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Sample records for abnormal lung development

  1. Pulmonary vascular development goes awry in congenital lung abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Kool, Heleen; Mous, Daphne; Tibboel, Dick; de Klein, Annelies; Rottier, Robbert J

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary vascular diseases of the newborn comprise a wide range of pathological conditions with developmental abnormalities in the pulmonary vasculature. Clinically, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH) is characterized by persistent increased resistance of the vasculature and abnormal vascular response. The classification of PH is primarily based on clinical parameters instead of morphology and distinguishes five groups of PH. Congenital lung anomalies, such as alveolar capillary dysplasia (ACD) and PH associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), but also bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), are classified in group three. Clearly, tight and correct regulation of pulmonary vascular development is crucial for normal lung development. Human and animal model systems have increased our knowledge and make it possible to identify and characterize affected pathways and study pivotal genes. Understanding of the normal development of the pulmonary vasculature will give new insights in the origin of the spectrum of rare diseases, such as CDH, ACD, and BPD, which render a significant clinical problem in neonatal intensive care units around the world. In this review, we describe normal pulmonary vascular development, and focus on four diseases of the newborn in which abnormal pulmonary vascular development play a critical role in morbidity and mortality. In the future perspective, we indicate the lines of research that seem to be very promising for elucidating the molecular pathways involved in the origin of congenital pulmonary vascular disease.

  2. Abnormalities of lung function in hay fever.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, E J; Hall, D R

    1976-01-01

    Twenty subjects with symptoms of hay fever were studied to see whether abnormalities could be detected in the function of small airways. The investigations included dynamic compliance at varying respiratory frequencies, closing capacity, residual volume, transfer factor, and maximal expiratory flow-volume curves. The tests were repeated in the winter when symptoms had resolved. Frequency dependence of compliance was found in eight subjects with symptoms (40%), closing capacities being abnormal in only two instances. Conventional pulmonary function tests, including expiratory flow rates at mid vital capacity, were within the predicted range of all subjects. When tests were repeated in the winter, frequency dependence of compliance was no longer present in subjects whose symptoms had resolved. The study suggests that reversible small airway abnormalities are present in a significant proportion of subjects with symptoms of hay fever and that such abnormalities are best detected by the measurement of dynamic compliance at varying respiratory frequencies. PMID:769243

  3. Association Between Interstitial Lung Abnormalities and All-Cause Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Putman, Rachel K.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Araki, Tetsuro; Gudmundsson, Gunnar; Gao, Wei; Nishino, Mizuki; Okajima, Yuka; Dupuis, Josée; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Cho, Michael H.; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Coxson, Harvey O.; Celli, Bartolome R.; Fernandez, Isis E.; Zazueta, Oscar E.; Ross, James C.; Harmouche, Rola; Estépar, Raúl San José; Diaz, Alejandro A.; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Gudmundsson, Elías F.; Eiríksdottír, Gudny; Aspelund, Thor; Budoff, Matthew J.; Kinney, Gregory L.; Hokanson, John E.; Williams, Michelle C; Murchison, John T.; MacNee, William; Hoffmann, Udo; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Launer, Lenore J.; Harrris, Tamara B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Silverman, Edwin K.; O’Connor, George T.; Washko, George R.; Rosas, Ivan O.; Hunninghake, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Interstitial lung abnormalities have been associated with decreased six-minute walk distance, diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide and total lung capacity; however to our knowledge, an association with mortality has not been previously investigated. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether interstitial lung abnormalities are associated with increased mortality. DESIGN, SETTING, POPULATION Prospective cohort studies of 2633 participants from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) (CT scans obtained 9/08–3/11), 5320 from the Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik (recruited 1/02–2/06), 2068 from COPDGene (recruited 11/07–4/10), and 1670 from the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate End-points (ECLIPSE) (between 12/05–12/06). EXPOSURES Interstitial lung abnormality status as determined by chest CT evaluation. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES All cause mortality over approximately 3 to 9 year median follow up time. Cause-of-death information was also examined in the AGES-Reykjavik cohort. RESULTS Interstitial lung abnormalities were present in 177 (7%) of the participants from FHS, 378 (7%) from AGES-Reykjavik, 156 (8%) from COPDGene, and in 157 (9%) from ECLIPSE. Over median follow-up times of ~3–9 years there were more deaths (and a greater absolute rate of mortality) among those with interstitial lung abnormalities compared to those without interstitial lung abnormalities in each cohort; 7% compared to 1% in FHS (6% difference, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2%, 10%), 56% compared to 33% in AGES-Reykjavik (23% difference, 95% CI 18%, 28%), 16% compared to 11% in COPDGene (5% difference, 95% CI −1%, 11%) and 11% compared to 5% in ECLIPSE (6% difference, 95% CI 1%, 11%). After adjustment for covariates, interstitial lung abnormalities were associated with an increase in the risk of death in the FHS (HR=2.7, 95% CI, 1.1–65, P=0.030), AGES-Reykjavik (HR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2–1.4, P<0.001), COPDGene (HR=1.8, 95% CI, 1.1, 2

  4. Using K-Nearest Neighbor Classification to Diagnose Abnormal Lung Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin-Hsing; Huang, Wen-Tzeng; Tan, Tan-Hsu; Chang, Cheng-Chun; Chang, Yuan-Jen

    A reported 30% of people worldwide have abnormal lung sounds, including crackles, rhonchi, and wheezes. To date, the traditional stethoscope remains the most popular tool used by physicians to diagnose such abnormal lung sounds, however, many problems arise with the use of a stethoscope, including the effects of environmental noise, the inability to record and store lung sounds for follow-up or tracking, and the physician’s subjective diagnostic experience. This study has developed a digital stethoscope to help physicians overcome these problems when diagnosing abnormal lung sounds. In this digital system, mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) were used to extract the features of lung sounds, and then the K-means algorithm was used for feature clustering, to reduce the amount of data for computation. Finally, the K-nearest neighbor method was used to classify the lung sounds. The proposed system can also be used for home care: if the percentage of abnormal lung sound frames is > 30% of the whole test signal, the system can automatically warn the user to visit a physician for diagnosis. We also used bend sensors together with an amplification circuit, Bluetooth, and a microcontroller to implement a respiration detector. The respiratory signal extracted by the bend sensors can be transmitted to the computer via Bluetooth to calculate the respiratory cycle, for real-time assessment. If an abnormal status is detected, the device will warn the user automatically. Experimental results indicated that the error in respiratory cycles between measured and actual values was only 6.8%, illustrating the potential of our detector for home care applications. PMID:26053756

  5. Disruption of the gene encoding the latent transforming growth factor-beta binding protein 4 (LTBP-4) causes abnormal lung development, cardiomyopathy, and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sterner-Kock, Anja; Thorey, Irmgard S; Koli, Katri; Wempe, Frank; Otte, Jürgen; Bangsow, Thorsten; Kuhlmeier, Katharina; Kirchner, Thomas; Jin, Shenchu; Keski-Oja, Jorma; von Melchner, Harald

    2002-09-01

    Transforming growth factor-betas (TGF-betas) are multifunctional growth factors that are secreted as inactive (latent) precursors in large protein complexes. These complexes include the latency-associated propeptide (LAP) and a latent transforming growth factor-beta binding protein (LTBP). Four isoforms of LTBPs (LTBP-1-LTBP-4) have been cloned and are believed to be structural components of connective tissue microfibrils and local regulators of TGF-beta tissue deposition and signaling. By using a gene trap strategy that selects for integrations into genes induced transiently during early mouse development, we have disrupted the mouse homolog of the human LTBP-4 gene. Mice homozygous for the disrupted allele develop severe pulmonary emphysema, cardiomyopathy, and colorectal cancer. These highly tissue-specific abnormalities are associated with profound defects in the elastic fiber structure and with a reduced deposition of TGF-beta in the extracellular space. As a consequence, epithelial cells have reduced levels of phosphorylated Smad2 proteins, overexpress c-myc, and undergo uncontrolled proliferation. This phenotype supports the predicted dual role of LTBP-4 as a structural component of the extracellular matrix and as a local regulator of TGF-beta tissue deposition and signaling.

  6. Measurement of total lung aerosol deposition as an index of lung abnormality.

    PubMed

    Kim, C S; Lewars, G A; Sackner, M A

    1988-04-01

    Total aerosol deposition in the lung was measured in 100 subjects with various lung conditions. The subjects consisted of 40 normals (N), 15 asymptomatic smokers (S), 10 smokers with small airway disease (SAD), 20 with chronic simple bronchitis (SB), and 15 with chronic obstructive bronchitis (COPD), and a relationship of total aerosol deposition to degree of lung abnormality was investigated. The subjects were categorized by medical history and a battery of pulmonary function tests, including spirometry, body plethysmography, and single and multiple N2 washout measurements. Subjects repeatedly breathed a monodisperse test aerosol (1.0 micron diam) from a collapsible rebreathing bag (0.5 liter volume) at a rate of 30 breaths/min, while inhaled and exhaled aerosol concentrations were continuously monitored by a laser aerosol photometer in situ and recorded on a strip-chart recorder. The number of rebreathing breaths resulting in 90% aerosol loss from the bag (N90) was determined, and percent predicted N90 values were then determined from the results of computer simulation and used as a deposition index. The percent predicted N90 values were 99.7 +/- 14, 86.5 +/- 15, 66.9 +/- 17, 51 +/- 12, and 30.9 +/- 9, respectively, for N, S, SAD, SB, and COPD. All of these values were significantly different from each other (P less than 0.05). There was no difference between male and female but percent predicted N90 values were slightly higher in young than in old normals. Percent predicted N90 values showed a strong linear correlation with spirometric measurements of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and maximum midexpiratory flow rate. However, many of the SAD and SB with normal spirometry showed abnormal N90. These results suggest that total lung aerosol deposition is a sensitive index of lung abnormality and may be of potential use for nonspecific general patient screening.

  7. Potential Metabolic Biomarkers to Identify Interstitial Lung Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yong; Jia, Dongmei; Lin, Zhang; Guo, Baosheng; He, Bing; Lu, Cheng; Xiao, Cheng; Liu, Zhongdi; Zhao, Ning; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Zhang, Ge; Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Xinru; Lu, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    Determining sensitive biomarkers in the peripheral blood to identify interstitial lung abnormalities (ILAs) is essential for the simple early diagnosis of ILAs. This study aimed to determine serum metabolic biomarkers of ILAs and the corresponding pathogenesis. Three groups of subjects undergoing health screening, including healthy subjects, subjects with ILAs, and subjects who were healthy initially and with ILAs one year later (Healthy→ILAs), were recruited for this study. The metabolic profiles of all of the subjects’ serum were analyzed by liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The metabolic characteristics of the ILAs subjects were discovered, and the corresponding biomarkers were predicted. The metabolomic data from the Healthy→ILAs subjects were collected for further verification. The results indicated that five serum metabolite alterations (up-regulated phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidic acid, betaine aldehyde and phosphatidylethanolamine, as well as down-regulated 1-acylglycerophosphocholine) were sensitive and reliable biomarkers for identifying ILAs. Perturbation of the corresponding biological pathways (RhoA signaling, mTOR/P70S6K signaling and phospholipase C signaling) might be at least partially responsible for the pathogenesis of ILAs. This study may provide a good template for determining the early diagnostic markers of subclinical disease status and for obtaining a better understanding of their pathogenesis. PMID:27438829

  8. Segmentation and Image Analysis of Abnormal Lungs at CT: Current Approaches, Challenges, and Future Trends.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Awais; Bagci, Ulas; Foster, Brent; Xu, Ziyue; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Folio, Les R; Udupa, Jayaram K; Mollura, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The computer-based process of identifying the boundaries of lung from surrounding thoracic tissue on computed tomographic (CT) images, which is called segmentation, is a vital first step in radiologic pulmonary image analysis. Many algorithms and software platforms provide image segmentation routines for quantification of lung abnormalities; however, nearly all of the current image segmentation approaches apply well only if the lungs exhibit minimal or no pathologic conditions. When moderate to high amounts of disease or abnormalities with a challenging shape or appearance exist in the lungs, computer-aided detection systems may be highly likely to fail to depict those abnormal regions because of inaccurate segmentation methods. In particular, abnormalities such as pleural effusions, consolidations, and masses often cause inaccurate lung segmentation, which greatly limits the use of image processing methods in clinical and research contexts. In this review, a critical summary of the current methods for lung segmentation on CT images is provided, with special emphasis on the accuracy and performance of the methods in cases with abnormalities and cases with exemplary pathologic findings. The currently available segmentation methods can be divided into five major classes: (a) thresholding-based, (b) region-based, (c) shape-based, (d) neighboring anatomy-guided, and (e) machine learning-based methods. The feasibility of each class and its shortcomings are explained and illustrated with the most common lung abnormalities observed on CT images. In an overview, practical applications and evolving technologies combining the presented approaches for the practicing radiologist are detailed.

  9. Interactive lung segmentation in abnormal human and animal chest CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Kockelkorn, Thessa T. J. P. Viergever, Max A.; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia M.; Bozovic, Gracijela; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate; Rikxoort, Eva M. van; Brown, Matthew S.; Jong, Pim A. de; Ginneken, Bram van

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Many medical image analysis systems require segmentation of the structures of interest as a first step. For scans with gross pathology, automatic segmentation methods may fail. The authors’ aim is to develop a versatile, fast, and reliable interactive system to segment anatomical structures. In this study, this system was used for segmenting lungs in challenging thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods: In volumetric thoracic CT scans, the chest is segmented and divided into 3D volumes of interest (VOIs), containing voxels with similar densities. These VOIs are automatically labeled as either lung tissue or nonlung tissue. The automatic labeling results can be corrected using an interactive or a supervised interactive approach. When using the supervised interactive system, the user is shown the classification results per slice, whereupon he/she can adjust incorrect labels. The system is retrained continuously, taking the corrections and approvals of the user into account. In this way, the system learns to make a better distinction between lung tissue and nonlung tissue. When using the interactive framework without supervised learning, the user corrects all incorrectly labeled VOIs manually. Both interactive segmentation tools were tested on 32 volumetric CT scans of pigs, mice and humans, containing pulmonary abnormalities. Results: On average, supervised interactive lung segmentation took under 9 min of user interaction. Algorithm computing time was 2 min on average, but can easily be reduced. On average, 2.0% of all VOIs in a scan had to be relabeled. Lung segmentation using the interactive segmentation method took on average 13 min and involved relabeling 3.0% of all VOIs on average. The resulting segmentations correspond well to manual delineations of eight axial slices per scan, with an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.933. Conclusions: The authors have developed two fast and reliable methods for interactive lung segmentation in

  10. Abnormal ventilation scans in middle-aged smokers. Comparison with tests of overall lung function

    SciTech Connect

    Barter, S.J.; Cunningham, D.A.; Lavender, J.P.; Gibellino, F.; Connellan, S.J.; Pride, N.B.

    1985-07-01

    The uniformity of regional ventilation during tidal breathing has been assessed using continuous inhalation of krypton-81m in 43 male, lifelong nonsmokers and 46 male, current cigarette smokers (mean daily consumption 24.1 cigarettes/day) between 44 and 61 yr of age and with mild or no respiratory symptoms. All subjects had normal chest radiographs. The results of the ventilation scans were compared with tests of overall lung function (spirometry, maximal expiratory flow-volume curves, and single-breath N2 test). Diffuse abnormalities of the ventilation scan were found in 19 (41%) of the 46 smokers but in none of the nonsmokers. Focal abnormalities were found in 7 smokers and 3 nonsmokers. Smokers showed the expected abnormalities in overall lung function (reduced FEV1 and VC, increased single-breath N2 slope, and closing volume), but in individual smokers there was only a weak relation between the severity of abnormality of overall lung function and an abnormal ventilation scan. Abnormal scans could be found when overall lung function was normal and were not invariably found when significant abnormalities in FEV1/VC or N2 slope were present. There was no relation between the presence of chronic expectoration and an abnormal scan. The prognostic significance of an abnormal ventilation scan in such smokers remains to be established.

  11. Abnormalities of pathways of fibrin turnover in lung lavage of rats with oleic acid and bleomycin-induced lung injury support alveolar fibrin deposition.

    PubMed Central

    Idell, S.; James, K. K.; Gillies, C.; Fair, D. S.; Thrall, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    Alveolar fibrin deposition commonly accompanies acute lung injury, but the nature of the local abnormalities of coagulation and fibrinolysis that support pathologic fibrin deposition are not well understood. The trended abnormalities of procoagulant and fibrinolytic activities occurring in lung lavage fluids of Fischer 344 rats after lung injury induced by intravenous oleic acid (OA) or intratracheal bleomycin were studied. After injury by either agent, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) contained increased procoagulant activity and decreased fibrinolytic activity. Lavage procoagulant activity was mainly due to an activator of Factor X attributable to the extrinsic coagulation pathway, and fibrinolytic activity was almost completely plasminogen dependent. Major mechanisms of inhibition of fibrinolytic activity involved both the inhibition of the plasminogen activator (PA) and plasmin. These abnormalities were temporally associated with prominent alveolar fibrin deposition in both models. In OA-treated animals, lavage fibrinolytic activity was absent or profoundly decreased, and antiplasmin and procoagulant activities were increased within 4 hours after the induction of acute lung injury. By 24 hours after OA, lavage PA inhibitor (PAI) activity was elevated with sustained antiplasmin activity. By 3 days after OA, these abnormalities had resolved in association with almost complete resolution of alveolar fibrin deposits. Within 3 days after bleomycin-induced lung injury, lavage procoagulant activity was increased and fibrinolytic activity was depressed due to increased antiplasmin and PAI activities. These conditions persisted for 2 weeks, during which time alveolar fibrin deposition was associated with the development of pulmonary fibrosis. These data indicate that a disruption of the normal balance between procoagulant and fibrinolytic activities occurs in alveolar lining fluids of rats with alveolitis induced by either OA or bleomycin, and that concurrent abnormalities

  12. Abnormal epithelial structure and chronic lung inflammation after repair of chlorine-induced airway injury.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yiqun; Chen, Jing; Humphrey, David M; Fodah, Ramy A; Warawa, Jonathan M; Hoyle, Gary W

    2015-01-15

    Chlorine is a toxic gas used in a variety of industrial processes and is considered a chemical threat agent. High-level chlorine exposure causes acute lung injury, but the long-term effects of acute chlorine exposure are unclear. Here we characterized chronic pulmonary changes following acute chlorine exposure in mice. A/J mice were exposed to 240 parts per million-hour chlorine or sham-exposed to air. Chlorine inhalation caused sloughing of bronchial epithelium 1 day after chlorine exposure, which was repaired with restoration of a pseudostratified epithelium by day 7. The repaired epithelium contained an abnormal distribution of epithelial cells containing clusters of club or ciliated cells rather than the uniformly interspersed pattern of these cells in unexposed mice. Although the damaged epithelium in A/J mice was repaired rapidly, and minimal airway fibrosis was observed, chlorine-exposed mice developed pneumonitis characterized by infiltration of alveoli with neutrophils and prominent, large, foamy macrophages. Levels of CXCL1/KC, CXCL5/LPS-induced CXC chemokine, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and VEGF in bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluid from chlorine-exposed mice showed steadily increasing trends over time. BAL protein levels were increased on day 4 and remained elevated out to day 28. The number of bacteria cultured from lungs of chlorine-exposed mice 4 wk after exposure was not increased compared with sham-exposed mice, indicating that the observed pneumonitis was not driven by bacterial infection of the lung. The results indicate that acute chlorine exposure may cause chronic abnormalities in the lungs despite rapid repair of injured epithelium.

  13. Abnormal epithelial structure and chronic lung inflammation after repair of chlorine-induced airway injury

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yiqun; Chen, Jing; Humphrey, David M.; Fodah, Ramy A.; Warawa, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Chlorine is a toxic gas used in a variety of industrial processes and is considered a chemical threat agent. High-level chlorine exposure causes acute lung injury, but the long-term effects of acute chlorine exposure are unclear. Here we characterized chronic pulmonary changes following acute chlorine exposure in mice. A/J mice were exposed to 240 parts per million-hour chlorine or sham-exposed to air. Chlorine inhalation caused sloughing of bronchial epithelium 1 day after chlorine exposure, which was repaired with restoration of a pseudostratified epithelium by day 7. The repaired epithelium contained an abnormal distribution of epithelial cells containing clusters of club or ciliated cells rather than the uniformly interspersed pattern of these cells in unexposed mice. Although the damaged epithelium in A/J mice was repaired rapidly, and minimal airway fibrosis was observed, chlorine-exposed mice developed pneumonitis characterized by infiltration of alveoli with neutrophils and prominent, large, foamy macrophages. Levels of CXCL1/KC, CXCL5/LPS-induced CXC chemokine, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and VEGF in bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluid from chlorine-exposed mice showed steadily increasing trends over time. BAL protein levels were increased on day 4 and remained elevated out to day 28. The number of bacteria cultured from lungs of chlorine-exposed mice 4 wk after exposure was not increased compared with sham-exposed mice, indicating that the observed pneumonitis was not driven by bacterial infection of the lung. The results indicate that acute chlorine exposure may cause chronic abnormalities in the lungs despite rapid repair of injured epithelium. PMID:25398987

  14. Segmentation and Image Analysis of Abnormal Lungs at CT: Current Approaches, Challenges, and Future Trends

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, Awais; Foster, Brent; Xu, Ziyue; Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Folio, Les R.; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The computer-based process of identifying the boundaries of lung from surrounding thoracic tissue on computed tomographic (CT) images, which is called segmentation, is a vital first step in radiologic pulmonary image analysis. Many algorithms and software platforms provide image segmentation routines for quantification of lung abnormalities; however, nearly all of the current image segmentation approaches apply well only if the lungs exhibit minimal or no pathologic conditions. When moderate to high amounts of disease or abnormalities with a challenging shape or appearance exist in the lungs, computer-aided detection systems may be highly likely to fail to depict those abnormal regions because of inaccurate segmentation methods. In particular, abnormalities such as pleural effusions, consolidations, and masses often cause inaccurate lung segmentation, which greatly limits the use of image processing methods in clinical and research contexts. In this review, a critical summary of the current methods for lung segmentation on CT images is provided, with special emphasis on the accuracy and performance of the methods in cases with abnormalities and cases with exemplary pathologic findings. The currently available segmentation methods can be divided into five major classes: (a) thresholding-based, (b) region-based, (c) shape-based, (d) neighboring anatomy–guided, and (e) machine learning–based methods. The feasibility of each class and its shortcomings are explained and illustrated with the most common lung abnormalities observed on CT images. In an overview, practical applications and evolving technologies combining the presented approaches for the practicing radiologist are detailed. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26172351

  15. Abnormalities of the lungs and thoracic cage in the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ayres, J G; Pope, F M; Reidy, J F; Clark, T J

    1985-01-01

    Twenty patients with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, (10 type I, six type II, and four type IV) were studied to assess the frequency of respiratory abnormalities in this condition. Five patients (25%) had had at least one episode of haemoptysis, but none had any defect of coagulation. There was a high frequency of recurrent sinusitis, notably in those with the type I syndrome. Two patients had bullous lung disease, one of whom (type IV) had had three pneumothoraces and subsequent pleurodesis; he also had tracheomegaly (the Mounier-Kuhn abnormality). Minor skeletal abnormalities such as pectus excavatum were common, particularly in patients with type IV disease. Three patients had the straight back syndrome. There were no consistent spirometric or lung volume abnormalities, but eight patients (40%) had a raised gas transfer coefficient (Kco), possibly due to an increased intrapulmonary vascular volume. Two other patients had very low values of Kco that were unexplained. Images PMID:4023980

  16. A General Approach to the Evaluation of Ventilation-Perfusion Ratios in Normal and Abnormal Lungs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Peter D.

    1977-01-01

    Outlines methods for manipulating multiple gas data so as to gain the greatest amount of insight into the properties of ventilation-perfusion distributions. Refers to data corresponding to normal and abnormal lungs. Uses a two-dimensional framework with the respiratory gases of oxygen and carbon dioxide. (CS)

  17. Exhaled Aerosol Pattern Discloses Lung Structural Abnormality: A Sensitivity Study Using Computational Modeling and Fractal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Si, Xiuhua A.; Kim, JongWon; Mckee, Edward; Lin, En-Bing

    2014-01-01

    Background Exhaled aerosol patterns, also called aerosol fingerprints, provide clues to the health of the lung and can be used to detect disease-modified airway structures. The key is how to decode the exhaled aerosol fingerprints and retrieve the lung structural information for a non-invasive identification of respiratory diseases. Objective and Methods In this study, a CFD-fractal analysis method was developed to quantify exhaled aerosol fingerprints and applied it to one benign and three malign conditions: a tracheal carina tumor, a bronchial tumor, and asthma. Respirations of tracer aerosols of 1 µm at a flow rate of 30 L/min were simulated, with exhaled distributions recorded at the mouth. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian tracking approach were used to simulate respiratory airflows and aerosol dynamics. Aerosol morphometric measures such as concentration disparity, spatial distributions, and fractal analysis were applied to distinguish various exhaled aerosol patterns. Findings Utilizing physiology-based modeling, we demonstrated substantial differences in exhaled aerosol distributions among normal and pathological airways, which were suggestive of the disease location and extent. With fractal analysis, we also demonstrated that exhaled aerosol patterns exhibited fractal behavior in both the entire image and selected regions of interest. Each exhaled aerosol fingerprint exhibited distinct pattern parameters such as spatial probability, fractal dimension, lacunarity, and multifractal spectrum. Furthermore, a correlation of the diseased location and exhaled aerosol spatial distribution was established for asthma. Conclusion Aerosol-fingerprint-based breath tests disclose clues about the site and severity of lung diseases and appear to be sensitive enough to be a practical tool for diagnosis and prognosis of respiratory diseases with structural abnormalities. PMID:25105680

  18. Are interstitial lung abnormalities associated with COPD? A nested case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Bozzetti, Francesca; Paladini, Ilaria; Rabaiotti, Enrico; Franceschini, Alessandro; Alfieri, Veronica; Chetta, Alfredo; Crisafulli, Ernesto; Silva, Mario; Pastorino, Ugo; Sverzellati, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In this study, we tested the association between COPD and interstitial lung abnormality (ILA), notably in relation to the presence of computed tomography (CT) signs of lung fibrosis. Patients and methods COPD cases were selected from participants undergoing lung cancer screening (Multicentric Italian Lung Detection trial) for airflow obstruction (n=311/2,303, 13.5%) and 146 consecutive patients with clinical COPD. In all, 457 COPD cases were selected and classified according to the stages of Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease. A nested matching (case:control = 1:2) according to age, sex, and smoking history was operated between each COPD case and two control subjects from Multicentric Italian Lung Detection trial without airflow obstruction. Low-dose CT scans of COPD cases and controls were reviewed for the presence of ILA, which were classified into definite or indeterminate according to the presence of signs of lung fibrosis. Results The frequency of definite ILA was similar between COPD cases and controls (P=0.2), independent of the presence of signs of lung fibrosis (P=0.07). Combined definite and indeterminate ILA was homogeneously distributed across Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages (P=0.6). Definite ILA was directly associated with current smoker status (odds ratio [OR] 4.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.2–7.4) and increasing pack-years (OR 1.01, 95% CI: 1–1.02). Subjects with any fibrotic ILA were more likely to be older (OR 1.17, 95% CI: 1.10–1.25) and male (OR 8.58, 95% CI: 1.58–68.9). Conclusion There was no association between COPD and definite ILA. However, low-dose CT signs of lung fibrosis were also observed in COPD, and their clinical relevance is yet to be determined. PMID:27307724

  19. [Current state and development of artificial lungs].

    PubMed

    Mei, Zaoxian; Sun, Xin; Wu, Qi

    2010-12-01

    The artificial lung is a technical device for providing life support; it will be put in use when the natural lungs are failing and are not able to maintain sufficient oxygenation of the body's organ systems. From the viewpoint of long-term development, the artificial lung should be permanently implanted in the body, so that it will substitute for the human pulmonary function partially or completely. In this paper, four artificial lung technologies were expounded with reference to the development and research process of artificial lung. They were extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, intravascular artificial lung, implantable artificial lung, and pumpless extracorporeal lung assist. In this paper were described the structure of the four kinds of artificial lung, the working principle, and their advantages, disadvantages and indications. The prospect of artificial lung was evaluated in the light of the data from the existing animal experiments and from the clinical experience of the centers.

  20. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-{alpha}-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-{alpha} and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction.

  1. Early Lung Cancer Detection in Uranium Miners with Abnormal Sputum Cytology

    SciTech Connect

    Saccomanno, G.

    2000-06-30

    ''Early Lung Cancer Detection in Uranium Miners with Abnormal Sputum Cytology'' was funded by the Department of Energy to monitor the health effects of radon exposure and/or cigarette smoke on uranium workers from the Colorado Plateau. The resulting Saccomanno Uranium Workers Archive and data base has been used as a source of information to prove eligibility for compensation under the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act and as the source of primary data tissue for a subcontract and other collaborations with outside investigators. The latter includes a study of radon exposure and lung cancer risk in a non-smoking cohort of uranium miners (subcontract); a study of genetic markers for lung cancer susceptibility; and a study of {sup 210}Pb accumulation in the skull as a biomarker of radon exposure.

  2. Regeneration of the lung: Lung stem cells and the development of lung mimicking devices.

    PubMed

    Schilders, Kim A A; Eenjes, Evelien; van Riet, Sander; Poot, André A; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Truckenmüller, Roman; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Rottier, Robbert J

    2016-04-23

    Inspired by the increasing burden of lung associated diseases in society and an growing demand to accommodate patients, great efforts by the scientific community produce an increasing stream of data that are focused on delineating the basic principles of lung development and growth, as well as understanding the biomechanical properties to build artificial lung devices. In addition, the continuing efforts to better define the disease origin, progression and pathology by basic scientists and clinicians contributes to insights in the basic principles of lung biology. However, the use of different model systems, experimental approaches and readout systems may generate somewhat conflicting or contradictory results. In an effort to summarize the latest developments in the lung epithelial stem cell biology, we provide an overview of the current status of the field. We first describe the different stem cells, or progenitor cells, residing in the homeostatic lung. Next, we focus on the plasticity of the different cell types upon several injury-induced activation or repair models, and highlight the regenerative capacity of lung cells. Lastly, we summarize the generation of lung mimics, such as air-liquid interface cultures, organoids and lung on a chip, that are required to test emerging hypotheses. Moreover, the increasing collaboration between distinct specializations will contribute to the eventual development of an artificial lung device capable of assisting reduced lung function and capacity in human patients.

  3. Exercise tolerance, lung function abnormalities, anemia, and cardiothoracic ratio in sickle cell patients.

    PubMed

    van Beers, Eduard J; van der Plas, Mart N; Nur, Erfan; Bogaard, Harm-Jan; van Steenwijk, Reindert P; Biemond, Bart J; Bresser, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Many patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) have a reduced exercise capacity and abnormal lung function. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) can identify causes of exercise limitation. Forty-four consecutive SCD patients (27 HbSS, 11 HbSC, and 6 HbS-beta thalassemia) with a median age (interquartile range) of 26 (21-41) years underwent pulmonary function tests, CPET, chest x-ray, and echocardiography to further characterize exercise limitation in SCD. Peak oxygen uptake (V'O2 -peak), expressing maximum exercise capacity, was decreased in 83% of the studied patients. V'O2 -peak correlated with hemoglobin levels (R = 0.440, P = 0.005), forced vital capacity (FVC) (R = 0.717, P < 0.0001). Cardiothoracic ratio on chest x-ray inversely correlated with FVC (R = -0.637, P < 0.001). According to criteria for exercise limitation, the patients were limited in exercise capacity due to anemia (n = 17), cardiovascular dysfunction (n = 2), musculoskeletal function (n = 10), pulmonary ventilatory abnormalities (n = 1), pulmonary vascular exercise limitation (n = 1), and poor effort (n = 3). In the present study we demonstrate that anemia is the most important determinant of reduced exercise tolerance observed in SCD patients without signs of pulmonary hypertension. We found a strong correlation between various parameters of lung volume and cardiothoracic ratio and we hypothesize that cardiomegaly and relative small chest size may be important causes of the impairment in pulmonary function, that is, reduced long volumes and diffusion capacity, in SCD. Taking into account anthropomorphic differences between SCD patients and controls could help to interpret lung function studies in SCD better.

  4. Novel Logistic Regression Model of Chest CT Attenuation Coefficient Distributions for the Automated Detection of Abnormal (Emphysema or ILD) versus Normal Lung

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kung-Sik; Jiao, Feiran; Mikulski, Marek A.; Gerke, Alicia; Guo, Junfeng; Newell, John D; Hoffman, Eric A.; Thompson, Brad; Lee, Chang Hyun; Fuortes, Laurence J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives We evaluated the role of automated quantitative computed tomography (CT) scan interpretation algorithm in detecting Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) and/or emphysema in a sample of elderly subjects with mild lung disease.ypothesized that the quantification and distributions of CT attenuation values on lung CT, over a subset of Hounsfield Units (HU) range [−1000 HU, 0 HU], can differentiate early or mild disease from normal lung. Materials and Methods We compared results of quantitative spiral rapid end-exhalation (functional residual capacity; FRC) and end-inhalation (total lung capacity; TLC) CT scan analyses in 52 subjects with radiographic evidence of mild fibrotic lung disease to 17 normal subjects. Several CT value distributions were explored, including (i) that from the peripheral lung taken at TLC (with peels at 15 or 65mm), (ii) the ratio of (i) to that from the core of lung, and (iii) the ratio of (ii) to its FRC counterpart. We developed a fused-lasso logistic regression model that can automatically identify sub-intervals of [−1000 HU, 0 HU] over which a CT value distribution provides optimal discrimination between abnormal and normal scans. Results The fused-lasso logistic regression model based on (ii) with 15 mm peel identified the relative frequency of CT values over [−1000, −900] and that over [−450,−200] HU as a means of discriminating abnormal versus normal, resulting in a zero out-sample false positive rate and 15%false negative rate of that was lowered to 12% by pooling information. Conclusions We demonstrated the potential usefulness of this novel quantitative imaging analysis method in discriminating ILD and/or emphysema from normal lungs. PMID:26776294

  5. Bioreactor Development for Lung Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Much recent interest in lung bioengineering by pulmonary investigators, industry and the organ transplant field has seen a rapid growth of bioreactor development ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems. A comprehension of the findings from these models is needed to provide the basis for further bioreactor development. Objective The goal was to comprehensively review the current state of bioreactor development for the lung. Methods A search using PubMed was done for published, peer-reviewed papers using the keywords “lung” AND “bioreactor” or “bioengineering” or “tissue engineering” or “ex vivo perfusion”. Main Results Many new bioreactors ranging from the microfluidic scale to the human-sized whole lung systems have been developed by both academic and commercial entities. Microfluidic, lung-mimic and lung slice cultures have the advantages of cost-efficiency and high throughput analyses ideal for pharmaceutical and toxicity studies. Perfused/ventilated rodent whole lung systems can be adapted for mid-throughput studies of lung stem/progenitor cell development, cell behavior, understanding and treating lung injury and for preliminary work that can be translated to human lung bioengineering. Human-sized ex vivo whole lung bioreactors incorporating perfusion and ventilation are amenable to automation and have been used for whole lung decellularization and recellularization. Clinical scale ex vivo lung perfusion systems have been developed for lung preservation and reconditioning and are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Conclusions Significant advances in bioreactors for lung engineering have been made at both the microfluidic and the macro scale. The most advanced are closed systems that incorporate pressure-controlled perfusion and ventilation and are amenable to automation. Ex vivo lung perfusion systems have advanced to clinical trials for lung preservation and reconditioning. The biggest

  6. A rare extramedullary involvement in myeloma: lung parenchyma and association with unfavorable chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Şahin Balçık, Özlem; Albayrak, Murat; Dağdaş, Simten; Ceran, Funda; Özet, Gülsüm; Demirağ, Funda; Yokuş, Osman

    2010-06-05

    Although pulmonary complications developing secondary to lung infections and involvement in ribs occur frequently in multiple myeloma (MM), involvement of the lung parenchyma is quite rare. In clinical studies, the involvement of lung parenchyma has been found to be associated with unfavorable prognosis. Here, a MM case in whom involvement of lung parenchyma was accompanied by unfavorable prognostic cytogenetic markers is presented. A 62-year-old male presented with complaint of cough, and heterogeneous hypodense mass was detected in thorax computerized tomography. The patient underwent bronchoscopic biopsy. Pathological examination revealed diffuse plasma cell infiltration staining with kappa immunohistochemically. In bone marrow biopsy, plasma cell infiltration was observed. In conventional cytogenetic examination, hypodiploidy was established. In cytogenetic examination carried out with fluorescence in situ hybridization, deletion (13q) was determined. In conclusion, in patients diagnosed with MM and presenting with pulmonary mass lesion, lung involvement associated with plasma cell infiltration should also be considered in the differential diagnosis. As overall survival is low in these cases, more aggressive treatment approaches such as high-dose treatment should be immediately considered.

  7. Gross Motor Development, Movement Abnormalities, and Early Identification of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Young, Gregory S.; Goldring, Stacy; Greiss-Hess, Laura; Herrera, Adriana M.; Steele, Joel; Macari, Suzanne; Hepburn, Susan; Rogers, Sally J.

    2015-01-01

    Gross motor development (supine, prone, rolling, sitting, crawling, walking) and movement abnormalities were examined in the home videos of infants later diagnosed with autism (regression and no regression subgroups), developmental delays (DD), or typical development. Group differences in maturity were found for walking, prone, and supine, with the DD and Autism-No Regression groups both showing later developing motor maturity than typical children. The only statistically significant differences in movement abnormalities were in the DD group; the two autism groups did not differ from the typical group in rates of movement abnormalities or lack of protective responses. These findings do not replicate previous investigations suggesting that early motor abnormalities seen on home video can assist in early identification of autism. PMID:17805956

  8. Abnormalities occurring during female gametophyte development result in the diversity of abnormal embryo sacs and leads to abnormal fertilization in indica/japonica hybrids in rice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yu-Xiang; Hu, Chao-Yue; Lu, Yong-Gen; Li, Jin-Quan; Liu, Xiang-Dong

    2009-01-01

    Embryo sac abortion is one of the major reasons for sterility in indica/japonica hybrids in rice. To clarify the causal mechanism of embryo sac abortion, we studied the female gametophyte development in two indica/japonica hybrids via an eosin B staining procedure for embryo sac scanning using confocal laser scanning microscope. Different types of abnormalities occurred during megasporogenesis and megagametogenesis were demonstrated. The earliest abnormality was observed in the megasporocyte. A lot of the chalazal-most megaspores were degenerated before the mono-nucleate embryo sac stage. Disordered positioning of nucleus and abnormal nucellus tissue were characteristics of the abnormal female gametes from the mono-nucleate to four-nucleate embryo sac stages. The abnormalities that occurred from the early stage of the eight-nucleate embryo sac development to the mature embryo sac stage were characterized by smaller sizes and wrinkled antipodals. Asynchronous nuclear migration, abnormal positioning of nucleus, and degeneration of egg apparatus were also found at the eight-nucleate embryo sac stage. The abnormalities that occurred during female gametophyte development resulted in five major types of abnormal embryo sacs. These abnormal embryo sacs led to abnormal fertilization. Hand pollination using normal pollens on the spikelets during anthesis showed that normal pollens could not exclude the effect of abnormal embryo sac on seed setting.

  9. Screening for ALK abnormalities in central nervous system metastases of non-small-cell lung cancer: ALK abnormalities in CNS metastases of NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Nicoś, Marcin; Jarosz, Bożena; Krawczyk, Paweł; Wojas-Krawczyk, Kamila; Kucharczyk, Tomasz; Sawicki, Marek; Pankowski, Juliusz; Trojanowski, Tomasz; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-11-23

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement was reported in 3-7% of primary non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its presence is commonly associated with adenocarcinoma (AD) type and non-smoking history. ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as crizotinib, alectinib and ceritinib showed efficiency in patients with primary NSCLC harboring ALK gene rearrangement. Moreover, response to ALK TKIs was observed in central nervous system (CNS) metastatic lesions of NSCLC. However, there are no reports concerning the frequency of ALK rearrangement in CNS metastases. We assessed the frequency of ALK abnormalities in 145 formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue samples from CNS metastases of NSCLC using immunohistochemical (IHC) automated staining (BenchMark GX, Ventana, USA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique (Abbot Molecular, USA). The studied group was heterogeneous in terms of histopathology and smoking status. ALK abnormalities were detected in 4.8% (7/145) of CNS metastases. ALK abnormalities were observed in six AD (7.5%; 6/80) and in single patients with adenosuqamous lung carcinoma. Analysis of clinical and demographic factors indicated that expression of abnormal ALK was significantly more frequently observed (p=0.0002; χ(2) =16.783) in former-smokers. Comparison of IHC and FISH results showed some discrepancies, which were caused by unspecific staining of macrophages and glial/nerve cells, which constitute the background of CNS tissues. Our results indicate high frequency of ALK gene rearrangement in CNS metastatic sites of NSCLC that are in line with prior studies concerning evaluation of the presence of ALK abnormalities in such patients. However, we showed that assessment of ALK by IHC and FISH methods in CNS tissues require additional standardizations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Gross Motor Development, Movement Abnormalities, and Early Identification of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozonoff, Sally; Young, Gregory S.; Goldring, Stacy; Greiss-Hess, Laura; Herrera, Adriana M.; Steele, Joel; Macari, Suzanne; Hepburn, Susan; Rogers, Sally J.

    2008-01-01

    Gross motor development (supine, prone, rolling, sitting, crawling, walking) and movement abnormalities were examined in the home videos of infants later diagnosed with autism (regression and no regression subgroups), developmental delays (DD), or typical development. Group differences in maturity were found for walking, prone, and supine, with…

  11. The Pulmonary Mesenchyme Directs Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    McCulley, David; Wienhold, Mark; Sun, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Each of the steps of respiratory system development relies on intricate interactions and coordinated development of the lung epithelium and mesenchyme. In the past, more attention has been paid to the epithelium than the mesenchyme. The mesenchyme is a source of specification and morphogenetic signals as well as a host of surprisingly complex cell lineages that are critical for normal lung development and function. This review highlights recent research focusing on the mesenchyme that has revealed genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of its development in the context of other cell layers during respiratory lineage specification, branching morphogenesis, epithelial differentiation, lineage distinction, vascular development, and alveolar maturation. PMID:25796078

  12. Toxicity of cadmium to the developing lung

    SciTech Connect

    Daston, G.P.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of cadmium on the developing lung and pulmonary surfactant were studied. Pregnant rats received subcutaneous injections of cadmium chloride on days 12 to 15 of gestation and were sacrificed throughout late gestation. The treatment resulted in high embryonic mortality and growth regardation. Fetal lung weight was reduced 20 to 30% due to hypoplasia, as the number of lung cells (DNA/lung) but not cell size (protein/cell) was lowered. The ultrastructural development of alveolar epithelium was altered; cytodifferentiation was delayed; and the cytoplasmic inclusions which contain pulmonary surfactant, were reduced in the term fetus. Accumulation of phosphatidylcholine (PC), the major component of pulmonary surfactant, was diminished in the lungs of treated fetuses. The immediate cause of this lowered accumulation was a decreased rate of synthesis of PC from choline. Carbohydrates probably represent a major source of PC precursors and are present in large quantities in the fetal lung as glycogen. The pulmonary glycogen content of cadmium-exposed fetuses was diminished. It is postulated that this is a reason for the lowered rate of PC synthesis. Maternally administered cadmium did not pass through the placenta; thus, the mechanism of fetotoxicity was indirect. Maternal cadmium exposure did result in lowered fetal zinc levels. Coadministration of zinc with cadmium raised fetal zinc concentration to control values and alleviated all fetotoxicity. Fetal zinc deficiency is a possible mechanism for the toxic effects on the developing lung. Several dams were allowed to give birth and their offspring were observed for respiratory problems. Cadmium treatment delayed parturition by about a day. Symptoms of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) were observed in 11% of the treated neonates. All but one of these individuals died and had lungs with hyaline membranes. This is the only known case of an environmental agent causing neonatal RDS.

  13. DANCE in developing and injured lung.

    PubMed

    Jean, Jyh-Chang; Eruchalu, Ifeanyi; Cao, Yu Xia; Joyce-Brady, Martin

    2002-01-01

    We identified rat developing arteries and neural crest derivatives with multiple epidermal growth factor-like domains (DANCE) as a developmentally regulated gene using suppression-subtractive hybridization. Northern analysis confirmed a fivefold induction of this mRNA transcript between fetal day 18 and 20 that persisted through postnatal day 17. The level was declining at postnatal day 21 and was similar in adult lung to that at fetal day 18. In adults DANCE mRNA abundance was highest in lung, kidney, and spleen, lower in heart, skeletal muscle, and brain, but absent from liver and thymus. It was abundant in pulmonary artery endothelium and a lung epithelial type 2 cell line, barely detectable in vascular smooth muscle, and absent in fibroblasts. In situ hybridization revealed a regulated pattern of expression in endothelial cells of fetal, postnatal, and adult lung. Because DANCE mRNA was inducible in systemic arteries during recovery from injury, we searched for induction in lung injured by hyperoxia. Mouse DANCE mRNA abundance was unchanged during an acute 3-day exposure period, induced threefold 5 days into the recovery phase, and returned to baseline at days 8, 11, and 14. In situ hybridization at day 5 suggested a diffuse pattern of induction. DANCE may play a role in lung endothelial cell biology during development repair after injury.

  14. Abnormal retinal development associated with FRMD7 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Mervyn G.; Crosier, Moira; Lindsay, Susan; Kumar, Anil; Araki, Masasuke; Leroy, Bart P.; McLean, Rebecca J.; Sheth, Viral; Maconachie, Gail; Thomas, Shery; Moore, Anthony T.; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic infantile nystagmus (IIN) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, often associated with FRMD7 mutations. As the appearance of the retina is reported to be normal based on conventional fundus photography, IIN is postulated to arise from abnormal cortical development. To determine whether the afferent visual system is involved in FRMD7 mutations, we performed in situ hybridization studies in human embryonic and fetal stages (35 days post-ovulation to 9 weeks post-conception). We show a dynamic retinal expression pattern of FRMD7 during development. We observe expression within the outer neuroblastic layer, then in the inner neuroblastic layer and at 9 weeks post-conception a bilaminar expression pattern. Expression was also noted within the developing optic stalk and optic disk. We identified a large cohort of IIN patients (n = 100), and performed sequence analysis which revealed 45 patients with FRMD7 mutations. Patients with FRMD7 mutations underwent detailed retinal imaging studies using ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography. The tomograms were compared with a control cohort (n = 60). The foveal pit was significantly shallower in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). The optic nerve head morphology was abnormal with significantly decreased optic disk area, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, cup area and cup depth in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). This study shows for the first time that abnormal afferent system development is associated with FRMD7 mutations and could be an important etiological factor in the development of nystagmus. PMID:24688117

  15. Abnormal retinal development associated with FRMD7 mutations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mervyn G; Crosier, Moira; Lindsay, Susan; Kumar, Anil; Araki, Masasuke; Leroy, Bart P; McLean, Rebecca J; Sheth, Viral; Maconachie, Gail; Thomas, Shery; Moore, Anthony T; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic infantile nystagmus (IIN) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, often associated with FRMD7 mutations. As the appearance of the retina is reported to be normal based on conventional fundus photography, IIN is postulated to arise from abnormal cortical development. To determine whether the afferent visual system is involved in FRMD7 mutations, we performed in situ hybridization studies in human embryonic and fetal stages (35 days post-ovulation to 9 weeks post-conception). We show a dynamic retinal expression pattern of FRMD7 during development. We observe expression within the outer neuroblastic layer, then in the inner neuroblastic layer and at 9 weeks post-conception a bilaminar expression pattern. Expression was also noted within the developing optic stalk and optic disk. We identified a large cohort of IIN patients (n = 100), and performed sequence analysis which revealed 45 patients with FRMD7 mutations. Patients with FRMD7 mutations underwent detailed retinal imaging studies using ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography. The tomograms were compared with a control cohort (n = 60). The foveal pit was significantly shallower in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). The optic nerve head morphology was abnormal with significantly decreased optic disk area, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, cup area and cup depth in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). This study shows for the first time that abnormal afferent system development is associated with FRMD7 mutations and could be an important etiological factor in the development of nystagmus.

  16. Physiologic assessment before video thoracoscopic resection for lung cancer in patients with abnormal pulmonary function

    PubMed Central

    Benattia, Amira; Debeaumont, David; Guyader, Vincent; Tardif, Catherine; Peillon, Christophe; Cuvelier, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired respiratory function may prevent curative surgery for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) reduces postoperative morbility-mortality and could change preoperative assessment practices and therapeutic decisions. We evaluated the relation between preoperative pulmonary function tests and the occurrence of postoperative complications after VATS pulmonary resection in patients with abnormal pulmonary function. Methods We included 106 consecutive patients with ≤80% predicted value of presurgical expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and/or diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO) and who underwent VATS pulmonary resection for NSCLC from a prospective surgical database. Results Patients (64±9.5 years) had lobectomy (n=91), segmentectomy (n=7), bilobectomy (n=4), or pneumonectomy (n=4). FEV1 and DLCO preoperative averages were 68%±21% and 60%±18%. Operative mortality was 1.89%. Only FEV1 was predictive of postoperative complications [odds ratio (OR), 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.926–0.991, P=0.016], but there was no determinable threshold. Twenty-five patients underwent incremental exercise testing. Desaturations during exercise (OR, 0.462; 95% CI, 0.191–0.878, P=0.039) and heart rate (HR) response (OR, 0.953; 95% CI, 0.895–0.993, P=0.05) were associated with postoperative complications. Conclusions FEV1 but not DLCO was a significant predictor of pulmonary complications after VATS pulmonary resection despite a low rate of severe morbidity. Incremental exercise testing seems more discriminating. Further investigation is required in a larger patient population to change current pre-operative threshold in a new era of minimally invasive surgery. PMID:27293834

  17. Abnormal megakaryocyte development and platelet function in Nbeal2(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Kahr, Walter H A; Lo, Richard W; Li, Ling; Pluthero, Fred G; Christensen, Hilary; Ni, Ran; Vaezzadeh, Nima; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Weyrich, Andrew S; Di Paola, Jorge; Landolt-Marticorena, Carolina; Gross, Peter L

    2013-11-07

    Gray platelet syndrome (GPS) is an inherited bleeding disorder associated with macrothrombocytopenia and α-granule-deficient platelets. GPS has been linked to loss of function mutations in NEABL2 (neurobeachin-like 2), and we describe here a murine GPS model, the Nbeal2(-/-) mouse. As in GPS, Nbeal2(-/-) mice exhibit splenomegaly, macrothrombocytopenia, and a deficiency of platelet α-granules and their cargo, including von Willebrand factor (VWF), thrombospondin-1, and platelet factor 4. The platelet α-granule membrane protein P-selectin is expressed at 48% of wild-type levels and externalized upon platelet activation. The presence of P-selectin and normal levels of VPS33B and VPS16B in Nbeal2(-/-) platelets suggests that NBEAL2 acts independently of VPS33B/VPS16B at a later stage of α-granule biogenesis. Impaired Nbeal2(-/-) platelet function was shown by flow cytometry, platelet aggregometry, bleeding assays, and intravital imaging of laser-induced arterial thrombus formation. Microscopic analysis detected marked abnormalities in Nbeal2(-/-) bone marrow megakaryocytes, which when cultured showed delayed maturation, decreased survival, decreased ploidy, and developmental abnormalities, including abnormal extracellular distribution of VWF. Our results confirm that α-granule secretion plays a significant role in platelet function, and they also indicate that abnormal α-granule formation in Nbeal2(-/-) mice has deleterious effects on megakaryocyte survival, development, and platelet production.

  18. Emotion processes in normal and abnormal development and preventive intervention.

    PubMed

    Izard, Carroll E; Fine, Sarah; Mostow, Allison; Trentacosta, Christopher; Campbell, Jan

    2002-01-01

    We present an analysis of the role of emotions in normal and abnormal development and preventive intervention. The conceptual framework stems from three tenets of differential emotions theory (DET). These principles concern the constructs of emotion utilization; intersystem connections among modular emotion systems, cognition, and action; and the organizational and motivational functions of discrete emotions. Particular emotions and patterns of emotions function differentially in different periods of development and in influencing the cognition and behavior associated with different forms of psychopathology. Established prevention programs have not emphasized the concept of emotion as motivation. It is even more critical that they have generally neglected the idea of modulating emotions, not simply to achieve self-regulation, but also to utilize their inherently adaptive functions as a means of facilitating the development of social competence and preventing psychopathology. The paper includes a brief description of a theory-based prevention program and suggestions for complementary targeted interventions to address specific externalizing and internalizing problems. In the final section, we describe ways in which emotion-centered preventions can provide excellent opportunities for research on the development of normal and abnormal behavior.

  19. Endotoxin "priming" potentiates lung vascular abnormalities in response to Escherichia coli hemolysin: an example of synergism between endo- and exotoxin

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The pore-forming hemolysin of Escherichia coli (HlyA), an important virulence factor in extraintestinal E. coli infections, causes thromboxane generation and related vasoconstriction in perfused rabbit lungs (Seeger, W., H. Walter, N. Suttorp, M. Muhly, and S. Bhakdi. 1989. J. Clin. Invest. 84:220). We investigated the influence of pulmonary vascular "priming" with endotoxin on the responsiveness of the lung to a low-dose HlyA challenge. Rabbit lungs were perfused with Krebs Henseleit buffer containing 0.1-100 ng/ml Salmonella abortus equii lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 60-180 min. This treatment caused protracted release of tumor necrosis factor into the recirculating medium, but did not induce significant alterations of pulmonary hemodynamics and fluid balance. At a dose of 1 ng/ml, HlyA elicited only moderate thromboxane release (< 200 pg/ml) and pulmonary artery pressure increase (< or = 6 mmHg) in control lungs. Acceleration and potentiation of both the metabolic and vasoconstrictor response occurred in lungs primed with LPS. This priming effect displayed dose (threshold integral of 0.1-1 ng/ml LPS) and time dependencies (threshold integral of 60-90 min LPS incubation). Maximum thromboxane release and pulmonary artery pressure increase surpassed the responses to HlyA in nonprimed lungs by more than 15-fold. Cyclooxygenase inhibition and thromboxane-receptor antagonism blocked these effects. These data demonstrate that LPS priming synergizes with HlyA challenge to provoke vascular abnormalities that are possibly relevant to the pathogenesis of organ failure in severe local and systemic infections. PMID:7931076

  20. Lung function and heart disease in American Indian adults with high frequency of metabolic abnormalities (from the Strong Heart Study).

    PubMed

    Yeh, Fawn; Dixon, Anne E; Best, Lyle G; Marion, Susan M; Lee, Elisa T; Ali, Tauqeer; Yeh, Jeunliang; Rhoades, Everett R; Howard, Barbara V; Devereux, Richard B

    2014-07-15

    The associations of pulmonary function with cardiovascular disease (CVD) independent of diabetes mellitus (DM) and metabolic syndrome have not been examined in a population-based setting. We examined prevalence and incidence CVD in relation to lower pulmonary function in the Strong Heart Study second examination (1993 to 1995) in 352 CVD and 2,873 non-CVD adults free of overt lung disease (mean age 60 years). Lung function was assessed by standard spirometry. Participants with metabolic syndrome or DM with or without CVD had lower pulmonary function than participants without these conditions after adjustment for hypertension, age, gender, abdominal obesity, smoking, physical activity index, and study field center. CVD participants with DM had significantly lower forced vital capacity than participants with CVD alone. Significant associations were observed between reduced pulmonary function, preclinical CVD, and prevalent CVD after adjustment for multiple CVD risk factors. During follow-up (median 13.3 years), pulmonary function did not predict CVD incidence, it predicted CVD mortality. Among 3,225 participants, 412 (298 without baseline CVD) died from CVD by the end of 2008. In models adjusted for multiple CVD risk factors, DM, metabolic syndrome, and baseline CVD, compared with highest quartile of lung function, lower lung function predicted CVD mortality (relative risk up to 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.0, p<0.05). In conclusion, a population with a high prevalence of DM and metabolic syndrome and lower lung function was independently associated with prevalent clinical and preclinical CVD, and its impairment predicted CVD mortality. Additional research is needed to identify mechanisms linking metabolic abnormalities, low lung function, and CVD.

  1. Abnormal lung gallium-67 uptake preceding pulmonary physiologic impairment in an asymptomatic patient with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, T.F.; Golden, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia was suggested by a diffuse, bilateral pulmonary uptake of gallium-67 in an asymptomatic, homosexual male with the antibody to the immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who was undergoing staging evaluation for lymphoma clinically localized to a left inguinal lymph node. Chest radiograph and pulmonary function evaluation, including lung volumes, diffusing capacity and arterial blood gases, were within normal limits. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed Pneumocystis carinii organisms. In this asymptomatic, HIV-positive patient, active alveolar infection, evidenced by abnormal gallium-67 scanning, predated pulmonary physiologic abnormalities. This observation raises questions concerning the natural history of this disease process and the specificity of physiologic tests for excluding disease. It also has implications for the treatment of neoplasia in the HIV-positive patient population.

  2. Severe asthma with markedly increased asbestos of 2 types & TXB2, and markedly reduced acetylcholine, DHEA & drug uptake in parts of upper lungs, & similar abnormalities at respiratory & cardiac center of medulla oblongata: complete elimination of this asthma within 15 days using one optimal dose of astragalus & application of strong red light & EMF neutralizer on respiratory centers of abnormal medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Henoch, Avraham; Shimotsuura, Yasuhira; Duvvi, Harsha; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Ohki, Motomu

    2009-01-01

    When the window of an Asbestos-contaminated room from a broken ceiling was opened wide, A 73 year-old male physician of Oriental origin, who was sitting in the next room, suddenly developed a severe asthma attack, which did not stop by the use of a hand-held Albuterol inhaler. Temporary relief was obtained only by using a Compressor-Nebulizer (Inspiration 626 with Albuterol Sulfate Inhalation Solution 0.083%). During the attack, abnormal areas were discovered at the upper lobes of both lungs, where Thromboxane B2 (TXB2) was markedly increased to 500 ng (BDORT units) (the rest of the lung had about 2.5 ng), 2 types of Asbestos (Chrysotile and Crocidolite) were abnormally increased to 0.120-0.135 mg, (BDORT units) Acetylcholine was markedly reduced to 0.5 ng (the rest of the lung was low, about 100 ng), DHEA was extremely reduced to 1 ng (the rest of the lung had about 52 ng), and telomere was less than 1 yg (= 10(-24) g). Bacterial & viral infections were also present in these abnormal areas, but no antibiotics entered the abnormal parts of the lungs. Therefore, one optimal dose of Astragalus was given once, which resulted in a rapid continuous excretion of large amounts of the above 2 types of Asbestos & TXB2 in urine & sputum, and Asthma symptoms reduced slightly in severity. Additional acupuncture & shiatsu given on all the known acupuncture points for lung disease only created slight, temporary improvement. Then, the respiratory & cardiac center of the Medulla Oblongata was found to have similar abnormalities as the lungs. Therefore, 100 mW output of Light Emitting Diode of red spectra (650 nm center spectrum) was projected on the abnormal area of the medulla oblongata on the back of the head. This resulted drug uptake of on and off and significantly reduced difficulty of breathing. Additional application of the EMF Neutralizer on the abnormal area of the Medulla Oblongata for 3 hours resulted in continuous drug uptake and complete disappearance of asthma. As a

  3. FGF Signaling Pathway in the Developing Chick Lung: Expression and Inhibition Studies

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Rute S.; Coutinho-Borges, José P.; Pacheco, Ana P.; daMota, Paulo O.; Correia-Pinto, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factors (FGF) are essential key players during embryonic development. Through their specific cognate receptors (FGFR) they activate intracellular cascades, finely regulated by modulators such as Sprouty. Several FGF ligands (FGF1, 2, 7, 9, 10 and 18) signaling through the four known FGFRs, have been implicated in lung morphogenesis. Although much is known about mammalian lung, so far, the avian model has not been explored for lung studies. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we provide the first description of fgf10, fgfr1-4 and spry2 expression patterns in early stages of chick lung development by in situ hybridization and observe that they are expressed similarly to their mammalian counterparts. Furthermore, aiming to determine a role for FGF signaling in chick lung development, in vitro FGFR inhibition studies were performed. Lung explants treated with an FGF receptor antagonist (SU5402) presented an impairment of secondary branch formation after 48 h of culture; moreover, abnormal lung growth with a cystic appearance of secondary bronchi and reduction of the mesenchymal tissue was observed. Branching and morphometric analysis of lung explants confirmed that FGFR inhibition impaired branching morphogenesis and induced a significant reduction of the mesenchyme. Conclusions/Significance This work demonstrates that FGFRs are essential for the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions that determine epithelial branching and mesenchymal growth and validate the avian embryo as a good model for pulmonary studies, namely to explore the FGF pathway as a therapeutic target. PMID:21412430

  4. CHRONIC PERCHLORATE EXPOSURE CAUSES MORPHOLOGICAL ABNORMALITIES IN DEVELOPING STICKLEBACK

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Richard R.; Von Hippel, Frank A.; O’Hara, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have examined the effects of chronic perchlorate exposure during growth and development, and fewer still have analyzed the effects of perchlorate over multiple generations. We describe morphological and developmental characteristics for threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) that were spawned and raised to sexual maturity in perchlorate-treated water (G1,2003) and for their offspring (G2,2004) that were not directly treated with perchlorate. The G1,2003 displayed a variety of abnormalities, including impaired formation of calcified traits, slower growth rates, aberrant sexual development, poor survivorship, and reduced pigmentation that allowed internal organs to be visible. Yet these conditions were absent when the offspring of contaminated fish (G2,2004) were raised in untreated water, suggesting a lack of transgenerational effects and that surviving populations may be able to recover following remediation of perchlorate-contaminated sites PMID:21465539

  5. ALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASES EXPRESSION DURING POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT: LIVER VS. LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules present in the environment, and can be produced during biotransformation of xenobiotics. Although the lung can be a major target for aldehyde toxicity, development of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), which detoxify aldehydes, in lung has be...

  6. Cardiac troponin I is abnormally expressed in non-small cell lung cancer tissues and human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Liu, Jia-Bao; Bian, Zhi-Ping; Xu, Jin-Dan; Wu, Heng-Fang; Gu, Chun-Rong; Shi, Yi; Zhang, Ji-Nan; Chen, Xiang-Jian; Yang, Di

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is the only sarcomeric protein identified to date that is expressed exclusively in cardiac muscle. Its expression in cancer tissues has not been reported. Herein, we examined cTnI expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues, human adenocarcinoma cells SPCA-1 (lung) and BGC 823 (gastric) by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and real-time PCR. Immunopositivity for cTnI was demonstrated in 69.4% (34/49) NSCLC tissues evaluated, and was strong intensity in 35.3% (6/17) lung squamous cell carcinoma cases. The non-cancer-bearing lung tissues except tuberculosis (9/9, 100%) showed negative staining for cTnI. Seven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human cTnI were applied in immunofluorescence. The result showed that the staining pattern within SPCA-1 and BGC 823 was dependent on the epitope of the cTnI mAbs. The membrane and nucleus of cancer cells were stained by mAbs against N-terminal peptides of cTnI, and cytoplasm was stained by mAbs against the middle and C-terminal peptides of cTnI. A ~25 kD band was identified by anti-cTnI mAb in SPCA-1 and BGC 823 extracts by western blot, as well as in cardiomyocyte extracts. The cTnI mRNA expressions in SPCA-1 and BGC 823 cells were about ten thousand times less than that in cardiomyocytes. Our study shows for the first time that cTnI protein and mRNA were abnormally expressed in NSCLC tissues, SPCA-1 and BGC 823 cells. These findings challenge the conventional view of cTnI as a cardiac-specific protein, enabling the potential use of cTnI as a diagnostic marker or targeted therapy for cancer.

  7. Lung development of monotremes: evidence for the mammalian morphotype.

    PubMed

    Ferner, Kirsten; Zeller, Ulrich; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2009-02-01

    The reproductive strategies and the extent of development of neonates differ markedly between the three extant mammalian groups: the Monotremata, Marsupialia, and Eutheria. Monotremes and marsupials produce highly altricial offspring whereas the neonates of eutherian mammals range from altricial to precocial. The ability of the newborn mammal to leave the environment in which it developed depends highly on the degree of maturation of the cardio-respiratory system at the time of birth. The lung structure is thus a reflection of the metabolic capacity of neonates. The lung development in monotremes (Ornithorhynchus anatinus, Tachyglossus aculeatus), in one marsupial (Monodelphis domestica), and one altricial eutherian (Suncus murinus) species was examined. The results and additional data from the literature were integrated into a morphotype reconstruction of the lung structure of the mammalian neonate. The lung parenchyma of monotremes and marsupials was at the early terminal air sac stage at birth, with large terminal air sacs. The lung developed slowly. In contrast, altricial eutherian neonates had more advanced lungs at the late terminal air sac stage and postnatally, lung maturation proceeded rapidly. The mammalian lung is highly conserved in many respects between monotreme, marsupial, and eutherian species and the structural differences in the neonatal lungs can be explained mainly by different developmental rates. The lung structure of newborn marsupials and monotremes thus resembles the ancestral condition of the mammalian lung at birth, whereas the eutherian newborns have a more mature lung structure.

  8. Abnormal cingulum bundle development in autism: a probabilistic tractography study.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Toshikazu; Shafritz, Keith M; Bregman, Joel; Peters, Bart D; Gruner, Patricia; Malhotra, Anil K; Szeszko, Philip R

    2014-01-30

    There is now considerable evidence that white matter abnormalities play a role in the neurobiology of autism. Little research has been directed, however, at understanding (a) typical white matter development in autism and how this relates to neurocognitive impairments observed in the disorder. In this study we used probabilistic tractography to identify the cingulum bundle in 21 adolescents and young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. We investigated group differences in the relationships between age and fractional anisotropy, a putative measure of white matter integrity, within the cingulum bundle. Moreover, in a preliminary investigation, we examined the relationship between cingulum fractional anisotropy and executive functioning using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). The ASD participants demonstrated significantly lower fractional anisotropy within the cingulum bundle compared to the typically developing volunteers. There was a significant group-by-age interaction such that the ASD group did not show the typical age-associated increases in fractional anisotropy observed among healthy individuals. Moreover, lower fractional anisotropy within the cingulum bundle was associated with worse BRIEF behavioral regulation index scores in the ASD group. The current findings implicate a dysregulation in cingulum bundle white matter development occurring in late adolescence and early adulthood in ASD, and suggest that greater disturbances in this trajectory are associated with executive dysfunction in ASD.

  9. Loss of Rab27 function results in abnormal lung epithelium structure in mice.

    PubMed

    Bolasco, Giulia; Tracey-White, Dhani C; Tolmachova, Tanya; Thorley, Andrew J; Tetley, Teresa D; Seabra, Miguel C; Hume, Alistair N

    2011-03-01

    Rab27 small GTPases regulate secretion and movement of lysosome-related organelles such as T cell cytolytic granules and platelet-dense granules. Previous studies indicated that Rab27a and Rab27b are expressed in the murine lung suggesting that they regulate secretory processes in the lung. Consistent with those studies, we found that Rab27a and Rab27b are expressed in cell types that contain secretory granules: alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) and Clara cells. We then used Rab27a/Rab27b double knockout (DKO) mice to examine the functional consequence of loss of Rab27 proteins in the murine lung. Light and electron microscopy revealed a number of morphological changes in lungs from DKO mice when compared with those in control animals. In aged DKO mice we observed atrophy of the bronchiolar and alveolar epithelium with reduction of cells numbers, thinning of the bronchiolar epithelium and alveolar walls, and enlargement of alveolar airspaces. In these samples we also observed increased numbers of activated foamy alveolar macrophages and granulocyte containing infiltrates together with reduction in the numbers of Clara cells and AEII cells compared with control. At the ultrastructural level we observed accumulation of cytoplasmic membranes and vesicles in Clara cells. Meanwhile, AEII cells in DKO accumulated large mature lamellar bodies and lacked immature/precursor lamellar bodies. We hypothesize that the morphological changes observed at the ultrastructural level in DKO samples result from secretory defects in AEII and Clara cells and that over time these defects lead to atrophy of the epithelium.

  10. Abnormal humoral immune response to mucosal antigenic stimulation in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Michils, A; Yernault, J C; Noel, E; Gossart, B; Servais, G; Duchateau, J

    1992-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested an inverse relationship between atopy and cancer of mucosal surfaces. Atopy is classically assessed by detecting specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies against inhalant allergens. However, Platts-Mills recently proposed that atopy is the ability of an organism to recognize and to respond to limited doses of allergens presented at the mucosal level by producing not only IgE, but also immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies. The authors compared the prevalence of atopy in 103 patients with lung cancer (a model of mucosal cancer), 51 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease matched for age, sex, and smoking habits with patients with lung cancer, and 102 healthy control subjects. The authors investigated whether the IgG response to antigens presented at the mucosal level, exacerbated in atopic subjects, might inversely be decreased in patients with lung cancer. Serum IgE antibodies against five common inhalant allergens (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus [Der p1], Aspergillus fumigatus, grass pollen, and cat and dog danders) were detected through a radioallergosorbent test assay. Serum IgG antibodies against allergens naturally presented at the mucosal level (respiratory mucosa with Der p1 and digestive mucosa with betalactoglobulin [BLG] and soya proteins [SP]) were measured through a solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. Atopic status was assessed in 19 patients (18.4%) with lung cancer, 9 patients (17.6%) with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and 18 healthy control subjects (17.6%). Distributions of specific IgG levels were represented on frequency histograms after natural logarithmic transformation and showed reduced levels of anti-Der p1 and anti-BLG IgG in the cancer population compared with the control populations but similar levels of anti-SP IgG. Influence of sex, age, smoking habits, histologic type of cancer, and its extent could be excluded. The authors' results show no

  11. Inflammation in the development of lung cancer: epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Engels, Eric A

    2008-04-01

    The lung is a site for repeated or chronic inflammatory insults. Epidemiologic research has provided evidence to support the hypothesis that tissue damage caused by inflammation can initiate or promote the development of lung cancer, possibly in conjunction with tobacco use. For example, some studies suggest an increased risk of lung cancer among persons with lung infections, such as tuberculosis, bacterial pneumonia, or inflammatory lung diseases. Elevated serum levels of C-reactive protein, an inflammation marker, are associated with heightened lung cancer risk. Recent studies also demonstrate increased lung cancer risk among immunosuppressed individuals infected with HIV. Other research indicates an association between genetic polymorphisms in the inflammation pathway, which might modulate the inflammatory response and lung cancer risk.

  12. SMC4, which is essentially involved in lung development, is associated with lung adenocarcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengli; Kuang, Manchao; Li, Meng; Feng, Lin; Zhang, Kaitai; Cheng, Shujun

    2016-01-01

    Structural maintenance of chromosome 4 (SMC4) is a core subunit of condensin complexes that mainly contributes to chromosome condensation and segregation. Our previous study demonstrated that the gene expression profile during lung development is of great values for the study of lung cancer. In this study, we identified SMC4 through co-expression network analysis and clique percolation clustering using genes that constant changes during four stages of lung development. Gene ontology and KEGG pathway enrichment analysis demonstrated that SMC4 is closely related to cell cycle, cell adhesion, and RNA processing in lung development and carcinogenesis. Moreover, SMC4 is overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma tissues and acts as an independent prognostic factor. SMC4 knockdown significantly inhibits the proliferation and invasion of A549 cells. Furthermore, we found that SMC4 interacts with DDX46 (DEAD-box helicase 46). In conclusion, the pivotal role of SMC4 in lung development and carcinogenesis suggests that genes with a similar expression pattern to SMC4 in lung development may also contribute to lung cancer progression. The identification of genes that are essentially involved in development through a comparative study between development and cancer may be a practical strategy for discovering potential biomarkers and illuminating the mechanisms of carcinogenesis. PMID:27687868

  13. VARA attenuates hyperoxia-induced impaired alveolar development and lung function in newborn mice

    PubMed Central

    James, Masheika L.; Ross, A. Catharine; Nicola, Teodora; Steele, Chad

    2013-01-01

    We have recently shown that a combination of vitamin A (VA) and retinoic acid (RA) in a 10:1 molar ratio (VARA) synergistically increases lung retinoid content in newborn rodents, more than either VA or RA alone in equimolar amounts. We hypothesized that the increase in lung retinoids would reduce oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokines, resulting in attenuation of alveolar simplification and abnormal lung function in hyperoxia-exposed newborn mice. Newborn C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 85% O2 (hyperoxia) or air (normoxia) for 7 or 14 days from birth and given vehicle or VARA every other day. Lung retinol content was measured by HPLC, function was assessed by flexiVent, and development was evaluated by radial alveolar counts, mean linear intercept, and secondary septal crest density. Mediators of oxidative stress, inflammation, and alveolar development were evaluated in lung homogenates. We observed that VARA increased lung retinol stores and attenuated hyperoxia-induced alveolar simplification while increasing lung compliance and lowering resistance. VARA attenuated hyperoxia-induced increases in DNA damage and protein oxidation accompanied with a reduction in nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 protein but did not alter malondialdehyde adducts, nitrotyrosine, or myeloperoxidase concentrations. Interferon-γ and macrophage inflammatory protein-2α mRNA and protein increased with hyperoxia, and this increase was attenuated by VARA. Our study suggests that the VARA combination may be a potential therapeutic strategy in conditions characterized by VA deficiency and hyperoxia-induced lung injury during lung development, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants. PMID:23585226

  14. X Chromosome Abnormalities and Cognitive Development: Implications for Understanding Normal Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walzer, Stanley

    1985-01-01

    Argues that knowledge from studies of individuals with sex chromosome abnormalities can further understanding of aspects of normal human development. Studies of XO girls, XXY boys, XXX girls, and males with a fragile X chromosome are summarized to demonstrate how results contribute to knowledge about normal cognitive development and about…

  15. Ectopic expression of C/EBPalpha in the lung epithelium disrupts late lung development.

    PubMed

    Berg, Tove; Didon, Lukas; Nord, Magnus

    2006-10-01

    The lung develops from the endoderm through a process of branching morphogenesis. This process is highly active during the pseudoglandular stage of lung development and continues into the canalicular stage, resulting in the formation of terminal sacs. CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs) are transcription factors regulating central aspects of differentiation and proliferation. We report here the developmental expression of C/EBPalpha, -beta, and -delta in the lung. C/EBPalpha exhibits a dynamic expression pattern and is first detected during the late pseudoglandular stage. At this stage, expression is observed in a subset of epithelial cells in the distal parts of the branching tubules. The expression of C/EBPalpha is confined to nonproliferating cells. To examine the role of C/EBPalpha in lung development, we generated transgenic mice ectopically expressing C/EBPalpha in the lung epithelium using the human surfactant protein C promoter. Lungs from these mice were of normal size but exhibited a phenotype characterized by fewer and larger developing epithelial tubules, indicating that the branching process was affected. No effects on overall proliferation or cellular differentiation were observed. When this phenotype was compared with that of mice carrying a targeted mutation of the Cebpa gene, the Cebpa-/- mice exhibited a similar developmental phenotype. In conclusion, our results show a role for C/EBPalpha in lung development and suggest a function in the later stages of lung branching morphogenesis.

  16. Abnormal Canine Bone Development Associated with Hypergravity Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, J. P.; Fisher, G. L.; McNeill, K. L.; Oyama, J.

    1979-01-01

    Chronic centrifugation of 85- to 92-day-old Beagles at 2.0 x g and 2.6 x g for 26 weeks during the time of active skeletal growth caused skeletal abnormalities in the radius and the ulna of ten of 11 dogs. The pattern of change mimicked that found in naturally occurring and experimentally induced premature distal ulnar physeal closure or delayed growth at this physis. Minimal changes in bone density were detected by sensitive photon absorptiometric techniques. Skeletal abnormalities also were found in five of the six cage-control dogs, although the run-control dogs were radiographically normal.

  17. Development of Abnormality Detection System for Bathers using Ultrasonic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Yosuke; Abe, Takehiko; Nambo, Hidetaka; Kimura, Haruhiko; Ogoshi, Yasuhiro

    This paper proposes an abnormality detection system for bather sitting in bathtub. Increasing number of in-bathtub drowning accidents in Japan draws attention. Behind this large number of bathing accidents, Japan's unique social and cultural background come surface. For majority of people in Japan, bathing serves purpose in deep warming up of body, relax and enjoyable time. Therefore it is the custom for the Japanese to soak in bathtub. However overexposure to hot water may cause dizziness or fainting, which is possible to cause in-bathtub drowning. For drowning prevention, the system detects bather's abnormal state using an ultrasonic sensor array. The array, which has many ultrasonic sensors, is installed on the ceiling of bathroom above bathtub. The abnormality detection system uses the following two methods: posture detection and behavior detection. The function of posture detection is to estimate the risk of drowning by monitoring bather's posture. Meanwhile, the function of behavior detection is to estimate the risk of drowning by monitoring bather's behavior. By using these methods, the system detects bathers' different state from normal. As a result of experiment with a subject in the bathtub, the system was possible to detect abnormal state using subject's posture and behavior. Therefore the system is useful for monitoring bather to prevent drowning in bathtub.

  18. Lung imaging fluorescence endoscope: development and experimental prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palcic, Branko; Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum E.; Hung, Jaclyn; Jaggi, Bruno; Radjinia, Massud; Pon, Alfred; Profio, A. E.

    1991-06-01

    A lung imaging fluorescence endoscope has been developed which can be used for detection and localization of early lung cancer. We exploited tissue autofluorescence alone or in combination with fluorescent tumor localizing drugs to create pseudo images which can clearly delineate the diseased sites from the surrounding normal tissues. With this technique it is possible to detect early lung cancer as well as pre-cancerous lesions of one to two millimeters in diameter and only a few cell layers thick.

  19. Development and Evaluation of Sterographic Display for Lung Cancer Screening

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Sterographic Display for Lung Cancer Screening PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Xiao Hui Wang, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of...NUMBER Development and Evaluation of Sterographic Display for Lung Cancer Screening 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0101 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT See next page. 15. SUBJECT TERMS lung cancer screening, stereo display

  20. Repression of Igf1 expression by Ezh2 prevents basal cell differentiation in the developing lung

    PubMed Central

    Galvis, Laura A.; Holik, Aliaksei Z.; Short, Kieran M.; Pasquet, Julie; Lun, Aaron T. L.; Blewitt, Marnie E.; Smyth, Ian M.; Ritchie, Matthew E.; Asselin-Labat, Marie-Liesse

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms involved in the establishment of lung epithelial cell lineage identities during development are largely unknown. Here, we explored the role of the histone methyltransferase Ezh2 during lung lineage determination. Loss of Ezh2 in the lung epithelium leads to defective lung formation and perinatal mortality. We show that Ezh2 is crucial for airway lineage specification and alveolarization. Using optical projection tomography imaging, we found that branching morphogenesis is affected in Ezh2 conditional knockout mice and the remaining bronchioles are abnormal, lacking terminally differentiated secretory club cells. Remarkably, RNA-seq analysis revealed the upregulation of basal genes in Ezh2-deficient epithelium. Three-dimensional imaging for keratin 5 further showed the unexpected presence of a layer of basal cells from the proximal airways to the distal bronchioles in E16.5 embryos. ChIP-seq analysis indicated the presence of Ezh2-mediated repressive marks on the genomic loci of some but not all basal genes, suggesting an indirect mechanism of action of Ezh2. We found that loss of Ezh2 de-represses insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1) expression and that modulation of IGF1 signaling ex vivo in wild-type lungs could induce basal cell differentiation. Altogether, our work reveals an unexpected role for Ezh2 in controlling basal cell fate determination in the embryonic lung endoderm, mediated in part by repression of Igf1 expression. PMID:25790853

  1. Recent developments in the epidemiology of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kabat, G.C. )

    1993-03-01

    Lung cancer is currently the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and also the most common tumor worldwide. Changes in the distribution of histologic types over the past two decades in the United States, as well as high rates of lung cancer in certain subpopulations, require explanation. While cigarette smoking and specific occupational exposures are firmly established as important risk factors for lung cancer, recent work provides evidence that other factors may play a role either as independent risk factors or as modifiers of the effect of smoking. This paper reviews the epidemiology of lung cancer, with an emphasis on developments in the past decade. 79 refs.

  2. 78 FR 33851 - Lung Cancer Patient-Focused Drug Development; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... cancer. Lung cancer is a disease caused by uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the lung, usually in the cells lining air passages. Lung cancer cells can spread (metastasize) to almost... disease (including surgery, radiation therapy, conventional chemotherapy, and targeted therapies),...

  3. Ghrelin and obestatin: different role in fetal lung development?

    PubMed

    Nunes, Susana; Nogueira-Silva, Cristina; Dias, Emanuel; Moura, Rute S; Correia-Pinto, Jorge

    2008-12-01

    Ghrelin and obestatin are two proteins that originate from post-translational processing of the preproghrelin peptide. Various authors claim an opposed role of ghrelin and obestatin in several systems. Preproghrelin mRNA is significantly expressed in airway epithelium throughout lung development, predominantly during the earliest stages. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of ghrelin and obestatin in fetal lung development in vitro. Immunohistochemistry studies were performed at different gestational ages in order to clarify the expression pattern of ghrelin, GHS-R1a, obestatin and GPR39 during fetal lung development. Fetal rat lung explants were harvested at 13.5 days post-conception (dpc) and cultured during 4 days with increasing doses of total ghrelin, acylated ghrelin, desacyl-ghrelin, ghrelin antagonist (D-Lys(3)-GHRP-6) or obestatin. Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated that ghrelin, GHS-R1a, obestatin and GPR39 proteins were expressed in primitive rat lung epithelium throughout all studied gestational ages. Total and acylated ghrelin supplementation significantly increased the total number of peripheral airway buds, whereas desacyl-ghrelin induced no effect. Moreover, GHS-R1a antagonist significantly decreased lung branching. Finally, obestatin supplementation induced no significant effect in the measured parameters. The present study showed that ghrelin has a positive effect in fetal lung development through its GHS-R1a receptor, whereas obestatin has no effect on lung branching.

  4. An observational study of Donor Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion in UK lung transplantation: DEVELOP-UK.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Andrew; Andreasson, Anders; Chrysos, Alexandros; Lally, Joanne; Mamasoula, Chrysovalanto; Exley, Catherine; Wilkinson, Jennifer; Qian, Jessica; Watson, Gillian; Lewington, Oli; Chadwick, Thomas; McColl, Elaine; Pearce, Mark; Mann, Kay; McMeekin, Nicola; Vale, Luke; Tsui, Steven; Yonan, Nizar; Simon, Andre; Marczin, Nandor; Mascaro, Jorge; Dark, John

    2016-01-01

    stay was similar in both groups. There was a higher rate of very early grade 3 primary graft dysfunction (PGD) in the EVLP arm, but rates of PGD did not differ between groups after 72 hours. The requirement for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support was higher in the EVLP arm (7/18, 38.8%) than in the standard arm (6/184, 3.2%). There were no major differences in rates of chest radiograph abnormalities, infection, lung function or rejection by 12 months. The cost of EVLP transplants is approximately £35,000 higher than the cost of standard transplants, as a result of the cost of the EVLP procedure, and the increased ECMO use and ITU stay. Predictors of cost were quality of life on joining the waiting list, type of transplant and number of lungs transplanted. An exploratory model comparing a NHS lung transplant service that includes EVLP and standard lung transplants with one including only standard lung transplants resulted in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £73,000. Interviews showed that patients had a good understanding of the need for, and the processes of, EVLP. If EVLP can increase the number of usable donor lungs and reduce waiting, it is likely to be acceptable to those waiting for lung transplantation. Study limitations include small numbers in the EVLP arm, limiting analysis to descriptive statistics and the EVLP protocol change during the study. CONCLUSIONS Overall, one-third of donor lungs subjected to EVLP were deemed suitable for transplant. Estimated survival over 12 months was lower than in the standard group, but the data were also consistent with no difference in survival between groups. Patients receiving these additional transplants experience a higher rate of early graft injury and need for unplanned ECMO support, at increased cost. The small number of participants in the EVLP arm because of early study termination limits the robustness of these conclusions. The reason for the increased PGD rates, high ECMO requirement and

  5. Allometric growth in the extant coelacanth lung during ontogenetic development

    PubMed Central

    Cupello, Camila; Brito, Paulo M.; Herbin, Marc; Meunier, François J; Janvier, Philippe; Dutel, Hugo; Clément, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    Coelacanths are lobe-finned fishes known from the Devonian to Recent that were long considered extinct, until the discovery of two living species in deep marine waters of the Mozambique Channel and Sulawesi. Despite extensive studies, the pulmonary system of extant coelacanths has not been fully investigated. Here we confirm the presence of a lung and discuss its allometric growth in Latimeria chalumnae, based on a unique ontogenetic series. Our results demonstrate the presence of a potentially functional, well-developed lung in the earliest known coelacanth embryo, and its arrested growth at later ontogenetic stages, when the lung is clearly vestigial. The parallel development of a fatty organ for buoyancy control suggests a unique adaptation to deep-water environments. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence for the presence of small, hard, flexible plates around the lung in L. chalumnae, and consider them homologous to the plates of the ‘calcified lung' of fossil coelacanths. PMID:26372119

  6. Allometric growth in the extant coelacanth lung during ontogenetic development.

    PubMed

    Cupello, Camila; Brito, Paulo M; Herbin, Marc; Meunier, François J; Janvier, Philippe; Dutel, Hugo; Clément, Gaël

    2015-09-15

    Coelacanths are lobe-finned fishes known from the Devonian to Recent that were long considered extinct, until the discovery of two living species in deep marine waters of the Mozambique Channel and Sulawesi. Despite extensive studies, the pulmonary system of extant coelacanths has not been fully investigated. Here we confirm the presence of a lung and discuss its allometric growth in Latimeria chalumnae, based on a unique ontogenetic series. Our results demonstrate the presence of a potentially functional, well-developed lung in the earliest known coelacanth embryo, and its arrested growth at later ontogenetic stages, when the lung is clearly vestigial. The parallel development of a fatty organ for buoyancy control suggests a unique adaptation to deep-water environments. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence for the presence of small, hard, flexible plates around the lung in L. chalumnae, and consider them homologous to the plates of the 'calcified lung' of fossil coelacanths.

  7. Development of a Decellularized Lung Bioreactor System for Bioengineering the Lung: The Matrix Reloaded

    PubMed Central

    Price, Andrew P.; England, Kristen A.; Matson, Amy M.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a decellularized murine lung matrix bioreactor system that could be used to evaluate the potential of stem cells to regenerate lung tissue. Lungs from 2–3-month-old C57BL/6 female mice were excised en bloc with the trachea and heart, and decellularized with sequential solutions of distilled water, detergents, NaCl, and porcine pancreatic DNase. The remaining matrix was cannulated and suspended in small airway growth medium, attached to a ventilator to simulate normal, murine breathing-induced stretch. After 7 days in an incubator, lung matrices were analyzed histologically. Scanning electron microscopy and histochemical staining demonstrated that the pulmonary matrix was intact and that the geographic placement of the proximal and distal airways, alveoli and vessels, and the basement membrane of these structures all remained intact. Decellularization was confirmed by the absence of nuclear 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and negative polymerase chain reaction for genomic DNA. Collagen content was maintained at normal levels. Elastin, laminin, and glycosaminglycans were also present, although at lower levels compared to nondecellularized lungs. The decellularized lung matrix bioreactor was capable of supporting growth of fetal alveolar type II cells. Analysis of day 7 cryosections of fetal-cell-injected lung matrices showed pro-Sp-C, cytokeratin 18, and 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-positive cells lining alveolar areas that appeared to be attached to the matrix. These data illustrate the potential of using decellularized lungs as a natural three-dimensional bioengineering matrix as well as provide a model for the study of lung regeneration from pulmonary stem cells. PMID:20297903

  8. [Graphic Evolution Witness the Development of Lung Cancer Translational Research].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhong, Wenzhao

    2016-06-20

    Lung cancer treatment has altered from conventional chemotherapy to targeted treatment, which now has been turned to the immunotherapy. Translational research has played an irreplaceable role during this progression which graphic evolution has witnessed. The evolution has gone through forest plot, KM-curve, waterfall plot, spider plot and timeline-area, showing us the refining concept and gradual process of lung cancer treatment undergoing from community towards individual. Even though the latest immunotherapy is getting increasingly hot, the result isn't quite expected. Meanwhile, the limitations of conventional treatment still exist which require further research. This article will primarily illustrate the development of translational research of lung cancer via the aspect of curve evolution and analysis some abortive clinical trials in lung cancer surgery for inspiring the next graphic style and lung cancer treatment.

  9. Development of Mouse Lung Deposition Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    unit (thermochemical) calorie (thermochemical) cal (thermochemical/cm ) curie degree (angle) degree Fahrenheit electron volt erg erg/second foot...fraction dropped to zero . The results indicated that to reach the deepest regions of the lung with significant deposition, particle size should have been

  10. Abnormal ventricular development in preterm neonates with visually normal MRIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jie; Wang, Yalin; Lao, Yi; Ceschin, Rafael; Mi, Liang; Nelson, Marvin D.; Panigrahy, Ashok; Leporé, Natasha

    2015-12-01

    Children born preterm are at risk for a wide range of neurocognitive and neurobehavioral disorders. Some of these may stem from early brain abnormalities at the neonatal age. Hence, a precise characterization of neonatal neuroanatomy may help inform treatment strategies. In particular, the ventricles are often enlarged in neurocognitive disorders, due to atrophy of surrounding tissues. Here we present a new pipeline for the detection of morphological and relative pose differences in the ventricles of premature neonates compared to controls. To this end, we use a new hyperbolic Ricci flow based mapping of the ventricular surfaces of each subjects to the Poincaré disk. Resulting surfaces are then registered to a template, and a between group comparison is performed using multivariate tensor-based morphometry. We also statistically compare the relative pose of the ventricles within the brain between the two groups, by performing a Procrustes alignment between each subject's ventricles and an average shape. For both types of analyses, differences were found in the left ventricles between the two groups.

  11. Air pollution during pregnancy and lung development in the child.

    PubMed

    Korten, Insa; Ramsey, Kathryn; Latzin, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Air pollution exposure has increased extensively in recent years and there is considerable evidence that exposure to particulate matter can lead to adverse respiratory outcomes. The health impacts of exposure to air pollution during the prenatal period is especially concerning as it can impair organogenesis and organ development, which can lead to long-term complications. Exposure to air pollution during pregnancy affects respiratory health in different ways. Lung development might be impaired by air pollution indirectly by causing lower birth weight, premature birth or disturbed development of the immune system. Exposure to air pollution during pregnancy has also been linked to decreased lung function in infancy and childhood, increased respiratory symptoms, and the development of childhood asthma. In addition, impaired lung development contributes to infant mortality. The mechanisms of how prenatal air pollution affects the lungs are not fully understood, but likely involve interplay of environmental and epigenetic effects. The current epidemiological evidence on the effect of air pollution during pregnancy on lung function and children's respiratory health is summarized in this review. While evidence for the adverse effects of prenatal air pollution on lung development and health continue to mount, rigorous actions must be taken to reduce air pollution exposure and thus long-term respiratory morbidity and mortality.

  12. Sonic hedgehog signaling in the lung. From development to disease.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Matthias C; Joyner, Alexandra L; Loomis, Cynthia A; Munger, John S

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the secreted protein sonic hedgehog (SHH) has emerged as a critical morphogen during embryonic lung development, regulating the interaction between epithelial and mesenchymal cell populations in the airway and alveolar compartments. There is increasing evidence that the SHH pathway is active in adult lung diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer, which raises two questions: (1) What role does SHH signaling play in these diseases? and (2) Is it a primary driver of the disease or a response (perhaps beneficial) to the primary disturbance? In this review we aim to fill the gap between the well-studied period of embryonic lung development and the adult diseased lung by reviewing the hedgehog (HH) pathway during the postnatal period and in adult uninjured and injured lungs. We elucidate the similarities and differences in the epithelial-mesenchymal interplay during the fibrosis response to injury in lung compared with other organs and present a critical appraisal of tools and agents available to evaluate HH signaling.

  13. Major enzymes controlling the androgenic pressure in the developing lung.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Yves; Provost, Pierre R

    2013-09-01

    A sex difference is observed in the incidence and morbidity of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) of the neonate and in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The involvement of androgens is well evidenced in RDS and it is suspected in BPD. Interestingly, the developing lung is not an inert tissue just exposed to circulating androgens, but is rather an active androgen metabolizing tissue, expressing enzymes involved in both androgen synthesis and inactivation. The present review focuses on the major enzymes involved in androgen metabolism within the developing lung. Testosterone synthesis and inactivation by AKR1C3/Akr1c6 (human/mouse 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) type 5) and HSD17B2 (17β-HSD type 2), respectively, play an important role in the developing lung. Akr1c14 (3α-HSD) shows a strong increase in expression according to developmental time. The canalicular stage of lung development corresponding to the surge of surfactant lipid synthesis, which is linked to RDS, as well as saccularization/alveolarization, which are linked to BPD, are covered by this review for the mouse and human species. The androgen metabolizing enzymes expressed within the developing lung can become potential pharmaceutical targets in the objective of accelerating lung maturation by specific treatments. The classic deleterious effects of androgens on lung maturation and the surge of surfactant synthesis in males are well known. Conversely, androgens also have positive impacts on the development of both male and female lungs. Steroidogenic enzymes are key regulators of these positive effects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'CSR 2013'.

  14. Genetic Influences on Asthma Susceptibility in the Developing Lung

    PubMed Central

    Carpe, Nicole; Mandeville, Isabel; Ribeiro, Leslie; Ponton, Andre; Martin, James G.; Kho, Alvin T.; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Tantisira, Kelan; Weiss, Scott T.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Kaplan, Feige

    2010-01-01

    Asthma is the leading serious pediatric chronic illness in the United States, affecting 7.1 million children. The prevalence of asthma in children under 4 years of age has increased dramatically in the last 2 decades. Existing evidence suggests that this increase in prevalence derives from early environmental exposures acting on a pre-existing asthma-susceptible genotype. We studied the origins of asthma susceptibility in developing lung in rat strains that model the distinct phenotypes of airway hyperresponsiveness (Fisher rats) and atopy (brown Norway [BN] rats). Postnatal BN rat lungs showed increased epithelial proliferation and tracheal goblet cell hyperplasia. Fisher pups showed increased lung resistance at age 2 weeks, with elevated neutrophils throughout the postnatal period. Diverse transcriptomic signatures characterized the distinct respiratory phenotypes of developing lung in both rat models. Linear regression across age and strain identified developmental variation in expression of 1,376 genes, and confirmed both strain and temporal regulation of lung gene expression. Biological processes that were heavily represented included growth and development (including the T Box 1 transcription factor [Tbx5], the epidermal growth factor receptor [Egfr], the transforming growth factor beta-1-induced transcript 1 [Tgfbr1i1]), extracellular matrix and cell adhesion (including collagen and integrin genes), and immune function (including lymphocyte antigen 6 (Ly6) subunits, IL-17b, Toll-interacting protein, and Ficolin B). Genes validated by quantitative RT-PCR and protein analysis included collagen III alpha 1 Col3a1, Ly6b, glucocorticoid receptor and Importin-13 (specific to the BN rat lung), and Serpina1 and Ficolin B (specific to the Fisher lung). Innate differences in patterns of gene expression in developing lung that contribute to individual variation in respiratory phenotype are likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:20118217

  15. Role of Systemic Therapy in the Development of Lung Sequelae After Conformal Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Zoltan; Cserhati, Adrienn; Kelemen, Gyoengyi; Boda, Krisztina; Thurzo, Laszlo; Kahan, Zsuzsanna

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the risk of radiogenic lung damage in breast cancer patients after conformal radiotherapy and different forms of systemic treatment. Methods and Materials: In 328 patients receiving sequential taxane-based chemotherapy, concomitant hormone therapy (tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors), or no adjuvant systemic therapy, symptomatic and asymptomatic lung sequelae were prospectively evaluated via the detection of visible CT abnormalities, 3 months or 1 year after the completion of the radiotherapy. Results: Significant positive associations were detected between the development of both pneumonitis and fibrosis of Grade 1 and patient age, ipsilateral mean lung dose, volume of the ipsilateral lung receiving 20 Gy, and irradiation of the regional lymph nodes. In multivariate analysis, age and mean lung dose proved to be independent predictors of early (odds ratio [OR] = 1.035, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.011-1.061 and OR = 1.113, 95% CI 1.049-1.181, respectively) and late (OR = 1.074, 95% CI 1.042-1.107 and OR = 1.207, 95% CI 1.124-1.295, respectively) radiogenic lung damage, whereas the role of systemic therapy was significant in the development of Grade 1 lung fibrosis (p = 0.01). Among the various forms of systemic therapy, tamoxifen increased the risk of late lung sequelae (OR = 2.442, 95% CI 1.120-5.326, p = 0.025). No interaction was demonstrated between the administration of systemic therapy and the other above-mentioned parameters as regards the risk of radiogenic lung damage. Conclusions: Our analyses demonstrate the independent role of concomitant tamoxifen therapy in the development of radiogenic lung fibrosis but do not suggest such an effect for the other modes of systemic treatment.

  16. Wait Times Experienced by Lung Cancer Patients in the BC Southern Interior to Obtain Oncologic Care: Exploration of the Intervals from First Abnormal Imaging to Oncologic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Rezwan; Boyce, Andrew; Halperin, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is associated with rapid disease progression, which can significantly progress over a duration of four to eight weeks. This study examines the time interval lung cancer patients from the interior of British Columbia (BC) experience while undergoing diagnostic evaluation, biopsy, staging, and preparation for treatment. Methods: A chart review of lung cancer patients (n=231) referred to the BC Cancer Agency Centre for the Southern Interior between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011 was performed. Time zero was defined as the date of the first abnormal chest imaging. Time intervals, expressed as median averages, to specialist consult, biopsy, oncologic referral, initial oncology consultation, and commencement of oncologic treatment were obtained. Results: The median time interval from first abnormal chest imaging to a specialist consultation was 18 days (interquartile range, IQR, 7-36). An additional nine days elapsed prior to biopsy in the form of bronchoscopy, CT-guided biopsy, or sputum cytology (median; IQR, 3-21); if lobectomy was required, 18 days elapsed (median; IQR, 9-28). Eight days were required for pathologic diagnosis and subsequent referral to the cancer centre (median; IQR, 3-16.5). Once referral was received, 10 days elapsed prior to consultation with either a medical or radiation oncologist (median, IQR 5-18). Finally, eight days was required for initiation of radiation and/or chemotherapy (median; IQR, 1-15). The median wait time from detection of lung cancer on imaging to oncologic treatment in the form of radiation and/or chemotherapy was 65.5 days (IQR, 41.5-104.3).  Interpretation: Patients in the BC Southern Interior experience considerable delays in accessing lung cancer care. During this time, the disease has the potential to significantly progress and it is possible that a subset of patients may lose their opportunity for curative intent treatment. PMID:26543688

  17. [Heritability and environment in normal and abnormal development].

    PubMed

    Lejarraga, Horacio

    2010-12-01

    The environmental influence on human development can be studied by assessing similarities and discrepancies in developmental traits between biological and adopted siblings and twins, reared together and reared apart. Approximately 50% of total variance of general cognitive ability in a given population can be explained by the environment. This influence gradually decreases with age, from infancy to adulthood. Two types of environments can be distinguished: shared and non shared. The former one, acts predominantly in childhood, and the non shared environment becomes more important in adulthood. Paradoxically, quantitative genetics can make a significant contribution to knowledge on the influence of environment on human development.

  18. Development of lung cancer CT screening operating support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigaki, Rikuta; Hanai, Kozou; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Eguchi, Kenji; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2009-02-01

    In Japan, lung cancer death ranks first among men and third among women. Lung cancer death is increasing yearly, thus early detection and treatment are needed. For this reason, CT screening for lung cancer has been introduced. The CT screening services are roughly divided into three sections: office, radiology and diagnosis sections. These operations have been performed through paper-based or a combination of paper-based and an existing electronic health recording system. This paper describes an operating support system for lung cancer CT screening in order to make the screening services efficient. This operating support system is developed on the basis of 1) analysis of operating processes, 2) digitalization of operating information, and 3) visualization of operating information. The utilization of the system is evaluated through an actual application and users' survey questionnaire obtained from CT screening centers.

  19. HCG stimulation test in children with abnormal sexual development.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, D B; Laurance, B M; Atherden, S M; Ryness, J

    1976-01-01

    Plasma testosterone was estimated by radioimmunoassay in 60 children with disorders of sexual development before and after stimulation with human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG). In 21 children the testosterone levels after 3 and 5 daily injections of 1000 units HCG were compared and good correlation was found between the paired results (r =0-93), suggesting that the 5-day HCG test has no advantage over the 3-day test. In 7 boys with apparently normal genital development the increments in plasma testosterone ranged from 2-0 to 8-5 nmol/1 after 3 injections of HCG. 10 boys with anorchia showed little response to HCG stimulation, but in patients with other disorders, such as micropenis (10), cryptorchidism (8), hermaphroditism (3), male pseudohermaphroditism (13), hypospadias (3), and sex chromosome anomalies (6), there was considerable variation in the plasma testosterone level after HCG. In 2 boys with suspected anorchia the results suggested that testes were present and this was confirmed at operation. PMID:9030

  20. Bridging Lung Development with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. Relevance of Developmental Pathways in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Boucherat, Olivier; Morissette, Mathieu C; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien; Maltais, François

    2016-02-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic airflow limitation. This generic term encompasses emphysema and chronic bronchitis, two common conditions, each having distinct but also overlapping features. Recent epidemiological and experimental studies have challenged the traditional view that COPD is exclusively an adult disease occurring after years of inhalational insults to the lungs, pinpointing abnormalities or disruption of the pathways that control lung development as an important susceptibility factor for adult COPD. In addition, there is growing evidence that emphysema is not solely a destructive process because it is also characterized by a failure in cell and molecular maintenance programs necessary for proper lung development. This leads to the concept that tissue regeneration required stimulation of signaling pathways that normally operate during development. We undertook a review of the literature to outline the contribution of developmental insults and genes in the occurrence and pathogenesis of COPD, respectively.

  1. Antenatal endotoxin disrupts lung vitamin D receptor and 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase expression in the developing rat.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Erica; Seedorf, Gregory J; Ryan, Sharon; Gien, Jason; Cramer, Scott D; Abman, Steven H

    2015-11-01

    Vitamin D [vit D; 1,25-(OH)2D] treatment improves survival and lung alveolar and vascular growth in an experimental model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) after antenatal exposure to endotoxin (ETX). However, little is known about lung-specific 1,25-(OH)2D3 regulation during development, especially regarding maturational changes in lung-specific expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR), 1α-hydroxylase (1α-OHase), and CYP24A1 during late gestation and the effects of antenatal ETX exposure on 1,25-(OH)2D3 metabolism in the lung. We hypothesized that vit D regulatory proteins undergo maturation regulation in the late fetal and early neonatal lung and that prenatal exposure to ETX impairs lung growth partly through abnormal endogenous vit D metabolism. Normal fetal rat lungs were harvested between embryonic day 15 and postnatal day 14. Lung homogenates were assayed for VDR, 1α-OHase, and CYP24A1 protein contents by Western blot analysis. Fetal rats were injected on embryonic day 20 with intra-amniotic ETX, ETX + 1,25-(OH)2D3, or saline and delivered 2 days later. Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) from fetal sheep were assessed for VDR, 1α-OHase, and CYP24A1 expression after treatment with 25-(OH)D3, 1,25-(OH)2D3, ETX, ETX + 25-(OH)D3, or ETX + 1,25-(OH)2D3. We found that lung VDR, 1α-OHase, and CYP2741 protein expression dramatically increase immediately before birth (P < 0.01 vs. early fetal values). Antenatal ETX increases CYP24A1 expression (P < 0.05) and decreases VDR and 1α-OHase expression at birth (P < 0.001), but these changes are prevented with concurrent vit D treatment (P < 0.001). ETX-induced reduction of fetal PAEC growth and tube formation and lung 1α-OHase expression are prevented by vit D treatment (P < 0.001). We conclude that lung VDR, 1α-OHase, and CYP24A1 protein content markedly increase before birth and that antenatal ETX disrupts lung vit D metabolism through downregulation of VDR and increased vit D catabolic enzyme

  2. Regulation of lung development and regeneration by the vascular system.

    PubMed

    Woik, Nicole; Kroll, Jens

    2015-07-01

    Blood vessels have been described a long time ago as passive circuits providing sufficient blood supply to ensure proper distribution of oxygen and nutrition. Blood vessels are mainly formed during embryonic development and in the early postnatal period. In the adult, blood vessels are quiescent, but can be activated and subsequently induced under pathophysiological conditions, such as ischemia and tumor growth. Surprisingly, recent data have suggested an active function for blood vessels, named angiocrine signaling, releasing trophogens which regulate organ development and organ regeneration including in the pancreas, lung, tumor cells, liver and bone. Lung development is driven by hypoxia as well as an intense endothelial-epithelial interaction, and important mechanisms contributing to these processes have recently been identified. This review aims to summarize recent developments and concepts about embryonic pulmonary vascular development and lung regeneration. We discuss hypoxia-inducible factor HIF-2α and vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF as important mediators in lung development and focus on endothelial-epithelial interactions and angiocrine signaling mechanisms.

  3. A Brief History of the Development of Abnormal Psychology: A Training Guide. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, William R.

    Presented for practitioners is a history of the development of abnormal psychology. Areas covered include the following: Early medical concepts, ideas carried over from literature, early treatment of the mentally ill, development of the psychological viewpoint, Freud's psychoanalytic theory, Jung's analytic theory, the individual psychology of…

  4. The p44/wdr77-dependent cellular proliferation process during lung development is re-activated in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhongping; Zhang, Fahao; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Ma, Wencai; Davis, Richard E.; Wang, Zhengxin

    2014-01-01

    During lung development, cells proliferate for a defined length of time before they begin to differentiate. Factors that control this proliferative process and how this growth process is related to lung cancer are currently unknown. Here, we found that the WD40-containing protein (p44/wdr77) was expressed in growing epithelial cells at the early stages of lung development. In contrast, p44/wdr77 expression was diminished in fully differentiated epithelial cells in the adult lung. Loss of p44/wdr77 gene expression led to cell growth arrest and differentiation. Re-expression of p44/wdr77 caused terminally differentiated cells to re-enter the cell cycle. Our findings suggest that p44/wdr77 is essential and sufficient for proliferation of lung epithelial cells. P44/Wdr77 was re-expressed in lung cancer, and silencing p44/wdr77 expression strongly inhibited growth of lung adenocarcinoma cells in tissue culture and abolished growth of lung adenocarcinoma tumor xenografts in mice. The growth arrest induced by loss of p44/wdr77 expression was partially through the p21-Rb signaling. Our results suggest that p44/wdr77 controls cellular proliferation during lung development and this growth process is re-activated during lung tumorigenesis. PMID:22665061

  5. Disorders of sexual development and abnormal early development in domestic food-producing mammals: the role of chromosome abnormalities, environment and stress factors.

    PubMed

    Favetta, L A; Villagómez, D A F; Iannuzzi, L; Di Meo, G; Webb, A; Crain, S; King, W A

    2012-01-01

    The management of disorders of sexual development (DSD) in humans and domestic animals has been the subject of intense interest for decades. The association between abnormal chromosome constitutions and DSDs in domestic animals has been recorded since the beginnings of conventional cytogenetic analysis. Deviated karyotypes consisting of abnormal sex chromosome sets and/or the coexistence of cells with different sex chromosome constitutions in an individual seem to be the main causes of anomalies of sex determination and sex differentiation. In recent years, a growing interest has developed around the environmental insults, such as endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDC) and heat stressors, which affect fertility, early embryonic development and, in some instances, directly the sex ratio and/or the development of 1 specific sex versus the other. A variety of chemical compounds present in the environment at low doses has been shown to have major effects on the reproductive functions in human and domestic animals following prolonged exposure. In this review, we present an overview of congenital/chromosomal factors that are responsible for the DSDs and link them and the lack of proper embryonic development to environmental factors that are becoming a major global concern.

  6. Oxidative Stress and Therapeutic Development in Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Leah; Stidham, Timothy; Nozik-Grayck, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has many implications in the pathogenesis of lung diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species and antioxidants, how they relate to normal physiological function and the pathophysiology of different lung diseases, and therapeutic strategies. The production of ROS/RNS from endogenous and exogenous sources is first discussed, followed by antioxidant systems that restore oxidative balance and cellular homeostasis. The contribution of oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in lung disease pathogenesis is also discussed. An overview of therapeutic strategies is provided, such as augmenting NO bioactivity, blocking the production of ROS/RNS and replacement of deficient antioxidants. The limitations of current strategies and failures of clinical trials are then addressed, followed by discussion of novel experimental approaches for the development of improved antioxidant therapies. PMID:27019769

  7. Oxidative Stress and Therapeutic Development in Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Leah; Stidham, Timothy; Nozik-Grayck, Eva

    2014-08-01

    Oxidative stress has many implications in the pathogenesis of lung diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species and antioxidants, how they relate to normal physiological function and the pathophysiology of different lung diseases, and therapeutic strategies. The production of ROS/RNS from endogenous and exogenous sources is first discussed, followed by antioxidant systems that restore oxidative balance and cellular homeostasis. The contribution of oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in lung disease pathogenesis is also discussed. An overview of therapeutic strategies is provided, such as augmenting NO bioactivity, blocking the production of ROS/RNS and replacement of deficient antioxidants. The limitations of current strategies and failures of clinical trials are then addressed, followed by discussion of novel experimental approaches for the development of improved antioxidant therapies.

  8. Postnatal lethality and abnormal development of foregut and spleen in Ndrg4 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xianghu; Li, Jing; Baldwin, H. Scott

    2016-01-01

    NDRG4 is a member of the NDRG family (N-myc downstream-regulated gene), which is highly expressed in brain and heart. Previous studies showed that Ndrg1-deficient mice exhibited a progressive demyelinating disorder of peripheral nerves and Ndrg4-deficient mice had spatial learning deficits and vulnerabilities to cerebral ischemia. Here, we report generation of Ndrg4 mutant alleles that exhibit several development defects different from those previously reported. Our homozygous mice showed growth retardation and postnatal lethality. Spleen and thymuses of Ndrg4−/− mice are considerably reduced in size from 3 weeks of age. Histological analysis revealed abnormal hyperkeratosis in the squamous foregut and abnormal loss of erythrocytes in the spleen of Ndrg4−/− mice. In addition, we observed an abnormal hind limb clasping phenotype upon tail suspension suggesting neurological abnormalities. Consistent to these abnormalities, Ndrg4 is expressed in smooth muscle cells of the stomach, macrophages of the spleen and neurons. Availability of the conditional allele for Ndrg4 should facilitate further detailed analyses of the potential roles of Ndrg4 in gut development, nervous system and immune system. PMID:26801554

  9. Genotype-driven therapies for non-small cell lung cancer: focus on EGFR, KRAS and ALK gene abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, Elizabeth M; Costa, Daniel B

    2011-05-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) are heterogeneous cancers. In 2004, the identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) somatic mutations provided the first glimpse of a clinically relevant NSCLC oncogene. Approximately 70% of NSCLCs with EGFR mutations (exon 19 deletions or the exon 21 L858R) attain responses to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) gefitinib and erlotinib, with improved response rate (RR), progression-free survival (PFS) and in some reports overall survival (OS) when compared with EGFR wildtype (WT) cases. Three randomized trials of gefitinib versus chemotherapy (IPASS, WJTOG3405, NEJ002) in stage IV NSCLC have consistently demonstrated better RR and PFS (hazard ratios of 0.48 [IPASS], 0.49 [WJTOG3405] and 0.30 [NEJ002]) for EGFR-mutated NSCLCs treated with gefitinib. Novel irreversible EGFR TKIs (afatinib, XL647, PF00299804) show similar activity in EGFR-mutated patients. A translocation involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene with EML4, identified in 2007, is the most recent oncogene found in NSCLC. Crizotinib (PF02341066), an ALK TKI, has shown impressive activity against ALK translocated NSCLC in an expanded cohort of a phase I trial (NCT00585195). Over 80 patients have been treated and the RR is ∼60% with the 6-month PFS rate exceeding 70%. A registration phase III trial of crizotinib versus second-line chemotherapy (pemetrexed/docetaxel) is underway (PROFILE 1007, NCT00932893). KRAS, EGFR mutations and ALK translocations are mutually exclusive and few EGFR WT NSCLCs respond to EGFR TKIs. The promising results of EGFR and ALK TKIs in molecular subgroups of NSCLCs herald a new age of drug and clinical trial development for patients with NSCLC.

  10. Slit and robo expression in the developing mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, James M; Thompson, Felisa Y; Brooks, Sherry K; Shannon, John M; Akeson, Ann L

    2004-06-01

    Mammalian lung development is mediated through complex interactions between foregut endoderm and surrounding mesenchyme. As airway branching progresses, the mesenchyme undergoes dramatic remodeling and differentiation. Little is understood about the mechanisms that direct mesenchymal organization during lung development. A screen for candidate genes mediating this process identified Slit, a ligand for the Roundabout (Robo) receptor previously associated with guidance of axonal projections during central nervous system development. Here, we demonstrate by in situ hybridization that two Slit genes (Slit-2 and Slit-3) and two Robo genes (Robo-1 and Robo-2) are expressed in fetal lung mesenchyme. Slit-2 and Robo-1 expression is present throughout mesenchyme at midgestation and is not detectable by newborn day 1. Slit-3 and Robo-2 expression is restricted to specific, complementary subsets of mesenchyme. Robo-2 is expressed in mesenchymal cells immediately adjacent to large airways, whereas Slit-3 expression predominates in mesenchyme remote from airway epithelium. The temporal and spatial distribution of Slit and Robo mRNAs indicate that these genes may direct the functional organization and differentiation of fetal lung mesenchyme.

  11. Abnormal development of the lesser wing of the sphenoid with microphthalmos and microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, C; Mullaney, P; Bosley, T M

    2001-02-01

    We report two patients with abnormal development of the lesser wing of the sphenoid bone, globe, optic nerve and cerebral hemisphere without stigmata of neurofibromatosis type 1. The lesser wing of the sphenoid bone was abnormally formed and was not ossified ipsilateral to the dysmorphic eye and underdeveloped cerebral hemisphere. Maldevelopment of the sphenoid wing may interfere with the normal closure of the optic vesicle and normal growth of encephalic structures, possibly by disturbing developmental tissue interactions. These patients may exhibit a type of restricted primary sphenoid dysplasia, while the sphenoid dysplasia of neurofibromatosis type 1 may be secondary to orbital or ocular neurofibromas and other factors associated with that disease.

  12. Disturbance in Maternal Environment Leads to Abnormal Synaptic Instability during Neuronal Circuitry Development

    PubMed Central

    Hatanaka, Yusuke; Kabuta, Tomohiro; Wada, Keiji

    2017-01-01

    Adverse maternal environment during gestation and lactation can have negative effects on the developing brain that persist into adulthood and result in behavioral impairment. Recent studies of human and animal models suggest epidemiological and experimental association between disturbances in maternal environments during brain development and the occurrence of neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, anxiety, depression, and neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the effects of maternal metabolic and hormonal abnormalities on the developing brain by focusing on the dynamics of dendritic spine, an excitatory postsynaptic structure. We discuss the abnormal instability of dendritic spines that is common to developmental disorders and neurological diseases. We also introduce our recent studies that demonstrate how maternal obesity and hyperandrogenism leads to abnormal development of neuronal circuitry and persistent synaptic instability, which results in the loss of synapses. The aim of this review is to highlight the links between abnormal maternal environment, behavioral impairment in offspring, and the dendiric spine pathology of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:28220059

  13. Disturbance in Maternal Environment Leads to Abnormal Synaptic Instability during Neuronal Circuitry Development.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Yusuke; Kabuta, Tomohiro; Wada, Keiji

    2017-01-01

    Adverse maternal environment during gestation and lactation can have negative effects on the developing brain that persist into adulthood and result in behavioral impairment. Recent studies of human and animal models suggest epidemiological and experimental association between disturbances in maternal environments during brain development and the occurrence of neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, anxiety, depression, and neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the effects of maternal metabolic and hormonal abnormalities on the developing brain by focusing on the dynamics of dendritic spine, an excitatory postsynaptic structure. We discuss the abnormal instability of dendritic spines that is common to developmental disorders and neurological diseases. We also introduce our recent studies that demonstrate how maternal obesity and hyperandrogenism leads to abnormal development of neuronal circuitry and persistent synaptic instability, which results in the loss of synapses. The aim of this review is to highlight the links between abnormal maternal environment, behavioral impairment in offspring, and the dendiric spine pathology of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  14. Abnormal development of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum in the setting of lamin B2 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Coffinier, Catherine; Chang, Sandy Y.; Nobumori, Chika; Tu, Yiping; Farber, Emily A.; Toth, Julia I.; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear lamins are components of the nuclear lamina, a structural scaffolding for the cell nucleus. Defects in lamins A and C cause an array of human diseases, including muscular dystrophy, lipodystrophy, and progeria, but no diseases have been linked to the loss of lamins B1 or B2. To explore the functional relevance of lamin B2, we generated lamin B2-deficient mice and found that they have severe brain abnormalities resembling lissencephaly, with abnormal layering of neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. This neuronal layering abnormality is due to defective neuronal migration, a process that is dependent on the organized movement of the nucleus within the cell. These studies establish an essential function for lamin B2 in neuronal migration and brain development. PMID:20145110

  15. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease recapitulates phosphorylation during development.

    PubMed

    Goedert, M; Jakes, R; Crowther, R A; Six, J; Lübke, U; Vandermeeren, M; Cras, P; Trojanowski, J Q; Lee, V M

    1993-06-01

    Tau is a neuronal phosphoprotein whose expression is developmentally regulated. A single tau isoform is expressed in fetal human brain but six isoforms are expressed in adult brain, with the fetal isoform corresponding to the shortest of the adult isoforms. Phosphorylation of tau is also developmentally regulated, as fetal tau is phosphorylated at more sites than adult tau. In Alzheimer disease, the six adult tau isoforms become abnormally phosphorylated and form the paired helical filament, the major fibrous component of the characteristic neurofibrillary lesions. We show here that Ser-202 (in the numbering of the longest human brain tau isoform) is a phosphorylation site that distinguishes fetal from adult tau and we identify it as one of the abnormal phosphorylation sites in Alzheimer disease. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease thus recapitulates normal phosphorylation during development.

  16. Early life exposure to allergen and ozone results in altered development in adolescent rhesus macaque lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, M.J.; Putney, L.F.; St George, J.A.; Avdalovic, M.V.; Schelegle, E.S.; Miller, L.A.; Hyde, D.M.

    2015-02-15

    In rhesus macaques, previous studies have shown that episodic exposure to allergen alone or combined with ozone inhalation during the first 6 months of life results in a condition with many of the hallmarks of asthma. This exposure regimen results in altered development of the distal airways and parenchyma (Avdalovic et al., 2012). We hypothesized that the observed alterations in the lung parenchyma would be permanent following a long-term recovery in filtered air (FA) housing. Forty-eight infant rhesus macaques (30 days old) sensitized to house dust mite (HDM) were treated with two week cycles of FA, house dust mite allergen (HDMA), ozone (O{sub 3}) or HDMA/ozone (HDMA + O{sub 3}) for five months. At the end of the five months, six animals from each group were necropsied. The other six animals in each group were allowed to recover in FA for 30 more months at which time they were necropsied. Design-based stereology was used to estimate volumes of lung components, number of alveoli, size of alveoli, distribution of alveolar volumes, interalveolar capillary density. After 30 months of recovery, monkeys exposed to HDMA, in either group, had significantly more alveoli than filtered air. These alveoli also had higher capillary densities as compared with FA controls. These results indicate that early life exposure to HDMA alone or HDMA + O{sub 3} alters the development process in the lung alveoli. - Highlights: • Abnormal lung development after postnatal exposure to ozone and allergen • This remodeling is shown as smaller, more numerous alveoli and narrower airways. • Allergen appears to have more of an effect than ozone during recovery. • These animals also have continued airway hyperresponsiveness (Moore et al. 2014)

  17. Understanding normal and abnormal development of the Wolffian/epididymal duct by using transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Murashima, Aki; Xu, Bingfang; Hinton, Barry T

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Wolffian/epididymal duct is crucial for proper function and, therefore, male fertility. The development of the epididymis is complex; the initial stages form as a transient embryonic kidney; then the mesonephros is formed, which in turn undergoes extensive morphogenesis under the influence of androgens and growth factors. Thus, understanding of its full development requires a wide and multidisciplinary view. This review focuses on mouse models that display abnormalities of the Wolffian duct and mesonephric development, the importance of these mouse models toward understanding male reproductive tract development, and how these models contribute to our understanding of clinical abnormalities in humans such as congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). PMID:26112482

  18. Unique aspects of the developing lung circulation: structural development and regulation of vasomotor tone

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuangsheng; Cornfield, David N.; Stenmark, Kurt R.; Thébaud, Bernard; Abman, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This review summarizes our current knowledge on lung vasculogenesis and angiogenesis during normal lung development and the regulation of fetal and postnatal pulmonary vascular tone. In comparison to that of the adult, the pulmonary circulation of the fetus and newborn displays many unique characteristics. Moreover, altered development of pulmonary vasculature plays a more prominent role in compromised pulmonary vasoreactivity than in the adult. Clinically, a better understanding of the developmental changes in pulmonary vasculature and vasomotor tone and the mechanisms that are disrupted in disease states can lead to the development of new therapies for lung diseases characterized by impaired alveolar structure and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27942377

  19. Normal and abnormal development of pulmonary veins: state of the art and correlation with clinical entities.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Yvonne L; Jongbloed, Monique R M; Deruiter, Marco C; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C

    2011-02-17

    Interest for the pulmonary veins has increased in the past decade after the potential arrhythmogenicity of the myocardial sleeve surrounding these structures has been recognized. Furthermore, there are several clinical entities, such as anomalous connection pattern and pulmonary vein stenosis, that are related to abnormal pulmonary vein development. In this review, we will describe current literature and aim to elucidate and reorganize current opinions on normal and abnormal pulmonary vein development in relation to clinical (management of) diseases. Several unresolved questions will be addressed, as well as current conceptual controversies. First, a general overview of development of structures at the venous pole of the heart, including normal development of the pulmonary vein from a primitive Anlage, will be provided. Recent insights indicate an important contributory role of the mesoderm behind the heart, the so-called second heart field, to this area. Subsequently, the formation of a myocardial and smooth muscle vascular wall of the pulmonary veins and the left atrium is described, as well as current insights in the mechanisms involved in the differentiation of these different cell types in this area. Next, developmental concepts of normal pulmonary venous drainage patterns are reviewed, and an overview is provided of clinical entities related to abnormal development at several anatomical levels. Lastly, attention is paid to arrhythmogenesis in relation to pulmonary vein development, as well the consequences for clinical management.

  20. 78 FR 40485 - Lung Cancer Patient-Focused Drug Development; Extension of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Lung Cancer Patient-Focused Drug Development; Extension of... lung cancer patient-focused drug development. In the Federal Register of June 5, 2013 (78 FR 33581... comment on lung cancer patient- focused drug development and explained that the comment period would...

  1. Cranial index of children with normal and abnormal brain development in Sokoto, Nigeria: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Muhammad Awwal; Zagga, Abdullahi Daudu; Danfulani, Mohammed; Tadros, Aziz Abdo; Ahmed, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Abnormal brain development due to neurodevelopmental disorders in children has always been an important concern, but yet has to be considered as a significant public health problem, especially in the low- and middle-income countries including Nigeria. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine whether abnormal brain development in the form of neurodevelopmental disorders causes any deviation in the cranial index of affected children. Materials and Methods: This is a comparative study on the head length, head width, and cranial index of 112 children (72 males and 40 females) diagnosed with at least one abnormal problem in brain development, in the form of a neurodevelopmental disorder (NDD), in comparison with that of 218 normal growing children without any form of NDD (121 males and 97 females), aged 0-18 years old seen at the Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, over a period of six months, June to December, 2012. The head length and head width of the children was measured using standard anatomical landmarks and cranial index calculated. The data obtained was entered into the Microsoft excel worksheet and analyzed using SPSS version 17. Results: The mean Cephalic Index for normal growing children with normal brain development was 79.82 ± 3.35 and that of the children with abnormal brain development was 77.78 ± 2.95 and the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Conclusion: It can be deduced from this present study that the cranial index does not change in children with neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:24966551

  2. Prevalence of abnormal findings when adopting new national and international Global Lung Function Initiative reference values for spirometry in the Finnish general population

    PubMed Central

    Kainu, Annette; Lindqvist, Ari; Sovijärvi, Anssi R. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background New Finnish (Kainu2015) and international Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI2012) reference values for spirometry were recently published. The aim of this study is to compare the interpretative consequences of adopting these new reference values with older, currently used Finnish reference values (Viljanen1982) in the general population of native Finns. Methods Two Finnish general population samples including 1,328 adults (45% males) aged 21–74 years were evaluated. Airway obstruction was defined as a reduced ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC), possible restrictive pattern as reduced FVC, and decreased ventilatory capacity as reduced FEV1 below their respective 2.5th percentiles. The severity gradings of reduced lung function were also compared. Results Using the Kainu2015 reference values, the prevalence of airway obstruction in the population was 5.6%; using GLI2012 it was 4.0% and with Viljanen1982 it was 13.0%. Possible restrictive pattern was found in 4.2% using the Kainu2015 values, in 2.0% with GLI2012, and 7.9% with the Viljanen1982 values. The prevalence of decreased ventilatory capacity was 6.8, 4.0, and 13.3% with the Kainu2015, GLI2012 and Viljanen1982 values, respectively. Conclusions The application of the GLI2012 reference values underestimates the prevalence of abnormal spirometric findings in native Finns. The adoption of the Kainu2015 reference values reduces the prevalences of airways obstruction, decreased ventilatory capacity, and restrictive impairment by approximately 50%. Changing from the 2.5th percentile, the previously used lower limit of normal, to the 5th percentile recommended by the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society will not increase the prevalence of abnormal findings in the implementation of spirometry reference values. PMID:27608270

  3. The development of Akabane virus-induced congenital abnormalities in cattle.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, P D; Barry, R D; Harper, P A; Zelski, R Z

    1988-06-11

    A prospective study of the incidence and severity of congenital deformities of calves, attributable to maternal infection by Akabane virus, was carried out on a population of 174 susceptible animals that were between one and nine months pregnant at the time of infection. The study was carried out in the Hunter Valley of New South Wales during 1983, after an epidemic of Akabane virus infection in late February to early March 1983. The incidence of virus-induced abnormalities in calves and fetuses was 17.8 per cent (31/174). The highest incidence of abnormalities occurred during the third and sixth months of gestation (27 to 29 per cent). The earliest abnormality was observed after infection at 76 days of gestation, and the last after infection at 249 days. The development of the pathological entities of hydranencephaly/porencephaly and arthrogryposis were found to be quite distinct. Cases of hydranencephaly and porencephaly developed after infection between 76 and 104 days of gestation whereas arthrogryposis developed after infection between 103 and 174 days of infection. It was concluded that the type of congenital deformity produced by maternal infection with Akabane virus was dependent on the stage of fetal development at the time of infection. The data suggest that the infection was transplacental and that fetuses of less than two months of age were protected from infection.

  4. mTOR signaling and its roles in normal and abnormal brain development.

    PubMed

    Takei, Nobuyuki; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) was first identified in yeast as a target molecule of rapamycin, an anti-fugal and immunosuppressant macrolide compound. In mammals, its orthologue is called mammalian TOR (mTOR). mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase that converges different extracellular stimuli, such as nutrients and growth factors, and diverges into several biochemical reactions, including translation, autophagy, transcription, and lipid synthesis among others. These biochemical reactions govern cell growth and cause cells to attain an anabolic state. Thus, the disruption of mTOR signaling is implicated in a wide array of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. In the central nervous system, the mTOR signaling cascade is activated by nutrients, neurotrophic factors, and neurotransmitters that enhances protein (and possibly lipid) synthesis and suppresses autophagy. These processes contribute to normal neuronal growth by promoting their differentiation, neurite elongation and branching, and synaptic formation during development. Therefore, disruption of mTOR signaling may cause neuronal degeneration and abnormal neural development. While reduced mTOR signaling is associated with neurodegeneration, excess activation of mTOR signaling causes abnormal development of neurons and glia, leading to brain malformation. In this review, we first introduce the current state of molecular knowledge of mTOR complexes and signaling in general. We then describe mTOR activation in neurons, which leads to translational enhancement, and finally discuss the link between mTOR and normal/abnormal neuronal growth during development.

  5. Fine structural aspects of postnatal development of feline lung.

    PubMed

    al-Tikriti, M S; Henry, R W; Eiler, H; Schultz, T W; Breider, M A; Cullens, W C

    1991-12-01

    Lung development was studied in late prenatal, 1-, 7-, 14-, and 21-days postnatal and adult cats. Cats were born with a few alveoli, and the lungs appeared to have patches of primitive air spaces (saccules). The saccules of prenatal kittens were thick walled, very cellular, and lined by type II pneumocytes. Eosinophils were observed in the septum, intraepithelially, and in the alveolar space of growing cats. Secondary septa were flanked by a double capillary network and divided saccules into multiple shallow alveoli. Septation was irregular and time dependent and not completed by day 231 of postnatal life. Elastic fibers accumulated at the tip of the septa, seemingly playing an important role in alveolar formation. Type II pneumocytes were located at the base of the secondary septa in growing cats, thus strengthening secondary septa to withstand the stresses of respiration. Pores of Kohn were not observed in growing cats.

  6. Bax deficiency extends the survival of Ku70 knockout mice that develop lung and heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Ngo, J; Matsuyama, M; Kim, C; Poventud-Fuentes, I; Bates, A; Siedlak, S L; Lee, H-G; Doughman, Y Q; Watanabe, M; Liner, A; Hoit, B; Voelkel, N; Gerson, S; Hasty, P; Matsuyama, S

    2015-03-26

    Ku70 (Lupus Ku autoantigen p70) is essential in nonhomologous end joining DNA double-strand break repair, and ku70(-/-) mice age prematurely because of increased genomic instability and DNA damage responses. Previously, we found that Ku70 also inhibits Bax, a key mediator of apoptosis. We hypothesized that Bax-mediated apoptosis would be enhanced in the absence of Ku70 and contribute to premature death observed in ku70(-/-) mice. Here, we show that ku70(-/-) bax(+/-) and ku70(-/-) bax(-/-) mice have better survival, especially in females, than ku70(-/-) mice, even though Bax deficiency did not decrease the incidence of lymphoma observed in a Ku70-null background. Moreover, we found that ku70(-/-) mice develop lung diseases, like emphysema and pulmonary arterial (PA) occlusion, by 3 months of age. These lung abnormalities can trigger secondary health problems such as heart failure that may account for the poor survival of ku70(-/-) mice. Importantly, Bax deficiency appeared to delay the development of emphysema. This study suggests that enhanced Bax activity exacerbates the negative impact of Ku70 deletion. Furthermore, the underlying mechanisms of emphysema and pulmonary hypertension due to PA occlusion are not well understood, and therefore ku70(-/-) and Bax-deficient ku70(-/-) mice may be useful models to study these diseases.

  7. Factors affecting the development of lung function in Tunisian children.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Y; Pariès, J; Harrabi, I; Zbidi, A; Tabka, Z; Richalet, J P; Buvry, A

    2008-01-01

    We undertook to evaluate the impacts of morphology at birth, physical activity, anthropometric, socioeconomic and environmental factors on lung function in healthy Tunisian children. Pulmonary function parameters were measured with a Minato portable spirometer in a randomized population of 756 healthy children (388 males and 368 females) aged between 6 and 16. The morphology at birth, the gestational age, the physical activity, the socioeconomic status, the type of habitation, and the environmental factors were all assessed by a standard questionnaire. Using univariate analysis, we found that: (1) morphometric parameters (height, weight, maximal inspiratory, and expiratory perimeter), as well as sex were highly associated with pulmonary function parameters; (2) Height at birth showed strong significant relations with FVC, FEV(1), and FEV(1)/FVC; (3) lung function parameters were influenced by physical training of our children, socioeconomic status, indoor pollution, and passive smoking; and (4) we did not observe any association between the gestational age and the weight at their birth and lung function parameters. Using a general linear model analysis, morphometric parameters, age, sex, type of heating, and maximal inspiratory and expiratory perimeters had significant relation with respiratory parameters. In our population of healthy Tunisian children, the main predictive factors of the pulmonary development were the morphological factors such as height, weight, maximal inspiratory, and expiratory thoracic perimeter, sex and age, and the environmental conditions such as type of heating but not morphology at birth, physical activity, or socioeconomic status.

  8. Innate immunity in the lung regulates the development of asthma.

    PubMed

    DeKruyff, Rosemarie H; Yu, Sanhong; Kim, Hye Young; Umetsu, Dale T

    2014-07-01

    The lung, while functioning as a gas exchange organ, encounters a large array of environmental factors, including particulate matter, toxins, reactive oxygen species, chemicals, allergens, and infectious microbes. To rapidly respond to and counteract these elements, a number of innate immune mechanisms have evolved that can lead to lung inflammation and asthma, which is the focus of this review. These innate mechanisms include a role for two incompletely understood cell types, invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), which together produce a wide range of cytokines, including interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-13, interferon-γ, IL-17, and IL-22, independently of adaptive immunity and conventional antigens. The specific roles of iNKT cells and ILCs in immunity are still being defined, but both cell types appear to play important roles in the lungs, particularly in asthma. As we gain a better understanding of these innate cell types, we will acquire great insight into the mechanisms by which allergic and non-allergic asthma phenotypes develop.

  9. Abnormal development of Purkinje cells and lymphocytes in Atm mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Borghesani, Paul R.; Alt, Frederick W.; Bottaro, Andrea; Davidson, Laurie; Aksoy, Saime; Rathbun, Gary A.; Roberts, Thomas M.; Swat, Wojciech; Segal, Rosalind A.; Gu, Yansong

    2000-01-01

    Motor incoordination, immune deficiencies, and an increased risk of cancer are the characteristic features of the hereditary disease ataxia–telangiectasia (A-T), which is caused by mutations in the ATM gene. Through gene targeting, we have generated a line of Atm mutant mice, Atmy/y mice. In contrast to other Atm mutant mice, Atmy/y mice show a lower incidence of thymic lymphoma and survive beyond a few months of age. Atmy/y mice exhibit deficits in motor learning indicative of cerebellar dysfunction. Even though we found no gross cerebellar degeneration in older Atmy/y animals, ectopic and abnormally differentiated Purkinje cells were apparent in mutant mice of all ages. These findings establish that some neuropathological abnormalities seen in A-T patients also are present in Atm mutant mice. In addition, we report a previously unrecognized effect of Atm deficiency on development or maintenance of CD4+8+ thymocytes. We discuss these findings in the context of the hypothesis that abnormal development of Purkinje cells and lymphocytes contributes to the pathogenesis of A-T. PMID:10716718

  10. Postnatal lung and metabolic development in two marsupial and four eutherian species

    PubMed Central

    Szdzuy, Kirsten; Zeller, Ulrich; Renfree, Marilyn; Tzschentke, Barbara; Janke, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Two marsupial species (Monodelphis domestica, Macropus eugenii) and four eutherian species (Mesocricetus auratus, Suncus murinus, Tupaia belangeri and Cavia aperea) were examined to compare and contrast the timing of lung and metabolic development during the postnatal maturation of the mammalian respiratory apparatus. Using light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, the lung structural changes were correlated with indirect calorimetry to track the metabolic development. Marsupial and eutherian species followed the same pattern of mammalian lung development, but differed in the developmental pace. In the two newborn marsupial species, the lung parenchyma was at the early terminal sac stage, with large terminal air sacs, and the lung developed slowly. In contrast, the newborn eutherian species had more advanced lungs at the late terminal sac stage in altricial species (M. auratus, S. murinus) and at the alveolar stage in precocial species (T. belangeri, C. aperea). Postnatal lung development proceeded rapidly in eutherian species. The marsupial species had a low metabolic rate at birth and achieved adult metabolism late in postnatal development. In contrast, newborn eutherian species had high metabolic rates and reached adult metabolism during the first week of life. The time course of the metabolic development is thus tightly linked to the structural differentiation of the lungs and the timing of postnatal lung development. These differences in the neonatal lung structure and the timing of postnatal lung maturation between marsupial and eutherian species reflect their differing reproductive strategies. PMID:18179474

  11. Lung cancer development in patients with connective tissue disease–related interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Yasunori; Inui, Naoki; Yoshimura, Katsuhiro; Nishimoto, Koji; Mori, Kazutaka; Kono, Masato; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Iwashita, Toshihide; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have reported that patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis occasionally develop lung cancer (LC). However, in connective tissue disease (CTD)-related interstitial lung disease (ILD), there are few data regarding the LC development. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical significance of LC development in patients with CTD-ILD. A retrospective review of our database of 562 patients with ILD between 2000 and 2014 identified 127 patients diagnosed with CTD-ILD. The overall and cumulative incidences of LC were calculated. In addition, the risk factors and prognostic impact of LC development were evaluated. The median age at the ILD diagnosis was 63 years (range 37–84 years), and 73 patients (57.5%) were female. The median follow-up period from the ILD diagnosis was 67.4 months (range 10.4–322.1 months). During the period, 7 out of the 127 patients developed LC (overall incidence 5.5%). The cumulative incidences at 1, 3, and 5 years were 0.0%, 1.8%, and 2.9%, respectively. The risk of LC development was significantly higher in patients with higher smoking pack-year (odds ratio [OR] 1.028; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.008–1.049; P = 0.007) and emphysema on chest high-resolution computed tomography (OR 14.667; 95% CI 2.871–74.926; P = 0.001). The median overall survival time after developing LC was 7.0 months (95% CI 4.9–9.1 months), and the most common cause of death was LC, not ILD. According to the Cox proportional hazard model analysis with time-dependent covariates, patients who developed LC showed significantly poorer prognosis than those who did not (hazard ratio 87.86; 95% CI 19.56–394.67; P < 0.001). In CTD-ILD, clinicians should be careful with the risk of LC development in patients with a heavy smoking history and subsequent emphysema. Although not so frequent, the complication could be a poor prognostic determinant. PMID:27977621

  12. The development of hepatic stellate cells in normal and abnormal human fetuses – an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Christine K C; Pereira, Tamara N; Pozniak, Katarzyna N; Ramsing, Mette; Vogel, Ida; Ramm, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    The precise embryological origin and development of hepatic stellate cells is not established. Animal studies and observations on human fetuses suggest that they derive from posterior mesodermal cells that migrate via the septum transversum and developing diaphragm to form submesothelial cells beneath the liver capsule, which give rise to mesenchymal cells including hepatic stellate cells. However, it is unclear if these are similar to hepatic stellate cells in adults or if this is the only source of stellate cells. We have studied hepatic stellate cells by immunohistochemistry, in developing human liver from autopsies of fetuses with and without malformations and growth restriction, using cellular Retinol Binding Protein-1 (cRBP-1), Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), and α-Smooth Muscle Actin (αSMA) antibodies, to identify factors that influence their development. We found that hepatic stellate cells expressing cRBP-1 are present from the end of the first trimester of gestation and reduce in density throughout gestation. They appear abnormally formed and variably reduced in number in fetuses with abnormal mesothelial Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) function, diaphragmatic hernia and in ectopic liver nodules without mesothelium. Stellate cells showed similarities to intravascular cells and their presence in a fetus with diaphragm agenesis suggests they may be derived from circulating stem cells. Our observations suggest circulating stem cells as well as mesothelium can give rise to hepatic stellate cells, and that they require normal mesothelial function for their development. PMID:26265759

  13. A mechanical model predicts morphological abnormalities in the developing human brain.

    PubMed

    Budday, Silvia; Raybaud, Charles; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-07-10

    The developing human brain remains one of the few unsolved mysteries of science. Advancements in developmental biology, neuroscience, and medical imaging have brought us closer than ever to understand brain development in health and disease. However, the precise role of mechanics throughout this process remains underestimated and poorly understood. Here we show that mechanical stretch plays a crucial role in brain development. Using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth, we model the human brain as a living system with a morphogenetically growing outer surface and a stretch-driven growing inner core. This approach seamlessly integrates the two popular but competing hypotheses for cortical folding: axonal tension and differential growth. We calibrate our model using magnetic resonance images from very preterm neonates. Our model predicts that deviations in cortical growth and thickness induce morphological abnormalities. Using the gyrification index, the ratio between the total and exposed surface area, we demonstrate that these abnormalities agree with the classical pathologies of lissencephaly and polymicrogyria. Understanding the mechanisms of cortical folding in the developing human brain has direct implications in the diagnostics and treatment of neurological disorders, including epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism.

  14. A mechanical model predicts morphological abnormalities in the developing human brain

    PubMed Central

    Budday, Silvia; Raybaud, Charles; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The developing human brain remains one of the few unsolved mysteries of science. Advancements in developmental biology, neuroscience, and medical imaging have brought us closer than ever to understand brain development in health and disease. However, the precise role of mechanics throughout this process remains underestimated and poorly understood. Here we show that mechanical stretch plays a crucial role in brain development. Using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth, we model the human brain as a living system with a morphogenetically growing outer surface and a stretch-driven growing inner core. This approach seamlessly integrates the two popular but competing hypotheses for cortical folding: axonal tension and differential growth. We calibrate our model using magnetic resonance images from very preterm neonates. Our model predicts that deviations in cortical growth and thickness induce morphological abnormalities. Using the gyrification index, the ratio between the total and exposed surface area, we demonstrate that these abnormalities agree with the classical pathologies of lissencephaly and polymicrogyria. Understanding the mechanisms of cortical folding in the developing human brain has direct implications in the diagnostics and treatment of neurological disorders, including epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism. PMID:25008163

  15. Genetic analysis of abnormal male sexual development in Aedes aegypti and Ae. mascarensis backcross progeny.

    PubMed

    Hilburn, L R; Rai, K S

    1982-01-01

    When male hybrids of Aedes aegypti females and A. mascarensis males were backcrossed to A. aegypti females, 32.8 percent of the male progeny exhibited abnormal sexual development, including failure of the terminalia to rotate, a split sternite of the eighth abdominal segment with partially duplicated telomeres, or feminization that gives rise to sterile intersexes. Observations made on three morphological marker loci and five isozyme loci with characteristic electromorphs in the two parental species suggested that when the sex-determining M locus is derived from A. mascarensis and the chromosome regions including s, LDH, and lDH2 on chromosome 2 and blt and 6PGD on chromosome 3 are homozygous for genes from A. aegypti, the frequency of abnormal sexual development is increased. An even greater percentage of males suffer aberrant development if recombination also occurs between the M and re locus of chromosome 1. The data suggest that genes on chromosome 2 control normal development of the male terminalia, genes on chromosome 3 control sexual differentiation, and the entire process is controlled by genes on chromosome 1 that are linked to, but not identical with, the M locus.

  16. A mechanical model predicts morphological abnormalities in the developing human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budday, Silvia; Raybaud, Charles; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-07-01

    The developing human brain remains one of the few unsolved mysteries of science. Advancements in developmental biology, neuroscience, and medical imaging have brought us closer than ever to understand brain development in health and disease. However, the precise role of mechanics throughout this process remains underestimated and poorly understood. Here we show that mechanical stretch plays a crucial role in brain development. Using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth, we model the human brain as a living system with a morphogenetically growing outer surface and a stretch-driven growing inner core. This approach seamlessly integrates the two popular but competing hypotheses for cortical folding: axonal tension and differential growth. We calibrate our model using magnetic resonance images from very preterm neonates. Our model predicts that deviations in cortical growth and thickness induce morphological abnormalities. Using the gyrification index, the ratio between the total and exposed surface area, we demonstrate that these abnormalities agree with the classical pathologies of lissencephaly and polymicrogyria. Understanding the mechanisms of cortical folding in the developing human brain has direct implications in the diagnostics and treatment of neurological disorders, including epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism.

  17. New insights into lung development and diseases: the role of microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Johar, Dina; Siragam, Vinayakumar; Mahood, Thomas H; Keijzer, Richard

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short endogenous noncoding RNA molecules (∼ 22 nucleotides) that can regulate gene expression at the post-transcription level. Research interest in the role of miRNAs in lung biology is emerging. MiRNAs have been implicated in a range of processes such as development, homeostasis, and inflammatory diseases in lung tissues and are capable of inducing differentiation, morphogenesis, and apoptosis. In recent years, several studies have reported that miRNAs are differentially regulated in lung development and lung diseases in response to epigenetic changes, providing new insights for their versatile role in various physiological and pathological processes in the lung. In this review, we discuss the contribution of miRNAs to lung development and diseases and possible future implications in the field of lung biology.

  18. Knockout of G protein β5 impairs brain development and causes multiple neurologic abnormalities in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Hua; Pandey, Mritunjay; Seigneur, Erica M.; Panicker, Leelamma M.; Koo, Lily; Schwartz, Owen M.; Chen, Weiping; Chen, Ching-Kang; Simonds, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Gβ5 is a divergent member of the signal-transducing G protein β subunit family encoded by GNB5 and expressed principally in brain and neuronal tissue. Among heterotrimeric Gβ isoforms, Gβ5 is unique in its ability to heterodimerize with members of the R7 subfamily of the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins that contain G protein-γ like domains. Previous studies employing Gnb5 knockout (KO) mice have shown that Gβ5 is an essential stabilizer of such RGS proteins and regulates the deactivation of retinal phototransduction and the proper functioning of retinal bipolar cells. However, little is known of the function of Gβ5 in the brain outside the visual system. We show here that mice lacking Gβ5 have a markedly abnormal neurologic phenotype that includes impaired development, tiptoe-walking, motor learning and coordination deficiencies, and hyperactivity. We further show that Gβ5-deficient mice have abnormalities of neuronal development in cerebellum and hippocampus. We find that the expression of both mRNA and protein from multiple neuronal genes is dysregulated in Gnb5 KO mice. Taken together with previous observations from Gnb5 KO mice, our findings suggest a model in which Gβ5 regulates dendritic arborization and/or synapse formation during development, in part by effects on gene expression. PMID:21883221

  19. Transcriptome Analysis for Abnormal Spike Development of the Wheat Mutant dms

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xin-Xin; Li, Qiao-Yun; Shen, Chun-Cai; Duan, Zong-Biao; Yu, Dong-Yan; Niu, Ji-Shan; Ni, Yong-Jing; Jiang, Yu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) spike development is the foundation for grain yield. We obtained a novel wheat mutant, dms, characterized as dwarf, multi-pistil and sterility. Although the genetic changes are not clear, the heredity of traits suggests that a recessive gene locus controls the two traits of multi-pistil and sterility in self-pollinating populations of the medium plants (M), such that the dwarf genotype (D) and tall genotype (T) in the progeny of the mutant are ideal lines for studies regarding wheat spike development. The objective of this study was to explore the molecular basis for spike abnormalities of dwarf genotype. Results Four unigene libraries were assembled by sequencing the mRNAs of the super-bulked differentiating spikes and stem tips of the D and T plants. Using integrative analysis, we identified 419 genes highly expressed in spikes, including nine typical homeotic genes of the MADS-box family and the genes TaAP2, TaFL and TaDL. We also identified 143 genes that were significantly different between young spikes of T and D, and 26 genes that were putatively involved in spike differentiation. The result showed that the expression levels of TaAP1-2, TaAP2, and other genes involved in the majority of biological processes such as transcription, translation, cell division, photosynthesis, carbohydrate transport and metabolism, and energy production and conversion were significantly lower in D than in T. Conclusions We identified a set of genes related to wheat floral organ differentiation, including typical homeotic genes. Our results showed that the major causal factors resulting in the spike abnormalities of dms were the lower expression homeotic genes, hormonal imbalance, repressed biological processes, and deficiency of construction materials and energy. We performed a series of studies on the homeotic genes, however the other three causal factors for spike abnormal phenotype of dms need further study. PMID:26982202

  20. Lung-derived growth factors: possible paracrine effectors of fetal lung development

    SciTech Connect

    Montes, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    A potential role for paracrine secretions in lung organogenesis has been hypothesized (Alescio and Piperno, 1957). These studies present direct support for the paracrine model by demonstrating the presence of locally produced mitogenic/maturational factors in fetal rat lung tissue. Conditioned serum free medium (CSFM) from nineteen-day fetal rat lung cultures was shown to contain several bioactive peptides as detected by /sup 3/H-Thymidine incorporation into chick embryo and rat lung fibroblasts, as well as /sup 14/C-choline incorporation into surfactant in mixed cell cultures. Using ion-exchange chromatography and Sephadex gel filtration, a partially purified mitogen, 11-III, was obtained. The partially purified 11-III stimulates mitosis in chick embryo fibroblasts and post-natal rat lung fibroblasts. Multiplication in fetal rat lung fibroblasts cultures is stimulated only when these are pre-incubated with a competence factor or unprocessed CSFM. This suggests the existence of an endogenously produced competence factor important in the regulation of fetal lung growth. Preparation 11-III does not possess surfactant stimulating activity as assessed by /sup 3/H-choline incorporation into lipids in predominantly type-II cell cultures. These data demonstrate the presence of a maturational/mitogenic factor, influencing type-II mixed cell cultures. In addition, 11-III had been shown to play an autocrine role stimulating the proliferation of fetal lung fibroblasts. Finally, these data suggest the existence of a local produced competence factor.

  1. Vascular endothelial growth factor co-ordinates proper development of lung epithelium and vasculature.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liqing; Wang, Ke; Ferrara, Napoleone; Vu, Thiennu H

    2005-07-01

    The vasculature forms an intrinsic functional component of the lung and its development must be tightly regulated and coordinated with lung epithelial morphogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors are highly expressed in a complementary pattern in the lungs during embryonic development. VEGF is expressed by epithelium and the receptors in the surrounding mesenchyme. To determine the function of VEGF in lung formation, we inhibited its activity using a soluble receptor in lung renal capsule grafts. Inhibition of VEGF results in inhibition of vascular development and significant alteration in epithelial development. Epithelial proliferation is inhibited, sacculation is impaired, and the epithelium undergoes apoptosis. Interestingly, when VEGF is attenuated, epithelial differentiation still proceeds, as shown by acquisition of both proximal and distal markers. These data show that VEGF co-ordinates epithelial and vascular development. It is required for the development of the lung vasculature and the vasculature is necessary for epithelial proliferation and morphogenesis, but not for cell differentiation.

  2. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  3. Effect of antenatal tracheal occlusion on lung development in the sheep model of congenital diaphragmatic hernia: a morphometric analysis of pulmonary structure and maturity.

    PubMed

    Lipsett, J; Cool, J C; Runciman, S I; Ford, W D; Kennedy, J D; Martin, A J

    1998-04-01

    The incidence of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is 1:1,207-5,000, and the condition is associated with high mortality and morbidity, attributed principally to associated pulmonary hypoplasia. Repairing the diaphragmatic defect by antenatal surgery has high mortality, mainly due to premature labor. Antenatal tracheal occlusion, which is achievable by less invasive methods, stimulates lung growth (weight and DNA). However, its effectiveness in reversing structural and maturational abnormalities and its optimal timing requires further investigation. We hypothesized that (1) antenatal tracheal occlusion performed in the lamb model of congenital diaphragmatic hernia will stimulate lung growth and structural development and restore lung structure and maturity toward normal levels by term gestation; (2) effects will be detectable by morphometric measurements of the following parameters: lung volume, ratio of parenchyma to nonparenchyma, volume density of connective tissue within nonparenchyma, ratio of gas exchange tissue to airspace in parenchyma, gas exchange surface area, capillary loading, alveolar/airspace density and alveolar perimeter; (3) effects will be seen in all lobes of the lung; and (4) a greater effect will be observed when tracheal occlusion is performed early rather than late in gestation. Fourteen lambs underwent CDH creation at gestation day 72-74 followed by tracheal occlusion at day 101 (n = 7) or 129 (n = 7). They were delivered by Cesarean section at 143 days (term = 145-149). Lungs were obtained at autopsy, inflation fixed, divided into lobes, and sampled; morphometric analysis was performed. Comparisons were made with previously reported results from control lungs of normal lambs and lambs with untreated CDH. In comparison with untreated lungs, antenatal tracheal occlusion at both times resulted in increased volumes for total lung and lobes, increased volume density of parenchyma and of airspace within parenchyma, and increased gas exchange

  4. Differential response of the epithelium and interstitium in developing human fetal lung explants to hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Bustani, Porus; Hodge, Rachel; Tellabati, Ananth; Li, Juan; Pandya, Hitesh; Kotecha, Sailesh

    2006-03-01

    Hyperoxia is closely linked with the development of chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD), but the exact mechanisms whereby hyperoxia alters the lung architecture in the developing lung remain largely unknown. We developed a fetal human lung organ culture model to investigate (a) the morphologic changes induced by hyperoxia and (b) whether hyperoxia resulted in differential cellular responses in the epithelium and interstitium. The effects of hyperoxia on lung morphometry were analyzed using computer-assisted image analysis. The lung architecture remained largely unchanged in normoxia lasting as long as 4 d. In contrast, hyperoxic culture of pseudoglandular fetal lungs resulted in significant dilatation of airways, thinning of the epithelium, and regression of the interstitium including the pulmonary vasculature. Although there were no significant differences in Ki67 between normoxic and hyperoxic lungs, activated caspase-3 was significantly increased in interstitial cells, but not epithelial cells, under hyperoxic conditions. These changes show that exposure of pseudoglandular lungs to hyperoxia modulates the lung architecture to resemble saccular lungs.

  5. Cigarette smoke induces aberrant EGF receptor activation that mediates lung cancer development and resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Filosto, Simone; Becker, Cathleen R; Goldkorn, Tzipora

    2012-04-01

    The EGF receptor (EGFR) and its downstream signaling are implicated in lung cancer development. Therefore, much effort was spent in developing specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) that bind to the EGFR ATP-pocket, blocking EGFR phosphorylation/signaling. Clinical use of TKIs is effective in a subset of lung cancers with mutations in the EGFR kinase domain, rendering the receptor highly susceptible to TKIs. However, these benefits are limited, and emergence of additional EGFR mutations usually results in TKI resistance and disease progression. Previously, we showed one mechanism linking cigarette smoke to EGFR-driven lung cancer. Specifically, exposure of lung epithelial cells to cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress stimulates aberrant EGFR phosphorylation/activation with impaired receptor ubiquitination/degradation. The abnormal stabilization of the activated receptor leads to uncontrolled cell growth and tumorigenesis. Here, we describe for the first time a novel posttranslational mechanism of EGFR resistance to TKIs. Exposure of airway epithelial cells to cigarette smoke causes aberrant phosphorylation/activation of EGFR, resulting in a conformation that is different from that induced by the ligand EGF. Unlike EGF-activated EGFR, cigarette smoke-activated EGFR binds c-Src and caveolin-1 and does not undergo canonical dimerization. Importantly, the cigarette smoke-activated EGFR is not inhibited by TKIs (AG1478; erlotinib; gefitinib); in fact, the cigarette smoke exposure induces TKI-resistance even in the TKI-sensitive EGFR mutants. Our findings show that cigarette smoke exposure stimulates not only aberrant EGFR phosphorylation impairing receptor degradation, but also induces a different EGFR conformation and signaling that are resistant to TKIs. Together, these findings offer new insights into cigarette smoke-induced lung cancer development and TKI resistance.

  6. [Analysis of the factors associated with abnormal coagulation and prognosis
 in patients with non-small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhua; Wei, Suju; Wang, Junyan; Hong, Lei; Cui, Lige; Wang, Cai

    2014-11-01

    背景与目的 凝血及纤溶系统激活在肺癌患者中较为常见,与肺癌侵袭、转移的高风险和预后差相关。非小细胞肺癌(non-small cell lung cancer, NSCLC)占肺癌的80%-85%,本研究旨在回顾性分析凝血功能指标对NSCLC的预后价值,为目前NSCLC患者高凝状态的预防及治疗提供参考。方法 回顾性分析2009年1月-2012年12月首次就诊于河北医科大学第四医院的604例经病理学证实的NSCLC患者的临床资料。资料内容包括患者治疗前凝血功能相关指标[血浆凝血酶原时间(prothrombin time, PT)、凝血酶原活动度(prothrombin time activity, PTA)、国际标准化比率(international normalized ratio, INR)、活化部分凝血活酶时间(activated partial thromboplastin time, APTT)、纤维蛋白原(fibrinogen, Fib)、D二聚体(D-dimer, D-D)、血小板计数(platelet count, PLT)]、性别、年龄、病理分型、TNM分期、淋巴结状态等。本研究选择了50例同期就诊于河北医科大学第四医院的非癌症患者作为对照组。采用SPSS 13.0统计软件进行分析。结果 NSCLC组与对照组之间所有的凝血功能指标(包括PT、PTA、INR、APTT、Fib、D-D、血小板计数)的血浆水平显示均有统计学差异[除了Fib(P=0.001,5)、Plt(P=0.004,5),其余指标(P<0.001)]。纤维蛋白原水平与NSCLC的组织学亚型之间相关,鳞癌比腺癌的Fib水平明显升高(P<0.001)。III期、IV期期比I期-II期患者的Fib、PLT水平升高(P<0.001, P=0.014),APTT缩短(P<0.001)。与N0患者相比,N1-N3患者的APTT,明显缩短(P<0.001),Fib、D-D水平升高(P<0.001, P=0.048)。对生存率的比较研究显示,PT、INR延长(P=0.032, P=0.001),Fib升高(P<0.001),PTA下降(P=0.005),在统计学上对总生存有明显的不利影响。多因素生存分析显示,在凝血功能指标中INR是唯

  7. Automated Lung Segmentation from HRCT Scans with Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pulagam, Ammi Reddy; Kande, Giri Babu; Ede, Venkata Krishna Rao; Inampudi, Ramesh Babu

    2016-08-01

    Performing accurate and fully automated lung segmentation of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images affected by dense abnormalities is a challenging problem. This paper presents a novel algorithm for automated segmentation of lungs based on modified convex hull algorithm and mathematical morphology techniques. Sixty randomly selected lung HRCT scans with different abnormalities are used to test the proposed algorithm, and experimental results show that the proposed approach can accurately segment the lungs even in the presence of disease patterns, with some limitations in the apices and bases of lungs. The algorithm demonstrates a high segmentation accuracy (dice similarity coefficient = 98.62 and shape differentiation metrics dmean = 1.39 mm, and drms = 2.76 mm). Therefore, the developed automated lung segmentation algorithm is a good candidate for the first stage of a computer-aided diagnosis system for diffuse lung diseases.

  8. Common and unusual dental development abnormalities in a patient with bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Răducanu, Anca Maria; Feraru, Ion Victor; Suciu, Ioana; Teodorescu, Elina; Didilescu, Andreea Cristiana; Ionescu, Ileana; Ionescu, Ecaterina

    2016-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common congenital abnormality of the heart. In this condition, instead of three cusps, the aortic valve has two cusps. Children with congenital heart diseases are at increased risk of developing oral diseases, such as: higher number of decayed teeth, developmental anomalies, periodontal disease, malocclusion, dental crowding, as well as susceptibility to develop infective endocarditis from bacteremia caused by chronic poor oral health. However, little information is available regarding oral manifestations and their management in patients with congenital heart defects, despite the importance of these diseases. This paper presents oral manifestations associated with BAV in a young patient, alongside the general features of the condition. The presented case with BAV brings together features of a complex pathology and multidisciplinary treatment, which was conducted over a long period of time and still continues nowadays.

  9. Wntless is required for peripheral lung differentiation and pulmonary vascular development.

    PubMed

    Cornett, Bridget; Snowball, John; Varisco, Brian M; Lang, Richard; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Sinner, Debora

    2013-07-01

    Wntless (Wls), a gene highly conserved across the animal kingdom, encodes for a transmembrane protein that mediates Wnt ligand secretion. Wls is expressed in developing lung, wherein Wnt signaling is necessary for pulmonary morphogenesis. We hypothesize that Wls plays a critical role in modulating Wnt signaling during lung development and therefore affects processes critical for pulmonary morphogenesis. We generated conditional Wls mutant mice utilizing Shh-Cre and Dermo1-Cre mice to delete Wls in the embryonic respiratory epithelium and mesenchyme, respectively. Epithelial deletion of Wls disrupted lung branching morphogenesis, peripheral lung development and pulmonary endothelial differentiation. Epithelial Wls mutant mice died at birth due to respiratory failure caused by lung hypoplasia and pulmonary hemorrhage. In the lungs of these mice, VEGF and Tie2-angiopoietin signaling pathways, which mediate vascular development, were downregulated from early stages of development. In contrast, deletion of Wls in mesenchymal cells of the developing lung did not alter branching morphogenesis or early mesenchymal differentiation. In vitro assays support the concept that Wls acts in part via Wnt5a to regulate pulmonary vascular development. We conclude that epithelial Wls modulates Wnt ligand activities critical for pulmonary vascular differentiation and peripheral lung morphogenesis. These studies provide a new framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying normal pulmonary vasculature formation and the dysmorphic pulmonary vasculature development associated with congenital lung disease.

  10. The abnormal distribution of development: policies for southern women and children.

    PubMed

    Burman, E

    1995-03-01

    This paper offers a feminist critique of the relationships between gender and development by exploring the intersections between three sets of debates: firstly, the relations between interventions for women and for children through the anomalous position accorded to 'the girl child' in aid and development policies; secondly, the relations between psychological and economic models of development; and thirdly, the gendered and geographical allocation of attributes and opportunities. Drawing on analyses of the 'psychological complex' the author suggests that the cultural resources that inform developmental psychological models are highly cultural and class-specific (white, middle class, of the northern hemisphere), giving rise to a globalization of development that is reinscribed within international aid and development policies. In homogenizing difference to its norms, this globalization paradoxically reproduces the north-south opposition as an expression of cultural and political imperialism. While northern children 'develop', dominant discourses of children of the South are preoccupied with 'survival'. By such means the cultural hegemony of a unitary psychology remains intact. This paper discusses the 'abnormal distribution' of development to draw attention to the ways cultural and gender inequalities flow from the norms and generalized descriptions central to the current practice of developmental psychology and to urge that this is an important site of intervention for feminists addressing gender and development issues.

  11. Abnormal vascular development in zebrafish models for fukutin and FKRP deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wood, Alasdair J; Müller, Juliane S; Jepson, Catherine D; Laval, Steve H; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Barresi, Rita; Straub, Volker

    2011-12-15

    Fukutin and fukutin-related protein (FKRP) are involved in the glycosylation of α-dystroglycan, a key receptor for basement membrane proteins. Aberrant α-dystroglycan glycosylation leads to a broad spectrum of disorders, ranging from limb girdle muscular dystrophy to Walker-Warburg syndrome. This is the first study investigating a role of fukutin and FKRP-mediated glycosylation in angiogenesis. Transgenic zebrafish expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein in blood vessels were treated with morpholino antisense oligonucleotides that blocked the expression of fukutin, FKRP and dystroglycan. All morphant fish showed muscle damage and vascular abnormalities at day 1 post-fertilization. Intersegmental vessels of somites failed to reach the dorsal longitudinal anastomosis and in more severe phenotypes retracted further or were in some cases even completely missing. In contrast, the eye vasculature was distorted in both fukutin and FKRP morphants, but not in dystroglycan morphants or control fish. The eye size was also smaller in the fukutin and FKRP morphants when compared with dystroglycan knockdown fish and controls. In general, the fukutin morphant fish had the most severe skeletal muscle and eye phenotype. Our findings suggest that fukutin and FKRP have functions that affect ocular development in zebrafish independently of dystroglycan. Despite anecdotal reports about vascular abnormalities in patients affected by dystroglycanopathies, the clinical relevance of such lesions remains unclear and should be subject to further review and investigations.

  12. The character of abnormalities found in eye development of quail embruos exposed under space flight conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, E.; Dadheva, O.; Polinskaya, V.; Guryeva, T.

    The avian embryonic eye is used as a model system for studies on the environmental effects on central nervous system development. Here we present results of qualitative investigation of the eye development in quail embryos incubated in micro-"g" environment. In this study we used eyes of Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix Japonica) embryos "flown" onboard biosatellite Kosmos-1129 and on Mir station within the framework of Mir-NASA Program. Eyes obtained from embryos ranging in age from 3-12 days (E3-E12) were prepared histologically and compared with those of the synchronous and laboratory gound controls. Ther most careful consideration was given to finding and analysis of eye developmental abnormalities. Then they were compared with those already described by experimental teratology for birds and mammals. At the stage of the "eye cup" (E3) we found the case of invalid formation of the inner retina. The latter was represented by disorganized neuroblasts occupying whole posterior chamber of the eye. On the 7th day of quail eye development, at the period of cellular growth activation some cases of small eyes with many folds of overgrowing neural and pigmented retinal layers were detected. In retinal folds of these eyes the normal layering was disturbed as well as the formation of aqueous body and pecten oculi. At this time point the changes were also found in the anterior part of the eye. The peculiarities came out of the bigger width of the cornea and separation of its layers, but were found in synchronous control as well. Few embryos of E10 had also eyes with the abnormities described for E7 but this time they were more vivid because of the completion of eye tissue differentiation. At the stage E12 we found the case evaluated as microphthalmia attending by overgrowth of anterior pigmented tissues - iris and ciliary body attached with the cornea. Most, but not all, of abnormalities we found in eye morphogeneses belonged to the birds "flown" aboard Kosmos- 1129 and

  13. Genetic Evidence for XPC-KRAS Interactions During Lung Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; He, Nonggao; Gu, Dongsheng; Wickliffe, Jeff; Salazar, James; Boldogh, Istavan; Xie, Jingwu

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer causes more deaths than breast, colorectal and prostate cancers combined. Despite major advances in targeted therapy in a subset of lung adenocarcinomas, the overall 5-year survival rate for lung cancer worldwide has not significantly changed for the last few decades. DNA repair deficiency is known to contribute to lung cancer development. In fact, human polymorphisms in DNA repair genes such as xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) are highly associated with lung cancer incidence. However, the direct genetic evidence for the role of XPC for lung cancer development is still lacking. Mutations of the Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras) or its downstream effector genes occur in almost all lung cancer cells, and there are a number of mouse models for lung cancer using these mutations. Using activated Kras, KrasLA1, as a driver for lung cancer development in mice, we showed for the first time that mice with KrasLA1 and Xpc knockout had worst outcomes in lung cancer development, and this phenotype was associated with accumulated DNA damage. Using cultured cells, we demonstrated that induced expression of oncogenic KRASG12V led to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as DNA damage, and both can be suppressed by anti-oxidants. Thus, it appears that XPC may help repair DNA damage caused by KRAS-mediated production of ROS. PMID:26554912

  14. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than..., tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis, and any other significant abnormal findings, NIOSH...

  15. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings... shape or size, tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis, and any other significant...

  16. Immunotherapy and lung cancer: current developments and novel targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Duarte; Turner, Alice; Silva, Maria Dília; Marques, Dânia Sofia; Mellidez, Juan Carlos; Wannesson, Luciano; Mountzios, Giannis; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a highly prevalent and aggressive disease. In the metastatic setting, major advances include the incorporation of immunotherapy and targeted therapies into the clinician's therapeutic armamentarium. Standard chemotherapeutic regimens have long been reported to interfere with the immune response to the tumor; conversely, antitumor immunity may add to the effects of those therapies. The aim of immunotherapy is to specifically enhance the immune response directed to the tumor. Recently, many trials addressed the role of such therapies for metastatic NSCLC treatment: ipilimumab, tremelimumab, nivolumab and lambrolizumab are immunotherapeutic agents of main interest in this field. In addition, anti-tumor vaccines, such as MAGE-A3, Tecetomide, TG4010, CIMAvax, ganglioside vaccines, tumor cell vaccines and dendritic cell vaccines, emerged as potent inducers of immune response against the tumor. The current work aims to address the most recent developments regarding these innovative immunotherapies and their implementation in the treatment of metastatic NSCLC.

  17. Regulated overexpression of interleukin 11 in the lung. Use to dissociate development-dependent and -independent phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Ray, P; Tang, W; Wang, P; Homer, R; Kuhn, C; Flavell, R A; Elias, J A

    1997-01-01

    Standard overexpression transgenic approaches are limited in their ability to model waxing and waning diseases and frequently superimpose development-dependent and -independent phenotypic manifestations. We used the clara cell 10-kD protein (CC10) promoter and the reverse tetracycline transactivator (rtTA) to create a lung-specific, externally regulatable, overexpression transgenic system and used this system to express human interleukin 11 (IL-11) in respiratory structures. Gene induction could be achieved in utero, in neonates and in adult animals. Moreover, gene expression could be turned off by removal of the inducing stimulus. When gene activation was initiated in utero and continued into adulthood, subepithelial airway fibrosis, peribronchiolar mononuclear nodules, and alveolar enlargement (emphysema) were noted. Induction in the mature lung caused airway remodeling and peribronchiolar nodules, but alveolar enlargement was not appreciated. In contrast, induction in utero and during the first 14 d of life caused alveolar enlargement without airway remodeling or peribronchiolar nodules. Thus, IL-11 overexpression causes abnormalities that are dependent (large alveoli) and independent (airway remodeling, peribronchiolar nodules) of lung growth and development, and the CC10-rtTA system can be used to differentiate among these effector functions. The CC10-rtTA transgenic system can be used to model waxing and waning, childhood and growth and development-related biologic processes with enhanced fidelity. PMID:9366564

  18. Abnormal Mammary Development in 129:STAT1-Null Mice is Stroma-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jane Q; Mori, Hidetoshi; Cardiff, Robert D; Trott, Josephine F; Hovey, Russell C; Hubbard, Neil E; Engelberg, Jesse A; Tepper, Clifford G; Willis, Brandon J; Khan, Imran H; Ravindran, Resmi K; Chan, Szeman R; Schreiber, Robert D; Borowsky, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Female 129:Stat1-null mice (129S6/SvEvTac-Stat1(tm1Rds) homozygous) uniquely develop estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumors. Herein we report that the mammary glands (MG) of these mice have altered growth and development with abnormal terminal end buds alongside defective branching morphogenesis and ductal elongation. We also find that the 129:Stat1-null mammary fat pad (MFP) fails to sustain the growth of 129S6/SvEv wild-type and Stat1-null epithelium. These abnormalities are partially reversed by elevated serum progesterone and prolactin whereas transplantation of wild-type bone marrow into 129:Stat1-null mice does not reverse the MG developmental defects. Medium conditioned by 129:Stat1-null epithelium-cleared MFP does not stimulate epithelial proliferation, whereas it is stimulated by medium conditioned by epithelium-cleared MFP from either wild-type or 129:Stat1-null females having elevated progesterone and prolactin. Microarrays and multiplexed cytokine assays reveal that the MG of 129:Stat1-null mice has lower levels of growth factors that have been implicated in normal MG growth and development. Transplanted 129:Stat1-null tumors and their isolated cells also grow slower in 129:Stat1-null MG compared to wild-type recipient MG. These studies demonstrate that growth of normal and neoplastic 129:Stat1-null epithelium is dependent on the hormonal milieu and on factors from the mammary stroma such as cytokines. While the individual or combined effects of these factors remains to be resolved, our data supports the role of STAT1 in maintaining a tumor-suppressive MG microenvironment.

  19. Abnormal Mammary Development in 129:STAT1-Null Mice is Stroma-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Cardiff, Robert D.; Trott, Josephine F.; Hovey, Russell C.; Hubbard, Neil E.; Engelberg, Jesse A.; Tepper, Clifford G.; Willis, Brandon J.; Khan, Imran H.; Ravindran, Resmi K.; Chan, Szeman R.; Schreiber, Robert D.; Borowsky, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    Female 129:Stat1-null mice (129S6/SvEvTac-Stat1tm1Rds homozygous) uniquely develop estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive mammary tumors. Herein we report that the mammary glands (MG) of these mice have altered growth and development with abnormal terminal end buds alongside defective branching morphogenesis and ductal elongation. We also find that the 129:Stat1-null mammary fat pad (MFP) fails to sustain the growth of 129S6/SvEv wild-type and Stat1-null epithelium. These abnormalities are partially reversed by elevated serum progesterone and prolactin whereas transplantation of wild-type bone marrow into 129:Stat1-null mice does not reverse the MG developmental defects. Medium conditioned by 129:Stat1-null epithelium-cleared MFP does not stimulate epithelial proliferation, whereas it is stimulated by medium conditioned by epithelium-cleared MFP from either wild-type or 129:Stat1-null females having elevated progesterone and prolactin. Microarrays and multiplexed cytokine assays reveal that the MG of 129:Stat1-null mice has lower levels of growth factors that have been implicated in normal MG growth and development. Transplanted 129:Stat1-null tumors and their isolated cells also grow slower in 129:Stat1-null MG compared to wild-type recipient MG. These studies demonstrate that growth of normal and neoplastic 129:Stat1-null epithelium is dependent on the hormonal milieu and on factors from the mammary stroma such as cytokines. While the individual or combined effects of these factors remains to be resolved, our data supports the role of STAT1 in maintaining a tumor-suppressive MG microenvironment. PMID:26075897

  20. Normal susceptibility to visual illusions in abnormal development: evidence from Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Melanie; Ogbonna, Chinyere; Landau, Barbara; Egeth, Howard

    2009-01-01

    The perception of visual illusions is a powerful diagnostic of implicit integration of global information. Many illusions occur when length, size, orientation, or luminance are misjudged because neighboring visuospatial information cannot be ignored. We asked if people with Williams syndrome (WS), a rare genetic disorder that results in severely impaired global visuospatial construction abilities, are also susceptible to the context of visual illusions. Remarkably, we found that illusions influenced WS individuals to the same degree as normal adults, although size discrimination was somewhat impaired in WS. Our results are evidence that illusions are a consequence of the brain's bias to implicitly integrate visual information, even in a population known to have difficulty in explicitly representing spatial relationships among objects. Moreover, these results suggest that implicit and non-implicit integration of spatial information have different vulnerabilities in abnormal development.

  1. Marsupial tammar wallaby delivers milk bioactives to altricial pouch young to support lung development.

    PubMed

    Modepalli, Vengamanaidu; Hinds, Lyn A; Sharp, Julie A; Lefevre, Christophe; Nicholas, Kevin R

    2016-11-01

    Our research is exploiting the marsupial as a model to understand the signals required for lung development. Marsupials have a unique reproductive strategy, the mother gives birth to altricial neonate with an immature lung and the changes in milk composition during lactation in marsupials appears to provide bioactives that can regulate diverse aspects of lung development, including branching morphogenesis, cell proliferation and cell differentiation. These effects are seen with milk collected between 25 and 100days postpartum. To better understand the temporal effects of milk composition on postnatal lung development we used a cross-fostering technique to restrict the tammar pouch young to milk composition not extending beyond day 25 for 45days of its early postnatal life. These particular time points were selected as our previous study showed that milk protein collected prior to ~day 25 had no developmental effect on mouse embryonic lungs in culture. The comparative analysis of the foster group and control young at day 45 postpartum demonstrated that foster pouch young had significantly reduced lung size. The lungs in fostered young were comprised of large intermediate tissue, had a reduced size of airway lumen and a higher percentage of parenchymal tissue. In addition, expression of marker genes for lung development (BMP4, WNT11, AQP-4, HOPX and SPB) were significantly reduced in lungs from fostered young. Further, to identify the potential bioactive expressed by mammary gland that may have developmental effect on pouch young lungs, we performed proteomics analysis on tammar milk through mass-spectrometry and listed the potential bioactives (PDGF, IGFBP5, IGFBPL1 and EGFL6) secreted in milk that may be involved in regulating pouch young lung development. The data suggest that postnatal lung development in the tammar young is most likely regulated by maternal signalling factors supplied through milk.

  2. Development of abnormal fluid pressures beneath a ramping thrust sheet: Where's the evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Wiltschko, D.V.; Smith, R.E. . Dept. of Geology and Center for Tectonophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Many models for the mechanics of fold and thrust belts hold that fluid pressure is locally, or even everywhere, abnormal, thus aiding both internal deformation and motion along the base. Recent support comes from studies of accretionary prisms where drill-stem measurements of both fluid flow in fault zones and formation pressure are pointed to as evidence for a hydrodynamic system characterized by wide-spread excess fluid pressure. However, despite the general acceptance of high fluid pressure (Pf) as a potentially important controlling mechanism for thrust motion, and despite nearly 30 years of looking, direct evidence for abnormal fluid pressure in ancient continental thrust belts is either rare or ambiguous. The authors have developed a two-dimensional model for the evolution of fluid pressure within and beneath a ramping thrust sheet. In the model, the fluid and heat flow equations are solved and applied at each time step. The model accounts for porosity compaction, thermal pressuring, and fluid flow. Results of this model show, first, that high fluid pressure can be developed during deposition, before thrust motion. The authors used typical rates of deposition, duration of deposition, and a simplified three-layer stratigraphy for North American thrust belts. Second, the models show that high Pf can be maintained and/or further enhanced during thrusting depending upon the permeabilities assigned to the model hydrostratigraphic section. Of the rock properties studied in detail, modes are most sensitive to permeability. Nevertheless, the models show that for best guesses of the relevant rock properties it should be possible to find evidence for high fluid pressure in, (1) the crests of ramp anticlines and, (2) the toe region, especially in the lower plate.

  3. Normal and Abnormal Development of Motor Behavior: Lessons From Experiments in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gramsbergen, Albert

    2001-01-01

    In this essay a few relevant aspects of the neural and behavioral development of the brain in the human and in the rat are reviewed and related to the consequences of lesions in the central and peripheral nervous system at early and later age. Movements initially are generated by local circuits in the spinal cord and without the involvement of descending projections. After birth, both in humans and in rats it seems that the devlopment of postural control is the limiting factor for several motor behaviors to mature. Strong indications exist that the cerebellum is significantly involved in this control. Lesions in the CNS at early stages interfere with fundamental processes of neural development, such as the establishment of fiber connections and cell death patterns. Consequently, the functional effects are strongly dependent on the stage of development. The young and undisturbed CNS, on the other hand, has a much greater capacity than the adult nervous system for compensating abnormal reinnervation in the peripheral nervous system. Animal experiments indicated that the cerebellar cortex might play an important part in this compensation. This possibility should be investigated further as it might offer important perspectives for treatment in the human. PMID:11530886

  4. Serotonin transporter variant drives preventable gastrointestinal abnormalities in development and function

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Kara Gross; Li, Zhishan; Stevanovic, Korey; Saurman, Virginia; Anderson, George M.; Snyder, Isaac; Blakely, Randy D.; Gershon, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is an increasingly common behavioral condition that frequently presents with gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances. It is not clear, however, how gut dysfunction relates to core ASD features. Multiple, rare hyperfunctional coding variants of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT, encoded by SLC6A4) have been identified in ASD. Expression of the most common SERT variant (Ala56) in mice increases 5-HT clearance and causes ASD-like behaviors. Here, we demonstrated that Ala56-expressing mice display GI defects that resemble those seen in mice lacking neuronal 5-HT. These defects included enteric nervous system hypoplasia, slow GI transit, diminished peristaltic reflex activity, and proliferation of crypt epithelial cells. An opposite phenotype was seen in SERT-deficient mice and in progeny of WT dams given the SERT antagonist fluoxetine. The reciprocal phenotypes that resulted from increased or decreased SERT activity support the idea that 5-HT signaling regulates enteric neuronal development and can, when disturbed, cause long-lasting abnormalities of GI function. Administration of a 5-HT4 agonist to Ala56 mice during development prevented Ala56-associated GI perturbations, suggesting that excessive SERT activity leads to inadequate 5-HT4–mediated neurogenesis. We propose that deficient 5-HT signaling during development may contribute to GI and behavioral features of ASD. The consequences of therapies targeting SERT during pregnancy warrant further evaluation. PMID:27111230

  5. Effect of FHIT loss and p53 mutation on HPV-infected lung carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Liu, Xiaofei; Yang, Yuxuan; Zhao, Xiaodan; Xue, Jianjun; Zhang, Weixiao; Yang, Aimin

    2015-07-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV)16/18 infection in the development of lung cancer has previously been identified, and fragile histidine triad (FHIT) loss and p53 mutation are frequently observed in the disease. However, the association between these factors has not been well studied. The present study aimed to further investigate the significance of HPV infection, FHIT loss and p53 mutations in the development of lung cancer and their possible associations. DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded specimens from 88 cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 56 of adenocarcinoma (AC), 36 of small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and 110 non-cancer control cases of lung neoplasms. The prevalence of HPV infection was determined by polymerase chain reaction analysis, and FHIT loss and p53 mutations were detected by immunohistochemistry. The χ(2), Fisher's exact and Pearson correlation tests were applied for statistical analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that HPVL1 (the major capsid protein of HPV), HPV16 and HPV18 infection were more prevalent in the lung cancer samples compared with the non-cancer controls (all P<0.001). FHIT loss occurred more frequently in the lung cancer samples (44.44%) compared with the non-cancer controls (7.25%) (P<0.001). FHIT loss in the HPVL1-positive group was significantly increased compared with the HPVL1-negative group in the lung cancer cases and the non-cancer controls (P<0.05). In the lung cancer cases, the p53 mutation rates in the HPVL1- and HPV16/18-positive groups were significantly increased compared with the HPVL1- and HPV16/18-negative groups (P<0.05). In the 180 lung cancer cases, the coexistence rate of FHIT loss and a history of smoking was 38.33% (69/180; Pearson contingency coefficient of r=0.318; P<0.001). FHIT loss and p53 mutation exhibited a synergistic effect on HPV-associated lung cancer (Pearson contingency coefficient r=0.357, P<0.001). The present study demonstrated that FHIT loss may be important

  6. Ultrastructural and cellular basis for the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics during the transition from hypertension to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sanjiv J; Aistrup, Gary L; Gupta, Deepak K; O'Toole, Matthew J; Nahhas, Amanda F; Schuster, Daniel; Chirayil, Nimi; Bassi, Nikhil; Ramakrishna, Satvik; Beussink, Lauren; Misener, Sol; Kane, Bonnie; Wang, David; Randolph, Blake; Ito, Aiko; Wu, Megan; Akintilo, Lisa; Mongkolrattanothai, Thitipong; Reddy, Mahendra; Kumar, Manvinder; Arora, Rishi; Ng, Jason; Wasserstrom, J Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Although the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics represents a key step during the transition from hypertension to overt heart failure (HF), the underlying ultrastructural and cellular basis of abnormal myocardial mechanics remains unclear. We therefore investigated how changes in transverse (T)-tubule organization and the resulting altered intracellular Ca(2+) cycling in large cell populations underlie the development of abnormal myocardial mechanics in a model of chronic hypertension. Hearts from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs; n = 72) were studied at different ages and stages of hypertensive heart disease and early HF and were compared with age-matched control (Wistar-Kyoto) rats (n = 34). Echocardiography, including tissue Doppler and speckle-tracking analysis, was performed just before euthanization, after which T-tubule organization and Ca(2+) transients were studied using confocal microscopy. In SHRs, abnormalities in myocardial mechanics occurred early in response to hypertension, before the development of overt systolic dysfunction and HF. Reduced longitudinal, circumferential, and radial strain as well as reduced tissue Doppler early diastolic tissue velocities occurred in concert with T-tubule disorganization and impaired Ca(2+) cycling, all of which preceded the development of cardiac fibrosis. The time to peak of intracellular Ca(2+) transients was slowed due to T-tubule disruption, providing a link between declining cell ultrastructure and abnormal myocardial mechanics. In conclusion, subclinical abnormalities in myocardial mechanics occur early in response to hypertension and coincide with the development of T-tubule disorganization and impaired intracellular Ca(2+) cycling. These changes occur before the development of significant cardiac fibrosis and precede the development of overt cardiac dysfunction and HF.

  7. Deficiency of the Chromatin Regulator Brpf1 Causes Abnormal Brain Development*

    PubMed Central

    You, Linya; Zou, Jinfeng; Zhao, Hong; Bertos, Nicholas R.; Park, Morag; Wang, Edwin; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important in different neurological disorders, and one such mechanism is histone acetylation. The multivalent chromatin regulator BRPF1 (bromodomain- and plant homeodomain-linked (PHD) zinc finger-containing protein 1) recognizes different epigenetic marks and activates three histone acetyltransferases, so it is both a reader and a co-writer of the epigenetic language. The three histone acetyltransferases are MOZ, MORF, and HBO1, which are also known as lysine acetyltransferase 6A (KAT6A), KAT6B, and KAT7, respectively. The MORF gene is mutated in four neurodevelopmental disorders sharing the characteristic of intellectual disability and frequently displaying callosal agenesis. Here, we report that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene caused early postnatal lethality, neocortical abnormalities, and partial callosal agenesis. With respect to the control, the mutant forebrain contained fewer Tbr2-positive intermediate neuronal progenitors and displayed aberrant neurogenesis. Molecularly, Brpf1 loss led to decreased transcription of multiple genes, such as Robo3 and Otx1, important for neocortical development. Surprisingly, elevated expression of different Hox genes and various other transcription factors, such as Lhx4, Foxa1, Tbx5, and Twist1, was also observed. These results thus identify an important role of Brpf1 in regulating forebrain development and suggest that it acts as both an activator and a silencer of gene expression in vivo. PMID:25568313

  8. Deficiency of the chromatin regulator BRPF1 causes abnormal brain development.

    PubMed

    You, Linya; Zou, Jinfeng; Zhao, Hong; Bertos, Nicholas R; Park, Morag; Wang, Edwin; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-03-13

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important in different neurological disorders, and one such mechanism is histone acetylation. The multivalent chromatin regulator BRPF1 (bromodomain- and plant homeodomain-linked (PHD) zinc finger-containing protein 1) recognizes different epigenetic marks and activates three histone acetyltransferases, so it is both a reader and a co-writer of the epigenetic language. The three histone acetyltransferases are MOZ, MORF, and HBO1, which are also known as lysine acetyltransferase 6A (KAT6A), KAT6B, and KAT7, respectively. The MORF gene is mutated in four neurodevelopmental disorders sharing the characteristic of intellectual disability and frequently displaying callosal agenesis. Here, we report that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene caused early postnatal lethality, neocortical abnormalities, and partial callosal agenesis. With respect to the control, the mutant forebrain contained fewer Tbr2-positive intermediate neuronal progenitors and displayed aberrant neurogenesis. Molecularly, Brpf1 loss led to decreased transcription of multiple genes, such as Robo3 and Otx1, important for neocortical development. Surprisingly, elevated expression of different Hox genes and various other transcription factors, such as Lhx4, Foxa1, Tbx5, and Twist1, was also observed. These results thus identify an important role of Brpf1 in regulating forebrain development and suggest that it acts as both an activator and a silencer of gene expression in vivo.

  9. Prenatal ketamine exposure causes abnormal development of prefrontal cortex in rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tianyun; Li, Chuanxiang; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Haixing; Ma, Daqing; Song, Xingrong; Zhou, Libing

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is commonly used for anesthesia and as a recreational drug. In pregnant users, a potential neurotoxicity in offspring has been noted. Our previous work demonstrated that ketamine exposure of pregnant rats induces affective disorders and cognitive impairments in offspring. As the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critically involved in emotional and cognitive processes, here we studied whether maternal ketamine exposure influences the development of the PFC in offspring. Pregnant rats on gestational day 14 were treated with ketamine at a sedative dose for 2 hrs, and pups were studied at postnatal day 0 (P0) or P30. We found that maternal ketamine exposure resulted in cell apoptosis and neuronal loss in fetal brain. Upon ketamine exposure in utero, PFC neurons at P30 showed more dendritic branching, while cultured neurons from P0 PFC extended shorter neurites than controls. In addition, maternal ketamine exposure postponed the switch of NR2B/2A expression, and perturbed pre- and postsynaptic protein expression in the PFC. These data suggest that prenatal ketamine exposure impairs neuronal development of the PFC, which may be associated with abnormal behavior in offsprings. PMID:27226073

  10. Secreted Phosphoprotein 1 Is a Determinant of Lung Function Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Timothy M.; Concel, Vincent J.; Upadhyay, Swapna; Bein, Kiflai; Brant, Kelly A.; George, Leema; Mitra, Ankita; Thimraj, Tania A.; Fabisiak, James P.; Vuga, Louis J.; Fattman, Cheryl; Kaminski, Naftali; Schulz, Holger; Leikauf, George D.

    2014-01-01

    Secreted phosphoprotein 1 (Spp1) is located within quantitative trait loci associated with lung function that was previously identified by contrasting C3H/HeJ and JF1/Msf mouse strains that have extremely divergent lung function. JF1/Msf mice with diminished lung function had reduced lung SPP1 transcript and protein during the peak stage of alveologenesis (postnatal day [P]14–P28) as compared with C3H/HeJ mice. In addition to a previously identified genetic variant that altered runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) binding in the Spp1 promoter, we identified another promoter variant in a putative RUNX2 binding site that increased the DNA protein binding. SPP1 induced dose-dependent mouse lung epithelial-15 cell proliferation. Spp1(−/−) mice have decreased specific total lung capacity/body weight, higher specific compliance, and increased mean airspace chord length (Lm) compared with Spp1(+/+) mice. Microarray analysis revealed enriched gene ontogeny categories, with numerous genes associated with lung development and/or respiratory disease. Insulin-like growth factor 1, Hedgehog-interacting protein, wingless-related mouse mammary tumor virus integration site 5A, and NOTCH1 transcripts decreased in the lung of P14 Spp1(−/−) mice as determined by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. SPP1 promotes pneumocyte growth, and mice lacking SPP1 have smaller, more compliant lungs with enlarged airspace (i.e., increased Lm). Microarray analysis suggests a dysregulation of key lung developmental transcripts in gene-targeted Spp1(−/−) mice, particularly during the peak phase of alveologenesis. In addition to its known roles in lung disease, this study supports SPP1 as a determinant of lung development in mice. PMID:24816281

  11. N-Methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Excessive Activation Inhibited Fetal Rat Lung Development In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zhengchang; Zhou, Xiaocheng; Luo, Ziqiang; Huo, Huiyi; Wang, Mingjie; Yu, Xiaohe; Cao, Chuanding; Ding, Ying; Xiong, Zeng

    2016-01-01

    Background. Intrauterine hypoxia is a common cause of fetal growth and lung development restriction. Although N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are distributed in the postnatal lung and play a role in lung injury, little is known about NMDAR's expression and role in fetal lung development. Methods. Real-time PCR and western blotting analysis were performed to detect NMDARs between embryonic days (E) 15.5 and E21.5 in fetal rat lungs. NMDAR antagonist MK-801's influence on intrauterine hypoxia-induced retardation of fetal lung development was tested in vivo, and NMDA's direct effect on fetal lung development was observed using fetal lung organ culture in vitro. Results. All seven NMDARs are expressed in fetal rat lungs. Intrauterine hypoxia upregulated NMDARs expression in fetal lungs and decreased fetal body weight, lung weight, lung-weight-to-body-weight ratio, and radial alveolar count, whereas MK-801 alleviated this damage in vivo. In vitro experiments showed that NMDA decreased saccular circumference and area per unit and downregulated thyroid transcription factor-1 and surfactant protein-C mRNA expression. Conclusions. The excessive activation of NMDARs contributed to hypoxia-induced fetal lung development retardation and appropriate blockade of NMDAR might be a novel therapeutic strategy for minimizing the negative outcomes of prenatal hypoxia on lung development. PMID:27478831

  12. Pleiotrophin regulates lung epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation during fetal lung development via beta-catenin and Dlk1.

    PubMed

    Weng, Tingting; Gao, Li; Bhaskaran, Manoj; Guo, Yujie; Gou, Deming; Narayanaperumal, Jeyaparthasarathy; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Zhang, Kexiong; Liu, Lin

    2009-10-09

    The role of pleiotrophin in fetal lung development was investigated. We found that pleiotrophin and its receptor, protein-tyrosine phosphatase receptor beta/zeta, were highly expressed in mesenchymal and epithelial cells of the fetal lungs, respectively. Using isolated fetal alveolar epithelial type II cells, we demonstrated that pleiotrophin promoted fetal type II cell proliferation and arrested type II cell trans-differentiation into alveolar epithelial type I cells. Pleiotrophin also increased wound healing of injured type II cell monolayer. Knockdown of pleiotrophin influenced lung branching morphogenesis in a fetal lung organ culture model. Pleiotrophin increased the tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin, promoted beta-catenin translocation into the nucleus, and activated T cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor transcription factors. Dlk1, a membrane ligand that initiates the Notch signaling pathway, was identified as a downstream target of the pleiotrophin/beta-catenin pathway by endogenous dlk1 expression, promoter assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation. These results provide evidence that pleiotrophin regulates fetal type II cell proliferation and differentiation via integration of multiple signaling pathways including pleiotrophin, beta-catenin, and Notch pathways.

  13. Abnormal Sperm Development in pcd3J-/- Mice: the Importance of Agtpbp1 in Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nameun; Xiao, Rui; Choi, Hojun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Sang-Jun, Uhm; Chankyu, Park

    2011-01-01

    Homozygous Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd) mutant males exhibit abnormal sperm development. Microscopic examination of the testes from pcd3J-/- mice at postnatal days 12, 15, 18 and 60 revealed histological differences, in comparison to wild-type mice, which were evident by day 18. Greatly reduced numbers of spermatocytes and spermatids were found in the adult testes, and apoptotic cells were identified among the differentiating germ cells after day 15. Our immunohistological analysis using an antihuman AGTPBP1 antibody showed that AGTPBP1 was expressed in spermatogenic cells between late stage primary spermatocytes and round spermatids. A global gene expression analysis from the testes of pcd3J-/- mice showed that expression of cyclin B3 and de-ubiquitinating enzymes USP2 and USP9y was altered by >1.5-fold compared to the expression levels in the wild-type. Our results suggest that the pcd mutant mice have defects in spermatogenesis that begin with the pachytene spermatocyte stage and continue through subsequent stages. Thus, Agtpbp1, the gene responsible for the pcd phenotype, plays an important role in spermatogenesis and is important for survival of germ cells at spermatocytes stage onward. PMID:21110128

  14. Backdoor pathway for dihydrotestosterone biosynthesis: implications for normal and abnormal human sex development.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Maki; Homma, Keiko; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2013-04-01

    We review the current knowledge about the "backdoor" pathway for the biosynthesis of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). While DHT is produced from cholesterol through the conventional "frontdoor" pathway via testosterone, recent studies have provided compelling evidence for the presence of an alternative "backdoor" pathway to DHT without testosterone intermediacy. This backdoor pathway is known to exist in the tammar wallaby pouch young testis and the immature mouse testis, and has been suggested to be present in the human as well. Indeed, molecular analysis has identified pathologic mutations of genes involved in the backdoor pathway in genetic male patients with undermasculinized external genitalia, and urine steroid profile analysis has argued for the relevance of the activated backdoor pathway to abnormal virilization in genetic females with cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency and 21-hydroxylase deficiency. It is likely that the backdoor pathway is primarily operating in the fetal testis in a physiological condition to produce a sufficient amount of DHT for male sex development, and that the backdoor pathway is driven with a possible interaction between fetal and permanent adrenals in pathologic conditions with increased 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels. These findings provide novel insights into androgen biosynthesis in both physiological and pathological conditions.

  15. Stem cell and lung cancer development: blaming the Wnt, Hh and Notch signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    García Campelo, María Rosario; Alonso Curbera, Guillermo; Aparicio Gallego, Guadalupe; Grande Pulido, Enrique; Antón Aparicio, Luis Miguel

    2011-02-01

    Primary lung cancer may arise from the central (bronchial) or peripheral (bronchiolo-alveolar) compartments. However the origins of the different histological types of primary lung cancer are not well understood. Stem cells are believed to be crucial players in tumour development and there is much interest in identifying those compartments that harbour stem cells involved in lung cancer. Although the role of stem cells in carcinogenesis is not well characterised, emerging evidence is providing new insights into this process. Numerous studies have indicated that lung cancer is not a result of a sudden transforming event but a multistep process in which a sequence of molecular changes result in genetic and morphological aberrations. The exact sequence of molecular events involved in lung carcinogenesis is not yet well understood, therefore deeper knowledge of the aberrant stem cell fate signalling pathway could be crucial in the development of new drugs against the advanced setting.

  16. Continuous exposure to bisphenol A during in vitro follicular development induces meiotic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Lenie, Sandy; Cortvrindt, Rita; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula; Smitz, Johan

    2008-03-12

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a widely used environmental contaminant, may exert weak estrogenic, anti-androgenic and anti-thyroidic activities. BPA is suspected to possess aneugenic properties that may affect somatic cells and mammalian oocytes. Oocyte growth and maturation depend upon a complex bi-directional signaling between the oocyte and its companion somatic cells. Consequently, disturbances in oocyte maturation may originate either from direct effects of BPA at the level of the oocyte or from indirect influences at the follicular level, such as alterations in hormonal homeostasis. This study aimed to analyze the effects of chronic BPA exposure (3 nM to 30 microM) on follicle-enclosed growth and maturation of mouse oocytes in vitro. Oocytes were cultured and their spindle and chromosomes were stained by alpha-tubulin immunofluorescence and ethidium homodimer-2, respectively. Confocal microscopy was utilized for subsequent analysis. Only follicles that were exposed to 30 microM BPA during follicular development showed a slightly reduced granulosa cell proliferation and a lower total estrogen production, but they still developed and formed antral-like cavities. However, 18% of oocytes were unable to resume meiosis after stimulation of oocyte maturation, and 37% arrested after germinal vesicle breakdown, significantly different from controls (p<0.05). Only 45% of the oocytes extruded a first polar body (p < 0.05). 30 microM BPA led also to a significant increase in meiosis I-arrested oocytes with unaligned chromosomes and spindle aberrations. Oocytes that were able to progress beyond meiosis I, frequently arrested at an abnormal telophase I. Additionally, in many oocytes exposed to low chronic BPA that matured to meiosis II chromosomes failed to congress at the spindle equator. In conclusion, mouse follicle culture reveals non-linear dose-dependent effects of BPA on the meiotic spindle in mouse oocytes when exposure was chronic throughout oocyte growth and maturation.

  17. Regulation of mouse lung development by the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor, CaR.

    PubMed

    Finney, Brenda A; del Moral, Pierre M; Wilkinson, William J; Cayzac, Sebastien; Cole, Martin; Warburton, David; Kemp, Paul J; Riccardi, Daniela

    2008-12-15

    Postnatal lung function is critically dependent upon optimal embryonic lung development. As the free ionized plasma calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](o)) of the fetus is higher than that of the adult, the process of lung development occurs in a hypercalcaemic environment. In the adult, [Ca(2+)](o) is monitored by the G-protein coupled, extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaR), but neither its ontogeny nor its potential role in lung development are known. Here, we demonstrate that CaR is expressed in the mouse lung epithelium, and that its expression is developmentally regulated, with a peak of expression at embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) and a subsequent decrease by E18, after which the receptor is absent. Experiments carried out using the lung explant culture model in vitro show that lung branching morphogenesis is sensitive to [Ca(2+)](o), being maximal at physiological adult [Ca(2+)](o) (i.e. 1.0-1.3 mM) and lowest at the higher, fetal (i.e. 1.7 mM) [Ca(2+)](o). Administration of the specific CaR positive allosteric modulator, the calcimimetic R-568, mimics the suppressive effects of high [Ca(2+)](o) on branching morphogenesis while both phospholipase C and PI3 kinase inhibition reverse these effects. CaR activation suppresses cell proliferation while it enhances intracellular calcium signalling, lung distension and fluid secretion. Conditions which are restrictive either to branching or to secretion can be rescued by manipulating [Ca(2+)](o) in the culture medium. In conclusion, fetal Ca(2+)(o), acting through a developmentally regulated CaR, is an important extrinsic factor that modulates the intrinsic lung developmental programme. Our observations support a novel role for the CaR in preventing hyperplastic lung disease in utero.

  18. Development of a Guinea Pig Lung Deposition Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    Toxicology Letters 41:159-173. Brewer NR, Cruise LJ. (1997). The Respiratory System of the Guinea Pig: Emphasis on Species Differences. Contemp Top...3 3.1. MODELING DEPOSITION EFFICIENCY IN THE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT ............. 3 3.2. LUNG GEOMETRY...15 iv LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Compartmental representation of the respiratory tract

  19. Interaction of epithelium with mesenchyme affects global features of lung architecture: a computer model of development.

    PubMed

    Tebockhorst, Seth; Lee, Dongyoub; Wexler, Anthony S; Oldham, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Lung airway morphogenesis is simulated in a simplified diffusing environment that simulates the mesenchyme to explore the role of morphogens in airway architecture development. Simple rules govern local branching morphogenesis. Morphogen gradients are modeled by four pairs of sources and their diffusion through the mesenchyme. Sensitivity to lobar architecture and mesenchymal morphogen are explored. Even if the model accurately represents observed patterns of local development, it could not produce realistic global patterns of lung architecture if interaction with its environment was not taken into account, implying that reciprocal interaction between airway growth and morphogens in the mesenchyme plays a critical role in producing realistic global features of lung architecture.

  20. Gravity in mammalian organ development: differentiation of cultured lung and pancreas rudiments during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Hardman, P.; Paulsen, A.

    1994-01-01

    Organ culture of embryonic mouse lung and pancreas rudiments has been used to investigate development and differentiation, and to assess the effects of microgravity on culture differentiation, during orbital spaceflight of the shuttle Endeavour (mission STS-54). Lung rudiments continue to grow and branch during spaceflight, an initial result that should allow future detailed study of lung morphogenesis in microgravity. Cultured embryonic pancreas undergoes characteristic exocrine acinar tissue and endocrine islet tissue differentiation during spaceflight, and in ground controls. The rudiments developing in the microgravity environment of spaceflight appear to grow larger than their ground counterparts, and they may have differentiated more rapidly than controls, as judged by exocrine zymogen granule presence.

  1. Gene expression subtraction of non-cancerous lung from smokers and non-smokers with adenocarcinoma, as a predictor for smokers developing lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stav, David; Bar, Ilan; Sandbank, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer death in developed countries. Adenocarcinoma is becoming the most common form of lung cancer. Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor for lung cancer. Long-term cigarettes smoking may be characterized by genetic alteration and diffuse injury of the airways surface, named field cancerization, while cancer in non-smokers is usually clonally derived. Detecting specific genes expression changes in non-cancerous lung in smokers with adenocarcinoma may give us instrument for predicting smokers who are going to develop this malignancy. Objectives We described the gene expression in non-cancerous lungs from 21 smoker patients with lung adenocarcinoma and compare it to gene expression in non-cancerous lung tissue from 10 non-smokers with primary lung adenocarcinoma. Methods Total RNA was isolated from peripheral non-cancerous lung tissue. The cDNA was hybridized to the U133A GeneChip array. Hierarchical clustering analysis on genes obtained from smokers and non-smokers, after subtracting were exported to the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software for further analysis. Results The genes subtraction resulted in disclosure of 36 genes with high score. They were subsequently mapped and sorted based on location, cellular components, and biochemical activity. The gene functional analysis disclosed 20 genes, which are involved in cancer process (P = 7.05E-5 to 2.92E-2). Conclusion Detected genes may serve as a predictor for smokers who may be at high risk of developing lung cancer. In addition, since these genes originating from non-cancerous lung, which is the major area of the lungs, a sample from an induced sputum may represent it. PMID:18811983

  2. Lung cancer: a rare indication for, but frequent complication after lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Robin; Yserbyt, Jonas; Decaluwe, Herbert; De Leyn, Paul; Verleden, Geert M.

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation is an effective and safe therapy for carefully selected patients suffering from a variety of end-stage pulmonary diseases. Lung cancer negatively affects prognosis, particularly in patients who are no longer candidates for complete resection. Lung transplantation can be considered for carefully selected and well staged lung cancer patients with proven, lung-limited, multifocal, (minimally invasive) adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) (previously called bronchioloalveolar cell carcinoma) causing respiratory failure. Despite a substantial risk of tumour recurrence (33–75%), lung transplantation may offer a survival benefit (50% at 5 years) with best palliation of their disease. Reports on lung transplantation for other low-grade malignancies are rare. Lung transplant candidates at higher risk for developing lung cancer [mainly previous smokers with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) or older patients] should be thoroughly and repeatedly screened for lung cancer prior to listing, and preferably also during waiting list time if longer than 1 year, including the use of PET-CT scan and EBUS-assisted bronchoscopy in case of undefined, but suspicious pulmonary abnormalities. Double-lung transplantation should now replace single-lung transplantation in these high-risk patients because of a 6–9% prevalence of lung cancer developing in the remaining native lung. Patients with unexpected, early stage bronchial carcinoma in the explanted lung may have favourable survival without recurrence. Early PET-CT (at 3–6 months) following lung transplantation is advisable to detect early, subclinical disease progression. Donor lungs from (former) smokers should be well examined at retrieval. Suspicious nodules should be biopsied to avoid grafting cancer in the recipient. Close follow-up with regular visits and screening test in all recipients is needed because of the increased risk of developing a primary or secondary

  3. The Role of Serotonin Transporter in Human Lung Development and in Neonatal Lung Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sen, P.; Parks, W. T.; Langston, C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Failure of the vascular pulmonary remodeling at birth often manifests as pulmonary hypertension (PHT) and is associated with a variety of neonatal lung disorders including a uniformly fatal developmental disorder known as alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV). Serum serotonin regulation has been linked to pulmonary vascular function and disease, and serotonin transporter (SERT) is thought to be one of the key regulators in these processes. We sought to find evidence of a role that SERT plays in the neonatal respiratory adaptation process and in the pathomechanism of ACD/MPV. Methods. We used histology and immunohistochemistry to determine the timetable of SERT protein expression in normal human fetal and postnatal lungs and in cases of newborn and childhood PHT of varied etiology. In addition, we tested for a SERT gene promoter defect in ACD/MPV patients. Results. We found that SERT protein expression begins at 30 weeks of gestation, increases to term, and stays high postnatally. ACD/MPV patients had diminished SERT expression without SERT promoter alteration. Conclusion. We concluded that SERT/serotonin pathway is crucial in the process of pulmonary vascular remodeling/adaptation at birth and plays a key role in the pathobiology of ACD/MPV. PMID:28316463

  4. Low Level Laser Therapy Reduces the Development of Lung Inflammation Induced by Formaldehyde Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Miranda da Silva, Cristiane; Peres Leal, Mayara; Brochetti, Robson Alexandre; Braga, Tárcio; Vitoretti, Luana Beatriz; Saraiva Câmara, Niels Olsen; Damazo, Amílcar Sabino; Ligeiro-de-Oliveira, Ana Paula; Chavantes, Maria Cristina; Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Lung diseases constitute an important public health problem and its growing level of concern has led to efforts for the development of new therapies, particularly for the control of lung inflammation. Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) has been highlighted as a non-invasive therapy with few side effects, but its mechanisms need to be better understood and explored. Considering that pollution causes several harmful effects on human health, including lung inflammation, in this study, we have used formaldehyde (FA), an environmental and occupational pollutant, for the induction of neutrophilic lung inflammation. Our objective was to investigate the local and systemic effects of LLLT after FA exposure. Male Wistar rats were exposed to FA (1%) or vehicle (distillated water) during 3 consecutive days and treated or not with LLLT (1 and 5 hours after each FA exposure). Non-manipulated rats were used as control. 24 h after the last FA exposure, we analyzed the local and systemic effects of LLLT. The treatment with LLLT reduced the development of neutrophilic lung inflammation induced by FA, as observed by the reduced number of leukocytes, mast cells degranulated, and a decreased myeloperoxidase activity in the lung. Moreover, LLLT also reduced the microvascular lung permeability in the parenchyma and the intrapulmonary bronchi. Alterations on the profile of inflammatory cytokines were evidenced by the reduced levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and the elevated levels of IL-10 in the lung. Together, our results showed that LLLT abolishes FA-induced neutrophilic lung inflammation by a reduction of the inflammatory cytokines and mast cell degranulation. This study may provide important information about the mechanisms of LLLT in lung inflammation induced by a pollutant. PMID:26569396

  5. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  6. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  7. Indoor fuel exposure and the lung in both developing and developed countries: An update

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Almost 3 billion people worldwide burn solid fuels indoors. These fuels include biomass and coal. Although indoor solid fuel smoke is likely a greater problem in developing countries, wood burning populations in developed countries may also be at risk from these exposures. Despite the large population at risk worldwide, the effect of exposure to indoor solid fuel smoke has not been adequately studied. Indoor air pollution from solid fuel use is strongly associated with COPD (both emphysema and chronic bronchitis), acute respiratory tract infections, and lung cancer (primarily coal use) and weakly associated with asthma, tuberculosis, and interstitial lung disease. Tobacco use further potentiates the development of respiratory disease among subjects exposed to solid fuel smoke. There is a need to perform additional interventional studies in this field. It is also important to increase awareness about the health effects of solid fuel smoke inhalation among physicians and patients as well as trigger preventive actions through education, research, and policy change in both developing and developed countries. PMID:23153607

  8. Gene expression profile of androgen modulated genes in the murine fetal developing lung

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidences suggest that sex affects lung development. Indeed, a higher incidence of respiratory distress syndrome is observed in male compared to female preterm neonates at comparable developmental stage and experimental studies demonstrated an androgen-related delay in male lung maturation. However, the precise mechanisms underlying these deleterious effects of androgens in lung maturation are only partially understood. Methods To build up a better understanding of the effect of androgens on lung development, we analyzed by microarrays the expression of genes showing a sexual difference and those modulated by androgens. Lungs of murine fetuses resulting from a timely mating window of 1 hour were studied at gestational day 17 (GD17) and GD18, corresponding to the period of surge of surfactant production. Using injections of the antiandrogen flutamide to pregnant mice, we hunted for genes in fetal lungs which are transcriptionally modulated by androgens. Results Results revealed that 1844 genes were expressed with a sexual difference at GD17 and 833 at GD18. Many genes were significantly modulated by flutamide: 1597 at GD17 and 1775 at GD18. Datasets were analyzed by using in silico tools for reconstruction of cellular pathways. Between GD17 and GD18, male lungs showed an intensive transcriptional activity of proliferative pathways along with the onset of lung differentiation. Among the genes showing a sex difference or an antiandrogen modulation of their expression, we specifically identified androgen receptor interacting genes, surfactant related genes in particularly those involved in the pathway leading to phospholipid synthesis, and several genes of lung development regulator pathways. Among these latter, some genes related to Shh, FGF, TGF-beta, BMP, and Wnt signaling are modulated by sex and/or antiandrogen treatment. Conclusion Our results show clearly that there is a real delay in lung maturation between male and female in this period

  9. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor in Rat Fetal Lung Development: Expression and Functional Studies

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira-Silva, Cristina; Piairo, Paulina; Carvalho-Dias, Emanuel; Peixoto, Francisca O.; Moura, Rute S.; Correia-Pinto, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Background Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are members of the family of the glycoprotein 130 (gp130)-type cytokines. These cytokines share gp130 as a common signal transducer, which explains why they show some functional redundancy. Recently, it was demonstrated that IL-6 promotes fetal lung branching. Additionally, LIF has been implicated in developmental processes of some branching organs. Thus, in this study LIF expression pattern and its effects on fetal rat lung morphogenesis were assessed. Methodology/Principal Findings LIF and its subunit receptor LIFRα expression levels were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blot in fetal rat lungs of different gestational ages, ranging from 13.5 to 21.5 days post-conception. Throughout all gestational ages studied, LIF was constitutively expressed in pulmonary epithelium, whereas LIFRα was first mainly expressed in the mesenchyme, but after pseudoglandular stage it was also observed in epithelial cells. These results point to a LIF epithelium-mesenchyme cross-talk, which is known to be important for lung branching process. Regarding functional studies, fetal lung explants were cultured with increasing doses of LIF or LIF neutralizing antibodies during 4 days. MAPK, AKT, and STAT3 phosphorylation in the treated lung explants was analyzed. LIF supplementation significantly inhibited lung growth in spite of an increase in p44/42 phosphorylation. On the other hand, LIF inhibition significantly stimulated lung growth via p38 and Akt pathways. Conclusions/Significance The present study describes that LIF and its subunit receptor LIFRα are constitutively expressed during fetal lung development and that they have an inhibitory physiological role on fetal lung branching. PMID:22291973

  10. Development of a new interfacility extracorporeal membrane oxygenation transport program for pediatric lung transplantation evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Edward G.; Gee, Samantha W.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric lung transplantation is a life-saving intervention for children with irreversible end-stage lung disease. Access to transplant can be limited by geographic isolation from a center or the presence of comorbidities affecting transplant eligibility. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)-supported patients are an uncommon but historically high-risk cohort of patients considered for lung transplant. We report the development of a service at our center to provide transport services to our hospital for patients unable to wean from ECMO support at their local institution for the purpose of evaluation for lung transplantation by our program. We developed a process for pre-transport consultation by the lung transplant physician team, standardized hand-off tools and equipment lists, and procedures for transitioning patients to transport ECMO machinery. Four patients have been transported to date including fixed wing (FW) and helicopter transports. All patients were successfully transported with either none or minor complications. Transport of ECMO-supported patients is a feasible method to increase access of patients with irreversible lung injured patients to evaluation for lung transplant. PMID:28275613

  11. Development of a new interfacility extracorporeal membrane oxygenation transport program for pediatric lung transplantation evaluation.

    PubMed

    Frazier, W Joshua; Shepherd, Edward G; Gee, Samantha W

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric lung transplantation is a life-saving intervention for children with irreversible end-stage lung disease. Access to transplant can be limited by geographic isolation from a center or the presence of comorbidities affecting transplant eligibility. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)-supported patients are an uncommon but historically high-risk cohort of patients considered for lung transplant. We report the development of a service at our center to provide transport services to our hospital for patients unable to wean from ECMO support at their local institution for the purpose of evaluation for lung transplantation by our program. We developed a process for pre-transport consultation by the lung transplant physician team, standardized hand-off tools and equipment lists, and procedures for transitioning patients to transport ECMO machinery. Four patients have been transported to date including fixed wing (FW) and helicopter transports. All patients were successfully transported with either none or minor complications. Transport of ECMO-supported patients is a feasible method to increase access of patients with irreversible lung injured patients to evaluation for lung transplant.

  12. MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELASTOGRAPHY OF HUMAN LUNG PARENCHYMA: TECHNICAL DEVELOPMENT, THEORETICAL MODELING AND IN VIVO VALIDATION

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Yogesh K; Glaser, Kevin J; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Manduca, Armando; Ehman, Richard L; McGee, Kiaran P

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To develop a novel MR-based method for visualizing the elastic properties of human lung parenchyma in vivo and to evaluate the ability of this method to resolve differences in parenchymal stiffness at different respiration states in healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods A spin-echo MR Elastography (MRE) pulse sequence was developed to provide both high shear wave motion sensitivity and short TE for improved visualization of lung parenchyma. The improved motion sensitivity of this approach was modeled and tested with phantom experiments. In vivo testing was then performed on ten healthy volunteers at the respiratory states of residual volume (RV) and total lung capacity (TLC). Results Shear wave propagation was visualized within the lungs of all volunteers and was processed to provide parenchymal shear stiffness maps of all ten subjects. Density corrected stiffness values at TLC (1.83 ± 0.22 kPa) were higher than those at the RV (1.14 ± 0.14 kPa) with the difference being statistically significant (p<0.0001). Conclusion 1H-based MR Elastography can noninvasively measure the shear stiffness of human lung parenchyma in vivo and can quantitate the change in shear stiffness due to respiration. The values obtained were consistent with previously reported in vitro assessments of cadaver lungs. Further work is required to increase the flexibility of the current acquisition and to investigate the clinical potential of lung MRE. PMID:21591003

  13. Checkpoint inhibitors in lung cancer: latest developments and clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Schvartsman, Gustavo; Ferrarotto, Renata; Massarelli, Erminia

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. The vast majority of patients are diagnosed with metastatic disease with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. After first-line chemotherapy or biomarker-matched targeted therapy, only suitable for a small group of patients, further systemic therapy options rendered very limited, if any, benefit until recently. Checkpoint inhibitors have significantly improved outcomes in patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and are currently an established second-line therapeutic option. In this manuscript, we review the mechanism of action of checkpoint inhibitors, present the available data with approved and experimental agents, discuss the progress that has already been made in the field, as well as toxicity awareness, and future perspectives. PMID:27800034

  14. Development and Evaluation of Stereographic Display for Lung Cancer Screening

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    image interpretation. REFERENCES 1. Greenlee RT, Murray T , Bolder S, et al. Cancer statistics, 2000. CA Cancer J Clin 2000; 50:7-33. 2. Ries... Shinde , Samaia Piracha, Kristin Foley, Carl R. Fuhrman, Betty E. Shindel, J . Ken Leader, Walter F. Good Department of Radiology, University of...Habbema JDF, Pedersen JH, et al. Lung cancer screening by low-dose spiral computed tomography. Eur Respir J 2001; 18:857-866. 4. Flehinger BJ, Kimmel M

  15. Affect of Early Life Oxygen Exposure on Proper Lung Development and Response to Respiratory Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Domm, William; Misra, Ravi S.; O’Reilly, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Children born preterm often exhibit reduced lung function and increased severity of response to respiratory viruses, suggesting that premature birth has compromised proper development of the respiratory epithelium and innate immune defenses. Increasing evidence suggests that premature birth promotes aberrant lung development likely due to the neonatal oxygen transition occurring before pulmonary development has matured. Given that preterm infants are born at a point of time where their immune system is also still developing, early life oxygen exposure may also be disrupting proper development of innate immunity. Here, we review current literature in hopes of stimulating research that enhances understanding of how the oxygen environment at birth influences lung development and host defense. This knowledge may help identify those children at risk for disease and ideally culminate in the development of novel therapies that improve their health. PMID:26322310

  16. Ezh2 represses the basal cell lineage during lung endoderm development.

    PubMed

    Snitow, Melinda E; Li, Shanru; Morley, Michael P; Rathi, Komal; Lu, Min Min; Kadzik, Rachel S; Stewart, Kathleen M; Morrisey, Edward E

    2015-01-01

    The development of the lung epithelium is regulated in a stepwise fashion to generate numerous differentiated and stem cell lineages in the adult lung. How these different lineages are generated in a spatially and temporally restricted fashion remains poorly understood, although epigenetic regulation probably plays an important role. We show that the Polycomb repressive complex 2 component Ezh2 is highly expressed in early lung development but is gradually downregulated by late gestation. Deletion of Ezh2 in early lung endoderm progenitors leads to the ectopic and premature appearance of Trp63+ basal cells that extend the entire length of the airway. Loss of Ezh2 also leads to reduced secretory cell differentiation. In their place, morphologically similar cells develop that express a subset of basal cell genes, including keratin 5, but no longer express high levels of either Trp63 or of standard secretory cell markers. This suggests that Ezh2 regulates the phenotypic switch between basal cells and secretory cells. Together, these findings show that Ezh2 restricts the basal cell lineage during normal lung endoderm development to allow the proper patterning of epithelial lineages during lung formation.

  17. Butylated hydroxyanisole and lung tumor development in A/J mice

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.R.; Doherty, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    A diet containing 0.75% butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) did not enhance the development of lung tumors in A/J mice if fed for 8 weeks after administration of urethane, benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), or dimethylnitrosamine (DMN). Prefeeding animals with BHA partially protected animals against the tumorigenic effect of urethane and B(a)P. Partial protection was also seen in animals given B(a)P and then exposed to BHA in the diet. The two isomers of BHA 3-tert.-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole and 2-tert.-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole) were synthesized and injected ip. They failed to enhance lung tumor development. It is concluded that BHA is not a promoting agent as is butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) for lung tumors in mice. One possible explanation is that BHA in the diet does not produce the extensive cell proliferation seen in the lungs of mice fed BHT. 19 references, 5 tables.

  18. Development and assessment of countermeasure formulations for treatment of lung injury induced by chlorine inhalation.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, Gary W; Chen, Jing; Schlueter, Connie F; Mo, Yiqun; Humphrey, David M; Rawson, Greg; Niño, Joe A; Carson, Kenneth H

    2016-05-01

    Chlorine is a commonly used, reactive compound to which humans can be exposed via accidental or intentional release resulting in acute lung injury. Formulations of rolipram (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor), triptolide (a natural plant product with anti-inflammatory properties), and budesonide (a corticosteroid), either neat or in conjunction with poly(lactic:glycolic acid) (PLGA), were developed for treatment of chlorine-induced acute lung injury by intramuscular injection. Formulations were produced by spray-drying, which generated generally spherical microparticles that were suitable for intramuscular injection. Multiple parameters were varied to produce formulations with a wide range of in vitro release kinetics. Testing of selected formulations in chlorine-exposed mice demonstrated efficacy against key aspects of acute lung injury. The results show the feasibility of developing microencapsulated formulations that could be used to treat chlorine-induced acute lung injury by intramuscular injection, which represents a preferred route of administration in a mass casualty situation.

  19. Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) and neuroepithelial bodies (NEB): chemoreceptors and regulators of lung development.

    PubMed

    Van Lommel, A

    2001-06-01

    The airway and alveolar epithelia contain pulmonary neuroendocrine cells whose structure indicates an endocrine function. They are also in contact with sensory nerve fibres. These cells often aggregate into distinct corpuscles-neuroepithelial bodies-and carry membrane receptors sensitive to a number of stimuli, including hypoxia and nicotine. They synthesise, store and release a number of bioactive substances such as serotonin, calcitonin gene-related peptide and the mitogen bombesin. When these are released they contribute to redistribution of pulmonary blood flow, regulation of bronchomotor tone, modulation of the immune response, stimulation of sensory nerve fibres and regulation of lung growth and development. Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells and neuroepithelial bodies seem to be most important in the fetal and neonatal lung as regulators of airway development and hypoxia-sensitive chemoreceptors. There is a link between these cells and specific types of lung cancer and their involvement in lung and paediatric pathology may be profound.

  20. Sex differences in abnormal white matter development associated with conduct disorder in children

    PubMed Central

    Decety, Jean; Yoder, Keith J.; Lahey, Benjamin B.

    2015-01-01

    Associations between white matter pathway abnormalities and antisocial personality disorder in adults are well replicated, and there is some evidence for an association of white matter abnormalities with conduct disorder (CD) in adolescents. In this study, white matter maturation using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was examined in 110 children aged 10.0 ± 0.8 years selected to vary widely in their numbers of CD symptoms. The results replicated age-related increases in fractional anisotropy (FA) found in previous studies. There was not a significant association between the number of CD symptoms and FA, but CD symptoms were found to be significantly associated with greater axial and radial diffusivity in a broad range of white matter tracts, particularly in girls. In complementary analyses, there were similar significant differences in axial and radial diffusivity between children who met diagnostic criteria for CD and healthy children with no symptoms of CD, particularly in girls. Brain structural abnormalities may contribute to the emergence of CD in childhood, perhaps playing a greater role in girls. PMID:26195297

  1. Sex differences in abnormal white matter development associated with conduct disorder in children.

    PubMed

    Decety, Jean; Yoder, Keith J; Lahey, Benjamin B

    2015-08-30

    Associations between white matter pathway abnormalities and antisocial personality disorder in adults are well replicated, and there is some evidence for an association of white matter abnormalities with conduct disorder (CD) in adolescents. In this study, white matter maturation using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was examined in 110 children aged 10.0 ± 0.8 years selected to vary widely in their numbers of CD symptoms. The results replicated age-related increases in fractional anisotropy (FA) found in previous studies. There was not a significant association between the number of CD symptoms and FA, but CD symptoms were found to be significantly associated with greater axial and radial diffusivity in a broad range of white matter tracts, particularly in girls. In complementary analyses, there were similar significant differences in axial and radial diffusivity between children who met diagnostic criteria for CD and healthy children with no symptoms of CD, particularly in girls. Brain structural abnormalities may contribute to the emergence of CD in childhood, perhaps playing a greater role in girls.

  2. A review of recent developments and applications of morphometry/stereology in lung research.

    PubMed

    Mühlfeld, Christian; Hegermann, Jan; Wrede, Christoph; Ochs, Matthias

    2015-09-15

    Design-based stereology is the gold standard of morphometry in lung research. Here, we analyze the current use of morphometric and stereological methods in lung research and provide an overview on recent methodological developments and biological observations made by the use of stereology. Based on this analysis we hope to provide useful recommendations for a good stereological practice to further the use of advanced and unbiased stereological methods.

  3. Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0238 TITLE: Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL...of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Oxygen-rich environments can create pro-mutagenic DNA lesions such as 8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) that can be misreplicated during translesion DNA synthesis

  4. A human YAC transgene rescues craniofacial and neural tube development in PDGFRalpha knockout mice and uncovers a role for PDGFRalpha in prenatal lung growth.

    PubMed

    Sun, T; Jayatilake, D; Afink, G B; Ataliotis, P; Nistér, M; Richardson, W D; Smith, H K

    2000-11-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor alpha-receptor (PDGFRalpha) plays a vital role in the development of vertebrate embryos, since mice lacking PDGFRalpha die in mid-gestation. PDGFRalpha is expressed in several types of migratory progenitor cells in the embryo including cranial neural crest cells, lung smooth muscle progenitors and oligodendrocyte progenitors. To study PDGFRalpha gene regulation and function during development, we generated transgenic mice by pronuclear injection of a 380 kb yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) containing the human PDGFRalpha gene. The YAC transgene was expressed in neural crest cells, rescued the profound craniofacial abnormalities and spina bifida observed in PDGFRalpha knockout mice and prolonged survival until birth. The ultimate cause of death was respiratory failure due to a defect in lung growth, stemming from failure of the transgene to be expressed correctly in lung smooth muscle progenitors. However, the YAC transgene was expressed faithfully in oligodendrocyte progenitors, which was not previously observed with plasmid-based transgenes containing only upstream PDGFRalpha control sequences. Our data illustrate the complexity of PDGFRalpha genetic control, provide clues to the location of critical regulatory elements and reveal a requirement for PDGF signalling in prenatal lung growth, which is distinct from the known requirement in postnatal alveogenesis. In addition, we found that the YAC transgene did not prolong survival of Patch mutant mice, indicating that genetic defects outside the PDGFRalpha locus contribute to the early embryonic lethality of Patch mice.

  5. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  6. Development of a neonate lung reconstruction algorithm using a wavelet AMG and estimated boundary form.

    PubMed

    Bayford, R; Kantartzis, P; Tizzard, A; Yerworth, R; Liatsis, P; Demosthenous, A

    2008-06-01

    Objective, non-invasive measures of lung maturity and development, oxygen requirements and lung function, suitable for use in small, unsedated infants, are urgently required to define the nature and severity of persisting lung disease, and to identify risk factors for developing chronic lung problems. Disorders of lung growth, maturation and control of breathing are among the most important problems faced by the neonatologists. At present, no system for continuous monitoring of neonate lung function to reduce the risk of chronic lung disease in infancy in intensive care units exists. We are in the process of developing a new integrated electrical impedance tomography (EIT) system based on wearable technology to integrate measures of the boundary diameter from the boundary form for neonates into the reconstruction algorithm. In principle, this approach could provide a reduction of image artefacts in the reconstructed image associated with incorrect boundary form assumptions. In this paper, we investigate the required accuracy of the boundary form that would be suitable to minimize artefacts in the reconstruction for neonate lung function. The number of data points needed to create the required boundary form is automatically determined using genetic algorithms. The approach presented in this paper is to assist quality of the reconstruction using different approximations to the ideal boundary form. We also investigate the use of a wavelet algebraic multi-grid (WAMG) preconditioner to reduce the reconstruction computation requirements. Results are presented that demonstrate a full 3D model is required to minimize artefact in the reconstructed image and the implementation of a WAMG for EIT.

  7. VEGF receptor expression decreases during lung development in congenital diaphragmatic hernia induced by nitrofen

    PubMed Central

    Sbragia, L.; Nassr, A.C.C.; Gonçalves, F.L.L.; Schmidt, A.F.; Zuliani, C.C.; Garcia, P.V.; Gallindo, R.M.; Pereira, L.A.V.

    2014-01-01

    Changes in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in pulmonary vessels have been described in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and may contribute to the development of pulmonary hypoplasia and hypertension; however, how the expression of VEGF receptors changes during fetal lung development in CDH is not understood. The aim of this study was to compare morphological evolution with expression of VEGF receptors, VEGFR1 (Flt-1) and VEGFR2 (Flk-1), in pseudoglandular, canalicular, and saccular stages of lung development in normal rat fetuses and in fetuses with CDH. Pregnant rats were divided into four groups (n=20 fetuses each) of four different gestational days (GD) 18.5, 19.5, 20.5, 21.5: external control (EC), exposed to olive oil (OO), exposed to 100 mg nitrofen, by gavage, without CDH (N-), and exposed to nitrofen with CDH (CDH) on GD 9.5 (term=22 days). The morphological variables studied were: body weight (BW), total lung weight (TLW), left lung weight, TLW/BW ratio, total lung volume, and left lung volume. The histometric variables studied were: left lung parenchymal area density and left lung parenchymal volume. VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 expression were determined by Western blotting. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance with the Tukey-Kramer post hoc test. CDH frequency was 37% (80/216). All the morphological and histometric variables were reduced in the N- and CDH groups compared with the controls, and reductions were more pronounced in the CDH group (P<0.05) and more evident on GD 20.5 and GD 21.5. Similar results were observed for VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 expression. We conclude that N- and CDH fetuses showed primary pulmonary hypoplasia, with a decrease in VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 expression. PMID:24519134

  8. VEGF receptor expression decreases during lung development in congenital diaphragmatic hernia induced by nitrofen.

    PubMed

    Sbragia, L; Nassr, A C C; Gonçalves, F L L; Schmidt, A F; Zuliani, C C; Garcia, P V; Gallindo, R M; Pereira, L A V

    2014-02-01

    Changes in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in pulmonary vessels have been described in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and may contribute to the development of pulmonary hypoplasia and hypertension; however, how the expression of VEGF receptors changes during fetal lung development in CDH is not understood. The aim of this study was to compare morphological evolution with expression of VEGF receptors, VEGFR1 (Flt-1) and VEGFR2 (Flk-1), in pseudoglandular, canalicular, and saccular stages of lung development in normal rat fetuses and in fetuses with CDH. Pregnant rats were divided into four groups (n=20 fetuses each) of four different gestational days (GD) 18.5, 19.5, 20.5, 21.5: external control (EC), exposed to olive oil (OO), exposed to 100 mg nitrofen, by gavage, without CDH (N-), and exposed to nitrofen with CDH (CDH) on GD 9.5 (term=22 days). The morphological variables studied were: body weight (BW), total lung weight (TLW), left lung weight, TLW/BW ratio, total lung volume, and left lung volume. The histometric variables studied were: left lung parenchymal area density and left lung parenchymal volume. VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 expression were determined by Western blotting. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance with the Tukey-Kramer post hoc test. CDH frequency was 37% (80/216). All the morphological and histometric variables were reduced in the N- and CDH groups compared with the controls, and reductions were more pronounced in the CDH group (P<0.05) and more evident on GD 20.5 and GD 21.5. Similar results were observed for VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 expression. We conclude that N- and CDH fetuses showed primary pulmonary hypoplasia, with a decrease in VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 expression.

  9. Developing Optimal Parameters for Hyperpolarized Noble Gas and Inert Fluorinated Gas MRI of Lung Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Lung Transplant; Lung Resection; Lung Cancer; Asthma; Cystic Fibrosis; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Emphysema; Mesothelioma; Asbestosis; Pulmonary Embolism; Interstitial Lung Disease; Pulmonary Fibrosis; Bronchiectasis; Seasonal Allergies; Cold Virus; Lung Infection; Pulmonary Hypertension; Pulmonary Dysplasia; Obstructive Sleep Apnea

  10. [Effect of propofol-based combined anesthesia on the development of adaptive mechanisms to the prolonged one-lung artificial ventilation].

    PubMed

    Kurilova, O A; Vyzhigina, M A; Sandrikov, V A; Mizikov, V M; Kulagina, T Iu; Zhukova, S G; Parshin, V D

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the assessment of the adequacy and safety of multicomponent anesthesia based on propofol at lung surgery requiring one-lung ventilation (OLV) in patients with chronic respiratory diseases and with the evaluation of the effect of propofol on the development of adaptive mechanisms in various ventilation modalities in thoracic surgery. The pressor, resistive, and volume characteristics of pulmonary blood flow, systemic and intracardiac hemodynamics under artificial ventilation (AV) and OLV of a duration of up to 1.5 hours by a combination of pulmonal and transpulmonal thermodilution on a PiCCO plus device with a VOLEF attachment were compared. Multicomponent balanced anesthesia based on continuous graduated propofol infusion provides adequate protection of patients during thoracic operations, including those with concomitant respiratory abnormality.

  11. Maternal high-fat diet is associated with impaired fetal lung development.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Reina S; Finch, Katelyn E; Zehr, Jordan; Morselli, Eugenia; Neinast, Michael D; Frank, Aaron P; Hahner, Lisa D; Wang, Jason; Rakheja, Dinesh; Palmer, Biff F; Rosenfeld, Charles R; Savani, Rashmin C; Clegg, Deborah J

    2015-08-15

    Maternal nutrition has a profound long-term impact on infant health. Poor maternal nutrition influences placental development and fetal growth, resulting in low birth weight, which is strongly associated with the risk of developing chronic diseases, including heart disease, hypertension, asthma, and type 2 diabetes, later in life. Few studies have delineated the mechanisms by which maternal nutrition affects fetal lung development. Here, we report that maternal exposure to a diet high in fat (HFD) causes placental inflammation, resulting in placental insufficiency, fetal growth restriction (FGR), and inhibition of fetal lung development. Notably, pre- and postnatal exposure to maternal HFD also results in persistent alveolar simplification in the postnatal period. Our novel findings provide a strong association between maternal diet and fetal lung development.

  12. In vitro evaluation of a newly developed implantable artificial lung.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hitoshi; Taga, Ichiro; Kinoshita, Takahiro; Funakubo, Akio; Ichiba, Shingo; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2006-04-01

    A prototype of an implantable artificial lung without a pump (Prototype II) has been tested. A commercially available membrane oxygenator, MENOX AL6000alpha (Dainippon Ink and Chemicals, Inc., Tokyo, Japan), was used as a basic model. The packing density of the hollow fiber was decreased in order to achieve low resistance through the blood pathway. The configuration of its housing was also re-designed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The first prototype, known as Prototype I, was already tested in a 15 kg pig, which showed excellent gas exchange with normal hemodynamics. A second prototype, Prototype II, has a larger membrane surface area than Prototype I. The device was evaluated for resistance through the blood path and gas transfer rate in an in vitro setting by the single pass method using fresh bovine blood. The resistance through the blood path of Prototype II was 2.7+- 0.7 mmHg/(L/min) at Q = 5L/min. The oxygen (O2) transfer rate was 178 +- 5.3 ml/min at Q = 5 L/min, V/Q = 3, and the carbon dioxide (CO2) transfer rate was 149 +- 28 ml/min at Q = 5 L/min, V/Q = 2 (Q: blood flow rate, V: sweep oxygen flow rate through the artificial lung). For the purpose of implantation, this prototype showed sufficiently low resistance in the pulmonary circulation with reasonable gas exchange.

  13. Novel compounds in the treatment of lung cancer: current and developing therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Rudi; Chan, Pokman

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Though incremental advances have been made in the treatment of this devastating disease during the past decade, new therapies are urgently needed. Traditional cytotoxic agents have been combined with other modalities with improved survival for early-stage patients. Newer cytotoxic agents targeting the same or different mechanisms have been developed at different stages. Optimization of various chemotherapy regimens in different settings is one of the aims of current clinical trials. Some predictive biomarkers (eg, excision repair cross-complementing 1, ERCC1) and histotypes (eg, adenocarcinoma) are found to be associated with resistance/response to some cytotoxic drugs. Another notable advance is the addition of targeted therapy to lung cancer treatment. Targeted agents such as erlotinib and bevacizumab have demonstrated clinical benefits and gained Food and Drug Administration approval for lung cancer. More agents targeting various signaling pathways critical to lung cancer are at different stages of development. Along with the effort of new targeted drug discovery, biomarkers such as epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase mutations have proven useful for patient selection, and more predictive biomarkers have been actively evaluated in non-small cell lung cancer. The paradigm of lung cancer treatment has shifted towards biomarker-based personalized medicine. PMID:27186107

  14. Indium Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Makiko; Omae, Kazuyuki; Takeuchi, Koichiro; Chonan, Tatsuya; Xiao, Yong-long; Harley, Russell A.; Roggli, Victor L.; Hebisawa, Akira; Tallaksen, Robert J.; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Day, Gregory A.; Saito, Rena; Stanton, Marcia L.; Suarthana, Eva; Kreiss, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reports of pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema, and, more recently, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) in indium workers suggested that workplace exposure to indium compounds caused several different lung diseases. Methods: To better understand the pathogenesis and natural history of indium lung disease, a detailed, systematic, multidisciplinary analysis of clinical, histopathologic, radiologic, and epidemiologic data for all reported cases and workplaces was undertaken. Results: Ten men (median age, 35 years) who produced, used, or reclaimed indium compounds were diagnosed with interstitial lung disease 4-13 years after first exposure (n = 7) or PAP 1-2 years after first exposure (n = 3). Common pulmonary histopathologic features in these patients included intraalveolar exudate typical of alveolar proteinosis (n = 9), cholesterol clefts and granulomas (n = 10), and fibrosis (n = 9). Two patients with interstitial lung disease had pneumothoraces. Lung disease progressed following cessation of exposure in most patients and was fatal in two. Radiographic data revealed that two patients with PAP subsequently developed fibrosis and one also developed emphysematous changes. Epidemiologic investigations demonstrated the potential for exposure to respirable particles and an excess of lung abnormalities among coworkers. Conclusions: Occupational exposure to indium compounds was associated with PAP, cholesterol ester crystals and granulomas, pulmonary fibrosis, emphysema, and pneumothoraces. The available evidence suggests exposure to indium compounds causes a novel lung disease that may begin with PAP and progress to include fibrosis and emphysema, and, in some cases, premature death. Prospective studies are needed to better define the natural history and prognosis of this emerging lung disease and identify effective prevention strategies. PMID:22207675

  15. Development of a Three-Dimensional Bioengineering Technology to Generate Lung Tissue for Personalized Disease Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dan C; Alva-Ornelas, Jackelyn A; Sucre, Jennifer M S; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Durra, Abdo; Richardson, Wade; Jonas, Steven J; Paul, Manash K; Karumbayaram, Saravanan; Dunn, Bruce; Gomperts, Brigitte N

    2017-02-01

    Stem cell technologies, especially patient-specific, induced stem cell pluripotency and directed differentiation, hold great promise for changing the landscape of medical therapies. Proper exploitation of these methods may lead to personalized organ transplants, but to regenerate organs, it is necessary to develop methods for assembling differentiated cells into functional, organ-level tissues. The generation of three-dimensional human tissue models also holds potential for medical advances in disease modeling, as full organ functionality may not be necessary to recapitulate disease pathophysiology. This is specifically true of lung diseases where animal models often do not recapitulate human disease. Here, we present a method for the generation of self-assembled human lung tissue and its potential for disease modeling and drug discovery for lung diseases characterized by progressive and irreversible scarring such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Tissue formation occurs because of the overlapping processes of cellular adhesion to multiple alveolar sac templates, bioreactor rotation, and cellular contraction. Addition of transforming growth factor-β1 to single cell-type mesenchymal organoids resulted in morphologic scarring typical of that seen in IPF but not in two-dimensional IPF fibroblast cultures. Furthermore, this lung organoid may be modified to contain multiple lung cell types assembled into the correct anatomical location, thereby allowing cell-cell contact and recapitulating the lung microenvironment. Our bottom-up approach for synthesizing patient-specific lung tissue in a scalable system allows for the development of relevant human lung disease models with the potential for high throughput drug screening to identify targeted therapies. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:622-633.

  16. Development of a Three-Dimensional Bioengineering Technology to Generate Lung Tissue for Personalized Disease Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dan C; Alva-Ornelas, Jackelyn A; Sucre, Jennifer M S; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Durra, Abdo; Richardson, Wade; Jonas, Steven J; Paul, Manash K; Karumbayaram, Saravanan; Dunn, Bruce; Gomperts, Brigitte N

    2016-09-15

    : Stem cell technologies, especially patient-specific, induced stem cell pluripotency and directed differentiation, hold great promise for changing the landscape of medical therapies. Proper exploitation of these methods may lead to personalized organ transplants, but to regenerate organs, it is necessary to develop methods for assembling differentiated cells into functional, organ-level tissues. The generation of three-dimensional human tissue models also holds potential for medical advances in disease modeling, as full organ functionality may not be necessary to recapitulate disease pathophysiology. This is specifically true of lung diseases where animal models often do not recapitulate human disease. Here, we present a method for the generation of self-assembled human lung tissue and its potential for disease modeling and drug discovery for lung diseases characterized by progressive and irreversible scarring such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Tissue formation occurs because of the overlapping processes of cellular adhesion to multiple alveolar sac templates, bioreactor rotation, and cellular contraction. Addition of transforming growth factor-β1 to single cell-type mesenchymal organoids resulted in morphologic scarring typical of that seen in IPF but not in two-dimensional IPF fibroblast cultures. Furthermore, this lung organoid may be modified to contain multiple lung cell types assembled into the correct anatomical location, thereby allowing cell-cell contact and recapitulating the lung microenvironment. Our bottom-up approach for synthesizing patient-specific lung tissue in a scalable system allows for the development of relevant human lung disease models with the potential for high throughput drug screening to identify targeted therapies.

  17. Foxp transcription factors suppress a non-pulmonary gene expression program to permit proper lung development.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanru; Morley, Michael; Lu, MinMin; Zhou, Su; Stewart, Kathleen; French, Catherine A; Tucker, Haley O; Fisher, Simon E; Morrisey, Edward E

    2016-08-15

    The inhibitory mechanisms that prevent gene expression programs from one tissue to be expressed in another are poorly understood. Foxp1/2/4 are forkhead transcription factors that repress gene expression and are individually important for endoderm development. We show that combined loss of all three Foxp1/2/4 family members in the developing anterior foregut endoderm leads to a loss of lung endoderm lineage commitment and subsequent development. Foxp1/2/4 deficient lungs express high levels of transcriptional regulators not normally expressed in the developing lung, including Pax2, Pax8, Pax9 and the Hoxa9-13 cluster. Ectopic expression of these transcriptional regulators is accompanied by decreased expression of lung restricted transcription factors including Nkx2-1, Sox2, and Sox9. Foxp1 binds to conserved forkhead DNA binding sites within the Hoxa9-13 cluster, indicating a direct repression mechanism. Thus, Foxp1/2/4 are essential for promoting lung endoderm development by repressing expression of non-pulmonary transcription factors.

  18. Towards an integrated approach to lung health in adolescents in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Nelson, E A S; Olukoya, A; Scherpbier, R W

    2004-06-01

    The World Health Organization strategies, Integrated Management of Childhood Illness and Practical Approach to Lung health provide assessment and management guidelines for health workers in developing countries. We reviewed issues important to lung health in adolescents to highlight whether differences in factors such as adolescent behaviour have consequences for the development of case management guidelines, to form a bridge between guidelines for younger children and for adults and to make suggestions for further study. Pneumonia, asthma and tuberculosis are the leading lung health problems in adolescents. As countries industrialise, the importance of asthma mortality and morbidity increases as that of pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis decreases. Guidelines for managing pneumonia and asthma in children and adults in developing and developed countries should be adaptable for use in adolescents in developing countries, although more information is needed on predictors of severity such as respiratory rate cut-offs, level of fever, hypotension, malnutrition and level of consciousness. The effectiveness of low-cost treatment for asthma should be explored further. HIV and the global resurgence of tuberculosis pose significant challenges for improving adolescent lung health, and prevention of smoking initiation during adolescence is a priority goal of any integrated approach to improving lung health.

  19. Loss of the SWI/SNF ATPase subunits BRM and BRG1 drives lung cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Marquez-Vilendrer, Stefanie B.; Rai, Sudhir K.; Gramling, Sarah JB; Lu, Li; Reisman, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Inactivation of Brg1 and Brm accelerated lung tumor development, shortened tumor latency, and caused a loss of differentiation. Tumors with Brg1 and/or Brm loss recapitulated the evolution of human lung cancer as observed by the development of local tumor invasion as well as distal tumor metastasis, thereby making this model useful in lung cancer studies. Brg1 loss contributed to metastasis in part by driving E-cadherin loss and Vimentin up-regulation. By changing more than 6% of the murine genome with the down-regulation of tumor suppressors, DNA repair, differentiation and cell adhesion genes, and the concomitant up-regulation of oncogenes, angiogenesis, metastasis and antiapoptosis genes, caused by the dual loss of Brg1/Brm further accelerated tumor development. Additionally, this Brg1/Brm-driven change in gene expression resulted in a nearly two-fold increase in tumorigenicity in Brg1/Brm knockout mice compared with wild type mice. Most importantly, Brg1/Brm-driven lung cancer development histologically and clinically reflects human lung cancer development thereby making this GEMM model potentially useful. PMID:28105457

  20. Failure of ozone and nitrogen dioxide to enhance lung tumor development in hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.; Breider, M.A.; Schuller, H.M. )

    1993-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the two common oxidant air pollutants, ozone and nitrogen dioxide, modulate the development of respiratory tract tumors in Syrian golden hamsters. The animals received subcutaneous injections of the carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (20 mg/kg) twice a week while being exposed continuously to an atmosphere of 0.8 parts per million (ppm)* of ozone or 15 ppm of nitrogen dioxide. Animals were killed 16 weeks or 24 to 32 weeks after the beginning of the treatment. Ozone delayed the appearance of tracheal tumors and reduced the incidence of tumors in the lung periphery. A suspected neuroendocrine differentiation of those lung tumors could not be established by immunocytochemistry due to overfixation of tissues. On the other hand, ozone seemed to mitigate development of hepatotoxic lesions mediated by diethylnitrosamine. In animals treated with diethylnitrosamine and exposed to nitrogen dioxide, fewer tracheal tumors and no lung tumors were found. Only a few lung tumors were produced in animals treated with diethylnitrosamine and kept in an atmosphere of 65% oxygen. The previously observed neuroendocrine nature of tumors induced by simultaneous exposure to diethylnitrosamine and hyperoxia could not be established because the long fixation of tissues precluded immunocytochemical stains. Animals treated with diethylnitrosamine and kept in filtered air while being housed in wire-mesh cages developed fewer lung tumors than animals given the same treatment and kept on conventional bedding in shoebox cages. Although all inhalants tested are known to produce substantial cell proliferation in the respiratory tract, it was not possible to document whether this would enhance lung tumor development. The role of the two common air pollutants, ozone and nitrogen dioxide, as possible additional risks in the pathogenesis of lung cancer in animals continues to remain uncertain.

  1. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Rates of development in male and female Wood Frogs and patterns of parasitism by lung nematodes.

    PubMed

    Dare, O K; Forbes, M R

    2008-03-01

    Researchers are becoming interested in testing whether investment in growth and/or development trades off against investment in parasite defence. We tested this idea by examining relations between development of Wood Frogs (Rana sylvatica) and susceptibility to lung nematodes (Rhabdias ranae). Male and female frogs reared in outdoor mesocosms were the same length and mass at metamorphosis. However, males metamorphosed sooner than females. Lung nematodes were no more likely to penetrate male versus female metamorphs following controlled exposures, but males had higher intensities of adult female worms and the largest worms per host were, on average, of larger size in male metamorphs. Males that took longer to metamorphose carried higher numbers of worms in their lungs than males that metamorphosed early. In comparison, females that developed faster harboured more worms in their lungs than females that took longer to reach metamorphosis. Our results suggest that variation in susceptibility to lung nematodes is influenced by host sex and possibly also by sex-specific relations with developmental rate. Further, male hosts might prove to be a more important source of infective stages of worms than female hosts.

  3. Mechanical stretch-induced serotonin release from pulmonary neuroendocrine cells: implications for lung development.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Copland, Ian; Post, Martin; Yeger, Herman; Cutz, Ernest

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) produce amine (serotonin, 5-HT) and peptides (e.g., bombesin, calcitonin) with growth factor-like properties and are thought to play an important role in lung development. Because physical forces are essential for lung growth and development, we investigated the effects of mechanical strain on 5-HT release in PNEC freshly isolated from rabbit fetal lung and in the PNEC-related tumor H727 cell line. Cultures exposed to sinusoidal cyclic stretch showed a significant 5-HT release inhibitable with gadolinium chloride (10 nM), a blocker of mechanosensitive channels. In contrast to hypoxia (Po2 approximately 20 mmHg), stretch-induced 5-HT release was not affected by Ca2+-free medium or nifedipine (50 microM), excluding the exocytic pathway. In H727 cells, stretch failed to release calcitonin, a peptide stored within dense core vesicles (DCV), whereas hypoxia caused massive calcitonin release. 5-HT released by mechanical stretch is derived predominantly from the cytoplasmic pool, because it is rapid ( approximately 5 min) and is releasable from early (20 days of gestation) fetal PNEC containing few DCV. Both mechanical stretch and hypoxia upregulated expression of tryptophan hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme of 5-HT synthesis. We conclude that mechanical strain is an important physiological stimulus for the release of 5-HT from PNEC via mechanosensitive channels with potential effects on lung development and resorption of lung fluid at the time of birth.

  4. Skeletal development and abnormalities of the vertebral column and of the fins in hatchery-reared turbot Scophthalmus maximus.

    PubMed

    Tong, X H; Liu, Q H; Xu, S H; Ma, D Y; Xiao, Z Z; Xiao, Y S; Li, J

    2012-03-01

    To describe the skeletal development and abnormalities in turbot Scophthalmus maximus, samples were collected every day from hatching to 60 days after hatching (DAH). A whole-mount cartilage and bone-staining technique was used. Vertebral ontogeny started with the formation of anterior haemal arches at 5·1 mm standard length (L(S) ) c. 11 DAH, and was completed by the full attainment of parapophyses at 16·9 mm L(S) c. 31 DAH. Vertebral centra started to develop at 6·3 mm L(S) c. 16 DAH and ossification in all centra was visible at 11·0 mm L(S) c. 25 DAH. The caudal fin appeared at 5·1 mm L(S) c. 11 DAH and ossification was visible at 20·6 mm L(S) c. 37 DAH. The onset of dorsal and anal fin elements appeared at 5·8 mm L(S) c. 15 DAH and 6·3 mm L(S) c. 16 DAH, respectively. Ossifications of both dorsal fin and anal fin were visible at 20·6 mm L(S) c. 37 DAH. The pectorals were the only fins present before first feeding, their ossifications were completed at 23·5 mm L(S) c. 48 DAH. Pelvic fins began forming at 7·2 mm L(S) c. 19 DAH and calcification of the whole structure was visible at 19·8 mm L(S) c. 36 DAH. In the present study, 24 types of skeletal abnormalities were observed. About 51% of individuals presented skeletal abnormalities, and the highest occurrence was found in the haemal region of the vertebral column. As for each developmental stage, the most common abnormalities were in the dorsal fin during early metamorphic period (stage 2), vertebral fusion during climax metamorphosis (stage 3) and caudal fin abnormality during both late-metamorphic period (stage 4) and post-metamorphic period (stage 5). Such research will be useful for early detection of skeletal malformations during different growth periods of reared S. maximus.

  5. Development and Validation of a Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Model for African-Americans

    PubMed Central

    Etzel, Carol J.; Kachroo, Sumesh; Liu, Mei; D'Amelio, Anthony; Dong, Qiong; Cote, Michele L.; Wenzlaff, Angela S.; Hong, Waun Ki; Greisinger, Anthony J.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Spitz, Margaret R.

    2009-01-01

    Because existing risk prediction models for lung cancer were developed in white populations, they may not be appropriate for predicting risk among African-Americans. Therefore, a need exists to construct and validate a risk prediction model for lung cancer that is specific to African-Americans. We analyzed data from 491 African-Americans with lung cancer and 497 matched African-American controls to identify specific risks and incorporate them into a multivariable risk model for lung cancer and estimate the 5-year absolute risk of lung cancer. We performed internal and external validations of the risk model using data on additional cases and controls from the same ongoing multiracial/ethnic lung cancer case-control study from which the model-building data were obtained as well as data from two different lung cancer studies in metropolitan Detroit, respectively. We also compared our African-American model with our previously developed risk prediction model for whites. The final risk model included smoking-related variables [smoking status, pack-years smoked, age at smoking cessation (former smokers), and number of years since smoking cessation (former smokers)], self- reported physician diagnoses of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or hay fever, and exposures to asbestos or wood dusts. Our risk prediction model for African-Americans exhibited good discrimination [75% (95% confidence interval, 0.67−0.82)] for our internal data and moderate discrimination [63% (95% confidence interval, 0.57−0.69)] for the external data group, which is an improvement over the Spitz model for white subjects. Existing lung cancer prediction models may not be appropriate for predicting risk for African-Americans because (a) they were developed using white populations, (b) level of risk is different for risk factors that African-American share with whites, and (c) unique group-specific risk factors exist for African-Americans. This study developed and validated a risk prediction

  6. Deficiency of antiproliferative family protein Ana correlates with development of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Toru; Nakamura, Takahisa; Ajima, Rieko; Yoshida, Yutaka; Kakuta, Shigeru; Katsuko, Sudo; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Shibutani, Makoto; Mitsumori, Kunitoshi; Yokota, Jun; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2009-02-01

    The abundant in neuroepithelium area (ana) gene was originally identified as a member of the tob/btg family of antiproliferative genes. Like the other family members, Ana inhibits growth of NIH3T3 cells when overexpressed. However, whether or not Ana is involved in tumor progression has been elusive. Here, we show that expression of ana is relatively high in the lung, the expression being restricted in type II alveolar epithelial cells. We further show that ana expression is reduced in 97% of the human lung cancer cell lines examined (61/63) and 86% of clinical samples from lung adenocarcinoma patients (36/42). Long-term observation of ana-deficient (ana−/–) mice reveals that 8% of them develop lung tumors (5/66) by 21 months after birth, while 0% of wild-type mice (0/35) develop the same type of tumors. We also show that exogenously expressed ana gene product suppresses the levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression in lung cancer cells. Taken together, we propose that ana functions as a tumor suppressor and that its product inhibits tumor progression as well by suppressing angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis.

  7. Lung and metabolic development in mammals: contribution to the reconstruction of the marsupial and eutherian morphotype.

    PubMed

    Szdzuy, Kirsten; Zeller, Ulrich

    2009-09-15

    Marsupials represent only 6% of all living mammals. Marsupialia and Placentalia are distinguished mainly by their modes of reproduction. In particular, the differences in the stage of development of the neonates may be one explanation for the divergent evolutionary success. In this respect one important question is whether the survivability of the neonate depends on the degree of maturation of the respiratory system relative to the metabolic capacity at the time of birth. Therefore, this review highlights the differences in lung morphology and metabolic development of extant Marsupialia and Placentalia. The Marsupial neonate is born with a low birth weight and is highly immature. The neonatal lung is characterized by large terminal sacs, a poorly developed bronchial system and late formation of alveoli. Marsupialia have a low metabolic rate at birth and attain adult metabolic rate and thermoregulatory capacity late in postnatal development. In contrast, the eutherian neonate is born with a relative high birth weight and is always more mature than marsupial neonates. The neonatal lung has small terminal sacs, the bronchial system is well developed and the formation of alveoli begins few days after birth. Placentalia have a high metabolic rate at birth and attain adult metabolic rate and thermoregulatory capacity early in postnatal development. The differences in the developmental degree of the newborn lung between Marsupialia and Placentalia have consequences for their metabolic and thermoregulatory capacity. These differences could be advantageous for Placentalia in the changing environments in which they evolved.

  8. The role of leptin in the development of pulmonary neutrophilia in infection and Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ubags, Niki D.; Vernooy, Juanita H.; Burg, Elianne; Hayes, Catherine; Bement, Jenna; Dilli, Estee; Zabeau, Lennart; Abraham, Edward; Poch, Katie R.; Nick, Jerry A.; Dienz, Oliver; Zuñiga, Joaquin; Wargo, Matthew J.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.; Tavernier, Jan; Rincón, Mercedes; Poynter, Matthew E.; Wouters, Emiel F.M.; Suratt, Benjamin T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective One of the hallmarks of severe pneumonia and associated Acute Lung Injury (ALI) is neutrophil recruitment to the lung. Leptin is thought to be up-regulated in the lung following injury and to exert diverse effects on leukocytes, influencing both chemotaxis and survival. We hypothesized that pulmonary leptin contributes directly to the development of pulmonary neutrophilia during pneumonia and ALI. Design Controlled human and murine in vivo and ex vivo experimental studies. Settings Research laboratory of a university hospital. Subjects Healthy human volunteers and subjects hospitalized with bacterial and H1N1 pneumonia. C57Bl/6 and db/db mice were also used. Interventions Lung samples from patients and mice with either bacterial or H1N1 pneumonia and associated ALI were immunostained for leptin. Human bronchoalveolar-lavage (BAL) samples obtained after lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury were assayed for leptin. C57Bl/6 mice were examined after oropharyngeal aspiration of recombinant leptin alone or in combination with E.coli- or K.pneumonia-induced pneumonia. Leptin-resistant (db/db) mice were also examined using the E.coli model. BAL neutrophilia and cytokine levels were measured. Leptin-induced chemotaxis was examined in human blood- and murine marrow-derived neutrophils in vitro. Measurements and Main Results Injured human and murine lung tissue showed leptin induction compared to normal lung, as did human BAL following LPS instillation. BAL neutrophilia in uninjured and infected mice was increased and lung bacterial-load decreased by airway leptin administration, whereas BAL neutrophilia in infected leptin-resistant mice was decreased. In sterile lung injury by LPS, leptin also appeared to decrease airspace neutrophil apoptosis. Both human and murine neutrophils migrated towards leptin in vitro, and this required intact signaling through the JAK2/PI3K pathway. Conclusion We demonstrate that pulmonary leptin is induced in injured human and

  9. Effects of maternal captopril treatment during late pregnancy on neonatal lung development in rats.

    PubMed

    Capelari, Diego N; Sánchez, Susana I; Ortega, Hugo H; Ciuffo, Gladys M; Fuentes, Lucia B

    2012-08-20

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary fibrosis. In the present study, we examined the effects of maternal exposure to captopril (2.85 mg/kg/day) during late pregnancy (G13-G21) on postnatal rat lung development. Treatment with captopril during late pregnancy caused a significant decrease in ACE activity in P0 rats. Body weight decreased at P0 (p<0.001), P8 and P15 (p<0.01) in captopril-treated rats. Lung weight of P0 and P8 pups was lower in treated-animals (p<0.05). Lungs from captopril-treated animals showed impaired alveolar formation, with enlarged distal airway spaces at P8, P15 and P30. Interalveolar wall distance measured by mean linear intercept increased in treated vs. age-matched animals at P8, P15 (p<0.001) and P30 (p<0.05) resembling new bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In control animals, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) marker was higher at P0 and then drops gradually, while in captopril-treated animals PCNA marker remains higher at all stages studied. α-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a marker of fibroblast differentiation into myofibroblasts, was higher at the tips of developing secondary septa in captopril-treated lungs at P8 and P15. The increased expression of PCNA and α-SMA in treated pups suggest that beyond the effect caused by captopril, the developing lungs have the capacity to recover once the treatment was stopped. Taking together the low weight, histomorphological changes and increased expression of cellular markers caused by ACE inhibition during late pregnancy, it appears that the RAS could be an intrinsic factor involved in secondary septa formation during lung development.

  10. Immunolocalization of Sprouty-1 and Sprouty-2 in Developing Rat Lung

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shuichi; Nakano, Hiroshi; Suguta, Yuko; Singh, Gurmukh; Katyal, Sikandar L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Sprouty, a common antagonist of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and epidermal growth factor signaling, is a key player regulating tracheal branching and eye development in Drosophila. Four Sprouty homologs have been identified in vertebrates and all share a cysteine-rich region. However, the physiological function(s) of the individual Sprouty homologs is unknown. mRNA of Sprouty homologs is expressed during mouse lung development. In the present study, we investigated the immunolocalization of Sprouty proteins in rat lung at different stages of development. Methods Rabbit antibodies were raised against peptides derived from rat Sprouty-1 and Sprouty-2 and were used in Western blot analysis to determine Sprouty distribution in subcellular fractions (pellets and supernatant centrifuged at 5,000 and 20,000 g) and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) from adult rat lungs or used in immunohistochemistry. Results Western blot analysis revealed a 30-kDa Sprouty-1 band and a 34-kDa Sprouty-2 band in the supernatant and pellet fractions centrifuged at 20,000 g. BAL contained a band of approximately 16 kDa with Sprouty-1 antibody derived from proteolytic fragmentation of Sprouty-1. In embryonic day (E) 14 and E16 lungs, Sprouty-1 and Sprouty-2 were expressed both in epithelial and peripheral mesenchymal cells. In adult rat lung, bronchiolar and alveolar type II epithelial cells showed staining for both Sprouty-1 and Sprouty-2. Sprouty-1 expression was also seen in alveolar type I epithelial cells. Conclusion In light of the proximity of the distribution of Sprouty to that of FGF-10 (peripheral mesenchyme) and its receptor FGFR2IIIb (distal tubular epithelium) in lung development, and the finding that FGF-9, which is expressed in mesothelial cells, upregulates FGF-10, it appears that Sprouty expression in epithelial and mesenchymal cells during branching morphogenesis is closely related to signaling by FGF-9 and FGF-10. PMID:22236546

  11. Abnormal gene expression in cerebellum of Npc1-/- mice during postnatal development

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Guanghong; Wen, Zhining; Irizarry, Kristopher; Huang, Ying; Mitsouras, Katherine; Darmani, Mariam; Leon, Terry; Shi, Leming; Bi, Xiaoning

    2010-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C disease is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with abnormal lipid storage as the major cellular pathologic hallmark. Genetic analyses have identified mutations in NPC1 gene in the great majority of cases, while mutations in NPC2 account for the remainders. Yet, little is known regarding the cellular mechanisms responsible for NPC pathogenesis, especially for neurodegeneration, which is the usual cause of death. To identify critical steps that could account for the pathological manifestations of the disease in one of the most affected brain structures, we performed global gene expression analysis in the cerebellum from three-week old Npc1+/+ and Npc1-/- mice with two different microarray platforms (Agilent and Illumina). Differentially-expressed genes identified by both microarray platforms were then subjected to KEGG pathway analysis. Expression of genes in six pathways was significantly altered in Npc1-/- mice; functionally, these signaling pathways belong to the following three categories: 1) steroid and terpenoid biosynthesis, 2) immune response, and 3) cell adhesion/motility. In addition, the expression of several proteins involved in lipid transport was significantly altered in Npc1-/- mice. Our results provide novel molecular insight regarding the mechanisms of pathogenesis in NPC disease and reveal potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:20153740

  12. The Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort: A publicly available resource for the study of normal and abnormal brain development in youth.

    PubMed

    Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Connolly, John J; Ruparel, Kosha; Calkins, Monica E; Jackson, Chad; Elliott, Mark A; Roalf, David R; Ryan Hopsona, Karthik Prabhakaran; Behr, Meckenzie; Qiu, Haijun; Mentch, Frank D; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Sleiman, Patrick M A; Gur, Ruben C; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gur, Raquel E

    2016-01-01

    The Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort (PNC) is a large-scale study of child development that combines neuroimaging, diverse clinical and cognitive phenotypes, and genomics. Data from this rich resource is now publicly available through the Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP). Here we focus on the data from the PNC that is available through dbGaP and describe how users can access this data, which is evolving to be a significant resource for the broader neuroscience community for studies of normal and abnormal neurodevelopment.

  13. Development and proof-of-concept of three-dimensional lung histology volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Lindsay; Alabousi, Mostafa; Wheatley, Andrew; Aladl, Usaf; Slipetz, Deborah; Hogg, James C.; Fenster, Aaron; Parraga, Grace

    2012-03-01

    Most medical imaging is inherently three-dimensional (3D) but for validation of pathological findings, histopathology is commonly used and typically histopathology images are acquired as twodimensional slices with quantitative analysis performed in a single dimension. Histopathology is invasive, labour-intensive, and the analysis cannot be performed in real time, yet it remains the gold standard for the pathological diagnosis and validation of clinical or radiological diagnoses of disease. A major goal worldwide is to improve medical imaging resolution, sensitivity and specificity to better guide therapy and biopsy and to one day delay or replace biopsy. A key limitation however is the lack of tools to directly compare 3D macroscopic imaging acquired in patients with histopathology findings, typically provided in a single dimension (1D) or in two dimensions (2D). To directly address this, we developed methods for 2D histology slice visualization/registration to generate 3D volumes and quantified tissue components in the 3D volume for direct comparison to volumetric micro-CT and clinical CT. We used the elastase-instilled mouse emphysema lung model to evaluate our methods with murine lungs sectioned (5 μm thickness/10 μm gap) and digitized with 2μm in-plane resolution. 3D volumes were generated for wildtype and elastase mouse lung sections after semi-automated registration of all tissue slices. The 1D mean linear intercept (Lm) for wildtype (WT) (47.1 μm +/- 9.8 μm) and elastase mouse lung (64.5 μm +/- 14.0 μm) was significantly different (p<.001). We also generated 3D measurements based on tissue and airspace morphometry from the 3D volumes and all of these were significantly different (p<.0001) when comparing elastase and WT mouse lung. The ratio of the airspace-to-lung volume for the entire lung volume was also significantly and strongly correlated with Lm.

  14. Lung-targeting drug delivery system of baicalin-loaded nanoliposomes: development, biodistribution in rabbits, and pharmacodynamics in nude mice bearing orthotopic human lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yumeng; Liang, Jing; Zheng, Xiaoli; Pi, Chao; Liu, Hao; Yang, Hongru; Zou, Yonggen; Ye, Yun; Zhao, Ling

    2017-01-01

    The present study aims to develop a kind of novel nanoliposomes for the lung-targeting delivery system of baicalin as a Chinese medicine monomer. Baicalin-loaded nanoliposomes were prepared by the effervescent dispersion and lyophilized techniques. Baicalin-loaded nanoliposomes had an average particle size of 131.7±11.7 nm with 0.19±0.02 polydispersity index, 82.8%±1.24% entrapment efficiency and 90.47%±0.93% of yield and sustaining drug release effect over 24 h and were stable for 12 months at least. In vitro no hemolytic activity was observed for the experimental drug concentration. After intravenous administration of baicalin-loaded nanoliposomes to rabbits, drug concentration in the lungs was the highest among the tested organs at all time points and was significantly higher than that of its solution. For the targeting parameters, the relative intake rate and the ratio of peak concentration of lung were 4.837 and 2.789, respectively. Compared with plasma, liver, spleen, and kidney, the ratios of targeting efficacy (Te)liposomes to (Te)injection of lung were increased by a factor of 14.131, 1.893, 3.357, and 3.470, respectively. Furthermore, the results showed that the baicalin-loaded nanoliposomes did not induce lung injury. Importantly, baicalin-loaded nanoliposomes showed better antitumor therapeutic efficacy in the nude mice bearing orthotopic human lung cancer with the median survival time of blank liposomes (11.40±0.16 days), baicalin solution (17.30±0.47 days), and baicalin-loaded nanoliposomes (25.90±0.53 days). Therefore, the liposome is a promising drug carrier with an excellent lung-targeting property and therapeutic effect for the treatment of lung disease, such as lung cancer. PMID:28096670

  15. Relapsed small cell lung cancer: treatment options and latest developments

    PubMed Central

    Ohkuni, Yoshihiro; Kaneko, Norihiro; Yamaguchi, Etsuro; Kubo, Akihito

    2014-01-01

    According to recent analyses, there was a modest yet significant improvement in median survival time and 5-year survival rate of limited stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in North America, Europe, Japan and other countries over the last 30 years. The median survival time of limited stage SCLC is 15–20 months and 5-year survival rate is 15% or less. In terms of extensive stage SCLC, a median survival time of 9.4–12.8 months and 2-year survival of 5.2–19.5% are still disappointing. Despite being highly sensitive to first-line chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatments, most patients with SCLC experience relapse within 2 years and die from systemic metastasis. While several clinical trials of cytotoxic chemotherapies and molecular targeting agents have been investigated in the treatment of relapsed SCLC, none showed a significant clinical activity to be able to exceed topotecan as second-line chemotherapy. There are problematic issues to address for relapsed SCLC, such as standardizing the treatment for third-line chemotherapy. Topotecan alone was the first approved therapy for second-line treatment for relapsed SCLC. Amrubicin is a promising drug and a variety of trials evaluating its efficacy have been carried out. Amrubicin has shown superiority to topotecan in a Japanese population, but was not superior in a study of western patients. There are some controversial issues for relapsed SCLC, such as treatment for older patients, third-line chemotherapy and efficacy of molecular targeting therapy. This article reviews current standard treatment, recent clinical trials and other topics on relapsed SCLC. PMID:24587832

  16. Evidence for the involvement of fibroblast growth factor 10 in lipofibroblast formation during embryonic lung development.

    PubMed

    Al Alam, Denise; El Agha, Elie; Sakurai, Reiko; Kheirollahi, Vahid; Moiseenko, Alena; Danopoulos, Soula; Shrestha, Amit; Schmoldt, Carole; Quantius, Jennifer; Herold, Susanne; Chao, Cho-Ming; Tiozzo, Caterina; De Langhe, Stijn; Plikus, Maksim V; Thornton, Matthew; Grubbs, Brendan; Minoo, Parviz; Rehan, Virender K; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-12-01

    Lipid-containing alveolar interstitial fibroblasts (lipofibroblasts) are increasingly recognized as an important component of the epithelial stem cell niche in the rodent lung. Although lipofibroblasts were initially believed merely to assist type 2 alveolar epithelial cells in surfactant production during neonatal life, recent evidence suggests that these cells are indispensable for survival and growth of epithelial stem cells during adulthood. Despite increasing interest in lipofibroblast biology, little is known about their cellular origin or the molecular pathways controlling their formation during embryonic development. Here, we show that a population of lipid-droplet-containing stromal cells emerges in the developing mouse lung between E15.5 and E16.5. This is accompanied by significant upregulation, in the lung mesenchyme, of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (master switch of lipogenesis), adipose differentiation-related protein (marker of mature lipofibroblasts) and fibroblast growth factor 10 (previously shown to identify a subpopulation of lipofibroblast progenitors). We also demonstrate that although only a subpopulation of total embryonic lipofibroblasts derives from Fgf10(+) progenitor cells, in vivo knockdown of Fgfr2b ligand activity and reduction in Fgf10 expression lead to global reduction in the expression levels of lipofibroblast markers at E18.5. Constitutive Fgfr1b knockouts and mutants with conditional partial inactivation of Fgfr2b in the lung mesenchyme reveal the involvement of both receptors in lipofibroblast formation and suggest a possible compensation between the two receptors. We also provide data from human fetal lungs to demonstrate the relevance of our discoveries to humans. Our results reveal an essential role for Fgf10 signaling in the formation of lipofibroblasts during late lung development.

  17. Evidence for the involvement of fibroblast growth factor 10 in lipofibroblast formation during embryonic lung development

    PubMed Central

    Al Alam, Denise; El Agha, Elie; Sakurai, Reiko; Kheirollahi, Vahid; Moiseenko, Alena; Danopoulos, Soula; Shrestha, Amit; Schmoldt, Carole; Quantius, Jennifer; Herold, Susanne; Chao, Cho-Ming; Tiozzo, Caterina; De Langhe, Stijn; Plikus, Maksim V.; Thornton, Matthew; Grubbs, Brendan; Minoo, Parviz; Rehan, Virender K.; Bellusci, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    Lipid-containing alveolar interstitial fibroblasts (lipofibroblasts) are increasingly recognized as an important component of the epithelial stem cell niche in the rodent lung. Although lipofibroblasts were initially believed merely to assist type 2 alveolar epithelial cells in surfactant production during neonatal life, recent evidence suggests that these cells are indispensable for survival and growth of epithelial stem cells during adulthood. Despite increasing interest in lipofibroblast biology, little is known about their cellular origin or the molecular pathways controlling their formation during embryonic development. Here, we show that a population of lipid-droplet-containing stromal cells emerges in the developing mouse lung between E15.5 and E16.5. This is accompanied by significant upregulation, in the lung mesenchyme, of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (master switch of lipogenesis), adipose differentiation-related protein (marker of mature lipofibroblasts) and fibroblast growth factor 10 (previously shown to identify a subpopulation of lipofibroblast progenitors). We also demonstrate that although only a subpopulation of total embryonic lipofibroblasts derives from Fgf10+ progenitor cells, in vivo knockdown of Fgfr2b ligand activity and reduction in Fgf10 expression lead to global reduction in the expression levels of lipofibroblast markers at E18.5. Constitutive Fgfr1b knockouts and mutants with conditional partial inactivation of Fgfr2b in the lung mesenchyme reveal the involvement of both receptors in lipofibroblast formation and suggest a possible compensation between the two receptors. We also provide data from human fetal lungs to demonstrate the relevance of our discoveries to humans. Our results reveal an essential role for Fgf10 signaling in the formation of lipofibroblasts during late lung development. PMID:26511927

  18. Preclinical evaluation of human secretoglobin 3A2 in mouse models of lung development and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yan; Winn, Melissa E.; Zehmer, John K.; Gillette, William K.; Lubkowski, Jacek T.; Pilon, Aprile L.

    2013-01-01

    Secretoglobin (SCGB) 3A2 is a member of the SCGB gene superfamily of small secreted proteins, predominantly expressed in lung airways. We hypothesize that human SCGB3A2 may exhibit anti-inflammatory, growth factor, and antifibrotic activities and be of clinical utility. Recombinant human SCGB3A2 was expressed, purified, and biochemically characterized as a first step to its development as a therapeutic agent in clinical settings. Human SCGB3A2, as well as mouse SCGB3A2, readily formed a dimer in solution and exhibited novel phospholipase A2 inhibitory activity. This is the first demonstration of any quantitative biochemical measurement for the evaluation of SCGB3A2 protein. In the mouse as an experimental animal, human SCGB3A2 exhibited growth factor activity by promoting embryonic lung development in both ex vivo and in vivo systems and antifibrotic activity in the bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis model. The results suggested that human SCGB3A2 can function as a growth factor and an antifibrotic agent in humans. When SCGB3A2 was administered to pregnant female mice through the tail vein, the protein was detected in the dam's serum and lung, as well as the placenta, amniotic fluids, and embryonic lungs at 10 min postadministration, suggesting that SCGB3A2 readily crosses the placenta. The results warrant further development of recombinant SCGB3A2 as a therapeutic agent in treating patients suffering from lung diseases or preterm infants with respiratory distress. PMID:24213919

  19. Nuclear Factor-Kappa-B Signaling in Lung Development and Disease: One Pathway, Numerous Functions

    PubMed Central

    Alvira, Cristina M

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to other organs, the lung completes a significant portion of its development after term birth. During this stage of alveolarization, division of the alveolar ducts into alveolar sacs by secondary septation, and expansion of the pulmonary vasculature by means of angiogenesis markedly increase the gas exchange surface area of the lung. However, postnatal completion of growth renders the lung highly susceptible to environmental insults such as inflammation that disrupt this developmental program. This is particularly evident in the setting of preterm birth, where impairment of alveolarization causes bronchopulmonary dysplasia, a chronic lung disease associated with significant morbidity. The nuclear factor κ-B (NFκB) family of transcription factors are ubiquitously expressed, and function to regulate diverse cellular processes including proliferation, survival, and immunity. Extensive evidence suggests that activation of NFκB is important in the regulation of inflammation and in the control of angiogenesis. Therefore, NFκB-mediated downstream effects likely influence the lung response to injury and may also mediate normal alveolar development. This review summarizes the main biologic functions of NFκB, and highlights the regulatory mechanisms that allow for diversity and specificity in downstream gene activation. This is followed by a description of the pro and anti-inflammatory functions of NFκB in the lung, and of NFκB-mediated angiogenic effects. Finally, this review summarizes the clinical and experimental data that support a role for NFκB in mediating postnatal angiogenesis and alveolarization, and discusses the challenges that remain in developing therapies that can selectively block the detrimental functions of NFκB yet preserve the beneficial effects. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 100:202–216, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24639404

  20. Prenatal and Perinatal Determinants of Lung Health and Disease in Early Life: A National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Workshop Report.

    PubMed

    Manuck, Tracy A; Levy, Philip T; Gyamfi-Bannerman, Cynthia; Jobe, Alan H; Blaisdell, Carol J

    2016-05-02

    Human lung growth and development begins with preconception exposures and continues through conception and childhood into early adulthood. Numerous environmental exposures (both positive and negative) can affect lung health and disease throughout life. Infant lung health correlates with adult lung function, but significant knowledge gaps exist regarding the influence of preconception, perinatal, and postnatal exposures on general lung health throughout life. On October 1 and 2, 2015, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a group of extramural investigators to develop their recommendations for the direction(s) for future research in prenatal and perinatal determinants of lung health and disease in early life and to identify opportunities for scientific advancement. They identified that future investigations will need not only to examine abnormal lung development, but also to use developing technology and resources to better define normal and/or enhanced lung health. Birth cohort studies offer key opportunities to capture the important influence of preconception and obstetric risk factors on lung health, development, and disease. These studies should include well-characterized obstetrical data and comprehensive plans for prospective follow-up. The importance of continued basic science, translational, and animal studies for providing mechanisms to explain causality using new methods cannot be overemphasized. Multidisciplinary approaches involving obstetricians, neonatologists, pediatric and adult pulmonologists, and basic scientists should be encouraged to design and conduct comprehensive and impactful research on the early stages of normal and abnormal human lung growth that influence adult outcome.

  1. Using mouse models to understand normal and abnormal urogenital tract development.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Cathy

    2009-01-01

    Removal of toxic substances from the blood depends on patent connections between the kidneys, ureters and bladder that are established when the ureter is transposed from its original insertion site in the Wolffian duct, to the bladder, its final insertion site. The Ureteral Bud Theory of Mackie and Stephens suggests that repositioning of the ureter orifice occurs as the trigone forms from the common nephric duct (CND), the caudal-most Wolffian duct segment. According to this model, insertion of the CND into the bladder and its expansion into the trigone both repositions the ureter in the bladder and enables it to separate from the Wolffian duct. The availability of new mouse models has enabled to re-examine this hypothesis using morphological analysis and lineage studies to follow the fate of the ureter and CND during the maturation process. We find that in contrast to what has been previously thought, the CND does not differentiate into the trigone but instead, undergoes apoptosis, a step that enables the ureter to separate from the Wolffian duct. Apoptosis occurs as the CND and ureter merge with the urogenital sinus positioning the ureter orifice at a site close to the Wolffian duct. Finally, expansion of the bladder moves the ureter orifice which is now fused with epithelium to its final position which is at the bladder neck. Interestingly, CND apoptosis appears to depend on close proximity to the bladder, suggesting that the bladder may be a source of signals that induce cell death. Together, these studies provide new insights into the normal process of ureter maturation, and shed light on possible causes of obstruction and reflux, ureteral abnormalities that affect 1-2% of the human population.

  2. DLX4 is associated with orofacial clefting and abnormal jaw development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Mandal, Shyamali; Choi, Alex; Anderson, August; Prochazkova, Michaela; Perry, Hazel; Gil-Da-Silva-Lopes, Vera L.; Lao, Richard; Wan, Eunice; Tang, Paul Ling-Fung; Kwok, Pui-yan; Klein, Ophir; Zhuan, Bian; Slavotinek, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) are common structural birth defects in humans. We used exome sequencing to study a patient with bilateral CL/P and identified a single nucleotide deletion in the patient and her similarly affected son—c.546_546delG, predicting p.Gln183Argfs*57 in the Distal-less 4 (DLX4) gene. The sequence variant was absent from databases, predicted to be deleterious and was verified by Sanger sequencing. In mammals, there are three Dlx homeobox clusters with closely located gene pairs (Dlx1/Dlx2, Dlx3/Dlx4, Dlx5/Dlx6). In situ hybridization showed that Dlx4 was expressed in the mesenchyme of the murine palatal shelves at E12.5, prior to palate closure. Wild-type human DLX4, but not mutant DLX4_c.546delG, could activate two murine Dlx conserved regulatory elements, implying that the mutation caused haploinsufficiency. We showed that reduced DLX4 expression after short interfering RNA treatment in a human cell line resulted in significant up-regulation of DLX3, DLX5 and DLX6, with reduced expression of DLX2 and significant up-regulation of BMP4, although the increased BMP4 expression was demonstrated only in HeLa cells. We used antisense morpholino oligonucleotides to target the orthologous Danio rerio gene, dlx4b, and found reduced cranial size and abnormal cartilaginous elements. We sequenced DLX4 in 155 patients with non-syndromic CL/P and CP, but observed no sequence variants. From the published literature, Dlx1/Dlx2 double homozygous null mice and Dlx5 homozygous null mice both have clefts of the secondary palate. This first finding of a DLX4 mutation in a family with CL/P establishes DLX4 as a potential cause of human clefts. PMID:25954033

  3. The Role of Neutrophil Myeloperoxidase in Models of Lung Tumor Development

    PubMed Central

    Rymaszewski, Amy L.; Tate, Everett; Yimbesalu, Joannes P.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Jarzembowski, Jason A.; Zhang, Hao; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.; Vikis, Haris G.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a key tumor-promoting role in lung cancer. Our previous studies in mice demonstrated that neutrophils are critical mediators of tumor promotion in methylcholanthrene (MCA)-initiated, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated the role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in this inflammation promoted model. Increased levels of MPO protein and activity were present in the lungs of mice administered BHT. Treatment of mice with N-acetyl lysyltyrosylcysteine amide (KYC), a novel tripeptide inhibitor of MPO, during the inflammatory stage reduced tumor burden. In a separate tumor model, KYC treatment of a Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumor graft in mice had no effect on tumor growth, however, mice genetically deficient in MPO had significantly reduced LLC tumor growth. Our observations suggest that MPO catalytic activity is critical during the early stages of tumor development. However, during the later stages of tumor progression, MPO expression independent of catalytic activity appears to be required. Our studies advocate for the use of MPO inhibitors in a lung cancer prevention setting. PMID:24821130

  4. Retention and clearance of inhaled ceramic fibres in rat lungs and development of a dissolution model.

    PubMed Central

    Yamato, H; Hori, H; Tanaka, I; Higashi, T; Morimoto, Y; Kido, M

    1994-01-01

    Male Wistar rats were exposed to aluminium silicate ceramic fibres by inhalation to study pulmonary deposition, clearance, and dissolution of the fibres. Rats were killed at one day, one month, three months, and six months after the termination of exposure. After exposure, fibres greater than 50 microns in length were seen with a scanning electron microscope in the alveolar region of the lung. Fibres were recovered from the lungs with a low temperature ashing technique and their number, diameter, and length were measured by scanning electron microscopy. The number of fibres remaining in the lungs declined exponentially with time after exposure and their silicon content also fell. The geometric median diameter of fibres decreased linearly with time. By six months after exposure, the surface of fibres recovered from the lungs had an eroded appearance. The results suggest that ceramic fibres are physically cleared from the lung and that they show signs of dissolution. Finally, the results were used to develop a theoretical model of fibre dissolution that gives a satisfactory fit to the experimental data. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:8199672

  5. Retention and clearance of inhaled ceramic fibres in rat lungs and development of a dissolution model.

    PubMed

    Yamato, H; Hori, H; Tanaka, I; Higashi, T; Morimoto, Y; Kido, M

    1994-04-01

    Male Wistar rats were exposed to aluminium silicate ceramic fibres by inhalation to study pulmonary deposition, clearance, and dissolution of the fibres. Rats were killed at one day, one month, three months, and six months after the termination of exposure. After exposure, fibres greater than 50 microns in length were seen with a scanning electron microscope in the alveolar region of the lung. Fibres were recovered from the lungs with a low temperature ashing technique and their number, diameter, and length were measured by scanning electron microscopy. The number of fibres remaining in the lungs declined exponentially with time after exposure and their silicon content also fell. The geometric median diameter of fibres decreased linearly with time. By six months after exposure, the surface of fibres recovered from the lungs had an eroded appearance. The results suggest that ceramic fibres are physically cleared from the lung and that they show signs of dissolution. Finally, the results were used to develop a theoretical model of fibre dissolution that gives a satisfactory fit to the experimental data.

  6. Development of a computer-aided detection system for lung cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hideo; Inaoka, Noriko; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Sasaoka, Soichi; Natori, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Akira

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes a modified system for automatic detection of lung nodules by means of chest x ray image processing techniques. The objective of the system is to help radiologists to improve their accuracy in cancer detection. It is known from retrospective studies of chest x- ray images that radiologists fail to detect about 30 percent of lung cancer cases. A computerized method for detecting lung nodules would be very useful for decreasing the proportion of such oversights. Our proposed system consists of five sub-systems, for image input, lung region determination, nodule detection, rule-based false-positive elimination, and statistical false-positive elimination. In an experiment with the modified system, using 30 lung cancer cases and 78 normal control cases, we obtained figures of 73.3 percent and 89.7 percent for the sensitivity and specificity of the system, respectively. The system has been developed to run on the IBM* PS/55* and IBM RISC System/6000* (RS/6000), and we give the processing time for each platform.

  7. Involvement of phosphoinositide 3-kinases in neutrophil activation and the development of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yum, H K; Arcaroli, J; Kupfner, J; Shenkar, R; Penninger, J M; Sasaki, T; Yang, K Y; Park, J S; Abraham, E

    2001-12-01

    Activated neutrophils contribute to the development and severity of acute lung injury (ALI). Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3-K) and the downstream serine/threonine kinase Akt/protein kinase B have a central role in modulating neutrophil function, including respiratory burst, chemotaxis, and apoptosis. In the present study, we found that exposure of neutrophils to endotoxin resulted in phosphorylation of Akt, activation of NF-kappaB, and expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and TNF-alpha through PI3-K-dependent pathways. In vivo, endotoxin administration to mice resulted in activation of PI3-K and Akt in neutrophils that accumulated in the lungs. The severity of endotoxemia-induced ALI was significantly diminished in mice lacking the p110gamma catalytic subunit of PI3-K. In PI3-Kgamma(-/-) mice, lung edema, neutrophil recruitment, nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB, and pulmonary levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha were significantly lower after endotoxemia as compared with PI3-Kgamma(+/+) controls. Among neutrophils that did accumulate in the lungs of the PI3-Kgamma(-/-) mice after endotoxin administration, activation of NF-kappaB and expression of proinflammatory cytokines was diminished compared with levels present in lung neutrophils from PI3-Kgamma(+/+) mice. These results show that PI3-K, and particularly PI3-Kgamma, occupies a central position in regulating endotoxin-induced neutrophil activation, including that involved in ALI.

  8. The Pulmonary Surfactant: Impact of Tobacco Smoke and Related Compounds on Surfactant and Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    Scott, J Elliott

    2004-01-01

    Cigarette smoking, one of the most pervasive habits in society, presents many well established health risks. While lung cancer is probably the most common and well documented disease associated with tobacco exposure, it is becoming clear from recent research that many other diseases are causally related to smoking. Whether from direct smoking or inhaling environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), termed secondhand smoke, the cells of the respiratory tissues and the lining pulmonary surfactant are the first body tissues to be directly exposed to the many thousands of toxic chemicals in tobacco. Considering the vast surface area of the lung and the extreme attenuation of the blood-air barrier, it is not surprising that this organ is the primary route for exposure, not just to smoke but to most environmental contaminants. Recent research has shown that the pulmonary surfactant, a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, is the first site of defense against particulates or gas components of smoke. However, it is not clear what effect smoke has on the surfactant. Most studies have demonstrated that smoking reduces bronchoalveolar lavage phospholipid levels. Some components of smoke also appear to have a direct detergent-like effect on the surfactant while others appear to alter cycling or secretion. Ultimately these effects are reflected in changes in the dynamics of the surfactant system and, clinically in changes in lung mechanics. Similarly, exposure of the developing fetal lung through maternal smoking results in postnatal alterations in lung mechanics and higher incidents of wheezing and coughing. Direct exposure of developing lung to nicotine induces changes suggestive of fetal stress. Furthermore, identification of nicotinic receptors in fetal lung airways and corresponding increases in airway connective tissue support a possible involvement of nicotine in postnatal asthma development. Finally, at the level of the alveoli of the lung, colocalization of nicotinic

  9. The Pulmonary Surfactant: Impact of Tobacco Smoke and Related Compounds on Surfactant and Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    Scott, J Elliott

    2004-01-01

    Cigarette smoking, one of the most pervasive habits in society, presents many well established health risks. While lung cancer is probably the most common and well documented disease associated with tobacco exposure, it is becoming clear from recent research that many other diseases are causally related to smoking. Whether from direct smoking or inhaling environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), termed secondhand smoke, the cells of the respiratory tissues and the lining pulmonary surfactant are the first body tissues to be directly exposed to the many thousands of toxic chemicals in tobacco. Considering the vast surface area of the lung and the extreme attenuation of the blood-air barrier, it is not surprising that this organ is the primary route for exposure, not just to smoke but to most environmental contaminants. Recent research has shown that the pulmonary surfactant, a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, is the first site of defense against particulates or gas components of smoke. However, it is not clear what effect smoke has on the surfactant. Most studies have demonstrated that smoking reduces bronchoalveolar lavage phospholipid levels. Some components of smoke also appear to have a direct detergent-like effect on the surfactant while others appear to alter cycling or secretion. Ultimately these effects are reflected in changes in the dynamics of the surfactant system and, clinically in changes in lung mechanics. Similarly, exposure of the developing fetal lung through maternal smoking results in postnatal alterations in lung mechanics and higher incidents of wheezing and coughing. Direct exposure of developing lung to nicotine induces changes suggestive of fetal stress. Furthermore, identification of nicotinic receptors in fetal lung airways and corresponding increases in airway connective tissue support a possible involvement of nicotine in postnatal asthma development. Finally, at the level of the alveoli of the lung, colocalization of nicotinic

  10. Overlap of abnormal photoreceptor development and progressive degeneration in Leber congenital amaurosis caused by NPHP5 mutation.

    PubMed

    Downs, Louise M; Scott, Erin M; Cideciyan, Artur V; Iwabe, Simone; Dufour, Valerie; Gardiner, Kristin L; Genini, Sem; Marinho, Luis Felipe; Sumaroka, Alexander; Kosyk, Mychajlo S; Swider, Malgorzata; Aguirre, Geoffrey K; Jacobson, Samuel G; Beltran, William A; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2016-10-01

    Ciliary defects can result in severe disorders called ciliopathies. Mutations in NPHP5 cause a ciliopathy characterized by severe childhood onset retinal blindness, Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), and renal disease. Using the canine NPHP5-LCA model we compared human and canine retinal phenotypes, and examined the early stages of photoreceptor development and degeneration, the kinetics of photoreceptor loss, the progression of degeneration and the expression profiles of selected genes. NPHP5-mutant dogs recapitulate the human phenotype of very early loss of rods, and relative retention of the central retinal cone photoreceptors that lack function. In mutant dogs, rod and cone photoreceptors have a sensory cilium, but develop and function abnormally and then rapidly degenerate; L/M cones are more severely affected than S-cones. The lack of outer segments in mutant cones indicates a ciliary dysfunction. Genes expressed in mutant rod or both rod and cone photoreceptors show significant downregulation, while those expressed only in cones are unchanged. Many genes in cell-death and -survival pathways also are downregulated. The canine disease is a non-syndromic LCA-ciliopathy, with normal renal structures and no CNS abnormalities. Our results identify the critical time points in the pathogenesis of the photoreceptor disease, and bring us closer to defining a potential time window for testing novel therapies for translation to patients.

  11. The incidence and mortality of lung cancer and their relationship to development in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Pakzad, Reza; Mohammadian-Hafshejani, Abdollah; Ghoncheh, Mahshid; Pakzad, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the deadliest cancer worldwide and the most common cancer in Asia. It is necessary to get information on epidemiology and inequalities related to incidence and mortality of the cancer to use for planning and further research. This study aimed to investigate epidemiology and inequality of incidence and mortality from lung cancer in Asia. Methods The study was conducted based on data from the world data of cancer and the World Bank [including the Human Development Index (HDI) and its components]. The incidence and mortality rates, and cancer distribution maps were drawn for Asian countries. To analyze data, correlation test between incidence and death rates, and HDI and its components at significant was used in the significant level of 0.05 using SPSS software. Results A total of 1,033,881 incidence (71.13% were males and 28.87% were females. Sex ratio was 2.46) and 936,051 death (71.45% in men and 28.55% in women. The sex ratio was 2.50) recorded in Asian countries in 2012. Five countries with the highest standardized incidence and mortality rates of lung cancer were Democratic Republic of Korea, China, Armenia, Turkey, and Timor-Leste, respectively. Correlation between HDI and standardized incidence rate was 0.345 (P=0.019), in men 0.301 (P=0.042) and in women 0.3 (P=0.043); also between HDI and standardized mortality rate 0.289 (P=0.052), in men 0.265 (P=0.075) and in women 0.200 (P=0.182). Conclusions The incidence of lung cancer has been increasing in Asia. It is high in men. Along with development, the incidence and mortality from lung cancer increases. It seems necessary to study reasons and factors of increasing the incidence and mortality of lung cancer in Asian countries. PMID:26798586

  12. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than... files and the most recent examination was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis,...

  13. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than... files and the most recent examination was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis,...

  14. Cerebellar cortex development in the weaver condition presents regional and age-dependent abnormalities without differences in Purkinje cells neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, María C; Hervás, José P; Bayer, Shirley A; Villegas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Ataxias are neurological disorders associated with the degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs). Homozygous weaver mice (wv/wv) have been proposed as a model for hereditary cerebellar ataxia because they present motor abnormalities and PC loss. To ascertain the physiopathology of the weaver condition, the development of the cerebellar cortex lobes was examined at postnatal day (P): P8, P20 and P90. Three approaches were used: 1) quantitative determination of several cerebellar features; 2) qualitative evaluation of the developmental changes occurring in the cortical lobes; and 3) autoradiographic analyses of PC generation and placement. Our results revealed a reduction in the size of the wv/wv cerebellum as a whole, confirming previous results. However, as distinguished from these reports, we observed that quantified parameters contribute differently to the abnormal growth of the wv/wv cerebellar lobes. Qualitative analysis showed anomalies in wv/wv cerebellar cytoarchitecture, depending on the age and lobe analyzed. Such abnormalities included the presence of the external granular layer after P20 and, at P90, ectopic cells located in the molecular layer following several placement patterns. Finally, we obtained autoradiographic evidence that wild-type and wv/wv PCs presented similar neurogenetic timetables, as reported. However, the innovative character of this current work lies in the fact that the neurogenetic gradients of wv/wv PCs were not modified from P8 to P90. A tendency for the accumulation of late-formed PCs in the anterior and posterior lobes was found, whereas early-generated PCs were concentrated in the central and inferior lobes. These data suggested that wv/wv PCs may migrate properly to their final destinations. The extrapolation of our results to patients affected with cerebellar ataxias suggests that all cerebellar cortex lobes are affected with several age-dependent alterations in cytoarchitectonics. We also propose that PC loss may be regionally

  15. Extracellular Assembly of the Elastin Cable Line Element in the Developing Lung.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Cristian D; Wagner, Willi L; Bennett, Robert D; Ysasi, Alexandra B; Belle, Janeil; Molter, Karin; Straub, Beate K; Wang, Dong; Chen, Zi; Ackermann, Maximilian; Tsuda, Akira; Mentzer, Steven J

    2017-04-05

    In the normal lung, a dominant structural element is an elastic "line element" that originates in the central bronchi and inserts into the distal airspaces. Despite its structural importance, the process that leads to development of the cable line element is unknown. To investigate the morphologic events contributing to its development, we used optical clearing methods to examine the postnatal rat lung. An unexpected finding was numerous spheres, with a median diameter of 1-2µm, within the primary septa of the rat lung. The spheres demonstrated green autofluorescence, selective fluorescent eosin staining, reactivity with carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester, and specific labeling with anti-tropoelastin monoclonal antibody-findings consistent with tropoelastin. The sphere number peaked on rat postnatal day 4 (P4) and were rare by P14. The disappearance of the spheres was coincident with the development of the cable line element in the rat lung. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated no consistent association between parenchymal cells and sphere alignment. In contrast, the alignment of tropoelastin spheres appeared to be the direct result of interactions of scaffold proteins including collagen fibers and fibrillin microfibrils. We conclude that the spatial organization of the cable line element appears to be independent of tropoelastin deposition, but dependent upon crosslinking to scaffold proteins within the primary septa. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Conditional overexpression of connective tissue growth factor disrupts postnatal lung development.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu; Platteau, Astrid; Chen, Shaoyi; McNamara, George; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Bancalari, Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a member of an emerging family of immediate-early gene products that coordinates complex biological processes during development, differentiation, and tissue repair. Overexpression of CTGF is associated with mechanical ventilation with high tidal volume and oxygen exposure in newborn lungs. However, the role of CTGF in postnatal lung development and remodeling is not well understood. In the present study, a double-transgenic mouse model was generated with doxycycline-inducible overexpression of CTGF in respiratory epithelial cells. Overexpression of CTGF from Postnatal Days 1-14 resulted in thicker alveolar septa and decreased secondary septal formation. This is correlated with increased myofibroblast differentiation and disorganized elastic fiber deposition in alveolar septa. Overexpression of CTGF also decreased alveolar capillary network formation. There were increased alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and collagen deposition, and dramatic thickening in the peribronchial/peribronchiolar and perivascular regions in the double-transgenic lungs. Furthermore, overexpression of CTGF increased integrin-linked kinase expression, activated its downstream signaling target, Akt, as well as increased mRNA expression of fibronectin. These data demonstrate that overexpression of CTGF disrupts alveologenesis and capillary formation, and induces fibrosis during the critical period of alveolar development. These histologic changes are similar to those observed in lungs of infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

  17. Development of ferret as a human lung cancer model by injecting4-(N-methyl-N-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of new animal lung cancer models that are relevant to human lung carcinogenesis is important for lung cancer research. Previously we have shown the induction of lung tumor in ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) exposed to both tobacco smoke and a tobacco carcinogen (4-(N-methyl-N-nitrosamino...

  18. Analysis of the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway in normal and abnormal bladder development.

    PubMed

    DeSouza, Kristin R; Saha, Monalee; Carpenter, Ashley R; Scott, Melissa; McHugh, Kirk M

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined the expression of Sonic Hedgehog, Patched, Gli1, Gli2, Gli3 and Myocardin in the developing bladders of male and female normal and megabladder (mgb-/-) mutant mice at embryonic days 12 through 16 by in situ hybridization. This analysis indicated that each member of the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway as well as Myocardin displayed distinct temporal and spatial patterns of expression during normal bladder development. In contrast, mgb-/- bladders showed both temporal and spatial changes in the expression of Patched, Gli1 and Gli3 as well as a complete lack of Myocardin expression. These changes occurred primarily in the outer mesenchyme of developing mgb-/- bladders consistent with the development of an amuscular bladder phenotype in these animals. These results provide the first comprehensive analysis of the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway during normal bladder development and provide strong evidence that this key signaling cascade is critical in establishing radial patterning in the developing bladder. In addition, the lack of detrusor smooth muscle development observed in mgb-/- mice is associated with bladder-specific temporospatial changes in Sonic Hedgehog signaling coupled with a lack of Myocardin expression that appears to result in altered patterning of the outer mesenchyme and poor initiation and differentiation of smooth muscle cells within this region of the developing bladder.

  19. Abnormal Expression of miR-21 and miR-95 in Cancer Stem-Like Cells is Associated with Radioresistance of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinghui; Zhang, Chailan; Hu, Lin; He, Yin; Shi, Zeya; Tang, Siyuan; Chen, Yuxiang

    2015-05-01

    This study demonstrated that miR-21 and miR-95 expression were significantly higher in the ALDH1(+)CD133(+)subpopulation than in the ALDH1(-)CD133(-) subpopulation of lung cancer cells. Combined delivery of anti-miR-21 and anti-miR-95 by calcium phosphate nanoparticles significantly inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft tumor model and sensitized radiotherapy. The anti-miRNAs significantly reduced miR-21 and miR-95 levels, increased PTEN, SNX1, and SGPP1 protein expression, but reduced Akt Ser(473) and Thr(308) phosphorylation. ALDH1(+)CD133(+) subpopulation of NSCLC tumor cells confers radioresistance due to high expression of miR-21 and miR-95. Targeting inhibition of miR-21 and miR-95 can inhibit tumor growth through elevating PTEN, SNX1, and SGPP1 expression and inhibiting Akt phosphorylation.

  20. Effect of chemical stabilizers of hypoxia-inducible factors on early lung development.

    PubMed

    Groenman, Freek A; Rutter, Martin; Wang, Jinxia; Caniggia, Isabella; Tibboel, Dick; Post, Martin

    2007-09-01

    Low oxygen stimulates pulmonary vascular development and airway branching and involves hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). HIF is stable and initiates expression of angiogenic factors under hypoxia, whereas normoxia triggers hydroxylation of the HIF-1alpha subunit by prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs) and subsequent degradation. Herein, we investigated whether chemical stabilization of HIF-1alpha under normoxic (20% O(2)) conditions would stimulate vascular growth and branching morphogenesis in early lung explants. Tie2-LacZ (endothelial LacZ marker) mice were used for visualization of the vasculature. Embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) lung buds were dissected and cultured in 20% O(2) in the absence or presence of cobalt chloride (CoCl(2), a hypoxia mimetic), dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG; a nonspecific inhibitor of PHDs), or desferrioxamine (DFO; an iron chelator). Vascularization was assessed by X-gal staining, and terminal buds were counted. The fine vascular network surrounding the developing lung buds seen in control explants disappeared in CoCl(2)- and DFO-treated explants. Also, epithelial branching was reduced in the explants treated with CoCl(2) and DFO. In contrast, DMOG inhibited branching but stimulated vascularization. Both DFO and DMOG increased nuclear HIF-1alpha protein levels, whereas CoCl(2) had no effect. Since HIF-1alpha induces VEGF expression, the effect of SU-5416, a potent VEGF receptor (VEGFR) blocker, on early lung development was also investigated. Inhibition of VEGFR2 signaling in explants maintained under hypoxic (2% O(2)) conditions completely abolished vascularization and slightly decreased epithelial branching. Taken together, the data suggest that DMOG stabilization of HIF-1alpha during early development leads to a hypervascular lung and that airway branching proceeds without the vasculature, albeit at a slower rate.

  1. Exogenous Fibroblast Growth Factor-10 Induces Cystic Lung Development with Altered Target Gene Expression in the Presence of Heparin in Cultures of Embryonic Rat Lung

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shuichi; Nakano, Hiroshi; Suguta, Yuko; Irie, Seiko; Jianhua, Luo; Katyal, Sikardar L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Signaling by fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor (FGFR) 2IIIb regulates branching morphogenesis in the mammalian lung. FGFR2IIIb is primarily expressed in epithelial cells, whereas its ligands, FGF-10 and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF; FGF-7), are expressed in mesenchymal cells. FGF-10 null mice lack lungs, whereas KGF null animals have normal lung development, indicating that FGF-10 regulates lung branching morphogenesis. In this study, we determined the effects of FGF-10 on lung branching morphogenesis and accompanying gene expression in cultures of embryonic rat lungs. Methods Embryonic day 14 rat lungs were cultured with FGF-10 (0–250 ng/ml) in the absence or presence of heparin (30 ng/ml) for 4 days. Gene expression profiles were analyzed by Affymetrix microchip array including pathway analysis. Some of these genes, functionally important in FGF-10 signaling, were further analyzed by Northern blot, real-time PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Results Exogenous FGF-10 inhibited branching and induced cystic lung growth only in cultures containing heparin. In total, 252 upregulated genes and 164 downregulated genes were identified, and these included Spry1 (Sprouty-1), Spry2 (Sprouty-2), Spred-1, Bmp4 (bone morphogenetic protein-4, BMP-4), Shh(sonic hedgehog, SHH), Pthlh (parathyroid hormone-related protein, PTHrP), Dusp6 (MAP kinase phosphatase-3, MKP-3) and Clic4 (chloride intracellular channel-4, CLIC-4) among the upregulated genes and Igf1 (insulin-like growth factor-1, IGF-1), Tcf21 (POD), Gyg1 (glycogenin 1), Sparc (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine, SPARC), Pcolce (procollagen C-endopeptidase enhancer protein, Pro CEP) and Lox (lysyl oxidase) among the downregulated genes. Gsk3β and Wnt2, which are involved in canonical Wnt signaling, were up- and downregulated, respectively. Conclusions Unlike FGF-7, FGF-10 effects on lung branching morphogenesis are heparin-dependent. Sprouty-2, BMP-4, SHH, IGF-1, SPARC

  2. Abnormal Development of the Femoral Head Epiphysis in an Infant with no Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Apparent on Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Atalar, Hakan; Gunay, Cuneyd; Aytekin, Mahmut Nedim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In the investigation of hip development in newborns and infants, ultrasonography and radiography are widely used, but their optimal roles in this setting remain controversial. Case Report: Here we describe an 8.5-month-old infant who had undergone hip radiography at a primary care facility and was referred to our hospital to be evaluated for developmental dysplasia of the hip. Ultrasonography showed no developmental dysplasia of the hip according to standard criteria, but developmental retardation of the femoral head was apparent on the radiograph. Conclusion: This patient's findings demonstrate that abnormalities in femoral head epiphysis development can go undetected during routine ultrasonographic evaluations for developmental dysplasia of the hip. PMID:27298982

  3. Metyrapone alleviates deleterious effects of maternal food restriction on lung development and growth of rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Paek, David S; Sakurai, Reiko; Saraswat, Aditi; Li, Yishi; Khorram, Omid; Torday, John S; Rehan, Virender K

    2015-02-01

    Maternal food restriction (MFR) causes intrauterine growth restriction, a known risk factor for developing chronic lung disease. However, it is unknown whether this negative outcome is gender specific or preventable by blocking the MFR-induced hyperglucocorticoidism. Using a well-established rat model, we used metyrapone (MTP), an inhibitor of glucocorticoid synthesis, to study the MFR-induced lung changes on postnatal day (p) 21 in a gender-specific manner. From embryonic day 10 until delivery, pregnant dams were fed either an ad libitum diet or a 50% caloric restricted diet with or without MTP supplementation. Postnatally, the offspring were fed ad libitum from healthy dams until p21. Morphometric, Western blot, and immunohistochemical analysis of the lungs demonstrated that MTP mitigated the MFR-mediated decrease in alveolar count, decrease in adipogenic protein peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, increase in myogenic proteins (fibronectin, α-smooth muscle actin, and calponin), increase in Wnt signaling intermediates (lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 and β-catenin), and increase in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) levels. The MFR-induced lung phenotype and the effects of MTP were similar in both genders. To elucidate the mechanism of MFR-induced shift of the adipogenic-to-myogenic phenotype, lung fibroblasts were used to independently study the effects of (1) nutrient restriction and (2) excess steroid exposure. Nutrient deprivation increased myogenic proteins, Wnt signaling intermediates, and GR, all changes blocked by protein supplementation. MTP also blocked, likely by normalizing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate levels, the corticosterone-induced increase in myogenic proteins, but had no effect on GR levels. In summary, protein restriction and increased glucocorticoid levels appear to be the key players in MFR-induced lung disease, affecting both genders.

  4. White-matter tract abnormalities and antisocial behavior: A systematic review of diffusion tensor imaging studies across development.

    PubMed

    Waller, Rebecca; Dotterer, Hailey L; Murray, Laura; Maxwell, Andrea M; Hyde, Luke W

    2017-01-01

    Antisocial behavior (AB), including aggression, violence, and theft, is thought be underpinned by abnormal functioning in networks of the brain critical to emotion processing, behavioral control, and reward-related learning. To better understand the abnormal functioning of these networks, research has begun to investigate the structural connections between brain regions implicated in AB using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which assesses white-matter tract microstructure. This systematic review integrates findings from 22 studies that examined the relationship between white-matter microstructure and AB across development. In contrast to a prior hypothesis that AB is associated with greater diffusivity specifically in the uncinate fasciculus, findings suggest that adult AB is associated with greater diffusivity across a range of white-matter tracts, including the uncinate fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, cingulum, corticospinal tract, thalamic radiations, and corpus callosum. The pattern of findings among youth studies was inconclusive with both higher and lower diffusivity found across association, commissural, and projection and thalamic tracts.

  5. Steroid abnormalities and the developing brain: Declarative memory for emotionally arousing and neutral material in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Maheu, Françoise S.; Merke, Deborah P.; Schroth, Elizabeth A.; Keil, Margaret F.; Hardin, Julie; Poeth, Kaitlin; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique

    2008-01-01

    Summary Steroid hormones modulate memory in animals and human adults. Little is known on the developmental effect of these hormones on the neural networks underlying memory. Using Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) as a naturalistic model of early steroid abnormalities, this study examines the consequences of CAH on memory and its neural correlates for emotionally arousing and neutral material in children. Seventeen patients with CAH and 17 age- and sex-matched healthy children (ages 12 to 14 years) completed the study. Subjects were presented positive, negative and neutral pictures. Memory recall occurred about 30 minutes after viewing the pictures. Children with CAH showed memory deficits for negative pictures compared to healthy children (p < 0.01). There were no group differences on memory performance for either positive or neutral pictures (p’s >0.1). In patients, 24h urinary-free cortisol levels (reflecting glucocorticoid replacement therapy) and testosterone levels were not associated with memory performance. These findings suggest that early steroid imbalances affect memory for negative material in children with CAH. Such memory impairments may result from abnormal brain organization and function following hormonal dysfunction during critical periods of development. PMID:18162329

  6. Structural abnormalities develop in the brain after ablation of the gene encoding nonmuscle myosin II-B heavy chain.

    PubMed

    Tullio, A N; Bridgman, P C; Tresser, N J; Chan, C C; Conti, M A; Adelstein, R S; Hara, Y

    2001-04-23

    Ablation of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain II-B (NMHC-B) in mice results in severe hydrocephalus with enlargement of the lateral and third ventricles. All B(-)/B(-) mice died either during embryonic development or on the day of birth (PO). Neurons cultured from superior cervical ganglia of B(-)/B(-) mice between embryonic day (E) 18 and P0 showed decreased rates of neurite outgrowth, and their growth cones had a distinctive narrow morphology compared with those from normal mice. Serial sections of E12.5, E13.5, and E15 mouse brains identified developmental defects in the ventricular neuroepithelium. On E12.5, disruption of the coherent ventricular surface and disordered cell migration of neuroepithelial and differentiated cells were seen at various points in the ventricular walls. These abnormalities resulted in the formation of rosettes in various regions of the brain and spinal cord. On E13.5 and E15, disruption of the ventricular surface and aberrant protrusions of neural cells into the ventricles became more prominent. By E18.5 and P0, the defects in cells lining the ventricular wall resulted in an obstructive hydrocephalus due to stenosis or occlusion of the third ventricle and cerebral aqueduct. These defects may be caused by abnormalities in the cell adhesive properties of neuroepithelial cells and suggest that NMHC-B is essential for both early and late developmental processes in the mammalian brain.

  7. Steroid abnormalities and the developing brain: declarative memory for emotionally arousing and neutral material in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Maheu, Françoise S; Merke, Deborah P; Schroth, Elizabeth A; Keil, Margaret F; Hardin, Julie; Poeth, Kaitlin; Pine, Daniel S; Ernst, Monique

    2008-02-01

    Steroid hormones modulate memory in animals and human adults. Little is known on the developmental effects of these hormones on the neural networks underlying memory. Using Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) as a naturalistic model of early steroid abnormalities, this study examines the consequences of CAH on memory and its neural correlates for emotionally arousing and neutral material in children. Seventeen patients with CAH and 17 age- and sex-matched healthy children (ages 12-14 years) completed the study. Subjects were presented positive, negative and neutral pictures. Memory recall occurred about 30min after viewing the pictures. Children with CAH showed memory deficits for negative pictures compared to healthy children (p<0.01). There were no group differences on memory performance for either positive or neutral pictures (p>0.1). In patients, 24h urinary-free cortisol levels (reflecting glucocorticoid replacement therapy) and testosterone levels were not associated with memory performance. These findings suggest that early steroid imbalances affect memory for negative material in children with CAH. Such memory impairments may result from abnormal brain organization and function following hormonal dysfunction during critical periods of development.

  8. Lung Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, David; El-Hashash, Ahmed; Carraro, Gianni; Tiozzo, Caterina; Sala, Frederic; Rogers, Orquidea; De Langhe, Stijn; Kemp, Paul J.; Riccardi, Daniela; Torday, John; Bellusci, Saverio; Shi, Wei; Lubkin, Sharon R; Jesudason, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    Developmental lung biology is a field that has the potential for significant human impact: lung disease at the extremes of age continues to cause major morbidity and mortality worldwide. Understanding how the lung develops holds the promise that investigators can use this knowledge to aid lung repair and regeneration. In the decade since the “molecular embryology” of the lung was first comprehensively reviewed, new challenges have emerged—and it is on these that we focus the current review. Firstly, there is a critical need to understand the progenitor cell biology of the lung in order to exploit the potential of stem cells for the treatment of lung disease. Secondly, the current familiar descriptions of lung morphogenesis governed by growth and transcription factors need to be elaborated upon with the reinclusion and reconsideration of other factors, such as mechanics, in lung growth. Thirdly, efforts to parse the finer detail of lung bud signaling may need to be combined with broader consideration of overarching mechanisms that may be therapeutically easier to target: in this arena, we advance the proposal that looking at the lung in general (and branching in particular) in terms of clocks may yield unexpected benefits. PMID:20691848

  9. Redox Abnormalities as a Vulnerability Phenotype for Autism and Related Alterations in CNS Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    involved in autism pathogenesis also occur in many children that do not develop ASD. This suggests there is an underlying vulnerability phenotype that...involved in autism pathogenesis occur in many more children than those that develop ASD. This suggests that there is an underlying vulnerability phenotype...hypothesis to explain the observations that the multiple environmental insults that have been suggested to be involved in autism pathogenesis occur in

  10. Regulation of proto-oncogene expression in adult and developing lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Molinar-Rode, R; Smeyne, R J; Curran, T; Morgan, J I

    1993-01-01

    Activation of immediate-early gene expression has been associated with mitogenesis, differentiation, nerve cell depolarization, and recently, terminal differentiation processes and programmed cell death. Previous evidence also suggested that immediate-early genes play a role in the physiology of the lungs (J. I. Morgan, D. R. Cohen, J. L. Hempstead, and T. Curran, Science 237:192-197, 1987). Therefore, we analyzed c-fos expression in adult and developing lung tissues. Seizures elicited by chemoconvulsants induced expression of mRNA for c-fos, c-jun, and junB and Fos-like immunoreactivity in lung tissue. The use of pharmacological antagonists and adrenalectomy indicated that this increased expression was neurogenic. Interestingly, by using a fos-lacZ transgenic mouse, it was shown that Fos-LacZ expression in response to seizure occurred preferentially in clusters of epithelial cells at the poles of the bronchioles. This was the same location of Fos-LacZ expression detected during early lung development. These data imply that pharmacological induction of immediate-early gene expression in adult mice recapitulates an embryological program of gene expression. Images PMID:8497249

  11. Development of deformable moving lung phantom to simulate respiratory motion in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jina; Lee, Youngkyu; Shin, Hunjoo; Ji, Sanghoon; Park, Sungkwang; Kim, Jinyoung; Jang, Hongseok; Kang, Youngnam

    2016-07-01

    Radiation treatment requires high accuracy to protect healthy organs and destroy the tumor. However, tumors located near the diaphragm constantly move during treatment. Respiration-gated radiotherapy has significant potential for the improvement of the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion, such as lung and liver tumors. To measure and minimize the effects of respiratory motion, a realistic deformable phantom is required for use as a gold standard. The purpose of this study was to develop and study the characteristics of a deformable moving lung (DML) phantom, such as simulation, tissue equivalence, and rate of deformation. The rate of change of the lung volume, target deformation, and respiratory signals were measured in this study; they were accurately measured using a realistic deformable phantom. The measured volume difference was 31%, which closely corresponds to the average difference in human respiration, and the target movement was − 30 to + 32 mm. The measured signals accurately described human respiratory signals. This DML phantom would be useful for the estimation of deformable image registration and in respiration-gated radiotherapy. This study shows that the developed DML phantom can exactly simulate the patient's respiratory signal and it acts as a deformable 4-dimensional simulation of a patient's lung with sufficient volume change.

  12. Elastin metabolism and chemistry: potential roles in lung development and structure.

    PubMed Central

    Rucker, R B; Dubick, M A

    1984-01-01

    Elastic fibers are important for elasticity and extensibility of lung tissue. In the developing lung, elastic fibers appear in greatest numbers during the process or period of alveolarization . A variety of mesenchymal cells in lung appear responsible for elastin synthesis. Elastin is a novel protein both from the standpoint of its processing into elastic fibers and chemical properties. For example, elastin undergoes posttranslational modification before its assembly into fibers. These steps include limited proteolysis, hydroxylation of prolyl residues and the oxidative deamination of lysyl residues prior to their incorporation into the crosslinks that covalently bond together polypeptide chains of elastin. The crosslinking amino acids include lysinonorleucine , merodesmosine and desmosine isomers. A key enzyme that controls this process is lysyl oxidase. Lysyl oxidase is a copper metalloprotein whose activity is responsive to and modulated by environmental insults, nutrition deficiencies and the administration of various pharmacological agents. Regarding chemical properties, elastin is one of the most apolar proteins secreted by mammalian cells. Moreover, elastin is one of the most long-lived proteins secreted into the extracellular matrix. In relationship to its processing into elastic fibers and chemical properties, details related to major aspects of elastin metabolism as well as speculation on its potential as a factor in lung development and disease are discussed. Images FIGURE 1. PMID:6376098

  13. Cardiopulmonary bypass: development of John Gibbon's heart-lung machine

    PubMed Central

    Passaroni, Andréia Cristina; Silva, Marcos Augusto de Moraes; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide a brief review of the development of cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods A review of the literature on the development of extracorporeal circulation techniques, their essential role in cardiovascular surgery, and the complications associated with their use, including hemolysis and inflammation. Results The advancement of extracorporeal circulation techniques has played an essential role in minimizing the complications of cardiopulmonary bypass, which can range from various degrees of tissue injury to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Investigators have long researched the ways in which cardiopulmonary bypass may insult the human body. Potential solutions arose and laid the groundwork for development of safer postoperative care strategies. Conclusion Steady progress has been made in cardiopulmonary bypass in the decades since it was first conceived of by Gibbon. Despite the constant evolution of cardiopulmonary bypass techniques and attempts to minimize their complications, it is still essential that clinicians respect the particularities of each patient's physiological function. PMID:26107456

  14. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  15. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  16. Collagen and elastin cross-linking is altered during aberrant late lung development associated with hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Mižíková, Ivana; Ruiz-Camp, Jordi; Steenbock, Heiko; Madurga, Alicia; Vadász, István; Herold, Susanne; Mayer, Konstantin; Seeger, Werner; Brinckmann, Jürgen; Morty, Rory E

    2015-06-01

    Maturation of the lung extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in the formation of alveolar gas exchange units. A key step in ECM maturation is cross-linking of collagen and elastin, which imparts stability and functionality to the ECM. During aberrant late lung development in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) patients and animal models of BPD, alveolarization is blocked, and the function of ECM cross-linking enzymes is deregulated, suggesting that perturbed ECM cross-linking may impact alveolarization. In a hyperoxia (85% O2)-based mouse model of BPD, blunted alveolarization was accompanied by alterations to lung collagen and elastin levels and cross-linking. Total collagen levels were increased (by 63%). The abundance of dihydroxylysinonorleucine collagen cross-links and the dihydroxylysinonorleucine-to-hydroxylysinonorleucine ratio were increased by 11 and 18%, respectively, suggestive of a profibrotic state. In contrast, insoluble elastin levels and the abundance of the elastin cross-links desmosine and isodesmosine in insoluble elastin were decreased by 35, 30, and 21%, respectively. The lung collagen-to-elastin ratio was threefold increased. Treatment of hyperoxia-exposed newborn mice with the lysyl oxidase inhibitor β-aminopropionitrile partially restored normal collagen levels, normalized the dihydroxylysinonorleucine-to-hydroxylysinonorleucine ratio, partially normalized desmosine and isodesmosine cross-links in insoluble elastin, and partially restored elastin foci structure in the developing septa. However, β-aminopropionitrile administration concomitant with hyperoxia exposure did not improve alveolarization, evident from unchanged alveolar surface area and alveoli number, and worsened septal thickening (increased by 12%). These data demonstrate that collagen and elastin cross-linking are perturbed during the arrested alveolarization of developing mouse lungs exposed to hyperoxia.

  17. Embryonic exposure to thimerosal, an organomercury compound, causes abnormal early development of serotonergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Ida-Eto, Michiru; Oyabu, Akiko; Ohkawara, Takeshi; Tashiro, Yasura; Narita, Naoko; Narita, Masaaki

    2011-11-14

    Even though neuronal toxicity due to organomercury compounds is well known, thimerosal, an organomercury compound, is widely used in pediatric vaccine preservation. In the present study, we examined whether embryonic exposure to thimerosal affects early development of serotonergic neurons. Thimerosal (1mg Hg/kg) was intramuscularly administered to pregnant rats on gestational day 9 (susceptible time window for development of fetal serotonergic system), and fetal serotonergic neurons were assessed at embryonic day 15 using anti-serotonin antibodies. A dramatic increase in the number of serotonergic neurons localized to the lateral portion of the caudal raphe was observed in thimerosal group (1.9-fold increase, p<0.01 compared to control). These results indicate that embryonic exposure to thimerosal affects early development of serotonergic neurons.

  18. Abnormal development of sensory-motor, visual temporal and parahippocampal cortex in children with learning disabilities and borderline intellectual functioning.

    PubMed

    Baglio, Francesca; Cabinio, Monia; Ricci, Cristian; Baglio, Gisella; Lipari, Susanna; Griffanti, Ludovica; Preti, Maria G; Nemni, Raffaello; Clerici, Mario; Zanette, Michela; Blasi, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) is a condition characterized by an intelligence quotient (IQ) between 70 and 85. BIF children present with cognitive, motor, social, and adaptive limitations that result in learning disabilities and are more likely to develop psychiatric disorders later in life. The aim of this study was to investigate brain morphometry and its relation to IQ level in BIF children. Thirteen children with BIF and 14 age- and sex-matched typically developing (TD) children were enrolled. All children underwent a full IQ assessment (WISC-III scale) and a magnetic resonance (MR) examination including conventional sequences to assess brain structural abnormalities and high resolution 3D images for voxel-based morphometry analysis. To investigate to what extent the group influenced gray matter (GM) volumes, both univariate and multivariate generalized linear model analysis of variance were used, and the varimax factor analysis was used to explore variable correlations and clusters among subjects. Results showed that BIF children, compared to controls have increased regional GM volume in bilateral sensorimotor and right posterior temporal cortices and decreased GM volume in the right parahippocampal gyrus. GM volumes were highly correlated with IQ indices. The present work is a case study of a group of BIF children showing that BIF is associated with abnormal cortical development in brain areas that have a pivotal role in motor, learning, and behavioral processes. Our findings, although allowing for little generalization to the general population, contribute to the very limited knowledge in this field. Future longitudinal MR studies will be useful in verifying whether cortical features can be modified over time even in association with rehabilitative intervention.

  19. Interstitial lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... advanced ILD may have: Abnormal enlargement of the base of the fingernails ( clubbing ) Blue color of the ... scan of the chest Echocardiogram Open lung biopsy Measurement of the blood oxygen level at rest or ...

  20. Auditory Processing in Infancy: Do Early Abnormalities Predict Disorders of Language and Cognitive Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzzetta, Francesco; Conti, Guido; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    Increasing attention has been devoted to the maturation of sensory processing in the first year of life. While the development of cortical visual function has been thoroughly studied, much less information is available on auditory processing and its early disorders. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the assessment techniques for…

  1. Unsupervised segmentation of lungs from chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Payel; Antani, Sameer K.; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes our preliminary investigations for deriving and characterizing coarse-level textural regions present in the lung field on chest radiographs using unsupervised grow-cut (UGC), a cellular automaton based unsupervised segmentation technique. The segmentation has been performed on a publicly available data set of chest radiographs. The algorithm is useful for this application because it automatically converges to a natural segmentation of the image from random seed points using low-level image features such as pixel intensity values and texture features. Our goal is to develop a portable screening system for early detection of lung diseases for use in remote areas in developing countries. This involves developing automated algorithms for screening x-rays as normal/abnormal with a high degree of sensitivity, and identifying lung disease patterns on chest x-rays. Automatically deriving and quantitatively characterizing abnormal regions present in the lung field is the first step toward this goal. Therefore, region-based features such as geometrical and pixel-value measurements were derived from the segmented lung fields. In the future, feature selection and classification will be performed to identify pathological conditions such as pulmonary tuberculosis on chest radiographs. Shape-based features will also be incorporated to account for occlusions of the lung field and by other anatomical structures such as the heart and diaphragm.

  2. Overexpression of the CmACS-3 gene in melon causes abnormal pollen development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Luan, F

    2015-09-08

    Sexual diversity expressed by the Curcurbitaceae family is a primary example of developmental plasticity in plants. Most melon genotypes are andromonoecious, where an initial phase of male flowers is followed by a mixture of bisexual and male flowers. Over-expression of the CmACS-3 gene in melon plants showed an increased number of flower buds, and increased femaleness as demonstrated by a larger number bisexual buds. Transformation of CmACS-3 in melons showed earlier development of and an increased number of bisexual buds that matured to anthesis but also increased the rate of development of the bisexual buds to maturity. Field studies showed that CmACS-3-overexpressing melons had earlier mature bisexual flowers, earlier fruit set, and an increased number of fruits set on closely spaced nodes on the main stem.

  3. Baseline sacroiliac joint magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities and male sex predict the development of radiographic sacroiliitis.

    PubMed

    Akar, Servet; Isik, Sibel; Birlik, Bilge; Solmaz, Dilek; Sari, Ismail; Onen, Fatos; Akkoc, Nurullah

    2013-10-01

    We evaluated the relationship between the baseline sacroiliac joint (SIJ) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and the development of radiographic sacroiliitis and tested their prognostic significance in cases of ankylosing spondylitis. Patients who had undergone an SIJ MRI at the rheumatology department were identified. Individuals for whom pelvic X-rays were available after at least 1 year of MRI were included in the analysis. All radiographs and MRI examinations were scored by two independent readers. Medical records of the patients were reviewed to obtain potentially relevant demographic and clinical data. We identified 1,069 SIJ MRIs, and 328 fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Reliability analysis revealed moderate to good inter- and intra-observer agreement. On presentation data, 14 cases were excluded because they had unequivocal radiographic sacroiliitis at baseline. After a mean of 34.8 months of follow-up, 24 patients developed radiographic sacroiliitis. The presence of active sacroiliitis (odds ratio (OR) 15.1) and structural lesions on MRI (OR 8.3), male sex (OR 4.7), fulfillment of Calin's inflammatory back pain criteria (P = 0.001), and total MRI activity score (P < 0.001) were found to be related to the development of radiographic sacroiliitis. By regression modeling, the presence of both active inflammatory and structural damage lesions on MRI and male sex were found to be predictive factors for the development of radiographic sacroiliitis. Our present results suggest that the occurrence of both active inflammatory and structural lesions in SIJs revealed by MRI is a significant risk factor for radiographic sacroiliitis, especially in male patients with early inflammatory back pain.

  4. The sequential development of abnormal prion protein accumulation in mice with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed Central

    Muramoto, T.; Kitamoto, T.; Tateishi, J.; Goto, I.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution and sequential development of prion protein (PrP) accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS) and non-neuronal organs of mice infected with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) were investigated immunohistochemically using a new pretreatment method that greatly enhanced the immunoreactivity of PrP. Prion protein accumulation in the CNS was first detected at 30 days after inoculation and then developed near the inoculation site or periventricular area, and later spread to the whole cerebrum and then to the pons. Its staining took some characteristic forms. Among non-neuronal organs, PrP accumulated in the follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) in spleen, lymph node, Peyer's patch, and thymus. FDCs staining appeared in spleen, lymph node, and Peyer's patch at 21 or 30 days after inoculation, and in thymus at 90 days. Germinal centers developed in the thymus of some CJD-infected mice. No PrP staining was detected in any examined organs of age-matched control mice. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1376559

  5. Hippocampal neuronal subtypes develop abnormal dendritic arbors in the presence of Fragile X astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, S; Cheng, C; Doering, L C

    2016-06-02

    Astrocytes are now recognized as key players in the neurobiology of neurodevelopmental disorders such as Fragile X syndrome. However, the nature of Fragile X astrocyte-mediated control of dendrite development in subtypes of hippocampal neurons is not yet known. We used a co-culture procedure in which wildtype primary hippocampal neurons were cultured with astrocytes from either a wildtype or Fragile X mouse, for either 7, 14 or 21 days. The neurons were processed for immunocytochemistry with the dendritic marker MAP2, classified by morphological criteria into one of five neuronal subtypes, and subjected to Sholl analyses. Both linear and semi-log methods of Sholl analyses were applied to the neurons in order to provide an in depth analysis of the dendritic arborizations. We found that Fragile X astrocytes affect the development of dendritic arborization of all subtypes of wildtype hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we show that hippocampal neurons with spiny stellate neuron morphology exhibit the most pervasive developmental delays, with significant dendritic arbor alterations persisting at 21 days in culture. The results further dictate the critical role astrocytes play in governing neuronal morphology including altered dendrite development in Fragile X.

  6. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Ina; Hume, Kelly R.; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Peters, Rachel M.; Weiss, Robert S.; Webb, Watt W.

    2010-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading killer among all cancers for both men and women in the US, and is associated with one of the lowest 5-year survival rates. Current diagnostic techniques, such as histopathological assessment of tissue obtained by computed tomography guided biopsies, have limited accuracy, especially for small lesions. Early diagnosis of lung cancer can be improved by introducing a real-time, optical guidance method based on the in vivo application of multiphoton microscopy (MPM). In particular, we hypothesize that MPM imaging of living lung tissue based on twophoton excited intrinsic fluorescence and second harmonic generation can provide sufficient morphologic and spectroscopic information to distinguish between normal and diseased lung tissue. Here, we used an experimental approach based on MPM with multichannel fluorescence detection for initial discovery that MPM spectral imaging could differentiate between normal and neoplastic lung in ex vivo samples from a murine model of lung cancer. Current results indicate that MPM imaging can directly distinguish normal and neoplastic lung tissues based on their distinct morphologies and fluorescence emission properties in non-processed lung tissue. Moreover, we found initial indication that MPM imaging differentiates between normal alveolar tissue, inflammatory foci, and lung neoplasms. Our long-term goal is to apply results from ex vivo lung specimens to aid in the development of multiphoton endoscopy for in vivo imaging of lung abnormalities in various animal models, and ultimately for the diagnosis of human lung cancer.

  7. Tobacco smoking and methylation of genes related to lung cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xu; Zhang, Yan; Breitling, Lutz Philipp; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, and cigarette smoking is the major environmental hazard for its development. This study intended to examine whether smoking could alter methylation of genes at lung cancer risk loci identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs). By systematic literature review, we selected 75 genomic candidate regions based on 120 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). DNA methylation levels of 2854 corresponding cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) candidates in whole blood samples were measured by the Illumina Infinium Human Methylation450 Beadchip array in two independent subsamples of the ESTHER study. After correction for multiple testing, we successfully confirmed associations with smoking for one previously identified CpG site within the KLF6 gene and identified 12 novel sites located in 7 genes: STK32A, TERT, MSH5, ACTA2, GATA3, VTI1A and CHRNA5 (FDR <0.05). Current smoking was linked to a 0.74% to 2.4% decrease of DNA methylation compared to never smoking in 11 loci, and all but one showed significant associations (FDR <0.05) with life-time cumulative smoking (pack-years). In conclusion, our study demonstrates the impact of tobacco smoking on DNA methylation of lung cancer related genes, which may indicate that lung cancer susceptibility genes might be regulated by methylation changes in response to smoking. Nevertheless, this mechanism warrants further exploration in future epigenetic and biomarker studies. PMID:27323854

  8. Hemorrhage and resuscitation induce alterations in cytokine expression and the development of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Shenkar, R; Coulson, W F; Abraham, E

    1994-03-01

    Acute pulmonary injury occurs frequently following hemorrhage and injury. In order to better examine the sequence of events leading to lung injury in this setting, we investigated lung histology as well as in vivo mRNA levels for cytokines with proinflammatory and immunoregulatory properties (IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha, TGF-beta, IFN-gamma) over the 3 days following hemorrhage and resuscitation. Significant increases in mRNA levels for IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-10, and IFN-gamma, but not TNF-alpha, were present among intraparenchymal pulmonary mononuclear cells obtained 1 and 3 days after hemorrhage. Among alveolar macrophages, TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta mRNA levels were increased 3 days after hemorrhage. Few changes in cytokine mRNA levels, with the exception of TNF-alpha at 3 days after hemorrhage, were present among peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Histologic examination of lungs from hemorrhaged animals showed no alterations 1 day after hemorrhage, but neutrophil and mononuclear cell infiltrates, edema, intra-alveolar hemorrhage, and fibrin generation were present 3 days after hemorrhage. These results suggest that hemorrhage-induced enhancement of proinflammatory cytokine gene transcription may be an important mechanism contributing to the frequent development of acute lung injury following blood loss and injury.

  9. Human 14-3-3 gamma protein results in abnormal cell proliferation in the developing eye of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sophia W; Qi, Wenqing; Brabant, Marc; Bosco, Giovanni; Martinez, Jesse D

    2008-01-01

    Background 14-3-3 proteins are a family of adaptor proteins that participate in a wide variety of cellular processes. Recent evidence indicates that the expression levels of these proteins are elevated in some human tumors providing circumstantial evidence for their involvement in human cancers. However, the mechanism through which these proteins act in tumorigenesis is uncertain. Results To determine whether elevated levels of 14-3-3 proteins may perturb cell growth we overexpressed human 14-3-3 gamma (h14-3-3 gamma) in Drosophila larvae using the heat shock promoter or the GMR-Gal4 driver and then examined the effect that this had on cell proliferation in the eye imaginal discs of third instar larvae. We found that induction of h14-3-3 gamma resulted in the abnormal appearance of replicating cells in the differentiating proneural photoreceptor cells of eye imaginal discs where h14-3-3 gamma was driven by the heat shock promoter. Similarly, we found that driving h14-3-3 gamma expression specifically in developing eye discs with the GMR-Gal4 driver resulted in increased numbers of replicative cells following the morphogenetic furrow. Interestingly, we found that the effects of overexpressing h1433 gamma on eye development were increased in a genetic background where String (cdc25) function was compromised. Conclusion Taken together our results indicate that h14-3-3 gamma can promote abnormal cell proliferation and may act through Cdc25. This has important implications for 14-3-3 gamma as an oncogene as it suggests that elevated levels of 14-3-3 may confer a growth advantage to cells that overexpress it. PMID:18194556

  10. Anesthesia for Children With Craniofacial Abnormalities in the Developing Countries: Challenges and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Melookaran, Ann M; Rao, Sirisha A; Antony, Sible B; Herrera, Adriana

    2015-06-01

    Interest in global health to provide safer pediatric surgical care in developing countries has increased during the last decade. A collaborative effort between surgeons and anesthesiologists has provided the opportunity to deliver specialized care to children, particularly in the areas of cleft lip and palate repair. However, medical resources, facilities, and adequately trained personnel, especially in pediatric anesthesia, are often limited in these countries. Challenges, educational efforts, and future directions for the globalization of anesthesia are discussed. Involvement of international entities may help raise awareness, channel efforts, expand programs and encourage volunteerism to ultimately provide safer care to pediatric patients, have better outcomes and reduced anesthesia-related morbidity and mortality.

  11. The glucocorticoid-glucocorticoid receptor signal transduction pathway, transforming growth factor-beta, and embryonic mouse lung development in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jaskoll, T; Choy, H A; Melnick, M

    1996-05-01

    Lung morphogenesis has been shown to be regulated by glucocorticoids (CORT). Because CORT has been primarily thought to affect fetal lung development, previous studies have focused on the role of CORT receptor (GR)-mediated regulation of fetal lung development. Although endogenous CORT increases during embryonic and fetal stages and exogenous CORT treatment in vivo and in vitro clearly accelerates embryonic lung development, little is known about the morphoregulatory role of the embryonic CORT-GR signal transduction pathway during lung development. In this study, we characterize the embryonic mouse CORT-GR pathway and demonstrate: stage-specific in situ patterns of GR immunolocalization; similarity in GR relative mobility with progressive (E13 --> E17) development; that embryonic GR can be activated to bind a GR response element (GRE); significantly increasing levels of functional GR with increasing lung maturation; and the presence of heat shock protein (hsp) 70 and hsp90 from early (E13) to late (E17) developmental stages. These results support the purported importance of the embryonic CORT-GR signal transduction pathway in progressive lung differentiation. To demonstrate that the embryonic CORT-GR directed pathway plays a role in lung development, early embryonic (E12) lungs were exposed to CORT in utero and surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) expression was analyzed; CORT treatment up-regulates SP-A mRNA expression and spatiotemporal protein distribution. Finally, to determine whether CORT-GR-directed pulmonary morphogenesis in vivo involves the modulation of growth factors, we studied the effect of CORT on TGF-beta gene expression. Northern analysis of TGF-beta 1, TGF-beta 2, and TGF-beta 3 transcript levels in vivo indicates that CORT regulates the rate of lung morpho- and histodifferentiation by down-regulating TGF-beta 3 gene expression.

  12. Development of Liposomal Ciprofloxacin to Treat Lung Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cipolla, David; Blanchard, Jim; Gonda, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Except for management of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) in cystic fibrosis, there are no approved inhaled antibiotic treatments for any other diseases or for infections from other pathogenic microorganisms such as tuberculosis, non-tuberculous mycobacteria, fungal infections or potential inhaled biowarfare agents including Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Coxiella burnetii (which cause pneumonic tularemia, plague and Q fever, respectively). Delivery of an antibiotic formulation via the inhalation route has the potential to provide high concentrations at the site of infection with reduced systemic exposure to limit side effects. A liposomal formulation may improve tolerability, increase compliance by reducing the dosing frequency, and enhance penetration of biofilms and treatment of intracellular infections. Two liposomal ciprofloxacin formulations (Lipoquin® and Pulmaquin®) that are in development by Aradigm Corporation are described here. PMID:26938551

  13. Annual Research Review: Growth connectomics – the organization and reorganization of brain networks during normal and abnormal development

    PubMed Central

    Vértes, Petra E; Bullmore, Edward T

    2015-01-01

    Background We first give a brief introduction to graph theoretical analysis and its application to the study of brain network topology or connectomics. Within this framework, we review the existing empirical data on developmental changes in brain network organization across a range of experimental modalities (including structural and functional MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography in humans). Synthesis We discuss preliminary evidence and current hypotheses for how the emergence of network properties correlates with concomitant cognitive and behavioural changes associated with development. We highlight some of the technical and conceptual challenges to be addressed by future developments in this rapidly moving field. Given the parallels previously discovered between neural systems across species and over a range of spatial scales, we also review some recent advances in developmental network studies at the cellular scale. We highlight the opportunities presented by such studies and how they may complement neuroimaging in advancing our understanding of brain development. Finally, we note that many brain and mind disorders are thought to be neurodevelopmental in origin and that charting the trajectory of brain network changes associated with healthy development also sets the stage for understanding abnormal network development. Conclusions We therefore briefly review the clinical relevance of network metrics as potential diagnostic markers and some recent efforts in computational modelling of brain networks which might contribute to a more mechanistic understanding of neurodevelopmental disorders in future. PMID:25441756

  14. A mitochondrial DNA sequence is associated with abnormal pollen development in cytoplasmic male sterile bean plants.

    PubMed Central

    Johns, C; Lu, M; Lyznik, A; Mackenzie, S

    1992-01-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in common bean is associated with the presence of a 3-kb unique mitochondrial sequence designated pvs. The pvs sequence encodes at least two open reading frames (297 and 720 bp in length) with portions derived from the chloroplast genome. Fertility restoration by the nuclear restorer gene Fr results in the loss of this transcriptionally active unique region. We examined the effect of CMS (pvs present) and fertility restoration by Fr (pvs absent) on the pattern of pollen development in bean. In the CMS line, pollen aborted in the tetrad stage late in microgametogenesis. Microspores maintained cytoplasmic connections throughout pollen development, indicating aberrant or incomplete cytokinesis. Pollen-specific events associated with pollen abortion and fertility restoration imply that a gametophytic factor or event may be involved in CMS. In situ hybridization experiments suggested that significant reduction or complete loss of the mitochondrial sterility-associated sequence occurred in fertile pollen of F2 populations segregating for fertility. These observations support a model of fertility restoration by the loss of a mitochondrial DNA sequence prior to or during microsporogenesis/gametogenesis. PMID:1498602

  15. Decline in lung function rather than baseline lung function is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome: A six-year longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jong-Ha; Jee, Jae Hwan; Hur, Kyu Yeon; Lee, Moon-Kyu

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate whether baseline lung function or change in lung function is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome (MS) in Koreans. We analyzed clinical and laboratory data from 3,768 Koreans aged 40–60 years who underwent medical check-ups over a six-year period between 2006 and 2012. We calculated the percent change in forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) over the study period. We tested for an association between baseline lung function or lung function change during the follow-up period and the development of MS. The 533 subjects (14.1%) developed MS after the six-year follow-up. The baseline FVC and FEV1 were not different between the subjects who developed MS after six years and the subject without MS after six years. The percent change in FVC over six years in subjects who developed MS after six years was higher than that in subjects who did not develop MS (-5.75 [-10.19 –-1.17], -3.29 [-7.69–1.09], respectively, P = 0.001). The percent change in FVC over six years was associated with MS development after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), glucose, HDL, triglyceride, waist circumferences (WC), and systolic blood pressure. However, these association was not significant after adjusting for change of BMI and change of WC over six years (P = 0.306). The greater change in vital capacity over six years of follow-up was associated with MS development, predominantly due to obesity and abdominal obesity. The prospective study is needed to determine the relationship between lung function decline and MS. PMID:28346522

  16. Abnormal in vitro development of ovarian follicles explanted from mice exposed to tetrachlorvinphos.

    PubMed

    Nayudu, P L; Kiesel, P S; Nowshari, M A; Hodges, J K

    1994-01-01

    A system of mouse ovarian follicle culture in which follicles can be grown from a preantral stage of development through antral formation has been developed and modified recently by Nayudu and colleagues. Follicles have been shown to grow in this culture system at a relatively constant rate and show responsiveness to LH at the end of the culture by ovulation of mature oocytes. Reported here are the distinctly different in vitro growth patterns of follicles explanted from 22- to 24-day-old mice during a period when the colony was being treated for skin parasites with tetrachlorvinphos (TCVP) (Rabond). There is to date no information on the effects of this compound on the mammalian female reproductive system. For follicles from the TCVP treated group, the duration of growth as intact follicles was markedly reduced in comparison to mice of the same strain and source not treated with TCVP. In the treated group, premature termination of follicular growth was also associated with the spontaneous expulsion of oocytes with immature nuclei and without cumulus cells. For those follicles from treated mice that did remain in culture until the day luteinizing hormone was given, the ovulatory response was poor and the maturation response of the oocytes was low in comparison with the follicles from untreated mice. The effect of the treatment on the follicles was further characterized by obvious differences in the patterns of growth. Follicles in the untreated group grew in a linear pattern at around 25 microns/day; a single phase, fast pattern for the whole culture period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Early neuromodulation prevents the development of brain and behavioral abnormalities in a rodent model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hadar, R; Bikovski, L; Soto-Montenegro, M L; Schimke, J; Maier, P; Ewing, S; Voget, M; Wieske, F; Götz, T; Desco, M; Hamani, C; Pascau, J; Weiner, I; Winter, C

    2017-04-04

    The notion that schizophrenia is a neurodevelopmental disorder in which neuropathologies evolve gradually over the developmental course indicates a potential therapeutic window during which pathophysiological processes may be modified to halt disease progression or reduce its severity. Here we used a neurodevelopmental maternal immune stimulation (MIS) rat model of schizophrenia to test whether early targeted modulatory intervention would affect schizophrenia's neurodevelopmental course. We applied deep brain stimulation (DBS) or sham stimulation to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of adolescent MIS rats and respective controls, and investigated its behavioral, biochemical, brain-structural and -metabolic effects in adulthood. We found that mPFC-DBS successfully prevented the emergence of deficits in sensorimotor gating, attentional selectivity and executive function in adulthood, as well as the enlargement of lateral ventricle volumes and mal-development of dopaminergic and serotonergic transmission. These data suggest that the mPFC may be a valuable target for effective preventive treatments. This may have significant translational value, suggesting that targeting the mPFC before the onset of psychosis via less invasive neuromodulation approaches may be a viable preventive strategy.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 4 April 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.52.

  18. Role of abnormal lipid metabolism in development, progression, diagnosis and therapy of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swierczynski, Julian; Hebanowska, Areta; Sledzinski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that metabolic alterations play an important role in cancer development and progression. The metabolism of cancer cells is reprogrammed in order to support their rapid proliferation. Elevated fatty acid synthesis is one of the most important aberrations of cancer cell metabolism. An enhancement of fatty acids synthesis is required both for carcinogenesis and cancer cell survival, as inhibition of key lipogenic enzymes slows down the growth of tumor cells and impairs their survival. Based on the data that serum fatty acid synthase (FASN), also known as oncoantigen 519, is elevated in patients with certain types of cancer, its serum level was proposed as a marker of neoplasia. This review aims to demonstrate the changes in lipid metabolism and other metabolic processes associated with lipid metabolism in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common pancreatic neoplasm, characterized by high mortality. We also addressed the influence of some oncogenic factors and tumor suppressors on pancreatic cancer cell metabolism. Additionally the review discusses the potential role of elevated lipid synthesis in diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. In particular, FASN is a viable candidate for indicator of pathologic state, marker of neoplasia, as well as, pharmacological treatment target in pancreatic cancer. Recent research showed that, in addition to lipogenesis, certain cancer cells can use fatty acids from circulation, derived from diet (chylomicrons), synthesized in liver, or released from adipose tissue for their growth. Thus, the interactions between de novo lipogenesis and uptake of fatty acids from circulation by PDAC cells require further investigation. PMID:24605027

  19. Identification of gene markers in the development of smoking-induced lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhao; Zhuan, Bing; Yan, Ying; Jiang, Simin; Wang, Tao

    2016-01-15

    Lung cancer is a malignant tumor with high mortality in both women and men. To study the mechanisms of smoking-induced lung cancer, we analyzed microarray of GSE4115. GSE4115 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus including 78 and 85 bronchial epithelium tissue samples separately from smokers with and without lung cancer. Limma package in R was used to screen differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Hierarchical cluster analysis for DEGs was conducted using orange software and visualized by distance map. Using DAVID software, functional and pathway enrichment analyses separately were conducted for the DEGs. And protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using Cytoscape software. Then, the pathscores of enriched pathways were calculated. Besides, functional features were screened and optimized using the recursive feature elimination (RFE) method. Additionally, the support vector machine (SVM) method was used to train model. Total 1923 DEGs were identified between the two groups. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated that there were differences in gene level between the two groups. And SVM analysis indicated that the five features had potential diagnostic value. Importantly, MAPK1 (degree=30), SRC (degree=29), SMAD4 (degree=23), EEF1A1 (degree=21), TRAF2 (degree=21) and PLCG1 (degree=20) had higher degrees in the PPI network of the DEGs. They might be involved in smoking-induced lung cancer by interacting with each other (e.g. MAPK1-SMAD4, SMAD4-EEF1A1 and SRC-PLCG1). MAPK1, SRC, SMAD4, EEF1A1, TRAF2 and PLCG1 might be responsible for the development of smoking-induced lung cancer.

  20. The development of the trabecular meshwork and its abnormality in primary infantile glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D R

    1981-01-01

    Tissue from ten eyes with infantile glaucoma and from 40 normal eyes of fetuses and infants without glaucoma were examined by light and electron microscopy. In normal development, the corneoscleral coat grows faster than the uveal tract during the last trimester, leading to a posterior migration of the ciliary body attachment from Schwalbe's line (5th month) to the scleral spur (9th month), and then to a location behind the scleral spur (postnatally). In infantile glaucoma, the insertion of the anterior ciliary body and iris overlaps the trabecular meshwork, similar to the late fetal position. The trabecular sheets are perforated, and there is no membrane over the surface of the trabecular meshwork. The trabecular beams are thicker than in normal infant eyes. There is both histologic and clinical evidence of traction on the iris root exerted by the thickened trabecular beams. These findings suggest that in congenital glaucoma the thickened beams had prevented the normal posterior migration of the ciliary body and iris root. This traction may compact the thickened trabecular beams, obstructing aqueous humor outflow. Release of the traction by an incision (goniotomy or trabeculotomy) of the thickened meshwork may relieve the obstruction. Of uncertain pathological significance is that there are no vacuoles in the endothelium of Schlemm's canal and there is a broad layer of collagen and amorphous material in the juxtacanalicular connective tissue. The ciliary processes are elongated inward, as if they were pulled by zonular traction (perhaps created by an enlarging diameter of the limbus with a fixed lens diameter). Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 20 A FIGURE 20 B FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 5 A FIGURE 5 B FIGURE 6 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 PMID:7342408

  1. Copy number variants and infantile spasms: evidence for abnormalities in ventral forebrain development and pathways of synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    Paciorkowski, Alex R; Thio, Liu Lin; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Gajecka, Marzena; Gurnett, Christina A; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Chung, Wendy K; Marsh, Eric D; Gentile, Mattia; Reggin, James D; Wheless, James W; Balasubramanian, Sandhya; Kumar, Ravinesh; Christian, Susan L; Marini, Carla; Guerrini, Renzo; Maltsev, Natalia; Shaffer, Lisa G; Dobyns, William B

    2011-01-01

    Infantile spasms (ISS) are an epilepsy disorder frequently associated with severe developmental outcome and have diverse genetic etiologies. We ascertained 11 subjects with ISS and novel copy number variants (CNVs) and combined these with a new cohort with deletion 1p36 and ISS, and additional published patients with ISS and other chromosomal abnormalities. Using bioinformatics tools, we analyzed the gene content of these CNVs for enrichment in pathways of pathogenesis. Several important findings emerged. First, the gene content was enriched for the gene regulatory network involved in ventral forebrain development. Second, genes in pathways of synaptic function were overrepresented, significantly those involved in synaptic vesicle transport. Evidence also suggested roles for GABAergic synapses and the postsynaptic density. Third, we confirm the association of ISS with duplication of 14q12 and maternally inherited duplication of 15q11q13, and report the association with duplication of 21q21. We also present a patient with ISS and deletion 7q11.3 not involving MAGI2. Finally, we provide evidence that ISS in deletion 1p36 may be associated with deletion of KLHL17 and expand the epilepsy phenotype in that syndrome to include early infantile epileptic encephalopathy. Several of the identified pathways share functional links, and abnormalities of forebrain synaptic growth and function may form a common biologic mechanism underlying both ISS and autism. This study demonstrates a novel approach to the study of gene content in subjects with ISS and copy number variation, and contributes further evidence to support specific pathways of pathogenesis. PMID:21694734

  2. Computerized scheme for detection of diffuse lung diseases on CR chest images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Roberto R., Jr.; Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Feng; Li, Qiang; Doi, Kunio

    2008-03-01

    We have developed a new computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme for detection of diffuse lung disease in computed radiographic (CR) chest images. One hundred ninety-four chest images (56 normals and 138 abnormals with diffuse lung diseases) were used. The 138 abnormal cases were classified into three levels of severity (34 mild, 60 moderate, and 44 severe) by an experienced chest radiologist with use of five different patterns, i.e., reticular, reticulonodular, nodular, air-space opacity, and emphysema. In our computerized scheme, the first moment of the power spectrum, the root-mean-square variation, and the average pixel value were determined for each region of interest (ROI), which was selected automatically in the lung fields. The average pixel value and its dependence on the location of the ROI were employed for identifying abnormal patterns due to air-space opacity or emphysema. A rule-based method was used for determining three levels of abnormality for each ROI (0: normal, 1: mild, 2: moderate, and 3: severe). The distinction between normal lungs and abnormal lungs with diffuse lung disease was determined based on the fractional number of abnormal ROIs by taking into account the severity of abnormalities. Preliminary results indicated that the area under the ROC curve was 0.889 for the 44 severe cases, 0.825 for the 104 severe and moderate cases, and 0.794 for all cases. We have identified a number of problems and reasons causing false positives on normal cases, and also false negatives on abnormal cases. In addition, we have discussed potential approaches for improvement of our CAD scheme. In conclusion, the CAD scheme for detection of diffuse lung diseases based on texture features extracted from CR chest images has the potential to assist radiologists in their interpretation of diffuse lung diseases.

  3. Mice with Tak1 deficiency in neural crest lineage exhibit cleft palate associated with abnormal tongue development.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhongchen; Liu, Chao; Iwata, Junichi; Gu, Shuping; Suzuki, Akiko; Sun, Cheng; He, Wei; Shu, Rong; Li, Lu; Chai, Yang; Chen, YiPing

    2013-04-12

    Cleft palate represents one of the most common congenital birth defects in humans. TGFβ signaling, which is mediated by Smad-dependent and Smad-independent pathways, plays a crucial role in regulating craniofacial development and patterning, particularly in palate development. However, it remains largely unknown whether the Smad-independent pathway contributes to TGFβ signaling function during palatogenesis. In this study, we investigated the function of TGFβ activated kinase 1 (Tak1), a key regulator of Smad-independent TGFβ signaling in palate development. We show that Tak1 protein is expressed in both the epithelium and mesenchyme of the developing palatal shelves. Whereas deletion of Tak1 in the palatal epithelium or mesenchyme did not give rise to a cleft palate defect, inactivation of Tak1 in the neural crest lineage using the Wnt1-Cre transgenic allele resulted in failed palate elevation and subsequently the cleft palate formation. The failure in palate elevation in Wnt1-Cre;Tak1(F/F) mice results from a malformed tongue and micrognathia, resembling human Pierre Robin sequence cleft of the secondary palate. We found that the abnormal tongue development is associated with Fgf10 overexpression in the neural crest-derived tongue tissue. The failed palate elevation and cleft palate were recapitulated in an Fgf10-overexpressing mouse model. The repressive effect of the Tak1-mediated noncanonical TGFβ signaling on Fgf10 expression was further confirmed by inhibition of p38, a downstream kinase of Tak1, in the primary cell culture of developing tongue. Tak1 thus functions to regulate tongue development by controlling Fgf10 expression and could represent a candidate gene for mutation in human PRS clefting.

  4. Branching patterns emerge in a mathematical model of the dynamics of lung development.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yina; Chen, Ting-Hsuan; Zeng, Xingjuan; Warburton, David; Boström, Kristina I; Ho, Chih-Ming; Zhao, Xin; Garfinkel, Alan

    2014-01-15

    Recent experimental work has described an elegant pattern of branching in the development of the lung. Multiple forms of branching have been identified, including side branching and tip bifurcation. A particularly interesting feature is the phenomenon of 'orthogonal rotation of the branching plane'. The lung must fill 3D space with the essentially 2D phenomenon of branching. It accomplishes this by rotating the branching plane by 90° with each generation. The mechanisms underlying this rotation are not understood. In general, the programmes that underlie branching have been hypothetically attributed to genetic 'subroutines' under the control of a 'global master routine' to invoke particular subroutines at the proper time and location, but the mechanisms of these routines are not known. Here, we demonstrate that fundamental mechanisms, the reaction and diffusion of biochemical morphogens, can create these patterns. We used a partial differential equation model that postulates three morphogens, which we identify with specific molecules in lung development. We found that cascades of branching events, including side branching, tip splitting and orthogonal rotation of the branching plane, all emerge immediately from the model, without further assumptions. In addition, we found that one branching mode can be easily switched to another, by increasing or decreasing the values of key parameters. This shows how a 'global master routine' could work by the alteration of a single parameter. Being able to simulate cascades of branching events is necessary to understand the critical features of branching, such as orthogonal rotation of the branching plane between successive generations, and branching mode switch during lung development. Thus, our model provides a paradigm for how genes could possibly act to produce these spatial structures. Our low-dimensional model gives a qualitative understanding of how generic physiological mechanisms can produce branching phenomena, and how

  5. Micron-sized intrapulmonary particle deposition in the developing rat lung.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Holger; Eder, Gunter; Bolle, Ines; Tsuda, Akira; Karrasch, Stefan

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about the effects of postnatal developmental changes in lung architecture and breathing patterns on intrapulmonary particle deposition. We measured deposition in the developing Wistar-Kyoto rat, whose lung development largely parallels that of humans. Deposition of 2-μm sebacate particles was determined in anesthetized, intubated, spontaneously breathing rats on postnatal days (P) 7 to 90 by aerosol photometry (Karrasch S, Eder G, Bolle I, Tsuda A, Schulz H. J Appl Physiol 107: 1293-1299, 2009). Respiratory parameters were determined by body plethysmography. Tidal volume increased substantially from P7 (0.19 ml) to P90 (2.1 ml) while respiratory rate declined from 182 to 107/min. Breath-specific deposition was lowest (9%) at P7 and P90 and markedly higher at P35 (almost 16%). Structural changes of the alveolar region include a ninefold increase in surface area (Bolle I, Eder G, Takenaka S, Ganguly K, Karrasch S, Zeller C, Neuner M, Kreyling WG, Tsuda A, Schulz H. J Appl Physiol 104: 1167-1176, 2008). Particle deposition per unit of time and surface area peaked at P35 and showed a minimum at P90. At an inhaled particle number concentration of 10(5)/cm(3), there was an estimated 450, 690, and 330 particles/(min × cm(2)) at P7, P35, and P90, respectively. Multiple regression models showed that deposition depends on the mean linear intercept as structural component and the breathing parameters, tidal volume, and respiratory rate (r(2) > 0.9). In conclusion, micron-sized particle deposition was dependent on the stage of postnatal lung development. A maximum was observed during late alveolarization (P35), which corresponds to human lungs of about eight years of age. Children at this age may therefore be more susceptible to micron-sized airborne environmental health hazards.

  6. 42 CFR 37.53 - Notification of abnormal roentgenographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... suggesting, enlarged heart, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than... findings suggesting, abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other... files and the most recent examination was interpreted to show enlarged heart, tuberculosis,...

  7. Role played by Prx1-dependent extracellular matrix properties in vascular smooth muscle development in embryonic lungs

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Juliana; Chokshi, Mithil; Aiad, Norman; Sanyal, Sonali; Kawabata, Kimihito C.; Levental, Ilya; Sundararaghavan, Harini G.; Burdick, Jason A.; Janmey, Paul; Miyazono, Kohei; Wells, Rebecca G.; Jones, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although there are many studies focusing on the molecular pathways underlying lung vascular morphogenesis, the extracellular matrix (ECM)–dependent regulation of mesenchymal cell differentiation in vascular smooth muscle development needs better understanding. In this study, we demonstrate that the paired related homeobox gene transcription factor Prx1 maintains the elastic ECM properties, which are essential for vascular smooth muscle precursor cell differentiation. We have found that Prx1null mouse lungs exhibit defective vascular smooth muscle development, downregulated elastic ECM expression, and compromised transforming growth factor (TGF)–β localization and signaling. Further characterization of ECM properties using decellularized lung ECM scaffolds derived from Prx1 mice demonstrated that Prx1 is required to maintain lung ECM stiffness. The results of cell culture using stiffness-controlled 2-D and 3-D synthetic substrates confirmed that Prx1-dependent ECM stiffness is essential for promotion of smooth muscle precursor differentiation for effective TGF-β stimulation. Supporting these results, both decellularized Prx1null lung ECM and Prx1WT (wild type) ECM scaffolds with blocked TGF-β failed to support mesenchymal cell to 3-D smooth muscle cell differentiation. These results suggest a novel ECM-dependent regulatory pathway of lung vascular development wherein Prx1 regulates lung vascular smooth muscle precursor development by coordinating the ECM biophysical and biochemical properties. PMID:26064466

  8. Early life exposure to allergen and ozone results in altered development in adolescent rhesus macaque lungs.

    PubMed

    Herring, M J; Putney, L F; St George, J A; Avdalovic, M V; Schelegle, E S; Miller, L A; Hyde, D M

    2015-02-15

    In rhesus macaques, previous studies have shown that episodic exposure to allergen alone or combined with ozone inhalation during the first 6 months of life results in a condition with many of the hallmarks of asthma. This exposure regimen results in altered development of the distal airways and parenchyma (Avdalovic et al., 2012). We hypothesized that the observed alterations in the lung parenchyma would be permanent following a long-term recovery in filtered air (FA) housing. Forty-eight infant rhesus macaques (30 days old) sensitized to house dust mite (HDM) were treated with two week cycles of FA, house dust mite allergen (HDMA), ozone (O3) or HDMA/ozone (HDMA+O3) for five months. At the end of the five months, six animals from each group were necropsied. The other six animals in each group were allowed to recover in FA for 30 more months at which time they were necropsied. Design-based stereology was used to estimate volumes of lung components, number of alveoli, size of alveoli, distribution of alveolar volumes, interalveolar capillary density. After 30 months of recovery, monkeys exposed to HDMA, in either group, had significantly more alveoli than filtered air. These alveoli also had higher capillary densities as compared with FA controls. These results indicate that early life exposure to HDMA alone or HDMA+O3 alters the development process in the lung alveoli.

  9. Alveolar flows of the developing lungs:from embryonic to early childhood airways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenenbaum-Katan, Janna; Hofemeier, Philipp; Fishler, Rami; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Sznitman, Josue

    2014-11-01

    At the onset of life in utero the respiratory system is simply a liquid-filled duct. With our first breath, alveoli are filled with air and become a significant port of entry for airborne particles. As such, alveolar lining is nearly fully functional at birth, though lung development continues during childhood as structural changes increase alveolar surface area to optimize ventilation. We hypothesize that such fluid dynamical changes potentially affect two phenomena occurring within alveoli: (i) flow patterns in airspaces at distinct stages of both in- and ex-utero life and (ii) fate of inhaled particles ex-utero. To investigate these phenomena, we combine experimental and numerical approaches where (i) microfluidic in vitro devices mimic liquid flows across the epithelium of fetal airspaces, and (ii) computational simulations are employed to examine particle transport and deposition in the deep alveolated regions of infants' lungs. Our approaches capture anatomically-inspired geometries based on morphometrical data, as well as physiological flows, including the convective-diffusive nature of submicron particle transport in alveolar regions.Overall, we investigate respiratory flows in alveolar regions of developing lungs, from early embryonic stages to late childhood

  10. Glycosidases during chick embryo lung development and their colocalization with proteoglycans and growth factors.

    PubMed

    Stabellini, G; Calvitti, M; Baroni, T; Marinucci, L; Calastrini, C; Carinci, P; Becchetti, E

    2002-01-01

    During development, the epithelial component of the lung goes through a complex orderly process of branching, following strict patterns of space and time. Proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans and growth factors are fundamental components of the extracellular matrix and perform a key role in differentiative processes. The embryonic chick lung shows a specific glycosaminoglycan composition at different levels of branching and at different embryonic stages. Proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan accumulation is the result of secretion, absorption and degradation processes. In this pathway, enzymes, such as glycosidases, growth factors and cytokines are involved. We examined the behaviour of glycosidases, such as beta-hexosaminidases (beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase, beta-N-acetyl-D-galactosaminidase), beta-glucuronidase and beta-galactosidase, during the development of the lung bud. Our data show that the activity of the enzymes is closely linked to the processes of epithelial proliferation, bronchial tubule lengthening and infiltration of the surrounding mesenchyme. The glycosaminoglycans colocalize with transforming growth factor beta2 and interleukin-1 in the basement membrane and in the mesenchymal areas where the epithelium grows, and are complementary to the presence of the glycosidases. In conclusion, the activity of these glycosidases is spatially and temporally programmed and favors the release of the factors and the events which they influence.

  11. A systematic approach to the development of novel therapeutics for lung cancer using genomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Daigo, Y; Takano, A; Teramoto, K; Chung, S; Nakamura, Y

    2013-08-01

    Molecularly targeted drugs for cancer therapy represent a therapeutic advance, but the proportion of patients who receive clinical benefit is still very limited. We present here the rationale and initial results of our program to define molecules involved in lung carcinogenesis with the goal of identifying new therapeutic targets and/or predictive biomarkers for drug response. We have used gene expression analysis of 120 lung cancers followed by RNA interference, tumor-tissue microarray analysis, and functional analyses to systematically distinguish potential target molecules specifically expressed in cancer cells. Through this approach, we have identified oncoproteins that provide the starting point for the development of therapeutic antibodies, dominant negative peptides, small-molecule inhibitors, and therapeutic cancer vaccines. We believe that the approach we describe should result in new molecularly targeted therapies with minimal risk of adverse events.

  12. Development of an inhalable, stimuli-responsive particulate system for delivery to deep lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Yasmine; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Tammam, Salma; Lamprecht, Alf; Ali, Mohamed Ehab; Schmidt, Annette; Sollazzo, Silvio; Mathur, Sanjay

    2016-10-01

    Lung cancer, the deadliest solid tumor among all types of cancer, remains difficult to treat. This is a result of unavoidable exposure to carcinogens, poor diagnosis, the lack of targeted drug delivery platforms and limitations associated with delivery of drug to deep lung tissues. Development of a non-invasive, patient-convenient formula for the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutics to cancer in deep lung tissue is the aim of this study. The formulation consisted of inhalable polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/maltodextrin (MD)-based microparticles (MPs) encapsulating chitosan (CS) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with either drug only or drug and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Drug release from CS NPs was enhanced with the aid of MNPs by a factor of 1.7 in response to external magnetic field. Preferential toxicity by CS NPs was shown towards tumor cells (A549) in comparison to cultured fibroblasts (L929). The prepared spray freeze dried (SFD) powders for CS NPs and CS MNPs were of the same size at ∼6μm. They had a fine particle fraction (FPF≤5.2μm) of 40-42% w/w and mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 5-6μm as determined by the Next Generation Impactor (NGI). SFD-MPs of CS MNPs possess higher MMAD due to the high density associated with encapsulated MNPs. The developed formulation demonstrates several capabilities including tissue targeting, controlled drug release, and the possible imaging and diagnostic values (due to its MNPs content) and therefore represents an improved therapeutic platform for drug delivery to cancer in deep lung tissue.

  13. Sperm exposure to carbon-based nanomaterials causes abnormalities in early development of purple sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus).

    PubMed

    Mesarič, Tina; Sepčić, Kristina; Drobne, Damjana; Makovec, Darko; Faimali, Marco; Morgana, Silvia; Falugi, Carla; Gambardella, Chiara

    2015-06-01

    We examined egg fertilisation in purple sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) after sperm exposure to carbon-based nanomaterials, carbon black (CB) and graphene oxide (GO), from 0.0001 mg/L to 1.0mg/L. Gastrula stage embryos were investigated for acetylcholinesterase and propionylcholinesterase activities, and their morphological characteristics. Plutei were analysed for morphological abnormalities, with emphasis on skeletal rod formation. Egg fertilisation was significantly affected by CB, at all concentrations tested. Loss of cell adhesion at the gastrula surface was observed in eggs fertilised with sperm treated with CB. However, concentration-dependent morphological anomalies were observed in the gastrulae and plutei formed after sperm exposure to either CB or GO. The activities of both cholinesterases decreased in the gastrulae, although not in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects appear to arise from physical interactions between these carbon-based nanomaterials and the sperm, whereby nanomaterials attached to the sperm surface interfere with fertilisation, which leads to disturbances in the signalling pathways of early embryonic development. Reduced cholinesterase activity in gastrulae from eggs fertilised with nanomaterial-treated sperm confirms involvement of the cholinergic system in early sea urchin development, including skeletogenesis.

  14. Blocking Endogenous Leukemia Inhibitory Factor During Placental Development in Mice Leads to Abnormal Placentation and Pregnancy Loss

    PubMed Central

    Winship, Amy; Correia, Jeanne; Krishnan, Tara; Menkhorst, Ellen; Cuman, Carly; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Nicola, Nicos A.; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2015-01-01

    The placenta forms the interface between the maternal and fetal circulation and is critical for the establishment of a healthy pregnancy. Specialized trophoblast cells derived from the embryonic trophectoderm play a pivotal role in the establishment of the placenta. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is one of the predominant cytokines present in the placenta during early pregnancy. LIF has been shown to regulate trophoblast adhesion and invasion in vitro, however its precise role in vivo is unknown. We hypothesized that LIF would be required for normal placental development in mice. LIF and LIFRα were immunolocalized to placental trophoblasts and fetal vessels in mouse implantation sites during mid-gestation. Temporally blocking LIF action during specific periods of placental development via intraperitoneal administration of our specific LIFRα antagonist, PEGLA, resulted in abnormal placental trophoblast and vascular morphology and reduced activated STAT3 but not ERK. Numerous genes regulating angiogenesis and oxidative stress were altered in the placenta in response to LIF inhibition. Pregnancy viability was also significantly compromised in PEGLA treated mice. Our data suggest that LIF plays an important role in placentation in vivo and the maintenance of healthy pregnancy. PMID:26272398

  15. Trichostatin A suppresses lung adenocarcinoma development in Grg1 overexpressing transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ju; Li, Yan; Dong, Fengyun; Li, Liqun; Masuda, Takahiro; Allen, Thaddeus D.; Lobe, Corrinne G.

    2015-08-07

    Trichostatin A (TSA) is a histone deacetylase inhibitor and a potential therapeutic for various malignancies. The in vivo effect of TSA, however, has not been investigated in a transgenic lung cancer model. Previously, we generated transgenic mice with overexpression of Groucho-related-gene 1 (Grg1) and these mice all developed mucinous lung adenocarcinoma. Grg1 is a transcriptional co-repressor protein, the function of which is thought to depend on HDAC activity. However, functions outside the nucleus have also been proposed. We tested the supposition that Grg1-induced tumorigenesis is HDAC-dependent by assaying the therapeutic effect of TSA in the Grg1 transgenic mouse model. We found that TSA significantly inhibited lung tumorigenesis in Grg1 transgenic mice (p < 0.01). TSA did not affect overall Grg1 protein levels, but instead reduced ErbB1 and ErbB2 expression, which are upregulated by Grg1 in the absence of TSA. We confirmed this effect in A549 cells. Furthermore, lapatinib, an inhibitor of both ErbB1 and ErbB2, effectively masked the effect of TSA on the inhibition of A549 cell proliferation and migration, suggesting TSA does work, at least in part, by downregulating ErbB receptors. We additionally found that TSA reduced the expression of VEGF and VEGFR2, but not basic FGF and FGFR1. Our findings indicate that TSA effectively inhibits Grg1-induced lung tumorigenesis through the down-regulation of ErbB1 and ErbB2, as well as reduced VEGF signaling. This suggests TSA and other HDAC inhibitors could have therapeutic value in the treatment of lung cancers with Grg1 overexpression. - Highlights: • TSA suppresses lung tumorigenesis in Grg1 overexpressing transgenic mice. • TSA does not affect overall Grg1 protein levels in the mice and in A549 cells. • TSA reduces ErbB1 and ErbB2 expression in the mice and in A549 cells. • Lapatinib masks TSA-induced inhibition of A549 cell proliferation and migration. • TSA inhibits VEGF signaling, but not basic FGF

  16. The Implantable Pediatric Artificial Lung: Interim Report on the Development of an End-Stage Lung Failure Model

    PubMed Central

    Alghanem, Fares; Davis, Ryan P.; Bryner, Benjamin S.; Hoffman, Hayley R.; Trahanas, John; Cornell, Marie; Rojas-Peña, Alvaro; Bartlett, Robert H.; Hirschl, Ronald B.

    2015-01-01

    An implantable pediatric artificial lung (PAL) may serve as a bridge to lung transplantation for children with end-stage lung failure (ESLF); however, an animal model of pediatric lung failure is needed to evaluate a PAL’s efficacy before it can enter clinical trials. The objective of this study was to assess ligation of the right pulmonary artery (rPA) as a model for pediatric ESLF. Seven 20-30kg lambs underwent rPA ligation and were recovered and monitored for up to 4 days. Intraoperatively, rPA ligation significantly increased physiologic deadspace fraction (Vd/Vt: baseline=48.6±5.7%, rPA ligation=60.1±5.2%, p=0.012), mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPPA: baseline=17.4±2.2mmHg, rPA ligation=28.5±5.2mmHg, p<0.001), and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2: baseline=40.4±9.3mmHg, rPA ligation=57.3±12.7mmHg, p=0.026). Of the 7 lambs, 3 were unable to be weaned from mechanical ventilation post-operatively, 3 were successfully weaned but suffered cardiorespiratory failure within 4 days, and 1 survived all 4 days. All 4 animals that were successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation had persistent pulmonary hypertension (mPPA=28.6±2.2mmHg) and remained tachypneic (respiratory rate=63±21min−1). Three of the 4 recovered lambs required supplemental oxygen. We conclude that rPA ligation creates the physiologic derangements commonly seen in pediatric end-stage lung failure and may be suitable for testing and implanting a PAL. PMID:25905495

  17. Abnormal immune system development and function in schizophrenia helps reconcile diverse findings and suggests new treatment and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Anders, Sherry; Kinney, Dennis K

    2015-08-18

    Extensive research implicates disturbed immune function and development in the etiology and pathology of schizophrenia. In addition to reviewing evidence for immunological factors in schizophrenia, this paper discusses how an emerging model of atypical immune function and development helps explain a wide variety of well-established - but puzzling - findings about schizophrenia. A number of theorists have presented hypotheses that early immune system programming, disrupted by pre- and perinatal adversity, often combines with abnormal brain development to produce schizophrenia. The present paper focuses on the hypothesis that disruption of early immune system development produces a latent immune vulnerability that manifests more fully after puberty, when changes in immune function and the thymus leave individuals more susceptible to infections and immune dysfunctions that contribute to schizophrenia. Complementing neurodevelopmental models, this hypothesis integrates findings on many contributing factors to schizophrenia, including prenatal adversity, genes, climate, migration, infections, and stress, among others. It helps explain, for example, why (a) schizophrenia onset is typically delayed until years after prenatal adversity, (b) individual risk factors alone often do not lead to schizophrenia, and (c) schizophrenia prevalence rates actually tend to be higher in economically advantaged countries. Here we discuss how the hypothesis explains 10 key findings, and suggests new, potentially highly cost-effective, strategies for treatment and prevention of schizophrenia. Moreover, while most human research linking immune factors to schizophrenia has been correlational, these strategies provide ethical ways to experimentally test in humans theories about immune function and schizophrenia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroimmunology in Health And Disease.

  18. Characterization of the skeletal fusion with sterility (sks) mouse showing axial skeleton abnormalities caused by defects of embryonic skeletal development.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Kouyou; Katayama, Kentaro; Tsuji, Takehito; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    The development of the axial skeleton is a complex process, consisting of segmentation and differentiation of somites and ossification of the vertebrae. The autosomal recessive skeletal fusion with sterility (sks) mutation of the mouse causes skeletal malformations due to fusion of the vertebrae and ribs, but the underlying defects of vertebral formation during embryonic development have not yet been elucidated. For the present study, we examined the skeletal phenotypes of sks/sks mice during embryonic development and the chromosomal localization of the sks locus. Multiple defects of the axial skeleton, including fusion of vertebrae and fusion and bifurcation of ribs, were observed in adult and neonatal sks/sks mice. In addition, we also found polydactyly and delayed skull ossification in the sks/sks mice. Morphological defects, including disorganized vertebral arches and fusions and bifurcations of the axial skeletal elements, were observed during embryonic development at embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) and E14.5. However, no morphological abnormality was observed at E11.5, indicating that defects of the axial skeleton are caused by malformation of the cartilaginous vertebra and ribs at an early developmental stage after formation and segmentation of the somites. By linkage analysis, the sks locus was mapped to an 8-Mb region of chromosome 4 between D4Mit331 and D4Mit199. Since no gene has already been identified as a cause of malformation of the vertebra and ribs in this region, the gene responsible for sks is suggested to be a novel gene essential for the cartilaginous vertebra and ribs.

  19. Development of a nonlinear fiber-optic spectrometer for human lung tissue exploration.

    PubMed

    Peyrot, Donald A; Lefort, Claire; Steffenhagen, Marie; Mansuryan, Tigran; Ducourthial, Guillaume; Abi-Haidar, Darine; Sandeau, Nicolas; Vever-Bizet, Christine; Kruglik, Sergei G; Thiberville, Luc; Louradour, Frédéric; Bourg-Heckly, Geneviève

    2012-05-01

    Several major lung pathologies are characterized by early modifications of the extracellular matrix (ECM) fibrillar collagen and elastin network. We report here the development of a nonlinear fiber-optic spectrometer, compatible with an endoscopic use, primarily intended for the recording of second-harmonic generation (SHG) signal of collagen and two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) of both collagen and elastin. Fiber dispersion is accurately compensated by the use of a specific grism-pair stretcher, allowing laser pulse temporal width around 70 fs and excitation wavelength tunability from 790 to 900 nm. This spectrometer was used to investigate the excitation wavelength dependence (from 800 to 870 nm) of SHG and 2PEF spectra originating from ex vivo human lung tissue samples. The results were compared with spectral responses of collagen gel and elastin powder reference samples and also with data obtained using standard nonlinear microspectroscopy. The excitation-wavelength-tunable nonlinear fiber-optic spectrometer presented in this study allows performing nonlinear spectroscopy of human lung tissue ECM through the elastin 2PEF and the collagen SHG signals. This work opens the way to tunable excitation nonlinear endomicroscopy based on both distal scanning of a single optical fiber and proximal scanning of a fiber-optic bundle.

  20. Inhibitory effect of 5F on development of lung cancer in A/J mice

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hua; Yang, Xiaoqing; Wu, Kefeng; Li, Li; Lv, Yingnian; Liu, Yi; Zheng, Xuebao

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the effect of ent-11α-hydroxy-15-oxo-kaur-16-en-19-oic-acid (5F) on the model of induced A/J mice lung cancer in A/J mice. The expressions of tumor-related molecules including P65 and Bcl-2 at protein level were examined using the immunohistochemical method (IHC). Side effects of 5F were also monitored. The results indicated that 5F significantly suppressed the development of B[a]P and NNK-induced lung cancer in vivo by facilitating cell apoptosis with minimal side effects. Compared to the expressions of P65 and Bcl-2 in model group, the levels were strongly attenuated both in blank and 5F injection groups. Moreover, P65 and Bcl-2 levels varied among different groups receiving 5F treatment. The expressions of P65 and Bcl-2 were much lower in groups receiving high-concentration 5F treatment than those with low-concentration 5F injection. Findings revealed that 5F inhibited the pathogenesis of lung cancer through accelerating apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:26097604

  1. Lung surfactant: Function and composition in the context of development and respiratory physiology.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Wolfgang

    2016-11-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex with a unique phospholipid and protein composition. Its specific function is to reduce surface tension at the pulmonary air-liquid interface. The underlying Young-Laplace equation, applying to the surface of any geometrical structure, is the more important the smaller its radii are. It therefore applies to the alveoli and bronchioli of mature lungs, as well as to the tubules and saccules of immature lungs. Surfactant comprises 80% phosphatidylcholine (PC), of which dipalmitoyl-PC, palmitoyl-myristoyl-PC and palmitoyl-palmitoleoyl-PC together are 75%. Anionic phosphatidylglycerol and cholesterol are about 10% each, whereas surfactant proteins SP-A to -D comprise 2-5%. Maturation of the surfactant system is not essentially due to increased synthesis but to decreased turnover of specific components. Molecular differences correlate with resting respiratory rate (RR), where PC16:0/16:0 is the lower the higher RR is. PC16:0/14:0 is increased during alveolar formation, and decreases immune reactions that might impair alveolar development. In rigid bird lungs, with air-capillaries rather than alveoli, and no surface area changes during the respiratory cycle, PC16:0/16:0 is highest and PC16:0/14:0 absent. As there is no need for a surface-associated surfactant reservoir, SP-C is absent in birds as well. Airflow is lowest and particle sedimentation highest in the extrapulmonary air-sacs, rather than in the gas-exchange area. Consequently, SP-A and -D for particle opsonization are absent in bird surfactant. In essence, comparative analysis is consistent with the concept that surfactant is adapted to the physiologic needs of a given vertebrate species at a given developmental stage.

  2. Excess TSH causes abnormal skeletal development in young mice with hypothyroidism via suppressive effects on the growth plate.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2013-09-01

    Hypothyroidism in the young leads to irreversible growth failure. hyt/hyt Mice have a nonfunctional TSH receptor (TSHR) and are severely hypothyroid, but growth retardation was not observed in adult mice. We found that epiphysial cartilage as well as cultured chondrocytes expressed functional TSHR at levels comparable to that seen in the thyroid, and that addition of TSH to cultured chondrocytes suppressed expression of chondrocyte differentiation marker genes such as Sox-9 and type IIa collagen. Next, we compared the long bone phenotypes of two distinct mouse models of hypothyroidism: thyroidectomized (THYx) mice and hyt/hyt mice. Although both THYx and hyt/hyt mice were severely hypothyroid and had similar serum Ca(2+) and growth hormone levels, the tibia was shorter and the proliferating and hypertrophic zones in the growth plate was significantly narrower in THYx mice than in hyt/hyt mice. Supplementation of hyt/hyt mice thyroid hormone resulted in a wider growth plate compared with that of wild-type mice. Expressions of chondrocyte differentiation marker genes Sox-9 and type IIa collagen in growth plate from THYx mice were 52 and 60% lower than those of hyt/hyt mice, respectively. High serum TSH causes abnormal skeletal development in young mice with hypothyroidism via suppressive effects on the growth plate.

  3. Morphological abnormalities, impaired fetal development and decrease in myostatin expression following somatic cell nuclear transfer in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hong, Il-Hwa; Jeong, Yeon-Woo; Shin, Taeyoung; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Park, Jin-Kyu; Ki, Mi-Ran; Han, Seon-Young; Park, Se-Il; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Eun-Mi; Kim, Ah-Young; You, Sang-Young; Hwang, Woo-Suk; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2011-05-01

    Several mammals, including dogs, have been successfully cloned using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), but the efficiency of generating normal, live offspring is relatively low. Although the high failure rate has been attributed to incomplete reprogramming of the somatic nuclei during the cloning process, the exact cause is not fully known. To elucidate the cause of death in cloned offspring, 12 deceased offspring cloned by SCNT were necropsied. The clones were either stillborn just prior to delivery or died with dyspnea shortly after birth. On gross examination, defects in the anterior abdominal wall and increased heart and liver sizes were found. Notably, a significant increase in muscle mass and macroglossia lesions were observed in deceased SCNT-cloned dogs. Interestingly, the expression of myostatin, a negative regulator of muscle growth during embryogenesis, was down-regulated at the mRNA level in tongues and skeletal muscles of SCNT-cloned dogs compared with a normal dog. Results of the present study suggest that decreased expression of myostatin in SCNT-cloned dogs may be involved in morphological abnormalities such as increased muscle mass and macroglossia, which may contribute to impaired fetal development and poor survival rates.

  4. Mature Surfactant Protein-B Expression by Immunohistochemistry as a Marker for Surfactant System Development in the Fetal Sheep Lung.

    PubMed

    Lock, Mitchell C; McGillick, Erin V; Orgeig, Sandra; Zhang, Song; McMillen, I Caroline; Morrison, Janna L

    2015-11-01

    Evaluation of the number of type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) is an important measure of the lung's ability to produce surfactant. Immunohistochemical staining of these cells in lung tissue commonly uses antibodies directed against mature surfactant protein (SP)-C, which is regarded as a reliable SP marker of type II AECs in rodents. There has been no study demonstrating reliable markers for surfactant system maturation by immunohistochemistry in the fetal sheep lung despite being widely used as a model to study lung development. Here we examine staining of a panel of surfactant pro-proteins (pro-SP-B and pro-SP-C) and mature proteins (SP-B and SP-C) in the fetal sheep lung during late gestation in the saccular/alveolar phase of development (120, 130, and 140 days), with term being 150 ± 3 days, to identify the most reliable marker of surfactant producing cells in this species. Results from this study indicate that during late gestation, use of anti-SP-B antibodies in the sheep lung yields significantly higher cell counts in the alveolar epithelium than SP-C antibodies. Furthermore, this study highlights that mature SP-B antibodies are more reliable markers than SP-C antibodies to evaluate surfactant maturation in the fetal sheep lung by immunohistochemistry.

  5. Potential Adverse Effects of Prolonged Sevoflurane Exposure on Developing Monkey Brain: From Abnormal Lipid Metabolism to Neuronal Damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Rainosek, Shuo W.; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica L.; Patterson, Tucker A.; Paule, Merle G.; Slikker, William; Wang, Cheng; Han, Xianlin

    2015-01-01

    Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic that has been widely used in general anesthesia, yet its safety in pediatric use is a public concern. This study sought to evaluate whether prolonged exposure of infant monkeys to a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane is associated with any adverse effects on the developing brain. Infant monkeys were exposed to 2.5% sevoflurane for 9 h, and frontal cortical tissues were harvested for DNA microarray, lipidomics, Luminex protein, and histological assays. DNA microarray analysis showed that sevoflurane exposure resulted in a broad identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the monkey brain. In general, these genes were associated with nervous system development, function, and neural cell viability. Notably, a number of DEGs were closely related to lipid metabolism. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that critical lipid components, (eg, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol) were significantly downregulated by prolonged exposure of sevoflurane. Luminex protein analysis indicated abnormal levels of cytokines in sevoflurane-exposed brains. Consistently, Fluoro-Jade C staining revealed more degenerating neurons after sevoflurane exposure. These data demonstrate that a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane (2.5%) is capable of inducing and maintaining an effective surgical plane of anesthesia in the developing nonhuman primate and that a prolonged exposure of 9 h resulted in profound changes in gene expression, cytokine levels, lipid metabolism, and subsequently, neuronal damage. Generally, sevoflurane-induced neuronal damage was also associated with changes in lipid content, composition, or both; and specific lipid changes could provide insights into the molecular mechanism(s) underlying anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity and may be sensitive biomarkers for the early detection of anesthetic-induced neuronal damage. PMID:26206149

  6. Potential Adverse Effects of Prolonged Sevoflurane Exposure on Developing Monkey Brain: From Abnormal Lipid Metabolism to Neuronal Damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Rainosek, Shuo W; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica L; Patterson, Tucker A; Paule, Merle G; Slikker, William; Wang, Cheng; Han, Xianlin

    2015-10-01

    Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic that has been widely used in general anesthesia, yet its safety in pediatric use is a public concern. This study sought to evaluate whether prolonged exposure of infant monkeys to a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane is associated with any adverse effects on the developing brain. Infant monkeys were exposed to 2.5% sevoflurane for 9 h, and frontal cortical tissues were harvested for DNA microarray, lipidomics, Luminex protein, and histological assays. DNA microarray analysis showed that sevoflurane exposure resulted in a broad identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the monkey brain. In general, these genes were associated with nervous system development, function, and neural cell viability. Notably, a number of DEGs were closely related to lipid metabolism. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that critical lipid components, (eg, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol) were significantly downregulated by prolonged exposure of sevoflurane. Luminex protein analysis indicated abnormal levels of cytokines in sevoflurane-exposed brains. Consistently, Fluoro-Jade C staining revealed more degenerating neurons after sevoflurane exposure. These data demonstrate that a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane (2.5%) is capable of inducing and maintaining an effective surgical plane of anesthesia in the developing nonhuman primate and that a prolonged exposure of 9 h resulted in profound changes in gene expression, cytokine levels, lipid metabolism, and subsequently, neuronal damage. Generally, sevoflurane-induced neuronal damage was also associated with changes in lipid content, composition, or both; and specific lipid changes could provide insights into the molecular mechanism(s) underlying anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity and may be sensitive biomarkers for the early detection of anesthetic-induced neuronal damage.

  7. The roles of microRNAs and protein components of the microRNA pathway in lung development and diseases.

    PubMed

    Cushing, Leah; Jiang, Zhihua; Kuang, Pingping; Lü, Jining

    2015-04-01

    Decades of studies have shown evolutionarily conserved molecular networks consisting of transcriptional factors, diffusing growth factors, and signaling pathways that regulate proper lung development. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs), small, noncoding regulatory RNAs, have been integrated into these networks. Significant advances have been made in characterizing the developmental stage- or cell type-specific miRNAs during lung development by using approaches such as genome-wide profiling and in situ hybridization. Results from gain- or loss-of-function studies revealed pivotal roles of protein components of the miRNA pathway and individual miRNAs in regulating proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and morphogenesis during lung development. Aberrant expression or functions of these components have been associated with pulmonary disorders, suggesting their involvement in pathogenesis of these diseases. Moreover, genetically modified mice generated in these studies have become useful models of human lung diseases. Challenges in this field include characterization of collective function and responsible targets of miRNAs specifically expressed during lung development, and translation of these basic findings into clinically relevant information for better understanding of human diseases. The goal of this review is to discuss the recent progress on the understanding of how the miRNA pathway regulates lung development, how dysregulation of miRNA activities contributes to pathogenesis of related pulmonary diseases, and to identify relevant questions and future directions.

  8. Effect of exogenous surfactant on the development of surfactant synthesis in premature rabbit lung.

    PubMed

    Amato, Maurizio; Petit, Kevin; Fiore, Humberto H; Doyle, Cynthia A; Frantz, Ivan D; Nielsen, Heber C

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant replacement is an effective therapy for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. Full recovery from respiratory distress syndrome requires development of endogenous surfactant synthesis and metabolism. The influence of exogenous surfactant on the development of surfactant synthesis in premature lungs is not known. We hypothesized that different exogenous surfactants have different effects on the development of endogenous surfactant production in the premature lung. We treated organ cultures of d 25 fetal rabbit lung for 3 d with 100 mg/kg body weight of natural rabbit surfactant, Survanta, and Exosurf and measured their effects on the development of surfactant synthesis. Additional experiments tested how these surfactants and Curosurf affected surfactant protein (SP) SP-A, SP-B, and SP-C mRNA expression. Surfactant synthesis was measured as the incorporation of 3H-choline and 14C-glycerol into disaturated phosphatidylcholine recovered from lamellar bodies. Randomized-block ANOVA showed significant differences among treatments for incorporation of both labels (p < 0.01), with natural rabbit surfactant less than control, Survanta greater than control, and Exosurf unchanged. Additional experiments with natural rabbit surfactant alone showed no significant effects in doses up to 1000 mg/kg. Survanta stimulated disaturated phosphatidylcholine synthesis (173 +/- 41% of control; p = 0.01), increased total lamellar body disaturated phosphatidylcholine by 22% (p < 0.05), and increased 14C-disat-PC specific activity by 35% (p < 0.05). The response to Survanta was dose-dependent up to 1000 mg/kg. Survanta did not affect surfactant release. No surfactant altered the expression of mRNA for SP-A, SP-B, or SP-C. We conclude that surfactant replacement therapy can enhance the maturation of surfactant synthesis, but this potential benefit differs with different surfactant preparations.

  9. Genetically induced abnormal cranial development in human trisomy 18 with holoprosencephaly: comparisons with the normal tempo of osteogenic-neural development.

    PubMed

    Reid, Shaina N; Ziermann, Janine M; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C

    2015-07-01

    Craniofacial malformations are common congenital defects caused by failed midline inductive signals. These midline defects are associated with exposure of the fetus to exogenous teratogens and with inborn genetic errors such as those found in Down, Patau, Edwards' and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndromes. Yet, there are no studies that analyze contributions of synchronous neurocranial and neural development in these disorders. Here we present the first in-depth analysis of malformations of the basicranium of a holoprosencephalic (HPE) trisomy 18 (T18; Edwards' syndrome) fetus with synophthalmic cyclopia and alobar HPE. With a combination of traditional gross dissection and state-of-the-art computed tomography, we demonstrate the deleterious effects of T18 caused by a translocation at 18p11.31. Bony features included a single developmentally unseparated frontal bone, and complete dual absence of the anterior cranial fossa and ethmoid bone. From a superior view with the calvarium plates removed, there was direct visual access to the orbital foramen and hard palate. Both the eyes and the pituitary gland, normally protected by bony structures, were exposed in the cranial cavity and in direct contact with the brain. The middle cranial fossa was shifted anteriorly, and foramina were either missing or displaced to an abnormal location due to the absence or misplacement of its respective cranial nerve (CN). When CN development was conserved in its induction and placement, the respective foramen developed in its normal location albeit with abnormal gross anatomical features, as seen in the facial nerve (CNVII) and the internal acoustic meatus. More anteriorly localized CNs and their foramina were absent or heavily disrupted compared with posterior ones. The severe malformations exhibited in the cranial fossae, orbital region, pituitary gland and sella turcica highlight the crucial involvement of transcription factors such as TGIF, which is located on chromosome 18 and contributes

  10. The Implantable Pediatric Artificial Lung: Interim Report on the Development of an End-Stage Lung Failure Model.

    PubMed

    Alghanem, Fares; Davis, Ryan P; Bryner, Benjamin S; Hoffman, Hayley R; Trahanas, John; Cornell, Marie S; Rojas-Peña, Alvaro; Bartlett, Robert H; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2015-01-01

    An implantable pediatric artificial lung (PAL) may serve as a bridge to lung transplantation for children with end-stage lung failure (ESLF); however, an animal model of pediatric lung failure is needed to evaluate the efficacy of PAL before it can enter clinical trials. The objective of this study was to assess ligation of the right pulmonary artery (rPA) as a model for pediatric ESLF. Seven lambs weighing 20-30 kg underwent rPA ligation and were recovered and monitored for up to 4 days. Intraoperatively, rPA ligation significantly increased physiologic dead space fraction (Vd/Vt; baseline = 48.6 ± 5.7%, rPA ligation = 60.1 ± 5.2%, p = 0.012), mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPPA; baseline = 17.4 ± 2.2 mm Hg, rPA ligation = 28.5 ± 5.2 mm Hg, p < 0.001), and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (baseline = 40.4 ± 9.3 mm Hg, rPA ligation = 57.3 ± 12.7 mm Hg, p = 0.026). Of the seven lambs, three were unable to be weaned from mechanical ventilation postoperatively, three were successfully weaned but suffered cardiorespiratory failure within 4 days, and one survived all 4 days. All four animals that were successfully weaned from mechanical ventilation had persistent pulmonary hypertension (mPPA = 28.6 ± 2.2 mm Hg) and remained tachypneic (respiratory rate = 63 ± 21 min). Three of the four recovered lambs required supplemental oxygen. We conclude that rPA ligation creates the physiologic derangements commonly seen in pediatric ESLF and may be suitable for testing and implanting a PAL.

  11. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes intratracheally instilled into the rat lung induce development of pleural malignant mesothelioma and lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Suzui, Masumi; Futakuchi, Mitsuru; Fukamachi, Katsumi; Numano, Takamasa; Abdelgied, Mohamed; Takahashi, Satoru; Ohnishi, Makoto; Omori, Toyonori; Tsuruoka, Shuji; Hirose, Akihiko; Kanno, Jun; Sakamoto, Yoshimitsu; Alexander, David B; Alexander, William T; Jiegou, Xu; Tsuda, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have a fibrous structure and physical properties similar to asbestos and have been shown to induce malignant mesothelioma of the peritoneum after injection into the scrotum or peritoneal cavity in rats and mice. For human cancer risk assessment, however, data after administration of MWCNT via the airway, the exposure route that is most relevant to humans, is required. The present study was undertaken to investigate the carcinogenicity of MWCNT-N (NIKKISO) after administration to the rat lung. MWCNT-N was fractionated by passing it through a sieve with a pore size of 25 μm. The average lengths of the MWCNT were 4.2 μm before filtration and 2.6 μm in the flow-through fraction; the length of the retained MWCNT could not be determined. For the present study, 10-week-old F344/Crj male rats were divided into five groups: no treatment, vehicle control, MWCNT-N before filtration, MWCNT-N flow-through and MWCNT-N retained groups. Administration was by the trans-tracheal intrapulmonary spraying (TIPS) method. Rats were administered a total of 1 mg/rat during the initial 2 weeks of the experiment and then observed up to 109 weeks. The incidences of malignant mesothelioma and lung tumors (bronchiolo-alveolar adenomas and carcinomas) were 6/38 and 14/38, respectively, in the three groups administered MWCNT and 0/28 and 0/28, respectively, in the control groups. All malignant mesotheliomas were localized in the pericardial pleural cavity. The sieve fractions did not have a significant effect on tumor incidence. In conclusion, administration of MWCNT to the lung in the rat induces malignant mesothelioma and lung tumors.

  12. Epiphyseal abnormalities, trabecular bone loss and articular chondrocyte hypertrophy develop in the long bones of postnatal Ext1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Sgariglia, Federica; Candela, Maria Elena; Huegel, Julianne; Jacenko, Olena; Koyama, Eiki; Yamaguchi, Yu; Pacifici, Maurizio; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2013-11-01

    Long bones are integral components of the limb skeleton. Recent studies have indicated that embryonic long bone development is altered by mutations in Ext genes and consequent heparan sulfate (HS) deficiency, possibly due to changes in activity and distribution of HS-binding/growth plate-associated signaling proteins. Here we asked whether Ext function is continuously required after birth to sustain growth plate function and long bone growth and organization. Compound transgenic Ext1(f/f);Col2CreERT mice were injected with tamoxifen at postnatal day 5 (P5) to ablate Ext1 in cartilage and monitored over time. The Ext1-deficient mice exhibited growth retardation already by 2weeks post-injection, as did their long bones. Mutant growth plates displayed a severe disorganization of chondrocyte columnar organization, a shortened hypertrophic zone with low expression of collagen X and MMP-13, and reduced primary spongiosa accompanied, however, by increased numbers of TRAP-positive osteoclasts at the chondro-osseous border. The mutant epiphyses were abnormal as well. Formation of a secondary ossification center was significantly delayed but interestingly, hypertrophic-like chondrocytes emerged within articular cartilage, similar to those often seen in osteoarthritic joints. Indeed, the cells displayed a large size and round shape, expressed collagen X and MMP-13 and were surrounded by an abundant Perlecan-rich pericellular matrix not seen in control articular chondrocytes. In addition, ectopic cartilaginous outgrowths developed on the lateral side of mutant growth plates over time that resembled exostotic characteristic of children with Hereditary Multiple Exostoses, a syndrome caused by Ext mutations and HS deficiency. In sum, the data do show that Ext1 is continuously required for postnatal growth and organization of long bones as well as their adjacent joints. Ext1 deficiency elicits defects that can occur in human skeletal conditions including trabecular bone loss

  13. The trajectory of gray matter development in Broca’s area is abnormal in people who stutter

    PubMed Central

    Beal, Deryk S.; Lerch, Jason P.; Cameron, Brodie; Henderson, Rhaeling; Gracco, Vincent L.; De Nil, Luc F.

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition and mastery of speech-motor control requires years of practice spanning the course of development. People who stutter often perform poorly on speech-motor tasks thereby calling into question their ability to establish the stable neural motor programs required for masterful speech-motor control. There is evidence to support the assertion that these neural motor programs are represented in the posterior part of Broca’s area, specifically the left pars opercularis. Consequently, various theories of stuttering causation posit that the disorder is related to a breakdown in the formation of the neural motor programs for speech early in development and that this breakdown is maintained throughout life. To date, no study has examined the potential neurodevelopmental signatures of the disorder across pediatric and adult populations. The current study aimed to fill this gap in our knowledge. We hypothesized that the developmental trajectory of cortical thickness in people who stutter would differ across the lifespan in the left pars opercularis relative to a group of control participants. We collected structural magnetic resonance images from 116 males (55 people who stutter) ranging in age from 6 to 48 years old. Differences in cortical thickness across ages and between patients and controls were investigated in 30 brain regions previously implicated in speech-motor control. An interaction between age and group was found for the left pars opercularis only. In people who stutter, the pars opercularis did not demonstrate the typical maturational pattern of gradual gray matter thinning with age across the lifespan that we observed in control participants. In contrast, the developmental trajectory of gray matter thickness in other regions of interest within the neural network for speech-motor control was similar for both groups. Our findings indicate that the developmental trajectory of gray matter in left pars opercularis is abnormal in people who stutter

  14. Onset of alveolar recirculation in the developing lungs and its consequence on nanoparticle deposition in the pulmonary acinus

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Frank S.

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the gas exchange region of the human lung (the pulmonary acinus) undergoes profound change in the first few years of life. In this paper, we investigate numerically how the change in alveolar shape with time affects the rate of nanoparticle deposition deep in the lung during postnatal development. As human infant data is unavailable, we use a rat model of lung development. The process of postnatal lung development in the rat is remarkably similar to that of the human, and the structure of the rat acinus is indistinguishable from that of the human acinus. The current numerical predictions support our group's recent in vivo findings, which were also obtained by using growing rat lung models, that nanoparticle deposition in infants is strongly affected by the change in the structure of the pulmonary acinus. In humans, this major structural change occurs over the first 2 yr of life. Our current predictions would suggest that human infants at the age of ∼2 yr might be most at risk to the harmful effects of air pollution. Our results also suggest that dose estimates for inhalation therapies using nanoparticles, based on fully developed adult lungs with simple body weight scaling, are likely to overestimate deposition by up to 55% for newborns and underestimate deposition by up to 17% for 2-yr-old infants. PMID:26494453

  15. Development of a Multicompartment Permeability-Limited Lung PBPK Model and Its Application in Predicting Pulmonary Pharmacokinetics of Antituberculosis Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gaohua, L; Wedagedera, J; Small, BG; Almond, L; Romero, K; Hermann, D; Hanna, D; Jamei, M; Gardner, I

    2015-01-01

    Achieving sufficient concentrations of antituberculosis (TB) drugs in pulmonary tissue at the optimum time is still a challenge in developing therapeutic regimens for TB. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model incorporating a multicompartment permeability-limited lung model was developed and used to simulate plasma and pulmonary concentrations of seven drugs. Passive permeability of drugs within the lung was predicted using an in vitro-in vivo extrapolation approach. Simulated epithelial lining fluid (ELF):plasma concentration ratios showed reasonable agreement with observed clinical data for rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol, and erythromycin. For clarithromycin, itraconazole and pyrazinamide the observed ELF:plasma ratios were significantly underpredicted. Sensitivity analyses showed that changing ELF pH or introducing efflux transporter activity between lung tissue and ELF can alter the ELF:plasma concentration ratios. The described model has shown utility in predicting the lung pharmacokinetics of anti-TB drugs and provides a framework for predicting pulmonary concentrations of novel anti-TB drugs. PMID:26535161

  16. Non-Coding RNAs in Lung Cancer: Contribution of Bioinformatics Analysis to the Development of Non-Invasive Diagnostic Tools.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Meik; Wolf, Beat; Schulze, Harald; Atlan, David; Walles, Thorsten; Walles, Heike; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-12-26

    Lung cancer is currently the leading cause of cancer related mortality due to late diagnosis and limited treatment intervention. Non-coding RNAs are not translated into proteins and have emerged as fundamental regulators of gene expression. Recent studies reported that microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs are involved in lung cancer development and progression. Moreover, they appear as new promising non-invasive biomarkers for early lung cancer diagnosis. Here, we highlight their potential as biomarker in lung cancer and present how bioinformatics can contribute to the development of non-invasive diagnostic tools. For this, we discuss several bioinformatics algorithms and software tools for a comprehensive understanding and functional characterization of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs.

  17. Non-Coding RNAs in Lung Cancer: Contribution of Bioinformatics Analysis to the Development of Non-Invasive Diagnostic Tools

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Meik; Wolf, Beat; Schulze, Harald; Atlan, David; Walles, Thorsten; Walles, Heike; Dandekar, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is currently the leading cause of cancer related mortality due to late diagnosis and limited treatment intervention. Non-coding RNAs are not translated into proteins and have emerged as fundamental regulators of gene expression. Recent studies reported that microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs are involved in lung cancer development and progression. Moreover, they appear as new promising non-invasive biomarkers for early lung cancer diagnosis. Here, we highlight their potential as biomarker in lung cancer and present how bioinformatics can contribute to the development of non-invasive diagnostic tools. For this, we discuss several bioinformatics algorithms and software tools for a comprehensive understanding and functional characterization of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs. PMID:28035947

  18. The Relationship between Personality Dimensions and Resiliency to Environmental Stress in Orange-Winged Amazon Parrots (Amazona amazonica), as Indicated by the Development of Abnormal Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Cussen, Victoria A; Mench, Joy A

    2015-01-01

    Parrots are popular companion animals, but are frequently relinquished because of behavioral problems, including abnormal repetitive behaviors like feather damaging behavior and stereotypy. In addition to contributing to pet relinquishment, these behaviors are important as potential indicators of diminished psychological well-being. While abnormal behaviors are common in captive animals, their presence and/or severity varies between animals of the same species that are experiencing the same environmental conditions. Personality differences could contribute to this observed individual variation, as they are known risk factors for stress sensitivity and affective disorders in humans. The goal of this study was to assess the relationship between personality and the development and severity of abnormal behaviors in captive-bred orange-winged Amazon parrots (Amazona amazonica). We monitored between-individual behavioral differences in enrichment-reared parrots of known personality types before, during, and after enrichment deprivation. We predicted that parrots with higher scores for neurotic-like personality traits would be more susceptible to enrichment deprivation and develop more abnormal behaviors. Our results partially supported this hypothesis, but also showed that distinct personality dimensions were related to different forms of abnormal behavior. While neuroticism-like traits were linked to feather damaging behavior, extraversion-like traits were negatively related to stereotypic behavior. More extraverted birds showed resiliency to environmental stress, developing fewer stereotypies during enrichment deprivation and showing lower levels of these behaviors following re-enrichment. Our data, together with the results of the few studies conducted on other species, suggest that, as in humans, certain personality types render individual animals more susceptible or resilient to environmental stress. Further, this susceptibility/resiliency can have a long

  19. Lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, José Eduardo; Werebe, Eduardo de Campos; Carraro, Rafael Medeiros; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lung transplantation is a globally accepted treatment for some advanced lung diseases, giving the recipients longer survival and better quality of life. Since the first transplant successfully performed in 1983, more than 40 thousand transplants have been performed worldwide. Of these, about seven hundred were in Brazil. However, survival of the transplant is less than desired, with a high mortality rate related to primary graft dysfunction, infection, and chronic graft dysfunction, particularly in the form of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. New technologies have been developed to improve the various stages of lung transplant. To increase the supply of lungs, ex vivo lung reconditioning has been used in some countries, including Brazil. For advanced life support in the perioperative period, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and hemodynamic support equipment have been used as a bridge to transplant in critically ill patients on the waiting list, and to keep patients alive until resolution of the primary dysfunction after graft transplant. There are patients requiring lung transplant in Brazil who do not even come to the point of being referred to a transplant center because there are only seven such centers active in the country. It is urgent to create new centers capable of performing lung transplantation to provide patients with some advanced forms of lung disease a chance to live longer and with better quality of life. PMID:26154550

  20. Receptor for advanced glycation end products contributes to postnatal pulmonary development and adult lung maintenance program in mice.

    PubMed

    Fineschi, Silvia; De Cunto, Giovanna; Facchinetti, Fabrizio; Civelli, Maurizio; Imbimbo, Bruno P; Carnini, Chiara; Villetti, Gino; Lunghi, Benedetta; Stochino, Stefania; Gibbons, Deena L; Hayday, Adrian; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Cavarra, Eleonora

    2013-02-01

    The role of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in promoting the inflammatory response through activation of NF-κB pathway is well established. Recent findings indicate that RAGE may also have a regulative function in apoptosis, as well as in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and adhesion. Unlike other organs, lung tissue in adulthood and during organ development shows relatively high levels of RAGE expression. Thus a role for the receptor in lung organogenesis and homeostasis may be proposed. To evaluate the role of RAGE in lung development and adult lung homeostasis, we generated hemizygous and homozygous transgenic mice overexpressing human RAGE, and analyzed their lungs from the fourth postnatal day to adulthood. Moderate RAGE hyperexpression during lung development influenced secondary septation, resulting in an impairment of alveolar morphogenesis and leading to significant changes in morphometric parameters such as airspace number and the size of alveolar ducts. An increase in alveolar cell apoptosis and a decrease in cell proliferation were demonstrated by the terminal deoxy-nucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling reaction, active caspase-3, and Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Alterations in elastin organization and deposition and in TGF-β expression were observed. In homozygous mice, the hyperexpression of RAGE resulted in histological changes resembling those changes characterizing human bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). RAGE hyperexpression in the adult lung is associated with an increase of the alveolar destructive index and persistent inflammatory status leading to "destructive" emphysema. These results suggest an important role for RAGE in both alveolar development and lung homeostasis, and open new doors to working hypotheses on the pathogenesis of BPD and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  1. Foxp1/4 control epithelial cell fate during lung development and regeneration through regulation of anterior gradient 2.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanru; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Yuzhen; Lu, Min Min; DeMayo, Francesco J; Dekker, Joseph D; Tucker, Philip W; Morrisey, Edward E

    2012-07-01

    The molecular pathways regulating cell lineage determination and regeneration in epithelial tissues are poorly understood. The secretory epithelium of the lung is required for production of mucus to help protect the lung against environmental insults, including pathogens and pollution, that can lead to debilitating diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We show that the transcription factors Foxp1 and Foxp4 act cooperatively to regulate lung secretory epithelial cell fate and regeneration by directly restricting the goblet cell lineage program. Loss of Foxp1/4 in the developing lung and in postnatal secretory epithelium leads to ectopic activation of the goblet cell fate program, in part, through de-repression of the protein disulfide isomerase anterior gradient 2 (Agr2). Forced expression of Agr2 is sufficient to promote the goblet cell fate in the developing airway epithelium. Finally, in a model of lung secretory cell injury and regeneration, we show that loss of Foxp1/4 leads to catastrophic loss of airway epithelial regeneration due to default differentiation of secretory cells into the goblet cell lineage. These data demonstrate the importance of Foxp1/4 in restricting cell fate choices during development and regeneration, thereby providing the proper balance of functional epithelial lineages in the lung.

  2. The Risk of Early and Late Lung Sequelae After Conformal Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, Zsuzsanna . E-mail: kahan@onko.szote.u-szeged.hu; Csenki, Melinda; Varga, Zoltan; Szil, Elemer; Cserhati, Adrienn; Balogh, Attila; Gyulai, Zsofia; Mandi, Yvette; Boda, Krisztina; Thurzo, Laszlo

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To study the risks of early and late radiogenic lung damage in breast cancer patients after conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Radiogenic lung sequelae were assessed prospectively in 119 patients by means of clinical signs, radiologic abnormalities, and the mean density change (MDC) of the irradiated lung on CT. Results: Significant positive associations were detected between the development of lung abnormalities 3 months or 1 year after the radiotherapy and the age of the patient, the ipsilateral mean lung dose (MLD), the radiation dose to 25% of the ipsilateral lung (D{sub 25%}) and the volume of the ipsilateral lung receiving 20 Gy (V{sub 20Gy}). The irradiation of the axillary and supraclavicular lymph nodes favored the development of pneumonitis but not that of fibrosis. No relation was found between the preradiotherapy plasma TGF-{beta} level and the presence of radiogenic lung damage. At both time points, MDC was strongly related to age. Significant positive associations were demonstrated between the risks of pneumonitis or fibrosis and the age of the patient, MLD, D{sub 25%}, and V{sub 20Gy}. A synergistic effect of MLD, D{sub 25%}, and V{sub 20Gy} with age in patients older than 59 years is suggested. Conclusion: Our analyses indicate that the risks of early and late radiogenic lung sequelae are strongly related to the age of the patient, the volume of the irradiated lung, and the dose to it.

  3. Development of molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapies in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Adam; Bhosle, Jaishree; Abdelraouf, Fatma; Popat, Sanjay; O'Brien, Mary; Yap, Timothy A

    2016-06-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a smoking-induced malignancy with multiple toxin-associated mutations, which accounts for 15% of all lung cancers. It remains a clinical challenge with a rapid doubling time, early dissemination and poor prognosis. Despite multiple clinical trials in SCLC, platinum-based chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment in the first line advanced disease setting; good initial responses are nevertheless inevitably followed by disease relapse and survival ultimately remains poor. There are currently no molecularly targeted agents licenced for use in SCLC. Advances in sequencing the cancer genome and other high-throughput profiling technologies have identified aberrant pathways and mechanisms implicated in SCLC development and progression. Novel anti-tumour therapeutics that impact these putative targets are now being developed and investigated in SCLC. In this review, we discuss novel anti-tumour agents assessed in SCLC with reference to the complex molecular mechanisms implicated in SCLC development and progression. We focus on novel DNA damage response inhibitors, immune checkpoint modulators and antibody-drug conjugates that have shown promise in SCLC, and which may potentially transform treatment strategies in this disease. Finally, we envision the future management of SCLC and propose a biomarker-driven translational treatment paradigm for SCLC that incorporates next generation sequencing studies with patient tumours, circulating plasma DNA and functional imaging. Such modern strategies have the potential to transform the management and improve patient outcomes in SCLC.

  4. Ozone Exposure Alters Serotonin and Serotonin Receptor Expression in the Developing Lung

    PubMed Central

    Van Winkle, Laura S.

    2013-01-01

    Ozone, a pervasive environmental pollutant, adversely affects functional lung growth in children. Animal studies demonstrate that altered lung development is associated with modified signaling within the airway epithelial mesenchymal trophic unit, including mediators that can change nerve growth. We hypothesized that ozone exposure alters the normal pattern of serotonin, its transporter (5-HTT), and two key receptors (5-HT2A and 5-HT4), a pathway involved in postnatal airway neural, epithelial, and immune processes. We exposed monkeys to acute or episodic ozone during the first 2 or 6 months of life. There were three exposure groups/age: (1) filtered air, (2) acute ozone challenge, and (3) episodic ozone + acute ozone challenge. Lungs were prepared for compartment-specific qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and stereology. Airway epithelial serotonin immunopositive staining increased in all exposure groups with the most prominent in 2-month midlevel and 6-month distal airways. Gene expression of 5-HTT, 5-HT2AR, and 5-HT4R increased in an age-dependent manner. Overall expression was greater in distal compared with midlevel airways. Ozone exposure disrupted both 5-HT2AR and 5-HT4R protein expression in airways and enhanced immunopositive staining for 5-HT2AR (2 months) and 5-HT4R (6 months) on smooth muscle. Ozone exposure increases serotonin in airway epithelium regardless of airway level, age, and exposure history and changes the spatial pattern of serotonin receptor protein (5-HT2A and 5-HT4) and 5-HTT gene expression depending on compartment, age, and exposure history. Understanding how serotonin modulates components of reversible airway obstruction exacerbated by ozone exposure sets the foundation for developing clinically relevant therapies for airway disease. PMID:23570994

  5. Development and Validation of a Lung Transplant-Specific Disability Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Jonathan Paul; Blanc, Paul David; Dean, Y. Monica; Hays, Steven; Leard, Lorriana; Kukreja, Jasleen; Golden, Jeffrey; Katz, Patricia P

    2014-01-01

    Background Lung transplant (LT) aims to extend survival and improve patient-centered outcomes (PCOs) by reducing disability and improving health-related quality of life (HRQL). Few PCO instruments have been validated in LT populations. We aimed to develop and validate a shortened version of the Valued Life Activities (VLA) disability scale specific to LT. Methods We used data from 140 subjects participating in an ongoing cohort study of LT. Subjects completed a survey battery, including VLA items, and physical assessments before LT. To develop a shortened lung transplant specific VLA (LT-VLA), we iteratively deleted items from a longer 32-item VLA battery, retaining the instrument’s conceptual framework, scoring and performance characteristics. We evaluated LT-VLA validity by testing correlations with a HRQL measure (Short Form-12 Physical Function [SF-12 PF] subscale), FVC% predicted, and 6-minute walk distance (6MWD). Responsiveness was evaluated in 84 subjects who completed assessments before and after LT. Results The 15-item LT-VLA scoring closely matched the longer VLA (correlations ≥0.96) and had excellent internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha: 0.92). The LT-VLA required only 3 minutes or less to administer. The LT-VLA, measured as mean difficulty in performing each of the 15 activities queried, correlated with FVC% predicted (r= −0.30), 6MWD (r= −0.38) and SF-12 PF (r= −0.47) (all p<0.01). The LT-VLA mean difficulty was responsive to change from before to after LT: (63% improvement; effect size=1.60) Conclusions The LT-VLA is a short, easy to administer, valid, and responsive disease-specific PCO instrument that may be useful in clinical and research applications for lung transplantation. PMID:24355825

  6. Do sleep abnormalities and misaligned sleep/circadian rhythm patterns represent early clinical characteristics for developing psychosis in high risk populations?

    PubMed

    Zanini, Marcio; Castro, Juliana; Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho; Bittencourt, Lia; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Tufik, Sergio; Brietzke, Elisa

    2013-12-01

    Sleep architecture changes, such as slow-wave sleep (SWS) percentage variations and reductions in latency and density of rapid eye movement (REM), are found in most patients with schizophrenia and are considered to be an important part of the pathophysiology of the disorder. In addition to these sleep parameters changes, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and the sleep/circadian rhythm also occur in these patients. Sleep/circadian rhythm abnormalities negatively affect neocortical plasticity and cognition and often precede the diagnosis of the illness. Thus, it has been suggested that the sleep/circadian rhythm might be involved in the pathophysiology of psychosis. Recent advances in the identification of individuals at a high risk for developing schizophrenia allow us to investigate several neurobiological processes involved in the development of psychosis. In this article, we review the current evidence of the effects of sleep parameter abnormalities, disruptions in sleep homeostasis and misalignments of sleep circadian rhythm on the early stages of schizophrenia. In addition, we discuss the preliminary evidence of sleep and circadian rhythm abnormalities during the prodromal stages of psychosis and propose that these abnormalities can be explored as potential predictors, as an adjunct to clinical diagnosis, of developing a psychotic disorder in at risk populations.

  7. Lung boundary detection in pediatric chest x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candemir, Sema; Antani, Sameer; Jaeger, Stefan; Browning, Renee; Thoma, George R.

    2015-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem worldwide, and highly prevalent in developing countries. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), over 95% of TB deaths occur in low- and middle- income countries that often have under-resourced health care systems. In an effort to aid population screening in such resource challenged settings, the U.S. National Library of Medicine has developed a chest X-ray (CXR) screening system that provides a pre-decision on pulmonary abnormalities. When the system is presented with a digital CXR image from the Picture Archive and Communication Systems (PACS) or an imaging source, it automatically identifies the lung regions in the image, extracts image features, and classifies the image as normal or abnormal using trained machine-learning algorithms. The system has been trained on adult CXR images, and this article presents enhancements toward including pediatric CXR images. Our adult lung boundary detection algorithm is model-based. We note the lung shape differences during pediatric developmental stages, and adulthood, and propose building new lung models suitable for pediatric developmental stages. In this study, we quantify changes in lung shape from infancy to adulthood toward enhancing our lung segmentation algorithm. Our initial findings suggest pediatric age groupings of 0 - 23 months, 2 - 10 years, and 11 - 18 years. We present justification for our groupings. We report on the quality of boundary detection algorithm with the pediatric lung models.

  8. Fetal lung development in the elephant reflects the adaptations required for snorkeling in adult life.

    PubMed

    West, John B; Fu, Zhenxing; Gaeth, Ann P; Short, Roger V

    2003-11-14

    The adult elephant is unique among mammals in that the pleural membranes are thickened and the pleural cavity is obliterated by connective tissue. It has been suggested that this peculiar anatomy developed because the animal can snorkel at depth, and this behavior subjects the microvessels in the parietal pleura to a very large transmural pressure. To investigate the development of the parietal pleura, the thickness of the endothoracic fascia (ET) was measured in four fetal African elephants of approximate gestational age 111-130 days, and the appearances were compared with those in human, rabbit, rat and mouse fetuses of approximately the same stage of lung organogenesis. The mean thicknesses of ET in the elephant, human, rabbit, rat and mouse were 403, 53, 29, 27 and 37 microm, respectively. This very early development of a thick parietal pleura in the elephant fetus is consistent with the hypothesis of a long history of snorkeling in the elephant's putative aquatic ancestors.

  9. Prevalence of Electrocardiographic Abnormalities in a Middle-Aged, Biracial Population: Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Joseph A; Prineas, Ronald; Daviglus, Martha L.; Ning, Hongyan; Liu, Kiang; Lewis, Cora E.; Sidney, Steven; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Iribarren, Carlos; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Few studies to date have described the prevalence of electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities in a biracial middle-aged cohort. Methods and Results Participants underwent measurement of traditional risk factors and 12-lead ECGs coded using both Minnesota Code (MC) and Novacode (NC) criteria. Among 2585 participants, of whom 57% were women and 44% were black (mean age 45 years), the prevalence of major and minor abnormalities were significantly higher (all P<0.001) among black men and women compared to whites. These differences were primarily due to higher QRS voltage and ST/T wave abnormalities among blacks. There was also a higher prevalence of Q waves (MC 1-1, 1-2, 1-3) than described by previous studies. These racial differences remained after multivariate adjustment for traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors. Conclusions Black men and women have a significantly higher prevalence of ECG abnormalities, independent of traditional CV risk factors, than whites in a contemporary cohort middle-aged participants. PMID:20374967

  10. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  11. Structural Development, Cellular Differentiation and Proliferation of the Respiratory Epithelium in the Bovine Fetal Lung.

    PubMed

    Drozdowska, J; Cousens, C; Finlayson, J; Collie, D; Dagleish, M P

    2016-01-01

    Fetal bovine lung samples of 11 different gestational ages were assigned to a classical developmental stage based on histological morphology. Immunohistochemistry was used to characterize the morphology of forming airways, proliferation rate of airway epithelium and the presence of epithelial cell types (i.e. ciliated cells, club cells, neuroepithelial cells (NECs) and type II pneumocytes). Typical structural organization of pseudoglandular (84-98 days gestational age [DGA]), canalicular (154-168 DGA) and alveolar (224-266 DGA) stages was recognized. In addition, transitional pseudoglandular-canalicular (112-126 DGA) and canalicular-saccular (182 DGA) morphologies were present. The embryonic stage was not observed. A significantly (P <0.05) higher proliferation rate of pulmonary epithelium, on average 5.5% and 4.4% in bronchi and bronchioles, respectively, was present in the transitional pseudoglandular-canalicular phase (112-126 DGA) compared with all other phases, while from 8 weeks before term (224-266 DGA) proliferation had almost ceased. The first epithelial cells identified by specific marker proteins in the earliest samples available for study (84 DGA) were ciliated cells and NECs. Club cells were present initially at 112 DGA and type II pneumocytes at 224 DGA. At the latest time points (224-226 DGA) these latter cell types were still present at a much lower percentage compared with adult cattle. This study characterized bovine fetal lung development by histological morphology and cellular composition of the respiratory epithelium and suggests that the apparent structural anatomical maturity of the bovine lung at term is not matched by functional maturity of the respiratory epithelium.

  12. Origin and characterization of alpha smooth muscle actin-positive cells during murine lung development.

    PubMed

    Moiseenko, Alena; Kheirollahi, Vahid; Chao, Cho-Ming; Ahmadvand, Negah; Quantius, Jennifer; Wilhelm, Jochen; Herold, Susanne; Ahlbrecht, Katrin; Morty, Rory E; Rizvanov, Albert A; Minoo, Parviz; El Agha, Elie; Bellusci, Saverio

    2017-04-03

    ACTA2 expression identifies pulmonary airway and vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as well as alveolar myofibroblasts (MYF). Mesenchymal progenitors expressing fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10), Wilms tumor 1 (Wt1), or glioma-associated oncogene 1 (Gli1) contribute to SMC formation from early stages of lung development. However, their respective contribution and specificity to the SMC and/or alveolar MYF lineages remain controversial. In addition, the contribution of mesenchymal cells undergoing active WNT signaling remains unknown. Using Fgf10(CreERT2) , Wt1(CreERT2) , Gli1(CreERT2) , and Axin2(CreERT2) inducible driver lines in combination with a tdTomato(flox) reporter line, the respective differentiation of each pool of labeled progenitor cells along the SMC and alveolar MYF lineages was quantified. The results revealed that while FGF10(+) and WT1(+) cells show a minor contribution to the SMC lineage, GLI1(+) and AXIN2(+) cells significantly contribute to both the SMC and alveolar MYF lineages, but with limited specificity. Lineage tracing using the Acta2-CreERT2 transgenic line showed that ACTA2(+) cells labeled at embryonic day (E)11.5 do not expand significantly to give rise to new SMCs at E18.5. However, ACTA2(+) cells labeled at E15.5 give rise to the majority (85%-97%) of the SMCs in the lung at E18.5 as well as alveolar MYF progenitors in the lung parenchyma. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based isolation of different subpopulations of ACTA2(+) lineage-traced cells followed by gene arrays, identified transcriptomic signatures for alveolar MYF progenitors versus airway and vascular SMCs at E18.5. Our results establish a new transcriptional landscape for further experiments addressing the function of signaling pathways in the formation of different subpopulations of ACTA2(+) cells. Stem Cells 2017.

  13. Fetal calcium regulates branching morphogenesis in the developing human and mouse lung: involvement of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Sarah C; Finney, Brenda A; Lazarou, Maria; Rosser, Anne E; Scherf, Caroline; Adriaensen, Dirk; Kemp, Paul J; Riccardi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Airway branching morphogenesis in utero is essential for optimal postnatal lung function. In the fetus, branching morphogenesis occurs during the pseudoglandular stage (weeks 9-17 of human gestation, embryonic days (E)11.5-16.5 in mouse) in a hypercalcaemic environment (~1.7 in the fetus vs. ~1.1-1.3 mM for an adult). Previously we have shown that fetal hypercalcemia exerts an inhibitory brake on branching morphogenesis via the calcium-sensing receptor. In addition, earlier studies have shown that nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCC), inhibits fetal lung growth, suggesting a role for VGCC in lung development. The aim of this work was to investigate the expression of VGCC in the pseudoglandular human and mouse lung, and their role in branching morphogenesis. Expression of L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3), P/Q type (CaV2.1), N-type (CaV2.2), R-type (CaV2.3), and T-type (CaV3.2 and CaV3.3) VGCC was investigated in paraffin sections from week 9 human fetal lungs and E12.5 mouse embryos. Here we show, for the first time, that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are expressed in both the smooth muscle and epithelium of the developing human and mouse lung. Additionally, Cav2.3 was expressed in the lung epithelium of both species. Incubating E12.5 mouse lung rudiments in the presence of nifedipine doubled the amount of branching, an effect which was partly mimicked by the Cav2.3 inhibitor, SNX-482. Direct measurements of changes in epithelial cell membrane potential, using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSBAC2(3), demonstrated that cyclic depolarisations occur within the developing epithelium and coincide with rhythmic occlusions of the lumen, driven by the naturally occurring airway peristalsis. We conclude that VGCC are expressed and functional in the fetal human and mouse lung, where they play a role in branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, rhythmic epithelial depolarisations evoked by airway peristalsis would allow for branching to match

  14. Characterization of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α-positive cell lineage during murine late lung development.

    PubMed

    Ntokou, Aglaia; Klein, Friederike; Dontireddy, Daria; Becker, Sven; Bellusci, Saverio; Richardson, William D; Szibor, Marten; Braun, Thomas; Morty, Rory E; Seeger, Werner; Voswinckel, Robert; Ahlbrecht, Katrin

    2015-11-01

    A reduced number of alveoli is the structural hallmark of diseases of the neonatal and adult lung, where alveoli either fail to develop (as in bronchopulmonary dysplasia), or are progressively destroyed (as in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). To correct the loss of alveolar septa through therapeutic regeneration, the mechanisms of septa formation must first be understood. The present study characterized platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α-positive (PDGFRα(+)) cell populations during late lung development in mice. PDGFRα(+) cells (detected using a PDGFRα(GFP) reporter line) were noted around the proximal airways during the pseudoglandular stage. In the canalicular stage, PDGFRα(+) cells appeared in the more distal mesenchyme, and labeled α-smooth muscle actin-positive tip cells in the secondary crests and lipofibroblasts in the primary septa during alveolarization. Some PDGFRα(+) cells appeared in the mesenchyme of the adult lung. Over the course of late lung development, PDGFRα(+) cells consistently expressed collagen I, and transiently expressed markers of mesenchymal stem cells. With the use of both, a constitutive and a conditional PDGFRα(Cre) line, it was observed that PDGFRα(+) cells generated alveolar myofibroblasts including tip cells of the secondary crests, and lipofibroblasts. These lineages were committed before secondary septation. The present study provides new insights into the time-dependent commitment of the PDGFRα(+) cell lineage to lipofibroblasts and myofibroblasts during late lung development that is needed to better understand the cellular contribution to the process of alveolarization.

  15. Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Abnormalities in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Mourani, Peter M; Abman, Steven H

    2015-12-01

    Despite advances in the care of preterm infants, these infants remain at risk bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which results in prolonged need for supplemental oxygen, recurrent respiratory exacerbations, and exercise intolerance. Recent investigations have highlighted the important contribution of the developing pulmonary circulation to lung development, showing that these infants are also at risk for pulmonary vascular disease (PVD), including pulmonary hypertension (PH) and pulmonary vascular abnormalities. Several epidemiologic studies have delineated the incidence of PH in preterm infants and the impact on outcomes. These studies have also highlighted gaps in the understanding of PVD in BPD.

  16. Development of a temperature distribution simulator for lung RFA based on air dependence of thermal and electrical properties.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Nozomu; Watanabe, Hiroki; Lu, XiaoWei; Isobe, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Yo; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2012-01-01

    Radio frequency ablation (RFA) for lung cancer has increasingly been used over the past few years, because it is a minimally invasive treatment. As a feature of RFA for lung cancer, lung contains air. Air is low thermal and electrical conductivity. Therefore, RFA for this cancer has the advantage that only the cancer is coagulated, because the heated area is confined to the immediate vicinity of the heating point. However, it is difficult for operators to control the precise formation of coagulation zones due to inadequate imaging modalities. We propose a method using finite element method to analyze the temperature distribution of the organ in order to overcome the current deficiencies. Creating an accurate thermal physical model was a challenging problem because of the complexities of the thermal properties of the organ. In this study, we developed a temperature distribution simulator for lung RFA using thermal and electrical properties that were based on the lung's internal air dependence. In addition, we validated the constructed simulator in an in vitro study, and the lung's internal heat transfer during RFA was validated quantitatively.

  17. Development of a computerized scheme for detection of very subtle lung nodules located in opaque areas on chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Doi, Kunio

    2006-03-01

    The detection of lung nodules located in opaque areas including the mediastinum, retrocardiac lung, and lung projected below or on the diaphragm has been very difficult, because the contrast of these nodules is usually extremely low, and sometimes radiologists may not pay attention to these locations. In this study, we have developed a new computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme designed specifically for the detection of these difficult-to-detect lung nodules located in opaque areas. We used 1,000 chest images with 1,076 lung nodules, which included 73 very difficult lung nodules in these opaque areas. In this new computerized scheme, opaque areas within a chest image were segmented by use of an adaptive multi-thresholding method based on edge-gradient values, and then the gray level and contrast of the chest image were adjusted for the opaque areas. Initial candidates were identified by use of the nodule-enhanced image obtained with the average radial-gradient (ARG) filtering technique based on radial gradient values. We employed a total of 35 image features for sequential application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in order to reduce the number of false-positive candidates. The ANNs were trained and tested by use of a k-fold cross-validation test method (k=100), in which each of 100 different combinations of training and test image data sets included 990 and 10 chest images, respectively. The overall performance determined from the results of 100 test data sets indicated that the average sensitivity in detecting lung nodules was 52.1% with 1.89 false positives per image, which was considered "acceptable", because these nodules were very subtle and difficult to detect. By combination of this advanced CAD scheme with our standard CAD scheme for lung-nodule detection, the clinical usefulness of the CAD scheme would be improved significantly.

  18. Neuroendocrine factors regulate retinoic acid receptors in normal and hypoplastic lung development

    PubMed Central

    Pereira-Terra, Patrícia; Moura, Rute S; Nogueira-Silva, Cristina; Correia-Pinto, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is characterised by a spectrum of lung hypoplasia and consequent pulmonary hypertension, leading to high morbidity and mortality rates. Moreover, CDH has been associated with an increase in the levels of pulmonary neuroendocrine factors, such as bombesin and ghrelin, and a decrease in the action of retinoic acid (RA). The present study aimed to elucidate the interaction between neuroendocrine factors and RA. In vitro analyses were performed on Sprague–Dawley rat embryos. Normal lung explants were treated with bombesin, ghrelin, a bombesin antagonist, a ghrelin antagonist, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), RA dissolved in DMSO, bombesin plus RA and ghrelin plus RA. Hypoplastic lung explants (nitrofen model) were cultured with bombesin, ghrelin, bombesin antagonist or ghrelin antagonist. The lung explants were analysed morphometrically, and retinoic acid receptor (RAR) α, β and γ expression levels were assessed via Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry analysis of RAR was performed in normal and hypoplastic lungs 17.5 days post-conception (dpc). Compared with the controls, hypoplastic lungs exhibited significantly higher RARα/γ expression levels. Furthermore considering hypoplastic lungs, bombesin and ghrelin antagonists decreased RARα/γ expression. Normal lung explants (13.5 dpc) treated with RA, bombesin plus RA, ghrelin plus RA, bombesin or ghrelin exhibited increased lung growth. Moreover, bombesin and ghrelin increased RARα/γ expression levels, whereas the bombesin and ghrelin antagonists decreased RARα/γ expression. This study demonstrates for the first time that neuroendocrine factors function as lung growth regulators, sensitising the lung to the action of RA through up-regulation of RARα and RARγ. Key points Retinoic acid (RA) and ghrelin levels are altered in human hypoplastic lungs when compared to healthy lungs. Although considerable data have been obtained about RA, ghrelin and bombesin in the congenital

  19. Development of controlled-release cisplatin dry powders for inhalation against lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Levet, Vincent; Rosière, Rémi; Merlos, Romain; Fusaro, Luca; Berger, Gilles; Amighi, Karim; Wauthoz, Nathalie

    2016-12-30

    The present study focuses on the development of dry powders for inhalation as adjuvant chemotherapy in lung cancer treatment. Cisplatin was chosen as a potential candidate for a local treatment as it remains the main platinum component used in conventional chemotherapies, despite its high and cumulative systemic toxicities. Bulk cisplatin was reduced to submicron sizes using high-pressure homogenization, mixed with a solubilized lipid and/or PEGylated component and then spray-dried to produce controlled-release dry powder formulations. The obtained formulations were characterized for their physicochemical properties (particle size and morphology), aerodynamic performance and release profiles. Cisplatin content and integrity were assessed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and (195)Pt nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. DPI formulations with cisplatin contents ranging from 48.5 to 101.0% w/w exhibited high fine particle fractions ranging from 37.3% to 51.5% of the nominal dose. Formulations containing cisplatin microcrystals dispersed in solid lipid microparticles based on acceptable triglycerides for inhalation and PEGylated excipients showed a controlled-release for more than 24h and a limited burst effect. These new formulations could provide an interesting approach to increasing and prolonging drug exposure in the lung while minimizing systemic toxicities.

  20. Stromal expression of miR-143/145 promotes neoangiogenesis in lung cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrova, Nadya; Gocheva, Vasilena; Bhutkar, Arjun; Resnick, Rebecca; Jong, Robyn M.; Miller, Kathryn M.; Bendor, Jordan; Jacks, Tyler

    2015-01-01

    The two unrelated miRNAs, miR-143 and miR-145, co-expressed from the miR-143/145 cluster have been proposed to act as tumor suppressors in human cancer and therapeutic benefits of delivering miR-143 and miR-145 to tumors have been reported. In contrast, we found that tumor-specific deletion of miR-143/145 in an autochthonous mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma did not affect tumor development. This was consistent with the lack of endogenous miR-143/145 expression in normal and transformed lung epithelium. Surprisingly, miR-143/145 in the tumor microenvironment dramatically promoted tumor growth by stimulating the proliferation of endothelial cells. Loss of miR-143/145 in vivo led to derepression of the miR-145 target Camk1d, an inhibitory kinase, which when overexpressed prevents mitotic entry of endothelial cells. As a consequence, tumors in miR-143/145-deficient animals exhibited diminished neoangiogenesis, increased apoptosis and their expansion was limited by the tumor’s ability to co-opt the alveolar vasculature. These findings demonstrate that stromal miR-143/145 promotes tumorigenesis and cautions against the use of these miRNAs as agents in cancer therapeutics. PMID:26586766

  1. Development and Evaluation of Patient Education Materials for Elderly Lung Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Jewitt, Natalie; Hope, Andrew J; Milne, Robin; Le, Lisa W; Papadakos, Janet; Abdelmutti, Nazek; Catton, Pamela; Giuliani, Meredith E

    2016-03-01

    Patients treated for lung cancer are often elderly presenting a unique challenge for developing patient education materials. This study developed and evaluated a patient education pamphlet on lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) designed specifically for an elderly population. The SBRT pamphlet was developed using a participatory design involving a convenience sample of patients. This prospective study assessed patient's opinions of pamphlet effectiveness through self-report questionnaires. The pamphlet was deemed "effective" if patients rated 16/18 evaluation statements as "strongly agree" or "agree." Demographic data and health literacy (Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine short-form (REALM-SF)) were also assessed. Patient opinion of pamphlet "effectiveness" was compared between patients with REALM-SF scores of 7 versus <7 using Fisher's exact test. The overall EQ-5D-5L score was compared for patients who did and did not find the pamphlet effective using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Thirty-seven patients participated. The median age was 76 years (range 56-93) and 22 patients (59 %) had ≤high school education. Most patients preferred to have verbal (65 %) or written (78 %) educational materials as opposed to online information or educational classes. Thirty-two patients (86 %) rated the pamphlet as effective. The proportion of patients who found the pamphlet effective was 85.7 versus 86.7 % (p = 1.00) in those with REALM 7 versus <7. The mean EQ-5D score was 67.5 (SD 19.1) versus 71.8 (SD 8.7) (p = 0.84) in those who found the pamphlet effective versus not. Participatory design is an effective method for developing education materials for challenging patient groups such as elderly patients. Despite advanced age and comorbidity, this patient group had adequate health literacy.

  2. Integrative analysis of lung development-cancer expression associations reveals the roles of signatures with inverse expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunlong; Li, Chunquan; Xu, Yanjun; Feng, Li; Shang, Desi; Yang, Xinmiao; Han, Junwei; Sun, Zeguo; Li, Yixue; Li, Xia

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have focused on exploring the associations between organ development and malignant tumors; however, the clinical relevance of the development signatures was inadequately addressed in lung cancer. In this study, we explored the associations between lung development and lung cancer progression by analyzing a total of two development and seven cancer datasets. We identified representative expression patterns (continuously up- and down-regulated) from development and cancer profiles, and inverse pattern associations were observed at both the gene and functional levels. Furthermore, we dissected the biological processes dominating the associations, and found that proliferation and immunity were respectively involved in the two inverse development-cancer expression patterns. Through sub-pathway analysis of the signatures with inverse expression patterns, we finally identified a 13-gene risk signature from the cell cycle sub-pathway, and evaluated its predictive performance for lung cancer patient clinical outcome using independent cohorts. Our findings indicated that the integrative analysis of development and cancer expression patterns provided a framework for identifying effective molecular signatures for clinical utility.

  3. Relationship between DNA damage in sperm after ex vivo exposure and abnormal embryo development in the progeny of the three-spined stickleback.

    PubMed

    Santos, R; Palos-Ladeiro, M; Besnard, A; Porcher, J M; Bony, S; Sanchez, W; Devaux, A

    2013-04-01

    Many xenobiotics released in the aquatic environment exhibit a genotoxic potential toward organisms. Long term exposure to such compounds is expected to lead to multigenerational reproductive defects, further influencing the recruitment rate and hence, the population dynamics. Paternal exposure to genotoxicants was previously shown to increase abnormal development in the progeny of mammalian or aquatic species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between DNA damage in sperm of the fish three-spined stickleback and progeny developmental defects. Spermatozoa were exposed ex vivo to an alkylating agent (methyl methanesulfonate) before in vitro fertilization and DNA damage was assessed by the alkaline comet assay. A significant relationship between abnormal development and sperm DNA damage was underlined. This study illustrates the interest to use germ cell DNA damage after ex vivo exposure to evaluate the impact of genotoxic compounds on progeny fitness in aquatic organisms.

  4. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Ford, Jean G.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ever since a lung cancer epidemic emerged in the mid-1900s, the epidemiology of lung cancer has been intensively investigated to characterize its causes and patterns of occurrence. This report summarizes the key findings of this research. Methods: A detailed literature search provided the basis for a narrative review, identifying and summarizing key reports on population patterns and factors that affect lung cancer risk. Results: Established environmental risk factors for lung cancer include smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, occupational lung carcinogens, radiation, and indoor and outdoor air pollution. Cigarette smoking is the predominant cause of lung cancer and the leading worldwide cause of cancer death. Smoking prevalence in developing nations has increased, starting new lung cancer epidemics in these nations. A positive family history and acquired lung disease are examples of host factors that are clinically useful risk indicators. Risk prediction models based on lung cancer risk factors have been developed, but further refinement is needed to provide clinically useful risk stratification. Promising biomarkers of lung cancer risk and early detection have been identified, but none are ready for broad clinical application. Conclusions: Almost all lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking, underscoring the need for ongoing efforts at tobacco control throughout the world. Further research is needed into the reasons underlying lung cancer disparities, the causes of lung cancer in never smokers, the potential role of HIV in lung carcinogenesis, and the development of biomarkers. PMID:23649439

  5. Robust algorithmic detection of the developed cardiac pathologies and emerging or transient abnormalities from short periods of RR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrishchaka, Valeriy V.; Senyukova, Olga

    2011-06-01

    Numerous research efforts and clinical testing have confirmed validity of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis as one of the cardiac diagnostics modalities. The majority of HRV analysis tools currently used in practice are based on linear indicators. Methods from nonlinear dynamics (NLD) provide more natural modeling framework for adaptive biological systems with multiple feedback loops. Compared to linear indicators, many NLD-based measures are much less sensitive to data artifacts and non-stationarity. However, majority of NLD measures require long time series for stable calculation. Similar restrictions also apply for linear indicators. Such requirements could drastically limit practical usability of HRV analysis in many applications, including express diagnostics, early indication of subtle directional changes during personalization of medical treatment, and robust detection of emerging or transient abnormalities. Recently we have illustrated that these challenges could be overcome by using classification framework based on boosting-like ensemble learning techniques that are capable of discovering robust meta-indicators from existing HRV measures and other incomplete empirical knowledge. In this paper we demonstrate universality of such meta-indicators and discuss operational details of their practical usage. Using such pathology examples as congestive heart failure (CHF) and arrhythmias, we show that classifiers trained on short RR segments (down to several minutes) could achieve reasonable classification accuracy (˜80-85% and higher). These indicators calculated from longer RR segments could be applicable for accurate diagnostics with classification accuracy approaching 100%. In addition, it is feasible to discover single "normal-abnormal" meta-classifier capable of detecting multiple abnormalities.

  6. The fetal sheep lung does not respond to cortisol infusion during the late canalicular phase of development

    PubMed Central

    McGillick, Erin V; Orgeig, Sandra; McMillen, I Caroline; Morrison, Janna L

    2013-01-01

    The prepartum surge in plasma cortisol concentrations in humans and sheep promotes fetal lung and surfactant system maturation in the support of air breathing after birth. This physiological process has been used to enhance lung maturation in the preterm fetus using maternal administration of betamethasone in the clinical setting in fetuses as young as 24 weeks gestation (term = 40 weeks). Here, we have investigated the impact of fetal intravenous cortisol infusion during the canalicular phase of lung development (from 109- to 116-days gestation, term = 150 ± 3 days) on the expression of genes regulating glucocorticoid (GC) activity, lung liquid reabsorption, and surfactant maturation in the very preterm sheep fetus and compared this to their expression near term. Cortisol infusion had no impact on mRNA expression of the corticosteroid receptors (GC receptor and mineralocorticoid receptor) or HSD11B-2, however, there was increased expression of HSD11B-1 in the fetal lung. Despite this, cortisol infusion had no effect on the expression of genes involved in lung sodium (epithelial sodium channel -α, -β, or -γ subunits and sodium–potassium ATPase-β1 subunit) or water (aquaporin 1, 3, and 5) reabsorption when compared to the level of expression during exposure to the normal prepartum cortisol surge. Furthermore, in comparison to late gestation, cortisol infusion does not increase mRNA expression of surfactant proteins (SFTP-A, -B, and -C) or the number of SFTP-B-positive cells present in the alveolar epithelium, the cells that produce pulmonary surfactant. These data suggest that there may be an age before which the lung is unable to respond biochemically to an increase in fetal plasma cortisol concentrations. PMID:24400136

  7. Epidemiology, incidence and mortality of lung cancer and their relationship with the development index in the world

    PubMed Central

    Rafiemanesh, Hosein; Mehtarpour, Mojtaba; Khani, Farah; Hesami, Sayed Mohammadali; Shamlou, Reza; Towhidi, Farhad; Makhsosi, Behnam Reza; Moini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background The highest incidence of lung cancer is seen in North America and the lowest incidence in central Africa. Socioeconomic factors of inequality reflect regional disparities in human development. Due to the importance of awareness about incidence and mortality of lung cancer in health programming and the possible role of the human development index (HDI), this study was done with the aim to investigate the epidemiology of lung cancer in the world and its relationship with HDI. Methods The study was conducted based on data from the world data of cancer and the World Bank (including the HDI and its components). Data about the age-specific incidence and mortality rate (ASR) for every country in 2012 were getting from the global cancer project. To analyze data, correlation tests between incidence and death rates, and HDI and its components were employed with a significance level of 0.05 using SPSS software. Results Lung cancer with standardized incidence rate (ASIR) and standardized mortality rate (ASMR), equal to 23.1 and 19.7 (in 100,000 people), respectively. The highest and lowest values of mortality incidence ratio (MIR) for lung cancer due to continents division were 0.93 and 0.71 for Eastern Africa and Australia/New Zealand, respectively. Univariate analysis showed significant relationship (P<0.0001) between ASIR and ASMR with life expectancy at birth and mean years of schooling. Conclusions The highest MIR for lung cancer was for medium human development countries. Linear regression analysis showed a reverse significant relationship between MIR and HDI. PMID:27293825

  8. Development of a Multicomponent Prediction Model for Acute Esophagitis in Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    De Ruyck, Kim; Sabbe, Nick; Oberije, Cary; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Thas, Olivier; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Phillipe; Van Meerbeeck, Jan; De Neve, Wilfried; Thierens, Hubert

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To construct a model for the prediction of acute esophagitis in lung cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy by combining clinical data, treatment parameters, and genotyping profile. Patients and Methods: Data were available for 273 lung cancer patients treated with curative chemoradiotherapy. Clinical data included gender, age, World Health Organization performance score, nicotine use, diabetes, chronic disease, tumor type, tumor stage, lymph node stage, tumor location, and medical center. Treatment parameters included chemotherapy, surgery, radiotherapy technique, tumor dose, mean fractionation size, mean and maximal esophageal dose, and overall treatment time. A total of 332 genetic polymorphisms were considered in 112 candidate genes. The predicting model was achieved by lasso logistic regression for predictor selection, followed by classic logistic regression for unbiased estimation of the coefficients. Performance of the model was expressed as the area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic and as the false-negative rate in the optimal point on the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: A total of 110 patients (40%) developed acute esophagitis Grade {>=}2 (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0). The final model contained chemotherapy treatment, lymph node stage, mean esophageal dose, gender, overall treatment time, radiotherapy technique, rs2302535 (EGFR), rs16930129 (ENG), rs1131877 (TRAF3), and rs2230528 (ITGB2). The area under the curve was 0.87, and the false-negative rate was 16%. Conclusion: Prediction of acute esophagitis can be improved by combining clinical, treatment, and genetic factors. A multicomponent prediction model for acute esophagitis with a sensitivity of 84% was constructed with two clinical parameters, four treatment parameters, and four genetic polymorphisms.

  9. Post-irradiation dietary vitamin E does not affect the development of radiation-induced lung damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Wiegman, Erwin M; van Gameren, Mieke M; Kampinga, Harm H; Szabó, Ben G; Coppes, Rob P

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether application of post-irradiation vitamin E, an anti-oxidant, could prevent the development of radiation induced lung damage. Wistar rats were given vitamin E enriched or vitamin E deprived food starting from 4 weeks after 18Gy single dose irradiation of the right thorax. Neither breathing frequencies nor CT density measurements revealed differences between the groups. It is concluded that post-irradiation vitamin E does not influence radiation-induced fibrosis to the lung.

  10. Functional characterization of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells in lung development, injury, and tumorigenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs) are proposed to be the first specialized cell type to appear in the lung, but their ontogeny remains obscure. Although studies of PNECs have suggested their involvement in a number of lung functions, neither their in vivo significance nor the molecular mechanis...

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF 3-D COMPUTER MODELS OF HUMAN LUNG MORPHOLOGY FOR IMPROOVED RISK ASSESSMENT OF INHALED PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    DEVELOPMENT OF 3-D COMPUTER MODELS OF HUMAN LUNG MORPHOLOGY FOR IMPROVED RISK ASSESSMENT OF INHALED PARTICULATE MATTER

    Jeffry D. Schroeter, Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599; Ted B. Martonen, ETD, NHEERL, USEPA, RTP, NC 27711; Do...

  12. Temporal dynamics of the developing lung transcriptome in three common inbred strains of laboratory mice reveals multiple stages of postnatal alveolar development

    PubMed Central

    Beauchemin, Kyle J.; Wells, Julie M.; Kho, Alvin T.; Philip, Vivek M.; Kamir, Daniela; Kohane, Isaac S.

    2016-01-01

    To characterize temporal patterns of transcriptional activity during normal lung development, we generated genome wide gene expression data for 26 pre- and post-natal time points in three common inbred strains of laboratory mice (C57BL/6J, A/J, and C3H/HeJ). Using Principal Component Analysis and least squares regression modeling, we identified both strain-independent and strain-dependent patterns of gene expression. The 4,683 genes contributing to the strain-independent expression patterns were used to define a murine Developing Lung Characteristic Subtranscriptome (mDLCS). Regression modeling of the Principal Components supported the four canonical stages of mammalian embryonic lung development (embryonic, pseudoglandular, canalicular, saccular) defined previously by morphology and histology. For postnatal alveolar development, the regression model was consistent with four stages of alveolarization characterized by episodic transcriptional activity of genes related to pulmonary vascularization. Genes expressed in a strain-dependent manner were enriched for annotations related to neurogenesis, extracellular matrix organization, and Wnt signaling. Finally, a comparison of mouse and human transcriptomics from pre-natal stages of lung development revealed conservation of pathways associated with cell cycle, axon guidance, immune function, and metabolism as well as organism-specific expression of genes associated with extracellular matrix organization and protein modification. The mouse lung development transcriptome data generated for this study serves as a unique reference set to identify genes and pathways essential for normal mammalian lung development and for investigations into the developmental origins of respiratory disease and cancer. The gene expression data are available from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) archive (GSE74243). Temporal expression patterns of mouse genes can be investigated using a study specific web resource (http

  13. Developing Software to “Track and Catch” Missed Follow-up of Abnormal Test Results in a Complex Sociotechnical Environment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M.; Murphy, D.; Laxmisan, A.; Sittig, D.; Reis, B.; Esquivel, A.; Singh, H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Abnormal test results do not always receive timely follow-up, even when providers are notified through electronic health record (EHR)-based alerts. High workload, alert fatigue, and other demands on attention disrupt a provider’s prospective memory for tasks required to initiate follow-up. Thus, EHR-based tracking and reminding functionalities are needed to improve follow-up. Objectives The purpose of this study was to develop a decision-support software prototype enabling individual and system-wide tracking of abnormal test result alerts lacking follow-up, and to conduct formative evaluations, including usability testing. Methods We developed a working prototype software system, the Alert Watch And Response Engine (AWARE), to detect abnormal test result alerts lacking documented follow-up, and to present context-specific reminders to providers. Development and testing took place within the VA’s EHR and focused on four cancer-related abnormal test results. Design concepts emphasized mitigating the effects of high workload and alert fatigue while being minimally intrusive. We conducted a multifaceted formative evaluation of the software, addressing fit within the larger socio-technical system. Evaluations included usability testing with the prototype and interview questions about organizational and workflow factors. Participants included 23 physicians, 9 clinical information technology specialists, and 8 quality/safety managers. Results Evaluation results indicated that our software prototype fit within the technical environment and clinical workflow, and physicians were able to use it successfully. Quality/safety managers reported that the tool would be useful in future quality assurance activities to detect patients who lack documented follow-up. Additionally, we successfully installed the software on the local facility’s “test” EHR system, thus demonstrating technical compatibility. Conclusion To address the factors involved in missed

  14. Morphometric studies on the structural development of the lung in Macaca fascicularis during fetal and postnatal life.

    PubMed Central

    Hislop, A; Howard, S; Fairweather, D V

    1984-01-01

    The structural development of the normal monkey lung (Macaca fascicularis) from 61 days of gestation to 14 days postnatal age has been described using quantitative morphometric techniques. The lung of the adult monkey has also been studied. The airway and arterial branching pattern has been traced using serial sections. The alveolar number and size have been estimated and the structure of the arteries after postmortem arterial injection has been assessed. Comparison of lung morphology in monkey and man shows that there are similarities in segmental arrangement, structure and branching pattern of airways, in arterial structure and in changes in the arteries after birth. Although there are differences in the number of lobes, the number of generations of different types of airways and the number and size of alveoli, the overall structure in the monkey is more similar to that in man than is the structure of the lung in species such as sheep, pig or rat. During fetal life the monkey lung passes through the same stages of development as the human fetus but at birth the monkey has a full complement of airways and mature alveoli. Postnatal growth of airways and alveoli is due to increase in size rather than to multiplication. In man there is an increase in the number of alveoli and alveolar ducts after birth as well as an increase in size. Despite the differences between the species it seems appropriate to use the monkey in experimental studies on the lung. Images Fig. 1 (cont.) Fig. 1 Fig. 4 (cont.) Fig. 4 PMID:6706842

  15. Helical and Static-port Tomotherapy Using the Newly-developed Dynamic Jaws Technology for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Yoshihiko; Shibamoto, Yuta; Sugie, Chikao; Hayashi, Akihiro; Murai, Taro; Yanagi, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    With the newly developed dynamic jaws technology, radiation dose for the cranio-caudal edges of a target can be lowered in the treatment with tomotherapy. We compared dynamic-jaw- and fixed-jaw-mode plans for lung cancer. In 35 patients, four plans using the 2.5-cm dynamic-, 2.5-cm fixed-, 5.0-cm dynamic-, and 5.0-cm fixed-jaw modes were generated. For 10 patients with upper lobe stage I lung cancer, the helical tomotherapy mode was used. Fifty-six Gy in 8 fractions was prescribed as a minimum coverage dose for 95% of the target (D95%). For 25 patients with locally advanced lung cancer, plans using four static ports (TomoDirect® mode) were made. Sixty Gy in 30 daily fractions for the primary tumor and swollen lymph nodes and 51 Gy in 30 fractions for prophylactic lymph node areas were prescribed as median doses. The mean conformity index of the planning target volume were similar among the four plans. The mean V5 Gy of the lung for 2.5-cm dynamic-, 2.5-cm fixed-, 5.0-cm dynamic-, and 5.0-cm fixed-jaw mode plans were 18.5%, 21.8%, 20.1%, and 29.4%, respectively (p < 0.0001), for patients with stage I lung cancer, and 37.3%, 38.7%, 40.4%, and 44.0%, respectively (p < 0.0001), for patients with locally advanced lung cancer. The mean V5 Gy of the whole body was 1,826, 2,143, 1,983, and 2,939 ml, respectively (p < 0.0001), for patients with stage I lung cancer and 4,849, 5,197, 5,220, and 6,154 ml, respectively (p < 0.0001), for patients with locally advanced lung cancer. Treatment time was reduced by 21-39% in 5.0-cm dynamic-jaw plans compared to 2.5-cm plans. Regarding dose distribution, 2.5-cm dynamic-jaw plans were the best, and 5.0-cm dynamic-jaw plans were comparable to 2.5-cm fixed-jaw plans with shorter treatment times. The dynamic-jaw mode should be used instead of the conventional fixed-jaw mode in tomotherapy for lung cancer.

  16. Metabolic Changes Precede the Development of Pulmonary Hypertension in the Monocrotaline Exposed Rat Lung

    PubMed Central

    Rafikova, Olga; Meadows, Mary L.; Kinchen, Jason M.; Mohney, Robert P.; Maltepe, Emin; Desai, Ankit A.; Yuan, Jason X.-J.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Rafikov, Ruslan; Black, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the potential for metabolic profiling to evaluate the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, a detailed analysis of the metabolic changes in lungs at the early stage of PH, characterized by increased pulmonary artery pressure but prior to the development of right ventricle hypertrophy and failure, is lacking in a preclinical animal model of PH. Thus, we undertook a study using rats 14 days after exposure to monocrotaline (MCT), to determine whether we could identify early stage metabolic changes prior to the manifestation of developed PH. We observed changes in multiple pathways associated with the development of PH, including activated glycolysis, increased markers of proliferation, disruptions in carnitine homeostasis, increased inflammatory and fibrosis biomarkers, and a reduction in glutathione biosynthesis. Further, our global metabolic profile data compare favorably with prior work carried out in humans with PH. We conclude that despite the MCT-model not recapitulating all the structural changes associated with humans with advanced PH, including endothelial cell proliferation and the formation of plexiform lesions, it is very similar at a metabolic level. Thus, we suggest that despite its limitations it can still serve as a useful preclinical model for the study of PH. PMID:26937637

  17. Metabolic Changes Precede the Development of Pulmonary Hypertension in the Monocrotaline Exposed Rat Lung.

    PubMed

    Rafikova, Olga; Meadows, Mary L; Kinchen, Jason M; Mohney, Robert P; Maltepe, Emin; Desai, Ankit A; Yuan, Jason X-J; Garcia, Joe G N; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Rafikov, Ruslan; Black, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the potential for metabolic profiling to evaluate the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, a detailed analysis of the metabolic changes in lungs at the early stage of PH, characterized by increased pulmonary artery pressure but prior to the development of right ventricle hypertrophy and failure, is lacking in a preclinical animal model of PH. Thus, we undertook a study using rats 14 days after exposure to monocrotaline (MCT), to determine whether we could identify early stage metabolic changes prior to the manifestation of developed PH. We observed changes in multiple pathways associated with the development of PH, including activated glycolysis, increased markers of proliferation, disruptions in carnitine homeostasis, increased inflammatory and fibrosis biomarkers, and a reduction in glutathione biosynthesis. Further, our global metabolic profile data compare favorably with prior work carried out in humans with PH. We conclude that despite the MCT-model not recapitulating all the structural changes associated with humans with advanced PH, including endothelial cell proliferation and the formation of plexiform lesions, it is very similar at a metabolic level. Thus, we suggest that despite its limitations it can still serve as a useful preclinical model for the study of PH.

  18. Cystic Fibrosis: The Mechanisms of Pathogenesis of an Inherited Lung Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Clunes, Mark T.; Boucher, Richard C.

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis patients exhibit lung disease consistent with a failure of innate airway defense mechanisms. The link between abnormal ion transport and disease initiation and progression is not fully understood, but airway mucus dehydration seems paramount in the initiation of CF lung disease. New therapies are currently in development that target the ion transport defects in CF with the intention of rehydrating airway surfaces. PMID:18560471

  19. Development of diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice promotes Chlamydia pneumoniae dissemination from lung to peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Oshio, Ichiro; Osaki, Takako; Kurata, Satoru; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2006-01-01

    We examined a possible association between development of diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and dissemination of Chlamydia (Chlamydophila) pneumoniae from lung to peripheral blood. By real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with primers for C. pneumoniae 16S rRNA, following multiple intranasal inoculations, we detected bacteria in lung in NOD mice with diabetes (38.5%) as well as Institute of Cancer Research, USA (ICR) mice (40%), but prevalence of bacteria in NOD mice without diabetes (pre-diabetic NOD mice and non-diabetic retired NOD mice) was very low (4.8%). The bacteria were only detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cultured with hydrocortisone of the NOD mice with diabetes (53.8%). Results of immunostaining with fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antichlamydia monoclonal antibody also showed the presence of bacterial antigens in the lungs and the PBMCs judged as positive by the RT-PCR. However, C. pneumoniae from cultured PBMCs of all NOD mice was undetected by cultivation method with inclusion-forming units assay. In addition, no influence of C. pneumoniae intranasal inoculation on development of diabetes in NOD mice was confirmed. Thus, the development of diabetes in NOD mouse appears to be one of critical factors for promoting the dissemination of C. pneumoniae from lung to peripheral blood. PMID:16623756

  20. Altered mRNA Splicing, Chondrocyte Gene Expression and Abnormal Skeletal Development due to SF3B4 Mutations in Rodriguez Acrofacial Dysostosis

    PubMed Central

    Nevarez, Lisette; Pogue, Robert; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The acrofacial dysostoses (AFD) are a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited disorders with craniofacial and limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome is a severe, usually perinatal lethal AFD, characterized by severe retrognathia, oligodactyly and lower limb abnormalities. Rodriguez syndrome has been proposed to be a severe form of Nager syndrome, a non-lethal AFD that results from mutations in SF3B4, a component of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U2 snRNP). Furthermore, a case with a phenotype intermediate between Rodriguez and Nager syndromes has been shown to have an SF3B4 mutation. We identified heterozygosity for SF3B4 mutations in Rodriguez syndrome, confirming that the phenotype is a dominant disorder that is allelic with Nager syndrome. The mutations led to reduced SF3B4 synthesis and defects in mRNA splicing, primarily exon skipping. The mutations also led to reduced expression in growth plate chondrocytes of target genes, including the DLX5, DLX6, SOX9, and SOX6 transcription factor genes, which are known to be important for skeletal development. These data provide mechanistic insight toward understanding how SF3B4 mutations lead to the skeletal abnormalities observed in the acrofacial dysostoses. PMID:27622494

  1. Life-long Programming Implications of Exposure to Tobacco Smoking and Nicotine Before and Soon After Birth: Evidence for Altered Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    Maritz, Gert S.; Harding, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Tobacco smoking during pregnancy remains common, especially in indigenous communities, and likely contributes to respiratory illness in exposed offspring. It is now well established that components of tobacco smoke, notably nicotine, can affect multiple organs in the fetus and newborn, potentially with life-long consequences. Recent studies have shown that nicotine can permanently affect the developing lung such that its final structure and function are adversely affected; these changes can increase the risk of respiratory illness and accelerate the decline in lung function with age. In this review we discuss the impact of maternal smoking on the lungs and consider the evidence that smoking can have life-long, programming consequences for exposed offspring. Exposure to maternal tobacco smoking and nicotine intake during pregnancy and lactation changes the genetic program that controls the development and aging of the lungs of the offspring. Changes in the conducting airways and alveoli reduce lung function in exposed offspring, rendering the lungs more susceptible to obstructive lung disease and accelerating lung aging. Although it is generally accepted that prevention of maternal smoking during pregnancy and lactation is essential, current knowledge of the effects of nicotine on lung development does not support the use of nicotine replacement therapy in this group. PMID:21556184

  2. Vertebrate lungs: structure, topography and mechanics. A comparative perspective of the progressive integration of respiratory system, locomotor apparatus and ontogenetic development.

    PubMed

    Duncker, Hans-Rainer

    2004-12-15

    Vertebrate lungs are highly diverse in their structure, topographical position, ventilation mechanisms, constructional integration into the locomotor apparatus, and the interrelationships with the mode of their ontogenetic development. Vertebrate lungs evolved as supplementary air-breathing organs in primary fishes, being ventilated by buccal pumping. In most recent fishes the lungs are transformed into the hydrostatic swimbladder. This basic type of unicameral lungs and their buccal pumping ventilation are also found in recent amphibians. Land vertebrates developed a very efficient aspiration type of ventilation. In most recent reptiles the lungs are subdivided into three rows of lung chambers, enlarging the exchange surface in correlation to their increasing metabolic needs. The avian respiratory apparatus, with its volume-constant lungs and highly compliant air sacs, and the mammalian broncho-alveolar lung, with its very low compliance, are both derived from multicameral lungs. The avian and the mammalian respiratory systems are integrated very differently with the specific constructions of their locomotor apparatusses and the specific mode of their ontogenetic development.

  3. A novel scheme for detection of diffuse lung disease in MDCT by use of statistical texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiahui; Li, Feng; Doi, Kunio; Li, Qiang

    2009-02-01

    The successful development of high performance computer-aided-diagnostic systems has potential to assist radiologists in the detection and diagnosis of diffuse lung disease. We developed in this study an automated scheme for the detection of diffuse lung disease on multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT). Our database consisted of 68 CT scans, which included 31 normal and 37 abnormal cases with three kinds of abnormal patterns, i.e., ground glass opacity, reticular, and honeycombing. Two radiologists first selected the CT scans with abnormal patterns based on clinical reports. The areas that included specific abnormal patterns in the selected CT images were then delineated as reference standards by an expert chest radiologist. To detect abnormal cases with diffuse lung disease, the lungs were first segmented from the background in each slice by use of a texture analysis technique, and then divided into contiguous volumes of interest (VOIs) with a 64×64×64 matrix size. For each VOI, we calculated many statistical texture features, including the mean and standard deviation of CT values, features determined from the run length matrix, and features from the co-occurrence matrix. A quadratic classifier was employed for distinguishing between normal and abnormal VOIs by use of a leave-one-case-out validation scheme. A rule-based criterion was employed to further determine whether a case was normal or abnormal. For the detection of abnormal VOIs, our CAD system achieved a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 90%. For the detection of abnormal cases, it achieved a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 90%. This preliminary study indicates that our CAD system would be useful for the detection of diffuse lung disease.

  4. Age factor relevant to the development of radiation pneumonitis in radiotherapy of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, K.; Kusumoto, S.; Watanabe, K.; Nishikawa, K.; Harada, K.; Ebihara, H.

    1988-02-01

    The significance of age factor for the development of radiation pneumonitis is evaluated in 62 patients with lung cancer between 1977 and 1985. The younger group consists of those less than 70 years old and the elderly group of those 70 years old or more. Radiation doses ranged from 1.5 to 2 Gy, 3 to 5 times per week, therefore the delivered doses were converted to nominal single doses (rets dose). Severe radiation pneumonitis was more often observed in the elderly than in the younger regardless of radiation field size and chemotherapy (n.s.). The onset of radiation pneumonitis occurred earlier in a field size of 90 sq cm or more than in that of less than 90 sq cm in both age groups; there was no significant difference between the two age groups in each field size. The pneumonitis was more frequently noted with increasing rets dose in both age groups (n.s.) regardless of field size and chemotherapy. It is concluded that there is no significant difference in the development of radiation pneumonitis between the younger group and the elderly group, but the pneumonitis is inclined to be more severe in the latter.

  5. Circulating, but not local lung, IL-5 is required for the development of antigen-induced airways eosinophilia.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Palmer, K; Lŏtvall, J; Milan, S; Lei, X F; Matthaei, K I; Gauldie, J; Inman, M D; Jordana, M; Xing, Z

    1998-01-01

    IL-5 is induced locally in the lung and systemically in the circulation during allergic airways eosinophilic inflammation both in humans and experimental animals. However, the precise role of local and systemic IL-5 in the development of allergic airways eosinophilia remains to be elucidated. In our current study, we demonstrate that compared with their IL-5(+/+) counterparts, IL-5(-/-) mice lacked an IL-5 response both in the lung and peripheral blood, yet they released similar amounts of IL-4, eotaxin, and MIP-1alpha in the lung after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge. At cellular levels, these mice failed to develop peripheral blood and airways eosinophilia while the responses of lymphocytes, neutrophils, and macrophages remained similar to those in IL-5(+/+) mice. To dissect the relative role of local and systemic IL-5 in this model, we constructed a gene transfer vector expressing murine IL-5. Intramuscular IL-5 gene transfer to OVA-sensitized IL-5(-/-) mice led to raised levels of IL-5 compartmentalized to the circulation and completely reconstituted airways eosinophilia upon OVA challenge, which was associated with reconstitution of eosinophilia in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Significant airways eosinophilia was observed for at least 7 d in these mice. In contrast, intranasal IL-5 gene transfer, when rendered to give rise to a significant but compartmentalized level of transgene protein IL-5 in the lung, was unable to reconstitute airways eosinophilia in OVA-sensitized IL-5(-/-) mice upon OVA-challenge, which was associated with a lack of eosinophilic responses in bone marrow and peripheral blood. Our findings thus provide unequivocal evidence that circulating but not local lung IL-5 is critically required for the development of allergic airways eosinophilia. These findings also provide the rationale for developing strategies to target circulating IL-5 and/or its receptors in bone marrow to effectively control asthmatic airways

  6. Development of APE1 enzymatic DNA repair assays: low APE1 activity is associated with increase lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Sevilya, Ziv; Leitner-Dagan, Yael; Pinchev, Mila; Kremer, Ran; Elinger, Dalia; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Rennert, Hedy S; Freedman, Laurence S; Rennert, Gad; Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Livneh, Zvi

    2015-09-01

    The key role of DNA repair in removing DNA damage and minimizing mutations makes it an attractive target for cancer risk assessment and prevention. Here we describe the development of a robust assay for apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1 (APE1; APEX1), an essential enzyme involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. APE1 DNA repair enzymatic activity was measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cell protein extracts using a radioactivity-based assay, and its association with lung cancer was determined using conditional logistic regression with specimens from a population-based case-control study with 96 lung cancer cases and 96 matched control subjects. The mean APE1 enzyme activity in case patients was 691 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 655-727] units/ng protein, significantly lower than in control subjects (mean = 793, 95% CI = 751-834 units/ng protein, P = 0.0006). The adjusted odds ratio for lung cancer associated with 1 SD (211 units) decrease in APE1 activity was 2.0 (95% CI = 1.3-3.1; P = 0.002). Comparison of radioactivity- and fluorescence-based assays showed that the two are equivalent, indicating no interference by the fluorescent tag. The APE1Asp148Glu SNP was associated neither with APE1 enzyme activity nor with lung cancer risk. Taken together, our results indicate that low APE1 activity is associated with lung cancer risk, consistent with the hypothesis that 'bad DNA repair', rather than 'bad luck', is involved in cancer etiology. Such assays may be useful, along with additional DNA repair biomarkers, for risk assessment of lung cancer and perhaps other cancers, and for selecting individuals to undergo early detection techniques such as low-dose CT.

  7. Lung Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Lung transplant Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A lung transplant is a surgical procedure to replace a diseased or ... lung, usually from a deceased donor. A lung transplant is reserved for people who have tried other ...

  8. Lung Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies Cardiac Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at ... should be considered an emergency. Symptoms of sudden lung collapse (pneumothorax) Symptoms of a sudden lung collapse ...

  9. Development of a highly metastatic model that reveals a crucial role of fibronectin in lung cancer cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The formation of metastasis is the most common cause of death in patients with lung cancer. A major implement to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung cancer metastasis has been the lack of suitable models to address it. In this study, we aimed at establishing a highly metastatic model of human lung cancer and characterizing its metastatic properties and underlying mechanisms. Methods The human lung adeno-carcinoma SPC-A-1 cell line was used as parental cells for developing of highly metastatic cells by in vivo selection in NOD/SCID mice. After three rounds of selection, a new SPC-A-1sci cell line was established from pulmonary metastatic lesions. Subsequently, the metastatic properties of this cell line were analyzed, including optical imaging of in vivo metastasis, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analysis of several epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) makers and trans-well migration and invasion assays. Finally, the functional roles of fibronectin in the invasive and metastatic potentials of SPC-A-1sci cells were determined by shRNA analysis. Results A spontaneously pulmonary metastatic model of human lung adeno-carcinoma was established in NOD/SCID mice, from which a new lung cancer cell line, designated SPC-A-1sci, was isolated. Initially, the highly metastatic behavior of this cell line was validated by optical imaging in mice models. Further analyses showed that this cell line exhibit phenotypic and molecular alterations consistent with EMT. Compared with its parent cell line SPC-A-1, SPC-A-1sci was more aggressive in vitro, including increased potentials for cell spreading, migration and invasion. Importantly, fibronectin, a mesenchymal maker of EMT, was found to be highly expressed in SPC-A-1sci cells and down-regulation of it can decrease the in vitro and in vivo metastatic abilities of this cell line. Conclusions We have successfully established a new human lung cancer cell line with highly metastatic potentials

  10. The lung volume reduction coil for the treatment of emphysema: a new therapy in development.

    PubMed

    Klooster, Karin; Ten Hacken, Nick H T; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2014-09-01

    Lung volume reduction (LVR) coil treatment is a novel therapy for patients with severe emphysema. In this bilateral bronchoscopic treatment, approximately 10 LVR coils per lobe are delivered under fluoroscopic guidance in two sequential procedures. The LVR coil reduces lung volume by compressing the most destructed areas of the lung parenchyma and restores the lung elastic recoil. Both patients with upper- and lower-lobe predominant emphysema as well as a homogeneous emphysema distribution can be treated. LVR coil treatment results in an improvement of pulmonary function, exercise tolerance and quality of life. The LVR-coil treatment has been evaluated in several European clinical trials since 2008 and received CE mark approval in 2010. Currently, two large multicenter randomized controlled trials are underway in Europe and North America to assess the efficacy and safety of the LVR-coil treatment at 12 months compared with usual care. In this review, we share our experience with the LVR-coil treatment.

  11. Milk from dams fed an obesogenic diet combined with a high-fat/high-sugar diet induces long-term abnormal mammary gland development in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Hue-Beauvais, C; Koch, E; Chavatte-Palmer, P; Galio, L; Chat, S; Letheule, M; Rousseau-Ralliard, D; Jaffrezic, F; Laloë, D; Aujean, E; Révillion, F; Lhotellier, V; Gertler, A; Devinoy, E; Charlier, M

    2015-04-01

    Alterations to the metabolic endocrine environment during early life are crucial to mammary gland development. Among these environmental parameters, the initial nutritional event after birth is the consumption of milk, which represents the first maternal support provided to mammalian newborns. Milk is a complex fluid that exerts effects far beyond its immediate nutritional value. The present study, therefore, aimed to determine the effect of the nutritional changes during the neonatal and prepubertal periods on the adult mammary phenotype. Newborn rabbits were suckled by dams fed a high-fat/high-sugar obesogenic (OD) or a control (CON) diet and then subsequently fed either the OD or CON diets from the onset of puberty and throughout early pregnancy. Mammary glands were collected during early pregnancy (Day 8 of pregnancy). Rabbits fed with OD milk and then subjected to an OD diet displayed an abnormal development of the mammary gland: the mammary ducts were markedly enlarged (P < 0.05) and filled with abundant secretory products. Moreover, the alveolar secretory structures were disorganized, with an abnormal aspect characterized by large lumina. Mammary epithelial cells contained numerous large lipid droplets and exhibited fingering of the apical membrane and abnormally enlarged intercellular spaces filled with casein micelles. Leptin has been shown to be involved in modulating several developmental processes. We therefore analyzed its expression in the mammary gland. Mammary leptin mRNA was strongly expressed in rabbits fed with OD milk and subjected to an OD diet by comparison with the CON rabbits. Leptin transcripts and protein were localized in the epithelial cells, indicating that the increase in leptin synthesis occurs in this compartment. Taken together, these findings suggest that early-life nutritional history, in particular through the milking period, can determine subsequent mammary gland development. Moreover, they highlight the potentially important

  12. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  13. Advances in the Development of Molecularly Targeted Agents in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dolly, Saoirse O; Collins, Dearbhaile C; Sundar, Raghav; Popat, Sanjay; Yap, Timothy A

    2017-04-04

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a significant global health challenge and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The traditional 'one-size-fits-all' treatment approach has now evolved into one that involves personalized strategies based on histological and molecular subtypes. The molecular era has revolutionized the treatment of patients harboring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and ROS1 gene aberrations. In the appropriately selected population, anti-tumor agents against these molecular targets can significantly improve progression-free survival. However, the emergence of acquired resistance is inevitable. Novel potent compounds with much improved and rational selectivity profiles, such as third-generation EGFR T790M resistance mutation-specific inhibitors, have been developed and added to the NSCLC armamentarium. To date, attempts to overcome resistance bypass pathways through downstream signaling blockade has had limited success. Furthermore, the majority of patients still do not harbor known driver genetic or epigenetic alterations and/or have no new available treatment options, with chemotherapy remaining their standard of care. Several potentially actionable driver aberrations have recently been identified, with the early clinical development of multiple inhibitors against these promising targets currently in progress. The advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors has led to significant benefit for advanced NSCLC patients with durable responses observed. Further interrogation of the underlying biology of NSCLC, coupled with modern clinical trial designs, is now required to develop novel targeted therapeutics rationally matched with predictive biomarkers of response, so as to further advance NSCLC therapeutics through the next decade.

  14. Book lung development in the embryo, postembryo and first instar of the cobweb spider, Parasteatoda tepidariorum C. L Koch, 1841 (Araneomorphae, Theridiidae).

    PubMed

    Farley, Roger D

    2015-07-01

    Light and electron microscopy were used to compare spider book lung development with earlier studies of the development of horseshoe crab book gills and scorpion book lungs. Histological studies at the beginning of the 20th century provided evidence that spider and scorpion book lungs begin with outgrowth of a few primary lamellae (respiratory furrows, saccules) from the posterior surface of opisthosomal limb buds, reminiscent of the formation of book gills in the horseshoe crab. In spider embryos, light micrographs herein also show small primary lamellae formed at the posterior surface of opisthosomal limb buds. Later, more prominent primary lamellae extend into each book lung sinus from the inner wall of the book lung operculum formed from the limb bud. It appears most primary lamellae continue developing and become part of later book lungs, but there is variation in the rate and sequence of development. Electron micrographs show the process of air channel formation from parallel rows of precursor cells: mode I (cord hollowing), release of secretory vesicles into the extracellular space and mode II (cell hollowing), alignment and fusion of intracellular vesicles. Cell death (cavitation) is much less common but occurs in some places. Results herein support the early 20th century hypotheses that 1) book lungs are derived from book gills and 2) book lungs are an early step in the evolution of spider tracheae.

  15. Abnormal cartilage development and altered N-glycosylation in Tmem165-deficient zebrafish mirrors the phenotypes associated with TMEM165-CDG.

    PubMed

    Bammens, Riet; Mehta, Nickita; Race, Valérie; Foulquier, François; Jaeken, Jaak; Tiemeyer, Michael; Steet, Richard; Matthijs, Gert; Flanagan-Steet, Heather

    2015-06-01

    The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), a group of inherited diseases characterized by aberrant glycosylation, encompass a wide range of defects, including glycosyltransferases, glycosidases, nucleotide-sugar transporters as well as proteins involved in maintaining Golgi architecture, pH and vesicular trafficking. Mutations in a previously undescribed protein, TMEM165, were recently shown to cause a new form of CDG, termed TMEM165-CDG. TMEM165-CDG patients exhibit cartilage and bone dysplasia and altered glycosylation of serum glycoproteins. We utilized a morpholino knockdown strategy in zebrafish to investigate the physiologic and pathogenic functions of TMEM165. Inhibition of tmem165 expression in developing zebrafish embryos caused craniofacial abnormalities, largely attributable to fewer chondrocytes. Decreased expression of several markers of cartilage and bone development suggests that Tmem165 deficiency alters both chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation. Glycomic analysis of tmem165 morphants also revealed altered initiation, processing and extension of N-glycans, paralleling some of the glycosylation changes noted in human patients. Collectively, these findings highlight the utility of zebrafish to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms associated with glycosylation disorders and suggest that the cartilage and bone dysplasia manifested in TMEM165-CDG patients may stem from abnormal development of chondrocytes and osteoblasts.

  16. Abnormal cartilage development and altered N-glycosylation in Tmem165-deficient zebrafish mirrors the phenotypes associated with TMEM165-CDG

    PubMed Central

    Bammens, Riet; Mehta, Nickita; Race, Valérie; Foulquier, François; Jaeken, Jaak; Tiemeyer, Michael; Steet, Richard; Matthijs, Gert; Flanagan-Steet, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG), a group of inherited diseases characterized by aberrant glycosylation, encompass a wide range of defects, including glycosyltransferases, glycosidases, nucleotide-sugar transporters as well as proteins involved in maintaining Golgi architecture, pH and vesicular trafficking. Mutations in a previously undescribed protein, TMEM165, were recently shown to cause a new form of CDG, termed TMEM165-CDG. TMEM165-CDG patients exhibit cartilage and bone dysplasia and altered glycosylation of serum glycoproteins. We utilized a morpholino knockdown strategy in zebrafish to investigate the physiologic and pathogenic functions of TMEM165. Inhibition of tmem165 expression in developing zebrafish embryos caused craniofacial abnormalities, largely attributable to fewer chondrocytes. Decreased expression of several markers of cartilage and bone development suggests that Tmem165 deficiency alters both chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation. Glycomic analysis of tmem165 morphants also revealed altered initiation, processing and extension of N-glycans, paralleling some of the glycosylation changes noted in human patients. Collectively, these findings highlight the utility of zebrafish to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms associated with glycosylation disorders and suggest that the cartilage and bone dysplasia manifested in TMEM165-CDG patients may stem from abnormal development of chondrocytes and osteoblasts. PMID:25609749

  17. Potential coverage of circulating HPV types by current and developing vaccines in a group of women in Bosnia and Herzegovina with abnormal Pap smears.

    PubMed

    Salimović-Bešić, I; Hukić, M

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in a group of Bosnian-Herzegovinian women with abnormal cytology and to assess their potential coverage by vaccines. HPVs were identified by multiplex real-time PCR test (HPV High Risk Typing Real-TM; Sacace Biotechnologies, Italy) of 105 women with an abnormal cervical Pap smear and positive high-risk (HR) HPV DNA screening test. The most common genotypes in the study were HPV-16 (32·6%, 48/147), HPV-31 (14·3%, 21/147), HPV-51 (9·5%, 14/147) and HPV-18 (7·5%, 11/147). The overall frequency of HR HPV-16 and/or HPV-18, covered by currently available vaccines [Gardasil® (Merck & Co., USA) and Cervarix®; (GlaxoSmithKline, UK)] was lower than the overall frequency of other HPVs detected in the study (40·1%, 59/174, P = 0·017). Group prevalence of HR HPVs targeted by a nine-valent vaccine in development (code-named V503) was higher than total frequency of other HPVs detected (68·0%, 100/147, P < 0·001). Development of cervical cytological abnormalities was independent of the presence of multiple infections (χ 2 = 0·598, P = 0·741). Compared to other HPVs, dependence of cervical diagnosis and HPV-16, -18 (P = 0·008) and HPV-16, -18, -31 (P = 0·008) infections were observed. Vaccines targeting HR HPV-16, -18 and -31 might be an important tool in the prevention of cervical disease in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  18. Lesion removal and lesion addition algorithms in lung volumetric data sets for perception studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Mark T.; Berbaum, Kevin S.; Ellingson, Andrew; Thompson, Brad H.; Mullan, Brian F.

    2006-03-01

    Image perception studies of medical images provide important information about how radiologists interpret images and insights for reducing reading errors. In the past, perception studies have been difficult to perform using clinical imaging studies because of the problems associated with obtaining images demonstrating proven abnormalities and appropriate normal control images. We developed and evaluated interactive software that allows the seamless removal of abnormal areas from CT lung image sets. We have also developed interactive software for capturing lung lesions in a database where they can be added to lung CT studies. The efficacy of the software to remove abnormal areas of lung CT studies was evaluated psychophysically by having radiologists select the one altered image from a display of four. The software for adding lesions was evaluated by having radiologists classify displayed CT slices with lesions as real or artificial scaled to 3 levels of confidence. The results of these experiments demonstrated that the radiologist had difficulty in distinguishing the raw clinical images from those that had been altered. We conclude that this software can be used to create experimental normal control and "proven" lesion data sets for volumetric CT of the lung fields. We also note that this software can be easily adapted to work with other tissue besides lung and that it can be adapted to other digital imaging modalities.

  19. Gene Expression Changes during the Development of Acute Lung Injury Role of Transforming Growth Factor β

    PubMed Central

    Wesselkamper, Scott C.; Case, Lisa M.; Henning, Lisa N.; Borchers, Michael T.; Tichelaar, Jay W.; Mason, John M.; Dragin, Nadine; Medvedovic, Mario; Sartor, Maureen A.; Tomlinson, Craig R.; Leikauf, George D.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Acute lung injury can occur from multiple causes, resulting in high mortality. The pathophysiology of nickel-induced acute lung injury in mice is remarkably complex, and the molecular mechanisms are uncertain. Objectives: To integrate molecular pathways and investigate the role of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in acute lung injury in mice. Methods: cDNA microarray analyses were used to identify lung gene expression changes after nickel exposure. MAPPFinder analysis of the microarray data was used to determine significantly altered molecular pathways. TGF-β1 protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, as well as the effect of inhibition of TGF-β, was assessed in nickel-exposed mice. The effect of TGF-β on surfactant-associated protein B (Sftpb) promoter activity was measured in mouse lung epithelial cells. Measurements and Main Results: Genes that decreased the most after nickel exposure play important roles in lung fluid absorption or surfactant and phospholipid synthesis, and genes that increased the most were involved in TGF-β signaling. MAPPFinder analysis further established TGF-β signaling to be significantly altered. TGF-β–inducible genes involved in the regulation of extracellular matrix function and fibrinolysis were significantly increased after nickel exposure, and TGF-β1 protein was also increased in the lavage fluid. Pharmacologic inhibition of TGF-β attenuated nickel-induced protein in bronchoalveolar lavage. In addition, treatment with TGF-β1 dose-dependently repressed Sftpb promoter activity in vitro, and a novel TGF-β–responsive region in the Sftpb promoter was identified. Conclusions: These data suggest that TGF-β acts as a central mediator of acute lung injury through the alteration of several different molecular pathways. PMID:16100012

  20. Pigment epithelium-derived factor mediates impaired lung vascular development in neonatal hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Anne; Bennett, Michelle; Dang, Linh; Nakamura, Daisy; Cao, Gong-Jie; Mujahid, Sana; Volpe, MaryAnn; Herman, Ira; Becerra, S Patricia; Nielsen, Heber C

    2015-03-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is a chronic lung disease of preterm infants characterized by arrested microvascularization and alveolarization. Studies show the importance of proangiogenic factors for alveolarization, but the importance of antiangiogenic factors is unknown. We proposed that hyperoxia increases the potent angiostatin, pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), in neonatal lungs, inhibiting alveolarization and microvascularization. Wild-type (WT) and PEDF(-/-) mice were exposed to room air (RA) or 0.9 fraction of inspired oxygen from Postnatal Day 5 to 13. PEDF protein was increased in hyperoxic lungs compared with RA-exposed lungs (P < 0.05). In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence identified PEDF production primarily in alveolar epithelium. Hyperoxia reduced alveolarization in WT mice (P < 0.05) but not in PEDF(-/-) mice. WT hyperoxic mice had fewer platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-positive cells per alveolus (1.4 ± 0.4) than RA-exposed mice (4.3 ± 0.3; P < 0.05); this reduction was absent in hyperoxic PEDF(-/-) mice. The interactive regulation of lung microvascularization by vascular endothelial growth factor and PEDF was studied in vitro using MFLM-91U cells, a fetal mouse lung endothelial cell line. Vascular endothelial growth factor stimulation of proliferation, migration, and capillary tube formation was inhibited by PEDF. MFLM-91U cells exposed to conditioned medium (CM) from E17 fetal mouse lung type II (T2) cells cultured in 0.9 fraction of inspired oxygen formed fewer capillary tubes than CM from T2 cells cultured in RA (hyperoxia CM, 51 ± 10% of RA CM, P < 0.05), an effect abolished by PEDF antibody. We conclude that PEDF mediates reduced vasculogenesis and alveolarization in neonatal hyperoxia. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia likely results from an altered balance between pro- and antiangiogenic factors.

  1. Acute ozone-induced lung injury in rats: Structural-functional relationships of developing alveolar edema

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.F.; Hammond, M.D.; Montgomery, M.R.; Sharp, J.T.; Farrier, S.E.; Balis, J.U. )

    1992-11-01

    As part of a study on the effects of acute ozone stress on the lung surfactant system, we correlated morphometric, biochemical, and functional indices of lung injury using male rats exposed to 3 ppm ozone for 1, 2, 4, and 8 hr. Evaluation of lung mechanics, using the Pulmonary Evaluation and Diagnostic Laboratory System, revealed a significant decrease in dynamic lung compliance (ml/cmH[sub 2]O/kg) from a control value of 0.84 [plus minus] 0.02 (SEM) to 0.72 [plus minus] 0.04 and 0.57 [plus minus] 0.06 at 4 and 8 hr, respectively. At 2 hr there was a transient increase in PaO[sub 2] to 116 torr (control = 92 torr) followed by a decrease at 4 hr (65 torr) and 8 hr (55 torr). Morphometry of lung tissue, fixed by perfusion of fixative via the pulmonary artery at 12 cm H[sub 2]O airway distending pressure, demonstrated an increase in the area of the intravascular compartment at 8 hr, in association with a 65 and 39% replacement of the alveolar area by fluid in ventral and dorsal lung regions, respectively. There was a positive correlation (r = 0.966) between alveolar edema and transudated proteins in lavage fluid. A stepwise multiple regression model, with edema as the dependent variable, suggested that pulmonary vasodilatation, hypoxemia, and depletion of surfactant tubular myelin in lavage fluid were indices for predicting alveolar edema. In a second model, with lavage protein concentration as the dependent variable, decreasing dynamic compliance and hypoxemia were predictors of progressive, intraalveolar transudation of plasma proteins. The above structural-functional relationships support the concept that ozone-induced high-protein alveolar edema is pathogenetically linked to pulmonary hyperemia, deficiency of surfactant tubular myelin, and associated lung dysfunctions.

  2. Animal models and medical countermeasures development for radiation-induced lung damage: report from an NIAID Workshop.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jacqueline P; Jackson, Isabel L; Shah, Jui R; Czarniecki, Christine W; Maidment, Bert W; DiCarlo, Andrea L

    2012-05-01

    Since 9/11, there have been concerns that terrorists may detonate a radiological or nuclear device in an American city. Aside from several decorporation and blocking agents for use against internal radionuclide contamination, there are currently no medications within the Strategic National Stockpile that are approved to treat the immediate or delayed complications resulting from accidental exposure to radiation. Although the majority of research attention has focused on developing countermeasures that target the bone marrow and gastrointestinal tract, since they represent the most acutely radiosensitive organs, individuals who survive early radiation syndromes will likely suffer late effects in the months that follow. Of particular concern are the delayed effects seen in the lung that play a major role in late mortality seen in radiation-exposed patients and accident victims. To address these concerns, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases convened a workshop to discuss pulmonary model development, mechanisms of radiation-induced lung injury, targets for medical countermeasures development, and end points to evaluate treatment efficacy. Other topics covered included guidance on the challenges of developing and licensing drugs and treatments specific to a radiation lung damage indication. This report reviews the data presented, as well as key points from the ensuing discussion.

  3. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  4. Fibroblast Growth Factor 9 Regulation by MicroRNAs Controls Lung Development and Links DICER1 Loss to the Pathogenesis of Pleuropulmonary Blastoma.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yongjun; Castro, Angela M; Hoekstra, Marrit; Yan, Thomas J; Kanakamedala, Ajay C; Dehner, Louis P; Hill, D Ashley; Ornitz, David M

    2015-05-01

    Pleuropulmonary Blastoma (PPB) is the primary neoplastic manifestation of a pediatric cancer predisposition syndrome that is associated with several diseases including cystic nephroma, Wilms tumor, neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, medulloblastoma, and ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor. The primary pathology of PPB, epithelial cysts with stromal hyperplasia and risk for progression to a complex primitive sarcoma, is associated with familial heterozygosity and lesion-associated epithelial loss-of-heterozygosity of DICER1. It has been hypothesized that loss of heterozygosity of DICER1 in lung epithelium is a non-cell autonomous etiology of PPB and a critical pathway that regulates lung development; however, there are no known direct targets of epithelial microRNAs (miRNAs) in the lung. Fibroblast Growth Factor 9 (FGF9) is expressed in the mesothelium and epithelium during lung development and primarily functions to regulate lung mesenchyme; however, there are no known mechanisms that regulate FGF9 expression during lung development. Using mouse genetics and molecular phenotyping of human PPB tissue, we show that FGF9 is overexpressed in lung epithelium in the initial multicystic stage of Type I PPB and that in mice lacking epithelial Dicer1, or induced to overexpress epithelial Fgf9, increased Fgf9 expression results in pulmonary mesenchymal hyperplasia and a multicystic architecture that is histologically and molecularly indistinguishable from Type I PPB. We further show that miR-140 is expressed in lung epithelium, regulates epithelial Fgf9 expression, and regulates pseudoglandular stages of lung development. These studies identify an essential miRNA-FGF9 pathway for lung development and a non-cell autonomous signaling mechanism that contributes to the mesenchymal hyperplasia that is characteristic of Type I PPB.

  5. Recurrence of lymphangioleiomyomatosis: Nine years after a bilateral lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Khawaja S; Aryan, Zahra; Mehta, Atul C; Akindipe, Olufemi; Budev, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare, slowly progressive lethal lung disease primary afflicting young women. LAM is characterized by proliferation of abnormal smooth muscle cells that target the lungs, causing cystic destruction and eventual respiratory failure leading to death. Recent ten year mortality due to end stage LAM has been reported to be approximately 10%-20%, but may vary. The decline in lung function in LAM is gradual, occurring at a rate of about 3% to 15% per year but can vary from patient to patient. But recently therapy with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors such as sirolimus has shown promising results in the stabilization of lung function and reduction of chylous effusions in LAM. Lung transplantation is a viable option for patients who continue to have decline in lung function despite mTOR therapy. Unique issues that may occur post-transplant in a recipient with LAM include development of chylous effusion and a risk of recurrence. We describe a case of LAM recurrence in a bilateral lung transplant recipient who developed histological findings of LAM nine years after transplantation. PMID:27011924

  6. Failure of ozone and nitrogen dioxide to enhance lung tumor development in hamsters. Research report, January 1989-March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.; Breider, M.A.; Schuller, H.M.

    1993-09-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that ozone and nitrogen dioxide modulate the development of respiratory tract tumors, in particular neuroendocrine cell tumors, in Syrian golden hamsters. The animals received subcutaneous injections of the carcinogen N-diethylnitrosamine (20 mg/kg) twice a week while being exposed continuously to an atmosphere of 0.8 parts per million (ppm) of ozone or 15 ppm nitrogen dioxide. Animals were killed 16 weeks or 24 to 32 weeks after the beginning of the treatment. For positive controls, animals were treated with N-diethylnitrosamine and exposed to 65% oxygen. Ozone delayed the incidence of tumors in the lung periphery. Ozone also seemed to mitigate development of hepatoxic lesions mediated by N-diethylnitrosamine. The role of ozone and nitrogen dioxide as possible additional risks in the pathogenesis of lung cancer in animals continues to remain uncertain.

  7. Challenges and Current Efforts in the Development of Biomarkers for Chronic Inflammatory and Remodeling Conditions of the Lungs.

    PubMed

    Grunig, Gabriele; Baghdassarian, Aram; Park, Sung-Hyun; Pylawka, Serhiy; Bleck, Bertram; Reibman, Joan; Berman-Rosenzweig, Erika; Durmus, Nedim

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses biomarkers that are being researched for their usefulness to phenotype chronic inflammatory lung diseases that cause remodeling of the lung's architecture. The review focuses on asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and pulmonary hypertension. Bio-markers of environmental exposure and specific classes of biomarkers (noncoding RNA, metabolism, vitamin, coagulation, and microbiome related) are also discussed. Examples of biomarkers that are in clinical use, biomarkers that are under development, and biomarkers that are still in the research phase are discussed. We chose to present examples of the research in biomarker development by diseases, because asthma, COPD, and pulmonary hypertension are distinct entities, although they clearly share processes of inflammation and remodeling.

  8. Development of an Ex Vivo Porcine Lung Model for Studying Growth, Virulence, and Signaling of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Muruli, Aneesha; Higgins, Steven; Diggle, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Research into chronic infection by bacterial pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, uses various in vitro and live host models. While these have increased our understanding of pathogen growth, virulence, and evolution, each model has certain limitations. In vitro models cannot recapitulate the complex spatial structure of host organs, while experiments on live hosts are limited in terms of sample size and infection duration for ethical reasons; live mammal models also require specialized facilities which are costly to run. To address this, we have developed an ex vivo pig lung (EVPL) model for quantifying Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth, quorum sensing (QS), virulence factor production, and tissue damage in an environment that mimics a chronically infected cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. In a first test of our model, we show that lasR mutants, which do not respond to 3-oxo-C12-homoserine lactone (HSL)-mediated QS, exhibit reduced virulence factor production in EVPL. We also show that lasR mutants grow as well as or better than a corresponding wild-type strain in EVPL. lasR mutants frequently and repeatedly arise during chronic CF lung infection, but the evolutionary forces governing their appearance and spread are not clear. Our data are not consistent with the hypothesis that lasR mutants act as social “cheats” in the lung; rather, our results support the hypothesis that lasR mutants are more adapted to the lung environment. More generally, this model will facilitate improved studies of microbial disease, especially studies of how cells of the same and different species interact in polymicrobial infections in a spatially structured environment. PMID:24866798

  9. Agenesis of the lung--a rare congenital anomaly of the lung.

    PubMed

    De, Arun

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary agenesis is a very rare condition and many of them are associated with a variety of cardiac and non-cardiac malformations. We report an eight-month old girl with chronic lung infection due to right sided pulmonary agenesis without any associated major cardiac or non-cardiac abnormalities. The case brings in forth the importance of investigating any infant presenting with features of chronic lung infection for any congenital abnormality of the lung including aplasia of the lung. This case also emphasizes that mildness of the attack does not exclude right sided aplasia of the lung.

  10. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  11. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  12. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  13. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  14. Oncogenic role of EAPII in lung cancer development and its activation of the MAPK–ERK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Fan, S; Owonikoko, T K; Khuri, F R; Sun, S-Y; Li, R

    2011-01-01

    Cancer progression involves multiple complex and interdependent steps, including progressive proliferation, angiogenesis and metastases. The complexity of these processes requires a comprehensive elucidation of the integrated signaling networks for better understanding. EAPII interacts with multiple cancer-related proteins, but its biological significance in cancer development remains unknown. In this report we identified the elevated level of EAPII protein in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients and NSCLC cell lines in culture. The oncogenic role of EAPII in lung cancer development was demonstrated using NSCLC cells with genetic manipulations that influence EAPII expression: EAPII overexpression increases proliferation of NSCLC cells with an accelerated transition of cell cycle and facilitates xenograft tumor growth in vivo; EAPII knockdown results in apoptosis of NSCLC cells and reduces xenograft tumor formation. To further explore the mechanism of EAPII's oncogenic role in lung cancer development and to elucidate the potential signaling pathway(s) that EAPII may impact, we employed antibody array to investigate the alternation of the major signaling pathways in NSCLC cells with altered EAPII level. We found that EAPII overexpression significantly activated Raf1 and ERK1/2, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 pathways. Consistently, the protein and mRNA levels of MYC and cyclin D1, which are targets of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK–ERK) pathway, are significantly increased by EAPII overexpression. Taken together, we demonstrated that EAPII is an oncogenic factor and the activation of MAPK–ERK signaling pathway by EAPII may contribute to lung cancer development. PMID:21478903

  15. Fatal tracheal aspergillosis during rituximab combined chemotherapy for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that developed after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, K; Shibasaki, Y; Sato, S; Nemoto, H; Takizawa, J; Narita, M; Tsuchida, M; Sone, H; Masuko, M

    2015-12-01

    Invasive tracheal aspergillosis (ITA) is an infection that is unique to patients who have undergone lung transplantation (LT). Although the activity of this disease often appears on imaging, we encountered a case of ITA that became exacerbated, despite few computed tomography (CT) findings, during rituximab combined chemotherapy for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. ITA developed during immunosuppressive therapy after LT. Because CT findings may show false-negative results, bronchoscopy is recommended for such cases.

  16. Perfusion lung scan: an aid in detection of lymphangitic carcinomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, S.E.; Tranum, B.L.

    1982-07-15

    Lymphangitic carcinomatosis is usually a late manifestation of metastatic disease. The patient usually presents with cough or dyspnea, and the chest radiograph is often nondiagnostic. Two patients are presented who developed symptoms while on adjuvant chemotherapy. Both had abnormal perfusion lung scans. One had matching ventilation defects; the other a normal ventilation study. Biopsy revealed metastatic carcinoma; in one case tumor was seen in both the pulmonary lymphatics and arterioles; in the other, tumor was identified but the site could not be specified. The radionuclide lung scan is a technique which can speed diagnosis and institution of therapy in lymphangitic carcinomatosis.

  17. The Role of VATS in Lung Cancer Surgery: Current Status and Prospects for Development

    PubMed Central

    Dziedzic, Dariusz; Orlowski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of anatomic lung resection by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) 20 years ago, VATS has experienced major advances in both equipment and technique, introducing a technical challenge in the surgical treatment of both benign and malignant lung disease. The demonstrated safety, decreased morbidity, and equivalent efficacy of this minimally invasive technique have led to the acceptance of VATS as a standard surgical modality for early-stage lung cancer and increasing application to more advanced disease. Formerly there was much debate about the feasibility of the technique in cancer surgery and proper lymph node handling. Although there is a lack of proper randomized studies, it is now generally accepted that the outcome of a VATS procedure is at least not inferior to a resection via a traditional thoracotomy. PMID:26294970

  18. Sleep in patients with restrictive lung disease.

    PubMed

    Won, Christine H J; Kryger, Meir

    2014-09-01

    Restrictive lung disease leads to ventilatory defects and diffusion impairments. These changes may contribute to abnormal nocturnal pathophysiology, including sleep architecture disruption and impaired ventilation and oxygenation. Patients with restrictive lung disease may suffer significant daytime fatigue and dysfunction. Hypercarbia and hypoxemia during sleep may impact progression of lung disease and related symptoms. Little is known about the impact of treatment of sleep disruption on sleep quality and overall prognosis in restrictive lung disease. This review discusses the pathophysiology of sleep and comorbid sleep disorders in restrictive lung diseases including interstitial lung disease, neuromuscular disease, and obesity hypoventilation syndrome.

  19. A rhesus monkey model to characterize the role of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) in lung development. Evidence for stimulation of airway growth.

    PubMed Central

    Li, K; Nagalla, S R; Spindel, E R

    1994-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is developmentally expressed in human fetal lung and is a growth factor for normal and neoplastic lung but its role in normal lung development has yet to be clearly defined. In this study we have characterized the expression of GRP and its receptor in fetal rhesus monkey lung and determined the effects of bombesin on fetal lung development in vitro. By RNA blot analysis, GRP mRNA was first detectable in fetal monkey lung at 63 days gestation, reached highest levels at 80 days gestation, and then declined to near adult levels by 120 days gestation; a pattern closely paralleling GRP expression in human fetal lung. As in human lung, in situ hybridization localized GRP mRNA to neuroendocrine cells though during the canalicular phase of development (between 63-80 days gestation) GRP mRNA was present not only in classic pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, but also in cells of budding airways. Immunohistochemistry showed that bombesin-like immunoreactivity was present in neuroendocrine cells, but not in budding airways, suggesting that in budding airways either the GRP mRNA is not translated, is rapidly secreted, or a related, but different RNA is present. RNase protection analysis using a probe to the monkey GRP receptor demonstrated that the time course of receptor RNA expression closely paralleled the time course of GRP RNA expression. In situ hybridization showed that GRP receptors were primarily expressed in epithelial cells of the developing airways. Thus GRP would appear to be secreted from neuroendocrine cells to act on target cells in developing airways. This hypothesis was confirmed by organ culture of fetal monkey lung in the presence of bombesin and bombesin antagonists. Bombesin treatment at 1 and 10 nM significantly increased DNA synthesis in airway epithelial cells and significantly increased the number and size of airways in cultured fetal lung. In fact, culturing 60 d fetal lung for 5 d with 10 nM bombesin increased airway size

  20. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  1. Advances in artificial lungs.

    PubMed

    Ota, Kei

    2010-04-01

    Artificial lungs have already been developed as complete artificial organs, and results of many investigations based on innovative concepts have been reported continuously. In open-heart surgery, artificial lungs are used for extracorporeal circulation to maintain gas exchange, and the commercial products currently available perform adequately, including providing for antithrombogenicity. However, patients after cardiopulmonary arrest or severe respiratory/circulatory failure have required long-term assist with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The number of artificial lungs used for ECMO in those cases has shown significant growth in recent years. Therefore, it is expected that durability and antithrombogenicity will ensure the prolonged use of an artificial lung for several weeks or months. Furthermore, interests in research are shifting to use of oxygenators as a bridge to lung transplantation and an implantable artificial lung. This paper discusses recent advances in artificial lungs, focusing on the current state and on trends in research and development.

  2. "What can I do to enhance the development of a premature infant with chronic lung disease?".

    PubMed

    Stein, M T; Gorski, P; Vaucher, Y; Kettel, F R

    2000-04-01

    CASE. Timmy was born at 32 weeks of gestation after an uncomplicated pregnancy until there was a spontaneous rupture of the membranes and preterm labor associated with chorioamnionitis. A 2-month hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was associated with pneumonia, a Grade II intraventricular hemorrhage, chronic lung disease, and a slow weight gain in the nursery. He was discharged to home with plans for ongoing care by his pediatrician. The primary care pediatrician attended a multidisciplinary conference with the NICU staff and Timmy's parents. At the time of discharge from the nursery, at 38 weeks postconceptual age, Timmy still required oral diuretics and supplemental oxygen, as well as other medications such as iron. Timmy's respiratory rates were between 40 and 60 breaths per minute at rest, with mild intercostal retractions. He was discharged with a cardiorespiratory monitor. The discharge examination revealed mild to moderate symmetrical hypotonia with intact deep tendon reflexes, shoulder girdle weakness, and a mild head lag. Timmy would regard a human face and a bright object and would follow them briefly. He became active and would thrash his extremities with minimal tactile, bright light, or auditory stimulation. Typically, he settled slowly with swaddling and a pacifier. Nursing was slow to develop; he was currently receiving one half of his calories at the breast and the remainder of his calories from bottle-feeding of fortified expressed breast milk. As she prepared for the first office visit with Timmy and his parents, the pediatrician asked herself, "What can I do to enhance the developmental outcome for this child?"

  3. Computerized detection of diffuse lung disease in MDCT: the usefulness of statistical texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiahui; Li, Feng; Doi, Kunio; Li, Qiang

    2009-11-01

    Accurate detection of diffuse lung disease is an important step for computerized diagnosis and quantification of this disease. It is also a difficult clinical task for radiologists. We developed a computerized scheme to assist radiologists in the detection of diffuse lung disease in multi-detector computed tomography (CT). Two radiologists selected 31 normal and 37 abnormal CT scans with ground glass opacity, reticular, honeycombing and nodular disease patterns based on clinical reports. The abnormal cases in our database must contain at least an abnormal area with a severity of moderate or severe level that was subjectively rated by the radiologists. Because statistical texture features may lack the power to distinguish a nodular pattern from a normal pattern, the abnormal cases that contain only a nodular pattern were excluded. The areas that included specific abnormal patterns in the selected CT images were then delineated as reference standards by an expert chest radiologist. The lungs were first segmented in each slice by use of a thresholding technique, and then divided into contiguous volumes of interest (VOIs) with a 64 × 64 × 64 matrix size. For each VOI, we determined and employed statistical texture features, such as run-length and co-occurrence matrix features, to distinguish abnormal from normal lung parenchyma. In particular, we developed new run-length texture features with clear physical meanings to considerably improve the accuracy of our detection scheme. A quadratic classifier was employed for distinguishing between normal and abnormal VOIs by the use of a leave-one-case-out validation scheme. A rule-based criterion was employed to further determine whether a case was normal or abnormal. We investigated the impact of new and conventional texture features, VOI size and the dimensionality for regions of interest on detecting diffuse lung disease. When we employed new texture features for 3D VOIs of 64 × 64 × 64 voxels, our system achieved the

  4. Caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis results in mild lung inflammation and altered respiratory mechanics.

    PubMed

    Elder, Alison S F; Saccone, Gino T P; Bersten, Andrew D; Dixon, Dani-Louise

    2011-03-01

    Acute lung injury is a common complication of acute pancreatitis (AP) and contributes to the majority of AP-associated deaths. Although some aspects of AP-induced lung inflammation have been demonstrated, investigation of resultant changes in lung function is limited. The aim of this study was to characterize lung injury in caerulein-induced AP. Male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 7-8/group) received 7 injections of caerulein (50 μg/kg) at 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, or 120 hours before measurement of lung impedance mechanics. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), plasma, pancreatic, and lung tissue were collected to determine pancreatic and lung measures of acute inflammation. AP developed between 12 and 24 hours, as indicated by increased plasma amylase activity and pancreatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, edema, and abnormal acinar cells, before beginning to resolve by 48 hours. In the lung, MPO activity peaked at 12 and 96 hours, with BAL cytokine concentrations peaking at 12 hours, followed by lung edema at 24 hours, and BAL cell count at 48 hours. Importantly, no significant changes in BAL protein concentration or arterial blood gas-pH levels were evident over the same period, and only modest changes were observed in respiratory mechanics. Caerulein-induced AP results in minor lung injury, which is not sufficient to allow protein permeability and substantially alter respiratory mechanics.

  5. Combustion derived ultrafine particles induce cytochrome P-450 expression in specific lung compartments in the developing neonatal and adult rat

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jackie K. W.; Vogel, Christoph F.; Baek, Jaeeun; Kodani, Sean D.; Uppal, Ravi S.; Bein, Keith J.; Anderson, Donald S.

    2013-01-01

    Vehicle exhaust is rich in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and can be a dominant contributor to ultrafine urban particulate matter (PM). Exposure to ultrafine PM is correlated with respiratory infections and asthmatic symptoms in young children. The lung undergoes substantial growth, alveolarization, and cellular maturation within the first years of life, which may be impacted by environmental pollutants such as PM. PAHs in PM can serve as ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) that induces expression of certain isozymes in the cytochrome P-450 superfamily, such as CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, localized in specific lung cell types. Although AhR activation and induction has been widely studied, its context within PM exposure and impact on the developing lung is poorly understood. In response, we have developed a replicable ultrafine premixed flame particle (PFP) generating system and used in vitro and in vivo models to define PM effects on AhR activation in the developing lung. We exposed 7-day neonatal and adult rats to a single 6-h PFP exposure and determined that PFPs cause significant parenchymal toxicity in neonates. PFPs contain weak AhR agonists that upregulate AhR-xenobiotic response element activity and expression and are capable inducers of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in both ages with different spatial and temporal patterns. Neonatal CYP1A1 expression was muted and delayed compared with adults, possibly because of differences in the enzyme maturation. We conclude that the inability of neonates to sufficiently adapt in response to PFP exposure may, in part, explain their susceptibility to PFP and urban ultrafine PM. PMID:23502512

  6. Combustion derived ultrafine particles induce cytochrome P-450 expression in specific lung compartments in the developing neonatal and adult rat.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jackie K W; Vogel, Christoph F; Baek, Jaeeun; Kodani, Sean D; Uppal, Ravi S; Bein, Keith J; Anderson, Donald S; Van Winkle, Laura S

    2013-05-15

    Vehicle exhaust is rich in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and can be a dominant contributor to ultrafine urban particulate matter (PM). Exposure to ultrafine PM is correlated with respiratory infections and asthmatic symptoms in young children. The lung undergoes substantial growth, alveolarization, and cellular maturation within the first years of life, which may be impacted by environmental pollutants such as PM. PAHs in PM can serve as ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) that induces expression of certain isozymes in the cytochrome P-450 superfamily, such as CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, localized in specific lung cell types. Although AhR activation and induction has been widely studied, its context within PM exposure and impact on the developing lung is poorly understood. In response, we have developed a replicable ultrafine premixed flame particle (PFP) generating system and used in vitro and in vivo models to define PM effects on AhR activation in the developing lung. We exposed 7-day neonatal and adult rats to a single 6-h PFP exposure and determined that PFPs cause significant parenchymal toxicity in neonates. PFPs contain weak AhR agonists that upregulate AhR-xenobiotic response element activity and expression and are capable inducers of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in both ages with different spatial and temporal patterns. Neonatal CYP1A1 expression was muted and delayed compared with adults, possibly because of differences in the enzyme maturation. We conclude that the inability of neonates to sufficiently adapt in response to PFP exposure may, in part, explain their susceptibility to PFP and urban ultrafine PM.

  7. Human COL2A1-directed SV40 T antigen expression in transgenic and chimeric mice results in abnormal skeletal development

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The ability of SV40 T antigen to cause abnormalities in cartilage development in transgenic mice and chimeras has been tested. The cis- regulatory elements of the COL2A1 gene were used to target expression of SV40 T antigen to differentiating chondrocytes in transgenic mice and chimeras derived from embryonal stem (ES) cells bearing the same transgene. The major phenotypic consequences of transgenic (pAL21) expression are malformed skeleton, disproportionate dwarfism, and perinatal/neonatal death. Expression of T antigen was tissue specific and in the main characteristic of the mouse alpha 1(II) collagen gene. Chondrocyte densities and levels of alpha 1(II) collagen mRNAs were reduced in the transgenic mice. Islands of cells which express cartilage characteristic genes such as type IIB procollagen, long form alpha 1(IX) collagen, alpha 2(XI) collagen, and aggrecan were found in the articular and growth cartilages of pAL21 chimeric fetuses and neonates. But these cells, which were expressing T antigen, were not properly organized into columns of proliferating chondrocytes. Levels of alpha 1(II) collagen mRNA were reduced in these chondrocytes. In addition, these cells did not express type X collagen, a marker for hypertrophic chondrocytes. The skeletal abnormality in pAL21 mice may therefore be due to a retardation of chondrocyte maturation or an impaired ability of chondrocytes to complete terminal differentiation and an associated paucity of some cartilage matrix components. PMID:7822417

  8. Consequences of a Maternal High-Fat Diet and Late Gestation Diabetes on the Developing Rat Lung

    PubMed Central

    Forred, Benjamin J.; Larsen, Tricia D.; Jensen, Danielle N.; Wachal, Angela L.; Khan, Muhammad Ali; Vitiello, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Infants born to diabetic or obese mothers are at risk of respiratory distress and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), conceivably through fuel-mediated pathogenic mechanisms. Prior research and preventative measures focus on controlling maternal hyperglycemia, but growing evidence suggests a role for additional circulating fuels including lipids. Little is known about the individual or additive effects of a maternal high-fat diet on fetal lung development. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a maternal high-fat diet, alone and alongside late-gestation diabetes, on lung alveologenesis and vasculogenesis, as well as to ascertain if consequences persist beyond the perinatal period. Methods A rat model was used to study lung development in offspring from control, diabetes-exposed, high-fat diet-exposed and combination-exposed pregnancies via morphometric, histologic (alveolarization and vasculogenesis) and physiologic (echocardiography, pulmonary function) analyses at birth and 3 weeks of age. Outcomes were interrogated for diet, diabetes and interaction effect using ANOVA with significance set at p≤0.05. Findings prompted additional mechanistic inquiry of key molecular pathways. Results Offspring exposed to maternal diabetes or high-fat diet, alone and in combination, had smaller lungs and larger hearts at birth. High-fat diet-exposed, but not diabetes-exposed offspring, had a higher perinatal death rate and echocardiographic evidence of PPHN at birth. Alveolar mean linear intercept, septal thickness, and airspace area (D2) were not significantly different between the groups; however, markers of lung maturity were. Both diabetes-exposed and diet-exposed offspring expressed more T1α protein, a marker of type I cells. Diet-exposed newborn pups expressed less surfactant protein B and had fewer pulmonary vessels enumerated. Mechanistic inquiry revealed alterations in AKT activation, higher endothelin-1

  9. Three generations of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors developed to revolutionize the therapy of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer, ~80%–85% of which is non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Sensitizing mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene (EGFRm+), such as exon 19 deletions and exon 21 L858R point mutations, are the most important drivers in NSCLC patients. In this respect, small-molecule EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been designed and developed, which launched the era of targeted, personalized and precise medicine for lung cancer. Patients with EGFRm+ could achieve good responses to the treatment with the first-generation EGFR TKIs, such as erlotinib and gefitinib. However, most patients develop acquired drug resistance mostly driven by the T790M mutation occurring within exon 20. Although the second-generation EGFR TKIs, such as afatinib, dacomitinib and neratinib, demonstrated promising activity against T790M in preclinical models, they have failed to overcome resistance in patients due to dose-limiting toxicity. Recently, the third-generation EGFR TKIs have shown to be effective against cell lines and murine models harboring T790M mutations while sparing wild-type EGFR, which represents a promising breakthrough approach in overcoming T790M-mediated resistance in NSCLC patients. This article provides a comprehensive review of the therapy revolution for NSCLC with three generations of EGFR TKIs. PMID:27920501

  10. Developing EZH2-Targeted Therapy for Lung Cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Epigenetic targets are exciting new avenues for cancer drug discovery. Zhang and colleagues have designed the open-source EZH2 inhibitor JQEZ5 and shown antitumor efficacy in vitro and in vivo in preclinical studies in murine and human lung adenocarcinoma models expressing high levels of EZH2.

  11. Salivary Proteomic and microRNA Biomarkers Development for Lung Cancer Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    biomarker discovery and definitive validation of salivary proteomic and miRNA biomarkers for detection of lung cancer based on PRoBE design...principles (prospective-specimen- collection and retrospective-blinded-evaluation). The outcome of this three-year proposal will be a panel of definitively

  12. Development of a lavage procedure to collect lung secretions from chickens for evaluating respiratory humoral immunity.

    PubMed

    Holt, Peter S; Stone, Henry D; Moore, Randle W; Gast, Richard K

    2005-10-01

    Mucosal immunology research has been hampered by the difficulty and labour-intensiveness of collecting samples. This is especially true for sites such as the lung, and the present paper describes a simple method for obtaining samples from this organ in chickens. Following sacrifice, the bird was placed on its back and the trachea was cut and exteriorized. Narrow-diameter tubing, to which a 30 ml syringe was attached, was threaded down the trachea to the bronchi and air was evacuated from the lung. Warm buffer was administered and the lung sample then aspirated, processed and frozen. In the current experiment this sampling system was tested on hens that were challenged with Salmonella Enteritidis. Elevated anti-Salmonella Enteritidis antibody levels in lung from infected hens were observed in significantly more infected hens than non-infected control hens in two trials. The simplicity and utility of this sampling system will make it a useful tool for those laboratories wishing to expand their humoral mucosal immunology capabilities, even for study of non-respiratory pathogens.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF THE HUMAN LUNG MEASURED BY AEROSOL-DERIVED AIRWAY MORPHEMETRY (ADAM).

    EPA Science Inventory

    We measured, in vivo, the airspace calibers of the small airways and alveoli by ADAM in the lungs of children of ages 6 to 18 years and adults aged 18 to 80 years. ADAM utilizes the gravitational settling time of inhaled monodisperse particles to infer the vertical distance to th...

  14. In silico modeling of interstitial lung mechanics: implications for disease development and repair.

    PubMed

    Suki, Béla; Majumdar, Arnab; Nugent, Matthew A; Bates, Jason H T

    2007-01-01

    In this perspective, we first review some of the published literature on structural modeling of the mechanical properties of the lung parenchyma. Based on a recent study, we demonstrate why mechanical dysfunction accompanying parenchymal diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema can follow a very different course from the progression of the underlying microscopic pathophysiology itself, particularly in the early stages. The key idea is related to the concept of percolation on elastic networks where the bulk modulus of the network suddenly changes when the fibrotic stiff regions or the emphysematous holes become suddenly connected across the network. We also introduce the concept of depercolation as a basis for the rational optimization of tissue repair. Specifically, we use these network models to predict the functional improvements that a hypothetical biological or tissue engineering repair could achieve. We find that rational targeted repair can have significant benefits over generic random repair. This concept may find application in the treatment of lung fibrosis, surgical, bronchoscopic, or biological lung volume reduction, or any future alveolar regeneration or tissue engineering solution to the repair of connective tissue damage of the lung.

  15. Berberine suppresses Id-1 expression and inhibits the growth and development of lung metastases in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Chi Man; Cheung, Kenneth Chat Pan; Cheung, Yuk Chun; Man, Kwan; Lui, Vivian Wai-Yan; Tsao, Sai Wah; Feng, Yibin

    2015-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an invasive cancer with a high rate of recurrence and metastasis. Agents with anti-proliferative as well as anti-metastatic activity will be ideal for effective treatment. Here, we demonstrated that berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, harbored potent anti-metastatic and anti-proliferative activities in vivo. Using an orthotopic model of HCC (MHCC-97L), which spontaneously develops lung metastases (one of the most common sites of HCC metastasis), we found that berberine treatment (10mg/kg/2days) significantly reduced lung metastasis from the liver tumors by ~85% (quantitated by bioluminescence emitted from lung metastases). Histological examination also confirmed the reduced incidence and number of lung metastases in berberine-treated mice. Furthermore, berberine effectively suppressed extra-tumor invasion of the primary HCC implant into the surrounding normal liver tissue, illustrating its potent anti-metastatic action in vivo. Consistent with previous reports in other cancer, berberine's anti-tumor activity was accompanied by suppression of cellular proliferation, invasiveness and HIF-1α/VEGF signaling. Strikingly, further mechanistic investigation revealed that berberine exerted profound inhibitory effect on the expression of Id-1, which is a key regulator for HCC development and metastasis. Berberine could suppress the transcription level of Id-1 through inhibiting its promotor activity. Specific downregulation of Id-1 by knocking down its RNA transcripts in HCC cells inhibited cellular growth, invasion and VEGF secretion, demonstrating the functional relevance of Id-1 downregulation induced by berberine. Lastly, berberine's anti-proliferative and anti-invasive activities could be partially rescued by Id-1 overexpression in HCC models, revealing a novel anti-cancer/anti-invasive mechanism of berberine via Id-1 suppression.

  16. Exposure to low doses of formaldehyde during pregnancy suppresses the development of allergic lung inflammation in offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Maiellaro, Marília; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Vitoretti, Luana Beatriz; Gimenes Júnior, João Antônio; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Tavares-de-Lima, Wothan; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana

    2014-08-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an environmental and occupational pollutant, and its toxic effects on the immune system have been shown. Nevertheless, no data are available regarding the programming mechanisms after FA exposure and its repercussions for the immune systems of offspring. In this study, our objective was to investigate the effects of low-dose exposure of FA on pregnant rats and its repercussion for the development of allergic lung inflammation in offspring. Pregnant Wistar rats were assigned in 3 groups: P (rats exposed to FA (0.75 ppm, 1 h/day, 5 days/week, for 21 days)), C (rats exposed to vehicle of FA (distillated water)) and B (rats non-manipulated). After 30 days of age, the offspring was sensitised with ovalbumin (OVA)-alum and challenged with aerosolized OVA (1%, 15 min, 3 days). After 24 h the OVA challenge the parameters were evaluated. Our data showed that low-dose exposure to FA during pregnancy induced low birth weight and suppressed the development of allergic lung inflammation and tracheal hyperresponsiveness in offspring by mechanisms mediated by reduced anaphylactic antibodies synthesis, IL-6 and TNF-alpha secretion. Elevated levels of IL-10 were found. Any systemic alteration was detected in the exposed pregnant rats, although oxidative stress in the uterine environment was evident at the moment of the delivery based on elevated COX-1 expression and reduced cNOS and SOD-2 in the uterus. Therefore, we show the putative programming mechanisms induced by FA on the immune system for the first time and the mechanisms involved may be related to oxidative stress in the foetal microenvironment. - Highlights: • Formaldehyde exposure does not cause lung inflammation in pregnant rats. • Formaldehyde exposure suppresses allergic lung inflammation in the offspring. • Formaldehyde exposure induces oxidative stress in uterine environment.

  17. Glucocorticoids Distinctively Modulate the CFTR Channel with Possible Implications in Lung Development and Transition into Extrauterine Life.

    PubMed

    Laube, Mandy; Bossmann, Miriam; Thome, Ulrich H

    2015-01-01

    During fetal development, the lung is filled with fluid that is secreted by an active Cl- transport promoting lung growth. The basolateral Na+,K+,2Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1) participates in Cl- secretion. The apical Cl- channels responsible for secretion are unknown but studies suggest an involvement of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR is developmentally regulated with a high expression in early fetal development and a decline in late gestation. Perinatal lung transition is triggered by hormones that stimulate alveolar Na+ channels resulting in fluid absorption. Little is known on how hormones affect pulmonary Cl- channels. Since the rise of fetal cortisol levels correlates with the decrease in fetal CFTR expression, a causal relation may be assumed. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of glucocorticoids on pulmonary Cl- channels. Alveolar cells from fetal and adult rats, A549 cells, bronchial Calu-3 and 16HBE14o- cells, and primary rat airway cells were studied with real-time quantitative PCR and Ussing chambers. In fetal and adult alveolar cells, glucocorticoids strongly reduced Cftr expression and channel activity, which was prevented by mifepristone. In bronchial and primary airway cells CFTR mRNA expression was also reduced, whereas channel activity was increased which was prevented by LY-294002 in Calu-3 cells. Therefore, glucocorticoids strongly reduce CFTR expression while their effect on CFTR activity depends on the physiological function of the cells. Another apical Cl- channel, anoctamin 1 showed a glucocorticoid-induced reduction of mRNA expression in alveolar cells and an increase in bronchial cells. Furthermore, voltage-gated chloride channel 5 and anoctamine 6 mRNA expression were increased in alveolar cells. NKCC1 expression was reduced by glucocorticoids in alveolar and bronchial cells alike. The results demonstrate that glucocorticoids differentially modulate pulmonary Cl- channels and are likely

  18. Inactivation of ca10a and ca10b Genes Leads to Abnormal Embryonic Development and Alters Movement Pattern in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Aspatwar, Ashok; Barker, Harlan R.; Saralahti, Anni K.; Bäuerlein, Carina A.; Ortutay, Csaba; Pan, Peiwen; Kuuslahti, Marianne; Parikka, Mataleena; Rämet, Mika; Parkkila, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase related proteins (CARPs) X and XI are highly conserved across species and are predominantly expressed in neural tissues. The biological role of these proteins is still an enigma. Ray-finned fish have lost the CA11 gene, but instead possess two co-orthologs of CA10. We analyzed the expression pattern of zebrafish ca10a and ca10b genes during embryonic development and in different adult tissues, and studied 61 CARP X/XI-like sequences to evaluate their phylogenetic relationship. Sequence analysis of zebrafish ca10a and ca10b reveals strongly predicted signal peptides, N-glycosylation sites, and a potential disulfide, all of which are conserved, suggesting that all of CARP X and XI are secretory proteins and potentially dimeric. RT-qPCR showed that zebrafish ca10a and ca10b genes are expressed in the brain and several other tissues throughout the development of zebrafish. Antisense morpholino mediated knockdown of ca10a and ca10b showed developmental delay with a high rate of mortality in larvae. Zebrafish morphants showed curved body, pericardial edema, and abnormalities in the head and eye, and there was increased apoptotic cell death in the brain region. Swim pattern showed abnormal movement in morphant zebrafish larvae compared to the wild type larvae. The developmental phenotypes of the ca10a and ca10b morphants were confirmed by inactivating these genes with the CRISPR/Cas9 system. In conclusion, we introduce a novel zebrafish model to investigate the mechanisms of CARP Xa and CARP Xb functions. Our data indicate that CARP Xa and CARP Xb have important roles in zebrafish development and suppression of ca10a and ca10b expression in zebrafish larvae leads to a movement disorder. PMID:26218428

  19. Familial risk for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanwal, Madiha; Ding, Xiao-Ji; Cao, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer, which has a low survival rate, is a leading cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Smoking and air pollution are the major causes of lung cancer; however, numerous studies have demonstrated that genetic factors also contribute to the development of lung cancer. A family history of lung cancer increases the risk for the disease in both smokers and never-smokers. This review focuses on familial lung cancer, in particular on the familial aggregation of lung cancer. The development of familial lung cancer involves shared environmental and genetic factors among family members. Familial lung cancer represents a good model for investigating the association between environmental and genetic factors, as well as for identifying susceptibility genes for lung cancer. In addition, studies on familial lung cancer may help to elucidate the etiology and mechanism of lung cancer, and may identify novel biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis, targeted therapy and improved prevention strategies. This review presents the aetiology and molecular biology of lung cancer and then systematically introduces and discusses several aspects of familial lung cancer, including the characteristics of familial lung cancer, population-based studies on familial lung cancer and the genetics of familial lung cancer. PMID:28356926

  20. Urinary Levels of Cigarette Smoke Constituent Metabolites Are Prospectively Associated with Lung Cancer Development in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jian-Min; Gao, Yu-Tang; Murphy, Sharon E.; Carmella, Steven G.; Wang, Renwei; Zhong, Yan; Moy, Kristin A.; Davis, Andrew B.; Tao, Li; Chen, Menglan; Han, Shaomei; Nelson, Heather H.; Yu, Mimi C.; Hecht, Stephen S.

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are believed to be among the principal causative agents for lung cancer in smokers, but no epidemiologic studies have evaluated the relationship of PAH uptake and metabolism to lung cancer. In this study, we quantified prediagnostic urinary levels of r-1,t-2,3,c-4-tetrahydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-phenanthrene (PheT), a validated biomarker of PAH uptake and metabolism, as well as 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol and its glucuronides (total NNAL), and cotinine and its glucuronides (total cotinine), validated biomarkers of uptake of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone, and nicotine, respectively, in relation to lung cancer risk among current smokers in a nested case–control study within a cohort of 18,244 Chinese men in Shanghai, China. Urinary levels of PheT, total NNAL, and total cotinine were significantly higher in cases than controls (N = 476 matched pairs). ORs (95% confidence intervals) for lung cancer in the second, third, fourth, and fifth quintiles of PheT were 1.70 (1.00–2.88), 1.07 (0.62–1.84), 1.48 (0.86–2.53), and 2.34 (1.33–4.11), respectively, relative to the lowest quartile (Ptrend = 0.023) after adjustment for self-reported smoking intensity and duration and urinary total NNAL and total cotinine. This study also confirmed that urinary total NNAL and total cotinine are independently related to lung cancer risk. PMID:22028322

  1. Perfusion lung scan: an aid in detection of lymphangitic carcinomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, S.E.; Tranum, B.L.

    1982-07-15

    Lymphangitic carcinomatosis is usually a late manifestation of metastatic disease. The patient usually presents with cough or dyspnea, and the chest radiograph is often nondiagnostic. Two patients are presented who developed symptoms while on adjuvant chemotherapy. Both had abnormal perfusion lung scans. One had matching ventilation defects; the other a normal ventilation study. Biopsy revealed metastatic carcinoma; in one case tumor was seen in both the pulmonary lymphatics and arterioles; in technique which can speed diagnosis and institution of therapy in lymphangitic carcinomatosis.

  2. The H2S-generating enzymes cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase play a role in vascular development during normal lung alveolarization.

    PubMed

    Madurga, Alicia; Golec, Anita; Pozarska, Agnieszka; Ishii, Isao; Mižíková, Ivana; Nardiello, Claudio; Vadász, István; Herold, Susanne; Mayer, Konstantin; Reichenberger, Frank; Fehrenbach, Heinz; Seeger, Werner; Morty, Rory E

    2015-10-01

    The gasotransmitter hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is emerging as a mediator of lung physiology and disease. Recent studies revealed that H2S administration limited perturbations to lung structure in experimental animal models of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), partially restoring alveolarization, limiting pulmonary hypertension, limiting inflammation, and promoting epithelial repair. No studies have addressed roles for endogenous H2S in lung development. H2S is endogenously generated by cystathionine β-synthase (Cbs) and cystathionine γ-lyase (Cth). We demonstrate here that the expression of Cbs and Cth in mouse lungs is dynamically regulated during lung alveolarization and that alveolarization is blunted in Cbs(-/-) and Cth(-/-) mouse pups, where a 50% reduction in the total number of alveoli was observed, without any impact on septal thickness. Laser-capture microdissection and immunofluorescence staining indicated that Cbs and Cth were expressed in the airway epithelium and lung vessels. Loss of Cbs and Cth led to a 100-500% increase in the muscularization of small- and medium-sized lung vessels, which was accompanied by increased vessel wall thickness, and an apparent decrease in lung vascular supply. Ablation of Cbs expression using small interfering RNA or pharmacological inhibition of Cth using propargylglycine in lung endothelial cells limited angiogenic capacity, causing a 30-40% decrease in tube length and a 50% decrease in number of tubes formed. In contrast, exogenous administration of H2S with GYY4137 promoted endothelial tube formation. These data confirm a key role for the H2S-generating enzymes Cbs and Cth in pulmonary vascular development and homeostasis and in lung alveolarization.

  3. The Role of Chronic Hypoxia in the Development of Neurocognitive Abnormalities in Preterm Infants with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raman, Lakshmi; Georgieff, Michael K.; Rao, Raghavendra

    2006-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is the most common pulmonary morbidity in preterm infants and is associated with chronic hypoxia. Animal studies have demonstrated structural, neurochemical and functional alterations due to chronic hypoxia in the developing brain. Long-term impairments in visual-motor, gross and fine motor, articulation, reading,…

  4. Lung Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... are used to treat people who have severe COPD Cystic fibrosis Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency Pulmonary hypertension Complications of lung transplantation include rejection of the transplanted lung and infection. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  5. Lung transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the arteries of the lungs ( pulmonary hypertension ) Sarcoidosis Lung transplant may not be done for people ... Chronic Cystic fibrosis Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis Lung disease Sarcoidosis Review Date 4/13/2015 Updated by: Dale ...

  6. Lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... they can't breathe deeply. Pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis are examples of lung tissue disease. Lung circulation ... tuberculosis Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Simple pulmonary eosinophilia Patient Instructions Chronic obstructive pulmonary ...

  7. Identification of nickel response genes in abnormal early developments of sea urchin by differential display polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Tae Kwon; Lee, Gunsup; Rhee, Yong; Park, Heung-Sik; Chang, Man; Lee, Sukchan; Lee, Jaean; Lee, Taek-Kyun

    2012-10-01

    Bioassays and biomarkers have been previously developed to assess the effects of heavy metal contaminants on the early life stages of the sea urchin. In this study, malformation in the early developmental processes was observed in sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus intermedius) larvae exposed to 10 ppm Ni for over 30 h. The most critical stage at which the triggering of nickel effects takes place is thought to be the blastula stage, which occurs after fertilization in larval development. To investigate the molecular-level responses of sea urchin exposed to heavy metal stress and to explore the differentially expressed genes that are induced or repressed by nickel, differential display polymerase chain reaction (DD-PCR) was used with sea urchin mRNAs. The malformation-related genes expressed in the early life stages of the sea urchin were cloned from larvae exposed to 10 ppm of nickel for 15 h, and accessed via DD-PCR. Sequence analysis results revealed that each of the genes evidenced high homology with EGF2, PCSK9, serine/threonine protein kinase, apolipophorin precursor protein, and MGC80921 protein/transcript variant 2. This result may prove useful in the development of novel biomarkers for the assessment of heavy metal stresses on sea urchin embryos.

  8. Choline or CDP-choline attenuates coagulation abnormalities and prevents the development of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in dogs during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Zeki; Ozarda, Yesim; Cansev, Mehmet; Eralp, Oya; Kocaturk, Meric; Ulus, Ismail H

    2010-06-01

    Sepsis/endotoxemia causes platelet dysfunctions, abnormalities in coagulation and hemostatic mechanisms leading to organ dysfunctions and mortality. Choline prevents organ injury and improves survival during endotoxemia. The main objective of the present study was to determine the effects of choline or cytidine-5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) on endotoxin-induced activation of coagulation and development of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Dogs were treated intravenously (i.v.) with saline, choline (20 mg/kg), or CDP-choline (70 mg/kg) three times with 4-h intervals starting 5 min before i.v. injection of endotoxin (1 mg/kg). Platelet counts and functions, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, coagulation factors, D-dimer and antithrombin (AT) were measured before and at 0.5-96 h after endotoxin. Circulating platelet, fibrinogen, coagulation factors and AT were decreased, whereas PT and aPTT were prolonged and serum D-dimer levels were elevated after endotoxin. Endotoxin-induced reductions in platelet counts and functions, fibrinogen, coagulation factors and AT were attenuated or blocked by choline or CDP-choline. Choline or CDP-choline blocked endotoxin-induced prolongation in PT and aPTT and enhancement in D-dimer. Elevated DIC scores were attenuated by choline and blocked by CDP-choline. Choline administration increased serum choline concentrations and caused bradycardia. Choline also increased choline and acetylcholine contents of circulating mononuclear cells and inhibited radioligand binding to their cholinergic receptors. These data show that choline administration, as choline chloride or CDP-choline, restores the abnormalities in the primary, secondary, and tertiary hemostasis and prevents the development of DIC during experimental endotoxemia in dogs probably by increasing both neuronal and non-neuronal cholinergic activity.

  9. Abnormalities of Endocytosis, Phagocytosis, and Development Process in Dictyostelium Cells That Over-Express Acanthamoeba castellanii Metacaspase Protein

    PubMed Central

    SAHEB, Entsar; TRZYNA, Wendy; MARINGER, Katherine; BUSH, John

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acanthamoeba castellanii forms a resistant cyst that protects the parasite against the host’s immune response. Acanthamoeba Type-I metacaspase (Acmcp) is a caspase-like protein that has been found to be expressed during the encystations. Dictyostelium discoideum is an organism closely related to Acanthamoeba useful for studying the molecular function of this protozoan caspase-like protein. Methods: The full length of Acmcp and a mutated version of the same gene, which lacks the proline rich N-terminal region (Acmcp-dpr), were cloned into the pDneo2a-GFP vector separately. The pDneo2a-GFP-Acmcp and pDneo2a-GFPAcmcp-dpr were electro-transfected into wild type D. discoideum cells to create cell lines that over-expressed Acmcp or Acmcp-dpr. Results: Both cell lines that over-expressed Acmcp and Acmcp-dpr showed a significant increase in the fluid phase internalization and phagocytosis rate compared to the control cells. Additionally, the cells expressing the Acmcp-dpr mutant were unable to initiate early development and failed to aggregate or form fruiting bodies under starvation conditions, whereas Acmcp over-expressing cells showed the opposite phenomena. Quantitative cell death analysis provided additional support for these findings. Conclusion: Acmcp is involved in the processes of endocytosis and phagocytosis. In addition, the proline rich region in Acmcp is important for cellular development in Dictyostelium. Given its important role in the development process, metacaspase protein is proposed as a candidate drug target against infections caused by A. castellanii. PMID:26246819

  10. PCB1254 exposure contributes to the abnormalities of optomotor responses and influence of the photoreceptor cell development in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Hong, Qin; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Min; Guo, Xirong; Chi, Xia; Tong, Meiling

    2015-08-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), a group of highly toxic environmental pollutants, have been report to influence the visual system development in children. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. The study was aim to investigate the effects of continuous PCBs exposure on optomotor response (OMR) and retinal photoreceptor cell development-related gene expression in zebrafish larvae. The fertilized zebrafish embryos were exposed to PCBs at concentrations of 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, and 1mg/L until 7 days post-fertilization. Control groups with blank and 0.01% methanol were also prepared. OMR test was used to detect the visual behavior. The mRNA expression of the CRX, RHO, SWS1, and SWS2 was assessed by the Quantitative Real-Time PCR. The OMR test showed that the visual behavior of the larvae was most sensitive when the grating spatial frequency was 0.20LP/mm and the moving speed was 25cm/s. Moreover, the proportion of positively swimming fish was significantly reduced in the 0.5 and 1mg/L PCB1254 treatment group (P<0.05) compared with the controls. In addition, the expression of SWS2 was significantly down-regulated in all PCB1254 treatment groups (P<0.05), whereas the decreased expression of the CRX, RHO and SWS1 was found in the 0.5 and 1mg/L PCB1254 groups (P<0.05). This is the first report to demonstrate that continue exposure of zebrafish larvae to PCBs causes photoreceptor cell development-related gene expression changes that lead to OMR behavioral alterations. Analysis of these visual behavioral paradigms may be useful in predicting the adverse effects of toxicants on visual function in fish.

  11. Histopathological Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Glycyrrhizic Acid as a Radioprotector Against the Development of Radiation-Induced Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Refahi, Soheila; Minaei, Bagher; Haddadi, Gholam Hassan; Khoei, Samideh; Bakhtiarian, Azam; Pourissa, Masoud; Takavar, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy of the thorax often causes lung inflammation leading to fibrosis. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of glycyrrhizic acid (GLA) could improve the development of lung fibrosis in irradiated animals. Materials and Methods Wistar rats were divided into four groups. Group A rats received thoracic irradiation. Rats in group B received GLA and irradiation. Group C received GLA and no irradiation. Group D received no GLA and irradiation. GLA was administered at a dose of 4 mg/kg body weight using an intraperitoneal injection one hour before thoracic irradiation. Radiation therapy was delivered on a Cobalt-60 unit using a single fraction of 16 Gy. The animals were sacrificed at 32 weeks following thoracic irradiation. The lungs were dissected and blind histopathological evaluation was performed. Results Histopathologically, a decrease (statistically not significant) in the thickening of alveolar or bronchial wall, formation of fibrous bands, and superimposed collagen were noted in the animals in group B as compared to the animals in group A. Conclusion In this experimental study, administration of GLA one hour before thoracic irradiation may be a protective agent against radiation-induced fibrosis in animals and this model could be used in future studies. PMID:27679696

  12. Thymidine Kinase 2 Deficiency-Induced Mitochondrial DNA Depletion Causes Abnormal Development of Adipose Tissues and Adipokine Levels in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Villarroya, Joan; Dorado, Beatriz; Vilà, Maya R.; Garcia-Arumí, Elena; Domingo, Pere; Giralt, Marta; Hirano, Michio; Villarroya, Francesc

    2011-01-01

    Mammal adipose tissues require mitochondrial activity for proper development and differentiation. The components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain/oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS) are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. The maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a key element for a functional mitochondrial oxidative activity in mammalian cells. To ascertain the role of mtDNA levels in adipose tissue, we have analyzed the alterations in white (WAT) and brown (BAT) adipose tissues in thymidine kinase 2 (Tk2) H126N knockin mice, a model of TK2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion. We observed respectively severe and moderate mtDNA depletion in TK2-deficient BAT and WAT, showing both tissues moderate hypotrophy and reduced fat accumulation. Electron microscopy revealed altered mitochondrial morphology in brown but not in white adipocytes from TK2-deficient mice. Although significant reduction in mtDNA-encoded transcripts was observed both in WAT and BAT, protein levels from distinct OXPHOS complexes were significantly reduced only in TK2-deficient BAT. Accordingly, the activity of cytochrome c oxidase was significantly lowered only in BAT from TK2-deficient mice. The analysis of transcripts encoding up to fourteen components of specific adipose tissue functions revealed that, in both TK2-deficient WAT and BAT, there was a consistent reduction of thermogenesis related gene expression and a severe reduction in leptin mRNA. Reduced levels of resistin mRNA were found in BAT from TK2-deficient mice. Analysis of serum indicated a dramatic reduction in circulating levels of leptin and resistin. In summary, our present study establishes that mtDNA depletion leads to a moderate impairment in mitochondrial respiratory function, especially in BAT, causes substantial alterations in WAT and BAT development, and has a profound impact in the endocrine properties of adipose tissues. PMID:22216345

  13. Abnormal differentiation of dopaminergic neurons in zebrafish trpm7 mutant larvae impairs development of the motor pattern

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Amanda R.; McNeill, Matthew S.; Lambert, Aaron M.; Overton, Jeffrey D.; Chen, Yu-Chia; Lorca, Ramón A.; Johnson, Nicolas A.; Brockerhoff, Susan E.; Mohapatra, Durga P.; MacArthur, Heather; Panula, Pertti; Masino, Mark A.; Runnels, Loren W.; Cornell, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential, melastatin-like 7 (Trpm7) is a combined ion channel and kinase implicated in the differentiation or function of many cell types. Early lethality in mice and frogs depleted of the corresponding gene impedes investigation of the functions of this protein particularly during later stages of development. By contrast, zebrafish trpm7 mutant larvae undergo early morphogenesis normally and thus do not have this limitation. The mutant larvae are characterized by multiple defects including melanocyte cell death, transient paralysis, and an ion imbalance that leads to the development of kidney stones. Here we report a requirement for Trpm7 in differentiation or function of dopaminergic neurons in vivo. First, trpm7 mutant larvae are hypomotile and fail to make a dopamine-dependent developmental transition in swim-bout length. Both of these deficits are partially rescued by the application of levodopa or dopamine. Second, histological analysis reveals that in trpm7 mutants a significant fraction of dopaminergic neurons lack expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. Third, trpm7 mutants are unusually sensitive to the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, an oxidative stressor, and their motility is partially rescued by application of the iron chelator deferoxamine, an anti-oxidant. Finally, in SH-SY5Y cells, which model aspects of human dopaminergic neurons, forced expression of a channel-dead variant of TRPM7 causes cell death. In summary, a forward genetic screen in zebrafish has revealed that both melanocytes and dopaminergic neurons depend on the ion channel Trpm7. The mechanistic underpinning of this dependence requires further investigation. PMID:24291744

  14. Abnormal pituitary development and function in three siblings of a Jamaican family: A new syndrome involving the Pit-1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J.C.; Schiavi, A.; Parks, J.

    1994-09-01

    In 1967 Mckusick et al. reported three siblings in Canada who had combine pituitary hormone deficiencies (CPHD). Since that report there have been several families with multiple affected members who share the common characteristics of autosomal recessive inheritance and clinical expression of pituitary deficiencies at an early age. We report here a CPHD family of Jamaican origin with three affected and two unaffected siblings. The affected siblings have evidence of severe growth failure, growth hormone deficiency, hypothyroidism and variable prolactin deficiency. Recently, in some families with CPHD a defect has been detected in the Pit-1 gene, which encodes a transcription factor involved in the differentiation of the pituitary and the production of growth hormone, TSH and prolactin. We are studying the Pit-1 gene in this family as a candidate gene that may explain the family phenotype. The Pit-1 gene has been analyzed in DNA extracted from blood. No gross deletion were detected in exons 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 using exon-specific PCR assay developed in our laboratory. Exon 1 is also currently being analyzed. Single stand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, a screening technique for point mutations within genes, is being used to identify putative base pair changes in the Pit-1 gene. The exon findings will be confirmed using standard DNA sequencing procedures. If a Pit-1 gene is detected, this family would provide a novel presentation, since gonadotropin deficiency appears to be present. Alternatively, this family may represent a mutation on another yet unknown factor involved in normal pituitary development.

  15. Pneumothorax as a complication of lung volume recruitment*,**

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Erik J.A.; Jans, Maurice; Gaytant, Michael A.; Bach, John R.; Kampelmacher, Mike J.

    2013-01-01

    Lung volume recruitment involves deep inflation techniques to achieve maximum insufflation capacity in patients with respiratory muscle weakness, in order to increase peak cough flow, thus helping to maintain airway patency and improve ventilation. One of these techniques is air stacking, in which a manual resuscitator is used in order to inflate the lungs. Although intrathoracic pressures can rise considerably, there have been no reports of respiratory complications due to air stacking. However, reaching maximum insufflation capacity is not recommended in patients with known structural abnormalities of the lungs or chronic obstructive airway disease. We report the case of a 72-year-old woman who had poliomyelitis as a child, developed torsion scoliosis and post-polio syndrome, and had periodic but infrequent asthma attacks. After performing air stacking for 3 years, the patient suddenly developed a pneumothorax, indicating that this technique should be used with caution or not at all in patients with a known pulmonary pathology PMID:23857693

  16. Dysregulation of lung injury and repair in moesin-deficient mice treated with intratracheal bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Soshi; Amaya, Fumimasa; Matsuyama, Hiroki; Ueno, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Shojiro; Tanaka, Masaki; Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Ebina, Masahito; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Tsukita, Sachiko; Hashimoto, Satoru

    2008-10-01

    Moesin belongs to the ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) protein family and participates in cellular functions, such as morphogenesis and motility, by cross-linking between the actin cytoskeleton and plasma membranes. Although moesin seems necessary for tissue construction and repair, its function at the whole body level remains elusive, perhaps because of redundancy among ERM proteins. To determine the role played by moesin in the modulation of pulmonary alveolar structure associated with lung injury and repair, we examined the morphological changes in the lung and the effect of bleomycin-induced lung injury and fibrosis in moesin-deficient (Msn(-/Y)) and control wild-type mice (Msn(+/Y)). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that moesin was specifically localized in the distal lung epithelium, where ezrin and radixin were faintly detectable in Msn(+/Y) mice. Compared with Msn(+/Y) mice, Msn(-/Y) mice displayed abnormalities of alveolar architecture and, when treated with bleomycin, developed more prominent lung injury and fibrosis and lower body weight and survival rate. Furthermore, Msn(-/Y) mice had abnormal cytokine and chemokine gene expression as shown by real-time PCR. This is the first report of a functional involvement of moesin in the regulation of lung inflammation and repair. Our observations show that moesin critically regulates the preservation of alveolar structure and lung homeostasis.

  17. Impact of the Loss of Hoxa5 Function on Lung Alveogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mandeville, Isabel; Aubin, Josée; LeBlanc, Michelle; Lalancette-Hébert, Mélanie; Janelle, Marie-France; Tremblay, Guy M.; Jeannotte, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    The involvement of genes controlling embryonic processes in the etiology of diseases often escapes attention because of the focus given to their inherent developmental role. Hoxa5 belongs to the Hox gene family encoding transcription factors known for their role in skeletal patterning. Hoxa5 is required for embryonic respiratory tract morphogenesis. We now show that the loss of Hoxa5 function has severe repercussions on postnatal lung development. Hoxa5−/− lungs present an emphysema-like morphology because of impaired alveogenesis. Chronic inflammation characteristics, including goblet cell hyperplasia, mucus hypersecretion, and recruitment of inflammatory cells, were also observed. Altered cell specification during lung morphogenesis triggered goblet cell anomalies. In addition, the defective motility of alveolar myofibroblast precursors in the embryonic lung led to the mispositioning of the alveolar myofibroblasts and to abnormal elastin deposition postnatally. Both goblet cell hyperplasia and elastic fiber abnormalities contributed to the chronic physiopathological features of Hoxa5−/− lungs. They constituted an attractive stimulus to recruit activated macrophages that in turn generated a positive feedback loop that perpetuated macrophage accumulation in the lung. The present work corroborates the notion that altered Hox gene expression may predispose to lung pathologies. PMID:17003488

  18. Lung-On-A-Chip Technologies for Disease Modeling and Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Dipasri; Devarasetty, Mahesh; Yildiz, Didem V.; Atala, Anthony; Murphy, Sean V.

    2016-01-01

    Animal and two-dimensional cell culture models have had a profound impact on not only lung research but also medical research at large, despite inherent flaws and differences when compared with in vivo and clinical observations. Three-dimensional (3D) tissue models are a natural progression and extension of existing techniques that seek to plug the gaps and mitigate the drawbacks of two-dimensional and animal technologies. In this review, we describe the transition of historic models to contemporary 3D cell and organoid models, the varieties of current 3D cell and tissue culture modalities, the common methods for imaging these models, and finally, the applications of these models and imaging techniques to lung research. PMID:27127414

  19. Hormonal and extracellular matrix components act as mediators for mouse fetal lung development

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.I.

    1988-01-01

    The concentration of disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in 16 day lung tissue was measured after 5 days in culture. When grown in the absence of serum and hormones, levels of DPPC, assayed by phosphorus content, increased over 17 day in vivo controls. Treated with thyroxine and dexamethasone, DPPC levels were comparable to 2 day postnatal controls. Levels of DPPC increased in cultures containing dexamethasone alone while thyroxine alone had significantly less effect. 16- and 19-day fetal lung tissues were labeled with {sup 35}S-sulfate and {sup 3}H-glucosamine. Each pool was analyzed by DEAE-sepharose chromatography and by digestion with nitrous acid and chondroitinase. GAG synthesis was inhibited using {beta}-xyloside. The {beta}-xyloside inhibition of GAG synthesis was examined morphologically by transmission and scanning electron microscopy and functionally by autoradiography, sequential extraction, chromatography, and digestion as above.

  20. Diethylcarbamazine attenuates the development of carrageenan-induced lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Edlene Lima; Barbosa, Karla Patricia de Souza; Fragoso, Ingrid Tavares; Donato, Mariana Aragão Matos; Gomes, Fabiana Oliveira dos Santos; da Silva, Bruna Santos; Soares e Silva, Amanda Karolina; Rocha, Sura Wanessa Santos; da Silva Junior, Valdemiro Amaro; Peixoto, Christina Alves

    2014-01-01

    Diethylcarbamazine (DEC) is an antifilarial drug with potent anti-inflammatory properties as a result of its interference with the metabolism of arachidonic acid. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of DEC in a mouse model of acute inflammation (carrageenan-induced pleurisy). The injection of carrageenan into the pleural cavity induced the accumulation of fluid containing a large number of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) as well as infiltration of PMNs in lung tissues and increased production of nitrite and tumor necrosis factor-α and increased expression of interleukin-1β, cyclooxygenase (COX-2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Carrageenan also induced the expression of nuclear factor-κB. The oral administration of DEC (50 mg/Kg) three days prior to the carrageenan challenge led to a significant reduction in all inflammation markers. The present findings demonstrate that DEC is a potential drug for the treatment of acute lung inflammation.

  1. Intermediate endpoint biomarkers for lung cancer chemoprevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Klein-Parker, Helga; Gazdar, Adi; Guillaud, Martial; Payne, Peter W.; Le Riche, Jean C.; Dawe, Chris; Band, Pierre; Palcic, Branko

    1998-04-01

    Given the demographics of current and ex-smoking populations in North America, lung cancer will be a major problem in the foreseeable future. Early detection and treatment of lung cancer holds great promise for the management of this disease. Unlike cervical cancer, the physical, complete removal/destruction of all dysplastic lesions in the bronchial tree is not possible; however, treatment of the lesions using a chemopreventive agent is. Intermediate biomarkers have been used to screen promising chemopreventive agents for larger population studies. We have examined the natural history of lung cancer development by following a group of subjects at high risk of developing lung cancer using fluorescence endoscopy to identify the areas of abnormality for biopsy. Approximately 900 biopsies have been collected in this fashion and graded by at least two experienced, expert pathologists. Using an interactive version of the Cyto-Savant (Oncometrics Imaging Corp.), cytometric and tissue architectural data were collected from these biopsies. Using only the data from the normal and invasive cancer biopsies, quantitative morphometric and architectural indices were generated and calculated for all the collected biopsies. These indices were compared with Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) of ten sites commonly associated with cancer. These results and the application of these quantitative measures to two small chemoprevention studies will be reported.

  2. Modeling propagation delays in the development of SOMs--a parallel with abnormal brain growth in autism.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Gerardo

    2008-01-01

    Brain overgrowth in early developmental stages of children with autism is well documented. This paper explores the possibility that increases in propagation delays of stimuli and the signals triggered by them, resulting from this overgrowth, may be conducive to the development of poorly structured cortical maps, which may in turn be associated with autistic characteristics. We use a framework based on Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs). Unlike the conventional SOM model that assumes that all neurons in the neighborhood of the neuron closest to a stimulus instantaneously react to it and adjust their weights, we propose a more biolo