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Sample records for abnormal meningeal enhancement

  1. [Normal and abnormal meningeal enhancement: MRI features].

    PubMed

    Dietemann, J L; Correia Bernardo, R; Bogorin, A; Abu Eid, M; Koob, M; Nogueira, Th; Vargas, M I; Fakhoury, W; Zöllner, G

    2005-11-01

    The authors describe normal imaging of the meninges and meningeal spaces and MR (magnetic resonance) imaging findings in tumoral and nontumoral diseases. Dural or/and pial enhancement may be related to tumoral, infectious or granulomatous diseases. PMID:16269979

  2. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... system, infecting the meninges and causing meningitis. continue Bacteria and Viruses Many viruses can cause viral meningitis. ... examined under a microscope to see if any bacteria, cells, or substances that indicate inflammation or infection ...

  3. Abnormal head movement in a patient with tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Singh, Maneesh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The bobble-head doll syndrome is characterised by abnormal head movements. These head movements are usually 'yes-yes' (up and down) type; rarely, head movements are 'no-no' (side-to-side) type. Commonly described causes of the bobble-head doll syndrome include third ventricular tumours, suprasellar arachnoid cysts, aqueductal stenosis and other lesions in the region of the third ventricle of the brain. We report a case of tuberculous meningitis with hydrocephalus; in this patient bobble-head doll syndrome developed following external ventricular drainage. In our patient, placement of intraventricular drain led to massive dilatation of the frontal horn of the left lateral ventricle because of blocked foramina of Monro on the left side. The bobble-head doll syndrome, presumably, developed because of the pressure effect of the dilated third ventricle on the dorsomedial nucleus of the thalamus, red nucleus and dentatorubrothalamic pathways. We think that distortion of the third ventricle was responsible for the impairment of the functions of all these structures. PMID:23035162

  4. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by: Chemical irritation Drug allergies Fungi Parasites Tumors Many types of viruses can cause meningitis: Enteroviruses: These are viruses that also can cause intestinal illness. Herpes viruses: These are the same viruses ...

  5. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications. Viral meningitis is caused by viruses like enteroviruses , which are very common in summer and early ... or when they sneeze without covering their mouths. Enteroviruses begin to multiply in the digestive tract and ...

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities in patients with neoplastic meningitis. An evaluation using /sup 111/In-DTPA ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, S.A.; Trump, D.L.; Chen, D.C.; Thompson, G.; Camargo, E.E.

    1982-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics were evaluated by /sup 111/In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (/sup 111/In-DTPA) ventriculography in 27 patients with neoplastic meningitis. Nineteen patients (70 percent) had evidence of cerebrospinal fluid flow disturbances. These occurred as ventricular outlet obstructions, abnormalities of flow in the spinal canal, or flow distrubances over the cortical convexities. Tumor histology, physical examination, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, myelograms, and computerized axial tomographic scans were not sufficient to predict cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns. These data indicate that cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities are common in patients with neoplastic meningitis and that /sup 111/In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging is useful in characterizing these abnormalities. This technique provides insight into the distribution of intraventricularly administered chemotherapy and may provide explanations for treatment failure and drug-induced neurotoxicity in patients with neoplastic meningitis.

  7. Quantification of traumatic meningeal injury using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Williford, Joshua P.; Cota, Martin R.; MacLaren, Judy M.; Dardzinski, Bernard J.; Latour, Lawrence L.; Pham, Dzung L.; Butman, John A.

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic meningeal injury is a novel imaging marker of traumatic brain injury, which appears as enhancement of the dura on post-contrast T2-weighted FLAIR images, and is likely associated with inflammation of the meninges. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI provides a better discrimination of abnormally perfused regions. A method to properly identify those regions is presented. Images of seventeen patients scanned within 96 hours of head injury with positive traumatic meningeal injury were normalized and aligned. The difference between the pre- and last post-contrast acquisitions was segmented and voxels in the higher class were spatially clustered. Spatial and morphological descriptors were used to identify the regions of enhancement: a) centroid; b) distance to the brain mask from external voxels; c) distance from internal voxels; d) size; e) shape. The method properly identified thirteen regions among all patients. The method failed in one case due to the presence of a large brain lesion that altered the mask boundaries. Most false detections were correctly rejected resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 92.9% and 93.6%, respectively.

  8. Interferon-γ from Brain Leukocytes Enhances Meningitis by Type 4 Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Pettini, Elena; Fiorino, Fabio; Cuppone, Anna Maria; Iannelli, Francesco; Medaglini, Donata; Pozzi, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis. Pneumococcal meningitis is a life-threatening disease with high rates of mortality and neurological sequelae. Immune targeting of S. pneumoniae is essential for clearance of infection; however, within the brain, the induced inflammatory response contributes to pathogenesis. In this study we investigate the local inflammatory response and the role of IFN-γ in a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis induced by intracranial injection of type 4 S. pneumoniae. Lymphoid and myeloid cell populations involved in meningitis, as well as cytokine gene expression, were investigated after infection. Animals were treated with a monoclonal antibody specific for murine IFN-γ to evaluate its role in animal survival. Intracranial inoculation of 3 × 104 colony-forming units of type 4 strain TIGR4 caused 75% of mice to develop meningitis within 4 days. The amount of lymphocytes, NK cells, neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages in the brain increased 48 h post infection. IFN-γ mRNA levels were about 240-fold higher in brains of infected mice compared to controls. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and TNF-α, and TLR2 were also upregulated. In vivo treatment with anti-IFN-γ antibody increased survival of infected mice. This study shows that IFN-γ produced during meningitis by type 4 S. pneumoniae enhances bacterial pathogenesis exerting a negative effect on the disease outcome. PMID:26648922

  9. Interferon-γ from Brain Leukocytes Enhances Meningitis by Type 4 Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Pettini, Elena; Fiorino, Fabio; Cuppone, Anna Maria; Iannelli, Francesco; Medaglini, Donata; Pozzi, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis. Pneumococcal meningitis is a life-threatening disease with high rates of mortality and neurological sequelae. Immune targeting of S. pneumoniae is essential for clearance of infection; however, within the brain, the induced inflammatory response contributes to pathogenesis. In this study we investigate the local inflammatory response and the role of IFN-γ in a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis induced by intracranial injection of type 4 S. pneumoniae. Lymphoid and myeloid cell populations involved in meningitis, as well as cytokine gene expression, were investigated after infection. Animals were treated with a monoclonal antibody specific for murine IFN-γ to evaluate its role in animal survival. Intracranial inoculation of 3 × 10(4) colony-forming units of type 4 strain TIGR4 caused 75% of mice to develop meningitis within 4 days. The amount of lymphocytes, NK cells, neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages in the brain increased 48 h post infection. IFN-γ mRNA levels were about 240-fold higher in brains of infected mice compared to controls. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and TNF-α, and TLR2 were also upregulated. In vivo treatment with anti-IFN-γ antibody increased survival of infected mice. This study shows that IFN-γ produced during meningitis by type 4 S. pneumoniae enhances bacterial pathogenesis exerting a negative effect on the disease outcome. PMID:26648922

  10. Neuroimaging in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Jain, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculous meningitis is a serious infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Early diagnosis is the key to success of treatment. Neuroimaging plays a crucial role in the early and accurate diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis and its disabling complications. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered superior to computed tomography. Neuroimaging characteristics include leptomeningeal and basal cisternal enhancement, hydrocephalus, periventricular infarcts, and tuberculoma. Partially treated pyogenic meningitis, cryptococcal meningitis, viral encephalitis, carcinomatous, and lymphomatous meningitis may have many similar neuroimaging characteristics, and differentiation from tuberculous meningitis at times on the basis of neuroimaging characteristics becomes difficult. PMID:26954796

  11. Hemi-meningitis with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kocak, Ozan; Yarar, Coskun; Yimenicioğlu, Sevgi; Ekici, Arzu; Bör, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder. HLH may occur as a complication of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), particularly in patients with immunodeficiencies. Herein, we describe a 16-year-old girl with neurological complications associated EBV-induced HLH. Her cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted images with enhancement of meningeal surface in the right hemisphere that was consistent with right hemi-meningitis. Hydrocephalus, dilated subdural spaces, delayed myelination, edema, diffuse parenchymal atrophy, calcifications, diffuse/patchy white matter abnormalities have all been previously described with HLH. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of hemi-meningitis associated with HLH. We suggest that clinicians should consider HLH with vascular disorders when they determine unilateral meningitis on a brain MRI. PMID:27570395

  12. Neuroimaging features of tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sobri, M; Merican, J S; Nordiyana, M; Valarmathi, S; Ai-Edrus, S A

    2006-03-01

    Tuberculous meningitis leads to a high mortality rate. However, it responds well to chemotherapy if the treatment is started early. Neuroimaging is one of the most important initial investigations. There were 42 patients diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis in Kuala Lumpur Hospital based on clinical criteria, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and response to anti-tuberculous treatment over a 7 year period. Relevant information was obtained from patients' medical case notes and neuroimaging findings were evaluated. Male to female ratio was 3:1. The three major ethnics and the immigrant groups in Malaysia were represented in this study. The majority of the cases involved the Malays followed by immigrants, Chinese and Indians. The patients' age ranged from 18 to 62 years old with the mean age of 34.4 years. There were 95.2% (n = 40) of patients who presented with various neuroimaging abnormalities and only 2 (4.8%) patients had normal neuroimaging findings. Hydrocephalus and meningeal enhancement were the two commonest neuroimaging features. Other features include infarction, enhancing lesion, tuberculoma, abcess, oedema and calcification. Contrasted CT scan is an adequate neuroimaging tool to unmask abnormal findings in tuberculous meningitis. PMID:16708732

  13. Meningitis - pneumococcal

    MedlinePlus

    ... and older People at high risk for pneumococcus infection Alternative Names Pneumococcal meningitis Images Pneumococci organism Pneumococcal pneumonia References Swartz MN. Meningitis: bacterial, ...

  14. Meningitis and Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Meningitis and Encephalitis ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  15. Viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, David R

    2005-01-01

    Viruses probably account for most cases of acute meningitis. Viral meningitis is often assumed to be a largely benign disease. For the commonest pathogens causing meningitis, enteroviruses, this is usually the case; however, for many of the other pathogens causing viral meningitis, and for common pathogens in the immunocompromised or infants, viral meningitis is frequently associated with substantial neurological complications and a significant mortality. Diagnostic methods for rapid and accurate identification of pathogens have improved over recent years, permitting more precise and earlier diagnoses. There have been fewer developments in therapies for viral meningitis, and there remain no effective therapies for most pathogens, emphasising the importance of prevention and early diagnosis. This review focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and management of viral meningitis and also covers the prevention of meningitis for pathogens where effective vaccines are available. PMID:16474042

  16. Cryptococcal Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Reviewed May 19, 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 503 Cryptococcal Meningitis WHAT IS CRYPTOCOCCAL MENINGITIS? HOW ... as part of the immune reconstitution syndrome (see fact sheet 483 .) A study in 2011 showed that starting ...

  17. Viral Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially from late spring to fall when these viruses spread most often. However, only a small number ... infected with enteroviruses will actually develop meningitis. Other viruses that can cause meningitis are Mumps virus Herpesviruses, ...

  18. Detectability of early brain meningitis with magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Wells, J.W.; Williams, N.M.

    1995-08-01

    The ability of high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect early brain meningitis was evaluated in a canine model. Contrast dose, timing postinjection, and imaging technique (specifically the use of magnetization transfer) were assessed. Imaging of five canines was performed at 1.5 T 24 hours after injection of Cowans staphylococcus into the cisterna magna. Two control animals also were imaged using the same protocol. Contrast doses of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.8 mmol/kg gadoteridol were compared. Scans were performed at 2, 13, and 22 minutes after an initial injection of 0.1 mmol/kg. Thirty minutes after the initial injection of contrast, a supplemental dose of 0.2 mmol/kg was given. Scans were then repeated at 2, 12, and 22 minutes after this dose was administered. A second supplemental contrast injection of 0.5 mmol/kg was given at 70 minutes, and immediate postinjection scans with and without MT were acquired. Results. In the animals receiving a cisternal injection of bacteria, the degree of meningeal enhancement was greatest at 0.8 mmol/kg, intermediate at 0.3 mmol/kg, and least at 0.1 mmol/kg. Scans in control studies did not demonstrate abnormal meningeal enhancement. High-contrast dose, MT, and acquisition of immediate postcontrast scans all resulted in statistically significant improvement. On masked film review, abnormal meningeal enhancement was noted in only 2 of 5 experimental dogs at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg (regardless of the use of MT) compared with all animals at a dose of 0.3 mmol/kg. In 18 of 37 dogs (paired scans with and without MT), when abnormal enhancement was noted, the use of MT improved the visualization of abnormal meningeal enhancement. In early brain meningitis, high-contrast dose (0.3 mmol/kg), MT, and scanning immediately after injection improve detection of abnormal meningeal enhancement, thus facilitating the diagnosis of meningitis. Of these factors, contrast dose is the most important. 14 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Meningitis - staphylococcal

    MedlinePlus

    Staphylococcal meningitis is caused by Staphylococcus bacteria. When it is caused by Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria, it usually develops as a complication of surgery or ...

  20. Meningitis - pneumococcal

    MedlinePlus

    ... History of meningitis Infection of a heart valve Injury or trauma to the head Meningitis in which there is leakage of spinal fluid Recent ear infection Recent pneumonia Recent upper respiratory infection Spleen removal or a spleen that does not function

  1. Rheumatoid meningitis.

    PubMed

    Nihat, Akin; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Bridges, Leslie; Johns, Paul; Sofat, Nidhi; Moynihan, Barry

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid meningitis is a rare, potentially treatable condition that can mimic a wide range of neurological conditions, including vascular syndromes and encephalopathies. Despite a concurrent history of rheumatoid arthritis, patients often have no active synovitis. Here we describe a patient with rheumatoid meningitis who presented to a hyperacute stroke unit with dysarthria on waking and transient facial droop. PMID:27029468

  2. Treating Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... ways to treat bacterial meningitis. 1 They compared steroids (dexamethasone) with pla- cebo. The doctors gave medication ( ... compared anti- biotics by themselves with antibiotics plus steroids. Dr. Fritz and colleagues compared the mortality (deaths) ...

  3. Meningococcal Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cord. The extended meningitis belt of sub-Saharan Africa, stretching from Senegal in the west to Ethiopia ... ampicillin, chloramphenicol and ceftriaxone. Under epidemic conditions in Africa in areas with limited health infrastructure and resources, ...

  4. Meningitis - meningococcal

    MedlinePlus

    ... spring. It may cause local epidemics at boarding schools, college dormitories, or military bases. Risk factors include ... and close contacts (especially in health care or school settings) of people with this type of meningitis ...

  5. Meningitis - cryptococcal

    MedlinePlus

    Antifungal medicines are used to treat this form of meningitis. Intravenous (IV, through a vein) therapy with ... treatment. It is often combined with an oral antifungal medicine called 5-flucytosine. Another oral medication, fluconazole, ...

  6. Meningitis - meningococcal

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most commonly used antibiotics for meningococcal meningitis. Penicillin in high doses is almost always effective, too. If the patient is allergic to penicillin, chloramphenicol may be used. Sometimes corticosteroids may be ...

  7. Neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Heath, P T; Nik Yusoff, N K; Baker, C J

    2003-05-01

    Twelve years ago an annotation was published in Archives of Disease in Childhood regarding the antibiotic treatment of suspected neonatal meningitis. The authors recommended the use of cephalosporins rather than chloramphenicol and advocated intraventricular aminoglycoside treatment in selected cases. They noted the absence of clinical trials with third generation cephalosporins that showed an improvement in mortality or neurological outcome. PMID:12719388

  8. Spinal perineurial and meningeal cysts.

    PubMed

    Tarlov, I M

    1970-12-01

    Perineurial cysts may be responsible for clinical symptoms and a cure effected by their removal. They do not fill on initial myelography but may fill with Pantopaque some time, days or weeks, after Pantopaque has been instilled into the subarachnoid space. Perineurial cysts arise at the site of the posterior root ganglion. The cyst wall is composed of neural tissue. When initial myelography fails to reveal an adequate cause for the patient's symptoms and signs referable to the caudal nerve roots, then about a millilitre of Pantopaque should be left in the canal for delayed myelography which may later reveal a sacral perineurial cyst or, occasionally, a meningeal cyst. Meningeal diverticula occur proximal to the posterior root ganglia and usually fill on initial myelography. They are in free communication with the subarachnoid space and are rarely in my experience responsible for clinical symptoms. Meningeal diverticula and meningeal cysts appear to represent a continuum. Pantopaque left in the subarachnoid space may convert a meningeal diverticulum into an expanding symptomatic meningeal cyst, as in the case described. Many cases described as perineurial cysts represent abnormally long arachnoidal prolongations over nerve roots or meningeal diverticula. In general, neither of the latter is of pathological significance. Perineurial, like meningeal cysts and diverticula, may be asymptomatic. They should be operated upon only if they produce progressive or disabling symptoms or signs clearly attributable to them. When myelography must be done, and this should be done only as a preliminary to a probable necessary operation, then patient effort should be made to remove the Pantopaque. PMID:5531903

  9. Meningitis - gram-negative

    MedlinePlus

    Gram-negative meningitis ... Acute bacterial meningitis can be caused by Gram-negative bacteria. Meningococcal and H. influenzae meningitis are caused by Gram-negative bacteria and are covered in detail in other articles. This article ...

  10. Investigation on two abnormal phenomena about thermal conductivity enhancement of BN/EG nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of boron nitride/ethylene glycol (BN/EG) nanofluids was investigated by transient hot-wire method and two abnormal phenomena was reported. One is the abnormal higher thermal conductivity enhancement for BN/EG nanofluids at very low-volume fraction of particles, and the other is the thermal conductivity enhancement of BN/EG nanofluids synthesized with large BN nanoparticles (140 nm) which is higher than that synthesized with small BN nanoparticles (70 nm). The chain-like loose aggregation of nanoparticles is responsible for the abnormal increment of thermal conductivity enhancement for the BN/EG nanofluids at very low particles volume fraction. And the difference in specific surface area and aspect ratio of BN nanoparticles may be the main reasons for the abnormal difference between thermal conductivity enhancements for BN/EG nanofluids prepared with 140- and 70-nm BN nanoparticles, respectively. PMID:21740586

  11. Automatic Fault Characterization via Abnormality-Enhanced Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Bronevetsky, G; Laguna, I; de Supinski, B R

    2010-12-20

    Enterprise and high-performance computing systems are growing extremely large and complex, employing hundreds to hundreds of thousands of processors and software/hardware stacks built by many people across many organizations. As the growing scale of these machines increases the frequency of faults, system complexity makes these faults difficult to detect and to diagnose. Current system management techniques, which focus primarily on efficient data access and query mechanisms, require system administrators to examine the behavior of various system services manually. Growing system complexity is making this manual process unmanageable: administrators require more effective management tools that can detect faults and help to identify their root causes. System administrators need timely notification when a fault is manifested that includes the type of fault, the time period in which it occurred and the processor on which it originated. Statistical modeling approaches can accurately characterize system behavior. However, the complex effects of system faults make these tools difficult to apply effectively. This paper investigates the application of classification and clustering algorithms to fault detection and characterization. We show experimentally that naively applying these methods achieves poor accuracy. Further, we design novel techniques that combine classification algorithms with information on the abnormality of application behavior to improve detection and characterization accuracy. Our experiments demonstrate that these techniques can detect and characterize faults with 65% accuracy, compared to just 5% accuracy for naive approaches.

  12. Meningitis and Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... No. 04-4840 Back to Meningitis and Encephalitis Information Page See a list of all NINDS Disorders Publicaciones en Español Meningitis y Encefalitis Prepared by: Office of Communications and Public Liaison National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  13. Meningitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cord. Most cases are caused by bacteria or viruses, but some can be due to certain medications or illnesses. Bacterial meningitis is rare, but is usually serious and can be life threatening if not treated right away. Viral meningitis ( ...

  14. Meningitis Myths and Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Infographic Prevention and Control of Meningococcal Disease Meningitis Myths and Facts Myth: Meningococcal disease is easy ... infected person, such as shaking hands. Fact: Meningococcal meningitis is spread through air droplets and direct contact ...

  15. Meningitis Caused by Candida Dubliniensis in a Patient with Cirrhosis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Yamahiro, Atsuko; Lau, K H Vincent; Peaper, David R; Villanueva, Merceditas

    2016-08-01

    Candida species, including Candida dubliniensis, are a rare cause of meningitis. Herein, we report the second case of C. dubliniensis meningitis in a 49-year-old man with a history of hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis, substance use disorder, and recent exposure to intravenous antibiotic therapy, presenting with confusion, abnormal gait, and urinary incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed marked hydrocephalus and leptomeningeal enhancement. Initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies were concerning for bacterial meningitis, although cultures were negative. Despite empiric treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, the patient's mental status declined. The diagnosis of C. dubliniensis meningitis was not made until the third lumbar puncture. The patient was treated with liposomal amphotericin B and flucytosine. Despite improvement of hydrocephalus on MRI of the brain and sterilization of CSF, the patient's mental status declined and he expired. This case highlights the difficulty in the diagnosis of C. dubliniensis meningitis as multiple lumbar punctures may be necessary. C. dubliniensis meningitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for a patient with risk factors such as end-stage liver disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, recent chemotherapy, substance use disorders, and recent broad-spectrum antibiotic use. A high index of suspicion is necessary as delay in initiation of therapy is associated with high mortality. The optimal treatment strategy has not been determined. PMID:27038312

  16. Use of Virtual Reality Technology to Enhance Undergraduate Learning in Abnormal Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark-Wroblewski, Kim; Kreiner, David S.; Boeding, Christopher M.; Lopata, Ashley N.; Ryan, Joseph J.; Church, Tina M.

    2008-01-01

    We examined whether using virtual reality (VR) technology to provide students with direct exposure to evidence-based psychological treatment approaches would enhance their understanding of and appreciation for such treatments. Students enrolled in an abnormal psychology course participated in a VR session designed to help clients overcome the fear…

  17. Cognitive impairment in adults with good recovery after bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    van de Beek, Diederik; Schmand, Ben; de Gans, Jan; Weisfelt, Martijn; Vaessen, Heleen; Dankert, Jacob; Vermeulen, Marinus

    2002-10-01

    Adults without neurologic sequelae after bacterial meningitis are supposed to live without restrictions. Neuropsychological outcome was assessed in 51 adults from a prospective cohort with good recovery, defined as Glasgow Outcome Scale score 5, after pneumococcal or meningococcal meningitis. Patients who recovered well after pneumococcal meningitis showed cognitive slowness (P=.001). A cognitive disorder was found in 27% of these patients. Patients who previously had meningococcal meningitis were not significantly different from control subjects. Scores on general health and quality of life questionnaires revealed lower scores for patients with meningitis, which were related to cognitive slowing (R, -0.46 to -0.38). In conclusion, adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis were at significant risk of neuropsychological abnormalities, even if they were clinically well recovered. PMID:12232850

  18. Evaluation and Treatment of Chronic Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Zunt, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic meningitis is defined as an inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile that persists for at least 1 month. The presentation often includes headache, nausea, vomiting, cranial neuropathies, symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure, or focal neurologic deficits. The most common etiologies of chronic meningitis fall into 3 broad categories: infectious, autoimmune, and neoplastic. Evaluation of the patient with suspected chronic meningitis should include a detailed history and physical examination as well as repeated CSF diagnostics, serologic studies, and biopsy of the brain or other abnormal tissue (eg, lymph node or lung), when indicated. Early identification of the etiology and rapid treatment are crucial for improving morbidity and mortality, but potential infectious and neoplastic conditions should be excluded prior to empirically starting steroids or immunosuppressive medications. PMID:25360204

  19. Topological Defects at the Graphene/h-BN interface Abnormally Enhance Its Thermal Conductance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangjun; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-08-10

    Low thermal conductance across interface is often the limiting factor in managing heat in many advanced device applications. The most commonly used approach to enhance the thermal conductance is to reduce/eliminate the interfacial structural defects. Using a graphene/h-BN (Gr/h-BN) interface, we show surprisingly that topological defects are able to enhance the thermal conductance across the interface. It is found that the phonon transmission across the Gr/h-BN interface with 5|7 defects is higher than that of the pristine interface, which is in strong contrast to the common notion that interface defects promote phonon scattering. By analyzing the strain distribution and phonon vibrational spectra, we find that this abnormal enhancement in interfacial thermal conductance originates from the localization of the stress fields arising from misfit dislocations and their out-of-plane deformations at the interface. In the presence of the defects, the overall mismatch strain is reduced. In addition, the out-of-plane deformations screen the long-ranged dislocation strain fields, resulting in the stress fields to be localized only at the cores of the defects. This abnormal mechanism provides a new dimension to enhance the interfacial thermal conductance in two-dimensional heterostructures. PMID:27387848

  20. Spinal Cord and Spinal Nerve Root Involvement (Myeloradiculopathy) in Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rahul; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Jain, Amita; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Verma, Rajesh; Sharma, Praveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Most of the information about spinal cord and nerve root involvement in tuberculous meningitis is available in the form of isolated case reports or case series. In this article, we evaluated the incidence, predictors, and prognostic impact of spinal cord and spinal nerve root involvement in tuberculous meningitis. In this prospective study, 71 consecutive patients of newly diagnosed tuberculous meningitis were enrolled. In addition to clinical evaluation, patients were subjected to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain and spine. Patients were followed up for at least 6 months. Out of 71 patients, 33 (46.4%) had symptoms/signs of spinal cord and spinal nerve root involvement, 22 (30.9%) of whom had symptoms/signs at enrolment. Eleven (15.4%) patients had paradoxical involvement. Paraparesis was present in 22 (31%) patients, which was of upper motor neuron type in 6 (8.4%) patients, lower motor neuron type in 10 (14%) patients, and mixed type in 6 (8.4%) patients. Quadriparesis was present in 3 (4.2%) patients. The most common finding on spinal MRI was meningeal enhancement, seen in 40 (56.3%) patients; in 22 (30.9%), enhancement was present in the lumbosacral region. Other MRI abnormalities included myelitis in 16 (22.5%), tuberculoma in 4 (5.6%), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) loculations in 4 (5.6%), cord atrophy in 3 (4.2%), and syrinx in 2 (2.8%) patients. The significant predictor associated with myeloradiculopathy was raised CSF protein (>250 mg/dL). Myeloradiculopathy was significantly associated with poor outcome. In conclusion, spinal cord and spinal nerve root involvement in tuberculous meningitis is common. Markedly raised CSF protein is an important predictor. Patients with myeloradiculopathy have poor outcome. PMID:25621686

  1. Meningococcal Meningitis Surveillance in the African Meningitis Belt, 2004–2013

    PubMed Central

    Lingani, Clément; Bergeron-Caron, Cassi; Stuart, James M.; Fernandez, Katya; Djingarey, Mamoudou H.; Ronveaux, Olivier; Schnitzler, Johannes C.; Perea, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. An enhanced meningitis surveillance network was established across the meningitis belt of sub-Saharan Africa in 2003 to rapidly collect, disseminate, and use district weekly data on meningitis incidence. Following 10 years’ experience with enhanced surveillance that included the introduction of a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT (MenAfriVac), in 2010, we analyzed the data on meningitis incidence and case fatality from countries reporting to the network. Methods. After de-duplication and reconciliation, data were extracted from the surveillance bulletins and the central database held by the World Health Organization Inter-country Support Team in Burkina Faso for countries reporting consistently from 2004 through 2013 (Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Togo). Results. The 10 study countries reported 341 562 suspected and confirmed cases over the 10-year study period, with a marked peak in 2009 due to a large epidemic of group A Neisseria meningitidis (NmA) meningitis. Case fatality was lowest (5.9%) during this year. A mean of 71 and 67 districts annually crossed the alert and epidemic thresholds, respectively. The incidence rate of NmA meningitis fell >10-fold, from 0.27 per 100 000 in 2004–2010 to 0.02 per 100 000 in 2011–2013 (P < .0001). Conclusions. In addition to supporting timely outbreak response, the enhanced meningitis surveillance system provides a global overview of the epidemiology of meningitis in the region, despite limitations in data quality and completeness. This study confirms a dramatic fall in NmA incidence after the introduction of PsA-TT. PMID:26553668

  2. Serial study of clinical and CT changes in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, P; Kalita, J; Misra, U K

    2003-05-01

    Clinical and radiological changes in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) have been reported but there is paucity of comprehensive serial clinicoradiological follow-up. In this prospective hospital based study, we investigated serial changes in the clinical and radiological findings and their relationships over 6 months in 31 consecutive patients with TBM, diagnosed on the basis of clinical, radiological and spinal fluid criteria. We graded the severity of the TBM as I-III. Detailed clinical examination, contrast-enhanced CT and activities of daily living (ADL) assessments were made on admission, and 3 and 6 months after therapy. Further CT was carried out as required. Patients received four-drug antituberculous therapy (RHZE) and underwent a ventriculoperitoneal shunt if necessary. Outcome was defined as poor, partial or complete recovery using the Barthel index score at 6 months. The age of the patients was 6-80 years, mean 35.2 years; four were children and 13 female. Meningitis was stage I in 5, stage II in six and stage III in 20 patients. Focal weakness was present in nine, papilloedema in six and ophthalmoplegia in ten. There were ten patients who deteriorated within first 6 weeks of therapy. Mean Glasgow coma score (GCS) deteriorated from 12.5 to 11.4; the grade of meningitis increased by two stages in one patient, one stage in another, and motor deficits appeared in four and optic atrophy in four; four patients required shunt surgery. By 3 months most patients were stable. At 6 months 17 patients had complete, four partial and nine poor recovery. Initial CT was abnormal in 28 patients, revealing hydrocephalus and exudates in 15 each, infarcts in ten and tuberculomas in 13. It was repeated in ten patients who deteriorated, showing new abnormalities such as hydrocephalus in two, infarcts in four, exudates in four and granulomas in two, with worsening of the previous findings. CT at 3 and 6 months was still abnormal in most patients. At 6 months hydrocephalus had

  3. Non-Infectious Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Related Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Non-Infectious Meningitis ... confusion) Top of Page Related Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis File Formats Help: ...

  4. Meningitis - H. influenzae

    MedlinePlus

    ... and close contacts (especially in health care or school settings) of people with this type of meningitis ... first visit. Close contacts in the same household, school, or day care center should be watched for ...

  5. Syphilitic aseptic meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    Syphilitic aseptic meningitis is a complication of untreated syphilis. It involves inflammation of the tissues covering the ... Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochete bacteria Treponema pallidum . Syphilis has three main ...

  6. DISCUSSION ON MENINGITIS

    PubMed Central

    1929-01-01

    (1) Meningitis: two groups of cases. (2) A method of washing out the subarachnoid space in cases of septic meningitis secondary to infection of the ear. (3) Discussion on the value of maintaining a positive pressure of the cerebrospinal fluid when operating on a septic region communicating with the subarachnoid space. (4) Leaking cerebrospinal fluid from the region of the ear: operative treatment. PMID:19986899

  7. Abnormal PTPN11 enhancer methylation promotes rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocyte aggressiveness and joint inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Maeshima, Keisuke; Stanford, Stephanie M.; Hammaker, Deepa; Sacchetti, Cristiano; Zeng, Li-fan; Ai, Rizi; Zhang, Vida; Boyle, David L.; Aleman Muench, German R.; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Whitaker, John W.; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Wang, Wei; Bottini, Nunzio; Firestein, Gary S.

    2016-01-01

    The PTPN11 gene, encoding the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, is overexpressed in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) compared with osteoarthritis (OA) FLS and promotes RA FLS invasiveness. Here, we explored the molecular basis for PTPN11 overexpression in RA FLS and the role of SHP-2 in RA pathogenesis. Using computational methods, we identified a putative enhancer in PTPN11 intron 1, which contained a glucocorticoid receptor– binding (GR-binding) motif. This region displayed enhancer function in RA FLS and contained 2 hypermethylation sites in RA compared with OA FLS. RA FLS stimulation with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone induced GR binding to the enhancer and PTPN11 expression. Glucocorticoid responsiveness of PTPN11 was significantly higher in RA FLS than OA FLS and required the differentially methylated CpGs for full enhancer function. SHP-2 expression was enriched in the RA synovial lining, and heterozygous Ptpn11 deletion in radioresistant or innate immune cells attenuated K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in mice. Treatment with SHP-2 inhibitor 11a-1 reduced RA FLS migration and responsiveness to TNF and IL-1β stimulation and reduced arthritis severity in mice. Our findings demonstrate how abnormal epigenetic regulation of a pathogenic gene determines FLS behavior and demonstrate that targeting SHP-2 or the SHP-2 pathway could be a therapeutic strategy for RA. PMID:27275015

  8. Approach to Chronic Lymphocytic Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Khadilkar, Satish V; Nadkarni, Nilesh

    2015-09-01

    Chronic meningitis is a common clinical problem. Early diagnosis and appropriate therapy is important in improving the overall outcome and to prevent long-lasting sequels. As many etiological agents lead to the development of chronic lymphocytic meningitis, it is important to develop a systematic approach to the diagnosis; taking clues from history, examination and laboratory tests, to make an accurate diagnosis and institute appropriate therapy. This review focuses on the diagnostic approach towards the commonly encountered situation of chronic lymphocytic meningitis. Chronic meningitis is defined as meningeal inflammation that persists for more than 4 weeks. Chronic meningitis accounts for less than 10% of all the cases of meningitis.1 Causes of chronic lymphocytic meningitis are mainly divided into infectious and non-infectious listed in Table 1.2 Due to advancement in investigations, diseases causing chronic meningitis may be diagnosed earlier than 4 weeks and hence the definition should be considered as a rough guideline. PMID:27608867

  9. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Sonja E.; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. Methods: We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. Results: When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30–48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only 16 of 40 patients (40%) received immunomodulating therapy at the time of diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was delayed in 17 of 40 patients (43%), mainly because of the initial suspicion of neurosarcoidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed mildly elevated white blood cell count (range 23–129/mm3). Twenty-nine of 32 cases (91%) had a positive CSF culture for Cryptococcus neoformans and 25 of 27 cases (93%) had a positive CSF C neoformans antigen test. CD4 counts were low in all patients in whom counts were performed (84–228/mL). Twelve patients had an unfavorable outcome (32%), of which 7 died (19%) and 24 patients (65%) had a favorable outcome. The rate of unfavorable outcome in patients with a delayed diagnosis was 7 of 17 (41%) compared to 5 of 28 (21%) in patients in whom diagnosis was not delayed. Conclusion: Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of sarcoidosis. Patients were often initially misdiagnosed as neurosarcoidosis, which resulted in considerable treatment delay and worse outcome. CSF cryptococcal antigen tests are advised in patients with sarcoidosis and meningitis. PMID:27583871

  10. FDG PET in Intracranial Carcinomatous Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Heimburger, Céline; Bund, Caroline; Namer, Izzie Jacques

    2016-01-01

    A 63-year-old white man, diagnosed with pT3N2 squamous cell lung carcinoma, underwent right upper lobectomy with adjuvant radiochemotherapy. After a partial epileptic seizure, MRI revealed a solitary right frontal metastasis that was treated with surgical resection followed by stereotaxic radiotherapy. Three months later, the patient presented weight loss, weakness, and headache. He underwent a whole-body FDG PET/CT for restaging. It showed intense FDG uptakes on the brain periphery corresponding to nodular meningeal contrast enhancement on MRI leading to the diagnosis of carcinomatous meningitis, despite negative cerebrospinal fluid cytology. PMID:26447391

  11. Epidemiology of Meningitis in an HIV-Infected Ugandan Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rajasingham, Radha; Rhein, Joshua; Klammer, Kate; Musubire, Abdu; Nabeta, Henry; Akampurira, Andrew; Mossel, Eric C.; Williams, Darlisha A.; Boxrud, Dave J.; Crabtree, Mary B.; Miller, Barry R.; Rolfes, Melissa A.; Tengsupakul, Supatida; Andama, Alfred O.; Meya, David B.; Boulware, David R.

    2015-01-01

    There is limited understanding of the epidemiology of meningitis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected populations in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected adults with suspected meningitis in Uganda, to comprehensively evaluate the etiologies of meningitis. Intensive cerebrospiral fluid (CSF) testing was performed to evaluate for bacterial, viral, fungal, and mycobacterial etiologies, including neurosyphilis,16s ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for bacteria, Plex-ID broad viral assay, quantitative-PCR for HSV-1/2, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), and Toxoplasma gondii; reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for Enteroviruses and arboviruses, and Xpert MTB/RIF assay. Cryptococcal meningitis accounted for 60% (188 of 314) of all causes of meningitis. Of 117 samples sent for viral PCR, 36% were EBV positive. Among cryptococcal antigen negative patients, the yield of Xpert MTB/RIF assay was 22% (8 of 36). After exclusion of cryptococcosis and bacterial meningitis, 61% (43 of 71) with an abnormal CSF profile had no definitive diagnosis. Exploration of new TB diagnostics and diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of meningitis in resource-limited settings remains needed, and implementation of cryptococcal diagnostics is critical. PMID:25385864

  12. Use of Intrathecal Fluorescein in Recurrent Meningitis after Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Swati; Singh, Satinder; Sharma, Shalabh; Lahiri, Asish K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital anomalies of the cochlea and labyrinth can be associated with meningitis and varying degrees of hearing loss or deafness. Despite antibiotics, meningitis remains a life threatening complication. Case Report: We report a case of recurrent meningitis following episodes of otitis media in a cochlear implantee child with bilateral vestibulocochlear malformation, due to fistula in the stapes footplate. Intrathecal fluorescin was used to identify the leak site. Conclusion: Recurrent meningitis can indicate for possible immunological or anatomical abnormalities as well for chronic parameningeal infections. Intraoperative use of intrathecal fluorescin is an ideal investigative tool to demonstrate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak site in patients in whom other investigations fail to do so. PMID:27429952

  13. Assessment of Specific Characteristics of Abnormal General Movements: Does It Enhance the Prediction of Cerebral Palsy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamer, Elisa G.; Bos, Arend F.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Abnormal general movements at around 3 months corrected age indicate a high risk of cerebral palsy (CP). We aimed to determine whether specific movement characteristics can improve the predictive power of definitely abnormal general movements. Method: Video recordings of 46 infants with definitely abnormal general movements at 9 to 13 weeks…

  14. [Angiostrongylosis or eosinophilic meningitis].

    PubMed

    Bourée, Patrice; Dumazedier, Déborah; Dahane, Naïma

    2010-04-20

    Eosinophilic meningitis, or angiostrongyliasis, is a common disease in Asia, in the Caribbean and in the Pacific islands. It is caused by a rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Infection occurs by consumption of raw or undercooked snails. Diagnosis is based on epidemiological criteria, clinical manifestations, elevated count of eosinophils in the cerebrospinal fluid and serological tests. Treatment is symptomatic and supportive. PMID:20465114

  15. Abnormal fb Es enhancements in equatorial Es layers during magnetic storms of solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resende, L. C. A.; Denardini, C. M.; Batista, I. S.

    2013-09-01

    We have analyzed the behavior of blanketing frequency of the Es layer (fb Es) occurring at an equatorial station covering the days before, during and subsequent to 24 intense and very intense magnetic storms (Dst≤-100 nT) that occurred during the solar cycle 23. The fb Es was measured by digital ionosonde over São Luís, Brazil (2.33° S, 44.2° W, dip: -4.5°). Our analysis shows that there are significant changes in the fb Es, mainly during the recovery phase of magnetic storms, characterized by occurrence of peaks that exceed the ambient background values. Also, these peaks are associated to other types of sporadic E layer than the Esq (a non-blanketing layer detected due the plasma irregularities in the equatorial electrojet), which in turn means competing mechanisms. The results are discussed in terms of the statistics of the abnormal enhancement taking into account the phase of the magnetic storm.

  16. Carcinomatosis of the Meninges

    PubMed Central

    Dinsdale, Henry B.; Taghavy, Ahmad

    1964-01-01

    Some clinical and pathological features of carcinomatosis of the meninges are reviewed along with a report of four cases. This condition usually presents in middle age as a subacute meningitis with cranial nerve involvement, but the diagnostic importance of the various mental disturbances which may be encountered early in its course are noted. The acute or subacute course may reflect a widespread mechanical interference with normal cerebral metabolism, a notion which is supported by recent clinical measurements in these patients of the rate of glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier. It is probable that the route taken by tumour cells to reach the meningeal spaces is a relatively unimportant factor in determining this pattern of growth and that the intrinsic growth characteristics of the primary tumour, its nutritional needs, and gravity probably play the major roles in production of this unusual type of secondary invasion. Greater therapeutic use of irradiation for these patients is encouraged. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:14118690

  17. Meningococcal meningitis outbreak control strategies.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, S; Kumar, R; Roy, P; Varma, S; Sharma, B K

    2000-12-01

    Meningococcal meningitis has been occurring worldwide in both endemic and epidemic forms. Serogroup A accounts for majority of cases of epidemic as well as endemic Meningococcal meningitis in developing nations, whereas group C and group B causes epidemic and endemic meningococcal meningitis in developed countries. Person to person spread of N. meningitides generally occurs through inhalation of droplets of infected nasopharyngeal secretions by direct or indirect oral contact. Incubation period varies from 2 to 10 days. N. meningitides typically causes acute infective illness characterized by sequential development of upper respiratory tract infection, meningococcemia, meningitis and focal neurological deficit. Over 90 per cent cases of adult meningococcal infections have cerebrospinal meningitis, whereas in children prevalence of meningitis is much lower (50 per cent). Acute meningitis manifests with fever, severe headache, vomiting and neck stiffness. Presentations may be non-specific in infants, elderly and in patients with fulminant meningococcemia. Diagnosis is confirmed with cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Overall mortality due to meningitis is usually around 10 per cent. In meningococcal septicemia, the case fatality rate may exceed 50 per cent. Preventive strategies include vaccination, chemoprophylaxis and early detection and treatment. Mass vaccination campaign, if appropriately carried out, has been documented to halt an epidemic of meningococcal disease due to serogroup A or C. In the present review we have discussed the available evidence with regards to prevention at primary, secondary and tertiary level. Public health approach to an outbreak of meningococcal meningitis in a community or an organization is also outlined. PMID:11668937

  18. Appearance of the canine meninges in subtraction magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Christopher R; Lam, Richard; Keenihan, Erin K; Frean, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The canine meninges are not visible as discrete structures in noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) images, and are incompletely visualized in T1-weighted, postgadolinium images, reportedly appearing as short, thin curvilinear segments with minimal enhancement. Subtraction imaging facilitates detection of enhancement of tissues, hence may increase the conspicuity of meninges. The aim of the present study was to describe qualitatively the appearance of canine meninges in subtraction MR images obtained using a dynamic technique. Images were reviewed of 10 consecutive dogs that had dynamic pre- and postgadolinium T1W imaging of the brain that was interpreted as normal, and had normal cerebrospinal fluid. Image-anatomic correlation was facilitated by dissection and histologic examination of two canine cadavers. Meningeal enhancement was relatively inconspicuous in postgadolinium T1-weighted images, but was clearly visible in subtraction images of all dogs. Enhancement was visible as faint, small-rounded foci compatible with vessels seen end on within the sulci, a series of larger rounded foci compatible with vessels of variable caliber on the dorsal aspect of the cerebral cortex, and a continuous thin zone of moderate enhancement around the brain. Superimposition of color-encoded subtraction images on pregadolinium T1- and T2-weighted images facilitated localization of the origin of enhancement, which appeared to be predominantly dural, with relatively few leptomeningeal structures visible. Dynamic subtraction MR imaging should be considered for inclusion in clinical brain MR protocols because of the possibility that its use may increase sensitivity for lesions affecting the meninges. PMID:24833219

  19. Meningitis - gram-negative

    MedlinePlus

    ... and children include: Infection Recent brain surgery Recent injury to the head Spinal abnormalities Spinal fluid shunt placement after brain surgery Urinary tract abnormalities Urinary tract infection Weakened immune system

  20. Recognising early meningitis: a missed opportunity to diagnose meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ponnampalam, Anusha; de Sousa, Paula; Carroll, Will

    2016-01-01

    There are ∼250 cases of neonatal bacterial meningitis each year in the UK. Clinical evaluation of signs and symptoms of meningitis is challenging, particularly, during the neonatal period. Although uncommon, it is recognised that bacterial meningitis can be present in a child with an apparently normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) initially.We report the case of a newborn baby girl who was admitted with concerns regarding 2 dusky episodes. She underwent blood tests, a lumbar puncture and was started on intravenous antibiotics. With negative cultures, normal blood results and following a significant clinical improvement, antibiotics were discontinued after 48 hours and the baby was discharged home. She re-presented to the children's emergency department 7 hours later with a history of an apnoeic episode. A second CSF sample was suggestive of bacterial meningitis. We will discuss the published literature and the potential drawbacks of lumbar punctures and ways to diagnose meningitis early. PMID:27516108

  1. Severe cochlear dysplasia causing recurrent meningitis: a surgical lesson.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D S; Proops, D W; Phelps, P D

    1993-08-01

    Meningitis may be the sole presenting sign of a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula of the temporal bone. An eight-year-old boy suffering from recurrent meningitis was found to have bilateral severe cochlear dysplasia. Bilateral tympanotomies were performed, planning to obliterate each vestibule. In the right ear a stapedectomy was performed, resulting in a torrential 'CSF gusher' and difficulty in packing the vestibule. CSF rhinorrhoea requiring revision surgery and two episodes of gram-negative bacterial meningitis complicated the post-operative management, resulting in a prolonged hospital stay. Subsequently, the left ear was managed in a different fashion, leaving the stapes in situ, with grafts placed to seal the oval window niche. We would recommend this alternative procedure in cases of severe cochlear dysplasia, where abnormalities of the vestibule and basal turn of the cochlea mean that performing a stapedectomy to pack the vestibule may result in a severe 'CSF gusher', by opening directly into the subarachnoid space. PMID:8409727

  2. The Meningitis Vaccine Project.

    PubMed

    LaForce, F Marc; Konde, Kader; Viviani, Simonetta; Préziosi, Marie-Pierre

    2007-09-01

    Epidemic meningococcal meningitis is an important public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Current control measures rely on reactive immunizations with polysaccharide (PS) vaccines that do not induce herd immunity and are of limited effectiveness in those under 2 years of age. Conversely, polysaccharide conjugate vaccines are effective in infants and have consistently shown an important effect on decreasing carriage, two characteristics that facilitate disease control. In 2001 the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) was created as a partnership between PATH and the World Health Organization (WHO) with the goal of eliminating meningococcal epidemics in Africa through the development, licensure, introduction, and widespread use of conjugate meningococcal vaccines. Since group A Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) is the dominant pathogen causing epidemic meningitis in Africa MVP is developing an affordable (US$ 0.40 per dose) meningococcal A (Men A) conjugate vaccine through an innovative international partnership that saw transfer of a conjugation and fermentation technology to a developing country vaccine manufacturer. A Phase 1 study of the vaccine in India has shown that the product is safe and immunogenic. Phase 2 studies have begun in Africa, and a large demonstration study of the conjugate vaccine is envisioned for 2008-2009. After extensive consultations with African public health officials a vaccine introduction plan has been developed that includes introduction of the Men A conjugate vaccine into standard Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) schedules but also emphasizes mass vaccination of 1-29 years old to induce herd immunity, a strategy that has been shown to be highly effective when the meningococcal C (Men C) conjugate vaccine was introduced in several European countries. The MVP model is a clear example of the usefulness of a "push mechanism" to finance the development of a needed vaccine for the developing world. PMID:17521780

  3. Approach to diagnosis of meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid evaluation.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, J E

    1990-12-01

    CSF evaluation is the single most important aspect of the laboratory diagnosis of meningitis. Analysis of the CSF abnormalities produced by bacterial, mycobacterial, and fungal infections may greatly facilitate diagnosis and direct initial therapy. Basic studies of CSF that should be performed in all patients with meningitis include measurement of pressure, cell count and white cell differential; determination of glucose and protein levels; Gram's stain; and culture. In bacterial meningitis, Limulus lysate assay and tests to identify bacterial antigens may allow rapid diagnosis. Where there is strong suspicion of tuberculous or fungal meningitis, CSF should also be submitted for acid-fast stain, India ink preparation, and cryptococcal antigen; unless contraindicated by increased intracranial pressure, large volumes (up to 40-50 mL) should be obtained for culture. If a history of residence in the Southwest is elicited, complement-fixing antibodies to Coccidioides immitis should also be ordered. Newer tests based on immunologic methods or gene amplification techniques hold great promise for diagnosis of infections caused by organisms that are difficult to culture or present in small numbers. Despite the great value of lumbar puncture in the diagnosis of meningitis, injudicious use of the procedure may result in death from brain herniation. Lumbar puncture should be avoided if focal neurologic findings suggest concomitant mass lesion, as in brain abscess, and lumbar puncture should be approached with great caution if meningitis is accompanied by evidence of significant intracranial hypertension. Institution of antibiotic therapy for suspected meningitis should not be delayed while neuroradiologic studies are obtained to exclude abscess or while measures are instituted to reduce intracranial pressure. PMID:2277190

  4. Recurrent meningitis associated with complete Currarino triad in an adult--case report.

    PubMed

    Haga, Yasushi; Cho, Hiroyuki; Shinoda, Souji; Masuzawa, Toshio

    2003-10-01

    A 58-year-old woman presented with Currarino triad manifesting as recurrent meningitis. Currarino triad is a combination of a presacral mass, a congenital sacral bony abnormality, and an anorectal malformation, which is caused by dorsal-ventral patterning defects during embryonic development. She had a history of treatment for anal stenosis in her childhood. Radiographic examinations demonstrated the characteristic findings of Currarino triad and a complicated mass lesion. The diagnosis was recurrent meningitis related to the anterior sacral meningocele. Neck ligation of the meningocele was performed via a posterior transsacral approach after treatment with antibiotics. At surgery, an epidermoid cyst was observed inside the meningocele. The cyst content was aspirated. She suffered no further episodes of meningitis. The meningitis was probably part of the clinical course of Currarino triad. Radiography of the sacrum and magnetic resonance imaging are recommended for patients with meningitis of unknown origin. The early diagnosis and treatment of this condition are important. PMID:14620204

  5. Herpes Zoster Meningitis Complicating Combined Tocilizumab and Cyclosporine Therapy for Adult-Onset Still's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsurukawa, Shinichiro; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Shirakawa, Atsunori; Kawahara, Chieko; Shukuwa, Tetsuo; Inamoto, Miwako; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old female with refractory adult-onset Still's disease presented with ocular herpes zoster infection during TCZ treatment. After three days of acyclovir treatment (5 mg/kg), she developed a severe headache and high fever. Viral DNA isolation and cerebral spinal fluid abnormalities led to a herpes zoster meningitis diagnosis. Her meningitis was cured by high doses of intravenous acyclovir (10 mg/kg for 14 days). To our knowledge, this is the first report of meningeal herpes zoster infection in rheumatic diseases under TCZ treatment. PMID:27092286

  6. Herpes Zoster Meningitis Complicating Combined Tocilizumab and Cyclosporine Therapy for Adult-Onset Still's Disease.

    PubMed

    Tsurukawa, Shinichiro; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Shirakawa, Atsunori; Kawahara, Chieko; Shukuwa, Tetsuo; Inamoto, Miwako; Kawakami, Atsushi; Migita, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old female with refractory adult-onset Still's disease presented with ocular herpes zoster infection during TCZ treatment. After three days of acyclovir treatment (5 mg/kg), she developed a severe headache and high fever. Viral DNA isolation and cerebral spinal fluid abnormalities led to a herpes zoster meningitis diagnosis. Her meningitis was cured by high doses of intravenous acyclovir (10 mg/kg for 14 days). To our knowledge, this is the first report of meningeal herpes zoster infection in rheumatic diseases under TCZ treatment. PMID:27092286

  7. Campylobacter Fetus Meningitis in Adults

    PubMed Central

    van Samkar, Anusha; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter fetus is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, predisposing factors and outcome of C fetus meningitis in adults. We report cases of C fetus meningitis in a nationwide cohort study of adult bacterial meningitis patients in the Netherlands and performed a review of the literature. Two patients with C fetus meningitis were identified from January 2006 through May 2015. The calculated annual incidence was 0.02 per million adults. Combined with the literature, we identified 22 patients with a median age of 48 years. An immunocompromised state was present in 16 patients (73%), mostly due to alcoholism (41%) and diabetes mellitus (27%). The source of infection was identified in 13 out of 19 patients (68%), consisting of regular contact with domestic animals in 5 and working on a farm in 4. Recurrent fever and illness was reported in 4 patients (18%), requiring prolonged antibiotic treatment. Two patients died (9%) and 3 survivors (15%) had neurological sequelae. C fetus is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis and is associated with an immunocompromised state. Based on the apparent slow clinical response seen in this limited number of cases, the authors of this study recommend a prolonged course of antimicrobial therapy when C fetus is identified as a causative agent of bacterial meningitis. Cases appeared to do best with carbapenem therapy. PMID:26937916

  8. The frequency of physical signs usually attributed to meningeal irritation in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Puxty, J A; Fox, R A; Horan, M A

    1983-10-01

    Nuchal rigidity, which may be a sign of meningitis, was found in 35 per cent of geriatric patients on acute-care and rehabilitation wards and in 13 per cent of younger patients on an acute-care ward. It was significantly associated with cerebrovascular disease, confusion, abnormal plantar responses, and primitive reflexes. Elderly patients who have nuchal rigidity with no history of neurologic or cognitive disorders should be investigated for meningitis. PMID:6619465

  9. Abnormal enhancement of dilepton yield in central heavy-ion collisions from local parity breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, A. A.; Andrianov, V. A.; Espriu, D.; Planells, X.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new explanation for the dilepton excess observed in dense (hot) nuclear matter at invariant masses below 1GeV. We argue that the presence of local parity breaking due to a time-dependent isosinglet and/or isotriplet pseudoscalar condensate may substantially modify the dispersion relation of photons and vector mesons propagating in such a medium, resulting in an abnormally large excess of e+e- pairs with respect to the common theoretical predictions based on a "cocktail" of hadronic processes. We propose various signatures to prove or disprove this effect.

  10. Concurrent meningitis and vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    Santra, Tuhin; Datta, Sumana; Agrawal, Neha; Bar, Mita; Kar, Arnab; Adhikary, Apu; Ranjan, Kunal

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is an endemic infectious disease in India. It is often associated with other infective conditions but concomitant infection of malaria and meningitis are uncommon. We present a case of meningitis with vivax malaria infection in a 24-year-old lady. This case emphasizes the importance of high index of clinical suspicion to detect other infective conditions like meningitis when fever does not improve even after anti-malarial treatment in a patient of malaria before switching therapy suspecting drug resistance, which is quite common in this part of world. PMID:26985423

  11. Rheumatoid meningitis associated with infliximab

    PubMed Central

    Stroberg, Edana; Metting, Austin

    2016-01-01

    We present a patient who had rheumatoid meningitis while on infliximab, a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitor, which initially presented as transient ischemic attacks. Although our patient had been stable on infliximab for several years, her neurologic symptoms improved when her infliximab was held due to active infection and then recurred after reinitiation of therapy. Rheumatoid meningitis is exceedingly rare; however, there have been several other reports of rheumatoid meningitis developing in patients on TNF-α inhibitor therapy. PMID:27034572

  12. Murine abortion is associated with enhanced hyaluronan expression and abnormal localization at the fetomaternal interface.

    PubMed

    Cordo-Russo, R; Garcia, M G; Barrientos, G; Orsal, A S; Viola, M; Moschansky, P; Ringel, F; Passi, A; Alaniz, L; Hajos, S; Blois, S M

    2009-01-01

    The remodelling of the endometrial architecture is fundamental to create a suitable environment for the establishment of pregnancy. During this process, substantial alterations in the composition of maternal extracellular matrix play an important role by providing a prosperous medium for implantation as well as modulating trophoblast invasion leading to the formation of a functional placental unit. Hyaluronan is a conspicuous component of the extracellular matrix, particularly in remodelling tissues undergoing regeneration and repair. During gestation, changes in HA deposition and distribution indicate that this molecule may participate in preparation of the endometrial stroma for reception and implantation of the embryo. However, little is known about the role of hyaluronan at the fetomaternal interface, specially regarding its influence in pregnancy outcome. In the present study we show increased decidual hyaluronan levels in spontaneous abortion compared with normal pregnancy mice on gestation day 7.5. Both in normal and pathologic pregnancies, high molecular size hyaluronan was found at the fetomaternal unit. However, hyaluronan metabolism (which results from the activity of hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronidases) seems to be altered in spontaneous abortion as shown by a decrease in Hyal-3 expression as well as by differences in hyaluronan molecular size spectrum. This alteration in hyaluronan metabolism in spontaneous abortion could explain its increased concentration observed in decidua and the abnormal distribution of hyaluronan around the embryo implantation crypt. Thus, increased decidual hyaluronan levels resulting from abnormal deposition and turn over may contribute to the pathogenesis of pregnancy failure. PMID:19059644

  13. Angiostrongylus cantonensis eosinophilic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pien, F D; Pien, B C

    1999-01-01

    In the past 50 years, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis, has spread from Southeast Asia to the South Pacific, Africa, India, the Caribbean, and recently, to Australia and North America, mainly carried by cargo ship rats. Humans are accidental, "dead-end" hosts infected by eating larvae from snails, slugs, or contaminated, uncooked vegetables. These larvae migrate to the brain, spinal cord, and nerve roots, causing eosinophilia in both spinal fluid and peripheral blood. Infected patients present with severe headache, vomiting, paresthesias, weakness, and occasionally visual disturbances and extraocular muscular paralysis. Most patients have a full recovery; however, heavy infections can lead to chronic, disabling disease and even death. There is no proven treatment for this disease. In the authors' experience, corticosteroids have been helpful in severe cases to relieve intracranial pressure as well as neurologic symptoms due to inflammatory responses to migrating and eventually dying worms. PMID:10460929

  14. Subarachnoid space: middle ear pathways and recurrent meningitis.

    PubMed

    Barcz, D V; Wood, R P; Stears, J; Jafek, B W; Shields, M

    1985-03-01

    Congenital bony abnormalities of the inner ear may result in a communication between the middle ear and the subarachnoid space. Patients with this anomaly often present with recurrent meningitis associated with acute otitis media or with middle ear fluid. This article presents three cases of recurrent meningitis with open middle ear--subarachnoid space connections. The first two cases involve a cerebrospinal fluid leak into the middle ear via the oval window, both patients having a Mondini-type of inner ear deformity. The pathway in the third case opened into the middle ear along the horizontal portion of the facial nerve. Computed tomography (CT) scanning with metrizamide and differential density calculations helped to identify the abnormal pathway and to confirm that the leak has been closed postoperatively. Use of the CT scanner in these cases can be helpful in planning the surgical closure and in postoperative follow-up. PMID:4039111

  15. [Cryptococcus meningitis in an immunocompetent child: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, M; Hagerimana, R; Diagne, N S; Faye, M W; Sène, M S; Sow, A D; Sène-Diouf, F; Diop, A G; Ndiaye, M M

    2010-07-01

    Cryptococcus meningitis is uncommon in childhood. We report a Senegalese case of cryptococcus meningitis diagnosed in an apparently immunocompetent child. A 9-year-old boy was admitted for acute meningoencephalitis. A computerized tomography scan of the brain showed an ischemic lesion in the left caudate and study of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed cytological and biochemical abnormalities and Cryptococcus neoformans on direct exam and culture. HIV and syphilis antibodies were negative and the blood CD4 lymphocyte count was 804/mm(3). The child had no immunocompromising factors such as hematologic abnormalities, solid tumor, or undernutrition. He was treated with fluconazole intravenously, but clinical outcome was unsuccessful. The patient died after 1 month from cardiovascular and respiratory distress. PMID:20400277

  16. Considering syphilis in aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Sarup; Chadwick, David; Chawla, Girish

    2009-12-01

    Clinicians need to consider syphilis in the differential diagnosis of macular or papular rashes with neurological conditions, particularly aseptic meningitis, as early diagnosis and treatment lead to a better prognosis. PMID:20095316

  17. Severe Cysticercal Meningitis: Clinical and Imaging Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Graciela; Jung, Helgi; Ríos, Camilo; Fleury, Agnes; Soto-Hernández, José Luís

    2010-01-01

    In disease-endemic areas, severe cysticercal meningitis (SCM) is characterized by intense inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and negative bacterial and fungal cultures. There have been no systematic studies of SCM. We characterized patients with SCM and compare them with neurocysticercosis (NC) patients with mild CSF abnormalities by conducting a nine-year retrospective review at a neurological referral center. Two groups of patients were compared: group A, those with severe CSF pleocytosis > 1,000 cells/mm3 (n = 12), and group B, those with CSF pleocytosis ≤ 1,000 cells/mm3 (n = 126). All patients had positive CSF results in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for cysticercal antigens and negative CSF cultures for bacteria, fungi, and mycobacteria. Intracranial hypertension, meningeal signs, CSF hypoglycorrachia, and a longer clinical course of NC were more frequently seen in group A. It is likely that SCM often goes unrecognized. Its correct identification may reduce morbidity and risks of unnecessary surgery in patients with chronic NC and CSF shunts. PMID:20065006

  18. Federal regulation of vision enhancement devices for normal and abnormal vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drum, Bruce

    2006-09-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) evaluates the safety and effectiveness of medical devices and biological products as well as food and drugs. The FDA defines a device as a product that is intended, by physical means, to diagnose, treat, or prevent disease, or to affect the structure or function of the body. All vision enhancement devices fulfill this definition because they are intended to affect a function (vision) of the body. In practice, however, FDA historically has drawn a distinction between devices that are intended to enhance low vision as opposed to normal vision. Most low vision aids are therapeutic devices intended to compensate for visual impairment, and are actively regulated according to their level of risk to the patient. The risk level is usually low (e.g. Class I, exempt from 510(k) submission requirements for magnifiers that do not touch the eye), but can be as high as Class III (requiring a clinical trial and Premarket Approval (PMA) application) for certain implanted and prosthetic devices (e.g. intraocular telescopes and prosthetic retinal implants). In contrast, the FDA usually does not actively enforce its regulations for devices that are intended to enhance normal vision, are low risk, and do not have a medical intended use. However, if an implanted or prosthetic device were developed for enhancing normal vision, the FDA would likely decide to regulate it actively, because its intended use would entail a substantial medical risk to the user. Companies developing such devices should contact the FDA at an early stage to clarify their regulatory status.

  19. Meningeal involvement in Wegener granulomatosis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Soriano, A; Lo Vullo, M; Casale, M; Quattrocchi, C C; Afeltra, A

    2012-01-01

    Wegener Granulomatosis (WG) is a multisystem autoimmune disorder characterized by necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis that most commonly involves the upper respiratory tract, lungs, and kidneys. The involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) is infrequent and can cause stroke, cranial nerve abnormalities, cerebrovascular events, seizures, and meningeal involvement. Meningeal involvement is rare and may occur due to local vasculitis, directly spread from adjacent disease in the skull base, paranasal or orbital region. We describe the case of a 20-year-old Caucasian man who was diagnosed with sinonasal WG with frontal focal meningeal involvement. A literature review on diagnosis and treatment of meningeal involvement in course of WG was carried out. The importance of an early diagnosis and treatment of localized WG has been emphasized, in order to avoid the progression to a severe form of disease, especially in younger patients and in paucisymptomatic cases. PMID:23298504

  20. Spatial dynamics of meningococcal meningitis in Niger: observed patterns in comparison with measles.

    PubMed

    Bharti, N; Broutin, H; Grais, R F; Ferrari, M J; Djibo, A; Tatem, A J; Grenfell, B T

    2012-08-01

    Throughout the African meningitis belt, meningococcal meningitis outbreaks occur only during the dry season. Measles in Niger exhibits similar seasonality, where increased population density during the dry season probably escalates measles transmission. Because meningococcal meningitis and measles are both directly transmitted, we propose that host aggregation also impacts the transmission of meningococcal meningitis. Although climate affects broad meningococcal meningitis seasonality, we focus on the less examined role of human density at a finer spatial scale. By analysing spatial patterns of suspected cases of meningococcal meningitis, we show fewer absences of suspected cases in districts along primary roads, similar to measles fadeouts in the same Nigerien metapopulation. We further show that, following periods during no suspected cases, districts with high reappearance rates of meningococcal meningitis also have high measles reintroduction rates. Despite many biological and epidemiological differences, similar seasonal and spatial patterns emerge from the dynamics of both diseases. This analysis enhances our understanding of spatial patterns and disease transmission and suggests hotspots for infection and potential target areas for meningococcal meningitis surveillance and intervention. PMID:22009033

  1. Tuberculous granulomas in childhood tuberculous meningitis: radiological features and course.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, A; Schoeman, J F; Donald, P R

    2001-02-01

    The clinical course and serial cranial computerized tomographic (CT) findings of 202 children with tuberculous meningitis (TBM) admitted to Tygerberg Hospital between 1985 and 1994 were reviewed with regard to the incidence, CT appearance and clinical course of associated intracranial tuberculous granulomas. Thirty-four patients (16.85 per cent) had associated intracranial granulomas. Thirty-eight individual lesions were analysed and classified as meningeal, parenchymal or ependymal according to their central nervous system (CNS) location. Twenty-five patients had round to irregular, brain iso-, hypo- or hyperdense meningeal granulomas with variable degrees of enhancement and peri-lesional hypodensities. Four patients had diffusely enhancing, brain isodense, enplaque-like ependymal granulomas associated with the ventricular ependymal lining. Four patients with miliary tuberculosis and TBM showed multiple small diffusely enhancing, brain iso- or hyperdense parenchymal lesions and associated hypodensities on initial CT. Although granulomas in the meningeal and ependymal group had the propensity to paradoxically enlarge or appear on standard four-drug antituberculosis therapy, the majority resolved uneventfully. Rapid resolution of small parenchymal granulomas associated with miliary tuberculosis occurred in all cases. Most granulomas in this series were co-incidental, asymptomatic CT findings. In rare cases, the development or enlargement of a strategically located granuloma may result in complications. PMID:11245351

  2. Abnormal brain scan with subacute extradural haematomas

    PubMed Central

    Morley, J. Barrie; Langford, Keith H.

    1970-01-01

    Four patients are described with proven subacute extradural haematomas, each with an abnormal cerebral scan of diagnostic assistance. A possible mechanism of production of the subacute extradural haematoma is discussed, and appears to be similar to the mechanism involved in the subacute subdural haematoma. The means by which the abnormal scan results in such cases is also examined, from which it appears that non-specific meningeal membrane inflammatory reaction surrounding the haematoma is significant. Images PMID:5478950

  3. An unusual case of meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Pond, Eric DR; El-Bailey, Sameh; Webster, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis. A 56-year-old man with several pets developed a profoundly decreased level of consciousness following left tympanomastoidectomy. Lumbar puncture produced cerebrospinal fluid with the typical findings of meningitis (low glucose, high protein, high leukocytes). Cultures from the cerebrospinal fluid and a swab of the left ear revealed Gram-negative coccobacillus identified as P multocida. The organism was sensitive to ceftriaxone, ampicillin and penicillin, and a 14-day course of intravenous penicillin was used as definitive treatment, resulting in full recovery. Although rare, P multocida should be considered as a potential cause of meningitis in patients with animal exposure, particularly in the setting of recent cranial surgery. PMID:26236360

  4. Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial Meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby ... advice from your health care provider. What is meningitis? Meningitis is an infection of the lining that ...

  5. Meningitis, clinical presentation of tetanus.

    PubMed

    Moniuszko, Anna; Zajkowska, Agata; Tumiel, Ewa; Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Czupryna, Piotr; Pancewicz, Sławomir; Rutkowski, Ryszard; Zdrodowska, Agnieszka; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tetanus is an acute disease caused by a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium tetani. Tetanus immunization has been available since the late 1930s but sporadic cases still occur, usually in incompletely vaccinated or unvaccinated individuals. Case Report. An elderly previously vaccinated female contracted tetanus following foot injury. Clinically she presented with meningitis causing diagnostic and therapeutic delays. Why Should Physician Be Aware of This? Even in developed countries the differential diagnosis of meningitis, especially in the elderly, should include tetanus. Treatment in intensive care unit is required. General population might benefit from vaccine boosters and education on this potentially fatal disease. PMID:25789186

  6. Diagnostic Accuracy of Intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis Detection for Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guo-dong; Shi, Ming; Ma, Lei; Chen, Ping; Wang, Bing-ju; Zhang, Min; Chang, Xiao-lin; Su, Xiu-chu; Yang, Yi-ning; Fan, Xin-hong; Dai, Wen; Liu, Ting-ting; He, Ying; Bian, Ting; Duan, Li-xin; Li, Jin-ge; Hao, Xiao-ke; Liu, Jia-yun; Xue, Xin; Song, Yun-zhang; Wu, Hai-qin; Niu, Guo-qiang; Zhang, Li; Han, Cui-juan; Lin, Hong; Lin, Zhi-hui; Liu, Jian-jun; Jian, Qian; Zhang, Jin-she; Tian, Ye; Zhou, Bai-yu; Wang, Jing; Xue, Chang-hu; Han, Xiao-fang; Wang, Jian-feng; Wang, Shou-lian

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Early diagnosis and treatment of tuberculous meningitis saves lives, but current laboratory diagnostic tests lack sensitivity. Objectives: We investigated whether the detection of intracellular bacteria by a modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain and early secretory antigen target (ESAT)-6 in cerebrospinal fluid leukocytes improves tuberculous meningitis diagnosis. Methods: Cerebrospinal fluid specimens from patients with suspected tuberculous meningitis were stained by conventional Ziehl-Neelsen stain, a modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain involving cytospin slides with Triton processing, and an ESAT-6 immunocytochemical stain. Acid-fast bacteria and ESAT-6–expressing leukocytes were detected by microscopy. All tests were performed prospectively in a central laboratory by experienced technicians masked to the patients’ final diagnosis. Measurements and Main Results: Two hundred and eighty patients with suspected tuberculous meningitis were enrolled. Thirty-seven had Mycobacterium tuberculosis cultured from cerebrospinal fluid; 40 had a microbiologically confirmed alternative diagnosis; the rest had probable or possible tuberculous meningitis according to published criteria. Against a clinical diagnostic gold standard the sensitivity of conventional Ziehl-Neelsen stain was 3.3% (95% confidence interval, 1.6–6.7%), compared with 82.9% (95% confidence interval, 77.4–87.3%) for modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain and 75.1% (95% confidence interval, 68.8–80.6%) for ESAT-6 immunostain. Intracellular bacteria were seen in 87.8% of the slides positive by the modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain. The specificity of modified Ziehl-Neelsen and ESAT-6 stain was 85.0% (95% confidence interval, 69.4–93.8%) and 90.0% (95% confidence interval, 75.4–96.7%), respectively. Conclusions: Enhanced bacterial detection by simple modification of the Ziehl-Neelsen stain and an ESAT-6 intracellular stain improve the laboratory diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis. PMID:24450377

  7. Abnormally enhanced dielectric permittivity in poly(vinylidene fluoride)/nanosized-La2NiO4-δ films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeporn, Keerati; Maensiri, Santi; Thongbai, Prasit

    2016-09-01

    The abnormally enhanced dielectric properties of poly(vinylidene fluoride)/nano-sized La2NiO4-δ (PVDF/LNO) nanocomposite films were investigated. To study the effects of surface modification of LNO nanoparticles caused by a combustion process on the formation of a percolating network and interfacial polarization, micro-sized LNO was also used as filler. The abrupt changes in the dielectric permittivity (ɛ‧) and loss tangent (tan δ) of PVDF/LNO composites were observed, indicating the formation of percolation network of LNO filler particles. ɛ‧ of the nanocomposites was larger than that of the microcomposites. Significantly improved dielectric properties with ɛ‧ ≈ 431.17 and tan δ ≈ 0.43 were successfully achieved by optimizing loading content of LNO filler to be 25 vol%. Large interfacial polarization intensity due to nano-sized filler particles and modified-surface LNO particles were suggested to be primary causes for improving the dielectric properties of PVDF/LNO nanocomposite films.

  8. Behavioral Abnormality Induced by Enhanced Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenocortical Axis Activity under Dietary Zinc Deficiency and Its Usefulness as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Haruna; Nishio, Ryusuke; Murakami, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Dietary zinc deficiency increases glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal cortex via enhanced hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity and induces neuropsychological symptoms, i.e., behavioral abnormality. Behavioral abnormality is due to the increase in glucocorticoid secretion rather than disturbance of brain zinc homeostasis, which occurs after the increase in glucocorticoid secretion. A major target of glucocorticoids is the hippocampus and their actions are often associated with disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission, which may be linked to behavioral abnormality, such as depressive symptoms and aggressive behavior under zinc deficiency. Glucocorticoid-mediated disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus is also involved in the pathophysiology of, not only psychiatric disorders, such as depression, but also neurodegenerative disorders, e.g., Alzheimer’s disease. The evidence suggests that zinc-deficient animals are models for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), as well as depression. To understand validity to apply zinc-deficient animals as a behavioral abnormality model, this paper deals with the effect of antidepressive drugs and herbal medicines on hippocampal dysfunctions and behavioral abnormality, which are induced by enhanced HPA axis activity under dietary zinc deficiency. PMID:27438830

  9. Behavioral Abnormality Induced by Enhanced Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenocortical Axis Activity under Dietary Zinc Deficiency and Its Usefulness as a Model.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Haruna; Nishio, Ryusuke; Murakami, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Dietary zinc deficiency increases glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal cortex via enhanced hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity and induces neuropsychological symptoms, i.e., behavioral abnormality. Behavioral abnormality is due to the increase in glucocorticoid secretion rather than disturbance of brain zinc homeostasis, which occurs after the increase in glucocorticoid secretion. A major target of glucocorticoids is the hippocampus and their actions are often associated with disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission, which may be linked to behavioral abnormality, such as depressive symptoms and aggressive behavior under zinc deficiency. Glucocorticoid-mediated disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus is also involved in the pathophysiology of, not only psychiatric disorders, such as depression, but also neurodegenerative disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease. The evidence suggests that zinc-deficient animals are models for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), as well as depression. To understand validity to apply zinc-deficient animals as a behavioral abnormality model, this paper deals with the effect of antidepressive drugs and herbal medicines on hippocampal dysfunctions and behavioral abnormality, which are induced by enhanced HPA axis activity under dietary zinc deficiency. PMID:27438830

  10. Tuberculous meningitis with dementia as the presenting symptom after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Yagi, Hideki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Early-stage TB meningitis has no specific symptoms in patients, potentially leading to delayed diagnosis and consequently worsening prognosis. The authors present the fatal case with a delayed diagnosis of tuberculous (TB) meningitis with dementia as the presenting symptom after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection. The medical records, operative reports, and radiographical imaging studies of a single patient were retrospectively reviewed. A 77-year-old man who underwent thoracic intramedullary hemangioblastoma resection for 2 times. The postoperative course was uneventful, but 1.5 months after surgery, the patient suffered from dementia with memory loss and diminished motivation and speech in the absence of a fever. No abnormalities were detected on blood test, brain computed tomography and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. A sputum sample was negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold (QFT-G) In-Tube Test and the tuberculin skin test was also negative. The patient was diagnosed with senile dementia by a psychiatrist. However, the patient’s symptoms progressively worsened. Despite the absence of TB meningitis findings, we suspected TB meningitis from the patient’s history, and administered a four-drug regimen. However the patient died 29 days after admission, subsequently M. tuberculosis was detected in the CSF sample. This case is a rare case of TB meningitis initially mistaken for dementia after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection. Symptoms of dementia after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection should first be suspected as one of TB meningitis, even if the tests for meningitis are negative. We propose that anti-tuberculosis therapy should be immediately initiated in cases of suspected TB meningitis prior to positive identification on culture. PMID:26663944

  11. Long-Term Effects from Bacterial Meningitis in Childhood and Adolescence on Postural Control

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Hannes; Patel, Mitesh; Ingason, Einar F.; Einarsson, Einar J.; Haraldsson, Ásgeir; Fransson, Per-Anders

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis in childhood is associated with cognitive deficiencies, sensorimotor impairments and motor dysfunction later in life. However, the long-term effects on postural control is largely unknown, e.g., whether meningitis subjects as adults fully can utilize visual information and adaptation to enhance stability. Thirty-six subjects (20 women, mean age 19.3 years) treated in childhood or adolescence for bacterial meningitis, and 25 controls (13 women, mean age 25.1 years) performed posturography with eyes open and closed under unperturbed and perturbed standing. The meningitis subjects were screened for subjective vertigo symptoms using a questionnaire, clinically tested with headshake and head thrust test, as well as their hearing was evaluated. Meningitis subjects were significantly more unstable than controls during unperturbed (p≤0.014) and perturbed standing, though while perturbed only with eyes open in anteroposterior direction (p = 0.034) whereas in lateral direction both with eyes open and closed (p<0.001). Meningitis subjects had poorer adaption ability to balance perturbations especially with eyes open, and they frequently reported symptoms of unsteadiness (88% of the subjects) and dizziness (81%), which was found significantly correlated to objectively decreased stability. Out of the 36 subjects only 3 had unilateral hearing impairment. Hence, survivors of childhood bacterial meningitis may suffer long-term disorders affecting postural control, and would greatly benefit if these common late effects became generally known so treatments can be developed and applied. PMID:25405756

  12. Using Relative Humidity Forecasts to Manage Meningitis in the Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, R. E.; Adams-Forgor, A.; Akweogno, P.; Awine, T.; Dalaba, M.; Dukic, V.; Dumont, A.; Hayden, M.; Hodgson, A.; Hopson, T. M.; Hugonnet, S.; Yoksas, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    the number cases of meningitis in the Sahel. Using currently available forecast models contributed through the WMO Thorpex-Tigge project, and applying quantile regression to enhance their accuracy, we can forecast the average weekly relative humidity to two weeks in advance which allows us to anticipate the end of an epidemic in a region of the Sahel up to four weeks in advance. This would allow public health officials to deploy vaccines to areas in which the epidemics are likely to persist due to continued dryness and avoid vaccinating in areas where the epidemics will end with higher humidity. Our presentation will conclude by introducing the relative humidity decision-information tool developed for use by public-health officials. We will also summarize the results of a weekly meningitis forecast exercise held during the 2011-2012 dry season with public health decision makers from several African countries and the World Health Organization. Finally, we highlight some results of concurrent socio-economic research that suggests other interventions for managing meningitis and helps quantify the economic impact of the disease in Ghana. Overall, while our research has demonstrated an actionable relationship between weather and disease, this relationship is only one factor in a complex and coupled human-natural system which merits continued investigation.

  13. Corticosteroids for managing tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Kameshwar; Singh, Mamta B; Ryan, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculous meningitis is a serious form of tuberculosis (TB) that affects the meninges that cover a person's brain and spinal cord. It is associated with high death rates and with disability in people who survive. Corticosteroids have been used as an adjunct to antituberculous drugs to treat people with tuberculous meningitis, but their role has been controversial. Objectives To evaluate the effects of corticosteroids as an adjunct to antituberculous treatment on death and severe disability in people with tuberculous meningitis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register up to the 18 March 2016; CENTRAL; MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS; and Current Controlled Trials. We also contacted researchers and organizations working in the field, and checked reference lists. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that compared corticosteroid plus antituberculous treatment with antituberculous treatment alone in people with clinically diagnosed tuberculous meningitis and included death or disability as outcome measures. Data collection and analysis We independently assessed search results and methodological quality, and extracted data from the included trials. We analysed the data using risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and used a fixed-effect model. We performed an intention-to-treat analysis, where we included all participants randomized to treatment in the denominator. This analysis assumes that all participants who were lost to follow-up have good outcomes. We carried out a sensitivity analysis to explore the impact of the missing data. Main results Nine trials that included 1337 participants (with 469 deaths) met the inclusion criteria. At follow-up from three to 18 months, steroids reduce deaths by almost one quarter (RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.87; nine trials, 1337 participants, high quality evidence). Disabling neurological deficit is not common in survivors, and steroids may have little or no

  14. Streptococcal meningitis following myelogram procedures.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jennifer; Jensen, Bette; Arduino, Matthew; Bergeron, Toni; Fox, Teresa; Gum, Greg; Pischke, Vera; Potts, David; Townes, John; Srinivasan, Arjun

    2007-05-01

    In September of 2004, we investigated 7 cases of post-myelography meningitis. Streptococcal species were recovered from blood or cerebrospinal fluid in all cases. Our findings suggest that droplet transmission of the oral flora of the clinician performing the procedure was the most likely source of these infections. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the use of face masks by those performing myelograms. PMID:17464927

  15. Polyploidy Enhances F1 Pollen Sterility Loci Interactions That Increase Meiosis Abnormalities and Pollen Sterility in Autotetraploid Rice1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinwen; Chen, Lin; Chen, Zhixiong; Wang, Lan; Lu, Yonggen

    2015-01-01

    Intersubspecific autotetraploid rice (Oryza sativa ssp. indica × japonica) hybrids have greater biological and yield potentials than diploid rice. However, the low fertility of intersubspecific autotetraploid hybrids, which is largely caused by high pollen abortion rates, limits their commercial utility. To decipher the cytological and molecular mechanisms underlying allelic interactions in autotetraploid rice, we developed an autotetraploid rice hybrid that was heterozygous (SiSj) at F1 pollen sterility loci (Sa, Sb, and Sc) using near-isogenic lines. Cytological studies showed that the autotetraploid had higher percentages (>30%) of abnormal chromosome behavior and aberrant meiocytes (>50%) during meiosis than did the diploid rice hybrid control. Analysis of gene expression profiles revealed 1,888 genes that were differentially expressed between the autotetraploid and diploid hybrid lines at the meiotic stage, among which 889 and 999 were up- and down-regulated, respectively. Of the 999 down-regulated genes, 940 were associated with the combined effect of polyploidy and pollen sterility loci interactions (IPE). Gene Ontology enrichment analysis identified a prominent functional gene class consisting of seven genes related to photosystem I (Gene Ontology 0009522). Moreover, 55 meiosis-related or meiosis stage-specific genes were associated with IPE in autotetraploid rice, including Os02g0497500, which encodes a DNA repair-recombination protein, and Os02g0490000, which encodes a component of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. These results suggest that polyploidy enhances epistatic interactions between alleles of pollen sterility loci, thereby altering the expression profiles of important meiosis-related or meiosis stage-specific genes and resulting in high pollen sterility. PMID:26511913

  16. Gallium-67 uptake in meningeal sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, J.G.; Hicks, B.H.; Maisey, M.N.

    1986-07-01

    A case of sarcoidosis limited to the central nervous system is described in which the diagnosis was suggested by high Ga-67 uptake in the cranial and spinal meninges. The diagnosis was confirmed by meningeal biopsy. Treatment with oral corticosteroids resulted in clinical improvement and marked reduction in Ga-67 uptake in the meninges. This is the first reported case of the central nervous system sarcoid diagnosed by Ga-67 imaging.

  17. Pathophysiology and Treatment of Bacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency requiring immediate diagnosis and immediate treatment. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are the most common and most aggressive pathogens of meningitis. Emerging antibiotic resistance is an upcoming challenge. Clinical and experimental studies have established a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms resulting in brain damage, sequelae and neuropsychological deficits. We summarize the current pathophysiological concept of acute bacterial meningitis and present current treatment strategies. PMID:21180625

  18. Noninfectious Meningitis Caused by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Case Series of 4 Patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Ji Young; Lee, Young-Jun; Park, Dong Woo; Kim, Young Seo; Kim, Hyun Young

    2016-01-01

    We report magnetic resonance imaging findings of 4 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus who presented with noninfectious meningitis by lupus itself. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain demonstrated diffuse or localized high-signal intensity in subarachnoid spaces on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) or postcontrast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery. Cerebrospinal fluid study revealed no abnormalities other than increased level of proteins. Our report is the first description of magnetic resonance findings in context of leptomeningeal involvement in non-infectious meningitis of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:26938698

  19. Recurrent sterile meningitis caused by a pituitary abscess.

    PubMed

    Ford, J; Torres, L F; Cox, T; Hayward, R

    1986-10-01

    The case of a 21 year old woman who presented with recurrent sterile meningitis and bitemporal hemianopia is described. Computed tomographic scan showed a large low density ring enhancing lesion above and within the pituitary fossa which at operation and on histological examination was found to be compatible with an abscess. The visual field defect recovered completely and the scan appearances returned to normal postoperatively. PMID:3774724

  20. Gender Differences in Community-acquired Meningitis in Adults: Clinical Presentations and Prognostic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Dharmarajan, Lavanya; Salazar, Lucrecia; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Community-acquired meningitis is a serious disease that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the gender differences involved with the clinical presentations of and prognostic factors for this disease. We conducted a retrospective study of 619 adults diagnosed with community-acquired meningitis in Houston, Texas, who were hospitalized between 2005 and 2010. Patients were categorized as male or female. Those who were evaluated to have a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of four or less were classified to have an adverse clinical outcome. Males consisted of 47.2% (292/619) of the total cohort, and more often presented with coexisting medical conditions, fever, abnormal microbiology results, and abnormalities on head computed tomography. Females more often presented with nuchal rigidity. On logistic regression, fever, CSF glucose <45 mg/dL, and an abnormal neurological examination were predictors of an adverse outcome in male patients, while age greater than 60 years and an abnormal neurological examination were associated with a poor prognosis in female patients. Thus, community-acquired meningitis in males differs significantly from females in regards to comorbidities, presenting symptoms and signs, abnormal laboratory and imaging analysis, and predictors of adverse clinical outcomes. PMID:27500284

  1. Reliability and Diagnostic Performance of CT Imaging Criteria in the Diagnosis of Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Botha, Hugo; Ackerman, Christelle; Candy, Sally; Carr, Jonathan A.; Griffith-Richards, Stephanie; Bateman, Kathleen J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Abnormalities on CT imaging may contribute to the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). Recently, an expert consensus case definition (CCD) and set of imaging criteria for diagnosing basal meningeal enhancement (BME) have been proposed. This study aimed to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and reliability of these in a prospective cohort of adult meningitis patients. Methods Initial diagnoses were based on the CCD, classifying patients into: ‘Definite TBM’ (microbiological confirmation), ‘Probable TBM’ (diagnostic score ≥10), ‘Possible TBM’ (diagnostic score 6–9), ‘Not TBM’ (confirmation of an alternative diagnosis) or ‘Uncertain’ (diagnostic score of <6). CT images were evaluated independently on two occasions by four experienced reviewers. Intra-rater and inter-rater agreement were calculated using the kappa statistic. Sensitivities and specificities were calculated using both ‘Definite TBM’ and either ‘Definite TBM’ or ‘Probable TBM’ as gold standards. Results CT scan criteria for BME had good intra-rater agreement (κ range 0.35–0.78) and fair to moderate inter-rater agreement (κ range 0.20–0.52). Intra- and inter-rater agreement on the CCD components were good to fair (κ  =  ranges 0.47–0.81 and 0.21–0.63). Using ‘Definite TBM’ as a gold standard, the criteria for BME were very specific (61.5%–100%), but insensitive (5.9%–29.4%). Similarly, the imaging components of the CCD were highly specific (69.2–100%) but lacked sensitivity (0–56.7%). Similar values were found when using ‘Definite TBM’ or ‘Probable TBM’ as a gold standard. Discussion The fair to moderate inter-rater agreement and poor sensitivities of the criteria for BME suggest that little reliance should be placed in these features in isolation. While the presence of the CCD criteria of acute infarction or tuberculoma(s) appears useful as rule-in criteria, their absence is of little help in excluding TBM. The

  2. Case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis meningitis: Gram staining as a useful initial diagnostic clue for tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Sayoko; Kawamura, Yasuyosi; Nishiyama, Kyouhei; Hatanaka, Hiroki; Fujisaki, Ryuichi; Ono, Yasuo; Miyazawa, Yukihisa; Nishiya, Hajime

    2012-12-01

    A 32-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of fever, headache, and loss of consciousness. Four days before admission, he had had difficulty speaking. On the day of admission, his colleague had found him to be unconscious and lying on his back. He was admitted to our hospital. The temperature at the eardrum was 35.2°C. Neurologic evaluation was negative. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed slight ventricular enlargement bilaterally. An X-ray film of the chest showed no abnormality. On the second hospital day, neck stiffness was noted. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contained 870 white cells/μl, most of which were neutrophils; the glucose level in the CSF was 10 mg/dl, and the protein level was 140 mg/dl. Stained smears of the CSF, including Gram staining and India-ink preparations, disclosed no microorganisms. Capsular antigen tests for several bacteria were negative. Antimicrobial agents were started. However, by changing the microscope focus slightly while viewing Gram stains of the CSF, we could see brightened and Gram-positive bacilli that had been phagocytosed by neutrophils. This finding suggested the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Ziehl-Neelsen staining of the CSF and gastric juice revealed anti-acid bacilli. Polymerase chain reaction for M. tuberculosis in the gastric juice was positive. This case showed that Gram staining could be useful as an initial adjunct for the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis, particularly when the CSF shows predominantly neutrocytic pleocytosis, but no other evidence of bacterial meningitis. PMID:22476652

  3. Japanese encephalitis virus in meningitis patients, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Masaru; Ito, Mikako; Takao, Shinichi; Shimazu, Yukie; Fukuda, Shinji; Miyazaki, Kazuo; Kurane, Ichiro; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2005-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid specimens from 57 patients diagnosed with meningitis were tested for Japanese encephalitis virus. Total RNA was extracted from the specimens and amplified. Two products had highest homology with Nakayama strain and 2 with Ishikawa strain. Results suggest that Japanese encephalitis virus causes some aseptic meningitis in Japan. PMID:15757569

  4. Full recovery from Baylisascaris procyonis eosinophilic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pai, Poulomi J; Blackburn, Brian G; Kazacos, Kevin R; Warrier, Rajasekharan P; Bégué, Rodolfo E

    2007-06-01

    Infection by Baylisascaris procyonis is an uncommon but devastating cause of eosinophilic meningitis. We report the first case-patient, to our knowledge, who recovered from B. procyonis eosinophilic meningitis without any recognizable neurologic deficits. The spectrum of illness for this organism may be wider than previously recognized. PMID:17553240

  5. Cryptococcal Meningitis: Diagnosis and Management Update

    PubMed Central

    Abassi, Mahsa; Boulware, David R; Rhein, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the diagnosis and management of cryptococcal meningitis are promising and have been improving long-term survival. Point of care testing has made diagnosing cryptococcal meningitis rapid, practical, and affordable. Targeted screening and treatment programs for cryptococcal antigenemia are a cost effective method for reducing early mortality on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Optimal initial management with amphotericin and flucytosine improves survival against alternative therapies, although amphotericin is difficult to administer and flucytosine is not available in middle or low income countries, where cryptococcal meningitis is most prevalent. Controlling increased intracranial pressure with serial therapeutic lumbar punctures has a proven survival benefit. Delaying ART initiation for 4 weeks after the diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis is associated with improved survival. Fortunately, new approaches have been leading the way toward improving care for cryptococcal meningitis patients. New trials utilizing different combinations of antifungal therapy are reviewed, and we summarize the efficacy of different regimens. PMID:26279970

  6. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-induced aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Wambulwa, Charles; Bwayo, Salome; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O.; Lombardo, Fredric

    2005-01-01

    We present a 46-year-old African-American man with AIDS who was admitted on two different occasions within three weeks for signs and symptoms of meningitis after using trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX). TMP/SMX is primarily used for the treatment of pneumocystis carinii pneumonia prophylaxis in AIDS patients. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis (DIAM) is commonly seen with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), antibiotics (with TMP/SMX being the most frequently implicated), intravenous immunoglobulins and OKT3 antibodies. However, the implication of TMP/SMX inducing aseptic meningitis has been underreported to FDA/MEDWATCH program. This might be due to the fact that it has also been used to treat bacterial meningitis from organisms like Listeria monocytogenes, which is a common pathogen in the elderly and in infants. We reviewed the literature in an attempt to characterize the pattern and predictors of TMP/SMX-induced aseptic meningitis. PMID:16396068

  7. Lymphocytes modulate innate immune responses and neuronal damage in experimental meningitis.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Olaf; Rung, Olga; Held, Josephin; Boettcher, Chotima; Prokop, Stefan; Stenzel, Werner; Priller, Josef

    2015-01-01

    In bacterial meningitis, excessive immune responses carry significant potential for damage to brain tissue even after successful antibiotic therapy. Bacterial meningitis is regarded primarily as the domain of innate immunity, and the role of lymphocytes remains unclear. We studied the contribution of lymphocytes to acute inflammation and neurodegeneration in experimental Toll-like receptor 2-driven meningitis, comparing wild-type mice with RAG-1-deficient mice that have no mature T and B lymphocytes. At 24 h after intrathecal challenge with the synthetic bacterial lipopeptide Pam(3)CysSK(4), RAG-1-deficient mice displayed more pronounced clinical impairment and an increased concentration of neutrophils, reduced expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA, and increased expression of CXCL1 mRNA in the cerebrospinal fluid. Conversely, neuronal loss in the dentate gyrus was reduced in RAG-1-deficient mice, and expression of IL-10, transforming growth factor β and CCL2 mRNA by microglia was increased compared to wild-type mice. Adoptive transfer of wild-type lymphocytes reversed the enhanced meningeal inflammation and functional impairment observed in RAG-1-deficient mice. Our findings suggest compartment-specific effects of lymphocytes during acute bacterial meningitis, including attenuation of meningeal inflammation and shifting of microglial activation toward a more neurotoxic phenotype. PMID:25348636

  8. Towards a meningitis free world--can we eliminate meningococcal meningitis?: contribution of the meningitis patient groups.

    PubMed

    Davie, Sue; Glennie, Linda; Rowland, Kate

    2012-05-30

    Patient groups play a critical part in the fight against meningitis in all its forms. The UK has the world's three largest meningitis patient groups, which over the past 3 decades have worked tirelessly in the fight against meningitis. Within the UK, where the patient groups work to prevent or alleviate the suffering caused by meningitis and septicaemia, their work is in three areas: continued research; demonstrating burden; and awareness-raising and advocacy. The research relates to developing and improving vaccines, and to improving outcomes for forms of meningitis that are not vaccine preventable. Demonstrating burden - showing the real impact of meningitis from a human perspective - highlights the need for vaccines to prevent the disease. Lives are saved by raising awareness of signs and symptoms and of the need for fast action, whilst advocacy can bring about change to improve the quality of life of those affected by meningitis. Awareness raising and advocacy also have the wider benefit of creating a climate in which people recognise the need for vaccines to prevent this dreadful disease. In addition, the patient groups seek to influence the early introduction and uptake of vaccines as they are licensed and approved by the expert bodies, the UK body being the Joint Committee for Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI). Each area of activity is explored, and examples given from each of the patient groups of work they have done or are doing in that area. PMID:22607905

  9. In Brief: Forecasting meningitis threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-12-01

    The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), in conjunction with a team of health and weather organizations, has launched a project to provide weather forecasts to medical officials in Africa to help reduce outbreaks of meningitis. The forecasts will enable local health care providers to target vaccination programs more effectively. In 2009, meteorologists with the National Center for Atmospheric Research, which is managed by UCAR, will begin issuing 14-day forecasts of atmospheric conditions in Ghana. Later, UCAR plans to work closely with health experts from several African countries to design and test a decision support system to provide health officials with useful meteorological information. ``By targeting forecasts in regions where meningitis is a threat, we may be able to help vulnerable populations. Ultimately, we hope to build on this project and provide information to public health programs battling weather-related diseases in other parts of the world,'' said Rajul Pandya, director of UCAR's Community Building Program. Funding for the project comes from a $900,000 grant from Google.org, the philanthropic arm of the Internet search company.

  10. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Climate Change and Cerebrospinal Meningitis in the Ghanaian Meningitis Belt

    PubMed Central

    Codjoe, Samuel Nii Ardey; Nabie, Vivian Adams

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrospinal meningitis (CSM) is one of the infectious diseases likely to be affected by climate change. Although there are a few studies on the climate change-CSM nexus, none has considered perceptions of community members. However, understanding public perception in relation to a phenomenon is very significant for the design of effective communication and mitigation strategies as well as coping and adaptation strategies. This paper uses focus group discussions (FGDs) to fill this knowledge lacuna. Results show that although a few elderly participants ascribed fatal causes (disobedience to gods, ancestors, and evil spirits) to CSM infections during FGDs, majority of participants rightly linked CSM infections to dry, very hot and dusty conditions experienced during the dry season. Finally, community members use a suite of adaptation options to curb future CSM epidemics. PMID:25003550

  12. Neoplastic Meningitis from Solid Tumors: New Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Zustovich, Fable; Farina, Patrizia; Della Puppa, Alessandro; Manara, Renzo; Cecchin, Diego; Brunello, Antonella; Cappetta, Alessandro; Zagonel, Vittorina

    2011-01-01

    Neoplastic meningitis is a result of the spread of malignant cells to the leptomeninges and subarachnoid space and their dissemination within the cerebrospinal fluid. This event occurs in 4%–15% of all patients with solid tumors and represents an important prognostic factor for poor survival. Neoplastic meningitis should be diagnosed in the early stages of disease to prevent important neurological deficits and to provide the most appropriate treatment. Despite new diagnostic approaches developed in recent years, such as positron emission tomography–computed tomography and new biological markers, the combination of magnetic resonance imaging without and with gadolinium enhancement and cytology still has the greatest diagnostic sensitivity. Recently, no new randomized studies comparing intrathecal (i.t.) with systemic treatment have been performed, yet there have been a few small phase II studies and case reports about new molecularly targeted substances whose successful i.t. or systemic application has been reported. Trastuzumab, gefitinib, and sorafenib are examples of possible future treatments for neoplastic meningitis, in order to better individualize therapy thus allowing better outcomes. In this review, we analyze the most recent and interesting developments on diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:21795431

  13. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: rare cause of meningitis.

    PubMed

    Correia, Cátia Rodrigues; Ferreira, Sara Tavares; Nunes, Paula

    2014-08-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a Gram-negative bacillus, which is an extremely rare cause of meningitis. To our knowledge, there are only five previous pediatrics cases. Here, we describe the case of a 4-year-old boy who developed meningitis associated with this organism, after several neurosurgical procedures and previous treatment with a broad-spectrum antibiotic. He was treated successfully with a combination of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ceftazidime and levofloxacin. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia should be considered as a potential cause of meningitis, especially among severely debilitated or immunosuppressed patients. Antimicrobial therapy is complicated by the high resistance of the organism to multiple antibiotics. PMID:25252064

  14. Chronic Meningitis: Simplifying a Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kelly; Whiting, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Chronic meningitis can be a diagnostic dilemma for even the most experienced clinician. Many times, the differential diagnosis is broad and encompasses autoimmune, neoplastic, and infectious etiologies. This review will focus on a general approach to chronic meningitis to simplify the diagnostic challenges many clinicians face. The article will also review the most common etiologies of chronic meningitis in some detail including clinical presentation, diagnostic testing, treatment, and outcomes. By using a case-based approach, we will focus on the key elements of clinical presentation and laboratory analysis that will yield the most rapid and accurate diagnosis in these complicated cases. PMID:26888190

  15. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious health problems (e.g. Down syndrome ). Single-Gene Abnormalities Sometimes the chromosomes are normal in number, ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase ...

  16. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  17. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  18. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  19. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Nail abnormalities are problems with the color, shape, texture, or thickness of the fingernails or toenails. ... Fungus or yeast cause changes in the color, texture, and shape of the nails. Bacterial infection may ...

  20. A Rare Case of Crowned Dens Syndrome Mimicking Aseptic Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Teruyuki; Minakata, Yugo; Tamura, Masato; Takasu, Toshiaki; Murakami, Marohito

    2013-01-01

    Background Crowned dens syndrome (CDS), related to microcrystalline deposition in the periodontoid process, is the main cause of acute or chronic cervical pain. Microcrystal-line deposition most often consists of calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals and/or hydroxyapatite crystals. Case Presentation This report describes the case of an 89-year-old woman who presented with sudden onset, high fever, severe occipital headache, and neck stiffness. A laboratory examination revealed a markedly elevated white blood cell count (11,100/µl) and C-reactive protein level (23.8 mg/dl). These clinical findings suggested severe infection such as meningitis with sepsis. However, the results of blood culture, serum endotoxin, and procalcitonin were all negative, and cerebrospinal fluid studies revealed only a slight abnormality. The patient was first diagnosed with meningitis and treated with antiviral and antibiotic agents as well as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but they only had limited effects. A cervical plain computed tomography (CT) scan and its three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction detected a remarkable crown-like calcification surrounding the odontoid process. On the basis of the CT findings, the patient was diagnosed as a severe case of CDS and was immediately treated with corticosteroids. The patient's condition drastically improved within a week after one course of corticosteroid therapy. Conclusion Some atypical symptoms of CDS are misleading and may be misdiagnosed as meningitis, as happened in our case. A CT scan, especially a 3D-CT scan, is necessary and useful for a definitive diagnosis of CDS. CDS should be considered as a differential diagnosis of a possible etiology for fever, headache, and cervical pain of unknown origin. PMID:23569451

  1. [Pasteurella multocida meningitis with cerebral abscesses].

    PubMed

    Nguefack, S; Moifo, B; Chiabi, A; Mah, E; Bogne, J-B; Fossi, M; Fru, F; Mbonda, E; Djientcheu, V-P

    2014-03-01

    Pasteurella multocida is classically responsible for local soft tissue infections secondary to dog bites or cat scratches. It can be responsible for meningitis in infants and elderly persons. We report the case history of a 5-year-old male child admitted to our pediatric unit for meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed an infection with P. multocida. The suspected mode of contamination was either from the saliva of a pet dog or through an unnoticed skull fracture sustained after an accident 1 year prior to the occurrence of meningitis. In spite of the neurologic complication (cerebral abscess), the progression was favorable after drainage of the abscess, 5 weeks of parenteral treatment, and 3 weeks of oral antibiotic therapy. Meningitis due to Pasteurella sp. is rare and can lead to neurologic complications. The notion of bites or scratches can be absent and the mode of contamination is sometimes difficult to unveil. PMID:24457110

  2. Environmental Risk and Meningitis Epidemics in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Molesworth, Anna M.; Cuevas, Luis E.; Connor, Stephen J.; Morse, Andrew P.

    2003-01-01

    Epidemics of meningococcal meningitis occur in areas with particular environmental characteristics. We present evidence that the relationship between the environment and the location of these epidemics is quantifiable and propose a model based on environmental variables to identify regions at risk for meningitis epidemics. These findings, which have substantial implications for directing surveillance activities and health policy, provide a basis for monitoring the impact of climate variability and environmental change on epidemic occurrence in Africa. PMID:14609465

  3. Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Tunkel, A R; Scheld, W M

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis remains a disease with associated unacceptable morbidity and mortality rates despite the availability of effective bactericidal antimicrobial therapy. Through the use of experimental animal models of infection, a great deal of information has been gleaned concerning the pathogenic and pathophysiologic mechanisms operable in bacterial meningitis. Most cases of bacterial meningitis begin with host acquisition of a new organism by nasopharyngeal colonization followed by systemic invasion and development of a high-grade bacteremia. Bacterial encapsulation contributes to this bacteremia by inhibiting neutrophil phagocytosis and resisting classic complement-mediated bactericidal activity. Central nervous system invasion then occurs, although the exact site of bacterial traversal into the central nervous system is unknown. By production and/or release of virulence factors into and stimulation of formation of inflammatory cytokines within the central nervous system, meningeal pathogens increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier, thus allowing protein and neutrophils to move into the subarachnoid space. There is then an intense subarachnoid space inflammatory response, which leads to many of the pathophysiologic consequences of bacterial meningitis, including cerebral edema and increased intracranial pressure. Attenuation of this inflammatory response with adjunctive dexamethasone therapy is associated with reduced concentrations of tumor necrosis factor in the cerebrospinal fluid, with diminished cerebrospinal fluid leukocytosis, and perhaps with improvement of morbidity, as demonstrated in recent clinical trials. Further information on the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis should lead to the development of more innovative treatment and/or preventive strategies for this disorder. Images PMID:8472245

  4. Diagnostic Accuracy of Procalcitonin in Bacterial Meningitis Versus Nonbacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ting-Ting; Hu, Zhi-De; Qin, Bao-Dong; Ma, Ning; Tang, Qing-Qin; Wang, Li-Li; Zhou, Lin; Zhong, Ren-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have investigated the diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin (PCT) levels in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in bacterial meningitis (BM), but the results were heterogeneous. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the diagnostic accuracy of PCT as a marker for BM detection. A systematic search of the EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, and PubMed databases was performed to identify studies published before December 7, 2015 investigating the diagnostic accuracy of PCT for BM. The quality of the eligible studies was assessed using the revised Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy method. The overall diagnostic accuracy of PCT detection in CSF or blood was pooled using the bivariate model. Twenty-two studies involving 2058 subjects were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The overall specificities and sensitivities were 0.86 and 0.80 for CSF PCT, and 0.97 and 0.95 for blood PCT, respectively. Areas under the summary receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.90 and 0.98 for CSF PCT and blood PCT, respectively. The major limitation of this systematic review and meta-analysis was the small number of studies included and the heterogeneous diagnostic thresholds adopted by eligible studies. Our meta-analysis shows that PCT is a useful biomarker for BM diagnosis. PMID:26986140

  5. An uncommon cause of recurrent pyogenic meningitis: pituitary abscess

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Rama; Bhansali, Anil; Dutta, Pinaki; Shanmugasundar, G; Mukherjee, Kanchan Kumar; Upreti, Vimal; Das, Ashim

    2010-01-01

    The authors report a 36-year-old male who presented with headache and hypopituitarism, and MRI revealed a ring enhancing lesion with pituitary stalk thickening. During follow-up, he presented with recurrent pyogenic meningitis with persistence of the lesion, therefore a diagnosis of pituitary abscess was considered. He underwent trans-sphenoidal surgery (TSS) with evacuation of pus and received antibiotic treatment for the same. After this he remarkably improved and had no recurrence of symptoms. He is on levothyroxine, glucocorticoids and testosterone replacement therapy for his respective hormone deficits. PMID:22767626

  6. Meningitis and Climate: From Science to Practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez Garcia-Pando, Carlos; Thomson, Madeleine C.; Stanton, Michelle C.; Diggle, Peter J.; Hopson, Thomas; Pandya, Rajul; Miller, Ron L.; Hugonnet, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis is a climate sensitive infectious disease. The regional extent of the Meningitis Belt in Africa, where the majority of epidemics occur, was originally defined by Lapeysonnie in the 1960s. A combination of climatic and environmental conditions and biological and social factors have been associated to the spatial and temporal patterns of epidemics observed since the disease first emerged in West Africa over a century ago. However, there is still a lack of knowledge and data that would allow disentangling the relative effects of the diverse risk factors upon epidemics. The Meningitis Environmental Risk Information Technologies Initiative (MERIT), a collaborative research-to-practice consortium, seeks to inform national and regional prevention and control strategies across the African Meningitis Belt through the provision of new data and tools that better determine risk factors. In particular MERIT seeks to consolidate a body of knowledge that provides evidence of the contribution of climatic and environmental factors to seasonal and year-to-year variations in meningococcal meningitis incidence at both district and national scales. Here we review recent research and practice seeking to provide useful information for the epidemic response strategy of National Ministries of Health in the Meningitis Belt of Africa. In particular the research and derived tools described in this paper have focused at "getting science into policy and practice" by engaging with practitioner communities under the umbrella of MERIT to ensure the relevance of their work to operational decision-making. We limit our focus to that of reactive vaccination for meningococcal meningitis. Important but external to our discussion is the development and implementation of the new conjugate vaccine, which specifically targets meningococcus A

  7. Role of imaging in the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis and its complications.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D C; Raghavan, A; Mordekar, S R; Griffiths, P D; Connolly, D J A

    2010-08-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis is a common neurological emergency and a leading cause of death and neurological disability worldwide. Diagnosis is based on clinical and microbiological findings with neuroimaging in the form of CT reserved for those with specific adverse clinical features or when an underlying cause such as mastoiditis is suspected. MRI is extremely useful for detecting and monitoring the complications of meningitis. These can be remembered by the mnemonic HACTIVE (hydrocephalus, abscess, cerebritis/cranial nerve lesion, thrombosis, infarct, ventriculitis/vasculopathy and extra-axial collection). Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) are useful to distinguish abscess from other ring enhancing lesions. PMID:20709770

  8. Procalcitonin as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Factor for Tuberculosis Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinseung; Kim, Si Eun; Park, Bong Soo; Shin, Kyong Jin; Ha, Sam Yeol; Park, JinSe; Kim, Sung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated the potential role of serum procalcitonin in differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial and viral meningitis, and in predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. Methods This was a retrospective study of 26 patients with tuberculosis meningitis. In addition, 70 patients with bacterial meningitis and 49 patients with viral meningitis were included as the disease control groups for comparison. The serum procalcitonin level was measured in all patients at admission. Differences in demographic and laboratory data, including the procalcitonin level, were analyzed among the three groups. In addition, we analyzed the predictive factors for a prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at discharge, and the correlation between the level of procalcitonin and the GCS score at discharge. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a low level of procalcitonin (≤1.27 ng/mL) independently distinguished tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis. The sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis were 96.2% and 62.9%, respectively. However, the level of procalcitonin in patients with tuberculosis meningitis did not differ significantly from that in patients with viral meningitis. In patients with tuberculosis meningitis, a high level of procalcitonin (>0.4 ng/mL) was a predictor of a poor prognosis, and the level of procalcitonin was negatively correlated with the GCS score at discharge (r=-0.437, p=0.026). Conclusions We found that serum procalcitonin is a useful marker for differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis and is also valuable for predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. PMID:27165424

  9. Endolymphatic sac involvement in bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2015-04-01

    The commonest sequelae of bacterial meningitis are related to the inner ear. Little is known about the inner ear immune defense. Evidence suggests that the endolymphatic sac provides some protection against infection. A potential involvement of the endolymphatic sac in bacterial meningitis is largely unaccounted for, and thus the object of the present study. A well-established adult rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis was employed. Thirty adult rats were inoculated intrathecally with Streptococcus pneumoniae and received no additional treatment. Six rats were sham-inoculated. The rats were killed when reaching terminal illness or on day 7, followed by light microscopy preparation and PAS-Alcian blue staining. The endolymphatic sac was examined for bacterial invasion and leukocyte infiltration. Neither bacteria nor leukocytes infiltrated the endolymphatic sac during the first days. Bacteria invaded the inner ear through the cochlear aquaduct. On days 5-6, the bacteria invaded the endolymphatic sac through the endolymphatic duct subsequent to invasion of the vestibular endolymphatic compartment. No evidence of direct bacterial invasion of the sac through the meninges was found. Leukocyte infiltration of the sac occurred prior to bacterial invasion. During meningitis, bacteria do not invade the endolymphatic sac through the dura, but solely through the endolymphatic duct, following the invasion of the vestibular system. Leukocyte infiltration of the sac occurs prior to, as well as concurrent with bacterial invasion. The findings support the endolymphatic sac as part of an innate immune defense system protecting the inner ear from infection. PMID:24452771

  10. [A case of recurrent aseptic meningitis induced by ergot agents].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tomoko; Tagawa, Asako; Hashimoto, Ritsuo; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 29-year-old woman with recurrent aseptic meningitis that was caused by ergot agents. She miscarried at age 27, and the uterus constrictor methylergometrine was prescribed. Three days later, she developed aseptic meningitis and was hospitalized. Two years later, she again developed aseptic meningitis the day after she took ergotamine tartrate. In both events, her symptoms improved rapidly when the medication was stopped. The drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test for methylergometrine yielded a value of 180%. Drug-induced meningitis is a rare form of recurrent aseptic meningitis. Many studies have reported cases of meningitis caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but many other drugs can induce aseptic meningitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of aseptic meningitis induced by ergot agents. PMID:26103816

  11. Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Language: English Español ( ... Compartir 2002 Study of the Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Many people have ...

  12. A role for PDGF-C/PDGFRα signaling in the formation of the meningeal basement membranes surrounding the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Andrae, Johanna; Gouveia, Leonor; Gallini, Radiosa; He, Liqun; Fredriksson, Linda; Nilsson, Ingrid; Johansson, Bengt R; Eriksson, Ulf; Betsholtz, Christer

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor-C (PDGF-C) is one of three known ligands for the tyrosine kinase receptor PDGFRα. Analysis ofPdgfcnull mice has demonstrated roles for PDGF-C in palate closure and the formation of cerebral ventricles, but redundancy with other PDGFRα ligands might obscure additional functions. In search of further developmental roles for PDGF-C, we generated mice that were double mutants forPdgfc(-/-)andPdgfra(GFP/+) These mice display a range of severe phenotypes including spina bifida, lung emphysema, abnormal meninges and neuronal over-migration in the cerebral cortex. We focused our analysis on the central nervous system (CNS), where PDGF-C was identified as a critical factor for the formation of meninges and assembly of the glia limitans basement membrane. We also present expression data onPdgfa,PdgfcandPdgfrain the cerebral cortex and microarray data on cerebral meninges. PMID:26988758

  13. A role for PDGF-C/PDGFRα signaling in the formation of the meningeal basement membranes surrounding the cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Andrae, Johanna; Gouveia, Leonor; Gallini, Radiosa; He, Liqun; Fredriksson, Linda; Nilsson, Ingrid; Johansson, Bengt R.; Eriksson, Ulf; Betsholtz, Christer

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Platelet-derived growth factor-C (PDGF-C) is one of three known ligands for the tyrosine kinase receptor PDGFRα. Analysis of Pdgfc null mice has demonstrated roles for PDGF-C in palate closure and the formation of cerebral ventricles, but redundancy with other PDGFRα ligands might obscure additional functions. In search of further developmental roles for PDGF-C, we generated mice that were double mutants for Pdgfc−/− and PdgfraGFP/+. These mice display a range of severe phenotypes including spina bifida, lung emphysema, abnormal meninges and neuronal over-migration in the cerebral cortex. We focused our analysis on the central nervous system (CNS), where PDGF-C was identified as a critical factor for the formation of meninges and assembly of the glia limitans basement membrane. We also present expression data on Pdgfa, Pdgfc and Pdgfra in the cerebral cortex and microarray data on cerebral meninges. PMID:26988758

  14. Postsurgical Pantoea calida meningitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pantoea calida, a recently described environmental Enterobacteriaceae organism, has not yet been associated with human infection. Case presentation We report a case of postoperative meningitis caused by P. calida. After pituitary adenoma resection, a 52-year-old Caucasian woman developed febrile meningitis confirmed by cerebrospinal fluid analysis. P. calida was grown in pure culture from this fluid and was firmly identified with partial rpoB gene sequencing. She was cured by a 14-day course of meropenem. Conclusions P. calida must be added to the list of opportunistic Enterobacteriaceae pathogens responsible for postsurgical meningitis. It is easily identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. PMID:24934580

  15. Meningitis after cochlear implantation in Mondini malformation.

    PubMed

    Page, E L; Eby, T L

    1997-01-01

    Although the potential for CSF leakage and subsequent meningitis after cochlear implantation in the malformed cochlea has been recognized, this complication has not been previously reported. We report a case of CSF otorhinorrhea and meningitis after minor head trauma developing 2 years after cochlear implantation in a child with Mondini malformation. Leakage of CSF was identified from the cochleostomy around the electrode of the implant, and this leak was sealed with a temporalis fascia and muscle plug. Although this complication appears to be rare, care must be taken to seal the cochleostomy in children with inner ear malformations at the initial surgery, and any episode of meningitis after surgery must be thoroughly investigated to rule out CSF leakage from the labyrinth. PMID:9018266

  16. [Purulent meningitis, caused by Corynebacterium xerosis, after spinal anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Vukmirovits, G; Todorova, R; Arányi, Z; Káli, G

    1991-12-30

    A previously healthy 25 year old sportsman is reported who developed Corynebacterium xerosis meningitis with coma and seizures after spinal anaesthesia. The adequate therapy (dexamethason, penicillin, ampicillin, mannitol, intensive care, hyperventillation) resulted in a complete recovery. To the authors' knowledge this is the first case of Corynebacterium xerosis meningitis and the first bacterial meningitis reported after spinal anaesthesia in Hungary. PMID:1766661

  17. Meningitis-Retention Syndrome as a Presentation of West Nile Virus Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Laengvejkal, Pavis; Argueta, Erwin; Limsuwat, Chok; Nugent, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    A 26-year-old previously healthy man presented with fever, urinary retention, nuchal rigidity, and hyperreflexia but with a clear sensorium. His initial spinal fluid results were consistent with aseptic meningitis from West Nile virus infection, and this was confirmed by serological studies on blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies were unremarkable. He received supportive care and urinary catheterization to prevent bladder injury from overdistension. He was discharged home without recurrence of urinary retention after five days of hospitalization. Therefore, this case report describes the first case of West Nile virus meningitis in a patient with the meningitis-retention syndrome. PMID:23983716

  18. Asymptomatic (Subclinical) Meningitis in One of Premature Triplets with Simultaneous Enteroviral Meningitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashish; Tolan, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Most enterovirus infection in the neonate and young infant is asymptomatic, but serious disease may occur, especially if acquired perinatally. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of asymptomatic enterovirus aseptic meningitis, and of concurrent enterovirus aseptic meningitis in premature triplets. Ten-week-old, 31-week-estimated gestational age premature triplet boys were diagnosed with enterovirus aseptic meningitis on the same day. Two of the triplets developed symptoms on the day of admission, while the third remained symptom free throughout the infection. All three recovered completely and are healthy more than a decade later. PMID:23946897

  19. Meningitis-retention Syndrome; A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Gen; Hata, Kenichi; Aoki, Soichiro; Suzuki, Masayasu; Kimura, Takahiro; Egawa, Shin

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of meningitis-retention syndrome followed by urodynamic tests. A 48-year-old man was admitted to the hospital for an undiagnosed fever with headache and urinary retention. Aseptic meningitis was suspected according to cerebrospinal fluid analyses, and urodynamic test showed an underactive detrusor, leading to inadequate contraction of the bladder on voiding in spite of a normal sensation during bladder filling. Clean intermittent self-catheterization was required temporarily, but normal urinary voiding without the need for medication was restored in 2 weeks after discharge from the hospital, when urodynamic tests showed normal contractility of the bladder during voiding. PMID:27175342

  20. Meningitis-retention Syndrome; A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Gen; Hata, Kenichi; Aoki, Soichiro; Suzuki, Masayasu; Kimura, Takahiro; Egawa, Shin

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of meningitis-retention syndrome followed by urodynamic tests. A 48-year-old man was admitted to the hospital for an undiagnosed fever with headache and urinary retention. Aseptic meningitis was suspected according to cerebrospinal fluid analyses, and urodynamic test showed an underactive detrusor, leading to inadequate contraction of the bladder on voiding in spite of a normal sensation during bladder filling. Clean intermittent self-catheterization was required temporarily, but normal urinary voiding without the need for medication was restored in 2 weeks after discharge from the hospital, when urodynamic tests showed normal contractility of the bladder during voiding. PMID:27175342

  1. CSF cytology versus immunocytochemistry in meningeal carcinomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Boogerd, W; Vroom, T M; van Heerde, P; Brutel de la Rivière, G; Peterse, J L; van der Sande, J J

    1988-01-01

    CSF immunocytochemistry with monoclonal antibodies was compared with conventional cytology to determine its sensitivity in detecting malignant cells in patients with meningeal carcinomatosis. One hundred and eighteen samples were investigated. Cytology was tumour positive in 83 samples and immunocytochemistry in 85. Dissimilar results between the two diagnostic methods were noted in 12 specimens, invariably occurring in samples with a low cell count and obtained from treated patients. Combined use of the two methods led to a 9% increase of sensitivity in detecting malignant cells compared with cytology alone. It is concluded that immunocytochemistry is of minor help in the problem of false-negative cytology in meningeal carcinomatosis. PMID:2832546

  2. [Bacterial meningitis in patients with sepsis syndrome].

    PubMed

    Olejnik, Z; Janeczko, J; Lipowski, D; Przyjałkowski, W; Strzelecki, R; Romanowska, B; Pogorzelska, E

    1994-01-01

    The authors discuss problems connected with diagnosis, management and treatment of bacterial meningitis among patients with the sepsis syndrome. Considering secondary organ changes bacterial meningitis belongs to the severest one and as a life-threathing sequel of sepsis demands immediate use of proper casual treatment. The authors show the therapeutic difficulties in this group of patients particularly when the etiological organism is unknown. They discuss this problems and present their own schemes of tretment. They indicate the value of passive immunotherapy and surgical removal of the primary source of infection. They emphasize final result depends on secondary organ changes, age, immunity of patient and the kind of etiological agent. PMID:7938619

  3. Solar 3He-rich events and abnormal enhancements of heavy-ion isotopes accelerated in two stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. X.; Wang, J. X.; Tan, A.

    2005-12-01

    Heating and acceleration of neon (20Ne), magnesium (24Mg), and their rare isotopes (22Ne and 26Mg) in solar 3He-rich events are investigated according to the two-stage acceleration mechanism. It is shown that 20Ne+8, 22Ne+9, 24Mg+10, and 26Mg+11 can be preferentially heated by H-cyclotron waves with a frequency close to twice the 3He-cyclotron frequency that also heat 3He, through the third harmonic cyclotron resonance. If the initial electron temperature is in the range of ˜2-10 MK, the abundance ratios 22Ne/20Ne and 26Mg/24Mg in high-energy particles due to the second-stage acceleration can be enhanced by a factor of ˜2-6 relative to the solar corona, which are consistent with the measurements of the University of Maryland particle instrument on the Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer and the Ultra Lower Energy Isotope Spectrometer particle instrument on the Advanced Composition Explorer.

  4. Clinical aspects of eosinophilic meningitis and meningoencephalitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Gerald S; Johnson, Stuart

    2013-06-01

    Angiostrongylus Eosinophilic Meningitis is caused by human infection with larvae of the rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The clinical presentation includes a spectrum of disease, from meningitis through radiculitis, cranial nerve abnormalities, ataxia, encephalitis, coma, and rarely death. The condition is diagnosed by recognizing the triad of: the clinical syndrome, eosinophils in the cerebrospinal fluid or blood, and exposure history. A history of eating raw or poorly cooked snails is classic, but ingestion of other intermediate hosts or unwashed produce (such as lettuce) harboring hosts is not uncommon. Several serologic tests exist but none has yet been fully validated. There is good evidence that a 2 week course of high dose corticosteroids shortens the duration and severity of symptoms. There is somewhat weaker evidence that albendazole reduces symptoms. The combination of prednisolone and albendazole is being used more commonly for treatment. Some suggestions for future research are given. PMID:23901382

  5. Clinical Aspects of Eosinophilic Meningitis and Meningoencephalitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the Rat Lungworm

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Angiostrongylus Eosinophilic Meningitis is caused by human infection with larvae of the rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The clinical presentation includes a spectrum of disease, from meningitis through radiculitis, cranial nerve abnormalities, ataxia, encephalitis, coma, and rarely death. The condition is diagnosed by recognizing the triad of: the clinical syndrome, eosinophils in the cerebrospinal fluid or blood, and exposure history. A history of eating raw or poorly cooked snails is classic, but ingestion of other intermediate hosts or unwashed produce (such as lettuce) harboring hosts is not uncommon. Several serologic tests exist but none has yet been fully validated. There is good evidence that a 2 week course of high dose corticosteroids shortens the duration and severity of symptoms. There is somewhat weaker evidence that albendazole reduces symptoms. The combination of prednisolone and albendazole is being used more commonly for treatment. Some suggestions for future research are given. PMID:23901382

  6. Simulation using novel equipment designed to explain spirometric abnormalities in respiratory disease enhances learning in higher cognitive domains.

    PubMed

    Jamison, J P; Stewart, M T

    2015-10-01

    Simulation of disorders of respiratory mechanics shown by spirometry provides insight into the pathophysiology of disease but some clinically important disorders have not been simulated and none have been formally evaluated for education. We have designed simple mechanical devices which, along with existing simulators, enable all the main dysfunctions which have diagnostic value in spirometry to be simulated and clearly explained with visual and haptic feedback. We modelled the airways as Starling resistors by a clearly visible mechanical action to simulate intra- and extra-thoracic obstruction. A narrow tube was used to simulate fixed large airway obstruction and inelastic bands to simulate restriction. We hypothesized that using simulators whose action explains disease promotes learning especially in higher domain educational objectives. The main features of obstruction and restriction were correctly simulated. Simulation of variable extra-thoracic obstruction caused blunting and plateauing of inspiratory flow, and simulation of intra-thoracic obstruction caused limitation of expiratory flow with marked dynamic compression. Multiple choice tests were created with questions allocated to lower (remember and understand) or higher cognitive domains (apply, analyse and evaluate). In a cross-over design, overall mean scores increased after 1½ h simulation spirometry (43-68 %, effect size 1.06, P < 0.0001). In higher cognitive domains the mean score was lower before and increased further than lower domains (Δ 30 vs 20 %, higher vs lower effect size 0.22, P < 0.05). In conclusion, the devices successfully simulate various patterns of obstruction and restriction. Using these devices medical students achieved marked enhancement of learning especially in higher cognitive domains. PMID:25528245

  7. Tuberculous meningitis in a Filipino maid.

    PubMed

    Sheu, J J; Yuan, R Y; Lu, J J; Chung, C L; Hsu, C Y

    1999-11-01

    Tuberculous meningitis, while not uncommon in Taiwan, has not been reported among foreign workers. We report the first case of tuberculous meningitis in a 37-year-old Filipino maid in Taiwan, who presented with headache, fever and vomiting. She had been well before this episode and the small screening films of the chest radiograph obtained on her arrival in Taiwan 15 months previously, and every 6 months thereafter showed no evidence of tuberculosis. The suspicion of tuberculous meningitis was delayed until disturbance of consciousness manifested and a standard chest radiograph showed a diffuse miliary pattern in both lung fields. A cerebrospinal fluid sample that was sent for a polymerase chain reaction-based assay specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed a positive result. The patient recovered with sequelae of mildly incoherent speech and urinary incontinence after antituberculous medication and short-course steroid treatment. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of tuberculous meningitis in foreign workers with complaints of fever and headache. Because high-quality chest radiographs are a prerequisite for early detection of pulmonary tuberculosis, we recommended that standard posterior-anterior chest radiographs should be obtained as part of the routine health examination for foreign workers. PMID:10705697

  8. Citrobacter koseri meningitis: another freediving risk?

    PubMed

    Pollara, Gabriele; Savy, Lloyd; Cropley, Ian; Hopkins, Susan

    2011-01-01

    We present a rare case of meningitis caused by Citrobacter koseri in an immunocompetent adult who had recently been freediving. Middle ear pressure changes from this recreational activity, and the subsequent inflammatory response, are likely to have provided this environmental organism access to the central nervous system, and thus the ability to cause clinically significant infection. PMID:20933000

  9. Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Jose M.; Tilley, Drake H.; Briceno, Jesus A.; Zunt, Joseph R.; Montano, Silvia M.

    2013-01-01

    A 59-year-old man with a history of fever, unsteadiness, hemiparesis, motor aphasia and consciousness disturbance was hospitalized for Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis. He denied contact with farm animals, but had a practice of consuming unpasteurized goats’ cheese from an uncertain source. PMID:23105024

  10. Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B.; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  11. Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-07-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  12. Infective Meningitis Caused by Phialemonium curvatum

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yueli; Bu, Hui; He, Yunying; Guo, Li

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by rarely encountered fungal pathogens have increased in recent decades. Phialemonium species are widely distributed in the environment and are also involved in human infections, affecting both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. The present study describes a case of meningitis caused by Phialemonium curvatum. PMID:24850352

  13. Meninges: from protective membrane to stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Decimo, Ilaria; Fumagalli, Guido; Berton, Valeria; Krampera, Mauro; Bifari, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Meninges are a three tissue membrane primarily known as coverings of the brain. More in depth studies on meningeal function and ultrastructure have recently changed the view of meninges as a merely protective membrane. Accurate evaluation of the anatomical distribution in the CNS reveals that meninges largely penetrate inside the neural tissue. Meninges enter the CNS by projecting between structures, in the stroma of choroid plexus and form the perivascular space (Virchow-Robin) of every parenchymal vessel. Thus, meninges may modulate most of the physiological and pathological events of the CNS throughout the life. Meninges are present since the very early embryonic stages of cortical development and appear to be necessary for normal corticogenesis and brain structures formation. In adulthood meninges contribute to neural tissue homeostasis by secreting several trophic factors including FGF2 and SDF-1. Recently, for the first time, we have identified the presence of a stem cell population with neural differentiation potential in meninges. In addition, we and other groups have further described the presence in meninges of injury responsive neural precursors. In this review we will give a comprehensive view of meninges and their multiple roles in the context of a functional network with the neural tissue. We will highlight the current literature on the developmental feature of meninges and their role in cortical development. Moreover, we will elucidate the anatomical distribution of the meninges and their trophic properties in adult CNS. Finally, we will emphasize recent evidences suggesting the potential role of meninges as stem cell niche harbouring endogenous precursors that can be activated by injury and are able to contribute to CNS parenchymal reaction. PMID:23671802

  14. Enterovirus meningitis in Brazil, 1998-2003.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Gina P L; Skraba, Irene; Oliveira, Denise; Lima, Ana A F; de Melo, Maria Mabel M; Kmetzsch, Claudete I; da Costa, Eliane V; da Silva, Edson E

    2006-01-01

    Acute viral infections of the central nervous system (CNS) such as acute flaccid paralysis, meningitis, and encephalitis, are responsible for a high morbidity, particularly in children. Non-Polio enteroviruses (NPEV) are known to be responsible for over 80% of viral meningitis in which the etiologic agent is identified. In the present study, we show the frequency of enterovirus meningitis in Brazil from December 1998 to December 2003. Enterovirus were isolated from 162 (15.8%), of a total of 1,022 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens analyzed. Echovirus 30 was identified in 139 of these isolates (139/162-85.2%). Other identified enteroviruses were: Coxsackievirus B5 (3.7%), Echovirus 13 (3.7%), Echovirus 18 (3%), Echovirus 6 (1.2%), Echovirus 25 (1.2%), Echovirus 1 (0.6%), and Echovirus 4 (0.6%). Patients's age ranged from 28 days to 68 years old. The most frequent symptoms were fever (77%), headache (69.5%), vomiting (71.3%), neck stiffness (41.3%), convulsion (7.1%), and diarrhea (3.7%). Although, the majority of the patients recovered without any complication or permanent squeal, five deaths occurred. Throughout the surveillance period, five viral meningitis outbreaks were confirmed: four in the Southern Brazil and one in the Northeast Brazil. Echovirus 30 was responsible for four out of the five outbreaks while Echovirus 13 caused the fifth one. Besides the outbreaks, 734 sporadic cases were also identified during the study period and 59 of these were positive for virus isolation (8%). Echovirus 30 accounted for 70% of the isolates. Our results showed that Echovirus 30 was the most prevalent etiological agent of viral meningitis in Brazil, causing both outbreaks and sporadic cases. PMID:16299728

  15. Neuroimaging of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis: comparison of magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with and without immune reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Katchanov, Juri; Branding, Gordian; Jefferys, Laura; Arastéh, Keikawus; Stocker, Hartmut; Siebert, Eberhard

    2016-02-01

    To determine the frequency, imaging characteristics, neuroanatomical distribution and dynamics of magnetic resonance imaging findings in HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompromised patients we compared patients without antiretroviral therapy with patients undergoing immune reconstitution. Neuroimaging and clinical data of 21 consecutive patients presenting to a German HIV centre in a 10-year period between 2005 and 2014 were reviewed. We identified eight patients with magnetic resonance imaging findings related to cryptococcal disease: five patients without antiretroviral therapy and three patients receiving effective antiretroviral therapy resulting in immune reconstitution. The pattern of magnetic resonance imaging manifestations was different in the two groups. In patients not on antiretroviral therapy, pseudocysts (n = 3) and lacunar ischaemic lesions (n = 2) were detected. Contrast-enhancing focal leptomeningeal and/or parenchymal lesions were found in all patients under immune reconstitution (n = 3). Magnetic resonance imaging lesions suggestive of leptomeningitis or meningoencephalitis were detected in all patients with a recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis under immune reconstitution, which differs from the classical magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients without antiretroviral therapy. In antiretroviral therapy-treated patients with past medical history of cryptococcal meningitis, detection of contrast-enhancing focal meningeal and/or parenchymal lesions should prompt further investigations for a recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis under immune reconstitution. PMID:25693580

  16. P08.19PRIMARY INTRATHECAL MELANOMA ARISING FROM MENINGEAL MELANOCYTOSIS: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Moser, W.; Thier, K.; Hafner, C.; Trautinger, F.; Ungersböck, K.; Sedivy, R.; Oberndorfer, S.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Primary melanocytic tumours of the leptomeninges are rare diseases. The WHO classification of 2007 described four entities: diffuse melanocytosis, melanocytoma, malignant melanoma and meningeal melanomatosis. Meningeal melanocytosis is a benign proliferation of melanocytes with a risk of malignant transformation and is often associated with neurocutaneos melanosis. CASE REPORT: A 65-year-old male patient presented with low back pain and disturbed micturition. Neurological examination revealed left sided S1- sensory radiculopathy. His medical history was unremarkable. MRI of the lumbar spine showed a contrast-enhancing intrathecal tumour of the conus medullaris and MRI of the brain was suspicious of neoplastic meningitis. Spinal surgery exhibited a brown tumour mass with diffuse spreading of pigmented lesions along the arachnoidea. Histological, immunohistochemical, and molecular analyses showed an intrathecal melanoma with a wild-type BRAF genotype. Dermatological examination was unremarkable. Lumbar stereotactic radiotherapy was applied. Subsequently, 3 cycles of temozolomide (150mg/m2 on 5 days out of 28) and bi-weekly intrathecal liposomal cytarabine were administered. Despite the poor prognosis of neoplastic meningitis in melanoma, the patient survived without clinical for more than one year. 15 months after the initial diagnosis spinal MRI showed a local relapse and a second surgery was performed. This time molecular analysis of the tumor revealed the presence of the BRAF V600E mutation. Due to the initially slow tumor progression treatment with B-Raf inhibitors was withheld and immunotherapy with the anti-CTLA-4 antibody ipilimumab was initiated together with stereotactic radiotherapy of the conus medullaris. Three months later, the patient complained about diplopia and dizziness. Neurological examination revealed oculomotor nerve palsy. MRI of the brain showed a meningeal contrast-enhancement in the brainstem area. The B-Raf inhibitor

  17. An unusual presentation of carcinomatous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Foo, Chuan T; Burrell, Louise M; Johnson, Douglas F

    2016-08-01

    A 67-year old previously well male presented with a 1 week history of confusion on a background of 3 weeks of headache. Past history included two superficial melanomas excised 5 years ago. Treatment for meningoencephalitis was commenced based on lumbar puncture (LP) and non-contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. Lack of a clinical response to antibiotics resulted in a second LP and contrast brain MRI which demonstrated hydrocephalus and leptomeningeal disease. Ongoing deterioration led to a whole-body computed tomographic and spinal MRI that showed widespread metastatic disease and extensive leptomeningeal involvement of the spinal cord. The diagnosis of metastatic melanoma with carcinomatous meningitis was made based on cytological analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. He died 2 weeks later in a palliative care facility. This case illustrates that the diagnosis of carcinomatous meningitis can be difficult to make as the heterogeneous nature of its presentation often delays the diagnosis. PMID:27574561

  18. An unusual presentation of carcinomatous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Chuan T.; Burrell, Louise M.; Johnson, Douglas F.

    2016-01-01

    A 67-year old previously well male presented with a 1 week history of confusion on a background of 3 weeks of headache. Past history included two superficial melanomas excised 5 years ago. Treatment for meningoencephalitis was commenced based on lumbar puncture (LP) and non-contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. Lack of a clinical response to antibiotics resulted in a second LP and contrast brain MRI which demonstrated hydrocephalus and leptomeningeal disease. Ongoing deterioration led to a whole-body computed tomographic and spinal MRI that showed widespread metastatic disease and extensive leptomeningeal involvement of the spinal cord. The diagnosis of metastatic melanoma with carcinomatous meningitis was made based on cytological analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. He died 2 weeks later in a palliative care facility. This case illustrates that the diagnosis of carcinomatous meningitis can be difficult to make as the heterogeneous nature of its presentation often delays the diagnosis. PMID:27574561

  19. Neurosyphilis: An Unresolved Case of Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Shagufta; Burrascano, Joesph

    2015-01-01

    Neurosyphilis can cause both symptomatic and asymptomatic meningitis. However the epidemiology of modern neurosyphilis is not well defined because of the paucity of population-based data. The majority of neurosyphilis cases have been reported in HIV-infected patients. Here we present a case of early neurosyphilis/symptomatic syphilitic meningitis in a non-HIV patient who presented with rash but was mistakenly treated for early latent or secondary syphilis. Syphilis presenting with a skin rash and an extremely high RPR titer could indicate CNS infection rather than simply secondary syphilis because rash is a nonspecific manifestation of disseminated infection. Given the effectiveness of penicillin therapy, why is the rate of syphilis continuing to increase? Is it due to a failure of prevention or could it be also because of failure to diagnose and treat syphilis adequately, as in this case? PMID:26075118

  20. Cryptococcal meningitis: epidemiology and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Derek J; Parris, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis causes morbidity and mortality worldwide. The burden of disease is greatest in middle- and low-income countries with a high incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Patients taking immunosuppressive drugs and some immunocompetent hosts are also at risk. Treatment of cryptococcal meningitis consists of three phases: induction, consolidation, and maintenance. Effective induction therapy requires potent fungicidal drugs (amphotericin B and flucytosine), which are often unavailable in low-resource, high-endemicity settings. As a consequence, mortality is unacceptably high. Wider access to effective treatment is urgently required to improve outcomes. For human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, judicious management of asymptomatic cryptococcal antigenemia and appropriately timed introduction of antiretroviral therapy are important. PMID:24872723

  1. Meningitis C vaccine (North American vaccine).

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, Maria; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2002-01-01

    North American Vaccine Inc (NAVI) has launched a conjugate polysaccharide vaccinefor the prevention of meningitis caused by group C meningococcal bacteria [433475]. The vaccine is based upon conjugate technology, incorporating the serogroup C polysaccharide (CPS) of all three major serogroups. Antibody-dependent, complement-mediated activity was demonstrated in mice and non-human primates, with no detectable adverse effects [277193]. Approval was filed for in the UK in January 2000 [353305]. In July 2000, Baxter received approval for NeisVac-C in the UK, and by September 2000 the vaccine was expected to be incorporated into the NHS's immunization campaign against meningitis C [381225]. NeisVac-C will initially appear labeled from NAVI; Baxter completed its acquisition of NAVI in June 2000 [375389]. Baxter estimates the worldwide global market for the vaccine at US $600 million per year [376204]. PMID:12054072

  2. A pituitary abscess masquerading as recurrent hypernatremia and aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Michael; Marik, Paul Ellis; Khardori, Romesh K; O'Brian, John T

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare condition. In the setting of multiple surgical interventions, the risk of its development increases. A 49-year-old man presented with episodes of altered mental status. He had two surgeries for a recurrent suprasellar arachnoid cyst. The second surgery was complicated by a persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak that required two repairs following which he developed panhypopituitarism and central diabetes insipidus. Twelve months after his last surgery he was diagnosed with aseptic meningitis. This was followed by recurrent hospitalisations for severe hypernatremia blamed on poor medication compliance. He was subsequently hospitalised for the evaluation of a febrile illness. Brain MRI showed ventriculitis and enhancement of the sella. Exploratory surgery revealed a purulent collection in the sella and a mucosal graft which had been used to repair the CSF leak. After drainage of pus and replacement of the graft he recovered completely but requiring life-long hormonal replacement. PMID:22751424

  3. A pituitary abscess masquerading as recurrent hypernatremia and aseptic meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Michael; Marik, Paul Ellis; Khardori, Romesh K; O'Brian, John T

    2012-01-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare condition. In the setting of multiple surgical interventions, the risk of its development increases. A 49-year-old man presented with episodes of altered mental status. He had two surgeries for a recurrent suprasellar arachnoid cyst. The second surgery was complicated by a persistent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak that required two repairs following which he developed panhypopituitarism and central diabetes insipidus. Twelve months after his last surgery he was diagnosed with aseptic meningitis. This was followed by recurrent hospitalisations for severe hypernatremia blamed on poor medication compliance. He was subsequently hospitalised for the evaluation of a febrile illness. Brain MRI showed ventriculitis and enhancement of the sella. Exploratory surgery revealed a purulent collection in the sella and a mucosal graft which had been used to repair the CSF leak. After drainage of pus and replacement of the graft he recovered completely but requiring life-long hormonal replacement. PMID:22751424

  4. Tuberculous radiculomyelitis complicating tuberculous meningitis: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Albújar, S; Arribas, J R; Royo, A; González-García, J J; Peña, J M; Vázquez, J J

    2000-06-01

    Tuberculous radiculomyelitis (TBRM) is a complication of tuberculous meningitis (TBM), which has been reported rarely in the modern medical literature. We describe a case of TBRM that developed in an human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patient, despite prompt antituberculous treatment. To our knowledge, this is the second case of TBRM reported in an HIV-infected patient. We also review 74 previously reported cases of TBRM. TBRM develops at various periods after TBM, even in adequately treated patients after sterilization of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The most common symptoms are subacute paraparesis, radicular pain, bladder disturbance, and subsequent paralysis. CSF evaluation usually shows an active inflammatory response with a very high protein level. MRI and CT scan are critical for diagnosis, revealing loculation and obliteration of the subarachnoid space along with linear intradural enhancement. As in other forms of paradoxical reactions to antituberculous treatment, there is evidence that steroid treatment might have a beneficial effect. PMID:10854362

  5. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 prevents cognitive impairment induced by pneumococcal meningitis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Michelon, Cleonice M; Simões, Lutiana R; Elias, Samuel G; Vuolo, Franciele; Comim, Clarissa M; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Quevedo, João

    2014-02-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a relevant clinical disease characterized by an intense inflammatory reaction into the subarachnoid and ventricular spaces, leading to blood-brain barrier breakdown, hearing loss, and cognitive impairment. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are capable of degrading components of the basal laminin, thus contributing to BBB damage and neuronal injury. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-2/9 inhibitors on BBB integrity, learning, and memory in Wistar rats subjected to pneumococcal meningitis. The animals underwent a magna cistern tap and received either 10 µL sterile saline as a placebo or an equivalent volume of a Streptococcus pneumoniae suspension at a concentration of 5 × 10(9)cfu/mL. The rats were randomized into different groups that received adjuvant treatment with MMP-2, MMP-9 or MMP-2/9 inhibitors. The BBB integrity was evaluated, and the animals were habituated to open-field and object recognition tasks 10 days after meningitis induction. Adjuvant treatments with inhibitors of MMP-2 or MMP-2/9 prevented BBB breakdown in the hippocampus, and treatments with inhibitors of MMP-2, MMP-9 or MMP-2/9 prevented BBB breakdown in the cortex. Ten days after meningitis induction, the animals that received adjuvant treatment with the inhibitor of MMP-2/9 demonstrated that animals habituated to the open-field task faster and enhanced memory during short-term and long-term retention test sessions in the object recognition task. Further investigation is necessary to provide support for MMP inhibitors as an alternative treatment for bacterial meningitis; however, these findings suggest that the meningitis model could be a good research tool for studying the biological mechanisms involved in the behavioral alterations associated with pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:24419461

  6. Clinical Value of Assessing Cytokine Levels for the Differential Diagnosis of Bacterial Meningitis in a Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qing; Shao, Wen-Xia; Shang, Shi-Qiang; Shen, Hong-Qiang; Chen, Xue-Jun; Tang, Yong-Min; Yu, Yong-Lin; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We performed a prospective observational study to evaluate the utility of measuring inflammatory cytokine levels to discriminate bacterial meningitis from similar common pediatric diseases. Inflammatory cytokine levels and other cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) physicochemical indicators were evaluated in 140 patients who were diagnosed with bacterial meningitis via microbiological culture or PCR assay. The CSF concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10, CSF/blood IL-6 and IL-10 ratios, CSF white blood cell count, and CSF micro total protein were significantly elevated in bacterial meningitis patients compared with healthy children or patients with viral encephalitis, epilepsy, or febrile convulsions (P < 0.001). The area under the curve values for CSF concentrations of IL-6 and IL-10, CSF/blood IL-6 and IL-10 ratios, CSF white blood cell count, and CSF micro total protein to identify bacterial meningitis episodes by receiver-operating characteristic analysis were 0.988, 0.949, 0.995, 0.924, 0.945, and 0.928, respectively. The area under the curve for the combination of CSF IL-6 and CSF/blood IL-6 ratio was larger than that for either parameter alone, and the combination exhibited enhanced specificity and positive predictive value. After effective meningitis treatment, CSF IL-6 levels dropped significantly. These results suggest that CSF IL-6 and CSF/blood IL-6 ratio are good biomarkers in discriminating bacterial meningitis. Evaluating CSF IL-6 and CSF/blood IL-6 ratio in combination can improve diagnostic efficiency. Additionally, CSF IL-6 levels can be used to monitor the effects of bacterial meningitis treatment. PMID:27043692

  7. Cryptococcal meningitis in a patient with sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Maeghan

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease characterized by the presence of noncaseating granulomas. Case reports have previously described an association between sarcoidosis and cryptococcal infection, but many of these patients were receiving immunosuppression at the time of diagnosis or had limited cutaneous disease. We report a case of cryptococcal meningitis in a 65-year-old man with a new presentation of sarcoidosis who was not receiving immunosuppressive medications. PMID:27034573

  8. Testing for Meningitis in Children with Bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Stefanski, Michael; Williams, Ronald; McSherry, George; Geskey, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Viral bronchiolitis accounts for almost 20% of all-cause hospitalizations of infants (ie, children younger than age 1 year). The annual incidence of fever in viral bronchiolitis has been documented at 23% to 31%. However the incidence of concurrent serious bacterial infections is low (1%–7%), with meningitis occurring in less than 1% to 2% of cases, but lumbar puncture is performed in up to 9% of viral bronchiolitis cases. To our knowledge, no study has examined clinical factors that influence a physician’s decision to perform a lumbar puncture in the setting of viral bronchiolitis. We present a retrospective, case-control study of hospitalized infants younger than one year diagnosed with viral bronchiolitis who underwent lumbar puncture as part of an evaluation for meningitis. The objective of the study was to determine clinical factors that influence a physician’s decision to perform a lumbar puncture in the setting of viral bronchiolitis. Although the presence of apnea, cyanosis, meningeal signs, positive urine culture results, and young age were factors found to be preliminarily associated with the performance of a lumbar puncture in the setting of bronchiolitis, young age was the only significant clinical factor found after multivariable regression; no other demographic, clinical, laboratory, or radiologic variables were found to be significant. PMID:25662522

  9. Host-pathogen interactions in bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Doran, Kelly S; Fulde, Marcus; Gratz, Nina; Kim, Brandon J; Nau, Roland; Prasadarao, Nemani; Schubert-Unkmeir, Alexandra; Tuomanen, Elaine I; Valentin-Weigand, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a devastating disease occurring worldwide with up to half of the survivors left with permanent neurological sequelae. Due to intrinsic properties of the meningeal pathogens and the host responses they induce, infection can cause relatively specific lesions and clinical syndromes that result from interference with the function of the affected nervous system tissue. Pathogenesis is based on complex host-pathogen interactions, some of which are specific for certain bacteria, whereas others are shared among different pathogens. In this review, we summarize the recent progress made in understanding the molecular and cellular events involved in these interactions. We focus on selected major pathogens, Streptococcus pneumonia, S. agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus), Neisseria meningitidis, and Escherichia coli K1, and also include a neglected zoonotic pathogen, Streptococcus suis. These neuroinvasive pathogens represent common themes of host-pathogen interactions, such as colonization and invasion of mucosal barriers, survival in the blood stream, entry into the central nervous system by translocation of the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and induction of meningeal inflammation, affecting pia mater, the arachnoid and subarachnoid spaces. PMID:26744349

  10. Community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Chang, W N; Lu, C H; Huang, C R; Chuang, Y C

    2000-01-01

    Community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis in adults is an extremely rare infection of the central nervous system (CNS). Here we report one adult case of this rare CNS infection and review the clinical data of another seven cases reported in the English language literature. In total, eight patients (six men and two women) aged between 19 and 63 years were studied. The causative pathogen in our patient was Acinetobacter baumannii; in the other reported cases they were most likely Acinetobacter Iwoffii, Acinetobacter johnsonii, Acinetobacter junii, a genomic species 3 or 6. No underlying disease was found in seven of the eight cases and six of the eight patients acquired the infections before the age of 30 years. Fever and consciousness disturbance were the most common clinical manifestations. Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome (WFS) was found in two cases. Unlike the Acinetobacter strains found in nosocomial infections, the strain of Acinetobacter meningitis in the community-acquired case did not show multiple antibiotic resistance. Most adult patients with community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis can be saved by timely therapy with appropriate antibiotics before deterioration of the systemic condition and impairment of consciousness. PMID:11139162

  11. Aseptic meningitis caused by Leptospira spp diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Romero, Eliete Caló; Blanco, Roberta Morozetti; Yasuda, Paulo Hideki

    2010-12-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the pathogenic Leptospira spp. The clinical presentations are diverse, ranging from undifferentiated fever to fulminant disease including meningeal forms. The neurological leptospirosis forms are usually neglected. The aim of this study was to investigate leptospirosis as the cause of aseptic meningitis using different diagnostic techniques including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Thirty-nine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients presenting with meningeal abnormalities, predominance of lymphocytes and negative results by traditional microbiological tests were processed by leptospiral culture, anti-leptospiral antibody response and PCR. Leptospira spp DNA was detected in 23 (58.97%) of the CSF samples. Anti-leptospiral antibodies were found in 13 (33.33%) CSF samples. Twelve CSF samples were positive by PCR assay and negative by microscopic agglutination test (MAT) assay. Two CSF samples were positive by MAT and negative by PCR. The positive and negative agreement between both tests was 11 and 14, respectively. CSF samples from six cases of unknown diagnosis were positive by PCR assay. Eight cases showed positive results using PCR and MAT. Leptospirosis could be detected by PCR assay from the 3rd-26th day after illness onset. The sensitivity of the PCR was assessed with confirmed cases of leptospirosis (by MAT) and found to be 89.5%. All CSFs were negative by culture. PCR was found to be a powerful tool for diagnosing meningitis cases of leptospirosis. We recommend that it may be used as a supplementary diagnostic tool, especially in the early stages of the disease, when other diagnostic techniques such as serology are not sensitive. PMID:21225195

  12. From Epidemic Meningitis Vaccines for Africa to the Meningitis Vaccine Project

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, M. Teresa; Jodar, Luis; Granoff, Dan; Rabinovich, Regina; Ceccarini, Costante; Perkin, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Polysaccharide vaccines had been used to control African meningitis epidemics for >30 years but with little or modest success, largely because of logistical problems in the implementation of reactive vaccination campaigns that are begun after epidemics are under way. After the major group A meningococcal meningitis epidemics in 1996–1997 (250 000 cases and 25 000 deaths), African ministers of health declared the prevention of meningitis a high priority and asked the World Health Organization (WHO) for help in developing better immunization strategies to eliminate meningitis epidemics in Africa. Methods. WHO accepted the challenge and created a project called Epidemic Meningitis Vaccines for Africa (EVA) that served as an organizational framework for external consultants, PATH, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF). Consultations were initiated with major vaccine manufacturers. EVA commissioned a costing study/business plan for the development of new group A or A/C conjugate vaccines and explored the feasibility of developing these products as a public–private partnership. Representatives from African countries were consulted. They confirmed that the development of conjugate vaccines was a priority and provided information on preferred product characteristics. In parallel, a strategy for successful introduction was also anticipated and discussed. Results. The expert consultations recommended that a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine be developed and introduced into the African meningitis belt. The results of the costing study indicated that the “cost of goods” to develop a group A – containing conjugate vaccine in the United States would be in the range of US$0.35–$1.35 per dose, depending on composition (A vs A/C), number of doses/vials, and presentation. Following an invitation from BMGF, a proposal was submitted in the spring of 2001. Conclusions. In June 2001

  13. Density abnormalities in normal-appearing gray matter in the middle-aged brain with white matter hyperintense lesions: a DARTEL-enhanced voxel-based morphometry study

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yan; Li, Shenhong; Zhuang, Ying; Liu, Xiaojia; Wu, Lin; Gong, Honghan; Liu, Dewu; Zhou, Fuqing

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Little is known about the structural alterations within gray matter (GM) in middle-aged subjects with white matter hyperintense (WMH) lesions. Here, we aimed to examine the anatomical changes within the GM and their relationship to WMH lesion loads in middle-aged subjects. Participants and methods Twenty-three middle-aged subjects with WMH lesions (WMH group) and 23 demographically matched healthy control subjects participated in the study. A Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through Exponentiated Liealgebra-enhanced voxel-based morphometry was used to measure the GM density, and the correlations between WMH lesion volume and extracted GM values in abnormal regions were identified by voxel-based morphometry analysis. Results Compared with the healthy control subjects, the WMH group had a significantly decreased GM density in the left middle frontal gyrus, bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, left and right premotor cortex, and left and right middle cingulate cortex and an increased GM density in the bilateral cerebellum anterior lobe, left middle temporal gyrus, right temporoparietal junction, left and right prefrontal cortex (PFC), and left inferior parietal lobule. A relationship was observed between the normalized WMH lesion volume and the decreased GM density, including the left middle frontal gyrus (ρ=−0.629, P=0.002), bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ρ=−0.507, P=0.019), right middle cingulate cortex (ρ=−0.484, P=0.026), and right premotor cortex (ρ=−0.438, P=0.047). The WMH lesion loads also negatively correlated with increased GM density in the right temporoparietal junction (ρ=−0.484, P=0.026), left PFC (ρ=−0.469, P=0.032), and right PFC (ρ=−0.438, P=0.047). Conclusion We observed that lesion load-associated structural plasticity corresponds to bidirectional changes in regional GM density in the WMH group. PMID:27274211

  14. In-situ observation of abnormal electron temperure in the F-region valley associated with the prereversal enhancement in the vertical plasma drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralikrishna, Polinaya; Batista, Inez S.; Odriozola, Siomel

    During one of the post sunset rocket launches made on 18-th December 1995 from the equatorial rocket launching station CLA in Alcântara, Brazil a Langmuir probe measured abnormally large electron temperatures below the F-region just before the onset of plasma bubbles but temperatures became normal soon after the onset of bubbles. In-situ measurements made from Brazil recently using rocket-borne swept-bias Langmuir Probes show that the electron temperatures in the valley region between the equatorial E and F regions get modified before the onset of plasma bubbles, probably associated with the prereversal enhancement in the vertical plasma drift. On 2-nd December 2011 a Brazilian VS-30 single stage rocket was launched from the equatorial rocket launching station CLBI in Natal, Brazil carrying a Langmuir probe operating alternately in swept and constant bias modes to measure both electron temperature and electron density respectively. The ground equipments operated during the rocket launch clearly showed the rapid rise of the F-region base indicating the prereversal enhancement of the F-region vertical drift. At the time of launch the bubble activity was also at its peak. The electron density and temperature height profiles could be estimated from the LP data up to the rocket apogee altitude of 139km. During the rocket upleg and downleg the valley region showed the presence of electron temperatures as high as 2000 ºK while the temperatures expected from the existing models are around 500 ºK. A two stage VS-30/Orion rocket was again launched on 8-th December 2012 soon after sunset carrying a Langmuir Probe operating alternately in swept and constant bias modes. At the time of launch ground equipments operated at equatorial stations showed rapid rise in the base of the F-layer and creating ionospheric conditions favorable for the generation of plasma bubbles. Electron temperatures as high as 3500ºK were observed in the valley region during the rocket upleg and

  15. Estimation of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahale, Rohan R.; Mehta, Anish; Uchil, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in tuberculosis is around 5–10%. Of the various manifestations of CNS tuberculosis, meningitis is the most common (70–80%). Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels in tubercular meningitis and compare the levels with controls. Methods: Cross-sectional, prospective, observational, hospital-based study done in 20 patients of tubercular meningitis, 20 patients of aseptic meningitis (AM) and 25 control subjects without any preexisting neurological disorders who have undergone lumbar puncture for spinal anesthesia. Results: Cortisol was detected in all 40 CSF samples of patients (100%). Mean CSF cortisol level was 8.82, 3.47 and 1.05 in tubercular meningitis, AM and controls, respectively. Mean CSF cortisol level in tubercular meningitis was significantly higher as compared to AM and controls (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Cortisol level estimation in CSF is one of the rapid, relatively inexpensive diagnostic markers in early identification of tubercular meningitis along with CSF findings of elevated proteins, hypoglycorrhachia and lymphocytic pleocytosis. This aids in earlier institution of appropriate treatment and thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. This is the first study on the estimation of CSF cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis. PMID:26752900

  16. Abducens Nerve Palsy and Meningitis by Rickettsia typhi

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Wai Lun; Ooi, Say Tat

    2015-01-01

    Patients with rickettsial infection may present with encephalitis or meningitis but neurologic involvement is rare in murine typhus. Here, we report two patients with Rickettsia typhi meningitis who presented with cranial neuropathy, presumably caused by two distinct disease processes. Recognition of the disease manifestations is important because rickettsial infections are potentially associated with significant morbidity. Simple effective treatments are available. PMID:25548377

  17. Meningitis in a College Student in Connecticut, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa, Lynn E.; Gupta, Shaili; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Hadler, James L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe a case of aseptic meningitis in a college student that was ultimately attributed to infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The authors also provide a review of LCMV infection, epidemiology, and public health implications. Providers should be aware of LCMV as a cause of meningitis in college students,…

  18. Quantitative proteomics for identifying biomarkers for tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculous meningitis is a frequent extrapulmonary disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is associated with high mortality rates and severe neurological sequelae. In an earlier study employing DNA microarrays, we had identified genes that were differentially expressed at the transcript level in human brain tissue from cases of tuberculous meningitis. In the current study, we used a quantitative proteomics approach to discover protein biomarkers for tuberculous meningitis. Methods To compare brain tissues from confirmed cased of tuberculous meningitis with uninfected brain tissue, we carried out quantitative protein expression profiling using iTRAQ labeling and LC-MS/MS analysis of SCX fractionated peptides on Agilent’s accurate mass QTOF mass spectrometer. Results and conclusions Through this approach, we identified both known and novel differentially regulated molecules. Those described previously included signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPA) and protein disulfide isomerase family A, member 6 (PDIA6), which have been shown to be overexpressed at the mRNA level in tuberculous meningitis. The novel overexpressed proteins identified in our study included amphiphysin (AMPH) and neurofascin (NFASC) while ferritin light chain (FTL) was found to be downregulated in TBM. We validated amphiphysin, neurofascin and ferritin light chain using immunohistochemistry which confirmed their differential expression in tuberculous meningitis. Overall, our data provides insights into the host response in tuberculous meningitis at the molecular level in addition to providing candidate diagnostic biomarkers for tuberculous meningitis. PMID:23198679

  19. Meningococcal meningitis C in Tamil Nadu, public health perspectives.

    PubMed

    David, Kirubah Vasandhi; Pricilla, Ruby Angeline; Thomas, Beeson

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis has rarely been reported in Tamil Nadu. We report here two children diagnosed with meningococcal meningitis in Vellore, Tamil Nadu, on May 2014. The causative strain was Neisseria meningitidis serotype C. The role of the primary care physician in early diagnosis, appropriate referral, and preventive measures of this disease to the immediate family and community is stressed. PMID:25657960

  20. Cryptococcal meningitis post autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chaaban, S; Wheat, L J; Assi, M

    2014-06-01

    Disseminated Cryptococcus disease occurs in patients with defective T-cell immunity. Cryptococcal meningitis following autologous stem cell transplant (SCT) has been described previously in only 1 patient, 4 months post SCT and while off antifungal prophylaxis. We present a unique case of Cryptococcus meningitis pre-engraftment after autologous SCT, while the patient was receiving fluconazole prophylaxis. A 41-year-old man with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma underwent autologous SCT. Post-transplant prophylaxis consisted of fluconazole 400 mg daily, levofloxacin 500 mg daily, and acyclovir 800 mg twice daily. On day 9 post transplant, he developed fever and headache. Peripheral white blood cell count (WBC) was 700/μL. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed lesions consistent with meningoencephalitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed a WBC of 39 with 77% lymphocytes, protein 63, glucose 38, CSF pressure 20.5 cmH2 O, and a positive cryptococcal antigen. CSF culture confirmed Cryptococcus neoformans. The patient was treated with liposomal amphotericin B 5 mg/kg intravenously daily, and flucytosine 37.5 mg/kg orally every 6 h. He was switched to fluconazole 400 mg daily after 3 weeks of amphotericin therapy, with sterilization of the CSF with negative CSFCryptococcus antigen and negative CSF culture. Review of the literature revealed 9 cases of cryptococcal disease in recipients of SCT. Median time of onset was 64 days post transplant. Only 3 meningitis cases were described; 2 of them after allogeneic SCT. Fungal prophylaxis with fluconazole post autologous SCT is recommended at least through engraftment, and for up to 100 days in high-risk patients. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose and treat opportunistic infections, especially in the face of immunosuppression and despite adequate prophylaxis. Infection is usually fatal without treatment, thus prompt diagnosis and therapy might be life saving. PMID:24750320

  1. Spinal epidural abscess and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative analgaesia.

    PubMed

    van Rappard, Juliaan R M; Tolenaar, Jip L; Smits, Anke B; Go, Peter M N Y H

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative pain relief after a laparoscopic sigmoid resection. On the fifth postoperative day, 2 days after removal of the epidural catheter, the patient developed high fever, leucocytosis and elevated C reactive protein. Blood cultures showed a methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. A photon emission tomography scan revealed increased activity of the spinal canal, suggesting S. aureus meningitis. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed a SEA that was localised at the epidural catheter insertion site. Conservative management with intravenous flucloxacillin was initiated, as no neurological deficits were seen. At last follow-up, 8 weeks postoperatively, the patient showed complete recovery. PMID:26294360

  2. Meningeal Melanocytes in the Mouse: Distribution and Dependence on Mitf

    PubMed Central

    Gudjohnsen, Stefán A. H.; Atacho, Diahann A. M.; Gesbert, Franck; Raposo, Graca; Hurbain, Ilse; Larue, Lionel; Steingrimsson, Eirikur; Petersen, Petur Henry

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Melanocytes are pigment producing cells derived from the neural crest. They are primarily found in the skin and hair follicles, but can also be found in other tissues including the eye, ear and heart. Here, we describe the distribution of pigmented cells in C57BL/6J mouse meninges, the membranes that envelope the brain. These cells contain melanosomes of all four stages of development and they depend on Microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF), the master regulator of melanocyte development, suggesting that they are bona-fide melanocytes. The location of these pigmented cells is consistent with the location of meningeal melanomas in humans and animal models. Significance: Here, we document and define pigmented cells in the meninges of the mouse brain and confirm that they are melanocytes. This is important for understanding the role of this cell type and for understanding primary meningeal melanoma, a rare disease that likely arises from normal meningeal melanocytes. PMID:26635543

  3. Brain Abscesses Complicating Acute Pneumococcal Meningitis During Etanercept Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kasirye, Yusuf; Epperla, Narendranath; Manne, Janaki Ram; Bapani, Sowjanya; Garcia-Montilla, Romel J

    2012-01-01

    Brain abscess formation as a sequelae of community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis is extremely rare, accounting for less than 1% of all meningitis complications. Although metastatic seeding from a distal peripheral septic focus has been observed, this phenomenon most commonly occurs in the context of ear, nose and throat infections, post-cranial neurosurgical procedures, traumatic open cranial injury, or immunosuppression. We present the case of a man, 61 years old, on etanercept therapy for ankylosing spondylitis who developed multiple brain abscesses as a complication of pneumococcal meningitis. We believe that the predisposition to this extremely rare complication of a particularly aggressive pneumococcal meningitis was most likely due to the underlying immunosuppression resulting from etanercept therapy. As far as we know, this case is the first report linking multiple brain abscess formation in a patient with community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis with etanercept therapy. PMID:22634540

  4. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Dredla, Brynn

    2015-01-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient’s medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis. PMID:27053985

  5. Pneumococcal meningitis: development of a new animal model

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Benjamin P.C.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Robins-Browne, Roy M.; Clark, Graeme M.; O’Leary, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Hypothesis The rat is a suitable animal to establish a model for the study of pneumococcal meningitis post cochlear implantation Background There has been an increase in the number of cases of cochlear implant-related meningitis. The most common organism identified was Streptococcus pneumoniae. Whether cochlear implantation increases the risk of pneumococcal meningitis in healthy subjects without other risk factors remains to be determined. Previous animal studies do not focus on the pathogenesis and risk of pneumococcal meningitis post implantation and are based on relatively small animal numbers, making it difficult to assess the cause and effect relationship. There is, therefore, a need to develop a new animal model allowing direct examination of the pathogenesis of meningitis in the presence of a cochlear implant. Methods Eighteen non-implanted rats were infected with 1× 106 and 1 × 108 colony forming units (CFU) of a clinical isolate of S. pneumoniae via three different inoculation routes (middle ear, inner ear and intraperitoneal) to examine for evidence of meningitis over 24 hours. Six implanted rats were infected with the highest amount of bacteria possible for each route of inoculation (4 × 1010 CFU intraperitoneal, 3 × 108CFU middle ear, 1 × 106 CFU inner ear) to examine for evidence of meningitis with the presence of an implant. Histological pattern of cochlear infections for each of the three different inoculating routes were examined. Results Pneumococcal meningitis was evident in all 6 implanted animals for each of the three different routes of inoculation. Once in the inner ear, bacteria were found to enter the central nervous system either via the cochlear aqueduct or canaliculi perforantes of osseous spiral lamina, reaching the perineural and perivascular space then the internal acoustic meatus. The rate, extent and pattern of infection within the cochleae depended on the route of inoculation. Finally, there was no evidence of pneumococcal

  6. Neutrophilic bacterial meningitis: pathology and etiologic diagnosis of fatal cases.

    PubMed

    Guarner, Jeannette; Liu, Lindy; Bhatnagar, Julu; Jones, Tara; Patel, Mitesh; DeLeon-Carnes, Marlene; Zaki, Sherif R

    2013-08-01

    The frequency of fatalities due to acute bacterial meningitis has decreased significantly due to vaccinations, early diagnoses, and treatments. We studied brain tissues of patients with fatal neutrophilic meningitis referred to the Centers for Disease Control for etiologic diagnosis from 2000-2009 to highlight aspects of the disease that may be preventable or treatable. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were extracted from records. Of 117 cases in the database with a diagnosis of meningitis or meningoencephalitis, 39 had neutrophilic inflammation in the meninges. Inflammatory cells infiltrated the superficial cortex in 16 of 39 (41%) cases. Bacteria were found using Gram and bacterial silver stains in 72% of cases, immunohistochemistry in 69% (including two cases where the meningococcus was found outside the meninges), and PCR in 74%. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the cause of the meningitis in 14 patients and Neisseria meningitidis in 9. In addition, Streptococcus spp. were found to be the cause in six cases, while Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., and Fusobacterium were the cause of one case each. There were six cases in which no specific etiological agent could be determined. The mean age of the patients with S. pneumoniae was 39 years (range 0-65), with N. meningitidis was 19 years (range 7-51), whereas that for all others was 31 years (range 0-68). In summary, our study shows that S. pneumoniae continues to be the most frequent cause of fatal neutrophilic bacterial meningitis followed by N. meningitidis, both vaccine preventable diseases. PMID:23558577

  7. Neuropsychological sequelae of bacterial and viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H; Heimann, B; Djukic, M; Mazurek, C; Fels, C; Wallesch, C-W; Nau, R

    2006-02-01

    Survivors of meningitis often complain about neurological and neuropsychological consequences. In this study, the extent of these sequelae was quantified and correlated to MRI findings. Neurological, neuropsychological and neuroradiological examinations were performed with adult patients younger than 70 years, 1-12 years after recovery from bacterial meningitis (BM; n = 59), or from viral meningitis (VM; n = 59). Patients with other potential causes for neuropsychological deficits (e.g. alcoholism) were carefully excluded. Patients were compared to 30 healthy subjects adjusted for age, gender and length of school education. With the exception of attention functions, both patient groups showed more frequently pathological results than the control group for all domains examined. Applying an overall cognitive sum score, patients after BM did not differ significantly in their performance from patients after VM. Separate analyses of various cognitive domains, however, revealed a higher rate of persistent disturbances in short-term and working memory after BM than after VM. Moreover, patients after BM exhibited greater impairment of executive functions. Associative learning of verbal material was also reduced. These deficits could not be ascribed to impaired alertness functions or decreased motivation in BM patients. Applying a logistic regression model, the neuropsychological outcome was related to the neurological outcome. Patients with a Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) of <5 had more frequently impaired test results for non-verbal learning and memory. GOS was also correlated with performance in executive functions. Brain volume was lower and ventricular volume was higher in the bacterial than in the VM group, and cerebral volume and the amount of white matter lesions of patients after BM were negatively correlated with short-term and working memory. In conclusion, patients after both BM and VM with favourable outcome showed affected learning and memory functions. More

  8. Ibuprofen-induced meningitis in mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, M; Gray, R G

    1982-06-01

    A young Black woman with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) developed an aseptic meningitis after receiving ibuprofen. The meningeal reaction, reported infrequently in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and only once previously in MCTD, was characterized by a predominantly polymorphonuclear cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis and depression of CSF glucose. Reversible renal insufficiency also occurred. Features suggestive of a hypersensitivity reaction included pruritus, conjunctivitis, facial oedema, desquamation of the palms and soles, and subsequent near total alopecia. Meningeal signs responded rapidly to systemic corticosteroid therapy. Patients with MCTD as well as those with SLE may be at peculiar risk of developing this uncommon reaction to ibuprofen. PMID:6985377

  9. Intracranial meningeal chondrosarcoma--probable mesenchymal type.

    PubMed

    Rodda, R A; Franklin, C I

    1984-08-01

    A 12 year old girl with episodes of left hemiparesis for 9 months was found to have a large, partly calcified brain tumour which at craniotomy presented on the parasagittal and medial surfaces of the right frontal lobe. No dural or falx attachment could be found and naked eye removal of the tumour was achieved. At a second craniotomy 10 weeks later there was recurrent tumour attached to the falx and involving the sagittal sinus. She died 5 months later. Pathologically, almost all this malignant intracranial neoplasm comprised differentiated cartilaginous tumour. Although only a very small amount of undifferentiated mesenchymal tissue was found in the surgical material available for histological study, it is suggested the tumour can be regarded as a predominantly mature mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the meninges. PMID:6593035

  10. Bacterial meningitis: a new risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Ataee, Ramezan Ali; Mehrabi-Tavana, Ali; Izadi, Morteza; Hosseini, Sayed Mohammad Javad; Ataee, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study is to discuss a possible new risk factor for the bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Cerebrospinal fluid collected from 270 patients was assayed. An enzyme immunosorbent assay for the detection of Staphylococcal enterotoxins A to E was used. RESULTS: The results indicated that the frequency of Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (CoNS) was 35 (20.46%). An important finding of this research was that the CoNS isolates produced enterotoxin C and D or enterotoxin C and E. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of enterotoxin-producing Coagulase Negative Staphylococci isolated from CSF patients. Therefore, these enterotoxins probably act as risk factors in the bacterial invasion into central nervous system. PMID:22091233

  11. Gemifloxacin Is Effective in Experimental Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, A.; Wellmer, A.; Gerber, J.; Maier, K.; Henne, S.; Nau, R.

    2000-01-01

    In a rabbit model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis, 5 mg of gemifloxacin mesylate (SB-265805) per kg/h reduced the bacterial titers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) almost as rapidly as 10 mg of ceftriaxone per kg/h (Δlog CFU/ml/h ± standard deviation [SD], −0.25 ± 0.09 versus −0.38 ± 0.11; serum and CSF concentrations of gemifloxacin were 2.1 ± 1.4 mg/liter and 0.59 ± 0.38 mg/liter, respectively, at 24 h). Coadministration of 1 mg of dexamethasone per kg did not affect gemifloxacin serum and CSF levels (2.7 ± 1.4 mg/liter and 0.75 ± 0.34 mg/liter, respectively, at 24 h) or activity (Δlog CFU/ml/h ± SD, −0.26 ± 0.11). PMID:10681354

  12. A Case of Tuberculous Meningitis with Tuberculoma in Nonimmunocompromised Immigrant

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Hammad; Bihler, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of tuberculous (TB) meningitis in nonimmunocompromised immigrant worker who initially presented with headache and later with generalized tonic clonic seizures and disseminated tuberculosis. PMID:27413568

  13. Future challenges in the elimination of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Bottomley, Matthew J; Serruto, Davide; Sáfadi, Marco Aurélio Palazzi; Klugman, Keith P

    2012-05-30

    Despite the widespread implementation of several effective vaccines over the past few decades, bacterial meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis and Group B Streptococcus (GBS) still results in unacceptably high levels of human mortality and morbidity. A residual disease burden due to bacterial meningitis is also apparent due to a number of persistent or emerging pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella spp. and Streptococcus suis. Here, we review the current status of bacterial meningitis caused by these pathogens, highlighting how past and present vaccination programs have attempted to counter these pathogens. We discuss how improved pathogen surveillance, implementation of current vaccines, and development of novel vaccines may be expected to further reduce bacterial meningitis and related diseases in the future. PMID:22607903

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid "leaks" and meningitis following acoustic tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Hughes, G B; Glasscock, M E; Hays, J W; Jackson, C G; Sismanis, A

    1982-01-01

    We reviewed 271 intracanalicular and cerebellopontine angle lesions removed over the past ten years, 237 by the translabyrinthine or combined approach which created a mastoid defect. The patients were divided into three groups with the following results: (1) obliteration of the mastoid defect combined with older wound closure techniques in the first 188 patients produced CSF leakage in 25% and meningitis in 16% of cases; (2) not obliterating the defect intentionaly in 16 patients produced CSF leakage in 50% and meningitis in 25% of cases; (3) obliteration of the defect combined with newer packing and closure techniques in the last 33 patients produced CSF leakage and meningitis in only 6% of cases. Four problem areas were identified: the eustachian tube, middle ear, mastoid defect, and postauricular wound. Of these, obliteration of the mastoid defect was most important in minimizing postoperative CSF wound leakage, CSF rhinorrhea, and meningitis. PMID:6806745

  15. Five Cases of Recurrent Meningitis Associated with Chronic Strongyloidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Shimasaki, Teppei; Chung, Heath; Shiiki, Soichi

    2015-01-01

    Although meningitis secondary to chronic strongyloidiasis is a rare complication, it is associated with a high mortality rate. Recurrent meningitis can occur if the underlying parasitic infection is left untreated. We report five cases of recurrent meningitis related to chronic strongyloidiasis that were associated with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. Common causative organisms are Escherichia coli, Streptococcus bovis, and Klebsiella pneumonia. One patient died during the second episode of meningitis. Three patients showed significant gastrointestinal and respiratory symptoms before developing headache and fever. In four cases, patients developed multiple recurrences even with the treatment of thiabendazol. Ivermectin seems to be a better agent compared with thiabendazol to achieve eradication of strongyloidiasis. PMID:25548379

  16. A case of postpartum Group B streptococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Gayford, Kylie; McCarthy, Ana; Hague, William M

    2011-01-01

    A case of postpartum Group B streptococcal meningitis, a rare complication of an invasive infection by a common maternal commensal bacterium, which demonstrates the need to develop rapid and accurate antepartum and intrapartum screening methods for this organism.

  17. POOR CLINICAL OUTCOME FOR MENINGITIS CAUSED BY H. INFLUENZAE SEROTYPE A STRAINS CONTAINING THE IS1016-BEXA DELETION

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Josilene B. T.; Ribeiro, Guilherme S.; Cordeiro, Soraia M.; Gouveia, Edilane L.; Salgado, Kátia; Spratt, Brian G.; Godoy, Daniel; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Ko, Albert I.; Reis, Joice N.

    2010-01-01

    Following introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccines, meningitis caused by serotypes other than Hib has gained importance. We conducted active hospital-based surveillance for meningitis over an 11-year period in Salvador, Brazil. H. influenzae isolates were serotyped and analyzed by PCR, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA sequencing to identify strains with a specific deletion (IS1016) in the bexA gene (IS1016-bexA). We identified 43 meningitis cases caused by non-type b H. influenzae: 28 (65%) were caused by type a (Hia), 9 (21%) by non-capsulated strains and 3 (7%) each by types e and f. Hia isolates clustered in two clonal groups; clonal group A strains (n=9) had the IS1016-bexA deletion. Among children <5 years, meningitis caused by Hia from clonal group A had higher case-fatality than clonal group B. Despite small numbers, these results indicate that the presence of IS1016-bexA deletion is associated with enhanced virulence in non-type b H. influenzae. PMID:20932170

  18. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  19. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. Causes Abnormal urine color may ... red blood cells, or mucus in the urine. Dark brown but clear urine is a sign of ...

  20. Enterococcus gallinarum meningitis in an immunocompetent host: a case report.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Vicente Sperb; Zenkner, Francis de Moura; França, Josiane; Santos, Breno Riegel

    2010-01-01

    We describe a rare case of a 53-year-old man with a long history of alcohol abuse, with Enterococcus gallinarum meningitis, an organism that rarely causes human infection and is primarily found in the gastrointestinal tract of poultry. The patient improved with high-dose ampicillin and gentamicin therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first Brazilian reported case of E. gallinarum meningitis and probably the first case described in an immunocompetent host. PMID:20464133

  1. An aseptic meningitis picture from incipient brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Singer, J I

    1992-08-01

    A preadolescent with headache and stiff neck presented for emergency department care. The presumptive diagnosis of viral meningitis was entertained on the basis of clinical examination and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Events subsequent to his release from the department formed the stimulus for this report. It is apparent that patients with complicated sinusitis may present with a constellation of findings consistent with viral meningitis. PMID:1513739

  2. Liver metastasis of meningeal hemangiopericytoma: a study of 5 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Regina C.; Suriawinata, Arief A.; Rubin, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal tumors in the liver, whether primary or metastatic, are rare. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is characteristically associated with delayed metastasis and the liver is one of the most common sites. Despite its consistent histological features, a pathological diagnosis of HPC in the liver is sometimes not straightforward due to its rarity and usually remote medical history of the primary meningeal tumor. In this report, the clinicopathological features of 5 cases of metastatic HPC to the liver were reviewed and described. PMID:27044772

  3. Management of meningitis due to antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter species

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Baek-Nam; Peleg, Anton Y; Lodise, Thomas P; Lipman, Jeffrey; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger; Paterson, David L

    2009-01-01

    Acinetobacter meningitis is becoming an increasingly common clinical entity, especially in the postneurosurgical setting, with mortality from this infection exceeding 15%. Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines for therapy of postneurosurgical meningitis recommend either ceftazidime or cefepime as empirical coverage against Gram-negative pathogens. However, assessment of the pharmacodynamics of these cephalosporins in cerebrospinal fluid suggests that recommended doses will achieve pharmacodynamic targets against fewer than 10% of contemporary acinetobacter isolates. Thus, these antibiotics are poor options for suspected acinetobacter meningitis. From in vitro and pharmacodynamic perspectives, intravenous meropenem plus intraventricular administration of an aminoglycoside may represent a superior, albeit imperfect, regimen for suspected acinetobacter meningitis. For cases of meningitis due to carbapenem-resistant acinetobacter, use of tigecycline is not recommended on pharmacodynamic grounds. The greatest clinical experience rests with use of polymyxins, although an intravenous polymyxin alone is inadvisable. Combination with an intraventricularly administered antibiotic plus removal of infected neurosurgical hardware appears the therapeutic strategy most likely to succeed in this situation. Unfortunately, limited development of new antibiotics plus the growing threat of multidrug-resistant acinetobacter is likely to increase the problems posed by acinetobacter meningitis in the future. PMID:19324297

  4. Aetiology, Clinical Presentation, and Outcome of Meningitis in Patients Coinfected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwan, Smita; Naidoo, Kogieleum

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective review of confirmed HIV-TB coinfected patients previously enrolled as part of the SAPiT study in Durban, South Africa. Patients with suspected meningitis were included in this case series. From 642 individuals, 14 episodes of meningitis in 10 patients were identified. For 8 patients, this episode of meningitis was the AIDS defining illness, with cryptococcus (9/14 episodes) and tuberculosis (3/14 episodes) as the commonest aetiological agents. The combination of headache and neck stiffness (78.6%) was the most frequent clinical presentation. Relapsing cryptococcal meningitis occurred in 3/7 patients. Mortality was 70% (7/10), with 4 deaths directly due to meningitis. In an HIV TB endemic region we identified cryptococcus followed by tuberculosis as the leading causes of meningitis. We highlight the occurrence of tuberculous meningitis in patients already receiving antituberculous therapy. The development of meningitis heralded poor outcomes, high mortality, and relapsing meningitis despite ART. PMID:22216407

  5. A Case Report on the Successful Treatment of Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Infectious Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Initially Presenting with Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kawatani, Yohei; Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Hayashi, Yujiro; Taneichi, Tetsuyoshi; Ito, Yujiro; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Suda, Yuji; Hori, Takaki

    2015-01-01

    Infectious abdominal aortic aneurysms often present with abdominal and lower back pain, but prolonged fever may be the only symptom. Infectious abdominal aortic aneurysms initially presenting with meningitis are extremely rare; there are no reports of their successful treatment. Cases with Streptococcus pneumoniae as the causative bacteria are even rarer with a higher mortality rate than those caused by other bacteria. We present the case of a 65-year-old man with lower limb weakness and back pain. Examination revealed fever and neck stiffness. Cerebrospinal fluid showed leukocytosis and low glucose levels. The patient was diagnosed with meningitis and bacteremia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and treated with antibiotics. Fever, inflammatory response, and neurologic findings showed improvement. However, abdominal computed tomography revealed an aneurysm not present on admission. Antibiotics were continued, and a rifampicin soaked artificial vascular graft was implanted. Tissue cultures showed no bacteria, and histological findings indicated inflammation with high leukocyte levels. There were no postoperative complications or neurologic abnormalities. Physical examination, blood tests, and computed tomography confirmed there was no relapse over the following 13 months. This is the first reported case of survival of a patient with an infectious abdominal aortic aneurysm initially presenting with meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. PMID:26779361

  6. Herpes Zoster Meningitis Presenting With a Cerebrospinal Fluid Leukemoid Reaction in an Adolescent With preB-ALL in Remission.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kristina; Song, Sophie X; Kao, Roy L; Van Dyne, Elizabeth; Kempert, Pamela; Deville, Jaime G

    2016-08-01

    A 19-year-old girl with a history of precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia in remission presented with fever, headache, and a skin rash. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination reported pleocytosis with blast-like cells concerning for a central nervous system leukemic relapse. After the patient showed significant improvement on intravenous acyclovir, a repeat lumbar puncture revealed normalization of CSF. The abnormal CSF cells were reviewed and ultimately determined to be activated and atypical lymphocytes. The patient recovered uneventfully. Atypical lymphocytes resembling leukemic blasts are an unusual finding in viral meningitis. Varicella zoster virus reactivation should be considered during initial evaluation for central nervous system relapse of leukemia. PMID:27322719

  7. Loss of capsaicin-induced meningeal neurogenic sensory vasodilatation in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Dux, M; Rosta, J; Pintér, S; Sántha, P; Jancsó, G

    2007-11-30

    dysfunction, e.g. due to a limited removal of inflammatory mediators and/or tissue metabolites from the meningeal tissue, may contribute to the enhanced incidence of headaches in diabetics. PMID:17920775

  8. Streptococcus pneumoniae Meningitis Presenting with Acute Urinary Retention and Emphysematous Cystitis.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yasushi; Doi, Asako; Endo, Akiko; Nishioka, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A combination of acute urinary retention and aseptic meningitis has occasionally been described, which is referred to as meningitis-retention syndrome. In contrast, acute urinary retention has rarely been reported in bacterial meningitis. We herein report a case of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis presenting with acute urinary retention which led to emphysematous cystitis in an elderly woman. She presented with impaired consciousness and a distended lower abdomen. She was diagnosed with pneumococcal meningitis by lumbar puncture. Abdominal computed tomography revealed the presence of emphysematous cystitis. She completely recovered with antibiotic therapy without any complications. Acute urinary retention can occur secondary to pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27477423

  9. Meningococcal carriage in the African meningitis belt

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A meningococcal serogroup A polysaccharide/tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) (MenAfriVac#x2122;) is being deployed in countries of the African meningitis belt. Experience with other polysaccharide/protein conjugate vaccines has shown that an important part of their success has been their ability to prevent the acquisition of pharyngeal carriage and hence to stop transmission and induce herd immunity. If PsA-TT is to achieve the goal of preventing epidemics, it must be able to prevent the acquisition of pharyngeal carriage as well as invasive meningococcal disease and whether PsA-TT can prevent pharyngeal carriage needs to be determined. To address this issue, a consortium (the African Meningococcal Carriage (MenAfriCar) consortium) was established in 2009 to investigate the pattern of meningococcal carriage in countries of the African meningitis belt prior to and after the introduction of PsA-TT. This article describes how the consortium was established, its objectives and the standardised field and laboratory methods that were used to achieve these objectives. The experience of the MenAfriCar consortium will help in planning future studies on the epidemiology of meningococcal carriage in countries of the African meningitis belt and elsewhere. Un vaccin conjugué contenant un polysaccharide du sérogroupe A méningococcique et une anatoxine du tétanos (PsA-TT) (MenAfriVac™) est en cours de déploiement dans les pays de la ceinture africaine de la méningite. L’ expérience avec d’ autres vaccins conjugués polysaccharide/protéine a montré qu’ une partie importante de leur succès a été leur capacité à empêcher l’ acquisition du portage pharyngé et donc à arrêter la transmission et à induire une immunité de group. Si PsA-TT doit d’ atteindre l’ objectif de prévenir les épidémies, il devrait être en mesure d’ empêcher l’ acquisition du portage pharyngé ainsi que la méningococcie invasive et le fait que PsA-TT puisse emp

  10. Diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis: challenges and promises.

    PubMed

    Philip, N; William, T; William, D V

    2015-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) which is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infects primarily the lungs but it also affects other parts of the body. Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is the most severe form of TB and has the highest mortality and morbidity rate compared to other forms of TB. It is common in young children and HIV-infected patients, but is also seen in adults. Despite anti-tuberculosis treatment, TBM is still a major cause of death and neurological sequelae as treatment given to the patients is often delayed. Early diagnosis is challenging due to the non-specific symptoms of TBM and the low number of tubercle bacilli in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Until now, there is no established diagnostic method that can rapidly detect M. tuberculosis in TBM patients with high sensitivity and specificity. The emergence of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains further complicates the diagnosis and treatment regimen of TBM. This review summarizes challenges of the currently used diagnostic methods and the potential future use of molecular diagnostic methods for TBM. PMID:25890607

  11. Hemorrhage in the central canal of the cervical spinal cord in a coonhound diagnosed with canine juvenile polyarteritis (steroid responsive meningitis-arteritis)

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Kelly L.; Stieger-Vanegas, Susanne M.; Valentine, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Patchy meningeal and parenchymal contrast enhancement of the spinal cord with multifocal central canal dilations was noted in a computed tomography myelogram of the cervical spine of a 6-month-old intact female coonhound with a confirmed diagnosis of canine juvenile polyarteritis and associated hemorrhage within the central canal. PMID:26028675

  12. Non-Contrast-Enhanced Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the General Population: The Incidence of Abnormal Findings in Patients 50 Years Old and Younger Compared to Older Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cieszanowski, Andrzej; Maj, Edyta; Kulisiewicz, Piotr; Grudzinski, Ireneusz P.; Jakoniuk-Glodala, Karolina; Chlipala-Nitek, Irena; Kaczynski, Bartosz; Rowinski, Olgierd

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess and compare the incidence of abnormal findings detected during non-contrast-enhanced whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) in the general population in two age groups: (1) 50 years old and younger; and (2) over 50 years old. Materials and Methods The analysis included 666 non-contrast-enhanced WB-MRIs performed on a 1.5-T scanner between December 2009 and June 2013 in a private hospital in 451 patients 50 years old and younger and 215 patients over 50 years old. The following images were obtained: T2-STIR (whole body-coronal plane), T2-STIR (whole spine-sagittal), T2-TSE with fat-saturation (neck and trunk-axial), T2-FLAIR (head-axial), 3D T1-GRE (thorax-coronal, axial), T2-TSE (abdomen-axial), chemical shift (abdomen-axial). Detected abnormalities were classified as: insignificant (type I), potentially significant, requiring medical attention (type II), significant, requiring treatment (type III). Results There were 3375 incidental findings depicted in 659 (98.9%) subjects: 2997 type I lesions (88.8%), 363 type II lesions (10.8%) and 15 type III lesions (0.4%), including malignant or possibly malignant lesions in seven subjects. The most differences in the prevalence of abnormalities on WB-MRI between patients 50 years old and younger and over 50 years old concerned: brain infarction (22.2%, 45.0% respectively), thyroid cysts/nodules (8.7%, 18.8%), pulmonary nodules (5.0%, 16.2%), significant degenerative disease of the spine (23.3%, 44.5%), extra-spinal degenerative disease (22.4%, 61.1%), hepatic steatosis (15.8%, 24.9%), liver cysts/hemangiomas (24%, 34.5%), renal cysts (16.9%, 40.6%), prostate enlargement (5.1% of males, 34.2% of males), uterine fibroids (16.3% of females, 37.9% of females). Conclusions Incidental findings were detected in almost all of the subjects. WB-MRI demonstrated that the prevalence of the vast majority of abnormalities increases with age. PMID:25259581

  13. The Meninges: New Therapeutic Targets For Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Russi, Abigail E.; Brown, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    The CNS is largely comprised of non-regenerating cells, including neurons and myelin-producing oligodendrocytes, which are particularly vulnerable to immune cell mediated damage. To protect the CNS, mechanisms exist that normally restrict the transit of peripheral immune cells into the brain and spinal cord, conferring an “immune specialized” status. Thus, there has been a long-standing debate as to how these restrictions are overcome in several inflammatory diseases of the CNS, including multiple sclerosis (MS). In this review, we highlight the role of the meninges, tissues that surround and protect the CNS and enclose the cerebral spinal fluid, in promoting chronic inflammation that leads to neuronal damage. Although the meninges have traditionally been considered structures that provide physical protection for the brain and spinal cord, new data has established these tissues as sites of active immunity. It has been hypothesized that the meninges are important players in normal immunosurveillance of the CNS but also serve as initial sites of anti-myelin immune responses. The resulting robust meningeal inflammation elicits loss of localized blood barrier integrity and facilitates a large-scale influx of immune cells into the CNS parenchyma. We propose that targeting of the cells and molecules mediating these inflammatory responses within the meninges offers promising therapies for MS that are free from the constraints imposed by the blood brain barrier. Importantly, such therapies may avoid the systemic immunosuppression often associated with the existing treatments. PMID:25241937

  14. Chronic candidal meningitis: an uncommon manifestation of candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Voice, R A; Bradley, S F; Sangeorzan, J A; Kauffman, C A

    1994-07-01

    Chronic meningitis is an uncommon manifestation of candidiasis. We present the case of an elderly woman who had symptoms such as headache, malaise, and fever for 8 months and was found to have Candida albicans meningitis, and we review 17 similar cases. An underlying illness or risk factor for candidiasis was present in only 13 (72%) of the 18 patients. Headache, fever, and nuchal rigidity were the predominant clinical findings. Analysis of CSF showed either mononuclear or neutrophilic pleocytosis, an elevated protein level, and a decreased level of glucose. Only 17% of CSF smears were positive, and only 44% of initial CSF cultures yielded Candida species. In four cases, Candida species grew only after special techniques were used; in three cases, CSF cultures remained negative. The overall mortality associated with candidal meningitis was 53%, but among 12 patients who were treated and followed, the rate was 33%. In addition to acute meningitis seen with disseminated infection, Candida species can cause chronic meningitis that mimics tuberculosis and the more common fungal meningitides, such as cryptococcosis. PMID:7948559

  15. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  16. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... from many different conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth color, time of appearance, or absence ...

  17. CSF ADA Determination in Early Diagnosis of Tuberculous Meningitis in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Gopal Chandra; Sharma, Brijesh; Gupta, B. B.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculous and Cryptococcal meningitis are common in HIV patients. A highly specific and sensitive rapid test for diagnosis of Tuberculous meningitis especially in setting of HIV is not available in developing countries where the burden of disease is high. We measured ADA (adenosine deaminase) levels using spectrophotometric method in the CSF of HIV patients with meningitis to differentiate Tuberculous meningitis from meningitis due to other causes. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare ADA values between tuberculous meningitis (TBM) and nontuberculous (non-TB) meningitis patients and a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis curve was drawn from these values. Levels of ADA in the CSF of patients with TBM were significantly higher than those in patients with meningitis due to other causes. CSF ADA level determination with a cut-off value of 6 IU/L was found to be highly specific and fairly sensitive test for the diagnosis of TBM in HIV positive patients. PMID:27144055

  18. Dementia and capsular genu ischemia in patients with severe bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Naito, Makoto; Johkura, Ken; Momoo, Takayuki; Nomiya, Tamaki; Kudo, Yosuke; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki

    2010-04-01

    Infarction in the genu of the internal capsule causes dementia that is characterized by abulia, lethargy and memory loss without obvious motor palsy (capsular genu syndrome). We found infarction or decreased cerebral blood flow in the genu of the internal capsule in 6 of 13 patients with severe bacterial meningitis. Four of these six patients developed post-meningitis dementia, characterized by abulia, lethargy, and memory loss. Of 24 patients with viral meningitis, none developed capsular genu ischemia or post-meningitis dementia. In patients with severe bacterial meningitis, capsular genu ischemia may play some role in the development of post-meningitis dementia. In patients with viral meningitis, absence of such ischemia may explain, at least in a part, the rarity of post-meningitis dementia. PMID:19838622

  19. Stroke Secondary to Aseptic Meningitis After Endovascular Treatment of a Giant Aneurysm with Parent Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Doenmez, Halil Mavili, Ertugrul Ikizceli, Tuerkan; Durak, Ahmet Candan; Kurtsoy, Ali

    2009-07-15

    Aseptic meningitis related to hydrogel-coated coils is a known complication, but it is extremely rare after platinum bare coil aseptic meningitis. Here we report the development of aseptic meningitis causing brain stem and cerebellar infarct in a patient with a giant aneurysm treated with bare platinum coils. We conclude that aneurysm size is an important factor affecting the occurrence of aseptic meningitis associated with stroke.

  20. Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Wanis H; Elalamy, Osama R; Doiphode, Sanjay H; Mobyaed, Hassan; Darweesh, Adham

    2010-01-01

    Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia is a very rare manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, with only a few cases reported in the literature. In almost all previously reported cases, other clinical manifestations of meningitis, such as fever, headache, and neck stiffness preceded acute myelopathy. In this paper, we report a case of acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, in the absence of other clinical manifestations of meningitis. PMID:21483588

  1. Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Wanis H.; Elalamy, Osama R.; Doiphode, Sanjay H.; Mobyaed, Hassan; Darweesh, Adham

    2010-01-01

    Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia is a very rare manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, with only a few cases reported in the literature. In almost all previously reported cases, other clinical manifestations of meningitis, such as fever, headache, and neck stiffness preceded acute myelopathy. In this paper, we report a case of acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, in the absence of other clinical manifestations of meningitis. PMID:21483588

  2. The Evolution of the Meningitis Vaccine Project

    PubMed Central

    Tiffay, Kathleen; Jodar, Luis; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Socquet, Muriel; LaForce, F. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background. In 2001, the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) was tasked to develop, test, license, and introduce a group A meningococcal (MenA) conjugate vaccine for sub-Saharan Africa. African public health officials emphasized that a vaccine price of less than US$0.50 per dose was necessary to ensure introduction and sustained use of this new vaccine. Methods. Initially, MVP envisioned partnering with a multinational vaccine manufacturer, but the target price and opportunity costs were problematic and formal negotiations ended in 2002. MVP chose to become a “virtual vaccine company,” and over the next decade managed a network of public–private and public–public partnerships for pharmaceutical development, clinical development, and regulatory submission. MVP supported the transfer of key know-how for the production of group A polysaccharide and a new conjugation method to the Serum Institute of India, Ltd, based in Pune, India. A robust staff structure supported by technical consultants and overseen by advisory groups in Europe and Africa ensured that the MenA conjugate vaccine would meet all international standards. Results. A robust project structure including a team of technical consultants and 3 advisory groups in Europe and Africa ensured that the MenA conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT, MenAfriVac) was licensed by the Drug Controller General of India and prequalified by the World Health Organization in June 2010. The vaccine was introduced in Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger in December 2010. Conclusions. The development, through a public–private partnership, of a safe, effective, and affordable vaccine for sub-Saharan Africa, PsA-TT, offers a new paradigm for the development of vaccines specifically targeting populations in resource-poor countries. PMID:26553666

  3. Preventing deaths from cryptococcal meningitis: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Roy, Monika; Chiller, Tom

    2011-09-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis (CM), a fungal disease caused by Cryptococcus spp., is the most common form of meningitis and a leading cause of death among persons with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. Detection of cryptococcal antigen, which is present several weeks before overt signs of meningitis develop, provides an opportunity to detect infection early. Screening persons with HIV for cryptococcal infection when they access healthcare can identify asymptomatic infected patients allowing for prompt treatment and prevention of death. A newly developed point-of-care assay for cryptococcal antigen, as well as growing evidence supporting the utility and cost-effectiveness of screening, are further reasons to consider broad implementation of cryptococcal screening in countries with a high burden of cryptococcal disease. PMID:21905781

  4. Vaccine preventable meningitis in Malaysia: epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Hannah C; Jefferies, Johanna M C; Clarke, Stuart C

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide bacterial meningitis accounts for more than one million cases and 135,000 deaths annually. Profound, lasting neurological complications occur in 9-25% of cases. This review confirms the greatest risk from bacterial meningitis is in early life in Malaysia. Much of the disease burden can be avoided by immunization, particularly against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Despite inclusion of the Hib vaccine in the National Immunisation Programme and the licensure of pneumococcal vaccines, these two species are the main contributors to bacterial meningitis in Malaysia, with Neisseria meningitidis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, causing a smaller proportion of disease. The high Hib prevalence may partly be due to dated, small-scale studies limiting the understanding of the current epidemiological situation. This highlights the need for larger, better quality surveillance from Malaysia to evaluate the success of Hib immunization and to help guide immunization policy for vaccines against S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis. PMID:25962101

  5. Citramalic acid in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Perlman, S; Carr, S A

    1984-07-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from uninfected patients and from patients with bacterial and viral meningitis was analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography, with use of a flame ionization detector, and by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The resulting profiles were consistent and reproducible. Hydroxy acids were the compounds found in greatest abundance in both normal and infected CSF. Control experiments to establish the sensitivity and efficiency of the extraction and derivatization methods are also presented. Constituents of CSF from patients with bacterial meningitis differed quantitatively and qualitatively from those of CSF from uninfected patients or patients with nonbacterial infections. CSF from seven of eight patients with bacterial meningitis contained citramalic acid, a compound not previously identified in either normal or infected CSF. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:6145530

  6. Multiplex PCR for rapid diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kusum, Sharma; Aman, Sharma; Pallab, Ray; Kumar, Sharma Shiv; Manish, Modi; Sudesh, Prabhakar; Subhash, Varma; Meera, Sharma

    2011-10-01

    Rapid and specific diagnosis of tubercular meningitis is of paramount importance to decrease morbidity and mortality. The aim of the study was to evaluate multiplex PCR using protein b, MPB 64, and IS6110 primers directed against M. tuberculosis complex for the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). Multiplex PCR was performed on 18 TBM confirmed cases (culture was positive), 92 clinically suspected TBM cases and 100 non-TBM (control group) patients. Multiplex PCR had a sensitivity of 94.4% for confirmed cases and specificity of 100% for confirmed TBM cases. In 92 clinically diagnosed but unconfirmed TBM cases, multiplex PCR was positive in 84.78% cases. The overall sensitivity of microscopy, culture and multiplex cases were 1.81, 16.73, and 86.63% and specificity was 100, 100, and 100% respectively. Multiplex PCR using protein b, MPB 64, and IS6110 primers has a high sensitivity and specificity in diagnosis of tubercular meningitis. PMID:21455603

  7. Probable acute disseminated encephalomyelitis due to Haemophilus influenzae meningitis.

    PubMed

    Beleza, Pedro; Ribeiro, Manuel; Pereira, João; Ferreira, Carla; Jordão, Maria José; Almeida, Fátima

    2008-05-01

    We report the case of a 17-year-old male on long-term steroid therapy for minimal lesion glomerulopathy who, after an upper respiratory infection, presented with Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis. Twenty-four hours later he developed depression of consciousness which progressed to coma and left hemiparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multiple lesions (hyperintense on T2 and slightly hypointense on Tl) involving mainly white matter suggestive of inflammation. MRI features were compatible with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), although a differential diagnosis included cerebritis or vasculitis, secondary to bacterial meningitis. The patient was treated with high-dose steroids which resulted in a gradual improvement followed by complete clinical recovery. We propose a diagnosis of ADEM was the best diagnosis because of the radiological features and response to steroids. The occurrence of ADEM associated with acute meningitis, however rare, represents an important diagnostic challenge for the clinician. PMID:18355336

  8. Recent advances in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Quagliarello, V J; Scheld, W M

    1986-11-01

    Bacterial meningitis continues to account for worldwide morbidity and mortality despite the advent of effective bactericidal antibiotic therapy. Recent advances over the past 10 years in the development of experimental animal models as well as basic investigation into critical bacterial surface virulence factors have begun to clarify a conceptual framework for understanding the mechanism of meningitis development in humans. Basic observations regarding competing host defenses and bacterial virulence factors have supported a pathogenetic sequence of mucosal colonization with a meningeal pathogen; systemic host invasion with intravascular replication; blood brain barrier penetration and unimpeded CSF proliferation amid the impaired host defenses in the CSF milieu; and pathophysiologic sequelae including vasogenic, cytotoxic, and interstitial brain edema (and other processes) accounting for irreversible neuronal injury and death. Only through continued basic investigation into each of these pathogenetic steps will significant reductions in morbidity and mortality ensue. PMID:3535498

  9. Streptococcus salivarius meningitis and sphenoid sinus mucocele. Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Conte, Aristide; Chinello, Pierangelo; Civljak, Rok; Bellussi, Angelo; Noto, Pasquale; Petrosillo, Nicola

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of meningitis caused by Streptococcus salivarius in a 49-year-old woman with a previously undiagnosed cerebrospinal fluid fistula due to a sphenoid mucocele. We reviewed the literature concerning meningitis caused by this uncommon organism and to the best of our knowledge this is the first case of S. salivarius meningitis associated with sphenoid mucocele. PMID:15936084

  10. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Paradoxical Manifestation is Common in HIV-negative Tuberculous Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tai, Mei-Ling Sharon; Nor, Hazman Mohd; Kadir, Khairul Azmi Abdul; Viswanathan, Shanthi; Rahmat, Kartini; Zain, Norzaini Rose Mohd; Ong, Kuo Ghee; Rafia, Mohd Hanip; Tan, Chong Tin

    2016-01-01

    Paradoxical manifestation is worsening of pre-existing tuberculous lesion or appearance of new lesions in patients whose condition initially improved with antituberculous treatment. Our hypothesis was that paradoxical manifestation in non-HIV tuberculous meningitis (TBM) patients was underestimated and this could contribute to patients' prognosis. This was the first systemic study of paradoxical manifestation in HIV-negative TBM patients. Between 2009 and 2014, TBM patients were studied prospectively in 2 hospitals. Clinical features, cerebrospinal fluid, and radiological findings were monitored. Paradoxical manifestation was divided into definite (4 weeks or more) and probable (between 14 and 27 d) after commencement of antituberculous treatment. Forty-one non-HIV TBM patients were recruited. Definite paradoxical manifestation occurred in 23/41 (56%) of the patients. Time to onset of paradoxical manifestation was between 28 days and 9 months, and majority was between 28 and 50 days. Neuroimaging manifestation in the brain (22/41 patients, 54%) and clinical manifestation (22/41 patients, 54%) were most commonly seen, followed by cerebrospinal fluid manifestation (7/41 patients, 17%). Neuroimaging changes most commonly seen were worsening of leptomeningeal enhancement, new infarcts, new tuberculomas, and enlargement of tuberculoma. Initial Computed Tomography Angiography/magnetic resonance angiography brain showed vasculitis in 14 patients, with 2 (12.5%) showing paradoxical vasculitis during follow-up. Recurrence of the paradoxical manifestation was seen in 7/23 (30%) of the patients. More than half (14/23, 61%) of the patients improved, 6 (26%) patients died, and 3 (13%) patients had persistent neurological deficit. Paradoxical manifestation was very common in non-HIV TBM patients. Neuroimaging paradoxical manifestation of 2-4 weeks may not be paradoxical manifestation but could be delayed treatment response. PMID:26735523

  12. Paradoxical Manifestation is Common in HIV-negative Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Mei-Ling Sharon; Nor, Hazman Mohd; Kadir, Khairul Azmi Abdul; Viswanathan, Shanthi; Rahmat, Kartini; Zain, Norzaini Rose Mohd; Ong, Kuo Ghee; Rafia, Mohd Hanip; Tan, Chong Tin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Paradoxical manifestation is worsening of pre-existing tuberculous lesion or appearance of new lesions in patients whose condition initially improved with antituberculous treatment. Our hypothesis was that paradoxical manifestation in non-HIV tuberculous meningitis (TBM) patients was underestimated and this could contribute to patients’ prognosis. This was the first systemic study of paradoxical manifestation in HIV-negative TBM patients. Between 2009 and 2014, TBM patients were studied prospectively in 2 hospitals. Clinical features, cerebrospinal fluid, and radiological findings were monitored. Paradoxical manifestation was divided into definite (4 weeks or more) and probable (between 14 and 27 d) after commencement of antituberculous treatment. Forty-one non-HIV TBM patients were recruited. Definite paradoxical manifestation occurred in 23/41 (56%) of the patients. Time to onset of paradoxical manifestation was between 28 days and 9 months, and majority was between 28 and 50 days. Neuroimaging manifestation in the brain (22/41 patients, 54%) and clinical manifestation (22/41 patients, 54%) were most commonly seen, followed by cerebrospinal fluid manifestation (7/41 patients, 17%). Neuroimaging changes most commonly seen were worsening of leptomeningeal enhancement, new infarcts, new tuberculomas, and enlargement of tuberculoma. Initial Computed Tomography Angiography/magnetic resonance angiography brain showed vasculitis in 14 patients, with 2 (12.5%) showing paradoxical vasculitis during follow-up. Recurrence of the paradoxical manifestation was seen in 7/23 (30%) of the patients. More than half (14/23, 61%) of the patients improved, 6 (26%) patients died, and 3 (13%) patients had persistent neurological deficit. Paradoxical manifestation was very common in non-HIV TBM patients. Neuroimaging paradoxical manifestation of 2-4 weeks may not be paradoxical manifestation but could be delayed treatment response. PMID:26735523

  13. Exome Array Analysis of Susceptibility to Pneumococcal Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kloek, Anne T; van Setten, Jessica; van der Ende, Arie; Bots, Michiel L; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Valls Serón, Mercedes; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik; Ferwerda, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Host genetic variability may contribute to susceptibility of bacterial meningitis, but which genes contribute to the susceptibility to this complex disease remains undefined. We performed a genetic association study in 469 community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis cases and 2072 population-based controls from the Utrecht Health Project in order to find genetic variants associated with pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility. A HumanExome BeadChip was used to genotype 102,097 SNPs in the collected DNA samples. Associations were tested with the Fisher exact test. None of the genetic variants tested reached Bonferroni corrected significance (p-value <5 × 10(-7)). Our strongest signals associated with susceptibility to pneumococcal meningitis were rs139064549 on chromosome 1 in the COL11A1 gene (p = 1.51 × 10(-6); G allele OR 3.21 [95% CI 2.05-5.02]) and rs9309464 in the EXOC6B gene on chromosome 2 (p = 6.01 × 10(-5); G allele OR 0.66 [95% CI 0.54-0.81]). The sequence kernel association test (SKAT) tests for associations between multiple variants in a gene region and pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility yielded one significant associated gene namely COL11A1 (p = 1.03 × 10(-7)). Replication studies are needed to validate these results. If replicated, the functionality of these genetic variations should be further studied to identify by which means they influence the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27389768

  14. Streptococcus suis Meningitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    van Samkar, Anusha; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Schultsz, Constance; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2015-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis is the most common cause of meningitis in pork consuming and pig rearing countries in South-East Asia. We performed a systematic review of studies on S. suis meningitis to define the clinical characteristics, predisposing factors and outcome. Methodology Studies published between January 1, 1980 and August 1, 2015 were identified from main literature databases and reference lists. Studies were included if they were written in West-European languages and described at least 5 adult patients with S. suis meningitis in whom at least one clinical characteristic was described. Findings We identified 913 patients with S. suis meningitis included in 24 studies between 1980 and 2015. The mean age was 49 years and 581 of 711 patients were male (82%). Exposure to pigs or pork was present in 395 of 648 patients (61%) while other predisposing factors were less common. 514 of 528 patients presented with fever (97%), 429 of 451 with headache (95%), 462 of 496 with neck stiffness (93%) and 78 of 384 patients (20%) had a skin injury in the presence of pig/pork contact. The case fatality rate was 2.9% and hearing loss was a common sequel occurring in 259 of 489 patients (53%). Treatment included dexamethasone in 157 of 300 (52%) of patients and was associated with reduced hearing loss in S. suis meningitis patients included in a randomized controlled trial. Conclusion S. suis meningitis has a clear association with pig and pork contact. Mortality is low, but hearing loss occurs frequently. Dexamethasone was shown to reduce hearing loss. PMID:26505485

  15. [A meningitis case of Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection].

    PubMed

    Karsen, Hasan; Karahocagil, Mustafa Kasim; Irmak, Hasan; Demiröz, Ali Pekcan

    2008-10-01

    Turkey is located at an endemic area for brusellosis and tuberculosis which are both important public health problems. Meningitis caused by Brucella and Mycobacterium spp. may be confused since the clinical and laboratory findings are similar. In this report, a meningitis case with Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection has been presented. A 19-years-old woman was admitted to our clinic with severe headache, fever, vomiting, meningeal irritation symptoms, confusion and diplopia. The patient was initially diagnosed as Brucella meningitis based on her history (stockbreeding, consuming raw milk products, clinical symptoms concordant to brucellosis lasting for 4-5 months), physical examination and laboratory findings of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Standard tube agglutination test for brucellosis was positive at 1/80 titer in CSF and at 1/640 titer in serum, whereas no growth of Brucella spp. was detected in CSF and blood cultures. Antibiotic therapy with ceftriaxone, rifampicin and doxycyclin was started, however, there was no clinical improvement and agitation and confusion of the patient continued by the end of second day of treatment. Repeated CSF examination yielded acid-fast bacteria. The patient was then diagnosed as meningitis with double etiology and the therapy was changed to ceftriaxone, streptomycin, morphozinamide, rifampicin and isoniazid for thirty days. Tuberculosis meningitis was confirmed with the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on the 14th day of cultivation (BACTEC, Becton Dickinson, USA) of the CSF sample. On the 30th day of treatment she was discharged on anti-tuberculous treatment with isoniazid and rifampicin for 12 months. The follow-up of the patient on the first and third months of treatment revealed clinical and laboratory improvement. Since this was a rare case of Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection, this report emphasizes that such co-infections should be kept in mind especially in the endemic areas for tuberculosis and brucellosis

  16. Exome Array Analysis of Susceptibility to Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kloek, Anne T.; van Setten, Jessica; van der Ende, Arie; Bots, Michiel L.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Serón, Mercedes Valls; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik; Ferwerda, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Host genetic variability may contribute to susceptibility of bacterial meningitis, but which genes contribute to the susceptibility to this complex disease remains undefined. We performed a genetic association study in 469 community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis cases and 2072 population-based controls from the Utrecht Health Project in order to find genetic variants associated with pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility. A HumanExome BeadChip was used to genotype 102,097 SNPs in the collected DNA samples. Associations were tested with the Fisher exact test. None of the genetic variants tested reached Bonferroni corrected significance (p-value <5 × 10−7). Our strongest signals associated with susceptibility to pneumococcal meningitis were rs139064549 on chromosome 1 in the COL11A1 gene (p = 1.51 × 10−6; G allele OR 3.21 [95% CI 2.05–5.02]) and rs9309464 in the EXOC6B gene on chromosome 2 (p = 6.01 × 10−5; G allele OR 0.66 [95% CI 0.54–0.81]). The sequence kernel association test (SKAT) tests for associations between multiple variants in a gene region and pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility yielded one significant associated gene namely COL11A1 (p = 1.03 × 10−7). Replication studies are needed to validate these results. If replicated, the functionality of these genetic variations should be further studied to identify by which means they influence the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27389768

  17. Bacterial meningitis as a first presentation of pituitary macroprolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Margari, Niki

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 56-year-old man was brought to the Emergency Department after being found collapsed at his office with a reduced level of consciousness. From clinical examination and initial investigations, he was diagnosed as having bacterial meningitis and was promptly commenced on empirical i.v. antibiotics. Computed tomography of the brain revealed a parenchymal mass at the base of the skull and subsequent magnetic resonance imaging of the head 4 days later confirmed a large soft tissue mass, which extended through to the cavernous sinus. Examination of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following lumbar puncture confirmed pneumococcal meningitis and antibiotics were continued for 2 weeks in total. During the admission, hormone profiling revealed a grossly elevated prolactin. When coupled with the initial results of the brain imaging, this result helped to confirm a macroprolactinoma that was invading the postnasal space. A final diagnosis of pneumococcal meningitis secondary to invading prolactinoma was made. The patient was started on cabergoline and was followed up in the outpatient clinic upon discharge. He made a full recovery from the meningitis. Over the next few months, prolactin levels returned to be normal and the prolactinoma shrank significantly in size. The patient remains on cabergoline that will most likely be continued indefinitely. Learning points Bacterial meningitis is a rare first presentation of pituitary macroprolactinoma.Patients with invasive macroprolactinoma do not always present with CSF leakage.Prompt treatment with antibiotics and a dopamine agonist is of great importance for a favourable outcome.Close monitoring of the patient for signs of raised intracranial pressure is essential in the management of macroprolactinoma.Note the risk of CSF leakage after initiation of dopamine agonist therapy irrespective of concomitant meningitis in macroprolactinoma. PMID:24963397

  18. Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis in Alcoholic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weisfelt, Martijn; de Gans, Jan; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Background Alcoholism is associated with susceptibility to infectious disease, particularly bacterial pneumonia. In the present study we described characteristics in alcoholic patients with bacterial meningitis and delineate the differences with findings in non-alcoholic adults with bacterial meningitis. Methods/Principal Findings This was a prospective nationwide observational cohort study including patients aged >16 years who had bacterial meningitis confirmed by culture of cerebrospinal fluid (696 episodes of bacterial meningitis occurring in 671 patients). Alcoholism was present in 27 of 686 recorded episodes of bacterial meningitis (4%) and alcoholics were more often male than non-alcoholics (82% vs 48%, P = 0.001). A higher proportion of alcoholics had underlying pneumonia (41% vs 11% P<0.001). Alcoholics were more likely to have meningitis due to infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (70% vs 50%, P = 0.01) and Listeria monocytogenes (19% vs 4%, P = 0.005), whereas Neisseria meningitidis was more common in non-alcoholic patients (39% vs 4%, P = 0.01). A large proportion of alcoholics developed complications during clinical course (82% vs 62%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.04), often cardiorespiratory failure (52% vs 28%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.01). Alcoholic patients were at risk for unfavourable outcome (67% vs 33%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P<0.001). Conclusions/Significance Alcoholic patients are at high risk for complications resulting in high morbidity and mortality. They are especially at risk for cardiorespiratory failure due to underlying pneumonia, and therefore, aggressive supportive care may be crucial in the treatment of these patients. PMID:20161709

  19. GLIAL ABNORMALITIES IN MOOD DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Öngür, Dost; Bechtholt, Anita J.; Carlezon, William A.; Cohen, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that mood disorders are associated with abnormalities in the brain's cellular composition, especially in glial cells. Considered inert support cells in the past, glial cells are now known to be important for brain function. Treatments for mood disorders enhance glial cell proliferation, and experimental stimulation of cell growth has antidepressant effects in animal models of mood disorders. These findings suggest that the proliferation and survival of glial cells may be important in the pathogenesis of mood disorders and may be possible targets for the development of new treatments. In this chapter, we will review the evidence for glial abnormalities in mood disorders. We will discuss glial cell biology and evidence from postmortem studies of mood disorders. This is not carry out a comprehensive review; rather we selectively discuss existing evidence in building an argument for the role of glial cells in mood disorders. PMID:25377605

  20. Inhibition of Hippocampal Regeneration by Adjuvant Dexamethasone in Experimental Infant Rat Pneumococcal Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Bally, Lia; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis (PM) causes neurological sequelae in up to half of surviving patients. Neuronal damage associated with poor outcome is largely mediated by the inflammatory host response. Dexamethasone (DXM) is used as an adjuvant therapy in adult PM, but its efficacy in the treatment of pneumococcal meningitis in children is controversially discussed. While DXM has previously been shown to enhance hippocampal apoptosis in experimental PM, its impact on hippocampal cell proliferation is not known. This study investigated the impact of DXM on hippocampal proliferation in infant rat PM. Eleven-day-old nursing Wistar rats (n = 90) were intracisternally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae to induce experimental meningitis. Treatment with DXM or vehicle was started 18 h after infection, concomitantly with antibiotics (ceftriaxone 100 mg/kg of body weight twice a day [b.i.d.]). Clinical parameters were monitored, and the amount of cells with proliferating activity was assessed using in vivo incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and an in vitro neurosphere culture system at 3 and 4 d postinfection. DXM significantly worsened weight loss and survival. Density of BrdU-positive cells, as an index of cells with proliferating activity, was significantly lower in DXM-treated animals compared to vehicle controls (P < 0.0001). In parallel, DXM reduced neurosphere formation as an index for stem/progenitor cell density compared to vehicle treatment (P = 0.01). Our findings provide clear evidence that DXM exerts an antiproliferative effect on the hippocampus in infant rat PM. We conclude that an impairment of regenerative hippocampal capacity should be taken into account when considering adjuvant DXM in the therapeutic regimen for PM in children. PMID:26824948

  1. Herpes simplex virus 2 meningitis: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Stephanie; Mateen, Farrah J; Aksamit, Allen J

    2013-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus 2 is a leading cause of viral meningitis and the most commonly recognized infectious cause of benign, recurrent meningitis. We report a retrospective, observational cohort study of patients with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) meningitis, confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The terms "herpes simplex," "meningitis," or "encephalitis" were searched in the medical records system of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota (1995-2008). Patients were included if they had a clinical diagnosis of meningitis and HSV-2 detected by PCR in the CSF. There were 28 patients with 33 episodes identified (83 % female; mean age at presentation of meningitis 36 years, range 17-53; mean time to HSV2 detection from symptom onset 3 days, range 0-6; history of genital herpes 23 %). No patient took oral antiviral treatment at the time of presentation. Episodes were most likely to include headache (100 %), photophobia (47 %), self-reported fever (45 %), meningismus (44 %), and nausea and/or vomiting (29 %). CSF at the time of meningitis was notable for elevated protein (mean 156 g/dL, range 60-258) and white cell count (mean 504 cells/μL, range 86-1,860) with normal glucose (mean 54 mg/dL, range 32-80). Mollaret cells were never detected. Neuroimaging was most often normal (83 %) when performed, although some cases showed nonspecific (14 %) or meningeal changes (3 %). There was no consistent relationship to genital herpes. The duration of treatment with intravenous acyclovir ranged from 3 to 14 days for the first meningitic episode (daily dose range from 500 to 1,000 mg and total dose range from 500 mg q8h for 3 days to 800 mg q8h for 14 days). For subsequent episodes, the duration of treatment of intravenous acyclovir ranged from less than 1 to 14 days (total dose range from 1,390 mg for 1 day to 900 mg q8h for 10 days). The dose of valacyclovir ranged from 500 mg once daily to 500 mg four times daily. The median duration

  2. Group A streptococcal meningitis in a patient with palmoplantar pustulosis.

    PubMed

    Hagiya, Hideharu; Otsuka, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    A 64-year-old man with a 10-year history of palmoplantar pustulosis, a recent history of cranial surgery and a persistent upper airway infection presented with a high fever and deep coma. The patient was diagnosed with Group A Streptococcal meningitis and promptly treated with antibiotics. Although his general condition recovered well, sensorineural hearing loss and facial palsy remained. Group A Streptococcal meningitis is a rare condition, and its typical clinical picture and epidemiological features remain poorly understood. Physicians need to be more aware of this infection, which is extremely rare but frequently causes various complications and yields a high mortality. PMID:24292762

  3. The pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma is an important driver of neuropathology and behavioural sequelae in experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Too, L K; Ball, Helen J; McGregor, Iain S; Hunt, Nicholas H

    2014-08-01

    Interferon-gamma is known to play a complex modulatory role in immune defence during microbial infections. Its actions in pneumococcal meningitis, however, remain ill-defined. Here, a pathological role for IFN-γ was demonstrated using a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis, in that C57BL/6J mice deficient in this pro-inflammatory cytokine (IFN-γ(-/-)) showed less severe acute and long-term neuropathology following intracerebral challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae. The absence of IFN-γ significantly lengthened the survival of mice that otherwise would have developed fatal clinical signs within two days of CNS infection. Compared to their wild-type counterparts, IFN-γ(-/-) mice showed a diminished inflammatory response (attenuated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the cerebrospinal fluid) and milder brain pathologies (less BBB permeability to protein and brain haemorrhage) during the acute phase of disease. Following a full regime of antibiotic treatment, we found substantial brain injuries in the wild-type mice 10days after infection. IFN-γ(-/-) mice, however, showed decreased neuronal damage in both hippocampus and cortex. In the longer term (≈10weeks p.i.), the wild-type mice that had survived meningitis due to antibiotic treatment had neurobehavioural abnormalities including diurnal hypoactivity, nocturnal hyperactivity and impaired performance in a discrimination reversal task. IFN-γ(-/-) mice, concomitantly tested in the automated IntelliCage platform, had reduced behavioural and cognitive disorders compared to wild-type mice. Both IFN-γ(-/-) and wild-type survivors of pneumococcal meningitis showed impaired working memory in the IntelliCage-based complex patrolling task. These observations indicate an association between IFN-γ-driven acute brain pathology and the long-term neurological sequelae resulting from pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:24607660

  4. The Risk of Meningitis Following Expanded Endoscopic Endonasal Skull Base Surgery: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Leon T.; Trooboff, Spencer; Morgan, Michael K.; Harvey, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the risk of postoperative meningitis following expanded endoscopic endonasal skull base (EESB) surgery. Setting A systematic analysis of publications identified through searches of the electronic databases from Embase (1980–July 17, 2012), Medline (1950–July 17, 2012), and references of review articles. Main Outcome Measures Incidence of meningitis following EESB surgery. Results A total of 2,444 manuscripts were selected initially, and full-text analysis produced 67 studies with extractable data. Fifty-two contained data regarding the frequency of postoperative meningitis. The overall risk of postoperative meningitis following EESB surgery was 1.8% (36 of 2,005). For those reporting a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, meningitis occurred in 13.0% (35 of 269). For those not reporting a CSF leak, meningitis occurred in 0.1% (1 of 1,736). The odds ratio for the development of meningitis in the presence of a postoperative CSF leak was 91.99 (95% confidence interval, 11.72–721.88; p < 0.01). There was no difference in reported incidence of meningitis or CSF leak between anterior and posterior cranial fossa surgery. There was one reported case of meningitis-related mortality following EESB surgery. Conclusion The evidence in skull base surgery is limited. This study demonstrates a low incidence of meningitis (1.8%) following EESB procedures. The incidence of meningitis from EESB surgery without an associated CSF leak is uncommon. PMID:24498585

  5. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  6. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  7. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  8. Paradoxical Growth of Optochiasmatic Tuberculoma during the Treatment of Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    AHMETGJEKAJ, ILIR; KABASHI-MUÇAJ, SERBEZE; LASCU, LUANA CORINA; BONDARI, SIMONA; BONDARI, A.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial brain parenchymal tuberculomas may form paradoxically, days to months after starting antituberculous drug therapy. They may develop in and around optic chiasm and optic nerves after antituberculous treatment as a quite rare occurrence in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) this may lead to severe visual loss if not treated properly. We describe a 5 year-old child with documented TBM being treated with first line antituberculous drugs which developed visual impairment 3 months after starting the treatment. MRI after gadolinium administration revealed multiple perichiasmatic ring enhancing lesions due to tuberculomas. Visual impairment developing in a patient on treatment with antituberculous drugs should give rise to a suspicion of rare optochiasmatic tuberculomas; this necessitates urgent contrast-enhanced MRI of the brain and prompt treatment with steroids. PMID:25729611

  9. [Revival of old diagnostic markers in the cerebrospinal fluid for the detection of infectious meningitis].

    PubMed

    Sakushima, Ken; Yabe, Ichiro; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis and tubercular meningitis are still neurological emergencies characterized by severe mortality and morbidity. Recent studies of meta-analysis have shown the usefulness of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate and CSF adenosine deaminase (ADA) as markers for the detection of bacterial meningitis and tubercular meningitis, respectively. CSF lactate has a high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis, but the sensitivity can be reduced by antibiotic pretreatment. CSF-ADA has a moderate sensitivity but a high specificity and is reliable for the diagnosis of tubercular meningitis. These old diagnostic markers can be evaluated in resource-poor settings including small general hospitals and non-specialized hospitals for infectious diseases, and they can contribute to the quick and accurate diagnosis of infectious meningitis. PMID:22260972

  10. Pituitary abscess: an unusual presentation of "aseptic meningitis".

    PubMed

    Schwartz, I D; Zalles, M C; Foster, J L; Burry, V F

    1995-01-01

    Granulomatous inflammation of the pituitary and pituitary abscesses are rare entities. These conditions are found even more rarely in the pediatric aged population. We report a case of a radiographic and clinical, sterile pituitary abscess with non-caseating granulomatous inflammation in a girl who presented with hypopituitarism, meningeal irritation, and symptoms of pituitary apoplexy. PMID:7584709

  11. Recurrent Lymphocytic Meningitis Positive for Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Seppänen, Mikko; Kautiainen, Hannu; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lappalainen, Maija; Valtonen, Ville; Färkkilä, Markus; Kalso, Eija

    2009-01-01

    We found the prevalence of recurrent lymphocytic meningitis associated with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was 2.2/100,000 population in Finland during 1996–2006, higher than previous estimates. PCR was most sensitive in detecting HSV-2 DNA from cerebrospinal fluid if the sample was taken 2–5 days after symptom onset. PMID:19624935

  12. Recurrent lymphocytic meningitis positive for herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    Kallio-Laine, Katariina; Seppänen, Mikko; Kautiainen, Hannu; Lokki, Marja Liisa; Lappalainen, Maija; Valtonen, Ville; Färkkilä, Markus; Kalso, Eija

    2009-07-01

    We found the prevalence of recurrent lymphocytic meningitis associated with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was 2.2/100,000 population in Finland during 1996-2006, higher than previous estimates. PCR was most sensitive in detecting HSV-2 DNA from cerebrospinal fluid if the sample was taken 2-5 days after symptom onset. PMID:19624935

  13. Real-time PCR for Strongyloides stercoralis-associated meningitis.

    PubMed

    Nadir, Eyal; Grossman, Tamar; Ciobotaro, Pnina; Attali, Malka; Barkan, Daniel; Bardenstein, Rita; Zimhony, Oren

    2016-03-01

    Four immunocompromised patients, immigrants from Ethiopia, presented with diverse clinical manifestations of meningitis associated with Strongyloides stercoralis dissemination as determined by identification of intestinal larvae. The cerebrospinal fluid of 3 patients was tested by a validated (for stool) real-time PCR for S. stercoralis and was found positive, establishing this association. PMID:26704620

  14. Staphylococcal meningitis following Synchromed intrathecal pump implant: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M I; Tai, Y M; Symonds, J M

    1994-02-01

    Staphylococcal meningitis associated with implantation of an intrathecal drug pump for spasticity was successfully treated by intrathecal vancomycin delivered by the same pump. This produced high CSF antibiotic levels, and the pump and catheter system did not have to be removed. We are unable to identify a similar case reported in the literature to date. PMID:8008414

  15. [Salmonella meningitis in an infant due to a pet turtle].

    PubMed

    Ricard, C; Mellentin, J; Ben Abdallah Chabchoub, R; Kingbede, P; Heuclin, T; Ramdame, A; Bouquet, A; Couttenier, F; Hendricx, S

    2015-06-01

    In humans, Salmonella most often causes self-limiting gastroenteritis, but more severe symptoms such as sepsis and meningitis can also occur and can sometimes have a fatal outcome. Even if the meningitis is not fatal, sequelae such as epilepsy, cranial nerve palsies, and hydrocephalus can occur. In the United States, it has been estimated that approximately 6% of the human cases of salmonellosis can be attributed to contact with reptiles or amphibians. The infection may take place by direct contact between reptile and human or indirectly via contact with an environment contaminated with Salmonella from a reptile. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Vitkin is a common gut inhabitant of reptiles. Though human cases due to this organism are exceedingly rare, it may infect young infants and immunocompromised individuals with a history of intimate associations with reptiles. Gastroenteritis is the most common presentation ; others include peritonitis, meningitis and bacteremia. We report a case of meningitis caused by S. enterica subsp. enterica serotype Vitkin in a 1-month-old child due to a pet turtle. PMID:26014646

  16. Eggerthella lenta Bacteremia Complicated by Spondylodiscitis, Psoas Abscess, and Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Korman, T. M.; Junckerstorff, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Eggerthella lenta bacteremia is uncommon and generally associated with abdominal sepsis. The organism and its clinical significance have not been well characterized due to historical difficulties with identification. We report a case of severe infection in a paraplegic man complicated by psoas abscess, osteomyelitis, and meningitis and discuss treatment challenges. PMID:24430458

  17. Cytomegalovirus Meningitis in an Infant with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Vicetti Miguel, Claudia P; Mejias, Asuncion; Ramilo, Octavio; Ardura, Monica I; Sánchez, Pablo J

    2016-06-01

    A 35-day-old female with severe combined immunodeficiency developed cytomegalovirus (CMV) meningitis before undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Strategies for timely diagnosis of neonates with congenital or acquired CMV infection and prevention of CMV acquisition in the era of universal newborn severe combined immunodeficiency screening are needed. PMID:26996725

  18. Prevention of bacterial meningitis: an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kameshwar; Karlupia, Neha

    2007-10-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is an acute inflammation of leptomeninges caused by bacteria, and has a case fatality rate of 10-30%. Prevention strategies, such as vaccination and prophylactic antibiotics, can prevent ABM and have substantial public health impact by reducing the disease burden associated with it. The aim of this paper is to summarize the main findings from Cochrane systematic reviews that have considered the evidence for measures to prevent ABM. We assessed the evidence available in the Cochrane Library. We found five Cochrane reviews focused on the prevention of ABM; three with use of vaccination and two with prophylactic antibiotics. Polysaccharide serogroup A vaccine is strongly protective for the first year, against serogroup A meningococcal meningitis in adults and children over 5 years of age. Meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccine is safe and effective in infants. Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine is safe and effective against Hib-invasive disease at all ages. Ceftriaxone, rifampicin and ciprofloxacin are the most effective prophylactic antibiotics against Neisseria meningitidis. There is sufficient evidence to use polysaccharide serogroup A vaccine to prevent serogroup A meningococcal meningitis, MCC conjugate vaccines to prevent meningococcal C meningitis and Hib conjugate vaccine to prevent Hib infections. More studies are needed to evaluate the effects of Hib conjugate vaccine on mortality. Further, studies are required to compare the relative effectiveness of ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin and rifampicin in chemoprophylaxis against meningococcal infection. PMID:17706408

  19. [Adult purulent meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in Dakar, Senegal].

    PubMed

    Manga, N M; Ndour, C T; Diop, S A; Ka-Sall, R; Dia, N M; Seydi, M; Soumare, M; Diop, B M; Sow, A I; Sow, P S

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe epidemiological, clinical, bacteriological and outcome features of purulent meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in adult patients hospitalized in the infectious diseases clinic of the Fann University Hospital in Dakar, Senegal from 1995 to 2004. A total of 73 cases of pneumococcal meningitis were recorded during the study period. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the second cause of purulent meningitis after meningococcal infection. Sickle-cell disease (n=3) and HIV infection (n=9) were the main underlying factors and pneumonia was the main portal of entry into the CNS (51.8%). Coma was a frequent complication (61.6%). Penicillin-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae (PNSP) accounted for 27.3% of isolated strains. However strains were sensitive to third-generation cephalosporin (100%) and chloramphenicol (68.2%) which were the most frequently used antibiotics. The mortality rate was 69.8% and neurological complications occurred in 13.7% of patients. The main unfavorable prognostic factors were cardiovascular collapse and/or coma at the time of admission and detection of pneumococcal strains by direct examination of CSF. The high mortality of pneumococcal meningitis in adult patients in Dakar shows the need to improve intensive care facilities and the growing incidence of PNSP underlines the requirement for better control of antibiotic prescription. PMID:19639833

  20. Pneumococcal meningitis: clinical-pathological correlations (MeninGene-Path).

    PubMed

    Engelen-Lee, Joo-Yeon; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Aronica, Eleonora; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. We systematically assessed brain histopathology of 31 patients who died of pneumococcal meningitis from a nationwide study (median age 67 years; 21 (67 %) were male) using a pathology score including inflammation and vascular damage. Of the 27 patients with known time from the admission to death, 14 patients died within 7 days of admission and 13 after 7 days of admission. Eleven of 25 (44 %) patients had been treated with adjunctive dexamethasone therapy. Observed pathological processes were inflammation of medium-large arteries in 30 brains (97 %), cerebral haemorrhage in 24 (77 %), cerebritis in 24 (77 %), thrombosis in 21 (68 %), infarction in 19 (61 %) and ventriculitis in 19 (of 28 cases, 68 %). Inflammation of medium-large arteries led to obstruction of the vascular lumen in 14 (of 31 cases, 45 %). Vascular inflammation was associated with infarction and thrombosis of brain parenchymal vessels. Hippocampal dentate gyrus apoptosis between patients treated with and without dexamethasone was similar (p = 0.66); however, dexamethasone treated patients had higher total pathology score than non-dexamethasone treated patients (p = 0.003). Our study shows that vascular damage is key in the process of brain damage in pneumococcal meningitis. Data and material of this study will be made open-access for translational research in pneumococcal meningitis (MeninGene-Path). PMID:27001057

  1. Streptococcus suis toxic-shock syndrome and meningitis.

    PubMed

    Leelarasamee, A; Nilakul, C; Tien-Grim, S; Srifuengfung, S; Susaengrat, W

    1997-01-01

    Three cases with S. suis bacteremia and meningitis were reported. The first case was a 23-year-old butcher who was a regular drinker of alcohol for two years and developed streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome. The organism was transmitted to him through a minor cut in his right arm. The second cases was a 49-year-old female laborer who had been consuming locally produced alcohol for 20 years and developed fever and meningitis. Unfortunately, she succumbed in seven days despite intensive supportive and cefotaxime treatments. The third case was a 45-year-old regular alcoholic drinker and car painter who was seen at a private hospital due to contusion at his left lateral chest wall. However, fever and confusion due to meningitis was detected upon admission. Irreversible deafness developed within 48 hours of ceftriaxone therapy for meningitis. He finally recovered with deafness. S. suis was isolated from blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures in all three cases though initially reported to be viridans group of streptococci. PMID:9078819

  2. [Systemic candidiasis with meningeal involvement in a newborn infant].

    PubMed

    Kacprzak-Bergman, I; Szychowska, Z; Rudkowski, Z

    1989-04-24

    The newborn with sepsis (E. coli) and salmonellosis was described. After treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics it was suffered from Candida albicans (Meningitis with Hydrocephalus internus, Chorioretinitis and Ostitis). The authors difficulties connected with diagnosis and anti-fungal therapy have showed. They have punctated the necessity of combined anti-mycotic therapy. PMID:2626360

  3. One Family's Crusade To Inform the Public about Meningococcal Meningitis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skowronek, Linda and Carl

    2001-01-01

    Describes meningococcal meningitis, which strikes over 100 college students yearly. Living in dormitories puts students at risk for contracting the disease. The current vaccine protects against the four main types of the infection, though it is not perfect protection. Some states have adopted legislation requiring all incoming college freshmen and…

  4. Variations of relative humidity in relation to meningitis in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seefeldt, M. W.; Hopson, T. M.

    2011-12-01

    The meningitis belt is a region covering Sub-Saharan Africa from the Sahel of West Africa eastward to western Ethiopia. The region is prone to meningitis epidemics during the dry season extending from approximately January to May, depending on the region. Relative humidity has been found to be a critical environmental factor indicating the susceptibility of a region to meningitis epidemics. This study evaluates the variation of relative humidity across West Africa over 30 dry-seasons (1979 - 2009) using the NASA-MERRA dataset. The method of self-organizing maps is employed to characterize the changes in relative humidity patterns across the region within a given dry season as well as changes over the 30 years. A general pattern of changes in relative humidity is indicated as the rainbelt retreats to the south at the onset of the dry season and then returns to the region at the end of the dry season. Within each dry season there is a unique pattern. The climatological conditions of relative humidity at the onset of the dry season provide an indication of the moisture environment for the entire dry season. Year to year variation in the relative humidity patterns are found to be gradual. Future applications involve using the results from the SOM evaluation to be used for future decisions involving prevention of meningitis epidemics.

  5. Vaccine May Reduce Incidence of Meningitis-Related Hearing Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dorothy

    1988-01-01

    Hearing loss as a result of meningitis, now the leading nongenetic cause of deafness in infants and young children, may be reduced by the introduction of the HiB (Hemophilus influenzae type B) vaccine. It is highly effective, relatively safe, and recommended for most children over 24 months and high risk children 18-24 months old. (VW)

  6. Streptococcus bovis septicemia and meningitis associated with chronic radiation enterocolitis

    SciTech Connect

    Jadeja, L.; Kantarjian, H.; Bolivar, R.

    1983-12-01

    We describe the first patient with simultaneous S bovis septicemia and meningitis associated with chronic radiation enterocolitis. This case underlines the value of a thorough gastrointestinal evaluation of all patients with S bovis infection, and the need for a neurologic investigation even with minor neurologic manifestations.

  7. Chromosomal Abnormalities and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    BASSETT, ANNE S.; CHOW, EVA W.C.; WEKSBERG, ROSANNA

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common and serious psychiatric illness with strong evidence for genetic causation, but no specific loci yet identified. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia may help to understand the genetic complexity of the illness. This paper reviews the evidence for associations between chromosomal abnormalities and schizophrenia and related disorders. The results indicate that 22q11.2 microdeletions detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) are significantly associated with schizophrenia. Sex chromosome abnormalities seem to be increased in schizophrenia but insufficient data are available to indicate whether schizophrenia or related disorders are increased in patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies. Other reports of chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia have the potential to be important adjuncts to linkage studies in gene localization. Advances in molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e., FISH) have produced significant increases in rates of identified abnormalities in schizophrenia, particularly in patients with very early age at onset, learning difficulties or mental retardation, or dysmorphic features. The results emphasize the importance of considering behavioral phenotypes, including adult onset psychiatric illnesses, in genetic syndromes and the need for clinicians to actively consider identifying chromosomal abnormalities and genetic syndromes in selected psychiatric patients. PMID:10813803

  8. Clinical Characteristics and Predictors of Adverse Outcome in Adult and Pediatric Patients With Healthcare-Associated Ventriculitis and Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Srihawan, Chanunya; Castelblanco, Rodrigo Lopez; Salazar, Lucrecia; Wootton, Susan H.; Aguilera, Elizabeth; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Sandberg, David I.; Choi, HuiMahn A.; Lee, Kiwon; Kitigawa, Ryan; Tandon, Nitin; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Healthcare-associated meningitis or ventriculitis is a serious and life-threatening complication of invasive neurosurgical procedures or penetrating head trauma. Methods. We performed a retrospective study of adults and children with the diagnosis of healthcare-associated meningitis or ventriculitis, as defined by the 2015 Centers of Disease Control and Prevention case definition, at 2 large tertiary care hospitals in Houston, Texas from July 2003 to November 2014. Patients were identified by infection control practitioners and by screening cerebrospinal fluid samples sent to the central laboratory. We collected data on demographics, clinical presentations, laboratory results, imaging studies, treatments, and outcomes. Results. A total of 215 patients were included (166 adults and 49 children). A positive cerebrospinal fluid culture was seen in 106 (49%) patients, with the majority of the etiologies being Staphylococcus and Gram-negative rods. An adverse clinical outcome was seen in 167 patients (77.7%) and was defined as death in 20 patients (9.3%), persistent vegetative state in 31 patients (14.4%), severe disability in 77 patients (35.8%), or moderate disability in 39 patients (18.1%). On logistic regression analysis, age >45 years (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 6.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.31–18.11; P ≤ .001), abnormal neurological exam (adjusted OR, 3.04; 95% CI, 1.27–7.29; P = .013), and mechanical ventilation (adjusted OR, 5.34; 95% CI, 1.51–18.92; P = .01) were associated with an adverse outcome. Conclusions. Healthcare-associated meningitis or ventriculitis is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. PMID:27419154

  9. Incidence, Carriage and Case-Carrier Ratios for Meningococcal Meningitis in the African Meningitis Belt: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Koutangni, Thibaut; Boubacar Maïnassara, Halima; Mueller, Judith E.

    2015-01-01

    Background To facilitate the interpretation of meningococcal meningitis epidemiology in the “African meningitis belt”, we aimed at obtaining serogroup-specific pooled estimates of incidence, carriage and case-carrier ratios for meningococcal meningitis in the African meningitis belt and describe their variations across the endemic, hyperendemic and epidemic context. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies reporting serogroup-specific meningococcal meningitis monthly incidence and carriage in the same population and time period. Epidemiological contexts were defined as endemic (wet season, no epidemic), hyperendemic (dry season, no epidemic), and epidemic (dry season, epidemic). Findings Eight studies reporting a total of eighty pairs of serogroup-specific meningococcal meningitis incidence and carriage estimates were included in this review. For serogroup A, changes associated with the transition from endemic to hyperendemic incidence and from hyperendemic to epidemic incidence were 15-fold and 120-fold respectively. Changes in carriage prevalence associated with both transitions were 1-fold and 30-fold respectively. 
For serogroup W and X, the transition from endemic to hyperendemic incidence involved a 4-fold and 1•1-fold increase respectively. Increases in carriage prevalence for the later transition were 7-fold and 1•7-fold respectively. No data were available for the hyperendemic-epidemic transition for these serogroups. Our findings suggested that the regular seasonal variation in serogroup A meningococcal meningitis incidence between the rainy and the dry season could be mainly driven by seasonal change in the ratio of clinical cases to subclinical infections. In contrast appearance of epidemic incidences is related to a substantial increase in transmission and colonisation and to lesser extent with changes in the case-carrier ratio. Conclusion Seasonal change in the rate of progression to disease given carriage

  10. Congenital cerebrospinal fluid fistula through the inner ear and meningitis.

    PubMed

    Phelps, P D; Proops, D; Sellars, S; Evans, J; Michaels, L

    1993-06-01

    Congenital deformities of the labyrinth of the inner ear can be associated with a fistulous communication between the intracranial subarachnoid space and the middle ear cavity. We describe seven such cases, six confirmed by high resolution CT and one by postmortem histological section. The seven patients all presented with meningitis although a cerebrospinal fluid fistula was demonstrated at subsequent surgery or postmortem. The lesions were bilateral in three patients, unilateral in three and probably bilateral in the postmortem case although only one temporal bone was obtained. In every case there was a dilated sac instead of the normal two and a half turn cochlea on the affected side and this was confirmed at surgery. The demonstration of the basal cochlear turn is of paramount importance in any deaf child presenting with meningitis. A true Mondini deformity with a normal basal turn and some hearing is not at risk of developing a fistula. PMID:8345296

  11. How Do Meningeal Lymphatic Vessels Drain the CNS?

    PubMed

    Raper, Daniel; Louveau, Antoine; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    The many interactions between the nervous and the immune systems, which are active in both physiological and pathological states, have recently become more clearly delineated with the discovery of a meningeal lymphatic system capable of carrying fluid, immune cells, and macromolecules from the central nervous system (CNS) to the draining deep cervical lymph nodes. However, the exact localization of the meningeal lymphatic vasculature and the path of drainage from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to the lymphatics remain poorly understood. Here, we discuss the potential differences between peripheral and CNS lymphatic vessels and examine the purported mechanisms of CNS lymphatic drainage, along with how these may fit into established patterns of CSF flow. PMID:27460561

  12. Epidemiology, Etiology, Pathogenesis, and Diagnosis of Recurrent Bacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Tebruegge, Marc; Curtis, Nigel

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent bacterial meningitis is a rare phenomenon and generally poses a considerable diagnostic challenge to the clinician. Ultimately, a structured approach and early diagnosis of any underlying pathology are crucial to prevent further episodes and improve the overall outcome for the affected individual. In this article, we are reviewing the existing literature on this topic over the last two decades, encompassing 363 cases of recurrent bacterial meningitis described in 144 publications. Of these cases, 214 (59%) were related to anatomical problems, 132 (36%) were related to immunodeficiencies, and 17 (5%) were related to parameningeal infections. The review includes a detailed discussion of the underlying pathologies and microbiological aspects as well as recommendations for appropriate diagnostic pathways for investigating this unusual entity. PMID:18625686

  13. Pneumococcal meningitis in an adolescent with fever and foot ache.

    PubMed

    Dias, Catarina; Pedrosa, Cláudia; Romariz, Jorge; Santos, Mafalda; Rodrigues, Lúcia

    2013-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease predominantly affects younger children, elderly, and immunocompromised patients. Pneumococcal meningitis is a particularly important form of presentation, considering its high rate of morbimortality. We present the case of a previously healthy 12-year-old adolescent male who was hospitalized due to suspicion of osteoarticular infection in his left foot. A few hours later, he developed meningeal signs, exhibiting slight pleocytosis and Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in both cerebrospinal fluid and blood. Imaging studies were inconclusive regarding the nature of the foot disorder. We considered the hypothesis of osteomyelitis of the navicular bone as the most likely, for which he completed six weeks of antibiotic therapy. There was a favorable clinical evolution, along with complete absence of osteoarticular or neurological sequelae. The relevance of this clinical case resides in the unusual presentation of invasive pneumococcal disease in this age group, as well as in the rare form of orthopedic involvement. PMID:23956909

  14. [A case of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis accompanied with Aspergillus meningitis].

    PubMed

    Akutsu, K; Goto, H; Sakurada, S; Ota, T; Yuasa, K; Iguchi, M; Okamura, T; Ieki, R; Kawamura, T

    1996-06-01

    A 53-year-old female was admitted to our hospital complaining of chest pain and gait disturbance. Examinations on admission showed that she was immunocompetent except the negative tuberculin test. The chest X-ray showed infiltrative shadows with old tuberculous lesions in the bilateral upper lung fields. In CT, a mass lesion was revealed in the lesion, which destructed the fifth thoracic vertebra and invaded into the epidural space. She died of meningitis on the 18th day after admission. On autopsy, it was made clear that the mass lesion was caused by Aspergillus fumigatus, and that the meningitis was the result of the invasion of the fungus into the epidural space. PMID:8741716

  15. Antibiotic therapy for bacterial meningitis in children in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, P.; Verma, I. C.

    1993-01-01

    We carried out a study to investigate the effectiveness of chloramphenicol alone as a treatment for bacterial meningitis. A total of 70 consecutive children aged > 3 months with bacterial meningitis, who had been admitted to the paediatric hospital of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, were randomized to receive chloramphenicol alone or chloramphenicol + penicillin. The two groups were matched with each other. Treatment failure occurred with three (9%) patients in the chloramphenicol-alone group and with four (12.1%) patients in the combination therapy group (P > 0.05). The mean duration of intravenous therapy, the number of intravenous cannulae used per patient, and the incidence of thrombophlebitis were significantly higher for the group that received the combination therapy. Also, the cost of using chloramphenicol + penicillin was four times higher than that of chloramphenicol alone. Hence, chloramphenicol alone was as effective as chloramphenicol + penicillin and much cheaper and more convenient to use. PMID:8490981

  16. Pasteurella multocida bacterial meningitis caused by contact with pigs

    PubMed Central

    López, C.; Sanchez-Rubio, P.; Betrán, A.; Terré, R.

    2013-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida belongs to the normal flora of the respiratory and digestive tract of many animals. Animal exposure is a considerable risk factor for Pasteurella infection. P. multocida is the most common cause of local infection after an animal bite but is an unusual cause of meningitis. We present a case of bacterial meningitis by P. multocida in a 37-year-old man who worked in a pig farm and was bitten by a pig. The patient had a defect located in the lamina cribosa and this lesion could be the gateway of the infection, although in this case the infection could also be acquired through the pig bite. The bacteria was identified as P. multocida with the biochemical test API 20E (bioMérieux). In agreement with findings in the literature, the strain was susceptible in vitro to penicillin, ampicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, imipenem and tetracycline. PMID:24294240

  17. Improving Decision-Making Activities for Meningitis and Malaria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ceccato, Pietro; Trzaska, Sylwia; Garcia-Pando, Carlos Perez; Kalashnikova, Olga; del Corral, John; Cousin, Remi; Blumenthal, M. Benno; Bell, Michael; Connor, Stephen J.; Thomson, Madeleine C.

    2013-01-01

    Public health professionals are increasingly concerned about the potential impact that climate variability and change can have on infectious disease. The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) is developing new products to increase the public health community's capacity to understand, use and demand the appropriate climate data and climate information to mitigate the public health impacts of climate on infectious disease, in particular meningitis and malaria. In this paper, we present the new and improved products that have been developed for: (i) estimating dust aerosol for forecasting risks of meningitis and (ii) for monitoring temperature and rainfall and integrating them into a vectorial capacity model for forecasting risks of malaria epidemics. We also present how the products have been integrated into a knowledge system (IRI Data Library Map Room, SERVIR) to support the use of climate and environmental information in climate-sensitive health decision-making.

  18. [Salmonella enteritidis: an unusual meningitis agent in an adult patient].

    PubMed

    Metan, Gökhan; Alp, Emine; Eşel, Duygu; Aygen, Bilgehan; Sümerkan, Bülent

    2005-10-01

    Salmonella species may cause wide spectrum of infections changing from enterocolitis to sepsis. However, Salmonella meningitis in adults is a rare but important clinical condition with a high mortality rate. In this report, a 71 years old male patient with Salmonella enteritidis meningitis who was followed-up with the diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenic purpura and had been administered azothioprin and prednisolone, has been presented and similar cases in the literature have been reviewed. The cerebrospinal fluid culture yielded S. enteritidis, and the isolate was intermediate susceptible to ampicillin, susceptible to cefotaxime, trimethoprim-sulphametoxasole, ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol. Our patient was successfully treated with ceftriaxone (2 x 2 gr i.v.) and discharged with total cure. PMID:16544553

  19. Pneumococcal Meningitis in an Adolescent with Fever and Foot Ache

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Catarina; Pedrosa, Cláudia; Romariz, Jorge; Santos, Mafalda; Rodrigues, Lúcia

    2013-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease predominantly affects younger children, elderly, and immunocompromised patients. Pneumococcal meningitis is a particularly important form of presentation, considering its high rate of morbimortality. We present the case of a previously healthy 12-year-old adolescent male who was hospitalized due to suspicion of osteoarticular infection in his left foot. A few hours later, he developed meningeal signs, exhibiting slight pleocytosis and Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in both cerebrospinal fluid and blood. Imaging studies were inconclusive regarding the nature of the foot disorder. We considered the hypothesis of osteomyelitis of the navicular bone as the most likely, for which he completed six weeks of antibiotic therapy. There was a favorable clinical evolution, along with complete absence of osteoarticular or neurological sequelae. The relevance of this clinical case resides in the unusual presentation of invasive pneumococcal disease in this age group, as well as in the rare form of orthopedic involvement. PMID:23956909

  20. Sonographic findings in bacterial meningitis in neonates and young infants.

    PubMed

    Yikilmaz, Ali; Taylor, George A

    2008-02-01

    Cranial sonography plays an important role in the initial evaluation of infants with suspected bacterial meningitis and in monitoring for complications of the disease. Echogenic widening of the brain sulci, meningeal thickening and hyperemia suggest the diagnosis in an at-risk population. Sonography can identify the presence of extra-axial fluid collections, and color Doppler sonography can be very helpful in differentiating benign enlargement of subarachnoid spaces from subdural effusions. Intraventricular debris and stranding, and an irregular and echogenic ependyma are highly suggestive findings associated with ventriculitis. Sonography can play an important role in the detection of postinfectious hydrocephalus, in the determination of the level of obstruction, and in the evaluation of intracranial compliance. Focal or diffuse parenchymal involvement can represent parenchymal involvement by cerebritis, infarction, secondary hemorrhage or early abscess. PMID:17611750

  1. Improving Decision-Making Activities for Meningitis and Malaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceccato, P.; Trzaska, S.; Perez, C.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; del Corral, J.; Cousin, R.; Blumenthal, M. B.; Connor, S.; Thomson, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Public health professionals are increasingly concerned about the potential impact that climate variability and change can have on infectious disease. The International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) is developing new products to increase the public health community's capacity to understand, use, and demand the appropriate climate data and climate information to mitigate the public health impacts of climate on infectious disease, in particular Meningitis and Malaria. In this paper we present the new and improved products that have been developed for monitoring dust, temperature, rainfall and vectorial capacity model for monitoring and forecasting risks of Meningitis and Malaria epidemics. We also present how the products have been integrated into a knowledge system (IRI Data Library Map room, SERVIR) to support the use of climate and environmental information in climate-sensitive health decision-making.

  2. Spatio-temporal pattern of viral meningitis in Michigan, 1993-2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Sharon K.; Schmidt, Mark A.; Stobierski, Mary Grace; Wilson, Mark L.

    2005-05-01

    To characterize Michigan's high viral meningitis incidence rates, 8,803 cases from 1993-2001 were analyzed for standard epidemiological indices, geographic distribution, and spatio-temporal clusters. Blacks and infants were found to be high-risk groups. Annual seasonality and interannual variability in epidemic magnitude were apparent. Cases were concentrated in southern Michigan, and cumulative incidence was correlated with population density at the county level (r=0.45, p<0.001). Kulldorff's Scan test identified the occurrence of spatio-temporal clusters in Lower Michigan during July-October 1998 and 2001 (p=0.01). More extensive data on cases, laboratory isolates, sociodemographics, and environmental exposures should improve detection and enhance the effectiveness of a Space-Time Information System aimed at prevention.

  3. The spectrum of primary blastomycotic meningitis: a review of central nervous system blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Gonyea, E F

    1978-01-01

    Three cases of meningitis with initial and exclusive neurological involvement prompted a review of the clinical, cerebrospinal fluid, and pathological findings in an additional 78 patients with central nervous system blastomycosis. The first patient of the 3 had progressive cerebellar dysfunction as the result of chronic basilar meningitis. The second had a C8-T1 radiculopathy without other evidence of superior sulcus syndrome, and subsequent acute fatal meningitis. The third had aseptic, benign, self-limited meningitis followed by clinically obvious systemic blastomycosis. Diagnosis is difficult, and it is likely that other cases have been presumptively treated for tuberculous meningitis. A more aggressive approach to diagnosis is proposed that takes into account the condition of the patient, the likelihood of dissemination at necropsy, and the frequent meningeal infections that are negative on culture of lumbar CSF. PMID:655652

  4. Recrudescence and relapse of meningococcal meningitis and septicaemia.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, P E; Thelle, T; Tvede, M

    1995-03-01

    Three cases of recrudescence and relapse of Neisseria meningitidis group B meningitis and septicaemia are reported. The recrudescence and relapses could not be explained by infectious foci, increased bacterial penicillin resistance or immunological defects. As a supplement to antibiotic treatment, all three patients received corticosteroids for the initial 2 days of treatment, and this may have contributed to the unusual course of the disease in our patient. PMID:7780262

  5. An outbreak of meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis Group A.

    PubMed

    Annapurna, M E; Bhave, G G; Mathur, M

    1989-03-01

    During a period of six months from September, 1985 to March, 1986, there were twenty seven cases of pyogenic meningitis due to Neisseria meningitidis Group A. Maximum number of cases could be diagnosed by antigen detection by latex agglutination test. The organism was sensitive to all commonly used antibiotics. The patients affected were mostly young adults. The mortality rate was eleven per cent. PMID:2509544

  6. Cerebrospinal Fluid Culture Positivity and Clinical Outcomes After Amphotericin-Based Induction Therapy for Cryptococcal Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Rolfes, Melissa A; Rhein, Joshua; Schutz, Charlotte; Taseera, Kabanda; Nabeta, Henry W; Huppler Hullsiek, Kathy; Akampuira, Andrew; Rajasingham, Radha; Musubire, Abdu; Williams, Darlisha A; Thienemann, Friedrich; Bohjanen, Paul R; Muzoora, Conrad; Meintjes, Graeme; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2015-12-01

    Background.  Amphotericin-based combination antifungal therapy reduces mortality from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated cryptococcal meningitis. However, 40%-50% of individuals have positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fungal cultures at completion of 2 weeks of amphotericin induction therapy. Residual CSF culture positivity has historically been associated with poor clinical outcomes. We investigated whether persistent CSF fungemia was associated with detrimental clinical outcomes in a contemporary African cohort. Methods.  Human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals with cryptococcal meningitis in Uganda and South Africa received amphotericin (0.7-1.0 mg/kg per day) plus fluconazole (800 mg/day) for 2 weeks, followed by "enhanced consolidation" therapy with fluconazole 800 mg/day for at least 3 weeks or until cultures were sterile, and then 400 mg/day for 8 weeks. Participants were randomized to receive antiretroviral therapy (ART) either 1-2 or 5 weeks after diagnosis and observed for 6 months. Survivors were classified as having sterile or nonsterile CSF based on 2-week CSF cultures. Mortality, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), and culture-positive relapse were compared in those with sterile or nonsterile CSF using Cox regression. Results.  Of 132 participants surviving 2 weeks, 57% had sterile CSF at 2 weeks, 23 died within 5 weeks, and 40 died within 6 months. Culture positivity was not significantly associated with mortality (adjusted 6-month hazard ratio, 1.2; 95% confidence interval, 0.6-2.3; P = .28). Incidence of IRIS or relapse was also not significantly related to culture positivity. Conclusions.  Among patients, all treated with enhanced consolidation antifungal therapy and ART, residual cryptococcal culture positivity was not found to be associated with poor clinical outcomes. PMID:26716103

  7. Cerebrospinal Fluid Culture Positivity and Clinical Outcomes After Amphotericin-Based Induction Therapy for Cryptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Rolfes, Melissa A.; Rhein, Joshua; Schutz, Charlotte; Taseera, Kabanda; Nabeta, Henry W.; Huppler Hullsiek, Kathy; Akampuira, Andrew; Rajasingham, Radha; Musubire, Abdu; Williams, Darlisha A.; Thienemann, Friedrich; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Muzoora, Conrad; Meintjes, Graeme; Meya, David B.; Boulware, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Amphotericin-based combination antifungal therapy reduces mortality from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated cryptococcal meningitis. However, 40%–50% of individuals have positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fungal cultures at completion of 2 weeks of amphotericin induction therapy. Residual CSF culture positivity has historically been associated with poor clinical outcomes. We investigated whether persistent CSF fungemia was associated with detrimental clinical outcomes in a contemporary African cohort. Methods. Human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals with cryptococcal meningitis in Uganda and South Africa received amphotericin (0.7–1.0 mg/kg per day) plus fluconazole (800 mg/day) for 2 weeks, followed by “enhanced consolidation” therapy with fluconazole 800 mg/day for at least 3 weeks or until cultures were sterile, and then 400 mg/day for 8 weeks. Participants were randomized to receive antiretroviral therapy (ART) either 1–2 or 5 weeks after diagnosis and observed for 6 months. Survivors were classified as having sterile or nonsterile CSF based on 2-week CSF cultures. Mortality, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), and culture-positive relapse were compared in those with sterile or nonsterile CSF using Cox regression. Results. Of 132 participants surviving 2 weeks, 57% had sterile CSF at 2 weeks, 23 died within 5 weeks, and 40 died within 6 months. Culture positivity was not significantly associated with mortality (adjusted 6-month hazard ratio, 1.2; 95% confidence interval, 0.6–2.3; P = .28). Incidence of IRIS or relapse was also not significantly related to culture positivity. Conclusions. Among patients, all treated with enhanced consolidation antifungal therapy and ART, residual cryptococcal culture positivity was not found to be associated with poor clinical outcomes. PMID:26716103

  8. [A case of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis in an immunocompetent infant].

    PubMed

    Pattarino, G; Arrigoni, S; Grazioli, R; De Palma, A; di Natale, B

    2006-08-01

    Listeria Monocytogenes meningitis is a rare affection after the neonatal period, but in immunocompromised patients. Listeria Monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, facultative intracellular bacterium frequently causing infection in pregnant women, in patients with cell-mediated immunity deficit and in the early and late stages of life. We present a case of Listeria Monocytogenes meningitis in an immunocompetent nomad 8-month-child, preceded by gastroenteritis. Although gastrointestinal symptoms may be due to intestinal infection by Listeria, the concomitant presence of other bacteric or viral enteric pathogens may have promoted bacterium intestinal translocation and generated disseminated disease. The main transmission route of infection after the neonatal period is ingestion of contaminated food. A diet history was taken after isolation of the bacterium in liquor and showed that the child was an eater of undercooked hot-dogs. Despite the frequency of clinical complication in such affection, the outcome in this patient was a complete recovery. Although the infection is extremely infrequent in healthy children, physicians should always consider Listeria as a possible etiologic agent of meningitis in pediatric patients, regardless of their age or immunological status, especially in patients living in precarious sanitary conditions, where weaning times and conditions are not respected and a suitable food cooking is not assured. PMID:17008849

  9. Streptococcus pneumoniae capsule determines disease severity in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Grandgirard, Denis; Valente, Luca G.; Täuber, Martin G.; Leib, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria can be characterized into over 90 serotypes according to the composition of their polysaccharide capsules. Some serotypes are common in nasopharyngeal carriage whereas others are associated with invasive disease, but when carriage serotypes do invade disease is often particularly severe. It is unknown whether disease severity is due directly to the capsule type or to other virulence factors. Here, we used a clinical pneumococcal isolate and its capsule-switch mutants to determine the effect of capsule, in isolation from the genetic background, on severity of meningitis in an infant rat model. We found that possession of a capsule was essential for causing meningitis. Serotype 6B caused significantly more mortality than 7F and this correlated with increased capsule thickness in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a stronger inflammatory cytokine response in the CSF and ultimately more cortical brain damage. We conclude that capsule type has a direct effect on meningitis severity. This is an important consideration in the current era of vaccination targeting a subset of capsule types that causes serotype replacement. PMID:27009189

  10. Distribution of meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) in South Dakota.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Christopher N; Jenks, Jonathan A

    2004-01-01

    Heads of hunter-harvested deer (Odocoileus sp.) and elk (Cervus elaphus) were collected from meat processing plants throughout South Dakota (USA) from 1997 through 1999 to determine distribution of meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) in eastern and western South Dakota. A total of 2,848 white-tailed deer (WTD) were examined for P. tenuis, of which 578 (20.3%) were infected with the parasite. Of 578 deer infected, 570 (98.6%) were harvested east of the Missouri River. Our results indicate that P. tenuis is widely distributed throughout eastern South Dakota and limited to the southcentral region of western South Dakota. Infected WTD were documented in 37 of 44 counties in eastern South Dakota and three of 22 counties in western South Dakota. No meningeal worms were found on the meninges or cranial surfaces of 215 mule deer ( Odocoileus hemionus) or 344 elk examined. These findings further define the distribution of the parasite throughout the state. We suggest that the Missouri River acts, in part, as a physical barrier to the westward expansion of P. tenuis to the grasslands of western South Dakota. PMID:15137501

  11. [Pneumococcal meningitis in the infantile population of Cantabria].

    PubMed

    Alonso Palacio, J; Madrigal Díez, V; García Fuentes, M

    1992-06-01

    A retrospective study of pneumococcal meningitis was carried out. This study included 22 cases of this illness that occurred in 17 pediatric patients in Cantabria between 1977 and 1990, inclusive. Three children suffered from recurrent meningitis. The age range of the patients was 0.3-14 years, with a mean age of 4 years. Of these cases, 77.4% occurred in the winter or spring. In 14 cases of meningitis (63.6%), corresponding to 9 patients, underlying pathology was observed: cranial fracture, occipital dermoid cyst, splenectomy, congenital cardiopathy, epilepsy and gastroduodenal "situs inversus". The isolated pneumococci were found to be resistant to penicillin and chloramphenicol in 4 cases. One patient suffered from septic shock. The outcome was complete recovery in 19 cases (86.4%), recovery with sequelae (deafness and epilepsy, respectively) in 2 cases (9.1%) and death in another 2 cases. CSF protein levels elevated above 150 mg/dl and the absence of glucose in the CSF were found to be the most useful analytical indicators of the seriousness of the illness. PMID:1497225

  12. Streptococcus pneumoniae capsule determines disease severity in experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, Lucy J; Grandgirard, Denis; Valente, Luca G; Täuber, Martin G; Leib, Stephen L

    2016-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniaebacteria can be characterized into over 90 serotypes according to the composition of their polysaccharide capsules. Some serotypes are common in nasopharyngeal carriage whereas others are associated with invasive disease, but when carriage serotypes do invade disease is often particularly severe. It is unknown whether disease severity is due directly to the capsule type or to other virulence factors. Here, we used a clinical pneumococcal isolate and its capsule-switch mutants to determine the effect of capsule, in isolation from the genetic background, on severity of meningitis in an infant rat model. We found that possession of a capsule was essential for causing meningitis. Serotype 6B caused significantly more mortality than 7F and this correlated with increased capsule thickness in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a stronger inflammatory cytokine response in the CSF and ultimately more cortical brain damage. We conclude that capsule type has a direct effect on meningitis severity. This is an important consideration in the current era of vaccination targeting a subset of capsule types that causes serotype replacement. PMID:27009189

  13. [Neonatal meningitis. Study of 26 cases and a review of its sequelae after 5 years].

    PubMed

    Cervantes Pardo, A; Tauler Girona, M C; López Soler, C; Puche Mira, A; Casas Fernández, C; Rodríguez Costa, T

    1988-06-01

    Twenty-six cases of neonatal meningitis in term newborns are studied. Incidence, etiological features, treatment, clinical and biochemical evolution and mortality are analysed. Lief motif of this paper is the search for deficits in psychomotor growth in propositi of four and six years old, finding an important relation between neonatal bacterial meningitis and neuropsychological deficits (hyperkinesia, perceptive area impairment, reading-writing disorders, etc.) in contrast to the good evolution of lymphocytic meningitis. PMID:2461673

  14. [Nosocomial meningitis with dual agents and treatment with intraventricular gentamicin].

    PubMed

    Oztoprak, Nefise; Celebi, Güven; Baruönü, Fatma; Kalayci, Murat

    2008-07-01

    Nosocomial central nervous system infections constitute 0.4% of all nosocomial infections. The responsible pathogens of nosocomial meningitis are quite different from community-acquired meningitis with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The most important prognostic factor is the appropriate choice of pathogen-specific antibacterial therapy. In this report, a 64 years old woman with nosocomial meningitis caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter spp. after lumbar disc hernia operation, has been presented. The risk factors were detected as recent history of neurosurgical operation for three times and long term (29 days) use of external ventricular drainaige (EVD) catheter. Empirical meropenem (3 x 2 g, IV) and vancomycin (2 x 1 g, IV) therapy was initiated upon the diagnosis of nosocomial meningitis based on the clinical and laboratory findings on the postoperative fifth day. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing K. pneumoniae (susceptible to amikacin, imipenem, meropenem, cefoxitine, ciprofloxacin, piperasillin-tazobactam and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole) was recovered from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood samples obtained on the same day. There was no change in the status of the patient on the eighth day of meropenem therapy, with high leukocyte number (1300/mm3) and presence of gram-negative bacilli in CSF, and ESBL positive K. pneumoniae (antibiotic susceptibility pattern same with the previous isolate) growth in CSF culture. Thereupon intravenous ciprofloxacin (3 x 400 mg) was added to the therapy and her EVD has been changed. However, ESBL positive K. pneumoniae (antibiotic susceptibility pattern same with the previous isolate) together with Acinetobacter spp. (susceptible to gentamycin, tobramycin, netilmicin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and cefepime) were isolated from CSF and blood cultures obtained on the 13th day of meropenem and fifth day of ciprofloxacin therapy. Therefore intraventricular and intravenous gentamicin (15 mg

  15. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. PMID:25903257

  16. Osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Emma CB; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine MB; Heyderman, Robert S; Garner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Every day children and adults throughout the world die from acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis, particularly in low-income countries. Survivors are at risk of deafness, epilepsy and neurological disabilities. Osmotic therapies have been proposed as an adjunct to improve mortality and morbidity from bacterial meningitis. The theory is that they will attract extra-vascular fluid by osmosis and thus reduce cerebral oedema by moving excess water from the brain into the blood. The intention is to thus reduce death and improve neurological outcomes. Objectives To evaluate the effects on mortality, deafness and neurological disability of osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis in children and adults. Search methods We searched CENTRAL 2012, Issue 11, MEDLINE (1950 to November week 3, 2012), EMBASE (1974 to November 2012), CINAHL (1981 to November 2012), LILACS (1982 to November 2012) and registers of ongoing clinical trials (April 2012). We also searched conference abstracts and contacted researchers in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials testing any osmotic therapy in adults or children with acute bacterial meningitis. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently screened the search results and selected trials for inclusion. We collected data from each study for mortality, deafness, seizures and neurological disabilities. Results are presented using risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and grouped according to whether the participants received steroids or not. Main results Four trials were included comprising 1091 participants. All compared glycerol (a water-soluble sugar alcohol) with a control; in three trials this was a placebo, and in one a small amount of 50% dextrose. Three trials included comparators of dexamethasone alone or in combination with glycerol. As dexamethasone appeared to have no modifying effect, we aggregated results across arms where both

  17. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  18. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  19. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  20. Post craniotomy extra-ventricular drain (EVD) associated nosocomial meningitis: CSF diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Gómez, Sigridh; Wirkowski, Elizabeth; Cunha, Burke A

    2015-01-01

    Because external ventricular drains (EVDs) provide access to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), there is potential for EVD associated acute bacterial meningitis (EVD-AM). Post-craniotomy, in patients with EVDs, one or more CSF abnormalities are commonly present making the diagnosis of EVD-AM problematic. EVD-AM was defined as elevated CSF lactic acid (>6 nmol/L), plus CSF marked pleocytosis (>50 WBCs/mm(3)), plus a positive Gram stain (same morphology as CSF isolate), plus a positive CSF culture of neuropathogen (same morphology as Gram stained organism). We reviewed 22 adults with EVDs to determine if our four CSF parameters combined accurately identified EVD-AM. No single or combination of <4 CSF parameters correctly diagnosed or ruled out EVD-AM. Combined our four CSF parameters clearly differentiated EVD-AM from one case of pseudomeningitis due to E. cloacae. We conclude that our four CSF criteria combined are useful in diagnosing EVD-AM in adults. PMID:25659927

  1. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  2. Molecular epidemiology of group B streptococcal meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period from Angola.

    PubMed

    Florindo, Carlos; Gomes, João P; Rato, Márcia G; Bernardino, Luís; Spellerberg, Barbara; Santos-Sanches, Ilda; Borrego, Maria J

    2011-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major pathogen of neonates and immunocompromised adults. Prior studies have demonstrated that, beyond the neonatal period, S. agalactiae rarely causes invasive infections in children. However, during 2004-2005, S. agalactiae was the causative agent of 60 meningitis episodes in children aged 3 months to 12 years from Angola. To identify and study the specific causative genetic lineages of S. agalactiae childhood meningitis, which lack characterization to date, we conducted an extensive molecular analysis of the recovered isolates (n = 21). This constitutes what we believe to be the first molecular study of the population structure of invasive S. agalactiae isolates from Africa. A low genetic diversity was observed among the isolates, where the majority belonged to clonal complex (CC) 17 presenting the capsular subtype III-2 (86 % of cases) and marked by the intron group II GBSi1, which has previously been observed to be associated with neonatal hosts. The predominance of single-locus variants of sequence type (ST) 17 suggested the local diversification of this hypervirulent clone, which displayed novel alleles of the fbsB and sip virulence genes. The absence of the scpB-lmb region in two S. agalactiae isolates with the Ia/ST23 genotype is more typical of cattle than human isolates. Globally, these data provide novel information about the enhanced invasiveness of the CC17 genetic lineage in older children and suggest the local diversification of this clone, which may be related to the future emergence of a novel epidemic clone in Angola. PMID:21474607

  3. Clinical and Microbiological Features of Salmonella Meningitis in a South African Population, 2003–2013

    PubMed Central

    Keddy, Karen H.; Sooka, Arvinda; Musekiwa, Alfred; Smith, Anthony M.; Ismail, Husna; Tau, Nomsa P.; Crowther-Gibson, Penny; Angulo, Frederick J.; Klugman, Keith P.

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical and microbiological characteristics of nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) meningitis in South Africa, where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence is high (approximately 15% in persons ≥15 years of age), were reviewed. Methods From 2003 through 2013, 278 cases were identified through national laboratory-based surveillance. Clinical information (age, sex, outcome, Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS], and HIV status) was ascertained at selected sites. Isolates were serotyped; susceptibility testing and multilocus sequence typing on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium isolates was performed. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with mortality outcome, using Stata software, version 13. Results Where age was ascertained, 139 of 256 (54.3%) patients were <15 years. Males represented 151 of 267 (56.6%). Mortality outcome was recorded for 112 of 146 (76.7%) enhanced surveillance patients; 53 of 112 (47.3%) died. Death was associated with GCS ≤13 (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 18.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.0–118.5; P = .002) on multivariable analysis. Where data were available, all 45 patients aged >15 years were HIV infected, compared with 24 of 46 (52.2%) patients aged <5 years. Neonates were less likely to be HIV infected than infants aged 2–12 months (OR, 4.8; 95% CI, 1.1–21.1; P = .039). Salmonella Typhimurium represented 106 of 238 (44.5%) serotyped isolates: 65 of 95 (68.4%) were ST313 vs ST19, respectively, and significantly associated with HIV-infected patients (P = .03) and multidrug resistance (OR, 6.6; 95% CI, 2.5–17.2; P < .001). Conclusions NTS meningitis in South Africa is highly associated with HIV in adults, with neonates (irrespective of HIV status), and with Salmonella Typhimurium ST313. GCS is the best predictor of mortality: early diagnosis and treatment are critical. Focused prevention requires further studies to understand the sources and transmission routes. PMID:26449942

  4. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  6. Clinical and laboratory features of Streptococcus salivarius meningitis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Megan; Martin, Ryan; Walk, Seth T; Young, Carol; Grossman, Sylvia; McKean, Erin Lin; Aronoff, David M

    2012-02-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a normal member of the human oral microbiome that is an uncommon cause of invasive infections. Meningitis is a rare but increasingly reported infection caused by S. salivarius. Despite the growing number of reported cases, a comprehensive review of the literature on S. salivarius meningitis is lacking. We sought to gain a better understanding of the clinical presentation, evaluation, management, and outcome of S. salivarius meningitis by analyzing previously reported cases. In addition to a single case reported here, 64 previously published cases of meningitis were identified for this review. The collected data confirm that most patients presented with classical signs and symptoms of bacterial meningitis with a predominance of neutrophils in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and hypoglycorrhachia. The majority of cases followed iatrogenic or traumatic CSF contamination. Most cases were diagnosed by CSF culture within one day of symptom onset. There was no clear evidence of predisposing co-morbid conditions in patients with meningitis, although in most case reports, limited information was given on the medical history of each patient. Outcomes were generally favorable with antibiotic management. Clinicians should suspect S. salivarius meningitis in patients presenting acutely after medical or surgical procedures involving the meninges. PMID:21817122

  7. Clinical and Laboratory Features of Streptococcus salivarius Meningitis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Megan; Martin, Ryan; Walk, Seth T.; Young, Carol; Grossman, Sylvia; McKean, Erin Lin; Aronoff, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a normal member of the human oral microbiome that is an uncommon cause of invasive infections. Meningitis is a rare but increasingly reported infection caused by S. salivarius. Despite the growing number of reported cases, a comprehensive review of the literature on S. salivarius meningitis is lacking. We sought to gain a better understanding of the clinical presentation, evaluation, management, and outcome of S. salivarius meningitis by analyzing previously reported cases. In addition to a single case reported here, 64 previously published cases of meningitis were identified for this review. The collected data confirm that most patients presented with classical signs and symptoms of bacterial meningitis with a predominance of neutrophils in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and hypoglycorrhachia. The majority of cases followed iatrogenic or traumatic CSF contamination. Most cases were diagnosed by CSF culture within one day of symptom onset. There was no clear evidence of predisposing co-morbid conditions in patients with meningitis, although in most case reports, limited information was given on the medical history of each patient. Outcomes were generally favorable with antibiotic management. Clinicians should suspect S. salivarius meningitis in patients presenting acutely after medical or surgical procedures involving the meninges. PMID:21817122

  8. Identification of Streptococcus suis Meningitis through Population-Based Surveillance, Togo, 2010–2014

    PubMed Central

    Tall, Haoua; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Berthe-Marie; Mounkoro, Didier; Tidjani, Loukoumane; Agbenoko, Kodjo; Alassani, Issifou; Amidou, Moussa; Tamekloe, Stanislas; Laing, Kenneth G.; Witney, Adam A.; Hinds, Jason; van der Linden, Mark P.G.; Gessner, Bradford D.

    2016-01-01

    During 2010–2014, we enrolled 511 patients with suspected bacterial meningitis into surveillance in 2 districts of northern Togo. We identified 15 persons with Streptococcus suis infection; 10 had occupational contact with pigs, and 12 suffered neurologic sequelae. S. suis testing should be considered in rural areas of the African meningitis belt. PMID:27314251

  9. Identification of Streptococcus suis Meningitis through Population-Based Surveillance, Togo, 2010-2014.

    PubMed

    Tall, Haoua; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Berthe-Marie; Mounkoro, Didier; Tidjani, Loukoumane; Agbenoko, Kodjo; Alassani, Issifou; Amidou, Moussa; Tamekloe, Stanislas; Laing, Kenneth G; Witney, Adam A; Hinds, Jason; van der Linden, Mark P G; Gessner, Bradford D; Moïsi, Jennifer C

    2016-07-01

    During 2010-2014, we enrolled 511 patients with suspected bacterial meningitis into surveillance in 2 districts of northern Togo. We identified 15 persons with Streptococcus suis infection; 10 had occupational contact with pigs, and 12 suffered neurologic sequelae. S. suis testing should be considered in rural areas of the African meningitis belt. PMID:27314251

  10. Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis with negative cryptococcal antigen: Evaluation of a new immunochromatographic detection assay

    PubMed Central

    Opota, O.; Desgraz, B.; Kenfak, A.; Jaton, K.; Cavassini, M.; Greub, G.; Prod'hom, G.; Giulieri, S.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of cryptococcal antigen in serum or cerebrospinal fluid allows cryptococcal meningitis diagnosis within few hours with >90% sensitivity. In an HIV-positive patient with Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis, initial antigen detection by immunoagglutination was negative. We thus evaluated a new immunochromatographic detection assay that exhibited a higher sensitivity. PMID:25755893

  11. Vitamin B6 reduces hippocampal apoptosis in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae leads to death in up to 30% of patients and leaves up to half of the survivors with neurological sequelae. The inflammatory host reaction initiates the induction of the kynurenine pathway and contributes to hippocampal apoptosis, a form of brain damage that is associated with learning and memory deficits in experimental paradigms. Vitamin B6 is an enzymatic cofactor in the kynurenine pathway and may thus limit the accumulation of neurotoxic metabolites and preserve the cellular energy status. The aim of this study in a pneumococcal meningitis model was to investigate the effect of vitamin B6 on hippocampal apoptosis by histomorphology, by transcriptomics and by measurement of cellular nicotine amide adenine dinucleotide content. Methods and results Eleven day old Wistar rats were infected with 1x106 cfu/ml of S. pneumoniae and randomized for treatment with vitamin B6 or saline as controls. Vitamin B6 led to a significant (p > 0.02) reduction of hippocampal apoptosis. According to functional annotation based clustering, vitamin B6 led to down-regulation of genes involved in processes of inflammatory response, while genes encoding for processes related to circadian rhythm, neuronal signaling and apoptotic cell death were mostly up-regulated. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that attenuation of apoptosis by vitamin B6 is multi-factorial including down-modulation of inflammation, up-regulation of the neuroprotective brain-derived neurotrophic factor and prevention of the exhaustion of cellular energy stores. The neuroprotective effect identifies vitamin B6 as a potential target for the development of strategies to attenuate brain injury in bacterial meningitis. PMID:23977941

  12. [Community-acquired Pseudomonas stutzeri meningitis in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Sünbül, Mustafa; Zivalioğlu, Muammer; Taşdelen Fişgin, Nuriye

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri which is an aerobic, non-fermentative gram-negative bacillus frequently found in soil, water and hospital environment, rarely leads to serious community-acquired infections. In this report a case of community-acquired meningitis due to P. stutzeri was presented. A 73-years-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department with the complaints of nausea, vomiting, headache, dizziness, difficulties in walking and speaking and loss of consciousness. There was no history of an underlying disease or immunosuppression. Physical examination revealed nuchal rigidity, however, Kernig and Brudzinski signs were negative. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed 0.4 mg/dl glucose (simultaneous blood glucose 145 mg/dl), and 618 mg/dl protein and 640 leucocyte/mm3 (90% PMNL). No bacteria were detected in Gram stained and Ehrlich-Ziehl-Neelsen stained CSF smears. Upon the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis, treatment with ceftriaxone and ampicillin was initiated, however, the patient died after 16 hours of hospitalization. CSF culture yielded the growth of gram-negative oxidase-positive bacteria and the isolate was identified as P. stutzeri by Vitek-2 Compact system (bioMerieux, France). The isolate was found to be sensitive to piperacillin/tazobactam, amikacin, gentamycin, ceftazidime, cefepime, ciprofloxacin, imipenem and meropenem. Since the patient was lost due to acute respiratory and cardiac failure, it was not possible to change the therapy to agent specific therapy. In conclusion, it should always be kept in mind that uncommon agents could lead to community-acquired meningitis in elderly patients and empirical treatment protocols might fail in such cases resulting in high morbidity and mortality. PMID:19334394

  13. A Five Years Study of Tuberculous Meningitis in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hajia, Massoud; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Nazari, Mina; Razavi Davodi, Neda; Karami Zarandi, Morteza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is a severe form of extra pulmonary tuberculosis with high mortality and morbidity rate in all age group patients specific in adults and children. The incidence and prevalence are not exactly known in Iran. In this study, we tried to evaluate the role of rapid diagnosis and to find out the highest risk group patients. Methods: Totally, 1783-suspected patients with tuberculous meningitis whose CSF specimens were admitted at Noor Pathobiology Laboratory, Tehran, Iran were enrolled in this study from January 2009 until December 2013. All specimens were checked for MTB by direct examination, culture and PCR tests, and for the adenosine deaminase (ADA). Results: Confirmed positive cases were aged from 13 to 82 yr old with mean age 46.63 yr (SD±18.84). The number of diagnosed positive MTB was different by the 3 applied protocol, 64 by PCR, 28 by culture and 33 by direct examination. Considering the result of PCR protocol the TBM was approved in 64 patients with rate of 3.59%. Two patients had other infection as well, one 56 years old with VZV and the other patient who was HIV positive was 27 years old. Increased ADA titer higher than cutoff was relevant with other results of positive samples except in two cases. Conclusion: Analysis of the results proved adults are more at risk for tuberculous meningitis than children in Iran are. It is also confirmed PCR method provide the most efficient, rapid and reliable results for these patients who are at the critical situations. PMID:26351499

  14. Place of Colistin-Rifampicin Association in the Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii Meningitis: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Souhail, Dahraoui; Bouchra, Belefquih; Belarj, Badia; Laila, Rar; Mohammed, Frikh; Nassirou, Oumarou Mamane; Azeddine, Ibrahimi; Haimeur, Charki; Lemnouer, Abdelhay; Elouennass, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis is an important challenge due to the accumulation of resistance of this bacteria and low meningeal diffusion of several antimicrobial requiring use of an antimicrobial effective combination to eradicate these species. We report a case of Acinetobacter baumannii multidrug-resistant nosocomial meningitis which was successfully treated with intravenous and intrathecal colistin associated with rifampicin. PMID:27064923

  15. Spirometric abnormalities among welders

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, S.K.; Gupta, B.N.; Husain, T.; Mathur, N.; Srivastava, S. )

    1991-10-01

    A group of manual welders age group 13-60 years having a mean exposure period of 12.4 {plus minus} 1.12 years were subjected to spirometry to evaluate the prevalence of spirometric abnormalities. The welders showed a significantly higher prevalence of respiratory impairment than that observed among the unexposed controls as a result of exposure to welding gases which comprised fine particles of lead, zinc, chromium, and manganese. This occurred despite the lower concentration of the pollutants at the work place. In the expose group, the smoking welders showed a prevalence of respiratory impairment significantly higher than that observed in the nonsmoking welders. The results of the pulmonary function tests showed a predominantly restrictive type of pulmonary impairment followed by a mixed ventilatory defect among the welders. The effect of age on pulmonary impairment was not discernible. Welders exposed for over 10 years showed a prevalence of respiratory abnormalities significantly higher than those exposed for less than 10 years. Smoking also had a contributory role.

  16. A Syrian patient diagnosed with meningococcal meningitis serogroup B

    PubMed Central

    Tezer, Hasan; Ozkaya-Parlakay, Aslinur; Kanik-Yuksek, Saliha; Gülhan, Belgin; Güldemir, Dilek

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal infection is an important health problem in children, with significant mortality and morbidity. In this infection, early recognition and aggressive treatment can reduce mortality. Herein we report an 11-year-old-Syrian refugee girl living in Turkey for 3 months admitting with fever, headache, and vomiting diagnosed as meningococcal meningitis type B who was cured with intravenous ceftriaxone therapy. Infections in refugee populations constitute major importance for highlighting importance of investigation of endemic diseases in their own country and contagious diseases in their present place. PMID:25424959

  17. Isavuconazole Is Effective for the Treatment of Experimental Cryptococcal Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Nathan P; Kovanda, Laura; Najvar, Laura K; Bocanegra, Rosie; Olivo, Marcos; Kirkpatrick, William R; Patterson, Thomas F

    2016-09-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of isavuconazole against cryptococcal meningitis. Treatment with either oral isavuconazole (120 mg/kg and 240 mg/kg twice a day [BID]) or fluconazole as the positive control significantly improved survival in mice infected intracranially with either Cryptococcus neoformans USC1597 or H99 and significantly reduced brain fungal burdens for both isolates. Concentrations of isavuconazole in plasma and brain tissue also demonstrated that the greatest improvements in survival and fungal burden were associated with elevated exposures. PMID:27324761

  18. Treatment of lymphomatous and leukemic meningitis with liposomal encapsulated cytarabine

    PubMed Central

    Kripp, Melanie; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Liposomal encapsulated cytarabine (DepoCyte®, Mundipharma GmbH, Limburg/Lahn, Germany) is a slow-release formulation of conventional cytarabine. It is licensed for intrathecal use in patients with lymphomatous and leukemic meningitis. DepoCyte® obtained superior response rates, improved patient quality of life and improved the time to neurological progression in a randomized albeit small clinical trial. In this review we briefly summarize the clinical data and discuss them in light of clinical problems and possible treatment scenarios. PMID:19337408

  19. Timing of Antiretroviral Therapy after Diagnosis of Cryptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Boulware, David R.; Meya, David B.; Muzoora, Conrad; Rolfes, Melissa A.; Huppler Hullsiek, Katherine; Musubire, Abdu; Taseera, Kabanda; Nabeta, Henry W.; Schutz, Charlotte; Williams, Darlisha A.; Rajasingham, Radha; Rhein, Joshua; Thienemann, Friedrich; Lo, Melanie W.; Nielsen, Kirsten; Bergemann, Tracy L.; Kambugu, Andrew; Manabe, Yukari C.; Janoff, Edward N.; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Background Cryptococcal meningitis accounts for 20 to 25% of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome–related deaths in Africa. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is essential for survival; however, the question of when ART should be initiated after diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis remains unanswered. Methods We assessed survival at 26 weeks among 177 human immunodeficiency virus–infected adults in Uganda and South Africa who had cryptococcal meningitis and had not previously received ART. We randomly assigned study participants to undergo either earlier ART initiation (1 to 2 weeks after diagnosis) or deferred ART initiation (5 weeks after diagnosis). Participants received amphotericin B (0.7 to 1.0 mg per kilogram of body weight per day) and fluconazole (800 mg per day) for 14 days, followed by consolidation therapy with fluconazole. Results The 26-week mortality with earlier ART initiation was significantly higher than with deferred ART initiation (45% [40 of 88 patients] vs. 30% [27 of 89 patients]; hazard ratio for death, 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06 to 2.82; P = 0.03). The excess deaths associated with earlier ART initiation occurred 2 to 5 weeks after diagnosis (P = 0.007 for the comparison between groups); mortality was similar in the two groups thereafter. Among patients with few white cells in their cerebrospinal fluid (<5 per cubic millimeter) at randomization, mortality was particularly elevated with earlier ART as compared with deferred ART (hazard ratio, 3.87; 95% CI, 1.41 to 10.58; P = 0.008). The incidence of recognized cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome did not differ significantly between the earlier-ART group and the deferred-ART group (20% and 13%, respectively; P = 0.32). All other clinical, immunologic, virologic, and microbiologic outcomes, as well as adverse events, were similar between the groups. Conclusions Deferring ART for 5 weeks after the diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was associated with

  20. From suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease to confirmed histoplasma meningitis.

    PubMed

    Batra, Vivek; Khararjian, Armen; Wheat, Joseph; Zhang, Sean X; Crain, Barbara; Baras, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old man with chronic obstructive lung disease who was on steroids, presented to the hospital after a fall with subacute headaches and ataxia. During the patient's hospital course, his clinical condition deteriorated with myoclonic jerks, fevers and severe encephalopathy. An extensive workup, including EEG, brain MRI and lumbar puncture, revealed possible Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Unfortunately, the patient failed to improve and died 12 days after admission. A brain-only autopsy revealed he had acute histoplasma meningitis with patchy superficial cerebritis. PMID:27389723

  1. Simultaneous genital ulcer and meningitis: a case of EBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Jairo Tavares; Lopes, Leonardo da Costa; Prokopowitsch, Aleksander Snioka

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a broad spectrum of diseases, mainly because of its genomic characteristics, which result in different latency patterns in immune cells and infective mechanisms. The patient described in this report is a previously healthy young man who presented to the emergency department with clinical features consistent with meningitis and genital ulcers, which raised concern that the herpes simplex virus was the causative agent. However, the polymerase chain reaction of cerebral spinal fluid was positive for EBV. The authors highlight the importance of this infection among the differential diagnosis of central nervous system involvement and genital ulceration. PMID:27547743

  2. Partial Kluver-Bucy syndrome secondary to tubercular meningitis.

    PubMed

    Jha, Kunal Kishor; Singh, Satyajeet Kumar; Kumar, Prem; Arora, Charu Dutt

    2016-01-01

    Tubercular meningitis (TBM) is a devastating extra pulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis and demonstrates a high neurological morbidity. A rare complication of this condition is Kluver-Bucy syndrome (KBS), which is a neurobehavioral disorder characterised by hyper-sexuality, visual agnosia, bulimia, placidity, hyperorality and memory deficits caused by lesions to the amygdala. The amygdala lesions can be due to many causes, including traumatic brain injury, systemic conditions and infections such as tuberculosis. Here, we present a case of partial KBS in a patient undergoing treatment for TBM. PMID:27530874

  3. Simultaneous genital ulcer and meningitis: a case of EBV infection.

    PubMed

    Rahhal, Hassan; Nunes, Jairo Tavares; Lopes, Leonardo da Costa; Prokopowitsch, Aleksander Snioka

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a broad spectrum of diseases, mainly because of its genomic characteristics, which result in different latency patterns in immune cells and infective mechanisms. The patient described in this report is a previously healthy young man who presented to the emergency department with clinical features consistent with meningitis and genital ulcers, which raised concern that the herpes simplex virus was the causative agent. However, the polymerase chain reaction of cerebral spinal fluid was positive for EBV. The authors highlight the importance of this infection among the differential diagnosis of central nervous system involvement and genital ulceration. PMID:27547743

  4. Treatment of lymphomatous and leukemic meningitis with liposomal encapsulated cytarabine.

    PubMed

    Kripp, Melanie; Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Liposomal encapsulated cytarabine (DepoCyte, Mundipharma GmbH, Limburg/Lahn, Germany) is a slow-release formulation of conventional cytarabine. It is licensed for intrathecal use in patients with lymphomatous and leukemic meningitis. DepoCyte obtained superior response rates, improved patient quality of life and improved the time to neurological progression in a randomized albeit small clinical trial. In this review we briefly summarize the clinical data and discuss them in light of clinical problems and possible treatment scenarios. PMID:19337408

  5. Assessments for the impact of mineral dust on the meningitis incidence in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiny, Nadège; Chiapello, Isabelle

    2013-05-01

    Recently, mineral dust has been suspected to be one of the important environmental risk factor for meningitis epidemics in West Africa. The current study is one of the first which relies on long-term robust aerosol measurements in the Sahel region to investigate the possible impact of mineral dust on meningitis cases (incidence). Sunphotometer measurements, which allow to derive aerosol and humidity parameters, i.e., aerosol optical thickness, Angström coefficient, and precipitable water, are combined with quantitative epidemiological data in Niger and Mali over the 2004-2009 AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) program period. We analyse how the extremely high aerosol loads in this region may influence both the calendar (onset, peaks, end) and the intensity of meningitis. We highlight three distinct periods: (i) from November to December, beginning of the dry season, humidity is weak, there is no dust and no meningitis cases; (ii) from January to April, humidity is still weak, but high dust loads occur in the atmosphere and this is the meningitis season; (iii) from May to October, humidity is high and there is no meningitis anymore, in presence of dust or not, which flow anyway in higher altitudes. More specifically, the onset of the meningitis season is tightly related to mineral dust flowing close to the surface at the very beginning of the year. During the dry, and the most dusty season period, from February to April, each meningitis peak is preceded by a dust peak, with a 0-2 week lead-time. The importance (duration, intensity) of these meningitis peaks seems to be related to that of dust, suggesting that a cumulative effect in dust events may be important for the meningitis incidence. This is not the case for humidity, confirming the special contribution of dust at this period of the year. The end of the meningitis season, in May, coincides with a change in humidity conditions related to the West African Monsoon. These results, which are

  6. Preventive immunisation could reduce the risk of meningococcal epidemics in the African meningitis belt.

    PubMed

    Chippaux, J P; Campagne, G; Djibo, S; Cissé, L; Hassane, A; Kanta, I

    1999-07-01

    Control of meningitis epidemics is based on early case detection followed by mass campaigns of immunisation. However, this strategy showed severe inadequacies during recent outbreaks in Africa. In Niamey, Niger, meningococcal vaccinations began in 1978 and detailed bacteriological and epidemiological surveillance of meningitis started in 1981. When vaccine coverage rates were higher than 50%, the prevalences of Neisseria meningitidis A meningitis were low in Niamey, although there was a concurrent epidemic in rural Niger. A massive outbreak of meningitis in Niamey in 1994-1995 followed a 6-year period during which the mean rate of vaccine coverage remained < 25%. The data indicate that, in the meningitis belt, preventive immunization should avoid a great number of deaths and be less expensive than mass immunisation campaigns performed after epidemics have begun. PMID:10690246

  7. EDA-containing fibronectin levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of children with meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pupek, Małgorzata; Jasonek, Jolanta; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Fibronectin containing an alternatively spliced extra domain A (EDA-FN) participates in diverse biological cell functions, being also directly or indirectly engaged during an inflammatory response to brain injury and/or neuron regeneration. We analyzed FN and EDA-FN isoform levels by ELISA in 85 cerebrospinal fluid samples and 67 plasma samples obtained from children suffering from bacterial or viral meningitis and non-meningitis peripheral inflammation. We have found that the cerebrospinal level of EDA-FN was significantly lower in the bacterial meningitis group than in the viral- and non-meningitis groups. In the patients' plasma, EDA-FN was almost undetectable. The determination of fibronectin containing the EDA segment might be considered as an additional diagnostic marker of bacterial meningitis in children. PMID:23884219

  8. Factors associated with mumps meningitis and the possible impact of vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Rhie, Kyuyol; Park, Heung-Keun; Kim, Young-Soo; Park, Ji Sook; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Park, Eun Sil; Lim, Jae-Young; Park, Chan-Hoo; Woo, Hyang-Ok; Youn, Hee-Shang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mumps meningitis is a common complication of mumps infection; however, information on mumps meningitis in the postvaccine era is limited. The purpose of the present study was to determine factors associated with mumps meningitis and to discuss the effect of vaccination on this disease. Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients younger than 19 years with mumps, diagnosed at a university hospital in Korea between 2003 and 2013. Patients were divided into groups with and without meningitis, and the clinical features of the 2 groups were compared. Results The study enrolled 119 patients: 19 patients with meningitis and 100 patients without. Univariate analysis showed that older age (median: 15 years vs. 9.5 years, respectively), a longer interval from last vaccination (median: 10.2 years vs. 4.8 years, respectively), and febrile presentation (94.7% vs. 31.0%, respectively) were significantly associated with mumps meningitis. Sex, number of vaccination doses, bilateral parotitis, and the presence of complications other than meningitis did not differ between the 2 groups. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, age (odds ratio, 1.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.01–1.89; P=0.04) and fever (odds ratio, 30.46; 95% confidence interval, 3.27–283.61; P<0.01) remained independent factors for mumps meningitis. Conclusion Clinicians in the postvaccine era should be aware of the possibility of mumps meningitis in febrile cases of mumps in adolescents, regardless of the number of vaccination doses. To establish the role of vaccination in mumps meningitis, further studies will be necessary. PMID:26893600

  9. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem. PMID:22377853

  10. [Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis associated with liver abscess: a case report].

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, T; Nakamura, H; Takei, I; Maruyama, H; Kataoka, K; Saruta, T; Kobayashi, Y

    1989-10-01

    We report a rare case of Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis associated with liver abscess, which was successfully treated with cefotaxime (CTX), one of the third-generation cephalosporins. A 53-year-old man was admitted to Keio University Hospital on June 13, 1988, because of a fever and a headache. On June 3, he suddenly started shivering and his temperature rose to 39 degrees C. He then began to complain of polydipsia, polyuria, and a weight loss of 4 kg a week. On June 11, he developed a severe headache. Four years prior to this incident, he had been diagnosed as having diabetes after a routine medical examination, but had neglected to undergo medical treatment. On admission, laboratory data showed leukocytosis, hyperglycemia (394 mg/dl) and ketonuria (4+). A lumbar puncture yielded cloudy cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) containing 500/3 cells/mm8, of which about 70% were neutrophils. A diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis and purulent meningitis was made. A treatment with ampicillin (ABPC) and CTX, (12 g/day, each) was begun. On the third day, cultures of a blood specimen and CSF yielded both K. pneumoniae. The MICs of CTX to K. pneumoniae isolated from blood and CSF were both 0.05 microgram/ml. ABPC was discontinued, gentamicin was administered for 2 days, CTX was continued at the same dosage level and an administration of prednisolone 40 mg daily was begun.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2691713

  11. [Carcinomatous meningitis: The radiation therapist's point of view].

    PubMed

    Espenel, S; Vallard, A; Langrand-Escure, J; Ben Mrad, M; Méry, B; Rivoirard, R; Moriceau, G; Guy, J-B; Trone, J-C; Moncharmont, C; Wang, G; Diao, P; Bernichon, É; Chanal, É; Fournel, P; Magné, N

    2016-02-01

    Carcinomatous meningitis complicates 5 to 10% of cancers, essentially with breast cancers, lung cancers and melanomas. The incidence probably increased because of therapeutic advances in oncology. Treatment is based on external beam radiotherapy, systemic treatment, intrathecal chemotherapy and supportive care. The aim of this work was to review data on external radiation therapy and carcinomatous meningitis. There are few evidences on the subject, but it is a major topic of interest. A whole brain radiation therapy is indicated in case of brain metastases or clinical encephalitis. Focal radiation therapy is recommended on symptomatic, bulky or obstructive sites. The dose depends on performance status (20 to 40 Gy in five to 20 fractions), volume to treat and available techniques (classic fractionation or hypofractionation via stereotactic radiosurgery). The objective of radiation therapy is to improve quality of life. Association with systemic therapy improves overall survival. Administration of sequential intrathecal chemotherapy may also improve overall survival, but induces more toxicity. The use of new radiotherapy techniques and development of radiosensitizing molecules in patients with good performance status could improve survival in this frequent complication of cancer. PMID:26867467

  12. The meningeal lymphatic system: a route for HIV brain migration?

    PubMed

    Lamers, Susanna L; Rose, Rebecca; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Nolan, David J; Salemi, Marco; Maidji, Ekaterina; Stoddart, Cheryl A; McGrath, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    Two innovative studies recently identified functional lymphatic structures in the meninges that may influence the development of HIV-associated neurological disorders (HAND). Until now, blood vessels were assumed to be the sole transport system by which HIV-infected monocytes entered the brain by bypassing a potentially hostile blood-brain barrier through inflammatory-mediated semi-permeability. A cascade of specific chemokine signals promote monocyte migration from blood vessels to surrounding brain tissues via a well-supported endothelium, where the cells differentiate into tissue macrophages capable of productive HIV infection. Lymphatic vessels on the other hand are more loosely organized than blood vessels. They absorb interstitial fluid from bodily tissues where HIV may persist and exchange a variety of immune cells (CD4(+) T cells, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells) with surrounding tissues through discontinuous endothelial junctions. We propose that the newly discovered meningeal lymphatics are key to HIV migration among viral reservoirs and brain tissue during periods of undetectable plasma viral loads due to suppressive combinational antiretroviral therapy, thus redefining the migration process in terms of a blood-lymphatic transport system. PMID:26572785

  13. Role of Microglial Activation in the Pathophysiology of Bacterial Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Simões, Lutiana R; Goularte, Jessica A; Petronilho, Fabricia; Saigal, Priyanka; Badawy, Marwa; Quevedo, João

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening infection associated with cognitive impairment in many survivors. The pathogen invades the central nervous system (CNS) by penetrating through the luminal side of the cerebral endothelium, which is an integral part of the blood-brain barrier. The replication of bacteria within the subarachnoid space occurs concomitantly with the release of their compounds that are highly immunogenic. These compounds known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) may lead to both an increase in the inflammatory response in the host and also microglial activation. Microglia are the resident macrophages of the CNS which, when activated, can trigger a host of immunological pathways. Classical activation increases the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and reactive oxygen species, while alternative activation is implicated in the inhibition of inflammation and restoration of homeostasis. The inflammatory response from classical microglial activation can facilitate the elimination of invasive microorganisms; however, excessive or extended microglial activation can result in neuronal damage and eventually cell death. This review aims to discuss the role of microglia in the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis as well as the process of microglial activation by PAMPs and by endogenous constituents that are normally released from damaged cells known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). PMID:25744564

  14. Rhodotorula glutinis meningitis: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Menon, Sarala; Gupta, H R; Sequeira, R; Chavan, Shazia; Gholape, D; Amandeep, S; Bhilave, N; Chowdhary, A S

    2014-07-01

    Rhodotorula is ubiquitous saprophytic yeast belonging to phylum Basidiomycota. These encapsulated basidiomycetes are being increasingly recognised as important emerging human pathogens. There are scanty reports of meningitis caused by Rhodurorula spp in HIV infected patients. We present one such case of meningitis by Rhodutorula glutinis in HIV-infected patient. The patient also had a past history of abdominal tuberculosis. The diagnosis of Rhodotorula was confirmed by Gram staining and culture of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Contamination was ruled out by repeated culturing of CSF from the same patient. Therapy with Amphotericin B showed good results. Patient was discharged from the hospital. However, in the seventh month of follow-up patient was readmitted with complaints of fever, breathlessness, altered sensorium, vomiting and succumbed to his illness. This time the CSF cultures remained negative for Rhodotorula, acid fast bacilli and other pyogenic organisms. Our last 11-year retrospective analysis of 8197 specimens received for mycological work-up showed that this is the first report of R. glutinis isolation from our institute. PMID:24589085

  15. Bilateral ophthalmic origin of the middle meningeal artery.

    PubMed

    Plas, B; Bonneville, F; Dupuy, M; Sol, J-C; Chaynes, P

    2013-01-01

    The origin of the middle meningeal artery (MMA) may vary although it can arise from the ophthalmic artery (OA) with a 0.5% prevalence. We report the exceptional bilateral asymmetric origin from the OAs that has not previously been reported in the literature. Surgeons should be aware of this variation as it could be crucial in the setting of an endovascular approach for meningeal lesions, as in our observation. A 50-year-old male underwent a preoperative cerebral digital subtracted angiography that incidentally revealed MMAs arising from the OA on both sides. In fact, the origin was asymmetric because it was complete on the right side with the anterior and posterior branches of the MMA arising from the OA, whereas it was partial on the left side, with only the anterior branch arising from the OA. The CT scan showed the absence of the foramen spinosum only on the right side. This paper discusses the unique anatomic variation in the light of MMA embryology and its different origins. Knowledge of this variation may have a practical impact in cases of cerebral embolization. PMID:24176432

  16. Meningitis in infancy in England and Wales: follow up at age 5 years

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Helen; de Louvois, John; Halket, Susan; Peckham, Catherine; Hurley, Rosalinde; Harvey, David

    2001-01-01

    Objective To describe important sequelae occurring among a cohort of children aged 5 years who had had meningitis during the first year of life and who had been identified by a prospective national study of meningitis in infancy in England and Wales between 1985 and 1987. Design Follow up questionnaires asking about the children's health and development were sent to general practitioners and parents of the children and to parents of matched controls. The organism that caused the infection and age at infection were also recorded. Setting England and Wales. Participants General practitioners and parents of children who had had meningitis before the age of 1 year and of matched controls. Main outcome measures The prevalence of health and developmental problems and overall disability among children who had had meningitis compared with controls. Results Altogether, 1584 of 1717 (92.2%) children who had had meningitis and 1391 of 1485 (93.6%) controls were successfully followed up. Among children who survived to age 5 years 247 of 1584 (15.6%) had a disability; there was a 10-fold increase in the risk of severe or moderate disability at 5 years of age among children who had had meningitis (relative risk 10.3, 95% confidence interval 6.7 to 16.0, P<0.001). There was considerable variation in the rates of severe or moderate disability in children infected with different organisms. Conclusion The long term consequences of having meningitis during the first year of life are significant: 32 of 1717 (1.8%) children died within five years. Not only did almost a fifth of children with meningitis have a permanent, severe or moderately severe disability, but subtle deficits were also more prevalent. What is already known on this topicMeningitis in infancy is associated with important long term consequencesThere is considerable variation in outcome depending on which organism caused the infectionWhat this study addsThis follow up study of 1717 children who had meningitis in infancy

  17. Aetiological agents of cerebrospinal meningitis: a retrospective study from a teaching hospital in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstracts Background Meningitis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in low-resource settings. In sub-Saharan Africa, the meningitis belt has been characterized by particularly high and seasonal incidences of bacterial meningitis extending throughout life. Despite the progress being made in treating the condition, the mortality rates continue to be high, ranging between 2% and 30% globally. In Ghana, the mortality rate of meningitis has been estimated to range from 36% to 50%. However little information is available on the pathogens contributing to meningitis and their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Updated information is essential to adjust the recommendations for empirical treatment or prevention of meningitis which could have immense implications for local and global health. Methods We retrospectively reviewed laboratory records of all patients suspected of bacterial meningitis who underwent a lumbar puncture from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. Data were retrieved from laboratory record books and double entered into a Microsoft® excel spreadsheet. Results Records of 4,955 cerebrospinal fluid samples were analysed. Of these, 163 (3.3%, 95%CI: 2.8% to 3.8%) were confirmed meningitis and 106 (2.1%, 95%CI: 1.7% to 2.6%) were probable meningitis cases. Confirmed meningitis cases were made up of 117 (71.8%) culture positive bacteria, 19 (11.7%) culture positive Cryptococcus neoformans and 27(16.6%) Gram positive bacteria with negative culture. The most prevalent bacteria was Streptococcus pneumoniae 91 (77.7%), followed by E.coli 4 (3.4%), Salmonella species 4 (3.4%), Neisseria meningitidis 3 (2.5%), Pseudomonas species 3(2.5%) and others. Pneumococcal isolates susceptibility to penicillin, chloramphenicol and ceftriaxone were 98.9% (95%CI: 94.0% to 100.0%), 83.0% (95%CI: 73.4% to 90.1%) and 100.0% (95%CI: 95.8% to 100.0%) respectively. Conclusion Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important cause of meningitis among all age groups and its

  18. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis in an Immunosuppressed Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis and IgG4 Subclass Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gaini, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    A 51-year-old Caucasian woman with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis was treated and discharged after an uncomplicated course. Her medical history included immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine for autoimmune hepatitis. A diagnostic work-up after the meningitis episode revealed that she had low levels of the IgG4 subclass. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a possible association between autoimmune hepatitis and the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis, describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and deficiency of the IgG4 subclass and finally describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprine. PMID:26558118

  19. Priorities for research on meningococcal disease and the impact of serogroup A vaccination in the African meningitis belt.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Danny; Aseffa, Abraham; Bash, Margaret; Basta, Nicole; Borrow, Ray; Broome, Claire; Caugant, Dominique; Clark, Tom; Collard, Jean-Marc; Djingarey, Mamoudou; Goldblatt, David; Greenwood, Brian; Griffiths, Ulla; Hajjeh, Rana; Hassan-King, Musa; Hugonnet, Stephane; Kimball, Ann Marie; LaForce, Marc; MacLennan, Calman; Maiden, Martin C J; Manigart, Olivier; Mayer, Leonard; Messonnier, Nancy; Moisi, Jennifer; Moore, Katie; Moto, Daugla Doumagoum; Mueller, Judith; Nascimento, Maria; Obaro, Stephen; Ouedraogo, Rasmata; Page, Anne-Laure; Perea, Willima; Pluschke, Gerd; Preziosi, Mari-Pierre; Sow, Samba; Stephens, David; Stuart, James; Thomson, Madeleiene; Tiendrebeogo, Sylvestre; Trape, Jean-Francois; Vernet, Guy

    2013-03-01

    For over 100 years, large epidemics of meningococcal meningitis have occurred every few years in areas of the African Sahel and sub-Sahel known as the African meningitis belt. Until recently, the main approach to the control of these epidemics has been reactive vaccination with a polysaccharide vaccine after an outbreak has reached a defined threshold and provision of easy access to effective treatment but this approach has not prevented the occurrence of new epidemics. Meningococcal conjugate vaccines, which can prevent meningococcal carriage and thus interrupt transmission, may be more effective than polysaccharide vaccines at preventing epidemics. Because the majority of African epidemics have been caused by serogroup A meningococci, a serogroup A polysaccharide/tetanus toxoid protein conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) has recently been developed. Results from an initial evaluation of the impact of this vaccine on meningococcal disease and meningococcal carriage in Burkina Faso have been encouraging. To review how the research agenda for meningococcal disease in Africa has been changed by the advent of PsA-TT and to define a new set of research priorities for study of meningococcal infection in Africa, a meeting of 41 scientists was held in Dakar, Senegal on April 24th and 25th 2012. The research recommendations developed during the course of this meeting are presented in this paper. The need for enhanced surveillance for meningitis in defined populations with good diagnostic facilities in African countries at risk of epidemics was identified as the highest priority. This is needed to determine the duration of protection against serogroup A meningococcal disease provided by PsA-TT and to determine the risk of disease and carriage caused by meningococci of other serogroups. Other research areas given high priority included identification and validation of serological correlates of protection against meningococcal disease and carriage, development of improved methods for

  20. Cerebral hemorrhage due to tuberculosis meningitis: a rare case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Hai; Pan, Ke-Hua; Pan, Hong-Ying; Huang, Dong-Sheng; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a common disease to threaten human health. TB of the central nervous system (CNS) is rare but the most serious type of systemic TB because of its high mortality rate, serious neurological complications and sequelae. In this case report, we describe a woman who presented with walking instability, intracerebral hemorrhage and leptomeningeal enhancement due to tuberculosis meningitis. The patient had no significant medical history and the initial clinical symptoms were walking instability. On analysis, the cerebrospinal fluid was colorless and transparent, the pressure was more than 400 mm H2O, there was lymphocytic pleocytosis, increased protein, and decreased glucose levels present. No tuberculosis or other bacteria were detected. The patient's brain computed tomography image showed intra-cerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and contrast magnetic resonance imaging showed ICH in the right frontal lob, and leptomeningeal enhancement. CNS TB is rare but has a high mortality rate. As this disease has no unique characteristics at first presentation such as epidemiology and obvious clinical manifestation, a diagnosis of CNS TB remains difficult. PMID:26675758

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Pneumococcal Meningitis Reveals Potential Biomarkers Associated with Survival

    PubMed Central

    Goonetilleke, Upali R.; Scarborough, Matthew; Ward, Stephen A.; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with pneumococcal meningitis often die or have severe neurological damage despite optimal antibiotic therapy. New or improved therapy is required. The delivery of new interventions will require an improved understanding of the disease pathogenesis. Our objective was to learn more about the pathophysiology of severe meningitis through the interpretation of differences in the proteomic profile of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with meningitis. Methods Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of CSF from normal subjects (controls, n = 10) and patients with pneumococcal meningitis (n = 20) was analyzed. Spot differences were compared and identified between controls, nonsurvivors (n = 9), and survivors (n = 11). Results Protein concentration in CSF of patients with meningitis was 4-fold higher than in CSF of control subjects (7.0 mg/mL vs 0.23 mg/mL; P < .01). A mean of 2466 discrete protein spots was present in CSF of patients with meningitis. Thirty-four protein spots were differentially expressed in CSF of nonsurvivors, compared with survivors. None of these protein spots were observed in CSF of control subjects. Conclusions Proteomic screening of CSF yields potential biomarkers capable of differentiating control subjects from nonsurvivors and survivors of meningitis. Proteins involved in the inflammatory process and central metabolism were represented in the differentially expressed protein repertoire. PMID:20608875

  2. Meninges harbor cells expressing neural precursor markers during development and adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Bifari, Francesco; Berton, Valeria; Pino, Annachiara; Kusalo, Marijana; Malpeli, Giorgio; Di Chio, Marzia; Bersan, Emanuela; Amato, Eliana; Scarpa, Aldo; Krampera, Mauro; Fumagalli, Guido; Decimo, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Brain and skull developments are tightly synchronized, allowing the cranial bones to dynamically adapt to the brain shape. At the brain-skull interface, meninges produce the trophic signals necessary for normal corticogenesis and bone development. Meninges harbor different cell populations, including cells forming the endosteum of the cranial vault. Recently, we and other groups have described the presence in meninges of a cell population endowed with neural differentiation potential in vitro and, after transplantation, in vivo. However, whether meninges may be a niche for neural progenitor cells during embryonic development and in adulthood remains to be determined. In this work we provide the first description of the distribution of neural precursor markers in rat meninges during development up to adulthood. We conclude that meninges share common properties with the classical neural stem cell niche, as they: (i) are a highly proliferating tissue; (ii) host cells expressing neural precursor markers such as nestin, vimentin, Sox2 and doublecortin; and (iii) are enriched in extracellular matrix components (e.g., fractones) known to bind and concentrate growth factors. This study underlines the importance of meninges as a potential niche for endogenous precursor cells during development and in adulthood. PMID:26483637

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid outflow resistance in rabbits with experimental meningitis. Alterations with penicillin and methylprednisolone.

    PubMed Central

    Scheld, W M; Dacey, R G; Winn, H R; Welsh, J E; Jane, J A; Sande, M A

    1980-01-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis may be associated with increased intracranial pressure, neurological sequelae such as communicating hydrocephalus, and a slow response to antibiotic therapy. Alterations in cerebrospinal hydrodynamics are at least partially responsible for these complications. Constant, low-flow short-duration manometric infusion studies through a hollow-bore pressure monitoring device in direct continuity with the supracortical subarachnoid space were performed in rabbits with experimental meningitis. Maximal resistance to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow from the subarachnoid to vascular space was markedly increaed in acute pneumococcal meningitis when compared to control, uninfected animals (6.77 +/- 3.52 vs. 0.26 +/- 0.04 mm Hg/microliter per min, P less than 0.001). Similar elevations (8.93 +/- 4.15 mm Hg/microliter per min were found in experimental Escherichia coli meningitis. Despite eradication of viable bacteria from the CSF by penicillin therapy during the acute stage of pneumococcal meningitis, resistance remained elevated (6.07 +/- 4.68 mm Hg/microliter per min) and had not returned to normal up to 15 d later. Administration of methylprednisolone during the early stages of acute pneumococcal meningitis reduced mean peak outflow resistance towards control values (0.59 mm Hg/microliter per min) and no "rebound" effect was apparent 24 h later. These hydrodynamic alterations in experimental meningitis prevent normal CSF absorption and decrease the ability of the bran to compensate for changes in intracranial volume and pressure. PMID:6995482

  4. rmpM gene as a genetic marker for human bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Dash, S K; Sharma, M; Khare, S; Kumar, A

    2012-01-01

    Meningitis is a bacterial, viral or fungal infection of the protective membrane meninges covering the brain and spinal cord. Viral and other forms of meningitis are mild and get cured within one or two week without any treatment. Whereas, bacterial meningitis can prove lethal if not being diagnosed or treated in time. Meningitis is a contagious infection and can spread from one person to another through coughing, sneezing or close contact. Usually the disease is diagnosed from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the patients using culture, PCR, immunological and biochemical tests. All these methods suffer from one or more limitations. Our lab has developed a quick PCR based detection of Neisseria meningitidis (bacterial meningitis) directly from the patient CSF samples using specific primers of virulent rmpM gene. The overall analysis completes in 80 min for confirmation of the disease. Amplicon of 308 bp of rmpM gene does not show homology with other organisms and can be used as a genetic marker for human bacterial meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis. PMID:23273188

  5. Acute bacterial meningitis in adults: a hospital based study in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Abdulrab, Amin; Algobaty, Faker; Salem, Ahmed K; Mohammed, Y A K

    2010-03-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis is an important cause of mortality and morbidity with high rates of long-term neurological sequelae. To determine the clinical presentation, complications, and outcome of acute meningitis in Yemen, a retrospective study in patients 15 years or older with acute bacterial meningitis who were admitted into Al-Thawra Teaching Hospital in Sana'a from January 2006 to December 2007 was carried out. There were 121 patients with acute bacterial meningitis. Lumbar puncture was performed in 112 (92.6%). The most common pathogen was Streptococcus pneumoniae found in 47.4% of positive cultures, Neisseria meningitidis in 33.9%, and Haemophilus influenzae in 10.2%. The classical triad of acute bacterial meningitis was found in 65% of cases. The mortality rate was 22.3%, with 27 patients dying during hospitalization. S. pneumoniae had a case fatality rate of 35.7%. Frequent complications were impaired consciousness, recurrent convulsion, and chest infection, which occurred in 30.6, 16.5, and 10.7% of the patients, respectively. Risk factors for death among those with acute bacterial meningitis included older age (>or=45 years), altered mental status, chest infection, and S. pneumoniae infection. This study highlights the importance of bacterial meningitis as a serious disease of adults in Yemen and the need for effective methods to prevent its complications. PMID:20332577

  6. Frequency and Outcome of Meningitis in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Amna; Bano, Surriya; Haque, Anwar Ul; Arif, Khubaib

    2016-08-01

    Meningitis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide in intensive care settings. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and outcome in children with meningitis through a retrospective chart review done in pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital from January 2000 to December 2014. During these 14 years, 64 patients were admitted with meningitis in pediatric intensive care unit. Out of 64, 36 were diagnosed with pyogenic meningitis, 18 patients with viral meningitis, and 10 with tuberculous meningitis. Most complications were observed in the initial 48 hours. Most common presentation was altered level of consciouness in 50 (78.1%), seizure in 38 (59.4%), and shock in 23 (35.9%) patients. Ventilatory support was required in 30 (46.9%) patients and inotropic support in 26 (40.6%). During stay in pediatric intensive care unit, there was 7.8% mortality. Although meningitis was an infrequent cause of hospitalization at the study centre, but it was an important infectious cause of mortality and morbidity in pediatric age group and associated with high neurological sequelae. PMID:27539773

  7. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  8. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Lucy; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common and debilitating condition with high direct and indirect costs. AUB frequently co-exists with fibroids, but the relationship between the two remains incompletely understood and in many women the identification of fibroids may be incidental to a menstrual bleeding complaint. A structured approach for establishing the cause using the Fédération International de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) PALM-COEIN (Polyp, Adenomyosis, Leiomyoma, Malignancy (and hyperplasia), Coagulopathy, Ovulatory disorders, Endometrial, Iatrogenic and Not otherwise classified) classification system will facilitate accurate diagnosis and inform treatment options. Office hysteroscopy and increasing sophisticated imaging will assist provision of robust evidence for the underlying cause. Increased availability of medical options has expanded the choice for women and many will no longer need to recourse to potentially complicated surgery. Treatment must remain individualised and encompass the impact of pressure symptoms, desire for retention of fertility and contraceptive needs, as well as address the management of AUB in order to achieve improved quality of life. PMID:26803558

  9. Analysis of tuberculous meningitis cases by an immunoblotting assay based on a mycobacterial antigen complex.

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Y L; Van Antwerpen, M P; Shi, G Q; Chen, Q X; Sindic, C J; Cocito, C

    1994-01-01

    Tuberculous meningitis cases were analyzed by an immunoblotting test based on Mycobacterium bovis BCG antigen complex A60. Anti-A60 immunoglobulin G (IgG) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allowed early diagnosis, and concentrations decreased after recovery. In primary meningitis forms, anti-A60 IgGs were intrathecally synthesized and specific oligoclonal IgGs were present in CSF. In meningeal complications of pulmonary tuberculosis, there were matching titers of anti-A60 IgG in blood and CSF (mirror pattern). Correlation between CSF-restricted patterns and CSF pleocytosis was shown. Images PMID:7496976

  10. Eosinophilic meningitis: a case series and review of literature of Angiostrongylus cantonensis and Gnathostoma spinigerum.

    PubMed

    Shah, I; Barot, S; Madvariya, M

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic meningitis is defined as the presence of >10 eosinophils/μL in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or at least 10% eosinophils in the total CSF leukocyte count. Eosinophilic meningitis has been reported in two case series and two case reports in India till date and has not been reported in children below 15 years of age. We present two children with eosinophilic meningitis with peripheral eosinophilia and the proposed etiologic agents based on the clinical setting and their response to antihelminthic agents. PMID:25560024

  11. Quick diagnosis of human brain meningitis using omp85 gene amplicon as a genetic marker.

    PubMed

    Dash, Sandip K; Sharma, Minakshi; Khare, Shashi; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-06-01

    The usual diagnosis of life-threatening human brain bacterial meningitis are expensive, time consuming or non-confirmatory. A quick PCR based diagnosis of meningitis in cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) using specific primers of virulent Omp85 gene of Neisseria meningitidis can detect as low as 1.0 ng of genomic DNA (G-DNA) in 80 min for confirmation of bacterial meningitis caused by N. meningitidis infection. The 257 bp amplicon of Omp85 gene does not show homology with other suspected pathogens in CSF and can be used as a specific genetic marker for diagnosis of the disease. PMID:24426115

  12. Response to trabectedin treatment in a highly pretreated patient with an advanced meningeal hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Trufero, Javier; Alfaro, Jorge; Felipo, Francesc; Alvarez, Maria; Madani, Julia; Cebollero, Ana

    2010-09-01

    Meningeal hemangiopericytoma is an uncommon and aggressive malignancy that, in contrast to meningiomas, shows a high propensity for local recurrence and the development of late extraneural metastases. The results of chemotherapy in advanced hemangiopericytoma have been disappointing, and they have been particularly poor in cases located in the meninges. We report a case of a heavily pretreated metastatic meningeal hemangiopericytoma in which fourth-line chemotherapy with trabectedin, a marine-derived antineoplastic agent effective in treating advanced soft tissue sarcomas, resulted in clinical benefit. PMID:20622667

  13. Interleukin-17 mediated differences in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated tuberculous and cryptococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Marais, Suzaan; Meintjes, Graeme; Lesosky, Maia; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Wilkinson, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Cryptococcus neoformans are major causes of meningitis in HIV-1-infected patients. Identifying differences in the inflammatory profiles of HIV-1-associated tuberculous meningitis (TBM) and cryptococcal meningitis may inform differences in immunopathogenic mechanisms in these diseases. In this study we compared the clinical and inflammatory features of HIV-1-associated TBM, and cryptococcal meningitis. Methods: A prospective study of HIV-1-infected adults who presented with either TBM [antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive] or cryptococcal meningitis (regardless of ART prescription). Clinical and laboratory findings and concentrations of 40 inflammatory mediators measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, 33 paired with blood) were compared between TBM and cryptococcal meningitis patients regardless of ART prescription and between TBM and cryptococcal meningitis patients not receiving ART. Results: Clinical and laboratory findings were similar in TBM (n=34) and cryptococcal meningitis (n = 19; ART prescribed: n = 10, no ART prescribed: n = 9). Exceptions included a higher median CD4+ cell count [interquartile: 113 (69–199) vs. 25 (8–49) cells/μl, P = 0.0001] and higher HIV-1 median viral load [plasma: 5.46 (4.82–5.89) vs. 4.87 (4.36–5.17) log10copies/ml, P = 0.037; CSF: 6.05 (5.43–6.56) vs. 5.56 (4.52–5.80) log10copies/ml, P = 0.03] in TBM vs. cryptococcal meningitis patients not receiving ART. CSF interleukin (IL)-17A was lower in TBM compared with cryptococcal meningitis [1.00 (0.25–2.35) vs. 9.31 (1.24–23.36) pg/ml, P-adjusted = 0.03]. Conclusion: Despite presenting with higher peripheral CD4+ cell counts, TBM patients also presented with higher HIV-1 viral loads compared with cryptococcal meningitis patients, suggesting a greater propensity of M. tuberculosis compared with C. neoformans to increase HIV-1 replication in vivo. CSF IL-17A was lower in TBM; its role in the

  14. Expanding poliomyelitis and measles surveillance networks to establish surveillance for acute meningitis and encephalitis syndromes--Bangladesh, China, and India, 2006-2008.

    PubMed

    2012-12-14

    Quality surveillance is critical to the control and elimination of vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs). A key strategy for enhancing VPD surveillance, outlined in the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Framework for Immunization Monitoring and Surveillance (GFIMS), is to expand and link existing VPD surveillance systems (particularly those developed for polio eradication and measles elimination) to include other priority VPDs. Since the launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative in 1988, the incidence of polio has decrease by 99% worldwide. A cornerstone of this success is a sensitive surveillance system based on the rapid and timely reporting of all acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) cases in children aged <15 years, with confirmatory diagnostic testing performed by laboratories that are part of a global network. As countries achieve polio-free status, many have expanded syndromic surveillance to include persons with rash and fever, and have built measles diagnostic capacity in existing polio reference laboratories. Acute meningitis/encephalitis syndrome (AMES) and acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) are candidates for expanded surveillance because they are most often caused by VPDs of public health importance for which confirmatory laboratory tests exist. Vaccine-preventable cases of encephalitis include approximately 68,000 Japanese encephalitis (JE) cases, resulting in 13,000-20,000 deaths each year in Asia. Moreover, although bacterial meningitis incidence in Asia is not as well-documented, pneumococcal and meningococcal meningitis outbreaks have been reported in Bangladesh and China, and the incidence of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) meningitis in children aged <5 years in India has been estimated to be 7.1 per 100,000 population, similar to that in European countries before the introduction of vaccine. This report describes a prototype for expanding existing polio and measles surveillance networks in Bangladesh, China, and India to include

  15. Risk factors associated with postcraniotomy meningitis: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang-Hua; Chang, Chih-Yen; Lin, Li-Jhen; Chen, Wei Liang; Chang, Yu-Jun; Wang, Shu-Hui; Cheng, Chun-Yuan; Yen, Hua-Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Postcraniotomy meningitis (PCM) is a major challenge in neurosurgery, and changing patterns of infectious agents in PCM have been noted. The limited epidemiological data and urgent clinical needs motivated this research. We conducted this study to determine a risk assessment for PCM and the current pattern of infectious agents.We performed a retrospective case-control study of significant cases of postcraniotomy meningitis in the Changhua Christian Hospital System between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2012. Postcraniotomy meningitis was diagnosed in 22 out of 4392 surgical patients; this data was reviewed for risk assessment.This study assessed the risk factors for postcraniotomy meningitis and found that it was more frequently seen in patients who were elderly (OR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.32-2.98, P = 0.013), underwent emergency procedures (OR = 4.82, 95% CI = 1.50-14.53, P = 0.008), had leak of cerebrospinal fluid (OR = 4.62, 95% CI = 2.03-10.50, P = 0.012), had external ventricular drainage (OR = 4.68, 95% CI = 2.46-8.87, P = 0.006), were admitted to the intensive care unit (OR = 2.41, 95% CI = 1.53-8.08, P = 0.012), had used drain placement >72 hours (OR = 2.66, 95% CI = 1.04-4.29, P = 0.007), had surgery >4.5 hours (OR = 2.38, 95% CI = 1.39-4.05, P = 0.005), had repeat operations (OR = 2.74, 95% CI = 1.31-5.73, P = 0.018), endured trauma (OR = 5.97, 95% CI = 1.57-17.61, P = 0.007), or had 30-days mortality (OR = 5.07, 95% CI = 2.20-11.48, P = 0.001). The predominant pathogens isolated from cerebrospinal fluid were Staphylococcus aureus in 8 patients (36.7%) and Acinetobacter baumannii in 7 patients (31.8%). In our study, the mortality rate was 5.1% among all postcraniotomy patients.Accurate risk assessment, early diagnosis, and choice of appropriate antibiotics in accordance with epidemiologic information are the cornerstones of reducing

  16. Salmonella berta meningitis in a term neonate.

    PubMed

    Bowe, A C; Fischer, M; Waggoner-Fountain, L A; Heinan, K C; Goodkin, H P; Zanelli, S A

    2014-10-01

    We report the case of a 37-week male infant born via spontaneous vaginal delivery who developed Salmonella berta sepsis and meningitis. The infant was born to a mother with active diarrhea and stool cultures growing S. berta. On day 3, the infant developed poor feeding, lethargy, apnea and bradycardia prompting a sepsis evaluation. Blood, stool and cerebrospinal fluid cultures were positive for S. berta. An electroencephalogram performed for posturing revealed neonatal status epilepticus. Extensive bilateral periventricular venous hemorrhagic infarctions with multiple herniations were seen on brain magnetic resonance imaging. The infant's condition continued to deteriorate despite maximal support and care was redirected towards comfort measures. PMID:25263727

  17. Recurrent pneumococcal meningitis in a splenectomised HIV-infected patient

    PubMed Central

    Morand, Philippe C; Veuillez, Veronique; Poyart, Claire; Abachin, Eric; Quesne, Gilles; Dupont, Bertrand; Berche, Patrick; Viard, Jean-Paul

    2003-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of human disease, especially in pre-school children and elderly people, as well as in special risk groups such as asplenic, antibody deficient patients, or presenting disruption of natural barriers. The occurrence of pneumococcal disease has increased with the onset of the HIV epidemic and the emergence of drug-resistance. Case presentation We report the case of an HIV-1-infected patient who experienced three episodes of recurrent pneumococcal meningitis over a 4-year period, despite chemoprophylaxis and capsular vaccination. Conclusions Efficacy of anti-pneumococcal chemoprophylaxis and vaccination in HIV-infected patients are discussed in the light of this particular case. PMID:14613586

  18. Risk factors associated with postcraniotomy meningitis: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chang-Hua; Chang, Chih-Yen; Lin, Li-Jhen; Chen, Wei Liang; Chang, Yu-Jun; Wang, Shu-Hui; Cheng, Chun-Yuan; Yen, Hua-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Postcraniotomy meningitis (PCM) is a major challenge in neurosurgery, and changing patterns of infectious agents in PCM have been noted. The limited epidemiological data and urgent clinical needs motivated this research. We conducted this study to determine a risk assessment for PCM and the current pattern of infectious agents. We performed a retrospective case-control study of significant cases of postcraniotomy meningitis in the Changhua Christian Hospital System between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2012. Postcraniotomy meningitis was diagnosed in 22 out of 4392 surgical patients; this data was reviewed for risk assessment. This study assessed the risk factors for postcraniotomy meningitis and found that it was more frequently seen in patients who were elderly (OR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.32–2.98, P = 0.013), underwent emergency procedures (OR = 4.82, 95% CI = 1.50–14.53, P = 0.008), had leak of cerebrospinal fluid (OR = 4.62, 95% CI = 2.03–10.50, P = 0.012), had external ventricular drainage (OR = 4.68, 95% CI = 2.46–8.87, P = 0.006), were admitted to the intensive care unit (OR = 2.41, 95% CI = 1.53–8.08, P = 0.012), had used drain placement >72 hours (OR = 2.66, 95% CI = 1.04–4.29, P = 0.007), had surgery >4.5 hours (OR = 2.38, 95% CI = 1.39–4.05, P = 0.005), had repeat operations (OR = 2.74, 95% CI = 1.31–5.73, P = 0.018), endured trauma (OR = 5.97, 95% CI = 1.57–17.61, P = 0.007), or had 30-days mortality (OR = 5.07, 95% CI = 2.20–11.48, P = 0.001). The predominant pathogens isolated from cerebrospinal fluid were Staphylococcus aureus in 8 patients (36.7%) and Acinetobacter baumannii in 7 patients (31.8%). In our study, the mortality rate was 5.1% among all postcraniotomy patients. Accurate risk assessment, early diagnosis, and choice of appropriate antibiotics in accordance with epidemiologic information are

  19. Prolonged incubation period in neonatal Pasteurella multocida meningitis and bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Tamura, Takuya; Abe, Michiko; Ogiwara, Shigetoshi; Sai, Shuji; Kosugiyama, Kiyotaka; Sugihara, Akemi; Nagumo, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Seido; Kinugawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-12-01

    Pasteurella multocida, often found as part of the human oral flora and in finger/toenails, also exists in many animals, especially cats, dogs, and pigs. Although rare, pasteurella infection in neonates can cause serious systemic disease, such as meningitis. In this article, a 23-day-old girl presented with decreased appetite and irritability for >2 days. Eighteen days previously her pet cat had jumped onto the left side of her head while she was sleeping. On laboratory data C-reactive protein was high, and on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis leukocyte count was extremely high, with low glucose and high protein. P. multocida grew out of the blood and CSF cultures, and she was successfully treated with antibiotics for 3 weeks. Although pasteurellosis rarely occurs, it can sometimes lead to life-threatening situations, so parents should exercise caution when having pets around their children. PMID:25521988

  20. Neisseria sicca meningitis following intracranial hemorrhage and ventriculostomy tube placement.

    PubMed

    Carter, J Elliot; Mizell, Kelly N; Evans, Tara N

    2007-12-01

    A normal component of the flora of the oropharynx, Neisseria sicca was first isolated in 1906 and has since been reported as a rare cause of various human infections including endocarditis, pneumonia, sinusitis, sepsis, and urethritis. We report the case of a 44-year-old African-American female with a history of hypertension who presented with complaints of right frontal headache, nausea, photophobia, and vomiting. A computed tomography scan of the patient's brain showed a large subarachnoid hemorrhage, and an arteriogram confirmed a large posterior communicating artery aneurysm. A ventriculostomy tube was placed, and the patient subsequently developed an elevated temperature and elevated white blood cell count. Cerebrospinal fluid studies showed elevated protein and glucose levels and cultures positive for N. sicca. This is only the seventh reported case of culture-proven meningitis related to N. sicca, and the first reported case associated with intracranial hemorrhage and ventriculostomy tube placement. PMID:17904282

  1. Tuberculous Meningitis in Children and Adults: A 10-Year Retrospective Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leca, Daniela A.; Juganariu, Gabriela; Teodor, Andra; Hurmuzache, Mihnea; Nastase, Eduard V.; Anton-Paduraru, Dana T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is the most lethal form of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, which has a high rate of neurological complications and sequelae. Objectives Our study offers a real-world infectious disease clinic perspective, being thus representative for the clinical environment of developing countries. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the 127 adult and 77 pediatric cases diagnosed with TBM in the Infectious Disease Hospital of the School of Medicine of Iasi, Romania between 2004–2013. Results Definite diagnosis of TBM was established in 31% of children but in only 20% of adults (p = 0.043). A contact with an individual with pulmonary tuberculosis was documented in 30% of children vs. 13% of adults (p = 0.0007). Coma occurred in 19% of patients (similar in children and adults); other consciousness abnormalities were seen in 27% of children and in 72% of adults (p = 0.000001). Cranial nerve palsies occurred prior to therapy in 9% of cases (12% vs 7% of children and adults, respectively, p>0.05), and developed 2–7 days after treatment initiation in 10% (12 vs 9%). CSF cultures were positive for M. tuberculosis in 24% of patients (31% vs. 20%, p>0.05). Overall mortality was 7.35%, similar for children and adults. Yet, permanent neurological sequelae, which were seen in 23% of patients occurred significantly more frequent in children vs. adults (36% vs. 14%, respectively, p = 0.0121). In conclusion, our retrospective analysis on a significant number of cases of TBM identified striking differences between children and adults: while children were in an earlier stage at the admission, they associated a higher frequency of neurological sequelae and miliary pattern, and they were more likely to have normal CSF protein levels and positive cultures of CSF. PMID:26186004

  2. Suppurative meningitis: A life-threatening complication in male macroprolactinomas

    PubMed Central

    Chentli, Farida; Akkache, Lina; Daffeur, Katia; Haddad, Meriem; Azzoug, Said

    2013-01-01

    Background: Suppurative meningitis (SM) or bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening condition, which is exceptionally due to pituitary tumors (PT). Our aim was to analyze its frequency among male macroprolactinomas (MPRL) deemed to be aggressive, to report the cases we observed in our practice and describe the circumstances under which SM appeared. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 82 male MPRL in order to look for a history of well proved SM and the circumstances under which SM appeared. We also took into account the possibility of SM relapsing. Results: Four out of 82 male MPRL had SM = 4.87%. Three consulted for SM symptoms. SM was confirmed in Infectious Diseases department, but only one had rhinorrhea. Hormonal assessment and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging pleaded for aggressive prolactinomas. After antibiotics, SM was sterilized. Then, MPRL were treated with bromocriptine, which normalized prolactin and reduced PT. SM never relapsed. The 4th case was hospitalized for a large multidirectional prolactinoma invading and/or arising from the skull base. He was operated on 3 times and then he was given Bromocriptine. After 3 months, he had rhinorrhea and then SM which was successfully treated by antibiotics. SM never relapsed after tumor reduction. Conclusion: SM was demonstrated in 4.87%. SM has revealed MPRL in 3 cases and appeared after bromocriptine intake in the 4th one. Endocrinologists should be aware of this severe condition, which can be avoided by repairing as soon as possible the bony defect secondary to aggressive tumors, unless it is clogged by fibrosis: What probably happened in our cases. PMID:24251128

  3. Surgical Treatments for Infantile Purulent Meningitis Complicated by Subdural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianshu; Zhang, Xiaoru; Cao, Hongbin; Jing, Shiyuan; Yang, Zhiguo; Cheng, Zhenghai; Liu, Ye; Li, Xin; Gao, Feifei; Ji, Yuanqi

    2015-01-01

    Background Infantile purulent meningitis (PM) is a commonly severe intracranial infectious disease in infants under age 1 year. In recent years, several diagnostic and treatment methods were reported, but in these cases the neurological complications and sequel were often observed, among which subdural effusion (SE) is the most common complication in PM. Timely diagnosis and early intervention are vital for better outcomes. In this study, the surgical treatments for infantile PM complicated by SE were investigated. Material/Methods Patients who had PM complicated by SE in the Children’s Hospital of Hebei Province from June 2000 to June 2012 were retrospectively analyzed and 170 patients were enrolled in the study. Surgical treatment for each patient was adopted according to producing effusion time, leucocyte count, protein content, intracranial pressure, and bacteria culture, coupled with cranial ultrasound examination, CT, and MRI scans. Results Nearly, 15 patients were cured using serial taps, with a 50% cure rate. Seventeen out of 30 (56.6%) patients receiving subcutaneous reservoir drainage had better outcome. Nearly 80% of patients (55/69) who underwent minimally invasive trepanation and drainage were positive. Surgical procedure of minimally invasive trepanation and drainage combined with drug douche was effective in 63% of patients (19/30). In addition, 6 patients were cured with subdural-peritoneal shunt. Only 1 patient died, after the recurrence of meningitis, and the remaining 4 patients were cured by craniotomy. Conclusions For infantile PM complicated with SE, treatment needs be chosen according to the specific situation. Surgical procedure of minimally invasive trepanation and drainage is a very effective treatment in curing PM complicated by SE. The treatment was highly effective with the use of drug douche. Subdural-peritoneal shunt and craniotomy were as effective as in refractory cases. PMID:26482715

  4. Meningeal Solitary Fibrous Tumors with Delayed Extracranial Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Nayoung; Kim, Hannah; Min, Soo Kee; Paek, Sun-Ha; Park, Chul-Kee; Choi, Seung-Hong; Chae, U-Ri; Park, Sung-Hye

    2016-01-01

    Background: The term solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is preferred over meningeal hemangiopericytoma (HPC), because NAB2-STAT6 gene fusion has been observed in both intracranial and extracranial HPCs. HPCs are now considered cellular variants of SFTs. Methods: This study analyzes 19 patients with STAT6-confirmed SFTs, who were followed for over 11 years in a single institution. Ten patients (10/19, 56.2%) had extracranial metastases (metastatic group), while the remainder (9/19) did not (non-metastatic group). These two groups were compared clinicopathologically. Results: In the metastatic group, the primary metastatic sites were the lungs (n = 6), bone (n = 4), and liver (n = 3). There was a mean lag time of 14.2 years between the diagnosis of the initial meningeal tumor to that of systemic metastasis. The median age at initial tumor onset was 37.1 years in the metastatic group and 52.5 in the non-metastatic group. The 10-year survival rates of the metastatic- and non-metastatic groups were 100% and 33%, respectively. The significant prognostic factors for poor outcomes on univariate analysis included advanced age (≥45 years) and large initial tumor size (≥5 cm). In contrast, the patients with higher tumor grade, high mitotic rate (≥5/10 high-power fields), high Ki-67 index (≥5%), and the presence of necrosis or CD34 positivity showed tendency of poor prognosis but these parameters were not statistically significant poor prognostic markers. Conclusions: Among patients with SFTs, younger patients (<45 years) experienced longer survival times and paradoxically had more frequent extracranial metastases after long latent periods than did older patients. Therefore, young patients with SFTs require careful surveillance and follow-up for early detection of systemic metastases. PMID:26657311

  5. Electrocardiograph abnormalities revealed during laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Dubrey, Simon William

    2010-01-01

    This brief case presents a well patient in whom an electrocardiograph abnormality consistent with an accessory pathway was found during a routine procedure. We present the electrocardiographs, explain the underlying condition, and consider why the abnormality was revealed in this manner. PMID:22419949

  6. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  7. Haem degradation in abnormal haemoglobins.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S B; Docherty, J C

    1978-01-01

    The coupled oxidation of certain abnormal haemoglobins leads to different bile-pigment isomer distributions from that of normal haemoglobin. The isomer pattern may be correlated with the structure of the abnormal haemoglobin in the neighbourhood of the haem pocket. This is support for haem degradation by an intramolecular reaction. PMID:708385

  8. The 2012 Fungal Meningitis Outbreak in the United States: Connections Between Soils and Human Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Lynn; Brevik, Eric

    2013-04-01

    In September of 2012 the United States found itself facing a fungal meningitis outbreak that was traced back to contaminated steroid injections. The fungus Exserohilium rostratum, which is found in soil, among other locations in the environment, was identified as the main cause of the health issues created by the contaminated steroids. As of November 7, 2012 419 cases of fungal meningitis, stroke due to presumed fungal meningitis, or other central nervous system-related infections, 10 cases of peripheral joint infections, and 31 deaths linked to the contaminated steroids had been documented. However, the life cycle and soil ecology of E. rostratum is not well understood, and such knowledge would aid human health professionals in understanding the pathogenic potential of E. rostratum. Therefore, soil scientists have a role to play in developing the most effective ways to combat human health challenges such as the 2012 fungal meningitis outbreak.

  9. Hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke secondary to herpes simplex virus type 2 meningitis and vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Snider, Samuel B; Jacobs, Claire S; Scripko, Patricia S; Klein, Joshua P; Lyons, Jennifer L

    2014-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) meningitis dogmatically is benign and self-limited in the immune competent patient. However, we describe how left untreated HSV-2 meningitis can be complicated by vasculitis and both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. We report a 57-year-old woman with lymphocytic meningitis complicated by ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage in the setting of vasculopathy and HSV-2 DNA detected in CSF successfully treated with acyclovir and corticosteroids. Subsequent angiographic magnetic resonance imaging revealed improvement in the vasculopathy after treatment. This case demonstrates that HSV-2 meningitis may take a less benign course and further provides the first evidence of angiographic improvement in addition to clinical improvement after definitive treatment. PMID:24806272

  10. Use of Vaccines to Prevent Meningitis in Persons with Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccine=MPSV4 Meningococcal conjugate vaccine=MenACWY Use of Vaccines to Prevent Meningitis in Persons with Cochlear Implants ... References FACT SHEET What You Should Know Pneumococcal Vaccine Recommendations Pneumococcal Vaccination for Cochlear Implant Candidates and ...

  11. Methods of rapid diagnosis for the etiology of meningitis in adults

    PubMed Central

    Bahr, Nathan C; Boulware, David R

    2014-01-01

    Infectious meningitis may be due to bacterial, mycobacterial, fungal or viral agents. Diagnosis of meningitis must take into account numerous items of patient history and symptomatology along with regional epidemiology and basic cerebrospinal fluid testing (protein, etc.) to allow the clinician to stratify the likelihood of etiology possibilities and rationally select additional diagnostic tests. Culture is the mainstay for diagnosis in many cases, but technology is evolving to provide more rapid, reliable diagnosis. The cryptococcal antigen lateral flow assay (Immuno-Mycologics) has revolutionized diagnosis of cryptococcosis and automated nucleic acid amplification assays hold promise for improving diagnosis of bacterial and mycobacterial meningitis. This review will focus on a holistic approach to diagnosis of meningitis as well as recent technological advances. PMID:25402579

  12. Soil Dust Aerosols and Wind as Predictors of Seasonal Meningitis Incidence in Niger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez Garcia Pando, Carlos; Stanton, Michelle C.; Diggle, Peter J.; Trzaska, Sylwia; Miller, Ron L.; Perlwitz, Jan P.; Baldasano, Jose M.; Cuevas, Emilio; Ceccato, Pietro; Yaka, Pascal; Thomson, Madeleine C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epidemics of meningococcal meningitis are concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa during the dry season, a period when the region is affected by the Harmattan, a dry and dusty northeasterly trade wind blowing from the Sahara into the Gulf of Guinea.Objectives: We examined the potential of climate-based statistical forecasting models to predict seasonal incidence of meningitis in Niger at both the national and district levels.Data and methods: We used time series of meningitis incidence from 1986 through 2006 for 38 districts in Niger. We tested models based on data that would be readily available in an operational framework, such as climate and dust, population, and the incidence of early cases before the onset of the meningitis season in January-May. Incidence was used as a proxy for immunological state.

  13. Expect the Unexpected: A Case of Isolated Eosinophilic Meningitis in Toxocariasis

    PubMed Central

    Sick, Christian; Hennerici, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a young police officer suffering from headache without other neurological symptoms caused by isolated eosinophilic meningitis, which resulted from an infection with Toxocara cati, along with a discussion of the differential diagnosis. PMID:25535488

  14. Awareness of Meningococcal Disease among Travelers from the United Kingdom to the Meningitis Belt in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Anna L.; Masuet-Aumatell, Cristina; Halbert, Jay; Zuckerman, Jane N.

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal disease causes considerable morbidity and has a high case-fatality rate. In the United Kingdom, the meningococcal quadrivalent vaccine is recommended for travelers visiting the meningitis belt of Africa. We analyzed 302 responses to a cross-sectional study conducted in 2010 of travelers who had visited the meningitis belt recently or were shortly due to travel there. Using the results of an online questionnaire, we assessed knowledge and understanding of meningococcal disease and likelihood of uptake of meningococcal immunization before travel. Meningococcal vaccine uptake was 30.1%. Although global scores in the questionnaire did not correlate with vaccine uptake, knowledge of the meningitis belt and knowledge of certain key symptoms or signs were statistically associated with high vaccine uptake. We conclude that improved education of travelers may improve vaccine uptake before travel to the meningitis belt in Africa. PMID:24891461

  15. Detection of single bacteria - causative agents of meningitis using raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikova, T. V.; Minaeva, S. A.; Sundukov, A. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Bagratashvili, V. N.; Alushin, M. V.; Gonchukov, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnostics of meningitis is a very topical problem as it is a fulminant disease with a high level of mortality. The progress of this disease is, as a rule, accompanied by the appearance of bacteria in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition. The examination of the CSF is well known to be the only reliable approach to the identification of meningitis. However, the traditional biochemical analyses are time consuming and not always reliable, simple, and inexpensive, whereas the optical methods are poorly developed. This work is devoted to the study of Raman spectra of several bacterial cultures which are mainly present during meningitis. Raman microscopy is a prompt and noninvasive technique capable of providing reliable information about molecular-level alterations of biological objects at their minimal quantity and size. It was shown that there are characteristic lines in Raman spectra which can be the reliable markers for determination of bacterial form of meningitis at a level of a single bacterium.

  16. Etiologies and Management of Aseptic Meningitis in Patients Admitted to an Internal Medicine Department

    PubMed Central

    Jarrin, Irène; Sellier, Pierre; Lopes, Amanda; Morgand, Marjolaine; Makovec, Tamara; Delcey, Veronique; Champion, Karine; Simoneau, Guy; Green, Andrew; Mouly, Stéphane; Bergmann, Jean-François; Lloret-Linares, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have focused on the clinical and biological characteristics of meningitis in order to distinguish between bacterial and viral meningitis in the emergency setting. However, little is known about the etiologies and outcomes of aseptic meningitis in patients admitted to Internal Medicine. The aim of the study is to describe the etiologies, characteristics, and outcomes of aseptic meningitis with or without encephalitis in adults admitted to an Internal Medicine Department. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the Internal Medicine Department of the Lariboisière Hospital in Paris, France, from January 2009 to December 2011. Clinical and biological characteristics of aseptic meningitis were recorded. These included cerebrospinal fluid analysis, results of polymerase chain reaction testing, final diagnoses, and therapeutic management. The cohort included 180 patients fulfilling the criteria for aseptic meningitis with (n = 56) or without (n = 124) encephalitis. A definitive etiological diagnosis was established in 83 of the 180 cases. Of the cases with a definitive diagnosis, 73 were due to infectious agents, mainly enteroviruses, Herpes Simplex Virus 2, and Varicella Zoster Virus (43.4%, 16.8%, and 14.5% respectively). Inflammatory diseases were diagnosed in 7 cases. Among the 97 cases without definitive diagnoses, 26 (26.8%) remained free of treatment throughout their management whereas antiviral or antibiotic therapy was initiated in the emergency department for the remaining 71 patients. The treatment was discontinued in only 10 patients deemed to have viral meningitis upon admission to Internal Medicine. The prevalence of inflammatory diseases among patients admitted to internal medicine for aseptic meningitis is not rare (4% of overall aseptic meningitis). The PCR upon admission to the emergency department is obviously of major importance for the prompt optimization of therapy and management. However, meningitis due to

  17. HSV-1 as a novel therapy for breast cancer meningeal metastases.

    PubMed

    Kuruppu, D; Tanabe, K K

    2015-10-01

    Meningeal metastasis is a fatal complication of breast cancer that affects 5-8% of patients. When cancer cells seed in the meninges, their subsequent growth results in severe neurological complications involving the cranial nerves, cerebrum and spinal cord, limiting life expectancy to less than 4 months. The incidences of meningeal metastases increase with prolonged lifespan resulting from treatment advances for primary breast cancer and their metastases. Currently, there is no cure. Aggressive multimodal therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy (intra-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and systemic) are ineffective. Therapeutic agents are often quickly cleared from the CSF, while higher doses that can achieve a therapeutic response are highly toxic. The secure guarding of the subarachnoid space by the blood-brain barrier on one side and the blood-CSF barrier on the other prevents chemotherapy from reaching cancer cells in the meninges. These challenges with treating meningeal metastases highlight the urgent need for a new therapeutic modality. An ideal treatment would be an agent that avoids rapid clearance, remains within the CSF, reaches the meninges and selectively destroys tumor cells. Replication conditional oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) may be effective in this regard. Viral oncolysis, the destruction of cancer cells by replicating virus, is under clinical investigation for cancers that are unresponsive to current therapies. It is based on the model of multiple cycles of lytic virus replication in cancer cells that amplify the injected dose. The therapeutic potential of oncolytic HSV-1 for breast cancer meningeal metastases is discussed here. HSV-1 could be a potential novel treatment for meningeal metastases that can be translated to the clinic. PMID:26384139

  18. A rare presentation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis associated with tubercular meningitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Lalla, Rakesh; Patil, Tushar B; Tiwari, Navin

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis may manifest as meningitis, meningoencephalitis, tuberculoma, tubercular abscess, stroke due to tuberculous vasculitis and tuberculous encephalopathy. Occasionally, tubercular meningitis (TBM) can predispose to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). We report a young man, who developed CVST as a complication of TBM. Worsening of pre-existing headache, impairment of consciousness and seizures should raise suspicion of CVST in any patient with CNS infection. Early diagnosis and appropriate clinical management are important for good outcome. PMID:23917359

  19. The relationship between prior antimicrobial prescription and meningitis: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, David; Ashworth, Mark; Dregan, Alex; White, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent research into the role of the human microbiome in maintaining health has identified the potentially harmful impact of antimicrobials. Aim The association with bacterial and viral meningitis following antimicrobial prescription during the previous year was investigated to determine whether antimicrobials have a deleterious effect on the nasopharyngeal microbiome. Design and setting A case-control study (1:4 cases to controls) was conducted examining the rate of previous antimicrobial exposure in cases of meningitis and in a matched control group. Data from a UK primary care clinical database were analysed using conditional logistic regression. Results A total of 7346 cases of meningitis were identified, 3307 (45%) viral, 1812 (25%) bacterial, and 2227 (30%) unspecified. The risks of viral (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.45; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.24 to 2.68) or bacterial (AOR 1.98; 95% CI = 1.71 to 2.30) meningitis were both increased following antimicrobial prescription in the preceding year. Patients who received ≥4 antimicrobial prescriptions in the preceding year were at significantly increased risk of all types of meningitis (AOR 2.85; 95% CI = 2.44 to 3.34), bacterial meningitis (AOR 3.06; 95% CI = 2.26 to 4.15) and viral meningitis (AOR 3.23; 95% CI = 2.55 to 4.08) compared to their matched controls. Conclusion There was an increased risk of meningitis following antimicrobial prescription in the previous year. It is possible that this increase was due to an effect of antimicrobials on the microbiome or reflected an increased general susceptibility to infections in these patients. PMID:26965030

  20. A rare presentation of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis associated with tubercular meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Lalla, Rakesh; Patil, Tushar B; Tiwari, Navin

    2013-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis may manifest as meningitis, meningoencephalitis, tuberculoma, tubercular abscess, stroke due to tuberculous vasculitis and tuberculous encephalopathy. Occasionally, tubercular meningitis (TBM) can predispose to cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST). We report a young man, who developed CVST as a complication of TBM. Worsening of pre-existing headache, impairment of consciousness and seizures should raise suspicion of CVST in any patient with CNS infection. Early diagnosis and appropriate clinical management are important for good outcome. PMID:23917359

  1. Rhodotorula mucilaginosa associacted meningitis: A subacute entity with high mortality. Case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Tsiodras, Sotirios; Papageorgiou, Sotirios; Meletiadis, Joseph; Tofas, Polydoros; Pappa, Vasiliki; Panayiotides, John; Karakitsos, Petros; Armaganidis, Apostolos; Petrikkos, George

    2014-01-01

    A fatal case of meningitis due to Rhodotorula mucilaginosa in a 28 year-old HIV-negative male with a history of Hodgkin lymphoma who underwent salvage chemotherapy is presented. Reviewing the literature we identified 13 cases with central nervous system infection due Rhodotorula spp. The disease usually occurs in HIV negative immunosupressed middle-aged males. It takes the form of subacute or chronic meningitis accompanied by fever with an overall mortality of 46.2% despite antifungal therapy. PMID:25379400

  2. Adjunctive N-acetyl-L-cysteine in treatment of murine pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Högen, Tobias; Demel, Cornelia; Giese, Armin; Angele, Barbara; Pfister, Hans-Walter; Koedel, Uwe; Klein, Matthias

    2013-10-01

    Despite antibiotic therapy, acute and long-term complications are still frequent in pneumococcal meningitis. One important trigger of these complications is oxidative stress, and adjunctive antioxidant treatment with N-acetyl-l-cysteine was suggested to be protective in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. However, studies of effects on neurological long-term sequelae are limited. Here, we investigated the impact of adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine on long-term neurological deficits in a mouse model of meningitis. C57BL/6 mice were intracisternally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Eighteen hours after infection, mice were treated with a combination of ceftriaxone and placebo or ceftriaxone and N-acetyl-l-cysteine, respectively. Two weeks after infection, neurologic deficits were assessed using a clinical score, an open field test (explorative activity), a t-maze test (memory function), and auditory brain stem responses (hearing loss). Furthermore, cochlear histomorphological correlates of hearing loss were assessed. Adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine reduced hearing loss after pneumococcal meningitis, but the effect was minor. There was no significant benefit of adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine treatment in regard to other long-term complications of pneumococcal meningitis. Cochlear morphological correlates of meningitis-associated hearing loss were not reduced by adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine. In conclusion, adjunctive therapy with N-acetyl-l-cysteine at a dosage of 300 mg/kg of body weight intraperitoneally for 4 days reduced hearing loss but not other neurologic deficits after pneumococcal meningitis in mice. These results make a clinical therapeutic benefit of N-acetyl-l-cysteine in the treatment of patients with pneumococcal meningitis questionable. PMID:23877681

  3. Successful treatment of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia meningitis in a preterm baby boy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an important cause of hospital acquired infection particularly among severely debilitated and immunosuppressed patients. Case presentation We report a case of S. maltophilia meningitis in a preterm baby boy after a neurosurgical procedure, successfully treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin. Conclusion This organism should be considered as a potential cause of meningitis and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin are a combination that is successful and safe for treating preterm infants. PMID:19830198

  4. A role for neuropilins in the interaction between Schwann cells and meningeal cells.

    PubMed

    Roet, Kasper C D; Wirz, Kerstin T S; Franssen, Elske H P; Verhaagen, Joost

    2014-01-01

    In their natural habitat, the peripheral nerve, Schwann cells (SCs) form nicely aligned pathways (also known as the bands of Büngner) that guide regenerating axons to their targets. Schwann cells that are implanted in the lesioned spinal cord fail to align in pathways that could support axon growth but form cellular clusters that exhibit only limited intermingling with the astrocytes and meningeal cells (MCs) that are present in the neural scar. The formation of cell clusters can be studied in co-cultures of SCs and MCs. In these co-cultures SCs form cluster-like non-overlapping cell aggregates with well-defined boundaries. There are several indications that neuropilins (NRPs) play an important role in MC-induced SC aggregation. Both SCs and MCs express NRP1 and NRP2 and SCs express the NRP ligands Sema3B, C and E while MCs express Sema3A, C, E and F. We now demonstrate that in SC-MC co-cultures, siRNA mediated knockdown of NRP2 in SCs decreased the formation of SC clusters while these SCs maintained their capacity to align in bands of Büngner-like columnar arrays. Unexpectedly, knockdown of NRP1 expression resulted in a significant increase in SC aggregation. These results suggest that a reduction in NRP2 expression may enhance the capacity of implanted SCs to interact with MCs that invade a neural scar formed after a lesion of the spinal cord. PMID:25314276

  5. A structure-activity relationship for induction of meningeal inflammation by muramyl peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, M; Rozdzinski, E; Geelen, S; Tuomanen, E

    1993-01-01

    Components of bacterial peptidoglycans have potent biological activities, including adjuvant effects, cytotoxicity, and induction of sleep. Mixtures of peptidoglycan components also induce inflammation in the lung, subarachnoid space, and joint, but the structural requirements for activity are unknown. Using a rabbit model for meningitis, we determined the biological activities of 14 individual muramyl peptides constituting > 90% of the peptidoglycan of the gram-negative pediatric pathogen Haemophilus influenzae. Upon intracisternal inoculation, most of the muropeptides induced leukocytosis in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), influx of protein into CSF, or brain edema, alone or in combination. The disaccharide-tetrapeptide, the major component of all gram-negative peptidoglycans, induced CSF leukocytosis and protein influx at doses as low as 0.4 microgram (0.42 nM). Modification of the N-acetyl muramic acid or substitution of the alanine at position four in the peptide side chain decreased leukocytosis but enhanced brain edema. As the size of the muropeptide increased, the inflammatory activity decreased. Muropeptide carrying the diaminopimelyl-diaminopimelic acid cross-link specifically induced cytotoxic brain edema. These findings significantly expand the spectrum of biological activities of natural muramyl peptides and provide the basis for a structure-activity relationship for the inflammatory properties of bacterial muropeptides. PMID:8325996

  6. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  7. Persistent Strongyloidiasis Complicated by Recurrent Meningitis in an HTLV Seropositive Peruvian Migrant Resettled in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Montagnani, Francesca; Tordini, Giacinta; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Bisoffi, Zeno; Bartoloni, Alessandro; De Luca, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of persistent strongyloidiasis complicated by recurrent meningitis, in a human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) seropositive Peruvian migrant adult resettled in Italy. He was admitted with signs and symptoms of acute bacterial meningitis, reporting four other meningitis episodes in the past 6 years, with an etiological diagnosis of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium in two cases. He had been previously treated with several antihelmintic regimens not including ivermectin, without eradication of strongyloidiasis, and he had never been tested for HTLV before. During the described episode, the patient was treated for meningitis with broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and 200 μg/kg/dose oral ivermectin once daily on day 1, 2, 15 and 16 with full recovery and no further episodes of meningitis. The presented case underlines several critical points concerning the management of poorly known neglected diseases such as strongyloidiasis and HTLV infection in low-endemic areas. Despite several admissions for meningitis and strongyloidiasis, the parasitic infection was not adequately treated and the patient was not previously tested for HTLV. The supply of ivermectin and the choice of treatment scheme was challenging since ivermectin is not approved in Italy and there are no standardized guidelines for the treatment of severe strongyloidiasis in HTLV seropositive subjects. PMID:25846292

  8. A Rare Complication of Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole: Drug Induced Aseptic Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Stromich, Jeremiah; Cohen, Mallory; Wainaina, Jane Njeri

    2016-01-01

    Drug induced aseptic meningitis is a rare but challenging diagnosis, most commonly reported with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is a sulfonamide that is widely used in clinical practice for the treatment and prophylaxis of various infections. Drug induced aseptic meningitis, when seen with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, occurs predominantly in patients with some degree of immune compromise and is less commonly seen in immune competent individuals. The patient often exhibits the classic symptoms of meningitis. Early diagnosis is important, since the cessation of the antibiotic leads to rapid clinical improvement. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole induced aseptic meningitis has been underreported to FDA/MED-WATCH program. Here we report two cases of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole: an immune competent individual and immune compromised individual, both of which presented with signs of meningitis and a negative infectious workup. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is an uncommon and mysterious adverse reaction to a commonly used antibiotic. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with acute signs and symptoms of meningitis especially after infectious causes have been ruled out. PMID:27579194

  9. [Meningitis and encephalitis in the years 1983-1990. Clinical observations].

    PubMed

    Kepa, L; Wilczek, K; Karasińska, M

    1991-01-01

    From 1983 to 1990, at the I Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Silesian Academy of Medicine in Bytom, 995 patients with meningitis and encephalitis were treated; the average age was 17.86 years. After cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examinations the patients were divided into groups. The first group consisted of patients with suppurative meningitis and encephalitis (202-20.30%), the other group were patients with aseptic meningitis (309-31.06%), a separate group consisted of patients with mumps meningitis (484-48.06% cases). In the group with suppurative meningitis and encephalitis etiological agents were isolated (Gram stain smear and/or culture of CSF) in 50.99% of cases. The most common causes of suppurative neuroinfections were: Neisseria meningitides and Streptococcus pneumoniae (in 23.76% cases). The increasing number of bacteriological tests positive results was observed during the analyzed period. The etiology of aseptic inflammation diseases of the central nervous system was defined with the help of serologic blood tests in 10-15%, and serologic confirmation of mumps meningitis was as high as 80% of cases. In the group of purulent neuroinfections, during the 8-year observation, 36 deaths occurred (17.82% of these patients). The observed tendency of the death rate decrease is concerned to be a result of better microbiological diagnostics and the possibility of an early aimed antibiotic therapy. PMID:1819814

  10. A Rare Complication of Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole: Drug Induced Aseptic Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pinky; Stromich, Jeremiah; Cohen, Mallory; Wainaina, Jane Njeri

    2016-01-01

    Drug induced aseptic meningitis is a rare but challenging diagnosis, most commonly reported with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is a sulfonamide that is widely used in clinical practice for the treatment and prophylaxis of various infections. Drug induced aseptic meningitis, when seen with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, occurs predominantly in patients with some degree of immune compromise and is less commonly seen in immune competent individuals. The patient often exhibits the classic symptoms of meningitis. Early diagnosis is important, since the cessation of the antibiotic leads to rapid clinical improvement. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole induced aseptic meningitis has been underreported to FDA/MED-WATCH program. Here we report two cases of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole: an immune competent individual and immune compromised individual, both of which presented with signs of meningitis and a negative infectious workup. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is an uncommon and mysterious adverse reaction to a commonly used antibiotic. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with acute signs and symptoms of meningitis especially after infectious causes have been ruled out. PMID:27579194

  11. Cryptococcal meningitis: improving access to essential antifungal medicines in resource-poor countries.

    PubMed

    Loyse, Angela; Thangaraj, Harry; Easterbrook, Philippa; Ford, Nathan; Roy, Monika; Chiller, Tom; Govender, Nelesh; Harrison, Thomas S; Bicanic, Tihana

    2013-07-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is the leading cause of adult meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa, and contributes up to 20% of AIDS-related mortality in low-income and middle-income countries every year. Antifungal treatment for cryptococcal meningitis relies on three old, off-patent antifungal drugs: amphotericin B deoxycholate, flucytosine, and fluconazole. Widely accepted treatment guidelines recommend amphotericin B and flucytosine as first-line induction treatment for cryptococcal meningitis. However, flucytosine is unavailable in Africa and most of Asia, and safe amphotericin B administration requires patient hospitalisation and careful laboratory monitoring to identify and treat common side-effects. Therefore, fluconazole monotherapy is widely used in low-income and middle-income countries for induction therapy, but treatment is associated with significantly increased rates of mortality. We review the antifungal drugs used to treat cryptococcal meningitis with respect to clinical effectiveness and access issues specific to low-income and middle-income countries. Each drug poses unique access challenges: amphotericin B through cost, toxic effects, and insufficiently coordinated distribution; flucytosine through cost and scarcity of registration; and fluconazole through challenges in maintenance of local stocks--eg, sustainability of donations or insufficient generic supplies. We advocate ten steps that need to be taken to improve access to safe and effective antifungal therapy for cryptococcal meningitis. PMID:23735626

  12. Persistent strongyloidiasis complicated by recurrent meningitis in an HTLV seropositive Peruvian migrant resettled in Italy.

    PubMed

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Montagnani, Francesca; Tordini, Giacinta; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Bisoffi, Zeno; Bartoloni, Alessandro; De Luca, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    We describe a case of persistent strongyloidiasis complicated by recurrent meningitis, in a human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) seropositive Peruvian migrant adult resettled in Italy. He was admitted with signs and symptoms of acute bacterial meningitis, reporting four other meningitis episodes in the past 6 years, with an etiological diagnosis of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium in two cases. He had been previously treated with several antihelmintic regimens not including ivermectin, without eradication of strongyloidiasis, and he had never been tested for HTLV before. During the described episode, the patient was treated for meningitis with broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and 200 μg/kg/dose oral ivermectin once daily on day 1, 2, 15 and 16 with full recovery and no further episodes of meningitis. The presented case underlines several critical points concerning the management of poorly known neglected diseases such as strongyloidiasis and HTLV infection in low-endemic areas. Despite several admissions for meningitis and strongyloidiasis, the parasitic infection was not adequately treated and the patient was not previously tested for HTLV. The supply of ivermectin and the choice of treatment scheme was challenging since ivermectin is not approved in Italy and there are no standardized guidelines for the treatment of severe strongyloidiasis in HTLV seropositive subjects. PMID:25846292

  13. Liposomal cytarabine (DepoCyte) for the treatment of neoplastic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Rueda Domínguez, Antonio; Olmos Hidalgo, David; Viciana Garrido, Ruth; Torres Sánchez, Esperanza

    2005-07-01

    Neoplastic meningitis is a feared complication in cancer patients, the median survival ranging from some weeks to a few months. Management is palliative and aims to provide symptoms relief while delaying neurological deterioration. Intrathecal methotrexate and/or cytarabine is the most widely used treatment in such clinical situations. These drugs are administered 2 or 3 times a week--a circumstance that is both bothersome for the patient and time-costly for the medical personnel. Liposomal cytarabine is a sustained-release cytarabine formulation specifically developed for the treatment of neoplastic meningitis. Its administration on a twice-weekly basis ensures sustained cytotoxic drug concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid. Controlled clinical trials have shown liposomal cytarabine to be equally or more effective than the classical treatment for neoplastic meningitis. In lymphomatous meningitis, liposomal cytarabine offers superior response rates, improved patient quality of life, and a prolongation of the time to neurological progression. When the cause of meningitis is a solid tumor, liposomal cytarabine prolongs the time to neurological progression and improves quality of life. These observations indicate that DepoCyte is a convenient treatment for patients with neoplastic meningitis, due to its efficacy and easy of administration characteristics. PMID:16131445

  14. Haematological abnormalities in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the kind of haematological abnormalities that are present in patients with mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and the frequency of their occurrence. METHODS The blood cell counts of a cohort of patients with syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs were retrospectively reviewed. MIDs were classified as ‘definite’, ‘probable’ or ‘possible’ according to clinical presentation, instrumental findings, immunohistological findings on muscle biopsy, biochemical abnormalities of the respiratory chain and/or the results of genetic studies. Patients who had medical conditions other than MID that account for the haematological abnormalities were excluded. RESULTS A total of 46 patients (‘definite’ = 5; ‘probable’ = 9; ‘possible’ = 32) had haematological abnormalities attributable to MIDs. The most frequent haematological abnormality in patients with MIDs was anaemia. 27 patients had anaemia as their sole haematological problem. Anaemia was associated with thrombopenia (n = 4), thrombocytosis (n = 2), leucopenia (n = 2), and eosinophilia (n = 1). Anaemia was hypochromic and normocytic in 27 patients, hypochromic and microcytic in six patients, hyperchromic and macrocytic in two patients, and normochromic and microcytic in one patient. Among the 46 patients with a mitochondrial haematological abnormality, 78.3% had anaemia, 13.0% had thrombopenia, 8.7% had leucopenia and 8.7% had eosinophilia, alone or in combination with other haematological abnormalities. CONCLUSION MID should be considered if a patient’s abnormal blood cell counts (particularly those associated with anaemia, thrombopenia, leucopenia or eosinophilia) cannot be explained by established causes. Abnormal blood cell counts may be the sole manifestation of MID or a collateral feature of a multisystem problem. PMID:26243978

  15. [Simultaneous association of tubercular meningitis and cryptococcal meningitis in an African with human immunodeficiency virus HIV positive serology. University Hospital Center of Bujumbura,Burundi].

    PubMed

    Niyongabo, T; Aubry, P

    1992-01-01

    The authors report a connection between a meningitis tuberculosis and a meningoencephalitis with cryptococcus in the case of an african VIH+. The diagnostic of a meningitis tuberculosis was retained on an indirect arguments, this of meningoencephalitis of direct arguments (antigen cryptococcus, cultivation on Sabouraud environment). The pulmonary tuberculosis and/or extrapulmonary tuberculosis is current in Central Africa during HIV infection, as well as the crytococcosis during AIDS. But, any observation on neuromeningitis strike of those two infections have been reported up to now. PMID:1406216

  16. Leukocyte Attraction by CCL20 and Its Receptor CCR6 in Humans and Mice with Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Angele, Barbara; Geldhoff, Madelijn; Marquez, Gabriel; Varona, Rosa; Häcker, Georg; Schmetzer, Helga; Häcker, Hans; Hammerschmidt, Sven; van der Ende, Arie; Pfister, Hans-Walter

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified CCL20 as an early chemokine in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with pneumococcal meningitis but its functional relevance was unknown. Here we studied the role of CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 in pneumococcal meningitis. In a prospective nationwide study, CCL20 levels were significantly elevated in the CSF of patients with pneumococcal meningitis and correlated with CSF leukocyte counts. CCR6-deficient mice with pneumococcal meningitis and WT mice with pneumococcal meningitis treated with anti-CCL20 antibodies both had reduced CSF white blood cell counts. The reduction in CSF pleocytosis was also accompanied by an increase in brain bacterial titers. Additional in vitro experiments showed direct chemoattractant activity of CCL20 for granulocytes. In summary, our results identify the CCL20-CCR6 axis as an essential component of the innate immune defense against pneumococcal meningitis, controlling granulocyte recruitment. PMID:24699535

  17. Usefulness of inflammatory biomarkers in discriminating between bacterial and aseptic meningitis in hospitalized children from a population with low vaccination coverage

    PubMed Central

    Wysocki, Jacek; Avonts, Dirk; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta; Michalak, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the most frequent pathogens responsible for meningitis beyond the neonatal period. Aseptic meningitis is a disabling condition, but bacterial meningitis if left untreated is 100% fatal. The aim of the study was to analyze the usefulness of biochemical and hematological parameters in distinguishing between bacterial and non-bacterial meningitis in children with meningitis from a population with low rates of vaccination against S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis. Material and methods This study is a retrospective chart review of children hospitalized with meningitis. In patients with aseptic and bacterial meningitis the following parameters were compared: C-reactive protein, D-dimers, fibrinogen, glucose level, and leukocyte level, and in cerebrospinal fluid, protein, glucose, and leukocyte concentrations were analyzed. Number of points in the Bacterial Meningitis Score (BMS) was calculated. The predictive value of each parameter to distinguish between bacterial and aseptic meningitis was evaluated. Results In total, 129 patients were included in the study: 65 diagnosed with bacterial meningitis and 64 with aseptic meningitis. Bacterial and aseptic meningitis were statistically significantly different based on each analyzed parameter (p < 0.000001). Among children with aseptic meningitis 42 (66%) scored 0 points in the BMS, while all the children with bacterial meningitis had at least one point. Conclusions In children with meningitis inflammatory biomarkers differ statistically significantly depending on the etiology – bacterial or aseptic. Serum concentration of C-reactive protein higher than 80 mg/dl is a useful marker of bacterial etiology of meningitis. A high Bacterial Meningitis Score is indicative for bacterial meningitis. PMID:27186188

  18. Expansion of syndromic vaccine preventable disease surveillance to include bacterial meningitis and Japanese encephalitis: Evaluation of adapting polio and measles laboratory networks in Bangladesh, China and India, 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Cavallaro, Kathleen F.; Sandhu, Hardeep S.; Hyde, Terri B.; Johnson, Barbara W.; Fischer, Marc; Mayer, Leonard W.; Clark, Thomas A.; Pallansch, Mark A.; Yin, Zundong; Zuo, Shuyan; Hadler, Stephen C.; Diorditsa, Serguey; Hasan, A.S.M. Mainul; Bose, Anindya S.; Dietz, Vance

    2016-01-01

    Background Surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis with laboratory confirmation has been a key strategy in the global polio eradication initiative, and the laboratory platform established for polio testing has been expanded in many countries to include surveillance for cases of febrile rash illness to identify measles and rubella cases. Vaccine-preventable disease surveillance is essential to detect outbreaks, define disease burden, guide vaccination strategies and assess immunization impact. Vaccines now exist to prevent Japanese encephalitis (JE) and some etiologies of bacterial meningitis. Methods We evaluated the feasibility of expanding polio–measles surveillance and laboratory networks to detect bacterial meningitis and JE, using surveillance for acute meningitis-encephalitis syndrome in Bangladesh and China and acute encephalitis syndrome in India. We developed nine syndromic surveillance performance indicators based on international surveillance guidelines and calculated scores using supervisory visit reports, annual reports, and case-based surveillance data. Results Scores, variable by country and targeted disease, were highest for the presence of national guidelines, sustainability, training, availability of JE laboratory resources, and effectiveness of using polio–measles networks for JE surveillance. Scores for effectiveness of building on polio–measles networks for bacterial meningitis surveillance and specimen referral were the lowest, because of differences in specimens and techniques. Conclusions Polio–measles surveillance and laboratory networks provided useful infrastructure for establishing syndromic surveillance and building capacity for JE diagnosis, but were less applicable for bacterial meningitis. Laboratory-supported surveillance for vaccine-preventable bacterial diseases will require substantial technical and financial support to enhance local diagnostic capacity. PMID:25597940

  19. Diagnostic performance of a multiplex PCR assay for meningitis in an HIV-infected population in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Rhein, Joshua; Bahr, Nathan C; Hemmert, Andrew C; Cloud, Joann L; Bellamkonda, Satya; Oswald, Cody; Lo, Eric; Nabeta, Henry; Kiggundu, Reuben; Akampurira, Andrew; Musubire, Abdu; Williams, Darlisha A; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2016-03-01

    Meningitis remains a worldwide problem, and rapid diagnosis is essential to optimize survival. We evaluated the utility of a multiplex PCR test in differentiating possible etiologies of meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 69 HIV-infected Ugandan adults with meningitis was collected at diagnosis (n=51) and among persons with cryptococcal meningitis during therapeutic lumbar punctures (n=68). Cryopreserved CSF specimens were analyzed with BioFire FilmArray® Meningitis/Encephalitis panel, which targets 17 pathogens. The panel detected Cryptococcus in the CSF of patients diagnosed with a first episode of cryptococcal meningitis by fungal culture with 100% sensitivity and specificity and differentiated between fungal relapse and paradoxical immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in recurrent episodes. A negative FilmArray result was predictive of CSF sterility on follow-up lumbar punctures for cryptococcal meningitis. EBV was frequently detected in this immunosuppressed population (n=45). Other pathogens detected included: cytomegalovirus (n=2), varicella zoster virus (n=2), human herpes virus 6 (n=1), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=1). The FilmArray Meningitis/Encephalitis panel offers a promising platform for rapid meningitis diagnosis. PMID:26711635

  20. Accuracy of universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of bacterial meningitis among suspected patients

    PubMed Central

    Moayedi, Ali Reza; Nejatizadeh, Abdolazim; Mohammadian, Maryam; Rahmati, Mohammad Bagher; Namardizadeh, Vahideh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Central nervous system (CNS) infections are life-threatening diseases caused by viral, bacterial, parasitic and fungal microorganisms. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of bacterial meningitis among patients who were referred to Koodakan Hospital in Bandar Abbas because they were suspected of having the disease. Methods This study was conducted in 2013 on the patients who were admitted to Bandar Abbas’ Koodakan Hospital because they were suspected of having meningitis. A questionnaire, including demographic data, was completed for each patient. Universal PCR, Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, and gram staining and cultures were done for all the patients. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results Among the 100 patients studied 59 (59%) were male and 41 (41%) were female. No patient in our study had a positive smear and culture for meningitis. Among the patients with negative smears and cultures six (6%) had positive universal PCR, and 94 (94%) had negative universal PCR. Based on these results, PCR had 95% specificity and 100% negative predictive value for the prediction of meningitis. In 30 patients (30%), the biochemical analysis of CSF were in favor of meningitis. Among the 30 patients, six patients (20%) had positive universal PCR and 24 patients (80%) had negative universal PCR. Conclusion Based on our results, the universal PCR test is useful in the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis in children. We recommend using it in combination with other tests, such as CSF analysis, for diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. PMID:26816587

  1. Development of a glycoconjugate vaccine to prevent meningitis in Africa caused by meningococcal serogroup X.

    PubMed

    Micoli, Francesca; Romano, Maria Rosaria; Tontini, Marta; Cappelletti, Emilia; Gavini, Massimiliano; Proietti, Daniela; Rondini, Simona; Swennen, Erwin; Santini, Laura; Filippini, Sara; Balocchi, Cristiana; Adamo, Roberto; Pluschke, Gerd; Norheim, Gunnstein; Pollard, Andrew; Saul, Allan; Rappuoli, Rino; MacLennan, Calman A; Berti, Francesco; Costantino, Paolo

    2013-11-19

    Neisseria meningitidis is a major cause of bacterial meningitis worldwide, especially in the African meningitis belt, and has a high associated mortality. The meningococcal serogroups A, W, and X have been responsible for epidemics and almost all cases of meningococcal meningitis in the meningitis belt over the past 12 y. Currently no vaccine is available against meningococcal X (MenX). Because the development of a new vaccine through to licensure takes many years, this leaves Africa vulnerable to new epidemics of MenX meningitis at a time when the epidemiology of meningococcal meningitis on the continent is changing rapidly, following the recent introduction of a glycoconjugate vaccine against serogroup A. Here, we report the development of candidate glycoconjugate vaccines against MenX and preclinical data from their use in animal studies. Following optimization of growth conditions of our seed MenX strain for polysaccharide (PS) production, a scalable purification process was developed yielding high amounts of pure MenX PS. Different glycoconjugates were synthesized by coupling MenX oligosaccharides of varying chain length to CRM197 as carrier protein. Analytical methods were developed for in-process control and determination of purity and consistency of the vaccines. All conjugates induced high anti-MenX PS IgG titers in mice. Antibodies were strongly bactericidal against African MenX isolates. These findings support the further development of glycoconjugate vaccines against MenX and their assessment in clinical trials to produce a vaccine against the one cause of epidemic meningococcal meningitis that currently cannot be prevented by available vaccines. PMID:24191022

  2. Development of a glycoconjugate vaccine to prevent meningitis in Africa caused by meningococcal serogroup X

    PubMed Central

    Micoli, Francesca; Romano, Maria Rosaria; Tontini, Marta; Cappelletti, Emilia; Gavini, Massimiliano; Proietti, Daniela; Rondini, Simona; Swennen, Erwin; Santini, Laura; Filippini, Sara; Balocchi, Cristiana; Adamo, Roberto; Pluschke, Gerd; Norheim, Gunnstein; Pollard, Andrew; Saul, Allan; Rappuoli, Rino; MacLennan, Calman A.; Berti, Francesco; Costantino, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a major cause of bacterial meningitis worldwide, especially in the African meningitis belt, and has a high associated mortality. The meningococcal serogroups A, W, and X have been responsible for epidemics and almost all cases of meningococcal meningitis in the meningitis belt over the past 12 y. Currently no vaccine is available against meningococcal X (MenX). Because the development of a new vaccine through to licensure takes many years, this leaves Africa vulnerable to new epidemics of MenX meningitis at a time when the epidemiology of meningococcal meningitis on the continent is changing rapidly, following the recent introduction of a glycoconjugate vaccine against serogroup A. Here, we report the development of candidate glycoconjugate vaccines against MenX and preclinical data from their use in animal studies. Following optimization of growth conditions of our seed MenX strain for polysaccharide (PS) production, a scalable purification process was developed yielding high amounts of pure MenX PS. Different glycoconjugates were synthesized by coupling MenX oligosaccharides of varying chain length to CRM197 as carrier protein. Analytical methods were developed for in-process control and determination of purity and consistency of the vaccines. All conjugates induced high anti-MenX PS IgG titers in mice. Antibodies were strongly bactericidal against African MenX isolates. These findings support the further development of glycoconjugate vaccines against MenX and their assessment in clinical trials to produce a vaccine against the one cause of epidemic meningococcal meningitis that currently cannot be prevented by available vaccines. PMID:24191022

  3. Computational approaches to identify common subunit vaccine candidates against bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Munikumar, Manne; Priyadarshini, I Vani; Pradhan, Dibyabhaba; Umamaheswari, Amineni; Vengamma, Bhuma

    2013-06-01

    Bacterial meningitis, an infection of the membranes (meninges) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) surrounding the brain and spinal cord, is a major cause of death and disability all over the world. From perinatal period to adult, four common organisms responsible for most of the bacterial meningitis are Streptococcus pneumonia, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenza and Staphylococcus aureus. As the disease is caused by more organisms, currently available vaccines for bacterial meningitis are specific and restricted to some of the serogroups or serotypes of each bacterium. In an effort to design common vaccine against bacterial meningitis, proteomes of the four pathogens were compared to extract seven common surface exposed ABC transporter proteins. Pro-Pred server was used to investigate the seven surface exposed proteins for promiscuous T-cell epitopes prediction. Predicted 22 T-cell epitopes were validated through published positive control, SYFPEITHI and immune epitope database to reduce the epitope dataset into seven. T-cell epitope 162-FMILPIFNV-170 of spermidine/putrescine ABC transporter permease (potH) protein was conserved across the four selected pathogens of bacterial meningitis. Hence, structural analysis was extended for epitope 162-FMILPIFNV-170. Crystal structures of HLA-DRB alleles were retrieved and structure of potH was modeled using Prime v3.0 for structural analysis. Computational docking of HLA-DRB alleles and epitope 162-FMILPIFNV-170 of potH was performed using Glide v5.7. RMSD and RMSF of simulation studies were analyzed by Desmond v3.2. The docking and simulation results revealed that the HLA-DRB-epitope complex was stable with interaction repressive function of HLA. Thus, the epitope would be ideal candidate for T-cell driven subunit vaccine design against bacterial meningitis. PMID:23740398

  4. Hearing loss in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis is associated with otitis and pneumococcal serotype.

    PubMed

    Heckenberg, S G B; Brouwer, M C; van der Ende, A; Hensen, E F; van de Beek, D

    2012-09-01

    We assessed the incidence of hearing loss and its relationship with clinical characteristics and pneumococcal serotypes in adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis. We analysed hearing loss in 531 adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis included in two prospective nationwide cohort studies performed from April 1998 through to October 2002 and March 2006 through to January 2009. Hearing loss was evaluated on admission and discharge for all patients. Severe hearing loss was assessed by pure tone average on audiology and corrected for age, or by the combination of hearing loss on discharge and a score on the Glasgow Outcome Scale below 5, which could not be explained by other neurological sequelae. A total of 531 episodes of pneumococcal meningitis with non-lethal outcome were included. Predisposing conditions for pneumococcal meningitis were present in the majority of patients (64%), most commonly otitis (36%). Hearing loss was present at discharge in 116 patients (22%) and was classified as mild in 53% and severe in 47%. Hearing loss was related to otitis (odds ratio [OR], 2.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.66-4.02; p < 0.001) and inversely related to serotype 23 F infection (OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.13-0.98; p = 0.025), but not with parameters of disease severity or indicators of cerebrospinal fluid inflammation severity. Meningitis due to pneumococcal serotype 3 was associated with the highest rate of hearing loss. Hearing loss frequently complicates pneumococcal meningitis. Risk factors for hearing loss were infection with pneumococcal serotype 23 F and otitis, but not disease severity. Otitis and resulting perilympathic inflammation contribute to meningitis-associated hearing loss. PMID:21958295

  5. Epidemiological, clinical and prognostic profile of childhood acute bacterial meningitis in a resource poor setting

    PubMed Central

    Kuti, Bankole Peter; Bello, Emmanuel Olasehinde; Jegede, Tolulope Opeoluwa; Olubosede, Omolayo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Childhood bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency that continues to kill and maims children particularly in developing countries with poor immunization coverage. Objective: This study set out to assess the hospital incidence, pattern of presentation, etiologic agents, outcome and determinants of mortality among the children admitted with bacterial meningitis at the Wesley Guild Hospital (WGH), Ilesa. Patients and Methods: We carried out a retrospective review of admitted cases of bacterial meningitis in children aged one month to 15 years at the WGH, Ilesa over a three year period by looking at the hospital records. Factors in the history and examinations were compared among survivors and those that died to determine factors significantly associated with mortality in these children. Results: Eighty-one (5.5%) of the 1470 childhood admissions during the study period had bacterial meningitis. Male preponderance was observed and two-thirds of the children were infants. More cases were admitted during the wet rainy season than during the dry harmattan season. Haemophilus influenzae type B and Streptococcus pneumoniae were the leading etiologic agents and ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone adequately cover for these organisms. Twenty-two (27.2%) of the 81 children died, while 34 (42.0%) survived with neurologic deficits. Children with multiple seizures, coma, neck retraction, hyponatremia, hypoglycorrhachia, turbid CSF as well as Gram positive meningitis at presentation were found to more likely to die (P < 0.05). None of these factors however independently predict mortality. Conclusion: Childhood bacterial meningitis often results in death and neurologic deficit among infants and young children admitted at the WGH, Ilesa. Children diagnosed with meningitis who in addition had multiple seizures, neck retraction and coma at presentation are at increased risk of dying. PMID:26752902

  6. Climate Regimes, El Niño-Southern Oscillation, and Meningococcal Meningitis Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Oluwole, Olusegun Steven Ayodele

    2015-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis is a major public health problem that kills thousands annually in Africa, Europe, North, and South America. Occurrence is, however, highest during the dry seasons in Sahel Africa. Interannual changes in precipitation correlate with interannual changes in El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), while interdecadal changes in precipitation correlate with Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The objective of the study was to determine if there is spectral coherence of seasonal, interannual, and interdecadal changes in occurrence of meningococcal meningitis in Sahel, Central, and East Africa with interannual and interdecadal changes of PDO and ENSO. Time series were fitted to occurrence of meningococcal meningitis in Sahel, Central, and East Africa, to indices of precipitation anomalies in the Sahel, and to indices of ENSO and PDO anomalies. Morlet wavelet was used to transform the time series to frequency-time domain. Wavelet spectra and coherence analyses were performed. Occurrence of meningococcal meningitis showed seasonal, interannual, and interdecadal changes. The magnitude of occurrence was higher during warm climate regime, and strong El Niños. Spectra coherence of interannual and interdecadal changes of ENSO and PDO with occurrence of meningococcal meningitis in Sahel, Central, and East Africa were significant at p < 0.0001. Precipitation in Sahel was low during warm climate regimes. Spectra coherence of changes in precipitation in Sahel with ENSO was significant at p < 0.0001. ENSO and PDO are determinants of the seasonal, interannual, and interdecadal changes in occurrence of meningococcal meningitis. Public health management of epidemics of meningococcal meningitis should include forecast models of changes in ENSO to predict periods of low precipitation, which initiate occurrence. PMID:26284234

  7. Meteorological influences on the interannual variability of meningitis incidence in northwest Nigeria.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdussalam, Auwal; Monaghan, Andrew; Dukic, Vanja; Hayden, Mary; Hopson, Thomas; Leckebusch, Gregor

    2013-04-01

    Northwest Nigeria is a region with high risk of bacterial meningitis. Since the first documented epidemic of meningitis in Nigeria in 1905, the disease has been endemic in the northern part of the country, with epidemics occurring regularly. In this study we examine the influence of climate on the interannual variability of meningitis incidence and epidemics. Monthly aggregate counts of clinically confirmed hospital-reported cases of meningitis were collected in northwest Nigeria for the 22-year period spanning 1990-2011. Several generalized linear statistical models were fit to the monthly meningitis counts, including generalized additive models. Explanatory variables included monthly records of temperatures, humidity, rainfall, wind speed, sunshine and dustiness from weather stations nearest to the hospitals, and a time series of polysaccharide vaccination efficacy. The effects of other confounding factors -- i.e., mainly non-climatic factors for which records were not available -- were estimated as a smooth, monthly-varying function of time in the generalized additive models. Results reveal that the most important explanatory climatic variables are mean maximum monthly temperature, relative humidity and dustiness. Accounting for confounding factors (e.g., social processes) in the generalized additive models explains more of the year-to-year variation of meningococcal disease compared to those generalized linear models that do not account for such factors. Promising results from several models that included only explanatory variables that preceded the meningitis case data by 1-month suggest there may be potential for prediction of meningitis in northwest Nigeria to aid decision makers on this time scale.

  8. Cannabidiol reduces host immune response and prevents cognitive impairments in Wistar rats submitted to pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Ceretta, Renan A; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Moreira, Ana Paula; Simões, Lutiana R; Comim, Clarissa M; Quevedo, João; Vilela, Márcia Carvalho; Zuardi, Antonio Waldo; Crippa, José A; Teixeira, Antônio Lucio

    2012-12-15

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a life-threatening disease characterized by an acute infection affecting the pia matter, arachnoid and subarachnoid space. The intense inflammatory response is associated with a significant mortality rate and neurologic sequelae, such as, seizures, sensory-motor deficits and impairment of learning and memory. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acute and extended administration of cannabidiol on pro-inflammatory cytokines and behavioral parameters in adult Wistar rats submitted to pneumococcal meningitis. Male Wistar rats underwent a cisterna magna tap and received either 10μl of sterile saline as a placebo or an equivalent volume of S. pneumoniae suspension. Rats subjected to meningitis were treated by intraperitoneal injection with cannabidiol (2.5, 5, or 10mg/kg once or daily for 9 days after meningitis induction) or a placebo. Six hours after meningitis induction, the rats that received one dose were killed and the hippocampus and frontal cortex were obtained to assess cytokines/chemokine and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. On the 10th day, the rats were submitted to the inhibitory avoidance task. After the task, the animals were killed and samples from the hippocampus and frontal cortex were obtained. The extended administration of cannabidiol at different doses reduced the TNF-α level in frontal cortex. Prolonged treatment with canabidiol, 10mg/kg, prevented memory impairment in rats with pneumococcal meningitis. Although descriptive, our results demonstrate that cannabidiol has anti-inflammatory effects in pneumococcal meningitis and prevents cognitive sequel. PMID:23085269

  9. Meningeal hemangiopericytomas and hemangiopericytoma/solitary fibrous tumors of extracranial soft tissues: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Ambrosini-Spaltro, Andrea; Eusebi, Vincenzo

    2010-04-01

    The current World Health Organization (WHO) classification of central nervous system tumors lists meningeal hemangiopericytomas (HPC) and meningeal solitary fibrous tumors (SFT) as separate entities. On the contrary, SFT and HPC of soft tissues are regarded in the WHO soft tissue fascicle as features of the same entity. The clinical data, histology, and immunohistochemistry of 18 cases of meningeal HPC and 12 cases of peripheral soft tissue HPC-SFT were compared. Both intracranial and soft tissue lesions had significant similarities that included staghorn vasculature, necrotic areas, cytologic atypia, and positivities for CD99, collagen IV, and reticulin. Nevertheless, intracranial tumors were more cellular than HPC-SFT of soft tissues and had fewer collagen bands. Meningeal HPC in addition had more mitoses, higher Ki67 index, stained less intensely for CD34 and B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) than HPC-SFT of soft tissues. Meningeal HPCs recurred in 13 out of 14 cases (92.9%). One of the patients died in the postoperative period for a recurrent lesion 5 years after the diagnosis, and another patient developed an extracranial metastasis 13 years after surgery. None of the six cases of HPC-SFT of soft tissues available for follow-up recurred. Both meningeal and soft tissue tumors appear to represent different features of the same entity. A more aggressive phenotype of the tumor together with incomplete surgical resection of intracranial lesions might explain the noticeable clinical difference between HPC of the meninges and HPC-SFT of soft tissues. PMID:20165866

  10. Mortality from tuberculous meningitis reduced by steroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Escobar, J A; Belsey, M A; Dueñas, A; Medina, P

    1975-12-01

    In this study of 99 tuberculous meningitis patients from Cali, Colombia, treatment with steroids (in conjunction with antituberculous drugs) was shown to be more effective in reducing mortality than treatment with antibacterial drugs alone. Results further suggest that low dosages of steroids (1 mg/kg of prednisone daily for r 30 days) are equally effective in treating the disease as high dosages (10 mg/kg of prednisone at the start of treatment, gradually reduced over a 30-day period). These results are band 4(-43 and -kk mg/100 ml) demonstrated cerebral release. Arterial blood hyperammonemia can be detoxified safely in the brain as long as the levels do not exceed approximately 300 mug/100 ml. Beyond that level lactic acidosis is observed, particularly in cerebral venous drainage. Arterial blood hyperammonemia was also related to the extent of alveolar hyperventilation. These findings are very similar to those seen in experimental hyperammonemia and support the concept that neurotoxicity in children with Reye's syndrome is at least partly due to impaired oxidative metabolism secondary to hyperammonemia. PMID:1105378

  11. [Cognitive Impairment in Patients with Bacterial Meningitis and Encephalitides].

    PubMed

    Kamei, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive impairments, including dementia, can present as first symptoms at the acute stage, and/or as sequelae in the chronic stages, in some patients with bacterial meningitis (BM) or encephalitides. BM and encephalitides are lifethreatening neurological emergencies, and early recognition, efficient decision-making, and rapid commencement of therapy can be lifesaving. Empirical therapy should be initiated promptly whenever BM or encephalitides are a probable diagnosis. In this article cognitive impairments, including dementia, presenting in patients with BM, Herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE), Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) encephalitis, and Anti N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis are reviewed. In the above mentioned diseases, cognitive impairment without fever might be observed at the time of disease onset. cognitive impairment has been also noted in some aged or immunocompromised patients at the onset of BM. Immediate memory disturbance as one of the first symptoms of HHV-6 encephalitis presented in 74% of patients with this disease. Cognitive impairment, including dementia as sequela, was also found in 10-27% of patients with BM, 54-69% of patients with HSVE, 33% of HHV-6 encephalitis patients, and 39% of patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Suitable therapeutic management of these diseases at the acute stage is thus required in order to avoid these sequelae. PMID:27056850

  12. Helminthic eosinophilic meningitis: emerging zoonotic diseases in the South.

    PubMed

    Diaz, James H

    2008-01-01

    Today most emerging infectious diseases, such as West Nile virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), arise in the natural environment as zoonoses and are often imported into the United States (US). The most common helminthic infections that can cause eosinophilic meningitis (EoM) in the US, neuroangiostrongyliasis and baylisascariasis, share many of the characteristics of emerging infectious diseases. Neuroangiostrongyliasis, a rodent zoonosis caused by the rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, is now endemic in the US following the importation of infected rats on container ships and African land snails, the parasite's intermediate hosts, as biological controls and exotic pets. Baylisascariasis, a raccoon zoonosis, caused by the raccoon roundworm, Baylisascaris procyonis, has extended its US distribution range from suburban neighborhoods in the northern US to the Southeast and West Coast since the 1980s. Both A. cantonensis and B. procyonis are now enzootic in Louisiana and have caused EoM in humans. This review analyzes scientific articles selected by MEDLINE search, 1966-2008, in order to assess the evolving epidemiology of EoM in the US, and specifically in Louisiana; and to alert Louisiana clinicians to populations at increased risk of helminthic EoM as a result of age, ethnicity, lifestyle, food choices, location of permanent residence, or recent travel in the Americas or Caribbean. Most parasitic diseases causing EoM are no longer confined to tropical countries; they are now endemic in the US and in Louisiana and more cases may be anticipated. PMID:19283982

  13. Clinical decision rules for acute bacterial meningitis: current insights

    PubMed Central

    Viallon, Alain; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth; Zeni, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis (BM) requires rapid diagnosis so that suitable treatment can be instituted within 60 minutes of admitting the patient. The cornerstone of diagnostic examination is lumbar puncture, which enables microbiological analysis and determination of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytochemical characteristics. However, microbiological testing is not sufficiently sensitive to rule out this diagnosis. With regard to the analysis of standard CSF cytochemical characteristics (polymorphonuclear count, CSF glucose and protein concentration, and CSF:serum glucose), this is often misleading. Indeed, the relatively imprecise nature of the cutoff values for these BM diagnosis markers can make their interpretation difficult. However, there are two markers that appear to be more efficient than the standard ones: CSF lactate and serum procalcitonin levels. Scores and predictive models are also available; however, they only define a clinical probability, and in addition, their use calls for prior validation on the population in which they are used. In this article, we review current methods of BM diagnosis. PMID:27307768

  14. TRPA1 receptors mediate environmental irritant-induced meningeal vasodilatation

    PubMed Central

    Kunkler, Phillip Edward; Ballard, Carrie Jo; Oxford, Gerry Stephen; Hurley, Joyce Harts

    2010-01-01

    The TRPA1 receptor is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of ion channels expressed in nociceptive neurons. TRPA1 receptors are targeted by pungent compounds from mustard and garlic and environmental irritants such as formaldehyde and acrolein. Ingestion or inhalation of these chemical agents causes irritation and burning in the nasal and oral mucosa and respiratory lining. Headaches have been widely reported to be induced by inhalation of environmental irritants, but it is unclear how these agents produce headache. Stimulation of trigeminal neurons releases CGRP and substance P and induces neurogenic inflammation associated with the pain of migraine. Here we test the hypothesis that activation of TRPA1 receptors are the mechanistic link between environmental irritants and peptide mediated neurogenic inflammation. Known TRPA1 agonists and environmental irritants stimulate CGRP release from dissociated rat trigeminal ganglia neurons and this release is blocked by a selective TRPA1 antagonist, HC-030031. Further, TRPA1 agonists and environmental irritants increase meningeal blood flow following intranasal administration. Prior dural application of the CGRP antagonist, CGRP8–37, or intranasal or dural administration of HC-030031, blocks the increases in blood flow elicited by environmental irritants. Together these results demonstrate that TRPA1 receptor activation by environmental irritants stimulates CGRP release and increases cerebral blood flow. We suggest that these events contribute to headache associated with environmental irritants. PMID:21075522

  15. Liposomal cytarabine for leukemic and lymphomatous meningitis: recent developments.

    PubMed

    Benesch, Martin; Urban, Christian

    2008-02-01

    Liposomal cytarabine (Depocyte) is a sustained-release formulation of cytarabine developed for intrathecal administration, ensuring prolonged cytotoxic drug concentrations of cytarabine in cerebrospinal fluid. Although liposomal cytarabine is increasingly used for the treatment (and prophylaxis) of CNS involvement in patients with leukemia/lymphoma, many of the recently presented clinical trials on liposomal cytarabine were retrospective in nature or used this drug on a compassionate basis. So far, one randomized Phase III study has shown significantly better response rates in patients with lymphomatous meningitis who received liposomal cytarabine compared with free cytarabine. Considerable concerns about the safety of this drug arose from recent observations that liposomal cytarabine might contribute to neurologic side effects when given too closely to high-dose systemic chemotherapy known to penetrate the brain-blood barrier. Superior efficacy of liposomal cytarabine compared with standard intrathecal therapy should be confirmed in prospective clinical trials. Careful adherence with preventive measures might help physicians to minimize side effects possibly related to the administration of liposomal cytarabine. PMID:18201152

  16. [Partial deficiency of cell-mediated immunity in a child with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. Intercurrent meningeal and pulmonary cryptococcosis].

    PubMed

    Gerbeaux, J; Baculard, A; Tournier, G; Moulias, R; Goust, J M; Drouhet, E d; Saint-Martin, J

    1975-01-01

    The authors report a new case of partial immune deficiency of cellular immunity, associated with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis in a 12 Years-old boy. The disease began very early during the first few weeks of life, with thrush in the mouth. This candidiasis then evolved intermittently and was still present. Numerous cutaneous, pulmonary and ear infections occured throughout this child's life. This morbid association led to a search for an immune deficiency. Humoral immunity was normal. Abnormalities of cellular immunity were as follows: apart from candidine skin anergy, there was a deficiency in the factor which inhibits leukocyte migration, secretion of a factor favouring this migration (MEF). It was also noted the presence of the patient's serum, of a factor inhibiting lymphocyte transformation in the presence of candidine. In spite of treatment with intravenous route, amphotericin B, followed by transfer factor, the oral candidiasis persisted together with the skin anergy to candidine. On the other hand, the serum inhibitory factor disappeared. Pulmonary cryptococcosis probably favoured by corticosteroid treatment, developed on this background of immune deficiency; as usual it spread to the meninges. Treatment associating intraveinous amphotericin B and 5 fluorocytosine oral and later intravenous, total duration 6 months, grave a recovery maintained on a 8 months follow up. PMID:1217770

  17. Ruptured pseudoaneurysm of the middle meningeal artery presenting with a temporal lobe hematoma and a contralateral subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marvin, Eric; Laws, Lindsay Hilken; Coppens, Jeroen Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the middle meningeal artery (MMA) are rare, associated with skull fractures, and have a high mortality rate. When they rupture, MMA pseudoaneurysms frequently cause epidural hematomas and occasionally ipsilateral subdural or subarachnoid hemorrhage. Isolated intraparenchymal hemorrhage has also been reported. Case Description: A 54-year-old female who suffered a loss of consciousness resulting in a fall presented with a Glasgow Coma Scale of 7t. Imaging demonstrated a right subdural hematoma (SDH) with midline shift, left skull fracture overlying the left MMA, and left temporal lobe intraparenchymal hematoma extending to the surface. The patient underwent a right craniectomy with evacuation of the SDH, and the preoperative computed tomographic angiography revealed abnormal dilation of the left MMA consistent with a pseudoaneurysm. The pseudoaneurysm was treated with endovascular treatment, and the intraparenchymal hematoma was treated conservatively. Her recovery was uneventful, and she received a cranioplasty 3 months after the decompression. Conclusions: The presence of a fracture over the MMA and intraparenchymal hematoma should prompt suspicion for a traumatic pseudoaneurysm. Pseudoaneurysms of the MMA can cause catastrophic bleeding, and prompt treatment is necessary. Endovascular embolization is an effective method that decreases the hemorrhage risk of MMA pseudoaneurysms. PMID:26862457

  18. Statistical Analysis of Haralick Texture Features to Discriminate Lung Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Nourhan; Elnemr, Heba A

    2015-01-01

    The Haralick texture features are a well-known mathematical method to detect the lung abnormalities and give the opportunity to the physician to localize the abnormality tissue type, either lung tumor or pulmonary edema. In this paper, statistical evaluation of the different features will represent the reported performance of the proposed method. Thirty-seven patients CT datasets with either lung tumor or pulmonary edema were included in this study. The CT images are first preprocessed for noise reduction and image enhancement, followed by segmentation techniques to segment the lungs, and finally Haralick texture features to detect the type of the abnormality within the lungs. In spite of the presence of low contrast and high noise in images, the proposed algorithms introduce promising results in detecting the abnormality of lungs in most of the patients in comparison with the normal and suggest that some of the features are significantly recommended than others. PMID:26557845

  19. Statistical Analysis of Haralick Texture Features to Discriminate Lung Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Zayed, Nourhan; Elnemr, Heba A.

    2015-01-01

    The Haralick texture features are a well-known mathematical method to detect the lung abnormalities and give the opportunity to the physician to localize the abnormality tissue type, either lung tumor or pulmonary edema. In this paper, statistical evaluation of the different features will represent the reported performance of the proposed method. Thirty-seven patients CT datasets with either lung tumor or pulmonary edema were included in this study. The CT images are first preprocessed for noise reduction and image enhancement, followed by segmentation techniques to segment the lungs, and finally Haralick texture features to detect the type of the abnormality within the lungs. In spite of the presence of low contrast and high noise in images, the proposed algorithms introduce promising results in detecting the abnormality of lungs in most of the patients in comparison with the normal and suggest that some of the features are significantly recommended than others. PMID:26557845

  20. Supporting meningitis diagnosis amongst infants and children through the use of fuzzy cognitive mapping

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Meningitis is characterized by an inflammation of the meninges, or the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Early diagnosis and treatment is crucial for a positive outcome, yet identifying meningitis is a complex process involving an array of signs and symptoms and multiple causal factors which require novel solutions to support clinical decision-making. In this work, we explore the potential of fuzzy cognitive map to assist in the modeling of meningitis, as a support tool for physicians in the accurate diagnosis and treatment of the condition. Methods Fuzzy cognitive mapping (FCM) is a method for analysing and depicting human perception of a given system. FCM facilitates the development of a conceptual model which is not limited by exact values and measurements and thus is well suited to representing relatively unstructured knowledge and associations expressed in imprecise terms. A team of doctors (physicians), comprising four paediatricians, was formed to define the multifarious signs and symptoms associated with meningitis and to identify risk factors integral to its causality, as indicators used by clinicians to identify the presence or absence of meningitis in patients. The FCM model, consisting of 20 concept nodes, has been designed by the team of paediatricians in collaborative dialogue with the research team. Results The paediatricians were supplied with a form containing various input parameters to be completed at the time of diagnosing meningitis among infants and children. The paediatricians provided information on a total of 56 patient cases amongst children whose age ranged from 2 months to 7 years. The physicians’ decision to diagnose meningitis was available for each individual case which was used as the outcome measure for evaluating the model. The FCM was trained using 40 cases with an accuracy of 95%, and later 16 test cases were used to analyze the accuracy and reliability of the model. The system produced the results

  1. Influence of ecologic factors on prevalence of meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) infection in South Dakota, USA.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Christopher N; Jenks, Jonathan A; Grovenburg, Troy W; Klaver, Robert W; Dubay, Shelli A

    2015-04-01

    The meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) is a nematode parasite that commonly infects white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus; WTD) throughout the deciduous forest biome and deciduous-coniferous ecotone of eastern and central North America; the species is not known to occur west of the grassland biome of central North America. We used county-specific prevalence data to evaluate potential effects of landscape and climatologic factors on the spatial distribution of meningeal worm infection in South Dakota, US. Probability of infection increased 4-fold between eastern and western South Dakota and 1.3-fold for each 1-cm increase in summer precipitation. Sixty-three percent of WTD had only a single worm in the cranium. Expansion of meningeal worm infection across western South Dakota may be inherently low due to the combined effects of arid climate and potential attributes of the Missouri River that limit regional movements by infected WTD. Use of landscape genetic analyses to identify potential relationships between landscape features and population genetic structure of infected deer and parasites may contribute to a greater understanding of regional heterogeneity in meningeal worm infection rates across South Dakota, particularly in counties adjacent to the Missouri River. Future research evaluating heterogeneity in prevalence and intensity of infection between fawn and yearling deer, and the potential role of yearling male deer as dispersal agents of meningeal worms across the Missouri River, also is warranted. PMID:25588013

  2. [Pediatric Patient with anaerobic Bacterial Meningitis Who was Infected through a Spinal Congenital Dermal Sinus Route].

    PubMed

    Okui, Hideyuki; Fukasawa, Chie; Tokutake, Shoko; Takei, Haruka; Sato, Junichi; Hoshino, Tadashi

    2016-05-01

    We report the case of a pediatric patient in whom a spinal congenital dermal sinus was detected after the onset of anaerobic bacterial meningitis. The patient was a 4-month-old boy. He had a recurrent fever for 2 weeks before admission. On admission, he presented with a convulsive status and a bulging anterior fontanel. The previously consulted physician had made a diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Spinal fluid cultures tested positive for Peptoniphilus asaccharolyticus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a spinal subdural abscess and cranial subdural hydrops; therefore, the patient was transported to our hospital for surgical treatment. A sacral dimple was noted on his lower back, and an MRI showed a spinal congenital dermal sinus. Antimicrobial therapy, cranial subdural aspiration, dermal sinus excision, and drainage were performed. He was discharged on the 60th hospital day. When pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli, Proteus sp. or anaerobic bacteria invade through a dermal sinus, it can result in meningitis. Involvement of a dermal sinus should be suspected when meningitis is caused by these pathogens or when recurrent meningitis occurs. PMID:27529968

  3. Response Strategies against Meningitis Epidemics after Elimination of Serogroup A Meningococci, Niger.

    PubMed

    Maïnassara, Halima Boubacar; Paireau, Juliette; Idi, Issa; Pelat, Jean-Paul Moulia; Oukem-Boyer, Odile Ouwe Missi; Fontanet, Arnaud; Mueller, Judith E

    2015-08-01

    To inform epidemic response strategies for the African meningitis belt after a meningococcal serogroup A conjugate vaccine was introduced in 2010, we compared the effectiveness and efficiency of meningitis surveillance and vaccine response strategies at district and health area levels using various thresholds of weekly incidence rates. We analyzed reports of suspected cases from 3 regions in Niger during 2002-2012 (154,392 health area weeks), simulating elimination of serogroup A meningitis by excluding health area years with identification of such cases. Effectiveness was highest for health area surveillance and district vaccination (58-366 cases; thresholds 7-20 cases/100,000 doses), whereas efficiency was optimized with health area vaccination (5.6-7.7 cases/100,000 doses). District-level intervention prevented <6 cases (0.2 cases/100,000 doses). Reducing the delay between epidemic signal and vaccine protection by 2 weeks doubled efficiency. Subdistrict surveillance and response might be most appropriate for meningitis epidemic response after elimination of serogroup A meningitis. PMID:26196461

  4. [Iatrogenic meningitis after diagnosis lumbar puncture: 3 cases reports in the paediatric Children's Hospital of Tunis].

    PubMed

    Smaoui, H; Hariga, D; Hajji, N; Bouziri, A; Ben Jaballah, N; Barsaoui, S; Bousnina, S; Sammoud, A; Kechrid, A

    2011-02-01

    We have collected cases of iatrogenic meningitis managed in the Children's Hospital of Tunis, between January 1998 and December 2006. Clinical information about each patient were collected, all bacterial samples were investigated in the microbiology laboratory of the hospital. Bacterial isolates were identified according to conventional criteria. In the interval under study, we recorded three cases of iatrogenic meningitis after lumbar puncture. Two cases occurred in newborn admitted for suspicion of neonatal infection and one in a 2-month-old infant admitted for exploration of hyperpyretic convulsion. In all patients, the initial cerebrospinal fluid was normal. All patients developed symptoms of acute meningitis within 72 hours after lumbar puncture; the second cerebrospinal fluid was, then, typical for purulent meningitis. The causal agents isolated in the three cases were Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Serratia marcescens, all resistant to beta-lactams by extended spectrum beta-lactamase production. The use of quinolones was required in all cases. Different complications were recorded: hydrocephalus and brain abscess in one case, respiratory and hemodynamic failure managed in the intensive care unit in the second, and brain hygroma in the third case. This study shows high morbidity of iatrogenic meningitis. Simple aseptic precautions undertaken before the procedure of lumbar puncture can prevent such cases. The urgent need for increasing the awareness among medical personnel in hospitals of developing countries cannot be overemphasized. PMID:21103965

  5. Influence of ecological factors on prevalence of meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis infection in South Dakota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacques, Christopher N.; Jenks, Jonathan A.; Grovenburg, Troy W.; Klaver, Robert W.; Dubay, Shelli A.

    2015-01-01

    The meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) is a nematode parasite that commonly infects white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus; WTD) throughout the deciduous forest biome and deciduous-coniferous ecotone of eastern and central North America; the species is not known to occur west of the grassland biome of central North America. We used county-specific prevalence data to evaluate potential effects of landscape and climatologic factors on the spatial distribution of meningeal worm infection in South Dakota, US. Probability of infection increased 4-fold between eastern and western South Dakota and 1.3-fold for each 1-cm increase in summer precipitation. Sixty-three percent of WTD had only a single worm in the cranium. Expansion of meningeal worm infection across western South Dakota may be inherently low due to the combined effects of arid climate and potential attributes of the Missouri River that limit regional movements by infected WTD. Use of landscape genetic analyses to identify potential relationships between landscape features and population genetic structure of infected deer and parasites may contribute to a greater understanding of regional heterogeneity in meningeal worm infection rates across South Dakota, particularly in counties adjacent to the Missouri River. Future research evaluating heterogeneity in prevalence and intensity of infection between fawn and yearling deer, and the potential role of yearling male deer as dispersal agents of meningeal worms across the Missouri River, also is warranted.

  6. Meningeal mast cell-T cell crosstalk regulates T cell encephalitogenicity.

    PubMed

    Russi, Abigail E; Walker-Caulfield, Margaret E; Guo, Yong; Lucchinetti, Claudia F; Brown, Melissa A

    2016-09-01

    GM-CSF is a cytokine produced by T helper (Th) cells that plays an essential role in orchestrating neuroinflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a rodent model of multiple sclerosis. Yet where and how Th cells acquire GM-CSF expression is unknown. In this study we identify mast cells in the meninges, tripartite tissues surrounding the brain and spinal cord, as important contributors to antigen-specific Th cell accumulation and GM-CSF expression. In the absence of mast cells, Th cells do not accumulate in the meninges nor produce GM-CSF. Mast cell-T cell co-culture experiments and selective mast cell reconstitution of the meninges of mast cell-deficient mice reveal that resident meningeal mast cells are an early source of caspase-1-dependent IL-1β that licenses Th cells to produce GM-CSF and become encephalitogenic. We also provide evidence of mast cell-T cell co-localization in the meninges and CNS of recently diagnosed acute MS patients indicating similar interactions may occur in human demyelinating disease. PMID:27396526

  7. Streptococcus gallolyticus meningitis in adults: report of five cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    van Samkar, A; Brouwer, M C; Pannekoek, Y; van der Ende, A; van de Beek, D

    2015-12-01

    We describe the incidence and patient characteristics of Streptococcus gallolyticus meningitis. We identified S. gallolyticus meningitis in a nationwide cohort of patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis, and performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all reported adult cases in the literature. Five cases were identified (0.3%) in a cohort of 1561 episodes of bacterial meningitis. In one patient, bowel disease (colon polyps) was identified as a predisposing condition for S. gallolyticus infection, whereas no patients were diagnosed with endocarditis. In a combined analysis of our patients and 37 reported in the literature, we found that the median age was 59 years. Predisposing factors were present in 21 of 42 patients (50%), and mainly consisted of immunosuppressive therapy (seven patients), cancer (four patients), and alcoholism (four patients). Colon disease was identified in 15 of 24 patients (63%) and endocarditis in five of 27 patients (18%). Co-infection with Strongyloides stercoralis was identified in 14 of 34 patients (41%), ten of whom were infected with human immunodeficiency virus or human T-lymphotropic virus. Outcomes were described for 37 patients; eight died (22%) and one (3%) had neurological sequelae. S. gallolyticus is an uncommon cause of bacterial meningitis, with specific predisposing conditions. When it is identified, consultation with a cardiologist and gastroenterologist is warranted to rule out underlying endocarditis or colon disease. Stool examinations for Strongyloides stercoralis should be performed in patients who have travelled to or originate from endemic areas. PMID:26314916

  8. [Bacterial meningitis in adults: a retrospective multicentric study in Tuscany (Italy)].

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, L; Meini, M; Luchi, S; Scasso, A; Corbisiero, R; Mencarelli, M; Cellesi, C; Aquilini, D; Carbonai, S; Paladini, A; Bresci, S; Panunzi, I; Leoncini, F; Trezzi, M; Nencioni, C; Toti, M; Maccanti, O; Pardelli, R; Sani, S; Pippi, L; Esperti, F; Messeri, D; Dionisio, D; Pippi, F; Ble, C; Pienotti, P; Mazzotta, F

    2006-06-01

    The Infectious Diseases Unit of Lucca Hospital conducted a multicentric retrospective study to evaluate the epidemiological and clinical features of adult patients affected by bacterial meningitis attending all the Infectious Diseases Units of Tuscany (Italy) from July 1999 to June 2004. A specific questionnaire was sent to all the units to collect information about each case of bacterial meningitis occurring in patients older than sixteen. Patients with meningitis by Mycobacterium tuberculosis were excluded from the analysis. Nine out of 12 Infectious Diseases Units of Tuscany took part in the study and 197 cases were identified. Most cases of meningitis occurred during 2002 with a slight reduction in cases in subsequent years. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis were the most frequently isolated pathogens with an increase in diagnosis from 1999 to 2004; in 23.8% of patients no pathogens were isolated, with a reduction in meningitis from unknown aetiology from 1999 to 2004. Most patients were treated with a combination of two antibiotics, and corticosteroid drugs were added to the therapy; in the group of patients treated with corticosteroid drugs invalidating complications occurred in 23% of cases and 5% of patients died. In all, 27 out of 197 subjects (13.7%) developed invalidating complications and 20 out of 197 patients (10.2%) died. PMID:16891852

  9. Seasonality of meningitis in Africa and climate forcing: aerosols stand out

    PubMed Central

    Agier, L.; Deroubaix, A.; Martiny, N.; Yaka, P.; Djibo, A.; Broutin, H.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an ongoing threat for the population of the African Meningitis Belt, a region characterized by the highest incidence rates worldwide. The determinants of the disease dynamics are still poorly understood; nevertheless, it is often advocated that climate and mineral dust have a large impact. Over the last decade, several studies have investigated this relationship at a large scale. In this analysis, we scaled down to the district-level weekly scale (which is used for in-year response to emerging epidemics), and used wavelet and phase analysis methods to define and compare the time-varying periodicities of meningitis, climate and dust in Niger. We mostly focused on detecting time-lags between the signals that were consistent across districts. Results highlighted the special case of dust in comparison to wind, humidity or temperature: a strong similarity between districts is noticed in the evolution of the time-lags between the seasonal component of dust and meningitis. This result, together with the assumption of dust damaging the pharyngeal mucosa and easing bacterial invasion, reinforces our confidence in dust forcing on meningitis seasonality. Dust data should now be integrated in epidemiological and forecasting models to make them more realistic and usable in a public health perspective. PMID:23221989

  10. Evidence that Meningeal Mast Cells Can Worsen Stroke Pathology in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arac, Ahmet; Grimbaldeston, Michele A.; Nepomuceno, Andrew R.B.; Olayiwola, Oluwatobi; Pereira, Marta P.; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Tsykin, Anna; Goodall, Gregory J.; Schlecht, Ulrich; Vogel, Hannes; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.; Bliss, Tonya M.; Steinberg, Gary K.

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability and the fourth most common cause of death in the United States. Inflammation is thought to play an important role in stroke pathology, but the factors that promote inflammation in this setting remain to be fully defined. An understudied but important factor is the role of meningeal-located immune cells in modulating brain pathology. Although different immune cells traffic through meningeal vessels en route to the brain, mature mast cells do not circulate but are resident in the meninges. With the use of genetic and cell transfer approaches in mice, we identified evidence that meningeal mast cells can importantly contribute to the key features of stroke pathology, including infiltration of granulocytes and activated macrophages, brain swelling, and infarct size. We also obtained evidence that two mast cell-derived products, interleukin-6 and, to a lesser extent, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 7, can contribute to stroke pathology. These findings indicate a novel role for mast cells in the meninges, the membranes that envelop the brain, as potential gatekeepers for modulating brain inflammation and pathology after stroke. PMID:25134760

  11. Intrathecal production of interleukin-12 and gamma interferon in patients with bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kornelisse, R F; Hack, C E; Savelkoul, H F; van der Pouw Kraan, T C; Hop, W C; van Mierlo, G; Suur, M H; Neijens, H J; de Groot, R

    1997-01-01

    To assess the role of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in children with bacterial meningitis, bioactive IL-12 (p70) and the inactive subunit p40 and IFN-gamma were measured in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 35 children with bacterial meningitis and 10 control subjects. The production of IFN-gamma is induced by IL-12 with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) as a costimulator and inhibited by IL-10. CSF concentrations of IL-12 p40 as well as those of IFN-gamma were markedly elevated, whereas IL-12 p70 was hardly detectable. Detectable CSF levels of IFN-gamma correlated positively with IL-12 p40 (r = 0.40, P = 0.02) and TNF-alpha (r = 0.46, P = 0.04) but not with IL-6, IL-8, or IL-10. In contrast to CSF levels of TNF-alpha, IL-12, and IL-10, those of IFN-gamma were significantly higher in patients with pneumococcal meningitis than in children with meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria meningitidis, presumably because of a high CSF TNF-alpha/IL-10 ratio in the former. We suggest that IL-12- and TNF-alpha-induced IFN-gamma production may contribute to the natural immunity against microorganisms in the CSF compartment during the acute phase of bacterial meningitis. PMID:9038291

  12. Imipramine reverses depressive-like parameters in pneumococcal meningitis survivor rats.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Milioli, Graziele; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Cipriano, Andreza L; Costa, Caroline S; Moreira, Ana Paula; Vilela, Márcia Carvalho; Comim, Clarissa M; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio; Quevedo, João

    2012-06-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a severe infectious disease of the central nervous system, associated with acute inflammation and might cause damage to the host, such as deafness, blindness, seizure, and learning deficits. However, infectious diseases can play a significant role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disturbances. In this context, we evaluated depressive-like parameters; corticosterone and ACTH levels in pneumococcal meningitis surviving rats. Wistar rats underwent a magna cistern tap receiving either 10 μL sterile saline or a Streptococcus pneumoniae suspension at the concentration of 5 × 10(9) cfu/mL. After 3 days of meningitis induction procedure, the animals were treated with imipramine at 10 mg/kg or saline for 14 days (3rd-17th day). The consumption of sweet food was measured for 7 days (10th-17th day). The meningitis group decreased the sucrose intake and increased the levels of corticosterone and ACTH levels in the serum and TNF-α in the cortex; however, the treatment with imipramine reverted the reduction of sweet food consumption, normalized hormonal levels and TNF-α in the cortex. Our results supported the hypothesis that the pneumococcal meningitis surviving rats showed depressive-like behavior and alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. PMID:22160551

  13. Identification of a novel pneumococcal vaccine antigen preferentially expressed during meningitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Layla K.; Wang, Hui; Van der Hoek, Mark B.; Paton, James C.; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of severe bacterial meningitis in children, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. To identify virulence factors preferentially expressed during meningitis, we conducted niche-specific genome-wide in vivo transcriptomic analysis after intranasal infection of mice with serotype 4 or 6A pneumococci. The expression of 34 bacterial genes was substantially altered in brain tissue of mice infected with either of the 2 strains. Ten upregulated genes were common to both strains, 7 of which were evaluated for their role in the development of meningitis. One previously uncharacterized protein, α-glycerophosphate oxidase (GlpO), was cytotoxic for human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) via generation of H2O2. A glpO deletion mutant was defective in adherence to HBMECs in vitro as well as in progression from the blood to the brain in vivo. Mutant bacteria also induced markedly reduced meningeal inflammation and brain pathology compared with wild type, despite similar levels of bacteremia. Immunization of mice with GlpO protected against invasive pneumococcal disease and provided additive protection when formulated with pneumolysin toxoid. Our results provide the basis of a strategy that can be adapted to identify genes that contribute to the development of meningitis caused by other pathogens. PMID:22622042

  14. Capnocytophaga canimorsus Meningitis: Three Cases and a Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    van Samkar, A; Brouwer, M C; Schultsz, C; van der Ende, A; van de Beek, D

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a disease with a high morbidity and mortality. It may be caused by the zoonotic pathogen Capnocytophaga canimorsus, which is part of the commensal oral flora in dogs and cats. We report three cases of C. canimorsus meningitis in a nationwide cohort study of bacterial meningitis patients and performed a review of the literature. Three episodes of C. canimorsus meningitis were identified in three patients included in a nationwide cohort study from 2006 through 2014. The calculated annual incidence was 0.03 per million adults. When combined with the literature, 33 patients were identified of which 28 were male (85%). The median age was 63 years, and 13 (42%) were immunocompromised, which consisted of alcoholism in 7 (21%). Animal contact could be established in 29 of 30 patients (93%) and consisted of dog bites in 22 of 29 (76%). One patient died (3%) and 8 had neurological sequelae upon discharge (25%), most often hearing loss (n = 6, 19%). Capnocytophaga canimorsus meningitis is associated with dog bites. Although mortality is relatively low, survivors often have neurological sequelae. PMID:26693951

  15. Response Strategies against Meningitis Epidemics after Elimination of Serogroup A Meningococci, Niger

    PubMed Central

    Paireau, Juliette; Idi, Issa; Pelat, Jean-Paul Moulia; Oukem-Boyer, Odile Ouwe Missi; Fontanet, Arnaud; Mueller, Judith E.

    2015-01-01

    To inform epidemic response strategies for the African meningitis belt after a meningococcal serogroup A conjugate vaccine was introduced in 2010, we compared the effectiveness and efficiency of meningitis surveillance and vaccine response strategies at district and health area levels using various thresholds of weekly incidence rates. We analyzed reports of suspected cases from 3 regions in Niger during 2002–2012 (154,392 health area weeks), simulating elimination of serogroup A meningitis by excluding health area years with identification of such cases. Effectiveness was highest for health area surveillance and district vaccination (58–366 cases; thresholds 7–20 cases/100,000 doses), whereas efficiency was optimized with health area vaccination (5.6–7.7 cases/100,000 doses). District-level intervention prevented <6 cases (0.2 cases/100,000 doses). Reducing the delay between epidemic signal and vaccine protection by 2 weeks doubled efficiency. Subdistrict surveillance and response might be most appropriate for meningitis epidemic response after elimination of serogroup A meningitis. PMID:26196461

  16. Genomic pneumococcal load and CSF cytokines are not related to outcome in Malawian adults with meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Emma C.; Gritzfeld, Jenna F.; Scarborough, Matthew; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine M.B.; Mukaka, Mavuto; Corless, Caroline; Lalloo, David G.; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective Bacterial meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa is predominantly caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, is often associated with HIV co-infection and mortality rates are double those seen in better resourced settings. Methods To investigate the cause of this excessive mortality we quantified the pneumococcal DNA load and six common pro-inflammatory cytokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of Malawian adults with culture proven pneumococcal meningitis and correlated the results to clinical parameters and outcome. There are currently no published data relating bacterial load to outcome in adults with pneumococcal meningitis. Results The mean age of patients was 32 years, 82% were HIV infected and 49% had died by day 40. CSF bacterial loads were high (median 6.5 × 105 copies/ml CSF) and there was no significant variation in bacterial load between survivors and non-survivors. All pro-inflammatory CSF cytokines were elevated in the CSF, with no clinically important differences between survivors and non-survivors. HIV status did not affect the CSF bacterial load or cytokine response. Conclusion Mortality from pneumococcal meningitis in adults in sub-Saharan Africa is not related to pneumococcal bacterial load. More research is needed to understand the very high mortality from meningitis in this region. PMID:24975177

  17. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Meningitis- and Bacteremia-Causing Pneumococci Identifies a Common Core Genome.

    PubMed

    Kulohoma, Benard W; Cornick, Jennifer E; Chaguza, Chrispin; Yalcin, Feyruz; Harris, Simon R; Gray, Katherine J; Kiran, Anmol M; Molyneux, Elizabeth; French, Neil; Parkhill, Julian; Faragher, Brian E; Everett, Dean B; Bentley, Stephen D; Heyderman, Robert S

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a nasopharyngeal commensal that occasionally invades normally sterile sites to cause bloodstream infection and meningitis. Although the pneumococcal population structure and evolutionary genetics are well defined, it is not clear whether pneumococci that cause meningitis are genetically distinct from those that do not. Here, we used whole-genome sequencing of 140 isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered from bloodstream infection (n = 70) and meningitis (n = 70) to compare their genetic contents. By fitting a double-exponential decaying-function model, we show that these isolates share a core of 1,427 genes (95% confidence interval [CI], 1,425 to 1,435 genes) and that there is no difference in the core genome or accessory gene content from these disease manifestations. Gene presence/absence alone therefore does not explain the virulence behavior of pneumococci that reach the meninges. Our analysis, however, supports the requirement of a range of previously described virulence factors and vaccine candidates for both meningitis- and bacteremia-causing pneumococci. This high-resolution view suggests that, despite considerable competency for genetic exchange, all pneumococci are under considerable pressure to retain key components advantageous for colonization and transmission and that these components are essential for access to and survival in sterile sites. PMID:26259813

  18. Molecular abnormalities in Ewing's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Burchill, Susan Ann

    2008-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is one of the few solid tumors for which the underlying molecular genetic abnormality has been described: rearrangement of the EWS gene on chromosome 22q12 with an ETS gene family member. These translocations define the Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) and provide a valuable tool for their accurate and unequivocal diagnosis. They also represent ideal targets for the development of tumor-specific therapeutics. Although secondary abnormalities occur in over 80% of primary ESFT the clinical utility of these is currently unclear. However, abnormalities in genes that regulate the G(1)/S checkpoint are frequently described and may be important in predicting outcome and response. Increased understanding of the molecular events that arise in ESFT and their role in the development and maintenance of the malignant phenotype will inform the improved stratification of patients for therapy and identify targets and pathways for the design of more effective cancer therapeutics. PMID:18925858

  19. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  20. [Emotion Disorders and Abnormal Perspiration].

    PubMed

    Umeda, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    This article reviewed the relationship between emotional disorders and abnormal perspiration. First, I focused on local brain areas related to emotional processing, and summarized the functions of the emotional network involving those local areas. Functional disorders followed by the damage in the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, and insular cortex were reviewed, including related abnormal perspiration. I then addressed the mechanisms of how autonomic disorders influence emotional processing. Finally, possible future directions for integrated understanding of the connection between neural activities and bodily reactions were discussed. PMID:27503817

  1. Ultrasonographic assessment of abnormal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    England, G C

    1998-07-01

    Ultrasonographic imaging is widely used in small animal practice for the diagnosis of pregnancy and the determination of fetal number. Ultrasonography can also be used to monitor abnormal pregnancies, for example, conceptuses that are poorly developed for their gestational age (and therefore are likely to fail), and pregnancies in which there is embryonic resorption or fetal abortion. An ultrasound examination may reveal fetal abnormalities and therefore alter the management of the pregnant bitch or queen prior to parturition. There are, however, a number of ultrasonographic features of normal pregnancies that may mimic disease, and these must be recognized. PMID:9698618

  2. Childhood pyogenic meningitis: clinical and investigative indicators of etiology and outcome.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Abdul-Wahab B R; Adedoyin, Olanrewaju T; Abdul-Karim, Aishat A; Olanrewaju, Abdul-Waheed I

    2007-08-01

    The relevant parameters of 71 consecutive pediatric admissions for pyogenic meningitis at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria, were analyzed to identify possible clinical and nonmicrobiologic investigative clues of disease etiology and mortality. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was Gram-smear positive (GSP) in 41 (57.6%) of the 71 cases. Twenty-three (56.1%) had Gram-positive cocci (GPC), 14 (34.2%) Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) and three (7.3%) Gram-negative diplococci (GND). The respective mean ages of GPC, GNB and GND cases were 4.49 +/- 5.3, 3.06 +/- 4.8 and 4.47 +/-4.9 years. Streptococcus pneumoniae accounted for 22 (78.6%) of the 28 CSF isolates (p=0.00), Haemophilus influenzae for two (7.1%) cases and Neisseria meningitides in one (3.5%). Anemia was significantly more common among GSP cases (p=0.04), as was convulsion among those with GNB-positive smears (p=0.03) and a bulging fontanelle in the Gram-smear-negative category. Otherwise, the prevalence and resolution times of the other clinical parameters were comparable across the etiological categories. There were 30 deaths (42.3%) among which GNB-positive cases had significantly shorter stay (p=0.045). Mortality was significantly higher in those with an abnormal respiratory rhythm at admission (p=0.04), purulent/turbid CSF (p=0.03), CSF protein of >150 mg/dl (p=0.02) and glucose <1 mg/dl (p=0.047). Our findings highlight the inherent limitations of predicting the etiology of pediatric meningitides from the clinical parameters as well as the poor prognostic import of respiratory dysrhythmia and a profoundly deranged CSF protein and glucose. The etiological burden of GPC/S. pneumoniae in childhood meningitides in sub-Saharan Africa, the propensity of GNB/H. influenzae for quick fatality and the need for the relevant preventive vaccines are expounded in the discussion. PMID:17722674

  3. Childhood pyogenic meningitis: clinical and investigative indicators of etiology and outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Abdul-Wahab B. R.; Adedoyin, Olanrewaju T.; Abdul-Karim, Aishat A.; Olanrewaju, Abdul-Waheed I.

    2007-01-01

    The relevant parameters of 71 consecutive pediatric admissions for pyogenic meningitis at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria, were analyzed to identify possible clinical and nonmicrobiologic investigative clues of disease etiology and mortality. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was Gram-smear positive (GSP) in 41 (57.6%) of the 71 cases. Twenty-three (56.1%) had Gram-positive cocci (GPC), 14 (34.2%) Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) and three (7.3%) Gram-negative diplococci (GND). The respective mean ages of GPC, GNB and GND cases were 4.49 +/- 5.3, 3.06 +/- 4.8 and 4.47 +/-4.9 years. Streptococcus pneumoniae accounted for 22 (78.6%) of the 28 CSF isolates (p=0.00), Haemophilus influenzae for two (7.1%) cases and Neisseria meningitides in one (3.5%). Anemia was significantly more common among GSP cases (p=0.04), as was convulsion among those with GNB-positive smears (p=0.03) and a bulging fontanelle in the Gram-smear-negative category. Otherwise, the prevalence and resolution times of the other clinical parameters were comparable across the etiological categories. There were 30 deaths (42.3%) among which GNB-positive cases had significantly shorter stay (p=0.045). Mortality was significantly higher in those with an abnormal respiratory rhythm at admission (p=0.04), purulent/turbid CSF (p=0.03), CSF protein of >150 mg/dl (p=0.02) and glucose <1 mg/dl (p=0.047). Our findings highlight the inherent limitations of predicting the etiology of pediatric meningitides from the clinical parameters as well as the poor prognostic import of respiratory dysrhythmia and a profoundly deranged CSF protein and glucose. The etiological burden of GPC/S. pneumoniae in childhood meningitides in sub-Saharan Africa, the propensity of GNB/H. influenzae for quick fatality and the need for the relevant preventive vaccines are expounded in the discussion. PMID:17722674

  4. Clinicopharmacological evaluation of amoxicillin and probenecid against bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Craft, J C; Feldman, W E; Nelson, J D

    1979-01-01

    Forty-three infants and children with bacterial meningitis were treated intravenously with 200 mg of amoxicillin sodium per kg per day for 10 days. (Patients were initially treated with ampicillin and chloramphenicol until the bacterial etiology was defined.) Patients were randomly treated with amoxicillin only or with amoxicillin and four doses of probenecid (10 mg/kg per dose) orally every 6 h for 24 h before the lumbar puncture at day 10. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were obtained on days 1, 5, and 10 of therapy for antibiotic assay. The mean peak serum concentration of amoxicillin of 49.2 micrograms/ml was increased to 61.4 micrograms/ml in patients who received probenecid. The half-life in serum (1.5 h) and area under the curve with probenecid (112.5 micrograms/ml-h) were increased compared with those of amoxicillin alone (1.3 h and 82.2 micrograms/ml-h). The mean peak CSF concentrations on days 1 and 5 were similar, but day 1 concentrations remained between 2.0 micrograms/ml and 5.0 micrograms/ml throughout the 4 h after a dose, whereas the day 5 values decreased at the same decay rate as that in serum. All CSF concentrations were lower on day 10, but patients receiving probenecid had peak values occurring at 1 hr rather than at 0.5 h, and levels were significantly greater at 1 and 2 h after a dose. There were no deaths and patients responded well to treatment. PMID:507789

  5. A fatal case of JC virus meningitis presenting with hydrocephalus in an HIV-seronegative patient

    PubMed Central

    Agnihotri, Shruti P.; Wuthrich, Christian; Dang, Xin; Nauen, David; Karimi, Reza; Viscidi, Raphael; Bord, Evelyn; Batson, Stephanie; Troncoso, Juan; Koralnik, Igor J.

    2014-01-01

    JC virus (JCV) is the etiologic agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, JCV granule cell neuronopathy and JCV encephalopathy. Whether JCV can also cause meningitis, has not yet been demonstrated. We report a case of aseptic meningitis resulting in symptomatic hydrocephalus in an HIV-seronegative patient. Brain imaging showed enlargement of ventricles but no parenchymal lesion. She had a very high JC viral load in the CSF and developed progressive cognitive dysfunction despite ventricular drainage. She was diagnosed with pancytopenia and passed away after 5 ½ months. Post-mortem exam revealed productive JCV infection of leptomeningeal and choroid plexus cells, and limited parenchymal involvement. Sequencing of JCV CSF strain showed an archetype-like regulatory region. Further studies of the role of JCV in aseptic meningitis and in idiopathic hydrocephalus are warranted. PMID:24895208

  6. [Empyema and subdural effusion after meningitis. 2 cases of unusual location].

    PubMed

    Thauvoy, C; Brucher, J M; Evrard, P; Dechef, G; Plaen, J; Stroobandt, G

    1975-01-01

    A 12-year old child and a 2-month old infant developed, in the wane of a purulent meningitis, the former, an infratentorial subdural empyema, the latter, a large, encapsulated, haemoorhagic, aseptic subdural effusion, in the right parieto-temporo-occipital region. In both cases, signs of intracranial hypertension dominated the clinical picture. Neuroradiological investigations permitted diagnosis and localisation of the expansive processes, whose subdural position was recognized at operation and confirmed by histopathological examination. According to the literature, purulent meningitis is a rare cause of subdural empyema, except in infants; the solely infratentorial location is also unusual. Sterile subdural effusion is a more common complication of purulent meningitis in infancy, but the unilateral posterior supratentorial location is also a peculiar feature. Subdural collections after memingitis may be aseptic and possibly haemorrhagic, or septic and purulent; these different modes of presentation correspond perhaps to different degrees or stages of subdural pathological changes in the neighbourhood of leptomeningeal infection. PMID:1233386

  7. Refractory status epilepticus due to pneumococcal meningitis in an infant with congenital immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Prasanth, Sudhakaran; Shaji, Velayudhan Cheruvallil; Lyla, Chacko; Jayalakshmi, Vasudevapanicker

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis remains a life-threatening infection, with varied presentations. A 3 month-old-baby with pneumococcal meningitis presented with clusters of seizures evolving into refractory status epilepticus despite standard antibiotic and aggressive anticonvulsant therapy. Progressive illness despite antibiotic initially suggested possible antibiotic resistance and resulted in addition of another antibiotic. Nonresponse to standard treatment and previous history of abscess in the back of neck pointed to some underlying congenital immunodeficiency. Further evaluation showed a deficiency of complement factor C3. This case underlines the need to consider underlying immunodeficiency in cases of refractory status epilepticus due to bacterial meningitis. Gram-staining of cerebrospinal fluid sample showing plenty of Gram-positive bacteria and comparatively fewer pus cells is a clue regarding some underlying immunodeficiency. PMID:27606021

  8. Refractory status epilepticus due to pneumococcal meningitis in an infant with congenital immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Prasanth, Sudhakaran; Shaji, Velayudhan Cheruvallil; Lyla, Chacko; Jayalakshmi, Vasudevapanicker

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis remains a life-threatening infection, with varied presentations. A 3 month-old-baby with pneumococcal meningitis presented with clusters of seizures evolving into refractory status epilepticus despite standard antibiotic and aggressive anticonvulsant therapy. Progressive illness despite antibiotic initially suggested possible antibiotic resistance and resulted in addition of another antibiotic. Nonresponse to standard treatment and previous history of abscess in the back of neck pointed to some underlying congenital immunodeficiency. Further evaluation showed a deficiency of complement factor C3. This case underlines the need to consider underlying immunodeficiency in cases of refractory status epilepticus due to bacterial meningitis. Gram-staining of cerebrospinal fluid sample showing plenty of Gram-positive bacteria and comparatively fewer pus cells is a clue regarding some underlying immunodeficiency. PMID:27606021

  9. Meningeal supratentorial hemangioblastoma in a patient with von hippel-lindau disease mimicking angioblastic menigioma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon; Park, Ik-Seong; Jo, Kwang Wook

    2013-11-01

    Hemangioblastomas are sporadic tumors found in the cerebellum or spinal cord. Supratentorial hemangioblastomas are rare, and those with meningeal involvement are extremely rare and have been reported in only approximately 130 patients. Here, we report the case of a 51-year-old female patient with supratentorial meningeal hemangioblastoma detected 5 years after surgical resection of an infratentorial hemangioblastoma associated with von Hippel-Lindau disease. Patients with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome are at risk for developing multiple hemangioblastomas, with new tumor formation and growth and possible meningeal infiltration. Regular lifelong follow-up in at-risk patients is recommended and should include the differential diagnosis of dural-based tumors such as angioblastic meningioma and metastatic renal cell carcinoma. PMID:24379949

  10. [The importance of immune deficiency for the prognosis of purulent meningitis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Weippl, G; Eibl, M; Harasek, G; Kucera, H; Unger, F

    1976-12-01

    Morbidity and mortality of suppurative bacterial meningitis show a very constant behavior over many decades. The introduction of antibiotics certainly lowered the lethality considerably, but since then it has remained fairly unchanged at about 15-20%. However, in the principal groups of pathogens--meningococci, pneumococci, Haemophilus influenzae--antibiotic resistence plays no special role. The significance of disorders of defense against infections for the course of the disease has not yet been investigated. Of 92 children examined with purulent meningitis, 49 showed a selective antibody deficiency syndrome against bacterial antigens, 38 of 48 children investigated showed further disorders of bactericidal activity. The proportion of these disorders is particularly high in children with defective healing of a meningitis. PMID:826806

  11. Post-neurosurgical meningitis caused by acinetobacter baumannii: case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Shunlan; Li, Shanshan; Yang, Naibin; Zhang, Sainan; Hu, Danping; Li, Qian; Lu, Mingqin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii), a gram-negative bacterium, has now become an important hospital pathogen, which causes various serious nosocomial infections worldwide. Bacterial meningitis is a common complication after neurosurgical operation, and the percentage of A. baumannii meningitis is growing, especially the one resisting multiple drugs. Method: We retrospectively reviewed the cases with postoperative A. baumannii meningitis (PABM) in the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University from January 2013 to October 2014. And we retrieved the PubMed for cases with PABM and reviewed them. Result: Five cases were included in our retrospective study. Two cases with sensitive A. baumannii and one with multidrug-resistant acinetobacter baumannii (MRAB) were cured, and other two with MRAB died. Conclusion: Intraventricular or intrathecal colistin could be a treatment to the MRAB. PMID:26885152

  12. Varicella-zoster meningitis with a late-onset of skin eruption.

    PubMed

    Sanguankeo, Anawin; Upala, Sikarin; Sornprom, Suthanya; Thamcharoen, Natanong

    2015-01-01

    Viral meningitis caused by varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is an uncommon neurological complication of herpes zoster. It may occur before or after the onset of the vesicular rash along the dermatomal distribution, which is the classic presentation of herpes zoster. We describe a case of a 51-year-old immunocompetent Caucasian man who presented with neck and severe right-sided facial pain. Eight days later, he had photophobia and papular rash on his forehead. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination confirmed aseptic meningitis and CSF PCR detected the presence of VZV DNA. Neurological complications of VZV infection, such as aseptic meningitis, may be difficult to diagnose and can cause delay in treatment, especially in cases with late onset of dermatological manifestations of herpes zoster. Definite diagnosis requires evidence of acute VZV infection in blood or cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:25691578

  13. Leuconostoc sp. Meningitis in a Patient Treated with Rituximab for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Holik, Hrvoje; Coha, Božena; Šiško, Marijan; Tomić-Paradžik, Maja

    2015-01-01

    We present a 64-year-old man who was treated with R-CHOP (rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone) chemoimmunotherapy for mantle cell lymphoma and developed purulent meningitis, probably caused by Leuconostoc sp. The patient had severe hypogammaglobulinemia, which is a possible complication of rituximab therapy. To our knowledge and after reviewing the available medical literature, this is the first described case of purulent meningitis caused by Leuconostoc sp. in a patient with mantle cell lymphoma that appeared after treatment with the R-CHOP protocol. The diagnosis of purulent meningitis was based on clinical, laboratory and cytological cerebrospinal fluid findings, in addition to blood culture results in which we isolated Leuconostoc sp. The patient was treated with meropenem with full recovery. PMID:26376594

  14. A paradoxical decline: intracranial lesions in two HIV-positive patients recovering from cryptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Kenneth D; Pappas, Peter G; Chin-Hong, Peter; Baxi, Sanjiv M

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (C-IRIS) is an increasingly important manifestation among patients with HIV/AIDS, especially as the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is expanding worldwide. Cryptococcus and associated C-IRIS are common causes of meningitis. While intracranial lesions are common in HIV/AIDS, they are rarely due to cryptococcosis or C-IRIS. We describe two cases of paradoxical C-IRIS associated with the development of intracranial cryptococcomas in HIV/AIDS. Both patients had an initial episode of cryptococcal meningitis treated with antifungal therapy. At the time, they had initiated or modified ART with subsequent evidence of immune reconstitution. Two months later, they developed aseptic meningitis with intracranial lesions. After exhaustive work ups, both patients were diagnosed with paradoxical C-IRIS and biopsy confirmed intracranial cryptococcomas. We review the important clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic features of cryptococcomas associated with C-IRIS in HIV/AIDS. PMID:26475880

  15. A critical review of control strategies against meningococcal meningitis epidemics in sub-Saharan African countries.

    PubMed

    Chippaux, J P; Debois, H; Saliou, P

    2002-08-01

    The control strategy of meningitis epidemics in sub-Saharan countries, although reexamined regularly, is based on epidemiological, immunological and logistical considerations put forward at the end of the 1970s. It comprises organizing large-scale vaccinations in the event of a declared epidemic. The obvious failure of this strategy recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) necessitates evaluation of the emergency vaccination criteria. Despite current controversy on the immunogenicity of the polysaccharide vaccine, its safety, effectiveness in the field and low cost could justify the reopening of a debate on its use in routine vaccination. Routine--or preventive--vaccination could significantly reduce the incidence of meningococcal meningitis and its severity. The conjugate vaccine, when available, will constitute an additional advantage in the prevention of meningococcal meningitis. A strategy combining both polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines according to the population targets and possibilities for funding remain to be defined. PMID:12236565

  16. Extracellular Matrix Abnormalities in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Sabina

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence points to the involvement of the brain extracellular matrix (ECM) in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (SZ). Abnormalities affecting several ECM components, including Reelin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), have been described in subjects with this disease. Solid evidence supports the involvement of Reelin, an ECM glycoprotein involved in corticogenesis, synaptic functions and glutamate NMDA receptor regulation, expressed prevalently in distinct populations of GABAergic neurons, which secrete it into the ECM. Marked changes of Reelin expression in SZ have typically been reported in association with GABA-related abnormalities in subjects with SZ and bipolar disorder. Recent findings from our group point to substantial abnormalities affecting CSPGs, a main ECM component, in the amygdala and entorhinal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia, but not bipolar disorder. Striking increases of glial cells expressing CSPGs were accompanied by reductions of perineuronal nets, CSPG- and Reelin-enriched ECM aggregates enveloping distinct neuronal populations. CSPGs developmental and adult functions, including neuronal migration, axon guidance, synaptic and neurotransmission regulation are highly relevant to the pathophysiology of SZ. Together with reports of anomalies affecting several other ECM components, these findings point to the ECM as a key component of the pathology of SZ. We propose that ECM abnormalities may contribute to several aspects of the pathophysiology of this disease, including disrupted connectivity and neuronal migration, synaptic anomalies and altered GABAergic, glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission. PMID:21856318

  17. DNGR-1(+) dendritic cells are located in meningeal membrane and choroid plexus of the noninjured brain.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Elena; Fernández, Andrés; Velasco, Patricia; de Andrés, Belén; Liste, Isabel; Sancho, David; Gaspar, María Luisa; Cano, Eva

    2015-12-01

    The role and different origin of brain myeloid cells in the brain is central to understanding how the central nervous system (CNS) responds to injury. C-type lectin receptor family 9, member A (DNGR-1/CLEC9A) is a marker of specific DC subsets that share functional similarities, such as CD8α(+) DCs in lymphoid tissues and CD103(+) CD11b(low) DCs in peripheral tissues. Here, we analyzed the presence of DNGR-1 in DCs present in the mouse brain (bDCs). Dngr-1/Clec9a mRNA is expressed mainly in the meningeal membranes and choroid plexus (m/Ch), and its expression is enhanced by fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L), a cytokine involved in DC homeostasis. Using Clec9a(egfp/egfp) mice, we show that Flt3L induces accumulation of DNGR-1-EGFP(+) cells in the brain m/Ch. Most of these cells also express major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) molecules. We also observed an increase in specific markers of cDC CD8α+ cells such as Batf-3 and Irf-8, but not of costimulatory molecules such as Cd80 and Cd86, indicating an immature phenotype for these bDCs in the noninjured brain. The presence of DNGR-1 in the brain provides a potential marker for the study of this specific brain cell subset. Knowledge and targeting of brain antigen presenting cells (APCs) has implications for the fight against brain diseases such as neuroinflammation-based neurodegenerative diseases, microbe-induced encephalitis, and brain tumors such as gliomas. PMID:26184558

  18. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Enterovirus Associated with Aseptic Meningitis in Shandong Province, China, 2006–2012

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guifang; Xu, Aiqiang; Lin, Xiaojuan; Song, Lizhi; Ji, Feng; Wang, Suting; Cui, Ning; Song, Yanyan

    2014-01-01

    Background Human enteroviruses (HEVs) are common causes of acute meningitis. However, there is limited information about HEV associated with aseptic meningitis in mainland China because it has not been classified as a notifiable disease. Objectives To characterize the HEVs associated with sporadic aseptic meningitis in China and to analyze their genetic features. Study Design Cerebrospinal fluid, throat swab and feces specimens were collected from patients with aseptic meningitis in 5 sentinel hospitals in Shandong Province, China between 2006 and 2012. Virological investigation (viral isolation and molecular identification) and phylogenetic analysis were performed. Results A total of 437 hospitalized patients were reported, and enteroviruses were detected in the specimens from 84 patients (19.2%) and were identified into 17 serotypes. The nine main serotypes were echovirus (E) 30 (27.4%), EV71 (13.1%), coxsackievirus (CV) B1 (9.5%), CVB3 (7.1%), CVB5 (7.1%), E6 (7.1%), E9 (7.1%), CVA9 (6.0%), and CVA10 (3.6%). Monthly distribution of isolated enteroviruses revealed a major peak in summer-fall season and a small second peak in winter constituted totally by EV71. Sequence analysis on VP1 coding region suggested Shandong strains had great genetic divergence with isolates from other countries. Conclusions Multiple serotypes were responsible for enterovirus meningitis in mainland China. Aseptic meningitis caused by EV71 and coxsackie A viruses–the predominant pathogens for the hand, foot, and mouth disease–is currently an important concern in mainland China. PMID:24587020

  19. Mortality of rocky mountain elk in Michigan due to meningeal worm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, L.C.; Schmitt, S.M.; Carlson, E.; Haufler, J.B.; Beyer, D.E., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Mortality from cerebrospinal parelaphostrongylosis caused by the meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) has been hypothesized to limit elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) populations in areas where elk are conspecific with white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Elk were reintroduced into Michigan (USA) in the early 1900s and subsequently greatly increased population size and distribution despite sympatric high-density (???12/km2) white-tailed deer populations. We monitored 100 radio-collared elk of all age and sex classes from 1981-94, during which time we documented 76 mortalities. Meningeal worm was a minor mortality factor for elk in Michigan and accounted for only 3% of mortalities, fewer than legal harvest (58%), illegal kills (22%), other diseases (7%), and malnutrition (4%). Across years, annual cause-specific mortality rates due to cerebrospinal parelaphostrongylosis were 0.033 (SE=0.006), 0.029 (SE=0.005), 0.000 (SE=0.001), and 0.000 (SE=0.000) for calves, 1-yr-old, 2-yr-old, and ???3-yr-old, respectively. The overall population-level mortality rate due to cerebrospinal parelaphostrongylosis was 0.009 (SE=0.001). Thus, meningeal worm had little impact on elk in Michigan during our study despite greater than normal precipitation (favoring gastropods) and record (???14 km2) deer densities. Further, elk in Michigan have shown sustained population rates-of-increase of ???18%/yr and among the highest levels of juvenile production and survival recorded for elk in North America, indicating that elk can persist in areas with meningeal worm at high levels of population productivity. it is likely that local ecologic characteristics among elk, white-tailed deer, and gastropods, and degree of exposure, age of elk, individual and population experience with meningeal worm, overall population vigor, and moisture determine the effects of meningeal worm on elk populations. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2005.

  20. Evaluation of meningitis surveillance before introduction of serogroup a meningococcal conjugate vaccine - Burkina Faso and Mali.

    PubMed

    2012-12-21

    Each year, 450 million persons in a region of sub-Saharan Africa known as the "meningitis belt" are at risk for death and disability from epidemic meningitis caused by serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis. In 2009, the first serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) developed solely for Africa (MenAfriVac, Serum Institute of India, Ltd.), was licensed for persons aged 1-29 years. During 2010-2011, the vaccine was introduced in the hyperendemic countries of Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger through mass campaigns. Strong meningitis surveillance is critical for evaluating the impact of PsA-TT because it was licensed based on safety and immunogenicity data without field effectiveness trials. Case-based surveillance, which includes the collection of epidemiologic and laboratory data on individual cases year-round, is recommended for countries that aim to evaluate the vaccine's impact. A key component of case-based surveillance is expansion of laboratory confirmation to include every case of bacterial meningitis because multiple meningococcal serogroups and different pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae cause meningitis that is clinically indistinguishable from that caused by serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis. Before the introduction of PsA-TT, evaluations of the existing meningitis surveillance in Burkina Faso and Mali were conducted to assess the capacity for case-based surveillance. This report describes the results of those evaluations, which found that surveillance infrastructures were strong but opportunities existed for improving data management, handling of specimens shipped to reference laboratories, and laboratory capacity for confirming cases. These findings underscore the need to evaluate surveillance before vaccine introduction so that activities to strengthen surveillance are tailored to a country's needs and capacities. PMID:23254257

  1. Management of cryptococcal meningitis in HIV-infected patients: Experience from western India

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Atul K.; Patel, Ketan K.; Ranjan, Rajiv; Shah, Shalin; Patel, Jagdish K.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Cryptococcal meningitis is one of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome defining infections with high mortality. Amphotericin B is the preferred drug for induction therapy. Despite advances in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment, Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) roll-out programs and availability of amphotericin B, cryptococcal meningitis remains an important cause of mortality in the African and other developing countries. Materials and Methods: We carried out a prospective observational study to determine the treatment response rate, tolerability and outcome of patients with cryptococcal meningitis in HIV treated with amphotericin B. Descriptive statistic was used to analyze the data. Results: A total of 27 patients were diagnosed with cryptococcal meningitis during the study period. Headache (96.29%) was the single most common presenting symptom of cryptococcal meningitis in HIV-infected patients, followed by vomiting (77.77%) and fever (66.66%). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) routine and microscopic examination was within normal limits in six patients. CSF became sterile on the 12th day of Amphotericin B in 55.55% of the patients while 33.33% had positive CSF cultures. Patients were started with ART after achieving sterile CSF and tolerated at least 2 weeks of fluconazole consolidation treatment and were free from symptoms. Median time for antiretroviral treatment initiation was 35 (14–90) days after completion of Amphotericin B treatment. One patient developed immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) after ART. Conclusions: We found that the recommended 2 weeks induction treatment with Amphotericin B monotherapy for HIV patients with cryptococcal meningitis in resource-limited settings may be suboptimal for at least one-third of the patients. Extending the therapy to 3 weeks is likely to result in sterilization of the CSF in a majority of these patients. This finding requires confirmation by a larger sample size in appropriately

  2. Meningitis, a whirlpool of death: literary reflections and Russian cultural beliefs.

    PubMed

    Zagvazdin, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges, the membranes that cover the central nervous system. The most frequent causes of the disease are viruses and bacteria. In the past, the disease was commonly referred to as "brain fever" or "brain inflammation," and extreme temperatures, sun, rain, mental distress, and other factors were believed to be its potent triggers. By the beginning of the twentieth century, these beliefs faded away in the United States and most western European countries. In contrast, some of these archaic notions persist in Russia, where cold air, draft, wet hair, and failure to cover one's head with a hat during winter are perceived as serious risks for contracting meningitis. These sentiments are reflected in the prose of Solzhenitsyn and other contemporary Russian authors. However, in the fictional literature of the nineteenth century, emotional or intellectual disturbances rather than the wrath of winter were portrayed worldwide as the most frequent cause of brain inflammation. Both physicians and laity blamed nervous breakdown or mental distress for the development of meningitis and the tragic deaths of the eminent Russian writer Gogol, talented poet Nadson, and heir to the Imperial throne Grand Duke Nicholas Romanov. Even in the twentieth century, esteemed Russian artists, including Pasternak, Paustovsky, and Roerich, highlighted this belief. Following the discovery of the infectious nature of meningitis, fictional depictions of the illness changed. While literary accounts of brain inflammation by the realists (e.g., Dostoevsky and Flaubert) were rather imprecise, the descriptions of the course and symptoms of meningitis by the modernists (e.g., Balmont, Hesse, and Huxley) became detailed and recognizable. Typically, the victim of the disease is a boy, and his imminent agony is preceded by immense suffering that devastates his parents. The dreadful experience of seeing children in the merciless clutches of meningitis had a profound

  3. Autosplenectomy Causing Catastrophic Pneumococcal Meningitis in a Patient with Lupus/Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Khushboo; Snyder, Aaron; Wu, Ulysses; Lahiri, Bimalin; Grover, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    We present the case ofa26-year-old female who presented to the hospital with pneumococcal meningitis. A review of her records showed atrophic spleen, and a hypercoagulable workup was positive for Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE)/Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome (APS). An autosplenectomy from thrombotic occlusion of the splenic artery made her susceptible to pneumococcal meningitis. Autoimmune conditions, particularly SLE and APS, are important causes of hypercoagulable states in a young population, and earlier detection of these conditions and appropriate treatment helps to decrease morbidity and mortality among these patients. PMID:26882790

  4. Invasive Fungal Sinusitis and Meningitis Due to Arthrographis kalrae in a Patient with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Chin-Hong, Peter V.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Roemer, Marguerite; Jacobson, Mark A.; Aberg, Judith A.

    2001-01-01

    We report the first described case of Arthrographis kalrae pansinusitis and meningitis in a patient with AIDS. The patient was initially diagnosed with Arthrographis kalrae pansinusitis by endoscopic biopsy and culture. The patient was treated with itraconazole for approximately 5 months and then died secondary to Pneumocytis carinii pneumonia. Postmortem examination revealed invasive fungal sinusitis that involved the sphenoid sinus and that extended through the cribiform plate into the inferior surfaces of the bilateral frontal lobes. There was also an associated fungal meningitis and vasculitis with fungal thrombosis and multiple recent infarcts that involved the frontal lobes, right caudate nucleus, and putamen. Post mortem cultures were positive for A. kalrae. PMID:11158158

  5. Cerebral distribution of immunoconjugate after treatment for neoplastic meningitis using an intrathecal radiolabeled monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, J.C.; Moss, T.; Moseley, R.P.; Maxwell, R.; Coakham, H.B. )

    1989-08-01

    A detailed autopsy and autoradiographic study was performed after the death of a patient undergoing intrathecal, antibody-guided irradiation for carcinomatous meningitis. The results demonstrated tumor cells infiltrating the surface meninges and a severe astrocytic reaction associated with oedema in the periventricular and brain stem subpial white matter. This was not seen in cortical or other gray matter structures. Autoradiographic examination correlated well, demonstrating isotope within the oedematous areas of the white matter in addition to the expected concentration in the leptomeningeal layers. These findings are discussed in the context of antibody binding to tumor tissue and the possible benefits conferred in the treatment of infiltrating tumor cells.

  6. A hemorrhagic pineal cyst with a bacterial meningitis-like manifestation and benign outcome.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kanji; Omodaka, Toshikazu; Watanabe, Rie; Kodaira, Minori

    2013-01-01

    Pineal cysts are a common incidental finding in imaging studies, and the majority of such cysts are asymptomatic. However, hemorrhaging pineal cysts, which are considered to be rare, are often associated with severe symptoms. We herein describe the case of a 58-year-old patient with the novel manifestation of a bleeding pineal cyst, who had a benign outcome without any surgical treatment. Although the clinical manifestations resembled those of bacterial meningitis, magnetic resonance images suggested chemical meningitis caused by an intracystic hemorrhage and rupture of the pineal cyst. PMID:24334592

  7. Neurological variant of Lemierre's Syndrome with purulent meningitis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bouziri, Asma; Douira, Wiem; Khaldi, Ammar; Mrad, Sonia; Bouyahia, Olfa; Smaoui, Hanene; Sammoud, Azza; Menif, Khaled; Ben Jaballah, Nejla

    2013-02-01

    We report an unusual variant of Lemierre's Syndrome (LS) in a 10-year-old-girl admitted to the intensive care unit for septic shock with meningitis. The primary infection was otitis media. A gram negative bacillus was identified in the direct exam of the purulent ear discharge and the cerebrospinal fluid but cultures were negative. Computerized tomography of the neck revealed a thrombus in the internal jugular vein. Septic shock improved rapidly under supportive treatment. The patient recovered without sequellae after a prolonged duration of parenteral antibiotherapy and hospital stay. Neurologic variants of LS with meningitis, previously reported in the literature, are reviewed. PMID:22506968

  8. Severe meningeal fibrinoid vasculitis associated with Theileria taurotragi infection in two short-horned Zebu cattle.

    PubMed

    Biasibetti, Elena; Sferra, Chiara; Lynen, Godelieve; Di Giulio, Giuseppe; De Meneghi, Daniele; Tomassone, Laura; Valenza, Federico; Capucchio, Maria Teresa

    2016-08-01

    The Authors describe a severe vasculitis with fibrinoid necrosis of the meningeal arteries observed in two brains of indigenous short-horn zebu (Bos indicus) cattle, with bovine cerebral theileriosis (BCT) caused by a tick-transmitted hemoprotozoan, Theileria taurotragi, from Northern Tanzania. In the Author's opinion, the role of T. taurotragi infection in the angiocentric and angiodestructive detected features remains to be evaluated. A possible immunopathologic cancerous mechanism, secondary to the lymphoid deregulation, could be involved. This report suggests further studies to better characterize the lymphoid cell involvement in the pathogenesis of the meningeal vascular lesions by T. taurotragi. PMID:27145963

  9. Recurrent meningitis with upper airway obstruction in a child: frontonasal encephalocele- a case report.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Soumya; Kapoor, Rohit; Paul, Premila; Yadav, Rakesh

    2014-08-01

    Nasal encephalocele are rare congenital anomalies; these benign masses may be confused with nasal dermoids, hemangiomas, nasal gliomas and anterior skull base masses. These lesions have concomitant defects in the anterior cranial fossa thus this potential communication can cause recurrent episodes of meningitis and/or difficulty in breathing and cosmetic anomalies. We bring a case of a 6-year-old child who presented to the clinic with multiple episodes of meningitis which was associated with nasal discharge. The imaging studies and nasal fluid analysis confirmed it as cerebrospinal fluid; subsequently imaging findings concluded it as frontonasal encephalocele which was later resected and patient showed improvement. PMID:25302244

  10. State-of-the-Art Microbiologic Testing for Community-Acquired Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Polage, Christopher R; Cohen, Stuart H

    2016-05-01

    Meningitis and encephalitis are potentially life-threatening diseases with a wide array of infectious, postinfectious, and noninfectious causes. Diagnostic testing is central to determining the underlying etiology, treatment, and prognosis, but many patients remain undiagnosed due to suboptimal testing and lack of tests for all pathogens. In this article, we summarize the epidemiology, barriers to diagnosis, and current best tests for meningitis and encephalitis in developed countries. We end with a brief discussion of new test methods, such as multiplex panel-based tests and metagenomic sequencing, which are likely to alter diagnostic strategies for these conditions in the near future. PMID:26888896

  11. Reversible Deafness and Blindness in a Patient with Cryptococcal Meningitis in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Douglas-Vail, Matt; Bechamp, Taylor; Gohal, Simran; Soegtrop, Robert; Vitali, Sarah; Rugemalila, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is a common and devastating complication of advanced HIV, and is most prevalent in low resource settings in sub Saharan Africa. Raised intracranial pressure is one of the hallmarks of the disease, which can lead to visual and hearing loss and ultimately death. We present the case of a patient with visual and hearing impairment secondary to Cryptococcal meningitis successfully managed by serial cerebrospinal fluid drainage. This case highlights some of the challenges of managing this severe opportunistic infection in a low resource setting. PMID:26753085

  12. Recent outbreak of meningococcal meningitis--a microbiological study with brief review of literature.

    PubMed

    Duggal, S; Duggal, N; Charoo, Hans; Mahajan, R K

    2007-12-01

    Meningococcal disease presents in various clinical forms, most common being meningitis and meningococcemia. A spurt of meningococcal cases was seen in medicine and pediatric wards of Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Hospital during the recent outbreak from Dec 2005 - June 2006. These had presented either with the classical features of acute purulent meningitis or as fever with rash. The patients were investigated microbiologically for the causative organism which was identified as Neisseria meningitidis in 257 out of 531 cases (48.39%). The classic finding of gram negative diplococci on gram stain remained the mainstay of diagnosis. N. meningitidis isolates from culture were sensitive to all commonly used antibiotics. PMID:18697589

  13. Swiftly Decreasing Cerebrospinal Fluid Cathelicidin Concentration Predicts Improved Outcome in Childhood Bacterial Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Savonius, Okko; Helve, Otto; Roine, Irmeli; Andersson, Sture; Fernández, Josefina; Peltola, Heikki; Pelkonen, Tuula

    2016-06-01

    We investigated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cathelicidin concentrations in childhood bacterial meningitis on admission and during antimicrobial treatment. CSF cathelicidin concentrations on admission correlated with CSF white cell counts and protein levels but not with bacterial etiology. A greater decrease in the concentration in response to treatment was associated with a better outcome. Since the CSF cathelicidin concentration reflects the degree of central nervous system (CNS) inflammation, it may be used as a novel biomarker in childhood bacterial meningitis. An early decrease during treatment likely signals more rapid mitigation of the disease process and thus a better outcome. PMID:27008883

  14. Dust and epidemic meningitis in the Sahel: A public health and operational research perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, M. C.; Jeanne, I.; Djingarey, M.

    2009-03-01

    Now that the health communities attention is increasingly focused on climate-health interactions, it has become essential for health decision makers to better understand the role that climate plays in driving disease burdens and health outcomes (both now and in the future) and the opportunity for integrating climate knowledge and information into health decision-making processes to mitigate the negative and strengthen the positive of climate-health interactions. Here we explore the potential climatic indicators and the climate information needs of relevance to the meningitis prevention and control community engaged in the African 'meningitis belt'.

  15. (1,3)-β-d-Glucan in Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Fungal Meningitis Associated with Contaminated Methylprednisolone Injections

    PubMed Central

    Singal, Bonita; Wheat, L. Joseph; Al Sous, Ola; Summons, Theresa A.; Durkin, Michelle M.; Pettit, April C.

    2014-01-01

    Prompt diagnosis and treatment of fungal meningitis are critical, but culture is insensitive. (1,3)-β-d-Glucan (BDG) testing is FDA approved for serological diagnosis of invasive fungal disease; however, BDG testing is not approved for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and the appropriate cutoff value is unknown. We aimed to validate the diagnostic accuracy of CSF BDG measurements for fungal meningitis among patients exposed to contaminated methylprednisolone acetate (MPA). A retrospective observational study was conducted at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital and Vanderbilt University from November 2013 to February 2014. Patients were included if they had received a contaminated MPA injection. Cases were classified as probable or proven meningitis according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. CSF BDG testing was performed according to the package insert instructions for serum samples, and results were validated using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute procedures (MiraVista Diagnostics). Of 233 patients, 45 had meningitis (28 proven cases), 53 had spinal/paraspinal infections (19 proven cases), and 135 did not develop disease. Using the manufacturer's cutoff value (≥80 pg/ml), the sensitivity and specificity were 96% and 95%, respectively, for proven meningitis and 84% and 95% for probable or proven meningitis. Receiver operating characteristic analysis identified the optimal cutoff value for proven meningitis to be 66 pg/ml (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 94%) and that for probable or proven meningitis to be 66 pg/ml (sensitivity, 91%; specificity, 92%). Our results suggest that CSF BDG measurements are highly sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of fungal meningitis associated with contaminated MPA injections. Further study on the utility of CSF BDG testing for other types of fungal meningitis is needed. PMID:25540391

  16. Mechanisms of Normal and Abnormal Endometrial Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    Expression of tissue factor (TF), the primary initiator of coagulation, is enhanced in decidualized human endometrial stromal cells (HESC) during the progesterone-dominated luteal phase. Progesterone also augments a second HESC hemostatic factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). In contrast, progestins inhibit HESC matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, 3 and 9 expression to stabilize endometrial stromal and vascular extracellular matrix. Through these mechanisms decidualized endometrium is rendered both hemostatic and resistant to excess trophoblast invasion in the mid-luteal phase and throughout gestation to prevent hemorrhage and accreta. In non-fertile cycles, progesterone withdrawal results in decreased HESC TF and PAI-expression and increased MMP activity and inflammatory cytokine production promoting the controlled hemorrhage of menstruation and related tissue sloughing. In contrast to these well ordered biochemical processes, unpredictable endometrial bleeding associated with anovulation reflects absence of progestational effects on TF, PAI-1 and MMP activity as well as unrestrained angiogenesis rendering the endometrium non-hemostatic, proteolytic and highly vascular. Abnormal bleeding associated with long-term progestin-only contraceptives results not from impaired hemostasis but from unrestrained angiogenesis leading to large fragile endometrial vessels. This abnormal angiogenesis reflects progestational inhibition of endometrial blood flow promoting local hypoxia and generation of reactive oxygen species that increase production of angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in HESCs and Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) in endometrial endothelial cells while decreasing HESC expression of angiostatic, Ang-1. The resulting vessel fragility promotes bleeding. Aberrant angiogenesis also underlies abnormal bleeding associated with myomas and endometrial polyps however there are gaps in our understanding of this pathology. PMID:21499503

  17. Central Mechanisms of Abnormal Sympathoexcitation in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Takuya; Hirooka, Yoshitaka

    2012-01-01

    It has been recognized that the sympathetic nervous system is abnormally activated in chronic heart failure, and leads to further worsening chronic heart failure. In the treatment of chronic heart failure many clinical studies have already suggested that the inhibition of the abnormal sympathetic hyperactivity by beta blockers is beneficial. It has been classically considered that abnormal sympathetic hyperactivity in chronic heart failure is caused by the enhancement of excitatory inputs including changes in peripheral baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes and chemical mediators that control sympathetic outflow. Recently, the abnormalities in the central regulation of sympathetic nerve activity mediated by brain renin angiotensin system-oxidative stress axis and/or proinflammatory cytokines have been focused. Central renin angiotensin system, proinflammatory cytokines, and the interaction between them have been determined as the target of the sympathoinhibitory treatment in experimental animal models with chronic heart failure. In conclusion, we must recognize that chronic heart failure is a syndrome with an abnormal sympathoexcitation, which is caused by the abnormalities in the central regulation of sympathetic nerve activity. PMID:22919539

  18. The red tide toxin, brevetoxin, induces embryo toxicity and developmental abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Kimm-Brinson, K L; Ramsdell, J S

    2001-01-01

    Brevetoxins are lipophilic polyether toxins produced by the red tide dinoflagellate Gymnodinium breve, and their neurotoxic effects on adult animals have been documented. In this study, we characterized adverse developmental effects of brevetoxin-1 (PbTx-1) using an exposure paradigm that parallels the maternal oocyte transfer of toxin. Medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) embryos were exposed to PbTx-1 via microinjection of toxin reconstituted in a triolein oil droplet. Embryos microinjected with doses of 0.1-8.0 ng/egg (ppm) of brevetoxin-1 exhibited pronounced muscular activity (hyperkinesis) after embryonic day 4. Upon hatching, morphologic abnormalities were commonly found in embryos at the following lowest adverse effect levels: 1.0-3.0 ppm, lateral curvature of the spinal column; 3.1-3.4 ppm, herniation of brain meninges through defects in the skull; and 3.4-4.0 ppm, malpositioned eye. Hatching abnormalities were also commonly observed at brevetoxin doses of 2.0 ppm and higher with head-first, as opposed to the normal tail-first, hatching, and doses > 4.1 ng/egg produced embryos that developed but failed to hatch. Given the similarity of developmental processes found between higher and lower vertebrates, teratogenic effects of brevetoxins have the potential to occur among different phylogenetic classes. The observation of developmental abnormalities after PbTx-1 exposure identifies a new spectrum of adverse effects that may be expected to occur following exposure to G. breve red tide events. PMID:11335186

  19. Pharmacokinetics of methotrexate in the cerebrospinal fluid after intracerebroventricular administration in patients with meningeal carcinomatosis and altered cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K.T.; Wilkinson, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters of the distribution and elimination of intracerebroventricularly administered methotrexate (MTX) were evaluated in three patients with meningeal carcinomatosis. Abnormal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics, which were not otherwise clinically evident, were diagnosed by 111In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate radionuclide imaging. Alterations in CSF flow resulted in large changes in MTX distribution. Reduced cortical convexity (type III), spinal subarachnoid (type II), or ventricular (type I) CSF flow resulted in a prolongation of the single-pass mean residence time of MTX in the peripheral compartment by as much as eightfold and a reduction in intercompartmental clearance by 94-99%. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis can affect both CSF MTX distribution and elimination, each to a different extent, within the same patient. Total MTX clearance from the CSF was reduced by 79-93% in the patients studied. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model, with elimination occurring from the peripheral compartment, gave values for the distribution rate constant from the central to the peripheral compartment (k12), which decreased with the extent of CSF flow abnormality. However, the elimination rate constant from the peripheral compartment (k20) was reduced to an extent apparently independent of CSF flow abnormality (percentage reduction in k12 and k20, respectively: type III, 18 and 66; type II, 67 and 86; type I, 78 and 48). Inadequate distribution and locally high concentrations of MTX within the CSF may contribute to therapeutic failure and neurotoxicity. Monitoring of MTX levels in the CSF may be deceiving when samples are drawn from the site of injection, since the distribution kinetics are altered by abnormal CSF flow dynamics.

  20. Procalcitonin as a Serum Biomarker for Differentiation of Bacterial Meningitis From Viral Meningitis in Children: Evidence From a Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Henry, Brandon Michael; Roy, Joyeeta; Ramakrishnan, Piravin Kumar; Vikse, Jens; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have explored the use of serum procalcitonin (PCT) in differentiating between bacterial and viral etiologies in children with suspected meningitis. We pooled these studies into a meta-analysis to determine the PCT diagnostic accuracy. All major databases were searched through March 2015. No date or language restrictions were applied. Eight studies (n = 616 pediatric patients) were included. Serum PCT assay was found to be very accurate for differentiating the etiology of pediatric meningitis with pooled sensitivity and specificity of 0.96 (95% CI = 0.92-0.98) and 0.89 (95% CI = 0.86-0.92), respectively. The pooled positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and area under the curve (AUC) for PCT were 7.5 (95% CI = 5.6-10.1), 0.08(95% CI = 0.04-0.14), 142.3 (95% CI = 59.5-340.4), and 0.97 (SE = 0.01), respectively. In 6 studies, PCT was found to be superior than CRP, whose DOR was only 16.7 (95%CI = 8.8-31.7). Our meta-analysis demonstrates that serum PCT assay is a highly accurate and powerful test for rapidly differentiating between bacterial and viral meningitis in children. PMID:26378091

  1. Comparative study of CD4 and CD45RO T cells and CD20 B cells in cerebrospinal fluid of syphilitic meningitis and tuberculous meningitis patients.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nian; Zhang, Qiao-Quan; Zhang, Kang; Xie, Yuan; Zhu, Hai-Qing; Lin, Xing-Jian; Di, Qing

    2016-09-01

    This study was to investigate the differences of lymphocyte in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with syphilis meningitis (SM) and tuberculous meningitis (TBM) for new diagnostic insights. Totally, 79 cases of SM and 45 cases of TBM were enrolled. In the CSF, the CD4, CD45RO or CD20 positive lymphocytes were detected by immunohistochemistry. The proportion of CD4 T cells in the CSF lymphocytes in patients with SM was significantly higher than that in patients with TBM (p < 0.05). After medical therapy, there was a significantly decline trend of the CD4 T-cell proportion in both groups (p < 0.05). The proportion of CD45RO T cells in CSF lymphocytes of patients with SM was less than that of patients with TBM (p < 0.05). After medical therapy, the positive ratio of CD45RO T cells was increased in the CSF of both group patients (p < 0.05). The proportion of CD20B cells in the CSF lymphocytes was not obviously different between the two groups during every stage. In conclusion, there are strong differences of CD4 and CD45RO T-cell ratio, but not the CD20 B cells in the meningitis. CD4 and CD45RO T cells in CSF are a useful complement in differentially diagnosing SM and TBM; it contributes to further understand the pathogenesis and prognosis of SM and TBM. PMID:27467195

  2. A rare case of neonatal cryptococcal meningitis in an HIV-unexposed 2-day-old infant: the youngest to date?

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Dominic Anthony

    2016-05-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is uncommon in children, particularly in infants. A 2-day-old boy was admitted with signs suggestive of meningitis. Lumbar puncture confirmed meningitis and cryptococcal infection (cryptococcal antigen and Indian ink stain-positive). His mother was HIV-negative. This is thought to be the youngest case of cryptococcal meningitis to be reported. Cryptococcal infection should be considered in children of all ages with meningitis where there is possible immunodeficiency or failure to respond to initial treatment with antibiotics. PMID:25839243

  3. Ethanol Exposure Induces Neonatal Neurodegeneration by Enhancing CB1R Exon1 Histone H4K8 Acetylation and Up-regulating CB1R Function causing Neurobehavioral Abnormalities in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Subbanna, Shivakumar; Nagre, Nagaraja N.; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Pace, Betty S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ethanol exposure to rodents during postnatal day 7 (P7), which is comparable to the third trimester of human pregnancy, induces long-term potentiation and memory deficits. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these deficits are still poorly understood. Methods: In the present study, we explored the potential role of epigenetic changes at cannabinoid type 1 (CB1R) exon1 and additional CB1R functions, which could promote memory deficits in animal models of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Results: We found that ethanol treatment of P7 mice enhances acetylation of H4 on lysine 8 (H4K8ace) at CB1R exon1, CB1R binding as well as the CB1R agonist-stimulated GTPγS binding in the hippocampus and neocortex, two brain regions that are vulnerable to ethanol at P7 and are important for memory formation and storage, respectively. We also found that ethanol inhibits cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) expression in neonatal and adult mice. The blockade or genetic deletion of CB1Rs prior to ethanol treatment at P7 rescued CREB phosphorylation and Arc expression. CB1R knockout mice exhibited neither ethanol-induced neurodegeneration nor inhibition of CREB phosphorylation or Arc expression. However, both neonatal and adult mice did exhibit enhanced CREB phosphorylation and Arc protein expression. P7 ethanol-treated adult mice exhibited impaired spatial and social recognition memory, which were prevented by the pharmacological blockade or deletion of CB1Rs at P7. Conclusions: Together, these findings suggest that P7 ethanol treatment induces CB1R expression through epigenetic modification of the CB1R gene, and that the enhanced CB1R function induces pCREB, Arc, spatial, and social memory deficits in adult mice. PMID:25609594

  4. States of 13C with abnormal radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demyanova, A. S.; Ogloblin, A. A.; Danilov, A. N.; Goncharov, S. A.; Belyaeva, T. L.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Khlebnikov, S. V.; Burtebaev, N.; Trzaska, W.; Heikkinen, P.; Tyurin, G. P.; Janseitov, D.; Gurov, Yu. B.

    2016-05-01

    Differential cross-sections of the elastic and inelastic 13C + α scattering were measured at E(α) = 90 MeV. The root mean-square radii() of 13C nucleus in the states: 8.86 (1/2-), 3.09 (1/2+) and 9.90 (3/2-) MeV were determined by the Modified diffraction model (MDM). The radii of the first two levels are enhanced compared to that of the ground state of 13C, confirming the suggestion that the 8.86 MeV state is an analogue of the Hoyle state in 12C and the 3.09 MeV state has a neutron halo. Some indications to the abnormally small size of the 9.90 MeV state were obtained.

  5. Neurobiology of social behavior abnormalities in autism and Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barak, Boaz; Feng, Guoping

    2016-04-26

    Social behavior is a basic behavior mediated by multiple brain regions and neural circuits, and is crucial for the survival and development of animals and humans. Two neuropsychiatric disorders that have prominent social behavior abnormalities are autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which is characterized mainly by hyposociability, and Williams syndrome (WS), whose subjects exhibit hypersociability. Here we review the unique properties of social behavior in ASD and WS, and discuss the major theories in social behavior in the context of these disorders. We conclude with a discussion of the research questions needing further exploration to enhance our understanding of social behavior abnormalities. PMID:27116389

  6. Reversible blindness in cryptococcal meningitis with normal intracranial pressure: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ghatalia, Pooja A; Vick, Amanda; Vattoth, Surjith; Roberson, Glenn H; Pappas, Peter G

    2014-07-15

    Ocular complications in cryptococcal meningitis (CM) are commonly attributed to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). We report a case of reversible vision loss complicating AIDS-related CM with a normal ICP. We review other cases of blindness in CM with normal ICP and the potential role of corticosteroids as treatment. PMID:24704725

  7. Meningitis following relapsing painful ophthalmoplegia in aspergillus sphenoidal sinusitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Botturi, A; Salmaggi, A; Pollo, B; Lamperti, E; Erbetta, A; Boiardi, A

    2006-09-01

    We report the case of a 58-year-old woman in whom relapsing painful ophthalmoplegia related to a mycetoma of the sphenoid sinus gave origin to meningitis with markedly depressed glucose levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. Surgical exeresis of the mycetoma allowed aetiological diagnosis (aspergillosis) and--together with antimycotic therapy--led to durable clinical response. PMID:16998735

  8. A Seroepidemiological Study of Serogroup A Meningococcal Infection in the African Meningitis Belt.

    PubMed

    Manigart, Olivier; Trotter, Caroline; Findlow, Helen; Assefa, Abraham; Mihret, Wude; Moti Demisse, Tesfaye; Yeshitela, Biruk; Osei, Isaac; Hodgson, Abraham; Quaye, Stephen Laryea; Sow, Samba; Coulibaly, Mamadou; Diallo, Kanny; Traore, Awa; Collard, Jean-Marc; Moustapha Boukary, Rahamatou; Djermakoye, Oumarou; Mahamane, Ali Elhaji; Jusot, Jean-François; Sokhna, Cheikh; Alavo, Serge; Doucoure, Souleymane; Ba, El Hadj; Dieng, Mariétou; Diallo, Aldiouma; Daugla, Doumagoum Moto; Omotara, Babatunji; Chandramohan, Daniel; Hassan-King, Musa; Nascimento, Maria; Woukeu, Arouna; Borrow, Ray; Stuart, James M; Greenwood, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of epidemic meningococcal disease in the African meningitis belt may be influenced by the background level of population immunity but this has been measured infrequently. A standardised enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for measuring meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibodies was established at five centres within the meningitis belt. Antibody concentrations were then measured in 3930 individuals stratified by age and residence from six countries. Seroprevalence by age was used in a catalytic model to determine the force of infection. Meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibody concentrations were high in each country but showed heterogeneity across the meningitis belt. The geometric mean concentration (GMC) was highest in Ghana (9.09 μg/mL [95% CI 8.29, 9.97]) and lowest in Ethiopia (1.43 μg/mL [95% CI 1.31, 1.57]) on the margins of the belt. The force of infection was lowest in Ethiopia (λ = 0.028). Variables associated with a concentration above the putative protective level of 2 μg/mL were age, urban residence and a history of recent vaccination with a meningococcal vaccine. Prior to vaccination with the serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, meningococcal serogroup A IgG antibody concentrations were high across the African meningitis belt and yet the region remained susceptible to epidemics. PMID:26872255

  9. Diagnostic value of latex agglutination test in diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Syeda Fasiha; Patil, Asha B.; Nadagir, Shobha D.; Nandihal, Namrata; Lakshminarayana, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To know the incidence of bacterial meningitis in children below five years of age. To compare conventional culture and antigen detection methods (Latex agglutination test). Materials and Methods: 100 CSF samples of clinically suspected meningitis cases in children below 5 years of age were included. The samples were subjected to cell count, Gram stain, culture and LAT. The organisms isolated in the study were characterized according to standard procedures. Results: Of the 100 cases studied, 31 cases were diagnosed as ABM by Gram stain, culture and latex agglutination test as per WHO criteria. The hospital frequency of ABM was 1.7%. 15 (48.38) cases were culture positive. Gram stain was positive in 22(70.96) cases and LAT in 17(54.83) cases. Haemophilus influenzae was the most common causative agent of acute bacterial meningitis followed by S.pneumoniae. Case fatality rate was 45.16%. The sensitivity and specificity of LAT was 66.66% and 87.91% respectively. Conclusion: Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency and early diagnosis and treatment is life saving and reduces chronic morbidity. LAT was more sensitive compared to conventional Gram stain and Culture technique in identifying the fastidious organisms like H.influenzae, S.pneumoniae and Group B Streptococcus. However, the combination of Gram stain, Culture and LAT proved to be more productive than any of the single tests alone. PMID:24339598

  10. [A case of elderly onset loss of consciousness due to bacterial meningitis and subsequent vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Kameno, Mami; Takata, Toshihiro; Yasuda, Hisahumi; Hara, Kenta; Okano, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Takashi; Nagata, Masao; Yokono, Koichi

    2008-07-01

    We reported an 83-year-old woman, who suffered from bacterial meningitis and subsequent vasculitis. She experienced episodes of loss of consciousness several times in July, 2006. She also had recurrent fever and was admitted to a local hospital. Routine examinations, including brain MRI and electroencephalogram, were negative and urinary tract infection was diagnosed. After successful antibiotic therapy, she was transferred to a rehabilitation hospital. After transfer, she had no headache, but presented fever again, and a reduced level of consciousness. Cerebrospinal fluid test showed that cell counts were high with a predominance of neutrophils, and her glucose level was low. She received antibiotic therapy on her suspicion of bacterial meningitis. Bacterial cultures of CSF and blood were negative, probably due to the previous antibiotic therapy. Repeated CSF analysis showed a decrease in cell counts, but her lower consciousness did not improve. Moreover, neurological symptoms such as left pyramidal tract sign appeared. She was transferred to our hospital on the suspicion of vasculitis. Diffusion MRI showed high intensity in the right middle cerebral artery (MCA) area and CT angiography showed the stenosis of the right MCA at the M3 portion. Two courses of steroid pulse therapy were performed. Her consciousness gradually improved and eventually could talk although cognitive decline remained as a residual deficit. Our patient failed to be diagnosed early because of atypical symptoms of meningitis. Caution seems necessary for elderly cases presenting with atypical initial symptoms of meningitis. Steroid pulse therapy was effective for the subsequent vasculitis, as reported previously. PMID:18753720

  11. Flow Cytometry To Assess Cerebrospinal Fluid Fungal Burden in Cryptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Lisa M.; Schutz, Charlotte; Scriba, Thomas J.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Boulware, David R.; Meintjes, Graeme; Lalloo, David G.; Urban, Britta C.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal burden in the cerebrospinal fluid is an important determinant of mortality in cryptococcal meningitis, but its use in aiding clinical decision making is hampered by the time involved to perform quantitative cultures. Here, we demonstrate the potential of flow cytometry as a novel and rapid technique to address this issue. PMID:26719441

  12. Genetic Variation in NFKBIE Is Associated With Increased Risk of Pneumococcal Meningitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lundbo, Lene F.; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Clausen, Louise N.; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Sørensen, Henrik T.; Hougaard, David M.; Konradsen, Helle B.; Nørgaard, Mette; Benfield, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are frequent pathogens in life-threatening infections. Genetic variation in the immune system may predispose to these infections. Nuclear factor-κB is a key component of the TLR-pathway, controlled by inhibitors, encoded by the genes NFKBIA, NFKBIE and NFKBIZ. We aimed to replicate previous findings of genetic variation associated with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), and to assess whether similar associations could be found in invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). Methods Cases with IPD and IMD and controls were identified by linking Danish national registries. DNA was obtained from the Danish Neonatal Screening Biobank. The association between SNPs and susceptibility to IPD and IMD, mortality and pneumococcal serotypes was investigated. Results 372 children with pneumococcal meningitis, 907 with pneumococcal bacteremia and 1273 controls were included. We included 406 cases with meningococcal meningitis, 272 with meningococcal bacteremia, and 672 controls. The NFKBIE SNP was associated with increased risk of pneumococcal meningitis (aOR 1.68; 95% CI: 1.20–2.36), but not bacteremia (aOR 1.08; 95% CI: 0.86–1.35). The remaining SNPs were not associated with susceptibility to invasive disease. None of the SNPs were associated with risk of IMD or mortality. Conclusions A NFKBIE polymorphism was associated with increased risk of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:26870821

  13. Late onset of Strongyloides stercoralis meningitis in a retired Belgian miner.

    PubMed

    Pypen, Y; Oris, E; Meeuwissen, J; Vander Laenen, M; Van Gompel, F; Coppens, G

    2015-12-01

    We report a rare case of Strongyloides stercoralis meningitis in an immunocompromised patient treated for a lung carcinoma. Despite his Belgian origin, he was infected with S. stercoralis due to his former work as a miner. Although mostly prevalent in (sub)tropical areas, there are temperate regions where this nematode can occur. PMID:26790558

  14. Interaction of fibrinogen and muramidase-released protein promotes the development of Streptococcus suis meningitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junping; Kong, Decong; Zhang, Shengwei; Jiang, Hua; Zheng, Yuling; Zang, Yating; Hao, Huaijie; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Muramidase-released protein (MRP) is as an important virulence marker of Streptococcus suis (S. suis) serotype 2. Our previous works have shown that MRP can bind human fibrinogen (hFg); however, the function of this interaction in S. suis meningitis is not known. In this study, we found that the deletion of mrp significantly impairs the hFg-mediated adherence and traversal ability of S. suis across human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3). Measurement of the permeability to Lucifer yellow in vitro and Evans blue extravasation in vivo show that the MRP-hFg interaction significantly increases the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the mouse meningitis model, wild type S. suis caused higher bacterial loads in the brain and more severe histopathological signs of meningitis than the mrp mutant at day 3 post-infection. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence observations reveal that the MRP-hFg interaction can destroy the cell adherens junction protein p120-catenin of hCMEC/D3. These results indicate that the MRP-hFg interaction is important in the development of S. suis meningitis. PMID:26441928

  15. Varicella Zoster Aseptic Meningitis: Report of an Atypical Case and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Walid; Elzouki, Abdel-Naser; Husain, Ahmed; Osman, Lubna

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 15 Final Diagnosis: Varicella Zoster aseptic meningitis Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Lumber punctur Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Neurologic complications can occur with varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, usually after vesicular exanthem. A review of the literature revealed 3 cases of viral meningitis associated with 6th nerve palsy but without significantly increased intracranial pressure. Case Report: We report a case of a previously healthy 15-year-old girl with aseptic meningitis as a result of reactivated-VZV infection with symptoms of increased intracranial pressure and reversible 6th cranial nerve palsy but without exanthema. Diagnosis was made by detection of VZV-DNA in cerebrospinal fluid using polymerase chain reaction and documented high intracranial pressure. Full recovery was achieved after a course of acyclovir and acetazolamide. Conclusions: This case demonstrates that VZV may be considered in cases of aseptic meningitis in immunocompetent individuals, even without exanthema, and it may increase the intracranial pressure, leading to symptoms, and causing reversible neurological deficit. PMID:26342350

  16. Streptococcus salivarius Meningitis Case Strain Traced to Oral Flora of Anesthesiologist▿

    PubMed Central

    Shewmaker, Patricia L.; Gertz, Robert E.; Kim, Clara Y.; de Fijter, Sietske; DiOrio, Mary; Moore, Matthew R.; Beall, Bernard W.

    2010-01-01

    Two women in labor received intrapartum spinal anesthesia from the same anesthesiologist approximately 1 h apart. Within 15 h, both patients developed Streptococcus salivarius meningitis and one patient died. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from both patients and tongue swab specimens from the anesthesiologist yielded isolates of an indistinguishable S. salivarius strain. PMID:20504987

  17. Streptococcus salivarius meningitis case strain traced to oral flora of anesthesiologist.

    PubMed

    Shewmaker, Patricia L; Gertz, Robert E; Kim, Clara Y; de Fijter, Sietske; DiOrio, Mary; Moore, Matthew R; Beall, Bernard W

    2010-07-01

    Two women in labor received intrapartum spinal anesthesia from the same anesthesiologist approximately 1 h apart. Within 15 h, both patients developed Streptococcus salivarius meningitis and one patient died. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from both patients and tongue swab specimens from the anesthesiologist yielded isolates of an indistinguishable S. salivarius strain. PMID:20504987

  18. Meningitis and intracranial bleed in a child with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Kanika; Saha, Abhijeet; Thakkar, Dhwanee; Dubey, N K; Vani, Kavita

    2015-11-01

    Meningitis and associated intracranial bleeding have been rarely reported in patients with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. We present such a case with raised intracranial tension in a 13-year-old child and discuss the management issues. Prompt recognition and appropriate treatment of these complications can be life saving in a child with nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26586071

  19. Meningitis and Bacteremia Due to Neisseria cinerea following a Percutaneous Rhizotomy of the Trigeminal Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Richter, H.; Bruderer, T.; Goldenberger, D.; Emonet, S.; Strahm, C.

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea is a human commensal. The first known case of meningitis and bacteremia due to Neisseria cinerea following percutaneous glycerol instillation of the trigeminal ganglion is reported. Conventional phenotypic methods and complete 16S RNA gene sequencing accurately identified the pathogen. Difficulties in differentiation from pathogenic neisseriae are discussed. PMID:26511743

  20. COGNUTUVE AND NEUROLOGICAL COMPLICATIONS OF BACTERIAL MENINGITIS IN ADULT PATIENTS: A HOSPITAL BASED STUDY.

    PubMed

    El-Gindy, Eman M; Ali-Eldin, Fatima A; Bayoumy, Iman; Abdel-Moneim, Lamiaa; Ibrahim, Wesam A

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis is associated with disabling sequelae in a significant proportion of patients. It is associated with high mortality, risk of neuropsychological sequelae and risk of cognitive impairment the purpose of this study is to assess cognitive and neurological complications in adult patients with bacterial meningitis. A total of 45 patients with bacterial meningitis and 16 patients with tuberculous meningitis were enrolled. They were subjected to full medical history taking and clinical examination, full neurological examination on admission and discharge. Mini mental state examination (MMSE) and Wechsler memory scale (WMS) were used to assess cognitive function. The results showed that the ischemic brain insult (87.88%) followed by cranial nerves affection (32.42%) were the commonest neurological complication detected on discharge. Cognitive impairment was detected in 53.66% of patients using MMSE.WMS showed that orientation, information and logical memory were the most common affected. Cognitive and neurological complications were not statistically related to age or etiology (P>0.05). Longer duration until diagnosis (Beta = -.18, p < 0.001), presence of intracranial complications (Beta = -.12, p < 0.005), need for mechanical ventilation (Beta = -.79, p < 0.001) and drug abuse (Beta = -0.11, p < 0.05) were significant predictors of worse outcome assessed by Glasgow outcome score. PMID:26939225