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Sample records for abnormal mitochondrial dynamics

  1. Abnormal Mitochondrial Dynamics in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiongwei; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.; Wang, Xinglong

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the most early and prominent features in vulnerable neurons in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Recent studies suggest that mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles characterized by a delicate balance of fission and fusion, a concept that has revolutionized our basic understanding of the regulation of mitochondrial structure and function which has far-reaching significance in studies of health and disease. Tremendous progress has been made in studying changes in mitochondrial dynamics in AD brain and models and the potential underlying mechanisms. This review highlights the recent work demonstrating abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and distribution in AD models and discusses how these abnormalities may contribute to various aspects of mitochondrial dysfunction and the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:22531428

  2. Abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial loss and mutant huntingtin oligomers in Huntington's disease: implications for selective neuronal damage

    PubMed Central

    Shirendeb, Ulziibat; Reddy, Arubala P.; Manczak, Maria; Calkins, Marcus J.; Mao, Peizhong; Tagle, Danilo A.; Hemachandra Reddy, P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the relationship between mutant huntingtin (Htt) and mitochondrial dynamics in the progression of Huntington's disease (HD). We measured the mRNA levels of electron transport chain genes, and mitochondrial structural genes, Drp1 (dynamin-related protein 1), Fis1 (fission 1), Mfn1 (mitofusin 1), Mfn2 (mitofusin 2), Opa1 (optric atrophy 1), Tomm40 (translocase of outermembrane 40) and CypD (cyclophilin D) in grade III and grade IV HD patients and controls. The mutant Htt oligomers and the mitochondrial structural proteins were quantified in the striatum and frontal cortex of HD patients. Changes in expressions of the electron transport chain genes were found in HD patients and may represent a compensatory response to mitochondrial damage caused by mutant Htt. Increased expression of Drp1 and Fis1 and decreased expression of Mfn1, Mfn2, Opa1 and Tomm40 were found in HD patients relative to the controls. CypD was upregulated in HD patients, and this upregulation increased as HD progressed. Significantly increased immunoreactivity of 8-hydroxy-guanosine was found in the cortical specimens from stage III and IV HD patients relative to controls, suggesting increased oxidative DNA damage in HD patients. In contrast, significantly decreased immunoreactivities of cytochrome oxidase 1 and cytochrome b were found in HD patients relative to controls, indicating a loss of mitochondrial function in HD patients. Immunoblotting analysis revealed 15, 25 and 50 kDa mutant Htt oligomers in the brain specimens of HD patients. All oligomeric forms of mutant Htt were significantly increased in the cortical tissues of HD patients, and mutant Htt oligomers were found in the nucleus and in mitochondria. The increase in Drp1, Fis1 and CypD and the decrease in Mfn1 and Mfn2 may be responsible for abnormal mitochondrial dynamics that we found in the cortex of HD patients, and may contribute to neuronal damage in HD patients. The presence of mutant Htt

  3. Abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial loss and mutant huntingtin oligomers in Huntington's disease: implications for selective neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Shirendeb, Ulziibat; Reddy, Arubala P; Manczak, Maria; Calkins, Marcus J; Mao, Peizhong; Tagle, Danilo A; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the relationship between mutant huntingtin (Htt) and mitochondrial dynamics in the progression of Huntington's disease (HD). We measured the mRNA levels of electron transport chain genes, and mitochondrial structural genes, Drp1 (dynamin-related protein 1), Fis1 (fission 1), Mfn1 (mitofusin 1), Mfn2 (mitofusin 2), Opa1 (optric atrophy 1), Tomm40 (translocase of outermembrane 40) and CypD (cyclophilin D) in grade III and grade IV HD patients and controls. The mutant Htt oligomers and the mitochondrial structural proteins were quantified in the striatum and frontal cortex of HD patients. Changes in expressions of the electron transport chain genes were found in HD patients and may represent a compensatory response to mitochondrial damage caused by mutant Htt. Increased expression of Drp1 and Fis1 and decreased expression of Mfn1, Mfn2, Opa1 and Tomm40 were found in HD patients relative to the controls. CypD was upregulated in HD patients, and this upregulation increased as HD progressed. Significantly increased immunoreactivity of 8-hydroxy-guanosine was found in the cortical specimens from stage III and IV HD patients relative to controls, suggesting increased oxidative DNA damage in HD patients. In contrast, significantly decreased immunoreactivities of cytochrome oxidase 1 and cytochrome b were found in HD patients relative to controls, indicating a loss of mitochondrial function in HD patients. Immunoblotting analysis revealed 15, 25 and 50 kDa mutant Htt oligomers in the brain specimens of HD patients. All oligomeric forms of mutant Htt were significantly increased in the cortical tissues of HD patients, and mutant Htt oligomers were found in the nucleus and in mitochondria. The increase in Drp1, Fis1 and CypD and the decrease in Mfn1 and Mfn2 may be responsible for abnormal mitochondrial dynamics that we found in the cortex of HD patients, and may contribute to neuronal damage in HD patients. The presence of mutant Htt

  4. Mechanical ventilation triggers abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and morphology in the diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Picard, Martin; Azuelos, Ilan; Jung, Boris; Giordano, Christian; Matecki, Stefan; Hussain, Sabah; White, Kathryn; Li, Tong; Liang, Feng; Benedetti, Andrea; Gentil, Benoit J; Burelle, Yan; Petrof, Basil J

    2015-05-01

    The diaphragm is a unique skeletal muscle designed to be rhythmically active throughout life, such that its sustained inactivation by the medical intervention of mechanical ventilation (MV) represents an unanticipated physiological state in evolutionary terms. Within a short period after initiating MV, the diaphragm develops muscle atrophy, damage, and diminished strength, and many of these features appear to arise from mitochondrial dysfunction. Notably, in response to metabolic perturbations, mitochondria fuse, divide, and interact with neighboring organelles to remodel their shape and functional properties-a process collectively known as mitochondrial dynamics. Using a quantitative electron microscopy approach, here we show that diaphragm contractile inactivity induced by 6 h of MV in mice leads to fragmentation of intermyofibrillar (IMF) but not subsarcolemmal (SS) mitochondria. Furthermore, physical interactions between adjacent organellar membranes were less abundant in IMF mitochondria during MV. The profusion proteins Mfn2 and OPA1 were unchanged, whereas abundance and activation status of the profission protein Drp1 were increased in the diaphragm following MV. Overall, our results suggest that mitochondrial morphological abnormalities characterized by excessive fission-fragmentation represent early events during MV, which could potentially contribute to the rapid onset of mitochondrial dysfunction, maladaptive signaling, and associated contractile dysfunction of the diaphragm.

  5. Mutant huntingtin, abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, defective axonal transport of mitochondria, and selective synaptic degeneration in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P Hemachandra; Shirendeb, Ulziibat P

    2012-02-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by expanded polyglutamine repeats in the HD gene. HD is characterized by chorea, seizures, involuntary movements, dystonia, cognitive decline, intellectual impairment and emotional disturbances. Research into mutant huntingtin (Htt) and mitochondria has found that mutant Htt interacts with the mitochondrial protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), enhances GTPase Drp1 enzymatic activity, and causes excessive mitochondrial fragmentation and abnormal distribution, leading to defective axonal transport of mitochondria and selective synaptic degeneration. This article summarizes latest developments in HD research and focuses on the role of abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and defective axonal transport in HD neurons. This article also discusses the therapeutic strategies that decrease mitochondrial fragmentation and neuronal damage in HD.

  6. Abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and synaptic degeneration as early events in Alzheimer's disease: implications to mitochondria-targeted antioxidant therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P Hemachandra; Tripathi, Raghav; Troung, Quang; Tirumala, Karuna; Reddy, Tejaswini P; Anekonda, Vishwanath; Shirendeb, Ulziibat P; Calkins, Marcus J; Reddy, Arubala P; Mao, Peizhong; Manczak, Maria

    2012-05-01

    Synaptic pathology and mitochondrial oxidative damage are early events in Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression. Loss of synapses and synaptic damage are the best correlates of cognitive deficits found in AD patients. Recent research on amyloid beta (Aβ) and mitochondria in AD revealed that Aβ accumulates in synapses and synaptic mitochondria, leading to abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and synaptic degeneration in AD neurons. Further, recent studies using live-cell imaging and primary neurons from amyloid beta precursor protein (AβPP) transgenic mice revealed reduced mitochondrial mass, defective axonal transport of mitochondria and synaptic degeneration, indicating that Aβ is responsible for mitochondrial and synaptic deficiencies. Tremendous progress has been made in studying antioxidant approaches in mouse models of AD and clinical trials of AD patients. This article highlights the recent developments made in Aβ-induced abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, defective mitochondrial biogenesis, impaired axonal transport and synaptic deficiencies in AD. This article also focuses on mitochondrial approaches in treating AD, and also discusses latest research on mitochondria-targeted antioxidants in AD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antioxidants and Antioxidant Treatment in Disease.

  7. Impaired mitochondrial biogenesis, defective axonal transport of mitochondria, abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and synaptic degeneration in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Calkins, Marcus J; Manczak, Maria; Mao, Peizhong; Shirendeb, Ulziibat; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2011-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) in synapses and synaptic mitochondria causes synaptic mitochondrial failure and synaptic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of this study was to better understand the effects of Aβ in mitochondrial activity and synaptic alterations in neurons from a mouse model of AD. Using primary neurons from a well-characterized Aβ precursor protein transgenic (AβPP) mouse model (Tg2576 mouse line), for the first time, we studied mitochondrial activity, including axonal transport of mitochondria, mitochondrial dynamics, morphology and function. Further, we also studied the nature of Aβ-induced synaptic alterations, and cell death in primary neurons from Tg2576 mice, and we sought to determine whether the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SS31 could mitigate the effects of oligomeric Aβ. We found significantly decreased anterograde mitochondrial movement, increased mitochondrial fission and decreased fusion, abnormal mitochondrial and synaptic proteins and defective mitochondrial function in primary neurons from AβPP mice compared with wild-type (WT) neurons. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a large number of small mitochondria and structurally damaged mitochondria, with broken cristae in AβPP primary neurons. We also found an increased accumulation of oligomeric Aβ and increased apoptotic neuronal death in the primary neurons from the AβPP mice relative to the WT neurons. Our results revealed an accumulation of intraneuronal oligomeric Aβ, leading to mitochondrial and synaptic deficiencies, and ultimately causing neurodegeneration in AβPP cultures. However, we found that the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SS31 restored mitochondrial transport and synaptic viability, and decreased the percentage of defective mitochondria, indicating that SS31 protects mitochondria and synapses from Aβ toxicity.

  8. Haematological abnormalities in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the kind of haematological abnormalities that are present in patients with mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and the frequency of their occurrence. METHODS The blood cell counts of a cohort of patients with syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs were retrospectively reviewed. MIDs were classified as ‘definite’, ‘probable’ or ‘possible’ according to clinical presentation, instrumental findings, immunohistological findings on muscle biopsy, biochemical abnormalities of the respiratory chain and/or the results of genetic studies. Patients who had medical conditions other than MID that account for the haematological abnormalities were excluded. RESULTS A total of 46 patients (‘definite’ = 5; ‘probable’ = 9; ‘possible’ = 32) had haematological abnormalities attributable to MIDs. The most frequent haematological abnormality in patients with MIDs was anaemia. 27 patients had anaemia as their sole haematological problem. Anaemia was associated with thrombopenia (n = 4), thrombocytosis (n = 2), leucopenia (n = 2), and eosinophilia (n = 1). Anaemia was hypochromic and normocytic in 27 patients, hypochromic and microcytic in six patients, hyperchromic and macrocytic in two patients, and normochromic and microcytic in one patient. Among the 46 patients with a mitochondrial haematological abnormality, 78.3% had anaemia, 13.0% had thrombopenia, 8.7% had leucopenia and 8.7% had eosinophilia, alone or in combination with other haematological abnormalities. CONCLUSION MID should be considered if a patient’s abnormal blood cell counts (particularly those associated with anaemia, thrombopenia, leucopenia or eosinophilia) cannot be explained by established causes. Abnormal blood cell counts may be the sole manifestation of MID or a collateral feature of a multisystem problem. PMID:26243978

  9. Mitochondrial division inhibitor 1 protects against mutant huntingtin-induced abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and neuronal damage in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Manczak, Maria; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2015-12-20

    The objective of this study was to determine the protective effects of the mitochondrial division inhibitor 1 (Mdivi1) in striatal neurons that stably express mutant Htt (STHDhQ111/Q111) and wild-type (WT) Htt (STHDhQ7/Q7). Using gene expression analysis, biochemical methods, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal microscopy methods, we studied (i) mitochondrial and synaptic activities by measuring mRNA and the protein levels of mitochondrial and synaptic genes, (ii) mitochondrial function and (iii) ultra-structural changes in mutant Htt neurons relative to WT Htt neurons. We also studied these parameters in Mdivil-treated and untreated WT and mutant Htt neurons. Increased expressions of mitochondrial fission genes, decreased expression of fusion genes and synaptic genes were found in the mutant Htt neurons relative to the WT Htt neurons. Electron microscopy of the mutant Htt neurons revealed a significantly increased number of mitochondria, indicating that mutant Htt fragments mitochondria. Biochemical analysis revealed defective mitochondrial functioning. In the Mdivil-treated mutant Htt neurons, fission genes were down-regulated, and fusion genes were up-regulated, suggesting that Mdivil decreases fission activity. Synaptic genes were up-regulated, and mitochondrial function was normal in the Mdivi1-treated mutant Htt neurons. Immunoblotting findings of mitochondrial and synaptic proteins agreed with mRNA findings. The TEM studies revealed that increased numbers of structurally intact mitochondria were present in Mdivi1-treated mutant Htt neurons. Increased synaptic and mitochondrial fusion genes and decreased fission genes were found in the Mdivi1-treated WT Htt neurons, indicating that Mdivi1 beneficially affects healthy neurons. Taken together, these findings suggest that Mdivi1 is protective against mutant Htt-induced mitochondrial and synaptic damage in HD neurons and that Mdivi1 may be a promising molecule for the treatment of HD patients.

  10. Melatonin prevents abnormal mitochondrial dynamics resulting from the neurotoxicity of cadmium by blocking calcium-dependent translocation of Drp1 to the mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shangcheng; Pi, Huifeng; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Nixian; Li, YuMing; Zhang, Huiliang; Tang, Ju; Li, Huijuan; Feng, Min; Deng, Ping; Guo, Pan; Tian, Li; Xie, Jia; He, Mindi; Lu, Yonghui; Zhong, Min; Zhang, Yanwen; Wang, Wang; Reiter, Russel J; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a persistent environmental toxin and occupational pollutant that is considered to be a potential risk factor in the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Abnormal mitochondrial dynamics are increasingly implicated in mitochondrial damage in various neurological pathologies. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the disturbance of mitochondrial dynamics contributed to Cd-induced neurotoxicity and whether melatonin has any neuroprotective properties. After cortical neurons were exposed to 10 μM cadmium chloride (CdCl2 ) for various periods (0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hr), the morphology of their mitochondria significantly changed from the normal tubular networks into punctuated structures within 3 hr. Following this pronounced mitochondrial fragmentation, Cd treatment led to signs of mitochondrial dysfunction, including excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, decreased ATP content, and mitochondrial membrane potential (▵Ψm) loss. However, 1 mM melatonin pretreatment efficiently attenuated the Cd-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, which improved the turnover of mitochondrial function. In the brain tissues of rats that were intraperitoneally given 1 mg/kg CdCl2 for 7 days, melatonin also ameliorated excessive mitochondrial fragmentation and mitochondrial damage in vivo. Melatonin's protective effects were attributed to its roles in preventing cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+) ]i ) overload, which blocked the recruitment of Drp1 from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria. Taken together, our results are the first to demonstrate that abnormal mitochondrial dynamics is involved in cadmium-induced neurotoxicity. Melatonin has significant pharmacological potential in protecting against the neurotoxicity of Cd by blocking the disbalance of mitochondrial fusion and fission.

  11. Swimming attenuates D-galactose-induced brain aging via suppressing miR-34a-mediated autophagy impairment and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kou, Xianjuan; Li, Jie; Liu, Xingran; Chang, Jingru; Zhao, Qingxia; Jia, Shaohui; Fan, Jingjing; Chen, Ning

    2017-03-16

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to be involved in many neurodegenerative diseases. In order to explore the regulatory role of miR-34a in aging-related diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) during exercise intervention, we constructed a rat model with (D-galactose) D-gal-induced oxidative stress and cognitive impairment coupled with dysfunctional autophagy and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, determined the mitigation of cognitive impairment of D-gal-induced aging rats during swimming intervention, and evaluated miR-34a-mediated functional status of autophagy and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics. Meanwhile, whether the up-regulation of miR-34a can lead to dysfunctional autophagy and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics was confirmed in human SH-SY5Y cells with silenced miR-34a by the transfection of miR-34a inhibitor. Results indicated that swimming intervention could significantly attenuate cognitive impairment, rescue the up-regulation of miR-34a, mitigate the dysfunctional autophagy, and inhibit the increase of Drp1 in D-gal-induced aging model rats. In contrast, miR-34a inhibitor in cell model not only attenuated D-gal-induced autophagy impairment, but also decreased the expression of Drp1 and Mfn2. Therefore, swimming training can attenuate the impairment of miR-34a-mediated autophagy and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics during D-gal-induced aging process in rat hippocampal tissue, which may be one of the mechanisms for delaying brain aging through swimming training, and miR-34a could be the novel therapeutic target for aging-related diseases such as AD.

  12. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cardiac function is energetically demanding, reliant on efficient well-coupled mitochondria to generate adenosine triphosphate and fulfill the cardiac demand. Predictably then, mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with cardiac pathologies, often related to metabolic disease, most commonly diabetes. Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM), characterized by decreased left ventricular function, arises independently of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis. Dysregulation of Ca2+ handling, metabolic changes, and oxidative stress are observed in DCM, abnormalities reflected in alterations in mitochondrial energetics. Cardiac tissue from DCM patients also presents with altered mitochondrial morphology, suggesting a possible role of mitochondrial dynamics in its pathological progression. Recent Advances: Abnormal mitochondrial morphology is associated with pathologies across diverse tissues, suggesting that this highly regulated process is essential for proper cell maintenance and physiological homeostasis. Highly structured cardiac myofibers were hypothesized to limit alterations in mitochondrial morphology; however, recent work has identified morphological changes in cardiac tissue, specifically in DCM. Critical Issues: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported independently from observations of altered mitochondrial morphology in DCM. The temporal relationship and causative nature between functional and morphological changes of mitochondria in the establishment/progression of DCM is unclear. Future Directions: Altered mitochondrial energetics and morphology are not only causal for but also consequential to reactive oxygen species production, hence exacerbating oxidative damage through reciprocal amplification, which is integral to the progression of DCM. Therefore, targeting mitochondria for DCM will require better mechanistic characterization of morphological distortion and bioenergetic dysfunction. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1545–1562. PMID

  13. Mitochondrial dynamics and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Baloh, Robert H

    2008-02-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is perhaps the archetypal disease of axonal degeneration, characteristically involving degeneration of the longest axons in the body. Evidence from both inherited and acquired forms of peripheral neuropathy strongly supports that the primary pathology is in the axons themselves and points to disruption of axonal transport as an important disease mechanism. Recent studies in human genetics have further identified abnormalities in mitochondrial dynamics--the fusion, fission, and movement of mitochondria--as a player in the pathogenesis of inherited peripheral neuropathy. This review provides an update on the mechanisms of mitochondrial trafficking in axons and the emerging relationship between the disruption of mitochondrial dynamics and axonal degeneration. Evidence suggests mitochondria are a "critical cargo" whose transport is necessary for proper axonal and synaptic function. Importantly, understanding the regulation of mitochondrial movement and the consequences of decreased axonal mitochondrial function may define new paths for therapeutic agents in peripheral neuropathy and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Mitochondrial Dynamics: Coupling Mitochondrial Fitness with Healthy Aging.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, David; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in mitochondrial function and the accumulation of abnormal mitochondria. However, the precise mechanisms by which aging promotes these mitochondrial alterations and the role of the latter in aging are still not fully understood. Mitochondrial dynamics is a key process regulating mitochondrial function and quality. Altered expression of some mitochondrial dynamics proteins has been recently associated with aging and with age-related alterations in yeast, Caenorhabditis elegans, mice, and humans. Here, we review the link between alterations in mitochondrial dynamics, aging, and age-related impairment. We propose that the dysregulation of mitochondrial dynamics leads to age-induced accumulation of unhealthy mitochondria and contributes to alterations linked to aging, such as diabetes and neurodegeneration.

  15. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, John; Dasgupta, Asish; Huston, Jessica; Chen, Kuang-Huieh; Archer, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an idiopathic cardiopulmonary disease characterized by obstruction of small pulmonary arteries by excessive proliferation and apoptosis-resistance of vascular cells, as well as inflammation, thrombosis and vasoconstriction. Vascular obstruction increases the afterload faced by the right ventricle (RV), leading to RV failure. The proliferative, obstructive vasculopathy of PAH shares several mitochondrial abnormalities with cancer, notably a shift to aerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial fragmentation. Mitochondria in the pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) normally serve as oxygen sensors. In PAH, acquired mitochondrial abnormalities, including epigenetic silencing of superoxide dismutase (SOD2), disrupt oxygen sensing creating a pseudo-hypoxic environment characterized by normoxic activation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α). The resulting metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg phenomenon) reflects inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases. In addition, altered mitochondrial dynamics result in mitochondrial fragmentation. The molecular basis of this structural change includes upregulation and activation of fission mediators, notably dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP-1), and downregulation of fusion mediators, especially mitofusin-2 (MFN2). These pathogenic mitochondrial abnormalities offer new therapeutic targets. Inhibition of mitotic fission or enhancement of fusion in PAH PASMC slows cell proliferation, causes cell cycle arrest, and induces apoptosis. DRP-1 inhibition or MFN2 gene therapy can regress PAH in experimental models of PAH. This review focuses on the etiology of mitochondrial fragmentation in PAH and explores the therapeutic implications of mitochondrial dynamics in the pulmonary vasculature and RV. PMID:25672499

  16. How mitochondrial dynamism orchestrates mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Shirihai, Orian; Song, Moshi; Dorn, Gerald W

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic, except in adult cardiomyocytes. Yet, the fission and fusion-promoting proteins that mediate mitochondrial dynamism are highly expressed in, and essential to the normal functioning of, hearts. Here, we review accumulating evidence supporting important roles for mitochondrial fission and fusion in cardiac mitochondrial quality control, focusing on the PINK1-Parkin mitophagy pathway.Based in part on recent findings from in vivo mouse models in which mitofusin-mediated mitochondrial fusion or Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission were conditionally interrupted in cardiac myocytes, we propose several new concepts that may provide insight into the cardiac mitochondrial dynamism-mitophagy interactome. PMID:25999423

  17. Methylene blue alleviates nuclear and mitochondrial abnormalities in progeria.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zheng-Mei; Choi, Ji Young; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Haoyue; Tariq, Zeshan; Wu, Di; Ko, Eunae; LaDana, Christina; Sesaki, Hiromi; Cao, Kan

    2016-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a fatal premature aging disease, is caused by a single-nucleotide mutation in the LMNA gene. Previous reports have focused on nuclear phenotypes in HGPS cells, yet the potential contribution of the mitochondria, a key player in normal aging, remains unclear. Using high-resolution microscopy analysis, we demonstrated a significantly increased fraction of swollen and fragmented mitochondria and a marked reduction in mitochondrial mobility in HGPS fibroblast cells. Notably, the expression of PGC-1α, a central regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, was inhibited by progerin. To rescue mitochondrial defects, we treated HGPS cells with a mitochondrial-targeting antioxidant methylene blue (MB). Our analysis indicated that MB treatment not only alleviated the mitochondrial defects but also rescued the hallmark nuclear abnormalities in HGPS cells. Additional analysis suggested that MB treatment released progerin from the nuclear membrane, rescued perinuclear heterochromatin loss and corrected misregulated gene expression in HGPS cells. Together, these results demonstrate a role of mitochondrial dysfunction in developing the premature aging phenotypes in HGPS cells and suggest MB as a promising therapeutic approach for HGPS.

  18. Mitochondrial dynamics and inherited peripheral nerve diseases.

    PubMed

    Pareyson, Davide; Saveri, Paola; Sagnelli, Anna; Piscosquito, Giuseppe

    2015-06-02

    Peripheral nerves have peculiar energetic requirements because of considerable length of axons and therefore correct mitochondria functioning and distribution along nerves is fundamental. Mitochondrial dynamics refers to the continuous change in size, shape, and position of mitochondria within cells. Abnormalities of mitochondrial dynamics produced by mutations in proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion (mitofusin-2, MFN2), fission (ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein-1, GDAP1), and mitochondrial axonal transport usually present with a Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) phenotype. MFN2 mutations cause CMT type 2A by altering mitochondrial fusion and trafficking along the axonal microtubule system. CMT2A is an axonal autosomal dominant CMT type which in most cases is characterized by early onset and rather severe course. GDAP1 mutations also alter fission, fusion and transport of mitochondria and are associated either with recessive demyelinating (CMT4A) and axonal CMT (AR-CMT2K) and, less commonly, with dominant, milder, axonal CMT (CMT2K). OPA1 (Optic Atrophy-1) is involved in fusion of mitochondrial inner membrane, and its heterozygous mutations lead to early-onset and progressive dominant optic atrophy which may be complicated by other neurological symptoms including peripheral neuropathy. Mutations in several proteins fundamental for the axonal transport or forming the axonal cytoskeleton result in peripheral neuropathy, i.e., CMT, distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) or hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN), as well as in hereditary spastic paraplegia. Indeed, mitochondrial transport involves directly or indirectly components of the kinesin superfamily (KIF5A, KIF1A, KIF1B), responsible of anterograde transport, and of the dynein complex and related proteins (DYNC1H1, dynactin, dynamin-2), implicated in retrograde flow. Microtubules, neurofilaments, and chaperones such as heat shock proteins (HSPs) also have a fundamental

  19. Abnormal mitochondrial transport and morphology as early pathological changes in human models of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chong-Chong; Denton, Kyle R; Wang, Zhi-Bo; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Li, Xue-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), characterized by specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons, is caused by mutations in the survival of motor neuron 1, telomeric (SMN1) gene and subsequent decreased levels of functional SMN. How the deficiency of SMN, a ubiquitously expressed protein, leads to spinal motor neuron-specific degeneration in individuals affected by SMA remains unknown. In this study, we examined the role of SMN in mitochondrial axonal transport and morphology in human motor neurons by generating SMA type 1 patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and differentiating these cells into spinal motor neurons. The initial specification of spinal motor neurons was not affected, but these SMA spinal motor neurons specifically degenerated following long-term culture. Moreover, at an early stage in SMA spinal motor neurons, but not in SMA forebrain neurons, the number of mitochondria, mitochondrial area and mitochondrial transport were significantly reduced in axons. Knocking down of SMN expression led to similar mitochondrial defects in spinal motor neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells, confirming that SMN deficiency results in impaired mitochondrial dynamics. Finally, the application of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) mitigated the impairment in mitochondrial transport and morphology and rescued motor neuron degeneration in SMA long-term cultures. Furthermore, NAC ameliorated the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential in SMA spinal motor neurons, suggesting that NAC might rescue apoptosis and motor neuron degeneration by improving mitochondrial health. Overall, our data demonstrate that SMN deficiency results in abnormal mitochondrial transport and morphology and a subsequent reduction in mitochondrial health, which are implicated in the specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons in SMA.

  20. Mitochondrial dynamics during cell cycling.

    PubMed

    Horbay, Rostyslav; Bilyy, Rostyslav

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria are the cell's power plant that must be in a proper functional state in order to produce the energy necessary for basic cellular functions, such as proliferation. Mitochondria are 'dynamic' in that they are constantly undergoing fission and fusion to remain in a functional state throughout the cell cycle, as well as during other vital processes such as energy supply, cellular respiration and programmed cell death. The mitochondrial fission/fusion machinery is involved in generating young mitochondria, while eliminating old, damaged and non-repairable ones. As a result, the organelles change in shape, size and number throughout the cell cycle. Such precise and accurate balance is maintained by the cytoskeletal transporting system via microtubules, which deliver the mitochondrion from one location to another. During the gap phases G1 and G2, mitochondria form an interconnected network, whereas in mitosis and S-phase fragmentation of the mitochondrial network will take place. However, such balance is lost during neoplastic transformation and autoimmune disorders. Several proteins, such as Drp1, Fis1, Kif-family proteins, Opa1, Bax and mitofusins change in activity and might link the mitochondrial fission/fusion events with processes such as alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential, apoptosis, necrosis, cell cycle arrest, and malignant growth. All this indicates how vital proper functioning of mitochondria is in maintaining cell integrity and preventing carcinogenesis.

  1. Death-associated Protein 3 Regulates Mitochondrial-encoded Protein Synthesis and Mitochondrial Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin; Xian, Hongxu; Lee, Kit Yee; Xiao, Bin; Wang, Hongyan; Yu, Fengwei; Shen, Han-Ming; Liou, Yih-Cherng

    2015-10-09

    Mitochondrial morphologies change over time and are tightly regulated by dynamic machinery proteins such as dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), mitofusion 1/2, and optic atrophy 1 (OPA1). However, the detailed mechanisms of how these molecules cooperate to mediate fission and fusion remain elusive. DAP3 is a mitochondrial ribosomal protein that involves in apoptosis, but its biological function has not been well characterized. Here, we demonstrate that DAP3 specifically localizes in the mitochondrial matrix. Knockdown of DAP3 in mitochondria leads to defects in mitochondrial-encoded protein synthesis and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics. Moreover, depletion of DAP3 dramatically decreases the phosphorylation of Drp1 at Ser-637 on mitochondria, enhancing the retention time of Drp1 puncta on mitochondria during the fission process. Furthermore, autophagy is inhibited in the DAP3-depleted cells, which sensitizes cells to different types of death stimuli. Together, our results suggest that DAP3 plays important roles in mitochondrial function and dynamics, providing new insights into the mechanism of a mitochondrial ribosomal protein function in cell death.

  2. Melatonin: A Mitochondrial Targeting Molecule Involving Mitochondrial Protection and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Qin, Lilan; Reiter, Russel J.

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin has been speculated to be mainly synthesized by mitochondria. This speculation is supported by the recent discovery that aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase/serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT/SNAT) is localized in mitochondria of oocytes and the isolated mitochondria generate melatonin. We have also speculated that melatonin is a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant. It accumulates in mitochondria with high concentration against a concentration gradient. This is probably achieved by an active transportation via mitochondrial melatonin transporter(s). Melatonin protects mitochondria by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibiting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), and activating uncoupling proteins (UCPs). Thus, melatonin maintains the optimal mitochondrial membrane potential and preserves mitochondrial functions. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics is also regulated by melatonin. In most cases, melatonin reduces mitochondrial fission and elevates their fusion. Mitochondrial dynamics exhibit an oscillatory pattern which matches the melatonin circadian secretory rhythm in pinealeocytes and probably in other cells. Recently, melatonin has been found to promote mitophagy and improve homeostasis of mitochondria. PMID:27999288

  3. Reincarnation in cultured muscle of mitochondrial abnormalities. Two patients with epilepsy and lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Askanas, V; Engel, W K; Britton, D E; Adornato, B T; Eiben, R M

    1978-12-01

    Two unrelated 9-year-old boys failed to thrive from ages 5 and 4 years, and had focal cerebral seizures followed by transcent hemipareses. Histochemistry of their muscle biopsies showed "ragged-red" fibers, which ultrastructurally contained clusters of mitochondria having loss of crisp delineation of crista membranes and contained amorphous inclusion material and parallel-packed cristae and sometimes paracrystalline inclusions. In the patients' cultured muscles, similar mitochondrial abnormalities were present. 2,4-Dinitrophenol, introduced to the medium of cultures of normal human muscle, produced mitochondrial abnormalities similar to those of the patients', and the medium of the patients' muscle cultures worsened the mitochondrial abnormalities. This study, in demonstrating a mitochondrial defect reproducible in the cultured muscle fibers and, therefore, intrinsic to the ragged-red muscle fibers themselves, raises the possibility of a collateral mitochondrial defect in CNS cells as part of a multicellular mitochondriopathy.

  4. Mitochondrial dynamics in mammalian health and disease.

    PubMed

    Liesa, Marc; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio

    2009-07-01

    The meaning of the word mitochondrion (from the Greek mitos, meaning thread, and chondros, grain) illustrates that the heterogeneity of mitochondrial morphology has been known since the first descriptions of this organelle. Such a heterogeneous morphology is explained by the dynamic nature of mitochondria. Mitochondrial dynamics is a concept that includes the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, the regulation of mitochondrial architecture (morphology and distribution), and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission events. The relevance of these events in mitochondrial and cell physiology has been partially unraveled after the identification of the genes responsible for mitochondrial fusion and fission. Furthermore, during the last decade, it has been identified that mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1) cause prevalent neurodegenerative diseases (Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and Kjer disease/autosomal dominant optic atrophy). In addition, other diseases such as type 2 diabetes or vascular proliferative disorders show impaired MFN2 expression. Altogether, these findings have established mitochondrial dynamics as a consolidated area in cellular physiology. Here we review the most significant findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics in mammalian cells and their implication in human pathologies.

  5. Mitochondrial dynamics and the cell cycle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nuclear-mitochondrial (NM) communication impacts many aspects of plant development including vigor, sterility and viability. Dynamic changes in mitochondrial number, shape, size, and cellular location takes place during the cell cycle possibly impacting the process itself and leading to distribution...

  6. Abnormal dynamics of language in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Stephane, Massoud; Kuskowski, Michael; Gundel, Jeanette

    2014-05-30

    Language could be conceptualized as a dynamic system that includes multiple interactive levels (sub-lexical, lexical, sentence, and discourse) and components (phonology, semantics, and syntax). In schizophrenia, abnormalities are observed at all language elements (levels and components) but the dynamic between these elements remains unclear. We hypothesize that the dynamics between language elements in schizophrenia is abnormal and explore how this dynamic is altered. We, first, investigated language elements with comparable procedures in patients and healthy controls. Second, using measures of reaction time, we performed multiple linear regression analyses to evaluate the inter-relationships among language elements and the effect of group on these relationships. Patients significantly differed from controls with respect to sub-lexical/lexical, lexical/sentence, and sentence/discourse regression coefficients. The intercepts of the regression slopes increased in the same order above (from lower to higher levels) in patients but not in controls. Regression coefficients between syntax and both sentence level and discourse level semantics did not differentiate patients from controls. This study indicates that the dynamics between language elements is abnormal in schizophrenia. In patients, top-down flow of linguistic information might be reduced, and the relationship between phonology and semantics but not between syntax and semantics appears to be altered.

  7. Role of Mitochondrial Dynamics in Neuronal Development: Mechanism for Wolfram Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hodurova, Zuzana; Mandel, Merle; Zeb, Akbar; Choubey, Vinay; Safiulina, Dzhamilja; Vasar, Eero; Veksler, Vladimir; Kaasik, Allen

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of the protein Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1) is associated with multiple neurological and psychiatric abnormalities similar to those observed in pathologies showing alterations in mitochondrial dynamics. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that WFS1 deficiency affects neuronal function via mitochondrial abnormalities. We show that down-regulation of WFS1 in neurons leads to dramatic changes in mitochondrial dynamics (inhibited mitochondrial fusion, altered mitochondrial trafficking, and augmented mitophagy), delaying neuronal development. WFS1 deficiency induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, leading to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) dysfunction and disturbed cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis, which, in turn, alters mitochondrial dynamics. Importantly, ER stress, impaired Ca2+ homeostasis, altered mitochondrial dynamics, and delayed neuronal development are causatively related events because interventions at all these levels improved the downstream processes. Our data shed light on the mechanisms of neuronal abnormalities in Wolfram syndrome and point out potential therapeutic targets. This work may have broader implications for understanding the role of mitochondrial dynamics in neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:27434582

  8. Dynamic Abnormal Grain Growth in Refractory Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, Philip J.; Taleff, Eric M.

    2015-11-01

    High-temperature plastic deformation of the body-centered cubic (BCC) refractory metals Mo and Ta can initiate and propagate abnormal grains at significantly lower temperatures and faster rates than is possible by static annealing alone. This discovery reveals a new and potentially important aspect of abnormal grain growth (AGG) phenomena. The process of AGG during plastic deformation at elevated temperatures, termed dynamic abnormal grain growth (DAGG), was observed at homologous temperatures between 0.52 and 0.72 in both Mo and Ta sheet materials; these temperatures are much lower than those for previous observations of AGG in these materials during static annealing. DAGG was used to repeatedly grow single crystals several centimeters in length. Investigations to date have produced a basic understanding of the conditions that lead to DAGG and how DAGG is affected by microstructure in BCC refractory metals. The current state of understanding for DAGG is reviewed in this paper. Attention is given to the roles of temperature, plastic strain, boundary mobility and preexisting microstructure. DAGG is considered for its potential useful applications in solid-state crystal growth and its possibly detrimental role in creating undesired abnormal grains during thermomechanical processing.

  9. Progressive dopaminergic alterations and mitochondrial abnormalities in LRRK2 G2019S knock in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yue, M.; Hinkle, K.; Davies, P.; Trushina, E.; Fiesel, F.; Christenson, T.; Schroeder, A.; Zhang, L.; Bowles, E.; Behrouz, B.; Lincoln, S.; Beevers, J.; Milnerwood, A.; Kurti, A.; McLean, P. J.; Fryer, J. D.; Springer, W.; Dickson, D.; Farrer, M.; Melrose, H.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the LRRK2 gene represent the most common genetic cause of late onset Parkinson’s disease. The physiological and pathological roles of LRRK2 are yet to be fully determined but evidence points towards LRRK2 mutations causing a gain in kinase function, impacting on neuronal maintenance, vesicular dynamics and neurotransmitter release. To explore the role of physiological levels of mutant LRRK2, we created knock in mice harboring the most common LRRK2 mutation G2019S in their own genome. We have performed comprehensive dopaminergic, behavioral and neuropathological analyses in this model up to 24 months of age. We find elevated kinase activity in the brain of both heterozygous and homozygous mice. Although normal at 6 months, by 12 months of age, basal and pharmacologically induced extracellular release of dopamine is impaired in both heterozygous and homozygous mice, corroborating previous findings in transgenic models over-expressing mutant LRRK2. Via in vivo microdialysis measurement of basal and drug- evoked extracellular release of dopamine and its metabolites, our findings indicate that exocytotic release from the vesicular pool is impaired. Furthermore, profound mitochondrial abnormalities are evident in the striatum of older homozygous G2019S mice, which are consistent with mitochondrial fission arrest. We anticipate the G2019S will be a useful pre-clinical model for further evaluation of early mechanistic events in LRRK2 pathogenesis and for second-hit approaches to model disease progression. PMID:25836420

  10. Mutations in the SPTLC1 protein cause mitochondrial structural abnormalities and endoplasmic reticulum stress in lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Myers, Simon J; Malladi, Chandra S; Hyland, Ryan A; Bautista, Tara; Boadle, Ross; Robinson, Phillip J; Nicholson, Garth A

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in serine palmitoyltransferase long chain subunit 1 (SPTLC1) cause the typical length-dependent axonal degeneration hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 (HSN1). Transmission electron microscopy studies on SPTLC1 mutant lymphoblasts derived from patients revealed specific structural abnormalities of mitochondria. Swollen mitochondria with abnormal cristae were clustered around the nucleus, with some mitochondria being wrapped in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. Total mitochondrial counts revealed a significant change in mitochondrial numbers between healthy and diseased lymphocytes but did not reveal any change in length to width ratios nor were there any changes to cellular function. However, there was a notable change in ER homeostasis, as assessed using key ER stress markers, BiP and ERO1-Lα, displaying reduced protein expression. The observations suggest that SPTLC1 mutations cause mitochondrial abnormalities and ER stress in HSN1 cells.

  11. Mitochondrial dynamics, mitophagy and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez‐Trincado, César; García‐Carvajal, Ivonne; Pennanen, Christian; Parra, Valentina; Hill, Joseph A.; Rothermel, Beverly A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac hypertrophy is often initiated as an adaptive response to haemodynamic stress or myocardial injury, and allows the heart to meet an increased demand for oxygen. Although initially beneficial, hypertrophy can ultimately contribute to the progression of cardiac disease, leading to an increase in interstitial fibrosis and a decrease in ventricular function. Metabolic changes have emerged as key mechanisms involved in the development and progression of pathological remodelling. As the myocardium is a highly oxidative tissue, mitochondria play a central role in maintaining optimal performance of the heart. ‘Mitochondrial dynamics’, the processes of mitochondrial fusion, fission, biogenesis and mitophagy that determine mitochondrial morphology, quality and abundance have recently been implicated in cardiovascular disease. Studies link mitochondrial dynamics to the balance between energy demand and nutrient supply, suggesting that changes in mitochondrial morphology may act as a mechanism for bioenergetic adaptation during cardiac pathological remodelling. Another critical function of mitochondrial dynamics is the removal of damaged and dysfunctional mitochondria through mitophagy, which is dependent on the fission/fusion cycle. In this article, we discuss the latest findings regarding the impact of mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy on the development and progression of cardiovascular pathologies, including diabetic cardiomyopathy, atherosclerosis, damage from ischaemia–reperfusion, cardiac hypertrophy and decompensated heart failure. We will address the ability of mitochondrial fusion and fission to impact all cell types within the myocardium, including cardiac myocytes, cardiac fibroblasts and vascular smooth muscle cells. Finally, we will discuss how these findings can be applied to improve the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26537557

  12. Dynamics of the mitochondrial network during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Kanfer, Gil; Kornmann, Benoît

    2016-04-15

    During mitosis, cells undergo massive deformation and reorganization, impacting on all cellular structures. Mitochondria, in particular, are highly dynamic organelles, which constantly undergo events of fission, fusion and cytoskeleton-based transport. This plasticity ensures the proper distribution of the metabolism, and the proper inheritance of functional organelles. During cell cycle, mitochondria undergo dramatic changes in distribution. In this review, we focus on the dynamic events that target mitochondria during mitosis. We describe how the cell-cycle-dependent microtubule-associated protein centromeric protein F (Cenp-F) is recruited to mitochondria by the mitochondrial Rho GTPase (Miro) to promote mitochondrial transport and re-distribution following cell division.

  13. Interfaces between mitochondrial dynamics and disease.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Prashant

    2016-09-01

    In the cellular context, mitochondria display a number of dynamic behaviors including fusion, division (or fission), directed transport, and targeted destruction (mitophagy). The relevance of these processes to human diseases has been intensively studied over the last several years, and emphasize the importance of mitochondrial dynamics to the central nervous system. Intriguingly, a common theme is that these behaviors do not function in isolation, but influence one another either directly or indirectly. Here, we review the dynamic properties of mitochondria and summarize their relationships to human diseases.

  14. Abnormalities of mitochondrial functioning can partly explain the metabolic disorders encountered in sarcopenic gastrocnemius.

    PubMed

    Martin, Caroline; Dubouchaud, Hervé; Mosoni, Laurent; Chardigny, Jean-Michel; Oudot, Alexandra; Fontaine, Eric; Vergely, Catherine; Keriel, Christiane; Rochette, Luc; Leverve, Xavier; Demaison, Luc

    2007-04-01

    Aging triggers several abnormalities in muscle glycolytic fibers including increased proteolysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis. Since the mitochondria are the main site of substrate oxidation, ROS production and programmed cell death, we tried to know whether the cellular disorders encountered in sarcopenia are due to abnormal mitochondrial functioning. Gastrocnemius mitochondria were extracted from adult (6 months) and aged (21 months) male Wistar rats. Respiration parameters, opening of the permeability transition pore and ROS production, with either glutamate (amino acid metabolism) or pyruvate (glucose metabolism) as a respiration substrate, were evaluated at different matrix calcium concentrations. Pyruvate dehydrogenase and respiratory complex activities as well as their contents measured by Western blotting analysis were determined. Furthermore, the fatty acid profile of mitochondrial phospholipids was also measured. At physiological calcium concentration, state III respiration rate was lowered by aging in pyruvate conditions (-22%), but not with glutamate. The reduction of pyruvate oxidation resulted from a calcium-dependent inactivation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase system and could provide for the well-known proteolysis encountered during sarcopenia. Matrix calcium loading and aging increased ROS production. They also reduced the oxidative phosphorylation. This was associated with lower calcium retention capacities, suggesting that sarcopenic fibers are more prone to programmed cell death. Aging was also associated with a reduced mitochondrial superoxide dismutase activity, which does not intervene in toxic ROS overproduction but could explain the lower calcium retention capacities. Despite a lower content, cytochrome c oxidase displayed an increased activity associated with an increased n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid ratio of mitochondrial phospholipids. In conclusion, we propose that mitochondria obtained from aged muscle

  15. Abnormal mitochondrial transport and morphology are common pathological denominators in SOD1 and TDP43 ALS mouse models.

    PubMed

    Magrané, Jordi; Cortez, Czrina; Gan, Wen-Biao; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2014-03-15

    Neuronal mitochondrial morphology abnormalities occur in models of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) associated with SOD1 and TDP43 mutations. These abnormalities have been linked to mitochondrial axonal transport defects, but the temporal and spatial relationship between mitochondrial morphology and transport alterations in these two distinct genetic forms of ALS has not been investigated in vivo. To address this question, we crossed SOD1 (wild-type SOD1(WT) and mutant SOD1(G93A)) or TDP43 (mutant TDP43(A315T)) transgenic mice with mice expressing the fluorescent protein Dendra targeted to mitochondria in neurons (mitoDendra). At different time points during the disease course, we studied mitochondrial transport in the intact sciatic nerve of living mice and analyzed axonal mitochondrial morphology at multiple sites, spanning from the spinal cord to the motor terminals. Defects of retrograde mitochondrial transport were detected at 45 days of age, before the onset of symptoms, in SOD1(G93A) and TDP43(A315T) mice, but not in SOD1(WT). At later disease stages, also anterograde mitochondrial transport was affected in both mutant mouse lines. In SOD1(G93A) mice, mitochondrial morphological abnormalities were apparent at 15 days of age, thus preceding transport abnormalities. Conversely, in TDP43(A315T) mice, morphological abnormalities appeared after the onset of transport defects. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that neuronal mitochondrial transport and morphology abnormalities occur in vivo and that they are common denominators of different genetic forms of the ALS. At the same time, differences in the temporal and spatial manifestation of mitochondrial abnormalities between the two mouse models of familial ALS imply that different molecular mechanisms may be involved.

  16. Inhibition of NAPDH Oxidase 2 (NOX2) Prevents Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Abnormalities Caused by Saturated Fat in Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Leroy C; Barca, Emanuele; Subramanyam, Prakash; Komrowski, Michael; Pajvani, Utpal; Colecraft, Henry M; Hirano, Michio; Morrow, John P

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and high saturated fat intake increase the risk of heart failure and arrhythmias. The molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesized that physiologic levels of saturated fat could increase mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiomyocytes, leading to abnormalities of calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial function. We investigated the effect of saturated fat on mitochondrial function and calcium homeostasis in isolated ventricular myocytes. The saturated fatty acid palmitate causes a decrease in mitochondrial respiration in cardiomyocytes. Palmitate, but not the monounsaturated fatty acid oleate, causes an increase in both total cellular ROS and mitochondrial ROS. Palmitate depolarizes the mitochondrial inner membrane and causes mitochondrial calcium overload by increasing sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak. Inhibitors of PKC or NOX2 prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and the increase in ROS, demonstrating that PKC-NOX2 activation is also required for amplification of palmitate induced-ROS. Cardiomyocytes from mice with genetic deletion of NOX2 do not have palmitate-induced ROS or mitochondrial dysfunction. We conclude that palmitate induces mitochondrial ROS that is amplified by NOX2, causing greater mitochondrial ROS generation and partial depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane. The abnormal sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak caused by palmitate could promote arrhythmia and heart failure. NOX2 inhibition is a potential therapy for heart disease caused by diabetes or obesity.

  17. Dynamic tubulation of mitochondria drives mitochondrial network formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Du, Wanqing; Su, Qian Peter; Zhu, Mingli; Feng, Peiyuan; Li, Ying; Zhou, Yichen; Mi, Na; Zhu, Yueyao; Jiang, Dong; Zhang, Senyan; Zhang, Zerui; Sun, Yujie; Yu, Li

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondria form networks. Formation of mitochondrial networks is important for maintaining mitochondrial DNA integrity and interchanging mitochondrial material, whereas disruption of the mitochondrial network affects mitochondrial functions. According to the current view, mitochondrial networks are formed by fusion of individual mitochondria. Here, we report a new mechanism for formation of mitochondrial networks through KIF5B-mediated dynamic tubulation of mitochondria. We found that KIF5B pulls thin, highly dynamic tubules out of mitochondria. Fusion of these dynamic tubules, which is mediated by mitofusins, gives rise to the mitochondrial network. We further demonstrated that dynamic tubulation and fusion is sufficient for mitochondrial network formation, by reconstituting mitochondrial networks in vitro using purified fusion-competent mitochondria, recombinant KIF5B, and polymerized microtubules. Interestingly, KIF5B only controls network formation in the peripheral zone of the cell, indicating that the mitochondrial network is divided into subzones, which may be constructed by different mechanisms. Our data not only uncover an essential mechanism for mitochondrial network formation, but also reveal that different parts of the mitochondrial network are formed by different mechanisms.

  18. Mitochondrial dynamics and morphology in beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Linsey; Shirihai, Orian S

    2012-12-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics contribute to the regulation of mitochondrial shape as well as various mitochondrial functions and quality control. This is of particular interest in the beta-cell because of the key role mitochondria play in the regulation of beta-cell insulin secretion function. Moreover, mitochondrial dysfunction has been suggested to contribute to the development of Type 2 Diabetes. Genetic tools that shift the balance of mitochondrial fusion and fission result in alterations to beta-cell function and viability. Additionally, conditions that induce beta-cell dysfunction, such as exposure to a high nutrient environment, disrupt mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. While it has been shown that mitochondria display a fragmented morphology in islets of diabetic patients and animal models, the mechanism behind this is currently unknown. Here, we review the current literature on mitochondrial morphology and dynamics in the beta-cell as well as some of the unanswered question in this field.

  19. Mitochondrial dynamics in the mouse liver infected by Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tina Tu-Wen; Wu, Lawrence Shih Hsin; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Pang, Cheng-Yoong; Lee, Kin-Mu; Cheng, Po-Ching; Peng, Shih-Yi

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics is crucial for regulation of cell homeostasis. Schistosoma mansoni is one of the most common parasites known to cause liver disease. Mice infected by S. mansoni show acute symptoms of schistosomiasis after 8 weeks. Hence, in this study, we attempted to assess the direct effects of S. mansoni infection on mice liver, and to explore the expression of mitochondrial morphology, dynamics, and function. Our recent findings show that S. mansoni infection changes mitochondrial morphology and affects mitochondrial functions, which attenuates mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP generation. S. mansoni-infected mice increases mitochondrial numbers by upregulating of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor c co-activator 1α (PGC1α) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). This may promote mitochondria generation for accelerating the recovery of mitochondrial functions. Moreover, S. mansoni would disrupt mitochondrial dynamics including induced mitochondrial fission and promoted mitochondrial fragmentation in mice liver. More importantly, S. mansoni further stimulated upregulation both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathway in infected mice liver. The intrinsic pathway was triggered by cytochrome c release. Additionally, NFκB (nuclear factor-kappa B, p65) could play a protective role to inhibit apoptosis through reducing active caspase-3 expression. Therefore, our results confirmed the liver damage mechanism of experimental schistosomiasis in mice model.

  20. Pink1 regulates mitochondrial dynamics through interaction with the fission/fusion machinery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yufeng; Ouyang, Yingshi; Yang, Lichuan; Beal, M Flint; McQuibban, Angus; Vogel, Hannes; Lu, Bingwei

    2008-05-13

    Mitochondria form dynamic tubular networks that undergo frequent morphological changes through fission and fusion, the imbalance of which can affect cell survival in general and impact synaptic transmission and plasticity in neurons in particular. Some core components of the mitochondrial fission/fusion machinery, including the dynamin-like GTPases Drp1, Mitofusin, Opa1, and the Drp1-interacting protein Fis1, have been identified. How the fission and fusion processes are regulated under normal conditions and the extent to which defects in mitochondrial fission/fusion are involved in various disease conditions are poorly understood. Mitochondrial malfunction tends to cause diseases with brain and skeletal muscle manifestations and has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Whether abnormal mitochondrial fission or fusion plays a role in PD pathogenesis has not been shown. Here, we show that Pink1, a mitochondria-targeted Ser/Thr kinase linked to familial PD, genetically interacts with the mitochondrial fission/fusion machinery and modulates mitochondrial dynamics. Genetic manipulations that promote mitochondrial fission suppress Drosophila Pink1 mutant phenotypes in indirect flight muscle and dopamine neurons, whereas decreased fission has opposite effects. In Drosophila and mammalian cells, overexpression of Pink1 promotes mitochondrial fission, whereas inhibition of Pink1 leads to excessive fusion. Our genetic interaction results suggest that Fis1 may act in-between Pink1 and Drp1 in controlling mitochondrial fission. These results reveal a cell biological role for Pink1 and establish mitochondrial fission/fusion as a paradigm for PD research. Compounds that modulate mitochondrial fission/fusion could have therapeutic value in PD intervention.

  1. Implications of mitochondrial dynamics on neurodegeneration and on hypothalamic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zorzano, Antonio; Claret, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics is a term that encompasses the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, regulation of their architecture, and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission. The importance of these events in cell physiology and pathology has been partially unraveled with the identification of the genes responsible for the catalysis of mitochondrial fusion and fission. Mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1) cause neurodegenerative diseases, namely Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA). Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics may be involved in the pathophysiology of prevalent neurodegenerative conditions. Moreover, impairment of the activity of mitochondrial fusion proteins dysregulates the function of hypothalamic neurons, leading to alterations in food intake and in energy homeostasis. Here we review selected findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics and their relevance for neurodegeneration and hypothalamic dysfunction. PMID:26113818

  2. Inflammation-induced alteration of astrocyte mitochondrial dynamics requires autophagy for mitochondrial network maintenance.

    PubMed

    Motori, Elisa; Puyal, Julien; Toni, Nicolas; Ghanem, Alexander; Angeloni, Cristina; Malaguti, Marco; Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio; Berninger, Benedikt; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Götz, Magdalena; Winklhofer, Konstanze F; Hrelia, Silvana; Bergami, Matteo

    2013-12-03

    Accumulating evidence suggests that changes in the metabolic signature of astrocytes underlie their response to neuroinflammation, but how proinflammatory stimuli induce these changes is poorly understood. By monitoring astrocytes following acute cortical injury, we identified a differential and region-specific remodeling of their mitochondrial network: while astrocytes within the penumbra of the lesion undergo mitochondrial elongation, those located in the core-the area invaded by proinflammatory cells-experience transient mitochondrial fragmentation. In brain slices, proinflammatory stimuli reproduced localized changes in mitochondrial dynamics, favoring fission over fusion. This effect was triggered by Drp1 phosphorylation and ultimately resulted in reduced respiratory capacity. Furthermore, maintenance of the mitochondrial architecture critically depended on the induction of autophagy. Deletion of Atg7, required for autophagosome formation, prevented the reestablishment of tubular mitochondria, leading to marked reactive oxygen species accumulation and cell death. Thus, our data reveal autophagy to be essential for regenerating astrocyte mitochondrial networks during inflammation.

  3. The complex interplay between mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Valentina; Verdejo, Hugo; del Campo, Andrea; Pennanen, Christian; Kuzmicic, Jovan; Iglewski, Myriam; Hill, Joseph A.; Rothermel, Beverly A.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles, capable of undergoing constant fission and fusion events, forming networks. These dynamic events allow the transmission of chemical and physical messengers and the exchange of metabolites within the cell. In this article we review the signaling mechanisms controlling mitochondrial fission and fusion, and its relationship with cell bioenergetics, especially in the heart. Furthermore we also discuss how defects in mitochondrial dynamics might be involved in the pathogenesis of metabolic cardiac diseases. PMID:21258852

  4. Dynamic actin cycling through mitochondrial subpopulations locally regulates the fission–fusion balance within mitochondrial networks

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Andrew S.; Wong, Yvette C.; Simpson, Cory L.; Holzbaur, Erika L. F.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria form interconnected networks that dynamically remodel in response to cellular needs. Using live-cell imaging, we investigate the role of the actin cytoskeleton in regulating mitochondrial fission and fusion. We identify cycling of actin filaments onto and off of subsets of cellular mitochondria. The association of actin filaments with mitochondrial subpopulations is transient; actin quickly disassembles, then reassembles around a distinct subpopulation, efficiently cycling through all cellular mitochondria within 14 min. The focal assembly of actin induces local, Drp1-dependent fragmentation of the mitochondrial network. On actin disassembly, fragmented mitochondria undergo rapid fusion, leading to regional recovery of the tubular mitochondrial network. Cycling requires dynamic actin polymerization and is blocked by inhibitors of both Arp2/3 and formins. We propose that cyclic assembly of actin onto mitochondria modulates the fission/fusion balance, promotes network remodelling and content mixing, and thus may serve as an essential mechanism regulating mitochondrial network homeostasis. PMID:27686185

  5. Impaired Mitochondrial Function and Dynamics in the Pathogenesis of FXTAS.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Mora, M I; Rodriguez-Revenga, L; Madrigal, I; Guitart-Mampel, M; Garrabou, G; Milà, M

    2016-10-22

    Mitochondrial involvement plays an important role in neurodegenerative diseases. At least one-third of adult carriers of a FMR1 premutation (55-200 CGG repeats) are at risk of presenting an adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder known as fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). In an attempt to provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of FXTAS, we characterized mitochondrial function and dynamics by the assessment of oxidative respiratory chain function, mitochondrial content, oxidative stress levels, and mitochondrial network complexity. Regarding mitochondrial function, we found that mitochondrial respiratory capacity is compromised in skin fibroblasts whereas in blood, no differences were observed between the FXTAS and control groups. Furthermore, fibroblasts from FXTAS patients presented altered mitochondrial architecture, with more circular and less interconnected mitochondria being observed. Mitochondrial function and dynamics deregulation and characteristic of neurological disorders are present in FXTAS patients. These features might be limiting temporal and spatial bioenergetics cells supply and thus contributing to disease pathogenesis.

  6. Neonatal mitochondrial abnormalities due to PINK1 deficiency: Proteomics reveals early changes relevant to Parkinson׳s disease

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Lance M.; Purnell, Phillip R.; Stauch, Kelly L.; Fox, Howard S.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson׳s disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, affects roughly 7–10 million people worldwide. A wide array of research has suggested that PD has a mitochondrial component and that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs well in advance of the clinical manifestation of the disease. Previous work by our lab has categorized the mitochondrial disorder associated with Parkinson׳s disease in a PINK1 knockout rat model. This model develops Parkinson׳s disease in a spontaneous, predictable manner. Our findings demonstrated PINK1-deficient rats at 4 months of age had mitochondrial proteomic and functional abnormalities before the onset of Parkinsonian symptoms (6 months) such as the movement disorder, loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, or the progressive degeneration present at 9 months. With this in mind, our group investigated the PINK1 knockout genetic rat model at postnatal day 10 to determine if the observed alterations at 4 months were present at an earlier time point. Using a proteomic analysis of brain mitochondria, we identified significant mitochondrial proteomic alterations in the absence of mitochondrial functional changes suggesting the observed alterations are part of the mitochondrial pathways leading to PD. Specifically, we identified differentially expressed proteins in the PINK1 knockout rat involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and fatty acid metabolism demonstrating abnormalities occur well in advance of the manifestation of clinical symptoms. Additionally, 13 of the differentially expressed proteins have been previously identified in older PINK1 knockout animals as differentially regulated suggesting these proteins may be viable markers of the PD pathology, and further, the abnormally regulated pathways could be targeted for therapeutic interventions. All raw data can be found in Supplementary Table 1. PMID:26866053

  7. Involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in the segregation of mitochondrial matrix proteins during stationary phase mitophagy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeliovich, Hagai; Zarei, Mostafa; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T. G.; Youle, Richard J.; Dengjel, Joern

    2013-11-01

    Mitophagy, the autophagic degradation of mitochondria, is an important housekeeping function in eukaryotic cells, and defects in mitophagy correlate with ageing phenomena and with several neurodegenerative disorders. A central mechanistic question regarding mitophagy is whether mitochondria are consumed en masse, or whether an active process segregates defective molecules from functional ones within the mitochondrial network, thus allowing a more efficient culling mechanism. Here we combine a proteomic study with a molecular genetics and cell biology approach to determine whether such a segregation process occurs in yeast mitochondria. We find that different mitochondrial matrix proteins undergo mitophagic degradation at distinctly different rates, supporting the active segregation hypothesis. These differential degradation rates depend on mitochondrial dynamics, suggesting a mechanism coupling weak physical segregation with mitochondrial dynamics to achieve a distillation-like effect. In agreement, the rates of mitophagic degradation strongly correlate with the degree of physical segregation of specific matrix proteins.

  8. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics and TBI Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tara D; Hylin, Michael J; Zhao, Jing; Moore, Anthony N; Waxham, M Neal; Dash, Pramod K

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is intimately linked to cellular survival, growth, and death. Mitochondria not only generate ATP from oxidative phosphorylation, but also mediate intracellular calcium buffering, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and apoptosis. Electron leakage from the electron transport chain, especially from damaged or depolarized mitochondria, can generate excess free radicals that damage cellular proteins, DNA, and lipids. Furthermore, mitochondrial damage releases pro-apoptotic factors to initiate cell death. Previous studies have reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI) reduces mitochondrial respiration, enhances production of ROS, and triggers apoptotic cell death, suggesting a prominent role of mitochondria in TBI pathophysiology. Mitochondria maintain cellular energy homeostasis and health via balanced processes of fusion and fission, continuously dividing and fusing to form an interconnected network throughout the cell. An imbalance of these processes, particularly an excess of fission, can be detrimental to mitochondrial function, causing decreased respiration, ROS production, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission is regulated by the cytosolic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), which translocates to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) to initiate fission. Aberrant Drp1 activity has been linked to excessive mitochondrial fission and neurodegeneration. Measurement of Drp1 levels in purified hippocampal mitochondria showed an increase in TBI animals as compared to sham controls. Analysis of cryo-electron micrographs of these mitochondria also showed that TBI caused an initial increase in the length of hippocampal mitochondria at 24 h post-injury, followed by a significant decrease in length at 72 h. Post-TBI administration of Mitochondrial division inhibitor-1 (Mdivi-1), a pharmacological inhibitor of Drp1, prevented this decrease in mitochondria length. Mdivi-1 treatment also reduced the loss of newborn neurons in the

  9. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics and TBI Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Tara D.; Hylin, Michael J.; Zhao, Jing; Moore, Anthony N.; Waxham, M. Neal; Dash, Pramod K.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is intimately linked to cellular survival, growth, and death. Mitochondria not only generate ATP from oxidative phosphorylation, but also mediate intracellular calcium buffering, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and apoptosis. Electron leakage from the electron transport chain, especially from damaged or depolarized mitochondria, can generate excess free radicals that damage cellular proteins, DNA, and lipids. Furthermore, mitochondrial damage releases pro-apoptotic factors to initiate cell death. Previous studies have reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI) reduces mitochondrial respiration, enhances production of ROS, and triggers apoptotic cell death, suggesting a prominent role of mitochondria in TBI pathophysiology. Mitochondria maintain cellular energy homeostasis and health via balanced processes of fusion and fission, continuously dividing and fusing to form an interconnected network throughout the cell. An imbalance of these processes, particularly an excess of fission, can be detrimental to mitochondrial function, causing decreased respiration, ROS production, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission is regulated by the cytosolic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), which translocates to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) to initiate fission. Aberrant Drp1 activity has been linked to excessive mitochondrial fission and neurodegeneration. Measurement of Drp1 levels in purified hippocampal mitochondria showed an increase in TBI animals as compared to sham controls. Analysis of cryo-electron micrographs of these mitochondria also showed that TBI caused an initial increase in the length of hippocampal mitochondria at 24 h post-injury, followed by a significant decrease in length at 72 h. Post-TBI administration of Mitochondrial division inhibitor-1 (Mdivi-1), a pharmacological inhibitor of Drp1, prevented this decrease in mitochondria length. Mdivi-1 treatment also reduced the loss of newborn neurons in the

  10. miR-125b controls monocyte adaptation to inflammation through mitochondrial metabolism and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Roubert, Christine; Ammari, Meryem; Présumey, Jessy; Grün, Joachim R.; Häupl, Thomas; Grützkau, Andreas; Lecellier, Charles-Henri; Boitez, Valérie; Codogno, Patrice; Escoubet, Johanna; Pers, Yves-Marie; Jorgensen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic changes drive monocyte differentiation and fate. Although abnormal mitochondria metabolism and innate immune responses participate in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory disorders, molecular events regulating mitochondrial activity to control life and death in monocytes remain poorly understood. We show here that, in human monocytes, microRNA-125b (miR-125b) attenuates the mitochondrial respiration through the silencing of the BH3-only proapoptotic protein BIK and promotes the elongation of the mitochondrial network through the targeting of the mitochondrial fission process 1 protein MTP18, leading to apoptosis. Proinflammatory activation of monocyte-derived macrophages is associated with a concomitant increase in miR-125b expression and decrease in BIK and MTP18 expression, which lead to reduced oxidative phosphorylation and enhanced mitochondrial fusion. In a chronic inflammatory systemic disorder, CD14+ blood monocytes display reduced miR-125b expression as compared with healthy controls, inversely correlated with BIK and MTP18 messenger RNA expression. Our findings not only identify BIK and MTP18 as novel targets for miR-125b that control mitochondrial metabolism and dynamics, respectively, but also reveal a novel function for miR-125b in regulating metabolic adaptation of monocytes to inflammation. Together, these data unravel new molecular mechanisms for a proapoptotic role of miR-125b in monocytes and identify potential targets for interfering with excessive inflammatory activation of monocytes in inflammatory disorders. PMID:27702798

  11. Mitochondrial fusion/fission dynamics in neurodegeneration and neuronal plasticity.

    PubMed

    Bertholet, A M; Delerue, T; Millet, A M; Moulis, M F; David, C; Daloyau, M; Arnauné-Pelloquin, L; Davezac, N; Mils, V; Miquel, M C; Rojo, M; Belenguer, P

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that continually move, fuse and divide. The dynamic balance of fusion and fission of mitochondria determines their morphology and allows their immediate adaptation to energetic needs, keeps mitochondria in good health by restoring or removing damaged organelles or precipitates cells in apoptosis in cases of severe defects. Mitochondrial fusion and fission are essential in mammals and their disturbances are associated with several diseases. However, while mitochondrial fusion/fission dynamics, and the proteins that control these processes, are ubiquitous, associated diseases are primarily neurological disorders. Accordingly, inactivation of the main actors of mitochondrial fusion/fission dynamics is associated with defects in neuronal development, plasticity and functioning, both ex vivo and in vivo. Here, we present the central actors of mitochondrial fusion and fission and review the role of mitochondrial dynamics in neuronal physiology and pathophysiology. Particular emphasis is placed on the three main actors of these processes i.e. DRP1,MFN1-2, and OPA1 as well as on GDAP1, a protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane preferentially expressed in neurons. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondria & Brain.

  12. Mitochondrial Dynamics Protein Drp1 Is Overexpressed in Oncocytic Thyroid Tumors and Regulates Cancer Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-da-Silva, André; Valacca, Cristina; Rios, Elisabete; Pópulo, Helena; Soares, Paula; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Scorrano, Luca; Máximo, Valdemar; Campello, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Oncocytic cell tumors are characterized by the accumulation of morphologically abnormal mitochondria in their cells, suggesting a role for abnormal mitochondrial biogenesis in oncocytic cell transformation. Little is known about the reason for the dysmorphology of accumulated mitochondria. The proteins regulating the morphology of mitochondria, the "mitochondria-shaping" proteins, can modulate their size and number; however, nothing is known hitherto about a possible involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in oncocytic cell transformation in tumors. Our aim was to assess the status of the mitochondria morphology and its role in oncocytic cell transformation. We therefore evaluated the expression pattern of the main mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in a series of thyroid cell tumor samples, as well as in thyroid tumor cell lines, with and without oncocytic cell features. The expression of mitochondrial fusion (Opa1, Mfn1 and Mfn2) and fission (Drp1 and Fis1) proteins were evaluated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in a series of 88 human thyroid tumors. In vitro studies, for comparative purposes and to deepen the study, were performed using TPC1 - a papillary thyroid carcinoma derived cell line—and XTC.UC1, an oncocytic follicular thyroid carcinoma-derived cell line. Both IHC and in vitro protein analyses showed an overall increase in the levels of "mitochondrial-shaping" proteins in oncocytic thyroid tumors. Furthermore, overexpression of the pro-fission protein Drp1 was found to be associated with malignant oncocytic thyroid tumors. Interestingly, genetic and pharmacological blockage of Drp1 activity was able to influence thyroid cancer cells’ migration/invasion ability, a feature of tumor malignancy. In this study we show that unbalanced mitochondrial dynamics characterize the malignant features of thyroid oncocytic cell tumors, and participate in the acquisition of the migrating phenotype. PMID:25822260

  13. Caspase-Cleaved Tau Impairs Mitochondrial Dynamics in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez, María José; Vergara-Pulgar, Katiana; Jara, Claudia; Cabezas-Opazo, Fabian; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A

    2017-01-13

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of aggregates of tau protein. Tau truncated by caspase-3 (D421) or tau hyperphosphorylated at Ser396/S404 might play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that modify their size and function through mitochondrial dynamics. Recent studies have shown that alterations of mitochondrial dynamics affect synaptic communication. Therefore, we studied the effects of pathological forms of tau on the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics. We used primary cortical neurons from tau(-/-) knockout mice and immortalized cortical neurons (CN1.4) that were transfected with plasmids containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GFP with different tau forms: full-length (GFP-T4), truncated (GFP-T4C3), pseudophosphorylated (GFP-T42EC), or both truncated and pseudophosphorylated modifications of tau (GFP-T4C3-2EC). Cells expressing truncated tau showed fragmented mitochondria compared to cells that expressed full-length tau. These findings were corroborated using primary neurons from tau(-/-) knockout mice that expressed the truncated and both truncated and pseudophosphorylated forms of tau. Interestingly, mitochondrial fragmentation was accompanied by a significant reduction in levels of optic atrophy protein 1 (Opa1) in cells expressing the truncated form of tau. In addition, treatment with low concentrations of amyloid-beta (Aβ) significantly reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, cell viability, and mitochondrial length in cortical cells and primary neurons from tau(-/-) mice that express truncated tau. These results indicate that the presence of tau pathology impairs mitochondrial dynamics by reducing Opa1 levels, an event that could lead to mitochondrial impairment observed in AD.

  14. Dynamic organization of the mitochondrial protein import machinery.

    PubMed

    Straub, Sebastian P; Stiller, Sebastian B; Wiedemann, Nils; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondria contain elaborate machineries for the import of precursor proteins from the cytosol. The translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) performs the initial import of precursor proteins and transfers the precursors to downstream translocases, including the presequence translocase and the carrier translocase of the inner membrane, the mitochondrial import and assembly machinery of the intermembrane space, and the sorting and assembly machinery of the outer membrane. Although the protein translocases can function as separate entities in vitro, recent studies revealed a close and dynamic cooperation of the protein import machineries to facilitate efficient transfer of precursor proteins in vivo. In addition, protein translocases were found to transiently interact with distinct machineries that function in the respiratory chain or in the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane architecture. Mitochondrial protein import is embedded in a regulatory network that ensures protein biogenesis, membrane dynamics, bioenergetic activity and quality control.

  15. Theoretical interpretation of abnormal ultrafine-grained material deformation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodin, Elijah N.; Mayer, Alexander E.

    2016-02-01

    Some recent experiments with ultrafine-grained metal samples reveal that it has an abnormal mechanical response on the intensive dynamical loading caused by its impact or electron beam irradiations. On the basis of the original plasticity model, which takes into account dislocation slip and grain boundary sliding, we show that this response is usual for such structure. Moreover, our calculations predict an inverse Hall-Petch relation for ultrafine grained metals at extremely high strain rates (above 107 s-1), while the classical low strain rate experiments and molecular dynamic simulations detects such inverse Hall-Petch relation only for nanocrystalline materials. The main outcomes of present work are the described plasticity model and the conclusions that the ultrafine-grained metals (with grains of about 100-200 nm in diameter) has to have maximal dynamic shear strength and it is the most persistent to dynamic spall fracture because of maximal energy dissipation in it.

  16. The plant mitochondrial genome: dynamics and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Gualberto, José M; Mileshina, Daria; Wallet, Clémentine; Niazi, Adnan Khan; Weber-Lotfi, Frédérique; Dietrich, André

    2014-05-01

    Plant mitochondria have a complex and peculiar genetic system. They have the largest genomes, as compared to organelles from other eukaryotic organisms. These can expand tremendously in some species, reaching the megabase range. Nevertheless, whichever the size, the gene content remains modest and restricted to a few polypeptides required for the biogenesis of the oxidative phosphorylation chain complexes, ribosomal proteins, transfer RNAs and ribosomal RNAs. The presence of autonomous plasmids of essentially unknown function further enhances the level of complexity. The physical organization of the plant mitochondrial DNA includes a set of sub-genomic forms resulting from homologous recombination between repeats, with a mixture of linear, circular and branched structures. This material is compacted into membrane-bound nucleoids, which are the inheritance units but also the centers of genome maintenance and expression. Recombination appears to be an essential characteristic of plant mitochondrial genetic processes, both in shaping and maintaining the genome. Under nuclear surveillance, recombination is also the basis for the generation of new mitotypes and is involved in the evolution of the mitochondrial DNA. In line with, or as a consequence of its complex physical organization, replication of the plant mitochondrial DNA is likely to occur through multiple mechanisms, potentially involving recombination processes. We give here a synthetic view of these aspects.

  17. Direct quantification of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yasutomo

    2012-11-01

    Mitochondria are known to be one of major organelles within a cell and to play a crucial role in many cellular functions. These organelles show the dynamic behaviors such as fusion, fission and the movement along cytoskeletal tracks. Besides mitochondria, mitochondrial DNA is also highly motile. Molecular analysis revealed that several proteins are involved in mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA dynamics. In addition to the degeneration of specific nerves with high energy requirement, mutation of genes coding these proteins results in metabolic diseases. During the last few years, a significant amount of relevant data has been obtained on molecular basis of these diseases but mitochondrial dynamics in cells derived from the patients is poorly understood. So far time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching and image correlation methods have been used to study organellar motion. Especially, image correlation method has possibility to evaluate diffusion coefficient of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA simultaneously and directly. When we search candidates for compounds that modulate mitochondrial dynamics by high throughput screening, image correlation method may be useful although the careful interpretation is required for crowded and heterogeneous environment within a cell.

  18. Dynamic evolution of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins in Holozoa.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Bettina M; Hausdorf, Bernhard

    2014-07-01

    We studied the highly dynamic evolution of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs) in Holozoa. Most major clades within Holozoa are characterized by gains and/or losses of MRPs. The usefulness of gains of MRPs as rare genomic changes in phylogenetics is undermined by the high frequency of secondary losses. However, phylogenetic analyses of the MRP sequences provide evidence for the Acrosomata hypothesis, a sister group relationship between Ctenophora and Bilateria. An extensive restructuring of the mitochondrial genome and, as a consequence, of the mitochondrial ribosomes occurred in the ancestor of metazoans. The last MRP genes encoded in the mitochondrial genome were either moved to the nuclear genome or were lost. The strong decrease in size of the mitochondrial genome was probably caused by selection for rapid replication of mitochondrial DNA during oogenesis in the metazoan ancestor. A phylogenetic analysis of MRPL56 sequences provided evidence for a horizontal gene transfer of the corresponding MRP gene between metazoans and Dictyostelidae (Amoebozoa). The hypothesis that the requisition of additional MRPs compensated for a loss of rRNA segments in the mitochondrial ribosomes is corroborated by a significant negative correlation between the number of MRPs and length of the rRNA. Newly acquired MRPs evolved faster than bacterial MRPs and positions in eukaryote-specific MRPs were more strongly affected by coevolution than positions in prokaryotic MRPs in accordance with the necessity to fit these proteins into the pre-existing structure of the mitoribosome.

  19. The mitochondrial elongation factors MIEF1 and MIEF2 exert partially distinct functions in mitochondrial dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tong; Yu, Rong; Jin, Shao-Bo; Han, Liwei; Lendahl, Urban; Zhao, Jian; Nistér, Monica

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles whose morphology is regulated by a complex balance of fission and fusion processes, and we still know relatively little about how mitochondrial dynamics is regulated. MIEF1 (also called MiD51) has recently been characterized as a key regulator of mitochondrial dynamics and in this report we explore the functions of its paralog MIEF2 (also called MiD49), to learn to what extent MIEF2 is functionally distinct from MIEF1. We show that MIEF1 and MIEF2 have many functions in common. Both are anchored in the mitochondrial outer membrane, recruit Drp1 from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial surface and cause mitochondrial fusion, and MIEF2, like MIEF1, can interact with Drp1 and hFis1. MIEF1 and MIEF2, however, also differ in certain aspects. MIEF1 and MIEF2 are differentially expressed in human tissues during development. When overexpressed, MIEF2 exerts a stronger fusion-promoting effect than MIEF1, and in line with this, hFis1 and Mff can only partially revert the MIEF2-induced fusion phenotype, whereas MIEF1-induced fusion is reverted to a larger extent by hFis1 and Mff. MIEF2 forms high molecular weight oligomers, while MIEF1 is largely present as a dimer. Furthermore, MIEF1 and MIEF2 use distinct domains for oligomerization: in MIEF1, the region from amino acid residues 109–154 is required, whereas oligomerization of MIEF2 depends on amino acid residues 1 to 49, i.e. the N-terminal end. We also show that oligomerization of MIEF1 is not required for its mitochondrial localization and interaction with Drp1. In conclusion, our data suggest that the mitochondrial regulators MIEF1 and MIEF2 exert partially distinct functions in mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • MIEF1 and MIEF2 recruit Drp1 to mitochondria and cause mitochondrial fusion. • MIEF2, like MIEF1, can interact with Drp1 and hFis1. • MIEF1 and MIEF2 are differentially expressed in human tissues during development. • MIEF2 exerts a stronger fusion

  20. Abnormal Mitochondrial cAMP/PKA Signaling Is Involved in Sepsis-Induced Mitochondrial and Myocardial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Neviere, Remi; Delguste, Florian; Durand, Arthur; Inamo, Jocelyn; Boulanger, Eric; Preau, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors couple to Gs-proteins leading to transmembrane adenylyl cyclase activation and cytosolic cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production. Cyclic AMP is also produced in the mitochondrial matrix, where it regulates respiration through protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of respiratory chain complexes. We hypothesized that a blunted mitochondrial cAMP-PKA pathway would participate in sepsis-induced heart dysfunction. Adult male mice were subjected to intra-abdominal sepsis. Mitochondrial respiration of cardiac fibers and myocardial contractile performance were evaluated in response to 8Br-cAMP, PKA inhibition (H89), soluble adenylyl cyclase inhibition (KH7), and phosphodiesterase inhibition (IBMX; BAY60-7550). Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-stimulated respiratory rates of cardiac fibers were reduced in septic mice. Compared with controls, stimulatory effects of 8Br-cAMP on respiration rates were enhanced in septic fibers, whereas inhibitory effects of H89 were reduced. Ser-58 phosphorylation of cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV-1 was reduced in septic hearts. In vitro, incubation of septic cardiac fibers with BAY60-7550 increased respiratory control ratio and improved cardiac MVO2 efficiency in isolated septic heart. In vivo, BAY60-7550 pre-treatment of septic mice have limited impact on myocardial function. Mitochondrial cAMP-PKA signaling is impaired in the septic myocardium. PDE2 phosphodiesterase inhibition by BAY60-7550 improves mitochondrial respiration and cardiac MVO2 efficiency in septic mice. PMID:27973394

  1. Dual Effect of Phosphate Transport on Mitochondrial Ca2+ Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, An-Chi; Liu, Ting; O'Rourke, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The large inner membrane electrochemical driving force and restricted volume of the matrix confer unique constraints on mitochondrial ion transport. Cation uptake along with anion and water movement induces swelling if not compensated by other processes. For mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, these include activation of countertransporters (Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and Na+/H+ exchanger) coupled to the proton gradient, ultimately maintained by the proton pumps of the respiratory chain, and Ca2+ binding to matrix buffers. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is known to affect both the Ca2+ uptake rate and the buffering reaction, but the role of anion transport in determining mitochondrial Ca2+ dynamics is poorly understood. Here we simultaneously monitor extra- and intra-mitochondrial Ca2+ and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) to examine the effects of anion transport on mitochondrial Ca2+ flux and buffering in Pi-depleted guinea pig cardiac mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake proceeded slowly in the absence of Pi but matrix free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]mito) still rose to ∼50 μm. Pi (0.001–1 mm) accelerated Ca2+ uptake but decreased [Ca2+]mito by almost 50% while restoring ΔΨm. Pi-dependent effects on Ca2+ were blocked by inhibiting the phosphate carrier. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake rate was also increased by vanadate (Vi), acetate, ATP, or a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog (AMP-PNP), with differential effects on matrix Ca2+ buffering and ΔΨm recovery. Interestingly, ATP or AMP-PNP prevented the effects of Pi on Ca2+ uptake. The results show that anion transport imposes an upper limit on mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and modifies the [Ca2+]mito response in a complex manner. PMID:25963147

  2. The dynamics of mitochondrial Ca2+ fluxes.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Sergio; Montenegro, Pablo; Fonteriz, Rosalba I; Moreno, Alfredo; Lobatón, Carmen D; Montero, Mayte; Alvarez, Javier

    2010-10-01

    We have investigated the kinetics of mitochondrial Ca(2+) influx and efflux and their dependence on cytosolic [Ca(2+)] and [Na(+)] using low-Ca(2+)-affinity aequorin. The rate of Ca(2+) release from mitochondria increased linearly with mitochondrial [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](M)). Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) release was predominant al low [Ca(2+)](M) but saturated at [Ca(2+)](M) around 400muM, while Na(+)-independent Ca(2+) release was very slow at [Ca(2+)](M) below 200muM, and then increased at higher [Ca(2+)](M), perhaps through the opening of a new pathway. Half-maximal activation of Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) release occurred at 5-10mM [Na(+)], within the physiological range of cytosolic [Na(+)]. Ca(2+) entry rates were comparable in size to Ca(2+) exit rates at cytosolic [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](c)) below 7muM, but the rate of uptake was dramatically accelerated at higher [Ca(2+)](c). As a consequence, the presence of [Na(+)] considerably reduced the rate of [Ca(2+)](M) increase at [Ca(2+)](c) below 7muM, but its effect was hardly appreciable at 10muM [Ca(2+)](c). Exit rates were more dependent on the temperature than uptake rates, thus making the [Ca(2+)](M) transients to be much more prolonged at lower temperature. Our kinetic data suggest that mitochondria have little high affinity Ca(2+) buffering, and comparison of our results with data on total mitochondrial Ca(2+) fluxes indicate that the mitochondrial Ca(2+) bound/Ca(2+) free ratio is around 10- to 100-fold for most of the observed [Ca(2+)](M) range and suggest that massive phosphate precipitation can only occur when [Ca(2+)](M) reaches the millimolar range.

  3. Early degenerative changes in transgenic mice expressing mutant huntingtin involve dendritic abnormalities but no impairment of mitochondrial energy production.

    PubMed

    Guidetti, P; Charles, V; Chen, E Y; Reddy, P H; Kordower, J H; Whetsell, W O; Schwarcz, R; Tagle, D A

    2001-06-01

    Mitochondrial defects, which occur in the brain of late-stage Huntington's disease (HD) patients, have been proposed to underlie the selective neuronal loss in the disease. To shed light on the possible role of mitochondrial energy impairment in the early phases of HD pathophysiology, we carried out Golgi impregnation and quantitative histochemical/biochemical studies in HD full-length cDNA transgenic mice that were symptomatic but had not developed to a stage in which neuronal loss could be documented. Golgi staining showed morphologic abnormalities that included a significant decrease in the number of dendritic spines and a thickening of proximal dendrites in striatal and cortical neurons. In contrast, measurements of mitochondrial electron transport Complexes I-IV did not reveal changes in the striatum and cerebral cortex in these mice. Examination of the neostriatum and cerebral cortex in human presymptomatic and pathological Grade 1 HD cases also showed no change in the activity of mitochondrial Complexes I-IV. These data suggest that dendritic alterations precede irreversible cell loss in HD, and that mitochondrial energy impairment is a consequence, rather than a cause, of early neuropathological changes.

  4. Mitochondrial Abnormality Associates with Type-Specific Neuronal Loss and Cell Morphology Changes in the Pedunculopontine Nucleus in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pienaar, Ilse S.; Elson, Joanna L.; Racca, Claudia; Nelson, Glyn; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Morris, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic neuronal loss in the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) associates with abnormal functions, including certain motor and nonmotor symptoms. This realization has led to low-frequency stimulation of the PPN for treating patients with Parkinson disease (PD) who are refractory to other treatment modalities. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying PPN neuronal loss and the therapeutic substrate for the clinical benefits following PPN stimulation remain poorly characterized, hampering progress toward designing more efficient therapies aimed at restoring the PPN's normal functions during progressive parkinsonism. Here, we investigated postmortem pathological changes in the PPN of PD cases. Our study detected a loss of neurons producing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as their output and glycinergic neurons, along with the pronounced loss of cholinergic neurons. These losses were accompanied by altered somatic cell size that affected the remaining neurons of all neuronal subtypes studied here. Because studies showed that mitochondrial dysfunction exists in sporadic PD and in PD animal models, we investigated whether altered mitochondrial composition exists in the PPN. A significant up-regulation of several mitochondrial proteins was seen in GABAergic and glycinergic neurons; however, cholinergic neurons indicated down-regulation of the same proteins. Our findings suggest an imbalance in the activity of key neuronal subgroups of the PPN in PD, potentially because of abnormal inhibitory activity and altered cholinergic outflow. PMID:24099985

  5. Abnormal interaction of VDAC1 with amyloid beta and phosphorylated tau causes mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Manczak, Maria; Reddy, P. Hemachandra

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the relationship between voltage-dependent anion channel 1 protein (VDAC1) and amyloid beta (Aβ) and phosphorylated tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using brain specimens from AD patients, control subjects and 6-, 12- and 24-month-old Aβ precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice, we studied VDAC1 protein levels. Further, we also studied the interaction between VDAC1 and Aβ (monomers and oligomers) and phosphorylated tau, using cortical issues from AD patients, control subjects, APP, APP/PS1 and 3XTg.AD mice. We also studied age- and VDAC1-linked, mutant APP/Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in APP and non-transgenic wild-type (WT) mice. We found progressively increased levels of VDAC1 in the cortical tissues from the brains of patients with AD, relative to control subjects, and significantly increased levels of VDAC1 in the cerebral cortices of 6-, 12- and 24-month-old APP transgenic mice, relative to the age-matched control WT mice. Interestingly, we found VDAC1 interacted with Aβ and phosphorylated tau in the brains from AD patients and from APP, APP/PS1 and 3XTg.AD mice. We found progressively increased mitochondrial dysfunction in APP mice relative to WT mice. These observations led us to conclude that VDAC1 interacts with Aβ, and phosphorylated tau may in turn block mitochondrial pores, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction in AD pathogenesis. Based on current study observations, we propose that reduced levels of VDAC1, Aβ and phosphorylated tau may reduce the abnormal interaction between VDAC1 and APP, VDAC1 and Aβ, and VDAC1 and phosphorylated tau; and that reduced levels of VDAC1, Aβ and phosphorylated tau may maintain normal mitochondrial pore opening and pore closure, ultimately leading to normal mitochondrial function, mitochondria supplying ATP to nerve terminals and boosting synaptic and cognitive function in AD. PMID:22926141

  6. A neuronal network of mitochondrial dynamics regulates metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Caino, M. Cecilia; Seo, Jae Ho; Aguinaldo, Angeline; Wait, Eric; Bryant, Kelly G.; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Hayden, James E.; Vaira, Valentina; Morotti, Annamaria; Ferrero, Stefano; Bosari, Silvano; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Languino, Lucia R.; Cohen, Andrew R.; Altieri, Dario C.

    2016-01-01

    The role of mitochondria in cancer is controversial. Using a genome-wide shRNA screen, we now show that tumours reprogram a network of mitochondrial dynamics operative in neurons, including syntaphilin (SNPH), kinesin KIF5B and GTPase Miro1/2 to localize mitochondria to the cortical cytoskeleton and power the membrane machinery of cell movements. When expressed in tumours, SNPH inhibits the speed and distance travelled by individual mitochondria, suppresses organelle dynamics, and blocks chemotaxis and metastasis, in vivo. Tumour progression in humans is associated with downregulation or loss of SNPH, which correlates with shortened patient survival, increased mitochondrial trafficking to the cortical cytoskeleton, greater membrane dynamics and heightened cell invasion. Therefore, a SNPH network regulates metastatic competence and may provide a therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:27991488

  7. Effects of suppressed autophagy on mitochondrial dynamics and cell cycle of N2a cells.

    PubMed

    Gui, Meng-cui; Chen, Bo; Yu, Shan-shan; Bu, Bi-tao

    2014-04-01

    Autophagy dysregulation, mitochondrial dynamic abnormality and cell cycle re-entry are implicated in the vulnerable neurons of patients with Alzheimer's disease. This study was designed to testify the association among autophagy, mitochondrial dynamics and cell cycle in dividing neuroblastoma (N2a) cells. The N2a cells were cultured in vitro and treated with different concentrations of 3-methyladenine (3-MA). The cell viability was detected by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay. They were randomly divided into control group (cells cultured in normal culture medium) and 3-MA group (cells treated with 10 mmol/L 3-MA). The cell cycle was analyzed in the two groups 3, 6, 12, and 24 h after treatment by flow cytometry. Western blotting was used to evaluate the expression levels of mitofission 1 (Fis1), mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), cell cycle-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and cdc2. The flow cytometry revealed that the proportion of cells in G(2)/M was significantly increased, and that in G0/G1 was significantly reduced in the 3-MA group as compared with the control group. Western blotting showed that the expression levels of Fis1, LC3, and CDK4 were significantly up-regulated in the 3-MA group at the four indicated time points as compared with the control group. Mfn2 was initially decreased in the 3-MA group, and then significantly increased at 6 h or 12 h. Cdc2 was significantly increased in the 3-MA group at 3 h and 6 h, and then dropped significantly at 12 h and 24 h. Our data indicated that 3-MA-induced suppressed autophagy may interfere with the cell cycle progression and mitochondrial dynamics, and cause cell death. There are interactions among cell cycle, mitochondrial dynamics and autophagy in neurons.

  8. Chemical genetics unveils a key role of mitochondrial dynamics, cytochrome c release and IP3R activity in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Giacomotto, Jean; Brouilly, Nicolas; Walter, Ludivine; Mariol, Marie-Christine; Berger, Joachim; Ségalat, Laurent; Becker, Thomas S; Currie, Peter D; Gieseler, Kathrin

    2013-11-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a neuromuscular disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The subcellular mechanisms of DMD remain poorly understood and there is currently no curative treatment available. Using a Caenorhabditis elegans model for DMD as a pharmacologic and genetic tool, we found that cyclosporine A (CsA) reduces muscle degeneration at low dose and acts, at least in part, through a mitochondrial cyclophilin D, CYN-1. We thus hypothesized that CsA acts on mitochondrial permeability modulation through cyclophilin D inhibition. Mitochondrial patterns and dynamics were analyzed, which revealed dramatic mitochondrial fragmentation not only in dystrophic nematodes, but also in a zebrafish model for DMD. This abnormal mitochondrial fragmentation occurs before any obvious sign of degeneration can be detected. Moreover, we demonstrate that blocking/delaying mitochondrial fragmentation by knocking down the fission-promoting gene drp-1 reduces muscle degeneration and improves locomotion abilities of dystrophic nematodes. Further experiments revealed that cytochrome c is involved in muscle degeneration in C. elegans and seems to act, at least in part, through an interaction with the inositol trisphosphate receptor calcium channel, ITR-1. Altogether, our findings reveal that mitochondria play a key role in the early process of muscle degeneration and may be a target of choice for the design of novel therapeutics for DMD. In addition, our results provide the first indication in the nematode that (i) mitochondrial permeability transition can occur and (ii) cytochrome c can act in cell death.

  9. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency with an atypical presentation and ultrastructural mitochondrial abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Carey, M P; Poulton, K; Hawkins, C; Murphy, R P

    1987-01-01

    A case of carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency presenting in a 72 year old woman with the clinical picture of ophthalmoplegia plus other muscle weakness is reported. Histological and ultrastructural examination showed the features of a mitochondrial myopathy. Images PMID:3655814

  10. Silencing of the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-associated gene GDAP1 induces abnormal mitochondrial distribution and affects Ca2+ homeostasis by reducing store-operated Ca2+ entry.

    PubMed

    Pla-Martín, David; Rueda, Carlos B; Estela, Anna; Sánchez-Piris, Maribel; González-Sánchez, Paloma; Traba, Javier; de la Fuente, Sergio; Scorrano, Luca; Renau-Piqueras, Jaime; Alvarez, Javier; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Palau, Francesc

    2013-07-01

    GDAP1 is an outer mitochondrial membrane protein that acts as a regulator of mitochondrial dynamics. Mutations of the GDAP1 gene cause Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy. We show that GDAP1 interacts with the vesicle-organelle trafficking proteins RAB6B and caytaxin, which suggests that GDAP1 may participate in the mitochondrial movement within the cell. GDAP1 silencing in the SH-SY5Y cell line induces abnormal distribution of the mitochondrial network, reduces the contact between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and alters the mobilization of mitochondria towards plasma membrane upon depletion of ER-Ca(2+) stores. GDAP1 silencing does not affect mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, ER-Ca(2+), or Ca(2+) flow from ER to mitochondria, but reduces Ca(2+) inflow through store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) following mobilization of ER-Ca(2+) and SOCE-driven Ca(2+) entry in mitochondria. Our studies suggest that the pathophysiology of GDAP1-related CMT neuropathies may be associated with abnormal distribution and movement of mitochondria throughout cytoskeleton towards the ER and subplasmalemmal microdomains, resulting in a decrease in SOCE activity and impaired SOCE-driven Ca(2+) uptake in mitochondria.

  11. Acquired Mitochondrial Abnormalities, Including Epigenetic Inhibition of Superoxide Dismutase 2, in Pulmonary Hypertension and Cancer: Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Archer, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    There is no cure for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Therapies lack efficacy and/or are toxic, reflecting a failure to target disease abnormalities that are distinct from processes vital to normal cells. NSCLC and PAH share reversible mitochondrial-metabolic abnormalities which may offer selective therapeutic targets. The following mutually reinforcing, mitochondrial abnormalities favor proliferation, impair apoptosis, and are relatively restricted to PAH and cancer cells: (1) Epigenetic silencing of superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2) by methylation of CpG islands creates a pseudohypoxic redox environment that causes normoxic activation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α). (2) HIF-1α increases expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), which impairs oxidative metabolism and promotes a glycolytic metabolic state. (3) Mitochondrial fragmentation, partially due to mitofusin-2 downregulation, promotes proliferation. This review focuses on the recent discovery that decreased expression of SOD2, a putative tumor-suppressor gene and the major source of H2O2, results from hypermethylation of CpG islands. In cancer and PAH hypermethylation of a site in the enhancer region of intron 2 inhibits SOD2 transcription. In normal PASMC, SOD2 siRNA decreases H2O2 and activates HIF-1α. In PAH, reduced SOD2 expression decreases H2O2, reduces the cytosol and thereby activates HIF-1α. This causes a glycolytic shift in metabolism and increases the proliferation/apoptosis ratio by downregulating Kv1.5 channels, increasing cytosolic calcium, and inhibiting caspases. The DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, which restores SOD2 expression, corrects the proliferation/apoptosis imbalance in PAH and cancer cells. The specificity of PAH for lung vessels may relate to the selective upregulation of DNA methyltransferases that mediate CpG methylation in PASMC (DNA MT-1A and -3B). SOD2 augmentation inactivates HIF-1α in PAH

  12. Regulation of Mitoflash Biogenesis and Signaling by Mitochondrial Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenwen; Sun, Tao; Liu, Beibei; Wu, Di; Qi, Wenfeng; Wang, Xianhua; Ma, Qi; Cheng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles undergoing constant network reorganization and exhibiting stochastic signaling events in the form of mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes). Here we investigate whether and how mitochondrial network dynamics regulate mitoflash biogenesis and signaling. We found that mitoflash frequency was largely invariant when network fragmentized or redistributed in the absence of mitofusin (Mfn) 1, Mfn2, or Kif5b. However, Opa1 deficiency decreased spontaneous mitoflash frequency due to superimposing changes in respiratory function, whereas mitoflash response to non-metabolic stimulation was unchanged despite network fragmentation. In Drp1- or Mff-deficient cells whose mitochondria hyperfused into a single whole-cell reticulum, the frequency of mitoflashes of regular amplitude and duration was again unaltered, although brief and low-amplitude “miniflashes” emerged because of improved detection ability. As the network reorganized, however, the signal mass of mitoflash signaling was dynamically regulated in accordance with the degree of network connectivity. These findings demonstrate a novel functional role of mitochondrial network dynamics and uncover a magnitude- rather than frequency-modulatory mechanism in the regulation of mitoflash signaling. In addition, our data support a stochastic trigger model for the ignition of mitoflashes. PMID:27623243

  13. Cause and Consequence: Mitochondrial Dysfunction Initiates and Propagates Neuronal Dysfunction, Neuronal Death and Behavioral Abnormalities in Age Associated Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Gary E.; Starkov, Anatoly; Blass, John P.; Ratan, Rajiv R.; Beal, M. Flint

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Age-related neurodegenerative diseases are associated with mild impairment of oxidative metabolism and accumulation of abnormal proteins. Within the cell, the mitochondria appears to be a dominant site for initiation and propagation of disease processes. Shifts in metabolism in response to mild metabolic perturbations may decrease the threshold for irreversible injury in response to ordinarily sub lethal metabolic insults. Mild impairment of metabolism accrue from and lead to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increased ROS change cell signaling via post transcriptional and transcriptional changes. The cause and consequences of mild impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is one focus of this review. Many experiments in tissues from humans support the notion that oxidative modification of the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) compromises neuronal energy metabolism and enhance ROS production in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). These data suggest that cognitive decline in AD derives from the selective tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle abnormalities. By contrast in Huntington’s Disease (HD), a movement disorder with cognitive features distinct form AD, complex II + III abnormalities may dominate. These distinct mitochondrial abnormalities culminate in oxidative stress, energy dysfunction, and aberrant homeostasis of cytosolic calcium. Cytosolic calcium, elevations even only transiently, leads to hyperactivity of a number of enzymes. One calcium activated enzyme with demonstrated pathophysiological import in HD and AD is transglutaminase (TGase). TGase is a cross linking enzymes that can modulate transcrption, inactivate metabolic enzymes, and cause aggregation of critical proteins. Recent data indicate that TGase can silence expression of genes involved in compensating for metabolic stress. Altogether, our results suggest that increasing KGDHC via inhibition of TGase or via a host of other strategies to be described would be effective therapeutic

  14. Early Expression of Parkinson's Disease-Related Mitochondrial Abnormalities in PINK1 Knockout Rats.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Lance M; Purnell, Phillip R; Boska, Michael D; Fox, Howard S

    2016-01-01

    PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) mutations are responsible for an autosomal recessive, familial form of Parkinson's disease. PINK1 protein is a Ser/Thr kinase localized to the mitochondrial membrane and is involved in many processes including mitochondrial trafficking, mitophagy, and proteasomal function. Using a new PINK1 knockout (PINK1 KO) rat model, we found altered brain metabolomic markers using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, identified changes in mitochondrial pathways with quantitative proteomics using sequential window acquisition of all theoretical spectra (SWATH) mass spectrometry, and demonstrated mitochondrial functional alterations through measurement of oxygen consumption and acidification rates. The observed alterations included reduced creatine, decreased levels of complex I of the electron transport chain, and increased proton leak in the electron transport chain in PINK1 KO rat brains. In conjunction, these results demonstrate metabolomic and mitochondrial alterations occur during the asymptomatic phase of Parkinson's disease in this model. These results indicate both potential early diagnostic markers and therapeutic pathways that can be used in PD.

  15. Mitochondrial Abnormalities and Synaptic Loss Underlie Memory Deficits Seen in Mouse Models of Obesity and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Isaura V.A.; Rivers-Auty, Jack; Allan, Stuart M.; Lawrence, Catherine B.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with impaired memory in humans, and obesity induced by high-fat diets leads to cognitive deficits in rodents and in mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, it remains unclear how high-fat diets contribute to memory impairment. Therefore, we tested the effect of a high-fat diet on memory in male and female control non-transgenic (Non-Tg) and triple-transgenic AD (3xTgAD) mice and determined if a high-fat diet caused similar ultrastructural abnormalities to those observed in AD. Behavior was assessed in mice on control or high-fat diet at 4, 8, or 14 months of age and ultrastructural analysis at 8 months of age. A high-fat diet increased body weight, fat weight, and insulin levels with some differences in these metabolic responses observed between Non-Tg and 3xTgAD mice. In both sexes, high-fat feeding caused memory impairments in Non-Tg mice and accelerated memory deficits in 3xTgAD mice. In 3xTgAD mice, changes in hippocampal mitochondrial morphology were observed in capillaries and brain neuropil that were accompanied by a reduction in synapse number. A high-fat diet also caused mitochondria abnormalities and a reduction in synapse number in Non-Tg mice, but did not exacerbate the changes seen in 3xTgAD mice. Our data demonstrate that a high-fat diet affected memory in Non-Tg mice and produced similar impairments in mitochondrial morphology and synapse number comparable to those seen in AD mice, suggesting that the detrimental effects of a high-fat diet on memory might be due to changes in mitochondrial morphology leading to a reduction in synaptic number. PMID:27802235

  16. Tools for assessing mitochondrial dynamics in mouse tissues and neurodegenerative models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Anh H.

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo membrane fusion and fission and transport. The dynamic properties of mitochondria are important for regulating mitochondrial function. Defects in mitochondrial dynamics are linked neurodegenerative diseases and affect the development of many tissues. To investigate the role of mitochondrial dynamics in diseases, versatile tools are needed to explore the physiology of these dynamic organelles in multiple tissues. Current tools for monitoring mitochondrial dynamics have been limited to studies in cell culture, which may be inadequate model systems for exploring the network of tissues. Here, we have generated mouse models for monitoring mitochondrial dynamics in a broad spectrum of tissues and cell types. The Photo-Activatable Mitochondrial (PhAM floxed) line enables Cre-inducible expression of a mitochondrial targeted photoconvertible protein, Dendra2 (mito-Dendra2). In the PhAMexcised line, mito-Dendra2 is ubiquitously expressed to facilitate broad analysis of mitochondria at various developmental processes. We have utilized these models to study mitochondrial dynamics in the nigrostriatal circuit of Parkinson's disease (PD) and in the development of skeletal muscles. Increasing evidences implicate aberrant regulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission in models of PD. To assess the function of mitochondrial dynamics in the nigrostriatal circuit, we utilized transgenic techniques to abrogate mitochondrial fusion. We show that deletion of the Mfn2 leads to the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and Parkinson's-like features in mice. To elucidate the dynamic properties of mitochondria during muscle development, we established a platform for examining mitochondrial compartmentalization in skeletal muscles. This model system may yield clues to the role of mitochondrial dynamics in mitochondrial myopathies.

  17. PMPCA mutations cause abnormal mitochondrial protein processing in patients with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, Rebekah K.; Assoum, Mirna; Gakh, Oleksandr; Blaser, Susan; Raiman, Julian A.; Mignot, Cyril; Roze, Emmanuel; Dürr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Lévy, Nicolas; Prasad, Chitra; Paton, Tara; Paterson, Andrew D.; Roslin, Nicole M.; Marshall, Christian R.; Desvignes, Jean-Pierre; Roëckel-Trevisiol, Nathalie; Scherer, Stephen W.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Mégarbané, André; Isaya, Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Non-progressive cerebellar ataxias are a rare group of disorders that comprise approximately 10% of static infantile encephalopathies. We report the identification of mutations in PMPCA in 17 patients from four families affected with cerebellar ataxia, including the large Lebanese family previously described with autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia and short stature of Norman type and localized to chromosome 9q34 (OMIM #213200). All patients present with non-progressive cerebellar ataxia, and the majority have intellectual disability of variable severity. PMPCA encodes α-MPP, the alpha subunit of mitochondrial processing peptidase, the primary enzyme responsible for the maturation of the vast majority of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins, which is necessary for life at the cellular level. Analysis of lymphoblastoid cells and fibroblasts from patients homozygous for the PMPCA p.Ala377Thr mutation and carriers demonstrate that the mutation impacts both the level of the alpha subunit encoded by PMPCA and the function of mitochondrial processing peptidase. In particular, this mutation impacts the maturation process of frataxin, the protein which is depleted in Friedreich ataxia. This study represents the first time that defects in PMPCA and mitochondrial processing peptidase have been described in association with a disease phenotype in humans. PMID:25808372

  18. Abnormal intermediate filament organization alters mitochondrial motility in giant axonal neuropathy fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Jason; Jain, Nikhil; Kuczmarski, Edward R.; Mahammad, Saleemulla; Goldman, Anne; Gelfand, Vladimir I.; Opal, Puneet; Goldman, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare disease caused by mutations in the GAN gene, which encodes gigaxonin, an E3 ligase adapter that targets intermediate filament (IF) proteins for degradation in numerous cell types, including neurons and fibroblasts. The cellular hallmark of GAN pathology is the formation of large aggregates and bundles of IFs. In this study, we show that both the distribution and motility of mitochondria are altered in GAN fibroblasts and this is attributable to their association with vimentin IF aggregates and bundles. Transient expression of wild-type gigaxonin in GAN fibroblasts reduces the number of IF aggregates and bundles, restoring mitochondrial motility. Conversely, silencing the expression of gigaxonin in control fibroblasts leads to changes in IF organization similar to that of GAN patient fibroblasts and a coincident loss of mitochondrial motility. The inhibition of mitochondrial motility in GAN fibroblasts is not due to a global inhibition of organelle translocation, as lysosome motility is normal. Our findings demonstrate that it is the pathological changes in IF organization that cause the loss of mitochondrial motility. PMID:26700320

  19. Abnormal intermediate filament organization alters mitochondrial motility in giant axonal neuropathy fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Jason; Jain, Nikhil; Kuczmarski, Edward R; Mahammad, Saleemulla; Goldman, Anne; Gelfand, Vladimir I; Opal, Puneet; Goldman, Robert D

    2016-02-15

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare disease caused by mutations in the GAN gene, which encodes gigaxonin, an E3 ligase adapter that targets intermediate filament (IF) proteins for degradation in numerous cell types, including neurons and fibroblasts. The cellular hallmark of GAN pathology is the formation of large aggregates and bundles of IFs. In this study, we show that both the distribution and motility of mitochondria are altered in GAN fibroblasts and this is attributable to their association with vimentin IF aggregates and bundles. Transient expression of wild-type gigaxonin in GAN fibroblasts reduces the number of IF aggregates and bundles, restoring mitochondrial motility. Conversely, silencing the expression of gigaxonin in control fibroblasts leads to changes in IF organization similar to that of GAN patient fibroblasts and a coincident loss of mitochondrial motility. The inhibition of mitochondrial motility in GAN fibroblasts is not due to a global inhibition of organelle translocation, as lysosome motility is normal. Our findings demonstrate that it is the pathological changes in IF organization that cause the loss of mitochondrial motility.

  20. A mitochondrial DNA sequence is associated with abnormal pollen development in cytoplasmic male sterile bean plants.

    PubMed Central

    Johns, C; Lu, M; Lyznik, A; Mackenzie, S

    1992-01-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in common bean is associated with the presence of a 3-kb unique mitochondrial sequence designated pvs. The pvs sequence encodes at least two open reading frames (297 and 720 bp in length) with portions derived from the chloroplast genome. Fertility restoration by the nuclear restorer gene Fr results in the loss of this transcriptionally active unique region. We examined the effect of CMS (pvs present) and fertility restoration by Fr (pvs absent) on the pattern of pollen development in bean. In the CMS line, pollen aborted in the tetrad stage late in microgametogenesis. Microspores maintained cytoplasmic connections throughout pollen development, indicating aberrant or incomplete cytokinesis. Pollen-specific events associated with pollen abortion and fertility restoration imply that a gametophytic factor or event may be involved in CMS. In situ hybridization experiments suggested that significant reduction or complete loss of the mitochondrial sterility-associated sequence occurred in fertile pollen of F2 populations segregating for fertility. These observations support a model of fertility restoration by the loss of a mitochondrial DNA sequence prior to or during microsporogenesis/gametogenesis. PMID:1498602

  1. Peripheral neuropathy in mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Pareyson, Davide; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Moroni, Isabella; Salsano, Ettore; Zeviani, Massimo

    2013-10-01

    Why is peripheral neuropathy common but mild in many mitochondrial disorders, and why is it, in some cases, the predominant or only manifestation? Although this question remains largely unanswered, recent advances in cellular and molecular biology have begun to clarify the importance of mitochondrial functioning and distribution in the peripheral nerve. Mutations in proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics (ie, fusion and fission) frequently result in a Charcot-Marie-Tooth phenotype. Peripheral neuropathies with different phenotypic presentations occur in mitochondrial diseases associated with abnormalities in mitochondrial DNA replication and maintenance, or associated with defects in mitochondrial respiratory chain complex V. Our knowledge of mitochondrial disorders is rapidly growing as new nuclear genes are identified and new phenotypes described. Early diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders, essential to provide appropriate genetic counselling, has become crucial in a few treatable conditions. Recognising and diagnosing an underlying mitochondrial defect in patients presenting with peripheral neuropathy is therefore of paramount importance.

  2. Effects of abnormal excitation on the dynamics of spiral waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min-Yi, Deng; Xue-Liang, Zhang; Jing-Yu, Dai

    2016-01-01

    The effect of physiological and pathological abnormal excitation of a myocyte on the spiral waves is investigated based on the cellular automaton model. When the excitability of the medium is high enough, the physiological abnormal excitation causes the spiral wave to meander irregularly and slowly. When the excitability of the medium is low enough, the physiological abnormal excitation leads to a new stable spiral wave. On the other hand, the pathological abnormal excitation destroys the spiral wave and results in the spatiotemporal chaos, which agrees with the clinical conclusion that the early after depolarization is the pro-arrhythmic mechanism of some anti-arrhythmic drugs. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are analyzed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11365003 and 11165004).

  3. Membrane trafficking and mitochondrial abnormalities precede subunit c deposition in a cerebellar cell model of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Fossale, Elisa; Wolf, Pavlina; Espinola, Janice A; Lubicz-Nawrocka, Tanya; Teed, Allison M; Gao, Hanlin; Rigamonti, Dorotea; Cattaneo, Elena; MacDonald, Marcy E; Cotman, Susan L

    2004-01-01

    Background JNCL is a recessively inherited, childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease most-commonly caused by a ~1 kb CLN3 mutation. The resulting loss of battenin activity leads to deposition of mitochondrial ATP synthase, subunit c and a specific loss of CNS neurons. We previously generated Cln3Δex7/8 knock-in mice, which replicate the common JNCL mutation, express mutant battenin and display JNCL-like pathology. Results To elucidate the consequences of the common JNCL mutation in neuronal cells, we used P4 knock-in mouse cerebella to establish conditionally immortalized CbCln3 wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous neuronal precursor cell lines, which can be differentiated into MAP-2 and NeuN-positive, neuron-like cells. Homozygous CbCln3Δex7/8 precursor cells express low levels of mutant battenin and, when aged at confluency, accumulate ATPase subunit c. Recessive phenotypes are also observed at sub-confluent growth; cathepsin D transport and processing are altered, although enzyme activity is not significantly affected, lysosomal size and distribution are altered, and endocytosis is reduced. In addition, mitochondria are abnormally elongated, cellular ATP levels are decreased, and survival following oxidative stress is reduced. Conclusions These findings reveal that battenin is required for intracellular membrane trafficking and mitochondrial function. Moreover, these deficiencies are likely to be early events in the JNCL disease process and may particularly impact neuronal survival. PMID:15588329

  4. The oral administration of D-galactose induces abnormalities within the mitochondrial respiratory chain in the brain of rats.

    PubMed

    Budni, Josiane; Garcez, Michelle Lima; Mina, Francielle; Bellettini-Santos, Tatiani; da Silva, Sabrina; Luz, Aline Pereira da; Schiavo, Gustavo Luiz; Batista-Silva, Hemily; Scaini, Giselli; Streck, Emílio Luiz; Quevedo, João

    2017-02-24

    D-Galactose (D-gal) chronic administration via intraperitoneal and subcutaneous routes has been used as a model of aging and Alzheimer disease in rodents. Intraperitoneal and subcutaneous administration of D-gal causes memory impairments, a reduction in the neurogenesis of adult mice, an increase in the levels of the amyloid precursor protein and oxidative damage; However, the effects of oral D-gal remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the oral administration of D-gal induces abnormalities within the mitochondrial respiratory chain of rats. Male Wistar rats (4 months old) received D-gal (100 mg/kg v.o.), during the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 6th or 8th weeks by oral gavage. The activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes was measured in the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th weeks after the administration of D-gal. The activity of the respiratory chain complex I was found to have increased in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in the 1st, 6th and 8th weeks, while the activity of the respiratory chain complex II increased in the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th weeks within the hippocampus and in the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th weeks within the prefrontal cortex. The activity of complex II-III increased within the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in each week of oral D-gal treatment. The activity of complex IV increased within the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in the 1st, 2nd, 6th and 8th weeks of treatment. After 4 weeks of treatment the activity increased only in hippocampus. In conclusion, the present study showed that the oral administration of D-gal increased the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I, II, II-III and IV in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Furthermore, the administration of D-gal via the oral route seems to cause the alterations in the mitochondrial respiratory complexes observed in brain neurodegeneration.

  5. Microtubules Are Essential for Mitochondrial Dynamics-Fission, Fusion, and Motility-in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Woods, Laken C; Berbusse, Gregory W; Naylor, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is dependent upon mitochondrial structure which is in turn dependent upon mitochondrial dynamics, including fission, fusion, and motility. Here we examined the relationship between mitochondrial dynamics and the cytoskeleton in Dictyostelium discoideum. Using time-lapse analysis, we quantified mitochondrial fission, fusion, and motility in the presence of cytoskeleton disrupting pharmaceuticals and the absence of the potential mitochondria-cytoskeleton linker protein, CluA. Our results indicate that microtubules are essential for mitochondrial movement, as well as fission and fusion; actin plays a less significant role, perhaps selecting the mitochondria for transport. We also suggest that CluA is not a linker protein but plays an unidentified role in mitochondrial fission and fusion. The significance of our work is to gain further insight into the role the cytoskeleton plays in mitochondrial dynamics and function. By better understanding these processes we can better appreciate the underlying mitochondrial contributions to many neurological disorders characterized by altered mitochondrial dynamics, structure, and/or function.

  6. The conformational dynamics of the mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone.

    PubMed

    Mapa, Koyeli; Sikor, Martin; Kudryavtsev, Volodymyr; Waegemann, Karin; Kalinin, Stanislav; Seidel, Claus A M; Neupert, Walter; Lamb, Don C; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2010-04-09

    Heat shock proteins 70 (Hsp70) represent a ubiquitous and conserved family of molecular chaperones involved in a plethora of cellular processes. The dynamics of their ATP hydrolysis-driven and cochaperone-regulated conformational cycle are poorly understood. We used fluorescence spectroscopy to analyze, in real time and at single-molecule resolution, the effects of nucleotides and cochaperones on the conformation of Ssc1, a mitochondrial member of the family. We report that the conformation of its ADP state is unexpectedly heterogeneous, in contrast to a uniform ATP state. Substrates are actively involved in determining the conformation of Ssc1. The J protein Mdj1 does not interact transiently with the chaperone, as generally believed, but rather is released slowly upon ATP hydrolysis. Analysis of the major bacterial Hsp70 revealed important differences between highly homologous members of the family, possibly explaining tuning of Hsp70 chaperones to meet specific functions in different organisms and cellular compartments.

  7. Mitochondrial dynamics and inheritance during cell division, development and disease.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Prashant; Chan, David C

    2014-10-01

    During cell division, it is critical to properly partition functional sets of organelles to each daughter cell. The partitioning of mitochondria shares some common features with that of other organelles, particularly in the use of interactions with cytoskeletal elements to facilitate delivery to the daughter cells. However, mitochondria have unique features - including their own genome and a maternal mode of germline transmission - that place additional demands on this process. Consequently, mechanisms have evolved to regulate mitochondrial segregation during cell division, oogenesis, fertilization and tissue development, as well as to ensure the integrity of these organelles and their DNA, including fusion-fission dynamics, organelle transport, mitophagy and genetic selection of functional genomes. Defects in these processes can lead to cell and tissue pathologies.

  8. Neurodegenerative Eye Disorders: Role of Mitochondrial Dynamics and Genomics.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Kuldeep; Dada, Rima; Dada, Tanuj

    2016-01-01

    As a major source of cellular energy, mitochondria are critical for optimal ocular function. They are also essential for cell differentiation and survival. Mitochondrial mutations and oxidative damage to the mitochondrial DNA are important factors underlying the pathology of many ocular disorders. With increasing age, mitochondrial DNA damage accumulates and results in several eye diseases. It is evident that the mitochondrial genome is more susceptible to stress and damage than the nuclear genome, as it lacks histone protection, a nucleotide excision repair system, and recombination repair, and it is the source and target of free radicals. Accumulation of mitochondrial mutations beyond a certain threshold explains the marked variations in phenotypes seen in mitochondrial diseases and the molecular mechanisms related to the pathogenesis of several chronic disorders in the eye. This review details the structure and function of mitochondria and the mitochondrial genome along with the mitochondrial involvement in various neurodegenerative ophthalmic disorders.

  9. Acetyl-L-carnitine and lipoic acid improve mitochondrial abnormalities and serum levels of liver enzymes in a mouse model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kathirvel, Elango; Morgan, Kengathevy; French, Samuel W; Morgan, Timothy R

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondrial abnormalities are suggested to be associated with the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver. Liver mitochondrial content and function have been shown to improve in oral feeding of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) to rodents. Carnitine is involved in the transport of acyl-coenzyme A across the mitochondrial membrane to be used in mitochondrial β-oxidation. We hypothesized that oral administration ALC with the antioxidant lipoic acid (ALC + LA) would benefit nonalcoholic fatty liver. To test our hypothesis, we fed Balb/C mice a standard diet (SF) or SF with ALC + LA or high-fat diet (HF) or HF with ALC + LA for 6 months. Acetyl-L-carnitine and LA were dissolved at 0.2:0.1% (wt/vol) in drinking water, and mice were allowed free access to food and water. Along with physical parameters, insulin resistance (blood glucose, insulin, glucose tolerance), liver function (alanine transaminase [ALT], aspartate transaminase [AST]), liver histology (hematoxylin and eosin), oxidative stress (malondialdehyde), and mitochondrial abnormalities (carbamoyl phosphate synthase 1 and electron microscopy) were done. Compared with SF, HF had higher body, liver, liver-to-body weight ratio, white adipose tissue, ALT, AST, liver fat, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance. Coadministration of ALC + LA to HF animals significantly improved the mitochondrial marker carbamoyl phosphate synthase 1 and the size of the mitochondria in liver. Alanine transaminase and AST levels were decreased. In a nonalcoholic fatty liver mice model, ALC + LA combination improved liver mitochondrial content, size, serum ALT, and AST without significant changes in oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and liver fat accumulation.

  10. Cell signaling and mitochondrial dynamics: implications for neuronal function and neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Theodore J.; Slupe, Andrew M.; Strack, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Nascent evidence indicates that mitochondrial fission, fusion, and transport are subject to intricate regulatory mechanisms that intersect with both well-characterized and emerging signaling pathways. While it is well established that mutations in components of the mitochondrial fission/fusion machinery can cause neurological disorders, relatively little is known about upstream regulators of mitochondrial dynamics and their role in neurodegeneration. Here, we review posttranslational regulation of mitochondrial fission/fusion enzymes, with particular emphasis on dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), as well as outer mitochondrial signaling complexes involving protein kinases and phosphatases. We also review recent evidence that mitochondrial dynamics has profound consequences for neuronal development and synaptic transmission and discuss implications for clinical translation. PMID:22297163

  11. ABT737 enhances cholangiocarcinoma sensitivity to cisplatin through regulation of mitochondrial dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Zhongqi; Yu, Huimei; Cui, Ni; Kong, Xianggui; Liu, Xiaomin; Chang, Yulei; Wu, Yao; Sun, Liankun; Wang, Guangyi

    2015-07-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma responses weakly to cisplatin. Mitochondrial dynamics participate in the response to various stresses, and mainly involve mitophagy and mitochondrial fusion and fission. Bcl-2 family proteins play critical roles in orchestrating mitochondrial dynamics, and are involved in the resistance to cisplatin. Here we reported that ABT737, combined with cisplatin, can promote cholangiocarcinoma cells to undergo apoptosis. We found that the combined treatment decreased the Mcl-1 pro-survival form and increased Bak. Cells undergoing cisplatin treatment showed hyperfused mitochondria, whereas fragmentation was dominant in the mitochondria of cells exposed to the combined treatment, with higher Fis1 levels, decreased Mfn2 and OPA1 levels, increased ratio of Drp1 60 kD to 80 kD form, and more Drp1 located on mitochondria. More p62 aggregates were observed in cells with fragmented mitochondria, and they gradually translocated to mitochondria. Mitophagy was induced by the combined treatment. Knockdown p62 decreased the Drp1 ratio, increased Tom20, and increased cell viability. Our data indicated that mitochondrial dynamics play an important role in the response of cholangiocarcinoma to cisplatin. ABT737 might enhance cholangiocarcinoma sensitivity to cisplatin through regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and the balance within Bcl-2 family proteins. Furthermore, p62 seems to be critical in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • Cholangiocarcinoma may adapt to cisplatin through mitochondrial fusion. • ABT737 sensitizes cholangiocarcinoma to cisplatin by promoting fission and mitophagy. • p62 might participate in the regulation of mitochondrial fission and mitophagy.

  12. Abnormally activated one-carbon metabolic pathway is associated with mtDNA hypermethylation and mitochondrial malfunction in the oocytes of polycystic gilt ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Longfei; Li, Juan; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Niu, Yingjie; Wang, Chenfei; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia and polycystic ovaries (PCO) usually produce oocytes of poor quality. However, the intracellular mechanism linking hyperhomocysteinemia and oocyte quality remains elusive. In this study, the quality of the oocytes isolated from healthy and polycystic gilt ovaries was evaluated in vitro in association with one-carbon metabolism, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) methylation, and mitochondrial function. PCO oocytes demonstrated impaired polar body extrusion, and significantly decreased cleavage and blastocyst rates. The mitochondrial distribution was disrupted in PCO oocytes, together with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and deformed mitochondrial structure. The mtDNA copy number and the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes were significantly lower in PCO oocytes. Homocysteine concentration in follicular fluid was significantly higher in PCO group, which was associated with significantly up-regulated one-carbon metabolic enzymes betaine homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT), glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. Moreover, mtDNA sequences coding for 12S, 16S rRNA and ND4, as well as the D-loop region were significantly hypermethylated in PCO oocytes. These results indicate that an abnormal activation of one-carbon metabolism and hypermethylation of mtDNA may contribute, largely, to the mitochondrial malfunction and decreased quality of PCO-derived oocytes in gilts. PMID:26758245

  13. Abnormally activated one-carbon metabolic pathway is associated with mtDNA hypermethylation and mitochondrial malfunction in the oocytes of polycystic gilt ovaries.

    PubMed

    Jia, Longfei; Li, Juan; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Niu, Yingjie; Wang, Chenfei; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-13

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia and polycystic ovaries (PCO) usually produce oocytes of poor quality. However, the intracellular mechanism linking hyperhomocysteinemia and oocyte quality remains elusive. In this study, the quality of the oocytes isolated from healthy and polycystic gilt ovaries was evaluated in vitro in association with one-carbon metabolism, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) methylation, and mitochondrial function. PCO oocytes demonstrated impaired polar body extrusion, and significantly decreased cleavage and blastocyst rates. The mitochondrial distribution was disrupted in PCO oocytes, together with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and deformed mitochondrial structure. The mtDNA copy number and the expression of mtDNA-encoded genes were significantly lower in PCO oocytes. Homocysteine concentration in follicular fluid was significantly higher in PCO group, which was associated with significantly up-regulated one-carbon metabolic enzymes betaine homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT), glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) and the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1. Moreover, mtDNA sequences coding for 12S, 16S rRNA and ND4, as well as the D-loop region were significantly hypermethylated in PCO oocytes. These results indicate that an abnormal activation of one-carbon metabolism and hypermethylation of mtDNA may contribute, largely, to the mitochondrial malfunction and decreased quality of PCO-derived oocytes in gilts.

  14. Live imaging of mitochondrial dynamics in CNS dopaminergic neurons in vivo demonstrates early reversal of mitochondrial transport following MPP(+) exposure.

    PubMed

    Dukes, April A; Bai, Qing; Van Laar, Victor S; Zhou, Yangzhong; Ilin, Vladimir; David, Christopher N; Agim, Zeynep S; Bonkowsky, Joshua L; Cannon, Jason R; Watkins, Simon C; Croix, Claudette M St; Burton, Edward A; Berman, Sarah B

    2016-11-01

    Extensive convergent evidence collectively suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction is central to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, changes in the dynamic properties of mitochondria have been increasingly implicated as a key proximate mechanism underlying neurodegeneration. However, studies have been limited by the lack of a model in which mitochondria can be imaged directly and dynamically in dopaminergic neurons of the intact vertebrate CNS. We generated transgenic zebrafish in which mitochondria of dopaminergic neurons are labeled with a fluorescent reporter, and optimized methods allowing direct intravital imaging of CNS dopaminergic axons and measurement of mitochondrial transport in vivo. The proportion of mitochondria undergoing axonal transport in dopaminergic neurons decreased overall during development between 2days post-fertilization (dpf) and 5dpf, at which point the major period of growth and synaptogenesis of the relevant axonal projections is complete. Exposure to 0.5-1.0mM MPP(+) between 4 and 5dpf did not compromise zebrafish viability or cause detectable changes in the number or morphology of dopaminergic neurons, motor function or monoaminergic neurochemistry. However, 0.5mM MPP(+) caused a 300% increase in retrograde mitochondrial transport and a 30% decrease in anterograde transport. In contrast, exposure to higher concentrations of MPP(+) caused an overall reduction in mitochondrial transport. This is the first time mitochondrial transport has been observed directly in CNS dopaminergic neurons of a living vertebrate and quantified in a PD model in vivo. Our findings are compatible with a model in which damage at presynaptic dopaminergic terminals causes an early compensatory increase in retrograde transport of compromised mitochondria for degradation in the cell body. These data are important because manipulation of early pathogenic mechanisms might be a valid therapeutic approach to PD. The novel transgenic lines and

  15. Mitochondrial Dynamics Tracking with Two-Photon Phosphorescent Terpyridyl Iridium(III) Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huaiyi; Zhang, Pingyu; Qiu, Kangqiang; Huang, Juanjuan; Chen, Yu; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics, including fission and fusion, control the morphology and function of mitochondria, and disruption of mitochondrial dynamics leads to Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, metabolic diseases, and cancers. Currently, many types of commercial mitochondria probes are available, but high excitation energy and low photo-stability render them unsuitable for tracking mitochondrial dynamics in living cells. Therefore, mitochondrial targeting agents that exhibit superior anti-photo-bleaching ability, deep tissue penetration and intrinsically high three-dimensional resolutions are urgently needed. Two-photon-excited compounds that use low-energy near-infrared excitation lasers have emerged as non-invasive tools for cell imaging. In this work, terpyridyl cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes (Ir1-Ir3) are demonstrated as one- and two-photon phosphorescent probes for real-time imaging and tracking of mitochondrial morphology changes in living cells.

  16. Mitochondrial Dynamics Tracking with Two-Photon Phosphorescent Terpyridyl Iridium(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huaiyi; Zhang, Pingyu; Qiu, Kangqiang; Huang, Juanjuan; Chen, Yu; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2016-02-11

    Mitochondrial dynamics, including fission and fusion, control the morphology and function of mitochondria, and disruption of mitochondrial dynamics leads to Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, metabolic diseases, and cancers. Currently, many types of commercial mitochondria probes are available, but high excitation energy and low photo-stability render them unsuitable for tracking mitochondrial dynamics in living cells. Therefore, mitochondrial targeting agents that exhibit superior anti-photo-bleaching ability, deep tissue penetration and intrinsically high three-dimensional resolutions are urgently needed. Two-photon-excited compounds that use low-energy near-infrared excitation lasers have emerged as non-invasive tools for cell imaging. In this work, terpyridyl cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes (Ir1-Ir3) are demonstrated as one- and two-photon phosphorescent probes for real-time imaging and tracking of mitochondrial morphology changes in living cells.

  17. Mitochondrial Dynamics Tracking with Two-Photon Phosphorescent Terpyridyl Iridium(III) Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huaiyi; Zhang, Pingyu; Qiu, Kangqiang; Huang, Juanjuan; Chen, Yu; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics, including fission and fusion, control the morphology and function of mitochondria, and disruption of mitochondrial dynamics leads to Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, metabolic diseases, and cancers. Currently, many types of commercial mitochondria probes are available, but high excitation energy and low photo-stability render them unsuitable for tracking mitochondrial dynamics in living cells. Therefore, mitochondrial targeting agents that exhibit superior anti-photo-bleaching ability, deep tissue penetration and intrinsically high three-dimensional resolutions are urgently needed. Two-photon-excited compounds that use low-energy near-infrared excitation lasers have emerged as non-invasive tools for cell imaging. In this work, terpyridyl cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes (Ir1-Ir3) are demonstrated as one- and two-photon phosphorescent probes for real-time imaging and tracking of mitochondrial morphology changes in living cells. PMID:26864567

  18. Paxillin mutations affect focal adhesions and lead to altered mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Ichiro; Hasina, Rifat; Lennon, Frances E; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Usatyuk, Peter; Tan, Yi-Hung C; Krishnaswamy, Soundararajan; Arif, Qudsia; Carey, George; Hseu, Robyn D; Robinson, Matthew; Tretiakova, Maria; Brand, Toni M; Iida, Mari; Ferguson, Mark K; Wheeler, Deric L; Husain, Aliya N; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Vokes, Everett E; Singleton, Patrick A; Salgia, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Cytoskeletal and focal adhesion abnormalities are observed in several types of cancer, including lung cancer. We have previously reported that paxillin (PXN) was mutated, amplified, and overexpressed in a significant number of lung cancer patient samples, that PXN protein was upregulated in more advanced stages of lung cancer compared with lower stages, and that the PXN gene was also amplified in some pre-neoplastic lung lesions. Among the mutations investigated, we previously found that PXN variant A127T in lung cancer cells enhanced cell proliferation and focal adhesion formation and colocalized with the anti-apoptotic protein B Cell Lymphoma 2 (BCL-2), which is known to localize to the mitochondria, among other sites. To further explore the effects of activating mutations of PXN on mitochondrial function, we cloned and expressed wild-type PXN and variants containing the most commonly occurring PXN mutations (P46S, P52L, G105D, A127T, P233L, T255I, D399N, E423K, P487L, and K506R) in a GFP-tagged vector using HEK-293 human embryonic kidney cells. Utilizing live-cell imaging to systematically study the effects of wild-type PXN vs. mutants, we created a model that recapitulates the salient features of the measured dynamics and conclude that compared with wild-type, some mutant clones confer enhanced focal adhesion and lamellipodia formation (A127T, P233L, and P487L) and some confer increased association with BCL-2, Dynamin-related Protein-1 (DRP-1), and Mitofusion-2 (MFN-2) proteins (P233L and D399N). Further, PXN mutants, through their interactions with BCL-2 and DRP-1, could regulate cisplatin drug resistance in human lung cancer cells. The data reported herein suggest that mutant PXN variants play a prominent role in mitochondrial dynamics with direct implications on lung cancer progression and hence, deserve further exploration as therapeutic targets. PMID:23792636

  19. Mitochondrial dynamics changes with age in an APPsw/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin-Lin; Shen, Yang; Wang, Xiao; Wei, Li-Fei; Wang, Ping; Yang, Hui; Wang, Cun-Fu; Xie, Zhao-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Increasing research suggests that mitochondrial defects play a major role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. We aimed to better understand changes in mitochondria with the development and progression of AD. We compared APPsw/PS1dE9 transgenic mice at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months old as an animal model of AD and age-matched C57BL/6 mice as controls. The learning ability and spatial memory ability of APPsw/PS1dE9 mice showed significant differences compared with controls until 9 and 12 months. Mitochondrial morphology was altered in hippocampus tissue of APPsw/PS1dE9 mice beginning from the third month. ‘Medullary corpuscle’, which is formed by the accumulation of a large amount of degenerative and fragmented mitochondria in neuropils, may be the characteristic change observed on electron microscopy at a late stage of AD. Moreover, levels of mitochondrial fusion proteins (optic atrophy 1 and mitofusin 2) and fission proteins (dynamin-related protein 1 and fission 1) were altered in transgenic mice compared with controls with progression of AD. We found increased levels of fission and fusion proteins in APP/PS1 mice at 3 months, indicating that the presence of abnormal mitochondrial dynamics may be events in early AD progression. Changes in mitochondrial preceded the onset of memory decline as measured by the modified Morris water maze test. Abnormal mitochondrial dynamics could be a marker for early diagnosis of AD and monitoring disease progression. Further research is needed to study the signaling pathways that govern mitochondrial fission/fusion in AD. PMID:28118288

  20. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hong-Seok; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Shin, Hae-Young; Oh, Jae-Min; Park, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae-Il; Carp, Richard I; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2014-05-30

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the neuropathological changes associated with prion disease.

  1. Real-time tracking mitochondrial dynamic remodeling with two-photon phosphorescent iridium (III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huaiyi; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Pingyu; Qiu, Kangqiang; Huang, Juanjuan; Chen, Yu; Diao, JiaJie; Liu, Jiankang; Ji, Liangnian; Long, Jiangang; Chao, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial fission and fusion control the shape, size, number, and function of mitochondria in the cells of organisms from yeast to mammals. The disruption of mitochondrial fission and fusion is involved in severe human diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, metabolic diseases, and cancers. Agents that can real-time track the mitochondrial dynamics are of great importance. However, the short excitation wavelengths and rapidly photo-bleaching properties of commercial mitochondrial dyes render them unsuitable for tracking mitochondrial dynamics. Thus, mitochondrial targeting agents that exhibit superior photo-stability under continual light irradiation, deep tissue penetration and at intrinsically high three-dimensional resolutions are urgently needed. Two-photon-excited compounds employ low-energy near-infrared light and have emerged as a non-invasive tool for real-time cell imaging. Here, cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes (Ir1-Ir5) are demonstrated as one- and two-photon phosphorescent probes for the real-time imaging and tracking of mitochondrial fission and fusion. The results indicate that Ir2 is well suited for two-photon phosphorescent tracking of mitochondrial fission and fusion in living cells and in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). This study provides a practical use for mitochondrial targeting two-photon phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes.

  2. The Effects of Grain Size and Texture on Dynamic Abnormal Grain Growth in Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, Philip J.; Taleff, Eric M.

    2016-10-01

    This is the first report of abnormal grain morphologies specific to a Mo sheet material produced from a commercial-purity arc-melted ingot. Abnormal grains initiated and grew during plastic deformation of this material at temperatures of 1793 K and 1813 K (1520 °C and 1540 °C). This abnormal grain growth during high-temperature plastic deformation is termed dynamic abnormal grain growth, DAGG. DAGG in this material readily consumes nearly all grains near the sheet center while leaving many grains near the sheet surface unconsumed. Crystallographic texture, grain size, and other microstructural features are characterized. After recrystallization, a significant through-thickness variation in crystallographic texture exists in this material but does not appear to directly influence DAGG propagation. Instead, dynamic normal grain growth, which may be influenced by texture, preferentially occurs near the sheet surface prior to DAGG. The large grains thus produced near the sheet surface inhibit the subsequent growth of the abnormal grains produced by DAGG, which preferentially consume the finer grains near the sheet center. This produces abnormal grains that span the sheet center but leave unconsumed polycrystalline microstructure near the sheet surface. Abnormal grains are preferentially oriented with the < 110rangle approximately along the tensile axis. These results provide additional new evidence that boundary curvature is the primary driving force for DAGG in Mo.

  3. Altered mitochondrial dynamics as a consequence of Venezuelan Equine encephalitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Keck, Forrest; Brooks-Faulconer, Taryn; Lark, Tyler; Ravishankar, Pavitra; Bailey, Charles; Salvador-Morales, Carolina; Narayanan, Aarthi

    2017-01-11

    Mitochondria are sentinel organelles that are impacted by various forms of cellular stress, including viral infections. While signaling events associated with mitochondria, including those activated by pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), are widely studied, alterations in mitochondrial distribution and changes in mitochondrial dynamics are also beginning to be associated with cellular insult. Cells of neuronal origin have been demonstrated to display remarkable alterations in several instances, including neurodegenerative disorders. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus (VEEV) is a New World alphavirus that infects neuronal cells and contributes to an encephalitic phenotype. We demonstrate that upon infection by the vaccine strain of VEEV (TC-83), astrocytoma cells experience a robust drop in mitochondrial activity, which corresponds with an increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in an infection-dependent manner. Infection status also corresponds with a prominent perinuclear accumulation of mitochondria. Cellular enzymatic machinery, including PINK1 and Parkin, appears to be enriched in mitochondrial fractions as compared with uninfected cells, which is indicative of mitochondrial damage. Dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1), a protein that is associated with mitochondrial fission, demonstrated a modest enrichment in mitochondrial fractions of infected cells. Treatment with an inhibitor of mitochondrial fission, Mdivi-1, led to a decrease in caspase cleavage, suggesting that mitochondrial fission was likely to contribute to apoptosis of infected cells. Finally, our data demonstrate that mitophagy ensues in infected cells. In combination, our data suggest that VEEV infection results in significant changes in the mitochondrial landscape that may influence pathological outcomes in the infected cell.

  4. Abnormal Behavior in Cascading Dynamics with Node Weight

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianwei; Cai, Lin; Xu, Bo; Wu, Yuedan

    2015-01-01

    Considering a preferential selection mechanism of load destination, we introduce a new method to quantify initial load distribution and subsequently construct a simple cascading model. By attacking the node with the highest load, we investigate the cascading dynamics in some synthetic networks. Surprisingly, we observe that for several networks of different structural patterns, a counterintuitive phenomenon emerges if the highest load attack is applied to the system, i.e., investing more resources to protect every node in a network inversely makes the whole network more vulnerable. We explain this ability paradox by analyzing the micro-structural components of the underlying network and therefore reveals how specific structural patterns may influence the cascading dynamics. We discover that the robustness of the network oscillates as the capacity of each node increases. The conclusion of the paper may shed lights on future investigations to avoid the demonstrated ability paradox and subsequent cascading failures in real-world networks. PMID:26451594

  5. Regulation of mitochondrial dynamics: convergences and divergences between yeast and vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Lendahl, Urban; Nistér, Monica

    2013-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the shape of mitochondria can be tuned to various physiological conditions by a balance of fusion and fission processes termed mitochondrial dynamics. Mitochondrial dynamics controls not only the morphology but also the function of mitochondria, and therefore is crucial in many aspects of a cell's life. Consequently, dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics has been implicated in a variety of human diseases including cancer. Several proteins important for mitochondrial fusion and fission have been discovered over the past decade. However, there is emerging evidence that there are as yet unidentified proteins important for these processes and that the fusion/fission machinery is not completely conserved between yeast and vertebrates. The recent characterization of several mammalian proteins important for the process that were not conserved in yeast, may indicate that the molecular mechanisms regulating and controlling the morphology and function of mitochondria are more elaborate and complex in vertebrates. This difference could possibly be a consequence of different needs in the different cell types of multicellular organisms. Here, we review recent advances in the field of mitochondrial dynamics. We highlight and discuss the mechanisms regulating recruitment of cytosolic Drp1 to the mitochondrial outer membrane by Fis1, Mff, and MIEF1 in mammals and the divergences in regulation of mitochondrial dynamics between yeast and vertebrates.

  6. Cardiac Mitochondrial Proteome Dynamics with Heavy Water Reveals Stable Rate of Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis in Heart Failure Despite Decline in Mitochondrial Oxidative Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Shekar, Kadambari Chandra; Li, Ling; Dabkowski, Erinne R.; Xu, Wenhong; Ribeiro, Rogerio Faustino; Hecker, Peter A.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Sadygov, Rovshan G.; Willard, Belinda; Kasumov, Takhar; Stanley, William C.

    2017-01-01

    We recently developed a method to measure mitochondrial proteome dynamics with heavy water (2H2O)-based metabolic labeling and high resolution mass spectrometry. We reported the half-lives and synthesis rates of several proteins in the two cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations, subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar (SSM and IFM), in Sprague Dawley rats. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the mitochondrial protein synthesis rate is reduced in heart failure, with possible differential changes in SSM versus IFM. Six to seven week old male Sprague Dawley rats underwent transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and developed moderate heart failure after 22 weeks. Heart failure and sham rats of the same age received heavy water (5% in drinking water) for up to 80 days. Cardiac SSM and IFM were isolated from both groups and the proteins were separated by 1D gel electrophoresis. Heart failure reduced protein content and increased the turnover rate of several proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation, electron transport chain and ATP synthesis, while it decreased the turnover of other proteins, including pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit in IFM, but not in SSM. Because of these bidirectional changes, the average overall half-life of proteins was not altered by heart failure in both SSM and IFM. The kinetic measurements of individual mitochondrial proteins presented in this study may contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for mitochondrial alterations in the failing heart. PMID:24995939

  7. Mitochondrial Dynamics is a Distinguishing Feature of Skeletal Muscle Fiber Types and Regulates Organellar Compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Prashant; Varuzhanyan, Grigor; Pham, Anh H; Chan, David C

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers differentiate into specific fiber types with distinct metabolic properties determined by their reliance on oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Using in vivo approaches, we find that OXPHOS-dependent fibers, compared to glycolytic fibers, contain elongated mitochondrial networks with higher fusion rates that are dependent on the mitofusins Mfn1 and Mfn2. Switching of a glycolytic fiber to an oxidative IIA type is associated with elongation of mitochondria, suggesting that mitochondrial fusion is linked to metabolic state. Furthermore, we reveal that mitochondrial proteins are compartmentalized to discrete domains centered around their nuclei of origin. The domain dimensions are dependent on fiber type and are regulated by the mitochondrial dynamics proteins Mfn1, Mfn2, and Mff. Our results indicate that mitochondrial dynamics is tailored to fiber type physiology and provides a rationale for the segmental defects characteristic of aged and diseased muscle fibers.

  8. Quality control of mitochondria during aging: is there a good and a bad side of mitochondrial dynamics?

    PubMed

    Figge, Marc Thilo; Osiewacz, Heinz D; Reichert, Andreas S

    2013-04-01

    Maintenance of functional mitochondria is essential in order to prevent degenerative processes leading to disease and aging. Mitochondrial dynamics plays a crucial role in ensuring mitochondrial quality but may also generate and spread molecular damage through a population of mitochondria. Computational simulations suggest that this dynamics is advantageous when mitochondria are not or only marginally damaged. In contrast, at a higher degree of damage, mitochondrial dynamics may be disadvantageous. Deceleration of fusion-fission cycles could be one way to adapt to this situation and to delay a further decline in mitochondrial quality. However, this adaptive response makes the mitochondrial network more vulnerable to additional molecular damage. The "mitochondrial infectious damage adaptation" (MIDA) model explains a number of inconsistent and counterintuitive data such as the "clonal expansion" of mutant mitochondrial DNA. We propose that mitochondrial dynamics is a double-edged sword and suggest ways to test this experimentally.

  9. Noninvasive evaluation of corneal abnormalities using static and dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Misra, Anup K.; Leung, Alfred B.; King, James F.; Datiles, Manuel B., III

    2002-06-01

    A preliminary study of corneal abnormalities in intact bovine eyes is presented. Twenty-one eyes were treated with chemicals, cotton swabs, and radial and photo-refractive surgeries. Dynamic and static light scattering was performed as a function of the penetration depth into the corneal tissue. Topographical maps of corneal refractive power from untreated and treated corneas were also obtained using videokeratoscopy and results compared. The ultimate aim is to develop the technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) for clinical applications in early evaluation of corneal complications after laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgeries and other corneal abnormalities.

  10. Non-Invasive Evaluation of Corneal Abnormalities Using Static and Dynamic Light Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Misra, Anup K.; Leung, Alfred B.; King, James F.; Datiles, Manuel B., III

    2002-01-01

    A preliminary study of corneal abnormalities in intact bovine eyes is presented. Twenty-one eyes were treated with chemicals, cotton swabs, and radial and photo-refractive surgeries. Dynamic and static light scattering was performed as a function of the penetration depth into the corneal tissue. Topographical maps of corneal refractive power from untreated and treated corneas were also obtained using videokeratoscopy and results compared. The ultimate aim is to develop the technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) for clinical applications in early evaluation of corneal complications after laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgeries and other corneal abnormalities.

  11. Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-associated missense mutation in HSPD1 blunts mitochondrial dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Eguchi, Takahiro; Kawahara, Kazuko; Hasegawa, Nanami; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Funakoshi-Tago, Megumi; Tanoue, Akito; Tamura, Hiroomi; Yamauchi, Junji

    2015-07-03

    Myelin-forming glial cells undergo dynamic morphological changes in order to produce mature myelin sheaths with multiple layers. In the central nervous system (CNS), oligodendrocytes differentiate to insulate neuronal axons with myelin sheaths. Myelin sheaths play a key role in homeostasis of the nervous system, but their related disorders lead not only to dismyelination and repeated demyelination but also to severe neuropathies. Hereditary hypomyelinating leukodystrophies (HLDs) are a group of such diseases affecting oligodendrocytes and are often caused by missense mutations of the respective responsible genes. Despite increasing identification of gene mutations through advanced nucleotide sequencing technology, studies on the relationships between gene mutations and their effects on cellular and subcellular aberrance have not followed at the same rapid pace. In this study, we report that an HLD4-associated (Asp-29-to-Gly) mutant of mitochondrial heat shock 60-kDa protein 1 (HSPD1) causes short-length morphologies and increases the numbers of mitochondria due to their aberrant fission and fusion cycles. In experiments using a fluorescent dye probe, this mutation decreases the mitochondrial membrane potential. Also, mitochondria accumulate in perinuclear regions. HLD4-associated HSPD1 mutant blunts mitochondrial dynamics, probably resulting in oligodendrocyte malfunction. This study constitutes a first finding concerning the relationship between disease-associated HSPD1 mutation and mitochondrial dynamics, which may be similar to the relationship between another disease-associated HSPD1 mutation (MitCHAP-60 disease) and aberrant mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • The HLD4 mutant of HSPD1 decreases mitochondrial fission frequency. • The HLD4 mutant decreases mitochondrial fusion frequency. • Mitochondria harboring the HLD4 mutant exhibit slow motility. • The HLD4 mutant of HSPD1 decreases mitochondrial membrane potential. • HLD4-related diseases may

  12. Mitochondrial morphology and dynamics in Triticum aestivum roots in response to rotenone and antimycin A.

    PubMed

    Rakhmatullina, Daniya; Ponomareva, Anastasiya; Gazizova, Natalia; Minibayeva, Farida

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles, capable of fusion and fission as a part of cellular responses to various signals, such as the shifts in the redox status of a cell. The mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC.) is involved in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), with complexes I and III contributing the most to this process. Disruptions of ETC. can lead to increased ROS generation. Here, we demonstrate the appearance of giant mitochondria in wheat roots in response to simultaneous application of the respiratory inhibitors rotenone (complex I of mitochondrial ETC.) and antimycin A (complex III of mitochondrial ETC.). The existence of such megamitochondria was temporary, and following longer treatment with inhibitors mitochondria resumed their conventional size and oval shape. Changes in mitochondrial morphology were accompanied with a decrease in mitochondrial potential and an unexpected increase in oxygen consumption. Changes in mitochondrial morphology and activity may result from the fusion and fission of mitochondria induced by the disruption of mitochondrial ETC. Results from experiments with the inhibitor of mitochondrial fission Mdivi-1 suggest that the retarded fission may facilitate plant mitochondria to appear in a fused shape. The processes of mitochondrial fusion and fission are involved in the regulation of the efficacy of the functions of the respiratory chain complexes and ROS metabolism during stresses. The changes in morphology of mitochondria, along with the changes in their functional activity, can be a part of the strategy of the plant adaptation to stresses.

  13. Improvement of mitochondrial function and dynamics by the metabolic enhancer piracetam.

    PubMed

    Stockburger, Carola; Kurz, Christopher; Koch, Konrad A; Eckert, Schamim H; Leuner, Kristina; Müller, Walter E

    2013-10-01

    The metabolic enhancer piracetam is used in many countries to treat cognitive impairment in aging, brain injuries, as well as dementia such as AD (Alzheimer's disease). As a specific feature of piracetam, beneficial effects are usually associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In previous studies we were able to show that piracetam enhanced ATP production, mitochondrial membrane potential as well as neurite outgrowth in cell and animal models for aging and AD. To investigate further the effects of piracetam on mitochondrial function, especially mitochondrial fission and fusion events, we decided to assess mitochondrial morphology. Human neuroblastoma cells were treated with the drug under normal conditions and under conditions imitating aging and the occurrence of ROS (reactive oxygen species) as well as in stably transfected cells with the human wild-type APP (amyloid precursor protein) gene. This AD model is characterized by expressing only 2-fold more human Aβ (amyloid β-peptide) compared with control cells and therefore representing very early stages of AD when Aβ levels gradually increase over decades. Interestingly, these cells exhibit an impaired mitochondrial function and morphology under baseline conditions. Piracetam is able to restore this impairment and shifts mitochondrial morphology back to elongated forms, whereas there is no effect in control cells. After addition of a complex I inhibitor, mitochondrial morphology is distinctly shifted to punctate forms in both cell lines. Under these conditions piracetam is able to ameliorate morphology in cells suffering from the mild Aβ load, as well as mitochondrial dynamics in control cells.

  14. Dynamics of enhanced mitochondrial respiration in female compared with male rat cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Rutkai, Ibolya; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V; Busija, David W

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial respiration has never been directly examined in intact cerebral arteries. We tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial energetics of large cerebral arteries ex vivo are sex dependent. The Seahorse XFe24 analyzer was used to examine mitochondrial respiration in isolated cerebral arteries from adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. We examined the role of nitric oxide (NO) on mitochondrial respiration under basal conditions, using N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, and following pharmacological challenge using diazoxide (DZ), and also determined levels of mitochondrial and nonmitochondrial proteins using Western blot, and vascular diameter responses to DZ. The components of mitochondrial respiration including basal respiration, ATP production, proton leak, maximal respiration, and spare respiratory capacity were elevated in females compared with males, but increased in both male and female arteries in the presence of the NOS inhibitor. Although acute DZ treatment had little effect on mitochondrial respiration of male arteries, it decreased the respiration in female arteries. Levels of mitochondrial proteins in Complexes I-V and the voltage-dependent anion channel protein were elevated in female compared with male cerebral arteries. The DZ-induced vasodilation was greater in females than in males. Our findings show that substantial sex differences in mitochondrial respiratory dynamics exist in large cerebral arteries and may provide the mechanistic basis for observations that the female cerebral vasculature is more adaptable after injury.

  15. Screen for abnormal mitochondrial phenotypes in mouse embryonic stem cells identifies a model for succinyl-CoA ligase deficiency and mtDNA depletion

    PubMed Central

    Donti, Taraka R.; Stromberger, Carmen; Ge, Ming; Eldin, Karen W.; Craigen, William J.; Graham, Brett H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutations in subunits of succinyl-CoA synthetase/ligase (SCS), a component of the citric acid cycle, are associated with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, elevation of methylmalonic acid (MMA), and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion. A FACS-based retroviral-mediated gene trap mutagenesis screen in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells for abnormal mitochondrial phenotypes identified a gene trap allele of Sucla2 (Sucla2SAβgeo), which was used to generate transgenic mice. Sucla2 encodes the ADP-specific β-subunit isoform of SCS. Sucla2SAβgeo homozygotes exhibited recessive lethality, with most mutants dying late in gestation (e18.5). Mutant placenta and embryonic (e17.5) brain, heart and muscle showed varying degrees of mtDNA depletion (20–60%). However, there was no mtDNA depletion in mutant liver, where the gene is not normally expressed. Elevated levels of MMA were observed in embryonic brain. SCS-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) demonstrated a 50% reduction in mtDNA content compared with wild-type MEFs. The mtDNA depletion resulted in reduced steady state levels of mtDNA encoded proteins and multiple respiratory chain deficiencies. mtDNA content could be restored by reintroduction of Sucla2. This mouse model of SCS deficiency and mtDNA depletion promises to provide insights into the pathogenesis of mitochondrial diseases with mtDNA depletion and into the biology of mtDNA maintenance. In addition, this report demonstrates the power of a genetic screen that combines gene trap mutagenesis and FACS analysis in mouse ES cells to identify mitochondrial phenotypes and to develop animal models of mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:24271779

  16. Dynamics, Structure, and Function are Coupled in the Mitochondrial Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalettar, Bethe A.; Abney, James R.; Hackenbrock, Charles R.

    1991-09-01

    The coupling between molecular diffusion and the structure and function of the rat liver mitochondrial matrix was explored using fluorescence anisotropy techniques and electron microscopy. The results confirm that matrix ultrastructure and the concentration of matrix protein are influenced by the respiratory state of mitochondria and the osmolarity of the external medium. At physiological osmolarity, a fluorescent metabolite-sized probe was found to diffuse slowly in the mitochondrial matrix but not to be completely immobile. In addition, significant differences in diffusion rates were found to exist between different mitochondrial respiratory states, with the slowest diffusion occurring in states with the highest matrix protein concentration. These data support the concept of a matrix structure in which diffusion is considerably hindered due to limited probe-accessible water and further suggest that volume-dependent regulation of matrix protein packing may modulate metabolite diffusion and, in turn, mitochondrial metabolism.

  17. Bovine and murine models highlight novel roles for SLC25A46 in mitochondrial dynamics and metabolism, with implications for human and animal health.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Amandine; Vaiman, Anne; Castille, Johan; Beauvallet, Christian; Gaignard, Pauline; Floriot, Sandrine; Rodriguez, Sabrina; Vilotte, Marthe; Boulanger, Laurent; Passet, Bruno; Albaric, Olivier; Guillaume, François; Boukadiri, Abdelhak; Richard, Laurence; Bertaud, Maud; Timsit, Edouard; Guatteo, Raphaël; Jaffrézic, Florence; Calvel, Pierre; Helary, Louise; Mahla, Rachid; Esquerré, Diane; Péchoux, Christine; Liuu, Sophie; Vallat, Jean-Michel; Boichard, Didier; Slama, Abdelhamid; Vilotte, Jean-Luc

    2017-04-01

    Neuropathies are neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and other mammals. Many genetic causes have been identified so far, including mutations of genes encoding proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics. Recently, the "Turning calves syndrome", a novel sensorimotor polyneuropathy was described in the French Rouge-des-Prés cattle breed. In the present study, we determined that this hereditary disease resulted from a single nucleotide substitution in SLC25A46, a gene encoding a protein of the mitochondrial carrier family. This mutation caused an apparent damaging amino-acid substitution. To better understand the function of this protein, we knocked out the Slc25a46 gene in a mouse model. This alteration affected not only the nervous system but also altered general metabolism, resulting in premature mortality. Based on optic microscopy examination, electron microscopy and on biochemical, metabolic and proteomic analyses, we showed that the Slc25a46 disruption caused a fusion/fission imbalance and an abnormal mitochondrial architecture that disturbed mitochondrial metabolism. These data extended the range of phenotypes associated with Slc25a46 dysfunction. Moreover, this Slc25a46 knock-out mouse model should be useful to further elucidate the role of SLC25A46 in mitochondrial dynamics.

  18. Mitochondrial dynamics underlying thermal plasticity of cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) hearts.

    PubMed

    Oellermann, Michael; Pörtner, Hans O; Mark, Felix C

    2012-09-01

    In the eurythermal cuttlefish Sepia officinalis, performance depends on hearts that ensure systemic oxygen supply over a broad range of temperatures. We therefore aimed to identify adjustments in energetic cardiac capacity and underlying mitochondrial function supporting thermal acclimation and adaptation that could be crucial for the cuttlefish's competitive success in variable environments. Two genetically distinct cuttlefish populations were acclimated to 11, 16 and 21°C. Subsequently, skinned and permeabilised heart fibres were used to assess mitochondrial functioning by means of high-resolution respirometry and a substrate-inhibitor protocol, followed by measurements of cardiac citrate synthase and cytosolic enzyme activities. Temperate English Channel cuttlefish had lower mitochondrial capacities but larger hearts than subtropical Adriatic cuttlefish. Warm acclimation to 21°C decreased mitochondrial complex I activity in Adriatic cuttlefish and increased complex IV activity in English Channel cuttlefish. However, compensation of mitochondrial capacities did not occur during cold acclimation to 11°C. In systemic hearts, the thermal sensitivity of mitochondrial substrate oxidation was high for proline and pyruvate but low for succinate. Oxygen efficiency of catabolism rose as temperature changed from 11 to 21°C via shifts to oxygen-conserving oxidation of proline and pyruvate and via reduced relative proton leak. The changes observed for substrate oxidation, mitochondrial complexes, relative proton leak and heart mass improve energetic efficiency and essentially seem to extend tolerance to high temperatures and reduce associated tissue hypoxia. We conclude that cuttlefish sustain cardiac performance and, thus, systemic oxygen delivery over short- and long-term changes of temperature and environmental conditions by multiple adjustments in cellular and mitochondrial energetics.

  19. Curcumin prevents mitochondrial dynamics disturbances in early 5/6 nephrectomy: Relation to oxidative stress and mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Aparicio-Trejo, Omar Emiliano; Tapia, Edilia; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Macías-Ruvalcaba, Norma Angélica; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; García-Arroyo, Fernando E; Cristóbal, Magdalena; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2016-11-01

    Five-sixths nephrectomy (5/6NX) is a widely used model to study the mechanisms leading to renal damage in chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, early alterations on renal function, mitochondrial dynamics, and oxidative stress have not been explored yet. Curcumin is an antioxidant that has shown nephroprotection in 5/6NX-induced renal damage. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of curcumin on early mitochondrial alterations induced by 5/6NX in rats. In isolated mitochondria, 5/6NX-induced hydrogen peroxide production was associated with decreased activity of complexes I and V, decreased activity of antioxidant enzymes, alterations in oxygen consumption and increased MDA-protein adducts. In addition, it was found that 5/6NX shifted mitochondrial dynamics to fusion, which was evidenced by increased optic atrophy 1 and mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) and decreased fission 1 and dynamin-related protein 1 expressions. These data were confirmed by morphological analysis and immunoelectron microscopy of Mfn-1. All the above-described mechanisms were prevented by curcumin. Also, it was found that curcumin prevented renal dysfunction by improving renal blood flow and the total antioxidant capacity induced by 5/6NX. Moreover, in glomeruli and proximal tubules 5/6NX-induced superoxide anion production by uncoupled nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX) dependent way, this latter was associated with increased phosphorylation of serine 304 of p47phox subunit of NOX. In conclusion, this study shows that curcumin pretreatment decreases early 5/6NX-induced altered mitochondrial dynamics, bioenergetics, and oxidative stress, which may be associated with the preservation of renal function. © 2016 BioFactors, 00(00):000000, 2016.

  20. Carboxylic Acid Fullerene (C60) Derivatives Attenuated Neuroinflammatory Responses by Modulating Mitochondrial Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Shefang; Zhou, Tong; Cheng, Keman; Chen, Mingliang; Wang, Yange; Jiang, Yuanqin; Yang, Peiyan

    2015-05-01

    Fullerene (C60) derivatives, a unique class of compounds with potent antioxidant properties, have been reported to exert a wide variety of biological activities including neuroprotective properties. Mitochondrial dynamics are an important constituent of cellular quality control and function, and an imbalance of the dynamics eventually leads to mitochondria disruption and cell dysfunctions. This study aimed to assess the effects of carboxylic acid C60 derivatives (C60-COOH) on mitochondrial dynamics and elucidate its associated mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 microglial cell model. Using a cell-based functional screening system labeled with DsRed2-mito in BV-2 cells, we showed that LPS stimulation led to excessive mitochondrial fission, increased mitochondrial localization of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), both of which were markedly suppressed by C60-COOH pretreatment. LPS-induced mitochondria reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δ Ψm) were also significantly inhibited by C60-COOH. Moreover, we also found that C60-COOH pretreatment resulted in the attenuation of LPS-mediated activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, as well as the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that carboxylic acid C60 derivatives may exert neuroprotective effects through regulating mitochondrial dynamics and functions in microglial cells, thus providing novel insights into the mechanisms of the neuroprotective properties of carboxylic acid C60 derivatives.

  1. A mitochondrial location for haemoglobins--dynamic distribution in ageing and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Freya; Greville-Heygate, Oliver; Marsh, Oliver; Anderson, Susan; Chakrabarti, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Haemoglobins are iron-containing proteins that transport oxygen in the blood of most vertebrates. The mitochondrion is the cellular organelle which consumes oxygen in order to synthesise ATP. Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in neurodegeneration and ageing. We find that α and β haemoglobin (Hba and Hbb) proteins are altered in their distribution in mitochondrial fractions from degenerating brain. We demonstrate that both Hba and Hbb are co-localised with the mitochondrion in mammalian brain. The precise localisation of the Hbs is within the inner membrane space and associated with inner mitochondrial membrane. Relative mitochondrial to cytoplasmic ratios of Hba and Hbb show changing distributions of these proteins during the process of neurodegeneration in the pcd(5j) mouse brain. A significant difference in mitochondrial Hba and Hbb content in the mitochondrial fraction is seen at 31 days after birth, this corresponds to a stage when dynamic neuronal loss is measured to be greatest in the Purkinje Cell Degeneration mouse. We also report changes in mitochondrial Hba and Hbb levels in ageing brain and muscle. Significant differences in mitochondrial Hba and Hbb can be seen when comparing aged brain to muscle, suggesting tissue specific functions of these proteins in the mitochondrion. In muscle there are significant differences between Hba levels in old and young mitochondria. To understand whether the changes detected in mitochondrial Hbs are of clinical significance, we examined Parkinson's disease brain, immunohistochemistry studies suggest that cell bodies in the substantia nigra accumulate mitochondrial Hb. However, western blotting of mitochondrial fractions from PD and control brains indicates significantly less Hb in PD brain mitochondria. One explanation could be a specific loss of cells containing mitochondria loaded with Hb proteins. Our study opens the door to an examination of the role of Hb function, within the context of the mitochondrion

  2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation through mitochondrial dynamics regulation.

    PubMed

    Torres, Gloria; Morales, Pablo E; García-Miguel, Marina; Norambuena-Soto, Ignacio; Cartes-Saavedra, Benjamín; Vidal-Peña, Gonzalo; Moncada-Ruff, David; Sanhueza-Olivares, Fernanda; San Martín, Alejandra; Chiong, Mario

    2016-03-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a neuroendocrine hormone produced by gastrointestinal tract in response to food ingestion. GLP-1 plays a very important role in the glucose homeostasis by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion, inhibiting glucagon secretion, inhibiting gastric emptying, reducing appetite and food intake. Because of these actions, the GLP-1 peptide-mimetic exenatide is one of the most promising new medicines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In vivo treatments with GLP-1 or exenatide prevent neo-intima layer formation in response to endothelial damage and atherosclerotic lesion formation in aortic tissue. Whether GLP-1 modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation by controlling mitochondrial dynamics is unknown. In this report, we showed that GLP-1 increased mitochondrial fusion and activity in a PKA-dependent manner in the VSMC cell line A7r5. GLP-1 induced a Ser-637 phosphorylation in the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, and decreased Drp1 mitochondrial localization. GLP-1 inhibited PDGF-BB-induced VSMC migration and proliferation, actions inhibited by overexpressing wild type Drp1 and mimicked by the Drp1 inhibitor Mdivi-1 and by overexpressing dominant negative Drp1. These results show that GLP-1 stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial activity and decreases PDGF-BB-induced VSMC dedifferentiation by a PKA/Drp1 signaling pathway. Our data suggest that GLP-1 inhibits vascular remodeling through a mitochondrial dynamics-dependent mechanism.

  3. Mitochondrial Dynamics and Mitophagy in the 6-Hydroxydopamine Preclinical Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Galindo, Maria F.; Solesio, Maria E.; Atienzar-Aroca, Sandra; Zamora, Maria J.; Jordán Bueso, Joaquín

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the participation of mitochondrial dynamics and autophagy in the 6-hydroxidopamine-induced Parkinson's disease model. The regulation of dynamic mitochondrial processes such as fusion, fission, and mitophagy has been shown to be an important mechanism controlling cellular fate. An imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics may contribute to both familial and sporadic neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease. With special attention we address the role of second messengers as the role of reactive oxygen species and the mitochondria as the headquarters of cell death. The role of molecular signaling pathways, for instance, the participation of Dynamin-related protein 1(Drp1), will also be addressed. Furthermore evidence demonstrates the therapeutic potential of small-molecule inhibitors of mitochondrial division in Parkinson's disease. For instance, pharmacological inhibition of Drp1, through treatment with the mitochondrial division inhibitor-1, results in the abrogation of mitochondrial fission and in a decrease of the number of autophagic cells. Deciphering the signaling cascades that underlie mitophagy triggered by 6-OHDA, as well as the mechanisms that determine the selectivity of this response, will help to better understand this process and may have impact on human treatment strategies of Parkinson's disease. PMID:22966477

  4. Mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy in the 6-hydroxydopamine preclinical model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Maria F; Solesio, Maria E; Atienzar-Aroca, Sandra; Zamora, Maria J; Jordán Bueso, Joaquín

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the participation of mitochondrial dynamics and autophagy in the 6-hydroxidopamine-induced Parkinson's disease model. The regulation of dynamic mitochondrial processes such as fusion, fission, and mitophagy has been shown to be an important mechanism controlling cellular fate. An imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics may contribute to both familial and sporadic neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease. With special attention we address the role of second messengers as the role of reactive oxygen species and the mitochondria as the headquarters of cell death. The role of molecular signaling pathways, for instance, the participation of Dynamin-related protein 1(Drp1), will also be addressed. Furthermore evidence demonstrates the therapeutic potential of small-molecule inhibitors of mitochondrial division in Parkinson's disease. For instance, pharmacological inhibition of Drp1, through treatment with the mitochondrial division inhibitor-1, results in the abrogation of mitochondrial fission and in a decrease of the number of autophagic cells. Deciphering the signaling cascades that underlie mitophagy triggered by 6-OHDA, as well as the mechanisms that determine the selectivity of this response, will help to better understand this process and may have impact on human treatment strategies of Parkinson's disease.

  5. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hong-Seok; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Shin, Hae-Young; Oh, Jae-Min; Park, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae-Il; Carp, Richard I.; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • Mfn1 and Fis1 are significantly increased in the hippocampal region of the ME7 prion-infected brain, whereas Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the infected brain. • Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the cytosolic fraction of the hippocampus in the infected brain. • Neuronal mitochondria in the prion-infected brains are enlarged and swollen compared to those of control brains. • There are significantly fewer mitochondria in the ME7-infected brain compared to the number in control brain. - Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the

  6. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics induced by tebufenpyrad and pyridaben in a dopaminergic neuronal cell culture model

    PubMed Central

    Charli, Adhithiya; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2015-01-01

    Tebufenpyrad and pyridaben are two agro-chemically important acaricides that function like the known mitochondrial toxicant rotenone. Although these two compounds have been commonly used to kill populations of mites and ticks in commercial greenhouses, their neurotoxic profiles remain largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effects of these two pesticides on mitochondrial structure and function in an in vitro cell culture model using the Seahorse bioanalyzer and confocal fluorescence imaging. The effects were compared with rotenone. Exposing rat dopaminergic neuronal cells (N27 cells) to tebufenpyrad and pyridaben for 3 h induced dose-dependent cell death with an EC50 of 3.98 μM and 3.77 μM, respectively. Also, tebufenpyrad and pyridaben (3 μM) exposure induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and m-aconitase damage, suggesting that the pesticide toxicity is associated with oxidative damage. Morphometric image analysis with the MitoTracker red fluorescent probe indicated that tebufenpyrad and pyridaben, as well as rotenone, caused abnormalities in mitochondrial morphology, including reduced mitochondrial length and circularity. Functional bioenergetic experiments using the Seahorse XF96 analyzer revealed that tebufenpyrad and pyridaben very rapidly suppressed the basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate similar to that of rotenone. Further analysis of bioenergetic curves also revealed dose-dependent decreases in ATP-linked respiration and respiratory capacity. The luminescence-based ATP measurement further confirmed that pesticide-induced mitochondrial inhibition of respiration is accompanied by the loss of cellular ATP. Collectively, our results suggest that exposure to the pesticides tebufenpyrad and pyridaben induces neurotoxicity by rapidly initiating mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Our findings also reveal that monitoring the kinetics of mitochondrial respiration with Seahorse could be used

  7. Thymidine Kinase 2 Deficiency-Induced Mitochondrial DNA Depletion Causes Abnormal Development of Adipose Tissues and Adipokine Levels in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Villarroya, Joan; Dorado, Beatriz; Vilà, Maya R.; Garcia-Arumí, Elena; Domingo, Pere; Giralt, Marta; Hirano, Michio; Villarroya, Francesc

    2011-01-01

    Mammal adipose tissues require mitochondrial activity for proper development and differentiation. The components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain/oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS) are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. The maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a key element for a functional mitochondrial oxidative activity in mammalian cells. To ascertain the role of mtDNA levels in adipose tissue, we have analyzed the alterations in white (WAT) and brown (BAT) adipose tissues in thymidine kinase 2 (Tk2) H126N knockin mice, a model of TK2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion. We observed respectively severe and moderate mtDNA depletion in TK2-deficient BAT and WAT, showing both tissues moderate hypotrophy and reduced fat accumulation. Electron microscopy revealed altered mitochondrial morphology in brown but not in white adipocytes from TK2-deficient mice. Although significant reduction in mtDNA-encoded transcripts was observed both in WAT and BAT, protein levels from distinct OXPHOS complexes were significantly reduced only in TK2-deficient BAT. Accordingly, the activity of cytochrome c oxidase was significantly lowered only in BAT from TK2-deficient mice. The analysis of transcripts encoding up to fourteen components of specific adipose tissue functions revealed that, in both TK2-deficient WAT and BAT, there was a consistent reduction of thermogenesis related gene expression and a severe reduction in leptin mRNA. Reduced levels of resistin mRNA were found in BAT from TK2-deficient mice. Analysis of serum indicated a dramatic reduction in circulating levels of leptin and resistin. In summary, our present study establishes that mtDNA depletion leads to a moderate impairment in mitochondrial respiratory function, especially in BAT, causes substantial alterations in WAT and BAT development, and has a profound impact in the endocrine properties of adipose tissues. PMID:22216345

  8. Mitochondrial Dynamics Decrease Prior to Axon Degeneration Induced by Vincristine and are Partially Rescued by Overexpressed cytNmnat1

    PubMed Central

    Berbusse, Gregory W.; Woods, Laken C.; Vohra, Bhupinder P. S.; Naylor, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Axon degeneration is a prominent feature of various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, and is often characterized by aberrant mitochondrial dynamics. Mitochondrial fission, fusion, and motility have been shown to be particularly important in progressive neurodegeneration. Thus we investigated these imperative dynamics, as well as mitochondrial fragmentation in vincristine induced axon degradation in cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. CytNmnat1 inhibits axon degeneration in various paradigms including vincristine toxicity. The mechanism of its protection is not yet fully understood; therefore, we also investigated the effect of cytNmnat1 on mitochondrial dynamics in vincristine treated neurons. We observed that vincristine treatment decreases the rate of mitochondrial fission, fusion and motility and induces mitochondrial fragmentation. These mitochondrial events precede visible axon degeneration. Overexpression of cytNmnat1 inhibits axon degeneration and preserves the normal mitochondrial dynamics and motility in vincristine treated neurons. We suggest the alterations in mitochondrial structure and dynamics are early events which lead to axon degeneration and cytNmnat1 blocks axon degeneration by halting the vincristine induced changes to mitochondrial structure and dynamics. PMID:27486387

  9. Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-associated missense mutation in HSPD1 blunts mitochondrial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Eguchi, Takahiro; Kawahara, Kazuko; Hasegawa, Nanami; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Funakoshi-Tago, Megumi; Tanoue, Akito; Tamura, Hiroomi; Yamauchi, Junji

    2015-07-03

    Myelin-forming glial cells undergo dynamic morphological changes in order to produce mature myelin sheaths with multiple layers. In the central nervous system (CNS), oligodendrocytes differentiate to insulate neuronal axons with myelin sheaths. Myelin sheaths play a key role in homeostasis of the nervous system, but their related disorders lead not only to dismyelination and repeated demyelination but also to severe neuropathies. Hereditary hypomyelinating leukodystrophies (HLDs) are a group of such diseases affecting oligodendrocytes and are often caused by missense mutations of the respective responsible genes. Despite increasing identification of gene mutations through advanced nucleotide sequencing technology, studies on the relationships between gene mutations and their effects on cellular and subcellular aberrance have not followed at the same rapid pace. In this study, we report that an HLD4-associated (Asp-29-to-Gly) mutant of mitochondrial heat shock 60-kDa protein 1 (HSPD1) causes short-length morphologies and increases the numbers of mitochondria due to their aberrant fission and fusion cycles. In experiments using a fluorescent dye probe, this mutation decreases the mitochondrial membrane potential. Also, mitochondria accumulate in perinuclear regions. HLD4-associated HSPD1 mutant blunts mitochondrial dynamics, probably resulting in oligodendrocyte malfunction. This study constitutes a first finding concerning the relationship between disease-associated HSPD1 mutation and mitochondrial dynamics, which may be similar to the relationship between another disease-associated HSPD1 mutation (MitCHAP-60 disease) and aberrant mitochondrial dynamics.

  10. Mitochondrial translocation of EGFR regulates mitochondria dynamics and promotes metastasis in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Che, Ting-Fang; Lin, Ching-Wen; Wu, Yi-Ying; Chen, Yu-Ju; Han, Chia-Li; Chang, Yih-leong; Wu, Chen-Tu; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Hong, Tse-Ming; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2015-11-10

    Dysfunction of the mitochondria is well-known for being associated with cancer progression. In the present study, we analyzed the mitochondria proteomics of lung cancer cell lines with different invasion abilities and found that EGFR is highly expressed in the mitochondria of highly invasive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. EGF induces the mitochondrial translocation of EGFR; further, it leads to mitochondrial fission and redistribution in the lamellipodia, upregulates cellular ATP production, and enhances motility in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, EGFR can regulate mitochondrial dynamics by interacting with Mfn1 and disturbing Mfn1 polymerization. Overexpression of Mfn1 reverses the phenotypes resulting from EGFR mitochondrial translocation. We show that the mitochondrial EGFR expressions are higher in paired samples of the metastatic lymph node as compared with primary lung tumor and are inversely correlated with the overall survival in NSCLC patients. Therefore, our results demonstrate that besides the canonical role of EGFR as a receptor tyrosine, the mitochondrial translocation of EGFR may enhance cancer invasion and metastasis through regulating mitochondria dynamics.

  11. Role of the mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system in membrane architecture and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rampelt, Heike; Zerbes, Ralf M; van der Laan, Martin; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2017-04-01

    The elaborate membrane architecture of mitochondria is a prerequisite for efficient respiration and ATP generation. The cristae membranes, invaginations of the inner mitochondrial membrane, represent a specialized compartment that harbors the complexes of the respiratory chain and the F1Fo-ATP synthase. Crista junctions form narrow openings that connect the cristae membranes to the inner boundary membrane. The mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system (MICOS) is located at crista junctions where it stabilizes membrane curvature and forms contact sites between the mitochondrial inner and outer membranes. MICOS is a large machinery, consisting of two dynamic subcomplexes that are anchored in the inner membrane and expose domains to the intermembrane space. The functions of MICOS in mitochondrial membrane architecture and biogenesis are influenced by numerous interaction partners and the phospholipid environment.

  12. 3D Time-lapse Imaging and Quantification of Mitochondrial Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sison, Miguel; Chakrabortty, Sabyasachi; Extermann, Jérôme; Nahas, Amir; James Marchand, Paul; Lopez, Antonio; Weil, Tanja; Lasser, Theo

    2017-01-01

    We present a 3D time-lapse imaging method for monitoring mitochondrial dynamics in living HeLa cells based on photothermal optical coherence microscopy and using novel surface functionalization of gold nanoparticles. The biocompatible protein-based biopolymer coating contains multiple functional groups which impart better cellular uptake and mitochondria targeting efficiency. The high stability of the gold nanoparticles allows continuous imaging over an extended time up to 3000 seconds without significant cell damage. By combining temporal autocorrelation analysis with a classical diffusion model, we quantify mitochondrial dynamics and cast these results into 3D maps showing the heterogeneity of diffusion parameters across the whole cell volume. PMID:28230188

  13. 3D Time-lapse Imaging and Quantification of Mitochondrial Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sison, Miguel; Chakrabortty, Sabyasachi; Extermann, Jérôme; Nahas, Amir; James Marchand, Paul; Lopez, Antonio; Weil, Tanja; Lasser, Theo

    2017-02-01

    We present a 3D time-lapse imaging method for monitoring mitochondrial dynamics in living HeLa cells based on photothermal optical coherence microscopy and using novel surface functionalization of gold nanoparticles. The biocompatible protein-based biopolymer coating contains multiple functional groups which impart better cellular uptake and mitochondria targeting efficiency. The high stability of the gold nanoparticles allows continuous imaging over an extended time up to 3000 seconds without significant cell damage. By combining temporal autocorrelation analysis with a classical diffusion model, we quantify mitochondrial dynamics and cast these results into 3D maps showing the heterogeneity of diffusion parameters across the whole cell volume.

  14. The Differential DRP1 Phosphorylation and Mitochondrial Dynamics in the Regional Specific Astroglial Death Induced by Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ah-Reum; Hyun, Hye-Won; Min, Su-Ji; Kim, Ji-Eun

    2016-01-01

    The response and susceptibility to astroglial degenerations are relevant to the distinctive properties of astrocytes in a hemodynamic-independent manner following status epilepticus (SE). Since impaired mitochondrial fission plays an important role in mitosis, apoptosis and programmed necrosis, we investigated whether the unique pattern of mitochondrial dynamics is involved in the characteristics of astroglial death induced by SE. In the present study, SE induced astroglial apoptosis in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, accompanied by decreased mitochondrial length. In contrast, clasmatodendritic (autophagic) astrocytes in the CA1 region showed mitochondrial elongation induced by SE. Mdivi-1 (an inhibitor of mitochondrial fission) effectively attenuated astroglial apoptosis, but WY14643 (an enhancer of mitochondrial fission) aggravated it. In addition, Mdivi-1 accelerated clasmatodendritic changes in astrocytes. These regional specific mitochondrial dynamics in astrocytes were closely correlated with dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) phosphorylation, not optic atrophy 1 (OPA1; a mitochondrial fusion protein) expression. To the best of our knowledge, the present data demonstrate for the first time the novel role of DRP1-mediated mitochondrial fission in astroglial loss. Thus, the present findings suggest that the differential astroglial mitochondrial dynamics may participate in the distinct characteristics of astroglial death induced by SE. PMID:27242436

  15. Dynamics of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids regulated by mitochondrial fission is essential for maintenance of homogeneously active mitochondria during neonatal heart development.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Takaya; Ban-Ishihara, Reiko; Maeda, Maki; Matsunaga, Yui; Ichimura, Ayaka; Kyogoku, Sachiko; Aoki, Hiroki; Katada, Shun; Nakada, Kazuto; Nomura, Masatoshi; Mizushima, Noboru; Mihara, Katsuyoshi; Ishihara, Naotada

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles, and their fusion and fission regulate cellular signaling, development, and mitochondrial homeostasis, including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) distribution. Cardiac myocytes have a specialized cytoplasmic structure where large mitochondria are aligned into tightly packed myofibril bundles; however, recent studies have revealed that mitochondrial dynamics also plays an important role in the formation and maintenance of cardiomyocytes. Here, we precisely analyzed the role of mitochondrial fission in vivo. The mitochondrial fission GTPase, Drp1, is highly expressed in the developing neonatal heart, and muscle-specific Drp1 knockout (Drp1-KO) mice showed neonatal lethality due to dilated cardiomyopathy. The Drp1 ablation in heart and primary cultured cardiomyocytes resulted in severe mtDNA nucleoid clustering and led to mosaic deficiency of mitochondrial respiration. The functional and structural alteration of mitochondria also led to immature myofibril assembly and defective cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Thus, the dynamics of mtDNA nucleoids regulated by mitochondrial fission is required for neonatal cardiomyocyte development by promoting homogeneous distribution of active mitochondria throughout the cardiomyocytes.

  16. Bioenergetic flux, mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial morphology dynamics in AD and MCI cybrid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Diana F.; Selfridge, J. Eva; Lu, Jianghua; E, Lezi; Roy, Nairita; Hutfles, Lewis; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Michaelis, Elias K.; Yan, ShiDu; Cardoso, Sandra M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2013-01-01

    Bioenergetic dysfunction occurs in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a clinical syndrome that frequently precedes symptomatic AD. In this study, we modeled AD and MCI bioenergetic dysfunction by transferring mitochondria from MCI, AD and control subject platelets to mtDNA-depleted SH-SY5Y cells. Bioenergetic fluxes and bioenergetics-related infrastructures were characterized in the resulting cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) cell lines. Relative to control cybrids, AD and MCI cybrids showed changes in oxygen consumption, respiratory coupling and glucose utilization. AD and MCI cybrids had higher ADP/ATP and lower NAD+/NADH ratios. AD and MCI cybrids exhibited differences in proteins that monitor, respond to or regulate cell bioenergetic fluxes including HIF1α, PGC1α, SIRT1, AMPK, p38 MAPK and mTOR. Several endpoints suggested mitochondrial mass increased in the AD cybrid group and probably to a lesser extent in the MCI cybrid group, and that the mitochondrial fission–fusion balance shifted towards increased fission in the AD and MCI cybrids. As many of the changes we observed in AD and MCI cybrid models are also seen in AD subject brains, we conclude reduced bioenergetic function is present during very early AD, is not brain-limited and induces protean retrograde responses that likely have both adaptive and mal-adaptive consequences. PMID:23740939

  17. Mitochondrial fission factor Drp1 maintains oocyte quality via dynamic rearrangement of multiple organelles.

    PubMed

    Udagawa, Osamu; Ishihara, Takaya; Maeda, Maki; Matsunaga, Yui; Tsukamoto, Satoshi; Kawano, Natsuko; Miyado, Kenji; Shitara, Hiroshi; Yokota, Sadaki; Nomura, Masatoshi; Mihara, Katsuyoshi; Mizushima, Noboru; Ishihara, Naotada

    2014-10-20

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that change their morphology by active fusion and fission in response to cellular signaling and differentiation. The in vivo role of mitochondrial fission in mammals has been examined by using tissue-specific knockout (KO) mice of the mitochondria fission-regulating GTPase Drp1, as well as analyzing a human patient harboring a point mutation in Drp1, showing that Drp1 is essential for embryonic and neonatal development and neuronal function. During oocyte maturation and aging, structures of various membrane organelles including mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are changed dynamically, and their organelle aggregation is related to germ cell formation and epigenetic regulation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of organelle dynamics during the development and aging of oocytes have not been well understood. Here, we analyzed oocyte-specific mitochondrial fission factor Drp1-deficient mice and found that mitochondrial fission is essential for follicular maturation and ovulation in an age-dependent manner. Mitochondria were highly aggregated with other organelles, such as the ER and secretory vesicles, in KO oocyte, which resulted in impaired Ca(2+) signaling, intercellular communication via secretion, and meiotic resumption. We further found that oocytes from aged mice displayed reduced Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission and defective organelle morphogenesis, similar to Drp1 KO oocytes. On the basis of these findings, it appears that mitochondrial fission maintains the competency of oocytes via multiorganelle rearrangement.

  18. Imbalance of mitochondrial dynamics in Drosophila models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Altanbyek, Volodya; Cha, Sun-Joo; Kang, Ga-Un; Im, Dai Sig; Lee, Seongsoo; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Kiyoung

    2016-12-09

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common neurodegenerative disease, characterized by progressive and selective loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. DNA/RNA-binding proteins such as TDP-43, FUS, and TAF15 have been linked with the sporadic and familial forms of ALS. However, the exact pathogenic mechanism of ALS is still unknown. Recently, we found that ALS-causing genes such as TDP-43, FUS, and TAF15 genetically interact with mitochondrial dynamics regulatory genes. In this study, we show that mitochondrial fission was highly enhanced in muscles and motor neurons of TDP-43, FUS, and TAF15-induced fly models of ALS. Furthermore, the mitochondrial fission defects were rescued by co-expression of mitochondrial dynamics regulatory genes such as Marf, Opa1, and the dominant negative mutant form of Drp1. Moreover, we found that the expression level of Marf was decreased in ALS-induced flies. These results indicate that the imbalance of mitochondrial dynamics caused by instability of Marf is linked to the pathogenesis of TDP-43, FUS, and TAF15-associated ALS.

  19. Alterations of mitochondrial dynamics allow retrograde propagation of locally initiated axonal insults

    PubMed Central

    Lassus, Benjamin; Magifico, Sebastien; Pignon, Sandra; Belenguer, Pascale; Miquel, Marie-Christine; Peyrin, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    In chronic neurodegenerative syndromes, neurons progressively die through a generalized retraction pattern triggering retrograde axonal degeneration toward the cell bodies, which molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Recent observations suggest that direct activation of pro-apoptotic signaling in axons triggers local degenerative events associated with early alteration of axonal mitochondrial dynamics. This raises the question of the role of mitochondrial dynamics on both axonal vulnerability stress and their implication in the spreading of damages toward unchallenged parts of the neuron. Here, using microfluidic chambers, we assessed the consequences of interfering with OPA1 and DRP1 proteins on axonal degeneration induced by local application of rotenone. We found that pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial fission prevented axonal damage induced by rotenone, in low glucose conditions. While alteration of mitochondrial dynamics per se did not lead to spontaneous axonal degeneration, it dramatically enhanced axonal vulnerability to rotenone, which had no effect in normal glucose conditions, and promoted retrograde spreading of axonal degeneration toward the cell body. Altogether, our results suggest a mitochondrial priming effect in axons as a key process of axonal degeneration. In the context of neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, mitochondria fragmentation could hasten neuronal death and initiate spatial dispersion of locally induced degenerative events. PMID:27604820

  20. Insights on altered mitochondrial function and dynamics in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, mitochondria are enriched to provide energy and calcium buffering required for synaptic transmission. Additionally, mitochondria localize to the synapse, where they are critical for the mobilization of reserve pool vesicles and for neurotransmitter release. Previously, functional defects in mitochondria were considered to be downstream effects of neurodegenerative diseases. However, more recent findings suggest mitochondria may serve as key mediators in the onset and progression of some types of neurodegeneration. In this review, we explore the possible roles of altered mitochondrial function and dynamics in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, with a particular focus on Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD), which have highlighted the important role of mitochondria in neurodegeneration. While inheritable diseases like Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A are concretely linked to gene mutations affecting mitochondrial function, the cause of mitochondrial dysfunction in primarily sporadic diseases such as AD and PD is less clear. Neuronal death in PD is associated with defects in mitochondrial function and dynamics arising from mutations in proteins affecting these processes, including α-synuclein, DJ-1, LRRK2, Parkin and Pink1. In the case of AD, however, the connection between mitochondria and the onset of neurodegeneration has been less clear. Recent findings, however, have implicated altered function of ER-mitochondria contact sites and amyloid beta- and/or tau-induced defects in mitochondrial function and dynamics in the pathogenesis of AD, suggesting that mitochondrial defects may act as key mediators in the pathogenesis of AD as well. With recent findings at hand, it may be postulated that defects in mitochondrial processes comprise key events in the onset of neurodegeneration. PMID:23711354

  1. Abnormal intrinsic dynamics of dendritic spines in a fragile X syndrome mouse model in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nagaoka, Akira; Takehara, Hiroaki; Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Noguchi, Jun; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Shirai, Fukutoshi; Yagishita, Sho; Akagi, Takanori; Ichiki, Takanori; Kasai, Haruo

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spine generation and elimination play an important role in learning and memory, the dynamics of which have been examined within the neocortex in vivo. Spine turnover has also been detected in the absence of specific learning tasks, and is frequently exaggerated in animal models of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). The present study aimed to examine whether the baseline rate of spine turnover was activity-dependent. This was achieved using a microfluidic brain interface and open-dura surgery, with the goal of abolishing neuronal Ca2+ signaling in the visual cortex of wild-type mice and rodent models of fragile X syndrome (Fmr1 knockout [KO]). In wild-type and Fmr1 KO mice, the majority of baseline turnover was found to be activity-independent. Accordingly, the application of matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibitors selectively restored the abnormal spine dynamics observed in Fmr1 KO mice, without affecting the intrinsic dynamics of spine turnover in wild-type mice. Such findings indicate that the baseline turnover of dendritic spines is mediated by activity-independent intrinsic dynamics. Furthermore, these results suggest that the targeting of abnormal intrinsic dynamics might pose a novel therapy for ASD. PMID:27221801

  2. Mitochondria: a sulfhydryl oxidase and fission GTPase connect mitochondrial dynamics with pluripotency in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wilkerson, Donald C; Sankar, Uma

    2011-09-01

    Mitochondria have long been recognized as cellular energy power houses that also regulate cellular redox signaling to arbitrate cell survival. Recent studies of mitochondria in stem cells (SCs) demonstrate that they have critical roles beyond this traditional view. Embryonic (E) SCs, termed pluripotent for their ability to differentiate into all cell types within an organism, maintain a limited number of morphologically undifferentiated (electron translucent and poorly formed cristae) mitochondria. As these cells differentiate, their mitochondria undergo a tightly choreographed gain of number, mass and morphological complexity. Therefore, mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial growth, localization, division and partition must play active roles in the maintenance of pluripotency and execution of differentiation. Aberrant mitochondrial dynamics are associated with a plethora of human disorders, for which SCs hold curative potential. Hence, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial dynamics and function in SCs and their overall relationship to the maintenance of pluripotency is pivotal for the progression of therapeutic regenerative medicine.

  3. Mitochondria-targeted ROS scavenger improves post-ischemic recovery of cardiac function and attenuates mitochondrial abnormalities in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Escobales, Nelson; Nuñez, Rebeca E; Jang, Sehwan; Parodi-Rullan, Rebecca; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette; Sacher, Joshua R; Skoda, Erin M; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter; Javadov, Sabzali

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of aging and age-associated diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of XJB-5-131 (XJB), a mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, on cardiac resistance to ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced oxidative stress in aged rats. Male adult (5-month old, n=17) and aged (29-month old, n=19) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: adult (A), adult+XJB (AX), aged (O), and aged+XJB (OX). XJB was administered 3 times per week (3mg/kg body weight, IP) for four weeks. At the end of the treatment period, cardiac function was continuously monitored in excised hearts using the Langendorff technique for 30 min, followed by 20 min of global ischemia, and 60-min reperfusion. XJB improved post-ischemic recovery of aged hearts, as evidenced by greater left ventricular developed-pressures and rate-pressure products than the untreated, aged-matched group. The state 3 respiration rates at complexes I, II and IV of mitochondria isolated from XJB-treated aged hearts were 57% (P<0.05), 25% (P<0.05) and 28% (P<0.05), respectively, higher than controls. Ca(2+)-induced swelling, an indicator of permeability transition pore opening, was reduced in the mitochondria of XJB-treated aged rats. In addition, XJB significantly attenuated the H2O2-induced depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane as well as the total and mitochondrial ROS levels in cultured cardiomyocytes. This study underlines the importance of mitochondrial ROS in aging-induced cardiac dysfunction and suggests that targeting mitochondrial ROS may be an effective therapeutic approach to protect the aged heart against IR injury.

  4. Thermally Driven and Cytoskeletal-Assisted Dynamics of the Mitochondrial Reticulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Michelle K.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2003-05-01

    We report Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy (FICS) and digital video fluorescence microscopy (DVFM) measurements of the dynamics of the mitochondrial reticulum in living osteosarcoma cells. Mitochondrial dynamics are strongly influenced by interactions with cytoskeletal filaments and their associated motor proteins, which lead to complex multi-exponential relaxations that occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The cytoskeleton consists of an interconnected polymer network whose primary components are microfilaments (actin) and microtubules (tubulin). These filaments work with motor proteins to translate organelles through the cell. We studied the dynamics of osteosarcoma cells labeled with red fluorescent protein in the mitochondrial matrix space using DVFM and FICS. Cells were then treated with cytoskeletal destabilizing drugs. Analysis of microscopy data allows for us to determine whether dynamic processes are diffusive or driven (by the cytoskeleton or collective dynamics). In FICS experiments, the control cells exhibit a unique pattern of dynamics that are then simplified when the cytoskeleton is depolymerized. Upon depolymerization, the dynamics of the organelle appear primarily diffusive.

  5. Mitochondrial pleomorphy in plant cells is driven by contiguous ER dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jaipargas, Erica-Ashley; Barton, Kiah A.; Mathur, Neeta; Mathur, Jaideep

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are pleomorphic, double membrane-bound organelles involved in cellular energetics in all eukaryotes. Mitochondria in animal and yeast cells are typically tubular-reticulate structures and several micro-meters long but in green plants they are predominantly observed as 0.2–1.5 μm punctae. While fission and fusion, through the coordinated activity of several conserved proteins, shapes mitochondria, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has recently been identified as an additional player in this process in yeast and mammalian cells. The mitochondria-ER relationship in plant cells remains largely uncharacterized. Here, through live-imaging of the entire range of mitochondria pleomorphy we uncover the underlying basis for the predominantly punctate mitochondrial form in plants. We demonstrate that mitochondrial morphology changes in response to light and cytosolic sugar levels in an ER mediated manner. Whereas, large ER polygons and low dynamics under dark conditions favor mitochondrial fusion and elongation, small ER polygons result in increased fission and predominantly small mitochondria. Hypoxia also reduces ER dynamics and increases mitochondrial fusion to produce giant mitochondria. By observing elongated mitochondria in normal plants and fission-impaired Arabidopsis nmt1-2 and drp3a mutants we also establish that thin extensions called matrixules and a beads-on-a-string mitochondrial phenotype are direct consequences of mitochondria-ER interactions. PMID:26442089

  6. Mitochondrial activity and dynamics changes regarding metabolism in ageing and obesity.

    PubMed

    López-Lluch, Guillermo

    2017-03-01

    Mitochondria play an essential role in ageing and longevity. During ageing, a general deregulation of metabolism occurs, affecting molecular, cellular and physiological activities in the organism. Dysfunction of mitochondria has been associated with ageing and age-related diseases indicating their importance in the maintenance of cell homeostasis. Three major nutritional sensors, mTOR, AMPK and Sirtuins are involved in the control of mitochondrial physiology. These nutritional sensors control mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics by regulating fusion and fission processes, and turnover through mito- and autophagy. Apart of the known factors involved in fusion, OPA1 and mitofusins, and fission, DRP1 and FIS1, emerging factors such as prohibitins and sestrins can play important functions in mitochondrial dynamics regulation. Mitochondria is also affected by sexual hormones that suffer drastic changes during ageing. The recent literature demonstrates the complex interaction between nutritional sensors and mitochondrial homeostasis in the physiology of adipose tissue and in the accumulation of fat in other organs such as muscle and liver. In this article, the role of mitochondrial homeostasis in ageing and age-dependent fat accumulation is revised. This review highlights the importance of mitochondria in the accumulation of fat during ageing and related diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  7. Placenta Peptide Can Protect Mitochondrial Dysfunction through Inhibiting ROS and TNF-α Generation, by Maintaining Mitochondrial Dynamic Network and by Increasing IL-6 Level during Chronic Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Muluye, Rekik A.; Bian, Yuhong; Wang, Li; Alemu, Paulos N.; Cui, Huantian; Peng, Xiaofei; Li, Shanshan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Level of fatigue is related to the metabolic energy available to tissues and cells, mainly through mitochondrial respiration, as well fatigue is the most common symptom of poorly functioning mitochondria. Hence, dysfunction of these organelles may be the cause of the fatigue seen in Chronic fatigue (CF). Placenta has been used for treatment of fatigue and various disease, moreover peptides has known protect mitochondrial viability, and alleviate fatigue. These properties of placenta and peptides may link with its effect on mitochondria; therefore, it is highly important to investigate the effectiveness of placenta peptide on fatigue and mitochondrial dysfunction. Methods: After administration of sheep placenta peptide (SPP) for 1 month, mice’s were forced to swim till exhaustion for 90 min to induce chronic fatigue. Electron microscopic examination of skeletal muscle mitochondrial structure, tissue Malondialdehyde (MDA), mitochondrial SOD and serum inflammatory cytokines level were investigated in order to determine the potential effect of SPP on mitochondria during CF. Rat skeletal muscle (L6 cell) were also treated with different concentration of SPP to determine the effect of SPP on cell viability using Thiazoyl blue tetrazolium assay. Results: Our finding revealed that forced swimming induced fatigue model can cause mitochondrial damage through Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated lipid peroxidation and Tumor Necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) elevation. Whereas SPP protected fatigue induced mitochondrial dysfunction through preventing ROS and TNF-α generation, by maintaining mitochondrial dynamic network and by increasing serum IL-6 level. Conclusion: SPP can protect damage in mitochondrial components which will allow proper functioning of mitochondria that will in turn inhibit progression of chronic fatigue. Therefore, SPP may represent a novel therapeutic advantage for preventing mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with chronic fatigue. PMID

  8. Sessile snails, dynamic genomes: gene rearrangements within the mitochondrial genome of a family of caenogastropod molluscs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    order within a family of caenogastropod molluscs that are indicative of a highly dynamic mitochondrial genome. Studies of mitochondrial genomes at such low taxonomic levels should help to illuminate the dynamics of gene order change, since the telltale vestiges of gene duplication, translocation, and remolding have not yet been erased entirely. Likewise, gene order characters may improve phylogenetic hypotheses at finer taxonomic levels than once anticipated and aid in investigating the conditions under which sequence-based phylogenies lack resolution or prove misleading. PMID:20642828

  9. The Initiation and Propagation of Dynamic Abnormal Grain Growth in Molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, Philip J.; Worthington, Daniel L.; Taleff, Eric M.

    2015-12-01

    Plastic straining can initiate and propagate abnormal grains at temperatures significantly lower than is possible by static annealing. This phenomenon is termed dynamic abnormal grain growth (DAGG). Experiments that produce DAGG in commercial-purity molybdenum sheet materials are used to study the initiation and propagation of abnormal grains by plastic straining at temperatures from 1673 K to 2073 K (1400° C to 1800° C). The minimum strain necessary to initiate DAGG, termed the critical strain, decreases approximately linearly with increasing temperature. The variation in critical strain values observed at a single temperature and strain rate is well described by a normal distribution. An increased fraction of grains aligned with the < 110rangle along the tensile axis, a preferred orientation for DAGG grains, appears to decrease the critical strain for DAGG initiation. DAGG grains preferentially grow into the finest-grained polycrystalline regions, which suggests that the driving force for DAGG propagation is primarily from grain-boundary curvature. No effects of local crystallographic texture variation on growth are evident in microstructures containing DAGG grains. Together, these observations support the hypothesis that plastic straining during DAGG acts primarily to increase boundary mobility, rather than to increase the driving force for boundary migration.

  10. Proinflammatory cytokines differentially regulate adipocyte mitochondrial metabolism, oxidative stress, and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Wendy S.; Kuzmicic, Jovan; Burrill, Joel S.; Donoghue, Margaret A.; Foncea, Rocio; Jensen, Michael D.; Lavandero, Sergio; Arriaga, Edgar A.

    2014-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines differentially regulate adipocyte mitochondrial metabolism, oxidative stress, and dynamics. Macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue and the chronic low-grade production of inflammatory cytokines have been mechanistically linked to the development of insulin resistance, the forerunner of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this study, we evaluated the chronic effects of TNFα, IL-6, and IL-1β on adipocyte mitochondrial metabolism and morphology using the 3T3-L1 model cell system. TNFα treatment of cultured adipocytes led to significant changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics, including increased proton leak, decreased ΔΨm, increased basal respiration, and decreased ATP turnover. In contrast, although IL-6 and IL-1β decreased maximal respiratory capacity, they had no effect on ΔΨm and varied effects on ATP turnover, proton leak, or basal respiration. Only TNFα treatment of 3T3-L1 cells led to an increase in oxidative stress (as measured by superoxide anion production and protein carbonylation) and C16 ceramide synthesis. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with cytokines led to decreased mRNA expression of key transcription factors and control proteins implicated in mitochondrial biogenesis, including PGC-1α and eNOS as well as deceased expression of COX IV and Cyt C. Whereas each cytokine led to effects on expression of mitochondrial markers, TNFα exclusively led to mitochondrial fragmentation and decreased the total level of OPA1 while increasing OPA1 cleavage, without expression of levels of mitofusin 2, DRP-1, or mitofilin being affected. In summary, these results indicate that inflammatory cytokines have unique and specialized effects on adipocyte metabolism, but each leads to decreased mitochondrial function and a reprogramming of fat cell biology. PMID:24595304

  11. N-Myc overexpression increases cisplatin resistance in neuroblastoma via deregulation of mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Casinelli, Gabriella; LaRosa, Jeff; Sharma, Manika; Cherok, Edward; Banerjee, Swati; Branca, Maria; Edmunds, Lia; Wang, Yudong; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Churley, Luke; Kelly, Samantha; Sun, Ming; Stolz, Donna; Graves, J Anthony

    2016-01-01

    N-Myc is a global transcription factor that regulates the expression of genes involved in a number of essential cellular processes including: ribosome biogenesis, cell cycle and apoptosis. Upon deregulation, N-Myc can drive pathologic expression of many of these genes, which ultimately defines its oncogenic potential. Overexpression of N-Myc has been demonstrated to contribute to tumorigenesis, most notably for the pediatric tumor, neuroblastoma. Herein, we provide evidence that deregulated N-Myc alters the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics. We found that N-Myc overexpression leads to increased fusion of the mitochondrial reticulum secondary to changes in protein expression due to aberrant transcriptional and post-translational regulation. We believe the structural changes in the mitochondrial network in response to N-Myc amplification in neuroblastoma contributes to two important aspects of tumor development and maintenance—bioenergetic alterations and apoptotic resistance. Specifically, we found that N-Myc overexpressing cells are resistant to programmed cell death in response to exposure to low doses of cisplatin, and demonstrated that this was dependent on increased mitochondrial fusion. We speculate that these changes in mitochondrial structure and function may contribute significantly to the aggressive clinical ph9enotype of N-Myc amplified neuroblastoma. PMID:28028439

  12. PGC1α Activators Mitigate Diabetic Tubulopathy by Improving Mitochondrial Dynamics and Quality Control

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jun Mo; Kim, Dong-Jin; Park, Seon Hwa; Jeong, Hye Yun; Lee, Yu Ho; Kim, Yang Gyun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. In this study, we investigated the effect of PGC1α activators on mitochondrial fusion, fission, and autophagic quality control in renal tubular cells in a diabetic environment in vivo and in vitro. We also examined whether the upregulation of PGC1α attenuates diabetic tubulopathy by normalizing mitochondrial homeostasis. Methods. HKC8 cells were subjected to high-glucose conditions (30 mM D-glucose). Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin (STZ, 50 mg/kg i.p. for 5 days) in male C57/BL6J mice. AICAR or metformin was used as a PGC1α activator. Results. Treatment with the PGC1α activators AICAR and metformin improved functional mitochondrial mass in HKC8 cells in high-glucose conditions. Moreover, in renal proximal tubular cells, increased PGC1α activity correlated with the reversal of changes in Drp1, Mfn1, and LC3-II protein expression in a high-glucose environment. Normalized mitochondrial life cycles resulted in low ROS production and reduced apoptosis. AICAR and metformin treatment effectively mitigated albuminuria and renal histopathology and decreased the expression of TGFβ1 and αSMA in the kidneys of diabetic mice. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate that increases in PGC1α activity improve diabetic tubulopathy by modulating mitochondrial dynamics and autophagy.

  13. The influence of chronic fluorosis on mitochondrial dynamics morphology and distribution in cortical neurons of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lou, Di-Dong; Guan, Zhi-Zhong; Liu, Yan-Jie; Liu, Yan-Fei; Zhang, Kai-Lin; Pan, Ji-Gang; Pei, Jin-Jing

    2013-03-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of chronic fluorosis on the dynamics (including fusion and fission proteins), fragmentation, and distribution of mitochondria in the cortical neurons of the rat brain in an attempt to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying the brain damage associated with excess accumulation of fluoride. Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into three groups of 20 each, that is, the untreated control group (drinking water naturally containing <0.5 mg fluoride/l, NaF), the low-fluoride group (whose drinking water was supplemented with 10 mg fluoride/l) and the high-fluoride group (50 mg fluoride/l). After 6 months of exposure, the expression of mitofusin-1 (Mfn1), fission-1 (Fis1), and dynamin-related protein-1 (Drp1) at both the protein and mRNA levels were detected by Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and real-time PCR, respectively. Moreover, mitochondrial morphology and distribution in neurons were observed by transmission electron or fluorescence microscopy. In the cortices of the brains of rats with chronic fluorosis, the level of Mfn1 protein was clearly reduced, whereas the levels of Fis1 and Drp1 were elevated. The alternations of expression of the mRNAs encoding all three of these proteins were almost the same as the corresponding changes at the protein levels. The mitochondria were fragmented and the redistributed away from the axons of the cortical neurons. These findings indicate that chronic fluorosis induces abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, which might in turn result in a high level of oxidative stress.

  14. Monitoring mitochondrial [Ca(2+)] dynamics with rhod-2, ratiometric pericam and aequorin.

    PubMed

    Fonteriz, Rosalba I; de la Fuente, Sergio; Moreno, Alfredo; Lobatón, Carmen D; Montero, Mayte; Alvarez, Javier

    2010-07-01

    The dynamics of mitochondrial [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](M)) plays a key role in a variety of cellular processes. The most important methods available to monitor [Ca(2+)](M) are fluorescent dyes such as rhod-2 and specifically targeted proteins such as aequorin and pericam. However, significant discrepancies, both quantitative and qualitative, exist in the literature between the results obtained with different methods. We have made here a systematic comparison of the response of several fluorescent dyes, rhod-2 and rhod-FF, and two Ca(2+)-sensitive proteins, aequorin and pericam. Our results show that measurements obtained with aequorin and pericam are consistent in terms of dynamic Ca(2+) changes. Instead, fluorescent dyes failed to follow Ca(2+) changes adequately, especially during repetitive stimulation. In particular, measures obtained with rhod-2 or rhod-FF evidenced the previously reported Ca(2+)-dependent inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, but data obtained with aequorin or pericam under the same conditions did not. The reason for the loss of response of fluorescent dyes is unclear. Loading with these dyes produced changes in mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential, which were small and reversible at low concentrations (1-2 microM), but produced large and prolonged damage at higher concentrations. In addition, cells loaded with low concentrations of rhod-2 suffered large changes in mitochondrial morphology after light excitation. Our results suggest that [Ca(2+)](M) data obtained with these dyes should be taken with care.

  15. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Trigger Loss of Function and Perturbation of Mitochondrial Dynamics in Primary Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Vaishaali; Wilson, Christina L; Hayward, Stephen L; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are one of the most highly manufactured and employed nanomaterials in the world with applications in copious industrial and consumer products. The liver is a major accumulation site for many nanoparticles, including TiO2, directly through intentional exposure or indirectly through unintentional ingestion via water, food or animals and increased environmental contamination. Growing concerns over the current usage of TiO2 coupled with the lack of mechanistic understanding of its potential health risk is the motivation for this study. Here we determined the toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (commercially available rutile, anatase and P25) on primary rat hepatocytes. Specifically, we evaluated events related to hepatocyte functions and mitochondrial dynamics: (1) urea and albumin synthesis using colorimetric and ELISA assays, respectively; (2) redox signaling mechanisms by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP); (3) OPA1 and Mfn-1 expression that mediates the mitochondrial dynamics by PCR; and (4) mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker Green FM staining. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss (p < 0.05) in hepatocyte functions even at concentrations as low as 50 ppm with commercially used P25 causing maximum damage. TiO2 nanoparticles induced a strong oxidative stress in primary hepatocytes. TiO2 nanoparticles exposure also resulted in morphological changes in mitochondria and substantial loss in the fusion process, thus impairing the mitochondrial dynamics. Although this study demonstrated that TiO2 nanoparticles exposure resulted in substantial damage to primary hepatocytes, more in vitro and in vivo studies are required to determine the complete toxicological mechanism in primary hepatocytes and subsequently liver function.

  16. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Trigger Loss of Function and Perturbation of Mitochondrial Dynamics in Primary Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Vaishaali; Wilson, Christina L.; Hayward, Stephen L.; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are one of the most highly manufactured and employed nanomaterials in the world with applications in copious industrial and consumer products. The liver is a major accumulation site for many nanoparticles, including TiO2, directly through intentional exposure or indirectly through unintentional ingestion via water, food or animals and increased environmental contamination. Growing concerns over the current usage of TiO2 coupled with the lack of mechanistic understanding of its potential health risk is the motivation for this study. Here we determined the toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (commercially available rutile, anatase and P25) on primary rat hepatocytes. Specifically, we evaluated events related to hepatocyte functions and mitochondrial dynamics: (1) urea and albumin synthesis using colorimetric and ELISA assays, respectively; (2) redox signaling mechanisms by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP); (3) OPA1 and Mfn-1 expression that mediates the mitochondrial dynamics by PCR; and (4) mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker Green FM staining. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss (p < 0.05) in hepatocyte functions even at concentrations as low as 50 ppm with commercially used P25 causing maximum damage. TiO2 nanoparticles induced a strong oxidative stress in primary hepatocytes. TiO2 nanoparticles exposure also resulted in morphological changes in mitochondria and substantial loss in the fusion process, thus impairing the mitochondrial dynamics. Although this study demonstrated that TiO2 nanoparticles exposure resulted in substantial damage to primary hepatocytes, more in vitro and in vivo studies are required to determine the complete toxicological mechanism in primary hepatocytes and subsequently liver function. PMID:26247363

  17. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes.

    PubMed

    Luz, Anthony L; Rooney, John P; Kubik, Laura L; Gonzalez, Claudia P; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes.

  18. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Anthony L.; Rooney, John P.; Kubik, Laura L.; Gonzalez, Claudia P.; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes. PMID:26106885

  19. Abnormal dynamics of cortical resting state functional connectivity in chronic headache patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zewei; Yang, Qing; Chen, Li Min

    2017-02-01

    The goals of this study are to characterize the temporal dynamics of inter-regional connectivity of the brain in chronic headache (CH) patients versus their age/gender matched controls (CONCH, n=28 pairs), and to determine whether dynamic measures reveal additional features to static functional connectivity and correlate with psychometric scores. Cortical thickness and inter-regional resting state fMRI connectivity were quantified and compared between CH and CONCH groups. Six cortical regions of interest (ROI) pairs that exhibited correlated cortical thickness and static functional connectivity abnormalities were selected for temporal dynamic analysis. Two methods were used: temporal sliding-window (SW) and wavelet transformation coherence (WTC). SW analyses using three temporal windows of 30, 60, 120s revealed that all six ROI pairs of CH exhibited higher percentage of strong connectivity (high r values), and smaller fast Fourier transform (FFT) amplitudes at a very low frequency range (i.e., 0.002-0.01Hz), compared to those of CONCH. These features were particularly prevalent in the 120s window analysis. Less variable dynamic fluctuation (i.e., smaller standard deviation of r values) was identified in two out of six ROI pairs in CH. WTC analysis revealed that time-averaged coherence was generally greater in CH than CONCH between wavelet decomposition scales 20 to 55 (0.018-0.05Hz), and was statistically significant in three out of six ROI pairs. Together, the most robust and significant differences in temporal dynamics between CH and CONCH were detected in two ROI pairs: left medial-orbitofrontal-left posterior-cingulate and left medial-orbitofrontal-left inferior-temporal. The high degrees of sleep disturbance (high PSQI score), depression (high HRSD score) and fatigue (low SF-36 score) were associated with high degree of inter-regional temporal coherence in CH. In summary, these dynamic functional connectivity (dFC) measures uncovered a temporal "lock

  20. Drp1-Dependent Mitochondrial Fission Plays Critical Roles in Physiological and Pathological Progresses in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chenxia; Huang, Yong; Li, Lanjuan

    2017-01-01

    Current research has demonstrated that mitochondrial morphology, distribution, and function are maintained by the balanced regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion, and perturbation of the homeostasis between these processes has been related to cell or organ dysfunction and abnormal mitochondrial redistribution. Abnormal mitochondrial fusion induces the fragmentation of mitochondria from a tubular morphology into pieces; in contrast, perturbed mitochondrial fission results in the fusion of adjacent mitochondria. A member of the dynamin family of large GTPases, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), effectively influences cell survival and apoptosis by mediating the mitochondrial fission process in mammals. Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission is an intricate process regulating both cellular and organ dynamics, including development, apoptosis, acute organ injury, and various diseases. Only after clarification of the regulative mechanisms of this critical protein in vivo and in vitro will it set a milestone for preventing mitochondrial fission related pathological processes and refractory diseases. PMID:28098754

  1. Drp1-Dependent Mitochondrial Fission Plays Critical Roles in Physiological and Pathological Progresses in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chenxia; Huang, Yong; Li, Lanjuan

    2017-01-13

    Current research has demonstrated that mitochondrial morphology, distribution, and function are maintained by the balanced regulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion, and perturbation of the homeostasis between these processes has been related to cell or organ dysfunction and abnormal mitochondrial redistribution. Abnormal mitochondrial fusion induces the fragmentation of mitochondria from a tubular morphology into pieces; in contrast, perturbed mitochondrial fission results in the fusion of adjacent mitochondria. A member of the dynamin family of large GTPases, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), effectively influences cell survival and apoptosis by mediating the mitochondrial fission process in mammals. Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission is an intricate process regulating both cellular and organ dynamics, including development, apoptosis, acute organ injury, and various diseases. Only after clarification of the regulative mechanisms of this critical protein in vivo and in vitro will it set a milestone for preventing mitochondrial fission related pathological processes and refractory diseases.

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the limelight of Parkinson's disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Rebecca; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Beal, M. Flint; Thomas, Bobby

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder with unknown etiology. It is marked by widespread neurodegeneration in the brain with profound loss of A9 midbrain dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta. Several theories of biochemical abnormalities have been linked to pathogenesis of PD of which mitochondrial dysfunction due to an impairment of mitochondrial complex I and subsequent oxidative stress seems to take the center stage in experimental models of PD and in postmortem tissues of sporadic forms of illness. Recent identification of specific gene mutations and their influence on mitochondrial functions has further reinforced the relevance of mitochondrial abnormalities in disease pathogenesis. In both sporadic and familial forms of PD abnormal mitochondrial paradigms associated with disease include impaired functioning of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, aging associated damage to mitochondrial DNA, impaired calcium buffering, and anomalies in mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. Here we provide an overview of specific mitochondrial functions affected in sporadic and familial PD that play a role in disease pathogenesis. We propose to utilize these gained insights to further streamline and focus the research to better understand mitochondria's role in disease development and exploit potential mitochondrial targets for therapeutic interventions in PD pathogenesis. PMID:19059336

  3. Complex oscillatory redox dynamics with signaling potential at the edge between normal and pathological mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Kembro, Jackelyn M.; Cortassa, Sonia; Aon, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    The time-keeping properties bestowed by oscillatory behavior on functional rhythms represent an evolutionarily conserved trait in living systems. Mitochondrial networks function as timekeepers maximizing energetic output while tuning reactive oxygen species (ROS) within physiological levels compatible with signaling. In this work, we explore the potential for timekeeping functions dependent on mitochondrial dynamics with the validated two-compartment mitochondrial energetic-redox (ME-R) computational model, that takes into account (a) four main redox couples [NADH, NADPH, GSH, Trx(SH)2], (b) scavenging systems (glutathione, thioredoxin, SOD, catalase) distributed in matrix and extra-matrix compartments, and (c) transport of ROS species between them. Herein, we describe that the ME-R model can exhibit highly complex oscillatory dynamics in energetic/redox variables and ROS species, consisting of at least five frequencies with modulated amplitudes and period according to power spectral analysis. By stability analysis we describe that the extent of steady state—as against complex oscillatory behavior—was dependent upon the abundance of Mn and Cu, Zn SODs, and their interplay with ROS production in the respiratory chain. Large parametric regions corresponding to oscillatory dynamics of increasingly complex waveforms were obtained at low Cu, Zn SOD concentration as a function of Mn SOD. This oscillatory domain was greatly reduced at higher levels of Cu, Zn SOD. Interestingly, the realm of complex oscillations was located at the edge between normal and pathological mitochondrial energetic behavior, and was characterized by oxidative stress. We conclude that complex oscillatory dynamics could represent a frequency- and amplitude-modulated H2O2 signaling mechanism that arises under intense oxidative stress. By modulating SOD, cells could have evolved an adaptive compromise between relative constancy and the flexibility required under stressful redox

  4. Mitochondrial abnormality in sensory, but not motor, axons in paclitaxel-evoked painful peripheral neuropathy in the rat.

    PubMed

    Xiao, W H; Zheng, H; Zheng, F Y; Nuydens, R; Meert, T F; Bennett, G J

    2011-12-29

    The dose-limiting side effect of the anti-neoplastic agent, paclitaxel, is a chronic distal symmetrical peripheral neuropathy that produces sensory dysfunction (hypoesthesia and neuropathic pain) but little or no distal motor dysfunction. Similar peripheral neuropathies are seen with chemotherapeutics in the vinca alkaloid, platinum-complex, and proteasome inhibitor classes. Studies in rats suggest that the cause is a mitotoxic effect on axonal mitochondria. If so, then the absence of motor dysfunction may be due to mitotoxicity that affects sensory axons but spares motor axons. To investigate this, paclitaxel exposure levels in the dorsal root, ventral root, dorsal root ganglion, peripheral nerve, and spinal cord were measured, and the ultrastructure and the respiratory function of mitochondria in dorsal roots and ventral roots were compared. Sensory and motor axons in the roots and nerve had comparably low exposure to paclitaxel and exposure in the spinal cord was negligible. However, sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglion had a very high and remarkably persistent (up to 10 days or more after the last injection) exposure to paclitaxel. Paclitaxel evoked a significant increase in the incidence of swollen and vacuolated mitochondria in the myelinated and unmyelinated sensory axons of the dorsal root (as seen previously in the peripheral nerve) but not in the motor axons of the ventral root. Stimulated mitochondrial respiration in the dorsal root was significantly depressed in paclitaxel-treated animals examined 2-4 weeks after the last injection, whereas respiration in the ventral root was normal. We conclude that the absence of motor dysfunction in paclitaxel-evoked peripheral neuropathy may be due to the absence of a mitotoxic effect in motor neuron axons, whereas the sensory dysfunction may be due to a mitotoxic effect resulting from the primary afferent neuron's cell body being exposed to high and persistent levels of paclitaxel.

  5. Hydroxymethyl cytosine marks in the human mitochondrial genome are dynamic in nature.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sourav; Sengupta, Shantanu; Scaria, Vinod

    2016-03-01

    Apart from DNA methylation, hydroxymethylation has increasingly been studied as an important epigenetic mark. 5- hydroxymethylcytosines, though initially were thought to be an intermediary product of demethylation, recent studies suggest this to be a highly regulated process and modulated by the TET family of enzymes. Recent genome wide studies have shown that hydroxymethylcytosine marks are closely associated with the regulation of important biological processes like transcription and embryonic development. It is also known that aberrant hydroxymethylation marks have been associated with diseases like cancer. The presence of hydroxymethylcytosines in the mitochondrial genome has been earlier suggested, though the genome-scale map has not been laid out. In this present study, we have mapped and analyzed the hydroxymethylcytosine marks in the mitochondrial genome using 23 different publicly available datasets. We cross validated our data by checking for consistency across a subset of genomic regions previously annotated to hydroxymethylcytosines and show good consistency. We observe a dynamic distribution of hydroxymethylation marks in the mitochondrial genome. Unlike the methylcytosine marks, hydroxymethylcytosine marks are characterized by the lack of conservation across the samples considered, though similar cell types shared the pattern. We additionally observed that the hydroxymethylation marks are enriched in the upstream of GSS (gene start site) regions and in gene body as similar as nuclear genes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genome-scale map of hydroxymethyl cytosines in the human mitochondrial genome.

  6. PGC-1α controls mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics in lead-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dabrowska, Aleksandra; Venero, Jose Luis; Iwasawa, Ryota; Hankir, Mohammed-khair; Rahman, Sunniyat; Boobis, Alan; Hajji, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    Due to its role in regulation of mitochondrial function, PGC1α is emerging as an important player in ageing and neurodegenerative disorders. PGC1α exerts its neuroprotective effects by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis (MB) and functioning. However, the precise regulatory role of PGC1α in the control of mitochondrial dynamics (MD) and neurotoxicity is still unknown. Here we elucidate the role of PGC1α in vitro and in vivo in the regulatory context of MB and MD in response to lead (II) acetate as a relevant model of neurotoxicity. We show that there is an adaptive response (AR) to lead, orchestrated by the BAP31-calcium signalling system operating between the ER and mitochondria. We find that this hormetic response is controlled by a cell-tolerated increase of PGC1α expression, which in turn induces a balanced expression of fusion/fission genes by binding to their promoters and implying its direct role in regulation of MD. However, dysregulation of PGC1α expression through either stable downregulation or overexpression, renders cells more susceptible to lead insult leading to mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death. Our data provide novel evidence that PGC1α expression is a key regulator of MD and the maintenance of tolerated PGC1α expression may offer a promising strategy for neuroprotective therapies. PMID:26363853

  7. PGC-1α controls mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics in lead-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Dabrowska, Aleksandra; Venero, Jose Luis; Iwasawa, Ryota; Hankir, Mohammed-Khair; Rahman, Sunniyat; Boobis, Alan; Hajji, Nabil

    2015-09-01

    Due to its role in regulation of mitochondrial function, PGC1α is emerging as an important player in ageing and neurodegenerative disorders. PGC1α exerts its neuroprotective effects by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis (MB) and functioning. However, the precise regulatory role of PGC1α in the control of mitochondrial dynamics (MD) and neurotoxicity is still unknown. Here we elucidate the role of PGC1αin vitro and in vivo in the regulatory context of MB and MD in response to lead (II) acetate as a relevant model of neurotoxicity. We show that there is an adaptive response (AR) to lead, orchestrated by the BAP31-calcium signalling system operating between the ER and mitochondria. We find that this hormetic response is controlled by a cell-tolerated increase of PGC1α expression, which in turn induces a balanced expression of fusion/fission genes by binding to their promoters and implying its direct role in regulation of MD. However, dysregulation of PGC1α expression through either stable downregulation or overexpression, renders cells more susceptible to lead insult leading to mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death. Our data provide novel evidence that PGC1α expression is a key regulator of MD and the maintenance of tolerated PGC1α expression may offer a promising strategy for neuroprotective therapies.

  8. Effects of cultured Cordyceps mycelia polysaccharide A on tumor neurosis factor-α induced hepatocyte injury with mitochondrial abnormality.

    PubMed

    Tang, Huiling; Wei, Weikun; Wang, Wang; Zha, Zhengqi; Li, Ting; Zhang, Zhijie; Luo, Chen; Yin, Hongping; Huang, Fengjie; Wang, Ying

    2017-05-01

    Cordyceps sinensis mycelia polysaccharide A (CPS-A), was isolated from cultured Cordyceps mycelia by 65% alcohol extraction and ion-exchange column chromatography. The molecular weight of CPS-A was 1.2×10(4)Da and the backbone was mainly composed of (1→2)-linked β-d-mannopyranose, (1→2,4)-linked β-d-mannopyranose and (1→4)-linked α-d-glucopyranose with terminal β-d-mannopyranose and α-d-glucopyranose residues. CPS-A played a protective role against TNF-α induced mitochondria injury in L02 cells via up-regulation of mitofusin 2, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), and membrane potential. CPS-A also played a protective role against TNF-α induced L02 cells apoptosis via up-regulation of Bcl-2 and down-regulation of Bid, Bax, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9 and ROS production. Moreover, CPS-A attenuated both the normal expression and overexpression of TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) induced by TNF-α administration. In conclusion, CPS-A was involved in TNF-α induced mitochondria abnormality via TNFR1/ROS/Mfn2 pathway.

  9. Physical exercise improves brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial bioenergetics and alters apoptotic, dynamic and auto(mito)phagy markers.

    PubMed

    Marques-Aleixo, I; Santos-Alves, E; Balça, M M; Rizo-Roca, D; Moreira, P I; Oliveira, P J; Magalhães, J; Ascensão, A

    2015-08-20

    We here investigate the effects of two exercise modalities (endurance treadmill training-TM and voluntary free-wheel activity-FW) on the brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial bioenergetics, permeability transition pore (mPTP), oxidative stress, as well as on proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, apoptosis, and quality control. Eighteen male rats were assigned to sedentary-SED, TM and FW groups. Behavioral alterations and ex vivo brain mitochondrial function endpoints were assessed. Proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, including the adenine nucleotide translocator), oxidative stress markers and regulatory proteins (SIRT3, p66shc, UCP2, carbonyls, MDA, -SH, aconitase, Mn-SOD), as well as proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC1α, TFAM) were evaluated. Apoptotic signaling was measured through quantifying caspase 3, 8 and 9-like activities, Bax, Bcl2, CypD, and cofilin expression. Mitochondrial dynamics (Mfn1/2, OPA1 and DRP1) and auto(mito)phagy (LC3II, Beclin1, Pink1, Parkin, p62)-related proteins were also measured by Western blotting. Only the TM exercise group showed increased spontaneous alternation and exploratory activity. Both exercise regimens improved mitochondrial respiratory activity, increased OXPHOS complexes I, III and V subunits in both brain subareas and decreased oxidative stress markers. Increased resistance to mPTP and decreased apoptotic signaling were observed in the brain cortex from TM and in the cerebellum from TM and FW groups. Also, exercise increased the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy and fusion, simultaneous with decreased expression of mitochondrial fission-related protein DRP1. In conclusion, physical exercise improves brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial function, decreasing oxidative stress and apoptotic related markers. It is also possible that favorable alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and autophagy signaling induced by exercise

  10. Enhanced Neuroplasticity by the Metabolic Enhancer Piracetam Associated with Improved Mitochondrial Dynamics and Altered Permeability Transition Pore Function

    PubMed Central

    Stockburger, Carola; Miano, Davide; Pallas, Thea; Müller, Walter E.

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial cascade hypothesis of dementia assumes mitochondrial dysfunction leading to reduced energy supply, impaired neuroplasticity, and finally cell death as one major pathomechanism underlying the continuum from brain aging over mild cognitive impairment to initial and advanced late onset Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, improving mitochondrial function has become an important strategy to treat the early stages of this continuum. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been proposed as possible prototype for those compounds by increasing impaired mitochondrial function and related aspects like mechanisms of neuroplasticity. We here report that piracetam at therapeutically relevant concentrations improves neuritogenesis in the human cell line SH-SY5Y over conditions mirroring the whole spectrum of age-associated cognitive decline. These effects go parallel with improvement of impaired mitochondrial dynamics shifting back fission and fusion balance to the energetically more favorable fusion site. Impaired fission and fusion balance can also be induced by a reduction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) function as atractyloside which indicates the mPTP has similar effects on mitochondrial dynamics. These changes are also reduced by piracetam. These findings suggest the mPTP as an important target for the beneficial effects of piracetam on mitochondrial function. PMID:27747106

  11. Real-time monitoring of metabolic function in liver-on-chip microdevices tracks the dynamics of mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bavli, Danny; Prill, Sebastian; Ezra, Elishai; Levy, Gahl; Cohen, Merav; Vinken, Mathieu; Vanfleteren, Jan; Jaeger, Magnus; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic organ-on-a-chip technology aims to replace animal toxicity testing, but thus far has demonstrated few advantages over traditional methods. Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in the development of chemical and pharmaceutical toxicity, as well as pluripotency and disease processes. However, current methods to evaluate mitochondrial activity still rely on end-point assays, resulting in limited kinetic and prognostic information. Here, we present a liver-on-chip device capable of maintaining human tissue for over a month in vitro under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiration was monitored in real time using two-frequency phase modulation of tissue-embedded phosphorescent microprobes. A computer-controlled microfluidic switchboard allowed contiguous electrochemical measurements of glucose and lactate, providing real-time analysis of minute shifts from oxidative phosphorylation to anaerobic glycolysis, an early indication of mitochondrial stress. We quantify the dynamics of cellular adaptation to mitochondrial damage and the resulting redistribution of ATP production during rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and troglitazone (Rezulin)-induced mitochondrial stress. We show troglitazone shifts metabolic fluxes at concentrations previously regarded as safe, suggesting a mechanism for its observed idiosyncratic effect. Our microfluidic platform reveals the dynamics and strategies of cellular adaptation to mitochondrial damage, a unique advantage of organ-on-chip technology. PMID:27044092

  12. Dynamics of nucleoid structure regulated by mitochondrial fission contributes to cristae reformation and release of cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Ban-Ishihara, Reiko; Ishihara, Takaya; Sasaki, Narie; Mihara, Katsuyoshi; Ishihara, Naotada

    2013-07-16

    Mammalian cells typically contain thousands of copies of mitochondrial DNA assembled into hundreds of nucleoids. Here we analyzed the dynamic features of nucleoids in terms of mitochondrial membrane dynamics involving balanced fusion and fission. In mitochondrial fission GTPase dynamin-related protein (Drp1)-deficient cells, nucleoids were enlarged by their clustering within hyperfused mitochondria. In normal cells, mitochondrial fission often occurred adjacent to nucleoids, since localization of Mff and Drp1 is dependent on the nucleoids. Thus, mitochondrial fission adjacent to nucleoids should prevent their clustering by maintaining small and fragmented nucleoids. The enhanced clustering of nucleoids resulted in the formation of highly stacked cristae structures in enlarged bulb-like mitochondria (mito-bulbs). Enclosure of proapoptotic factor cytochrome c, but not of Smac/DIABLO, into the highly stacked cristae suppressed its release from mitochondria under apoptotic stimuli. In the absence of nucleoids, Drp1 deficiency failed to form mito-bulbs and to protect against apoptosis. Thus, mitochondrial dynamics by fission and fusion play a critical role in controlling mitochondrial nucleoid structures, contributing to cristae reformation and the proapoptotic status of mitochondria.

  13. Mitochondrial aging and age-related dysfunction of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Sobenin, Igor A; Revin, Victor V; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2014-01-01

    Age-related changes in mitochondria are associated with decline in mitochondrial function. With advanced age, mitochondrial DNA volume, integrity and functionality decrease due to accumulation of mutations and oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In aged subjects, mitochondria are characterized by impaired function such as lowered oxidative capacity, reduced oxidative phosphorylation, decreased ATP production, significant increase in ROS generation, and diminished antioxidant defense. Mitochondrial biogenesis declines with age due to alterations in mitochondrial dynamics and inhibition of mitophagy, an autophagy process that removes dysfunctional mitochondria. Age-dependent abnormalities in mitochondrial quality control further weaken and impair mitochondrial function. In aged tissues, enhanced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis contributes to an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells. However, implementation of strategies such as caloric restriction and regular physical training may delay mitochondrial aging and attenuate the age-related phenotype in humans.

  14. Dynamic Nucleotide Mutation Gradients and Control Region Usage in Squamate Reptile Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Castoe, T.A.; Gu, W.; de Koning, A.P.J.; Daza, J.M.; Jiang, Z.J.; Parkinson, C.L.; Pollock, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    Gradients of nucleotide bias and substitution rates occur in vertebrate mitochondrial genomes due to the asymmetric nature of the replication process. The evolution of these gradients has previously been studied in detail in primates, but not in other vertebrate groups. From the primate study, the strengths of these gradients are known to evolve in ways that can substantially alter the substitution process, but it is unclear how rapidly they evolve over evolutionary time or how different they may be in different lineages or groups of vertebrates. Given the importance of mitochondrial genomes in phylogenetics and molecular evolutionary research, a better understanding of how asymmetric mitochondrial substitution gradients evolve would contribute key insights into how this gradient evolution may mislead evolutionary inferences, and how it may also be incorporated into new evolutionary models. Most snake mitochondrial genomes have an additional interesting feature, 2 nearly identical control regions, which vary among different species in the extent that they are used as origins of replication. Given the expanded sampling of complete snake genomes currently available, together with 2 additional snakes sequenced in this study, we reexamined gradient strength and CR usage in alethinophidian snakes as well as several lizards that possess dual CRs. Our results suggest that nucleotide substitution gradients (and corresponding nucleotide bias) and CR usage is highly labile over the ∼200 m.y. of squamate evolution, and demonstrates greater overall variability than previously shown in primates. The evidence for the existence of such gradients, and their ability to evolve rapidly and converge among unrelated species suggests that gradient dynamics could easily mislead phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary inferences, and argues strongly that these dynamics should be incorporated into phylogenetic models. PMID:20215734

  15. Dynamic nucleotide mutation gradients and control region usage in squamate reptile mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Castoe, T A; Gu, W; de Koning, A P J; Daza, J M; Jiang, Z J; Parkinson, C L; Pollock, D D

    2009-01-01

    Gradients of nucleotide bias and substitution rates occur in vertebrate mitochondrial genomes due to the asymmetric nature of the replication process. The evolution of these gradients has previously been studied in detail in primates, but not in other vertebrate groups. From the primate study, the strengths of these gradients are known to evolve in ways that can substantially alter the substitution process, but it is unclear how rapidly they evolve over evolutionary time or how different they may be in different lineages or groups of vertebrates. Given the importance of mitochondrial genomes in phylogenetics and molecular evolutionary research, a better understanding of how asymmetric mitochondrial substitution gradients evolve would contribute key insights into how this gradient evolution may mislead evolutionary inferences, and how it may also be incorporated into new evolutionary models. Most snake mitochondrial genomes have an additional interesting feature, 2 nearly identical control regions, which vary among different species in the extent that they are used as origins of replication. Given the expanded sampling of complete snake genomes currently available, together with 2 additional snakes sequenced in this study, we reexamined gradient strength and CR usage in alethinophidian snakes as well as several lizards that possess dual CRs. Our results suggest that nucleotide substitution gradients (and corresponding nucleotide bias) and CR usage is highly labile over the approximately 200 m.y. of squamate evolution, and demonstrates greater overall variability than previously shown in primates. The evidence for the existence of such gradients, and their ability to evolve rapidly and converge among unrelated species suggests that gradient dynamics could easily mislead phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary inferences, and argues strongly that these dynamics should be incorporated into phylogenetic models.

  16. Correcting mitochondrial fusion by manipulating mitofusin conformations

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Antonietta; Kitsis, Richard N.; Fleischer, Julie A.; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Kornfeld, Opher S.; Gong, Guohua; Biris, Nikolaos; Benz, Ann; Qvit, Nir; Donnelly, Sara K; Chen, Yun; Mennerick, Steven; Hodgson, Louis; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Dorn, Gerald W

    2017-01-01

    Summary Mitochondria are dynamic organelles, remodeling and exchanging contents during cyclic fusion and fission. Genetic mutations of mitofusin (Mfn) 2 interrupt mitochondrial fusion and cause the untreatable neurodegenerative condition, Charcot Marie Tooth disease type 2A (CMT2A). It has not been possible to directly modulate mitochondrial fusion, in part because the structural basis of mitofusin function is incompletely understood. Here we show that mitofusins adopt either a fusion-constrained or fusion-permissive molecular conformation directed by specific intramolecular binding interactions, and demonstrate that mitofusin-dependent mitochondrial fusion can be regulated by targeting these conformational transitions. Based on this model we engineered a cell-permeant minipeptide to destabilize fusion-constrained mitofusin and promote the fusion-permissive conformation, reversing mitochondrial abnormalities in cultured fibroblasts and neurons harboring CMT2A gene defects. The relationship between mitofusin conformational plasticity and mitochondrial dynamism uncovers a central mechanism regulating mitochondrial fusion whose manipulation can correct mitochondrial pathology triggered by defective or imbalanced mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:27775718

  17. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake controls actin cytoskeleton dynamics during cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Prudent, Julien; Popgeorgiev, Nikolay; Gadet, Rudy; Deygas, Mathieu; Rimokh, Ruth; Gillet, Germain

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ signaling regulates cell migration by acting on cytoskeleton architecture, cell directionality and focal adhesions dynamics. In migrating cells, cytosolic Ca2+ pool and Ca2+ pulses are described as key components of these effects. Whereas the role of the mitochondrial calcium homeostasis and the Mitochondria Cacium Uniporter (MCU) in cell migration were recently highlighted in vivo using the zebrafish model, their implication in actin cystokeleton dynamics and cell migration in mammals is not totally characterized. Here, we show that mcu silencing in two human cell lines compromises their migration capacities. This phenotype is characterized by actin cytoskeleton stiffness, a cell polarization loss and an impairment of the focal adhesion proteins dynamics. At the molecular level, these effects appear to be mediated by the reduction of the ER and cytosolic Ca2+ pools, which leads to a decrease in Rho-GTPases, RhoA and Rac1, and Ca2+-dependent Calpain activites, but seem to be independent of intracellular ATP levels. Together, this study highlights the fundamental and evolutionary conserved role of the mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis in cytoskeleton dynamics and cell migration. PMID:27827394

  18. Real-time observation of the conformational dynamics of mitochondrial Hsp70 by spFRET.

    PubMed

    Sikor, Martin; Mapa, Koyeli; von Voithenberg, Lena Voith; Mokranjac, Dejana; Lamb, Don C

    2013-05-29

    The numerous functions of the important class of molecular chaperones, heat shock proteins 70 (Hsp70), rely on cycles of intricate conformational changes driven by ATP-hydrolysis and regulated by cochaperones and substrates. Here, we used Förster resonance energy transfer to study the conformational dynamics of individual molecules of Ssc1, a mitochondrial Hsp70, in real time. The intrinsic dynamics of the substrate-binding domain of Ssc1 was observed to be uncoupled from the dynamic interactions between substrate- and nucleotide-binding domains. Analysis of the fluctuations in the interdomain separation revealed frequent transitions to a nucleotide-free state. The nucleotide-exchange factor Mge1 did not induce ADP release, as expected, but rather facilitated binding of ATP. These results indicate that the conformational cycle of Ssc1 is more elaborate than previously thought and provide insight into how the Hsp70s can perform a wide variety of functions.

  19. Mitochondrial function as a therapeutic target in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David A.; Perry, Justin B.; Allen, Mitchell E.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Stauffer, Brian L.; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Cleland, John G. F.; Colucci, Wilson S.; Butler, Javed; Voors, Adriaan A.; Anker, Stefan D.; Pitt, Bertram; Pieske, Burkert; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Greene, Stephen J.; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure is a pressing worldwide public-health problem with millions of patients having worsening heart failure. Despite all the available therapies, the condition carries a very poor prognosis. Existing therapies provide symptomatic and clinical benefit, but do not fully address molecular abnormalities that occur in cardiomyocytes. This shortcoming is particularly important given that most patients with heart failure have viable dysfunctional myocardium, in which an improvement or normalization of function might be possible. Although the pathophysiology of heart failure is complex, mitochondrial dysfunction seems to be an important target for therapy to improve cardiac function directly. Mitochondrial abnormalities include impaired mitochondrial electron transport chain activity, increased formation of reactive oxygen species, shifted metabolic substrate utilization, aberrant mitochondrial dynamics, and altered ion homeostasis. In this Consensus Statement, insights into the mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure are presented, along with an overview of emerging treatments with the potential to improve the function of the failing heart by targeting mitochondria. PMID:28004807

  20. The EF-Hand Ca2+ Binding Protein MICU Choreographs Mitochondrial Ca2+ Dynamics in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Carraretto, Luca; Teardo, Enrico; Cendron, Laura; Füßl, Magdalena; Doccula, Fabrizio G.; Szabò, Ildikò

    2015-01-01

    Plant organelle function must constantly adjust to environmental conditions, which requires dynamic coordination. Ca2+ signaling may play a central role in this process. Free Ca2+ dynamics are tightly regulated and differ markedly between the cytosol, plastid stroma, and mitochondrial matrix. The mechanistic basis of compartment-specific Ca2+ dynamics is poorly understood. Here, we studied the function of At-MICU, an EF-hand protein of Arabidopsis thaliana with homology to constituents of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter machinery in mammals. MICU binds Ca2+ and localizes to the mitochondria in Arabidopsis. In vivo imaging of roots expressing a genetically encoded Ca2+ sensor in the mitochondrial matrix revealed that lack of MICU increased resting concentrations of free Ca2+ in the matrix. Furthermore, Ca2+ elevations triggered by auxin and extracellular ATP occurred more rapidly and reached higher maximal concentrations in the mitochondria of micu mutants, whereas cytosolic Ca2+ signatures remained unchanged. These findings support the idea that a conserved uniporter system, with composition and regulation distinct from the mammalian machinery, mediates mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in plants under in vivo conditions. They further suggest that MICU acts as a throttle that controls Ca2+ uptake by moderating influx, thereby shaping Ca2+ signatures in the matrix and preserving mitochondrial homeostasis. Our results open the door to genetic dissection of mitochondrial Ca2+ signaling in plants. PMID:26530087

  1. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics Contributes to Propofol-Induced Cell Death in Human Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Twaroski, Danielle M.; Yan, Yasheng; Zaja, Ivan; Clark, Eric; Bosnjak, Zeljko J.; Bai, Xiaowen

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies in developing animals have shown that when anesthetic agents are administered early in life, it can lead to neuronal cell death and learning disabilities. Development of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neurons has provided a valuable tool for understanding the effects of anesthetics on developing human neurons. Unbalanced mitochondrial fusion/fission leads to various pathological conditions including neurodegeneration. The aim of this study was to dissect the role of mitochondrial dynamics in propofol-induced neurotoxicity. Methods TUNEL staining was used to assess cell death in hESC-derived neurons. Mitochondrial fission was assessed using TOM20 staining and electron microscopy. Expression of mitochondrial fission-related proteins was assessed by Western blot and confocal microscopy was used to assess opening time of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Results Exposure to 6 hours of 20 μg/mL propofol increased cell death from 3.18±0.17% in the control-treated group to 9.6±0.95% and led to detrimental increases in mitochondrial fission (n=5 coverslips/group) accompanied by increased expression of activated dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), key proteins responsible for mitochondrial fission. Propofol exposure also induced earlier opening of the mPTP from 118.9±3.1 seconds in the control-treated group to 73.3±1.6 seconds. Pretreatment of the cells with mdivi-1, a mitochondrial fission blocker rescued the propofol-induced toxicity, mitochondrial fission and mPTP opening time (n=75 cells/group). Inhibiting CDK1 attenuated the increase in cell death and fission and the increase in expression of activated Drp1. Conclusions These data demonstrate for the first time that propofol-induced neurotoxicity occurs through a mitochondrial fission/mPTP-mediated pathway. PMID:26352374

  2. Stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors reduces intracellular cholesterol accumulation and rescues mitochondrial abnormalities in human neural cell models of Niemann-Pick C1.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, A; De Nuccio, C; Pepponi, R; Visentin, S; Martire, A; Bernardo, A; Minghetti, L; Popoli, P

    2016-04-01

    Niemann Pick C 1 (NPC1) disease is an incurable, devastating lysosomal-lipid storage disorder characterized by hepatosplenomegaly, progressive neurological impairment and early death. Current treatments are very limited and the research of new therapeutic targets is thus mandatory. We recently showed that the stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) rescues the abnormal phenotype of fibroblasts from NPC1 patients suggesting that A2AR agonists could represent a therapeutic option for this disease. However, since all NPC1 patients develop severe neurological symptoms which can be ascribed to the complex pathology occurring in both neurons and oligodendrocytes, in the present paper we tested the effects of the A2AR agonist CGS21680 in human neuronal and oligodendroglial NPC1 cell lines (i.e. neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y and oligodendroglial MO3.13 transiently transfected with NPC1 small interfering RNA). The down-regulation of the NPC1 protein effectively resulted in intracellular cholesterol accumulation and altered mitochondrial membrane potential. Both effects were significantly attenuated by CGS21680 (500 nM). The protective effects of CGS were prevented by the selective A2AR antagonist ZM241385 (500 nM). The involvement of calcium modulation was demonstrated by the ability of Bapta-AM (5-7 μM) in reverting the effect of CGS. The A2A-dependent activity was prevented by the PKA-inhibitor KT5720, thus showing the involvement of the cAMP/PKA signaling. These findings provide a clear in vitro proof of concept that A2AR agonists are promising potential drugs for NPC disease.

  3. Alterations in Mitochondrial Quality Control in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qian; Tammineni, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the earliest and most prominent features in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. Recent studies suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD. Neurons are metabolically active cells, causing them to be particularly dependent on mitochondrial function for survival and maintenance. As highly dynamic organelles, mitochondria are characterized by a balance of fusion and fission, transport, and mitophagy, all of which are essential for maintaining mitochondrial integrity and function. Mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy can therefore be identified as key pathways in mitochondrial quality control. Tremendous progress has been made in studying changes in these key aspects of mitochondrial biology in the vulnerable neurons of AD brains and mouse models, and the potential underlying mechanisms of such changes. This review highlights recent findings on alterations in the mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy in AD and discusses how these abnormalities impact mitochondrial quality control and thus contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction in AD. PMID:26903809

  4. Tissue Specific Impacts of a Ketogenic Diet on Mitochondrial Dynamics in the BTBRT+tf/j Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Christopher; Shutt, Timothy E.; Ahn, Younghee; Hittel, Dustin. S.; Khan, Aneal; Rho, Jong M.; Shearer, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) has been utilized as a dietary therapeutic for nearly a century. One experimental model particularly responsive to the KD is the BTBRT+tf/j (BTBR) mouse, which displays phenotypic characteristics of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and insulin resistance. Recently, the study of impaired mitochondrial function has become a focal point of research investigating the pathophysiology of ASD. As highly dynamic organelles, mitochondria undergo constant fluctuations in morphology, biogenesis, and quality control in order to maintain cellular homeostasis. An important modifier of mitochondrial dynamics is energy availability. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the impact of a KD on mitochondrial dynamics in the liver and brain (prefrontal cortex) of the BTBR mouse model of ASD. Juvenile male C57Bl/6 (B6) and BTBR mice were age-matched to 5 weeks of age before being fed standard chow (CD, 13% kcal fat) or a KD (75% kcal fat) for 10–14 days. Analysis of brain tissue identified differences in mitochondrial gene expression but no correlation with protein levels. Unlike in the brain, KD led to decreased levels of mitochondrial proteins in the liver, despite increased gene expression. Consistent with decreased mitochondrial proteins, we also observed decreased mtDNA for all mice on the KD, demonstrating that the KD reduces the total amount of mitochondria in the liver. In order to explain the discrepancy between protein levels and gene expression, we investigated whether mitochondrial turnover via mitophagy was increased. To this end, we examined expression levels of the mitophagy regulator BNIP3 (BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19 kd-interacting protein 3). BNIP3 gene and protein expression were significantly elevated in liver of KD animals (p < 0.05), indicating the potential activation of mitophagy. Therefore, consumption of a KD exerts highly tissue-specific effects, ultimately increasing mitochondrial turnover in the liver, while gene and protein

  5. Tissue Specific Impacts of a Ketogenic Diet on Mitochondrial Dynamics in the BTBR(T+tf/j) Mouse.

    PubMed

    Newell, Christopher; Shutt, Timothy E; Ahn, Younghee; Hittel, Dustin S; Khan, Aneal; Rho, Jong M; Shearer, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) has been utilized as a dietary therapeutic for nearly a century. One experimental model particularly responsive to the KD is the BTBR(T+tf/j) (BTBR) mouse, which displays phenotypic characteristics of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and insulin resistance. Recently, the study of impaired mitochondrial function has become a focal point of research investigating the pathophysiology of ASD. As highly dynamic organelles, mitochondria undergo constant fluctuations in morphology, biogenesis, and quality control in order to maintain cellular homeostasis. An important modifier of mitochondrial dynamics is energy availability. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the impact of a KD on mitochondrial dynamics in the liver and brain (prefrontal cortex) of the BTBR mouse model of ASD. Juvenile male C57Bl/6 (B6) and BTBR mice were age-matched to 5 weeks of age before being fed standard chow (CD, 13% kcal fat) or a KD (75% kcal fat) for 10-14 days. Analysis of brain tissue identified differences in mitochondrial gene expression but no correlation with protein levels. Unlike in the brain, KD led to decreased levels of mitochondrial proteins in the liver, despite increased gene expression. Consistent with decreased mitochondrial proteins, we also observed decreased mtDNA for all mice on the KD, demonstrating that the KD reduces the total amount of mitochondria in the liver. In order to explain the discrepancy between protein levels and gene expression, we investigated whether mitochondrial turnover via mitophagy was increased. To this end, we examined expression levels of the mitophagy regulator BNIP3 (BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19 kd-interacting protein 3). BNIP3 gene and protein expression were significantly elevated in liver of KD animals (p < 0.05), indicating the potential activation of mitophagy. Therefore, consumption of a KD exerts highly tissue-specific effects, ultimately increasing mitochondrial turnover in the liver, while gene and protein

  6. Imaging of mitochondrial Ca2+ dynamics in astrocytes using cell-specific mitochondria-targeted GCaMP5G/6s: mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and cytosolic Ca2+ availability via the endoplasmic reticulum store.

    PubMed

    Li, Hailong; Wang, Xiaowan; Zhang, Nannan; Gottipati, Manoj K; Parpura, Vladimir; Ding, Shinghua

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) plays a critical physiological role in cellular energy metabolism and signaling, and its overload contributes to various pathological conditions including neuronal apoptotic death in neurological diseases. Live cell mitochondrial Ca(2+) imaging is an important approach to understand mitochondrial Ca(2+) dynamics. Recently developed GCaMP genetically-encoded Ca(2+) indicators provide unique opportunity for high sensitivity/resolution and cell type-specific mitochondrial Ca(2+) imaging. In the current study, we implemented cell-specific mitochondrial targeting of GCaMP5G/6s (mito-GCaMP5G/6s) and used two-photon microscopy to image astrocytic and neuronal mitochondrial Ca(2+) dynamics in culture, revealing Ca(2+) uptake mechanism by these organelles in response to cell stimulation. Using these mitochondrial Ca(2+) indicators, our results show that mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in individual mitochondria in cultured astrocytes and neurons can be seen after stimulations by ATP and glutamate, respectively. We further studied the dependence of mitochondrial Ca(2+) dynamics on cytosolic Ca(2+) changes following ATP stimulation in cultured astrocytes by simultaneously imaging mitochondrial and cytosolic Ca(2+) increase using mito-GCaMP5G and a synthetic organic Ca(2+) indicator, x-Rhod-1, respectively. Combined with molecular intervention in Ca(2+) signaling pathway, our results demonstrated that the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is tightly coupled with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-mediated Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum and the activation of G protein-coupled receptors. The current study provides a novel approach to image mitochondrial Ca(2+) dynamics as well as Ca(2+) interplay between the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, which is relevant for neuronal and astrocytic functions in health and disease.

  7. GDAP1 mutations differ in their effects on mitochondrial dynamics and apoptosis depending on the mode of inheritance.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Axel; Wagner, Konstanze Marion; Ruegg, Marcel; Suter, Ueli

    2009-12-01

    Mutations in the GDAP1 gene lead to recessively or dominantly inherited peripheral neuropathies (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease; CMT). Here, we demonstrate that GDAP1 is a mitochondrial fission factor whose activity is dependent on the fission factors Drp1 and Fis1. Unlike other mitochondrial fission factors, GDAP1 overexpression or knockdown does not influence the susceptibility of cells to apoptotic stimuli. Recessively inherited CMT-associated forms of GDAP1 (rmGDAP1s) have reduced fission activity, whereas dominantly inherited forms (dmGDAP1s) interfere with mitochondrial fusion. Only the expression of dmGDAP1s increases the production of ROS, leads to uneven mitochondrial transmembrane potentials, and enhances the susceptibility to apoptotic stimuli. Taken together, our results indicate that wild-type GDAP1 promotes fission without increasing the risk of apoptosis. In CMT, recessive GDAP1 mutations are associated with reduced fission activity, while dominant mutations impair mitochondrial fusion and cause mitochondrial damage. Thus, different cellular mechanisms that disturb mitochondrial dynamics underlie the similar clinical manifestations caused by GDAP1 mutations, depending on the mode of inheritance.

  8. Growth Factor erv1-like Modulates Drp1 to Preserve Mitochondrial Dynamics and Function in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Lance R.; Damin, Matthew N.; Gomathinayagam, Rohini; Horn, Sarah R.; Means, Anthony R.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship of mitochondrial dynamics and function to pluripotency are rather poorly understood aspects of stem cell biology. Here we show that growth factor erv1-like (Gfer) is involved in preserving mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) mitochondrial morphology and function. Knockdown (KD) of Gfer in ESCs leads to decreased pluripotency marker expression, embryoid body (EB) formation, cell survival, and loss of mitochondrial function. Mitochondria in Gfer-KD ESCs undergo excessive fragmentation and mitophagy, whereas those in ESCs overexpressing Gfer appear elongated. Levels of the mitochondrial fission GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) are highly elevated in Gfer-KD ESCs and decreased in Gfer-overexpressing cells. Treatment with a specific inhibitor of Drp1 rescues mitochondrial function and apoptosis, whereas expression of Drp1-dominant negative resulted in the restoration of pluripotency marker expression in Gfer-KD ESCs. Altogether, our data reveal a novel prosurvival role for Gfer in maintaining mitochondrial fission–fusion dynamics in pluripotent ESCs. PMID:20147447

  9. Growth factor erv1-like modulates Drp1 to preserve mitochondrial dynamics and function in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Todd, Lance R; Damin, Matthew N; Gomathinayagam, Rohini; Horn, Sarah R; Means, Anthony R; Sankar, Uma

    2010-04-01

    The relationship of mitochondrial dynamics and function to pluripotency are rather poorly understood aspects of stem cell biology. Here we show that growth factor erv1-like (Gfer) is involved in preserving mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) mitochondrial morphology and function. Knockdown (KD) of Gfer in ESCs leads to decreased pluripotency marker expression, embryoid body (EB) formation, cell survival, and loss of mitochondrial function. Mitochondria in Gfer-KD ESCs undergo excessive fragmentation and mitophagy, whereas those in ESCs overexpressing Gfer appear elongated. Levels of the mitochondrial fission GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) are highly elevated in Gfer-KD ESCs and decreased in Gfer-overexpressing cells. Treatment with a specific inhibitor of Drp1 rescues mitochondrial function and apoptosis, whereas expression of Drp1-dominant negative resulted in the restoration of pluripotency marker expression in Gfer-KD ESCs. Altogether, our data reveal a novel prosurvival role for Gfer in maintaining mitochondrial fission-fusion dynamics in pluripotent ESCs.

  10. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase γ: Novel Mechanisms of Function and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Euro, Liliya; Haapanen, Outi; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Suomalainen, Anu; Sharma, Vivek

    2017-03-07

    DNA polymerase γ (Pol γ) is a key component of the mitochondrial DNA replisome and an important cause of neurological diseases. Despite the availability of its crystal structures, the molecular mechanism of DNA replication, the switch between polymerase and exonuclease activities, the site of replisomal interactions, and functional effects of patient mutations that do not affect direct catalysis have remained elusive. Here we report the first atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations of the human Pol γ replicative complex. Our simulation data show that DNA binding triggers remarkable changes in the enzyme structure, including (1) completion of the DNA-binding channel via a dynamic subdomain, which in the apo form blocks the catalytic site, (2) stabilization of the structure through the distal accessory β-subunit, and (3) formation of a putative transient replisome-binding platform in the "intrinsic processivity" subdomain of the enzyme. Our data indicate that noncatalytic mutations may disrupt replisomal interactions, thereby causing Pol γ-associated neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Dynamic abnormalities of spontaneous brain activity in women with primary dysmenorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lingmin; Yang, Xuejuan; Liu, Peng; Sun, Jinbo; Chen, Fei; Xu, Ziliang; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to investigate the regional spontaneous brain activity changes in primary dysmenorrhea (PD) patients in different phases of the menstrual cycle by regional homogeneity (ReHo) analysis. Patients and methods Thirty-three PD patients and 32 healthy controls (HCs) separately received resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging during menstrual phase and follicular phase (non-menstrual phase). Cox retrospective symptom scale (RSS), Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) were applied to assess related symptoms and emotions. Results There was no significant difference between the two groups in demographic data. The PD patients obtained higher RSS score, SAS score and SDS score than HCs. Compared with HCs, the ReHo values of the PD patients were increased in left midbrain and hippocampus, right posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), insula and middle temporal cortex (MTC) and decreased in left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in menstrual phase. In non-menstrual phase, enhanced ReHo values were found in bilateral S1 and precuneus, left S2 and MTC, and reduced ReHo values were observed in left mPFC and orbital frontal cortex. RSS score positively correlated with ReHo values of midbrain and negatively correlated with mPFC and PCC. Conclusion Our results suggested that PD is accompanied by dynamic regional spontaneous activity changes across the menstrual cycle, and the altered regions were involved in descending pain modulation, default mode network and sensory modulation. These abnormal activations might contribute to maintain the menstrual pain. PMID:28392711

  12. The AAA+ ATPase ATAD3A Controls Mitochondrial Dynamics at the Interface of the Inner and Outer Membranes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Gilquin, Benoît; Taillebourg, Emmanuel; Cherradi, Nadia; Hubstenberger, Arnaud; Gay, Olivia; Merle, Nicolas; Assard, Nicole; Fauvarque, Marie-Odile; Tomohiro, Shiho; Kuge, Osamu; Baudier, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic interactions between components of the outer (OM) and inner (IM) membranes control a number of critical mitochondrial functions such as channeling of metabolites and coordinated fission and fusion. We identify here the mitochondrial AAA+ ATPase protein ATAD3A specific to multicellular eukaryotes as a participant in these interactions. The N-terminal domain interacts with the OM. A central transmembrane segment (TMS) anchors the protein in the IM and positions the C-terminal AAA+ ATPase domain in the matrix. Invalidation studies in Drosophila and in a human steroidogenic cell line showed that ATAD3A is required for normal cell growth and cholesterol channeling at contact sites. Using dominant-negative mutants, including a defective ATP-binding mutant and a truncated 50-amino-acid N-terminus mutant, we showed that ATAD3A regulates dynamic interactions between the mitochondrial OM and IM sensed by the cell fission machinery. The capacity of ATAD3A to impact essential mitochondrial functions and organization suggests that it possesses unique properties in regulating mitochondrial dynamics and cellular functions in multicellular organisms. PMID:20154147

  13. Dynamic Changes of Striatal and Extrastriatal Abnormalities in Glutaric Aciduria Type I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harting, Inga; Neumaier-Probst, Eva; Seitz, Angelika; Maier, Esther M.; Assmann, Birgit; Baric, Ivo; Troncoso, Monica; Muhlhausen, Chris; Zschocke, Johannes; Boy, Nikolas P. S.; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Garbade, Sven F.; Kolker, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    In glutaric aciduria type I, an autosomal recessive disease of mitochondrial lysine, hydroxylysine and tryptophan catabolism, striatal lesions are characteristically induced by acute encephalopathic crises during a finite period of brain development (age 3-36 months). The frequency of striatal injury is significantly less in patients diagnosed as…

  14. A threshold of transmembrane potential is required for mitochondrial dynamic balance mediated by DRP1 and OMA1.

    PubMed

    Jones, Edith; Gaytan, Norma; Garcia, Iraselia; Herrera, Alan; Ramos, Manuel; Agarwala, Divya; Rana, Maahrose; Innis-Whitehouse, Wendy; Schuenzel, Erin; Gilkerson, Robert

    2016-11-17

    As an organellar network, mitochondria dynamically regulate their organization via opposing fusion and fission pathways to maintain bioenergetic homeostasis and contribute to key cellular pathways. This dynamic balance is directly linked to bioenergetic function: loss of transmembrane potential across the inner membrane (Δψ m) disrupts mitochondrial fission/fusion balance, causing fragmentation of the network. However, the level of Δψ m required for mitochondrial dynamic balance, as well as the relative contributions of fission and fusion pathways, have remained unclear. To explore this, mitochondrial morphology and Δψ m were examined via confocal imaging and tetramethyl rhodamine ester (TMRE) flow cytometry, respectively, in cultured 143B osteosarcoma cells. When normalized to the TMRE value of untreated 143B cells as 100%, both genetic (mtDNA-depleted ρ(0)) and pharmacological [carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP)-treated] cell models below 34% TMRE fluorescence were unable to maintain mitochondrial interconnection, correlating with loss of fusion-active long OPA1 isoforms (L-OPA1). Mechanistically, this threshold is maintained by mechanistic coordination of DRP1-mediated fission and OPA1-mediated fusion: cells lacking either DRP1 or the OMA1 metalloprotease were insensitive to loss of Δψ m, instead maintaining an obligately fused morphology. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a mitochondrial 'tipping point' threshold mediated by the interaction of Δψ m with both DRP1 and OMA1; moreover, DRP1 appears to be required for effective OPA1 maintenance and processing, consistent with growing evidence for direct interaction of fission and fusion pathways. These results suggest that Δψ m below threshold coordinately activates both DRP1-mediated fission and OMA1 cleavage of OPA1, collapsing mitochondrial dynamic balance, with major implications for a range of signaling pathways and cellular life/death events.

  15. [Comparative investigations of osteotropic radionucleides. IV. The dynamics of uptake in normal and abnormal bone (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Creutzig, H; Gerdts, K G; Creutzig, A

    1977-03-01

    The dynamics of uptake of osteotropic radionucleides in normal and abnormal bone were studied by means of sequential and functional scans. Various phosphate and phosphonate complexes were compared in vivo and in vitro. Only phosphonates were considered as suitable for bone scanning. In normal bones in beagles, radioactivity after HEDP fell to 65% after two hours, but was 105% with 18F. In relation to healing fractures, the curves differ quantitatively and qualitatively. In this situation, functional curves derived from dynamic scans provide a better parallel with histological findings than does static scintigraphy with an uptake quotient. Sequential and functional scanning are able to document the therapeutic effect of irradiation of bone metastases.

  16. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR) γ and PPARα Agonists Modulate Mitochondrial Fusion-Fission Dynamics: Relevance to Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-Related Neurodegenerative Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Zolezzi, Juan M.; Silva-Alvarez, Carmen; Ordenes, Daniela; Godoy, Juan A.; Carvajal, Francisco J.; Santos, Manuel J.; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies showed that the activation of the retinoid X receptor, which dimerizes with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), leads to an enhanced clearance of Aβ from the brain of transgenic mice model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), because an increased expression of apolipoprotein E and it main transporters. However, the effects observed must involve additional underlying mechanisms that have not been yet explored. Several studies conducted in our laboratory suggest that part of the effects observed for the PPARs agonist might involves mitochondrial function and, particularly, mitochondrial dynamics. In the present study we assessed the effects of oxidative stress challenge on mitochondrial morphology and mitochondrial dynamics-related proteins in hippocampal neurons. Using immunofluorescence, we evaluated the PPARγ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α), dynamin related protein 1 (DRP1), mitochondrial fission protein 1 (FIS1), and mitochondrial length, in order to determine if PPARs agonist pre-treatment is able to protect mitochondrial population from hippocampal neurons through modulation of the mitochondrial fusion-fission events. Our results suggest that both a PPARγ agonist (ciglitazone) and a PPARα agonist (WY 14.643) are able to protect neurons by modulating mitochondrial fusion and fission, leading to a better response of neurons to oxidative stress, suggesting that a PPAR based therapy could acts simultaneously in different cellular components. Additionally, our results suggest that PGC-1α and mitochondrial dynamics should be further studied in future therapy research oriented to ameliorate neurodegenerative disorders, such as AD. PMID:23675519

  17. The Pleiotropic Effect of Physical Exercise on Mitochondrial Dynamics in Aging Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Elena; Agostini, Deborah; Polidori, Emanuela; Potenza, Lucia; Guescini, Michele; Lucertini, Francesco; Annibalini, Giosuè; Stocchi, Laura; De Santi, Mauro; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2015-01-01

    Decline in human muscle mass and strength (sarcopenia) is one of the principal hallmarks of the aging process. Regular physical exercise and training programs are certain powerful stimuli to attenuate the physiological skeletal muscle alterations occurring during aging and contribute to promote health and well-being. Although the series of events that led to these muscle adaptations are poorly understood, the mechanisms that regulate these processes involve the “quality” of skeletal muscle mitochondria. Aerobic/endurance exercise helps to maintain and improve cardiovascular fitness and respiratory function, whereas strength/resistance-exercise programs increase muscle strength, power development, and function. Due to the different effect of both exercises in improving mitochondrial content and quality, in terms of biogenesis, dynamics, turnover, and genotype, combined physical activity programs should be individually prescribed to maximize the antiaging effects of exercise. PMID:25945152

  18. Control of Mitochondrial Dynamics by Fas-induced Caspase-8 Activation in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyo Min

    2015-01-01

    Cells undergo apoptosis mainly via two pathways-the mitochondrial pathway and the cytosolic pathway. It has been well documented that activation of the mitochondrial pathway promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and inhibition of mitochondrial fragmentation partly represses cell death. However, the mitochondrial events following activation of the cytosolic pathway are less understood. In this study, we treated Fas-activating antibody and found mitochondrial fragmentation without cell death in hippocampal primary neurons and HT-22 cell lines. Fas antibody treatment, in fact, promoted rapid activation of caspase-8, while executioner caspase-3 activation was not observed. Furthermore, blockage of caspase-8 efficiently prevented Fas antibody-induced mitochondrial fragmentation. These results suggest that the cytosolic pathway induced by death receptor activation promotes caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial fission. PMID:26412971

  19. The Spectrum of Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Defects in Mitochondrial Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Amy E.; Ng, Yi Shiau; White, Kathryn; Davey, Tracey; Mannella, Carmen; Falkous, Gavin; Feeney, Catherine; Schaefer, Andrew M.; McFarland, Robert; Gorman, Grainne S.; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Doug M.; Picard, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions are intrinsically linked to their morphology and membrane ultrastructure. Characterizing abnormal mitochondrial structural features may thus provide insight into the underlying pathogenesis of inherited and acquired mitochondrial diseases. Following a systematic literature review on ultrastructural defects in mitochondrial myopathy, we investigated skeletal muscle biopsies from seven subjects with genetically defined mtDNA mutations. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology were characterized using two complimentary approaches: transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and serial block face scanning EM (SBF-SEM) with 3D reconstruction. Six ultrastructural abnormalities were identified including i) paracrystalline inclusions, ii) linearization of cristae and abnormal angular features, iii) concentric layering of cristae membranes, iv) matrix compartmentalization, v) nanotunelling, and vi) donut-shaped mitochondria. In light of recent molecular advances in mitochondrial biology, these findings reveal novel aspects of mitochondrial ultrastructure and morphology in human tissues with implications for understanding the mechanisms linking mitochondrial dysfunction to disease. PMID:27506553

  20. A novel Gfer-Drp1 link in preserving mitochondrial dynamics and function in pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Todd, Lance R; Gomathinayagam, Rohini; Sankar, Uma

    2010-08-01

    Mitochondria, the dynamic energy powerhouses of the cell, have vital roles in a multitude of cellular processes including differentiation and cell survival. Tight regulation of mitochondrial dynamics, integrity and function is indispensible for preservation of homeostasis in all cells, including pluripotent stem cells. The ability to proliferate and self-renew indefinitely bestows the pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) with immense curative potential. Mechanisms that preserve mitochondrial well-being, and therefore maintain "stemness," are vital in realizing the full potential of ESCs in therapeutic regenerative medicine. However, virtually nothing is known regarding the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and function and the relationship thereof to overall cell fate and function in pluripotent ESCs or other somatic stem cells. Using loss- and gain-of-function approaches, we show that growth factor erv1-like (Gfer) plays an essential pro-survival role in the maintenance of murine ESC pluripotency by preserving the structural and functional integrity of their mitochondria, through modulation of the key mitochondrial fission factor Drp1.

  1. Dynamin-Related Protein 1 and Mitochondrial Fragmentation in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra; Reddy, Tejaswini P.; Manczak, Maria; Calkins, Marcus J.; Shirendeb, Ulziibat; Mao, Peizhong

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the recent developments of abnormal mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial fragmentation, and neuronal damage in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The GTPase family of proteins, including fission proteins, dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1), mitochondrial fission 1 (Fis1), and fusion proteins (Mfn1, Mfn2 and Opa1) are essential to maintain mitochondrial fission and fusion balance, and to provide necessary adenosine triphosphate to neurons. Among these, Drp1 is involved in several important aspects of mitochondria, including shape, size, distribution, remodeling, and maintenance of X in mammalian cells. In addition, recent advancements in molecular, cellular, electron microscopy, and confocal imaging studies revealed that Drp1 is associated with several cellular functions, including mitochondrial and peroxisomal fragmentation, phosphorylation, SUMOylation, ubiquitination, and cell death. In the last two decades, tremendous progress has been made in researching mitochondrial dynamics, in yeast, worms, and mammalian cells; and this research has provided evidence linking Drp1 to neurodegenerative diseases. Researchers in the neurodegenerative disease field are beginning to recognize the possible involvement of Drp1 in causing mitochondrial fragmentation and abnormal mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegenerative diseases. This article summarizes research findings relating Drp1 to mitochondrial fission and fusion, in yeast, worms, and mammals. Based on findings from the Reddy laboratory and others’, we propose that mutant proteins of neurodegenerative diseases, including AD, PD, HD, and ALS, interact with Drp1, activate mitochondrial fission machinery, fragment mitochondria excessively, and impair mitochondrial transport and mitochondrial dynamics, ultimately causing mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal damage. PMID:21145355

  2. Arp2/3 complex and actin dynamics are required for actin-based mitochondrial motility in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Boldogh, Istvan R.; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol; Nowakowski, W. Dan; Karmon, Sharon L.; Hays, Lara G.; Yates, John R.; Pon, Liza A.

    2001-01-01

    The Arp2/3 complex is implicated in actin polymerization-driven movement of Listeria monocytogenes. Here, we find that Arp2p and Arc15p, two subunits of this complex, show tight, actin-independent association with isolated yeast mitochondria. Arp2p colocalizes with mitochondria. Consistent with this result, we detect Arp2p-dependent formation of actin clouds around mitochondria in intact yeast. Cells bearing mutations in ARP2 or ARC15 genes show decreased velocities of mitochondrial movement, loss of all directed movement and defects in mitochondrial morphology. Finally, we observe a decrease in the velocity and extent of mitochondrial movement in yeast in which actin dynamics are reduced but actin cytoskeletal structure is intact. These results support the idea that the movement of mitochondria in yeast is actin polymerization driven and that this movement requires Arp2/3 complex. PMID:11248049

  3. Troglitazone-induced hepatic mitochondrial proteome expression dynamics in heterozygous Sod2{sup +/-} mice: Two-stage oxidative injury

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.H. |; Chung, Maxey C.M. | Lin Qingsong; Boelsterli, Urs A. ||

    2008-08-15

    The determinants of susceptibility to troglitazone-induced idiosyncratic liver injury have not yet been determined; however, troglitazone has been shown to target mitochondria and induce mitochondria-mediated hepatocellular injury in vitro. The aim of this study was to use a systems approach to analyze the dynamics of mitochondrial changes at the proteome level and more clearly define the mechanisms and time course of troglitazone hepatotoxicity by using a previously characterized mouse model that is highly sensitized to troglitazone hepatotoxicity. Mice heterozygous in mitochondrial superoxide dismutase-2 (Sod2{sup +/-}) were injected intraperitoneally with troglitazone (30 mg/kg/day) or vehicle daily for 2 or 4 weeks. Hepatic mitochondria were isolated, purified, and subjected to two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). We found that among the {approx} 1500 resolved hepatic mitochondrial proteins, 70 exhibited significantly altered abundance after troglitazone treatment. MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS analysis revealed that early changes (2 weeks) included increased levels of heat shock protein family members (mortalin, HSP7C), Lon protease, and catalase, indicating induction of a mitochondrial stress response. In contrast, after 4 weeks, a number of critical proteins including ATP synthase {beta}-subunit, aconitase-2, and catalase exhibited decreased abundance, and total protein carbonyls were significantly increased, suggesting uncompensated oxidative damage. Aconitase-2 (ACO2) was decreased at both time points, making this protein a potential sensitive and early biomarker for mitochondrial oxidant stress. These results show that, in this murine model of underlying clinically silent mitochondrial stress, superimposed troglitazone induces a two-stage response: an initial adaptive response, followed by a toxic response involving oxidant injury to mitochondrial proteins.

  4. Physical exercise in aging human skeletal muscle increases mitochondrial calcium uniporter expression levels and affects mitochondria dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Sandra; Mammucari, Cristina; Romanello, Vanina; Barberi, Laura; Pietrangelo, Laura; Fusella, Aurora; Mosole, Simone; Gherardi, Gaia; Höfer, Christian; Löfler, Stefan; Sarabon, Nejc; Cvecka, Jan; Krenn, Matthias; Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Protasi, Feliciano; Musarò, Antonio; Sandri, Marco; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2016-12-01

    Age-related sarcopenia is characterized by a progressive loss of muscle mass with decline in specific force, having dramatic consequences on mobility and quality of life in seniors. The etiology of sarcopenia is multifactorial and underlying mechanisms are currently not fully elucidated. Physical exercise is known to have beneficial effects on muscle trophism and force production. Alterations of mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis regulated by mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) have been recently shown to affect muscle trophism in vivo in mice. To understand the relevance of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in aging and to investigate the effect of physical exercise on MCU expression and mitochondria dynamics, we analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies from 70-year-old subjects 9 weeks trained with either neuromuscular electrical stimulation (ES) or leg press. Here, we demonstrate that improved muscle function and structure induced by both trainings are linked to increased protein levels of MCU Ultrastructural analyses by electron microscopy showed remodeling of mitochondrial apparatus in ES-trained muscles that is consistent with an adaptation to physical exercise, a response likely mediated by an increased expression of mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1. Altogether these results indicate that the ES-dependent physiological effects on skeletal muscle size and force are associated with changes in mitochondrial-related proteins involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis and mitochondrial shape. These original findings in aging human skeletal muscle confirm the data obtained in mice and propose MCU and mitochondria-related proteins as potential pharmacological targets to counteract age-related muscle loss.

  5. Early replication dynamics of sex-linked mitochondrial DNAs in the doubly uniparental inheritance species Ruditapes philippinarum (Bivalvia Veneridae)

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, D; Ghiselli, F; Milani, L; Breton, S; Passamonti, M

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial homoplasmy, which is maintained by strictly maternal inheritance and a series of bottlenecks, is thought to be an adaptive condition for metazoans. Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) is a unique mode of mitochondrial transmission found in bivalve species, in which two distinct mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) lines are present, one inherited through eggs (F) and one through sperm (M). During development, the two lines segregate in a sex- and tissue-specific manner: females lose M during embryogenesis, whereas males actively segregate it in the germ line. These two pivotal events are still poorly characterized. Here we investigated mtDNA replication dynamics during embryogenesis and pre-adulthood of the venerid Ruditapes philippinarum using real-time quantitative PCR. We found that both mtDNAs do not detectably replicate during early embryogenesis, and that the M line might be lost from females around 24 h of age. A rise in mtDNA copy number was observed before the first reproductive season in both sexes, with the M mitochondrial genome replicating more than the F in males, and we associate these boosts to the early phase of gonad production. As evidence indicates that DUI relies on the same molecular machine of mitochondrial maternal inheritance that is common in most animals, our data are relevant not only to DUI but also to shed light on how differential segregations of mtDNA variants, in the same nuclear background, may be controlled during development. PMID:26626575

  6. Early replication dynamics of sex-linked mitochondrial DNAs in the doubly uniparental inheritance species Ruditapes philippinarum (Bivalvia Veneridae).

    PubMed

    Guerra, D; Ghiselli, F; Milani, L; Breton, S; Passamonti, M

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial homoplasmy, which is maintained by strictly maternal inheritance and a series of bottlenecks, is thought to be an adaptive condition for metazoans. Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) is a unique mode of mitochondrial transmission found in bivalve species, in which two distinct mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) lines are present, one inherited through eggs (F) and one through sperm (M). During development, the two lines segregate in a sex- and tissue-specific manner: females lose M during embryogenesis, whereas males actively segregate it in the germ line. These two pivotal events are still poorly characterized. Here we investigated mtDNA replication dynamics during embryogenesis and pre-adulthood of the venerid Ruditapes philippinarum using real-time quantitative PCR. We found that both mtDNAs do not detectably replicate during early embryogenesis, and that the M line might be lost from females around 24 h of age. A rise in mtDNA copy number was observed before the first reproductive season in both sexes, with the M mitochondrial genome replicating more than the F in males, and we associate these boosts to the early phase of gonad production. As evidence indicates that DUI relies on the same molecular machine of mitochondrial maternal inheritance that is common in most animals, our data are relevant not only to DUI but also to shed light on how differential segregations of mtDNA variants, in the same nuclear background, may be controlled during development.

  7. Dynamic microtubule organization and mitochondrial transport are regulated by distinct Kinesin-1 pathways

    PubMed Central

    Melkov, Anna; Simchoni, Yasmin; Alcalay, Yehonatan; Abdu, Uri

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The microtubule (MT) plus-end motor kinesin heavy chain (Khc) is well known for its role in long distance cargo transport. Recent evidence showed that Khc is also required for the organization of the cellular MT network by mediating MT sliding. We found that mutations in Khc and the gene of its adaptor protein, kinesin light chain (Klc) resulted in identical bristle morphology defects, with the upper part of the bristle being thinner and flatter than normal and failing to taper towards the bristle tip. We demonstrate that bristle mitochondria transport requires Khc but not Klc as a competing force to dynein heavy chain (Dhc). Surprisingly, we demonstrate for the first time that Dhc is the primary motor for both anterograde and retrograde fast mitochondria transport. We found that the upper part of Khc and Klc mutant bristles lacked stable MTs. When following dynamic MT polymerization via the use of GFP-tagged end-binding protein 1 (EB1), it was noted that at Khc and Klc mutant bristle tips, dynamic MTs significantly deviated from the bristle parallel growth axis, relative to wild-type bristles. We also observed that GFP-EB1 failed to concentrate as a focus at the tip of Khc and Klc mutant bristles. We propose that the failure of bristle tapering is due to defects in directing dynamic MTs at the growing tip. Thus, we reveal a new function for Khc and Klc in directing dynamic MTs during polarized cell growth. Moreover, we also demonstrate a novel mode of coordination in mitochondrial transport between Khc and Dhc. PMID:26581590

  8. Human mitochondria and mitochondrial genome function as a single dynamic cellular unit

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    rho 0 HeLa cells entirely lacking mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mitochondrial transfection techniques were used to examine intermitochondrial interactions between mitochondria with and without mtDNA, and also between those with wild-type (wt) and mutant-type mtDNA in living human cells. First, unambiguous evidence was obtained that the DNA-binding dyes ethidium bromide (EtBr) and 4',6-diamidino-2- phenylindole (DAPI) exclusively stained mitochondria containing mtDNA in living human cells. Then, using EtBr or DAPI fluorescence as a probe, mtDNA was shown to spread rapidly to all rho 0 HeLa mitochondria when EtBr- or DAPI-stained HeLa mitochondria were introduced into rho 0 HeLa cells. Moreover, coexisting wt-mtDNA and mutant mtDNA with a large deletion (delta-mtDNA) were shown to mix homogeneously throughout mitochondria, not to remain segregated by use of electron microscopic analysis of cytochrome c oxidase activities of individual mitochondria as a probe to identify mitochondria with predominantly wt- or delta- mtDNA in single cells. This rapid diffusion of mtDNA and the resultant homogeneous distribution of the heteroplasmic wt- and delta-mtDNA molecules throughout mitochondria in a cell suggest that the mitochondria in living human cells have lost their individuality. Thus, the actual number of mitochondria per cell is not of crucial importance, and mitochondria in a cell should be considered as a virtually single dynamic unit. PMID:8138574

  9. Detecting Abnormal Vehicular Dynamics at Intersections Based on an Unsupervised Learning Approach and a Stochastic Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Hernández, Hugo; González-Barbosa, Jose-Joel; Garcia-Ramírez, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    This investigation demonstrates an unsupervised approach for modeling traffic flow and detecting abnormal vehicle behaviors at intersections. In the first stage, the approach reveals and records the different states of the system. These states are the result of coding and grouping the historical motion of vehicles as long binary strings. In the second stage, using sequences of the recorded states, a stochastic graph model based on a Markovian approach is built. A behavior is labeled abnormal when current motion pattern cannot be recognized as any state of the system or a particular sequence of states cannot be parsed with the stochastic model. The approach is tested with several sequences of images acquired from a vehicular intersection where the traffic flow and duration used in connection with the traffic lights are continuously changed throughout the day. Finally, the low complexity and the flexibility of the approach make it reliable for use in real time systems. PMID:22163616

  10. Mitochondrial DNA variants help monitor the dynamics of Wolbachia invasion into host populations.

    PubMed

    Yeap, H L; Rašić, G; Endersby-Harshman, N M; Lee, S F; Arguni, E; Le Nguyen, H; Hoffmann, A A

    2016-03-01

    Wolbachia is the most widespread endosymbiotic bacterium of insects and other arthropods that can rapidly invade host populations. Deliberate releases of Wolbachia into natural populations of the dengue fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, are used as a novel biocontrol strategy for dengue suppression. Invasion of Wolbachia through the host population relies on factors such as high fidelity of the endosymbiont transmission and limited immigration of uninfected individuals, but these factors can be difficult to measure. One way of acquiring relevant information is to consider mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation alongside Wolbachia in field-caught mosquitoes. Here we used diagnostic mtDNA markers to differentiate infection-associated mtDNA haplotypes from those of the uninfected mosquitoes at release sites. Unique haplotypes associated with Wolbachia were found at locations outside Australia. We also performed mathematical and qualitative analyses including modelling the expected dynamics of the Wolbachia and mtDNA variants during and after a release. Our analyses identified key features in haplotype frequency patterns to infer the presence of imperfect maternal transmission of Wolbachia, presence of immigration and possibly incomplete cytoplasmic incompatibility. We demonstrate that ongoing screening of the mtDNA variants should provide information on maternal leakage and immigration, particularly in releases outside Australia. As we demonstrate in a case study, our models to track the Wolbachia dynamics can be successfully applied to temporal studies in natural populations or Wolbachia release programs, as long as there is co-occurring mtDNA variation that differentiates infected and uninfected populations.

  11. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  12. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy dynamics in a kindred harboring a novel pathogenic mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA glutamate gene

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes, C.T.; Hao, H.; Bonilla, E.; DiMauro, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a novel mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation in a 32-year-old male with a myopathy (without progressive external ophthalmoplegia) and mild pyramidal involvement. This A{yields}G transition at mtDNA position 14709 alters an evolutionary conserved nucleotide in a region coding for the anticodon loop of the mitcohondrial tRNA{sup Glu}. The 14709 mtDNA mutation was heteroplasmic but present at very high levels in the patient`s muscle (95%), white blood cells (81%) and hair follicles (90%). The same mutant mtDNA population was observed in white blood cells and hair follicles of all maternal relatives, but a lesser percentage (25-80%). The patient`s muscle showed many ragged-red fibers and a severe focal defect in cytochrome c oxidase activity, accompanied by the absence of cross-reacting material for mitochondrially synthesized polypeptides (ND 1 and COX II). The percentage of mutant mtDNA was not preferentially increased over two generations. Rather, the percentage of mutant mtDNA observed in siblings seemed to follow a normal distribution around the percentage observed in their mothers. Single hair PCR/RFLP analysis showed that the intercellular fluctuation in the percentage of mutant mtDNA differs among family members. Younger generations tend to have a more homogeneous distribution of mutant mtDNA in different hair follicles. The highest degree of variability between individual hair follicles was observed in the patient`s grandmother. These results suggest that the intercellular distribution of the mutant and wild-type mtDNA populations may drift towards homogeneity in subsequent generations.

  13. Mic60/Mitofilin determines MICOS assembly essential for mitochondrial dynamics and mtDNA nucleoid organization

    PubMed Central

    Li, H; Ruan, Y; Zhang, K; Jian, F; Hu, C; Miao, L; Gong, L; Sun, L; Zhang, X; Chen, S; Chen, H; Liu, D; Song, Z

    2016-01-01

    The MICOS complex (mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system) is essential for mitochondrial inner membrane organization and mitochondrial membrane contacts, however, the molecular regulation of MICOS assembly and the physiological functions of MICOS in mammals remain obscure. Here, we report that Mic60/Mitofilin has a critical role in the MICOS assembly, which determines the mitochondrial morphology and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) organization. The downregulation of Mic60/Mitofilin or Mic19/CHCHD3 results in instability of other MICOS components, disassembly of MICOS complex and disorganized mitochondrial cristae. We show that there exists direct interaction between Mic60/Mitofilin and Mic19/CHCHD3, which is crucial for their stabilization in mammals. Importantly, we identified that the mitochondrial i-AAA protease Yme1L regulates Mic60/Mitofilin homeostasis. Impaired MICOS assembly causes the formation of 'giant mitochondria' because of dysregulated mitochondrial fusion and fission. Also, mtDNA nucleoids are disorganized and clustered in these giant mitochondria in which mtDNA transcription is attenuated because of remarkable downregulation of some key mtDNA nucleoid-associated proteins. Together, these findings demonstrate that Mic60/Mitofilin homeostasis regulated by Yme1L is central to the MICOS assembly, which is required for maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and organization of mtDNA nucleoids. PMID:26250910

  14. Dynamics of Human Mitochondrial Complex I Assembly: Implications for Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Giachin, Gabriele; Bouverot, Romain; Acajjaoui, Samira; Pantalone, Serena; Soler-López, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are extremely energy demanding cells and highly dependent on the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system. Mitochondria generate the energetic potential via the respiratory complexes I to IV, which constitute the electron transport chain (ETC), together with complex V. These redox reactions release energy in the form of ATP and also generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are involved in cell signaling but can eventually lead to oxidative stress. Complex I (CI or NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the largest ETC enzyme, containing 44 subunits and the main contributor to ROS production. In recent years, the structure of the CI has become available and has provided new insights into CI assembly. A number of chaperones have been identified in the assembly and stability of the mature holo-CI, although they are not part of its final structure. Interestingly, CI dysfunction is the most common OXPHOS disorder in humans and defects in the CI assembly process are often observed. However, the dynamics of the events leading to CI biogenesis remain elusive, which precludes our understanding of how ETC malfunctioning affects neuronal integrity. Here, we review the current knowledge of the structural features of CI and its assembly factors and the potential role of CI misassembly in human disorders such as Complex I Deficiencies or Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. PMID:27597947

  15. A role for sequestosome 1/p62 in mitochondrial dynamics, import and genome integrity.

    PubMed

    Seibenhener, M Lamar; Du, Yifeng; Diaz-Meco, Maria-Theresa; Moscat, Jorge; Wooten, Michael C; Wooten, Marie W

    2013-03-01

    As a signaling scaffold, p62/sequestosome (p62/SQSTM1) plays important roles in cell signaling and degradation of misfolded proteins. While localization of p62 to mitochondria has been reported, a description of its function once there, remains unclear. Here, we report that p62 is localized to mitochondria in non-stressed situations and demonstrate that deficiency in p62 exacerbates defects in mitochondrial membrane potential and energetics leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. We report on the relationship between mitochondrial protein import and p62. In a p62 null background, mitochondrial import of the mitochondrial transcription factor TFAM is disrupted. When p62 is returned, mitochondrial function is restored to more normal levels. We identify for the first time that p62 localization plays a role in regulating mitochondrial morphology, genome integrity and mitochondrial import of a key transcription factor. We present evidence that these responses to the presence of p62 extend beyond the protein's immediate influence on membrane potential.

  16. Mitochondrial fission and fusion in secondary brain damage after CNS insults.

    PubMed

    Balog, Justin; Mehta, Suresh L; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria are dynamically active organelles, regulated through fission and fusion events to continuously redistribute them across axons, dendrites, and synapses of neurons to meet bioenergetics requirements and to control various functions, including cell proliferation, calcium buffering, neurotransmission, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. However, following acute or chronic injury to CNS, altered expression and function of proteins that mediate fission and fusion lead to mitochondrial dynamic imbalance. Particularly, if the fission is abnormally increased through pro-fission mediators such as Drp1, mitochondrial function will be impaired and mitochondria will become susceptible to insertion of proapototic proteins. This leads to the formation of mitochondrial transition pore, which eventually triggers apoptosis. Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction is a major promoter of neuronal death and secondary brain damage after an insult. This review discusses the implications of mitochondrial dynamic imbalance in neuronal death after acute and chronic CNS insults.

  17. 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Regulates Mitochondrial Oxygen Consumption and Dynamics in Human Skeletal Muscle Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Zachary C.; Craig, Theodore A.; Folmes, Clifford D.; Wang, Xuewei; Lanza, Ian R.; Schaible, Niccole S.; Salisbury, Jeffrey L.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran; Terzic, Andre; Sieck, Gary C.; Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness and myopathy are observed in vitamin D deficiency and chronic renal failure, where concentrations of the active vitamin D3 metabolite, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3), are low. To evaluate the mechanism of action of 1α,25(OH)2D3 in skeletal muscle, we examined mitochondrial oxygen consumption, dynamics, and biogenesis and changes in expression of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins in human skeletal muscle cells following treatment with 1α,25(OH)2D3. The mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR) increased in 1α,25(OH)2D3-treated cells. Vitamin D3 metabolites lacking a 1α-hydroxyl group (vitamin D3, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, and 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3) decreased or failed to increase OCR. 1α-Hydroxyvitamin D3 did not increase OCR. In 1α,25(OH)2D3-treated cells, mitochondrial volume and branching and expression of the pro-fusion protein OPA1 (optic atrophy 1) increased, whereas expression of the pro-fission proteins Fis1 (fission 1) and Drp1 (dynamin 1-like) decreased. Phosphorylated pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) (Ser-293) and PDH kinase 4 (PDK4) decreased in 1α,25(OH)2D3-treated cells. There was a trend to increased PDH activity in 1α,25(OH)2D3-treated cells (p = 0.09). 83 nuclear mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins were changed following 1α,25(OH)2D3 treatment; notably, PDK4 mRNA decreased, and PDP2 mRNA increased. MYC, MAPK13, and EPAS1 mRNAs, which encode proteins that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, were increased following 1α,25(OH)2D3 treatment. Vitamin D receptor-dependent changes in the expression of 1947 mRNAs encoding proteins involved in muscle contraction, focal adhesion, integrin, JAK/STAT, MAPK, growth factor, and p53 signaling pathways were observed following 1α,25(OH)2D3 treatment. Five micro-RNAs were induced or repressed by 1α,25(OH)2D3. 1α,25(OH)2D3 regulates mitochondrial function, dynamics, and enzyme function, which are likely to influence muscle strength. PMID:26601949

  18. Altered neuronal mitochondrial coenzyme A synthesis in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation caused by abnormal processing, stability, and catalytic activity of mutant pantothenate kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Kotzbauer, Paul T; Truax, Adam C; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2005-01-19

    Mutations in the pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) gene have been identified in patients with neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA; formerly Hallervorden-Spatz disease). However, the mechanisms by which these mutations cause neurodegeneration are unclear, especially given the existence of multiple pantothenate kinase genes in humans and multiple PanK2 transcripts with potentially different subcellular localizations. We demonstrate that PanK2 protein is localized to mitochondria of neurons in human brain, distinguishing it from other pantothenate kinases that do not possess mitochondrial-targeting sequences. PanK2 protein translated from the most 5' start site is sequentially cleaved at two sites by the mitochondrial processing peptidase, generating a long-lived 48 kDa mature protein identical to that found in human brain extracts. The mature protein catalyzes the initial step in coenzyme A (CoA) synthesis but displays feedback inhibition in response to species of acyl CoA rather than CoA itself. Some, but not all disease-associated point mutations result in significantly reduced catalytic activity. The most common mutation, G521R, results in marked instability of the intermediate PanK2 isoform and reduced production of the mature isoform. These results suggest that NBIA is caused by altered neuronal mitochondrial lipid metabolism caused by mutations disrupting PanK2 protein levels and catalytic activity.

  19. Protective Role of PGC-1α in Diabetic Nephropathy Is Associated with the Inhibition of ROS through Mitochondrial Dynamic Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Wu, Mian; Zhang, Lei; Yu, Haoyong; Zhang, Mingliang; Bao, Yuqian; He, John Cijiang; Chen, Haibing; Jia, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    The overproduction of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate the role of PGC-1α in the pathogenesis of DN. Rat glomerular mesangial cells (RMCs) were incubated in normal or high glucose medium with or without the PGC-1α-overexpressing plasmid (pcDNA3-PGC-1α) for 48 h. In the diabetic rats, decreased PGC-1α expression was associated with increased mitochondrial ROS generation in the renal cortex, increased proteinuria, glomerular hypertrophy, and higher glomerular 8-OHdG (a biomarker for oxidative stress). In vitro, hyperglycemia induced the downregulation of PGC-1α, which led to increased DRP1 expression, increased mitochondrial fragmentation and damaged network structure. This was associated with an increase in ROS generation and mesangial cell hypertrophy. These pathological changes were reversed in vitro by the transfection of pcDNA3-PGC-1α. These data suggest that PGC-1α may protect DN via the inhibition of DRP1-mediated mitochondrial dynamic remodeling and ROS production. These findings may assist the development of novel therapeutic strategies for patients with DN. PMID:25853493

  20. Inhibition of ERK-DLP1 signaling and mitochondrial division alleviates mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease cybrid cell

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Xueqi; Huang, Shengbin; Wu, Long; Wang, Yongfu; Hu, Gang; Li, Guangyue; Zhang, Hongju; Yu, Haiyang; Swerdlow, Russell Howard; Chen, John Xi; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is an early pathological feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The underlying mechanisms and strategies to repair it remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the direct consequences and potential mechanisms of mitochondrial functional defects associated with abnormal mitochondrial dynamics in AD. Using cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) neurons with incorporated platelet mitochondria from AD and age-matched non-AD human subjects into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted neuronal cells, we observed that AD cybrid cells had significant changes in morphology and function; such changes associate with altered expression and distribution of dynamin-like protein (DLP1) and mitofusin 2 (Mfn2). Treatment with antioxidant protects against AD mitochondria-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation and mitochondrial fission-fusion imbalances. Notably, inhibition of ERK activation not only attenuates aberrant mitochondrial morphology and function but also restores the mitochondrial fission and fusion balance. These effects suggest a role of oxidative stress-mediated ERK signal transduction in modulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion events. Further, blockade of the mitochondrial fission protein DLP1 by a genetic manipulation with a dominant negative DLP1 (DLP1K38A), its expression with siRNA-DLP1, or inhibition of mitochondrial division with mdivi-1 attenuates mitochondrial functional defects observed in AD cybrid cells. Our results provide new insights into mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from changes in the ERK-fission/fusion (DLP1) machinery and signaling pathway. The protective effect of mdivi-1 and inhibition of ERK signaling on maintenance of normal mitochondrial structure and function holds promise as a potential novel therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:24252614

  1. Inhibition of ERK-DLP1 signaling and mitochondrial division alleviates mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease cybrid cell.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xueqi; Huang, Shengbin; Wu, Long; Wang, Yongfu; Hu, Gang; Li, Guangyue; Zhang, Hongju; Yu, Haiyang; Swerdlow, Russell Howard; Chen, John Xi; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2014-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is an early pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The underlying mechanisms and strategies to repair it remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the direct consequences and potential mechanisms of mitochondrial functional defects associated with abnormal mitochondrial dynamics in AD. Using cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) neurons with incorporated platelet mitochondria from AD and age-matched non-AD human subjects into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted neuronal cells, we observed that AD cybrid cells had significant changes in morphology and function; such changes associate with altered expression and distribution of dynamin-like protein (DLP1) and mitofusin 2 (Mfn2). Treatment with antioxidant protects against AD mitochondria-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation and mitochondrial fission-fusion imbalances. Notably, inhibition of ERK activation not only attenuates aberrant mitochondrial morphology and function but also restores the mitochondrial fission and fusion balance. These effects suggest a role of oxidative stress-mediated ERK signal transduction in modulation of mitochondrial fission and fusion events. Further, blockade of the mitochondrial fission protein DLP1 by a genetic manipulation with a dominant negative DLP1 (DLP1(K38A)), its expression with siRNA-DLP1, or inhibition of mitochondrial division with mdivi-1 attenuates mitochondrial functional defects observed in AD cybrid cells. Our results provide new insights into mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from changes in the ERK-fission/fusion (DLP1) machinery and signaling pathway. The protective effect of mdivi-1 and inhibition of ERK signaling on maintenance of normal mitochondrial structure and function holds promise as a potential novel therapeutic strategy for AD.

  2. Abnormal dynamics of activation of object use information in apraxia: evidence from eyetracking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Iin; Mirman, Daniel; Buxbaum, Laurel J

    2014-07-01

    Action representations associated with object use may be incidentally activated during visual object processing, and the time course of such activations may be influenced by lexical-semantic context (e.g., Lee, Middleton, Mirman, Kalénine, & Buxbaum (2012). Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 39(1), 257-270). In this study we used the "visual world" eye-tracking paradigm to examine whether a deficit in producing skilled object-use actions (apraxia) is associated with abnormalities in incidental activation of action information, and assessed the neuroanatomical substrates of any such deficits. Twenty left hemisphere stroke patients, ten of whom were apraxic, performed a task requiring identification of a named object in a visual display containing manipulation-related and unrelated distractor objects. Manipulation relationships among objects were not relevant to the identification task. Objects were cued with neutral ("S/he saw the…."), or action-relevant ("S/he used the….") sentences. Non-apraxic participants looked at use-related non-target objects significantly more than at unrelated non-target objects when cued both by neutral and action-relevant sentences, indicating that action information is incidentally activated. In contrast, apraxic participants showed delayed activation of manipulation-based action information during object identification when cued by neutral sentences. The magnitude of delayed activation in the neutral sentence condition was reliably predicted by lower scores on a test of gesture production to viewed objects, as well as by lesion loci in the inferior parietal and posterior temporal lobes. However, when cued by a sentence containing an action verb, apraxic participants showed fixation patterns that were statistically indistinguishable from non-apraxic controls. In support of grounded theories of cognition, these results suggest that apraxia and temporal-parietal lesions may be associated with

  3. Abnormal dynamics of activation of object use information in apraxia: evidence from eyetracking

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-lin; Mirman, Daniel; Buxbaum, Laurel J.

    2014-01-01

    Action representations associated with object use may be incidentally activated during visual object processing, and the time course of such activations may be influenced by lexical-semantic context (e.g., Lee, Middleton, Mirman, Kalénine, & Buxbaum, 2012). In this study we used the “visual world” eye-tracking paradigm to examine whether a deficit in producing skilled object-use actions (apraxia) is associated with abnormalities in incidental activation of action information, and assessed the neuroanatomical substrates of any such deficits. Twenty left hemisphere stroke patients, ten of whom were apraxic, performed a task requiring identification of a named object in a visual display containing manipulation-related and unrelated distractor objects. Manipulation relationships among objects were not relevant to the identification task. Objects were cued with neutral (“S/he saw the….”), or action-relevant (“S/he used the….”) sentences. Non-apraxic participants looked at use-related non-target objects significantly more than at unrelated non-target objects when cued both by neutral and action-relevant sentences, indicating that action information is incidentally activated. In contrast, apraxic participants showed delayed activation of manipulation-based action information during object identification when cued by neutral sentences. The magnitude of delayed activation in the neutral sentence condition was reliably predicted by lower scores on a test of gesture production to viewed objects, as well as by lesion loci in the inferior parietal and posterior temporal lobes. However, when cued by a sentence containing an action verb, apraxic participants showed fixation patterns that were statistically indistinguishable from non-apraxic controls. In support of grounded theories of cognition, these results suggest that apraxia and temporal-parietal lesions may be associated with abnormalities in incidental activation of action information from objects. Further

  4. Melatonin attenuates methamphetamine-induced disturbances in mitochondrial dynamics and degeneration in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Parameyong, Arisa; Charngkaew, Komgrid; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Chetsawang, Banthit

    2013-10-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a psychostimulant drug that can cause toxicity and degeneration in the brain. The toxicity due to METH involves multiple pathways, including the mitochondrial-dependent death pathway. Several pieces of evidence have emphasized that the fragmentation of mitochondria into smaller structures plays some role in the cell-death process. In this study, we investigated the role of mitochondrial dynamics in METH-induced toxicity in human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cultured cell lines. In addition, the protective effect of melatonin against METH-induced toxicity was investigated. Our results show that METH significantly decreased cell viability and increased the levels of the mitochondrial fission protein, Fis1 and the Drp1 oligomer. However, the levels of the mitochondrial fusion proteins OPA1 and Mfn1 did not change in METH-treated cells. Melatonin can reverse the toxic effects of the METH-induced reduction in cell viability and the production of the Fis1 protein and the Drp1 oligomer. Moreover, the morphological alteration of mitochondria was investigated in METH-treated cells in the presence of melatonin using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). At 24 hr after METH exposure, typical cell shrinkage was observed in SH-SY5Y cells. Mitochondria were fragmented into small globular structures in a large proportion of METH-treated cells, but tubular networks of mitochondria were present in large proportions of control-untreated cells and METH-treated cells in the presence of melatonin. The results of the present study demonstrate the potential of melatonin to reduce cell death and restore mitochondrial function in neurons affected by METH-induced toxicity.

  5. Mouse Tmem135 mutation reveals a mechanism involving mitochondrial dynamics that leads to age-dependent retinal pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Hua; Higuchi, Hitoshi; Ikeda, Sakae; Macke, Erica L; Takimoto, Tetsuya; Pattnaik, Bikash R; Liu, Che; Chu, Li-Fang; Siepka, Sandra M; Krentz, Kathleen J; Rubinstein, C Dustin; Kalejta, Robert F; Thomson, James A; Mullins, Robert F; Takahashi, Joseph S; Pinto, Lawrence H; Ikeda, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    While the aging process is central to the pathogenesis of age-dependent diseases, it is poorly understood at the molecular level. We identified a mouse mutant with accelerated aging in the retina as well as pathologies observed in age-dependent retinal diseases, suggesting that the responsible gene regulates retinal aging, and its impairment results in age-dependent disease. We determined that a mutation in the transmembrane 135 (Tmem135) is responsible for these phenotypes. We observed localization of TMEM135 on mitochondria, and imbalance of mitochondrial fission and fusion in mutant Tmem135 as well as Tmem135 overexpressing cells, indicating that TMEM135 is involved in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics. Additionally, mutant retina showed higher sensitivity to oxidative stress. These results suggest that the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics through TMEM135 is critical for protection from environmental stress and controlling the progression of retinal aging. Our study identified TMEM135 as a critical link between aging and age-dependent diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19264.001 PMID:27863209

  6. Inhibiting Na+/K+ ATPase Can Impair Mitochondrial Energetics and Induce Abnormal Ca2+ Cycling and Automaticity in Guinea Pig Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qince; Pogwizd, Steven M.; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Zhou, Lufang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides have been used for the treatment of heart failure because of their capabilities of inhibiting Na+/K+ ATPase (NKA), which raises [Na+]i and attenuates Ca2+ extrusion via the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX), causing [Ca2+]i elevation. The resulting [Ca2+]i accumulation further enhances Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release, generating the positive inotropic effect. However, cardiac glycosides have some toxic and side effects such as arrhythmogenesis, confining their extensive clinical applications. The mechanisms underlying the proarrhythmic effect of glycosides are not fully understood. Here we investigated the mechanisms by which glycosides could cause cardiac arrhythmias via impairing mitochondrial energetics using an integrative computational cardiomyocyte model. In the simulations, the effect of glycosides was mimicked by blocking NKA activity. Results showed that inhibiting NKA not only impaired mitochondrial Ca2+ retention (thus suppressed reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging) but also enhanced oxidative phosphorylation (thus increased ROS production) during the transition of increasing workload, causing oxidative stress. Moreover, concurrent blocking of mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, but not enhancing of Ca2+ uniporter, alleviated the adverse effects of NKA inhibition. Intriguingly, NKA inhibition elicited Ca2+ transient and action potential alternans under more stressed conditions such as severe ATP depletion, augmenting its proarrhythmic effect. This computational study provides new insights into the mechanisms underlying cardiac glycoside-induced arrhythmogenesis. The findings suggest that targeting both ion handling and mitochondria could be a very promising strategy to develop new glycoside-based therapies in the treatment of heart failure. PMID:24722410

  7. Bcl-xL-mediated antioxidant function abrogates the disruption of mitochondrial dynamics induced by LRRK2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Saez-Atienzar, Sara; Bonet-Ponce, Luis; da Casa, Carmen; Perez-Dolz, Laura; Blesa, Jose R; Nava, Eduardo; Galindo, Maria F; Jordan, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    We have used the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y overexpressing Bcl-xL (SH-SY5Y/Bcl-xL) to clarify the effects of this mitochondrial protein on the control of mitochondrial dynamics and the autophagic processes which occur after the inhibition of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) with GSK2578215A. In wild type (SH-SY5Y/Neo) cells, GSK2578215A (1nM) caused a disruption of mitochondrial morphology and an imbalance in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) as indicated by an increase in dichlorofluorescein fluorescence and 4-hydroxynonenal. However, SH-SY5Y/Bcl-xL cells under GSK2578215A treatment, unlike the wild type, preserved a high mitochondrial membrane potential and did not exhibit apoptotical chromatins. In contrast to wild type cells, in SH-SY5Y/Bcl-xL cells, GSK2578215A did not induce mitochondrial translocation of neither dynamin related protein-1 nor the proapoptotic protein, Bax. In SH-SY5Y/Neo, but not SH-SY5Y/Bcl-xL cells, mitochondrial fragmentation elicited by GSK2578215A precedes an autophagic response. Furthermore, the overexpression of Bcl-xL protein restores the autophagic flux pathway disrupted by this inhibitor. SH-SY5Y/Neo, but not SH-SY5Y/Bcl-xL cells, responded to LRRK2 inhibition by an increase in the levels of acetylated tubulin, indicating that this was abrogated by Bcl-xL overexpression. This hyperacetylation of tubulin took place earlier than any of the above-mentioned events suggesting that it is involved in the autophagic flux interruption. Pre-treatment with tempol prevented the GSK2578215A-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, autophagy and the rise in acetylated tubulin in SH-SY5Y/Neo cells. Thus, these data support the notion that ROS act as a second messenger connexion between LRRK2 inhibition and these deleterious responses, which are markedly alleviated by the Bcl-xL-mediated ROS generation blockade.

  8. A MYC-Driven Change in Mitochondrial Dynamics Limits YAP/TAZ Function in Mammary Epithelial Cells and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    von Eyss, Björn; Jaenicke, Laura A; Kortlever, Roderik M; Royla, Nadine; Wiese, Katrin E; Letschert, Sebastian; McDuffus, Leigh-Anne; Sauer, Markus; Rosenwald, Andreas; Evan, Gerard I; Kempa, Stefan; Eilers, Martin

    2015-12-14

    In several developmental lineages, an increase in MYC expression drives the transition from quiescent stem cells to transit-amplifying cells. We show that MYC activates a stereotypic transcriptional program of genes involved in cell growth in mammary epithelial cells. This change in gene expression indirectly inhibits the YAP/TAZ co-activators, which maintain the clonogenic potential of these cells. We identify a phospholipase of the mitochondrial outer membrane, PLD6, as the mediator of MYC activity. MYC-dependent growth strains cellular energy resources and stimulates AMP-activated kinase (AMPK). PLD6 alters mitochondrial fusion and fission dynamics downstream of MYC. This change activates AMPK, which in turn inhibits YAP/TAZ. Mouse models and human pathological data show that MYC enhances AMPK and suppresses YAP/TAZ activity in mammary tumors.

  9. A new 4D trajectory-based approach unveils abnormal LV revolution dynamics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Madeo, Andrea; Piras, Paolo; Re, Federica; Gabriele, Stefano; Nardinocchi, Paola; Teresi, Luciano; Torromeo, Concetta; Chialastri, Claudia; Schiariti, Michele; Giura, Geltrude; Evangelista, Antonietta; Dominici, Tania; Varano, Valerio; Zachara, Elisabetta; Puddu, Paolo Emilio

    2015-01-01

    ventricle deformation in patients affected by hypertrophic cardiomyopathy compared to healthy subjects may be assessed by modern shape analysis better than by traditional 3D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography global parameters. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy pathophysiology was unveiled in a new manner whereby also diastolic phase abnormalities are evident which is more difficult to investigate by traditional ecocardiographic techniques.

  10. Mitochondrial inheritance in a mitochondrially mediated disease.

    PubMed

    Egger, J; Wilson, J

    1983-07-21

    Mendelian inheritance involves the transmission to successive generations of DNA contained in genes in the nucleus, but DNA is also contained in mitochondria, where it is believed to be responsible for the encoding of certain mitochondrial enzymes. Since nearly all mitochondrial DNA is maternally transmitted, one might expect a nonmendelian pattern of inheritance in mitochondrial cytopathy, a syndrome in which there are abnormalities in mitochondrial structure and deficiencies in a variety of mitochondrial enzymes. We studied the pedigrees of 6 affected families whose members we had examined personally and of 24 families described in the literature. In 27 families, exclusively maternal transmission occurred; in 3 there was also paternal transmission in one generation. Altogether, 51 mothers but only 3 fathers had transmitted the condition. These results are consistent with mitochondrial transmission of mitochondrial cytopathy; the inheritance and enzyme defects of mitochondrial cytopathy can be considered in the light of recent evidence that subunits of respiratory-enzyme complexes are encoded solely by mitochondrial DNA. The occasional paternal transmission may be explained if certain enzyme subunits that are encoded by nuclear DNA are affected.

  11. Mitochondrial Sirtuin Network Reveals Dynamic SIRT3-Dependent Deacetylation in Response to Membrane Depolarization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Nagasawa, Koji; Münch, Christian; Xu, Yingjie; Satterstrom, Kyle; Jeong, Seungmin; Hayes, Sebastian D; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Vyas, F Sejal; Zaganjor, Elma; Guarani, Virginia; Ringel, Alison E; Gygi, Steven P; Harper, J Wade; Haigis, Marcia C

    2016-11-03

    Mitochondrial sirtuins, SIRT3-5, are NAD(+)-dependent deacylases and ADP-ribosyltransferases that are critical for stress responses. However, a comprehensive understanding of sirtuin targets, regulation of sirtuin activity, and the relationships between sirtuins remains a key challenge in mitochondrial physiology. Here, we employ systematic interaction proteomics to elucidate the mitochondrial sirtuin protein interaction landscape. This work reveals sirtuin interactions with numerous functional modules within mitochondria, identifies candidate sirtuin substrates, and uncovers a fundamental role for sequestration of SIRT3 by ATP synthase in mitochondrial homeostasis. In healthy mitochondria, a pool of SIRT3 binds ATP synthase, but upon matrix pH reduction with concomitant loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, SIRT3 dissociates. This release correlates with rapid deacetylation of matrix proteins, and SIRT3 is required for recovery of membrane potential. In vitro reconstitution experiments, as well as analysis of CRISPR/Cas9-engineered cells, indicate that pH-dependent SIRT3 release requires H135 in the ATP5O subunit of ATP synthase. Our SIRT3-5 interaction network provides a framework for discovering novel biological functions regulated by mitochondrial sirtuins.

  12. Mitochondrial fusion dynamics is robust in the heart and depends on calcium oscillations and contractile activity.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Verónica; Cupo, Ryan R; Gao, Erhe; Csordás, György; Slovinsky, William S; Paillard, Melanie; Cheng, Lan; Ibetti, Jessica; Chen, S R Wayne; Chuprun, J Kurt; Hoek, Jan B; Koch, Walter J; Hajnóczky, György

    2017-01-31

    Mitochondrial fusion is thought to be important for supporting cardiac contractility, but is hardly detectable in cultured cardiomyocytes and is difficult to directly evaluate in the heart. We overcame this obstacle through in vivo adenoviral transduction with matrix-targeted photoactivatable GFP and confocal microscopy. Imaging in whole rat hearts indicated mitochondrial network formation and fusion activity in ventricular cardiomyocytes. Promptly after isolation, cardiomyocytes showed extensive mitochondrial connectivity and fusion, which decayed in culture (at 24-48 h). Fusion manifested both as rapid content mixing events between adjacent organelles and slower events between both neighboring and distant mitochondria. Loss of fusion in culture likely results from the decline in calcium oscillations/contractile activity and mitofusin 1 (Mfn1), because (i) verapamil suppressed both contraction and mitochondrial fusion, (ii) after spontaneous contraction or short-term field stimulation fusion activity increased in cardiomyocytes, and (iii) ryanodine receptor-2-mediated calcium oscillations increased fusion activity in HEK293 cells and complementing changes occurred in Mfn1. Weakened cardiac contractility in vivo in alcoholic animals is also associated with depressed mitochondrial fusion. Thus, attenuated mitochondrial fusion might contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy.

  13. Impaired Mitochondrial Dynamics and Mitophagy in Neuronal Models of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; Saffari, Afshin; Wahlster, Lara; Di Nardo, Alessia; Turner, Daria; Lewis, Tommy L; Conrad, Christopher; Rothberg, Jonathan M; Lipton, Jonathan O; Kölker, Stefan; Hoffmann, Georg F; Han, Min-Joon; Polleux, Franck; Sahin, Mustafa

    2016-10-18

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a neurodevelopmental disease caused by TSC1 or TSC2 mutations and subsequent activation of the mTORC1 kinase. Upon mTORC1 activation, anabolic metabolism, which requires mitochondria, is induced, yet at the same time the principal pathway for mitochondrial turnover, autophagy, is compromised. How mTORC1 activation impacts mitochondrial turnover in neurons remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate impaired mitochondrial homeostasis in neuronal in vitro and in vivo models of TSC. We find that Tsc1/2-deficient neurons accumulate mitochondria in cell bodies, but are depleted of axonal mitochondria, including those supporting presynaptic sites. Axonal and global mitophagy of damaged mitochondria is impaired, suggesting that decreased turnover may act upstream of impaired mitochondrial metabolism. Importantly, blocking mTORC1 or inducing mTOR-independent autophagy restores mitochondrial homeostasis. Our study clarifies the complex relationship between the TSC-mTORC1 pathway, autophagy, and mitophagy, and defines mitochondrial homeostasis as a therapeutic target for TSC and related diseases.

  14. The Maize Ncs2 Abnormal Growth Mutant Has a Chimeric Nad4-Nad7 Mitochondrial Gene and Is Associated with Reduced Complex I Function

    PubMed Central

    Marienfeld, J. R.; Newton, K. J.

    1994-01-01

    The molecular basis of the maternally inherited, heteroplasmic NCS2 mutant of maize was investigated. Analysis of the NCS2 mtDNA showed that it closely resembles the progenitor cmsT mitochondrial genome, except that the mutant genome contains a fused nad4-nad7 gene and is deleted for the small fourth exon of nad4. The rearrangement has occurred at a 16-bp repeat present in the third intron of the nad4 gene and in the second intron of the nad7 gene. Transcripts containing exon 4 of the nad4 gene are greatly reduced in mtRNA preparations from heteroplasmic NCS2 plants; larger transcripts are associated with the first three nad4 exons. Identical 5' ends of the nad4 transcripts have been mapped 396 and 247 bp upstream of the start codon in mtRNAs from both NCS2 and related non-NCS plants. The putative transcription termination signal of nad4 is deleted in mutant DNA, resulting in the production of the unique longer transcripts. The complex transcript pattern associated with nad7 is also altered in the mutant. Both nad4 and nad7 encode subunits of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) of the mitochondrial electron transfer chain. Oxygen uptake experiments show that the functioning of complex I is specifically reduced in mitochondria isolated from NCS2 mutant plants. PMID:7851780

  15. Evolution Along the Mutation Gradient in the Dynamic Mitochondrial Genome of Salamanders

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Rebecca A.; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are intracellular organelles where oxidative phosphorylation is carried out to complete ATP synthesis. Mitochondria have their own genome; in metazoans, this is a small, circular molecule encoding 13 electron transport proteins, 22 tRNAs, and 2 rRNAs. In invertebrates, mitochondrial gene rearrangement is common, and it is correlated with increased substitution rates. In vertebrates, mitochondrial gene rearrangement is rare, and its relationship to substitution rate remains unexplored. Mitochondrial genes can also show spatial variation in substitution rates around the genome due to the mechanism of mtDNA replication, which produces a mutation gradient. To date, however, the strength of the mutation gradient and whether movement along the gradient in rearranged (or otherwise modified) genomes impacts genic substitution rates remain unexplored in the majority of vertebrates. Salamanders include both normal mitochondrial genomes and independently derived rearrangements and expansions, providing a rare opportunity to test the effects of large-scale changes to genome architecture on vertebrate mitochondrial gene sequence evolution. We show that: 1) rearranged/expanded genomes have higher substitution rates; 2) most genes in rearranged/expanded genomes maintain their position along the mutation gradient, substitution rates of the genes that do move are unaffected by their new position, and the gradient in salamanders is weak; and 3) genomic rearrangements/expansions occur independent of levels of selective constraint on genes. Together, our results demonstrate that large-scale changes to genome architecture impact mitochondrial gene evolution in predictable ways; however, despite these impacts, the same functional constraints act on mitochondrial protein-coding genes in both modified and normal genomes. PMID:23918809

  16. Evolution along the mutation gradient in the dynamic mitochondrial genome of salamanders.

    PubMed

    Chong, Rebecca A; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are intracellular organelles where oxidative phosphorylation is carried out to complete ATP synthesis. Mitochondria have their own genome; in metazoans, this is a small, circular molecule encoding 13 electron transport proteins, 22 tRNAs, and 2 rRNAs. In invertebrates, mitochondrial gene rearrangement is common, and it is correlated with increased substitution rates. In vertebrates, mitochondrial gene rearrangement is rare, and its relationship to substitution rate remains unexplored. Mitochondrial genes can also show spatial variation in substitution rates around the genome due to the mechanism of mtDNA replication, which produces a mutation gradient. To date, however, the strength of the mutation gradient and whether movement along the gradient in rearranged (or otherwise modified) genomes impacts genic substitution rates remain unexplored in the majority of vertebrates. Salamanders include both normal mitochondrial genomes and independently derived rearrangements and expansions, providing a rare opportunity to test the effects of large-scale changes to genome architecture on vertebrate mitochondrial gene sequence evolution. We show that: 1) rearranged/expanded genomes have higher substitution rates; 2) most genes in rearranged/expanded genomes maintain their position along the mutation gradient, substitution rates of the genes that do move are unaffected by their new position, and the gradient in salamanders is weak; and 3) genomic rearrangements/expansions occur independent of levels of selective constraint on genes. Together, our results demonstrate that large-scale changes to genome architecture impact mitochondrial gene evolution in predictable ways; however, despite these impacts, the same functional constraints act on mitochondrial protein-coding genes in both modified and normal genomes.

  17. Mitochondrial morphology is altered in atrophied skeletal muscle of aged mice.

    PubMed

    Leduc-Gaudet, Jean-Philippe; Picard, Martin; St-Jean Pelletier, Félix; Sgarioto, Nicolas; Auger, Marie-Joëlle; Vallée, Joanne; Robitaille, Richard; St-Pierre, David H; Gouspillou, Gilles

    2015-07-20

    Skeletal muscle aging is associated with a progressive decline in muscle mass and strength, a process termed sarcopenia. Evidence suggests that accumulation of mitochondrial dysfunction plays a causal role in sarcopenia, which could be triggered by impaired mitophagy. Mitochondrial function, mitophagy and mitochondrial morphology are interconnected aspects of mitochondrial biology, and may coordinately be altered with aging. However, mitochondrial morphology has remained challenging to characterize in muscle, and whether sarcopenia is associated with abnormal mitochondrial morphology remains unknown. Therefore, we assessed the morphology of SubSarcolemmal (SS) and InterMyoFibrillar (IMF) mitochondria in skeletal muscle of young (8-12wk-old) and old (88-96wk-old) mice using a quantitative 2-dimensional transmission electron microscopy approach. We show that sarcopenia is associated with larger and less circular SS mitochondria. Likewise, aged IMF mitochondria were longer and more branched, suggesting increased fusion and/or decreased fission. Accordingly, although no difference in the content of proteins regulating mitochondrial dynamics (Mfn1, Mfn2, Opa1 and Drp1) was observed, a mitochondrial fusion index (Mfn2-to-Drp1 ratio) was significantly increased in aged muscles. Our results reveal that sarcopenia is associated with complex changes in mitochondrial morphology that could interfere with mitochondrial function and mitophagy, and thus contribute to aging-related accumulation of mitochondrial dysfunction and sarcopenia.

  18. Structural, energetic, and dynamic insights into the abnormal xylene separation behavior of hierarchical porous crystal.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiao-Min; He, Chun-Ting; Liao, Pei-Qin; Lin, Rui-Biao; Zhang, Jie-Peng

    2015-06-26

    Separation of highly similar molecules and understanding the underlying mechanism are of paramount theoretical and practical importance, but visualization of the host-guest structure, energy, or dynamism is very difficult and many details have been overlooked. Here, we report a new porous coordination polymer featuring hierarchical porosity and delicate flexibility, in which the three structural isomers of xylene (also similar disubstituted benzene derivatives) can be efficiently separated with an elution sequence inversed with those for conventional mechanisms. More importantly, the separation mechanism is comprehensively and quantitatively visualized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography coupled with multiple computational simulation methods, in which the small apertures not only fit best the smallest para-isomer like molecular sieves, but also show seemingly trivial yet crucial structural alterations to distinguish the meta- and ortho-isomers via a gating mechanism, while the large channels allow fast guest diffusion and enable the structural/energetic effects to be accumulated in the macroscopic level.

  19. Mcl-1 involvement in mitochondrial dynamics is associated with apoptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Morciano, Giampaolo; Giorgi, Carlotta; Balestra, Dario; Marchi, Saverio; Perrone, Daniela; Pinotti, Mirko; Pinton, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family proteins are critical regulators of apoptosis and consist of both proapoptotic and antiapoptotic factors. Within this family, the myeloid cell leukemia factor 1 (Mcl-1) protein exists in two forms as the result of alternative splicing. The long variant (Mcl-1L) acts as an antiapoptotic factor, whereas the short isoform (Mcl-1S) displays proapoptotic activity. In this study, using splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs), we increased the synthesis of Mcl-1S, which induced a concurrent reduction of Mcl-1L, resulting in increased sensitivity of cancer cells to apoptotic stimuli. The Mcl-1 ASOs also induced mitochondrial hyperpolarization and a consequent increase in mitochondrial calcium (Ca2+) accumulation. The high Mcl-1S/L ratio correlated with significant hyperfusion of the entire mitochondrial network, which occurred in a dynamin-related protein (Drp1)–dependent manner. Our data indicate that the balance between the long and short variants of the Mcl-1 gene represents a key aspect of the regulation of mitochondrial physiology. We propose that the Mcl-1L/S balance is a novel regulatory factor controlling the mitochondrial fusion and fission machinery. PMID:26538029

  20. Metabolic dysfunction and altered mitochondrial dynamics in the utrophin-dystrophin deficient mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pant, Meghna; Sopariwala, Danesh H; Bal, Naresh C; Lowe, Jeovanna; Delfín, Dawn A; Rafael-Fortney, Jill; Periasamy, Muthu

    2015-01-01

    The utrophin-dystrophin deficient (DKO) mouse model has been widely used to understand the progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). However, it is unclear as to what extent muscle pathology affects metabolism. Therefore, the present study was focused on understanding energy expenditure in the whole animal and in isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and to determine changes in metabolic enzymes. Our results show that the 8 week-old DKO mice consume higher oxygen relative to activity levels. Interestingly the EDL muscle from DKO mouse consumes higher oxygen per unit integral force, generates less force and performs better in the presence of pyruvate thus mimicking a slow twitch muscle. We also found that the expression of hexokinase 1 and pyruvate kinase M2 was upregulated several fold suggesting increased glycolytic flux. Additionally, there is a dramatic increase in dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp 1) and mitofusin 2 protein levels suggesting increased mitochondrial fission and fusion, a feature associated with increased energy demand and altered mitochondrial dynamics. Collectively our studies point out that the dystrophic disease has caused significant changes in muscle metabolism. To meet the increased energetic demand, upregulation of metabolic enzymes and regulators of mitochondrial fusion and fission is observed in the dystrophic muscle. A better understanding of the metabolic demands and the accompanied alterations in the dystrophic muscle can help us design improved intervention therapies along with existing drug treatments for the DMD patients.

  1. Structural, energetic, and dynamic insights into the abnormal xylene separation behavior of hierarchical porous crystal

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiao-Min; He, Chun-Ting; Liao, Pei-Qin; Lin, Rui-Biao; Zhang, Jie-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Separation of highly similar molecules and understanding the underlying mechanism are of paramount theoretical and practical importance, but visualization of the host-guest structure, energy, or dynamism is very difficult and many details have been overlooked. Here, we report a new porous coordination polymer featuring hierarchical porosity and delicate flexibility, in which the three structural isomers of xylene (also similar disubstituted benzene derivatives) can be efficiently separated with an elution sequence inversed with those for conventional mechanisms. More importantly, the separation mechanism is comprehensively and quantitatively visualized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography coupled with multiple computational simulation methods, in which the small apertures not only fit best the smallest para-isomer like molecular sieves, but also show seemingly trivial yet crucial structural alterations to distinguish the meta- and ortho-isomers via a gating mechanism, while the large channels allow fast guest diffusion and enable the structural/energetic effects to be accumulated in the macroscopic level. PMID:26113287

  2. Abnormal Brain Dynamics Underlie Speech Production in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Pang, Elizabeth W; Valica, Tatiana; MacDonald, Matt J; Taylor, Margot J; Brian, Jessica; Lerch, Jason P; Anagnostou, Evdokia

    2016-02-01

    A large proportion of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have speech and/or language difficulties. While a number of structural and functional neuroimaging methods have been used to explore the brain differences in ASD with regards to speech and language comprehension and production, the neurobiology of basic speech function in ASD has not been examined. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a neuroimaging modality with high spatial and temporal resolution that can be applied to the examination of brain dynamics underlying speech as it can capture the fast responses fundamental to this function. We acquired MEG from 21 children with high-functioning autism (mean age: 11.43 years) and 21 age- and sex-matched controls as they performed a simple oromotor task, a phoneme production task and a phonemic sequencing task. Results showed significant differences in activation magnitude and peak latencies in primary motor cortex (Brodmann Area 4), motor planning areas (BA 6), temporal sequencing and sensorimotor integration areas (BA 22/13) and executive control areas (BA 9). Our findings of significant functional brain differences between these two groups on these simple oromotor and phonemic tasks suggest that these deficits may be foundational and could underlie the language deficits seen in ASD.

  3. Abnormal Brain Dynamics Underlie Speech Production in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Valica, Tatiana; MacDonald, Matt J.; Taylor, Margot J.; Brian, Jessica; Lerch, Jason P.; Anagnostou, Evdokia

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have speech and/or language difficulties. While a number of structural and functional neuroimaging methods have been used to explore the brain differences in ASD with regards to speech and language comprehension and production, the neurobiology of basic speech function in ASD has not been examined. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a neuroimaging modality with high spatial and temporal resolution that can be applied to the examination of brain dynamics underlying speech as it can capture the fast responses fundamental to this function. We acquired MEG from 21 children with high‐functioning autism (mean age: 11.43 years) and 21 age‐ and sex‐matched controls as they performed a simple oromotor task, a phoneme production task and a phonemic sequencing task. Results showed significant differences in activation magnitude and peak latencies in primary motor cortex (Brodmann Area 4), motor planning areas (BA 6), temporal sequencing and sensorimotor integration areas (BA 22/13) and executive control areas (BA 9). Our findings of significant functional brain differences between these two groups on these simple oromotor and phonemic tasks suggest that these deficits may be foundational and could underlie the language deficits seen in ASD. Autism Res 2016, 9: 249–261. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26363154

  4. The ageing neuromuscular system and sarcopenia: a mitochondrial perspective

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Martin; Turnbull, Doug M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Skeletal muscles undergo structural and functional decline with ageing, culminating in sarcopenia. The underlying neuromuscular mechanisms have been the subject of intense investigation, revealing mitochondrial abnormalities as potential culprits within both nerve and muscle cells. Implicated mechanisms involve impaired mitochondrial dynamics, reduced organelle biogenesis and quality control via mitophagy, accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and respiratory chain defect, metabolic disturbance, pro‐apoptotic signalling, and oxidative stress. This article provides an overview of the cellular mechanisms whereby mitochondria may promote maladaptive changes within motor neurons, the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and muscle fibres. Lifelong physical activity, which promotes mitochondrial health across tissues, is emerging as an effective countermeasure for sarcopenia. PMID:26921061

  5. Effects of Astragalus Polysaccharides on Dysfunction of Mitochondrial Dynamics Induced by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan-Feng; Lu, Lu; Zhu, Da-Jian; Wang, Ming; Yin, Yi; Chen, De-Xiu; Wei, Lian-Bo

    2016-01-01

    This paper studied the chronic fatigue induced by excessive exercise and the restoration effects of Astragalus polysaccharides (APS) on mitochondria. In vivo, we found that excessive exercise could cause oxidative stress statue which led to morphological and functional changes of mitochondria. The changes, including imbalance between mitochondria fusion-fission processes, activation of mitophagy, and decrease of PGC-1α expression, could be restored by APS. We further confirmed in vitro, and what is more, we found that APS may ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction through Sirt1 pathway. Based on the results, we may figure out part of the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial amelioration by APS. PMID:26881048

  6. Sulforaphane induces differential modulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics in normal cells and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Negrette-Guzmán, Mario; Huerta-Yepez, Sara; Vega, Mario I; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Rodríguez, Esteban; Tapia, Edilia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2017-02-01

    Antioxidant-based chemotherapy has been intensely debated. Herein, we show that sulforaphane (SFN) induced mitochondrial biogenesis followed by mitochondrial fusion in a kidney cell line commonly used in nephroprotective models. At the same concentration and exposure time, SFN induced cell death in prostate cancer cells accompanied by mitochondrial biogenesis and fragmentation. Stabilization of the nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) could be associated with these effects in the tumor cell line. An increase in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator-1α (PGC1α) level and a decrease in the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α) level would suggest a possible metabolic shift. The knockdown in the nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF1) attenuated the SFN-induced effect on prostate cancer cells demonstrating that mitochondrial biogenesis plays an important role in cell death for this kind of tumor cells. This evidence supports SFN as a potential antineoplastic agent that could inhibit tumor development and could protect normal tissues by modulating common processes.

  7. Dynamics of mitochondrial inheritance in the evolution of binary mating types and two sexes.

    PubMed

    Hadjivasiliou, Zena; Lane, Nick; Seymour, Robert M; Pomiankowski, Andrew

    2013-10-22

    The uniparental inheritance (UPI) of mitochondria is thought to explain the evolution of two mating types or even true sexes with anisogametes. However, the exact role of UPI is not clearly understood. Here, we develop a new model, which considers the spread of UPI mutants within a biparental inheritance (BPI) population. Our model explicitly considers mitochondrial mutation and selection in parallel with the spread of UPI mutants and self-incompatible mating types. In line with earlier work, we find that UPI improves fitness under mitochondrial mutation accumulation, selfish conflict and mitonuclear coadaptation. However, we find that as UPI increases in the population its relative fitness advantage diminishes in a frequency-dependent manner. The fitness benefits of UPI 'leak' into the biparentally reproducing part of the population through successive matings, limiting the spread of UPI. Critically, while this process favours some degree of UPI, it neither leads to the establishment of linked mating types nor the collapse of multiple mating types to two. Only when two mating types exist beforehand can associated UPI mutants spread to fixation under the pressure of high mitochondrial mutation rate, large mitochondrial population size and selfish mutants. Variation in these parameters could account for the range of UPI actually observed in nature, from strict UPI in some Chlamydomonas species to BPI in yeast. We conclude that UPI of mitochondria alone is unlikely to have driven the evolution of two mating types in unicellular eukaryotes.

  8. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  9. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  10. Anoxia-Reoxygenation Regulates Mitochondrial Dynamics through the Hypoxia Response Pathway, SKN-1/Nrf, and Stomatin-Like Protein STL-1/SLP-2

    PubMed Central

    Tabakin, Alexandra; Salazar-Vasquez, Nathaly; Rongo, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Many aerobic organisms encounter oxygen-deprived environments and thus must have adaptive mechanisms to survive such stress. It is important to understand how mitochondria respond to oxygen deprivation given the critical role they play in using oxygen to generate cellular energy. Here we examine mitochondrial stress response in C. elegans, which adapt to extreme oxygen deprivation (anoxia, less than 0.1% oxygen) by entering into a reversible suspended animation state of locomotory arrest. We show that neuronal mitochondria undergo DRP-1-dependent fission in response to anoxia and undergo refusion upon reoxygenation. The hypoxia response pathway, including EGL-9 and HIF-1, is not required for anoxia-induced fission, but does regulate mitochondrial reconstitution during reoxygenation. Mutants for egl-9 exhibit a rapid refusion of mitochondria and a rapid behavioral recovery from suspended animation during reoxygenation; both phenotypes require HIF-1. Mitochondria are significantly larger in egl-9 mutants after reoxygenation, a phenotype similar to stress-induced mitochondria hyperfusion (SIMH). Anoxia results in mitochondrial oxidative stress, and the oxidative response factor SKN-1/Nrf is required for both rapid mitochondrial refusion and rapid behavioral recovery during reoxygenation. In response to anoxia, SKN-1 promotes the expression of the mitochondrial resident protein Stomatin-like 1 (STL-1), which helps facilitate mitochondrial dynamics following anoxia. Our results suggest the existence of a conserved anoxic stress response involving changes in mitochondrial fission and fusion. PMID:24385935

  11. Adult-onset mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sola, J.; Casademont, J.; Grau, J. M.; Graus, F.; Cardellach, F.; Pedrol, E.; Urbano-Marquez, A.

    1992-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are polymorphic entities which may affect many organs and systems. Skeletal muscle involvement is frequent in the context of systemic mitochondrial disease, but adult-onset pure mitochondrial myopathy appears to be rare. We report 3 patients with progressive skeletal mitochondrial myopathy starting in adult age. In all cases, the proximal myopathy was the only clinical feature. Mitochondrial pathology was confirmed by evidence of ragged-red fibres in muscle histochemistry, an abnormal mitochondrial morphology in electron microscopy and by exclusion of other underlying diseases. No deletions of mitochondrial DNA were found. We emphasize the need to look for a mitochondrial disorder in some non-specific myopathies starting in adult life. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1589382

  12. Inhibitors of mitochondrial fission as a therapeutic strategy for diseases with oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential cytoplasmic organelles, critical for cell survival and death. Recent mitochondrial research revealed that mitochondrial dynamics-the balance of fission and fusion in normal mitochondrial dynamics--is an important cellular mechanism in eukaryotic cell and is involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial morphology, structure, number, distribution, and function. Research into mitochondria and cell function has revealed that mitochondrial dynamics is impaired in a large number of aging and neurodegenerative diseases, and in several inherited mitochondrial diseases, and that this impairment involves excessive mitochondrial fission, resulting in mitochondrial structural changes and dysfunction, and cell damage. Attempts have been made to develop molecules to reduce mitochondrial fission while maintaining normal mitochondrial fusion and function in those diseases that involve excessive mitochondrial fission. This review article discusses mechanisms of mitochondrial fission in normal and diseased states of mammalian cells and discusses research aimed at developing therapies, such as Mdivi, Dynasore and P110, to prevent or to inhibit excessive mitochondrial fission.

  13. In utero exposure to prepregnancy maternal obesity and postweaning high-fat diet impair regulators of mitochondrial dynamics in rat placenta and offspring.

    PubMed

    Borengasser, Sarah J; Faske, Jennifer; Kang, Ping; Blackburn, Michael L; Badger, Thomas M; Shankar, Kartik

    2014-12-01

    The proportion of pregnant women who are obese at conception continues to rise. Compelling evidence suggests the intrauterine environment is an important determinant of offspring health. Maternal obesity and unhealthy diets are shown to promote metabolic programming in the offspring. Mitochondria are maternally inherited, and we have previously shown impaired mitochondrial function in rat offspring exposed to maternal obesity in utero. Mitochondrial health is maintained by mitochondrial dynamics, or the processes of fusion and fission, which serve to repair damaged mitochondria, remove irreparable mitochondria, and maintain mitochondrial morphology. An imbalance between fusion and fission has been associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and reproduction complications. In the present study, we examined the influence of maternal obesity and postweaning high-fat diet (HFD) on key regulators of mitochondrial fusion and fission in rat offspring at important developmental milestones which included postnatal day (PND)35 (2 wk HFD) and PND130 (∼16 wk HFD). Our results indicate HFD-fed offspring had reduced mRNA expression of presenilin-associated rhomboid-like (PARL), optic atrophy (OPA)1, mitofusin (Mfn)1, Mfn2, fission (Fis)1, and nuclear respiratory factor (Nrf)1 at PND35, while OPA1 and Mfn2 remained decreased at PND130. Putative transcriptional regulators of mitochondrial dynamics were reduced in rat placenta and offspring liver and skeletal muscle [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC1)α, PGC1β, and estrogen-related receptor (ERR)α], consistent with indirect calorimetry findings revealing reduced energy expenditure and impaired fat utilization. Overall, maternal obesity detrimentally alters mitochondrial targets that may contribute to impaired mitochondrial health and increased obesity susceptibility in later life.

  14. Elastocapillary Instability in Mitochondrial Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Sart, Sébastien; Babataheri, Avin; Tareste, David; Barakat, Abdul I.; Clanet, Christophe; Husson, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic cell organelles that constantly undergo fission and fusion events. These dynamical processes, which tightly regulate mitochondrial morphology, are essential for cell physiology. Here we propose an elastocapillary mechanical instability as a mechanism for mitochondrial fission. We experimentally induce mitochondrial fission by rupturing the cell's plasma membrane. We present a stability analysis that successfully explains the observed fission wavelength and the role of mitochondrial morphology in the occurrence of fission events. Our results show that the laws of fluid mechanics can describe mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

  15. [Cardiac manifestations of mitochondrial diseases].

    PubMed

    Ritzenthaler, Thomas; Luis, David; Hullin, Thomas; Fayssoil, Abdallah

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are multi-system disorders in relation with mitochondrial DNA and/or nuclear DNA abnormalities. Clinical pictures are heterogeneous, involving endocrine, cardiac, neurologic or sensory systems. Cardiac involvements are morphological and electrical disturbances. Prognosis is worsened in case of cardiac impairment. Treatments are related to the type of cardiac dysfunction including medication or pacemaker implantation.

  16. The small GTPase Arf1 modulates mitochondrial morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Ackema, Karin B; Hench, Jürgen; Böckler, Stefan; Wang, Shyi Chyi; Sauder, Ursula; Mergentaler, Heidi; Westermann, Benedikt; Bard, Frédéric; Frank, Stephan; Spang, Anne

    2014-11-18

    The small GTPase Arf1 plays critical roles in membrane traffic by initiating the recruitment of coat proteins and by modulating the activity of lipid-modifying enzymes. Here, we report an unexpected but evolutionarily conserved role for Arf1 and the ArfGEF GBF1 at mitochondria. Loss of function of ARF-1 or GBF-1 impaired mitochondrial morphology and activity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Similarly, mitochondrial defects were observed in mammalian and yeast cells. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aberrant clusters of the mitofusin Fzo1 accumulated in arf1-11 mutants and were resolved by overexpression of Cdc48, an AAA-ATPase involved in ER and mitochondria-associated degradation processes. Yeast Arf1 co-fractionated with ER and mitochondrial membranes and interacted genetically with the contact site component Gem1. Furthermore, similar mitochondrial abnormalities resulted from knockdown of either GBF-1 or contact site components in worms, suggesting that the role of Arf1 in mitochondrial functioning is linked to ER-mitochondrial contacts. Thus, Arf1 is involved in mitochondrial homeostasis and dynamics, independent of its role in vesicular traffic.

  17. Mitofusin 2 regulates the oocytes development and quality by modulating meiosis and mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qun; Kang, Lina; Wang, Lingjuan; Zhang, Ling; Xiang, Wenpei

    2016-01-01

    Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2), one of the mitochondrial dynamic proteins plays a key role in maintaining the integrity of mitochondrial morphology and function. However, it is unknown if Mfn2 influences the quality of oocytes in the process of development by modulating mitochondrial function in vitro. In this study, immature oocytes were transfected with Mfn2-siRNA for 16 h. We found that the expression level of the Mfn2 gene was significantly lower than those of the control group. The rates of maturation and fertility were also found to have declined. Moreover, mitochondrial structure and function, especially the morphogenesis of spindles, were observed as abnormal during meiosis. Thus, the above findings indicate that down-regulation of Mfn2 may have an impact on the maturation and fertilization of immature oocytes in vitro by modulating meiosis and mitochondrial function. PMID:27469431

  18. The dual role of cyclin C connects stress regulated gene expression to mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Strich, Randy; Cooper, Katrina F.

    2014-01-01

    Following exposure to cytotoxic agents, cellular damage is first recognized by a variety of sensor mechanisms. Thenceforth, the damage signal is transduced to the nucleus to install the correct gene expression program including the induction of genes whose products either detoxify destructive compounds or repair the damage they cause. Next, the stress signal is disseminated throughout the cell to effect the appropriate changes at organelles including the mitochondria. The mitochondria represent an important signaling platform for the stress response. An initial stress response of the mitochondria is extensive fragmentation. If the damage is prodigious, the mitochondria fragment (fission) and lose their outer membrane integrity leading to the release of pro-apoptotic factors necessary for programmed cell death (PCD) execution. As this complex biological process contains many moving parts, it must be exquisitely coordinated as the ultimate decision is life or death. The conserved C-type cyclin plays an important role in executing this molecular Rubicon by coupling changes in gene expression to mitochondrial fission and PCD. Cyclin C, along with its cyclin dependent kinase partner Cdk8, associates with the RNA polymerase holoenzyme to regulate transcription. In particular, cyclin C-Cdk8 repress many stress responsive genes. To relieve this repression, cyclin C is destroyed in cells exposed to pro-oxidants and other stressors. However, prior to its destruction, cyclin C, but not Cdk8, is released from its nuclear anchor (Med13), translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it interacts with the fission machinery and is both necessary and sufficient to induce extensive mitochondria fragmentation. Furthermore, cytoplasmic cyclin C promotes PCD indicating that it mediates both mitochondrial fission and cell death pathways. This review will summarize the role cyclin C plays in regulating stress-responsive transcription. In addition, we will detail this new function

  19. Canonical Wnt signaling protects hippocampal neurons from Aβ oligomers: role of non-canonical Wnt-5a/Ca(2+) in mitochondrial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Silva-Alvarez, Carmen; Arrázola, Macarena S; Godoy, Juan A; Ordenes, Daniela; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of age-related dementia. The disease is characterized by a progressive loss of cognitive abilities, severe neurodegeneration, synaptic loss and mitochondrial dysfunction. The Wnt signaling pathway participates in the development of the central nervous system and growing evidence indicates that Wnts also regulate the function of the adult nervous system. We report here, that indirect activation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling using Bromoindirubin-30-Oxime (6-BIO), an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β, protects hippocampal neurons from amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers with the concomitant blockade of neuronal apoptosis. More importantly, activation with Wnt-5a, a non-canonical Wnt ligand, results in the modulation of mitochondrial dynamics, preventing the changes induced by Aβ oligomers (Aβo) in mitochondrial fission-fusion dynamics and modulates Bcl-2 increases induced by oligomers. The canonical Wnt-3a ligand neither the secreted Frizzled-Related Protein (sFRP), a Wnt scavenger, did not prevent these effects. In contrast, some of the Aβ oligomer effects were blocked by Ryanodine. We conclude that canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls neuronal survival, and that non-canonical Wnt/Ca(2+)signaling modulates mitochondrial dysfunction. Since mitochondrial dysfunction is present in neurodegenerative diseases, the therapeutic possibilities of the activation of Wnt signaling are evident.

  20. Canonical Wnt signaling protects hippocampal neurons from Aβ oligomers: role of non-canonical Wnt-5a/Ca2+ in mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Alvarez, Carmen; Arrázola, Macarena S.; Godoy, Juan A.; Ordenes, Daniela; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of age-related dementia. The disease is characterized by a progressive loss of cognitive abilities, severe neurodegeneration, synaptic loss and mitochondrial dysfunction. The Wnt signaling pathway participates in the development of the central nervous system and growing evidence indicates that Wnts also regulate the function of the adult nervous system. We report here, that indirect activation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling using Bromoindirubin-30-Oxime (6-BIO), an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β, protects hippocampal neurons from amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers with the concomitant blockade of neuronal apoptosis. More importantly, activation with Wnt-5a, a non-canonical Wnt ligand, results in the modulation of mitochondrial dynamics, preventing the changes induced by Aβ oligomers (Aβo) in mitochondrial fission-fusion dynamics and modulates Bcl-2 increases induced by oligomers. The canonical Wnt-3a ligand neither the secreted Frizzled-Related Protein (sFRP), a Wnt scavenger, did not prevent these effects. In contrast, some of the Aβ oligomer effects were blocked by Ryanodine. We conclude that canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls neuronal survival, and that non-canonical Wnt/Ca2+signaling modulates mitochondrial dysfunction. Since mitochondrial dysfunction is present in neurodegenerative diseases, the therapeutic possibilities of the activation of Wnt signaling are evident. PMID:23805073

  1. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Male-killing Wolbachia and mitochondrial DNA: selective sweeps, hybrid introgression and parasite population dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Jiggins, Francis M

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences are widely used as neutral genetic markers in insects. However, patterns of mtDNA variability are confounded by the spread of maternally transmitted parasites, which are genetically linked to the mitochondria. We have investigated these effects in the butterflies Acraea encedon (which is host to two strains of male-killing Wolbachia bacteria) and A. encedana (which is host to one strain). Within a population, the mitochondria are in linkage disequilibrium with the different male-killers. Furthermore, there has been a recent selective sweep of the mtDNA, which has led to the loss of mitochondrial variation within populations and erased any geographical structure. We also found that one of the male-killers, together with the associated mtDNA, has introgressed from A. encedana into A. encedon within the last 16,000 years. Interestingly, because butterflies are female heterogametic, this will presumably have also led to the introgression of genes on the W sex chromosome. Finally, in A. encedon the mitochondria in uninfected females are unaltered by the spread of the male-killer and have diverse, geographically structured mtDNA. This means we can reject the hypothesis that the male-killer is at a stable equilibrium maintained by imperfect transmission of the bacterium. Instead, some other form of balancing selection may be maintaining uninfected females in the population and preventing the species from going extinct due to a shortage of males. PMID:12750316

  3. Unraveling the complexity of mitochondrial complex I assembly: A dynamic process.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Caballero, Laura; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Nijtmans, Leo

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian complex I is composed of 44 different subunits and its assembly requires at least 13 specific assembly factors. Proper function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme is of crucial importance for cell survival due to its major participation in energy production and cell signaling. Complex I assembly depends on the coordination of several crucial processes that need to be tightly interconnected and orchestrated by a number of assembly factors. The understanding of complex I assembly evolved from simple sequential concept to the more sophisticated modular assembly model describing a convoluted process. According to this model, the different modules assemble independently and associate afterwards with each other to form the final enzyme. In this review, we aim to unravel the complexity of complex I assembly and provide the latest insights in this fundamental and fascinating process. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  4. Tbx2 confers poor prognosis in glioblastoma and promotes temozolomide resistance with change of mitochondrial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Fuxin; Du, Jianzhou; Ni, Weimin; Liu, Weixian

    2017-01-01

    Tbx2 is a cancer-related protein that was found to be overexpressed in several human malignancies. The present study aims to investigate the clinical significance and biological role of Tbx2 in human astrocytoma. We examined its protein expression in 102 cases of astrocytoma tissues using immunohistochemical staining. Negative Tbx2 staining was observed in normal astrocytes, and positive nuclear staining was found in 41 out of 102 astrocytoma specimens. The rate of Tbx2 overexpression in pylocytic astrocytoma, diffuse astrocytoma, anaplastic astrocytoma, and glioblastoma multiform (GBM) were 0%, 26.1%, 40%, and 52%, respectively. Tbx2 overexpression correlated with poor prognosis in patients with astrocytoma or GBM. Tbx2 plasmid transfection was performed in A172 cells, and Tbx2 siRNA knockdown was carried out in U251 cells. Cell Counting Kit-8, cell cycle analysis, and matrigel invasion assay showed that Tbx2 overexpression upregulated cell proliferation, G1-S transition, and invasion, with corresponding change of cyclin D1, p21, and MMP 2 and 9. Importantly, we demonstrated that Tbx2 reduced apoptosis and conferred resistance to temozolomide in GBM cell lines. Further experiments showed that Tbx2 could regulate mitochondrial fission/fusion balance. Western blot showed that Tbx2 overexpression reduced caspase 3 cleavage, while it induced Bcl-2 and p-Drp1 upregulation. In conclusion, our results indicated that Tbx2 might serve as an indicator for poor prognosis and also be useful as an important therapeutic in human GBM, which inhibits apoptosis through regulation of mitochondrial function. PMID:28260920

  5. Redox dynamics of manganese as a mitochondrial life-death switch

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Matthew Ryan; Fernandes, Jolyn; Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P.

    2017-01-01

    Sten Orrenius, M.D., Ph.D., pioneered many areas of cellular and molecular toxicology and made seminal contributions to our knowledge of oxidative stress and glutathione (GSH) metabolism, organellar functions and Ca+2-dependent mechanisms of cell death, and mechanisms of apoptosis. On the occasion of his 80th birthday, we summarize current knowledge on redox biology of manganese (Mn) and its role in mechanisms of cell death. Mn is found in all organisms and has critical roles in cell survival and death mechanisms by regulating Mn-containing enzymes such as manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) or affecting expression and activity of caspases. Occupational exposures to Mn cause “manganism”, a Parkinson's disease-like condition of neurotoxicity, and experimental studies show that Mn exposure leads to accumulation of Mn in the brain, especially in mitochondria, and neuronal cell death occurs with features of an apoptotic mechanism. Interesting questions are why a ubiquitous metal that is essential for mitochondrial function would accumulate to excessive levels, cause increased H2O2 production and lead to cell death. Is this due to the interactions of Mn with other essential metals, such as iron, or with toxic metals, such as cadmium? Why is the Mn loading in the human brain so variable, and why is there such a narrow window between dietary adequacy and toxicity? Are non-neuronal tissues similarly vulnerable to insufficiency and excess, yet not characterized? We conclude that Mn is an important component of the redox interface between an organism and its environment and warrants detailed studies to understand the role of Mn as a mitochondrial life-death switch. PMID:28212723

  6. Regulation and quantification of cellular mitochondrial morphology and content.

    PubMed

    Tronstad, Karl J; Nooteboom, Marco; Nilsson, Linn I H; Nikolaisen, Julie; Sokolewicz, Maciek; Grefte, Sander; Pettersen, Ina K N; Dyrstad, Sissel; Hoel, Fredrik; Willems, Peter H G M; Koopman, Werner J H

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in signal transduction, redox homeostasis and cell survival, which extends far beyond their classical functioning in ATP production and energy metabolism. In living cells, mitochondrial content ("mitochondrial mass") depends on the cell-controlled balance between mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation. These processes are intricately linked to changes in net mitochondrial morphology and spatiotemporal positioning ("mitochondrial dynamics"), which are governed by mitochondrial fusion, fission and motility. It is becoming increasingly clear that mitochondrial mass and dynamics, as well as its ultrastructure and volume, are mechanistically linked to mitochondrial function and the cell. This means that proper quantification of mitochondrial morphology and content is of prime importance in understanding mitochondrial and cellular physiology in health and disease. This review first presents how cellular mitochondrial content is regulated at the level of mitochondrial biogenesis, degradation and dynamics. Next we discuss how mitochondrial dynamics and content can be analyzed with a special emphasis on quantitative live-cell microscopy strategies.

  7. Abnormal Glucose Metabolism in Alzheimer's Disease: Relation to Autophagy/Mitophagy and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Kalpita; Munshi, Soumyabrata; Frank, David E; Gibson, Gary E

    2015-12-01

    Diminished glucose metabolism accompanies many neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease. An understanding of the relation of these metabolic changes to the disease will enable development of novel therapeutic strategies. Following a metabolic challenge, cells generally conserve energy to preserve viability. This requires activation of many cellular repair/regenerative processes such as mitophagy/autophagy and fusion/fission. These responses may diminish cell function in the long term. Prolonged fission induces mitophagy/autophagy which promotes repair but if prolonged progresses to mitochondrial degradation. Abnormal glucose metabolism alters protein signaling including the release of proteins from the mitochondria or migration of proteins from the cytosol to the mitochondria or nucleus. This overview provides an insight into the different mechanisms of autophagy/mitophagy and mitochondrial dynamics in response to the diminished metabolism that occurs with diseases, especially neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. The review discusses multiple aspects of mitochondrial responses including different signaling proteins and pathways of mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis. Improving cellular bioenergetics and mitochondrial dynamics will alter protein signaling and improve cellular/mitochondrial repair and regeneration. An understanding of these changes will suggest new therapeutic strategies.

  8. Abnormal Glucose Metabolism in Alzheimer’s Disease: Relation to Autophagy/Mitophagy and Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Kalpita; Munshi, Soumyabrata; Frank, David E.; Gibson, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    Diminished glucose metabolism accompanies many neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease. An understanding of the relation of these metabolic changes to the disease will enable development of novel therapeutic strategies. Following a metabolic challenge, cells generally conserve energy to preserve viability. This requires activation of many cellular repair/regenerative processes such as mitophagy/autophagy and fusion/fission. These responses may diminish cell function in the long term. Prolonged fission induces mitophagy/autophagy which promotes repair but if prolonged progresses to mitochondrial degradation. Abnormal glucose metabolism alters protein signaling including the release of proteins from the mitochondria or migration of proteins from the cytosol to the mitochondria or nucleus. This overview provides an insight into the different mechanisms of autophagy/mitophagy and mitochondrial dynamics in response to the diminished metabolism that occurs with diseases, especially neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. The review discusses multiple aspects of mitochondrial responses including different signaling proteins and pathways of mitophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis. Improving cellular bioenergetics and mitochondrial dynamics will alter protein signaling and improve cellular/mitochondrial repair and regeneration. An understanding of these changes will suggest new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26077923

  9. Mitochondrial dynamics and optical conformation changes in DsRed as studied by Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senning, Eric Nicolas

    Novel experiments that probe the dynamics of intracellular species, including the center-of-mass displacements and internal conformational transitions of biological macromolecules, have the potential to reveal the complex biochemical mechanisms operating within the cell. This work presents the implementation and development of Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy (FICS), a phase-selective approach to fluorescence spectroscopy that measures the collective coordinate fluctuations of fluorescently labeled microscopic particles. In FICS experiments, a spatially modulated optical grating excites a fluorescently labeled sample. Phase-synchronous detection of the fluorescence, with respect to the phase of the exciting optical grating, can be used to monitor the fluctuations of partially averaged spatial coordinates. These data are then analyzed by two-point and four-point time correlation functions to provide a statistically meaningful understanding of the dynamics under observation. FICS represents a unique route to elevate signal levels, while acquiring detailed information about molecular coordinate trajectories. Mitochondria of mammalian cells are known to associate with cytoskeletal proteins, and their motions are affected by the stability of microtubules and microfilaments. Within the cell it is possible to fluorescently label the mitochondria and study its dynamic behavior with FICS. The dynamics of S. cerevisiae yeast mitochondria are characterized at four discrete length scales (ranging from 0.6--1.19 mum) and provide detailed information about the influence of specific cytoskeletal elements. Using the microtubule and microfilament destabilizing agents, Nocodazole and Latrunculin A, it is determined that microfilaments are required for normal yeast mitochondrial motion while microtubules have no effect. Experiments with specific actin mutants revealed that actin is responsible for enhanced mobility on length scales greater than 0.6 mum. The versatility of

  10. Mitochondrial Ribosomal Protein L10 Associates with Cyclin B1/Cdk1 Activity and Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Bo; Wang, Ruo-Xi; Jiang, Hai-Bo; Zhang, En-dong; Tan, Jie-Qiong; Xu, Hui-Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomal proteins are important for mitochondrial-encoded protein synthesis and mitochondrial function. In addition to their roles in mitoribosome assembly, several mitochondrial ribosome proteins are also implicated in cellular processes like cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and mitochondrial homeostasis regulation. Here, we demonstrate that MRPL10 regulates cyclin B1/Cdk1 (cyclin-dependent kinase 1) activity and mitochondrial protein synthesis in mammalian cells. In Drosophila, inactivation of mRpL10 (the Drosophila ortholog of mammalian MRPL10) in eyes results in abnormal eye development. Furthermore, expression of human cyclin B1 suppresses eye phenotypes and mitochondrial abnormality of mRpL10 knockdown Drosophila. This study identified that the physiological regulatory pathway of MRPL10 and providing new insights into the role of MRPL10 in growth control and mitochondrial function. PMID:27726420

  11. HIV alters neuronal mitochondrial fission/fusion in the brain during HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Fields, Jerel Adam; Serger, Elisabeth; Campos, Sofia; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Kim, Changyoun; Smith, Kendall; Trejo, Margarita; Adame, Anthony; Spencer, Brian; Rockenstein, Edward; Murphy, Anne N; Ellis, Ronald J; Letendre, Scott; Grant, Igor; Masliah, Eliezer

    2016-02-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) still occur in approximately 50% of HIV patients, and therapies to combat HAND progression are urgently needed. HIV proteins are released from infected cells and cause neuronal damage, possibly through mitochondrial abnormalities. Altered mitochondrial fission and fusion is implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we hypothesized that mitochondrial fission/fusion may be dysregulated in neurons during HAND. We have identified decreased mitochondrial fission protein (dynamin 1-like; DNM1L) in frontal cortex tissues of HAND donors, along with enlarged and elongated mitochondria localized to the soma of damaged neurons. Similar pathology was observed in the brains of GFAP-gp120 tg mice. In vitro, recombinant gp120 decreased total and active DNM1L levels, reduced the level of Mitotracker staining, and increased extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) in primary neurons. DNM1L knockdown enhanced the effects of gp120 as measured by reduced Mitotracker signal in the treated cells. Interestingly, overexpression of DNM1L increased the level of Mitotracker staining in primary rat neurons and reduced neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the GFAP-gp120-tg mice. These data suggest that mitochondrial biogenesis dynamics are shifted towards mitochondrial fusion in brains of HAND patients and this may be due to gp120-induced reduction in DNM1L activity. Promoting mitochondrial fission during HIV infection of the CNS may restore mitochondrial biogenesis and prevent neurodegeneration.

  12. HIV alters neuronal mitochondrial fission/fusion in the brain during HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Jerel Adam; Serger, Elisabeth; Campos, Sofia; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Kim, Changyoun; Smith, Kendall; Trejo, Margarita; Adame, Anthony; Spencer, Brian; Rockenstein, Edward; Murphy, Anne N.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott; Grant, Igor; Masliah, Eliezer

    2015-01-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) still occur in approximately 50% of HIV patients, and therapies to combat HAND progression are urgently needed. HIV proteins are released from infected cells and cause neuronal damage, possibly through mitochondrial abnormalities. Altered mitochondrial fission and fusion is implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we hypothesized that mitochondrial fission/fusion may be dysregulated in neurons during HAND. We have identified decreased mitochondrial fission protein (dynamin 1-like; DNM1L) in frontal cortex tissues of HAND donors, along with enlarged and elongated mitochondria localized to the soma of damaged neurons. Similar pathology was observed in the brains of GFAP-gp120 tg mice. In vitro, recombinant gp120 decreased total and active DNM1L levels, reduced the level of Mitotracker staining, and increased extracellular acidification rate (ECAR) in primary neurons. DNM1L knockdown enhanced the effects of gp120 as measured by reduced Mitotracker signal in the treated cells. Interestingly, overexpression of DNM1L increased the level of Mitotracker staining in primary rat neurons and reduced neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the GFAP-gp120-tg mice. These data suggest that mitochondrial biogenesis dynamics are shifted towards mitochondrial fusion in brains of HAND patients and this may be due to gp120-induced reduction in DNM1L activity. Promoting mitochondrial fission during HIV infection of the CNS may restore mitochondrial biogenesis and prevent neurodegeneration. PMID:26611103

  13. Mitochondrial shaping cuts.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Henriques, Mafalda; Langer, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A broad range of cellular processes are regulated by proteolytic events. Proteolysis has now also been established to control mitochondrial morphology which results from the balanced action of fusion and fission. Two out of three known core components of the mitochondrial fusion machinery are under proteolytic control. The GTPase Fzo1 in the outer membrane of mitochondria is degraded along two independent proteolytic pathways. One controls mitochondrial fusion in vegetatively growing cells, the other one acts upon mating factor-induced cell cycle arrest. Fusion also depends on proteolytic processing of the GTPase Mgm1 by the rhomboid protease Pcp1 in the inner membrane of mitochondria. Functional links of AAA proteases or other proteolytic components to mitochondrial dynamics are just emerging. This review summarises the current understanding of regulatory roles of proteolytic processes for mitochondrial plasticity.

  14. Impaired presynaptic cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium dynamics in aged compared to young adult hippocampal CA1 synapses ameliorated by calcium chelation.

    PubMed

    Tonkikh, A A; Carlen, P L

    2009-04-10

    Impaired regulation of presynaptic intracellular calcium is thought to adversely affect synaptic plasticity and cognition in the aged brain. We studied presynaptic cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium (Ca) dynamics using axonally loaded Calcium Green-AM and Rhod-2 AM fluorescence respectively in young (2-3 months) and aged (23-26 months) CA3 to CA1 Schaffer collateral excitatory synapses in hippocampal brain slices from Fisher 344 rats. After a tetanus (100 Hz, 200 ms), the presynaptic cytosolic Ca peaked at approximately 10 s in the young and approximately 12 s in the aged synapses. Administration of the membrane permeant Ca chelator, bis (O-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N,N-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA-AM), significantly attenuated the Ca response in the aged slices, but not in the young slices. The presynaptic mitochondrial Ca signal was much slower, peaking at approximately 90 s in both young and aged synapses, returning to baseline by 300 s. BAPTA-AM significantly attenuated the mitochondrial calcium signal only in the young synapses. Uncoupling mitochondrial respiration by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) application evoked a massive intracellular cytosolic Ca increase and a significant drop of mitochondrial Ca, especially in aged slices wherein the cytosolic Ca signal disappeared after approximately 150 s of washout and the mitochondrial Ca signal disappeared after 25 s of washout. These signals were preserved in aged slices by BAPTA-AM. Five minutes of oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) was associated with a significant increase in cytosolic Ca in both young and aged synapses, which was irreversible in the aged synapses. These responses were significantly attenuated by BAPTA-AM in both the young and aged synapses. These results support the hypothesis that increasing intracellular calcium neuronal buffering in aged rats ameliorates age-related impaired presynaptic Ca regulation.

  15. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  16. Analysis of Mitochondrial Network Morphology in Cultured Myoblasts from Patients with Mitochondrial Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sládková, J; Spáčilová, J; Čapek, M; Tesařová, M; Hansíková, H; Honzík, T; Martínek, J; Zámečník, J; Kostková, O; Zeman, J

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial morphology was studied in cultivated myoblasts obtained from patients with mitochondrial disorders, including CPEO, MELAS and TMEM70 deficiency. Mitochondrial networks and ultrastructure were visualized by fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. A heterogeneous picture of abnormally sized and shaped mitochondria with fragmentation, shortening, and aberrant cristae, lower density of mitochondria and an increased number of "megamitochondria" were found in patient myoblasts. Morphometric Fiji analyses revealed different mitochondrial network properties in myoblasts from patients and controls. The small number of cultivated myoblasts required for semiautomatic morphometric image analysis makes this tool useful for estimating mitochondrial disturbances in patients with mitochondrial disorders.

  17. The clinical maze of mitochondrial neurology

    PubMed Central

    DiMauro, Salvatore; Schon, Eric A.; Carelli, Valerio; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases involve the respiratory chain, which is under the dual control of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The complexity of mitochondrial genetics provides one explanation for the clinical heterogeneity of mitochondrial diseases, but our understanding of disease pathogenesis remains limited. Classification of Mendelian mitochondrial encephalomyopathies has been laborious, but whole-exome sequencing studies have revealed unexpected molecular aetiologies for both typical and atypical mitochondrial disease phenotypes. Mendelian mitochondrial defects can affect five components of mitochondrial biology: subunits of respiratory chain complexes (direct hits); mitochondrial assembly proteins; mtDNA translation; phospholipid composition of the inner mitochondrial membrane; or mitochondrial dynamics. A sixth category—defects of mtDNA maintenance—combines features of Mendelian and mitochondrial genetics. Genetic defects in mitochondrial dynamics are especially important in neurology as they cause optic atrophy, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease. Therapy is inadequate and mostly palliative, but promising new avenues are being identified. Here, we review current knowledge on the genetics and pathogenesis of the six categories of mitochondrial disorders outlined above, focusing on their salient clinical manifestations and highlighting novel clinical entities. An outline of diagnostic clues for the various forms of mitochondrial disease, as well as potential therapeutic strategies, is also discussed. PMID:23835535

  18. Dynamic Regulation of Genes Involved in Mitochondrial DNA Replication and Transcription during Mouse Brown Fat Cell Differentiation and Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Murholm, Maria; Dixen, Karen; Qvortrup, Klaus; Hansen, Lillian H. L.; Amri, Ez-Zoubir; Madsen, Lise; Barbatelli, Giorgio; Quistorff, Bjørn; Hansen, Jacob B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Brown adipocytes are specialised in dissipating energy through adaptive thermogenesis, whereas white adipocytes are specialised in energy storage. These essentially opposite functions are possible for two reasons relating to mitochondria, namely expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and a remarkably higher mitochondrial abundance in brown adipocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report a comprehensive characterisation of gene expression linked to mitochondrial DNA replication, transcription and function during white and brown fat cell differentiation in vitro as well as in white and brown fat, brown adipose tissue fractions and in selected adipose tissues during cold exposure. We find a massive induction of the majority of such genes during brown adipocyte differentiation and recruitment, e.g. of the mitochondrial transcription factors A (Tfam) and B2 (Tfb2m), whereas only a subset of the same genes were induced during white adipose conversion. In addition, PR domain containing 16 (PRDM16) was found to be expressed at substantially higher levels in brown compared to white pre-adipocytes and adipocytes. We demonstrate that forced expression of Tfam but not Tfb2m in brown adipocyte precursor cells promotes mitochondrial DNA replication, and that silencing of PRDM16 expression during brown fat cell differentiation blunts mitochondrial biogenesis and expression of brown fat cell markers. Conclusions/Significance Using both in vitro and in vivo model systems of white and brown fat cell differentiation, we report a detailed characterisation of gene expression linked to mitochondrial biogenesis and function. We find significant differences in differentiating white and brown adipocytes, which might explain the notable increase in mitochondrial content observed during brown adipose conversion. In addition, our data support a key role of PRDM16 in triggering brown adipocyte differentiation, including mitochondrial biogenesis and expression of UCP1

  19. Comparison of mitochondrial genomes provides insights into intron dynamics and evolution in the caterpillar fungus Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjie; Zhang, Shu; Zhang, Guozhen; Liu, Xingzhong; Wang, Chengshu; Xu, Jianping

    2015-04-01

    Intra-specific comparison of mitochondrial genomes can help elucidate the evolution of a species, however it has not been performed for hypocrealean fungi that form diverse symbiotic associations with other organisms. In this study, comparative analyses of three completely sequenced mitochondrial genomes of a hypocrealean fungus, Cordyceps militaris, the type species of Cordyceps genus, revealed that the introns were the main contributors to mitochondrial genome size variations among strains. Mitochondrial genes in C. militaris have been invaded by group I introns in at least eight positions. PCR assays of various C. militaris isolates showed abundant variations of intron presence/absence among strains at seven of the eight intronic loci. Although the ancestral intron pattern was inferred to contain all eight introns, loss and/or gain events occurred for seven of the eight introns. These introns invaded the C. militaris mitochondrial genome probably by horizontal transfer from other fungi, and intron insertions into intronless genes in C. militaris were accompanied by co-conversions of upstream exon sequences especially for those introns targeting protein-coding genes. We also detected phylogenetic congruence between the intron and exon trees at each individual locus, consistent with the ancestral mitochondria of C. militaris as having all eight introns. This study helps to explain the evolution of C. militaris mitochondrial genomes and will facilitate population genetic studies of this medicinally important fungus.

  20. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Autism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    a heterogeneous array of OXPHOS genes coded by either the nDNA or the mtDNA. Genetic defects producing mitochondrial dysfunction include: (1...3. Zhu X, Perry G, Moreira PI, Aliev G, Cash AD, et al. (2006) Mitochondrial abnormalities and oxidative imbalance in Alzheimer disease. J... Alzheimers Dis 9: 147-153. 4. de la Monte SM, Wands JR (2001) Alzheimer -associated neuronal thread protein-induced apoptosis and impaired mitochondrial

  1. Parkinson's disease-associated mutant VPS35 causes mitochondrial dysfunction by recycling DLP1 complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenzhang; Wang, Xinglong; Fujioka, Hisashi; Hoppel, Charles; Whone, Alan L; Caldwell, Maeve A; Cullen, Peter J; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction represents a critical step during the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), and increasing evidence suggests abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and quality control as important underlying mechanisms. The VPS35 gene, which encodes a key component of the membrane protein-recycling retromer complex, is the third autosomal-dominant gene associated with PD. However, how VPS35 mutations lead to neurodegeneration remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that PD-associated VPS35 mutations caused mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death in cultured neurons in vitro, in mouse substantia nigra neurons in vivo and in human fibroblasts from an individual with PD who has the VPS35(D620N) mutation. VPS35-induced mitochondrial deficits and neuronal dysfunction could be prevented by inhibition of mitochondrial fission. VPS35 mutants showed increased interaction with dynamin-like protein (DLP) 1, which enhanced turnover of the mitochondrial DLP1 complexes via the mitochondria-derived vesicle-dependent trafficking of the complexes to lysosomes for degradation. Notably, oxidative stress increased the VPS35-DLP1 interaction, which we also found to be increased in the brains of sporadic PD cases. These results revealed a novel cellular mechanism for the involvement of VPS35 in mitochondrial fission, dysregulation of which is probably involved in the pathogenesis of familial, and possibly sporadic, PD.

  2. Dynamical Constants and Time Universals: A First Step toward a Metrical Definition of Ordered and Abnormal Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Mark A.; du Bois, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    From the point of view of the cognitive dynamicist the organization of brain circuitry into assemblies defined by their synchrony at particular (and precise) oscillation frequencies is important for the correct correlation of all independent cortical responses to the different aspects of a given complex thought or object. From the point of view of anyone operating complex mechanical systems, i.e., those comprising independent components that are required to interact precisely in time, it follows that the precise timing of such a system is essential – not only essential but measurable, and scalable. It must also be reliable over observations to bring about consistent behavior, whatever that behavior is. The catastrophic consequence of an absence of such precision, for instance that required to govern the interference engine in many automobiles, is indicative of how important timing is for the function of dynamical systems at all levels of operation. The dynamics and temporal considerations combined indicate that it is necessary to consider the operating characteristic of any dynamical, cognitive brain system in terms, superficially at least, of oscillation frequencies. These may, themselves, be forensic of an underlying time-related taxonomy. Currently there are only two sets of relevant and necessarily systematic observations in this field: one of these reports the precise dynamical structure of the perceptual systems engaged in dynamical binding across form and time; the second, derived both empirically from perceptual performance data, as well as obtained from theoretical models, demonstrates a timing taxonomy related to a fundamental operator referred to as the time quantum. In this contribution both sets of theory and observations are reviewed and compared for their predictive consistency. Conclusions about direct comparability are discussed for both theories of cognitive dynamics and time quantum models. Finally, a brief review of some experimental data

  3. Dynamic changes in the main regulatory genes of mitochondrial permeability transition pore in Eimeria tenella host cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Yong; Zheng, Ming-Xue; Zhang, Yan; Cui, Xiao-Zhen; Yang, Sha-Sha; Liu, Rui-Li; Li, Shan; Xi, Rou; Gong, Xin; Bai, Rui

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the dynamic changes in the main regulatory genes of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in E. tenella host cells. Primary chick embryo cecum epithelial cell culture techniques, spectrophotometer technology, Hoechst-Annexin V-PI apoptosis staining and ELISA were used to detect the apoptosis rate and dynamic changes of Bcl-2, Bcl-xl, Bax, Bak, Bid, Bad, HK-II, and ATP content in E. tenella host cells at 4, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h. The rates of early apoptosis, late apoptosis, and necrosis of group T0 were significantly lower (P < 0.05) or highly significantly lower (P < 0.01) than those of group C at 4 h, but higher (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01) at varying degrees than those of the same group at 24-120 h. Compared to group C, the amount of Bcl-2, ATP, Bax and Bad in group T0 were visibly lower (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01) at 4 h, whereas Bcl-xl/Bax was highly significantly higher (P < 0.01) at 4 h. In addition, group T0 had less ATP at 24-120 h than group C, whereas the amount of Bcl-2, Bcl-xl, Bax, Bak, Bid, Bad and HK-II in group T0 inversely increased in varying degrees at 24-120 h compared with group C. Moreover, Bcl-2/Bax was lower (P < 0.01) at 24, 48, and 96 h, and Bcl-xl/Bax was lower (P < 0.05) at 48 h in group T0 than in group C, respectively. Taken together, these observations indicate that in the early developmental stages of E. tenella, the host-cell apoptosis rate decreased; although the amount of anti- and pro-apoptotic genes in host cells decreased, the ratios of anti-apoptotic to pro-apoptotic bcl-2 gene-family members increased. In the middle and later developmental stages of E. tenella, the host-cell apoptosis rate increased; the amount of anti- and pro-apoptotic genes increased, while the ratios of anti-apoptotic to pro-apoptotic bcl-2 gene-family members decreased. In addition, ATP decreased at all developmental stages of E. tenella.

  4. Different dynamic movements of wild-type and pathogenic VCPs and their cofactors to damaged mitochondria in a Parkin-mediated mitochondrial quality control system.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoko; Fukushi, Junpei; Hori, Seiji; Matsuda, Noriyuki; Okatsu, Kei; Kakiyama, Yukie; Kawawaki, Junko; Kakizuka, Akira; Tanaka, Keiji

    2013-12-01

    VCP/p97 is a hexameric ring-shaped AAA(+) ATPase that participates in various ubiquitin-associated cellular functions. Mis-sense mutations in VCP gene are associated with the pathogenesis of two inherited diseases: inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of the bone and front-temporal dementia (IBMPFD) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These pathogenic VCPs have higher affinities for several cofactors, including Npl4, Ufd1 and p47. In Parkin-dependent mitochondrial quality control systems, VCP migrates to damaged mitochondria (e.g., those treated with uncouplers) to aid in the degradation of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins and to eliminate mitochondria. We showed that endogenous Npl4 and p47 also migrate to mitochondria after uncoupler treatment, and Npl4, Ufd1 or p47 silencing causes defective mitochondria clearance after uncoupler treatment. Moreover, pathogenic VCPs show impaired migration to mitochondria, and the exogenous pathogenic VCP expression partially inhibits Npl4 and p47 localization to mitochondria. These results suggest that the increased affinities of pathogenic VCPs for these cofactors cause the impaired movement of pathogenic VCPs. In adult flies, exogenous expression of wild-type VCP, but not pathogenic VCPs, reduces the number of abnormal mitochondria in muscles. Failure of pathogenic VCPs to function on damaged mitochondria may be related to the pathogenesis of IBMPFD and ALS.

  5. Differentiation State-Specific Mitochondrial Dynamic Regulatory Networks Are Revealed by Global Transcriptional Analysis of the Developing Chicken Lens

    PubMed Central

    Chauss, Daniel; Basu, Subhasree; Rajakaruna, Suren; Ma, Zhiwei; Gau, Victoria; Anastas, Sara; Brennan, Lisa A.; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding; Menko, A. Sue; Kantorow, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The mature eye lens contains a surface layer of epithelial cells called the lens epithelium that requires a functional mitochondrial population to maintain the homeostasis and transparency of the entire lens. The lens epithelium overlies a core of terminally differentiated fiber cells that must degrade their mitochondria to achieve lens transparency. These distinct mitochondrial populations make the lens a useful model system to identify those genes that regulate the balance between mitochondrial homeostasis and elimination. Here we used an RNA sequencing and bioinformatics approach to identify the transcript levels of all genes expressed by distinct regions of the lens epithelium and maturing fiber cells of the embryonic Gallus gallus (chicken) lens. Our analysis detected more than 15,000 unique transcripts expressed by the embryonic chicken lens. Of these, more than 3000 transcripts exhibited significant differences in expression between lens epithelial cells and fiber cells. Multiple transcripts coding for separate mitochondrial homeostatic and degradation mechanisms were identified to exhibit preferred patterns of expression in lens epithelial cells that require mitochondria relative to lens fiber cells that require mitochondrial elimination. These included differences in the expression levels of metabolic (DUT, PDK1, SNPH), autophagy (ATG3, ATG4B, BECN1, FYCO1, WIPI1), and mitophagy (BNIP3L/NIX, BNIP3, PARK2, p62/SQSTM1) transcripts between lens epithelial cells and lens fiber cells. These data provide a comprehensive window into all genes transcribed by the lens and those mitochondrial regulatory and degradation pathways that function to maintain mitochondrial populations in the lens epithelium and to eliminate mitochondria in maturing lens fiber cells. PMID:24928582

  6. The Use of Neuroimaging in the Diagnosis of Mitochondrial Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Seth D.; Shaw, Dennis W. W.; Ishak, Gisele; Gropman, Andrea L.; Saneto, Russell P.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA impacting mitochondrial function result in disease manifestations ranging from early death to abnormalities in all major organ systems and to symptoms that can be largely confined to muscle fatigue. The definitive diagnosis of a mitochondrial disorder can be difficult to establish. When the constellation…

  7. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20-40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia.

  8. Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    El-Hattab, Ayman W.; Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and perform various essential functions, including the generation of cellular energy. Mitochondria are under dual genome control. Only a small fraction of their proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), whereas more than 99% of them are encoded by nuclear DNA (nDNA). Mutations in mtDNA or mitochondria-related nDNA genes result in mitochondrial dysfunction leading to insufficient energy production required to meet the needs for various organs, particularly those with high energy requirements, including the central nervous system, skeletal and cardiac muscles, kidneys, liver, and endocrine system. Because cardiac muscles are one of the high energy demanding tissues, cardiac involvement occurs in mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies being one of the most frequent cardiac manifestations found in these disorders. Cardiomyopathy is estimated to occur in 20–40% of children with mitochondrial diseases. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies can vary in severity from asymptomatic status to severe manifestations including heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common type; however, mitochondrial cardiomyopathies might also present as dilated, restrictive, left ventricular non-compaction, and histiocytoid cardiomyopathies. Cardiomyopathies are frequent manifestations of mitochondrial diseases associated with defects in electron transport chain complexes subunits and their assembly factors, mitochondrial transfer RNAs, ribosomal RNAs, ribosomal proteins, translation factors, mtDNA maintenance, and coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Other mitochondrial diseases with cardiomyopathies include Barth syndrome, Sengers syndrome, TMEM70-related mitochondrial complex V deficiency, and Friedreich ataxia. PMID:27504452

  9. Mitochondrial vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Zarrouk-Mahjoub, Sinda

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are usually multisystem disorders (mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome) either on from onset or starting at a point during the disease course. Most frequently affected tissues are those with a high oxygen demand such as the central nervous system, the muscle, endocrine glands, or the myocardium. Recently, it has been shown that rarely also the arteries may be affected (mitochondrial arteriopathy). This review focuses on the type, diagnosis, and treatment of mitochondrial vasculopathy in MID patients. A literature search using appropriate search terms was carried out. Mitochondrial vasculopathy manifests as either microangiopathy or macroangiopathy. Clinical manifestations of mitochondrial microangiopathy include leukoencephalopathy, migraine-like headache, stroke-like episodes, or peripheral retinopathy. Mitochondrial macroangiopathy manifests as atherosclerosis, ectasia of arteries, aneurysm formation, dissection, or spontaneous rupture of arteries. The diagnosis relies on the documentation and confirmation of the mitochondrial metabolic defect or the genetic cause after exclusion of non-MID causes. Treatment is not at variance compared to treatment of vasculopathy due to non-MID causes. Mitochondrial vasculopathy exists and manifests as micro- or macroangiopathy. Diagnosing mitochondrial vasculopathy is crucial since appropriate treatment may prevent from severe complications. PMID:27231520

  10. Mitochondrial-associated metabolic changes and neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease - from clinical features to the bench.

    PubMed

    Rosenstock, Tatiana R; Duarte, Ana I; Rego, A Cristina

    2010-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disease selectively leading to striatal neurodegeneration, but also affecting the cortex and the hypothalamus. Although it is hard to predict the sequence of cell-damaging events occurring in HD patients, several pathological mechanisms have been proposed to explain HD selective neurodegeneration and disease symptomatology. Abnormalities in mitochondrial function and bioenergetics contribute to cell death and have been reported in HD-affected individuals, both in central and peripheral tissues. Moreover, the latter has been characterized in several HD models. Thus, this review describes the converging mechanisms that lead to mitochondrial and metabolic abnormalities in thoroughly studied in vivo and in vitro HD models, including excitotoxicity, altered calcium handling, changes in mitochondrial structure and dynamics and transcription deregulation, which may represent important disease therapeutic targets. Furthermore, the review describes the current evidences of metabolic disturbances in the brain of HD-affected humans and of peripheral metabolic and mitochondrial changes, weight loss and endocrine abnormalities operating in the whole HD body.

  11. [The state of the mitochondrial energy-supplying system of blood leukocytes in the dynamics of Guerin's carcinoma growth under the low-level irradiation conditions].

    PubMed

    Marchenko, M M; Voloshchuk, O N

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial NADH-dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase activities of peripheral blood leukocytes of rats with the grafted Guerin's carcinoma were studied in the dynamics of oncogenesis under the conditions of the preliminary low-level irradiation. Tumor growth was accompanied by a decrease in NADH-dehydrogenase activity, an increase of succinate dehydrogenase activity. Cytochrome oxidase activity of leucocytes remained at the control level up to the terminal stages of tumor growth. Preliminary low-level irradiation of the tumor bearing animals caused a tendency to the decrease of enzymatic activities studied. This tendency was observed from the initial stages of oncogenesis.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA with a large-scale deletion causes two distinct mitochondrial disease phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Katada, Shun; Mito, Takayuki; Ogasawara, Emi; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi; Nakada, Kazuto

    2013-09-04

    Studies in patients have suggested that the clinical phenotypes of some mitochondrial diseases might transit from one disease to another (e.g., Pearson syndrome [PS] to Kearns-Sayre syndrome) in single individuals carrying mitochondrial (mt) DNA with a common deletion (ΔmtDNA), but there is no direct experimental evidence for this. To determine whether ΔmtDNA has the pathologic potential to induce multiple mitochondrial disease phenotypes, we used trans-mitochondrial mice with a heteroplasmic state of wild-type mtDNA and ΔmtDNA (mito-miceΔ). Late-stage embryos carrying ≥50% ΔmtDNA showed abnormal hematopoiesis and iron metabolism in livers that were partly similar to PS (PS-like phenotypes), although they did not express sideroblastic anemia that is a typical symptom of PS. More than half of the neonates with PS-like phenotypes died by 1 month after birth, whereas the rest showed a decrease of ΔmtDNA load in the affected tissues, peripheral blood and liver, and they recovered from PS-like phenotypes. The proportion of ΔmtDNA in various tissues of the surviving mito-miceΔ increased with time, and Kearns-Sayre syndrome-like phenotypes were expressed when the proportion of mtDNA in various tissues reached >70-80%. Our model mouse study clearly showed that a single ΔmtDNA was responsible for at least two distinct disease phenotypes at different ages and suggested that the level and dynamics of mtDNA load in affected tissues would be important for the onset and transition of mitochondrial disease phenotypes in mice.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA with a Large-Scale Deletion Causes Two Distinct Mitochondrial Disease Phenotypes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Katada, Shun; Mito, Takayuki; Ogasawara, Emi; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi; Nakada, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    Studies in patients have suggested that the clinical phenotypes of some mitochondrial diseases might transit from one disease to another (e.g., Pearson syndrome [PS] to Kearns-Sayre syndrome) in single individuals carrying mitochondrial (mt) DNA with a common deletion (∆mtDNA), but there is no direct experimental evidence for this. To determine whether ∆mtDNA has the pathologic potential to induce multiple mitochondrial disease phenotypes, we used trans-mitochondrial mice with a heteroplasmic state of wild-type mtDNA and ∆mtDNA (mito-mice∆). Late-stage embryos carrying ≥50% ∆mtDNA showed abnormal hematopoiesis and iron metabolism in livers that were partly similar to PS (PS-like phenotypes), although they did not express sideroblastic anemia that is a typical symptom of PS. More than half of the neonates with PS-like phenotypes died by 1 month after birth, whereas the rest showed a decrease of ∆mtDNA load in the affected tissues, peripheral blood and liver, and they recovered from PS-like phenotypes. The proportion of ∆mtDNA in various tissues of the surviving mito-mice∆ increased with time, and Kearns-Sayre syndrome−like phenotypes were expressed when the proportion of ∆mtDNA in various tissues reached >70–80%. Our model mouse study clearly showed that a single ∆mtDNA was responsible for at least two distinct disease phenotypes at different ages and suggested that the level and dynamics of ∆mtDNA load in affected tissues would be important for the onset and transition of mitochondrial disease phenotypes in mice. PMID:23853091

  14. Mitochondrial diseases of the brain.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Rajnish K; Flint Beal, M

    2013-10-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are debilitating diseases of the brain, characterized by behavioral, motor and cognitive impairments. Ample evidence underpins mitochondrial dysfunction as a central causal factor in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedreich's ataxia and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In this review, we discuss the role of mitochondrial dysfunction such as bioenergetics defects, mitochondrial DNA mutations, gene mutations, altered mitochondrial dynamics (mitochondrial fusion/fission, morphology, size, transport/trafficking, and movement), impaired transcription and the association of mutated proteins with mitochondria in these diseases. We highlight the therapeutic role of mitochondrial bioenergetic agents in toxin and in cellular and genetic animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. We also discuss clinical trials of bioenergetics agents in neurodegenerative disorders. Lastly, we shed light on PGC-1α, TORC-1, AMP kinase, Nrf2-ARE, and Sirtuins as novel therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. Mitochondrial implications in bulbospinal muscular atrophy (Kennedy disease).

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Mishra, Anushree; Wakil, Salma; Pennuto, Maria; Soraru, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that mitochondrial functions are secondarily disturbed in bulbospinal muscular atrophy (BSMA). This review focuses on the relation between BSMA and the effect of the expanded polyglutamine (poly-Q) androgen receptor (AR) on mitochondrial functions. Mitochondrial functions in bulbospinal muscular atrophy (SBMA) are affected on the molecular, clinical, and therapeutic level. On the molecular level there is down-regulation of various nuclear-DNA-encoded mitochondrial proteins by mutant androgen receptor (mAR), colocalization of the mAR with various mitochondrial proteins, association of mAR aggregates with mitochondria resulting in abnormal distribution of mitochondria, mtDNA depletion or multiple mtDNA deletions, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, increase in reactive oxidative species, and activation of the mitochondrial caspase pathway. On the clinical level various mitochondrial disorders mimic SBMA, and on the therapeutic level pioglitazone expresses PPAR-γ, cyclosporine-A restores mitochondrial membrane potentials, coenzyme-Q and idebenone reduce oxidative stress, and geldanamycin up-regulates protective mitochondrial heat shock proteins. In conclusion, in BSMA mitochondrial dysfunction results from various interactions of elongated poly-Q AR with mitochondria, mitochondrial proteins, nuclear or mitochondrial DNA, causing oxidative stress, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, or activation of the mitochondrial caspase pathway. Additionally, mitochondrial disease may mimic BSMA and therapeutic approaches may depend on modifications of mitochondrial pathways.

  16. Mitochondrial Quality Control in Cardiac Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Juliane C.; Bozi, Luiz H. M.; Bechara, Luiz R. G.; Lima, Vanessa M.; Ferreira, Julio C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of mitochondrial homeostasis is a hallmark of cardiac diseases. Therefore, maintenance of mitochondrial integrity through different surveillance mechanisms is critical for cardiomyocyte survival. In this review, we discuss the most recent findings on the central role of mitochondrial quality control processes including regulation of mitochondrial redox balance, aldehyde metabolism, proteostasis, dynamics, and clearance in cardiac diseases, highlighting their potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:27818636

  17. Abnormal UP/DOWN Membrane Potential Dynamics Coupled with the Neocortical Slow Oscillation in Dentate Granule Cells during the Latent Phase of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy123

    PubMed Central

    Ouedraogo, David W.; Lenck-Santini, Pierre-Pascal; Marti, Geoffrey; Robbe, David; Crépel, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    The dentate gyrus, a major entry point to the hippocampus, gates (or filters) incoming information from the cortex. During sleep or anesthesia, the slow-wave oscillation (SWO) orchestrates hippocampus–neocortex communication, which is important for memory formation. The dentate gate is altered in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) early during epileptogenesis, which favors the propagation of pathological activities. Yet, whether the gating of physiological SWO by dentate granule cells (DGCs) is altered in TLE has remained unexplored. We combined intracellular recordings of membrane potential (Vm) of DGCs and local field potential recordings of the SWO in parietal cortex in anesthetized rats early during epileptogenesis [post-status epilepticus (SE) rats]. As expected, in control rats, the Vm of DGCs weakly and rarely oscillated in the SWO frequency range. In contrast, in post-SE rats, the Vm of DGCs displayed strong and long-lasting SWO. In these cells, clear UP and DOWN states, in phase with the neocortical SWO, led to a bimodal Vm distribution. In post-SE rats, the firing of DGCs was increased and more temporally modulated by the neocortical SWO. We conclude that UP/DOWN state dynamics dominate the Vm of DGCs and firing early during epileptogenesis. This abnormally strong neocortical influence on the dynamics of DGCs may profoundly modify the hippocampus–neocortex dialogue during sleep and associated cognitive functions. PMID:27257629

  18. Mitochondrial ultrastructure and markers of dynamics in hepatocytes from aged, calorie restricted mice fed with different dietary fats

    PubMed Central

    Khraiwesh, Husam; López-Domínguez, José A.; del Río, Lucía Fernández; Gutierrez-Casado, Elena; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido; de Cabo, Rafael; Ramsey, Jon J.; Burón, María I.; Villalba, José M.; González-Reyes, José A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we analyzed changes in hepatocyte mitochondrial mass and ultrastructure as well as in mitochondrial markers of fission/fusion and biogenesis in mice subjected to 40% calorie restriction (CR) for 18 months versus ad libitum-fed controls. Animals subjected to CR were separated into three groups with different dietary fats: soybean oil (also in controls),fish oil and lard. Therefore, the effect of the dietary fat under CR was studied as well. Our results show that CR induced changes in hepatocyte and mitochondrial size, in the volume fraction occupied by mitochondria, and in the number of mitochondria per hepatocyte. Also, mean number of mitochondrial cristae and lengths were significantly higher in all CR groups compared with controls. Finally, CR had no remarkable effects on the expression levels of fission and fusion protein markers. However, considerable differences in many of these parameters were found when comparing the CR groups, supporting the idea that dietary fat plays a relevant role in the modulation of CR effects in aged mice. PMID:24704714

  19. The Biarzo case in northern Italy: is the temporal dynamic of swine mitochondrial DNA lineages in Europe related to domestication?

    PubMed Central

    Vai, Stefania; Vilaça, Sibelle Torres; Romandini, Matteo; Benazzo, Andrea; Visentini, Paola; Modolo, Marta; Bertolini, Marco; MacQueen, Peggy; Austin, Jeremy; Cooper, Alan; Caramelli, David; Lari, Martina; Bertorelle, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Genetically-based reconstructions of the history of pig domestication in Europe are based on two major pillars: 1) the temporal changes of mitochondrial DNA lineages are related to domestication; 2) Near Eastern haplotypes which appeared and then disappeared in some sites across Europe are genetic markers of the first Near Eastern domestic pigs. We typed a small but informative fragment of the mitochondrial DNA in 23 Sus scrofa samples from a site in north eastern Italy (Biarzo shelter) which provides a continuous record across a ≈6,000 year time frame from the Upper Palaeolithic to the Neolithic. We additionally carried out several radiocarbon dating. We found that a rapid mitochondrial DNA turnover occurred during the Mesolithic, suggesting that substantial changes in the composition of pig mitochondrial lineages can occur naturally across few millennia independently of domestication processes. Moreover, so-called Near Eastern haplotypes were present here at least two millennia before the arrival of Neolithic package in the same area. Consequently, we recommend a re-evaluation of the previous idea that Neolithic farmers introduced pigs domesticated in the Near East, and that Mesolithic communities acquired domestic pigs via cultural exchanges, to include the possibility of a more parsimonious hypothesis of local domestication in Europe. PMID:26549464

  20. Dietary supplementation with fish oil alters the expression levels of proteins governing mitochondrial dynamics and prevents high-fat diet-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ruifang; Wang, Xiaoming; Liu, Yan; Xia, Min

    2014-07-28

    Diets supplemented with fish oil (FO), which is rich in n-3 PUFA, have been shown to modify several key risk factors for CVD. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of FO supplementation on mitochondrial dynamic protein expression in the endothelium and on endothelial cell function. Male apoE-deficient (apoE-/-) mice (8 weeks old, n 12 per group) were fed a high-fat diet containing 45% fat (HFD group) or a HFD with partial replacement of lard with 10% (w/w) FO (FO group) (total EPA and DHA content 64.1 g/kg) for 8 weeks. ApoE-/- mice in the FO group had a greater endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation response to acetylcholine (Ach) than those in the HFD group. The atherosclerotic lesion volume in the aortic sinus of mice in the FO group was 54% lower than that in the HFD group (P< 0.01). In addition, the aortas isolated from mice in the FO group had higher expression levels of Mfn2 and Opa1 but lower expression levels of Fis1 than those from the HFD group. Compared with mice fed the HFD, those fed the FO diet showed significantly lower levels of mitochondrial oxidative stress, cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activity (each P< 0.05). Furthermore, FO-fed mice displayed increased NO release and availability and enhanced endothelial NO synthase activity compared with HFD-fed mice. Taken together, these results reveal a novel mechanism by which FO protects against endothelial cell dysfunction, which may result in improved mitochondrial dynamics.

  1. The role of mitochondrial dysfunction in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tadafumi

    2006-12-01

    Altered energy metabolism and accumulated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in the brain, associated mtDNA polymorphisms/mutations or nuclear encoded mitochondrial genes, effects of mood stabilizers on mitochondria and comorbidity of mood disorders with mitochondrial disorders, together suggest the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. Mitochondrial dysfunction may be involved in the calcium signaling abnormality found in bipolar disorder. We recently produced mice accumulating neuron-specific mtDNA deletions. Bipolar disorder-like behavioral phenotypes of these mice supported this hypothesis. Thus, development of new mood stabilizers acting on mitochondrial function might be warranted.

  2. Mitochondria-specific accumulation of amyloid β induces mitochondrial dysfunction leading to apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Cha, Moon-Yong; Han, Sun-Ho; Son, Sung Min; Hong, Hyun-Seok; Choi, Young-Ju; Byun, Jayoung; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are best known as the essential intracellular organelles that host the homeostasis required for cellular survival, but they also have relevance in diverse disease-related conditions, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid β (Aβ) peptide is the key molecule in AD pathogenesis, and has been highlighted in the implication of mitochondrial abnormality during the disease progress. Neuronal exposure to Aβ impairs mitochondrial dynamics and function. Furthermore, mitochondrial Aβ accumulation has been detected in the AD brain. However, the underlying mechanism of how Aβ affects mitochondrial function remains uncertain, and it is questionable whether mitochondrial Aβ accumulation followed by mitochondrial dysfunction leads directly to neuronal toxicity. This study demonstrated that an exogenous Aβ(1-42) treatment, when applied to the hippocampal cell line of mice (specifically HT22 cells), caused a deleterious alteration in mitochondria in both morphology and function. A clathrin-mediated endocytosis blocker rescued the exogenous Aβ(1-42)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, the mitochondria-targeted accumulation of Aβ(1-42) in HT22 cells using Aβ(1-42) with a mitochondria-targeting sequence induced the identical morphological alteration of mitochondria as that observed in the APP/PS AD mouse model and exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. In addition, subsequent mitochondrial dysfunctions were demonstrated in the mitochondria-specific Aβ(1-42) accumulation model, which proved indistinguishable from the mitochondrial impairment induced by exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. Finally, cellular toxicity was directly induced by mitochondria-targeted Aβ(1-42) accumulation, which mimics the apoptosis process in exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that mitochondria-targeted Aβ(1-42) accumulation is the necessary and sufficient condition for Aβ-mediated mitochondria impairments, and leads

  3. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    PubMed

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    of human diseases arising from defects in mitochondrial ion and ROS homeostasis, energy production and morphology [1]. Parkinson´s Disease (PD) is a very good example of this important mitochondrial component on neurodegenerative diseases. Anuradha Yadav, Swati Agrawal, Shashi Kant Tiwari, and Rajnish K. Chaturvedi (CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research / Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, India) [6] remark in their review the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD with special focus on the role of oxidative stress and bioenergetic deficits. These alterations may have their origin on pathogenic gene mutations in important genes such as DJ-1, -syn, parkin, PINK1 or LRRK2. These mutations, in turn, may cause defects in mitochondrial dynamics (key events like fission/fusion, biogenesis, trafficking in retrograde and anterograde directions, and mitophagy). This work reviews different strategies to enhance mitochondrial bioenergetics in order to ameliorate the neurodegenerative process, with an emphasis on clinical trials reports that indicate their potential. Among them creatine, Coenzyme Q10 and mitochondrial targeted antioxidants/peptides are reported to have the most remarkable effects in clinical trials. They highlight a dual effect of PGC-1α expression on PD prognosis. Whereas a modest expression of this transcriptional co-activator results in positive effects, a moderate to substantial overexpession may have deleterious consequences. As strategies to induce PGC-1α activation, these authors remark the possibility to activate Sirt1 with resveratrol, to use PPAR agonists such as pioglitazone, rosiglitazone, fenofibrate and bezafibrate. Other strategies include the triggering of Nrf2/antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway by triterpenoids (derivatives of oleanolic acid) or by Bacopa monniera, the enhancement of ATP production by carnitine and -lipoic acid. Mitochondrial dysfunctions are the prime source of neurodegenerative diseases and

  4. Depletion of Mitofusin-2 Causes Mitochondrial Damage in Cisplatin-Induced Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bobylev, Ilja; Joshi, Abhijeet R; Barham, Mohammed; Neiss, Wolfram F; Lehmann, Helmar C

    2017-01-21

    Sensory neuropathy is a relevant side effect of the antineoplastic agent cisplatin. Mitochondrial damage is assumed to play a critical role in cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy, but the pathomechanisms underlying cisplatin-induced mitotoxicity and neurodegeneration are incompletely understood. In an animal model of cisplatin-induced neuropathy, we determined in detail the extent and spatial distribution of mitochondrial damage during cisplatin treatment. Changes in the total number of axonal mitochondria during cisplatin treatment were assessed in intercostal nerves from transgenic mice that express cyan fluorescent protein. Further, we explored the impact of cisplatin on the expression of nuclear encoded molecules of mitochondrial fusion and fission, including mitofusin-2 (MFN2), optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), and dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1). Cisplatin treatment resulted in a loss of total mitochondrial mass in axons and in an abnormal mitochondrial morphology including atypical enlargement, increased vacuolization, and loss of cristae. These changes were observed in distal and proximal nerve segments and were more prominent in axons than in Schwann cells. Transcripts of fusion and fission proteins were reduced in distal nerve segments. Significant reduced expression levels of the fusion protein MFN2 was detected in nerves of cisplatin-exposed animals. In summary, we provide for the first time an evidence that cisplatin alters mitochondrial dynamics in peripheral nerves. Loss of MFN2, previously implicated in the pathogenesis of other neurodegenerative diseases, also contributes to the pathogenesis in cisplatin-induced neuropathy.

  5. Compartmentalized Regulation of Parkin-Mediated Mitochondrial Quality Control in the Drosophila Nervous System In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hyun; Tandarich, Lauren C.; Nguyen, Kenny

    2016-01-01

    In neurons, the normal distribution and selective removal of mitochondria are considered essential for maintaining the functions of the large asymmetric cell and its diverse compartments. Parkin, a E3 ubiquitin ligase associated with familial Parkinson's disease, has been implicated in mitochondrial dynamics and removal in cells including neurons. However, it is not clear how Parkin functions in mitochondrial turnover in vivo, or whether Parkin-dependent events of the mitochondrial life cycle occur in all neuronal compartments. Here, using the live Drosophila nervous system, we investigated the involvement of Parkin in mitochondrial dynamics, distribution, morphology, and removal. Contrary to our expectations, we found that Parkin-deficient animals do not accumulate senescent mitochondria in their motor axons or neuromuscular junctions; instead, they contain far fewer axonal mitochondria, and these displayed normal motility behavior, morphology, and metabolic state. However, the loss of Parkin did produce abnormal tubular and reticular mitochondria restricted to the motor cell bodies. In addition, in contrast to drug-treated, immortalized cells in vitro, mature motor neurons rarely displayed Parkin-dependent mitophagy. These data indicate that the cell body is the focus of Parkin-dependent mitochondrial quality control in neurons, and argue that a selection process allows only healthy mitochondria to pass from cell bodies to axons, perhaps to limit the impact of mitochondrial dysfunction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Parkin has been proposed to police mitochondrial fidelity by binding to dysfunctional mitochondria via PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog)-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and targeting them for autophagic degradation. However, it is unknown whether and how the PINK1/Parkin pathway regulates the mitochondrial life cycle in neurons in vivo. Using Drosophila motor neurons, we show that parkin disruption generates an abnormal mitochondrial network in cell

  6. Modulation of mitochondrial function and morphology by interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with the mitochondrial fusion factor OPA1

    SciTech Connect

    Kieper, Nicole; Holmstroem, Kira M.; Ciceri, Dalila; Fiesel, Fabienne C.; Wolburg, Hartwig; Ziviani, Elena; Whitworth, Alexander J.; Martins, L. Miguel; Kahle, Philipp J.; Krueger, Rejko

    2010-04-15

    Loss of Omi/HtrA2 function leads to nerve cell loss in mouse models and has been linked to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. Omi/HtrA2 is a serine protease released as a pro-apoptotic factor from the mitochondrial intermembrane space into the cytosol. Under physiological conditions, Omi/HtrA2 is thought to be involved in protection against cellular stress, but the cytological and molecular mechanisms are not clear. Omi/HtrA2 deficiency caused an accumulation of reactive oxygen species and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. In Omi/HtrA2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, as well as in Omi/HtrA2 silenced human HeLa cells and Drosophila S2R+ cells, we found elongated mitochondria by live cell imaging. Electron microscopy confirmed the mitochondrial morphology alterations and showed abnormal cristae structure. Examining the levels of proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion, we found a selective up-regulation of more soluble OPA1 protein. Complementation of knockout cells with wild-type Omi/HtrA2 but not with the protease mutant [S306A]Omi/HtrA2 reversed the mitochondrial elongation phenotype and OPA1 alterations. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation showed direct interaction of Omi/HtrA2 with endogenous OPA1. Thus, we show for the first time a direct effect of loss of Omi/HtrA2 on mitochondrial morphology and demonstrate a novel role of this mitochondrial serine protease in the modulation of OPA1. Our results underscore a critical role of impaired mitochondrial dynamics in neurodegenerative disorders.

  7. Dysregulation of Mitochondrial Dynamics and the Muscle Transcriptome in ICU Patients Suffering from Sepsis Induced Multiple Organ Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Katarina; Tjäder, Inga; Keller, Pernille; Petrovic, Natasa; Ahlman, Bo; Schéele, Camilla; Wernerman, Jan; Timmons, James A.; Rooyackers, Olav

    2008-01-01

    Background Septic patients treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) often develop multiple organ failure including persistent skeletal muscle dysfunction which results in the patient's protracted recovery process. We have demonstrated that muscle mitochondrial enzyme activities are impaired in septic ICU patients impairing cellular energy balance, which will interfere with muscle function and metabolism. Here we use detailed phenotyping and genomics to elucidate mechanisms leading to these impairments and the molecular consequences. Methodology/Principal Findings Utilising biopsy material from seventeen patients and ten age-matched controls we demonstrate that neither mitochondrial in vivo protein synthesis nor expression of mitochondrial genes are compromised. Indeed, there was partial activation of the mitochondrial biogenesis pathway involving NRF2α/GABP and its target genes TFAM, TFB1M and TFB2M yet clearly this failed to maintain mitochondrial function. We therefore utilised transcript profiling and pathway analysis of ICU patient skeletal muscle to generate insight into the molecular defects driving loss of muscle function and metabolic homeostasis. Gene ontology analysis of Affymetrix analysis demonstrated substantial loss of muscle specific genes, a global oxidative stress response related to most probably cytokine signalling, altered insulin related signalling and a substantial overlap between patients and muscle wasting/inflammatory animal models. MicroRNA 21 processing appeared defective suggesting that post-transcriptional protein synthesis regulation is altered by disruption of tissue microRNA expression. Finally, we were able to demonstrate that the phenotype of skeletal muscle in ICU patients is not merely one of inactivity, it appears to be an actively remodelling tissue, influenced by several mediators, all of which may be open to manipulation with the aim to improve clinical outcome. Conclusions/Significance This first combined protein and

  8. Staying in aerobic shape: how the structural integrity of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA is maintained.

    PubMed

    Scott, Sidney V; Cassidy-Stone, Ann; Meeusen, Shelly L; Nunnari, Jodi

    2003-08-01

    The structure and integrity of the mitochondrial compartment are features essential for it to function efficiently. The maintenance of mitochondrial structure in cells ranging from yeast to humans has been shown to require both ongoing fission and fusion. Recent characterization of many of the molecular components that direct mitochondrial fission and fusion events have led to a more complete understanding of how these processes take place. Further, mitochondrial fragmentation observed when cells undergo apoptosis requires mitochondrial fission, underlying the importance of mitochondrial dynamics in cellular homeostasis. Mitochondrial structure also impacts mitochondrial DNA inheritance. Recent studies suggest that faithful transmission of mitochondrial DNA to daughter cells might require a mitochondrial membrane tethering apparatus.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  10. Mitochondrial genetics

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, Patrick Francis; Hudson, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the last 10 years the field of mitochondrial genetics has widened, shifting the focus from rare sporadic, metabolic disease to the effects of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in a growing spectrum of human disease. The aim of this review is to guide the reader through some key concepts regarding mitochondria before introducing both classic and emerging mitochondrial disorders. Sources of data In this article, a review of the current mitochondrial genetics literature was conducted using PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/). In addition, this review makes use of a growing number of publically available databases including MITOMAP, a human mitochondrial genome database (www.mitomap.org), the Human DNA polymerase Gamma Mutation Database (http://tools.niehs.nih.gov/polg/) and PhyloTree.org (www.phylotree.org), a repository of global mtDNA variation. Areas of agreement The disruption in cellular energy, resulting from defects in mtDNA or defects in the nuclear-encoded genes responsible for mitochondrial maintenance, manifests in a growing number of human diseases. Areas of controversy The exact mechanisms which govern the inheritance of mtDNA are hotly debated. Growing points Although still in the early stages, the development of in vitro genetic manipulation could see an end to the inheritance of the most severe mtDNA disease. PMID:23704099

  11. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  12. Novel targets for mitochondrial medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wang; Karamanlidis, Georgios; Tian, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria—classically viewed as the powerhouses of the cell—have taken center stage in disease pathogenesis and resolution. Mitochondrial dysfunction, which originates from primary defects within the organelle or is induced by environmental stresses, plays a critical role in human disease. Despite their central role in human health and disease, there are no approved drugs that directly target mitochondria. We present possible new druggable targets in mitochondrial biology, including protein modification, calcium ion (Ca2+) transport, and dynamics, as we move into a new era of mitochondrial medicine. PMID:26888432

  13. Sleep Disorders Associated with Primary Mitochondrial Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Ryan J.; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Primary mitochondrial diseases are caused by heritable or spontaneous mutations in nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA. Such pathological mutations are relatively common in humans and may lead to neurological and neuromuscular complication that could compromise normal sleep behavior. To gain insight into the potential impact of primary mitochondrial disease and sleep pathology, we reviewed the relevant English language literature in which abnormal sleep was reported in association with a mitochondrial disease. Design: We examined publications reported in Web of Science and PubMed from February 1976 through January 2014, and identified 54 patients with a proven or suspected primary mitochondrial disorder who were evaluated for sleep disturbances. Measurements and Results: Both nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA mutations were associated with abnormal sleep patterns. Most subjects who underwent polysomnography had central sleep apnea, and only 5 patients had obstructive sleep apnea. Twenty-four patients showed decreased ventilatory drive in response to hypoxia and/or hypercapnia that was not considered due to weakness of the intrinsic muscles of respiration. Conclusions: Sleep pathology may be an underreported complication of primary mitochondrial diseases. The probable underlying mechanism is cellular energy failure causing both central neurological and peripheral neuromuscular degenerative changes that commonly present as central sleep apnea and poor ventilatory response to hypercapnia. Increased recognition of the genetics and clinical manifestations of mitochondrial diseases by sleep researchers and clinicians is important in the evaluation and treatment of all patients with sleep disturbances. Prospective population-based studies are required to determine the true prevalence of mitochondrial energy failure in subjects with sleep disorders, and conversely, of individuals with primary mitochondrial diseases and sleep pathology. Citation: Ramezani RJ

  14. Maximal oxidative capacity during exercise is associated with skeletal muscle fuel selection and dynamic changes in mitochondrial protein acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Overmyer, Katherine A.; Evans, Charles R.; Qi, Nathan R.; Minogue, Catherine E.; Carson, Joshua J.; Chermside-Scabbo, Christopher J.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Pagliarini, David J.; Coon, Joshua J.; Burant, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Maximal exercise-associated oxidative capacity is strongly correlated with health and longevity in humans. Rats selectively bred for high running capacity (HCR) have improved metabolic health and are longer-lived than their low capacity counterparts (LCR). Using metabolomic and proteomic profiling, we show that HCR efficiently oxidize fatty acids (FA) and branched-chain amino acid (BCAA), sparing glycogen and reducing accumulation of short- and medium-chain acylcarnitines. HCR mitochondria have reduced acetylation of mitochondrial proteins within oxidative pathways at rest, and there is rapid protein deacetylation with exercise, which is greater in HCR than LCR. Fluxomic analysis of valine degradation with exercise demonstrates a functional role of differential protein acetylation in HCR and LCR. Our data suggest efficient FA and BCAA utilization contribute to high intrinsic exercise capacity and the health and longevity benefits associated with enhanced fitness. PMID:25738461

  15. Glucocorticoid Modulation of Mitochondrial Function in Hepatoma Cells Requires the Mitochondrial Fission Protein Drp1

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Alvarez, María Isabel; Paz, José C.; Sebastián, David; Muñoz, Juan Pablo; Liesa, Marc; Segalés, Jessica; Palacín, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Glucocorticoids, such as dexamethasone, enhance hepatic energy metabolism and gluconeogenesis partly through changes in mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial function is influenced by the balance between mitochondrial fusion and fission events. However, whether glucocorticoids modulate mitochondrial function through the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics is currently unknown. Results: Here, we report that the effects of dexamethasone on mitochondrial function and gluconeogenesis in hepatoma cells are dependent on the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). Dexamethasone increased routine oxygen consumption, maximal respiratory capacity, superoxide anion, proton leak, and gluconeogenesis in hepatoma cells. Under these conditions, dexamethasone altered mitochondrial morphology, which was paralleled by a large increase in Drp1 expression, and reduced mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) and Mfn2. In vivo dexamethasone treatment also enhanced Drp1 expression in mouse liver. On the basis of these observations, we analyzed the dependence on the Drp1 function of dexamethasone effects on mitochondrial respiration and gluconeogenesis. We show that the increase in mitochondrial respiration and gluconeogenesis induced by dexamethasone are hampered by the inhibition of Drp1 function. Innovation: Our findings provide the first evidence that the effects of glucocorticoids on hepatic metabolism require the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1. Conclusion: In summary, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial effects of dexamethasone both on mitochondrial respiration and on the gluconeogenic pathway depend on Drp1. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 366–378. PMID:22703557

  16. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism.

  17. A small natural molecule promotes mitochondrial fusion through inhibition of the deubiquitinase USP30

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Wen; Chen, Ziheng; Liu, Haiyang; Yan, Chen; Chen, Ming; Feng, Du; Yan, Chaojun; Wu, Hao; Du, Lei; Wang, Yueying; Liu, Jinhua; Huang, Xiaohu; Xia, Laixin; Liu, Lei; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Haijing; Wang, Jun; Song, Zhiyin; Hao, Xiaojiang; Chen, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial fusion is a highly coordinated process that mixes and unifies the mitochondrial compartment for normal mitochondrial functions and mitochondrial DNA inheritance. Dysregulated mitochondrial fusion causes mitochondrial fragmentation, abnormal mitochondrial physiology and inheritance, and has been causally linked with a number of neuronal diseases. Here, we identified a diterpenoid derivative 15-oxospiramilactone (S3) that potently induced mitochondrial fusion to restore the mitochondrial network and oxidative respiration in cells that are deficient in either Mfn1 or Mfn2. A mitochondria-localized deubiquitinase USP30 is a target of S3. The inhibition of USP30 by S3 leads to an increase of non-degradative ubiquitination of Mfn1/2, which enhances Mfn1 and Mfn2 activity and promotes mitochondrial fusion. Thus, through the use of an inhibitor of USP30, our study uncovers an unconventional function of non-degradative ubiquitination of Mfns in promoting mitochondrial fusion. PMID:24513856

  18. A small natural molecule promotes mitochondrial fusion through inhibition of the deubiquitinase USP30.

    PubMed

    Yue, Wen; Chen, Ziheng; Liu, Haiyang; Yan, Chen; Chen, Ming; Feng, Du; Yan, Chaojun; Wu, Hao; Du, Lei; Wang, Yueying; Liu, Jinhua; Huang, Xiaohu; Xia, Laixin; Liu, Lei; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Haijing; Wang, Jun; Song, Zhiyin; Hao, Xiaojiang; Chen, Quan

    2014-04-01

    Mitochondrial fusion is a highly coordinated process that mixes and unifies the mitochondrial compartment for normal mitochondrial functions and mitochondrial DNA inheritance. Dysregulated mitochondrial fusion causes mitochondrial fragmentation, abnormal mitochondrial physiology and inheritance, and has been causally linked with a number of neuronal diseases. Here, we identified a diterpenoid derivative 15-oxospiramilactone (S3) that potently induced mitochondrial fusion to restore the mitochondrial network and oxidative respiration in cells that are deficient in either Mfn1 or Mfn2. A mitochondria-localized deubiquitinase USP30 is a target of S3. The inhibition of USP30 by S3 leads to an increase of non-degradative ubiquitination of Mfn1/2, which enhances Mfn1 and Mfn2 activity and promotes mitochondrial fusion. Thus, through the use of an inhibitor of USP30, our study uncovers an unconventional function of non-degradative ubiquitination of Mfns in promoting mitochondrial fusion.

  19. Mitochondrial and Nuclear Genes of Mitochondrial Components in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kirches, E

    2009-01-01

    Although the observation of aerobic glycolysis of tumor cells by Otto v. Warburg had demonstrated abnormalities of mitochondrial energy metabolism in cancer decades ago, there was no clear evidence for a functional role of mutant mitochondrial proteins in cancer development until the early years of the 21st century. In the year 2000, a major breakthrough was achieved by the observation, that several genes coding for subunits of the respiratory chain (ETC) complex II, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) are tumor suppressor genes in heritable paragangliomas, fulfilling Knudson’s classical two-hit hypothesis. A functional inactivation of both alleles by germline mutations and chromosomal losses in the tumor tissue was found in the patients. Later, SDH mutations were also identified in sporadic paragangliomas and pheochromocytomas. Genes of the mitochondrial ATP-synthase and of mitochondrial iron homeostasis have been implicated in cancer development at the level of cell culture and mouse experiments. In contrast to the well established role of some nuclear SDH genes, a functional impact of the mitochondrial genome itself (mtDNA) in cancer development remains unclear. Nevertheless, the extremely high frequency of mtDNA mutations in solid tumors raises the question, whether this small circular genome might be applicable to early cancer detection. This is a meaningful approach, especially in cancers, which tend to spread tumor cells early into bodily fluids or faeces, which can be screened by non-invasive methods. PMID:19949549

  20. Mitochondrial fusion and fission in cell life and death.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Benedikt

    2010-12-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that constantly fuse and divide. These processes (collectively termed mitochondrial dynamics) are important for mitochondrial inheritance and for the maintenance of mitochondrial functions. The core components of the evolutionarily conserved fusion and fission machineries have now been identified, and mechanistic studies have revealed the first secrets of the complex processes that govern fusion and fission of a double membrane-bound organelle. Mitochondrial dynamics was recently recognized as an important constituent of cellular quality control. Defects have detrimental consequences on bioenergetic supply and contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. These findings open exciting new directions to explore mitochondrial biology.

  1. Reversible Inhibition of Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis during Linezolid-Related Hyperlactatemia▿

    PubMed Central

    Garrabou, Glòria; Soriano, Alejandro; López, Sònia; Guallar, Jordi P.; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc; Martínez, Jose A.; Casademont, Jordi; Cardellach, Francesc; Mensa, Josep; Miró, Òscar

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the mitochondrial toxicity mechanisms of linezolid-related hyperlactatemia. Five patients on a long-term schedule of linezolid treatment were studied during the acute phase of hyperlactatemia and after clinical recovery and lactate normalization following linezolid withdrawal. Mitochondrial studies were performed with peripheral blood mononuclear cells and consisted of measurement of mitochondrial mass, mitochondrial protein synthesis homeostasis (cytochrome c oxidase [COX] activity, COX-II subunit expression, COX-II mRNA abundance, and mitochondrial DNA [mtDNA] content), and overall mitochondrial function (mitochondrial membrane potential and intact-cell oxidative capacity). During linezolid-induced hyperlactatemia, we found extremely reduced protein expression (16% of the remaining content compared to control values [100%], P < 0.001) for the mitochondrially coded, transcribed, and translated COX-II subunit. Accordingly, COX activity was also found to be decreased (51% of the remaining activity, P < 0.05). These reductions were observed despite the numbers of COX-II mitochondrial RNA transcripts being abnormally increased (297%, P = 0.10 [not significant]) and the mitochondrial DNA content remaining stable. These abnormalities persisted even after the correction for mitochondrial mass, which was mildly decreased during the hyperlactatemic phase. Most of the mitochondrial abnormalities returned to control ranges after linezolid withdrawal, lactate normalization, and clinical recovery. Linezolid inhibits mitochondrial protein synthesis, leading to decreased mitochondrial enzymatic activity, which causes linezolid-related hyperlactatemia, which resolves upon discontinuation of linezolid treatment. PMID:17194826

  2. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 2 deficiency is a novel disorder of mitochondrial fission.

    PubMed

    Shahni, Rojeen; Cale, Catherine M; Anderson, Glenn; Osellame, Laura D; Hambleton, Sophie; Jacques, Thomas S; Wedatilake, Yehani; Taanman, Jan-Willem; Chan, Emma; Qasim, Waseem; Plagnol, Vincent; Chalasani, Annapurna; Duchen, Michael R; Gilmour, Kimberly C; Rahman, Shamima

    2015-10-01

    Defects of mitochondrial dynamics are emerging causes of neurological disease. In two children presenting with severe neurological deterioration following viral infection we identified a novel homozygous STAT2 mutation, c.1836 C>A (p.Cys612Ter), using whole exome sequencing. In muscle and fibroblasts from these patients, and a third unrelated STAT2-deficient patient, we observed extremely elongated mitochondria. Western blot analysis revealed absence of the STAT2 protein and that the mitochondrial fission protein DRP1 (encoded by DNM1L) is inactive, as shown by its phosphorylation state. All three patients harboured decreased levels of DRP1 phosphorylated at serine residue 616 (P-DRP1(S616)), a post-translational modification known to activate DRP1, and increased levels of DRP1 phosphorylated at serine 637 (P-DRP1(S637)), associated with the inactive state of the DRP1 GTPase. Knockdown of STAT2 in SHSY5Y cells recapitulated the fission defect, with elongated mitochondria and decreased P-DRP1(S616) levels. Furthermore the mitochondrial fission defect in patient fibroblasts was rescued following lentiviral transduction with wild-type STAT2 in all three patients, with normalization of mitochondrial length and increased P-DRP1(S616) levels. Taken together, these findings implicate STAT2 as a novel regulator of DRP1 phosphorylation at serine 616, and thus of mitochondrial fission, and suggest that there are interactions between immunity and mitochondria. This is the first study to link the innate immune system to mitochondrial dynamics and morphology. We hypothesize that variability in JAK-STAT signalling may contribute to the phenotypic heterogeneity of mitochondrial disease, and may explain why some patients with underlying mitochondrial disease decompensate after seemingly trivial viral infections. Modulating JAK-STAT activity may represent a novel therapeutic avenue for mitochondrial diseases, which remain largely untreatable. This may also be relevant for more

  3. Mitochondrial Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... are defective, the cells do not have enough energy. The unused oxygen and fuel molecules build up in the cells and cause damage. The symptoms of mitochondrial disease can vary. It depends on how ... high energy needs, so muscular and neurological problems are common. ...

  4. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders.

  5. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  6. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  7. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  8. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  9. Unravelling mitochondrial pathways to Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Celardo, I; Martins, L M; Gandhi, S

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential for cellular function due to their role in ATP production, calcium homeostasis and apoptotic signalling. Neurons are heavily reliant on mitochondrial integrity for their complex signalling, plasticity and excitability properties, and to ensure cell survival over decades. The maintenance of a pool of healthy mitochondria that can meet the bioenergetic demands of a neuron, is therefore of critical importance; this is achieved by maintaining a careful balance between mitochondrial biogenesis, mitochondrial trafficking, mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy. The molecular mechanisms that underlie these processes are gradually being elucidated. It is widely recognized that mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the form of reduced bioenergetic capacity, increased oxidative stress and reduced resistance to stress, is observed in several Parkinson's disease models. However, identification of the recessive genes implicated in Parkinson's disease has revealed a common pathway involving mitochondrial dynamics, transport, turnover and mitophagy. This body of work has led to the hypothesis that the homeostatic mechanisms that ensure a healthy mitochondrial pool are key to neuronal function and integrity. In this paradigm, impaired mitochondrial dynamics and clearance result in the accumulation of damaged and dysfunctional mitochondria, which may directly induce neuronal dysfunction and death. In this review, we consider the mechanisms by which mitochondrial dysfunction may lead to neurodegeneration. In particular, we focus on the mechanisms that underlie mitochondrial homeostasis, and discuss their importance in neuronal integrity and neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph

  10. Dynamic function of the alkyl spacer of acetogenins in their inhibitory action with mitochondrial complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase).

    PubMed

    Abe, Masato; Murai, Masatoshi; Ichimaru, Naoya; Kenmochi, Atsushi; Yoshida, Takehiko; Kubo, Akina; Kimura, Yuka; Moroda, Aki; Makabe, Hidefumi; Nishioka, Takaaki; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2005-11-15

    Studies on the inhibitory mechanism of acetogenins, the most potent inhibitors of mitochondrial complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase), are useful for elucidating the structural and functional features of the terminal electron transfer step of this enzyme. Previous studies of the structure-activity relationship revealed that except for the alkyl spacer linking the two toxophores (i.e., the hydroxylated THF and the gamma-lactone rings), none of the multiple functional groups of these inhibitors is essential for potent inhibition. To elucidate the function of the alkyl spacer, two sets of systematically selected analogues were synthesized. First, the length of the spacer was varied widely. Second, the local flexibility of the spacer was specifically reduced by introducing multiple bond(s) into different regions of the spacer. The optimal length of the spacer for inhibition was approximately 13 carbon atoms. The decrease in the strength of the inhibitory effect caused by elongating the spacer from 13 carbons was much more drastic than that caused by shortening. Local flexibility in a specific region of the spacer was not important for the inhibition. These observations indicate that the active conformation of the spacer is not an extended form, and is not necessarily restricted to a certain rigid shape. Moreover, an analogue in which a spacer covering 10 carbon atoms was hardened into a rodlike shape still maintained a potent inhibitory effect. Our results strongly suggest that the spacer portion is free from steric congestion arising from the putative binding site probably because there is no cavity-like binding site for the spacer portion. The manner of acetogenin binding to the enzyme may not be explained by a simple "key and keyhole" analogy.

  11. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  12. The Neuro-Ophthalmology of Mitochondrial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, J. Alexander; Biousse, Valérie; Newman, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases frequently manifest neuro-ophthalmologic symptoms and signs. Because of the predilection of mitochondrial disorders to involve the optic nerves, extraocular muscles, retina, and even the retrochiasmal visual pathways, the ophthalmologist is often the first physician to be consulted. Disorders caused by mitochondrial dysfunction can result from abnormalities in either the mitochondrial DNA or in nuclear genes which encode mitochondrial proteins. Inheritance of these mutations will follow patterns specific to their somatic or mitochondrial genetics. Genotype-phenotype correlations are inconstant, and considerable overlap may occur among these syndromes. The diagnostic approach to the patient with suspected mitochondrial disease entails a detailed personal and family history, careful ophthalmic, neurologic, and systemic examination, directed investigations, and attention to potentially life-threatening sequelae. Although curative treatments for mitochondrial disorders are currently lacking, exciting research advances are being made, particularly in the area of gene therapy. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, with its window of opportunity for timely intervention and its accessibility to directed therapy, offers a unique model to study future therapeutic interventions. Most patients and their relatives benefit from informed genetic counseling. PMID:20471050

  13. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial uncoupling in a murine cancer cachexia model.

    PubMed

    Tzika, A Aria; Fontes-Oliveira, Cibely Cristine; Shestov, Alexander A; Constantinou, Caterina; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Righi, Valeria; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Busquets, Silvia; Lopez-Soriano, Francisco J; Milot, Sylvain; Lepine, Francois; Mindrinos, Michael N; Rahme, Laurence G; Argiles, Josep M

    2013-09-01

    Approximately half of all cancer patients present with cachexia, a condition in which disease-associated metabolic changes lead to a severe loss of skeletal muscle mass. Working toward an integrated and mechanistic view of cancer cachexia, we investigated the hypothesis that cancer promotes mitochondrial uncoupling in skeletal muscle. We subjected mice to in vivo phosphorous-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy and subjected murine skeletal muscle samples to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The mice used in both experiments were Lewis lung carcinoma models of cancer cachexia. A novel 'fragmented mass isotopomer' approach was used in our dynamic analysis of 13C mass isotopomer data. Our 31P NMR and GC/MS results indicated that the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis rate and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux were reduced by 49% and 22%, respectively, in the cancer-bearing mice (p<0.008; t-test vs. controls). The ratio of ATP synthesis rate to the TCA cycle flux (an index of mitochondrial coupling) was reduced by 32% in the cancer-bearing mice (p=0.036; t-test vs. controls). Genomic analysis revealed aberrant expression levels for key regulatory genes and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural abnormalities in the muscle fiber, consistent with the presence of abnormal, giant mitochondria. Taken together, these data suggest that mitochondrial uncoupling occurs in cancer cachexia and thus point to the mitochondria as a potential pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cachexia. These findings may prove relevant to elucidating the mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle wasting observed in other chronic diseases, as well as in aging.

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction: a neglected component of skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Feichtinger, René G; Sperl, Wolfgang; Bauer, Johann W; Kofler, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Aberrant mitochondrial structure and function influence tissue homeostasis and thereby contribute to multiple human disorders and ageing. Ten per cent of patients with primary mitochondrial disorders present skin manifestations that can be categorized into hair abnormalities, rashes, pigmentation abnormalities and acrocyanosis. Less attention has been paid to the fact that several disorders of the skin are linked to alterations of mitochondrial energy metabolism. This review article summarizes the contribution of mitochondrial pathology to both common and rare skin diseases. We explore the intriguing observation that a wide array of skin disorders presents with primary or secondary mitochondrial pathology and that a variety of molecular defects can cause dysfunctional mitochondria. Among them are mutations in mitochondrial- and nuclear DNA-encoded subunits and assembly factors of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes; mutations in intermediate filament proteins involved in linking, moving and shaping of mitochondria; and disorders of mitochondrial DNA metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and heme synthesis. Thus, we assume that mitochondrial involvement is the rule rather than the exception in skin diseases. We conclude the article by discussing how improving mitochondrial function can be beneficial for aged skin and can be used as an adjunct therapy for certain skin disorders. Consideration of mitochondrial energy metabolism in the skin creates a new perspective for both dermatologists and experts in metabolic disease.

  15. Mitochondrial flashes: new insights into mitochondrial ROS signalling and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Tingting; Wang, Xianhua; Ma, Qi; Cheng, Heping

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory mitochondria undergo stochastic, intermittent bursts of superoxide production accompanied by transient depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential and reversible opening of the membrane permeability transition pore. These discrete events were named ‘superoxide flashes’ for the reactive oxygen species (ROS) signal involved, and ‘mitochondrial flashes’ (mitoflashes) for the entirety of the multifaceted and intertwined mitochondrial processes. In contrast to the flashless basal ROS production of ‘homeostatic ROS’ for redox regulation, bursting ROS production during mitoflashes may provide ‘signalling ROS’ at the organelle level, fulfilling distinctly different cell functions. Mounting evidence indicates that mitoflash frequency is richly regulated over a broad range, and represents a novel, universal, and ‘digital’ readout of mitochondrial functional status and of the mitochondrial stress response. An emerging view is that mitoflashes participate in vital processes including metabolism, cell differentiation, the stress response and ageing. These recent advances shed new light on the role of mitochondrial functional dynamics in health and disease. PMID:25038239

  16. Mitochondrial fusion is essential for steroid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Alejandra; Poderoso, Cecilia; Cooke, Mariana; Soria, Gastón; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2012-01-01

    Although the contribution of mitochondrial dynamics (a balance in fusion/fission events and changes in mitochondria subcellular distribution) to key biological process has been reported, the contribution of changes in mitochondrial fusion to achieve efficient steroid production has never been explored. The mitochondria are central during steroid synthesis and different enzymes are localized between the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum to produce the final steroid hormone, thus suggesting that mitochondrial fusion might be relevant for this process. In the present study, we showed that the hormonal stimulation triggers mitochondrial fusion into tubular-shaped structures and we demonstrated that mitochondrial fusion does not only correlate-with but also is an essential step of steroid production, being both events depend on PKA activity. We also demonstrated that the hormone-stimulated relocalization of ERK1/2 in the mitochondrion, a critical step during steroidogenesis, depends on mitochondrial fusion. Additionally, we showed that the SHP2 phosphatase, which is required for full steroidogenesis, simultaneously modulates mitochondrial fusion and ERK1/2 localization in the mitochondrion. Strikingly, we found that mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) expression, a central protein for mitochondrial fusion, is upregulated immediately after hormone stimulation. Moreover, Mfn2 knockdown is sufficient to impair steroid biosynthesis. Together, our findings unveil an essential role for mitochondrial fusion during steroidogenesis. These discoveries highlight the importance of organelles' reorganization in specialized cells, prompting the exploration of the impact that organelle dynamics has on biological processes that include, but are not limited to, steroid synthesis.

  17. Oncogenic K-ras expression is associated with derangement of the cAMP/PKA pathway and forskolin-reversible alterations of mitochondrial dynamics and respiration.

    PubMed

    Palorini, R; De Rasmo, D; Gaviraghi, M; Sala Danna, L; Signorile, A; Cirulli, C; Chiaradonna, F; Alberghina, L; Papa, S

    2013-01-17

    The Warburg effect in cancer cells has been proposed to involve several mechanisms, including adaptation to hypoxia, oncogenes activation or loss of oncosuppressors and impaired mitochondrial function. In previous papers, it has been shown that K-ras transformed mouse cells are much more sensitive as compared with normal cells to glucose withdrawal (undergoing apoptosis) and present a high glycolytic rate and a strong reduction of mitochondrial complex I. Recent observations suggest that transformed cells have a derangement in the cyclic adenosine monophosphate/cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP/PKA) pathway, which is known to regulate several mitochondrial functions. Herein, the derangement of the cAMP/PKA pathway and its impact on transformation-linked changes of mitochondrial functions is investigated. Exogenous stimulation of PKA activity, achieved by forskolin treatment, protected K-ras-transformed cells from apoptosis induced by glucose deprivation, enhanced complex I activity, intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels, mitochondrial fusion and decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Several of these effects were almost completely prevented by inhibiting the PKA activity. Short-time treatment with compounds favoring mitochondrial fusion strongly decreased the cellular ROS levels especially in transformed cells. These findings support the notion that glucose shortage-induced apoptosis, specific of K-ras-transformed cells, is associated to a derangement of PKA signaling that leads to mitochondrial complex I decrease, reduction of ATP formation, prevalence of mitochondrial fission over fusion, and thereby opening new approaches for development of anticancer drugs.

  18. Mitochondrial morphology-emerging role in bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Chad A; Lee, Hakjoo; Yoon, Yisang

    2012-12-15

    Dynamic change in mitochondrial shape is a cellular process mediated mainly by fission and fusion of mitochondria. Studies have shown that mitochondrial fission and fusion are directly and indirectly associated with mitochondrial maintenance, bioenergetic demand, and cell death. Changes in mitochondrial morphology are frequently observed in response to changes in the surrounding cellular milieu, such as metabolic flux, that influence cellular bioenergetics. Connections between morphological regulation and the bioenergetic status of mitochondria are emerging as reciprocally responsive processes, though the nature of the signaling remains to be defined. Given the pivotal role mitochondria play in cellular fate, tight regulation of fission and fusion is therefore critical to preserving normal cellular physiology. Here we describe recent advancements in the understanding of the mechanisms governing mitochondrial morphology and their emerging role in mitochondrial bioenergetics.

  19. Mitochondrial Disease: Possible Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Instagram Email Menu Understanding Mitochondrial Disease What is Mito? What is Mitochondrial Disease? Types of Mitochondrial Disease ... Program Frequently Asked Questions Newly Diagnosed Treatments & Therapies Mito 101 MitoFIRST Handbook Current Clinical Trials & Studies Community ...

  20. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  1. Appoptosin interacts with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuilin; Shi, Zhun; Zhang, Lingzhi; Zhou, Zehua; Zheng, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Guiying; Bu, Guojun; Fraser, Paul E; Xu, Huaxi; Zhang, Yun-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial morphology is regulated by fusion and fission machinery. Impaired mitochondria dynamics cause various diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. Appoptosin (encoded by SLC25A38) is a mitochondrial carrier protein that is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Appoptosin overexpression causes overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase-dependent apoptosis, whereas appoptosin downregulation abolishes β-amyloid-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and neuronal death during Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we found that overexpression of appoptosin resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation in a manner independent of its carrier function, ROS production or caspase activation. Although appoptosin did not affect levels of mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion (MFN1 and MFN2), inner-membrane fusion (OPA1) and fission [DRP1 (also known as DNM1L) and FIS1] proteins, appoptosin interacted with MFN1 and MFN2, as well as with the mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase MITOL (also known as MARCH5) but not OPA1, FIS1 or DRP1. Appoptosin overexpression impaired the interaction between MFN1 and MFN2, and mitochondrial fusion. By contrast, co-expression of MFN1, MITOL and a dominant-negative form of DRP1, DRP1(K38A), partially rescued appoptosin-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and apoptosis, whereas co-expression of FIS1 aggravated appoptosin-induced apoptosis. Together, our results demonstrate that appoptosin can interact with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology.

  2. The Use of Cytochrome C Oxidase Enzyme Activity and Immunohistochemistry in Defining Mitochondrial Injury in Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Zsengellér, Zsuzsanna K; Rosen, Seymour

    2016-09-01

    The renal biopsy is a dynamic way of looking at renal disease, and tubular elements are an important part of this analysis. The mitochondria in 20 renal biopsies were examined by immunohistochemical (electron transport chain enzyme: cytochrome C oxidase IV [COX IV]) and enzyme histochemical methods (COX), both by light and electron microscopy. The distal convoluted tubules and thick ascending limbs showed the greatest intensity in the COX immunostains and enzyme activity in controls. The degree of mitochondrial COX protein and enzyme activity diminished as the tubules became atrophic. With proximal hypertrophic changes, there was great variation in both COX activity and protein expression. In contrast, in three cases of systemic lupus erythematosus, biopsied for high-grade proteinuria, the activity was consistently upregulated, whereas protein expression remained normal. These unexpected findings of heterogeneous upregulation in hypertrophy and the dyssynchrony of protein expression and activity may indicate mitochondrial dysregulation. Functional electron microscopy showed COX activity delineated by the intense mitochondrial staining in normal or hypertrophic proximal tubules. With atrophic changes, residual small mitochondria with diminished activity could be seen. With mitochondrial size abnormalities (enlargement and irregularity, adefovir toxicity), activity persisted. In the renal biopsy, mitochondrial analysis is feasible utilizing immunohistochemical and enzyme histochemical techniques.

  3. Mitochondrial maintenance failure in aging and role of sexual dimorphism

    PubMed Central

    Tower, John

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression changes during aging are partly conserved across species, and suggest that oxidative stress, inflammation and proteotoxicity result from mitochondrial malfunction and abnormal mitochondrial-nuclear signaling. Mitochondrial maintenance failure may result from trade-offs between mitochondrial turnover versus growth and reproduction, sexual antagonistic pleiotropy and genetic conflicts resulting from uni-parental mitochondrial transmission, as well as mitochondrial and nuclear mutations and loss of epigenetic regulation. Aging phenotypes and interventions are often sex-specific, indicating that both male and female sexual differentiation promote mitochondrial failure and aging. Studies in mammals and invertebrates implicate autophagy, apoptosis, AKT, PARP, p53 and FOXO in mediating sex-specific differences in stress resistance and aging. The data support a model where the genes Sxl in Drosophila, sdc-2 in C. elegans, and Xist in mammals regulate mitochondrial maintenance across generations and in aging. Several interventions that increase life span cause a mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt), and UPRmt is also observed during normal aging, indicating hormesis. The UPRmt may increase life span by stimulating mitochondrial turnover through autophagy, and/or by inhibiting the production of hormones and toxic metabolites. The data suggest that metazoan life span interventions may act through a common hormesis mechanism involving liver UPRmt, mitochondrial maintenance and sexual differentiation. PMID:25447815

  4. Protective role of melatonin in mitochondrial dysfunction and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Paradies, Giuseppe; Paradies, Valeria; Ruggiero, Francesca M; Petrosillo, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria are the powerhouse of the eukaryotic cell through their use of oxidative phosphorylation to generate ATP. Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered an important contributing factor in a variety of physiopathological situations such as aging, heart ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetes and several neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases, as well as in cell death. Increased formation of reactive oxygen species, altered respiratory chain complexes activity and opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore have been suggested as possible factors responsible for impaired mitochondrial function. Therefore, preventing mitochondrial dysfunction could be an effective therapeutic strategy against cellular degenerative processes. Cardiolipin is a unique phospholipid located at the level of inner mitochondrial membrane where it plays an important role in mitochondrial bioenergetics, as well as in cell death. Cardiolipin abnormalities have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in a variety of pathological conditions and aging. Melatonin, the major secretory product of the pineal gland, is a well-known antioxidant agent and thus an effective protector of mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Melatonin was reported to prevent mitochondrial dysfunction from oxidative damage by preserving cardiolipin integrity, and this may explain, at least in part, the beneficial effect of this compound in mitochondrial physiopathology. In this article, mechanisms through which melatonin exerts its protective role in mitochondrial dysfunction and related disorders are reviewed.

  5. Mitochondrial maintenance failure in aging and role of sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Tower, John

    2015-06-15

    Gene expression changes during aging are partly conserved across species, and suggest that oxidative stress, inflammation and proteotoxicity result from mitochondrial malfunction and abnormal mitochondrial-nuclear signaling. Mitochondrial maintenance failure may result from trade-offs between mitochondrial turnover versus growth and reproduction, sexual antagonistic pleiotropy and genetic conflicts resulting from uni-parental mitochondrial transmission, as well as mitochondrial and nuclear mutations and loss of epigenetic regulation. Aging phenotypes and interventions are often sex-specific, indicating that both male and female sexual differentiation promote mitochondrial failure and aging. Studies in mammals and invertebrates implicate autophagy, apoptosis, AKT, PARP, p53 and FOXO in mediating sex-specific differences in stress resistance and aging. The data support a model where the genes Sxl in Drosophila, sdc-2 in Caenorhabditis elegans, and Xist in mammals regulate mitochondrial maintenance across generations and in aging. Several interventions that increase life span cause a mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt), and UPRmt is also observed during normal aging, indicating hormesis. The UPRmt may increase life span by stimulating mitochondrial turnover through autophagy, and/or by inhibiting the production of hormones and toxic metabolites. The data suggest that metazoan life span interventions may act through a common hormesis mechanism involving liver UPRmt, mitochondrial maintenance and sexual differentiation.

  6. Dynamic 31P–MRSI using spiral spectroscopic imaging can map mitochondrial capacity in muscles of the human calf during plantar flexion exercise at 7 T

    PubMed Central

    Valkovič, Ladislav; Chmelík, Marek; Meyerspeer, Martin; Gagoski, Borjan; Rodgers, Christopher T.; Krššák, Martin; Andronesi, Ovidiu C.; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Phosphorus MRSI (31P–MRSI) using a spiral‐trajectory readout at 7 T was developed for high temporal resolution mapping of the mitochondrial capacity of exercising human skeletal muscle. The sensitivity and localization accuracy of the method was investigated in phantoms. In vivo performance was assessed in 12 volunteers, who performed a plantar flexion exercise inside a whole‐body 7 T MR scanner using an MR‐compatible ergometer and a surface coil. In five volunteers the knee was flexed (~60°) to shift the major workload from the gastrocnemii to the soleus muscle. Spiral‐encoded MRSI provided 16–25 times faster mapping with a better point spread function than elliptical phase‐encoded MRSI with the same matrix size. The inevitable trade‐off for the increased temporal resolution was a reduced signal‐to‐noise ratio, but this was acceptable. The phosphocreatine (PCr) depletion caused by exercise at 0° knee angulation was significantly higher in both gastrocnemii than in the soleus (i.e. 64.8 ± 19.6% and 65.9 ± 23.6% in gastrocnemius lateralis and medialis versus 15.3 ± 8.4% in the soleus). Spiral‐encoded 31P–MRSI is a powerful tool for dynamic mapping of exercising muscle oxidative metabolism, including localized assessment of PCr concentrations, pH and maximal oxidative flux with high temporal and spatial resolution. PMID:27862510

  7. Abnormalities of lung function in hay fever.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, E J; Hall, D R

    1976-01-01

    Twenty subjects with symptoms of hay fever were studied to see whether abnormalities could be detected in the function of small airways. The investigations included dynamic compliance at varying respiratory frequencies, closing capacity, residual volume, transfer factor, and maximal expiratory flow-volume curves. The tests were repeated in the winter when symptoms had resolved. Frequency dependence of compliance was found in eight subjects with symptoms (40%), closing capacities being abnormal in only two instances. Conventional pulmonary function tests, including expiratory flow rates at mid vital capacity, were within the predicted range of all subjects. When tests were repeated in the winter, frequency dependence of compliance was no longer present in subjects whose symptoms had resolved. The study suggests that reversible small airway abnormalities are present in a significant proportion of subjects with symptoms of hay fever and that such abnormalities are best detected by the measurement of dynamic compliance at varying respiratory frequencies. PMID:769243

  8. Mitochondrial Protein Quality Control: The Mechanisms Guarding Mitochondrial Health

    PubMed Central

    Bohovych, Iryna; Chan, Sherine S.L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Mitochondria are complex dynamic organelles pivotal for cellular physiology and human health. Failure to maintain mitochondrial health leads to numerous maladies that include late-onset neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular disorders. Furthermore, a decline in mitochondrial health is prevalent with aging. A set of evolutionary conserved mechanisms known as mitochondrial quality control (MQC) is involved in recognition and correction of the mitochondrial proteome. Recent Advances: Here, we review current knowledge and latest developments in MQC. We particularly focus on the proteolytic aspect of MQC and its impact on health and aging. Critical Issues: While our knowledge about MQC is steadily growing, critical gaps remain in the mechanistic understanding of how MQC modules sense damage and preserve mitochondrial welfare, particularly in higher organisms. Future Directions: Delineating how coordinated action of the MQC modules orchestrates physiological responses on both organellar and cellular levels will further elucidate the current picture of MQC's role and function in health, cellular stress, and degenerative diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 977–994. PMID:25546710

  9. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphism in mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Holt, I J; Harding, A E; Morgan-Hughes, J A

    1988-05-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that mitochondrial myopathy may be caused by mutation of the mitochondrial (mt) genome, restriction fragment length polymorphism in leucocyte mt DNA has been studied in 38 patients with mitochondrial myopathy, 44 of their unaffected matrilineal relatives, and 35 normal control subjects. Previously unreported mt DNA polymorphisms were identified in both patients and controls. No differences in restriction fragment patterns were observed between affected and unaffected individuals in the same maternal line, and there was no evidence of major deletion of mt DNA in patients. This study provides no positive evidence of mitochondrial inheritance in mitochondrial myopathy, but this has not been excluded.

  11. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  12. The Function of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yajin; Dong, Yuan; Cheng, Jinbo

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU)—a calcium uniporter on the inner membrane of mitochondria—controls the mitochondrial calcium uptake in normal and abnormal situations. Mitochondrial calcium is essential for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP); however, excessive calcium will induce mitochondrial dysfunction. Calcium homeostasis disruption and mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role and regulatory mechanism of the MCU in the development of these diseases are obscure. In this review, we summarize the role of the MCU in controlling oxidative stress-elevated mitochondrial calcium and its function in neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibition of the MCU signaling pathway might be a new target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:28208618

  13. Cardiac mitochondrial biogenesis in endotoxemia is not accompanied by mitochondrial function recovery.

    PubMed

    Vanasco, Virginia; Saez, Trinidad; Magnani, Natalia D; Pereyra, Leonardo; Marchini, Timoteo; Corach, Alejandra; Vaccaro, María Inés; Corach, Daniel; Evelson, Pablo; Alvarez, Silvia

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis emerges as a compensatory mechanism involved in the recovery process in endotoxemia and sepsis. The aim of this work was to analyze the time course of the cardiac mitochondrial biogenesis process occurring during endotoxemia, with emphasis on the quantitative analysis of mitochondrial function. Female Sprague-Dawley rats (45 days old) were ip injected with LPS (10 mg/kg). Measurements were performed at 0-24 h after LPS administration. PGC-1α and mtTFA expression for biogenesis and p62 and LC3 expression for autophagy were analyzed by Western blot; mitochondrial DNA levels by qPCR, and mitochondrial morphology by transmission electron microscopy. Mitochondrial function was evaluated as oxygen consumption and respiratory chain complex activity. PGC-1α and mtTFA expression significantly increased in every time point analyzed, and mitochondrial mass was increased by 20% (P<0.05) at 24 h. p62 expression was significantly decreased in a time-dependent manner. LC3-II expression was significantly increased at all time points analyzed. Ultrastructurally, mitochondria displayed several abnormalities (internal vesicles, cristae disruption, and swelling) at 6 and 18 h. Structures compatible with fusion/fission processes were observed at 24 h. A significant decrease in state 3 respiration was observed in every time point analyzed (LPS 6h: 20%, P<0.05). Mitochondrial complex I activity was found decreased by 30% in LPS-treated animals at 6 and 24h. Complex II and complex IV showed decreased activity only at 24 h. The present results show that partial restoration of cardiac mitochondrial architecture is not accompanied by improvement of mitochondrial function in acute endotoxemia. The key implication of our study is that cardiac failure due to bioenergetic dysfunction will be overcome by therapeutic interventions aimed to restore cardiac mitochondrial function.

  14. COX assembly factor ccdc56 regulates mitochondrial morphology by affecting mitochondrial recruitment of Drp1.

    PubMed

    Ban-Ishihara, Reiko; Tomohiro-Takamiya, Shiho; Tani, Motohiro; Baudier, Jacques; Ishihara, Naotada; Kuge, Osamu

    2015-10-07

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that alter their morphology in response to cellular signaling and differentiation through balanced fusion and fission. In this study, we found that the mitochondrial inner membrane ATPase ATAD3A interacted with ccdc56/MITRAC12/COA3, a subunit of the cytochrome oxidase (COX)-assembly complex. Overproduction of ccdc56 in HeLa cells resulted in fragmented mitochondrial morphology, while mitochondria were highly elongated in ccdc56-repressed cells by the defective recruitment of the fission factor Drp1. We also found that mild and chronic inhibition of COX led to mitochondrial elongation, as seen in ccdc56-repressed cells. These results indicate that ccdc56 positively regulates mitochondrial fission via regulation of COX activity and the mitochondrial recruitment of Drp1, and thus, suggest a novel relationship between COX assembly and mitochondrial morphology.

  15. Loss of PLA2G6 leads to elevated mitochondrial lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Quan, Jorge Iván; Bartolome, Fernando; Angelova, Plamena R.; Li, Li; Pope, Simon; Cochemé, Helena M.; Khan, Shabana; Asghari, Shabnam; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Hardy, John; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Partridge, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The PLA2G6 gene encodes a group VIA calcium-independent phospholipase A2 beta enzyme that selectively hydrolyses glycerophospholipids to release free fatty acids. Mutations in PLA2G6 have been associated with disorders such as infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy, neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation type II and Karak syndrome. More recently, PLA2G6 was identified as the causative gene in a subgroup of patients with autosomal recessive early-onset dystonia-parkinsonism. Neuropathological examination revealed widespread Lewy body pathology and the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau, supporting a link between PLA2G6 mutations and parkinsonian disorders. Here we show that knockout of the Drosophila homologue of the PLA2G6 gene, iPLA2-VIA, results in reduced survival, locomotor deficits and organismal hypersensitivity to oxidative stress. Furthermore, we demonstrate that loss of iPLA2-VIA function leads to a number of mitochondrial abnormalities, including mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction, reduced ATP synthesis and abnormal mitochondrial morphology. Moreover, we show that loss of iPLA2-VIA is strongly associated with increased lipid peroxidation levels. We confirmed our findings using cultured fibroblasts taken from two patients with mutations in the PLA2G6 gene. Similar abnormalities were seen including elevated mitochondrial lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial membrane defects, as well as raised levels of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Finally, we demonstrated that deuterated polyunsaturated fatty acids, which inhibit lipid peroxidation, were able to partially rescue the locomotor abnormalities seen in aged flies lacking iPLA2-VIA gene function, and restore mitochondrial membrane potential in fibroblasts from patients with PLA2G6 mutations. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that loss of normal PLA2G6 gene activity leads to lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial dysfunction and subsequent mitochondrial membrane

  16. Mitochondrial respiration without ubiquinone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Hekimi, Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquinone (UQ), a.k.a. coenzyme Q, is a redox-active lipid that participates in several cellular processes, in particular mitochondrial electron transport. Primary UQ deficiency is a rare but severely debilitating condition. Mclk1 (a.k.a. Coq7) encodes a conserved mitochondrial enzyme that is necessary for UQ biosynthesis. We engineered conditional Mclk1 knockout models to study pathogenic effects of UQ deficiency and to assess potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of UQ deficiencies. We found that Mclk1 knockout cells are viable in the total absence of UQ. The UQ biosynthetic precursor DMQ9 accumulates in these cells and can sustain mitochondrial respiration, albeit inefficiently. We demonstrated that efficient rescue of the respiratory deficiency in UQ-deficient cells by UQ analogues is side chain length dependent, and that classical UQ analogues with alkyl side chains such as idebenone and decylUQ are inefficient in comparison with analogues with isoprenoid side chains. Furthermore, Vitamin K2, which has an isoprenoid side chain, and has been proposed to be a mitochondrial electron carrier, had no efficacy on UQ-deficient mouse cells. In our model with liver-specific loss of Mclk1, a large depletion of UQ in hepatocytes caused only a mild impairment of respiratory chain function and no gross abnormalities. In conjunction with previous findings, this surprisingly small effect of UQ depletion indicates a nonlinear dependence of mitochondrial respiratory capacity on UQ content. With this model, we also showed that diet-derived UQ10 is able to functionally rescue the electron transport deficit due to severe endogenous UQ deficiency in the liver, an organ capable of absorbing exogenous UQ. PMID:23847050

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction in liver failure requiring transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lane, Maria; Boczonadi, Veronika; Bachtari, Sahar; Gomez-Duran, Aurora; Langer, Thorsten; Griffiths, Alexandra; Kleinle, Stephanie; Dineiger, Christine; Abicht, Angela; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Schara, Ulrike; Gerner, Patrick; Horvath, Rita

    2016-05-01

    Liver failure is a heterogeneous condition which may be fatal and the primary cause is frequently unknown. We investigated mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in patients undergoing liver transplantation. We studied 45 patients who had liver transplantation due to a variety of clinical presentations. Blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with immunodetection of respiratory chain complexes I-V, biochemical activity of respiratory chain complexes II and IV and quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number were investigated in liver tissue collected from the explanted liver during transplantation. Abnormal mitochondrial function was frequently present in this cohort: ten of 40 patients (25 %) had a defect of one or more respiratory chain enzyme complexes on blue native gels, 20 patients (44 %) had low activity of complex II and/or IV and ten (22 %) had a reduced mtDNA copy number. Combined respiratory chain deficiency and reduced numbers of mitochondria were detected in all three patients with acute liver failure. Low complex IV activity in biliary atresia and complex II defects in cirrhosis were common findings. All six patients diagnosed with liver tumours showed variable alterations in mitochondrial function, probably due to the heterogeneity of the presenting tumour. In conclusion, mitochondrial dysfunction is common in severe liver failure in non-mitochondrial conditions. Therefore, in contrast to the common practice detection of respiratory chain abnormalities in liver should not restrict the inclusion of patients for liver transplantation. Furthermore, improving mitochondrial function may be targeted as part of a complex therapy approach in different forms of liver diseases.

  18. The dynamic plant chondriome.

    PubMed

    Logan, David C

    2010-08-01

    The higher plant chondriome is highly dynamic both in terms of the morphology and velocity of individual mitochondria within any given cell. Plant mitochondrial dynamics is a relatively new area of research, but one that has developed considerably over the early years of this century due to the generation of mitochondrially targeted fluorescent protein constructs and stably transformed lines. Several putative members of the plant mitochondrial division apparatus have been identified, but no genes have been identified as being involved in mitochondrial fusion. Despite the highly dynamic nature of plant mitochondria there is little specific scientific evidence linking mitochondrial dynamics to organelle and cell function. Two exceptions to this are the changes in mitochondrial dynamics that are early events during the induction of cell death programmes, and the extensive mitochondrial fusion that occurs before cytokinesis, although in both cases the role(s) of these events are a matter for conjecture.

  19. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  20. Ultrastructure of mitochondrial nucleoid and its surroundings.

    PubMed

    Prachař, Jarmil

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial nucleoids (hereafter nucleoids) contain genetic information, mitochondrial DNA, prerequisite for mitochondrial functioning, particularly information required for mitochondrial electron transport. To understand nucleoid functioning, it is imperative to know its ultrastructure and dynamics in the context of the actual mitochondrial state. In this study, we document the internal structure, different positions of nucleoids inside the mitochondrial tube and their different morphology. The nucleoid cores appear in section as circular or slightly oval objects ranging from 50 to 100 nm in diameter. They are mainly located in the matrix between cristae inside the mitochondrial tube but they are also frequently found close to the inner mitochondrial surface. In tightly packed form, their interior exhibits sophisticated nucleoprotein regularity. The core surroundings form an electron-lucent thick layer which is probably partitioned into separate chambers. We suggest that the morphology of nucleoids mirrors the mode of energy production, glycolysis versus oxidative phosphorylation. The new high resolution transmission electron microscopy method enabled us to obtain morphological characteristics on yet unpublished level.

  1. Deconstructing mitochondrial dysfunction in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    García-Escudero, Vega; Martín-Maestro, Patricia; Perry, George; Avila, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    There is mounting evidence showing that mitochondrial damage plays an important role in Alzheimer disease. Increased oxygen species generation and deficient mitochondrial dynamic balance have been suggested to be the reason as well as the consequence of Alzheimer-related pathology. Mitochondrial damage has been related to amyloid-beta or tau pathology or to the presence of specific presenilin-1 mutations. The contribution of these factors to mitochondrial dysfunction is reviewed in this paper. Due to the relevance of mitochondrial alterations in Alzheimer disease, recent works have suggested the therapeutic potential of mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant. On the other hand, autophagy has been demonstrated to play a fundamental role in Alzheimer-related protein stress, and increasing data shows that this pathway is altered in the disease. Moreover, mitochondrial alterations have been related to an insufficient clearance of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy. Consequently, different approaches for the removal of damaged mitochondria or to decrease the related oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease have been described. To understand the role of mitochondrial function in Alzheimer disease it is necessary to generate human cellular models which involve living neurons. We have summarized the novel protocols for the generation of neurons by reprogramming or direct transdifferentiation, which offer useful tools to achieve this result.

  2. Development of mitochondrial gene replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shaharyar M; Bennett, James P

    2004-08-01

    Many "classic" mitochondrial diseases have been described that arise from single homoplasmic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). These diseases typically affect nonmitotic tissues (brain, retina, muscle), present with variable phenotypes, can appear sporadically, and are untreatable. Evolving evidence implicates mtDNA abnormalities in diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and type II diabetes, but specific causal mutations for these conditions remain to be defined. Understanding the mtDNA genotype-phenotype relationships and developing specific treatment for mtDNA-based diseases is hampered by inability to manipulate the mitochondrial genome. We present a novel protein transduction technology ("protofection") that allows insertion and expression of the human mitochondrial genome into mitochondria of living cells. With protofection, the mitochondrial genotype can be altered, or exogenous genes can be introduced to be expressed and either retained in mitochondria or be directed to other organelles. Protofection also delivers mtDNA in vivo, opening the way to rational development of mitochondrial gene replacement therapy of mtDNA-based diseases.

  3. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Maheen F; Elwell, Clare; Johnson, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are classified as neurodevelopmental disorders characterised by diminished social communication and interaction. Recently, evidence has accrued that a significant proportion of individuals with autism have concomitant diseases such as mitochondrial disease and abnormalities of energy generation. This has therefore led to the hypothesis that autism may be linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. We review such studies reporting decreased activity of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes and reduced gene expression of mitochondrial genes, in particular genes of respiratory chain complexes, in individuals with autism. Overall, the findings support the hypothesis that there is an association of ASD with impaired mitochondrial function; however, many of the studies have small sample sizes and there is variability in the techniques utilised. There is therefore a vital need to utilise novel imaging techniques, such as near-infrared spectroscopy, that will allow non-invasive measurement of metabolic markers for neuronal activity such as cytochrome c oxidase, in order to better establish the link between autism and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27928515

  4. Hyperglycemia decreases mitochondrial function: The regulatory role of mitochondrial biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeira, Carlos M. Rolo, Anabela P.; Berthiaume, Jessica; Bjork, James A.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2007-12-01

    Increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in 'glucose toxicity' in diabetes. However, little is known about the action of glucose on the expression of transcription factors in hepatocytes, especially those involved in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription. Since mitochondrial functional capacity is dynamically regulated, we hypothesized that stressful conditions of hyperglycemia induce adaptations in the transcriptional control of cellular energy metabolism, including inhibition of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Cell viability, mitochondrial respiration, ROS generation and oxidized proteins were determined in HepG2 cells cultured in the presence of either 5.5 mM (control) or 30 mM glucose (high glucose) for 48 h, 96 h and 7 days. Additionally, mtDNA abundance, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) transcripts were evaluated by real time PCR. High glucose induced a progressive increase in ROS generation and accumulation of oxidized proteins, with no changes in cell viability. Increased expression of PAI-1 was observed as early as 96 h of exposure to high glucose. After 7 days in hyperglycemia, HepG2 cells exhibited inhibited uncoupled respiration and decreased MitoTracker Red fluorescence associated with a 25% decrease in mtDNA and 16% decrease in TFAM transcripts. These results indicate that glucose may regulate mtDNA copy number by modulating the transcriptional activity of TFAM in response to hyperglycemia-induced ROS production. The decrease of mtDNA content and inhibition of mitochondrial function may be pathogenic hallmarks in the altered metabolic status associated with diabetes.

  5. Mitochondrial Machineries for Protein Import and Assembly.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Nils; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2017-03-15

    Mitochondria are essential organelles with numerous functions in cellular metabolism and homeostasis. Most of the >1,000 different mitochondrial proteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and are imported into mitochondria by five transport pathways. The protein import machineries of the mitochondrial membranes and aqueous compartments reveal a remarkable variability of mechanisms for protein recognition, translocation, and sorting. The protein translocases do not operate as separate entities but are connected to each other and to machineries with functions in energetics, membrane organization, and quality control. Here, we discuss the versatility and dynamic organization of the mitochondrial protein import machineries. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial protein translocation is crucial for understanding the integration of protein translocases into a large network that controls organelle biogenesis, function, and dynamics. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biochemistry Volume 86 is June 20, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  6. Mitochondrial Biology and Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Siddharth; Liu, Lei; Donmez, Gizem

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are extremely active organelles that perform a variety of roles in the cell including energy production, regulation of calcium homeostasis, apoptosis, and population maintenance through fission and fusion. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the form of oxidative stress and mutations can contribute to the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s (PD), Alzheimer’s (AD), and Huntington’s diseases (HD). Abnormalities of Complex I function in the electron transport chain have been implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases, inhibiting ATP production and generating reactive oxygen species that can cause major damage to mitochondria Mutations in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA can contribute to neurodegenerative disease, although the pathogenesis of these conditions tends to focus on nuclear mutations. In PD, nuclear genome mutations in the PINK1 and parkin genes have been implicated in neurodegeneration [1], while mutations in APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 have been implicated in a variety of clinical symptoms of AD [5]. Mutant htt protein is known to cause HD [2]. Much progress has been made to determine some causes of these neurodegenerative diseases, though permanent treatments have yet to be developed. In this review, we discuss the roles of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of these diseases. PMID:26903445

  7. Modulating mitochondrial quality in disease transmission: towards enabling mitochondrial DNA disease carriers to have healthy children

    PubMed Central

    Diot, Alan; Dombi, Eszter; Lodge, Tiffany; Liao, Chunyan; Morten, Karl; Carver, Janet; Wells, Dagan; Child, Tim; Johnston, Iain G.; Williams, Suzannah; Poulton, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    One in 400 people has a maternally inherited mutation in mtDNA potentially causing incurable disease. In so-called heteroplasmic disease, mutant and normal mtDNA co-exist in the cells of carrier women. Disease severity depends on the proportion of inherited abnormal mtDNA molecules. Families who have had a child die of severe, maternally inherited mtDNA disease need reliable information on the risk of recurrence in future pregnancies. However, prenatal diagnosis and even estimates of risk are fraught with uncertainty because of the complex and stochastic dynamics of heteroplasmy. These complications include an mtDNA bottleneck, whereby hard-to-predict fluctuations in the proportions of mutant and normal mtDNA may arise between generations. In ‘mitochondrial replacement therapy’ (MRT), damaged mitochondria are replaced with healthy ones in early human development, using nuclear transfer. We are developing non-invasive alternatives, notably activating autophagy, a cellular quality control mechanism, in which damaged cellular components are engulfed by autophagosomes. This approach could be used in combination with MRT or with the regular management, pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Mathematical theory, supported by recent experiments, suggests that this strategy may be fruitful in controlling heteroplasmy. Using mice that are transgenic for fluorescent LC3 (the hallmark of autophagy) we quantified autophagosomes in cleavage stage embryos. We confirmed that the autophagosome count peaks in four-cell embryos and this correlates with a drop in the mtDNA content of the whole embryo. This suggests removal by mitophagy (mitochondria-specific autophagy). We suggest that modulating heteroplasmy by activating mitophagy may be a useful complement to mitochondrial replacement therapy. PMID:27528757

  8. Novel mitochondrial extensions provide evidence for a link between microtubule-directed movement and mitochondrial fission

    SciTech Connect

    Bowes, Timothy; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2008-11-07

    Mitochondrial dynamics play an important role in a large number of cellular processes. Previously, we reported that treatment of mammalian cells with the cysteine-alkylators, N-ethylmaleimide and ethacrynic acid, induced rapid mitochondrial fusion forming a large reticulum approximately 30 min after treatment. Here, we further investigated this phenomenon using a number of techniques including live-cell confocal microscopy. In live cells, drug-induced fusion coincided with a cessation of fast mitochondrial movement which was dependent on microtubules. During this loss of movement, thin mitochondrial tubules extending from mitochondria were also observed, which we refer to as 'mitochondrial extensions'. The formation of these mitochondrial extensions, which were not observed in untreated cells, depended on microtubules and was abolished by pretreatment with nocodazole. In this study, we provide evidence that these extensions result from of a block in mitochondrial fission combined with continued application of motile force by microtubule-dependent motor complexes. Our observations strongly suggest the existence of a link between microtubule-based mitochondrial trafficking and mitochondrial fission.

  9. Distribution of mitochondrial nucleoids upon mitochondrial network fragmentation and network reintegration in HEPG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Jan; Dlasková, Andrea; Šantorová, Jitka; Smolková, Katarína; Alán, Lukáš; Špaček, Tomáš; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Jabůrek, Martin; Ježek, Petr

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is organized in nucleoids in complex with accessory proteins, proteins of mtDNA replication and gene expression machinery. A robust mtDNA genome is represented by hundreds to thousands of nucleoids in cell mitochondrion. Detailed information is lacking about the dynamics of nucleoid distribution within the mitochondrial network upon physiological and pathological events. Therefore, we used confocal microscopy to study mitochondrial nucleoid redistribution upon mitochondrial fission and following reintegration of the mitochondrial network. Fission was induced by oxidative stress at respiration inhibition by rotenone or upon elimination of the protonmotive force by uncoupling or upon canceling its electrical component, ΔΨ(m), by valinomycin; and by silencing of mitofusin MFN2. Agent withdrawal resulted in concomitant mitochondrial network reintegration. We found two major principal morphological states: (i) a tubular state of the mitochondrial network with equidistant nucleoid spacing, 1.10±0.2 nucleoids per μm, and (ii) a fragmented state of solitary spheroid objects in which several nucleoids were clustered. We rarely observed singular mitochondrial fragments with a single nucleoid inside and very seldom we observed empty fragments. Reintegration of fragments into the mitochondrial network re-established the tubular state with equidistant nucleoid spacing. The two major morphological states coexisted at intermediate stages. These observations suggest that both mitochondrial network fission and reconnection of the disintegrated network are nucleoid-centric, i.e., fission and new mitochondrial tubule formation are initiated around nucleoids. Analyses of combinations of these morphological icons thus provide a basis for a future mitochondrial morphology diagnostics.

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction in autism.

    PubMed

    Legido, Agustín; Jethva, Reena; Goldenthal, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    Using data of the current prevalence of autism as 200:10,000 and a 1:2000 incidence of definite mitochondrial (mt) disease, if there was no linkage of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and mt disease, it would be expected that 1 in 110 subjects with mt disease would have ASD and 1 in 2000 individuals with ASD would have mt disease. The co-occurrence of autism and mt disease is much higher than these figures, suggesting a possible pathogenetic relationship. Such hypothesis was initially suggested by the presence of biochemical markers of abnormal mt metabolic function in patients with ASD, including elevation of lactate, pyruvate, or alanine levels in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or brain; carnitine level in plasma; and level of organic acids in urine, and by demonstrating impaired mt fatty acid β-oxidation. More recently, mtDNA genetic mutations or deletions or mutations of nuclear genes regulating mt function have been associated with ASD in patients or in neuropathologic studies on the brains of patients with autism. In addition, the presence of dysfunction of the complexes of the mt respiratory chain or electron transport chain, indicating abnormal oxidative phosphorylation, has been reported in patients with ASD and in the autopsy samples of brains. Possible pathogenetic mechanisms linking mt dysfunction and ASD include mt activation of the immune system, abnormal mt Ca(2+) handling, and mt-induced oxidative stress. Genetic and epigenetic regulation of brain development may also be disrupted by mt dysfunction, including mt-induced oxidative stress. The role of the purinergic system linking mt dysfunction and ASD is currently under investigation. In summary, there is genetic and biochemical evidence for a mitochondria (mt) role in the pathogenesis of ASD in a subset of children. To determine the prevalence and type of genetic and biochemical mt defects in ASD, there is a need for further research using the latest genetic technology such as next

  11. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Gliomas: Pharmacotherapeutic Potential of Natural Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Guntuku, Lalita; Naidu, G.M.; Yerra, Veera Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors either benign or malignant originating from the glial tissue. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most prevalent and aggressive form among all gliomas, associated with decimal prognosis due to it's high invasive nature. GBM is also characterized by high recurrence rate and apoptosis resistance features which make the therapeutic targeting very challenging. Mitochondria are key cellular organelles that are acting as focal points in diverse array of cellular functions such as cellular energy metabolism, regulation of ion homeostasis, redox signaling and cell death. Eventual findings of mitochondrial dysfunction include preference of glycolysis over oxidative phosphorylation, enhanced reactive oxygen species generation and abnormal mitochondria mediated apoptotic machinery are frequently observed in various malignancies including gliomas. In particular, gliomas harbor mitochondrial structure abnormalities, genomic mutations in mtDNA, altered energy metabolism (Warburg effect) along with mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) enzyme. Numerous natural compounds have shown efficacy in the treatment of gliomas by targeting mitochondrial aberrant signaling cascades. Some of the natural compounds directly target the components of mitochondria whereas others act indirectly through modulating metabolic abnormalities that are consequence of the mitochondrial dysfunction. The present review offers a molecular insight into mitochondrial pathology in gliomas and therapeutic mechanisms of some of the promising natural compounds that target mitochondrial dysfunction. This review also sheds light on the challenges and possible ways to overcome the hurdles associated with these natural compounds to enter into the clinical market. PMID:26791479

  12. Isolation of Mitochondrial Ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Adam J

    2017-01-01

    Translation of mitochondrial encoded mRNAs by mitochondrial ribosomes is thought to play a major role in regulating the expression of mitochondrial proteins. However, the structure and function of plant mitochondrial ribosomes remains poorly understood. To study mitochondrial ribosomes, it is necessary to separate them from plastidic and cytosolic ribosomes that are generally present at much higher concentrations. Here, a straight forward protocol for the preparation of fractions highly enriched in mitochondrial ribosomes from plant cells is described. The method begins with purification of mitochondria followed by mitochondrial lysis and ultracentrifugation of released ribosomes through sucrose cushions and gradients. Dark-grown Arabidopsis cells were used in this example because of the ease with which good yields of pure mitochondria can be obtained from them. However, the steps for isolation of ribosomes from mitochondria could be applied to mitochondria obtained from other sources. Proteomic analyses of resulting fractions have confirmed strong enrichment of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins.

  13. Mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Francisca; Moraes, Carlos T

    2008-07-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process involving the coordinated expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, the import of the products of the latter into the organelle and turnover. The mechanisms associated with these events have been intensively studied in the last 20 years and our understanding of their details is much improved. Mitochondrial biogenesis requires the participation of calcium signaling that activates a series of calcium-dependent protein kinases that in turn activate transcription factors and coactivators such as PGC-1alpha that regulates the expression of genes coding for mitochondrial components. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis involves the balance of mitochondrial fission-fusion. Mitochondrial malfunction or defects in any of the many pathways involved in mitochondrial biogenesis can lead to degenerative diseases and possibly play an important part in aging.

  14. Trends in Mitochondrial Therapeutics for Neurological Disease.

    PubMed

    Leitão-Rocha, Ana; Guedes-Dias, Pedro; Pinho, Brígida R; Oliveira, Jorge M A

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal homeostasis is critically dependent on healthy mitochondria. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), in nuclear-encoded mitochondrial components, and age-dependent mitochondrial damage, have all been connected with neurological disorders. These include not only typical mitochondrial syndromes with neurological features such as encephalomyopathy, myoclonic epilepsy, neuropathy and ataxia; but also secondary mitochondrial involvement in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. Unravelling the molecular aetiology of mitochondrial dysfunction opens new therapeutic prospects for diseases thus far lacking effective treatments. In this review we address recent advances on preventive strategies, such as pronuclear, spindle-chromosome complex, or polar body genome transfer to replace mtDNA and avoid disease transmission to newborns; we also address experimental mitochondrial therapeutics aiming to benefit symptomatic patients and prevent disease manifestation in those at risk. Specifically, we focus on: (1) gene therapy to reduce mutant mtDNA, such as anti-replicative therapies and mitochondriatargeted nucleases allowing favourable heteroplasmic shifts; (2) allotopic expression of recoded wild-type mitochondrial genes, including targeted tRNAs and xenotopic expression of cognate genes to compensate for pathogenic mutations; (3) mitochondria targeted-peptides and lipophilic cations for in vivo delivery of antioxidants or other putative therapeutics; and (4) modulation of mitochondrial dynamics at the level of biogenesis, fission, fusion, movement and mitophagy. Further advances in therapeutic development are hindered by scarce in vivo models for mitochondrial disease, with the bulk of available data coming from cellular models. Nevertheless, wherever available, we also address data from in vivo experiments and clinical trials, focusing on neurological disease models.

  15. Development of pharmacological strategies for mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kanabus, M; Heales, S J; Rahman, S

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are an unusually genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of disorders, which are extremely challenging to treat. Currently, apart from supportive therapy, there are no effective treatments for the vast majority of mitochondrial diseases. Huge scientific effort, however, is being put into understanding the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial disease pathology and developing potential treatments. To date, a variety of treatments have been evaluated by randomized clinical trials, but unfortunately, none of these has delivered breakthrough results. Increased understanding of mitochondrial pathways and the development of many animal models, some of which are accurate phenocopies of human diseases, are facilitating the discovery and evaluation of novel prospective treatments. Targeting reactive oxygen species has been a treatment of interest for many years; however, only in recent years has it been possible to direct antioxidant delivery specifically into the mitochondria. Increasing mitochondrial biogenesis, whether by pharmacological approaches, dietary manipulation or exercise therapy, is also currently an active area of research. Modulating mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy and the mitochondrial membrane lipid milieu have also emerged as possible treatment strategies. Recent technological advances in gene therapy, including allotopic and transkingdom gene expression and mitochondrially targeted transcription activator-like nucleases, have led to promising results in cell and animal models of mitochondrial diseases, but most of these techniques are still far from clinical application. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24116962

  16. Mitochondrial morphological features are associated with fission and fusion events.

    PubMed

    Westrate, Laura M; Drocco, Jeffrey A; Martin, Katie R; Hlavacek, William S; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo constant remodeling through the regulation of two opposing processes, mitochondrial fission and fusion. Although several key regulators and physiological stimuli have been identified to control mitochondrial fission and fusion, the role of mitochondrial morphology in the two processes remains to be determined. To address this knowledge gap, we investigated whether morphological features extracted from time-lapse live-cell images of mitochondria could be used to predict mitochondrial fate. That is, we asked if we could predict whether a mitochondrion is likely to participate in a fission or fusion event based on its current shape and local environment. Using live-cell microscopy, image analysis software, and supervised machine learning, we characterized mitochondrial dynamics with single-organelle resolution to identify features of mitochondria that are predictive of fission and fusion events. A random forest (RF) model was trained to correctly classify mitochondria poised for either fission or fusion based on a series of morphological and positional features for each organelle. Of the features we evaluated, mitochondrial perimeter positively correlated with mitochondria about to undergo a fission event. Similarly mitochondrial solidity (compact shape) positively correlated with mitochondria about to undergo a fusion event. Our results indicate that fission and fusion are positively correlated with mitochondrial morphological features; and therefore, mitochondrial fission and fusion may be influenced by the mechanical properties of mitochondrial membranes.

  17. [The relativity of abnormity].

    PubMed

    Nilson, Annika

    2006-01-01

    In the late 19th century and in the beginning of the 20th century, mental diseases and abnormal behavior was considered to be a great danger to culture and society. "Degeneration" was the buzzword of the time, used and misused by artists and scientists alike. At the same time, some scientists saw abnormity as the key to unlock the mysteries of the ordinary mind. Naturalistic curiosity left Pandoras box open when religion declined in Darwins wake. Two swedish scientists, the physician Bror Gadelius (1862-1938) and his friend the philosopher Axel Herrlin (1870-1937), inspired by the French psychologist Theodule Ribots (1839-1916) "psychology without a soul", denied all fixed demarcation lines between abnormity and normality. All humans are natures creatures ruled by physiological laws, not ruled by God or convention. Even ordinary morality was considered to be an utterly backward explanation and guideline for complex human behavior. Different forms of therapy, not various kinds of penalties for wicked and disturbing behavior, are the now the solution for lots of people, "normal" as well as "abnormal". Psychiatry is expanding.

  18. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  19. Human β Cell Transcriptome Analysis Uncovers lncRNAs That Are Tissue-Specific, Dynamically Regulated, and Abnormally Expressed in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Morán, Ignasi; Akerman, İldem; van de Bunt, Martijn; Xie, Ruiyu; Benazra, Marion; Nammo, Takao; Arnes, Luis; Nakić, Nikolina; García-Hurtado, Javier; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Sauty-Colace, Claire; Beucher, Anthony; Scharfmann, Raphael; van Arensbergen, Joris; Johnson, Paul R; Berry, Andrew; Lee, Clarence; Harkins, Timothy; Gmyr, Valery; Pattou, François; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Berney, Thierry; Hanley, Neil A; Gloyn, Anna L; Sussel, Lori; Langman, Linda; Brayman, Kenneth L; Sander, Maike; McCarthy, Mark I.; Ravassard, Philippe; Ferrer, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A significant portion of the genome is transcribed as long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), several of which are known to control gene expression. The repertoire and regulation of lncRNAs in disease-relevant tissues, however, has not been systematically explored. We report a comprehensive strand-specific transcriptome map of human pancreatic islets and β-cells, and uncover >1100 intergenic and antisense islet-cell lncRNA genes. We find islet lncRNAs that are dynamically regulated, and show that they are an integral component of the β-cell differentiation and maturation program. We sequenced the mouse islet transcriptome, and identify lncRNA orthologs that are regulated like their human counterparts. Depletion of HI-LNC25, a β-cell specific lncRNA, downregulated GLIS3 mRNA, thus exemplifying a gene regulatory function of islet lncRNAs. Finally, selected islet lncRNAs were dysregulated in type 2 diabetes or mapped to genetic loci underlying diabetes susceptibility. These findings reveal a new class of islet-cell genes relevant to β-cell programming and diabetes pathophysiology. PMID:23040067

  20. Mitochondrial DNA mutations provoke dominant inhibition of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Sauvanet, Cécile; Duvezin-Caubet, Stéphane; Salin, Bénédicte; David, Claudine; Massoni-Laporte, Aurélie; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Rojo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that continuously move, fuse and divide. Mitochondrial dynamics modulate overall mitochondrial morphology and are essential for the proper function, maintenance and transmission of mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We have investigated mitochondrial fusion in yeast cells with severe defects in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) due to removal or various specific mutations of mtDNA. We find that, under fermentative conditions, OXPHOS deficient cells maintain normal levels of cellular ATP and ADP but display a reduced mitochondrial inner membrane potential. We demonstrate that, despite metabolic compensation by glycolysis, OXPHOS defects are associated to a selective inhibition of inner but not outer membrane fusion. Fusion inhibition was dominant and hampered the fusion of mutant mitochondria with wild-type mitochondria. Inhibition of inner membrane fusion was not systematically associated to changes of mitochondrial distribution and morphology, nor to changes in the isoform pattern of Mgm1, the major fusion factor of the inner membrane. However, inhibition of inner membrane fusion correlated with specific alterations of mitochondrial ultrastructure, notably with the presence of aligned and unfused inner membranes that are connected to two mitochondrial boundaries. The fusion inhibition observed upon deletion of OXPHOS related genes or upon removal of the entire mtDNA was similar to that observed upon introduction of point mutations in the mitochondrial ATP6 gene that are associated to neurogenic ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) or to maternally inherited Leigh Syndrome (MILS) in humans. Our findings indicate that the consequences of mtDNA mutations may not be limited to OXPHOS defects but may also include alterations in mitochondrial fusion. Our results further imply that, in healthy cells, the dominant inhibition of fusion could mediate the exclusion of OXPHOS-deficient mitochondria from the network of

  1. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction in blood cells from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Ehinger, Johannes K; Morota, Saori; Hansson, Magnus J; Paul, Gesine; Elmér, Eskil

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, where the progressive degeneration of motor neurons results in muscle atrophy, paralysis and death. Abnormalities in both central nervous system and muscle mitochondria have previously been demonstrated in patient samples, indicating systemic disease. In this case-control study, venous blood samples were acquired from 24 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients and 21 age-matched controls. Platelets and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and mitochondrial oxygen consumption measured in intact and permeabilized cells with additions of mitochondrial substrates, inhibitors and titration of an uncoupler. Respiratory values were normalized to cell count and for two markers of cellular mitochondrial content, citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA, respectively. Mitochondrial function was correlated with clinical staging of disease severity. Complex IV (cytochrome c-oxidase)-activity normalized to mitochondrial content was decreased in platelets from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients both when normalized to citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA copy number. In mononuclear cells, complex IV-activity was decreased when normalized to citrate synthase activity. Mitochondrial content was increased in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patient platelets. In mononuclear cells, complex I activity declined and mitochondrial content increased progressively with advancing disease stage. The findings are, however, based on small subsets of patients and need to be confirmed. We conclude that when normalized to mitochondria-specific content, complex IV-activity is reduced in blood cells from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients and that there is an apparent compensatory increase in cellular mitochondrial content. This supports systemic involvement in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and suggests further study of mitochondrial function in blood cells as a future biomarker for the

  3. Mitochondrial Proteome Studies in Seeds during Germination

    PubMed Central

    Czarna, Malgorzata; Kolodziejczak, Marta; Janska, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Seed germination is considered to be one of the most critical phases in the plant life cycle, establishing the next generation of a plant species. It is an energy-demanding process that requires functioning mitochondria. One of the earliest events of seed germination is progressive development of structurally simple and metabolically quiescent promitochondria into fully active and cristae-containing mitochondria, known as mitochondrial biogenesis. This is a complex and tightly regulated process, which is accompanied by sequential and dynamic gene expression, protein synthesis, and post-translational modifications. The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive summary of seed mitochondrial proteome studies during germination of various plant model organisms. We describe different gel-based and gel-free proteomic approaches used to characterize mitochondrial proteomes of germinating seeds as well as challenges and limitations of these proteomic studies. Furthermore, the dynamic changes in the abundance of the mitochondrial proteomes of germinating seeds are illustrated, highlighting numerous mitochondrial proteins involved in respiration, tricarboxycylic acid (TCA) cycle, metabolism, import, and stress response as potentially important for seed germination. We then review seed mitochondrial protein carbonylation, phosphorylation, and S-nitrosylation as well as discuss the possible link between these post-translational modifications (PTMs) and the regulation of seed germination. PMID:28248229

  4. Roles of mitochondrial fragmentation and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Saotome, Masao; Nobuhara, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Funaki, Makoto; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests an association between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac diseases. Because myocardial metabolic deficiency caused by insulin resistance plays a crucial role in heart disease, we investigated the role of dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) in the pathogenesis of myocardial insulin resistance. Methods and Results: DRP1-expressing H9c2 myocytes, which had fragmented mitochondria with mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ{sub m}) depolarization, exhibited attenuated insulin signaling and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake, indicating insulin resistance. Treatment of the DRP1-expressing myocytes with Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin pentachloride (TMPyP) significantly improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. When myocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), they increased DRP1 expression and mitochondrial fragmentation, resulting in ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and insulin resistance. When DRP1 was suppressed by siRNA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance were restored. Our results suggest that a mutual enhancement between DRP1 and reactive oxygen species could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance. In palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myocytes, neither DRP1-suppression nor TMPyP restored the ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and impaired 2-DG uptake, however they improved insulin signaling. Conclusions: A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS could promote mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of insulin signal transduction. However, other mechanisms, including lipid metabolite-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, may be involved in palmitate-induced insulin resistance. - Highlights: • DRP1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and insulin-resistance. • A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS ipromotes insulin-resistance. • Palmitate increases DRP1 expression and induces insulin

  5. Mitochondrial Diseases and Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Brunel-Guitton, Catherine; Levtova, Alina; Sasarman, Florin

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. An integrative approach encompassing clinical, biochemical, and molecular investigations is required to reach a specific diagnosis. In this review we summarize the clinical and genetic aspects of mitochondrial disorders associated with cardiomyopathy, including disorders of oxidative phosphorylation. It also describes groups of disorders that, although not usually classified as mitochondrial disorders, stem from defects in mitochondrial function (eg, disorders of β-oxidation and the carnitine cycle), are associated with secondary mitochondrial impairment (eg, organic acidurias), and are important diagnostically because they are treatable. Current biochemical and molecular techniques for the diagnosis of mitochondrial cardiomyopathies are described, and a diagnostic algorithm is proposed, to help clinicians in their approach to cardiomyopathies in the context of mitochondrial diseases.

  6. Ionizing radiation accelerates Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission, which involves delayed mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in normal human fibroblast-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report first time that ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial dynamic changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced mitochondrial fission was caused by Drp1 localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that radiation causes delayed ROS from mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down regulation of Drp1 rescued mitochondrial dysfunction after radiation exposure. -- Abstract: Ionizing radiation is known to increase intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through mitochondrial dysfunction. Although it has been as a basis of radiation-induced genetic instability, the mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction remains unclear. Here we studied the dynamics of mitochondrial structure in normal human fibroblast like cells exposed to ionizing radiation. Delayed mitochondrial O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-} production was peaked 3 days after irradiation, which was coupled with accelerated mitochondrial fission. We found that radiation exposure accumulated dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria. Knocking down of Drp1 expression prevented radiation induced acceleration of mitochondrial fission. Furthermore, knockdown of Drp1 significantly suppressed delayed production of mitochondrial O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-}. Since the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which was induced by radiation was prevented in cells knocking down of Drp1 expression, indicating that the excessive mitochondrial fission was involved in delayed mitochondrial dysfunction after irradiation.

  7. Genetic disorders with both hearing loss and cardiovascular abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Belmont, John W; Craigen, William; Martinez, Hugo; Jefferies, John Lynn

    2011-01-01

    There has been a growing appreciation for conditions that affect hearing and which are accompanied by significant cardiovascular disorders. In this chapter we consider several broad classes of conditions including deafness due to abnormal structural development of the inner ear, those with physiological abnormalities in the inner ear sensory apparatus, and conditions with progressive loss of function of sensory cells or middle ear functions. Because of shared developmental controls, inner ear malformations are often associated with congenital heart defects and can be part of complex syndromes that affect other organs and neurodevelopmental outcome. Physiological disorders of the hair cells can lead to hearing loss and can be associated with cardiac arrhythmias, especially long QT syndrome. In addition, cellular energy defects such as mitochondrial disorders can affect maintenance of hair cells and are often associated with cardiomyopathy. Lysosomal storage diseases and other disorders affecting connective tissue can lead to chronic middle ear disease, with conductive hearing loss and also cause cardiac valve disease and/or cardiomyopathy. The genetic basis for these conditions is heterogeneous and includes chromosomal/genomic disorders, de novo dominant mutations, and familial dominant, autosomal-recessive, and mitochondrial (matrilineal) inheritance. Taken together, there are more than 100 individual genes implicated in genetic hearing impairment that are also associated with congenital and/or progressive cardiac abnormalities. These genes encode transcription factors, chromatin remodeling factors, components of signal transduction pathways, ion channels, mitochondrial proteins and assembly factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and enzymes involved in lysosomal functions.

  8. Heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B K; Kaiser, L; Maxwell, H S

    2008-08-01

    The etiologies for congenital bovine fetal anomalies can be divided into heritable, toxic, nutritional, and infectious categories. Although uncommon in most herds, inherited congenital anomalies are probably present in all breeds of cattle and propagated as a result of specific trait selection that inadvertently results in propagation of the defect. In some herds, the occurrence of inherited anomalies has become frequent, and economically important. Anomalous traits can affect animals in a range of ways, some being lethal or requiring euthanasia on humane grounds, others altering structure, function, or performance of affected animals. Veterinary practitioners should be aware of the potential for inherited defects, and be prepared to investigate and report animals exhibiting abnormal characteristics. This review will discuss the morphologic characteristics, mode of inheritance, breeding lines affected, and the availability of genetic testing for selected heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

  9. Liver abnormalities in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Than, Nwe Ni; Neuberger, James

    2013-08-01

    Abnormalities of liver function (notably rise in alkaline phosphatase and fall in serum albumin) are common in normal pregnancy, whereas rise in serum bilirubin and aminotransferase suggest either exacerbation of underlying pre-existing liver disease, liver disease related to pregnancy or liver disease unrelated to pregnancy. Pregnant women appear to have a worse outcome when infected with Hepatitis E virus. Liver diseases associated with pregnancy include abnormalities associated hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver disease, pre-eclampsia, cholestasis of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. Prompt investigation and diagnosis is important in ensuring a successful maternal and foetal outcome. In general, prompt delivery is the treatment of choice for acute fatty liver, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome and ursodeoxycholic acid is used for cholestasis of pregnancy although it is not licenced for this indication.

  10. Mitochondrial dysfunction in migraine.

    PubMed

    Yorns, William R; Hardison, H Huntley

    2013-09-01

    Migraine is the most frequent type of headache in children. In the 1980s, scientists first hypothesized a connection between migraine and mitochondrial (mt) disorders. More recent studies have suggested that at least some subtypes of migraine may be related to a mt defect. Different types of evidence support a relationship between mitochondria (mt) and migraine: (1) Biochemical evidence: Abnormal mt function translates into high intracellular penetration of Ca(2+), excessive production of free radicals, and deficient oxidative phosphorylation, which ultimately causes energy failure in neurons and astrocytes, thus triggering migraine mechanisms, including spreading depression. The mt markers of these events are low activity of superoxide dismutase, activation of cytochrome-c oxidase and nitric oxide, high levels of lactate and pyruvate, and low ratios of phosphocreatine-inorganic phosphate and N-acetylaspartate-choline. (2) Morphologic evidence: mt abnormalities have been shown in migraine sufferers, the most characteristic ones being direct observation in muscle biopsy of ragged red and cytochrome-c oxidase-negative fibers, accumulation of subsarcolemmal mt, and demonstration of giant mt with paracrystalline inclusions. (3) Genetic evidence: Recent studies have identified specific mutations responsible for migraine susceptibility. However, the investigation of the mtDNA mutations found in classic mt disorders (mt encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes, myoclonus epilepsy with ragged red fibers, Kearns-Sayre syndrome, and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy) has not demonstrated any association. Recently, 2 common mtDNA polymorphisms (16519C→T and 3010G→A) have been associated with pediatric cyclic vomiting syndrome and migraine. Also, POLG mutations (eg, p.T851 A, p.N468D, p.Y831C, p.G517V, and p.P163S) can cause disease through impaired replication of mtDNA, including migraine. Further studies to investigate the relationship between mt

  11. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  12. Anatomical Abnormalities in Autism?

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Berman, Sigal; Behrmann, Marlene; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-04-01

    Substantial controversy exists regarding the presence and significance of anatomical abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The release of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (∼1000 participants, age 6-65 years) offers an unprecedented opportunity to conduct large-scale comparisons of anatomical MRI scans across groups and to resolve many of the outstanding questions. Comprehensive univariate analyses using volumetric, thickness, and surface area measures of over 180 anatomically defined brain areas, revealed significantly larger ventricular volumes, smaller corpus callosum volume (central segment only), and several cortical areas with increased thickness in the ASD group. Previously reported anatomical abnormalities in ASD including larger intracranial volumes, smaller cerebellar volumes, and larger amygdala volumes were not substantiated by the current study. In addition, multivariate classification analyses yielded modest decoding accuracies of individuals' group identity (<60%), suggesting that the examined anatomical measures are of limited diagnostic utility for ASD. While anatomical abnormalities may be present in distinct subgroups of ASD individuals, the current findings show that many previously reported anatomical measures are likely to be of low clinical and scientific significance for understanding ASD neuropathology as a whole in individuals 6-35 years old.

  13. From Isolated to Networked: A Paradigmatic Shift in Mitochondrial Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Aon, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    A new paradigm of mitochondrial function in networks is emerging which includes, without undermining, the glorious and still useful paradigm of the isolated mitochondrion. The mitochondrial network paradigm introduces new concepts, tools, and analytical techniques. Among them is that mitochondrial function in networks exhibits interdependence and multiplicative effects based on synchronization mechanisms, which involve communication between mitochondrial neighbors. The collective dynamics of these networks become advantageous for coordinating function spanning from the cell, to the tissue, and the organ. However, under severely stressful conditions the network behavior of mitochondria may become life threatening. PMID:21423362

  14. Mitochondrial approaches to protect against cardiac ischemia and reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Camara, Amadou K S; Bienengraeber, Martin; Stowe, David F

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrion is a vital component in cellular energy metabolism and intracellular signaling processes. Mitochondria are involved in a myriad of complex signaling cascades regulating cell death vs. survival. Importantly, mitochondrial dysfunction and the resulting oxidative and nitrosative stress are central in the pathogenesis of numerous human maladies including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, and retinal diseases, many of which are related. This review will examine the emerging understanding of the role of mitochondria in the etiology and progression of cardiovascular diseases and will explore potential therapeutic benefits of targeting the organelle in attenuating the disease process. Indeed, recent advances in mitochondrial biology have led to selective targeting of drugs designed to modulate or manipulate mitochondrial function, to the use of light therapy directed to the mitochondrial function, and to modification of the mitochondrial genome for potential therapeutic benefit. The approach to rationally treat mitochondrial dysfunction could lead to more effective interventions in cardiovascular diseases that to date have remained elusive. The central premise of this review is that if mitochondrial abnormalities contribute to the etiology of cardiovascular diseases (e.g., ischemic heart disease), alleviating the mitochondrial dysfunction will contribute to mitigating the severity or progression of the disease. To this end, this review will provide an overview of our current understanding of mitochondria function in cardiovascular diseases as well as the potential role for targeting mitochondria with potential drugs or other interventions that lead to protection against cell injury.

  15. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Pathology in Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Clay, Hayley; Sillivan, Stephanie; Konradi, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BPD) and schizophrenia (SZ) are severe psychiatric illnesses with a combined prevalence of 4%. A disturbance of energy metabolism is frequently observed in these disorders. Several pieces of evidence point to an underlying dysfunction of mitochondria: i) decreased mitochondrial respiration; (ii) changes in mitochondrial morphology; iii) increases in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphisms and in levels of mtDNA mutations; iv) downregulation of nuclear mRNA molecules and proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration; v) decreased high-energy phosphates and decreased pH in the brain; and vi) psychotic and affective symptoms, and cognitive decline in mitochondrial disorders. Furthermore, transgenic mice with mutated mitochondrial DNA polymerase show mood disorder-like phenotypes. In this review, we will discuss the genetic and physiological components of mitochondria and the evidence for mitochondrial abnormalities in BPD and SZ. We will furthermore describe the role of mitochondria during brain development and the effect of current drugs for mental illness on mitochondrial function. Understanding the role of mitochondria, both developmentally as well as in the ailing brain, is of critical importance to elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms in psychiatric disorders. PMID:20833242

  16. Mitochondrial Approaches to Protect Against Cardiac Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Camara, Amadou K. S.; Bienengraeber, Martin; Stowe, David F.

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrion is a vital component in cellular energy metabolism and intracellular signaling processes. Mitochondria are involved in a myriad of complex signaling cascades regulating cell death vs. survival. Importantly, mitochondrial dysfunction and the resulting oxidative and nitrosative stress are central in the pathogenesis of numerous human maladies including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, and retinal diseases, many of which are related. This review will examine the emerging understanding of the role of mitochondria in the etiology and progression of cardiovascular diseases and will explore potential therapeutic benefits of targeting the organelle in attenuating the disease process. Indeed, recent advances in mitochondrial biology have led to selective targeting of drugs designed to modulate or manipulate mitochondrial function, to the use of light therapy directed to the mitochondrial function, and to modification of the mitochondrial genome for potential therapeutic benefit. The approach to rationally treat mitochondrial dysfunction could lead to more effective interventions in cardiovascular diseases that to date have remained elusive. The central premise of this review is that if mitochondrial abnormalities contribute to the etiology of cardiovascular diseases (e.g., ischemic heart disease), alleviating the mitochondrial dysfunction will contribute to mitigating the severity or progression of the disease. To this end, this review will provide an overview of our current understanding of mitochondria function in cardiovascular diseases as well as the potential role for targeting mitochondria with potential drugs or other interventions that lead to protection against cell injury. PMID:21559063

  17. Mitochondrial helicases and mitochondrial genome maintenance

    PubMed Central

    de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C.; Aamann, Maria D.; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Stevnsner, Tinna V.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2010-01-01

    Helicases are essential enzymes that utilize the energy of nucleotide hydrolysis to drive unwinding of nucleic acid duplexes. Helicases play roles in all aspects of DNA metabolism including DNA repair, DNA replication and transcription. The subcellular locations and functions of several helicases have been studied in detail; however, the roles of specific helicases in mitochondrial biology remain poorly characterized. This review presents important recent advances in identifying and characterizing mitochondrial helicases, some of which also operate in the nucleus. PMID:20576512

  18. Primary Mitochondrial Disease and Secondary Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Importance of Distinction for Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Niyazov, Dmitriy M.; Kahler, Stephan G.; Frye, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disease refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting in defective cellular energy production due to abnormal oxidative phosphorylation (oxphos). Primary mitochondrial disease (PMD) is diagnosed clinically and ideally, but not always, confirmed by a known or indisputably pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or nuclear DNA (nDNA) mutation. The PMD genes either encode oxphos proteins directly or they affect oxphos function by impacting production of the complex machinery needed to run the oxphos process. However, many disorders have the ‘mitochondrial’ phenotype without an identifiable mtDNA or nDNA mutation or they have a variant of unknown clinical significance. Secondary mitochondrial dysfunction (SMD) can be caused by genes encoding neither function nor production of the oxphos proteins and accompanies many hereditary non-mitochondrial diseases. SMD may also be due to nongenetic causes such as environmental factors. In our practice, we see many patients with clinical signs of mitochondrial dysfunction based on phenotype, biomarkers, imaging, muscle biopsy, or negative/equivocal mtDNA or nDNA test results. In these cases, it is often tempting to assign a patient's phenotype to ‘mitochondrial disease’, but SMD is often challenging to distinguish from PMD. Fortunately, rapid advances in molecular testing, made possible by next generation sequencing, have been effective at least in some cases in establishing accurate diagnoses to distinguish between PMD and SMD. This is important, since their treatments and prognoses can be quite different. However, even in the absence of the ability to distinguish between PMD and SMD, treating SMD with standard treatments for PMD can be effective. We review the latest findings regarding mitochondrial disease/dysfunction and give representative examples in which differentiation between PMD and SMD has been crucial for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27587988

  19. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in hyperglycaemia-induced coronary microvascular dysfunction: Protective role of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mandar S; Williams, David; Horlock, Duncan; Samarasinghe, Thilini; Andrews, Karen L; Jefferis, Ann-Maree; Berger, Philip J; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P; Kaye, David M

    2015-05-01

    Microvascular complications are now recognized to play a major role in diabetic complications, and understanding the mechanisms is critical. Endothelial dysfunction occurs early in the course of the development of complications; the precise mechanisms remain poorly understood. Mitochondrial dysfunction may occur in a diabetic rat heart and may act as a source of the oxidative stress. However, the role of endothelial cell-specific mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic vascular complications is poorly studied. Here, we studied the role of diabetes-induced abnormal endothelial mitochondrial function and the resultant endothelial dysfunction. Understanding the role of endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic vasculature is critical in order to develop new therapies. We demonstrate that hyperglycaemia leads to mitochondrial dysfunction in microvascular endothelial cells, and that mitochondrial inhibition induces endothelial dysfunction. Additionally, we show that resveratrol acts as a protective agent; resveratrol-mediated mitochondrial protection may be used to prevent long-term diabetic cardiovascular complications.

  20. Cambogin exerts anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on breast adenocarcinoma through the induction of NADPH oxidase 1 and the alteration of mitochondrial morphology and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jianling; Wu, Minfeng; Cai, Bo; Liu, Yurong; Zhang, Hong; Tan, Hongsheng; Pan, Yingyi; Xu, Hongxi

    2016-01-01

    Cambogin, a bioactive polycyclic polyprenylated acylphoroglucinol (PPAP) derived from the Garcinia genus, possesses proapoptotic effect in medulloblastoma and breast cancer cells. We have previously demonstrated that the proapoptotic effect of cambogin is driven by the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we have shown that the inhibitory effect of cambogin on cell proliferation is associated with the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) and mitochondrial fragmentation. Cambogin also promotes the mutual complex formation of the membrane-bound subunit p22phox of NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1), as well as the phosphorylation of the cytosolic subunit p47phox, subsequently enhancing membrane-bound NOX1 activity, which leads to increases in intracellular and mitochondrial levels of O2.- and H2O2. Pharmacological inhibition of NOX1 using apocynin (pan-NOX inhibitor), ML171 (NOX1 inhibitor) or siRNA against NOX1 prevents the increases in O2.- and H2O2 levels and the anti-proliferative effect of cambogin. Antioxidants, including SOD (superoxide dismutase), CAT (catalase) and EUK-8, are also able to restore cell viability in the presence of cambogin. Besides, cambogin increases the dissociation of thioredoxin-1 (Trx1) from ASK1, switching the inactive form of ASK1 to the active kinase, subsequently leads to the phosphorylation of JNK/SAPK, which is abolished upon ML171 treatment. The proapoptotic effect of cambogin in breast cancer cells is also aggravated upon knocking down Trx1 in MCF-7 cells. Taken in conjunction, these data indicate that the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effect of cambogin is mediated via inducing NOX1-dependent ROS production and the dissociation of ASK1 and Trx1. PMID:27418140

  1. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  2. Desmin Cytoskeleton Linked to Muscle Mitochondrial Distribution and Respiratory Function

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Derek J.; Mavroidis, Manolis; Weisleder, Noah; Capetanaki, Yassemi

    2000-01-01

    Ultrastructural studies have previously suggested potential association of intermediate filaments (IFs) with mitochondria. Thus, we have investigated mitochondrial distribution and function in muscle lacking the IF protein desmin. Immunostaining of skeletal muscle tissue sections, as well as histochemical staining for the mitochondrial marker enzymes cytochrome C oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase, demonstrate abnormal accumulation of subsarcolemmal clumps of mitochondria in predominantly slow twitch skeletal muscle of desmin-null mice. Ultrastructural observation of desmin-null cardiac muscle demonstrates in addition to clumping, extensive mitochondrial proliferation in a significant fraction of the myocytes, particularly after work overload. These alterations are frequently associated with swelling and degeneration of the mitochondrial matrix. Mitochondrial abnormalities can be detected very early, before other structural defects become obvious. To investigate related changes in mitochondrial function, we have analyzed ADP-stimulated respiration of isolated muscle mitochondria, and ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration in situ using saponin skinned muscle fibers. The in vitro maximal rates of respiration in isolated cardiac mitochondria from desmin-null and wild-type mice were similar. However, mitochondrial respiration in situ is significantly altered in desmin-null muscle. Both the maximal rate of ADP-stimulated oxygen consumption and the dissociation constant (Km) for ADP are significantly reduced in desmin-null cardiac and soleus muscle compared with controls. Respiratory parameters for desmin-null fast twitch gastrocnemius muscle were unaffected. Additionally, respiratory measurements in the presence of creatine indicate that coupling of creatine kinase and the adenine translocator is lost in desmin-null soleus muscle. This coupling is unaffected in cardiac muscle from desmin-null animals. All of these studies indicate that desmin IFs play a significant

  3. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  4. Mitochondrial lipids in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Aufschnaiter, Andreas; Kohler, Verena; Diessl, Jutta; Peselj, Carlotta; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Keller, Walter; Büttner, Sabrina

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including proteinopathies such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, which are characterized by the deposition of aggregated proteins in the form of insoluble fibrils or plaques. The distinct molecular processes that eventually result in mitochondrial dysfunction during neurodegeneration are well studied but still not fully understood. However, defects in mitochondrial fission and fusion, mitophagy, oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial bioenergetics have been linked to cellular demise. These processes are influenced by the lipid environment within mitochondrial membranes as, besides membrane structure and curvature, recruitment and activity of different proteins also largely depend on the respective lipid composition. Hence, the interaction of neurotoxic proteins with certain lipids and the modification of lipid composition in different cell compartments, in particular mitochondria, decisively impact cell death associated with neurodegeneration. Here, we discuss the relevance of mitochondrial lipids in the pathological alterations that result in neuronal demise, focussing on proteinopathies.

  5. Upstream Pathways Controlling Mitochondrial Function in Major Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Alencar Kolinski; Pan, Alexander Yongshuai; da Silva, Tatiane Morgana; Duong, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is commonly observed in bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia (SCZ) and may be a central feature of psychosis. These illnesses are complex and heterogeneous, which is reflected by the complexity of the processes regulating mitochondrial function. Mitochondria are typically associated with energy production; however, dysfunction of mitochondria affects not only energy production but also vital cellular processes, including the formation of reactive oxygen species, cell cycle and survival, intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, and neurotransmission. In this review, we characterize the upstream components controlling mitochondrial function, including 1) mutations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, 2) mitochondrial dynamics, and 3) intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. Characterizing and understanding the upstream factors that regulate mitochondrial function is essential to understand progression of these illnesses and develop biomarkers and therapeutics. PMID:27310240

  6. Retro-translocation of mitochondrial intermembrane space proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bragoszewski, Piotr; Wasilewski, Michal; Sakowska, Paulina; Gornicka, Agnieszka; Böttinger, Lena; Qiu, Jian; Wiedemann, Nils; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    The content of mitochondrial proteome is maintained through two highly dynamic processes, the influx of newly synthesized proteins from the cytosol and the protein degradation. Mitochondrial proteins are targeted to the intermembrane space by the mitochondrial intermembrane space assembly pathway that couples their import and oxidative folding. The folding trap was proposed to be a driving mechanism for the mitochondrial accumulation of these proteins. Whether the reverse movement of unfolded proteins to the cytosol occurs across the intact outer membrane is unknown. We found that reduced, conformationally destabilized proteins are released from mitochondria in a size-limited manner. We identified the general import pore protein Tom40 as an escape gate. We propose that the mitochondrial proteome is not only regulated by the import and degradation of proteins but also by their retro-translocation to the external cytosolic location. Thus, protein release is a mechanism that contributes to the mitochondrial proteome surveillance. PMID:26056291

  7. The little big genome: the organization of mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Iraselia; Jones, Edith; Ramos, Manuel; Innis-Whitehouse, Wendy; Gilkerson, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The small (16,569 base pair) human mitochondrial genome plays a significant role in cell metabolism and homeostasis. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) contributes to the generation of complexes which are essential to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). As such, mtDNA is directly integrated into mitochondrial biogenesis and signaling and regulates mitochondrial metabolism in concert with nuclear-encoded mitochondrial factors. Mitochondria are a highly dynamic, pleiomorphic network that undergoes fission and fusion events. Within this network, mtDNAs are packaged into structures called nucleoids which are actively distributed in discrete foci within the network. This sensitive organelle is frequently disrupted by insults such as oxidants and inflammatory cytokines, and undergoes genomic damage with double- and single-strand breaks that impair its function. Collectively, mtDNA is emerging as a highly sensitive indicator of cellular stress, which is directly integrated into the mitochondrial network as a contributor of a wide range of critical signaling pathways. PMID:27814641

  8. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  9. Kif5 regulates mitochondrial movement, morphology, function and neuronal survival.

    PubMed

    Iworima, Diepiriye G; Pasqualotto, Bryce A; Rintoul, Gordon L

    2016-04-01

    Due to the unique architecture of neurons, trafficking of mitochondria throughout processes to regions of high energetic demand is critical to sustain neuronal health. It has been suggested that compromised mitochondrial trafficking may play a role in neurodegenerative diseases. We evaluated the consequences of disrupted kif5c-mediated mitochondrial trafficking on mitochondrial form and function in primary rat cortical neurons. Morphological changes in mitochondria appeared to be due to remodelling, a phenomenon distinct from mitochondrial fission, which resulted in punctate-shaped mitochondria. We also demonstrated that neurons displaying punctate mitochondria exhibited relatively decreased ROS and increased cellular ATP levels using ROS-sensitive GFP and ATP FRET probes, respectively. Somewhat unexpectedly, neurons overexpressing the dominant negative form of kif5c exhibited enhanced survival following excitotoxicity, suggesting that the impairment of mitochondrial trafficking conferred some form of neuroprotection. However, when neurons were exposed to H2O2, disruption of kif5c exacerbated cell death indicating that the effect on cell viability was dependent on the mode of toxicity. Our results suggest a novel role of kif5c. In addition to mediating mitochondrial transport, kif5c plays a role in the mechanism of regulating mitochondrial morphology. Our results also suggest that kif5c mediated mitochondrial dynamics may play an important role in regulating mitochondrial function and in turn cellular health. Moreover, our studies demonstrate an interesting interplay between the regulation of mitochondrial motility and morphology.

  10. Mitochondria and the success of somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning: from nuclear-mitochondrial interactions to mitochondrial complementation and mitochondrial DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Hiendleder, Stefan; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Wolf, Eckhard

    2005-01-01

    The overall success of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is rather unsatisfactory, both in terms of efficacy and from an animal health and welfare point of view. Most research activities have concentrated on epigenetic reprogramming problems as one major cause of SCNT failure. The present review addresses the limited success of mammalian SCNT from yet another viewpoint, the mitochondrial perspective. Mitochondria have a broad range of critical functions in cellular energy supply, cell signalling and programmed cell death and, thus, affect embryonic and fetal development, suggesting that inadequate or perturbed mitochondrial functions may adversely affect SCNT success. A survey of perinatal clinical data from human subjects with deficient mitochondrial respiratory chain activity has revealed a plethora of phenotypes that have striking similarities with abnormalities commonly encountered in SCNT fetuses and offspring. We discuss the limited experimental data on nuclear-mitochondrial interaction effects in SCNT and explore the potential effects in the context of new findings about the biology of mitochondria. These include mitochondrial fusion/fission, mitochondrial complementation and mitochondrial DNA recombination, processes that are likely to be affected by and impact on SCNT cloning. Furthermore, we indicate pathways that could link epigenetic reprogramming and mitochondria effects in SCNT and address questions and perspectives for future research.

  11. DJ-1 Null Dopaminergic Neuronal Cells Exhibit Defects in Mitochondrial Function and Structure: Involvement of Mitochondrial Complex I Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jun Young; Park, Ji Hoon; Kim, Soung Jung; Seo, Kang Sik; Han, Jeong Su; Lee, Sang Hee; Kim, Jin Man; Park, Jong Il; Park, Seung Kiel; Lim, Kyu; Hwang, Byung Doo; Shong, Minho; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2012-01-01

    DJ-1 is a Parkinson's disease-associated gene whose protein product has a protective role in cellular homeostasis by removing cytosolic reactive oxygen species and maintaining mitochondrial function. However, it is not clear how DJ-1 regulates mitochondrial function and why mitochondrial dysfunction is induced by DJ-1 deficiency. In a previous study we showed that DJ-1 null dopaminergic neuronal cells exhibit defective mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I activity. In the present article we investigated the role of DJ-1 in complex I formation by using blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and 2-dimensional gel analysis to assess native complex status. On the basis of these experiments, we concluded that DJ-1 null cells have a defect in the assembly of complex I. Concomitant with abnormal complex I formation, DJ-1 null cells show defective supercomplex formation. It is known that aberrant formation of the supercomplex impairs the flow of electrons through the channels between respiratory chain complexes, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction. We took two approaches to study these mitochondrial defects. The first approach assessed the structural defect by using both confocal microscopy with MitoTracker staining and electron microscopy. The second approach assessed the functional defect by measuring ATP production, O2 consumption, and mitochondrial membrane potential. Finally, we showed that the assembly defect as well as the structural and functional abnormalities in DJ-1 null cells could be reversed by adenovirus-mediated overexpression of DJ-1, demonstrating the specificity of DJ-1 on these mitochondrial properties. These mitochondrial defects induced by DJ-1mutation may be a pathological mechanism for the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. PMID:22403686

  12. Impaired Lung Mitochondrial Respiration Following Perinatal Nicotine Exposure in Rats.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Daniel T; Liu, Jie; Sakurai, Reiko; Rossiter, Harry B; Rehan, Virender K

    2016-04-01

    Perinatal smoke/nicotine exposure predisposes to chronic lung disease and morbidity. Mitochondrial abnormalities may contribute as the PPARγ pathway is involved in structural and functional airway deficits after perinatal nicotine exposure. We hypothesized perinatal nicotine exposure results in lung mitochondrial dysfunction that can be rescued by rosiglitazone (RGZ; PPARγ receptor agonist). Sprague-Dawley dams received placebo (CON), nicotine (NIC, 1 mg kg(-1)), or NIC + RGZ (3 mg kg(-1)) daily from embryonic day 6 to postnatal day 21. Parenchymal lung (~10 mg) was taken from adult male offspring for mitochondrial assessment in situ. ADP-stimulated O2 consumption was less in NIC and NIC + RGZ compared to CON (F[2,14] = 17.8; 4.5 ± 0.8 and 4.1 ± 1.4 vs. 8.8 ± 2.5 pmol s mg(-1); p < 0.05). The respiratory control ratio for ADP, an index of mitochondrial coupling, was reduced in NIC and remediated in NIC + RGZ (F[2,14] = 3.8; p < 0.05). Reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity and abnormal coupling were evident after perinatal nicotine exposure. RGZ improved mitochondrial function through tighter coupling of oxidative phosphorylation.

  13. Conformational Dynamics of the Bovine Mitochondrial ADP/ATP Carrier Isoform 1 Revealed by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Martial; Man, Petr; Clémençon, Benjamin; Trézéguet, Véronique; Brandolin, Gérard; Forest, Eric; Pelosi, Ludovic

    2010-01-01

    The mitochondrial adenine nucleotide carrier (Ancp) catalyzes the transport of ADP and ATP across the mitochondrial inner membrane, thus playing an essential role in cellular energy metabolism. During the transport mechanism the carrier switches between two different conformations that can be blocked by two toxins: carboxyatractyloside (CATR) and bongkrekic acid. Therefore, our understanding of the nucleotide transport mechanism can be improved by analyzing structural differences of the individual inhibited states. We have solved the three-dimensional structure of bovine carrier isoform 1 (bAnc1p) in a complex with CATR, but the structure of the carrier-bongkrekic acid complex, and thus, the detailed mechanism of transport remains unknown. Improvements in sample processing in the hydrogen/deuterium exchange technique coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) have allowed us to gain novel insights into the conformational changes undergone by bAnc1p. This paper describes the first study of bAnc1p using HDX-MS. Results obtained with the CATR-bAnc1p complex were fully in agreement with published results, thus, validating our approach. On the other hand, the HDX kinetics of the two complexes displays marked differences. The bongkrekic acid-bAnc1p complex exhibits greater accessibility to the solvent on the matrix side, whereas the CATR-bAnc1p complex is more accessible on the intermembrane side. These results are discussed with respect to the structural and biochemical data available on Ancp. PMID:20805227

  14. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  15. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  16. [Mitochondrial and oocyte development].

    PubMed

    Deng, Wei-Ping; Ren, Zhao-Rui

    2007-12-01

    Oocyte development and maturation is a complicated process. The nuclear maturation and cytoplasmic maturation must synchronize which can ensure normal oocyte fertilization and following development. Mitochondrial is the most important cellular organell in cytoplasm, and the variation of its distribution during oocyte maturation, the capacity of OXPHOS generating ATP as well as the content or copy number or transcription level of mitochondrial DNA play an important role in oocyte development and maturation. Therefore, the studies on the variation of mitochondrial distribution, function and mitochondrial DNA could enhance our understanding of the physiology of reproduction and provide new insight to solve the difficulties of assisted reproduction as well as cloning embryo technology.

  17. Progress in mitochondrial epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Manev, Hari; Dzitoyeva, Svetlana

    2013-08-01

    Mitochondria, intracellular organelles with their own genome, have been shown capable of interacting with epigenetic mechanisms in at least four different ways. First, epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the expression of nuclear genome influence mitochondria by modulating the expression of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. Second, a cell-specific mitochondrial DNA content (copy number) and mitochondrial activity determine the methylation pattern of nuclear genes. Third, mitochondrial DNA variants influence the nuclear gene expression patterns and the nuclear DNA (ncDNA) methylation levels. Fourth and most recent line of evidence indicates that mitochondrial DNA similar to ncDNA also is subject to epigenetic modifications, particularly by the 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine marks. The latter interaction of mitochondria with epigenetics has been termed 'mitochondrial epigenetics'. Here we summarize recent developments in this particular area of epigenetic research. Furthermore, we propose the term 'mitoepigenetics' to include all four above-noted types of interactions between mitochondria and epigenetics, and we suggest a more restricted usage of the term 'mitochondrial epigenetics' for molecular events dealing solely with the intra-mitochondrial epigenetics and the modifications of mitochondrial genome.

  18. Mitochondrial threshold effects.

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Rodrigue; Faustin, Benjamin; Rocher, Christophe; Malgat, Monique; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Letellier, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The study of mitochondrial diseases has revealed dramatic variability in the phenotypic presentation of mitochondrial genetic defects. To attempt to understand this variability, different authors have studied energy metabolism in transmitochondrial cell lines carrying different proportions of various pathogenic mutations in their mitochondrial DNA. The same kinds of experiments have been performed on isolated mitochondria and on tissue biopsies taken from patients with mitochondrial diseases. The results have shown that, in most cases, phenotypic manifestation of the genetic defect occurs only when a threshold level is exceeded, and this phenomenon has been named the 'phenotypic threshold effect'. Subsequently, several authors showed that it was possible to inhibit considerably the activity of a respiratory chain complex, up to a critical value, without affecting the rate of mitochondrial respiration or ATP synthesis. This phenomenon was called the 'biochemical threshold effect'. More recently, quantitative analysis of the effects of various mutations in mitochondrial DNA on the rate of mitochondrial protein synthesis has revealed the existence of a 'translational threshold effect'. In this review these different mitochondrial threshold effects are discussed, along with their molecular bases and the roles that they play in the presentation of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:12467494

  19. Novel roles for actin in mitochondrial fission.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Anna L; Gurel, Pinar S; Higgs, Henry N

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics, including fusion, fission and translocation, are crucial to cellular homeostasis, with roles in cellular polarity, stress response and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission has received particular attention, owing to links with several neurodegenerative diseases. A central player in fission is the cytoplasmic dynamin-related GTPase Drp1, which oligomerizes at the fission site and hydrolyzes GTP to drive membrane ingression. Drp1 recruitment to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) is a key regulatory event, which appears to require a pre-constriction step in which the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrion interact extensively, a process termed ERMD (ER-associated mitochondrial division). It is unclear how ER-mitochondrial contact generates the force required for pre-constriction or why pre-constriction leads to Drp1 recruitment. Recent results, however, show that ERMD might be an actin-based process in mammals that requires the ER-associated formin INF2 upstream of Drp1, and that myosin II and other actin-binding proteins might be involved. In this Commentary, we present a mechanistic model for mitochondrial fission in which actin and myosin contribute in two ways; firstly, by supplying the force for pre-constriction and secondly, by serving as a coincidence detector for Drp1 binding. In addition, we discuss the possibility that multiple fission mechanisms exist in mammals.

  20. Novel roles for actin in mitochondrial fission

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Anna L.; Gurel, Pinar S.; Higgs, Henry N.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial dynamics, including fusion, fission and translocation, are crucial to cellular homeostasis, with roles in cellular polarity, stress response and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission has received particular attention, owing to links with several neurodegenerative diseases. A central player in fission is the cytoplasmic dynamin-related GTPase Drp1, which oligomerizes at the fission site and hydrolyzes GTP to drive membrane ingression. Drp1 recruitment to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) is a key regulatory event, which appears to require a pre-constriction step in which the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrion interact extensively, a process termed ERMD (ER-associated mitochondrial division). It is unclear how ER–mitochondrial contact generates the force required for pre-constriction or why pre-constriction leads to Drp1 recruitment. Recent results, however, show that ERMD might be an actin-based process in mammals that requires the ER-associated formin INF2 upstream of Drp1, and that myosin II and other actin-binding proteins might be involved. In this Commentary, we present a mechanistic model for mitochondrial fission in which actin and myosin contribute in two ways; firstly, by supplying the force for pre-constriction and secondly, by serving as a coincidence detector for Drp1 binding. In addition, we discuss the possibility that multiple fission mechanisms exist in mammals. PMID:25217628

  1. Integrity of the yeast mitochondrial genome, but not its distribution and inheritance, relies on mitochondrial fission and fusion.

    PubMed

    Osman, Christof; Noriega, Thomas R; Okreglak, Voytek; Fung, Jennifer C; Walter, Peter

    2015-03-03

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for mitochondrial and cellular function. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mtDNA is organized in nucleoprotein structures termed nucleoids, which are distributed throughout the mitochondrial network and are faithfully inherited during the cell cycle. How the cell distributes and inherits mtDNA is incompletely understood although an involvement of mitochondrial fission and fusion has been suggested. We developed a LacO-LacI system to noninvasively image mtDNA dynamics in living cells. Using this system, we found that nucleoids are nonrandomly spaced within the mitochondrial network and observed the spatiotemporal events involved in mtDNA inheritance. Surprisingly, cells deficient in mitochondrial fusion and fission distributed and inherited mtDNA normally, pointing to alternative pathways involved in these processes. We identified such a mechanism, where we observed fission-independent, but F-actin-dependent, tip generation that was linked to the positioning of mtDNA to the newly generated tip. Although mitochondrial fusion and fission were dispensable for mtDNA distribution and inheritance, we show through a combination of genetics and next-generation sequencing that their absence leads to an accumulation of mitochondrial genomes harboring deleterious structural variations that cluster at the origins of mtDNA replication, thus revealing crucial roles for mitochondrial fusion and fission in maintaining the integrity of the mitochondrial genome.

  2. Altered Mitochondrial Respiration and Other Features of Mitochondrial Function in Parkin-Mutant Fibroblasts from Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Swart, Chrisna; van der Westhuizen, Francois; van Dyk, Hayley; van der Merwe, Lize; van der Merwe, Celia; Loos, Ben; Carr, Jonathan; Kinnear, Craig; Bardien, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common cause of early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in respiratory chain function, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. Human cellular models with parkin null mutations are particularly valuable for investigating the mitochondrial functions of parkin. However, published results reporting on patient-derived parkin-mutant fibroblasts have been inconsistent. This study aimed to functionally compare parkin-mutant fibroblasts from PD patients with wild-type control fibroblasts using a variety of assays to gain a better understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD. To this end, dermal fibroblasts were obtained from three PD patients with homozygous whole exon deletions in parkin and three unaffected controls. Assays of mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial network integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell growth were performed as informative markers of mitochondrial function. Surprisingly, it was found that mitochondrial respiratory rates were markedly higher in the parkin-mutant fibroblasts compared to control fibroblasts (p = 0.0093), while exhibiting more fragmented mitochondrial networks (p = 0.0304). Moreover, cell growth of the parkin-mutant fibroblasts was significantly higher than that of controls (p = 0.0001). These unanticipated findings are suggestive of a compensatory mechanism to preserve mitochondrial function and quality control in the absence of parkin in fibroblasts, which warrants further investigation. PMID:27034887

  3. Kinetics and specificity of paternal mitochondrial elimination in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Lianwan; Liang, Qian; Yin, Xiao-Ming; Miao, Long; Kang, Byung-Ho; Xue, Ding

    2016-09-01

    In most eukaryotes, mitochondria are inherited maternally. The autophagy process is critical for paternal mitochondrial elimination (PME) in Caenorhabditis elegans, but how paternal mitochondria, but not maternal mitochondria, are selectively targeted for degradation is poorly understood. Here we report that mitochondrial dynamics have a profound effect on PME. A defect in fission of paternal mitochondria delays PME, whereas a defect in fusion of paternal mitochondria accelerates PME. Surprisingly, a defect in maternal mitochondrial fusion delays PME, which is reversed by a fission defect in maternal mitochondria or by increasing maternal mitochondrial membrane potential using oligomycin. Electron microscopy and tomography analyses reveal that a proportion of maternal mitochondria are compromised when they fail to fuse normally, leading to their competition for the autophagy machinery with damaged paternal mitochondria and delayed PME. Our study indicates that mitochondrial dynamics play a critical role in regulating both the kinetics and the specificity of PME.

  4. Kinetics and specificity of paternal mitochondrial elimination in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Lianwan; Liang, Qian; Yin, Xiao-Ming; Miao, Long; Kang, Byung-Ho; Xue, Ding

    2016-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, mitochondria are inherited maternally. The autophagy process is critical for paternal mitochondrial elimination (PME) in Caenorhabditis elegans, but how paternal mitochondria, but not maternal mitochondria, are selectively targeted for degradation is poorly understood. Here we report that mitochondrial dynamics have a profound effect on PME. A defect in fission of paternal mitochondria delays PME, whereas a defect in fusion of paternal mitochondria accelerates PME. Surprisingly, a defect in maternal mitochondrial fusion delays PME, which is reversed by a fission defect in maternal mitochondria or by increasing maternal mitochondrial membrane potential using oligomycin. Electron microscopy and tomography analyses reveal that a proportion of maternal mitochondria are compromised when they fail to fuse normally, leading to their competition for the autophagy machinery with damaged paternal mitochondria and delayed PME. Our study indicates that mitochondrial dynamics play a critical role in regulating both the kinetics and the specificity of PME. PMID:27581092

  5. Mitochondrial fusion/fission, transport and autophagy in Parkinson's disease: when mitochondria get nasty.

    PubMed

    Arduíno, Daniela M; Esteves, A Raquel; Cardoso, Sandra M

    2011-02-20

    Understanding the molecular basis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has proven to be a major challenge in the field of neurodegenerative diseases. Although several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of PD, a growing body of evidence has highlighted the role of mitochondrial dysfunction and the disruption of the mechanisms of mitochondrial dynamics in PD and other parkinsonian disorders. In this paper, we comment on the recent advances in how changes in the mitochondrial function and mitochondrial dynamics (fusion/fission, transport, and clearance) contribute to neurodegeneration, specifically focusing on PD. We also evaluate the current controversies in those issues and discuss the role of fusion/fission dynamics in the mitochondrial lifecycle and maintenance. We propose that cellular demise and neurodegeneration in PD are due to the interplay between mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial trafficking disruption, and impaired autophagic clearance.

  6. Modulation of the matrix redox signaling by mitochondrial Ca(2.).

    PubMed

    Santo-Domingo, Jaime; Wiederkehr, Andreas; De Marchi, Umberto

    2015-11-26

    Mitochondria sense, shape and integrate signals, and thus function as central players in cellular signal transduction. Ca(2+) waves and redox reactions are two such intracellular signals modulated by mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport is of utmost physio-pathological relevance with a strong impact on metabolism and cell fate. Despite its importance, the molecular nature of the proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport has been revealed only recently. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) promotes energy metabolism through the activation of matrix dehydrogenases and down-stream stimulation of the respiratory chain. These changes also alter the mitochondrial NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratio, but at the same time will increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Reducing equivalents and ROS are having opposite effects on the mitochondrial redox state, which are hard to dissect. With the recent development of genetically encoded mitochondrial-targeted redox-sensitive sensors, real-time monitoring of matrix thiol redox dynamics has become possible. The discoveries of the molecular nature of mitochondrial transporters of Ca(2+) combined with the utilization of the novel redox sensors is shedding light on the complex relation between mitochondrial Ca(2+) and redox signals and their impact on cell function. In this review, we describe mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling, focusing on a number of newly identified proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and release. We further discuss our recent findings, revealing how mitochondrial Ca(2+) influences the matrix redox state. As a result, mitochondrial Ca(2+) is able to modulate the many mitochondrial redox-regulated processes linked to normal physiology and disease.

  7. Mitochondrial accumulation under oxidative stress is due to defects in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Cheng; Li, Yan; Wang, Hui; Feng, Zhihui; Li, Yuan; Long, Jiangang; Liu, Jiankang

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics maintains normal mitochondrial function by degrading damaged mitochondria and generating newborn mitochondria. The accumulation of damaged mitochondria influences the intracellular environment by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction, and thus initiating a vicious cycle. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial malfunction, which is involved in many cardiovascular diseases. However, the mechanism of mitochondrial accumulation in cardiac myoblasts remains unclear. We observed mitochondrial dysfunction and an increase in mitochondrial mass under the oxidative conditions produced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP) in cardiac myoblast H9c2 cells. However, in contrast to the increase in mitochondrial mass, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) decreased, suggesting that enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis may be not the primary cause of the mitochondrial accumulation. Therefore, we investigated changes in a number of proteins involved in autophagy. Beclin1, Atg12-Atg5 conjugate, Atg7 contents decreased but LC3-II accumulated in tBHP-treated H9c2 cells. Moreover, the capacity for acid hydrolysis decreased in H9c2 cells. We also demonstrated a decrease in DJ-1 protein under the oxidative conditions that deregulate mitochondrial dynamics. These results reveal that autophagy became defective under oxidative stress. We therefore suggest that defects in autophagy mediate mitochondrial accumulation under these conditions.

  8. Epilepsy and chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many chromosomal abnormalities are associated with Central Nervous System (CNS) malformations and other neurological alterations, among which seizures and epilepsy. Some of these show a peculiar epileptic and EEG pattern. We describe some epileptic syndromes frequently reported in chromosomal disorders. Methods Detailed clinical assessment, electrophysiological studies, survey of the literature. Results In some of these congenital syndromes the clinical presentation and EEG anomalies seems to be quite typical, in others the manifestations appear aspecific and no strictly linked with the chromosomal imbalance. The onset of seizures is often during the neonatal period of the infancy. Conclusions A better characterization of the electro clinical patterns associated with specific chromosomal aberrations could give us a valuable key in the identification of epilepsy susceptibility of some chromosomal loci, using the new advances in molecular cytogenetics techniques - such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), subtelomeric analysis and CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) microarray. However further studies are needed to understand the mechanism of epilepsy associated with chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:20438626

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tobe, Edward H

    2013-01-01

    There is controversy about depression being a physical illness, in part because a reproducible, sensitive, and specific biologic marker is not available. However, there is evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress may be associated with abnormal brain function and mood disorders, such as depression. This paper reviews selected human and animal studies providing evidence that intracellular mitochondrial metabolic dysfunction in specific brain regions is associated with major depressive disorder. This supports the hypothesis that chronic mitochondrial dysfunction in specific tissues may be associated with depression. Evaluation of mitochondrial dysfunction in specific tissues may broaden the perspective of depression beyond theories about neurotransmitters or receptor sites, and may explain the persistent signs and symptoms of depression. PMID:23650447

  10. Kearns Sayre syndrome: an unusual form of mitochondrial diabetes.

    PubMed

    Laloi-Michelin, M; Virally, M; Jardel, C; Meas, T; Ingster-Moati, I; Lombès, A; Massin, P; Chabriat, H; Tielmans, A; Mikol, J; Guillausseau, P J

    2006-04-01

    Kearns Sayre syndrome (KSS) is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by the emergence before age 20 of progressive external ophthalmoplegia, pigmentary retinopathy, together with other heterogeneous clinical manifestations, including cardiac conduction defects, muscle abnormalities and endocrinopathies. KSS is associated with large heteroplasmic deletions in mitochondrial DNA. We report the case of a 43-year-old woman, with diabetes mellitus as a first manifestation at age 19. Later, she exhibited bilateral ptosis and external ophthalmoplegia with progressive worsening. DNA analysis identified a large mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion, which confirmed the diagnosis of KSS. By reporting this case with diabetes mellitus as first manifestation, we aim at emphasizing problems of diagnosis in these subtypes of mitochondrial diabetes.

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction in neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed

    Katsetos, Christos D; Koutzaki, Sirma; Melvin, Joseph J

    2013-09-01

    This review deciphers aspects of mitochondrial (mt) dysfunction among nosologically, pathologically, and genetically diverse diseases of the skeletal muscle, lower motor neuron, and peripheral nerve, which fall outside the traditional realm of mt cytopathies. Special emphasis is given to well-characterized mt abnormalities in collagen VI myopathies (Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy), megaconial congenital muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 (calpainopathy), centronuclear myopathies, core myopathies, inflammatory myopathies, spinal muscular atrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2, and drug-induced peripheral neuropathies. Among inflammatory myopathies, mt abnormalities are more prominent in inclusion body myositis and a subset of polymyositis with mt pathology, both of which are refractory to corticosteroid treatment. Awareness is raised about instances of phenotypic mimicry between cases harboring primary mtDNA depletion, in the context of mtDNA depletion syndrome, and established neuromuscular disorders such as spinal muscular atrophy. A substantial body of experimental work, derived from animal models, attests to a major role of mitochondria (mt) in the early process of muscle degeneration. Common mechanisms of mt-related cell injury include dysregulation of the mt permeability transition pore opening and defective autophagy. The therapeutic use of mt permeability transition pore modifiers holds promise in various neuromuscular disorders, including muscular dystrophies.

  12. Mutations in FBXL4, Encoding a Mitochondrial Protein, Cause Early-Onset Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gai, Xiaowu; Ghezzi, Daniele; Johnson, Mark A.; Biagosch, Caroline A.; Shamseldin, Hanan E.; Haack, Tobias B.; Reyes, Aurelio; Tsukikawa, Mai; Sheldon, Claire A.; Srinivasan, Satish; Gorza, Matteo; Kremer, Laura S.; Wieland, Thomas; Strom, Tim M.; Polyak, Erzsebet; Place, Emily; Consugar, Mark; Ostrovsky, Julian; Vidoni, Sara; Robinson, Alan J.; Wong, Lee-Jun; Sondheimer, Neal; Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jishi, Emtethal; Raab, Christopher P.; Bean, Charles; Furlan, Francesca; Parini, Rossella; Lamperti, Costanza; Mayr, Johannes A.; Konstantopoulou, Vassiliki; Huemer, Martina; Pierce, Eric A.; Meitinger, Thomas; Freisinger, Peter; Sperl, Wolfgang; Prokisch, Holger; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; Falk, Marni J.; Zeviani, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing and autozygosity mapping studies, independently performed in subjects with defective combined mitochondrial OXPHOS-enzyme deficiencies, identified a total of nine disease-segregating FBXL4 mutations in seven unrelated mitochondrial disease families, composed of six singletons and three siblings. All subjects manifested early-onset lactic acidemia, hypotonia, and developmental delay caused by severe encephalomyopathy consistently associated with progressive cerebral atrophy and variable involvement of the white matter, deep gray nuclei, and brainstem structures. A wide range of other multisystem features were variably seen, including dysmorphism, skeletal abnormalities, poor growth, gastrointestinal dysmotility, renal tubular acidosis, seizures, and episodic metabolic failure. Mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency was present in muscle or fibroblasts of all tested individuals, together with markedly reduced oxygen consumption rate and hyperfragmentation of the mitochondrial network in cultured cells. In muscle and fibroblasts from several subjects, substantially decreased mtDNA content was observed. FBXL4 is a member of the F-box family of proteins, some of which are involved in phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination and/or G protein receptor coupling. We also demonstrate that FBXL4 is targeted to mitochondria and localizes in the intermembrane space, where it participates in an approximately 400 kDa protein complex. These data strongly support a role for FBXL4 in controlling bioenergetic homeostasis and mtDNA maintenance. FBXL4 mutations are a recurrent cause of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy onset in early infancy. PMID:23993194

  13. Mitochondrial inheritance: cell cycle and actin cable dependence of polarized mitochondrial movements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Simon, V R; Karmon, S L; Pon, L A

    1997-01-01

    Asymmetric growth and division of budding yeast requires the vectorial transport of growth components and organelles from mother to daughter cells. Time lapse video microscopy and vital staining were used to study motility events which result in partitioning of mitochondria in dividing yeast. We identified four different stages in the mitochondrial inheritance cycle: (1) mitochondria align along the mother-bud axis prior to bud emergence in G1 phase, following polarization of the actin cytoskeleton; (2) during S phase, mitochondria undergo linear, continuous and polarized transfer from mother to bud; (3) during S and G2 phases, inherited mitochondria accumulate in the bud tip. This event occurs concomitant with accumulation of actin patches in this region; and (4) finally, during M phase prior to cytokinesis, mitochondria are released from the bud tip and redistribute throughout the bud. Previous studies showed that yeast mitochondria colocalize with actin cables and that isolated mitochondria contain actin binding and motor activities on their surface. We find that selective destabilization of actin cables in a strain lacking the tropomyosin 1 gene (TPM1) has no significant effect on the velocity of mitochondrial motor activity in vivo or in vitro. However, tpm1 delta mutants display abnormal mitochondrial distribution and morphology; loss of long distance, directional mitochondrial movement; and delayed transfer of mitochondria from the mother cell to the bud. Thus, cell cycle-linked mitochondrial motility patterns which lead to inheritance are strictly dependent on organized and properly oriented actin cables.

  14. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Yashika; Kuhad, Anurag

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background Depression is the most debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder with significant impact on socio-occupational and well being of individual. The exact pathophysiology of depression is still enigmatic though various theories have been put forwarded. There are evidences showing that mitochondrial dysfunction in various brain regions is associated with depression. Recent findings have sparked renewed appreciation for the role of mitochondria in many intracellular processes coupled to synaptic plasticity and cellular resilience. New insights in depression pathophysiology are revolving around the impairment of neuroplasticity. Mitochondria have potential role in ATP production, intracellular Ca2+ signalling to establish membrane stability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) balance and to execute the complex processes of neurotransmission and plasticity. So understanding the various concepts of mitochondrial dysfunction in pathogenesis of depression indubitably helps to generate novel and more targeted therapeutic approaches for depression treatment. Objective The review was aimed to give a comprehensive insight on role of mitochondrial dysfunction in depression. Result Targeting mitochondrial dysfunction and enhancing the mitochondrial functions might act as potential target for the treatment of depression. Conclusion Literature cited in this review highly supports the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in depression. As impairment in the mitochondrial functions lead to the generation of various insults that exaggerate the pathogenesis of depression. So, it is useful to study mitochondrial dysfunction in relation to mood disorders, synaptic plasticity, neurogenesis and enhancing the functions of mitochondria might show promiscuous effects in the treatment of depressed patients. PMID:26923778

  15. Clinical mitochondrial genetics

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, P.; Howell, N.; Andrews, R.; Turnbull, D.

    1999-01-01

    The last decade has been an age of enlightenment as far as mitochondrial pathology is concerned. Well established nuclear genetic diseases, such as Friedreich's ataxia,12 Wilson disease,3 and autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia,4 have been shown to have a mitochondrial basis, and we are just starting to unravel the complex nuclear genetic disorders which directly cause mitochondrial dysfunction (table 1). However, in addition to the 3 billion base pair nuclear genome, each human cell typically contains thousands of copies of a small, 16.5 kb circular molecule of double stranded DNA (fig 1). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) accounts for only 1% of the total cellular nucleic acid content. It encodes for 13 polypeptides which are essential for aerobic metabolism and defects of the mitochondrial genome are an important cause of human disease.9293 Since the characterisation of the first pathogenic mtDNA defects in 1988,513 over 50 point mutations and well over 100 rearrangements of the mitochondrial genome have been associated with human disease9495 (http://www.gen.emory.edu/mitomap.html). These disorders form the focus of this article.


Keywords: mitochondrial DNA; mitochondrial disease; heteroplasmy; genetic counselling PMID:10874629

  16. Ketogenic diet slows down mitochondrial myopathy progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Ahola-Erkkilä, Sofia; Carroll, Christopher J; Peltola-Mjösund, Katja; Tulkki, Valtteri; Mattila, Ismo; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Oresic, Matej; Tyynismaa, Henna; Suomalainen, Anu

    2010-05-15

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a major cause of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular diseases of adult age and of multisystem disorders of childhood. However, no effective treatment exists for these progressive disorders. Cell culture studies suggested that ketogenic diet (KD), with low glucose and high fat content, could select against cells or mitochondria with mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but proper patient trials are still lacking. We studied here the transgenic Deletor mouse, a disease model for progressive late-onset mitochondrial myopathy, accumulating mtDNA deletions during aging and manifesting subtle progressive respiratory chain (RC) deficiency. We found that these mice have widespread lipidomic and metabolite changes, including abnormal plasma phospholipid and free amino acid levels and ketone body production. We treated these mice with pre-symptomatic long-term and post-symptomatic shorter term KD. The effects of the diet for disease progression were followed by morphological, metabolomic and lipidomic tools. We show here that the diet decreased the amount of cytochrome c oxidase negative muscle fibers, a key feature in mitochondrial RC deficiencies, and prevented completely the formation of the mitochondrial ultrastructural abnormalities in the muscle. Furthermore, most of the metabolic and lipidomic changes were cured by the diet to wild-type levels. The diet did not, however, significantly affect the mtDNA quality or quantity, but rather induced mitochondrial biogenesis and restored liver lipid levels. Our results show that mitochondrial myopathy induces widespread metabolic changes, and that KD can slow down progression of the disease in mice. These results suggest that KD may be useful for mitochondrial late-onset myopathies.

  17. Mitochondrial inheritance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Benedikt

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondria are the site of oxidative phosphorylation, play a key role in cellular energy metabolism, and are critical for cell survival and proliferation. The propagation of mitochondria during cell division depends on replication and partitioning of mitochondrial DN