Science.gov

Sample records for abnormal mitotic figures

  1. A selective stain for mitotic figures, particularly in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Fraser, F J

    1982-07-01

    A selective stain for mitotic figures is valuable where autoradiographic counting is not required, especially in the developing brain. Most work in this field has been based on conventional nuclear stains which do not differentiate mitotic figures from resting cells by color. Hematoxylin, Feulgen, gallocyanin and Nissl methods have been used particularly. The method described uses a modified Bouin fixative, followed by hydrolysis in 1 N HCl. Mitotic figures are selectively stained using crystal violet, with nuclear fast red as the counterstain for resting cells. The method has been tested using material from postnatal and fetal sheep, guinea pig and rat. Using paraffin mounted serial sections it is applicable to all organs. The method was very successful on developing rat brain, particularly for detail and quantitative estimation in the early stages of prenatal development, which was of primary interest. Nucleated cells of the erythrocytic series, keratin and what appear to be mast cells were found to stain. When nuclear counting or cell recognition were required these did not cause any difficulty, except in prenatal liver. The highly selective method presented stains mitotic figures, in all tissue tested, an intense blue against a background of red resting cells. PMID:6183796

  2. Using Automated Image Analysis Algorithms to Distinguish Normal, Aberrant, and Degenerate Mitotic Figures Induced by Eg5 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Bigley, Alison L; Klein, Stephanie K; Davies, Barry; Williams, Leigh; Rudmann, Daniel G

    2016-07-01

    Modulation of the cell cycle may underlie the toxicologic or pharmacologic responses of a potential therapeutic agent and contributes to decisions on its preclinical and clinical safety and efficacy. The descriptive and quantitative assessment of normal, aberrant, and degenerate mitotic figures in tissue sections is an important end point characterizing the effect of xenobiotics on the cell cycle. Historically, pathologists used manual counting and special staining visualization techniques such as immunohistochemistry for quantification of normal, aberrant, and degenerate mitotic figures. We designed an automated image analysis algorithm for measuring these mitotic figures in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained sections. Algorithm validation methods used data generated from a subcutaneous human transitional cell carcinoma xenograft model in nude rats treated with the cell cycle inhibitor Eg5. In these studies, we scanned and digitized H&E-stained xenografts and applied a complex ruleset of sequential mathematical filters and shape discriminators for classification of cell populations demonstrating normal, aberrant, or degenerate mitotic figures. The resultant classification system enabled the representations of three identifiable degrees of morphological change associated with tumor differentiation and compound effects. The numbers of mitotic figure variants and mitotic indices data generated corresponded to a manual assessment by a pathologist and supported automated algorithm verification and application for both efficacy and toxicity studies. PMID:26936079

  3. The moyamoya disease susceptibility variant RNF213 R4810K (rs112735431) induces genomic instability by mitotic abnormality

    SciTech Connect

    Hitomi, Toshiaki; Habu, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Harada, Kouji H.; Osafune, Kenji; Taura, Daisuke; Sone, Masakatsu; Asaka, Isao; Ameku, Tomonaga; Watanabe, Akira; Kasahara, Tomoko; Sudo, Tomomi; Shiota, Fumihiko; Hashikata, Hirokuni; Takagi, Yasushi; Morito, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Susumu; Nakao, Kazuwa; Koizumi, Akio

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K inhibited cell proliferation. •Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K had the time of mitosis 4-fold and mitotic failure. •R4810K formed a complex with MAD2 more readily than wild-type. •iPSECs from the MMD patients had elevated mitotic failure compared from the control. •RNF213 R4810K induced mitotic abnormality and increased risk of aneuploidy. -- Abstract: Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a cerebrovascular disease characterized by occlusive lesions in the Circle of Willis. The RNF213 R4810K polymorphism increases susceptibility to MMD. In the present study, we characterized phenotypes caused by overexpression of RNF213 wild type and R4810K variant in the cell cycle to investigate the mechanism of proliferation inhibition. Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K in HeLa cells inhibited cell proliferation and extended the time of mitosis 4-fold. Ablation of spindle checkpoint by depletion of mitotic arrest deficiency 2 (MAD2) did not shorten the time of mitosis. Mitotic morphology in HeLa cells revealed that MAD2 colocalized with RNF213 R4810K. Immunoprecipitation revealed an RNF213/MAD2 complex: R4810K formed a complex with MAD2 more readily than RNF213 wild-type. Desynchronized localization of MAD2 was observed more frequently during mitosis in fibroblasts from patients (n = 3, 61.0 ± 8.2%) compared with wild-type subjects (n = 6, 13.1 ± 7.7%; p < 0.01). Aneuploidy was observed more frequently in fibroblasts (p < 0.01) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) (p < 0.03) from patients than from wild-type subjects. Vascular endothelial cells differentiated from iPSCs (iPSECs) of patients and an unaffected carrier had a longer time from prometaphase to metaphase than those from controls (p < 0.05). iPSECs from the patients and unaffected carrier had significantly increased mitotic failure rates compared with controls (p < 0.05). Thus, RNF213 R4810K induced mitotic abnormalities and increased risk of genomic instability.

  4. Abnormal mitotic spindle assembly and cytokinesis induced by D-Limonene in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Maurizio; Catanzaro, Irene; Naselli, Flores; Sciandrello, Giulia; Caradonna, Fabio

    2013-11-01

    D-Limonene is found widely in citrus and many other plant species; it is a major constituent of many essential oils and is used as a solvent for commercial purposes. With the discovery of its chemotherapeutic properties against cancer, it is important to investigate the biological effects of the exposure to D-Limonene and elucidate its, as yet unknown, mechanism of action. We reported here that D-Limonene is toxic in V79 Chinese hamster cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, to determine the cellular target of D-Limonene, we performed morphological observations and immunocytochemical analysis and we showed that this drug has a direct effect on dividing cells preventing assembly of mitotic spindle microtubules. This affects both chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, resulting in aneuploidy that in turn can lead to cell death or genomic instability. PMID:23913329

  5. Unequal mitotic sister chromatid exchange: A rare mechanism for chromosomal abnormality resulting in duplication/deletion of chromosome 7q

    SciTech Connect

    Eydoux, P.; Ortenberg, J.; Chalifoux, N.

    1994-09-01

    We report a case of unequal mitotic chromatid exchange, which has rarely been reported as a mechanism for microscopic chromosomal anomalies. The proposita was born at 40 weeks, after an uneventful pregnancy, of parents with a negative family history. The baby was small for gestational age and had dysmorphic features, including scaphocephaly, bilateral epicanthal folds and palpebral ptosis, mild hypertelorism, hypoplasia of orbital contours, right coloboma, bulbous prominent nose, retrognathism, downturned mouth, low set posteriorly rotated ears, tapering of the limbs. bilateral Sydney creases. At 5 months, she was under the 5th percentile for height, weight and head circumference, and had a mild developmental delay. The karyotype showed an abnormality of chromosome 7 in all cells, half with a duplication and half with a deletion of the same region; 46,XX,del(7)(q33{yields}q34)/46,XX,dup(7)(q33{yields}q34). This chromosomal abnormality could be explained by an unequal chromatid exchange occuring in the first mitosis of the embryo. To our knowledge, only one such human microscopic abnormality, involving chromosome Y, has been reported to date. This type of genetic unbalance could be missed by molecular techniques.

  6. SIRT2 knockdown increases basal autophagy and prevents postslippage death by abnormally prolonging the mitotic arrest that is induced by microtubule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Toshiaki; Nakayama, Yuji; Li, Yanze; Matsumori, Haruka; Takahashi, Haruka; Kojima, Hirotada; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Katoh, Motonobu; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2014-06-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, a form of cell death that occurs during mitosis and after mitotic slippage to a tetraploid state, plays important roles in the efficacy of cancer cell killing by microtubule inhibitors (MTIs). Prolonged mitotic arrest by the spindle assembly checkpoint is a well-known requirement for mitotic catastrophe, and thus for conferring sensitivity to MTIs. We previously reported that turning off spindle assembly checkpoint activation after a defined period of time is another requirement for efficient postslippage death from a tetraploid state, and we identified SIRT2, a member of the sirtuin protein family, as a regulator of this process. Here, we investigated whether SIRT2 regulates basal autophagy and whether, in that case, autophagy regulation by SIRT2 is required for postslippage death, by analogy with previous insights into SIRT1 functions in autophagy. We show, by combined knockdown of autophagy genes and SIRT2, that SIRT2 serves this function at least partially by suppressing basal autophagy levels. Notably, increased autophagy induced by rapamycin and mild starvation caused mitotic arrest for an abnormally long period of time in the presence of MTIs, and this was followed by delayed postslippage death, which was also observed in cells with SIRT2 knockdown. These results underscore a causal association among increased autophagy levels, mitotic arrest for an abnormally long period of time after exposure to MTIs, and resistance to MTIs. Although autophagy acts as a tumor suppressor mechanism, this study highlights its negative aspects, as increased autophagy may cause mitotic catastrophe malfunction. Thus, SIRT2 offers a novel target for tumor therapy. PMID:24712640

  7. Sulforaphane induces DNA damage and mitotic abnormalities in human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells: correlation with cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira de Oliveira, José Miguel P; Remédios, Catarina; Oliveira, Helena; Pinto, Pedro; Pinho, Francisco; Pinho, Sónia; Costa, Maria; Santos, Conceição

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a recalcitrant bone malignancy with poor responsiveness to treatments; therefore, new chemotherapeutic compounds are needed. Sulforaphane (SFN) has been considered a promising chemotherapeutic compound for several types of tumors by inducing apoptosis and cytostasis, but its effects (e.g., genotoxicity) in osteosarcoma cells remains exploratory. In this work, the MG-63 osteosarcoma cell line was exposed to SFN up to 20 μM for 24 and 48 h. SFN induced G2/M phase arrest and decreased nuclear division index, associated with disruption of cytoskeletal organization. Noteworthy, SFN induced a transcriptome response supportive of G2/M phase arrest, namely a decrease in Chk1- and Cdc25C-encoding transcripts, and an increase in Cdk1-encoding transcripts. After 48-h exposure, SFN at a dietary concentration (5 μM) contributed to genomic instability in the MG-63 cells as confirmed by increased number of DNA breaks, clastogenicity, and nuclear and mitotic abnormalities. The increased formation of nucleoplasmic bridges, micronuclei, and apoptotic cells positively correlated with loss of viability. These results suggest that genotoxic damage is an important step for SFN-induced cytotoxicity in MG-63 cells. In conclusion, SFN shows potential to induce genotoxic damage at low concentrations and such potential deserves further investigation in other tumor cell types. PMID:24405297

  8. Adaptive face space coding in congenital prosopagnosia: typical figural aftereffects but abnormal identity aftereffects.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Romina; Rivolta, Davide; Wilson, C Ellie; Jeffery, Linda

    2011-12-01

    People with congenital prosopagnosia (CP) report difficulty recognising faces in everyday life and perform poorly on face recognition tests. Here, we investigate whether impaired adaptive face space coding might contribute to poor face recognition in CP. To pinpoint how adaptation may affect face processing, a group of CPs and matched controls completed two complementary face adaptation tasks: the figural aftereffect, which reflects adaptation to general distortions of shape, and the identity aftereffect, which directly taps the mechanisms involved in the discrimination of different face identities. CPs displayed a typical figural aftereffect, consistent with evidence that they are able to process some shape-based information from faces, e.g., cues to discriminate sex. CPs also demonstrated a significant identity aftereffect. However, unlike controls, CPs impression of the identity of the neutral average face was not significantly shifted by adaptation, suggesting that adaptive coding of identity is abnormal in CP. In sum, CPs show reduced aftereffects but only when the task directly taps the use of face norms used to code individual identity. This finding of a reduced face identity aftereffect in individuals with severe face recognition problems is consistent with suggestions that adaptive coding may have a functional role in face recognition. PMID:21986295

  9. Preserved local but disrupted contextual figure-ground influences in an individual with abnormal function of intermediate visual areas

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Joseph L.; Gilaie-Dotan, Sharon; Rees, Geraint; Bentin, Shlomo; Driver, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Visual perception depends not only on local stimulus features but also on their relationship to the surrounding stimulus context, as evident in both local and contextual influences on figure-ground segmentation. Intermediate visual areas may play a role in such contextual influences, as we tested here by examining LG, a rare case of developmental visual agnosia. LG has no evident abnormality of brain structure and functional neuroimaging showed relatively normal V1 function, but his intermediate visual areas (V2/V3) function abnormally. We found that contextual influences on figure-ground organization were selectively disrupted in LG, while local sources of figure-ground influences were preserved. Effects of object knowledge and familiarity on figure-ground organization were also significantly diminished. Our results suggest that the mechanisms mediating contextual and familiarity influences on figure-ground organization are dissociable from those mediating local influences on figure-ground assignment. The disruption of contextual processing in intermediate visual areas may play a role in the substantial object recognition difficulties experienced by LG. PMID:22947116

  10. Diagnostic cellular abnormalities in neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions of the epidermis: a morphological and statistical study

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Saurabh; Kazlouskaya, Viktoryia; Andres, Christian; Gui, Jiang; Elston, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Background Distinguishing cellular abnormalities in reactive and malignant lesions is challenging. We compared the incidence and severity of cytological abnormalities in malignant/premalignant and benign epidermal lesions. Methods One hundred fifty-two biopsies representing 69 malignant/premalignant squamous lesions and 83 benign conditions were studied. Cytological features, including nuclear hyperchromasia, nuclear overlap (crowding), irregular nuclei, high nuclear/cytoplasmic (N/C) ratio, conspicuous nucleoli, delicate inconspicuous nucleoli, clumped chromatin, pleomorphic parakeratosis, normal and abnormal mitotic figures and necrotic keratinocytes, were evaluated and graded. Statistical analysis was performed. Results Irregular nuclei, increased N/C ratio, conspicuous single prominent nucleoli, nuclear overlap (crowding), pleomorphic parakeratosis, nuclear hyperchromasia, necrotic keratinocytes, normal and abnormal mitotic figures and coarse chromatin were seen more frequently in malignant neoplasms (p < 0.05). Abnormal mitotic figures, although uncommon (20.3%), were only noted in the malignant/premalignant group. Certain cytological features were common among both malignant and benign lesions, suggesting that they are of little value. Conclusion In the setting of an atypical cutaneous squamous proliferation, nuclear irregularity, increased N/C ratio, conspicuous nucleoli, crowding and hyperchromasia are the most useful indicators of malignancy. In contrast, mitotic figures, necrotic cells and coarse chromatin are less useful. The presence of abnormal mitotic figures is very helpful when present; however, their overall rarity limits their utility. PMID:23398548

  11. Myosin-10 independently influences mitotic spindle structure and mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Sandquist, Joshua C; Larson, Matthew E; Hine, Ken J

    2016-06-01

    The iconic bipolar structure of the mitotic spindle is of extreme importance to proper spindle function. At best, spindle abnormalities result in a delayed mitosis, while worse outcomes include cell death or disease. Recent work has uncovered an important role for the actin-based motor protein myosin-10 in the regulation of spindle structure and function. Here we examine the contribution of the myosin tail homology 4 (MyTH4) domain of the myosin-10 tail to the protein's spindle functions. The MyTH4 domain is known to mediate binding to microtubules and we verify the suspicion that this domain contributes to myosin-10's close association with the spindle. More surprisingly, our data demonstrate that some but not all of myosin-10's spindle functions require microtubule binding. In particular, myosin-10's contribution to spindle pole integrity requires microtubule binding, whereas its contribution to normal mitotic progression does not. This is demonstrated by the observation that dominant negative expression of the wild-type MyTH4 domain produces multipolar spindles and an increased mitotic index, whereas overexpression of a version of the MyTH4 domain harboring point mutations that abrogate microtubule binding results in only the mitotic index phenotype. Our data suggest that myosin-10 helps to control the metaphase to anaphase transition in cells independent of microtubule binding. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27220038

  12. Analysis of the mitotic exit control system using locked levels of stable mitotic cyclin.

    PubMed

    Drapkin, Benjamin J; Lu, Ying; Procko, Andrea L; Timney, Benjamin L; Cross, Frederick R

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) both promotes mitotic entry (spindle assembly and anaphase) and inhibits mitotic exit (spindle disassembly and cytokinesis), leading to an elegant quantitative hypothesis that a single cyclin oscillation can function as a ratchet to order these events. This ratchet is at the core of a published ODE model for the yeast cell cycle. However, the ratchet model requires appropriate cyclin dose-response thresholds. Here, we test the inhibition of mitotic exit in budding yeast using graded levels of stable mitotic cyclin (Clb2). In opposition to the ratchet model, stable levels of Clb2 introduced dose-dependent delays, rather than hard thresholds, that varied by mitotic exit event. The ensuing cell cycle was highly abnormal, suggesting a novel reason for cyclin degradation. Cdc14 phosphatase antagonizes Clb2-Cdk, and Cdc14 is released from inhibitory nucleolar sequestration independently of stable Clb2. Thus, Cdc14/Clb2 balance may be the appropriate variable for mitotic regulation. Although our results are inconsistent with the aforementioned ODE model, revision of the model to allow Cdc14/Clb2 balance to control mitotic exit corrects these discrepancies, providing theoretical support for our conclusions. PMID:19920813

  13. Defective control of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1(-/-) fibroblasts after mitotic spindle disruption.

    PubMed

    Halappanavar, Sabina S; Shah, Girish M

    2004-03-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP), a DNA damage-responsive nuclear enzyme present in higher eukaryotes, is well-known for its roles in protecting the genome after DNA damage. However, even without exogenous DNA damage, PARP may play a role in stabilizing the genome because cells or mice deficient in PARP exhibit various signs of genomic instability, such as tetraploidy, aneuploidy, chromosomal abnormalities and susceptibility to spontaneous carcinogenesis. Normally, cell cycle checkpoints ensure elimination of cells with genomic abnormalities. Therefore, we examined efficiency of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in PARP-/- and PARP+/+ mouse embryonic fibroblasts treated with mitotic spindle disrupting agent colcemid. PARP+/+ cells, like most mammalian cells, eventually escaped from spindle disruption-induced mitotic checkpoint arrest by 60 h. In contrast, PARP-/- cells rapidly escaped from mitotic arrest within 24 h by downregulation of cyclin B1/CDK-1 kinase activity. After escaping from mitotic arrest; both the PARP genotypes arrive in G1 tetraploid state, where they face post-mitotic checkpoints which either induce apoptosis or prevent DNA endoreduplication. While all the G1 tetraploid PARP+/+ cells were eliminated by apoptosis, the majority of the G1 tetraploid PARP-/- cells became polyploid by resisting apoptosis and carrying out DNA endoreduplication. Introduction of PARP in PARP-/- fibroblasts partially increased the stringency of mitotic checkpoint arrest and fully restored susceptibility to G1 tetraploidy checkpoint-induced apoptosis; and thus prevented formation of polyploid cells. Our results suggest that PARP may serve as a guardian angel of the genome even without exogenous DNA damage through its role in mitotic and post-mitotic G1 tetraploidy checkpoints. PMID:14726664

  14. Figure Drawing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The figure has "figured" prominently in the choice of subject matter for many artists throughout history. Whether they may choose to depict it in an abstract or expressive form, most artists are quite capable of realistic portrayals of the human form. And all people know that one of the very first drawings made by young children is a symbol for…

  15. Mitotic bookmarking by transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mitosis is accompanied by dramatic changes in chromatin organization and nuclear architecture. Transcription halts globally and most sequence-specific transcription factors and co-factors are ejected from mitotic chromatin. How then does the cell maintain its transcriptional identity throughout the cell division cycle? It has become clear that not all traces of active transcription and gene repression are erased within mitotic chromatin. Many histone modifications are stable or only partially diminished throughout mitosis. In addition, some sequence-specific DNA binding factors have emerged that remain bound to select sites within mitotic chromatin, raising the possibility that they function to transmit regulatory information through the transcriptionally silent mitotic phase, a concept that has been termed “mitotic bookmarking.” Here we review recent approaches to studying potential bookmarking factors with regards to their mitotic partitioning, and summarize emerging ideas concerning the in vivo functions of mitotically bound nuclear factors. PMID:23547918

  16. Pancreatic cancer cells retain the epithelial-related phenotype and modify mitotic spindle microtubules after the administration of ukrain in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gagliano, Nicoletta; Volpari, Tatiana; Clerici, Marco; Pettinari, Letizia; Barajon, Isabella; Portinaro, Nicola; Colombo, Graziano; Milzani, Aldo; Dalle-Donne, Isabella; Martinelli, Carla

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize the phenotype of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells in relation to the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and determine whether ukrain, an anticancer drug based on the alkaloids extracted from greater celandine, modulates in vitro the malignant behavior of PDAC cells in order to extend our understanding of its therapeutic potential. Three cell lines (HPAF-II, HPAC, and PL45) were treated with ukrain (5, 10, and 20 μmol/l) for 48 h or left untreated (control). Cell proliferation was assessed by growth curves. Apoptosis was determined by Hoechst nuclear staining and by cytochrome c and caspase-8 expressions. The EMT markers E-cadherin, β-catenin, and vimentin, as well as actin and tubulin cytoskeletons, were analyzed by immunofluorescence. Interphase and mitotic microtubules as well as abnormal mitotic figures were studied by fluorescence microscopy after tubulin immunolabeling. Ukrain strongly suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis possibly through an extrinsic pathway as cytochrome c immunoreactivity suggested that the integrity of the mitochondria was not affected. Tubulin expression indicated an antiproliferative effect of ukrain on the basis of alterations in mitotic spindle microtubule dynamics, leading to abnormal mitosis. Membranous E-cadherin/β-catenin immunoreactivity was similarly expressed in control-treated and ukrain-treated cells, although the drug upregulated E-cadherin in cell lysates. Our results suggest that ukrain exerts its chemotherapeutic action on PDAC cells targeting mitotic spindle microtubules, leading to abnormal mitosis and apoptosis, and favoring cell cohesiveness. The differentiated epithelial phenotype of HPAF-II, HPAC, and PL45 cell lines concomitant with a highly invasive potential suggests that further experiments will be necessary to definitively clarify the role of EMT in PDAC progression. PMID:22700003

  17. DNA profiles in mitotic cells from gastric adenomas.

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, C. A.; Kato, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative DNA measurements were done in mitotic figures from 17 gastric adenomas having slight (3 cases), moderate (8 cases), or severe dysplasia (3 cases) or foci of invasive adenocarcinoma (3 cases). Values higher than for normal diploid control cells (2c) or their estimated tetraploid values (4c) were found to increase gradually from slight dysplasia to invasive adenocarcinoma through moderate and severe dysplasia. While none of the adenomas having slight or moderate dysplasia demonstrated aneuploid mitoses (ie, values higher than 5c), 1% of the mitoses in severe dysplasia and 27% of those with invasive adenocarcinoma had values higher than 5c. The present results thus suggest that aneuploid mitotic figures may help to recognize those gastric adenomas having invasive growth. Images Figure 1 PMID:3348355

  18. Go Figure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Geri

    2000-01-01

    Describes the first assignment for an intermediate oil painting class in which the students painted the human figure. Explains that the assignment involved three techniques: (1) abstract application of acrylic paint; (2) oil "Paintstiks" from Shiva; and (3) a final layer of actual oil paint. (CMK)

  19. Mitotic Spindle Disruption by Alternating Electric Fields Leads to Improper Chromosome Segregation and Mitotic Catastrophe in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giladi, Moshe; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Voloshin, Tali; Porat, Yaara; Munster, Mijal; Blat, Roni; Sherbo, Shay; Bomzon, Zeev; Urman, Noa; Itzhaki, Aviran; Cahal, Shay; Shteingauz, Anna; Chaudhry, Aafia; Kirson, Eilon D; Weinberg, Uri; Palti, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields. TTFields are a unique anti-mitotic treatment modality delivered in a continuous, noninvasive manner to the region of a tumor. It was previously postulated that by exerting directional forces on highly polar intracellular elements during mitosis, TTFields could disrupt the normal assembly of spindle microtubules. However there is limited evidence directly linking TTFields to an effect on microtubules. Here we report that TTFields decrease the ratio between polymerized and total tubulin, and prevent proper mitotic spindle assembly. The aberrant mitotic events induced by TTFields lead to abnormal chromosome segregation, cellular multinucleation, and caspase dependent apoptosis of daughter cells. The effect of TTFields on cell viability and clonogenic survival substantially depends upon the cell division rate. We show that by extending the duration of exposure to TTFields, slowly dividing cells can be affected to a similar extent as rapidly dividing cells. PMID:26658786

  20. Mitotic Spindle Disruption by Alternating Electric Fields Leads to Improper Chromosome Segregation and Mitotic Catastrophe in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Giladi, Moshe; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Voloshin, Tali; Porat, Yaara; Munster, Mijal; Blat, Roni; Sherbo, Shay; Bomzon, Zeev; Urman, Noa; Itzhaki, Aviran; Cahal, Shay; Shteingauz, Anna; Chaudhry, Aafia; Kirson, Eilon D; Weinberg, Uri; Palti, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields. TTFields are a unique anti-mitotic treatment modality delivered in a continuous, noninvasive manner to the region of a tumor. It was previously postulated that by exerting directional forces on highly polar intracellular elements during mitosis, TTFields could disrupt the normal assembly of spindle microtubules. However there is limited evidence directly linking TTFields to an effect on microtubules. Here we report that TTFields decrease the ratio between polymerized and total tubulin, and prevent proper mitotic spindle assembly. The aberrant mitotic events induced by TTFields lead to abnormal chromosome segregation, cellular multinucleation, and caspase dependent apoptosis of daughter cells. The effect of TTFields on cell viability and clonogenic survival substantially depends upon the cell division rate. We show that by extending the duration of exposure to TTFields, slowly dividing cells can be affected to a similar extent as rapidly dividing cells. PMID:26658786

  1. Variation in sensitivity to. gamma. -ray-induced chromosomal aberrations during the mitotic cycle of the sea urchin egg

    SciTech Connect

    Ejima, Y.; Nakamura, I.; Shiroya, T.

    1982-11-01

    Sea urchin eggs were irradiated with /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. rays at various stages of the mitotic cycle, and chromosomal aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis and embryonic abnormalities at later developmental stages were examined. The radiosensitivity of the eggs to both endpoints varied in parallel with the mitotic stage at the time of irradiation, suggesting a possible relationship between chromosomal damage and embryonic abnormalities.

  2. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Kawamura, Ryo; Marko, John F.

    2011-02-01

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed.

  3. Cep192 and the generation of the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Ferreria, Maria Ana; Sharp, David J

    2008-06-01

    The cellular mechanisms used to generate sufficient microtubule polymer mass to drive the assembly and function of the mitotic spindle remain a matter of great interest. As the primary microtubule nucleating structures in somatic animal cells, centrosomes have been assumed to figure prominently in spindle assembly. At the onset of mitosis, centrosomes undergo a dramatic increase in size and microtubule nucleating capacity, termed maturation, which is likely a key event in mitotic spindle formation. Interestingly, however, spindles can still form in the absence of centrosomes calling into question the specific mitotic role of these organelles. Recent work has shown that the human centrosomal protein, Cep192, is required for both centrosome maturation and spindle assembly thus providing a molecular link between these two processes. In this article, we propose that Cep192 does so by forming a scaffolding on which proteins involved in microtubule nucleation are sequestered and become active in mitotic cells. Normally, this activity is largely confined to centrosomes but in their absence continues to function but is dispersed to other sites within the cell. PMID:18469523

  4. Theory of Mitotic Spindle Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Kruse, Karsten; Jülicher, Frank

    2005-03-01

    During unequal cell division the mitotic spindle is positioned away from the center of the cell before cell cleavage. In many biological systems this repositioning is accompanied by oscillatory movements of the spindle. We present a theoretical description for mitotic spindle oscillations. We show that the cooperative attachment and detachment of cortical force generators to astral microtubules leads to spontaneous oscillations beyond a critical number of force generators. This mechanism can quantitatively describe the spindle oscillations observed during unequal division of the one cell stage Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

  5. Evidence of Selection against Complex Mitotic-Origin Aneuploidy during Preimplantation Development

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Rajiv C.; Demko, Zachary P.; Ryan, Allison; Banjevic, Milena; Hill, Matthew; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Rabinowitz, Matthew; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-chromosome imbalances affect over half of early human embryos and are the leading cause of pregnancy loss. While these errors frequently arise in oocyte meiosis, many such whole-chromosome abnormalities affecting cleavage-stage embryos are the result of chromosome missegregation occurring during the initial mitotic cell divisions. The first wave of zygotic genome activation at the 4–8 cell stage results in the arrest of a large proportion of embryos, the vast majority of which contain whole-chromosome abnormalities. Thus, the full spectrum of meiotic and mitotic errors can only be detected by sampling after the initial cell divisions, but prior to this selective filter. Here, we apply 24-chromosome preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) to 28,052 single-cell day-3 blastomere biopsies and 18,387 multi-cell day-5 trophectoderm biopsies from 6,366 in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles. We precisely characterize the rates and patterns of whole-chromosome abnormalities at each developmental stage and distinguish errors of meiotic and mitotic origin without embryo disaggregation, based on informative chromosomal signatures. We show that mitotic errors frequently involve multiple chromosome losses that are not biased toward maternal or paternal homologs. This outcome is characteristic of spindle abnormalities and chaotic cell division detected in previous studies. In contrast to meiotic errors, our data also show that mitotic errors are not significantly associated with maternal age. PGS patients referred due to previous IVF failure had elevated rates of mitotic error, while patients referred due to recurrent pregnancy loss had elevated rates of meiotic error, controlling for maternal age. These results support the conclusion that mitotic error is the predominant mechanism contributing to pregnancy losses occurring prior to blastocyst formation. This high-resolution view of the full spectrum of whole-chromosome abnormalities affecting early embryos provides insight

  6. Metaplastic and mitotic activity of the ischemic (endocrine) kidney in experimental renal hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, M.; Solymoss, B.; Benchimol, S.; Desormeaux, Y.; Langlais, J.; Ballak, M.

    1979-01-01

    Partial ligation of the aorta between the renal arteries in the rat induces malignant hypertension, metaplasia of smooth-muscle cells of arterioles and arteries into juxtaglomerular cells, and a complex series of events in tubular cells at all levels of the ischemic kidney. The tubular cells of the outer cortex, particularly the proximal convoluted cells, show a very rapid and progressive simple atrophy. In contrast, necrosis of individual cells is followed by mitotic activity in atrophic tubular cells of the inner cortex, medulla, and papilla. Subsequently, polyploidy and hyperplasia occur in the inner cortex. At the same time, hypertrophy of the protein-synthesizing apparatus and an increase in protein, DNA, and RNA, followed by a decrease in the protein content, are seen in the tubular cells of the inner cortex. In the medulla and papilla, necrosis of individual cells proceeds side by side with waves of mitotic activity. These events take place, albeit to a lesser degree, even in cases of very mild renal ischemia. While they may by unrelated to hypertension, these changes are probably involved in the increase in hydrolytic enzyme activity characteristic of the ischemic renal cortex. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:474709

  7. Arsenite-induced mitotic death involves stress response and is independent of tubulin polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B. Frazier; McNeely, Samuel C.; Miller, Heather L.; States, J. Christopher

    2008-07-15

    Arsenite, a known mitotic disruptor, causes cell cycle arrest and cell death at anaphase. The mechanism causing mitotic arrest is highly disputed. We compared arsenite to the spindle poisons nocodazole and paclitaxel. Immunofluorescence analysis of {alpha}-tubulin in interphase cells demonstrated that, while nocodazole and paclitaxel disrupt microtubule polymerization through destabilization and hyperpolymerization, respectively, microtubules in arsenite-treated cells remain comparable to untreated cells even at supra-therapeutic concentrations. Immunofluorescence analysis of {alpha}-tubulin in mitotic cells showed spindle formation in arsenite- and paclitaxel-treated cells but not in nocodazole-treated cells. Spindle formation in arsenite-treated cells appeared irregular and multi-polar. {gamma}-tubulin staining showed that cells treated with nocodazole and therapeutic concentrations of paclitaxel contained two centrosomes. In contrast, most arsenite-treated mitotic cells contained more than two centrosomes, similar to centrosome abnormalities induced by heat shock. Of the three drugs tested, only arsenite treatment increased expression of the inducible isoform of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70i). HSP70 and HSP90 proteins are intimately involved in centrosome regulation and mitotic spindle formation. HSP90 inhibitor 17-DMAG sensitized cells to arsenite treatment and increased arsenite-induced centrosome abnormalities. Combined treatment of 17-DMAG and arsenite resulted in a supra-additive effect on viability, mitotic arrest, and centrosome abnormalities. Thus, arsenite-induced abnormal centrosome amplification and subsequent mitotic arrest is independent of effects on tubulin polymerization and may be due to specific stresses that are protected against by HSP90 and HSP70.

  8. Role of senescence and mitotic catastrophe in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Senescence and mitotic catastrophe (MC) are two distinct crucial non-apoptotic mechanisms, often triggered in cancer cells and tissues in response to anti-cancer drugs. Chemotherapeuticals and myriad other factors induce cell eradication via these routes. While senescence drives the cells to a state of quiescence, MC drives the cells towards death during the course of mitosis. The senescent phenotype distinguishes tumor cells that survived drug exposure but lost the ability to form colonies from those that recover and proliferate after treatment. Although senescent cells do not proliferate, they are metabolically active and may secrete proteins with potential tumor-promoting activities. The other anti-proliferative response of tumor cells is MC that is a form of cell death that results from abnormal mitosis and leads to the formation of interphase cells with multiple micronuclei. Different classes of cytotoxic agents induce MC, but the pathways of abnormal mitosis differ depending on the nature of the inducer and the status of cell-cycle checkpoints. In this review, we compare the two pathways and mention that they are activated to curb the growth of tumors. Altogether, we have highlighted the possibilities of the use of senescence targeting drugs, mitotic kinases and anti-mitotic agents in fabricating novel strategies in cancer control. PMID:20205872

  9. Mechanisms of Mitotic Spindle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Life depends on cell proliferation and the accurate segregation of chromosomes, which are mediated by the microtubule (MT)-based mitotic spindle and ~200 essential MT-associated proteins. Yet, a mechanistic understanding of how the mitotic spindle is assembled and achieves chromosome segregation is still missing. This is mostly due to the density of MTs in the spindle, which presumably precludes their direct observation. Recent insight has been gained into the molecular building plan of the metaphase spindle using bulk and single-molecule measurements combined with computational modeling. MT nucleation was uncovered as a key principle of spindle assembly, and mechanistic details about MT nucleation pathways and their coordination are starting to be revealed. Lastly, advances in studying spindle assembly can be applied to address the molecular mechanisms of how the spindle segregates chromosomes. PMID:27145846

  10. All about Lissajous Figures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    1993-01-01

    Uses diagrams and text to illustrate the use of Lissajous figures (the figures that are traced out when two simple harmonic motions are combined at right angles to each other) in teaching basic physics concepts. Covers the mathematics of the Lissajous Figure; demonstrating Lissajous Figures; and a typical class. (ZWH)

  11. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with cyclopia and synophthalmia.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, R O

    1977-01-01

    At the present time, essentially all known facts concerning cyclopia are consistent with some chromosomal disease, including clinical features of the pregnancy (fetal wastage, prematurity, intrauterine growth retardation, maternal age factor, complications of pregnancy), the generalized developmental abnormalities, specific ocular dysgenesis, by the high incidence of chromosomal abnormality already demonstrated, and the possibility of error in those cases of cyclopia with normal chromosomes. Even if chromosomal aberrations represent only one group of several different etiologic factors leading to cyclopia, at the present time chromosomal errors would seem to be the most common cause of cyclopia now recognized. Further studies will establish or disprove a chromosomal error in those instances which are now considered to be the result of an environmental factor alone or those with apparent familial patterns of inheritance. This apparent diverse origin of cyclopia can be clarified if future cyclopic specimens are carefully investigated. The evaluation should include a careful gross and microscopic examination of all organs, including the eye, and chromosome banding studies of all organs, including the eye, and chromosome banding studies of at least two cyclopic tissues. Then the presence or absence of multiple causative factors can be better evaluated. Images FIGURE 2 A FIGURE 2 B FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C FIGURE 1 D FIGURE 1 E FIGURE 1 F FIGURE 3 A FIGURE 3 B FIGURE 4 A FIGURE 4 B FIGURE 4 C FIGURE 4 D FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 A FIGURE 7 B PMID:418547

  12. Axin localizes to mitotic spindles and centrosomes in mitotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Choi, Eun-Jin; Song, Ki-Joon; Kim, Sewoon; Seo, Eunjeong; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Kee, Sun-Ho

    2009-04-01

    Wnt signaling plays critical roles in cell proliferation and carcinogenesis. In addition, numerous recent studies have shown that various Wnt signaling components are involved in mitosis and chromosomal instability. However, the role of Axin, a negative regulator of Wnt signaling, in mitosis has remained unclear. Using monoclonal antibodies against Axin, we found that Axin localizes to the centrosome and along mitotic spindles. This localization was suppressed by siRNA specific for Aurora A kinase and by Aurora kinase inhibitor. Interestingly, Axin over-expression altered the subcellular distribution of Plk1 and of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3{beta}) without producing any notable changes in cellular phenotype. In the presence of Aurora kinase inhibitor, Axin over-expression induced the formation of cleavage furrow-like structures and of prominent astral microtubules lacking midbody formation in a subset of cells. Our results suggest that Axin modulates distribution of Axin-associated proteins such as Plk1 and GSK3{beta} in an expression level-dependent manner and these interactions affect the mitotic process, including cytokinesis under certain conditions, such as in the presence of Aurora kinase inhibitor.

  13. Suppression of ectopic assembly of centriole proteins ensures mitotic spindle integrity.

    PubMed

    Shiratsuchi, Gen; Kitagawa, Daiju

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in maintaining the appropriate number of centrioles could be the origin of genome instability in tumor formation. Recently, we demonstrated that ectopic formation of aberrant centriole-related structures occurs even in the presence of pre-existing centrioles, leading to mitotic spindle defects and possibly contributing to tumorigenesis. PMID:27308496

  14. Suppression of ectopic assembly of centriole proteins ensures mitotic spindle integrity

    PubMed Central

    Shiratsuchi, Gen; Kitagawa, Daiju

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in maintaining the appropriate number of centrioles could be the origin of genome instability in tumor formation. Recently, we demonstrated that ectopic formation of aberrant centriole-related structures occurs even in the presence of pre-existing centrioles, leading to mitotic spindle defects and possibly contributing to tumorigenesis. PMID:27308496

  15. Microelasticity of Single Mitotic Chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Michael; Eroglu, Sertac; Chatenay, Didier; Marko, John F.; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2000-03-01

    The force-extension behavior of mitotic chromosomes from the newt TVI tumor cell line was studied using micropipette manipulation and force measuring techniques. Reversible, linear elastic response was observed for extensions up to 5 times the native length; the force required to double chromosome length was 1 nanonewton (nN). For further elongations, the linear response teminates at a force plateau of 15 nN and at an extension of 20x. Beyond this extension, the chromosome breaks at elongations between 20x and 70x. These results will be compared to the similar behavior of mitotic chromosomes from explanted newt cells (Poirier, Eroglu, Chatenay and Marko, Mol. Biol. Cell, in press). Also, the effect of biochemical modifications on the elasticity was studied. Ethidium Bromide, which binds to DNA, induces up to a 10 times increase in the Young's modulus. Anti-XCAP-E, which binds to a putative chromosome folding protein, induces up to a 2 times increase in the Young's modulus. Preliminary results on the dynamical relaxation of chromosomes will also be presented. Support of this research through a Biomedical Engineering Research Grant from The Whitaker Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta induces apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe by disrupting centrosome regulation in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Yuki; Ishioka, Chikashi

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β) has been investigated as a therapeutic target for numerous human diseases including cancer because of their diverse cellular functions. Although GSK-3β inhibitors have been investigated as anticancer reagents, precise biological mechanisms remain to be determined. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of GSK-3β inhibitors on cancer cell lines and observed centrosome dysregulation which resulted in abnormal mitosis. Mitotic checkpoints sensed the mitotic abnormalities and induced apoptosis. For cells that were inherently resistant to apoptosis, cell death distinct from apoptosis was induced. After GSK-3β inhibitor treatment, these cells exhibited characteristic features of mitotic catastrophe, including distended and multivesiculated nuclei and inappropriate reductions in cyclin B1 expression. This suggested that mitotic catastrophe was an alternative mechanism in cells resistant to apoptosis. Although the role of GSK-3β in centrosomes has not yet been clarified, phosphorylated GSK-3β was localised in centrosomes. From these data, GSK-3β seems to regulate centrosome function. Thus, we propose that centrosome dysregulation is an important mechanism for the anticancer effects of GSK-3β inhibitors and that mitotic catastrophe serves as a safe-guard system to remove cells with any mitotic abnormalities induced by GSK-3β inhibition. PMID:26292722

  17. OTSSP167 Abrogates Mitotic Checkpoint through Inhibiting Multiple Mitotic Kinases.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenbin; Arnst, Christopher; Tipton, Aaron R; Bekier, Michael E; Taylor, William R; Yen, Tim J; Liu, Song-Tao

    2016-01-01

    OTSSP167 was recently characterized as a potent inhibitor for maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) and is currently tested in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors that have not responded to other treatment. Here we report that OTSSP167 abrogates the mitotic checkpoint at concentrations used to inhibit MELK. The abrogation is not recapitulated by RNAi mediated silencing of MELK in cells. Although OTSSP167 indeed inhibits MELK, it exhibits off-target activity against Aurora B kinase in vitro and in cells. Furthermore, OTSSP167 inhibits BUB1 and Haspin kinases, reducing phosphorylation at histones H2AT120 and H3T3 and causing mislocalization of Aurora B and associated chromosomal passenger complex from the centromere/kinetochore. The results suggest that OTSSP167 may have additional mechanisms of action for cancer cell killing and caution the use of OTSSP167 as a MELK specific kinase inhibitor in biochemical and cellular assays. PMID:27082996

  18. OTSSP167 Abrogates Mitotic Checkpoint through Inhibiting Multiple Mitotic Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Tipton, Aaron R.; Bekier, Michael E.; Taylor, William R.; Yen, Tim J.; Liu, Song-Tao

    2016-01-01

    OTSSP167 was recently characterized as a potent inhibitor for maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) and is currently tested in Phase I clinical trials for solid tumors that have not responded to other treatment. Here we report that OTSSP167 abrogates the mitotic checkpoint at concentrations used to inhibit MELK. The abrogation is not recapitulated by RNAi mediated silencing of MELK in cells. Although OTSSP167 indeed inhibits MELK, it exhibits off-target activity against Aurora B kinase in vitro and in cells. Furthermore, OTSSP167 inhibits BUB1 and Haspin kinases, reducing phosphorylation at histones H2AT120 and H3T3 and causing mislocalization of Aurora B and associated chromosomal passenger complex from the centromere/kinetochore. The results suggest that OTSSP167 may have additional mechanisms of action for cancer cell killing and caution the use of OTSSP167 as a MELK specific kinase inhibitor in biochemical and cellular assays. PMID:27082996

  19. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes of

  20. A time-course study on effects of aluminium on mitotic cell division in Allium sativum.

    PubMed

    Roy, A K; Sharma, A; Talukder, G

    1989-12-01

    Cytotoxic effects of aluminium sulphate on root-tip cells of Allium sativum during a time-course study and during recovery were observed. The endpoints considered were mitotic index and frequencies of aberrant cells and micronuclei induced. Chronic exposure induced mitotic depression and abnormal cells to a degree directly proportional to the concentration used and the period of treatment up to 24 h. A reduction of the early higher level of toxicity was noticed following 48 h of treatment and subsequent recovery in aluminium-free nutrient media in experiments carried out with lower concentrations. PMID:2586548

  1. Comparative diagnostic and prognostic performances of the hematoxylin-eosin and phospho-histone H3 mitotic count and Ki-67 index in adrenocortical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Duregon, Eleonora; Molinaro, Luca; Volante, Marco; Ventura, Laura; Righi, Luisella; Bolla, Stefania; Terzolo, Massimo; Sapino, Anna; Papotti, Mauro G

    2014-09-01

    Mitotic count on hematoxylin and eosin slides is a fundamental morphological criterion in the diagnosis and grading of adrenocortical carcinoma in any scoring system employed. Moreover, it is the unique term strongly associated with patient's prognosis. Phospho-histone H3 is a mitosis-specific antibody, which was already proven to facilitate mitotic count in melanoma and other tumors. Therefore, a study was designed to assess the diagnostic and prognostic role of phospho-histone H3 in 52 adrenocortical carcinomas, comparing manual and computerized count to standard manual hematoxylin- and eosin-based method and Ki-67 index. Manual hematoxylin and eosin and phospho-histone H3 mitotic counts were highly correlated (r=0.9077, P<0.0001), better than computer-assisted phospho-histone H3 evaluations, and had an excellent inter-observer reproducibility at Bland-Altman analysis. Three of 15 cases having <5 mitotic figures per 50 high-power fields by standard count on hematoxylin and eosin gained the mitotic figure point of Weiss Score after a manual count on phospho-histone H3 slides. Traditional mitotic count confirmed to be a strong predictor of overall survival (P=0.0043), better than phospho-histone H3-based evaluation (P=0.051), but not as strong as the Ki-67 index (P<0.0001). The latter further segregated adrenocortical carcinomas into three prognostic groups, stratifying cases by low (<20%), intermediate (20-50%), and high (>50%) Ki-67 values. We conclude that (a) phospho-histone H3 staining is a useful diagnostic complementary tool to standard hematoxylin and eosin mitotic count, enabling optimal mitotic figure evaluation (including atypical mitotic figures) even in adrenocortical carcinomas with a low mitotic index and with a very high reproducibility; (b) Ki-67 proved to be the best prognostic indicator of overall survival, being superior to the mitotic index, irrespective of the method (standard on hematoxylin and eosin or phospho-histone H3-based) used to count

  2. Mitotic Stress Is an Integral Part of the Oncogene-Induced Senescence Program that Promotes Multinucleation and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Dikovskaya, Dina; Cole, John J; Mason, Susan M; Nixon, Colin; Karim, Saadia A; McGarry, Lynn; Clark, William; Hewitt, Rachael N; Sammons, Morgan A; Zhu, Jiajun; Athineos, Dimitris; Leach, Joshua D G; Marchesi, Francesco; van Tuyn, John; Tait, Stephen W; Brock, Claire; Morton, Jennifer P; Wu, Hong; Berger, Shelley L; Blyth, Karen; Adams, Peter D

    2015-09-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a tumor suppression mechanism that blocks cell proliferation in response to oncogenic signaling. OIS is frequently accompanied by multinucleation; however, the origin of this is unknown. Here, we show that multinucleate OIS cells originate mostly from failed mitosis. Prior to senescence, mutant H-RasV12 activation in primary human fibroblasts compromised mitosis, concordant with abnormal expression of mitotic genes functionally linked to the observed mitotic spindle and chromatin defects. Simultaneously, H-RasV12 activation enhanced survival of cells with damaged mitoses, culminating in extended mitotic arrest and aberrant exit from mitosis via mitotic slippage. ERK-dependent transcriptional upregulation of Mcl1 was, at least in part, responsible for enhanced survival and slippage of cells with mitotic defects. Importantly, mitotic slippage and oncogene signaling cooperatively induced senescence and key senescence effectors p21 and p16. In summary, activated Ras coordinately triggers mitotic disruption and enhanced cell survival to promote formation of multinucleate senescent cells. PMID:26299965

  3. A mitotic kinase scaffold depleted in testicular seminomas impacts spindle orientation in germ line stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hehnly, Heidi; Canton, David; Bucko, Paula; Langeberg, Lorene K; Ogier, Leah; Gelman, Irwin; Santana, L Fernando; Wordeman, Linda; Scott, John D

    2015-01-01

    Correct orientation of the mitotic spindle in stem cells underlies organogenesis. Spindle abnormalities correlate with cancer progression in germ line-derived tumors. We discover a macromolecular complex between the scaffolding protein Gravin/AKAP12 and the mitotic kinases, Aurora A and Plk1, that is down regulated in human seminoma. Depletion of Gravin correlates with an increased mitotic index and disorganization of seminiferous tubules. Biochemical, super-resolution imaging, and enzymology approaches establish that this Gravin scaffold accumulates at the mother spindle pole during metaphase. Manipulating elements of the Gravin-Aurora A-Plk1 axis prompts mitotic delay and prevents appropriate assembly of astral microtubules to promote spindle misorientation. These pathological responses are conserved in seminiferous tubules from Gravin(-/-) mice where an overabundance of Oct3/4 positive germ line stem cells displays randomized orientation of mitotic spindles. Thus, we propose that Gravin-mediated recruitment of Aurora A and Plk1 to the mother (oldest) spindle pole contributes to the fidelity of symmetric cell division. PMID:26406118

  4. Heat shock protein inhibitors, 17-DMAG and KNK437, enhance arsenic trioxide-induced mitotic apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yichen; Yen Wenyen; Lee, T.-C. Yih, L.-H.

    2009-04-15

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic agent in leukemia because of its ability to induce apoptosis. However, there is no sufficient evidence to support its therapeutic use for other types of cancers. In this study, we investigated if, and how, 17-dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxy-geldanamycin (17-DMAG), an antagonist of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), and KNK437, a HSP synthesis inhibitor, potentiated the cytotoxic effect of ATO. Our results showed that cotreatment with ATO and either 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced cell death and apoptosis. siRNA-mediated attenuation of the expression of the inducible isoform of HSP70 (HSP70i) or HSP90{alpha}/{beta} also enhanced ATO-induced apoptosis. In addition, cotreatment with ATO and 17-DMAG or KNK437 significantly increased ATO-induced mitotic arrest and ATO-induced BUBR1 phosphorylation and PDS1 accumulation. Cotreatment also significantly increased the percentage of mitotic cells with abnormal mitotic spindles and promoted metaphase arrest as compared to ATO treatment alone. These results indicated that 17-DMAG or KNK437 may enhance ATO cytotoxicity by potentiating mitotic arrest and mitotic apoptosis possibly through increased activation of the spindle checkpoint.

  5. A mitotic kinase scaffold depleted in testicular seminomas impacts spindle orientation in germ line stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hehnly, Heidi; Canton, David; Bucko, Paula; Langeberg, Lorene K; Ogier, Leah; Gelman, Irwin; Santana, L Fernando; Wordeman, Linda; Scott, John D

    2015-01-01

    Correct orientation of the mitotic spindle in stem cells underlies organogenesis. Spindle abnormalities correlate with cancer progression in germ line-derived tumors. We discover a macromolecular complex between the scaffolding protein Gravin/AKAP12 and the mitotic kinases, Aurora A and Plk1, that is down regulated in human seminoma. Depletion of Gravin correlates with an increased mitotic index and disorganization of seminiferous tubules. Biochemical, super-resolution imaging, and enzymology approaches establish that this Gravin scaffold accumulates at the mother spindle pole during metaphase. Manipulating elements of the Gravin-Aurora A-Plk1 axis prompts mitotic delay and prevents appropriate assembly of astral microtubules to promote spindle misorientation. These pathological responses are conserved in seminiferous tubules from Gravin−/− mice where an overabundance of Oct3/4 positive germ line stem cells displays randomized orientation of mitotic spindles. Thus, we propose that Gravin-mediated recruitment of Aurora A and Plk1 to the mother (oldest) spindle pole contributes to the fidelity of symmetric cell division. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09384.001 PMID:26406118

  6. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Mitotic effects of the aqueous leaf extract of Cymbopogon citratus in Allium cepa root tips.

    PubMed

    Williams, G O; Omoh, L E

    1996-01-01

    Aqueous extracts of the lemon grass, Cymbopogon citratus, were used to clear the malaria parasite in infected mice, although they died some days later. Allium cepa roots grown in aqueous extracts from 3, 6, 12 and 20 g of chopped leaves for 1, 3, and 6 h, showed some mitotic abnormalities including c-mitotic and mitodepressive effects. The abnormalities were not peculiar to any concentration or duration of extract treatment. The highest frequency of affected cells was 0.75% in the treatment with the 20 g concentration, but the 3 h treatment group had the greatest variety of effects. The mitodepressive effect of the extract increased significantly with concentration and time, and persisted even after 24 h in tap water. The chromosomal effects of the extract occur at a very low frequency but the mitodepressive effects may have implications for man. PMID:9172394

  8. Mitotic regulation by NIMA-related kinases

    PubMed Central

    O'Regan, Laura; Blot, Joelle; Fry, Andrew M

    2007-01-01

    The NIMA-related kinases represent a family of serine/threonine kinases implicated in cell cycle control. The founding member of this family, the NIMA kinase of Aspergillus nidulans, as well as the fission yeast homologue Fin1, contribute to multiple aspects of mitotic progression including the timing of mitotic entry, chromatin condensation, spindle organization and cytokinesis. Mammals contain a large family of eleven NIMA-related kinases, named Nek1 to Nek11. Of these, there is now substantial evidence that Nek2, Nek6, Nek7 and Nek9 also regulate mitotic events. At least three of these kinases, as well as NIMA and Fin1, have been localized to the microtubule organizing centre of their respective species, namely the centrosome or spindle pole body. Here, they have important functions in microtubule organization and mitotic spindle assembly. Other Nek kinases have been proposed to play microtubule-dependent roles in non-dividing cells, most notably in regulating the axonemal microtubules of cilia and flagella. In this review, we discuss the evidence that NIMA-related kinases make a significant contribution to the orchestration of mitotic progression and thereby protect cells from chromosome instability. Furthermore, we highlight their potential as novel chemotherapeutic targets. PMID:17727698

  9. Quantitative assessment of chromosome instability induced through chemical disruption of mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Markossian, Sarine; Arnaoutov, Alexei; Saba, Nakhle S.; Larionov, Vladimir; Dasso, Mary

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most solid tumors are aneuploid, carrying an abnormal number of chromosomes, and they frequently missegregate whole chromosomes in a phenomenon termed chromosome instability (CIN). While CIN can be provoked through disruption of numerous mitotic pathways, it is not clear which of these mechanisms are most critical, or whether alternative mechanisms could also contribute significantly in vivo. One difficulty in determining the relative importance of candidate CIN regulators has been the lack of a straightforward, quantitative assay for CIN in live human cells: While gross mitotic abnormalities can be detected visually, moderate levels of CIN may not be obvious, and are thus problematic to measure. To address this issue, we have developed the first Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC)-based quantitative live-cell assay for mitotic chromosome segregation in human cells. We have produced U2OS-Phoenix cells carrying the alphoidtetO-HAC encoding copies of eGFP fused to the destruction box (DB) of anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) substrate hSecurin and sequences encoding the tetracycline repressor fused to mCherry (TetR-mCherry). Upon HAC missegregation, daughter cells that do not obtain a copy of the HAC are GFP negative in the subsequent interphase. The HAC can also be monitored live following the TetR-mCherry signal. U2OS-Phoenix cells show low inherent levels of CIN, which can be enhanced by agents that target mitotic progression through distinct mechanisms. This assay allows direct detection of CIN induced by clinically important agents without conspicuous mitotic defects, allowing us to score increased levels of CIN that fall below the threshold required for discernable morphological disruption. PMID:27104376

  10. Quantitative assessment of chromosome instability induced through chemical disruption of mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Markossian, Sarine; Arnaoutov, Alexei; Saba, Nakhle S; Larionov, Vladimir; Dasso, Mary

    2016-07-01

    Most solid tumors are aneuploid, carrying an abnormal number of chromosomes, and they frequently missegregate whole chromosomes in a phenomenon termed chromosome instability (CIN). While CIN can be provoked through disruption of numerous mitotic pathways, it is not clear which of these mechanisms are most critical, or whether alternative mechanisms could also contribute significantly in vivo. One difficulty in determining the relative importance of candidate CIN regulators has been the lack of a straightforward, quantitative assay for CIN in live human cells: While gross mitotic abnormalities can be detected visually, moderate levels of CIN may not be obvious, and are thus problematic to measure. To address this issue, we have developed the first Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC)-based quantitative live-cell assay for mitotic chromosome segregation in human cells. We have produced U2OS-Phoenix cells carrying the alphoid(tetO)-HAC encoding copies of eGFP fused to the destruction box (DB) of anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) substrate hSecurin and sequences encoding the tetracycline repressor fused to mCherry (TetR-mCherry). Upon HAC missegregation, daughter cells that do not obtain a copy of the HAC are GFP negative in the subsequent interphase. The HAC can also be monitored live following the TetR-mCherry signal. U2OS-Phoenix cells show low inherent levels of CIN, which can be enhanced by agents that target mitotic progression through distinct mechanisms. This assay allows direct detection of CIN induced by clinically important agents without conspicuous mitotic defects, allowing us to score increased levels of CIN that fall below the threshold required for discernable morphological disruption. PMID:27104376

  11. Effects of ovariectomy on estrogen uptake capacity, mitotic index and morphology of immunocytochemically-identified gonadotropes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.F.

    1985-01-01

    The primary objective of these studies was to examine the effects of ovariectomy on the pituitary gonadotrope population in the rat. Several parameters were examined including morphology, mitotic index and ability of individual cells to concentrate estrogen. Adult, female rats which had been ovariectomized 3, 14, or 50 previously, were injected with /sup 3/H-estradiol (i.v.) and killed 1 hour later. Pituitaries were excised and immediately hemisected (mid-sagittal cut). Trunk blood was collected for subsequent radioimmunoassay of serum LH levels to assess the activity of the pituitary gonadotropes. Frozen pituitaries were sectioned and processed for dry-mount autoradiography. Estrogen uptake capacity of gonadotropes increased with time after ovariectomy. This increase was not seen in male rats after castration. Hemi-pituitaries were sectioned (1 ..mu..m) and analyzed for the number of mitotic figures per mm/sup 2/ and dividing cells were characterized as to their hormonal content. Ovariectomy induced an increase in the mitotic index of the pituitary gland. Furthermore, a majority of the mitotic futures seen in the ovariectomized rat were found in cells containing LH-immunoreactivity. Electron microscopic examination of dividing gonadotropes revealed that these cells contained large amounts of vesiculated endoplasmic reticumum typical of post-castration gonadotropes.

  12. Moderate intensity static magnetic fields affect mitotic spindles and increase the antitumor efficacy of 5-FU and Taxol.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; Ji, Xinmiao; Liu, Juanjuan; Li, Zhiyuan; Wang, Wenchao; Chen, Wei; Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Qingsong; Zhang, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Microtubules are the fundamental components in mitotic spindle, which plays essential roles in cell division. It was well known that purified microtubules could be affected by static magnetic fields (SMFs) in vitro because of the diamagnetic anisotropy of tubulin. However, whether these effects lead to cell division defects was unknown. Here we find that 1T SMFs induce abnormal mitotic spindles and increase mitotic index. Synchronization experiments show that SMFs delay cell exit from mitosis and cause mitotic arrest. These mimic the cellular effects of a microtubule-targeting drug Paclitaxel (Taxol), which is frequently used in combination with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and Cisplatin in cancer treatment. Using four different human cancer cell lines, HeLa, HCT116, CNE-2Z and MCF7, we find that SMFs increase the antitumor efficacy of 5-FU or 5-FU/Taxol, but not Cisplatin, which indicates that the SMF-induced combinational effects with chemodrugs are drug-specific. Our study not only reveals the effect of SMFs on microtubules to cause abnormal mitotic spindles and delay cells exit from mitosis, but also implies the potential applications of SMFs in combination with chemotherapy drugs 5-FU or 5-FU/Taxol, but not with Cisplatin in cancer treatment. PMID:26775206

  13. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious health problems (e.g. Down syndrome ). Single-Gene Abnormalities Sometimes the chromosomes are normal in number, ... blood flow to the fetus impair fetal growth. Alcohol consumption and certain drugs during pregnancy significantly increase ...

  14. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  15. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  16. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  17. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Nail abnormalities are problems with the color, shape, texture, or thickness of the fingernails or toenails. ... Fungus or yeast cause changes in the color, texture, and shape of the nails. Bacterial infection may ...

  18. Evidence that phosphorylation by the mitotic kinase Cdk1 promotes ICER monoubiquitination and nuclear delocalization

    SciTech Connect

    Memin, Elisabeth; Genzale, Megan; Crow, Marni; Molina, Carlos A.

    2011-10-15

    In contrast to normal prostatic cells, the transcriptional repressor Inducible cAMP Early Repressor (ICER) is undetected in the nuclei of prostate cancer cells. The molecular mechanisms for ICER abnormal expression in prostate cancer cells remained largely unknown. In this report data is presented demonstrating that ICER is phosphorylated by the mitotic kinase cdk1. Phosphorylation of ICER on a discrete residue targeted ICER to be monoubiquitinated. Different from unphosphorylated, phosphorylated and polyubiquitinated ICER, monoubiquitinated ICER was found to be cytosolic. Taken together, these results hinted on a mechanism for the observed abnormal subcellular localization of ICER in human prostate tumors.

  19. Evidence that phosphorylation by the mitotic kinase Cdk1 promotes ICER monoubiquitination and nuclear delocalization.

    PubMed

    Mémin, Elisabeth; Genzale, Megan; Crow, Marni; Molina, Carlos A

    2011-10-15

    In contrast to normal prostatic cells, the transcriptional repressor Inducible cAMP Early Repressor (ICER) is undetected in the nuclei of prostate cancer cells. The molecular mechanisms for ICER abnormal expression in prostate cancer cells remained largely unknown. In this report data is presented demonstrating that ICER is phosphorylated by the mitotic kinase cdk1. Phosphorylation of ICER on a discrete residue targeted ICER to be monoubiquitinated. Different from unphosphorylated, phosphorylated and polyubiquitinated ICER, monoubiquitinated ICER was found to be cytosolic. Taken together, these results hinted on a mechanism for the observed abnormal subcellular localization of ICER in human prostate tumors. PMID:21767532

  20. Stellar figure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, W. N.

    1973-01-01

    A compilation of analytical and experimental data is presented concerning the stellar figure sensor. The sensor is an interferometric device which is located in the focal plane of an orbiting large space telescope (LST). The device was designed to perform interferometry on the optical wavefront of a single star after it has propagated through the LST. An analytical model of the device was developed and its accuracy was verified by an operating laboratory breadboard. A series of linear independent control equations were derived which define the operations required for utilizing a focal plane figure sensor in the control loop for the secondary mirror position and for active control of the primary mirror.

  1. Figurative Language Awards Ceremony.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Lisa

    Figurative language enlivens a text, providing visuals in the minds of readers. This lesson will have students listening to and reading selected texts as they seek out their favorite literary devices. During the five to seven 50-minute sessions, grade three through five students will: acquire a clear understanding of the concept of figurative…

  2. OECD in Figures, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    "OECD in Figures" is a primary statistical source for key data on OECD countries, ranging from economic growth and employment to inflation, trade and environment. Information is presented in tabular form for: (1) Demography and Health; (2) Economy; (3) Energy; (4) Labour; (5) Science and Technology; (6) Environment; (7) Education; (8) Public…

  3. Rapid measurement of mitotic spindle orientation in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Decarreau, Justin; Driver, Jonathan; Asbury, Charles; Wordeman, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Factors that influence the orientation of the mitotic spindle are important for the maintenance of stem cell populations and in cancer development. However, screening for these factors requires rapid quantification of alterations of the angle of the mitotic spindle in cultured cell lines. Here we describe a method to image mitotic cells and rapidly score the angle of the mitotic spindle using a simple MATLAB application to analyze a stack of Z-images. PMID:24633791

  4. The putative oncogene CEP72 inhibits the mitotic function of BRCA1 and induces chromosomal instability.

    PubMed

    Lüddecke, S; Ertych, N; Stenzinger, A; Weichert, W; Beissbarth, T; Dyczkowski, J; Gaedcke, J; Valerius, O; Braus, G H; Kschischo, M; Bastians, H

    2016-05-01

    BRCA1 is a tumor-suppressor gene associated with, but not restricted to, breast and ovarian cancer and implicated in various biological functions. During mitosis, BRCA1 and its positive regulator Chk2 are localized at centrosomes and are required for the regulation of microtubule plus end assembly, thereby ensuring faithful mitosis and numerical chromosome stability. However, the function of BRCA1 during mitosis has not been defined mechanistically. To gain insights into the mitotic role of BRCA1 in regulating microtubule assembly, we systematically identified proteins interacting with BRCA1 during mitosis and found the centrosomal protein Cep72 as a novel BRCA1-interacting protein. CEP72 is frequently upregulated in colorectal cancer tissues and overexpression of CEP72 mirrors the consequences of BRCA1 loss during mitosis. In detail, the overexpression of CEP72 causes an increase in microtubule plus end assembly, abnormal mitotic spindle formation and the induction of chromosomal instability. Moreover, we show that high levels of Cep72 counteract Chk2 as a positive regulator of BRCA1 to ensure proper mitotic microtubule assembly. Thus, CEP72 represents a putative oncogene in colorectal cancer that might negatively regulate the mitotic function of BRCA1 to ensure chromosomal stability. PMID:26300001

  5. Mitotic Stress and Chromosomal Instability in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malumbres, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    Cell cycle deregulation is a common motif in human cancer, and multiple therapeutic strategies are aimed to prevent tumor cell proliferation. Whereas most current therapies are designed to arrest cell cycle progression either in G1/S or in mitosis, new proposals include targeting the intrinsic chromosomal instability (CIN, an increased rate of gain or losses of chromosomes during cell division) or aneuploidy (a genomic composition that differs from diploid) that many tumor cells display. Why tumors cells are chromosomally unstable or aneuploid and what are the consequences of these alterations are not completely clear at present. Several mitotic regulators are overexpressed as a consequence of oncogenic alterations, and they are likely to alter the proper regulation of chromosome segregation in cancer cells. In this review, we propose the relevance of TPX2, a mitotic regulator involved in the formation of the mitotic spindle, in oncogene-induced mitotic stress. This protein, as well as its partner Aurora-A, is frequently overexpressed in human cancer, and its deregulation may participate not only in chromosome numeric aberrations but also in other forms of genomic instability in cancer cells. PMID:23634259

  6. Proteomic profiling revealed the functional networks associated with mitotic catastrophe of HepG2 hepatoma cells induced by 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Bo; Huang Bo; Guan Hua; Zhang Shimeng; Xu Qinzhi; He Xingpeng; Liu Xiaodan; Wang Yu; Shang Zengfu; Zhou Pingkun

    2011-05-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, a form of cell death resulting from abnormal mitosis, is a cytotoxic death pathway as well as an appealing mechanistic strategy for the development of anti-cancer drugs. In this study, 6-bromine-5-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde was demonstrated to induce DNA double-strand break, multipolar spindles, sustain mitotic arrest and generate multinucleated cells, all of which indicate mitotic catastrophe, in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. We used proteomic profiling to identify the differentially expressed proteins underlying mitotic catastrophe. A total of 137 differentially expressed proteins (76 upregulated and 61 downregulated proteins) were identified. Some of the changed proteins have previously been associated with mitotic catastrophe, such as DNA-PKcs, FoxM1, RCC1, cyclin E, PLK1-pT210, 14-3-3{sigma} and HSP70. Multiple isoforms of 14-3-3, heat-shock proteins and tubulin were upregulated. Analysis of functional significance revealed that the 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the differentially expressed proteins. The modulated proteins were found to be involved in macromolecule complex assembly, cell death, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin and cytoskeletal organization. These findings revealed the overall molecular events and functional signaling networks associated with spindle disruption and mitotic catastrophe. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: > 6-bromoisovanillin induced spindle disruption and sustained mitotic arrest, consequently resulted in mitotic catastrophe. > Proteomic profiling identified 137 differentially expressed proteins associated mitotic catastrophe. > The 14-3-3-mediated signaling network was the most significantly enriched for the altered proteins. > The macromolecule complex assembly, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling and DNA repair, tubulin organization were also shown involved in mitotic catastrophe.

  7. The Aurora-A inhibitor MLN8237 affects multiple mitotic processes and induces dose-dependent mitotic abnormalities and aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Asteriti, Italia Anna; Cesare, Erica Di; Mattia, Fabiola De; Hilsenstein, Volker; Neumann, Beate; Cundari, Enrico; Lavia, Patrizia; Guarguaglini, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of Aurora kinase activity by small molecules is being actively investigated as a potential anti-cancer strategy. A successful therapeutic use of Aurora inhibitors relies on a comprehensive understanding of the effects of inactivating Aurora kinases on cell division, a challenging aim given the pleiotropic roles of those kinases during mitosis. Here we have used the Aurora-A inhibitor MLN8237, currently under phase-I/III clinical trials, in dose-response assays in U2OS human cancer cells synchronously proceeding towards mitosis. By following the behaviour and fate of single Aurora-inhibited cells in mitosis by live microscopy, we show that MLN8237 treatment affects multiple processes that are differentially sensitive to the loss of Aurora-A function. A role of Aurora-A in controlling the orientation of cell division emerges. MLN8237 treatment, even in high doses, fails to induce efficient elimination of dividing cells, or of their progeny, while inducing significant aneuploidy in daughter cells. The results of single-cell analyses show a complex cellular response to MLN8237 and evidence that its effects are strongly dose-dependent: these issues deserve consideration in the light of the design of strategies to kill cancer cells via inhibition of Aurora kinases. PMID:25153724

  8. The Aurora-A inhibitor MLN8237 affects multiple mitotic processes and induces dose-dependent mitotic abnormalities and aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Asteriti, Italia Anna; Di Cesare, Erica; De Mattia, Fabiola; Hilsenstein, Volker; Neumann, Beate; Cundari, Enrico; Lavia, Patrizia; Guarguaglini, Giulia

    2014-08-15

    Inhibition of Aurora kinase activity by small molecules is being actively investigated as a potential anti-cancer strategy. A successful therapeutic use of Aurora inhibitors relies on a comprehensive understanding of the effects of inactivating Aurora kinases on cell division, a challenging aim given the pleiotropic roles of those kinases during mitosis. Here we have used the Aurora-A inhibitor MLN8237, currently under phase-I/III clinical trials, in dose-response assays in U2OS human cancer cells synchronously proceeding towards mitosis. By following the behaviour and fate of single Aurora-inhibited cells in mitosis by live microscopy, we show that MLN8237 treatment affects multiple processes that are differentially sensitive to the loss of Aurora-A function. A role of Aurora-A in controlling the orientation of cell division emerges. MLN8237 treatment, even in high doses, fails to induce efficient elimination of dividing cells, or of their progeny, while inducing significant aneuploidy in daughter cells. The results of single-cell analyses show a complex cellular response to MLN8237 and evidence that its effects are strongly dose-dependent: these issues deserve consideration in the light of the design of strategies to kill cancer cells via inhibition of Aurora kinases. PMID:25153724

  9. Mitotic-like tau phosphorylation by p25-Cdk5 kinase complex.

    PubMed

    Hamdane, Malika; Sambo, Anne-Véronique; Delobel, Patrice; Bégard, Séverine; Violleau, Anne; Delacourte, André; Bertrand, Philippe; Benavides, Jesus; Buée, Luc

    2003-09-01

    Among tau phosphorylation sites, some phosphoepitopes referred to as abnormal ones are exclusively found on tau aggregated into filaments in Alzheimer's disease. Recent data suggested that molecular mechanisms similar to those encountered during mitosis may play a role in abnormal tau phosphorylation. In particular, TG-3 phosphoepitope is associated with early stages of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). In this study, we reported a suitable cell model consisting of SH-SY5Y cells stably transfected with an inducible p25 expression vector. It allows investigation of tau phosphorylation by p25-Cdk5 kinase complex in a neuronal context and avoiding p25-induced cytotoxicity. Immunoblotting analyses showed that p25-Cdk5 strongly phosphorylates tau protein not only at the AT8 epitope but also at the AT180 epitope and at the Alzheimer's mitotic epitope TG-3. Further biochemical analyses showed that abnormal phosphorylated tau accumulated in cytosol as a microtubule-free form, suggesting its impact on tau biological activity. Since tau abnormal phosphorylation occurred in dividing cells, TG-3 immunoreactivity was also investigated in differentiated neuronal ones, and both TG-3-immunoreactive tau and nucleolin, another early marker for NFT, were also generated. These data suggest that p25-Cdk5 is responsible for the mitotic-like phosphoepitopes present in NFT and argue for a critical role of Cdk5 in neurodegenerative mechanisms. PMID:12826674

  10. Ewing sarcoma fusion protein EWSR1/FLI1 interacts with EWSR1 leading to mitotic defects in zebrafish embryos and human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Embree, Lisa J; Azuma, Mizuki; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2009-05-15

    The mechanism whereby the fusion of EWSR1 with the ETS transcription factor FLI1 contributes to malignant transformation in Ewing sarcoma remains unclear. We show that injection of human or zebrafish EWSR1/FLI1 mRNA into developing zebrafish embryos leads to mitotic defects with multipolar and disorganized mitotic spindles. Expression of human EWSR1/FLI1 in HeLa cells also results in mitotic defects, along with mislocalization of Aurora kinase B, a key regulator of mitotic progression. Because these mitotic abnormalities mimic those observed with the knockdown of EWSR1 in zebrafish embryos and HeLa cells, we investigated whether EWSR1/FLI1 interacts with EWSR1 and interferes with its function. EWSR1 coimmunoprecipitates with EWSR1/FLI1, and overexpression of EWSR1 rescues the mitotic defects in EWSR1/FLI1-transfected HeLa cells. This interaction between EWSR1/FLI1 and EWSR1 in Ewing sarcoma may induce mitotic defects leading to genomic instability and subsequent malignant transformation. PMID:19417137

  11. Measuring mitotic spindle dynamics in budding yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Kemp

    In order to carry out its life cycle and produce viable progeny through cell division, a cell must successfully coordinate and execute a number of complex processes with high fidelity, in an environment dominated by thermal noise. One important example of such a process is the assembly and positioning of the mitotic spindle prior to chromosome segregation. The mitotic spindle is a modular structure composed of two spindle pole bodies, separated in space and spanned by filamentous proteins called microtubules, along which the genetic material of the cell is held. The spindle is responsible for alignment and subsequent segregation of chromosomes into two equal parts; proper spindle positioning and timing ensure that genetic material is appropriately divided amongst mother and daughter cells. In this thesis, I describe fluorescence confocal microscopy and automated image analysis algorithms, which I have used to observe and analyze the real space dynamics of the mitotic spindle in budding yeast. The software can locate structures in three spatial dimensions and track their movement in time. By selecting fluorescent proteins which specifically label the spindle poles and cell periphery, mitotic spindle dynamics have been measured in a coordinate system relevant to the cell division. I describe how I have characterised the accuracy and precision of the algorithms by simulating fluorescence data for both spindle poles and the budding yeast cell surface. In this thesis I also describe the construction of a microfluidic apparatus that allows for the measurement of long time-scale dynamics of individual cells and the development of a cell population. The tools developed in this thesis work will facilitate in-depth quantitative analysis of the non-equilibrium processes in living cells.

  12. Automatic microscopy for mitotic cell location.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herron, J.; Ranshaw, R.; Castle, J.; Wald, N.

    1972-01-01

    Advances are reported in the development of an automatic microscope with which to locate hematologic or other cells in mitosis for subsequent chromosome analysis. The system under development is designed to perform the functions of: slide scanning to locate metaphase cells; conversion of images of selected cells into binary form; and on-line computer analysis of the digitized image for significant cytogenetic data. Cell detection criteria are evaluated using a test sample of 100 mitotic cells and 100 artifacts.

  13. Pb-inhibited mitotic activity in onion roots involves DNA damage and disruption of oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Singh, Harminder Pal; Batish, Daizy Rani; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Plant responses to abiotic stress significantly affect the development of cells, tissues and organs. However, no studies correlating Pb-induced mitotic inhibition and DNA damage and the alterations in redox homeostasis during root division per se were found in the literature. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to evaluate the impact of Pb on mitotic activity and the associated changes in the oxidative metabolism in onion roots. The cytotoxic effect of Pb on cell division was assessed in the root meristems of Allium cepa (onion). The mitotic index (MI) was calculated and chromosomal abnormalities were sought. Pb-treatment induced a dose-dependent decrease in MI in the onion root tips and caused mitotic abnormalities such as distorted metaphase, fragments, sticky chromosomes, laggards, vagrant chromosomes and bridges. Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis was also performed to evaluate Pb induced genotoxicity. It was accompanied by altered oxidative metabolism in the onion root tips suggesting the interference of Pb with the redox homeostasis during cell division. There was a higher accumulation of malondialdehyde, conjugated dienes and hydrogen peroxide, and a significant increase in the activities of superoxide dismutases, ascorbate peroxidases, guaiacol peroxidases and glutathione reductases in Pb-treated onion roots, whereas catalases activity exhibited a decreasing pattern upon Pb exposure. The study concludes that Pb-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in the onion roots is mediated through ROS and is also tightly linked to the cell cycle. The exposure to higher concentrations arrested cell cycle leading to cell death, whereas different repair responses are generated at lower concentrations, thereby allowing the cell to complete the cell cycle. PMID:25023386

  14. Nuclear Chk1 prevents premature mitotic entry.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Makoto; Goto, Hidemasa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Kawakami, Yoshitaka; Nakanishi, Makoto; Kiyono, Tohru; Goshima, Naoki; Inagaki, Masaki

    2011-07-01

    Chk1 inhibits the premature activation of the cyclin-B1-Cdk1. However, it remains controversial whether Chk1 inhibits Cdk1 in the centrosome or in the nucleus before the G2-M transition. In this study, we examined the specificity of the mouse monoclonal anti-Chk1 antibody DCS-310, with which the centrosome was stained. Conditional Chk1 knockout in mouse embryonic fibroblasts reduced nuclear but not centrosomal staining with DCS-310. In Chk1(+/myc) human colon adenocarcinoma (DLD-1) cells, Chk1 was detected in the nucleus but not in the centrosome using an anti-Myc antibody. Through the combination of protein array and RNAi technologies, we identified Ccdc-151 as a protein that crossreacted with DCS-310 on the centrosome. Mitotic entry was delayed by expression of the Chk1 mutant that localized in the nucleus, although forced immobilization of Chk1 to the centrosome had little impact on the timing of mitotic entry. These results suggest that nuclear but not centrosomal Chk1 contributes to correct timing of mitotic entry. PMID:21628425

  15. Mitotic spindle studied using picosecond laser scissors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, N. M.; Botvinick, E. L.; Shi, Linda; Berns, M. B.; Wu, George

    2006-08-01

    In previous studies we have shown that the second harmonic 532 nm, from a picosecond frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, can cleanly and selectively disrupt spindle fiber microtubules in live cells (Botvinick et al 2004, Biophys. J. 87:4303-4212). In the present study we have ablated different locations and amounts of the metaphase mitotic spindle, and followed the cells in order to observe the fate of the irradiated spindle and the ability of the cell to continue through mitosis. Cells of the rat kangaroo line (PTK2) were stably transfected by ECFP-tubulin and, using fluorescent microscopy and the automated RoboLase microscope, (Botvinick and Berns, 2005, Micros. Res. Tech. 68:65-74) brightly fluorescent individual cells in metaphase were irradiated with 0.2447 nJ/micropulse corresponding to an irradiance of 1.4496*10^7 J/(ps*cm^2) . Upon irradiation the exposed part of the mitotic spindle immediately lost fluorescence and the following events were observed in the cells over time: (1) immediate contraction of the spindle pole towards the cut, (2) recovery of connection between pole and cut microtubule, (3) completion of mitosis. This system should be very useful in studying internal cellular dynamics of the mitotic spindle.

  16. Chemically diverse microtubule stabilizing agents initiate distinct mitotic defects and dysregulated expression of key mitotic kinases.

    PubMed

    Rohena, Cristina C; Peng, Jiangnan; Johnson, Tyler A; Crews, Phillip; Mooberry, Susan L

    2013-04-15

    Microtubule stabilizers are some of the most successful drugs used in the treatment of adult solid tumors and yet the molecular events responsible for their antimitotic actions are not well defined. The mitotic events initiated by three structurally and biologically diverse microtubule stabilizers; taccalonolide AJ, laulimalide/fijianolide B and paclitaxel were studied. These microtubule stabilizers cause the formation of aberrant, but structurally distinct mitotic spindles leading to the hypothesis that they differentially affect mitotic signaling. Each microtubule stabilizer initiated different patterns of expression of key mitotic signaling proteins. Taccalonolide AJ causes centrosome separation and disjunction failure to a much greater extent than paclitaxel or laulimalide, which is consistent with the distinct defects in expression and activation of Plk1 and Eg5 caused by each stabilizer. Localization studies revealed that TPX2 and Aurora A are associated with each spindle aster formed by each stabilizer. This suggests a common mechanism of aster formation. However, taccalonolide AJ also causes pericentrin accumulation on every spindle aster. The presence of pericentrin at every spindle aster initiated by taccalonolide AJ might facilitate the maintenance and stability of the highly focused asters formed by this stabilizer. Laulimalide and paclitaxel cause completely different patterns of expression and activation of these proteins, as well as phenotypically different spindle phenotypes. Delineating how diverse microtubule stabilizers affect mitotic signaling pathways could identify key proteins involved in modulating sensitivity and resistance to the antimitotic actions of these compounds. PMID:23399639

  17. Figuring Out Fat and Calories

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Figuring Out Fat and Calories KidsHealth > For Teens > Figuring Out Fat ... the truth on fat and calories? What Are Fat and Calories? Fats, or lipids , are nutrients in ...

  18. Lunar Regolith Figures of Merit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Scjrader. Cjrostoam; Jpe (zer. Jams); Fourroux, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the lunar regolith figures of merit. The contents include: 1) A quick review of Figures-of-Merit (FoM); 2) Software Implementation of FoM Algorithms; and 3) Demonstration of the Software.

  19. Making better scientific figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Ed; McNeall, Doug

    2016-04-01

    In the words of the UK government chief scientific adviser "Science is not finished until it's communicated" (Walport 2013). The tools to produce good visual communication have never been so easily accessible to scientists as at the present. Correspondingly, it has never been easier to produce and disseminate poor graphics. In this presentation, we highlight some good practice and offer some practical advice in preparing scientific figures for presentation to peers or to the public. We identify common mistakes in visualisation, including some made by the authors, and offer some good reasons not to trust defaults in graphics software. In particular, we discuss the use of colour scales and share our experiences in running a social media campaign (http://tiny.cc/endrainbow) to replace the "rainbow" (also "jet", or "spectral") colour scale as the default in (climate) scientific visualisation.

  20. Implications of mitotic and meiotic irregularities in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Lima, D C; Braz, G T; Dos Reis, G B; Techio, V H; Davide, L C; de F B Abreu, A

    2016-01-01

    The common bean has great social and economic importance in Brazil and is the subject of a high number of publications, especially in the fields of genetics and breeding. Breeding programs aim to increase grain yield; however, mitosis and meiosis represent under explored research areas that have a direct impact on grain yield. Therefore, the study of cell division could be another tool available to bean geneticists and breeders. The aim of this study was to investigate irregularities occurring during the cell cycle and meiosis in common bean. The common bean cultivar used was BRSMG Talismã, which owing to its high yield and grain quality is recommended for cultivation in Brazil. We classified the interphase nuclei, estimated the mitotic and meiotic index, grain pollen viability, and percentage of abnormalities in both processes. The mitotic index was 4.1%, the interphase nucleus was non-reticulated, and 19% of dividing somatic cells showed abnormal behavior. Meiosis also presented irregularities resulting in a meiotic index of 44.6%. Viability of pollen grains was 94.3%. These results indicate that the common bean cultivar BRSMG Talismã possesses repair mechanisms that compensate for changes by producing a large number of pollen grains. Another important strategy adopted by bean plants to ensure stability is the elimination of abnormal cells by apoptosis. As the common bean cultivar BRSMG Talismã is recommended for cultivation because of its good agronomic performance, it can be concluded that mitotic and meiotic irregularities have no negative influence on its grain quality and yield. PMID:27323072

  1. Mitotically active microglandular hyperplasia of the cervix: a case series with implications for the differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Abi-Raad, Rita; Alomari, Ahmed; Hui, Pei; Buza, Natalia

    2014-09-01

    Microglandular hyperplasia (MGH) is a benign proliferation of endocervical glands with relatively uniform columnar or cuboidal nuclei, and rare to absent mitoses. Endometrial adenocarcinomas with mucinous differentiation or a microglandular pattern can closely mimic MGH, often resulting in a diagnostic dilemma in small biopsy specimens. Rare unusual morphologic features-mild to moderate nuclear atypia, solid or reticular growth pattern, hobnail and signet ring cells-have been previously reported in MGH. We present 9 cases of unusual, mitotically active-between 5 and 11 mitotic figures per 10 HPF-MGH, all of which presented as endocervical polyps and had morphologic features otherwise typical of MGH. The patients' age ranged between 35 and 56 yr, 2 patients were postmenopausal. High-risk human papillomavirus status was available in 7 patients, all of which were negative. The Ki-67 proliferation index ranged between 1% and 15%, and all cases were negative for p16, carcinoembryonic antigen, and vimentin immunostains. The clinical follow-up ranged from 3 to 76.2 mo, with a median of 40.7 mo, all patients were doing well without evidence of endocervical or endometrial malignancy. In summary, this case series documents the presence of rare cases of MGH demonstrating significant mitotic activity (up to 11/10 HPF) without a negative impact on the clinical prognosis. Mitotic activity alone should be interpreted with caution in small biopsy specimens with microglandular growth pattern. Immunohistochemical stains, especially p16, carcinoembryonic antigen, and vimentin, may be helpful-in addition to the patient's clinical history and human papillomavirus status to rule out endocervical or endometrial malignancy. PMID:25083971

  2. Novel insights into mitotic chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    Piskadlo, Ewa; Oliveira, Raquel A.

    2016-01-01

    The fidelity of mitosis is essential for life, and successful completion of this process relies on drastic changes in chromosome organization at the onset of nuclear division. The mechanisms that govern chromosome compaction at every cell division cycle are still far from full comprehension, yet recent studies provide novel insights into this problem, challenging classical views on mitotic chromosome assembly. Here, we briefly introduce various models for chromosome assembly and known factors involved in the condensation process (e.g. condensin complexes and topoisomerase II). We will then focus on a few selected studies that have recently brought novel insights into the mysterious way chromosomes are condensed during nuclear division. PMID:27508072

  3. Centromeric barrier disruption leads to mitotic defects in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Gaither, Terilyn L; Merrett, Stephanie L; Pun, Matthew J; Scott, Kristin C

    2014-04-01

    Centromeres are cis-acting chromosomal domains that direct kinetochore formation, enabling faithful chromosome segregation and preserving genome stability. The centromeres of most eukaryotic organisms are structurally complex, composed of nonoverlapping, structurally and functionally distinct chromatin subdomains, including the specialized core chromatin that underlies the kinetochore and pericentromeric heterochromatin. The genomic and epigenetic features that specify and preserve the adjacent chromatin subdomains critical to centromere identity are currently unknown. Here we demonstrate that chromatin barriers regulate this process in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Reduced fitness and mitotic chromosome segregation defects occur in strains that carry exogenous DNA inserted at centromere 1 chromatin barriers. Abnormal phenotypes are accompanied by changes in the structural integrity of both the centromeric core chromatin domain, containing the conserved CENP-A(Cnp1) protein, and the flanking pericentric heterochromatin domain. Barrier mutant cells can revert to wild-type growth and centromere structure at a high frequency after the spontaneous excision of integrated exogenous DNA. Our results reveal a previously undemonstrated role for chromatin barriers in chromosome segregation and in the prevention of genome instability. PMID:24531725

  4. Nercc1, a mammalian NIMA-family kinase, binds the Ran GTPase and regulates mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Roig, Joan; Mikhailov, Alexei; Belham, Christopher; Avruch, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    The protein kinase NIMA is an indispensable pleiotropic regulator of mitotic progression in Aspergillus. Although several mammalian NIMA-like kinases (Neks) are known, none appears to have the broad importance for mitotic regulation attributed to NIMA. Nercc1 is a new NIMA-like kinase that regulates chromosome alignment and segregation in mitosis. Its NIMA-like catalytic domain is followed by a noncatalytic tail containing seven repeats homologous to those of the Ran GEF, RCC1, a Ser/Thr/Pro-rich segment, and a coiled-coil domain. Nercc1 binds to another NIMA-like kinase, Nek6, and also binds specifically to the Ran GTPase through both its catalytic and its RCC1-like domains, preferring RanGDP in vivo. Nercc1 exists as a homooligomer and can autoactivate in vitro by autophosphorylation. Nercc1 is a cytoplasmic protein that is activated during mitosis and is avidly phosphorylated by active p34Cdc2. Microinjection of anti-Nercc1 antibodies in prophase results in spindle abnormalities and/or chromosomal misalignment. In Ptk2 cells the outcome is prometaphase arrest or aberrant chromosome segregation and aneuploidy, whereas in CFPAC-1 cells prolonged arrest in prometaphase is the usual response. Nercc1 and its partner Nek6 represent a new signaling pathway that regulates mitotic progression. PMID:12101123

  5. Preventing farnesylation of the dynein adaptor Spindly contributes to the mitotic defects caused by farnesyltransferase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Andrew J.; Reis, Rita M.; Niessen, Sherry; Pereira, Cláudia; Andres, Douglas A.; Spielmann, H. Peter; Cleveland, Don W.; Desai, Arshad; Gassmann, Reto

    2015-01-01

    The clinical interest in farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) makes it important to understand how these compounds affect cellular processes involving farnesylated proteins. Mitotic abnormalities observed after treatment with FTIs have so far been attributed to defects in the farnesylation of the outer kinetochore proteins CENP-E and CENP-F, which are involved in chromosome congression and spindle assembly checkpoint signaling. Here we identify the cytoplasmic dynein adaptor Spindly as an additional component of the outer kinetochore that is modified by farnesyltransferase (FTase). We show that farnesylation of Spindly is essential for its localization, and thus for the proper localization of dynein and its cofactor dynactin, to prometaphase kinetochores and that Spindly kinetochore recruitment is more severely affected by FTase inhibition than kinetochore recruitment of CENP-E and CENP-F. Molecular replacement experiments show that both Spindly and CENP-E farnesylation are required for efficient chromosome congression. The identification of Spindly as a new mitotic substrate of FTase provides insight into the causes of the mitotic phenotypes observed with FTase inhibitors. PMID:25808490

  6. Disruption of IFT Complex A Causes Cystic Kidneys without Mitotic Spindle Misorientation

    PubMed Central

    Jonassen, Julie A.; SanAgustin, Jovenal; Baker, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) complexes A and B build and maintain primary cilia. In the mouse, kidney-specific or hypomorphic mutant alleles of IFT complex B genes cause polycystic kidneys, but the influence of IFT complex A proteins on renal development is not well understood. In the present study, we found that HoxB7-Cre–driven deletion of the complex A gene Ift140 from collecting ducts disrupted, but did not completely prevent, cilia assembly. Mutant kidneys developed collecting duct cysts by postnatal day 5, with rapid cystic expansion and renal dysfunction by day 15 and little remaining parenchymal tissue by day 20. In contrast to many models of polycystic kidney disease, precystic Ift140-deleted collecting ducts showed normal centrosomal positioning and no misorientation of the mitotic spindle axis, suggesting that disruption of oriented cell division is not a prerequisite to cyst formation in these kidneys. Precystic collecting ducts had an increased mitotic index, suggesting that cell proliferation may drive cyst expansion even with normal orientation of the mitotic spindle. In addition, we observed significant increases in expression of canonical Wnt pathway genes and mediators of Hedgehog and tissue fibrosis in highly cystic, but not precystic, kidneys. Taken together, these studies indicate that loss of Ift140 causes pronounced renal cystic disease and suggest that abnormalities in several different pathways may influence cyst progression. PMID:22282595

  7. Post-slippage multinucleation renders cytotoxic variation in anti-mitotic drugs that target the microtubules or mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanting; Zhou, Yuan; Shi, Jue

    2014-01-01

    One common cancer chemotherapeutic strategy is to perturb cell division with anti-mitotic drugs. Paclitaxel, the classic microtubule-targeting anti-mitotic drug, so far still outperforms the newer, more spindle-specific anti-mitotics in the clinic, but the underlying cellular mechanism is poorly understood. In this study we identified post-slippage multinucleation, which triggered extensive DNA damage and apoptosis after drug-induced mitotic slippage, contributes to the extra cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in comparison to the spindle-targeting drug, Kinesin-5 inhibitor. Based on quantitative single-cell microscopy assays, we showed that attenuation of the degree of post-slippage multinucleation significantly reduced DNA damage and apoptosis in response to paclitaxel, and that post-slippage apoptosis was likely mediated by the p53-dependent DNA damage response pathway. Paclitaxel appeared to act as a double-edge sword, capable of killing proliferating cancer cells both during mitotic arrest and after mitotic slippage by inducing DNA damage. Our results thus suggest that to predict drug response to paclitaxel and anti-mitotics in general, 2 distinct sets of bio-markers, which regulate mitotic and post-slippage cytotoxicity, respectively, may need to be considered. Our findings provide important new insight not only for elucidating the cytotoxic mechanisms of paclitaxel, but also for understanding the variable efficacy of different anti-mitotic chemotherapeutics. PMID:24694730

  8. Induction of mitotic aneuploidy in lower eukaryotes

    SciTech Connect

    Kappas, A.

    1993-12-31

    Genetic tests for induction of mitotic aneuploidy in lower eukarotes used mainly the fungal systems of Aspergillus nidulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There are several differences between the two systems such as the greater tolerance for aneuploidy and the fertility of triploids in S. cerevisiae, the stability of diploids and the selective advantage of haploids over diploids in Aspergillus and the mycelial growth of Aspergillus. On the other hand several similarities also exist between the two systems such as the general instability and varying growth rate of disomics and the random loss of extra chromosomes which produces more competitive types or the most frequent recovery of certain specific aneuploids. In using lower eukaryotes as test systems for the identification of aneugens several points should be considered which concern the relevance of such systems to higher organisms, the ability to identify primary aneuploidy and distinguish this from events, such as chromosomal breaks, which lead to secondary aneuploidy and the ability to obtain repeatable results. Within the framework of an EEC comparative study for evaluating assays for aneuploidy, a number of chemicals were assayed in A. nidulans for mitotic instability due to malsegregation of chromosomes at cell division.

  9. Random mitotic activities across human embryonic stem cell colonies.

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Q.; Duggan, R.; Dasa, S.; Li, F.; Chen, L.

    2010-08-01

    A systemic and quantitative study was performed to examine whether different levels of mitotic activities, assessed by the percentage of S-phase cells at any given time point, existed at different physical regions of human embryonic stem (hES) cell colonies at 2, 4, 6 days after cell passaging. Mitotically active cells were identified by the positive incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) within their newly synthesized DNA. Our data indicated that mitotically active cells were often distributed as clusters randomly across the colonies within the examined growth period, presumably resulting from local deposition of newly divided cells. This latter notion was further demonstrated by the confined growth of enhanced green florescence protein (EGFP) expressing cells amongst non-GFP expressing cells. Furthermore, the overall percentage of mitotically active cells remained constantly at about 50% throughout the 6-day culture period, indicating mitotic activities of hES cell cultures were time-independent under current growth conditions.

  10. Identification of a mitotic death signature in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sakurikar, Nandini; Eichhorn, Joshua M; Alford, Sarah E; Chambers, Timothy C

    2014-02-28

    This study examined the molecular mechanism of action of anti-mitotic drugs. The hypothesis was tested that death in mitosis occurs through sustained mitotic arrest with robust Cdk1 signaling causing complete phosphorylation of Mcl-1 and Bcl-xL, and conversely, that mitotic slippage is associated with incomplete phosphorylation of Mcl-1/Bcl-xL. The results, obtained from studying six different cancer cell lines, strongly support the hypothesis and identify for the first time a unique molecular signature for mitotic death. The findings represent an important advance in understanding anti-mitotic drug action and provide insight into cancer cell susceptibility to such drugs which has important clinical implications. PMID:24099917

  11. Forced mitotic entry of S-phase cells as a therapeutic strategy induced by inhibition of WEE1.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Marieke; Sharpe, Rachel; Garcia-Murillas, Isaac; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Hurd, Melissa S; Shumway, Stuart D; Toniatti, Carlo; Ashworth, Alan; Turner, Nicholas C

    2012-06-01

    Inhibition of the protein kinase WEE1 synergizes with chemotherapy in preclinical models and WEE1 inhibitors are being explored as potential cancer therapies. Here, we investigate the mechanism that underlies this synergy. We show that WEE1 inhibition forces S-phase-arrested cells directly into mitosis without completing DNA synthesis, resulting in highly abnormal mitoses characterized by dispersed chromosomes and disorganized bipolar spindles, ultimately resulting in mitotic exit with gross micronuclei formation and apoptosis. This mechanism of cell death is shared by CHK1 inhibitors, and combined WEE1 and CHK1 inhibition forces mitotic entry from S-phase in the absence of chemotherapy. We show that p53/p21 inactivation combined with high expression of mitotic cyclins and EZH2 predispose to mitotic entry during S-phase with cells reliant on WEE1 to prevent premature cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)1 activation. These features are characteristic of aggressive breast, and other, cancers for which WEE1 inhibitor combinations represent a promising targeted therapy. PMID:22628408

  12. Figure Analysis: An Implementation Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiles, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    Figure analysis is a novel active learning teaching technique that reinforces visual literacy. Small groups of students discuss diagrams in class in order to learn content. The instructor then gives a brief introduction and later summarizes the content of the figure. This teaching technique can be used in place of lecture as a mechanism to deliver…

  13. Three-Dimensional Lissajous Figures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Mura, John M.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a mechanically driven device for generating three-dimensional harmonic space figures with different frequencies and phase angles on the X, Y, and Z axes. Discussed are apparatus, viewing stereo pairs, equations of motion, and using space figures in classroom. (YP)

  14. Force and Length in the Mitotic Spindle

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Sophie; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    The mitotic spindle assembles to a steady-state length at metaphase through the integrated action of molecular mechanisms that generate and respond to mechanical forces. While molecular mechanisms that produce force have been described, our understanding of how they integrate with each other, and with the assembly-disassembly mechanisms that regulate length, is poor. We review current understanding of the basic architecture and dynamics of the metaphase spindle, and some of the elementary force producing mechanisms. We then discuss models for force integration, and spindle length determination. We also emphasize key missing data that notably includes absolute values of forces, and how they vary as a function of position, within the spindle. PMID:19906577

  15. Identification of a novel mitotic phosphorylation motif associated with protein localization to the mitotic apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Luo, Quanzhou; Kelly, Ryan T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Brinkley, William R.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2007-11-16

    The chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) is a critical regulator of chromosome, cytoskeleton and membrane dynamics during mitosis. Here, we identified phosphopeptides and phosphoprotein complexes recognized by a phosphorylation specific antibody that labels the CPC using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. A mitotic phosphorylation motif (PX{G/T/S}{L/M}[pS]P or WGL[pS]P) was identified in 11 proteins including Fzr/Cdh1 and RIC-8, two proteins with potential links to the CPC. Phosphoprotein complexes contained known CPC components INCENP, Aurora-B and TD-60, as well as SMAD2, 14-3-3 proteins, PP2A, and Cdk1, a likely kinase for this motif. Protein sequence analysis identified phosphorylation motifs in additional proteins including SMAD2, Plk3 and INCENP. Mitotic SMAD2 and Plk3 phosphorylation was confirmed using phosphorylation specific antibodies, and in the case of Plk3, phosphorylation correlates with its localization to the mitotic apparatus. A mutagenesis approach was used to show INCENP phosphorylation is required for midbody localization. These results provide evidence for a shared phosphorylation event that regulates localization of critical proteins during mitosis.

  16. Ki-67 proliferation index but not mitotic thresholds integrates the molecular prognostic stratification of lower grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Duregon, Eleonora; Bertero, Luca; Pittaro, Alessandra; Soffietti, Riccardo; Rudà, Roberta; Trevisan, Morena; Papotti, Mauro; Ventura, Laura; Senetta, Rebecca; Cassoni, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Despite several molecular signatures for “lower grade diffuse gliomas” (LGG) have been identified, WHO grade still remains a cornerstone of treatment guidelines. Mitotic count bears a crucial role in its definition, although limited by the poor reproducibility of standard Hematoxylin & Eosin (H&E) evaluation. Phospho-histone-H3 (PHH3) and Ki-67 have been proposed as alternative assays of cellular proliferation. Therefore in the present series of 141 LGG, the molecular characterization (namely IDH status, 1p/19q co-deletion and MGMT promoter methylation) was integrated with the tumor “proliferative trait” (conventional H&E or PHH3-guided mitotic count and Ki-67 index) in term of prognosis definition. Exclusively high PHH3 and Ki-67 values were predictor of poor prognosis (log rank test, P = 0.0281 for PHH3 and P = 0.032 for Ki-67), unlike standard mitotic count. Based on Cox proportional hazard regression analyses, among all clinical (age), pathological (PHH3 and Ki-67) and molecular variables (IDH, 1p/19q codeletion and MGMT methylation) with a prognostic relevance at univariate survival analysis, only IDH expression (P = 0.001) and Ki-67 proliferation index (P = 0.027) proved to be independent prognostic factors. In addition, stratifying by IDH expression status, high Ki-67 retained its prognostic relevance uniquely in the IDH negative patient (P = 0.029) doubling their risk of death (hazard ratio = 2.27). Overall, PHH3 immunostaining is the sole reliable method with a prognostic value to highlight mitotic figures in LGG. Ki-67 proliferation index exceeds PHH3 mitotic count as a predictor of patient's prognosis, and should be integrated with molecular markers in a comprehensive grading system for LGG. PMID:27049832

  17. Ki-67 proliferation index but not mitotic thresholds integrates the molecular prognostic stratification of lower grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Duregon, Eleonora; Bertero, Luca; Pittaro, Alessandra; Soffietti, Riccardo; Rudà, Roberta; Trevisan, Morena; Papotti, Mauro; Ventura, Laura; Senetta, Rebecca; Cassoni, Paola

    2016-04-19

    Despite several molecular signatures for "lower grade diffuse gliomas" (LGG) have been identified, WHO grade still remains a cornerstone of treatment guidelines. Mitotic count bears a crucial role in its definition, although limited by the poor reproducibility of standard Hematoxylin & Eosin (H&E) evaluation. Phospho-histone-H3 (PHH3) and Ki-67 have been proposed as alternative assays of cellular proliferation. Therefore in the present series of 141 LGG, the molecular characterization (namely IDH status, 1p/19q co-deletion and MGMT promoter methylation) was integrated with the tumor "proliferative trait" (conventional H&E or PHH3-guided mitotic count and Ki-67 index) in term of prognosis definition. Exclusively high PHH3 and Ki-67 values were predictor of poor prognosis (log rank test, P = 0.0281 for PHH3 and P = 0.032 for Ki-67), unlike standard mitotic count. Based on Cox proportional hazard regression analyses, among all clinical (age), pathological (PHH3 and Ki-67) and molecular variables (IDH, 1p/19q codeletion and MGMT methylation) with a prognostic relevance at univariate survival analysis, only IDH expression (P = 0.001) and Ki-67 proliferation index (P = 0.027) proved to be independent prognostic factors. In addition, stratifying by IDH expression status, high Ki-67 retained its prognostic relevance uniquely in the IDH negative patient (P = 0.029) doubling their risk of death (hazard ratio = 2.27). Overall, PHH3 immunostaining is the sole reliable method with a prognostic value to highlight mitotic figures in LGG. Ki-67 proliferation index exceeds PHH3 mitotic count as a predictor of patient's prognosis, and should be integrated with molecular markers in a comprehensive grading system for LGG. PMID:27049832

  18. Depletion of pre-mRNA splicing factor Cdc5L inhibits mitotic progression and triggers mitotic catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Mu, R; Wang, Y-B; Wu, M; Yang, Y; Song, W; Li, T; Zhang, W-N; Tan, B; Li, A-L; Wang, N; Xia, Q; Gong, W-L; Wang, C-G; Zhou, T; Guo, N; Sang, Z-H; Li, H-Y

    2014-01-01

    Disturbing mitotic progression via targeted anti-mitotic therapy is an attractive strategy for cancer treatment. Therefore, the exploration and elucidation of molecular targets and pathways in mitosis are critical for the development of anti-mitotic drugs. Here, we show that cell division cycle 5-like (Cdc5L), a pre-mRNA splicing factor, is a regulator of mitotic progression. Depletion of Cdc5L causes dramatic mitotic arrest, chromosome misalignments and sustained activation of spindle assembly checkpoint, eventually leading to mitotic catastrophe. Moreover, these defects result from severe impairment of kinetochore-microtubule attachment and serious DNA damage. Genome-wide gene expression analysis reveals that Cdc5L modulates the expression of a set of genes involved in the mitosis and the DNA damage response. We further found that the pre-mRNA splicing efficiency of these genes were impaired when Cdc5L was knocked down. Interestingly, Cdc5L is highly expressed in cervical tumors and osteosarcoma. Finally, we demonstrate that downregulation of Cdc5L decreases the cell viability of related tumor cells. These results suggest that Cdc5L is a key regulator of mitotic progression and highlight the potential of Cdc5L as a target for cancer therapy. PMID:24675469

  19. Depletion of pre-mRNA splicing factor Cdc5L inhibits mitotic progression and triggers mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Mu, R; Wang, Y-B; Wu, M; Yang, Y; Song, W; Li, T; Zhang, W-N; Tan, B; Li, A-L; Wang, N; Xia, Q; Gong, W-L; Wang, C-G; Zhou, T; Guo, N; Sang, Z-H; Li, H-Y

    2014-01-01

    Disturbing mitotic progression via targeted anti-mitotic therapy is an attractive strategy for cancer treatment. Therefore, the exploration and elucidation of molecular targets and pathways in mitosis are critical for the development of anti-mitotic drugs. Here, we show that cell division cycle 5-like (Cdc5L), a pre-mRNA splicing factor, is a regulator of mitotic progression. Depletion of Cdc5L causes dramatic mitotic arrest, chromosome misalignments and sustained activation of spindle assembly checkpoint, eventually leading to mitotic catastrophe. Moreover, these defects result from severe impairment of kinetochore-microtubule attachment and serious DNA damage. Genome-wide gene expression analysis reveals that Cdc5L modulates the expression of a set of genes involved in the mitosis and the DNA damage response. We further found that the pre-mRNA splicing efficiency of these genes were impaired when Cdc5L was knocked down. Interestingly, Cdc5L is highly expressed in cervical tumors and osteosarcoma. Finally, we demonstrate that downregulation of Cdc5L decreases the cell viability of related tumor cells. These results suggest that Cdc5L is a key regulator of mitotic progression and highlight the potential of Cdc5L as a target for cancer therapy. PMID:24675469

  20. Cancer Facts and Figures 2014

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facts & Figures 2014 This annual report provides the estimated numbers of new cancer cases and deaths in ... and treatment. In 2014, there will be an estimated 1,665,540 new cancer cases diagnosed and ...

  1. The Nuclear Matrix Protein Megator Regulates Stem Cell Asymmetric Division through the Mitotic Checkpoint Complex in Drosophila Testes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Singh, Shree Ram; Zeng, Xiankun; Zhao, Jiangsha; Hou, Steven X

    2015-12-01

    In adult Drosophila testis, asymmetric division of germline stem cells (GSCs) is specified by an oriented spindle and cortically localized adenomatous coli tumor suppressor homolog 2 (Apc2). However, the molecular mechanism underlying these events remains unclear. Here we identified Megator (Mtor), a nuclear matrix protein, which regulates GSC maintenance and asymmetric division through the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) complex. Loss of Mtor function results in Apc2 mis-localization, incorrect centrosome orientation, defective mitotic spindle formation, and abnormal chromosome segregation that lead to the eventual GSC loss. Expression of mitotic arrest-deficient-2 (Mad2) and monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) of the SAC complex effectively rescued the GSC loss phenotype associated with loss of Mtor function. Collectively our results define a new role of the nuclear matrix-SAC axis in regulating stem cell maintenance and asymmetric division. PMID:26714316

  2. The Nuclear Matrix Protein Megator Regulates Stem Cell Asymmetric Division through the Mitotic Checkpoint Complex in Drosophila Testes

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiankun; Zhao, Jiangsha; Hou, Steven X.

    2015-01-01

    In adult Drosophila testis, asymmetric division of germline stem cells (GSCs) is specified by an oriented spindle and cortically localized adenomatous coli tumor suppressor homolog 2 (Apc2). However, the molecular mechanism underlying these events remains unclear. Here we identified Megator (Mtor), a nuclear matrix protein, which regulates GSC maintenance and asymmetric division through the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) complex. Loss of Mtor function results in Apc2 mis-localization, incorrect centrosome orientation, defective mitotic spindle formation, and abnormal chromosome segregation that lead to the eventual GSC loss. Expression of mitotic arrest-deficient-2 (Mad2) and monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) of the SAC complex effectively rescued the GSC loss phenotype associated with loss of Mtor function. Collectively our results define a new role of the nuclear matrix-SAC axis in regulating stem cell maintenance and asymmetric division. PMID:26714316

  3. Micromechanical study of mitotic chromosome structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marko, John

    2011-03-01

    Our group has developed micromanipulation techniques for study of the highly compacted mitotic form of chromosome found in eukaryote cells during cell division. Each metaphase chromosome contains two duplicate centimeter-long DNA molecules, folded up by proteins into cylindrical structures several microns in length. Native chromosomes display linear and reversible stretching behavior over a wide range of extensions (up to 5x native length for amphibian chromosomes), described by a Young modulus of about 300 Pa. Studies using DNA-cutting and protein-cutting enzymes have revealed that metaphase chromosomes behave as a network of chromatin fibers held together by protein-based isolated crosslinks. Our results are not consistent with the more classical model of loops of chromatin attached to a protein-based structural organizer or ``scaffold". In short, our experiments indicate that metaphase chromosomes can be considered to be ``gels" of chromatin; the stretching modulus of a whole chromosome is consistent with stretching of the chromatin fibers contained within it. Experiments using topoisomerases suggest that topological constraints may play an appreciable role in confining chromatin in the metaphase chromosome. Finally, recent experiments on human chromosomes will be reviewed, including results of experiments where chromosome-folding proteins are specifically depleted using siRNA methods. Supported by NSF-MCB-1022117, DMR-0715099, PHY-0852130, DMR-0520513, NCI 1U54CA143869-01 (NU-PS-OC), and the American Heart Association.

  4. Mitotic Diversity in Homeostatic Human Interfollicular Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Nöske, Katharina; Stark, Hans-Jürgen; Nevaril, Leonard; Berning, Manuel; Langbein, Lutz; Goyal, Ashish; Diederichs, Sven; Boukamp, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of skin research, regulation of proliferation and homeostasis in human epidermis is still insufficiently understood. To address the role of mitoses in tissue regulation, we utilized human long-term skin equivalents and systematically assessed mitoses during early epidermal development and long-term epidermal regeneration. We now demonstrate four different orientations: (1) horizontal, i.e., parallel to the basement membrane (BM) and suggestive of symmetric divisions; (2) oblique with an angle of 45°–70°; or (3) perpendicular, suggestive of asymmetric division. In addition, we demonstrate a fourth substantial fraction of suprabasal mitoses, many of which are committed to differentiation (Keratin K10-positive). As verified also for normal human skin, this spatial mitotic organization is part of the regulatory program of human epidermal tissue homeostasis. As a potential marker for asymmetric division, we investigated for Numb and found that it was evenly spread in almost all undifferentiated keratinocytes, but indeed asymmetrically distributed in some mitoses and particularly frequent under differentiation-repressing low-calcium conditions. Numb deletion (stable knockdown by CRISPR/Cas9), however, did not affect proliferation, neither in a three-day follow up study by life cell imaging nor during a 14-day culture period, suggesting that Numb is not essential for the general control of keratinocyte division. PMID:26828486

  5. Paclitaxel targets FOXM1 to regulate KIF20A in mitotic catastrophe and breast cancer paclitaxel resistance.

    PubMed

    Khongkow, P; Gomes, A R; Gong, C; Man, E P S; Tsang, J W-H; Zhao, F; Monteiro, L J; Coombes, R C; Medema, R H; Khoo, U S; Lam, E W-F

    2016-02-25

    FOXM1 has been implicated in taxane resistance, but the molecular mechanism involved remains elusive. In here, we show that FOXM1 depletion can sensitize breast cancer cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts into entering paclitaxel-induced senescence, with the loss of clonogenic ability, and the induction of senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity and flat cell morphology. We also demonstrate that FOXM1 regulates the expression of the microtubulin-associated kinesin KIF20A at the transcriptional level directly through a Forkhead response element (FHRE) in its promoter. Similar to FOXM1, KIF20A expression is downregulated by paclitaxel in the sensitive MCF-7 breast cancer cells and deregulated in the paclitaxel-resistant MCF-7Tax(R) cells. KIF20A depletion also renders MCF-7 and MCF-7Tax(R) cells more sensitive to paclitaxel-induced cellular senescence. Crucially, resembling paclitaxel treatment, silencing of FOXM1 and KIF20A similarly promotes abnormal mitotic spindle morphology and chromosome alignment, which have been shown to induce mitotic catastrophe-dependent senescence. The physiological relevance of the regulation of KIF20A by FOXM1 is further highlighted by the strong and significant correlations between FOXM1 and KIF20A expression in breast cancer patient samples. Statistical analysis reveals that both FOXM1 and KIF20A protein and mRNA expression significantly associates with poor survival, consistent with a role of FOXM1 and KIF20A in paclitaxel action and resistance. Collectively, our findings suggest that paclitaxel targets the FOXM1-KIF20A axis to drive abnormal mitotic spindle formation and mitotic catastrophe and that deregulated FOXM1 and KIF20A expression may confer paclitaxel resistance. These findings provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of paclitaxel resistance and have implications for the development of predictive biomarkers and novel chemotherapeutic strategies for paclitaxel resistance. PMID:25961928

  6. Paclitaxel targets FOXM1 to regulate KIF20A in mitotic catastrophe and breast cancer paclitaxel resistance

    PubMed Central

    Khongkow, P; Gomes, A R; Gong, C; Man, E P S; Tsang, J W-H; Zhao, F; Monteiro, L J; Coombes, R C; Medema, R H; Khoo, U S; Lam, E W-F

    2016-01-01

    FOXM1 has been implicated in taxane resistance, but the molecular mechanism involved remains elusive. In here, we show that FOXM1 depletion can sensitize breast cancer cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts into entering paclitaxel-induced senescence, with the loss of clonogenic ability, and the induction of senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity and flat cell morphology. We also demonstrate that FOXM1 regulates the expression of the microtubulin-associated kinesin KIF20A at the transcriptional level directly through a Forkhead response element (FHRE) in its promoter. Similar to FOXM1, KIF20A expression is downregulated by paclitaxel in the sensitive MCF-7 breast cancer cells and deregulated in the paclitaxel-resistant MCF-7TaxR cells. KIF20A depletion also renders MCF-7 and MCF-7TaxR cells more sensitive to paclitaxel-induced cellular senescence. Crucially, resembling paclitaxel treatment, silencing of FOXM1 and KIF20A similarly promotes abnormal mitotic spindle morphology and chromosome alignment, which have been shown to induce mitotic catastrophe-dependent senescence. The physiological relevance of the regulation of KIF20A by FOXM1 is further highlighted by the strong and significant correlations between FOXM1 and KIF20A expression in breast cancer patient samples. Statistical analysis reveals that both FOXM1 and KIF20A protein and mRNA expression significantly associates with poor survival, consistent with a role of FOXM1 and KIF20A in paclitaxel action and resistance. Collectively, our findings suggest that paclitaxel targets the FOXM1-KIF20A axis to drive abnormal mitotic spindle formation and mitotic catastrophe and that deregulated FOXM1 and KIF20A expression may confer paclitaxel resistance. These findings provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of paclitaxel resistance and have implications for the development of predictive biomarkers and novel chemotherapeutic strategies for paclitaxel resistance. PMID:25961928

  7. Abnormal mitosis induced by wheat-rye 1R monosomic addition lines.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shu-Lan; Yang, Man-Yu; Ren, Zheng-Long; Yan, Ben-Ju; Tang, Zong-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Octoploid triticale were derived from common wheat (Triticum aestivum L. 'Mianyang11') × rye (Secale cereale L. 'Kustro'), and some progeny were obtained by the backcrossing of triticale with 'Mianyang11' followed by self-fertilization. In situ hybridization using rye genomic DNA and repetitive sequences pAs1 and pSc119.2 as probes was used to analyze the mitotic chromosomes of these progeny. Three wheat-rye 1R monosomic addition lines and a wheat line (12FT-1685) containing a 1R and a 1BL.1RS translocation chromosome were identified. Abnormal mitosis was observed in the two lines. During mitosis of a 1R monosomic addition line (3-8-20-1R-2), lagging chromosomes, micronuclei, chromosomal bridges, and the one pole segregation of 1R chromosome were observed. Abnormal mitotic behaviour of chromosomes was also observed in some of the self-progeny plants of lines 12FT-1685 and 3-8-20-1R-2. These progeny contained 1R chromosome or 1R chromosome arm. In addition, 4B chromosomes were absent from one of the progeny of 3-8-20-1R-2. This abnormal mitotic behaviour of chromosomes was not observed in two other 1R monosomic addition lines. These results indicate that a single 1R chromosome added to wheat might cause abnormal mitotic behaviour of both wheat and rye chromosomes and different genetic variations might occurr among the sibling 1R monosomic addition lines. PMID:24564212

  8. Micromechanical-biochemical studies of mitotic chromosome elasticity and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Michael Guy

    The structure of mitotic chromosomes was studied by combining micromechanical force measurements with microfluidic biochemical exposures. Our method is to use glass micropipettes attached to either end of a single chromosome to do mechanical experiments in the extracellular buffer. A third pipette can be used to locally 'spray' reactants so as to carry out dynamical mechanical-chemical experiments. The following elastic properties of mitotic chromosomes are found: Young's modulus, Y = 300 Pa; Poisson ratio, sigma = 0.1; Bending rigidity, B = 1 x 10 -22 J·m; Internal viscosity, eta' = 100 kg/m·sec; Volume fraction, ϕ = 0.7; Extensions of less than 3 times the relaxed length are linear and reversible; Extensions beyond 30 fold exhibit a force plateau at 15 nN and convert the chromosome to a disperse ghost-like state with little change in chromatin structure; Mitotic chromosomes are relatively isotropic; dsDNA cuts of at least every 3 kb cause the a mitotic chromosomes to fall apart; dsDNA cuts less frequently than every 50 kb do not affect mitotic chromosome structure. These results lead to the conclusion that mitotic chromosomes are a network crosslinked every 50 kb between which chromatin is fold by chromatin folding proteins, which are likely to be condensins.

  9. Sharing of mitotic pre-ribosomal particles between daughter cells.

    PubMed

    Sirri, Valentina; Jourdan, Nathalie; Hernandez-Verdun, Danièle; Roussel, Pascal

    2016-04-15

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental multistep process initiated by the synthesis of 90S pre-ribosomal particles in the nucleoli of higher eukaryotes. Even though synthesis of ribosomes stops during mitosis while nucleoli disappear, mitotic pre-ribosomal particles persist as observed in pre-nucleolar bodies (PNBs) during telophase. To further understand the relationship between the nucleolus and the PNBs, the presence and the fate of the mitotic pre-ribosomal particles during cell division were investigated. We demonstrate that the recently synthesized 45S precursor ribosomal RNAs (pre-rRNAs) as well as the 32S and 30S pre-rRNAs are maintained during mitosis and associated with the chromosome periphery together with pre-rRNA processing factors. Maturation of the mitotic pre-ribosomal particles, as assessed by the stability of the mitotic pre-rRNAs, is transiently arrested during mitosis by a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)1-cyclin-B-dependent mechanism and can be restored by CDK inhibitor treatments. At the M-G1 transition, the resumption of mitotic pre-rRNA processing in PNBs does not induce the disappearance of PNBs; this only occurs when functional nucleoli reform. Strikingly, during their maturation process, mitotic pre-rRNAs localize in reforming nucleoli. PMID:26929073

  10. Timeless links replication termination to mitotic kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wiedmer, Andreas; Hayden, James; Speicher, David; Gotter, Anthony L; Yen, Tim; Lieberman, Paul M

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that coordinate the termination of DNA replication with progression through mitosis are not completely understood. The human Timeless protein (Tim) associates with S phase replication checkpoint proteins Claspin and Tipin, and plays an important role in maintaining replication fork stability at physical barriers, like centromeres, telomeres and ribosomal DNA repeats, as well as at termination sites. We show here that human Tim can be isolated in a complex with mitotic entry kinases CDK1, Auroras A and B, and Polo-like kinase (Plk1). Plk1 bound Tim directly and colocalized with Tim at a subset of mitotic structures in M phase. Tim depletion caused multiple mitotic defects, including the loss of sister-chromatid cohesion, loss of mitotic spindle architecture, and a failure to exit mitosis. Tim depletion caused a delay in mitotic kinase activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as a reduction in global histone H3 S10 phosphorylation during G2/M phase. Tim was also required for the recruitment of Plk1 to centromeric DNA and formation of catenated DNA structures at human centromere alpha satellite repeats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tim coordinates mitotic kinase activation with termination of DNA replication. PMID:21573113

  11. Targeting the Mitotic Catastrophe Signaling Pathway in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mc Gee, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic catastrophe, as defined in 2012 by the International Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death, is a bona fide intrinsic oncosuppressive mechanism that senses mitotic failure and responds by driving a cell to an irreversible antiproliferative fate of death or senescence. Thus, failed mitotic catastrophe can promote the unrestrained growth of defective cells, thereby representing a major gateway to tumour development. Furthermore, the activation of mitotic catastrophe offers significant therapeutic advantage which has been exploited in the action of conventional and targeted anticancer agents. Yet, despite its importance in tumour prevention and treatment, the molecular mechanism of mitotic catastrophe is not well understood. A better understanding of the signals that determine cell fate following failed or defective mitosis will reveal new opportunities to selectively target and enhance the programme for therapeutic benefit and reveal biomarkers to predict patient response. This review is focused on the molecular mechanism of mitotic catastrophe induction and signalling and highlights current strategies to exploit the process in cancer therapy. PMID:26491220

  12. Inhibition of Bcl-xL sensitizes cells to mitotic blockers, but not mitotic drivers

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Ailsa; Sloss, Olivia; Topham, Caroline; Nelson, Louisa; Tighe, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Cell fate in response to an aberrant mitosis is governed by two competing networks: the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. The mechanistic interplay between these two networks is obscured by functional redundancy and the ability of cells to die either in mitosis or in the subsequent interphase. By coupling time-lapse microscopy with selective pharmacological agents, we systematically probe pro-survival Bcl-xL in response to various mitotic perturbations. Concentration matrices show that BH3-mimetic-mediated inhibition of Bcl-xL synergises with perturbations that induce an SAC-mediated mitotic block, including drugs that dampen microtubule dynamics, and inhibitors targeting kinesins and kinases required for spindle assembly. By contrast, Bcl-xL inhibition does not synergize with drugs which drive cells through an aberrant mitosis by overriding the SAC. This differential effect, which is explained by compensatory Mcl-1 function, provides opportunities for patient stratification and combination treatments in the context of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27512141

  13. Figure analysis: An implementation dialogue.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Amy M

    2016-07-01

    Figure analysis is a novel active learning teaching technique that reinforces visual literacy. Small groups of students discuss diagrams in class in order to learn content. The instructor then gives a brief introduction and later summarizes the content of the figure. This teaching technique can be used in place of lecture as a mechanism to deliver information to students. Here, a "how to" guide is presented in the form of an in-class dialogue, displaying the difficulties in visual interpretation that some students may experience while figure analysis is being implemented in an upper-level, cell biology course. Additionally, the dialogue serves as a guide for instructors who may implement the active learning technique as they consider how to respond to students' concerns in class. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):345-348, 2016. PMID:26892173

  14. Therapeutic potential of mitotic interaction between the nucleoporin Tpr and aurora kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Akiko; Hashizume, Chieko; Dowaki, Takayuki; Wong, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Spindle poles are defined by centrosomes; therefore, an abnormal number or defective structural organization of centrosomes can lead to loss of spindle bipolarity and genetic integrity. Previously, we showed that Tpr (translocated promoter region), a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), interacts with Mad1 and dynein to promote proper chromosome segregation during mitosis. Tpr also associates with p53 to induce autophagy. Here, we report that Tpr depletion induces mitotic catastrophe and enhances the rate of tetraploidy and polyploidy. Mechanistically, Tpr interacts, via its central domain, with Aurora A but not Aurora B kinase. In Tpr-depleted cells, the expression levels, centrosomal localization and phosphorylation of Aurora A were all reduced. Surprisingly, an Aurora A inhibitor, Alisertib (MLN8237), also disrupted centrosomal localization of Tpr and induced mitotic catastrophe and cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Strikingly, over-expression of Aurora A disrupted Tpr centrosomal localization only in cells with supernumerary centrosomes but not in bipolar cells. Our results highlight the mutual regulation between Tpr and Aurora A and further confirm the importance of nucleoporin function in spindle pole organization, bipolar spindle assembly, and mitosis; functions that are beyond the conventional nucleocytoplasmic transport and NPC structural roles of nucleoporins. Furthermore, the central coiled-coil domain of Tpr binds to and sequesters extra Aurora A to safeguard bipolarity. This Tpr domain merits further investigation for its ability to inhibit Aurora kinase and as a potential therapeutic agent in cancer treatment. PMID:25789545

  15. Mcl-1 dynamics influence mitotic slippage and death in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Sloss, Olivia; Topham, Caroline; Diez, Maria; Taylor, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-binding drugs such as taxol are frontline treatments for a variety of cancers but exactly how they yield patient benefit is unclear. In cell culture, inhibiting microtubule dynamics prevents spindle assembly, leading to mitotic arrest followed by either apoptosis in mitosis or slippage, whereby a cell returns to interphase without dividing. Myeloid cell leukaemia-1 (Mcl-1), a pro-survival member of the Bcl-2 family central to the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, is degraded during a prolonged mitotic arrest and may therefore act as a mitotic death timer. Consistently, we show that blocking proteasome-mediated degradation inhibits taxol-induced mitotic apoptosis in a Mcl-1-dependent manner. However, this degradation does not require the activity of either APC/C-Cdc20, FBW7 or MULE, three separate E3 ubiquitin ligases implicated in targeting Mcl-1 for degradation. This therefore challenges the notion that Mcl-1 undergoes regulated degradation during mitosis. We also show that Mcl-1 is continuously synthesized during mitosis and that blocking protein synthesis accelerates taxol induced death-in-mitosis. Modulating Mcl-1 levels also influences slippage; overexpressing Mcl-1 extends the time from mitotic entry to mitotic exit in the presence of taxol, while inhibiting Mcl-1 accelerates it. We suggest that Mcl-1 competes with Cyclin B1 for binding to components of the proteolysis machinery, thereby slowing down the slow degradation of Cyclin B1 responsible for slippage. Thus, modulating Mcl-1 dynamics influences both death-in-mitosis and slippage. However, because mitotic degradation of Mcl-1 appears not to be under the control of an E3 ligase, we suggest that the notion of network crosstalk is used with caution. PMID:26769847

  16. PKCι depletion initiates mitotic slippage-induced senescence in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Restall, Ian J; Parolin, Doris A E; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Hanson, Jennifer E L; Simard, Manon A; Fitzpatrick, Megan E; Kumar, Ritesh; Lavictoire, Sylvie J; Lorimer, Ian A J

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a tumor suppressor mechanism where cells enter a permanent growth arrest following cellular stress. Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is induced in non-malignant cells following the expression of an oncogene or inactivation of a tumor suppressor. Previously, we have shown that protein kinase C iota (PKCι) depletion induces cellular senescence in glioblastoma cells in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Here we demonstrate that senescent glioblastoma cells exhibit an aberrant centrosome morphology. This was observed in basal levels of senescence, in p21-induced senescence, and in PKCι depletion-induced senescence. In addition, senescent glioblastoma cells are polyploid, Ki-67 negative and arrest at the G1/S checkpoint, as determined by expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins. These markers are all consistent with cells that have undergone mitotic slippage. Failure of the spindle assembly checkpoint to function properly can lead to mitotic slippage, resulting in the premature exit of mitotic cells into the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Although in G1, these cells have the replicated DNA and centrosomal phenotype of a cell that has entered mitosis and failed to divide. Overall, we demonstrate that PKCι depletion initiates mitotic slippage-induced senescence in glioblastoma cells. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of markers of mitotic slippage directly in senescent cells by co-staining for senescence-associated β-galactosidase and immunofluorescence markers in the same cell population. We suggest that markers of mitotic slippage be assessed in future studies of senescence to determine the extent of mitotic slippage in the induction of cellular senescence. PMID:26208522

  17. Choreography Styles in Figure Skating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moormann, Peter Paul

    2006-01-01

    Fifty-eight figure skating trainers from fifteen different countries acted as volunteers in this study on choreography styles. The styles were based on reports of artistic-creative strategies in composing music, drawing, writing poems or novels, and in making dances. The prevalence of the Mozartian (at the onset the choreographer already has a…

  18. A Figural Education with Lyotard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Derek R.

    2015-01-01

    While there was a flurry of articles throughout the 1990s in philosophy of education on Lyotard, there are still several key concepts in his "oeuvre" that have import for but remain largely underdeveloped or absent in the field. One of the most interesting of these absent concepts is Lyotard's notion of the figural. In this paper, I…

  19. Figuring out a scientific understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Clive

    1993-12-01

    This article attempts to place analogy and metaphor within the wider context of all figurative language, and to trace the relationship between that kind of expression and the supposedly literal and direct accounts of nature that scientists have built up.I explore the functions of figures of speech in the development of new scientific ideas, and trace how they fade or die as each area of scientific knowledge matures. What we then take to be the literal words of scientific description are in effect the remnants of old figures of speech that have grown so familiar that their earlier metaphorical quality is easily overlooked. The conventional separation of figurative and literal cannot be sustained, and a new understanding of their relationship is needed.The practical implications of this analysis are to do with how we can reactivate the dormant metaphors in ordinary scientific language, so that learners may hear again the human voice of scientists who developed the ways of talking we now take for granted. To reactivate the system of thought behind any established way of talking, we must be able to get the learners to understand that language works as a medium of interpretation and persuasion, and not simply a system of descriptive labeling. These two views of language are compared and contrasted.

  20. Storytelling Figures: A Pueblo Tradition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraus, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    In a collaborative unit on pueblo storytelling figures involving art, music, language arts, and physical education, a teacher describes how she helped second graders understand the Pueblo pottery tradition by reading aloud literature covering the past and present. Lists folklore, fiction, poetry, nonfiction, professional resources, videos, CDs,…

  1. The estimate on lunar figure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, B. X.

    2008-10-01

    In 1799 Laplace had discovered that the lunar three principal momentum are not in equilibrium with the Moon's current orbital and rotational state.Some authors suggested that the Moon may carry a fossil figure. Before more 3 billion years the liquid Moon was closer to the Earth and revolved faster.Then the Moon migrated outwards and revolved slow down. During the early part of this migration, the Moon was continually subjected to tidal and rotational stretching and formed into an ellipsoid. Then the Moon cooled and solidified quickly. Eventually, the solid Moon's lithosphere was stable, so that we may see the very early lunar figure. In this paper, by using the lunar libration parameters and the spherical-harmonic gravity coefficient, the length of three radii a, b, c of the ellipsoid and the Moon's figure as an equilibrium tidal have been calculated. Then three conclusions can be obtained; (1) In the beginning the Moon may be very close to the Earth, before about 3 billion years the moon may cooled and solidified, and the present Moon are in the fossil figure. (2) In the third section of this paper, we demonstrate that the tidal deformation of liquid Moon was 1.934 times then the equilibrium tide. So that if to calculating the true lunar figure by using the lunar spherical-harmonic gravity coefficients, the effects of Liquid Love number hf = 1.934must be considered. (3) According to the difference between a, b, and c, the lunar distance (1.7455×108m) and spin period 3.652day can be calculated. So that the lunar orbits period was 8.34day. Hence the Moon was locked closely into a resonance orbit in the ratio 2:1 when the Moon froze.

  2. Mice produced by mitotic reprogramming of sperm injected into haploid parthenogenotes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toru; Asami, Maki; Hoffmann, Martin; Lu, Xin; Gužvić, Miodrag; Klein, Christoph A; Perry, Anthony C F

    2016-01-01

    Sperm are highly differentiated and the activities that reprogram them for embryonic development during fertilization have historically been considered unique to the oocyte. We here challenge this view and demonstrate that mouse embryos in the mitotic cell cycle can also directly reprogram sperm for full-term development. Developmentally incompetent haploid embryos (parthenogenotes) injected with sperm developed to produce healthy offspring at up to 24% of control rates, depending when in the embryonic cell cycle injection took place. This implies that most of the first embryonic cell cycle can be bypassed in sperm genome reprogramming for full development. Remodelling of histones and genomic 5'-methylcytosine and 5'-hydroxymethylcytosine following embryo injection were distinct from remodelling in fertilization and the resulting 2-cell embryos consistently possessed abnormal transcriptomes. These studies demonstrate plasticity in the reprogramming of terminally differentiated sperm nuclei and suggest that different epigenetic pathways or kinetics can establish totipotency. PMID:27623537

  3. Loops determine the mechanical properties of mitotic chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Heermann, Dieter W.

    2013-03-01

    In mitosis, chromosomes undergo a condensation into highly compacted, rod-like objects. Many models have been put forward for the higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes including radial loop and hierarchical folding models. Additionally, mechanical properties of mitotic chromosomes under different conditions were measured. However, the internal organization of mitotic chromosomes still remains unclear. Here we present a polymer model for mitotic chromosomes and show how chromatin loops play a major role for their mechanical properties. The key assumption of the model is the ability of the chromatin fibre to dynamically form loops with the help of binding proteins. Our results show that looping leads to a tight compaction and significantly increases the bending rigidity of chromosomes. Moreover, our qualitative prediction of the force elongation behaviour is close to experimental findings. This indicates that the internal structure of mitotic chromosomes is based on self-organization of the chromatin fibre. We also demonstrate how number and size of loops have a strong influence on the mechanical properties. We suggest that changes in the mechanical characteristics of chromosomes can be explained by an altered internal loop structure. YZ gratefully appreciates funding by the German National Academic Foundation (Studienstiftung des deutschen Volkes) and support by the Heidelberg Graduate School for Mathematical and Computational Methods in the Sciences (HGS MathComp).

  4. Mitotic Exit Control as an Evolved Complex System

    SciTech Connect

    Bosl, W; Li, R

    2005-04-25

    The exit from mitosis is the last critical decision a cell has to make during a division cycle. A complex regulatory system has evolved to evaluate the success of mitotic events and control this decision. Whereas outstanding genetic work in yeast has led to rapid discovery of a large number of interacting genes involved in the control of mitotic exit, it has also become increasingly difficult to comprehend the logic and mechanistic features embedded in the complex molecular network. Our view is that this difficulty stems in part from the attempt to explain mitotic exit control using concepts from traditional top-down engineering design, and that exciting new results from evolutionary engineering design applied to networks and electronic circuits may lend better insights. We focus on four particularly intriguing features of the mitotic exit control system: the two-stepped release of Cdc14; the self-activating nature of Tem1 GTPase; the spatial sensor associated with the spindle pole body; and the extensive redundancy in the mitotic exit network. We attempt to examine these design features from the perspective of evolutionary design and complex system engineering.

  5. Mitotic Chromosome Loss in a Disomic Haploid of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, D. A.; Fogel, S.; Lusnak, K.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments designed to characterize the incidence of mitotic chromosome loss in a yeast disomic haploid were performed. The selective methods employed utilize the non-mating property of strains disomic for linkage group III and heterozygous at the mating type locus. The principal findings are: (1) The frequency of spontaneous chromosome loss in the disome is of the order 10-4 per cell; this value approximates the frequency in the same population of spontaneous mitotic exchange resulting in homozygosity at the mating type locus. (2) The recovered diploids are pure clones, and thus represent unique events in the disomic haploid. (3) Of the euploid chromosomes recovered after events leading to chromosome loss, approximately 90% retain the parental marker configuration expected from segregation alone; however, the remainder are recombinant for marker genes, and are the result of mitotic exchanges in the disome, especially in regions near the centromere. The recombinant proportion significantly exceeds that expected if chromosome loss and mitotic exchange in the disome were independent events. The data are consistent with a model proposing mitotic nondisjunction as the event responsible for chromosome loss in the disomic haploid. PMID:1092597

  6. Mechanical control of mitotic progression in single animal cells

    PubMed Central

    Cattin, Cedric J.; Düggelin, Marcel; Martinez-Martin, David; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J.; Stewart, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of mitotic cell rounding in tissue development and cell proliferation, there remains a paucity of approaches to investigate the mechanical robustness of cell rounding. Here we introduce ion beam-sculpted microcantilevers that enable precise force-feedback–controlled confinement of single cells while characterizing their progression through mitosis. We identify three force regimes according to the cell response: small forces (∼5 nN) that accelerate mitotic progression, intermediate forces where cells resist confinement (50–100 nN), and yield forces (>100 nN) where a significant decline in cell height impinges on microtubule spindle function, thereby inhibiting mitotic progression. Yield forces are coincident with a nonlinear drop in cell height potentiated by persistent blebbing and loss of cortical F-actin homogeneity. Our results suggest that a buildup of actomyosin-dependent cortical tension and intracellular pressure precedes mechanical failure, or herniation, of the cell cortex at the yield force. Thus, we reveal how the mechanical properties of mitotic cells and their response to external forces are linked to mitotic progression under conditions of mechanical confinement. PMID:26305930

  7. Robust mitotic entry is ensured by a latching switch

    PubMed Central

    Tuck, Chloe; Zhang, Tongli; Potapova, Tamara; Malumbres, Marcos; Novák, Béla

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell cycle events are driven by Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) and by their counter-acting phosphatases. Activation of the Cdk1:Cyclin B complex during mitotic entry is controlled by the Wee1/Myt1 inhibitory kinases and by Cdc25 activatory phosphatase, which are themselves regulated by Cdk1:Cyclin B within two positive circuits. Impairing these two feedbacks with chemical inhibitors induces a transient entry into M phase referred to as mitotic collapse. The pathology of mitotic collapse reveals that the positive circuits play a significant role in maintaining the M phase state. To better understand the function of these feedback loops during G2/M transition, we propose a simple model for mitotic entry in mammalian cells including spatial control over Greatwall kinase phosphorylation. After parameter calibration, the model is able to recapture the complex and non-intuitive molecular dynamics reported by Potapova et al. (Potapova et al., 2011). Moreover, it predicts the temporal patterns of other mitotic regulators which have not yet been experimentally tested and suggests a general design principle of cell cycle control: latching switches buffer the cellular stresses which accompany cell cycle processes to ensure that the transitions are smooth and robust. PMID:24143279

  8. Mitotic Functions for SNAP45, a Subunit of the Small Nuclear RNA-activating Protein Complex SNAPc*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; Hernandez, Nouria

    2008-01-01

    The small nuclear RNA-activating protein complex SNAPc is required for transcription of small nuclear RNA genes and binds to a proximal sequence element in their promoters. SNAPc contains five types of subunits stably associated with each other. Here we show that one of these polypeptides, SNAP45, also known as PTF δ, localizes to centrosomes during parts of mitosis, as well as to the spindle midzone during anaphase and the mid-body during telophase. Consistent with localization to these mitotic structures, both down- and up-regulation of SNAP45 lead to a G2/M arrest with cells displaying abnormal mitotic structures. In contrast, down-regulation of SNAP190, another SNAPc subunit, leads to an accumulation of cells with a G0/G1 DNA content. These results are consistent with the proposal that SNAP45 plays two roles in the cell, one as a subunit of the transcription factor SNAPc and another as a factor required for proper mitotic progression. PMID:18356157

  9. CHK2–BRCA1 tumor-suppressor axis restrains oncogenic Aurora-A kinase to ensure proper mitotic microtubule assembly

    PubMed Central

    Ertych, Norman; Stolz, Ailine; Valerius, Oliver; Braus, Gerhard H.; Bastians, Holger

    2016-01-01

    BRCA1 (breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein) is a multifunctional tumor suppressor involved in DNA damage response, DNA repair, chromatin regulation, and mitotic chromosome segregation. Although the nuclear functions of BRCA1 have been investigated in detail, its role during mitosis is little understood. It is clear, however, that loss of BRCA1 in human cancer cells leads to chromosomal instability (CIN), which is defined as a perpetual gain or loss of whole chromosomes during mitosis. Moreover, our recent work has revealed that the mitotic function of BRCA1 depends on its phosphorylation by the tumor-suppressor kinase Chk2 (checkpoint kinase 2) and that this regulation is required to ensure normal microtubule plus end assembly rates within mitotic spindles. Intriguingly, loss of the positive regulation of BRCA1 leads to increased oncogenic Aurora-A activity, which acts as a mediator for abnormal mitotic microtubule assembly resulting in chromosome missegregation and CIN. However, how the CHK2–BRCA1 tumor suppressor axis restrains oncogenic Aurora-A during mitosis to ensure karyotype stability remained an open question. Here we uncover a dual molecular mechanism by which the CHK2–BRCA1 axis restrains oncogenic Aurora-A activity during mitosis and identify BRCA1 itself as a target for Aurora-A relevant for CIN. In fact, Chk2-mediated phosphorylation of BRCA1 is required to recruit the PP6C–SAPS3 phosphatase, which acts as a T-loop phosphatase inhibiting Aurora-A bound to BRCA1. Consequently, loss of CHK2 or PP6C-SAPS3 promotes Aurora-A activity associated with BRCA1 in mitosis. Aurora-A, in turn, then phosphorylates BRCA1 itself, thereby inhibiting the mitotic function of BRCA1 and promoting mitotic microtubule assembly, chromosome missegregation, and CIN. PMID:26831064

  10. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  11. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine may be cloudy, dark, or blood-colored. Causes Abnormal urine color may ... red blood cells, or mucus in the urine. Dark brown but clear urine is a sign of ...

  12. MYC Is a Major Determinant of Mitotic Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Topham, Caroline; Tighe, Anthony; Ly, Peter; Bennett, Ailsa; Sloss, Olivia; Nelson, Louisa; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Huels, David; Littler, Samantha; Schandl, Claudia; Sun, Ying; Bechi, Beatrice; Procter, David J.; Sansom, Owen J.; Cleveland, Don W.; Taylor, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Taxol and other antimitotic agents are frontline chemotherapy agents but the mechanisms responsible for patient benefit remain unclear. Following a genome-wide siRNA screen, we identified the oncogenic transcription factor Myc as a taxol sensitizer. Using time-lapse imaging to correlate mitotic behavior with cell fate, we show that Myc sensitizes cells to mitotic blockers and agents that accelerate mitotic progression. Myc achieves this by upregulating a cluster of redundant pro-apoptotic BH3-only proteins and suppressing pro-survival Bcl-xL. Gene expression analysis of breast cancers indicates that taxane responses correlate positively with Myc and negatively with Bcl-xL. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of Bcl-xL restores apoptosis in Myc-deficient cells. These results open up opportunities for biomarkers and combination therapies that could enhance traditional and second-generation antimitotic agents. PMID:26175417

  13. MYC Is a Major Determinant of Mitotic Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Topham, Caroline; Tighe, Anthony; Ly, Peter; Bennett, Ailsa; Sloss, Olivia; Nelson, Louisa; Ridgway, Rachel A; Huels, David; Littler, Samantha; Schandl, Claudia; Sun, Ying; Bechi, Beatrice; Procter, David J; Sansom, Owen J; Cleveland, Don W; Taylor, Stephen S

    2015-07-13

    Taxol and other antimitotic agents are frontline chemotherapy agents but the mechanisms responsible for patient benefit remain unclear. Following a genome-wide siRNA screen, we identified the oncogenic transcription factor Myc as a taxol sensitizer. Using time-lapse imaging to correlate mitotic behavior with cell fate, we show that Myc sensitizes cells to mitotic blockers and agents that accelerate mitotic progression. Myc achieves this by upregulating a cluster of redundant pro-apoptotic BH3-only proteins and suppressing pro-survival Bcl-xL. Gene expression analysis of breast cancers indicates that taxane responses correlate positively with Myc and negatively with Bcl-xL. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of Bcl-xL restores apoptosis in Myc-deficient cells. These results open up opportunities for biomarkers and combination therapies that could enhance traditional and second-generation antimitotic agents. PMID:26175417

  14. Shaping mitotic chromosomes: From classical concepts to molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kschonsak, Marc; Haering, Christian H

    2015-01-01

    How eukaryotic genomes are packaged into compact cylindrical chromosomes in preparation for cell divisions has remained one of the major unsolved questions of cell biology. Novel approaches to study the topology of DNA helices inside the nuclei of intact cells, paired with computational modeling and precise biomechanical measurements of isolated chromosomes, have advanced our understanding of mitotic chromosome architecture. In this Review Essay, we discuss – in light of these recent insights – the role of chromatin architecture and the functions and possible mechanisms of SMC protein complexes and other molecular machines in the formation of mitotic chromosomes. Based on the information available, we propose a stepwise model of mitotic chromosome condensation that envisions the sequential generation of intra-chromosomal linkages by condensin complexes in the context of cohesin-mediated inter-chromosomal linkages, assisted by topoisomerase II. The described scenario results in rod-shaped metaphase chromosomes ready for their segregation to the cell poles. PMID:25988527

  15. A requirement for epsin in mitotic membrane and spindle organization

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells possess a sophisticated membrane system to facilitate diverse functions. Whereas much is known about the nature of membrane systems in interphase, the organization and function of the mitotic membrane system are less well understood. In this study, we show that epsin, an endocytic adapter protein, regulates mitotic membrane morphology and spindle integrity in HeLa cells. Using epsin that harbors point mutations in the epsin NH2-terminal homology domain and spindle assembly assays in Xenopus laevis egg extracts, we show that epsin-induced membrane curvature is required for proper spindle morphogenesis, independent of its function in endocytosis during interphase. Although several other membrane-interacting proteins, including clathrin, AP2, autosomal recessive hypercholesterolemia, and GRASP65, are implicated in the regulation of mitosis, whether they participate through regulation of membrane organization is unclear. Our study of epsin provides evidence that mitotic membrane organization influences spindle integrity. PMID:19704019

  16. EGF Induced Centrosome Separation Promotes Mitotic Progression and Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Mardin, Balca R.; Isokane, Mayumi; Cosenza, Marco R.; Krämer, Alwin; Ellenberg, Jan; Fry, Andrew M.; Schiebel, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Summary Timely and accurate assembly of the mitotic spindle is critical for the faithful segregation of chromosomes and centrosome separation is a key step in this process. The timing of centrosome separation varies dramatically between cell types; however, the mechanisms responsible for these differences and its significance are unclear. Here, we show that activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling determines the timing of centrosome separation. Premature separation of centrosomes decreases the requirement for the major mitotic kinesin Eg5 for spindle assembly, accelerates mitosis and decreases the rate of chromosome missegregation. Importantly, EGF stimulation impacts upon centrosome separation and mitotic progression to different degrees in different cell lines. Cells with high EGFR levels fail to arrest in mitosis upon Eg5 inhibition. This has important implications for cancer therapy since cells with high centrosomal response to EGF are more susceptible to combinatorial inhibition of EGFR and Eg5. PMID:23643362

  17. Shaping mitotic chromosomes: From classical concepts to molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kschonsak, Marc; Haering, Christian H

    2015-07-01

    How eukaryotic genomes are packaged into compact cylindrical chromosomes in preparation for cell divisions has remained one of the major unsolved questions of cell biology. Novel approaches to study the topology of DNA helices inside the nuclei of intact cells, paired with computational modeling and precise biomechanical measurements of isolated chromosomes, have advanced our understanding of mitotic chromosome architecture. In this Review Essay, we discuss - in light of these recent insights - the role of chromatin architecture and the functions and possible mechanisms of SMC protein complexes and other molecular machines in the formation of mitotic chromosomes. Based on the information available, we propose a stepwise model of mitotic chromosome condensation that envisions the sequential generation of intra-chromosomal linkages by condensin complexes in the context of cohesin-mediated inter-chromosomal linkages, assisted by topoisomerase II. The described scenario results in rod-shaped metaphase chromosomes ready for their segregation to the cell poles. PMID:25988527

  18. Obliquely incident ion beam figuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lin; Dai, Yifan; Xie, Xuhui; Li, Shengyi

    2015-10-01

    A new ion beam figuring (IBF) technique, obliquely incident IBF (OI-IBF), is proposed. In OI-IBF, the ion beam bombards the optical surface obliquely with an invariable incident angle instead of perpendicularly as in the normal IBF. Due to the higher removal rate in oblique incidence, the process time in OI-IBF can be significantly shortened. The removal rates at different incident angles were first tested, and then a test mirror was processed by OI-IBF. Comparison shows that in the OI-IBF technique with a 30 deg incident angle, the process time was reduced by 56.8%, while keeping the same figure correcting ability. The experimental results indicate that the OI-IBF technique is feasible and effective to improve the surface correction process efficiency.

  19. Single-walled carbon nanotube-induced mitotic disruption⋆

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, L.M.; Hubbs, A.F.; Young, S.-H.; Kashon, M.L.; Dinu, C.Z.; Salisbury, J.L.; Benkovic, S.A.; Lowry, D.T.; Murray, A.R.; Kisin, E.R.; Siegrist, K.J.; Battelli, L.; Mastovich, J.; Sturgeon, J.L.; Bunker, K.L.; Shvedova, A.A.; Reynolds, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were among the earliest products of nanotechnology and have many potential applications in medicine, electronics, and manufacturing. The low density, small size, and biological persistence of carbon nanotubes create challenges for exposure control and monitoring and make respiratory exposures to workers likely. We have previously shown mitotic spindle aberrations in cultured primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells exposed to 24, 48 and 96 μg/cm2 single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). To investigate mitotic spindle aberrations at concentrations anticipated in exposed workers, primary and immortalized human airway epithelial cells were exposed to SWCNT for 24–72 h at doses equivalent to 20 weeks of exposure at the Permissible Exposure Limit for particulates not otherwise regulated. We have now demonstrated fragmented centrosomes, disrupted mitotic spindles and aneuploid chromosome number at those doses. The data further demonstrated multipolar mitotic spindles comprised 95% of the disrupted mitoses. The increased multipolar mitotic spindles were associated with an increased number of cells in the G2 phase of mitosis, indicating a mitotic checkpoint response. Nanotubes were observed in association with mitotic spindle microtubules, the centrosomes and condensed chromatin in cells exposed to 0.024, 0.24, 2.4 and 24 μg/cm2 SWCNT. Three-dimensional reconstructions showed carbon nanotubes within the centrosome structure. The lower doses did not cause cytotoxicity or reduction in colony formation after 24 h; however, after three days, significant cytotoxicity was observed in the SWCNT-exposed cells. Colony formation assays showed an increased proliferation seven days after exposure. Our results show significant disruption of the mitotic spindle by SWCNT at occupationally relevant doses. The increased proliferation that was observed in carbon nanotube-exposed cells indicates a greater potential to pass the genetic damage to daughter

  20. Dynamical modeling of syncytial mitotic cycles in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Calzone, Laurence; Thieffry, Denis; Tyson, John J; Novak, Bela

    2007-01-01

    Immediately following fertilization, the fruit fly embryo undergoes 13 rapid, synchronous, syncytial nuclear division cycles driven by maternal genes and proteins. During these mitotic cycles, there are barely detectable oscillations in the total level of B-type cyclins. In this paper, we propose a dynamical model for the molecular events underlying these early nuclear division cycles in Drosophila. The model distinguishes nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of the embryo and permits exploration of a variety of rules for protein transport between the compartments. Numerical simulations reproduce the main features of wild-type mitotic cycles: patterns of protein accumulation and degradation, lengthening of later cycles, and arrest in interphase 14. The model is consistent with mutations that introduce subtle changes in the number of mitotic cycles before interphase arrest. Bifurcation analysis of the differential equations reveals the dependence of mitotic oscillations on cycle number, and how this dependence is altered by mutations. The model can be used to predict the phenotypes of novel mutations and effective ranges of the unmeasured rate constants and transport coefficients in the proposed mechanism. PMID:17667953

  1. A mitotic transcriptional switch in polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Verdeguer, Francisco; Corre, Stephanie Le; Fischer, Evelyne; Callens, Celine; Garbay, Serge; Doyen, Antonia; Igarashi, Peter; Terzi, Fabiola; Pontoglio, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β(HNF-1β) is a transcription factor required for the expression of several renal cystic genes and whose prenatal deletion leads to polycystic kidney disease (PKD)1. We show here that inactivation of Hnf1b from postnatal day 10 onward does not elicit cystic dilations in tubules after their proliferative morphogenetic elongation is over. Cystogenic resistance is intrinsically linked to the quiescent state of cells. In fact, when Hnf1b deficient quiescent cells are forced to proliferate by an ischemiareperfusion injury, they give rise to cysts, owing to loss of oriented cell division. Remarkably, in quiescent cells, the transcription of crucial cystogenic target genes is maintained even in the absence of HNF-1β. However, their expression is lost as soon as cells proliferate and the chromatin of target genes acquires heterochromatin marks. These results unveil a previously undescribed aspect of gene regulation. It is well established that transcription is shut off during the mitotic condensation of chromatin2,3. We propose that transcription factors such as HNF-1β might be involved in reprogramming gene expression after transcriptional silencing is induced by mitotic chromatin condensation. Notably, HNF-1β remains associated with the mitotically condensed chromosomal barrels. This association suggests that HNF-1β is a bookmarking factor that is necessary for reopening the chromatin of target genes after mitotic silencing. PMID:19966811

  2. Reconstitution of Basic Mitotic Spindles in Spherical Emulsion Droplets.

    PubMed

    Vleugel, Mathijs; Roth, Sophie; Groenendijk, Celebrity F; Dogterom, Marileen

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic spindle assembly, positioning and orientation depend on the combined forces generated by microtubule dynamics, microtubule motor proteins and cross-linkers. Growing microtubules can generate pushing forces, while depolymerizing microtubules can convert the energy from microtubule shrinkage into pulling forces, when attached, for example, to cortical dynein or chromosomes. In addition, motor proteins and diffusible cross-linkers within the spindle contribute to spindle architecture by connecting and sliding anti-parallel microtubules. In vivo, it has proven difficult to unravel the relative contribution of individual players to the overall balance of forces. Here we present the methods that we recently developed in our efforts to reconstitute basic mitotic spindles bottom-up in vitro. Using microfluidic techniques, centrosomes and tubulin are encapsulated in water-in-oil emulsion droplets, leading to the formation of geometrically confined (double) microtubule asters. By additionally introducing cortically anchored dynein, plus-end directed microtubule motors and diffusible cross-linkers, this system is used to reconstitute spindle-like structures. The methods presented here provide a starting point for reconstitution of more complete mitotic spindles, allowing for a detailed study of the contribution of each individual component, and for obtaining an integrated quantitative view of the force-balance within the mitotic spindle. PMID:27584979

  3. Rab11-endosomes contribute to mitotic spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    During interphase, Rab11-GTPase-containing endosomes recycle endocytic cargo. However, little is known about Rab11 and endosomes in mitosis. Here we show that Rab11 localizes to the mitotic spindle and regulates dynein-dependent endosome localization at poles. We found that mitotic recycling endosomes bind γ-TuRC components and associate with tubulin in vitro. Rab11-depletion or dominant-negative Rab11 expression disrupts astral microtubules, delays mitosis, and redistributes spindle pole proteins. Reciprocally, constitutively-active Rab11 increases astral microtubules, restores γ-tubulin spindle pole localization and generates robust spindles. This suggests a fundamental role for Rab11 activity in spindle pole maturation during mitosis. Rab11 depletion causes misorientation of the mitotic spindle and the plane of cell division. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for the organization of astral microtubules and the mitotic spindle through Rab11-dependent control of spindle pole assembly and function. We propose that Rab11 and its associated endosomes co-contribute to these processes through retrograde transport to poles by dynein. PMID:24561039

  4. Rab11 endosomes contribute to mitotic spindle organization and orientation.

    PubMed

    Hehnly, Heidi; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-03-10

    During interphase, Rab11-GTPase-containing endosomes recycle endocytic cargo. However, little is known about Rab11 endosomes in mitosis. Here, we show that Rab11 localizes to the mitotic spindle and regulates dynein-dependent endosome localization at poles. We found that mitotic recycling endosomes bind γ-TuRC components and associate with tubulin in vitro. Rab11 depletion or dominant-negative Rab11 expression disrupts astral microtubules, delays mitosis, and redistributes spindle pole proteins. Reciprocally, constitutively active Rab11 increases astral microtubules, restores γ-tubulin spindle pole localization, and generates robust spindles. This suggests a role for Rab11 activity in spindle pole maturation during mitosis. Rab11 depletion causes misorientation of the mitotic spindle and the plane of cell division. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism for the organization of astral microtubules and the mitotic spindle through Rab11-dependent control of spindle pole assembly and function. We propose that Rab11 and its associated endosomes cocontribute to these processes through retrograde transport to poles by dynein. PMID:24561039

  5. The budding yeast nuclear envelope adjacent to the nucleolus serves as a membrane sink during mitotic delay

    PubMed Central

    Witkin, Keren L.; Chong, Yolanda; Shao, Sichen; Webster, Micah T.; Lahiri, Sujoy; Walters, Alison D.; Lee, Brandon; Koh, Judice L.Y.; Prinz, William A.; Andrews, Brenda J.; Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2012-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms that dictate nuclear shape are largely unknown. Here we screened the budding yeast deletion collection for mutants with abnormal nuclear shape. A common phenotype was the appearance of a nuclear extension, particularly in mutants in DNA repair and chromosome segregation genes. Our data suggest that these mutations led to the abnormal nuclear morphology indirectly, by causing a checkpoint-induced cell cycle delay. Indeed, delaying cells in mitosis by other means also led to the appearance of nuclear extensions, while inactivating the DNA damage checkpoint pathway in a DNA repair mutant reduced the fraction of cells with nuclear extensions. Formation of a nuclear extension was specific to a mitotic delay, as cells arrested in S or G2 had round nuclei. Moreover, the nuclear extension always coincided with the nucleolus, while the morphology of DNA mass remained largely unchanged. Finally, we found that phospholipid synthesis continues unperturbed when cells delay in mitosis, and inhibiting phospholipid synthesis abolished the formation of nuclear extensions. Our data suggest a mechanism that promotes nuclear envelope expansion during mitosis. When mitotic progression is delayed, cells sequester the added membrane to the nuclear envelope associated with the nucleolus, possibly to avoid disruption of intra-nuclear organization. PMID:22658600

  6. Cytotoxic effects of cylindrospermopsin in mitotic and non-mitotic Vicia faba cells.

    PubMed

    Garda, Tamás; Riba, Milán; Vasas, Gábor; Beyer, Dániel; M-Hamvas, Márta; Hajdu, Gréta; Tándor, Ildikó; Máthé, Csaba

    2015-02-01

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a cyanobacterial toxin known as a eukaryotic protein synthesis inhibitor. We aimed to study its effects on growth, stress responses and mitosis of a eukaryotic model, Vicia faba (broad bean). Growth responses depended on exposure time (3 or 6d), cyanotoxin concentration, culture conditions (dark or continuous light) and V. faba cultivar ("Standard" or "ARC Egypt Cross"). At 6d of exposure, CYN had a transient stimulatory effect on root system growth, roots being possibly capable of detoxification. The toxin induced nucleus fragmentation, blebbing and chromosomal breaks indicating double stranded DNA breaks and programmed cell death. Root necrotic tissue was observed at 0.1-20 μg mL(-1) CYN that probably impeded toxin uptake into vascular tissue. Growth and cell death processes observed were general stress responses. In lateral root tip meristems, lower CYN concentrations (0.01-0.1 μg mL(-1)) induced the stimulation of mitosis and distinct mitotic phases, irrespective of culture conditions or the cultivar used. Higher cyanotoxin concentrations inhibited mitosis. Short-term exposure of hydroxylurea-synchronized roots to 5 μg mL(-1) CYN induced delay of mitosis that might have been related to a delay of de novo protein synthesis. CYN induced the formation of double, split and asymmetric preprophase bands (PPBs), in parallel with the alteration of cell division planes, related to the interference of cyanotoxin with protein synthesis, thus it was a plant- and CYN specific alteration. PMID:25016338

  7. Recurrent 1;17 translocations in human neuroblastoma reveal nonhomologous mitotic recombination during the S/G2 phase as a novel mechanism for loss of heterozygosity.

    PubMed Central

    Caron, H.; van Sluis, P.; van Roy, N.; de Kraker, J.; Speleman, F.; Voûte, P. A.; Westerveld, A.; Slater, R.; Versteeg, R.

    1994-01-01

    Neuroblastomas often show loss of heterozygosity of the chromosomal region 1p36 (LOH 1p), probably reflecting loss of a tumor-suppressor gene. Here we describe three neuroblastoma tumors and two cell lines in which LOH 1p results from an unbalanced translocation between the p arm of chromosome 1 and the q arm of chromosome 17. Southern blot and cytogenetic analyses show that in all cases the chromosome 17 homologue from which the 1;17 translocation was derived is still present and intact. This suggests a model in which a translocation between the short arm of chromosome 1 and the long arm of chromosome 17 takes place in the S/G2 phase of the cell cycle and results in LOH 1p. Nonhomologous mitotic recombination in the S/G2 phase is a novel mechanism of LOH. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8037211

  8. Enhanced spatial resolution on figures versus grounds.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Lauren N; Cosman, Joshua D; Vecera, Shaun P

    2016-07-01

    Much is known about the cues that determine figure-ground assignment, but less is known about the consequences of figure-ground assignment on later visual processing. Previous work has demonstrated that regions assigned figural status are subjectively more shape-like and salient than background regions. The increase in subjective salience of figural regions could be caused by a number of processes, one of which may be enhanced perceptual processing (e.g., an enhanced neural representation) of figures relative to grounds. We explored this hypothesis by having observers perform a perceptually demanding spatial resolution task in which targets appeared on either figure or ground regions. To rule out a purely attentional account of figural salience, observers discriminated targets on the basis of a region's color (red or green), which was equally likely to define the figure or the ground. The results of our experiments showed that targets appearing on figures were discriminated more accurately than those appearing in ground regions. In addition, targets appearing on figures were discriminated better than those presented in regions considered figurally neutral, but targets appearing within ground regions were discriminated more poorly than those appearing in figurally neutral regions. Taken together, our findings suggest that when two regions share a contour, regions assigned as figure are perceptually enhanced, whereas regions assigned as ground are perceptually suppressed. PMID:27048441

  9. Mechanism of APC/CCDC20 activation by mitotic phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Renping; Weissmann, Florian; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Brown, Nicholas G.; VanderLinden, Ryan; Imre, Richard; Jarvis, Marc A.; Brunner, Michael R.; Davidson, Iain F.; Litos, Gabriele; Haselbach, David; Mechtler, Karl; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome segregation and mitotic exit are initiated by the 1.2-MDa ubiquitin ligase APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome) and its coactivator CDC20 (cell division cycle 20). To avoid chromosome missegregation, APC/CCDC20 activation is tightly controlled. CDC20 only associates with APC/C in mitosis when APC/C has become phosphorylated and is further inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex until all chromosomes are bioriented on the spindle. APC/C contains 14 different types of subunits, most of which are phosphorylated in mitosis on multiple sites. However, it is unknown which of these phospho-sites enable APC/CCDC20 activation and by which mechanism. Here we have identified 68 evolutionarily conserved mitotic phospho-sites on human APC/C bound to CDC20 and have used the biGBac technique to generate 47 APC/C mutants in which either all 68 sites or subsets of them were replaced by nonphosphorylatable or phospho-mimicking residues. The characterization of these complexes in substrate ubiquitination and degradation assays indicates that phosphorylation of an N-terminal loop region in APC1 is sufficient for binding and activation of APC/C by CDC20. Deletion of the N-terminal APC1 loop enables APC/CCDC20 activation in the absence of mitotic phosphorylation or phospho-mimicking mutations. These results indicate that binding of CDC20 to APC/C is normally prevented by an autoinhibitory loop in APC1 and that its mitotic phosphorylation relieves this inhibition. The predicted location of the N-terminal APC1 loop implies that this loop controls interactions between the N-terminal domain of CDC20 and APC1 and APC8. These results reveal how APC/C phosphorylation enables CDC20 to bind and activate the APC/C in mitosis. PMID:27114510

  10. Mechanism of APC/CCDC20 activation by mitotic phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Renping; Weissmann, Florian; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Brown, Nicholas G; VanderLinden, Ryan; Imre, Richard; Jarvis, Marc A; Brunner, Michael R; Davidson, Iain F; Litos, Gabriele; Haselbach, David; Mechtler, Karl; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-05-10

    Chromosome segregation and mitotic exit are initiated by the 1.2-MDa ubiquitin ligase APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome) and its coactivator CDC20 (cell division cycle 20). To avoid chromosome missegregation, APC/C(CDC20) activation is tightly controlled. CDC20 only associates with APC/C in mitosis when APC/C has become phosphorylated and is further inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex until all chromosomes are bioriented on the spindle. APC/C contains 14 different types of subunits, most of which are phosphorylated in mitosis on multiple sites. However, it is unknown which of these phospho-sites enable APC/C(CDC20) activation and by which mechanism. Here we have identified 68 evolutionarily conserved mitotic phospho-sites on human APC/C bound to CDC20 and have used the biGBac technique to generate 47 APC/C mutants in which either all 68 sites or subsets of them were replaced by nonphosphorylatable or phospho-mimicking residues. The characterization of these complexes in substrate ubiquitination and degradation assays indicates that phosphorylation of an N-terminal loop region in APC1 is sufficient for binding and activation of APC/C by CDC20. Deletion of the N-terminal APC1 loop enables APC/C(CDC20) activation in the absence of mitotic phosphorylation or phospho-mimicking mutations. These results indicate that binding of CDC20 to APC/C is normally prevented by an autoinhibitory loop in APC1 and that its mitotic phosphorylation relieves this inhibition. The predicted location of the N-terminal APC1 loop implies that this loop controls interactions between the N-terminal domain of CDC20 and APC1 and APC8. These results reveal how APC/C phosphorylation enables CDC20 to bind and activate the APC/C in mitosis. PMID:27114510

  11. Hooke's figurations: a figural drawing attributed to Robert Hooke.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Matthew C

    2010-09-20

    The experimental philosopher Robert Hooke (1635-1703) is known to have apprenticed to the leading painter Peter Lely on his first arrival in London in the late 1640s. Yet the relevance of Hooke's artistic training to his mature draughtsmanship and identity has remained unclear. Shedding light on that larger interpretive problem, this article argues for the attribution to Hooke of a figural drawing now in Tate Britain (T10678). This attributed drawing is especially interesting because it depicts human subjects and bears Hooke's name functioning as an artistic signature, both highly unusual features for his draughtsmanship. From evidence of how this drawing was collected and physically placed alongside images by leading artists in the early eighteenth century, I suggest how it can offer new insight into the reception of Hooke and his graphic work in the early Enlightenment. PMID:20973449

  12. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  13. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... from many different conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth color, time of appearance, or absence ...

  14. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Part 38

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Figures to Part 38 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Other Vehicles and Systems Trams, and similar vehicles, and systems Pt. 38, Figures Figures to Part 38 ER28SE98.000...

  15. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Part 38

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Figures to Part 38 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Other Vehicles and Systems Trams, and similar vehicles, and systems Pt. 38, Figures Figures to Part 38 ER28SE98.000...

  16. Preadolescent male perceptions of action figure physiques.

    PubMed

    Baghurst, Timothy; Carlston, David; Wood, Julie; Wyatt, Frank B

    2007-12-01

    This study investigated the preference and reasoning of 176 preadolescent and adolescent males when presented with original and current action figures that had statistically different physiques. Current action figures were perceived as significantly more muscular and healthier. Participants also preferred to resemble current action figures citing muscularity and size for their preference. PMID:18023792

  17. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Part 38

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Figures to Part 38 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Other Vehicles and Systems Trams, and similar vehicles, and systems Pt. 38, Figures Figures to Part 38 ER28SE98.000...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix - Figures to Part 38

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Figures to Part 38 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Other Vehicles and Systems Trams, and similar vehicles, and systems Pt. 38, Figures Figures to Part 38 ER28SE98.000...

  19. PHOBOS Experiment: Figures and Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The PHOBOS Collaboration

    PHOBOS consists of many silicon detectors surrounding the interaction region. With these detectors physicists can count the total number of produced particles and study the angular distributions of all the products. Physicists know from other branches of physics that a characteristic of phase transitions are fluctuations in physical observables. With the PHOBOS array they look for unusual events or fluctuations in the number of particles and angular distribution. The articles that have appeared in refereed science journals are listed here with separate links to the supporting data plots, figures, and tables of numeric data.  See also supporting data for articles in technical journals at http://www.phobos.bnl.gov/Publications/Technical/phobos_technical_publications.htm and from conference proceedings at http://www.phobos.bnl.gov/Publications/Proceedings/phobos_proceedings_publications.htm

  20. The Xenopus TACC Homologue, Maskin, Functions in Mitotic Spindle AssemblyD⃞

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Lori L.; Albee, Alison J.; Liu, Lingling; Tao, Wei; Dobrzyn, Pawel; Lizarraga, Sofia B.; Wiese, Christiane

    2005-01-01

    Maskin is the Xenopus homolog of the transforming acidic coiled coil (TACC)-family of microtubule and centrosome-interacting proteins. Members of this family share a ∼200 amino acid coiled coil motif at their C-termini, but have only limited homology outside of this domain. In all species examined thus far, perturbations of TACC proteins lead to disruptions of cell cycle progression and/or embryonic lethality. In Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, and humans, these disruptions have been attributed to mitotic spindle assembly defects, and the TACC proteins in these organisms are thought to function as structural components of the spindle. In contrast, cell division failure in early Xenopus embryo blastomeres has been attributed to a role of maskin in regulating the translation of, among others, cyclin B1 mRNA. In this study, we show that maskin, like other TACC proteins, plays a direct role in mitotic spindle assembly in Xenopus egg extracts and that this role is independent of cyclin B. Maskin immunodepletion and add-back experiments demonstrate that maskin, or a maskin-associated activity, is required for two distinct steps during spindle assembly in Xenopus egg extracts that can be distinguished by their response to “rescue” experiments. Defects in the “early” step, manifested by greatly reduced aster size during early time points in maskin-depleted extracts, can be rescued by readdition of purified full-length maskin. Moreover, defects in this step can also be rescued by addition of only the TACC-domain of maskin. In contrast, defects in the “late” step during spindle assembly, manifested by abnormal spindles at later time points, cannot be rescued by readdition of maskin. We show that maskin interacts with a number of proteins in egg extracts, including XMAP215, a known modulator of microtubule dynamics, and CPEB, a protein that is involved in translational regulation of important cell cycle regulators. Maskin depletion from egg extracts results

  1. Mitotic Phosphorylation of Histone H3: Spatio-Temporal Regulation by Mammalian Aurora Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Crosio, Claudia; Fimia, Gian Maria; Loury, Romain; Kimura, Masashi; Okano, Yukio; Zhou, Hongyi; Sen, Subrata; Allis, C. David; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2002-01-01

    Phosphorylation at a highly conserved serine residue (Ser-10) in the histone H3 tail is considered to be a crucial event for the onset of mitosis. This modification appears early in the G2 phase within pericentromeric heterochromatin and spreads in an ordered fashion coincident with mitotic chromosome condensation. Mutation of Ser-10 is essential in Tetrahymena, since it results in abnormal chromosome segregation and extensive chromosome loss during mitosis and meiosis, establishing a strong link between signaling and chromosome dynamics. Although mitotic H3 phosphorylation has been long recognized, the transduction routes and the identity of the protein kinases involved have been elusive. Here we show that the expression of Aurora-A and Aurora-B, two kinases of the Aurora/AIK family, is tightly coordinated with H3 phosphorylation during the G2/M transition. During the G2 phase, the Aurora-A kinase is coexpressed while the Aurora-B kinase colocalizes with phosphorylated histone H3. At prophase and metaphase, Aurora-A is highly localized in the centrosomic region and in the spindle poles while Aurora-B is present in the centromeric region concurrent with H3 phosphorylation, to then translocate by cytokinesis to the midbody region. Both Aurora-A and Aurora-B proteins physically interact with the H3 tail and efficiently phosphorylate Ser10 both in vitro and in vivo, even if Aurora-A appears to be a better H3 kinase than Aurora-B. Since Aurora-A and Aurora-B are known to be overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, our findings provide an attractive link between cell transformation, chromatin modifications and a specific kinase system. PMID:11784863

  2. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Cell cycle regulation of the activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a human protein kinase implicated in mitotic spindle function.

    PubMed

    Golsteyn, R M; Mundt, K E; Fry, A M; Nigg, E A

    1995-06-01

    Correct assembly and function of the mitotic spindle during cell division is essential for the accurate partitioning of the duplicated genome to daughter cells. Protein phosphorylation has long been implicated in controlling spindle function and chromosome segregation, and genetic studies have identified several protein kinases and phosphatases that are likely to regulate these processes. In particular, mutations in the serine/threonine-specific Drosophila kinase polo, and the structurally related kinase Cdc5p of Saccharomyces cerevisae, result in abnormal mitotic and meiotic divisions. Here, we describe a detailed analysis of the cell cycle-dependent activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a recently identified human protein kinase with extensive sequence similarity to both Drosophila polo and S. cerevisiae Cdc5p. With the aid of recombinant baculoviruses, we have established a reliable in vitro assay for Plk1 kinase activity. We show that the activity of human Plk1 is cell cycle regulated, Plk1 activity being low during interphase but high during mitosis. We further show, by immunofluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy, that human Plk1 binds to components of the mitotic spindle at all stages of mitosis, but undergoes a striking redistribution as cells progress from metaphase to anaphase. Specifically, Plk1 associates with spindle poles up to metaphase, but relocalizes to the equatorial plane, where spindle microtubules overlap (the midzone), as cells go through anaphase. These results indicate that the association of Plk1 with the spindle is highly dynamic and that Plk1 may function at multiple stages of mitotic progression. Taken together, our data strengthen the notion that human Plk1 may represent a functional homolog of polo and Cdc5p, and they suggest that this kinase plays an important role in the dynamic function of the mitotic spindle during chromosome segregation. PMID:7790358

  4. PUL21a-Cyclin A2 Interaction is Required to Protect Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells from the Deleterious Consequences of Mitotic Entry

    PubMed Central

    Eifler, Martin; Uecker, Ralf; Weisbach, Henry; Bogdanow, Boris; Richter, Ellen; König, Lydia; Vetter, Barbara; Lenac-Rovis, Tihana; Jonjic, Stipan; Neitzel, Heidemarie; Hagemeier, Christian; Wiebusch, Lüder

    2014-01-01

    Entry into mitosis is accompanied by dramatic changes in cellular architecture, metabolism and gene expression. Many viruses have evolved cell cycle arrest strategies to prevent mitotic entry, presumably to ensure sustained, uninterrupted viral replication. Here we show for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) what happens if the viral cell cycle arrest mechanism is disabled and cells engaged in viral replication enter into unscheduled mitosis. We made use of an HCMV mutant that, due to a defective Cyclin A2 binding motif in its UL21a gene product (pUL21a), has lost its ability to down-regulate Cyclin A2 and, therefore, to arrest cells at the G1/S transition. Cyclin A2 up-regulation in infected cells not only triggered the onset of cellular DNA synthesis, but also promoted the accumulation and nuclear translocation of Cyclin B1-CDK1, premature chromatin condensation and mitotic entry. The infected cells were able to enter metaphase as shown by nuclear lamina disassembly and, often irregular, metaphase spindle formation. However, anaphase onset was blocked by the still intact anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) inhibitory function of pUL21a. Remarkably, the essential viral IE2, but not the related chromosome-associated IE1 protein, disappeared upon mitotic entry, suggesting an inherent instability of IE2 under mitotic conditions. Viral DNA synthesis was impaired in mitosis, as demonstrated by the abnormal morphology and strongly reduced BrdU incorporation rates of viral replication compartments. The prolonged metaphase arrest in infected cells coincided with precocious sister chromatid separation and progressive fragmentation of the chromosomal material. We conclude that the Cyclin A2-binding function of pUL21a contributes to the maintenance of a cell cycle state conducive for the completion of the HCMV replication cycle. Unscheduled mitotic entry during the course of the HCMV replication has fatal consequences, leading to abortive infection and cell death. PMID

  5. A comprehensive model to predict mitotic division in budding yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Sutradhar, Sabyasachi; Yadav, Vikas; Sridhar, Shreyas; Sreekumar, Lakshmi; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Ghosh, Santanu Kumar; Paul, Raja; Sanyal, Kaustuv

    2015-01-01

    High-fidelity chromosome segregation during cell division depends on a series of concerted interdependent interactions. Using a systems biology approach, we built a robust minimal computational model to comprehend mitotic events in dividing budding yeasts of two major phyla: Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. This model accurately reproduces experimental observations related to spindle alignment, nuclear migration, and microtubule (MT) dynamics during cell division in these yeasts. The model converges to the conclusion that biased nucleation of cytoplasmic microtubules (cMTs) is essential for directional nuclear migration. Two distinct pathways, based on the population of cMTs and cortical dyneins, differentiate nuclear migration and spindle orientation in these two phyla. In addition, the model accurately predicts the contribution of specific classes of MTs in chromosome segregation. Thus we present a model that offers a wider applicability to simulate the effects of perturbation of an event on the concerted process of the mitotic cell division. PMID:26310442

  6. Regulation of mitotic progression by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Lischetti, Tiziana; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Equal segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis requires that pairs of kinetochores establish proper attachment to microtubules emanating from opposite poles of the mitotic spindle. The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) protects against errors in segregation by delaying sister separation in response to improper kinetochore–microtubule interactions, and certain checkpoint proteins help to establish proper attachments. Anaphase entry is inhibited by the checkpoint through assembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of the 2 checkpoint proteins, Mad2 and BubR1, bound to Cdc20. The outer kinetochore acts as a catalyst for MCC production through the recruitment and proper positioning of checkpoint proteins and recently there has been remarkable progress in understanding how this is achieved. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of kinetochore–checkpoint protein interactions and inhibition of the anaphase promoting complex by the MCC. PMID:27308407

  7. Brownian dynamics simulation of fission yeast mitotic spindle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelmaier, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The mitotic spindle segregates chromosomes during mitosis. The dynamics that establish bipolar spindle formation are not well understood. We have developed a computational model of fission-yeast mitotic spindle formation using Brownian dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods. Our model includes rigid, dynamic microtubules, a spherical nuclear envelope, spindle pole bodies anchored in the nuclear envelope, and crosslinkers and crosslinking motor proteins. Crosslinkers and crosslinking motor proteins attach and detach in a grand canonical ensemble, and exert forces and torques on the attached microtubules. We have modeled increased affinity for crosslinking motor attachment to antiparallel microtubule pairs, and stabilization of microtubules in the interpolar bundle. We study parameters controlling the stability of the interpolar bundle and assembly of a bipolar spindle from initially adjacent spindle-pole bodies.

  8. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 648 - Figure 1 to Part 648

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Figure 1 to Part 648 1 Figure 1 to Part 648 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Pt. 648, Figure 1 Figure 1...

  9. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 648 - Figure 1 to Part 648

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Figure 1 to Part 648 1 Figure 1 to Part 648 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Pt. 648, Figure 1 Figure 1...

  10. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 648 - Figure 1 to Part 648

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Figure 1 to Part 648 1 Figure 1 to Part 648 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Pt. 648, Figure 1 Figure 1...

  11. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 648 - Figure 1 to Part 648

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Figure 1 to Part 648 1 Figure 1 to Part 648 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Pt. 648, Figure 1 Figure 1...

  12. Mitotic activity in dorsal epidermis of Rana pipiens.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Arce, H.; Mizell, S.

    1972-01-01

    Study of statistically significant rhythms of mitotic division in dorsal epidermis of frogs, Rana pipiens, exposed to a 12:12 light:dark environment for 14 days. The results include the findings that (1) male animals have a primary period of 22 hr in summer and 18 hr in winter, (2) female animals have an 18 hr period, and (3) parapinealectomy and blinding abolish the rhythm.

  13. Different cell fates after mitotic slippage: From aneuploidy to polyploidy.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Akihiro

    2016-03-01

    The molecular mechanism responsible for cell fate after mitotic slippage remains unclear. We investigated the different postmitotic effects of aneuploidy versus polyploidy using chemical inhibitors of centromere-associated protein-E (CENP-E) and kinesin family member 11 (KIF11, also known as Eg5). Aneuploidy caused substantial proteotoxic stress and DNA damage accompanied by p53-mediated postmitotic apoptosis, whereas polyploidy did not induce these antiproliferative effects. PMID:27308610

  14. Observing Mitotic Division and Dynamics in a Live Zebrafish Embryo.

    PubMed

    Percival, Stefanie M; Parant, John M

    2016-01-01

    Mitosis is critical for organismal growth and differentiation. The process is highly dynamic and requires ordered events to accomplish proper chromatin condensation, microtubule-kinetochore attachment, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis in a small time frame. Errors in the delicate process can result in human disease, including birth defects and cancer. Traditional approaches investigating human mitotic disease states often rely on cell culture systems, which lack the natural physiology and developmental/tissue-specific context advantageous when studying human disease. This protocol overcomes many obstacles by providing a way to visualize, with high resolution, chromosome dynamics in a vertebrate system, the zebrafish. This protocol will detail an approach that can be used to obtain dynamic images of dividing cells, which include: in vitro transcription, zebrafish breeding/collecting, embryo embedding, and time-lapse imaging. Optimization and modifications of this protocol are also explored. Using H2A.F/Z-EGFP (labels chromatin) and mCherry-CAAX (labels cell membrane) mRNA-injected embryos, mitosis in AB wild-type, auroraB(hi1045) (,) and esco2(hi2865) mutant zebrafish is visualized. High resolution live imaging in zebrafish allows one to observe multiple mitoses to statistically quantify mitotic defects and timing of mitotic progression. In addition, observation of qualitative aspects that define improper mitotic processes (i.e., congression defects, missegregation of chromosomes, etc.) and improper chromosomal outcomes (i.e., aneuploidy, polyploidy, micronuclei, etc.) are observed. This assay can be applied to the observation of tissue differentiation/development and is amenable to the use of mutant zebrafish and pharmacological agents. Visualization of how defects in mitosis lead to cancer and developmental disorders will greatly enhance understanding of the pathogenesis of disease. PMID:27501381

  15. Mitotic exit: Determining the PP2A dephosphorylation program.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Gislene; Schiebel, Elmar

    2016-08-29

    In mitotic exit, proteins that were highly phosphorylated are sequentially targeted by the phosphatase PP2A-B55, but what underlies substrate selection is unclear. In this issue, Cundell et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201606033) identify the determinants of PP2A-B55's dephosphorylation program, thereby influencing spindle disassembly, nuclear envelope reformation, and cytokinesis. PMID:27551057

  16. SUMOylation inhibits FOXM1 activity and delays mitotic transition.

    PubMed

    Myatt, S S; Kongsema, M; Man, C W-Y; Kelly, D J; Gomes, A R; Khongkow, P; Karunarathna, U; Zona, S; Langer, J K; Dunsby, C W; Coombes, R C; French, P M; Brosens, J J; Lam, E W-F

    2014-08-21

    The forkhead box transcription factor FOXM1 is an essential effector of G2/M-phase transition, mitosis and the DNA damage response. As such, it is frequently deregulated during tumorigenesis. Here we report that FOXM1 is dynamically modified by SUMO1 but not by SUMO2/3 at multiple sites. We show that FOXM1 SUMOylation is enhanced in MCF-7 breast cancer cells in response to treatment with epirubicin and mitotic inhibitors. Mutation of five consensus conjugation motifs yielded a SUMOylation-deficient mutant FOXM1. Conversely, fusion of the E2 ligase Ubc9 to FOXM1 generated an auto-SUMOylating mutant (FOXM1-Ubc9). Analysis of wild-type FOXM1 and mutants revealed that SUMOylation inhibits FOXM1 activity, promotes translocation to the cytoplasm and enhances APC/Cdh1-mediated ubiquitination and degradation. Further, expression of the SUMOylation-deficient mutant enhanced cell proliferation compared with wild-type FOXM1, whereas the FOXM1-Ubc9 fusion protein resulted in persistent cyclin B1 expression and slowed the time from mitotic entry to exit. In summary, our findings suggest that SUMOylation attenuates FOXM1 activity and causes mitotic delay in cytotoxic drug response. PMID:24362530

  17. On the molecular mechanisms of mitotic kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Richard; Fry, Andrew; Haq, Tamanna; Yeoh, Sharon

    2012-11-01

    During mitosis, human cells exhibit a peak of protein phosphorylation that alters the behaviour of a significant proportion of proteins, driving a dramatic transformation in the cell's shape, intracellular structures and biochemistry. These mitotic phosphorylation events are catalysed by several families of protein kinases, including Auroras, Cdks, Plks, Neks, Bubs, Haspin and Mps1/TTK. The catalytic activities of these kinases are activated by phosphorylation and through protein-protein interactions. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of the structural basis of mitotic kinase activation mechanisms. This review aims to provide a clear and comprehensive primer on these mechanisms to a broad community of researchers, bringing together the common themes, and highlighting specific differences. Along the way, we have uncovered some features of these proteins that have previously gone unreported, and identified unexplored questions for future work. The dysregulation of mitotic kinases is associated with proliferative disorders such as cancer, and structural biology will continue to play a critical role in the development of chemical probes used to interrogate disease biology and applied to the treatment of patients. PMID:23226601

  18. On the molecular mechanisms of mitotic kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Bayliss, Richard; Fry, Andrew; Haq, Tamanna; Yeoh, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, human cells exhibit a peak of protein phosphorylation that alters the behaviour of a significant proportion of proteins, driving a dramatic transformation in the cell's shape, intracellular structures and biochemistry. These mitotic phosphorylation events are catalysed by several families of protein kinases, including Auroras, Cdks, Plks, Neks, Bubs, Haspin and Mps1/TTK. The catalytic activities of these kinases are activated by phosphorylation and through protein–protein interactions. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of the structural basis of mitotic kinase activation mechanisms. This review aims to provide a clear and comprehensive primer on these mechanisms to a broad community of researchers, bringing together the common themes, and highlighting specific differences. Along the way, we have uncovered some features of these proteins that have previously gone unreported, and identified unexplored questions for future work. The dysregulation of mitotic kinases is associated with proliferative disorders such as cancer, and structural biology will continue to play a critical role in the development of chemical probes used to interrogate disease biology and applied to the treatment of patients. PMID:23226601

  19. Toward a systems-level view of mitotic checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Bashar

    2015-03-01

    Reproduction and natural selection are the key elements of life. In order to reproduce, the genetic material must be doubled, separated and placed into two new daughter cells, each containing a complete set of chromosomes and organelles. In mitosis, transition from one process to the next is guided by intricate surveillance mechanisms, known as the mitotic checkpoints. Dis-regulation of cell division through checkpoint malfunction can lead to developmental defects and contribute to the development or progression of tumors. This review approaches two important mitotic checkpoints, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC). The highly conserved spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) controls the onset of anaphase by preventing premature segregation of the sister chromatids of the duplicated genome, to the spindle poles. In contrast, the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC), in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ensures that during asymmetric cell division mitotic exit does not occur until the spindle is properly aligned with the cell polarity axis. Although there are no known homologs, there is indication that functionally similar checkpoints exist also in animal cells. This review can be regarded as an "executable model", which could be easily translated into various quantitative concrete models like Petri nets, ODEs, PDEs, or stochastic particle simulations. It can also function as a base for developing quantitative models explaining the interplay of the various components and proteins controlling mitosis. PMID:25722206

  20. Human Nek7-interactor RGS2 is required for mitotic spindle organization.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Edmarcia Elisa; Hehnly, Heidi; Perez, Arina Marina; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Smetana, Juliana Helena Costa; Doxsey, Stephen; Kobarg, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The mitotic spindle apparatus is composed of microtubule (MT) networks attached to kinetochores organized from 2 centrosomes (a.k.a. spindle poles). In addition to this central spindle apparatus, astral MTs assemble at the mitotic spindle pole and attach to the cell cortex to ensure appropriate spindle orientation. We propose that cell cycle-related kinase, Nek7, and its novel interacting protein RGS2, are involved in mitosis regulation and spindle formation. We found that RGS2 localizes to the mitotic spindle in a Nek7-dependent manner, and along with Nek7 contributes to spindle morphology and mitotic spindle pole integrity. RGS2-depletion leads to a mitotic-delay and severe defects in the chromosomes alignment and congression. Importantly, RGS2 or Nek7 depletion or even overexpression of wild-type or kinase-dead Nek7, reduced γ-tubulin from the mitotic spindle poles. In addition to causing a mitotic delay, RGS2 depletion induced mitotic spindle misorientation coinciding with astral MT-reduction. We propose that these phenotypes directly contribute to a failure in mitotic spindle alignment to the substratum. In conclusion, we suggest a molecular mechanism whereupon Nek7 and RGS2 may act cooperatively to ensure proper mitotic spindle organization. PMID:25664600

  1. Human Nek7-interactor RGS2 is required for mitotic spindle organization

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Edmarcia Elisa; Hehnly, Heidi; Perez, Arina Marina; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Smetana, Juliana Helena Costa; Doxsey, Stephen; Kobarg, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The mitotic spindle apparatus is composed of microtubule (MT) networks attached to kinetochores organized from 2 centrosomes (a.k.a. spindle poles). In addition to this central spindle apparatus, astral MTs assemble at the mitotic spindle pole and attach to the cell cortex to ensure appropriate spindle orientation. We propose that cell cycle-related kinase, Nek7, and its novel interacting protein RGS2, are involved in mitosis regulation and spindle formation. We found that RGS2 localizes to the mitotic spindle in a Nek7-dependent manner, and along with Nek7 contributes to spindle morphology and mitotic spindle pole integrity. RGS2-depletion leads to a mitotic-delay and severe defects in the chromosomes alignment and congression. Importantly, RGS2 or Nek7 depletion or even overexpression of wild-type or kinase-dead Nek7, reduced γ-tubulin from the mitotic spindle poles. In addition to causing a mitotic delay, RGS2 depletion induced mitotic spindle misorientation coinciding with astral MT-reduction. We propose that these phenotypes directly contribute to a failure in mitotic spindle alignment to the substratum. In conclusion, we suggest a molecular mechanism whereupon Nek7 and RGS2 may act cooperatively to ensure proper mitotic spindle organization. PMID:25664600

  2. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  3. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  4. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  5. Chromosomal Abnormalities and Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    BASSETT, ANNE S.; CHOW, EVA W.C.; WEKSBERG, ROSANNA

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common and serious psychiatric illness with strong evidence for genetic causation, but no specific loci yet identified. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia may help to understand the genetic complexity of the illness. This paper reviews the evidence for associations between chromosomal abnormalities and schizophrenia and related disorders. The results indicate that 22q11.2 microdeletions detected by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) are significantly associated with schizophrenia. Sex chromosome abnormalities seem to be increased in schizophrenia but insufficient data are available to indicate whether schizophrenia or related disorders are increased in patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies. Other reports of chromosomal abnormalities associated with schizophrenia have the potential to be important adjuncts to linkage studies in gene localization. Advances in molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e., FISH) have produced significant increases in rates of identified abnormalities in schizophrenia, particularly in patients with very early age at onset, learning difficulties or mental retardation, or dysmorphic features. The results emphasize the importance of considering behavioral phenotypes, including adult onset psychiatric illnesses, in genetic syndromes and the need for clinicians to actively consider identifying chromosomal abnormalities and genetic syndromes in selected psychiatric patients. PMID:10813803

  6. Recommended reference figures for geophysics and geodesy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, M. A.; Okeefe, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Specific reference figures are recommended for consistent use in geophysics and geodesy. The selection of appropriate reference figure for geophysical studies suggests a relationship between the Antarctic negative gravity anomaly and the great shrinkage of the Antarctic ice cap about 4-5 million years ago. The depression of the south polar regions relative to the north polar regions makes the Southern Hemisphere flatter than the Northern Hemisphere, thus producing the third harmonic (pear-shaped) contribution to the earth's figure.

  7. Requirements for dE2F function in proliferating cells and in post-mitotic differentiating cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, A; Xie, J E; Du, W; Dyson, N

    1996-01-01

    The transcription factor E2F is a target of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRB) and may mediate pRB regulation of S phase entry in mammalian cells. The recent identification of mutant alleles of the Drosophila E2F gene (dE2F) has shown that dE2F is required for embryogenesis. dE2F-mutant embryos lack a co-ordinated program of gene expression which accompanies S phase entry and DNA synthesis declines to levels that are barely detectable. We have investigated the role of the dE2F gene at later stages of development. dE2F is expressed in several larval tissues and is required for cell proliferation in the eye imaginal disc. Surprisingly, dE2F expression persists in post-mitotic cells of the eye disc of third-instar larvae. The loss of dE2F function in these cells causes a novel phenotype, characterized by loss of photoreceptors and abnormal rhabdomere cell morphology. These results show that dE2F is required at multiple stages of development and suggest that E2F may have an important function in post-mitotic cells in addition to its role during cell proliferation. Images PMID:8670871

  8. Determination of genotoxic effects of Imazethapyr herbicide in Allium cepa root cells by mitotic activity, chromosome aberration, and comet assay.

    PubMed

    Liman, Recep; Ciğerci, İbrahim Hakkı; Öztürk, Nur Serap

    2015-02-01

    Imazethapyr (IM) is an imidazolinone herbicide that is currently used for broad-spectrum weed control in soybean and other legume crops. In this study, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of IM were investigated by using mitotic index (MI), mitotic phases, chromosomal abnormalities (CAs) and DNA damage on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa. In Allium root growth inhibition test, EC50 value was determined as 20 ppm, and 0.5xEC50, EC50 and 2xEC50 concentrations of IM herbicide were introduced to onion tuber roots. Distilled water and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS, 10 mg/L) were used as a negative and positive control, respectively. As A. cepa cell cycle is 24 hours, so, application process was carried out for 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours. All the applied doses decreased MIs compared to control group and these declines were found to be statistically meaningful. Analysis of the chromosomes showed that 10 ppm IM except for 48 h induced CAs but 40 ppm IM except for 72 h decreased CAs. DNA damage was found significantly higher in 20 and 40 ppm of IM compared to the control in comet assay. These results indicated that IM herbicide exhibits cytotoxic activity but not genotoxic activity (except 10 ppm) and induced DNA damage in a dose dependent manner in A. cepa root meristematic cells. PMID:25752428

  9. Influence of the circadian rhythm in cell division on radiation-induced mitotic delay in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, N.H.

    1982-01-01

    Mitotic delay is described as a classical response to radiation; however, circadian rhythmicity in cell division in vivo has not been considered by many authors. The present study investigated the relation between fluctuations reported as mitotic delay and recovery in vivo and circadian oscillations in mitotic index in mouse corneal epithelium. One aspect involved single doses (approximately 600 rad) given to mice at different circadian stages. The normal circadian rhythm in cell division was never obliterated. Inhibition of mitosis was evident but unpredictable, ranging from 6 to 15 hr after irradiation. Recovery was evident only during the daily increase in mitotic index of controls. The classical interpretation of recovery from mitotic delay may be in an in vitro phenomenon not reflecting in vivo responses, which are apparently strongly circadian stage dependent. The second portion of the study demonstrated a dose-response effect on length of mitotic delay and, to a lesser extent, degree of recovery.

  10. Enhancement of spontaneous mitotic recombination by the meiotic mutant spo11-1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Bruschi, C.V.; Esposito, M.S.

    1983-12-01

    Both nonreciprocal and reciprocal mitotic recombination are enhanced by the recessive mutant spo11-1, which was previously shown to affect meiosis by decreasing recombination and increasing nondisjunction. The mitotic effects are not distributed equally in all chromosomal regions. The genotypes of mitotic recombinants in spo11-1/spo11-1 diploid cells provide further evidence that widely spaced chromosomal markers undergo coincident conversion in mitosis.

  11. "Blessed": Musical Talent, Smartness, & Figured Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Adria R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore smartness and talent as social constructs. Drawing on Holland et al.'s (1998) figured identities, this article explores the figuring of abilities by elucidating the voices of African American high school chorus students. Critical Race Theory (CRT) helps to unpack normalized language and practices that…

  12. Evolution of the Significant Figure Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Ashley R.

    2013-01-01

    Today, almost all introductory physics textbooks include standardized "rules" on how to find the number of significant figures in a calculated value. And yet, 30 years ago these rules were almost nonexistent. Why have we increased the role of significant figures in introductory classes, and should we continue this trend? A look back at…

  13. Plasma surface figuring of large optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdain, R.; Castelli, M.; Morantz, P.; Shore, P.

    2012-04-01

    Fast figuring of large optical components is well known as a highly challenging manufacturing issue. Different manufacturing technologies including: magnetorheological finishing, loose abrasive polishing, ion beam figuring are presently employed. Yet, these technologies are slow and lead to expensive optics. This explains why plasma-based processes operating at atmospheric pressure have been researched as a cost effective means for figure correction of metre scale optical surfaces. In this paper, fast figure correction of a large optical surface is reported using the Reactive Atom Plasma (RAP) process. Achievements are shown following the scaling-up of the RAP figuring process to a 400 mm diameter area of a substrate made of Corning ULE®. The pre-processing spherical surface is characterized by a 3 metres radius of curvature, 2.3 μm PVr (373nm RMS), and 1.2 nm Sq nanometre roughness. The nanometre scale correction figuring system used for this research work is named the HELIOS 1200, and it is equipped with a unique plasma torch which is driven by a dedicated tool path algorithm. Topography map measurements were carried out using a vertical work station instrumented by a Zygo DynaFiz interferometer. Figuring results, together with the processing times, convergence levels and number of iterations, are reported. The results illustrate the significant potential and advantage of plasma processing for figuring correction of large silicon based optical components.

  14. Figure-Associated Text Summarization and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Polepalli Ramesh, Balaji; Sethi, Ricky J.; Yu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical literature incorporates millions of figures, which are a rich and important knowledge resource for biomedical researchers. Scientists need access to the figures and the knowledge they represent in order to validate research findings and to generate new hypotheses. By themselves, these figures are nearly always incomprehensible to both humans and machines and their associated texts are therefore essential for full comprehension. The associated text of a figure, however, is scattered throughout its full-text article and contains redundant information content. In this paper, we report the continued development and evaluation of several figure summarization systems, the FigSum+ systems, that automatically identify associated texts, remove redundant information, and generate a text summary for every figure in an article. Using a set of 94 annotated figures selected from 19 different journals, we conducted an intrinsic evaluation of FigSum+. We evaluate the performance by precision, recall, F1, and ROUGE scores. The best FigSum+ system is based on an unsupervised method, achieving F1 score of 0.66 and ROUGE-1 score of 0.97. The annotated data is available at figshare.com (http://figshare.com/articles/Figure_Associated_Text_Summarization_and_Evaluation/858903). PMID:25643357

  15. Feature Assignment in Perception of Auditory Figure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Melissa K.; Samuel, Arthur G.

    2012-01-01

    Because the environment often includes multiple sounds that overlap in time, listeners must segregate a sound of interest (the auditory figure) from other co-occurring sounds (the unattended auditory ground). We conducted a series of experiments to clarify the principles governing the extraction of auditory figures. We distinguish between auditory…

  16. Figuring "Success" in a Bilingual High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Ali; Andrade, Norma; Bartlett, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    Using the concept of figured worlds, this article demonstrates how the faculty, staff, and students of Gregorio Luperon High School in New York City figured "success" by prioritizing the students' linguistic and cultural resources. "Success" was constructed specifically through granting Spanish high status, developing positive teacher-student…

  17. Automatic figure classification in bioscience literature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehyun; Ramesh, Balaji Polepalli; Yu, Hong

    2011-10-01

    Millions of figures appear in biomedical articles, and it is important to develop an intelligent figure search engine to return relevant figures based on user entries. In this study we report a figure classifier that automatically classifies biomedical figures into five predefined figure types: Gel-image, Image-of-thing, Graph, Model, and Mix. The classifier explored rich image features and integrated them with text features. We performed feature selection and explored different classification models, including a rule-based figure classifier, a supervised machine-learning classifier, and a multi-model classifier, the latter of which integrated the first two classifiers. Our results show that feature selection improved figure classification and the novel image features we explored were the best among image features that we have examined. Our results also show that integrating text and image features achieved better performance than using either of them individually. The best system is a multi-model classifier which combines the rule-based hierarchical classifier and a support vector machine (SVM) based classifier, achieving a 76.7% F1-score for five-type classification. We demonstrated our system at http://figureclassification.askhermes.org/. PMID:21645638

  18. The Development of Ambiguous Figure Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimmer, Marina C.; Doherty, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Ambiguous figures have fascinated researchers for almost 200 years. The physical properties of these figures remain constant, yet two distinct interpretations are possible; these reverse (switch) from one percept to the other. The consensus is that reversal requires complex interaction of perceptual bottom-up and cognitive top-down elements. The…

  19. Human Figure Drawings: Abusing the Abused.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardos, Achilles N.

    1993-01-01

    Responds to previous article (Motta, Little, and Tobin, this issue) which reviewed data-based studies on figure drawings and found little support for their validity or use in assessing personality, behavior, emotion, or intellectual functioning. Notes recent approaches to interpretation of human figure drawings and cites flaws in argument against…

  20. Figure-associated text summarization and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Polepalli Ramesh, Balaji; Sethi, Ricky J; Yu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical literature incorporates millions of figures, which are a rich and important knowledge resource for biomedical researchers. Scientists need access to the figures and the knowledge they represent in order to validate research findings and to generate new hypotheses. By themselves, these figures are nearly always incomprehensible to both humans and machines and their associated texts are therefore essential for full comprehension. The associated text of a figure, however, is scattered throughout its full-text article and contains redundant information content. In this paper, we report the continued development and evaluation of several figure summarization systems, the FigSum+ systems, that automatically identify associated texts, remove redundant information, and generate a text summary for every figure in an article. Using a set of 94 annotated figures selected from 19 different journals, we conducted an intrinsic evaluation of FigSum+. We evaluate the performance by precision, recall, F1, and ROUGE scores. The best FigSum+ system is based on an unsupervised method, achieving F1 score of 0.66 and ROUGE-1 score of 0.97. The annotated data is available at figshare.com (http://figshare.com/articles/Figure_Associated_Text_Summarization_and_Evaluation/858903). PMID:25643357

  1. Detector array evaluation and figures of merit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dereniak, Eustace L.

    1990-01-01

    The commonly used methods to evaluate the performance of a two-dimensional focal-plane array using charge transfer devices are reviewed. Two figures of merit that attempt to combine quantum efficiency, read noise and dark-current generation into a single parameter are discussed. The figures of merit are suggested as possible alternatives to the D asterisk.

  2. Aspects of Reference in Figurative Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankhurst, Anne

    1995-01-01

    This study considers some problems of reference found in figurative language, particularly in metaphor and metonymy. Analysis is based on the notion that the effects communicated by figurative language depend to a large extent on reference to more than one concept, experience, or entity, and that the presence of multiple potential referents…

  3. Equilibrium figures in geodesy and geophysics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, H.

    There is an enormous literature on geodetic equilibrium figures, but the various works have not always been interrelated, also for linguistic reasons (English, French, German, Italian, Russian). The author attempts to systematize the various approaches and to use the standard second-order theory for a study of the deviation of the actual earth and of the equipotential reference ellipsoid from an equilibrium figure.

  4. 46 CFR 69.123 - Figures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Figures. 69.123 Section 69.123 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) DOCUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS Standard Measurement System § 69.123 Figures. EC01FE91.042 EC01FE91.043 EC01FE91.044...

  5. Delaying mitotic exit downregulates FLIP expression and strongly sensitizes tumor cells to TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pérez, T; Medema, R H; López-Rivas, A

    2015-01-29

    Many of the current antitumor therapeutic strategies are based on the perturbation of the cell cycle, especially during mitosis. Antimitotic drugs trigger mitotic checkpoint activation, mitotic arrest and eventually cell death. However, mitotic slippage represents a major mechanism of resistance to these treatments. In an attempt to circumvent the process of slippage, targeting mitotic exit has been proposed as a better strategy to kill tumor cells. In this study, we show that treatments that induce mitotic checkpoint activation and mitotic arrest downregulate FLICE-like inhibitory protein (FLIP) levels and sensitize several tumor cell lines to TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand)-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, we also demonstrate that in absence of mitotic checkpoint activation, mitotic arrest induced either by Cdc20 knockdown or overexpression of nondegradable cyclin B is sufficient to induce both FLIP downregulation and sensitivity to TRAIL. In summary, our data suggest that a combination of antimitotic drugs targeting cyclin B degradation and TRAIL might prevent mitotic slippage and allow tumor cells to reach the threshold for apoptosis induction, thereby facilitating tumor suppression. PMID:24488010

  6. The Distribution of Active Force Generators Controls Mitotic Spindle Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grill, Stephan W.; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.; Hyman, Anthony A.

    2003-07-01

    During unequal cell divisions a mitotic spindle is eccentrically positioned before cell cleavage. To determine the basis of the net force imbalance that causes spindle displacement in one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, we fragmented centrosomes with an ultraviolet laser. Analysis of the mean and variance of fragment speeds suggests that the force imbalance is due to a larger number of force generators pulling on astral microtubules of the posterior aster relative to the anterior aster. Moreover, activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) α subunits is required to generate these astral forces.

  7. Cyto-3D-print to attach mitotic cells.

    PubMed

    Castroagudin, Michelle R; Zhai, Yujia; Li, Zhi; Marnell, Michael G; Glavy, Joseph S

    2016-08-01

    The Cyto-3D-print is an adapter that adds cytospin capability to a standard centrifuge. Like standard cytospinning, Cyto-3D-print increases the surface attachment of mitotic cells while giving a higher degree of adaptability to other slide chambers than available commercial devices. The use of Cyto-3D-print is cost effective, safe, and applicable to many slide designs. It is durable enough for repeated use and made of biodegradable materials for environment-friendly disposal. PMID:26464272

  8. The p90 ribosomal S6 kinase 2 specifically affects mitotic progression by regulating the basal level, distribution and stability of mitotic spindles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yun Yeon; Nam, Hyun-Ja; Do, Mihyang; Lee, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    RSK2, also known as RPS6KA3 (ribosomal protein S6 kinase, 90 kDa, polypeptide 3), is a downstream kinase of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, which is important in regulating survival, transcription, growth and proliferation. However, its biological role in mitotic progression is not well understood. In this study, we examined the potential involvement of RSK2 in the regulation of mitotic progression. Interestingly, depletion of RSK2, but not RSK1, caused the accumulation of mitotic cells. Time-lapse analysis revealed that mitotic duration, particularly the duration for metaphase-to-anaphase transition was prolonged in RSK2-depleted cells, suggesting activation of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Indeed, more BubR1 (Bub1-related kinase) was present on metaphase plate kinetochores in RSK2-depleted cells, and depletion of BubR1 abolished the mitotic accumulation caused by RSK2 depletion, confirming BubR1-dependent SAC activation. Along with the shortening of inter-kinetochore distance, these data suggested that weakening of the tension across sister kinetochores by RSK2 depletion led to the activation of SAC. To test this, we analyzed the RSK2 effects on the stability of kinetochore–microtubule interactions, and found that RSK2-depleted cells formed less kinetochore–microtubule fibers. Moreover, RSK2 depletion resulted in the decrease of basal level of microtubule as well as an irregular distribution of mitotic spindles, which might lead to observed several mitotic progression defects such as increase in unaligned chromosomes, defects in chromosome congression and a decrease in pole-to-pole distance in these cells. Taken together, our data reveal that RSK2 affects mitotic progression by regulating the distribution, basal level and the stability of mitotic spindles. PMID:27491410

  9. Withaferin-A induces mitotic catastrophe and growth arrest in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ram V; Suman, Suman; Das, Trinath P.; Luevano, Joe; Damodaran, Chendil

    2014-01-01

    Cell cycle deregulation is strongly associated with the pathogenesis of prostate cancer (CaP). Clinical trials of cell cycle regulators that target either the G0/G1 or G2/M phase to inhibit the growth of cancers including CaP are increasing. In this study, we determined the cell-cycle regulatory potential of the herbal molecule Withaferin-A (WA) on CaP cells. WA induced irreversible G2/M arrest in both CaP cell lines (PC3 and DU145) for 48 h. The G2/M arrest was accompanied by upregulation of phosphorylated Wee1, phophorylated histone H3, p21 and Aurora-B. On the other hand, downregulation of cyclins (E2, A, and B1) and phorphorylated Cdc2 (Tyr15) was observed in WA-treated CaP cells. In addition, decreased levels of phosphorylated Chk1 (Ser345) and Chk2 (Thr68) were evident in WA-treated CaP cells. Our results suggest that activation of Cdc2 leads to accumulation in M-phase, with abnormal duplication, and initiation of mitotic catastrophe that results in cell death. In conclusion, these results clearly highlight the potential of WA as a regulator of the G2/M phase of the cell cycle and as a therapeutic agent for CaP. PMID:24079846

  10. Chromosomal instability, tolerance of mitotic errors and multidrug resistance are promoted by tetraploidization in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Anastasia Y; Seget, Katarzyna; Moeller, Giuliana K; de Pagter, Mirjam S.; de Roos, Jeroen A D M; Dürrbaum, Milena; Kuffer, Christian; Müller, Stefan; Zaman, Guido J R; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Storchová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    Up to 80% of human cancers, in particular solid tumors, contain cells with abnormal chromosomal numbers, or aneuploidy, which is often linked with marked chromosomal instability. Whereas in some tumors the aneuploidy occurs by missegregation of one or a few chromosomes, aneuploidy can also arise during proliferation of inherently unstable tetraploid cells generated by whole genome doubling from diploid cells. Recent findings from cancer genome sequencing projects suggest that nearly 40% of tumors underwent whole genome doubling at some point of tumorigenesis, yet its contribution to cancer phenotypes and benefits for malignant growth remain unclear. Here, we investigated the consequences of a whole genome doubling in both cancerous and non-transformed p53 positive human cells. SNP array analysis and multicolor karyotyping revealed that induced whole-genome doubling led to variable aneuploidy. We found that chromosomal instability (CIN) is a frequent, but not a default outcome of whole genome doubling. The CIN phenotypes were accompanied by increased tolerance to mitotic errors that was mediated by suppression of the p53 signaling. Additionally, the expression of pro-apoptotic factors, such as iASPP and cIAP2, was downregulated. Furthermore, we found that whole genome doubling promotes resistance to a broad spectrum of chemotherapeutic drugs and stimulates anchorage-independent growth even in non-transformed p53-positive human cells. Taken together, whole genome doubling provides multifaceted benefits for malignant growth. Our findings provide new insight why genome-doubling promotes tumorigenesis and correlates with poor survival in cancer. PMID:26151317

  11. Non-anti-mitotic concentrations of taxol reduce breast cancer cell invasiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Truong-An; Gillet, Ludovic; Roger, Sebastien; Besson, Pierre; White, Edward; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves

    2009-02-06

    Taxol is widely used in breast cancer chemotherapy. Its effects are primarily attributed to its anti-mitotic activity. Microtubule perturbators also exert antimetastatic activities which cannot be explained solely by the inhibition of proliferation. Voltage-dependent sodium channels (Na{sub V}) are abnormally expressed in the highly metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and not in MDA-MB-468 cell line. Inhibiting Na{sub V} activity with tetrodotoxin is responsible for an approximately 0.4-fold reduction of MDA-MB-231 cell invasiveness. In this study, we focused on the effect of a single, 2-h application of 10 nM taxol on the two cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468. At this concentration, taxol had no effect on proliferation after 7 days and on migration in any cell line. However it led to a 40% reduction of transwell invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. There was no additive effect when taxol and tetrodotoxin were simultaneously applied. Na{sub V} activity, as assessed by patch-clamp, indicates that it was changed by taxol pre-treatment. We conclude that taxol can exert anti-tumoral activities, in cells expressing Na{sub V}, at low doses that have no effect on cell proliferation. This effect might be due to a modulation of signalling pathways involving sodium channels.

  12. Mitotic and meiotic behavior of rye chromosomes in wheat - Psathyrostachys huashanica amphiploid x triticale progeny.

    PubMed

    Xie, Q; Kang, H; Sparkes, D L; Tao, S; Fan, X M; Xu, L; Fan, X; Sha, L; Zhang, H; Wang, Y; Zeng, J; Zhou, Y

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of rye chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis was analyzed in a subset comprising 33 F3 lines from the cross of wheat, Psathyrostachys huashanica amphiploid (AABBDDNsNs) and hexaploid triticale (AABBRR), as visualized by genomic in situ hybridization. The results indicated that 31 of the total lines contained 4-14 rye chromosomes. Twenty-eight combinations had more rye chromosomes than the F1 hybrids, suggesting the occurrence of spontaneous quantitative increment. No P. huashanica chromosomes were detected in all of the combinations tested. Mitotic analysis showed that rye chromosomes progressed normally with the wheat counterparts without loss. However, abnormal meiosis was found in almost all lines. Similar progression between wheat and rye genomes appeared from interphase to metaphase I. It was at anaphase I that many rye univalents lagged behind those of wheat, followed by equational division. This resulted in the formation of chromosomal segments and micronuclei at telophase I or II. Micronuclei could also be generated from the immobilized univalents in the periphery of cells. Synapsis and translocations between wheat and rye genomes, chromosome bridges, and unreduced gametes were detected. Therefore, it is proposed that rye chromosome elimination may involve chromatid lagging, fragmentation and micronucleation, or the immobilization of certain univalents during meiosis instead of mitosis in the relatively advanced generations. This mechanism, together with spontaneous incremental increase of rye chromosome number, permitted the generation of various germplasms for wheat improvement. PMID:23315875

  13. Alterations and Abnormal Mitosis of Wheat Chromosomes Induced by Wheat-Rye Monosomic Addition Lines

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shulan; Yang, Manyu; Fei, Yunyan; Tan, Feiquan; Ren, Zhenglong; Yan, Benju; Zhang, Huaiyu; Tang, Zongxiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Wheat-rye addition lines are an old topic. However, the alterations and abnormal mitotic behaviours of wheat chromosomes caused by wheat-rye monosomic addition lines are seldom reported. Methodology/Principal Findings Octoploid triticale was derived from common wheat T. aestivum L. ‘Mianyang11’×rye S. cereale L. ‘Kustro’ and some progeny were obtained by the controlled backcrossing of triticale with ‘Mianyang11’ followed by self-fertilization. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) using rye genomic DNA and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using repetitive sequences pAs1 and pSc119.2 as probes were used to analyze the mitotic chromosomes of these progeny. Strong pSc119.2 FISH signals could be observed at the telomeric regions of 3DS arms in ‘Mianyang11’. However, the pSc119.2 FISH signals were disappeared from the selfed progeny of 4R monosomic addition line and the changed 3D chromosomes could be transmitted to next generation stably. In one of the selfed progeny of 7R monosomic addition line, one 2D chromosome was broken and three 4A chromosomes were observed. In the selfed progeny of 6R monosomic addition line, structural variation and abnormal mitotic behaviour of 3D chromosome were detected. Additionally, 1A and 4B chromosomes were eliminated from some of the progeny of 6R monosomic addition line. Conclusions/Significance These results indicated that single rye chromosome added to wheat might cause alterations and abnormal mitotic behaviours of wheat chromosomes and it is possible that the stress caused by single alien chromosome might be one of the factors that induced karyotype alteration of wheat. PMID:23936213

  14. CamKII inhibitors reduce mitotic instability, connexon anomalies and progression of the in vivo behavioral phenotype in transgenic animals expressing a mutated Gjb1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Mones, Saleh; Bordignon, Benoit; Peiretti, Franck; Landrier, Jean F.; Gess, Burkhardt; Bourguignon, Jean J.; Bihel, Frédéric; Fontés, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Mutation in the Gjb1 gene, coding for a connexin (Cx32), is associated with an inherited peripheral neuropathic disorder (X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth, CMTX). Our previous work reported that transgenic animals expressing a human Gjb1 transgene present polyploidy and abnormal over-duplication of the centrosome, suggesting a role for Gjb1 in mitotic stability. In this article, we propose mechanisms by which mutations in Gjb1 induce mitotic instability and discuss its potential relation with the CMTX phenotype. We showed that transgenic cells exhibit CamKII over-stimulation, a phenomenon that has been linked to mitotic instability (polyploidy, nuclear volume and centrosome over-duplication), that is reversed by CamKII inhibitors. We also demonstrate that connexon activity is partially restored in transgenic cells with CamKII inhibitors. Our model supports the role for Pim1, a kinase that has been associated with genomic instability in cancers, in genomic instability in Cx32 mutations. Regarding in vivo phenotype, we showed that degradation on the rotarod test in our transgenic mice is significantly lowered by treatment with a CamKII inhibitor (KN93). This effect was seen in two lines with different point mutations in GJB1, and stopping the treatment led to degradation of the phenotype. PMID:24982612

  15. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1509 - Figure 3 to Part 1509

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Figure 3 to Part 1509 3 Figure 3 to Part 1509 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS Pt. 1509, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part 1509 EC03OC91.066...

  16. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1508 - Figure 3 to Part 1508

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Figure 3 to Part 1508 3 Figure 3 to Part 1508 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES Multiple-tube fireworks devices. Pt. 1508, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part 1508...

  17. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1509 - Figure 1 to Part 1509

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Figure 1 to Part 1509 1 Figure 1 to Part 1509 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS Pt. 1509, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1509 EC03OC91.064...

  18. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1508 - Figure 3 to Part 1508

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Figure 3 to Part 1508 3 Figure 3 to Part 1508 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS Pt. 1508, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part 1508 EC03OC91.063...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1509 - Figure 1 to Part 1509

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Figure 1 to Part 1509 1 Figure 1 to Part 1509 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS Pt. 1509, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1509 EC03OC91.064...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1509 - Figure 3 to Part 1509

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Figure 3 to Part 1509 3 Figure 3 to Part 1509 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS Pt. 1509, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part 1509 EC03OC91.066...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1508 - Figure 3 to Part 1508

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Figure 3 to Part 1508 3 Figure 3 to Part 1508 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS Pt. 1508, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part 1508 EC03OC91.063...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1508 - Figure 3 to Part 1508

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Figure 3 to Part 1508 3 Figure 3 to Part 1508 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES Multiple-tube fireworks devices. Pt. 1508, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part 1508...

  3. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1508 - Figure 3 to Part 1508

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Figure 3 to Part 1508 3 Figure 3 to Part 1508 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES Multiple-tube fireworks devices. Pt. 1508, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part 1508...

  4. Abnormal mitosis in hypertetraploid cells causes aberrant nuclear morphology in association with H2O2-induced premature senescence.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Susumu

    2008-09-01

    Aberrant nuclear morphology, such as nuclei with irregular shapes or fragmented nuclei, is often observed in senescent cells, but its biological significance is not fully understood. My previous study showed that aberrant nuclear morphology in senescent human fibroblasts is attributable to abnormal mitosis in later passages. In this study, the production of abnormal nuclei in association with premature senescence was investigated. Premature senescence was induced by brief exposure of human fibroblasts to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and mitosis was observed by time-lapse microscopy. In addition, cell cycle and nuclear morphology after exposure to H(2)O(2) were also analyzed using a laser scanning cytometer. Time-lapse analysis revealed that the induction of premature senescence caused abnormal mitoses, such as mitotic slippage or incomplete mitosis, especially in later days after H(2)O(2) exposure and often resulted in abnormal nuclear morphology. Analysis by laser scanning cytometer showed significantly higher frequency of abnormal cells with deformed nuclei and abnormal mitotic cells with misaligned chromosomes in a hypertetraploid subpopulation. These results suggest that unstable hypertetraploid cells, formed in association with H(2)O(2)-induced premature senescence, cause abnormal mitosis that leads to aberrant nuclear morphology. PMID:18618767

  5. Inhibition of mitotic-specific histone phophorylation by sodium arsenite

    SciTech Connect

    Cobo, J.M.; Valdez, J.G.; Gurley, L.R.

    1994-10-01

    Synchronized cultures of Chinese hamster cells (line CHO) were used to measure the effects of 10{mu}M sodium arsenite on histone phosphorylation. This treatment caused cell proliferation to be temporarily arrested, after which the cells spontaneously resumed cell proliferation in a radiomimetric manner. Immediately following treatment, it was found that sodium arsenite affected only mitotic-specific HI and H3 phosphorylations. Neither interphase, nor mitotic, H2A and H4 phosphorylations were affected, nor was interphase HI Phosphorylation affected. The phosphorylation of HI was inhibited only in mitosis, reducing HI phosphorylation to 38.1% of control levels, which was the level of interphase HI phosphorylation. The phosphorylation of both H3 variants was inhibited in mitosis, the less hydrophobic H3 to 19% and the more hydrophobic H3 to 24% of control levels. These results suggest that sodium arsenite may inhibite cell proliferation by interfering with the cyclin B/p34{sup cdc2} histone kinase activity which is thought to play a key role in regulating the cell cycle. It has been proposed by our laboratory that HI and H3 phosphorylations play a role in restructuring interphase chromatin into metaphase chromosomes. Interference of this process by sodium arsenite may lead to structurally damaged chromosomes resulting in the increased cancer risks known to be produced by arsenic exposure from the environment.

  6. Mitotic internalization of planar cell polarity proteins preserves tissue polarity.

    PubMed

    Devenport, Danelle; Oristian, Daniel; Heller, Evan; Fuchs, Elaine

    2011-08-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is the collective polarization of cells along the epithelial plane, a process best understood in the terminally differentiated Drosophila wing. Proliferative tissues such as mammalian skin also show PCP, but the mechanisms that preserve tissue polarity during proliferation are not understood. During mitosis, asymmetrically distributed PCP components risk mislocalization or unequal inheritance, which could have profound consequences for the long-range propagation of polarity. Here, we show that when mouse epidermal basal progenitors divide PCP components are selectively internalized into endosomes, which are inherited equally by daughter cells. Following mitosis, PCP proteins are recycled to the cell surface, where asymmetry is re-established by a process reliant on neighbouring PCP. A cytoplasmic dileucine motif governs mitotic internalization of atypical cadherin Celsr1, which recruits Vang2 and Fzd6 to endosomes. Moreover, embryos transgenic for a Celsr1 that cannot mitotically internalize exhibit perturbed hair-follicle angling, a hallmark of defective PCP. This underscores the physiological relevance and importance of this mechanism for regulating polarity during cell division. PMID:21743464

  7. Evidence for mitotic recombination in W sup ei /+ heterozygous mice

    SciTech Connect

    Panthier, J.J.; Condamine, H.; Jacob, F. ); Guenet, J.L. )

    1990-05-01

    A number of alleles at coat color loci of the house mouse give rise to areas of wild-type pigmentation on the coats of otherwise mutant animals. Such unstable alleles include both recessive and dominant mutations. Among the latter are several alleles at the W locus. In this report, phenotypic reversions of the W{sup ei} allele at the W locus were studied. Mice heterozygous in repulsion for both W{sup ei} and buff (bf) (i.e. W{sup ei}+/+bf) were examined for the occurrence of phenotypic reversion events. Buff (bf) is a recessive mutation, which lies 21 cM from W on the telomeric side of chromosome 5 and is responsible for the khaki colored coat of nonagouti buff homozygotes (a/a; bf/bf). Two kinds of fully pigmented reversion spots were recovered on the coats of a/a; W{sup ei}+/+bf mice: either solid black or khaki colored. Furthermore phenotypic reversions of W{sup ei}/+ were enhanced significantly following X-irradiation of 9.25-day-old W{sup ei}/+ embryos (P < 0.04). These observations are consistent with the suggestion of a role for mitotic recombination in the origin of these phenotypic reversions. In addition these results raise the intriguing possibility that some W mutations may enhance mitotic recombination in the house mouse.

  8. Towards a quantitative understanding of mitotic spindle assembly and mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Mogilner, Alex; Craig, Erin

    2010-01-01

    The ‘simple’ view of the mitotic spindle is that it self-assembles as a result of microtubules (MTs) randomly searching for chromosomes, after which the spindle length is maintained by a balance of outward tension exerted by molecular motors on the MTs connecting centrosomes and chromosomes, and compression generated by other motors on the MTs connecting the spindle poles. This picture is being challenged now by mounting evidence indicating that spindle assembly and maintenance rely on much more complex interconnected networks of microtubules, molecular motors, chromosomes and regulatory proteins. From an engineering point of view, three design principles of this molecular machine are especially important: the spindle assembles quickly, it assembles accurately, and it is mechanically robust – yet malleable. How is this design achieved with randomly interacting and impermanent molecular parts? Here, we review recent interdisciplinary studies that have started to shed light on this question. We discuss cooperative mechanisms of spindle self-assembly, error correction and maintenance of its mechanical properties, speculate on analogy between spindle and lamellipodial dynamics, and highlight the role of quantitative approaches in understanding the mitotic spindle design. PMID:20930139

  9. A molecular mechanism of mitotic centrosome assembly in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Conduit, Paul T; Richens, Jennifer H; Wainman, Alan; Holder, James; Vicente, Catarina C; Pratt, Metta B; Dix, Carly I; Novak, Zsofia A; Dobbie, Ian M; Schermelleh, Lothar; Raff, Jordan W

    2014-01-01

    Centrosomes comprise a pair of centrioles surrounded by pericentriolar material (PCM). The PCM expands dramatically as cells enter mitosis, but it is unclear how this occurs. In this study, we show that the centriole protein Asl initiates the recruitment of DSpd-2 and Cnn to mother centrioles; both proteins then assemble into co-dependent scaffold-like structures that spread outwards from the mother centriole and recruit most, if not all, other PCM components. In the absence of either DSpd-2 or Cnn, mitotic PCM assembly is diminished; in the absence of both proteins, it appears to be abolished. We show that DSpd-2 helps incorporate Cnn into the PCM and that Cnn then helps maintain DSpd-2 within the PCM, creating a positive feedback loop that promotes robust PCM expansion around the mother centriole during mitosis. These observations suggest a surprisingly simple mechanism of mitotic PCM assembly in flies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03399.001 PMID:25149451

  10. Unconventional Functions of Mitotic Kinases in Kidney Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hascoet, Pauline; Chesnel, Franck; Le Goff, Cathy; Le Goff, Xavier; Arlot-Bonnemains, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Human tumors exhibit a variety of genetic alterations, including point mutations, translocations, gene amplifications and deletions, as well as aneuploid chromosome numbers. For carcinomas, aneuploidy is associated with poor patient outcome for a large variety of tumor types, including breast, colon, and renal cell carcinoma. The Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a heterogeneous carcinoma consisting of different histologic types. The clear renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most common subtype and represents 85% of the RCC. Central to the biology of the ccRCC is the loss of function of the Von Hippel–Lindau gene, but is also associated with genetic instability that could be caused by abrogation of the cell cycle mitotic spindle checkpoint and may involve the Aurora kinases, which regulate centrosome maturation. Aneuploidy can also result from the loss of cell–cell adhesion and apical–basal cell polarity that also may be regulated by the mitotic kinases (polo-like kinase 1, casein kinase 2, doublecortin-like kinase 1, and Aurora kinases). In this review, we describe the “non-mitotic” unconventional functions of these kinases in renal tumorigenesis. PMID:26579493

  11. Differential Mitotic Stability of Yeast Disomes Derived from Triploid Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Douglas; Doctor, John S.; Feuersanger, Jeane H.; Doolittle, Mark M.

    1981-01-01

    The frequencies of recovered disomy among the meiotic segregants of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) triploids were assessed under conditions in which all 17 yeast chromosomes were monitored simultaneously. The studies employed inbred triploids, in which all homologous centromeres were identical by descent, and single haploid testers carrying genetic markers for all 17 linkage groups. The principal results include: (1) Ascospores from triploid meiosis germinate at frequencies comparable to those from normal diploids, but most fail to produce visible colonies due to the growth-retarding effects of high multiple disomy. (2) The probability of disome formation during triploid meiosis is the same for all chromosomes; disomy for any given chromosome does not exclude simultaneous disomy for any other chromosome. (3) The 17 yeast chromosomes fall into three frequency classes in terms of disome recovery. The results support the idea that multiply disomic meiotic segregants of the triploid experience repeated, nonrandom, post-germination mitotic chromosome losses (N+1→N) and that the observed variations in individual disome recovery are wholly attributable to inherent differences in disome mitotic stability. PMID:7035289

  12. Small Molecule Approach to Study the Function of Mitotic Kinesins.

    PubMed

    Al-Obaidi, Naowras; Kastl, Johanna; Mayer, Thomas U

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic motor proteins of the kinesin superfamily are critical for the faithful segregation of chromosomes and the formation of the two daughter cells during meiotic and mitotic M-phase. Of the 45 human kinesins, roughly a dozen are involved in the assembly of the bipolar spindle, alignment of chromosomes at the spindle equator, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis. The functions of kinesins in these processes are highly diverse and include the transport of cargo molecules, sliding and bundling of microtubules, and regulation of microtubule dynamics. In light of this multitude of diverse functions and the complex functional interplay of different kinesins during M-phase, it is not surprising that one of the greatest challenges in cell biology is the functional dissection of individual motor proteins. Reversible and fast acting small molecules are powerful tools to accomplish this challenge. However, the validity of conclusions drawn from small molecule studies strictly depends on compound specificity. In this chapter, we present methods for the identification of small molecule inhibitors of a motor protein of interest. In particular, we focus on a protein-based large throughput screen to identify inhibitors of the ATPase activity of kinesins. Furthermore, we provide protocols and guidelines for secondary screens to validate hits and select for specific inhibitors. PMID:27193856

  13. Polyoma small T antigen triggers cell death via mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Pores Fernando, A T; Andrabi, S; Cizmecioglu, O; Zhu, C; Livingston, D M; Higgins, J M G; Schaffhausen, B S; Roberts, T M

    2015-05-01

    Polyoma small T antigen (PyST), an early gene product of the polyoma virus, has been shown to cause cell death in a number of mammalian cells in a protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-dependent manner. In the current study, using a cell line featuring regulated expression of PyST, we found that PyST arrests cells in mitosis. Live-cell and immunofluorescence studies showed that the majority of the PyST expressing cells were arrested in prometaphase with almost no cells progressing beyond metaphase. These cells exhibited defects in chromosomal congression, sister chromatid cohesion and spindle positioning, thereby resulting in the activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint. Prolonged mitotic arrest then led to cell death via mitotic catastrophe. Cell cycle inhibitors that block cells in G1/S prevented PyST-induced death. PyST-induced cell death that occurs during M is not dependent on p53 status. These data suggested, and our results confirmed, that PP2A inhibition could be used to preferentially kill cancer cells with p53 mutations that proliferate normally in the presence of cell cycle inhibitors. PMID:24998850

  14. Advanced figure sensor operations and maintenance manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    This manual contains procedures for installing, operating, and maintaining the optical figure sensor and its associated electronic controls. The optical figure sensor, a system of integrated components, comprises: (1) a phase measuring modified interferometer employing a single frequency 6328 A laser, and a Vidissector; (2) a two-axis automatic thermal compensation control mount; (3) a five degree of freedom manual adjustment stand; and (4) a control console. This instrument provides real time output data of optical figure errors for spherical mirrors, and is also capable of measuring aspherical mirrors if a null corrector is added.

  15. Timely Endocytosis of Cytokinetic Enzymes Prevents Premature Spindle Breakage during Mitotic Exit

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Masayuki; Yeong, Foong May

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis requires the spatio-temporal coordination of membrane deposition and primary septum (PS) formation at the division site to drive acto-myosin ring (AMR) constriction. It has been demonstrated that AMR constriction invariably occurs only after the mitotic spindle disassembly. It has also been established that Chitin Synthase II (Chs2p) neck localization precedes mitotic spindle disassembly during mitotic exit. As AMR constriction depends upon PS formation, the question arises as to how chitin deposition is regulated so as to prevent premature AMR constriction and mitotic spindle breakage. In this study, we propose that cells regulate the coordination between spindle disassembly and AMR constriction via timely endocytosis of cytokinetic enzymes, Chs2p, Chs3p, and Fks1p. Inhibition of endocytosis leads to over accumulation of cytokinetic enzymes during mitotic exit, which accelerates the constriction of the AMR, and causes spindle breakage that eventually could contribute to monopolar spindle formation in the subsequent round of cell division. Intriguingly, the mitotic spindle breakage observed in endocytosis mutants can be rescued either by deleting or inhibiting the activities of, CHS2, CHS3 and FKS1, which are involved in septum formation. The findings from our study highlight the importance of timely endocytosis of cytokinetic enzymes at the division site in safeguarding mitotic spindle integrity during mitotic exit. PMID:27447488

  16. Comprehension of Figurative Language in Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nippold, Marilyn A.

    1985-01-01

    A review of developmental studies concerning metaphor, idiom, and proverb comprehension suggest a variety of assessment tasks for language impaired children. Also suggested are such intervention considerations as the comprehension of literal meaning of figurative expressions before nonliteral meanings. (CL)

  17. Significant Figure Rules for General Arithmetic Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Provides some significant figure rules used in chemistry including the general theoretical basis; logarithms and antilogarithms; exponentiation (with exactly known exponents); sines and cosines; and the extreme value rule. (YP)

  18. Ion beam figuring system in NUDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lin; Xie, Xuhui; Dai, Yifan; Jiao, Changjun; Li, Shengyi

    2007-12-01

    Ion beam figuring (IBF) is an optical fabrication technique that provides highly deterministic process to correct surface figure error of previously polished surfaces by using a directed, inert and neutralized ion beam to physically sputter material from the optic surface. Recently, an ion beam figuring system KDIFS-500 has been designed and built in National University of Defense Technology (NUDT) of the P.R. China. KDIFS-500 is capable of processing workpiece up to Φ500mm. Line scanning process was discussed in detail for estimating the parameters of the beam removal function (BRF) in process. Experiments were conducted to demonstrate that the BRF increases gradually in process and by employing a stability control, the BRF can be kept stable in process. Finally, a Φ95 mm plano optical sample of CVD coated SiC substrate has been figured in two process iterations for demonstrating the correction capability of the KDIFS-500. Their figure convergence ratios reached 5.8 and 2.1 respectively. The actual figure residual errors were basically consistent with the predicted error. These consistencies indicated that the IBF processes on KDIFS-500 are predictable deterministic processes.

  19. Ion beam figuring of small optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drueding, Thomas W.; Fawcett, Steven C.; Wilson, Scott R.; Bifano, Thomas G.

    1995-12-01

    Ion beam figuring provides a highly deterministic method for the final precision figuring of optical components with advantages over conventional methods. The process involves bombarding a component with a stable beam of accelerated particles that selectively removes material from the surface. Figure corrections are achieved by rastering the fixed-current beam across the workplace at appropriate, time-varying velocities. Unlike conventional methods, ion figuring is a noncontact technique and thus avoids such problems as edge rolloff effects, tool wear, and force loading of the workpiece. This work is directed toward the development of the precision ion machining system at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. This system is designed for processing small (approximately equals 10-cm diam) optical components. Initial experiments were successful in figuring 8-cm-diam fused silica and chemical-vapor-deposited SiC samples. The experiments, procedures, and results of figuring the sample workpieces to shallow spherical, parabolic (concave and convex), and non-axially-symmetric shapes are discussed. Several difficulties and limitations encountered with the current system are discussed. The use of a 1-cm aperture for making finer corrections on optical components is also reported.

  20. Regulation of cancer cell survival by BCL2 family members upon prolonged mitotic arrest: opportunities for anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Barillé-Nion, Sophie; Bah, Nourdine; Véquaud, Eloïse; Juin, Philippe

    2012-10-01

    Attacking cancer cell survival defense by targeting B-Cell Lymphoma 2 (BCL2) family of anti-apoptotic proteins may provide a powerful means to improve chemotherapy efficiency. This could be particularly relevant to anti-mitotic-based therapy, where tumor response relates to a competing network between mitotic cell death signaling and mitotic slippage as an adaptative response to a leaky mitotic checkpoint. In this review, we focus on recent findings that point out the major role played by BCL2 family members in response to anti-mitotic agents, which reveal dependence of cancer cell survival on BCL2 homologs during mitotic arrest and after mitotic slippage. Finally, we discuss pre-clinical data combining anti-mitotic agents with BCL2 inhibitors. PMID:23060542

  1. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. PMID:25903257

  2. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  3. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  4. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  5. Aurora A's Functions During Mitotic Exit: The Guess Who Game.

    PubMed

    Reboutier, David; Benaud, Christelle; Prigent, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, the knowledge of Aurora A kinase functions during mitosis was limited to pre-metaphase events, particularly centrosome maturation, G2/M transition, and mitotic spindle assembly. However, an involvement of Aurora A in post-metaphase events was also suspected, but not clearly demonstrated due to the technical difficulty to perform the appropriate experiments. Recent developments of both an analog-specific version of Aurora A and small molecule inhibitors have led to the first demonstration that Aurora A is required for the early steps of cytokinesis. As in pre-metaphase, Aurora A plays diverse functions during anaphase, essentially participating in astral microtubules dynamics and central spindle assembly and functioning. The present review describes the experimental systems used to decipher new functions of Aurora A during late mitosis and situate these functions into the context of cytokinesis mechanisms. PMID:26734572

  6. FTO influences adipogenesis by regulating mitotic clonal expansion

    PubMed Central

    Merkestein, Myrte; Laber, Samantha; McMurray, Fiona; Andrew, Daniel; Sachse, Gregor; Sanderson, Jeremy; Li, Mengdi; Usher, Samuel; Sellayah, Dyan; Ashcroft, Frances M.; Cox, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    The fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene plays a pivotal role in regulating body weight and fat mass; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we show that primary adipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from FTO overexpression (FTO-4) mice exhibit increased potential for adipogenic differentiation, while MEFs derived from FTO knockout (FTO-KO) mice show reduced adipogenesis. As predicted from these findings, fat pads from FTO-4 mice fed a high-fat diet show more numerous adipocytes. FTO influences adipogenesis by regulating events early in adipogenesis, during the process of mitotic clonal expansion. The effect of FTO on adipogenesis appears to be mediated via enhanced expression of the pro-adipogenic short isoform of RUNX1T1, which enhanced adipocyte proliferation, and is increased in FTO-4 MEFs and reduced in FTO-KO MEFs. Our findings provide novel mechanistic insight into how upregulation of FTO leads to obesity. PMID:25881961

  7. Mitotic Exit and Separation of Mother and Daughter Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    Productive cell proliferation involves efficient and accurate splitting of the dividing cell into two separate entities. This orderly process reflects coordination of diverse cytological events by regulatory systems that drive the cell from mitosis into G1. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, separation of mother and daughter cells involves coordinated actomyosin ring contraction and septum synthesis, followed by septum destruction. These events occur in precise and rapid sequence once chromosomes are segregated and are linked with spindle organization and mitotic progress by intricate cell cycle control machinery. Additionally, critical parts of the mother/daughter separation process are asymmetric, reflecting a form of fate specification that occurs in every cell division. This chapter describes central events of budding yeast cell separation, as well as the control pathways that integrate them and link them with the cell cycle. PMID:23212898

  8. Regulation of midbody formation and function by mitotic kinases.

    PubMed

    D'Avino, Pier Paolo; Capalbo, Luisa

    2016-05-01

    Cytokinesis is the final phase of cell division and safeguards the correct distribution of genomic and cytoplasmic materials between the two nascent daughter cells. The final separation, or abscission, of the daughter cells depends on the proper assembly of an organelle at the intercellular bridge, the midbody, which acts as a platform for the recruitment and organisation of various proteins involved in both the control and execution of the abscission process. Recent studies have led to the identification of the mechanisms, signalling pathways and molecules that control the two tightly linked processes of midbody formation and abscission. Here we review our current knowledge of the role that mitotic kinases play in these processes and offer our perspectives on the potential future challenges that await researchers in the field. PMID:26802517

  9. Mitotic wavefronts mediated by mechanical signaling in early Drosophila embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Louis; Idema, Timon; Liu, Andrea; Lubensky, Tom

    2013-03-01

    Mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo demonstrates spatial and temporal correlations in the form of wavefronts that travel across the embryo in each cell cycle. This coordinated phenomenon requires a signaling mechanism, which we suggest is mechanical in origin. We have constructed a theoretical model that supports nonlinear wavefront propagation in a mechanically-excitable medium. Previously, we have shown that this model captures quantitatively the wavefront speed as it varies with cell cycle number, for reasonable values of the elastic moduli and damping coefficient of the medium. Now we show that our model also captures the displacements of cell nuclei in the embryo in response to the traveling wavefront. This new result further supports that mechanical signaling may play an important role in mediating mitotic wavefronts.

  10. Embryos of Robertsonian Translocation Carriers Exhibit a Mitotic Interchromosomal Effect That Enhances Genetic Instability during Early Development

    PubMed Central

    Alfarawati, Samer; Fragouli, Elpida; Colls, Pere; Wells, Dagan

    2012-01-01

    Balanced chromosomal rearrangements represent one of the most common forms of genetic abnormality affecting approximately 1 in every 500 (0.2%) individuals. Difficulties processing the abnormal chromosomes during meiosis lead to an elevated risk of chromosomally abnormal gametes, resulting in high rates of miscarriage and/or children with congenital abnormalities. It has also been suggested that the presence of chromosome rearrangements may also cause an increase in aneuploidy affecting structurally normal chromosomes, due to disruption of chromosome alignment on the spindle or disturbance of other factors related to meiotic chromosome segregation. The existence of such a phenomenon (an inter-chromosomal effect—ICE) remains controversial, with different studies presenting contradictory data. The current investigation aimed to demonstrate conclusively whether an ICE truly exists. For this purpose a comprehensive chromosome screening technique, optimized for analysis of minute amounts of tissue, was applied to a unique collection of samples consisting of 283 oocytes and early embryos derived from 44 patients carrying chromosome rearrangements. A further 5,078 oocytes and embryos, derived from chromosomally normal individuals of identical age, provided a robust control group for comparative analysis. A highly significant (P = 0.0002) increase in the rate of malsegregation affecting structurally normal chromosomes was observed in association with Robertsonian translocations. Surprisingly, the ICE was clearly detected in early embryos from female carriers, but not in oocytes, indicating the possibility of mitotic rather than the previously suggested meiotic origin. These findings have implications for our understanding of genetic stability during preimplantation development and are of clinical relevance for patients carrying a Robertsonian translocation. The results are also pertinent to other situations when cellular mechanisms for maintaining genetic fidelity

  11. Wet-Etch Figuring Optical Figuring by Controlled Application of Liquid Etchant

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J

    2001-02-13

    WET-ETCH FIGURING (WEF) is an automated method of precisely figuring optical materials by the controlled application of aqueous etchant solution. This technology uses surface-tension-gradient-driven flow to confine and stabilize a wetted zone of an etchant solution or other aqueous processing fluid on the surface of an object. This wetted zone can be translated on the surface in a computer-controlled fashion for precise spatial control of the surface reactions occurring (e.g. chemical etching). WEF is particularly suitable for figuring very thin optical materials because it applies no thermal or mechanical stress to the material. Also, because the process is stress-free the workpiece can be monitored during figuring using interferometric metrology, and the measurements obtained can be used to control the figuring process in real-time--something that cannot be done with traditional figuring methods.

  12. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  13. Induction of mitotic and chromosomal abnormalities on Allium cepa cells by pesticides imidacloprid and sulfentrazone and the mixture of them.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Jaqueline; Fernandes, Thais Cristina Casimiro; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of low concentrations of pesticides in non-target organisms, seeds of Allium cepa were exposed for 24 h to the imidacloprid insecticide, sulfentrazone herbicide and to the mixture of them, followed by recovery periods of 48 and 72 h. Imidacloprid results indicated an indirect genotoxic effect by inducing different types of chromosome aberration (CA), mainly bridges and chromosomal adherences. Cells with micronucleus (MN) were not significant in the analyzed meristems. Moreover, the 72-h recovery tests indicated that the two lower concentrations of the insecticide (0.036 and 0.36 g L(-1)) had their genotoxic effects minimized after discontinuation of treatment, differently to the observed for the field concentration (3.6 g L(-1)). Sulfentrazone herbicide at field concentration (6 g L(-1)) caused cytotoxic effects by inducing nuclear fragmentation and inhibition of cell division. The other concentrations (0.06, 0.6 and 1.2 g L(-1)) indicated genotoxic effects for this herbicide. The concentration of 0.06 g L(-1) induced persistent effects that could be visualized both by the induction of CA in the recovery times as by the presence of MN in meristematic and F1 cells. The induction of MN by this lowest concentration was associated with the great amount of breakage, losses and chromosomal bridges. The mixture of pesticides induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects, by reducing the MI of the cells. The chromosomal damage induced by the mixture of pesticides was not persistent to the cells, since such damage was minimized 72 h after the interruption of the exposure. PMID:26386773

  14. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  16. Mitotic Asynchrony Induces Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Secretion from Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Alcala, Sarah E.; Benton, Angela S.; Watson, Alan M.; Kureshi, Suraiya; Reeves, Erica M. K.; Damsker, Jesse; Wang, Zuyi; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Anderson, Julia; Williams, Aaron M.; Lee, Amber J. Y.; Hayes, Kathleen; Rose, Mary C.; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2014-01-01

    We recently proposed that mitotic asynchrony in repairing tissue may underlie chronic inflammation and fibrosis, where immune cell infiltration is secondary to proinflammatory cross-talk among asynchronously repairing adjacent tissues. Building on our previous finding that mitotic asynchrony is associated with proinflammatory/fibrotic cytokine secretion (e.g., transforming growth factor [TGF]-β1), here we provide evidence supporting cause-and-effect. Under normal conditions, primary airway epithelial basal cell populations undergo mitosis synchronously and do not secrete proinflammatory or profibrotic cytokines. However, when pairs of nonasthmatic cultures were mitotically synchronized at 12 hours off-set and then combined, the mixed cell populations secreted elevated levels of TGF-β1. This shows that mitotic asynchrony is not only associated with but is also causative of TGF-β1 secretion. The secreted cytokines and other mediators from asthmatic cells were not the cause of asynchronous regeneration; synchronously mitotic nonasthmatic epithelia exposed to conditioned media from asthmatic cells did not show changes in mitotic synchrony. We also tested if resynchronization of regenerating asthmatic airway epithelia reduces TGF-β1 secretion and found that pulse-dosed dexamethasone, simvastatin, and aphidicolin were all effective. We therefore propose a new model for chronic inflammatory and fibrotic conditions where an underlying factor is mitotic asynchrony. PMID:24669775

  17. Closed MAD2 (C-MAD2) is selectively incorporated into the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC)

    PubMed Central

    Tipton, Aaron R; Tipton, Michael; Yen, Tim

    2011-01-01

    The mitotic checkpoint is a specialized signal transduction pathway that monitors kinetochore-microtubule attachment to achieve faithful chromosome segregation. MAD2 is an evolutionarily conserved mitotic checkpoint protein that exists in open (O) and closed (C) conformations. The increase of intracellular C-MAD2 level during mitosis, through O→C-MAD2 conversion as catalyzed by unattached kinetochores, is a critical signaling event for the mitotic checkpoint. However, it remains controversial whether MAD2 is an integral component of the effector of the mitotic checkpoint—the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC). We show here that endogenous human MCC is assembled by first forming a BUBR1:BUB3:CDC20 complex in G2 and then selectively incorporating C-MAD2 during mitosis. Nevertheless, MCC can be induced to form in G1/S cells by expressing a C-conformation locked MAD2 mutant, indicating intracellular level of C-MAD2 as a major limiting factor for MCC assembly. In addition, a recombinant MCC containing C-MAD2 exhibits effective inhibitory activity toward APC/C isolated from mitotic HeLa cells, while a recombinant BUBR1:BUB3:CDC20 ternary complex is ineffective at comparable concentrations despite association with APC/C. These results help establish a direct connection between a major signal transducer (C-MAD2) and the potent effector (MCC) of the mitotic checkpoint, and provide novel insights into protein-protein interactions during assembly of a functional MCC. PMID:22037211

  18. Efficient Activation of Apoptotic Signaling during Mitotic Arrest with AK301

    PubMed Central

    Bleiler, Marina; Yeagley, Michelle; Wright, Dennis; Giardina, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic inhibitors are widely utilized chemotherapeutic agents that take advantage of mitotic defects in cancer cells. We have identified a novel class of piperazine-based mitotic inhibitors, of which AK301 is the most potent derivative identified to date (EC50 < 200 nM). Colon cancer cells arrested in mitosis with AK301 readily underwent a p53-dependent apoptosis following compound withdrawal and arrest release. This apoptotic response was significantly higher for AK301 than for other mitotic inhibitors tested (colchicine, vincristine, and BI 2536). AK301-treated cells exhibited a robust mitosis-associated DNA damage response, including ATM activation, γH2AX phosphorylation and p53 stabilization. The association between mitotic signaling and the DNA damage response was supported by the finding that Aurora B inhibition reduced the level of γH2AX staining. Confocal imaging of AK301-treated cells revealed multiple γ-tubulin microtubule organizing centers attached to microtubules, but with limited centrosome migration, raising the possibility that aberrant microtubule pulling may underlie DNA breakage. AK301 selectively targeted APC-mutant colonocytes and promoted TNF-induced apoptosis in p53-mutant colon cancer cells. Our findings indicate that AK301 induces a mitotic arrest state with a highly active DNA damage response. Together with a reversible arrest state, AK301 is a potent promoter of a mitosis-to-apoptosis transition that can target cancer cells with mitotic defects. PMID:27097159

  19. Software systems for modeling articulated figures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Cary B.

    1989-01-01

    Research in computer animation and simulation of human task performance requires sophisticated geometric modeling and user interface tools. The software for a research environment should present the programmer with a powerful but flexible substrate of facilities for displaying and manipulating geometric objects, yet insure that future tools have a consistent and friendly user interface. Jack is a system which provides a flexible and extensible programmer and user interface for displaying and manipulating complex geometric figures, particularly human figures in a 3D working environment. It is a basic software framework for high-performance Silicon Graphics IRIS workstations for modeling and manipulating geometric objects in a general but powerful way. It provides a consistent and user-friendly interface across various applications in computer animation and simulation of human task performance. Currently, Jack provides input and control for applications including lighting specification and image rendering, anthropometric modeling, figure positioning, inverse kinematics, dynamic simulation, and keyframe animation.

  20. Figure control concepts for segmented reflector telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, D.; Chu, C. C.; Ih, C.-H. C.; Wang, S. J.; Ryaciotaki-Boussalis, H. A.

    1989-01-01

    Control analysis activities related to the development of figure control technologies for large space telescopes with precision segmented actively controlled primary reflectors are reviewed. The Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR) configuration is described along with the development and use of the PSR models. Geometric and dynamic models, characterization of figure estimation errors and optimal sensor placement, and the development of quasi-static and dynamic control concepts are outlined. The structure of a quasi-static controller is presented, that utilizes edge sensor measurements to estimate displacement errors at the actuator level and generates figure correction commands. The second approach considers decentralization of the reflector system at the panel level, while the third considers decentralization at the actuator level.

  1. Spirometric abnormalities among welders

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, S.K.; Gupta, B.N.; Husain, T.; Mathur, N.; Srivastava, S. )

    1991-10-01

    A group of manual welders age group 13-60 years having a mean exposure period of 12.4 {plus minus} 1.12 years were subjected to spirometry to evaluate the prevalence of spirometric abnormalities. The welders showed a significantly higher prevalence of respiratory impairment than that observed among the unexposed controls as a result of exposure to welding gases which comprised fine particles of lead, zinc, chromium, and manganese. This occurred despite the lower concentration of the pollutants at the work place. In the expose group, the smoking welders showed a prevalence of respiratory impairment significantly higher than that observed in the nonsmoking welders. The results of the pulmonary function tests showed a predominantly restrictive type of pulmonary impairment followed by a mixed ventilatory defect among the welders. The effect of age on pulmonary impairment was not discernible. Welders exposed for over 10 years showed a prevalence of respiratory abnormalities significantly higher than those exposed for less than 10 years. Smoking also had a contributory role.

  2. Mitotic Intragenic Recombination: A Mechanism of Survival for Several Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Kane, Megan S; Davids, Mariska; Adams, Christopher; Wolfe, Lynne A; Cheung, Helen W; Gropman, Andrea; Huang, Yan; Ng, Bobby G; Freeze, Hudson H; Adams, David R; Gahl, William A; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2016-02-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) are disorders of abnormal protein glycosylation that affect multiple organ systems. Because most CDGs have been described in only a few individuals, our understanding of the associated phenotypes and the mechanisms of individual survival are limited. In the process of studying two siblings, aged 6 and 11 years, with MOGS-CDG and biallelic MOGS (mannosyl-oligosaccharide glucosidase) mutations (GenBank: NM_006302.2; c.[65C>A; 329G>A] p.[Ala22Glu; Arg110His]; c.[370C>T] p.[Gln124(∗)]), we noted that their survival was much longer than the previous report of MOGS-CDG, in a child who died at 74 days of age. Upon mutation analysis, we detected multiple MOGS genotypes including wild-type alleles in their cultured fibroblast and peripheral blood DNA. Further analysis of DNA from cultured fibroblasts of six individuals with compound heterozygous mutations of PMM2 (PMM2-CDG), MPI (MPI-CDG), ALG3 (ALG3-CDG), ALG12 (ALG12-CDG), DPAGT1 (DPAGT1-CDG), and ALG1 (ALG1-CDG) also identified multiple genotypes including wild-type alleles for each. Droplet digital PCR showed a ratio of nearly 1:1 wild-type to mutant alleles for most, but not all, mutations. This suggests that mitotic recombination contributes to the survival and the variable expressivity of individuals with compound heterozygous CDGs. This also provides an explanation for prior observations of a reduced frequency of homozygous mutations and might contribute to increased levels of residual enzyme activity in cultured fibroblasts of individuals with MPI- and PMM2-CDGs. PMID:26805780

  3. Mitotic Intragenic Recombination: A Mechanism of Survival for Several Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Megan S.; Davids, Mariska; Adams, Christopher; Wolfe, Lynne A.; Cheung, Helen W.; Gropman, Andrea; Huang, Yan; Ng, Bobby G.; Freeze, Hudson H.; Adams, David R.; Gahl, William A.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) are disorders of abnormal protein glycosylation that affect multiple organ systems. Because most CDGs have been described in only a few individuals, our understanding of the associated phenotypes and the mechanisms of individual survival are limited. In the process of studying two siblings, aged 6 and 11 years, with MOGS-CDG and biallelic MOGS (mannosyl-oligosaccharide glucosidase) mutations (GenBank: NM_006302.2; c.[65C>A; 329G>A] p.[Ala22Glu; Arg110His]; c.[370C>T] p.[Gln124∗]), we noted that their survival was much longer than the previous report of MOGS-CDG, in a child who died at 74 days of age. Upon mutation analysis, we detected multiple MOGS genotypes including wild-type alleles in their cultured fibroblast and peripheral blood DNA. Further analysis of DNA from cultured fibroblasts of six individuals with compound heterozygous mutations of PMM2 (PMM2-CDG), MPI (MPI-CDG), ALG3 (ALG3-CDG), ALG12 (ALG12-CDG), DPAGT1 (DPAGT1-CDG), and ALG1 (ALG1-CDG) also identified multiple genotypes including wild-type alleles for each. Droplet digital PCR showed a ratio of nearly 1:1 wild-type to mutant alleles for most, but not all, mutations. This suggests that mitotic recombination contributes to the survival and the variable expressivity of individuals with compound heterozygous CDGs. This also provides an explanation for prior observations of a reduced frequency of homozygous mutations and might contribute to increased levels of residual enzyme activity in cultured fibroblasts of individuals with MPI- and PMM2-CDGs. PMID:26805780

  4. [Figures of anima in the Odyssey].

    PubMed

    Meneghello, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Feminine characters in the Odyssey show different aspects of the archetype: Mother and Anima (C.G. Jung). From an Analytical Psychology perspective the encounters of Odysseus with goddesses: Circe, Calypso, Ino are looked at as different and successive stages of the hero's way into the inconscious, who shows himself in feminine figures, being masculine the consciousness of the hero. Nausicaa is a new, nearly-human figure of Anima who appears after the symbolic death of Odysseus and leads him to the royal couple Alcinous-Arete: in front of them all he finds his new, reborn, personality by creating and narrating his own myth. PMID:25807734

  5. Abnormal Early Cleavage Events Predict Early Embryo Demise: Sperm Oxidative Stress and Early Abnormal Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Burruel, Victoria; Klooster, Katie; Barker, Christopher M.; Pera, Renee Reijo; Meyers, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Human embryos resulting from abnormal early cleavage can result in aneuploidy and failure to develop normally to the blastocyst stage. The nature of paternal influence on early embryo development has not been directly demonstrated although many studies have suggested effects from spermatozoal chromatin packaging, DNA damage, centriolar and mitotic spindle integrity, and plasma membrane integrity. The goal of this study was to determine whether early developmental events were affected by oxidative damage to the fertilizing sperm. Survival analysis was used to compare patterns of blastocyst formation based on P2 duration. Kaplan-Meier survival curves demonstrate that relatively few embryos with short (<1 hr) P2 times reached blastocysts, and the two curves diverged beginning on day 4, with nearly all of the embryos with longer P2 times reaching blastocysts by day 6 (p < .01). We determined that duration of the 2nd to 3rd mitoses were sensitive periods in the presence of spermatozoal oxidative stress. Embryos that displayed either too long or too short cytokineses demonstrated an increased failure to reach blastocyst stage and therefore survive for further development. Although paternal-derived gene expression occurs later in development, this study suggests a specific role in early mitosis that is highly influenced by paternal factors. PMID:25307782

  6. Atomic Force Microscopy to Study Mechanics of Living Mitotic Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P.; Hyman, Anthony A.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2011-08-01

    While biochemical pathways within mitotic cells have been intensively studied, the mechanics of dividing cells is only poorly understood. In our recent report, an experimental system combining fluorescence and atomic force microscopy was set up to study dynamics of mitotic rounding of mammalian cells. We show that cells have a rounding pressure that increases upon mitotic entry. Using specific inhibitors or perturbations, we revealed biological processes required for force generation that underpin the cell rounding shape change during mitosis. The significance of the finding and an outlook are discussed.

  7. Identification of consensus motifs associated with mitotic recombination and clinical characteristics in patients with paternal uniparental isodisomy of chromosome 11.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Yasufumi; Higashimoto, Ken; Oka, Takehiko; Yatsuki, Hitomi; Jozaki, Kosuke; Maeda, Toshiyuki; Kawahara, Kozo; Hamasaki, Yuhei; Matsuo, Muneaki; Nishioka, Kenichi; Joh, Keiichiro; Mukai, Tsunehiro; Soejima, Hidenobu

    2016-04-01

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) is defined as the inheritance of both homologs of a given genomic region from only one parent. The majority of UPD includes an entire chromosome. However, the extent of UPD is sometimes limited to a subchromosomal region (segmental UPD). Mosaic paternal UPD (pUPD) of chromosome 11 is found in approximately 20% of patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) and almost all pUPDs are segmental isodisomic pUPDs resulting from mitotic recombination at an early embryonic stage. A mechanism initiating a DNA double strand break (DSB) within 11p has been predicted to lead to segmental pUPD. However, no consensus motif has yet been found. Here, we analyzed 32 BWS patients with pUPD by SNP array and searched for consensus motifs. We identified four consensus motifs frequently appearing within breakpoint regions of segmental pUPD. These motifs were found in another nine BWS patients with pUPD. In addition, the seven motifs found in meiotic recombination hot spots could not be found within pUPD breakpoint regions. Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, a marker of DSB initiation, could not be found either. These findings suggest that the mechanism(s) of mitotic recombination leading to segmental pUPD are different from that of meiotic recombination. Furthermore, we found seven patients with paternal uniparental diploidy (PUD) mosaicism. Comparison of clinical features between segmental pUPDs and PUDs showed that developmental disability and cardiac abnormalities were additional characteristic features of PUD mosaicism, along with high risk of tumor development. We also found that macroglossia was characteristic of segmental pUPD mosaicism. PMID:26908620

  8. Oxidative Damage to Rhesus Macaque Spermatozoa Results in Mitotic Arrest and Transcript Abundance Changes in Early Embryos1

    PubMed Central

    Burruel, Victoria; Klooster, Katie L.; Chitwood, James; Ross, Pablo J.; Meyers, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our objective was to determine whether oxidative damage of rhesus macaque sperm induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro would affect embryo development following intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) of metaphase II (MII) oocytes. Fresh rhesus macaque spermatozoa were treated with ROS as follows: 1 mM xanthine and 0.1 U/ml xanthine oxidase (XXO) at 37°C and 5% CO2 in air for 2.25 h. Sperm were then assessed for motility, viability, and lipid peroxidation. Motile ROS-treated and control sperm were used for ICSI of MII oocytes. Embryo culture was evaluated for 3 days for development to the eight-cell stage. Embryos were fixed and stained for signs of cytoplasmic and nuclear abnormalities. Gene expression was analyzed by RNA-Seq in two-cell embryos from control and treated groups. Exposure of sperm to XXO resulted in increased lipid peroxidation and decreased sperm motility. ICSI of MII oocytes with motile sperm induced similar rates of fertilization and cleavage between treatments. Development to four- and eight-cell stage was significantly lower for embryos generated with ROS-treated sperm than for controls. All embryos produced from ROS-treated sperm demonstrated permanent embryonic arrest and varying degrees of degeneration and nuclear fragmentation, changes that are suggestive of prolonged senescence or apoptotic cell death. RNA-Seq analysis of two-cell embryos showed changes in transcript abundance resulting from sperm treatment with ROS. Differentially expressed genes were enriched for processes associated with cytoskeletal organization, cell adhesion, and protein phosphorylation. ROS-induced damage to sperm adversely affects embryo development by contributing to mitotic arrest after ICSI of MII rhesus oocytes. Changes in transcript abundance in embryos destined for mitotic arrest is evident at the two-cell stage of development. PMID:23904511

  9. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 640 - Figure 1 to Part 640

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Figure 1 to Part 640 1 Figure 1 to Part 640 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SPINY LOBSTER FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Pt....

  10. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 640 - Figure 1 to Part 640

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Figure 1 to Part 640 1 Figure 1 to Part 640 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SPINY LOBSTER FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Pt....

  11. 50 CFR Figure 1 to Part 640 - Figure 1 to Part 640

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Figure 1 to Part 640 1 Figure 1 to Part 640 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE SPINY LOBSTER FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Pt....

  12. Adolescent Girls' Parasocial Interactions with Media Figures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theran, Sally A.; Newberg, Emily M.; Gleason, Tracy R.

    2010-01-01

    We examined aspects of adolescent girls' parasocial interactions in the context of typical development. Parasocial interactions are defined as symbolic, one-sided quasi-interactions between a viewer and a media figure. In total, 107 adolescent girls were examined; 94% reported engaging in parasocial interactions to some degree. Preoccupied…

  13. 36 CFR Appendix - Figures to Part 1194

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Figures to Part 1194 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ACCESSIBILITY STANDARDS Information, Documentation, and Support Information, documentation, and support. Pt. 1194,...

  14. 36 CFR Appendix - Figures to Part 1194

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Figures to Part 1194 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ACCESSIBILITY STANDARDS Information, Documentation, and Support Information, documentation, and support. Pt. 1194,...

  15. 36 CFR Appendix - Figures to Part 1192

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Figures to Part 1192 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Other Vehicles and Systems Trams, similar vehicles and systems. Pt....

  16. 36 CFR Appendix - Figures to Part 1192

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Figures to Part 1192 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Other Vehicles and Systems Trams, similar vehicles and systems. Pt....

  17. 36 CFR Appendix - Figures to Part 1192

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Figures to Part 1192 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Other Vehicles and Systems Trams, similar vehicles and systems. Pt....

  18. 36 CFR Appendix - Figures to Part 1194

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Figures to Part 1194 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ACCESSIBILITY STANDARDS Information, Documentation, and Support Information, documentation, and support. Pt. 1194,...

  19. Fading-Figure Tracing in Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagai, Chiyoko; Inui, Toshio; Iwata, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe impairment of visuospatial abilities. Figure-drawing abilities, which are thought to reflect visuospatial abilities, have yet to be fully investigated in WS. The purpose of the present study was to clarify whether drawing abilities differ between WS individuals and…

  20. Participation in the Figured World of Graffiti

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, Imuris; Weiss, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on ethnographic work with two "crews" of young graffiti artists in southern Mexico City. The crews share certain characteristics with gangs or urban tribes, but more with "communities of practice": they live in the "figured world" of graffiti, a community of practice at the local and global level. Through participation,…

  1. 36 CFR Appendix - Figures to Part 1194

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Figures to Part 1194 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ACCESSIBILITY STANDARDS Information, Documentation, and Support Information, documentation, and support. Pt. 1194,...

  2. 36 CFR Appendix - Figures to Part 1194

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Figures to Part 1194 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ACCESSIBILITY STANDARDS Information, Documentation, and Support Information, documentation, and support. Pt. 1194,...

  3. 36 CFR Appendix - Figures to Part 1192

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Figures to Part 1192 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Other Vehicles and Systems Trams, similar vehicles and systems. Pt....

  4. 36 CFR Appendix - Figures to Part 1192

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Figures to Part 1192 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Other Vehicles and Systems Trams, similar vehicles and systems. Pt....

  5. Cylindrical optic figuring dwell time optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waluschka, Eugene

    2000-11-01

    The Constellation-X, grazing incidence, x-ray telescope may be fabricated from replicated segments. A series of mandrels will serve as the 'masters' in the replication processes. Diamond turning (milling) followed by abrasive figuring followed by a super polishing are the steps currently envisioned in making just one (of many) mandrel. The abrasive figuring of a mandrel is accomplished by moving a grinding tool along a helical path on this almost cylindrical surface. The measurement of the surface is, however, performed along 'axial' scan lines which intercept this helical path. This approach to figuring and measuring permits a relatively simple scheme to be implemented for the determination of the optimal dwell times of the figuring tool. These optimal dwell times are determined by a deconvolution which approaches the problem in a linear programming context and uses the Simplex Method. The approach maximizes the amount of material removed at any point subject to inequality constraints. The effects of using these 'optimum' dwell times is to significantly improve the tools effectiveness at removing the higher spatial frequencies while staying (strictly) within the bounds and constraints imposed by the hardware. In addition, the ringing at the edges of the optic, frequently present in deconvolution problems, is completely eliminated.

  6. Go Figure. HEADJAM. Teaching Guide [and Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MATHCOUNTS Foundation, Alexandria, VA.

    The HeadJam series is comprised of six programs exploring mathematics, science, and critical thinking skills. It is an award-winning, educational videotape series for middle school students that explores multi-disciplinary skills in a highly entertaining way. The teacher's guide and 22-minute video, "Go Figure," demonstrate how math is used in the…

  7. The Offerings of Fringe Figures and Migrants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engels-Schwarzpaul, A.-Chr.

    2015-01-01

    "The Western tradition", as passe-partout, includes fringe figures, émigrés and migrants. Rather than looking to resources at the core of the Western tradition to overcome its own blindnesses, I am more interested in its gaps and peripheries, where other thoughts and renegade knowledges take hold. It is in the contact zones with…

  8. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem. PMID:22377853

  9. Mirror Figuring Techniques of Sir William Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, E. F.

    2004-05-01

    Between the years 1773 to 1818, Sir William Herschel constructed dozens of speculum telescope mirrors, with diameters ranging from 6 - 48 inches. Very little, if any, detailed information has ever been published on the specifics of his mirror figuring efforts. The reason for this certainly relates to his desire to closely guard mirror production trade secrets. Upon Herschel's death, all telescope-making documents were passed on to his only son, Sir John Herschel. These materials are now in the possession of the British RAS and primarily consist of: a) a four volume series entitled "Experiments on the Construction of Specula," b) a 129 page treaty called "On the Construction of Specula," and c) a 179 page manuscript entitled "Results of Experiments on the Construction of Mirrors." It is suggested that publication was further delayed and then eventually abandoned due to silver-coated glass mirrors coming into favor. A recent investigation by the author, of the unpublished manuscripts on the construction of specula, suggests that Herschel's mirror figuring techniques did not involve any guess work; in fact, his methods were highly refined -- never leaving to chance the evolution of a spherical surface into the required paraboloid. At the heart of Herschel's figuring techniques were a series of aperture diaphragms (similar to the Couder masks used by modern telescope makers) that were placed over the mirror, which allowed for the precise determination of its curvature at various predefined zones. With this information, Herschel was able to vary his figuring strokes with his polishing tool accordingly. In addition, all mirrors were subsequently "star tested," sometimes with aperture diaphragms in place, allowing for field examination of the mirror's "distinctness" or performance. Double stars and the planet Saturn were favorite targets used to analyze and then correct a mirror's figure.

  10. Semaphorin-Plexin Signaling Controls Mitotic Spindle Orientation during Epithelial Morphogenesis and Repair.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jingjing; Swiercz, Jakub M; Bañón-Rodríguez, Inmaculada; Matković, Ivana; Federico, Giuseppina; Sun, Tianliang; Franz, Timo; Brakebusch, Cord H; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Friedel, Roland H; Martín-Belmonte, Fernando; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Offermanns, Stefan; Worzfeld, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Morphogenesis, homeostasis, and regeneration of epithelial tissues rely on the accurate orientation of cell divisions, which is specified by the mitotic spindle axis. To remain in the epithelial plane, symmetrically dividing epithelial cells align their mitotic spindle axis with the plane. Here, we show that this alignment depends on epithelial cell-cell communication via semaphorin-plexin signaling. During kidney morphogenesis and repair, renal tubular epithelial cells lacking the transmembrane receptor Plexin-B2 or its semaphorin ligands fail to correctly orient the mitotic spindle, leading to severe defects in epithelial architecture and function. Analyses of a series of transgenic and knockout mice indicate that Plexin-B2 controls the cell division axis by signaling through its GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain and Cdc42. Our data uncover semaphorin-plexin signaling as a central regulatory mechanism of mitotic spindle orientation necessary for the alignment of epithelial cell divisions with the epithelial plane. PMID:25892012

  11. Mitotic noncoding RNA processing promotes kinetochore and spindle assembly in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Grenfell, Andrew W; Heald, Rebecca; Strzelecka, Magdalena

    2016-07-18

    Transcription at the centromere of chromosomes plays an important role in kinetochore assembly in many eukaryotes, and noncoding RNAs contribute to activation of the mitotic kinase Aurora B. However, little is known about how mitotic RNA processing contributes to spindle assembly. We found that inhibition of transcription initiation or RNA splicing, but not translation, leads to spindle defects in Xenopus egg extracts. Spliceosome inhibition resulted in the accumulation of high molecular weight centromeric transcripts, concomitant with decreased recruitment of the centromere and kinetochore proteins CENP-A, CENP-C, and NDC80 to mitotic chromosomes. In addition, blocking transcript synthesis or processing during mitosis caused accumulation of MCAK, a microtubule depolymerase, on the spindle, indicating misregulation of Aurora B. These findings suggest that co-transcriptional recruitment of the RNA processing machinery to nascent mitotic transcripts is an important step in kinetochore and spindle assembly and challenge the idea that RNA processing is globally repressed during mitosis. PMID:27402954

  12. Human mitotic chromosomes consist predominantly of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres without a 30-nm chromatin structure

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Yoshinori; Eltsov, Mikhail; Joti, Yasumasa; Ito, Kazuki; Takata, Hideaki; Takahashi, Yukio; Hihara, Saera; Frangakis, Achilleas S; Imamoto, Naoko; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    How a long strand of genomic DNA is compacted into a mitotic chromosome remains one of the basic questions in biology. The nucleosome fibre, in which DNA is wrapped around core histones, has long been assumed to be folded into a 30-nm chromatin fibre and further hierarchical regular structures to form mitotic chromosomes, although the actual existence of these regular structures is controversial. Here, we show that human mitotic HeLa chromosomes are mainly composed of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres rather than 30-nm chromatin fibres. Our comprehensive and quantitative study using cryo-electron microscopy and synchrotron X-ray scattering resolved the long-standing contradictions regarding the existence of 30-nm chromatin structures and detected no regular structure >11 nm. Our finding suggests that the mitotic chromosome consists of irregularly arranged nucleosome fibres, with a fractal nature, which permits a more dynamic and flexible genome organization than would be allowed by static regular structures. PMID:22343941

  13. The NOXA-MCL1-BIM axis defines lifespan on extended mitotic arrest.

    PubMed

    Haschka, Manuel D; Soratroi, Claudia; Kirschnek, Susanne; Häcker, Georg; Hilbe, Richard; Geley, Stephan; Villunger, Andreas; Fava, Luca L

    2015-01-01

    Cell death on extended mitotic arrest is considered arguably most critical for the efficacy of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) in anticancer therapy. While the molecular machinery controlling mitotic arrest on MTA treatment, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), appears well defined, the molecular components executing cell death, as well as factors connecting both networks remain poorly understood. Here we conduct a mini screen exploring systematically the contribution of individual BCL2 family proteins at single cell resolution to death on extended mitotic arrest, and demonstrate that the mitotic phosphorylation of BCL2 and BCLX represent a priming event for apoptosis that is ultimately triggered by NOXA-dependent MCL1 degradation, enabling BIM-dependent cell death. Our findings provide a comprehensive model for the initiation of apoptosis in cells stalled in mitosis and provide a molecular basis for the increased efficacy of combinatorial treatment of cancer cells using MTAs and BH3 mimetics. PMID:25922916

  14. Phosphorylation of the proapoptotic BH3-only protein bid primes mitochondria for apoptosis during mitotic arrest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengbo; Lindsay, Jennefer; Owens, Thomas W; Mularczyk, Ewa J; Warwood, Stacey; Foster, Fiona; Streuli, Charles H; Brennan, Keith; Gilmore, Andrew P

    2014-05-01

    Mitosis is a moment of exquisite vulnerability for a metazoan cell. Failure to complete mitosis accurately can lead to aneuploidy and cancer initiation. Therefore, if the exit from mitosis is delayed, normal cells are usually removed by apoptosis. However, how failure to complete mitosis activates apoptosis is still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a phosphorylated form of the BH3-only protein Bid regulates apoptosis if mitotic exit is delayed. Bid is phosphorylated on serine 66 as cells enter mitosis, and this phosphorylation is lost during the metaphase-to-anaphase transition. Cells expressing a nonphosphorylatable version of Bid or a BH3-domain mutant were resistant to mitotic-arrest-induced apoptosis. Thus, we show that Bid phosphorylation primes cells to undergo mitochondrial apoptosis if mitotic exit is delayed. Avoidance of this mechanism may explain the selective pressure for cancer cells to undergo mitotic slippage. PMID:24767991

  15. Association of Chromosome Loss with Centromere-Adjacent Mitotic Recombination in a Yeast Disomic Haploid

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, D. A.; Fogel, S.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments designed to characterize the association between disomic chromosome loss and centromere-adjacent mitotic recombination were performed. Mitotic gene convertants were selected at two heteroallelic sites on the left arm of disomic chromosome III and tested for coincident chromosome loss. The principal results are: (1) Disomic chromosome loss is markedly enhanced (nearly 40-fold) over basal levels among mitotic gene convertants selected to arise close to the centromere; no such enhancement is observed among convertants selected to arise relatively far from the centromere. (2) Chromosome loss is primarily associated with proximal allele conversion at the centromere-adjacent site, and many of these convertants are reciprocally recombined in the adjacent proximal interval. (3) Partial aneuploid exceptions provisionally identified as carrying left arm telocentrics have been found. A testable model is proposed suggesting that centromere involvement in genetic recombination may precipitate segregational disfunction leading to mitotic chromosome loss. PMID:324869

  16. Developmental alterations in centrosome integrity contribute to the post-mitotic state of mammalian cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Zebrowski, David C; Vergarajauregui, Silvia; Wu, Chi-Chung; Piatkowski, Tanja; Becker, Robert; Leone, Marina; Hirth, Sofia; Ricciardi, Filomena; Falk, Nathalie; Giessl, Andreas; Just, Steffen; Braun, Thomas; Weidinger, Gilbert; Engel, Felix B

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cardiomyocytes become post-mitotic shortly after birth. Understanding how this occurs is highly relevant to cardiac regenerative therapy. Yet, how cardiomyocytes achieve and maintain a post-mitotic state is unknown. Here, we show that cardiomyocyte centrosome integrity is lost shortly after birth. This is coupled with relocalization of various centrosome proteins to the nuclear envelope. Consequently, postnatal cardiomyocytes are unable to undergo ciliogenesis and the nuclear envelope adopts the function as cellular microtubule organizing center. Loss of centrosome integrity is associated with, and can promote, cardiomyocyte G0/G1 cell cycle arrest suggesting that centrosome disassembly is developmentally utilized to achieve the post-mitotic state in mammalian cardiomyocytes. Adult cardiomyocytes of zebrafish and newt, which are able to proliferate, maintain centrosome integrity. Collectively, our data provide a novel mechanism underlying the post-mitotic state of mammalian cardiomyocytes as well as a potential explanation for why zebrafish and newts, but not mammals, can regenerate their heart. PMID:26247711

  17. The NOXA–MCL1–BIM axis defines lifespan on extended mitotic arrest

    PubMed Central

    Haschka, Manuel D.; Soratroi, Claudia; Kirschnek, Susanne; Häcker, Georg; Hilbe, Richard; Geley, Stephan; Villunger, Andreas; Fava, Luca L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell death on extended mitotic arrest is considered arguably most critical for the efficacy of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) in anticancer therapy. While the molecular machinery controlling mitotic arrest on MTA treatment, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), appears well defined, the molecular components executing cell death, as well as factors connecting both networks remain poorly understood. Here we conduct a mini screen exploring systematically the contribution of individual BCL2 family proteins at single cell resolution to death on extended mitotic arrest, and demonstrate that the mitotic phosphorylation of BCL2 and BCLX represent a priming event for apoptosis that is ultimately triggered by NOXA-dependent MCL1 degradation, enabling BIM-dependent cell death. Our findings provide a comprehensive model for the initiation of apoptosis in cells stalled in mitosis and provide a molecular basis for the increased efficacy of combinatorial treatment of cancer cells using MTAs and BH3 mimetics. PMID:25922916

  18. Inhibition of a Mitotic Motor Protein: Where, How, and Conformational Consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Youwei; Sardana, Vinod; Xu, Bei; Homnick, Carl; Halczenko, Wasyl; Buser, Carolyn A.; Schaber, Michael; Hartman, George D.; Huber, Hans E.; Kuo, Lawrence C.

    2010-11-16

    We report here the first inhibitor-bound structure of a mitotic motor protein. The 1.9 {angstrom} resolution structure of the motor domain of KSP, bound with the small molecule monastrol and Mg{sup 2+} {center_dot} ADP, reveals that monastrol confers inhibition by 'induced-fitting' onto the protein some 12 {angstrom} away from the catalytic center of the enzyme, resulting in the creation of a previously non-existing binding pocket. The structure provides new insights into the biochemical and mechanical mechanisms of the mitotic motor domain. Inhibition of KSP provides a novel mechanism to arrest mitotic spindle formation, a target of several approved and investigative anti-cancer agents. The structural information gleaned from this novel pocket offers a new angle for the design of anti-mitotic agents.

  19. Regulation of mitotic spindle orientation: an integrated view.

    PubMed

    di Pietro, Florencia; Echard, Arnaud; Morin, Xavier

    2016-08-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is essential for cell fate decisions, epithelial maintenance, and tissue morphogenesis. In most animal cell types, the dynein motor complex is anchored at the cell cortex and exerts pulling forces on astral microtubules to position the spindle. Early studies identified the evolutionarily conserved Gαi/LGN/NuMA complex as a key regulator that polarizes cortical force generators. In recent years, a combination of genetics, biochemistry, modeling, and live imaging has contributed to decipher the mechanisms of spindle orientation. Here, we highlight the dynamic nature of the assembly of this complex and discuss the molecular regulation of its localization. Remarkably, a number of LGN-independent mechanisms were described recently, whereas NuMA remains central in most pathways involved in recruiting force generators at the cell cortex. We also describe the emerging role of the actin cortex in spindle orientation and discuss how dynamic astral microtubule formation is involved. We further give an overview on instructive external signals that control spindle orientation in tissues. Finally, we discuss the influence of cell geometry and mechanical forces on spindle orientation. PMID:27432284

  20. Maintaining Genome Stability in Defiance of Mitotic DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Stefano; Gentili, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of decisions affecting cell viability and proliferation is based on prompt detection of the issue to be addressed, formulation and transmission of a correct set of instructions and fidelity in the execution of orders. While the first and the last are purely mechanical processes relying on the faithful functioning of single proteins or macromolecular complexes (sensors and effectors), information is the real cue, with signal amplitude, duration, and frequency ultimately determining the type of response. The cellular response to DNA damage is no exception to the rule. In this review article we focus on DNA damage responses in G2 and Mitosis. First, we set the stage describing mitosis and the machineries in charge of assembling the apparatus responsible for chromosome alignment and segregation as well as the inputs that control its function (checkpoints). Next, we examine the type of issues that a cell approaching mitosis might face, presenting the impact of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on the correct and timely functioning of pathways correcting errors or damage before chromosome segregation. We conclude this essay with a perspective on the current status of mitotic signaling pathway inhibitors and their potential use in cancer therapy. PMID:27493659

  1. Centrin: Another target of monastrol, an inhibitor of mitotic spindle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lian; Wang, Tong-Qing; Bian, Wei; Liu, Wen; Sun, Yue; Yang, Bin-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    Monastrol, a cell-permeable inhibitor, considered to specifically inhibit kinesin Eg5, can cause mitotic arrest and monopolar spindle formation, thus exhibiting antitumor properties. Centrin, a ubiquitous protein associated with centrosome, plays a critical role in centrosome duplication. Moreover, a correlation between centrosome amplification and cancer has been reported. In this study, it is proposed for the first time that centrin may be another target of the anticancer drug monastrol since monastrol can effectively inhibit not only the growth of the transformed Escherichia coli cells in vivo, but also the Lu3+-dependent self-assembly of EoCen in vitro. The two closely related compounds (Compounds 1 and 2) could not take the same effect. Fluorescence titration experiments suggest that four monastrols per protein is the optimum binding pattern, and the binding constants at different temperatures were obtained. Detailed thermodynamic analysis indicates that hydrophobic force is the main acting force between monastrol and centrin, and the extent of monastrol inhibition of centrin self-assembly is highly dependent upon the hydrophobic region of the protein, which is largely exposed by the binding of metal ions.

  2. Physical Description of Mitotic Spindle Orientation During Cell Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Dalmaroni, Andrea; Théry, Manuel; Racine, Victor; Bornens, Michel; Jülicher, Frank

    2009-03-01

    During cell division, the duplicated chromosomes are physically separated by the action of the mitotic spindle. The spindle is a dynamic structure of the cytoskeleton, which consists of two microtubule asters. Its orientation defines the axis along which the cell divides. Recent experiments show that the spindle orientation depends on the spatial distribution of cell adhesion sites. Here we show that the experimentally observed spindle orientation can be understood as the result of the action of cortical force generators acting on the spindle. We assume that the local activity of force generators is controlled by the spatial distribution of cell adhesion sites determined by the particular geometry of the adhesive substrate. We develop a simple physical description of the spindle mechanics, which allows us to calculate the torque acting on the spindle, as well as the energy profile and the angular distribution of spindle orientation. Our model accounts for the preferred spindle orientation, as well as the full shape of the angular distributions of spindle orientation observed in a large variety of pattern geometries. M. Th'ery, A. Jim'enez-Dalmaroni, et al., Nature 447, 493 (2007).

  3. Karyotypic abnormalities in tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Bardi, G.; Johansson, B.; Pandis, N.; Mandahl, N.; Bak-Jensen, E.; Andrén-Sandberg, A.; Mitelman, F.; Heim, S.

    1993-01-01

    Short-term cultures from 20 pancreatic tumours, three endocrine and 17 exocrine, were cytogenetically analysed. All three endocrine tumours had a normal chromosome complement. Clonal chromosome aberrations were detected in 13 of the 17 exocrine tumours: simple karyotypic changes were found in five carcinomas and numerous numerical and/or structural changes in eight. When the present findings and those previously reported by our group were viewed in conjunction, the most common numerical imbalances among the 22 karyotypically abnormal pancreatic carcinomas thus available for evaluation turned out to be, in order of falling frequency, -18, -Y, +20, +7, +11 and -12. Imbalances brought about by structural changes most frequently affected chromosomes 1 (losses in 1p but especially gains of 1q), 8 (in particular 8q gains but also 8p losses), and 17 (mostly 17q gain but also loss of 17p). Chromosomal bands 1p32, 1q10, 6q21, 7p22, 8p21, 8q11, 14p11, 15q10-11, and 17q11 were the most common breakpoint sites affected by the structural rearrangements. Abnormal karyotypes were detected more frequently in poorly differentiated and anaplastic carcinomas than in moderately and well differentiated tumours. Images Figure 1 PMID:8494707

  4. Cross-Talk between AURKA and Plk1 in Mitotic Entry and Spindle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Asteriti, Italia Anna; De Mattia, Fabiola; Guarguaglini, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    The Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is involved in different aspects of mitotic control, from mitotic entry to cytokinesis. Consistent with its pleiotropic roles, several AURKA interactors are able to modulate its activity, the best characterized being the microtubule-binding protein TPX2, the centrosomal protein Cep192, and Bora. Bora has been described as an essential cofactor of AURKA for phosphorylation-mediated activation of the mitotic kinase polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) at the G2/M transition. A complex AURKA/Plk1 signaling axis is emerging, with multiple involved actors; recent data suggest that this control network is not restricted to mitotic entry only, but operates throughout mitosis. Here, we integrate available data from the literature to depict the complex interplay between AURKA and Plk1 in G2 and mitosis and how it contributes to their mitotic functions. We will particularly focus on how the activity of specifically localized AURKA/Plk1 pools is modulated in time and space by their reciprocal regulation to ensure the timely and coordinated unfolding of downstream mitotic events. PMID:26779436

  5. The STARD9/Kif16a Kinesin Associates With Mitotic Microtubules and Regulates Spindle Pole Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Jorge Z.; Summers, Matthew K.; Peterson, David; Brauer, Matthew J.; Lee, James; Senese, Silvia; Gholkar, Ankur A.; Lo, Yu-Chen; Lei, Xingye; Jung, Kenneth; Anderson, David C.; Davis, David P.; Belmont, Lisa; Jackson, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY During cell division cells form the microtubule-based mitotic spindle, a highly specialized and dynamic structure that mediates proper chromosome transmission to daughter cells. Cancer cells can show perturbed mitotic spindles and an approach in cancer treatment has been to trigger cell killing by targeting microtubule dynamics or spindle assembly. To identify and characterize proteins necessary for spindle assembly, and potential antimitotic targets, we performed a proteomic and genetic analysis of 592 mitotic microtubule co-purifying proteins (MMCPs). Screening for regulators that affect both mitosis and apoptosis, we report the identification and characterization of STARD9, a kinesin-3 family member, which localizes to centrosomes and stabilizes the pericentriolar material (PCM). STARD9-depleted cells have fragmented PCM, form multipolar spindles, activate the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), arrest in mitosis, and undergo apoptosis. Interestingly, STARD9-depletion synergizes with the chemotherapeutic agent taxol to increase mitotic death, demonstrating that STARD9 is a mitotic kinesin and a potential anti-mitotic target. PMID:22153075

  6. Genetic depletion of Polo-like kinase 1 leads to embryonic lethality due to mitotic aberrancies.

    PubMed

    Wachowicz, Paulina; Fernández-Miranda, Gonzalo; Marugán, Carlos; Escobar, Beatriz; de Cárcer, Guillermo

    2016-07-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a serine/threonine kinase that plays multiple and essential roles during the cell division cycle. Its inhibition in cultured cells leads to severe mitotic aberrancies and cell death. Whereas previous reports suggested that Plk1 depletion in mice leads to a non-mitotic arrest in early embryos, we show here that the bi-allelic Plk1 depletion in mice certainly results in embryonic lethality due to extensive mitotic aberrations at the morula stage, including multi- and mono-polar spindles, impaired chromosome segregation and cytokinesis failure. In addition, the conditional depletion of Plk1 during mid-gestation leads also to severe mitotic aberrancies. Our data also confirms that Plk1 is completely dispensable for mitotic entry in vivo. On the other hand, Plk1 haploinsufficient mice are viable, and Plk1-heterozygous fibroblasts do not harbor any cell cycle alterations. Plk1 is overexpressed in many human tumors, suggesting a therapeutic benefit of inhibiting Plk1, and specific small-molecule inhibitors for this kinase are now being evaluated in clinical trials. Therefore, the different Plk1 mouse models here presented are a valuable tool to reexamine the relevance of the mitotic kinase Plk1 during mammalian development and animal physiology. PMID:27417127

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibitors disrupt the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint by targeting histone and nonhistone proteins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Brian; Brown, Mellissa

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors exhibit pleiotropic effects on cell functions, both in vivo and in vitro. One of the more dramatic effects of these drugs is their ability to disrupt normal mitotic division, which is a significant contributor to the anticancer properties of these drugs. The most important feature of the disrupted mitosis is that drug treatment overcomes the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint and drives mitotic slippage, but in a manner that triggers apoptosis. The mechanism by which histone deacetylase inhibitors affect mitosis is now becoming clearer through the identification of a number of chromatin and nonchromatin protein targets that are critical to the regulation of normal mitotic progression and cell division. These proteins are directly regulated by acetylation and deacetylation, or in some cases indirectly through the acetylation of essential partner proteins. There appears to be little contribution from deacetylase inhibitor-induced transcriptional changes to the mitotic effects of these drugs. The overall mitotic phenotype of drug treatment appears to be the sum of these disrupted mechanisms. PMID:23088867

  8. The Mitotic Checkpoint Gene, SIL is Regulated by E2F1

    PubMed Central

    Erez, Ayelet; Chaussepied, Marie; Tina, Colaizzo-Anas; Aplan, Peter; Ginsberg, Doron; Izraeli, Shai

    2009-01-01

    The SIL gene expression is increased in multiple cancers and correlates with the expression of mitotic spindle checkpoint genes and with increased metastatic potential. SIL regulates mitotic entry, organization of the mitotic spindle and cell survival. The E2F transcription factors regulate cell cycle progression by controlling the expression of genes mediating the G1/S transition. More recently E2F has been shown to regulate mitotic spindle checkpoint genes as well. As SIL expression correlates with mitotic checkpoint genes we hypothesized that SIL is regulated by E2F. We mined raw data of published experiments and performed new experiments by modification of E2F expression in cell lines, reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Ectopic expression or endogenous activation of E2F induced the expression of SIL, while knockdown of E2F by shRNA, downregulated SIL expression. E2F activated SIL promoter by reporter assay and bound to SIL promoter in-vivo. Taken together these data demonstrate that SIL is regulated by E2F. As SIL is essential for mitotic entry, E2F may regulate G2/M transition through the induction of SIL. Furthermore, as silencing of SIL cause apoptosis in cancer cells, these finding may have therapeutic relevance in tumors with constitutive activation of E2F. PMID:18649360

  9. Robust linear regression model of Ki-67 for mitotic rate in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    KEMMERLING, RALF; WEYLAND, DENIS; KIESSLICH, TOBIAS; ILLIG, ROMANA; KLIESER, ECKHARD; JÄGER, TARKAN; DIETZE, OTTO; NEUREITER, DANIEL

    2014-01-01

    Risk stratification of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) by tumor size, lymph node and metastasis status is crucially affected by mitotic activity. To date, no studies have quantitatively compared mitotic activity in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained tissue sections with immunohistochemical markers, such as phosphohistone H3 (PHH3) and Ki-67. According to the TNM guidelines, the mitotic count on H&E sections and immunohistochemical PHH3-stained slides has been assessed per 50 high-power fields of 154 specimens of clinically documented GIST cases. The Ki-67-associated proliferation rate was evaluated on three digitalized hot spots using image analysis. The H&E-based mitotic rate was found to correlate significantly better with Ki-67-assessed proliferation activity than with PHH3-assessed proliferation activity (r=0.780; P<0.01). A linear regression model (analysis of variance; P<0.001) allowed reliable predictions of the H&E-associated mitoses based on the Ki-67 expression alone. Additionally, the Ki-67-associated proliferation revealed a higher and significant impact on the recurrence and metastasis rate of the GIST cases than by the classical H&E-based mitotic rate. The results of the present study indicated that the mitotic rate may be reliably and time-efficiently estimated by immunohistochemistry of Ki-67 using only three hot spots. PMID:24527082

  10. Kinesin-13 regulates flagellar, interphase, and mitotic microtubule dynamics in Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Scott C; Sagolla, Meredith S; Mancuso, Joel J; Woessner, David J; House, Susan A; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian; Cande, W Zacheus

    2007-12-01

    Microtubule depolymerization dynamics in the spindle are regulated by kinesin-13, a nonprocessive kinesin motor protein that depolymerizes microtubules at the plus and minus ends. Here we show that a single kinesin-13 homolog regulates flagellar length dynamics, as well as other interphase and mitotic dynamics in Giardia intestinalis, a widespread parasitic diplomonad protist. Both green fluorescent protein-tagged kinesin-13 and EB1 (a plus-end tracking protein) localize to the plus ends of mitotic and interphase microtubules, including a novel localization to the eight flagellar tips, cytoplasmic anterior axonemes, and the median body. The ectopic expression of a kinesin-13 (S280N) rigor mutant construct caused significant elongation of the eight flagella with significant decreases in the median body volume and resulted in mitotic defects. Notably, drugs that disrupt normal interphase and mitotic microtubule dynamics also affected flagellar length in Giardia. Our study extends recent work on interphase and mitotic kinesin-13 functioning in metazoans to include a role in regulating flagellar length dynamics. We suggest that kinesin-13 universally regulates both mitotic and interphase microtubule dynamics in diverse microbial eukaryotes and propose that axonemal microtubules are subject to the same regulation of microtubule dynamics as other dynamic microtubule arrays. Finally, the present study represents the first use of a dominant-negative strategy to disrupt normal protein function in Giardia and provides important insights into giardial microtubule dynamics with relevance to the development of antigiardial compounds that target critical functions of kinesins in the giardial life cycle. PMID:17766466

  11. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  12. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Lucy; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common and debilitating condition with high direct and indirect costs. AUB frequently co-exists with fibroids, but the relationship between the two remains incompletely understood and in many women the identification of fibroids may be incidental to a menstrual bleeding complaint. A structured approach for establishing the cause using the Fédération International de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) PALM-COEIN (Polyp, Adenomyosis, Leiomyoma, Malignancy (and hyperplasia), Coagulopathy, Ovulatory disorders, Endometrial, Iatrogenic and Not otherwise classified) classification system will facilitate accurate diagnosis and inform treatment options. Office hysteroscopy and increasing sophisticated imaging will assist provision of robust evidence for the underlying cause. Increased availability of medical options has expanded the choice for women and many will no longer need to recourse to potentially complicated surgery. Treatment must remain individualised and encompass the impact of pressure symptoms, desire for retention of fertility and contraceptive needs, as well as address the management of AUB in order to achieve improved quality of life. PMID:26803558

  13. Variable-spot ion beam figuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lixiang; Qiu, Keqiang; Fu, Shaojun

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces a new scheme of ion beam figuring (IBF), or rather variable-spot IBF, which is conducted at a constant scanning velocity with variable-spot ion beam collimated by a variable diaphragm. It aims at improving the reachability and adaptation of the figuring process within the limits of machine dynamics by varying the ion beam spot size instead of the scanning velocity. In contrast to the dwell time algorithm in the conventional IBF, the variable-spot IBF adopts a new algorithm, which consists of the scan path programming and the trajectory optimization using pattern search. In this algorithm, instead of the dwell time, a new concept, integral etching time, is proposed to interpret the process of variable-spot IBF. We conducted simulations to verify its feasibility and practicality. The simulation results indicate the variable-spot IBF is a promising alternative to the conventional approach.

  14. Figure correction of multilayer coated optics

    DOEpatents

    Chapman; Henry N. , Taylor; John S.

    2010-02-16

    A process is provided for producing near-perfect optical surfaces, for EUV and soft-x-ray optics. The method involves polishing or otherwise figuring the multilayer coating that has been deposited on an optical substrate, in order to correct for errors in the figure of the substrate and coating. A method such as ion-beam milling is used to remove material from the multilayer coating by an amount that varies in a specified way across the substrate. The phase of the EUV light that is reflected from the multilayer will be affected by the amount of multilayer material removed, but this effect will be reduced by a factor of 1-n as compared with height variations of the substrate, where n is the average refractive index of the multilayer.

  15. Recommended Figures of Merit for Green Monopropellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, William M.; Deans, Matthew C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrazine propellant has historically been used as a rocket thruster monopropellant since the mid-1960s. Mission managers are well aware of its characteristics and performance. However, it is a known toxic chemical and a wide effort is underway to reduce and/or eliminate its use worldwide. Several new propellant combinations have been developed in the last few years which tout or promise to provide same or better performance as hydrazine while being "non-toxic" or "green". Yet, there is no consistent definition for what constitutes "non-toxic" or "green", and thus no good figure of merit for which to compare. This paper seeks to review the three major categories of figures of merit, and discusses how they might be used to assess the viability of a propellant.

  16. Expression analysis of mitotic spindle checkpoint genes in breast carcinoma: role of NDC80/HEC1 in early breast tumorigenicity, and a two-gene signature for aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Aneuploidy and chromosomal instability (CIN) are common abnormalities in human cancer. Alterations of the mitotic spindle checkpoint are likely to contribute to these phenotypes, but little is known about somatic alterations of mitotic spindle checkpoint genes in breast cancer. Methods To obtain further insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying aneuploidy in breast cancer, we used real-time quantitative RT-PCR to quantify the mRNA expression of 76 selected mitotic spindle checkpoint genes in a large panel of breast tumor samples. Results The expression of 49 (64.5%) of the 76 genes was significantly dysregulated in breast tumors compared to normal breast tissues: 40 genes were upregulated and 9 were downregulated. Most of these changes in gene expression during malignant transformation were observed in epithelial cells. Alterations of nine of these genes, and particularly NDC80, were also detected in benign breast tumors, indicating that they may be involved in pre-neoplastic processes. We also identified a two-gene expression signature (PLK1 + AURKA) which discriminated between DNA aneuploid and DNA diploid breast tumor samples. Interestingly, some DNA tetraploid tumor samples failed to cluster with DNA aneuploid breast tumors. Conclusion This study confirms the importance of previously characterized genes and identifies novel candidate genes that could be activated for aneuploidy to occur. Further functional analyses are required to clearly confirm the role of these new identified genes in the molecular mechanisms involved in breast cancer aneuploidy. The novel genes identified here, and/or the two-gene expression signature, might serve as diagnostic or prognostic markers and form the basis for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:21352579

  17. Frequency and mitotic heritability of epimutations in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Roquis, David; Rognon, Anne; Chaparro, Cristian; Boissier, Jerome; Arancibia, Nathalie; Cosseau, Celine; Parrinello, Hugues; Grunau, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is a parasitic platyhelminth responsible for intestinal bilharzia. It has a complex life cycle, infecting a freshwater snail of the Biomphalaria genus, and then a mammalian host. Schistosoma mansoni adapts rapidly to new (allopatric) strains of its intermediate host. To study the importance of epimutations in this process, we infected sympatric and allopatric mollusc strains with parasite clones. ChIP-Seq was carried out on four histone modifications (H3K4me3, H3K27me3, H3K27ac and H4K20me1) in parallel with genomewide DNA resequencing (i) on parasite larvae shed by the infected snails and (ii) on adult worms that had developed from the larvae. No change in single nucleotide polymorphisms and no mobilization of transposable elements were observed, but 58-105 copy number variations (CNVs) within the parasite clones in different molluscs were detected. We also observed that the allopatric environment induces three types of chromatin structure changes: (i) host-induced changes on larvae epigenomes in 51 regions of the genome that are independent of the parasites' genetic background, (ii) spontaneous changes (not related to experimental condition or genotype of the parasite) at 64 locations and (iii) 64 chromatin structure differences dependent on the parasite genotype. Up to 45% of the spontaneous, but none of the host-induced chromatin structure changes were transmitted to adults. In our model, the environment induces epigenetic changes at specific loci but only spontaneous epimutations are mitotically heritable and have therefore the potential to contribute to transgenerational inheritance. We also show that CNVs are the only source of genetic variation and occur at the same order of magnitude as epimutations. PMID:26826554

  18. Kinetic analysis of mitotic spindle elongation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Baskin, T I; Cande, W Z

    1990-09-01

    Studies of mitotic spindle elongation in vitro using populations of diatom spindles visualized with immunofluorescence microscopy have shown that the two interdigitating half-spindles are driven apart by an ATP-dependent process that generates force in the zone of overlap between half-spindles. To characterize further the system responsible for spindle elongation, we observed spindle elongation directly with polarized light or phase-contrast video-microscopy. We report that the kinetics of spindle elongation versus time are linear. A constant rate of spindle elongation occurs despite the continuous decrease in length of the zone of overlap between half-spindles. The average rate of spindle elongation varies as a function of treatment, and rates measured match spindle elongation rates measured in vivo. When spindles elongated in the presence of polymerizing tubulin (from bovine brain), the extent of elongation was greater than the original zone of half-spindle overlap, but the rate of elongation was constant. No component of force due to tubulin polymerization was found. The total elongation observed in the presence of added tubulin could exceed a doubling of original spindle length, matching the elongation in the intact diatom. The linear rate of spindle elongation in vitro suggests that the force transducer for anaphase B is a mechanochemical ATPase, analogous to dynein or myosin, and that the force for spindle elongation does not arise from stored energy, e.g. in an elastic matrix in the midzone. Additionally, on the basis of observations described here, we conclude that the force-transduction system for spindle elongation must be able to remain in the zone of microtubule overlap during the sliding apart of half-spindles, and that the transducer can generate force between microtubules that are not strictly antiparallel. PMID:2258393

  19. Crumbs 2 prevents cortical abnormalities in mouse dorsal telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Dudok, Jacobus J; Murtaza, Mariyam; Henrique Alves, C; Rashbass, Pen; Wijnholds, Jan

    2016-07-01

    The formation of a functionally integrated nervous system is dependent on a highly organized sequence of events that includes timely division and differentiation of progenitors. Several apical polarity proteins have been shown to play crucial roles during neurogenesis, however, the role of Crumbs 2 (CRB2) in cortical development has not previously been reported. Here, we show that conditional ablation of Crb2 in the murine dorsal telencephalon leads to defects in the maintenance of the apical complex. Furthermore, within the mutant dorsal telencephalon there is premature expression of differentiation proteins. We examined the physiological function of Crb2 on wild type genetic background as well as on background lacking Crb1. Telencephalon lacking CRB2 resulted in reduced levels of PALS1 and CRB3 from the apical complex, an increased number of mitotic cells and expanded neuronal domain. These defects are transient and therefore only result in rather mild cortical abnormalities. We show that CRB2 is required for maintenance of the apical polarity complex during development of the cortex and regulation of cell division, and that loss of CRB2 results in cortical abnormalities. PMID:26802325

  20. Figures of Equilibrium among Binary Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hestroffer, D.; Tanga, P.

    2005-12-01

    The original idea of Farinella et al. [1] that rubble pile asteroids can have figures of equilibrium, is rehabilitated. Albeit asteroids generally have a broad distribution of shapes and do not follow sequences of (hydrostatic) equilibrium, we show that some asteroids are indeed Jacobi or Darwin ellipsoids. Such statement is obtained from an analysis of their ellipsoidal shape (a:b:c) together with recent measures of their mass and bulk density [2,3]. This means that both their shape and adimensional rotation frequency sbond Ω =Ω /(π ρ G) follow sequences of equilibrium [4,5]. Jacobi and Darwin figures are obtained for uniformly rotating mass of (inviscid as well as compressible) fluids and relatively large angular momentum. Interestingly these objects appear to preferably be binaries. We moreover show that the porosity of such objects is relatively large (approx. 40%) indicating that they are loose rubble piles, yet with dense packing. Last we show that, given the observed bulk-densities, these bodies must be homogeneous bodies of uniform density distribution. Thus, though solid-solid friction must occur in such aggregates, the surface of these bodies is a surface of level similar to that of inviscid fluids. Comparison to other asteroids of similar mass either possessing a moonlet or with no known satellites should shed light on their formation history and/or constrains on collisional evolution. Binaries with low eccentricities and inclination (hence prograde orbit) should preferably be the outcome of catastrophic disruption as is supposed for members of dynamical family [6,7]. Future work and analysis of the typical reaccumulation time scales, typical angular momentum, possible post-reaccumulation cosmic shaking, etc. shall help to know how the fate of collisions or catastrophic breakup of a parent body can differ yielding to binaries with equilibrium figures. In any case the existence of a figure of equilibrium appears to be highly correlated to the presence

  1. Electrocardiograph abnormalities revealed during laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Dubrey, Simon William

    2010-01-01

    This brief case presents a well patient in whom an electrocardiograph abnormality consistent with an accessory pathway was found during a routine procedure. We present the electrocardiographs, explain the underlying condition, and consider why the abnormality was revealed in this manner. PMID:22419949

  2. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  3. Haem degradation in abnormal haemoglobins.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S B; Docherty, J C

    1978-01-01

    The coupled oxidation of certain abnormal haemoglobins leads to different bile-pigment isomer distributions from that of normal haemoglobin. The isomer pattern may be correlated with the structure of the abnormal haemoglobin in the neighbourhood of the haem pocket. This is support for haem degradation by an intramolecular reaction. PMID:708385

  4. The biphasic interphase-mitotic polarity of cell nuclei induced under DNA replication stress seems to be correlated with Pin2 localization in root meristems of Allium cepa.

    PubMed

    Żabka, Aneta; Trzaskoma, Paweł; Winnicki, Konrad; Polit, Justyna Teresa; Chmielnicka, Agnieszka; Maszewski, Janusz

    2015-02-01

    Long-term treatment of Allium cepa seedlings with low concentration of hydroxyurea (HU) results in a disruption of cell cycle checkpoints, leading root apex meristem (RAM) cells to an abnormal organization of nuclear structures forming interphase (I) and mitotic (M) domains of chromatin at opposite poles of the nucleus. Thus far, both critical cell length and an uneven distribution of cyclin B-like proteins along the nuclear axis have been recognized as essential factors needed to facilitate the formation of biphasic interphase-mitotic (IM) cells. Two new aspects with respect to their emergence are investigated in this study. The first concerns a relationship between the polarity of increasing chromatin condensation (IM orientation) and the acropetal (base→apex) alignment of RAM cell files. The second problem involves the effects of auxin (IAA), on the frequency of IM cells. We provide evidence that there is an association between the advanced M-poles of the IM cell nuclei and the polarized accumulation sites of auxin efflux carriers (PIN2 proteins) and IAA. Furthermore, our observations reveal exclusion regions for PIN2 proteins in the microtubule-rich structures, such as preprophase bands (PPBs) and phragmoplast. The current and previous studies have prompted us to formulate a hypothetical mechanism linking PIN2-mediated unilateral localization of IAA and the induction of bipolar IM cells in HU-treated RAMs of A. cepa. PMID:25462968

  5. PARP targeting counteracts gliomagenesis through induction of mitotic catastrophe and aggravation of deficiency in homologous recombination in PTEN-mutant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Majuelos-Melguizo, Jara; Rodríguez, María Isabel; López-Jiménez, Laura; Rodríguez-Vargas, Jose M.; Martí Martín-Consuegra, Juan M.; Serrano-Sáenz, Santiago; Gavard, Julie; Mariano Ruiz de Almodóvar, J; Javier Oliver, F

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary brain tumour in adults and one of the most aggressive cancers. PARP-1 is a nuclear protein involved in multiple facets of DNA repair and transcriptional regulation. In this study we dissected the action of PARP inhibition in different GBM cell lines with either functional or mutated PTEN that confers resistance to diverse therapies. In PTEN mutant cells, PARP inhibition induced a severe genomic instability, exacerbated homologous recombination repair (HR) deficiency and down-regulated the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC) factor BUBR1, leading to mitotic catastrophe (MC). EGFR gene amplification also represents a signature of genetic abnormality in GBM. To more effectively target GBM cells, co-treatment with a PARP inhibitor and an EGFR blocker, erlotinib, resulted in a strong suppression of ERK1/2 activation and in vivo the combined effect elicited a robust reduction in tumour development. In conclusion, PARP inhibition targets PTEN-deficient GBM cells through accentuation of SAC repression and aggravation of HR deficiency, leading to the induction of genomic instability and eventually deriving to mitotic catastrophe (MC); the inhibition of PARP and co-treatment with an inhibitor of pro-survival pathways strongly retarded in vivo gliomagenesis. PMID:25576921

  6. Aurora kinase-induced phosphorylation excludes transcription factor RUNX from the chromatin to facilitate proper mitotic progression.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Linda Shyue Huey; Khor, Jian Ming; Lai, Soak Kuan; Garg, Shubham; Krishnan, Vaidehi; Koh, Cheng-Gee; Lee, Sang Hyun; Ito, Yoshiaki

    2016-06-01

    The Runt-related transcription factors (RUNX) are master regulators of development and major players in tumorigenesis. Interestingly, unlike most transcription factors, RUNX proteins are detected on the mitotic chromatin and apparatus, suggesting that they are functionally active in mitosis. Here, we identify key sites of RUNX phosphorylation in mitosis. We show that the phosphorylation of threonine 173 (T173) residue within the Runt domain of RUNX3 disrupts RUNX DNA binding activity during mitotic entry to facilitate the recruitment of RUNX proteins to mitotic structures. Moreover, knockdown of RUNX3 delays mitotic entry. RUNX3 phosphorylation is therefore a regulatory mechanism for mitotic entry. Cancer-associated mutations of RUNX3 T173 and its equivalent in RUNX1 further corroborate the role of RUNX phosphorylation in regulating proper mitotic progression and genomic integrity. PMID:27217562

  7. Inhibitory factors associated with anaphase-promoting complex/cylosome in mitotic checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, Ilana; Miniowitz, Shirly; Moshe, Yakir; Hershko, Avram

    2007-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system ensures accurate chromosome segregation by preventing anaphase initiation until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. It affects the activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a ubiquitin ligase that targets inhibitors of anaphase initiation for degradation. The mechanisms by which this system regulates APC/C remain obscure. Some models propose that the system promotes sequestration of the APC/C activator Cdc20 by binding to the checkpoint proteins Mad2 and BubR1. A different model suggests that a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of BubR1, Bub3, Cdc20, and Mad2 inhibits APC/C in mitotic checkpoint [Sudakin V, Chan GKT, Yen TJ (2001) J Cell Biol 154:925–936]. We examined this problem by using extracts from nocodazole-arrested cells that reproduce some downstream events of the mitotic checkpoint system, such as lag kinetics of the degradation of APC/C substrate. Incubation of extracts with adenosine-5′-(γ-thio)triphosphate (ATP[γS]) stabilized the checkpoint-arrested state, apparently by stable thiophosphorylation of some proteins. By immunoprecipitation of APC/C from stably checkpoint-arrested extracts, followed by elution with increased salt concentration, we isolated inhibitory factors associated with APC/C. A part of the inhibitory material consists of Cdc20 associated with BubR1 and Mad2, and is thus similar to MCC. Contrary to the original MCC hypothesis, we find that MCC disassembles upon exit from the mitotic checkpoint. Thus, the requirement of the mitotic checkpoint system for the binding of Mad2 and BubR1 to Cdc20 may be for the assembly of the inhibitory complex rather than for Cdc20 sequestration. PMID:17360335

  8. Continued Stabilization of the Nuclear Higher-Order Structure of Post-Mitotic Neurons In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Alva-Medina, Janeth; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Dent, Myrna A. R.; Aranda-Anzaldo, Armando

    2011-01-01

    Background Cellular terminal differentiation (TD) correlates with a permanent exit from the cell cycle and so TD cells become stably post-mitotic. However, TD cells express the molecular machinery necessary for cell proliferation that can be reactivated by experimental manipulation, yet it has not been reported the stable proliferation of any type of reactivated TD cells. Neurons become post-mitotic after leaving the ventricular zone. When neurons are forced to reenter the cell cycle they invariably undergo cell death. Wider evidence indicates that the post-mitotic state cannot solely depend on gene products acting in trans, otherwise mutations in the corresponding genes may lead to reentry and completion of the cell cycle in TD cells, but this has not been observed. In the interphase, nuclear DNA of metazoan cells is organized in supercoiled loops anchored to a nuclear nuclear matrix (NM). The DNA-NM interactions define a higher-order structure in the cell nucleus (NHOS). We have previously compared the NHOS of aged rat hepatocytes with that of early post-mitotic rat neurons and our results indicated that a very stable NHOS is a common feature of both senescent and post-mitotic cells in vivo. Principal Findings In the present work we compared the NHOS in rat neurons from different post-natal ages. Our results show that the trend towards further stabilization of the NHOS in neurons continues throughout post-natal life. This phenomenon occurs in absence of overt changes in the post-mitotic state and transcriptional activity of neurons, suggesting that it is independent of functional constraints. Conclusions Apparently the continued stabilization of the NHOS as a function of time is basically determined by thermodynamic and structural constraints. We discuss how the resulting highly stable NHOS of neurons may be the structural, non-genetic basis of their permanent and irreversible post-mitotic state. PMID:21731716

  9. Bcl-xL controls a switch between cell death modes during mitotic arrest

    PubMed Central

    Bah, N; Maillet, L; Ryan, J; Dubreil, S; Gautier, F; Letai, A; Juin, P; Barillé-Nion, S

    2014-01-01

    Antimitotic agents such as microtubule inhibitors (paclitaxel) are widely used in cancer therapy while new agents blocking mitosis onset are currently in development. All these agents impose a prolonged mitotic arrest in cancer cells that relies on sustained activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint and may lead to subsequent cell death by incompletely understood molecular events. We have investigated the role played by anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members in the fate of mitotically arrested mammary tumor cells treated with paclitaxel, or depleted in Cdc20, the activator of the anaphase promoting complex. Under these conditions, a weak and delayed mitotic cell death occurs that is caspase- and Bax/Bak-independent. Moreover, BH3 profiling assays indicate that viable cells during mitotic arrest are primed to die by apoptosis and that Bcl-xL is required to maintain mitochondrial integrity. Consistently, Bcl-xL depletion, or treatment with its inhibitor ABT-737 (but not with the specific Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-199), during mitotic arrest converts cell response to antimitotics to efficient caspase and Bax-dependent apoptosis. Apoptotic priming under conditions of mitotic arrest relies, at least in part, on the phosphorylation on serine 62 of Bcl-xL, which modulates its interaction with Bax and its sensitivity to ABT-737. The phospho-mimetic S62D-Bcl-xL mutant is indeed less efficient than the corresponding phospho-deficient S62A-Bcl-xL mutant in sequestrating Bax and in protecting cancer cells from mitotic cell death or yeast cells from Bax-induced growth inhibition. Our results provide a rationale for combining Bcl-xL targeting to antimitotic agents to improve clinical efficacy of antimitotic strategy in cancer therapy. PMID:24922075

  10. Abnormal accumulation of NACP/alpha-synuclein in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, A.; Mallory, M.; Sundsmo, M.; Honer, W.; Hansen, L.; Masliah, E.

    1998-01-01

    The precursor of the non-Abeta component of Alzheimer's disease amyloid (NACP) (also known as a-synuclein) is a presynaptic terminal molecule that accumulates in the plaques of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies have shown that a mutation in NACP is associated with familial Parkinson's disease, and that Lewy bodies are immunoreactive with antibodies against this molecule. To clarify the patterns of accumulation and differences in abnormal compartmentalization, we studied NACP immunoreactivity using double immunolabeling and laser scanning confocal microscopy in the cortex of patients with various neurodegenerative disorders. In Lewy body variant of Alzheimer's disease, diffuse Lewy body disease, and Parkinson's disease, NACP was found to immunolabel cortical Lewy bodies, abnormal neurites, and dystrophic neurites in the plaques. Double-labeling studies showed that all three of these neuropathological structures also contained ubiquitin, synaptophysin, and neurofilament (but not tau) immunoreactivity. In contrast, neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads, Pick bodies, ballooned neurons, and glial tangles (most of which were tau positive) were NACP negative. These results support the view that NACP specifically accumulates in diseases related to Lewy bodies such as Lewy body variant of Alzheimer's disease, diffuse Lewy body disease, and Parkinson's disease and suggests a role for this synaptic protein in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9466562

  11. Figures of merit for laser beam quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milster, T. D.; Walker, E. P.

    1993-01-01

    It was shown how full-width at half maximum (FWHM), full-width at 1/e(sup 2) (FW1/e(sup 2)), Strehl ratio, and encircled energy figures of merit vary with different types of aberration and measurement methods. The array sampling method and the slit-scan method are examined in detail. Our irradiance in the exit pupil of the optical system is a simple gaussian. It was found that in general the slit-scan method and the array method do not yield the same result. The width measurements for the central lobe of the diffraction pattern are very insensitive to aberration.

  12. Noise figure of amplified dispersive Fourier transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Keisuke; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-09-15

    Amplified dispersive Fourier transformation (ADFT) is a powerful tool for fast real-time spectroscopy as it overcomes the limitations of traditional optical spectrometers. ADFT maps the spectrum of an optical pulse into a temporal waveform using group-velocity dispersion and simultaneously amplifies it in the optical domain. It greatly simplifies spectroscopy by replacing the diffraction grating and detector array in the conventional spectrometer with a dispersive fiber and single-pixel photodetector, enabling ultrafast real-time spectroscopic measurements. Following our earlier work on the theory of ADFT, here we study the effect of noise on ADFT. We derive the noise figure of ADFT and discuss its dependence on various parameters.

  13. Infrared thermal imaging figures of merit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Herbert

    1989-01-01

    Commercially available types of infrared thermal imaging instruments, both viewers (qualitative) and imagers (quantitative) are discussed. The various scanning methods by which thermal images (thermograms) are generated will be reviewed. The performance parameters (figures of merit) that define the quality of performance of infrared radiation thermometers will be introduced. A discussion of how these parameters are extended and adapted to define the performance of thermal imaging instruments will be provided. Finally, the significance of each of the key performance parameters of thermal imaging instruments will be reviewed and procedures currently used for testing to verify performance will be outlined.

  14. The Utilization during Mitotic Cell Division of Loci Controlling Meiotic Recombination and Disjunction in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Bruce S.; Carpenter, Adelaide T. C.; Ripoll, P.

    1978-01-01

    To inquire whether the loci identified by recombination-defective and disjunction-defective meiotic mutants in Drosophila are also utilized during mitotic cell division, the effects of 18 meiotic mutants (representing 13 loci) on mitotic chromosome stability have been examined genetically. To do this, meiotic-mutant-bearing flies heterozygous for recessive somatic cell markers were examined for the frequencies and types of spontaneous clones expressing the cell markers. In such flies, marked clones can arise via mitotic recombination, mutation, chromosome breakage, nondisjunction or chromosome loss, and clones from these different origins can be distinguished. In addition, meiotic mutants at nine loci have been examined for their effects on sensitivity to killing by UV and X rays.—Mutants at six of the seven recombination-defective loci examined (mei-9, mei-41, c(3)G, mei-W68, mei-S282, mei-352, mei-218) cause mitotic chromosome instability in both sexes, whereas mutants at one locus (mei-218) do not affect mitotic chromosome stability. Thus many of the loci utilized during meiotic recombination also function in the chromosomal economy of mitotic cells.—The chromosome instability produced by mei-41 alleles is the consequence of chromosome breakage, that of mei-9 alleles is primarily due to chromosome breakage and, to a lesser extent, to an elevated frequency of mitotic recombination, whereas no predominant mechanism responsible for the instability caused by c(3)G alleles is discernible. Since these three loci are defective in their responses to mutagen damage, their effects on chromosome stability in nonmutagenized cells are interpreted as resulting from an inability to repair spontaneous lesions. Both mei-W68 and mei-S282 increase mitotic recombination (and in mei-W68, to a lesser extent, chromosome loss) in the abdomen but not the wing. In the abdomen, the primary effect on chromosome stability occurs during the larval period when the abdominal histoblasts

  15. Induction of Aneuploidy, Centrosome Abnormality, Multipolar Spindle, and Multipolar Division in Cultured Mammalian Cells Exposed to an Arsenic Metabolite, Dimethylarsinate.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Toxicological studies of arsenic compounds were conducted in cultured mammalian cells to investigate the effects of glutathione (GSH) depletion. Dimethylarsinate DMA(V) was not cytotoxic in cells depleted of GSH, but was found to be cytotoxic when GSH was present outside the cells. The results suggested that a reactive form of DMA(V) was generated through interaction with GSH. Dimethylarsine iodide DMI(III) was used as a model compound of DMA(III), and the biological effects were investigated. DMI(III) was about 10000 times more toxic to the cells than DMA(V). Chromosome structural aberrations and numerical changes, such as aneuploidy, were induced by DMI(III). DMA(V) induced multiple foci of the centrosome protein, γ-tubulin, which were colocalized with multipolar spindles in mitotic cells. The multiple foci coalesced into a single dot on disruption of the microtubules (MT). However, reorganization of the MT caused multiple foci of γ-tubulin, suggesting that the induction of centrosome abnormalities by DMA(V) required intact MT. Inhibition of the MT-dependent motor, kinesin, prevented formation of multiple foci of γ-tubulin, which pointed to the involvement of the MT-dependent mitotic motor, kinesin, in the maintenance of centrosome abnormalities. DMI(III) caused abnormal cytokinesis (multipolar division). In addition, DMI(III) caused morphological transformation in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Consideration of the overall process following the centrosome abnormalities caused by DMA(V) suggested a mode of cytotoxicity in which the mitotic centrosome is a critical target. PMID:27252065

  16. Atoh1 governs the migration of post-mitotic neurons that shape respiratory effectiveness at birth and chemoresponsiveness in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Hsiang; Tupal, Srinivasan; Huang, Teng-Wei; Ward, Christopher S.; Neul, Jeffery L.; Klisch, Tiemo J.; Gray, Paul A.; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Hindbrain neuronal networks serving respiratory, proprioceptive, and arousal functions share a developmental requirement for the bHLH transcription factor Atoh1. Loss of Atoh1 in mice results in respiratory failure and neonatal lethality; however, the neuronal identity and mechanism by which Atoh1-dependent cells sustain newborn breathing remains unknown. We uncovered that selective loss of Atoh1 from the post-mitotic retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) neurons results in severely impaired inspiratory rhythm and pronounced neonatal death. Mice that escape neonatal death develop abnormal chemoresponsiveness as adults. Interestingly, the expression of Atoh1 in the RTN neurons is not required for their specification or maintenance, but is important for their proper localization and to establish essential connections with the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC). These results provide insights into the genetic regulation of neonatal breathing and shed light on the labile sites that might contribute to sudden death in newborn infants and altered chemoresponsiveness in adults. PMID:22958821

  17. Stimulatory Effects of Gamma Irradiation on Phytochemical Properties, Mitotic Behaviour, and Nutritional Composition of Sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop.)

    PubMed Central

    Mat Taha, Rosna; Lay, Ma Ma; Khalili, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop. Syn. Onobrychis sativa L.) is a bloat-safe forage crop with high levels of tannins, which is renowned for its medicinal qualities in grazing animals. Mutagenesis technique was applied to investigate the influence of gamma irradiation at 30, 60, 90, and 120 Gy on mitotic behavior, in vitro growth factors, phytochemical and nutritional constituents of sainfoin. Although a percentage of plant necrosis and non-growing seed were enhanced by irradiation increment, the germination speed was significantly decreased. It was observed that gamma irradiated seeds had higher value of crude protein and dry matter digestibility compared to control seeds. Toxicity of copper was reduced in sainfoin irradiated seeds at different doses of gamma rays. Anthocyanin content also decreased in inverse proportion to irradiation intensity. Accumulation of phenolic and flavonoid compounds was enhanced by gamma irradiation exposure in leaf cells. HPLC profiles differed in peak areas of the two important alkaloids, Berberine and Sanguinarine, in 120 Gy irradiated seeds compared to control seeds. There were positive correlations between irradiation dose and some abnormality divisions such as laggard chromosome, micronucleus, binucleated cells, chromosome bridge, and cytomixis. In reality, radiocytological evaluation was proven to be essential in deducing the effectiveness of gamma irradiation to induce somaclonal variation in sainfoin. PMID:25147870

  18. Stimulatory effects of gamma irradiation on phytochemical properties, mitotic behaviour, and nutritional composition of sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop.).

    PubMed

    Mohajer, Sadegh; Taha, Rosna Mat; Lay, Ma Ma; Esmaeili, Arash Khorasani; Khalili, Mahsa

    2014-01-01

    Sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop. Syn. Onobrychis sativa L.) is a bloat-safe forage crop with high levels of tannins, which is renowned for its medicinal qualities in grazing animals. Mutagenesis technique was applied to investigate the influence of gamma irradiation at 30, 60, 90, and 120 Gy on mitotic behavior, in vitro growth factors, phytochemical and nutritional constituents of sainfoin. Although a percentage of plant necrosis and non-growing seed were enhanced by irradiation increment, the germination speed was significantly decreased. It was observed that gamma irradiated seeds had higher value of crude protein and dry matter digestibility compared to control seeds. Toxicity of copper was reduced in sainfoin irradiated seeds at different doses of gamma rays. Anthocyanin content also decreased in inverse proportion to irradiation intensity. Accumulation of phenolic and flavonoid compounds was enhanced by gamma irradiation exposure in leaf cells. HPLC profiles differed in peak areas of the two important alkaloids, Berberine and Sanguinarine, in 120 Gy irradiated seeds compared to control seeds. There were positive correlations between irradiation dose and some abnormality divisions such as laggard chromosome, micronucleus, binucleated cells, chromosome bridge, and cytomixis. In reality, radiocytological evaluation was proven to be essential in deducing the effectiveness of gamma irradiation to induce somaclonal variation in sainfoin. PMID:25147870

  19. hSNF5/INI1 inactivation is mainly associated with homozygous deletions and mitotic recombinations in rhabdoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Rousseau-Merck, M F; Versteege, I; Legrand, I; Couturier, J; Mairal, A; Delattre, O; Aurias, A

    1999-07-01

    The chromatin-remodeling hSNF5/INI1 gene has recently been shown to act as a tumor suppressor gene in rhabdoid tumors (RTs). In an attempt to further characterize the main chromosomal mechanisms involved in hSNF5/INI1 inactivation in RTs, we report here the molecular cytogenetic data obtained in 12 cell lines harboring hSNF5/INI1 mutations and/or deletions in relation to the molecular genetic analysis using polymorphic markers extended to both extremities of chromosome 22q. On the whole, mitotic recombination occurring in the proximal part of chromosome 22q, as demonstrated in five cases, and nondisjunction/duplication, highly suspected in two cases (processes leading respectively to partial or complete isodisomy), appear to be major mechanisms associated with hSNF5/INI1 inactivation. Such isodisomy accompanies each of the RTs exhibiting two cytogenetically normal chromosomes 22. This results in homozygosity for the mutation at the hSNF5/INI1 locus. An alternate mechanism accounting for hSNF5/INI1 inactivation observed in these tumors is homozygous deletion in the rhabdoid consensus region. This was observed in each of the four tumors carrying a chromosome 22q abnormality and, in particular, in the three tumors with chromosomal translocations. Only one case of our series illustrates the mutation/deletion classical model proposed for the double-hit inactivation of a tumor suppressor gene. PMID:10397258

  20. Molecular mechanism of APC/C activation by mitotic phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suyang; Chang, Leifu; Alfieri, Claudio; Zhang, Ziguo; Yang, Jing; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, Mark; Barford, David

    2016-05-12

    results reveal the mechanism for the regulation of mitotic APC/C by phosphorylation and provide a rationale for the development of selective inhibitors of this state. PMID:27120157

  1. A study of directional instability during mitotic chromosome movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Ajit P.

    Mitotic chromosome movements are responsible for the correct segregation of duplicated chromosomes into the daughter cells. Errors in this process are known to play a role in some of the serious diseases such as cancer, and the little understood process of aging. A thorough comprehension of the physical basis of this process is therefore necessary. An intriguing aspect of chromosome movements during mitosis is "directional instability": runs with approximately constant speed punctuated by abrupt reversal in direction of motion. I have constructed a mechanistic model that views chromosome movement as a result of interplay between poleward and antipoleward or polar ejection forces (PEF) on a chromosome; and microtubule (MT) depolymerization-coupled movement of the chromosome. Computer simulations based on this model using a single set of parameters accurately and quantitatively predict: the force, character, speed, and duration of chromosome movements, oscillations of chromosomes associated with only one spindle pole, the larger force during anaphase, the effect of MT-depolymerizing drugs on chromosome movements, and the decreased turnover of kinetochore-MTs during anaphase. The model also predicts how chromosome behavior should respond to perturbations of the PEF. These predictions could be unequivocally tested if it were possible to destroy structures smaller than the light resolution limit with minimal collateral damage. To address these requirements, I developed a methodology for ultrahigh resolution microsurgery with tightly-focused, ultrafast lasers pulses. This entailed an in-depth study of optical breakdown in dielectrics. Characterization of the single pulse damage in test dielectric materials ranging from silicon and glass to cell walls and membranes has shown that in the target regions where the laser intensity exceeds critical intensity, optical breakdown proceeds by tunneling ionization followed by a runaway avalanche ionization that ends with the

  2. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  3. Sources and Structures of Mitotic Crossovers That Arise When BLM Helicase Is Absent in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    LaFave, Matthew C.; Andersen, Sabrina L.; Stoffregen, Eric P.; Holsclaw, Julie K.; Kohl, Kathryn P.; Overton, Lewis J.; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    The Bloom syndrome helicase, BLM, has numerous functions that prevent mitotic crossovers. We used unique features of Drosophila melanogaster to investigate origins and properties of mitotic crossovers that occur when BLM is absent. Induction of lesions that block replication forks increased crossover frequencies, consistent with functions for BLM in responding to fork blockage. In contrast, treatment with hydroxyurea, which stalls forks, did not elevate crossovers, even though mutants lacking BLM are sensitive to killing by this agent. To learn about sources of spontaneous recombination, we mapped mitotic crossovers in mutants lacking BLM. In the male germline, irradiation-induced crossovers were distributed randomly across the euchromatin, but spontaneous crossovers were nonrandom. We suggest that regions of the genome with a high frequency of mitotic crossovers may be analogous to common fragile sites in the human genome. Interestingly, in the male germline there is a paucity of crossovers in the interval that spans the pericentric heterochromatin, but in the female germline this interval is more prone to crossing over. Finally, our system allowed us to recover pairs of reciprocal crossover chromosomes. Sequencing of these revealed the existence of gene conversion tracts and did not provide any evidence for mutations associated with crossovers. These findings provide important new insights into sources and structures of mitotic crossovers and functions of BLM helicase. PMID:24172129

  4. The effect of magnesium on mitotic spindle formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Uz, Gulsen; Sarikaya, Aysegul Topal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Magnesium (Mg2+), an essential ion for cells and biological systems, is involved in a variety of cellular processes, including the formation and breakdown of microtubules. The results of a previous investigation suggested that as cells grow the intracellular Mg2+ concentration falls, thereby stimulating formation of the mitotic spindle. In the present work, we used a Mg2+-deficient Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain GA2, in which two essential membrane Mg2+ transporter genes (homologs of ALR1 and ALR2 in Saccharomyces cerevisae) were deleted, and its parental strain Sp292, to examine the extent to which low Mg2+ concentrations can affect mitotic spindle formation. The two S. pombe strains were transformed with a plasmid carrying a GFP-α2-tubulin construct to fluorescently label microtubules. Using the free Mg2+-specific fluorescent probe mag-fura-2, we confirmed that intracellular free Mg2+ levels were lower in GA2 than in the parental strain. Defects in interphase microtubule organization, a lower percentage of mitotic spindle formation and a reduced mitotic index were also observed in the GA2 strain. Although there was interphase microtubule polymerization, the lower level of mitotic spindle formation in the Mg2+-deficient strain suggested a greater requirement for Mg2+ in this phenomenon than previously thought. PMID:27560651

  5. The non-coding RNA composition of the mitotic chromosome by 5′-tag sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yicong; Yi, Xianfu; Li, Xinhui; Hu, Chuansheng; Wang, Ju; Bai, Ling; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic chromosomes are one of the most commonly recognized sub-cellular structures in eukaryotic cells. Yet basic information necessary to understand their structure and assembly, such as their composition, is still lacking. Recent proteomic studies have begun to fill this void, identifying hundreds of RNA-binding proteins bound to mitotic chromosomes. However, by contrast, there are only two RNA species (U3 snRNA and rRNA) that are known to be associated with the mitotic chromosome, suggesting that there are many mitotic chromosome-associated RNAs (mCARs) not yet identified. Here, using a targeted protocol based on 5′-tag sequencing to profile the mammalian mCAR population, we report the identification of 1279 mCARs, the majority of which are ncRNAs, including lncRNAs that exhibit greater conservation across 60 vertebrate species than the entire population of lncRNAs. There is also a significant enrichment of snoRNAs and specific SINE RNAs. Finally, ∼40% of the mCARs are presently unannotated, many of which are as abundant as the annotated mCARs, suggesting that there are also many novel ncRNAs in the mCARs. Overall, the mCARs identified here, together with the previous proteomic and genomic data, constitute the first comprehensive catalogue of the molecular composition of the eukaryotic mitotic chromosomes. PMID:27016738

  6. Mitotic crossover--an evolutionary rudiment which promotes carcinogenesis of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rovcanin, Branislav; Ivanovski, Ivan; Djuric, Olivera; Nikolic, Dimitrije; Petrovic, Jelena; Ivanovski, Petar

    2014-09-21

    Mitotic crossover is a natural mechanism that is a main source of the genetic variability of primitive organisms. In complex organisms such as mammals, it represents an evolutionary rudiment which persisted as one of the numerous DNA repair mechanisms, and results in the production of homozygous allele combinations in all heterozygous genes located on the chromosome arm distal to the crossover. This event is familiar as loss of heterozygosity, which is one of the key mechanisms responsible for the development and progression of almost all cancers. We propose the hypothesis in which mitotic crossover is a principal source of the increased loss of heterozygosity that leads to the initiation and progression of colorectal carcinoma. The hypothesis could be tested by in vitro inhibition of Rad51 protein, orthotopic grafting of human colon cancer tissue into the gut of mice, and treatment with potential inhibitors. After these procedures, the frequency of mitotic crossover would be estimated. The development of selective inhibitors of mitotic crossover could stop further carcinogenesis of colorectal carcinoma, as well as many other neoplastic events. Loss of heterozygosity is an event responsible for carcinogenesis, its reduction by selective inhibitors of mitotic crossover could have a positive effect on cancer chemoprevention, as well as on growth reduction and a cessation in the progression of earlier developed tumors. PMID:25253953

  7. Mitotic activation: a convergent mechanism for a cohort of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Husseman, J W; Nochlin, D; Vincent, I

    2000-01-01

    Previous evidence from our lab and others has implicated the mitotic cdc2/cyclin B1 kinase in the neurofibrillary degeneration of Alzheimer's disease. To examine the specificity of this relationship, and define conditions leading to atypical activation of mitotic kinase in postmitotic neurons, we have applied antibodies specific for the cdc2 kinase, its activator, cyclin B1, and three cdc2 produced phosphoepitopes: the TG-3 phosphoepitope in tau and nucleolin, the MPM-2 phosphoepitope in a variety of substrates, and the H5 phosphoepitope in RNA polymerase II, to affected brain regions from a spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders. Our results demonstrate that neurons containing characteristic lesions in a subset of diseases including Down Syndrome (DS), Frontotemporal Dementia linked to chromosome 17 (FTD-17), Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP), Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD), Parkinson-Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis of Guam (GP-ALS), Niemann Pick disease type C (NPDC), and Pick's disease, display mitotic indices, implicating diverse etiologies in mitotic activation. The convergence of various degenerative schemes into a unified mitotic kinase-driven pathway provides a common target for therapeutic treatment of these different disorders. PMID:11124425

  8. Dietary flavonoid fisetin induces a forced exit from mitosis by targeting the mitotic spindle checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Salmela, Anna-Leena; Pouwels, Jeroen; Varis, Asta; Kukkonen, Anu M.; Toivonen, Pauliina; Halonen, Pasi K.; Perälä, Merja; Kallioniemi, Olli; Gorbsky, Gary J.; Kallio, Marko J.

    2009-01-01

    Fisetin is a natural flavonol present in edible vegetables, fruits and wine at 2–160 μg/g concentrations and an ingredient in nutritional supplements with much higher concentrations. The compound has been reported to exert anticarcinogenic effects as well as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity via its ability to act as an inhibitor of cell proliferation and free radical scavenger, respectively. Our cell-based high-throughput screen for small molecules that override chemically induced mitotic arrest identified fisetin as an antimitotic compound. Fisetin rapidly compromised microtubule drug-induced mitotic block in a proteasome-dependent manner in several human cell lines. Moreover, in unperturbed human cancer cells fisetin caused premature initiation of chromosome segregation and exit from mitosis without normal cytokinesis. To understand the molecular mechanism behind these mitotic errors, we analyzed the consequences of fisetin treatment on the localization and phoshorylation of several mitotic proteins. Aurora B, Bub1, BubR1 and Cenp-F rapidly lost their kinetochore/centromere localization and others became dephosphorylated upon addition of fisetin to the culture medium. Finally, we identified Aurora B kinase as a novel direct target of fisetin. The activity of Aurora B was significantly reduced by fisetin in vitro and in cells, an effect that can explain the observed forced mitotic exit, failure of cytokinesis and decreased cell viability. In conclusion, our data propose that fisetin perturbs spindle checkpoint signaling, which may contribute to the antiproliferative effects of the compound. PMID:19395653

  9. The effect of magnesium on mitotic spindle formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Uz, Gulsen; Sarikaya, Aysegul Topal

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg2+), an essential ion for cells and biological systems, is involved in a variety of cellular processes, including the formation and breakdown of microtubules. The results of a previous investigation suggested that as cells grow the intracellular Mg2+ concentration falls, thereby stimulating formation of the mitotic spindle. In the present work, we used a Mg2+-deficient Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain GA2, in which two essential membrane Mg2+ transporter genes (homologs of ALR1 and ALR2 in Saccharomyces cerevisae) were deleted, and its parental strain Sp292, to examine the extent to which low Mg2+ concentrations can affect mitotic spindle formation. The two S. pombe strains were transformed with a plasmid carrying a GFP-α2-tubulin construct to fluorescently label microtubules. Using the free Mg2+-specific fluorescent probe mag-fura-2, we confirmed that intracellular free Mg2+ levels were lower in GA2 than in the parental strain. Defects in interphase microtubule organization, a lower percentage of mitotic spindle formation and a reduced mitotic index were also observed in the GA2 strain. Although there was interphase microtubule polymerization, the lower level of mitotic spindle formation in the Mg2+-deficient strain suggested a greater requirement for Mg2+ in this phenomenon than previously thought. PMID:27560651

  10. Co-inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 and Aurora kinases promotes mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Hong, Myung Jin; Chow, Jeremy P H; Man, Wing Yu; Mak, Joyce P Y; Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y C

    2015-04-20

    Mitosis is choreographed by a number of protein kinases including polo-like kinases and Aurora kinases. As these kinases are frequently dysregulated in cancers, small-molecule inhibitors have been developed for targeted anticancer therapies. Given that PLK1 and Aurora kinases possess both unique functions as well as co-regulate multiple mitotic events, whether pharmacological inhibition of these kinases together can enhance mitotic catastrophe remains an outstanding issue to be determined. Using concentrations of inhibitors that did not induce severe mitotic defects on their own, we found that both the metaphase arrest and mitotic slippage induced by inhibitors targeting Aurora A and Aurora B (MK-5108 and Barasertib respectively) were enhanced by a PLK1 inhibitor (BI 2536). We found that PLK1 is overexpressed in cells from nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a highly invasive cancer with poor prognosis, in comparison to normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells were more sensitive to BI 2536 as a single agent and co-inhibition with Aurora kinases than normal cells. These observations underscore the mechanism and potential benefits of targeting PLK1 and Aurora kinases to induce mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells. PMID:25871386

  11. Mechanisms and Regulation of the Mitotic Inheritance of the Golgi Complex

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Carmen; Colanzi, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the Golgi complex is structured in the form of a continuous membranous system composed of stacks connected by tubular bridges: the “Golgi ribbon.” At the onset of mitosis, the Golgi complex undergoes a multi-step fragmentation process that is required for its correct partition into the dividing cells. Importantly, inhibition of Golgi disassembly results in cell-cycle arrest at the G2 stage, which indicates that accurate inheritance of the Golgi complex is monitored by a “Golgi mitotic checkpoint.” Moreover, mitotic Golgi disassembly correlates with the release of a set of Golgi-localized proteins that acquire specific functions during mitosis, such as mitotic spindle formation and regulation of the spindle checkpoint. Most of these events are regulated by small GTPases of the Arf and Rab families. Here, we review recent studies that are revealing the fundamental mechanisms, the molecular players, and the biological significance of mitotic inheritance of the Golgi complex in mammalian cells. We also briefly comment on how Golgi partitioning is coordinated with mitotic progression. PMID:26734607

  12. Ki-67 acts as a biological surfactant to disperse mitotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Cuylen, Sara; Blaukopf, Claudia; Politi, Antonio Z; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Neumann, Beate; Poser, Ina; Ellenberg, Jan; Hyman, Anthony A; Gerlich, Daniel W

    2016-07-14

    Eukaryotic genomes are partitioned into chromosomes that form compact and spatially well-separated mechanical bodies during mitosis. This enables chromosomes to move independently of each other for segregation of precisely one copy of the genome to each of the nascent daughter cells. Despite insights into the spatial organization of mitotic chromosomes and the discovery of proteins at the chromosome surface, the molecular and biophysical bases of mitotic chromosome structural individuality have remained unclear. Here we report that the proliferation marker protein Ki-67 (encoded by the MKI67 gene), a component of the mitotic chromosome periphery, prevents chromosomes from collapsing into a single chromatin mass after nuclear envelope disassembly, thus enabling independent chromosome motility and efficient interactions with the mitotic spindle. The chromosome separation function of human Ki-67 is not confined within a specific protein domain, but correlates with size and net charge of truncation mutants that apparently lack secondary structure. This suggests that Ki-67 forms a steric and electrostatic charge barrier, similar to surface-active agents (surfactants) that disperse particles or phase-separated liquid droplets in solvents. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy showed a high surface density of Ki-67 and dual-colour labelling of both protein termini revealed an extended molecular conformation, indicating brush-like arrangements that are characteristic of polymeric surfactants. Our study thus elucidates a biomechanical role of the mitotic chromosome periphery in mammalian cells and suggests that natural proteins can function as surfactants in intracellular compartmentalization. PMID:27362226

  13. Aurora B prevents delayed DNA replication and premature mitotic exit by repressing p21Cip1

    PubMed Central

    Trakala, Marianna; Fernández-Miranda, Gonzalo; Pérez de Castro, Ignacio; Heeschen, Christopher; Malumbres, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    Aurora kinase B is a critical component of the chromosomal passenger complex, which is involved in the regulation of microtubule-kinetochore attachments and cytokinesis. By using conditional knockout cells and chemical inhibition, we show here that inactivation of Aurora B results in delayed G1/S transition and premature mitotic exit. Aurora B deficiency results in delayed DNA replication in cultured fibroblasts as well as liver cells after hepatectomy. This is accompanied by increased transcription of the cell cycle inhibitor p21Cip1. Lack of Aurora B does not prevent mitotic entry but results in a premature exit from prometaphase in the presence of increased p21Cip1-Cdk1 inactive complexes. Aurora B-null cells display reduced degradation of cyclin B1, suggesting the presence of phenomenon known as adaptation to the mitotic checkpoint, previously described in yeast. Elimination of p21Cip1 rescues Cdk1 activity and prevents premature mitotic exit in Aurora B-deficient cells. These results suggest that Aurora B represses p21Cip1, preventing delayed DNA replication, Cdk inhibition and premature mitotic exit. The upregulation of p21Cip1 observed after inhibition of Aurora B may have important implications in cell cycle progression, tetraploidy, senescence or cancer therapy. PMID:23428904

  14. Co-inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 and Aurora kinases promotes mitotic catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjing; Hong, Myung Jin; Chow, Jeremy P.H.; Man, Wing Yu; Mak, Joyce P.Y.; Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y.C.

    2015-01-01

    Mitosis is choreographed by a number of protein kinases including polo-like kinases and Aurora kinases. As these kinases are frequently dysregulated in cancers, small-molecule inhibitors have been developed for targeted anticancer therapies. Given that PLK1 and Aurora kinases possess both unique functions as well as co-regulate multiple mitotic events, whether pharmacological inhibition of these kinases together can enhance mitotic catastrophe remains an outstanding issue to be determined. Using concentrations of inhibitors that did not induce severe mitotic defects on their own, we found that both the metaphase arrest and mitotic slippage induced by inhibitors targeting Aurora A and Aurora B (MK-5108 and Barasertib respectively) were enhanced by a PLK1 inhibitor (BI 2536). We found that PLK1 is overexpressed in cells from nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a highly invasive cancer with poor prognosis, in comparison to normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells were more sensitive to BI 2536 as a single agent and co-inhibition with Aurora kinases than normal cells. These observations underscore the mechanism and potential benefits of targeting PLK1 and Aurora kinases to induce mitotic catastrophe in cancer cells. PMID:25871386

  15. Plk1-dependent recruitment of gamma-tubulin complexes to mitotic centrosomes involves multiple PCM components.

    PubMed

    Haren, Laurence; Stearns, Tim; Lüders, Jens

    2009-01-01

    The nucleation of microtubules requires protein complexes containing gamma-tubulin, which are present in the cytoplasm and associate with the centrosome and with the mitotic spindle. We have previously shown that these interactions require the gamma-tubulin targeting factor GCP-WD/NEDD1, which has an essential role in spindle formation. The recruitment of additional gamma-tubulin to the centrosomes occurs during centrosome maturation at the G2/M transition and is regulated by the mitotic kinase Plk1. However, the molecular details of this important pathway are unknown and a Plk1 substrate that controls gamma-tubulin recruitment has not been identified. Here we show that Plk1 associates with GCP-WD in mitosis and Plk1 activity contributes to phosphorylation of GCP-WD. Plk1 depletion or inhibition prevents accumulation of GCP-WD at mitotic centrosomes, but GCP-WD mutants that are defective in Plk1-binding and -phosphorylation still accumulate at mitotic centrosomes and recruit gamma-tubulin. Moreover, Plk1 also controls the recruitment of other PCM proteins implicated in centrosomal gamma-tubulin attachment (Cep192/hSPD2, pericentrin, Cep215/Cdk5Rap2). Our results support a model in which Plk1-dependent recruitment of gamma-tubulin to mitotic centrosomes is regulated upstream of GCP-WD, involves multiple PCM proteins and therefore potentially multiple Plk1 substrates. PMID:19543530

  16. PP1 initiates the dephosphorylation of MASTL, triggering mitotic exit and bistability in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Samuel; Fey, Dirk; McCloy, Rachael A.; Parker, Benjamin L.; Mitchell, Nicholas J.; Payne, Richard J.; Daly, Roger J.; James, David E.; Caldon, C. Elizabeth; Watkins, D. Neil; Croucher, David R.; Burgess, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Entry into mitosis is driven by the phosphorylation of thousands of substrates, under the master control of Cdk1. During entry into mitosis, Cdk1, in collaboration with MASTL kinase, represses the activity of the major mitotic protein phosphatases, PP1 and PP2A, thereby ensuring mitotic substrates remain phosphorylated. For cells to complete and exit mitosis, these phosphorylation events must be removed, and hence, phosphatase activity must be reactivated. This reactivation of phosphatase activity presumably requires the inhibition of MASTL; however, it is not currently understood what deactivates MASTL and how this is achieved. In this study, we identified that PP1 is associated with, and capable of partially dephosphorylating and deactivating, MASTL during mitotic exit. Using mathematical modelling, we were able to confirm that deactivation of MASTL is essential for mitotic exit. Furthermore, small decreases in Cdk1 activity during metaphase are sufficient to initiate the reactivation of PP1, which in turn partially deactivates MASTL to release inhibition of PP2A and, hence, create a feedback loop. This feedback loop drives complete deactivation of MASTL, ensuring a strong switch-like activation of phosphatase activity during mitotic exit. PMID:26872783

  17. The non-coding RNA composition of the mitotic chromosome by 5'-tag sequencing.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yicong; Yi, Xianfu; Li, Xinhui; Hu, Chuansheng; Wang, Ju; Bai, Ling; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-06-01

    Mitotic chromosomes are one of the most commonly recognized sub-cellular structures in eukaryotic cells. Yet basic information necessary to understand their structure and assembly, such as their composition, is still lacking. Recent proteomic studies have begun to fill this void, identifying hundreds of RNA-binding proteins bound to mitotic chromosomes. However, by contrast, there are only two RNA species (U3 snRNA and rRNA) that are known to be associated with the mitotic chromosome, suggesting that there are many mitotic chromosome-associated RNAs (mCARs) not yet identified. Here, using a targeted protocol based on 5'-tag sequencing to profile the mammalian mCAR population, we report the identification of 1279 mCARs, the majority of which are ncRNAs, including lncRNAs that exhibit greater conservation across 60 vertebrate species than the entire population of lncRNAs. There is also a significant enrichment of snoRNAs and specific SINE RNAs. Finally, ∼40% of the mCARs are presently unannotated, many of which are as abundant as the annotated mCARs, suggesting that there are also many novel ncRNAs in the mCARs. Overall, the mCARs identified here, together with the previous proteomic and genomic data, constitute the first comprehensive catalogue of the molecular composition of the eukaryotic mitotic chromosomes. PMID:27016738

  18. Haematological abnormalities in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the kind of haematological abnormalities that are present in patients with mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and the frequency of their occurrence. METHODS The blood cell counts of a cohort of patients with syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs were retrospectively reviewed. MIDs were classified as ‘definite’, ‘probable’ or ‘possible’ according to clinical presentation, instrumental findings, immunohistological findings on muscle biopsy, biochemical abnormalities of the respiratory chain and/or the results of genetic studies. Patients who had medical conditions other than MID that account for the haematological abnormalities were excluded. RESULTS A total of 46 patients (‘definite’ = 5; ‘probable’ = 9; ‘possible’ = 32) had haematological abnormalities attributable to MIDs. The most frequent haematological abnormality in patients with MIDs was anaemia. 27 patients had anaemia as their sole haematological problem. Anaemia was associated with thrombopenia (n = 4), thrombocytosis (n = 2), leucopenia (n = 2), and eosinophilia (n = 1). Anaemia was hypochromic and normocytic in 27 patients, hypochromic and microcytic in six patients, hyperchromic and macrocytic in two patients, and normochromic and microcytic in one patient. Among the 46 patients with a mitochondrial haematological abnormality, 78.3% had anaemia, 13.0% had thrombopenia, 8.7% had leucopenia and 8.7% had eosinophilia, alone or in combination with other haematological abnormalities. CONCLUSION MID should be considered if a patient’s abnormal blood cell counts (particularly those associated with anaemia, thrombopenia, leucopenia or eosinophilia) cannot be explained by established causes. Abnormal blood cell counts may be the sole manifestation of MID or a collateral feature of a multisystem problem. PMID:26243978

  19. [The endemic goitre in figurative arts].

    PubMed

    Giampalmo, A

    1996-01-01

    For the past fifteen years the author has been collecting photografic documentation of works of figurative arts (graffiti, mosiac, engravings, paintings and sculptures) made at different times and places, in which he found mostly unintentional display of diseases or deformities that would be clearly identified in nosography in the light of today's knowledge. In this study the author intends to illustrate briefly different cases on endemic goitre - whose representation is particularly frequent in figurative arts - in chronological order, beginning with the most ancient ones and focussing on Italian portraying of the Nativity and the Passion of Christ, where the most striking infirmities and disabilities were mirrored and commonly accepted. This study whose interest lies between a scientific and a humanistic one has also importance in the field of art, and especially in relevant philological research which is of particular importance to us pathologists. At last it contribute to establish the epidemiology of some diseases and the knowledge of historical and geographical pathology. PMID:11623474

  20. Interferometer for optical waviness and figure testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freischlad, Klaus R.

    1997-09-01

    A novel instrument is described for the optical, non-contact measurement of the waviness and figure component of the surface texture of flat surface. Here the spatial frequency range for waviness is typically chosen from 1.25/mm to 0.05/mm, whereas the global figure error contains the lower spatial frequencies. The special requirements on the dynamic range, the spatial resolution, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurement are discussed. The presented instrument consists of a white-light, extended-source, phase-shifting Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The special design employing low temporal and spatial coherence avoids coherent speckle noise on the measured surface maps while providing good spatial resolution. Thus in the waviness frequency band the modulation transfer function exceeds 0.75, an the RMS- precision is 0.1nm over the measurement area of 100mm in diameter. Measurement examples of typical applications, e.g. substrates for hard disks and flat panel displays, are shown.

  1. Surface figure control for coated optics

    DOEpatents

    Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.; Spence, Paul A.; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    A pedestal optical substrate that simultaneously provides high substrate dynamic stiffness, provides low surface figure sensitivity to mechanical mounting hardware inputs, and constrains surface figure changes caused by optical coatings to be primarily spherical in nature. The pedestal optical substrate includes a disk-like optic or substrate section having a top surface that is coated, a disk-like base section that provides location at which the substrate can be mounted, and a connecting cylindrical section between the base and optics or substrate sections. The optic section has an optical section thickness.sup.2 /optical section diameter ratio of between about 5 to 10 mm, and a thickness variation between front and back surfaces of less than about 10%. The connecting cylindrical section may be attached via three spaced legs or members. However, the pedestal optical substrate can be manufactured from a solid piece of material to form a monolith, thus avoiding joints between the sections, or the disk-like base can be formed separately and connected to the connecting section. By way of example, the pedestal optical substrate may be utilized in the fabrication of optics for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography imaging system, or in any optical system requiring coated optics and substrates with reduced sensitivity to mechanical mounts.

  2. Hyperactive mTOR pathway promotes lymphoproliferation and abnormal differentiation in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Völkl, Simon; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Allgäuer, Andrea; Schreiner, Elisabeth; Lorenz, Myriam Ricarda; Rohr, Jan; Klemann, Christian; Fuchs, Ilka; Schuster, Volker; von Bueren, André O; Naumann-Bartsch, Nora; Gambineri, Eleonora; Siepermann, Kathrin; Kobbe, Robin; Nathrath, Michaela; Arkwright, Peter D; Miano, Maurizio; Stachel, Klaus-Daniel; Metzler, Markus; Schwarz, Klaus; Kremer, Anita N; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-07-14

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a human disorder characterized by defective Fas signaling, resulting in chronic benign lymphoproliferation and accumulation of TCRαβ(+) CD4(-) CD8(-) double-negative T (DNT) cells. Although their phenotype resembles that of terminally differentiated or exhausted T cells, lack of KLRG1, high eomesodermin, and marginal T-bet expression point instead to a long-lived memory state with potent proliferative capacity. Here we show that despite their terminally differentiated phenotype, human ALPS DNT cells exhibit substantial mitotic activity in vivo. Notably, hyperproliferation of ALPS DNT cells is associated with increased basal and activation-induced phosphorylation of serine-threonine kinases Akt and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). The mTOR inhibitor rapamycin abrogated survival and proliferation of ALPS DNT cells, but not of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells in vitro. In vivo, mTOR inhibition reduced proliferation and abnormal differentiation by DNT cells. Importantly, increased mitotic activity and hyperactive mTOR signaling was also observed in recently defined CD4(+) or CD8(+) precursor DNT cells, and mTOR inhibition specifically reduced these cells in vivo, indicating abnormal programming of Fas-deficient T cells before the DNT stage. Thus, our results identify the mTOR pathway as a major regulator of lymphoproliferation and aberrant differentiation in ALPS. PMID:27099149

  3. The post-mitotic state in neurons correlates with a stable nuclear higher-order structure.

    PubMed

    Aranda-Anzaldo, Armando

    2012-03-01

    Neurons become terminally differentiated (TD) post-mitotic cells very early during development yet they may remain alive and functional for decades. TD neurons preserve the molecular machinery necessary for DNA synthesis that may be reactivated by different stimuli but they never complete a successful mitosis. The non-reversible nature of the post-mitotic state in neurons suggests a non-genetic basis for it since no set of mutations has been able to revert it. Comparative studies of the nuclear higher-order structure in neurons and cells with proliferating potential suggest that the non-reversible nature of the post-mitotic state in neurons has a structural basis in the stability of the nuclear higher-order structure. PMID:22808316

  4. RGS14 is a mitotic spindle protein essential from the first division of the mammalian zygote.

    PubMed

    Martin-McCaffrey, Luke; Willard, Francis S; Oliveira-dos-Santos, Antonio J; Natale, David R C; Snow, Bryan E; Kimple, Randall J; Pajak, Agnieszka; Watson, Andrew J; Dagnino, Lina; Penninger, Josef M; Siderovski, David P; D'Souza, Sudhir J A

    2004-11-01

    Heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunits, RGS proteins, and GoLoco motif proteins have been recently implicated in the control of mitotic spindle dynamics in C. elegans and D. melanogaster. Here we show that "regulator of G protein signaling-14" (RGS14) is expressed by the mouse embryonic genome immediately prior to the first mitosis, where it colocalizes with the anastral mitotic apparatus of the mouse zygote. Loss of Rgs14 expression in the mouse zygote results in cytofragmentation and failure to progress to the 2-cell stage. RGS14 is found in all tissues and segregates to the nucleus in interphase and to the mitotic spindle and centrioles during mitosis. Alteration of RGS14 levels in exponentially proliferating cells leads to cell growth arrest. Our results indicate that RGS14 is one of the earliest essential product of the mammalian embryonic genome yet described and has a general role in mitosis. PMID:15525537

  5. Moscatilin induces apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe in human esophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-An; Chen, Chien-Chih; Shen, Chien-Chang; Chang, Hen-Hong; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2013-10-01

    Moscatilin, a bibenzyl derivative from the orchid Dendrobium loddigesii, has been shown to possess anticancer activity. We examined the effect of moscatilin on human esophageal cancer cells, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (ADC) cells and its possible mechanisms. Moscatilin suppressed the growth of both the histological cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Morphological changes indicative of apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe were observed following moscatilin treatment. The population of cells in the sub-G1 phase and polyploidy phase significantly increased after treatment. Immunofluorescence revealed multipolar mitosis and subsequent multinucleation in moscatilin-treated cells, indicating the development of mitotic catastrophe. Western blot showed a marked increase in expressions of polo-like kinase 1 and cyclin B1 after exposure to moscatilin. In conclusion, moscatilin inhibits growth and induces apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe in human esophageal SCC- and ADC-derived cell lines, indicating that moscatilin has broad potential against esophageal cancer. PMID:24074296

  6. Moscatilin Induces Apoptosis and Mitotic Catastrophe in Human Esophageal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-An; Chen, Chien-Chih; Shen, Chien-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Moscatilin, a bibenzyl derivative from the orchid Dendrobium loddigesii, has been shown to possess anticancer activity. We examined the effect of moscatilin on human esophageal cancer cells, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (ADC) cells and its possible mechanisms. Moscatilin suppressed the growth of both the histological cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Morphological changes indicative of apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe were observed following moscatilin treatment. The population of cells in the sub-G1 phase and polyploidy phase significantly increased after treatment. Immunofluorescence revealed multipolar mitosis and subsequent multinucleation in moscatilin-treated cells, indicating the development of mitotic catastrophe. Western blot showed a marked increase in expressions of polo-like kinase 1 and cyclin B1 after exposure to moscatilin. In conclusion, moscatilin inhibits growth and induces apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe in human esophageal SCC- and ADC-derived cell lines, indicating that moscatilin has broad potential against esophageal cancer. PMID:24074296

  7. Mitotic cells contract actomyosin cortex and generate pressure to round against or escape epithelial confinement

    PubMed Central

    Sorce, Barbara; Escobedo, Carlos; Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P.; Cattin, Cedric J.; Newton, Richard; Banerjee, Indranil; Stettler, Alexander; Roska, Botond; Eaton, Suzanne; Hyman, Anthony A.; Hierlemann, Andreas; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how mitotic cells round against epithelial confinement. Here, we engineer micropillar arrays that subject cells to lateral mechanical confinement similar to that experienced in epithelia. If generating sufficient force to deform the pillars, rounding epithelial (MDCK) cells can create space to divide. However, if mitotic cells cannot create sufficient space, their rounding force, which is generated by actomyosin contraction and hydrostatic pressure, pushes the cell out of confinement. After conducting mitosis in an unperturbed manner, both daughter cells return to the confinement of the pillars. Cells that cannot round against nor escape confinement cannot orient their mitotic spindles and more likely undergo apoptosis. The results highlight how spatially constrained epithelial cells prepare for mitosis: either they are strong enough to round up or they must escape. The ability to escape from confinement and reintegrate after mitosis appears to be a basic property of epithelial cells. PMID:26602832

  8. Mitotic cells contract actomyosin cortex and generate pressure to round against or escape epithelial confinement.

    PubMed

    Sorce, Barbara; Escobedo, Carlos; Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P; Cattin, Cedric J; Newton, Richard; Banerjee, Indranil; Stettler, Alexander; Roska, Botond; Eaton, Suzanne; Hyman, Anthony A; Hierlemann, Andreas; Müller, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how mitotic cells round against epithelial confinement. Here, we engineer micropillar arrays that subject cells to lateral mechanical confinement similar to that experienced in epithelia. If generating sufficient force to deform the pillars, rounding epithelial (MDCK) cells can create space to divide. However, if mitotic cells cannot create sufficient space, their rounding force, which is generated by actomyosin contraction and hydrostatic pressure, pushes the cell out of confinement. After conducting mitosis in an unperturbed manner, both daughter cells return to the confinement of the pillars. Cells that cannot round against nor escape confinement cannot orient their mitotic spindles and more likely undergo apoptosis. The results highlight how spatially constrained epithelial cells prepare for mitosis: either they are strong enough to round up or they must escape. The ability to escape from confinement and reintegrate after mitosis appears to be a basic property of epithelial cells. PMID:26602832

  9. Localization of latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) on mitotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Rahayu, Retno; Ohsaki, Eriko; Omori, Hiroko; Ueda, Keiji

    2016-09-01

    In latent infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), viral gene expression is extremely limited and copy numbers of viral genomes remain constant. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is known to have a role in maintaining viral genome copy numbers in growing cells. Several studies have shown that LANA is localized in particular regions on mitotic chromosomes, such as centromeres/pericentromeres. We independently examined the distinct localization of LANA on mitotic chromosomes during mitosis, using super-resolution laser confocal microscopy and correlative fluorescence microscopy-electron microscopy (FM-EM) analyses. We found that the majority of LANA were not localized at particular regions such as telomeres/peritelomeres, centromeres/pericentromeres, and cohesion sites, but at the bodies of condensed chromosomes. Thus, LANA may undergo various interactions with the host factors on the condensed chromosomes in order to tether the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes and realize faithful viral genome segregation during cell division. PMID:27254595

  10. Bistability of mitotic entry and exit switches during open mitosis in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hégarat, Nadia; Rata, Scott; Hochegger, Helfrid

    2016-07-01

    Mitotic entry and exit are switch-like transitions that are driven by the activation and inactivation of Cdk1 and mitotic cyclins. This simple on/off reaction turns out to be a complex interplay of various reversible reactions, feedback loops, and thresholds that involve both the direct regulators of Cdk1 and its counteracting phosphatases. In this review, we summarize the interplay of the major components of the system and discuss how they work together to generate robustness, bistability, and irreversibility. We propose that it may be beneficial to regard the entry and exit reactions as two separate reversible switches that are distinguished by differences in the state of phosphatase activity, mitotic proteolysis, and a dramatic rearrangement of cellular components after nuclear envelope breakdown, and discuss how the major Cdk1 activity thresholds could be determined for these transitions. PMID:27231150

  11. Mitotic cells contract actomyosin cortex and generate pressure to round against or escape epithelial confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorce, Barbara; Escobedo, Carlos; Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P.; Cattin, Cedric J.; Newton, Richard; Banerjee, Indranil; Stettler, Alexander; Roska, Botond; Eaton, Suzanne; Hyman, Anthony A.; Hierlemann, Andreas; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about how mitotic cells round against epithelial confinement. Here, we engineer micropillar arrays that subject cells to lateral mechanical confinement similar to that experienced in epithelia. If generating sufficient force to deform the pillars, rounding epithelial (MDCK) cells can create space to divide. However, if mitotic cells cannot create sufficient space, their rounding force, which is generated by actomyosin contraction and hydrostatic pressure, pushes the cell out of confinement. After conducting mitosis in an unperturbed manner, both daughter cells return to the confinement of the pillars. Cells that cannot round against nor escape confinement cannot orient their mitotic spindles and more likely undergo apoptosis. The results highlight how spatially constrained epithelial cells prepare for mitosis: either they are strong enough to round up or they must escape. The ability to escape from confinement and reintegrate after mitosis appears to be a basic property of epithelial cells.

  12. Cell fate after mitotic arrest in different tumor cells is determined by the balance between slippage and apoptotic threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Galán-Malo, Patricia; Vela, Laura; Gonzalo, Oscar; Calvo-Sanjuán, Rubén; Gracia-Fleta, Lucía; Naval, Javier; Marzo, Isabel

    2012-02-01

    Microtubule poisons and other anti-mitotic drugs induce tumor death but the molecular events linking mitotic arrest to cell death are still not fully understood. We have analyzed cell fate after mitotic arrest produced by the microtubule-destabilizing drug vincristine in a panel of human tumor cell lines showing different response to vincristine. In Jurkat, RPMI 8226 and HeLa cells, apoptosis was triggered shortly after vincristine-induced mitotic arrest. However, A549 cells, which express a great amount of Bcl-x{sub L} and undetectable amounts of Bak, underwent mitotic slippage prior to cell death. However, when Bcl-x{sub L} gene was silenced in A549 cells, vincristine induced apoptosis during mitotic arrest. Another different behavior was found in MiaPaca2 cells, where vincristine caused death by mitotic catastrophe that switched to apoptosis when cyclin B1 degradation was prevented by proteasome inhibition. Overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L} or silencing Bax and Bak expression delayed the onset of apoptosis in Jurkat and RPMI 8226 cells, enabling mitotic slippage and endoreduplication. In HeLa cells, overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L} switched cell death from apoptosis to mitotic catastrophe. Mcl-1 offered limited protection to vincristine-induced cell death and Mcl-1 degradation was not essential for vincristine-induced death. All these results, taken together, indicate that the Bcl-x{sub L}/Bak ratio and the ability to degrade cyclin B1 determine cell fate after mitotic arrest in the different tumor cell types. Highlights: ► Vincristine induces cell death by apoptosis or mitotic catastrophe. ► Apoptosis-proficient cells die by apoptosis during mitosis upon vincristine treatment. ► p53wt apoptosis-deficient cells undergo apoptosis from a G1-like tetraploid state. ► p53mt apoptosis-deficient cells can survive and divide giving rise to 8N cells.

  13. Poetry and the Teaching of Figurative Language Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Harold K., Jr.

    Many teachers note the importance of student ability to analyze and understand intricate uses of figurative language in reading. Research in recent years has focused on the prevalence of figures of speech in textbooks and other reading, suggesting that the fostering of figurative language skills should become a more common feature of language…

  14. Enactivism, Figural Apprehension and Knowledge Objectification: An Exploration of Figural Pattern Generalisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samson, Duncan; Schafer, Marc

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the inter-relationship between the embodied processes of pattern generalisation and the visualisation of pictorial cues. A research framework is established for analysing pupils' multiple visualisations of figural cues in the context of pattern generalisation. The research framework centres on a novel combination of three…

  15. Figure Control of Lightweight Optical Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Main, John A.; Song, Haiping

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to demonstrate the use of fuzzy logic controllers in modifying the figure of a piezoceramic bimorph mirror. Non-contact electron actuation technology is used to actively control a bimorph mirror comprised two PZT-5H wafers by varying the electron flux and electron voltages. Due to electron blooming generated by the electron flux, it is difficult to develop an accurate control model for the bimorph mirror through theoretical analysis alone. The non-contact shape control system with electron flux blooming can be approximately described with a heuristic model based on experimental data. Two fuzzy logic feedback controllers are developed to control the shape of the bimorph mirror according to heuristic fuzzy inference rules generated from previous experimental results. Validation of the proposed fuzzy logic controllers is also discussed.

  16. Precision Segmented Reflector figure control system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, E.; Eldred, D.; Briggs, C.; Kiceniuk, T.; Agronin, M.

    1989-01-01

    A control system architecture for an actively controlled segmented reflector is described along with a design realization for achieving precision alignment of reflector panels. Performance requirements are derived in part from the Large Deployable Reflector, which is a representative mission, and error allocations are made which consider mirror panel surface errors, position measurement and figure estimation, and position control of both quasi-static and dynamic disturbances. The design uses multiple wavelength interferometric edge sensors and voice coil actuators in conjunction with a hybrid control strategy to correct panel position errors. A unit cell shown to be central to the concept is analyzed. The cell integrates the sensing, actuation, and mechanical functions of a control module together with a reflector panel to form a unitized assembly.

  17. Interdependent figure-of-merit software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K.; Kirsch, T.

    1989-01-01

    This program was undertaken in order to understand the complex nature of interdependent performance in space missions. At the first step in a planned sequence of progress, a spread sheet program was developed to evaluate different fuel/oxidizer combinations for a specific Martian mission. This program is to be linked with output attained using sophisticated software produced by Gordon and McBride. The programming to date makes use of 11 independent parameters. Optimization is essential when faced with the incredible magnitude of costs, risks, and benefits involved with space exploration. A system of weights needs to be devised on which to measure the options. It was the goal to devise a Figure of Merit (FoM) on which different choices can be presented and made. The plan was to model typical missions to Mars, identify the parameters, and vary them until the best one is found. Initially, most of the focus was placed on propellant selection.

  18. Structure analysis for plane geometry figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tianxiao; Lu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Lu; Li, Keqiang; Tang, Zhi

    2013-12-01

    As there are increasing numbers of digital documents for education purpose, we realize that there is not a retrieval application for mathematic plane geometry images. In this paper, we propose a method for retrieving plane geometry figures (PGFs), which often appear in geometry books and digital documents. First, detecting algorithms are applied to detect common basic geometry shapes from a PGF image. Based on all basic shapes, we analyze the structural relationships between two basic shapes and combine some of them to a compound shape to build the PGF descriptor. Afterwards, we apply matching function to retrieve candidate PGF images with ranking. The great contribution of the paper is that we propose a structure analysis method to better describe the spatial relationships in such image composed of many overlapped shapes. Experimental results demonstrate that our analysis method and shape descriptor can obtain good retrieval results with relatively high effectiveness and efficiency.

  19. Induced rates of mitotic crossing over and possible mitotic gene conversion per wing anlage cell in Drosophila melanogaster by X rays and fission neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Ayaki, T.; Fujikawa, K.; Ryo, H.; Itoh, T.; Kondo, S. )

    1990-09-01

    As a model for chromosome aberrations, radiation-induced mitotic recombination of mwh and flr genes in Drosophila melanogaster strain (mwh +/+ flr) was quantitatively studied. Fission neutrons were five to six times more effective than X rays per unit dose in producing either crossover-mwh/flr twins and mwh singles-or flr singles, indicating that common processes are involved in the production of crossover and flr singles. The X-ray-induced rate/wing anlage cell/Gy for flr singles was 1 X 10(-5), whereas that of crossover was 2 x 10(-4); the former and the latter rate are of the same order of magnitude as those of gene conversion and crossover in yeast, respectively. Thus, we conclude that proximal-marker flr singles induced in the transheterozygote are gene convertants. Using the model based on yeast that recombination events result from repair of double-strand breaks or gaps, we propose that mitotic recombination in the fly is a secondary result of recombinational DNA repair. Evidence for recombinational misrepair in the fly is given. The relative ratio of radiation-induced mitotic crossover to spontaneous meiotic crossover is one order of magnitude higher in the fly than in yeast and humans.

  20. Mitotic arrest-associated apoptosis induced by sodium arsenite in A375 melanoma cells is BUBR1-dependent

    SciTech Connect

    McNeely, Samuel C.; Taylor, B. Frazier; States, J. Christopher

    2008-08-15

    A375 human malignant melanoma cells undergo mitotic arrest-associated apoptosis when treated with pharmacological concentrations of sodium arsenite, a chemotherapeutic for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Our previous studies indicated that decreased arsenite sensitivity correlated with reduced mitotic spindle checkpoint function and reduced expression of the checkpoint protein BUBR1. In the current study, arsenite induced securin and cyclin B stabilization, BUBR1 phosphorylation, and spindle checkpoint activation. Arsenite also increased activating cyclin dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) Thr{sup 161} phosphorylation but decreased inhibitory Tyr15 phosphorylation. Mitotic arrest resulted in apoptosis as indicated by colocalization of mitotic phospho-Histone H3 with active caspase 3. Apoptosis was associated with BCL-2 Ser70 phosphorylation. Inhibition of CDK1 with roscovitine in arsenite-treated mitotic cells inhibited spindle checkpoint maintenance as inferred from reduced BUBR1 phosphorylation, reduced cyclin B expression, and diminution of mitotic index. Roscovitine also reduced BCL-2 Ser70 phosphorylation and protected against apoptosis, suggesting mitotic arrest caused by hyperactivation of CDK1 directly or indirectly leads to BCL-2 phosphorylation and apoptosis. In addition, suppression of BUBR1 with siRNA prevented arsenite-induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis. These findings provide insight into the mechanism of arsenic's chemotherapeutic action and indicate a functional spindle checkpoint may be required for arsenic-sensitivity.

  1. Loading of PAX3 to Mitotic Chromosomes Is Mediated by Arginine Methylation and Associated with Waardenburg Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tsu-Fang; Yao, Ya-Li; Lai, I-Lu; Lai, Chien-Chen; Lin, Pei-Lun; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2015-01-01

    PAX3 is a transcription factor critical to gene regulation in mammalian development. Mutations in PAX3 are associated with Waardenburg syndrome (WS), but the mechanism of how mutant PAX3 proteins cause WS remains unclear. Here, we found that PAX3 loads on mitotic chromosomes using its homeodomain. PAX3 WS mutants with mutations in homeodomain lose the ability to bind mitotic chromosomes. Moreover, loading of PAX3 on mitotic chromosomes requires arginine methylation, which is regulated by methyltransferase PRMT5 and demethylase JMJD6. Mutant PAX3 proteins that lose mitotic chromosome localization block cell proliferation and normal development of zebrafish. These results reveal the molecular mechanism of PAX3s loading on mitotic chromosomes and the importance of this localization pattern in normal development. Our findings suggest that PAX3 WS mutants interfere with the normal functions of PAX3 in a dominant negative manner, which is important to the understanding of the pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome. PMID:26149688

  2. Loading of PAX3 to Mitotic Chromosomes Is Mediated by Arginine Methylation and Associated with Waardenburg Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsu-Fang; Yao, Ya-Li; Lai, I-Lu; Lai, Chien-Chen; Lin, Pei-Lun; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2015-08-14

    PAX3 is a transcription factor critical to gene regulation in mammalian development. Mutations in PAX3 are associated with Waardenburg syndrome (WS), but the mechanism of how mutant PAX3 proteins cause WS remains unclear. Here, we found that PAX3 loads on mitotic chromosomes using its homeodomain. PAX3 WS mutants with mutations in homeodomain lose the ability to bind mitotic chromosomes. Moreover, loading of PAX3 on mitotic chromosomes requires arginine methylation, which is regulated by methyltransferase PRMT5 and demethylase JMJD6. Mutant PAX3 proteins that lose mitotic chromosome localization block cell proliferation and normal development of zebrafish. These results reveal the molecular mechanism of PAX3s loading on mitotic chromosomes and the importance of this localization pattern in normal development. Our findings suggest that PAX3 WS mutants interfere with the normal functions of PAX3 in a dominant negative manner, which is important to the understanding of the pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome. PMID:26149688

  3. PP1-mediated dephosphorylation of phosphoproteins at mitotic exit is controlled by inhibitor-1 and PP1 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Judy Qiju; Guo, Jessie Yanxiang; Tang, Wanli; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Freel, Christopher D.; Chen, Chen; Nairn, Angus C.; Kornbluth, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Loss of Cdc2 activity following Cyclin B degradation is necessary, but not sufficient, for mitotic exit. Proteins phosphorylated by Cdc2 and downstream mitotic kinases must also be dephosphorylated. We report here that protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is the major catalyst of mitotic phosphoprotein dephosphorylation. Suppression of PP1 during early mitosis is maintained through the dual inhibition of PP1 by Cdc2 phosphorylation and the binding of Inhibitor-1 (I1), which is facilitated by PKA-mediated I1 phosphorylation. As Cdc2 levels drop following Cyclin B degradation, autodephosphorylation of PP1 at the site of Cdc2 phosphorylation (T320) allows partial PP1 activation. This promotes PP1-regulated dephosphorylation of I1 at its activating site (T35), dissociation of the I1-PP1 complex, and full PP1 activation to promote mitotic exit. Thus, Cdc2 both phosphorylates multiple mitotic substrates and inhibits their PP1-mediated dephosphorylation. PMID:19396163

  4. A Computer Graphics Human Figure Application Of Biostereometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetter, William A.

    1980-07-01

    A study of improved computer graphic representation of the human figure is being conducted under a National Science Foundation grant. Special emphasis is given biostereometrics as a primary data base from which applications requiring a variety of levels of detail may be prepared. For example, a human figure represented by a single point can be very useful in overview plots of a population. A crude ten point figure can be adequate for queuing theory studies and simulated movement of groups. A one hundred point figure can usefully be animated to achieve different overall body activities including male and female figures. A one thousand point figure si-milarly animated, begins to be useful in anthropometrics and kinesiology gross body movements. Extrapolations of this order-of-magnitude approach ultimately should achieve very complex data bases and a program which automatically selects the correct level of detail for the task at hand. See Summary Figure 1.

  5. A figure control sensor for the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, R.; Dubovitsky, S.

    1988-01-01

    A sensing and control system is required to maintain high optical figure quality in a segmented reflector. Upon detecting a deviation of the segmented surface from its ideal form, the system drives segment mounted actuators to realign the individual segments and thereby return the surface to its intended figure. When the reflector is in use, a set of figure sensors will determine positions of a number of points on the back surface of each of the reflector's segments, each sensor being assigned to a single point. By measuring the positional deviations of these points from previously established nominal values, the figure sensors provide the control system with the information required to maintain the reflector's optical figure. The optical lever, multiple wavelength interferometer, and electronic capacitive sensor, the most promising technologies for the development of the figure sensor, are illustrated. It is concluded that to select a particular implementation of the figure sensors, performance requirement will be refined and relevant technologies investigated further.

  6. A case of figurate urticaria by etanercept.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Maurizio; Sullo, Maria Giuseppa; Mascolo, Annamaria; Cimmaruta, Daniela; Romano, Francesca; Puca, Rosa Valentina; Capuano, Annalisa; Rossi, Francesco; Schiavo, Ada Lo

    2016-01-01

    Etanercept is a competitive inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) a polypeptide hormone, involved in the development of the immune system, in host defense and immune surveillance. Even if the etanercept mechanism of action is not completely understood, it is supposed that it negatively modulates biological responses mediated by molecules (cytokines, adhesion molecules, or proteinases) induced or regulated by TNF. For this reason, it is widely used in the treatment of immunologicals diseases, such as rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic active, ankylosing spondylitis, and plaque psoriasis. Etanercept has a good tolerability profile. Adverse events related to skin are rare, arising usually in about 5% of patients treated with anti-TNF α. In this scenario, we describe a case of figurate urticaria arose after the re-administration of etanercept in a patient affected by psoriasis and hepatitis B. A 65-year-old man, affected by psoriasis, was hospitalized in September 2014 to the Regional Center for the treatment of psoriasis and Biological Drugs of Second University of Naples for progressive extension of psoriatic skin lesions. The laboratory analysis detected positivity for hepatitis B virus (HBV) antigens. For this reason, it was administered to him lamivudine 100 mg/die about 30 days before to start etanercept treatment. The etanercept therapy has resulted in a progressive improving of skin manifestations, and the patient decided individually to stop the therapy. Afterwards, for worsening of the psoriatic lesions, he was again hospitalized and treated with the same therapeutic schedule (lamivudine followed by etanercept). Ten days after the start of therapy, the patient showed the onset of urticarial rash. Due to this, the treatment with lamivudine and etanercept was suspended and the patient's clinical conditions improved. It is probably that immunological disorders due to etanercept therapy and HBV infection could

  7. A case of figurate urticaria by etanercept

    PubMed Central

    Sessa, Maurizio; Sullo, Maria Giuseppa; Mascolo, Annamaria; Cimmaruta, Daniela; Romano, Francesca; Puca, Rosa Valentina; Capuano, Annalisa; Rossi, Francesco; Schiavo, Ada Lo

    2016-01-01

    Etanercept is a competitive inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) a polypeptide hormone, involved in the development of the immune system, in host defense and immune surveillance. Even if the etanercept mechanism of action is not completely understood, it is supposed that it negatively modulates biological responses mediated by molecules (cytokines, adhesion molecules, or proteinases) induced or regulated by TNF. For this reason, it is widely used in the treatment of immunologicals diseases, such as rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic active, ankylosing spondylitis, and plaque psoriasis. Etanercept has a good tolerability profile. Adverse events related to skin are rare, arising usually in about 5% of patients treated with anti-TNF α. In this scenario, we describe a case of figurate urticaria arose after the re-administration of etanercept in a patient affected by psoriasis and hepatitis B. A 65-year-old man, affected by psoriasis, was hospitalized in September 2014 to the Regional Center for the treatment of psoriasis and Biological Drugs of Second University of Naples for progressive extension of psoriatic skin lesions. The laboratory analysis detected positivity for hepatitis B virus (HBV) antigens. For this reason, it was administered to him lamivudine 100 mg/die about 30 days before to start etanercept treatment. The etanercept therapy has resulted in a progressive improving of skin manifestations, and the patient decided individually to stop the therapy. Afterwards, for worsening of the psoriatic lesions, he was again hospitalized and treated with the same therapeutic schedule (lamivudine followed by etanercept). Ten days after the start of therapy, the patient showed the onset of urticarial rash. Due to this, the treatment with lamivudine and etanercept was suspended and the patient's clinical conditions improved. It is probably that immunological disorders due to etanercept therapy and HBV infection could

  8. Molecular abnormalities in Ewing's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Burchill, Susan Ann

    2008-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is one of the few solid tumors for which the underlying molecular genetic abnormality has been described: rearrangement of the EWS gene on chromosome 22q12 with an ETS gene family member. These translocations define the Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) and provide a valuable tool for their accurate and unequivocal diagnosis. They also represent ideal targets for the development of tumor-specific therapeutics. Although secondary abnormalities occur in over 80% of primary ESFT the clinical utility of these is currently unclear. However, abnormalities in genes that regulate the G(1)/S checkpoint are frequently described and may be important in predicting outcome and response. Increased understanding of the molecular events that arise in ESFT and their role in the development and maintenance of the malignant phenotype will inform the improved stratification of patients for therapy and identify targets and pathways for the design of more effective cancer therapeutics. PMID:18925858

  9. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  10. The flavonoid eupatorin inactivates the mitotic checkpoint leading to polyploidy and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Salmela, Anna-Leena; Pouwels, Jeroen; Kukkonen-Macchi, Anu; Waris, Sinikka; Toivonen, Pauliina; Jaakkola, Kimmo; Maeki-Jouppila, Jenni; Kallio, Lila; Kallio, Marko J.

    2012-03-10

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a conserved mechanism that ensures the fidelity of chromosome distribution in mitosis by preventing anaphase onset until the correct bipolar microtubule-kinetochore attachments are formed. Errors in SAC function may contribute to tumorigenesis by inducing numerical chromosome anomalies (aneuploidy). On the other hand, total disruption of SAC can lead to massive genomic imbalance followed by cell death, a phenomena that has therapeutic potency. We performed a cell-based high-throughput screen with a compound library of 2000 bioactives for novel SAC inhibitors and discovered a plant-derived phenolic compound eupatorin (3 Prime ,5-dihydroxy-4 Prime ,6,7-trimethoxyflavone) as an anti-mitotic flavonoid. The premature override of the microtubule drug-imposed mitotic arrest by eupatorin is dependent on microtubule-kinetochore attachments but not interkinetochore tension. Aurora B kinase activity, which is essential for maintenance of normal SAC signaling, is diminished by eupatorin in cells and in vitro providing a mechanistic explanation for the observed forced mitotic exit. Eupatorin likely has additional targets since eupatorin treatment of pre-mitotic cells causes spindle anomalies triggering a transient M phase delay followed by impaired cytokinesis and polyploidy. Finally, eupatorin potently induces apoptosis in multiple cancer cell lines and suppresses cancer cell proliferation in organotypic 3D cell culture model.

  11. A mitotic SKAP isoform regulates spindle positioning at astral microtubule plus ends.

    PubMed

    Kern, David M; Nicholls, Peter K; Page, David C; Cheeseman, Iain M

    2016-05-01

    The Astrin/SKAP complex plays important roles in mitotic chromosome alignment and centrosome integrity, but previous work found conflicting results for SKAP function. Here, we demonstrate that SKAP is expressed as two distinct isoforms in mammals: a longer, testis-specific isoform that was used for the previous studies in mitotic cells and a novel, shorter mitotic isoform. Unlike the long isoform, short SKAP rescues SKAP depletion in mitosis and displays robust microtubule plus-end tracking, including localization to astral microtubules. Eliminating SKAP microtubule binding results in severe chromosome segregation defects. In contrast, SKAP mutants specifically defective for plus-end tracking facilitate proper chromosome segregation but display spindle positioning defects. Cells lacking SKAP plus-end tracking have reduced Clasp1 localization at microtubule plus ends and display increased lateral microtubule contacts with the cell cortex, which we propose results in unbalanced dynein-dependent cortical pulling forces. Our work reveals an unappreciated role for the Astrin/SKAP complex as an astral microtubule mediator of mitotic spindle positioning. PMID:27138257

  12. Direct preparation protocol to obtain mitotic chromosomes from canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Morais, C S D; Affonso, P R A M; Bitencourt, J A; Wenceslau, A A

    2015-01-01

    Currently, mammary neoplasms in female canines are a serious problem in veterinary clinics. In addition, the canine species is an excellent disease model for human oncology because of the biological and genetic similarities between the species. Cytogenetics has allowed further study of the characterization of neoplasms in canines. We hypothesized that the use of a direct preparation protocol for mitotic chromosome analysis would provide a simple and low cost protocol for use in all laboratories. The objective of this method is to display in a few hours of dividing cells just like the time of collection since cell division in tissue can be obtained. Ten female canines with the spontaneous occurrence of mammary neoplasia were used to test a pioneering direct preparation protocol to obtain mitotic chromosomes. The excised breast tumor tissue fragments were subjected to the protocol consisting of treatment with colchicine, treatment with hypotonic solution, and fixation. Mitotic chromosomes were absent in cell suspensions of only two samples among the 10 materials analyzed, based on the analysis of five blades for each preparation obtained. So, the cell suspension obtained allowed for the observation of eight tissue samples viable for cytogenetic analysis, five of which had excellent numbers of mitotic chromosomes. However, the technique was unsuccessful in producing high-quality cell suspensions because of inadequate condensation and scattering of chromosomes. While adjustments to methodological procedures are needed, this protocol represents a low cost and simplified method to study the cytogenetics of canine tumors. PMID:26782592

  13. A Late Mitotic Regulatory Network Controlling Cyclin Destruction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jaspersen, Sue L.; Charles, Julia F.; Tinker-Kulberg, Rachel L.; Morgan, David O.

    1998-01-01

    Exit from mitosis requires the inactivation of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase–cyclin complexes, primarily by ubiquitin-dependent cyclin proteolysis. Cyclin destruction is regulated by a ubiquitin ligase known as the anaphase-promoting complex (APC). In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, members of a large class of late mitotic mutants, including cdc15, cdc5, cdc14, dbf2, and tem1, arrest in anaphase with a phenotype similar to that of cells expressing nondegradable forms of mitotic cyclins. We addressed the possibility that the products of these genes are components of a regulatory network that governs cyclin proteolysis. We identified a complex array of genetic interactions among these mutants and found that the growth defect in most of the mutants is suppressed by overexpression of SPO12, YAK1, and SIC1 and is exacerbated by overproduction of the mitotic cyclin Clb2. When arrested in late mitosis, the mutants exhibit a defect in cyclin-specific APC activity that is accompanied by high Clb2 levels and low levels of the anaphase inhibitor Pds1. Mutant cells arrested in G1 contain normal APC activity. We conclude that Cdc15, Cdc5, Cdc14, Dbf2, and Tem1 cooperate in the activation of the APC in late mitosis but are not required for maintenance of that activity in G1. PMID:9763445

  14. Frequencies of mutagen-induced coincident mitotic recombination at unlinked loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Kathryn M; Hoffmann, George R

    2007-03-01

    Frequencies of coincident genetic events were measured in strain D7 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This diploid strain permits the detection of mitotic gene conversion involving the trp5-12 and trp5-27 alleles, mitotic crossing-over and gene conversion leading to the expression of the ade2-40 and ade2-119 alleles as red and pink colonies, and reversion of the ilv1-92 allele. The three genes are on different chromosomes, and one might expect that coincident (simultaneous) genetic alterations at two loci would occur at frequencies predicted by those of the single alterations acting as independent events. Contrary to this expectation, we observed that ade2 recombinants induced by bleomycin, beta-propiolactone, and ultraviolet radiation occur more frequently among trp5 convertants than among total colonies. This excess among trp5 recombinants indicates that double recombinants are more common than expected for independent events. No similar enrichment was found among Ilv(+) revertants. The possibility of an artifact in which haploid yeasts that mimic mitotic recombinants are generated by a low frequency of cryptic meiosis has been excluded. Several hypotheses that can explain the elevated incidence of coincident mitotic recombination have been evaluated, but the cause remains uncertain. Most evidence suggests that the excess is ascribable to a subset of the population being in a recombination-prone state. PMID:17156798

  15. Mitotic phosphorylation of VCIP135 blocks p97ATPase-mediated Golgi membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Totsukawa, Go; Matsuo, Ayaka; Kubota, Ayano; Taguchi, Yuya; Kondo, Hisao

    2013-04-05

    Highlights: •VCIP135 is mitotically phosphorylated on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 by Cdc2. •Phosphorylated VCIP135 does not bind to p97ATPase. •The phosphorylation of VCIP135 inhibits p97ATPase-mediated Golgi membrane fusion. -- Abstract: In mammals, the Golgi apparatus is disassembled early mitosis and reassembled at the end of mitosis. For Golgi disassembly, membrane fusion needs to be blocked. Golgi biogenesis requires two distinct p97ATPase-mediated membrane fusion, the p97/p47 and p97/p37 pathways. We previously reported that p47 phosphorylation on Serine-140 and p37 phosphorylation on Serine-56 and Threonine-59 result in mitotic inhibition of the p97/p47 and the p97/p37 pathways, respectively [11,14]. In this study, we show another mechanism of mitotic inhibition of p97-mediated Golgi membrane fusion. We clarified that VCIP135, an essential factor in both p97 membrane fusion pathways, is phosphorylated on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 by Cdc2 at mitosis and that this phosphorylated VCIP135 does not bind to p97. An in vitro Golgi reassembly assay revealed that VCIP135(T760E, S767E), which mimics mitotic phosphorylation, caused no cisternal regrowth. Our results indicate that the phosphorylation of VCIP135 on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 inhibits p97-mediated Golgi membrane fusion at mitosis.

  16. Regulation of Mitotic Cytoskeleton Dynamics and Cytokinesis by Integrin-Linked Kinase in Retinoblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manju; Assi, Kiran; Salh, Baljinder; Cox, Michael E.; Mills, Julia

    2014-01-01

    During cell division integrin-linked kinase (ILK) has been shown to regulate microtubule dynamics and centrosome clustering, processes involved in cell cycle progression, and malignant transformation. In this study, we examine the effects of downregulating ILK on mitotic function in human retinoblastoma cell lines. These retinal cancer cells, caused by the loss of function of two gene alleles (Rb1) that encode the retinoblastoma tumour suppressor, have elevated expression of ILK. Here we show that inhibition of ILK activity results in a concentration-dependent increase in nuclear area and multinucleated cells. Moreover, inhibition of ILK activity and expression increased the accumulation of multinucleated cells over time. In these cells, aberrant cytokinesis and karyokinesis correlate with altered mitotic spindle organization, decreased levels of cortical F-actin and centrosome de-clustering. Centrosome de-clustering, induced by ILK siRNA, was rescued in FLAG-ILK expressing Y79 cells as compared to those expressing FLAG-tag alone. Inhibition of ILK increased the proportion of cells exhibiting mitotic spindles and caused a significant G2/M arrest as early as 24 hours after exposure to QLT-0267. Live cell analysis indicate ILK downregulation causes an increase in multipolar anaphases and failed cytokinesis (bipolar and multipolar) of viable cells. These studies extend those indicating a critical function for ILK in mitotic cytoskeletal organization and describe a novel role for ILK in cytokinesis of Rb deficient cells. PMID:24911651

  17. Regulation of mitotic cytoskeleton dynamics and cytokinesis by integrin-linked kinase in retinoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sikkema, William K A; Strikwerda, Arend; Sharma, Manju; Assi, Kiran; Salh, Baljinder; Cox, Michael E; Mills, Julia

    2014-01-01

    During cell division integrin-linked kinase (ILK) has been shown to regulate microtubule dynamics and centrosome clustering, processes involved in cell cycle progression, and malignant transformation. In this study, we examine the effects of downregulating ILK on mitotic function in human retinoblastoma cell lines. These retinal cancer cells, caused by the loss of function of two gene alleles (Rb1) that encode the retinoblastoma tumour suppressor, have elevated expression of ILK. Here we show that inhibition of ILK activity results in a concentration-dependent increase in nuclear area and multinucleated cells. Moreover, inhibition of ILK activity and expression increased the accumulation of multinucleated cells over time. In these cells, aberrant cytokinesis and karyokinesis correlate with altered mitotic spindle organization, decreased levels of cortical F-actin and centrosome de-clustering. Centrosome de-clustering, induced by ILK siRNA, was rescued in FLAG-ILK expressing Y79 cells as compared to those expressing FLAG-tag alone. Inhibition of ILK increased the proportion of cells exhibiting mitotic spindles and caused a significant G2/M arrest as early as 24 hours after exposure to QLT-0267. Live cell analysis indicate ILK downregulation causes an increase in multipolar anaphases and failed cytokinesis (bipolar and multipolar) of viable cells. These studies extend those indicating a critical function for ILK in mitotic cytoskeletal organization and describe a novel role for ILK in cytokinesis of Rb deficient cells. PMID:24911651

  18. Cell cycle-dependent SUMO-1 conjugation to nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA)

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Jae Sung; Kim, Ha Na; Kim, Sun-Jick; Bang, Jiyoung; Kim, Eun-A; Sung, Ki Sa; Yoon, Hyun-Joo; Yoo, Hae Yong; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •NuMA is modified by SUMO-1 in a cell cycle-dependent manner. •NuMA lysine 1766 is the primary target site for SUMOylation. •SUMOylation-deficient NuMA induces multiple spindle poles during mitosis. •SUMOylated NuMA induces microtubule bundling. -- Abstract: Covalent conjugation of proteins with small ubiquitin-like modifier 1 (SUMO-1) plays a critical role in a variety of cellular functions including cell cycle control, replication, and transcriptional regulation. Nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) localizes to spindle poles during mitosis, and is an essential component in the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles. Here we show that NuMA is a target for covalent conjugation to SUMO-1. We find that the lysine 1766 residue is the primary NuMA acceptor site for SUMO-1 conjugation. Interestingly, SUMO modification of endogenous NuMA occurs at the entry into mitosis and this modification is reversed after exiting from mitosis. Knockdown of Ubc9 or forced expression of SENP1 results in impairment of the localization of NuMA to mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. The SUMOylation-deficient NuMA mutant is defective in microtubule bundling, and multiple spindles are induced during mitosis. The mitosis-dependent dynamic SUMO-1 modification of NuMA might contribute to NuMA-mediated formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis.

  19. Involvement of CNOT3 in mitotic progression through inhibition of MAD1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akinori; Kikuguchi, Chisato; Morita, Masahiro; Shimodaira, Tetsuhiro; Tokai-Nishizumi, Noriko; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Ohsugi, Miho; Suzuki, Toru; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Cell Signal Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Kunigami, Okinawa 904-0412

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNOT3 depletion increases the mitotic index. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNOT3 inhibits the expression of MAD1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNOT3 destabilizes the MAD1 mRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAD1 knockdown attenuates the CNOT3 depletion-induced mitotic arrest. -- Abstract: The stability of mRNA influences the dynamics of gene expression. The CCR4-NOT complex, the major deadenylase in mammalian cells, shortens the mRNA poly(A) tail and contributes to the destabilization of mRNAs. The CCR4-NOT complex plays pivotal roles in various physiological functions, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, and metabolism. Here, we show that CNOT3, a subunit of the CCR4-NOT complex, is involved in the regulation of the spindle assembly checkpoint, suggesting that the CCR4-NOT complex also plays a part in the regulation of mitosis. CNOT3 depletion increases the population of mitotic-arrested cells and specifically increases the expression of MAD1 mRNA and its protein product that plays a part in the spindle assembly checkpoint. We showed that CNOT3 depletion stabilizes the MAD1 mRNA, and that MAD1 knockdown attenuates the CNOT3 depletion-induced increase of the mitotic index. Basing on these observations, we propose that CNOT3 is involved in the regulation of the spindle assembly checkpoint through its ability to regulate the stability of MAD1 mRNA.

  20. Novel insights into the mechanisms of mitotic spindle assembly by NEK kinases.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Suzanna L; O'Regan, Laura; Fry, Andrew M

    2016-05-01

    The mitotic spindle is the apparatus upon which chromosomes are segregated during cell division. We have discovered new roles for two members of the NIMA-related kinase (NEK) family in different molecular processes of spindle assembly. Moreover, loss of these proteins leads to segregation errors that drive cancer progression. PMID:27314078

  1. Novel insights into the mechanisms of mitotic spindle assembly by NEK kinases

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Suzanna L.; O'Regan, Laura; Fry, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mitotic spindle is the apparatus upon which chromosomes are segregated during cell division. We have discovered new roles for two members of the NIMA-related kinase (NEK) family in different molecular processes of spindle assembly. Moreover, loss of these proteins leads to segregation errors that drive cancer progression. PMID:27314078

  2. Developmental alterations in centrosome integrity contribute to the post-mitotic state of mammalian cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zebrowski, David C; Vergarajauregui, Silvia; Wu, Chi-Chung; Piatkowski, Tanja; Becker, Robert; Leone, Marina; Hirth, Sofia; Ricciardi, Filomena; Falk, Nathalie; Giessl, Andreas; Just, Steffen; Braun, Thomas; Weidinger, Gilbert; Engel, Felix B

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cardiomyocytes become post-mitotic shortly after birth. Understanding how this occurs is highly relevant to cardiac regenerative therapy. Yet, how cardiomyocytes achieve and maintain a post-mitotic state is unknown. Here, we show that cardiomyocyte centrosome integrity is lost shortly after birth. This is coupled with relocalization of various centrosome proteins to the nuclear envelope. Consequently, postnatal cardiomyocytes are unable to undergo ciliogenesis and the nuclear envelope adopts the function as cellular microtubule organizing center. Loss of centrosome integrity is associated with, and can promote, cardiomyocyte G0/G1 cell cycle arrest suggesting that centrosome disassembly is developmentally utilized to achieve the post-mitotic state in mammalian cardiomyocytes. Adult cardiomyocytes of zebrafish and newt, which are able to proliferate, maintain centrosome integrity. Collectively, our data provide a novel mechanism underlying the post-mitotic state of mammalian cardiomyocytes as well as a potential explanation for why zebrafish and newts, but not mammals, can regenerate their heart. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05563.001 PMID:26247711

  3. The Ki-67 and RepoMan mitotic phosphatases assemble via an identical, yet novel mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ganesan Senthil; Gokhan, Ezgi; De Munter, Sofie; Bollen, Mathieu; Vagnarelli, Paola; Peti, Wolfgang; Page, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Ki-67 and RepoMan have key roles during mitotic exit. Previously, we showed that Ki-67 organizes the mitotic chromosome periphery and recruits protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) to chromatin at anaphase onset, in a similar manner as RepoMan (Booth et al., 2014). Here we show how Ki-67 and RepoMan form mitotic exit phosphatases by recruiting PP1, how they distinguish between distinct PP1 isoforms and how the assembly of these two holoenzymes are dynamically regulated by Aurora B kinase during mitosis. Unexpectedly, our data also reveal that Ki-67 and RepoMan bind PP1 using an identical, yet novel mechanism, interacting with a PP1 pocket that is engaged only by these two PP1 regulators. These findings not only show how two distinct mitotic exit phosphatases are recruited to their substrates, but also provide immediate opportunities for the design of novel cancer therapeutics that selectively target the Ki-67:PP1 and RepoMan:PP1 holoenzymes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16539.001 PMID:27572260

  4. DDRI-9: a novel DNA damage response inhibitor that blocks mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun-Hee; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Sunshin; Lee, Chang-Hun

    2016-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is an emerging target for cancer therapy. By modulating the DDR, including DNA repair and cell cycle arrest, the efficacy of anticancer drugs can be enhanced and side effects reduced. We previously screened a chemical library and identified novel DDR inhibitors including DNA damage response inhibitor-9 (DDRI-9; 1H-Purine-2,6-dione,7-[(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]-3,7-dihydro-3-methyl-8-nitro). In this study, we characterized DDRI-9 activity and found that it inhibited phosphorylated histone variant H2AX foci formation upon DNA damage, delayed DNA repair, and enhanced the cytotoxicity of etoposide and ionizing radiation. It also reduced the foci formation of DNA repair-related proteins, including the protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated, DNA-dependent protein kinase, breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein, and p53-binding protein 1, but excluding mediator of DNA damage checkpoint protein 1. Cell cycle analysis revealed that DDRI-9 blocked mitotic progression. Like other mitotic inhibitors, DDRI-9 treatment resulted in the accumulation of mitotic protein and induced cell death. Thus, DDRI-9 may affect both DDR signal amplification and mitotic progression. This study suggests that DDRI-9 is a good lead molecule for the development of anticancer drugs. PMID:26848527

  5. Miniaturization of mitotic index cell-based assay using "wall-less" plate technology.

    PubMed

    Le Guezennec, Xavier; Phong, Mark; Nor, Liyana; Kim, Namyong

    2014-03-01

    The use of microscopic imaging for the accurate assessment of cells in mitosis is hampered by the round morphology of mitotic cells, which renders them poorly adherent and highly susceptible to loss during the washing stage of cell-based assays. Here, to circumvent these limitations, we make use of DropArray, a recent technology that allows high retention of weakly adherent cells and suspension cells. DropArray offers the competitive advantage of maintaining the classic high throughput format of microtiter plates while reducing classic microwell volume by up to 90% by using a drop format. Here, we present a mitotic index cell-based assay using the mitosis marker phospho histone H3 at serine 10 on a DropArray 384-well plate format. Dose-response curve analysis of the mitotic index assay with an antimitotic drug (docetaxel) on DropArray is presented that shows an effective dosage compared to previous established results similar to those obtained with conventional microtiter plates. The mitotic index assay with DropArray showed a Z-factor >0.6. Our results validate DropArray as a suitable platform for high throughput screening for compounds affecting mitosis or the cell cycle. PMID:24611478

  6. The Ki-67 and RepoMan mitotic phosphatases assemble via an identical, yet novel mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ganesan Senthil; Gokhan, Ezgi; De Munter, Sofie; Bollen, Mathieu; Vagnarelli, Paola; Peti, Wolfgang; Page, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Ki-67 and RepoMan have key roles during mitotic exit. Previously, we showed that Ki-67 organizes the mitotic chromosome periphery and recruits protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) to chromatin at anaphase onset, in a similar manner as RepoMan (Booth et al., 2014). Here we show how Ki-67 and RepoMan form mitotic exit phosphatases by recruiting PP1, how they distinguish between distinct PP1 isoforms and how the assembly of these two holoenzymes are dynamically regulated by Aurora B kinase during mitosis. Unexpectedly, our data also reveal that Ki-67 and RepoMan bind PP1 using an identical, yet novel mechanism, interacting with a PP1 pocket that is engaged only by these two PP1 regulators. These findings not only show how two distinct mitotic exit phosphatases are recruited to their substrates, but also provide immediate opportunities for the design of novel cancer therapeutics that selectively target the Ki-67:PP1 and RepoMan:PP1 holoenzymes. PMID:27572260

  7. [Emotion Disorders and Abnormal Perspiration].

    PubMed

    Umeda, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    This article reviewed the relationship between emotional disorders and abnormal perspiration. First, I focused on local brain areas related to emotional processing, and summarized the functions of the emotional network involving those local areas. Functional disorders followed by the damage in the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, and insular cortex were reviewed, including related abnormal perspiration. I then addressed the mechanisms of how autonomic disorders influence emotional processing. Finally, possible future directions for integrated understanding of the connection between neural activities and bodily reactions were discussed. PMID:27503817

  8. Ultrasonographic assessment of abnormal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    England, G C

    1998-07-01

    Ultrasonographic imaging is widely used in small animal practice for the diagnosis of pregnancy and the determination of fetal number. Ultrasonography can also be used to monitor abnormal pregnancies, for example, conceptuses that are poorly developed for their gestational age (and therefore are likely to fail), and pregnancies in which there is embryonic resorption or fetal abortion. An ultrasound examination may reveal fetal abnormalities and therefore alter the management of the pregnant bitch or queen prior to parturition. There are, however, a number of ultrasonographic features of normal pregnancies that may mimic disease, and these must be recognized. PMID:9698618

  9. An economics figure of merit in ALPS

    SciTech Connect

    Shatilla, Y.A.

    2000-07-01

    One of the most pressing issues facing the deregulated nuclear electric power industry is its economic competitiveness when compared to other sources of electrical power. Traditionally, finding the optimum loading pattern (LP) that meets all the safety and operational objective functions and at the same time produces the most attractive economical solutions is an iterative process. This is because (a) LP search tools usually lack the capability to generate equilibrium solutions and (b) economics objective functions are hard to include in the search process. In this paper, the Westinghouse Advanced Loading Pattern Search code (ALPS) has been demonstrated to successfully find LPs that meet user-defined operational and safety as well as economics objectives. This has been made possible by the development of TULIP language that allows the integration of external procedures into the search process of the main program, ALPS. In the example given, an economic figure of merit (EFM) has been defined and included via TULIP script into the fuel management optimization problem of a three-loop Westinghouse core operating an 18-month cycle. The LPs found by ALPS exhibit a clear trend of meeting and, in some cases, exceeding the EFM objective function defined for the ALPS search process a priori.

  10. Figure skater level moderates balance training.

    PubMed

    Saunders, N W; Hanson, N J; Koutakis, P; Chaudhari, A M; Devor, S T

    2013-04-01

    It was suggested that baseline levels of postural control in figure skaters might influence the effectiveness of neuromuscular training. The aims of the present study were to investigate the baseline association of skater skill level with standard center of pressure metrics and time to stabilization, and to determine if skill level influenced the effectiveness of a 6-week neuromuscular training program. There was no main effect of skill level for any baseline center of pressure metric for either test. There was no main effect of skill level on the percent change in any metric for the single leg stance following training. However, skill level did influence landing test outcome measures. The difference in percent change of root mean squared was evident for the mediolateral (low: 24.5±16.50% vs. high: 2.42±14.99%) and anterior-posterior (low: 6.66±9.21% vs. high: - 4.03±5.91%) axes. Percent change in anterior-posterior time to stabilization also differed by skill level (low: - 0.73%±4.74 vs. high: - 5.61%±2.76). Note that this study was underpowered with 26 subjects and 14 subjects contributing to baseline and post-training assessments, respectively. Though no baseline differences in postural control were observed, compared with low skill levels, high skill levels benefitted more from training. PMID:23184479

  11. Resolving the formation of modern Chladni figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuan, P. H.; Tung, J. C.; Liang, H. C.; Chiang, P. Y.; Huang, K. F.; Chen, Y. F.

    2015-09-01

    The resonant spectrum of a thin plate driven with a mechanical oscillator is precisely measured to distinguish modern Chladni figures (CFs) observed at the resonant frequencies from classical CFs observed at the non-resonant frequencies. Experimental results reveal that modern CFs generally display an important characteristic of avoided crossings of nodal lines, whereas the nodal lines of classical CFs form a regular grid. The formation of modern CFs and the resonant frequency spectrum are resolved with a theoretical model that characterizes the interaction between the plate and the driving source into the inhomogeneous Kirchhoff-Love equation. The derived formula for determining resonant frequencies is shown to be exactly identical to the meromorphic function given in singular billiards that deals with the coupling strength on the transition between integrable and chaotic features. The good agreement between experimental results and theoretical predictions verifies the significant role of the strong-coupling effect in the formation of modern CFs. More importantly, it is confirmed that the apparatus for generating modern CFs can be developed to serve as an expedient system for exploring the nodal domains of chaotic wave functions as well as the physics of the strong coupling with a point scatterer.

  12. Figuring the Acceleration of the Simple Pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberherr, Martin

    2011-12-01

    The centripetal acceleration has been known since Huygens' (1659) and Newton's (1684) time.1,2 The physics to calculate the acceleration of a simple pendulum has been around for more than 300 years, and a fairly complete treatise has been given by C. Schwarz in this journal.3 But sentences like "the acceleration is always directed towards the equilibrium position" beside the picture of a swing on a circular arc can still be found in textbooks, as e.g. in Ref. 4. Vectors have been invented by Grassmann (1844)5 and are conveniently used to describe the acceleration in curved orbits, but acceleration is more often treated as a scalar with or without sign, as the words acceleration/deceleration suggest. The component tangential to the orbit is enough to deduce the period of the simple pendulum, but it is not enough to discuss the forces on the pendulum, as has been pointed out by Santos-Benito and A. Gras-Marti.6 A suitable way to address this problem is a nice figure with a catch for classroom discussions or homework. When I plotted the acceleration vectors of the simple pendulum in their proper positions, pictures as in Fig. 1 appeared on the screen. The endpoints of the acceleration vectors, if properly scaled, seemed to lie on a curve with a familiar shape: a cardioid. Is this true or just an illusion?

  13. Advances in precision mirror figure metrology (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Furenlid, K. ); Church, E.L. )

    1992-01-01

    New developments in optical measurement techniques have made it possible to test the surface quality on grazing incidence optics with extreme precision and accuracy. An instrument developed at Brookhaven, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP), measures the figure of large (up to 1 m long) cylindrical aspheres with nanometer accuracy. The LTP optical system is based around a common-path interferometer design belonging to the class of slope measuring interferometers and, as such, it is very robust, stable, and vibration insensitive. A unique error correction technique removes the effect of tilt errors in the optical head as it traverses the air bearing, thus allowing one to accurately measure the absolute surface profile and radius of curvature. This is of critical importance to the manufacture of long-radius spherical optics used in high-resolution soft x-ray monochromators and in the testing of mirror bending systems. This talk will review the principle of operation of the LTP, probe the factors limiting the performance of the system, and will examine the current state of the art in synchrotron radiation mirror manufacturing quality (as viewed by our metrology techniques). This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC02-76CH00016.

  14. 2008 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    PubMed

    2008-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the seventh leading cause of all deaths in the United States and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans older than the age of 65 years. More than 5 million Americans are estimated to have Alzheimer's disease. Every 71 seconds someone in America develops Alzheimer's disease; by 2050 it is expected to occur every 33 seconds. During the coming decades, baby boomers are projected to add 10 million people to these numbers. By 2050, the incidence of Alzheimer's disease is expected to approach nearly a million people per year, with a total estimated prevalence of 11 to 16 million persons. Significant cost implications related to Alzheimer's disease and other dementias include an estimated $148 billion annually in direct (Medicare/Medicaid) and indirect (eg, caregiver lost wages and out-of-pocket expenses, decreased business productivity) costs. Not included in these figures are the estimated 10 million caregivers who annually provide $89 billion in unpaid services to individuals with Alzheimer's disease. This report provides information to increase understanding of the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease, including incidence and prevalence, mortality, lifetime risks, costs, and impact on family caregivers. PMID:18631956

  15. Chelidonine induces mitotic slippage and apoptotic-like death in SGC-7901 human gastric carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhongyuan; Zou, Xiang; Zhang, Xiujuan; Sheng, Jiejing; Wang, Yumeng; Wang, Jiaqi; Wang, Chao; Ji, Yubin

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of chelidonine on mitotic slippage and apoptotic-like death in SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cells. The MTT assay was performed to detect the antiproliferative effect of chelidonine. Following treatment with chelidonine (10 µmol/l), the ultrastructure changes in SGC-7901, MCF-7 and HepG2 cells were observed by transmission electron microscopy. The effects of chelidonine on G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells were determined by flow cytometry. Indirect immunofluorescence assay and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) were used to detect the phosphorylation level of histone H3 (Ser10) and microtubule formation was detected using LSCM following immunofluorescent labeling. Subsequent to treatment with chelidonine (10 µmol/l), expression levels of mitotic slippage-associated proteins, including BUB1 mitotic checkpoint serine/threonine kinase B (BubR1), cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) and cyclin B1, and apoptosis-associated protein, caspase-3 were examined by western blotting at 24, 48 and 72 h. The half maximal inhibitory concentration of chelidonine was 23.13 µmol/l over 48 h and chelidonine induced G2/M phase arrest of cells. The phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 was significantly increased following treatment with chelidonine for 24 h, indicating that chelidonine arrested the SGC-7901 cells in the M phase. Chelidonine inhibited microtubule polymerization, destroyed microtubule structures and induced cell cycle arrest in the M phase. Giant cells were observed with multiple micronuclei of varying sizes, which indicated that following a prolonged arrest in the M phase, the cells underwent mitotic catastrophe. Western blotting demonstrated that the protein expression levels of BubR1, cyclin B1 and Cdk1 decreased significantly between 48 and 72 h. Low expression levels of BubR1 and inactivation of the cyclin B1-Cdk1 complex results in the cells being arrested at mitosis and leads to

  16. Dataset from the global phosphoproteomic mapping of early mitotic exit in human cells.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Samuel; McCloy, Rachael A; Parker, Benjamin L; Chaudhuri, Rima; Gayevskiy, Velimir; Hoffman, Nolan J; Watkins, D Neil; Daly, Roger J; James, David E; Burgess, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    The presence or absence of a phosphorylation on a substrate at any particular point in time is a functional readout of the balance in activity between the regulatory kinase and the counteracting phosphatase. Understanding how stable or short-lived a phosphorylation site is required for fully appreciating the biological consequences of the phosphorylation. Our current understanding of kinases and their substrates is well established; however, the role phosphatases play is less understood. Therefore, we utilized a phosphatase dependent model of mitotic exit to identify potential substrates that are preferentially dephosphorylated. Using this method, we identified >16,000 phosphosites on >3300 unique proteins, and quantified the temporal phosphorylation changes that occur during early mitotic exit (McCloy et al., 2015 [1]). Furthermore, we annotated the majority of these phosphorylation sites with a high confidence upstream kinase using published, motif and prediction based methods. The results from this study have been deposited into the ProteomeXchange repository with identifier PXD001559. Here we provide additional analysis of this dataset; for each of the major mitotic kinases we identified motifs that correlated strongly with phosphorylation status. These motifs could be used to predict the stability of phosphorylated residues in proteins of interest, and help infer potential functional roles for uncharacterized phosphorylations. In addition, we provide validation at the single cell level that serine residues phosphorylated by Cdk are stable during phosphatase dependent mitotic exit. In summary, this unique dataset contains information on the temporal mitotic stability of thousands of phosphorylation sites regulated by dozens of kinases, and information on the potential preference that phosphatases have at both the protein and individual phosphosite level. The compellation of this data provides an invaluable resource for the wider research community. PMID

  17. Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade.

    PubMed

    Purrington, Kristen S; Slettedahl, Seth; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Czene, Kamila; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bojesen, Stig E; Andrulis, Irene L; Cox, Angela; Hall, Per; Carpenter, Jane; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Haiman, Christopher A; Fasching, Peter A; Mannermaa, Arto; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Lindblom, Annika; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Benitez, Javier; Swerdlow, Anthony; Kristensen, Vessela; Guénel, Pascal; Meindl, Alfons; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Fagerholm, Rainer; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Wang, Xianshu; Olswold, Curtis; Olson, Janet E; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Knight, Julia A; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Reed, Malcolm W R; Cross, Simon S; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Fostira, Florentia; Fountzilas, George; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Ekici, Arif B; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Pylkäs, Katri; Kauppila, Saila; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Arndt, Volker; Margolin, Sara; Balleine, Rosemary; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Pilar Zamora, M; Menéndez, Primitiva; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Arveux, Patrick; Kerbrat, Pierre; Truong, Thérèse; Bugert, Peter; Toland, Amanda E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Labrèche, France; Goldberg, Mark S; Dumont, Martine; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lee, Eunjung; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Peterlongo, Paolo; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Martens, John W M; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine D; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Tapper, William J; Gerty, Susan M; Durcan, Lorraine; Mclean, Catriona; Milne, Roger L; Baglietto, Laura; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Van'T Veer, Laura J; Cornelissen, Sten; Försti, Asta; Torres, Diana; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Nickels, Stefan; Weltens, Caroline; Floris, Giuseppe; Moisse, Matthieu; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Brown, Judith; Simard, Jacques; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Hopper, John L; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Zheng, Wei; Radice, Paolo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Devillee, Peter; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hooning, Maartje; García-Closas, Montserrat; Sawyer, Elinor; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmee, Frederick; Eccles, Diana M; Giles, Graham G; Peto, Julian; Schmidt, Marjanka; Broeks, Annegien; Hamann, Ute; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lambrechts, Diether; Pharoah, Paul D P; Easton, Douglas; Pankratz, V Shane; Slager, Susan; Vachon, Celine M; Couch, Fergus J

    2014-11-15

    Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 194 mitotic genes and breast cancer risk, overall and by histologic grade, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) iCOGS study (n = 39 067 cases; n = 42 106 controls). SNPs in TACC2 [rs17550038: odds ratio (OR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16-1.33, P = 4.2 × 10(-10)) and EIF3H (rs799890: OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04-1.11, P = 8.7 × 10(-6)) were significantly associated with risk of low-grade breast cancer. The TACC2 signal was retained (rs17550038: OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.23, P = 7.9 × 10(-5)) after adjustment for breast cancer risk SNPs in the nearby FGFR2 gene, suggesting that TACC2 is a novel, independent genome-wide significant genetic risk locus for low-grade breast cancer. While no SNPs were individually associated with high-grade disease, a pathway-level gene set analysis showed that variation across the 194 mitotic genes was associated with high-grade breast cancer risk (P = 2.1 × 10(-3)). These observations will provide insight into the contribution of mitotic defects to histological grade and the etiology of breast cancer. PMID:24927736

  18. Functional Characterization of G12, a Gene Required for Mitotic Progression during Gastrulation in Zebrafish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinsch, Sigrid; Conway, Gregory; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In a differential RNA display screen we have isolated a zebrafish gene, G12, for which homologs can only be found in DNA databases for vertebrates, but not invertebrates. This suggests that this is a gene required specifically in vertebrates. G12 expression is upregulated at mid-blastula transition (MBT). Morpholino inactivation of this gene by injection into 1-cell embryos results in mitotic defects and apoptosis shortly after MBT. Nuclei in morpholino treated embryos also display segregation defects. We have characterized the localization of this gene as a GFP fusion in live and fixed embryos. Overexpression of G12-GFP is non-toxic. Animals retain GFP expression for at least 7 days with no developmental defects, Interestingly in these animals G12-GFP is never detectable in blood cells though blood is present. In the deep cells of early embryos, G 12GFP is localized to nuclei and cytoskeletal elements in interphase and to the centrosome and spindle apparatus during mitosis. In the EVL, G12-GFP shows additional localization to the cell periphery, especially in mitosis. In the yolk syncytium, G12-GFP again localizes to nuclei and strongly to cytoplasmic microtubules of migrating nuclei at the YSL margin. Morpholinc, injection specifically into the YSL after cellularization blocks epiboly and nuclei of the YSL show mitotic defects while deep cells show no mitotic defects and continue to divide. Rescue experiments in which morpholino and G12-GFP RNA are co-injected indicate partial rescue by the G12-GFP. The rescue is cell autonomous; that is, regions of the embryo with higher G12-GFP expression show fewer mitotic defects. Spot 14, the human bomolog of G12, has been shown to be amplified in aggressive breast tumors. This finding, along with our functional and morphological data suggest that G12 and spot 14 are vertebrate-specific and may function either as mitotic checkpoints or as structural components of the spindle apparatus.

  19. Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade

    PubMed Central

    Purrington, Kristen S.; Slettedahl, Seth; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Czene, Kamila; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bojesen, Stig E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Cox, Angela; Hall, Per; Carpenter, Jane; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Haiman, Christopher A.; Fasching, Peter A.; Mannermaa, Arto; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Lindblom, Annika; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Benitez, Javier; Swerdlow, Anthony; Kristensen, Vessela; Guénel, Pascal; Meindl, Alfons; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Fagerholm, Rainer; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Wang, Xianshu; Olswold, Curtis; Olson, Janet E.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Knight, Julia A.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Cross, Simon S.; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Fostira, Florentia; Fountzilas, George; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Ekici, Arif B.; Hartmann, Arndt; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Pylkäs, Katri; Kauppila, Saila; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Arndt, Volker; Margolin, Sara; Balleine, Rosemary; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Pilar Zamora, M.; Menéndez, Primitiva; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Arveux, Patrick; Kerbrat, Pierre; Truong, Thérèse; Bugert, Peter; Toland, Amanda E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Labrèche, France; Goldberg, Mark S.; Dumont, Martine; Ziogas, Argyrios; Lee, Eunjung; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Long, Jirong; Shrubsole, Martha; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Ficarazzi, Filomena; Barile, Monica; Peterlongo, Paolo; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Martens, John W.M.; Kriege, Mieke; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Susan M.; Durcan, Lorraine; Mclean, Catriona; Milne, Roger L.; Baglietto, Laura; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Van'T Veer, Laura J.; Cornelissen, Sten; Försti, Asta; Torres, Diana; Rüdiger, Thomas; Rudolph, Anja; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Nickels, Stefan; Weltens, Caroline; Floris, Giuseppe; Moisse, Matthieu; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Brown, Judith; Simard, Jacques; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hopper, John L.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Zheng, Wei; Radice, Paolo; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Devillee, Peter; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hooning, Maartje; García-Closas, Montserrat; Sawyer, Elinor; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marmee, Frederick; Eccles, Diana M.; Giles, Graham G.; Peto, Julian; Schmidt, Marjanka; Broeks, Annegien; Hamann, Ute; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lambrechts, Diether; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Easton, Douglas; Pankratz, V. Shane; Slager, Susan; Vachon, Celine M.; Couch, Fergus J.

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic index is an important component of histologic grade and has an etiologic role in breast tumorigenesis. Several small candidate gene studies have reported associations between variation in mitotic genes and breast cancer risk. We measured associations between 2156 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 194 mitotic genes and breast cancer risk, overall and by histologic grade, in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) iCOGS study (n = 39 067 cases; n = 42 106 controls). SNPs in TACC2 [rs17550038: odds ratio (OR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–1.33, P = 4.2 × 10−10) and EIF3H (rs799890: OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04–1.11, P = 8.7 × 10−6) were significantly associated with risk of low-grade breast cancer. The TACC2 signal was retained (rs17550038: OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.07–1.23, P = 7.9 × 10−5) after adjustment for breast cancer risk SNPs in the nearby FGFR2 gene, suggesting that TACC2 is a novel, independent genome-wide significant genetic risk locus for low-grade breast cancer. While no SNPs were individually associated with high-grade disease, a pathway-level gene set analysis showed that variation across the 194 mitotic genes was associated with high-grade breast cancer risk (P = 2.1 × 10−3). These observations will provide insight into the contribution of mitotic defects to histological grade and the etiology of breast cancer. PMID:24927736

  20. Greatwall dephosphorylation and inactivation upon mitotic exit is triggered by PP1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sheng; Vigneron, Suzanne; Robert, Perle; Strub, Jean Marc; Cianferani, Sara; Castro, Anna; Lorca, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Entry into mitosis is induced by the activation of cyclin-B-Cdk1 and Greatwall (Gwl; also known as MASTL in mammals) kinases. Cyclin-B-Cdk1 phosphorylates mitotic substrates, whereas Gwl activation promotes the phosphorylation of the small proteins Arpp19 and ENSA. Phosphorylated Arpp19 and/or ENSA bind to and inhibit PP2A comprising the B55 subunit (PP2A-B55; B55 is also known as PPP2R2A), the phosphatase responsible for cyclin-B-Cdk1 substrate dephosphorylation, allowing the stable phosphorylation of mitotic proteins. Upon mitotic exit, cyclin-B-Cdk1 and Gwl kinases are inactivated, and mitotic substrates are dephosphorylated. Here, we have identified protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) as the phosphatase involved in the dephosphorylation of the activating site (Ser875) of Gwl. Depletion of PP1 from meioticXenopusegg extracts maintains phosphorylation of Ser875, as well as the full activity of this kinase, resulting in a block of meiotic and mitotic exit. By contrast, preventing the reactivation of PP2A-B55 through the addition of a hyperactive Gwl mutant (GwlK72M) mainly affected Gwl dephosphorylation on Thr194, resulting in partial inactivation of Gwl and in the incomplete exit from mitosis or meiosis. We also show that when PP2A-B55 is fully reactivated by depleting Arpp19, this protein phosphatase is able to dephosphorylate both activating sites, even in the absence of PP1. PMID:26906418

  1. Trivalent dimethylarsenic compound induces histone H3 phosphorylation and abnormal localization of Aurora B kinase in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshihide; Miyazaki, Koichi; Kita, Kayoko; Ochi, Takafumi

    2009-12-15

    Trivalent dimethylarsinous acid [DMA(III)] has been shown to induce mitotic abnormalities, such as centrosome abnormality, multipolar spindles, multipolar division, and aneuploidy, in several cell lines. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these mitotic abnormalities, we investigated DMA(III)-mediated changes in histone H3 phosphorylation and localization of Aurora B kinase, which is a key molecule in cell mitosis. DMA(III) caused the phosphorylation of histone H3 (ser10) and was distributed predominantly in mitotic cells, especially in prometaphase cells. By contrast, most of the phospho-histone H3 was found to be localized in interphase cells after treatment with inorganic arsenite [iAs(III)], suggesting the involvement of a different pathway in phosphorylation. DMA(III) activated Aurora B kinase and slightly activated ERK MAP kinase. Phosphorylation of histone H3 by DMA(III) was effectively reduced by ZM447439 (Aurora kinase inhibitor) and slightly reduced by U0126 (MEK inhibitor). By contrast, iAs(III)-dependent histone H3 phosphorylation was markedly reduced by U0126. Aurora B kinase is generally localized in the midbody during telophase and plays an important role in cytokinesis. However, in some cells treated with DMA(III), Aurora B was not localized in the midbody of telophase cells. These findings suggested that DMA(III) induced a spindle abnormality, thereby activating the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) through the Aurora B kinase pathway. In addition, cytokinesis was not completed because of the abnormal localization of Aurora B kinase by DMA(III), thereby resulting in the generation of multinucleated cells. These results provide insight into the mechanism of arsenic tumorigenesis.

  2. Changes after irradiation in the number of mitotic cells and apoptotic fragments in growing mouse hair follicles and in the width of their hairs

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, L.; Potten, C.S. )

    1990-07-01

    The hair follicle or its differentiated product, the hair, which represents the linear historical record of the follicular proliferative activity, could provide a biological dosimeter of value for dose distribution determinations after accidental exposure. Here we present some further studies on irradiated mouse hair follicles and hair, and discuss the difficulties in obtaining similar data for humans. The incidence of cell death in the follicles has been shown elsewhere to be maximum 12 h after irradiation, and it increases with dose. Here we confirm that doses of 0.2-0.4 Gy can be readily detected. We show here that there is only a little more cell death in the larger follicles even though they contain many more cells and mitotic figures. About one-third of all the dead cell fragments in a follicle can be seen in a good longitudinal follicle section. Mitotic activity declines progressively with dose in the large follicles, which start with more mitotic cells, showing the dose-dependent changes most readily. The dead cells are morphologically identical to apoptotic cells at the level of the light microscope, and they fragment into several bodies, the number of which increases with dose. The total number of apoptotic bodies or fragments in whole large follicles increases almost 100-fold over a range of 1.3 Gy (from 0.2 to 1.5 Gy) and about tenfold over the range 0.2-0.5 Gy. The estimated number of dead (apoptotic) cells increases about sevenfold over the same 1.3-Gy range. The width of the middle portion of the broadest, awl, hairs measured 12 days after irradiation decreases with increasing dose. About 80% of the hairs show an obvious reduction in width after 2 Gy and the effects of a dose of about 1 Gy can be detected. The width of the hair is reduced by 10-14% per Gy. A comparison has been made between BDF1 (black) and BALB-c (albino) mice.

  3. The morphology and symptom history of the Achilles tendons of figure skaters: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Perry, Mark; Tillett, Eleanor; Mitchell, Sophie; Maffulli, Nicola; Morrissey, Dylan

    2012-04-01

    This cross-sectional study assessed the prevalence of Achilles tendinopathy symptoms and ultrasound (US) abnormalities in male and female ice skaters, and compared this to age-matched controls. The 20 skaters of mean (sd) age 17.3 (7.9) were recruited from British figure skating clubs. The 17 non-skaters of mean age 18.0 (3.7) were recruited from a secondary school and university. Each group had 12 females. All participants completed a questionnaire, and Achilles tendons were ultrasound-scanned for thickening, hypoechoic areas, paratenon blurring and neovascularization. Skaters experienced significantly more lifetime symptoms (p=0.012) than the control group but there were no differences in present symptoms. Mid-tendon longitudinal thickness and the coefficient of variation (CoV) for longitudinal tendon thickness were significantly greater in the skaters (p=0.001 and p=0.017 respectively). No other ultrasound abnormalities were detected in either group. Figure skaters may be at a greater risk of Achilles tendon problems than the general population and have adaptive changes in their tendons. PMID:23738283

  4. The morphology and symptom history of the Achilles tendons of figure skaters: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Mark; Tillett, Eleanor; Mitchell, Sophie; Maffulli, Nicola; Morrissey, Dylan

    2012-01-01

    Summary This cross-sectional study assessed the prevalence of Achilles tendinopathy symptoms and ultrasound (US) abnormalities in male and female ice skaters, and compared this to age-matched controls. The 20 skaters of mean (sd) age 17.3 (7.9) were recruited from British figure skating clubs. The 17 non-skaters of mean age 18.0 (3.7) were recruited from a secondary school and university. Each group had 12 females. All participants completed a questionnaire, and Achilles tendons were ultrasound-scanned for thickening, hypoechoic areas, paratenon blurring and neovascularization. Skaters experienced significantly more lifetime symptoms (p=0.012) than the control group but there were no differences in present symptoms. Mid-tendon longitudinal thickness and the coefficient of variation (CoV) for longitudinal tendon thickness were significantly greater in the skaters (p=0.001 and p=0.017 respectively). No other ultrasound abnormalities were detected in either group. Figure skaters may be at a greater risk of Achilles tendon problems than the general population and have adaptive changes in their tendons. PMID:23738283

  5. Extracellular Matrix Abnormalities in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Sabina

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence points to the involvement of the brain extracellular matrix (ECM) in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (SZ). Abnormalities affecting several ECM components, including Reelin and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), have been described in subjects with this disease. Solid evidence supports the involvement of Reelin, an ECM glycoprotein involved in corticogenesis, synaptic functions and glutamate NMDA receptor regulation, expressed prevalently in distinct populations of GABAergic neurons, which secrete it into the ECM. Marked changes of Reelin expression in SZ have typically been reported in association with GABA-related abnormalities in subjects with SZ and bipolar disorder. Recent findings from our group point to substantial abnormalities affecting CSPGs, a main ECM component, in the amygdala and entorhinal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia, but not bipolar disorder. Striking increases of glial cells expressing CSPGs were accompanied by reductions of perineuronal nets, CSPG- and Reelin-enriched ECM aggregates enveloping distinct neuronal populations. CSPGs developmental and adult functions, including neuronal migration, axon guidance, synaptic and neurotransmission regulation are highly relevant to the pathophysiology of SZ. Together with reports of anomalies affecting several other ECM components, these findings point to the ECM as a key component of the pathology of SZ. We propose that ECM abnormalities may contribute to several aspects of the pathophysiology of this disease, including disrupted connectivity and neuronal migration, synaptic anomalies and altered GABAergic, glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission. PMID:21856318

  6. Lighting, backlighting and watercolor illusions and the laws of figurality.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Baingio; Reeves, Adam

    2006-01-01

    We report some novel 'lighting' and 'backlighting' effects in plane figures similar to those which induce the 'watercolor illusion', that is, figures made with outlines composed of juxtaposed parallel lines varying in brightness and chromatic color. These new effects show 'illumination' as an emergent percept, and show how arrangements of 'dark and light' along the boundaries of various plane figures model the volume and strengthen the illusion of depth. To account for these various effects we propose several phenomenological 'laws of figurality' to add to the Gestalt laws of organization and figure-ground segregation. We offer a set of meta-laws which are speculative but which serve to integrate and organize the phenomenological laws. These laws indicate how luminance gradient profiles across boundary contours define both the 3D appearance of figures and the properties of the light reflected from their volumetric shapes. PMID:16862844

  7. 2009 Alzheimer's disease facts and figures.

    PubMed

    2009-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the sixth leading cause of all deaths in the United States, and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans aged 65 and older. Whereas other major causes of death have been on the decrease, deaths attributable to AD have been rising dramatically. Between 2000 and 2006, heart-disease deaths decreased nearly 12%, stroke deaths decreased 18%, and prostate cancer-related deaths decreased 14%, whereas deaths attributable to AD increased 47%. An estimated 5.3 million Americans have AD; the approximately 200,000 persons under age 65 years with AD comprise the younger-onset AD population. Every 70 seconds, someone in America develops AD; by 2050, this time is expected to decrease to every 33 seconds. Over the coming decades, the "baby-boom" population is projected to add 10 million people to these numbers. In 2050, the incidence of AD is expected to approach nearly a million people per year, with a total estimated prevalence of 11 to 16 million people. Significant cost implications related to AD and other dementias include an estimated $148 billion annually in direct (Medicare/Medicaid) and indirect (e.g., decreased business productivity) costs. Not included in these figures is the $94 billion in unpaid services to individuals with AD provided annually by an estimated 10 million caregivers. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an important component in the continuum from healthy cognition to dementia. Understanding which individuals with MCI are at highest risk for eventually developing AD is key to our ultimate goal of preventing AD. This report provides information meant to increase an understanding of the public-health impact of AD, including incidence and prevalence, mortality, lifetime risks, costs, and impact on family caregivers. This report also sets the stage for a better understanding of the relationship between MCI and AD. PMID:19426951

  8. Oncogenic KRAS triggers MAPK-dependent errors in mitosis and MYC-dependent sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents.

    PubMed

    Perera, David; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS induces cell proliferation and transformation, but little is known about its effects on cell division. Functional genetic screens have recently revealed that cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic KRAS are sensitive to interference with mitosis, but neither the mechanism nor the uniformity of anti-mitotic drug sensitivity connected with mutant KRAS expression are yet clear. Here, we report that acute expression of oncogenic KRAS in HeLa cells induces mitotic delay and defects in chromosome segregation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation and de-regulated expression of several mitosis-related genes. These anomalies are accompanied by increased sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents, a phenotype dependent on the transcription factor MYC and its downstream target anti-apoptotic protein BCL-XL. Unexpectedly, we find no correlation between KRAS mutational status or MYC expression levels and anti-mitotic drug sensitivity when surveying a large database of anti-cancer drug responses. However, we report that the co-existence of KRAS mutations and high MYC expression predicts anti-mitotic drug sensitivity. Our findings reveal a novel function of oncogenic KRAS in regulating accurate mitotic progression and suggest new avenues to therapeutically target KRAS-mutant tumours and stratify patients in ongoing clinical trials of anti-mitotic drugs. PMID:27412232

  9. Mlp1 Acts as a Mitotic Scaffold to Spatially Regulate Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Proteins in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Colin P.; Hashmi, Shahr B.; Nayak, Tania; Oakley, Berl

    2009-01-01

    During open mitosis several nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins have mitotic specific localizations and functions. We find that the Aspergillus nidulans Mlp1 NPC protein has previously unrealized mitotic roles involving spatial regulation of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) proteins. In interphase, An-Mlp1 tethers the An-Mad1 and An-Mad2 SAC proteins to NPCs. During a normal mitosis, An-Mlp1, An-Mad1, and An-Mad2 localize similarly on, and around, kinetochores until telophase when they transiently localize near the spindle but not at kinetochores. During SAC activation, An-Mlp1 remains associated with kinetochores in a manner similar to An-Mad1 and An-Mad2. Although An-Mlp1 is not required for An-Mad1 kinetochore localization during early mitosis, it is essential to maintain An-Mad1 in the extended region around kinetochores in early mitosis and near the spindle in telophase. Our data are consistent with An-Mlp1 being part of a mitotic spindle matrix similar to its Drosophila orthologue and demonstrate that this matrix localizes SAC proteins. By maintaining SAC proteins near the mitotic apparatus, An-Mlp1 may help monitor mitotic progression and coordinate efficient mitotic exit. Consistent with this possibility, An-Mad1 and An-Mlp1 redistribute from the telophase matrix and associate with segregated kinetochores when mitotic exit is prevented by expression of nondegradable cyclin B. PMID:19225157

  10. Oncogenic KRAS triggers MAPK-dependent errors in mitosis and MYC-dependent sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents

    PubMed Central

    Perera, David; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS induces cell proliferation and transformation, but little is known about its effects on cell division. Functional genetic screens have recently revealed that cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic KRAS are sensitive to interference with mitosis, but neither the mechanism nor the uniformity of anti-mitotic drug sensitivity connected with mutant KRAS expression are yet clear. Here, we report that acute expression of oncogenic KRAS in HeLa cells induces mitotic delay and defects in chromosome segregation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation and de-regulated expression of several mitosis-related genes. These anomalies are accompanied by increased sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents, a phenotype dependent on the transcription factor MYC and its downstream target anti-apoptotic protein BCL-XL. Unexpectedly, we find no correlation between KRAS mutational status or MYC expression levels and anti-mitotic drug sensitivity when surveying a large database of anti-cancer drug responses. However, we report that the co-existence of KRAS mutations and high MYC expression predicts anti-mitotic drug sensitivity. Our findings reveal a novel function of oncogenic KRAS in regulating accurate mitotic progression and suggest new avenues to therapeutically target KRAS-mutant tumours and stratify patients in ongoing clinical trials of anti-mitotic drugs. PMID:27412232

  11. Beyond captions: linking figures with abstract sentences in biomedical articles.

    PubMed

    Bockhorst, Joseph P; Conroy, John M; Agarwal, Shashank; O'Leary, Dianne P; Yu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Although figures in scientific articles have high information content and concisely communicate many key research findings, they are currently under utilized by literature search and retrieval systems. Many systems ignore figures, and those that do not typically only consider caption text. This study describes and evaluates a fully automated approach for associating figures in the body of a biomedical article with sentences in its abstract. We use supervised methods to learn probabilistic language models, hidden Markov models, and conditional random fields for predicting associations between abstract sentences and figures. Three kinds of evidence are used: text in abstract sentences and figures, relative positions of sentences and figures, and the patterns of sentence/figure associations across an article. Each information source is shown to have predictive value, and models that use all kinds of evidence are more accurate than models that do not. Our most accurate method has an F1-score of 69% on a cross-validation experiment, is competitive with the accuracy of human experts, has significantly better predictive accuracy than state-of-the-art methods and enables users to access figures associated with an abstract sentence with an average of 1.82 fewer mouse clicks. A user evaluation shows that human users find our system beneficial. The system is available at http://FigureItOut.askHERMES.org. PMID:22815711

  12. pH-induced changes in mitotic and developmental patterns in sea urchin embryogenesis. I. Exposure of embryos.

    PubMed

    Pagano, G; Cipollaro, M; Corsale, G; Esposito, A; Ragucci, E; Giordano, G G

    1985-01-01

    The effects of different pH conditions have been investigated on sea urchin larval development following exposure of embryos to controlled, though changing, decreases or increases of seawater pH. The pH of filtered natural seawater was initially adjusted with 1 N HCl of 1 N KOH and then was altered back to its normal values (8.0-8.2) by the exchange with atmospheric CO2 and subsequent carbonic acid equilibrium. During cultures, pH was regularly monitored. When developing embryos were reared in different pH conditions, larval differentiation was sharply affected by an apparently moderate pH decrease, such as 0.5 pH units. However, even pH decreases as small as 0.2 pH units from the normal value showed reproducible damage to embryogenesis. This damage appeared to be early and irreversible, since the exposure of cleaving embryos resulted in more severe developmental defects than exposure of posthatching blastulae. Moreover, mitotic abnormalities were observed following early exposure of embryos to decreased pH. Increased pH, up to 8.6 (approximately 0.5 pH units above normal value), failed to exert any adverse effect on subsequent development. Moreover, an initial pH increase (8.5-8.7) resulted in the final adjustment of culture pH to 8.1-8.2, thus providing optimal conditions for rearing embryos. Two attempts to stabilize culture pH were performed by decreasing gaseous exchanges or by using Tris as a buffering agent. Both approaches appeared to be impractical, thus ruling out any further attempts. The results point out the hazards of acid contamination in restricted bodies of seawater, leading to apparently "moderate" decreases in pH, which can result in severe damage to some marine organisms, both adult and larval forms. PMID:2859664

  13. The Transcriptional Repressor Kaiso Localizes at the Mitotic Spindle and Is a Constituent of the Pericentriolar Material

    PubMed Central

    Soubry, Adelheid; Staes, Katrien; Parthoens, Eef; Noppen, Sam; Stove, Christophe; Bogaert, Pieter; van Hengel, Jolanda; van Roy, Frans

    2010-01-01

    Kaiso is a BTB/POZ zinc finger protein known as a transcriptional repressor. It was originally identified through its in vitro association with the Armadillo protein p120ctn. Subcellular localization of Kaiso in cell lines and in normal and cancerous human tissues revealed that its expression is not restricted to the nucleus. In the present study we monitored Kaiso's subcellular localization during the cell cycle and found the following: (1) during interphase, Kaiso is located not only in the nucleus, but also on microtubular structures, including the centrosome; (2) at metaphase, it is present at the centrosomes and on the spindle microtubules; (3) during telophase, it accumulates at the midbody. We found that Kaiso is a genuine PCM component that belongs to a pericentrin molecular complex. We analyzed the functions of different domains of Kaiso by visualizing the subcellular distribution of GFP-tagged Kaiso fragments throughout the cell cycle. Our results indicate that two domains are responsible for targeting Kaiso to the centrosomes and microtubules. The first domain, designated SA1 for spindle-associated domain 1, is located in the center of the Kaiso protein and localizes at the spindle microtubules and centrosomes; the second domain, SA2, is an evolutionarily conserved domain situated just before the zinc finger domain and might be responsible for localizing Kaiso towards the centrosomal region. Constructs containing both SA domains and Kaiso's aminoterminal BTB/POZ domain triggered the formation of abnormal centrosomes. We also observed that overexpression of longer or full-length Kaiso constructs led to mitotic cell arrest and frequent cell death. Knockdown of Kaiso accelerated cell proliferation. Our data reveal a new target for Kaiso at the centrosomes and spindle microtubules during mitosis. They also strongly imply that Kaiso's function as a transcriptional regulator might be linked to the control of the cell cycle and to cell proliferation in cancer

  14. Axitinib induces DNA damage response leading to senescence, mitotic catastrophe, and increased NK cell recognition in human renal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Maria Beatrice; Amantini, Consuelo; Santoni, Matteo; Soriani, Alessandra; Nabissi, Massimo; Cardinali, Claudio; Santoni, Angela; Santoni, Giorgio

    2015-11-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) including axitinib have been introduced in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) because of their anti-angiogenic properties. However, no evidence are presently available on a direct cytotoxic anti-tumor activity of axitinib in RCC.Herein we reported by western blot analysis that axitinib treatment induces a DNA damage response (DDR) initially characterized by γ-H2AX phosphorylation and Chk1 kinase activation and at later time points by p21 overexpression in A-498 and Caki-2 RCC cells although with a different potency. Analysis by immunocytochemistry for the presence of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in cellular DNA and flow cytometry using the redox-sensitive fluorescent dye DCFDA, demonstrated that DDR response is accompanied by the presence of oxidative DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. This response leads to G2/M cell cycle arrest and induces a senescent-like phenotype accompanied by enlargement of cells and increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, which are abrogated by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) pre-treatment. In addition, axitinib-treated cells undergo to cell death through mitotic catastrophe characterized by micronucleation and abnormal microtubule assembly as assessed by fluorescence microscopy.On the other hand, axitinib, through the DDR induction, is also able to increase the surface NKG2D ligand expression. Accordingly, drug treatment promotes NK cell recognition and degranulation in A-498 RCC cells in a ROS-dependent manner.Collectively, our results indicate that both cytotoxic and immunomodulatory effects on RCC cells can contribute to axitinib anti-tumor activity. PMID:26474283

  15. Figures and First Years: Examining first-year Calculus I student ability to incorporate figures into technical reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonacci, Nathan; Rogers, Michael; Pfaff, Thomas

    This three-year study focused on first-year Calculus I students and their abilities to incorporate figures into technical reports. Students were handed guidelines as part of their Multidisciplinary Sustainability Education Module meant to aid them in crafting effective figures. Figure-specific questionnaires were added in the class to gain insight into the quantitative literacy skills students possessed both before starting their course and after its completion. Reviews of the figures in 78 technical reports written by 106 students showed repeated failure to refer to figures in discussion sections and use them in evidence-based arguments. Analysis of quantitative literacy skills revealed that the students could both read and interpret figures, suggesting that issues with literacy were not the main contributor to the sub-par graphs.

  16. The Endocrine Dyscrasia that Accompanies Menopause and Andropause Induces Aberrant Cell Cycle Signaling that Triggers Cell Cycle Reentry of Post-mitotic Neurons, Neurodysfunction, Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Craig S.; Bowen, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Sex hormones are the physiological factors that regulate neurogenesis during embryogenesis and continuing through adulthood. These hormones support the formation of brain structures such as dendritic spines, axons and synapses required for the capture of information (memories). Intriguingly, a recent animal study has demonstrated that induction of neurogenesis results in the loss of previously encoded memories in animals (e.g. infantile amnesia). In this connection, much evidence now indicates that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) also involves aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into the cell cycle. Cell cycle abnormalities appear very early in the disease, prior to the appearance of plaques and tangles, and explain the biochemical, neuropathological and cognitive changes observed with disease progression. Since sex hormones control when and how neurons proliferate and differentiate, the endocrine dyscrasia that accompanies menopause and andropause is a key signaling event that impacts neurogenesis and the acquisition, processing, storage and recall of memories. Here we review the biochemical, epidemiological and clinical evidence that alterations in endocrine signaling with menopause and andropause drive the aberrant re-entry of post-mitotic neurons into an abortive cell cycle with neurite retraction that leads to neuron dysfunction and death. When the reproductive axis is in balance, luteinizing hormone (LH), and its fetal homolog, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), promote pluripotent human and totipotent murine embryonic stem cell and neuron proliferation. However, strong evidence supports menopausal/andropausal elevations in the ratio of LH:sex steroids as driving aberrant mitotic events mediated by the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor, amyloid-β precursor protein processing towards the production of mitogenic Aβ, and the activation of Cdk5, a key regulator of cell cycle progression and tau phosphorylation (a cardinal feature of both neurogenesis and

  17. Gonosomal mosaicism in myotonic dystrophy patients: Involvement of mitotic events in (CTG)[sub n] repeat variation and selection against extreme expansion in sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, G.; Coerwinkel, M.; Wieringa, B.; Nillesen, W.; Smeets, H.; Brunner, H.; Wieringa, B. ); Willems, P.; Vits, L. ); Hoeweler, C. )

    1994-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is caused by abnormal expansion of a polymorphic (CTG)[sub n] repeat, located in the DM protein kinase gene. The authors determined the (CTG)[sub n] repeat lengths in a broad range of tissue DNAs from patients with mild, classical, or congenital manifestation of DM. Differences in the repeat length were seen in somatic tissues from single DM individuals and twins. Repeats appeared to expand to a similar extent in tissues originating from the same embryonal origin. In most male patients carrying intermediate- or small-sized expansions in blood, the repeat lengths covered a markedly wider range in sperm. In contrast, male patients with large allele expansions in blood (>700 CTGs) had similar or smaller repeats in sperm, when detectable. Sperm alleles with >1,000 CTGs were not seen. The authors conclude that DM patients can be considered gonosomal mosaics, i.e., combined somatic and germ-line tissue mosaics. Most remarkably, they observed multiple cases where the length distributions of intermediate- or small-sized alleles in fathers' sperm were significantly different from that in their offspring's blood. The combined findings indicate that intergenerational length changes in the unstable CTG repeat are most likely to occur during early embryonic mitotic divisions in both somatic and germ-line tissue formation. Both the initial CTG length, the overall number of cell divisions involved in tissue formation, and perhaps a specific selection process in spermatogenesis may influence the dynamics of this process. A model explaining mitotic instability and sex-dependent segregation phenomena in DM manifestation is discussed. 59 refs., 5 figs.

  18. A novel strategy for targeted killing of tumor cells: Induction of multipolar acentrosomal mitotic spindles with a quinazolinone derivative mdivi-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingnan; Li, Jianfeng; Santana-Santos, Lucas; Shuda, Masahiro; Sobol, Robert W; Van Houten, Bennett; Qian, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Traditional antimitotic drugs for cancer chemotherapy often have undesired toxicities to healthy tissues, limiting their clinical application. Developing novel agents that specifically target tumor cell mitosis is needed to minimize the toxicity and improve the efficacy of this class of anticancer drugs. We discovered that mdivi-1 (mitochondrial division inhibitor-1), which was originally reported as an inhibitor of mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, specifically disrupts M phase cell cycle progression only in human tumor cells, but not in non-transformed fibroblasts or epithelial cells. The antimitotic effect of mdivi-1 is Drp1 independent, as mdivi-1 induces M phase abnormalities in both Drp1 wild-type and Drp1 knockout SV40-immortalized/transformed MEF cells. We also identified that the tumor transformation process required for the antimitotic effect of mdivi-1 is downstream of SV40 large T and small t antigens, but not hTERT-mediated immortalization. Mdivi-1 induces multipolar mitotic spindles in tumor cells regardless of their centrosome numbers. Acentrosomal spindle poles, which do not contain the bona-fide centrosome components γ-tubulin and centrin-2, were found to contribute to the spindle multipolarity induced by mdivi-1. Gene expression profiling revealed that the genes involved in oocyte meiosis and assembly of acentrosomal microtubules are highly expressed in tumor cells. We further identified that tumor cells have enhanced activity in the nucleation and assembly of acentrosomal kinetochore-attaching microtubules. Mdivi-1 inhibited the integration of acentrosomal microtubule-organizing centers into centrosomal asters, resulting in the development of acentrosomal mitotic spindles preferentially in tumor cells. The formation of multipolar acentrosomal spindles leads to gross genome instability and Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis. Taken together, our studies indicate that inducing multipolar spindles composing of acentrosomal poles in mitosis could achieve

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Relativistic Figures of Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mars, M.

    2009-08-01

    Compact fluid bodies in equilibrium under its own gravitational field are abundant in the Universe and a proper treatment of them can only be carried out using the full theory of General Relativity. The problem is of enormous complexity as it involves two very different regimes, namely the interior and the exterior of the fluid, coupled through the surface of the body. This problem is very challenging both from a purely theoretical point of view, as well as regarding the obtaining of realistic models and the description of their physical properties. It is therefore an excellent piece of news that the book 'Relativistic Figures of Equilibrium' by R Meinel, M Ansorg, A Kleinwächter, G Neugebauer and D Petroff has been recently published. This book approaches the topic in depth and its contents will be of interest to a wide range of scientists working on gravitation, including theoreticians in general relativity, mathematical physicists, astrophysicists and numerical relativists. This is an advanced book that intends to present some of the present-day results on this topic. The most basic results are presented rather succinctly, and without going into the details, of their derivations. Although primarily not intended to serve as a textbook, the presentation is nevertheless self-contained and can therefore be of interest both for experts on the field as well as for anybody wishing to learn more about rotating self-gravitating compact bodies in equilibrium. It should be remarked, however, that this book makes a rather strong selection of topics and concentrates fundamentally on presenting the main results obtained by the authors during their research in this field. The book starts with a chapter where the fundamental aspects of rotating fluids in equilibrium, including its thermodynamic properties, are summarized. Of particular interest are the so-called mass-shedding limit, which is the limit where the body is rotating so fast that it is on the verge of starting

  20. On the origins of the mitotic shift in proliferating cell layers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background During plant and animal development, monolayer cell sheets display a stereotyped distribution of polygonal cell shapes. In interphase cells these shapes range from quadrilaterals to decagons, with a robust average of six sides per cell. In contrast, the subset of cells in mitosis exhibits a distinct distribution with an average of seven sides. It remains unclear whether this ‘mitotic shift’ reflects a causal relationship between increased polygonal sidedness and increased division likelihood, or alternatively, a passive effect of local proliferation on cell shape. Methods We use a combination of probabilistic analysis and mathematical modeling to predict the geometry of mitotic polygonal cells in a proliferating cell layer. To test these predictions experimentally, we use Flp-Out stochastic labeling in the Drosophila wing disc to induce single cell clones, and confocal imaging to quantify the polygonal topologies of these clones as a function of cellular age. For a more generic test in an idealized cell layer, we model epithelial sheet proliferation in a finite element framework, which yields a computationally robust, emergent prediction of the mitotic cell shape distribution. Results Using both mathematical and experimental approaches, we show that the mitotic shift derives primarily from passive, non-autonomous effects of mitoses in neighboring cells on each cell’s geometry over the course of the cell cycle. Computationally, we predict that interphase cells should passively gain sides over time, such that cells at more advanced stages of the cell cycle will tend to have a larger number of neighbors than those at earlier stages. Validating this prediction, experimental analysis of randomly labeled epithelial cells in the Drosophila wing disc demonstrates that labeled cells exhibit an age-dependent increase in polygonal sidedness. Reinforcing these data, finite element simulations of epithelial sheet proliferation demonstrate in a generic framework

  1. Antiproliferative Fate of the Tetraploid Formed after Mitotic Slippage and Its Promotion; A Novel Target for Cancer Therapy Based on Microtubule Poisons.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yuji; Inoue, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule poisons inhibit spindle function, leading to activation of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and mitotic arrest. Cell death occurring in prolonged mitosis is the first target of microtubule poisons in cancer therapies. However, even in the presence of microtubule poisons, SAC and mitotic arrest are not permanent, and the surviving cells exit the mitosis without cytokinesis (mitotic slippage), becoming tetraploid. Another target of microtubule poisons-based cancer therapy is antiproliferative fate after mitotic slippage. The ultimate goal of both the microtubule poisons-based cancer therapies involves the induction of a mechanism defined as mitotic catastrophe, which is a bona fide intrinsic oncosuppressive mechanism that senses mitotic failure and responds by driving a cell to an irreversible antiproliferative fate of death or senescence. This mechanism of antiproliferative fate after mitotic slippage is not as well understood. We provide an overview of mitotic catastrophe, and explain new insights underscoring a causal association between basal autophagy levels and antiproliferative fate after mitotic slippage, and propose possible improved strategies. Additionally, we discuss nuclear alterations characterizing the mitotic catastrophe (micronuclei, multinuclei) after mitotic slippage, and a possible new type of nuclear alteration (clustered micronuclei). PMID:27213315

  2. GLIAL ABNORMALITIES IN MOOD DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Öngür, Dost; Bechtholt, Anita J.; Carlezon, William A.; Cohen, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that mood disorders are associated with abnormalities in the brain's cellular composition, especially in glial cells. Considered inert support cells in the past, glial cells are now known to be important for brain function. Treatments for mood disorders enhance glial cell proliferation, and experimental stimulation of cell growth has antidepressant effects in animal models of mood disorders. These findings suggest that the proliferation and survival of glial cells may be important in the pathogenesis of mood disorders and may be possible targets for the development of new treatments. In this chapter, we will review the evidence for glial abnormalities in mood disorders. We will discuss glial cell biology and evidence from postmortem studies of mood disorders. This is not carry out a comprehensive review; rather we selectively discuss existing evidence in building an argument for the role of glial cells in mood disorders. PMID:25377605

  3. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 223 - Flounder TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flounder TED 10 Figure 10 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Part 223—Flounder TED...

  4. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 223 - Flounder TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flounder TED 10 Figure 10 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Part 223—Flounder TED...

  5. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 223 - Flounder TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flounder TED 10 Figure 10 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Part 223—Flounder TED...

  6. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 223 - Flounder TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flounder TED 10 Figure 10 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Part 223—Flounder TED...

  7. 50 CFR Figure 10 to Part 223 - Flounder TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flounder TED 10 Figure 10 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 10 Figure 10 to Part 223—Flounder TED...

  8. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  9. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  10. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1203 - Anatomical Planes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anatomical Planes 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1203—Anatomical Planes ER10MR98.001...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart D of... - Figures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Figures B Appendix B to Subpart D of Part 89 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Provisions Pt. 89, Subpt. D, App. B Appendix B to Subpart D of Part 89—Figures EC01MR92.000 EC01MR92.001...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart D of... - Figures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Figures B Appendix B to Subpart D of Part 89 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Provisions Pt. 89, Subpt. D, App. B Appendix B to Subpart D of Part 89—Figures EC01MR92.000 EC01MR92.001...

  13. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart D of... - Figures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Figures B Appendix B to Subpart D of Part 90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Provisions Pt. 90, Subpt. D, App. B Appendix B to Subpart D of Part 90—Figures EC01MR92.085 EC01MR92.086...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart E of... - Figures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Figures B Appendix B to Subpart E of Part 90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Procedures Pt. 90, Subpt. E, App. B Appendix B to Subpart E of Part 90—Figures EC01MR92.087...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart D of... - Figures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Figures B Appendix B to Subpart D of Part 90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Provisions Pt. 90, Subpt. D, App. B Appendix B to Subpart D of Part 90—Figures EC01MR92.085 EC01MR92.086...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart E of... - Figures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Figures B Appendix B to Subpart E of Part 90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Procedures Pt. 90, Subpt. E, App. B Appendix B to Subpart E of Part 90—Figures EC01MR92.087...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix B to Subpart D of... - Figures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Figures B Appendix B to Subpart D of Part 91 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED.... D, App. B Appendix B to Subpart D of Part 91—Figures ER04OC96.013 ER04OC96.014...

  18. Interpreting Children's Human Figure Drawings: Basic Guidelines for School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Yuehong Chen; Mullis, Fran

    2008-01-01

    The literature was reviewed and summarized to provide common interpretations of human figure drawings. Basic guidelines for interpreting human figure drawings (i.e., face and head, body, arms and hands, and legs and feet) are presented. Expectations for students at different developmental levels (ages 1 1/2 through adolescence) are identified, and…

  19. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Subpart A of... - Impactor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Impactor 5 Figure 5 to Subpart A of Part 1201 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR ARCHITECTURAL GLAZING MATERIALS The Standard Pt. 1201, Subpt. A, Fig. 5 Figure 5...

  20. 50 CFR Figure 3 to Part 223 - Matagorda TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Matagorda TED 3 Figure 3 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 3 Figure 3...

  1. 46 CFR Figure 1 to Part 150 - Compatibility Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compatibility Chart 1 Figure 1 to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 150—Compatibility Chart EC02FE91.079...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Subpart A of... - Specimen Tray

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Specimen Tray 7 Figure 7 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 7 Figure...

  3. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 223 - Georgia TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Georgia TED 4 Figure 4 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 4 Figure 4...

  4. 46 CFR Figure 1 to Part 150 - Compatibility Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compatibility Chart 1 Figure 1 to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 150—Compatibility Chart EC02FE91.079...

  5. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Subpart A of... - Test Frame

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Test Frame 2 Figure 2 to Subpart A of Part 1201 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR ARCHITECTURAL GLAZING MATERIALS The Standard Pt. 1201, Subpt. A, Fig. 2 Figure 2...

  6. 50 CFR Figure 3 to Part 223 - Matagorda TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Matagorda TED 3 Figure 3 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 3 Figure 3...

  7. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Subpart A of... - Specimen Tray

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Specimen Tray 7 Figure 7 to Subpart A of Part 1209 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS INTERIM SAFETY STANDARD FOR CELLULOSE INSULATION The Standard Pt. 1209, Subpt. A, Fig. 7 Figure...

  8. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1511 - Pacifier Test Fixture

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pacifier Test Fixture 1 Figure 1 to Part 1511 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR PACIFIERS Pt. 1511, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1511—Pacifier Test Fixture...

  9. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1610 - Igniter

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Igniter 6 Figure 6 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1610—Igniter ER20OC08.001...

  10. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  11. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Subpart A of... - Impactor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Impactor 5 Figure 5 to Subpart A of Part 1201 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR ARCHITECTURAL GLAZING MATERIALS The Standard Pt. 1201, Subpt. A, Fig. 5 Figure 5...

  12. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1610 - Flammability Apparatus Views

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flammability Apparatus Views 2 Figure 2 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part...

  13. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1610 - Igniter

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Igniter 6 Figure 6 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1610—Igniter ER20OC08.001...

  14. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Brushing Device 7 Figure 7 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 7 Figure 7 to Part 1610—Brushing Device ER25MR08.006...

  15. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1511 - Pacifier Test Fixture

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pacifier Test Fixture 1 Figure 1 to Part 1511 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR PACIFIERS Pt. 1511, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1511—Pacifier Test Fixture...

  16. 16 CFR Figure 6 to Part 1610 - Igniter

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Igniter 6 Figure 6 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 6 Figure 6 to Part 1610—Igniter ER20OC08.001...

  17. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Subpart A of... - Impactor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Impactor 5 Figure 5 to Subpart A of Part 1201 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR ARCHITECTURAL GLAZING MATERIALS The Standard Pt. 1201, Subpt. A, Fig. 5 Figure 5...

  18. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1511 - Pacifier Test Fixture

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pacifier Test Fixture 1 Figure 1 to Part 1511 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR PACIFIERS Pt. 1511, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1511—Pacifier Test Fixture...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Subpart A of... - Test Frame

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Test Frame 2 Figure 2 to Subpart A of Part 1201 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR ARCHITECTURAL GLAZING MATERIALS The Standard Pt. 1201, Subpt. A, Fig. 2 Figure 2...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1610 - Flammability Apparatus Views

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flammability Apparatus Views 2 Figure 2 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Subpart A of... - Test Frame

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Test Frame 2 Figure 2 to Subpart A of Part 1201 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR ARCHITECTURAL GLAZING MATERIALS The Standard Pt. 1201, Subpt. A, Fig. 2 Figure 2...

  3. 46 CFR Figure 1 to Part 150 - Compatibility Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compatibility Chart 1 Figure 1 to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 150—Compatibility Chart EC02FE91.079...

  4. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Brushing Device 7 Figure 7 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 7 Figure 7 to Part 1610—Brushing Device ER25MR08.006...

  5. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1610 - Flammability Apparatus Views

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flammability Apparatus Views 2 Figure 2 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part...

  6. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1508 - Headform Probe

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Headform Probe 2 Figure 2 to Part 1508 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES Multiple-tube fireworks devices. Pt. 1508, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part 1508—Headform...

  7. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 223 - Georgia TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Georgia TED 4 Figure 4 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 4 Figure 4...

  8. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 223 - Georgia TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Georgia TED 4 Figure 4 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 4 Figure 4...

  9. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  10. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1610 - Flammability Apparatus Views

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flammability Apparatus Views 2 Figure 2 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part...

  11. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Subpart A of... - Impactor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Impactor 5 Figure 5 to Subpart A of Part 1201 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR ARCHITECTURAL GLAZING MATERIALS The Standard Pt. 1201, Subpt. A, Fig. 5 Figure 5...

  12. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1610 - Brush

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Brush 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610—Brush ER25MR08.007...

  13. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  14. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1509 - Headform Probe

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Headform Probe 2 Figure 2 to Part 1509 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS Pt. 1509, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part 1509—Headform Probe EC03OC91.065...

  15. 46 CFR Figure 1 to Part 150 - Compatibility Chart

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compatibility Chart 1 Figure 1 to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 150—Compatibility Chart EC02FE91.079...

  16. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Brushing Device 7 Figure 7 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 7 Figure 7 to Part 1610—Brushing Device ER25MR08.006...

  17. 16 CFR Figure 2 to Part 1508 - Headform Probe

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Headform Probe 2 Figure 2 to Part 1508 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS FIREWORKS DEVICES Multiple-tube fireworks devices. Pt. 1508, Fig. 2 Figure 2 to Part 1508—Headform...

  18. 50 CFR Figure 4 to Part 223 - Georgia TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Georgia TED 4 Figure 4 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 4 Figure 4...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1203 - Impact Test Apparatus

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Impact Test Apparatus 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS Pt. 1203, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1203—Impact Test Apparatus...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1610 - Brush

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Brush 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610—Brush ER25MR08.007...