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Sample records for abnormal nerve conduction

  1. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... polyneuropathy Tibial nerve dysfunction Ulnar nerve dysfunction Any peripheral neuropathy can cause abnormal results. Damage to the spinal ... Herniated disk Lambert-Eaton syndrome Mononeuropathy Multiple ... azotemia Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sciatica ...

  2. [An analysis of characteristics of nerve conduction in 154 cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ren, Y T; Cui, F; Yang, F; Chen, Z H; Ling, L; Huang, X S

    2016-10-01

    Objective: To analyze the features of nerve conduction in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and explore the correlation between compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude and disease duration and revised amyotrophic lateral sclerosis functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R). Methods: Standard motor and sensory nerve conduction studies were performed in 154 patients with ALS. The following parameters were collected including CMAP amplitude, distal motor latency (DML), motor conduction velocity, sensory conduction velocity and sensory nerve action potential amplitude. Regression study was done to explore the correlation between CMAP amplitude and disease duration and ALSFRS-R. Results: Motor nerve conduction abnormalities were presented in a majority of the patients with prolonged DML in the tibial nerve, median nerve and ulnar nerve as the most common form (61.06%-81.42%), followed by decreased CMAP amplitude (30.12%-53.98%), decreased MCV (12.05%-16.81%) and absence of CMAP (2.65%-9.73%). Sensory nerve conduction abnormalities were detected in a small proportion of patients and the decreased SCV, decreased SNAP amplitude and absence of SNAP in the sural nerve, median nerve and ulnar nerve were found in 1.22%-2.73%, 0-1.82% and 0-1.22% patients respectively. No correlation was found between CMAP of the common peroneal nerve, tibial nerve, median nerve and ulnar nerve and the disease duration (P>0.05), while significant positive correlation was established between CMAP amplitude of the median nerve and ulnar nerve and ALSFRS-R (r=0.273, P=0.016; r=0.357, P=0.001). Conclusions: Motor nerve conduction is abnormal in a majority of ALS patients with prolonged DML as the most common form, while abnormal sensory nerve conduction is only found in a few of ALS patients. CMAP amplitude of the median nerve and ulnar nerve might be of certain clinical value in evaluating the severity of ALS.

  3. Conduction Properties Of Decellularized Nerve Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Urbanchek, M.G.; Shim, B.S.; Baghmanli, Z.; Wei, B.; Schroeder, K.; Langhals, N.B.; Miriani, R.M.; Egeland, B.M.; Kipke, D.R.; Martin, D.C.; Cederna, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to optimize poly(3,4,-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) polymerization into decellular nerve scaffolding for interfacing to peripheral nerves. Our ultimate aim is to permanently implant highly conductive peripheral nerve interfaces between amputee, stump, nerve fascicles and prosthetic electronics. Decellular nerve (DN) scaffolds are an FDA approved biomaterial (Axogen ) with the flexible tensile properties needed for successful permanent coaptation to peripheral nerves. Biocompatible, electroconductive, PEDOT facilitates electrical conduction through PEDOT coated acellular muscle. New electrochemical methods were used to polymerize various PEDOT concentrations into DN scaffolds without the need for a final dehydration step. DN scaffolds were then tested for electrical impedance and charge density. PEDOT coated DN scaffold materials were also implanted as 15–20mm peripheral nerve grafts. Measurement of in-situ nerve conduction immediately followed grafting. DN showed significant improvements in impedance for dehydrated and hydrated, DN, polymerized with moderate and low PEDOT concentrations when they were compared with DN alone (a ≤ 0.05). These measurements were equivalent to those for DN with maximal PEDOT concentrations. In-situ, nerve conduction measurements demonstrated that DN alone is a poor electro-conductor while the addition of PEDOT allows DN scaffold grafts to compare favorably with the “gold standard”, autograft (Table 1). Surgical handling characteristics for conductive hydrated PEDOT DN scaffolds were rated 3 (pliable) while the dehydrated models were rated 1 (very stiff) when compared with autograft ratings of 4 (normal). Low concentrations of PEDOT on DN scaffolds provided significant increases in electro active properties which were comparable to the densest PEDOT coatings. DN pliability was closely maintained by continued hydration during PEDOT electrochemical polymerization without compromising

  4. Electrochemical Skin Conductance Correlates with Skin Nerve Fiber Density

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Electrochemical skin conductance (ESC) using reverse iontophoresis and chronoamperometry has been used to evaluate abnormal function of small fibers. How ESC correlates with loss of small fibers in skin is unclear. Methods: This was a prospective, blinded study. The primary outcome measure was the correlation between ESC at the feet and results of skin biopsies including epidermal nerve fiber density (ENFD) and sweat gland nerve fiber density (SGNFD) at the distal leg. ESC, ENFD, and SGNFD data were normalized by adjusting for weight. The secondary outcome measures were the correlation between ESC and the following variables: quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test (QSART) and symptom scales (neuropathy, pain and autonomic). Results: Eighty-one patients (mean ± sd): age = 53.3 ± 17.3, men/women = 25/56 were enrolled in the study. ESC was reduced in subjects with abnormally low ENFD (ENFD normal/abnormal, ESC = 1.17 ± 0.27/0.87 ± 0.34 μSiemens/kg, p < 0.0008) and abnormally low SGNFD (SGNFD normal/abnormal ESC = 1.09 ± 0.34/0.78 ± 0.3 μSiemens/kg, p < 0.0003). ESC correlated with ENFD (ρ = 0.73, p = 0.0001) and SGNFD (ρ = 0.64, p = 0.0001). ESC did not correlate with symptom scales. Conclusion: ESC is diminished in subjects who have a reduced number of small fibers in the skin and the ESC reduction is proportional to ENFD and SGNFD. ESC can be useful in detecting loss of small nerve fibers. PMID:27605912

  5. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a device which measures nerve conduction time by applying a stimulus, usually to a...

  6. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a device which measures nerve conduction time by applying a stimulus, usually to a...

  7. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a device which measures nerve conduction time by applying a stimulus, usually to a...

  8. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a device which measures nerve conduction time by applying a stimulus, usually to a...

  9. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device is a device which measures nerve conduction time by applying a stimulus, usually to a...

  10. Abnormal hopping conduction in semiconducting polycrystalline graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeongho; Mitchel, William C.; Elhamri, Said; Grazulis, Larry; Altfeder, Igor

    2013-07-01

    We report the observation of an abnormal carrier transport phenomenon in polycrystalline semiconducting graphene grown by solid carbon source molecular beam epitaxy. At the lowest temperatures in samples with small grain size, the conduction does not obey the two-dimensional Mott-type variable-range hopping (VRH) conduction often reported in semiconducting graphene. The hopping exponent p is found to deviate from the 1/3 value expected for Mott VRH with several samples exhibiting a p=2/5 dependence. We also show that the maximum energy difference between hopping sites is larger than the activation energy for nearest-neighbor hopping, violating the assumptions of the Mott model. The 2/5 dependence more closely agrees with the quasi-one-dimensional VRH model proposed by Fogler, Teber, and Shklovskii (FTS). In the FTS model, conduction occurs by tunneling between neighboring metallic wires. We suggest that metallic edge states and conductive grain boundaries play the role of the metallic wires in the FTS model.

  11. Sensory nerve conduction in the upper limbs at various stages of diabetic neuropathy 1

    PubMed Central

    Noël, P.

    1973-01-01

    In 59 diabetic patients, sensory nerve potentials were recorded at various sites along the course of the median nerve. Pathological responses were characterized by reduced amplitude, desynchronization and decreased conduction velocity (CV). Four groups of patients with increasingly severe nerve dysfunction were distinguished. The presence and severity of clinical neuropathy in the upper limbs could be related to decreased maximal sensory nerve CV in the proximal segment of the limbs. When maximal sensory nerve CV was normal above the wrist, neuropathy usually remained latent. In severe cases where no sensory nerve potentials could be recorded, the cerebral evoked potentials nonetheless permitted a precise evaluation of the somatosensory conduction. In these cases, maximal sensory nerve CV was very low. In five patients with a so-called diabetic mononeuropathy, abnormal nerve potentials were recorded in the median nerve, although no clinical signs could be seen in the corresponding territory. It is proposed that the diabetic nature of a mononeuropathy can be assessed by the finding of latent abnormalities in seemingly normal nerve. PMID:4753874

  12. Assessment of temporal dispersion in motor nerves with normal conduction velocity.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Mattler, W J; Jakob, M; Zierz, S

    1999-04-01

    Demyelinated nerves attenuate high-frequency components of propagating action potentials. In order to study if there is diagnostic use of this in motor nerves, the spectral energy above 49 Hz, amplitude, area, and duration of the compound muscle action potentials were measured; values after distal and proximal stimulation of posterior tibial nerves were compared. Normative data were collected in 48 control subjects. The same measurements were made in 20 patients with polyneuropathy and reduced motor nerve conduction velocity, in 21 patients with mild polyneuropathy but normal motor nerve conduction velocity, and in 8 patients with myasthenia gravis. Overall, high-frequency attenuation was closely correlated with amplitude decay (r = 0.63, P<10(-19)) and with increase of action potential duration (r = 0.34, P = 10(-5)). In the group of patients with normal NCV, high-frequency attenuation was abnormal in 9 (43%), amplitude decay was abnormal in two (10%), and area decay was abnormal in one (5%) patient. The action potential duration was normal in all of these patients. High-frequency attenuation was not influenced by stimulus intensity, thus it is not changed by conduction block, and it was not influenced by impaired neuromuscular transmission. Hence, high-frequency attenuation, both sensitively and specifically does indicate abnormal temporal dispersion. In conclusion, the simple measurement of high-frequency attenuation markedly improves detection and characterization of demyelination of human motor fibers.

  13. Comparison of Nerve Excitability Testing, Nerve Conduction Velocity, and Behavioral Observations for Acrylamide Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nerve excitability (NE) testing is a sensitive method to test for peripheral neurotoxicity in humans,and may be more sensitive than compound nerve action potential (CNAP) or nerve conduction velocity (NCV).We used acrylamide to compare the NE and CNAP/NCV methods. Behavioral test...

  14. Bupivacaine and ropivacaine: comparative effects on nerve conduction block.

    PubMed

    Bariskaner, H; Ayaz, M; Guney, F B; Dalkilic, N; Guney, O

    2007-06-01

    Unlike other drugs which act in the region of the synapse, local anesthetics are agents that reversibly block the generation and conduction of nerve impulses along a nerve fiber. This study aims to investigate the comparative inhibitions of bupivacaine and ropivacaine on the frog sciatic nerve. Isolated nerves were transferred to the nerve chamber which includes Ringer's solution. The nerves were stimulated by standard square wave pulse protocols and the responses were recorded with conventional systems. Bupivacaine (n = 8) and ropivacaine (n = 8) were administered in the nerve chamber bath with cumulative concentrations (10(-9) to 10(-3) M) and the effects were monitored for variable time periods (5, 10 and 15 min). Both bupivacaine and ropivacaine significantly depressed the compound action potential (CAP) parameters in a dose-dependent (p < 0.05) and reversible manner. Difference in the effects of these two drugs was detectable only when the dose (> or =10(-5) M) and exposure time (15 min) were increased. Percent inhibitions in maximum derivatives and latency-period measurements have shown that ropivacaine is not only fast but also much more powerful in conduction block for longer and higher doses. Bupivacaine, on the other hand, is effective in the group of fibers with relatively slower conduction velocity for all the measured doses and time periods. In conclusion, ropivacaine has a sensory specific side of action, when compared with the bupivacaine.

  15. Spatial pattern of nerve fiber abnormality indicative of pathologic mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Dyck, P. J.; Karnes, J.; O'Brien, P.; Nukada, H.; Lais, A.; Low, P.

    1984-01-01

    Estimates of the number, density, and size distribution of myelinated fibers at selected levels of roots, spinal tracts, and sampled levels of peripheral nerves may be used in the detection and characterization of alterations of motor, sensory, and autonomic neurons and their axons with development, aging and disease. Use of imaging techniques, now available, increases the reliability, versatility, and speed of such analysis. In this study, the authors evaluated the spatial pattern of fibers in sampled frames and contour areas of transverse sections of nerve fascicles, utilizing, the coefficient of variation and index of dispersion (ID), the latter extensively employed by plant ecologists. The ID was used for recognization of increased, normal, or decreased variability of density within fascicles, between fascicles, and between nerves in health and in various experimental neuropathies. In addition, various morphometric measurements were made in transverse sections at defined levels along the hind limb nerves of rats in acute and chronic ischemia, after rhizotomy and in galactose neuropathy. These stereomorphometric studies, emphasizing the number, size, shape, and spatial pattern of fibers, revealed differences among experimental neuropathies and may be found to be helpful in the characterization and prediction of pathologic mechanisms in neuropathies of unknown cause. Specifically, these approaches could be used for study of whether fiber loss in human diabetic neuropathy is multifocal and determination of the levels of such losses. PMID:6333825

  16. Differential fiber-specific block of nerve conduction in mammalian peripheral nerves using kilohertz electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogi A; Butera, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    Kilohertz electrical stimulation (KES) has been shown to induce repeatable and reversible nerve conduction block in animal models. In this study, we characterized the ability of KES stimuli to selectively block specific components of stimulated nerve activity using in vivo preparations of the rat sciatic and vagus nerves. KES stimuli in the frequency range of 5-70 kHz and amplitudes of 0.1-3.0 mA were applied. Compound action potentials were evoked using either electrical or sensory stimulation, and block of components was assessed through direct nerve recordings and muscle force measurements. Distinct observable components of the compound action potential had unique conduction block thresholds as a function of frequency of KES. The fast component, which includes motor activity, had a monotonically increasing block threshold as a function of the KES frequency. The slow component, which includes sensory activity, showed a nonmonotonic block threshold relationship with increasing KES frequency. The distinct trends with frequency of the two components enabled selective block of one component with an appropriate choice of frequency and amplitude. These trends in threshold of the two components were similar when studying electrical stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve, electrical stimulation and responses of the vagus nerve, and sensorimotor stimulation and responses of the sciatic nerve. This differential blocking effect of KES on specific fibers can extend the applications of KES conduction block to selective block and stimulation of neural signals for neuromodulation as well as selective control of neural circuits underlying sensorimotor function.

  17. Effects of clinical infrared laser on superficial radial nerve conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Greathouse, D.G.; Currier, D.P.; Gilmore, R.L.

    1985-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to demonstrate the effects of infrared laser radiation on the sensory nerve conduction of a specified peripheral nerve in man and determine temperature changes in the tissue surrounding the treated nerve. Twenty healthy adults were divided into three groups: control (n = 5); experimental (n = 10), infrared laser radiation at 20 sec/cm2; and experimental (n = 5), infrared laser radiation treatment at 120 sec/cm2. Antidromic sensory nerve conduction studies were performed on the superficial radial nerve of each subject's right forearm. The infrared laser radiation was applied at a fixed intensity for five 1-cm2 segments. Latency, amplitude, and temperature measurements were recorded pretest; posttest; and posttest intervals of 1, 3, 5, 10, and 15 minutes. An analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to examine the data. No significant change was noted in the distal sensory latency or amplitude of the evoked sensory potential in either experimental or control groups as a result of the applications of the infrared laser radiation treatment. This study demonstrates that infrared laser used at clinically applied intensities does not alter conduction of sensory nerves nor does it elevate the subcutaneous temperature.

  18. Numbness after Transradial Cardiac Catheterization: the Results from a Nerve Conduction Study of the Superficial Radial Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ho-Jun; Kim, Ji-Young; Han, Jae Deok; Lee, Hyun Jong; Kim, Je Sang; Park, Jin Sik; Choi, Rak Kyeong; Choi, Young Jin; Shim, Won-Heum; Kwon, Sung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Numbness on the hand occurs infrequently after a transradial cardiac catheterization (TRC). The symptom resembles that of neuropathy. We, therefore, investigated the prevalence, the predicting factors and the presence of neurological abnormalities of numbness, using a nerve conduction study (NCS). Subjects and Methods From April to December 2013, all patients who underwent a TRC were prospectively enrolled. From among these, the patients who experienced numbness on the ipsilateral hand were instructed to describe their symptoms using a visual analogue scale; subsequently, NCSs were performed on these patients. Results Of the total 479 patients in the study sample, numbness occurred in nine (1.8%) following the procedure. The NCS was performed for eight out of the nine patients, four (50%) of which had an abnormal NCS result at the superficial radial nerve. A larger sheath and history of myocardial infarction (p=0.14 and 0.08 respectively) tended towards the occurrence of numbness; however, only the use of size 7 French sheaths was an independent predictor for the occurrence of numbness (odds ratio: 5.50, 95% confidence interval: 1.06-28.58, p=0.042). The symptoms disappeared for all patients but one, within four months. Conclusion A transient injury of the superficial radial nerve could be one reason for numbness after a TRC. A large sheath size was an independent predictor of numbness; therefore, large sized sheaths should be used with caution when performing a TRC. PMID:27014346

  19. A conduction block in sciatic nerves can be detected by magnetic motor root stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Konoma, Yuko; Fujii, Kengo; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Terao, Yasuo; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-15

    Useful diagnostic techniques for the acute phase of sciatic nerve palsy, an entrapment neuropathy, are not well established. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the diagnostic utility of magnetic sacral motor root stimulation for sciatic nerve palsy. We analyzed the peripheral nerves innervating the abductor hallucis muscle using both electrical stimulations at the ankle and knee and magnetic stimulations at the neuro-foramina and conus medullaris levels in a patient with sciatic nerve palsy at the level of the piriformis muscle due to gluteal compression related to alcohol consumption. On the fourth day after onset, magnetic sacral motor root stimulation using a MATS coil (the MATS coil stimulation method) clearly revealed a conduction block between the knee and the sacral neuro-foramina. Two weeks after onset, needle electromyography supported the existence of the focal lesion. The MATS coil stimulation method clearly revealed a conduction block in the sciatic nerve and is therefore a useful diagnostic tool for the abnormal neurophysiological findings associated with sciatic nerve palsy even at the acute phase.

  20. Establishing improved normal values for nerve conduction studies.

    PubMed

    Buschbacher, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    Nerve conduction studies are commonly performed to diagnose injuries of the peripheral nerves. In the past, normal ranges have been derived on relatively small samples of normal subjects. These ranges were often suboptimal for clinical use. Therefore, this series of articles was created to establish an improved database of normative values. It highlights the key contributions of a number of authors. In this foreword, the contributions of the various authors to the special issue on the development of an improved database for nerve conduction studies are described. The authors are introduced, including their training, gifts, and which articles they were involved in writing. In addition, there is a brief review of each of the articles in this special supplement. The fundamentals of ulnar motor nerve conduction to the first dorsal interosseous muscle are described, as is the contribution of Nate Prahlow, MD. In addition, the median motor nerve conduction to the pronator teres muscle and flexor carpi radialis muscle is highlighted including the contributions of Brian Foley, MD. The radial sensory nerve and dorsal ulnar cutaneous sensory nerve studies are described, as well as the contributions of Van Evanoff, Jr., MD, in creating this research. Median motor conduction to the lumbrical muscles and ulnar motor conduction to the palmar interosseous muscles are described, again highlighting the contributions of Dr. Foley. In addition, medial and lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve studies are described, along with the contributions of Dr. Nathan Prahlow. Median and ulnar sensory conduction studies recording from the fourth digit, as well as median and radial sensory conduction to the first digit, are described, as are the contributions of James Lohman, MD, and Andrew Berkson, DO. The side-to-side differences in median and ulnar sensory conduction studies and the importance of performing such studies are described, as are the contributions in this research of Dr. Nathan

  1. Preliminary Study on the Lesion Location and Prognosis of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome by Motor Nerve Conduction Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhu; Jia, Zhi-Rong; Wang, Ting-Ting; Shi, Xin; Liang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background: To study lesions’ location and prognosis of cubital tunnel syndrome (CubTS) by routine motor nerve conduction studies (MNCSs) and short-segment nerve conduction studies (SSNCSs, inching test). Methods: Thirty healthy subjects were included and 60 ulnar nerves were studied by inching studies for normal values. Sixty-six patients who diagnosed CubTS clinically were performed bilaterally by routine MNCSs and SSNCSs. Follow-up for 1-year, the information of brief complaints, clinical symptoms, and physical examination were collected. Results: Sixty-six patients were included, 88 of nerves was abnormal by MNCS, while 105 was abnormal by the inching studies. Medial epicondyle to 2 cm above medial epicondyle is the most common segment to be detected abnormally (59.09%), P < 0.01. Twenty-two patients were followed-up, 17 patients’ symptoms were improved. Most of the patients were treated with drugs and modification of bad habits. Conclusions: (1) SSNCSs can detect lesions of compressive neuropathy in CubTS more precisely than the routine motor conduction studies. (2) SSNCSs can diagnose CubTS more sensitively than routine motor conduction studies. (3) In this study, we found that medial epicondyle to 2 cm above the medial epicondyle is the most vulnerable place that the ulnar nerve compressed. (4) The patients had a better prognosis who were abnormal in motor nerve conduction time only, but not amplitude in compressed lesions than those who were abnormal both in velocity and amplitude. Our study suggests that SSNCSs is a practical method in detecting ulnar nerve compressed neuropathy, and sensitive in diagnosing CubTS. The compound muscle action potentials by SSNCSs may predict prognosis of CubTS. PMID:25947398

  2. Morphometric Brain Abnormalities in Boys with Conduct Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Thomas; Vloet, Timo D.; Marx, Ivo; Konrad, Kerstin; Fink, Gereon R.; Herpertz, Sabine C.; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate

    2008-01-01

    Conduct disorder (CD) is associated with antisocial personality behavior that violates the basic rights of others. Results, on examining the structural brain aberrations in boys' CD, show that boys with CD and cormobid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder showed abnormalities in frontolimbic areas that could contribute to antisocial…

  3. Distribution of pressure-induced fast axonal transport abnormalities in primate optic nerve. An autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L

    1981-07-01

    The distribution of transport abnormalities in primate optic nerve from eyes subjected to five hours of pressure elevation (perfusion pressure of 35 mm Hg) was studied. Tissue autoradiography and electron microscopy were used to localize regions of the lamina cribrosa with increased transport interruption. A preferential involvement by this transport abnormality involved the superior, temporal, and inferior portions, to the exclusion of the nasal portion, of the optic nerve head. This observation supports the hypothesis that transport interruption seen in this model may be pertinent to the study of clinical glaucomatous neuropathy.

  4. Optic nerve fast axonal transport abnormalities in primates. Occurrence after short posterior ciliary artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L

    1980-11-01

    Fast axonal transport abnormalities in primate (Aotus trivirgatus) optic nerve were studied in ten eyes at various intervals after occlusion of the lateral short posterior ciliary circulation. Evidence of focal axonal ischemia, as indicated by swelling of mitochondria and dissolution of cytoplasmic detail, was noted as early as one hour after occlusion. Accumulation of mitochondria, microvesicles, and dense bodies, indicating focal interruption of axonal transport mechanisms, was noted in eyes examined at 2, 4, and 6 hours. This accumulation of organelles was limited to the region of the lamina cribrosa. Nerve head abnormalities were not seen in two eyes studied at two weeks.

  5. Insulin Pump Therapy Is Associated with Lower Rates of Retinopathy and Peripheral Nerve Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Zabeen, Bedowra; Craig, Maria E.; Virk, Sohaib A.; Pryke, Alison; Chan, Albert K. F.; Cho, Yoon Hi; Benitez-Aguirre, Paul Z.; Hing, Stephen; Donaghue, Kim C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare rates of microvascular complications in adolescents with type 1 diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) versus multiple daily injections (MDI). Research Design and Methods Prospective cohort of 989 patients (aged 12–20 years; diabetes duration >5 years) treated with CSII or MDI for >12 months. Microvascular complications were assessed from 2000–14: early retinopathy (seven-field fundal photography), peripheral nerve function (thermal and vibration threshold testing), autonomic nerve abnormality (heart rate variability analysis of electrocardiogram recordings) and albuminuria (albumin creatinine ratio/timed overnight albumin excretion). Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to examine the relationship between treatment and complications rates, adjusting for socio-economic status (SES) and known risk factors including HbA1c and diabetes duration. Results Comparing CSII with MDI: HbA1C was 8.6% [70mmol/mol] vs. 8.7% [72 mmol/mol]) (p = 0.7), retinopathy 17% vs. 22% (p = 0.06); microalbuminuria 1% vs. 4% (p = 0.07), peripheral nerve abnormality 27% vs. 33% (p = 0.108) and autonomic nerve abnormality 24% vs. 28% (p = 0.401). In multivariable GEE, CSII use was associated with lower rates of retinopathy (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.45–0.95, p = 0.029) and peripheral nerve abnormality (OR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42–0.95, p = 0.026), but not albuminuria (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.10–2.17, p = 0.33). SES was not associated with any of the complication outcomes. Conclusions In adolescents, CSII use is associated with lower rates of retinopathy and peripheral nerve abnormality, suggesting an apparent benefit of CSII over MDI independent of glycemic control or SES. PMID:27050468

  6. Combined KHFAC + DC nerve block without onset or reduced nerve conductivity after block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Manfred; Vrabec, Tina; Wainright, Jesse; Bhadra, Niloy; Bhadra, Narendra; Kilgore, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Kilohertz frequency alternating current (KHFAC) waveforms have been shown to provide peripheral nerve conductivity block in many acute and chronic animal models. KHFAC nerve block could be used to address multiple disorders caused by neural over-activity, including blocking pain and spasticity. However, one drawback of KHFAC block is a transient activation of nerve fibers during the initiation of the nerve block, called the onset response. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using charge balanced direct current (CBDC) waveforms to temporarily block motor nerve conductivity distally to the KHFAC electrodes to mitigate the block onset-response. Approach. A total of eight animals were used in this study. A set of four animals were used to assess feasibility and reproducibility of a combined KHFAC + CBDC block. A following randomized study, conducted on a second set of four animals, compared the onset response resulting from KHFAC alone and combined KHFAC + CBDC waveforms. To quantify the onset, peak forces and the force-time integral were measured during KHFAC block initiation. Nerve conductivity was monitored throughout the study by comparing muscle twitch forces evoked by supra-maximal stimulation proximal and distal to the block electrodes. Each animal of the randomized study received at least 300 s (range: 318-1563 s) of cumulative dc to investigate the impact of combined KHFAC + CBDC on nerve viability. Main results. The peak onset force was reduced significantly from 20.73 N (range: 18.6-26.5 N) with KHFAC alone to 0.45 N (range: 0.2-0.7 N) with the combined CBDC and KHFAC block waveform (p < 0.001). The area under the force curve was reduced from 6.8 Ns (range: 3.5-21.9 Ns) to 0.54 Ns (range: 0.18-0.86 Ns) (p < 0.01). No change in nerve conductivity was observed after application of the combined KHFAC + CBDC block relative to KHFAC waveforms. Significance. The distal application of CBDC can significantly reduce or even

  7. Electrical stimulation of nerve cells using conductive nanofibrous scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Morshed, Mohammad; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2009-11-01

    Fabrication of scaffolds with suitable chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties is critical for the success of nerve tissue engineering. Electrical stimulation was directly applied to electrospun conductive nanofibrous scaffolds to enhance the nerve regeneration process. In the present study, electrospun conductive nanofibers were prepared by mixing 10 and 15 wt% doped polyaniline (PANI) with poly (epsilon-caprolactone)/gelatin (PG) (70:30) solution (PANI/PG) by electrospinning. The fiber diameter, pore size, hydrophilicity, tensile properties, conductivity, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra of nanofibers were determined, and the in vitro biodegradability of the different nanofibrous scaffolds was also evaluated. Nanofibrous scaffolds containing 15% PANI was found to exhibit the most balanced properties to meet all the required specifications for electrical stimulation for its enhanced conductivity and is used for in vitro culture and electrical stimulation of nerve stem cells. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay and scanning electron microscopy results showed that conductive nanofibrous scaffolds are suitable substrates for the attachment and proliferation of nerve stem cells. Electrical stimulation through conductive nanofibrous PANI/PG scaffolds showed enhanced cell proliferation and neurite outgrowth compared to the PANI/PG scaffolds that were not subjected to electrical stimulation.

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Lateral Femoral Cutaneous Nerve Conduction Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bum Jun; Joeng, Eui Soo; Choi, Jun Kyu; Kang, Seok; Yoon, Joon Shik

    2015-01-01

    Objective To verify the utility of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) ultrasound-guided conduction technique compared to that of the conventional nerve conduction technique. Methods Fifty-eight legs of 29 healthy participants (18 males and 11 females; mean age, 42.7±14.9 years) were recruited. The conventional technique was performed bilaterally. The LFCN was localized by ultrasound. Cross-sectional area (CSA) of the LFCN and the distance between the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) and the LFCN was measured. The nerve conduction study was repeated with the corrected cathode location. Sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitudes of the LFCN were recorded and compared between the ultrasound-guided and conventional techniques. Results Mean body mass index of the participants was 23.7±3.5 kg/m2, CSA was 4.2±1.9 mm2, and the distance between the ASIS and LFCN was 5.6±1.7 mm. The mean amplitude values were 6.07±0.52 µV and 6.66±0.54 µV using the conventional and ultrasound-guided techniques, respectively. The SNAP amplitude of the LFCN using the ultrasound-guided technique was significantly larger than that recorded using the conventional technique. Conclusion Correcting the stimulation position using the ultrasound-guided technique helped obtain increased SNAP amplitude. PMID:25750871

  9. Neurological Assessment and Nerve Conduction Study Findings in 22 Patients with Alkaptonuria from Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Alrawashdeh, Omar; Alsbou, Mohammad; Alzoubi, Hamed; Al-shagahin, Hani

    2017-01-01

    Alkaptonuria is a rare metabolic disease characterised by accumulative deposition of homogentisic acid in the connective tissue of the body. This results in early degeneration of tendons, cartilages, heart valves, and other tissues. The main objective of the study is to examine the possibility of the nervous system involvement in patients with alkaptonuria The sample consists of two groups; 22 patients with AKU and 20 controls. A neurological assessment has been carried out including detailed medical history, neurological examination, and a nerve conduction study of the nerves of the dominant hand. The prevalence of any abnormality was compared between the two groups using chi square test. The mean values of the nerve conduction study were compared between the two groups using student t-test. There was a higher prevalence of low back pain, hearing problems and tinnitus, numbness and neuropathic pain in alkaptonuria patients. There was no significant difference between the two groups in other conditions such as seizures, headache, and syncope. The values of the nerve conduction study did not show significant difference between the two groups. Neurologically related symptoms in alkaptonuria mostly represent complications of the connective tissue degeneration rather than direct involvement of the nervous system. This has been supported further by the normal findings of the neurophysiology study in patients with alkaptonuria. PMID:28217270

  10. The medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve: antidromic and orthodromic conduction studies.

    PubMed

    Seror, Paul

    2002-09-01

    Medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve (MABCN) conduction studies were performed antidromically and orthodromically in 70 control subjects to determine normal values and define the lower limits of normality. The mean sensory action potential (SAP) amplitudes were 17.7 and 17.5 microV and the sensory conduction velocities were 60 and 61 m/s, respectively, with the antidromic and orthodromic techniques. With both techniques, no SAP amplitude was lower than 6 microV. The lower limits of normal of the interside amplitude ratio were 1.66 when both techniques were used and 2.0 when only one was used.

  11. [Physiological approach to peripheral neuropathy. Conventional nerve conduction studies and magnetic motor root stimulation].

    PubMed

    Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2004-11-01

    In this communication, I first show some points we should mind in the conventional peripheral nerve conduction studies and later present clinical usefulness of motor root stimulation for peripheral neuropathy. CONVENTIONAL NERVE CONDUCTION STUDIES (NCS): The most important point revealed by the conventional NCSs is whether neuropathy is due to axonal degeneration or demyelinating process. Precise clinical examination with this neurophysiological information leads us to a diagnosis and treatment. Poor clinical examination makes these findings useless. Long standing axonal degeneration sometimes induces secondary demyelination at the most distal part of involved nerves. On the other hand, severe segmental demyelination often provokes secondary axonal degeneration at distal parts to the site of demyelination. These secondary changes show the same abnormal neurophysiological findings as those of the primary involvement. We should be careful of this possibility when interpreting the results of NCS. NCS of sensory nerves is not good at revealing demyelinating process. Mild temporal dispersion of potentials often reduces an amplitude of SNAP or loss of responses, which usually suggests axonal degeneration, because of short duration of sensory nerve potentials. MOTOR ROOT STIMULATION IN PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY: Magnetic stimulation with a coil placed over the spine activates motor roots and evokes EMG responses from upper and lower limb muscles. The site of activation with this method was determined to be where the motor roots exit from the spinal canal (intervertebral foramina) (J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 52 (9): 1025-1032, 1989) because induced currents are very dense at such a foramen made by electric resistant bones. In several kinds of peripheral neuropathy, this method has been used to detect a lesion at a proximal part of the peripheral nerves which can not be detected by the conventional NCSs. I present a few cases in whom motor root stimulation had a clinical

  12. Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity In Postmenopausal Women with Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Naiyer; Singh, Paras Nath; Hossain, Mohd Mobarak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The post-menopausal phase is characterized by a decline in the serum oestrogen and progesterone levels. This phase is also associated with higher incidence of peripheral neuropathy. Aim To explore the relationship between the peripheral motor nerve status and serum oestrogen and progesterone levels through assessment of Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity (MNCV) in post-menopausal women with peripheral neuropathy. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College during 2011-2013. The study included 30 post-menopausal women with peripheral neuropathy (age: 51.4±7.9) and 30 post-menopausal women without peripheral neuropathy (control) (age: 52.5±4.9). They were compared for MNCV in median, ulnar and common peroneal nerves and serum levels of oestrogen and progesterone estimated through enzyme immunoassays. To study the relationship between hormone levels and MNCV, a stepwise linear regression analysis was done. Results The post-menopausal women with peripheral neuropathy had significantly lower MNCV and serum oestrogen and progesterone levels as compared to control subjects. Stepwise linear regression analysis showed oestrogen with main effect on MNCV. Conclusion The findings of the present study suggest that while the post-menopausal age group is at a greater risk of peripheral neuropathy, it is the decline in the serum estrogen levels which is critical in the development of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:28208850

  13. Multidimensional conducting polymer nanotubes for ultrasensitive chemical nerve agent sensing.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Seok; Park, Seon Joo; Lee, Jun Seop; Park, Eunyu; Kim, Taejoon; Park, Hyun-Woo; You, Sun Ah; Yoon, Hyeonseok; Jang, Jyongsik

    2012-06-13

    Tailoring the morphology of materials in the nanometer regime is vital to realizing enhanced device performance. Here, we demonstrate flexible nerve agent sensors, based on hydroxylated poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanotubes (HPNTs) with surface substructures such as nanonodules (NNs) and nanorods (NRs). The surface substructures can be grown on a nanofiber surface by controlling critical synthetic conditions during vapor deposition polymerization (VDP) on the polymer nanotemplate, leading to the formation of multidimensional conducting polymer nanostructures. Hydroxyl groups are found to interact with the nerve agents. Representatively, the sensing response of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) as a simulant for sarin is highly sensitive and reversible from the aligned nanotubes. The minimum detection limit is as low as 10 ppt. Additionally, the sensor had excellent mechanical bendability and durability.

  14. Electrical conduction block in large nerves: high-frequency current delivery in the nonhuman primate.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, D Michael; Ethier, Christian; Foldes, Emily L; Oby, Emily R; Tyler, Dustin; Bauman, Matt; Bhadra, Niloy; Miller, Lee; Kilgore, Kevin L

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies have made significant progress toward the clinical implementation of high-frequency conduction block (HFB) of peripheral nerves. However, these studies were performed in small nerves, and questions remain regarding the nature of HFB in large-diameter nerves. This study in nonhuman primates shows reliable conduction block in large-diameter nerves (up to 4.1 mm) with relatively low-threshold current amplitude and only moderate nerve discharge prior to the onset of block.

  15. Fibrosis, Connexin-43, and Conduction Abnormalities in the Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nademanee, Koonlawee; Raju, Hariharan; de Noronha, Sofia V.; Papadakis, Michael; Robinson, Laurence; Rothery, Stephen; Makita, Naomasa; Kowase, Shinya; Boonmee, Nakorn; Vitayakritsirikul, Vorapot; Ratanarapee, Samrerng; Sharma, Sanjay; van der Wal, Allard C.; Christiansen, Michael; Tan, Hanno L.; Wilde, Arthur A.; Nogami, Akihiko; Sheppard, Mary N.; Veerakul, Gumpanart; Behr, Elijah R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) is acknowledged to be responsible for arrhythmogenesis in Brugada syndrome (BrS), but the pathophysiology remains controversial. Objectives This study assessed the substrate underlying BrS at post-mortem and in vivo, and the role for open thoracotomy ablation. Methods Six whole hearts from male post-mortem cases of unexplained sudden death (mean age 23.2 years) with negative specialist cardiac autopsy and familial BrS were used and matched to 6 homograft control hearts by sex and age (within 3 years) by random risk set sampling. Cardiac autopsy sections from cases and control hearts were stained with picrosirius red for collagen. The RVOT was evaluated in detail, including immunofluorescent stain for connexin-43 (Cx43). Collagen and Cx43 were quantified digitally and compared. An in vivo study was undertaken on 6 consecutive BrS patients (mean age 39.8 years, all men) during epicardial RVOT ablation for arrhythmia via thoracotomy. Abnormal late and fractionated potentials indicative of slowed conduction were identified, and biopsies were taken before ablation. Results Collagen was increased in BrS autopsy cases compared with control hearts (odds ratio [OR]: 1.42; p = 0.026). Fibrosis was greatest in the RVOT (OR: 1.98; p = 0.003) and the epicardium (OR: 2.00; p = 0.001). The Cx43 signal was reduced in BrS RVOT (OR: 0.59; p = 0.001). Autopsy and in vivo RVOT samples identified epicardial and interstitial fibrosis. This was collocated with abnormal potentials in vivo that, when ablated, abolished the type 1 Brugada electrocardiogram without ventricular arrhythmia over 24.6 ± 9.7 months. Conclusions BrS is associated with epicardial surface and interstitial fibrosis and reduced gap junction expression in the RVOT. This collocates to abnormal potentials, and their ablation abolishes the BrS phenotype and life-threatening arrhythmias. BrS is also associated with increased collagen throughout the heart

  16. Reversible Nerve Conduction Block Using Kilohertz Frequency Alternating Current

    PubMed Central

    Kilgore, Kevin L.; Bhadra, Niloy

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The features and clinical applications of balanced-charge kilohertz frequency alternating currents (KHFAC) are reviewed. Preclinical studies of KHFAC block have demonstrated that it can produce an extremely rapid and reversible block of nerve conduction. Recent systematic analysis and experimentation utilizing KHFAC block has resulted in a significant increase in interest in KHFAC block, both scientifically and clinically. Materials and Methods We review the history and characteristics of KHFAC block, the methods used to investigate this type of block, the experimental evaluation of block, and the electrical parameters and electrode designs needed to achieve successful block. We then analyze the existing clinical applications of high frequency currents, comparing the early results with the known features of KHFAC block. Results Although many features of KHFAC block have been characterized, there is still much that is unknown regarding the response of neural structures to rapidly fluctuating electrical fields. The clinical reports to date do not provide sufficient information to properly evaluate the mechanisms that result in successful or unsuccessful treatment. Conclusions KHFAC nerve block has significant potential as a means of controlling nerve activity for the purpose of treating disease. However, early clinical studies in the use of high frequency currents for the treatment of pain have not been designed to elucidate mechanisms or allow direct comparisons to preclinical data. We strongly encourage the careful reporting of the parameters utilized in these clinical studies, as well as the development of outcome measures that could illuminate the mechanisms of this modality. PMID:23924075

  17. MRI abnormalities of peripheral nerve and muscle are common in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and share features with multifocal motor neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Staff, Nathan P.; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Howe, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction MRI of peripheral nerve and muscle in patients with ALS may be performed to investigate alternative diagnoses including multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). MRI findings of peripheral nerve and muscle are not well described in these conditions, making interpretation of results difficult. Methods We examined systematically the peripheral nerve and muscle MRI findings in patients with ALS (n=60) and MMN (n=8). Results In patients with ALS and MMN, abnormal MRIs were common (85% and 75%, respectively) but did not correlate with disease severity. Peripheral nerve MRI abnormalities were similar in frequency (ALS: 58% vs. MMN: 63%) with most changes being of mild-to-moderate severity. Muscle MRI changes were more common in ALS (57% vs. 33%), and no muscle atrophy was seen in patients with MMN. Discussion MRI abnormalities of peripheral nerve and muscle in ALS and MMN are common and share some features. PMID:25736373

  18. The action of local anesthetics on myelin structure and nerve conduction in toad sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Mateu, L; Morán, O; Padrón, R; Borgo, M; Vonasek, E; Márquez, G; Luzzati, V

    1997-06-01

    X-ray scattering and electrophysiological experiments were performed on toad sciatic nerves in the presence of local anesthetics. In vitro experiments were performed on dissected nerves superfused with Ringer's solutions containing procaine, lidocaine, tetracaine, or dibucaine. In vivo experiments were performed on nerves dissected from animals anesthesized by targeted injections of tetracaine-containing solutions. In all cases the anesthetics were found to have the same effects on the x-ray scattering spectra: the intensity ratio of the even-order to the odd-order reflections increases and the lattice parameter increases. These changes are reversible upon removal of the anesthetic. The magnitude of the structural changes varies with the duration of the superfusion and with the nature and concentration of the anesthetic molecule. A striking quantitative correlation was observed between the structural effects and the potency of the anesthetic. Electron density profiles, which hardly showed any structural alteration of the unit membrane, clearly indicated that the anesthetics have the effect of moving the pairs of membranes apart by increasing the thickness of the cytoplasmic space. Electrophysiological measurements performed on the very samples used in the x-ray scattering experiments showed that the amplitude of the compound action potential is affected earlier than the structure of myelin (as revealed by the x-ray scattering experiments), whereas conduction velocity closely follows the structural alterations.

  19. Spontaneous temporal changes and variability of peripheral nerve conduction analyzed using a random effects model.

    PubMed

    Krøigård, Thomas; Gaist, David; Otto, Marit; Højlund, Dorthe; Selmar, Peter E; Sindrup, Søren H

    2014-08-01

    The reproducibility of variables commonly included in studies of peripheral nerve conduction in healthy individuals has not previously been analyzed using a random effects regression model. We examined the temporal changes and variability of standard nerve conduction measures in the leg. Peroneal nerve distal motor latency, motor conduction velocity, and compound motor action potential amplitude; sural nerve sensory action potential amplitude and sensory conduction velocity; and tibial nerve minimal F-wave latency were examined in 51 healthy subjects, aged 40 to 67 years. They were reexamined after 2 and 26 weeks. There was no change in the variables except for a minor decrease in sural nerve sensory action potential amplitude and a minor increase in tibial nerve minimal F-wave latency. Reproducibility was best for peroneal nerve distal motor latency and motor conduction velocity, sural nerve sensory conduction velocity, and tibial nerve minimal F-wave latency. Between-subject variability was greater than within-subject variability. Sample sizes ranging from 21 to 128 would be required to show changes twice the magnitude of the spontaneous changes observed in this study. Nerve conduction studies have a high reproducibility, and variables are mainly unaltered during 6 months. This study provides a solid basis for the planning of future clinical trials assessing changes in nerve conduction.

  20. Detecting abnormality in optic nerve head images using a feature extraction analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haogang; Poostchi, Ali; Vernon, Stephen A; Crabb, David P

    2014-07-01

    Imaging and evaluation of the optic nerve head (ONH) plays an essential part in the detection and clinical management of glaucoma. The morphological characteristics of ONHs vary greatly from person to person and this variability means it is difficult to quantify them in a standardized way. We developed and evaluated a feature extraction approach using shift-invariant wavelet packet and kernel principal component analysis to quantify the shape features in ONH images acquired by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (Heidelberg Retina Tomograph [HRT]). The methods were developed and tested on 1996 eyes from three different clinical centers. A shape abnormality score (SAS) was developed from extracted features using a Gaussian process to identify glaucomatous abnormality. SAS can be used as a diagnostic index to quantify the overall likelihood of ONH abnormality. Maps showing areas of likely abnormality within the ONH were also derived. Diagnostic performance of the technique, as estimated by ROC analysis, was significantly better than the classification tools currently used in the HRT software - the technique offers the additional advantage of working with all images and is fully automated.

  1. Relation between abnormal patterns of muscle activation and response to common peroneal nerve stimulation in hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Burridge, J; McLellan, D

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the relation between response to common peroneal nerve stimulation, timed to the swing phase of walking, and abnormal ankle movement and muscle activation patterns.
METHOD—Eighteen patients who took part had a drop foot and had had a stroke at least 6 months before the study Twelve age matched normal subjects were also studied. Response to stimulation was measured by changes in the speed and effort of walking when the stimulator was used. Speed was measured over 10 m and effort by the physiological cost index. Abnormal ankle movement and muscle activation were measured in a rig by ability to follow a tracking signal moving sinusoidally at either 1 or 2 Hz, resistance to passive movement, and EMG activity during both passive and active movements. Indices were derived to define EMG response to passive stretch, coactivation, and ability to activate muscles appropriately during active movement
RESULTS—Different mechanisms underlying the drop foot were seen. Results showed that patients who had poor control of ankle movement and spasticity, demonstrated by stretch reflex and coactivation, were more likely to respond well to stimulation. Those with mechanical resistance to passive movement and with normal muscle activation responded less well.
CONCLUSIONS—The results support the hypothesis that stimulation of the common peroneal nerve to elicit a contraction of the anterior tibial muscles also inhibits the antagonist calf muscles. The technique used may be useful in directing physiotherapy by indicating the underlying cause of the drop foot.

 PMID:10945810

  2. Different clinical electrodes achieve similar electrical nerve conduction block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boger, Adam; Bhadra, Narendra; Gustafson, Kenneth J.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. We aim to evaluate the suitability of four electrodes previously used in clinical experiments for peripheral nerve electrical block applications. Approach. We evaluated peripheral nerve electrical block using three such clinical nerve cuff electrodes (the Huntington helix, the Case self-sizing Spiral and the flat interface nerve electrode) and one clinical intramuscular electrode (the Memberg electrode) in five cats. Amplitude thresholds for the block using 12 or 25 kHz voltage-controlled stimulation, onset response, and stimulation thresholds before and after block testing were determined. Main results. Complete nerve block was achieved reliably and the onset response to blocking stimulation was similar for all electrodes. Amplitude thresholds for the block were lowest for the Case Spiral electrode (4 ± 1 Vpp) and lower for the nerve cuff electrodes (7 ± 3 Vpp) than for the intramuscular electrode (26 ± 10 Vpp). A minor elevation in stimulation threshold and reduction in stimulus-evoked urethral pressure was observed during testing, but the effect was temporary and did not vary between electrodes. Significance. Multiple clinical electrodes appear suitable for neuroprostheses using peripheral nerve electrical block. The freedom to choose electrodes based on secondary criteria such as ease of implantation or cost should ease translation of electrical nerve block to clinical practice.

  3. NERVE GROWTH FACTOR MAINTAINS POTASSIUM CONDUCTANCE AFTER NERVE INJURY IN ADULT CUTANEOUS AFFERENT DORSAL ROOT GANGLION NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    EVERILL, B.; KOCSIS, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    Whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were used to study the effects of nerve growth factor on voltage-dependent potassium conductance in normal and axotomized identified large cutaneous afferent dorsal root ganglion neurons (48–50 μm diameter) many of which probably give rise to myelinated Aβ fibers. K-currents were isolated by blocking Na- and Ca-currents with appropriate ion replacement and channel blockers. Separation of current components was achieved on the basis of response to variation in conditioning voltage. Cutaneous afferents were labeled by the retrograde marker hydroxy-stilbamide (FluoroGold) which was injected into the skin of the foot. The sciatic nerve was either ligated or crushed with fine forceps five to seven days later. Neurons were dissociated 14–17 days after injury. The cut ends of the sciatic nerves were positioned into polyethylene tubes, which were connected to mini-osmotic pumps filled with either nerve growth factor or sterile saline. Control neurons displayed a prominent sustained K-current and the transient potassium currents “A” and “D”. Nerve ligation, which blocks target reconnection resulted in near 50% reduction of total outward current; isolated sustained K-current and transient A-current were reduced by a comparable amount. Nerve crush, which allows regeneration to peripheral targets and exposure of the regenerating nerve to the distal nerve segment, resulted in a small reduction in sustained K-current but no reduction in transient A-current compared to controls. Levels of transient A-current and sustained K-current were maintained at control levels after nerve growth factor treatment. These results indicate that the large reduction in transient A-current, and in sustained K-current, observed in cutaneous afferent cell bodies after nerve ligation is prevented by application of nerve growth factor. PMID:11008179

  4. A case of optic-nerve hypoplasia and anterior segment abnormality associated with facial cleft

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Tomoko; Kojima, Shota; Sugiyama, Tetsuya; Ueki, Mari; Sugasawa, Jun; Oku, Hidehiro; Tajiri, Kensuke; Shigemura, Yuka; Ueda, Koichi; Harada, Atsuko; Yamasaki, Mami; Yamanaka, Takumi; Utsunomiya, Hidetsuna; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of facial cleft is rare and ranges between 1.43 and 4.85 per 100,000 births. To date, there have been few reports of detailed ophthalmologic examinations performed in cases of facial cleft. Here, we report a case of optic-nerve hypoplasia and anterior segment abnormality associated with facial cleft. Case report A 9-day-old female infant was delivered by cesarian section at 34 weeks of gestational age (the second baby of twins) and weighed 2,276 g upon presentation. She had a facial cleft and ectrodactyly at birth. Right eye-dominant blepharophimosis was obvious. Examination of the right eye revealed inferior corneal opacity with vascularization, downward corectopia, and optic-nerve hypoplasia. The corneal diameter was 8 mm in both eyes, and tonometry by use of a Tono-Pen® XL (Reichert Technologies, Depew, NY, USA) handheld applanation tonometer revealed that her intraocular pressure was 11–22 mmHg (Oculus Dexter) and 8 mmHg (Oculus Sinister). B-mode echo revealed no differences in axial length between her right and left eyes. When she was 15–16 months old, we attempted to examine her eyes before she underwent plastic surgery under general anesthesia. She had a small optic disc in both eyes and the right-eye disc was tilted. After undergoing canthotomy, gonioscopy and ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed that almost all directions were open except for the peripheral anterior synechia. Since magnetic resonance imaging revealed ventriculomegaly associated with an interhemispheric cyst at birth, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was inserted at 12 days of age. At 25 months of age, her condition suddenly deteriorated due to occlusion of the ventricular shunt catheter, and she died 5 days later. In this patient, amniotic band syndrome was presumed to be the primary cause due to the clinical findings. Conclusion We experienced a case of optic-nerve hypoplasia and anterior segment abnormality that occurred with facial cleft. The cause of these

  5. Nerve conduction block using combined thermoelectric cooling and high frequency electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, D Michael; Foldes, Emily L; Bhadra, Niloy; Kilgore, Kevin L

    2010-10-30

    Conduction block of peripheral nerves is an important technique for many basic and applied neurophysiology studies. To date, there has not been a technique which provides a quickly initiated and reversible "on-demand" conduction block which is both sustainable for long periods of time and does not generate activity in the nerve at the onset of the conduction block. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of a combined method of nerve block which utilizes two well established nerve blocking techniques in a rat and cat model: nerve cooling and electrical block using high frequency alternating currents (HFAC). This combined method effectively makes use of the contrasting features of both nerve cooling and electrical block using HFAC. The conduction block was initiated using nerve cooling, a technique which does not produce nerve "onset response" firing, a prohibitive drawback of HFAC electrical block. The conduction block was then readily transitioned into an electrical block. A long-term electrical block is likely preferential to a long-term nerve cooling block because nerve cooling block generates large amounts of exhaust heat, does not allow for fiber diameter selectivity and is known to be unsafe for prolonged delivery.

  6. Effect of pioglitazone on nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel in type 2 diabetes patients

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Sudip; Sanyal, Debmalya; Das Choudhury, Sourav; Bandyopadhyay, Mili; Chakraborty, Suraj; Mukherjee, Arabinda

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the impact of pioglitazone pharmacotherapy in median nerve electrophysiology in the carpal tunnel among type 2 diabetes patients. METHODS The study was executed in patients with type 2 diabetes, treated with oral drugs, categorized under pioglitazone or non-pioglitazone group (14 in each group), and who received electrophysiological evaluation by nerve conduction velocity at baseline and 3 mo. RESULTS At 3 mo, pioglitazone-category had inferior amplitude in sensory median nerve [8.5 interquartile range (IQR) = 6.5 to 11.5) vs non-pioglitazone 14.5 (IQR 10.5 to 18.75)] (P = 0.002). Non-pioglitazone category displayed amelioration in amplitude in the sensory median nerve [baseline 13 (IQR = 9 to 16.25) vs 3 mo 8.5 (IQR = 6.5 to 11.5)] (P = 0.01) and amplitude in motor median nerve [baseline 9 (IQR = 4.75 to 11) vs 3 mo 6.75 (IQR = 4.75 to 10.25)] (P = 0.049); and deterioration of terminal latency of in motor ulnar nerve [baseline 2.07 (IQR = 1.92 to 2.25) vs 3 mo 2.16 (IQR = 1.97 to 2.325)] (P = 0.043). There was amelioration of terminal latency in sensory ulnar nerve [baseline 2.45 (IQR = 2.315 to 2.88) vs 3 mo 2.37 (IQR = 2.275 to 2.445) for pioglitazone group (P = 0.038). CONCLUSION Treatment with pioglitazone accentuates probability of compressive neuropathy. In spite of comparable glycemic control over 3 mo, patients treated with pioglitazone showed superior electrophysiological parameters for the ulnar nerve. Pioglitazone has favourable outcome in nerve electrophysiology which was repealed when the nerve was subjected to compressive neuropathy. PMID:27895823

  7. Abnormal intracellular calcium homeostasis associated with vulnerability in the nerve cells from heroin-dependent rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoshan; Wang, Guangyong; Pu, Hongwei; Jing, Hualan

    2014-07-14

    The cellular mechanisms by which opiate addiction develops with repetitive use remain largely unresolved. Intercellular calcium homeostasis is one of the most critical elements to determine neuroadaptive changes and neuronal fate. Heroin, one of the most addictive opiates, may induce neurotoxicity potentially inducing brain impairment, especially for those chronic users who get an overdose. Here we examined changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) after repeated exposure to heroin using cultured cerebral cortical neurons. Dynamic changes in [Ca2+]i indicated by fluo-3-AM were monitored using confocal laser scan microscopy, followed by cytotoxicity assessments. It showed that the cells dissociated from heroin-dependent rats had a smaller depolarization-induced [Ca2+]i responses, and a higher elevation in [Ca2+]i when challenged with a high concentration of heroin (500 μM). The restoration ability to remove calcium after washout of these stimulants was impaired. Calcium channel blocker verapamil inhibited the heroin-induced [Ca2+]i elevations as well as the heroin-induced cell damage. The relative [Ca2+]i of the nerve cells closely correlated with the number of damaged cells induced by heroin. These results demonstrate that nerve cells from heroin-dependent rats manifest abnormal [Ca2+]i homeostasis, as well as vulnerability to heroin overdose, suggesting involvement of [Ca2+]i regulation mechanisms in heroin addiction and neurotoxicity.

  8. Nerve Conduction in the Pre-Medical Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbie, Russell K.

    1973-01-01

    Reviews properties of nerves, analogous networks in propagation of electrical signals in axons, and regenerative changes in membrane permeability due to propagation of the action potential, which can be explained in the noncalculus physics course. (CC)

  9. Conduction abnormalities and ventricular arrhythmogenesis: The roles of sodium channels and gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Tse, Gary; Yeo, Jie Ming

    2015-12-07

    Ventricular arrhythmias arise from disruptions in the normal orderly sequence of electrical activation and recovery of the heart. They can be categorized into disorders affecting predominantly cellular depolarization or repolarization, or those involving action potential (AP) conduction. This article briefly discusses the factors causing conduction abnormalities in the form of unidirectional conduction block and reduced conduction velocity (CV). It then examines the roles that sodium channels and gap junctions play in AP conduction. Finally, it synthesizes experimental results to illustrate molecular mechanisms of how abnormalities in these proteins contribute to such conduction abnormalities and hence ventricular arrhythmogenesis, in acquired pathologies such as acute ischaemia and heart failure, as well as inherited arrhythmic syndromes.

  10. Nerve conduction velocities and hair concentrations of trace elements in haemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sasagawa, I; Nakada, T; Sawamura, T; Kato, T; Hashimoto, T; Ishigooka, M; Izumiya, K

    1993-01-01

    Nerve conduction velocities and hair concentrations of trace elements were studied in 19 male patients with chronic renal failure undergoing haemodialysis. Both motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities were significantly lower in haemodialysis patients as compared to controls (p < 0.001). Calcium and aluminium concentrations were significantly higher in patients (p < 0.01), however, vanadium and arsenic levels were significantly lower in patients (p < 0.01). In concentrations of copper and zinc there was no significant difference between patients and controls. There were no significant correlations between hair concentrations of trace elements and nerve conduction velocities except between calcium concentration and sensory nerve conduction velocity. These facts suggest that nerve conduction velocities are not influenced by changes of trace element concentrations in hair in patients with chronic renal failure undergoing haemodialysis.

  11. Sensory nerve conduction and nociception in the equine lower forelimb during perineural bupivacaine infusion along the palmar nerves

    PubMed Central

    Zarucco, Laura; Driessen, Bernd; Scandella, Massimiliano; Cozzi, Francesca; Cantile, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study lateral palmar nerve (LPN) and medial palmar nerve (MPN) morphology and determine nociception and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) following placement of continuous peripheral nerve block (CPNB) catheters along LPN and MPN with subsequent bupivacaine (BUP) infusion. Myelinated nerve fiber distribution in LPN and MPN was examined after harvesting nerve specimens in 3 anesthetized horses and processing them for morphometric analysis. In 5 sedated horses, CPNB catheters were placed along each PN in both forelimbs. Horses then received in one forelimb 3 mL 0.125% BUP containing epinephrine 1:200 000 and 0.04% NaHCO3 per catheter site followed by 2 mL/h infusion over a 6-day period, while in the other forelimb equal amounts of saline (SAL) solution were administered. The hoof withdrawal response (HWR) threshold during pressure loading of the area above the dorsal coronary band was determined daily in both forelimbs. On day 6 SNCV was measured under general anesthesia of horses in each limb’s LPN and MPN to detect nerve injury, followed by CPNB catheter removal. The SNCV was also recorded in 2 anesthetized non-instrumented horses (sham controls). In both LPN and MPN myelinated fiber distributions were bimodal. The fraction of large fibers (>7 μm) was greater in the MPN than LPN (P < 0.05). Presence of CPNB catheters and SAL administration did neither affect measured HWR thresholds nor SNCVs, whereas BUP infusion suppressed HWRs. In conclusion, CPNB with 0.125% BUP provides pronounced analgesia by inhibiting sensory nerve conduction in the distal equine forelimb. PMID:21197231

  12. The Study of Diagnostic Efficacy of Nerve Conduction Study Parameters in Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Sachin; Kashikar, Aditi; Shende, Vinod; Waghmare, Satish

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cervical Radiculopathy (CR) is a neurologic condition characterised by dysfunction of a cervical spinal nerve, the roots of the nerve, or both. Diagnostic criteria for CR are not well defined, and no universally accepted criteria for its diagnosis have been established. Clinical examination, radiological imaging and electrophysiologic evaluation are the different modalities to diagnose CR. The incidence of Cervical Spondylosis and related conditions is increasing in the present scenario and the use of radiologic examination is time consuming and uneconomical for the common Indian setup. Thus, there is a definite need to establish a cost effective, reliable, and accurate means for establishing the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy. Electrodiagnostic tests are the closest to fulfill these criteria. Aim: To evaluate diagnostic utility of various motor and sensory nerve conduction study parameters in cervical radiculopathy. Setting and Design: It was a cross-sectional study conducted on 100 subjects of age > 40 years. Material and Methods: The consecutive patients clinically diagnosed to have cervical radiculopathy, referred from department of Orthopaedics were prospectively recruited for the motor and sensory nerve conduction study using RMS EMG EP Mark-II. Parameters studied were Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP), Distal Motor Latency (DML) and Conduction Velocity (CV) for motor nerves and Sensory Nerve Action Potential (SNAP) and CV for sensory nerves. Statistical Analysis: Study observations and results were analysed to find the Specificity, Sensitivity, Positive Predictive Value and Negative Predictive Value using SPSS 16.0. Results: Among various motor nerve conduction parameters CMAP was found to be more sensitive with high positive predicative value. CV was found to have greater specificity and DML had least negative predictive value. Sensory nerve conduction parameters were found to have less sensitivity but higher specificity as compared

  13. Brain Structure Abnormalities in Adolescent Girls with Conduct Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairchild, Graeme; Hagan, Cindy C.; Walsh, Nicholas D.; Passamonti, Luca; Calder, Andrew J.; Goodyer, Ian M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Conduct disorder (CD) in female adolescents is associated with a range of negative outcomes, including teenage pregnancy and antisocial personality disorder. Although recent studies have documented changes in brain structure and function in male adolescents with CD, there have been no neuroimaging studies of female adolescents with CD.…

  14. The Relationship between Nerve Conduction Study and Clinical Grading of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cheluvaiah, Janardhan D.; Agadi, Jagadish B.; Nagaraj, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is the most common nerve entrapment. Subjective sensory symptoms are common place in patients with CTS, but sometimes they are not supported by objective findings in the neurological examination. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) studies are a valid and reliable means of confirming the diagnosis. The amplitudes along with the conduction velocities of the sensory nerve action potential and motor nerve action potential reflect the functional state of axons, and are useful parameters and complement the clinical grading in the assessment of severity of CTS. Aim To conduct median nerve sensory and motor conduction studies on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and correlate the relationship between nerve conduction study parameters and the clinical severity grading. Materials and Methods Based on clinical assessment, the study patients were divided into 03 groups with mild CTS, moderate CTS and severe CTS respectively as per Mackinnson’s classification. Median and ulnar nerve conduction studies were performed on bilateral upper limbs of 50 patients with symptoms of CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects. The relationship between the clinical severity grade and various nerve conduction study parameters were correlated. Results In this prospective case control study, 50 patients with symptoms consistent with CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects were examined over a 10 month period. A total of 30 patients had unilateral CTS (right upper limb in 19 and left upper limb in 11) and 20 patients had bilateral CTS. Female to male ratio was 3.54 to 1. Age ranged from 25 to 81 years. The mean age at presentation was 49.68±11.7 years. Tingling paresthesias of hand and first three fingers were the most frequent symptoms 48 (98%). Tinel’s and Phalen’s sign were positive in 36 (72%) and 44 (88%) patients respectively. The mean duration of symptoms at presentation was 52.68±99.81 weeks. 16 patients (32%) had

  15. Investigation on two abnormal phenomena about thermal conductivity enhancement of BN/EG nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjiao; Zhou, Jing'en; Luo, Zhifeng; Tung, Simon; Schneider, Eric; Wu, Jiangtao; Li, Xiaojing

    2011-07-09

    The thermal conductivity of boron nitride/ethylene glycol (BN/EG) nanofluids was investigated by transient hot-wire method and two abnormal phenomena was reported. One is the abnormal higher thermal conductivity enhancement for BN/EG nanofluids at very low-volume fraction of particles, and the other is the thermal conductivity enhancement of BN/EG nanofluids synthesized with large BN nanoparticles (140 nm) which is higher than that synthesized with small BN nanoparticles (70 nm). The chain-like loose aggregation of nanoparticles is responsible for the abnormal increment of thermal conductivity enhancement for the BN/EG nanofluids at very low particles volume fraction. And the difference in specific surface area and aspect ratio of BN nanoparticles may be the main reasons for the abnormal difference between thermal conductivity enhancements for BN/EG nanofluids prepared with 140- and 70-nm BN nanoparticles, respectively.

  16. Ultrasound thermotherapy effect on the recovery of nerve conduction in experimental compression neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hong, C Z; Liu, H H; Yu, J

    1988-06-01

    Bilateral tibial nerves of 18 albino rats were mechanically compressed between knee and ankle. Beginning on the fifth day after compression, ultrasound thermotherapy of 0.5 or 1.0watt/cm2 was applied over the area of nerve compression in one limb for one minute three times per week. The other side (control) was not treated. Motor distal latency (DL), motor nerve conduction velocity (NCV) of the segment with nerve compression, and amplitude of the evoked compound muscle action potential (ACMAP) were measured before and immediately after nerve compression and two or three times per week after compression. The recovery rates of NCV and ACMAP of the tibial nerve treated with ultrasound of 0.5watt/cm2 were significantly faster than those of the control nerve. There was no significant change in the recovery rate of DL. However, if ultrasound of 1.0watt/cm2 was applied, the recovery rate of ACMAP of the treated nerve was slower than that of the control nerve. There were no significant changes in the recovery rates of DL and NCV. Low doses of ultrasound thermotherapy may facilitate recovery of compression neuropathy, but higher doses may induce an adverse effect.

  17. Microstructural abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve by diffusion-tensor imaging in trigeminal neuralgia without neurovascular compression

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, Kumar; Ashish, Awasthi; Jayantee, Kalita; Usha Kant, Misra

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural changes of the trigeminal nerve in trigeminal neuralgia due to neurovascular compression have been reported by using diffusion tensor imaging. Other aetiologies such as primary demyelinating lesions, brain stem infarction and nerve root infiltration by tumour affecting the trigeminal pathway may also present as trigeminal neuralgia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microstructural tissue abnormalities in the trigeminal nerve in symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia not related to neurovascular compression using diffusion tensor imaging. Mean values of the quantitative diffusion parameters of trigeminal nerve, fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient, were measured in a group of four symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia patients without neurovascular compression who showed focal non-enhancing T2-hyperintense lesions in the pontine trigeminal pathway. These diffusion parameters were compared between the affected and unaffected sides in the same patient and with four age-matched healthy controls. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintense lesions in the dorsolateral part of the pons along the central trigeminal pathway on T2-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. The mean fractional anisotropy value on the affected side was significantly decreased (P = 0.001) compared to the unaffected side and healthy controls. Similarly, the mean apparent diffusion coefficient value was significantly higher (P = 0.001) on the affected side compared to the unaffected side and healthy controls. The cause of trigeminal neuralgia in our patients was abnormal pontine lesions affecting the central trigeminal pathway. The diffusion tensor imaging results suggest that microstructural tissue abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve also exist even in non-neurovascular compression-related trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26678753

  18. Electrically conductive biodegradable polymer composite for nerve regeneration: electricity-stimulated neurite outgrowth and axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ze; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Wang, Zhaoxu; Roberge, Christophe; Shi, Guixin; Roche, Phillippe; Li, Jiangming; Dao, Lê H

    2007-01-01

    Normal and electrically stimulated PC12 cell cultures and the implantation of nerve guidance channels were performed to evaluate newly developed electrically conductive biodegradable polymer composites. Polypyrrole (PPy) doped by butane sulfonic acid showed a significantly higher number of viable cells compared with PPy doped by polystyrenesulfonate after a 6-day culture. The PC12 cells were left to proliferate for 6 days, and the PPy-coated membranes, showing less initial cell adherence, recorded the same proliferation rate as did the noncoated membranes. Direct current electricity at various intensities was applied to the PC12 cell-cultured conductive membranes. After 7 days, the greatest number of neurites appeared on the membranes with a current intensity approximating 1.7-8.4 microA/cm. Nerve guidance channels made of conductive biodegradable composite were implanted into rats to replace 8 mm of sciatic nerve. The implants were harvested after 2 months and analyzed with immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. The regenerated nerve tissue displayed myelinated axons and Schwann cells that were similar to those in the native nerve. Electrical stimulation applied through the electrically conductive biodegradable polymers therefore enhanced neurite outgrowth in a current-dependent fashion. The conductive polymers also supported sciatic nerve regeneration in rats.

  19. Conduction abnormalities and ventricular arrhythmogenesis: The roles of sodium channels and gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary; Yeo, Jie Ming

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias arise from disruptions in the normal orderly sequence of electrical activation and recovery of the heart. They can be categorized into disorders affecting predominantly cellular depolarization or repolarization, or those involving action potential (AP) conduction. This article briefly discusses the factors causing conduction abnormalities in the form of unidirectional conduction block and reduced conduction velocity (CV). It then examines the roles that sodium channels and gap junctions play in AP conduction. Finally, it synthesizes experimental results to illustrate molecular mechanisms of how abnormalities in these proteins contribute to such conduction abnormalities and hence ventricular arrhythmogenesis, in acquired pathologies such as acute ischaemia and heart failure, as well as inherited arrhythmic syndromes. PMID:26839915

  20. Mice lacking GD3 synthase display morphological abnormalities in the sciatic nerve and neuronal disturbances during peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Resende, Victor Túlio; Araújo Gomes, Tiago; de Lima, Silmara; Nascimento-Lima, Maiara; Bargas-Rega, Michele; Santiago, Marcelo Felipe; Reis, Ricardo Augusto de Melo; de Mello, Fernando Garcia

    2014-01-01

    The ganglioside 9-O-acetyl GD3 is overexpressed in peripheral nerves after lesioning, and its expression is correlated with axonal degeneration and regeneration in adult rodents. However, the biological roles of this ganglioside during the regenerative process are unclear. We used mice lacking GD3 synthase (Siat3a KO), an enzyme that converts GM3 to GD3, which can be further converted to 9-O-acetyl GD3. Morphological analyses of longitudinal and transverse sections of the sciatic nerve revealed significant differences in the transverse area and nerve thickness. The number of axons and the levels of myelin basic protein were significantly reduced in adult KO mice compared to wild-type (WT) mice. The G-ratio was increased in KO mice compared to WT mice based on quantification of thin transverse sections stained with toluidine blue. We found that neurite outgrowth was significantly reduced in the absence of GD3. However, addition of exogenous GD3 led to neurite growth after 3 days, similar to that in WT mice. To evaluate fiber regeneration after nerve lesioning, we compared the regenerated distance from the lesion site and found that this distance was one-fourth the length in KO mice compared to WT mice. KO mice in which GD3 was administered showed markedly improved regeneration compared to the control KO mice. In summary, we suggest that 9-O-acetyl GD3 plays biological roles in neuron-glia interactions, facilitating axonal growth and myelination induced by Schwann cells. Moreover, exogenous GD3 can be converted to 9-O-acetyl GD3 in mice lacking GD3 synthase, improving regeneration.

  1. Mice Lacking GD3 Synthase Display Morphological Abnormalities in the Sciatic Nerve and Neuronal Disturbances during Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-Resende, Victor Túlio; Gomes, Tiago Araújo; de Lima, Silmara; Nascimento-Lima, Maiara; Bargas-Rega, Michele; Santiago, Marcelo Felipe; Reis, Ricardo Augusto de Melo; de Mello, Fernando Garcia

    2014-01-01

    The ganglioside 9-O-acetyl GD3 is overexpressed in peripheral nerves after lesioning, and its expression is correlated with axonal degeneration and regeneration in adult rodents. However, the biological roles of this ganglioside during the regenerative process are unclear. We used mice lacking GD3 synthase (Siat3a KO), an enzyme that converts GM3 to GD3, which can be further converted to 9-O-acetyl GD3. Morphological analyses of longitudinal and transverse sections of the sciatic nerve revealed significant differences in the transverse area and nerve thickness. The number of axons and the levels of myelin basic protein were significantly reduced in adult KO mice compared to wild-type (WT) mice. The G-ratio was increased in KO mice compared to WT mice based on quantification of thin transverse sections stained with toluidine blue. We found that neurite outgrowth was significantly reduced in the absence of GD3. However, addition of exogenous GD3 led to neurite growth after 3 days, similar to that in WT mice. To evaluate fiber regeneration after nerve lesioning, we compared the regenerated distance from the lesion site and found that this distance was one-fourth the length in KO mice compared to WT mice. KO mice in which GD3 was administered showed markedly improved regeneration compared to the control KO mice. In summary, we suggest that 9-O-acetyl GD3 plays biological roles in neuron-glia interactions, facilitating axonal growth and myelination induced by Schwann cells. Moreover, exogenous GD3 can be converted to 9-O-acetyl GD3 in mice lacking GD3 synthase, improving regeneration. PMID:25330147

  2. Effect of pulsed infrared lasers on neural conduction and axoplasmic transport in sensory nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesselmann, Ursula; Rymer, William Z.; Lin, Shien-Fong

    1990-06-01

    Over the past ten years there has been an increasing interest in the use of lasers for neurosurgical and neurological procedures. Novel recent applications range from neurosurgical procedures such as dorsal root entry zone lesions made with argon and carbon dioxide microsurgical lasers to pain relief by low power laser irradiation of the appropriate painful nerve or affected region1 '2 However, despite the widespread clinical applications of laser light, very little is known about the photobiological interactions between laser light and nervous tissue. The present studies were designed to evaluate the effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser light on neural impulse conduction and axoplasmic transport in sensory nerves in rats and cats. Our data indicate that Q-switched Nd:YAG laser irradiation can induce a preferential impairment of (1) the synaptic effects of small afferent fibers on dorsal horn cells in the spinal cord and of (2) small slow conducting sensory nerve fibers in dorsal roots and peripheral nerves. These results imply that laser light might have selective effects on impulse conduction in slow conducting sensory nerve fibers. In agreement with our elecirophysiological observations recent histological data from our laboratory show, that axonal transport of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase is selectively impaired in small sensory nerve fibers. In summary these data indicate, that Q-switched Nd:YAG laser irradiation can selectively impair neural conduction and axoplasmic transport in small sensory nerve fibers as compared to fast conducting fibers. A selective influence of laser irradiation on slow conducting fibers could have important clinical applications, especially for the treatment of chronic pain.

  3. Effects of the diacylglycerol complexing agent, cremophor, on nerve-conduction velocity and perfusion in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Jack, A M; Cameron, N E; Cotter, M A

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of diacylglycerol (DAG) and protein kinase C (PKC) to diabetic complications has been the subject of debate. In vascular tissues, diabetes increases DAG content, which activates PKC and causes abnormal tissue perfusion. Reduced nerve blood flow has been implicated in the development of neuropathy. However, nerve DAG/PKC activity is not increased and may even be reduced by diabetes, which has also been implicated in neuropathy. The aim was to test whether 2 weeks of treatment with cremophor, an agent that complexes DAG and prevents PKC activation, could correct nerve-conduction velocity (NCV) deficits in rats with 6 weeks of untreated diabetes, as predicted on a vascular hypothesis, or whether this worsened the deficits, as predicted for a direct effect on nerve fibers. Diabetes caused 17.9 +/- 0.9% (+/- SEM) and 15.5 +/- 1.6% reductions in sciatic motor and saphenous sensory NCV, respectively, that were largely (79.6 +/- 6.3% and 57.8 +/- 11.5%) corrected by 100 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1) cremophor treatment. The effects of cremophor on motor and sensory NCV were completely attenuated by co-treatment with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-l-arginine. In contrast, co-treatment with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, flurbiprofen, had no effect on NCV. Sciatic nutritive and total endoneurial perfusion were 49.7 +/- 3.4% and 51.8 +/- 4.2% reduced by diabetes, respectively, and these deficits were 69.5 +/- 7.4% and 79.0 +/- 11.6% corrected by cremophor treatment. Thus the data suggest that an increased DAG/PKC vascular mechanism, perhaps linked to the nitric oxide system, contributes to the etiology of diabetic nerve dysfunction.

  4. Shock wave over hand muscles: a neurophysiological study on peripheral conduction nerves in normal subjects

    PubMed Central

    Manganotti, Paolo; Amelio, Ernesto; Guerra, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and purpose: shock waves are defined as a sequence of single sonic pulses largely used in the treatment of bone and tendon diseases and recently on muscular hypertonia in stroke patients. Our purpose is to investigate the short and long term effect of extra-corporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on the peripheral nerve conduction and central conductions from the treated muscles in normal human subjects in order to define safety criteria. Methods: we studied 10 patients normal subjects. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity and F response from right ipothenar eminence (abductor digiti minimi) of the hand was recorded. Furthermore MEP latency and amplitude and central conduction from the same muscles by transcranial magnetic stimulation was evaluated. In all subjects each neurophysiological measures were monitored before, immediately after, 15 minutes and after 30 minutes from the active ESWT treatment (1600 shots with an energy applied of 0.030 mj/mm2). Results: no significant short or long term changes were noted in sensory and motor peripheral nerve conduction and in central motor conduction in all the subjects evaluated after ESWT. Conclusions: the ESWT has no effect on sensory and motor peripheral nerve conduction and in central motor conduction. The ESWT using low level of energy represent a safety method for treating the muscles in human subjects without involvement of motor or sensory nervous trunks. Different mechanisms of action of ESWT are discussed. PMID:23738282

  5. Kilohertz Electrical Stimulation Nerve Conduction Block: Effects of Electrode Surface Area.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogi A; Kim, Brian S; Rountree, William S; Butera, Robert J

    2017-03-17

    Kilohertz electrical stimulation (KES) induces repeatable and reversible conduction block of nerve activity and is a potential therapeutic option for various diseases and disorders resulting from pathological or undesired neurological activity. However successful translation of KES nerve block to clinical applications is stymied by many unknowns such as the relevance of the onset response, acceptable levels of waveform contamination, and optimal electrode characteristics. We investigated the role of electrode geometric surface area on the KES nerve block threshold using 20 and 40 kHz current-controlled sinusoidal KES. Electrodes were electrochemically characterized and used to characterize typical KES waveforms and electrode charge characteristics. KES nerve block amplitudes, onset duration, and recovery of normal conduction after delivery of KES were evaluated along with power requirements for effective KES nerve block. Results from this investigation demonstrate that increasing electrode geometric surface area provides for a more power efficient KES nerve block. Reductions in block threshold by increased electrode surface area were found to be KESfrequency dependent, with block thresholds and average power consumption reduced by >2x with 20 kHz KES waveforms and >3x for 40 kHz KES waveforms.

  6. Loss of the Sall3 Gene Leads to Palate Deficiency, Abnormalities in Cranial Nerves, and Perinatal Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, M.; Ott, T.; Lance-Jones, C.; Schuetz, G.; Schwaeger-Nickolenko, A.; Monaghan, A. P.

    2004-01-01

    Members of the Spalt gene family encode putative transcription factors characterized by seven to nine C2H2 zinc finger motifs. Four genes have been identified in mice—Spalt1 to Spalt4 (Sall1 to Sall4). Spalt homologues are widely expressed in neural and mesodermal tissues during early embryogenesis. Sall3 is normally expressed in mice from embryonic day 7 (E7) in the neural ectoderm and primitive streak and subsequently in the brain, peripheral nerves, spinal cord, limb buds, palate, heart, and otic vesicles. We have generated a targeted disruption of Sall3 in mice. Homozygous mutant animals die on the first postnatal day and fail to feed. Examination of the oral structures of these animals revealed that abnormalities were present in the palate and epiglottis from E16.5. In E10.5 embryos, deficiencies in cranial nerves that normally innervate oral structures, particularly the glossopharyngeal nerve (IX), were observed. These studies indicate that Sall3 is required for the development of nerves that are derived from the hindbrain and for the formation of adjacent branchial arch derivatives. PMID:15282310

  7. Application of conductive polymers, scaffolds and electrical stimulation for nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Morshed, Mohammad; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein; Baharvand, Hossein; Kiani, Sahar; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2011-04-01

    Among the numerous attempts to integrate tissue engineering concepts into strategies to repair nearly all parts of the body, neuronal repair stands out. This is partially due to the complexity of the nervous anatomical system, its functioning and the inefficiency of conventional repair approaches, which are based on single components of either biomaterials or cells alone. Electrical stimulation has been shown to enhance the nerve regeneration process and this consequently makes the use of electrically conductive polymers very attractive for the construction of scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering. In this review, by taking into consideration the electrical properties of nerve cells and the effect of electrical stimulation on nerve cells, we discuss the most commonly utilized conductive polymers, polypyrrole (PPy) and polyaniline (PANI), along with their design and modifications, thus making them suitable scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering. Other electrospun, composite, conductive scaffolds, such as PANI/gelatin and PPy/poly(ε-caprolactone), with or without electrical stimulation, are also discussed. Different procedures of electrical stimulation which have been used in tissue engineering, with examples on their specific applications in tissue engineering, are also discussed.

  8. Axo-glial dysjunction. A novel structural lesion that accounts for poorly reversible slowing of nerve conduction in the spontaneously diabetic bio-breeding rat.

    PubMed Central

    Sima, A A; Lattimer, S A; Yagihashi, S; Greene, D A

    1986-01-01

    Biochemical abnormalities in peripheral nerve are thought to precede and condition the development of diabetic neuropathy, but metabolic intervention in chronic diabetic neuropathy produces only limited acute clinical response. The residual, metabolically unresponsive neurological deficits have never been rigorously defined in terms of either persistent metabolic derangements or irreversible structural defects because human nerve tissue is rarely accessible for anatomical and biochemical study and experimentally diabetic animals do not develop the structural hallmarks of human diabetic neuropathy. Detailed neuroanatomical-functional-biochemical correlation was therefore undertaken in long-term spontaneously diabetic BB-Wistar rats that functionally and structurally model human diabetic neuropathy. Vigorous insulin replacement in chronically diabetic BB rats essentially normalized both the sural nerve fiber caliber spectrum and the decreased sciatic nerve myo-inositol and (Na,K)-ATPase levels generally associated with conduction slowing in diabetic animals; yet, nerve conduction was only partially restored toward normal. Morphometric analysis revealed a striking disappearance of paranodal axo-glial junctional complexes that was not corrected by insulin replacement. Loss of these strategic junctional complexes, which are thought to limit lateral migration of axolemmal Na channels away from nodes of Ranvier, correlates with and can account for the diminished nodal Na permeability and resultant nodal conduction delay characteristic of chronic diabetic neuropathy in this animal model. Images PMID:3003160

  9. Effects of high-frequency alternating current on axonal conduction through the vagus nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waataja, Jonathan J.; Tweden, Katherine S.; Honda, Christopher N.

    2011-10-01

    High-frequency alternating current (HFAC) is known to disrupt axonal conduction in peripheral nerves, and HFAC has much potential as a therapeutic approach for a number of pathological conditions. Many previous studies have utilized motor output as a bioassay of effects of HFAC on conduction through medium- to large-diameter motor axons. However, little is known about the effectiveness of HFAC on smaller, more slowly conducting nerve fibres. The present study tested whether HFAC influences axonal conduction through sub-diaphragmatic levels of the rat vagus nerve, which consists almost entirely of small calibre axons. Using an isolated nerve preparation, we tested the effects of HFAC on electrically evoked compound action potentials (CAPs). We found that delivery of charge-balanced HFAC at 5000 Hz for 1 min was effective in producing reversible blockade of axonal conduction. Both Aδ and C components of the vagus CAP were attenuated, and the degree of blockade as well as time to recovery was proportional to the amount of HFAC current delivered. The Aδ waves were more sensitive than C waves to HFAC blockade, but they required more time to recover.

  10. Reversible acute axonal polyneuropathy associated with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: impaired physiological nerve conduction due to thiamine deficiency?

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, S; Yokota, T; Shiojiri, T; Matunaga, T; Tanaka, H; Nishina, K; Hirota, H; Inaba, A; Yamada, M; Kanda, T; Mizusawa, H

    2003-05-01

    Acute axonal polyneuropathy and Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy developed simultaneously in three patients. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) detected markedly decreased compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) and sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) with minimal conduction slowing; sympathetic skin responses (SSRs) were also notably decreased. Sural nerve biopsies showed only mild axonal degeneration with scattered myelin ovoid formation. The symptoms of neuropathy lessened within two weeks after an intravenous thiamine infusion. CMAPs, SNAPs, and SSRs also increased considerably. We suggest that this is a new type of peripheral nerve impairment: physiological conduction failure with minimal conduction delay due to thiamine deficiency.

  11. A mouse model of conduction system patterning abnormalities in heterotaxy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Czosek, Richard J; Haaning, Allison; Ware, Stephanie M

    2010-10-01

    Duplication or absence of parts of the specialized cardiac conduction system in patients with heterotaxy syndrome causes significant clinical disease, but the mechanistic basis by which embryonic disruption of left-right patterning alters conduction system patterning in these patients is not well understood. We sought to determine whether a mouse model of X-linked human heterotaxy recapitulates conduction system abnormalities identified in patients with heterotaxy. Cardiac structure and conduction system patterning were evaluated in Zic3 null embryos from e9.5 to e16.5 using genetic and molecular methods. Severe structural abnormalities involving atrial, ventricular, and conotruncal development were associated with a spectrum of disorganized and ambiguous arrangements throughout the conduction system, including the appearance of duplicated structures. The severity and location of conduction system abnormalities correlated with the severity and location of associated structural heart disease and were identifiable at the earliest stages examined. The Zic3 mouse model provides a novel tool to dissect the mechanistic underpinnings of conduction system patterning and dysfunction and its relationship to cardiovascular malformations, making it a promising model to improve understanding and risk assessment in the clinical arena.

  12. Morphological abnormalities of embryonic cranial nerves after in utero exposure to valproic acid: implications for the pathogenesis of autism with multiple developmental anomalies.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Yasura; Oyabu, Akiko; Imura, Yoshio; Uchida, Atsuko; Narita, Naoko; Narita, Masaaki

    2011-06-01

    Autism is often associated with multiple developmental anomalies including asymmetric facial palsy. In order to establish the etiology of autism with facial palsy, research into developmental abnormalities of the peripheral facial nerves is necessary. In the present study, to investigate the development of peripheral cranial nerves for use in an animal model of autism, rat embryos were treated with valproic acid (VPA) in utero and their cranial nerves were visualized by immunostaining. Treatment with VPA after embryonic day 9 had a significant effect on the peripheral fibers of several cranial nerves. Following VPA treatment, immunoreactivity within the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves was significantly reduced. Additionally, abnormal axonal pathways were observed in the peripheral facial nerves. Thus, the morphology of several cranial nerves, including the facial nerve, can be affected by prenatal VPA exposure as early as E13. Our findings indicate that disruption of early facial nerve development is involved in the etiology of asymmetric facial palsy, and may suggest a link to the etiology of autism.

  13. Confirmation of Correlation between Brain Nerve Conduction Velocity and Intelligence Level in Normal Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, T. Edward; Vernon, Philip A.; Johnson, Andrew M.

    2004-01-01

    In 1992, Reed and Jensen ["Intelligence" 16 (1992) 259-272] reported a positive correlation (0.26; "p"= 0.002; 0.37 after correcting for restricted intelligence range) between a brain nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and intelligence level in 147 normal male students. In the first follow-up of their study, we report on a study…

  14. Asymptomatic rhythm and conduction abnormalities in children with acute rheumatic fever: 24-hour electrocardiography study.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Mehmet; Işıkay, Sedat; Olgun, Haşim; Ceviz, Naci

    2010-12-01

    Some rhythm and conduction abnormalities can occur in children with acute rheumatic fever. These abnormalities have been defined based on standard electrocardiography; however, the real prevalence of these abnormalities has not been investigated previously by the evaluation of long-term electrocardiographic recordings. In this study, we evaluated the asymptomatic rhythm and conduction abnormalities in children with acute rheumatic fever by evaluating the 24-hour electrocardiography. We evaluated the standard electrocardiography and the 24-hour electrocardiography of 64 children with acute rheumatic fever. On standard electrocardiography, the frequency of the first-degree atrioventricular block was found to be 21.9%. Electrocardiography at 24 hours detected three additional and separate patients with a long PR interval. Mobitz type I block and atypical Wenckebach periodicity were determined in one patient (1.56%) on 24-hour electrocardiography. While accelerated junctional rhythm was detected in three patients on standard electrocardiography, it was present in nine patients according to 24-hour electrocardiography. Premature contractions were present in 1.7% of standard electrocardiography, but in 29.7% of 24-hour electrocardiography. Absence of carditis was found to be related to the presence of accelerated junctional rhythm (p > 0.05), and the presence of carditis was found to be related to the presence of premature contractions (p = 0.000). In conclusion, our results suggest that in children with acute rheumatic fever, the prevalence of rhythm and conduction abnormalities may be much higher than determined on standard electrocardiography. Further studies are needed to clarify whether or not these abnormalities are specific to acute rheumatic fever.

  15. Effects of Head-down Tilt on Nerve Conduction in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Yun; Liu, Li-Zhi; Chen, Zhao-Hui; Dai, Zhong-Quan; Huang, Xu-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Few studies have focused on peripheral nerve conduction during exposure to microgravity. The −6° head-down tilt (HDT) comprises an experimental model used to simulate the space flight environment. This study investigated nerve conduction characteristics of rhesus monkeys before and after prolonged exposure to HDT. Methods: Six rhesus monkeys (3–4 years old) were tilted backward 6° from the horizontal. Nerve conduction studies (NCSs) were performed on the median, ulnar, tibial, and fibular motor nerves. Analysis of variance with a randomized block design was conducted to compare the differences in the NCS before and 7, 21, and 42 days after the −6° HDT. Results: The proximal amplitude of the CMAP of the median nerve was significantly decreased at 21 and 42 days of HDT compared with the amplitude before HDT (4.38 ± 2.83 vs. 8.40 ± 2.66 mV, F = 4.85, P = 0.013 and 3.30 ± 2.70 vs. 8.40 ± 2.66 mV, F = 5.93, P = 0.004, respectively). The distal amplitude of the CMAP of the median nerve was significantly decreased at 7, 21, and 42 days of HDT compared with the amplitude before HDT (7.28 ± 1.27 vs. 10.25 ± 3.40 mV, F = 4.03, P = 0.039; 5.05 ± 2.01 vs. 10.25 ± 3.40 mV, F = 6.25, P = 0.04; and 3.95 ± 2.79 vs. 10.25 ± 3.40 mV, F = 7.35, P = 0.01; respectively). The proximal amplitude of the CMAP of the tibial nerve was significantly decreased at 42 days of HDT compared with the amplitude before HDT (6.14 ± 1.94 vs. 11.87 ± 3.19 mV, F = 5.02, P = 0.039). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the compound muscle action potential amplitudes of nerves are decreased under simulated microgravity in rhesus monkeys. Moreover, rhesus monkeys exposed to HDT might be served as an experimental model for the study of NCS under microgravity. PMID:28139516

  16. The Expanded Bead Size of Corneal C-Nerve Fibers Visualized by Corneal Confocal Microscopy Is Associated with Slow Conduction Velocity of the Peripheral Nerves in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to establish the corneal nerve fiber (CNF) morphological alterations in a large cohort of type 2 diabetic patients and to investigate the association between the bead size, a novel parameter representing composite of accumulated mitochondria, glycogen particles, and vesicles in CNF, and the neurophysiological dysfunctions of the peripheral nerves. 162 type 2 diabetic patients and 45 healthy control subjects were studied in detail with a battery of clinical and neurological examinations and corneal confocal microscopy. Compared with controls, patients had abnormal CNF parameters. In particular the patients had reduced density and length of CNF and beading frequency and increased bead size. Alterations in CNF parameters were significant even in patients without neuropathy. The HbA1c levels were tightly associated with the bead size, which was inversely related to the motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and to the distal latency period of the median nerve positively. The CNF density and length positively correlated with the NCV and amplitude. The hyperglycemia-induced expansion of beads in CNF might be a predictor of slow NCV in peripheral nerves in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:27563679

  17. The Molecular and Morphologic Structures That Make Saltatory Conduction Possible in Peripheral Nerve.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Steven L

    2017-03-14

    Saltatory conduction is the process by which action potentials are rapidly and efficiently propagated along myelinated axons. In the peripheral nervous system, saltatory conduction is made possible by a series of morphologically and molecularly distinct subdomains in both axons and their associated myelinating Schwann cells. This review briefly summarizes current knowledge on the molecular structure and physiology of the node of Ranvier and adjacent regions of the axoglial unit in peripheral nerve.

  18. Nerve conduction

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... peripheral nervous system (PNS). The CNS contains the brain and the spinal cord and the PNS consists ... the axon. Without this insulation, signals from the brain might never reach the outlying muscle groups in ...

  19. Electrical Stimulation to Conductive Scaffold Promotes Axonal Regeneration and Remyelination in a Rat Model of Large Nerve Defect

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongguang; Liang, Wei; Wu, Siyu; Luo, Zhuojing

    2012-01-01

    Background Electrical stimulation (ES) has been shown to promote nerve regeneration when it was applied to the proximal nerve stump. However, the possible beneficial effect of establishing a local electrical environment between a large nerve defect on nerve regeneration has not been reported in previous studies. The present study attempted to establish a local electrical environment between a large nerve defect, and examined its effect on nerve regeneration and functional recovery. Methodology/Findings In the present study, a conductive scaffold was constructed and used to bridge a 15 mm sciatic nerve defect in rats, and intermittent ES (3 V, 20 Hz) was applied to the conductive scaffold to establish an electrical environment at the site of nerve defect. Nerve regeneration and functional recovery were examined after nerve injury repair and ES. We found that axonal regeneration and remyelination of the regenerated axons were significantly enhanced by ES which was applied to conductive scaffold. In addition, both motor and sensory functional recovery was significantly improved and muscle atrophy was partially reversed by ES localized at the conductive scaffold. Further investigations showed that the expression of S-100, BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), P0 and Par-3 was significantly up-regulated by ES at the conductive scaffold. Conclusions/Significance Establishing an electrical environment with ES localized at the conductive scaffold is capable of accelerating nerve regeneration and promoting functional recovery in a 15 mm nerve defect in rats. The findings provide new directions for exploring regenerative approaches to achieve better functional recovery in the treatment of large nerve defect. PMID:22737243

  20. Electrophysiological consequences of KATP Gain-of-function in the heart: Conduction abnormalities in Cantu Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Mark D.; Zhang, Haixia; Uchida, Keita; Grange, Dorothy K.; Singh, Gautam K.; Nichols, Colin G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in the KATP channel subunits Kir6.1 and SUR2 cause Cantu syndrome (CS), a disease characterized by multiple cardiovascular abnormalities. Objective To better understand the electrophysiological consequences of such GOF mutations in the heart. Methods We generated transgenic mice (Kir6.1-GOF) expressing ATP-insensitive Kir6.1[G343D] subunits under α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) promoter control, to target gene expression specifically in cardiomyocytes, and carried out patch-clamp experiments on isolated ventricular myocytes, invasive electrophysiology on anesthetized mice. Results In Kir6.1-GOF ventricular myocytes, KATP channels show decreased ATP sensitivity, but there is no significant change in current density. Ambulatory ECG recordings on Kir6.1-GOF mice reveal AV nodal conduction abnormalities and junctional rhythm. Invasive electrophysiological analyses reveal slowing of conduction and conduction failure through the AV node, but no increase in susceptibility to atrial or ventricular ectopic activity. Surface electrocardiograms recorded from CS patients also demonstrate first degree AV block, and fascicular block. Conclusions The primary electrophysiological consequence of cardiac KATP GOF is on the conduction system, particularly the AV node, resulting in conduction abnormalities in CS patients, who carry KATP GOF mutations. PMID:26142302

  1. Fast-conducting mechanoreceptors contribute to withdrawal behavior in normal and nerve injured rats.

    PubMed

    Boada, M Danilo; Martin, Thomas J; Peters, Christopher M; Hayashida, Kenichiro; Harris, Michael H; Houle, Timothy T; Boyden, Edward S; Eisenach, James C; Ririe, Douglas G

    2014-12-01

    Fast-conducting myelinated high-threshold mechanoreceptors (AHTMR) are largely thought to transmit acute nociception from the periphery. However, their roles in normal withdrawal and in nerve injury-induced hyperalgesia are less well accepted. Modulation of this subpopulation of peripheral neurons would help define their roles in withdrawal behaviors. The optically active proton pump, ArchT, was placed in an adeno-associated virus-type 8 viral vector with the CAG promoter and was administered by intrathecal injection resulting in expression in myelinated neurons. Optical inhibition of peripheral neurons at the soma and transcutaneously was possible in the neurons expressing ArchT, but not in neurons from control animals. Receptive field characteristics and electrophysiology determined that inhibition was neuronal subtype-specific with only AHTMR neurons being inhibited. One week after nerve injury the AHTMR are hyperexcitable, but can still be inhibited at the soma and transcutaneously. Withdrawal thresholds to mechanical stimuli in normal and in hyperalgesic nerve-injured animals also were increased by transcutaneous light to the affected hindpaw. This suggests that AHTMR neurons play a role not only in threshold-related withdrawal behavior in the normal animal, but also in sensitized states after nerve injury. This is the first time this subpopulation of neurons has been reversibly modulated to test their contribution to withdrawal-related behaviors before and after nerve injury. This technique may prove useful to define the role of selective neuronal populations in different pain states.

  2. Fast Conducting Mechanoreceptors Contribute to Withdrawal Behavior in Normal and Nerve Injured Rats

    PubMed Central

    Boada, M. Danilo; Martin, Thomas J.; Peters, Christopher M.; Hayashida, Kenichiro; Harris, Michael H.; Houle, Timothy T.; Boyden, Edward S.; Eisenach, James C.; Ririe, Douglas G.

    2014-01-01

    Fast conducting myelinated high threshold mechanoreceptors (AHTMR) are largely thought to transmit acute nociception from the periphery. However, their roles in normal withdrawal and in nerve injury induced hyperalgesia are less well accepted. Modulation of this subpopulation of peripheral neurons would help define their roles in withdrawal behaviors. The optically active proton pump, ArchT, was placed in an AAV8 viral vector with the CAG promoter and was administered by intrathecal injection resulting in expression in myelinated neurons. Optical inhibition of peripheral neurons at the soma and transcutaneously was possible in the neurons expressing ArchT, but not in neurons from control animals. Receptive field characteristics and electrophysiology determined that inhibition was neuronal subtype specific with only AHTMR neurons being inhibited. One week following nerve injury the AHTMR are hyperexcitable, but can still be inhibited at the soma and transcutaneously. Withdrawal thresholds to mechanical stimuli in normal and in hyperalgesic nerve injured animals were also increased by transcutaneous light to the affected hindpaw. This suggests that AHTMR neurons play a role not only in threshold related withdrawal behavior in the normal animal, but also in sensitized states after nerve injury. This is the first time this subpopulation of neurons has been reversibly modulated to test their contribution to withdrawal related behaviors before and after nerve injury. This technique may prove useful to define the role of selective neuronal populations in different pain states. PMID:25267211

  3. Molecular Regulators of Nerve Conduction - Lessons from Inherited Neuropathies and Rodent Genetic Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Myelinated nerve fibers are highly compartmentalized. Helically wrapped lipoprotein membranes of myelin are integrated with subsets of proteins specifically in each compartment to shape the physiological behavior of these nerve fibers. With the advance of molecular biology and genetics, many functions of these proteins have been revealed over the past decade. In this review, we will first discuss how action potential propagation has been understood by classical electrophysiological studies. In particular, the discussion will be concentrated on how the geometric dimensions of myelinated nerve fibers (such as internodal length and myelin thickness) may affect nerve conduction velocity. This discussion will then extend into how specific myelin proteins may shape these geometric parameters, thereby regulating action potential propagation. For instance, periaxin may specifically affect the internodal length, but not other parameters. In contrast, neuregulin-1 may affect myelin thickness, but not axon diameter or internodal length. Finally, we will discuss how these basic neurobiological observations can be applied to inherited peripheral nerve diseases. PMID:25792482

  4. Lysosome abnormalities and lipofucsin content of nerve cells of oedematous human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Castejón, O J

    2004-01-01

    Lysosome alterations and lipofucsin content of nerve cells, capillary endothelial cells and pericytes were examined in the anoxic-ischaemic brain parenchyma of thirty two patients with congenital hydrocephalus, complicated brain traumatic injuries, brain tumours and vascular anomalies. Cortical biopsies of frontal, parietal and temporal cortex were processed for transmission electron microscopy. In oedematous non pyramidal and pyramidal nerve cells, lysosomes showed fragmentation of their limiting membranes and an associated dense granulation. Areas of cytoplasmic focal necrosis were observed surrounding the lysosomes. Lipofucsin granules were also observed in neonate and infant patients with congenital hydrocephalus, suggesting that lipofucsin formation is a life span process. Lysosomes coexisting with an increased amount of lipofucsin granules were observed in young and adult patients with brain trauma, tumours and vascular anomalies. Phagocytic astrocytes and activated oligodendroglial cells showed the overall spectrum of an altered endosomal/lysosomal system. Lipofucsin granules and multivesicular bodies also were distinguished in endothelial and pericyte cells. The role of released and activated lysosomal enzymes is discussed in relation with the cytoplasmatic focal necrosis of nerve cells and the genesis of moderate and severe oedema.

  5. A novel method for measuring hydraulic conductivity at the human blood-nerve barrier in vitro.

    PubMed

    Helton, E Scott; Palladino, Steven; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2017-01-01

    Microvascular barrier permeability to water is an essential biophysical property required for the homeostatic maintenance of unique tissue microenvironments. This is of particular importance in peripheral nerves where strict control of ionic concentrations is needed for axonal signal transduction. Previous studies have associated inflammation, trauma, toxin exposure and metabolic disease with increases in water influx and hydrostatic pressure in peripheral nerves with resultant endoneurial edema that may impair axonal function. The regulation of water permeability across endoneurial microvessels that form the blood-nerve barrier (BNB) is poorly understood. Variations exist in apparatus and methods used to measure hydraulic conductivity. The objective of the study was to develop a simplified hydraulic conductivity system using commercially available components to evaluate the BNB. We determined the mean hydraulic conductivity of cultured confluent primary and immortalized human endoneurial endothelial cell layers as 2.00×10(-7) and 2.17×10(-7)cm/s/cm H₂O respectively, consistent with restrictive microvascular endothelial cells in vitro. We also determined the mean hydraulic conductivity of immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial cell layers, a commonly used blood-brain barrier (BBB) cell line, as 0.20×10(-7)cm/s/cm H₂O, implying a mean 10-fold higher resistance to transendothelial water flux in the brain compared to peripheral nerves. To our knowledge, this is the first reported measurement of human BNB and BBB hydraulic conductivities. This model represents an important tool to further characterize the human BNB and deduce the molecular determinants and signaling mechanisms responsible for BNB hydraulic conductivity in normal and disease states in vitro.

  6. Sympathetic Nerves Inhibit Conducted Vasodilatation Along Feed Arteries during Passive Stretch of Hamster Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Haug, Sara J; Welsh, Donald G; Segal, Steven S

    2003-01-01

    Ascending vasodilatation is integral to blood flow control in exercising skeletal muscle and is attributable to conduction from intramuscular arterioles into proximal feed arteries. Passive stretch of skeletal muscle can impair muscle blood flow but the mechanism is not well understood. We hypothesized that the conduction of vasodilatation along feed arteries can be modulated by changes in muscle length. In anaesthetized hamsters, acetylcholine (ACh) microiontophoresis triggered conducted vasodilatation along feed arteries (diameter, 50-70 μm) of the retractor muscle secured at 100 % resting length or stretched by 30 %. At 100 % length, ACh evoked local dilatation (> 30 μm) and this response conducted rapidly along the feed artery (14 ± 1 μm dilatation at 1600 μm upstream). During muscle stretch, feed arteries constricted ≈10 μm (P < 0.05) and local vasodilatation to ACh was maintained while conducted vasodilatation was reduced by half (P < 0.01). Resting diameter and conduction recovered upon restoring 100 % length. Sympathetic nerve stimulation (4-8 Hz) produced vasoconstriction and attenuated conduction in the manner observed during muscle stretch, as did noradrenaline or phenylephrine (10 nm). Inhibiting nitric oxide production (Nω-nitro-L-arginine, 50 μm) produced similar vasoconstriction yet had no effect on conduction. Phentolamine, prazosin, or tetrodotoxin (1 μm) during muscle stretch abolished vasoconstriction and restored conduction. Inactivation of sensory nerves with capsaicin had no effect on vasomotor responses. Thus, muscle stretch can attenuate conducted vasodilatation by activating α-adrenoreceptors on feed arteries through noradrenaline released from perivascular sympathetic nerves. This autonomic feedback mechanism can restrict muscle blood flow during passive stretch. PMID:12897176

  7. Abnormal neutrophil chemotactic activity in children with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA): the role of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Beigelman, Avraham; Levy, Jacov; Hadad, Nurit; Pinsk, Vered; Haim, Alon; Fruchtman, Yariv; Levy, Rachel

    2009-03-01

    A 1926-ins-T mutation in the TrkA gene encoding the tyrosine kinase receptor for nerve growth factor (NGF) was previously documented in patients with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA). These patients suffer from skin lacerations which often evolve into deep tissue infections. Abnormality in neutrophil functions may explain this high rate of severe infections. In this study we show that chemotaxis was significantly (P<0.001) suppressed in patients' neutrophils, compared to healthy controls. Although NGF alone did not exert a chemotactic effect, its presence enhanced both migration toward fMLP and phosphorylation of MAP kinases (ERK and JNK) in neutrophils from healthy controls, but not in neutrophils from CIPA patients. The significantly impaired chemotactic activity of neutrophils from a CIPA patient, which has been attributed to the molecular defect in the TrkA receptor, may contribute to the high rate of infection.

  8. Topological Defects at the Graphene/h-BN interface Abnormally Enhance Its Thermal Conductance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangjun; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-08-10

    Low thermal conductance across interface is often the limiting factor in managing heat in many advanced device applications. The most commonly used approach to enhance the thermal conductance is to reduce/eliminate the interfacial structural defects. Using a graphene/h-BN (Gr/h-BN) interface, we show surprisingly that topological defects are able to enhance the thermal conductance across the interface. It is found that the phonon transmission across the Gr/h-BN interface with 5|7 defects is higher than that of the pristine interface, which is in strong contrast to the common notion that interface defects promote phonon scattering. By analyzing the strain distribution and phonon vibrational spectra, we find that this abnormal enhancement in interfacial thermal conductance originates from the localization of the stress fields arising from misfit dislocations and their out-of-plane deformations at the interface. In the presence of the defects, the overall mismatch strain is reduced. In addition, the out-of-plane deformations screen the long-ranged dislocation strain fields, resulting in the stress fields to be localized only at the cores of the defects. This abnormal mechanism provides a new dimension to enhance the interfacial thermal conductance in two-dimensional heterostructures.

  9. Changes in nerve conduction and Pi/PCr ratio during denervation-reinnervation of the gastrocsoleus muscles of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, K. S.; Jaweed, M. M.; Seestead, R.; Herbison, G. J.; Ditunno, J. F. Jr; McCully, K.; Chance, B.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the changes in nerve conduction and phosphate metabolites of the gastrocsoleus muscles of rats during denervation-reinnervation. Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent unilateral crush-denervation of the left sciatic nerves at the sciatic notch. Six rats were used for measurement of motor conduction latency and action potential amplitude of the gastrocsoleus muscle by stimulating the sciatic nerve at one, two and eight weeks after nerve crush. The other ten rats were designated for evaluation of the ratio of inorganic phosphorous (Pi) to phosphocreatine (PCr) by a 31P-phosphoenergetic spectrometer at two weeks and eight weeks after nerve crush. None of the sciatic nerves showed conduction to the gastrocsoleus at one or two weeks after nerve crush. At eight weeks postcrush, the motor conduction latency returned to within normal limits, whereas the action potential amplitude was only 55% of the normal. For the eight-week period of study, the Pi/PCr ratio of the normal control muscles ranged between 0.09 +/- 0.02 and 0.11 +/- 0.02 (mean +/- SD). The denervated muscles showed an increase of Pi/PCr ratio by 54% at two weeks postcrush, compared to the respective contralateral control sides. The ratios returned to the normal value by eight weeks postcrush. In summary, these data suggested that the metabolic recovery of the crush-denervated muscle followed the same pattern as the parameters of nerve conduction.

  10. Evaluation of PVA biodegradable electric conductive membranes for nerve regeneration in axonotmesis injuries: the rat sciatic nerve animal model.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jorge; Caseiro, Ana Rita; Pereira, Tiago; Armada-da-Silva, Paulo Alexandre; Pires, Isabel; Prada, Justina; Amorim, Irina; Leal Reis, Inês; Amado, Sandra; Santos, José Domingos; Bompasso, Simone; Raimondo, Stefania; Varejão, Artur Severo Proença; Geuna, Stefano; Luís, Ana Lúcia; Maurício, Ana Colette

    2017-05-01

    The therapeutic effect of three polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) membranes loaded with electrically conductive materials - carbon nanotubes (PVA-CNTs) and polypyrrole (PVA-PPy) - were tested in vivo for neuro-muscular regeneration after an axonotmesis injury in the rat sciatic nerve. The membranes electrical conductivity measured was 1.5 ± 0.5 × 10(-6) S/m, 579 ± 0.6 × 10(-6) S/m, and 1837.5 ± 0.7 × 10(-6) S/m, respectively. At week-12, a residual motor and nociceptive deficit were present in all treated groups, but at week-12, a better recovery to normal gait pattern of the PVA-CNTs and PVA-PPy treated groups was observed. Morphometrical analysis demonstrated that PVA-CNTs group presented higher myelin thickness and lower g-ratio. The tibialis anterior muscle, in the PVA-PPy and PVA-CNTs groups showed a 9% and 19% increase of average fiber size area and a 5% and 10% increase of the "minimal Feret's diameter," respectively. No inflammation, degeneration, fibrosis or necrosis were detected in lung, liver, kidneys, spleen, and regional lymph nodes and absence of carbon deposits was confirmed with Von Kossa and Masson-Fontana stains. In conclusion, the membranes of PVA-CNTs and PVA-PPy are biocompatible and have electrical conductivity. The higher electrical conductivity measured in PVA-CNTs membrane might be responsible for the positive results on maturation of myelinated fibers. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 1267-1280, 2017.

  11. Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Conducting-Polymer Nanotubes as Highly Sensitive Nerve-Agent Chemiresistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Oh Seok; Park, Chul Soon; Park, Seon Joo; Noh, Seonmyeong; Kim, Saerona; Kong, Hye Jeong; Bae, Joonwon; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2016-09-01

    Organophosphates are powerful inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, which is critical to nerve function. Despite continuous research for detecting the highly toxic organophosphates, a new and improved methodology is still needed. Herein we demonstrate simple-to-fabricate chemiresistive gas sensors using conducting-polymer polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube transducers, which are chemically specific and capable of recognizing sub-ppb concentrations (ca. 0.5 ppb) of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a simulant of nerve agent sarin. Interestingly, the introduction of carboxylic groups on the surface of PPy nanotube transistors resulted in enhanced sensitivity to DMMP via intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity of the nanotube transducer depended on the degree of the carboxylic group introduced. Finally, a sensor array composed of 5 different transducers including the carboxylated nanotubes exhibited excellent selectivity to DMMP in 16 vapor species.

  12. Carboxylic Acid-Functionalized Conducting-Polymer Nanotubes as Highly Sensitive Nerve-Agent Chemiresistors

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh Seok; Park, Chul Soon; Park, Seon Joo; Noh, Seonmyeong; Kim, Saerona; Kong, Hye Jeong; Bae, Joonwon; Lee, Chang-Soo; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphates are powerful inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, which is critical to nerve function. Despite continuous research for detecting the highly toxic organophosphates, a new and improved methodology is still needed. Herein we demonstrate simple-to-fabricate chemiresistive gas sensors using conducting-polymer polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube transducers, which are chemically specific and capable of recognizing sub-ppb concentrations (ca. 0.5 ppb) of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a simulant of nerve agent sarin. Interestingly, the introduction of carboxylic groups on the surface of PPy nanotube transistors resulted in enhanced sensitivity to DMMP via intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity of the nanotube transducer depended on the degree of the carboxylic group introduced. Finally, a sensor array composed of 5 different transducers including the carboxylated nanotubes exhibited excellent selectivity to DMMP in 16 vapor species. PMID:27650635

  13. Post stimulus effects of high frequency biphasic electrical current on a fibre's conductibility in isolated frog nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hailong; Zhu, Linlin; Sheng, Shulei; Sun, Lifei; Zhou, Hongmin; Tang, Hong; Qiu, Tianshuang

    2013-06-01

    Objective. High frequency biphasic (HFB) electrical currents are widely used in nerve blocking studies. Their safety margins largely remain unknown and need to be investigated. Approach. This study, exploring the post stimulus effects of HFB electrical currents on a nerve's conductibility, was performed on bullfrog sciatic nerves. Both compound action potentials (CAPs) and differential CAPs (DCAPs, i.e. control CAPs subtracted by CAPs following HFB currents) were obtained, and N1 and N2 components, which were the first and second upward components of DCAPs, were used for analyses of the effects introduced by HFB electrical stimulation. Main results. First, HFB currents of 10 kHz at a completely blocking threshold were applied for 5 s. The maximum amplitudes and conducting velocities of the CAPs were significantly (P < 0.02) decreased within the observed period (60 s) following HFB currents. The DCAPs displayed clear N1 and N2 components, demonstrating respectively the losses of the fibres' normal conductibility and the appearances of new delayed conductions. Decreases of N1 amplitudes along time, regarded as the recovery of the nerve's conductibility, exhibited two distinct phases: a fast one lasting several seconds and a slow one lasting longer than 5 min. Further tests showed a linear relationship between the HFB stimulation durations and recovering periods of N1 amplitudes. Supra-threshold blocking did not cause higher N1 amplitudes. Significance. This study indicates that HFB electrical currents lead to long lasting post stimulus reduction of a nerve's conductibility, which might relate to potential nerve injuries. A possible mechanism, focusing on changes in intracellular and periaxonal ionic concentrations, was proposed to underlie the reduction of the nerve's conductibility and potential nerve injuries. Greater caution and stimulation protocols with greater safety margins should be explored when utilizing HFB electrical current to block nerve conductions.

  14. Sex differences in abnormal white matter development associated with conduct disorder in children

    PubMed Central

    Decety, Jean; Yoder, Keith J.; Lahey, Benjamin B.

    2015-01-01

    Associations between white matter pathway abnormalities and antisocial personality disorder in adults are well replicated, and there is some evidence for an association of white matter abnormalities with conduct disorder (CD) in adolescents. In this study, white matter maturation using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was examined in 110 children aged 10.0 ± 0.8 years selected to vary widely in their numbers of CD symptoms. The results replicated age-related increases in fractional anisotropy (FA) found in previous studies. There was not a significant association between the number of CD symptoms and FA, but CD symptoms were found to be significantly associated with greater axial and radial diffusivity in a broad range of white matter tracts, particularly in girls. In complementary analyses, there were similar significant differences in axial and radial diffusivity between children who met diagnostic criteria for CD and healthy children with no symptoms of CD, particularly in girls. Brain structural abnormalities may contribute to the emergence of CD in childhood, perhaps playing a greater role in girls. PMID:26195297

  15. Sex differences in abnormal white matter development associated with conduct disorder in children.

    PubMed

    Decety, Jean; Yoder, Keith J; Lahey, Benjamin B

    2015-08-30

    Associations between white matter pathway abnormalities and antisocial personality disorder in adults are well replicated, and there is some evidence for an association of white matter abnormalities with conduct disorder (CD) in adolescents. In this study, white matter maturation using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was examined in 110 children aged 10.0 ± 0.8 years selected to vary widely in their numbers of CD symptoms. The results replicated age-related increases in fractional anisotropy (FA) found in previous studies. There was not a significant association between the number of CD symptoms and FA, but CD symptoms were found to be significantly associated with greater axial and radial diffusivity in a broad range of white matter tracts, particularly in girls. In complementary analyses, there were similar significant differences in axial and radial diffusivity between children who met diagnostic criteria for CD and healthy children with no symptoms of CD, particularly in girls. Brain structural abnormalities may contribute to the emergence of CD in childhood, perhaps playing a greater role in girls.

  16. Nerve growth factor-immobilized polypyrrole: Bioactive electrically conducting polymer for enhanced neurite extension

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Natalia; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials that present multiple stimuli are attractive for a number of biomedical applications. In particular, electrical and biological cues are important factors to include in interfaces with neurons for applications such as nerve conduits and neural probes. Here, we report the combination of these two stimuli, by immobilizing nerve growth factor (NGF) on the surface of the electrically conducting polymer polypyrrole (PPy). NGF was immobilized using an intermediate linker provided by a layer of polyallylamine conjugated to an arylazido functional group. Upon exposure to UV light and activation of the azido groups, NGF was fixed to the substrate. Three different surface concentrations were obtained (0.21–0.98 ng/mm2) and similar levels of neurite extension were observed on immobilized NGF as with soluble NGF. Additionally, electrical stimulation experiments were conducted with the modified polymer and revealed a 50% increase in neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells compared to experiments without electrical stimulation. This novel modification of PPy provides both electrical and biological stimulation, by presenting tethered growth factors and only producing a small decrease in the material's properties (conductivity ~10 S cm−1) when compared to other modification techniques (conductivity ~10−3–10−6 S cm−1. PMID:17111407

  17. Thermal conductivity of abnormally behaving liquids: Prediction methods and their applicability in microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latini, G.; Passerini, G.

    1999-01-01

    Most organic and inorganic liquids show a general decrease of the thermal conductivity but very few compounds show an increase of thermal conductivity with temperature. Hydrogen and Water show an even more abnormal behavior since their thermal conductivity increases from the melting point to a reduced temperature of about 0.65-0.70 then decreases at higher temperatures. Due to their peculiar behavior, none of the general prediction methods developed for organic and inorganic liquids are effective for such substances in their saturated liquid state over the whole temperature range, from melting point to near the critical point. In this paper we present an estimation method able to evaluate thermal conductivity of Hydrogen and Water in their saturated liquid state from the melting point near to the critical point. The equation we present, as a new result of a previously introduced prediction method, links the thermal conductivity of water and Hydrogen with the reduced temperature. Tests, performed against experimental data, show a good accuracy of the method being the deviations generally less than 3% with peak deviations less than 10%.

  18. Easy method to examine single nerve fiber excitability and conduction parameters using intact nonanesthetized earthworms

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christiane K.

    2014-01-01

    The generation and conduction of neuronal action potentials (APs) were the subjects of a cell physiology exercise for first-year medical students. In this activity, students demonstrated the all-or-none nature of AP generation, measured conduction velocity, and examined the dependence of the threshold stimulus amplitude on stimulus duration. For this purpose, they used the median giant nerve fiber (MGF) in the ventral nerve cord of the common earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris). Here, we introduce a specialized stimulation and recording chamber that the nonanesthetized earthworm enters completely unforced. The worm resides in a narrow round duct with silver electrodes on the bottom such that individual APs of the MGF can be elicited and recorded superficially. Our experimental setup combines several advantages: it allows noninvasive single fiber AP measurements taken from a nonanesthetized animal that is yet restrained. Students performed the experiments with a high success rate. According to the data acquired by the students, the mean conduction velocity of the MGF was 30.2 m/s. From the amplitude-duration relationship for threshold stimulation, rheobase and chronaxie were graphically determined by the students according to Lapicque's method. The mean rheobase was 1.01 V, and the mean chronaxie was 0.06 ms. The acquired data and analysis results are of high quality, as deduced from critical examination based on the law of Weiss. In addition, we provide video material, which was also used in the practical course. PMID:25179616

  19. Conduction in the giant nerve fiber pathway in temperature-sensitive paralytic mutants of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Elkins, T; Ganetzky, B

    1990-08-01

    To study electrogenic conduction in neurons of the cervical giant nerve fiber (CGF) pathway in Drosophila adults carrying temperature-sensitive paralytic mutations that affect sodium channels, we recorded dorsal longitudinal muscle (DLM) responses evoked by electrical stimulation of the brain. In the mutants tipE, napts and parats, conduction in certain neurons presynaptic to the CGF failed at about the same temperature at which paralysis occurred in each mutant. Conduction in the CGF and neurons postsynaptic to it remained active in all mutants even at very elevated temperatures. In contrast, analysis of sei mutants showed enhanced spontaneous activity at elevated temperatures in at least some neurons of the CGF pathway. The implications of these results with respect to the normal in vivo functions of these genes in neuronal signalling are considered.

  20. Dynamic Modulation of Myelination in Response to Visual Stimuli Alters Optic Nerve Conduction Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Etxeberria, Ainhoa; Hokanson, Kenton C.; Dao, Dang Q.; Mayoral, Sonia R.; Mei, Feng; Redmond, Stephanie A.; Ullian, Erik M.

    2016-01-01

    Myelin controls the time required for an action potential to travel from the neuronal soma to the axon terminal, defining the temporal manner in which information is processed within the CNS. The presence of myelin, the internodal length, and the thickness of the myelin sheath are powerful structural factors that control the velocity and fidelity of action potential transmission. Emerging evidence indicates that myelination is sensitive to environmental experience and neuronal activity. Activity-dependent modulation of myelination can dynamically alter action potential conduction properties but direct functional in vivo evidence and characterization of the underlying myelin changes is lacking. We demonstrate that in mice long-term monocular deprivation increases oligodendrogenesis in the retinogeniculate pathway but shortens myelin internode lengths without affecting other structural properties of myelinated fibers. We also demonstrate that genetically attenuating synaptic glutamate neurotransmission from retinal ganglion cells phenocopies the changes observed after monocular deprivation, suggesting that glutamate may constitute a signal for myelin length regulation. Importantly, we demonstrate that visual deprivation and shortened internodes are associated with a significant reduction in nerve conduction velocity in the optic nerve. Our results reveal the importance of sensory input in the building of myelinated fibers and suggest that this activity-dependent alteration of myelination is important for modifying the conductive properties of brain circuits in response to environmental experience. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Oligodendrocyte precursor cells differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes and are capable of ensheathing axons with myelin without molecular cues from neurons. However, this default myelination process can be modulated by changes in neuronal activity. Here, we show, for the first time, that experience-dependent activity modifies the length of myelin

  1. Acute corneal epithelial debridement unmasks the corneal stromal nerve responses to ocular stimulation in rats: Implications for abnormal sensations of the eye.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Harumitsu; Mizerska, Kamila K; Dallacasagrande, Valentina A; Guaiquil, Victor H; Rosenblatt, Mark I

    2017-03-01

    It is widely accepted that the mechanisms for transducing sensory information reside in the nerve terminals. Occasionally, however, studies have appeared demonstrating that similar mechanisms may exist in the axon to which these terminals are connected. We examined this issue using the cornea where nerve terminals in the epithelial cell layers are easily accessible for debridement, leaving the underlying stromal (axonal) nerves undisturbed. In isoflurane-anesthetized rats, we recorded extracellularly from single trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the cornea that are excited by ocular dryness and cooling: low threshold (<2 oC cooling) and high threshold (>2 oC) cold-sensitive plus dry sensitive (LT-CS+DS and HT-CS+DS) neurons, playing possible roles in tearing and ocular pain. We found that the responses in both types of neurons to dryness, wetness, and menthol stimuli were effectively abolished by the debridement, indicating that their transduction mechanisms lie in the nerve terminals. However, some responses to the cold, heat and hyperosmolar stimuli in LT-CS+DS neurons still remained. Surprisingly, the responses to heat in ~ half of the neurons were augmented after the debridement. We were also able to evoke these residual responses and follow the trajectory of the stromal nerves, which we subsequently confirmed histologically. The residual responses always disappeared when the stromal nerves were cut at the limbus, suggesting that the additional transduction mechanisms for these sensory modalities originated mostly likely in stromal nerves. The functional significance of these residual and enhanced responses from stromal nerves may be related to the abnormal sensations observed in ocular disease.

  2. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Healthy and Abnormal Regions of Retinal Nerve Fiber Bundles of Patients With Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Monica F.; Chui, Toco Y. P.; Alhadeff, Paula; Rosen, Richard B.; Ritch, Robert; Dubra, Alfredo; Hood, Donald C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To better understand the nature of glaucomatous damage of the macula, especially the structural changes seen between relatively healthy and clearly abnormal (AB) retinal regions, using an adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO). Methods. Adaptive optics SLO images and optical coherence tomography (OCT) vertical line scans were obtained on one eye of seven glaucoma patients, with relatively deep local arcuate defects on the 10-2 visual field test in one (six eyes) or both hemifields (one eye). Based on the OCT images, the retinal nerve fiber (RNF) layer was divided into two regions: (1) within normal limits (WNL), relative RNF layer thickness within mean control values ±2 SD; and (2) AB, relative thickness less than −2 SD value. Results. As seen on AO-SLO, the pattern of AB RNF bundles near the border of the WNL and AB regions differed across eyes. There were normal-appearing bundles in the WNL region of all eyes and AB-appearing bundles near the border with the AB region. This region with AB bundles ranged in extent from a few bundles to the entire AB region in the case of one eye. All other eyes had a large AB region without bundles. However, in two of these eyes, a few bundles were seen within this region of otherwise missing bundles. Conclusions. The AO-SLO images revealed details of glaucomatous damage that are difficult, if not impossible, to see with current OCT technology. Adaptive optics SLO may prove useful in following progression in clinical trials, or in disease management, if AO-SLO becomes widely available and easy to use. PMID:25574048

  3. A case of Lewis-Sumner syndrome with conduction abnormalities only in the brachial plexus and roots.

    PubMed

    Dionne, Annie; Brunet, Denis

    2006-10-01

    We present a case of subacute weakness of one hand with unusual sensory involvement including the upper thorax. Despite normal distal conduction studies, a clinical diagnosis of Lewis-Sumner syndrome was made and the patient responded well to intravenous immunoglobulins. Repeated studies after clinical exacerbation finally proved the demyelinating nature of the neuropathy using proximal magnetic nerve stimulation. This case underlies the importance of seeking proximal conduction blocks in patients with suspected demyelinating neuropathy.

  4. Determination of electrode to nerve fiber distance and nerve conduction velocity through spectral analysis of the extracellular action potentials recorded from earthworm giant fibers.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shaoyu; Odoemene, Onyekachi; Yoshida, Ken

    2012-08-01

    Microneurography and the use of selective microelectrodes that can resolve single-unit nerve activity have become a tool to understand the coding within the nervous system and a clinical diagnostic tool to assess peripheral neural pathologies. Central to these techniques is the use of the differences in the shape of the extracellular action potential (AP) waveform to identify and discriminate units from one another. Theoretical modeling of the origins of these shape differences has shown that the position of the nerve fiber relative to the electrode and the conduction velocity of the unit contribute to these differences giving rise to the hypothesis that more information about the fiber and its relationship to the electrode could be extracted given further analysis of the AP waveform. This paper addresses this question by exploring the electrical coupling between the electrode and nerve fiber. Idealized models and the literature indicate that two parameters, the electrode-fiber distance and the unit conduction velocity, contribute to the amplitude of the extracellular AP detected by the electrode, which confounds the quantification of coupling using the spike amplitude alone. To resolve this, we develop a method that enables differential quantification of these two parameters using spectral analysis of the single-unit AP waveform and demonstrate that the two parameters could be effectively decoupled in an in vitro earthworm model. The method could open the way forward toward micro-scale in situ monitoring of the interaction of nerve fiber and neural interface.

  5. Noninvasive Peroneal Sensory and Motor Nerve Conduction Recordings in the Rabbit Distal Hindlimb: Feasibility, Variability and Neuropathy Measure

    PubMed Central

    Hotson, John R.

    2014-01-01

    The peroneal nerve anatomy of the rabbit distal hindlimb is similar to humans, but reports of distal peroneal nerve conduction studies were not identified with a literature search. Distal sensorimotor recordings may be useful for studying rabbit models of length-dependent peripheral neuropathy. Surface electrodes were adhered to the dorsal rabbit foot overlying the extensor digitorum brevis muscle and the superficial peroneal nerve. The deep and superficial peroneal nerves were stimulated above the ankle and the common peroneal nerve was stimulated at the knee. The nerve conduction studies were repeated twice with a one-week intertest interval to determine measurement variability. Intravenous vincristine was used to produce a peripheral neuropathy. Repeat recordings measured the response to vincristine. A compound muscle action potential and a sensory nerve action potential were evoked in all rabbits. The compound muscle action potential mean amplitude was 0.29 mV (SD ± 0.12) and the fibula head to ankle mean motor conduction velocity was 46.5 m/s (SD ± 2.9). The sensory nerve action potential mean amplitude was 22.8 μV (SD ± 2.8) and the distal sensory conduction velocity was 38.8 m/s (SD ± 2.2). Sensorimotor latencies and velocities were least variable between two test sessions (coefficient of variation  =  2.6–5.9%), sensory potential amplitudes were intermediate (coefficient of variation  =  11.1%) and compound potential amplitudes were the most variable (coefficient of variation  = 19.3%). Vincristine abolished compound muscle action potentials and reduced sensory nerve action potential amplitudes by 42–57% while having little effect on velocity. Rabbit distal hindlimb nerve conduction studies are feasible with surface recordings and stimulation. The evoked distal sensory potentials have amplitudes, configurations and recording techniques that are similar to humans and may be valuable for measuring large sensory fiber function in chronic

  6. Effects of lead acetate on guinea pig - cochear microphonics, action potential, and motor nerve conduction velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, K.; Maehara, N.; Terayama, K.; Ueno, N.; Kohyama, A.; Sawada, Y.; Kishi, R.

    1987-04-01

    Segmental demyelination and axonal degeneration of motor nerves induced by lead exposure is well known in man, and animals. The effect of lead acetate exposure to man may involve the cranial nerves, since vertigo and sensory neuronal deafness have been reported among lead workers. However, there are few reports concerning the dose-effects of lead acetate both to the peripheral nerve and the cranial VII nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration. The authors investigated the effects of lead acetate to the cochlea and the VIII nerve using CM (cochlear microphonics) and AP (action potential) of the guinea pigs. The effects of lead acetate to the sciatic nerve were measured by MCV of the sciatic nerve with measurement of blood lead concentration.

  7. The Development of Electrically Conductive Polycaprolactone Fumarate-Polypyrrole Composite Materials for Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Runge, M. Brett; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Knight, Andrew M.; Ruesink, Terry; Lazcano, Eric; Lu, Lichun; Windebank, Anthony J.; Yaszemski, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Electrically conductive polymer composites composed of polycaprolactone fumarate and polypyrrole (PCLF-PPy) have been developed for nerve regeneration applications. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of PCLF-PPy and in vitro studies showing PCLF-PPy materials support both PC12 cell and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurite extension. PCLF-PPy composite materials were synthesized by polymerizing pyrrole in pre-formed PCLF scaffolds (Mn 7,000 or 18,000 g mol−1) resulting in interpenetrating networks of PCLF-PPy. Chemical compositions and thermal properties were characterized by ATR-FTIR, XPS, DSC, and TGA. PCLF-PPy materials were synthesized with five different anions (naphthalene-2-sulfonic acid sodium salt (NSA), dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid sodium salt (DBSA), dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt (DOSS), potassium iodide (I), and lysine) to investigate effects on electrical conductivity and to optimize chemical composition for cellular compatibility. PCLF-PPy materials have variable electrical conductivity up to 6 mS cm−1 with bulk compositions ranging from 5 to 13.5 percent polypyrrole. AFM and SEM characterization show microstructures with a root mean squared (RMS) roughness of 1195 nm and nanostructures with RMS roughness of 8 nm. In vitro studies using PC12 cells and DRG show PCLF-PPy materials synthesized with NSA or DBSA support cell attachment, proliferation, neurite extension, and are promising materials for future studies involving electrical stimulation. PMID:20483452

  8. Psychological performance in relation to central and peripheral nerve conduction in workers exposed to lead, zinc, and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, S.; Yokoyama, K.; Aono, H.; Murata, K.

    1986-01-01

    Psychological performance was examined in relation to central and peripheral nerve conduction by means of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale test, short-latency somatosensory-evoked potential (SSEP), and median nerve conduction velocity in 19 male gun-metal foundry workers exposed to lead, zinc, and copper. (Their blood lead concentrations--ie, 16-64 micrograms/dl with a mean of 42--and plasma zinc and copper concentrations were significantly higher than those of control subjects). In these workers, the score of picture completion (psychological performance) was significantly low; indicators of lead absorption, but no indicators of zinc and copper absorption, were significantly correlated with this score. The score of picture completion was significantly correlated with the N11-N13 latency of SSEP (conduction time in the spinobulbar region) in the workers; their N11-N13 latency, together with the N9 and N9-N11 latencies, was significantly prolonged and was significantly correlated with indicators of lead absorption. Furthermore, their maximal motor and sensory conduction velocities of the median nerve were significantly slowed. It is concluded that both psychological performance and central and peripheral nerve conduction may be impaired in lead-exposed workers with BPb's below approximately 60 micrograms/dl.

  9. Neuroactive conducting scaffolds: nerve growth factor conjugation on active ester-functionalized polypyrrole

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Young; Lee, Joo-Woon; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2009-01-01

    Electrically conductive and biologically active scaffolds are desirable for enhancing adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of a number of cell types such as neurons. Hence, the incorporation of neuroactive molecules into electroconductive polymers via a specific and stable method is essential for neuronal tissue engineering applications. Traditional conjugation approaches dramatically impair conductivities and/or stabilities of the scaffolds and ligands. In this study, we developed copolymers (PPy-NSE) of N-hydroxyl succinimidyl ester pyrrole and regular pyrrole, which can be immobilized with nerve growth factor (NGF) without significantly hindering electroconductivity. The presence of active ester groups was confirmed using reflectance infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) from the copolymers prepared from different monomer compositions. We selected PPy-NSE50 (polymerized from a 50 : 50 monomer ratio of pyrrole : pyrrole-NSE) for further modification with NGF because this copolymer retains good conductivity (approx. 8 S cm−1) and presents active ester groups for NGF immobilization. We tethered NGF on the PPy-NSE50 surface, and found that PC12 cells extended neurites similarly to cells cultured in NGF-containing medium. XPS and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay confirmed that NGF immobilized via the active ester on the PPy-NSE50 film was stable for up to 5 days in phosphate-buffered saline solution. Also, application of an external electrical potential to NGF-immobilized PPy films did not cause a significant release of NGF nor reduce their neurotrophic activity. This novel scaffold, providing electroconductive and neurotrophic activities, has potential for neural applications, such as tissue engineering scaffolds and biosensors. PMID:19068472

  10. Sympathetic nerve activity can be estimated from skin conductance responses - a comment on Henderson et al. (2012).

    PubMed

    Bach, Dominik R

    2014-01-01

    A recent paper by Henderson et al. (2012) claimed that skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) can not be retrieved from skin conductance responses (SCR). Here, I argue that this claim is not supported by the literature, and comment on contemporary approaches of estimating SSNA from SCR using biophysical models.

  11. Peripheral nerve conduction recorded by a micro gradiometer system (micro-SQUID) in humans.

    PubMed

    Hoshiyama, M; Kakigi, R; Nagata, O

    1999-09-17

    We developed a new multi (twelve) -channel gradiometer system with the smallest and highest quality superconducting quantum interference device (micro-SQUID). A very small distance (3.80 mm) between the sensor coils and the skin provides quite high spatial resolution. The actual whole image of the sensory nerve action fields (NAF) of the human median nerve at the wrist were successfully recorded following digital nerve stimulation by using the micro-SQUID. The NAF showed the biphasic waveform at each of the 12 channels, and the isomagnetic field map clearly showed the moving quadrupole pattern. The quadrupole comprised a dipole for depolarization followed by another dipole with the opposite direction for repolarization. The polarized length of the nerve obtained by reconstructing the magnetic field maps was approximately 17 cm, and the magnetic field complex moved along the nerve from the distal to the proximal part of the wrist at 58.7 m/s.

  12. Validation of a one-stop carpal tunnel clinic including nerve conduction studies and hand therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ball, C; Pearse, M; Kennedy, D; Hall, A; Nanchahal, J

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common hand disorder. We describe a pathway that includes clinical assessment, neurophysiological testing, surgery and physical therapy all at the same visit. METHODS All referrals for carpal tunnel syndrome were screened for inclusion in a ‘one-stop’ surgeon-led clinic. Prospective clinical data collected included patient reported outcome measures and satisfaction scores, touch threshold, pinch and grip strength. Patients were assessed clinically, underwent nerve conduction studies and surgery as indicated, all on the same day. Baseline and one-year follow-up data were analysed for 57 patients (62 hands). RESULTS There was significant improvement in all domains of the Boston Carpal Tunnel and Michigan Hand Outcomes questionnaires, grip strength and touch threshold. There were no adverse events. The total mean operating time was 12.8 minutes (range: 5–15 minutes) and the mean tourniquet time was 2.5 minutes (range: 1–11 minutes). Using a dual theatre model produced a short mean turnaround time of 14.8 minutes (range: 2–37 minutes). Patient satisfaction as judged using a Picker questionnaire was very high. CONCLUSIONS A highly efficient clinical service involving both diagnostics and treatment can be delivered at a single hospital visit while maintaining optimal outcomes and high patient satisfaction. PMID:22041242

  13. Septin/anillin filaments scaffold central nervous system myelin to accelerate nerve conduction

    PubMed Central

    Patzig, Julia; Erwig, Michelle S; Tenzer, Stefan; Kusch, Kathrin; Dibaj, Payam; Möbius, Wiebke; Goebbels, Sandra; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Werner, Hauke B

    2016-01-01

    Myelination of axons facilitates rapid impulse propagation in the nervous system. The axon/myelin-unit becomes impaired in myelin-related disorders and upon normal aging. However, the molecular cause of many pathological features, including the frequently observed myelin outfoldings, remained unknown. Using label-free quantitative proteomics, we find that the presence of myelin outfoldings correlates with a loss of cytoskeletal septins in myelin. Regulated by phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2)-levels, myelin septins (SEPT2/SEPT4/SEPT7/SEPT8) and the PI(4,5)P2-adaptor anillin form previously unrecognized filaments that extend longitudinally along myelinated axons. By confocal microscopy and immunogold-electron microscopy, these filaments are localized to the non-compacted adaxonal myelin compartment. Genetic disruption of these filaments in Sept8-mutant mice causes myelin outfoldings as a very specific neuropathology. Septin filaments thus serve an important function in scaffolding the axon/myelin-unit, evidently a late stage of myelin maturation. We propose that pathological or aging-associated diminishment of the septin/anillin-scaffold causes myelin outfoldings that impair the normal nerve conduction velocity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17119.001 PMID:27504968

  14. Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity Depends on Stimuli Frequency in the Rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez, Ma C.; Cruz, Elizabeth; Caudillo, Cipriana; Sosa, Modesto; Gamiño, Sergio M.

    2003-09-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of frequency and duration of stimuli on motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) in the rat. MNCV was evaluated in two separate series of records. In the first the frequency of stimuli was varied between 1.0 and 10.0 Hz, by 1 Hz steps, keeping the duration of the pulses constant at 0.1 ms. In a second experimental trial, the frequency of the stimuli was kept at 10.0 Hz, while duration increased from 0.05 to 1.00 ms, at customized steps. Supramaximal stimulation pulses were always used. Measures were performed in the right pelvic limb of 12 anesthetized rats. The active needle electrode was inserted in the second interosseus space of the paw, while a subcutaneous reference electrode was inserted in the third toe. The ground electrode was placed on dorsal surface of the limb. The proximal stimuli site was identified at the sciatic notch and the distal one at the ankle. Surface stimulation was used. Latency, duration, area under the curve and amplitude of the muscular action potential were also measured. MNCV was estimated by dividing distal to proximal latency difference by the distance between stimuli sites. MNCV exhibited an increase to a plateu with stimulus frequency growth. Duration also showed the same behavior.

  15. Regenerating mammalian nerve fibres: changes in action potential waveform and firing characteristics following blockage of potassium conductance.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, J D; Waxman, S G; Hildebrand, C; Ruiz, J A

    1982-12-22

    Extracellular application of potassium channel blocking agents is known to increase the amplitude and duration of the compound action potential in non-myelinated and demyelinated axons, but not in mature mammalian myelinated fibres. In the present study we used intra-axonal and whole nerve recording techniques to study the effects of the potassium channel blocking agent 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) on regenerating rat nerve fibres. Our results indicate that early regenerating (premyelinated) axons show considerable broadening of the action potential after 4-AP application and late regenerating (myelinated) axons give rise to burst activity following a single stimulus after 4-AP application. 4-AP did not affect spike waveform or firing properties of normal mature sciatic nerve fibres. These results demonstrate the importance of potassium conductance in stabilizing firing properties of myelinated regenerating axons.

  16. Polarity reversal of the optical rotation signals with change in direction of impulse conduction along the lobster nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, A

    1993-01-01

    1. The optical rotation signal of nerve associated with excitation was recorded from peripheral nerve taken from a walking leg of a spiny lobster and its properties were analysed. 2. The polarity of the optical rotation signal was reversed when the site of stimulation was changed with reference to the site of optical recording, so that the direction of impulse conduction was reversed, in most of the preparations. 3. Apart from the main response, which is associated with the conducted impulse, a pre-response was found to exist, which manifested itself on anodic stimulation, in a tetrodotoxin-treated nerve, or during the refractory period of the nerve, when the site of stimulation was close to the site of optical recording. The polarity of the pre-response was also reversed when the site of stimulation was changed with reference to the site of optical recording. 4. When the nerve was inclined from the horizontal level, so that the angle of incidence of light to the nerve was changed, the main response changed its amplitude and sometimes its polarity, whereas the pre-response remained practically unchanged. Thus the dependence on the angle of incidence was different between the pre-response and the main response. 5. It is suggested that the dependence of amplitude and polarity of the main response on the angle of incidence of light cannot be explained by the change in molecular axes of the membrane macromolecules, but can only be explained by their conformational change; and therefore the main response can be used as a monitor for the molecular conformation. PMID:8410706

  17. Limb lengthening and peripheral nerve function—factors associated with deterioration of conduction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Limb lengthening is performed for a diverse range of orthopedic problems. A high rate of complications has been reported in these patients, which include motor and sensory loss as a result of nerve damage. We investigated the effect of limb lengthening on peripheral nerve function. Patients and methods 36 patients underwent electrophysiological testing at 3 points: (1) preoperatively, (2) after application of external fixator/corticotomy but before lengthening, and (3) after lengthening. The limb-length discrepancy was due to a congenital etiology (n = 19), a growth disturbance (n = 9), or a traumatic etiology (n = 8). Results 2 of the traumatic etiology patients had significant changes evident on electrophysiological testing preoperatively. They both deteriorated further with lengthening. 7 of the 21 patients studied showed deterioration in nerve function after lengthening, but not postoperatively, indicating that this was due to the lengthening process and not to the surgical procedure. All of these patients had a congenital etiology for their leg-length discrepancy. Interpretation As detailed electrophysiological tests were carried out before surgery, after surgery but before lengthening, and finally after completion of lengthening, it was possible to distinguish between the effects of the operation and the effects of lengthening on nerve function. The results indicate that the etiology, site (femur or tibia), and nerve (common peroneal or tibial) had a bearing on the risk of nerve injury and that these factors had a far greater effect than the total amount of lengthening. PMID:24171677

  18. The Effect of Low Omega-3/Omega-6 Ratio on Auditory Nerve Conduction in Rat Pups.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Saeid; Motasaddi Zarandy, Masoud; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Shidfar, Farzad; Jalaie, Shohreh; Rahimi, Vida

    2015-01-01

    The biological effects of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are determined by their mutual interactions. This interaction extremely affects various functions. Lower consumption of omega-3 during gestation leads to various disorders, even in hearing. We aimed to assess the effect of low omega-3/omega-6 ratios on auditory nerve conduction. In this experimental study, the auditory brainstem response test was performed on 24-day-old rat (n=14). The rats were divided into case (low omega-3/omega-6 ratio during gestation and lactation) and control groups. Variables such as P1, P3, and P4 absolute latency period, interpeaks (P3-P4, P1-P3, and P1-P4), and P4/P1 amplitude ratio were measured. We found an increased P4 omega-3/omega-6 ratio in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.01). No significant difference was observed in the P1 and P3 absolute latency period between the studied groups  (P>0.05).  Also, no significant difference was observed between the groups with respect to the P1-P3 interpeak latency (IPL) periods (P>0.05); while the P1-P4 and P3-P4 IPLs were significantly increased in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.05). The P4/P1 amplitude ratio significantly decreased in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.05). Results confirmed the negative effects of low omega-3/omega-6 ratio on the auditory system and hearing.

  19. Lower limb areflexia without central and peripheral conduction abnormalities is highly suggestive of Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease Pro102Leu.

    PubMed

    Salsano, Ettore; Fancellu, Roberto; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Ciano, Claudia; Scaioli, Vidmer; Nanetti, Lorenzo; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Mariotti, Caterina; Pareyson, Davide

    2011-03-15

    Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease Pro102Leu (GSS102) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited prion disease due to a substitution of proline for leucine at codon 102 in the Prion Protein gene, and characterized by early walking difficulties and much later occurring dementia. We report clinical, electrophysiological and neuroradiological features of seven novel Italian cases of GSS102. The findings in our series support the thesis that early signs of GSS102 (including areflexia, ataxia, lower limb weakness, and painful dysesthesias) are likely due to a caudal myelopathic process, and suggest that GSS102 should be included among the causes of ataxia with areflexia. Moreover, our observations show that in patients with GSS102, as opposed to Friedreich's ataxia and other forms of ataxia with areflexia, nerve conduction studies and somato-sensory evoked potentials are normal, despite the presence of lower limb areflexia. Hence, in subjects with walking difficulties, the presence of lower limb areflexia without central and peripheral conduction abnormalities is highly suggestive or possibly pathognomonic of GSS102, and can easily guide the clinicians to make the diagnosis of this rare neurodegenerative disease.

  20. Cytocompatibility of a conductive nanofibrous carbon nanotube/poly (L-Lactic acid) composite scaffold intended for nerve tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kabiri, Mahboubeh; Oraee-Yazdani, Saeed; Dodel, Masumeh; Hanaee-Ahvaz, Hana; Soudi, Sara; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Salehi, Mohammad; Soleimani, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to fabricate a conductive aligned nanofibrous substrate and evaluate its suitability and cytocompatibility with neural cells for nerve tissue engineering purposes. In order to reach these goals, we first used electrospinning to fabricate single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWCNT) incorporated poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanofibrous scaffolds and then assessed its cytocompatibility with olfactory ensheathing glial cells (OEC). The plasma treated scaffolds were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and water contact angle. OECs were isolated from olfactory bulb of GFP Sprague-Dawley rats and characterized using OEC specific markers via immunocytochemistry and flow cytometery. The cytocompatibility of the conductive aligned nano-featured scaffold was assessed using microscopy and MTT assay. We indicate that doping of PLLA polymer with SWCNT can augment the aligned nanosized substrate with conductivity, making it favorable for nerve tissue engineering. Our results demonstrated that SWCNT/PLLA composite scaffold promote the adhesion, growth, survival and proliferation of OEC. Regarding the ideal physical, topographical and electrical properties of the scaffold and the neurotrophic and migratory features of the OECs, we suggest this scaffold and the cell/scaffold construct as a promising platform for cell delivery to neural defects in nerve tissue engineering approaches. PMID:26600751

  1. Association of interatrial septal abnormalities with cardiac impulse conduction disorders in adult patients: experience from a tertiary center in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Bakalli, Aurora; Pllana, Ejup; Koçinaj, Dardan; Bekteshi, Tefik; Dragusha, Gani; Gashi, Masar; Musliu, Nebih; Gashi, Zaim

    2011-01-01

    Interatrial septal disorders, which include: atrial septal defect, patent foramen ovale and atrial septal aneurysm, are frequent congenital anomalies found in adult patients. Early detection of these anomalies is important to prevent their hemodynamic and/or thromboembolic consequences. The aims of this study were: to assess the association between impulse conduction disorders and anomalies of interatrial septum; to determine the prevalence of different types of interatrial septum abnormalities; to assess anatomic, hemodynamic, and clinical consequences of interatrial septal pathologies. Fifty-three adult patients with impulse conduction disorders and patients without ECG changes but with signs of interatrial septal abnormalities, who were referred to our center for echocardiography, were included in a prospective transesophageal echocardiography study. Interatrial septal anomalies were detected in around 85% of the examined patients. Patent foramen ovale was encountered in 32% of the patients, and in combination with atrial septal aneurysm in an additional 11.3% of cases. Atrial septal aneurysm and atrial septal defect were diagnosed with equal frequency in 20.7% of our study population. Impulse conduction disorders were significantly more suggestive of interatrial septal anomalies than clinical signs and symptoms observed in our patients (84.91% vs 30.19%, P=0.002). Right bundle branch block was the most frequent impulse conduction disorder, found in 41 (77.36%) cases. We conclude that interatrial septal anomalies are highly associated with impulse conduction disorders, particularly with right bundle branch block. Impulse conduction disorders are more indicative of interatrial septal abnormalities in earlier stages than can be understood from the patient’s clinical condition. PMID:21977304

  2. Conductance fluctuations from the inactivation process of sodium channels in myelinated nerve fibres*

    PubMed Central

    Conti, F.; Neumcke, B.; Nonner, W.; Stämpfli, R.

    1980-01-01

    1. Na currents and fluctuations of Na currents were studied under voltage clamp in the same myelinated nerve fibres of Rana esculenta at 13 °C. The results were used to test several kinetic models for the gating process of Na channels. 2. Long voltage pulses, depolarizing the membrane by 16-48 mV from a hyperpolarizing holding level of — 28 mV, were applied in 4 sec intervals. The d.c. and a.c. components of the membrane current were recorded during the last 328 msec of the 473 msec pulses. For each depolarization, ninety-six trials were made with the node in Ringer solution and, again, after adding 300 nm-tetrodotoxin (TTX) in that solution. 3. The TTX-sensitive d.c. component declined during the 328 msec records by 14-51% of its time average. The a.c. component was corrected for this trend by subtracting the first from the second of each pair of subsequent records. The TTX-sensitive part of its variance declined, on the average, in parallel to the current, as if the open probability rather than the conductance of the individual Na channels was reduced by a slow process. 4. Single-channel conductances, γ, were calculated on the assumption that Na channels have only one non-zero conductance and were corrected for the limited band width (5 kHz) of the a.c. records. Values of γ increased slightly (< 30% from 16 to 40 mV), and averaged 8·85 ± 0·7 pS (s.e. of mean, seventeen measurements on ten fibres). This small degree of change in γ suggests that deviations from the all-or-none gating are very small. 5. Power spectral densities of the fluctuations between 3 Hz and 5 kHz were calculated from the trend-free a.c. records and corrected for the TTX-insensitive noise component. Control calculations showed that the only effect of the nonstationarity in the Na current was to enhance the low-frequency points of such spectra by less than 10%. The spectra revealed at least two Lorentzian components with cut-off frequencies in the range expected from the activation and

  3. Scaling factor relating conduction velocity and diameter for myelinated afferent nerve fibres in the cat hind limb.

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, I A; Kalu, K U

    1979-01-01

    1. Compound action potentials were recorded from certain muscle and cutaneous nerves in normal and chronically de-efferentated hind limbs of cats during stimulation of the appropriate dorsal spinal roots, 2. The peaks for groups I, II and III in the compound action potential were correlated with the corresponding peaks in the fibre-diameter histograms of the same de-efferentated nerve after processing it for light microscopy. 3. The scaling factor (ratio of conduction velocity in m/sec to total diameter in micrometer) was not constant for all sizes of fibre nor did it increase progressively with fibre size. Evidence is presented that a logarithmic relation between conduction velocity and fibre diameter is not appropriate. 4. In muscle nerves the scaling factor for fibres fixed by glutaraldehyde perfusion and embedded in Epon was 5.7 for group I afferent fibres and 4.6 for myelinated fibres in both group II and group III. 5. In cutaneous nerves the scaling factor was 5.6 for large fibres (group I or Abeta) and 4.6 for small fibres (group III or Adelta). 6. The scaling factor for group I fibres is the same as was found previously for alpha-efferent fibres, and that for groups II and III is the same as for gamma-efferent fibres (Boyd & Davey, 1968). 7. The possibility that there is a clear discontinuity in scaling factor between fibres in groups I and alpha, and those in other functional groups, is discussed. 8. It is concluded that there must be some structural feature of alpha and group I fibres which differs from that of smaller myelinated fibres. It is likely that a difference in the relative thickness of the myelin sheath is involved and possibly also in the conductances responsible for generating the action potential. Images Plate 1 PMID:458657

  4. Α-Dendrotoxin-sensitive Kv1 channels contribute to conduction failure of polymodal nociceptive C-fibers from rat coccygeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Chao; Wang, Shan; Zhang, Ming; Gao, Fang; Yin, Chun; Li, Hao; Zhang, Ying; Hu, San-Jue; Duan, Jian-Hong

    2016-02-01

    It is known that some patients with diabetic neuropathy are usually accompanied by abnormal painful sensations. Evidence has accumulated that diabetic neuropathic pain is associated with the hyperexcitability of peripheral nociceptors. Previously, we demonstrated that reduced conduction failure of polymodal nociceptive C-fibers and enhanced voltage-dependent sodium currents of small dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons contribute to diabetic hyperalgesia. To further investigate whether and how potassium channels are involved in the conduction failure, α-dendrotoxin (α-DTX), a selective blocker of the low-threshold sustained Kv1 channel, was chosen to examine its functional capability in modulating the conduction properties of polymodal nociceptive C-fibers and the excitability of sensory neurons. We found that α-DTX reduced the conduction failure of C-fibers from coccygeal nerve in vivo accompanied by an increased initial conduction velocity but a decreased activity-dependent slowing of conduction velocity. In addition, the number of APs evoked by step currents was significantly enhanced after the treatment with α-DTX in small-diameter sensory neurons. Further study of the mechanism indicates α-DTX-sensitive K(+) current significantly reduced and the activation of this current in peak and steady state shifted to depolarization for diabetic neurons. Expression of Kv channel subunits Kv1.2 and Kv1.6 was downregulated in both small dorsal root ganglion neurons and peripheral C-fibers. Taken together, these results suggest that α-DTX-sensitive Kv1 channels might play an important role in regulating the conduction properties of polymodal nociceptive C-fibers and firing properties of sensory neurons.

  5. Tetrodotoxic poisoning from ingestion of a porcupine fish (Diodon hystrix) in Papua New Guinea: nerve conduction studies.

    PubMed

    Trevett, A J; Mavo, B; Warrell, D A

    1997-01-01

    Near Port Moresby in Papua New Guinea, three of four adult family members who ate a porcupine fish (Diodon hystrix) were severely poisoned. Within one hour of the meal, both the mother and her older daughter had developed paraesthesiae, ataxia, hypersalivation, sweating, and had collapsed and died. The younger daughter developed similar symptoms with progressive paralysis requiring mechanical ventilation for 24 hr, but she made a complete recovery 10 days after the poisoning. In this patient, nerve conduction studies showed reduced sensory and motor conduction velocities and evoked amplitudes with gradual improvement in parallel with the patient's clinical condition, consistent with the known action of tetrodotoxin on voltage-gated sodium channels.

  6. Effect of Treating Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats With Sorbinil, Myo-Inositol or Aminoguanidine on Endoneurial Blood Flow, Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity and Vascular Function of Epineurial Arterioles of the Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Coppey, Lawrence J.; Gellett, Jill S.; Davidson, Eric P.; Dunlap, Joyce A.

    2002-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated that diabetes causes impairment in vascular function of epineurial vessels, which precedes the slowing of motor nerve conduction velocity. Treatment of diabetic rats with aldose reductase inhibitors, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol supplementation have been shown to improve motor nerve conduction velocity and/or decreased endoneurial blood flow. However, the effect these treatments have on vascular reactivity of epineurial vessels of the sciatic nerve is unknown. In these studies we examined the effect of treating streptozotocininduced rats with sorbinil, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol on motor nerve conduction velocity, endoneurial blood flow and endothelium dependent vascular relaxation of arterioles that provide circulation to the region of the sciatic nerve. Treating diabetic rats with sorbinil, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol improved the reduction of endoneurial blood flow and motor nerve conduction velocity. However, only sorbinil treatment significantly improved the diabetes-induced impairment of acetylcholinemediated vasodilation of epineurial vessels of the sciatic nerve. All three treatments were efficacious in preventing the appropriate metabolic derangements associated with either activation of the polyol pathway or increased nonenzymatic glycation. In addition, sorbinil was shown to prevent the diabetes-induced decrease in lens glutathione level. However, other markers of oxidative stress were not vividly improved by these treatments. These studies suggest that sorbinil treatment may be more effective in preventing neural dysfunction in diabetes than either aminoguanidine or myoinositol. PMID:11900277

  7. Material properties and electrical stimulation regimens through polycaprolactone fumarate-polypyrrole scaffolds as potential conductive nerve conduits

    PubMed Central

    Moroder, Philipp; Wang, Huan; Ruesink, Terry; Lu, Lichun; Windebank, Anthony J.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Runge, M. Brett

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical and electrical properties of polycaprolactone fumarate-polypyrrole (PCLF-PPy) scaffolds were studied under physiological conditions to evaluate their ability to maintain material properties necessary for application as conductive nerve conduits. PC12 cells cultured on PCLF-PPy scaffolds were stimulated with regimens of 10 μA of constant or 20 Hz frequency current passed through the scaffolds for 1 h/day. PC12 cellular morphologies were analyzed by fluorescence microscopy after 48 h. PCLF-PPy scaffolds exhibited excellent mechanical properties at 37°C which would allow suturing and flexibility. The surface resistivity of the scaffolds was 2kΩ and the scaffolds were electrically stable during application of electrical stimulation (ES). In vitro studies showed significant increases in percentage of neurite bearing cells, number of neurites per cell and neurite length in the presence of ES compared to no ES. Additionally, extending neurites were observed to align in the direction of the applied current. This study shows that electrically conductive PCLF-PPy scaffolds possess material properties necessary for application as nerve conduits. Additionally, the capability to significantly enhance and direct neurite extension by passing electrical current through PCLF-PPy scaffolds renders them even more promising as future therapeutic treatments for severe nerve injuries. PMID:20965280

  8. Relevance of nerve conduction velocity in the assessment of balance performance in older adults with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting-Yun; Chen, Shih-Ching; Peng, Chih-Wei; Kang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Yu-Luen; Chen, Chun-Lung; Chou, Yi-Lin; Lai, Chien-Hung

    2017-03-01

    Purpose This study investigated the relationship between peripheral nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and balance performance in older adults with diabetes. Methods Twenty older adults with diabetes were recruited to evaluate the NCV of their lower limbs and balance performance. The balance assessments comprised the timed up and go (TUG) test, Berg balance scale (BBS), unipedal stance test (UST), multidirectional reach test (MDRT), maximum step length (MSL) test and quiet standing with eyes open and closed. The relationship between NCV and balance performance was evaluated by Pearson's correlation coefficients, and the balance performances of the diabetic patients with and without peripheral neuropathy were compared by using Mann-Whitney U tests. Results The NCV in the lower limbs exhibited a moderate to strong correlation with most of the balance tests including the TUG (r = -0.435 to -0.520, p < 0.05), BBS (r = 0.406-0.554, p < 0.05), UST (r = 0.409-0.647, p < 0.05) and MSL (r = 0.399-0.585, P < 0.05). In addition, patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy had a poorer TUG (p < 0.05), BBS (p < 0.01), UST (p < 0.05) and MSL performance (p < 0.05) compared with those without peripheral neuropathy (p < 0.05). Conclusion Our findings revealed that a decline in peripheral nerve conduction in the lower limb is not only an indication of nerve dysfunction, but may also be related to the impairment of balance performance in patients with diabetes. Implications for Rehabilitation Nerve conduction velocity in the lower limbs of diabetic older adults showed moderate to strong correlations with most of the results of balance tests, which are commonly used in clinics. Decline in nerve conduction velocity of the lower limbs may be related to the impairment of balance control in patients with diabetes. Diabetic older adults with peripheral neuropathy exhibited greater postural instability than those without peripheral

  9. Prevalence of Chagas Disease in a U.S. Population of Latin American Immigrants with Conduction Abnormalities on Electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Traina, Mahmoud I; Hernandez, Salvador; Sanchez, Daniel R; Dufani, Jalal; Salih, Mohsin; Abuhamidah, Adieb M; Olmedo, Wilman; Bradfield, Jason S; Forsyth, Colin J; Meymandi, Sheba K

    2017-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) affects over six million people and is a leading cause of cardiomyopathy in Latin America. Given recent migration trends, there is a large population at risk in the United States (US). Early stage cardiac involvement from CD usually presents with conduction abnormalities on electrocardiogram (ECG) including right bundle branch block (RBBB), left anterior or posterior fascicular block (LAFB or LPFB, respectively), and rarely, left bundle branch block (LBBB). Identification of disease at this stage may lead to early treatment and potentially delay the progression to impaired systolic function. All ECGs performed in a Los Angeles County hospital and clinic system were screened for the presence of RBBB, LAFB, LPFB, or LBBB. Patients were contacted and enrolled in the study if they had previously resided in Latin America for at least 12 months and had no history of cardiac disease. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunofluorescence assay (IFA) tests were utilized to screen for Trypanosoma cruzi seropositivity. A total of 327 consecutive patients were screened for CD from January 2007 to December 2010. The mean age was 46.3 years and the mean length of stay in the US was 21.2 years. Conduction abnormalities were as follows: RBBB 40.4%, LAFB 40.1%, LPFB 2.8%, LBBB 5.5%, RBBB and LAFB 8.6%, and RBBB and LPFB 2.8%. Seventeen patients were positive by both ELISA and IFA (5.2%). The highest prevalence rate was among those with RBBB and LAFB (17.9%). There is a significant prevalence of CD in Latin American immigrants residing in Los Angeles with conduction abnormalities on ECG. Clinicians should consider evaluating all Latin American immigrant patients with unexplained conduction disease for CD.

  10. Prevalence of Chagas Disease in a U.S. Population of Latin American Immigrants with Conduction Abnormalities on Electrocardiogram

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Salvador; Sanchez, Daniel R.; Dufani, Jalal; Salih, Mohsin; Abuhamidah, Adieb M.; Olmedo, Wilman; Bradfield, Jason S.; Forsyth, Colin J.; Meymandi, Sheba K.

    2017-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) affects over six million people and is a leading cause of cardiomyopathy in Latin America. Given recent migration trends, there is a large population at risk in the United States (US). Early stage cardiac involvement from CD usually presents with conduction abnormalities on electrocardiogram (ECG) including right bundle branch block (RBBB), left anterior or posterior fascicular block (LAFB or LPFB, respectively), and rarely, left bundle branch block (LBBB). Identification of disease at this stage may lead to early treatment and potentially delay the progression to impaired systolic function. All ECGs performed in a Los Angeles County hospital and clinic system were screened for the presence of RBBB, LAFB, LPFB, or LBBB. Patients were contacted and enrolled in the study if they had previously resided in Latin America for at least 12 months and had no history of cardiac disease. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunofluorescence assay (IFA) tests were utilized to screen for Trypanosoma cruzi seropositivity. A total of 327 consecutive patients were screened for CD from January 2007 to December 2010. The mean age was 46.3 years and the mean length of stay in the US was 21.2 years. Conduction abnormalities were as follows: RBBB 40.4%, LAFB 40.1%, LPFB 2.8%, LBBB 5.5%, RBBB and LAFB 8.6%, and RBBB and LPFB 2.8%. Seventeen patients were positive by both ELISA and IFA (5.2%). The highest prevalence rate was among those with RBBB and LAFB (17.9%). There is a significant prevalence of CD in Latin American immigrants residing in Los Angeles with conduction abnormalities on ECG. Clinicians should consider evaluating all Latin American immigrant patients with unexplained conduction disease for CD. PMID:28056014

  11. Increasing strength and conductivity of Cu alloy through abnormal plastic deformation of an intermetallic compound.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung Zeon; Lim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Sangshik; Lee, Jehyun; Goto, Masahiro; Kim, Hyung Giun; Han, Byungchan; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2016-08-04

    The precipitation strengthening of Cu alloys inevitably accompanies lowering of their electric conductivity and ductility. We produced bulk Cu alloys arrayed with nanofibers of stiff intermetallic compound through a precipitation mechanism using conventional casting and heat treatment processes. We then successfully elongated these arrays of nanofibers in the bulk Cu alloys to 400% of original length without breakage at room temperature using conventional rolling process. By inducing such an one-directional array of nanofibers of intermetallic compound from the uniform distribution of fine precipitates in the bulk Cu alloys, the trade-off between strength and conductivity and between strength and ductility could be significantly reduced. We observed a simultaneous increase in electrical conductivity by 1.3 times and also tensile strength by 1.3 times in this Cu alloy bulk compared to the conventional Cu alloys.

  12. Increasing strength and conductivity of Cu alloy through abnormal plastic deformation of an intermetallic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seung Zeon; Lim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Sangshik; Lee, Jehyun; Goto, Masahiro; Kim, Hyung Giun; Han, Byungchan; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2016-08-01

    The precipitation strengthening of Cu alloys inevitably accompanies lowering of their electric conductivity and ductility. We produced bulk Cu alloys arrayed with nanofibers of stiff intermetallic compound through a precipitation mechanism using conventional casting and heat treatment processes. We then successfully elongated these arrays of nanofibers in the bulk Cu alloys to 400% of original length without breakage at room temperature using conventional rolling process. By inducing such an one-directional array of nanofibers of intermetallic compound from the uniform distribution of fine precipitates in the bulk Cu alloys, the trade-off between strength and conductivity and between strength and ductility could be significantly reduced. We observed a simultaneous increase in electrical conductivity by 1.3 times and also tensile strength by 1.3 times in this Cu alloy bulk compared to the conventional Cu alloys.

  13. Increasing strength and conductivity of Cu alloy through abnormal plastic deformation of an intermetallic compound

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Zeon; Lim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Sangshik; Lee, Jehyun; Goto, Masahiro; Kim, Hyung Giun; Han, Byungchan; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2016-01-01

    The precipitation strengthening of Cu alloys inevitably accompanies lowering of their electric conductivity and ductility. We produced bulk Cu alloys arrayed with nanofibers of stiff intermetallic compound through a precipitation mechanism using conventional casting and heat treatment processes. We then successfully elongated these arrays of nanofibers in the bulk Cu alloys to 400% of original length without breakage at room temperature using conventional rolling process. By inducing such an one-directional array of nanofibers of intermetallic compound from the uniform distribution of fine precipitates in the bulk Cu alloys, the trade-off between strength and conductivity and between strength and ductility could be significantly reduced. We observed a simultaneous increase in electrical conductivity by 1.3 times and also tensile strength by 1.3 times in this Cu alloy bulk compared to the conventional Cu alloys. PMID:27488621

  14. Abnormal thermal conductivity in tetragonal tungsten bronze Ba6-xSrxNb10O30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodiazhnyi, T.; Sakurai, H.; Vasylkiv, O.; Borodianska, H.; Mozharivskyj, Y.

    2014-03-01

    Ba6-xSrxNb10O30 solid solution with 0 ≤ x ≤ 6 crystallizes in centrosymmetric tetragonal "tungsten bronze" structure (space group P4/mbm). We report on the x dependence of thermal conductivity of polycrystalline samples measured in the 2-400 K temperature interval. Substitution of Sr for Ba brings about a significant decrease in thermal conductivity at x ≥ 3 accompanied by development of a low-temperature (T ≈ 10-30 K) "plateau" region reminiscent of a glass-like compounds. We explain this behaviour based on a size-driven site occupancy and atomic displacement parameters associated with an alkaline earth atomic positions in the title compounds.

  15. Abnormalities of atrioventricular conduction in patients with the Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, J; Fabián, J; Belán, A

    1978-01-01

    In 18 patients with the Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome and in 11 control subjects the response of the atrioventricular conduction system to heart rate acceleration by right atrial pacing, and, with the aid of His bundle electrogram, the behaviour of individual levels of the atrioventricular conduction system were studied. At spontaneous sinus rhythm A-H interval was shorter in the patients with the Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome than in the controls. In the latter the A-H interval became markedly prolonged, up to a Wenckebach-type IInd-degree AV block, already at a minor pacing-induced acceleration of the heart rate, whereas in the patients with the Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome the atrioventricular propagation of excitation at a 1:1 ratio remained preserved even at substantially higher heart-rate values. On the basis of the responses of the A-H interval to pacing the patients with the Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome were classed into four types.

  16. Regulation of the synthesis and metabolism of striatal dopamine after disruption of nerve conduction in the medial forebrain bundle.

    PubMed Central

    Commissiong, J. W.; Slimovitch, C.; Toffano, G.

    1990-01-01

    1. After physical (knife-cut) or chemically-mediated (tetrodotoxin 300 nM, 1.5 microliters; 1.0 microliters min-1) interruption of nerve conduction in the nigrostriatal tract, there was a marked increase in the synthesis and metabolism of dopamine in the isolated dopaminergic nerve terminals of the striatum. The effect peaked at 4 h post-transection, at which time 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were increased by 300% and 700% respectively (DOPAC: 27 +/- 13 vs 80 +/- 17 nmol g-1; HVA: 6.66 +/- 3.57 vs 54 +/- 18 nmol g-1). The increases in dopamine content and metabolism are secondary to an increase in the rate of synthesis on the lesioned side, versus the intact, control side. 2. In both experimental situations, haloperidol (1.0 mg kg-1, i.p.) retained its known ability to induce a significant increase in DOPAC and HVA in the striatum, despite the interruption of nerve conduction in the nigrostriatal tract. 3. Six days after cutting the left nigrostriatal tract, dopamine in the left striatum was reduced to less than 5% of the control value, and DOPAC and HVA were not detectable. In the denervated, left striatum, the synthesis of dopamine (from injected L-DOPA), and its metabolism to DOPAC and HVA, occurred to the same degree as in the intact right side. In these DOPA-treated rats, haloperidol (1.0 mg kg-1, i.p.) caused a further increase in DOPAC and HVA in the intact striatum, but not in the denervated striatum.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2361171

  17. The effects of dietary treatment with essential fatty acids on sciatic nerve conduction and activity of the Na+/K+ pump in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Lockett, M. J.; Tomlinson, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    1. This study examined the effects of dietary essential fatty acid supplementation (5% (w/w) evening primrose oil) upon sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity and 86Rb+ pumping in sciatic nerve endoneurial preparations in rats with 4 to 5 weeks of streptozotocin-induced diabetes. 2. Control diabetic rats (dietary supplementation with 5% (w/w) hydrogenated coconut oil) exhibited a reduction in motor nerve conduction velocity (16%; P less than 0.05) compared to similarly-fed non-diabetic controls, but there was no significant alteration in ouabain-sensitive 86Rb+ pumping, a parameter reflecting activity of the Na+/K+ pump. 3. Treatment of diabetic rats with evening primrose oil prevented completely the development of the motor nerve conduction velocity deficit without affecting the severity of diabetes. Evening primrose oil treatment did not significantly affect motor nerve conduction velocity of non-diabetic animals. 4. Evening primrose oil treatment caused a significant reduction in activity of the Na+/K+ pump in sciatic nerves of diabetic animals (45%; P less than 0.05). 5. These results suggest that the acute conduction velocity defect arising in streptozotocin-diabetic rats, and the actions of evening primrose oil upon this, are independent of any effect on activity of the Na+/K+ pump. Other putative mechanisms are discussed. PMID:1313726

  18. Pycnogenol efficiency on glycaemia, motor nerve conduction velocity and markers of oxidative stress in mild type diabetes in rats.

    PubMed

    Jankyova, S; Kucera, P; Goldenberg, Z; Yaghi, D; Navarova, J; Kyselova, Z; Stolc, S; Klimas, J; Racanska, E; Matyas, S

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the effects of Pycnogenol at various doses on preprandial and postprandial glucose levels, the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs) and N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase (NAGA) and on motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Pycnogenol treatment (10, 20, 50 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)/day) lasted for 8 weeks after induction of diabetes. Pycnogenol significantly decreased elevated levels of preprandial glycaemia in treated animals at all doses. At doses of 10 mg/kg b.w./day and 20 mg/kg b.w./day it significantly decreased elevated levels of postprandial glycaemia compared with diabetic non-treated animals. Pycnogenol failed to induce a significant decrease of postprandial glycaemia at a dose of 50 mg/kg b.w./day. Pycnogenol improved significantly the impaired MNCV at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg b.w./day compared with non-treated animals. The levels of TBARs were elevated in diabetic rats. The levels of NAGA increased gradually despite the treatment. Pycnogenol failed to affect the increased levels of TBARs and NAGA. Pycnogenollowered the elevated levels of glycaemia and reduced the decline in motor nerve conduction velocity in STZ-induced diabetic rats. The effect of Pycnogenol on postprandial glycaemic levels and MNCV was not dose-dependent.

  19. CNS involvement in CMTX1 caused by a novel connexin 32 mutation: a 6-year follow-up in neuroimaging and nerve conduction.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chong; Zhou, Xiajun; Zhu, Desheng; Liu, Wei; Wang, Xiaoqing; Yang, Hong; Li, Zezhi; Hao, Yong; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Guan, Yangtai

    2016-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 1 (CMTX1) is one of the most common inherited neurological disorders. Obvious CNS involvement is relatively rare in CMTX1 patients. A 24-year-old male with CMTX1 presented with three transient stroke-like attacks, and was followed up regularly for 6 years with brain MRI and electrophysiological examination. Transient symmetrical high signals on T2 imaging and restricted diffusion were found in bilateral deep white matter. Electrophysiological measurement revealed a sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy with slightly reduced nerve conduction velocities. A novel thymine to cytosine mutation at nucleotide position 445 in the connexin 32 allele of the GJB1 gene was identified. During the 6-year longitudinal study, patient's motor and sensory function did not worsen; radiological abnormalities correlated with episodes of CNS dysfunction and resolved after clinical recovery; electrophysiological records showed no obvious change. Little change in the patient's clinical, radiological and electrophysiological results over the follow-up reflected a slow disease progression.

  20. Zero valent zinc nanoparticles promote neuroglial cell proliferation: A biodegradable and conductive filler candidate for nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Aydemir Sezer, Umran; Ozturk, Kevser; Aru, Basak; Yanıkkaya Demirel, Gulderen; Sezer, Serdar; Bozkurt, Mehmet Recep

    2017-01-01

    Regeneration of nerve, which has limited ability to undergo self-healing, is one of the most challenging areas in the field of tissue engineering. Regarding materials used in neuroregeneration, there is a recent trend toward electrically conductive materials. It has been emphasized that the capacity of conductive materials to regenerate such tissue having limited self-healing ability improves their clinical utility. However, there have been concerns about the safety of materials or fillers used for conductance due to their lack of degradability. Here, we attempt to use poly(Ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) matrix consisting of varying proportions of zero valent zinc nanoparticles (Zn NPs) via electrospinning. These conductive, biodegradable, and bioactive materials efficiently promoted neuroglial cell proliferation depending on the amount of Zn NPs present in the PCL matrix. Chemical characterizations indicated that the incorporated Zn NPs do not interact with the PCL matrix chemically and that the Zn NPs improved the tensile properties of the PCL matrix. All composites exhibited linear conductivity under in vitro conditions. In vitro cell culture studies were performed to determine the cytotoxicity and proliferative efficiency of materials containing different proportions of Zn NPs. The results were obtained to explore new conductive fillers that can promote tissue regeneration.

  1. Rat supraoptic magnocellular neurones show distinct large conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ channel subtypes in cell bodies versus nerve endings

    PubMed Central

    Dopico, Alejandro M; Widmer, Hélène; Wang, Gang; Lemos, José R; Treistman, Steven N

    1999-01-01

    Large conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels were identified in freshly dissociated rat supraoptic neurones using patch clamp techniques. The single channel conductance of cell body BK channels, recorded from inside-out patches in symmetric 145 mM K+, was 246.1 pS, compared with 213 pS in nerve ending BK channels (P < 0.01). At low open probability (Po), the reciprocal of the slope in the ln(NPo)-voltage relationship (N, number of available channels in the patch) for cell body and nerve ending channels were similar: 11 vs. 14 mVper e-fold change in NPo, respectively. At 40 mV, the [Ca2+]i producing half-maximal activation was 273 nM, as opposed to > 1.53 μM for the neurohypophysial channel, indicating the higher Ca2+ sensitivity of the cell body isochannel. Cell body BK channels showed fast kinetics (open time constant, 8.5 ms; fast closed time constant, 1.6 and slow closed time constant, 12.7 ms), identifying them as ‘type I’ isochannels, as opposed to the slow gating (type II) of neurohypophysial BK channels. Cell body BK activity was reduced by 10 nM charybdotoxin (NPo, 37 % of control), or 10 nM iberiotoxin (NPo, 5 % of control), whereas neurohypophysial BK channels are insensitive to charybdotoxin at concentrations as high as 360 nM. Whilst blockade of nerve ending BK channels markedly slowed the repolarization of evoked single spikes, blockade of cell body channels was without effect on repolarization of evoked single spikes. Ethanol reversibly increased neurohypophysial BK channel activity (EC50, 22 mM; maximal effect, 100 mM). In contrast, ethanol (up to 100 mM) failed to increase cell body BK channel activity. In conclusion, we have characterized BK channels in supraoptic neuronal cell bodies, and demonstrated that they display different electrophysiological and pharmacological properties from their counterparts in the nerve endings. PMID:10432342

  2. Nerve cell nuclear and nucleolar abnormalities in the human oedematous cerebral cortex. An electron microscopic study using cortical biopsies.

    PubMed

    Castejón, O J; Arismendi, G J

    2004-01-01

    Cerebral cortical biopsies of 17 patients with clinical diagnosis of congenital hydrocephalus, complicated brain trauma, cerebellar syndrome and vascular anomaly were examined with the transmission electron microscope to study the nuclear and nucleolar abnormalities induced by moderate and severe brain oedema, and the associated anoxic-ischemic conditions of brain tissue. In infant patients with congenital hydrocephalus and Arnold-Chiari malformation two different structural patterns of immature chromatin organization were found: the clear type characterized by a clear granular and fibrillar structure of euchromatin, scarce heterochromatin masses and few perichromatin granules, and a dense granular and fibrillar euchromatin with abundant and scattered heterochromatin masses, and increased number of perichromatin granules. The lobulated nuclei exhibited an irregularly dilated and fragmented perinuclear cistern, and areas of apparently intact nuclear pore complexes alternating with regions of nuclear pore complex disassembly. In moderate traumatic brain injuries some nucleoli exhibit apparent intact nucleolar substructures, and in severe brain oedema some nucleoli appeared shrunken and irregularly outlined with one or two fibrillar centers, and others were disintegrated. The nuclear and nucleolar morphological alterations are discussed in relation with oxidative stress, peroxidative damage, hemoglobin-induced cytotoxicity, calcium overload, glutamate excitotoxicity, and caspase activation.

  3. Cardiac conduction abnormalities in patients with breast cancer undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ando, M; Yokozawa, T; Sawada, J; Takaue, Y; Togitani, K; Kawahigashi, N; Narabayashi, M; Takeyama, K; Tanosaki, R; Mineishi, S; Kobayashi, Y; Watanabe, T; Adachi, I; Tobinai, K

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac toxicities in 39 consecutive patients with breast cancer receiving high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with stem cell transplantation were reviewed. All 39 patients received various anthracycline-containing regimens in adjuvant settings and/or for metastatic disease before HDC. As a cytoreductive regimen, all received cyclophosphamide 2000 mg/m2 and thiotepa 200 mg/m2 for 3 consecutive days. No immediate fatal toxicities were observed, but one patient developed chronic congestive heart failure and two had transient left ventricular dysfunction. Pericardial effusion was observed in another three patients. ST-T abnormalities during HDC were observed in two patients and arrhythmias were observed in nine, four of which occurred during stem cell infusion (SCI). There were three atrial arrhythmias, two ventricular arrhythmias, and four atrioventricular (AV)-block episodes. Two patients developed advanced and complete AV-block with an asystolic pause. Notably, three patients experienced AV-block with uncontrolled vomiting. No relationship was observed between the cumulative dose of anthracycline and cardiac toxicities during HDC. These results suggest that abnormalities in the conduction system during HDC may be more frequent than previously reported. Vagal reflex secondary to emesis may play an important role in the development of AV-block. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 185-189.

  4. Evening primrose oil treatment corrects reduced conduction velocity but not depletion of arachidonic acid in nerve from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, R; Peterson, R G; Kincaid, J C; Eichberg, J

    1998-09-01

    The effects of evening primrose oil (EPO) treatment, a source of gamma-linolenic acid, on the proportions of arachidonoyl-containing molecular species (ACMS) in sciatic nerve phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were determined in conjunction with alterations in nerve conduction velocity. Normal and diabetic rats were either untreated or fed a dietary supplement containing isocalorically equivalent amounts of either EPO or corn oil for the duration of the experiment. After 8 weeks of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, nerve conduction velocity was reduced 16% and this deficit was prevented by either EPO or corn oil treatment. Neither EPO nor corn oil supplementation significantly increased the depressed proportions of ACMS. The level of the linoleoyl-containing molecular species, 16:0/18:2, was elevated in the phospholipids from untreated diabetic rats and was further increased by EPO treatment. These results are consistent with decreased activity of the delta6 desaturase that is required for arachidonic acid synthesis in vivo, but suggests that an accompanying deficit in the subsequent delta5 desaturase-catalyzed reaction may be rate-limiting. These findings indicate that maintenance of normal ACMS levels is not required for prevention of diminished nerve conduction velocity and suggest that other factors influenced by an altered polyunsaturated fatty acid pattern, such as metabolites of linoleic acid or gamma-linolenic acid other than arachidonic acid, the energy state of the nerve or the degree of membrane fluidity may contribute to impaired nerve conduction velocity in diabetic neuropathy.

  5. Internal Conductivity of Axons, Nerve Cell Bodies and Large Nonnervous Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-03-01

    Thompson measured conductivity of packed frog muscle and determined that the in- ternal medium was as conductive as 0.13 to 0. 21 percent NaCl...solutions (resistivity 4. 3-6. 9 times that of frog Ringer). A more recent study on frog muscle using sim- ilar techniques reported...made to measure cytoplasmic conductivity of single i P, cells, beginning with Hartree and Hill who studied frog muscle fibers. They found

  6. Tension neuropathy of the superficial peroneal nerve: associated conditions and results of release.

    PubMed

    Johnston, E C; Howell, S J

    1999-09-01

    We reviewed eight patients who sustained superficial peroneal nerve neuralgia after an inversion ankle sprain. Surgical exploration found anatomic abnormalities that tethered the nerve from movement during plantarflexion and inversion of the ankle. Most patients' pain improved dramatically after release and anterior transposition of the nerve. Seven joints also underwent arthroscopy, which showed intra-articular disease that was consistent with the original trauma. Five patients had reflex sympathetic dystrophy, three of which resolved after nerve release. Nerve conduction studies were not helpful. Careful physical examination and local nerve blocks were most important in making the diagnosis and prescribing treatment. All conservative measures should be exhausted before surgery is considered.

  7. Easy Method to Examine Single Nerve Fiber Excitability and Conduction Parameters Using Intact Nonanesthetized Earthworms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bähring, Robert; Bauer, Christiane K.

    2014-01-01

    The generation and conduction of neuronal action potentials (APs) were the subjects of a cell physiology exercise for first-year medical students. In this activity, students demonstrated the all-or-none nature of AP generation, measured conduction velocity, and examined the dependence of the threshold stimulus amplitude on stimulus duration. For…

  8. Point-of-service nerve conduction studies: an example of industry-driven disruptive innovation in health care.

    PubMed

    Lesser, Eugene A; Starr, Jennifer; Kong, Xuan; Megerian, J Thomas; Gozani, Shai N

    2007-01-01

    Nerve conduction studies (NCS) and needle electromyography are useful and established diagnostic procedures for evaluating patients with signs and symptoms of neuromuscular disease. Although technological advances have occurred since the introduction of commercial electromyography instrumentation in the 1950s, most improvements have been evolutionary and were designed to benefit traditional users--neurologists and physiatrists specializing in electromyography. In the past seven years, instruments have been introduced that automate NCS and thereby enable a broader group of physicians, including internists and orthopedic surgeons, to perform these studies and utilize electromyographic data in the care of their patients. Automated NCS devices are an example of what Clayton Christensen terms a "disruptive innovation." In this article, automated NCS is contrasted with traditional electromyography, and the challenges and opposition to its widespread adoption are explored.

  9. Defects responsible for abnormal n-type conductivity in Ag-excess doped PbTe thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Byungki Lee, Jae Ki; Lee, Ji Eun; Joo, Sung-Jae; Kim, Bong-Seo; Min, Bok-Ki; Lee, Hee-Woong; Park, Su-Dong; Oh, Min-Wook

    2015-07-07

    Density functional calculations have been performed to investigate the role of Ag defects in PbTe thermoelectric materials. Ag-defects can be either donor, acceptor, or isovalent neutral defect. When Ag is heavily doped in PbTe, the neutral (Ag-Ag) dimer defect at Pb-site is formed and the environment changes to the Pb-rich/Te-poor condition. Under Pb-rich condition, the ionized Ag-interstitial defect (Ag{sub I}{sup +}) becomes the major donor. The formation energy of Ag{sub I}{sup +} is smaller than other native and Ag-related defects. Also it is found that Ag{sub I}{sup +} is an effective dopant. There is no additional impurity state near the band gap and the conduction band minimum. The charge state of Ag{sub I}{sup +} defect is maintained even when the Fermi level is located above the conduction band minimum. The diffusion constant of Ag{sub I}{sup +} is calculated based on the temperature dependent Fermi level, formation energy, and migration energy. When T > 550 K, the diffusion length of Ag within a few minutes is comparable to the grain size of the polycrystalline PbTe, implying that Ag is dissolved into PbTe and this donor defect is distributed over the whole lattice in Ag-excess doped polycrystalline PbTe. The predicted solubility of Ag{sub I}{sup +} well explains the increased electron carrier concentration and electrical conductivity reported in Ag-excess doped polycrystalline PbTe at T = 450–750 K [Pei et al., Adv. Energy Mater. 1, 291 (2011)]. In addition, we suggest that this abnormal doping behavior is also found for Au-doped PbTe.

  10. Axolemmal and septal conduction in the impedance of the earthworm medial giant nerve fiber.

    PubMed Central

    Krause, T L; Fishman, H M; Bittner, G D

    1994-01-01

    Ionic conduction in the axolemmal and septal membranes of the medial giant fiber (MGF) of the earthworm (EW) Lumbricus terrestris was assessed by impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range 2.5-1000 Hz. Impedance loci in the complex plane were described by two semi-circular arcs, one at a lower characteristic frequency (100 Hz) and the other at a higher frequency (500 Hz). The lower frequency arc had a chord resistance of 53 k omega and was not affected by membrane potential changes or ion channel blockers [tetrodotoxin (TTX), 3,4-diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP), 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), and tetraethylammonium (TEA)]. The higher frequency arc had a chord resistance of 274 k omega at resting potential, was voltage-dependent, and was affected by the addition of TTX, 3,4-DAP, 4-AP, and TEA to the physiological EW salines. When all four blockers were added to the bathing solution, the impedance locus was described by two voltage-independent arcs. Considering the effects of these and other (i.e., Cd and Ni) ion channel blockers, we conclude that: 1) the higher frequency locus reflects conduction by voltage-sensitive ion channels in the axolemmal membrane, which contains at least four ion channels selective for sodium, calcium, and potassium (delayed rectifier and calcium-dependent), and 2) the lower frequency locus reflects voltage-insensitive channels in the septal membrane, which separates adjacent MGFs. PMID:7524713

  11. Conductance of the sodium channel in myelinated nerve fibres with modified sodium inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Conti, F; Hille, B; Neumcke, B; Nonner, W; Stämpfli, R

    1976-01-01

    1. Na current fluctuations in nodes of Ranvier were measured under voltage clamp conditions as described in the preceding paper (Conti, Hille, Neumcke, Nonner & Stämpfli, 1976) and analysed in terms of power spectral density calculated for frequencies between 30 Hz and 5 kHz. 2. External (10(-5) g/ml.) Leiurus scorpion venom or Anemonia Toxin II (3 X 10(-5) g/ml.) or internal 20 mM iodate were applied in order to remove or slow down inactivation in part of the Na channels. The treatment increased the steady-state Na current during the noise measurement one-to eight fold over that in normal fibres. 3. Noise spectra were interpreted as the sum of 1/f noise and noise SNa(f) due to all-or-none, open-close transitions of single Na channels. The drug effects on the inactivation could be accounted for either by assuming two populations of channels, one with and one without inactivation, or by postulating a single population with modified inactivation characteristics. 4. Except for an increase in amplitude, the fluctuation spectra SNa(f) were similar to the ones in normal nodes. Again, the time constants taum obtained from the fit of the spectra agreed within a factor of 2 with the values of taum found in the macroscopic Na currents. 5. From the fluctuation spectra, single Na channel conductances gamma of 5-4 +/- 0-4 pS (iodate), 6-7 +/- 0-5 pS (Leiurus) and 7-0 +/- 0-6 pS (Anemonia) were calculated. The value of gamma was not significantly voltage dependent. 6. Our observations indicate that inactivation of Na channels can be modified with at most small effects on the microscopic properties of the activation process and on the conductance of the open channel. They suggest that the h mechanism normally produces all-or-none, open-close changes of conductance. PMID:1087644

  12. Development of a voltage-dependent current noise algorithm for conductance-based stochastic modelling of auditory nerve fibres.

    PubMed

    Badenhorst, Werner; Hanekom, Tania; Hanekom, Johan J

    2016-12-01

    This study presents the development of an alternative noise current term and novel voltage-dependent current noise algorithm for conductance-based stochastic auditory nerve fibre (ANF) models. ANFs are known to have significant variance in threshold stimulus which affects temporal characteristics such as latency. This variance is primarily caused by the stochastic behaviour or microscopic fluctuations of the node of Ranvier's voltage-dependent sodium channels of which the intensity is a function of membrane voltage. Though easy to implement and low in computational cost, existing current noise models have two deficiencies: it is independent of membrane voltage, and it is unable to inherently determine the noise intensity required to produce in vivo measured discharge probability functions. The proposed algorithm overcomes these deficiencies while maintaining its low computational cost and ease of implementation compared to other conductance and Markovian-based stochastic models. The algorithm is applied to a Hodgkin-Huxley-based compartmental cat ANF model and validated via comparison of the threshold probability and latency distributions to measured cat ANF data. Simulation results show the algorithm's adherence to in vivo stochastic fibre characteristics such as an exponential relationship between the membrane noise and transmembrane voltage, a negative linear relationship between the log of the relative spread of the discharge probability and the log of the fibre diameter and a decrease in latency with an increase in stimulus intensity.

  13. A novel large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel and current in nerve terminals of the rat neurohypophysis.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G; Thorn, P; Lemos, J R

    1992-01-01

    corresponds most closely to a Ca(2+)-activated K+ current (IK(Ca)) and not to a delayed rectifier or IA-like current. It also has properties different from that of the Ca(2+)-dependent outward current described in the magnocellular neuronal cell bodies of the hypothalamus. 8. A large conductance channel is often observed in isolated rat neurohypophysial nerve terminals. The channel had a unit conductance of 231 pS in symmetrical 150 mM K+.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1284313

  14. Effect of Enriched (Complex) Environment on Nerve Conduction Velocity: New Data and Review of Implications for the Speed of Information Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, T. Edward

    1993-01-01

    Results with 54 mice confirm that increased stimulation or usage, as would be provided by environmental enrichment (EE), increases peripheral nerve conduction velocity. These results suggest a role at the physiological level for EE (or deprivation) in affecting measured intelligence. (SLD)

  15. Unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy and abnormal enhancement of extraocular muscles on magnetic resonance imaging of orbit after the ingestion of methanol.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Kim, Sun Wook; Park, Yoo Seok; Park, Incheol

    2010-05-01

    Methanol is generally known to cause visual impairment and various systemic manifestations. There are a few reported specific findings for methanol intoxication on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. A case is reported of unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy oculus sinister (OS) after the ingestion of methanol. Unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve were confirmed by fundoscopy, flourescein angiography, visual evoked potential and electroretinogram. The optic nerve and extraocular muscles (superior rectus, medial rectus, inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscle) were enhanced by gadolinium-DTPA on MRI of the orbit. This is the first case report of permanent monocular blindness with confirmed unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve, combined with third cranial nerve palsy after methanol ingestion.

  16. The role of skin conductivity in a low frequency exposure assessment for peripheral nerve tissue according to the ICNIRP 2010 guidelines.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Gernot; Cecil, Stefan; Überbacher, Richard

    2013-07-07

    Based on numerical computations using commercially available finite difference time domain code and a state-of-the art anatomical model of a 5-year old child, the influence of skin conductivity on the induced electric field strength inside the tissue for homogeneous front-to-back magnetic field exposure and homogeneous vertical electric field exposure was computed. Both ungrounded as well as grounded conditions of the body model were considered. For electric field strengths induced inside CNS tissue the impact of skin conductivity was found to be less than 15%. However, the results demonstrated that the use of skin conductivity values as obtainable from the most widely used data base of dielectric tissue properties and recommended by safety standards are not suitable for exposure assessment with respect to peripheral nerve tissue according to the ICNIRP 2010 guidelines in which the use of the induced electric field strengths inside the skin is suggested as a conservative surrogate for peripheral nerve exposure. This is due to the fact that the skin conductivity values derived from these data bases refer to the stratum corneum, the uppermost layer of the skin, which does not contain any nerve or receptor cells to be protected from stimulation effects. Using these skin conductivity values which are approximately a factor 250-500 lower than skin conductivity values used in studies on which the ICNIRP 2010 guidelines are based on, may lead to overestimations of the induced electric field strengths inside the skin by substantially more than a factor of 10. However, reliable conductivity data of deeper skin layers where nerve and preceptor cells are located is very limited. It is therefore recommended to include appropriate background information in the ICNIRP guidelines and the dielectric tissue property databases, and to put some emphasis on a detailed layer-specific characterization of skin conductivity in near future.

  17. Clinical implications of the P wave duration and dispersion: relationship between atrial conduction defects and abnormally prolonged and fractionated atrial endocardial electrograms.

    PubMed

    Centurión, Osmar Antonio

    2009-05-01

    Atrial conduction disease provides a suitable substrate for reentry and appears to be a major predisposing factor for the development of atrial fibrillation. It was demonstrated that when depressed conduction was observed in recordings from human atrial muscle, the ultra-structure was usually abnormal. Areas of poorly coupled fibers in diseased atrial tissue with progressive fibro-degenerative changes may lead to abnormal electrophysiological characteristics. Structural inhomogeneity or local differences in electrophysiological or ultra-structural properties are considered to play a major role in the initiation of reentrant circuits due to the increased likelihood of unidirectional block of the premature impulse. The P wave of the electrocardiogram may show alterations that can be associated with atrial arrhythmias. It was shown that there is a statistical association between the low resting membrane potential and a prolonged P wave duration. Also a prolonged inter-atrial conduction time was significantly related to abnormal P wave morphology. In the evaluation of patients with altered P waves in the electrocardiogram, it is very important to keep in mind that, patients who have a great susceptibility to develop AF possess abnormally prolonged and fractionated atrial endocardial electrograms in sinus rhythm within the right atrium, a significantly longer P wave duration, a significantly longer intra-atrial and inter-atrial conduction time of sinus impulses; and a significantly greater sinus node dysfunction and higher incidence of induction of sustained atrial fibrillation. Awareness of this strong association may lead to a better therapeutic management in individual patients.

  18. Partial nerve injury induces electrophysiological changes in conducting (uninjured) nociceptive and nonnociceptive DRG neurons: Possible relationships to aspects of peripheral neuropathic pain and paresthesias

    PubMed Central

    Djouhri, Laiche; Fang, Xin; Koutsikou, Stella; Lawson, Sally N.

    2012-01-01

    Partial nerve injury leads to peripheral neuropathic pain. This injury results in conducting/uninterrupted (also called uninjured) sensory fibres, conducting through the damaged nerve alongside axotomised/degenerating fibres. In rats seven days after L5 spinal nerve axotomy (SNA) or modified-SNA (added loose-ligation of L4 spinal nerve with neuroinflammation-inducing chromic-gut), we investigated a) neuropathic pain behaviours and b) electrophysiological changes in conducting/uninterrupted L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with receptive fields (called: L4-receptive-field-neurons). Compared to pretreatment, modified-SNA rats showed highly significant increases in spontaneous-foot-lifting duration, mechanical-hypersensitivity/allodynia, and heat-hypersensitivity/hyperalgesia, that were significantly greater than after SNA, especially spontaneous-foot-lifting. We recorded intracellularly in vivo from normal L4/L5 DRG neurons and ipsilateral L4-receptive-field-neurons. After SNA or modified-SNA, L4-receptive-field-neurons showed the following: a) increased percentages of C-, Ad-, and Ab-nociceptors and cutaneous Aa/b-low-threshold mechanoreceptors with ongoing/spontaneous firing; b) spontaneous firing in C-nociceptors that originated peripherally; this was at a faster rate in modified-SNA than SNA; c) decreased electrical thresholds in A-nociceptors after SNA; d) hyperpolarised membrane potentials in A-nociceptors and Aa/b-low-threshold-mechanoreceptors after SNA, but not C-nociceptors; e) decreased somatic action potential rise times in C- and A-nociceptors, not Aa/b-low-threshold-mechanoreceptors. We suggest that these changes in subtypes of conducting/uninterrupted neurons after partial nerve injury contribute to the different aspects of neuropathic pain as follows: spontaneous firing in nociceptors to ongoing/spontaneous pain; spontaneous firing in Aa/b-low-threshold-mechanoreceptors to dysesthesias/paresthesias; and lowered A-nociceptor electrical thresholds

  19. A novel NF1 mutation in a Chinese patient with giant café-au-lait macule in neurofibromatosis type 1 associated with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and bone abnormality.

    PubMed

    Tong, H-X; Li, M; Zhang, Y; Zhu, J; Lu, W-Q

    2012-08-29

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1; OMIM#162200) is a common neurocutaneous disorder that is characterized by multiple café-au-lait, skinfold freckling, Lisch nodules, and neurofibromas. Mutations in the NF1 gene, which encodes the neurofibromin protein, have been identified as the pathogenic gene of NF1. In this study, we present a clinical and molecular study of a Chinese patient with giant café-au-lait in NF1. The patient showed >6 café-au-lait spots on the body, axillary freckling, and multiple subcutaneous neurofibromas. He also had a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and bone abnormalities. The germline mutational analysis of the NF1 gene revealed a novel missense mutation in exon 13. It is a novel heterozygous nucleotide G>A transition at position 2241 of the NF1 gene. We found no mutation in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor DNA from this patient. This expands the database for NF1 gene mutations in NF1. Its absence in the normal chromosomes suggests that it is responsible for the NF1 phenotype. To our knowledge, this is the first case of giant café-au-lait macule in NF1 associated with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and bone abnormality.

  20. Altered Active Zones, Vesicle Pools, Nerve Terminal Conductivity, and Morphology during Experimental MuSK Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vishwendra; Oh, Anne; Voit, Antanina; Sultatos, Lester G.; Babu, Gopal J.; Wilson, Brenda A.; Ho, Mengfei; McArdle, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate reduced motor-nerve function during autoimmune muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis (MG). To further understand the basis of motor-nerve dysfunction during MuSK-MG, we immunized female C57/B6 mice with purified rat MuSK ectodomain. Nerve-muscle preparations were dissected and neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) studied electrophysiologically, morphologically, and biochemically. While all mice produced antibodies to MuSK, only 40% developed respiratory muscle weakness. In vitro study of respiratory nerve-muscle preparations isolated from these affected mice revealed that 78% of NMJs produced endplate currents (EPCs) with significantly reduced quantal content, although potentiation and depression at 50 Hz remained qualitatively normal. EPC and mEPC amplitude variability indicated significantly reduced number of vesicle-release sites (active zones) and reduced probability of vesicle release. The readily releasable vesicle pool size and the frequency of large amplitude mEPCs also declined. The remaining NMJs had intermittent (4%) or complete (18%) failure of neurotransmitter release in response to 50 Hz nerve stimulation, presumably due to blocked action potential entry into the nerve terminal, which may arise from nerve terminal swelling and thinning. Since MuSK-MG-affected muscles do not express the AChR γ subunit, the observed prolongation of EPC decay time was not due to inactivity-induced expression of embryonic acetylcholine receptor, but rather to reduced catalytic activity of acetylcholinesterase. Muscle protein levels of MuSK did not change. These findings provide novel insight into the pathophysiology of autoimmune MuSK-MG. PMID:25438154

  1. Polymerizing Pyrrole Coated Poly (l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) Conductive Nanofibrous Conduit Combined with Electric Stimulation for Long-Range Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jialin; Sun, Binbin; Liu, Shen; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Yuanzheng; Wang, Chunyang; Mo, Xiumei; Che, Junyi; Ouyang, Yuanming; Yuan, Weien; Fan, Cunyi

    2016-01-01

    Electrospinning and electric stimulation (ES) are both promising methods to support neuron adhesion and guide extension of neurons for nerve regeneration. Concurrently, all studies focus on either electrospinning for conduits material or ES in vitro study to accelerate nerve regeneration; few work on the combined use of these two strategies or ES in vivo study. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the abilities of direct current ES through electrospinning conductive polymer composites composed of polypyrrole and Poly (l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) (PPY/PLCL) in peripheral nerve regeneration. PPY/PLCL composite conduits were synthesized by polymerizing pyrrole coated electrospun PLCL scaffolds. Morphologies and chemical compositions were characterized by scanning electron microscope and attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) microscope. Rat pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells cultured on PPY/PLCL scaffolds were stimulated with 100 mV/cm for 4 h per day. The median neurite length and cell viability were measured in PC-12 cells. The levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) were analyzed in DRG cells. In rats, 15 mm gaps of sciatic nerves were bridged using an autograft, non-stimulated PPY/PLCL conduit and PPY/PLCL conduit stimulated with 100 mV potential, respectively. A 100 mV potential direct current ES was applied for 1 h per day at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days post-implantation. The PPY/PLCL conduits with ES showed a similar performance compared with the autograft group, and significantly better than the non-stimulated PPY/PLCL conduit group. These promising results show that the PPY/PLCL conductive conduits’ combined use with ES has great potential for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27877111

  2. Polymerizing Pyrrole Coated Poly (l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) (PLCL) Conductive Nanofibrous Conduit Combined with Electric Stimulation for Long-Range Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Song, Jialin; Sun, Binbin; Liu, Shen; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Yuanzheng; Wang, Chunyang; Mo, Xiumei; Che, Junyi; Ouyang, Yuanming; Yuan, Weien; Fan, Cunyi

    2016-01-01

    Electrospinning and electric stimulation (ES) are both promising methods to support neuron adhesion and guide extension of neurons for nerve regeneration. Concurrently, all studies focus on either electrospinning for conduits material or ES in vitro study to accelerate nerve regeneration; few work on the combined use of these two strategies or ES in vivo study. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the abilities of direct current ES through electrospinning conductive polymer composites composed of polypyrrole and Poly (l-lactic acid-co-ε-caprolactone) (PPY/PLCL) in peripheral nerve regeneration. PPY/PLCL composite conduits were synthesized by polymerizing pyrrole coated electrospun PLCL scaffolds. Morphologies and chemical compositions were characterized by scanning electron microscope and attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) microscope. Rat pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells cultured on PPY/PLCL scaffolds were stimulated with 100 mV/cm for 4 h per day. The median neurite length and cell viability were measured in PC-12 cells. The levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) were analyzed in DRG cells. In rats, 15 mm gaps of sciatic nerves were bridged using an autograft, non-stimulated PPY/PLCL conduit and PPY/PLCL conduit stimulated with 100 mV potential, respectively. A 100 mV potential direct current ES was applied for 1 h per day at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days post-implantation. The PPY/PLCL conduits with ES showed a similar performance compared with the autograft group, and significantly better than the non-stimulated PPY/PLCL conduit group. These promising results show that the PPY/PLCL conductive conduits' combined use with ES has great potential for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  3. Role of cardiotoxin and phospholipase A in the blockade of nerve conduction and depolarization of skeletal muscle induced by cobra venom

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C. C.; Chuang, Sing-Tai; Lee, C. Y.; Wei, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    1. The effects of phospholipase A (PhA), cardiotoxin (CTX) and neurotoxin (cobrotoxin) isolated from Formosan cobra (Naja naja atra) venom on conduction of the rat phrenic nerve and membrane potential of the rat diaphragm were studied. 2. Phospholipase A, lysolecithin and cobrotoxin were without effect on the axonal conduction. Cardiotoxin was the only active agent in cobra venom, but it was less potent than the crude venom. 3. The blocking action of cardiotoxin was markedly accelerated by the simultaneous administration of phospholipase A. However, the minimum effective concentration of cardiotoxin (100 μg/ml), was not decreased by phospholipase A. Pretreatment of the nerve with phospholipase A, followed by washout, did not alter the activity of cardiotoxin. 4. Cardiotoxin (3 μg/ml) completely depolarized the membrane of superficial muscle fibres within 60 min, being 3 times more potent than the crude venom. Phospholipase A, on the other hand, needed a dose 30 times higher and a prolonged period of incubation to induce depolarization of similar extent. Cobrotoxin was without effect on membrane potentials. 5. CaCl2 (10 mM) effectively antagonized the nerve blocking as well as the depolarizing effect of the crude venom, cardiotoxin or cardiotoxin plus phospholipase A. By contrast, the slow depolarizing effect of phospholipase A was enhanced by high concentrations of calcium. 6. Cardiotoxic fractions of Indian cobra venom affected both nerve conduction and diaphragm membrane potential in exactly the same way as cardiotoxin. Toxin A of the same venom was without effect. 7. It is concluded that the active agent in cobra venoms either on axonal conduction or on muscle membrane is cardiotoxin. The synergistic effect of phospholipase A on cardiotoxin appears to be due to acceleration rather than potentiation of its action. The mechanism of action of cardiotoxin and its synergism by phospholipase A are discussed. PMID:5041453

  4. Comparison of the effects of evening primrose oil and triglycerides containing gamma-linolenic acid on nerve conduction and blood flow in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Dines, K C; Cameron, N E; Cotter, M A

    1995-04-01

    The aim was to ascertain whether the ability of evening primrose oil (EPO) treatment to correct peripheral nerve dysfunction in streptozotocin-diabetic rats depends on a gamma-linolenic acid (GLA)-containing triglyceride constituent, di-linolein mono-gamma-linolenate (DLMG). A second objective was to investigate whether the triglyceride conformation of GLA affects efficacy, using tri-gamma-linolenate (TGLA), which is not present in EPO. Third, we examined the actions of these omega-6 essential fatty acid-containing oils on sciatic nerve blood flow to establish a common mechanism. After 6 weeks of diabetes, sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity (NCV) was 21% reduced. EPO treatment caused dose-dependent increases in NCV that reached asymptote within 7 days. DLMG and TGLA, at doses matched for GLA content, had effects indistinguishable from those of EPO. Sciatic blood flow, 47.2% reduced by diabetes, was partially normalized by EPO, DLMG and TGLA. In contrast, sunflower oil (which does not contain GLA) did not alter NCV or blood flow. The data therefore provide strong evidence that DLMG is the active component of EPO and suggest that correction of nerve dysfunction involves a vascular action. The precise triglyceride configuration of GLA does not appear crucial to its effects in experimental diabetic neuropathy.

  5. Amplitude of sensory nerve action potential in early stage diabetic peripheral neuropathy: an analysis of 500 cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunqian; Li, Jintao; Wang, Tingjuan; Wang, Jianlin

    2014-07-15

    Early diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is important for the successful treatment of diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we recruited 500 diabetic patients from the Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University in China from June 2008 to September 2013: 221 cases showed symptoms of peripheral neuropathy (symptomatic group) and 279 cases had no symptoms of peripheral impairment (asymptomatic group). One hundred healthy control subjects were also recruited. Nerve conduction studies revealed that distal motor latency was longer, sensory nerve conduction velocity was slower, and sensory nerve action potential and amplitude of compound muscle action potential were significantly lower in the median, ulnar, posterior tibial and common peroneal nerve in the diabetic groups compared with control subjects. Moreover, the alterations were more obvious in patients with symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Of the 500 diabetic patients, neural conduction abnormalities were detected in 358 cases (71.6%), among which impairment of the common peroneal nerve was most prominent. Sensory nerve abnormality was more obvious than motor nerve abnormality in the diabetic groups. The amplitude of sensory nerve action potential was the most sensitive measure of peripheral neuropathy. Our results reveal that varying degrees of nerve conduction changes are present in the early, asymptomatic stage of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  6. Optic nerve hypoplasia in children.

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, S. M.; Dutton, G. N.

    1990-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is characterised by a diminished number of optic nerve fibres in the optic nerve(s) and until recently was thought to be rare. It may be associated with a wide range of other congenital abnormalities. Its pathology, clinical features, and the conditions associated with it are reviewed. Neuroendocrine disorders should be actively sought in any infant or child with bilateral ONH. Early recognition of the disorder may in some cases be life saving. Images PMID:2191713

  7. Motor nerve conduction study in cauda equina with high-voltage electrical stimulation in multifocal motor neuropathy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Akaza, Miho; Kanouchi, Tadashi; Inaba, Akira; Numasawa, Yoshiyuki; Irioka, Takashi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2011-02-01

    In this study we aim to establish a motor nerve conduction study (NCS) for the cauda equina and examine its usefulness in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). NCS of the tibial nerve proximal to the knee was performed with an optimized high-voltage electrical stimulation (HV-ES) method in 21 normal subjects, 5 with MMN, and 11 with ALS. HV-ES, but not magnetic stimulation, could supramaximally stimulate the cauda equina. Cauda equina motor conduction time determined by HV-ES, but not that with F-waves, correlated well with cauda equina length on magnetic resonance imaging. HV-ES revealed proximal lesions in 4 MMN patients but in none of the ALS patients. Importantly, 1 patient with "MMN without conduction block (CB)" had a CB in the cauda equina. Cauda equina motor conduction is better evaluated by HV-ES than with F-wave study or magnetic stimulation. HV-ES can help to distinguish MMN and "MMN without CB" from ALS.

  8. Effects of ozone on sciatic nerve in rat.

    PubMed

    Lin, Q; Chen, H; Lu, C; Wang, B; Zhang, Y; He, X; Yu, B

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluated the influence of ozone on rat sciatic nerve structure and function. Thirty Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups (n = 5). In groups I to IV, 1ml of ozone (O(3)) 10 μg/ml, 30 μg/ml, 50 μg/ml, 8 0 μg/ml was injected at the junction of gluteus maximus margin and lateral edge of the long head of biceps femoris respectively, in group V, 1 ml of pure O(2) was injected at the same point, and group V had puncture without any injection. Ozone was manufactured by an ozone generator (Ozone Line Co, Italy). The rats were investigated by both gross measurement and behavioral changes. One day, one week and three weeks after injection, rat hindlimb footprints were measured and the sciatic nerve function index (SFI) was calculated, and after three weeks, all right sciatic nerves were exposed under anesthesia. Near neural stimulation of the rat sciatic nerve was calculated and nerve conduction velocity, latency and maximum amplitude recorded. Animals were sacrificed for pathology, and ipsilateral triceps surae were taken for wet weight. No serious behavioral abnormalities were observed in any animal. SFI comparison in the various times and various groups showed no significant differences (p<0.05), and nerve conduction velocity, latency and maximum amplitude difference amongst the groups was not significant (p<0.05). There were no abnormalities in peripheral nerves pathologically after injection. Our initial study suggests that ozone concentrations from 10 μg/ml to 80 μg/ml injected around rat's peripheral nerve will not cause serious sequelae or serious damage to the structure and function of peripheral nerve. This finding provides evidence of the safety of ozone injected around the peripheral nerve.

  9. In situ determination of nerve agents in various matrices by portable capillary electropherograph with contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Kubáň, Petr; Seiman, Andrus; Makarõtševa, Natalja; Vaher, Merike; Kaljurand, Mihkel

    2011-05-06

    Rapid, efficient and robust methods for sampling and extracting genuine nerve agents sarin, soman and VX were developed for analyzing these compounds on various solid matrices, such as concrete, tile, soil and vegetation. A portable capillary electrophoretic (CE) system with contactless conductometric detection was used for the in situ analysis of the extracted samples. A 7.5 mM MES/HIS-based separation electrolyte accomplished the analysis of target analytes in less than 5 min. The overall duration of the process including instrument start-up, sample extraction and analysis was less than 10 min, which is the fastest screening of nerve agents achieved with liquid phase separation methods to date. The procedure can easily be performed by a person in a protective suit and is therefore suitable for real-life applications. The CE results were validated by an independent GC-MS method and a satisfactory correlation was obtained. The use of a proper sampling strategy with two internal standards and "smart" data-processing software can overcome the low reproducibility of CE. This has a significant impact on the potential acceptance of portable CE instrumentation for the detection and analysis of genuine chemical warfare agents (CWA).

  10. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Congenital Abnormalities Page Content Article Body About 3% to 4% ... of congenital abnormalities earlier. 5 Categories of Congenital Abnormalities Chromosome Abnormalities Chromosomes are structures that carry genetic ...

  11. Lower cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy.

  12. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene abnormalities in Indian males with congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens & renal anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Rahul; Kadam, Kaushiki; Khole, Aalok; Gaikwad, Avinash; Kadam, Seema; Shah, Rupin; Kumaraswamy, Rangaswamy; Khole, Vrinda

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations in congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens and unilateral renal agenesis (CBAVD-URA) has been controversial. Here, we report the cases of five Indian males with CBAVD-URA. The objective was to evaluate the presence or absence of CFTR gene mutations and variants in CBAVD-URA. The female partners of these males were also screened for cystic fibrosis (CF) carrier status. Methods: Direct DNA sequencing of CFTR gene was carried out in five Indian infertile males having CBAVD-URA. Female partners (n=5) and healthy controls (n=32) were also screened. Results: Three potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (c.1540A>G, c.2694T>G and c.4521G>A) were detected along with IVS8-5T mutation in three infertile males with CBAVD-URA. Five novel CFTR gene variants (c.621+91A>G, c.2752+106A>T, c.2751+85_88delTA, c.3120+529InsC and c.4375-69C>T), four potential regulatory CFTR gene variants (M470V, T854T, P1290P, Q1463Q) and seven previously reported CFTR gene variants (c.196+12T>C, c.875+40A>G, c.3041-71G>C, c.3271+42A>T, c.3272-93T>C, c.3500-140A>C and c.3601-65C>A) were detected in infertile men having CBAVD and renal anomalies Interpretation & conclusions: Based on our findings, we speculate that CBAVD-URA may also be attributed to CFTR gene mutations and can be considered as CFTR-related disorder (CFTR-RD). The CFTR gene mutation screening may be offered to CBAVD-URA men and their female partners undergoing ICSI. Further studies need to be done in a large sample to confirm the findings. PMID:27488005

  13. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in workers exposed to lead, zinc, and copper in relation to peripheral nerve conduction: a study of R-R interval variability

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, K.; Araki, S. )

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of the autonomic neurotoxicity due to lead was undertaken by measuring variability in the electrocardiographic R-R interval (CVRR) in 16 male workers exposed to lead, zinc, copper, and tin and in 16 unexposed control subjects. Two component coefficients of variation in the R-R interval, the C-CVRSA (respiratory sinus arrhythmia) and C-CVMWSA (Mayer wave related sinus arrhythmia), were examined; these indices are considered to reflect parasympathetic and sympathetic activities, respectively. Maximal motor and sensory conduction velocities (MCV and SCV) in the median nerve were also measured. In the 16 exposed workers, blood lead concentrations ranged from 16 to 60 (mean 34) micrograms/dl. The CVRR and C-CVRSA were found to be significantly reduced in the workers with elevated lead, zinc, and copper absorption as compared to unexposed control subjects; also, the MCV and SCV were significantly slowed. The C-CVMWSA was not significantly reduced, and was positively related to plasma zinc concentrations. No significant relationships were found between indicators of lead and copper absorption and these electrophysiological measurements. These data suggest that subclinical toxicity of lead occurs in the parasympathetic component of the autonomic nervous system as well as in the peripheral nerves. Zinc may antagonize the autonomic nervous dysfunction caused by lead.

  14. Functional end-plate recovery in long-term botulinum toxin therapy of hemifacial spasm: a nerve conduction study.

    PubMed

    Butera, C; Guerriero, R; Amadio, S; Ungaro, D; Tesfaghebriel, H; Bianchi, F; Comi, G; Del Carro, U

    2013-02-01

    Botulinum toxin type-A is currently thought to be effective and safe for hemifacial spasm (HFS). The pre-synaptic block of acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction induces depression of orbicularis oculi muscle compound motor action potential (CMAP). The aim of our study was to evaluate at what extent end-plate functional recovery is possible even in botulinum toxin treatments lasting up to 15 years. We examined 81 outpatients with primary HFS (mean treatment duration = 7.2 ± 4.2 years) who underwent neurophysiologic study, once clinical effect of the previous treatment had vanished. The mean CMAP amplitude, mean rectified amplitude of response 1 (R1) of the blink reflex and area of response 2 (R2) of treated orbicularis oculi muscle were measured in comparison to the controlateral side. Mean amplitude of the above mentioned parameters was slightly lower (about 20%; p < 0.001) in the treated side at the end of the follow-up period (4.7 ± 1.7 months). The CMAP amplitude reduction weakly correlated with the interval from last treatment, while other neurophysiologic parameters did not change due to treatment duration or total toxin amount. Our study demonstrates that botulinum toxin affects compound motor action potential and blink-reflex responses for at least 4-5 months in HFS patients. The residual block is slight and does not increase with repeated injections after several years of treatment. Our study, beside confirming the long-term efficacy of botulinum toxin treatment for HFS, provides neurophysiologic evidence that therapeutic effect may be obtained without hindering the regenerative potential of the nerve-muscle complex.

  15. Determination of nerve agent degradation products by capillary electrophoresis using field-amplified sample stacking injection with the electroosmotic flow pump and contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Hauser, Peter C; Lee, Hian Kee

    2009-07-31

    In the present study, field-amplified sample stacking injection using the electroosmotic flow pump (FAEP) was developed for the capillary electrophoretic separation of the four nerve agent degradation products methylphosphonic acid (MPA), ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA), isopropyl methylphosphonic acid (IMPA) and cyclohexyl methylphosphonic acid (CMPA). Coupled to contactless conductivity detection, direct quantification of these non-UV active compounds could be achieved. Sensitivity enhancement of up to 500 to 750-fold could be obtained. The newly established approach was applied to the determination of the analytes in river water and aqueous extracts of soil. Detection limits of 0.5, 0.7, 1.4 and 2.7 ng/mL were obtained for MPA, EMPA, IMPA and CMPA, respectively, in river water and 0.09, 0.14, 0.44 and 0.22 microg/g, respectively, in soil.

  16. Assessment of diabetic neuropathy using a point-of-care nerve conduction device shows significant associations with the LDIFLARE method and clinical neuropathy scoring.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sanjeev; Vas, Prashanth Rj; Rayman, Gerry

    2015-01-01

    Accurate assessment of diabetes polyneuropathy (DPN) is important in the prevention of foot ulcerations and amputations. Simple screening methods including the 10 g monofilament and the 128-Hz tuning fork are not sensitive enough nor intended for detection of early neuropathy, while more confirmatory tests such as nerve conduction studies are not universally available. We evaluated a rapid, low-cost, point-of-care nerve conduction device (POCD; NC-stat®|DPNCheck™) for the assessment of DPN and compared it with the LDIFLARE technique-an established method for early detection of small fibre dysfunction. A total of 162 patients with diabetes (DM) and 80 healthy controls (HC) were recruited. Based on the 10-point Neuropathy Disability Score (NDS), DPN was categorized into none (<2), mild (3-5) moderate (6-7), and severe (8-10). The LDIFLARE was performed in all patients according to previously described methodology. The associations between POCD outcomes and the LDIFLARE within the NDS categories were evaluated using regression analysis. In HC and DM, SNCV measured with the POCD correlated significantly with the LDIFLARE technique (r < 0.90 and r = 0.78, respectively) as did SNAP (r = 0.88 and r = 0.73, respectively); in addition, significance was found in all categories of DPN (r = 0.64 to 0.84; p= ≤ 0.03). ROC curves within each category of DPN showed that the POCD was sensitive in the assessment of DPN. We report highly significant linear relationships between the POCD with both comparators-the LDIFLARE technique and clinical neuropathy scores. Thus, the NC-stat|DPNCheck™ system appears to be an excellent adjunctive diagnostic tool for diagnosing DPN in the clinical setting.

  17. Pattern of Peripheral Nerve Involvement in Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 2: a Neurophysiological Assessment.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Marcio Luiz Escorcio; Pedroso, José Luiz; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Abrahao, Agessandro; de Albuquerque, Marcus Vinicius Cristino; Borges, Franklin Roberto Pereira; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza; Jardim, Laura Bannach; de Oliveira Braga, Nadia Iandoli; Manzano, Gilberto Mastrocola; Barsottini, Orlando G P

    2016-12-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is frequent in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), but the pattern and characteristics of nerve involvement are still an unsettled issue. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence, extent, and distribution of nerve involvement in SCA2 patients through neurophysiological studies. Thirty-one SCA2 patients and 20 control subjects were enrolled in this study. All subjects were prospectively evaluated through electromyography, including nerve conduction, needle electromyography in proximal and distal muscles of the upper and lower limbs, and sural radial amplitude ratio (SRAR). We aimed to differentiate distal axonopathy from diffuse nerve commitment, characterizing neuronopathy. Nerve involvement was observed in 83.6 % (26 individuals) of SCA2 patients. Among these, 19 had diffuse sensory abnormalities on nerve conduction predominantly on the upper limbs, with diffuse chronic denervation on needle electromyography and elevated SRAR values. Four individuals had only diffuse sensory involvement, and 2 had only motor involvement on needle evaluation and normal nerve conduction. These were interpreted as neuronopathy due to the diffuse distribution of the involvement. One individual had distal sensory axonopathy, with lower limb predominance. In this study, we found neuronopathy as the main pattern of nerve involvement in SCA2 patients and that motor involvement is a frequent feature. This information brings new insights into the understanding of the pathophysiology of nerve involvement in SCA2 and sets some key points about the phenotype, which is relevant to guide the genetic/molecular diagnosis.

  18. Aminoguanidine effects on nerve blood flow, vascular permeability, electrophysiology, and oxygen free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Kihara, Mikihiro; Schmelzer, J.D.; Poduslo, J.F.; Curran, G.L.; Nickander, K.K.; Low, P.A. )

    1991-07-15

    Since advanced glycosylation end products have been suggested to mediate hyperglycemia-induced microvascular atherogenesis and because aminoguanidine (AG) prevents their generation, the authors examined whether AG could prevent or ameliorate the physiologic and biochemical indices of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced experimental diabetic neuropathy. Four groups of adult Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: group I received STZ plus AG, group II received STZ plus AG, group III received STZ alone, and group IV was a control. They monitored conduction and action potential amplitudes serially in sciatic-tibial and caudal nerves, nerve blood flow, oxygen free radical activity (conjugated dienes and hydroperoxides), and the product of the permeability coefficient and surface area to {sup 125}I-labeled albumin. STZ-induced diabetes (group III) caused a 57% reduction in nerve blood flow and in abnormal nerve conduction and amplitudes and a 60% increase in conjugated dienes. Nerve blood flow was normalized by 8 weeks with AG (groups I and II) and conduction was significantly improved, in a dose-dependent manner, by 16 and 24 weeks in sciatic-tibial and caudal nerves, respectively. The permeability coefficient was not impaired, suggesting a normal blood-nerve barrier function for albumin, and the oxygen free-radical indices were not ameliorated by AG. They suggest that AG reverses nerve ischemia and more gradually improves their electrophysiology by an action on nerve microvessels. AG may have potential in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy.

  19. Conductive Hearing Loss Has Long-Lasting Structural and Molecular Effects on Presynaptic and Postsynaptic Structures of Auditory Nerve Synapses in the Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, Cheryl; Antunes, Flora M.

    2016-01-01

    Sound deprivation by conductive hearing loss increases hearing thresholds, but little is known about the response of the auditory brainstem during and after conductive hearing loss. Here, we show in young adult rats that 10 d of monaural conductive hearing loss (i.e., earplugging) leads to hearing deficits that persist after sound levels are restored. Hearing thresholds in response to clicks and frequencies higher than 8 kHz remain increased after a 10 d recovery period. Neural output from the cochlear nucleus measured at 10 dB above threshold is reduced and followed by an overcompensation at the level of the lateral lemniscus. We assessed whether structural and molecular substrates at auditory nerve (endbulb of Held) synapses in the cochlear nucleus could explain these long-lasting changes in hearing processing. During earplugging, vGluT1 expression in the presynaptic terminal decreased and synaptic vesicles were smaller. Together, there was an increase in postsynaptic density (PSD) thickness and an upregulation of GluA3 AMPA receptor subunits on bushy cells. After earplug removal and a 10 d recovery period, the density of synaptic vesicles increased, vesicles were also larger, and the PSD of endbulb synapses was larger and thicker. The upregulation of the GluA3 AMPAR subunit observed during earplugging was maintained after the recovery period. This suggests that GluA3 plays a role in plasticity in the cochlear nucleus. Our study demonstrates that sound deprivation has long-lasting alterations on structural and molecular presynaptic and postsynaptic components at the level of the first auditory nerve synapse in the auditory brainstem. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Despite being the second most prevalent form of hearing loss, conductive hearing loss and its effects on central synapses have received relatively little attention. Here, we show that 10 d of monaural conductive hearing loss leads to an increase in hearing thresholds, to an increased central gain upstream of

  20. A composite SWNT-collagen matrix: characterization and preliminary assessment as a conductive peripheral nerve regeneration matrix.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Z; McFetridge, P S

    2010-12-01

    Unique in their structure and function, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have received significant attention due to their potential to create unique conductive materials. For neural applications, these conductive materials hold promise as they may enhance regenerative processes. However, like other nano-scaled biomaterials it is important to have a comprehensive understanding how these materials interact with cell systems and how the biological system responds to their presence. These investigations aim to further our understanding of SWNT-cell interactions by assessing the effect SWNT/collagen hydrogels have on PC12 neuronal-like cells seeded within and (independently) on top of the composite material. Two types of collagen hydrogels were prepared: (1) SWNTs dispersed directly within the collagen (SWNT/COL) and (2) albumin-coated SWNTs prepared using the surfactant 'sodium cholate' to improve dispersion (AL-SWNT/COL) and collagen alone serving as a control (COL). SWNT dispersion was significantly improved when using surfactant-assisted dispersion. The enhanced dispersion resulted in a stiffer, more conductive material with an increased collagen fiber diameter. Short-term cell interactions with PC12 cells and SWNT composites have shown a stimulatory effect on cell proliferation relative to plain collagen controls. In parallel to these results, p53 gene displayed normal expression levels, which indicates the absence of nanoparticle-induced DNA damage. In summary, these mechanically tunable SWNT-collagen scaffolds show the potential for enhanced electrical activity and have shown positive in vitro biocompatibility results offering further evidence that SWNT-based materials have an important role in promoting neuronal regeneration.

  1. Ajmaline Challenge To Unmask Infrahisian Disease In Patients With Recurrent And Unexplained Syncope, Preserved Ejection Fraction, With Or Without Conduction Abnormalities On Surface ECG.

    PubMed

    Pentimalli, Francesco; Bacino, Luca; Ghione, Matteo; Giambattista, Siri; Gazzarata, Massimo; Bellotti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pharmacological challenge with class I antiarrhythmic drug is a recommended diagnostic test in patients with unexplained syncope only in the presence of bundle branch block, when non-invasive tests have failed to make the diagnosis. Its role in patients with minor or no conduction disturbances on 12-leads ECG has not been evaluated yet. It is also not clear which are the values of His-Ventricular interval to be considered diagnostic. We sought to evaluate the role of ajmaline challenge in unmasking the presence of an infrahisian disease in patients with recurrent and unexplained syncope, regardless of the existence of conduction disturbances on surface ECG. Materials And Methods: Patients with history of recurrent syncope, preserved EF and a negative first level workup were enrolled. Conduction disturbances on ECG were not considered as an exclusion criteria. During EPS, basal HV conduction was determined. In the presence of a HV >70 msec the study was interrupted and the patient was implanted with a pacemaker. If the HV was ≤ 70 msec, ajmaline was infused and HV was reassessed. The maximum value of HV was considered. A prolongation ≥ 100 msec was considered as diagnostic and indicative of conduction disease, and the patient underwent pacemaker implantation. Patients with an HV <100 msec were implanted with an ILR. Results: Sixteen consecutive patients were studied (age 76±5.2 years). Nine patients had conduction disturbances at baseline ECG (group ECG+). Among them, 5 had a basal diagnostic HV interval and 4 had a non-diagnostic HV interval. In the latter group, abnormal response to ajmaline was observed in 3 patients. In this group only one patient was implanted with an ILR, 8 patients were implanted with a pacemaker. Among the seven patients without conduction disturbances (group ECG-), no one had a diagnostic basal HV interval. After drug administration, 4 patients had a non-diagnostic response and were implanted with an ILR, while 3 patient

  2. Alveolar abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001093.htm Alveolar abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alveolar abnormalities are changes in the tiny air sacs in ...

  3. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... 2012:chap 71. Zaiac MN, Walker A. Nail abnormalities associated with systemic pathologies. Clin Dermatol . 2013;31: ...

  4. Electro membrane isolation of nerve agent degradation products across a supported liquid membrane followed by capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Hauser, Peter C; Lee, Hian Kee

    2008-12-19

    In the present study, electro membrane isolation (EMI) of four nerve agent degradation products has been successfully explored. In the procedure, a polypropylene sheet membrane folded into an envelope with an open end with its wall pores impregnated with 1-octanol was employed as the artificial supported liquid membrane (SLM). The envelope containing the extractant or aqueous acceptor phase (at pH 6.8) was immersed in the sample or donor phase (also aqueous at a pH of 6.8) for extraction. This ensured that the target analytes were fully ionized. A voltage was then applied, with the negative electrode placed in the donor phase with agitation, and the positive electrode in the acceptor phase. The ionized analytes were thus driven to migrate from the donor phase across the SLM to the acceptor phase. The factors influential to extraction: type of organic solvent, voltage, agitation speed, extraction time, pH of the donor and acceptor phase and concentration of humic acids were investigated in detail. After extraction, the acceptor phase was collected and directly injected for capillary electrophoretic (CE) analysis. Combined with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (C(4)D), the direct detection of these compounds could be achieved. Moreover, large-volume sample injection was employed to further enhance the sensitivity of this method. Limits of detection (LODs) as low as ng/mL were reached for the studied analytes, with overall LOD enhancements of four orders of magnitude.

  5. Ion-pair liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction of nerve agent degradation products followed by capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Gong, Xiao Yang; Lee, Hian Kee; Hauser, Peter C

    2008-09-26

    The four nerve agent degradation products methylphosphonic acid (MPA), ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA), isopropyl methylphosphonic acid (IMPA) and cyclohexyl methylphosphonic acid (CMPA) have been successfully extracted from aqueous sample solution by ion-pair liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction. In this procedure, the target analytes in the sample solution were converted into their ion-pair complexes with tri-n-butyl amine and then extracted by an organic solvent (1-octanol) layer on top of the sample solution. Simultaneously, the analytes were back-extracted into a drop of an aqueous acceptor solution which was suspended in the organic phase at a microsyringe needle tip. The factors influential to extraction: type of organic solvent, type of ion-pair reagent and its concentration, pH values of sample solution and acceptor aqueous phase, stirring rate and extraction time were investigated in detail. After extraction, the drop of the acceptor solution was withdrawn into the syringe and injected into a capillary electrophoresis system for analysis. Using contactless conductivity detection, direct quantification of these compounds is possible. Moreover, large-volume sample injection was employed for further preconcentration. Improvements in the limits of detection between 2.5 and 4 orders of magnitude could be achieved and concentrations at the ng/mL level can be determined. This newly established approach was successfully applied to a spiked river water sample.

  6. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Review Date 6/1/2015 ...

  7. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Common peroneal nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - common peroneal nerve; Peroneal nerve injury; Peroneal nerve palsy ... type of peripheral neuropathy (damage to nerves outside the brain ... nerve injuries. Damage to the nerve disrupts the myelin sheath ...

  9. Tourniquet-Related Iatrogenic Femoral Nerve Palsy after Knee Surgery: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mingo-Robinet, Juan; Castañeda-Cabrero, Carlos; Alvarez, Vicente; León Alonso-Cortés, José Miguel; Monge-Casares, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Tourniquet-induced nerve injuries have been reported in the literature, but even if electromyography abnormalities in knee surgery are frequent, only two cases of permanent femoral nerve palsies have been reported, both after prolonged tourniquet time. We report a case of tourniquet-related permanent femoral nerve palsy after knee surgery. Case Report. We report a case of a 58-year-old woman who underwent surgical treatment of a patella fracture. Tourniquet was inflated to 310 mmHg for 45 minutes. After surgery, patient complained about paralysis of the quadriceps femoris with inability to extend the knee. Electromyography and nerve conduction study showed a severe axonal neuropathy of the left femoral nerve, without clinical remission after several months. Discussion. Even if complications are not rare, safe duration and pressure for tourniquet use remain a controversy. Nevertheless, subtle clinical lesions of the femoral nerve or even subclinical lesions only detectable by nerve conduction and EMG activity are frequent, so persistent neurologic dysfunction, even if rare, may be an underreported complication of tourniquet application. Elderly persons with muscle atrophy and flaccid, loose skin might be in risk for iatrogenic nerve injury secondary to tourniquet. PMID:24371536

  10. The effects of treatment with alpha-lipoic acid or evening primrose oil on vascular hemostatic and lipid risk factors, blood flow, and peripheral nerve conduction in the streptozotocin-diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Ford, I; Cotter, M A; Cameron, N E; Greaves, M

    2001-08-01

    Oxidative stress and defective fatty acid metabolism in diabetes may lead to impaired nerve perfusion and contribute to the development of peripheral neuropathy. We studied the effects of 2-week treatments with evening primrose oil (EPO; n = 16) or the antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid (ALA; n = 16) on endoneurial blood flow, nerve conduction parameters, lipids, coagulation, and endothelial factors, in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Compared with their nondiabetic littermates, untreated diabetic rats had impaired sciatic motor and saphenous sensory nerve-conduction velocity (NCV; P <.001), reduced endoneurial blood flow (P <.001), and increased serum triglycerides (P <.01), cholesterol (P < 0.01), plasma factor VII (P <.0001), and von Willebrand factor (vWF; P <.0001). Plasma fibrinogen and serum high-density lipoprotein concentrations were not significantly different. Treatment with either ALA or EPO effectively corrected the deficits in NCV and endoneurial blood flow. ALA was associated with marked and statistically significant decreases in fibrinogen, factor VII, vWF, and triglycerides (P <.01, paired t tests before v after treatment). In contrast, EPO was associated with significant (P <.05) increases in fibrinogen, factor VII, vWF, triglycerides, and cholesterol and a significant decrease in high-density lipoprotein. Changes in levels of coagulation factors and lipids, qualitatively similar to those found with EPO, were obtained with a diet containing sunflower oil (to control for calorific and lipid content) or with a normal diet alone. Blood glucose and hematocrit levels were not significantly altered by treatments. These data suggest that although both ALA and EPO improve blood flow and nerve function, their actions on vascular factors differ. The marked effects of ALA in lowering lipid and hemostatic risk factors for cardiovascular disease indicate potential antithrombotic and antiatherosclerotic actions that could be of benefit in human diabetes

  11. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  12. Active Nerve Regeneration with Failed Target Reinnervation Drives Persistent Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral nerves can regenerate and, when injured, may cause neuropathic pain. We propose that the active regeneration process plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of neuropathic pain. In one commonly used rodent neuropathic pain model, pronounced pain behaviors follow ligation and cutting of the L5 spinal nerve. We found that the injured nerve regenerates into the sciatic nerve and functionally reinnervates target tissues: the regenerated nerve conducts electrical signals, mechanical responses, and tracers between the leg/hindpaw and axotomized sensory ganglion. The regenerating nerve is the primary source of abnormal spontaneous activity detected in vivo. Disrupting the regeneration inhibited pain. First, semaphorin 3A, an inhibitory axonal guidance molecule, reduced functional regeneration, spontaneous activity, and pain behaviors when applied to the injury site in vivo. Second, knockdown of the upregulated growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) with siRNA injected into the axotomized sensory ganglion reduced pain behaviors. We next examined the spared nerve injury model, in which pain behaviors are essentially permanent. The regeneration resulted in tangled GAP43-positive neuromas at the nerve injury site without target reinnervation. Perfusing the nerve stump with semaphorin 3A, but not removing the tangled fibers, prevented or reversed pain behaviors. This effect far outlasted the semaphorin 3A perfusion. Hence, in this model the long-lasting chronic pain may reflect the anatomical inability of regenerating nerves to successfully reinnervate target tissues, resulting in an ongoing futile regeneration process. We propose that specifically targeting the regeneration process may provide effective long-lasting pain relief in patients when functional reinnervation becomes impossible. PMID:28197545

  13. Nerve Blocks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sometimes the needle has to be inserted fairly deep to reach the nerve causing your problem. This ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  14. An imaging study of the facial nerve canal in congenital aural atresia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shouqin; Han, Demin; Wang, Zhenchang; Li, Jie; Qian, Yanni; Ren, Yuanyuan; Dong, Jiyong

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a prospective study to investigate the abnormalities of the facial nerve canal in patients with congenital aural atresia by computed tomography (CT). Our study population was made up of 99 patients--68 males and 31 females, aged 6 to 22 years (mean: 13.5)--who had unilateral congenital aural atresia without any inner ear malformations. We compared our findings in these patients with those in 50 controls-33 males and 17 females, aged 5 to 22 years (mean: 15.0)-who had normal ears. We classified the congenital aural atresia patients into three groups (A, B, and C) according to their Jahrsdoerfer grading scale score (≥8; 6 or 7; and ≤5, respectively). The course of the facial nerve canal in both the controls and the study patients was determined by temporal bone CT with multiplanar reconstruction. The distances from different parts of the facial nerve canal to surrounding structures were also measured. The course of the facial nerve canal in the normal ears did not vary much, and there were no statistically significant differences according to head side and sex. In groups B and C, the tympanic segment, mastoid segment, and angle of the second genu of the facial nerve canal were all significantly smaller than those of the controls (p < 0.01 in all cases). Statistically, the tympanic segment of the facial nerve canal in patients with congenital aural atresia was downwardly displaced. The mastoid segment of the facial nerve canal in these patients was more anterior than that of the controls. We conclude that congenital aural atresia is often accompanied by abnormalities of the facial nerve canal, especially in the tympanic segment, the mastoid segment, and the second genu. We found that the lower the Jahrsdoerfer score was, the shorter the tympanic segment was and the more forward the mastoid segment was.

  15. Abnormal thermal conductivity in tetragonal tungsten bronze Ba{sub 6−x}Sr{sub x}Nb{sub 10}O{sub 30}

    SciTech Connect

    Kolodiazhnyi, T. Sakurai, H.; Vasylkiv, O.; Borodianska, H.; Mozharivskyj, Y.

    2014-03-17

    Ba{sub 6−x}Sr{sub x}Nb{sub 10}O{sub 30} solid solution with 0 ≤ x ≤ 6 crystallizes in centrosymmetric tetragonal “tungsten bronze” structure (space group P4/mbm). We report on the x dependence of thermal conductivity of polycrystalline samples measured in the 2–400 K temperature interval. Substitution of Sr for Ba brings about a significant decrease in thermal conductivity at x ≥ 3 accompanied by development of a low-temperature (T ≈ 10–30 K) “plateau” region reminiscent of a glass-like compounds. We explain this behaviour based on a size-driven site occupancy and atomic displacement parameters associated with an alkaline earth atomic positions in the title compounds.

  16. Radiation-induced malignant and atypical peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, K.M.; Woodruff, J.M.; Ellis, F.T.; Posner, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    The reported peripheral nerve complications of therapeutic irradiation in humans include brachial and lumbar plexus fibrosis and cranial and peripheral nerve atrophy. We have encountered 9 patients with malignant (7) and atypical (2) peripheral nerve tumors occurring in an irradiated site suggesting that such tumors represent another delayed effect of radiation treatment on peripheral nerve. In all instances the radio-theray was within an acceptable radiation dosage, yet 3 patients developed local radiation-induced skin and bony abnormalities. The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors developed only in the radiation port. Animal studies support the clinical observation that malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors can occur as a delayed effect of irradiation.

  17. The cutaneous nerve biopsy: technical aspects, indications, and contribution.

    PubMed

    Mellgren, Svein Ivar; Nolano, Maria; Sommer, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Skin biopsy with a 3mm disposable circular punch is easy to perform and allows, after proper processing, the visualization of epidermal, dermal, and sweat gland nerve fibers. A technique of sampling the epidermis alone by applying a suction capsule, the "blister" technique, has also been developed. It is most common to stain immunohistochemically for the pan-axonal marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), an ubiquitin C-terminal hydroxylase. The sections are then observed and analyzed with bright-field microscopy or with indirect immunofluorescence with or without confocal microscopy. Most studies report quantification of intraepidermal nerve fiber density displayed in bright-field microscopy. Normative values have been established, particularly from the distal part of the leg, 10cm above the external malleolus. In diabetes mellitus early degeneration of intraepidermal nerve fibers is induced and there is slower regeneration even when there is no evidence of neuropathy. Skin biopsy is of particular value in the diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy when nerve conduction studies are normal. It may also be repeated in order to study the progressive nature of the disease and also has the potential of studying regeneration of nerve fibers and thus the effects of treatment. Inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies may also involve loss of small-diameter nerve fibers and IgM deposits in dermal myelinated nerve fibers in anti-MAG neuropathy. In some cases the presence of vasculitis in skin may indicate a nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy and in HIV neuropathy intraepidermal nerve fiber density is reduced in a length-dependent manner. In several hereditary neuropathies intraepidermal nerve fiber density may be reduced but other abnormalities can also be demonstrated in dermal myelinated fibers. Some small swellings and varicosities may be present in the distal leg skin biopsy of healthy individuals but large axonal swellings are considered as evidence of a pathological

  18. Assessment of the Medial Dorsal Cutaneous, Dorsal Sural, and Medial Plantar Nerves in Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Diabetic Patients With Normal Sural and Superficial Peroneal Nerve Responses

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sun; Kim, Sung-Rae; Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Yang Soo; Park, Geun-Young

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study evaluated the nerve conduction study (NCS) parameters of the most distal sensory nerves of the lower extremities—namely, the medial dorsal cutaneous (MDC), dorsal sural (DS), and medial plantar (MP) nerves—in diabetic (DM) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) patients who displayed normal findings on their routine NCSs. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Standard NCSs were performed on healthy control (HC), DM, and IGT groups (N = 147). The bilateral NCS parameters of the MDC, DS, and MP nerves were investigated. The Toronto Clinical Scoring System (TCSS) was assessed for the DM and IGT groups. RESULTS The mean TCSS scores of the IGT and DM groups were 2.5 ± 2.3 and 2.8 ± 2.2, respectively. No significant differences between the two groups were observed. After adjustment of age and BMI, the DM group showed significant NCS differences in DS and MDC nerves compared with the HC group (P < 0.05). These differences were also exhibited in the left DS of the IGT group (P = 0.0003). More advanced NCS findings were observed in the DM group. Bilateral abnormal NCS responses in these distal sensory nerves were found in 40 and 16% of DM and IGT patients, respectively. CONCLUSIONS These results showed that the simultaneous assessment of the most distal sensory nerves allowed the detection of early NCS changes in the IGT and DM groups, even when the routine NCS showed normal findings. PMID:22100966

  19. Tuning PAK Activity to Rescue Abnormal Myelin Permeability in HNPP.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bo; Arpag, Sezgi; Zhang, Xuebao; Möbius, Wiebke; Werner, Hauke; Sosinsky, Gina; Ellisman, Mark; Zhang, Yang; Hamilton, Audra; Chernoff, Jonathan; Li, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous systems extend their membranes to wrap axons concentrically and form the insulating sheath, called myelin. The spaces between layers of myelin are sealed by myelin junctions. This tight insulation enables rapid conduction of electric impulses (action potentials) through axons. Demyelination (stripping off the insulating sheath) has been widely regarded as one of the most important mechanisms altering the action potential propagation in many neurological diseases. However, the effective nerve conduction is also thought to require a proper myelin seal through myelin junctions such as tight junctions and adherens junctions. In the present study, we have demonstrated the disruption of myelin junctions in a mouse model (Pmp22+/-) of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) with heterozygous deletion of Pmp22 gene. We observed a robust increase of F-actin in Pmp22+/- nerve regions where myelin junctions were disrupted, leading to increased myelin permeability. These abnormalities were present long before segmental demyelination at the late phase of Pmp22+/- mice. Moreover, the increase of F-actin levels correlated with an enhanced activity of p21-activated kinase (PAK1), a molecule known to regulate actin polymerization. Pharmacological inhibition of PAK normalized levels of F-actin, and completely prevented the progression of the myelin junction disruption and nerve conduction failure in Pmp22+/- mice. Our findings explain how abnormal myelin permeability is caused in HNPP, leading to impaired action potential propagation in the absence of demyelination. We call it "functional demyelination", a novel mechanism upstream to the actual stripping of myelin that is relevant to many demyelinating diseases. This observation also provides a potential therapeutic approach for HNPP.

  20. Tuning PAK Activity to Rescue Abnormal Myelin Permeability in HNPP

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo; Zhang, Xuebao; Möbius, Wiebke; Werner, Hauke; Sosinsky, Gina; Ellisman, Mark; Zhang, Yang; Hamilton, Audra; Chernoff, Jonathan; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous systems extend their membranes to wrap axons concentrically and form the insulating sheath, called myelin. The spaces between layers of myelin are sealed by myelin junctions. This tight insulation enables rapid conduction of electric impulses (action potentials) through axons. Demyelination (stripping off the insulating sheath) has been widely regarded as one of the most important mechanisms altering the action potential propagation in many neurological diseases. However, the effective nerve conduction is also thought to require a proper myelin seal through myelin junctions such as tight junctions and adherens junctions. In the present study, we have demonstrated the disruption of myelin junctions in a mouse model (Pmp22+/-) of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) with heterozygous deletion of Pmp22 gene. We observed a robust increase of F-actin in Pmp22+/- nerve regions where myelin junctions were disrupted, leading to increased myelin permeability. These abnormalities were present long before segmental demyelination at the late phase of Pmp22+/- mice. Moreover, the increase of F-actin levels correlated with an enhanced activity of p21-activated kinase (PAK1), a molecule known to regulate actin polymerization. Pharmacological inhibition of PAK normalized levels of F-actin, and completely prevented the progression of the myelin junction disruption and nerve conduction failure in Pmp22+/- mice. Our findings explain how abnormal myelin permeability is caused in HNPP, leading to impaired action potential propagation in the absence of demyelination. We call it “functional demyelination”, a novel mechanism upstream to the actual stripping of myelin that is relevant to many demyelinating diseases. This observation also provides a potential therapeutic approach for HNPP. PMID:27583434

  1. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nerve Decompression Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Optic Nerve Decompression John Lee, MD Introduction Optic nerve decompression is a surgical procedure aimed at ...

  2. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... compressed in the elbow, a problem called cubital tunnel syndrome may result. When damage destroys the nerve ...

  3. Expressing hNF-LE397K results in abnormal gaiting in a transgenic model of CMT2E

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Jeffrey M.; Villalon, Eric; Shannon, Stephen G.; Barry, Devin M.; Markey, Rachel M.; Garcia, Virginia B.; Garcia, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. CMT disease signs include distal limb neuropathy, abnormal gaiting, exacerbation of neuropathy, sensory defects, and deafness. We generated a novel line of CMT2E mice expressing a hNF-LE397K transgene, which displayed muscle atrophy of the lower limbs without denervation, proximal reduction in large caliber axons, and decreased nerve conduction velocity. In this study, we demonstrated that hNF-LE397K mice developed abnormal gait of the hind limbs. The identification of severe gaiting defects in combination with previously observed muscle atrophy, reduced axon caliber, and decreased nerve conduction velocity suggests that hNF-LE397K mice recapitulate many of clinical signs associated with CMT2E. Therefore, hNF-LE397K mice provide a context for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:22288874

  4. Imaging the Facial Nerve: A Contemporary Review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Mends, Francine; Hagiwara, Mari; Fatterpekar, Girish; Roehm, Pamela C.

    2013-01-01

    Imaging plays a critical role in the evaluation of a number of facial nerve disorders. The facial nerve has a complex anatomical course; thus, a thorough understanding of the course of the facial nerve is essential to localize the sites of pathology. Facial nerve dysfunction can occur from a variety of causes, which can often be identified on imaging. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are helpful for identifying bony facial canal and soft tissue abnormalities, respectively. Ultrasound of the facial nerve has been used to predict functional outcomes in patients with Bell's palsy. More recently, diffusion tensor tractography has appeared as a new modality which allows three-dimensional display of facial nerve fibers. PMID:23766904

  5. Application of implantable wireless biomicrosystem for monitoring nerve impedance of rat after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ting; Peng, Chih-Wei; Chen, Lung-Tai; Lin, Wen-Shan; Chu, Chun-Hsun; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is usually applied percutaneously for facilitating peripheral nerve regeneration. However, few studies have conducted long-term monitoring of the condition of nerve regeneration. This study implements an implantable biomicrosystem for inducing pulse current for aiding nerve repair and monitoring the time-course changes of nerve impedance for assessing nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve injury rat model. For long-term implantation, a transcutaneous magnetic coupling technique is adopted for power and data transmission. For in vivo study, the implanted module was placed in the rat's abdomen and the cuff electrode was wrapped around an 8-mm sciatic nerve gap of the rat for nerve impedance measurement for 42 days. One group of animals received monophasic constant current via the cuff electrode and a second group had no stimulation between days 8-21. The nerve impedance increased to above 150% of the initial value in the nerve regeneration groups with and without stimulation whereas the group with no nerve regeneration increased to only 113% at day 42. The impedance increase in nerve regeneration groups can be observed before evident functional recovery. Also, the nerve regeneration group that received electrical stimulation had relatively higher myelinated fiber density than that of no stimulation group, 20686 versus 11417 fiber/mm (2). The developed implantable biomicrosystem is proven to be a useful experimental tool for long-term stimulation in aiding nerve fiber growth as well as impedance assessment for understanding the time-course changes of nerve regeneration.

  6. Screening for Electrophysiological Abnormalities in Chronic Hepatitis C Infection: Peripheral Neuropathy and Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    KÖŞKDERELİOĞLU, Aslı; ORTAN, Pınar; ARI, Alpay; GEDİZLİOĞLU, Muhteşem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To investigate the existence of peripheral and optic neuropathies in asymptomatic individuals with hepatitis C infection. Methods Thirty consecutive patients who were followed in a hepatitis C outpatient clinic were recruited for electrophysiological evaluation together with 30 age- and gender-compatible healthy controls. All patients had a detailed neurological examination. The information regarding the disease duration and management with interferons were collected. Nerve conduction studies and visual evoked potentials (VEP) were recorded in all subjects. The results of the patient and control groups were statistically compared. Results Of the patients with hepatitis C infection, 16 were females and 14 males. The mean age was 57.5 years, and the average disease duration was 6.43 years. The P100 latencies in the patient group were within normal limits, while the amplitudes were meaningfully small by comparison with the controls. There were some abnormalities in the nerve conduction studies of 15 patients. Sensorial neuropathy was detected in two patients, sensorimotor polyneuropathy in four, carpal tunnel syndrome in seven, and carpal tunnel syndrome and sensorimotor polyneuropathy as comorbid states in another two patients. The nerve conduction studies and VEP parameters were entirely normal in the control group. Conclusion Hepatitis C-related neurological abnormalities may occur both in the central and peripheral nervous system. Mononeuritis multiplex, sensorial axonal neuropathy, and multiple mononeuropathies are some of the presentations of the peripheral nervous system involvement. The mode of infection is considered to be via vasculitic mechanisms. In addition, optic neuropathy is a known complication of interferon treatment. Autoantibodies, cytokines, chemokines, and cryoglobulins are accused to play roles in the pathogenesis. In this study, we investigated the involvement of the peripheral nervous system and optic nerves in a group of patients

  7. Nerve function and structure beneath and distal to a pneumatic tourniquet applied to rabbit hindlimbs.

    PubMed

    Pedowitz, R A; Nordborg, C; Rosenqvist, A L; Rydevik, B L

    1991-01-01

    Neurophysiologic and neuropathologic changes were studied in rabbit hindlimbs after 2 hours of pneumatic tourniquet application with either 350 mmHg (n = 18) or 1,000 mmHg (n = 6) cuff inflation pressure. The toe spread reflex was decreased in 66% and absent in 33% of limbs 2 days after 350 mmHg compression, and was absent in all limbs after 1,000 mmHg compression. Compound motor action potential amplitudes (CMAPs), recorded from the abductor hallucis muscle, were significantly decreased with sciatic nerve stimulation 1 hour after 350 mmHg compression. CMAPs returned to baseline values one and two days later, however nerve conduction velocity (NCV) was still significantly decreased in the compressed sciatic nerves of these groups. In contrast, complete nerve conduction block, localized beneath the cuff's distal border, was observed two days after 1,000 mmHg compression, and NCV was still significantly decreased distal to the tourniquet zone. Using light and electron microscopy, scattered axonal degeneration, mild myelin damage, and normal nodes of Ranvier were observed two days after 350 mmHg tourniquet compression. Severe fiber damage and nodal obliteration were noted after 1,000 mmHg tourniquet compression. Although nodal invagination is probably not a significant pathogenic mechanism at clinically relevant tourniquet pressures and durations, functional abnormalities were induced by 2 hour, 350 mmHg tourniquet compression. Such changes probably correlate with clinical electromyographic abnormalities and delayed post-operative recovery following 'routine' extremity surgery using pneumatic tourniquets.

  8. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    Vagus nerve stimulation Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that involves implantation of a device that stimulates the vagus nerve with electrical impulses. There's one vagus nerve on ...

  9. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  10. Case Report of Lewis and Sumner Syndrome with Bilateral Vagus Nerves Paralysis for 16 Years.

    PubMed

    Vasaghi, Attiyeh; Ashraf, Alireza; Shirzadi, Alireza; Petramfar, Peyman

    2016-12-01

    This report describes a patient with dysphonia for 16 years in combination with asymmetric and progressive decrease in sense and power of both upper and lower extremities for the past 3 years. Electrophysiological study revealed asymmetric conduction block and abnormal sensory action potential in 4 limbs. The vagus nerves palsy and abnormal electrodiagnosis of the limbs led us to diagnose the disease as Lewis and Sumner syndrome, also called multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy diagnosis, which improved by corticosteroid consumption to some extent. This case is uncommon by its long time presentation and progression. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous bilateral vagus nerve palsy in combination with upper and lower limbs' demyelinating neuropathy. In conclusion, persistent dysphonia can be a part of the presentation of demyelinating neuropathy.

  11. Recurrent ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow: Correlation of surgical findings and 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Thakkar, Rashmi S; Carrino, John A; Dellon, A Lee

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe the correlation between 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) and surgical findings in two patients who underwent multiple previous failed ulnar nerve surgeries. MRN correctly localized the site of the abnormality. Prospectively observed MRN findings of perineural fibrosis, ulnar nerve re-entrapment abnormalities, medial antebrachial cutaneous neuroma and additional median nerve entrapment were confirmed surgically.

  12. Promotion of peripheral nerve regeneration and prevention of neuroma formation by PRGD/PDLLA/β-TCP conduit: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yixia; Li, Binbin; Yan, Qiongjiao; Dai, Honglian; Wang, Xinyu; Huang, Jifeng; Li, Shipu

    2015-06-01

    In the field of nerve repair, one major challenge is the formation of neuroma. However, reports on both the promotion of nerve regeneration and prevention of traumatic neuroma in the clinical settings are rare in the field of nerve repair. One of the reasons could be the insufficiency in the follow-up system. We have conducted 33 cases of nerve repair using PRGD/PDLLA/β-TCP conduit without any sign of adverse reaction, especially no neuroma formation. Among them, we have selected two cases as representatives to report in this article. The first case was a patient with an upper limb nerve wound was bridged by PRGD/PDLLA/β-TCP conduit and a plate fixation was given. After nearly 3-years' follow-up, the examination results demonstrated that nerve regeneration effect was very good. When the reoperation was performed to remove the steel plate we observed a uniform structure of the regenerated nerve without the formation of neuroma, and to our delight, the implanted conduit was completely degraded 23 months after the implantation. The second case had an obsolete nerve injury with neuroma formation. After removal of the neuroma, the nerve was bridged by PRGD/PDLLA/β-TCP conduit. Follow-up examinations showed that the structure and functional recovery were improved gradually in the 10-month follow-up; no end-enlargement and any other abnormal reaction associated with the characteristic of neuroma were found. Based on our 33-case studies, we have concluded that PRGD/PDLLA/β-TCP nerve conduit could both promote nerve regeneration and prevent neuroma formation; therefore, it is a good alternative for peripheral nerve repair.

  13. Sympathetic nerves bridge the cross-transmission in hemifacial spasm.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuesheng; Hong, Wenyao; Tang, Yinda; Wu, Zhenghai; Shang, Ming; Zhang, Wenchuan; Zhong, Jun; Li, Shiting

    2012-05-23

    The pathophysiologic basis of hemifacial spasm is abnormal cross-transmission between facial nerve fibers. The author hypothesized that the demyelinated facial nerve fibers were connected with the sympathetic nerve fibers on the offending artery wall, and thus the latter function as a bridge in the cross-transmission circuit. This hypothesis was tested using a rat model of hemifacial spasm. A facial muscle response was recorded while the offending artery wall was electrically stimulated. The nerve fibers on the offending artery wall were blocked with lidocaine, or the superior cervical ganglion, which innervates the offending artery, was resected, and meanwhile the abnormal muscle response was monitored and analyzed. A waveform was recorded from the facial muscle when the offending artery wall was stimulated, named as "Z-L response". The latency of Z-L response was different from that of abnormal muscle response. When the nerve fibers on the offending artery wall were blocked by lidocaine, the abnormal muscle response disappeared gradually and recovered in 2h. The abnormal muscle response disappeared permanently after the sympathetic ganglion was resected. Our findings indicate that cross-transmission between the facial nerve fibers is bridged by the nerve fibers on the offending artery wall, probably sympathetic nerve fibers.

  14. [The nerve agent sarin: history, clinical manifestations, and treatment].

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Nobuo

    2014-05-01

    Organic phosphate pesticides were used worldwide after World War II and experiences on poisoning and treatment have been accumulated. An organic phosphate "nerve agent" Sarin was used in two terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990s. Sarin effects on humans were well documented in these two incidents. Sarin gas inhalation caused instantaneous death by respiratory arrest in several victims in Matsumoto. Severely injured victims presenting with coma and generalized convulsion were resuscitated and recovered rapidly without sequelae. Miosis and blurred-dark vision, ocular pain, copious secretions from respiratory and gastrointestinal tract (muscarinic effects), and headache were common in severely to slightly affected victims. Plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity decreased in parallel with the severity of signs and symptoms in victims. Oximes, atropine sulphate, diazepam, and ample intravenous infusion were effective treatments. Follow-up examinations on victims were conducted up to 10 years in Matsumoto, and 5 years in Tokyo. No neurological sequelae or abnormalities were observed after 1 year, except for a few EEG abnormalities or delay in sensory nerve conduction velocity. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was observed in several of the victims in the 5-year follow up, irrespective of the severity of poisoning at Matsumoto. Psychological symptoms continue in victims of both incidents.

  15. Optic Nerve.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lynn K

    2016-10-28

    Optic nerve diseases arise from many different etiologies including inflammatory, neoplastic, genetic, infectious, ischemic, and idiopathic. Understanding some of the characteristics of the most common optic neuropathies along with therapeutic approaches to these diseases is helpful in designing recommendations for individual patients. Although many optic neuropathies have no specific treatment, some do, and it is those potentially treatable or preventable conditions which need to be recognized in order to help patients regain their sight or develop a better understanding of their own prognosis. In this chapter several diseases are discussed including idiopathic intracranial hypertension, optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathies, hereditary optic neuropathies, trauma, and primary tumors of the optic nerve. For each condition there is a presentation of the signs and symptoms of the disease, in some conditions the evaluation and diagnostic criteria are highlighted, and where possible, current therapy or past trials are discussed.

  16. Morphology of Donor and Recipient Nerves Utilised in Nerve Transfers to Restore Upper Limb Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Aurora; Van Zyl, Natasha; Weymouth, Michael; Flood, Stephen; Nunn, Andrew; Cooper, Catherine; Hahn, Jodie; Galea, Mary P.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of hand function after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) impacts heavily on independence. Multiple nerve transfer surgery has been applied successfully after cervical SCI to restore critical arm and hand functions, and the outcome depends on nerve integrity. Nerve integrity is assessed indirectly using muscle strength testing and intramuscular electromyography, but these measures cannot show the manifestation that SCI has on the peripheral nerves. We directly assessed the morphology of nerves biopsied at the time of surgery, from three patients within 18 months post injury. Our objective was to document their morphologic features. Donor nerves included teres minor, posterior axillary, brachialis, extensor carpi radialis brevis and supinator. Recipient nerves included triceps, posterior interosseus (PIN) and anterior interosseus nerves (AIN). They were fixed in glutaraldehyde, processed and embedded in Araldite Epon for light microscopy. Eighty percent of nerves showed abnormalities. Most common were myelin thickening and folding, demyelination, inflammation and a reduction of large myelinated axon density. Others were a thickened perineurium, oedematous endoneurium and Renaut bodies. Significantly, very thinly myelinated axons and groups of unmyelinated axons were observed indicating regenerative efforts. Abnormalities exist in both donor and recipient nerves and they differ in appearance and aetiology. The abnormalities observed may be preventable or reversible. PMID:27690115

  17. Peripheral neuropathy in chronic liver disease: clinical, electrodiagnostic, and nerve biopsy findings

    PubMed Central

    Knill-Jones, R. P.; Goodwill, C. J.; Dayan, A. D.; Williams, Roger

    1972-01-01

    In a prospective study of 70 unselected patients with chronic liver disease, clinical signs of a peripheral neuropathy were observed in 13 patients. Abnormal nerve conduction was demonstrated in nine of these and in one further patient who had no abnormal neurological signs. The occurrence of a neuropathy (in patients with cryptogenic cirrhosis, haemochromatosis, active chronic hepatitis as well as in alcoholic cirrhosis) could not be related to liver function, although it was associated with higher IgA and IgM values. Clinical diabetes was present in six of the 14 patients with neuropathy but there was no relation in the non-diabetic patients between neuropathy and minor impairment of carbohydrate tolerance. Those with neuropathy had a significantly higher incidence of oesophageal varices and there was also a relationship to a history of previous encephalopathy. Sural nerve biopsy was carried out on 14 patients, eight of whom had clinical or electrodiagnostic evidence of neuropathy. Single nerve fibres were examined by teasing and in all nerves histological evidence was found of an indolent process which had damaged whole Schwann cells and which resulted in demyelination and remyelination. Diabetic angiopathy was not seen and axonal degeneration, which was never severe, was found in all disease groups equally. Images PMID:4337271

  18. A Rational Design of a Selective Inhibitor for Kv1.1 Channels Prevalent in Demyelinated Nerves That Improves Their Impaired Axonal Conduction.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabi, Ahmed; Daly, Declan; Hoefer, Patrick; Kinsella, Gemma K; Metais, Charles; Pickering, Mark; Herron, Caroline; Kaza, Seshu Kumar; Nolan, Kieran; Dolly, J Oliver

    2017-03-23

    K(+) channels containing Kv1.1 α subunits, which become prevalent at internodes in demyelinated axons, may underlie their dysfunctional conduction akin to muscle weakness in multiple sclerosis. Small inhibitors were sought with selectivity for the culpable hyper-polarizing K(+) currents. Modeling of interactions with the extracellular pore in a Kv1.1-deduced structure identified diaryldi(2-pyrrolyl)methane as a suitable scaffold with optimized alkyl ammonium side chains. The resultant synthesized candidate [2,2'-((5,5'(di-p-topyldiaryldi(2-pyrrolyl)methane)bis(2,2'carbonyl)bis(azanediyl)) diethaneamine·2HCl] (8) selectively blocked Kv1.1 channels (IC50 ≈ 15 μM) recombinantly expressed in mammalian cells, induced a positive shift in the voltage dependency of K(+) current activation, and slowed its kinetics. It preferentially inhibited channels containing two or more Kv1.1 subunits regardless of their positioning in concatenated tetramers. In slices of corpus callosum from mice subjected to a demyelination protocol, this novel inhibitor improved neuronal conduction, highlighting its potential for alleviating symptoms in multiple sclerosis.

  19. Peripheral and segmental spinal abnormalities of median and ulnar somatosensory evoked potentials in Hirayama's disease

    PubMed Central

    Polo, A; Dossi, M; Fiaschi, A; Zanette, G; Rizzuto, N

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the origin of juvenile muscle atrophy of the upper limbs (Hirayama's disease, a type of cervical myelopathy of unknown origin). Subjects: Eight male patients were studied; data from 10 normal men were used as control. Methods: Median and ulnar nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) were recorded. Brachial plexus potentials at Erb's point (EP), dorsal horn responses (N13), and subcortical (P14) and cortical potentials (N20) were evaluated. Tibial nerve SEP and motor evoked potentials (MEP) were also recorded from scalp and spinal sites to assess posterior column and pyramidal tract conduction, respectively. Results: The most important SEP findings were: a very substantial attenuation of both the EP potentials and the N13 spinal responses; normal amplitude of the scalp N20; and normal latency of the individual peaks (EP-N9-N13-P14-N20). Although both nerves were involved, abnormalities in response to median nerve stimulation were more significant than those in response to ulnar nerve stimulation. There was little correlation between the degree of alterations observed and the clinical state. Latencies of both spinal and cortical potentials were normal following tibial nerve stimulation. The mean latency of cervical MEP and the central conduction time from the thenar eminence were slightly but significantly longer in patients than in controls. Conclusions: The findings support the hypothesis that this disease, which is clinically defined as a focal spinal muscle atrophy of the upper limb, may also involve the sensory system; if traumatic injury caused by stretching plays a role in the pathogenesis, the damage cannot be confined to the anterior horn of the spinal cord. PMID:12700306

  20. Anatomical Abnormalities in Autism?

    PubMed

    Haar, Shlomi; Berman, Sigal; Behrmann, Marlene; Dinstein, Ilan

    2016-04-01

    Substantial controversy exists regarding the presence and significance of anatomical abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The release of the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (∼1000 participants, age 6-65 years) offers an unprecedented opportunity to conduct large-scale comparisons of anatomical MRI scans across groups and to resolve many of the outstanding questions. Comprehensive univariate analyses using volumetric, thickness, and surface area measures of over 180 anatomically defined brain areas, revealed significantly larger ventricular volumes, smaller corpus callosum volume (central segment only), and several cortical areas with increased thickness in the ASD group. Previously reported anatomical abnormalities in ASD including larger intracranial volumes, smaller cerebellar volumes, and larger amygdala volumes were not substantiated by the current study. In addition, multivariate classification analyses yielded modest decoding accuracies of individuals' group identity (<60%), suggesting that the examined anatomical measures are of limited diagnostic utility for ASD. While anatomical abnormalities may be present in distinct subgroups of ASD individuals, the current findings show that many previously reported anatomical measures are likely to be of low clinical and scientific significance for understanding ASD neuropathology as a whole in individuals 6-35 years old.

  1. Luteolin improves the impaired nerve functions in diabetic neuropathy: behavioral and biochemical evidences

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Li, Qiang; Zhao, Qingsong; Zhang, Jinchao; Lin, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are a major cause of morbidity in patients with diabetes mellitus. Up to now, drugs for improving the impaired nerve functions has been lacking for diabetic neuropathy. The antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of luteolin make it an attractive candidate for diabetic neuropathy. The present study was designed to investigate the putative beneficial effect of luteolin on diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic rats were intraperitoneally treated with daily luteolin (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg) or vehicle for 3 weeks from the 28th day after streptozotocin injection. Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical studies were performed to evaluate the effect of luteolin on the impaired nerve functions in diabetic neuropathy. It was found that luteolin dose dependently alleviated abnormal sensation, improved nerve conduction velocities and nerve blood flow in diabetic rats. Biochanical analysis showed that luteolin significantly lowered the reactive oxygen species production and malondialdehyde level, as well as increased antioxidants activities in a dose dependent manner. In addition, luteolin significantly up-regulated the protein levels of nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in diabetic nerves. Taken together, luteolin is capable of improving diabetes-induced deficit in motor and sensory functions, which could be attributable, at least in part, to its Nrf2-dependent antioxidant capacity. The findings in the present study highlight the therapeutic value of luteolin for diabetic neuropathy. PMID:26617718

  2. Luteolin improves the impaired nerve functions in diabetic neuropathy: behavioral and biochemical evidences.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Li, Qiang; Zhao, Qingsong; Zhang, Jinchao; Lin, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are a major cause of morbidity in patients with diabetes mellitus. Up to now, drugs for improving the impaired nerve functions has been lacking for diabetic neuropathy. The antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of luteolin make it an attractive candidate for diabetic neuropathy. The present study was designed to investigate the putative beneficial effect of luteolin on diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic rats were intraperitoneally treated with daily luteolin (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg) or vehicle for 3 weeks from the 28(th) day after streptozotocin injection. Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical studies were performed to evaluate the effect of luteolin on the impaired nerve functions in diabetic neuropathy. It was found that luteolin dose dependently alleviated abnormal sensation, improved nerve conduction velocities and nerve blood flow in diabetic rats. Biochanical analysis showed that luteolin significantly lowered the reactive oxygen species production and malondialdehyde level, as well as increased antioxidants activities in a dose dependent manner. In addition, luteolin significantly up-regulated the protein levels of nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in diabetic nerves. Taken together, luteolin is capable of improving diabetes-induced deficit in motor and sensory functions, which could be attributable, at least in part, to its Nrf2-dependent antioxidant capacity. The findings in the present study highlight the therapeutic value of luteolin for diabetic neuropathy.

  3. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  4. Inner Ear Conductive Hearing Loss and Unilateral Pulsatile Tinnitus Associated with a Dural Arteriovenous Fistula: Case Based Review and Analysis of Relationship between Intracranial Vascular Abnormalities and Inner Ear Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Cassandro, Ettore; Cassandro, Claudia; Sequino, Giuliano; Scarpa, Alfonso; Petrolo, Claudio; Chiarella, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    While pulsatile tinnitus (PT) and dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) are not rarely associated, the finding of a conductive hearing loss (CHL) in this clinical picture is unusual. Starting from a case of CHL and PT, diagnosed to be due to a DAVF, we analyzed relationship between intracranial vascular abnormalities and inner ear fluids. DAVF was treated with endovascular embolization. Following this, there was a dramatic recovery of PT and of CHL, confirming their cause-effect link with DAVF. We critically evaluated the papers reporting this association. This is the first case of CHL associated with PT and DAVF. We describe the most significant experiences and theories reported in literature, with a personal analysis about the possible relationship between vascular intracranial system and labyrinthine fluids. In conclusion, we believe that this association may be a challenge for otolaryngologists. So we suggest to consider the possibility of a DAVF or other AVMs when PT is associated with CHL, without alterations of tympanic membrane and middle ear tests. PMID:26693371

  5. Notalgia paresthetica with a significant increase in the number of intradermal nerves.

    PubMed

    Inaloz, H Serhat; Kirtak, Necmettin; Erguven, H Gulcin; Karakok, Metin; Inaloz, Serap S

    2002-11-01

    Notalgia paresthetica is an isolated mononeuropathy involving the skin over or near the scapula. The cause remains unknown. We histologically observed a significant increase in the number of dermal nerves in a case of notalgia paresthetica. Immunohistochemical examination using a neural marker, S-100, positively stained the nerves. Interestingly, a biopsy from perilesional skin also showed an abnormal nerve proliferation.

  6. [A case of long thoracic nerve palsy, with winged scapula, as a result of prolonged exertion on practicing archery].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, J; Nishiyama, K; Takeda, K; Ichiba, T; Sakuta, M

    1990-08-01

    Reports of isolated long thoracic nerve palsy are rare in Japan. We reported a case of isolated long thoracic nerve palsy, resulted from recurrent injury to the nerve. Muscle CT and electrodiagnostic study were useful for confirming diagnosis of this cases. This patient was a student aged 20 years, with nothing of importance in his family or past history. After he started practicing archery, winging of left scapula was gradually developed. Physical examination revealed weakness and atrophy of left serratus anterior muscle. There was no wasting and weakness of other should girdle muscles. Hematochemical tests were normal, except slight hyperthyroidism. Radiography and myelography of the cervical spine were normal. Muscle CT of upper thoracic level demonstrated atrophy of left serratus anterior muscle, and no abnormality were found in other muscles. Electromyogram of the left serratus anterior revealed discrete activity of reduced amplitude, and fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves. Conduction time for left long thoracic nerve was prolonged, and amplitude of the evoked response was small and there were temporal dispersion. Muscle CT and electrodiagnostic studies were suggestive of neuroapraxia of left long thoracic nerve. Over stretching or compression during exercises may be responsible for the damage to the long thoracic nerve.

  7. Inferior alveolar nerve block: Alternative technique

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Kannan, R.; Kumar, N. Senthil

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) is a technique of dental anesthesia, used to produce anesthesia of the mandibular teeth, gingivae of the mandible and lower lip. The conventional IANB is the most commonly used the nerve block technique for achieving local anesthesia for mandibular surgical procedures. In certain cases, however, this nerve block fails, even when performed by the most experienced clinician. Therefore, it would be advantageous to find an alternative simple technique. Aim and Objective: The objective of this study is to find an alternative inferior alveolar nerve block that has a higher success rate than other routine techniques. To this purpose, a simple painless inferior alveolar nerve block was designed to anesthetize the inferior alveolar nerve. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in Oral surgery department of Vinayaka Mission's dental college Salem from May 2009 to May 2011. Five hundred patients between the age of 20 years and 65 years who required extraction of teeth in mandible were included in the study. Out of 500 patients 270 were males and 230 were females. The effectiveness of the IANB was evaluated by using a sharp dental explorer in the regions innervated by the inferior alveolar, lingual, and buccal nerves after 3, 5, and 7 min, respectively. Conclusion: This study concludes that inferior alveolar nerve block is an appropriate alternative nerve block to anesthetize inferior alveolar nerve due to its several advantages. PMID:25885503

  8. Cranial nerve palsies in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, C J; Godoy, F; ALQahtani, E

    2015-01-01

    We review ocular motor cranial nerve palsies in childhood and highlight many of the features that differentiate these from their occurrence in adulthood. The clinical characteristics of cranial nerve palsies in childhood are affected by the child's impressive ability to repair and regenerate after injury. Thus, aberrant regeneration is very common after congenital III palsy; Duane syndrome, the result of early repair after congenital VI palsy, is invariably associated with retraction of the globe in adduction related to the innervation of the lateral rectus by the III nerve causing co-contraction in adduction. Clinical features that may be of concern in adulthood may not be relevant in childhood; whereas the presence of mydriasis in III palsy suggests a compressive aetiology in adults, this is not the case in children. However, the frequency of associated CNS abnormalities in III palsy and the risk of tumour in VI palsy can be indications for early neuroimaging depending on presenting features elicited through a careful history and clinical examination. The latter should include the neighbouring cranial nerves. We discuss the impact of our evolving knowledge of congenital cranial dysinnervation syndromes on this field. PMID:25572578

  9. Dissociation between biochemical and functional effects of the aldose reductase inhibitor, ponalrestat, on peripheral nerve in diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, N. E.; Cotter, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    1. The aim of the study was to examine the effects in rats of two different doses of the aldose reductase inhibitor, ponalrestat, on functional measures of nerve conduction and sciatic nerve biochemistry. 2. After 1 month, streptozotocin-induced diabetes produced 22%, 23% and 15% deficits in conduction velocity of sciatic nerves supplying gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles and saphenous sensory nerve respectively compared to controls. These deficits were maintained over 2 months diabetes. 3. Slower-conducting motor fibres supplying the interosseus muscles of the foot did not show a diabetic deficit compared to onset controls, however, there was a 13% reduction in conduction velocity after 2 months diabetes relative to age-matched controls, indicating a maturation deficit. 4. Resistance to hypoxic conduction failure was investigated for sciatic nerve trunks in vitro. There was an increase in the duration of hypoxia necessary for an 80% reduction in compound action potential amplitude with diabetes. This was progressive; after 1 month, hypoxia time was increased by 22% and after 2 months by 57%. 5. The effect of 1-month treatment with the aldose reductase inhibitor, ponalrestat, on the abnormalities caused by an initial month of untreated diabetes was examined. Two doses of ponalrestat were employed, 8 mg kg-1 day-1 (which is equivalent to, or greater than, the blockade employed in clinical trials), and 100 mg kg-1 day-1. 6. Sciatic nerve sorbitol content was increased 7 fold by diabetes. Both doses were effective in reducing this; 70% for 8 mg kg-1 day-1, and to within the control range for 100 mg kg-1 day-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1467842

  10. Tissue-Engineered Nanofibrous Nerve Grafts for Enhancing the Rate of Nerve Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    wire electrodes connected to an electrical stimulator. A ground electrode was placed in the surrounding muscle tissues to remove conduction of...1 AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0320 TITLE: Tissue -Engineered Nanofibrous Nerve Grafts for Enhancing the Rate of Nerve...3. DATES COVERED 15 September 2014-14 September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Tissue -Engineered Nanofibrous Nerve Grafts for Enhancing the Rate of

  11. Systemic and ocular findings in 100 patients with optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M Lourdes; Ty, Edna B; Taban, Mehryar; David Rothner, A; Rogers, Douglas; Traboulsi, Elias I

    2006-11-01

    To describe associated ocular, neurologic, and systemic findings in a population of children with optic nerve hypoplasia, a retrospective chart review of 100 patients with optic nerve hypoplasia for the presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine abnormalities was performed. Neuroimaging and endocrine studies were obtained in 65 cases. Visual acuity and associated ocular, neurologic, endocrine, systemic, and structural brain abnormalities were recorded. Seventy-five percent had bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia. Conditions previously associated with optic nerve hypoplasia and present in our patients include premature birth in 21%, fetal alcohol syndrome in 9%, maternal diabetes in 6%, and endocrine abnormalities in 6%. Developmental delay was present in 32%, cerebral palsy in 13%, and seizures in 12%. Of those imaged, 60% had an abnormal study. Neuroimaging showed abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development in 29 patients, septo-optic dysplasia in 10, hydrocephalus in 10, and corpus callosum abnormalities in 8. There was an associated clinical neurologic abnormality in 57% of patients with bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia and in 32% of patients with unilateral optic nerve hypoplasia. Patients with unilateral and bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia frequently have a wide range and common occurrence of concomitant neurologic, endocrine, and systemic abnormalities.

  12. A novel rat forelimb model of neuropathic pain produced by partial injury of the median and ulnar nerves.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hanju; Kim, Myung Ah; Back, Seung Keun; Eun, Jong Shin; Na, Heung Sik

    2011-05-01

    The vast majority of human peripheral nerve injuries occur in the upper limb, whereas the most animal studies have been conducted using the hindlimb models of neuropathic pain, involving damages of the sciatic or lumbar spinal nerve(s). We attempted to develop a rat forelimb model of peripheral neuropathy by partial injury of the median and ulnar nerves. The halves of each nerve were transected by microscissors at about 5mm proximal from the elbow joint and behavioral signs of neuropathic pain, such as mechanical and cold allodynia, and heat hyperalgesia, were monitored up to 126 days following nerve injury. Mechanical allodynia was assessed by measuring the forepaw withdrawal threshold to von Frey filaments, and cold allodynia was evaluated by measuring the time spent in lifting or licking the forepaw after applying acetone to it. Heat hyperalgesia was also monitored by investigating the forepaw withdrawal latencies using the Hargreaves' test. After the nerve injury, the experimental animals exhibited long-lasting clear neuropathic pain-like behaviors, such as reduced forepaw withdrawal threshold to von Frey filaments, the increased response duration of the forepaw to acetone application, and the decreased withdrawal latency to radiant heat stimulation. These behaviors were significantly alleviated by administration of gabapentin (5 or 50mg/kg, i.p.) in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, these abnormal sensitivities are interpreted as the signs of neuropathic pain following injury of the median and ulnar nerves. Our rat forelimb model of neuropathic pain may be useful for studying human neuropathic pain and screening for valuable drug candidates.

  13. Delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following minor head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Yu; Toda, Masahiro; Shibao, Shunsuke; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2017-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to consider the mechanism of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy after minor head trauma. Case Description: We report a rare case of delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following minor head trauma. A 19-year-old boy complained of double vision 1 day after a minor head trauma. Neuro-ophthalmic examination showed isolated left oculomotor nerve palsy. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging examination revealed no abnormal findings and steroid therapy was administered for a week. Three months after the injury, the ptosis and extraocular movements had fully resolved, although the pupillary light reflex was still abnormal. Conclusions: Delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy may be caused by an injury at the point where the oculomotor nerve runs over the posterior petroclinoid ligament. Because edema of the damaged oculomotor nerve might result in constriction at the point where the nerve pierces the dura of the cavernous sinus, symptoms of oculomotor nerve palsy appeared late after trauma. Steroid treatment reducing edema could be effective for delayed and isolated oculomotor nerve palsy following minor head trauma. PMID:28217399

  14. Cranial Nerve Disorders in Children: MR Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yoon, Hee Mang; Jung, Ah Young; Cho, Young Ah; Lee, Jin Seong; Yoon, Chong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cranial nerve disorders are uncommon disease conditions encountered in pediatric patients, and can be categorized as congenital, inflammatory, traumatic, or tumorous conditions that involve the cranial nerve itself or propagation of the disorder from adjacent organs. However, determination of the normal course, as well as abnormalities, of cranial nerves in pediatric patients is challenging because of the small caliber of the cranial nerve, as well as the small intracranial and skull base structures. With the help of recently developed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques that provide higher spatial resolution and fast imaging techniques including three-dimensional MR images with or without the use of gadolinium contrast agent, radiologists can more easily diagnose disease conditions that involve the small cranial nerves, such as the oculomotor, abducens, facial, and hypoglossal nerves, as well as normal radiologic anatomy, even in very young children. If cranial nerve involvement is suspected, careful evaluation of the cranial nerves should include specific MR imaging protocols. Localization is an important consideration in cranial nerve imaging, and should cover entire pathways and target organs as much as possible. Therefore, radiologists should be familiar not only with the various diseases that cause cranial nerve dysfunction, and the entire course of each cranial nerve including the intra-axial nuclei and fibers, but also the technical considerations for optimal imaging of pediatric cranial nerves. In this article, we briefly review normal cranial nerve anatomy and imaging findings of various pediatric cranial nerve dysfunctions, as well as the technical considerations of pediatric cranial nerve imaging. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  15. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  16. Tooth - abnormal colors

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003065.htm Tooth - abnormal colors To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Abnormal tooth color is any color other than white to yellowish- ...

  17. Abnormal Head Position

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause. Can a longstanding head turn lead to any permanent problems? Yes, a significant abnormal head posture could cause permanent ... occipitocervical synostosis and unilateral hearing loss. Are there any ... postures? Yes. Abnormal head postures can usually be improved depending ...

  18. Skeletal limb abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003170.htm Skeletal limb abnormalities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Skeletal limb abnormalities refers to a variety of bone structure problems ...

  19. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... treat abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  20. Direct Cranial Nerve Involvement by Gliomas: Case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Mabray, Marc C.; Glastonbury, Christine M.; Mamlouk, Mark D.; Punch, Gregory E.; Solomon, David A.; Cha, Soonmee

    2017-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are characterized by infiltrative growth of tumor cells, including along white matter tracts. This may result in clinical cranial neuropathy due to direct involvement of a cranial nerve rather than by leptomeningeal spread along cranial nerves. Gliomas directly involving cranial nerves III-XII are rare with only eleven cases reported in the literature prior to 2014, including eight with imaging. We present eight additional cases demonstrating direct infiltration of a cranial nerve by glioma. Asymmetric cisternal nerve expansion as compared to the contralateral nerve was noted with a mean length of involvement of 9.4 mm. Based on our case series, the key imaging feature to recognize direct cranial nerve involvement by a glioma is the detection of an intra-axial mass in the pons or midbrain that is directly associated with expansion, signal abnormality, and/or enhancement of the adjacent cranial nerve(s). PMID:25857757

  1. Electrophysiology and ultrastructural changes in mouse sciatic nerve associated with colistin sulfate exposure.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chongshan; Li, Jichang; Lin, Wei; Li, Guangxing; Sun, Meicheng; Wang, Fengxia; Li, Jian

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the neurotoxicity of colistin, female mice received colistin sulfate (7.5 mg/kg/12 h) intravenously for 7 days successively, the behavioral changes, and the neuropathological and electrophysiological characterizations of sciatic nerves were determined prior to administration and at 1, 3, 7 and 15 days thereafter. At 1, 3, and 7 days, the compound action potential durations (CAPDs), compound muscle action potential amplitudes (CAPAs), conduction velocities of sciatic-tibial nerve (NCVs) showed progressively abnormal changes with the time prolonged. Compared to the control, these changes were significant at day 7 (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, p < 0.05, p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively), but at day 15, only CAPAs were significantly different (p < 0.05), other indexes presented a recovery tendency. These functional damages were confirmed by the synchronous ultrastructural observations which expressed axonal degeneration and demyelination in the sciatic nerves. These results indicated that peripheral neurotoxicity occurred in mice treated intravenously with colistin sulfate and the electrophysiological and ultrastructural changes of their sciatic nerves exerted in time-dependent fashion.

  2. The use of sensory action potential to evaluate inferior alveolar nerve damage after orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Francesca; Sellek, Lucy; Gugole, Fabio; Trevisiol, Lorenzo; Trevisol, Lorenzo; Bertolasi, Laura; D'Agostino, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    To assess and monitor the common event of neurosensory disturbance to the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) after bilateral sagittal split osteotomy, we used clinical sensory tests and neurophysiologic test sensory action potentials. The diagnostic value of these tests was evaluated by comparing them with the degree of nerve damage reported by patients. Fourteen patients undergoing bilateral sagittal split osteotomy were analyzed preoperatively and 2 years postoperatively. Patients were evaluated bilaterally for positive and negative symptoms: light touch sensation, paraesthesia, hyperesthesia, and dysaesthesia; a "sensation score" was then calculated for each patient. Patients were also asked if they would be willing to repeat the procedure knowing the sensation loss they had now. Next, the right and left IAN were evaluated using sensory action potential and correlated with the other results. Before surgery, the medium latency difference between left and right was lower compared with postsurgery, with all patients having some deficit. The reduction in medium amplitude of 67% after the intervention was statistically significant. The frequency of abnormal findings in the electrophysiologic tests indicating IAN injury correlated with subjective sensory alteration. All patients said that they would repeat the surgery. Electrophysiologic testing is recommended for the evaluation of nerve dysfunction and seems a sensitive method for accurately assessing postsurgical nerve conduction.

  3. Severity and Patterns of Blood-Nerve Barrier Breakdown in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy: Correlations with Clinical Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Fumitaka; Sawai, Setsu; Sano, Yasuteru; Beppu, Minako; Misawa, Sonoko; Nishihara, Hideaki; Koga, Michiaki; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Kanda, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is currently classified into clinical subtypes, including typical and atypical forms (multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM) and distal acquired demyelinating symmetric neuropathy (DADS)). The aim of this study was to elucidate the patterns and severity of breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier (BNB) in each CIDP subtype. Methods We evaluated the effects of sera obtained from patients with typical CIDP, MADSAM and DADS and control subjects on the expression levels of tight junction proteins and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) value in human peripheral nerve microvascular endothelial cells (PnMECs). Results The sera obtained from the patients with the three clinical phenotypes of CIDP decreased the amount of claudin-5 protein levels and TEER values in the PnMECs. In addition, the sera obtained from typical CIDP patients more prominently reduced claudin-5 protein levels and TEER values in the PnMECs than did that obtained from the MADSAM and DADS patients. Furthermore, the severity of BNB disruption after exposure to the sera was associated with higher Hughes grade, lower MRC score, more pronounced slowing of motor nerve conduction in the median nerve and higher frequency of abnormal temporal dispersion. Conclusions Sera derived from typical CIDP patients destroy the BNB more severely than those from MADSAM or DADS patients. The extent of BNB disruption in the setting of CIDP is associated with clinical disability and demyelination in the nerve trunk. These observations may explain the phenotypical differences between CIDP subtypes. PMID:25105500

  4. Normal and abnormal lid function.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Janet C

    2011-01-01

    This chapter on lid function is comprised of two primary sections, the first on normal eyelid anatomy, neurological innervation, and physiology, and the second on abnormal eyelid function in disease states. The eyelids serve several important ocular functions, the primary objectives of which are protection of the anterior globe from injury and maintenance of the ocular tear film. Typical eyelid behaviors to perform these functions include blinking (voluntary, spontaneous, or reflexive), voluntary eye closure (gentle or forced), partial lid lowering during squinting, normal lid retraction during emotional states such as surprise or fear (startle reflex), and coordination of lid movements with vertical eye movements for maximal eye protection. Detailed description of the neurological innervation patterns and neurophysiology of each of these lid behaviors is provided. Abnormal lid function is divided by conditions resulting in excessive lid closure (cerebral ptosis, apraxia of lid opening, blepharospasm, oculomotor palsy, Horner's syndrome, myasthenia gravis, and mechanical) and those resulting in excessive lid opening (midbrain lid retraction, facial nerve palsy, and lid retraction due to orbital disease).

  5. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  6. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  7. Unilateral Optic Nerve Hypoplasia with Contralateral Optic Pathway Hypoplasia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Tomo; Yukawa, Eiichi; Taoka, Toshiaki; Ogata, Nahoko

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia is diagnosed by the ophthalmoscopic appearance of the fundus of the eye and by standard magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. The ability to study eyes with optic nerve hypoplasia by magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging has improved the evaluation of the optic pathways. The authors report a case of unilateral optic nerve hypoplasia with hypoplasia of the contralateral optic pathway. The entire visual pathway of this patient was examined by magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging. The images show a decrease of the volume of the optic radiation contralateral to the optic nerve abnormality and also pre- and post-chiasmal abnormalities.

  8. Optic Nerve Pit

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  9. Facial nerve paralysis after cervical traction.

    PubMed

    So, Edmund Cheung

    2010-10-01

    Cervical traction is a frequently used treatment in rehabilitation clinics for cervical spine problems. This modality works, in principle, by decompressing the spinal cord or its nerve roots by applying traction on the cervical spine through a harness placed over the mandible (Olivero et al., Neurosurg Focus 2002;12:ECP1). Previous reports on treatment complications include lumbar radicular discomfort, muscle injury, neck soreness, and posttraction pain (LaBan et al., Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1992;73:295-6; Lee et al., J Biomech Eng 1996;118:597-600). Here, we report the first case of unilateral facial nerve paralysis developed after 4 wks of intermittent cervical traction therapy. Nerve conduction velocity examination revealed a peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis. Symptoms of facial nerve paralysis subsided after prednisolone treatment and suspension of traction therapy. It is suspected that a misplaced or an overstrained harness may have been the cause of facial nerve paralysis in this patient. Possible causes were (1) direct compression by the harness on the right facial nerve near its exit through the stylomastoid foramen; (2) compression of the right external carotid artery by the harness, causing transient ischemic injury at the geniculate ganglion; or (3) coincidental herpes zoster virus infection or idiopathic Bell's palsy involving the facial nerve.

  10. Evaluation of Tookad-mediated photodynamic effect on peripheral nerve and pelvic nerve in a canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzel, Fred W.; Chen, Qun; Dole, Kenneth C.; Blanc, Dominique; Whalen, Lawrence R.; Gould, Daniel H.; Huang, Zheng

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with a novel vascular targeting photosensitizer pd-bacteriopheophorbide (Tookad) has been investigated as an alternative modality for the treatment of prostate cancer and other diseases. This study investigated, for the first time, the vascular photodynamic effects of Tookad-PDT on nerve tissues. We established an in situ canine model using the cutaneous branches of the saphenous nerve to evaluate the effect of Tookad-PDT secondary to vascular damage on compound-action potentials. With Tookad dose of 2 mg/kg, treatment with 50 J/cm2 induced little change in nerve conduction. However, treatment with 100 J/cm2 resulted in decreases in nerve conduction velocities, and treatment with 200 J/cm2 caused a total loss of nerve conduction. Vasculature surrounding the saphenous nerve appeared irritated. The nerve itself looked swollen and individual fibers were not as distinct as they were before PDT treatment. Epineurium had mild hemorrhage, leukocyte infiltration, fibroplasias and vascular hypertrophy. However, the nerve fascicles and nerve fibers were free of lesions. We also studied the effect of Tookad-PDT secondary to vascular damage on the pelvic nerve in the immediate vicinity of the prostate gland. The pelvic nerve and saphenous nerve showed different sensitivity and histopathological responses to Tookad-PDT. Degeneration nerve fibers and necrotic neurons were seen in the pelvic nerve at a dose level of 1 mg/kg and 50 J/cm2. Adjacent connective tissue showed areas of hemorrhage, fibrosis and inflammation. Our preliminary results suggest that possible side effects of interstitial PDT on prostate nerve tissues need to be further investigated.

  11. Clinical and electrophysiological assessment of inferior alveolar nerve function after lateral nerve transposition.

    PubMed

    Nocini, P F; De Santis, D; Fracasso, E; Zanette, G

    1999-04-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) transposition surgery may cause some degree of sensory impairment. Accurate and reproducible tests are mandatory to assess IAN conduction capacity following nerve transposition. In this study subjective (heat, pain and tactile-discriminative tests) and objective (electrophysiological) assessments were performed in 10 patients receiving IAN transposition (bilaterally in 8 cases) in order to evaluate any impairment of the involved nerves one year post-operatively. All patients reported a tingling, well-tolerated sensation in the areas supplied by the mental nerve with no anaesthesia or burning paresthesia. Tactile discrimination was affected the most (all but 1 patient). No action potential was recorded in 4 patients' sides (23.5%); 12 sides showed a decreased nerve conduction velocity (NCV) (70.5%) and 1 side normal NCV values (6%). There was no significant difference in NCV decrease between partial and total transposition sides, if examined separately. Nerve conduction findings were related 2-point discrimination scores, but not to changes in pain and heat sensitivity. These findings show that lateral nerve transposition, though resulting in a high percentage of minor IAN injuries, as determined by electrophysiological testing, provides a viable surgical procedure to allow implant placement in the posterior mandible without causing severe sensory complaints. Considering ethical and forensic implications, patients should be fully informed that a certain degree of nerve injury might be expected to occur from the procedure. Electrophysiological evaluation is a reliable way to assess the degree of IAN dysfunction, especially if combined with a clinical examination. Intraoperative monitoring of IAN conduction might help identify the pathogenetic mechanisms of nerve injury and the surgical steps that are most likely to harm nerve integrity.

  12. Congenital anomalies of the optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Amador-Patarroyo, Manuel J.; Pérez-Rueda, Mario A.; Tellez, Carlos H.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital optic nerve head anomalies are a group of structural malformations of the optic nerve head and surrounding tissues, which may cause congenital visual impairment and blindness. Each entity in this group of optic nerve anomalies has individually become more prevalent as our ability to differentiate between them has improved due to better characterization of cases. Access to better medical technology (e.g., neuroimaging and genetic analysis advances in recent years) has helped to expand our knowledge of these abnormalities. However, visual impairment may not be the only problem in these patients, some of these entities will be related to ophthalmologic, neurologic and systemic features that will help the physician to identify and predict possible outcomes in these patients, which sometimes may be life-threatening. Herein we present helpful hints, associations and management (when plausible) for them. PMID:25859137

  13. Effects of Laser Irradiation on Peripheral Nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. D.; Chow, R.; Armati, P.; Bjordal, J. M.; Laakso, L.

    2009-06-01

    A literature review was undertaken to determine the electrophysiological effects of Laser Irradiation (LI) on peripheral mammalian nerves, as a means of elucidating the potential mechanisms underlying pain relief associated with laser therapy. Relevant computerized databases and reference lists were searched, and experts consulted for further articles. A total of 38 studies, comprising 82 separate experiments were identified. In human studies, all types of LI (red and infrared, pulsed and cw) slowed nerve conduction velocity, and reduced compound action potential of irradiated nerves. In animal studies, infrared LI suppressed conduction velocity, as well as noxious stimulation evoked potential. This review thus indicates the potential of laser irradiation to inhibit activity in peripheral nerves, and highlights one potential mechanism of action for laser-mediated pain relief.

  14. Optic Nerve Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Aijaz; Janecka, Ivo P.; Kapadia, Silloo; Johnson, Bruce L.; McVay, William

    1996-01-01

    The length of the optic nerves is a reflection of normal postnatal cranio-orbital development. Unilateral elongation of an optic nerve has been observed in two patients with orbital and skull base neoplasms. In the first case as compared to the patient's opposite, normal optic nerve, an elongated length of the involved optic nerve of 45 mm was present. The involved optic nerve in the second patient was 10 mm longer than the normal opposite optic nerve. The visual and extraocular function was preserved in the second patient. The first patient had only light perception in the affected eye. In this paper, the embryology, anatomy, and physiology of the optic nerve and its mechanisms of stretch and repair are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11Figure 13 PMID:17170975

  15. Abnormal Neuroimaging in a Case of Infant Botulism.

    PubMed

    Good, Ryan J; Messacar, Kevin; Stence, Nicholas V; Press, Craig A; Carpenter, Todd C

    2015-01-01

    We present the first case of abnormal neuroimaging in a case of infant botulism. The clinical findings of the patient with constipation, bulbar weakness, and descending, symmetric motor weakness are consistent with the classic findings of infant botulism. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), however, revealed restricted diffusion in the brain and enhancement of the cervical nerve roots. Traditionally, normal neuroimaging was used to help differentiate infant botulism from other causes of weakness in infants. Abnormal neuroimaging is seen in other causes of weakness in an infant including metabolic disorders and hypoxic-ischemic injury, but these diagnoses did not fit the clinical findings in this case. The explanation for the MRI abnormalities in the brain and cervical nerve roots is unclear as botulinum toxin acts at presynaptic nerve terminals and does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Possible explanations for the findings include inflammation from the botulinum toxin at the synapse, alterations in sensory signaling and retrograde transport of the botulinum toxin. The patient was treated with human botulism immune globulin and had rapid recovery in weakness. A stool sample from the patient was positive for Type A Clostridium botulinum toxin eventually confirming the diagnosis of infant botulism. The findings in this case support use of human botulism immune globulin when the clinical findings are consistent with infant botulism despite the presence of MRI abnormalities in the brain and cervical nerve roots.

  16. Expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor in distracted tibial nerve after limb lengthening.

    PubMed

    Shao, Heng; Shu, Hengsheng; Wang, Chunmei; Yuan, Wu; Li, Yunsheng

    2013-02-01

    Despite many experimental and clinical studies conducted on distraction osteogenesis (DO) in the past decade, changes in the surrounding tissues that occur after the procedure remains poorly understood. To study the biochemical changes of recovery in nerve tissues upon DO-induced nerve injury, we prepared a rabbit model of tibia lengthening to observe the expression pattern of nerve growth factor (NGF) and low-affinity NGF receptor (p75NGFR) in the distracted tibial nerve. The distracted tibial nerve was harvested at various time points during the consolidation period of new bone formation and immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect the expression of NGF and p75NGFR. The expression levels of NGF and p75NGFR were found to be different at various times after DO. The changes in expression of these two cellular factors show similar tendencies with significantly elevated expression in Schwann cells at 7 and 14 days after distraction, but low or undetectable levels of expression at 0, 28, and 56 days. These results suggest that NGF and p75NGFR may play important roles in the adaptive process of the distracted nerve. NGF and p75NGFR are autocrine growth factors present in the distracted nerve during the early consolidation period. NGF interacts with p75NGFR to promote damage repair and reconstruction of nerves. Together, this study furthers the understanding of the relative mechanisms of nerve repair, as well as provides a further basis for the clinical application of neurotrophins.

  17. Assessment of nerve morphology in nerve activation during electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Tames, Jose; Yu, Wenwei

    2013-10-01

    The distance between nerve and stimulation electrode is fundamental for nerve activation in Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation (TES). However, it is not clear the need to have an approximate representation of the morphology of peripheral nerves in simulation models and its influence in the nerve activation. In this work, depth and curvature of a nerve are investigated around the middle thigh. As preliminary result, the curvature of the nerve helps to reduce the simulation amplitude necessary for nerve activation from far field stimulation.

  18. Nerve Growth Factor Decreases in Sympathetic and Sensory Nerves of Rats with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays a critical role in the maintenance and survival of both sympathetic and sensory nerves. Also, NGF can regulate receptor expression and neuronal activity in the sympathetic and sensory neurons. Abnormalities in NGF regulation are observed in patients and animals with heart failure (HF). Nevertheless, the effects of chronic HF on the levels of NGF within the sympathetic and sensory nerves are not known. Thus, the ELISA method was used to assess the levels of NGF in the stellate ganglion (SG) and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of control rats and rats with chronic HF induced by myocardial infarction. Our data show for the first time that the levels of NGF were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in the SG and DRG neurons 6–20 weeks after ligation of the coronary artery. In addition, a close relation was observed between the NGF levels and the left ventricular function. In conclusion, chronic HF impairs the expression of NGF in the sympathetic and sensory nerves. Given that sensory afferent nerves are engaged in the sympathetic nervous responses to somatic stimulation (i.e. muscle activity during exercise) via a reflex mechanism, our data indicate that NGF is likely responsible for the development of muscle reflex-mediated abnormal sympathetic responsiveness observed in chronic HF. PMID:24913185

  19. A Biosynthetic Nerve Guide Conduit Based on Silk/SWNT/Fibronectin Nanocomposite for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh; Farokhi, Mehdi; Zaminy, Arash; Kokabi, Mehrdad; Soleimani, Masoud; Mirahmadi, Fereshteh

    2013-01-01

    As a contribution to the functionality of nerve guide conduits (NGCs) in nerve tissue engineering, here we report a conduit processing technique through introduction and evaluation of topographical, physical and chemical cues. Porous structure of NGCs based on freeze-dried silk/single walled carbon nanotubes (SF/SWNTs) has shown a uniform chemical and physical structure with suitable electrical conductivity. Moreover, fibronectin (FN) containing nanofibers within the structure of SF/SWNT conduits produced through electrospinning process have shown aligned fashion with appropriate porosity and diameter. Moreover, fibronectin remained its bioactivity and influenced the adhesion and growth of U373 cell lines. The conduits were then implanted to 10 mm left sciatic nerve defects in rats. The histological assessment has shown that nerve regeneration has taken places in proximal region of implanted nerve after 5 weeks following surgery. Furthermore, nerve conduction velocities (NCV) and more myelinated axons were observed in SF/SWNT and SF/SWNT/FN groups after 5 weeks post implantation, indicating a functional recovery for the injured nerves. With immunohistochemistry, the higher S-100 expression of Schwann cells in SF/SWNT/FN conduits in comparison to other groups was confirmed. In conclusion, an oriented conduit of biocompatible SF/SWNT/FN has been fabricated with acceptable structure that is particularly applicable in nerve grafts. PMID:24098649

  20. A biosynthetic nerve guide conduit based on silk/SWNT/fibronectin nanocomposite for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh; Farokhi, Mehdi; Zaminy, Arash; Kokabi, Mehrdad; Soleimani, Masoud; Mirahmadi, Fereshteh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2013-01-01

    As a contribution to the functionality of nerve guide conduits (NGCs) in nerve tissue engineering, here we report a conduit processing technique through introduction and evaluation of topographical, physical and chemical cues. Porous structure of NGCs based on freeze-dried silk/single walled carbon nanotubes (SF/SWNTs) has shown a uniform chemical and physical structure with suitable electrical conductivity. Moreover, fibronectin (FN) containing nanofibers within the structure of SF/SWNT conduits produced through electrospinning process have shown aligned fashion with appropriate porosity and diameter. Moreover, fibronectin remained its bioactivity and influenced the adhesion and growth of U373 cell lines. The conduits were then implanted to 10 mm left sciatic nerve defects in rats. The histological assessment has shown that nerve regeneration has taken places in proximal region of implanted nerve after 5 weeks following surgery. Furthermore, nerve conduction velocities (NCV) and more myelinated axons were observed in SF/SWNT and SF/SWNT/FN groups after 5 weeks post implantation, indicating a functional recovery for the injured nerves. With immunohistochemistry, the higher S-100 expression of Schwann cells in SF/SWNT/FN conduits in comparison to other groups was confirmed. In conclusion, an oriented conduit of biocompatible SF/SWNT/FN has been fabricated with acceptable structure that is particularly applicable in nerve grafts.

  1. Bulbocavernosus Reflex Test for Diagnosis of Pudendal Nerve Injury in Female Patients with Diabetic Neurogenic Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiaoting; Wang, Xun; Huang, Huanjie; Ni, Peiqi; Lin, Yuanshao; Shao, Bei

    2016-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate the clinical application and significance of the bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR) test for diagnosing diabetic neurogenic bladder (DNB) in female subjects. In this study, 68 female patients with DNB and 40 female normal controls were subjected to a nerve conduction study (NCS) of all four limbs and the BCR test. The data were analyzed and compared, and the corresponding diagnostic sensitivities were discussed. Mean BCR latency for female DNB patients was significantly prolonged, compared to that of the control group, suggesting pudendal nerve injuries in female DNB patients. Moreover, DNB patients were categorized according to the diabetes course. Compared to that of Group A (diabetes course < 5 y), the mean BCR latency was significantly prolonged in Group B (diabetes course between 5 and 10 y) and then further prolonged in Group C (diabetes course > 10 y), which were all longer than the control group. Furthermore, compared with that of the controls, the mean BCR latency was prolonged in DNB patients with or without NCS abnormalities in limbs. Nevertheless, no significant difference was observed in BCR latency between DNB patients with and without NCS abnormalities. Significantly increasing trends were also observed in the NCS and BCR abnormality rates along with increased diabetes course. Most importantly, compared with the NCS of limbs, the BCR test was more sensitive in diagnosing DNB in the female subjects. Overall, our findings suggest that the BCR test would help to assess the pudendal nerve injury in female DNB patients, which might be a potential diagnostic tool in the clinic. PMID:28053822

  2. Accessory Upper Subscapular Nerve – The Neurotisation Tool

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Vishwajit Ravindra; Mandal, Rabindra Prasad; Kusuma, Harisha

    2016-01-01

    During the routine dissection classes for undergraduate students, uncommon variation in relation to the upper subscapular nerve of posterior cord of brachial plexus was observed. Normally upper subscapular nerve takes origin from the posterior cord, but in this case report, it arises in triplet fashion, just above the circumflex scapular artery. All these accessory nerves were supplying upper part of the subscapularis muscle. As per our knowledge, this is a rare variation of brachial plexus. Many variations are encountered in the formation of brachial plexus. The normal and the abnormal origin of nerves are important considering neurotisation surgeries as well as during the infraclavicular nerve block for various axillary and upper limb surgeries. PMID:27790416

  3. MMP19 expression in the human optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Chirco, Kathleen R.; Hazlewood, Ralph J.; Miller, Kathy; Workalemahu, Grefachew; Jampol, Lee M.; Lesser, G. Robert; Mullins, Robert F.; Kuehn, Markus H.; Fingert, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The defining feature of glaucoma is excavation of the optic nerve head; however, the mechanism of this loss of tissue is not well understood. We recently discovered a copy number variation upstream of matrix metalloproteinase 19 (MMP19) in a large, autosomal dominant pedigree with a congenital malformation of the optic disc called cavitary optic disc anomaly (CODA). Patients with CODA have abnormal optic discs that exhibit an excavated shape similar to cupping seen in glaucoma. The goal of this study is to characterize the localization of MMP19 within the human optic nerve. Methods The MMP19 protein in the optic nerve was evaluated with western blot analysis and with immunohistochemistry in sagittal and en face/cross sections of optic nerves obtained from healthy human donor eyes. Results The MMP19 protein was detected in the human optic nerve, retina, and RPE/choroid with western blot analysis, with highest expression in the retina and the optic nerve. Using immunohistochemistry, MMP19 was localized within the optic nerve to the extracellular space within the septa that separate bundles of optic nerve axons into fascicles. The presence of MMP19 within the optic nerve septa was further confirmed by the colocalization of MMP19 to this structure with type IV collagen. Strong labeling of MMP19 was also detected in the arachnoid layer of the optic nerve sheath. Finally, immunohistochemistry of the optic nerve cross sections demonstrated that MMP19 shows a peripheral to central gradient, with more abundant labeling along the edges of the optic nerve and in the arachnoid layer than in the center of the nerve. Conclusions Abundant MMP19 was detected in the optic nerve head, the primary site of pathology in patients with CODA. The localization of MMP19 to the optic nerve septa is consistent with its predicted secretion and accumulation within the extracellular spaces of this tissue. Moreover, the lateral localization of MMP19 observed in the optic nerve cross

  4. Evaluation of dermal myelinated nerve fibers in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Amanda C; Myers, M Iliza; Artibee, Kay J; Hamilton, Audra D; Yan, Qing; Guo, Jiasong; Shi, Yaping; Wang, Lily; Li, Jun

    2013-06-01

    Skin biopsies have primarily been used to study the non-myelinated nerve fibers of the epidermis in a variety of neuropathies. In this study, we have expanded the skin biopsy technique to glabrous, non-hairy skin to evaluate myelinated nerve fibers in the most highly prevalent peripheral nerve disease, diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). Twenty patients with DPN (Type I, n = 9; Type II, n = 11) and 16 age-matched healthy controls (age 29-73) underwent skin biopsy of the index finger, nerve conduction studies (NCS), and composite neuropathy scoring. In patients with DPN, we found a statistically significant reduction of both mechanoreceptive Meissner corpuscles (MCs) and their afferent myelinated nerve fibers (p = 0.01). This myelinated nerve fiber loss was correlated with the decreased amplitudes of sensory/motor responses in NCS. This study supports the utilization of skin biopsy to quantitatively evaluate axonal loss of myelinated nerve fibers in patients with DPN.

  5. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  7. Electrophysiology of corneal cold receptor nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Carr, Richard W; Brock, James A

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms of sensory transduction in the fine nerve terminals of free nerve endings supplied by Adelta and C sensory axons are largely a matter of speculation. This is because the nerve terminals are small and inaccessible, particularly in intact tissues like skin. However, some of the difficulties associated with investigating the physiology of fine nerve terminals have recently been overcome using an in vitro preparation of the guinea-pig cornea that allows nerve terminal impulses (NTIs) to be recorded extracellularly from single polymodal and cold receptor nerve terminals. For cold receptors, the rate of spontaneously occurring NTIs is increased during cooling and decreased during heating. In addition, heating and cooling differentially modulate the shape of the recorded NTI. At the same temperature, NTIs are larger in amplitude and faster in time course during heating than those during cooling. The differential effect of heating and cooling on NTI shape is not considered to result simply from the temperature dependence of voltage-activated conductance kinetics or activity dependent changes in membrane excitability. Instead, changes in NTI shape may reflect changes in nerve terminal membrane potential that underlie the process of thermal transduction.

  8. Integrin antagonists affect growth and pathfinding of ventral motor nerves in the trunk of embryonic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Becker, Thomas; McLane, Mary Ann; Becker, Catherina G

    2003-05-01

    Integrins are thought to be important receptors for extracellular matrix (ECM) components on growing axons. Ventral motor axons in the trunk of embryonic zebrafish grow in a midsegmental pathway through an environment rich in ECM components. To test the role of integrins in this process, integrin antagonists (the disintegrin echistatin in native and recombinant form, as well as the Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide) were injected into embryos just prior to axon outgrowth at 14-16 h postfertilization (hpf). All integrin antagonists affected growth of ventral motor nerves in a similar way and native echistatin was most effective. At 24 hpf, when only the three primary motor axons per trunk hemisegment had grown out, 80% (16 of 20) of the embryos analyzed had abnormal motor nerves after injection of native echistatin, corresponding to 19% (91 of 480) of all nerves. At 33 hpf, when secondary motor axons were present in the pathway, 100% of the embryos were affected (24 of 24), with 20% of all nerves analyzed (196 of 960) being abnormal. Phenotypes comprised abnormal branching (64% of all abnormal nerves) and truncations (36% of all abnormal nerves) of ventral motor nerves at 24 hpf and mostly branching of the nerves at 33 hpf (94% of all abnormal nerves). Caudal branches were at least twice as frequent as rostral branches. Surrounding trunk tissue and a number of other axon fascicles were apparently not affected by the injections. Thus integrin function contributes to both growth and pathfinding of axons in ventral motor nerves in the trunk of zebrafish in vivo.

  9. Cutting your nerve changes your brain.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Keri S; Anastakis, Dimitri J; Davis, Karen D

    2009-11-01

    Following upper limb peripheral nerve transection and surgical repair, some patients regain good sensorimotor function while others do not. Understanding peripheral and central mechanisms that contribute to recovery may facilitate the development of new therapeutic interventions. Plasticity following peripheral nerve transection has been demonstrated throughout the neuroaxis in animal models of nerve injury. However, the brain changes that occur following peripheral nerve transection and surgical repair in humans have not been examined. Furthermore, the extent to which peripheral nerve regeneration influences functional and structural brain changes has not been characterized. Therefore, we asked whether functional changes are accompanied by grey and/or white matter structural changes and whether these changes relate to sensory recovery? To address these key issues we (i) assessed peripheral nerve regeneration; (ii) measured functional magnetic resonance imaging brain activation (blood oxygen level dependent signal; BOLD) in response to a vibrotactile stimulus; (iii) examined grey and white matter structural brain plasticity; and (iv) correlated sensory recovery measures with grey matter changes in peripheral nerve transection and surgical repair patients. Compared to each patient's healthy contralesional nerve, transected nerves have impaired nerve conduction 1.5 years after transection and repair, conducting with decreased amplitude and increased latency. Compared to healthy controls, peripheral nerve transection and surgical repair patients had altered blood oxygen level dependent signal activity in the contralesional primary and secondary somatosensory cortices, and in a set of brain areas known as the 'task positive network'. In addition, grey matter reductions were identified in several brain areas, including the contralesional primary and secondary somatosensory cortices, in the same areas where blood oxygen level dependent signal reductions were identified

  10. A study of axonal degeneration in the optic nerves of aging mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. E., Jr.; Philpott, D. E.; Miquel, J.

    1978-01-01

    The optic nerves of C57BL/6J mice ranging from 3 to 30 months were examined by electron microscopy. At all ages investigated, optic nerve axons contained enlarged mitochondria with abnormal cristae. With increasing age, a large number of necrotic axons were observed and were in the process of being phagocytized. The abnormal mitochondria may represent preliminary changes that eventually lead to necrosis of the axon.

  11. Causes of Secondary Radial Nerve Palsy and Results of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Paweł; Wnukiewicz, Witold; Witkowski, Jarosław; Bocheńska, Aneta; Mizia, Sylwia; Gosk, Jerzy; Zimmer, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to analyze the causes that lead to secondary damage of the radial nerve and to discuss the results of reconstructive treatment. Material/Methods The study group consisted of 33 patients treated for radial nerve palsy after humeral fractures. Patients were diagnosed based on clinical examinations, ultrasonography, electromyography, or nerve conduction velocity. During each operation, the location and type of nerve damage were analyzed. During the reconstructive treatment, neurolysis, direct neurorrhaphy, or reconstruction with a sural nerve graft was used. The outcomes were evaluated using the Medical Research Council (MRC) scales and the quick DASH score. Results Secondary radial nerve palsy occurs after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) by plate, as well as by closed reduction and internal fixation (CRIF) by nail. In the case of ORIF, it most often occurs when the lateral approach is used, as in the case of CRIF with an insertion interlocking screws. The results of the surgical treatment were statistically significant and depended on the time between nerve injury and revision (reconstruction) surgery, type of damage to the radial nerve, surgery treatment, and type of fixation. Treatment results were not statistically significant, depending on the type of fracture or location of the nerve injury. Conclusions The potential risk of radial nerve neurotmesis justifies an operative intervention to treat neurological complications after a humeral fracture. Adequate surgical treatment in many of these cases allows for functional recovery of the radial nerve. PMID:26895570

  12. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Strategies: Electrically Stimulating Polymer Based Nerve Growth Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Matthew; Shelke, Namdev B.; Manoukian, Ohan S.; Yu, Xiaojun; McCullough, Louise D.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of large peripheral nerve damages ranges from the use of an autologous nerve graft to a synthetic nerve growth conduit. Biological grafts, in spite of many merits, show several limitations in terms of availability and donor site morbidity, and outcomes are suboptimal due to fascicle mismatch, scarring, and fibrosis. Tissue engineered nerve graft substitutes utilize polymeric conduits in conjunction with cues both chemical and physical, cells alone and or in combination. The chemical and physical cues delivered through polymeric conduits play an important role and drive tissue regeneration. Electrical stimulation (ES) has been applied toward the repair and regeneration of various tissues such as muscle, tendon, nerve, and articular tissue both in laboratory and clinical settings. The underlying mechanisms that regulate cellular activities such as cell adhesion, proliferation, cell migration, protein production, and tissue regeneration following ES is not fully understood. Polymeric constructs that can carry the electrical stimulation along the length of the scaffold have been developed and characterized for possible nerve regeneration applications. We discuss the use of electrically conductive polymers and associated cell interaction, biocompatibility, tissue regeneration, and recent basic research for nerve regeneration. In conclusion, a multifunctional combinatorial device comprised of biomaterial, structural, functional, cellular, and molecular aspects may be the best way forward for effective peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27278739

  13. Tissue-engineered rhesus monkey nerve grafts for the repair of long ulnar nerve defects: similar outcomes to autologous nerve grafts

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chang-qing; Hu, Jun; Xiang, Jian-ping; Zhu, Jia-kai; Liu, Xiao-lin; Luo, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Acellular nerve allografts can help preserve normal nerve structure and extracellular matrix composition. These allografts have low immunogenicity and are more readily available than autologous nerves for the repair of long-segment peripheral nerve defects. In this study, we repaired a 40-mm ulnar nerve defect in rhesus monkeys with tissue-engineered peripheral nerve, and compared the outcome with that of autograft. The graft was prepared using a chemical extract from adult rhesus monkeys and seeded with allogeneic Schwann cells. Pathomorphology, electromyogram and immunohistochemistry findings revealed the absence of palmar erosion or ulcers, and that the morphology and elasticity of the hypothenar eminence were normal 5 months postoperatively. There were no significant differences in the mean peak compound muscle action potential, the mean nerve conduction velocity, or the number of neurofilaments between the experimental and control groups. However, outcome was significantly better in the experimental group than in the blank group. These findings suggest that chemically extracted allogeneic nerve seeded with autologous Schwann cells can repair 40-mm ulnar nerve defects in the rhesus monkey. The outcomes are similar to those obtained with autologous nerve graft. PMID:28123431

  14. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  15. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  16. Water excitation MPRAGE MRI of VII and VIII cranial nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Litt, A.W.; Licata, P.; Knopp, E.A.; Thomasson, D.M.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to compare magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo-water excitation (MPR-AGE-WE) with conventional spin echo (CSE) in the evaluation of the VII and VIII cranial nerves. One hundred three consecutive patients with symptoms referable to the VII/VIII nerves were studied with CSE T1 and MPRAGE-WE following intravenous gadolinium, contrast agent. Each right and left nerve pair was independently evaluated for the presence of an enhancing mass and for visualization of the nerves. On the CSE images, 26 definite and 2 possible lesions were identified, whereas 28 definite and 2 possible abnormalities were seen on the MPRAGE-WE. Four cases were better identified on the MPRAGE-WE and one better seen on the CSE. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0. 19). CSE demonstrated the nerves partially in 23 instances and completely in 6; MPRAGE-WE showed the nerves partially in 35 and completely in 73. This was highly significant (p < 0.001). With equivalent or slightly improved lesion detection and better visualization of the nerves, MPRAGE-WE may replace CSE in studying the VII/VIII nerves. 14 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Six3 regulates optic nerve development via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Anat; Rubinstein, Ariel M; Azar, Tehila T; Ben-Moshe Livne, Zohar; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Inbal, Adi

    2016-01-29

    Malformations of the optic nerve lead to reduced vision or even blindness. During optic nerve development, retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons navigate across the retina, exit the eye to the optic stalk (OS), and cross the diencephalon midline at the optic chiasm en route to their brain targets. Many signalling molecules have been implicated in guiding various steps of optic nerve pathfinding, however much less is known about transcription factors regulating this process. Here we show that in zebrafish, reduced function of transcription factor Six3 results in optic nerve hypoplasia and a wide repertoire of RGC axon pathfinding errors. These abnormalities are caused by multiple mechanisms, including abnormal eye and OS patterning and morphogenesis, abnormal expression of signalling molecules both in RGCs and in their environment and anatomical deficiency in the diencephalic preoptic area, where the optic chiasm normally forms. Our findings reveal new roles for Six3 in eye development and are consistent with known phenotypes of reduced SIX3 function in humans. Hence, the new zebrafish model for Six3 loss of function furthers our understanding of the mechanisms governing optic nerve development and Six3-mediated eye and forebrain malformations.

  18. Exacerbation of Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2E neuropathy following traumatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Villalón, Eric; Dale, Jeffrey M; Jones, Maria; Shen, Hailian; Garcia, Michael L

    2015-11-19

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most commonly inherited peripheral neuropathy. CMT disease signs include distal limb neuropathy, abnormal gait, sensory defects, and deafness. We generated a novel line of CMT2E mice expressing hNF-L(E397K), which displayed muscle atrophy of the lower limbs without denervation, proximal reduction in large caliber axons, and decreased nerve conduction velocity. In this study, we challenged wild type, hNF-L and hNF-L(E397K) mice with crush injury to the sciatic nerve. We analyzed functional recovery by measuring toe spread and analyzed gait using the Catwalk system. hNF-L(E397K) mice demonstrated reduced recovery from nerve injury consistent with increased susceptibility to neuropathy observed in CMT patients. In addition, hNF-L(E397K) developed a permanent reduction in their ability to weight bear, increased mechanical allodynia, and premature gait shift in the injured limb, which led to increasingly disrupted interlimb coordination in hNF-L(E397K). Exacerbation of neuropathy after injury and identification of gait alterations in combination with previously described pathology suggests that hNF-L(E397K) mice recapitulate many of clinical signs associated with CMT2. Therefore, hNF-L(E397K) mice provide a model for determining the efficacy of novel therapies.

  19. Peripheral nerve surgery.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, I G

    1985-05-01

    In treating the three main surgical problems of peripheral nerves--nerve sheath tumors, entrapment neuropathies, and acute nerve injuries--the overriding consideration is the preservation and restoration of neurologic function. Because of this, certain other principles may need to be compromised. These include achieving a gross total excision of benign tumors, employing conservative therapy as long as a disease process is not clearly progressing, and delaying repair of a nerve transection until the skin wound has healed. Only three pathophysiologic processes need be considered: neurapraxia (focal segmental dymyelination), axonotmesis (wallerian degeneration caused by a lesion that does not disrupt fascicles of nerve fibers), and neurotmesis (wallerian degeneration caused by a lesion that interrupts fascicles). With nerve sheath tumors and entrapment neuropathies, the goal is minimize the extent to which neurapraxia progresses to axonotmesis. The compressive force is relieved without carrying out internal neurolysis, a procedure that is poorly tolerated, presumably because a degree of nerve ischemia exists with any long-standing compression. When the nerve has sustained blunt trauma (through acute compression, percussion, or traction), the result can be a total loss of function and an extensive neuroma-in-continuity (scarring within the nerve). However, the neural pathophysiology may amount to nothing more than axonotmesis. Although this lesion, in time, leads to full and spontaneous recovery, it must be differentiated from the neuroma-in-continuity that contains disrupted fascicles requiring surgery. Finally, with open nerve transection, the priority is to match the fascicles of the proximal stump with those of the distal stump, a goal that is best achieved if primary neurorrhaphy is carried out.

  20. Preoperative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for localizing superficial nerve paths.

    PubMed

    Natori, Yuhei; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ayato

    2015-12-01

    During surgery, peripheral nerves are often seen to follow unpredictable paths because of previous surgeries and/or compression caused by a tumor. Iatrogenic nerve injury is a serious complication that must be avoided, and preoperative evaluation of nerve paths is important for preventing it. In this study, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was used for an in-depth analysis of peripheral nerve paths. This study included 27 patients who underwent the TENS procedure to evaluate the peripheral nerve path (17 males and 10 females; mean age: 59.9 years, range: 18-83 years) of each patient preoperatively. An electrode pen coupled to an electrical nerve stimulator was used for superficial nerve mapping. The TENS procedure was performed on patients' major peripheral nerves that passed close to the surgical field of tumor resection or trauma surgery, and intraoperative damage to those nerves was apprehensive. The paths of the target nerve were detected in most patients preoperatively. The nerve paths of 26 patients were precisely under the markings drawn preoperatively. The nerve path of one patient substantially differed from the preoperative markings with numbness at the surgical region. During surgery, the nerve paths could be accurately mapped preoperatively using the TENS procedure as confirmed by direct visualization of the nerve. This stimulation device is easy to use and offers highly accurate mapping of nerves for surgical planning without major complications. The authors conclude that TENS is a useful tool for noninvasive nerve localization and makes tumor resection a safe and smooth procedure.

  1. Early Electrophysiological Abnormalities and Clinical Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hyllienmark, Lars; Alstrand, Nils; Jonsson, Björn; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Cooray, Gerald; Wahlberg-Topp, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to elucidate whether subclinical nerve dysfunction as reflected by neurophysiological testing predicts the development of clinical neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Fifty-nine patients were studied twice with neurophysiological measurements at baseline and at follow-up. At baseline, patients were 15.5 ± 3.22 years (range 7–22 years) of age, and duration of diabetes was 6.8 ± 3.3 years. At follow-up, patients were 20–35 years of age, and disease duration was 20 ± 5.3 years (range 10–31 years). RESULTS At baseline, patients showed modestly reduced nerve conduction velocities and amplitudes compared with healthy subjects, but all were free of clinical neuropathy. At follow-up, clinical neuropathy was present in nine (15%) patients. These patients had a more pronounced reduction in peroneal motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV), median MCV, and sural sensory nerve action potential at baseline (P < 0.010–0.003). In simple logistic regression analyses, the predictor with the strongest association with clinical neuropathy was baseline HbA1c (R2 = 48%, odds ratio 7.9, P < 0.002) followed by peroneal MCV at baseline (R2 = 38%, odds ratio 0.6, P < 0.006). With the use of a stepwise forward analysis that included all predictors, first baseline HbA1c and then only peroneal MCV at baseline entered significantly (R2 = 61%). Neuropathy impairment assessment showed a stronger correlation with baseline HbA1c (ρ = 0.40, P < 0.002) than with follow-up HbA1c (ρ = 0.034, P < 0.007). CONCLUSIONS Early defects in nerve conduction velocity predict the development of diabetic neuropathy. However, the strongest predictor was HbA1c during the first years of the disease. PMID:23723354

  2. Physiological and pharmacologic aspects of peripheral nerve blocks

    PubMed Central

    Vadhanan, Prasanna; Tripaty, Debendra Kumar; Adinarayanan, S.

    2015-01-01

    A successful peripheral nerve block not only involves a proper technique, but also a thorough knowledge and understanding of the physiology of nerve conduction and pharmacology of local anesthetics (LAs). This article focuses on what happens after the block. Pharmacodynamics of LAs, underlying mechanisms of clinically observable phenomena such as differential blockade, tachyphylaxis, C fiber resistance, tonic and phasic blockade and effect of volume and concentration of LAs. Judicious use of additives along with LAs in peripheral nerve blocks can prolong analgesia. An entirely new group of drugs-neurotoxins has shown potential as local anesthetics. Various methods are available now to prolong the duration of peripheral nerve blocks. PMID:26330722

  3. Physiological and pharmacologic aspects of peripheral nerve blocks.

    PubMed

    Vadhanan, Prasanna; Tripaty, Debendra Kumar; Adinarayanan, S

    2015-01-01

    A successful peripheral nerve block not only involves a proper technique, but also a thorough knowledge and understanding of the physiology of nerve conduction and pharmacology of local anesthetics (LAs). This article focuses on what happens after the block. Pharmacodynamics of LAs, underlying mechanisms of clinically observable phenomena such as differential blockade, tachyphylaxis, C fiber resistance, tonic and phasic blockade and effect of volume and concentration of LAs. Judicious use of additives along with LAs in peripheral nerve blocks can prolong analgesia. An entirely new group of drugs-neurotoxins has shown potential as local anesthetics. Various methods are available now to prolong the duration of peripheral nerve blocks.

  4. Effects of ciguatoxin on nerve excitability in rats (Part I).

    PubMed

    Cameron, J; Flowers, A E; Capra, M F

    1991-01-01

    Ciguatera poisoning is the most common fish food poisoning encountered in man. Electrophysiological studies were performed on the ventral nerve of the tail on adult rats following intraperitoneal injection of toxic fish extract. Significant slowing of both mixed and motor nerve conduction velocities and F wave responses were recorded. Motor and mixed nerve amplitudes were significantly reduced. Both absolute and supernormal periods were significantly prolonged together with an exaggeration of the supernormal response. These findings indirectly suggest that ciguatoxin acts on mammalian nerve by prolonging sodium channel activation.

  5. Bilateral cochlear nerve absence in a 3 year old child with VACTERL association.

    PubMed

    Rudić, Milan; Wong, Winson; Viner, Stuart; Strachan, David; Raine, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    We report a case of a 3 year old boy with bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss diagnosed from New Born Hearing Screening, with severe form of VACTERL association. He was referred to our Cochlear Implant Unit for assessment with regard to the possibility of cochlear implantation. MRI findings have showed bilateral vestibulocochlear cystic abnormalities. Only single nerve noted within the IAM on the right and likely single nerve within the IAM on the left. Hence, decision was made not to offer cochlear implantation. This is the first report of severe bilateral cochleovestibular nerve abnormalities to be associated with VACTERL.

  6. Autotomy in rats after nerve section compared with nerve degeneration following intraneural injection of Ricinus communis agglutinin I.

    PubMed

    Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Z; Nennesmo, I; Kristensson, K

    1987-07-01

    Partial unilateral deafferentation of the hind limb of rats was carried out by section of the sciatic nerve or the intraneural injection of Ricinus communis agglutinin 1 (RCA I). The development of autotomy was observed over a 6 week period. The axotomized animals autotomized more than those injected with RCA I. A neuroma developed on the proximal stump of the axotomized nerves. Within 7 days the axons of the RCA I-injected nerve degenerated and the cell bodies in dorsal root ganglia L4 and L5 were destroyed. Since the RCA I-injected animals autotomized, it is concluded that purely central factors have a role in the generation of this abnormal behavior. As the axotomized animals autotomized more than the RCA I-treated ones it is further concluded that abnormal impulse activity arising from a neuroma may be an additional factor in causing autotomy.

  7. Re-innervation of facial nerve territory using a composite hypoglossal nerve--muscle autograft--facial nerve bridge. An experimental model in sheep.

    PubMed

    Drew, S J; Fullarton, A C; Glasby, M A; Mountain, R E; Murray, J A

    1995-04-01

    The hypoglossal nerve has been used both entirely and in part to repair the facial nerve. Using the partial technique it may be difficult to obtain sufficient length and a free interposed graft is then required to extend the hypoglossal element. In six sheep the facial nerve was excised between its emergence from the stylomastoid foramen and its bifurcation in the parotid gland. The hypoglossal nerve was exposed and split longitudinally producing a limb which was reflected towards the distal stump of the facial nerve. This left a gap of 4-5 cm which was bridged with a freeze-thawed coaxially aligned skeletal muscle autograft. The sheep were examined at 8 months. Laser doppler blood-flow studies showed the blood-flow distal to the graft to be about 25% of that at an equivalent site on the normal side. Peak nerve conduction velocities were also reduced on the repaired side but stimulation of the proximal hypoglossal nerve was nevertheless capable of causing adequate contraction of both facial and tongue muscles. Histological comparison of the repaired facial nerves with equivalent sites on the normal side showed a reduction in mean axon and fibre diameters with normal myelin sheath thickness for the regenerated axon sizes. All of these features are to be expected in a regenerated nerve and are consistent with a good level of recovery of function.

  8. Pathophysiology of nerve regeneration and nerve reconstruction in burned patients.

    PubMed

    Coert, J Henk

    2010-08-01

    In extensive burns peripheral nerves can be involved. The injury to the nerve can be direct by thermal or electrical burns, but nerves can also be indirectly affected by the systemic reaction that follows the burn. Mediators will be released causing a neuropathy to nerves remote from the involved area. Involved mediators and possible therapeutic options will be discussed. In burned patients nerves can be reconstructed using autologous nerve grafts or nerve conduits. A key factor is an adequate wound debridement and a well-vascularized bed to optimize the outgrowth of the axons. Early free tissue transfers have shown promising results.

  9. Glossopharyngeal Nerve Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Puzzilli, F.; Mastronardi, L.; Agrillo, U.; Nardi, P.

    1999-01-01

    Complete resection with conservation of cranial nerves is the primary goal of contemporary surgery for lower cranial nerve tumors. We describe the case of a patient with a schwannoma of the left glossopharyngeal nerve, operated on in our Neurosurgical Unit. The far lateral approach combined with laminectomy of the posterior arch of C1 was done in two steps. The procedure allowed total tumor resection and was found to be better than classic unilateral suboccipital or combined supra- and infratentorial approaches. The advantages and disadvantages of the far lateral transcondylar approach, compared to the other more common approaches, are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171083

  10. Electromechanical properties of biomembranes and nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimburg, T.; Blicher, A.; Mosgaard, L. D.; Zecchi, K.

    2014-12-01

    Lipid membranes are insulators and capacitors, which can be charged by an external electric field. This phenomenon plays an important role in the field of electrophysiology, for instance when describing nerve pulse conduction. Membranes are also made of polar molecules meaning that they contain molecules with permanent electrical dipole moments. Therefore, the properties of membranes are subject to changes in trans-membrane voltage. Vice versa, mechanical forces on membranes lead to changes in the membrane potential. Associated effects are flexoelectricity, piezoelectricity, and electrostriction. Lipid membranes can melt from an ordered to a disordered state. Due to the change of membrane dimensions associated with lipid membrane melting, electrical properties are linked to the melting transition. Melting of the membrane can induce changes in trans-membrane potential, and application of voltage can lead to a shift of the melting transition. Further, close to transitions membranes are very susceptible to piezoelectric phenomena. We discuss these phenomena in relation with the occurrence of lipid ion channels. Close to melting transitions, lipid membranes display step-wise ion conduction events, which are indistinguishable from protein ion channels. These channels display a voltage-dependent open probability. One finds asymmetric current-voltage relations of the pure membrane very similar to those found for various protein channels. This asymmetry falsely has been considered a criterion to distinguish lipid channels from protein channels. However, we show that the asymmetry can arise from the electromechanical properties of the lipid membrane itself. Finally, we discuss electromechanical behavior in connection with the electromechanical theory of nerve pulse transduction. It has been found experimentally that nerve pulses are related to changes in nerve thickness. Thus, during the nerve pulse a solitary mechanical pulse travels along the nerve. Due to

  11. Craniofacial abnormalities in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, N J; Silvera, V M; Campbell, S E; Gordon, L B

    2012-09-01

    HGPS is a rare syndrome of segmental premature aging. Our goal was to expand the scope of structural bone and soft-tissue craniofacial abnormalities in HGPS through CT or MR imaging. Using The Progeria Research Foundation Medical and Research Database, 98 imaging studies on 25 patients, birth to 14.1 years of age, were comprehensively reviewed. Eight newly identified abnormalities involving the calvaria, skull base, and soft tissues of the face and orbits were present with prevalences between 43% and 100%. These included J-shaped sellas, a mottled appearance and increased vascular markings of the calvaria, abnormally configured mandibular condyles, hypoplastic articular eminences, small zygomatic arches, prominent parotid glands, and optic nerve kinking. This expanded craniofacial characterization helps link disease features and improves our ability to evaluate how underlying genetic and cellular abnormalities culminate in a disease phenotype.

  12. Nerve growth factor released from a novel PLGA nerve conduit can improve axon growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Keng-Min; Shea, Jill; Gale, Bruce K.; Sant, Himanshu; Larrabee, Patti; Agarwal, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Nerve injury can occur due to penetrating wounds, compression, traumatic stretch, and cold exposure. Despite prompt repair, outcomes are dismal. In an attempt to help resolve this challenge, in this work, a poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nerve conduit with associated biodegradable drug reservoir was designed, fabricated, and tested. Unlike current nerve conduits, this device is capable of fitting various clinical scenarios by delivering different drugs without reengineering the whole system. To demonstrate the potential of this device for nerve repair, a series of experiments were performed using nerve growth factor (NGF). First, an NGF dosage curve was developed to determine the minimum NGF concentration for optimal axonal outgrowth on chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells. Next, PLGA devices loaded with NGF were evaluated for sustained drug release and axon growth enhancement with the released drug. A 20 d in vitro release test was conducted and the nerve conduit showed the ability to meet and maintain the minimum NGF requirement determined previously. Bioactivity assays of the released NGF showed that drug released from the device between the 15th and 20th day could still promote axon growth (76.6-95.7 μm) in chick DRG cells, which is in the range of maximum growth. These novel drug delivery conduits show the ability to deliver NGF at a dosage that efficiently promotes ex vivo axon growth and have the potential for in vivo application to help bridge peripheral nerve gaps.

  13. Peroneal nerve palsy after compression stockings application

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Hyun; Kim, Won Il; Kim, Ji Yeon; Choe, Won Joo

    2016-01-01

    Peroneal nerve palsy can be caused by various etiology. We report unilateral peroneal nerve palsy after compression stockings application. A 64-year-old man underwent off-pump coronary bypass graft. Surgeon did not use saphenous vein for the bypass graft. Sedation was stopped after 3 h postoperative. After 16 h, for prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis, knee-high elastic stocking was applied. After 1 h, he took off right stocking because of numbness but left stocking was kept. After 24 h postoperative, (8 h after stocking application) patient complained suddenly left foot drop. Manual muscle test revealed 0/5 of ankle dorsiflexion, ankle eversion, and toe extension. Sensory was decreased to 70% in lower half of anterolateral aspect of tibia, foot dorsum, and toes. Foot drop and sensory abnormality decreased in 3 weeks. Cardiac surgery patients already have many risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Clinicians should be careful when applying stockings on those patients. PMID:27833497

  14. Peroneal nerve palsy after compression stockings application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Hyun; Kim, Won Il; Kim, Ji Yeon; Choe, Won Joo

    2016-01-01

    Peroneal nerve palsy can be caused by various etiology. We report unilateral peroneal nerve palsy after compression stockings application. A 64-year-old man underwent off-pump coronary bypass graft. Surgeon did not use saphenous vein for the bypass graft. Sedation was stopped after 3 h postoperative. After 16 h, for prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis, knee-high elastic stocking was applied. After 1 h, he took off right stocking because of numbness but left stocking was kept. After 24 h postoperative, (8 h after stocking application) patient complained suddenly left foot drop. Manual muscle test revealed 0/5 of ankle dorsiflexion, ankle eversion, and toe extension. Sensory was decreased to 70% in lower half of anterolateral aspect of tibia, foot dorsum, and toes. Foot drop and sensory abnormality decreased in 3 weeks. Cardiac surgery patients already have many risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Clinicians should be careful when applying stockings on those patients.

  15. Optic Nerve Aplasia: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, Fariba; Bazvand, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Seyedeh Simindokht; Karkhaneh, Reza; Ebrahimiadib, Nazanin; Shekarchi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report three cases of optic nerve aplasia (ONA). Case Report: Herein three subjects with ONA are described, two subjects had unilateral involvement. In one of these cases, the fellow eye had an associated persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV). The third patient had bilateral ONA with multiple intracranial anomalies. Previous reports are reviewed and reported findings are summarized. Orbital and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were normal in two of our cases and loss of corpus callosum in the third case. Narrow optic nerve was observed on the right side and normal appearance in other two patients. Conclusion: The diagnosis of optic nerve abnormalities in children requires a thorough ophthalmic examination and proper ancillary testing. Although MRI is valuable in the diagnosis of associated central nervous system anomalies, the optic nerve may appear in normal size and course on MRI images and thus one may not be able to diagnose ONA in eyes with opaque media. PMID:26425324

  16. Mandibular Branch of the Facial Nerve in Wistar Rats: New Experimental Model to Assess Facial Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Salomone, Raquel; Nascimento, Silvia Bona do; Ferreira, Ricardo Jose Rodriguez; Silva, Ciro Ferreira da; Costa, Heloisa Juliana Zabeu Rossi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The ideal animal model for nerve regeneration studies is the object of controversy, because all models described by the literature have advantages and disadvantages. Objective To describe the histologic and functional patterns of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve of Wistar rats to create a new experimental model of facial nerve regeneration. Methods Forty-two male rats were submitted to a nerve conduction test of the mandibular branch to obtain the compound muscle action potential. Twelve of these rats had the mandibular branch surgically removed and submitted to histologic analysis (number, partial density, and axonal diameter) of the proximal and distal segments. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the functional and histologic variables studied. Conclusion These new histologic and functional standards of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve of rats establish an objective, easy, and greatly reproducible model for future facial nerve regeneration studies. PMID:25992106

  17. Mandibular branch of the facial nerve in wistar rats: new experimental model to assess facial nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Salomone, Raquel; Nascimento, Silvia Bona do; Ferreira, Ricardo Jose Rodriguez; Silva, Ciro Ferreira da; Costa, Heloisa Juliana Zabeu Rossi

    2014-07-01

    Introduction The ideal animal model for nerve regeneration studies is the object of controversy, because all models described by the literature have advantages and disadvantages. Objective To describe the histologic and functional patterns of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve of Wistar rats to create a new experimental model of facial nerve regeneration. Methods Forty-two male rats were submitted to a nerve conduction test of the mandibular branch to obtain the compound muscle action potential. Twelve of these rats had the mandibular branch surgically removed and submitted to histologic analysis (number, partial density, and axonal diameter) of the proximal and distal segments. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the functional and histologic variables studied. Conclusion These new histologic and functional standards of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve of rats establish an objective, easy, and greatly reproducible model for future facial nerve regeneration studies.

  18. Construction of nerve guide conduits from cellulose/soy protein composite membranes combined with Schwann cells and pyrroloquinoline quinone for the repair of peripheral nerve defect

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Lihua; Gan, Li; Liu, Yongming; Tian, Weiqun; Tong, Zan; Wang, Xiong; Huselstein, Celine; Chen, Yun

    2015-02-20

    Regeneration and functional reconstruction of peripheral nerve defects remained a significant clinical challenge. Nerve guide conduits, with seed cells or neurotrophic factors (NTFs), had been widely used to improve the repair and regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) was an antioxidant that can stimulate nerve growth factors (NGFs) synthesis and accelerate the Schwann cells (SCs) proliferation and growth. In present study, three kinds of nerve guide conduits were constructed: one from cellulose/SPI hollow tube (CSC), another from CSC combined with SCs (CSSC), and the third one from CSSC combined with PQQ (CSSPC), respectively. And then they were applied to bridge and repair the sciatic nerve defect in rats, using autograft as control. Effects of different nerve guide conduits on the nerve regeneration were comparatively evaluated by general analysis, sciatic function index (SFI) and histological analysis (HE and TEM). Newly-formed regenerative nerve fibers were observed and running through the transparent nerve guide conduits 12 weeks after surgery. SFI results indicated that the reconstruction of motor function in CSSPC group was better than that in CSSC and CSC groups. HE images from the cross-sections and longitudinal-sections of the harvested regenerative nerve indicated that regenerative nerve fibers had been formed and accompanied with new blood vessels and matrix materials in the conduits. TEM images also showed that lots of fresh myelinated and non-myelinated nerve fibers had been formed. Parts of vacuolar, swollen and abnormal axons occurred in CSC and CSSC groups, while the vacuolization and swell of axons was the least serious in CSSPC group. These results indicated that CSSPC group had the most ability to repair and reconstruct the nerve structure and functions due to the comprehensive contributions from hollow CSC tube, SCs and PQQ. As a result, the CSSPC may have the potential for the applications as nerve guide

  19. [The dynamics of reparative regeneration of the rat skin nerve after various degree of its damage].

    PubMed

    Arkhipova, E G; Greten, A G; Krylov, V N

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of skin nerve regeneration was studied during 10-50 days after it was damaged by crushing in 163 outbred rats. Two series of experiments were conducted. In the first series, skin nerve (n. saphenus) was crushed by a hemostatic clamp in a region 2 mm long, while in second series it was crushed in a region of 4 mm length. The destructive processes in LIII and LIV spinal ganglia, the increase in the number of myelinated nerve fibers in the nerve region distal to the damaged area, the velocities of growth of damaged nerve fibers to the skin, were similar in both series during 10-50 days after the nerve was injured at different length. The velocity of myelination of regenerating nerve fibers in rats after 2 mm-long nerve injury was higher than that in animals after 4 mm-long nerve injury for a period of 30 days after the damage.

  20. Peripheral nerve injuries in athletes. Treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Lorei, M P; Hershman, E B

    1993-08-01

    Peripheral nerve lesions are uncommon but serious injuries which may delay or preclude an athlete's safe return to sports. Early, accurate anatomical diagnosis is essential. Nerve lesions may be due to acute injury (e.g. from a direct blow) or chronic injury secondary to repetitive microtrauma (entrapment). Accurate diagnosis is based upon physical examination and a knowledge of the relative anatomy. Palpation, neurological testing and provocative manoeuvres are mainstays of physical diagnosis. Diagnostic suspicion can be confirmed by electrophysiological testing, including electromyography and nerve conduction studies. Proper equipment, technique and conditioning are the keys to prevention. Rest, anti-inflammatories, physical therapy and appropriate splinting are the mainstays of treatment. In the shoulder, spinal accessory nerve injury is caused by a blow to the neck and results in trapezius paralysis with sparing of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Scapular winging results from paralysis of the serratus anterior because of long thoracic nerve palsy. A lesion of the suprascapular nerve may mimic a rotator cuff tear with pain a weakness of the rotator cuff. Axillary nerve injury often follows anterior shoulder dislocation. In the elbow region, musculocutaneous nerve palsy is seen in weightlifters with weakness of the elbow flexors and dysesthesias of the lateral forearm. Pronator syndrome is a median nerve lesion occurring in the proximal forearm which is diagnosed by several provocative manoeuvres. Posterior interosseous nerve entrapment is common among tennis players and occurs at the Arcade of Froshe--it results in weakness of the wrist and metacarpophalangeal extensors. Ulnar neuritis at the elbow is common amongst baseball pitchers. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common neuropathy seen in sport and is caused by median nerve compression in the carpal tunnel. Paralysis of the ulnar nerve at the wrist is seen among bicyclists resulting in weakness of grip and

  1. The effects of evening primrose oil on nerve function and capillarization in streptozotocin-diabetic rats: modulation by the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor flurbiprofen.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, N. E.; Cotter, M. A.; Dines, K. C.; Robertson, S.; Cox, D.

    1993-01-01

    1. The aims of this study were first, to examine whether deficits in nerve conduction in streptozotocin-diabetic rats could be reversed by a 10% dietary supplement of evening primrose oil. Second, to determine the time-course of reversal, and third, to assess whether the effects could be blocked by the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor flurbiprofen (5 mg kg-1 day-1). 2. One-month diabetes produced 20% and 15% deficits in sciatic motor and saphenous sensory conduction velocity respectively, which were maintained over 2 months diabetes. 3. The effect of 1-month evening primrose oil treatment on abnormalities caused by an initial month of untreated diabetes was examined. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity were restored to the non-diabetic level. 4. Resistance to hypoxic conduction failure was investigated for sciatic nerve trunk in vitro. The 80% conduction failure times were 29% and 55% prolonged by 1- and 2-month diabetes respectively. Evening primrose oil did not reverse the increased hypoxic resistance following 1-month untreated diabetes. 5. Sciatic nerve endoneurial capillary density was not significantly affected by diabetes, but was 16% increased in diabetic rats with reversal by evening primrose oil treatment for 1 month compared to 2-month untreated diabetes. 6. Serial motor conduction velocity measurement after 3-month untreated diabetes revealed complete normalization by evening primrose oil within 4 days. Cessation of treatment resulted in a rapid decline in conduction velocity over 24 h. 7. In a preventive study of 2-month duration, 6 groups of rats were used.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8401950

  2. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  3. Optic Nerve Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... machines can help monitor and detect loss of optic nerve fibers. The Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) is a special ... keeping organized, you can establish a routine that works for you. Read more » Are You at Risk ...

  4. Axillary nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes Axillary nerve dysfunction is a form of peripheral neuropathy . It occurs when there is damage to the ... Multiple mononeuropathy Muscle function loss Numbness and tingling Peripheral neuropathy Systemic Review Date 2/3/2015 Updated by: ...

  5. Tibial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tibial nerve dysfunction is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy . It occurs when there is damage to the ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 76. Shy ME. Peripheral neuropathies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  6. Vagus Nerve Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2014-06-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality.

  7. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near the surface of the body where it crosses the elbow, so prolonged pressure on the elbow or entrapment ...

  8. Optic Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... of optic nerve disorders, including: Glaucoma is a group of diseases that are the leading cause of blindness in the United States. Glaucoma usually happens when the fluid pressure inside the eyes slowly rises and damages the ...

  9. Nerve Damage (Diabetic Neuropathies)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may include numbness or insensitivity to pain or temperature a tingling, burning, or prickling sensation sharp pains ... from working properly, the body cannot regulate its temperature as it should. Nerve damage can also cause ...

  10. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  11. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  12. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

  13. Terminal latency abnormality in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis without split hand syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Donghwi; Park, Jin-Sung

    2017-02-10

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has a peculiar involvement pattern; clinically it is known as split hand syndrome and electrophysiologically shows abnormalities in the abductor pollicis brevis (APB)/abductor digiti minimi (ADM) ratio. The aim of this study was to find a significant electrophysiological parameter in upper limb onset ALS patients with normal APB/ADM ratio when compared to cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA) and healthy controls. We retrospectively reviewed the electrophysiological results of 47 upper limb onset ALS and 42 CSA cases; 20 healthy individuals were included as controls. We included ALS and CSA patients with normal ADM/APB ratio (≥0.6, and ≤1.7), and the parameters of electrophysiological study were compared. The electrophysiological parameters of statistical significance among ALS, CSA and normal controls were: amplitude of median and ulnar nerves, the terminal latency of median nerve, F-wave latency of median and ulnar nerves, terminal latency ratio of ulnar/median nerves, and F-wave latency ratio of ulnar/median nerves (p < 0.05). Among these parameters, the terminal latency ratio of ulnar/median nerve and terminal latency of median nerve in ALS were significantly different with both of CSA and normal control (p < 0.006). The abnormality in the terminal latency of the median nerve can be partly explained by the distal motor axonal dysfunction due to sodium and potassium channel abnormalities. The hypothesis of distal axonopathy is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of ALS causing a significant prolongation of the terminal latency in the median nerve and the ulnar/median nerve ratio.

  14. Nerve Growth Factor and Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    Neuropathy is one of the most debilitating complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with estimates of prevalence between 50–90% depending on the means of detection. Diabetic neuropathies are heterogeneous and there is variable involvement of large myelinated fibers and small, thinly myelinated fibers. Many of the neuronal abnormalities in diabetes can be duplicated by experimental depletion of specific neurotrophic factors, their receptors or their binding proteins. In experimental models of diabetes there is a reduction in the availability of these growth factors, which may be a consequence of metabolic abnormalities, or may be independent of glycemic control. These neurotrophic factors are required for the maintenance of the neurons, the ability to resist apoptosis and regenerative capacity. The best studied of the neurotrophic factors is nerve growth factor (NGF) and the related members of the neurotrophin family of peptides. There is increasing evidence that there is a deficiency of NGF in diabetes, as well as the dependent neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) that may also contribute to the clinical symptoms resulting from small fiber dysfunction. Similarly, NT3 appears to be important for large fiber and IGFs for autonomic neuropathy. Whether the observed growth factor deficiencies are due to decreased synthesis, or functional, e.g. an inability to bind to their receptor, and/or abnormalities in nerve transport and processing, remains to be established. Although early studies in humans on the role of neurotrophic factors as a therapy for diabetic neuropathy have been unsuccessful, newer agents and the possibilities uncovered by further studies should fuel clinical trials for several generations. It seems reasonable to anticipate that neurotrophic factor therapy, specifically targeted at different nerve fiber populations, might enter the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:14668049

  15. Nerves and Tissue Repair.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-21

    complete dependence on nerves. Organ culture of sciatic nerves, combined with an assay for axolotl transferrin developed earlier, allows quantitative study...axonal release of various unknown proteins. Combining this approach with the ELISA for quantitative measurement of axolotl transferrin developed with...light microscope autoradiographic analysis following binding of radiolabelled Tf. Studies of Tf synthesis will employ cDNA probes for axolotl Tf mRNA

  16. Traumatic facial nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Linda N; Lyford-Pike, Sofia; Boahene, Kofi Derek O

    2013-10-01

    Facial nerve trauma can be a devastating injury resulting in functional deficits and psychological distress. Deciding on the optimal course of treatment for patients with traumatic facial nerve injuries can be challenging, as there are many critical factors to be considered for each patient. Choosing from the great array of therapeutic options available can become overwhelming to both patients and physicians, and in this article, the authors present a systematic approach to help organize the physician's thought process.

  17. [The relativity of abnormity].

    PubMed

    Nilson, Annika

    2006-01-01

    In the late 19th century and in the beginning of the 20th century, mental diseases and abnormal behavior was considered to be a great danger to culture and society. "Degeneration" was the buzzword of the time, used and misused by artists and scientists alike. At the same time, some scientists saw abnormity as the key to unlock the mysteries of the ordinary mind. Naturalistic curiosity left Pandoras box open when religion declined in Darwins wake. Two swedish scientists, the physician Bror Gadelius (1862-1938) and his friend the philosopher Axel Herrlin (1870-1937), inspired by the French psychologist Theodule Ribots (1839-1916) "psychology without a soul", denied all fixed demarcation lines between abnormity and normality. All humans are natures creatures ruled by physiological laws, not ruled by God or convention. Even ordinary morality was considered to be an utterly backward explanation and guideline for complex human behavior. Different forms of therapy, not various kinds of penalties for wicked and disturbing behavior, are the now the solution for lots of people, "normal" as well as "abnormal". Psychiatry is expanding.

  18. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  19. Optic nerve aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lisi; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-07-01

    We report a 55-year-old woman with optic nerve Aspergillosis. Aspergillus is an ubiquitous airborne saprophytic fungus. Inhaled Aspergillus conidia are normally eliminated in the immunocompetent host by innate immune mechanisms; however, in immunosuppressed patients, they can cause disease. The woman had a past medical history of hypertension and migraines. She presented 1 year prior to death with a new onset headache behind the left eye and later developed blurred vision and scotoma. A left temporal artery biopsy was negative for giant cell arteritis. One month prior to the current admission, she had an MRI showing optic nerve thickening with no other findings. Because of the visual loss and a positive antinuclear antibody test, she was given a trial of high dose steroids and while it significantly improved her headache, her vision did not improve. At autopsy, the left optic nerve at the level of the cavernous sinus and extending into the optic chiasm was enlarged in diameter and there was a 1.3 cm firm nodule surrounding the left optic nerve. Histologically, an abscess surrounded and involved the left optic nerve. Acute angle branching, angioinvasive fungal hyphae were identified on Grocott's methenamine silver stained sections, consistent with Aspergillus spp. No gross or microscopic evidence of systemic vasculitis or infection was identified in the body. The literature on optic nerve Aspergillosis is reviewed.

  20. Thin-film enhanced nerve guidance channels for peripheral nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Isaac P.; Kim, Young-tae; English, Arthur W.; Lu, Xi; Chung, Andy; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2009-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that nerve guidance channels containing stacked thin-films of aligned poly(acrylonitrile-methacrylate) fibers support peripheral nerve regeneration across critical sized nerve gaps, without the aid of exogenous cells or proteins. Here, we explore the ability of tubular channels mininally supplemented with aligned nanofiber-based thin-films to promote endogenous nerve repair. We describe a technique for fabricating guidance channels in which individual thin-films are fixed into place within the lumen of a polysulfone tube. Because each thin-film is <10μm thick, this technique allows fine control over the positioning of aligned scaffolding substrate. We evaluated nerve regeneration through a 1-film guidance channel - containing a single continuous thin-film of aligned fibers - in comparison to a 3-film channel that provided two additional thin-film tracks. Thirty rats were implanted with one of the two channel types, and regeneration across a 14 mm tibial nerve gap was evaluated after 6 weeks and 13 weeks, using a range of morphological and functional measures. Both the 1-film and the 3-film channels supported regeneration across the nerve gap resulting in functional muscular reinnervation. Each channel type characteristically influenced the morphology of the regeneration cable. Interestingly, the 1-film channels supported enhanced regeneration compared to the 3-film channels in terms of regenerated axon profile counts and measures of nerve conduction velocity. These results suggest that minimal levels of appropriately positioned topographical cues significantly enhance guidance channel function by modulating endogenous repair mechanisms, resulting in effective bridging of critically sized peripheral nerve gaps. PMID:19446873

  1. [New treatment for peripheral nerve defects: nerve elongation].

    PubMed

    Kou, Y H; Jiang, B G

    2016-10-18

    Peripheral nerve defects are still a major challenge in clinical practice, and the most commonly used method of treatment for peripheral nerve defects is nerve transplantation, which has certain limitations and shortcomings, so new repair methods and techniques are needed. The peripheral nerve is elongated in limb lengthening surgery without injury, from which we got inspirations and proposed a new method to repair peripheral nerve defects: peripheral nerve elongation. The peripheral nerve could beelongated by a certain percent, but the physiological change and the maximum elongation range were still unknown. This study discussed the endurance, the physiological and pathological change of peripheral nerve elongation in detail, and got a lot of useful data. First, we developed peripheral nerve extender which could match the slow and even extension of peripheral nerve. Then, our animal experiment result confirmed that the peripheral nerve had better endurance for chronic elongation than that of acute elongation and cleared the extensibility of peripheral nerve and the range of repair for peripheral nerve defects. Our result also revealed the histological basis and changed the rule for pathological physiology of peripheral nerve elongation: the most important structure foundation of peripheral nerve elongation was Fontana band, which was the coiling of nerve fibers under the epineurium, so peripheral nerve could be stretched for 8.5%-10.0% without injury because of the Fontana band. We confirmed that peripheral nerve extending technology could have the same repair effect as traditional nerve transplantation through animal experiments. Finally, we compared the clinical outcomes between nerve elongation and performance of the conventional method in the repair of short-distance transection injuries in human elbows, and the post-operative follow-up results demonstrated that early neurological function recovery was better in the nerve elongation group than in the

  2. Cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in vestibular neuritis: comparison between air- and bone-conducted stimulation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sun-Young; Kim, Ji-Soo; Yang, Tae-Ho; Shin, Byoung-Soo; Jeong, Seul-Ki

    2013-08-01

    To clarify the changes of cervical (cVEMP) and ocular (oVEMP) vestibular evoked myogenic potentials induced by air-conducted sound (ACS) and bone-conducted vibration (BCV) in patients with vestibular neuritis (VN), patients with VN (n = 30) and normal controls (n = 45) underwent recording of cVEMP and oVEMP in response to ACS (1,000 Hz, 5 ms, tone bursts) and BCV (500 Hz, short tone burst). Patients with VN showed a high proportion of oVEMP abnormalities in response to both ACS (80.0 %) and BCV at the forehead (Fz, 73.3 %) or the mastoid (76.7 %). In contrast, cVEMPs were mostly normal with both ACS and BCV in the patients. The dissociations in the abnormalities of cVEMP and oVEMP induced by ACS and BCV at the mastoids and at the forehead in patients with VN suggest that oVEMP reflects functions of the superior vestibular nerve and most likely the utricular function. The results of our study suggest that oVEMP induced by either ACS or BCV appears to depend on integrity of the superior vestibular nerve, possibly due to the utricular afferents travelling in it. In contrast, cVEMP elicited by either ACS or BCV may reflect function of the saccular afferents running in the inferior vestibular nerve.

  3. Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) in Israeli-Bedouins: genetic heterogeneity, novel mutations in the TRKA/NGF receptor gene, clinical findings, and results of nerve conduction studies.

    PubMed

    Shatzky, S; Moses, S; Levy, J; Pinsk, V; Hershkovitz, E; Herzog, L; Shorer, Z; Luder, A; Parvari, R

    2000-06-19

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA), a rare and severe disorder, comprises absence of sensation to noxious stimuli, inability to sweat, and recurrent episodes of hyperthermia. It has a relatively high prevalence in the consanguineous Israeli-Bedouins. Clinical studies of 28 patients are reported here. Using the linkage analysis approach, we linked the disease in 9 of 10 unrelated Israeli-Bedouin families with CIPA to the TrkA gene, which encodes the receptor for nerve growth factor. In one family, linkage was excluded, implying that another gene, yet unidentified, is involved. Two new mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of the TrkA gene were identified in our CIPA patients: a 1926-ins-T in most of the southern Israeli-Negev CIPA patients, and a Pro- 689-Leu mutation in a different isolate of Bedouins in northern Israel. Eight prenatal diagnoses were made in the southern Israeli-Negev Bedouins, two by linkage analysis and six by checking directly for the 1926-ins-T mutation. Three polymorphisms in the TrkA protein kinase encoding domain were also observed.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of isolated abducent nerve palsy induced by vascular compression of vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro

    2017-01-01

    If the origin of isolated abducent nerve palsy cannot be found on neuroradiological examinations, diabetes mellitus is known as a probable cause; however, some cases show no potential causes of isolated abducent nerve palsy. Here, we report a 74-year-old male who suffered from diplopia due to isolated left abducent nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance angiography and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition imaging clearly showed a dolichoectasic vertebrobasilar artery compressing the left abducent nerve upward and outward. There were no abnormal lesions in the brain stem, cavernous sinus, or orbital cavity. Laboratory data showed no abnormal findings. We concluded that neurovascular compression of the left abducent nerve might cause isolated left abducent nerve palsy. We observed him without surgical treatment considering his general condition with angina pectoris and old age. His symptom due to the left abducent nerve palsy persisted. From previous reports, conservative treatment could not improve abducent nerve palsy. Microvascular decompression should be considered for abducent nerve palsy due to vascular compression if patients are young, and their general condition is good. We also discuss interesting characteristics with a review of the literature. PMID:28149097

  5. GLIAL RESPONSES AFTER CHORDA TYMPANI NERVE INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Dianna L.

    2013-01-01

    The chorda tympani (CT) nerve innervates lingual taste buds and is susceptible to damage during dental and inner ear procedures. Interruption of the CT results in a disappearance of taste buds, which can be accompanied by taste disturbances. Because the CT usually regenerates to reinnervate taste buds successfully in a few weeks, a persistence of taste disturbances may indicate alterations in central nervous function. Peripheral injury to other sensory nerves leads to glial responses at central terminals, which actively contribute to abnormal sensations arising from nerve damage. Therefore, the current study examined microglial and astrocytic responses in the first central gustatory relay -the nucleus of the solitary tract (nTS)- after transection of the CT. Damage to the CT resulted in significant microglial responses in terms of morphological reactivity and an increased density of microglial cells from 2-20 days after injury. This increased microglial population primarily resulted from microglial proliferation from 1.5-3 days, which was supplemented by microglial migration within sub-divisions of the nTS between days 2-3. Unlike other nerve injuries, CT injury did not result in recruitment of bone marrow-derived precursors. Astrocytes also reacted in the nTS with increased levels of GFAP by 3 days, although none showed evidence of cell division. GFAP levels remained increased at 30 days by which time microglial responses had resolved. These results show that nerve damage to the CT results in central glial responses, which may participate in long lasting taste alterations following CT lesion. PMID:22315167

  6. Corneal nerve microstructure in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Misra, Stuti L; Kersten, Hannah M; Roxburgh, Richard H; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V; McGhee, Charles N J

    2017-03-03

    Ocular surface changes and blink abnormalities are well-established in Parkinson's disease. Blink rate may be influenced by corneal sub-basal nerve density, however, this relationship has not yet been investigated in Parkinson's disease. This case-control study examined the ocular surface in patients with moderately severe Parkinson's disease, including confocal microscopy of the cornea. Fifteen patients with moderately severe Parkinson's disease (modified Hoehn and Yahr grade 3 or 4) and fifteen control participants were recruited. Ophthalmic assessment included slit-lamp examination, blink rate assessment, central corneal aesthesiometry and in vivo corneal confocal microscopy. The effect of disease laterality was also investigated. Of the 15 patients with Parkinson's disease, ten were male and the mean age was 65.5±8.6years. The corneal sub-basal nerve plexus density was markedly reduced in patients with Parkinson's disease (7.56±2.4mm/mm(2)) compared with controls (15.91±2.6mm/mm(2)) (p<0.0001). Corneal sensitivity did not differ significantly between the patients with Parkinson's disease (0.79±1.2mBAR) and the control group (0.26±0.35mBAR), p=0.12. Sub-basal nerve density was not significantly different between the eye ipsilateral to the side of the body with most-severe motor symptoms, and the contralateral eye. There was a significant positive correlation between ACE-R scores and sub-basal corneal nerve density (R(2)=0.66, p=0.02). This is the first study to report a significant reduction in corneal sub-basal nerve density in Parkinson's disease and demonstrate an association with cognitive dysfunction. These results provide further evidence to support the involvement of the peripheral nervous system in Parkinson's disease, previously thought to be a central nervous system disorder.

  7. Peripheral nerve extract effects on mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Dietz, F R; Mukhopadhyay, B; Becker, G; Daniels, K; Solursh, M

    1996-01-01

    Several common congenital limb disorders are characterized by normal tissue differentiation but abnormal somatic growth. These include: idiopathic clubfoot, idiopathic leg length discrepancy, hemi-atrophy and hemi-hypertrophy. Both clinical and research studies have suggested that peripheral nerves may be important in regulating somatic growth of limb tissues. To investigate the hypothesis that peripheral nerves convey trophic substances to mesenchymal tissues that are involved in the regulation of growth, we developed an in vitro assay to assess the effect of fractions of peripheral nerve on myoblast and chondroblast growth and differentiation in a mammalian (rat) system. Whole rat sciatic nerve extract was fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation and by affinity chromatography. Concavalin A chromatography resolved whole nerve extract into a glycoprotein and a non-glycoprotein fraction. Serial ammonium sulfate precipitation yielded three pellet fractions designated as 35%, 70%, and 100% pellets; corresponding to ammonium sulfate concentrations of 0 to 35%, 35 to 70%, and 70 to 100% saturation, respectively. Dialyzed solutions of these pellets as well as the fractions from Concavalin A chromatography were assayed for biological activity in micromass cultures of rat limb bud mesenchyme, which allowed assessment of both myoblast and chondroblast stimulation. Stimulation of protein synthesis and myoblast proliferation (as measured by MF20 staining) occurred with both 70% and 100% ammonium sulfate fractions. Stimulation of chondroblasts (as measured by the number of alcian blue staining nodules) occurred with the 35% and 100% fractions. The glycoprotein fraction from the affinity chromatography stimulated protein synthesis and myoblast proliferation and inhibited chondroblast development. Stimulation of chondroblasts was seen with the non-glycoprotein fraction. No effect on protein synthesis, myoblast proliferation or chondroblast proliferation was found in

  8. Peripheral nerve extract effects on mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, F. R.; Mukhopadhyay, B.; Becker, G.; Daniels, K.; Solursh, M.

    1996-01-01

    Several common congenital limb disorders are characterized by normal tissue differentiation but abnormal somatic growth. These include: idiopathic clubfoot, idiopathic leg length discrepancy, hemi-atrophy and hemi-hypertrophy. Both clinical and research studies have suggested that peripheral nerves may be important in regulating somatic growth of limb tissues. To investigate the hypothesis that peripheral nerves convey trophic substances to mesenchymal tissues that are involved in the regulation of growth, we developed an in vitro assay to assess the effect of fractions of peripheral nerve on myoblast and chondroblast growth and differentiation in a mammalian (rat) system. Whole rat sciatic nerve extract was fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation and by affinity chromatography. Concavalin A chromatography resolved whole nerve extract into a glycoprotein and a non-glycoprotein fraction. Serial ammonium sulfate precipitation yielded three pellet fractions designated as 35%, 70%, and 100% pellets; corresponding to ammonium sulfate concentrations of 0 to 35%, 35 to 70%, and 70 to 100% saturation, respectively. Dialyzed solutions of these pellets as well as the fractions from Concavalin A chromatography were assayed for biological activity in micromass cultures of rat limb bud mesenchyme, which allowed assessment of both myoblast and chondroblast stimulation. Stimulation of protein synthesis and myoblast proliferation (as measured by MF20 staining) occurred with both 70% and 100% ammonium sulfate fractions. Stimulation of chondroblasts (as measured by the number of alcian blue staining nodules) occurred with the 35% and 100% fractions. The glycoprotein fraction from the affinity chromatography stimulated protein synthesis and myoblast proliferation and inhibited chondroblast development. Stimulation of chondroblasts was seen with the non-glycoprotein fraction. No effect on protein synthesis, myoblast proliferation or chondroblast proliferation was found in

  9. Medullary infarcts may cause ipsilateral masseter reflex abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Thömke, Frank; Marx, Jürgen J; Cruccu, Giorgio; Stoeter, Peter; Hopf, Hanns C

    2007-10-01

    There is a suprasegmental influence on the masseter reflex (MassR) in animals, which is mediated via the fifth nerve spinal nucleus (5SpN). Corresponding data in humans are lacking. Out of 268 prospectively recruited patients with clinical signs of acute brainstem infarctions, we identified 38 with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-documented unilateral infarcts caudal to the levels of the fifth nerve motor and main sensory nuclei. All had biplanar T2- and echo planar diffusion-weighted MRI and MassR testing. Five patients (13%) had ipsilateral MassR abnormalities. In all, the infarcts involved the region of the 5SpN. Patients with medullary infarcts involving the region of the 5SpN may thus have ipsilateral MassR abnormalities. This possibly represents an interruption of an excitatory projection mediated via the 5SpN to masseter motoneurons in the fifth nerve motor nucleus. MassR abnormalities with medullary lesions restrict the topodiagnostic value of the MassR.

  10. Acute peripheral facial palsy: is there a trigeminal nerve involvement?

    PubMed

    Uluduz, Derya; Kiziltan, Meral E; Akalin, Mehmet Ali

    2010-07-26

    The aim of this study was to investigate trigeminal nerve involvement in patients with peripheral facial palsy. In total, 25 patients with facial nerve palsy and 19 controls were tested by electrophysiological methods regarding their facial and trigeminal nerve functions within 1 month after disease onset. The presence of an abnormal blink reflex was determined in patients with peripheral facial palsy by comparing paralytic and non-paralytic sides (12.3+/-1.1 and 10.8+/-1.3, respectively; p=0.001). However, the average masseter inhibitory reflex difference between the paretic and non-paralytic sides of patients compared with the corresponding side-to-side comparison for controls was not statistically significant. The masseter inhibitory reflex response was abnormal in some cases. These findings suggest that the masseter inhibitory reflex, a trigemino-trigeminal reflex, was normal in most of our patients with peripheral facial palsy, but may be abnormal in individual cases. Our study showed that subclinical disorders affecting the trigeminal pathways occur in individual patients with idiopathic facial palsy, while the majority of patients have no trigeminal nerve involvement.

  11. Discrete impulses in ephaptically coupled nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Maïna, I; Tabi, C B; Ekobena Fouda, H P; Mohamadou, A; Kofané, T C

    2015-04-01

    We exclusively analyze the condition for modulated waves to emerge in two ephaptically coupled nerve fibers. Through the multiple scale expansion, it is shown that a set of coupled cable-like Hodgkin-Huxley equations can be reduced to a single differential-difference nonlinear equation. The standard approach of linear stability analysis of a plane wave is used to predict regions of parameters where nonlinear structures can be observed. Instability features are shown to be importantly controlled not only by the ephaptic coupling parameter, but also by the discreteness parameter. Numerical simulations, to verify our analytical predictions, are performed, and we explore the longtime dynamics of slightly perturbed plane waves in the coupled nerve fibers. On initially exciting only one fiber, quasi-perfect interneuronal communication is discussed along with the possibility of recruiting damaged or non-myelinated nerve fibers, by myelinated ones, into conduction.

  12. Autonomic correlations with MRI are abnormal in the brainstem vasomotor centre in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barnden, Leighton R; Kwiatek, Richard; Crouch, Benjamin; Burnet, Richard; Del Fante, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Autonomic changes are often associated with the chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), but their pathogenetic role is unclear and brain imaging investigations are lacking. The vasomotor centre and, through it, nuclei in the midbrain and hypothalamus play a key role in autonomic nervous system regulation of steady state blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). In this exploratory cross-sectional study, BP and HR, as indicators of autonomic function, were correlated with volumetric and T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo (T1w and T2w) brain MRI in 25 CFS subjects and 25 normal controls (NC). Steady state BP (systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure) and HR in two postures were extracted from 24 h blood pressure monitoring. We performed (1) MRI versus autonomic score interaction-with-group regressions to detect locations where regression slopes differed in the CFS and NC groups (collectively indicating abnormality in CFS), and (2) MRI regressions in the CFS and NC groups alone to detect additional locations with abnormal correlations in CFS. Significant CFS regressions were repeated controlling for anxiety and depression (A&D). Abnormal regressions were detected in nuclei of the brainstem vasomotor centre, midbrain reticular formation and hypothalamus, but also in limbic nuclei involved in stress responses and in prefrontal white matter. Group comparisons of CFS and NC did not find MRI differences in these locations. We propose therefore that these regulatory nuclei are functioning correctly, but that two-way communication between them is impaired in CFS and this affects signalling to/from peripheral effectors/sensors, culminating in inverted or magnified correlations. This single explanation for the diverse abnormal correlations detected here consolidates the conclusion for a brainstem/midbrain nerve conduction deficit inferred earlier (Barnden et al., 2015). Strong correlations were also detected in isolated NC regressions.

  13. Autonomic correlations with MRI are abnormal in the brainstem vasomotor centre in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Barnden, Leighton R.; Kwiatek, Richard; Crouch, Benjamin; Burnet, Richard; Del Fante, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Autonomic changes are often associated with the chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), but their pathogenetic role is unclear and brain imaging investigations are lacking. The vasomotor centre and, through it, nuclei in the midbrain and hypothalamus play a key role in autonomic nervous system regulation of steady state blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). In this exploratory cross-sectional study, BP and HR, as indicators of autonomic function, were correlated with volumetric and T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo (T1w and T2w) brain MRI in 25 CFS subjects and 25 normal controls (NC). Steady state BP (systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure) and HR in two postures were extracted from 24 h blood pressure monitoring. We performed (1) MRI versus autonomic score interaction-with-group regressions to detect locations where regression slopes differed in the CFS and NC groups (collectively indicating abnormality in CFS), and (2) MRI regressions in the CFS and NC groups alone to detect additional locations with abnormal correlations in CFS. Significant CFS regressions were repeated controlling for anxiety and depression (A&D). Abnormal regressions were detected in nuclei of the brainstem vasomotor centre, midbrain reticular formation and hypothalamus, but also in limbic nuclei involved in stress responses and in prefrontal white matter. Group comparisons of CFS and NC did not find MRI differences in these locations. We propose therefore that these regulatory nuclei are functioning correctly, but that two-way communication between them is impaired in CFS and this affects signalling to/from peripheral effectors/sensors, culminating in inverted or magnified correlations. This single explanation for the diverse abnormal correlations detected here consolidates the conclusion for a brainstem/midbrain nerve conduction deficit inferred earlier (Barnden et al., 2015). Strong correlations were also detected in isolated NC regressions. PMID:27114901

  14. Heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B K; Kaiser, L; Maxwell, H S

    2008-08-01

    The etiologies for congenital bovine fetal anomalies can be divided into heritable, toxic, nutritional, and infectious categories. Although uncommon in most herds, inherited congenital anomalies are probably present in all breeds of cattle and propagated as a result of specific trait selection that inadvertently results in propagation of the defect. In some herds, the occurrence of inherited anomalies has become frequent, and economically important. Anomalous traits can affect animals in a range of ways, some being lethal or requiring euthanasia on humane grounds, others altering structure, function, or performance of affected animals. Veterinary practitioners should be aware of the potential for inherited defects, and be prepared to investigate and report animals exhibiting abnormal characteristics. This review will discuss the morphologic characteristics, mode of inheritance, breeding lines affected, and the availability of genetic testing for selected heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

  15. Liver abnormalities in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Than, Nwe Ni; Neuberger, James

    2013-08-01

    Abnormalities of liver function (notably rise in alkaline phosphatase and fall in serum albumin) are common in normal pregnancy, whereas rise in serum bilirubin and aminotransferase suggest either exacerbation of underlying pre-existing liver disease, liver disease related to pregnancy or liver disease unrelated to pregnancy. Pregnant women appear to have a worse outcome when infected with Hepatitis E virus. Liver diseases associated with pregnancy include abnormalities associated hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver disease, pre-eclampsia, cholestasis of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. Prompt investigation and diagnosis is important in ensuring a successful maternal and foetal outcome. In general, prompt delivery is the treatment of choice for acute fatty liver, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome and ursodeoxycholic acid is used for cholestasis of pregnancy although it is not licenced for this indication.

  16. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  17. Hibernating myocardium results in partial sympathetic denervation and nerve sprouting

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Stanley F.; Ovchinnikov, Vladislav; Canty, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Hibernating myocardium due to chronic repetitive ischemia is associated with regional sympathetic nerve dysfunction and spontaneous arrhythmic death in the absence of infarction. Although inhomogeneity in regional sympathetic innervation is an acknowledged substrate for sudden death, the mechanism(s) responsible for these abnormalities in viable, dysfunctional myocardium (i.e., neural stunning vs. sympathetic denervation) and their association with nerve sprouting are unknown. Accordingly, markers of sympathetic nerve function and nerve sprouting were assessed in subendocardial tissue collected from chronically instrumented pigs with hibernating myocardium (n = 18) as well as sham-instrumented controls (n = 7). Hibernating myocardium exhibited evidence of partial sympathetic denervation compared with the normally perfused region and sham controls, with corresponding regional reductions in tyrosine hydroxylase protein (−32%, P < 0.001), norepinephrine uptake transport protein (−25%, P = 0.01), and tissue norepinephrine content (−45%, P < 0.001). Partial denervation induced nerve sprouting with regional increases in nerve growth factor precursor protein (31%, P = 0.01) and growth associated protein-43 (38%, P < 0.05). All of the changes in sympathetic nerve markers were similar in animals that developed sudden death (n = 9) compared with electively terminated pigs with hibernating myocardium (n = 9). In conclusion, sympathetic nerve dysfunction in hibernating myocardium is most consistent with partial sympathetic denervation and is associated with regional nerve sprouting. The extent of sympathetic remodeling is similar in animals that develop sudden death compared with survivors; this suggests that sympathetic remodeling in hibernating myocardium is not an independent trigger for sudden death. Nevertheless, sympathetic remodeling likely contributes to electrical instability in combination with other factors. PMID:23125211

  18. Clinicopathologic correlation of retinal to choroidal venous collaterals of the optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Schatz, H; Green, W R; Talamo, J H; Hoyt, W F; Johnson, R N; McDonald, H R

    1991-08-01

    An optic nerve meningioma developed in an elderly woman and was followed for 13 years until her death. The optic nerve was initially normal. Over time it became swollen and then atrophic and developed retinal venous to choroidal venous collaterals. Five hundred serial sections were prepared through the optic nerve and for approximately 1.5 mm superiorly and inferiorly to the optic nerve to trace the course of the collaterals that were seen ophthalmoscopically and angiographically in the optic nerve head. This clinicopathologic study shows clearly that the abnormal channels are, in fact, retinal venous to choroidal venous collaterals (bypass channels). Four collaterals extended around the end of Bruch's membrane at the optic nerve head. Two more collaterals extended through the retinal pigment epithelium to become continuous with a subretinal pigment epithelial neovascular membrane, the vessels of which connected with the choroidal vessels through a defect in Bruch's membrane.

  19. Barriers of the peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    Peltonen, Sirkku; Alanne, Maria; Peltonen, Juha

    2013-01-01

    This review introduces the traditionally defined anatomic compartments of the peripheral nerves based on light and electron microscopic topography and then explores the cellular and the most recent molecular basis of the different barrier functions operative in peripheral nerves. We also elucidate where, and how, the homeostasis of the normal human peripheral nerve is controlled in situ and how claudin-containing tight junctions contribute to the barriers of peripheral nerve. Also, the human timeline of the development of the barriers of the peripheral nerve is depicted. Finally, potential future therapeutic modalities interfering with the barriers of the peripheral nerve are discussed. PMID:24665400

  20. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  1. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  2. Long thoracic nerve paralysis associated with thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuchi, Y; Saitoh, S; Hosaka, M; Uchiyama, S

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of long thoracic nerve palsy associated with thoracic outlet syndrome are reported. Both patients had abnormal posture, with low-set shoulders and winged scapulae. Clinically there was weakness of the serratus anterior muscle with partial denervotion on electromyography. The diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome was based on positive vascular tests and brachial plexus nerve compression symptoms induced by the vascular testing positions. An orthosis that held the shoulder in an elevated position was used in both cases. Complete recovery of shoulder function and relief of the symptoms was achieved in both cases at 8 and 13 months, respectively, after application of the orthosis.

  3. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  4. A novel electrospun nerve conduit enhanced by carbon nanotubes for peripheral nerve regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenwen; Jiang, Xinquan; Cai, Ming; Zhao, Wen; Ye, Dongxia; Zhou, Yong; Zhu, Chao; Zhang, Xiuli; Lu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2014-04-01

    For artificial nerve conduits, great improvements have been achieved in mimicking the structures and components of autologous nerves. However, there are still some problems in conduit construction, especially in terms of mechanical properties, biomimetic surface tomography, electrical conductivity and sustained release of neurotrophic factors or cells. In this study, we designed and fabricated a novel electrospun nerve conduit enhanced by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) on the basis of a collagen/poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (collagen/PCL) fibrous scaffold. Our aim was to provide further knowledge about the mechanical effects and efficacy of MWNTs on nerve conduits as well as the biocompatibility and toxicology of MWNTs when applied in vivo. The results showed that as one component, carboxyl MWNTs could greatly alter the composite scaffold’s hydrophilicity, mechanical properties and degradability. The electrospun fibers enhanced by MWNTs could support Schwann cell adhesion and elongation as a substrate in vitro. In vivo animal studies demonstrated that the MWNT-enhanced collagen/PCL conduit could effectively promote nerve regeneration of sciatic nerve defect in rats and prevent muscle atrophy without invoking body rejection or serious chronic inflammation. All of these results showed that this MWNT-enhanced scaffold possesses good biocompatibility and MWNTs might be excellent candidates as engineered nanocarriers for further neurotrophic factor delivery research.

  5. Genes and nerves.

    PubMed

    Dieu, Tam; Johnstone, Bruce R; Newgreen, Don F

    2005-04-01

    The unpredictability of a brachial plexus graft, a median nerve repair, or a facial-nerve reconstruction is well known. No matter how precise the technical skills, a perfect recovery from a peripheral-nerve lesion is elusive. To resolve this problem, understanding of the normal development of the peripheral nervous system is needed. Presently, the development of the innervation in the upper limb is complex and not fully understood. However, many of the genes involved in this process are now known, and the link between anatomy and genetics is becoming clearer. This short review aims to acquaint the clinical surgeon with some of the main genes. The principal steps in the establishment of neural circuits will be summarized, in particular, the specification and development of neurons and glia, the pathfinding of cells and axons towards their target, and the downstream molecules that control the circuitry of these neurons.

  6. [Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of congenital abnormalities of the temporal bone].

    PubMed

    Czerny, C; Gstöttner, W; Imhof, H

    2003-03-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the temporal bone are mostly accompanied by conductive or sensori-neural hearing loss. Before any therapeutic procedures are done high resolution CT (HRCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should be performed to establish the correct diagnosis and to plan the potentially surgical intervention. HRCT best depicts osseous changes especially those of the external auditory canal and the middle ear containing the ossicles and the osseous structures of the temporal bone and the petrous bone containing the inner ear. MRI excellently shows soft tissue changes of the inner ear especially on the high resolution 3DT2-weighted sequences which give a superb contrast between the nerves and the cerebro-spinal fluid. Malformations of the external auditory canal consists of aplasia or hypoplasia and those of the middle ear range form extreme hypoplasia or aplasia to very mild deformations of the ossicles. Malformations of the inner ear also range form complete aplasia to very mild hypoplasia of the organs of the inner ear as well as malformations concerning the nerves in the internal auditory canal range from aplasia to hypoplasia. Malformations of the temporal bone can either occur isolated or in combination in which malformations of the external and middle ear may be accompanied by those of the inner ear. Furthermore, malformations of the temporal bone may also occur in otofacial, otocervical or otoskeletal syndromes. These syndromes may be accompanied by certain malformations of the temporal bone. HRCT and MRI are both excellent methods to depict congenital abnormalities of the temporal bone and of the inner ear and should be used as complementary methods because HRCT best depicts osseous changes and MRI superbly depicts soft tissue changes. Both methods are important to establish the correct diagnosis to plan the therapeutic procedures.

  7. Relationship Between Optic Nerve Appearance and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness as Explored with Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Tomas S.; Huang, Jiayan; Garrity, Sean T.; Carter, Stuart B.; Aleman, Wendy D.; Ying, Gui-shuang; Tamhankar, Madhura A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study the relationship between the appearance of the optic nerve and the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness determined by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods Records from patients with spectral domain-OCT imaging in a neuro-ophthalmology practice were reviewed. Eyes with glaucoma/glaucoma suspicion, macular/optic nerve edema, pseudophakia, and with refractive errors > 6D were excluded. Optic nerve appearance by slit lamp biomicroscopy was related to the RNFL thickness by spectral domain-OCT and to visual field results. Results Ninety-one patients (176 eyes; mean age: 49 ± 15 years) were included. Eighty-three eyes (47%) showed optic nerve pallor; 89 eyes (50.6%) showed RNFL thinning (sectoral or average peripapillary). Average peripapillary RNFL thickness in eyes with pallor (mean ± SD = 76 ± 17 μm) was thinner compared to eyes without pallor (91 ± 14 μm, P < 0.001). Optic nerve pallor predicted RNFL thinning with a sensitivity of 69% and a specificity of 75%. Optic nerve appearance predicted RNFL thinning (with a sensitivity and specificity of 81%) when RNFL had thinned by ∼ 40%. Most patients with pallor had RNFL thinning with (66%) or without (25%) visual field loss; the remainder had normal RNFL and fields (5%) or with visual field abnormalities (4%). Conclusions Optic nerve pallor as a predictor of RNFL thinning showed fair sensitivity and specificity, although it is optimally sensitive/specific only when substantial RNFL loss has occurred. Translational Relevance Finding an acceptable relationship between the optic nerve appearance by ophthalmoscopy and spectral domain-OCT RNFL measures will help the clinician's interpretation of the information provided by this technology, which is gaining momentum in neuro-ophthalmic research. PMID:25374773

  8. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  9. [Lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease].

    PubMed

    Shi, J G; Xu, X M; Sun, J C; Wang, Y; Guo, Y F; Yang, H S; Kong, Q J; Yang, Y; Shi, G D; Yuan, W; Jia, L S

    2017-03-21

    Objective: To define a novel disease-lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease, and propose the diagnostic criteria, while capsule surgery was performed and evaluated in the preliminary study. Methods: From June 2016 to December 2016, a total of 30 patients (22 male and 8 female; mean age of 55.1±9.7 years) with lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease were included in Department of Spine Surgery, Changzheng Hospital, the Second Military Medical University.Lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease was defined as axial hypertension of nerve root and spinal cord caused by congenital anomalies, which could be accompanied by other lesions as lumbar disc herniation, spinal cord stenosis or spondylolisthesis, or aggravated by iatrogenic lesions, resulting in neurological symptoms.This phenomenon is similar to a stretched string, the higher tension on each end the louder sound.Meanwhile, the shape of lumbosacral spine looks like a bow, thus, the disease is nominated as lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease.All the patients underwent capsule surgery and filled out Owestry disability index (ODI) and Tempa scale for kinesiophobia (TSK) before and after surgery. Results: The mean surgery time was (155±36) min, (4.3±0.4) segments were performed surgery.The pre-operative VAS, TSK and ODI scores were (7.6±0.8), (52.0±10.3) and (68.4±12.7), respectively.The post-operative VAS, TSK and ODI scores were (3.3±0.4), ( 24.6±5.2) and (32.1±7.4)(P<0.05, respectively), respectively. Conclusion: The definition and diagnostic criteria of lumbosacral nerve bowstring disease was proposed.Capsule surgery was an effective strategy with most patients acquired excellent outcomes as symptoms relieved and quality of life improved.

  10. Nerve Transfers in Tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Fox, Ida K

    2016-05-01

    Hand and upper extremity function is instrumental to basic activities of daily living and level of independence in cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Nerve transfer surgery is a novel and alternate approach for restoring function in SCI. This article discusses the biologic basis of nerve transfers in SCI, patient evaluation, management, and surgical approaches. Although the application of this technique is not new; recent case reports and case series in the literature have increased interest in this field. The challenges are to improve function, achieve maximal gains in function, avoid complications, and to primum non nocere.

  11. Recombinant hNeuritin Promotes Structural and Functional Recovery of Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haiyan; Li, Xinli; Shan, Liya; Zhu, Jingling; Chen, Rong; Li, Yuan; Yuan, Wumei; Yang, Lei; Huang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Neuritin is a new neurotropic factor implicated in nervous system development and plasticity. Studies have shown that Neuritin is upregulated in injured nerves, suggesting that it is involved in nerve repair. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether recombinant human Neuritin could restore nerve structure and function in a rat model of sciatic nerve injury. Neuritin treatment had a dose-dependent effect on functional recovery 4 weeks after injury, as determined by the walking-track test. Similar trends were observed for gastrocnemius muscular strength and nerve conduction velocity. Additionally, sciatic nerve fiber density and organization as well as degree of remyelination were increased, while growth-associated protein 43 and neurofilament 200 expression was upregulated upon treatment with Neuritin. These findings demonstrate that Neuritin stimulates nerve regeneration and functional recovery and thus promotes the repair of injured sciatic nerves. PMID:28066172

  12. The snapping medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve.

    PubMed

    Cesmebasi, Alper; O'driscoll, Shawn W; Smith, Jay; Skinner, John A; Spinner, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    Snapping elbow is a well-known condition where elbow flexion and extension elicits a painful, popping sensation. The most frequent etiology is anterior dislocation of the ulnar nerve over the medial epicondyle. Four patients (3 females and 1 male) presented with complaints of a popping sensation in the elbow, pain over the medial aspect of the forearm, and ulnar neuritis. All patients underwent preoperative dynamic ultrasound and surgical exploration of the medial elbow. Intraoperatively, snapping of the MABC over the medial epicondyle was discovered in all four patients. In three patients, there was abnormal displacement of the medial triceps and ulnar nerve: in two of these, both structures dislocated over the medial epicondyle and in one patient both structures subluxated. In each case, the MABC was decompressed (n = 1) and transposed (n = 3), and in three cases, the medial triceps and ulnar nerve were addressed as well. Symptomatic improvement was achieved in all cases. Retrospective review of the ultrasound revealed the snapping MABC, though it was less effective prospectively in the cases when snapping MABC was not suspected. In conclusion, snapping of the MABC broadens the spectrum of disorders that results in snapping elbow. To our knowledge, we are unaware of prior reports of this entity.

  13. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  14. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Low serum magnesium levels are associated with impaired peripheral nerve function in type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chen; Zhao, Weijing; Zhang, Yinan; Li, Lu; Lu, Jingyi; Jiang, Lan; Wang, Congrong; Jia, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between serum magnesium and peripheral nerve function in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). A total of 978 T2DM patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into tertiles according to serum magnesium concentration (low tertile: ≤0.85 mmol/L; medium tertile: 0.85 to 0.92 mmol/L; and high tertile: >0.92 mmol/L). All participants underwent nerve conduction (NC) studies. Composite z scores of conduction velocity, latency, and amplitude were constructed, respectively. The serum magnesium levels were significantly lower in patients with abnormal NC than in those with normal NC (0.87 [0.82, 0.92] vs. 0.88 [0.83, 0.93] mmol/L, P = 0.048). The composite z score of amplitude significantly increased with increasing tertiles of magnesium (−0.60 ± 0.02 vs. −0.57 ± 0.02 vs. −0.48 ± 0.03, P for trend = 0.001). After adjusting for all potential confounders, lower serum magnesium levels were still associated with lower composite z score of amplitude (β = 0.095, P = 0.014). In patients with T2DM, lower serum magnesium levels were significantly associated with lower composite z score of amplitude, indicating magnesium might affect peripheral nerve function through axonal degeneration. PMID:27601013

  16. Exploring vocal recovery after cranial nerve injury in Bengalese finches.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Catherine M; Peterson, Jennifer R; Cooper, Brenton G

    2013-02-08

    Songbirds and humans use auditory feedback to acquire and maintain their vocalizations. The Bengalese finch (Lonchura striata domestica) is a songbird species that rapidly modifies its vocal output to adhere to an internal song memory. In this species, the left side of the bipartite vocal organ is specialized for producing louder, higher frequencies (≥2.2kHz) and denervation of the left vocal muscles eliminates these notes. Thus, the return of higher frequency notes after cranial nerve injury can be used as a measure of vocal recovery. Either the left or right side of the syrinx was denervated by resection of the tracheosyringeal portion of the hypoglossal nerve. Histologic analyses of syringeal muscle tissue showed significant muscle atrophy in the denervated side. After left nerve resection, songs were mainly composed of lower frequency syllables, but three out of five birds recovered higher frequency syllables. Right nerve resection minimally affected phonology, but it did change song syntax; syllable sequence became abnormally stereotyped after right nerve resection. Therefore, damage to the neuromuscular control of sound production resulted in reduced motor variability, and Bengalese finches are a potential model for functional vocal recovery following cranial nerve injury.

  17. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    MedlinePlus

    ... and toxins. Some cranial nerve disorders interfere with eye movement. Eye movement is controlled by 3 pairs of muscles. These ... be able to move their eyes normally. How eye movement is affected depends on which nerve is affected. ...

  18. Nerve Injuries of the Upper Extremity

    MedlinePlus

    ... of individual nerve fibers and surrounding outer sheath (“insulation”) Figure 2: Nerve repair with realignment of bundles © ... of individual nerve fibers and surrounding outer sheath insulation Figure 2 - Nerve repair with realignment of bundles ...

  19. Involvement of Peripheral Nerves in the Transgenic PLP-α-Syn Model of Multiple System Atrophy: Extending the Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kuzdas-Wood, Daniela; Irschick, Regina; Theurl, Markus; Malsch, Philipp; Mair, Norbert; Mantinger, Christine; Wanschitz, Julia; Klimaschewski, Lars; Poewe, Werner; Stefanova, Nadia; Wenning, Gregor K.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a fatal, rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disease with (oligodendro-)glial cytoplasmic α-synuclein (α-syn) inclusions (GCIs). Peripheral neuropathies have been reported in up to 40% of MSA patients, the cause remaining unclear. In a transgenic MSA mouse model featuring GCI-like inclusion pathology based on PLP-promoter driven overexpression of human α-syn in oligodendroglia motor and non-motor deficits are associated with MSA-like neurodegeneration. Since α-syn is also expressed in Schwann cells we aimed to investigate whether peripheral nerves are anatomically and functionally affected in the PLP-α-syn MSA mouse model. Results To this end, heat/cold as well as mechanical sensitivity tests were performed. Furthermore, in vivo and ex vivo nerve conduction and the G-ratios of the sciatic nerve were analyzed, and thermosensitive ion channel mRNA expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was assessed. The presence of human α-syn in Schwann cells was associated with subtle behavioral impairments. The G-ratio of the sciatic nerve, the conduction velocity of myelinated and unmyelinated primary afferents and the expression of thermosensitive ion channels in the sensory neurons, however, were similar to wildtype mice. Conclusion Our results suggest that the PNS appears to be affected by Schwann cell α-syn deposits in the PLP-α-syn MSA mouse model. However, there was no consistent evidence for functional PNS perturbations resulting from such α-syn aggregates suggesting a more central cause of the observed behavioral abnormalities. Nonetheless, our results do not exclude a causal role of α-syn in the pathogenesis of MSA associated peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26496712

  20. Laminin-modified and aligned PHBV/PEO nanofibrous nerve conduits promote peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Hai-Xia; Ortiz, Lazarus Santiago; Xiao, Zhong-Dang; Huang, Ning-Ping

    2016-11-12

    Poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) has received much attention for its biodegradability and biocompatibility, characteristics which are required in tissue engineering. In this study, polyethylene oxide (PEO)-incorporated PHBV nanofibers with random or aligned orientation were obtained by electrospinning. For further use in vivo, the nanofiber films were made into nerve conduits after treated with NH3 plasma, which could improve the hydrophilicity of inner surfaces of nerve conduits and then facilitate laminin adsorption via electrostatic interaction for promoting cell adhesion and proliferation. Morphology of the surfaces of modified PHBV/PEO nanofibrous scaffolds were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Schwann cell viability assay was conducted and the results confirmed that the functionalized nanofibers were favorable for cell growth. Morphology of Schwann cells cultured on scaffolds showed that aligned nanofibrous scaffolds provided topographical guidance for cell orientation and elongation. Furthermore, 3D PHBV/PEO nerve conduits made from aligned and random-oriented nanofibers were implanted into 12-mm transected sciatic nerve rat model and subsequent analysis were conducted at 1 and 2 months post-surgery. The above functionalized PHBV/PEO scaffolds provide a novel and promising platform for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  1. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  2. Towards a thermodynamic theory of nerve pulse propagation.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Søren S L; Jackson, Andrew D; Heimburg, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    Nerve membranes consist of an approximately equal mixture of lipids and proteins. The propagation of nerve pulses is usually described with the ionic hypothesis, also known as the Hodgkin-Huxley model. This model assumes that proteins alone enable nerves to conduct signals due to the ability of various ion channel proteins to transport selectively sodium and potassium ions. While the ionic hypothesis describes electrical aspects of the action potential, it does not provide a theoretical framework for understanding other experimentally observed phenomena associated with nerve pulse propagation. This fact has led to a revised view of the action potential based on the laws of thermodynamics and the assumption that membrane lipids play a fundamental role in the propagation of nerve pulses. In general terms, we describe how pulses propagating in nerve membranes resemble propagating sound waves. We explain how the language of thermodynamics enables us to account for a number of phenomena not addressed by the ionic hypothesis. These include a thermodynamic explanation of the effect of anesthetics, the induction of action potentials by local nerve cooling, the physical expansion of nerves during pulse propagation, reversible heat production and the absence of net heat release during the action potential. We describe how these measurable features of a propagating nerve pulse, as well as the observed voltage change that accompanies an action potential, represent different aspects of a single phenomenon that can be predicted and explained by thermodynamics. We suggest that the proteins and lipids of the nerve membrane naturally constitute a single ensemble with thermodynamic properties appropriate for the description of a broad range of phenomena associated with a propagating nerve pulse.

  3. Altered protein phosphorylation in sciatic nerve from rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Schrama, L.H.; Berti-Mattera, L.N.; Eichberg, J.

    1987-11-01

    The effect of experimental diabetes on the phosphorylation of proteins in the rat sciatic nerve was studied. Nerves from animals made diabetic with streptozocin were incubated in vitro with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate and divided into segments from the proximal to the distal end, and proteins from each segment were then separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The principal labeled species were the major myelin proteins, P0, and the basic proteins. After 6 wk of diabetes, the incorporation of isotope into these proteins rose as a function of distance along the nerve in a proximal to distal direction and was significantly higher at the distal end compared with incorporation into nerves from age-matched controls. The overall level of isotope uptake was similar in nerves from diabetic animals and weight-matched controls. The distribution of /sup 32/P among proteins also differed in diabetic nerve compared with both control groups in that P0 and the small basic protein accounted for a greater proportion of total label incorporated along the entire length of nerve. In contrast to intact nerve, there was no significant difference in protein phosphorylation when homogenates from normal and diabetic nerve were incubated with (/sup 32/P)-gamma-ATP. The results suggest that abnormal protein phosphorylation, particularly of myelin proteins, is a feature of experimental diabetic neuropathy and that the changes are most pronounced in the distal portion of the nerve.

  4. Electrophysiologic nerve stimulation for identifying the recurrent laryngeal nerve in thyroid surgery: review of 70 consecutive thyroid surgeries.

    PubMed

    Echeverri, A; Flexon, P B

    1998-04-01

    To describe a simple technique for identifying the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) with a nerve stimulator to prevent damage to the nerve during thyroid surgery. A retrospective review of 70 thyroidectomies performed from October 1989 to January 1995 by one surgeon using electrophysiologic nerve stimulation to identify the RLN was conducted. The technique is described. Outpatient flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopy was performed preoperatively and postoperatively in all patients. From 70 thyroidectomies, 80 RLNs were identified to be at risk for injury. Five patients had transient unilateral vocal cord paresis postoperatively. No RLN transection or permanent vocal cord paralysis occurred. This is the first large series of patients undergoing the use of electrophysiologic nerve stimulation for identifying the RLN during thyroid surgery. We found the technique to be useful and safe for identifying the RLN. We present this technique as a less costly and time-consuming alternative to intraoperative RLN monitoring.

  5. Nerve guidance conduits from aligned nanofibers: improvement of nerve regeneration through longitudinal nanogrooves on a fiber surface.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen; Ouyang, Yuanming; Niu, Haitao; He, Nanfei; Ke, Qinfei; Jin, Xiangyu; Li, Dawei; Fang, Jun; Liu, Wanjun; Fan, Cunyi; Lin, Tong

    2015-04-08

    A novel fibrous conduit consisting of well-aligned nanofibers with longitudinal nanogrooves on the fiber surface was prepared by electrospinning and was subjected to an in vivo nerve regeneration study on rats using a sciatic nerve injury model. For comparison, a fibrous conduit having a similar fiber alignment structure without surface groove and an autograft were also conducted in the same test. The electrophysiological, walking track, gastrocnemius muscle, triple-immunofluorescence, and immunohistological analyses indicated that grooved fibers effectively improved sciatic nerve regeneration. This is mainly attributed to the highly ordered secondary structure formed by surface grooves and an increase in the specific surface area. Fibrous conduits made of longitudinally aligned nanofibers with longitudinal nanogrooves on the fiber surface may offer a new nerve guidance conduit for peripheral nerve repair and regeneration.

  6. Simultaneous degeneration of myenteric plexuses and pelvic parasympathetic colonic nerve in slow transit constipation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Kun; Bi, Dongsong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Slow transit constipation (STC) is a common disease of which the etiology is still not clear. Multiple hypotheses have been proposed to explain STC, including autonomic neuropathy, disorders of the enteric nervous system and so forth. Morphological abnormalities of the enteric nerves of the colon in patients with STC have been extensively reported, while there have been no morphological reports focusing on extrinsic extramural fibers from the pelvic plexus to the distal colon (i.e., pelvic parasympathetic colonic nerve) in patients with STC. Patient concerns: Whether morphological changes of pelvic parasympathetic colonic nerve coexist with abnormalities of the enteric nerves of the colon in the patient with STC. Diagnosis: Slow transit constipation (STC). Interventions: The patient with STC underwent a partial colectomy (sigmoid colon and partial descending colon). The fibers of the myenteric plexuses within the removed colon and the myelinated fibers of the pelvic parasympathetic colonic nerve were observed under optical and electron-microscope. Outcomes: The fibers of the myenteric plexuses showed vacuolated degeneration between the muscularis propria layer under optical microscope. Myelinated fibers of the pelvic parasympathetic colonic nerve showed obvious vacuolated degeneration under electron-microscopic examination. Lessons: Such a simultaneous neuropathy in both myenteric plexuses and extrinsic extramural nerves has not been documented previously. Our finding supports the notion that neuropathy remains the most plausible explanation for STC, in which nerve dysfunction might occur by way of a degenerative process. PMID:28296784

  7. Epilepsy and chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many chromosomal abnormalities are associated with Central Nervous System (CNS) malformations and other neurological alterations, among which seizures and epilepsy. Some of these show a peculiar epileptic and EEG pattern. We describe some epileptic syndromes frequently reported in chromosomal disorders. Methods Detailed clinical assessment, electrophysiological studies, survey of the literature. Results In some of these congenital syndromes the clinical presentation and EEG anomalies seems to be quite typical, in others the manifestations appear aspecific and no strictly linked with the chromosomal imbalance. The onset of seizures is often during the neonatal period of the infancy. Conclusions A better characterization of the electro clinical patterns associated with specific chromosomal aberrations could give us a valuable key in the identification of epilepsy susceptibility of some chromosomal loci, using the new advances in molecular cytogenetics techniques - such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), subtelomeric analysis and CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) microarray. However further studies are needed to understand the mechanism of epilepsy associated with chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:20438626

  8. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read More Abscess Diabetes Mononeuropathy Multiple mononeuropathy Myelin Peripheral neuropathy Polyarteritis nodosa Systemic Tumor Review Date 1/5/ ... Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Leg Injuries and Disorders Peripheral Nerve Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  9. Nerves and Tissue Repair.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    axolotl limbs are transected the concentration of transferrin in the distal limb tissue declines rapidly and limb regeneration stops. These results...transferrin binding and expression of the transferrin gene in cells of axolotl peripheral nerve indicate that both uptake and synthesis of this factor occur

  10. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  11. A variant of multifocal motor neuropathy with acute, generalised presentation and persistent conduction blocks

    PubMed Central

    Lefaucheur, J; Gregson, N; Gray, I; von Raison, F; Bertocchi, M; Creange, A

    2003-01-01

    Objective:Multifocal motor neuropathy with persistent conduction blocks is classically described as a chronic neuropathy with progressive onset, and acute forms have not previously been characterised. We report four cases of severe motor impairment with acute and generalised onset and with persistent motor conduction blocks. Patients and results:An acute tetraparesis with diffuse areflexia but little or no sensory disturbance was the clinical picture. Serial electrophysiological tests showed persistent multifocal motor conduction blocks with absent F waves in most tested motor nerves. No or minor abnormalities of the sensory nerve action potentials were observed. Cerebrospinal fluid contained normal or mildly increased protein levels (<1 g/l) without cells. Campylobacter jejuni serology was negative in three patients and consistent with past infection in one patient. Anti-ganglioside antibodies were positive in three patients. A five day course of intravenous immunoglobulins produced nearly complete symptom resolution in three patients and was ineffective in one patient. Conclusion:Because of the persistence of multifocal motor conduction blocks for several weeks or months as the isolated electrophysiological feature, these cases could not be consistent with Guillain–Barré syndrome or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. They suggest an original variant of multifocal motor neuropathy with an acute and generalised initial presentation and persistent motor conduction blocks affecting all four limbs. PMID:14617715

  12. Recurrent largngeal nerve paralysis: a laryngographic and computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Agha, F.P.

    1983-07-01

    Vocal cord paralysis is a relatively common entity, usually resulting from a pathologic process of the vagus nerve or its recurrent larynegeal branch. It is rarely caused by intralargngeal lesions. Four teen patients with recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis (RLNP) were evaluated by laryngography, computed tomography (CT), or both. In the evaluation of the paramedian cord, CT was limited in its ability to differentiate between tumor or RLNP as the cause of the fixed cord, but it yielded more information than laryngography on the structural abnormalities of the larynx and pre-epiglottic and paralaryngeal spaces. Laryngography revealed distinct features of RLNP and is the procedure of choice for evaluation of functional abnormalities of the larynx until further experience with faster CT scanners and dynamic scanning of the larynx is gained.

  13. Focused ultrasound effects on nerve action potential in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, Vincent; Strichartz, Gary; Jolesz, Ferenc; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-01-01

    Minimally invasive applications of thermal and mechanical energy to selective areas of the human anatomy have led to significant advances in treatment of and recovery from typical surgical interventions. Image-guided focused ultrasound allows energy to be deposited deep into the tissue, completely noninvasively. There has long been interest in using this focal energy delivery to block nerve conduction for pain control and local anesthesia. In this study, we have performed an in vitro study to further extend our knowledge of this potential clinical application. The sciatic nerves from the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) were subjected to focused ultrasound (at frequencies of 0.661MHz and 1.986MHz) and to heated Ringer’s solution. The nerve action potential was shown to decrease in the experiments and correlated with temperature elevation measured in the nerve. The action potential recovered either completely, partially, or not at all, depending on the parameters of the ultrasound exposure. The reduction of the baseline nerve temperature by circulating cooling fluid through the sonication chamber did not prevent the collapse of the nerve action potential; but higher power was required to induce the same endpoint as without cooling. These results indicate that a thermal mechanism of focused ultrasound can be used to block nerve conduction, either temporarily or permanently. PMID:19647923

  14. Sciatic nerve repair with tissue engineered nerve: Olfactory ensheathing cells seeded poly(lactic-co-glygolic acid) conduit in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, C W; Ng, M H; Ohnmar, H; Lokanathan, Y; Nur-Hidayah, H; Roohi, S A; Ruszymah, BHI; Nor-Hazla, M H; Shalimar, A; Naicker, A S

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim: Synthetic nerve conduits have been sought for repair of nerve defects as the autologous nerve grafts causes donor site morbidity and possess other drawbacks. Many strategies have been investigated to improve nerve regeneration through synthetic nerve guided conduits. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) that share both Schwann cell and astrocytic characteristics have been shown to promote axonal regeneration after transplantation. The present study was driven by the hypothesis that tissue-engineered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) seeded with OECs would improve peripheral nerve regeneration in a long sciatic nerve defect. Materials and Methods: Sciatic nerve gap of 15 mm was created in six adult female Sprague-Dawley rats and implanted with PLGA seeded with OECs. The nerve regeneration was assessed electrophysiologically at 2, 4 and 6 weeks following implantation. Histopathological examination, scanning electron microscopic (SEM) examination and immunohistochemical analysis were performed at the end of the study. Results: Nerve conduction studies revealed a significant improvement of nerve conduction velocities whereby the mean nerve conduction velocity increases from 4.2 ΁ 0.4 m/s at week 2 to 27.3 ΁ 5.7 m/s at week 6 post-implantation (P < 0.0001). Histological analysis revealed presence of spindle-shaped cells. Immunohistochemical analysis further demonstrated the expression of S100 protein in both cell nucleus and the cytoplasm in these cells, hence confirming their Schwann-cell-like property. Under SEM, these cells were found to be actively secreting extracellular matrix. Conclusion: Tissue-engineered PLGA conduit seeded with OECs provided a permissive environment to facilitate nerve regeneration in a small animal model. PMID:24379458

  15. Skeletal abnormalities in homocystinuria.

    PubMed Central

    Brenton, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The skeletal changes of thirty-four patients with the biochemical and clinical features of cystathionine synthase deficiency are described. It is emphasized that there is clinical evidence of excessive bone growth and the formation for bone which is structurally weaker than normal. The similarities and differences between this condition and Marfan's syndrome are stressed and the possible nature of the connective tissue defect leading to the skeletal changes discussed. The most characteristic skeletal changes in homocystinuria are the skeletal disproportion (pubis-heel length greater than crown-pubis length), the abnormal vertebrae, sternal deformities, genu valgum and large metaphyses and epiphyses. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:917963

  16. Eye movement abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Generation and control of eye movements requires the participation of the cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and brainstem. The signals of this complex neural network finally converge on the ocular motoneurons of the brainstem. Infarct or hemorrhage at any level of the oculomotor system (though more frequent in the brain-stem) may give rise to a broad spectrum of eye movement abnormalities (EMAs). Consequently, neurologists and particularly stroke neurologists are routinely confronted with EMAs, some of which may be overlooked in the acute stroke setting and others that, when recognized, may have a high localizing value. The most complex EMAs are due to midbrain stroke. Horizontal gaze disorders, some of them manifesting unusual patterns, may occur in pontine stroke. Distinct varieties of nystagmus occur in cerebellar and medullary stroke. This review summarizes the most representative EMAs from the supratentorial level to the brainstem.

  17. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNSTs ) are aggressive malignancies that arise within peripheral nerves. These tumors occur with increased...and abnormal expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We previously found that MPNSTs express increased levels of the CD44 family...kinase activity (and not increased Ras-GTP) contributes to MPNST cell invasion. We further find that EGFR contributes at least part of the elevated Src

  18. Sensory nerves in lung and airways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lu-Yuan; Yu, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Sensory nerves innervating the lung and airways play an important role in regulating various cardiopulmonary functions and maintaining homeostasis under both healthy and disease conditions. Their activities conducted by both vagal and sympathetic afferents are also responsible for eliciting important defense reflexes that protect the lung and body from potential health-hazardous effects of airborne particulates and chemical irritants. This article reviews the morphology, transduction properties, reflex functions, and respiratory sensations of these receptors, focusing primarily on recent findings derived from using new technologies such as neural immunochemistry, isolated airway-nerve preparation, cultured airway neurons, patch-clamp electrophysiology, transgenic mice, and other cellular and molecular approaches. Studies of the signal transduction of mechanosensitive afferents have revealed a new concept of sensory unit and cellular mechanism of activation, and identified additional types of sensory receptors in the lung. Chemosensitive properties of these lung afferents are further characterized by the expression of specific ligand-gated ion channels on nerve terminals, ganglion origin, and responses to the action of various inflammatory cells, mediators, and cytokines during acute and chronic airway inflammation and injuries. Increasing interest and extensive investigations have been focused on uncovering the mechanisms underlying hypersensitivity of these airway afferents, and their role in the manifestation of various symptoms under pathophysiological conditions. Several important and challenging questions regarding these sensory nerves are discussed. Searching for these answers will be a critical step in developing the translational research and effective treatments of airway diseases.

  19. Nerve root replantation.

    PubMed

    Carlstedt, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic avulsion of nerve roots from the spinal cord is a devastating event that usually occurs in the brachial plexus of young adults following motor vehicle or sports accidents or in newborn children during difficult childbirth. A strategy to restore motor function in the affected arm by reimplanting into the spinal cord the avulsed ventral roots or autologous nerve grafts connected distally to the avulsed roots has been developed. Surgical outcome is good and useful recovery in shoulder and proximal arm muscles occurs. Pain is alleviated with motor recovery but sensory improvement is poor when only motor conduits have been reconstructed. In experimental studies, restoration of sensory connections with general improvement in the outcome from this surgery is pursued.

  20. Abnormal retinal development associated with FRMD7 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Mervyn G.; Crosier, Moira; Lindsay, Susan; Kumar, Anil; Araki, Masasuke; Leroy, Bart P.; McLean, Rebecca J.; Sheth, Viral; Maconachie, Gail; Thomas, Shery; Moore, Anthony T.; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic infantile nystagmus (IIN) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, often associated with FRMD7 mutations. As the appearance of the retina is reported to be normal based on conventional fundus photography, IIN is postulated to arise from abnormal cortical development. To determine whether the afferent visual system is involved in FRMD7 mutations, we performed in situ hybridization studies in human embryonic and fetal stages (35 days post-ovulation to 9 weeks post-conception). We show a dynamic retinal expression pattern of FRMD7 during development. We observe expression within the outer neuroblastic layer, then in the inner neuroblastic layer and at 9 weeks post-conception a bilaminar expression pattern. Expression was also noted within the developing optic stalk and optic disk. We identified a large cohort of IIN patients (n = 100), and performed sequence analysis which revealed 45 patients with FRMD7 mutations. Patients with FRMD7 mutations underwent detailed retinal imaging studies using ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography. The tomograms were compared with a control cohort (n = 60). The foveal pit was significantly shallower in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). The optic nerve head morphology was abnormal with significantly decreased optic disk area, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, cup area and cup depth in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). This study shows for the first time that abnormal afferent system development is associated with FRMD7 mutations and could be an important etiological factor in the development of nystagmus. PMID:24688117

  1. Abnormal retinal development associated with FRMD7 mutations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mervyn G; Crosier, Moira; Lindsay, Susan; Kumar, Anil; Araki, Masasuke; Leroy, Bart P; McLean, Rebecca J; Sheth, Viral; Maconachie, Gail; Thomas, Shery; Moore, Anthony T; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-08-01

    Idiopathic infantile nystagmus (IIN) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, often associated with FRMD7 mutations. As the appearance of the retina is reported to be normal based on conventional fundus photography, IIN is postulated to arise from abnormal cortical development. To determine whether the afferent visual system is involved in FRMD7 mutations, we performed in situ hybridization studies in human embryonic and fetal stages (35 days post-ovulation to 9 weeks post-conception). We show a dynamic retinal expression pattern of FRMD7 during development. We observe expression within the outer neuroblastic layer, then in the inner neuroblastic layer and at 9 weeks post-conception a bilaminar expression pattern. Expression was also noted within the developing optic stalk and optic disk. We identified a large cohort of IIN patients (n = 100), and performed sequence analysis which revealed 45 patients with FRMD7 mutations. Patients with FRMD7 mutations underwent detailed retinal imaging studies using ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography. The tomograms were compared with a control cohort (n = 60). The foveal pit was significantly shallower in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). The optic nerve head morphology was abnormal with significantly decreased optic disk area, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, cup area and cup depth in FRMD7 patients (P < 0.0001). This study shows for the first time that abnormal afferent system development is associated with FRMD7 mutations and could be an important etiological factor in the development of nystagmus.

  2. Characterization of high capacitance electrodes for the application of direct current electrical nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Vrabec, Tina; Bhadra, Niloy; Wainright, Jesse; Bhadra, Narendra; Franke, Manfred; Kilgore, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Direct current (DC) can briefly produce a reversible nerve conduction block in acute experiments. However, irreversible reactions at the electrode–tissue interface have prevented its use in both acute and chronic settings. A high capacitance material (platinum black) using a charge-balanced waveform was evaluated to determine whether brief DC block (13 s) could be achieved repeatedly (>100 cycles) without causing acute irreversible reduction in nerve conduction. Electrochemical techniques were used to characterize the electrodes to determine appropriate waveform parameters. In vivo experiments on DC motor conduction block of the rat sciatic nerve were performed to characterize the acute neural response to this novel nerve block system. Complete nerve motor conduction block of the rat sciatic nerve was possible in all experiments, with the block threshold ranging from −0.15 to −3.0 mA. DC pulses were applied for 100 cycles with no nerve conduction reduction in four of the six platinum black electrodes tested. However, two of the six electrodes exhibited irreversible conduction degradation despite charge delivery that was within the initial Q (capacitance) value of the electrode. Degradation of material properties occurred in all experiments, pointing to a possible cause of the reduction in nerve conduction in some platinum black experiments. PMID:26358242

  3. Characterization of high capacitance electrodes for the application of direct current electrical nerve block.

    PubMed

    Vrabec, Tina; Bhadra, Niloy; Wainright, Jesse; Bhadra, Narendra; Franke, Manfred; Kilgore, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Direct current (DC) can briefly produce a reversible nerve conduction block in acute experiments. However, irreversible reactions at the electrode-tissue interface have prevented its use in both acute and chronic settings. A high capacitance material (platinum black) using a charge-balanced waveform was evaluated to determine whether brief DC block (13 s) could be achieved repeatedly (>100 cycles) without causing acute irreversible reduction in nerve conduction. Electrochemical techniques were used to characterize the electrodes to determine appropriate waveform parameters. In vivo experiments on DC motor conduction block of the rat sciatic nerve were performed to characterize the acute neural response to this novel nerve block system. Complete nerve motor conduction block of the rat sciatic nerve was possible in all experiments, with the block threshold ranging from -0.15 to -3.0 mA. DC pulses were applied for 100 cycles with no nerve conduction reduction in four of the six platinum black electrodes tested. However, two of the six electrodes exhibited irreversible conduction degradation despite charge delivery that was within the initial Q (capacitance) value of the electrode. Degradation of material properties occurred in all experiments, pointing to a possible cause of the reduction in nerve conduction in some platinum black experiments .

  4. Variations of Cords of Brachial Plexus and Branching Pattern of Nerves Emanating From Them.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajani

    2017-03-01

    Brachial plexus is complex network of nerves, formed by joining and splitting of ventral rami of spinal nerves C5, C6, C7, C8, and T1 forming trunks, divisions, and cords. The nerves emerging from trunks and cords innervate the upper limb and to some extent pectoral region. Scanty literature describes the variations in the formation of cords and nerves emanating from them. Moreover, the variations of cords of brachial plexus and nerves emanating from them have iatrogenic implications in the upper limb and pectoral region. Hence study has been carried out. Twenty-eight upper limbs and posterior triangles from 14 cadavers fixed in formalin were dissected and rare and new variations of cords were observed. Most common variation consisted of formation of posterior cord by fusion of posterior division of upper and middle trunk and lower trunk continued as medial cord followed by originating of 2 pectoral nerves from anterior divisions of upper and middle trunk. Other variations include anterior division of upper trunk continued as lateral cord and pierced the coracobrachialis, upper and middle trunk fused to form common cord which divided into lateral and posterior cords, upper trunk gave suprascapular nerve and abnormal lateral pectoral nerve and formation of median nerve by 3 roots. These variations were analyzed for diagnostic and clinical significance making the study relevant for surgeons, radiologists in arresting failure patients and anatomists academically in medical education.

  5. The "vagal ansa": a source of complication in vagus nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Chittur Viswanathan; Kestle, John R W; Connolly, Mary B

    2015-05-01

    A 16-year-old boy underwent vagus nerve stimulation for treatment-resistant multifocal epilepsy. During intraoperative system diagnostics, vigorous contraction of the ipsilateral sternomastoid muscle was observed. On re-exploration, a thin nerve fiber passing from the vagus to the sternomastoid was found hooked up in the upper electrode. Detailed inspection revealed an abnormal course of the superior root of the ansa cervicalis, which descended down as a single nerve trunk with the vagus and separated to join the inferior root. The authors discuss the variation in the course of the ansa cervicalis and how this could be a reason for postoperative neck muscle contractions.

  6. Choline Acetyltransferase Activity in Striatum of Neonatal Rats Increased by Nerve Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, William C.; Rutkowski, J. Lynn; Tennekoon, Gihan I.; Buchanan, Karen; Johnston, Michael V.

    1985-07-01

    Some neurodegenerative disorders may be caused by abnormal synthesis or utilization of trophic molecules required to support neuronal survival. A test of this hypothesis requires that trophic agents specific for the affected neurons be identified. Cholinergic neurons in the corpus striatum of neonatal rats were found to respond to intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor with prominent, dose-dependent, selective increases in choline acetyltransferase activity. Cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain also respond to nerve growth factor in this way. These actions of nerve growth factor may indicate its involvement in the normal function of forebrain cholinergic neurons as well as in neurodegenerative disorders involving such cells.

  7. In vivo impedance measurements on nerves and surrounding skeletal muscles in rats and human body.

    PubMed

    Prokhorov, E; Llamas, F; Morales-Sánchez, E; González-Hernández, J; Prokhorov, A

    2002-05-01

    The aim of the work was to use impedance measurements to find the location of nerves under the human skin. In vivo impedance measurements were performed on exposed nervous and muscular tissues of rats. Similarly, the impedance measurements were also performed on the skin of six men, over the median nerve at the wrist, as well as 4-5 mm away from this location. Results obtained with rats have shown that the relative permittivity and conductivity of nerves are larger (by almost two orders of magnitude) than those observed for the muscular tissues surrounding the nerve. The results obtained on human skin in the frequency range of 20-200 kHz, when the electrodes were placed over the nerve, show lower resistance and higher capacitance than in the other areas measured. These preliminary results indicate that it may be possible to use impedance measurements to find the location of exposed nerves and also nerves under the skin.

  8. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Robert; Dailey, Travis; Duncan, Kelsey; Abel, Naomi; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27983642

  9. Nerve regeneration in nerve grafts conditioned by vibration exposure.

    PubMed

    Bergman, S; Widerberg, A; Danielsen, N; Lundborg, G; Dahlin, L B

    1995-01-01

    Regeneration distances were studied in nerves from vibration-exposed limbs. One hind limb of anaesthetized rats was attached to a vibration exciter and exposed to vibration (80 Hz/32 m/s2) for 5 h/day for 2 or 5 days. Seven days after the latest vibration period a 10-mm long nerve graft was taken from the vibrated sciatic nerve and sutured into a corresponding defect in the con-tralateral sciatic nerve and vice versa, thereby creating two different models within the same animal: (i) regeneration from a freshly transected unvibrated nerve into a vibrated graft and (ii) regeneration from a vibrated nerve into a fresh nerve graft (vibrated recipient side). Four, 6 or 8 days postoperatively (p.o.) the distances achieved by the regenerating axons were determined using the pinch reflex test. Two days of vibration did not influence the regeneration, but 5 days of vibration reduced the initial delay period and a slight reduction of regeneration rate was observed. After 5 days of vibration an increased regeneration distance was observed in both models at day 4 p.o. and at day 6 p.o. in vibrated grafts. This study demonstrates that vibration can condition peripheral nerves and this may be caused by local changes in the peripheral nerve trunk and in the neuron itself.

  10. Restudy of malformations of the internal auditory meatus, cochlear nerve canal and cochlear nerve.

    PubMed

    Li, Youjin; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jinfen; Wu, Hao

    2015-07-01

    The present study aims to restudy the correlation between the internal auditory meatus (IAM), the cochlear nerve canal (CNC), the cochlear nerve (CN) and inner ear malformations. In this retrospective study design, the abnormal diameter of the IAM, CNC and CN in patients with any kind of inner ear malformations was evaluated using multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) (37 patients) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (18 patients). Of 37 MSCT-diagnosed patients, 2 had IAM atresia, 11 IAM stenosis, 22 enlarged IAM, and 2 normal IAM with an abnormal CN. MRI diagnoses of 18 patients revealed 8 cases of aplastic CN, 6 hypoplastic CN, and 4 normal CN. CNC stenosis was associated with CN hypoplasia (P < 0.001). Patients with absent or stenotic IAM had less CN development than those with normal or enlarged IAM (P = 0.001). We propose a modification of the existing classification systems with a view to distinguishing malformations of the IAM, CNC and CN.

  11. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed. PMID:25851889

  12. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  13. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  14. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases. PMID:19554648

  15. Nerve blocks for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Salim M; Shah, Atit

    2014-10-01

    Nerve blocks are often performed as therapeutic or palliative interventions for pain relief. However, they are often performed for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. When considering nerve blocks for chronic pain, clinicians must always consider the indications, risks, benefits, and proper technique. Nerve blocks encompass a wide variety of interventional procedures. The most common nerve blocks for chronic pain and that may be applicable to the neurosurgical patient population are reviewed in this article. This article is an introduction and brief synopsis of the different available blocks that can be offered to a patient.

  16. Nerves on magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J. D.; Shaver, M. L.; Batra, P.; Brown, K.

    1989-01-01

    Nerves are often visualized on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the soft tissues on the chest and shoulder girdle. To learn the reasons for the contrast between the nerves and adjacent tissues, the authors obtained a fresh specimen containing part of the brachial plexus nerves from the left axilla and compared MRI with x-ray projections and photomicrographs of histologic sections. The results suggest that the high signals from the nerves stand out in contrast to the low signals from their rich vascular supply. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6A Figure 6B Figure 7 PMID:2733051

  17. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    PubMed

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  18. Magnetoneurography: theory and application to peripheral nerve disorders.

    PubMed

    Mackert, Bruno-Marcel

    2004-12-01

    Magnetoneurography (MNG) is a non-invasive method to trace and visualize three-dimensionally the propagation path of compound action currents (CAC) along peripheral nerves. The basic physical and physiological principle is the mapping of extremely weak magnetic fields generated by the intraaxonal longitudinal ion flows of evoked nerval CAC using SQUID sensors (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices). During recent years, MNG protocols have been established which allow for a non-invasive spatiotemporal tracing of impulse propagation along peripheral nerves in humans and in particular along proximal nerve segments in a clinical setting. Thereby, the three-dimensional path, the local nerve conduction velocity, the length and strength of the CAC de- and repolarization phase have been reconstructed. First recordings in patients demonstrated that the method is sensitive enough to detect and to localize nerve conduction anomalities along nerve roots, as, e.g. caused by lumbosacral disc herniation. This review on MNG will focus on those studies which provide data from humans and thereby reveal perspectives for its future clinical applications.

  19. Ulnar nerve entrapment neuropathy in the forearm.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, R N; Mark, M H; Patel, M R; Wiener, L M

    1984-07-01

    A 74-year-old male attorney developed rapidly progressive weakness of the fourth and fifth digits of the right hand with impairment of his grip and ability to perform cursive writing. Lancinating pain occurred spontaneously and was triggered by pressure along the ulnar border of the forearm about 5 cm proximal to the wrist crease. Nerve conduction studies revealed a complete electrical block to stimulation at a point 5 cm proximal to the wrist crease when recording from the abductor digiti minimi. Distal to this point, responses of normal amplitude and latency were recorded. Surgical exploration disclosed two fibrovascular bands coursing from the ulnar artery to the distal belly of the flexor carpi ulnaris, entrapping and grooving the ulnar nerve. Release of these bands resulted in reversal of the electrical block, complete relief of pain, and a full neurologic recovery during the ensuing six months.

  20. [A case of localized hypertrophic neuropathy in the sciatic nerve].

    PubMed

    Izumi, T; Kusaka, H; Imai, T

    1995-01-01

    A 26-year-old male patient gradually developed muscular atrophy of the right lower leg over a two-year period. Neurological examination revealed absent Achilles tendon reflex and muscular atrophy of the right lower leg and right hamstring muscles. Conduction velocity of the F waves was delayed in the right posterior tibial nerve. A computerized tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass lesion along the proximal segment of the right sciatic nerve. Exploration revealed a fusiformly swollen sciatic nerve. Histological examination showed that a swollen segment of the sciatic nerve was filled with onion-bulb formations of perineurial cells, consistent with the diagnosis of localized hypertrophic neuropathy. This condition should be added to several etiologies of monomelic amyotrophy. Electrophysiological studies and neuroimaging techniques were useful in obtaining differential diagnosis.

  1. Accessory nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Olarte, M; Adams, D

    1977-11-01

    After apparently uncomplicated excision of benign lesions in the posterior cervical triangle, two patients had shoulder pain. In one, neck pain and trapezius weakness were not prominent until one month after surgery. Inability to elevate the arm above the horizontal without externally rotating it, and prominent scapular displacement on arm abduction, but not on forward pushing movements, highlighted the trapezius dysfunction and differentiated it from serratus anterior weakness. Spinal accessory nerve lesions should be considered when minor surgical procedures, lymphadenitis, minor trauma, or tumours involved the posterior triangle of the neck.

  2. Structural and functional assessment of skin nerve fibres in small-fibre pathology.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, P; Nyengaard, J R; Polydefkis, M; Jensen, T S

    2015-09-01

    Damage to nociceptor nerve fibres may give rise to peripheral neuropathies, some of which are pain free and some are painful. A hallmark of many peripheral neuropathies is the loss of small nerve fibres in the epidermis, a condition called small-fibre neuropathy (SFN) when it is predominantly the small nerve fibres that are damaged. Historically, SFN has been very difficult to diagnose as clinical examination and nerve conduction studies mainly detect large nerve fibres, and quantitative sensory testing is not sensitive enough to detect small changes in small nerve fibres. However, taking a 3-mm punch skin biopsy from the distal leg and quantification of the nerve fibre density has proven to be a useful method to diagnose SFN. However, the correlation between the nerve fibre loss and other test results varies greatly. Recent studies have shown that it is possible not only to extract information about the nerve fibre density from the biopsies but also to get an estimation of the nerve fibre length density using stereology, quantify sweat gland innervation and detect morphological changes such as axonal swelling, all of which may be additional parameters indicating diseased small fibres relating to symptoms reported by the patients. In this review, we focus on available tests to assess structure and function of the small nerve fibres, and summarize recent advances that have provided new possibilities to more specifically relate structural findings with symptoms and function in patients with SFN.

  3. Intraoperative monitoring of facial nerve antidromic potentials during acoustic neuroma surgery.

    PubMed

    Colletti, V; Fiorino, F; Policante, Z; Bruni, L

    1997-09-01

    The present paper presents monopolar recording of facial nerve antidromic potentials as an alternative technique to facial electromyography for the continuous monitoring of the facial nerve during acoustic neuroma surgery. The investigation involved 22 patients undergoing acoustic neuroma surgery via a retrosigmoid approach (tumour sizes ranging from 5 to 28 mm). Bipolar electrical stimulation of the marginalis mandibulae was performed to elicit facial nerve antidromic potentials. Stimulus intensity ranged from 2 to 6 mA with a delivery rate of 7/sec. A silver wire monopolar electrode positioned intracranially on the proximal portion of the acoustic facial bundle was used to record antidromic potentials. To define the specific origin of the action potentials and acquire normative data, monopolar and bipolar recordings of facial nerve antidromic potentials were performed in 15 subjects undergoing retrosigmoid vestibular neurectomy for Meniere's disease. The average facial nerve antidromic potential latency was 4.2 (+/- 0.6) msec in subjects with acoustic neuroma and 3.3 (+/- 0.2) msec in subjects with Meniere's disease. Facial nerve antidromic potentials furnished near real-time information about intraoperative facial nerve damage and postoperative facial nerve function during acoustic neuroma surgery. Facial nerve antidromic potentials may provide additional information to conventional EMG. They allow the use of endplate blockers, yield quantitative estimation of facial nerve conduction properties in terms of amplitude and latency, and allow actual continuous monitoring of the facial nerve.

  4. Facial nerve palsy and hemifacial spasm.

    PubMed

    Valls-Solé, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Facial nerve lesions are usually benign conditions even though patients may present with emotional distress. Facial palsy usually resolves in 3-6 weeks, but if axonal degeneration takes place, it is likely that the patient will end up with a postparalytic facial syndrome featuring synkinesis, myokymic discharges, and hemifacial mass contractions after abnormal reinnervation. Essential hemifacial spasm is one form of facial hyperactivity that must be distinguished from synkinesis after facial palsy and also from other forms of facial dyskinesias. In this condition, there can be ectopic discharges, ephaptic transmission, and lateral spread of excitation among nerve fibers, giving rise to involuntary muscle twitching and spasms. Electrodiagnostic assessment is of relevance for the diagnosis and prognosis of peripheral facial palsy and hemifacial spasm. In this chapter the most relevant clinical and electrodiagnostic aspects of the two disorders are reviewed, with emphasis on the various stages of facial palsy after axonal degeneration, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the various features of hemifacial spasm, and the cues for differential diagnosis between the two entities.

  5. Long thoracic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Wiater, J M; Flatow, E L

    1999-11-01

    Injury to the long thoracic nerve causing paralysis or weakness of the serratus anterior muscle can be disabling. Patients with serratus palsy may present with pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation, and scapular winging with medial translation of the scapula, rotation of the inferior angle toward the midline, and prominence of the vertebral border. Long thoracic nerve dysfunction may result from trauma or may occur without injury. Fortunately, most patients experience a return of serratus anterior function with conservative treatment, but recovery may take as many as 2 years. Bracing often is tolerated poorly. Patients with severe symptoms in whom 12 months of conservative treatment has failed may benefit from surgical reconstruction. Although many surgical procedures have been described, the current preferred treatment is transfer of the sternal head of the pectoralis major tendon to the inferior angle of the scapula reinforced with fascia or tendon autograft. Many series have shown good to excellent results, with consistent improvement in function, elimination of winging, and reduction of pain.

  6. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Paweł; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. Material/Methods After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. Conclusions The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  7. Indicators: Conductivity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Conductivity is a measure of the ability of water to pass an electrical current. Because dissolved salts and other inorganic chemicals conduct electrical current, conductivity increases as salinity increases.

  8. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    MedlinePlus

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... infant's facial nerve is also called the seventh cranial nerve. It can be damaged just before or at ...

  9. Chromosomal abnormalities and mental illness.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, D J; Blackwood, D H R; Porteous, D J; Pickard, B S; Muir, W J

    2003-03-01

    Linkage studies of mental illness have provided suggestive evidence of susceptibility loci over many broad chromosomal regions. Pinpointing causative gene mutations by conventional linkage strategies alone is problematic. The breakpoints of chromosomal abnormalities occurring in patients with mental illness may be more direct pointers to the relevant gene locus. Publications that describe patients where chromosomal abnormalities co-exist with mental illness are reviewed along with supporting evidence that this may amount to an association. Chromosomal abnormalities are considered to be of possible significance if (a) the abnormality is rare and there are independent reports of its coexistence with psychiatric illness, or (b) there is colocalisation of the abnormality with a region of suggestive linkage findings, or (c) there is an apparent cosegregation of the abnormality with psychiatric illness within the individual's family. Breakpoints have been described within many of the loci suggested by linkage studies and these findings support the hypothesis that shared susceptibility factors for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may exist. If these abnormalities directly disrupt coding regions, then combining molecular genetic breakpoint cloning with bioinformatic sequence analysis may be a method of rapidly identifying candidate genes. Full karyotyping of individuals with psychotic illness especially where this coexists with mild learning disability, dysmorphism or a strong family history of mental disorder is encouraged.

  10. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  11. Abnormalities of the blink reflex in burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jääskeläinen, S K; Forssell, H; Tenovuo, O

    1997-12-01

    To our knowledge, this is the first report on pain-related abnormalities of the eye blink reflex (BR) in a clinical pain patient population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the possible neuropathic mechanisms underlying the burning mouth syndrome (BMS), by means of objective electrophysiological examination of the trigemino-facial system. We studied the BR with stimulation of the supraorbital nerve (SON) with particular emphasis on the occurrence of the pain-related ultralate R3 components, and the habituation response of the R2 components. The subjects consisted of eleven BMS patients and 10 healthy control subjects. All patients underwent thorough clinical oral and neurological examinations. The motor function of the trigeminal nerve was assessed with a jaw reflex recording, and a needle-EMG examination of the facial and masticatory muscles was performed in the patients with abnormalities in the BR recordings. The jaw reflexes, the latencies of the BR components, and the needle-EMG examinations were normal in all patients. As a group, the BMS patients had statistically significantly higher stimulus thresholds for the tactile R 1 components of the BR compared with the control subjects. With non-noxious stimulation, the BMS patients showed more frequently pain-related R3 components (11/22 SONs) compared with the controls (3/20 SONs). In addition, four BMS patients had abnormal habituation of the R2 components. In two of these patients, the findings were segmental (i.e., unilateral), coinciding with the side of the subjective BM symptoms. The abnormalities of the BR tests appeared to be related to longer disease duration. Our results suggest a possible pathologic involvement of the nervous system in chronic BMS.

  12. Haematological abnormalities in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Frank, Marlies

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to assess the kind of haematological abnormalities that are present in patients with mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) and the frequency of their occurrence. METHODS The blood cell counts of a cohort of patients with syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs were retrospectively reviewed. MIDs were classified as ‘definite’, ‘probable’ or ‘possible’ according to clinical presentation, instrumental findings, immunohistological findings on muscle biopsy, biochemical abnormalities of the respiratory chain and/or the results of genetic studies. Patients who had medical conditions other than MID that account for the haematological abnormalities were excluded. RESULTS A total of 46 patients (‘definite’ = 5; ‘probable’ = 9; ‘possible’ = 32) had haematological abnormalities attributable to MIDs. The most frequent haematological abnormality in patients with MIDs was anaemia. 27 patients had anaemia as their sole haematological problem. Anaemia was associated with thrombopenia (n = 4), thrombocytosis (n = 2), leucopenia (n = 2), and eosinophilia (n = 1). Anaemia was hypochromic and normocytic in 27 patients, hypochromic and microcytic in six patients, hyperchromic and macrocytic in two patients, and normochromic and microcytic in one patient. Among the 46 patients with a mitochondrial haematological abnormality, 78.3% had anaemia, 13.0% had thrombopenia, 8.7% had leucopenia and 8.7% had eosinophilia, alone or in combination with other haematological abnormalities. CONCLUSION MID should be considered if a patient’s abnormal blood cell counts (particularly those associated with anaemia, thrombopenia, leucopenia or eosinophilia) cannot be explained by established causes. Abnormal blood cell counts may be the sole manifestation of MID or a collateral feature of a multisystem problem. PMID:26243978

  13. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  14. Neuromas of the calcaneal nerves.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Dellon, A L

    2001-11-01

    A neuroma of a calcaneal nerve has never been reported. A series of 15 patients with heel pain due to a neuroma of a calcaneal nerve are reviewed. These patients previously had either a plantar fasciotomy (n = 4), calcaneal spur removal (n = 2), ankle fusion (n = 2), or tarsal tunnel decompression (n = 7). Neuromas occurred on calcaneal branches that arose from either the posterior tibial nerve (n = 1), lateral plantar nerve (n = 1), the medial plantar nerve (n = 9), or more than one of these nerves (n = 4). Operative approach was through an extended tarsal tunnel incision to permit identification of all calcaneal nerves. The neuroma was resected and implanted into the flexor hallucis longus muscle. Excellent relief of pain occurred in 60%, and good relief in 33%. One patient (17%) had no improvement and required resection of the lateral plantar nerve. Awareness that the heel may be innervated by multiple calcaneal branches suggests that surgery for heel pain of neural origin employ a surgical approach that permits identification of all possible calcaneal branches.

  15. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  16. Nerve glue for upper extremity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tse, Raymond; Ko, Jason H

    2012-11-01

    Nerve glue is an attractive alternative to sutures to improve the results of nerve repair. Improved axon alignment, reduced scar and inflammation, greater and faster reinnervation, and better functional results have been reported with the use of nerve glue. The different types of nerve glue and the evidence to support or oppose their use are reviewed. Although the ideal nerve glue has yet to be developed, fibrin sealants can be used as nerve glue in select clinical situations. Technology to allow suture-free nerve repair is one development that can potentially improve functional nerve recovery and the outcomes of upper extremity reconstruction.

  17. Facial nerve rerouting in skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Parhizkar, Nooshin; Hiltzik, David H; Selesnick, Samuel H

    2005-08-01

    Facial nerve rerouting techniques were developed to facilitate re-section of extensive tumors occupying the skull base. Facial nerve rerouting has its own limitations and risks, requiring microsurgical expertise, additional surgical time, and often some degree of facial nerve paresis. This article presents different degrees of anterior and posterior facial nerve rerouting, techniques of facial nerve rerouting, and a comprehensive review of outcomes. It then reviews anatomic and functional preservation of the facial nerve in acoustic neuroma resection, technical aspects of facial nerve dissection, intracranial facial nerve repair options, and outcomes for successful acoustic neuroma surgery.

  18. Neck ultrasonography for detection of non-recurrent laryngeal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Citton, Marilisa; Viel, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-recurrent laryngeal nerve (NRLN) is a rare anatomical variant (0.3–6%) that is associated with some arterial abnormalities (absence of the brachiocephalic trunk and presence of a right aberrant subclavian lusorian artery). The availability of a preoperative diagnosis of NRLN may reduce the risk of nerve injuries. Preoperative ultrasonography (US) has been suggested as a reliable diagnostic tool to detect the arterial abnormalities associated with NRLN, but the literature is relatively scarce. This paper was aimed to review the literature, in order to offer an up to-date on this technique and its results. Methods A web search, focusing on humans, was performed by PubMed database, including papers published up to August 2016, using the key words “ultrasonography” AND “non-recurrent laryngeal nerve” or “nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve”. Results Eight papers, including 3,740 patients who underwent neck US for the detection of NRLN were selected. Only five studies focused on the preoperative use of US. The incidence of NRLN varied between 0.4% and 1.94%. The sensitivity and specificity varied between 99–100% and 41–100%, respectively. Conclusions US is a simple, non-invasive and cost-effective method to detect NRLN, also if its accuracy is not absolute. It may be used preoperatively and to prevent the intraoperative nerve damage, since the risk of NRLN palsies is significantly reduced when a preoperative diagnosis is available. PMID:28149804

  19. 21 CFR 882.5830 - Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator. 882.5830 Section 882.5830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... which an abnormally low amount of air enters the lungs) caused by brain stem disease, high...

  20. 21 CFR 882.5830 - Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator. 882.5830 Section 882.5830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... which an abnormally low amount of air enters the lungs) caused by brain stem disease, high...

  1. 21 CFR 882.5830 - Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator. 882.5830 Section 882.5830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... which an abnormally low amount of air enters the lungs) caused by brain stem disease, high...

  2. 21 CFR 882.5830 - Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator. 882.5830 Section 882.5830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... which an abnormally low amount of air enters the lungs) caused by brain stem disease, high...

  3. 21 CFR 882.5830 - Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator. 882.5830 Section 882.5830 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... which an abnormally low amount of air enters the lungs) caused by brain stem disease, high...

  4. Reduction in Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emberti Gialloreti, Leonardo; Pardini, Matteo; Benassi, Francesca; Marciano, Sara; Amore, Mario; Mutolo, Maria Giulia; Porfirio, Maria Cristina; Curatolo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the use of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) evaluation as an easy-to-use, reproducible, proxy-measure of brain structural abnormalities. Here, we evaluated RNFL thickness in a group of subjects with high functioning autism (HFA) or with Asperger Syndrome (AS) to its potential as a tool to study autism…

  5. Congenital abnormalities and selective abortion.

    PubMed

    Seller, M J

    1976-09-01

    The technique of amniocentesis, by which an abnormal fetus can be detected in utero, has brought a technological advance in medical science but attendant medical and moral problems. Dr Seller describes those congenital disabilities which can be detected in the fetus before birth, for which the "remedy" is selective abortion. She then discusses the arguments for and against selective abortion, for the issue is not simple, even in the strictly genetic sense of attempting to ensure a population free of congenital abnormality.

  6. Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2008-07-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell's palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the scull and mastoid, cerebral MRI, or nerve conduction studies. Bell's palsy may be diagnosed after exclusion of all secondary causes, but causes of secondary FNP and Bell's palsy may coexist. Treatment of secondary FNP is based on the therapy of the underlying disorder. Treatment of Bell's palsy is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but also studies, which show no beneficial effect. Additional measures include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or possibly surgery. Prognosis of Bell's palsy is fair with complete recovery in about 80% of the cases, 15% experience some kind of permanent nerve damage and 5% remain with severe sequelae.

  7. Lumbosacral nerve root avulsion.

    PubMed

    Chin, C H; Chew, K C

    1997-01-01

    Lumbosacral nerve root avulsion is a rare clinical entity. Since the first description in 1955, only 35 cases have been reported. It is often associated with pelvic fractures and may be missed in the initial clinical examination as these patients usually present with multiple injuries. We present three such cases with clinical and radiological findings. These patients were involved in road traffic accidents. Two had fractures of the sacroiliac joint with diastasis of the symphysis pubis (Tile type C 1.2) and one had fractures of the public rami (Tile type B 2.1). All three had various degrees of sensory and motor deficit of the lower limbs. Lumbar myelogram shows characteristic pseudomeningoceles in the affected lumboscral region. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides an additional non-invasive modality to diagnose this condition.

  8. Effects of deep heating provided by therapeutic ultrasound on demyelinating nerves

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Elif; Tastaban, Engin; Omurlu, Imran Kurt; Turan, Yasemin; Şendur, Ömer Faruk

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Physiotherapeutic heating agents are classified into two groups: superficial-heating agents and deep-heating agents. Therapeutic ultrasound is a deep-heating agent used to treat various musculosketal disorders. Numerous studies have attempted to determine the impact of ultrasound on healthy nerve conduction parameters. However, the instantaneous effects of deep heating via ultrasound on demyelinating nerves do not appear to have been described previously. The present study aimed to assess and compare the impact of ultrasound on demyelinating nerve and healthy nerve conduction parameters. [Subjects and Methods] Carpal tunnel syndrome was used as a focal demyelination model. Thirty-two hands of 25 participants with carpal tunnel syndrome were enrolled in the study. Ultrasound parameters were 3.3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm2, 8 minutes, and continuous wave. Electrodiagnostic studies were performed initially, at the midpoint (4th min), and immediately after (8th min) ultrasound application. [Results] Reduced motor conduction velocity was found in demyelinating nerves at the 4th and 8th minutes. Ulnar nerve onset latency was significantly prolonged in the 8th minute recording, compared to the initial value. There were no significant differences in relative velocity and latency changes between demyelinating and normal nerves. [Conclusion] Deep heating via ultrasound may inversely affect conduction velocity in demyelinating nerves. PMID:27190467

  9. The "all-or-none" law in skeletal muscle and nerve fibres.

    PubMed

    Pareti, G

    2007-01-01

    In 1905 the Cambridge physiologist Keith Lucas extended the "all-or-none" principle (introduced by H. P. Bowditch for the cardiac tissue) to skeletal muscle and nerve fibres. Nevertheless, in a short time it was clear that nerve fibres obey this law, but also that frequency of discharge is another relevant factor in the nervous conduction.

  10. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Sunita; Lee, Michael S

    2005-01-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSMs) grow slowly and, if untreated, patients may have stable visual function for up to several years. Treatment of an ONSM may lead to vision loss (radiation retinopathy or optic neuropathy). Therefore, observation is recommended for a patient with ONSM and relatively preserved visual acuity, color vision, pupils, and visual fields. Follow-up every 4 to 6 months initially is recommended extending to annual examinations if visual function and tumor size remain stable for a few years. Neuroimaging can be repeated every 12 months. An undisputed decline in visual function or any intracranial extension warrants treatment of the ONSM. The treatment of choice for a tumor confined to the orbit is stereotactic fractionated radiation. Stereotactic fractionated radiation uses multiple small doses of radiation using tight margins. A reasonable alternative, three-dimensional conformal fractionated radiation uses computed tomography-guided planning but usually requires wider margins. Conventional radiation uses much wider margins and would not be recommended for treatment of ONSM. The radiation can be administered during 5 to 6 weeks in 28 daily fractions of 1.8 to 2 Gy/fraction to a total of 50.4 to 56 Gy. Many patients have improvement or stabilization of their visual function. Gamma knife radiosurgery does not have a role in ONSM because the required dose is toxic to the optic nerve. A tumor that extends intracranially may be treated with fractionated radiation if any vision remains. Surgical excision can be considered for significant intracranial extension but this often leads to complete vision loss in the ipsilateral eye. A blind, disfigured eye also may be treated with en bloc surgical resection of the meningioma.

  11. The effect of height on paclitaxel nerve damage.

    PubMed

    Openshaw, Harry; Beamon, Karen; Longmate, Jeffrey; Synold, Timothy; Slatkin, Neal E; Somlo, George

    2005-09-01

    Dying-back neuropathies result in sensory loss and motor signs in the distal distribution of the longest nerves of the body. It would be expected, therefore, that taller individuals with dying-back neuropathies would tend to have worse nerve damage than shorter individuals. This hypothesis was tested in patients receiving high dose paclitaxel. Nerve conductions and quantitative sensory tests were obtained in 21 breast cancer subjects, prior to and 20-40 days after 725 mg/m(2) paclitaxel administered intravenously over 24 h. Despite the uniform dose of paclitaxel, there was a wide variation in post minus pre-paclitaxel changes. Analysis by linear regression showed that decrease of peroneal nerve compound muscle action potential amplitude was significantly greater in taller subjects (P=0.004), and increase in cold detection threshold was greater in taller subjects (P=0.02). No correlation with height was found for paclitaxel drug clearance, maximum concentration, and area under the curve. Decrease in sural sensory nerve action potential amplitude and increase in vibration detection threshold did not correlate with height. In summary, the wide variation of changes seen in neurophysiological tests suggests that multiple factors are involved in determining the severity of neuropathy. Nerve length is probably one of these factors. To determine whether the effect of height is clinically important would require additional study with a larger number of subjects and longer clinical follow-up.

  12. Stable long-term recordings from cat peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Stein, R B; Nichols, T R; Jhamandas, J; Davis, L; Charles, D

    1977-06-03

    A procedure has been developed for the stable long-term recording of nerve signals in unanesthetized mammals, which should have wide application in basic research on the nervous system and also in clinical areas such as the derivation of control signals for powered prostheses. Methods are fully described for constructing devices consisting of (1) Silastic nerve cuffs containing three or more electrodes, (2) coiled leads insulated with Silastic which extend from the cuffs to an integrated circuit socket, (3) a vitreous carbon transcutaneous connector which surrounds the integrated circuit socket and makes a good interface with the skin. Neural activity has been recorded from mammalian nerves for many months during normal behaviour. The peak-to-peak amplitude and latency of the recorded compound action potentials remain stable and may continue at a constant level more or less indefinitely. A tripolar recording configuration between a central lead and the two end leads, which are connected together, permits good rejection of EMG signals from surrounding muscles. The amplitude of single unit potentials increases as the square of the conduction velocity of the nerve fibre. Thus, the largest nerve fibres will dominate the signals recorded during behaviour. The reasons for premature termination of a few experiments are given together with methods for overcoming these problems. For example, platinum-iridium electrodes remain relatively stable, whereas silver wires tend to fracture after being in an animal for several months. This and other relationships are discussed which permit an optimal design of nerve cuffs for a given recording situation.

  13. [Application of fibrin glue in facial nerve repair].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinying; Hua, Qingquan; Wang, Shenqing

    2007-06-01

    This animal experiment was aimed to apply fibrin in facial nerve repair and to quest for technical improvements in facial surgery. In each of 15 healthy large ear white rabbits, a unilateral 5 mm intratemporal facial nerve gap was created, the proximal and distal stumps were inserted into chitin tube, 1 ml autologous fibrin glue was applied around the anastomotic zone, and no suture was employed. At 3 months and 5 months after opertion, electrophysioligical study was performed. Compared with normal nerves, the regenerating nerves in both the chitin tube bridged group and the perineurium suture group had longer incubation period, lower amplitude, slower nerve-muscle conduction velocity at 3 months postoperatively. The differences were distinctly significant (P < 0.01). Although being decreased at 5 months after operation, the differences were still statistically significant (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences between the chitin tube bridged group and perineurium suture group at 3 months and 5 months, respectively. The study suggests that facial nerve repair using fibrin glue and chitin tube has the advantages of being easier,faster and more stable.

  14. Vein, silastic, and polyglycolic acid fine mesh: a comparative study in peripheral nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Lolley, R D; Bose, W J; Bastian, F; Bassam, B; Meyer, F N; Anderson, L D

    1995-09-01

    We investigated three sheathing materials (autogenous vein, silastic, and polyglycolic acid fine mesh) using the rat model. Forty rats were divided into five groups of eight animals each. Group A animals underwent transection of the sciatic nerve but had no repair. In Group B, a standard epineural repair was performed. In Groups C, D, and E, the nerve was repaired as in Group B with the addition of autogenous vein, Silastic, and polyglycolic acid fine mesh sheaths, respectively. Nerve regeneration and function were assessed using sciatic functional index, nerve conduction studies, and light microscopy. Sheathing methods showed no statistically significant advantage to standard epineural repair without a sheath.

  15. [Post-traumatic infraorbital nerve neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Sakavicius, Dalius; Kubilius, Ricardas; Sabalys, Gintautas

    2002-01-01

    The authors have investigated functional state of infraorbital nerve of 479 patients with zygomatic fractures. The degree of nerve damage was evaluated according to changes of pain threshold during damaged nerve stimulation. It was estimated that in 64.3% of zygomatic fractures the infraorbital nerve was affected. The nerve damage degree could be mild, moderate and severe. In 43.18% of moderate and severe nerve damage cases the neuropathy develops. The symptoms, signs and treatment of neuropathy have been described. The neuropathy with clinical symptoms as permanent soreness and paresthesias (itch, "running ant", fibrillations of cheek tissues etc.) in the infraorbital nerve innervation zone occur to 43.18% of the patients after moderate and severe damage of the nerve. The treatment of neuropathy was analysed. In cases of moderate and severe nerve damages, authors recommend to perform decompression of the nerve, because if not applied, the function of nerve does not recover.

  16. ABNORMALITIES PRODUCED IN THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM BY ELECTRICAL INJURIES.

    PubMed

    Langworthy, O R

    1930-05-31

    The alternating and continuous circuits produced different types of lesions in the central nervous system. Hemorrhages were common after alternating current shocks and few hemorrhages were observed in the continuous circuit group. With both types of circuits at 1000 and 500 volts potential, severe abnormalities in the nerve cells were observed. These were more marked in the continuous circuit group. A uniformly staining, shrunken, pyknotic nucleus was taken as a criterion of nerve cell death. The Purkinje cells of the cerebellum were most susceptible to the current. Injured cells were studied in the dorsal nucleus of the vagus, in the somatic motor group, among the primary sensory neurones and in the olives. Changes in the histological structure of the cells in reference to recovery have been discussed. Injury to the cerebral and cerebellar cortices occurred on the dorsal surface close to the head electrode. Small cavities were produced, particularly in the cerebral cortex, as the result of the circuit contact. With the continuous and alternating circuits at 110 and 220 volts potential less severe changes were observed in the nerve cells although hemorrhages were common in the alternating circuit group. It must be assumed in these cases that death was due to respiratory block rather than actual death of the cells.

  17. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-06-03

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process.

  18. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process. PMID:27271632

  19. α-Synuclein pathology in the cranial and spinal nerves in Lewy body disease.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keiko; Mori, Fumiaki; Tanji, Kunikazu; Miki, Yasuo; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Yamada, Masahito; Wakabayashi, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation of phosphorylated α-synuclein in neurons and glial cells is a histological hallmark of Lewy body disease (LBD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). Recently, filamentous aggregations of phosphorylated α-synuclein have been reported in the cytoplasm of Schwann cells, but not in axons, in the peripheral nervous system in MSA, mainly in the cranial and spinal nerve roots. Here we conducted an immunohistochemical investigation of the cranial and spinal nerves and dorsal root ganglia of patients with LBD. Lewy axons were found in the oculomotor, trigeminal and glossopharyngeal-vagus nerves, but not in the hypoglossal nerve. The glossopharyngeal-vagus nerves were most frequently affected, with involvement in all of 20 subjects. In the spinal nerve roots, Lewy axons were found in all of the cases examined. Lewy axons in the anterior nerves were more frequent and numerous in the thoracic and sacral segments than in the cervical and lumbar segments. On the other hand, axonal lesions in the posterior spinal nerve roots appeared to increase along a cervical-to-sacral gradient. Although Schwann cell cytoplasmic inclusions were found in the spinal nerves, they were only minimal. In the dorsal root ganglia, axonal lesions were seldom evident. These findings indicate that α-synuclein pathology in the peripheral nerves is axonal-predominant in LBD, whereas it is restricted to glial cells in MSA.

  20. Lateral femoral cutaneous nerve transposition: Renaissance of an old concept in the light of new anatomy.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Amgad S

    2017-04-01

    Meralgia paresthetica causes pain in the anterolateral thigh. Most surgical procedures involve nerve transection or decompression. We conducted a cadaveric study to determine the feasibility of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) transposition. In three cadavers, the LFCN was exposed in the thigh and retroperitoneum. The two layers of the LFCN canal superficial and deep to the nerve were opened. The nerve was then mobilized medially away from the ASIS, by cutting the septum medial to sartorius. It was possible to mobilize the nerve for 2 cm medial to the ASIS. The nerve acquired a much straighter course with less tension. A new technique of LFCN transposition is presented here as an anatomical feasibility study. The surgical technique is based on the new understanding of the LFCN canal. Clin. Anat. 30:409-412, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Waveform changes in antidromic facial nerve responses in patients with Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Hiroaki; Iwai, Mitsuru; Takeda, Taizo; Hamada, Masashi; Kakigi, Akinobu; Nakahira, Mitsuhiko

    2002-02-01

    We repeatedly tested the antidromic facial nerve response within 7 days after onset of paralysis in patients with Bell's palsy. None of 109 patients showed the triphasic waveform that reflects normal conduction of the facial nerve action potential. The waves recorded from patients showed biphasic, monophasic, or flat waveforms. Eighty-two of 88 patients with complete recovery showed biphasic waves, whereas half of the patients with nerve degeneration had monophasic or flat waves. Most patients with complete recovery maintained biphasic waves, but in patients with incomplete recovery, the waveforms changed to monophasic or flat, except in 1 case. The presence of monophasic or flat waves with a low facial score strongly suggests nerve degeneration. The antidromic facial nerve response is recommended as a method of diagnosing paralysis and monitoring the progression of intratemporal facial nerve damage during its early stages.

  2. Conduction block and impaired axonal function in tick paralysis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Arun V; Lin, Cindy S; Reddel, Stephen W; McGrath, Robert; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2009-09-01

    Tick paralysis (TP) is an uncommon disorder caused by a neurotoxin secreted by engorged female ticks. The cause of TP remains unclear, although alterations in axonal ion channel function and neuromuscular transmission have been proposed. In the present case, nerve excitability techniques, which provide information regarding axonal ion channel function, were used to elucidate the mechanism underlying weakness in a 45-year-old man who presented with weakness following a tick bite in the lateral aspect of the left axilla. Standard clinical nerve conduction studies were undertaken during the acute phase of symptoms and following clinical recovery. Nerve excitability studies were performed to investigate possible changes in ion channel properties distal to the site of conduction failure. Nerve conduction studies and electromyography suggested the possibility of a lesion involving the lower trunk of the left brachial plexus. Nerve excitability studies distal to the site of the tick bite demonstrated an abrupt increase in refractoriness, a marker of recovery from inactivation of Na(+) channels. There was normalization of both nerve conduction and nerve excitability parameters associated with clinical recovery. The alteration in refractoriness is similar to that noted in disorders involving the terminal portion of the motor nerve. The changes raise the possibility that TP may cause weakness through impairment of distal neural transmission.

  3. [Diagnosticum of abnormalities of plant meiotic division].

    PubMed

    Shamina, N V

    2006-01-01

    Abnormalities of plant meiotic division leading to abnormal meiotic products are summarized schematically in the paper. Causes of formation of monads, abnormal diads, triads, pentads, polyads, etc. have been observed in meiosis with both successive and simultaneous cytokinesis.

  4. Electrical Conductivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Philip B.

    1979-01-01

    Examines Drude's classical (1900) theory of electrical conduction, details the objections to and successes of the 1900 theory, and investigates the Quantum (1928) theory of conduction, reviewing its successes and limitations. (BT)

  5. Nanofibrous nerve conduit-enhanced peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xu; Mi, Ruifa; Hoke, Ahmet; Chew, Sing Yian

    2014-05-01

    Fibre structures represent a potential class of materials for the formation of synthetic nerve conduits due to their biomimicking architecture. Although the advantages of fibres in enhancing nerve regeneration have been demonstrated, in vivo evaluation of fibre size effect on nerve regeneration remains limited. In this study, we analyzed the effects of fibre diameter of electrospun conduits on peripheral nerve regeneration across a 15-mm critical defect gap in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. By using an electrospinning technique, fibrous conduits comprised of aligned electrospun poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) microfibers (981 ± 83 nm, Microfiber) or nanofibers (251 ± 32 nm, Nanofiber) were obtained. At three months post implantation, axons regenerated across the defect gap in all animals that received fibrous conduits. In contrast, complete nerve regeneration was not observed in the control group that received empty, non-porous PCL film conduits (Film). Nanofiber conduits resulted in significantly higher total number of myelinated axons and thicker myelin sheaths compared to Microfiber and Film conduits. Retrograde labeling revealed a significant increase in number of regenerated dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons in the presence of Nanofiber conduits (1.93 ± 0.71 × 10(3) vs. 0.98 ± 0.30 × 10(3) in Microfiber, p < 0.01). In addition, the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes were higher and distal motor latency values were lower in the Nanofiber conduit group compared to the Microfiber group. This study demonstrated the impact of fibre size on peripheral nerve regeneration. These results could provide useful insights for future nerve guide designs.

  6. Isolated optic nerve oedema as unusual presentation of electric injury.

    PubMed

    Izzy, Saef; Deeb, Wissam; Peters, George B; Mitchell, Ann

    2014-10-15

    A 45-year-old man with no significant medical history presented following an electric current injury (380 V). He developed multiple systemic injuries including third degree burns and after 1 week of hospitalisation he reported unilateral visual changes. Examination suggested the presence of optic nerve oedema without evidence of haemorrhage, exudate or vessel abnormality. This was considered to be related to the electric shock. A trial of corticosteroids was considered. He was followed up to 5 months in clinic and was noted to have developed unilateral optic atrophy and no other systemic manifestations. Initial and 5 months follow-up optic nerve colour photograph and optical coherence topography were documented. The present case highlights the fact that electric current injury can present with only a unilateral ischaemic optic neuropathy, the need for early diagnosis for timely treatment and the controversial role of corticosteroids.

  7. Functional and structural analysis of partial optic nerve avulsion due to blunt trauma: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Mumcuoglu, Tarkan; Durukan, Hakan A; Erdurman, Cuneyt; Hurmeric, Volkan; Gundogan, Fatih C

    2010-01-01

    Partial optic nerve avulsion (ONA) secondary to finger gouging is an uncommon but devastating injury. A 21-year-old man who had an acute vision loss after accidentally getting poked by himself in his right eye when he fell down during jogging is reported. The patient was diagnosed with partial ONA. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed intact optic nerve. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed deep cavity at the inferior-temporal half of the optic disc. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness was also thin at the inferior quadrant with circumpapillary OCT scan. Visual field test and electrophysiological tests showed functional abnormality compatible with optic nerve lesion. Diagnostic tools for anatomical and functional evaluation may reveal the course of this injury. PMID:20952839

  8. Identifying the Non-recurrent Laryngeal Nerve: Preventing a Major Risk of Morbidity During Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mahmodlou, Rahim; Aghasi, Mohammad Reza; Sepehrvand, Nariman

    2013-01-01

    Non-recurrent laryngeal nerve (NRLN) is a rare anomaly which is reported in 0.3%-0.8% of people on the right side and in 0.004% (extremely rare) on the left side. Damage to this nerve during the surgical procedure may lead to severe iatrogenic morbidity and should therefore be prevented from being damaged. The best way to avoid this damage to the nerve is to identify the nerve with a systematic diligent dissection based on usual anatomical landmarks and awareness about the possibility of their existence. Hereby, we are going to present a 26-year-old woman, a case of NRLN on the right side which was identified during thyroidectomy. The nervous anomaly was accompanied with vascular abnormality which was confirmed by computerized tomography (CT) angiography, post-operatively. PMID:23543847

  9. Stimulation of the human auditory nerve with optical radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Andrew; Winkler, Piotr; Mierzwinski, Jozef; Beuth, Wojciech; Izzo Matic, Agnella; Siedlecki, Zygmunt; Teudt, Ingo; Maier, Hannes; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2009-02-01

    A novel, spatially selective method to stimulate cranial nerves has been proposed: contact free stimulation with optical radiation. The radiation source is an infrared pulsed laser. The Case Report is the first report ever that shows that optical stimulation of the auditory nerve is possible in the human. The ethical approach to conduct any measurements or tests in humans requires efficacy and safety studies in animals, which have been conducted in gerbils. This report represents the first step in a translational research project to initiate a paradigm shift in neural interfaces. A patient was selected who required surgical removal of a large meningioma angiomatum WHO I by a planned transcochlear approach. Prior to cochlear ablation by drilling and subsequent tumor resection, the cochlear nerve was stimulated with a pulsed infrared laser at low radiation energies. Stimulation with optical radiation evoked compound action potentials from the human auditory nerve. Stimulation of the auditory nerve with infrared laser pulses is possible in the human inner ear. The finding is an important step for translating results from animal experiments to human and furthers the development of a novel interface that uses optical radiation to stimulate neurons. Additional measurements are required to optimize the stimulation parameters.

  10. Evaluation of Sensorimotor Nerve Damage in Patients with Maxillofacial Trauma; a Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Poorian, Behnaz; Bemanali, Mehdi; Chavoshinejad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate sensorimotor nerve damage in patients with maxillofacial trauma referring to Taleghani hospital, Tehran, Iran Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted during a 2-year period from 2014 to 2012 in Taleghani hospital of Tehran. We included a total number of 495 patients with maxillofacial trauma referring to our center during the study period. The demographic information, type of fracture, location of fracture and nerve injuries were assessed and recorded in each patients. The frequency of sensorimotor injuries in these patients was recorded. Data are presented as frequencies and proportions as appropriate. Results: Overall we included 495 patients with maxillofacial trauma with mean age of 31.5±13.8 years. There were 430 (86.9% men and in 65 (13.1%) women among the patients. The frequency of nerve injuries was 67.7% (336 patients). The mean age of the patients with nerve injuries was 33.4 ± 3.7 years. Marginal mandibular branch of facial nerve was the most common involved nerve being involved in 5 patients (1%). Regarding trigeminal nerve, the inferior alveolar branch (194 patients 39.1%) was the most common involved branch followed by infraorbital branch (135 patients 27.2%). Mandibular fracture was the most common injured bone being reported in 376 patient (75.9%) patients followed by zygomatic bone in 100 patient (20%). Conclusion: The most frequent fracture occurred in mandible followed by zygoma and the most injured nerve was inferior alveolar nerve followed by infraorbital branch of trigeminal nerve. In facial nerve the marginal branch was the most involved nerve. The frequency of nerve injury and the male to female ratio was higher in the current study compared to the literature. PMID:27331065

  11. Solitary fibrous tumour of the vagus nerve.

    PubMed

    Scholsem, Martin; Scholtes, Felix

    2012-04-01

    We describe the complete removal of a foramen magnum solitary fibrous tumour in a 36-year-old woman. It originated on a caudal vagus nerve rootlet, classically described as the 'cranial' accessory nerve root. This ninth case of immunohistologically confirmed cranial or spinal nerve SFT is the first of the vagus nerve.

  12. MICROCHIP ENZYMATIC ASSAY OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE NERVE AGENTS. (R830900)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An on-chip enzymatic assay for screening organophosphate (OP) nerve agents, based on a pre-column reaction of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH), electrophoretic separation of the phosphonic acid products, and their contactless-conductivity detection, is described. Factors affec...

  13. Lateral congenital anomalies of the pharyngeal apparatus: part II. anatomy of the abnormal for the surgeon.

    PubMed

    Mirilas, Petros

    2011-09-01

    "Anatomy of the abnormal"-a branch of surgical anatomy-deals with relations of an anomaly to surrounding entities. Here, lateral congenital anomalies of the pharyngeal apparatus are examined; their relations to entities of the neck can be explained embryologically. Location of embryonic pharyngeal arches, clefts, and pouches in the adult is presented and terminology of these anomalies (fistulas, sinuses, cysts) is defined. First "cleft and pouch" anomalies relate with the parotid and facial nerve. Second cleft and pouch anomalies course deeply to second arch structures and superficially to third arch structures. Consequently, they relate with hypoglossal and glossopharyngeal nerves and internal and external carotid arteries. Third cleft and pouch anomalies pass deep to third arch entities and superficial to those of the fourth arch and relate with glossopharyngeal, hypoglossal, superior and recurrent laryngeal nerves, and the internal carotid artery. The complicated course of fourth cleft and pouch anomalies brings them into relationship with glossopharyngeal, hypoglossal, superior and recurrent nerves, internal carotid, aorta, and subclavian arteries. Found superficially are veins (external and anterior jugular, common facial, communicating), nerves (transverse cervical, great auricular, mandibular, cervical branches of facial), and relevant spinal nerves (e.g., accessory). Knowledge of these anatomical relations helps prevent anatomical complications.

  14. Radiographic abnormalities among construction workers exposed to quartz containing dust

    PubMed Central

    Tjoe, N; Burdorf, A; Parker, J; Attfield, M; van Duivenbooden, C; Heederik, D

    2003-01-01

    Background: Construction workers are exposed to quartz containing respirable dust, at levels that may cause fibrosis in the lungs. Studies so far have not established a dose-response relation for radiographic abnormalities for this occupational group. Aims: To measure the extent of radiographic abnormalities among construction workers primarily exposed to quartz containing respirable dust. Methods: A cross sectional study on radiographic abnormalities indicative of pneumoconiosis was conducted among 1339 construction workers mainly involved in grinding, (jack)-hammering, drilling, cutting, sawing, and polishing. Radiological abnormalities were determined by median results of the 1980 International Labour Organisation system of three certified "B" readers. Questionnaires were used for assessment of occupational history, presence of respiratory diseases, and symptoms and smoking habits. Results: An abnormality of ILO profusion category 1/0 and greater was observed on 10.2% of the chest radiographs, and profusion category of 1/1 or greater on 2.9% of the radiographs. The average duration of exposure of this group was 19 years and the average age was 42. The predominant type of small opacities (irregularly shaped) is presumably indicative of mixed dust pneumoconiosis. The prevalence of early signs of nodular silicosis (small rounded opacities of category 1/0 or greater) was low (0.8%). Conclusions: The study suggests an elevated risk of radiographic abnormalities among these workers with expected high exposure. An association between radiographic abnormalities and cumulative exposure to quartz containing dust from construction sites was observed, after correction for potentially confounding variables. PMID:12771392

  15. Surgical management of painful peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Elliot, David

    2014-07-01

    This article deals with the classification, assessment, and management of painful nerves of the distal upper limb. The author's preferred surgical and rehabilitation techniques in managing these conditions are discussed in detail and include (1) relocation of end-neuromas to specific sites, (2) division and relocation of painful nerves in continuity (neuromas-in-continuity and scar-tethered nerves) involving small nerves to the same sites, and (3) fascial wrapping of painful nerves in continuity involving larger nerves such as the median and ulnar nerves. The results of these treatments are presented as justification for current use of these techniques.

  16. Overview of Optic Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... where the problem is in the pathway. Visual Pathways and the Consequences of Damage Nerve signals travel ... eyes. Damage to an eye or the visual pathway causes different types of vision loss depending on ...

  17. Nerve entrapment and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sud, Vipul

    2002-01-01

    Peripheral entrapment neuropathy is a common cause of upper-extremity pain, paresthesias, and weakness. Although any of the major nerves can be affected, compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel is the commonest site of clinically significant nerve compression. Etiologically, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) has numerous causes, but the idiopathic group greatly outnumbers the rest. Moreover, the pathophysiology of CTS patients claiming work-related repetitive hand motion as a basis for their disorder has been the subject of intensive study because of its economic ramifications for industry. CTS can serve as a model for reviewing the pathophysiology and biochemical changes of the nerve and its exterior milieu at the cellular level, as well as the possibilities of modifying these changes at the molecular level.

  18. Schwannomatosis of Cervical Vagus Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Sasi, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical vagal schwannoma is a rare entity among lesions presenting as a neck mass. They are usually slow-growing benign lesions closely associated with the vagus nerve. They are usually solitary and asymptomatic. Multiple schwannomas occurring in patients without neurofibromatosis (NF) are rare and have recently been referred to as schwannomatosis. Here, we present a case of a neck mass that had imaging features suggestive of vagal schwannoma and was operated upon. Intraoperatively, it was discovered to be a case of multiple vagal cervical schwannoma, all directly related to the right vagus nerve, and could be resected from the nerve in toto preserving the function of the vagus nerve. Final HPR confirmed our pre-op suspicion of vagal schwannomatosis. PMID:27807496

  19. Action potential characteristics of demyelinated rat sciatic nerve following application of 4-aminopyridine.

    PubMed

    Targ, E F; Kocsis, J D

    1986-01-15

    The sciatic nerves of rats were demyelinated by microinjection of lysophosphatidylcholine. A variety of abnormalities such as conduction slowing and block were present. Application of the potassium channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) to the lesion site, led to an increase in area of the compound action potential recorded across the site of demyelination. Single axon recordings revealed three types of changes that may account for the 4-AP-induced increase in the compound response. One group showed broadening of the action potential. Other axons showed hyperexcitability following 4-AP, as manifest by spontaneous firing and multiple spike discharge following a single stimulus. In some of the axons studied, 4-AP led to overcoming of conduction block. Although many axons showed increased excitability properties in the presence of 4-AP, the frequency-following ability of the axons was reduced, and the absolute refractory period of the axons was increased. These results indicate that pharmacological blockade of potassium channels with 4-AP not only leads to action potential broadening in demyelinated axons, but to a variety of excitability changes. These heterogeneous effects of 4-AP should be considered in the rationale for its clinical use.

  20. Abnormal insulin levels and vertigo.

    PubMed

    Proctor, C A

    1981-10-01

    Fifty patients with unexplained vertigo (36) or lightheadedness (14) are evaluated, all of whom had abnormal ENGs and normal audiograms. Five hour insulin glucose tolerance tests were performance on all patients, with insulin levels being obtained fasting and at one-half, one, two, and three hours. The results of this investigation were remarkable. Borderline or abnormal insulin levels were discovered in 82% of patients; 90% were found to have either an abnormal glucose tolerance test or at least borderline insulin levels. The response to treatment in these dizzy patients was also startling, with appropriate low carbohydrate diets improving the patient's symptoms in 90% of cases. It is, therefore, apparent that the earliest identification of carbohydrate imbalance with an insulin glucose tolerance test is extremely important in the work-up of the dizzy patients.

  1. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  2. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    regeneration using our approach with an acellular nerve allograft to be equivalent to standard autograft repair in rodent models. An ongoing large animal ...be clinically acceptable for use in the animal studies in Aim 2. The anatomy of HAM is shown pictorially in Figure 7. In vivo, the epithelial...product. Given that the large animal studies with large caliber nerves in Aim 3 will use AxoGuard we feel that the single layer SIS material is totally

  3. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    around the nerve ends performed following application of 0.1% Rose Bengal dye in saline to wrap and epineurium with illumination at 532 nm. The HAM...results obtained with the three fixation methods under study (a) epineurial suture, (b) fibrin glue and (c) photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) with a...wrap material. All methods induced bonding between the nerve segments with bond strength in the order of suture>PTB> fibrin glue. Conventional

  4. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    performed following application of 0.1% Rose Bengal dye in saline to wrap and epineurium with illumination at 532 nm. The HAM wrap/nerve sample was then...the three fixation methods under study (a) epineurial suture, (b) fibrin glue and (c) photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) with a wrap material. All...methods induced bonding between the nerve segments with bond strength in the order of suture>PTB> fibrin glue. Conventional epineurial suturing using

  5. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    harvested from donor rats immediately post-euthanasia (Task 1g) and bonding of the wrap around the nerve ends performed following application of 0.1...a) epineurial suture, (b) fibrin glue and (c) photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) with a wrap material. All methods induced bonding between the nerve...segments with bond strength in the order of suture>PTB> fibrin glue. Conventional epineurial suturing using six 10.0 nylon sutures resulted in the

  6. Inferior alveolar nerve injury following orthognathic surgery: a review of assessment issues

    PubMed Central

    PHILLIPS, C.; ESSICK, G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The sensory branches of the trigeminal nerve encode information about facial expressions, speaking and chewing movements, and stimuli that come into contact with the orofacial tissues. Whatever the cause, damage to the inferior alveolar nerve negatively affects the quality of facial sensibility as well as the patient's ability to translate patterns of altered nerve activity into functionally meaningful motor behaviours. There is no generally accepted, standard method of estimating sensory disturbances in the distribution of the inferior alveolar nerve following injury. Assessment of sensory alterations can be conducted using three types of measures: (i) objective electrophysiological measures of nerve conduction, (ii) sensory testing (stimulus) measures and (iii) patient report. Each type of measure with advantages and disadvantages for use are reviewed. PMID:21058973

  7. Nerves as embodied metaphor in the Canada/Mexico seasonal agricultural workers program.

    PubMed

    Mysyk, Avis; England, Margaret; Gallegos, Juan Arturo Avila

    2008-01-01

    This article examines nerves among participants in the Canada/Mexico Seasonal Agricultural Workers Program (C/MSAWP). Based on in-depth interviews with 30 Mexican farm workers in southwestern Ontario, we demonstrate that nerves embodies the distress of economic need, relative powerlessness, and the contradictions inherent in the C/MSAWP that result in various life's lesions. We also explore their use of the nerves idiom as an embodied metaphor for their awareness of the breakdown in self/society relations and, in certain cases, of the lack of control over even themselves. This article contributes to that body of literature that locates nerves at the "normal" end of the "normal/abnormal" continuum of popular illness categories because, despite the similarities in symptoms of nerves among Mexican farm workers and those of anxiety and/or mood disorders, medicalization has not occurred. If nerves has not been medicalized among Mexican farm workers, neither has it given rise to resistance to their relative powerlessness as migrant farm workers. Nonetheless, nerves does serve as an effective vehicle for expressing their distress within the context of the C/MSAWP.

  8. US of the Peripheral Nerves of the Upper Extremity: A Landmark Approach.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jordan M; Yablon, Corrie M; Morag, Yoav; Brandon, Catherine J; Jacobson, Jon A

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) has become a first-line modality for the evaluation of the peripheral nerves of the upper extremity. The benefits of US over magnetic resonance (MR) imaging include higher soft-tissue resolution, cost effectiveness, portability, real-time and dynamic imaging, and the ability to scan an entire extremity quickly and efficiently. US can be performed on patients who are not eligible for MR imaging. Metallic implant artifacts are usually not problematic. US has been shown to have equal specificity and greater sensitivity than MR imaging in the evaluation of peripheral nerves. Any abnormal findings can be easily compared with the contralateral side. The published literature has shown that US has demonstrated clinical utility in patients with suspected peripheral nerve disease by guiding diagnostic and therapeutic decisions as well as by confirming electrodiagnostic findings. Common indications for upper extremity peripheral nerve US are the evaluation for injury due to penetrating trauma, entrapment by scar tissue, and tumor. US of the upper extremity is most commonly performed to evaluate carpal and cubital tunnel syndrome. It is important for the radiologist or sonographer to have a detailed knowledge of anatomy and specific anatomic landmarks for each nerve to efficiently and accurately perform an examination. The goal of this article is to introduce readers to the basics of US of the peripheral nerves of the upper extremity with a focus on the median, ulnar, and radial nerves. Common sites of disease and the location of important anatomic landmarks will be reviewed.

  9. Initial Pattern of Optic Nerve Enhancement in Korean Patients with Unilateral Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Son, Dae Yong; Park, Kyung-Ah; Seok, Su Sie; Lee, Ju-Yeun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to demonstrate whether the pattern of optic nerve enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can help to differentiate between idiopathic optic neuritis (ON), neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and multiple sclerosis (MS) in unilateral ON. Methods An MRI of the brain and orbits was obtained in patients with acute unilateral ON. Patients with ON were divided into three groups: NMO, MS, and idiopathic ON. The length and location of the abnormal optic nerve enhancement were compared for ON eyes with and without NMO or MS. The correlation between the pattern of optic nerve enhancement and the outcome of visual function was analyzed. Results Of the 36 patients with ON who underwent an MRI within 2 weeks of the onset, 19 were diagnosed with idiopathic ON, 9 with NMO, and 8 with MS. Enhancement of the optic nerve occurred in 21 patients (58.3%) and was limited to the orbital segment in 12 patients. Neither the length nor the location of the optic nerve enhancement was significantly correlated with visual functions other than contrast sensitivity or the diagnosis of idiopathic ON, MS, or NMO. Patients with greater extent of optic nerve sheath enhancement and more posterior segment involvement showed higher contrast sensitivity. Conclusions Our data revealed that the pattern of optic nerve enhancement was not associated with diagnosis of idiopathic ON, NMO, or MS in Korean patients with unilateral ON. We believe further studies that include different ethnic groups will lead to a more definitive answer on this subject. PMID:28243026

  10. [Peripheral Nerve Injuries in Sports].

    PubMed

    Tettenborn, B; Mehnert, S; Reuter, I

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries due to sports are relatively rare but the exact incidence is not known due to a lack of epidemiological studies. Particular sports activities tend to cause certain peripheral nerve injuries including direct acute compression or stretching, repetitive compression and stretching over time, or another mechanism such as ischemia or laceration. These nerve lesions may be severe and delay or preclude the athlete's return to sports, especially in cases with delayed diagnosis. Repetitive and vigorous use or overuse makes the athlete vulnerable to disorders of the peripheral nerves, and sports equipment may cause compression of the nerves. Depending on etiology, the treatment is primarily conservative and includes physiotherapy, modification of movements and sports equipment, shoe inserts, splinting, antiphlogistic drugs, sometimes local administration of glucocorticoids or, lately, the use of extracorporeal shock waves. Most often, cessation of the offending physical activity is necessary. Surgery is only indicated in the rare cases of direct traumatic nerve injury or when symptoms are refractory to conservative therapy. Prognosis mainly depends on the etiology and the available options of modifying measures.This article is based on the publications "Reuter I, Mehnert S. Engpasssyndrome peripherer Nerven bei Sportlern". Akt Neurol 2012;39:292-308 and Sportverl Sportschad 2013;27:130-146.

  11. Ectodermal dysplasia and abnormal thumbs.

    PubMed

    Lucky, A W; Esterly, N B; Tunnessen, W W

    1980-05-01

    Two unrelated children, a girl and a boy, with alopecia, anomalous cutaneous pigmentation, abnormal thumbs, and endocrine disorders, including short stature and delayed bone age in one patient and juvenile onset diabetes mellitus in the other, are described. In one instance, the mother and the maternal grandmother had similar abnormalities, although of a less severe nature. Both children had normal nails and no unusual susceptibility to infections. We believe these two patients represent a previously undescribed syndrome of ectodermal dysplasia that may be inherited as an autosomal-dominant trait.

  12. Neurologic abnormalities in workers of a 1-bromopropane factory.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, Gaku; Li, Weihua; Shibata, Eiji; Ding, Xuncheng; Wang, Hailan; Liang, Yideng; Peng, Simeng; Itohara, Seiichiro; Kamijima, Michihiro; Fan, Qiyuan; Zhang, Yunhui; Zhong, Enhong; Wu, Xiaoyun; Valentine, William M; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2004-09-01

    We reported recently that 1-bromopropane (1-BP; n-propylbromide, CAS Registry no. 106-94-5), an alternative to ozone-depleting solvents, is neurotoxic and exhibits reproductive toxicity in rats. The four most recent case reports suggested possible neurotoxicity of 1-BP in workers. The aim of the present study was to establish the neurologic effects of 1-BP in workers and examine the relationship with exposure levels. We surveyed 27 female workers in a 1-BP production factory and compared 23 of them with 23 age-matched workers in a beer factory as controls. The workers were interviewed and examined by neurologic, electrophysiologic, hematologic, biochemical, neurobehavioral, and postural sway tests. 1-BP exposure levels were estimated with passive samplers. Tests with a tuning fork showed diminished vibration sensation of the foot in 15 workers exposed to 1-BP but in none of the controls. 1-BP factory workers showed significantly longer distal latency in the tibial nerve than did the controls but no significant changes in motor nerve conduction velocity. Workers also displayed lower values in sensory nerve conduction velocity in the sural nerve, backward recalled digits, Benton visual memory test scores, pursuit aiming test scores, and five items of the Profile of Mood States (POMS) test (tension, depression, anxiety, fatigue, and confusion) compared with controls matched for age and education. Workers hired after May 1999, who were exposed to 1-BP only (workers hired before 1999 could have also been exposed to 2-BP), showed similar changes in vibration sense, distal latency, Benton test scores, and depression and fatigue in the POMS test. Time-weighted average exposure levels in the workers were 0.34-49.19 ppm. Exposure to 1-BP could adversely affect peripheral nerves or/and the central nervous system.

  13. Spatial analysis improves the detection of early corneal nerve fiber loss in patients with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Karsten; Strom, Alexander; Zhivov, Andrey; Allgeier, Stephan; Papanas, Nikolaos; Ziegler, Iris; Brüggemann, Jutta; Ringel, Bernd; Peschel, Sabine; Köhler, Bernd; Stachs, Oliver; Guthoff, Rudolf F.; Roden, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) has revealed reduced corneal nerve fiber (CNF) length and density (CNFL, CNFD) in patients with diabetes, but the spatial pattern of CNF loss has not been studied. We aimed to determine whether spatial analysis of the distribution of corneal nerve branching points (CNBPs) may contribute to improving the detection of early CNF loss. We hypothesized that early CNF decline follows a clustered rather than random distribution pattern of CNBPs. CCM, nerve conduction studies (NCS), and quantitative sensory testing (QST) were performed in a cross-sectional study including 86 patients recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and 47 control subjects. In addition to CNFL, CNFD, and branch density (CNBD), CNBPs were analyzed using spatial point pattern analysis (SPPA) including 10 indices and functional statistics. Compared to controls, patients with diabetes showed lower CNBP density and higher nearest neighbor distances, and all SPPA parameters indicated increased clustering of CNBPs (all P<0.05). SPPA parameters were abnormally increased >97.5th percentile of controls in up to 23.5% of patients. When combining an individual SPPA parameter with CNFL, ≥1 of 2 indices were >99th or <1st percentile of controls in 28.6% of patients compared to 2.1% of controls, while for the conventional CNFL/CNFD/CNBD combination the corresponding rates were 16.3% vs 2.1%. SPPA parameters correlated with CNFL and several NCS and QST indices in the controls (all P<0.001), whereas in patients with diabetes these correlations were markedly weaker or lost. In conclusion, SPPA reveals increased clustering of early CNF loss and substantially improves its detection when combined with a conventional CCM measure in patients with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes. PMID:28296936

  14. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor -A Rare Malignancy in Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Kotina, Sreekanth; Uppala, Divya; Kumar, Singam Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is biologically an aggressive tumor that is usually found in the extremities, trunk and infrequently found in the head and neck area particularly in the jaws, arising from the cells allied with nerve sheath. Mandibular MPNST may either arise from a preexisting neurofibroma or develop de novo. Because of the greater variability from case to case in overall appearance both clinically and histologically, a case of MPNST of the mandible in a 25-year-old female patient is reported. The lesion was excised and immunohistological studies (S-100 & Neuron specific enolase) were conducted to confirm the neural origin. PMID:27504425

  15. Constituent ratio of motor fibers from the C5-C7 spinal nerves in the radial nerve is greater in pup rats than in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Nie, Mingbo; Chen, Liang; Gu, Yudong

    2012-06-01

    Clinically, injuries of C5-C7 of the brachial plexus cause falling of the wrist and fingers in infants but not in adults unless 4 consecutive spinal nerves are injured. The purpose of this study was to compare the constituent difference of spinal nerves in the radial nerve between pup and adult rats.A group of 16 pup rats and a group of 16 adult rats were each divided into 2 groups of 8 (P1 and A1 groups, C5-C6 were divided; P2 and A2 groups, C5-C7 were divided]). A nerve conduction study and histological examination were performed to evaluate radial nerve innervation to the extensor digitorum communis muscle after dividing the spinal nerves. Retrograde tracing with 5% cholera toxin B for anterior horn motoneurons of the spinal cord innervating the radial nerve was performed in 8 pup rats and 8 adult rats. Results showed that the division of C5-C7 caused more significant damage to radial nerve innervation to the extensor digitorum communis in pups than in adults, although the division of C5-C6 did not. In pups, the percentages (median with interquartile) of anterior horn motoneurons of the spinal cord innervating the radial nerve were 36.4 (28.3-38.5) in C5-C6, 28.1 (24.5-32.5) in C7, and 37.5 (36.5-39.3) in C8-T1. In adults, they were 24.2 (23.6-27.8) in C5-C6, 21.8 (19.5-26.3) in C7, and 50.7 (48.7-55.5) C8-T1.This study implies that C7 innervation in the radial nerve in humans may be more critical to the function of this nerve in infants than in adults.

  16. Abnormal development of the lesser wing of the sphenoid with microphthalmos and microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Jacquemin, C; Mullaney, P; Bosley, T M

    2001-02-01

    We report two patients with abnormal development of the lesser wing of the sphenoid bone, globe, optic nerve and cerebral hemisphere without stigmata of neurofibromatosis type 1. The lesser wing of the sphenoid bone was abnormally formed and was not ossified ipsilateral to the dysmorphic eye and underdeveloped cerebral hemisphere. Maldevelopment of the sphenoid wing may interfere with the normal closure of the optic vesicle and normal growth of encephalic structures, possibly by disturbing developmental tissue interactions. These patients may exhibit a type of restricted primary sphenoid dysplasia, while the sphenoid dysplasia of neurofibromatosis type 1 may be secondary to orbital or ocular neurofibromas and other factors associated with that disease.

  17. Platysma Motor Nerve Transfer for Restoring Marginal Mandibular Nerve Function

    PubMed Central

    Jensson, David; Weninger, Wolfgang J.; Schmid, Melanie; Meng, Stefan; Tzou, Chieh-Han John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Injuries of the marginal mandibular nerve (MMN) of the facial nerve result in paralysis of the lower lip muscle depressors and an asymmetrical smile. Nerve reconstruction, when possible, is the method of choice; however, in cases of long nerve gaps or delayed nerve reconstruction, conventional nerve repairs may be difficult to perform or may provide suboptimal outcomes. Herein, we investigate the anatomical technical feasibility of transfer of the platysma motor nerve (PMN) to the MMN for restoration of lower lip function, and we present a clinical case where this nerve transfer was successfully performed. Methods: Ten adult fresh cadavers were dissected. Measurements included the number of MMN and PMN branches, the maximal length of dissection of the PMN from the parotid, and the distance from the anterior border of the parotid to the facial artery. The PMN reach for direct coaptation to the MMN at the level of the crossing with the facial artery was assessed. We performed histomorphometric analysis of the MMN and PMN branches. Results: The anatomy of the MMN and PMN was consistent in all dissections, with an average number of subbranches of 1.5 for the MMN and 1.2 for the PMN. The average maximal length of dissection of the PMN was 46.5 mm, and in every case, tension-free coaptation with the MMN was possible. Histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that the MMN contained an average of 3,866 myelinated fiber counts per millimeter, and the PMN contained 5,025. After a 3-year follow-up of the clinical case, complete recovery of MMN function was observed, without the need of central relearning and without functional or aesthetic impairment resulting from denervation of the platysma muscle. Conclusions: PMN to MMN transfer is an anatomically feasible procedure for reconstruction of isolated MMN injuries. In our patient, by direct nerve coaptation, a faster and full recovery of lower lip muscle depressors was achieved without the need of central

  18. Laminin-based Nanomaterials for Peripheral Nerve Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Rebekah Anne

    supported by nerve conduction studies and electromyography which described impulse transmission, muscle stimulation, and foot twitch through the region of regeneration. These studies provide a firm foundation for the use of natural-synthetic blend electrospun nanofibers to enhance existing hollow nerve guidance conduits. The similarity in surgical technique and obvious benefit to the patient should lead to rapid translation into clinical application.

  19. Vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders.

    PubMed

    Sando, I; Orita, Y; Miura, M; Balaban, C D

    2001-10-01

    This paper reviews the histopathologic features of vestibular abnormalities in congenital disorders affecting the inner ear, based upon a comprehensive literature survey and a review of cases in our temporal bone collection. The review proceeds in three systematic steps. First, we surveyed associated diseases with the major phenotypic features of congenital abnormalities of the inner ear (including the internal auditory canal and otic capsule). Second, the vestibular anomalies are examined specifically. Finally, the anomalies are discussed from a developmental perspective. Among vestibular anomalies, a hypoplastic endolymphatic duct and sac are observed most frequently. Anomalies of the semicircular canals are also often observed. From embryological and clinical viewpoints, many of these resemble the structural features from fetal stages and appear to be associated with vestibular dysfunction. It is expected that progress in genetic analysis and accumulation of temporal bone specimens with vestibular abnormalities in congenital diseases will provide crucial information not only for pathology of those diseases, but also for genetic factors that are responsible for the specific vestibular abnormalities.

  20. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Zhi-Yue; Zhang, Ze-Peng; Mo, Zhou-Yun; Chen, Shi-Jie; Xiang, Si-Yu; Zhang, Qing-Shan; Xue, Min

    2015-09-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury.

  1. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Zhi-yue; Zhang, Ze-peng; Mo, Zhou-yun; Chen, Shi-jie; Xiang, Si-yu; Zhang, Qing-shan; Xue, Min

    2015-01-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury. PMID:26604912

  2. Identification of Changes in Gene expression of rats after Sensory and Motor Nerves Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Guo, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Xun; Lu, Shi-Bi; Xu, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang

    2016-06-02

    Wallerian degeneration is a sequence of events in the distal stump of axotomized nerves. Despite large numbers of researches concentrating on WD, the biological mechanism still remains unclear. Hence we constructed a rat model with both motor and sensory nerves injury and then conducted a RNA-seq analysis. Here the rats were divided into the 4 following groups: normal motor nerves (NMN), injured motor nerves (IMN), normal sensory nerves (NSN) and injured sensory nerves (ISN). The transcriptomes of rats were sequenced by the Illumina HiSeq. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of 4 combinations including NMN vs. IMN, NSN vs. ISN, NMN vs. NSN and IMN vs. ISN were identified respectively. For the above 4 combinations, we identified 1666, 1514, 95 and 17 DEGs. We found that NMN vs. IMN shared the most common genes with NSN vs. ISN indicating common mechanisms between motor nerves injury and sensory nerves injury. At last, we performed an enrichment analysis and observed that the DEGs of NMN vs IMN and NSN vs. ISN were significantly associated with binding and activity, immune response, biosynthesis, metabolism and development. We hope our study may shed light on the molecular mechanisms of nerves degeneration and regeneration during WD.

  3. Intraoperative Assessment of Facial Nerve Trunk Width in Early Childhood With Cervicofacial Lymphatic Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ara; Seo, Jeong-Meen; Lim, So Young

    2017-01-01

    Background Facial nerve damage during head and neck surgery has long been an important issue. However, few publications on the gross anatomy of the facial nerve are available in the young population. The aim of this study was to provide in vivo measurements of the facial nerve trunk during lymphatic malformation (LM) resection and to determine the association between the trunk width and patient- and disease-related variables. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of 11 consecutive pediatric patients (11 facial nerve trunks) who underwent cervicofacial LM resection. The facial nerve of the affected side was dissected, and its trunk width at bifurcation was measured using calipers under a microscope during the operation. Results Eleven patients younger than 6 years were enrolled. The median width of the facial nerve in patients younger than 1 year was 1.15 mm; it was 2.5 mm in those older than 1 year. Trunk width was significantly greater in patients older than 1 year than those younger than 1 year, whereas no statistical significance was found when comparing other age groups. Patient weight was positively correlated with trunk width, whereas LM grade and diameter showed no significant correlation. Conclusions The significantly greater width of the facial nerve trunk in LM patients older than 1 year than those younger than 1 year suggests that the age of 1 may be a threshold for facial nerve hypertrophy and growth acceleration. This study provides informative in vivo data to help understand facial nerve characteristics in young patients. PMID:27922488

  4. Mitochondrial dynamics and inherited peripheral nerve diseases.

    PubMed

    Pareyson, Davide; Saveri, Paola; Sagnelli, Anna; Piscosquito, Giuseppe

    2015-06-02

    Peripheral nerves have peculiar energetic requirements because of considerable length of axons and therefore correct mitochondria functioning and distribution along nerves is fundamental. Mitochondrial dynamics refers to the continuous change in size, shape, and position of mitochondria within cells. Abnormalities of mitochondrial dynamics produced by mutations in proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion (mitofusin-2, MFN2), fission (ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein-1, GDAP1), and mitochondrial axonal transport usually present with a Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) phenotype. MFN2 mutations cause CMT type 2A by altering mitochondrial fusion and trafficking along the axonal microtubule system. CMT2A is an axonal autosomal dominant CMT type which in most cases is characterized by early onset and rather severe course. GDAP1 mutations also alter fission, fusion and transport of mitochondria and are associated either with recessive demyelinating (CMT4A) and axonal CMT (AR-CMT2K) and, less commonly, with dominant, milder, axonal CMT (CMT2K). OPA1 (Optic Atrophy-1) is involved in fusion of mitochondrial inner membrane, and its heterozygous mutations lead to early-onset and progressive dominant optic atrophy which may be complicated by other neurological symptoms including peripheral neuropathy. Mutations in several proteins fundamental for the axonal transport or forming the axonal cytoskeleton result in peripheral neuropathy, i.e., CMT, distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) or hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN), as well as in hereditary spastic paraplegia. Indeed, mitochondrial transport involves directly or indirectly components of the kinesin superfamily (KIF5A, KIF1A, KIF1B), responsible of anterograde transport, and of the dynein complex and related proteins (DYNC1H1, dynactin, dynamin-2), implicated in retrograde flow. Microtubules, neurofilaments, and chaperones such as heat shock proteins (HSPs) also have a fundamental

  5. Tissue-Engineered Nanofibrous Nerve Grafts for Enhancing the Rate of Nerve Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    bioactivity, transport features and mechanics ideal for enhancing the rate of nerve regeneration and healing critical sized nerve defects. We further...scaffolds in bioreactors prior to implantation in rat critical sized nerve defect model. 2. KEYWORDS: nerve regeneration, nerve guidance conduit...for an optimal nerve graft (Figure 1; Figure 2). Different wall thickness was achieved by using 6 different salt sizes . The 0.1mm wall thickness

  6. Functional recovery guided by an electrospun silk fibroin conduit after sciatic nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Sook Young; Ki, Chang Seok; Park, Young Hwan; Lee, Kwang Gill; Kang, Seok Woo; Kweon, Hae Yong; Kim, Hyun Jeong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the regenerative capacity of a newly developed nerve guidance conduit using electrospun silk fibroin (SFNC) implanted in a 10-mm defect of the sciatic nerve in rats. After evaluating the physical properties and cytocompatibility of SFNC in vitro, rats were randomly allocated into three groups: defect only, autograft and SFNC. To compare motor function and abnormal sensation among groups, ankle stance angle (ASA) and severity of autotomy were observed for 10 weeks after injury. Immunostaining with axonal neurofilament (NF) and myelin basic protein (MBP) antibodies were performed to investigate regenerated nerve fibres inside SFNC. ASA increased significantly in the SFNC group at 1, 7 and 10 weeks after injury compared to the defect only group (p<0.05). At one week, mean ASA of the SFNC group was significantly higher than that of the autograft group (p<0.05). Onset and severity of autotomy decreased significantly in the SFNC group compared to other groups (p<0.05). Autotomy in the SFNC group started at 4 weeks and maximally reached toe level. However, the defect only and autograft groups first showed autotomy at 2 and 1 weeks following injury, respectively, and then reached the sole level. Well myelinated nerve fibres stained with NF and MBP were found inside SFNC. In conclusion, SFNC could be helpful in restoring motor function and preventing abnormal sensations after nerve injury.

  7. Comparison of the fastest regenerating motor and sensory myelinated axons in the same peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Mihai; Sørensen, Jesper; Krarup, Christian

    2006-09-01

    Functional outcome after peripheral nerve regeneration is often poor, particularly involving nerve injuries far from their targets. Comparison of sensory and motor axon regeneration before target reinnervation is not possible in the clinical setting, and previous experimental studies addressing the question of differences in growth rates of different nerve fibre populations led to conflicting results. We developed an animal model to compare growth and maturation of the fastest growing sensory and motor fibres within the same mixed nerve after Wallerian degeneration. Regeneration of cat tibial nerve after crush (n = 13) and section (n = 7) was monitored for up to 140 days, using implanted cuff electrodes placed around the sciatic and tibial nerves and wire electrodes at plantar muscles. To distinguish between sensory and motor fibres, recordings were carried out from L6-S2 spinal roots using cuff electrodes. The timing of laminectomy was based on the presence of regenerating fibres along the nerve within the tibial cuff. Stimulation of unlesioned tibial nerves (n = 6) evoked the largest motor response in S1 ventral root and the largest sensory response in L7 dorsal root. Growth rates were compared by mapping the regenerating nerve fibres within the tibial nerve cuff to all ventral or dorsal roots and, regardless of the lesion type, the fastest growth was similar in sensory and motor fibres. Maturation was assessed as recovery of the maximum motor and sensory conduction velocities (CVs) within the tibial nerve cuff. Throughout the observation period the CV was approximately 14% faster in regenerated sensory fibres than in motor fibres in accordance with the difference observed in control nerves. Recovery of amplitude was only partial after section, whereas the root distribution pattern was restored. Our data suggest that the fastest growth and maturation rates that can be achieved during regeneration are similar for motor and sensory myelinated fibres.

  8. What Protects Certain Nerves from Stretch Injury?

    PubMed

    Schraut, Nicholas B; Walton, Sharon; Bou Monsef, Jad; Shott, Susan; Serici, Anthony; Soulii, Lioubov; Amirouche, Farid; Gonzalez, Mark H; Kerns, James M

    2016-01-01

    The human tibial nerves is less prone to injury following joint arthroplasty compared with the peroneal nerves. Besides the anatomical distribution, other features may confer protection from stretch injury. We therefore examined the size, shape and connective tissue distribution for the two nerves. The tibial and peroneal nerves from each side of nine fresh human cadavers we reharvested mid-thigh. Proximal segments manually stretched 20%-25% were fixed in aldehyde, while the adjacent distal segments were fixed in their natural length. Paraffin sections stained by Masson's trichrome method for connective tissue were examined by light microscopy. Tibial nerves had 2X more fascicles compared with the peroneal, but the axonal content appeared similar. Analysis showed that neither nerve had a significant reduction in cross sectional area of the fascicles following stretch. However, fascicles from stretched tibial nerves become significantly more oval compared with those from unstretched controls and peroneal nerves. Tibial nerves had a greater proportion that was extrafascicular tissue (50-55%) compared with peroneal nerves (38%-42%). This epineurium was typically adipose tissue. Perineurial thickness in both nerves was directly related to fascicular size. Tibial nerves have several unique histological features associated with size, shape and tissue composition compared with the peroneal nerve. We suggest that more fascicles with their tightly bound perineurium and more robust epineurium afford protection against stretch injury. Mechanical studies should clarify how size and shape contribute to nerve protection and/or neurapraxia.

  9. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Can Identify Trigeminal System Abnormalities in Classical Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    DeSouza, Danielle D.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Davis, Karen D.

    2016-01-01

    Classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a chronic pain disorder that has been described as one of the most severe pains one can suffer. The most prevalent theory of TN etiology is that the trigeminal nerve is compressed at the root entry zone (REZ) by blood vessels. However, there is significant evidence showing a lack of neurovascular compression (NVC) for many cases of classical TN. Furthermore, a considerable number of patients who are asymptomatic have MR evidence of NVC. Since there is no validated animal model that reproduces the clinical features of TN, our understanding of TN pathology mainly comes from biopsy studies that have limitations. Sophisticated structural MRI techniques including diffusion tensor imaging provide new opportunities to assess the trigeminal nerves and CNS to provide insight into TN etiology and pathogenesis. Specifically, studies have used high-resolution structural MRI methods to visualize patterns of trigeminal nerve-vessel relationships and to detect subtle pathological features at the trigeminal REZ. Structural MRI has also identified CNS abnormalities in cortical and subcortical gray matter and white matter and demonstrated that effective neurosurgical treatment for TN is associated with a reversal of specific nerve and brain abnormalities. In conclusion, this review highlights the advanced structural neuroimaging methods that are valuable tools to assess the trigeminal system in TN and may inform our current understanding of TN pathology. These methods may in the future have clinical utility for the development of neuroimaging-based biomarkers of TN. PMID:27807409

  10. Fiber diameter distributions in the chinchilla's ampullary nerves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Larry F.; Honrubia, Vicente

    2002-01-01

    A morphometric study of the chinchilla's ampullary nerves was conducted to produce an unbiased accounting of the diameter distribution of their constituent fibers. Diameter analyses were determined from 1 microm plastic-embedded nerve sections taken at a plane immediately proximal to the sensory epithelium. We found these nerves to be composed of 2094+/-573 fibers, having diameters that ranged from 0.5 to 8 microm. The distributions of diameters were positively skewed, where approximately 75% of the fibers were found to have diameters less than 3.5 microm. An analysis of the spatial distribution of diameters within the nerve section revealed that the lateralmost areas of the nerve contained larger fractions of fibers within the smallest diameter quintiles, and the central area harbored greater proportions of the larger diameter quintiles. However, significant fractions of all quintiles were found in all areas. These data were integrated with available data of Fernandez et al. (1998) to produce diameter estimates of calyx, dimorphic, and bouton morphology subpopulations. In view of a general relationship between diameter, innervation locus, and an afferent's physiologic characteristics, these data provide the basis for developing a perspective for the in situ distribution of afferent response dynamics.

  11. Cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and arrhythmia☆

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quan; Chen, Dongmei; Wang, Yonggang; Zhao, Xin; Zheng, Yang

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the distribution characteristics of cardiac autonomic nerves and to explore the correlation between cardiac autonomic nerve distribution and arrhythmia. DATA RETRIEVAL: A computer-based retrieval was performed for papers examining the distribution of cardiac autonomic nerves, using heart, autonomic nerve, sympathetic nerve, vagus nerve, nerve distribution, rhythm and atrial fibrillation as the key words. SELECTION CRITERIA: A total of 165 studies examining the distribution of cardiac autonomic nerve were screened, and 46 of them were eventually included. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The distribution and characteristics of cardiac autonomic