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Sample records for abnormal neural connectivity

  1. Abnormal Neural Connectivity in Schizophrenia and fMRI-Brain-Computer Interface as a Potential Therapeutic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Sergio; Birbaumer, Niels; Sitaram, Ranganatha

    2012-01-01

    Considering that single locations of structural and functional abnormalities are insufficient to explain the diverse psychopathology of schizophrenia, new models have postulated that the impairments associated with the disease arise from a failure to integrate the activity of local and distributed neural circuits: the “abnormal neural connectivity hypothesis.” In the last years, new evidence coming from neuroimaging have supported and expanded this theory. However, despite the increasing evidence that schizophrenia is a disorder of neural connectivity, so far there are no treatments that have shown to produce a significant change in brain connectivity, or that have been specifically designed to alleviate this problem. Brain-Computer Interfaces based on real-time functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI-BCI) are novel techniques that have allowed subjects to achieve self-regulation of circumscribed brain regions. In recent studies, experiments with this technology have resulted in new findings suggesting that this methodology could be used to train subjects to enhance brain connectivity, and therefore could potentially be used as a therapeutic tool in mental disorders including schizophrenia. The present article summarizes the findings coming from hemodynamics-based neuroimaging that support the abnormal connectivity hypothesis in schizophrenia, and discusses a new approach that could address this problem. PMID:23525496

  2. Abnormal Left-Sided Orbitomedial Prefrontal Cortical–Amygdala Connectivity during Happy and Fear Face Processing: A Potential Neural Mechanism of Female MDD

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Jorge Renner Cardoso; Kronhaus, Dina Michaela; Sibille, Etienne L.; Langenecker, Scott A.; Versace, Amelia; LaBarbara, Edmund James; Phillips, Mary Louise

    2011-01-01

    Background: Pathophysiologic processes supporting abnormal emotion regulation in major depressive disorder (MDD) are poorly understood. We previously found abnormal inverse left-sided ventromedial prefrontal cortical–amygdala effective connectivity to happy faces in females with MDD. We aimed to replicate and expand this previous finding in an independent participant sample, using a more inclusive neural model, and a novel emotion processing paradigm. Methods: Nineteen individuals with MDD in depressed episode (12 females), and 19 healthy individuals, age, and gender matched, performed an implicit emotion processing and automatic attentional control paradigm to examine abnormalities in prefrontal cortical–amygdala neural circuitry during happy, angry, fearful, and sad face processing measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging in a 3-T scanner. Effective connectivity was estimated with dynamic causal modeling in a trinodal neural model including two anatomically defined prefrontal cortical regions, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and subgenual cingulate cortex (sgACC), and the amygdala. Results: We replicated our previous finding of abnormal inverse left-sided top-down ventromedial prefrontal cortical–amygdala connectivity to happy faces in females with MDD (p = 0.04), and also showed a similar pattern of abnormal inverse left-sided sgACC–amygdala connectivity to these stimuli (p = 0.03). These findings were paralleled by abnormally reduced positive left-sided ventromedial prefrontal cortical–sgACC connectivity to happy faces in females with MDD (p = 0.008), and abnormally increased positive left-sided sgACC–amygdala connectivity to fearful faces in females, and all individuals, with MDD (p = 0.008; p = 0.003). Conclusion: Different patterns of abnormal prefrontal cortical–amygdala connectivity to happy and fearful stimuli might represent neural mechanisms for the excessive self-reproach and comorbid anxiety that

  3. Weakly connected neural nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1990-01-01

    A new neural network architecture is proposed based upon effects of non-Lipschitzian dynamics. The network is fully connected, but these connections are active only during vanishingly short time periods. The advantages of this architecture are discussed.

  4. Detection of Structural Abnormalities Using Neural Nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.; Maccalla, A.; Daggumati, V.; Gulati, S.; Toomarian, N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a feed-forward neural net approach for detection of abnormal system behavior based upon sensor data analyses. A new dynamical invariant representing structural parameters of the system is introduced in such a way that any structural abnormalities in the system behavior are detected from the corresponding changes to the invariant.

  5. Abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in male psychopathic offenders

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenbrouwers, Sylco S.; De Jesus, Danilo R.; Sun, Yinming; Stirpe, Tania; Hofman, Dennis; McMaster, Jeff; Hughes, Ginny; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.; Schutter, Dennis J.L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Psychopathic offenders inevitably violate interpersonal norms and frequently resort to aggressive and criminal behaviour. The affective and cognitive deficits underlying these behaviours have been linked to abnormalities in functional interhemispheric connectivity. However, direct neurophysiological evidence for dysfunctional connectivity in psychopathic offenders is lacking. Methods We used transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography to examine interhemispheric connectivity in the dorsolateral and motor cortex in a sample of psychopathic offenders and healthy controls. We also measured intracortical inhibition and facilitation over the left and right motor cortex to investigate the effects of local cortical processes on interhemispheric connectivity. Results We enrolled 17 psychopathic offenders and 14 controls in our study. Global abnormalities in right to left functional connectivity were observed in psychopathic offenders compared with controls. Furthermore, in contrast to controls, psychopathic offenders showed increased intracortical inhibition in the right, but not the left, hemisphere. Limitations The relatively small sample size limited the sensitivity to show that the abnormalities in interhemispheric connectivity were specifically related to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in psychopathic offenders. Conclusion To our knowledge, this study provides the first neurophysiological evidence for abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in psychopathic offenders and may further our understanding of the disruptive antisocial behaviour of these offenders. PMID:23937798

  6. Abnormal Asymmetry of Brain Connectivity in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ribolsi, Michele; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.; Siracusano, Alberto; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a growing body of data has revealed that beyond a dysfunction of connectivity among different brain areas in schizophrenia patients (SCZ), there is also an abnormal asymmetry of functional connectivity compared with healthy subjects. The loss of the cerebral torque and the abnormalities of gyrification, with an increased or more complex cortical folding in the right hemisphere may provide an anatomical basis for such aberrant connectivity in SCZ. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown a significant reduction of leftward asymmetry in some key white-matter tracts in SCZ. In this paper, we review the studies that investigated both structural brain asymmetry and asymmetry of functional connectivity in healthy subjects and SCZ. From an analysis of the existing literature on this topic, we can hypothesize an overall generally attenuated asymmetry of functional connectivity in SCZ compared to healthy controls. Such attenuated asymmetry increases with the duration of the disease and correlates with psychotic symptoms. Finally, we hypothesize that structural deficits across the corpus callosum may contribute to the abnormal asymmetry of intra-hemispheric connectivity in schizophrenia. PMID:25566030

  7. Schizophrenia, abnormal connection, and brain evolution.

    PubMed

    Randall, P L

    1983-03-01

    Abnormalities of functional connection between specialized areas in the human brain may underlie the symptoms which constitute the schizophrenia syndrome. Callosal and intrahemispheric fibres may be equally involved. The clinical emergence of symptoms in the later stages of brain maturation may be dependent on myelination of these fibre groups, both of which have extended myelination cycles. Ontogenetically earlier variants of the same mechanism could theoretically result in dyslexia and the syndromes of Kanner and Gilles de la Tourette. As new and unique extensions of specialized function emerge within the evolving brain, biological trial and error of connection both within and between them may produce individuals possessing phylogenetically advanced abilities, or equally, others possessing a wide range of abnormalities including those which comprise the schizophrenia syndrome. A dormant phenotypic potential for schizophrenia may exist in individuals who never develop symptoms during the course of a lifetime though some of these may become clinically apparent under the influence of various precipitating factors. It is concluded that abnormal functional connection and its normal and "supernormal" counterparts may be natural, essential, and inevitable consequences of brain evolution, and that this may have been so throughout the history of vertebrate brain evolution.

  8. Connectivity and functional profiling of abnormal brain structures in pedophilia

    PubMed Central

    Poeppl, Timm B.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Fox, Peter T.; Laird, Angela R.; Rupprecht, Rainer; Langguth, Berthold; Bzdok, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    Despite its 0.5–1% lifetime prevalence in men and its general societal relevance, neuroimaging investigations in pedophilia are scarce. Preliminary findings indicate abnormal brain structure and function. However, no study has yet linked structural alterations in pedophiles to both connectional and functional properties of the aberrant hotspots. The relationship between morphological alterations and brain function in pedophilia as well as their contribution to its psychopathology thus remain unclear. First, we assessed bimodal connectivity of structurally altered candidate regions using meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM) and resting-state correlations employing openly accessible data. We compared the ensuing connectivity maps to the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) maps of a recent quantitative meta-analysis of brain activity during processing of sexual stimuli. Second, we functionally characterized the structurally altered regions employing meta-data of a large-scale neuroimaging database. Candidate regions were functionally connected to key areas for processing of sexual stimuli. Moreover, we found that the functional role of structurally altered brain regions in pedophilia relates to nonsexual emotional as well as neurocognitive and executive functions, previously reported to be impaired in pedophiles. Our results suggest that structural brain alterations affect neural networks for sexual processing by way of disrupted functional connectivity, which may entail abnormal sexual arousal patterns. The findings moreover indicate that structural alterations account for common affective and neurocognitive impairments in pedophilia. The present multi-modal integration of brain structure and function analyses links sexual and nonsexual psychopathology in pedophilia. PMID:25733379

  9. On neural connectivity estimation problems.

    PubMed

    Baccalá, Luiz A; Sameshima, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    After briefly recapping and reframing the problem of neural connectivity and its implications for today's brain mapping efforts, we argue that supplementing/replacing traditional conservative correlation based analysis methods requires active user understanding of the aims and limitations of the newly proposed multivariate analysis frameworks before the new methods can gain general acceptance and full profit can be made from the expanded descriptive opportunities they offer. PMID:26737512

  10. Liver abnormalities in connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Maria; Crotti, Chiara; Selmi, Carlo

    2013-08-01

    The liver is a lymphoid organ involved in the immune response and in the maintenance of tolerance to self molecules, but it is also a target of autoimmune reactions, as observed in primary liver autoimmune diseases (AILD) such as autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. Further, the liver is frequently involved in connective tissue diseases (CTD), most commonly in the form of liver function test biochemical changes with predominant cholestatic or hepatocellular patterns. CTD commonly affecting the liver include systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholypid syndrome, primary Sjögren's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis, polimyositis, and anti-synthetase syndrome, while overlap syndromes between AILD and CTD may also be diagnosed. Although liver cirrhosis and failure are extremely rare in patients with CTD, unusual liver conditions such as nodular regenerative hyperplasia or Budd-Chiari syndrome have been reported with increasing frequency in patients with CTD. Acute or progressing liver involvement is generally related to viral hepatitis reactivation or to a concomitant AILD, so it appears to be fundamental to screen patients for HBV and HCV infection, in order to provide the ideal therapeutic regimen and avoid life-threatening reactivations. Finally, it is important to remember that the main cause of biochemical liver abnormalities in patients with CTD is a drug-induced alteration or coexisting viral hepatitis. The present article will provide a general overview of the liver involvement in CTD to allow rheumatologists to discriminate the most common clinical scenarios.

  11. Neural Field Dynamics with Heterogeneous Connection Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qubbaj, Murad R.; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2007-06-01

    Neural fields receive inputs from local and nonlocal sources. Notably in a biologically realistic architecture the latter vary under spatial translations (heterogeneous), the former do not (homogeneous). To understand the mutual effects of homogeneous and heterogeneous connectivity, we study the stability of the steady state activity of a neural field as a function of its connectivity and transmission speed. We show that myelination, a developmentally relevant change of the heterogeneous connectivity, always results in the stabilization of the steady state via oscillatory instabilities, independent of the local connectivity. Nonoscillatory instabilities are shown to be independent of any influences of time delay.

  12. Classification of breast abnormalities using artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Nur Atiqah Kamarul; Rahman, Wan Eny Zarina Wan Abdul; Jumaat, Abdul Kadir; Yasiran, Siti Salmah

    2015-05-01

    Classification is the process of recognition, differentiation and categorizing objects into groups. Breast abnormalities are calcifications which are tumor markers that indicate the presence of cancer in the breast. The aims of this research are to classify the types of breast abnormalities using artificial neural network (ANN) classifier and to evaluate the accuracy performance using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve. The methods used in this research are ANN for breast abnormalities classifications and Canny edge detector as a feature extraction method. Previously the ANN classifier provides only the number of benign and malignant cases without providing information for specific cases. However in this research, the type of abnormality for each image can be obtained. The existing MIAS MiniMammographic database classified the mammogram images into three features only namely characteristic of background tissues, class of abnormality and radius of abnormality. However, in this research three other features are added-in. These three features are number of spots, area and shape of abnormalities. Lastly the performance of the ANN classifier is evaluated using ROC curve. It is found that ANN has an accuracy of 97.9% which is considered acceptable.

  13. Connective tissue abnormalities in MRL/1 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J C; Cooke, A; Moore, A R; Collins, C; Hay, F; Willoughby, D A

    1986-01-01

    Pathological changes in the connective tissue of the limbs of MRL/1 mice are described. Focal infiltrates of polymorphs or large mononuclear cells, or both, were seen both in synovial lining and subcutaneous tissue. Infiltrates were associated with vasculitis in some cases. Deposits of amorphous material were seen in and around joints and in foot pads. The material was more particulate and refractile than typical 'fibrinoid' and showed a positive Feulgen reaction. It was not surrounded by palisading cells and when seen in synovial tissue was not usually associated with changes in synovial lining cells. No obvious difference was seen between intra-articular and extra-articular lesions. Lesions in subcutaneous tissue occurred exclusively in the foot pads. Lymphocyte infiltration was not prominent at any site and no follicle formation was seen. Of two colonies studied, only one showed a significant increase in lining cell numbers in synovial tissue. Exercised animals had a similar distribution and severity of disease to those of matched controls. All lesions described were distinguishable from non-specific inflammatory lesions in normal control mice and MRL/++ mice on assessment of unmarked sections. The relation between these connective tissue lesions and the changes found in human chronic synovitis is discussed. Images PMID:3729576

  14. Physiological consequences of abnormal connectivity in a developmental epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Shafi, Mouhsin M.; Vernet, Marine; Klooster, Debby; Chu, Catherine J.; Boric, Katica; Barnard, Mollie E.; Romatoski, Kelsey; Westover, M. Brandon; Christodoulou, Joanna A.; Gabrieli, John D.E.; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Chang, Bernard S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Many forms of epilepsy are associated with aberrant neuronal connections, but the relationship between such pathological connectivity and the underlying physiological predisposition to seizures is unclear. We sought to characterize the cortical excitability profile of a developmental form of epilepsy known to have structural and functional connectivity abnormalities. Methods We employed transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with simultaneous EEG recording in eight patients with epilepsy from periventricular nodular heterotopia (PNH) and matched healthy controls. We used connectivity imaging findings to guide TMS targeting and compared the evoked responses to single-pulse stimulation from different cortical regions. Results Heterotopia patients with active epilepsy demonstrated a relatively augmented late cortical response that was greater than that of matched controls. This abnormality was specific to cortical regions with connectivity to subcortical heterotopic gray matter. Topographic mapping of the late response differences showed distributed cortical networks that were not limited to the stimulation site, and source analysis in one subject revealed that the generator of abnormal TMS-evoked activity overlapped with the spike and seizure onset zone. Interpretation Our findings indicate that patients with epilepsy from gray matter heterotopia have altered cortical physiology consistent with hyperexcitability, and that this abnormality is specifically linked to the presence of aberrant connectivity. These results support the idea that TMS-EEG could be a useful biomarker in epilepsy in gray matter heterotopia, expand our understanding of circuit mechanisms of epileptogenesis, and have potential implications for therapeutic neuromodulation in similar epileptic conditions associated with deep lesions. PMID:25858773

  15. Neural correlates of abnormal sensory discrimination in laryngeal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Ramdhani, Ritesh A; Battistella, Giovanni; Rubien-Thomas, Estee; Choy, Melissa; Farwell, Ian M; Velickovic, Miodrag; Blitzer, Andrew; Frucht, Steven J; Reilly, Richard B; Hutchinson, Michael; Ozelius, Laurie J; Simonyan, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant sensory processing plays a fundamental role in the pathophysiology of dystonia; however, its underpinning neural mechanisms in relation to dystonia phenotype and genotype remain unclear. We examined temporal and spatial discrimination thresholds in patients with isolated laryngeal form of dystonia (LD), who exhibited different clinical phenotypes (adductor vs. abductor forms) and potentially different genotypes (sporadic vs. familial forms). We correlated our behavioral findings with the brain gray matter volume and functional activity during resting and symptomatic speech production. We found that temporal but not spatial discrimination was significantly altered across all forms of LD, with higher frequency of abnormalities seen in familial than sporadic patients. Common neural correlates of abnormal temporal discrimination across all forms were found with structural and functional changes in the middle frontal and primary somatosensory cortices. In addition, patients with familial LD had greater cerebellar involvement in processing of altered temporal discrimination, whereas sporadic LD patients had greater recruitment of the putamen and sensorimotor cortex. Based on the clinical phenotype, adductor form-specific correlations between abnormal discrimination and brain changes were found in the frontal cortex, whereas abductor form-specific correlations were observed in the cerebellum and putamen. Our behavioral and neuroimaging findings outline the relationship of abnormal sensory discrimination with the phenotype and genotype of isolated LD, suggesting the presence of potentially divergent pathophysiological pathways underlying different manifestations of this disorder.

  16. Neural correlates of abnormal sensory discrimination in laryngeal dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Ramdhani, Ritesh A.; Battistella, Giovanni; Rubien-Thomas, Estee; Choy, Melissa; Farwell, Ian M.; Velickovic, Miodrag; Blitzer, Andrew; Frucht, Steven J.; Reilly, Richard B.; Hutchinson, Michael; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Simonyan, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant sensory processing plays a fundamental role in the pathophysiology of dystonia; however, its underpinning neural mechanisms in relation to dystonia phenotype and genotype remain unclear. We examined temporal and spatial discrimination thresholds in patients with isolated laryngeal form of dystonia (LD), who exhibited different clinical phenotypes (adductor vs. abductor forms) and potentially different genotypes (sporadic vs. familial forms). We correlated our behavioral findings with the brain gray matter volume and functional activity during resting and symptomatic speech production. We found that temporal but not spatial discrimination was significantly altered across all forms of LD, with higher frequency of abnormalities seen in familial than sporadic patients. Common neural correlates of abnormal temporal discrimination across all forms were found with structural and functional changes in the middle frontal and primary somatosensory cortices. In addition, patients with familial LD had greater cerebellar involvement in processing of altered temporal discrimination, whereas sporadic LD patients had greater recruitment of the putamen and sensorimotor cortex. Based on the clinical phenotype, adductor form-specific correlations between abnormal discrimination and brain changes were found in the frontal cortex, whereas abductor form-specific correlations were observed in the cerebellum and putamen. Our behavioral and neuroimaging findings outline the relationship of abnormal sensory discrimination with the phenotype and genotype of isolated LD, suggesting the presence of potentially divergent pathophysiological pathways underlying different manifestations of this disorder. PMID:26693398

  17. Abnormal thalamocortical structural and functional connectivity in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    O’Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Vollmar, Christian; Barker, Gareth J.; Kumari, Veena; Symms, Mark R.; Thompson, Pam; Duncan, John S.; Koepp, Matthias J.

    2012-01-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is the most common idiopathic generalized epilepsy, characterized by frequent myoclonic jerks, generalized tonic-clonic seizures and, less commonly, absences. Neuropsychological and, less consistently, anatomical studies have indicated frontal lobe dysfunction in the disease. Given its presumed thalamo–cortical basis, we investigated thalamo–cortical structural connectivity, as measured by diffusion tensor imaging, in a cohort of 28 participants with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and detected changes in an anterior thalamo–cortical bundle compared with healthy control subjects. We then investigated task-modulated functional connectivity from the anterior thalamic region identified using functional magnetic resonance imaging in a task consistently shown to be impaired in this group, phonemic verbal fluency. We demonstrate an alteration in task-modulated connectivity in a region of frontal cortex directly connected to the thalamus via the same anatomical bundle, and overlapping with the supplementary motor area. Further, we show that the degree of abnormal connectivity is related to disease severity in those with active seizures. By integrating methods examining structural and effective interregional connectivity, these results provide convincing evidence for abnormalities in a specific thalamo–cortical circuit, with reduced structural and task-induced functional connectivity, which may underlie the functional abnormalities in this idiopathic epilepsy. PMID:23250883

  18. Abnormal folate metabolism in foetuses affected by neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Dunlevy, Louisa P E; Chitty, Lyn S; Burren, Katie A; Doudney, Kit; Stojilkovic-Mikic, Taita; Stanier, Philip; Scott, Rosemary; Copp, Andrew J; Greene, Nicholas D E

    2007-04-01

    Folic acid supplementation can prevent many cases of neural tube defects (NTDs), whereas suboptimal maternal folate status is a risk factor, suggesting that folate metabolism is a key determinant of susceptibility to NTDs. Despite extensive genetic analysis of folate cycle enzymes, and quantification of metabolites in maternal blood, neither the protective mechanism nor the relationship between maternal folate status and susceptibility are understood in most cases. In order to investigate potential abnormalities in folate metabolism in the embryo itself, we derived primary fibroblastic cell lines from foetuses affected by NTDs and subjected them to the dU suppression test, a sensitive metabolic test of folate metabolism. Significantly, a subset of NTD cases exhibited low scores in this test, indicative of abnormalities in folate cycling that may be causally linked to the defect. Susceptibility to NTDs may be increased by suppression of the methylation cycle, which is interlinked with the folate cycle. However, reduced efficacy in the dU suppression test was not associated with altered abundance of the methylation cycle intermediates, s-adenosylmethionine and s-adenosylhomocysteine, suggesting that a methylation cycle defect is unlikely to be responsible for the observed abnormality of folate metabolism. Genotyping of samples for known polymorphisms in genes encoding folate-associated enzymes did not reveal any correlation between specific genotypes and the observed abnormalities in folate metabolism. These data suggest that as yet unrecognized genetic variants result in embryonic abnormalities of folate cycling that may be causally related to NTDs. PMID:17438019

  19. Abnormal Functional Connectivity in Autism Spectrum Disorders during Face Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinhans, Natalia M.; Richards, Todd; Sterling, Lindsey; Stegbauer, Keith C.; Mahurin, Roderick; Johnson, L. Clark; Greenson, Jessica; Dawson, Geraldine; Aylward, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Abnormalities in the interactions between functionally linked brain regions have been suggested to be associated with the clinical impairments observed in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We investigated functional connectivity within the limbic system during face identification; a primary component of social cognition, in 19 high-functioning…

  20. Abnormal Neural Responses to Social Exclusion in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gradin, Victoria B.; Waiter, Gordon; Kumar, Poornima; Stickle, Catriona; Milders, Maarten; Matthews, Keith; Reid, Ian; Hall, Jeremy; Steele, J. Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Social exclusion is an influential concept in politics, mental health and social psychology. Studies on healthy subjects have implicated the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a region involved in emotional and social information processing, in neural responses to social exclusion. Impairments in social interactions are common in schizophrenia and are associated with reduced quality of life. Core symptoms such as delusions usually have a social content. However little is known about the neural underpinnings of social abnormalities. The aim of this study was to investigate the neural substrates of social exclusion in schizophrenia. Patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls underwent fMRI while participating in a popular social exclusion paradigm. This task involves passing a ‘ball’ between the participant and two cartoon representations of other subjects. The extent of social exclusion (ball not being passed to the participant) was parametrically varied throughout the task. Replicating previous findings, increasing social exclusion activated the mPFC in controls. In contrast, patients with schizophrenia failed to modulate mPFC responses with increasing exclusion. Furthermore, the blunted response to exclusion correlated with increased severity of positive symptoms. These data support the hypothesis that the neural response to social exclusion differs in schizophrenia, highlighting the mPFC as a potential substrate of impaired social interactions. PMID:22916139

  1. Abnormal fronto-striatal functional connectivity in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinping; Zhang, Jiuquan; Wang, Jiaojian; Li, Guanglin; Hu, Qingmao; Zhang, Yuanchao

    2016-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the relatively selective depletion of dopamine in the striatum, which consequently leads to dysfunctions in cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical circuitries. It has been shown that the most common cognitive deficits in PD patients are related to the fronto-striatal circuits. In PD, most previous functional connectivity studies have been performed using seed-based methods to identify the brain regions that are abnormally connected to one or more seeds, but these cannot be used to quantify the interactions between one region and all other regions in a particular network. Functional connectivity degree, which is a measurement that can be used to quantify the functional or structural connectivity of a complex brain network, was adopted in this study to assess the interactions of the fronto-striatal network. Compared to healthy controls, PD patients had significantly decreased total functional connectivity degree for the left putamen and the right globus pallidum in fronto-striatal networks. Additionally, negative correlations between the fronto-pallial functional connectivity degree (i.e., the right globus pallidum with the left middle frontal gyrus, and with the right triangular part of inferior frontal gyrus) and disease duration were observed in PD patients. The results of this study demonstrate that fronto-striatal functional connectivity is abnormal in patients with PD and indicate that these deficits might be the result of motor and cognitive dysfunctions in PD patients. PMID:26724369

  2. Dissociable cortico-striatal connectivity abnormalities in major depression in response to monetary gains and penalties

    PubMed Central

    Admon, Roee; Nickerson, Lisa D.; Dillon, Daniel G.; Holmes, Avram J.; Bogdan, Ryan; Kumar, Poornima; Dougherty, Darin D.; Iosifescu, Dan V.; Mischoulon, David; Fava, Maurizio; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) are characterized by maladaptive responses to both positive and negative outcomes, which have been linked to localized abnormal activations in cortical and striatal brain regions. However, the exact neural circuitry implicated in such abnormalities remains largely unexplored. Methods In this study 26 unmedicated adults with MDD and 29 matched healthy controls completed a monetary incentive delay task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analyses probed group differences in connectivity separately in response to positive and negative outcomes (i.e., monetary gains and penalties). Results Relative to controls, MDD subjects displayed decreased connectivity between the caudate and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) in response to monetary gains, yet increased connectivity between the caudate and a different, more rostral, dACC sub-region in response to monetary penalties. Moreover, exploratory analyses of 14 MDD patients who completed a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial after the baseline fMRI scans indicated that a more normative pattern of cortico-striatal connectivity pre-treatment was associated with more symptoms improvement 12 weeks later. Conclusions These results identify the caudate as a region with dissociable incentive-dependent dACC connectivity abnormalities in MDD, and provide initial evidence that cortico-striatal circuitry may play a role in MDD treatment response. Given the role of cortico-striatal circuitry in encoding action-outcome contingencies, such dysregulated connectivity may relate to the prominent disruptions in goal-directed behavior that characterize MDD. PMID:25055809

  3. Altered Immune Function Associated with Disordered Neural Connectivity and Executive Dysfunctions: A Neurophysiological Study on Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Yvonne M. Y.; Chan, Agnes S.; Sze, Sophia L.; Cheung, Mei-Chun; Wong, Chun-kwok; Lam, Joseph M. K.; Poon, Priscilla M. K.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have impaired executive function, disordered neural connectivity, and abnormal immunologic function. The present study examined whether these abnormalities were associated. Seventeen high-functioning (HFA) and 17 low-functioning (LFA) children with ASD, aged 8-17…

  4. Multiple neural representations of elementary logical connectives.

    PubMed

    Baggio, Giosuè; Cherubini, Paolo; Pischedda, Doris; Blumenthal, Anna; Haynes, John-Dylan; Reverberi, Carlo

    2016-07-15

    A defining trait of human cognition is the capacity to form compounds out of simple thoughts. This ability relies on the logical connectives AND, OR and IF. Simple propositions, e.g., 'There is a fork' and 'There is a knife', can be combined in alternative ways using logical connectives: e.g., 'There is a fork AND there is a knife', 'There is a fork OR there is a knife', 'IF there is a fork, there is a knife'. How does the brain represent compounds based on different logical connectives, and how are compounds evaluated in relation to new facts? In the present study, participants had to maintain and evaluate conjunctive (AND), disjunctive (OR) or conditional (IF) compounds while undergoing functional MRI. Our results suggest that, during maintenance, the left posterior inferior frontal gyrus (pIFG, BA44, or Broca's area) represents the surface form of compounds. During evaluation, the left pIFG switches to processing the full logical meaning of compounds, and two additional areas are recruited: the left anterior inferior frontal gyrus (aIFG, BA47) and the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS, BA40). The aIFG shows a pattern of activation similar to pIFG, and compatible with processing the full logical meaning of compounds, whereas activations in IPS differ with alternative interpretations of conditionals: logical vs conjunctive. These results uncover the functions of a basic cortical network underlying human compositional thought, and provide a shared neural foundation for the cognitive science of language and reasoning.

  5. Abnormal cortical thickness connectivity persists in childhood absence epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Curwood, Evan K; Pedersen, Mangor; Carney, Patrick W; Berg, Anne T; Abbott, David F; Jackson, Graeme D

    2015-01-01

    Objective Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is a childhood-onset generalized epilepsy. Recent fMRI studies have suggested that frontal cortex activity occurs before thalamic involvement in epileptic discharges suggesting that frontal cortex may play an important role in childhood absence seizures. Neurocognitive deficits can persist after resolution of the epilepsy. We investigate whether structural connectivity changes are present in the brains of CAE patients in young adulthood. Methods Cortical thickness measurements were obtained for 30 subjects with CAE (mean age 21 ± 2 years) and 56 healthy controls (mean age 24 ± 4) and regressed for age, sex, and total intracranial volume (TIV). Structural connectivity was evaluated by measuring the correlation between average cortical thicknesses in 915 regions over the brain. Maps of connectivity strength were then obtained for both groups. Results When compared to controls, the CAE group shows overall increased “connectivity” with focal increased connection strength in anterior regions including; the anterior cingulate and the insula and superior temporal gyrus bilaterally; the right orbito-frontal and supramarginal regions; and the left entorhinal cortex. Decreased connection strength in the CAE group was found in the left occipital lobe, with a similar trend in right occipital lobe. Interpretation Brains in young adults whose CAE was resolved had abnormal structural connectivity. Our findings suggest that frontal regions correlate most with cortical thickness throughout the brain in CAE patients, whereas occipital regions correlate most in well matched normal controls. We interpret this as evidence of a developmental difference in CAE that emphasizes these frontal lobe regions, perhaps driven by frontal lobe epileptiform activity. PMID:26000319

  6. Cocaine, Appetitive Memory and Neural Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Suchismita

    2013-01-01

    This review examines existing cognitive experimental and brain imaging research related to cocaine addiction. In section 1, previous studies that have examined cognitive processes, such as implicit and explicit memory processes in cocaine users are reported. Next, in section 2, brain imaging studies are reported that have used chronic users of cocaine as study participants. In section 3, several conclusions are drawn. They are: (a) in cognitive experimental literature, no study has examined both implicit and explicit memory processes involving cocaine related visual information in the same cocaine user, (b) neural mechanisms underlying implicit and explicit memory processes for cocaine-related visual cues have not been directly investigated in cocaine users in the imaging literature, and (c) none of the previous imaging studies has examined connectivity between the memory system and craving system in the brain of chronic users of cocaine. Finally, future directions in the field of cocaine addiction are suggested. PMID:25009766

  7. Multiple neural representations of elementary logical connectives.

    PubMed

    Baggio, Giosuè; Cherubini, Paolo; Pischedda, Doris; Blumenthal, Anna; Haynes, John-Dylan; Reverberi, Carlo

    2016-07-15

    A defining trait of human cognition is the capacity to form compounds out of simple thoughts. This ability relies on the logical connectives AND, OR and IF. Simple propositions, e.g., 'There is a fork' and 'There is a knife', can be combined in alternative ways using logical connectives: e.g., 'There is a fork AND there is a knife', 'There is a fork OR there is a knife', 'IF there is a fork, there is a knife'. How does the brain represent compounds based on different logical connectives, and how are compounds evaluated in relation to new facts? In the present study, participants had to maintain and evaluate conjunctive (AND), disjunctive (OR) or conditional (IF) compounds while undergoing functional MRI. Our results suggest that, during maintenance, the left posterior inferior frontal gyrus (pIFG, BA44, or Broca's area) represents the surface form of compounds. During evaluation, the left pIFG switches to processing the full logical meaning of compounds, and two additional areas are recruited: the left anterior inferior frontal gyrus (aIFG, BA47) and the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS, BA40). The aIFG shows a pattern of activation similar to pIFG, and compatible with processing the full logical meaning of compounds, whereas activations in IPS differ with alternative interpretations of conditionals: logical vs conjunctive. These results uncover the functions of a basic cortical network underlying human compositional thought, and provide a shared neural foundation for the cognitive science of language and reasoning. PMID:27138210

  8. Abnormal functional connectivity of the medial cortex in euthymic bipolar II disorder.

    PubMed

    Marchand, William R; Lee, James N; Johnson, Susanna; Gale, Phillip; Thatcher, John

    2014-06-01

    This project utilized functional MRI (fMRI) and a motor activation paradigm to investigate neural circuitry in euthymic bipolar II disorder. We hypothesized that circuitry involving the cortical midline structures (CMS) would demonstrate abnormal functional connectivity. Nineteen subjects with recurrent bipolar disorder and 18 controls were studied using fMRI and a motor activation paradigm. We used functional connectivity analyses to identify circuits with aberrant connectivity. We found increased functional connectivity among bipolar subjects compared to healthy controls in two CMS circuits. One circuit included the medial aspect of the left superior frontal gyrus and the dorsolateral region of the left superior frontal gyrus. The other included the medial aspect of the right superior frontal gyrus, the dorsolateral region of the left superior frontal gyrus and the right medial frontal gyrus and surrounding region. Our results indicate that CMS circuit dysfunction persists in the euthymic state and thus may represent trait pathology. Future studies should address whether these circuits contribute to relapse of illness. Our results also suggest the possibility that aberrations of superior frontal circuitry may impact default mode network and cognitive processes.

  9. A causal model of post-traumatic stress disorder: disentangling predisposed from acquired neural abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Admon, Roee; Milad, Mohammed R; Hendler, Talma

    2013-07-01

    Discriminating neural abnormalities into the causes versus consequences of psychopathology would enhance the translation of neuroimaging findings into clinical practice. By regarding the traumatic encounter as a reference point for disease onset, neuroimaging studies of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can potentially allocate PTSD neural abnormalities to either predisposing (pre-exposure) or acquired (post-exposure) factors. Based on novel research strategies in PTSD neuroimaging, including genetic, environmental, twin, and prospective studies, we provide a causal model that accounts for neural abnormalities in PTSD, and outline its clinical implications. Current data suggest that abnormalities within the amygdala and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex represent predisposing risk factors for developing PTSD, whereas dysfunctional hippocampal-ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) interactions may become evident only after having developed the disorder.

  10. [Neural network detection of abnormalities in fed-batch fermentation].

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Feng; Yuan, Jing-Qi

    2005-01-01

    During fermentation, it is often difficult to detect the abnormalities, for example, caused by contamination on-line. Instead, the faults were detected usually by off-line laboratory analysis or other ways, which in most cases, is too late to remedy the situation. In this paper, a simple three-layers BP network was used for the early prediction of the amount of product, based on the difference in prediction errors between normal and abnormal charges and other accessorial information, such as profit function and pH value. In addition, three indications characteristic to abnormal charge are incorporated in practical operation. The prediction for Cephalosporin C Fed-batch Fermentation in a Chinese pharmaceutical factory was studied in details as an example and the result shows the abnormal charge can be discovered early successfully using the method. PMID:15859337

  11. Abnormal resting-state functional connectivity of the nucleus accumbens in multi-year abstinent heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Zou, Feng; Wu, Xinhuai; Zhai, Tianye; Lei, Yu; Shao, Yongcong; Jin, Xiao; Tan, Shuwen; Wu, Bing; Wang, Lubin; Yang, Zheng

    2015-11-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies suggest that abnormal brain functional connectivity may be the neural underpinning of addiction to illicit drugs and of relapse after successful cessation therapy. Aberrant brain networks have been demonstrated in addicted patients and in newly abstinent addicts. However, it is not known whether abnormal brain connectivity patterns persist after prolonged abstinence. In this cross-sectional study, whole-brain resting-state functional magnetic resonance images (8 min) were collected from 30 heroin-addicted individuals after a long period of abstinence (more than 3 years) and from 30 healthy controls. We first examined the group differences in the resting-state functional connectivity of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a brain region implicated in relapse-related processes, including craving and reactivity to stress following acute and protracted withdrawal from heroin. We then examined the relation between the duration of abstinence and the altered NAc functional connectivity in the heroin group. We found that, compared with controls, heroin-dependent participants exhibited significantly greater functional connectivity between the right ventromedial prefrontal cortex and the NAc and weaker functional connectivity between the NAc and the left putamen, left precuneus, and supplementary motor area. However, with longer abstinence time, the strength of NAc functional connectivity with the left putamen increased. These results indicate that dysfunction of the NAc functional network is still present in long-term-abstinent heroin-dependent individuals. PMID:26280556

  12. Topographic organization of Hebbian neural connections by synchronous wave activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaliuk, Eugene; Wackerbauer, Renate; Showalter, Kenneth

    2001-03-01

    Experimental studies have revealed that the refinement of early, imprecise connections in the developing visual system involves activity in the retina before the onset of vision. We study the evolution of initially random unidirectional connections between two excitable layers of FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons with simulated spontaneous activity in the input layer. Lateral coupling within the layers yields synchronous neural wave activity that serves as a template for the Hebbian learning process, which establishes topographically precise interlayer connections.

  13. Causal connectivity of evolved neural networks during behavior.

    PubMed

    Seth, Anil K

    2005-03-01

    To show how causal interactions in neural dynamics are modulated by behavior, it is valuable to analyze these interactions without perturbing or lesioning the neural mechanism. This paper proposes a method, based on a graph-theoretic extension of vector autoregressive modeling and 'Granger causality,' for characterizing causal interactions generated within intact neural mechanisms. This method, called 'causal connectivity analysis' is illustrated via model neural networks optimized for controlling target fixation in a simulated head-eye system, in which the structure of the environment can be experimentally varied. Causal connectivity analysis of this model yields novel insights into neural mechanisms underlying sensorimotor coordination. In contrast to networks supporting comparatively simple behavior, networks supporting rich adaptive behavior show a higher density of causal interactions, as well as a stronger causal flow from sensory inputs to motor outputs. They also show different arrangements of 'causal sources' and 'causal sinks': nodes that differentially affect, or are affected by, the remainder of the network. Finally, analysis of causal connectivity can predict the functional consequences of network lesions. These results suggest that causal connectivity analysis may have useful applications in the analysis of neural dynamics. PMID:16350433

  14. Molecular signatures of neural connectivity in the olfactory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Diodato, Assunta; Ruinart de Brimont, Marion; Yim, Yeong Shin; Derian, Nicolas; Perrin, Sandrine; Pouch, Juliette; Klatzmann, David; Garel, Sonia; Choi, Gloria B; Fleischmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The ability to target subclasses of neurons with defined connectivity is crucial for uncovering neural circuit functions. The olfactory (piriform) cortex is thought to generate odour percepts and memories, and odour information encoded in piriform is routed to target brain areas involved in multimodal sensory integration, cognition and motor control. However, it remains unknown if piriform outputs are spatially organized, and if distinct output channels are delineated by different gene expression patterns. Here we identify genes selectively expressed in different layers of the piriform cortex. Neural tracing experiments reveal that these layer-specific piriform genes mark different subclasses of neurons, which project to distinct target areas. Interestingly, these molecular signatures of connectivity are maintained in reeler mutant mice, in which neural positioning is scrambled. These results reveal that a predictive link between a neuron's molecular identity and connectivity in this cortical circuit is determined independent of its spatial position. PMID:27426965

  15. Aortic tear and dissection related to connective tissues abnormalities resembling Marfan syndrome in a Great Dane.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Jennifer A; Bach, Jonathan F; Bell, Cynthia M; Stepien, Rebecca L

    2015-06-01

    Aortic tears and acute aortic dissection are rarely reported in dogs. This report describes a case of aortic dissection and probable sinus of Valsalva rupture in a young Great Dane with associated histopathologic findings suggestive of a connective tissue abnormality.

  16. Identification of the connections in biologically inspired neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuth, H.; Leung, K.; Beale, M.; Hicklin, J.

    1990-01-01

    We developed an identification method to find the strength of the connections between neurons from their behavior in small biologically-inspired artificial neural networks. That is, given the network external inputs and the temporal firing pattern of the neurons, we can calculate a solution for the strengths of the connections between neurons and the initial neuron activations if a solution exists. The method determines directly if there is a solution to a particular neural network problem. No training of the network is required. It should be noted that this is a first pass at the solution of a difficult problem. The neuron and network models chosen are related to biology but do not contain all of its complexities, some of which we hope to add to the model in future work. A variety of new results have been obtained. First, the method has been tailored to produce connection weight matrix solutions for networks with important features of biological neural (bioneural) networks. Second, a computationally efficient method of finding a robust central solution has been developed. This later method also enables us to find the most consistent solution in the presence of noisy data. Prospects of applying our method to identify bioneural network connections are exciting because such connections are almost impossible to measure in the laboratory. Knowledge of such connections would facilitate an understanding of bioneural networks and would allow the construction of the electronic counterparts of bioneural networks on very large scale integrated (VLSI) circuits.

  17. Estimation of effective connectivity via data-driven neural modeling

    PubMed Central

    Freestone, Dean R.; Karoly, Philippa J.; Nešić, Dragan; Aram, Parham; Cook, Mark J.; Grayden, David B.

    2014-01-01

    This research introduces a new method for functional brain imaging via a process of model inversion. By estimating parameters of a computational model, we are able to track effective connectivity and mean membrane potential dynamics that cannot be directly measured using electrophysiological measurements alone. The ability to track the hidden aspects of neurophysiology will have a profound impact on the way we understand and treat epilepsy. For example, under the assumption the model captures the key features of the cortical circuits of interest, the framework will provide insights into seizure initiation and termination on a patient-specific basis. It will enable investigation into the effect a particular drug has on specific neural populations and connectivity structures using minimally invasive measurements. The method is based on approximating brain networks using an interconnected neural population model. The neural population model is based on a neural mass model that describes the functional activity of the brain, capturing the mesoscopic biophysics and anatomical structure. The model is made subject-specific by estimating the strength of intra-cortical connections within a region and inter-cortical connections between regions using a novel Kalman filtering method. We demonstrate through simulation how the framework can be used to track the mechanisms involved in seizure initiation and termination. PMID:25506315

  18. Neural tube defects and abnormal brain development in F52-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, M; Chen, D F; Sasaoka, T; Tonegawa, S

    1996-01-01

    F52 is a myristoylated, alanine-rich substrate for protein kinase C. We have generated F52-deficient mice by the gene targeting technique. These mutant mice manifest severe neural tube defects that are not associated with other complex malformations, a phenotype reminiscent of common human neural tube defects. The neural tube defects observed include both exencephaly and spina bifida, and the phenotype exhibits partial penetrance with about 60% of homozygous embryos developing neural tube defects. Exencephaly is the prominent type of defect and leads to high prenatal lethality. Neural tube defects are observed in a smaller percentage of heterozygous embryos (about 10%). Abnormal brain development and tail formation occur in homozygous mutants and are likely to be secondary to the neural tube defects. Disruption of F52 in mice therefore identifies a gene whose mutation results in isolated neural tube defects and may provide an animal model for common human neural tube defects. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8700893

  19. A small number of abnormal brain connections predicts adult autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Yahata, Noriaki; Morimoto, Jun; Hashimoto, Ryuichiro; Lisi, Giuseppe; Shibata, Kazuhisa; Kawakubo, Yuki; Kuwabara, Hitoshi; Kuroda, Miho; Yamada, Takashi; Megumi, Fukuda; Imamizu, Hiroshi; Náñez, José E; Takahashi, Hidehiko; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Kasai, Kiyoto; Kato, Nobumasa; Sasaki, Yuka; Watanabe, Takeo; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Although autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a serious lifelong condition, its underlying neural mechanism remains unclear. Recently, neuroimaging-based classifiers for ASD and typically developed (TD) individuals were developed to identify the abnormality of functional connections (FCs). Due to over-fitting and interferential effects of varying measurement conditions and demographic distributions, no classifiers have been strictly validated for independent cohorts. Here we overcome these difficulties by developing a novel machine-learning algorithm that identifies a small number of FCs that separates ASD versus TD. The classifier achieves high accuracy for a Japanese discovery cohort and demonstrates a remarkable degree of generalization for two independent validation cohorts in the USA and Japan. The developed ASD classifier does not distinguish individuals with major depressive disorder and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder from their controls but moderately distinguishes patients with schizophrenia from their controls. The results leave open the viable possibility of exploring neuroimaging-based dimensions quantifying the multiple-disorder spectrum. PMID:27075704

  20. A small number of abnormal brain connections predicts adult autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Yahata, Noriaki; Morimoto, Jun; Hashimoto, Ryuichiro; Lisi, Giuseppe; Shibata, Kazuhisa; Kawakubo, Yuki; Kuwabara, Hitoshi; Kuroda, Miho; Yamada, Takashi; Megumi, Fukuda; Imamizu, Hiroshi; Náñez Sr, José E.; Takahashi, Hidehiko; Okamoto, Yasumasa; Kasai, Kiyoto; Kato, Nobumasa; Sasaki, Yuka; Watanabe, Takeo; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Although autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a serious lifelong condition, its underlying neural mechanism remains unclear. Recently, neuroimaging-based classifiers for ASD and typically developed (TD) individuals were developed to identify the abnormality of functional connections (FCs). Due to over-fitting and interferential effects of varying measurement conditions and demographic distributions, no classifiers have been strictly validated for independent cohorts. Here we overcome these difficulties by developing a novel machine-learning algorithm that identifies a small number of FCs that separates ASD versus TD. The classifier achieves high accuracy for a Japanese discovery cohort and demonstrates a remarkable degree of generalization for two independent validation cohorts in the USA and Japan. The developed ASD classifier does not distinguish individuals with major depressive disorder and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder from their controls but moderately distinguishes patients with schizophrenia from their controls. The results leave open the viable possibility of exploring neuroimaging-based dimensions quantifying the multiple-disorder spectrum. PMID:27075704

  1. Functional Connectivity Abnormalities of Brain Regions with Structural Deficits in Young Adult Male Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Limei; Yu, Dahua; Su, Shaoping; Ma, Yao; von Deneen, Karen M.; Luo, Lin; Zhai, Jinquan; Liu, Bo; Cheng, Jiadong; Guan, Yanyan; Li, Yangding; Bi, Yanzhi; Xue, Ting; Lu, Xiaoqi; Yuan, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is one of the most prevalent dependence disorders. Previous studies have detected structural and functional deficits in smokers. However, few studies focused on the changes of resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) of the brain regions with structural deficits in young adult smokers. Twenty-six young adult smokers and 26 well-matched healthy non-smokers participated in our study. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and RSFC were employed to investigate the structural and functional changes in young adult smokers. Compared with healthy non-smokers, young smokers showed increased gray matter (GM) volume in the left putamen and decreased GM volume in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Moreover, GM volume in the left ACC has a negative correlation trend with pack-years and GM volume in the left putamen was positively correlated with pack-years. The left ACC and putamen with abnormal volumes were chosen as the regions of interest (ROIs) for the RSFC analysis. We found that smokers showed increased RSFC between the left ACC and right amygdala and between the left putamen and right anterior insula. We revealed structural and functional deficits within the frontostriatal circuits in young smokers, which may shed new insights into the neural mechanisms of smoking. PMID:27757078

  2. Neural autoantibodies and neurophysiologic abnormalities in patients exposed to molds in water-damaged buildings.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Andrew W; Thrasher, Jack D; Madison, Roberta A; Vojdani, Aristo; Gray, Michael R; Johnson, Al

    2003-08-01

    Adverse health effects of fungal bioaerosols on occupants of water-damaged homes and other buildings have been reported. Recently, it has been suggested that mold exposure causes neurological injury. The authors investigated neurological antibodies and neurophysiological abnormalities in patients exposed to molds at home who developed symptoms of peripheral neuropathy (i.e., numbness, tingling, tremors, and muscle weakness in the extremities). Serum samples were collected and analyzed with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique for antibodies to myelin basic protein, myelin-associated glycoprotein, ganglioside GM1, sulfatide, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, alpha-B-crystallin, chondroitin sulfate, tubulin, and neurofilament. Antibodies to molds and mycotoxins were also determined with ELISA, as reported previously. Neurophysiologic evaluations for latency, amplitude, and velocity were performed on 4 motor nerves (median, ulnar, peroneal, and tibial), and for latency and amplitude on 3 sensory nerves (median, ulnar, and sural). Patients with documented, measured exposure to molds had elevated titers of antibodies (immunoglobulin [Ig]A, IgM, and IgG) to neural-specific antigens. Nerve conduction studies revealed 4 patient groupings: (1) mixed sensory-motor polyneuropathy (n = 55, abnormal), (2) motor neuropathy (n = 17, abnormal), (3) sensory neuropathy (n = 27, abnormal), and (4) those with symptoms but no neurophysiological abnormalities (n = 20, normal controls). All groups showed significantly increased autoantibody titers for all isotypes (IgA, IgM, and IgG) of antibodies to neural antigens when compared with 500 healthy controls. Groups 1 through 3 also exhibited abnormal neurophysiologic findings. The authors concluded that exposure to molds in water-damaged buildings increased the risk for development of neural autoantibodies, peripheral neuropathy, and neurophysiologic abnormalities in exposed individuals. PMID:15259425

  3. Ground states of partially connected binary neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baram, Yoram

    1990-01-01

    Neural networks defined by outer products of vectors over (-1, 0, 1) are considered. Patterns over (-1, 0, 1) define by their outer products partially connected neural networks consisting of internally strongly connected, externally weakly connected subnetworks. Subpatterns over (-1, 1) define subnetworks, and their combinations that agree in the common bits define permissible words. It is shown that the permissible words are locally stable states of the network, provided that each of the subnetworks stores mutually orthogonal subwords, or, at most, two subwords. It is also shown that when each of the subnetworks stores two mutually orthogonal binary subwords at most, the permissible words, defined as the combinations of the subwords (one corresponding to each subnetwork), that agree in their common bits are the unique ground states of the associated energy function.

  4. [Folate deficiency, cancer and congenital abnormalities. Is there a connection?].

    PubMed

    Christensen, B

    1996-01-20

    The biochemical role of folate is in the interconversion of one-carbon units in intermediary metabolism; a process in which a methyl group is formed de novo. The methyl group is subsequently transferred to adenosylmethionine, which is an important methyl donor in the methylation of DNA. A negative correlation exists between the intake of folate in pregnancy and the occurrence of neural tube defects and certain malignant brain tumours in children. Numerous clinical studies have pointed to an association between folate status in adults and both the occurrence of cancer and the premalignant changes, cervical dysplasia, bronchial metaplasia, and colorectal adenomas. Folate deficiency may cause chromosomal damage, due to impaired DNA synthesis or repair. Moreover, decreased production of adenosylmethionine may influence the expression of developmental genes and of oncogenes and/or tumour suppressor genes through disturbed methylation of DNA. PMID:8633336

  5. Abnormal Connectional Fingerprint in Schizophrenia: A Novel Network Analysis of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Edwin Thanarajah, Sharmili; Han, Cheol E.; Rotarska-Jagiela, Anna; Singer, Wolf; Deichmann, Ralf; Maurer, Konrad; Kaiser, Marcus; Uhlhaas, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The graph theoretical analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has received a great deal of interest in recent years to characterize the organizational principles of brain networks and their alterations in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. However, the characterization of networks in clinical populations can be challenging, since the comparison of connectivity between groups is influenced by several factors, such as the overall number of connections and the structural abnormalities of the seed regions. To overcome these limitations, the current study employed the whole-brain analysis of connectional fingerprints in diffusion tensor imaging data obtained at 3 T of chronic schizophrenia patients (n = 16) and healthy, age-matched control participants (n = 17). Probabilistic tractography was performed to quantify the connectivity of 110 brain areas. The connectional fingerprint of a brain area represents the set of relative connection probabilities to all its target areas and is, hence, less affected by overall white and gray matter changes than absolute connectivity measures. After detecting brain regions with abnormal connectional fingerprints through similarity measures, we tested each of its relative connection probability between groups. We found altered connectional fingerprints in schizophrenia patients consistent with a dysconnectivity syndrome. While the medial frontal gyrus showed only reduced connectivity, the connectional fingerprints of the inferior frontal gyrus and the putamen mainly contained relatively increased connection probabilities to areas in the frontal, limbic, and subcortical areas. These findings are in line with previous studies that reported abnormalities in striatal–frontal circuits in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, highlighting the potential utility of connectional fingerprints for the analysis of anatomical networks in the disorder. PMID:27445870

  6. Abnormal Connectional Fingerprint in Schizophrenia: A Novel Network Analysis of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Data.

    PubMed

    Edwin Thanarajah, Sharmili; Han, Cheol E; Rotarska-Jagiela, Anna; Singer, Wolf; Deichmann, Ralf; Maurer, Konrad; Kaiser, Marcus; Uhlhaas, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    The graph theoretical analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has received a great deal of interest in recent years to characterize the organizational principles of brain networks and their alterations in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. However, the characterization of networks in clinical populations can be challenging, since the comparison of connectivity between groups is influenced by several factors, such as the overall number of connections and the structural abnormalities of the seed regions. To overcome these limitations, the current study employed the whole-brain analysis of connectional fingerprints in diffusion tensor imaging data obtained at 3 T of chronic schizophrenia patients (n = 16) and healthy, age-matched control participants (n = 17). Probabilistic tractography was performed to quantify the connectivity of 110 brain areas. The connectional fingerprint of a brain area represents the set of relative connection probabilities to all its target areas and is, hence, less affected by overall white and gray matter changes than absolute connectivity measures. After detecting brain regions with abnormal connectional fingerprints through similarity measures, we tested each of its relative connection probability between groups. We found altered connectional fingerprints in schizophrenia patients consistent with a dysconnectivity syndrome. While the medial frontal gyrus showed only reduced connectivity, the connectional fingerprints of the inferior frontal gyrus and the putamen mainly contained relatively increased connection probabilities to areas in the frontal, limbic, and subcortical areas. These findings are in line with previous studies that reported abnormalities in striatal-frontal circuits in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, highlighting the potential utility of connectional fingerprints for the analysis of anatomical networks in the disorder.

  7. Abnormal Connectional Fingerprint in Schizophrenia: A Novel Network Analysis of Diffusion Tensor Imaging Data.

    PubMed

    Edwin Thanarajah, Sharmili; Han, Cheol E; Rotarska-Jagiela, Anna; Singer, Wolf; Deichmann, Ralf; Maurer, Konrad; Kaiser, Marcus; Uhlhaas, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    The graph theoretical analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has received a great deal of interest in recent years to characterize the organizational principles of brain networks and their alterations in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. However, the characterization of networks in clinical populations can be challenging, since the comparison of connectivity between groups is influenced by several factors, such as the overall number of connections and the structural abnormalities of the seed regions. To overcome these limitations, the current study employed the whole-brain analysis of connectional fingerprints in diffusion tensor imaging data obtained at 3 T of chronic schizophrenia patients (n = 16) and healthy, age-matched control participants (n = 17). Probabilistic tractography was performed to quantify the connectivity of 110 brain areas. The connectional fingerprint of a brain area represents the set of relative connection probabilities to all its target areas and is, hence, less affected by overall white and gray matter changes than absolute connectivity measures. After detecting brain regions with abnormal connectional fingerprints through similarity measures, we tested each of its relative connection probability between groups. We found altered connectional fingerprints in schizophrenia patients consistent with a dysconnectivity syndrome. While the medial frontal gyrus showed only reduced connectivity, the connectional fingerprints of the inferior frontal gyrus and the putamen mainly contained relatively increased connection probabilities to areas in the frontal, limbic, and subcortical areas. These findings are in line with previous studies that reported abnormalities in striatal-frontal circuits in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, highlighting the potential utility of connectional fingerprints for the analysis of anatomical networks in the disorder. PMID:27445870

  8. Optically Connected Multiprocessors For Simulating Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Joydeep; Hwang, Kai

    1988-05-01

    This paper investigates the architectural requirements in simulating large neural networks using a highly parallel multiprocessor with distributed memory and optical interconnects. First, we model the structure of a neural network and the functional behavior of individual cells. These models are used to estimate the volume of messages that need to be exchanged among physical processors to simulate the weighted connections of the neural network. The distributed processor/memory organization is tailored to an electronic implementation for greater versatility and flexibility. Optical interconnects are used to satisfy the interprocessor communication bandwidth demands. The hybrid implementation attempts to balance the processing, memory and bandwidth demands in simulating asynchronous, value-passing models for cooperative parallel computation with self-learning capabilities.

  9. Connecting Teratogen-Induced Congenital Heart Defects to Neural Crest Cells and Their Effect on Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Karunamuni, Ganga H.; Ma, Pei; Gu, Shi; Rollins, Andrew M.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-01-01

    Neural crest cells play many key roles in embryonic development, as demonstrated by the abnormalities that result from their specific absence or dysfunction. Unfortunately, these key cells are particularly sensitive to abnormalities in various intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as genetic deletions or ethanol-exposure that lead to morbidity and mortality for organisms. This review discusses the role identified for a segment of neural crest is in regulating the morphogenesis of the heart and associated great vessels. The paradox is that their derivatives constitute a small proportion of cells to the cardiovascular system. Findings supporting that these cells impact early cardiac function raises the interesting possibility that they indirectly control cardiovascular development at least partially through regulating function. Making connections between insults to the neural crest, cardiac function, and morphogenesis is more approachable with technological advances. Expanding our understanding of early functional consequences could be useful in improving diagnosis and testing therapies. PMID:25220155

  10. Connecting teratogen-induced congenital heart defects to neural crest cells and their effect on cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Karunamuni, Ganga H; Ma, Pei; Gu, Shi; Rollins, Andrew M; Jenkins, Michael W; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-09-01

    Neural crest cells play many key roles in embryonic development, as demonstrated by the abnormalities that result from their specific absence or dysfunction. Unfortunately, these key cells are particularly sensitive to abnormalities in various intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as genetic deletions or ethanol-exposure that lead to morbidity and mortality for organisms. This review discusses the role identified for a segment of neural crest in regulating the morphogenesis of the heart and associated great vessels. The paradox is that their derivatives constitute a small proportion of cells to the cardiovascular system. Findings supporting that these cells impact early cardiac function raises the interesting possibility that they indirectly control cardiovascular development at least partially through regulating function. Making connections between insults to the neural crest, cardiac function, and morphogenesis is more approachable with technological advances. Expanding our understanding of early functional consequences could be useful in improving diagnosis and testing therapies.

  11. Connective tissue spectrum abnormalities associated with spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Eyal; Pariani, Mitchel; Bannykh, Serguei; Rimoin, David L; Schievink, Wouter I

    2013-04-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of connective tissue abnormalities among patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks in a prospective study using a large cohort of patients. We enrolled a consecutive group of 50 patients, referred for consultation because of CSF leak. All patients have been carefully examined for the presence of connective tissue abnormalities, and based on findings, patients underwent genetic testing. Ancillary diagnostic studies included echocardiography, eye exam, and histopathological examinations of skin and dura biopsies in selected patients. We identified nine patients with heritable connective tissue disorders, including Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and other unclassified forms. In seven patients, spontaneous CSF leak was the first noted manifestation of the genetic disorder. We conclude that spontaneous CSF leaks are associated with a spectrum of connective tissue abnormalities and may be the first noted clinical presentation of the genetic disorder. We propose that there is a clinical basis for considering spontaneous CSF leak as a clinical manifestation of heritable connective tissue disorders, and we suggest that patients with CSF leaks should be screened for connective tissue and vascular abnormalities.

  12. Abnormally Malicious Autonomous Systems and their Internet Connectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Shue, Craig A; Kalafut, Prof. Andrew; Gupta, Prof. Minaxi

    2011-01-01

    While many attacks are distributed across botnets, investigators and network operators have recently targeted malicious networks through high profile autonomous system (AS) de-peerings and network shut-downs. In this paper, we explore whether some ASes indeed are safe havens for malicious activity. We look for ISPs and ASes that exhibit disproportionately high malicious behavior using ten popular blacklists, plus local spam data, and extensive DNS resolutions based on the contents of the blacklists. We find that some ASes have over 80% of their routable IP address space blacklisted. Yet others account for large fractions of blacklisted IP addresses. Several ASes regularly peer with ASes associated with significant malicious activity. We also find that malicious ASes as a whole differ from benign ones in other properties not obviously related to their malicious activities, such as more frequent connectivity changes with their BGP peers. Overall, we conclude that examining malicious activity at AS granularity can unearth networks with lax security or those that harbor cybercrime.

  13. Multidimensional analysis of the abnormal neural oscillations associated with lexical processing in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tingting; Stephane, Massoud; Parhi, Keshab K

    2013-04-01

    The neural mechanisms of language abnormalities, the core symptoms in schizophrenia, remain unclear. In this study, a new experimental paradigm, combining magnetoencephalography (MEG) techniques and machine intelligence methodologies, was designed to gain knowledge about the frequency, brain location, and time of occurrence of the neural oscillations that are associated with lexical processing in schizophrenia. The 248-channel MEG recordings were obtained from 12 patients with schizophrenia and 10 healthy controls, during a lexical processing task, where the patients discriminated correct from incorrect lexical stimuli that were visually presented. Event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) was computed along the frequency, time, and space dimensions combined, that resulted in a large spectral-spatial-temporal ERD/ERS feature set. Machine intelligence techniques were then applied to select a small subset of oscillation patterns that are abnormal in patients with schizophrenia, according to their discriminating power in patient and control classification. Patients with schizophrenia showed abnormal ERD/ERS patterns during both lexical encoding and post-encoding periods. The top-ranked features were located at the occipital and left frontal-temporal areas, and covered a wide frequency range, including δ (1-4 Hz), α (8-12 Hz), β (12-32 Hz), and γ (32-48 Hz) bands. These top features could discriminate the patient group from the control group with 90.91% high accuracy, which demonstrates significant brain oscillation abnormalities in patients with schizophrenia at the specific frequency, time, and brain location indicated by these top features. As neural oscillation abnormality may be due to the mechanisms of the disease, the spectral, spatial, and temporal content of the discriminating features can offer useful information for helping understand the physiological basis of the language disorder in schizophrenia, as well as the pathology of the

  14. Two-layer tree-connected feed-forward neural network model for neural cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xinyu; Liao, Xiaofeng; Chen, Fei; Huang, Tingwen

    2013-03-01

    Neural synchronization by means of mutual learning provides an avenue to design public key exchange protocols, bringing about what is known as neural cryptography. Two identically structured neural networks learn from each other and reach full synchronization eventually. The full synchronization enables two networks to have the same weight, which can be used as a secret key for many subsequent cryptographic purposes. It is striking to observe that after the first decade of neural cryptography, the tree parity machine (TPM) network with hidden unit K=3 appears to be the sole network that is suitable for a neural protocol. No convincingly secure neural protocol is well designed by using other network structures despite considerable research efforts. With the goal of overcoming the limitations of a suitable network structure, in this paper we develop a two-layer tree-connected feed-forward neural network (TTFNN) model for a neural protocol. The TTFNN model captures the notion that two partners are capable of exchanging a vector with multiple bits in each time step. An in-depth study of the dynamic process of TTFNN-based protocols is then undertaken, based upon which a feasible condition is theoretically obtained to seek applicable protocols. Afterward, according to two analytically derived heuristic rules, a complete methodology for designing feasible TTFNN-based protocols is elaborated. A variety of feasible neural protocols are constructed, which exhibit the effectiveness and benefits of the proposed model. With another look from the perspective of application, TTFNN-based instances, which can outperform the conventional TPM-based protocol with respect to synchronization speed, are also experimentally confirmed.

  15. Modulation of neural connectivity during tongue movement and reading.

    PubMed

    He, Alex G; Tan, Li Hai; Tang, Yiyuan; James, G Andrew; Wright, Paul; Eckert, Mark A; Fox, Peter T; Liu, Yijun

    2003-03-01

    In a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, a novel connectivity analysis method termed within-condition interregional covariance analysis (WICA) was introduced for investigation into brain modulation during tongue movement and reading Chinese pinyins and logographic characters. We found that performing a horizontal tongue movement task generated a specific brain module with hierarchical orders of neural computation. Such functional modularity was further examined during both overt and silent Chinese reading tasks. Our results showed that overt pinyin reading was associated with the following distributed regions involved in tongue movement: the primary motor cortex (M1), the supplementary motor area (SMA), Broca's area, and Wernicke's area. Furthermore, we have used the WICA and demonstrated task-dependent covariance patterns that are strongly associated with the M1 mouth/tongue region, in which the Broca-Wernicke pathway is implicated in a meaning access procedure based on assembled phonology, while the SMA-Broca pathway is implicated in a meaning access procedure based on addressed phonology. Our functional connectivity analysis of the neural pathway involved in language processing may provide a basis for future studies of the dynamic neural network associated with language learning and reading in both developmental and disease conditions. PMID:12599281

  16. Exploring brain connectivity with two-dimensional neural maps.

    PubMed

    Jianu, Radu; Demiralp, Çağatay; Laidlaw, David H

    2012-06-01

    We introduce two-dimensional neural maps for exploring connectivity in the brain. For this, we create standard streamtube models from diffusion-weighted brain imaging data sets along with neural paths hierarchically projected into the plane. These planar neural maps combine desirable properties of low-dimensional representations, such as visual clarity and ease of tract-of-interest selection, with the anatomical familiarity of 3D brain models and planar sectional views. We distribute this type of visualization both in a traditional stand-alone interactive application and as a novel, lightweight web-accessible system. The web interface integrates precomputed neural-path representations into a geographical digital-maps framework with associated labels, metrics, statistics, and linkouts. Anecdotal and quantitative comparisons of the present method with a recently proposed 2D point representation suggest that our representation is more intuitive and easier to use and learn. Similarly, users are faster and more accurate in selecting bundles using the 2D path representation than the 2D point representation. Finally, expert feedback on the web interface suggests that it can be useful for collaboration as well as quick exploration of data.

  17. Somatosensory cortex functional connectivity abnormalities in autism show opposite trends, depending on direction and spatial scale

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sheraz; Michmizos, Konstantinos; Tommerdahl, Mark; Ganesan, Santosh; Kitzbichler, Manfred G.; Zetino, Manuel; Garel, Keri-Lee A.; Herbert, Martha R.; Hämäläinen, Matti S.

    2015-01-01

    Functional connectivity is abnormal in autism, but the nature of these abnormalities remains elusive. Different studies, mostly using functional magnetic resonance imaging, have found increased, decreased, or even mixed pattern functional connectivity abnormalities in autism, but no unifying framework has emerged to date. We measured functional connectivity in individuals with autism and in controls using magnetoencephalography, which allowed us to resolve both the directionality (feedforward versus feedback) and spatial scale (local or long-range) of functional connectivity. Specifically, we measured the cortical response and functional connectivity during a passive 25-Hz vibrotactile stimulation in the somatosensory cortex of 20 typically developing individuals and 15 individuals with autism, all males and right-handed, aged 8–18, and the mu-rhythm during resting state in a subset of these participants (12 per group, same age range). Two major significant group differences emerged in the response to the vibrotactile stimulus. First, the 50-Hz phase locking component of the cortical response, generated locally in the primary (S1) and secondary (S2) somatosensory cortex, was reduced in the autism group (P < 0.003, corrected). Second, feedforward functional connectivity between S1 and S2 was increased in the autism group (P < 0.004, corrected). During resting state, there was no group difference in the mu-α rhythm. In contrast, the mu-β rhythm, which has been associated with feedback connectivity, was significantly reduced in the autism group (P < 0.04, corrected). Furthermore, the strength of the mu-β was correlated to the relative strength of 50 Hz component of the response to the vibrotactile stimulus (r = 0.78, P < 0.00005), indicating a shared aetiology for these seemingly unrelated abnormalities. These magnetoencephalography-derived measures were correlated with two different behavioural sensory processing scores (P < 0.01 and P < 0.02 for the autism

  18. Abnormal interhemispheric resting state functional connectivity of the insula in heroin users under methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-Wei; Lin, Huang-Chi; Liu, Gin-Chung; Yang, Yi-Hsin Connie; Ko, Chih-Hung; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2016-09-30

    Abnormal interhemispheric functional connectivity is attracting more and more attention in the field of substance use. This study aimed to examine 1) the differences in interhemispheric functional connections of the insula with the contralateral insula and other brain regions between heroin users under methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) and healthy controls, and 2) the association between heroin users' interhemispheric insular functional connectivity using resting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and the results of urine heroin analysis. Sixty male right-handed persons, including 30 with heroin dependence under MMT and 30 healthy controls, were recruited to this study. Resting fMRI experiments and urine heroin analysis were performed. Compared with the controls, the heroin users had a significantly lower interhemispheric insular functional connectivity. They also exhibited lower functional connectivity between insula and contralateral inferior orbital frontal lobe. After controlling for age, educational level and methadone dosage, less deviation of the interhemispheric insula functional connectivity was significantly associated with a lower risk of a positive urine heroin analysis result. Our findings demonstrated that the heroin users under MMT had abnormal long-range and interhemispheric resting functional connections. Those with a less dysfunctional interhemispheric insula functional connectivity had a lower risk of a positive urine heroin test. PMID:27497215

  19. Abnormality detection in retinal images using ant colony optimization and artificial neural networks - biomed 2010.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Ganesan; Ramakrishnan, Swaminathan

    2010-01-01

    Optic disc and retinal vasculature are important anatomical structures in the retina of the eye and any changes observed in these structures provide vital information on severity of various diseases. Digital retinal images are shown to provide a meaningful way of documenting and assessing some of the key elements inside the eye including the optic nerve and the tiny retinal blood vessels. In this work, an attempt has been made to detect and differentiate abnormalities of the retina using Digital image processing together with Optimization based segmentation and Artificial Neural Network methods. The retinal fundus images were recorded using standard protocols. Ant Colony Optimization is employed to extract the most significant objects namely the optic disc and blood vessel. The features related to these objects are obtained and corresponding indices are also derived. Further, these features are subjected to classification using Radial Basis Function Neural Networks and compared with conventional training algorithms. Results show that the Ant Colony Optimization is efficient in extracting useful information from retinal images. The features derived are effective for classification of normal and abnormal images using Radial basis function networks compared to other methods. As Optic disc and blood vessels are significant markers of abnormality in retinal images, the method proposed appears to be useful for mass screening. In this paper, the objectives of the study, methodology and significant observations are presented. PMID:20467104

  20. Abnormality detection in retinal images using ant colony optimization and artificial neural networks - biomed 2010.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Ganesan; Ramakrishnan, Swaminathan

    2010-01-01

    Optic disc and retinal vasculature are important anatomical structures in the retina of the eye and any changes observed in these structures provide vital information on severity of various diseases. Digital retinal images are shown to provide a meaningful way of documenting and assessing some of the key elements inside the eye including the optic nerve and the tiny retinal blood vessels. In this work, an attempt has been made to detect and differentiate abnormalities of the retina using Digital image processing together with Optimization based segmentation and Artificial Neural Network methods. The retinal fundus images were recorded using standard protocols. Ant Colony Optimization is employed to extract the most significant objects namely the optic disc and blood vessel. The features related to these objects are obtained and corresponding indices are also derived. Further, these features are subjected to classification using Radial Basis Function Neural Networks and compared with conventional training algorithms. Results show that the Ant Colony Optimization is efficient in extracting useful information from retinal images. The features derived are effective for classification of normal and abnormal images using Radial basis function networks compared to other methods. As Optic disc and blood vessels are significant markers of abnormality in retinal images, the method proposed appears to be useful for mass screening. In this paper, the objectives of the study, methodology and significant observations are presented.

  1. A neural network learned information measures for heart motion abnormality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nambakhsh, M. S.; Punithakumar, Kumaradevan; Ben Ayed, Ismail; Goela, Aashish; Islam, Ali; Peters, Terry; Li, Shuo

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we propose an information theoretic neural network for normal/abnormal left ventricular motion classification which outperforms significantly other recent methods in the literature. The proposed framework consists of a supervised 3-layer artificial neural network (ANN) which uses hyperbolic tangent sigmoid and linear transfer functions for hidden and output layers, respectively. The ANN is fed by information theoretic measures of left ventricular wall motion such as Shannon's differential entropy (SDE), Rényi entropy and Fisher information, which measure global information of subjects distribution. Using 395×20 segmented LV cavities of short-axis magnetic resonance images (MRI) acquired from 48 subjects, the experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms Support Vector Machine (SVM) and thresholding based information theoretic classifiers. It yields a specificity equal to 90%, a sensitivity of 91%, and a remarkable Area Under Curve (AUC) for Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC), equal to 93.2%.

  2. Abnormal Neural Activation to Faces in the Parents of Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Yucel, G H; Belger, A; Bizzell, J; Parlier, M; Adolphs, R; Piven, J

    2015-12-01

    Parents of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show subtle deficits in aspects of social behavior and face processing, which resemble those seen in ASD, referred to as the "Broad Autism Phenotype " (BAP). While abnormal activation in ASD has been reported in several brain structures linked to social cognition, little is known regarding patterns in the BAP. We compared autism parents with control parents with no family history of ASD using 2 well-validated face-processing tasks. Results indicated increased activation in the autism parents to faces in the amygdala (AMY) and the fusiform gyrus (FG), 2 core face-processing regions. Exploratory analyses revealed hyper-activation of lateral occipital cortex (LOC) bilaterally in autism parents with aloof personality ("BAP+"). Findings suggest that abnormalities of the AMY and FG are related to underlying genetic liability for ASD, whereas abnormalities in the LOC and right FG are more specific to behavioral features of the BAP. Results extend our knowledge of neural circuitry underlying abnormal face processing beyond those previously reported in ASD to individuals with shared genetic liability for autism and a subset of genetically related individuals with the BAP.

  3. Abnormal Neural Activation to Faces in the Parents of Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Yucel, G H; Belger, A; Bizzell, J; Parlier, M; Adolphs, R; Piven, J

    2015-12-01

    Parents of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show subtle deficits in aspects of social behavior and face processing, which resemble those seen in ASD, referred to as the "Broad Autism Phenotype " (BAP). While abnormal activation in ASD has been reported in several brain structures linked to social cognition, little is known regarding patterns in the BAP. We compared autism parents with control parents with no family history of ASD using 2 well-validated face-processing tasks. Results indicated increased activation in the autism parents to faces in the amygdala (AMY) and the fusiform gyrus (FG), 2 core face-processing regions. Exploratory analyses revealed hyper-activation of lateral occipital cortex (LOC) bilaterally in autism parents with aloof personality ("BAP+"). Findings suggest that abnormalities of the AMY and FG are related to underlying genetic liability for ASD, whereas abnormalities in the LOC and right FG are more specific to behavioral features of the BAP. Results extend our knowledge of neural circuitry underlying abnormal face processing beyond those previously reported in ASD to individuals with shared genetic liability for autism and a subset of genetically related individuals with the BAP. PMID:25056573

  4. Association of cervical artery dissection with connective tissue abnormalities in skin and arteries.

    PubMed

    Brandt, T; Morcher, M; Hausser, I

    2005-01-01

    Spontaneous cervical artery dissections (sCAD) often occur in otherwise healthy individuals without known risk factors for stroke and frequently develop spontaneously without relevant trauma. An underlying arteriopathy leading to a so-called 'weakness of the vessel wall' and predisposing certain individuals to dissection has often been postulated. Therefore, the morphology of connective tissue, a main component of vessel wall and environment, was investigated in carotids and skin. While the overall morphology of dermal connective tissue is normal, about half of patients with sCAD show mild ultrastructural connective tissue alterations. These ultrastructural morphological aberrations can be designated either as 'Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) III-like', resembling mild findings in patients with the hypermobility type of EDS (EDS III); or coined 'EDS IV-like' with collagen fibers containing fibrils with highly variable diameters resembling mild findings in vascular EDS; or the abnormalities are restricted to the elastic fibers (with fragmentation and minicalcifications) without significant alterations in the morphology of the collagen fibrils. These findings had some similarity with the morphology found in heterozygous carriers of pseudoxanthoma elasticum. A grading scale according to the severity of the findings has been introduced. Similar connective tissue abnormalities were detected in some first-degree relatives of patients with sCAD showing hereditary at least in a subgroup. They can serve as a phenotypic marker for further genetic studies in patients with sCAD and large families to possibly identify the underlying basic molecular defect(s). Very few of patients (<5%) with sCAD and connective tissue abnormalities have clinical manifestations of skin, joint, or skeletal abnormalities of a defined heritable connective tissue disorder. In specimens of arterial walls of carotid, aortic, and renal arteries of patients with sCAD, pronounced systemic, histopathological

  5. Abnormal causal connectivity by structural deficits in first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia at rest.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenbin; Liu, Feng; Liu, Jianrong; Yu, Liuyu; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Zhikun; Xiao, Changqing; Zhai, Jinguo; Zhao, Jingping

    2015-01-01

    Anatomical deficits and resting-state functional connectivity (FC) alterations in prefrontal-thalamic-cerebellar circuit have been implicated in the neurobiology of schizophrenia. However, the effect of structural deficits in schizophrenia on causal connectivity of this circuit remains unclear. This study was conducted to examine the causal connectivity biased by structural deficits in first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia patients. Structural and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were obtained from 49 first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia patients and 50 healthy controls. Data were analyzed by voxel-based morphometry and Granger causality analysis. The causal connectivity of the integrated prefrontal-thalamic (limbic)-cerebellar (sensorimotor) circuit was partly affected by structural deficits in first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia as follows: (1) unilateral prefrontal-sensorimotor connectivity abnormalities (increased driving effect from the left medial prefrontal cortex [MPFC] to the sensorimotor regions); (2) bilateral limbic-sensorimotor connectivity abnormalities (increased driving effect from the right anterior cingulate cortex [ACC] to the sensorimotor regions and decreased feedback from the sensorimotor regions to the right ACC); and (3) bilateral increased and decreased causal connectivities among the sensorimotor regions. Some correlations between the gray matter volume of the seeds, along with their causal effects and clinical variables (duration of untreated psychosis and symptom severity), were also observed in the patients. The findings indicated the partial effects of structural deficits in first-episode, drug-naive schizophrenia on the prefrontal-thalamic (limbic)-cerebellar (sensorimotor) circuit. Schizophrenia may reinforce the driving connectivities from the left MPFC or right ACC to the sensorimotor regions and may disrupt bilateral causal connectivities among the sensorimotor regions.

  6. A cell junction pathology of neural stem cells leads to abnormal neurogenesis and hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Esteban M; Guerra, María M; Vío, Karin; González, César; Ortloff, Alexander; Bátiz, Luis F; Rodríguez, Sara; Jara, María C; Muñoz, Rosa I; Ortega, Eduardo; Jaque, Jaime; Guerra, Francisco; Sival, Deborah A; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Jiménez, Antonio J; Domínguez-Pinos, María D; Pérez-Fígares, José M; McAllister, James P; Johanson, Conrad

    2012-01-01

    Most cells of the developing mammalian brain derive from the ventricular (VZ) and the subventricular (SVZ) zones. The VZ is formed by the multipotent radial glia/neural stem cells (NSCs) while the SVZ harbors the rapidly proliferative neural precursor cells (NPCs). Evidence from human and animal models indicates that the common history of hydrocephalus and brain maldevelopment starts early in embryonic life with disruption of the VZ and SVZ. We propose that a "cell junction pathology" involving adherent and gap junctions is a final common outcome of a wide range of gene mutations resulting in proteins abnormally expressed by the VZ cells undergoing disruption. Disruption of the VZ during fetal development implies the loss of NSCs whereas VZ disruption during the perinatal period implies the loss of ependyma. The process of disruption occurs in specific regions of the ventricular system and at specific stages of brain development. This explains why only certain brain structures have an abnormal development, which in turn results in a specific neurological impairment of the newborn. Disruption of the VZ of the Sylvian aqueduct (SA) leads to aqueductal stenosis and hydrocephalus, while disruption of the VZ of telencephalon impairs neurogenesis. We are currently investigating whether grafting of NSCs/neurospheres from normal rats into the CSF of hydrocephalic mutants helps to diminish/repair the outcomes of VZ disruption.

  7. [Tilt test and orthostatic intolerance: abnormalities in the neural sympathetic response to gravitational stimulus].

    PubMed

    Furlan, R

    2001-05-01

    In the present manuscript the different methodologies aimed at assessing the autonomic profile in humans during a gravitational stimulus have been described. In addition, strengths and drawbacks of the tilt test in relation to occasional orthostatic intolerance were addressed. Finally, different autonomic abnormalities underlying occasional and chronic orthostatic intolerance syndromes have been schematically highlighted. The direct recording of the neural sympathetic discharge from the peroneal nerve (MSNA), in spite of its invasive nature, still represents the recognized reference to quantify the changes in the sympathetic activity to the vessels attending postural modifications. The increase of plasma norepinephrine during a tilt test is achieved by both an increase in plasma spillover and a concomitant decrease in systemic clearance. Changes in the indices of cardiac sympathetic and vagal modulation may also be quantified during a tilt test by power spectrum analysis of RR interval variability. The spectral markers of cardiac autonomic control, if evaluated concomitantly with MSNA, may contribute to assess abnormalities in the regional distribution of the sympathetic activity to the heart and the vessels. The capability of the tilt test of reproducing a vasovagal event or of inducing "false positive responses" seems to be markedly affected by the age, thus suggesting that additional or different etiopathogenetic mechanisms might be involved in the loss of consciousness in older as compared to younger subjects. In subjects suffering from occasional or habitual neurally mediated syncope an increase or, respectively, a decrease in cardiac and vascular sympathetic modulation has been documented before the loss of consciousness. In patients with pure autonomic failure, a global dysautonomia affecting both the sympathetic and the vagal modulation to the heart, seems to be present. In chronic orthostatic intolerance, the most common form of dysautonomia of young women

  8. Abnormal Brain Connectivity Patterns in Adults with ADHD: A Coherence Study

    PubMed Central

    Sato, João Ricardo; Hoexter, Marcelo Queiroz; Castellanos, Xavier Francisco; Rohde, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    Studies based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during the resting state have shown decreased functional connectivity between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and regions of the Default Mode Network (DMN) in adult patients with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) relative to subjects with typical development (TD). Most studies used Pearson correlation coefficients among the BOLD signals from different brain regions to quantify functional connectivity. Since the Pearson correlation analysis only provides a limited description of functional connectivity, we investigated functional connectivity between the dACC and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) in three groups (adult patients with ADHD, n = 21; TD age-matched subjects, n = 21; young TD subjects, n = 21) using a more comprehensive analytical approach – unsupervised machine learning using a one-class support vector machine (OC-SVM) that quantifies an abnormality index for each individual. The median abnormality index for patients with ADHD was greater than for TD age-matched subjects (p = 0.014); the ADHD and young TD indices did not differ significantly (p = 0.480); the median abnormality index of young TD was greater than that of TD age-matched subjects (p = 0.016). Low frequencies below 0.05 Hz and around 0.20 Hz were the most relevant for discriminating between ADHD patients and TD age-matched controls and between the older and younger TD subjects. In addition, we validated our approach using the fMRI data of children publicly released by the ADHD-200 Competition, obtaining similar results. Our findings suggest that the abnormal coherence patterns observed in patients with ADHD in this study resemble the patterns observed in young typically developing subjects, which reinforces the hypothesis that ADHD is associated with brain maturation deficits. PMID:23049834

  9. Partially connected feedforward neural networks structured by input types.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sanggil; Isik, Can

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method to model partially connected feedforward neural networks (PCFNNs) from the identified input type (IT) which refers to whether each input is coupled with or uncoupled from other inputs in generating output. The identification is done by analyzing input sensitivity changes as amplifying the magnitude of inputs. The sensitivity changes of the uncoupled inputs are not correlated with the variation on any other input, while those of the coupled inputs are correlated with the variation on any one of the coupled inputs. According to the identified ITs, a PCFNN can be structured. Each uncoupled input does not share the neurons in the hidden layer with other inputs in order to contribute to output in an independent manner, while the coupled inputs share the neurons with one another. After deriving the mathematical input sensitivity analysis for each IT, several experiments, as well as a real example (blood pressure (BP) estimation), are described to demonstrate how well our method works.

  10. Abnormal functional connectivity in focal hand dystonia: Mutual information analysis in EEG

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Seung-Hyun; Lin, Peter; Auh, Sungyoung; Hallett, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate functional connectivity (FC) in focal hand dystonia (FHD) patients to understand the pathophysiology underlying their abnormality in movement. We recorded EEG from 58 electrodes in 15 FHD patients and 15 healthy volunteers during rest and a simple finger-tapping task that did not induce any dystonic symptoms. We investigated the mutual information (MI), which provides a quantitative measure of linear and nonlinear coupling, in the alpha, beta and gamma bands. Mean MI of all 58 channels and mean of the channels of interest (COIs) representative of regional FC over sensorimotor areas (C3, CP3, C4, CP4, FCz and Cz) were evaluated. For both groups, we found enhanced MI during the task compared to the rest condition specifically in the beta and gamma bands for mean MI of all channels, and in all bands for mean MI of COIs. Comparing the FHD patients to the healthy volunteers, for both rest and task, there was reduced MI in the beta band for both mean MI of all channels and mean MI of COIs. Regarding the properties of the connectivity in the beta band, we found that the majority of the MI differences were from linear connectivity. The abnormal beta band FC in FHD patients suggests deficient brain connectivity. PMID:21506166

  11. Selective functional connectivity abnormality of the transition zone of the inferior parietal lobule in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingyun; Zhuo, Chuanjun; Qin, Wen; Zhu, Jiajia; Xu, Lixue; Xu, Yongjie; Yu, Chunshui

    2016-01-01

    Structural and functional alterations in the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) in schizophrenia have been frequently reported; however, the IPL connectivity changes in schizophrenia remain largely unknown. Based on heterogeneity of the IPL in structure, connection and function, we hypothesize that the resting-state functional connectivities (rsFCs) of the IPL subregions are differentially affected in schizophrenia. This study included 95 schizophrenia patients and 104 healthy controls. The IPL subregions were defined according to a previous in vivo connection-based parcellation study. We calculated the rsFC of each IPL subregion and compared them between the two groups while controlling for the effects of age, gender, and grey matter volume. Among the six subregions of the left IPL and the five subregions of the right IPL, only the bilateral PFm (a transition zone of the IPL) subregions exhibited abnormal rsFC in schizophrenia. Specifically, the left PFm showed increased rsFC with the bilateral lingual gyri in schizophrenia patients than in healthy controls. The right PFm exhibited increased rsFC with the right lingual gyrus and inferior occipital gyrus, and bilateral mid-cingulate and sensorimotor cortices in schizophrenia patients. These findings suggest a selective rsFC abnormality in the IPL subregions in schizophrenia, characterized by the increased rsFC between the PFm subregion of the IPL and the visual and sensorimotor areas. PMID:27354957

  12. Abnormal striatal resting-state functional connectivity in adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Gail A; Mueller, Bryon A; Schreiner, Melinda Westlund; Campbell, Sarah M; Regan, Emily K; Nelson, Peter M; Houri, Alaa K; Lee, Susanne S; Zagoloff, Alexandra D; Lim, Kelvin O; Yacoub, Essa S; Cullen, Kathryn R

    2016-01-30

    Neuroimaging research has implicated abnormalities in cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical (CSTC) circuitry in pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In this study, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) was used to investigate functional connectivity in the CSTC circuitry in adolescents with OCD. Imaging was obtained with the Human Connectome Project (HCP) scanner using newly developed pulse sequences which allow for higher spatial and temporal resolution. Fifteen adolescents with OCD and 13 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (ages 12-19) underwent R-fMRI on the 3T HCP scanner. Twenty-four minutes of resting-state scans (two consecutive 12-min scans) were acquired. We investigated functional connectivity of the striatum using a seed-based, whole brain approach with anatomically-defined seeds placed in the bilateral caudate, putamen, and nucleus accumbens. Adolescents with OCD compared with controls exhibited significantly lower functional connectivity between the left putamen and a single cluster of right-sided cortical areas including parts of the orbitofrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and operculum. Preliminary findings suggest that impaired striatal connectivity in adolescents with OCD in part falls within the predicted CSTC network, and also involves impaired connections between a key CSTC network region (i.e., putamen) and key regions in the salience network (i.e., insula/operculum). The relevance of impaired putamen-insula/operculum connectivity in OCD is discussed. PMID:26674413

  13. Tools for resolving functional activity and connectivity within intact neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Joshua H; Stuber, Garret D

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian neural circuits are sophisticated biological systems that choreograph behavioral processes vital for survival. While the inherent complexity of discrete neural circuits has proven difficult to decipher, many parallel methodological developments promise to help delineate the function and connectivity of molecularly defined neural circuits. Here, we review recent technological advances designed to precisely monitor and manipulate neural circuit activity. We propose a holistic, multifaceted approach for unraveling how behavioral states are manifested through the cooperative interactions between discrete neurocircuit elements.

  14. Thalamic shape and connectivity abnormalities in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shugao; Li, Xiaobo; Kimball, Ariane E; Kelly, Mary S; Lesser, Iris; Branch, Craig

    2012-11-30

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterized by widespread structural and functional abnormalities in the cortico-striato-thalmo-cortical (CSTC) loops that subserve attention and executive functions. In this study, we analyzed thalamic shape and its white matter connections using structural magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion (DTI) data acquired from children with ADHD (n=19) and controls (n=19). Shape morphology of the thalamus was assessed using shape-based analysis, while connectivity between the thalamus and other brain regions was determined using probabilistic diffusion tractography. Shape-based analysis indicated significant regional atrophy in the left thalamus in children with ADHD compared to controls. Group analyses of white matter connectivity measures showed significantly decreased mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and volume of the tracts between thalamus and striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal lobe in children with ADHD compared to controls. The structural abnormalities within the thalamus and the reduced integrity of the white matter tracks between the thalamus and other brain regions, as shown from the results of this study, may be the anatomical bases of the impaired cognitive performances in the attention and executive function domains in ADHD.

  15. Situs inversus and ciliary abnormalities: 20 years later, what is the connection?

    PubMed

    Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Dworniczak, Bernd; Hamada, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Heterotaxy (also known as situs ambiguous) and situs inversus totalis describe disorders of laterality in which internal organs do not display their typical pattern of asymmetry. First described around 1600 by Girolamo Fabrizio, numerous case reports about laterality disorders in humans were published without any idea about the underlying cause. Then, in 1976, immotile cilia were described as the cause of a human syndrome that was previously clinically described, both in 1904 by AK Siewert and in 1933 by Manes Kartagener, as an association of situs inversus with chronic sinusitis and bronchiectasis, now commonly known as Kartagener's syndrome. Despite intense research, the underlying defect of laterality disorders remained unclear. Nearly 20 years later in 1995, Björn Afzelius discussed five hypotheses to explain the connection between ciliary defects and loss of laterality control in a paper published in the International Journal of Developmental Biology asking: 'Situs inversus and ciliary abnormalities: What is the connection?'. Here, nearly 20 research years later, we revisit some of the key findings that led to the current knowledge about the connection between situs inversus and ciliary abnormalities. PMID:25589952

  16. Abnormal synchrony and effective connectivity in patients with schizophrenia and auditory hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    de la Iglesia-Vaya, Maria; Escartí, Maria José; Molina-Mateo, Jose; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Gadea, Marien; Castellanos, Francisco Xavier; Aguilar García-Iturrospe, Eduardo J.; Robles, Montserrat; Biswal, Bharat B.; Sanjuan, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Auditory hallucinations (AH) are the most frequent positive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Hallucinations have been related to emotional processing disturbances, altered functional connectivity and effective connectivity deficits. Previously, we observed that, compared to healthy controls, the limbic network responses of patients with auditory hallucinations differed when the subjects were listening to emotionally charged words. We aimed to compare the synchrony patterns and effective connectivity of task-related networks between schizophrenia patients with and without AH and healthy controls. Schizophrenia patients with AH (n = 27) and without AH (n = 14) were compared with healthy participants (n = 31). We examined functional connectivity by analyzing correlations and cross-correlations among previously detected independent component analysis time courses. Granger causality was used to infer the information flow direction in the brain regions. The results demonstrate that the patterns of cortico-cortical functional synchrony differentiated the patients with AH from the patients without AH and from the healthy participants. Additionally, Granger-causal relationships between the networks clearly differentiated the groups. In the patients with AH, the principal causal source was an occipital–cerebellar component, versus a temporal component in the patients without AH and the healthy controls. These data indicate that an anomalous process of neural connectivity exists when patients with AH process emotional auditory stimuli. Additionally, a central role is suggested for the cerebellum in processing emotional stimuli in patients with persistent AH. PMID:25379429

  17. Abnormal synchrony and effective connectivity in patients with schizophrenia and auditory hallucinations.

    PubMed

    de la Iglesia-Vaya, Maria; Escartí, Maria José; Molina-Mateo, Jose; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Gadea, Marien; Castellanos, Francisco Xavier; Aguilar García-Iturrospe, Eduardo J; Robles, Montserrat; Biswal, Bharat B; Sanjuan, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Auditory hallucinations (AH) are the most frequent positive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Hallucinations have been related to emotional processing disturbances, altered functional connectivity and effective connectivity deficits. Previously, we observed that, compared to healthy controls, the limbic network responses of patients with auditory hallucinations differed when the subjects were listening to emotionally charged words. We aimed to compare the synchrony patterns and effective connectivity of task-related networks between schizophrenia patients with and without AH and healthy controls. Schizophrenia patients with AH (n = 27) and without AH (n = 14) were compared with healthy participants (n = 31). We examined functional connectivity by analyzing correlations and cross-correlations among previously detected independent component analysis time courses. Granger causality was used to infer the information flow direction in the brain regions. The results demonstrate that the patterns of cortico-cortical functional synchrony differentiated the patients with AH from the patients without AH and from the healthy participants. Additionally, Granger-causal relationships between the networks clearly differentiated the groups. In the patients with AH, the principal causal source was an occipital-cerebellar component, versus a temporal component in the patients without AH and the healthy controls. These data indicate that an anomalous process of neural connectivity exists when patients with AH process emotional auditory stimuli. Additionally, a central role is suggested for the cerebellum in processing emotional stimuli in patients with persistent AH. PMID:25379429

  18. Functional neuroanatomy of bipolar disorder: structure, function, and connectivity in an amygdala–anterior paralimbic neural system

    PubMed Central

    Blond, Benjamin N; Fredericks, Carolyn A; Blumberg, Hilary P

    2013-01-01

    Objectives In past decades, neuroimaging research in bipolar disorder has demonstrated a convergence of findings in an amygdala–anterior paralimbic cortex neural system. This paper reviews behavioral neurology literature that first suggested a central role for this neural system in the disorder and the neuroimaging evidence that supports it. Methods Relevant articles are reviewed to provide an amygdala–anterior paralimbic cortex neural system model of bipolar disorder, including articles from the fields of behavioral neurology and neuroanatomy, and neuroimaging. Results The literature is highly supportive of key roles for the amygdala, anterior paralimbic cortices, and connections among these structures in the emotional dysregulation of bipolar disorder. The functions subserved by their more widely distributed connection sites suggest that broader system dysfunction could account for the range of functions—from neurovegetative to cognitive—disrupted in the disorder. Abnormalities in some components of this neural system are apparent by adolescence, while others, such as those in rostral prefrontal regions, appear to progress over adolescence and young adulthood, suggesting a neurodevelopmental model of the disorder. However, some findings conflict, which may reflect the small sample sizes of some studies, and clinical heterogeneity and methodological differences across studies. Conclusions Consistent with models derived from early behavioral neurology studies, neuroimaging studies support a central role for an amygdala–anterior paralimbic neural system in bipolar disorder, and implicate abnormalities in the development of this system in the disorder. This system will be an important focus of future studies on the developmental pathophysiology, detection, treatment, and prevention of the disorder. PMID:22631619

  19. Neuronal substrate and effective connectivity of abnormal movement sequencing in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Zemankova, Petra; Lungu, Ovidiu; Huttlova, Jitka; Kerkovsky, Milos; Zubor, Jozef; Lipova, Petra; Bares, Martin; Kasparek, Tomas

    2016-06-01

    Movement sequencing difficulties are part of the neurological soft signs (NSS), they have high clinical value because they are not always present in schizophrenia. We investigated the neuronal correlates of movement sequencing in 24 healthy controls and 24 schizophrenia patients, with (SZP SQ+) or without (SZP SQ-) sequencing difficulties. We characterized simultaneous and lagged functional connectivity between brain regions involved in movement sequencing using psychophysiological interaction (PPI) and the Granger causality modeling (GCM), respectively. Left premotor cortex (PMC) and superior parietal lobule (SPL) were specifically activated during sequential movements in all participants. Right PMC and precuneus, ipsilateral to the hand executing the task, activated during sequential movements only in healthy controls and SZP SQ-. SZP SQ+ showed hyperactivation in contralateral PMC, as compared to the other groups. PPI analysis revealed a deficit in inhibitory connections within this fronto-parietal network in SZP SQ+ during sequential task. GCM showed a significant lagged effective connectivity from right PMC to left SPL during task and rest periods in all groups and from right PMC to right precuneus in SZP SQ+ group only. Both SZP groups had a significant lagged connectivity from right to left PMC, during sequential task. Our results indicate that aberrant fronto-parietal network connectivity with cortical inhibition deficit and abnormal reliance on previous network activity are related to movement sequencing in SZP. The overactivation of motor cortex seems to be a good compensating strategy, the hyperactivation of parietal cortex is linked to motor deficit symptoms. PMID:26780603

  20. Pattern separability and the effect of the number of connections in a random neural net with inhibitory connections.

    PubMed

    Torioka, T

    1978-11-10

    It has been claimed that pattern separation in cerebellar cortex plays an important role in controlling movements and balance for vertebrates. A number of the neural models for cerebellar cortex have been proposed and their pattern separability has been analyzed. These results, however, only explain a part of pattern separability in random neural nets. The present paper is intended to study an extended theory of pattern separability in a new model with inhibitory connections. In addition to this, the effect of the number of connections on pattern separability is cleared up. It is also shown that the signal from the inhibitory connections has crucial importance for pattern separability.

  1. Robustness analysis for connection weight matrices of global exponential stability of stochastic recurrent neural networks.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Song; Shen, Yi

    2013-02-01

    This paper analyzes the robustness of global exponential stability of stochastic recurrent neural networks (SRNNs) subject to parameter uncertainty in connection weight matrices. Given a globally exponentially stable stochastic recurrent neural network, the problem to be addressed here is how much parameter uncertainty in the connection weight matrices that the neural network can remain to be globally exponentially stable. We characterize the upper bounds of the parameter uncertainty for the recurrent neural network to sustain global exponential stability. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the theoretical result.

  2. Post mTBI fatigue is associated with abnormal brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Love Engström; Möller, Marika Christina; Julin, Per; Bartfai, Aniko; Hashim, Farouk; Li, Tie-Qiang

    2016-02-16

    This study set out to investigate the behavioral correlates of changes in resting-state functional connectivity before and after performing a 20 minute continuous psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) for patients with chronic post-concussion syndrome. Ten patients in chronic phase after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) with persisting symptoms of fatigue and ten matched healthy controls participated in the study. We assessed the participants' fatigue levels and conducted resting-state fMRI before and after a sustained PVT. We evaluated the changes in brain functional connectivity indices in relation to the subject's fatigue behavior using a quantitative data-driven analysis approach. We found that the PVT invoked significant mental fatigue and specific functional connectivity changes in mTBI patients. Furthermore, we found a significant linear correlation between self-reported fatigue and functional connectivity in the thalamus and middle frontal cortex. Our findings indicate that resting-state fMRI measurements may be a useful indicator of performance potential and a marker of fatigue level in the neural attentional system.

  3. Post mTBI fatigue is associated with abnormal brain functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Nordin, Love Engström; Möller, Marika Christina; Julin, Per; Bartfai, Aniko; Hashim, Farouk; Li, Tie-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    This study set out to investigate the behavioral correlates of changes in resting-state functional connectivity before and after performing a 20 minute continuous psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) for patients with chronic post-concussion syndrome. Ten patients in chronic phase after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) with persisting symptoms of fatigue and ten matched healthy controls participated in the study. We assessed the participants’ fatigue levels and conducted resting-state fMRI before and after a sustained PVT. We evaluated the changes in brain functional connectivity indices in relation to the subject’s fatigue behavior using a quantitative data-driven analysis approach. We found that the PVT invoked significant mental fatigue and specific functional connectivity changes in mTBI patients. Furthermore, we found a significant linear correlation between self-reported fatigue and functional connectivity in the thalamus and middle frontal cortex. Our findings indicate that resting-state fMRI measurements may be a useful indicator of performance potential and a marker of fatigue level in the neural attentional system. PMID:26878885

  4. Post mTBI fatigue is associated with abnormal brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Nordin, Love Engström; Möller, Marika Christina; Julin, Per; Bartfai, Aniko; Hashim, Farouk; Li, Tie-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    This study set out to investigate the behavioral correlates of changes in resting-state functional connectivity before and after performing a 20 minute continuous psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) for patients with chronic post-concussion syndrome. Ten patients in chronic phase after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) with persisting symptoms of fatigue and ten matched healthy controls participated in the study. We assessed the participants' fatigue levels and conducted resting-state fMRI before and after a sustained PVT. We evaluated the changes in brain functional connectivity indices in relation to the subject's fatigue behavior using a quantitative data-driven analysis approach. We found that the PVT invoked significant mental fatigue and specific functional connectivity changes in mTBI patients. Furthermore, we found a significant linear correlation between self-reported fatigue and functional connectivity in the thalamus and middle frontal cortex. Our findings indicate that resting-state fMRI measurements may be a useful indicator of performance potential and a marker of fatigue level in the neural attentional system. PMID:26878885

  5. Abnormalities of hippocampal-cortical connectivity in temporal lobe epilepsy patients with hippocampal sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; He, Huiguang; Lu, Jingjing; Wang, Chunheng; Li, Meng; Lv, Bin; Jin, Zhengyu

    2011-03-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is the most common damage seen in the patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In the present study, the hippocampal-cortical connectivity was defined as the correlation between the hippocampal volume and cortical thickness at each vertex throughout the whole brain. We aimed to investigate the differences of ipsilateral hippocampal-cortical connectivity between the unilateral TLE-HS patients and the normal controls. In our study, the bilateral hippocampal volumes were first measured in each subject, and we found that the ipsilateral hippocampal volume significantly decreased in the left TLE-HS patients. Then, group analysis showed significant thinner average cortical thickness of the whole brain in the left TLE-HS patients compared with the normal controls. We found significantly increased ipsilateral hippocampal-cortical connectivity in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus, the right cingulate gyrus and the left parahippocampal gyrus of the left TLE-HS patients, which indicated structural vulnerability related to the hippocampus atrophy in the patient group. However, for the right TLE-HS patients, no significant differences were found between the patients and the normal controls, regardless of the ipsilateral hippocampal volume, the average cortical thickness or the patterns of hippocampal-cortical connectivity, which might be related to less atrophies observed in the MRI scans. Our study provided more evidence for the structural abnormalities in the unilateral TLE-HS patients.

  6. Cell Junction Pathology of Neural Stem Cells Is Associated With Ventricular Zone Disruption, Hydrocephalus, and Abnormal Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guerra, María Montserrat; Henzi, Roberto; Ortloff, Alexander; Lichtin, Nicole; Vío, Karin; Jiménez, Antonio J; Dominguez-Pinos, María Dolores; González, César; Jara, Maria Clara; Hinostroza, Fernando; Rodríguez, Sara; Jara, Maryoris; Ortega, Eduardo; Guerra, Francisco; Sival, Deborah A; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Pérez-Fígares, José M; McAllister, James P; Johanson, Conrad E; Rodríguez, Esteban M

    2015-07-01

    Fetal-onset hydrocephalus affects 1 to 3 per 1,000 live births. It is not only a disorder of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics but also a brain disorder that corrective surgery does not ameliorate. We hypothesized that cell junction abnormalities of neural stem cells (NSCs) lead to the inseparable phenomena of fetal-onset hydrocephalus and abnormal neurogenesis. We used bromodeoxyuridine labeling, immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy, and cell culture to study the telencephalon of hydrocephalic HTx rats and correlated our findings with those in human hydrocephalic and nonhydrocephalic human fetal brains (n = 12 each). Our results suggest that abnormal expression of the intercellular junction proteins N-cadherin and connexin-43 in NSC leads to 1) disruption of the ventricular and subventricular zones, loss of NSCs and neural progenitor cells; and 2) abnormalities in neurogenesis such as periventricular heterotopias and abnormal neuroblast migration. In HTx rats, the disrupted NSC and progenitor cells are shed into the cerebrospinal fluid and can be grown into neurospheres that display intercellular junction abnormalities similar to those of NSC of the disrupted ventricular zone; nevertheless, they maintain their potential for differentiating into neurons and glia. These NSCs can be used to investigate cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this condition, thereby opening the avenue for stem cell therapy.

  7. Cell Junction Pathology of Neural Stem Cells Is Associated With Ventricular Zone Disruption, Hydrocephalus, and Abnormal Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guerra, María Montserrat; Henzi, Roberto; Ortloff, Alexander; Lichtin, Nicole; Vío, Karin; Jiménez, Antonio J; Dominguez-Pinos, María Dolores; González, César; Jara, Maria Clara; Hinostroza, Fernando; Rodríguez, Sara; Jara, Maryoris; Ortega, Eduardo; Guerra, Francisco; Sival, Deborah A; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Pérez-Fígares, José M; McAllister, James P; Johanson, Conrad E; Rodríguez, Esteban M

    2015-07-01

    Fetal-onset hydrocephalus affects 1 to 3 per 1,000 live births. It is not only a disorder of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics but also a brain disorder that corrective surgery does not ameliorate. We hypothesized that cell junction abnormalities of neural stem cells (NSCs) lead to the inseparable phenomena of fetal-onset hydrocephalus and abnormal neurogenesis. We used bromodeoxyuridine labeling, immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy, and cell culture to study the telencephalon of hydrocephalic HTx rats and correlated our findings with those in human hydrocephalic and nonhydrocephalic human fetal brains (n = 12 each). Our results suggest that abnormal expression of the intercellular junction proteins N-cadherin and connexin-43 in NSC leads to 1) disruption of the ventricular and subventricular zones, loss of NSCs and neural progenitor cells; and 2) abnormalities in neurogenesis such as periventricular heterotopias and abnormal neuroblast migration. In HTx rats, the disrupted NSC and progenitor cells are shed into the cerebrospinal fluid and can be grown into neurospheres that display intercellular junction abnormalities similar to those of NSC of the disrupted ventricular zone; nevertheless, they maintain their potential for differentiating into neurons and glia. These NSCs can be used to investigate cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this condition, thereby opening the avenue for stem cell therapy. PMID:26079447

  8. Dorsal Striatum and Its Limbic Connectivity Mediate Abnormal Anticipatory Reward Processing in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Hirvonen, Jussi; Hannukainen, Jarna C.; Immonen, Heidi; Lindroos, Markus M.; Salminen, Paulina; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by an imbalance in the brain circuits promoting reward seeking and those governing cognitive control. Here we show that the dorsal caudate nucleus and its connections with amygdala, insula and prefrontal cortex contribute to abnormal reward processing in obesity. We measured regional brain glucose uptake in morbidly obese (n = 19) and normal weighted (n = 16) subjects with 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia and with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while anticipatory food reward was induced by repeated presentations of appetizing and bland food pictures. First, we found that glucose uptake rate in the dorsal caudate nucleus was higher in obese than in normal-weight subjects. Second, obese subjects showed increased hemodynamic responses in the caudate nucleus while viewing appetizing versus bland foods in fMRI. The caudate also showed elevated task-related functional connectivity with amygdala and insula in the obese versus normal-weight subjects. Finally, obese subjects had smaller responses to appetizing versus bland foods in the dorsolateral and orbitofrontal cortices than did normal-weight subjects, and failure to activate the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was correlated with high glucose metabolism in the dorsal caudate nucleus. These findings suggest that enhanced sensitivity to external food cues in obesity may involve abnormal stimulus-response learning and incentive motivation subserved by the dorsal caudate nucleus, which in turn may be due to abnormally high input from the amygdala and insula and dysfunctional inhibitory control by the frontal cortical regions. These functional changes in the responsiveness and interconnectivity of the reward circuit could be a critical mechanism to explain overeating in obesity. PMID:22319604

  9. Abnormal structural connectivity in the brain networks of children with hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Weihong; Holland, Scott K; Shimony, Joshua S; Altaye, Mekibib; Mangano, Francesco T; Limbrick, David D; Jones, Blaise V; Nash, Tiffany; Rajagopal, Akila; Simpson, Sarah; Ragan, Dustin; McKinstry, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Increased intracranial pressure and ventriculomegaly in children with hydrocephalus are known to have adverse effects on white matter structure. This study seeks to investigate the impact of hydrocephalus on topological features of brain networks in children. The goal was to investigate structural network connectivity, at both global and regional levels, in the brains in children with hydrocephalus using graph theory analysis and diffusion tensor tractography. Three groups of children were included in the study (29 normally developing controls, 9 preoperative hydrocephalus patients, and 17 postoperative hydrocephalus patients). Graph theory analysis was applied to calculate the global network measures including small-worldness, normalized clustering coefficients, normalized characteristic path length, global efficiency, and modularity. Abnormalities in regional network parameters, including nodal degree, local efficiency, clustering coefficient, and betweenness centrality, were also compared between the two patients groups (separately) and the controls using two tailed t-test at significance level of p < 0.05 (corrected for multiple comparison). Children with hydrocephalus in both the preoperative and postoperative groups were found to have significantly lower small-worldness and lower normalized clustering coefficient than controls. Children with hydrocephalus in the postoperative group were also found to have significantly lower normalized characteristic path length and lower modularity. At regional level, significant group differences (or differences at trend level) in regional network measures were found between hydrocephalus patients and the controls in a series of brain regions including the medial occipital gyrus, medial frontal gyrus, thalamus, cingulate gyrus, lingual gyrus, rectal gyrus, caudate, cuneus, and insular. Our data showed that structural connectivity analysis using graph theory and diffusion tensor tractography is sensitive to detect

  10. Abnormal Functional Connectivity of Amygdala in Late-Onset Depression Was Associated with Cognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yingying; Yuan, Yonggui; Hou, Zhenghua; Jiang, Wenhao; Bai, Feng; Zhang, Zhijun

    2013-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with decreased function of cortico-limbic circuits, which play important roles in the pathogenesis of MDD. Abnormal functional connectivity (FC) with the amygdala, which is involved in cortico-limbic circuits, has also been observed in MDD. However, little is known about connectivity alterations in late-onset depression (LOD) or whether disrupted connectivity is correlated with cognitive impairment in LOD. Methods and Results A total of twenty-two LOD patients and twenty-two matched healthy controls (HC) underwent neuropsychological tests and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). Regional homogeneity (ReHo) and FC with bilateral amygdala seeds were used to analyze blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI data between two groups. Compared with HC, LOD patients showed decreased ReHo in the right middle frontal gyrus and left superior frontal gyrus. In the LOD group, the left amygdala had decreased FC with the right middle frontal gyrus and the left superior frontal gyrus in the amygdala positive network, and it had increased FC with the right post-central gyrus in the amygdala negative network. However, significantly reduced FC with the right amygdala was observed in the right middle occipital gyrus in the amygdala negative network. Further correlative analyses revealed that decreased FC between the amygdala and the right middle occipital gyrus was negatively correlated with the verbal fluency test (VFT, r = −0.485, P = 0.022) and the digit span test (DST, r = −0.561, P = 0.007). Conclusions Our findings of reduced activity of the prefrontal gyrus and abnormal FC with the bilateral amygdala may be key markers of cognitive dysfunction in LOD patients. PMID:24040385

  11. Introduction to a system for implementing neural net connections on SIMD architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomboulian, Sherryl

    1988-01-01

    Neural networks have attracted much interest recently, and using parallel architectures to simulate neural networks is a natural and necessary application. The SIMD model of parallel computation is chosen, because systems of this type can be built with large numbers of processing elements. However, such systems are not naturally suited to generalized elements. A method is proposed that allows an implementation of neural network connections on massively parallel SIMD architectures. The key to this system is an algorithm permitting the formation of arbitrary connections between the neurons. A feature is the ability to add new connections quickly. It also has error recovery ability and is robust over a variety of network topologies. Simulations of the general connection system, and its implementation on the Connection Machine, indicate that the time and space requirements are proportional to the product of the average number of connections per neuron and the diameter of the interconnection network.

  12. Introduction to a system for implementing neural net connections on SIMD architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomboulian, Sherryl

    1988-01-01

    Neural networks have attracted much interest recently, and using parallel architectures to simulate neural networks is a natural and necessary application. The SIMD model of parallel computation is chosen, because systems of this type can be built with large numbers of processing elements. However, such systems are not naturally suited to generalized communication. A method is proposed that allows an implementation of neural network connections on massively parallel SIMD architectures. The key to this system is an algorithm permitting the formation of arbitrary connections between the neurons. A feature is the ability to add new connections quickly. It also has error recovery ability and is robust over a variety of network topologies. Simulations of the general connection system, and its implementation on the Connection Machine, indicate that the time and space requirements are proportional to the product of the average number of connections per neuron and the diameter of the interconnection network.

  13. Abnormal neural processing during emotional salience attribution of affective asymmetry in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon-Koo; Chun, Ji Won; Lee, Jung Suk; Park, Hae-Jeong; Jung, Young-Chul; Seok, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant emotional salience attribution has been reported to be an important clinical feature in patients with schizophrenia. Real life stimuli that incorporate both positive and negative emotional traits lead to affective asymmetry such as negativity bias and positivity offset. In this study, we investigated the neural correlates of emotional salience attribution in patients with schizophrenia when affective asymmetry was processed. Fifteen patients with schizophrenia and 14 healthy controls were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an emotion judgment task in which two pictures were juxtaposed. The task consisted of responding to affective asymmetry condition (ambivalent and neutral) and affective symmetry conditions (positive and negative), and group comparisons were performed for each condition. Significantly higher activity in the medial prefrontal cortex and inferior frontal gyrus was observed for the ambivalent condition than for the other conditions in controls, but not in patients. Compared with controls, patients showed decreased activities in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, insula, and putamen for the ambivalent condition, but no changes were observed for the neutral condition. Multiple prefrontal hypoactivities during salience attribution of negativity bias in schizophrenia may underlie deficits in the integrative processing of emotional information. Regional abnormalities in the salience network may be the basis of defective emotional salience attribution in schizophrenia, which is likely involved in symptom formation and social dysfunction.

  14. Neural field dynamics under variation of local and global connectivity and finite transmission speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qubbaj, Murad R.; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2009-12-01

    Spatially continuous networks with heterogeneous connections are ubiquitous in biological systems, in particular neural systems. To understand the mutual effects of locally homogeneous and globally heterogeneous connectivity, we investigate the stability of the steady state activity of a neural field as a function of its connectivity. The variation of the connectivity is implemented through manipulation of a heterogeneous two-point connection embedded into the otherwise homogeneous connectivity matrix and by variation of the connectivity strength and transmission speed. Detailed examples including the Ginzburg-Landau equation and various other local architectures are discussed. Our analysis shows that developmental changes such as the myelination of the cortical large-scale fiber system generally result in the stabilization of steady state activity independent of the local connectivity. Non-oscillatory instabilities are shown to be independent of any influences of time delay.

  15. The visual perception of natural motion: abnormal task-related neural activity in DYT1 dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sako, Wataru; Fujita, Koji; Vo, An; Rucker, Janet C; Rizzo, John-Ross; Niethammer, Martin; Carbon, Maren; Bressman, Susan B; Uluğ, Aziz M; Eidelberg, David

    2015-12-01

    Although primary dystonia is defined by its characteristic motor manifestations, non-motor signs and symptoms have increasingly been recognized in this disorder. Recent neuroimaging studies have related the motor features of primary dystonia to connectivity changes in cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways. It is not known, however, whether the non-motor manifestations of the disorder are associated with similar circuit abnormalities. To explore this possibility, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study primary dystonia and healthy volunteer subjects while they performed a motion perception task in which elliptical target trajectories were visually tracked on a computer screen. Prior functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of healthy subjects performing this task have revealed selective activation of motor regions during the perception of 'natural' versus 'unnatural' motion (defined respectively as trajectories with kinematic properties that either comply with or violate the two-thirds power law of motion). Several regions with significant connectivity changes in primary dystonia were situated in proximity to normal motion perception pathways, suggesting that abnormalities of these circuits may also be present in this disorder. To determine whether activation responses to natural versus unnatural motion in primary dystonia differ from normal, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study 10 DYT1 dystonia and 10 healthy control subjects at rest and during the perception of 'natural' and 'unnatural' motion. Both groups exhibited significant activation changes across perceptual conditions in the cerebellum, pons, and subthalamic nucleus. The two groups differed, however, in their responses to 'natural' versus 'unnatural' motion in these regions. In healthy subjects, regional activation was greater during the perception of natural (versus unnatural) motion (P < 0.05). By contrast, in DYT1 dystonia subjects, activation was relatively greater

  16. Connecting Neural Coding to Number Cognition: A Computational Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prather, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    The current study presents a series of computational simulations that demonstrate how the neural coding of numerical magnitude may influence number cognition and development. This includes behavioral phenomena cataloged in cognitive literature such as the development of numerical estimation and operational momentum. Though neural research has…

  17. Neural Systems Language: A Formal Modeling Language for the Systematic Description, Unambiguous Communication, and Automated Digital Curation of Neural Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ramsay A.; Swanson, Larry W.

    2014-01-01

    Systematic description and the unambiguous communication of findings and models remain among the unresolved fundamental challenges in systems neuroscience. No common descriptive frameworks exist to describe systematically the connective architecture of the nervous system, even at the grossest level of observation. Furthermore, the accelerating volume of novel data generated on neural connectivity outpaces the rate at which this data is curated into neuroinformatics databases to synthesize digitally systems-level insights from disjointed reports and observations. To help address these challenges, we propose the Neural Systems Language (NSyL). NSyL is a modeling language to be used by investigators to encode and communicate systematically reports of neural connectivity from neuroanatomy and brain imaging. NSyL engenders systematic description and communication of connectivity irrespective of the animal taxon described, experimental or observational technique implemented, or nomenclature referenced. As a language, NSyL is internally consistent, concise, and comprehensible to both humans and computers. NSyL is a promising development for systematizing the representation of neural architecture, effectively managing the increasing volume of data on neural connectivity and streamlining systems neuroscience research. Here we present similar precedent systems, how NSyL extends existing frameworks, and the reasoning behind NSyL’s development. We explore NSyL’s potential for balancing robustness and consistency in representation by encoding previously reported assertions of connectivity from the literature as examples. Finally, we propose and discuss the implications of a framework for how NSyL will be digitally implemented in the future to streamline curation of experimental results and bridge the gaps among anatomists, imagers, and neuroinformatics databases. PMID:23787962

  18. Neural systems language: a formal modeling language for the systematic description, unambiguous communication, and automated digital curation of neural connectivity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ramsay A; Swanson, Larry W

    2013-09-01

    Systematic description and the unambiguous communication of findings and models remain among the unresolved fundamental challenges in systems neuroscience. No common descriptive frameworks exist to describe systematically the connective architecture of the nervous system, even at the grossest level of observation. Furthermore, the accelerating volume of novel data generated on neural connectivity outpaces the rate at which this data is curated into neuroinformatics databases to synthesize digitally systems-level insights from disjointed reports and observations. To help address these challenges, we propose the Neural Systems Language (NSyL). NSyL is a modeling language to be used by investigators to encode and communicate systematically reports of neural connectivity from neuroanatomy and brain imaging. NSyL engenders systematic description and communication of connectivity irrespective of the animal taxon described, experimental or observational technique implemented, or nomenclature referenced. As a language, NSyL is internally consistent, concise, and comprehensible to both humans and computers. NSyL is a promising development for systematizing the representation of neural architecture, effectively managing the increasing volume of data on neural connectivity and streamlining systems neuroscience research. Here we present similar precedent systems, how NSyL extends existing frameworks, and the reasoning behind NSyL's development. We explore NSyL's potential for balancing robustness and consistency in representation by encoding previously reported assertions of connectivity from the literature as examples. Finally, we propose and discuss the implications of a framework for how NSyL will be digitally implemented in the future to streamline curation of experimental results and bridge the gaps among anatomists, imagers, and neuroinformatics databases.

  19. Some neural connections subserving binocular vision in ungulates.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, J D; Ramachandran, V S; Bravo, H

    1984-01-01

    Using a combination of anatomical and physiological techniques we have studied some of the neural connections subserving binocular vision in two species of artiodactyl ungulates (the sheep, Ovis sp., and the goat, Capra hircus). After monocular injections of tritiated proline, transsynaptic transport was observed bilaterally in layers 4 and 6 of visual cortical areas V1 and V2, but there were no sharply defined ocular dominance columns of the kind seen in cats and rhesus monkeys. In coronal sections there was a discontinuity in density of labelling between areas V1 and V2 corresponding to a point in the visuotopic map about azimuth - 15 degrees in the ipsilateral visual field. This discontinuity was most pronounced in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the injected eye. We conclude, therefore, that while the cortical representation of ipsilateral visual space can be explained by the retino-geniculo-cortical input pathway from the contralateral eye, the physiologically demonstrated cortical contribution to ipsilateral visual space from the ipsilateral eye cannot be explained in this way. This conclusion was reinforced by experiments using retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase from the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and medial interlaminar nucleus (MIN) to retinal ganglion cells in flattened whole mounts. These experiments revealed a sharp nasotemporal decussation in the ipsilateral retina, which could not thereby subserve any significant representation of the ipsilateral visual field. In contrast the contralateral nasotemporal decussation was smeared, with many labelled ganglion cells in the temporal retina which could subserve visual input from the ipsilateral hemifield. When we estimated the projection of the nasotemporal decussation line into visual space, we found that it was tilted from vertical by about 5 degrees in each eye, in a similar way to that already reported in the cat. Neurophysiological recordings from binocular neurons in area V1 with

  20. Neural code alterations and abnormal time patterns in Parkinson’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, Daniela Sabrina; Cerquetti, Daniel; Merello, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    Objective. The neural code used by the basal ganglia is a current question in neuroscience, relevant for the understanding of the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease. While a rate code is known to participate in the communication between the basal ganglia and the motor thalamus/cortex, different lines of evidence have also favored the presence of complex time patterns in the discharge of the basal ganglia. To gain insight into the way the basal ganglia code information, we studied the activity of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi), an output node of the circuit. Approach. We implemented the 6-hydroxydopamine model of Parkinsonism in Sprague-Dawley rats, and recorded the spontaneous discharge of single GPi neurons, in head-restrained conditions at full alertness. Analyzing the temporal structure function, we looked for characteristic scales in the neuronal discharge of the GPi. Main results. At a low-scale, we observed the presence of dynamic processes, which allow the transmission of time patterns. Conversely, at a middle-scale, stochastic processes force the use of a rate code. Regarding the time patterns transmitted, we measured the word length and found that it is increased in Parkinson’s disease. Furthermore, it showed a positive correlation with the frequency of discharge, indicating that an exacerbation of this abnormal time pattern length can be expected, as the dopamine depletion progresses. Significance. We conclude that a rate code and a time pattern code can co-exist in the basal ganglia at different temporal scales. However, their normal balance is progressively altered and replaced by pathological time patterns in Parkinson’s disease.

  1. Neural tube opening and abnormal extraembryonic membrane development in SEC23A deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Min; Tao, Jiayi; Vasievich, Matthew P.; Wei, Wei; Zhu, Guojing; Khoriaty, Rami N.; Zhang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    COPII (coat protein complex-II) vesicles transport proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi. Higher eukaryotes have two or more paralogs of most COPII components. Here we characterize mice deficient for SEC23A and studied interactions of Sec23a null allele with the previously reported Sec23b null allele. SEC23A deficiency leads to mid-embryonic lethality associated with defective development of extraembryonic membranes and neural tube opening in midbrain. Secretion defects of multiple collagen types are observed in different connective tissues, suggesting that collagens are primarily transported in SEC23A-containing vesicles in these cells. Other extracellular matrix proteins, such as fibronectin, are not affected by SEC23A deficiency. Intracellular accumulation of unsecreted proteins leads to strong induction of the unfolded protein response in collagen-producing cells. No collagen secretion defects are observed in SEC23B deficient embryos. We report that E-cadherin is a cargo that accumulates in acini of SEC23B deficient pancreas and salivary glands. Compensatory increase of one paralog is observed in the absence of the second paralog. Haploinsufficiency of the remaining Sec23 paralog on top of homozygous inactivation of the first paralog leads to earlier lethality of embryos. Our results suggest that mammalian SEC23A and SEC23B transport overlapping yet distinct spectra of cargo in vivo. PMID:26494538

  2. Abnormal functional global and local brain connectivity in female patients with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Daniel; Borchardt, Viola; Lord, Anton R.; Boehm, Ilka; Ritschel, Franziska; Zwipp, Johannes; Clas, Sabine; King, Joseph A.; Wolff-Stephan, Silvia; Roessner, Veit; Walter, Martin; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous resting-state functional connectivity studies in patients with anorexia nervosa used independent component analysis or seed-based connectivity analysis to probe specific brain networks. Instead, modelling the entire brain as a complex network allows determination of graph-theoretical metrics, which describe global and local properties of how brain networks are organized and how they interact. Methods To determine differences in network properties between female patients with acute anorexia nervosa and pairwise matched healthy controls, we used resting-state fMRI and computed well-established global and local graph metrics across a range of network densities. Results Our analyses included 35 patients and 35 controls. We found that the global functional network structure in patients with anorexia nervosa is characterized by increases in both characteristic path length (longer average routes between nodes) and assortativity (more nodes with a similar connectedness link together). Accordingly, we found locally decreased connectivity strength and increased path length in the posterior insula and thalamus. Limitations The present results may be limited to the methods applied during preprocessing and network construction. Conclusion We demonstrated anorexia nervosa–related changes in the network configuration for, to our knowledge, the first time using resting-state fMRI and graph-theoretical measures. Our findings revealed an altered global brain network architecture accompanied by local degradations indicating wide-scale disturbance in information flow across brain networks in patients with acute anorexia nervosa. Reduced local network efficiency in the thalamus and posterior insula may reflect a mechanism that helps explain the impaired integration of visuospatial and homeostatic signals in patients with this disorder, which is thought to be linked to abnormal representations of body size and hunger. PMID:26252451

  3. Abnormal climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synaptic connections in the essential tremor cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Ying; Louis, Elan D.; Faust, Phyllis L.; Koeppen, Arnulf H.; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Structural changes in Purkinje cells have been identified in the essential tremor cerebellum, although the mechanisms that underlie these changes remain poorly understood. Climbing fibres provide one of the major excitatory inputs to Purkinje cells, and climbing fibre-Purkinje cell connections are essential for normal cerebellar-mediated motor control. The distribution of climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synapses on Purkinje cell dendrites is dynamically regulated and may be altered in disease states. The aim of the present study was to examine the density and distribution of climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synapses using post-mortem cerebellar tissue of essential tremor cases and controls. Using vesicular glutamate transporter type 2 immunohistochemistry, we labelled climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synapses of 12 essential tremor cases and 13 age-matched controls from the New York Brain Bank. Normally, climbing fibres form synapses mainly on the thick, proximal Purkinje cell dendrites in the inner portion of the molecular layer, whereas parallel fibres form synapses on the thin, distal Purkinje cell spiny branchlets. We observed that, compared with controls, essential tremor cases had decreased climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synaptic density, more climbing fibres extending to the outer portion of the molecular layer, and more climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synapses on the thin Purkinje cell spiny branchlets. Interestingly, in essential tremor, the increased distribution of climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synapses on the thin Purkinje cell branchlets was inversely associated with clinical tremor severity, indicating a close relationship between the altered distribution of climbing fibre-Purkinje cell connections and tremor. These findings suggest that abnormal climbing fibre-Purkinje cell connections could be of importance in the pathogenesis of essential tremor. PMID:25273997

  4. Perspectives on the neural connectivity of the fornix in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2014-01-01

    The fornix is involved in the transfer of information on episodic memory as a part of the Papez circuit. Diffusion tensor imaging enables to estimate the neural connectivity of the fornix. The anterior fornical body has high connectivity with the anterior commissure, and brain areas relevant to cholinergic nuclei (septal forebrain region and brainstem) and memory function (medial temporal lobe). In the normal subjects, by contrast, the posterior fornical body has connectivity with the cerebral cortex and brainstem through the splenium of the corpus callosum. We believe that knowledge of the neural connectivity of the fornix would be helpful in investigation of the neural network associated with memory and recovery mechanisms following injury of the fornix. PMID:25317154

  5. In search of neural mechanisms of mirror neuron dysfunction in schizophrenia: resting state functional connectivity approach.

    PubMed

    Zaytseva, Yuliya; Bendova, Marie; Garakh, Zhanna; Tintera, Jaroslav; Rydlo, Jan; Spaniel, Filip; Horacek, Jiri

    2015-09-01

    It has been repeatedly shown that schizophrenia patients have immense alterations in goal-directed behaviour, social cognition, and social interactions, cognitive abilities that are presumably driven by the mirror neurons system (MNS). However, the neural bases of these deficits still remain unclear. Along with the task-related fMRI and EEG research tapping into the mirror neuron system, the characteristics of the resting state activity in the particular areas that encompass mirror neurons might be of interest as they obviously determine the baseline of the neuronal activity. Using resting state fMRI, we investigated resting state functional connectivity (FC) in four predefined brain structures, ROIs (inferior frontal gyrus, superior parietal lobule, premotor cortex and superior temporal gyrus), known for their mirror neurons activity, in 12 patients with first psychotic episode and 12 matched healthy individuals. As a specific hypothesis, based on the knowledge of the anatomical inputs of thalamus to all preselected ROIs, we have investigated the FC between thalamus and the ROIs. Of all ROIs included, seed-to-voxel connectivity analysis revealed significantly decreased FC only in left posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG) and the areas in visual cortex and cerebellum in patients as compared to controls. Using ROI-to-ROI analysis (thalamus and selected ROIs), we have found an increased FC of STG and bilateral thalamus whereas the FC of these areas was decreased in controls. Our results suggest that: (1) schizophrenia patients exhibit FC of STG which corresponds to the previously reported changes of superior temporal gyrus in schizophrenia and might contribute to the disturbances of specific functions, such as emotional processing or spatial awareness; (2) as the thalamus plays a pivotal role in the sensory gating, providing the filtering of the redundant stimulation, the observed hyperconnectivity between the thalami and the STGs in patients with schizophrenia

  6. In search of neural mechanisms of mirror neuron dysfunction in schizophrenia: resting state functional connectivity approach.

    PubMed

    Zaytseva, Yuliya; Bendova, Marie; Garakh, Zhanna; Tintera, Jaroslav; Rydlo, Jan; Spaniel, Filip; Horacek, Jiri

    2015-09-01

    It has been repeatedly shown that schizophrenia patients have immense alterations in goal-directed behaviour, social cognition, and social interactions, cognitive abilities that are presumably driven by the mirror neurons system (MNS). However, the neural bases of these deficits still remain unclear. Along with the task-related fMRI and EEG research tapping into the mirror neuron system, the characteristics of the resting state activity in the particular areas that encompass mirror neurons might be of interest as they obviously determine the baseline of the neuronal activity. Using resting state fMRI, we investigated resting state functional connectivity (FC) in four predefined brain structures, ROIs (inferior frontal gyrus, superior parietal lobule, premotor cortex and superior temporal gyrus), known for their mirror neurons activity, in 12 patients with first psychotic episode and 12 matched healthy individuals. As a specific hypothesis, based on the knowledge of the anatomical inputs of thalamus to all preselected ROIs, we have investigated the FC between thalamus and the ROIs. Of all ROIs included, seed-to-voxel connectivity analysis revealed significantly decreased FC only in left posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG) and the areas in visual cortex and cerebellum in patients as compared to controls. Using ROI-to-ROI analysis (thalamus and selected ROIs), we have found an increased FC of STG and bilateral thalamus whereas the FC of these areas was decreased in controls. Our results suggest that: (1) schizophrenia patients exhibit FC of STG which corresponds to the previously reported changes of superior temporal gyrus in schizophrenia and might contribute to the disturbances of specific functions, such as emotional processing or spatial awareness; (2) as the thalamus plays a pivotal role in the sensory gating, providing the filtering of the redundant stimulation, the observed hyperconnectivity between the thalami and the STGs in patients with schizophrenia

  7. Gray Matter Abnormalities in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Relationships with Resting-State Functional Connectivity and Episodic Memory Performance

    PubMed Central

    Doucet, Gaelle E.; He, Xiaosong; Sperling, Michael; Sharan, Ashwini; Tracy, Joseph I.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) affects multiple brain regions through evidence from both structural (gray matter; GM) and functional connectivity (FC) studies. We tested whether these structural abnormalities were associated with FC abnormalities, and assessed the ability of these measures to explain episodic memory impairments in this population. A resting-state and T1 sequences were acquired on 94 (45 with mesial temporal pathology) TLE patients and 50 controls, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique. A voxel-based morphometry analysis was computed to determine the GM volume differences between groups (right, left TLE, controls). Resting-state FC between the abnormal GM volume regions was computed, and compared between groups. Finally, we investigated the relation between EM, GM and FC findings. Patients with and without temporal pathology were analyzed separately. The results revealed reduced GM volume in multiple regions in the patients relative to the controls. Using FC, we found the abnormal GM regions did not display abnormal functional connectivity. Lastly, we found in left TLE patients, verbal episodic memory was associated with abnormal left posterior hippocampus volume, while in right TLE, non-verbal episodic memory was better predicted by resting-state FC measures. This study investigated TLE abnormalities using a multi-modal approach combining GM, FC and neurocognitive measures. We did not find that the GM abnormalities were functionally or abnormally connected during an inter-ictal resting state, which may reflect a weak sensitivity of functional connectivity to the epileptic network. We provided evidence that verbal and non-verbal episodic memory in left and right TLE patients may have distinct relationships with structural and functional measures. Lastly, we provide data suggesting that in the setting of occult, non-lesional right TLE pathology, a coupling of structural and functional abnormalities in extra-temporal/non-ictal regions is

  8. Effect of neural connectivity on autocovariance and cross covariance estimates

    PubMed Central

    Stecker, Mark M

    2007-01-01

    Background Measurements of auto and cross covariance functions are frequently used to investigate neural systems. In interpreting this data, it is commonly assumed that the largest contribution to the recordings comes from sources near the electrode. However, the potential recorded at an electrode represents the superimposition of the potentials generated by large numbers of active neural structures. This creates situations under which the measured auto and cross covariance functions are dominated by the activity in structures far from the electrode and in which the distance dependence of the cross-covariance function differs significantly from that describing the activity in the actual neural structures. Methods Direct application of electrostatics to calculate the theoretical auto and cross covariance functions that would be recorded from electrodes immersed in a large volume filled with active neural structures with specific statistical properties. Results It is demonstrated that the potentials recorded from a monopolar electrode surrounded by dipole sources in a uniform medium are predominantly due to activity in neural structures far from the electrode when neuronal correlations drop more slowly than 1/r3 or when the size of the neural system is much smaller than a known correlation distance. Recordings from quadrupolar sources are strongly dependent on distant neurons when correlations drop more slowly than 1/r or the size of the system is much smaller than the correlation distance. Differences between bipolar and monopolar recordings are discussed. It is also demonstrated that the cross covariance of the recorded in two spatially separated electrodes declines as a power-law function of the distance between them even when the electrical activity from different neuronal structures is uncorrelated. Conclusion When extracellular electrophysiologic recordings are made from systems containing large numbers of neural structures, it is important to interpret

  9. Cardiorespiratory responses to exercise after anatomic repair of atrioventricular discordance with abnormal ventriculoarterial connection.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kenji; Ohuchi, Hideo; Ono, Yasuo; Yagihara, Toshikatsu; Echigo, Shigeyuki

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated exercise tolerance and cardiorespiratory responses to exercise in patients with atrioventricular discordance (AVD) and abnormal ventriculoarterial connection after anatomic repair. Cardiopulmonary treadmill exercise testing with gas measurement was done 62 times in 19 patients with AVD who had undergone anatomic repair at the National Cardiovascular Center. Exercise duration, oxygen uptake (V(O2)) and heart rate at anaerobic threshold and peak, and oxygen pulse during exercise were significantly lower in patients with AVD after anatomic repair than in controls. Carbon dioxide ventilatory equivalent during exercise was worse in patients with AVD after anatomic repair than in controls. Percentage peak V(O2) significantly correlated positively with percentage peak oxygen pulse and tended to correlate positively with the heart rate increments. Patients with AVD after anatomic repair exhibit impaired responses of heart rate and oxygen pulse with lower exercise capacity. Careful attention should be paid to patients with AVD after anatomic repair in terms of their functional capacity as well as other postoperative complications.

  10. Sall1 regulates cortical neurogenesis and laminar fate specification in mice: implications for neural abnormalities in Townes-Brocks syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Susan J.; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Jones, Kevin R.; Monaghan, A. Paula

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Progenitor cells in the cerebral cortex undergo dynamic cellular and molecular changes during development. Sall1 is a putative transcription factor that is highly expressed in progenitor cells during development. In humans, the autosomal dominant developmental disorder Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) is associated with mutations of the SALL1 gene. TBS is characterized by renal, anal, limb and auditory abnormalities. Although neural deficits have not been recognized as a diagnostic characteristic of the disease, ∼10% of patients exhibit neural or behavioral abnormalities. We demonstrate that, in addition to being expressed in peripheral organs, Sall1 is robustly expressed in progenitor cells of the central nervous system in mice. Both classical- and conditional-knockout mouse studies indicate that the cerebral cortex is particularly sensitive to loss of Sall1. In the absence of Sall1, both the surface area and depth of the cerebral cortex were decreased at embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5). These deficiencies are associated with changes in progenitor cell properties during development. In early cortical progenitor cells, Sall1 promotes proliferative over neurogenic division, whereas, at later developmental stages, Sall1 regulates the production and differentiation of intermediate progenitor cells. Furthermore, Sall1 influences the temporal specification of cortical laminae. These findings present novel insights into the function of Sall1 in the developing mouse cortex and provide avenues for future research into potential neural deficits in individuals with TBS. PMID:22228756

  11. Computer-assisted three-dimensional reconstruction and simulations of vestibular macular neural connectivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Chimento, Thomas; Doshay, David; Cheng, Rei

    1992-01-01

    Results of computer-assisted research concerned with the three-dimensional reconstruction and simulations of vestibular macular neural connectivities are summarized. The discussion focuses on terminal/receptive fields, the question of synapses across the striola, endoplasmic reticulum and its potential role in macular information processing, and the inner epithelial plexus. Also included are preliminary results of computer simulations of nerve fiber collateral functioning, an essential step toward the three-dimensional simulation of a functioning macular neural network.

  12. Effective Connectivity of Hippocampal Neural Network and Its Alteration in Mg2+-Free Epilepsy Model

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xin-Wei; Li, Jing-Bo; Lu, Qin-Chi; Liang, Pei-Ji; Zhang, Pu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the connectivity of the brain neural network and its evolution in epileptiform discharges is meaningful in the epilepsy researches and treatments. In the present study, epileptiform discharges were induced in rat hippocampal slices perfused with Mg2+-free artificial cerebrospinal fluid. The effective connectivity of the hippocampal neural network was studied by comparing the normal and epileptiform discharges recorded by a microelectrode array. The neural network connectivity was constructed by using partial directed coherence and analyzed by graph theory. The transition of the hippocampal network topology from control to epileptiform discharges was demonstrated. Firstly, differences existed in both the averaged in- and out-degree between nodes in the pyramidal cell layer and the granule cell layer, which indicated an information flow from the pyramidal cell layer to the granule cell layer during epileptiform discharges, whereas no consistent information flow was observed in control. Secondly, the neural network showed different small-worldness in the early, middle and late stages of the epileptiform discharges, whereas the control network did not show the small-world property. Thirdly, the network connectivity began to change earlier than the appearance of epileptiform discharges and lasted several seconds after the epileptiform discharges disappeared. These results revealed the important network bases underlying the transition from normal to epileptiform discharges in hippocampal slices. Additionally, this work indicated that the network analysis might provide a useful tool to evaluate the neural network and help to improve the prediction of seizures. PMID:24658094

  13. Effective connectivity of hippocampal neural network and its alteration in Mg2+-free epilepsy model.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xin-Wei; Li, Jing-Bo; Lu, Qin-Chi; Liang, Pei-Ji; Zhang, Pu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the connectivity of the brain neural network and its evolution in epileptiform discharges is meaningful in the epilepsy researches and treatments. In the present study, epileptiform discharges were induced in rat hippocampal slices perfused with Mg2+-free artificial cerebrospinal fluid. The effective connectivity of the hippocampal neural network was studied by comparing the normal and epileptiform discharges recorded by a microelectrode array. The neural network connectivity was constructed by using partial directed coherence and analyzed by graph theory. The transition of the hippocampal network topology from control to epileptiform discharges was demonstrated. Firstly, differences existed in both the averaged in- and out-degree between nodes in the pyramidal cell layer and the granule cell layer, which indicated an information flow from the pyramidal cell layer to the granule cell layer during epileptiform discharges, whereas no consistent information flow was observed in control. Secondly, the neural network showed different small-worldness in the early, middle and late stages of the epileptiform discharges, whereas the control network did not show the small-world property. Thirdly, the network connectivity began to change earlier than the appearance of epileptiform discharges and lasted several seconds after the epileptiform discharges disappeared. These results revealed the important network bases underlying the transition from normal to epileptiform discharges in hippocampal slices. Additionally, this work indicated that the network analysis might provide a useful tool to evaluate the neural network and help to improve the prediction of seizures.

  14. Network burst dynamics under heterogeneous cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneous synaptic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Knudstrup, Scott; Zochowski, Michal; Booth, Victoria

    2016-05-01

    The characteristics of neural network activity depend on intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity in the network. In brain networks, both of these properties are critically affected by the type and levels of neuromodulators present. The expression of many of the most powerful neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), varies tonically and phasically with behavioural state, leading to dynamic, heterogeneous changes in intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity properties. Namely, ACh significantly alters neural firing properties as measured by the phase response curve in a manner that has been shown to alter the propensity for network synchronization. The aim of this simulation study was to build an understanding of how heterogeneity in cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneity in synaptic connectivity affect the initiation and maintenance of synchronous network bursting in excitatory networks. We show that cells that display different levels of ACh modulation have differential roles in generating network activity: weakly modulated cells are necessary for burst initiation and provide synchronizing drive to the rest of the network, whereas strongly modulated cells provide the overall activity level necessary to sustain burst firing. By applying several quantitative measures of network activity, we further show that the existence of network bursting and its characteristics, such as burst duration and intraburst synchrony, are dependent on the fraction of cell types providing the synaptic connections in the network. These results suggest mechanisms underlying ACh modulation of brain oscillations and the modulation of seizure activity during sleep states.

  15. Network burst dynamics under heterogeneous cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneous synaptic connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Knudstrup, Scott; Zochowski, Michal; Booth, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of neural network activity depend on intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity in the network. In brain networks, both of these properties are critically affected by the type and levels of neuromodulators present. The expression of many of the most powerful neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), varies tonically and phasically with behavioural state, leading to dynamic, heterogeneous changes in intrinsic neural properties and synaptic connectivity properties. Namely, ACh significantly alters neural firing properties as measured by the phase response curve in a manner that has been shown to alter the propensity for network synchronization. The aim of this simulation study was to build an understanding of how heterogeneity in cholinergic modulation of neural firing properties and heterogeneity in synaptic connectivity affect the initiation and maintenance of synchronous network bursting in excitatory networks. We show that cells that display different levels of ACh modulation have differential roles in generating network activity: weakly modulated cells are necessary for burst initiation and provide synchronizing drive to the rest of the network, whereas strongly modulated cells provide the overall activity level necessary to sustain burst firing. By applying several quantitative measures of network activity, we further show that the existence of network bursting and its characteristics, such as burst duration and intraburst synchrony, are dependent on the fraction of cell types providing the synaptic connections in the network. These results suggest mechanisms underlying ACh modulation of brain oscillations and the modulation of seizure activity during sleep states. PMID:26869313

  16. Does motion-related brain functional connectivity reflect both artifacts and genuine neural activity?

    PubMed

    Pujol, Jesus; Macià, Dídac; Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; Martínez-Vilavella, Gerard; Sunyer, Jordi; de la Torre, Rafael; Caixàs, Assumpta; Martín-Santos, Rocío; Deus, Joan; Harrison, Ben J

    2014-11-01

    Imaging research on functional connectivity is uniquely contributing to characterize the functional organization of the human brain. Functional connectivity measurements, however, may be significantly influenced by head motion that occurs during image acquisition. The identification of how motion influences such measurements is therefore highly relevant to the interpretation of a study's results. We have mapped the effect of head motion on functional connectivity in six different populations representing a wide range of potential influences of motion on functional connectivity. Group-level voxel-wise maps of the correlation between a summary head motion measurement and functional connectivity degree were estimated in 80 young adults, 71 children, 53 older adults, 20 patients with Down syndrome, 24 with Prader-Willi syndrome and 20 with Williams syndrome. In highly compliant young adults, motion correlated with functional connectivity measurements showing a system-specific anatomy involving the sensorimotor cortex, visual areas and default mode network. Further characterization was strongly indicative of these changes expressing genuine neural activity related to motion, as opposed to pure motion artifact. In the populations with larger head motion, results were more indicative of widespread artifacts, but showing notably distinct spatial distribution patterns. Group-level regression of motion effects was efficient in removing both generalized changes and changes putatively related to neural activity. Overall, this study endorses a relatively simple approach for mapping distinct effects of head motion on functional connectivity. Importantly, our findings support the intriguing hypothesis that a component of motion-related changes may reflect system-specific neural activity.

  17. Identification of Abnormal System Noise Temperature Patterns in Deep Space Network Antennas Using Neural Network Trained Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Thomas; Pham, Timothy; Liao, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a fuzzy logic function trained by an artificial neural network to classify the system noise temperature (SNT) of antennas in the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). The SNT data were classified into normal, marginal, and abnormal classes. The irregular SNT pattern was further correlated with link margin and weather data. A reasonably good correlation is detected among high SNT, low link margin and the effect of bad weather; however we also saw some unexpected non-correlations which merit further study in the future.

  18. Neural Connectivity in Epilepsy as Measured by Granger Causality

    PubMed Central

    Coben, Robert; Mohammad-Rezazadeh, Iman

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by repeated seizures or excessive electrical discharges in a group of brain cells. Prevalence rates include about 50 million people worldwide and 10% of all people have at least one seizure at one time in their lives. Connectivity models of epilepsy serve to provide a deeper understanding of the processes that control and regulate seizure activity. These models have received initial support and have included measures of EEG, MEG, and MRI connectivity. Preliminary findings have shown regions of increased connectivity in the immediate regions surrounding the seizure foci and associated low connectivity in nearby regions and pathways. There is also early evidence to suggest that these patterns change during ictal events and that these changes may even by related to the occurrence or triggering of seizure events. We present data showing how Granger causality can be used with EEG data to measure connectivity across brain regions involved in ictal events and their resolution. We have provided two case examples as a demonstration of how to obtain and interpret such data. EEG data of ictal events are processed, converted to independent components and their dipole localizations, and these are used to measure causality and connectivity between these locations. Both examples have shown hypercoupling near the seizure foci and low causality across nearby and associated neuronal pathways. This technique also allows us to track how these measures change over time and during the ictal and post-ictal periods. Areas for further research into this technique, its application to epilepsy, and the formation of more effective therapeutic interventions are recommended. PMID:26236211

  19. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Connectivity Mapping: Tools for Studying the Neural Bases of Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, M.; Hoffman, R. E.

    2010-01-01

    There has been an increasing emphasis on characterizing pathophysiology underlying psychiatric and neurological disorders in terms of altered neural connectivity and network dynamics. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) provides a unique opportunity for investigating connectivity in the human brain. TMS allows researchers and clinicians to directly stimulate cortical regions accessible to electromagnetic coils positioned on the scalp. The induced activation can then propagate through long-range connections to other brain areas. Thus, by identifying distal regions activated during TMS, researchers can infer connectivity patterns in the healthy human brain and can examine how those patterns may be disrupted in patients with different brain disorders. Conversely, connectivity maps derived using neuroimaging methods can identify components of a dysfunctional network. Nodes in this dysfunctional network accessible as targets for TMS by virtue of their proximity to the scalp may then permit TMS-induced alterations of components of the network not directly accessible to TMS via propagated effects. Thus TMS can provide a portal for accessing and altering neural dynamics in networks that are widely distributed anatomically. Finally, when long-term modulation of network dynamics is induced by trains of repetitive TMS, changes in functional connectivity patterns can be studied in parallel with changes in patient symptoms. These correlational data can elucidate neural mechanisms underlying illness and recovery. In this review, we focus on the application of these approaches to the study of psychiatric and neurological illnesses. PMID:20941369

  20. Combined optical tweezers and laser dissector for controlled ablation of functional connections in neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Difato, Francesco; Dal Maschio, Marco; Marconi, Emanuele; Ronzitti, Giuseppe; Maccione, Alessandro; Fellin, Tommasso; Berdondini, Luca; Chieregatti, Evelina; Benfenati, Fabio; Blau, Axel

    2011-05-01

    Regeneration of functional connectivity within a neural network after different degrees of lesion is of utmost clinical importance. To test pharmacological approaches aimed at recovering from a total or partial damage of neuronal connections within a circuit, it is necessary to develop a precise method for controlled ablation of neuronal processes. We combined a UV laser microdissector to ablate neural processes in vitro at single neuron and neural network level with infrared holographic optical tweezers to carry out force spectroscopy measurements. Simultaneous force spectroscopy, down to the sub-pico-Newton range, was performed during laser dissection to quantify the tension release in a partially ablated neurite. Therefore, we could control and measure the damage inflicted to an individual neuronal process. To characterize the effect of the inflicted injury on network level, changes in activity of neural subpopulations were monitored with subcellular resolution and overall network activity with high temporal resolution by concurrent calcium imaging and microelectrode array recording. Neuronal connections have been sequentially ablated and the correlated changes in network activity traced and mapped. With this unique combination of electrophysiological and optical tools, neural activity can be studied and quantified in response to controlled injury at the subcellular, cellular, and network level.

  1. Functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals abnormal brain connectivity in EGR3 gene transfected rat model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Song, Tianbin; Nie, Binbin; Ma, Ensen; Che, Jing; Sun, Shilong; Wang, Yuli; Shan, Baoci; Liu, Yawu; Luo, Senlin; Ma, Guolin; Li, Kefeng

    2015-05-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by the disorder of "social brain". However, the alternation of connectivity density in brain areas of schizophrenia patients remains largely unknown. In this study, we successfully created a rat model of schizophrenia by the transfection of EGR3 gene into rat brain. We then investigated the connectivity density of schizophrenia susceptible regions in rat brain using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in combination with multivariate Granger causality (GC) model. We found that the average signal strength in prefrontal lobe and hippocampus of schizophrenia model group was significantly higher than the control group. Bidirectional Granger causality connection was observed between hippocampus and thalamic in schizophrenia model group. Both connectivity density and Granger causality connection were changed in prefrontal lobe, hippocampus and thalamus after risperidone treatment. Our results indicated that fMRI in combination with GC connection analysis may be used as an important method in diagnosis of schizophrenia and evaluation the effect of antipsychotic treatment. These findings support the connectivity disorder hypothesis of schizophrenia and increase our understanding of the neural mechanisms of schizophrenia.

  2. Neural immune pathways and their connection to inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Farideh; Webster, Jeanette I; Sternberg, Esther M

    2003-01-01

    Inflammation and inflammatory responses are modulated by a bidirectional communication between the neuroendocrine and immune system. Many lines of research have established the numerous routes by which the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS) communicate. The CNS signals the immune system through hormonal pathways, including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the hormones of the neuroendocrine stress response, and through neuronal pathways, including the autonomic nervous system. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and sex hormones also have an important immunoregulatory role. The immune system signals the CNS through immune mediators and cytokines that can cross the blood-brain barrier, or signal indirectly through the vagus nerve or second messengers. Neuroendocrine regulation of immune function is essential for survival during stress or infection and to modulate immune responses in inflammatory disease. This review discusses neuroimmune interactions and evidence for the role of such neural immune regulation of inflammation, rather than a discussion of the individual inflammatory mediators, in rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Neural connectivity during reward expectation dissociates psychopathic criminals from non-criminal individuals with high impulsive/antisocial psychopathic traits.

    PubMed

    Geurts, Dirk E M; von Borries, Katinka; Volman, Inge; Bulten, Berend Hendrik; Cools, Roshan; Verkes, Robbert-Jan

    2016-08-01

    Criminal behaviour poses a big challenge for society. A thorough understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying criminality could optimize its prevention and management. Specifically,elucidating the neural mechanisms underpinning reward expectation might be pivotal to understanding criminal behaviour. So far no study has assessed reward expectation and its mechanisms in a criminal sample. To fill this gap, we assessed reward expectation in incarcerated, psychopathic criminals. We compared this group to two groups of non-criminal individuals: one with high levels and another with low levels of impulsive/antisocial traits. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to quantify neural responses to reward expectancy. Psychophysiological interaction analyses were performed to examine differences in functional connectivity patterns of reward-related regions. The data suggest that overt criminality is characterized, not by abnormal reward expectation per se, but rather by enhanced communication between reward-related striatal regions and frontal brain regions. We establish that incarcerated psychopathic criminals can be dissociated from non-criminal individuals with comparable impulsive/antisocial personality tendencies based on the degree to which reward-related brain regions interact with brain regions that control behaviour. The present results help us understand why some people act according to their impulsive/antisocial personality while others are able to behave adaptively despite reward-related urges. PMID:27217111

  4. Neurulation abnormalities secondary to altered gene expression in neural tube defect susceptible Splotch embryos.

    PubMed

    Bennett, G D; An, J; Craig, J C; Gefrides, L A; Calvin, J A; Finnell, R H

    1998-01-01

    The murine mutant Splotch (Sp) is a well-established model for studying neural tube closure defects. In the current investigation, the progression through neural tube closure (NTC) as well as the expression patterns of 12 developmentally regulated genes were examined in the neural tissue of wildtype (+/+), Splotch heterozygous (Sp/+), and Splotch homozygous (Sp/Sp) embryos during neurulation. The overall growth of the embryos, as measured by the number of somite pairs, did not differ significantly between the three genotypes at any of the collection time-points. There was, however, a significant delay in the progression through NTC for both the Sp/+ and Sp/Sp embryos. A univariate analysis on the expression of the 12 candidate genes (bcl-2, FBP-2, Hmx-2, Msx-3, N-cam, N-cad, noggin, p53, Pax-3, Shh, Wee-1, wnt-1) revealed that although 11 were statistically altered, across time or by genotype, there were no significant interactions between gestation age and genotype for any of these genes during NTC. However, a multivariate statistical analysis on the simultaneous expression of these genes revealed interactions at both gestation day (GD) 8:12 (day:hour) and 9:00 among Pax-3, N-cam, N-cad, bcl-2, p53, and Wee-1 that could potentially explain the aberrant NTC. The data from these studies suggest that a disruption in the genes that govern the cell cycle or extracellular matrices of the developing neural tube might play a critical role in the occurrence of the NTDs observed in Splotch embryos.

  5. NKCC1-Deficiency Results in Abnormal Proliferation of Neural Progenitor Cells of the Lateral Ganglionic Eminence

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Ana Cathia; Rivera, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The proliferative pool of neural progenitor cells is maintained by exquisitely controlled mechanisms for cell cycle regulation. The Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC1) is important for regulating cell volume and the proliferation of different cell types in vitro. NKCC1 is expressed in ventral telencephalon of embryonic brains suggesting a potential role in neural development of this region. The ventral telencephalon is a major source for both interneuron and oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Whether NKCC1 is involved in the proliferation of these cell populations remains unknown. In order to assess this question, we monitored several markers for neural, neuronal, and proliferating cells in wild-type (WT) and NKCC1 knockout (KO) mouse brains. We found that NKCC1 was expressed in neural progenitor cells from the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) at E12.5. Mice lacking NKCC1 expression displayed reduced phospho-Histone H3 (PH3)-labeled mitotic cells in the ventricular zone (VZ) and reduced cell cycle reentry. Accordingly, we found a significant reduction of Sp8-labeled immature interneurons migrating from the dorsal LGE in NKCC1-deficient mice at a later developmental stage. Interestingly, at E14.5, NKCC1 regulated also the formation of Olig2-labeled oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Collectively, these findings show that NKCC1 serves in vivo as a modulator of the cell cycle decision in the developing ventral telencephalon at the early stage of neurogenesis. These results present a novel mechanistic avenue to be considered in the recent proposed involvement of chloride transporters in a number of developmentally related diseases, such as epilepsy, autism, and schizophrenia. PMID:27582690

  6. NKCC1-Deficiency Results in Abnormal Proliferation of Neural Progenitor Cells of the Lateral Ganglionic Eminence.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Ana Cathia; Rivera, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The proliferative pool of neural progenitor cells is maintained by exquisitely controlled mechanisms for cell cycle regulation. The Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC1) is important for regulating cell volume and the proliferation of different cell types in vitro. NKCC1 is expressed in ventral telencephalon of embryonic brains suggesting a potential role in neural development of this region. The ventral telencephalon is a major source for both interneuron and oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Whether NKCC1 is involved in the proliferation of these cell populations remains unknown. In order to assess this question, we monitored several markers for neural, neuronal, and proliferating cells in wild-type (WT) and NKCC1 knockout (KO) mouse brains. We found that NKCC1 was expressed in neural progenitor cells from the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) at E12.5. Mice lacking NKCC1 expression displayed reduced phospho-Histone H3 (PH3)-labeled mitotic cells in the ventricular zone (VZ) and reduced cell cycle reentry. Accordingly, we found a significant reduction of Sp8-labeled immature interneurons migrating from the dorsal LGE in NKCC1-deficient mice at a later developmental stage. Interestingly, at E14.5, NKCC1 regulated also the formation of Olig2-labeled oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Collectively, these findings show that NKCC1 serves in vivo as a modulator of the cell cycle decision in the developing ventral telencephalon at the early stage of neurogenesis. These results present a novel mechanistic avenue to be considered in the recent proposed involvement of chloride transporters in a number of developmentally related diseases, such as epilepsy, autism, and schizophrenia. PMID:27582690

  7. Working memory encoding and maintenance deficits in schizophrenia: neural evidence for activation and deactivation abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Anticevic, Alan; Repovs, Grega; Barch, Deanna M

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence implicates working memory (WM) as a core deficit in schizophrenia (SCZ), purportedly due to primary deficits in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex functioning. Recent findings suggest that SCZ is also associated with abnormalities in suppression of certain regions during cognitive engagement--namely the default mode system--that may further contribute to WM pathology. However, no study has systematically examined activation and suppression abnormalities across both encoding and maintenance phases of WM in SCZ. Twenty-eight patients and 24 demographically matched healthy subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T while performing a delayed match-to-sample WM task. Groups were accuracy matched to rule out performance effects. Encoding load was identical across subjects to facilitate comparisons across WM phases. We examined activation differences using an assumed model approach at the whole-brain level and within meta-analytically defined WM areas. Despite matched performance, we found regions showing less recruitment during encoding and maintenance for SCZ subjects. Furthermore, we identified 2 areas closely matching the default system, which SCZ subjects failed to deactivate across WM phases. Lastly, activation in prefrontal regions predicted the degree of deactivation for healthy but not SCZ subjects. Current results replicate and extend prefrontal recruitment abnormalities across WM phases in SCZ. Results also indicate deactivation abnormalities across WM phases, possibly due to inefficient prefrontal recruitment. Such regional deactivation may be critical for suppressing sources of interference during WM trace formation. Thus, deactivation deficits may constitute an additional source of impairments, which needs to be further characterized for a complete understanding of WM pathology in SCZ.

  8. Nonlinear spatio-temporal interactions and neural connections in human vision using transient and M-sequence stimuli

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.W.; Aine, C.J.; Flynn, E.R.; Wood, C.C.

    1996-02-01

    Reciprocal connections, in essence, are the dynamic wiring (connections) of the neural network circuitry. Given the high complexity of the neural circuitry in the human brain, it is quite a challenge to study the dynamic wiring of highly parallel and widely distributed neural networks. The measurements of stimulus evoked coherent oscillations provide indirect evidence of dynamic wiring. In this study, in addition to the coherent oscillation measurements, two more techniques are discussed for testing possible dynamic wiring: measurements of spatio-temporal interactions beyond the classical receptive fields, and neural structural testing using nonlinear systems analysis.

  9. Neural traffic as voxel-based measure of cerebral functional connectivity in fMRI.

    PubMed

    Beu, M; Baudrexel, S; Hautzel, H; Antke, Chr; Mueller, H-W

    2009-01-30

    To access functional connectivity by in vivo brain imaging voxel-by-voxel, we developed a novel approach named neural traffic (NT). NT depicts the intensity of functional connectivity on a voxel-by-voxel basis in the whole brain. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments were carried out on eight individuals during either hearing or viewing words. The blood oxygen level dependant (BOLD) signal was taken as measure of neural activity. For each voxel, functional connectivity with all other brain voxels was determined by calculating Pearson correlation coefficients at two connectivity thresholds (r=0.35 and 0.65). Then, NT images were derived by counting the number of suprathreshold connections for each individual voxel. Calculations based on random networks indicate that statistically reliable NT images can be derived in individuals. With regard to group analysis, at r=0.35 NT images are similar though not identical with the first component of principal component analysis (PCA), displaying a widespread but not ubiquitous pattern of functionally connected cortical areas. At r=0.65, NT group images display functional connectivity confined to circumscribed cortical regions which reach beyond the corresponding primary sensory areas, their known associated areas and the default network. In conclusion, NT goes beyond the approach of correlating the BOLD signal with the external stimulus-presentation time course by computing linear functional connectivity between all brain voxels based on any BOLD time course. First results demonstrate that the NT approach is likely - on an individual base - to reveal novel cortical and subcortical connectivities involved in stimulus processing.

  10. Abnormal Amygdalar Activation and Connectivity in Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Jonathan; Nagel, Bonnie J.; Maia, Tiago V.; Mechling, Anna; Oh, Milim; Wang, Zhishun; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Emotional reactivity is one of the most disabling symptoms associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We aimed to identify neural substrates associated with emotional reactivity and to assess the effects of stimulants on those substrates. Method: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess neural…

  11. Abnormal Functional Activation and Connectivity in the Working Memory Network in Early-Onset Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyriakopoulos, Marinos; Dima, Danai; Roiser, Jonathan P.; Corrigall, Richard; Barker, Gareth J.; Frangou, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Disruption within the working memory (WM) neural network is considered an integral feature of schizophrenia. The WM network, and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in particular, undergo significant remodeling in late adolescence. Potential interactions between developmental changes in the WM network and disease-related…

  12. Abnormal resting-state functional connectivity of the left caudate nucleus in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunhui; Juhás, Michal; Greenshaw, Andrew J; Hu, Qiang; Meng, Xin; Cui, Hongsheng; Ding, Yongzhuo; Kang, Lu; Zhang, Yubo; Wang, Yuhua; Cui, Guangcheng; Li, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Altered brain activities in the cortico-striato-thalamocortical (CSTC) circuitry are implicated in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, whether the underlying changes occur only within this circuitry or in large-scale networks is still not thoroughly understood. This study performed voxel-based functional connectivity analysis on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from thirty OCD patients and thirty healthy controls to investigate whole-brain intrinsic functional connectivity patterns in OCD. Relative to the healthy controls, OCD patients showed decreased functional connectivity within the CSTC circuitry but increased functional connectivity in other brain regions. Furthermore, decreased left caudate nucleus-thalamus connectivity within the CSTC circuitry was positively correlated with the illness duration of OCD. This study provides additional evidence that CSTC circuitry may play an essential role and alteration of large-scale brain networks may be involved in the pathophysiology of OCD. PMID:27143323

  13. Abnormalities in fronto-striatal connectivity within language networks relate to differences in grey-matter heterogeneity in Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Radulescu, Eugenia; Minati, Ludovico; Ganeshan, Balaji; Harrison, Neil A; Gray, Marcus A; Beacher, Felix D C C; Chatwin, Chris; Young, Rupert C D; Critchley, Hugo D

    2013-01-01

    Asperger syndrome (AS) is an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) characterised by qualitative impairment in the development of emotional and social skills with relative preservation of general intellectual abilities, including verbal language. People with AS may nevertheless show atypical language, including rate and frequency of speech production. We previously observed that abnormalities in grey matter homogeneity (measured with texture analysis of structural MR images) in AS individuals when compared with controls are also correlated with the volume of caudate nucleus. Here, we tested a prediction that these distributed abnormalities in grey matter compromise the functional integrity of brain networks supporting verbal communication skills. We therefore measured the functional connectivity between caudate nucleus and cortex during a functional neuroimaging study of language generation (verbal fluency), applying psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) methods to test specifically for differences attributable to grey matter heterogeneity in AS participants. Furthermore, we used dynamic causal modelling (DCM) to characterise the causal directionality of these differences in interregional connectivity during word production. Our results revealed a diagnosis-dependent influence of grey matter heterogeneity on the functional connectivity of the caudate nuclei with right insula/inferior frontal gyrus and anterior cingulate, respectively with the left superior frontal gyrus and right precuneus. Moreover, causal modelling of interactions between inferior frontal gyri, caudate and precuneus, revealed a reliance on bottom-up (stimulus-driven) connections in AS participants that contrasted with a dominance of top-down (cognitive control) connections from prefrontal cortex observed in control participants. These results provide detailed support for previously hypothesised central disconnectivity in ASD and specify discrete brain network targets for diagnosis and therapy in ASD.

  14. Binary synaptic connections based on memory switching in a-Si:H for artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, A. P.; Lamb, J. L.; Moopenn, A.; Khanna, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    A scheme for nonvolatile associative electronic memory storage with high information storage density is proposed which is based on neural network models and which uses a matrix of two-terminal passive interconnections (synapses). It is noted that the massive parallelism in the architecture would require the ON state of a synaptic connection to be unusually weak (highly resistive). Memory switching using a-Si:H along with ballast resistors patterned from amorphous Ge-metal alloys is investigated for a binary programmable read only memory matrix. The fabrication of a 1600 synapse test array of uniform connection strengths and a-Si:H switching elements is discussed.

  15. Weather sensitive short-term load forecasting using nonfully connected artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.T.; Yu, D.C.; Moghaddamjo, A.R. )

    1992-08-01

    This paper presents an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for forecasting weather sensitive loads. The proposed model is capable of forecasting the hourly loads for an entire week. The model is not fully connected; hence, it has a shorter training time than the fully-connected ANN. The proposed model can differentiate between the weekday loads and the weekend loads. The results indicate that this model can achieve greater forecasting accuracy than the traditional statistical model. This ANN model has been implemented on real load data. The average percentage peak error for the test cases is 1.12%.

  16. The necessity of connection structures in neural models of variable binding.

    PubMed

    van der Velde, Frank; de Kamps, Marc

    2015-08-01

    In his review of neural binding problems, Feldman (Cogn Neurodyn 7:1-11, 2013) addressed two types of models as solutions of (novel) variable binding. The one type uses labels such as phase synchrony of activation. The other ('connectivity based') type uses dedicated connections structures to achieve novel variable binding. Feldman argued that label (synchrony) based models are the only possible candidates to handle novel variable binding, whereas connectivity based models lack the flexibility required for that. We argue and illustrate that Feldman's analysis is incorrect. Contrary to his conclusion, connectivity based models are the only viable candidates for models of novel variable binding because they are the only type of models that can produce behavior. We will show that the label (synchrony) based models analyzed by Feldman are in fact examples of connectivity based models. Feldman's analysis that novel variable binding can be achieved without existing connection structures seems to result from analyzing the binding problem in a wrong frame of reference, in particular in an outside instead of the required inside frame of reference. Connectivity based models can be models of novel variable binding when they possess a connection structure that resembles a small-world network, as found in the brain. We will illustrate binding with this type of model with episode binding and the binding of words, including novel words, in sentence structures.

  17. Analyzing the scaling of connectivity in neuromorphic hardware and in models of neural networks.

    PubMed

    Partzsch, Johannes; Schüffny, René

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, neuromorphic hardware systems have significantly grown in size. With more and more neurons and synapses integrated in such systems, the neural connectivity and its configurability have become crucial design constraints. To tackle this problem, we introduce a generic extended graph description of connection topologies that allows a systematical analysis of connectivity in both neuromorphic hardware and neural network models. The unifying nature of our approach enables a close exchange between hardware and models. For an existing hardware system, the optimally matched network model can be extracted. Inversely, a hardware architecture may be fitted to a particular model network topology with our description method. As a further strength, the extended graph can be used to quantify the amount of configurability for a certain network topology. This is a hardware design variable that has widely been neglected, mainly because of a missing analysis method. To condense our analysis results, we develop a classification for the scaling complexity of network models and neuromorphic hardware, based on the total number of connections and the configurability. We find a gap between several models and existing hardware, making these hardware systems either impossible or inefficient to use for scaled-up network models. In this respect, our analysis results suggest models with locality in their connections as promising approach for tackling this scaling gap.

  18. Functional brain abnormalities in psychiatric disorders: neural mechanisms to detect and resolve cognitive conflict and interference.

    PubMed

    Melcher, Tobias; Falkai, Peter; Gruber, Oliver

    2008-11-01

    In the present article, we review functional neuroimaging studies on interference processing and performance monitoring in three groups of psychiatric disorders, (1) mood disorders, (2) schizophrenia, and (3) obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Ad (1) Behavioral performance measures suggest an impaired interference resolution capability in symptomatic bipolar disorder patients. A series of neuroimaging analyses found alterations in the ACC-DLPFC system in mood disorder (unipolar depressed and bipolar) patients, putatively reflective of an abnormal interplay of monitoring and executive neurocognitive functions. Other studies of euthymic bipolar patients showed relatively decreased interference-related activation in rostroventral PFC which conceivably underlies defective inhibitory control. Ad (2) Behavioral Stroop studies revealed a specific performance pattern of schizophrenia patients (normal RT interference but increased error interference and RT facilitation) suggestive of a deficit in ignoring irrelevant (word) information. Moreover, reduced/absent behavioral post-error and post-conflict adaptation effects suggest alterations in performance monitoring and/or adjustment capability in these patients. Neuroimaging findings converge to suggest a disorder-related abnormal neurophysiology in ACC which consistently showed conflict- and error-related hypoactivation that, however, appeared to be modulated by different factors. Moreover, studies suggest a specific deficit in context processing in schizophrenia, evidently related to activation reduction in DLPFC. Ad (3) Behavioral findings provide evidence for impaired interference resolution in OCD. Neuroimaging results consistently showed conflict- and error-related ACC hyperactivation which--conforming OCD pathogenesis models--can be conclusively interpreted as reflecting overactive performance monitoring. Taken together, interference resolution and performance monitoring appeared to be fruitful concepts in the

  19. Knowledge engineering tools for reasoning with scientific observations and interpretations: a neural connectivity use case

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We address the goal of curating observations from published experiments in a generalizable form; reasoning over these observations to generate interpretations and then querying this interpreted knowledge to supply the supporting evidence. We present web-application software as part of the 'BioScholar' project (R01-GM083871) that fully instantiates this process for a well-defined domain: using tract-tracing experiments to study the neural connectivity of the rat brain. Results The main contribution of this work is to provide the first instantiation of a knowledge representation for experimental observations called 'Knowledge Engineering from Experimental Design' (KEfED) based on experimental variables and their interdependencies. The software has three parts: (a) the KEfED model editor - a design editor for creating KEfED models by drawing a flow diagram of an experimental protocol; (b) the KEfED data interface - a spreadsheet-like tool that permits users to enter experimental data pertaining to a specific model; (c) a 'neural connection matrix' interface that presents neural connectivity as a table of ordinal connection strengths representing the interpretations of tract-tracing data. This tool also allows the user to view experimental evidence pertaining to a specific connection. BioScholar is built in Flex 3.5. It uses Persevere (a noSQL database) as a flexible data store and PowerLoom® (a mature First Order Logic reasoning system) to execute queries using spatial reasoning over the BAMS neuroanatomical ontology. Conclusions We first introduce the KEfED approach as a general approach and describe its possible role as a way of introducing structured reasoning into models of argumentation within new models of scientific publication. We then describe the design and implementation of our example application: the BioScholar software. This is presented as a possible biocuration interface and supplementary reasoning toolkit for a larger, more specialized

  20. Neural connectivity patterns underlying symbolic number processing indicate mathematical achievement in children.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonkoo; Li, Rosa; Brannon, Elizabeth M

    2014-03-01

    In early childhood, humans learn culturally specific symbols for number that allow them entry into the world of complex numerical thinking. Yet little is known about how the brain supports the development of the uniquely human symbolic number system. Here, we use functional magnetic resonance imaging along with an effective connectivity analysis to investigate the neural substrates for symbolic number processing in young children. We hypothesized that, as children solidify the mapping between symbols and underlying magnitudes, important developmental changes occur in the neural communication between the right parietal region, important for the representation of non-symbolic numerical magnitudes, and other brain regions known to be critical for processing numerical symbols. To test this hypothesis, we scanned children between 4 and 6 years of age while they performed a magnitude comparison task with Arabic numerals (numerical, symbolic), dot arrays (numerical, non-symbolic), and lines (non-numerical). We then identified the right parietal seed region that showed greater blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal in the numerical versus the non-numerical conditions. A psychophysiological interaction method was used to find patterns of effective connectivity arising from this parietal seed region specific to symbolic compared to non-symbolic number processing. Two brain regions, the left supramarginal gyrus and the right precentral gyrus, showed significant effective connectivity from the right parietal cortex. Moreover, the degree of this effective connectivity to the left supramarginal gyrus was correlated with age, and the degree of the connectivity to the right precentral gyrus predicted performance on a standardized symbolic math test. These findings suggest that effective connectivity underlying symbolic number processing may be critical as children master the associations between numerical symbols and magnitudes, and that these connectivity patterns may serve as an

  1. Abnormal Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Results of Seed and Data-Driven Analyses.

    PubMed

    Gay, Charles W; Robinson, Michael E; Lai, Song; O'Shea, Andrew; Craggs, Jason G; Price, Donald D; Staud, Roland

    2016-02-01

    Although altered resting-state functional connectivity (FC) is a characteristic of many chronic pain conditions, it has not yet been evaluated in patients with chronic fatigue. Our objective was to investigate the association between fatigue and altered resting-state FC in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). Thirty-six female subjects, 19 ME/CFS and 17 healthy controls, completed a fatigue inventory before undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. Two methods, (1) data driven and (2) model based, were used to estimate and compare the intraregional FC between both groups during the resting state (RS). The first approach using independent component analysis was applied to investigate five RS networks: the default mode network, salience network (SN), left frontoparietal networks (LFPN) and right frontoparietal networks, and the sensory motor network (SMN). The second approach used a priori selected seed regions demonstrating abnormal regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in ME/CFS patients at rest. In ME/CFS patients, Method-1 identified decreased intrinsic connectivity among regions within the LFPN. Furthermore, the FC of the left anterior midcingulate with the SMN and the connectivity of the left posterior cingulate cortex with the SN were significantly decreased. For Method-2, five distinct clusters within the right parahippocampus and occipital lobes, demonstrating significant rCBF reductions in ME/CFS patients, were used as seeds. The parahippocampal seed and three occipital lobe seeds showed altered FC with other brain regions. The degree of abnormal connectivity correlated with the level of self-reported fatigue. Our results confirm altered RS FC in patients with ME/CFS, which was significantly correlated with the severity of their chronic fatigue.

  2. Neural recruitment and connectivity during emotional memory retrieval across the adult life span.

    PubMed

    Ford, Jaclyn H; Morris, John A; Kensinger, Elizabeth A

    2014-12-01

    Although research has identified age-related changes in neural recruitment during emotional memory encoding, it is unclear whether these differences extend to retrieval. In this study, participants engaged in a recognition task during a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. They viewed neutral titles and indicated whether each title had been presented with an image during the study phase. Neural activity and connectivity during retrieval of titles associated with positive and negative images were compared with age (treated as a continuous variable) included as a regressor of interest. Aging was associated with increased prefrontal activation for retrieval of positive and negative memories, but this pattern was more widespread for negative memories. Aging also was associated with greater negative connectivity between a left hippocampal seed region and multiple regions of prefrontal cortex, but this effect of age occurred during negative retrieval only. These findings demonstrate that age-related changes in prefrontal recruitment and connectivity during retrieval depend on memory valence. The use of a life span approach also emphasized both continuities and discontinuities in recruitment and connectivity across the adult life span, highlighting the insights to be gained from using a full life span sample.

  3. Neural mechanisms of predatory aggression in rats-implications for abnormal intraspecific aggression.

    PubMed

    Tulogdi, Aron; Biro, Laszlo; Barsvari, Beata; Stankovic, Mona; Haller, Jozsef; Toth, Mate

    2015-04-15

    Our recent studies showed that brain areas that are activated in a model of escalated aggression overlap with those that promote predatory aggression in cats. This finding raised the interesting possibility that the brain mechanisms that control certain types of abnormal aggression include those involved in predation. However, the mechanisms of predatory aggression are poorly known in rats, a species that is in many respects different from cats. To get more insights into such mechanisms, here we studied the brain activation patterns associated with spontaneous muricide in rats. Subjects not exposed to mice, and those which did not show muricide were used as controls. We found that muricide increased the activation of the central and basolateral amygdala, and lateral hypothalamus as compared to both controls; in addition, a ventral shift in periaqueductal gray activation was observed. Interestingly, these are the brain regions from where predatory aggression can be elicited, or enhanced by electrical stimulation in cats. The analysis of more than 10 other brain regions showed that brain areas that inhibited (or were neutral to) cat predatory aggression were not affected by muricide. Brain activation patterns partly overlapped with those seen earlier in the cockroach hunting model of rat predatory aggression, and were highly similar with those observed in the glucocorticoid dysfunction model of escalated aggression. These findings show that the brain mechanisms underlying predation are evolutionarily conservative, and indirectly support our earlier assumption regarding the involvement of predation-related brain mechanisms in certain forms of escalated social aggression in rats.

  4. Intrinsic Cellular Properties and Connectivity Density Determine Variable Clustering Patterns in Randomly Connected Inhibitory Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Scott; Booth, Victoria; Zochowski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The plethora of inhibitory interneurons in the hippocampus and cortex play a pivotal role in generating rhythmic activity by clustering and synchronizing cell firing. Results of our simulations demonstrate that both the intrinsic cellular properties of neurons and the degree of network connectivity affect the characteristics of clustered dynamics exhibited in randomly connected, heterogeneous inhibitory networks. We quantify intrinsic cellular properties by the neuron's current-frequency relation (IF curve) and Phase Response Curve (PRC), a measure of how perturbations given at various phases of a neurons firing cycle affect subsequent spike timing. We analyze network bursting properties of networks of neurons with Type I or Type II properties in both excitability and PRC profile; Type I PRCs strictly show phase advances and IF curves that exhibit frequencies arbitrarily close to zero at firing threshold while Type II PRCs display both phase advances and delays and IF curves that have a non-zero frequency at threshold. Type II neurons whose properties arise with or without an M-type adaptation current are considered. We analyze network dynamics under different levels of cellular heterogeneity and as intrinsic cellular firing frequency and the time scale of decay of synaptic inhibition are varied. Many of the dynamics exhibited by these networks diverge from the predictions of the interneuron network gamma (ING) mechanism, as well as from results in all-to-all connected networks. Our results show that randomly connected networks of Type I neurons synchronize into a single cluster of active neurons while networks of Type II neurons organize into two mutually exclusive clusters segregated by the cells' intrinsic firing frequencies. Networks of Type II neurons containing the adaptation current behave similarly to networks of either Type I or Type II neurons depending on network parameters; however, the adaptation current creates differences in the cluster dynamics

  5. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection evokes neuronal abnormalities and alterations in neurally regulated electrolyte transport in rat jejunum.

    PubMed

    Masson, S D; McKay, D M; Stead, R H; Agro, A; Stanisz, A; Perdue, M H

    1996-08-01

    Neuronal abnormalities have been described in the intestine of helminth-infected rats. However, the physiological ramifications of these changes have not been determined. Here, we examined epithelial ion secretion, indicated by increases in short-circuit current (Isc), evoked by electrical transmural stimulation (TS) of enteric nerves in Ussing-chambered jejunal tissues from Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-infected rats. Rats were examined at 10 and 35 days post-infection (p.i.); non-infected rats served as controls. TS resulted in significantly reduced ion secretion in jejunum from 10 day p.i. rats compared to controls or jejunum from 35 day p.i. rats. The TS response in tissue from infected rats had, unlike controls, no cholinergic component. Tissues from both non-infected and infected rats were equally responsive to the muscarinic agonist bethanechol, suggesting that the cholinergic defect was neuronal and not an inability of the epithelium to respond to cholinergic stimulation. However, increases in Isc evoked by exogenous substance P (SP) in tissue from rats 10 day p.i. were reduced in magnitude to approximately 25% of control values. Concomitant with these physiological changes, tissue from infected rats contained increased amounts of substance P immunoreactivity and intestinal sections displayed increased numbers of substance P-immunoreactive nerve fibre profiles at both 10 and 35 days p.i. Thus, following N. brasiliensis infection there is a shift in the enteric nervous system away from cholinergic to non-cholinergic regulation, associated with increased amounts of the pro-inflammatory neuropeptide, substance P. We speculate that changes in neuronal structure and function are intimately involved in the co-ordinated multicellular response to intestinal parasitic infection and subsequent gut recovery.

  6. [A method of recognizing biology surface spectrum using cascade-connection artificial neural nets].

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei-Jie; Yao, Yong; Zhang, Tie-Qiang; Meng, Xian-Jiang

    2008-05-01

    A method of recognizing the visible spectrum of micro-areas on the biological surface with cascade-connection artificial neural nets is presented in the present paper. The visible spectra of spots on apples' pericarp, ranging from 500 to 730 nm, were obtained with a fiber-probe spectrometer, and a new spectrum recognition system consisting of three-level cascade-connection neural nets was set up. The experiments show that the spectra of rotten, scar and bumped spot on an apple's pericarp can be recognized by the spectrum recognition system, and the recognition accuracy is higher than 85% even when noise level is 15%. The new recognition system overcomes the disadvantages of poor accuracy and poor anti-noise with the traditional system based on single cascade neural nets. Finally, a new method of expression of recognition results was proved. The method is based on the conception of degree of membership in fuzzing mathematics, and through it the recognition results can be expressed exactly and objectively.

  7. Neuroticism and extraversion moderate neural responses and effective connectivity during appetitive conditioning.

    PubMed

    Schweckendiek, Jan; Stark, Rudolf; Klucken, Tim

    2016-08-01

    Classical appetitive conditioning constitutes a basic learning process through which environmental stimuli can be associated with reward. Previous studies showed that individual differences in neuroticism and extraversion influence emotional processing and have been shown to modulate neural activity in subcortical and prefrontal areas in response to emotional stimuli. However, the role of individual differences in appetitive conditioning has so far not been investigated in detail. The aim of this study was to assess the association between neuroticism and extraversion with neural activity and connectivity during appetitive conditioning. The conditioned stimulus (CS) was either a picture of a dish or a cup. One stimulus (CS+) was paired with a monetary reward and the other stimulus (CS-) was associated with its absence while hemodynamic activity was measured by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging. A significant negative correlation of neuroticism scores with amygdala activity was observed during appetitive conditioning. Further, extraversion was positively associated with responses in the hippocampus and the thalamus. In addition, effective connectivity between the amygdala as a seed region and the anterior cingulate cortex, the insula, and the thalamus was negatively correlated with neuroticism scores and positively correlated with extraversion scores. The results may indicate a neural correlate for the deficits in appetitive learning in subjects with high neuroticism scores and point to a facilitating effect of extraversion on reward-related learning. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2992-3002, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27132706

  8. Effective connectivity of neural pathways underlying disgust by multivariate Granger causality analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hao; Wang, Yonghui; Tian, Jie; Liu, Yijun

    2011-03-01

    The disgust system arises phylogenetically in response to dangers to the internal milieu from pathogens and their toxic products. Functional imaging studies have demonstrated that a much wider range of neural structures was involved in triggering disgust reactions. However, less is known regarding how and what neural pathways these neural structures interact. To address this issue, we adopted an effective connectivity based analysis, namely the multivariate Granger causality approach, to explore the causal interactions within these brain networks. Results presented that disgust can induce a wide range of brain activities, such as the insula, the anterior cingulate cortex, the parahippocampus lobe, the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, the superior occipital gyrus, and the supplementary motor cortex. These brain areas constitute as a whole, with much denser connectivity following disgust stimuli, in comparison with that of the neutral condition. Moreover, the anterior insula, showing multiple casual interactions with limbic and subcortical areas, was implicated as a central hub in organizing multiple information processing in the disgust system.

  9. Early signs of anomalous neural functional connectivity in healthy offspring of parents with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manpreet K; Chang, Kiki D; Kelley, Ryan G; Saggar, Manish; Reiss, Allan; Gotlib, Ian H

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Bipolar disorder (BD) has been associated with dysfunctional brain connectivity and with family chaos. It is not known whether aberrant connectivity occurs before illness onset, representing vulnerability for developing BD amidst family chaos. We used resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine neural network dysfunction in healthy offspring living with parents with BD and healthy comparison youth. Methods Using two complementary methodologies [data-driven independent component analyses (ICA) and hypothesis-driven region-of-interest (ROI)-based intrinsic connectivity], we examined resting state fMRI data in 8–17-year-old healthy offspring of a parent with BD (n = 24, high risk) and age-matched healthy youth without any personal or family psychopathology (n = 25, low risk). Results ICA revealed that relative to low-risk youth, high-risk youth showed increased connectivity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) subregion of the left executive control network (ECN), which includes frontoparietal regions important for emotion regulation. ROI-based analyses revealed that high-risk versus low-risk youth had decreased connectivities between left amygdala and pregenual cingulate, between subgenual cingulate and supplementary motor cortex, and between left VLPFC and left caudate. High-risk youth showed stronger connections in the VLPFC with age and higher functioning, which may be neuroprotective, and weaker connections between the left VLPFC and caudate with more family chaos, suggesting an environmental influence on frontostriatal connectivity. Conclusions Healthy offspring of parents with BD show atypical patterns of prefrontal and subcortical intrinsic connectivity that may be early markers of resilience from or vulnerability for developing BD. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether these patterns predict outcomes. PMID:24938878

  10. The neural basis of the abnormal self-referential processing and its impact on cognitive control in depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gerd; Schachtzabel, Claudia; Peikert, Gregor; Bär, Karl-Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Persistent pondering over negative self-related thoughts is a central feature of depressive psychopathology. In this study, we sought to investigate the neural correlates of abnormal negative self-referential processing (SRP) in patients with Major Depressive Disorder and its impact on subsequent cognitive control-related neuronal activation. We hypothesized aberrant activation dynamics during the period of negative and neutral SRP in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) and in the amygdala in patients with major depressive disorder. Additionally, we assumed abnormal activation in the fronto-cingulate network during Stroop task execution. 19 depressed patients and 20 healthy controls participated in the study. Using an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design, negative, positive and neutral self-referential statements were displayed for 6.5 s and followed by incongruent or congruent Stroop conditions. The data were analyzed with SPM8. In contrast to controls, patients exhibited no significant valence-dependent rACC activation differences during SRP. A novel finding was the significant activation of the amygdala and the reward-processing network during presentation of neutral self-referential stimuli relative to baseline and to affective stimuli in patients. The fMRI analysis of the Stroop task revealed a reduced BOLD activation in the right fronto-parietal network of patients in the incongruent condition after negative SRP only. Thus, the inflexible activation in the rACC may correspond to the inability of depressed patients to shift their attention away from negative self-related stimuli. The accompanying negative affect and task-irrelevant emotional processing may compete for neuronal resources with cognitive control processes and lead thereby to deficient cognitive performance associated with decreased fronto-parietal activation. PMID:25872899

  11. Processing of different types of social threat in shyness: Preliminary findings of distinct functional neural connectivity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Alva; Beaton, Elliott A; Tatham, Erica; Schulkin, Jay; Hall, Geoffrey B; Schmidt, Louis A

    2016-01-01

    Current theory suggests that the processing of different types of threat is supported by distinct neural networks. Here we tested whether there are distinct neural correlates associated with different types of threat processing in shyness. Using fMRI and multivariate techniques, we compared neural responses and functional connectivity during the processing of imminent (i.e., congruent angry/angry face pairs) and ambiguous (i.e., incongruent angry/neutral face pairs) social threat in young adults selected for high and low shyness. To both types of threat processing, non-shy adults recruited a right medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) network encompassing nodes of the default mode network involved in automatic emotion regulation, whereas shy adults recruited a right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) network encompassing nodes of the frontoparietal network that instantiate active attentional and cognitive control. Furthermore, in shy adults, the mPFC interacted with the dACC network for ambiguous threat, but with a distinct network encompassing nodes of the salience network for imminent threat. These preliminary results expand our understanding of right mPFC function associated with temperamental shyness. They also provide initial evidence for differential neural networks associated with shy and non-shy profiles in the context of different types of social threat processing.

  12. Abnormal EEG Complexity and Functional Connectivity of Brain in Patients with Acute Thalamic Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuang; Guo, Jie; Meng, Jiayuan; Wang, Zhijun; Yao, Yang; Yang, Jiajia; Qi, Hongzhi; Ming, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic thalamus stroke has become a serious cardiovascular and cerebral disease in recent years. To date the existing researches mostly concentrated on the power spectral density (PSD) in several frequency bands. In this paper, we investigated the nonlinear features of EEG and brain functional connectivity in patients with acute thalamic ischemic stroke and healthy subjects. Electroencephalography (EEG) in resting condition with eyes closed was recorded for 12 stroke patients and 11 healthy subjects as control group. Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC), Sample Entropy (SampEn), and brain network using partial directed coherence (PDC) were calculated for feature extraction. Results showed that patients had increased mean LZC and SampEn than the controls, which implied the stroke group has higher EEG complexity. For the brain network, the stroke group displayed a trend of weaker cortical connectivity, which suggests a functional impairment of information transmission in cortical connections in stroke patients. These findings suggest that nonlinear analysis and brain network could provide essential information for better understanding the brain dysfunction in the stroke and assisting monitoring or prognostication of stroke evolution. PMID:27403202

  13. A parallel neural network simulator on the connection machine CM-5.

    PubMed

    Reczko, M; Hatzigeorgiou, A; Mache, N; Zell, A; Suhai, S

    1995-06-01

    We here present a parallel implementation of artificial neural networks on the connection machine CM-5 and compare it with other parallel implementations on SIMD and MIMD architectures. This parallel implementation was developed with the goal of efficiently training large neural networks with huge training pattern sets for applications in molecular biology, in particular the prediction of coding regions in DNA sequences. The implementation uses training pattern parallelism and makes use of the parallel I/O facilities of the CM-5 and its efficient reduction operations available within the control network to achieve a high scalability. The parallel simulator obtains a maximum speed of 149.25 MCUPS for training feedforward networks with backpropagation on a 512 processor CM-5 system without using the CM-5 vector facility. The implementation poses no restriction on the type of network topology and works with different batch training algorithms like BP. Quickprop and Rprop.

  14. Mutual information and self-control of a fully-connected low-activity neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollé, D.; Carreta, D. Dominguez

    2000-11-01

    A self-control mechanism for the dynamics of a three-state fully connected neural network is studied through the introduction of a time-dependent threshold. The self-adapting threshold is a function of both the neural and the pattern activity in the network. The time evolution of the order parameters is obtained on the basis of a recently developed dynamical recursive scheme. In the limit of low activity the mutual information is shown to be the relevant parameter in order to determine the retrieval quality. Due to self-control an improvement of this mutual information content as well as an increase of the storage capacity and an enlargement of the basins of attraction are found. These results are compared with numerical simulations.

  15. On the connection between level of education and the neural circuitry of emotion perception.

    PubMed

    Demenescu, Liliana R; Stan, Adrian; Kortekaas, Rudie; van der Wee, Nic J A; Veltman, Dick J; Aleman, André

    2014-01-01

    Through education, a social group transmits accumulated knowledge, skills, customs, and values to its members. So far, to the best of our knowledge, the association between educational attainment and neural correlates of emotion processing has been left unexplored. In a retrospective analysis of The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we compared two groups of fourteen healthy volunteers with intermediate and high educational attainment, matched for age and gender. The data concerned event-related fMRI of brain activation during perception of facial emotional expressions. The region of interest (ROI) analysis showed stronger right amygdala activation to facial expressions in participants with lower relative to higher educational attainment (HE). The psychophysiological interaction analysis revealed that participants with HE exhibited stronger right amygdala-right insula connectivity during perception of emotional and neutral facial expressions. This exploratory study suggests the relevance of educational attainment on the neural mechanism of facial expressions processing.

  16. Genetic dyslexia risk variant is related to neural connectivity patterns underlying phonological awareness in children.

    PubMed

    Skeide, Michael A; Kirsten, Holger; Kraft, Indra; Schaadt, Gesa; Müller, Bent; Neef, Nicole; Brauer, Jens; Wilcke, Arndt; Emmrich, Frank; Boltze, Johannes; Friederici, Angela D

    2015-09-01

    Phonological awareness is the best-validated predictor of reading and spelling skill and therefore highly relevant for developmental dyslexia. Prior imaging genetics studies link several dyslexia risk genes to either brain-functional or brain-structural factors of phonological deficits. However, coherent evidence for genetic associations with both functional and structural neural phenotypes underlying variation in phonological awareness has not yet been provided. Here we demonstrate that rs11100040, a reported modifier of SLC2A3, is related to the functional connectivity of left fronto-temporal phonological processing areas at resting state in a sample of 9- to 12-year-old children. Furthermore, we provide evidence that rs11100040 is related to the fractional anisotropy of the arcuate fasciculus, which forms the structural connection between these areas. This structural connectivity phenotype is associated with phonological awareness, which is in turn associated with the individual retrospective risk scores in an early dyslexia screening as well as to spelling. These results suggest a link between a dyslexia risk genotype and a functional as well as a structural neural phenotype, which is associated with a phonological awareness phenotype. The present study goes beyond previous work by integrating genetic, brain-functional and brain-structural aspects of phonological awareness within a single approach. These combined findings might be another step towards a multimodal biomarker for developmental dyslexia.

  17. A closer look at the apparent correlation of structural and functional connectivity in excitable neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messé, Arnaud; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; König, Peter; Hilgetag, Claus C.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the structural connectivity (SC) and functional connectivity (FC) of neural systems is a central focus in brain network science. It is an open question, however, how strongly the SC-FC relationship depends on specific topological features of brain networks or the models used for describing excitable dynamics. Using a basic model of discrete excitable units that follow a susceptible - excited - refractory dynamic cycle (SER model), we here analyze how functional connectivity is shaped by the topological features of a neural network, in particular its modularity. We compared the results obtained by the SER model with corresponding simulations by another well established dynamic mechanism, the Fitzhugh-Nagumo model, in order to explore general features of the SC-FC relationship. We showed that apparent discrepancies between the results produced by the two models can be resolved by adjusting the time window of integration of co-activations from which the FC is derived, providing a clearer distinction between co-activations and sequential activations. Thus, network modularity appears as an important factor shaping the FC-SC relationship across different dynamic models.

  18. Connecting mean field models of neural activity to EEG and fMRI data.

    PubMed

    Bojak, Ingo; Oostendorp, Thom F; Reid, Andrew T; Kötter, Rolf

    2010-06-01

    Progress in functional neuroimaging of the brain increasingly relies on the integration of data from complementary imaging modalities in order to improve spatiotemporal resolution and interpretability. However, the usefulness of merely statistical combinations is limited, since neural signal sources differ between modalities and are related non-trivially. We demonstrate here that a mean field model of brain activity can simultaneously predict EEG and fMRI BOLD with proper signal generation and expression. Simulations are shown using a realistic head model based on structural MRI, which includes both dense short-range background connectivity and long-range specific connectivity between brain regions. The distribution of modeled neural masses is comparable to the spatial resolution of fMRI BOLD, and the temporal resolution of the modeled dynamics, importantly including activity conduction, matches the fastest known EEG phenomena. The creation of a cortical mean field model with anatomically sound geometry, extensive connectivity, and proper signal expression is an important first step towards the model-based integration of multimodal neuroimages.

  19. Reconstruction of sparse connectivity in neural networks from spike train covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernice, Volker; Rotter, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    The inference of causation from correlation is in general highly problematic. Correspondingly, it is difficult to infer the existence of physical synaptic connections between neurons from correlations in their activity. Covariances in neural spike trains and their relation to network structure have been the subject of intense research, both experimentally and theoretically. The influence of recurrent connections on covariances can be characterized directly in linear models, where connectivity in the network is described by a matrix of linear coupling kernels. However, as indirect connections also give rise to covariances, the inverse problem of inferring network structure from covariances can generally not be solved unambiguously. Here we study to what degree this ambiguity can be resolved if the sparseness of neural networks is taken into account. To reconstruct a sparse network, we determine the minimal set of linear couplings consistent with the measured covariances by minimizing the L1 norm of the coupling matrix under appropriate constraints. Contrary to intuition, after stochastic optimization of the coupling matrix, the resulting estimate of the underlying network is directed, despite the fact that a symmetric matrix of count covariances is used for inference. The performance of the new method is best if connections are neither exceedingly sparse, nor too dense, and it is easily applicable for networks of a few hundred nodes. Full coupling kernels can be obtained from the matrix of full covariance functions. We apply our method to networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons in an asynchronous-irregular state, where spike train covariances are well described by a linear model.

  20. Abnormal functional connectivity density in patients with ischemic white matter lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ju-Rong; Ding, Xin; Hua, Bo; Xiong, Xingzhong; Wang, Qingsong; Chen, Huafu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract White matter lesions (WMLs) are frequently detected in elderly people. Previous structural and functional studies have demonstrated that WMLs are associated with cognitive and motor decline. However, the underlying mechanism of how WMLs lead to cognitive decline and motor disturbance remains unclear. We used functional connectivity density mapping (FCDM) to investigate changes in brain functional connectivity in 16 patients with ischemic WMLs and 13 controls. Both short- and long-range FCD maps were computed, and group comparisons were performed between the 2 groups. A correlation analysis was further performed between regions with altered FCD and cognitive test scores (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] and Montreal Cognitive Assessment [MoCA]) in the patient group. We found that patients with ischemic WMLs showed reduced short-range FCD in the temporal cortex, primary motor cortex, and subcortical region, which may account for inadequate top-down attention, impaired motor, memory, and executive function associated with WMLs. The positive correlation between primary motor cortex and MoCA scores may provide evidence for the influences of cognitive function on behavioral performance. The inferior parietal cortex exhibited increased short-range FCD, reflecting a hyper bottom-up attention to compensate for the inadequate top-down attention for language comprehension and information retrieval in patients with WMLs. Moreover, the prefrontal and primary motor cortex showed increased long-range FCD and the former positively correlated with MoCA scores, which may suggest a strategy of cortical functional reorganization to compensate for motor and executive deficits. Our findings provide new insights into how WMLs cause cognitive and motor decline from cortical functional connectivity perspective. PMID:27603353

  1. Abnormal functional connectivity density in patients with ischemic white matter lesions: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ju-Rong; Ding, Xin; Hua, Bo; Xiong, Xingzhong; Wang, Qingsong; Chen, Huafu

    2016-09-01

    White matter lesions (WMLs) are frequently detected in elderly people. Previous structural and functional studies have demonstrated that WMLs are associated with cognitive and motor decline. However, the underlying mechanism of how WMLs lead to cognitive decline and motor disturbance remains unclear. We used functional connectivity density mapping (FCDM) to investigate changes in brain functional connectivity in 16 patients with ischemic WMLs and 13 controls. Both short- and long-range FCD maps were computed, and group comparisons were performed between the 2 groups. A correlation analysis was further performed between regions with altered FCD and cognitive test scores (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] and Montreal Cognitive Assessment [MoCA]) in the patient group. We found that patients with ischemic WMLs showed reduced short-range FCD in the temporal cortex, primary motor cortex, and subcortical region, which may account for inadequate top-down attention, impaired motor, memory, and executive function associated with WMLs. The positive correlation between primary motor cortex and MoCA scores may provide evidence for the influences of cognitive function on behavioral performance. The inferior parietal cortex exhibited increased short-range FCD, reflecting a hyper bottom-up attention to compensate for the inadequate top-down attention for language comprehension and information retrieval in patients with WMLs. Moreover, the prefrontal and primary motor cortex showed increased long-range FCD and the former positively correlated with MoCA scores, which may suggest a strategy of cortical functional reorganization to compensate for motor and executive deficits. Our findings provide new insights into how WMLs cause cognitive and motor decline from cortical functional connectivity perspective. PMID:27603353

  2. [Emotion Disorders and Abnormal Perspiration].

    PubMed

    Umeda, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    This article reviewed the relationship between emotional disorders and abnormal perspiration. First, I focused on local brain areas related to emotional processing, and summarized the functions of the emotional network involving those local areas. Functional disorders followed by the damage in the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, and insular cortex were reviewed, including related abnormal perspiration. I then addressed the mechanisms of how autonomic disorders influence emotional processing. Finally, possible future directions for integrated understanding of the connection between neural activities and bodily reactions were discussed. PMID:27503817

  3. [Emotion Disorders and Abnormal Perspiration].

    PubMed

    Umeda, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    This article reviewed the relationship between emotional disorders and abnormal perspiration. First, I focused on local brain areas related to emotional processing, and summarized the functions of the emotional network involving those local areas. Functional disorders followed by the damage in the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, and insular cortex were reviewed, including related abnormal perspiration. I then addressed the mechanisms of how autonomic disorders influence emotional processing. Finally, possible future directions for integrated understanding of the connection between neural activities and bodily reactions were discussed.

  4. Augmented Indian hedgehog signaling in cranial neural crest cells leads to craniofacial abnormalities and dysplastic temporomandibular joint in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ling; Gu, Shuping; Ye, Wenduo; Song, Yingnan; Chen, YiPing

    2016-01-01

    Extensive studies have pinpointed the crucial role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling in the development of the appendicular skeleton and the essential function of Ihh in the formation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this study, we have investigated the effect of augmented Ihh signaling in TMJ development. We took a transgenic gain-of-function approach by overexpressing Ihh in the cranial neural crest (CNC) cells using a conditional Ihh transgenic allele and the Wnt1-Cre allele. We found that Wnt1-Cre-mediated tissue-specific overexpression of Ihh in the CNC lineage caused severe craniofacial abnormalities, including cleft lip/palate, encephalocele, anophthalmos, micrognathia, and defective TMJ development. In the mutant TMJ, the glenoid fossa was completely absent, whereas the condyle and the articular disc appeared relatively normal with slightly delayed chondrocyte differentiation. Our findings thus demonstrate that augmented Ihh signaling is detrimental to craniofacial development, and that finely tuned Ihh signaling is critical for TMJ formation. Our results also provide additional evidence that the development of the condyle and articular disc is independent of the glenoid fossa. PMID:26553654

  5. Attentional Dissociation in Hypnosis And Neural Connectivity: Preliminary Evidence from Bilateral Electrodermal Activity.

    PubMed

    Bob, Petr; Siroka, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    According to recent findings, interhemispheric interactions and information connectivity represent crucial mechanisms used in processing information across various sensory modalities. To study these interactions, the authors measured bilateral electrodermal activity (EDA) in 33 psychiatric outpatients. The results show that, during congruent Stroop stimuli in hypnosis, the patients with higher hypnotizability manifest a decreased level of interhemispheric information transfer measured by pointwise transinformation (PTI) that was calculated from left and right EDA records. These results show that specific shifts of attentional focus during hypnosis are related to changes of interhemispheric interactions that may be reflected in neural connectivity calculated from the bilateral EDA measurement. This attentional shift may cause dissociated attentional control disturbing integrative functions of consciousness and contextual experiences. PMID:27267677

  6. Neural circuits with long-distance axon tracts for determining functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Tang-Schomer, Min D; Davies, Paul; Graziano, Daniel; Thurber, Amy E; Kaplan, David L

    2014-01-30

    The cortical circuitry in the brain consists of structurally and functionally distinct neuronal assemblies with reciprocal axon connections. To generate cell culture-based systems that emulate axon tract systems of an in vivo neural network, we developed a living neural circuit consisting of compartmentalized neuronal populations connected by arrays of two millimeter-long axon tracts that are integrated on a planar multi-electrode array (MEA). The millimeter-scale node-to-node separation allows for pharmacological and electrophysiological manipulations to simultaneously target multiple neuronal populations. The results show controlled selectivity of dye absorption by neurons in different compartments. MEA-transmitted electrical stimulation of targeted neurons shows ∼46% increase of intracellular calcium levels with 20 Hz stimulation, but ∼22% decrease with 2k Hz stimulation. The unique feature of long distance axons promotes in vivo-like fasciculation. These axon tracts are determined to be inhibitory afferents by showing increased action potential firing of downstream node upon selective application of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to the upstream node. Together, this model demonstrates integrated capabilities for assessing multiple endpoints including axon tract tracing, calcium influx, network architecture and activities. This system can be used as a multi-functional platform for studying axon tract-associated CNS disorders in vitro, such as diffuse axonal injury after brain trauma. PMID:24216177

  7. Recruitment of Polysynaptic Connections Underlies Functional Recovery of a Neural Circuit after Lesion.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Akira; Tamvacakis, Arianna N; Katz, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment of additional neurons to neural circuits often occurs in accordance with changing functional demands. Here we found that synaptic recruitment plays a key role in functional recovery after neural injury. Disconnection of a brain commissure in the nudibranch mollusc, Tritonia diomedea, impairs swimming behavior by eliminating particular synapses in the central pattern generator (CPG) underlying the rhythmic swim motor pattern. However, the CPG functionally recovers within a day after the lesion. The strength of a spared inhibitory synapse within the CPG from Cerebral Neuron 2 (C2) to Ventral Swim Interneuron B (VSI) determines the level of impairment caused by the lesion, which varies among individuals. In addition to this direct synaptic connection, there are polysynaptic connections from C2 and Dorsal Swim Interneurons to VSI that provide indirect excitatory drive but play only minor roles under normal conditions. After disconnecting the pedal commissure (Pedal Nerve 6), the recruitment of polysynaptic excitation became a major source of the excitatory drive to VSI. Moreover, the amount of polysynaptic recruitment, which changed over time, differed among individuals and correlated with the degree of recovery of the swim motor pattern. Thus, functional recovery was mediated by an increase in the magnitude of polysynaptic excitatory drive, compensating for the loss of direct excitation. Since the degree of susceptibility to injury corresponds to existing individual variation in the C2 to VSI synapse, the recovery relied upon the extent to which the network reorganized to incorporate additional synapses. PMID:27570828

  8. Neural Circuits with Long-Distance Axon Tracts for Determining Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Tang-Schomer, Min D.; Davies, Paul; Graziano, Daniel; Thurber, Amy E.; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The cortical circuitry in the brain consists of structurally and functionally distinct neuronal assemblies with reciprocal axon connections. To generate cell culture-based systems that emulate axon tract systems of an in vivo neural network, we developed a living neural circuit consisting of compartmentalized neuronal populations connected by arrays of two millimeter-long axon tracts that are integrated on a planar multi-electrode array (MEA). The millimeter-scale node-to-node separation allows for pharmacological and electrophysiological manipulations to simultaneously target multiple neuronal populations. The results show controlled selectivity of dye absorption by neurons in different compartments. MEA-transmitted electrical stimulation of targeted neurons shows ∼46% increase of intracellular calcium levels with 20 Hz stimulation, but ∼22% decrease with 2k Hz stimulation. The unique feature of long distance axons promotes in vivo-like fasciculation. These axon tracts are determined to be inhibitory afferents by showing increased action potential firing of downstream node upon selective application of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to the upstream node. Together, this model demonstrates integrated capabilities for assessing multiple endpoints including axon tract tracing, calcium influx, network architecture and activities. This system can be used as a multi-functional platform for studying axon tract-associated CNS disorders in vitro, such as diffuse axonal injury after brain trauma. PMID:24216177

  9. Neural circuits with long-distance axon tracts for determining functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Tang-Schomer, Min D; Davies, Paul; Graziano, Daniel; Thurber, Amy E; Kaplan, David L

    2014-01-30

    The cortical circuitry in the brain consists of structurally and functionally distinct neuronal assemblies with reciprocal axon connections. To generate cell culture-based systems that emulate axon tract systems of an in vivo neural network, we developed a living neural circuit consisting of compartmentalized neuronal populations connected by arrays of two millimeter-long axon tracts that are integrated on a planar multi-electrode array (MEA). The millimeter-scale node-to-node separation allows for pharmacological and electrophysiological manipulations to simultaneously target multiple neuronal populations. The results show controlled selectivity of dye absorption by neurons in different compartments. MEA-transmitted electrical stimulation of targeted neurons shows ∼46% increase of intracellular calcium levels with 20 Hz stimulation, but ∼22% decrease with 2k Hz stimulation. The unique feature of long distance axons promotes in vivo-like fasciculation. These axon tracts are determined to be inhibitory afferents by showing increased action potential firing of downstream node upon selective application of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to the upstream node. Together, this model demonstrates integrated capabilities for assessing multiple endpoints including axon tract tracing, calcium influx, network architecture and activities. This system can be used as a multi-functional platform for studying axon tract-associated CNS disorders in vitro, such as diffuse axonal injury after brain trauma.

  10. Recruitment of Polysynaptic Connections Underlies Functional Recovery of a Neural Circuit after Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Tamvacakis, Arianna N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The recruitment of additional neurons to neural circuits often occurs in accordance with changing functional demands. Here we found that synaptic recruitment plays a key role in functional recovery after neural injury. Disconnection of a brain commissure in the nudibranch mollusc, Tritonia diomedea, impairs swimming behavior by eliminating particular synapses in the central pattern generator (CPG) underlying the rhythmic swim motor pattern. However, the CPG functionally recovers within a day after the lesion. The strength of a spared inhibitory synapse within the CPG from Cerebral Neuron 2 (C2) to Ventral Swim Interneuron B (VSI) determines the level of impairment caused by the lesion, which varies among individuals. In addition to this direct synaptic connection, there are polysynaptic connections from C2 and Dorsal Swim Interneurons to VSI that provide indirect excitatory drive but play only minor roles under normal conditions. After disconnecting the pedal commissure (Pedal Nerve 6), the recruitment of polysynaptic excitation became a major source of the excitatory drive to VSI. Moreover, the amount of polysynaptic recruitment, which changed over time, differed among individuals and correlated with the degree of recovery of the swim motor pattern. Thus, functional recovery was mediated by an increase in the magnitude of polysynaptic excitatory drive, compensating for the loss of direct excitation. Since the degree of susceptibility to injury corresponds to existing individual variation in the C2 to VSI synapse, the recovery relied upon the extent to which the network reorganized to incorporate additional synapses. PMID:27570828

  11. Rearranging the world: Neural networks supporting the processing of temporal connectives

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zheng; Kutas, Marta; George, Marie St.; Sereno, Marty; Münte, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Temporal conjunctions ‘before’ and ‘after’ give us freedom to describe a series of events in different orders. Previous studies suggested ‘before’ sentences in which events were expresses in an order inconsistent with their actual order of occurrence need additional computations, i.e. reversing the order of event mention to reach the actual order of event occurrence. This study found the additional computations may be supported by a neural network connecting the caudate nucleus with the medial prefrontal cortex, middle frontal gyrus (MFG), precuneus and occipital cortex. The connectivity in this network was strongly enhanced for ‘before’ than ‘after’ sentences. Meanwhile, another network was observed to support the memory retrieval, connecting the hippocampus with the MFG via the orbital inferior frontal gyrus and temporal pole. The connectivity pattern of this network was not different between conditions. With the common node MFG, these two networks may communicate in working memory to work together. PMID:22146750

  12. Functional connectivity and information flow of the respiratory neural network in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lianchun; De Mazancourt, Marine; Hess, Agathe; Ashadi, Fakhrul R.; Klein, Isabelle; Mal, Hervé; Courbage, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Breathing involves a complex interplay between the brainstem automatic network and cortical voluntary command. How these brain regions communicate at rest or during inspiratory loading is unknown. This issue is crucial for several reasons: (i) increased respiratory loading is a major feature of several respiratory diseases, (ii) failure of the voluntary motor and cortical sensory processing drives is among the mechanisms that precede acute respiratory failure, (iii) several cerebral structures involved in responding to inspiratory loading participate in the perception of dyspnea, a distressing symptom in many disease. We studied functional connectivity and Granger causality of the respiratory network in controls and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), at rest and during inspiratory loading. Compared with those of controls, the motor cortex area of patients exhibited decreased connectivity with their contralateral counterparts and no connectivity with the brainstem. In the patients, the information flow was reversed at rest with the source of the network shifted from the medulla towards the motor cortex. During inspiratory loading, the system was overwhelmed and the motor cortex became the sink of the network. This major finding may help to understand why some patients with COPD are prone to acute respiratory failure. Network connectivity and causality were related to lung function and illness severity. We validated our connectivity and causality results with a mathematical model of neural network. Our findings suggest a new therapeutic strategy involving the modulation of brain activity to increase motor cortex functional connectivity and improve respiratory muscles performance in patients. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2736–2754, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27059277

  13. Functional connectivity and information flow of the respiratory neural network in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lianchun; De Mazancourt, Marine; Hess, Agathe; Ashadi, Fakhrul R; Klein, Isabelle; Mal, Hervé; Courbage, Maurice; Mangin, Laurence

    2016-08-01

    Breathing involves a complex interplay between the brainstem automatic network and cortical voluntary command. How these brain regions communicate at rest or during inspiratory loading is unknown. This issue is crucial for several reasons: (i) increased respiratory loading is a major feature of several respiratory diseases, (ii) failure of the voluntary motor and cortical sensory processing drives is among the mechanisms that precede acute respiratory failure, (iii) several cerebral structures involved in responding to inspiratory loading participate in the perception of dyspnea, a distressing symptom in many disease. We studied functional connectivity and Granger causality of the respiratory network in controls and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), at rest and during inspiratory loading. Compared with those of controls, the motor cortex area of patients exhibited decreased connectivity with their contralateral counterparts and no connectivity with the brainstem. In the patients, the information flow was reversed at rest with the source of the network shifted from the medulla towards the motor cortex. During inspiratory loading, the system was overwhelmed and the motor cortex became the sink of the network. This major finding may help to understand why some patients with COPD are prone to acute respiratory failure. Network connectivity and causality were related to lung function and illness severity. We validated our connectivity and causality results with a mathematical model of neural network. Our findings suggest a new therapeutic strategy involving the modulation of brain activity to increase motor cortex functional connectivity and improve respiratory muscles performance in patients. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2736-2754, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Efficient "Shotgun" Inference of Neural Connectivity from Highly Sub-sampled Activity Data

    PubMed Central

    Soudry, Daniel; Keshri, Suraj; Stinson, Patrick; Oh, Min-hwan; Iyengar, Garud; Paninski, Liam

    2015-01-01

    Inferring connectivity in neuronal networks remains a key challenge in statistical neuroscience. The “common input” problem presents a major roadblock: it is difficult to reliably distinguish causal connections between pairs of observed neurons versus correlations induced by common input from unobserved neurons. Available techniques allow us to simultaneously record, with sufficient temporal resolution, only a small fraction of the network. Consequently, naive connectivity estimators that neglect these common input effects are highly biased. This work proposes a “shotgun” experimental design, in which we observe multiple sub-networks briefly, in a serial manner. Thus, while the full network cannot be observed simultaneously at any given time, we may be able to observe much larger subsets of the network over the course of the entire experiment, thus ameliorating the common input problem. Using a generalized linear model for a spiking recurrent neural network, we develop a scalable approximate expected loglikelihood-based Bayesian method to perform network inference given this type of data, in which only a small fraction of the network is observed in each time bin. We demonstrate in simulation that the shotgun experimental design can eliminate the biases induced by common input effects. Networks with thousands of neurons, in which only a small fraction of the neurons is observed in each time bin, can be quickly and accurately estimated, achieving orders of magnitude speed up over previous approaches. PMID:26465147

  15. Differential Patterns of Abnormal Activity and Connectivity in the Amygdala-Prefrontal Circuitry in Bipolar-I and Bipolar-NOS Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Farchione, Tiffany; Diwadkar, Vaibhav; Pruitt, Patrick; Radwan, Jacqueline; Axelson, David A.; Birmaher, Boris; Phillips, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The functioning of neural systems supporting emotion processing and regulation in youth with bipolar disorder not otherwise specified (BP-NOS) remains poorly understood. We sought to examine patterns of activity and connectivity in youth with BP-NOS relative to youth with bipolar disorder type I (BP-I) and healthy controls (HC). Method:…

  16. Dynamic labelling of neural connections in multiple colours by trans-synaptic fluorescence complementation

    PubMed Central

    Macpherson, Lindsey J.; Zaharieva, Emanuela E.; Kearney, Patrick J.; Alpert, Michael H.; Lin, Tzu-Yang; Turan, Zeynep; Lee, Chi-Hon; Gallio, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Determining the pattern of activity of individual connections within a neural circuit could provide insights into the computational processes that underlie brain function. Here, we develop new strategies to label active synapses by trans-synaptic fluorescence complementation in Drosophila. First, we demonstrate that a synaptobrevin-GRASP chimera functions as a powerful activity-dependent marker for synapses in vivo. Next, we create cyan and yellow variants, achieving activity-dependent, multi-colour fluorescence reconstitution across synapses (X-RASP). Our system allows for the first time retrospective labelling of synapses (rather than whole neurons) based on their activity, in multiple colours, in the same animal. As individual synapses often act as computational units in the brain, our method will promote the design of experiments that are not possible using existing techniques. Moreover, our strategies are easily adaptable to circuit mapping in any genetic system. PMID:26635273

  17. Association of neural tube defects in children of mothers with MTHFR 677TT genotype and abnormal carbohydrate metabolism risk: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cadenas-Benitez, N M; Yanes-Sosa, F; Gonzalez-Meneses, A; Cerrillos, L; Acosta, D; Praena-Fernandez, J M; Neth, O; Gomez de Terreros, I; Ybot-González, P

    2014-03-26

    Abnormalities in maternal folate and carbohydrate metabolism have both been shown to induce neural tube defects (NTD) in humans and animal models. However, the relationship between these two factors in the development of NTDs remains unclear. Data from mothers of children with spina bifida seen at the Unidad de Espina Bífida del Hospital Infantil Virgen del Rocío (case group) were compared to mothers of healthy children with no NTD (control group) who were randomly selected from patients seen at the outpatient ward in the same hospital. There were 25 individuals in the case group and 41 in the control group. Analysis of genotypes for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677CT polymorphism in women with or without risk factors for abnormal carbohydrate metabolism revealed that mothers who were homozygous for the MTHFR 677TT polymorphism and at risk of abnormal carbohydrate metabolism were more likely to have offspring with spina bifida and high levels of homocysteine, compared to the control group. The increased incidence of NTDs in mothers homozygous for the MTHFR 677TT polymorphism and at risk of abnormal carbohydrate metabolism stresses the need for careful metabolic screening in pregnant women, and, if necessary, determination of the MTHFR 677CT genotype in those mothers at risk of developing abnormal carbohydrate metabolism.

  18. Caged Neuron MEA: A system for long-term investigation of cultured neural network connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Jonathan; Tooker, Angela; Tai, Y-C.; Pine, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    Traditional techniques for investigating cultured neural networks, such as the patch clamp and multi-electrode array, are limited by: 1) the number of identified cells which can be simultaneously electrically contacted, 2) the length of time for which cells can be studied, and 3) the lack of one-to-one neuron-to-electrode specificity. Here, we present a new device—the caged neuron multi-electrode array—which overcomes these limitations. This micro-machined device consists of an array of neurocages which mechanically trap a neuron near an extracellular electrode. While the cell body is trapped, the axon and dendrites can freely grow into the surrounding area to form a network. The electrode is bi-directional, capable of both stimulating and recording action potentials. This system is non-invasive, so that all constituent neurons of a network can be studied over its lifetime with stable one-to-one neuron-to-electrode correspondence. Proof-of-concept experiments are described to illustrate that functional networks form in a neurochip system of 16 cages in a 4×4 array, and that suprathreshold connectivity can be fully mapped over several weeks. The neurochip opens a new domain in neurobiology for studying small cultured neural networks. PMID:18775453

  19. On the connection between level of education and the neural circuitry of emotion perception

    PubMed Central

    Demenescu, Liliana R.; Stan, Adrian; Kortekaas, Rudie; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Veltman, Dick J.; Aleman, André

    2014-01-01

    Through education, a social group transmits accumulated knowledge, skills, customs, and values to its members. So far, to the best of our knowledge, the association between educational attainment and neural correlates of emotion processing has been left unexplored. In a retrospective analysis of The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we compared two groups of fourteen healthy volunteers with intermediate and high educational attainment, matched for age and gender. The data concerned event-related fMRI of brain activation during perception of facial emotional expressions. The region of interest (ROI) analysis showed stronger right amygdala activation to facial expressions in participants with lower relative to higher educational attainment (HE). The psychophysiological interaction analysis revealed that participants with HE exhibited stronger right amygdala—right insula connectivity during perception of emotional and neutral facial expressions. This exploratory study suggests the relevance of educational attainment on the neural mechanism of facial expressions processing. PMID:25386133

  20. On self-feedback connectivity in neural mass models applied to event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Youssofzadeh, Vahab; Prasad, Girijesh; Wong-Lin, KongFatt

    2015-03-01

    Neural mass models (NMMs) applied to neuroimaging data often do not emphasise intrinsic self-feedback within a neural population. However, based on mean-field theory, any population of coupled neurons is intrinsically endowed with effective self-coupling. In this work, we examine the effectiveness of three cortical NMMs with different self-feedbacks using a dynamic causal modelling approach. Specifically, we compare the classic Jansen and Rit (1995) model (no self-feedback), a modified model by Moran et al. (2007) (only inhibitory self-feedback), and our proposed model with inhibitory and excitatory self-feedbacks. Using bifurcation analysis, we show that single-unit Jansen-Rit model is less robust in generating oscillatory behaviour than the other two models. Next, under Bayesian inversion, we simulate single-channel event-related potentials (ERPs) within a mismatch negativity auditory oddball paradigm. We found fully self-feedback model (FSM) to provide the best fit to single-channel data. By analysing the posterior covariances of model parameters, we show that self-feedback connections are less sensitive to the generated evoked responses than the other model parameters, and hence can be treated analogously to "higher-order" parameter corrections of the original Jansen-Rit model. This is further supported in the more realistic multi-area case where FSM can replicate data better than JRM and MoM in the majority of subjects by capturing the finer features of the ERP data more accurately. Our work informs how NMMs with full self-feedback connectivity are not only more consistent with the underlying neurophysiology, but can also account for more complex features in ERP data.

  1. Functional connectivity reveals load dependent neural systems underlying encoding and maintenance in verbal working memory.

    PubMed

    Woodward, T S; Cairo, T A; Ruff, C C; Takane, Y; Hunter, M A; Ngan, E T C

    2006-04-28

    One of the main challenges in working memory research has been to understand the degree of separation and overlap between the neural systems involved in encoding and maintenance. In the current study we used a variable load version of the Sternberg item recognition test (two, four, six, or eight letters) and a functional connectivity method based on constrained principal component analysis to extract load-dependent neural systems underlying encoding and maintenance, and to characterize their anatomical overlap and functional interaction. Based on the pattern of functional connectivity, constrained principal component analysis identified a load-dependent encoding system comprising bilateral occipital (Brodmann's area (BA) 17, 18), bilateral superior parietal (BA 7), bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal (BA 46), and dorsal anterior cingulate (BA 24, 32) regions. For maintenance, in contrast, constrained principal component analysis identified a system that was characterized by both load-dependent increases and decreases in activation. The structures in this system jointly activated by maintenance load involved left posterior parietal (BA 40), left inferior prefrontal (BA 44), left premotor and supplementary motor areas (BA 6), and dorsal cingulate regions (BA 24, 32), while the regions displaying maintenance-load-dependent activity decreases involved bilateral occipital (BA 17, 18), posterior cingulate (BA 23) and rostral anterior cingulate/orbitofrontal (BA 10, 11, 32) regions. The correlation between the encoding and maintenance systems was strong and negative (Pearson's r = -.55), indicting that some regions important for visual processing during encoding displayed reduced activity during maintenance, while subvocal rehearsal and phonological storage regions important for maintenance showed a reduction in activity during encoding. In summary, our analyses suggest that separable and complementary subsystems underlie encoding and maintenance in verbal working memory

  2. Weather sensitive short-term load forecasting using non-fully connected artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Shintzo.

    1991-01-01

    Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) are parallel distributed models which are capable of performing nonlinear modeling and adaptation without making functional assumptions. This thesis presents a non-fully connected ANN model with cascaded training strategy for forecasting weather sensitive electric loads. The proposed model is capable of forecasting the hourly load for an entire week and has been implemented on real load data. The average absolute forecast errors of the one hour ahead forecast in the Winter and Summer test cases are shown to be 3.42% and 3.19% respectively; the average absolute forecast errors at peak in both test cases are shown to be 1.19% and 3.45%. The model is superior to the conventional statistical method in model life cycle length, degree of recursiveness and accuracy. With non-fully connected network structure, the network training time is reduced and the degree of robustness is enhanced. By applying the cascaded learning strategy, the network performance is improved. General guidelines in constructing ANN forecasting models are developed. Intensive illustrations are also provided to explain the fundamental behavior of the ANN models in time series applications.

  3. Primary prevention of neural-tube defects and some other congenital abnormalities by folic acid and multivitamins: history, missed opportunity and tasks

    PubMed Central

    Bártfai, Zoltán; Bánhidy, Ferenc

    2011-01-01

    The history of intervention trials of periconception folic acid with multivitamin and folic acid supplementation in women has shown a recent breakthrough in the primary prevention of structural birth defects, namely neural-tube defects and some other congenital abnormalities. Recently, some studies have demonstrated the efficacy of this new method in reducing congenital abnormalities with specific origin; for example, in the offspring of diabetic and epileptic mothers, and in pregnancy with high fever. The benefits and drawbacks of four possible uses of periconception folate/folic acid and multivitamin supplementation are discussed: we believe there has been a missed opportunity to implement this preventive approach in medical practice. The four methods are as follows: (i) dietary intake of folate and other vitamins, (ii) periconception folic acid/multivitamin supplementation, (iii) food fortification with folic acid, and (iv) the combination of oral contraceptives with 6S-5-methytetrahydrofolate (‘folate’). PMID:25083211

  4. Abnormal epigenetic regulation of the gene expression levels of Wnt2b and Wnt7b: Implications for neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    BAI, BAOLING; CHEN, SHUYUAN; ZHANG, QIN; JIANG, QIAN; LI, HUILI

    2016-01-01

    The association between Wnt genes and neural tube defects (NTDs) is recognized, however, it remains to be fully elucidated. Our previous study demonstrated that epigenetic mechanisms are affected in human NTDs. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate whether Wnt2b and Wnt7b are susceptible to abnormal epigenetic modification in NTDs, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays to evaluate histone enrichments and the MassARRAY platform to detect the methylation levels of target regions within Wnt genes. The results demonstrated that the transcriptional activities of Wnt2b and Wnt7b were abnormally upregulated in mouse fetuses with NTDs and, in the GC-rich promoters of these genes, histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) acetylation was enriched, whereas H3K27 trimethylation was reduced. Furthermore, several CpG sites in the altered histone modification of target regions were significantly hypomethylated. The present study also detected abnormal epigenetic modifications of these Wnt genes in human NTDs. In conclusion, the present study detected abnormal upregulation in the levels of Wnt2b and Wnt7b, and hypothesized that the alterations may be due to the ectopic opening of chromatin structure. These results improve understanding of the dysregulation of epigenetic modification of Wnt genes in NTDs. PMID:26548512

  5. Compensation through increased functional connectivity: neural correlates of inhibition in old and young.

    PubMed

    Geerligs, Linda; Saliasi, Emi; Maurits, Natasha M; Lorist, Monicque M

    2012-10-01

    With increasing age, people experience more difficulties with suppressing irrelevant information, which may have a major impact on cognitive functioning. The extent of decline of inhibitory functions with age is highly variable between individuals. In this study, we used ERPs and phase locking analyses to investigate neural correlates of this variability in inhibition between individuals. Older and younger participants performed a selective attention task in which relevant and irrelevant information was presented simultaneously. The participants were split into high and low performers based on their level of inhibition inefficiency, that is, the slowing of RTs induced by information that participants were instructed to ignore. P1 peak amplitudes were larger in low performers than in high performers, indicating that low performers were less able to suppress the processing of irrelevant stimuli. Phase locking analyses were used as a measure of functional connectivity. Efficient inhibition in both age groups was related to the increased functional connectivity in the alpha band between frontal and occipito-parietal ROIs in the prestimulus interval. In addition, increased power in the alpha band in occipito-parietal ROIs was related to better inhibition both before and after stimulus onset. Phase locking in the upper beta band before and during stimulus presentation between frontal and occipito-parietal ROIs was related to a better performance in older participants only, suggesting that this is an active compensation mechanism employed to maintain adequate performance. In addition, increased top-down modulation and increased power in the alpha band appears to be a general mechanism facilitating inhibition in both age groups.

  6. Doublesex Regulates the Connectivity of a Neural Circuit Controlling Drosophila Male Courtship Song.

    PubMed

    Shirangi, Troy R; Wong, Allan M; Truman, James W; Stern, David L

    2016-06-20

    It is unclear how regulatory genes establish neural circuits that compose sex-specific behaviors. The Drosophila melanogaster male courtship song provides a powerful model to study this problem. Courting males vibrate a wing to sing bouts of pulses and hums, called pulse and sine song, respectively. We report the discovery of male-specific thoracic interneurons-the TN1A neurons-that are required specifically for sine song. The TN1A neurons can drive the activity of a sex-non-specific wing motoneuron, hg1, which is also required for sine song. The male-specific connection between the TN1A neurons and the hg1 motoneuron is regulated by the sexual differentiation gene doublesex. We find that doublesex is required in the TN1A neurons during development to increase the density of the TN1A arbors that interact with dendrites of the hg1 motoneuron. Our findings demonstrate how a sexual differentiation gene can build a sex-specific circuit motif by modulating neuronal arborization. PMID:27326931

  7. Dishevelled is essential for neural connectivity and planar cell polarity in planarians.

    PubMed

    Almuedo-Castillo, Maria; Saló, Emili; Adell, Teresa

    2011-02-15

    The Wingless/Integrated (Wnt) signaling pathway controls multiple events during development and homeostasis. It comprises multiple branches, mainly classified according to their dependence on β-catenin activation. The Wnt/β-catenin branch is essential for the establishment of the embryonic anteroposterior (AP) body axis throughout the phylogenetic tree. It is also required for AP axis establishment during planarian regeneration. Wnt/β-catenin-independent signaling encompasses several different pathways, of which the most extensively studied is the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, which is responsible for planar polarization of cell structures within an epithelial sheet. Dishevelled (Dvl) is the hub of Wnt signaling because it regulates and channels the Wnt signal into every branch. Here, we analyze the role of Schmidtea mediterranea Dvl homologs (Smed-dvl-1 and Smed-dvl-2) using gene silencing. We demonstrate that in addition to a role in AP axis specification, planarian Dvls are involved in at least two different β-catenin-independent processes. First, they are essential for neural connectivity through Smed-wnt5 signaling. Second, Smed-dvl-2, together with the S. mediterranea homologs of Van-Gogh (Vang) and Diversin (Div), is required for apical positioning of the basal bodies of epithelial cells. These data represent evidence not only of the function of the PCP network in lophotrocozoans but of the involvement of the PCP core elements Vang and Div in apical positioning of the cilia.

  8. Connections between inversion, kriging, wiener filters, support vector machines, and neural networks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzma, H. A.; Kappler, K. A.; Rector, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    Kriging, wiener filters, support vector machines (SVMs), neural networks, linear and non-linear inversion are methods for predicting the values of one set of variables given the values of another. They can all be used to estimate a set of model parameters from measured data given that a physical relationship exists between models and data. However, since the methods were developed in different fields, the mathematics used to describe them tend to obscure rather than highlight the links between them. In this poster, we diagram the methods and clarify their connections in hopes that practitioners of one method will be able to understand and learn from the insights developed in another. At the heart of all of the methods are a set of coefficients that must be found by minimizing an objective function. The solution to the objective function can be found either by inverting a matrix, or by searching through a space of possible answers. We distinguish between direct inversion, in which the desired coefficients are those of the model itself, and indirect inversion, in which examples of models and data are used to estimate the coefficients of an inverse process that, once discovered, can be used to compute new models from new data. Kriging is developed from Geostatistics. The model is usually a rock property (such as gold concentration) and the data is a sample location (x,y,z). The desired coefficients are a set of weights which are used to predict the concentration of a sample taken at a new location based on a variogram. The variogram is computed by averaging across a given set of known samples and is manually adjusted to reflect prior knowledge. Wiener filters were developed in signal processing to predict the values of one time-series from measurements of another. A wiener filter can be derived from kriging by replacing variograms with correlation. Support vector machines are an offshoot of statistical learning theory. They can be written as a form of kriging in which

  9. Abnormal Neural Responses to Emotional Stimuli but Not Go/NoGo and Stroop Tasks in Adults with a History of Childhood Nocturnal Enuresis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mengxing; Zhang, Kaihua; Zhang, Jilei; Dong, Guangheng; Zhang, Hui; Du, Xiaoxia

    2015-01-01

    Background Nocturnal enuresis (NE) is a common disorder in school-aged children. Previous studies have reported that children with NE exhibit structural, functional and neurochemical abnormalities in the brain, suggesting that children with NE may have cognitive problems. Additionally, children with NE have been shown to process emotions differently from control children. In fact, most cases of NE resolve with age. However, adults who had experienced NE during childhood may still have potential cognitive or emotion problems, and this possibility has not been thoroughly investigated. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to evaluate brain functional changes in adults with a history of NE. Two groups, consisting of 21 adults with NE and 21 healthy controls, were scanned using fMRI. We did not observe a significant abnormality in activation during the Go/NoGo and Stroop tasks in adults with a history of NE compared with the control group. However, compared to healthy subjects, young adults with a history of NE mainly showed increased activation in the bilateral temporoparietal junctions, bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and bilateral anterior cingulate cortex while looking at negative vs. neutral pictures. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that adults with a history of childhood NE have no obvious deficit in response inhibition or cognitive control but showed abnormal neural responses to emotional stimuli. PMID:26571500

  10. Brief report: Anomalous neural deactivations and functional connectivity during receptive language in autism spectrum disorder: a functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Karten, Ariel; Hirsch, Joy

    2015-06-01

    Neural mechanisms that underlie language disability in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been associated with reduced excitatory processes observed as positive blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) responses. However, negative BOLD responses (NBR) associated with language and inhibitory processes have been less studied in ASD. In this study, functional magnetic resonance imaging showed that the NBR in ASD participants was reduced during passive listening to spoken narratives compared to control participants. Further, functional connectivity between the superior temporal gyrus and regions that exhibited a NBR during receptive language in control participants was increased in ASD participants. These findings extend models for receptive language disability in ASD to include anomalous neural deactivations and connectivity consistent with reduced or poorly modulated inhibitory processes. PMID:25526952

  11. Whole-brain functional connectivity during emotional word classification in medication-free Major Depressive Disorder: Abnormal salience circuitry and relations to positive emotionality☆

    PubMed Central

    van Tol, Marie-José; Veer, Ilya M.; van der Wee, Nic J.A.; Aleman, André; van Buchem, Mark A.; Rombouts, Serge A.R.B.; Zitman, Frans G.; Veltman, Dick J.; Johnstone, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) has been associated with biased processing and abnormal regulation of negative and positive information, which may result from compromised coordinated activity of prefrontal and subcortical brain regions involved in evaluating emotional information. We tested whether patients with MDD show distributed changes in functional connectivity with a set of independently derived brain networks that have shown high correspondence with different task demands, including stimulus salience and emotional processing. We further explored if connectivity during emotional word processing related to the tendency to engage in positive or negative emotional states. In this study, 25 medication-free MDD patients without current or past comorbidity and matched controls (n = 25) performed an emotional word-evaluation task during functional MRI. Using a dual regression approach, individual spatial connectivity maps representing each subject's connectivity with each standard network were used to evaluate between-group differences and effects of positive and negative emotionality (extraversion and neuroticism, respectively, as measured with the NEO-FFI). Results showed decreased functional connectivity of the medial prefrontal cortex, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, and ventral striatum with the fronto-opercular salience network in MDD patients compared to controls. In patients, abnormal connectivity was related to extraversion, but not neuroticism. These results confirm the hypothesis of a relative (para)limbic–cortical decoupling that may explain dysregulated affect in MDD. As connectivity of these regions with the salience network was related to extraversion, but not to general depression severity or negative emotionality, dysfunction of this network may be responsible for the failure to sustain engagement in rewarding behavior. PMID:24179829

  12. Cocaine addiction related reproducible brain regions of abnormal default-mode network functional connectivity: a group ICA study with different model orders.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyu; Lee, Seong-Whan

    2013-08-26

    Model order selection in group independent component analysis (ICA) has a significant effect on the obtained components. This study investigated the reproducible brain regions of abnormal default-mode network (DMN) functional connectivity related with cocaine addiction through different model order settings in group ICA. Resting-state fMRI data from 24 cocaine addicts and 24 healthy controls were temporally concatenated and processed by group ICA using model orders of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50, respectively. For each model order, the group ICA approach was repeated 100 times using the ICASSO toolbox and after clustering the obtained components, centrotype-based anterior and posterior DMN components were selected for further analysis. Individual DMN components were obtained through back-reconstruction and converted to z-score maps. A whole brain mixed effects factorial ANOVA was performed to explore the differences in resting-state DMN functional connectivity between cocaine addicts and healthy controls. The hippocampus, which showed decreased functional connectivity in cocaine addicts for all the tested model orders, might be considered as a reproducible abnormal region in DMN associated with cocaine addiction. This finding suggests that using group ICA to examine the functional connectivity of the hippocampus in the resting-state DMN may provide an additional insight potentially relevant for cocaine-related diagnoses and treatments. PMID:23707901

  13. Genetically induced abnormal cranial development in human trisomy 18 with holoprosencephaly: comparisons with the normal tempo of osteogenic-neural development.

    PubMed

    Reid, Shaina N; Ziermann, Janine M; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C

    2015-07-01

    Craniofacial malformations are common congenital defects caused by failed midline inductive signals. These midline defects are associated with exposure of the fetus to exogenous teratogens and with inborn genetic errors such as those found in Down, Patau, Edwards' and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndromes. Yet, there are no studies that analyze contributions of synchronous neurocranial and neural development in these disorders. Here we present the first in-depth analysis of malformations of the basicranium of a holoprosencephalic (HPE) trisomy 18 (T18; Edwards' syndrome) fetus with synophthalmic cyclopia and alobar HPE. With a combination of traditional gross dissection and state-of-the-art computed tomography, we demonstrate the deleterious effects of T18 caused by a translocation at 18p11.31. Bony features included a single developmentally unseparated frontal bone, and complete dual absence of the anterior cranial fossa and ethmoid bone. From a superior view with the calvarium plates removed, there was direct visual access to the orbital foramen and hard palate. Both the eyes and the pituitary gland, normally protected by bony structures, were exposed in the cranial cavity and in direct contact with the brain. The middle cranial fossa was shifted anteriorly, and foramina were either missing or displaced to an abnormal location due to the absence or misplacement of its respective cranial nerve (CN). When CN development was conserved in its induction and placement, the respective foramen developed in its normal location albeit with abnormal gross anatomical features, as seen in the facial nerve (CNVII) and the internal acoustic meatus. More anteriorly localized CNs and their foramina were absent or heavily disrupted compared with posterior ones. The severe malformations exhibited in the cranial fossae, orbital region, pituitary gland and sella turcica highlight the crucial involvement of transcription factors such as TGIF, which is located on chromosome 18 and contributes

  14. Peripheral nerve connections influence the appearance of neurosecretary material in neural sheath of ventral ganglion of the fly Sarcophaga bullata: an immunocytochemical study.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramanian, P; Sood, Prem Prakash

    2002-02-01

    This study examined the role of the brain and peripheral connections with the target organs in the appearance of neurosecretary material within the dorsal neural sheath of the ventral ganglion of the fly S. bullata. Specifically, the accumulation of the neuropeptide FMRFamide (the neurosecretary material) was examined by immunocytochemistry. Immunoreactions were performed on: (1) a normal intact ventral ganglion, (2) an isolated ventral ganglion that was cultured in vivo, and (3) a ventral ganglion that was isolated by transection from the brain, but retained its peripheral nerve connections. The results demonstrate that (a) the neurons of the ganglia survive and exhibit FMRFamide immune reaction independent of their peripheral connections, and (b) the accumulation of neuropeptide in the dorsal neural sheath is controlled by intact peripheral nerve connections with the ganglion. It is suggested that in the absence of their peripheral connections, the axons of FMRFamide immunoreactive neurons fail to invade the neural sheath resulting in the accumulation of neurosecretary material.

  15. Functionally reduced sensorimotor connections form with normal specificity despite abnormal muscle spindle development: the role of spindle-derived NT3

    PubMed Central

    Shneider, Neil A.; Mentis, George Z.; Schustak, Joshua; O’Donovan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms controlling the formation of synaptic connections between muscle spindle afferents and spinal motor neurons are believed to be regulated by factors originating from muscle spindles. Here, we find that the connections form with appropriate specificity in mice with abnormal spindle development caused by the conditional elimination of the neuregulin1 receptor ErbB2 from muscle precursors. However, despite a modest (~30%) decrease in the number of afferent terminals on motor neuron somata, the amplitude of afferent-evoked synaptic potentials recorded in motor neurons was reduced by ~80%, suggesting that many of the connections that form are functionally silent. The selective elimination of neurotrophin 3 (NT3) from muscle spindles had no effect on the amplitude of afferent-evoked ventral root potentials until the second postnatal week, revealing a late role for spindle-derived NT3 in the functional maintenance of the connections. These findings indicate that spindle-derived factors regulate the strength of the connections, but not their initial formation or their specificity. PMID:19369542

  16. An in vivo and in vitro H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of mdx mouse brain: abnormal development or neural necrosis?

    PubMed

    Tracey, I; Dunn, J F; Parkes, H G; Radda, G K

    1996-09-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder primarily affecting young boys, often causing mental retardation in addition to the well-known progressive muscular weakness. Normal dystrophin expression is lacking in skeletal muscle and the central nervous system (CNS) of both DMD children and the mdx mouse model. The underlying biochemical lesion causing mental impairment in DMD is unknown. 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) detects choline-containing compounds, creatine and N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) in vivo. NAA is commonly used as a chemical marker for neurons, and a decline in NAA is thought to correlate with neuronal loss. Control mice were compared to mdx using a combination of in vivo and in vitro 1H-MRS methods to determine whether neural necrosis or developmental abnormalities occur in dystrophic brain. NAA levels were normal in mdx brain compared to controls suggesting minor, if any, neuronal necrosis in dystrophic brain. In contrast, choline compounds and myo-inositol levels were increased, indicative of gliosis or developmental abnormalities in dystrophic brain. PMID:8880686

  17. Mutual connectivity analysis (MCA) using generalized radial basis function neural networks for nonlinear functional connectivity network recovery in resting-state functional MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Souza, Adora M.; Abidin, Anas Zainul; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the applicability of a computational framework, called mutual connectivity analysis (MCA), for directed functional connectivity analysis in both synthetic and resting-state functional MRI data. This framework comprises of first evaluating non-linear cross-predictability between every pair of time series prior to recovering the underlying network structure using community detection algorithms. We obtain the non-linear cross-prediction score between time series using Generalized Radial Basis Functions (GRBF) neural networks. These cross-prediction scores characterize the underlying functionally connected networks within the resting brain, which can be extracted using non-metric clustering approaches, such as the Louvain method. We first test our approach on synthetic models with known directional influence and network structure. Our method is able to capture the directional relationships between time series (with an area under the ROC curve = 0.92 +/- 0.037) as well as the underlying network structure (Rand index = 0.87 +/- 0.063) with high accuracy. Furthermore, we test this method for network recovery on resting-state fMRI data, where results are compared to the motor cortex network recovered from a motor stimulation sequence, resulting in a strong agreement between the two (Dice coefficient = 0.45). We conclude that our MCA approach is effective in analyzing non-linear directed functional connectivity and in revealing underlying functional network structure in complex systems.

  18. Abnormal folate metabolism and genetic polymorphism of the folate pathway in a child with Down syndrome and neural tube defect.

    PubMed

    Al-Gazali, L I; Padmanabhan, R; Melnyk, S; Yi, P; Pogribny, I P; Pogribna, M; Bakir, M; Hamid, Z A; Abdulrazzaq, Y; Dawodu, A; James, S J

    2001-10-01

    The association of neural tube defects (NTDs) with Down syndrome (trisomy 21) and altered folate metabolism in both mother and affected offspring provide a unique opportunity for insight into the etiologic role of folate deficiency in these congenital anomalies. We describe here the case of a male child with trisomy 21, cervical meningomyelocele, agenesis of corpus callosum, hydrocephaly, cerebellar herniation into the foramen magnum, and shallow posterior cranial fossa. Molecular analysis of the methylenetetrahydrofolate (MTHFR) gene revealed homozygosity for the mutant 677C-->T polymorphism in both the mother and child. The plasma homocysteine of the mother was highly elevated at 25.0 micromol/L and was associated with a low methionine level of 22.1 micromol/L. Her S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) level was three times that of reference normal women, resulting in a markedly reduced ratio of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to SAH and significant DNA hypomethylation in lymphocytes. The child had low plasma levels of both homocysteine and methionine and a reduced SAM/SAH ratio that was also associated with lymphocyte DNA hypomethylation. In addition, the child had a five-fold increase in cystathionine level relative to normal children, consistent with over-expression of the cystathionine beta synthase gene present on chromosome 21. We suggest that altered folate status plus homozygous mutation in the MTHFR gene in the mother could promote chromosomal instability and meiotic non-disjunction resulting in trisomy 21. Altered folate status and homozygous TT mutation in the MTHFR gene in both mother and child would be expected to increase the risk of neural tube defects. The presence of both trisomy 21 and postclosure NTD in the same child supports the need for an extended periconceptional period of maternal folate supplementation to achieve greater preventive effects for both NTD and trisomy 21. PMID:11568918

  19. Using large-scale neural models to interpret connectivity measures of cortico-cortical dynamics at millisecond temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Arpan; Pillai, Ajay S.; Horwitz, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades numerous functional imaging studies have shown that higher order cognitive functions are crucially dependent on the formation of distributed, large-scale neuronal assemblies (neurocognitive networks), often for very short durations. This has fueled the development of a vast number of functional connectivity measures that attempt to capture the spatiotemporal evolution of neurocognitive networks. Unfortunately, interpreting the neural basis of goal directed behavior using connectivity measures on neuroimaging data are highly dependent on the assumptions underlying the development of the measure, the nature of the task, and the modality of the neuroimaging technique that was used. This paper has two main purposes. The first is to provide an overview of some of the different measures of functional/effective connectivity that deal with high temporal resolution neuroimaging data. We will include some results that come from a recent approach that we have developed to identify the formation and extinction of task-specific, large-scale neuronal assemblies from electrophysiological recordings at a ms-by-ms temporal resolution. The second purpose of this paper is to indicate how to partially validate the interpretations drawn from this (or any other) connectivity technique by using simulated data from large-scale, neurobiologically realistic models. Specifically, we applied our recently developed method to realistic simulations of MEG data during a delayed match-to-sample (DMS) task condition and a passive viewing of stimuli condition using a large-scale neural model of the ventral visual processing pathway. Simulated MEG data using simple head models were generated from sources placed in V1, V4, IT, and prefrontal cortex (PFC) for the passive viewing condition. The results show how closely the conclusions obtained from the functional connectivity method match with what actually occurred at the neuronal network level. PMID:22291621

  20. Coherent periodic activity in excitatory Erdös-Renyi neural networks: the role of network connectivity.

    PubMed

    Tattini, Lorenzo; Olmi, Simona; Torcini, Alessandro

    2012-06-01

    In this article, we investigate the role of connectivity in promoting coherent activity in excitatory neural networks. In particular, we would like to understand if the onset of collective oscillations can be related to a minimal average connectivity and how this critical connectivity depends on the number of neurons in the networks. For these purposes, we consider an excitatory random network of leaky integrate-and-fire pulse coupled neurons. The neurons are connected as in a directed Erdös-Renyi graph with average connectivity scaling as a power law with the number of neurons in the network. The scaling is controlled by a parameter γ, which allows to pass from massively connected to sparse networks and therefore to modify the topology of the system. At a macroscopic level, we observe two distinct dynamical phases: an asynchronous state corresponding to a desynchronized dynamics of the neurons and a regime of partial synchronization (PS) associated with a coherent periodic activity of the network. At low connectivity, the system is in an asynchronous state, while PS emerges above a certain critical average connectivity (c). For sufficiently large networks, (c) saturates to a constant value suggesting that a minimal average connectivity is sufficient to observe coherent activity in systems of any size irrespectively of the kind of considered network: sparse or massively connected. However, this value depends on the nature of the synapses: reliable or unreliable. For unreliable synapses, the critical value required to observe the onset of macroscopic behaviors is noticeably smaller than for reliable synaptic transmission. Due to the disorder present in the system, for finite number of neurons we have inhomogeneities in the neuronal behaviors, inducing a weak form of chaos, which vanishes in the thermodynamic limit. In such a limit, the disordered systems exhibit regular (non chaotic) dynamics and their properties correspond to that of a homogeneous

  1. Effective connectivity in the neural network underlying coarse-to-fine categorization of visual scenes. A dynamic causal modeling study.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, Louise; Chauvin, Alan; Pichat, Cédric; Peyrin, Carole

    2015-10-01

    According to current models of visual perception scenes are processed in terms of spatial frequencies following a predominantly coarse-to-fine processing sequence. Low spatial frequencies (LSF) reach high-order areas rapidly in order to activate plausible interpretations of the visual input. This triggers top-down facilitation that guides subsequent processing of high spatial frequencies (HSF) in lower-level areas such as the inferotemporal and occipital cortices. However, dynamic interactions underlying top-down influences on the occipital cortex have never been systematically investigated. The present fMRI study aimed to further explore the neural bases and effective connectivity underlying coarse-to-fine processing of scenes, particularly the role of the occipital cortex. We used sequences of six filtered scenes as stimuli depicting coarse-to-fine or fine-to-coarse processing of scenes. Participants performed a categorization task on these stimuli (indoor vs. outdoor). Firstly, we showed that coarse-to-fine (compared to fine-to-coarse) sequences elicited stronger activation in the inferior frontal gyrus (in the orbitofrontal cortex), the inferotemporal cortex (in the fusiform and parahippocampal gyri), and the occipital cortex (in the cuneus). Dynamic causal modeling (DCM) was then used to infer effective connectivity between these regions. DCM results revealed that coarse-to-fine processing resulted in increased connectivity from the occipital cortex to the inferior frontal gyrus and from the inferior frontal gyrus to the inferotemporal cortex. Critically, we also observed an increase in connectivity strength from the inferior frontal gyrus to the occipital cortex, suggesting that top-down influences from frontal areas may guide processing of incoming signals. The present results support current models of visual perception and refine them by emphasizing the role of the occipital cortex as a cortical site for feedback projections in the neural network underlying

  2. Getting directions from the hippocampus: The neural connection between looking and memory.

    PubMed

    Meister, Miriam L R; Buffalo, Elizabeth A

    2016-10-01

    Investigations into the neural basis of memory in human and non-human primates have focused on the hippocampus and associated medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures. However, how memory signals from the hippocampus affect motor actions is unknown. We propose that approaching this question through eye movement, especially by assessing the changes in looking behavior that occur with experience, is a promising method for exposing neural computations within the hippocampus. Here, we review how looking behavior is guided by memory in several ways, some of which have been shown to depend on the hippocampus, and how hippocampal neural signals are modulated by eye movements. Taken together, these findings highlight the need for future research on how MTL structures interact with the oculomotor system. Probing how the hippocampus reflects and impacts motor output during looking behavior renders a practical path to advance our understanding of the hippocampal memory system.

  3. Axonal growth and connectivity from neural stem cell grafts in models of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lu, Paul; Kadoya, Ken; Tuszynski, Mark H

    2014-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) damages both gray matter and white matter, but white matter damage is responsible for the vast majority of the subsequent functional loss. Neural stem cells (NSCs) have been investigated as a means of improving outcomes after SCI, either through neuroprotective properties that limit secondary damage or by direct cell replacement. This review will focus on cell replacement strategies, and the ability of multipotent NSCs to form new functional synaptic relays across sites of even severe SCI. The ability of these early stage neurons to extend axons from the lesion site in large numbers and over long distances constitutes an important mechanism underlying their potential to promote neural repair.

  4. Neural systems for social cognition: gray matter volume abnormalities in boys at high genetic risk of autism symptoms, and a comparison with idiopathic autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Marcia N; Swaab, Hanna; Rombouts, Serge A R B; van Rijn, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY) is associated with several physical, cognitive, and behavioral consequences. In terms of social development, there is an increased risk of autism symptomatology. However, it remains unclear how social deficits are related to abnormal brain development and to what degree underlying mechanisms of social dysfunction in 47, XXY are similar to, or different from, those in idiopathic autism (ASD). This study was aimed at investigating the neural architecture of brain structures related to social information processing in boys with 47, XXY, also in comparison with boys with idiopathic ASD. MRI scans of 16 boys with 47, XXY, 16 with ASD, and 16 nonclinical, male controls were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). A region of interest mask containing the superior temporal cortex, amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), insular cortex, and medial frontal cortex was used. The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) was used to assess degree of autism spectrum symptoms. The 47, XXY group could not be distinguished from the ASD group on mean SRS scores, and their scores were significantly higher than in controls. VBM showed that boys with 47, XXY have significant gray matter volume reductions in the left and right insula, and the left OFC, compared with controls and boys with ASD. Additionally, boys with 47, XXY had significantly less gray matter in the right superior temporal gyrus than controls. These results imply social challenges associated with 47, XXY may be rooted in neural anatomy, and autism symptoms in boys with 47, XXY and boys with ASD might have, at least partially, different underlying etiologies.

  5. Improvement of white matter and functional connectivity abnormalities by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in crossed aphasia in dextral.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haitao; Wu, Haiyan; Cheng, Hewei; Wei, Dongjie; Wang, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yong; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    As a special aphasia, the occurrence of crossed aphasia in dextral (CAD) is unusual. This study aims to improve the language ability by applying 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). We studied multiple modality imaging of structural connectivity (diffusion tensor imaging), functional connectivity (resting fMRI), PET, and neurolinguistic analysis on a patient with CAD. Furthermore, we applied rTMS of 1 Hz for 40 times and observed the language function improvement. The results indicated that a significantly reduced structural and function connectivity was found in DTI and fMRI data compared with the control. The PET imaging showed hypo-metabolism in right hemisphere and left cerebellum. In conclusion, one of the mechanisms of CAD is that right hemisphere is the language dominance. Stimulating left Wernicke area could improve auditory comprehension, stimulating left Broca's area could enhance expression, and the results outlasted 6 months by 1 Hz rTMS balancing the excitability inter-hemisphere in CAD. PMID:25419415

  6. Abnormal Resting-State Functional Connectivity Strength in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Its Conversion to Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuxia; Wang, Xiaoni; Li, Yongqiu; Sun, Yu; Sheng, Can; Li, Hongyan; Li, Xuanyu; Yu, Yang; Chen, Guanqun; Hu, Xiaochen; Jing, Bin; Wang, Defeng; Li, Kuncheng; Jessen, Frank; Han, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Individuals diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are at high risk of transition to Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, little is known about functional characteristics of the conversion from MCI to AD. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 25 AD patients, 31 MCI patients, and 42 well-matched normal controls at baseline. Twenty-one of the 31 MCI patients converted to AD at approximately 24 months of follow-up. Functional connectivity strength (FCS) and seed-based functional connectivity analyses were used to assess the functional differences among the groups. Compared to controls, subjects with MCI and AD showed decreased FCS in the default-mode network and the occipital cortex. Importantly, the FCS of the left angular gyrus and middle occipital gyrus was significantly lower in MCI-converters as compared with MCI-nonconverters. Significantly decreased functional connectivity was found in MCI-converters compared to nonconverters between the left angular gyrus and bilateral inferior parietal lobules, dorsolateral prefrontal and lateral temporal cortices, and the left middle occipital gyrus and right middle occipital gyri. We demonstrated gradual but progressive functional changes during a median 2-year interval in patients converting from MCI to AD, which might serve as early indicators for the dysfunction and progression in the early stage of AD. PMID:26843991

  7. Modeling, control, and simulation of grid connected intelligent hybrid battery/photovoltaic system using new hybrid fuzzy-neural method.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Alireza; Khalili, Abbas; Mazareie, Alireza; Gandomkar, Majid

    2016-07-01

    Nowadays, photovoltaic (PV) generation is growing increasingly fast as a renewable energy source. Nevertheless, the drawback of the PV system is its dependence on weather conditions. Therefore, battery energy storage (BES) can be considered to assist for a stable and reliable output from PV generation system for loads and improve the dynamic performance of the whole generation system in grid connected mode. In this paper, a novel topology of intelligent hybrid generation systems with PV and BES in a DC-coupled structure is presented. Each photovoltaic cell has a specific point named maximum power point on its operational curve (i.e. current-voltage or power-voltage curve) in which it can generate maximum power. Irradiance and temperature changes affect these operational curves. Therefore, the nonlinear characteristic of maximum power point to environment has caused to development of different maximum power point tracking techniques. In order to capture the maximum power point (MPP), a hybrid fuzzy-neural maximum power point tracking (MPPT) method is applied in the PV system. Obtained results represent the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed method, and the average tracking efficiency of the hybrid fuzzy-neural is incremented by approximately two percentage points in comparison to the conventional methods. It has the advantages of robustness, fast response and good performance. A detailed mathematical model and a control approach of a three-phase grid-connected intelligent hybrid system have been proposed using Matlab/Simulink. PMID:26961319

  8. Modeling, control, and simulation of grid connected intelligent hybrid battery/photovoltaic system using new hybrid fuzzy-neural method.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Alireza; Khalili, Abbas; Mazareie, Alireza; Gandomkar, Majid

    2016-07-01

    Nowadays, photovoltaic (PV) generation is growing increasingly fast as a renewable energy source. Nevertheless, the drawback of the PV system is its dependence on weather conditions. Therefore, battery energy storage (BES) can be considered to assist for a stable and reliable output from PV generation system for loads and improve the dynamic performance of the whole generation system in grid connected mode. In this paper, a novel topology of intelligent hybrid generation systems with PV and BES in a DC-coupled structure is presented. Each photovoltaic cell has a specific point named maximum power point on its operational curve (i.e. current-voltage or power-voltage curve) in which it can generate maximum power. Irradiance and temperature changes affect these operational curves. Therefore, the nonlinear characteristic of maximum power point to environment has caused to development of different maximum power point tracking techniques. In order to capture the maximum power point (MPP), a hybrid fuzzy-neural maximum power point tracking (MPPT) method is applied in the PV system. Obtained results represent the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed method, and the average tracking efficiency of the hybrid fuzzy-neural is incremented by approximately two percentage points in comparison to the conventional methods. It has the advantages of robustness, fast response and good performance. A detailed mathematical model and a control approach of a three-phase grid-connected intelligent hybrid system have been proposed using Matlab/Simulink.

  9. Mode of Effective Connectivity within a Putative Neural Network Differentiates Moral Cognitions Related to Care and Justice Ethics

    PubMed Central

    Cáceda, Ricardo; James, G. Andrew; Ely, Timothy D.; Snarey, John; Kilts, Clinton D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Moral sensitivity refers to the interpretive awareness of moral conflict and can be justice or care oriented. Justice ethics is associated primarily with human rights and the application of moral rules, whereas care ethics is related to human needs and a situational approach involving social emotions. Among the core brain regions involved in moral issue processing are: medial prefrontal cortex, anterior (ACC) and posterior (PCC) cingulate cortex, posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), insula and amygdala. This study sought to inform the long standing debate of whether care and justice moral ethics represent one or two different forms of cognition. Methodology/Principal Findings Model-free and model-based connectivity analysis were used to identify functional neural networks underlying care and justice ethics for a moral sensitivity task. In addition to modest differences in patterns of associated neural activity, distinct modes of functional and effective connectivity were observed for moral sensitivity for care and justice issues that were modulated by individual variation in moral ability. Conclusions/Significance These results support a neurobiological differentiation between care and justice ethics and suggest that human moral behavior reflects the outcome of integrating opposing rule-based, self-other perspectives, and emotional responses. PMID:21364916

  10. Navigating toward a novel environment from a route or survey perspective: neural correlates and context-dependent connectivity.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Maddalena; Guariglia, C; Sabatini, U; Nemmi, F

    2016-05-01

    When we move toward a novel environment we may learn it in different ways, i.e., by walking around or studying a map. Both types of learning seem to be very effective in daily life navigation and correspond to two different types of mental representation of space: route and survey representation. In the present study, we investigated the neural basis of route and survey perspectives during learning and retrieval of novel environments. The study was carried out over 5 days, during which participants learned two paths from a different perspective (i.e., route learning and survey learning). Then participants had to retrieve these paths using a survey or route perspective during fMRI scans, on the first and fifth day. We found that the left inferior temporal lobe and right angular gyrus (AG) were activated more during recall of paths learned in a survey perspective than in a route perspective. We also found a session by perspective interaction effect on neural activity in brain areas classically involved in navigation such as the parahippocampal place area (PPA) and the retrosplenial cortex (RSC). A set of frontal, parietal and temporal areas showed different patterns of activity according to the type of retrieval perspective. We tested the context-dependent connectivity of right PPA, RSC and AG, finding that these areas showed different patterns of connectivity in relation to the learning and recalling perspective. Our results shed more light on the segregation of neural circuits involved in the acquisition of a novel environment and navigational strategies. PMID:25739692

  11. Intelligence and Neural Efficiency: Measures of Brain Activation versus Measures of Functional Connectivity in the Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neubauer, Aljoscha C.; Fink, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The neural efficiency hypothesis of intelligence suggests a more efficient use of the cortex (or even the brain) in brighter as compared to less intelligent individuals. This has been shown in a series of studies employing different neurophysiological measurement methods and a broad range of different cognitive task demands. However, most of the…

  12. Neural reuse leads to associative connections between concrete (physical) and abstract (social) concepts and motives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimeng; Bargh, John A

    2016-01-01

    Consistent with neural reuse theory, empirical tests of the related "scaffolding" principle of abstract concept development show that higher-level concepts "reuse" and are built upon fundamental motives such as survival, safety, and consumption. This produces mutual influence between the two levels, with far-ranging impacts from consumer behavior to political attitudes. PMID:27561234

  13. Global and regional functional connectivity maps of neural oscillations in focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Englot, Dario J; Hinkley, Leighton B; Kort, Naomi S; Imber, Brandon S; Mizuiri, Danielle; Honma, Susanne M; Findlay, Anne M; Garrett, Coleman; Cheung, Paige L; Mantle, Mary; Tarapore, Phiroz E; Knowlton, Robert C; Chang, Edward F; Kirsch, Heidi E; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2015-08-01

    Intractable focal epilepsy is a devastating disorder with profound effects on cognition and quality of life. Epilepsy surgery can lead to seizure freedom in patients with focal epilepsy; however, sometimes it fails due to an incomplete delineation of the epileptogenic zone. Brain networks in epilepsy can be studied with resting-state functional connectivity analysis, yet previous investigations using functional magnetic resonance imaging or electrocorticography have produced inconsistent results. Magnetoencephalography allows non-invasive whole-brain recordings, and can be used to study both long-range network disturbances in focal epilepsy and regional connectivity at the epileptogenic zone. In magnetoencephalography recordings from presurgical epilepsy patients, we examined: (i) global functional connectivity maps in patients versus controls; and (ii) regional functional connectivity maps at the region of resection, compared to the homotopic non-epileptogenic region in the contralateral hemisphere. Sixty-one patients were studied, including 30 with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and 31 with focal neocortical epilepsy. Compared with a group of 31 controls, patients with epilepsy had decreased resting-state functional connectivity in widespread regions, including perisylvian, posterior temporo-parietal, and orbitofrontal cortices (P < 0.01, t-test). Decreased mean global connectivity was related to longer duration of epilepsy and higher frequency of consciousness-impairing seizures (P < 0.01, linear regression). Furthermore, patients with increased regional connectivity within the resection site (n = 24) were more likely to achieve seizure postoperative seizure freedom (87.5% with Engel I outcome) than those with neutral (n = 15, 64.3% seizure free) or decreased (n = 23, 47.8% seizure free) regional connectivity (P < 0.02, chi-square). Widespread global decreases in functional connectivity are observed in patients with focal epilepsy, and may reflect deleterious

  14. Neural mechanism of activity spread in the cat motor cortex and its relation to the intrinsic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Capaday, Charles; van Vreeswijk, Carl; Ethier, Christian; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Weber, Doug

    2011-05-15

    Motor cortical points are linked by intrinsic horizontal connections having a recurrent network topology. However, it is not known whether neural activity can propagate over the area covered by these intrinsic connections and whether there are spatial anisotropies of synaptic strength, as opposed to synaptic density. Moreover, the mechanisms by which activity spreads have yet to be determined. To address these issues, an 8 × 8 microelectrode array was inserted in the forelimb area of the cat motor cortex (MCx). The centre of the array had a laser etched hole ∼500 μm in diameter. A microiontophoretic pipette, with a tip diameter of 2-3 μm, containing bicuculline methiodide (BIC) was inserted in the hole and driven to a depth of 1200-1400 μm from the cortical surface. BIC was ejected for ∼2min from the tip of the micropipette with positive direct current ranging between 20 and 40 nA in different experiments. This produced spontaneous nearly periodic bursts (0.2-1.0 Hz) of multi-unit activity in a radius of about 400 μm from the tip of the micropipette. The bursts of neural activity spread at a velocity of 0.11-0.24 ms⁻¹ (mean=0.14 mm ms⁻¹, SD=0.05)with decreasing amplitude.The area activated was on average 7.22 mm² (SD=0.91 mm²), or ∼92% of the area covered by the recording array. The mode of propagation was determined to occur by progressive recruitment of cortical territory, driven by a central locus of activity of some 400 μm in radius. Thus, activity did not propagate as a wave. Transection of the connections between the thalamus and MCx did not significantly alter the propagation velocity or the size of the recruited area, demonstrating that the bursts spread along the routes of intrinsic cortical connectivity. These experiments demonstrate that neural activity initiated within a small motor cortical locus (≤ 400 μm in radius) can recruit a relatively large neighbourhood in which a variety of muscles acting at several forelimb joints are

  15. Causal manipulation of functional connectivity in a specific neural pathway during behaviour and at rest

    PubMed Central

    Johnen, Vanessa M; Neubert, Franz-Xaver; Buch, Ethan R; Verhagen, Lennart; O'Reilly, Jill X; Mars, Rogier B; Rushworth, Matthew F S

    2015-01-01

    Correlations in brain activity between two areas (functional connectivity) have been shown to relate to their underlying structural connections. We examine the possibility that functional connectivity also reflects short-term changes in synaptic efficacy. We demonstrate that paired transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) near ventral premotor cortex (PMv) and primary motor cortex (M1) with a short 8-ms inter-pulse interval evoking synchronous pre- and post-synaptic activity and which strengthens interregional connectivity between the two areas in a pattern consistent with Hebbian plasticity, leads to increased functional connectivity between PMv and M1 as measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Moreover, we show that strengthening connectivity between these nodes has effects on a wider network of areas, such as decreasing coupling in a parallel motor programming stream. A control experiment revealed that identical TMS pulses at identical frequencies caused no change in fMRI-measured functional connectivity when the inter-pulse-interval was too long for Hebbian-like plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04585.001 PMID:25664941

  16. Changes in Neural Connectivity and Memory Following a Yoga Intervention for Older Adults: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, Harris A.; Acevedo, Bianca; Yang, Hongyu; Siddarth, Prabha; Van Dyk, Kathleen; Ercoli, Linda; Leaver, Amber M.; Cyr, Natalie St.; Narr, Katherine; Baune, Bernhard T.; Khalsa, Dharma S.; Lavretsky, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background: No study has explored the effect of yoga on cognitive decline and resting-state functional connectivity. Objectives: This study explored the relationship between performance on memory tests and resting-state functional connectivity before and after a yoga intervention versus active control for subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Methods: Participants ( ≥ 55 y) with MCI were randomized to receive a yoga intervention or active “gold-standard” control (i.e., memory enhancement training (MET)) for 12 weeks. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to map correlations between brain networks and memory performance changes over time. Default mode networks (DMN), language and superior parietal networks were chosen as networks of interest to analyze the association with changes in verbal and visuospatial memory performance. Results: Fourteen yoga and 11 MET participants completed the study. The yoga group demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in depression and visuospatial memory. We observed improved verbal memory performance correlated with increased connectivity between the DMN and frontal medial cortex, pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, right middle frontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and left lateral occipital cortex. Improved verbal memory performance positively correlated with increased connectivity between the language processing network and the left inferior frontal gyrus. Improved visuospatial memory performance correlated inversely with connectivity between the superior parietal network and the medial parietal cortex. Conclusion:Yoga may be as effective as MET in improving functional connectivity in relation to verbal memory performance. These findings should be confirmed in larger prospective studies. PMID:27060939

  17. Neural correlates of verbal creativity: differences in resting-state functional connectivity associated with expertise in creative writing.

    PubMed

    Lotze, Martin; Erhard, Katharina; Neumann, Nicola; Eickhoff, Simon B; Langner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Neural characteristics of verbal creativity as assessed by word generation tasks have been recently identified, but differences in resting-state functional connectivity (rFC) between experts and non-experts in creative writing have not been reported yet. Previous electroencephalography (EEG) coherence measures during rest demonstrated a decreased cooperation between brain areas in association with creative thinking ability. Here, we used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to compare 20 experts in creative writing and 23 age-matched non-experts with respect to rFC strengths within a brain network previously found to be associated with creative writing. Decreased rFC for experts was found between areas 44 of both hemispheres. Increased rFC for experts was observed between right hemispheric caudate and intraparietal sulcus. Correlation analysis of verbal creativity indices (VCIs) with rFC values in the expert group revealed predominantly negative associations, particularly of rFC between left area 44 and left temporal pole. Overall, our data support previous findings of reduced connectivity between interhemispheric areas and increased right-hemispheric connectivity during rest in highly verbally creative individuals. PMID:25076885

  18. Structural connectivity of neural reward networks in youth at risk for substance use disorders

    PubMed Central

    Squeglia, Lindsay M.; Sorg, Scott F.; Jacobus, Joanna; Brumback, Ty; Taylor, Charles T.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Having a positive family history of alcohol use disorders (FHP), as well as aberrant reward circuitry, has been implicated in the initiation of substance use during adolescence. This study explored the relationship between FHP status and reward circuitry in substance naïve youth to better understand future risky behaviors. Methods Participants were 49 FHP and 45 demographically matched family history negative (FHN) substance-naïve 12–14 year-olds (54 % female). Subjects underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging, including diffusion tensor imaging. Nucleus accumbens and orbitofrontal cortex volumes were derived using FreeSurfer, and FSL probabilistic tractography probed structural connectivity and differences in white matter diffusivity estimates (e.g. fractional anisotropy, and mean, radial, and axial diffusivity) between fiber tracts connecting these regions. Result FHP and FHN youth did not differ on nucleus accumbens or orbitofrontal cortex volumes, white matter tract volumes, or percentages of streamlines (a proxy for fiber tract count) connecting these regions. However, within white matter tracts connecting the nucleus accumbens to the orbitofrontal cortex, FHP youth had significantly lower mean and radial diffusivity (ps < 0.03) than FHN youth. Discussion While white matter macrostructure between salience and reward regions did not differ between FHP and FHN youth, FHP youth showed greater white matter coherence within these tracts than FHN youth. Aberrant connectivity between reward regions in FHP youth could be linked to an increased risk for substance use initiation. PMID:25563237

  19. Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grush, Mary, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Connectivity has dramatically changed the landscape of higher education IT. From "on-demand" services for net-gen students and advanced eLearning systems for faculty, to high-performance computing grid resources for researchers, IT now provides more networked services than ever to connect campus constituents to each other and to the world.…

  20. Neural Connectivity and Immunocytochemical Studies of Anatomical Sites Related to Nauseogenic and Emetic Reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The studies conducted in this research project examined several aspects of neuroanatomical structures and neurochemical processes related to motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate neurochemical changes in the central nervous system that are related to motion sickness with the objective of defining neural mechanisms important to this malady. For purposes of exposition, the studies and research finding have been classified into five categories. These are: immunoreactivity in the brainstem, vasopressin effects, lesion studies of area postrema, role of the vagus nerve, and central nervous system structure related to adaptation to microgravity.

  1. Real Time Selective Harmonic Minimization for Multilevel Inverters Connected to Solar Panels Using Artificial Neural Network Angle Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, Leon M; Ozpineci, Burak; Filho, Faete; Cao, Yue

    2011-01-01

    This work approximates the selective harmonic elimination problem using artificial neural networks (ANNs) to generate the switching angles in an 11-level full-bridge cascade inverter powered by five varying dc input sources. Each of the five full bridges of the cascade inverter was connected to a separate 195-W solar panel. The angles were chosen such that the fundamental was kept constant and the low-order harmonics were minimized or eliminated. A nondeterministic method is used to solve the system for the angles and to obtain the data set for the ANN training. The method also provides a set of acceptable solutions in the space where solutions do not exist by analytical methods. The trained ANN is a suitable tool that brings a small generalization effect on the angles' precision and is able to perform in real time (50-/60-Hz time window).

  2. Theory of Mind and the Whole Brain Functional Connectivity: Behavioral and Neural Evidences with the Amsterdam Resting State Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Antonella; Baglio, Francesca; Costantini, Isa; Dipasquale, Ottavia; Savazzi, Federica; Nemni, Raffaello; Sangiuliano Intra, Francesca; Tagliabue, Semira; Valle, Annalisa; Massaro, Davide; Castelli, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    A topic of common interest to psychologists and philosophers is the spontaneous flow of thoughts when the individual is awake but not involved in cognitive demands. This argument, classically referred to as the "stream of consciousness" of James, is now known in the psychological literature as "Mind-Wandering." Although of great interest, this construct has been scarcely investigated so far. Diaz et al. (2013) created the Amsterdam Resting State Questionnaire (ARSQ), composed of 27 items, distributed in seven factors: discontinuity of mind, theory of mind (ToM), self, planning, sleepiness, comfort, and somatic awareness. The present study aims at: testing psychometric properties of the ARSQ in a sample of 670 Italian subjects; exploring the neural correlates of a subsample of participants (N = 28) divided into two groups on the basis of the scores obtained in the ToM factor. Results show a satisfactory reliability of the original factional structure in the Italian sample. In the subjects with a high mean in the ToM factor compared to low mean subjects, functional MRI revealed: a network (48 nodes) with higher functional connectivity (FC) with a dominance of the left hemisphere; an increased within-lobe FC in frontal and insular lobes. In both neural and behavioral terms, our results support the idea that the mind, which does not rest even when explicitly asked to do so, has various and interesting mentalistic-like contents.

  3. Theory of Mind and the Whole Brain Functional Connectivity: Behavioral and Neural Evidences with the Amsterdam Resting State Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Antonella; Baglio, Francesca; Costantini, Isa; Dipasquale, Ottavia; Savazzi, Federica; Nemni, Raffaello; Sangiuliano Intra, Francesca; Tagliabue, Semira; Valle, Annalisa; Massaro, Davide; Castelli, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    A topic of common interest to psychologists and philosophers is the spontaneous flow of thoughts when the individual is awake but not involved in cognitive demands. This argument, classically referred to as the “stream of consciousness” of James, is now known in the psychological literature as “Mind-Wandering.” Although of great interest, this construct has been scarcely investigated so far. Diaz et al. (2013) created the Amsterdam Resting State Questionnaire (ARSQ), composed of 27 items, distributed in seven factors: discontinuity of mind, theory of mind (ToM), self, planning, sleepiness, comfort, and somatic awareness. The present study aims at: testing psychometric properties of the ARSQ in a sample of 670 Italian subjects; exploring the neural correlates of a subsample of participants (N = 28) divided into two groups on the basis of the scores obtained in the ToM factor. Results show a satisfactory reliability of the original factional structure in the Italian sample. In the subjects with a high mean in the ToM factor compared to low mean subjects, functional MRI revealed: a network (48 nodes) with higher functional connectivity (FC) with a dominance of the left hemisphere; an increased within-lobe FC in frontal and insular lobes. In both neural and behavioral terms, our results support the idea that the mind, which does not rest even when explicitly asked to do so, has various and interesting mentalistic-like contents. PMID:26696924

  4. Neural Connectivity Patterns Underlying Symbolic Number Processing Indicate Mathematical Achievement in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Joonkoo; Li, Rosa; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    In early childhood, humans learn culturally specific symbols for number that allow them entry into the world of complex numerical thinking. Yet little is known about how the brain supports the development of the uniquely human symbolic number system. Here, we use functional magnetic resonance imaging along with an effective connectivity analysis…

  5. The association between the 5-HTTLPR and neural correlates of fear conditioning and connectivity.

    PubMed

    Klucken, Tim; Schweckendiek, Jan; Blecker, Carlo; Walter, Bertram; Kuepper, Yvonne; Hennig, Juergen; Stark, Rudolf

    2015-05-01

    Strong evidence links the 5-HTTLPR genotype to the modulation of amygdala reactivity during fear conditioning, which is considered to convey the increased vulnerability for anxiety disorders in s-allele carriers. In addition to amygdala reactivity, the 5-HTTLPR has been shown to be related to alterations in structural and effective connectivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 5-HTTLPR genotype on amygdala reactivity and effective connectivity during fear conditioning, as well as structural connectivity [as measured by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)]. To integrate different classification strategies, we used the bi-allelic (s-allele vs l/l-allele group) as well as the tri-allelic (low-functioning vs high-functioning) classification approach. S-allele carriers showed exaggerated amygdala reactivity and elevated amygdala-insula coupling during fear conditioning (CS + > CS-) compared with the l/l-allele group. In addition, DTI analysis showed increased fractional anisotropy values in s-allele carriers within the uncinate fasciculus. Using the tri-allelic classification approach, increased amygdala reactivity and amygdala insula coupling were observed in the low-functioning compared with the high-functioning group. No significant differences between the two groups were found in structural connectivity. The present results add to the current debate on the influence of the 5-HTTLPR on brain functioning. These differences between s-allele and l/l-allele carriers may contribute to altered vulnerability for psychiatric disorders.

  6. Artificial neural networks for control of a grid-connected rectifier/inverter under disturbance, dynamic and power converter switching conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuhui; Fairbank, Michael; Johnson, Cameron; Wunsch, Donald C; Alonso, Eduardo; Proaño, Julio L

    2014-04-01

    Three-phase grid-connected converters are widely used in renewable and electric power system applications. Traditionally, grid-connected converters are controlled with standard decoupled d-q vector control mechanisms. However, recent studies indicate that such mechanisms show limitations in their applicability to dynamic systems. This paper investigates how to mitigate such restrictions using a neural network to control a grid-connected rectifier/inverter. The neural network implements a dynamic programming algorithm and is trained by using back-propagation through time. To enhance performance and stability under disturbance, additional strategies are adopted, including the use of integrals of error signals to the network inputs and the introduction of grid disturbance voltage to the outputs of a well-trained network. The performance of the neural-network controller is studied under typical vector control conditions and compared against conventional vector control methods, which demonstrates that the neural vector control strategy proposed in this paper is effective. Even in dynamic and power converter switching environments, the neural vector controller shows strong ability to trace rapidly changing reference commands, tolerate system disturbances, and satisfy control requirements for a faulted power system.

  7. Neural Abnormalities in Nonallergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Jonathan A; Singh, Umesh

    2015-04-01

    Sensory nerve endings within the airway epithelial cells and the solitary chemoreceptor cells, synapsing with sensory nerves, respond to airborne irritants. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels (A1 and V1 subtypes, specifically) on these nerve endings initiate local antidromic reflexes resulting in the release of neuropeptides such as substance P and calcitonin G-related peptides. These neuropeptides dilate epithelial submucosal blood vessels and may therefore increase transudation across these vessels resulting in submucosal edema, congestion, and rhinitis. Altered expression or activity of these TRP channels can therefore influence responsiveness to irritants. Besides these pathogenic mechanisms, additional mechanisms such as dysautonomia resulting in diminished sympathetic activity and comparative parasympathetic overactivity have also been suggested as a probable mechanism. Therapeutic effectiveness for this condition has been demonstrated through desensitization of TRPV1 channels with typical agonists such as capsaicin. Other agents effective in treating nonallergic rhinitis (NAR) such as azelastine have been demonstrated to exhibit TRPV1 channel activity through the modulation of Ca(2+) signaling on sensory neurons and in nasal epithelial cells. Roles of antimuscarinic agents such as tiotropium in NAR have been suggested by associations of muscarinic cholinergic receptors with TRPV1. The associations between these channels have also been suggested as mechanisms of airway hyperreactivity in asthma. The concept of the united airway disease hypothesis suggests a significant association between rhinitis and asthma. This concept is supported by the development of late-onset asthma in about 10-40 % of NAR patients who also exhibit a greater severity in their asthma. The factors and mechanisms associating NAR with nonallergic asthma are currently unknown. Nonetheless, free immunoglobulin light chains and microRNA alteration as mediators of these inflammatory conditions may play key roles in this association. PMID:26130469

  8. Connectivity, Pharmacology, and Computation: Toward a Mechanistic Understanding of Neural System Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Anticevic, Alan; Cole, Michael W.; Repovs, Grega; Savic, Aleksandar; Driesen, Naomi R.; Yang, Genevieve; Cho, Youngsun T.; Murray, John D.; Glahn, David C.; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Krystal, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and bipolar illness alter the structure and function of distributed neural networks. Functional neuroimaging tools have evolved sufficiently to reliably detect system-level disturbances in neural networks. This review focuses on recent findings in schizophrenia and bipolar illness using resting-state neuroimaging, an advantageous approach for biomarker development given its ease of data collection and lack of task-based confounds. These benefits notwithstanding, neuroimaging does not yet allow the evaluation of individual neurons within local circuits, where pharmacological treatments ultimately exert their effects. This limitation constitutes an important obstacle in translating findings from animal research to humans and from healthy humans to patient populations. Integrating new neuroscientific tools may help to bridge some of these gaps. We specifically discuss two complementary approaches. The first is pharmacological manipulations in healthy volunteers, which transiently mimic some cardinal features of psychiatric conditions. We specifically focus on recent neuroimaging studies using the NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine, to probe glutamate synaptic dysfunction associated with schizophrenia. Second, we discuss the combination of human pharmacological imaging with biophysically informed computational models developed to guide the interpretation of functional imaging studies and to inform the development of pathophysiologic hypotheses. To illustrate this approach, we review clinical investigations in addition to recent findings of how computational modeling has guided inferences drawn from our studies involving ketamine administration to healthy subjects. Thus, this review asserts that linking experimental studies in humans with computational models will advance to effort to bridge cellular, systems, and clinical neuroscience approaches to psychiatric disorders. PMID:24399974

  9. Building Neural Networks Within the Academy: Connecting Neuroscience to Other Disciplines

    PubMed Central

    Wichlinski, Lawrence J.

    2009-01-01

    Never before in human history has there been a more exciting time to be studying neuroscience. By extension, the opportunities have never been greater to examine how contemporary findings in neuroscience might relate to other areas of human inquiry. Over the last two decades I have participated in a number of formal and informal attempts to connect neuroscience and psychology to other academic disciplines in the context of interdisciplinary courses. Herein lies a brief overview of my experiences with these undertakings. PMID:23493585

  10. Central Thalamic Deep-Brain Stimulation Alters Striatal-Thalamic Connectivity in Cognitive Neural Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui-Ching; Pan, Han-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Huang; Lo, Yu-Chun; Shen, Elise Ting-Hsin; Liao, Lun-De; Liao, Pei-Han; Chien, Yi-Wei; Liao, Kuei-Da; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chu, Kai-Wen; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Central thalamic deep brain stimulation (CT-DBS) has been proposed as an experimental therapeutic approach to produce consistent sustained regulation of forebrain arousal for several neurological diseases. We investigated local field potentials (LFPs) induced by CT-DBS from the thalamic central lateral nuclei (CL) and the striatum as potential biomarkers for the enhancement of lever-pressing skill learning. LFPs were simultaneously recorded from multiple sites in the CL, ventral striatum (Vstr), and dorsal striatum (Dstr). LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed and compared between the CT-DBS and sham control groups. The theta and alpha LFP oscillations were significantly increased in the CL and striatum in the CT-DBS group. Furthermore, interhemispheric coherences between bilateral CL and striatum were increased in the theta band. Additionally, enhancement of c-Fos activity, dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2), and α4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4-nAChR) occurred after CT-DBS treatment in the striatum and hippocampus. CT-DBS strengthened thalamic-striatal functional connectivity, which demonstrates that the inter-regional connectivity enhancement might contribute to synaptic plasticity in the striatum. Altered dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors resulted in modulation of striatal synaptic plasticity's ability to regulate downstream signaling cascades for higher brain functions of lever-pressing skill learning. PMID:26793069

  11. Central Thalamic Deep-Brain Stimulation Alters Striatal-Thalamic Connectivity in Cognitive Neural Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ching; Pan, Han-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Huang; Lo, Yu-Chun; Shen, Elise Ting-Hsin; Liao, Lun-De; Liao, Pei-Han; Chien, Yi-Wei; Liao, Kuei-Da; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chu, Kai-Wen; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Central thalamic deep brain stimulation (CT-DBS) has been proposed as an experimental therapeutic approach to produce consistent sustained regulation of forebrain arousal for several neurological diseases. We investigated local field potentials (LFPs) induced by CT-DBS from the thalamic central lateral nuclei (CL) and the striatum as potential biomarkers for the enhancement of lever-pressing skill learning. LFPs were simultaneously recorded from multiple sites in the CL, ventral striatum (Vstr), and dorsal striatum (Dstr). LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed and compared between the CT-DBS and sham control groups. The theta and alpha LFP oscillations were significantly increased in the CL and striatum in the CT-DBS group. Furthermore, interhemispheric coherences between bilateral CL and striatum were increased in the theta band. Additionally, enhancement of c-Fos activity, dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2), and α4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4-nAChR) occurred after CT-DBS treatment in the striatum and hippocampus. CT-DBS strengthened thalamic-striatal functional connectivity, which demonstrates that the inter-regional connectivity enhancement might contribute to synaptic plasticity in the striatum. Altered dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors resulted in modulation of striatal synaptic plasticity's ability to regulate downstream signaling cascades for higher brain functions of lever-pressing skill learning. PMID:26793069

  12. Optimized neural coding? Control mechanisms in large cortical networks implemented by connectivity changes

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Katy A.; Iacoboni, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that a distributed fronto-parietal visuomotor integration network is recruited to overcome automatic responses to both biological and non-biological cues. Activity levels in these areas are similar for both cue types. The functional connectivity of this network, however, reveals differential coupling with thalamus and precuneus (biological cues) and extrastriate cortex (non biological cues). This suggests that a set of cortical areas equally activated in two tasks may accomplish task goals differently depending on their network interactions. This supports models of brain organization that emphasize efficient coding through changing patterns of integration between regions of specialized function. PMID:21976418

  13. Cadherin-Based Transsynaptic Networks in Establishing and Modifying Neural Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Lauren G.; Benson, Deanna L.; Huntley, George W.

    2015-01-01

    It is tacitly understood that cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are critically important for the development of cells, circuits, and synapses in the brain. What is less clear is what CAMs continue to contribute to brain structure and function after the early period of development. Here, we focus on the cadherin family of CAMs to first briefly recap their multidimensional roles in neural development and then to highlight emerging data showing that with maturity, cadherins become largely dispensible for maintaining neuronal and synaptic structure, instead displaying new and narrower roles at mature synapses where they critically regulate dynamic aspects of synaptic signaling, structural plasticity, and cognitive function. At mature synapses, cadherins are an integral component of multiprotein networks, modifying synaptic signaling, morphology, and plasticity through collaborative interactions with other CAM family members as well as a variety of neurotransmitter receptors, scaffolding proteins, and other effector molecules. Such recognition of the ever-evolving functions of synaptic cadherins may yield insight into the pathophysiology of brain disorders in which cadherins have been implicated and that manifest at different times of life. PMID:25733148

  14. Happier People Show Greater Neural Connectivity during Negative Self-Referential Processing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Joo; Kyeong, Sunghyon; Cho, Sang Woo; Chun, Ji-Won; Park, Hae-Jeong; Kim, Jihye; Kim, Joohan; Dolan, Raymond J; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Life satisfaction is an essential component of subjective well-being and provides a fundamental resource for optimal everyday functioning. The goal of the present study was to examine how life satisfaction influences self-referential processing of emotionally valenced stimuli. Nineteen individuals with high life satisfaction (HLS) and 21 individuals with low life satisfaction (LLS) were scanned using functional MRI while performing a face-word relevance rating task, which consisted of 3 types of face stimuli (self, public other, and unfamiliar other) and 3 types of word stimuli (positive, negative, and neutral). We found a significant group x word valence interaction effect, most strikingly in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex. In the positive word condition dorsal medial prefrontal cortex activity was significantly higher in the LLS group, whereas in the negative word condition it was significantly higher in the HLS group. The two groups showed distinct functional connectivity of the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex with emotional processing-related regions. The findings suggest that, in response to emotional stimuli, individuals with HLS may successfully recruit emotion regulation-related regions in contrast to individuals with LLS. The difference in functional connectivity during self-referential processing may lead to an influence of life satisfaction on responses to emotion-eliciting stimuli.

  15. Protocadherin-dependent dendritic self-avoidance regulates neural connectivity and circuit function

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinov, Dimitar; Sanes, Joshua R

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic and axonal arbors of many neuronal types exhibit self-avoidance, in which branches repel each other. In some cases, these neurites interact with those of neighboring neurons, a phenomenon called self/non-self discrimination. The functional roles of these processes remain unknown. In this study, we used retinal starburst amacrine cells (SACs), critical components of a direction-selective circuit, to address this issue. In SACs, both processes are mediated by the gamma-protocadherins (Pcdhgs), a family of 22 recognition molecules. We manipulated Pcdhg expression in SACs and recorded from them and their targets, direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs). SACs form autapses when self-avoidance is disrupted and fail to form connections with other SACs when self/non-self discrimination is perturbed. Pcdhgs are also required to prune connections between closely spaced SACs. These alterations degrade the direction selectivity of DSGCs. Thus, self-avoidance, self/non-self discrimination, and synapse elimination are essential for proper function of a circuit that computes directional motion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08964.001 PMID:26140686

  16. Happier People Show Greater Neural Connectivity during Negative Self-Referential Processing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Joo; Kyeong, Sunghyon; Cho, Sang Woo; Chun, Ji-Won; Park, Hae-Jeong; Kim, Jihye; Kim, Joohan; Dolan, Raymond J.; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Life satisfaction is an essential component of subjective well-being and provides a fundamental resource for optimal everyday functioning. The goal of the present study was to examine how life satisfaction influences self-referential processing of emotionally valenced stimuli. Nineteen individuals with high life satisfaction (HLS) and 21 individuals with low life satisfaction (LLS) were scanned using functional MRI while performing a face-word relevance rating task, which consisted of 3 types of face stimuli (self, public other, and unfamiliar other) and 3 types of word stimuli (positive, negative, and neutral). We found a significant group x word valence interaction effect, most strikingly in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex. In the positive word condition dorsal medial prefrontal cortex activity was significantly higher in the LLS group, whereas in the negative word condition it was significantly higher in the HLS group. The two groups showed distinct functional connectivity of the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex with emotional processing-related regions. The findings suggest that, in response to emotional stimuli, individuals with HLS may successfully recruit emotion regulation-related regions in contrast to individuals with LLS. The difference in functional connectivity during self-referential processing may lead to an influence of life satisfaction on responses to emotion-eliciting stimuli. PMID:26900857

  17. Associations of Postural Knowledge and Basic Motor Skill with Dyspraxia in Autism: Implication for Abnormalities in Distributed Connectivity and Motor Learning

    PubMed Central

    Dowell, Lauren R.; Mahone, E. Mark; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2009-01-01

    Children with autism often have difficulty performing skilled movements. Praxis performance requires basic motor skill, knowledge of representations of the movement (mediated by parietal regions), and transcoding of these representations into movement plans (mediated by premotor circuits). The goals of this study were: (a) to determine whether dyspraxia in autism is associated with impaired representational (“postural”) knowledge, and (b) to examine the contributions of postural knowledge and basic motor skill to dyspraxia in autism. Thirty-seven children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 50 typically developing (TD) children, ages 8–13, completed: (a) an examination of basic motor skills, (b) a postural knowledge test assessing praxis discrimination, and (c) a praxis examination. Children with ASD showed worse basic motor skill and postural knowledge than controls. The ASD group continued to show significantly poorer praxis than controls after accounting for age, IQ, basic motor skill, and postural knowledge. Dyspraxia in autism appears to be associated with impaired formation of spatial representations, as well as transcoding and execution. Distributed abnormality across parietal, premotor, and motor circuitry, as well as anomalous connectivity may be implicated. PMID:19702410

  18. Growth-related neural reorganization and the autism phenotype: a test of the hypothesis that altered brain growth leads to altered connectivity.

    PubMed

    Lewis, John D; Elman, Jeffrey L

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical considerations, and findings from computational modeling, comparative neuroanatomy and developmental neuroscience, motivate the hypothesis that a deviant brain growth trajectory will lead to deviant patterns of change in cortico-cortical connectivity. Differences in brain size during development will alter the relative cost and effectiveness of short- and long-distance connections, and should thus impact the growth and retention of connections. Reduced brain size should favor long-distance connectivity; brain overgrowth should favor short-distance connectivity; and inconsistent deviations from the normal growth trajectory - as occurs in autism - should result in potentially disruptive changes to established patterns of functional and physical connectivity during development. To explore this hypothesis, neural networks which modeled inter-hemispheric interaction were grown at the rate of either typically developing children or children with autism. The influence of the length of the inter-hemispheric connections was analyzed at multiple developmental time-points. The networks that modeled autistic growth were less affected by removal of the inter-hemispheric connections than those that modeled normal growth - indicating a reduced reliance on long-distance connections - for short response times, and this difference increased substantially at approximately 24 simulated months of age. The performance of the networks showed a corresponding decline during development. And direct analysis of the connection weights showed a parallel reduction in connectivity. These modeling results support the hypothesis that the deviant growth trajectory in autism spectrum disorders may lead to a disruption of established patterns of functional connectivity during development, with potentially negative behavioral consequences, and a subsequent reduction in physical connectivity. The results are discussed in relation to the growing body of evidence of reduced functional and

  19. Preterm Birth Results in Alterations in Neural Connectivity at Age 16 Years

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Katherine M.; Vohr, Betty R.; Katz, Karol H.; Schneider, Karen C.; Lacadie, Cheryl; Hampson, Michelle; Makuch, Robert W.; Reiss, Allan R.; Constable, R. Todd; Ment, Laura R.

    2010-01-01

    maturation or the engagement of alternative neural pathways for language in the developing PT brain. PMID:21073965

  20. Training Recurrent Neural Networks With the Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm for Optimal Control of a Grid-Connected Converter.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xingang; Li, Shuhui; Fairbank, Michael; Wunsch, Donald C; Alonso, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates how to train a recurrent neural network (RNN) using the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm as well as how to implement optimal control of a grid-connected converter (GCC) using an RNN. To successfully and efficiently train an RNN using the LM algorithm, a new forward accumulation through time (FATT) algorithm is proposed to calculate the Jacobian matrix required by the LM algorithm. This paper explores how to incorporate FATT into the LM algorithm. The results show that the combination of the LM and FATT algorithms trains RNNs better than the conventional backpropagation through time algorithm. This paper presents an analytical study on the optimal control of GCCs, including theoretically ideal optimal and suboptimal controllers. To overcome the inapplicability of the optimal GCC controller under practical conditions, a new RNN controller with an improved input structure is proposed to approximate the ideal optimal controller. The performance of an ideal optimal controller and a well-trained RNN controller was compared in close to real-life power converter switching environments, demonstrating that the proposed RNN controller can achieve close to ideal optimal control performance even under low sampling rate conditions. The excellent performance of the proposed RNN controller under challenging and distorted system conditions further indicates the feasibility of using an RNN to approximate optimal control in practical applications.

  1. Effect of intermodular connection on fast sparse synchronization in clustered small-world neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Lim, Woochang

    2015-01-01

    We consider a clustered network with small-world subnetworks of inhibitory fast spiking interneurons and investigate the effect of intermodular connection on the emergence of fast sparsely synchronized rhythms by varying both the intermodular coupling strength J(inter) and the average number of intermodular links per interneuron M(syn)(inter). In contrast to the case of nonclustered networks, two kinds of sparsely synchronized states such as modular and global synchronization are found. For the case of modular sparse synchronization, the population behavior reveals the modular structure, because the intramodular dynamics of subnetworks make some mismatching. On the other hand, in the case of global sparse synchronization, the population behavior is globally identical, independently of the cluster structure, because the intramodular dynamics of subnetworks make perfect matching. We introduce a realistic cross-correlation modularity measure, representing the matching degree between the instantaneous subpopulation spike rates of the subnetworks, and examine whether the sparse synchronization is global or modular. Depending on its magnitude, the intermodular coupling strength J(inter) seems to play "dual" roles for the pacing between spikes in each subnetwork. For large J(inter), due to strong inhibition it plays a destructive role to "spoil" the pacing between spikes, while for small J(inter) it plays a constructive role to "favor" the pacing between spikes. Through competition between the constructive and the destructive roles of J(inter), there exists an intermediate optimal J(inter) at which the pacing degree between spikes becomes maximal. In contrast, the average number of intermodular links per interneuron M(syn)(inter) seems to play a role just to favor the pacing between spikes. With increasing M(syn)(inter), the pacing degree between spikes increases monotonically thanks to the increase in the degree of effectiveness of global communication between spikes

  2. Effect of intermodular connection on fast sparse synchronization in clustered small-world neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Lim, Woochang

    2015-11-01

    We consider a clustered network with small-world subnetworks of inhibitory fast spiking interneurons and investigate the effect of intermodular connection on the emergence of fast sparsely synchronized rhythms by varying both the intermodular coupling strength Jinter and the average number of intermodular links per interneuron Msyn(inter ). In contrast to the case of nonclustered networks, two kinds of sparsely synchronized states such as modular and global synchronization are found. For the case of modular sparse synchronization, the population behavior reveals the modular structure, because the intramodular dynamics of subnetworks make some mismatching. On the other hand, in the case of global sparse synchronization, the population behavior is globally identical, independently of the cluster structure, because the intramodular dynamics of subnetworks make perfect matching. We introduce a realistic cross-correlation modularity measure, representing the matching degree between the instantaneous subpopulation spike rates of the subnetworks, and examine whether the sparse synchronization is global or modular. Depending on its magnitude, the intermodular coupling strength Jinter seems to play "dual" roles for the pacing between spikes in each subnetwork. For large Jinter, due to strong inhibition it plays a destructive role to "spoil" the pacing between spikes, while for small Jinter it plays a constructive role to "favor" the pacing between spikes. Through competition between the constructive and the destructive roles of Jinter, there exists an intermediate optimal Jinter at which the pacing degree between spikes becomes maximal. In contrast, the average number of intermodular links per interneuron Msyn(inter ) seems to play a role just to favor the pacing between spikes. With increasing Msyn(inter ), the pacing degree between spikes increases monotonically thanks to the increase in the degree of effectiveness of global communication between spikes. Furthermore, we

  3. Effect of intermodular connection on fast sparse synchronization in clustered small-world neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Lim, Woochang

    2015-01-01

    We consider a clustered network with small-world subnetworks of inhibitory fast spiking interneurons and investigate the effect of intermodular connection on the emergence of fast sparsely synchronized rhythms by varying both the intermodular coupling strength J(inter) and the average number of intermodular links per interneuron M(syn)(inter). In contrast to the case of nonclustered networks, two kinds of sparsely synchronized states such as modular and global synchronization are found. For the case of modular sparse synchronization, the population behavior reveals the modular structure, because the intramodular dynamics of subnetworks make some mismatching. On the other hand, in the case of global sparse synchronization, the population behavior is globally identical, independently of the cluster structure, because the intramodular dynamics of subnetworks make perfect matching. We introduce a realistic cross-correlation modularity measure, representing the matching degree between the instantaneous subpopulation spike rates of the subnetworks, and examine whether the sparse synchronization is global or modular. Depending on its magnitude, the intermodular coupling strength J(inter) seems to play "dual" roles for the pacing between spikes in each subnetwork. For large J(inter), due to strong inhibition it plays a destructive role to "spoil" the pacing between spikes, while for small J(inter) it plays a constructive role to "favor" the pacing between spikes. Through competition between the constructive and the destructive roles of J(inter), there exists an intermediate optimal J(inter) at which the pacing degree between spikes becomes maximal. In contrast, the average number of intermodular links per interneuron M(syn)(inter) seems to play a role just to favor the pacing between spikes. With increasing M(syn)(inter), the pacing degree between spikes increases monotonically thanks to the increase in the degree of effectiveness of global communication between spikes

  4. Self-consistent determination of the spike-train power spectrum in a neural network with sparse connectivity.

    PubMed

    Dummer, Benjamin; Wieland, Stefan; Lindner, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    A major source of random variability in cortical networks is the quasi-random arrival of presynaptic action potentials from many other cells. In network studies as well as in the study of the response properties of single cells embedded in a network, synaptic background input is often approximated by Poissonian spike trains. However, the output statistics of the cells is in most cases far from being Poisson. This is inconsistent with the assumption of similar spike-train statistics for pre- and postsynaptic cells in a recurrent network. Here we tackle this problem for the popular class of integrate-and-fire neurons and study a self-consistent statistics of input and output spectra of neural spike trains. Instead of actually using a large network, we use an iterative scheme, in which we simulate a single neuron over several generations. In each of these generations, the neuron is stimulated with surrogate stochastic input that has a similar statistics as the output of the previous generation. For the surrogate input, we employ two distinct approximations: (i) a superposition of renewal spike trains with the same interspike interval density as observed in the previous generation and (ii) a Gaussian current with a power spectrum proportional to that observed in the previous generation. For input parameters that correspond to balanced input in the network, both the renewal and the Gaussian iteration procedure converge quickly and yield comparable results for the self-consistent spike-train power spectrum. We compare our results to large-scale simulations of a random sparsely connected network of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons (Brunel, 2000) and show that in the asynchronous regime close to a state of balanced synaptic input from the network, our iterative schemes provide an excellent approximations to the autocorrelation of spike trains in the recurrent network.

  5. Self-consistent determination of the spike-train power spectrum in a neural network with sparse connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Dummer, Benjamin; Wieland, Stefan; Lindner, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    A major source of random variability in cortical networks is the quasi-random arrival of presynaptic action potentials from many other cells. In network studies as well as in the study of the response properties of single cells embedded in a network, synaptic background input is often approximated by Poissonian spike trains. However, the output statistics of the cells is in most cases far from being Poisson. This is inconsistent with the assumption of similar spike-train statistics for pre- and postsynaptic cells in a recurrent network. Here we tackle this problem for the popular class of integrate-and-fire neurons and study a self-consistent statistics of input and output spectra of neural spike trains. Instead of actually using a large network, we use an iterative scheme, in which we simulate a single neuron over several generations. In each of these generations, the neuron is stimulated with surrogate stochastic input that has a similar statistics as the output of the previous generation. For the surrogate input, we employ two distinct approximations: (i) a superposition of renewal spike trains with the same interspike interval density as observed in the previous generation and (ii) a Gaussian current with a power spectrum proportional to that observed in the previous generation. For input parameters that correspond to balanced input in the network, both the renewal and the Gaussian iteration procedure converge quickly and yield comparable results for the self-consistent spike-train power spectrum. We compare our results to large-scale simulations of a random sparsely connected network of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons (Brunel, 2000) and show that in the asynchronous regime close to a state of balanced synaptic input from the network, our iterative schemes provide an excellent approximations to the autocorrelation of spike trains in the recurrent network. PMID:25278869

  6. Nested Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baram, Yoram

    1992-01-01

    Report presents analysis of nested neural networks, consisting of interconnected subnetworks. Analysis based on simplified mathematical models more appropriate for artificial electronic neural networks, partly applicable to biological neural networks. Nested structure allows for retrieval of individual subpatterns. Requires fewer wires and connection devices than fully connected networks, and allows for local reconstruction of damaged subnetworks without rewiring entire network.

  7. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  9. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  10. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  11. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... Just like the skin, the fingernails tell a lot about your health: ... the fingernail. These lines can occur after illness, injury to ...

  12. Data-driven inference of network connectivity for modeling the dynamics of neural codes in the insect antennal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Shlizerman, Eli; Riffell, Jeffrey A.; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The antennal lobe (AL), olfactory processing center in insects, is able to process stimuli into distinct neural activity patterns, called olfactory neural codes. To model their dynamics we perform multichannel recordings from the projection neurons in the AL driven by different odorants. We then derive a dynamic neuronal network from the electrophysiological data. The network consists of lateral-inhibitory neurons and excitatory neurons (modeled as firing-rate units), and is capable of producing unique olfactory neural codes for the tested odorants. To construct the network, we (1) design a projection, an odor space, for the neural recording from the AL, which discriminates between distinct odorants trajectories (2) characterize scent recognition, i.e., decision-making based on olfactory signals and (3) infer the wiring of the neural circuit, the connectome of the AL. We show that the constructed model is consistent with biological observations, such as contrast enhancement and robustness to noise. The study suggests a data-driven approach to answer a key biological question in identifying how lateral inhibitory neurons can be wired to excitatory neurons to permit robust activity patterns. PMID:25165442

  13. A Realistic Neural Mass Model of the Cortex with Laminar-Specific Connections and Synaptic Plasticity – Evaluation with Auditory Habituation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Knösche, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we propose a biologically realistic local cortical circuit model (LCCM), based on neural masses, that incorporates important aspects of the functional organization of the brain that have not been covered by previous models: (1) activity dependent plasticity of excitatory synaptic couplings via depleting and recycling of neurotransmitters and (2) realistic inter-laminar dynamics via laminar-specific distribution of and connections between neural populations. The potential of the LCCM was demonstrated by accounting for the process of auditory habituation. The model parameters were specified using Bayesian inference. It was found that: (1) besides the major serial excitatory information pathway (layer 4 to layer 2/3 to layer 5/6), there exists a parallel “short-cut” pathway (layer 4 to layer 5/6), (2) the excitatory signal flow from the pyramidal cells to the inhibitory interneurons seems to be more intra-laminar while, in contrast, the inhibitory signal flow from inhibitory interneurons to the pyramidal cells seems to be both intra- and inter-laminar, and (3) the habituation rates of the connections are unsymmetrical: forward connections (from layer 4 to layer 2/3) are more strongly habituated than backward connections (from Layer 5/6 to layer 4). Our evaluation demonstrates that the novel features of the LCCM are of crucial importance for mechanistic explanations of brain function. The incorporation of these features into a mass model makes them applicable to modeling based on macroscopic data (like EEG or MEG), which are usually available in human experiments. Our LCCM is therefore a valuable building block for future realistic models of human cognitive function. PMID:24205009

  14. The neural basis of trait self-esteem revealed by the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and resting state functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weigang; Liu, Congcong; Yang, Qian; Gu, Yan; Yin, Shouhang; Chen, Antao

    2016-03-01

    Self-esteem is an affective, self-evaluation of oneself and has a significant effect on mental and behavioral health. Although research has focused on the neural substrates of self-esteem, little is known about the spontaneous brain activity that is associated with trait self-esteem (TSE) during the resting state. In this study, we used the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal of the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFFs) and resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) to identify TSE-related regions and networks. We found that a higher level of TSE was associated with higher ALFFs in the left ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and lower ALFFs in the left cuneus/lingual gyrus and right lingual gyrus. RSFC analyses revealed that the strengths of functional connectivity between the left vmPFC and bilateral hippocampus were positively correlated with TSE; however, the connections between the left vmPFC and right inferior frontal gyrus and posterior superior temporal sulcus were negatively associated with TSE. Furthermore, the strengths of functional connectivity between the left cuneus/lingual gyrus and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex were positively related to TSE. These findings indicate that TSE is linked to core regions in the default mode network and social cognition network, which is involved in self-referential processing, autobiographical memory and social cognition.

  15. Heath monitoring of a glass transfer robot in the mass production line of liquid crystal display using abnormal operating sounds based on wavelet packet transform and artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eui-Youl; Lee, Young-Joon; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the fault detect method of a moving transfer robot in the mass production line of liquid crystal display (LCD) manufacturers based on the wavelet packet transform (WPT) for feature extraction and the artificial neural network (ANN) for fault classification. Most of fault detection methods in a mechanical system have been researched based on the vibration signal. Unlike the existing methodologies, this study aims to minimize the uncertainty of a field engineer's decision making process for determining whether a fault is present or not based on the human auditory perception by developing a fault diagnosis system that uses the abnormal operating sound radiated from a moving transfer robot as a source signal. Abnormal operating sound radiated from a moving transfer robot has been used for this work instead of other source signals such as vibration, acoustic emission, electrical signal, etc. Its advantage as a source signal makes it possible to monitor the status of multiple faults by using only a microphone despite a relatively low sensitivity. In the application of ANN, since it is important to minimize the error of trained ANN in terms of the accuracy of fault diagnosis logic, in the paper, the number of input and target data samples was increased through a regeneration process based on statistical properties, and then the uncorrelated nodes in the input vector were also removed to improve the orthogonality of the input vector based on the entropy based feature selection method. Consequently, it can be concluded that the abnormal operating sound is sufficiently useful as a source signal for the fault diagnosis of mechanical components as well as other source signals.

  16. Brief Report: Anomalous Neural Deactivations and Functional Connectivity during Receptive Language in Autism Spectrum Disorder--A Functional MRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karten, Ariel; Hirsch, Joy

    2015-01-01

    Neural mechanisms that underlie language disability in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been associated with reduced excitatory processes observed as positive blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) responses. However, negative BOLD responses (NBR) associated with language and inhibitory processes have been less studied in ASD. In this study,…

  17. [Evaluation of systemic involving of the connective tissue in children with different localisation of isolated abnormal chords of the left ventricle (ACLV)].

    PubMed

    Kondrashova, V H; Sheĭko, L P; Kondrashova, N S

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of the systemic involving of the connective tissue (SICT) under the new Ghent nosology (2010) showed that in children with isolated ACLV born to parents exposed to the Chernobyl disaster, its expression is associated with their location and quantity. The degree of systemic involvement of connective tissue is confirmed by the results of the analysis of features echostructure of isolated ACLV (the presence of thickening and calcification), echomorphometry, assessment of systolic (hypokinetic organization of the central hemodynamics), and the relaxation functions of the heart (initiation of diastolic dysfunction). High level of SICT (score greater than 5) indicates systemic damage to the body and particularly the heart, which requires dynamic monitoring and preventive measures. Found that the diagnostic and monitoring of children with isolated ACLV may be based on registration of systemic involvement of connective tissue with the calculation of points under the new Ghent nosology of 2010.

  18. A reinforcement learning trained fuzzy neural network controller for maintaining wireless communication connections in multi-robot systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xu; Zhou, Yu

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a decentralized multi-robot motion control strategy to facilitate a multi-robot system, comprised of collaborative mobile robots coordinated through wireless communications, to form and maintain desired wireless communication coverage in a realistic environment with unstable wireless signaling condition. A fuzzy neural network controller is proposed for each robot to maintain the wireless link quality with its neighbors. The controller is trained through reinforcement learning to establish the relationship between the wireless link quality and robot motion decision, via consecutive interactions between the controller and environment. The tuned fuzzy neural network controller is applied to a multi-robot deployment process to form and maintain desired wireless communication coverage. The effectiveness of the proposed control scheme is verified through simulations under different wireless signal propagation conditions.

  19. Synergistic interactions between XPC and p53 mutations in double-mutant mice: neural tube abnormalities and accelerated UV radiation-induced skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheo, D L; Meira, L B; Hammer, R E; Burns, D K; Doughty, A T; Friedberg, E C

    1996-12-01

    The significance of DNA repair to human health has been well documented by studies on xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients, who suffer a dramatically increased risk of cancer in sun-exposed areas of their skin [1,2]. This autosomal recessive disorder has been directly associated with a defect in nucleotide excision-repair (NER) [1,2]. Like human XP individuals, mice carrying homozygous mutations in XP genes manifest a predisposition to skin carcinogenesis following exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation [3-5]. Recent studies have suggested that, in addition to roles in apoptosis [6] and cell-cycle checkpoint control [7] in response to DNA damage, p53 protein may modulate NER [8]. Mutations in the p53 gene have been observed in 50% of all human tumors [9] and have been implicated in both the early [10] and late [11] stages of skin cancer. To examine the consequences of a combined deficiency of the XPC and the p53 proteins in mice, we generated double-mutant animals. We document a spectrum of neural tube defects in XPC p53 mutant embryos. Additionally, we show that, following exposure to UV-B radiation, XPC p53 mutant mice have more severe solar keratosis and suffer accelerated skin cancer compared with XPC mutant mice that are wild-type with respect to p53. PMID:8994835

  20. Voltage-sensitive-dye imaging of microstimulation-evoked neural activity through intracortical horizontal and callosal connections in cat visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzurikawa, Jun; Tani, Toshiki; Nakao, Masayuki; Tanaka, Shigeru; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2009-12-01

    Recently, intrinsic signal optical imaging has been widely used as a routine procedure for visualizing cortical functional maps. We do not, however, have a well-established imaging method for visualizing cortical functional connectivity indicating spatio-temporal patterns of activity propagation in the cerebral cortex. In the present study, we developed a novel experimental setup for investigating the propagation of neural activities combining the intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) technique with voltage sensitive dye (VSD) imaging, and demonstrated the feasibility of this setup applying to the measurement of time-dependent intra- and inter-hemispheric spread of ICMS-evoked excitation in the cat visual cortices, areas 17 and 18. A microelectrode array for the ICMS was inserted with a specially designed easy-to-detach electrode holder around the 17/18 transition zones (TZs), where the left and right hemispheres were interconnected via the corpus callosum. The microelectrode array was stably anchored in agarose without any holder, which enabled us to visualize evoked activities even in the vicinity of penetration sites as well as in a wide recording region that covered a part of both hemispheres. The VSD imaging could successfully visualize ICMS-evoked excitation and subsequent propagation in the visual cortices contralateral as well as ipsilateral to the ICMS. Using the orientation maps as positional references, we showed that the activity propagation patterns were consistent with previously reported anatomical patterns of intracortical and interhemispheric connections. This finding indicates that our experimental system can serve for the investigation of cortical functional connectivity.

  1. Abnormalities of Inter- and Intra-Hemispheric Functional Connectivity in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Study Using the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange Database

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Min; Kyeong, Sunghyun; Kim, Eunjoo; Cheon, Keun-Ah

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE) project revealed decreased functional connectivity in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) relative to the typically developing controls (TDCs). However, it is still questionable whether the source of functional under-connectivity in subjects with ASD is equally contributed by the ipsilateral and contralateral parts of the brain. In this study, we decomposed the inter- and intra-hemispheric regions and compared the functional connectivity density (FCD) between 458 subjects with ASD and 517 TDCs from the ABIDE database. We quantified the inter- and intra-hemispheric FCDs in the brain by counting the number of functional connectivity with all voxels in the opposite and same hemispheric brain regions, respectively. Relative to TDCs, both inter- and intra-hemispheric FCDs in the posterior cingulate cortex, lingual/parahippocampal gyrus, and postcentral gyrus were significantly decreased in subjects with ASD. Moreover, in the ASD group, the restricted and repetitive behavior subscore of the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS-RRB) score showed significant negative correlations with the average inter-hemispheric FCD and contralateral FCD in the lingual/parahippocampal gyrus cluster. Also, the ADOS-RRB score showed significant negative correlations with the average contralateral FCD in the default mode network regions such as the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus. Taken together, our findings imply that a deficit of non-social functioning processing in ASD such as restricted and repetitive behaviors and sensory hypersensitivity could be determined via both inter- and intra-hemispheric functional disconnections. PMID:27199653

  2. Neural markers of familial risk for depression: An investigation of cortical thickness abnormalities in healthy adolescent daughters of mothers with recurrent depression.

    PubMed

    Foland-Ross, Lara C; Gilbert, Brooke L; Joormann, Jutta; Gotlib, Ian H

    2015-08-01

    Having a mother with major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the strongest predictors of depression in late adolescence and early adulthood. Despite this fact, we know little about the neural mechanisms involved in the intergenerational transmission of risk for depression. Twenty-eight never-disordered daughters of recurrent depressed mothers (high-risk) and 36 never-disordered daughters of never-depressed mothers (low-risk) were scanned using MRI. Scan data were processed to provide measurements of cortical gray matter thickness. A general linear model was conducted at each surface point to assess the main effect of familial risk on cortical structure as well as to explore the interaction of familial risk and age. High-risk girls exhibited significantly thinner cortical gray matter in the right fusiform gyrus relative to low-risk girls. Exploratory analyses indicated interactions of risk group and age in the bilateral anterior insula and right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC); whereas low-risk girls exhibited an inverse association between age and thickness, girls at high risk for depression showed the reverse pattern. Additional exploratory analyses, using scores on the Children's Sadness Management Scale, indicated that thinner gray matter in the ACC of high-risk girls was associated with greater difficulty in managing sadness. These findings indicate that anomalous reductions in the cortical thickness of the fusiform gyrus may be a marker of risk for MDD. The interaction of age and group for gray matter thickness of the insula and ACC suggests a particularly important role for these regions in risk for depression and warrants additional research in longitudinal studies. PMID:25894441

  3. Lack of parvalbumin in mice leads to behavioral deficits relevant to all human autism core symptoms and related neural morphofunctional abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Wöhr, M; Orduz, D; Gregory, P; Moreno, H; Khan, U; Vörckel, K J; Wolfer, D P; Welzl, H; Gall, D; Schiffmann, S N; Schwaller, B

    2015-01-01

    Gene mutations and gene copy number variants are associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Affected gene products are often part of signaling networks implicated in synapse formation and/or function leading to alterations in the excitation/inhibition (E/I) balance. Although the network of parvalbumin (PV)-expressing interneurons has gained particular attention in ASD, little is known on PV's putative role with respect to ASD. Genetic mouse models represent powerful translational tools for studying the role of genetic and neurobiological factors underlying ASD. Here, we report that PV knockout mice (PV−/−) display behavioral phenotypes with relevance to all three core symptoms present in human ASD patients: abnormal reciprocal social interactions, impairments in communication and repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior. PV-depleted mice also showed several signs of ASD-associated comorbidities, such as reduced pain sensitivity and startle responses yet increased seizure susceptibility, whereas no evidence for behavioral phenotypes with relevance to anxiety, depression and schizophrenia was obtained. Reduced social interactions and communication were also observed in heterozygous (PV+/−) mice characterized by lower PV expression levels, indicating that merely a decrease in PV levels might be sufficient to elicit core ASD-like deficits. Structural magnetic resonance imaging measurements in PV−/− and PV+/− mice further revealed ASD-associated developmental neuroanatomical changes, including transient cortical hypertrophy and cerebellar hypoplasia. Electrophysiological experiments finally demonstrated that the E/I balance in these mice is altered by modification of both inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission. On the basis of the reported changes in PV expression patterns in several, mostly genetic rodent models of ASD, we propose that in these models downregulation of PV might represent one of the points of convergence, thus

  4. The Circadian Clock Gene Period1 Connects the Molecular Clock to Neural Activity in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Block, Gene D.; Colwell, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    The neural activity patterns of suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons are dynamically regulated throughout the circadian cycle with highest levels of spontaneous action potentials during the day. These rhythms in electrical activity are critical for the function of the circadian timing system and yet the mechanisms by which the molecular clockwork drives changes in the membrane are not well understood. In this study, we sought to examine how the clock gene Period1 (Per1) regulates the electrical activity in the mouse SCN by transiently and selectively decreasing levels of PER1 through use of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide. We found that this treatment effectively reduced SCN neural activity. Direct current injection to restore the normal membrane potential partially, but not completely, returned firing rate to normal levels. The antisense treatment also reduced baseline [Ca2+]i levels as measured by Fura2 imaging technique. Whole cell patch clamp recording techniques were used to examine which specific potassium currents were altered by the treatment. These recordings revealed that the large conductance [Ca2+]i-activated potassium currents were reduced in antisense-treated neurons and that blocking this current mimicked the effects of the anti-sense on SCN firing rate. These results indicate that the circadian clock gene Per1 alters firing rate in SCN neurons and raise the possibility that the large conductance [Ca2+]i-activated channel is one of the targets. PMID:26553726

  5. The Circadian Clock Gene Period1 Connects the Molecular Clock to Neural Activity in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Takashi; Block, Gene D; Colwell, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    The neural activity patterns of suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons are dynamically regulated throughout the circadian cycle with highest levels of spontaneous action potentials during the day. These rhythms in electrical activity are critical for the function of the circadian timing system and yet the mechanisms by which the molecular clockwork drives changes in the membrane are not well understood. In this study, we sought to examine how the clock gene Period1 (Per1) regulates the electrical activity in the mouse SCN by transiently and selectively decreasing levels of PER1 through use of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide. We found that this treatment effectively reduced SCN neural activity. Direct current injection to restore the normal membrane potential partially, but not completely, returned firing rate to normal levels. The antisense treatment also reduced baseline [Ca(2+)]i levels as measured by Fura2 imaging technique. Whole cell patch clamp recording techniques were used to examine which specific potassium currents were altered by the treatment. These recordings revealed that the large conductance [Ca(2+)]i-activated potassium currents were reduced in antisense-treated neurons and that blocking this current mimicked the effects of the anti-sense on SCN firing rate. These results indicate that the circadian clock gene Per1 alters firing rate in SCN neurons and raise the possibility that the large conductance [Ca(2+)]i-activated channel is one of the targets.

  6. The spacing principle for unlearning abnormal neuronal synchrony.

    PubMed

    Popovych, Oleksandr V; Xenakis, Markos N; Tass, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Desynchronizing stimulation techniques were developed to specifically counteract abnormal neuronal synchronization relevant to several neurological and psychiatric disorders. The goal of our approach is to achieve an anti-kindling, where the affected neural networks unlearn abnormal synaptic connectivity and, hence, abnormal neuronal synchrony, by means of desynchronizing stimulation, in particular, Coordinated Reset (CR) stimulation. As known from neuroscience, psychology and education, learning effects can be enhanced by means of the spacing principle, i.e. by delivering repeated stimuli spaced by pauses as opposed to delivering a massed stimulus (in a single long stimulation session). To illustrate that the spacing principle may boost the anti-kindling effect of CR neuromodulation, in this computational study we carry this approach to extremes. To this end, we deliver spaced CR neuromodulation at particularly weak intensities which render permanently delivered CR neuromodulation ineffective. Intriguingly, spaced CR neuromodulation at these particularly weak intensities effectively induces an anti-kindling. In fact, the spacing principle enables the neuronal population to successively hop from one attractor to another one, finally approaching attractors characterized by down-regulated synaptic connectivity and synchrony. Our computational results might open up novel opportunities to effectively induce sustained desynchronization at particularly weak stimulation intensities, thereby avoiding side effects, e.g., in the case of deep brain stimulation.

  7. Toward on-chip functional neuronal networks: computational study on the effect of synaptic connectivity on neural activity.

    PubMed

    Foroushani, Armin Najarpour; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new unified computational-experimental approach to study the role of the synaptic activity on the activity of neurons in the small neuronal networks (NNs). In a neuronal tissue/organ, this question is investigated with higher complexities by recording action potentials from population of neurons in order to find the relationship between connectivity and the recorded activities. In this approach, we study the dynamics of very small cortical neuronal networks, which can be experimentally synthesized on chip with constrained connectivity. Multi-compartmental Hodgkin-Huxley model is used in NEURON software to reproduce cells by extracting the experimental data from the synthesized NNs. We thereafter demonstrate how the type of synaptic activity affects the network response to specific spike train using the simulation results.

  8. On the nature of the intrinsic connectivity of the cat motor cortex: evidence for a recurrent neural network topology.

    PubMed

    Capaday, Charles; Ethier, Christian; Brizzi, Laurent; Sik, Attila; van Vreeswijk, Carl; Gingras, Denis

    2009-10-01

    The details and functional significance of the intrinsic horizontal connections between neurons in the motor cortex (MCx) remain to be clarified. To further elucidate the nature of this intracortical connectivity pattern, experiments were done on the MCx of three cats. The anterograde tracer biocytin was ejected iontophoretically in layers II, III, and V. Some 30-50 neurons within a radius of approximately 250 microm were thus stained. The functional output of the motor cortical point at which biocytin was injected, and of the surrounding points, was identified by microstimulation and electromyographic recordings. The axonal arborizations of the stained neurons were traced under camera lucida. The axon collaterals were extensive, reaching distances of connections but rather bind together the representations of a variety of muscles within a large neighborhood. This recurrent-network type connectivity strongly supports the hypothesis that the MCx controls the musculature in an integrated manner. PMID:19625531

  9. Innervation of Extrahepatic Biliary Tract, With Special Reference to the Direct Bidirectional Neural Connections of the Gall Bladder, Sphincter of Oddi and Duodenum in Suncus murinus, in Whole-Mount Immunohistochemical Study.

    PubMed

    Yi, S-Q; Ren, K; Kinoshita, M; Takano, N; Itoh, M; Ozaki, N

    2016-06-01

    Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction is one of the most important symptoms in post-cholecystectomy syndrome. Using either electrical or mechanical stimulation and retrogradely transported neuronal dyes, it has been demonstrated that there are direct neural pathways connecting gall bladder and the sphincter of Oddi in the Australian opossum and the golden hamster. In the present study, we employed whole-mount immunohistochemistry staining to observe and verify that there are two different plexuses of the extrahepatic biliary tract in Suncus murinus. One, named Pathway One, showed a fine, irregular but dense network plexus that ran adhesively and resided on/in the extrahepatic biliary tract wall, and the plexus extended into the intrahepatic area. On the other hand, named Pathway Two, exhibiting simple, thicker and straight neural bundles, ran parallel to the surface of the extrahepatic biliary tract and passed between the gall bladder and duodenum, but did not give off any branches to the liver. Pathway Two was considered to involve direct bidirectional neural connections between the duodenum and the biliary tract system. For the first time, morphologically, we demonstrated direct neural connections between gall bladder and duodenum in S. murinus. Malfunction of the sphincter of Oddi may be caused by injury of the direct neural pathways between gall bladder and duodenum by cholecystectomy. From the viewpoint of preserving the function of the major duodenal papilla and common bile duct, we emphasize the importance of avoiding kocherization of the common bile duct so as to preserve the direct neural connections between gall bladder and sphincter of Oddi. PMID:26179953

  10. Ketamine modulates subgenual cingulate connectivity with the memory-related neural circuit-a mechanism of relevance to resistant depression?

    PubMed

    Wong, Jing J; O'Daly, Owen; Mehta, Mitul A; Young, Allan H; Stone, James M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ketamine has been reported to have efficacy as an antidepressant in several studies of treatment-resistant depression. In this study, we investigate whether an acute administration of ketamine leads to reductions in the functional connectivity of subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) with other brain regions. Methods. Thirteen right-handed healthy male subjects underwent a 15 min resting state fMRI with an infusion of intravenous ketamine (target blood level = 150 ng/ml) starting at 5 min. We used a seed region centred on the sgACC and assessed functional connectivity before and during ketamine administration. Results. Before ketamine administration, positive coupling with the sgACC seed region was observed in a large cluster encompassing the anterior cingulate and negative coupling was observed with the anterior cerebellum. Following ketamine administration, sgACC activity became negatively correlated with the brainstem, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, retrosplenial cortex, and thalamus. Discussion. Ketamine reduced functional connectivity of the sgACC with brain regions implicated in emotion, memory and mind wandering. It is possible the therapeutic effects of ketamine may be mediated via this mechanism, although further work is required to test this hypothesis.

  11. Ketamine modulates subgenual cingulate connectivity with the memory-related neural circuit-a mechanism of relevance to resistant depression?

    PubMed

    Wong, Jing J; O'Daly, Owen; Mehta, Mitul A; Young, Allan H; Stone, James M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ketamine has been reported to have efficacy as an antidepressant in several studies of treatment-resistant depression. In this study, we investigate whether an acute administration of ketamine leads to reductions in the functional connectivity of subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) with other brain regions. Methods. Thirteen right-handed healthy male subjects underwent a 15 min resting state fMRI with an infusion of intravenous ketamine (target blood level = 150 ng/ml) starting at 5 min. We used a seed region centred on the sgACC and assessed functional connectivity before and during ketamine administration. Results. Before ketamine administration, positive coupling with the sgACC seed region was observed in a large cluster encompassing the anterior cingulate and negative coupling was observed with the anterior cerebellum. Following ketamine administration, sgACC activity became negatively correlated with the brainstem, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, retrosplenial cortex, and thalamus. Discussion. Ketamine reduced functional connectivity of the sgACC with brain regions implicated in emotion, memory and mind wandering. It is possible the therapeutic effects of ketamine may be mediated via this mechanism, although further work is required to test this hypothesis. PMID:26925332

  12. Uniphasic Blanching of the Fingers, Abnormal Capillaroscopy in Nonsymptomatic Digits, and Autoantibodies: Expanding Options to Increase the Level of Suspicion of Connective Tissue Diseases beyond the Classification of Raynaud's Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Ingegnoli, Francesca; Gualtierotti, Roberta; Orenti, Annalisa; Schioppo, Tommaso; Marfia, Giovanni; Campanella, Rolando; Mastaglio, Claudio; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Boracchi, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    In patients with Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), the role of medical history, capillaroscopy, and autoantibodies in order to provide an early diagnosis of connective tissue disease (CTD) were examined. 115 consecutive adults with uni-, bi-, or triphasic colour changes of the fingers were studied. RP was bilateral in 92.7% of patients. The middle finger was significantly more affected. A lack of association between fingers affected by RP and fingers with capillary abnormalities was observed OR = 0.75 (0.34-1.66). RP with the cyanotic phase had a higher risk at capillaroscopy to have hemorrhages OR = 4.46 (1.50-13.30) and giant capillaries OR = 24.85 (1.48-417.44). The thumb and triphasic involvement have an OR of 1.477 and 1.845, respectively. RP secondary to systemic sclerosis (SSc) had greater value of VAS pain (p = 0.011). The presence of anti-centromere antibodies was significantly associated with a higher risk of SSc (p < 0.001). 44.3% of subjects had uniphasic blanching of the fingers, and among these, 27% was diagnosed as having an overt or suspected CTD. Markers of a potential development of CTDs include severe RP symptoms, positive autoantibodies, and capillary abnormalities. These data support the proposal to not discharge patients with uniphasic blanching of the fingers to avoid missing the opportunity of an early diagnosis.

  13. Uniphasic Blanching of the Fingers, Abnormal Capillaroscopy in Nonsymptomatic Digits, and Autoantibodies: Expanding Options to Increase the Level of Suspicion of Connective Tissue Diseases beyond the Classification of Raynaud's Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Gualtierotti, Roberta; Orenti, Annalisa; Schioppo, Tommaso; Marfia, Giovanni; Campanella, Rolando; Mastaglio, Claudio; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Boracchi, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    In patients with Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), the role of medical history, capillaroscopy, and autoantibodies in order to provide an early diagnosis of connective tissue disease (CTD) were examined. 115 consecutive adults with uni-, bi-, or triphasic colour changes of the fingers were studied. RP was bilateral in 92.7% of patients. The middle finger was significantly more affected. A lack of association between fingers affected by RP and fingers with capillary abnormalities was observed OR = 0.75 (0.34–1.66). RP with the cyanotic phase had a higher risk at capillaroscopy to have hemorrhages OR = 4.46 (1.50–13.30) and giant capillaries OR = 24.85 (1.48–417.44). The thumb and triphasic involvement have an OR of 1.477 and 1.845, respectively. RP secondary to systemic sclerosis (SSc) had greater value of VAS pain (p = 0.011). The presence of anti-centromere antibodies was significantly associated with a higher risk of SSc (p < 0.001). 44.3% of subjects had uniphasic blanching of the fingers, and among these, 27% was diagnosed as having an overt or suspected CTD. Markers of a potential development of CTDs include severe RP symptoms, positive autoantibodies, and capillary abnormalities. These data support the proposal to not discharge patients with uniphasic blanching of the fingers to avoid missing the opportunity of an early diagnosis. PMID:26075287

  14. Functional connectivity associated with hand shape generation: Imitating novel hand postures and pantomiming tool grips challenge different nodes of a shared neural network.

    PubMed

    Vingerhoets, Guy; Clauwaert, Amanda

    2015-09-01

    Clinical research suggests that imitating meaningless hand postures and pantomiming tool-related hand shapes rely on different neuroanatomical substrates. We investigated the BOLD responses to different tasks of hand posture generation in 14 right handed volunteers. Conjunction and contrast analyses were applied to select regions that were either common or sensitive to imitation and/or pantomime tasks. The selection included bilateral areas of medial and lateral extrastriate cortex, superior and inferior regions of the lateral and medial parietal lobe, primary motor and somatosensory cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal, and ventral and dorsal premotor cortices. Functional connectivity analysis revealed that during hand shape generation the BOLD-response of every region correlated significantly with every other area regardless of the hand posture task performed, although some regions were more involved in some hand postures tasks than others. Based on between-task differences in functional connectivity we predict that imitation of novel hand postures would suffer most from left superior parietal disruption and that pantomiming hand postures for tools would be impaired following left frontal damage, whereas both tasks would be sensitive to inferior parietal dysfunction. We also unveiled that posterior temporal cortex is committed to pantomiming tool grips, but that the involvement of this region to the execution of hand postures in general appears limited. We conclude that the generation of hand postures is subserved by a highly interconnected task-general neural network. Depending on task requirements some nodes/connections will be more engaged than others and these task-sensitive findings are in general agreement with recent lesion studies. PMID:26095674

  15. Functional connectivity associated with hand shape generation: Imitating novel hand postures and pantomiming tool grips challenge different nodes of a shared neural network.

    PubMed

    Vingerhoets, Guy; Clauwaert, Amanda

    2015-09-01

    Clinical research suggests that imitating meaningless hand postures and pantomiming tool-related hand shapes rely on different neuroanatomical substrates. We investigated the BOLD responses to different tasks of hand posture generation in 14 right handed volunteers. Conjunction and contrast analyses were applied to select regions that were either common or sensitive to imitation and/or pantomime tasks. The selection included bilateral areas of medial and lateral extrastriate cortex, superior and inferior regions of the lateral and medial parietal lobe, primary motor and somatosensory cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal, and ventral and dorsal premotor cortices. Functional connectivity analysis revealed that during hand shape generation the BOLD-response of every region correlated significantly with every other area regardless of the hand posture task performed, although some regions were more involved in some hand postures tasks than others. Based on between-task differences in functional connectivity we predict that imitation of novel hand postures would suffer most from left superior parietal disruption and that pantomiming hand postures for tools would be impaired following left frontal damage, whereas both tasks would be sensitive to inferior parietal dysfunction. We also unveiled that posterior temporal cortex is committed to pantomiming tool grips, but that the involvement of this region to the execution of hand postures in general appears limited. We conclude that the generation of hand postures is subserved by a highly interconnected task-general neural network. Depending on task requirements some nodes/connections will be more engaged than others and these task-sensitive findings are in general agreement with recent lesion studies.

  16. Limitations of short range Mexican hat connection for driving target selection in a 2D neural field: activity suppression and deviation from input stimuli.

    PubMed

    Mégardon, Geoffrey; Tandonnet, Christophe; Sumner, Petroc; Guillaume, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Neural Field models (DNF) often use a kernel of connection with short range excitation and long range inhibition. This organization has been suggested as a model for brain structures or for artificial systems involved in winner-take-all processes such as saliency localization, perceptual decision or target/action selection. A good example of such a DNF is the superior colliculus (SC), a key structure for eye movements. Recent results suggest that the superficial layers of the SC (SCs) exhibit relatively short range inhibition with a longer time constant than excitation. The aim of the present study was to further examine the properties of a DNF with such an inhibition pattern in the context of target selection. First we tested the effects of stimulus size and shape on when and where self-maintained clusters of firing neurons appeared, using three variants of the model. In each model variant, small stimuli led to rapid formation of a spiking cluster, a range of medium sizes led to the suppression of any activity on the network and hence to no target selection, while larger sizes led to delayed selection of multiple loci. Second, we tested the model with two stimuli separated by a varying distance. Again single, none, or multiple spiking clusters could occur, depending on distance and relative stimulus strength. For short distances, activity attracted toward the strongest stimulus, reminiscent of well-known behavioral data for saccadic eye movements, while for larger distances repulsion away from the second stimulus occurred. All these properties predicted by the model suggest that the SCs, or any other neural structure thought to implement a short range MH, is an imperfect winner-take-all system. Although, those properties call for systematic testing, the discussion gathers neurophysiological and behavioral data suggesting that such properties are indeed present in target selection for saccadic eye movements.

  17. Limitations of short range Mexican hat connection for driving target selection in a 2D neural field: activity suppression and deviation from input stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Mégardon, Geoffrey; Tandonnet, Christophe; Sumner, Petroc; Guillaume, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic Neural Field models (DNF) often use a kernel of connection with short range excitation and long range inhibition. This organization has been suggested as a model for brain structures or for artificial systems involved in winner-take-all processes such as saliency localization, perceptual decision or target/action selection. A good example of such a DNF is the superior colliculus (SC), a key structure for eye movements. Recent results suggest that the superficial layers of the SC (SCs) exhibit relatively short range inhibition with a longer time constant than excitation. The aim of the present study was to further examine the properties of a DNF with such an inhibition pattern in the context of target selection. First we tested the effects of stimulus size and shape on when and where self-maintained clusters of firing neurons appeared, using three variants of the model. In each model variant, small stimuli led to rapid formation of a spiking cluster, a range of medium sizes led to the suppression of any activity on the network and hence to no target selection, while larger sizes led to delayed selection of multiple loci. Second, we tested the model with two stimuli separated by a varying distance. Again single, none, or multiple spiking clusters could occur, depending on distance and relative stimulus strength. For short distances, activity attracted toward the strongest stimulus, reminiscent of well-known behavioral data for saccadic eye movements, while for larger distances repulsion away from the second stimulus occurred. All these properties predicted by the model suggest that the SCs, or any other neural structure thought to implement a short range MH, is an imperfect winner-take-all system. Although, those properties call for systematic testing, the discussion gathers neurophysiological and behavioral data suggesting that such properties are indeed present in target selection for saccadic eye movements. PMID:26539103

  18. A newly identified mouse hypothalamic area having bidirectional neural connections with the lateral septum: the perifornical area of the anterior hypothalamus rich in chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Horii-Hayashi, Noriko; Sasagawa, Takayo; Hashimoto, Takashi; Kaneko, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Kosei; Nishi, Mayumi

    2015-09-01

    While previous studies and brain atlases divide the hypothalamus into many nuclei and areas, uncharacterised regions remain. Here, we report a new region in the mouse anterior hypothalamus (AH), a triangular-shaped perifornical area of the anterior hypothalamus (PeFAH) between the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus and fornix, that abundantly expresses chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). The PeFAH strongly stained with markers for chondroitin sulfate/CSPGs such as Wisteria floribunda agglutinin and antibodies against aggrecan and chondroitin 6 sulfate. Nissl-stained sections of the PeFAH clearly distinguished it as a region of comparatively low density compared to neighboring regions, the paraventricular nucleus and central division of the anterior hypothalamic area. Immunohistochemical and DNA microarray analyses suggested that PeFAH contains sparsely distributed calretinin-positive neurons and a compact cluster of enkephalinergic neurons. Neuronal tract tracing revealed that both enkephalin- and calretinin-positive neurons project to the lateral septum (LS), while the PeFAH receives input from calbindin-positive LS neurons. These results suggest bidirectional connections between the PeFAH and LS. Considering neuronal subtype and projection, part of PeFAH that includes a cluster of enkephalinergic neurons is similar to the rat perifornical nucleus and guinea pig magnocellular dorsal nucleus. Finally, we examined c-Fos expression after several types of stimuli and found that PeFAH neuronal activity was increased by psychological but not homeostatic stressors. These findings suggest that the PeFAH is a source of enkephalin peptides in the LS and indicate that bidirectional neural connections between these regions may participate in controlling responses to psychological stressors.

  19. The neural pathway underlying a numerical working memory task in abacus-trained children and associated functional connectivity in the resting brain.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongxin; Hu, Yuzheng; Zhao, Ming; Wang, Yunqi; Huang, Jian; Chen, Feiyan

    2013-11-20

    Training can induce significant changes in brain functioning and behavioral performance. One consequence of training is changing the pattern of brain activation. Abacus training is of interest because abacus experts gain the ability to handle digits with unusual speed and accuracy. However, the neural correlates of numerical memory in abacus-trained children remain unknown. In the current study, we aimed to detect a training effect of abacus-based mental calculations on numerical working memory in children. We measured brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation patterns in 17 abacus-trained children and 17 control children as they performed two numerical working memory tasks (digits and beads). Functional MRI results revealed higher activation in abacus-trained children than in the controls in the right posterior superior parietal lobule/superior occipital gyrus (PSPL/SOG) and the right supplementary motor area (SMA) in both tasks. When these regions were used as seeds in a functional connectivity analysis of the resting brain, the abacus-trained children showed significantly enhanced integration between the right SMA and the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). The IFG is considered to be the key region for the control of attention. These findings demonstrate that extensive engagement of the fronto-parietal network occurs during numerical memory tasks in the abacus-trained group. Furthermore, abacus training may increase the functional integration of visuospatial-attention circuitry, which and thus enhances high-level cognitive process. PMID:24080400

  20. The neural pathway underlying a numerical working memory task in abacus-trained children and associated functional connectivity in the resting brain.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongxin; Hu, Yuzheng; Zhao, Ming; Wang, Yunqi; Huang, Jian; Chen, Feiyan

    2013-11-20

    Training can induce significant changes in brain functioning and behavioral performance. One consequence of training is changing the pattern of brain activation. Abacus training is of interest because abacus experts gain the ability to handle digits with unusual speed and accuracy. However, the neural correlates of numerical memory in abacus-trained children remain unknown. In the current study, we aimed to detect a training effect of abacus-based mental calculations on numerical working memory in children. We measured brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation patterns in 17 abacus-trained children and 17 control children as they performed two numerical working memory tasks (digits and beads). Functional MRI results revealed higher activation in abacus-trained children than in the controls in the right posterior superior parietal lobule/superior occipital gyrus (PSPL/SOG) and the right supplementary motor area (SMA) in both tasks. When these regions were used as seeds in a functional connectivity analysis of the resting brain, the abacus-trained children showed significantly enhanced integration between the right SMA and the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). The IFG is considered to be the key region for the control of attention. These findings demonstrate that extensive engagement of the fronto-parietal network occurs during numerical memory tasks in the abacus-trained group. Furthermore, abacus training may increase the functional integration of visuospatial-attention circuitry, which and thus enhances high-level cognitive process.

  1. Detection of preclinical neural dysfunction from functional connectivity graphs derived from task fMRI. An example from degeneration.

    PubMed

    Vives-Gilabert, Yolanda; Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Kaller, Christoph P; Mader, Wolfgang; Wolf, Robert C; Schelter, Björn; Klöppel, Stefan

    2013-12-30

    The early, preferably pre-clinical, identification of neurodegenerative diseases is important as treatment will be most successful before substantial neuronal loss. Here, we reasoned that functional brain changes as measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) will precede neurodegeneration. Three independent cohorts of patients with the genetic mutation leading to Huntington's Disease (HD) but without any clinical symptoms and matched controls performed three different fMRI tasks: Sequential finger tapping engaged the motor system, which is primarily affected by HD, whereas a working-memory task and a task aiming to induce irritation represented the range of low- and high-level cognitive functions also affected by HD. Each diagnostic group of every cohort included 11-16 subjects. After segmentation into 76 cortical and 14 subcortical regions, we extracted functional connectivity patterns through pairwise correlation between the signals in the regions. The resulting coefficients were directly embedded as input to a pattern classifier aiming to separate controls from gene mutation carriers. Alternatively, graph-theory measures such as degree and clustering coefficient were used as features for the discrimination. Classification accuracy never outperformed the accuracy of a grouping based on parameter estimates from a general-linear model approach or a grouping based on features extracted from anatomical images as reported in a previous analysis. Despite good within-subject stability between two runs of the same task, a high between-subject variability led to chance-level accuracy. These results indicate that standard graph-metrics are insufficient to detect subtle disease related changes when within-group variability is high. Developing methods that reduce variability related to noise should be the focus of future studies.

  2. Neural networks underlying implicit and explicit moral evaluations in psychopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, K J; Harenski, C; Kiehl, K A; Decety, J

    2015-01-01

    Psychopathy, characterized by symptoms of emotional detachment, reduced guilt and empathy and a callous disregard for the rights and welfare of others, is a strong risk factor for immoral behavior. Psychopathy is also marked by abnormal attention with downstream consequences on emotional processing. To examine the influence of task demands on moral evaluation in psychopathy, functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure neural response and functional connectivity in 88 incarcerated male subjects (28 with Psychopathy Checklist Revised (PCL-R) scores ⩾30) while they viewed dynamic visual stimuli depicting interpersonal harm and interpersonal assistance in two contexts, implicit and explicit. During the implicit task, high psychopathy was associated with reduced activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and caudate when viewing harmful compared with helpful social interactions. Functional connectivity seeded in the right amygdala and right temporoparietal junction revealed decreased coupling with the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), anterior insula, striatum and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. In the explicit task, higher trait psychopathy predicted reduced signal change in ACC and amygdala, accompanied by decreased functional connectivity to temporal pole, insula and striatum, but increased connectivity with dorsal ACC. Psychopathy did not influence behavioral performance in either task, despite differences in neural activity and functional connectivity. These findings provide the first direct evidence that hemodynamic activity and neural coupling within the salience network are disrupted in psychopathy, and that the effects of psychopathy on moral evaluation are influenced by attentional demands. PMID:26305476

  3. Modular, Hierarchical Learning By Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldi, Pierre F.; Toomarian, Nikzad

    1996-01-01

    Modular and hierarchical approach to supervised learning by artificial neural networks leads to neural networks more structured than neural networks in which all neurons fully interconnected. These networks utilize general feedforward flow of information and sparse recurrent connections to achieve dynamical effects. The modular organization, sparsity of modular units and connections, and fact that learning is much more circumscribed are all attractive features for designing neural-network hardware. Learning streamlined by imitating some aspects of biological neural networks.

  4. Resting state EEG abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of complex and heterogeneous developmental disorders involving multiple neural system dysfunctions. In an effort to understand neurophysiological substrates, identify etiopathophysiologically distinct subgroups of patients, and track outcomes of novel treatments with translational biomarkers, EEG (electroencephalography) studies offer a promising research strategy in ASD. Resting-state EEG studies of ASD suggest a U-shaped profile of electrophysiological power alterations, with excessive power in low-frequency and high-frequency bands, abnormal functional connectivity, and enhanced power in the left hemisphere of the brain. In this review, we provide a summary of recent findings, discuss limitations in available research that may contribute to inconsistencies in the literature, and offer suggestions for future research in this area for advancing the understanding of ASD. PMID:24040879

  5. Abnormal postural reflexes in a patient with pontine ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Cantello, Roberto; Magistrelli, Luca; Terazzi, Emanuela; Grossini, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The control of body posture is a complex activity that needs a very close relationship between different structures, such as the vestibular system, and the muscle and joint receptors of the neck. Damage of even one of these structures can lead to abnormal postural reflexes. We describe a case of a woman with a left pontine ischaemia who developed a 'dystonic' extensor posture of the left limbs while turned on the right side. This clinical picture differs from previous reports on the subject, and may relate to ischaemic damage of a pontine structure involved in posture control, or of adjacent neural connections to be yet identified. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature. Clinical examples of an altered interplay between vestibular and neck receptors are rare. PMID:26561222

  6. Task-Rest Modulation of Basal Ganglia Connectivity in Mild to Moderate Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Oehring, Eva M.; Sullivan, Edith V.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Huang, Neng C.; Poston, Kathleen L.; Bronte-Stewart, Helen M.; Schulte, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with abnormal synchronization in basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loops. We tested whether early PD patients without demonstrable cognitive impairment exhibit abnormal modulation of functional connectivity at rest, while engaged in a task, or both. PD and healthy controls underwent two functional MRI scans: a resting-state scan and a Stroop Match-to-Sample task scan. Rest-task modulation of basal ganglia (BG) connectivity was tested using seed-to-voxel connectivity analysis with task and rest time series as conditions. Despite substantial overlap of BG–cortical connectivity patterns in both groups, connectivity differences between groups had clinical and behavioral correlates. During rest, stronger putamen–medial parietal and pallidum–occipital connectivity in PD than controls was associated with worse task performance and more severe PD symptoms suggesting that abnormalities in resting-state connectivity denote neural network dedifferentiation. During the executive task, PD patients showed weaker BG-cortical connectivity than controls, i.e., between caudate–supramarginal gyrus and pallidum–inferior prefrontal regions, that was related to more severe PD symptoms and worse task performance. Yet, task processing also evoked stronger striatal–cortical connectivity, specifically between caudate–prefrontal, caudate–precuneus, and putamen–motor/premotor regions in PD relative to controls, which was related to less severe PD symptoms and better performance on the Stroop task. Thus, stronger task-evoked striatal connectivity in PD demonstrated compensatory neural network enhancement to meet task demands and improve performance levels. fMRI-based network analysis revealed that despite resting-state BG network compromise in PD, BG connectivity to prefrontal, premotor, and precuneus regions can be adequately invoked during executive control demands enabling near normal task performance. PMID:25280970

  7. Task-rest modulation of basal ganglia connectivity in mild to moderate Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Müller-Oehring, Eva M; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Huang, Neng C; Poston, Kathleen L; Bronte-Stewart, Helen M; Schulte, Tilman

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with abnormal synchronization in basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loops. We tested whether early PD patients without demonstrable cognitive impairment exhibit abnormal modulation of functional connectivity at rest, while engaged in a task, or both. PD and healthy controls underwent two functional MRI scans: a resting-state scan and a Stroop Match-to-Sample task scan. Rest-task modulation of basal ganglia (BG) connectivity was tested using seed-to-voxel connectivity analysis with task and rest time series as conditions. Despite substantial overlap of BG-cortical connectivity patterns in both groups, connectivity differences between groups had clinical and behavioral correlates. During rest, stronger putamen-medial parietal and pallidum-occipital connectivity in PD than controls was associated with worse task performance and more severe PD symptoms suggesting that abnormalities in resting-state connectivity denote neural network dedifferentiation. During the executive task, PD patients showed weaker BG-cortical connectivity than controls, i.e., between caudate-supramarginal gyrus and pallidum-inferior prefrontal regions, that was related to more severe PD symptoms and worse task performance. Yet, task processing also evoked stronger striatal-cortical connectivity, specifically between caudate-prefrontal, caudate-precuneus, and putamen-motor/premotor regions in PD relative to controls, which was related to less severe PD symptoms and better performance on the Stroop task. Thus, stronger task-evoked striatal connectivity in PD demonstrated compensatory neural network enhancement to meet task demands and improve performance levels. fMRI-based network analysis revealed that despite resting-state BG network compromise in PD, BG connectivity to prefrontal, premotor, and precuneus regions can be adequately invoked during executive control demands enabling near normal task performance. PMID:25280970

  8. Neural crest cells: a model for invasive behavior.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Richard P

    2004-02-01

    Neural crest cells are the embryonic precursors of the neurons and glia of the peripheral nervous system, pigment cells, and connective tissue in the face, neck and heart. They are induced near the junction of the neural plate and embryonic ectoderm and undergo an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Neural crest cells then display invasive behavior and migrate into the surrounding tissues along specific pathways. Neural crest cells are amenable to study in tissue culture, and the molecules that regulate their development can be studied in vivo with antisense techniques as well as with the expression of gain and loss-of-function constructs. Mutations in factors that regulate neural crest cell survival or differentiation can lead to cell death or the premature cessation of their migration, resulting in craniofacial abnormalities, pigmentation defects and the absence of enteric neurons. This paper reviews recent advances in our understanding of neural crest cell induction and migration, emphasizing both avian and amphibian models. Cell facts: The embryonic progenitors of pigment cells, the neurons and glia of the peripheral nervous system, as well as connective tissue in the face, neck and heart. Induced to form at the boundary of the neuroepithelium and embryonic ectoderm. Expression of the transcription factors Snail, Slug and FoxD3 leads to delamination from the neural tube. Invasive motility not unlike that of tumor cells can be studied in vitro. Express proteases, distinctive cell surface receptors and glycoproteins to acquire an invasive phenotype. Mutations of transcription factors expressed by the neural crest or in other factors that inhibit their premature differentiation can lead to survival and migration-associated birth defects.

  9. A Rare Stapes Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Kanona, Hala; Virk, Jagdeep Singh; Kumar, Gaurav; Chawda, Sanjiv; Khalil, Sherif

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to increase awareness of rare presentations, diagnostic difficulties alongside management of conductive hearing loss and ossicular abnormalities. We report the case of a 13-year-old female reporting progressive left-sided hearing loss and high resolution computed tomography was initially reported as normal. Exploratory tympanotomy revealed an absent stapedius tendon and lack of connection between the stapes superstructure and footplate. The footplate was fixed. Stapedotomy and stapes prosthesis insertion resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 50 dB. A review of world literature was performed using MedLine. Middle ear ossicular discontinuity can result in significant conductive hearing loss. This can be managed effectively with surgery to help restore hearing. However, some patients may not be suitable or decline surgical intervention and can be managed safely conservatively. PMID:25628909

  10. Generalized Adaptive Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical model of supervised learning by artificial neural network provides for simultaneous adjustments of both temperatures of neurons and synaptic weights, and includes feedback as well as feedforward synaptic connections. Extension of mathematical model described in "Adaptive Neurons For Artificial Neural Networks" (NPO-17803). Dynamics of neural network represented in new model by less-restrictive continuous formalism.

  11. Neural-Network Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Paul H.

    1991-01-01

    F77NNS (FORTRAN 77 Neural Network Simulator) computer program simulates popular back-error-propagation neural network. Designed to take advantage of vectorization when used on computers having this capability, also used on any computer equipped with ANSI-77 FORTRAN Compiler. Problems involving matching of patterns or mathematical modeling of systems fit class of problems F77NNS designed to solve. Program has restart capability so neural network solved in stages suitable to user's resources and desires. Enables user to customize patterns of connections between layers of network. Size of neural network F77NNS applied to limited only by amount of random-access memory available to user.

  12. Evolvable Neural Software System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  13. Foundations of neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, P.K.

    1994-12-31

    Building intelligent systems that can model human behavior has captured the attention of the world for years. So, it is not surprising that a technology such as neural networks has generated great interest. This paper will provide an evolutionary introduction to neural networks by beginning with the key elements and terminology of neural networks, and developing the topologies, learning laws, and recall dynamics from this infrastructure. The perspective taken in this paper is largely that of an engineer, emphasizing the application potential of neural networks and drawing comparisons with other techniques that have similar motivations. As such, mathematics will be relied upon in many of the discussions to make points as precise as possible. The paper begins with a review of what neural networks are and why they are so appealing. A typical neural network is immediately introduced to illustrate several of the key features. With this network as a reference, the evolutionary introduction to neural networks is then pursued. The fundamental elements of a neural network, such as input and output patterns, processing element, connections, and threshold operations, are described, followed by descriptions of neural network topologies, learning algorithms, and recall dynamics. A taxonomy of neural networks is presented that uses two of the key characteristics of learning and recall. Finally, a comparison of neural networks and similar nonneural information processing methods is presented.

  14. Neural correlates of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Rees, Geraint

    2013-08-01

    Jon Driver's scientific work was characterized by an innovative combination of new methods for studying mental processes in the human brain in an integrative manner. In our collaborative work, he applied this approach to the study of attention and awareness, and their relationship to neural activity in the human brain. Here I review Jon's scientific work that relates to the neural basis of human consciousness, relating our collaborative work to a broader scientific context. I seek to show how his insights led to a deeper understanding of the causal connections between distant brain structures that are now believed to characterize the neural underpinnings of human consciousness.

  15. What Can Psychiatric Disorders Tell Us about Neural Processing of the Self?

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Weihua; Luo, Lizhu; Li, Qin; Kendrick, Keith M.

    2013-01-01

    Many psychiatric disorders are associated with abnormal self-processing. While these disorders also have a wide-range of complex, and often heterogeneous sets of symptoms involving different cognitive, emotional, and motor domains, an impaired sense of self can contribute to many of these. Research investigating self-processing in healthy subjects has facilitated identification of changes in specific neural circuits which may cause altered self-processing in psychiatric disorders. While there is evidence for altered self-processing in many psychiatric disorders, here we will focus on four of the most studied ones, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), major depression, and borderline personality disorder (BPD). We review evidence for dysfunction in two different neural systems implicated in self-processing, namely the cortical midline system (CMS) and the mirror neuron system (MNS), as well as contributions from altered inter-hemispheric connectivity (IHC). We conclude that while abnormalities in frontal-parietal activity and/or connectivity in the CMS are common to all four disorders there is more disruption of integration between frontal and parietal regions resulting in a shift toward parietal control in schizophrenia and ASD which may contribute to the greater severity and delusional aspects of their symptoms. Abnormalities in the MNS and in IHC are also particularly evident in schizophrenia and ASD and may lead to disturbances in sense of agency and the physical self in these two disorders. A better future understanding of how changes in the neural systems sub-serving self-processing contribute to different aspects of symptom abnormality in psychiatric disorders will require that more studies carry out detailed individual assessments of altered self-processing in conjunction with measurements of neural functioning. PMID:23966936

  16. Reconciling abnormalities of brain network structure and function in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fornito, Alex; Bullmore, Edward T

    2015-02-01

    Schizophrenia is widely regarded as a disorder of abnormal brain connectivity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggests that patients show robust reductions of structural connectivity. However, corresponding changes in functional connectivity do not always follow, with increased functional connectivity being reported in many cases. Here, we consider different methodological and mechanistic accounts that might reconcile these apparently contradictory findings and argue that increased functional connectivity in schizophrenia likely represents a pathophysiological dysregulation of brain activity arising from abnormal neurodevelopmental wiring of structural connections linking putative hub regions of association cortex to other brain areas. Elucidating the pathophysiological significance of connectivity abnormalities in schizophrenia will be contingent on better understanding how network structure shapes and constrains function.

  17. Chaotic Neural Networks and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, Kazuyuki; Yamada, Taiji; Oku, Makito

    2013-01-01

    A chaotic neuron model which is closely related to deterministic chaos observed experimentally with squid giant axons is explained, and used to construct a chaotic neural network model. Further, such a chaotic neural network is extended to different chaotic models such as a largescale memory relation network, a locally connected network, a vector-valued network, and a quaternionic-valued neuron.

  18. Space-Time Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, James A.; Shelton, Robert O.

    1992-01-01

    Concept of space-time neural network affords distributed temporal memory enabling such network to model complicated dynamical systems mathematically and to recognize temporally varying spatial patterns. Digital filters replace synaptic-connection weights of conventional back-error-propagation neural network.

  19. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  20. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  2. The equilibrium of neural firing: A mathematical theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Sizhong

    2014-12-15

    Inspired by statistical thermodynamics, we presume that neuron system has equilibrium condition with respect to neural firing. We show that, even with dynamically changeable neural connections, it is inevitable for neural firing to evolve to equilibrium. To study the dynamics between neural firing and neural connections, we propose an extended communication system where noisy channel has the tendency towards fixed point, implying that neural connections are always attracted into fixed points such that equilibrium can be reached. The extended communication system and its mathematics could be useful back in thermodynamics.

  3. Neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs), including spina bifida and anencephaly, are severe birth defects of the central nervous system that originate during embryonic development when the neural tube fails to close completely. Human NTDs are multifactorial, with contributions from both genetic and environmental factors. The genetic basis is not yet well understood, but several nongenetic risk factors have been identified as have possibilities for prevention by maternal folic acid supplementation. Mechanisms underlying neural tube closure and NTDs may be informed by experimental models, which have revealed numerous genes whose abnormal function causes NTDs and have provided details of critical cellular and morphological events whose regulation is essential for closure. Such models also provide an opportunity to investigate potential risk factors and to develop novel preventive therapies. PMID:25032496

  4. A neural connection between the central part of the medial preoptic nucleus and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis to regulate sexual behavior in male rats.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Sho; Ohishi, Naoya; Yamaguchi, Shohei; Tsukahara, Shinji

    2015-10-01

    The medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) is a regulatory center for male sexual behavior. It consists of sexually dimorphic structures that are male biased, and these structures are found in the central part of the MPN (MPNc). The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) also participates in male sexual behavior, and receives efferent neural projections from the MPNc. In this study, we examined if MPNc neurons projecting to the BNST are activated in male rats displaying sexual behavior. Fluoro-Gold (FG; a retrograde neural tracer) was injected into the BNST of male rats, which were separated into two groups: (1) those in contact with estrous female rats and displayed sexual behavior followed by ejaculation and (2) those without contact with estrous female rats. In both groups, protein expression of c-Fos (a neuronal activity marker) and calbindin (a location marker of the MPNc) were detected by fluorescent immunohistochemistry. The number of c-Fos-immunoreactive cells with or without FG labeling in the MPNc was also measured. The number of c-Fos-immunoreactive cells significantly increased following ejaculation. Approximately 10% of FG-labeled cells in ejaculation male rats were immunoreactive for c-Fos, and this percentage value was significantly higher in this group compared with control male rats. Overall, these results suggest that efferent projections from the MPNc to the BNST function to control sexual behavior in male rats.

  5. Growth-Related Neural Reorganization and the Autism Phenotype: A Test of the Hypothesis that Altered Brain Growth Leads to Altered Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, John D.; Elman, Jeffrey L.

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical considerations, and findings from computational modeling, comparative neuroanatomy and developmental neuroscience, motivate the hypothesis that a deviant brain growth trajectory will lead to deviant patterns of change in cortico-cortical connectivity. Differences in brain size during development will alter the relative cost and…

  6. Cortical and thalamic connectivity of the auditory anterior ectosylvian cortex of early-deaf cats: Implications for neural mechanisms of crossmodal plasticity.

    PubMed

    Meredith, M Alex; Clemo, H Ruth; Corley, Sarah B; Chabot, Nicole; Lomber, Stephen G

    2016-03-01

    Early hearing loss leads to crossmodal plasticity in regions of the cerebrum that are dominated by acoustical processing in hearing subjects. Until recently, little has been known of the connectional basis of this phenomenon. One region whose crossmodal properties are well-established is the auditory field of the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (FAES) in the cat, where neurons are normally responsive to acoustic stimulation and its deactivation leads to the behavioral loss of accurate orienting toward auditory stimuli. However, in early-deaf cats, visual responsiveness predominates in the FAES and its deactivation blocks accurate orienting behavior toward visual stimuli. For such crossmodal reorganization to occur, it has been presumed that novel inputs or increased projections from non-auditory cortical areas must be generated, or that existing non-auditory connections were 'unmasked.' These possibilities were tested using tracer injections into the FAES of adult cats deafened early in life (and hearing controls), followed by light microscopy to localize retrogradely labeled neurons. Surprisingly, the distribution of cortical and thalamic afferents to the FAES was very similar among early-deaf and hearing animals. No new visual projection sources were identified and visual cortical connections to the FAES were comparable in projection proportions. These results support an alternate theory for the connectional basis for cross-modal plasticity that involves enhanced local branching of existing projection terminals that originate in non-auditory as well as auditory cortices. PMID:26724756

  7. Local coupled feedforward neural network.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianye

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the local coupled feedforward neural network is presented. Its connection structure is same as that of Multilayer Perceptron with one hidden layer. In the local coupled feedforward neural network, each hidden node is assigned an address in an input space, and each input activates only the hidden nodes near it. For each input, only the activated hidden nodes take part in forward and backward propagation processes. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that this neural network owns the "universal approximation" property and can solve the learning problem of feedforward neural networks. In addition, its characteristic of local coupling makes knowledge accumulation possible.

  8. Neural network machine vision

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, R.O.; Czerniejewski, F.; Fluet, F.; Mitchell, E.

    1988-09-01

    Gould, Inc. and Nestor, Inc. cooperated on a joint development project to combine machine vision technology with neural network technology. The result is a machine vision system which can be trained by an inexperienced operator to perform qualitative classification. The hardware preprocessor reduces the information in the 2D camera image from 122,880 (i.e. 512 x 240) bytes to several hundred bytes in 64 milliseconds. The output of the preprocessor, which is in the format of connected lines, is fed to the first neural network. This neural network performs feature recognition. The output of the first neural network is a probability map. This map is fed to the input of the second neural network which performs object verification. The output of the second neural network is the object location and classification in the field of view. This information can optionally be fed into a third neural network which analyzes spatial relationships of objects in the field of view. The final output is a classification, by quality level, or by style. The system has been tested on applications ranging from the grading of plywood and the grading of paper to the sorting of fabricated metal parts. Specific application examples are presented.

  9. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jennings, J C

    1995-11-01

    Physicians who care for female patients cannot avoid the frequent complaint of abnormal uterine bleeding. Knowledge of the disorders that cause this problem can prevent serious consequences in many patients and improve the quality of life for many others. The availability of noninvasive and minimally invasive diagnostic studies and minimally invasive surgical treatment has revolutionized management of abnormal uterine bleeding. Similar to any other disorder, the extent to which a physician manages abnormal uterine bleeding depends on his or her own level of comfort. When limitations of either diagnostic or therapeutic capability are encountered, consultation and referral should be used to the best interest of patients.

  10. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  11. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  12. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  13. Functional connectivity between the amygdala and prefrontal cortex in medication-naive individuals with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Lingtao; Chen, Kaiyuan; Tang, Yanqing; Wu, Feng; Driesen, Naomi; Womer, Fay; Fan, Guoguang; Ren, Ling; Jiang, Wenyan; Cao, Yang; Blumberg, Hilary P.; Xu, Ke; Wang, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Background Convergent evidence suggests dysfunction within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and amygdala, important components of a neural system that subserves emotional processing, in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD). Abnormalities in this system in the left hemisphere and during processing of negative emotional stimuli are especially implicated. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate amygdala–PFC functional connectivity during emotional face processing in medication-naive individuals with MDD. Methods Individuals with MDD and healthy controls underwent fMRI scanning while processing 3 types of emotional face stimuli. We compared the strength of functional connectivity from the amygdala between the MDD and control groups. Results Our study included 28 individuals with MDD and 30 controls. Decreased amygdala–left rostral PFC (rPFC) functional connectivity was observed in the MDD group compared with controls for the fear condition (p < 0.05, corrected). No significant differences were found in amygdala connectivity to any cerebral regions between the MDD and control groups for the happy or neutral conditions. Limitations All participants with MDD were experiencing acute episodes, therefore the findings could not be generalized to the entire MDD population. Conclusion Medication-naive individuals with MDD showed decreased amygdala–left rPFC functional connectivity in response to negative emotional stimuli, suggesting that abnormalities in amygdala–left rPFC neural circuitry responses to negative emotional stimuli might play an important role in the pathophysiology of MDD. PMID:24148846

  14. Effects of Methylphenidate on Resting-State Functional Connectivity of the Mesocorticolimbic Dopamine Pathways in Cocaine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Konova, Anna B.; Moeller, Scott J.; Tomasi, Dardo; Volkow, Nora D.; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Cocaine addiction is associated with altered resting-state functional connectivity among regions of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine pathways. Methylphenidate hydrochloride, an indirect dopamine agonist, normalizes task-related regional brain activity and associated behavior in cocaine users; however, the neural systems–level effects of methylphenidate in this population have not yet been described. Objective To use resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine changes in mesocorticolimbic connectivity with methylphenidate and how connectivity of affected pathways relates to severity of cocaine addiction. Design Randomized, placebo-controlled, before-after, crossover study. Setting Clinical research center. Participants Eighteen nonabstaining individuals with cocaine use disorders. Interventions Single doses of oral methylphenidate (20 mg) or placebo were administered at each of 2 study sessions. At each session, resting scans were acquired twice: immediately after drug administration (before the onset of effects [baseline]) and 120 minutes later (within the window of peak effects). Main outcomes and Measures Functional connectivity strength was evaluated using a seed voxel correlation approach. Changes in this measure were examined to characterize the neural systems–level effects of methylphenidate; severity of cocaine addiction was assessed by interview and questionnaire. Results Short-term methylphenidate administration reduced an abnormally strong connectivity of the ventral striatum with the dorsal striatum (putamen/globus pallidus), and lower connectivity between these regions during placebo administration uniquely correlated with less severe addiction. In contrast, methylphenidate strengthened several corticolimbic and corticocortical connections. Conclusions and Relevance These findings help elucidate the neural systems–level effects of methylphenidate and suggest that short-term methylphenidate can, at least transiently

  15. Neural language networks at birth

    PubMed Central

    Perani, Daniela; Saccuman, Maria C.; Scifo, Paola; Anwander, Alfred; Spada, Danilo; Baldoli, Cristina; Poloniato, Antonella; Lohmann, Gabriele; Friederici, Angela D.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to learn language is a human trait. In adults and children, brain imaging studies have shown that auditory language activates a bilateral frontotemporal network with a left hemispheric dominance. It is an open question whether these activations represent the complete neural basis for language present at birth. Here we demonstrate that in 2-d-old infants, the language-related neural substrate is fully active in both hemispheres with a preponderance in the right auditory cortex. Functional and structural connectivities within this neural network, however, are immature, with strong connectivities only between the two hemispheres, contrasting with the adult pattern of prevalent intrahemispheric connectivities. Thus, although the brain responds to spoken language already at birth, thereby providing a strong biological basis to acquire language, progressive maturation of intrahemispheric functional connectivity is yet to be established with language exposure as the brain develops. PMID:21896765

  16. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Normalizes Functional Connectivity for Social Threat in Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Mason, Liam; Peters, Emmanuelle R; Dima, Danai; Williams, Steven C; Kumari, Veena

    2016-05-01

    Psychosis is often characterized by paranoia and poor social functioning. Neurally, there is evidence of functional dysconnectivity including abnormalities when processing facial affect. We sought to establish whether these abnormalities are resolved by cognitive behavioral therapy for psychosis (CBTp). The study involved 38 outpatients with one or more persistent positive psychotic symptoms, and 20 healthy participants. All participants completed an implicit facial affect processing task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Subsequently, patients either continued to receive standard care only (SCO,n= 16) or received CBTp on top of standard care (+CBTp,n= 22), with fMRI repeated 6-8 months later. To examine the mechanisms underlying CBTp-led changes in threat processing and appraisal, functional connectivity during the social threat (angry faces) condition was assessed separately from left amygdala and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) seeds. At baseline, patients, compared with healthy participants, showed greater amygdala connectivity with the insula and visual areas, but less connectivity with somatosensory areas. These differences normalized following CBTp and, compared with the SCO group, the +CBTp group showed greater increases in amygdala connectivity with DLPFC and inferior parietal lobule, with the latter correlating with improvement in positive symptoms. From the DLPFC seed, the +CBTp (compared with SCO) group showed significantly greater increase in DLPFC connectivity with other prefrontal regions including dorsal anterior cingulate and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. These findings indicate that CBTp strengthens connectivity between higher-order cognitive systems and those involved in threat and salience, potentially facilitating reappraisal.

  17. In Search of Neural Endophenotypes of Postpartum Psychopathology and Disrupted Maternal Caregiving

    PubMed Central

    Moses-Kolko, E. L.; Horner, M. S.; Phillips, M. L.; Hipwell, A. E.; Swain, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    This is a selective review that provides the context for the study of perinatal affective disorder mechanisms and outlines directions for future research. We integrate existing literature along neural networks of interest for affective disorders and maternal caregiving: (i) the salience/fear network; (ii) the executive network; (iii) the reward/social attachment network; and (iv) the default mode network. Extant salience/fear network research reveals disparate responses and corticolimbic coupling to various stimuli based upon a predominantly depressive versus anxious (post-traumatic stress disorder) clinical phenotype. Executive network and default mode connectivity abnormalities have been described in postpartum depression (PPD), although studies are very limited in these domains. Reward/social attachment studies confirm a robust ventral striatal response to infant stimuli, including cry and happy infant faces, which is diminished in depressed, insecurely attached and substance-using mothers. The adverse parenting experiences received and the attachment insecurity of current mothers are factors that are associated with a diminution in infant stimulus-related neural activity similar to that in PPD, and raise the need for additional studies that integrate mood and attachment concepts in larger study samples. Several studies examining functional connectivity in resting state and emotional activation functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigms have revealed attenuated corticolimbic connectivity, which remains an important outcome that requires dissection with increasing precision to better define neural treatment targets. Methodological progress is expected in the coming years in terms of refining clinical phenotypes of interest and experimental paradigms, as well as enlarging samples to facilitate the examination of multiple constructs. Functional imaging promises to determine neural mechanisms underlying maternal psychopathology and impaired caregiving, such

  18. Nested neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baram, Yoram

    1988-01-01

    Nested neural networks, consisting of small interconnected subnetworks, allow for the storage and retrieval of neural state patterns of different sizes. The subnetworks are naturally categorized by layers of corresponding to spatial frequencies in the pattern field. The storage capacity and the error correction capability of the subnetworks generally increase with the degree of connectivity between layers (the nesting degree). Storage of only few subpatterns in each subnetworks results in a vast storage capacity of patterns and subpatterns in the nested network, maintaining high stability and error correction capability.

  19. [Hair shaft abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Itin, P H; Düggelin, M

    2002-05-01

    Hair shaft disorders may lead to brittleness and uncombable hair. In general the hair feels dry and lusterless. Hair shaft abnormalities may occur as localized or generalized disorders. Genetic predisposition or exogenous factors are able to produce and maintain hair shaft abnormalities. In addition to an extensive history and physical examination the most important diagnostic examination to analyze a hair shaft problem is light microscopy. Therapy of hair shaft disorders should focus to the cause. In addition, minimizing traumatic influences to hair shafts, such as dry hair with an electric dryer, permanent waves and dyes is important. A short hair style is more suitable for such patients with hair shaft disorders.

  20. Analog hardware for learning neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, Silvio P. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    This is a recurrent or feedforward analog neural network processor having a multi-level neuron array and a synaptic matrix for storing weighted analog values of synaptic connection strengths which is characterized by temporarily changing one connection strength at a time to determine its effect on system output relative to the desired target. That connection strength is then adjusted based on the effect, whereby the processor is taught the correct response to training examples connection by connection.

  1. Functional connectivity of primary motor cortex is dependent on genetic burden in prodromal Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Katherine A; Lowe, Mark J; Harrington, Deborah L; Lin, Jian; Durgerian, Sally; Mourany, Lyla; Paulsen, Jane S; Rao, Stephen M

    2014-09-01

    Subtle changes in motor function have been observed in individuals with prodromal Huntington disease (prHD), but the underlying neural mechanisms are not well understood nor is the cumulative effect of the disease (disease burden) on functional connectivity. The present study examined the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) connectivity of the primary motor cortex (M1) in 16 gene-negative (NEG) controls and 48 gene-positive prHD participants with various levels of disease burden. The results showed that the strength of the left M1 connectivity with the ipsilateral M1 and somatosensory areas decreased as disease burden increased and correlated with motor symptoms. Weakened M1 connectivity within the motor areas was also associated with abnormalities in long-range connections that evolved with disease burden. In this study, M1 connectivity was decreased with visual centers (bilateral cuneus), but increased with a hub of the default mode network (DMN; posterior cingulate cortex). Changes in connectivity measures were associated with worse performance on measures of cognitive-motor functioning. Short- and long-range functional connectivity disturbances were also associated with volume loss in the basal ganglia, suggesting that weakened M1 connectivity is partly a manifestation of striatal atrophy. Altogether, the results indicate that the prodromal phase of HD is associated with abnormal interhemispheric interactions among motor areas and disturbances in the connectivity of M1 with visual centers and the DMN. These changes may, respectively, contribute to increased motor symptoms, visuomotor integration problems, and deficits in the executive control of movement as individuals approach a manifest diagnosis.

  2. Fusing EEG and fMRI based on a bottom-up model: inferring activation and effective connectivity in neural masses.

    PubMed

    Riera, J; Aubert, E; Iwata, K; Kawashima, R; Wan, X; Ozaki, T

    2005-05-29

    The elucidation of the complex machinery used by the human brain to segregate and integrate information while performing high cognitive functions is a subject of imminent future consequences. The most significant contributions to date in this field, known as cognitive neuroscience, have been achieved by using innovative neuroimaging techniques, such as electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which measure variations in both the time and the space of some interpretable physical magnitudes. Extraordinary maps of cerebral activation involving function-restricted brain areas, as well as graphs of the functional connectivity between them, have been obtained from EEG and fMRI data by solving some spatio-temporal inverse problems, which constitutes a top-down approach. However, in many cases, a natural bridge between these maps/graphs and the causal physiological processes is lacking, leading to some misunderstandings in their interpretation. Recent advances in the comprehension of the underlying physiological mechanisms associated with different cerebral scales have provided researchers with an excellent scenario to develop sophisticated biophysical models that permit an integration of these neuroimage modalities, which must share a common aetiology. This paper proposes a bottom-up approach, involving physiological parameters in a specific mesoscopic dynamic equations system. Further observation equations encapsulating the relationship between the mesostates and the EEG/fMRI data are obtained on the basis of the physical foundations of these techniques. A methodology for the estimation of parameters from fused EEG/fMRI data is also presented. In this context, the concepts of activation and effective connectivity are carefully revised. This new approach permits us to examine and discuss some future prospects for the integration of multimodal neuroimages.

  3. Disrupted Structural and Functional Connectivity in Prefrontal-Hippocampus Circuitry in First-Episode Medication-Naïve Adolescent Depression

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Haiyang; Wu, Feng; Kong, Lingtao; Tang, Yanqing; Zhou, Qian; Chang, Miao; Zhou, Yifang; Jiang, Xiaowei; Li, Songbai; Wang, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence implicates abnormalities in prefrontal-hippocampus neural circuitry in major depressive disorder (MDD). This study investigates the potential disruptions in prefrontal-hippocampus structural and functional connectivity, as well as their relationship in first-episode medication-naïve adolescents with MDD in order to investigate the early stage of the illness without confounds of illness course and medication exposure. Methods Diffusion tensor imaging and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data were acquired from 26 first-episode medication-naïve MDD adolescents and 31 healthy controls (HC). Fractional anisotropy (FA) values of the fornix and the prefrontal-hippocampus functional connectivity was compared between MDD and HC groups. The correlation between the FA value of fornix and the strength of the functional connectivity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) region showing significant differences between the two groups was identified. Results Compared with the HC group, adolescent MDD group had significant lower FA values in the fornix, as well as decreased functional connectivity in four PFC regions. Significant negative correlations were observed between fornix FA values and functional connectivity from hippocampus to PFC within the HC group. There was no significant correlation between the fornix FA and the strength of functional connectivity within the adolescent MDD group. Conclusions First-episode medication-naïve adolescent MDD showed decreased structural and functional connectivity as well as deficits of the association between structural and functional connectivity shown in HC in the PFC-hippocampus neural circuitry. These findings suggest that abnormal PFC-hippocampus neural circuitry may present in the early onset of MDD and play an important role in the neuropathophysiology of MDD. PMID:26863301

  4. Screening for Open Neural Tube Defects.

    PubMed

    Krantz, David A; Hallahan, Terrence W; Carmichael, Jonathan B

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical prenatal screening was initiated with the use of maternal serum alpha fetoprotein to screen for open neural tube defects. Screening now includes multiple marker and sequential screening protocols involving serum and ultrasound markers to screen for aneuploidy. Recently cell-free DNA screening for aneuploidy has been initiated, but does not screen for neural tube defects. Although ultrasound is highly effective in identifying neural tube defects in high-risk populations, in decentralized health systems maternal serum screening still plays a significant role. Abnormal maternal serum alpha fetoprotein alone or in combination with other markers may indicate adverse pregnancy outcome in the absence of open neural tube defects. PMID:27235920

  5. Neural network regulation driven by autonomous neural firings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myoung Won

    2016-07-01

    Biological neurons naturally fire spontaneously due to the existence of a noisy current. Such autonomous firings may provide a driving force for network formation because synaptic connections can be modified due to neural firings. Here, we study the effect of autonomous firings on network formation. For the temporally asymmetric Hebbian learning, bidirectional connections lose their balance easily and become unidirectional ones. Defining the difference between reciprocal connections as new variables, we could express the learning dynamics as if Ising model spins interact with each other in magnetism. We present a theoretical method to estimate the interaction between the new variables in a neural system. We apply the method to some network systems and find some tendencies of autonomous neural network regulation.

  6. Micro- and Nanotechnologies for Optical Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Pisanello, Ferruccio; Sileo, Leonardo; De Vittorio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    In last decade, the possibility to optically interface with the mammalian brain in vivo has allowed unprecedented investigation of functional connectivity of neural circuitry. Together with new genetic and molecular techniques to optically trigger and monitor neural activity, a new generation of optical neural interfaces is being developed, mainly thanks to the exploitation of both bottom-up and top-down nanofabrication approaches. This review highlights the role of nanotechnologies for optical neural interfaces, with particular emphasis on new devices and methodologies for optogenetic control of neural activity and unconventional methods for detection and triggering of action potentials using optically-active colloidal nanoparticles. PMID:27013939

  7. Electronic Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambe, John; Moopen, Alexander; Thakoor, Anilkumar P.

    1988-01-01

    Memory based on neural network models content-addressable and fault-tolerant. System includes electronic equivalent of synaptic network; particular, matrix of programmable binary switching elements over which data distributed. Switches programmed in parallel by outputs of serial-input/parallel-output shift registers. Input and output terminals of bank of high-gain nonlinear amplifiers connected in nonlinear-feedback configuration by switches and by memory-prompting shift registers.

  8. Serotonin mediated immunoregulation and neural functions: Complicity in the aetiology of autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Preeti; Mohanakumar, Kochupurackal P; Rajamma, Usha

    2015-08-01

    Serotonergic system has long been implicated in the aetiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), since platelet hyperserotonemia is consistently observed in a subset of autistic patients, who respond well to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Apart from being a neurotransmitter, serotonin functions as a neurotrophic factor directing brain development and as an immunoregulator modulating immune responses. Serotonin transporter (SERT) regulates serotonin level in lymphoid tissues to ensure its proper functioning in innate and adaptive responses. Immunological molecules such as cytokines in turn regulate the transcription and activity of SERT. Dysregulation of serotonergic system could trigger signalling cascades that affect normal neural-immune interactions culminating in neurodevelopmental and neural connectivity defects precipitating behavioural abnormalities, or the disease phenotypes. Therefore, we suggest that a better understanding of the cross talk between serotonergic genes, immune systems and serotonergic neurotransmission will open wider avenues to develop pharmacological leads for addressing the core ASD behavioural deficits.

  9. Neural timing nets.

    PubMed

    Cariani, P A

    2001-01-01

    Formulations of artificial neural networks are directly related to assumptions about neural coding in the brain. Traditional connectionist networks assume channel-based rate coding, while time-delay networks convert temporally-coded inputs into rate-coded outputs. Neural timing nets that operate on time structured input spike trains to produce meaningful time-structured outputs are proposed. Basic computational properties of simple feedforward and recurrent timing nets are outlined and applied to auditory computations. Feed-forward timing nets consist of arrays of coincidence detectors connected via tapped delay lines. These temporal sieves extract common spike patterns in their inputs that can subserve extraction of common fundamental frequencies (periodicity pitch) and common spectrum (timbre). Feedforward timing nets can also be used to separate time-shifted patterns, fusing patterns with similar internal temporal structure and spatially segregating different ones. Simple recurrent timing nets consisting of arrays of delay loops amplify and separate recurring time patterns. Single- and multichannel recurrent timing nets are presented that demonstrate the separation of concurrent, double vowels. Timing nets constitute a new and general neural network strategy for performing temporal computations on neural spike trains: extraction of common periodicities, detection of recurring temporal patterns, and formation and separation of invariant spike patterns that subserve auditory objects.

  10. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  11. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  12. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  13. Impaired functional but preserved structural connectivity in limbic white matter tracts in youth with conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder plus psychopathic traits

    PubMed Central

    Finger, Elizabeth Carrie; Marsh, Abigail; Blair, Karina Simone; Majestic, Catherine; Evangelou, Iordanis; Gupta, Karan; Schneider, Marguerite Reid; Sims, Courtney; Pope, Kayla; Fowler, Katherine; Sinclair, Stephen; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Pine, Daniel; Blair, Robert James

    2012-01-01

    Youths with conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder and psychopathic traits (CD/ODD+PT) are at high risk of adult anti-social behaviour and psychopathy. Neuroimaging studies demonstrate functional abnormalities in orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala in both youths and adults with psychopathic traits. Diffusion tensor imaging in psychopathic adults demonstrates disrupted structural connectivity between these regions (uncinate fasiculus). The current study examined whether functional neural abnormalities present in youths with CD/ODD+PT are associated with similar white matter abnormalities. Youths with CD/ODD+PT and comparison participants completed 3.0 T diffusion tensor scans and functional MRI scans. Diffusion tensor imaging did not reveal disruption in structural connections within the uncinate fasiculus or other white matter tracts in youths with CD/ODD+PT, despite the demonstration of disrupted amygdala-prefrontal functional connectivity in these youths. These results suggest that disrupted amygdala-frontal white matter connectivity as measured by fractional anisotropy is less sensitive than imaging measurements of functional perturbations in youths with psychopathic traits. If white matter tracts are intact in youths with this disorder, childhood may provide a critical window for intervention and treatment, before significant structural brain abnormalities solidify. PMID:22819939

  14. Impaired functional but preserved structural connectivity in limbic white matter tracts in youth with conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder plus psychopathic traits.

    PubMed

    Finger, Elizabeth Carrie; Marsh, Abigail; Blair, Karina Simone; Majestic, Catherine; Evangelou, Iordanis; Gupta, Karan; Schneider, Marguerite Reid; Sims, Courtney; Pope, Kayla; Fowler, Katherine; Sinclair, Stephen; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Pine, Daniel; Blair, Robert James

    2012-06-30

    Youths with conduct disorder or oppositional defiant disorder and psychopathic traits (CD/ODD+PT) are at high risk of adult antisocial behavior and psychopathy. Neuroimaging studies demonstrate functional abnormalities in orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala in both youths and adults with psychopathic traits. Diffusion tensor imaging in psychopathic adults demonstrates disrupted structural connectivity between these regions (uncinate fasiculus). The current study examined whether functional neural abnormalities present in youths with CD/ODD+PT are associated with similar white matter abnormalities. Youths with CD/ODD+PT and comparison participants completed 3.0 T diffusion tensor scans and functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Diffusion tensor imaging did not reveal disruption in structural connections within the uncinate fasiculus or other white matter tracts in youths with CD/ODD+PT, despite the demonstration of disrupted amygdala-prefrontal functional connectivity in these youths. These results suggest that disrupted amygdala-frontal white matter connectivity as measured by fractional anisotropy is less sensitive than imaging measurements of functional perturbations in youths with psychopathic traits. If white matter tracts are intact in youths with this disorder, childhood may provide a critical window for intervention and treatment, before significant structural brain abnormalities solidify.

  15. [Structure and function of neural plasticity-related gene products].

    PubMed

    Yamagata, K; Sugiura, H; Suzuki, K

    1998-08-01

    We have isolated novel immediate early genes (IEGs) from the hippocampus by differential cloning techniques. These mRNAs are induced by synaptic activity and translated into proteins that may affect neural function. We have analyzed a variety of "effector" immediate early genes. These mRNAs encode: 1) cytoplasmic proteins, such as cyclooxygenase-2, a small G protein, Rheb, and a cytoskeleton-associated protein, Arc; 2) membrane-bound proteins, such as the cell adhesion protein Arcadlin, and a neurite-outgrowth protein, Neuritin; and 3) a secreted protein, Narp. We hypothesize that physiological stimulation induces "effector" proteins that might strengthen synaptic connections of activated synapses. In contrast, pathological conditions such as epilepsy or drug addiction may accelerate overproduction of these gene products, which cause abnormal synapse formation. Gene targeting and in vivo gene transfer techniques are required to prove this hypothesis. PMID:9866829

  16. Analyzing rocket plume spectral data with neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Kevin W.; Krishnakumar, K. S.; Benzing, Daniel A.

    1995-01-01

    The Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) system is under development to provide early-warning failure detection in support of ground-level testing of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Failure detection is to be achieved through the acquisition of spectrally resolved plume emissions and subsequent identification of abnormal levels indicative of engine corrosion or component failure. Two computer codes (one linear and the other non-linear) are used by the OPAD system to iteratively determine specific element concentrations in the SSME plume, given emission intensity and wavelength information. Since this analysis is extremely labor intensive, a study was initiated to develop neural networks that would model the 'inverse' of these computer codes. Optimally connected feed-forward networks with imperceptible prediction error have been developed for each element modeled by the linear code, SPECTRA4. Radial basis function networks were developed for the non-linear code, SPECTRA5, and predict combustion temperature in addition to element concentrations.

  17. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  18. A neural substrate for atypical low-level visual processing in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Myriam W G; Scholte, H Steven; van Engeland, Herman; Lamme, Victor A F; Kemner, Chantal

    2008-04-01

    An important characteristic of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is increased visual detail perception. Yet, there is no standing neurobiological explanation for this aspect of the disorder. We show evidence from EEG data, from 31 control subjects (three females) and 13 subjects (two females) aged 16-28 years, for a specific impairment in object boundary detection in ASD, which is present as early as 120 ms after stimulus presentation. In line with a neural network model explicating the role of feedforward, horizontal and recurrent processing in visual perception, we can attribute this deficit to a dysfunction of horizontal connections within early visual areas. Interestingly, ASD subjects showed an increase in subsequent activity at lateral occipital sites (225 ms), which might reflect a compensational mechanism. In contrast, recurrent processing between higher and lower visual areas (around 260 ms), associated with the segregation between figure and background, was normal. Our results show specific neural abnormalities in ASD related to low-level visual processing. In addition, given the reconciliation between our findings and previous neuropathology and neurochemistry research, we suggest that atypical horizontal interactions might reflect a more general neural abnormality in this disorder. PMID:18192288

  19. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  20. Spatiotemporal dynamics of continuum neural fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    We survey recent analytical approaches to studying the spatiotemporal dynamics of continuum neural fields. Neural fields model the large-scale dynamics of spatially structured biological neural networks in terms of nonlinear integrodifferential equations whose associated integral kernels represent the spatial distribution of neuronal synaptic connections. They provide an important example of spatially extended excitable systems with nonlocal interactions and exhibit a wide range of spatially coherent dynamics including traveling waves oscillations and Turing-like patterns.

  1. Resting-state functional connectivity between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and thalamus is associated with risky decision-making in nicotine addicts

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhengde; Yang, Nannan; Liu, Ying; Yang, Lizhuang; Wang, Ying; Han, Long; Zha, Rujing; Huang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Yifeng; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine addiction is associated with risky behaviors and abnormalities in local brain areas related to risky decision-making such as the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), anterior insula (AI), and thalamus. Although these brain abnormalities are anatomically separated, they may in fact belong to one neural network. However, it is unclear whether circuit-level abnormalities lead to risky decision-making in smokers. In the current study, we used task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and examined resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) to study how connectivity between the dACC, insula, and thalamus influence risky decision-making in nicotine addicts. We found that an increase in risky decision-making was associated with stronger nicotine dependence and stronger RSFC of the dACC-rAI (right AI), the dACC-thalamus, the dACC-lAI (left AI), and the rAI-lAI, but that risky decision-making was not associated with risk level-related activation. Furthermore, the severity of nicotine dependence positively correlated with RSFC of the dACC-thalamus but was not associated with risk level-related activation. Importantly, the dACC-thalamus coupling fully mediated the effect of nicotine-dependent severity on risky decision-making. These results suggest that circuit-level connectivity may be a critical neural link between risky decision-making and severity of nicotine dependence in smokers. PMID:26879047

  2. Adaptive Neurons For Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1990-01-01

    Training time decreases dramatically. In improved mathematical model of neural-network processor, temperature of neurons (in addition to connection strengths, also called weights, of synapses) varied during supervised-learning phase of operation according to mathematical formalism and not heuristic rule. Evidence that biological neural networks also process information at neuronal level.

  3. Self-organization of neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, John W.; Winston, Jeffrey V.; Rafelski, Johann

    1984-05-01

    The plastic development of a neural-network model operating autonomously in discrete time is described by the temporal modification of interneuronal coupling strengths according to momentary neural activity. A simple algorithm (“brainwashing”) is found which, applied to nets with initially quasirandom connectivity, leads to model networks with properties conductive to the simulation of memory and learning phenomena.

  4. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  6. Nonequilibrium landscape theory of neural networks.

    PubMed

    Yan, Han; Zhao, Lei; Hu, Liang; Wang, Xidi; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2013-11-01

    The brain map project aims to map out the neuron connections of the human brain. Even with all of the wirings mapped out, the global and physical understandings of the function and behavior are still challenging. Hopfield quantified the learning and memory process of symmetrically connected neural networks globally through equilibrium energy. The energy basins of attractions represent memories, and the memory retrieval dynamics is determined by the energy gradient. However, the realistic neural networks are asymmetrically connected, and oscillations cannot emerge from symmetric neural networks. Here, we developed a nonequilibrium landscape-flux theory for realistic asymmetrically connected neural networks. We uncovered the underlying potential landscape and the associated Lyapunov function for quantifying the global stability and function. We found the dynamics and oscillations in human brains responsible for cognitive processes and physiological rhythm regulations are determined not only by the landscape gradient but also by the flux. We found that the flux is closely related to the degrees of the asymmetric connections in neural networks and is the origin of the neural oscillations. The neural oscillation landscape shows a closed-ring attractor topology. The landscape gradient attracts the network down to the ring. The flux is responsible for coherent oscillations on the ring. We suggest the flux may provide the driving force for associations among memories. We applied our theory to rapid-eye movement sleep cycle. We identified the key regulation factors for function through global sensitivity analysis of landscape topography against wirings, which are in good agreements with experiments.

  7. Altered functional connectivity of the language network in ASD: role of classical language areas and cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Verly, Marjolein; Verhoeven, Judith; Zink, Inge; Mantini, Dante; Peeters, Ronald; Deprez, Sabine; Emsell, Louise; Boets, Bart; Noens, Ilse; Steyaert, Jean; Lagae, Lieven; De Cock, Paul; Rommel, Nathalie; Sunaert, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The development of language, social interaction and communicative skills is remarkably different in the child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Atypical brain connectivity has frequently been reported in this patient population. However, the neural correlates underlying their disrupted language development and functioning are still poorly understood. Using resting state fMRI, we investigated the functional connectivity properties of the language network in a group of ASD patients with clear comorbid language impairment (ASD-LI; N = 19) and compared them to the language related connectivity properties of 23 age-matched typically developing children. A verb generation task was used to determine language components commonly active in both groups. Eight joint language components were identified and subsequently used as seeds in a resting state analysis. Interestingly, both the interregional and the seed-based whole brain connectivity analysis showed preserved connectivity between the classical intrahemispheric language centers, Wernicke's and Broca's areas. In contrast however, a marked loss of functional connectivity was found between the right cerebellar region and the supratentorial regulatory language areas. Also, the connectivity between the interhemispheric Broca regions and modulatory control dorsolateral prefrontal region was found to be decreased. This disruption of normal modulatory control and automation function by the cerebellum may underlie the abnormal language function in children with ASD-LI.

  8. Workshop on neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, R.E.; Emrich, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The topics covered in this report are: Learning, Memory, and Artificial Neural Systems; Emerging Neural Network Technology; Neural Networks; Digital Signal Processing and Neural Networks; Application of Neural Networks to In-Core Fuel Management; Neural Networks in Process Control; Neural Network Applications in Image Processing; Neural Networks for Multi-Sensor Information Fusion; Neural Network Research in Instruments Controls Division; Neural Networks Research in the ORNL Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division; Neural Network Applications for Linear Programming; Neural Network Applications to Signal Processing and Diagnostics; Neural Networks in Filtering and Control; Neural Network Research at Tennessee Technological University; and Global Minima within the Hopfield Hypercube.

  9. Abnormal ionization in sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Juan; An, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Sonoluminescence is a complex phenomenon, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The present study reveals that an abnormal ionization process is likely to be present in the sonoluminescing bubble. To fit the experimental data of previous studies, we assume that the ionization energies of the molecules and atoms in the bubble decrease as the gas density increases and that the decrease of the ionization energy reaches about 60%-70% as the bubble flashes, which is difficult to explain by using previous models. Project supported by the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120002110031) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11334005).

  10. Connectivity network measures predict volumetric atrophy in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Nir, Talia M; Jahanshad, Neda; Toga, Arthur W; Bernstein, Matt A; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by cortical atrophy and disrupted anatomic connectivity, and leads to abnormal interactions between neural systems. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and graph theory can be used to evaluate major brain networks and detect signs of a breakdown in network connectivity. In a longitudinal study using both DWI and standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we assessed baseline white-matter connectivity patterns in 30 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, mean age 71.8 ± 7.5 years, 18 males and 12 females) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Using both standard MRI-based cortical parcellations and whole-brain tractography, we computed baseline connectivity maps from which we calculated global "small-world" architecture measures, including mean clustering coefficient and characteristic path length. We evaluated whether these baseline network measures predicted future volumetric brain atrophy in MCI subjects, who are at risk for developing AD, as determined by 3-dimensional Jacobian "expansion factor maps" between baseline and 6-month follow-up anatomic scans. This study suggests that DWI-based network measures may be a novel predictor of AD progression.

  11. Abnormal hematological indices in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Qamar, Amir A; Grace, Norman D

    2009-01-01

    Abnormalities in hematological indices are frequently encountered in cirrhosis. Multiple causes contribute to the occurrence of hematological abnormalities. Recent studies suggest that the presence of hematological cytopenias is associated with a poor prognosis in cirrhosis. The present article reviews the pathogenesis, incidence, prevalence, clinical significance and treatment of abnormal hematological indices in cirrhosis. PMID:19543577

  12. Metastable dynamics in heterogeneous neural fields

    PubMed Central

    Schwappach, Cordula; Hutt, Axel; beim Graben, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of metastable states in heterogeneous neural fields that are connected along heteroclinic orbits. Such trajectories are possible representations of transient neural activity as observed, for example, in the electroencephalogram. Based on previous theoretical findings on learning algorithms for neural fields, we directly construct synaptic weight kernels from Lotka-Volterra neural population dynamics without supervised training approaches. We deliver a MATLAB neural field toolbox validated by two examples of one- and two-dimensional neural fields. We demonstrate trial-to-trial variability and distributed representations in our simulations which might therefore be regarded as a proof-of-concept for more advanced neural field models of metastable dynamics in neurophysiological data. PMID:26175671

  13. Metastable dynamics in heterogeneous neural fields.

    PubMed

    Schwappach, Cordula; Hutt, Axel; Beim Graben, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of metastable states in heterogeneous neural fields that are connected along heteroclinic orbits. Such trajectories are possible representations of transient neural activity as observed, for example, in the electroencephalogram. Based on previous theoretical findings on learning algorithms for neural fields, we directly construct synaptic weight kernels from Lotka-Volterra neural population dynamics without supervised training approaches. We deliver a MATLAB neural field toolbox validated by two examples of one- and two-dimensional neural fields. We demonstrate trial-to-trial variability and distributed representations in our simulations which might therefore be regarded as a proof-of-concept for more advanced neural field models of metastable dynamics in neurophysiological data. PMID:26175671

  14. Spirometric abnormalities among welders

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, S.K.; Gupta, B.N.; Husain, T.; Mathur, N.; Srivastava, S. )

    1991-10-01

    A group of manual welders age group 13-60 years having a mean exposure period of 12.4 {plus minus} 1.12 years were subjected to spirometry to evaluate the prevalence of spirometric abnormalities. The welders showed a significantly higher prevalence of respiratory impairment than that observed among the unexposed controls as a result of exposure to welding gases which comprised fine particles of lead, zinc, chromium, and manganese. This occurred despite the lower concentration of the pollutants at the work place. In the expose group, the smoking welders showed a prevalence of respiratory impairment significantly higher than that observed in the nonsmoking welders. The results of the pulmonary function tests showed a predominantly restrictive type of pulmonary impairment followed by a mixed ventilatory defect among the welders. The effect of age on pulmonary impairment was not discernible. Welders exposed for over 10 years showed a prevalence of respiratory abnormalities significantly higher than those exposed for less than 10 years. Smoking also had a contributory role.

  15. Alterations in Brain Structure and Functional Connectivity in Alcohol Dependent Patients and Possible Association with Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yue; Ma, Mengying; Ma, Yi; Dong, Yuru; Niu, Yajuan; Jiang, Yin; Wang, Hong; Wang, Zhiyan; Wu, Liuzhen; Sun, Hongqiang; Cui, Cailian

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have documented that heightened impulsivity likely contributes to the development and maintenance of alcohol use disorders. However, there is still a lack of studies that comprehensively detected the brain changes associated with abnormal impulsivity in alcohol addicts. This study was designed to investigate the alterations in brain structure and functional connectivity associated with abnormal impulsivity in alcohol dependent patients. Methods Brain structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging data as well as impulsive behavior data were collected from 20 alcohol dependent patients and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls respectively. Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate the differences of grey matter volume, and tract-based spatial statistics was used to detect abnormal white matter regions between alcohol dependent patients and healthy controls. The alterations in resting-state functional connectivity in alcohol dependent patients were examined using selected brain areas with gray matter deficits as seed regions. Results Compared with healthy controls, alcohol dependent patients had significantly reduced gray matter volume in the mesocorticolimbic system including the dorsal posterior cingulate cortex, the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, the medial prefrontal cortex, the orbitofrontal cortex and the putamen, decreased fractional anisotropy in the regions connecting the damaged grey matter areas driven by higher radial diffusivity value in the same areas and decreased resting-state functional connectivity within the reward network. Moreover, the gray matter volume of the left medial prefrontal cortex exhibited negative correlations with various impulse indices. Conclusions These findings suggest that chronic alcohol dependence could cause a complex neural changes linked to abnormal impulsivity. PMID:27575491

  16. Alterations of functional and structural connectivity of freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Jiang, Siming; Yuan, Yongsheng; Zhang, Li; Ding, Jian; Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Jiejin; Zhang, Kezhong; Wang, Jie

    2016-08-01

    This study assessed the patterns of functional and structural connectivity abnormalities in patients with Parkinson's disease with freezing of gait (PD FOG+) compared with those without freezing (PD FOG-) and healthy controls (HCs). Resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scans were obtained from 14 PD FOG+, 16 PD FOG- and 16HCs. Between-group difference in pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) functional connectivity (FC) was performed to assess FC dysfunction. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) was applied to compare white matter (WM) impairment across the whole brain between groups. PD FOG+ patients exhibited abnormal PPN FC, compared with HCs and with PD FOG-, mainly in the corticopontine-cerebellar pathways (in the bilateral cerebellum and in the pons), as well as the visual temporal areas (in the right middle temporal gyrus and in the right inferior temporal gyrus). Moreover, PD FOG+ patients, showed more pronounced WM abnormalities, relative to controls, including the interhemispheric connections of corpus callosum, the cortico-cortical WM tracts of the cingulum, the superior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, the corticofugal tract (cerebral peduncles, internal capsule, corona radiata), as well as tracts connecting the thalamus (thalamic radiation). This study suggests that FOG in PD is associated with abnormal PPN FC network, mainly affecting the corticopontine-cerebellar pathways as well as visual temporal areas involved in visual processing, and with diffuse WM deficits extending to motor, sensory and cognitive regions. Combining rs-fMRI and DTI method, our study should advance the understanding of neural mechanisms underlying FOG in PD. PMID:27230857

  17. Lie algebroids and optimal control: abnormality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero-Liñán, M.; de Diego, D. Martín; Muñoz-Lecanda, M. C.

    2009-05-01

    Candidates to be solutions to optimal control problems, called extremals, are found using Pontryagin's Maximum Principle [9]. This Principle gives necessary conditions for optimality and, under suitable assumptions, starts a presymplectic constraint algorithm in the sense given in [3]. This procedure, first considered in optimal control theory in [6], can be adapted to characterize the different kinds of extremals [1]. In this paper, we describe the constraints given by the algorithm for the so-called abnormal extremals for optimal control problems defined on Lie algebroids [4, 7, 8]. The peculiarity of the abnormal extremals is their independence on the cost function to characterize them. In particular, we are interested in how useful the geometry provided by the Lie algebroid is to study the constraints obtained in the optimal control problems for affine connection control systems. These systems model the motion of different types of mechanical systems such as rigid bodies, nonholonomic systems and robotic arms [2].

  18. Neurobiology of social behavior abnormalities in autism and Williams syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Barak, B; Feng, G

    2016-01-01

    Social behavior is a basic behavior mediated by multiple brain regions and neural circuits, and is crucial for the survival and development of animals and humans. Two neuropsychiatric disorders that have prominent social behavior abnormalities are autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which is characterized mainly by hyposociability, and Williams syndrome (WS), whose subjects exhibit hypersociability. Here, we review the unique properties of social behavior in ASD and WS, and discuss the major theories in social behavior in the context of these disorders. We conclude with a discussion of the research questions needing further exploration to enhance our understanding of social behavior abnormalities. PMID:27116389

  19. Neurobiology of social behavior abnormalities in autism and Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barak, Boaz; Feng, Guoping

    2016-04-26

    Social behavior is a basic behavior mediated by multiple brain regions and neural circuits, and is crucial for the survival and development of animals and humans. Two neuropsychiatric disorders that have prominent social behavior abnormalities are autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which is characterized mainly by hyposociability, and Williams syndrome (WS), whose subjects exhibit hypersociability. Here we review the unique properties of social behavior in ASD and WS, and discuss the major theories in social behavior in the context of these disorders. We conclude with a discussion of the research questions needing further exploration to enhance our understanding of social behavior abnormalities. PMID:27116389

  20. A neural net model for multiple memory domains.

    PubMed

    Anninos, P; Kokkinidis, M

    1984-07-01

    Previous studies with neural nets constructed of discrete populations of formal neurons have assumed that all neurons have the same probability of connection with any other neuron in the net. However, in this new study we incorporate the behavior of the neural systems in which the neural connections can be set up by means of chemical markers carried by the individual cells. With this new approach we studied the dynamics of isolated neural nets again as well as the dynamics of neural nets with sustained inputs. Results obtained with this approach show simple and multiple hysteresis phenomena. Such hysteresis loops may be considered to represent the basis for short-term memory.

  1. Neural Network Development Tool (NETS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baffes, Paul T.

    1990-01-01

    Artificial neural networks formed from hundreds or thousands of simulated neurons, connected in manner similar to that in human brain. Such network models learning behavior. Using NETS involves translating problem to be solved into input/output pairs, designing network configuration, and training network. Written in C.

  2. Connectome Signatures of Neurocognitive Abnormalities in Euthymic Bipolar I Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ajilore, Olusola; Vizueta, Nathalie; Walshaw, Patricia; Zhan, Liang; Leow, Alex; Altshuler, Lori L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Connectomics have allowed researchers to study integrative patterns of neural connectivity in humans. Yet, it is unclear how connectomics may elucidate structure-function relationships in bipolar I disorder (BPI). Expanding on our previous structural connectome study, here we used an overlapping sample with additional psychometric and fMRI data to relate structural connectome properties to both fMRI signals and cognitive performance. Methods 42 subjects completed a neuropsychological (NP) battery covering domains of processing speed, verbal memory, working memory, and cognitive flexibility. 32 subjects also had fMRI data performing a Go/NoGo task. Results Bipolar participants had lower NP performance across all domains, but only working memory reached statistical significance. In BPI participants, processing speed was significantly associated with both white matter integrity (WMI) in the corpus callosum and interhemispheric network integration. Mediation models further revealed that the relationship between interhemispheric integration and processing speed was mediated by WMI, and processing speed mediated the relationship between WMI and working memory. Bipolar subjects had significantly decreased BA47 activation during NoGo vs. Go. Significant predictors of BA47 fMRI activations during the Go/NoGo task were its nodal path length (left hemisphere) and its nodal clustering coefficient (right hemisphere). Conclusions This study suggests that structural connectome changes underlie abnormalities in fMRI activation and cognitive performance in euthymic BPI subjects. Results support that BA47 structural connectome changes may be a trait marker for BPI. Future studies are needed to determine if these “connectome signatures” may also confer a biological risk and/or serve as predictors of relapse. PMID:26228398

  3. Demultiplexer circuit for neural stimulation

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O; Okandan, Murat; Pearson, Sean

    2012-10-09

    A demultiplexer circuit is disclosed which can be used with a conventional neural stimulator to extend the number of electrodes which can be activated. The demultiplexer circuit, which is formed on a semiconductor substrate containing a power supply that provides all the dc electrical power for operation of the circuit, includes digital latches that receive and store addressing information from the neural stimulator one bit at a time. This addressing information is used to program one or more 1:2.sup.N demultiplexers in the demultiplexer circuit which then route neural stimulation signals from the neural stimulator to an electrode array which is connected to the outputs of the 1:2.sup.N demultiplexer. The demultiplexer circuit allows the number of individual electrodes in the electrode array to be increased by a factor of 2.sup.N with N generally being in a range of 2-4.

  4. Genetic Dissection of Neural Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Liqun; Callaway, Edward M.; Svoboda, Karel

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the principles of information processing in neural circuits requires systematic characterization of the participating cell types and their connections, and the ability to measure and perturb their activity. Genetic approaches promise to bring experimental access to complex neural systems, including genetic stalwarts such as the fly and mouse, but also to nongenetic systems such as primates. Together with anatomical and physiological methods, cell-type-specific expression of protein markers and sensors and transducers will be critical to construct circuit diagrams and to measure the activity of genetically defined neurons. Inactivation and activation of genetically defined cell types will establish causal relationships between activity in specific groups of neurons, circuit function, and animal behavior. Genetic analysis thus promises to reveal the logic of the neural circuits in complex brains that guide behaviors. Here we review progress in the genetic analysis of neural circuits and discuss directions for future research and development. PMID:18341986

  5. Convergent evidence for abnormal striatal synaptic plasticity in dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, David A.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Poizner, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Dystonia is a functionally disabling movement disorder characterized by abnormal movements and postures. Although substantial recent progress has been made in identifying genetic factors, the pathophysiology of the disease remains a mystery. A provocative suggestion gaining broader acceptance is that some aspect of neural plasticity may be abnormal. There is also evidence that, at least in some forms of dystonia, sensorimotor “use” may be a contributing factor. Most empirical evidence of abnormal plasticity in dystonia comes from measures of sensorimotor cortical organization and physiology. However, the basal ganglia also play a critical role in sensorimotor function. Furthermore, the basal ganglia are prominently implicated in traditional models of dystonia, are the primary targets of stereotactic neurosurgical interventions, and provide a neural substrate for sensorimotor learning influenced by neuromodulators. Our working hypothesis is that abnormal plasticity in the basal ganglia is a critical link between the etiology and pathophysiology of dystonia. In this review we set up the background for this hypothesis by integrating a large body of disparate indirect evidence that dystonia may involve abnormalities in synaptic plasticity in the striatum. After reviewing evidence implicating the striatum in dystonia, we focus on the influence of two neuromodulatory systems: dopamine and acetylcholine. For both of these neuromodulators, we first describe the evidence for abnormalities in dystonia and then the means by which it may influence striatal synaptic plasticity. Collectively, the evidence suggests that many different forms of dystonia may involve abnormal plasticity in the striatum. An improved understanding of these altered plastic processes would help inform our understanding of the pathophysiology of dystonia, and, given the role of the striatum in sensorimotor learning, provide a principled basis for designing therapies aimed at the dynamic processes

  6. Evidence for intact local connectivity but disrupted regional function in the occipital lobe in children and adolescents with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    White, Tonya; Moeller, Steen; Schmidt, Marcus; Pardo, Jose V; Olman, Cheryl

    2012-08-01

    It has long been known that specific visual frequencies result in greater blood flow to the striate cortex. These peaks are thought to reflect synchrony of local neuronal firing that is reflective of local cortical networks. Since disrupted neural connectivity is a possible etiology for schizophrenia, our goal was to investigate whether localized connectivity, as measured by aberrant synchrony, is abnormal in children and adolescents with schizophrenia. Subjects included 25 children and adolescents with schizophrenia and 39 controls matched for age and gender. Subjects were scanned on a Siemens 3 Tesla Trio scanner while observing flashing checkerboard presented at either 1, 4, 8, or 12 Hz. Image processing included both a standard GLM model and a Fourier transform analysis. Patients had significantly smaller volume of activation in the occipital lobe compared to controls. There were no differences in the integral or percent signal change of the hemodynamic response function for each of the four frequencies. Occipital activation was stable during development between childhood and late adolescence. Finally, both patients and controls demonstrated an increased response between 4 and 8 Hz consistent with synchrony or entrainment in the neuronal response. Children and adolescents with schizophrenia had a significantly lower volume of activation in the occipital lobe in response to the flashing checkerboard task. However, features of intact local connectivity in patients, such as the hemodynamic response function and maximal response at 8 Hz, were normal. These results are consistent with abnormalities in regional connectivity with preserved local connectivity in early-onset schizophrenia.

  7. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  8. Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Patrick I.

    2003-09-23

    Physicists use large detectors to measure particles created in high-energy collisions at particle accelerators. These detectors typically produce signals indicating either where ionization occurs along the path of the particle, or where energy is deposited by the particle. The data produced by these signals is fed into pattern recognition programs to try to identify what particles were produced, and to measure the energy and direction of these particles. Ideally, there are many techniques used in this pattern recognition software. One technique, neural networks, is particularly suitable for identifying what type of particle caused by a set of energy deposits. Neural networks can derive meaning from complicated or imprecise data, extract patterns, and detect trends that are too complex to be noticed by either humans or other computer related processes. To assist in the advancement of this technology, Physicists use a tool kit to experiment with several neural network techniques. The goal of this research is interface a neural network tool kit into Java Analysis Studio (JAS3), an application that allows data to be analyzed from any experiment. As the final result, a physicist will have the ability to train, test, and implement a neural network with the desired output while using JAS3 to analyze the results or output. Before an implementation of a neural network can take place, a firm understanding of what a neural network is and how it works is beneficial. A neural network is an artificial representation of the human brain that tries to simulate the learning process [5]. It is also important to think of the word artificial in that definition as computer programs that use calculations during the learning process. In short, a neural network learns by representative examples. Perhaps the easiest way to describe the way neural networks learn is to explain how the human brain functions. The human brain contains billions of neural cells that are responsible for processing

  9. Focal dermal hypoplasia: ultrastructural abnormalities of the connective tissue.

    PubMed

    del Carmen Boente, María; Asial, Raúl A; Winik, Beatriz C

    2007-02-01

    We followed over 10 years three girls with focal dermal hypoplasia syndrome. The histopathological changes demonstrated at the optical level an hypoplastic dermis with thin and scarce collagen bundles and a marked diminution of elastic fibers. Mature adipose tissue was found scattered within the papillary and reticular dermis. No alterations in the basal membrane were observed by immunocytochemical or ultrastructural techniques. Ultrastructurally, in the skin-affected areas, loosely arranged collagen bundles composed of few fibrils were seen scattered in the extracellular matrix. Scarce elastic fibers of normal morphology were also observed. Fibroblasts were smaller, oval-shaped, and diminished in number with a poorly developed cytoplasm. In these fibroblasts, the most conspicuous feature was a remarkable and irregular thickening of the nuclear fibrous lamina. Taking into account that a common link between all laminopaties may be a failure of stem cells to regenerate mesenchymal tissue, this failure would induce the dermal hypoplasia observed in our patients presenting Goltz syndrome.

  10. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  11. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  12. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  13. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential). PMID:261653

  14. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Lucy; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common and debilitating condition with high direct and indirect costs. AUB frequently co-exists with fibroids, but the relationship between the two remains incompletely understood and in many women the identification of fibroids may be incidental to a menstrual bleeding complaint. A structured approach for establishing the cause using the Fédération International de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) PALM-COEIN (Polyp, Adenomyosis, Leiomyoma, Malignancy (and hyperplasia), Coagulopathy, Ovulatory disorders, Endometrial, Iatrogenic and Not otherwise classified) classification system will facilitate accurate diagnosis and inform treatment options. Office hysteroscopy and increasing sophisticated imaging will assist provision of robust evidence for the underlying cause. Increased availability of medical options has expanded the choice for women and many will no longer need to recourse to potentially complicated surgery. Treatment must remain individualised and encompass the impact of pressure symptoms, desire for retention of fertility and contraceptive needs, as well as address the management of AUB in order to achieve improved quality of life. PMID:26803558

  15. Abortion for fetal abnormality.

    PubMed

    Maclean, N E

    1979-07-25

    I wish to thank Dr. Pauline Bennett for her reply (NZ Med J, 13 June). She has demonstrated well that in dealing with sensitive difficult issues such as abortion for fetal abnormality, the one thing the doctor is not recommended to do is to speak the truth] I am prompted to write this letter for 2 reasons. Firstly, the excellent letter written by Dr. A. M. Rutherford (NZ Med J, 13 June) on the subject of abortion stated, "The most disturbing feature about the whole controversy is the 'blunting of our conscience'." When the doctors are not encouraged to be honest with patients then indeed our conscience has been blunted. Secondly, I watched Holocaust last night, and cannot refrain from stating that I see frightening parallels between our liberal abortion policy and the activities of the Nazis. As I watched the "mental patients" being herded into the shed for gassing by the polite, tidy, white coated medical staff, and then heard the compassionate, sensitive, letter of the hospital authorities to the relatives of the deceased, the parallel became obvious. The mental patients were weak, defenseless, burdensome, and uneconomic; the unborn are weak, defenseless, burdensome, and uneconomic. The hospital authority's letter was acceptable in many ways, acceptable except that its words bore no relation to the truth. It is said that the "first casualty of war is the truth". Whether that war involves the Jews, or the insane, or the unborn, the statement would seem correct.

  16. The Neural Crest in Cardiac Congenital Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Keyte, Anna; Hutson, Mary Redmond

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the function of neural crest as they relate to cardiovascular defects. The cardiac neural crest cells are a subpopulation of cranial neural crest discovered nearly 30 years ago by ablation of premigratory neural crest. The cardiac neural crest cells are necessary for normal cardiovascular development. We begin with a description of the crest cells in normal development, including their function in remodeling the pharyngeal arch arteries, outflow tract septation, valvulogenesis, and development of the cardiac conduction system. The cells are also responsible for modulating signaling in the caudal pharynx, including the second heart field. Many of the molecular pathways that are known to influence specification, migration, patterning and final targeting of the cardiac neural crest cells are reviewed. The cardiac neural crest cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of various human cardiocraniofacial syndromes such as DiGeorge, Velocardiofacial, CHARGE, Fetal Alcohol, Alagille, LEOPARD, and Noonan syndromes, as well as Retinoic Acid Embryopathy. The loss of neural crest cells or their dysfunction may not always directly cause abnormal cardiovascular development, but are involved secondarily because crest cells represent a major component in the complex tissue interactions in the head, pharynx and outflow tract. Thus many of the human syndromes linking defects in the heart, face and brain can be better understood when considered within the context of a single cardiocraniofacial developmental module with the neural crest being a key cell type that interconnects the regions. PMID:22595346

  17. Neural tube defects and impaired neural progenitor cell proliferation in Gbeta1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Okae, Hiroaki; Iwakura, Yoichiro

    2010-04-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are well known for their roles in signal transduction downstream of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and both Galpha subunits and tightly associated Gbetagamma subunits regulate downstream effector molecules. Compared to Galpha subunits, the physiological roles of individual Gbeta and Ggamma subunits are poorly understood. In this study, we generated mice deficient in the Gbeta1 gene and found that Gbeta1 is required for neural tube closure, neural progenitor cell proliferation, and neonatal development. About 40% Gbeta1(-/-) embryos developed neural tube defects (NTDs) and abnormal actin organization was observed in the basal side of neuroepithelium. In addition, Gbeta1(-/-) embryos without NTDs showed microencephaly and died within 2 days after birth. GPCR agonist-induced ERK phosphorylation, cell proliferation, and cell spreading, which were all found to be regulated by Galphai and Gbetagamma signaling, were abnormal in Gbeta1(-/-) neural progenitor cells. These data indicate that Gbeta1 is required for normal embryonic neurogenesis. PMID:20186915

  18. Connected Traveler

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Alex

    2015-11-01

    The Connected Traveler project is a multi-disciplinary undertaking that seeks to validate potential for transformative transportation system energy savings by incentivizing efficient traveler behavior. This poster outlines various aspects of the Connected Traveler project, including market opportunity, understanding traveler behavior and decision-making, automation and connectivity, and a projected timeline for Connected Traveler's key milestones.

  19. A new perspective on behavioral inconsistency and neural noise in aging: compensatory speeding of neural communication

    PubMed Central

    Hong, S. Lee; Rebec, George V.

    2012-01-01

    This paper seeks to present a new perspective on the aging brain. Here, we make connections between two key phenomena of brain aging: (1) increased neural noise or random background activity; and (2) slowing of brain activity. Our perspective proposes the possibility that the slowing of neural processing due to decreasing nerve conduction velocities leads to a compensatory speeding of neuron firing rates. These increased firing rates lead to a broader distribution of power in the frequency spectrum of neural oscillations, which we propose, can just as easily be interpreted as neural noise. Compensatory speeding of neural activity, as we present, is constrained by the: (A) availability of metabolic energy sources; and (B) competition for frequency bandwidth needed for neural communication. We propose that these constraints lead to the eventual inability to compensate for age-related declines in neural function that are manifested clinically as deficits in cognition, affect, and motor behavior. PMID:23055970

  20. Degraded attentional modulation of cortical neural populations in strabismic amblyopia

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Chuan; Kim, Yee-Joon; Lai, Xin Jie; Verghese, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral studies have reported reduced spatial attention in amblyopia, a developmental disorder of spatial vision. However, the neural populations in the visual cortex linked with these behavioral spatial attention deficits have not been identified. Here, we use functional MRI–informed electroencephalography source imaging to measure the effect of attention on neural population activity in the visual cortex of human adult strabismic amblyopes who were stereoblind. We show that compared with controls, the modulatory effects of selective visual attention on the input from the amblyopic eye are substantially reduced in the primary visual cortex (V1) as well as in extrastriate visual areas hV4 and hMT+. Degraded attentional modulation is also found in the normal-acuity fellow eye in areas hV4 and hMT+ but not in V1. These results provide electrophysiological evidence that abnormal binocular input during a developmental critical period may impact cortical connections between the visual cortex and higher level cortices beyond the known amblyopic losses in V1 and V2, suggesting that a deficit of attentional modulation in the visual cortex is an important component of the functional impairment in amblyopia. Furthermore, we find that degraded attentional modulation in V1 is correlated with the magnitude of interocular suppression and the depth of amblyopia. These results support the view that the visual suppression often seen in strabismic amblyopia might be a form of attentional neglect of the visual input to the amblyopic eye. PMID:26885628

  1. Cross-Coupled Eye Movement Supports Neural Origin of Pattern Strabismus

    PubMed Central

    Ghasia, Fatema F.; Shaikh, Aasef G.; Jacobs, Jonathan; Walker, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Pattern strabismus describes vertically incomitant horizontal strabismus. Conventional theories emphasized the role of orbital etiologies, such as abnormal fundus torsion and misaligned orbital pulleys as a cause of the pattern strabismus. Experiments in animal models, however, suggested the role of abnormal cross-connections between the neural circuits. We quantitatively assessed eye movements in patients with pattern strabismus with a goal to delineate the role of neural circuits versus orbital etiologies. Methods. We measured saccadic eye movements with high-precision video-oculography in 14 subjects with pattern strabismus, 5 with comitant strabismus, and 15 healthy controls. We assessed change in eye position in the direction orthogonal to that of the desired eye movement (cross-coupled responses). We used fundus photography to quantify the fundus torsion. Results. We found cross-coupling of saccades in all patients with pattern strabismus. The cross-coupled responses were in the same direction in both eyes, but larger in the nonviewing eye. All patients had clinically apparent inferior oblique overaction with abnormal excylotorsion. There was no correlation between the amount of the fundus torsion or the grade of oblique overaction and the severity of cross-coupling. The disconjugacy in the saccade direction and amplitude in pattern strabismics did not have characteristics predicted by clinically apparent inferior oblique overaction. Conclusions. Our results validated primate models of pattern strabismus in human patients. We found no correlation between ocular torsion or oblique overaction and cross-coupling. Therefore, we could not ascribe cross-coupling exclusively to the orbital etiology. Patients with pattern strabismus could have abnormalities in the saccade generators. PMID:26024072

  2. Haem degradation in abnormal haemoglobins.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S B; Docherty, J C

    1978-01-01

    The coupled oxidation of certain abnormal haemoglobins leads to different bile-pigment isomer distributions from that of normal haemoglobin. The isomer pattern may be correlated with the structure of the abnormal haemoglobin in the neighbourhood of the haem pocket. This is support for haem degradation by an intramolecular reaction. PMID:708385

  3. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases. PMID:19554648

  4. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  5. Electrocardiograph abnormalities revealed during laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Dubrey, Simon William

    2010-01-01

    This brief case presents a well patient in whom an electrocardiograph abnormality consistent with an accessory pathway was found during a routine procedure. We present the electrocardiographs, explain the underlying condition, and consider why the abnormality was revealed in this manner.

  6. Neural-Network-Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Todd A.

    1993-01-01

    NETS, software tool for development and evaluation of neural networks, provides simulation of neural-network algorithms plus computing environment for development of such algorithms. Uses back-propagation learning method for all of networks it creates. Enables user to customize patterns of connections between layers of network. Also provides features for saving, during learning process, values of weights, providing more-precise control over learning process. Written in ANSI standard C language. Machine-independent version (MSC-21588) includes only code for command-line-interface version of NETS 3.0.

  7. Increased resting state functional connectivity in the fronto-parietal and default mode network in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Ilka; Geisler, Daniel; King, Joseph A.; Ritschel, Franziska; Seidel, Maria; Deza Araujo, Yacila; Petermann, Juliane; Lohmeier, Heidi; Weiss, Jessika; Walter, Martin; Roessner, Veit; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of anorexia nervosa (AN) is poorly understood. Results from functional brain imaging studies investigating the neural profile of AN using cognitive and emotional task paradigms are difficult to reconcile. Task-related imaging studies often require a high level of compliance and can only partially explore the distributed nature and complexity of brain function. In this study, resting state functional connectivity imaging was used to investigate well-characterized brain networks potentially relevant to understand the neural mechanisms underlying the symptomatology and etiology of AN. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data was obtained from 35 unmedicated female acute AN patients and 35 closely matched healthy controls female participants (HC) and decomposed using spatial group independent component analyses (ICA). Using validated templates, we identified components covering the fronto-parietal “control” network, the default mode network (DMN), the salience network, the visual and the sensory-motor network. Group comparison revealed an increased functional connectivity between the angular gyrus and the other parts of the fronto-parietal network in patients with AN in comparison to HC. Connectivity of the angular gyrus was positively associated with self-reported persistence in HC. In the DMN, AN patients also showed an increased functional connectivity strength in the anterior insula in comparison to HC. Anterior insula connectivity was associated with self-reported problems with interoceptive awareness. This study, with one of the largest sample to date, shows that acute AN is associated with abnormal brain connectivity in two major resting state networks (RSN). The finding of an increased functional connectivity in the fronto-parietal network adds novel support for the notion of AN as a disorder of excessive cognitive control, whereas the elevated functional connectivity of the anterior insula with the DMN may reflect the high

  8. Movement and Learning: A Valuable Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens-Smith, Deborah

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the relatedness between movement and learning for students. The process of learning involves basic nerve cells that transmit information and create numerous neural connections essential to learning. One way to increase learning is to encourage creation of more synaptic connections in the brain through…

  9. The neural basis of a deficit in abstract thinking in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jooyoung; Chun, Ji-Won; Joon Jo, Hang; Kim, Eunseong; Park, Hae-Jeong; Lee, Boreom; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2015-10-30

    Abnormal abstract thinking is a major cause of social dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia, but little is known about its neural basis. In this study, we aimed to determine the characteristic abstract thinking-related brain responses in patients using a task reflecting social situations. We conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging while 16 patients with schizophrenia and 16 healthy controls performed a theme-identification task, in which various emotional pictures depicting social situations were presented. Compared with healthy controls, the patients showed significantly decreased activity in the left frontopolar and right orbitofrontal cortices during theme identification. Activity in these two regions correlated well in the controls, but not in patients. Instead, the patients exhibited a close correlation between activity in both sides of the frontopolar cortex, and a positive correlation between the right orbitofrontal cortex activity and degrees of theme identification. Reduced activity in the left frontopolar and right orbitofrontal cortices and the underlying aberrant connectivity may be implicated in the patients' deficits in abstract thinking. These newly identified features of the neural basis of abnormal abstract thinking are important as they have implications for the impaired social behavior of patients with schizophrenia during real-life situations.

  10. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  11. Altered mGluR5-Homer scaffolds and corticostriatal connectivity in a Shank3 complete knockout model of autism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoming; Bey, Alexandra L.; Katz, Brittany M.; Badea, Alexandra; Kim, Namsoo; David, Lisa K.; Duffney, Lara J.; Kumar, Sunil; Mague, Stephen D.; Hulbert, Samuel W.; Dutta, Nisha; Hayrapetyan, Volodya; Yu, Chunxiu; Gaidis, Erin; Zhao, Shengli; Ding, Jin-Dong; Xu, Qiong; Chung, Leeyup; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Wang, Fan; Weinberg, Richard J.; Wetsel, William C.; Dzirasa, Kafui; Yin, Henry; Jiang, Yong-hui

    2016-01-01

    Human neuroimaging studies suggest that aberrant neural connectivity underlies behavioural deficits in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), but the molecular and neural circuit mechanisms underlying ASDs remain elusive. Here, we describe a complete knockout mouse model of the autism-associated Shank3 gene, with a deletion of exons 4–22 (Δe4–22). Both mGluR5-Homer scaffolds and mGluR5-mediated signalling are selectively altered in striatal neurons. These changes are associated with perturbed function at striatal synapses, abnormal brain morphology, aberrant structural connectivity and ASD-like behaviour. In vivo recording reveals that the cortico-striatal-thalamic circuit is tonically hyperactive in mutants, but becomes hypoactive during social behaviour. Manipulation of mGluR5 activity attenuates excessive grooming and instrumental learning differentially, and rescues impaired striatal synaptic plasticity in Δe4–22−/− mice. These findings show that deficiency of Shank3 can impair mGluR5-Homer scaffolding, resulting in cortico-striatal circuit abnormalities that underlie deficits in learning and ASD-like behaviours. These data suggest causal links between genetic, molecular, and circuit mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of ASDs. PMID:27161151

  12. Residual risk for cytogenetic abnormalities after prenatal diagnosis by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    PubMed

    Homer, Jeanne; Bhatt, Sucheta; Huang, Bing; Thangavelu, Maya

    2003-07-01

    Results from conventional cytogenetic studies on 21 609 amniotic fluid specimens were analyzed retrospectively to determine the residual risk for a cytogenetic abnormality if interphase FISH, capable of only detecting aneuploidy for chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y, was performed and did not reveal an abnormality. Detection rates (the probability of detecting a cytogenetic abnormality when an abnormality is present) and residual risks (the likelihood of a cytogenetic abnormality, in view of normal interphase FISH results) were calculated for the four major clinical indications for prenatal diagnosis (advanced maternal age, abnormal maternal serum screen indicating increased risk for trisomy 18 or trisomy 21, abnormal maternal serum screen indicating increased risk for neural tube defects and ultrasound abnormality). Differences in detection rates were observed to depend on clinical indication and presence or absence of ultrasound abnormalities. The detection rate ranged from 18.2 to 82.6% depending on the clinical indication. The detection rates of abnormalities significant to the pregnancy being evaluated (i.e. abnormalities excluding familial balanced rearrangements and familial markers) were between 28.6 and 86.4%. The presence of ultrasound abnormalities increased the detection rate from 72.2 to 92.5% for advanced maternal age and from 78.6 to 91.3% for abnormal maternal serum screen, indicating increased risk for trisomy 18 or trisomy 21. With regard to residual risk, the risk for a clinically significant abnormality decreased from 0.9-10.1%, prior to the interphase FISH assay, to a residual risk of 0.6-1.5% following a normal interphase FISH result in the 4 groups studied. Providing patients with detection rates and residual risks, most relevant to their situation (clinical indication and presence or absence of ultrasound abnormality) during counseling, could help them better understand the advantages and limitations of interphase FISH in their prenatal

  13. Ca^2+ Dynamics and Propagating Waves in Neural Networks with Excitatory and Inhibitory Neurons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, Vladimir E.

    2008-03-01

    Dynamics of neural spikes, intracellular Ca^2+, and Ca^2+ in intracellular stores was investigated both in isolated Chay's neurons and in the neurons coupled in networks. Three types of neural networks were studied: a purely excitatory neural network, with only excitatory (AMPA) synapses; a purely inhibitory neural network with only inhibitory (GABA) synapses; and a hybrid neural network, with both AMPA and GABA synapses. In the hybrid neural network, the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory neurons was 4:1. For each case, we considered two types of connections, ``all-with-all" and 20 connections per neuron. Each neural network contained 100 neurons with randomly distributed connection strengths. In the neural networks with ``all-with-all" connections and AMPA/GABA synapses an increase in average synaptic strength yielded bursting activity with increased/decreased number of spikes per burst. The neural bursts and Ca^2+ transients were synchronous at relatively large connection strengths despite random connection strengths. Simulations of the neural networks with 20 connections per neuron and with only AMPA synapses showed synchronous oscillations, while the neural networks with GABA or hybrid synapses generated propagating waves of membrane potential and Ca^2+ transients.

  14. Frequency-specific alterations in functional connectivity in treatment-resistant and -sensitive major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    He, Zongling; Cui, Qian; Zheng, Junjie; Duan, Xujun; Pang, Yajing; Gao, Qing; Han, Shaoqiang; Long, Zhiliang; Wang, Yifeng; Li, Jiao; Wang, Xiao; Zhao, Jingping; Chen, Huafu

    2016-11-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) may involve alterations in brain functional connectivity in multiple neural circuits and present large-scale network dysfunction. Patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and treatment-sensitive depression (TSD) show different responses to antidepressants and aberrant brain functions. This study aims to investigate functional connectivity patterns of TRD and TSD at the whole brain resting state. Seventeen patients with TRD, 17 patients with TSD, and 17 healthy controls matched with age, gender, and years of education were recruited in this study. The brain was divided using an automated anatomical labeling atlas into 90 regions of interest, which were used to construct the entire brain functional networks. An analysis method called network-based statistic was used to explore the dysconnected subnetworks of TRD and TSD at different frequency bands. At resting state, TSD and TRD present characteristic patterns of network dysfunction at special frequency bands. The dysconnected subnetwork of TSD mainly lies in the fronto-parietal top-down control network. Moreover, the abnormal neural circuits of TRD are extensive and complex. These circuits not only depend on the abnormal affective network but also involve other networks, including salience network, auditory network, visual network, and language processing cortex. Our findings reflect that the pathological mechanism of TSD may refer to impairment in cognitive control, whereas TRD mainly triggers the dysfunction of emotion processing and affective cognition. This study reveals that differences in brain functional connectivity at resting state reflect distinct pathophysiological mechanisms in TSD and TRD. These findings may be helpful in differentiating two types of MDD and predicting treatment responses. PMID:27459030

  15. Frequency-specific alterations in functional connectivity in treatment-resistant and -sensitive major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    He, Zongling; Cui, Qian; Zheng, Junjie; Duan, Xujun; Pang, Yajing; Gao, Qing; Han, Shaoqiang; Long, Zhiliang; Wang, Yifeng; Li, Jiao; Wang, Xiao; Zhao, Jingping; Chen, Huafu

    2016-11-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) may involve alterations in brain functional connectivity in multiple neural circuits and present large-scale network dysfunction. Patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and treatment-sensitive depression (TSD) show different responses to antidepressants and aberrant brain functions. This study aims to investigate functional connectivity patterns of TRD and TSD at the whole brain resting state. Seventeen patients with TRD, 17 patients with TSD, and 17 healthy controls matched with age, gender, and years of education were recruited in this study. The brain was divided using an automated anatomical labeling atlas into 90 regions of interest, which were used to construct the entire brain functional networks. An analysis method called network-based statistic was used to explore the dysconnected subnetworks of TRD and TSD at different frequency bands. At resting state, TSD and TRD present characteristic patterns of network dysfunction at special frequency bands. The dysconnected subnetwork of TSD mainly lies in the fronto-parietal top-down control network. Moreover, the abnormal neural circuits of TRD are extensive and complex. These circuits not only depend on the abnormal affective network but also involve other networks, including salience network, auditory network, visual network, and language processing cortex. Our findings reflect that the pathological mechanism of TSD may refer to impairment in cognitive control, whereas TRD mainly triggers the dysfunction of emotion processing and affective cognition. This study reveals that differences in brain functional connectivity at resting state reflect distinct pathophysiological mechanisms in TSD and TRD. These findings may be helpful in differentiating two types of MDD and predicting treatment responses.

  16. Noisy neural nets exhibiting memory domains.

    PubMed

    Anninos, P; Kokkinidis, M; Skouras, A

    1984-08-21

    Previous studies with probabilistic neural nets in which the neural connections are set up by means of chemical markers, revealed the existence of multiple memory domains. We generalized these studies by considering the intrinsic noise of the systems, caused by the spontaneous release of synaptic transmitter substance. A simple mathematical model is developed, which yields characteristics of multiple memory domains analogous to those occurring in noiseless nets.

  17. CDMA and TDMA based neural nets.

    PubMed

    Herrero, J C

    2001-06-01

    CDMA and TDMA telecommunication techniques were established long time ago, but they have acquired a renewed presence due to the rapidly increasing mobile phones demand. In this paper, we are going to see they are suitable for neural nets, if we leave the concept "connection" between processing units and we adopt the concept "messages" exchanged between them. This may open the door to neural nets with a higher number of processing units and flexible configuration.

  18. Neural Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin

    About the Series: Bioelectric Engineering presents state-of-the-art discussions on modern biomedical engineering with respect to applications of electrical engineering and information technology in biomedicine. This focus affirms Springer's commitment to publishing important reviews of the broadest interest to biomedical engineers, bioengineers, and their colleagues in affiliated disciplines. Recent volumes have covered modeling and imaging of bioelectric activity, neural engineering, biosignal processing, bionanotechnology, among other topics.

  19. Comparison of interfinger connection matrix computation techniques.

    PubMed

    Martin, Joel R; Terekhov, Alexander V; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2013-10-01

    A hypothesis was proposed that the central nervous system controls force production by the fingers through hypothetical neural commands. The neural commands are scaled between values of 0 to 1, indicating no intentional force production or maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force production, respectively. A matrix of interfinger connections transforms neural commands into finger forces. Two methods have been proposed to compute the interfinger connection matrix. The first method uses only single finger MVC trials and multiplies the interfinger connection matrix by a gain factor. The second method uses a neural network model based on experimental data. The performance of the two methods was compared on the MVC data and on a data set of submaximal forces, collected over a range of total forces and moments of force. The methods were compared in terms of (1) ability to predict finger forces, (2) accuracy of neural command reconstruction, and (3) preserved planarity of force data for submaximal force production task. Both methods did a reasonable job of predicting the total force in multifinger MVC trials; however, the neural network model performed better in regards to all other criteria. Overall, the results indicate that for modeling multifinger interaction the neural network method is preferable. PMID:23183029

  20. [Neural mechanism underlying autistic savant and acquired savant syndrome].

    PubMed

    Takahata, Keisuke; Kato, Motoichiro

    2008-07-01

    , especially that of the prefrontal cortex and the posterior regions of the brain. (3) Autistic models, including those based on weak central coherence theory (Frith, 1989), that focus on how savant skills emerge from an autistic brain. Based on recent neuroimaging studies of ASD, Just et al. (2004) suggested the underconnectivity theory, which emphasizes the disruption of long-range connectivity and the relative intact or even more enhanced local connectivity in the autistic brain. All the models listed above have certain advantages and shortcomings. At the end of this review, we propose another integrative model of savant syndrome. In this model, we predict an altered balance of local/global connectivity patterns that contribute to an altered functional segregation/integration ratio. In particular, we emphasize the crucial role played by the disruption of global connectivity in a parallel distributed cortical network, which might result in impairment in integrated cognitive processing, such as impairment in executive function and social cognition. On the other hand, the reduced inter-regional collaboration could lead to a disinhibitory enhancement of neural activity and connectivity in local cortical regions. In addition, enhanced connectivity in the local brain regions is partly due to the abnormal organization of the cortical network as a result of developmental and pathological states. This enhanced local connectivity results in the specialization and facilitation of low-level cognitive processing. The disruption of connectivity between the prefrontal cortex and other regions is considered to be a particularly important factor because the prefrontal region shows the most influential inhibitory control on other cortical areas. We propose that these neural mechanisms as the underlying causes for the emergence of savant ability in ASD and FTD patients.

  1. Implanted neural interfaces: biochallenges and engineered solutions.

    PubMed

    Grill, Warren M; Norman, Sharon E; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2009-01-01

    Neural interfaces are connections that enable two-way exchange of information with the nervous system. These connections can occur at multiple levels, including with peripheral nerves, with the spinal cord, or with the brain; in many instances, fundamental biophysical and biological challenges are shared across these levels. We review these challenges, including selectivity, stability, resolution versus invasiveness, implant-induced injury, and the host-interface response. Subsequently, we review the engineered solutions to these challenges, including electrode designs and geometry, stimulation waveforms, materials, and surface modifications. Finally, we consider emerging opportunities to improve neural interfaces, including cellular-level silicon to neuron connections, optical stimulation, and approaches to control inflammation. Overcoming the biophysical and biological challenges will enable effective high-density neural interfaces for stimulation and recording.

  2. Neural plasticity: changes with age.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Sampedro, M; Nieto-Díaz, M

    2005-01-01

    Changes in the number, type and function of nervous system connections, in the morphology and function of glia and in neuron-glia interactions, are at the basis of vertebrate adjustment to changing environmental and physiological conditions. Collected under "neural plasticity", these age-dependent changes underlie adaptations apparently as different as the physiological response to dehydration or learning, and its electrophysiological and morphological correlates.

  3. Aberrant Functional Connectivity and Structural Atrophy in Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: Relationship with Cognitive Impairments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Haibao; Zhu, Xiaoqun; Xu, Liyan; Sun, Zhongwu; Yu, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal structures in the cortical and subcortical regions have been identified in subcortical vascular cognition impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the functional alterations in SVCI, and no study refers to the functional connectivity in the prefrontal and subcortical regions in this context. The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is an important region of the executive network and default mode network, and the subcortical thalamus plays vital roles in mediating or modulating these two networks. To investigate both thalamus- and MPFC-related functional connectivity as well as its relationship with cognition in SVCI, 32 SVCI patients and 23 control individuals were administered neuropsychological assessments. They also underwent structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity analysis were performed to detect gray matter (GM) atrophy and to characterize the functional alterations in the thalamus and the MPFC. For structural data, we observed that GM atrophy was distributed in both cortical regions and subcortical areas. For functional data, we observed that the thalamus functional connectivity in SVCI was significantly decreased in several cortical regions [i.e., the orbitofrontal lobe (OFL)], which are mainly involved in executive function and memory function. However, connectivity was increased in several frontal regions (i.e., the inferior frontal gyrus), which may be induced by the compensatory recruitment of the decreased functional connectivity. The MPFC functional connectivity was also decreased in executive- and memory-related regions (i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex) along with a motor region (i.e., the supplementary motor area). In addition, the cognitive performance was closely correlated with functional connectivity between the left thalamus and the left OFL in SVCI. The present study, thus, provides evidence for an association between structural and functional alterations

  4. Aberrant Functional Connectivity and Structural Atrophy in Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: Relationship with Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xia; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Haibao; Zhu, Xiaoqun; Xu, Liyan; Sun, Zhongwu; Yu, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal structures in the cortical and subcortical regions have been identified in subcortical vascular cognition impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the functional alterations in SVCI, and no study refers to the functional connectivity in the prefrontal and subcortical regions in this context. The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is an important region of the executive network and default mode network, and the subcortical thalamus plays vital roles in mediating or modulating these two networks. To investigate both thalamus- and MPFC-related functional connectivity as well as its relationship with cognition in SVCI, 32 SVCI patients and 23 control individuals were administered neuropsychological assessments. They also underwent structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity analysis were performed to detect gray matter (GM) atrophy and to characterize the functional alterations in the thalamus and the MPFC. For structural data, we observed that GM atrophy was distributed in both cortical regions and subcortical areas. For functional data, we observed that the thalamus functional connectivity in SVCI was significantly decreased in several cortical regions [i.e., the orbitofrontal lobe (OFL)], which are mainly involved in executive function and memory function. However, connectivity was increased in several frontal regions (i.e., the inferior frontal gyrus), which may be induced by the compensatory recruitment of the decreased functional connectivity. The MPFC functional connectivity was also decreased in executive- and memory-related regions (i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex) along with a motor region (i.e., the supplementary motor area). In addition, the cognitive performance was closely correlated with functional connectivity between the left thalamus and the left OFL in SVCI. The present study, thus, provides evidence for an association between structural and functional alterations

  5. Aberrant Functional Connectivity and Structural Atrophy in Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: Relationship with Cognitive Impairments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Haibao; Zhu, Xiaoqun; Xu, Liyan; Sun, Zhongwu; Yu, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal structures in the cortical and subcortical regions have been identified in subcortical vascular cognition impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the functional alterations in SVCI, and no study refers to the functional connectivity in the prefrontal and subcortical regions in this context. The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is an important region of the executive network and default mode network, and the subcortical thalamus plays vital roles in mediating or modulating these two networks. To investigate both thalamus- and MPFC-related functional connectivity as well as its relationship with cognition in SVCI, 32 SVCI patients and 23 control individuals were administered neuropsychological assessments. They also underwent structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity analysis were performed to detect gray matter (GM) atrophy and to characterize the functional alterations in the thalamus and the MPFC. For structural data, we observed that GM atrophy was distributed in both cortical regions and subcortical areas. For functional data, we observed that the thalamus functional connectivity in SVCI was significantly decreased in several cortical regions [i.e., the orbitofrontal lobe (OFL)], which are mainly involved in executive function and memory function. However, connectivity was increased in several frontal regions (i.e., the inferior frontal gyrus), which may be induced by the compensatory recruitment of the decreased functional connectivity. The MPFC functional connectivity was also decreased in executive- and memory-related regions (i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex) along with a motor region (i.e., the supplementary motor area). In addition, the cognitive performance was closely correlated with functional connectivity between the left thalamus and the left OFL in SVCI. The present study, thus, provides evidence for an association between structural and functional alterations

  6. Resting‐state connectivity predicts levodopa‐induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Haagensen, Brian N.; Nielsen, Silas H.; Madsen, Kristoffer H.; Løkkegaard, Annemette; Siebner, Hartwig R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Levodopa‐induced dyskinesias are a common side effect of dopaminergic therapy in PD, but their neural correlates remain poorly understood. Objectives This study examines whether dyskinesias are associated with abnormal dopaminergic modulation of resting‐state cortico‐striatal connectivity. Methods Twelve PD patients with peak‐of‐dose dyskinesias and 12 patients without dyskinesias were withdrawn from dopaminergic medication. All patients received a single dose of fast‐acting soluble levodopa and then underwent resting‐state functional magnetic resonance imaging before any dyskinesias emerged. Levodopa‐induced modulation of cortico‐striatal resting‐state connectivity was assessed between the putamen and the following 3 cortical regions of interest: supplementary motor area, primary sensorimotor cortex, and right inferior frontal gyrus. These functional connectivity measures were entered into a linear support vector classifier to predict whether an individual patient would develop dyskinesias after levodopa intake. Linear regression analysis was applied to test which connectivity measures would predict dyskinesia severity. Results Dopaminergic modulation of resting‐state connectivity between the putamen and primary sensorimotor cortex in the most affected hemisphere predicted whether patients would develop dyskinesias with a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 91% (P < .0001). Modulation of resting‐state connectivity between the supplementary motor area and putamen predicted interindividual differences in dyskinesia severity (R 2 = 0.627, P = .004). Resting‐state connectivity between the right inferior frontal gyrus and putamen neither predicted dyskinesia status nor dyskinesia severity. Conclusions The results corroborate the notion that altered dopaminergic modulation of cortico‐striatal connectivity plays a key role in the pathophysiology of dyskinesias in PD. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement

  7. Serotonin, neural markers, and memory

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Diverse neuropsychiatric disorders present dysfunctional memory and no effective treatment exits for them; likely as result of the absence of neural markers associated to memory. Neurotransmitter systems and signaling pathways have been implicated in memory and dysfunctional memory; however, their role is poorly understood. Hence, neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions are revised. To our knowledge no previous systematic works have been published addressing these issues. The interactions among behavioral tasks, control groups and molecular changes and/or pharmacological effects are mentioned. Neurotransmitter receptors and signaling pathways, during normal and abnormally functioning memory with an emphasis on the behavioral aspects of memory are revised. With focus on serotonin, since as it is a well characterized neurotransmitter, with multiple pharmacological tools, and well characterized downstream signaling in mammals' species. 5-HT1A, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as well as SERT (serotonin transporter) seem to be useful neural markers and/or therapeutic targets. Certainly, if the mentioned evidence is replicated, then the translatability from preclinical and clinical studies to neural changes might be confirmed. Hypothesis and theories might provide appropriate limits and perspectives of evidence. PMID:26257650

  8. Neural correlates of cognitive ability.

    PubMed

    Brancucci, Alfredo

    2012-07-01

    The challenge to neuroscientists working on intelligence is to discover what neural structures and mechanisms are at the basis of such a complex and variegated capability. Several psychologists agree on the view that behavioral flexibility is a good measure of intelligence, resulting in the appearance of novel solutions that are not part of the animal's normal behavior. This article tries to indicate how the supposed differences in intelligence between species can be related to brain properties and suggests that the best neural indicators may be the ones that convey more information processing capacity to the brain, i.e., high conduction velocity of fibers and small distances between neurons, associated with a high number of neurons and an adequate level of connectivity. The neural bases of human intelligence have been investigated by means of anatomical, neurophysiological, and neuropsychological methods. These investigations have led to two important findings that are briefly discussed: the parietofrontal integration theory of intelligence, which assumes that a distributed network of cortical areas having its main nodes in the frontal and parietal lobes constitutes a probable substrate for smart behavior, and the neural efficiency hypothesis, according to which intelligent people process information more efficiently, showing weaker neural activations in a smaller number of areas than less intelligent people. PMID:22422612

  9. Abnormal autonomic and associated brain activities during rest in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Eilam-Stock, Tehila; Xu, Pengfei; Cao, Miao; Gu, Xiaosi; Van Dam, Nicholas T.; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Kolevzon, Alexander; Soorya, Latha; Park, Yunsoo; Siller, Michael; He, Yong; Hof, Patrick R.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are associated with social and emotional deficits, the aetiology of which are not well understood. A growing consensus is that the autonomic nervous system serves a key role in emotional processes, by providing physiological signals essential to subjective states. We hypothesized that altered autonomic processing is related to the socio-emotional deficits in autism spectrum disorders. Here, we investigated the relationship between non-specific skin conductance response, an objective index of sympathetic neural activity, and brain fluctuations during rest in high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorder relative to neurotypical controls. Compared with control participants, individuals with autism spectrum disorder showed less skin conductance responses overall. They also showed weaker correlations between skin conductance responses and frontal brain regions, including the anterior cingulate and anterior insular cortices. Additionally, skin conductance responses were found to have less contribution to default mode network connectivity in individuals with autism spectrum disorders relative to controls. These results suggest that autonomic processing is altered in autism spectrum disorders, which may be related to the abnormal socio-emotional behaviours that characterize this condition. PMID:24424916

  10. Ferroelectric Memory Capacitors For Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita; Moopenn, Alexander W.; Stadler, Henry L.

    1991-01-01

    Thin-film ferroelectric capacitors proposed as nonvolatile analog memory devices. Intended primarily for use as synaptic connections in electronic neural networks. Connection strengths (synaptic weights) stored as nonlinear remanent polarizations of ferroelectric films. Ferroelectric memory and interrogation capacitors combined into memory devices in vertical or lateral configurations. Photoconductive layer modulated by light provides variable resistance to alter bias signal applied to memory capacitor. Features include nondestructive readout, simplicity, and resistance to ionizing radiation. Interrogated without destroying stored analog data. Also amenable to very-large-scale integration. Allows use of ac coupling, eliminating errors caused by dc offsets in amplifier circuits of neural networks.

  11. Kidney transplantation in abnormal bladder

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Shashi K.; Muthu, V.; Rajapurkar, Mohan M.; Desai, Mahesh R.

    2007-01-01

    Structural urologic abnormalities resulting in dysfunctional lower urinary tract leading to end stage renal disease may constitute 15% patients in the adult population and up to 20-30% in the pediatric population. A patient with an abnormal bladder, who is approaching end stage renal disease, needs careful evaluation of the lower urinary tract to plan the most satisfactory technical approach to the transplant procedure. Past experience of different authors can give an insight into the management and outcome of these patients. This review revisits the current literature available on transplantation in abnormal bladder and summarizes the clinical approach towards handling this group of difficult transplant patients. We add on our experience as we discuss the various issues. The outcome of renal transplant in abnormal bladder is not adversely affected when done in a reconstructed bladder. Correct preoperative evaluation, certain technical modification during transplant and postoperative care is mandatory to avoid complications. Knowledge of the abnormal bladder should allow successful transplantation with good outcome. PMID:19718334

  12. A novel phenotype associated with cutis laxa, abnormal fat distribution, cardiomyopathy and cataract.

    PubMed

    Van Asbeck, Ellyze; Wolthuis, David F G J; Mohamed, Miski; Wevers, Ron A; Korenke, Cristoph G; Gardeitchik, Thatjana; Morava, Eva

    2014-04-01

    Cutis laxa (CL) is a connective tissue disorder, characterized by loose, inelastic, sagging skin. Both acquired and inherited (dominant, recessive, and X-linked) forms exist. Here, we describe a new phenotype, which overlaps with other known CL syndromes. Our patient has a unique combination of features in association with sagging, inelastic, wrinkled skin, including cataract, severe cardiomyopathy, abnormal fat distribution, improvement of skin-wrinkling with age, and white matter abnormalities but no significant histologic collagen or elastin abnormalities. Mutation analysis of known CL genes was negative. We suggest that our patient has a novel syndrome, with the main features of CL, intellectual disability, abnormal fat distribution, cardiomyopathy, and cataract.

  13. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  14. Gamma Frequency–Range Abnormalities to Auditory Stimulation in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jun Soo; O’Donnell, Brian F.; Wallenstein, Gene V.; Greene, Robert W.; Hirayasu, Yoshio; Nestor, Paul G.; Hasselmo, Michael E.; Potts, Geoffrey F.; Shenton, Martha E.; McCarley, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Basic science studies at the neuronal systems level have indicated that gamma-range (30–50 Hz) neural synchronization may be a key mechanism of information processing in neural networks, reflecting integration of various features of an object. Furthermore, gamma-range synchronization is thought to depend on the glutamatergically mediated interplay between excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory neurons utilizing g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which postmortem studies suggest may be abnormal in schizophrenia. We therefore tested whether auditory neural networks in patients with schizophrenia could support gamma-range synchronization. Methods Synchronization of the electroencephalogram (EEG) to different rates (20–40 Hz) of auditory stimulation was recorded from 15 patients with schizophrenia and 15 sex-, age-, and handedness-matched control subjects. The EEG power at each stimulation frequency was compared between groups. The time course of the phase relationship between each stimulus and EEG peak was also evaluated for gamma-range (40 Hz) stimulation. Results Schizophrenic patients showed reduced EEG power at 40 Hz, but not at lower frequencies of stimulation. In addition, schizophrenic patients showed delayed onset of phase synchronization and delayed desynchronization to the click train. Conclusions These data provide new information on selective deficits in early-stage sensory processing in schizophrenia, a failure to support the entrainment of intrinsic gamma-frequency oscillators. The reduced EEG power at 40 Hz in schizophrenic patients may reflect a dysfunction of the recurrent inhibitory drive on auditory neural networks. PMID:10565499

  15. Classification of behavior using unsupervised temporal neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, K.L.; Argo, P.

    1998-03-01

    Adding recurrent connections to unsupervised neural networks used for clustering creates a temporal neural network which clusters a sequence of inputs as they appear over time. The model presented combines the Jordan architecture with the unsupervised learning technique Adaptive Resonance Theory, Fuzzy ART. The combination yields a neural network capable of quickly clustering sequential pattern sequences as the sequences are generated. The applicability of the architecture is illustrated through a facility monitoring problem.

  16. Recognition with self-control in neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewenstein, Maciej; Nowak, Andrzej

    1989-10-01

    We present a theory of fully connected neural networks that incorporates mechanisms of dynamical self-control of recognition process. Using a functional integral technique, we formulate mean-field dynamics for such systems.

  17. γ-band abnormalities as markers of autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Donald C; Wilson, Lisa B

    2014-01-01

    Autism is a behaviorally diagnosed neurodevelopmental disorder with no current biomarkers with high specificity and sensitivity. γ-band abnormalities have been reported in many studies of autism spectrum disorders. γ-band activity is associated with perceptual and cognitive functions that are compromised in autism. Some γ-band deficits have also been seen in unaffected first-degree relatives, suggesting heritability of these findings. This review covers the published literature on γ abnormalities in autism, the proposed mechanisms underlying the deficits and the potential for translation into new treatments. Although the utility of γ-band metrics as diagnostic biomarkers is currently limited, such changes in autism are also useful as endophenotypes, for evaluating potential neural mechanisms, and for use as surrogate markers of treatment response to interventions.

  18. Gamma-band abnormalities as markers of autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Donald C.; Wilson, Lisa B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Autism is a behaviorally diagnosed neurodevelopmental disorder with no current biomarkers with high specificity and sensitivity. Gamma-band abnormalities have been reported in many studies of autism spectrum disorders. Gamma-band activity is associated with perceptual and cognitive functions that are compromised in autism. Some gamma-band deficits have also been seen in unaffected first-degree relatives, suggesting heritability of these findings. This review covers the published literature on gamma abnormalities in autism, the proposed mechanisms underlying the deficits, and the potential for translation into new treatments. Although the utility of gamma-band metrics as diagnostic biomarkers is currently limited, such changes in autism are also useful as endophenotypes, for evaluating potential neural mechanisms, and for use as surrogate markers of treatment response to interventions. PMID:24712425

  19. Improved Autoassociative Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hand, Charles

    2003-01-01

    Improved autoassociative neural networks, denoted nexi, have been proposed for use in controlling autonomous robots, including mobile exploratory robots of the biomorphic type. In comparison with conventional autoassociative neural networks, nexi would be more complex but more capable in that they could be trained to do more complex tasks. A nexus would use bit weights and simple arithmetic in a manner that would enable training and operation without a central processing unit, programs, weight registers, or large amounts of memory. Only a relatively small amount of memory (to hold the bit weights) and a simple logic application- specific integrated circuit would be needed. A description of autoassociative neural networks is prerequisite to a meaningful description of a nexus. An autoassociative network is a set of neurons that are completely connected in the sense that each neuron receives input from, and sends output to, all the other neurons. (In some instantiations, a neuron could also send output back to its own input terminal.) The state of a neuron is completely determined by the inner product of its inputs with weights associated with its input channel. Setting the weights sets the behavior of the network. The neurons of an autoassociative network are usually regarded as comprising a row or vector. Time is a quantized phenomenon for most autoassociative networks in the sense that time proceeds in discrete steps. At each time step, the row of neurons forms a pattern: some neurons are firing, some are not. Hence, the current state of an autoassociative network can be described with a single binary vector. As time goes by, the network changes the vector. Autoassociative networks move vectors over hyperspace landscapes of possibilities.

  20. Making Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to illustrate a process of making connections, not between mathematics and other activities, but within mathematics itself--between diverse parts of the subject. Novel connections are still possible in previously explored mathematics when the material happens to be unfamiliar, as may be the case for a learner at any career stage.…

  1. Electronic implementation of associative memory based on neural network models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moopenn, A.; Lambe, John; Thakoor, A. P.

    1987-01-01

    An electronic embodiment of a neural network based associative memory in the form of a binary connection matrix is described. The nature of false memory errors, their effect on the information storage capacity of binary connection matrix memories, and a novel technique to eliminate such errors with the help of asymmetrical extra connections are discussed. The stability of the matrix memory system incorporating a unique local inhibition scheme is analyzed in terms of local minimization of an energy function. The memory's stability, dynamic behavior, and recall capability are investigated using a 32-'neuron' electronic neural network memory with a 1024-programmable binary connection matrix.

  2. Neural correlates of epigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Canli, Turhan; Qiu, Maolin; Omura, Kazufumi; Congdon, Eliza; Haas, Brian W.; Amin, Zenab; Herrmann, Martin J.; Constable, R. Todd; Lesch, Klaus Peter

    2006-01-01

    The effect of life stress on depression is moderated by a repeat length variation in the transcriptional control region of the serotonin transporter gene, which renders carriers of the short variant vulnerable for depression. We investigated the underlying neural mechanisms of these epigenetic processes in individuals with no history of psychopathology by using multimodal magnetic resonance-based imaging (functional, perfusion, and structural), genotyping, and self-reported life stress and rumination. Based on functional MRI and perfusion data, we found support for a model by which life stress interacts with the effect of serotonin transporter genotype on amygdala and hippocampal resting activation, two regions involved in depression and stress. Life stress also differentially affected, as a function of serotonin transporter genotype, functional connectivity of the amygdala and hippocampus with a wide network of other regions, as well as gray matter structural features, and affected individuals' level of rumination. These interactions may constitute a neural mechanism for epigenetic vulnerability toward, or protection against, depression. PMID:17032778

  3. Effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on blink abnormalities of 6-OHDA lesioned rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaminer, Jaime; Thakur, Pratibha

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rat model share blink abnormalities. In view of the evolutionarily conserved organization of blinking, characterization of blink reflex circuits in rodents may elucidate the neural mechanisms of PD reflex abnormalities. We examine the extent of this shared pattern of blink abnormalities by measuring blink reflex excitability, blink reflex plasticity, and spontaneous blinking in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. We also investigate whether 130-Hz subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) affects blink abnormalities, as it does in PD patients. Like PD patients, 6-OHDA-lesioned rats exhibit reflex blink hyperexcitability, impaired blink plasticity, and a reduced spontaneous blink rate. At 130 Hz, but not 16 Hz, STN DBS eliminates reflex blink hyperexcitability and restores both short- and long-term blink plasticity. Replicating its lack of effect in PD patients, 130-Hz STN DBS does not reinstate a normal temporal pattern or rate to spontaneous blinking in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. These data show that the 6-OHDA lesioned rat is an ideal model system for investigating the neural bases of reflex abnormalities in PD and highlight the complexity of PD's effects on motor control, by showing that dopamine depletion does not affect all blink systems via the same neural mechanisms. PMID:25673748

  4. Disrupted cortical connectivity theory as an explanatory model for autism spectrum disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kana, Rajesh K.; Libero, Lauren E.; Moore, Marie S.

    2011-12-01

    such as Theory-of-Mind, cognitive flexibility, and information processing; and 2) how connection abnormalities relate to, and may determine, behavioral symptoms hallmarked by the triad of Impairments in ASD. Furthermore, we will relate the disrupted cortical connectivity model to existing cognitive and neural models of ASD.

  5. Altered resting-state functional connectivity in post-traumatic stress disorder: a perfusion MRI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baojuan; Liu, Jian; Liu, Yang; Lu, Hong-Bing; Yin, Hong

    2013-03-01

    The majority of studies on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) so far have focused on delineating patterns of activations during cognitive processes. Recently, more and more researches have started to investigate functional connectivity in PTSD subjects using BOLD-fMRI. Functional connectivity analysis has been demonstrated as a powerful approach to identify biomarkers of different brain diseases. This study aimed to detect resting-state functional connectivity abnormities in patients with PTSD using arterial spin labeling (ASL) fMRI. As a completely non-invasive technique, ASL allows quantitative estimates of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Compared with BOLD-fMRI, ASL fMRI has many advantages, including less low-frequency signal drifts, superior functional localization, etc. In the current study, ASL images were collected from 10 survivors in mining disaster with recent onset PTSD and 10 survivors without PTSD. Decreased regional CBF in the right middle temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus, and postcentral gyrus was detected in the PTSD patients. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity analysis was performed using an area in the right middle temporal gyrus as region of interest. Compared with the non-PTSD group, the PTSD subjects demonstrated increased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right superior temporal gyrus, the left middle temporal gyrus. Meanwhile, decreased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right postcentral gyrus, the right superior parietal lobule was also found in the PTSD patients. This is the first study which investigated resting-state functional connectivity in PTSD using ASL images. The results may provide new insight into the neural substrates of PTSD.

  6. Fault detection and diagnosis using neural network approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    Neural networks can be used to detect and identify abnormalities in real-time process data. Two basic approaches can be used, the first based on training networks using data representing both normal and abnormal modes of process behavior, and the second based on statistical characterization of the normal mode only. Given data representative of process faults, radial basis function networks can effectively identify failures. This approach is often limited by the lack of fault data, but can be facilitated by process simulation. The second approach employs elliptical and radial basis function neural networks and other models to learn the statistical distributions of process observables under normal conditions. Analytical models of failure modes can then be applied in combination with the neural network models to identify faults. Special methods can be applied to compensate for sensor failures, to produce real-time estimation of missing or failed sensors based on the correlations codified in the neural network.

  7. Electrocardiograph abnormalities in intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Nagatani, Kimihiro; Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the prevalence and type of electrocardiography (ECG) abnormalities, and their possible association with the clinical/radiological findings in 118 consecutive patients with non-traumatic, non-neoplastic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). ECG frequently demonstrates abnormalities in patients with ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage, but little is known of ECG changes in ICH patients. Clinical and radiological information was retrospectively reviewed. ECG recordings that were obtained within 24 hours of the initial hemorrhage were analyzed. Sixty-six patients (56%) had one or more ECG abnormalities. The most frequent was ST depression (24%), followed by left ventricular hypertrophy (20%), corrected QT interval (QTc) prolongation (19%), and T wave inversion (19%). The logistic regression analysis demonstrated the following: insular involvement was an independent predictive factor of ST depression (p<0.001; odds ratio OR 10.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.84-36.57); insular involvement (p<0.001; OR 23.98; 95% CI 4.91-117.11) and presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (p<0.001; OR 8.72; 95% CI 2.69-28.29) were independent predictive factors of QTc prolongation; deep hematoma location (p<0.001; OR 19.12; 95% CI 3.82-95.81) and hematoma volume >30 ml (p=0.001; OR 6.58; 95% CI 2.11-20.46) were independent predictive factors of T wave inversion. We demonstrate associations between ECG abnormalities and detailed characteristics of ICH.

  8. Fibrillin abnormalities and prognosis in Marfan syndrome and related disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, T.; Furthmayr, H.; Francke, U.; Gasner, C.

    1995-08-28

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), a multisystem autosomal-dominant disorder, is characterized by mutations of the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene and by abnormal patterns of synthesis, secretion, and matrix deposition of the fibrillin protein. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of fibrillin protein abnormalities in the diagnosis of MFS, we studied dermal fibroblasts from 57 patients with classical MFS, 15 with equivocal MFS, 8 with single-organ manifestations, and 16 with other connective tissue disorders including homocystinuria and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Abnormal fibrillin metabolism was identified in 70 samples that were classified into four different groups based on quantitation of fibrillin synthesis and matrix deposition. Significant correlations were found for phenotypic features including arachnodactyly, striae distensae, cardiovascular manifestations, and fibrillin groups II and IV, which included 70% of the MFS patients. In addition, these two groups were associated with shortened {open_quotes}event-free{close_quotes} survival and more severe cardiovascular complications than groups I and III. The latter included most of the equivocal MFS/single manifestation patients with fibrillin abnormalities. Our results indicate that fibrillin defects at the protein level per se are not specific for MFS, but that the drastically reduced fibrillin deposition, caused by a dominant-negative effect of abnormal fibrillin molecules in individuals defined as groups II and IV, is of prognostic and possibly diagnostic significance. 25 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. A neural network with modular hierarchical learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldi, Pierre F. (Inventor); Toomarian, Nikzad (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention provides a new hierarchical approach for supervised neural learning of time dependent trajectories. The modular hierarchical methodology leads to architectures which are more structured than fully interconnected networks. The networks utilize a general feedforward flow of information and sparse recurrent connections to achieve dynamic effects. The advantages include the sparsity of units and connections, the modular organization. A further advantage is that the learning is much more circumscribed learning than in fully interconnected systems. The present invention is embodied by a neural network including a plurality of neural modules each having a pre-established performance capability wherein each neural module has an output outputting present results of the performance capability and an input for changing the present results of the performance capabilitiy. For pattern recognition applications, the performance capability may be an oscillation capability producing a repeating wave pattern as the present results. In the preferred embodiment, each of the plurality of neural modules includes a pre-established capability portion and a performance adjustment portion connected to control the pre-established capability portion.

  10. Evolution of neural controllers for salamanderlike locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijspeert, Auke J.

    1999-08-01

    This paper presents an experiment in which evolutionary algorithms are used for the development of neural controllers for salamander locomotion. The aim of the experiment is to investigate which kind of neural circuitry can produce the typical swimming and trotting gaits of the salamander, and to develop a synthetic approach to neurobiology by using genetic algorithms as design tool. A 2D bio-mechanical simulation of the salamander's body is developed whose muscle contraction is determined by the locomotion controller simulated as continuous-time neural networks. While the connectivity of the neural circuitry underlying locomotion in the salamander has not been decoded for the moment, the general organization of the designed neural circuits corresponds to that hypothesized by neurobiologist for the real animal. In particular, the locomotion controllers are based on a body central pattern generator (CPG) corresponding to a lamprey-like swimming controller as developed by Ekeberg, and are extended with a limb CPG for controlling the salamander's body. A genetic algorithm is used to instantiate synaptic weights of the connections within the limb CPG and from the limb CPG to the body CPG given a high level description of the desired gaits. A set of biologically plausible controllers are thus developed which can produce a neural activity and locomotion gaits very similar to those observed in the real salamander. By simply varying the external excitation applied to the network, the speed, direction and type of gait can be varied.

  11. Neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Denker, J.S.; Howard, R.E.; Jackel, L.D.

    1988-07-26

    A structure suitable for information processing is described comprising a matrix and active electronic devices interacting with the matrix wherein the matrix comprises row electrodes and column electrodes. The matrix has intersecting regions that connect row electrodes to column electrodes wherein means are provided such that the information in process during the processing is interacting simultaneously with all the matrix intersections characterized in that at least a portion of the intersecting regions comprise a photoconductive material.

  12. Only Connect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMieux, Anne C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes how the author connects with today's adolescent readers by means of laughter and literature. Claims young adult literature can facilitate the growth of empathy and provide an impetus for adolescents to transcend the isolation modern culture engenders. (NH)

  13. Neural circuit dysfunction in schizophrenia: Insights from animal models.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, T

    2016-05-01

    Despite decades of research, the neural circuit abnormalities underlying schizophrenia remain elusive. Although studies on schizophrenia patients have yielded important insights they have not been able to fully reveal the details of how neural circuits are disrupted in the disease, which is essential for understanding its pathophysiology and developing new treatment strategies. Animal models of schizophrenia are likely to play an important role in this effort. Such models allow neural circuit dysfunction to be investigated in detail and the role of risk factors and pathophysiological mechanisms to be experimentally assessed. The goal of this review is to summarize what we have learned from electrophysiological studies that have examined neural circuit function in animal models of schizophrenia. Although these studies have revealed diverse manifestations of neural circuit dysfunction spanning multiple levels of analysis, common themes have nevertheless emerged across different studies and animal models, revealing a core set of neural circuit abnormalities. These include an imbalance between excitation and inhibition, deficits in synaptic plasticity, disruptions in local and long-range synchrony and abnormalities in dopaminergic signaling. The relevance of these findings to the pathophysiology of the disease is discussed, as well as outstanding questions for future research.

  14. Computer science: Nanoscale connections for brain-like circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legenstein, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Tiny circuit elements called memristors have been used as connections in an artificial neural network - enabling the system to learn to recognize letters of the alphabet from imperfect images. See Letter p.61

  15. Identifying the Neural Correlates Underlying Social Pain: Implications for Developmental Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberger, Naomi I.

    2006-01-01

    Although the need for social connection is critical for early social development as well as for psychological well-being throughout the lifespan, relatively little is known about the neural processes involved in maintaining social connections. The following review summarizes what is known regarding the neural correlates underlying feeling of…

  16. On lateral competition in dynamic neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Bellyustin, N.S.

    1995-02-01

    Artificial neural networks connected homogeneously, which use retinal image processing methods, are considered. We point out that there are probably two different types of lateral inhibition for each neural element by the neighboring ones-due to the negative connection coefficients between elements and due to the decreasing neuron`s response to a too high input signal. The first case characterized by stable dynamics, which is given by the Lyapunov function, while in the second case, stability is absent and two-dimensional dynamic chaos occurs if the time step in the integration of model equations is large enough. The continuous neural medium approximation is used for analytical estimation in both cases. The result is the partition of the parameter space into domains with qualitatively different dynamic modes. Computer simulations confirm the estimates and show that joining two-dimensional chaos with symmetries provided by the initial and boundary conditions may produce patterns which are genuine pieces of art.

  17. New Mechanism for Neural Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    1996-06-01

    We show how the diffusive effects of a neuron's dendritic tree can induce a Turing-like instability in a purely excitatory or inhibitory recurrent neural network. A crucial feature of the model is the existence of a correlation between the location of a synaptic connection on the tree and the relative separation of the associated neurons within the network.

  18. Face off against ROS: Tcof1/Treacle safeguards neuroepithelial cells and progenitor neural crest cells from oxidative stress during craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Daisuke; Trainor, Paul A

    2016-09-01

    One-third of all congenital birth defects affect the head and face, and most craniofacial anomalies are considered to arise through defects in the development of cranial neural crest cells. Cranial neural crest cells give rise to the majority of craniofacial bones, cartilages and connective tissues. Therefore, understanding the events that control normal cranial neural crest and subsequent craniofacial development is important for elucidating the pathogenetic mechanisms of craniofacial anomalies and for the exploring potential therapeutic avenues for their prevention. Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a congenital disorder characterized by severe craniofacial anomalies. An animal model of TCS, generated through mutation of Tcof1, the mouse (Mus musculus) homologue of the gene primarily mutated in association with TCS in humans, has recently revealed significant insights into the pathogenesis of TCS. Apoptotic elimination of neuroepithelial cells including neural crest cells is the primary cause of craniofacial defects in Tcof1 mutant embryos. However, our understanding of the mechanisms that induce tissue-specific apoptosis remains incomplete. In this review, we describe recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis TCS. Furthermore, we discuss the role of Tcof1 in normal embryonic development, the correlation between genetic and environmental factors on the severity of craniofacial abnormalities, and the prospect for prenatal prevention of craniofacial anomalies. PMID:27481486

  19. [Transient abnormal Q-waves].

    PubMed

    Godballe, C; Hoeck, H C; Sørensen, J A

    1990-01-01

    We present a case of transient abnormal Q-waves (TAQ) and a review of the literature. TAQ are defined as abnormal Q-waves, which disappear within ten days. They are most often seen in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) but are also seen in other conditions. Brief episodes of myocardial ischemia giving rise to reversible biochemical and ultrastructural myocardial changes, resulting in transient ECG changes, provide an accepted theory for the pathogenesis of TAO. Investigations have shown that the occurrence of exercise-induced TAQ may be a symptom of IHD. It is impossible to distinguish TAQ from Q-waves induced by myocardial infarction. Appearance of TAQ during exercise-testing frequently indicates IHD. PMID:2301045

  20. [Chromosome abnormalities in human cancer].

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Gómez, F

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigation on the presence of chromosome abnormalities in neoplasias has allowed outstanding advances in the knowledge of malignant transformation mechanisms and important applications in the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of leukaemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the most relevant cytogenetic aberrations, some of them described at the Unidad de Investigación Médica en Genética Humana, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, and to correlate these abnormalities with recent achievements in the knowledge of oncogenes, suppressor genes or antioncogenes, their chromosome localization, and their mutations in human neoplasia; as well as their perspectives in prevention and treatment of cancer that such findings permit to anticipate.

  1. Abnormalities in the awareness and control of action.

    PubMed Central

    Frith, C D; Blakemore, S J; Wolpert, D M

    2000-01-01

    Much of the functioning of the motor system occurs without awareness. Nevertheless, we are aware of some aspects of the current state of the system and we can prepare and make movements in the imagination. These mental representations of the actual and possible states of the system are based on two sources: sensory signals from skin and muscles, and the stream of motor commands that have been issued to the system. Damage to the neural substrates of the motor system can lead to abnormalities in the awareness of action as well as defects in the control of action. We provide a framework for understanding how these various abnormalities of awareness can arise. Patients with phantom limbs or with anosognosia experience the illusion that they can move their limbs. We suggest that these representations of movement are based on streams of motor commands rather than sensory signals. Patients with utilization behaviour or with delusions of control can no longer properly link their intentions to their actions. In these cases the impairment lies in the representation of intended movements. The location of the neural damage associated with these disorders suggests that representations of the current and predicted state of the motor system are in parietal cortex, while representations of intended actions are found in prefrontal and premotor cortex. PMID:11205340

  2. Implementing Recurrent Back Propagation on the Connection Machine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Deprit, E.M.

    1988-12-02

    Pineda's Recurrent Back-Propagation algorithm for neural networks was implemented on the Connection Machine, a massively parallel processor. Two fundamentally different graph architectures underlying the nets were tested - one based on arcs, the other on nodes. Confirming the predominance of communication over computation, performance measurements underscore the necessity to make connections the basic unit of representation. Comparisons between these graphs algorithms lead to important conclusions concerning the parallel implementation of neural nets in both software and hardware.

  3. Ultrasound screening for fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Chitty, L S

    1995-12-01

    Ultrasound screening for fetal abnormalities is increasingly becoming part of routine antenatal care in Europe and the UK. However, there has been very little formal evaluation of this practice. In this article reports of routine ultrasound screening are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages discussed. The majority of routine anomaly scanning is done in the second trimester but there may be a case for screening at other times in pregnancy and alternative anomaly screening policies are discussed. PMID:8710765

  4. Detector for flow abnormalities in gaseous diffusion plant compressors

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F.; Castleberry, Kim N.

    1998-01-01

    A detector detects a flow abnormality in a plant compressor which outputs a motor current signal. The detector includes a demodulator/lowpass filter demodulating and filtering the motor current signal producing a demodulated signal, and first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters connected to the demodulator/lowpass filter, and filtering the demodulated signal in accordance with first, second, third and fourth bandpass frequencies generating first, second, third and fourth filtered signals having first, second, third and fourth amplitudes. The detector also includes first, second, third and fourth amplitude detectors connected to the first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters respectively, and detecting the first, second, third and fourth amplitudes, and first and second adders connected to the first and fourth amplitude detectors and the second and third amplitude detectors respectively, and adding the first and fourth amplitudes and the second and third amplitudes respectively generating first and second added signals. Finally, the detector includes a comparator, connected to the first and second adders, and comparing the first and second added signals and detecting the abnormal condition in the plant compressor when the second added signal exceeds the first added signal by a predetermined value.

  5. Detector for flow abnormalities in gaseous diffusion plant compressors

    DOEpatents

    Smith, S.F.; Castleberry, K.N.

    1998-06-16

    A detector detects a flow abnormality in a plant compressor which outputs a motor current signal. The detector includes a demodulator/lowpass filter demodulating and filtering the motor current signal producing a demodulated signal, and first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters connected to the demodulator/lowpass filter, and filtering the demodulated signal in accordance with first, second, third and fourth bandpass frequencies generating first, second, third and fourth filtered signals having first, second, third and fourth amplitudes. The detector also includes first, second, third and fourth amplitude detectors connected to the first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters respectively, and detecting the first, second, third and fourth amplitudes, and first and second adders connected to the first and fourth amplitude detectors and the second and third amplitude detectors respectively, and adding the first and fourth amplitudes and the second and third amplitudes respectively generating first and second added signals. Finally, the detector includes a comparator, connected to the first and second adders, and comparing the first and second added signals and detecting the abnormal condition in the plant compressor when the second added signal exceeds the first added signal by a predetermined value. 6 figs.

  6. Electronic Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Anil

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on electronic neural networks for space station are presented. Topics covered include: electronic neural networks; electronic implementations; VLSI/thin film hybrid hardware for neurocomputing; computations with analog parallel processing; features of neuroprocessors; applications of neuroprocessors; neural network hardware for terrain trafficability determination; a dedicated processor for path planning; neural network system interface; neural network for robotic control; error backpropagation algorithm for learning; resource allocation matrix; global optimization neuroprocessor; and electrically programmable read only thin-film synaptic array.

  7. [Endocrine abnormalities in HIV infections].

    PubMed

    Verges, B; Chavanet, P; Desgres, J; Kisterman, J P; Waldner, A; Vaillant, G; Portier, H; Brun, J M; Putelat, R

    The finding of endocrine gland lesions at pathological examination in AIDS and reports of several cases of endocrine disease in patients with this syndrome have prompted us to study endocrine functions in 63 patients (51 men, 12 women) with HIV-1 infection. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) classification system, 13 of these patients were stage CDC II, 27 stage CDC III and 23 stage CDC IV. We explored the adrenocortical function (ACTH, immediate tetracosactrin test) and the thyroid function (free T3 and T4 levels, TRH on TSH test) in all 63 patients. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (testosterone levels, LHRH test) and prolactin secretion (THR test) were explored in the 51 men. The results obtained showed early peripheral testicular insufficiency at stage CDC II and early pituitary gland abnormalities with hypersecretion of ACTH and prolactin also at stage CDC II. On the other hand, adrenocortical and pituitary abnormalities were not frequently found. The physiopathology of the endocrine abnormalities observed in HIV-1-infected patients remains unclear, but one may suspect that it involves interleukin-1 since this protein factor has recently been shown to stimulate the corticotropin-releasing hormone secretion and to act directly on the glycoprotein capsule of the virus (gp 120) whose structure is similar to that of some neurohormones.

  8. Neural network models: Insights and prescriptions from practical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Samad, T.

    1995-12-31

    Neural networks are no longer just a research topic; numerous applications are now testament to their practical utility. In the course of developing these applications, researchers and practitioners have been faced with a variety of issues. This paper briefly discusses several of these, noting in particular the rich connections between neural networks and other, more conventional technologies. A more comprehensive version of this paper is under preparation that will include illustrations on real examples. Neural networks are being applied in several different ways. Our focus here is on neural networks as modeling technology. However, much of the discussion is also relevant to other types of applications such as classification, control, and optimization.

  9. Neural nets for adaptive filtering and adaptive pattern recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Widrow, B.; Winter, R.

    1988-03-01

    The fields of adaptive signal processing and adaptive neural networks have been developing independently but have that adaptive linear combiner (ALC) in common. With its inputs connected to a tapped delay line, the ALC becomes a key component of an adaptive filter. With its output connected to a quantizer, the ALC becomes an adaptive threshold element of adaptive neuron. Adaptive threshold elements, on the other hand, are the building blocks of neural networks. Today neural nets are the focus of widespread research interest. Areas of investigation include pattern recognition and trainable logic. Neural network systems have not yet had the commercial impact of adaptive filtering. The commonality of the ALC to adaptive signal processing and adaptive neural networks suggests the two fields have much to share with each other. This article describes practical applications of the ALC in signal processing and pattern recognition.

  10. A multilayer recurrent neural network for solving continuous-time algebraic Riccati equations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Wu, Guang

    1998-07-01

    A multilayer recurrent neural network is proposed for solving continuous-time algebraic matrix Riccati equations in real time. The proposed recurrent neural network consists of four bidirectionally connected layers. Each layer consists of an array of neurons. The proposed recurrent neural network is shown to be capable of solving algebraic Riccati equations and synthesizing linear-quadratic control systems in real time. Analytical results on stability of the recurrent neural network and solvability of algebraic Riccati equations by use of the recurrent neural network are discussed. The operating characteristics of the recurrent neural network are also demonstrated through three illustrative examples.

  11. Neural system prediction and identification challenge

    PubMed Central

    Vlachos, Ioannis; Zaytsev, Yury V.; Spreizer, Sebastian; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Can we infer the function of a biological neural network (BNN) if we know the connectivity and activity of all its constituent neurons?This question is at the core of neuroscience and, accordingly, various methods have been developed to record the activity and connectivity of as many neurons as possible. Surprisingly, there is no theoretical or computational demonstration that neuronal activity and connectivity are indeed sufficient to infer the function of a BNN. Therefore, we pose the Neural Systems Identification and Prediction Challenge (nuSPIC). We provide the connectivity and activity of all neurons and invite participants (1) to infer the functions implemented (hard-wired) in spiking neural networks (SNNs) by stimulating and recording the activity of neurons and, (2) to implement predefined mathematical/biological functions using SNNs. The nuSPICs can be accessed via a web-interface to the NEST simulator and the user is not required to know any specific programming language. Furthermore, the nuSPICs can be used as a teaching tool. Finally, nuSPICs use the crowd-sourcing model to address scientific issues. With this computational approach we aim to identify which functions can be inferred by systematic recordings of neuronal activity and connectivity. In addition, nuSPICs will help the design and application of new experimental paradigms based on the structure of the SNN and the presumed function which is to be discovered. PMID:24399966

  12. Exploring the utility of axial lumbar MRI for automatic diagnosis of intervertebral disc abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subarna; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we explore the importance of axial lumbar MRI slices for automatic detection of abnormalities. In the past, only the sagittal views were taken into account for lumbar CAD systems, ignoring the fact that a radiologist scans through the axial slices as well, to confirm the diagnosis and quantify various abnormalities like herniation and stenosis. Hence, we present an automatic diagnosis system from axial slices using CNN(Convolutional Neural Network) for dynamic feature extraction and classification of normal and abnormal lumbar discs. We show 80:81% accuracy (with a specificity of 85:29% and sensitivity of 75:56%) on 86 cases (391 discs) using only an axial slice for each disc, which implies the usefulness of axial views for automatic lumbar abnormality diagnosis in conjunction with sagittal views.

  13. Learning Topologies with the Growing Neural Forest.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Esteban José; López-Rubio, Ezequiel

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a novel self-organizing model called growing neural forest (GNF) is presented. It is based on the growing neural gas (GNG), which learns a general graph with no special provisions for datasets with separated clusters. On the contrary, the proposed GNF learns a set of trees so that each tree represents a connected cluster of data. High dimensional datasets often contain large empty regions among clusters, so this proposal is better suited to them than other self-organizing models because it represents these separated clusters as connected components made of neurons. Experimental results are reported which show the self-organization capabilities of the model. Moreover, its suitability for unsupervised clustering and foreground detection applications is demonstrated. In particular, the GNF is shown to correctly discover the connected component structure of some datasets. Moreover, it outperforms some well-known foreground detectors both in quantitative and qualitative terms. PMID:27121995

  14. Learning Topologies with the Growing Neural Forest.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Esteban José; López-Rubio, Ezequiel

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a novel self-organizing model called growing neural forest (GNF) is presented. It is based on the growing neural gas (GNG), which learns a general graph with no special provisions for datasets with separated clusters. On the contrary, the proposed GNF learns a set of trees so that each tree represents a connected cluster of data. High dimensional datasets often contain large empty regions among clusters, so this proposal is better suited to them than other self-organizing models because it represents these separated clusters as connected components made of neurons. Experimental results are reported which show the self-organization capabilities of the model. Moreover, its suitability for unsupervised clustering and foreground detection applications is demonstrated. In particular, the GNF is shown to correctly discover the connected component structure of some datasets. Moreover, it outperforms some well-known foreground detectors both in quantitative and qualitative terms.

  15. Device Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, John; Roberts, Ruth; Morris, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Patients with diabetes have to take numerous factors/data into their therapeutic decisions in daily life. Connecting the devices they are using by feeding the data generated into a database/app is supposed to help patients to optimize their glycemic control. As this is not established in practice, the different roadblocks have to be discussed to open the road. That large telecommunication companies are now entering this market might be a big help in pushing this forward. Smartphones offer an ideal platform for connectivity solutions. PMID:25614015

  16. Regional vulnerability of longitudinal cortical association connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ceschin, Rafael; Lee, Vince K.; Schmithorst, Vince; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    with alteration in eigenvector centrality, clustering coefficient (inter-regional) and participation co-efficient (inter-modular) alterations of frontal–striatal and fronto-limbic nodes suggesting re-organization of these pathways. Both along tract and structural topology network measurements correlated strongly with motor and visual clinical outcome scores. This study shows the value of combining along-tract analysis and structural network topology in depicting not only selective parietal occipital regional vulnerability but also reorganization of frontal–striatal and frontal–limbic pathways in preterm children with cerebral palsy. These finding also support the concept that widespread, but selective posterior–anterior neural network connectivity alterations in preterm children with cerebral palsy likely contribute to the pathogenesis of neurosensory and cognitive impairment in this group. PMID:26509119

  17. Reduced Prefrontal Connectivity in Psychopathy

    PubMed Central

    Motzkin, Julian C.; Newman, Joseph P.; Kiehl, Kent A.; Koenigs, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Linking psychopathy to a specific brain abnormality could have significant clinical, legal, and scientific implications. Theories on the neurobiological basis of the disorder typically propose dysfunction in a circuit involving ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). However, to date there is limited brain imaging data to directly test whether psychopathy may indeed be associated with any structural or functional abnormality within this brain area. In this study, we employ two complementary imaging techniques to assess the structural and functional connectivity of vmPFC in psychopathic and non-psychopathic criminals. Using diffusion tensor imaging, we show that psychopathy is associated with reduced structural integrity in the right uncinate fasciculus, the primary white matter connection between vmPFC and anterior temporal lobe. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that psychopathy is associated with reduced functional connectivity between vmPFC and amygdala as well as between vmPFC and medial parietal cortex. Together, these data converge to implicate diminished vmPFC connectivity as a characteristic neurobiological feature of psychopathy. PMID:22131397

  18. Automatic Semantic Priming Abnormalities in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Mathalon, Daniel H.; Roach, Brian J.; Ford, Judith M.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal activation of semantic networks characterizes schizophrenia and can be studied using the N400 event-related potential (ERP). N400 is elicited by words that are not primed by the preceding context and provides a direct measure of the neural mechanisms underlying semantic priming. Semantic priming refers to facilitated semantic processing gained through pre-exposure to semantic context, which can happen automatically if the interval between the prime and target is very short. We predicted that (1) schizophrenia patients have overly inclusive semantic networks, reflected in a less negative than expected N400 to relatively unprimed words, and (2) schizophrenia patients are deficient in their use of semantic context, responding to primed words as if they were unprimed, reflected in a more negative than expected N400 to primed words. N400s were acquired from patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia (n=26) and age-matched healthy comparison subjects (n=29) performing a picture-word verification (match vs. non-match) task. Word targets were presented 325ms after a picture prime, which either matched (CAMEL→”camel”), or did not match (In Category: CAMEL→”cow; Out Category: CAMEL→”candle”) the prime. N400 data suggest that both patients and controls are sensitive to the difference between primed and unprimed words, but patients are less sensitive than controls. Similarly, N400 data suggest that both groups were sensitive to the subtler difference between classes of unprimed words (In Category versus Out Category picture-word non-matches), but patients are less sensitive, especially those with prominent negative symptoms. PMID:19995582

  19. The hysteretic Hopfield neural network.

    PubMed

    Bharitkar, S; Mendel, J M

    2000-01-01

    A new neuron activation function based on a property found in physical systems--hysteresis--is proposed. We incorporate this neuron activation in a fully connected dynamical system to form the hysteretic Hopfield neural network (HHNN). We then present an analog implementation of this architecture and its associated dynamical equation and energy function.We proceed to prove Lyapunov stability for this new model, and then solve a combinatorial optimization problem (i.e., the N-queen problem) using this network. We demonstrate the advantages of hysteresis by showing increased frequency of convergence to a solution, when the parameters associated with the activation function are varied. PMID:18249816

  20. Neural nets.

    PubMed

    Hejnol, Andreas; Rentzsch, Fabian

    2015-09-21

    Although modern evolutionary biology has abandoned the use of 'lower' or 'higher' for animals, the quote of G.H. Parker captures quite well the current understanding of the nerve net as the evolutionarily oldest organization of the nervous system, the major organ system responsible for processing information and coordinating animal behaviour. The degree of complexity of a nervous system - in particular its organization into substructures such as brains and nerve cords - shows fascinating variations between animals. Even within an individual, the nervous system can show parallel existing types of organizations that are only partially connected, illustrated by the well-known central and peripheral nervous system. In general, the architecture of the nervous system is adapted to the specific needs and lifestyle of the individual species. How these diverse and complex nervous systems evolved is an ongoing debate among zoologists and evolutionary biologists.

  1. Making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

    PubMed

    Cody, Jannine DeMars; Hale, Daniel Esten

    2015-09-01

    Individuals affected by the classic chromosome deletion syndromes which were first identified at the beginning of the genetic age, are now positioned to benefit from genomic advances. This issue highlights five of these conditions (4p-, 5p-, 11q-, 18p-, and 18q-). It focuses on the increased in understanding of the molecular underpinnings and envisions how these can be transformed into effective treatments. While it is scientifically exciting to see the phenotypic manifestations of hemizygosity being increasingly understood at the molecular and cellular level, it is even more amazing to consider that we are now on the road to making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

  2. [Erythrocyte membrane abnormalities - hereditary elliptocytosis].

    PubMed

    Kvezereli-Kopadze, M; Kvezereli-Kopadze, A; Mtvarelidze, Z; Bubuteishvili, A

    2015-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the 4 year old boy with Hereditary Elliptocitosis (HE). The diagnosis of this rare hemolytic anemia was based on detailed family history (positive in the 4-th generation), physical examination and Para-clinical data analyses. The vast majority of patients with HE are asymptomatic, severe forms are rare. The most important is examination of blood films, which is helpful to detect the morphology abnormalities of red cells. In case of HE a different approach is required. Positive family history and series of investigations should be conducted to determine the HE.

  3. Abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick G

    2013-12-01

    Primary abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane are characterized by clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity. Among this group, hereditary spherocytosis patients are more likely to experience symptomatic anemia. Treatment of hereditary spherocytosis with splenectomy is curative in most patients. Growing recognition of the long-term risks of splenectomy has led to re-evaluation of the role of splenectomy. Management guidelines acknowledge these considerations and recommend discussion between health care providers, patient, and family. The hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes are the most common primary disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, most elliptocytosis patients are asymptomatic and do not require therapy.

  4. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  5. Structural and behavioral correlates of abnormal encoding of money value in the sensorimotor striatum in cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Konova, Anna B; Moeller, Scott J; Tomasi, Dardo; Parvaz, Muhammad A; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Volkow, Nora D; Goldstein, Rita Z

    2012-10-01

    Abnormalities in frontostriatal systems are thought to be central to the pathophysiology of addiction, and may underlie the maladaptive processing of the highly generalizable reinforcer, money. Although abnormal frontostriatal structure and function have been observed in individuals addicted to cocaine, it is less clear how individual variability in brain structure is associated with brain function to influence behavior. Our objective was to examine frontostriatal structure and neural processing of money value in chronic cocaine users and closely matched healthy controls. A reward task that manipulated different levels of money was used to isolate neural activity associated with money value. Gray matter volume measures were used to assess frontostriatal structure. Our results indicated that cocaine users had an abnormal money value signal in the sensorimotor striatum (right putamen/globus pallidus) that was negatively associated with accuracy adjustments to money and was more pronounced in individuals with more severe use. In parallel, group differences were also observed in both the function and gray matter volume of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex; in the cocaine users, the former was directly associated with response to money in the striatum. These results provide strong evidence for abnormalities in the neural mechanisms of valuation in addiction and link these functional abnormalities with deficits in brain structure. In addition, as value signals represent acquired associations, their abnormal processing in the sensorimotor striatum, a region centrally implicated in habit formation, could signal disadvantageous associative learning in cocaine addiction.

  6. College Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Scalzo, Mary Jo

    2012-01-01

    This article describes Oakwood City School District's College Connection Study, which is now in its eighth year. The purpose of the study is to help the educators in the district learn how to effectively prepare students for success in the colleges of their choice. Teachers, administrators, and other staff members travel to colleges to conduct…

  7. Connecting Node

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Raboin, Jasen L.; Spexarth, Gary R.

    2009-01-01

    A paper describes the Octanode, a connecting node that facilitates the integration of multiple docking mechanisms, hatches, windows, and internal and external systems with the use of flat surfaces. The Octanode is a 26- faced Great Rhombicuboctahedron Archi medean solid with six octagonshaped panels, eight hexagon-shaped panels, and 12 square panels using three unique, simple, flat shapes to construct a spherical approximation. Each flat shape can be constructed with a variety of material and manufacturing techniques, such as honeycomb composite panels or a pocketed skinstringer configuration, using conventional means. The flat shapes can be connected together and sealed to create a pressurizable volume by the use of any conventional means including welding or fastening devices and sealant. The node can then be connected to other elements to allow transfer between those elements, or it could serve as an airlock. The Octanode can be manufactured on the ground and can be integrated with subsystems including hatches and ports. The node can then be transported to its intended location, whether on orbit or on surface. Any of the flat panels could be replaced by curved ones, turning the node into a copula. Windows may be placed on flat panes with optimal viewing angles that are not blocked by large connecting nodes. The advantage of using flat panels to represent a spherical approximation is that this allows for easier integration of subsystems and design features.

  8. Get Connected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Jessica; Hagevik, Rita; Adkinson, Bennett; Parmly, Jilynn

    2013-01-01

    Technology can be both a blessing and a curse in the classroom. Although technology can provide greater access to information and increase student engagement, if screen time replaces time spent outside, then students stand to lose awareness and connectivity to the surrounding natural environment. This article describes how Google Earth can foster…

  9. Making Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quillen, Ian

    2014-01-01

    "We used to send out books that looked like this," says Barbara Dreyer, as she holds the 500-page volume from one of the first-ever courses offered online by Connections Academy. "You could look at this information online, but, frankly, a lot of people were doing this," she adds, thumbing through the book's pages. Dreyer,…

  10. An Overview of Bayesian Methods for Neural Spike Train Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Neural spike train analysis is an important task in computational neuroscience which aims to understand neural mechanisms and gain insights into neural circuits. With the advancement of multielectrode recording and imaging technologies, it has become increasingly demanding to develop statistical tools for analyzing large neuronal ensemble spike activity. Here we present a tutorial overview of Bayesian methods and their representative applications in neural spike train analysis, at both single neuron and population levels. On the theoretical side, we focus on various approximate Bayesian inference techniques as applied to latent state and parameter estimation. On the application side, the topics include spike sorting, tuning curve estimation, neural encoding and decoding, deconvolution of spike trains from calcium imaging signals, and inference of neuronal functional connectivity and synchrony. Some research challenges and opportunities for neural spike train analysis are discussed. PMID:24348527

  11. Decreased Connectivity and Cerebellar Activity in Autism during Motor Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Powell, Stephanie K.; Simmonds, Daniel J.; Goldberg, Melissa C.; Caffo, Brian; Pekar, James J.

    2009-01-01

    Although motor deficits are common in autism, the neural correlates underlying the disruption of even basic motor execution are unknown. Motor deficits may be some of the earliest identifiable signs of abnormal development and increased understanding of their neural underpinnings may provide insight into autism-associated differences in parallel…

  12. Structural abnormalities of common carp Cyprinus carpio spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Psenicka, Martin; Rodina, Marek; Flajshans, Martin; Kaspar, Vojtech; Linhart, Otomar

    2009-11-01

    Spermatozoa of common carp Cyprinus carpio are typically consist of a primitive head without acrosome, a midpiece with several mitochondria, a centriolar complex (proximal and distal centriole), and one flagellum. During an evaluation of the motility of common carp spermatozoa, we found spermatozoa with more than one flagellum and/or "double head" in three different individuals. This may be related to abnormal spermatogenesis. Ultrastructure and physiological parameters of spermatozoa were examined using light microscopy (dark field with stroboscopic illumination), transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and flow cytometry. The recorded pictures and videos were evaluated using Olympus MicroImage software. All spermatozoa with more than one flagellum had a larger head and shorter flagella. They occasionally demonstrated several cytoplasmic channels separating the flagella from the midpiece. Each flagellum was based upon its own centriolar complex, with the connection of the flagellum to the head always at a constant angle. The flagella always consisted of nine peripheral pairs and one central doublet of microtubules. Sperm exhibited a relative DNA content similar to that found in sperm from normal males, with higher coefficients of variation. Although similar abnormalities have been found in livestock, where they were described as a defect in spermiogenesis, no comparable results have been reported in fish. The frequency at which these abnormalities occurs, the fertilization ability of males with defects in spermiogenesis, the influence of these abnormalities on progeny in terms of ploidy level, and the occurrence of deformities warrant further investigation.

  13. The evolution and development of neural superposition.

    PubMed

    Agi, Egemen; Langen, Marion; Altschuler, Steven J; Wu, Lani F; Zimmermann, Timo; Hiesinger, Peter Robin

    2014-01-01

    Visual systems have a rich history as model systems for the discovery and understanding of basic principles underlying neuronal connectivity. The compound eyes of insects consist of up to thousands of small unit eyes that are connected by photoreceptor axons to set up a visual map in the brain. The photoreceptor axon terminals thereby represent neighboring points seen in the environment in neighboring synaptic units in the brain. Neural superposition is a special case of such a wiring principle, where photoreceptors from different unit eyes that receive the same input converge upon the same synaptic units in the brain. This wiring principle is remarkable, because each photoreceptor in a single unit eye receives different input and each individual axon, among thousands others in the brain, must be sorted together with those few axons that have the same input. Key aspects of neural superposition have been described as early as 1907. Since then neuroscientists, evolutionary and developmental biologists have been fascinated by how such a complicated wiring principle could evolve, how it is genetically encoded, and how it is developmentally realized. In this review article, we will discuss current ideas about the evolutionary origin and developmental program of neural superposition. Our goal is to identify in what way the special case of neural superposition can help us answer more general questions about the evolution and development of genetically "hard-wired" synaptic connectivity in the brain.

  14. The Evolution and Development of Neural Superposition

    PubMed Central

    Agi, Egemen; Langen, Marion; Altschuler, Steven J.; Wu, Lani F.; Zimmermann, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Visual systems have a rich history as model systems for the discovery and understanding of basic principles underlying neuronal connectivity. The compound eyes of insects consist of up to thousands of small unit eyes that are connected by photoreceptor axons to set up a visual map in the brain. The photoreceptor axon terminals thereby represent neighboring points seen in the environment in neighboring synaptic units in the brain. Neural superposition is a special case of such a wiring principle, where photoreceptors from different unit eyes that receive the same input converge upon the same synaptic units in the brain. This wiring principle is remarkable, because each photoreceptor in a single unit eye receives different input and each individual axon, among thousands others in the brain, must be sorted together with those few axons that have the same input. Key aspects of neural superposition have been described as early as 1907. Since then neuroscientists, evolutionary and developmental biologists have been fascinated by how such a complicated wiring principle could evolve, how it is genetically encoded, and how it is developmentally realized. In this review article, we will discuss current ideas about the evolutionary origin and developmental program of neural superposition. Our goal is to identify in what way the special case of neural superposition can help us answer more general questions about the evolution and development of genetically “hard-wired” synaptic connectivity in the brain. PMID:24912630

  15. Medical management of abnormal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, S S; Prasad, R N

    1990-06-01

    Medical termination of abnormal pregnancy requires specific techniques since some conditions make therapy more effective, e.g., missed abortion intrauterine death and molar pregnancy, and others less so, e.g. anencephalic pregnancy. In all cases it is best to terminate the pregnancy as soon as possible to reduce anguish and risks of complications such as consumptive coagulopathy. Oxytocin is not consistently effective, but intraamniotic rivanol has oxytocic properties, and prostaglandins (PGs) are effective by several routes. Surgical methods are more popular in Japan and the US. A diagnostic flow chart is included and described. For missed abortion and fetal death vacuum aspiration or dilatation and evacuation are appropriate for early pregnancy, or PGs are used for later pregnancy, unless there are medical contraindications. Anencephalic pregnancy, usually diagnoses in 2nd or 3rd trimester, is resistant to medical therapy and must often be terminated by cesarean section. Molar pregnancy can be managed with vacuum aspiration at any length of gestation, but must be completed by curettage. Intraamniotic PGs are not advised for mole or fetal death. PG analogs can be administered intramuscularly, or vaginally in gel form. Other types of abnormal pregnancy that can be managed with PGs are spina bifida, hydrocephalus, hydrops fetalis, Dandy-Walker syndrome and Down's syndrome. Tubal pregnancy can be evacuated with intratubally administered PGs under laparoscopic control, thereby preserving tubal integrity. PMID:2225605

  16. Parallel architectures and neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Calianiello, E.R. )

    1989-01-01

    This book covers parallel computer architectures and neural networks. Topics include: neural modeling, use of ADA to simulate neural networks, VLSI technology, implementation of Boltzmann machines, and analysis of neural nets.

  17. FGF signaling transforms non-neural ectoderm into neural crest.

    PubMed

    Yardley, Nathan; García-Castro, Martín I

    2012-12-15

    The neural crest arises at the border between the neural plate and the adjacent non-neural ectoderm. It has been suggested that both neural and non-neural ectoderm can contribute to the neural crest. Several studies have examined the molecular mechanisms that regulate neural crest induction in neuralized tissues or the neural plate border. Here, using the chick as a model system, we address the molecular mechanisms by which non-neural ectoderm generates neural crest. We report that in response to FGF the non-neural ectoderm can ectopically express several early neural crest markers (Pax7, Msx1, Dlx5, Sox9, FoxD3, Snail2, and Sox10). Importantly this response to FGF signaling can occur without inducing ectopic mesodermal tissues. Furthermore, the non-neural ectoderm responds to FGF by expressing the prospective neural marker Sox3, but it does not express definitive markers of neural or anterior neural (Sox2 and Otx2) tissues. These results suggest that the non-neural ectoderm can launch the neural crest program in the absence of mesoderm, without acquiring definitive neural character. Finally, we report that prior to the upregulation of these neural crest markers, the non-neural ectoderm upregulates both BMP and Wnt molecules in response to FGF. Our results provide the first effort to understand the molecular events leading to neural crest development via the non-neural ectoderm in amniotes and present a distinct response to FGF signaling. PMID:23000357

  18. Abnormal hippocampal structure and function in clinical anxiety and comorbid depression.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jiook; Greenberg, Tsafrir; Song, Inkyung; Blair Simpson, Helen; Posner, Jonathan; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R

    2016-05-01

    Given the high prevalence rates of comorbidity of anxiety and depressive disorders, identifying a common neural pathway to both disorders is important not only for better diagnosis and treatment, but also for a more complete conceptualization of each disease. Hippocampal abnormalities have been implicated in anxiety and depression, separately; however, it remains unknown whether these abnormalities are also implicated in their comorbidity. Here we address this question by testing 32 adults with generalized anxiety disorder (15 GAD only and 17 comorbid MDD) and 25 healthy controls (HC) using multimodal MRI (structure, diffusion and functional) and automated hippocampal segmentation. We demonstrate that (i) abnormal microstructure of the CA1 and CA2-3 is associated with GAD/MDD comorbidity and (ii) decreased anterior hippocampal reactivity in response to repetition of the threat cue is associated with GAD (with or without MDD comorbidity). In addition, mediation-structural equation modeling (SEM) reveals that our hippocampal and dimensional symptom data are best explained by a model describing a significant influence of abnormal hippocampal microstructure on both anxiety and depression-mediated through its impact on abnormal hippocampal threat processing. Collectively, our findings show a strong association between changes in hippocampal microstructure and threat processing, which together may present a common neural pathway to comorbidity of anxiety and depression.

  19. Electrode array for neural stimulation

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Okandan, Murat; Stein, David J.; Yang, Pin; Cesarano, III, Joseph; Dellinger, Jennifer

    2011-08-16

    An electrode array for neural stimulation is disclosed which has particular applications for use in a retinal prosthesis. The electrode array can be formed as a hermetically-sealed two-part ceramic package which includes an electronic circuit such as a demultiplexer circuit encapsulated therein. A relatively large number (up to 1000 or more) of individually-addressable electrodes are provided on a curved surface of a ceramic base portion the electrode array, while a much smaller number of electrical connections are provided on a ceramic lid of the electrode array. The base and lid can be attached using a metal-to-metal seal formed by laser brazing. Electrical connections to the electrode array can be provided by a flexible ribbon cable which can also be used to secure the electrode array in place.

  20. Neural predictive error signal correlates with depressive illness severity in a game paradigm.

    PubMed

    Steele, J D; Meyer, M; Ebmeier, K P

    2004-09-01

    Considerable experimental evidence supports the existence of predictive error signals in various brain regions during associative learning in animals and humans. These regions include the prefrontal cortex, temporal lobe, cerebellum and monoamine systems. Various quantitative theories have been developed to describe behaviour during learning, including Rescorla-Wagner, Temporal Difference and Kalman filter models. These theories may also account for neural error signals. Reviews of imaging studies of depressive illness have consistently implicated the prefrontal and temporal lobes as having abnormal function, and sometimes structure, whilst the monoamine systems are directly influenced by antidepressant medication. It was hypothesised that such abnormalities may be associated with a dysfunction of associative learning that would be reflected by different predictive error signals in depressed patients when compared with healthy controls. This was tested with 30 subjects, 15 with a major depressive illness, using a gambling paradigm and fMRI. Consistent with the hypothesis, depressed patients differed from controls in having an increased error signal. Additionally, for some brain regions, the magnitude of the error signal correlated with Hamilton depression rating of illness severity. Structural equation modelling was used to investigate hypothesised change in effective connectivity between prespecified regions of interest in the limbic and paralimbic system. Again, differences were found that in some cases correlated with illness severity. These results are discussed in the context of quantitative theories of brain function, clinical features of depressive illness and treatments. PMID:15325374

  1. Neural network optimization, components, and design selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Scott W.

    1990-07-01

    Neural Networks are part of a revived technology which has received a lot of hype in recent years. As is apt to happen in any hyped technology, jargon and predictions make its assimilation and application difficult. Nevertheless, Neural Networks have found use in a number of areas, working on non-trivial and noncontrived problems. For example, one net has been trained to "read", translating English text into phoneme sequences. Other applications of Neural Networks include data base manipulation and the solving of muting and classification types of optimization problems. Neural Networks are constructed from neurons, which in electronics or software attempt to model but are not constrained by the real thing, i.e., neurons in our gray matter. Neurons are simple processing units connected to many other neurons over pathways which modify the incoming signals. A single synthetic neuron typically sums its weighted inputs, runs this sum through a non-linear function, and produces an output. In the brain, neurons are connected in a complex topology: in hardware/software the topology is typically much simpler, with neurons lying side by side, forming layers of neurons which connect to the layer of neurons which receive their outputs. This simplistic model is much easier to construct than the real thing, and yet can solve real problems. The information in a network, or its "memory", is completely contained in the weights on the connections from one neuron to another. Establishing these weights is called "training" the network. Some networks are trained by design -- once constructed no further learning takes place. Other types of networks require iterative training once wired up, but are not trainable once taught Still other types of networks can continue to learn after initial construction. The main benefit to using Neural Networks is their ability to work with conflicting or incomplete ("fuzzy") data sets. This ability and its usefulness will become evident in the following

  2. Microbiota modulate behavioral and physiological abnormalities associated with neurodevelopmental disorders.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Elaine Y; McBride, Sara W; Hsien, Sophia; Sharon, Gil; Hyde, Embriette R; McCue, Tyler; Codelli, Julian A; Chow, Janet; Reisman, Sarah E; Petrosino, Joseph F; Patterson, Paul H; Mazmanian, Sarkis K

    2013-12-19

    Neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), are defined by core behavioral impairments; however, subsets of individuals display a spectrum of gastrointestinal (GI) abnormalities. We demonstrate GI barrier defects and microbiota alterations in the maternal immune activation (MIA) mouse model that is known to display features of ASD. Oral treatment of MIA offspring with the human commensal Bacteroides fragilis corrects gut permeability, alters microbial composition, and ameliorates defects in communicative, stereotypic, anxiety-like and sensorimotor behaviors. MIA offspring display an altered serum metabolomic profile, and B. fragilis modulates levels of several metabolites. Treating naive mice with a metabolite that is increased by MIA and restored by B. fragilis causes certain behavioral abnormalities, suggesting that gut bacterial effects on the host metabolome impact behavior. Taken together, these findings support a gut-microbiome-brain connection in a mouse model of ASD and identify a potential probiotic therapy for GI and particular behavioral symptoms in human neurodevelopmental disorders.

  3. Emotional detachment in psychopathy: Involvement of dorsal default-mode connections.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Arjun; Gregory, Sarah; Dell'Acqua, Flavio; Periche Thomas, Eva; Simmons, Andy; Murphy, Declan G M; Hodgins, Sheilagh; Blackwood, Nigel J; Craig, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Criminal psychopathy is defined by emotional detachment [Psychopathy Checklist - Revised (PCL-R) factor 1], and antisocial behaviour (PCL-R factor 2). Previous work has associated antisocial behaviour in psychopathy with abnormalities in a ventral temporo-amygdala-orbitofrontal network. However, little is known of the neural correlates of emotional detachment. Imaging studies have indicated that the 'default-mode network' (DMN), and in particular its dorsomedial (medial prefrontal - posterior cingulate) component, contributes to affective and social processing in healthy individuals. Furthermore, recent work suggests that this network may be implicated in psychopathy. However, no research has examined the relationship between psychopathy, emotional detachment, and the white matter underpinning the DMN. We therefore used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography in 13 offenders with psychopathy and 13 non-offenders to investigate the relationship between emotional detachment and the microstructure of white matter connections within the DMN. These included the dorsal cingulum (containing the medial prefrontal - posterior cingulate connections of the DMN), and the ventral cingulum (containing the posterior cingulate - medial temporal connections of the DMN). We found that fractional anisotropy (FA) was reduced in the left dorsal cingulum in the psychopathy group (p = .024). Moreover, within this group, emotional detachment was negatively correlated with FA in this tract portion bilaterally (left: r = -.61, p = .026; right: r = -.62, p = .023). These results suggest the importance of the dorsal DMN in the emotional detachment observed in individuals with psychopathy. We propose a 'dual-network' model of white matter abnormalities in the disorder, which incorporates these with previous findings. PMID:25218645

  4. Emotional detachment in psychopathy: Involvement of dorsal default-mode connections.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Arjun; Gregory, Sarah; Dell'Acqua, Flavio; Periche Thomas, Eva; Simmons, Andy; Murphy, Declan G M; Hodgins, Sheilagh; Blackwood, Nigel J; Craig, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Criminal psychopathy is defined by emotional detachment [Psychopathy Checklist - Revised (PCL-R) factor 1], and antisocial behaviour (PCL-R factor 2). Previous work has associated antisocial behaviour in psychopathy with abnormalities in a ventral temporo-amygdala-orbitofrontal network. However, little is known of the neural correlates of emotional detachment. Imaging studies have indicated that the 'default-mode network' (DMN), and in particular its dorsomedial (medial prefrontal - posterior cingulate) component, contributes to affective and social processing in healthy individuals. Furthermore, recent work suggests that this network may be implicated in psychopathy. However, no research has examined the relationship between psychopathy, emotional detachment, and the white matter underpinning the DMN. We therefore used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography in 13 offenders with psychopathy and 13 non-offenders to investigate the relationship between emotional detachment and the microstructure of white matter connections within the DMN. These included the dorsal cingulum (containing the medial prefrontal - posterior cingulate connections of the DMN), and the ventral cingulum (containing the posterior cingulate - medial temporal connections of the DMN). We found that fractional anisotropy (FA) was reduced in the left dorsal cingulum in the psychopathy group (p = .024). Moreover, within this group, emotional detachment was negatively correlated with FA in this tract portion bilaterally (left: r = -.61, p = .026; right: r = -.62, p = .023). These results suggest the importance of the dorsal DMN in the emotional detachment observed in individuals with psychopathy. We propose a 'dual-network' model of white matter abnormalities in the disorder, which incorporates these with previous findings.

  5. Parallel Consensual Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benediktsson, J. A.; Sveinsson, J. R.; Ersoy, O. K.; Swain, P. H.

    1993-01-01

    A new neural network architecture is proposed and applied in classification of remote sensing/geographic data from multiple sources. The new architecture is called the parallel consensual neural network and its relation to hierarchical and ensemble neural networks is discussed. The parallel consensual neural network architecture is based on statistical consensus theory. The input data are transformed several times and the different transformed data are applied as if they were independent inputs and are classified using stage neural networks. Finally, the outputs from the stage networks are then weighted and combined to make a decision. Experimental results based on remote sensing data and geographic data are given. The performance of the consensual neural network architecture is compared to that of a two-layer (one hidden layer) conjugate-gradient backpropagation neural network. The results with the proposed neural network architecture compare favorably in terms of classification accuracy to the backpropagation method.

  6. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the first month ... she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In spina ...

  7. Electronic device aspects of neural network memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambe, J.; Moopenn, A.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    The basic issues related to the electronic implementation of the neural network model (NNM) for content addressable memories are examined. A brief introduction to the principles of the NNM is followed by an analysis of the information storage of the neural network in the form of a binary connection matrix and the recall capability of such matrix memories based on a hardware simulation study. In addition, materials and device architecture issues involved in the future realization of such networks in VLSI-compatible ultrahigh-density memories are considered. A possible space application of such devices would be in the area of large-scale information storage without mechanical devices.

  8. Neural Simulations on Multi-Core Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Eichner, Hubert; Klug, Tobias; Borst, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Neuroscience is witnessing increasing knowledge about the anatomy and electrophysiological properties of neurons and their connectivity, leading to an ever increasing computational complexity of neural simulations. At the same time, a rather radical change in personal computer technology emerges with the establishment of multi-cores: high-density, explicitly parallel processor architectures for both high performance as well as standard desktop computers. This work introduces strategies for the parallelization of biophysically realistic neural simulations based on the compartmental modeling technique and results of such an implementation, with a strong focus on multi-core architectures and automation, i.e. user-transparent load balancing. PMID:19636393

  9. Neural complexity: a graph theoretic interpretation.

    PubMed

    Barnett, L; Buckley, C L; Bullock, S

    2011-04-01

    One of the central challenges facing modern neuroscience is to explain the ability of the nervous system to coherently integrate information across distinct functional modules in the absence of a central executive. To this end, Tononi et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 91, 5033 (1994)] proposed a measure of neural complexity that purports to capture this property based on mutual information between complementary subsets of a system. Neural complexity, so defined, is one of a family of information theoretic metrics developed to measure the balance between the segregation and integration of a system's dynamics. One key question arising for such measures involves understanding how they are influenced by network topology. Sporns et al. [Cereb. Cortex 10, 127 (2000)] employed numerical models in order to determine the dependence of neural complexity on the topological features of a network. However, a complete picture has yet to be established. While De Lucia et al. [Phys. Rev. E 71, 016114 (2005)] made the first attempts at an analytical account of this relationship, their work utilized a formulation of neural complexity that, we argue, did not reflect the intuitions of the original work. In this paper we start by describing weighted connection matrices formed by applying a random continuous weight distribution to binary adjacency matrices. This allows us to derive an approximation for neural complexity in terms of the moments of the weight distribution and elementary graph motifs. In particular, we explicitly establish a dependency of neural complexity on cyclic graph motifs.

  10. Electronic neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, R.E.; Jackel, L.D.; Graf, H.P.

    1988-02-01

    The use of electronic neural networks to handle some complex computing problems is discussed. A simple neural model is shown and discussed in terms of its computational aspects. The use of electronic neural networks in machine pattern recognition and classification and in machine learning is examined. CMOS programmable networks are discussed. 15 references.

  11. Alterations in functional connectivity for language in prematurely born adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Robin J; Lacadie, Cheryl; Vohr, Betty; Kesler, Shelli R; Katz, Karol H; Schneider, Karen C; Pugh, Kenneth R; Makuch, Robert W; Reiss, Allan L; Constable, R Todd; Ment, Laura R

    2009-03-01

    Recent data suggest recovery of language systems but persistent structural abnormalities in the prematurely born. We tested the hypothesis that subjects who were born prematurely develop alternative networks for processing language. Subjects who were born prematurely (n = 22; 600-1250 g birth weight), without neonatal brain injury on neonatal cranial ultrasound, and 26 term control subjects were examined with a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) semantic association task, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III (WISC-III) and the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals (CELF). In-magnet task accuracy and response times were calculated, and fMRI data were evaluated for the effect of group on blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation, the correlation between task accuracy and activation and the functional connectivity between regions activating to task. Although there were differences in verbal IQ and CELF scores between the preterm (PT) and term control groups, there were no significant differences for either accuracy or response time for the in-magnet task. Both groups activated classic semantic processing areas including the left superior and middle temporal gyri and inferior frontal gyrus, and there was no significant difference in activation patterns between groups. Clear differences between the groups were observed in the correlation between task accuracy and activation to task at P < 0.01, corrected for multiple comparisons. Left inferior frontal gyrus correlated with accuracy only for term controls and left sensory motor areas correlated with accuracy only for PT subjects. Left middle temporal gyri correlated with task accuracy for both groups. Connectivity analyses at P < 0.001 revealed the importance of a circuit between left middle temporal gyri and inferior frontal gyrus for both groups. In addition, the PT subjects evidenced greater connectivity between traditional language areas and sensory motor areas but significantly

  12. Adults with Chromosome 18 Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Soileau, Bridgette; Hasi, Minire; Sebold, Courtney; Hill, Annice; O'Donnell, Louise; Hale, Daniel E; Cody, Jannine D

    2015-08-01

    The identification of an underlying chromosome abnormality frequently marks the endpoint of a diagnostic odyssey. However, families are frequently left with more questions than answers as they consider their child's future. In the case of rare chromosome conditions, a lack of longitudinal data often makes it difficult to provide anticipatory guidance to these families. The objective of this study is to describe the lifespan, educational attainment, living situation, and behavioral phenotype of adults with chromosome 18 abnormalities. The Chromosome 18 Clinical Research Center has enrolled 483 individuals with one of the following conditions: 18q-, 18p-, Tetrasomy 18p, and Ring 18. As a part of the ongoing longitudinal study, we collect data on living arrangements, educational level attained, and employment status as well as data on executive functioning and behavioral skills on an annual basis. Within our cohort, 28 of the 483 participants have died, the majority of whom have deletions encompassing the TCF4 gene or who have unbalanced rearrangement involving other chromosomes. Data regarding the cause of and age at death are presented. We also report on the living situation, educational attainment, and behavioral phenotype of the 151 participants over the age of 18. In general, educational level is higher for people with all these conditions than implied by the early literature, including some that received post-high school education. In addition, some individuals are able to live independently, though at this point they represent a minority of patients. Data on executive function and behavioral phenotype are also presented. Taken together, these data provide insight into the long-term outcome for individuals with a chromosome 18 condition. This information is critical in counseling families on the range of potential outcomes for their child.

  13. Second cancer following cutaneous melanoma and cancers of the brain, thyroid, connective tissue, bone, and eye in Connecticut, 1935-82.

    PubMed

    Tucker, M A; Boice, J D; Hoffman, D A

    1985-12-01

    The risk of second primary cancers developing was evaluated in individuals with 6 rare tumors in Connecticut between 1935 and 1982. Small but significant excesses of all second cancers occurred in patients with cutaneous melanoma (42%), and cancers of the brain (59%), thyroid (49%), connective tissue (23%), bone (66%), and eye (40%). In individuals with cutaneous melanoma, the highest risks were for subsequent cutaneous melanomas [relative risk (RR) = 8.5] that persisted throughout all intervals of observation. The risk for second melanomas was higher in persons under age 40, consistent with a heritable component. Connective tissue tumors and breast cancers also occurred in excess. Among patients with brain cancer, an increase of melanoma was observed that may represent an underlying neural crest abnormality, although no excess of brain cancer was seen after melanoma. Reciprocal increases of bone cancer after connective tissue cancer and connective tissue cancer after bone cancer point to shared risk factors, such as high dose radiotherapy or genetic susceptibility states. An anticipated high risk of osteogenic sarcoma following Ewing's sarcoma was not seen. An excess of breast cancer (RR = 1.9) after thyroid cancer indicates common etiologic factors. Expected excesses of bilateral retinoblastoma and bone cancer after retinoblastoma were seen. Tumors commonly treated with alkylating agents or nitrosoureas (melanoma, brain, connective tissue) showed slightly elevated risks of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. Prostate cancer was frequently found to be in excess, but this is likely an artifact due to ascertainment bias.

  14. Computational modeling of neural plasticity for self-organization of neural networks.

    PubMed

    Chrol-Cannon, Joseph; Jin, Yaochu

    2014-11-01

    Self-organization in biological nervous systems during the lifetime is known to largely occur through a process of plasticity that is dependent upon the spike-timing activity in connected neurons. In the field of computational neuroscience, much effort has been dedicated to building up computational models of neural plasticity to replicate experimental data. Most recently, increasing attention has been paid to understanding the role of neural plasticity in functional and structural neural self-organization, as well as its influence on the learning performance of neural networks for accomplishing machine learning tasks such as classification and regression. Although many ideas and hypothesis have been suggested, the relationship between the structure, dynamics and learning performance of neural networks remains elusive. The purpose of this article is to review the most important computational models for neural plasticity and discuss various ideas about neural plasticity's role. Finally, we suggest a few promising research directions, in particular those along the line that combines findings in computational neuroscience and systems biology, and their synergetic roles in understanding learning, memory and cognition, thereby bridging the gap between computational neuroscience, systems biology and computational intelligence.

  15. Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging Classification of Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jeffrey S.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Froehlich, Alyson L.; DuBray, Molly B.; Druzgal, T. Jason; Cariello, Annahir N.; Cooperrider, Jason R.; Zielinski, Brandon A.; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Alexander, Andrew L.; Bigler, Erin D.; Lange, Nicholas; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2011-01-01

    Group differences in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity between individuals with autism and typically developing controls have been widely replicated for a small number of discrete brain regions, yet the whole-brain distribution of connectivity abnormalities in autism is not well characterized. It is also unclear…

  16. Brain potentials implicate temporal lobe abnormalities in criminal psychopaths.

    PubMed

    Kiehl, Kent A; Bates, Alan T; Laurens, Kristin R; Hare, Robert D; Liddle, Peter F

    2006-08-01

    Psychopathy is associated with abnormalities in attention and orienting. However, few studies have examined the neural systems underlying these processes. To address this issue, the authors recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) while 80 incarcerated men, classified as psychopathic or nonpsychopathic via the Hare Psychopathy Checklist--Revised (R. D. Hare, 1991, 2003), completed an auditory oddball task. Consistent with hypotheses, processing of targets elicited larger frontocentral negativities (N550) in psychopaths than in nonpsychopaths. Psychopaths also showed an enlarged N2 and reduced P3 during target detection. Similar ERP modulations have been reported in patients with amygdala and temporal lobe damage. The data are interpreted as supporting the hypothesis that psychopathy may be related to dysfunction of the paralimbic system--a system that includes parts of the temporal and frontal lobes. PMID:16866585

  17. A neural network prototyping package within IRAF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bazell, D.; Bankman, I.

    1992-01-01

    We outline our plans for incorporating a Neural Network Prototyping Package into the IRAF environment. The package we are developing will allow the user to choose between different types of networks and to specify the details of the particular architecture chosen. Neural networks consist of a highly interconnected set of simple processing units. The strengths of the