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Sample records for abnormal neuronal activity

  1. Abnormal neuronal activity in Tourette syndrome and its modulation using deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Israelashvili, Michal; Loewenstern, Yocheved

    2015-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a common childhood-onset disorder characterized by motor and vocal tics that are typically accompanied by a multitude of comorbid symptoms. Pharmacological treatment options are limited, which has led to the exploration of deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a possible treatment for severe cases. Multiple lines of evidence have linked TS with abnormalities in the motor and limbic cortico-basal ganglia (CBG) pathways. Neurophysiological data have only recently started to slowly accumulate from multiple sources: noninvasive imaging and electrophysiological techniques, invasive electrophysiological recordings in TS patients undergoing DBS implantation surgery, and animal models of the disorder. These converging sources point to system-level physiological changes throughout the CBG pathway, including both general altered baseline neuronal activity patterns and specific tic-related activity. DBS has been applied to different regions along the motor and limbic pathways, primarily to the globus pallidus internus, thalamic nuclei, and nucleus accumbens. In line with the findings that also draw on the more abundant application of DBS to Parkinson's disease, this stimulation is assumed to result in changes in the neuronal firing patterns and the passage of information through the stimulated nuclei. We present an overview of recent experimental findings on abnormal neuronal activity associated with TS and the changes in this activity following DBS. These findings are then discussed in the context of current models of CBG function in the normal state, during TS, and finally in the wider context of DBS in CBG-related disorders. PMID:25925326

  2. Knockdown of sodium channel NaV1.6 blocks mechanical pain and abnormal bursting activity of afferent neurons in inflamed sensory ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; Ye, Ling; Mao, Ju-Xian; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory processes in the sensory ganglia contribute to many forms of chronic pain. We previously showed that local inflammation of the lumbar sensory ganglia rapidly leads to prolonged mechanical pain behaviors and high levels of spontaneous bursting activity in myelinated cells. Abnormal spontaneous activity of sensory neurons occurs early in many preclinical pain models, and initiates many other pathological changes, but its molecular basis is not well understood. The sodium channel isoform NaV1.6 can underlie repetitive firing and excitatory persistent and resurgent currents. We used in vivo knockdown of this channel via local injection of siRNA to examine its role in chronic pain following local inflammation of the rat lumbar sensory ganglia. In normal DRG, quantitative PCR showed that cells capable of firing repetitively had significantly higher relative expression of NaV1.6. In inflamed DRG, spontaneously active bursting cells expressed high levels of NaV1.6′ immunoreactivity. In vivo knockdown of NaV1.6 locally in the lumbar DRG at the time of DRG inflammation completely blocked development of pain behaviors and abnormal spontaneous activity, while having only minor effects on unmyelinated C-cells. Current research on isoform-specific sodium channel blockers for chronic pain is largely focused on NaV1.8, because it is present primarily in unmyelinated C fiber nociceptors, or on NaV1.7, because lack of this channel causes congenital indifference to pain. However, the results suggest that NaV1.6 may be a useful therapeutic target for chronic pain, and that some pain conditions may be primarily mediated by myelinated A-fiber sensory neurons. PMID:23622763

  3. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and Abnormal Neuronal Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Alexandre E.

    2012-01-01

    The ingestion of alcohol during pregnancy can result in a group of neurobehavioral abnormalities collectively known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). During the past decade, studies using animal models indicated that early alcohol exposure can dramatically affect neuronal plasticity, an essential property of the central nervous system responsible for the normal wiring of the brain and involved in processes such as learning and memory. The abnormalities in neuronal plasticity caused by alcohol can explain many of the neurobehavioral deficits observed in FASD. Conversely, improving neuronal plasticity may have important therapeutic benefits. In this review, the author discuss the mechanisms that lead to these abnormalities and comment on recent pharmacological approaches that have been showing promising results in improving neuronal plasticity in FASD. PMID:21383101

  4. Serotonin neuron abnormalities in the BTBR mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yue-Ping; Commons, Kathryn G

    2017-01-01

    The inbred mouse strain BTBR T + Itpr3 tf /J (BTBR) is studied as a model of idiopathic autism because they are less social and more resistant to change than other strains. Forebrain serotonin receptors and the response to serotonin drugs are altered in BTBR mice, yet it remains unknown if serotonin neurons themselves are abnormal. In this study, we found that serotonin tissue content and the density of serotonin axons is reduced in the hippocampus of BTBR mice in comparison to C57BL/6J (C57) mice. This was accompanied by possible compensatory changes in serotonin neurons that were most pronounced in regions known to provide innervation to the hippocampus: the caudal dorsal raphe (B6) and the median raphe. These changes included increased numbers of serotonin neurons and hyperactivation of Fos expression. Metrics of serotonin neurons in the rostral 2/3 of the dorsal raphe and serotonin content of the prefrontal cortex were less impacted. Thus, serotonin neurons exhibit region-dependent abnormalities in the BTBR mouse that may contribute to their altered behavioral profile. Autism Res 2017, 10: 66-77. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Serotonin Neuron Abnormalities in the BTBR Mouse Model of Autism

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yue-Ping; Commons, Kathryn G.

    2017-01-01

    The inbred mouse strain BTBR T+ Itpr3tf/J (BTBR) i studied as a model of idiopathic autism because they are less social and more resistant to change than other strains. Forebrain serotonin receptors and the response to serotonin drugs are altered in BTBR mice, yet it remains unknown if serotonin neurons themselves are abnormal. In this study, we found that serotonin tissue content and the density of serotonin axons is reduced in the hippocampus of BTBR mice in comparison to C57BL/6J (C57) mice. This was accompanied by possible compensatory changes in serotonin neurons that were most pronounced in regions known to provide innervation to the hippocampus: the caudal dorsal raphe (B6) and the median raphe. These changes included increased numbers of serotonin neurons and hyperactivation of Fos expression. Metrics of serotonin neurons in the rostral 2/3 of the dorsal raphe and serotonin content of the prefrontal cortex were less impacted. Thus, serotonin neurons exhibit region-dependent abnormalities in the BTBR mouse that may contribute to their altered behavioral profile. PMID:27478061

  6. Morphological patterns in children with ganglion related enteric neuronal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Henna, Nausheen; Nagi, Abdul H; Sheikh, Muhammad A; Shaukat, Mahmood

    2011-01-01

    Hirschsprung's Disease (HD) is a developmental disorder of enteric nervous system characterised by the absence of ganglion cells in submucosal (Meissner's) and myenteric (Aurbach's) plexuses of distal bowel. The purpose of the present study was to observe and report the morphological patterns of ganglion related enteric neuronal abnormalities in children presented with clinical features of (HD) in a Pakistani population. A total of 92 patients with clinical presentation of HD were enrolled between March 2009 and October 2009. Among them, 8 were excluded according to the exclusion criteria. After detailed history and physical examination, paraffin embedded H and E stained sections were prepared from the serial open biopsies from colorectum. The data was analysed using SPSS-17. Frequencies and percentages are given for qualitative variables. Non-parametric Binomial Chi-Square test was applied to observe within group associations and p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Among 84 patients, 13 (15.5%) proved to be normally ganglionic whereas 71 (84.5%) showed ganglion related enteric neuronal abnormalities namely isolated hypoganglionosis 9 (12.7%), immaturity of ganglion cells 9 (12.7%), isolated hyperganglionosis (IND Type B) 2 (2.8%) and Hirschsprung's disease 51 (71.8%). Among HD group, 34 (66.7%) belonged to isolated form and 17 (33.3%) showed combined ganglion related abnormalities. Hirschsprung's disease is common in Pakistani population, followed by hypoganglionosis, immaturity of ganglion cells and IND type B. The presence of hypertrophic nerve fibres was significant in HD, hyperganglionosis and hypoganglionosis, whereas, no hypertrophic nerve fibres were appreciated in immaturity of ganglion cell group.

  7. Microtubule Abnormalities Underlying Gulf War Illness in Neurons from Human-Induced Pluripotent Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0433 TITLE: Microtubule Abnormalities Underlying Gulf War Illness in Neurons from Human -Induced Pluripotent Cells...2015 - 31 Aug 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Microtubule Abnormalities Underlying Gulf War Illness in Neurons from Human -Induced...functions to normal in neurons derived from human pluripotent cells exposed to Gulf War toxins. 15. SUBJECT TERMS microtubule, neuron, Gulf War Illness

  8. The development of behavioral abnormalities in the motor neuron degeneration (mnd) mouse.

    PubMed

    Bolivar, Valerie J; Scott Ganus, J; Messer, Anne

    2002-05-24

    The motor neuron degeneration (mnd) mouse, which has widespread abnormal accumulating lipoprotein and neuronal degeneration, has a mutation in CLN8, the gene for human progressive epilepsy with mental retardation (EPMR). EPMR is one of the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs), a group of neurological disorders characterized by autofluorescent lipopigment accumulation, blindness, seizures, motor deterioration, and dementia. The human phenotype of EPMR suggests that, in addition to the motor symptoms previously categorized, various types of progressive behavioral abnormalities would be expected in mnd mice. We have therefore examined exploratory behavior, fear conditioning, and aggression in 2-3 month and 4-5 month old male mnd mice and age-matched C57BL/6 (B6) controls. The mnd mice displayed increased activity with decreased habituation in the activity monitor, poor contextual and cued memory, and heightened aggression relative to B6 controls. These behavioral deficits were most prominent at 4-5 months of age, which is prior to the onset of gross motor symptoms at 6 months. Our results provide a link from the mutation via pathology to a quantifiable multidimensional behavioral phenotype of this naturally occurring mouse model of NCL.

  9. Abnormal Glycogen Storage by Retinal Neurons in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Tom A; Canning, Paul; Tipping, Nuala; Archer, Desmond B; Stitt, Alan W

    2015-12-01

    It is widely held that neurons of the central nervous system do not store glycogen and that accumulation of the polysaccharide may cause neurodegeneration. Since primary neural injury occurs in diabetic retinopathy, we examined neuronal glycogen status in the retina of streptozotocin-induced diabetic and control rats. Glycogen was localized in eyes of streptozotocin-induced diabetic and control rats using light microscopic histochemistry and electron microscopy, and correlated with immunohistochemical staining for glycogen phosphorylase and phosphorylated glycogen synthase (pGS). Electron microscopy of 2-month-old diabetic rats (n = 6) showed massive accumulations of glycogen in the perinuclear cytoplasm of many amacrine neurons. In 4-month-old diabetic rats (n = 11), quantification of glycogen-engorged amacrine cells showed a mean of 26 cells/mm of central retina (SD ± 5), compared to 0.5 (SD ± 0.2) in controls (n = 8). Immunohistochemical staining for glycogen phosphorylase revealed strong expression in amacrine and ganglion cells of control retina, and increased staining in cell processes of the inner plexiform layer in diabetic retina. In control retina, the inactive pGS was consistently sequestered within the cell nuclei of all retinal neurons and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), but in diabetics nuclear pGS was reduced or lost in all classes of retinal cell except the ganglion cells and cone photoreceptors. The present study identifies a large population of retinal neurons that normally utilize glycogen metabolism but show pathologic storage of the polysaccharide during uncontrolled diabetes.

  10. Abnormal mTOR Activation in Autism.

    PubMed

    Winden, Kellen D; Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; Sahin, Mustafa

    2018-01-25

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an important signaling hub that integrates environmental information regarding energy availability and stimulates anabolic molecular processes and cell growth. Abnormalities in this pathway have been identified in several syndromes in which autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is highly prevalent. Several studies have investigated mTOR signaling in developmental and neuronal processes that, when dysregulated, could contribute to the development of ASD. Although many potential mechanisms still remain to be fully understood, these associations are of great interest because of the clinical availability of mTOR inhibitors. Clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of mTOR Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Neuroscience Volume 41 is July 8, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  11. Pericellular innervation of neurons expressing abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in the hippocampal formation of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; Defelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) represent one of the main neuropathological features in the cerebral cortex associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This neurofibrillary lesion involves the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated or abnormally phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau into paired helical filaments (PHF-tau) within neurons. We have used immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy reconstructions to examine the distribution of PHF-tau-immunoreactive (ir) cells, and their perisomatic GABAergic and glutamatergic innervations in the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, correlative light and electron microscopy was employed to examine these neurons and the perisomatic synapses. We observed two patterns of staining in PHF-tau-ir neurons, pattern I (without NFT) and pattern II (with NFT), the distribution of which varies according to the cortical layer and area. Furthermore, the distribution of both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals around the soma and proximal processes of PHF-tau-ir neurons does not seem to be altered as it is indistinguishable from both control cases and from adjacent neurons that did not contain PHF-tau. At the electron microscope level, a normal looking neuropil with typical symmetric and asymmetric synapses was observed around PHF-tau-ir neurons. These observations suggest that the synaptic connectivity around the perisomatic region of these PHF-tau-ir neurons was apparently unaltered.

  12. Atypical PKC, PKCλ/ι, activates β-secretase and increases Aβ1-40/42 and phospho-tau in mouse brain and isolated neuronal cells, and may link hyperinsulinemia and other aPKC activators to development of pathological and memory abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sajan, Mini P; Hansen, Barbara C; Higgs, Margaret G; Kahn, C Ron; Braun, Ursula; Leitges, Michael; Park, Collin R; Diamond, David M; Farese, Robert V

    2018-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemia activates brain Akt and PKC-λ/ι and increases Aβ 1-40/42 and phospho-tau in insulin-resistant animals. Here, we examined underlying mechanisms in mice, neuronal cells, and mouse hippocampal slices. Like Aβ 1-40/42 , β-secretase activity was increased in insulin-resistant mice and monkeys. In insulin-resistant mice, inhibition of hepatic PKC-λ/ι sufficient to correct hepatic abnormalities and hyperinsulinemia simultaneously reversed increases in Akt, atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), β-secretase, and Aβ 1-40/42 , and restored acute Akt activation. However, 2 aPKC inhibitors additionally blocked insulin's ability to activate brain PKC-λ/ι and thereby increase β-secretase and Aβ 1-40/42 . Furthermore, direct blockade of brain aPKC simultaneously corrected an impairment in novel object recognition in high-fat-fed insulin-resistant mice. In neuronal cells and/or mouse hippocampal slices, PKC-ι/λ activation by insulin, metformin, or expression of constitutive PKC-ι provoked increases in β-secretase, Aβ 1-40/42 , and phospho-thr-231-tau that were blocked by various PKC-λ/ι inhibitors, but not by an Akt inhibitor. PKC-λ/ι provokes increases in brain β-secretase, Aβ 1-40/42 , and phospho-thr-231-tau. Excessive signaling via PKC-λ/ι may link hyperinsulinemia and other PKC-λ/ι activators to pathological and functional abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Mutations in α-Tubulin Cause Abnormal Neuronal Migration in Mice and Lissencephaly in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Keays, David A.; Tian, Guoling; Poirier, Karine; Huang, Guo-Jen; Siebold, Christian; Cleak, James; Oliver, Peter L.; Fray, Martin; Harvey, Robert J.; Molnár, Zoltán; Piñon, Maria C.; Dear, Neil; Valdar, William; Brown, Steve D.M.; Davies, Kay E.; Rawlins, J. Nicholas P.; Cowan, Nicholas J.; Nolan, Patrick; Chelly, Jamel; Flint, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Summary The development of the mammalian brain is dependent on extensive neuronal migration. Mutations in mice and humans that affect neuronal migration result in abnormal lamination of brain structures with associated behavioral deficits. Here, we report the identification of a hyperactive N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mouse mutant with abnormalities in the laminar architecture of the hippocampus and cortex, accompanied by impaired neuronal migration. We show that the causative mutation lies in the guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding pocket of α-1 tubulin (Tuba1) and affects tubulin heterodimer formation. Phenotypic similarity with existing mouse models of lissencephaly led us to screen a cohort of patients with developmental brain anomalies. We identified two patients with de novo mutations in TUBA3, the human homolog of Tuba1. This study demonstrates the utility of ENU mutagenesis in the mouse as a means to discover the basis of human neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:17218254

  14. Abnormal Reward System Activation in Mania

    PubMed Central

    Abler, Birgit; Greenhouse, Ian; Ongur, Dost; Walter, Henrik; Heckers, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Transmission of reward signals is a function of dopamine, a neurotransmitter known to be involved in the mechanism of psychosis. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated how expectation and receipt of monetary rewards modulate brain activation in patients with bipolar mania and schizophrenia. We studied 12 acutely manic patients with a history of bipolar disorder, 12 patients with a current episode of schizoaffective disorder or schizophrenia and 12 healthy subjects. All patients were treated with dopamine antagonists at the time of the study. Subjects performed a delayed incentive paradigm with monetary reward in the scanner that allowed for investigating effects of expectation, receipt, and omission of rewards. Patients with schizophrenia and healthy control subjects showed the expected activation of dopaminergic brain areas, that is, ventral tegmentum activation upon expectation of monetary rewards and nucleus accumbens activation during receipt vs omission of rewards. In manic patients, however, we did not find a similar pattern of brain activation and the differential signal in the nucleus accumbens upon receipt vs omission of rewards was significantly lower compared to the healthy control subjects. Our findings provide evidence for abnormal function of the dopamine system during receipt or omission of expected rewards in bipolar disorder. These deficits in prediction error processing in acute mania may help to explain symptoms of disinhibition and abnormal goal pursuit regulation. PMID:17987058

  15. Enhanced exosome secretion in Down syndrome brain - a protective mechanism to alleviate neuronal endosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Sébastien A; Pérez-González, Rocío; Sharma, Ajay; Huang, Fang-Ke; Alldred, Melissa J; Pawlik, Monika; Kaur, Gurjinder; Ginsberg, Stephen D; Neubert, Thomas A; Levy, Efrat

    2017-08-29

    A dysfunctional endosomal pathway and abnormally enlarged early endosomes in neurons are an early characteristic of Down syndrome (DS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have hypothesized that endosomal material can be released by endosomal multivesicular bodies (MVBs) into the extracellular space via exosomes to relieve neurons of accumulated endosomal contents when endosomal pathway function is compromised. Supporting this, we found that exosome secretion is enhanced in the brains of DS patients and a mouse model of the disease, and by DS fibroblasts. Furthermore, increased levels of the tetraspanin CD63, a regulator of exosome biogenesis, were observed in DS brains. Importantly, CD63 knockdown diminished exosome release and worsened endosomal pathology in DS fibroblasts. Taken together, these data suggest that increased CD63 expression enhances exosome release as an endogenous mechanism mitigating endosomal abnormalities in DS. Thus, the upregulation of exosome release represents a potential therapeutic goal for neurodegenerative disorders with endosomal pathology.

  16. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ashery, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level. PMID:26372048

  17. Dynamic transition of neuronal firing induced by abnormal astrocytic glutamate oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiajia; Tang, Jun; Ma, Jun; Du, Mengmeng; Wang, Rong; Wu, Ying

    2016-08-01

    The gliotransmitter glutamate released from astrocytes can modulate neuronal firing by activating neuronal N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors. This enables astrocytic glutamate(AG) to be involved in neuronal physiological and pathological functions. Based on empirical results and classical neuron-glial “tripartite synapse” model, we propose a practical model to describe extracellular AG oscillation, in which the fluctuation of AG depends on the threshold of calcium concentration, and the effect of AG degradation is considered as well. We predict the seizure-like discharges under the dysfunction of AG degradation duration. Consistent with our prediction, the suppression of AG uptake by astrocytic transporters, which operates by modulating the AG degradation process, can account for the emergence of epilepsy.

  18. Mechanism of gastrointestinal abnormal motor activity induced by cisplatin in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hiroyuki; Mochiki, Erito; Ohno, Tetsuro; Yanai, Mitsuhiro; Toyomasu, Yoshitaka; Ogata, Kyoichi; Tabe, Yuichi; Aihara, Ryuusuke; Nakabayashi, Toshihiro; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-14

    To investigate whether 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin; 5-HT) is involved in mediating abnormal motor activity in dogs after cisplatin administration. After the dogs had been given a 2-wk recovery period, all of them were administered cisplatin, and the motor activity was recorded using strain gauge force transducers. Blood and intestinal fluid samples were collected to measure 5-HT for 24 h. To determine whether 5-HT in plasma or that in intestinal fluids is more closely related to abnormal motor activity we injected 5-HT into the bloodstream and the intestinal tract of the dogs. Cisplatin given intravenously produced abnormal motor activity that lasted up to 5 h. From 3 to 4 h after cisplatin administration, normal intact dogs exhibited retropropagation of motor activity accompanied by emesis. The concentration of 5-HT in plasma reached the peak at 4 h, and that in intestinal fluids reached the peak at 3 h. In normal intact dogs with resection of the vagus nerve that were administered kytril, cisplatin given intravenously did not produce abnormal motor activity. Intestinal serotonin administration did not produce abnormal motor activity, but intravenous serotonin administration did. After the intravenous administration of cisplatin, abnormal motor activity was produced in the involved vagus nerve and in the involved serotonergic neurons via another pathway. This study was the first to determine the relationship between 5-HT and emesis-induced motor activity.

  19. Mechanism of gastrointestinal abnormal motor activity induced by cisplatin in conscious dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Hiroyuki; Mochiki, Erito; Ohno, Tetsuro; Yanai, Mitsuhiro; Toyomasu, Yoshitaka; Ogata, Kyoichi; Tabe, Yuichi; Aihara, Ryuusuke; Nakabayashi, Toshihiro; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin; 5-HT) is involved in mediating abnormal motor activity in dogs after cisplatin administration. METHODS: After the dogs had been given a 2-wk recovery period, all of them were administered cisplatin, and the motor activity was recorded using strain gauge force transducers. Blood and intestinal fluid samples were collected to measure 5-HT for 24 h. To determine whether 5-HT in plasma or that in intestinal fluids is more closely related to abnormal motor activity we injected 5-HT into the bloodstream and the intestinal tract of the dogs. RESULTS: Cisplatin given intravenously produced abnormal motor activity that lasted up to 5 h. From 3 to 4 h after cisplatin administration, normal intact dogs exhibited retropropagation of motor activity accompanied by emesis. The concentration of 5-HT in plasma reached the peak at 4 h, and that in intestinal fluids reached the peak at 3 h. In normal intact dogs with resection of the vagus nerve that were administered kytril, cisplatin given intravenously did not produce abnormal motor activity. Intestinal serotonin administration did not produce abnormal motor activity, but intravenous serotonin administration did. CONCLUSION: After the intravenous administration of cisplatin, abnormal motor activity was produced in the involved vagus nerve and in the involved serotonergic neurons via another pathway. This study was the first to determine the relationship between 5-HT and emesis-induced motor activity. PMID:25400453

  20. In vivo cell-autonomous transcriptional abnormalities revealed in mice expressing mutant huntingtin in striatal but not cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Elizabeth A; Coppola, Giovanni; Tang, Bin; Kuhn, Alexandre; Kim, SoongHo; Geschwind, Daniel H; Brown, Timothy B; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Ehrlich, Michelle E

    2011-03-15

    Huntington's disease (HD), caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene, is characterized by abnormal protein aggregates and motor and cognitive dysfunction. Htt protein is ubiquitously expressed, but the striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) is most susceptible to dysfunction and death. Abnormal gene expression represents a core pathogenic feature of HD, but the relative roles of cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous effects on transcription remain unclear. To determine the extent of cell-autonomous dysregulation in the striatum in vivo, we examined genome-wide RNA expression in symptomatic D9-N171-98Q (a.k.a. DE5) transgenic mice in which the forebrain expression of the first 171 amino acids of human Htt with a 98Q repeat expansion is limited to MSNs. Microarray data generated from these mice were compared with those generated on the identical array platform from a pan-neuronal HD mouse model, R6/2, carrying two different CAG repeat lengths, and a relatively high degree of overlap of changes in gene expression was revealed. We further focused on known canonical pathways associated with excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, dopamine signaling and trophic support. While genes related to excitotoxicity, dopamine signaling and trophic support were altered in both DE5 and R6/2 mice, which may be either cell autonomous or non-cell autonomous, genes related to mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor are primarily affected in DE5 transgenic mice, indicating cell-autonomous mechanisms. Overall, HD-induced dysregulation of the striatal transcriptome can be largely attributed to intrinsic effects of mutant Htt, in the absence of expression in cortical neurons.

  1. Resveratrol stimulates AMP kinase activity in neurons.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Biplab; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2007-04-24

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol produced by plants that has multiple beneficial activities similar to those associated with caloric restriction (CR), such as increased life span and delay in the onset of diseases associated with aging. CR improves neuronal health, and the global beneficial effects of CR have been postulated to be mediated by the nervous system. One key enzyme thought to be activated during CR is the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), a sensor of cellular energy levels. AMPK is activated by increases in the cellular AMP:ATP ratio, whereupon it functions to help preserve cellular energy. In this regard, the regulation of dietary food intake by hypothalamic neurons is mediated by AMPK. The suppression of nonessential energy expenditure by activated AMPK along with the CR mimetic and neuroprotective properties of resveratrol led us to hypothesize that neuronal activation of AMPK could be an important component of resveratrol activity. Here, we show that resveratrol activated AMPK in Neuro2a cells and primary neurons in vitro as well as in the brain. Resveratrol and the AMPK-activating compound 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR) promoted robust neurite outgrowth in Neuro2a cells, which was blocked by genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of AMPK. Resveratrol also stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis in an AMPK-dependent manner. Resveratrol-stimulated AMPK activity in neurons depended on LKB1 activity but did not require the NAD-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 during this time frame. These findings suggest that neuronal activation of AMPK by resveratrol could affect neuronal energy homeostasis and contribute to the neuroprotective effects of resveratrol.

  2. Effects of Microwave Radiation on Neuronal Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    salivary glands and human cultured cells to extremely low- frequency (ELF) EMF alters patterns of polypeptide synthesis (18,19). The effects displayed...at 16 Hz. Continuous exposure to radio- frequency radiation for 4 consecutive days led to the development of a cell number density gradient. The...RADIATION ON NEURONAL ACTIVITY SUMMARY The effects of radiofrequency radiation on rat hippocampal fetal neurons were examined. Carrier frequencies of 300 to

  3. Maternal immune activation and abnormal brain development across CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Knuesel, Irene; Chicha, Laurie; Britschgi, Markus; Schobel, Scott A; Bodmer, Michael; Hellings, Jessica A; Toovey, Stephen; Prinssen, Eric P

    2014-11-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a clear association between maternal infection and schizophrenia or autism in the progeny. Animal models have revealed maternal immune activation (mIA) to be a profound risk factor for neurochemical and behavioural abnormalities in the offspring. Microglial priming has been proposed as a major consequence of mIA, and represents a critical link in a causal chain that leads to the wide spectrum of neuronal dysfunctions and behavioural phenotypes observed in the juvenile, adult or aged offspring. Such diversity of phenotypic outcomes in the mIA model are mirrored by recent clinical evidence suggesting that infectious exposure during pregnancy is also associated with epilepsy and, to a lesser extent, cerebral palsy in children. Preclinical research also suggests that mIA might precipitate the development of Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. Here, we summarize and critically review the emerging evidence that mIA is a shared environmental risk factor across CNS disorders that varies as a function of interactions between genetic and additional environmental factors. We also review ongoing clinical trials targeting immune pathways affected by mIA that may play a part in disease manifestation. In addition, future directions and outstanding questions are discussed, including potential symptomatic, disease-modifying and preventive treatment strategies.

  4. Activation of Pedunculopontine Glutamate Neurons Is Reinforcing

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Hoon; Zell, Vivien; Wu, Johnathan; Punta, Cindy; Ramajayam, Nivedita; Shen, Xinyi; Faget, Lauren; Lilascharoen, Varoth; Lim, Byung Kook

    2017-01-01

    neuron activity and behavioral reinforcement. PMID:28053028

  5. Glial activation colocalizes with structural abnormalities in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Alshikho, Mohamad J; Zürcher, Nicole R; Loggia, Marco L; Cernasov, Paul; Chonde, Daniel B; Izquierdo Garcia, David; Yasek, Julia E; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Catana, Ciprian; Rosen, Bruce R; Cudkowicz, Merit E; Hooker, Jacob M; Atassi, Nazem

    2016-12-13

    In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to evaluate brain structural abnormalities in relation to glial activation in the same cohort of participants. Ten individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 10 matched healthy controls underwent brain imaging using integrated MR/PET and the radioligand [ 11 C]-PBR28. Diagnosis history and clinical assessments including Upper Motor Neuron Burden Scale (UMNB) were obtained from patients with ALS. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analyses including tract-based spatial statistics and tractography were applied. DTI metrics including fractional anisotropy (FA) and diffusivities (mean, axial, and radial) were measured in regions of interest. Cortical thickness was assessed using surface-based analysis. The locations of structural changes, measured by DTI and the areas of cortical thinning, were compared to regional glial activation measured by relative [ 11 C]-PBR28 uptake. In this cohort of individuals with ALS, reduced FA and cortical thinning colocalized with regions demonstrating higher radioligand binding. [ 11 C]-PBR28 binding in the left motor cortex was correlated with FA (r = -0.68, p < 0.05) and cortical thickness (r = -0.75, p < 0.05). UMNB was correlated with glial activation (r = +0.75, p < 0.05), FA (r = -0.77, p < 0.05), and cortical thickness (r = -0.75, p < 0.05) in the motor cortex. Increased uptake of the glial marker [ 11 C]-PBR28 colocalizes with changes in FA and cortical thinning. This suggests a link between disease mechanisms (gliosis and inflammation) and structural changes (cortical thinning and white and gray matter changes). In this multimodal neuroimaging work, we provide an in vivo model to investigate the pathogenesis of ALS. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Glial activation colocalizes with structural abnormalities in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alshikho, Mohamad J.; Zürcher, Nicole R.; Loggia, Marco L.; Cernasov, Paul; Chonde, Daniel B.; Izquierdo Garcia, David; Yasek, Julia E.; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Catana, Ciprian; Rosen, Bruce R.; Cudkowicz, Merit E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to evaluate brain structural abnormalities in relation to glial activation in the same cohort of participants. Methods: Ten individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 10 matched healthy controls underwent brain imaging using integrated MR/PET and the radioligand [11C]-PBR28. Diagnosis history and clinical assessments including Upper Motor Neuron Burden Scale (UMNB) were obtained from patients with ALS. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analyses including tract-based spatial statistics and tractography were applied. DTI metrics including fractional anisotropy (FA) and diffusivities (mean, axial, and radial) were measured in regions of interest. Cortical thickness was assessed using surface-based analysis. The locations of structural changes, measured by DTI and the areas of cortical thinning, were compared to regional glial activation measured by relative [11C]-PBR28 uptake. Results: In this cohort of individuals with ALS, reduced FA and cortical thinning colocalized with regions demonstrating higher radioligand binding. [11C]-PBR28 binding in the left motor cortex was correlated with FA (r = −0.68, p < 0.05) and cortical thickness (r = −0.75, p < 0.05). UMNB was correlated with glial activation (r = +0.75, p < 0.05), FA (r = −0.77, p < 0.05), and cortical thickness (r = −0.75, p < 0.05) in the motor cortex. Conclusions: Increased uptake of the glial marker [11C]-PBR28 colocalizes with changes in FA and cortical thinning. This suggests a link between disease mechanisms (gliosis and inflammation) and structural changes (cortical thinning and white and gray matter changes). In this multimodal neuroimaging work, we provide an in vivo model to investigate the pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:27837005

  7. Sustained neuronal activity generated by glial plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Pirttimaki, Tiina M.; Hall, Stephen D.; Parri, H. Rheinallt

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes release gliotransmitters, notably glutamate, that can affect neuronal and synaptic activity. In particular, astrocytic glutamate release results in the generation of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) mediated slow inward currents (SICs) in neurons. However, factors underlying the emergence of SICs, and their physiological roles are largely unknown. Here we show that, in acute slices of rat somatosensory thalamus, stimulation of Lemniscal or cortical afferents results in a sustained increase of SICs in thalamocortical (TC) neurons that outlasts the duration of the stimulus by an hour. This long term enhancement (LTE) of astrocytic glutamate release is induced by group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and is dependent on astrocytic intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). Neuronal SICs are mediated by extrasynaptic NR2B subunit-containing NMDA-Rs and are capable of eliciting bursts. These are distinct from T-type Ca2+ channel dependent bursts of action potentials, and are synchronized in neighboring TC neurons. These findings describe a previously unrecognized form of excitatory, non-synaptic plasticity in the central nervous system (CNS) that feeds forward to generate local neuronal firing long after stimulus termination. PMID:21613477

  8. Tansig activation function (of MLP network) for cardiac abnormality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan, Ja'afar; Daud, Nik Ghazali Nik; Ishak, Mohd Taufiq; Rizman, Zairi Ismael; Rahman, Muhammad Izzuddin Abd

    2018-02-01

    Heart abnormality often occurs regardless of gender, age and races. This problem sometimes does not show any symptoms and it can cause a sudden death to the patient. In general, heart abnormality is the irregular electrical activity of the heart. This paper attempts to develop a program that can detect heart abnormality activity through implementation of Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) network. A certain amount of data of the heartbeat signals from the electrocardiogram (ECG) will be used in this project to train the MLP network by using several training algorithms with Tansig activation function.

  9. Which Neurons Will Be the Engram - Activated Neurons and/or More Excitable Neurons?

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Il; Cho, Hye-Yeon; Han, Jin-Hee; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-04-01

    During past decades, the formation and storage principle of memory have received much attention in the neuroscience field. Although some studies have attempted to demonstrate the nature of the engram, elucidating the memory engram allocation mechanism was not possible because of the limitations of existing methods, which cannot specifically modulate the candidate neuronal population. Recently, the development of new techniques, which offer ways to mark and control specific populations of neurons, may accelerate solving this issue. Here, we review the recent advances, which have provided substantial evidence showing that both candidates (neuronal population that is activated by learning, and that has increased CREB level/excitability at learning) satisfy the criteria of the engram, which are necessary and sufficient for memory expression.

  10. Which Neurons Will Be the Engram - Activated Neurons and/or More Excitable Neurons?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-il; Cho, Hye-Yeon; Han, Jin-Hee

    2016-01-01

    During past decades, the formation and storage principle of memory have received much attention in the neuroscience field. Although some studies have attempted to demonstrate the nature of the engram, elucidating the memory engram allocation mechanism was not possible because of the limitations of existing methods, which cannot specifically modulate the candidate neuronal population. Recently, the development of new techniques, which offer ways to mark and control specific populations of neurons, may accelerate solving this issue. Here, we review the recent advances, which have provided substantial evidence showing that both candidates (neuronal population that is activated by learning, and that has increased CREB level/excitability at learning) satisfy the criteria of the engram, which are necessary and sufficient for memory expression. PMID:27122991

  11. Abnormal amygdala activation profile in pedophilia.

    PubMed

    Sartorius, Alexander; Ruf, Matthias; Kief, Christine; Demirakca, Traute; Bailer, Josef; Ende, Gabriele; Henn, Fritz A; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Dressing, Harald

    2008-08-01

    Despite considerable public interest research in neurobiological correlates of pedophilia is scarce. Since amygdala activation is central for emotional valuation, arousal, and salience, we investigated the activation profile of this structure in 10 male subjects with pedophilia (exclusively attracted to boys), all convicted sex-offenders and sentenced to forensic psychiatric treatment along with ten male heterosexual matched controls. We used a sexually non-explicit functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) paradigm with images of men, women, boys or girls randomly embedded in neutral target/non-target geometrical symbols. We applied statistical parametric mapping (SPM2) and SPSS 14 for image processing and analysis. While controls activated significantly less to pictures of children compared to adults, the activation profile was reversed in subjects with pedophilia, who exhibited significantly more activation to children than adults. The highest activation was observed for boys in the patient group, and for women in control participants. Our data show enhanced activation to children's pictures even in an incidental context and suggest the provocative hypothesis that a normally present mechanism for reduced emotional arousal for children relative to adults is reversed in pedophilia, suggesting a neural substrate associated with deviant sexual preference in this condition. More extensive research in this field would be of benefit for both the victims and the offenders.

  12. Silencing of the Drosophila ortholog of SOX5 leads to abnormal neuronal development and behavioral impairment.

    PubMed

    Li, Airong; Hooli, Basavaraj; Mullin, Kristina; Tate, Rebecca E; Bubnys, Adele; Kirchner, Rory; Chapman, Brad; Hofmann, Oliver; Hide, Winston; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2017-04-15

    SOX5 encodes a transcription factor that is expressed in multiple tissues including heart, lung and brain. Mutations in SOX5 have been previously found in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and developmental delay, intellectual disability and dysmorphic features. To characterize the neuronal role of SOX5, we silenced the Drosophila ortholog of SOX5, Sox102F, by RNAi in various neuronal subtypes in Drosophila. Silencing of Sox102F led to misorientated and disorganized michrochaetes, neurons with shorter dendritic arborization (DA) and reduced complexity, diminished larval peristaltic contractions, loss of neuromuscular junction bouton structures, impaired olfactory perception, and severe neurodegeneration in brain. Silencing of SOX5 in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells resulted in a significant repression of WNT signaling activity and altered expression of WNT-related genes. Genetic association and meta-analyses of the results in several large family-based and case-control late-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) samples of SOX5 variants revealed several variants that show significant association with AD disease status. In addition, analysis for rare and highly penetrate functional variants revealed four novel variants/mutations in SOX5, which taken together with functional prediction analysis, suggests a strong role of SOX5 causing AD in the carrier families. Collectively, these findings indicate that SOX5 is a novel candidate gene for LOAD with an important role in neuronal function. The genetic findings warrant further studies to identify and characterize SOX5 variants that confer risk for AD, ALS and intellectual disability. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Active Dendrites Enhance Neuronal Dynamic Range

    PubMed Central

    Gollo, Leonardo L.; Kinouchi, Osame; Copelli, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the past decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of an active dendritic tree is a highly non-linear function of its afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB). Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease in dynamic range. PMID:19521531

  14. Tinnitus Perception and Distress Is Related to Abnormal Spontaneous Brain Activity as Measured by Magnetoencephalography

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, Nathan; Moratti, Stephan; Meinzer, Marcus; Dohrmann, Katalin; Elbert, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background The neurophysiological mechanisms underlying tinnitus perception are not well understood. Surprisingly, there have been no group studies comparing abnormalities in ongoing, spontaneous neuronal activity in individuals with and without tinnitus perception. Methods and Findings Here, we show that the spontaneous neuronal activity of a group of individuals with tinnitus (n = 17) is characterised by a marked reduction in alpha (8–12 Hz) power together with an enhancement in delta (1.5–4 Hz) as compared to a normal hearing control group (n = 16). This pattern was especially pronounced for temporal regions. Moreover, correlations with tinnitus-related distress revealed strong associations with this abnormal spontaneous activity pattern, particularly in right temporal and left frontal areas. Overall, effects were stronger for the alpha than for the delta frequency band. A data stream of 5 min, recorded with a whole-head neuromagnetometer under a resting condition, was sufficient to extract the marked differences. Conclusions Despite some limitations, there are arguments that the regional pattern of abnormal spontaneous activity we found could reflect a tinnitus-related cortical network. This finding, which suggests that a neurofeedback approach could reduce the adverse effects of this disturbing condition, could have important implications for the treatment of tinnitus. PMID:15971936

  15. Activation of Supraoptic Oxytocin Neurons by Secretin Facilitates Social Recognition.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Yuki; Yoshida, Masahide; Takashima, Akihide; Takanami, Keiko; Yoshida, Shoma; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Nishijima, Ichiko; Sakamoto, Hirotaka; Yamagata, Takanori; Onaka, Tatsushi

    2017-02-01

    Social recognition underlies social behavior in animals, and patients with psychiatric disorders associated with social deficits show abnormalities in social recognition. Oxytocin is implicated in social behavior and has received attention as an effective treatment for sociobehavioral deficits. Secretin receptor-deficient mice show deficits in social behavior. The relationship between oxytocin and secretin concerning social behavior remains to be determined. Expression of c-Fos in oxytocin neurons and release of oxytocin from their dendrites after secretin application were investigated. Social recognition was examined after intracerebroventricular or local injection of secretin, oxytocin, or an oxytocin receptor antagonist in rats, oxytocin receptor-deficient mice, and secretin receptor-deficient mice. Electron and light microscopic immunohistochemical analysis was also performed to determine whether oxytocin neurons extend their dendrites into the medial amygdala. Supraoptic oxytocin neurons expressed the secretin receptor. Secretin activated supraoptic oxytocin neurons and facilitated oxytocin release from dendrites. Secretin increased acquisition of social recognition in an oxytocin receptor-dependent manner. Local application of secretin into the supraoptic nucleus facilitated social recognition, and this facilitation was blocked by an oxytocin receptor antagonist injected into, but not outside of, the medial amygdala. In the medial amygdala, dendrite-like thick oxytocin processes were found to extend from the supraoptic nucleus. Furthermore, oxytocin treatment restored deficits of social recognition in secretin receptor-deficient mice. The results of our study demonstrate that secretin-induced dendritic oxytocin release from supraoptic neurons enhances social recognition. The newly defined secretin-oxytocin system may lead to a possible treatment for social deficits. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. Hindbrain Catecholamine Neurons Activate Orexin Neurons During Systemic Glucoprivation in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ai-Jun; Wang, Qing; Elsarelli, Megan M; Brown, R Lane; Ritter, Sue

    2015-08-01

    Hindbrain catecholamine neurons are required for elicitation of feeding responses to glucose deficit, but the forebrain circuitry required for these responses is incompletely understood. Here we examined interactions of catecholamine and orexin neurons in eliciting glucoprivic feeding. Orexin neurons, located in the perifornical lateral hypothalamus (PeFLH), are heavily innervated by hindbrain catecholamine neurons, stimulate food intake, and increase arousal and behavioral activation. Orexin neurons may therefore contribute importantly to appetitive responses, such as food seeking, during glucoprivation. Retrograde tracing results showed that nearly all innervation of the PeFLH from the hindbrain originated from catecholamine neurons and some raphe nuclei. Results also suggested that many catecholamine neurons project collaterally to the PeFLH and paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. Systemic administration of the antiglycolytic agent, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, increased food intake and c-Fos expression in orexin neurons. Both responses were eliminated by a lesion of catecholamine neurons innervating orexin neurons using the retrogradely transported immunotoxin, anti-dopamine-β-hydroxylase saporin, which is specifically internalized by dopamine-β-hydroxylase-expressing catecholamine neurons. Using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs in transgenic rats expressing Cre recombinase under the control of tyrosine hydroxylase promoter, catecholamine neurons in cell groups A1 and C1 of the ventrolateral medulla were activated selectively by peripheral injection of clozapine-N-oxide. Clozapine-N-oxide injection increased food intake and c-Fos expression in PeFLH orexin neurons as well as in paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus neurons. In summary, catecholamine neurons are required for the activation of orexin neurons during glucoprivation. Activation of orexin neurons may contribute to appetitive responses required for glucoprivic feeding.

  17. Exposure to the cytokine EGF leads to abnormal hyperactivity of pallidal GABA neurons: implications for schizophrenia and its modeling.

    PubMed

    Sotoyama, Hidekazu; Namba, Hisaaki; Chiken, Satomi; Nambu, Atsushi; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies on a cytokine model for schizophrenia reveal that the hyperdopaminergic innervation and neurotransmission in the globus pallidus (GP) is involved in its behavioral impairments. Here, we further explored the physiological consequences of the GP abnormality in the indirect pathway, using the same schizophrenia model established by perinatal exposure to epidermal growth factor (EGF). Single-unit recordings revealed that the neural activity from the lateral GP was elevated in EGF-treated rats in vivo and in vitro (i.e., slice preparations), whereas the central area of the GP exhibited no significant differences. The increase in the pallidal activity was normalized by subchronic treatment with risperidone, which is known to ameliorate their behavioral deficits. We also monitored extracellular GABA concentrations in the substantia nigra, one of the targets of pallidal efferents. There was a significant increase in basal GABA levels in EGF-treated rats, whereas high potassium-evoked GABA effluxes and glutamate levels were not affected. A neurotoxic lesion in the GP of EGF-treated rats normalized GABA concentrations to control levels. Corroborating our in vivo results, GABA release from GP slices was elevated in EGF-treated animals. These findings suggest that the hyperactivity and enhanced GABA release of GP neurons represent the key pathophysiological features of this cytokine-exposure model for schizophrenia. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  18. Activation of VTA GABA neurons disrupts reward consumption

    PubMed Central

    van Zessen, Ruud; Phillips, Jana L.; Budygin, Evgeny A.; Stuber, Garret D.

    2012-01-01

    The activity of Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons promotes behavioral responses to rewards and environmental stimuli that predict them. VTA GABA inputs synapse directly onto DA neurons and may regulate DA neuronal activity to alter reward-related behaviors, however, the functional consequences of selective activation of VTA GABA neurons remains unknown. Here, we show that in vivo optogenetic activation of VTA GABA neurons disrupts reward consummatory behavior, but not conditioned anticipatory behavior in response to reward-predictive cues. In addition, direct activation of VTA GABA projections to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) resulted in detectable GABA release, but did not alter reward consumption. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of VTA GABA neurons directly suppressed the activity and excitability of neighboring DA neurons, as well as the release of DA in the NAc, suggesting that the dynamic interplay between VTA DA and GABA neurons can control the initiation and termination of reward-related behaviors. PMID:22445345

  19. Neuronal activity in ontogeny and oncology

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Humsa; Monje, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The nervous system plays a central role in regulating the stem cell niche in many organs and thereby critically modulates development, homeostasis and plasticity. A similarly powerful role for neural regulation of the cancer microenvironment is emerging. Neurons promote the growth of cancers of the brain, skin, prostate, pancreas and stomach. Parallel mechanisms shared in development and cancer suggest that neural modulation of the tumor microenvironment may prove a universal theme, although the mechanistic details of such modulation remain to be discovered for many malignancies. Here, we review what is known about the influences of active neurons on stem cell and cancer microenvironments across a broad range of tissues and discuss emerging principles of neural regulation of development and cancer. PMID:28718448

  20. Deficiency of Lipoprotein Lipase in Neurons Decreases AMPA Receptor Phosphorylation and Leads to Neurobehavioral Abnormalities in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tian; Taussig, Matthew D.; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V.; Astarita, Giuseppe; Piomelli, Daniele; Bergman, Bryan C.; Dell’Acqua, Mark L.; Eckel, Robert H.; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in lipid metabolism have been found in several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyzes triacylglycerides in lipoproteins and regulates lipid metabolism in multiple organs and tissues, including the central nervous system (CNS). Though many brain regions express LPL, the functions of this lipase in the CNS remain largely unknown. We developed mice with neuron-specific LPL deficiency that became obese on chow by 16 wks in homozygous mutant mice (NEXLPL-/-) and 10 mo in heterozygous mice (NEXLPL+/-). In the present study, we show that 21 mo NEXLPL+/- mice display substantial cognitive function decline including poorer learning and memory, and increased anxiety with no difference in general motor activities and exploratory behavior. These neurobehavioral abnormalities are associated with a reduction in the 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (AMPA) receptor subunit GluA1 and its phosphorylation, without any alterations in amyloid β accumulation. Importantly, a marked deficit in omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the hippocampus precedes the development of the neurobehavioral phenotype of NEXLPL+/- mice. And, a diet supplemented with n-3 PUFA can improve the learning and memory of NEXLPL+/- mice at both 10 mo and 21 mo of age. We interpret these findings to indicate that LPL regulates the availability of PUFA in the CNS and, this in turn, impacts the strength of synaptic plasticity in the brain of aging mice through the modification of AMPA receptor and its phosphorylation. PMID:26263173

  1. Mnemonic neuronal activity in somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y D; Fuster, J M

    1996-01-01

    Single-unit activity was recorded from the hand areas of the somatosensory cortex of monkeys trained to perform a haptic delayed matching to sample task with objects of identical dimensions but different surface features. During the memory retention period of the task (delay), many units showed sustained firing frequency change, either excitation or inhibition. In some cases, firing during that period was significantly higher after one sample object than after another. These observations indicate the participation of somatosensory neurons not only in the perception but in the short-term memory of tactile stimuli. Neurons most directly implicated in tactile memory are (i) those with object-selective delay activity, (ii) those with nondifferential delay activity but without activity related to preparation for movement, and (iii) those with delay activity in the haptic-haptic delayed matching task but no such activity in a control visuo-haptic delayed matching task. The results indicate that cells in early stages of cortical somatosensory processing participate in haptic short-term memory. PMID:8927629

  2. Human Cerebrospinal Fluid Promotes Neuronal Viability and Activity of Hippocampal Neuronal Circuits In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Alcazar, Marta; Culley, Georgia; Lyckenvik, Tim; Mobarrez, Kristoffer; Bjorefeldt, Andreas; Wasling, Pontus; Seth, Henrik; Asztely, Frederik; Harrer, Andrea; Iglseder, Bernhard; Aigner, Ludwig; Hanse, Eric; Illes, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    For decades it has been hypothesized that molecules within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diffuse into the brain parenchyma and influence the function of neurons. However, the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits are largely unexplored and unknown. A major reason for this is the absence of appropriate neuronal in vitro model systems, and it is uncertain if neurons cultured in pure CSF survive and preserve electrophysiological functionality in vitro. In this article, we present an approach to address how human CSF (hCSF) influences neuronal circuits in vitro. We validate our approach by comparing the morphology, viability, and electrophysiological function of single neurons and at the network level in rat organotypic slice and primary neuronal cultures cultivated either in hCSF or in defined standard culture media. Our results demonstrate that rodent hippocampal slices and primary neurons cultured in hCSF maintain neuronal morphology and preserve synaptic transmission. Importantly, we show that hCSF increases neuronal viability and the number of electrophysiologically active neurons in comparison to the culture media. In summary, our data indicate that hCSF represents a physiological environment for neurons in vitro and a superior culture condition compared to the defined standard media. Moreover, this experimental approach paves the way to assess the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits as well as suggesting a novel strategy for central nervous system (CNS) disease modeling. PMID:26973467

  3. A New Population of Parvocellular Oxytocin Neurons Controlling Magnocellular Neuron Activity and Inflammatory Pain Processing

    PubMed Central

    Eliava, Marina; Melchior, Meggane; Knobloch-Bollmann, H. Sophie; Wahis, Jérôme; Gouveia, Miriam da Silva; Tang, Yan; Ciobanu, Alexandru Cristian; del Rio, Rodrigo Triana; Roth, Lena C.; Althammer, Ferdinand; Chavant, Virginie; Goumon, Yannick; Gruber, Tim; Petit-Demoulière, Nathalie; Busnelli, Marta; Chini, Bice; Tan, Linette L.; Mitre, Mariela; Froemke, Robert C.; Chao, Moses V.; Giese, Günter; Sprengel, Rolf; Kuner, Rohini; Poisbeau, Pierrick; Seeburg, Peter H.; Stoop, Ron; Charlet, Alexandre; Grinevich, Valery

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Oxytocin (OT) is a neuropeptide elaborated by the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei. Magnocellular OT neurons of these nuclei innervate numerous forebrain regions and release OT into the blood from the posterior pituitary. The PVN also harbors parvocellular OT cells that project to the brainstem and spinal cord, but their function has not been directly assessed. Here, we identified a subset of approximately 30 parvocellular OT neurons, with collateral projections onto magnocellular OT neurons and neurons of deep layers of the spinal cord. Evoked OT release from these OT neurons suppresses nociception and promotes analgesia in an animal model of inflammatory pain. Our findings identify a new population of OT neurons that modulates nociception in a two tier process: (1) directly by release of OT from axons onto sensory spinal cord neurons and inhibiting their activity and (2) indirectly by stimulating OT release from SON neurons into the periphery. PMID:26948889

  4. A New Population of Parvocellular Oxytocin Neurons Controlling Magnocellular Neuron Activity and Inflammatory Pain Processing.

    PubMed

    Eliava, Marina; Melchior, Meggane; Knobloch-Bollmann, H Sophie; Wahis, Jérôme; da Silva Gouveia, Miriam; Tang, Yan; Ciobanu, Alexandru Cristian; Triana Del Rio, Rodrigo; Roth, Lena C; Althammer, Ferdinand; Chavant, Virginie; Goumon, Yannick; Gruber, Tim; Petit-Demoulière, Nathalie; Busnelli, Marta; Chini, Bice; Tan, Linette L; Mitre, Mariela; Froemke, Robert C; Chao, Moses V; Giese, Günter; Sprengel, Rolf; Kuner, Rohini; Poisbeau, Pierrick; Seeburg, Peter H; Stoop, Ron; Charlet, Alexandre; Grinevich, Valery

    2016-03-16

    Oxytocin (OT) is a neuropeptide elaborated by the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei. Magnocellular OT neurons of these nuclei innervate numerous forebrain regions and release OT into the blood from the posterior pituitary. The PVN also harbors parvocellular OT cells that project to the brainstem and spinal cord, but their function has not been directly assessed. Here, we identified a subset of approximately 30 parvocellular OT neurons, with collateral projections onto magnocellular OT neurons and neurons of deep layers of the spinal cord. Evoked OT release from these OT neurons suppresses nociception and promotes analgesia in an animal model of inflammatory pain. Our findings identify a new population of OT neurons that modulates nociception in a two tier process: (1) directly by release of OT from axons onto sensory spinal cord neurons and inhibiting their activity and (2) indirectly by stimulating OT release from SON neurons into the periphery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Hippocampal neuronal subtypes develop abnormal dendritic arbors in the presence of Fragile X astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, S; Cheng, C; Doering, L C

    2016-06-02

    Astrocytes are now recognized as key players in the neurobiology of neurodevelopmental disorders such as Fragile X syndrome. However, the nature of Fragile X astrocyte-mediated control of dendrite development in subtypes of hippocampal neurons is not yet known. We used a co-culture procedure in which wildtype primary hippocampal neurons were cultured with astrocytes from either a wildtype or Fragile X mouse, for either 7, 14 or 21 days. The neurons were processed for immunocytochemistry with the dendritic marker MAP2, classified by morphological criteria into one of five neuronal subtypes, and subjected to Sholl analyses. Both linear and semi-log methods of Sholl analyses were applied to the neurons in order to provide an in depth analysis of the dendritic arborizations. We found that Fragile X astrocytes affect the development of dendritic arborization of all subtypes of wildtype hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we show that hippocampal neurons with spiny stellate neuron morphology exhibit the most pervasive developmental delays, with significant dendritic arbor alterations persisting at 21 days in culture. The results further dictate the critical role astrocytes play in governing neuronal morphology including altered dendrite development in Fragile X. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Post-movement beta rebound abnormality as indicator of mirror neuron system dysfunction in autistic spectrum disorder: an MEG study.

    PubMed

    Honaga, Eiko; Ishii, Ryouhei; Kurimoto, Ryu; Canuet, Leonides; Ikezawa, Koji; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Nakahachi, Takayuki; Iwase, Masao; Mizuta, Ichiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2010-07-12

    The mu rhythm is regarded as a physiological indicator of the human mirror neuron system (MNS). The dysfunctional MNS hypothesis in patients with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) has often been tested using EEG and MEG, targeting mu rhythm suppression during action observation/execution, although with controversial results. We explored neural activity related to the MNS in patients with ASD, focusing on power increase in the beta frequency band after observation and execution of movements, known as post-movement beta rebound (PMBR). Multiple source beamformer (MSBF) and BrainVoyager QX were used for MEG source imaging and statistical group analysis, respectively. Seven patients with ASD and ten normal subjects participated in this study. During the MEG recordings, the subjects were asked to observe and later execute object-related hand actions performed by an experimenter. We found that both groups exhibited pronounced PMBR exceeding 20% when observing and executing actions with a similar topographic distribution of maximal activity. However, significantly reduced PMBR was found only during the observation condition in the patients relative to controls in cortical regions within the MNS, namely the sensorimotor area, premotor cortex and superior temporal gyrus. Reduced PMBR during the observation condition was also found in the medial prefrontal cortex. These results support the notion of a dysfunctional execution/observation matching system related to MNS impairment in patients with ASD, and the feasibility of using MEG to detect neural activity, in particular PMBR abnormalities, as an index of MNS dysfunction during performance of motor or cognitive tasks. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuronal medium that supports basic synaptic functions and activity of human neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bardy, Cedric; van den Hurk, Mark; Eames, Tameji; Marchand, Cynthia; Hernandez, Ruben V; Kellogg, Mariko; Gorris, Mark; Galet, Ben; Palomares, Vanessa; Brown, Joshua; Bang, Anne G; Mertens, Jerome; Böhnke, Lena; Boyer, Leah; Simon, Suzanne; Gage, Fred H

    2015-05-19

    Human cell reprogramming technologies offer access to live human neurons from patients and provide a new alternative for modeling neurological disorders in vitro. Neural electrical activity is the essence of nervous system function in vivo. Therefore, we examined neuronal activity in media widely used to culture neurons. We found that classic basal media, as well as serum, impair action potential generation and synaptic communication. To overcome this problem, we designed a new neuronal medium (BrainPhys basal + serum-free supplements) in which we adjusted the concentrations of inorganic salts, neuroactive amino acids, and energetic substrates. We then tested that this medium adequately supports neuronal activity and survival of human neurons in culture. Long-term exposure to this physiological medium also improved the proportion of neurons that were synaptically active. The medium was designed to culture human neurons but also proved adequate for rodent neurons. The improvement in BrainPhys basal medium to support neurophysiological activity is an important step toward reducing the gap between brain physiological conditions in vivo and neuronal models in vitro.

  8. Neuronal medium that supports basic synaptic functions and activity of human neurons in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bardy, Cedric; van den Hurk, Mark; Eames, Tameji; Marchand, Cynthia; Hernandez, Ruben V.; Kellogg, Mariko; Gorris, Mark; Galet, Ben; Palomares, Vanessa; Brown, Joshua; Bang, Anne G.; Mertens, Jerome; Böhnke, Lena; Boyer, Leah; Simon, Suzanne; Gage, Fred H.

    2015-01-01

    Human cell reprogramming technologies offer access to live human neurons from patients and provide a new alternative for modeling neurological disorders in vitro. Neural electrical activity is the essence of nervous system function in vivo. Therefore, we examined neuronal activity in media widely used to culture neurons. We found that classic basal media, as well as serum, impair action potential generation and synaptic communication. To overcome this problem, we designed a new neuronal medium (BrainPhys basal + serum-free supplements) in which we adjusted the concentrations of inorganic salts, neuroactive amino acids, and energetic substrates. We then tested that this medium adequately supports neuronal activity and survival of human neurons in culture. Long-term exposure to this physiological medium also improved the proportion of neurons that were synaptically active. The medium was designed to culture human neurons but also proved adequate for rodent neurons. The improvement in BrainPhys basal medium to support neurophysiological activity is an important step toward reducing the gap between brain physiological conditions in vivo and neuronal models in vitro. PMID:25870293

  9. Neurochemistry of neurons in the ventrolateral medulla activated by hypotension: Are the same neurons activated by glucoprivation?

    PubMed

    Parker, Lindsay M; Le, Sheng; Wearne, Travis A; Hardwick, Kate; Kumar, Natasha N; Robinson, Katherine J; McMullan, Simon; Goodchild, Ann K

    2017-06-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that a range of stimuli activate neurons, including catecholaminergic neurons, in the ventrolateral medulla. Not all catecholaminergic neurons are activated and other neurochemical content is largely unknown hence whether stimulus specific populations exist is unclear. Here we determine the neurochemistry (using in situ hybridization) of catecholaminergic and noncatecholaminergic neurons which express c-Fos immunoreactivity throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the ventrolateral medulla, in Sprague Dawley rats treated with hydralazine or saline. Distinct neuronal populations containing PPCART, PPPACAP, and PPNPY mRNAs, which were largely catecholaminergic, were activated by hydralazine but not saline. Both catecholaminergic and noncatecholaminergic neurons containing preprotachykinin and prepro-enkephalin (PPE) mRNAs were also activated, with the noncatecholaminergic population located in the rostral C1 region. Few GlyT2 neurons were activated. A subset of these data was then used to compare the neuronal populations activated by 2-deoxyglucose evoked glucoprivation (Brain Structure and Function (2015) 220:117). Hydralazine activated more neurons than 2-deoxyglucose but similar numbers of catecholaminergic neurons. Commonly activated populations expressing PPNPY and PPE mRNAs were defined. These likely include PPNPY expressing catecholaminergic neurons projecting to vasopressinergic and corticotrophin releasing factor neurons in the paraventricular nucleus, which when activated result in elevated plasma vasopressin and corticosterone. Stimulus specific neurons included noncatecholaminergic neurons and a few PPE positive catecholaminergic neuron but neurochemical codes were largely unidentified. Reasons for the lack of identification of stimulus specific neurons, readily detectable using electrophysiology in anaesthetized preparations and for which neural circuits can be defined, are discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Subliminal words durably affect neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Raphaël; Cohen, Laurent; Adam, Claude; Clemenceau, Stéphane; Hasboun, Dominique; Baulac, Michel; Willer, Jean-Claude; Dehaene, Stanislas; Naccache, Lionel

    2007-10-08

    Unconscious mental representations elicited by subliminal stimuli are marked by their fleeting lifetimes, usually below 1 s. Can such evanescent subliminal stimuli, nevertheless, lead to long-lasting learning? To date, evidence suggesting a long-term influence of briefly perceived stimuli on behaviour or brain activity is scarce and questionable. In this study, we used intracranial recordings to provide the first direct demonstration that unconsciously perceived subliminal words could exert long-lasting effects on neuronal signals. When repeating subliminal words over long interstimulus intervals, we observed electrophysiological repetition effects. These unconscious repetition effects suggest that the single presentation of a masked word can durably affect neural architecture.

  11. Neuron-specific knockdown of Drosophila PDHB induces reduction of lifespan, deficient locomotive ability, abnormal morphology of motor neuron terminals and photoreceptor axon targeting.

    PubMed

    Dung, Vuu My; Suong, Dang Ngoc Anh; Okamaoto, Yuji; Hiramatsu, Yu; Thao, Dang Thi Phuong; Yoshida, Hideki; Takashima, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2018-05-15

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex deficiency (PDCD) is a common primary cause of defects in mitochondrial function and also can lead to peripheral neuropathy. Pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component subunit beta (PDHB) is a subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase E1, which is a well-known component of PDC. In Drosophila melanogaster, the CG11876 (dPDHB) gene is a homolog of human PDHB. In this study, we established a Drosophila model with neuron-specific knockdown of dPDHB to investigate its role in neuropathy pathogenesis. Knockdown of dPDHB in pan-neurons induced locomotor defects in both larval and adult stages, which were consistent with abnormal morphology of the motor neuron terminals at neuromuscular junctions and mitochondrial fragmentation in brains. Moreover, neuron-specific knockdown of dPDHB also shortened the lifespan of adult flies. In addition, flies with knockdown of dPDHB manifested a rough eye phenotype and aberrant photoreceptor axon targeting. These results with the Drosophila model suggest the involvement of PDHB in peripheral neuropathy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Invisible Brain: Knowledge in Research Works and Neuron Activity

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Aviv; Curtis, Dorothy; Jung, Sukhwan; Chae, Suhyun

    2016-01-01

    If the market has an invisible hand, does knowledge creation and representation have an “invisible brain”? While knowledge is viewed as a product of neuron activity in the brain, can we identify knowledge that is outside the brain but reflects the activity of neurons in the brain? This work suggests that the patterns of neuron activity in the brain can be seen in the representation of knowledge-related activity. Here we show that the neuron activity mechanism seems to represent much of the knowledge learned in the past decades based on published articles, in what can be viewed as an “invisible brain” or collective hidden neural networks. Similar results appear when analyzing knowledge activity in patents. Our work also tries to characterize knowledge increase as neuron network activity growth. The results propose that knowledge-related activity can be seen outside of the neuron activity mechanism. Consequently, knowledge might exist as an independent mechanism. PMID:27439199

  13. Invisible Brain: Knowledge in Research Works and Neuron Activity.

    PubMed

    Segev, Aviv; Curtis, Dorothy; Jung, Sukhwan; Chae, Suhyun

    2016-01-01

    If the market has an invisible hand, does knowledge creation and representation have an "invisible brain"? While knowledge is viewed as a product of neuron activity in the brain, can we identify knowledge that is outside the brain but reflects the activity of neurons in the brain? This work suggests that the patterns of neuron activity in the brain can be seen in the representation of knowledge-related activity. Here we show that the neuron activity mechanism seems to represent much of the knowledge learned in the past decades based on published articles, in what can be viewed as an "invisible brain" or collective hidden neural networks. Similar results appear when analyzing knowledge activity in patents. Our work also tries to characterize knowledge increase as neuron network activity growth. The results propose that knowledge-related activity can be seen outside of the neuron activity mechanism. Consequently, knowledge might exist as an independent mechanism.

  14. Essential roles of mitochondrial depolarization in neuron loss through microglial activation and attraction toward neurons.

    PubMed

    Nam, Min-Kyung; Shin, Hyun-Ah; Han, Ji-Hye; Park, Dae-Wook; Rhim, Hyangshuk

    2013-04-10

    As life spans increased, neurodegenerative disorders that affect aging populations have also increased. Progressive neuronal loss in specific brain regions is the most common cause of neurodegenerative disease; however, key determinants mediating neuron loss are not fully understood. Using a model of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) loss, we found only 25% cell loss in SH-SY5Y (SH) neuronal mono-cultures, but interestingly, 85% neuronal loss occurred when neurons were co-cultured with BV2 microglia. SH neurons overexpressing uncoupling protein 2 exhibited an increase in neuron-microglia interactions, which represent an early step in microglial phagocytosis of neurons. This result indicates that ΔΨm loss in SH neurons is an important contributor to recruitment of BV2 microglia. Notably, we show that ΔΨm loss in BV2 microglia plays a crucial role in microglial activation and phagocytosis of damaged SH neurons. Thus, our study demonstrates that ΔΨm loss in both neurons and microglia is a critical determinant of neuron loss. These findings also offer new insights into neuroimmunological and bioenergetical aspects of neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Intrinsically Active and Pacemaker Neurons in Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neuronal Populations

    PubMed Central

    Illes, Sebastian; Jakab, Martin; Beyer, Felix; Gelfert, Renate; Couillard-Despres, Sébastien; Schnitzler, Alfons; Ritter, Markus; Aigner, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neurons generated from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) self-organize into functional neuronal assemblies in vitro, generating synchronous network activities. Intriguingly, PSC-derived neuronal assemblies develop spontaneous activities that are independent of external stimulation, suggesting the presence of thus far undetected intrinsically active neurons (IANs). Here, by using mouse embryonic stem cells, we provide evidence for the existence of IANs in PSC-neuronal networks based on extracellular multielectrode array and intracellular patch-clamp recordings. IANs remain active after pharmacological inhibition of fast synaptic communication and possess intrinsic mechanisms required for autonomous neuronal activity. PSC-derived IANs are functionally integrated in PSC-neuronal populations, contribute to synchronous network bursting, and exhibit pacemaker properties. The intrinsic activity and pacemaker properties of the neuronal subpopulation identified herein may be particularly relevant for interventions involving transplantation of neural tissues. IANs may be a key element in the regulation of the functional activity of grafted as well as preexisting host neuronal networks. PMID:24672755

  16. Intrinsically active and pacemaker neurons in pluripotent stem cell-derived neuronal populations.

    PubMed

    Illes, Sebastian; Jakab, Martin; Beyer, Felix; Gelfert, Renate; Couillard-Despres, Sébastien; Schnitzler, Alfons; Ritter, Markus; Aigner, Ludwig

    2014-03-11

    Neurons generated from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) self-organize into functional neuronal assemblies in vitro, generating synchronous network activities. Intriguingly, PSC-derived neuronal assemblies develop spontaneous activities that are independent of external stimulation, suggesting the presence of thus far undetected intrinsically active neurons (IANs). Here, by using mouse embryonic stem cells, we provide evidence for the existence of IANs in PSC-neuronal networks based on extracellular multielectrode array and intracellular patch-clamp recordings. IANs remain active after pharmacological inhibition of fast synaptic communication and possess intrinsic mechanisms required for autonomous neuronal activity. PSC-derived IANs are functionally integrated in PSC-neuronal populations, contribute to synchronous network bursting, and exhibit pacemaker properties. The intrinsic activity and pacemaker properties of the neuronal subpopulation identified herein may be particularly relevant for interventions involving transplantation of neural tissues. IANs may be a key element in the regulation of the functional activity of grafted as well as preexisting host neuronal networks.

  17. Epac activation sensitizes rat sensory neurons through activation of Ras.

    PubMed

    Shariati, Behzad; Thompson, Eric L; Nicol, Grant D; Vasko, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors directly activated by cAMP (Epacs) have emerged as important signaling molecules mediating persistent hypersensitivity in animal models of inflammation, by augmenting the excitability of sensory neurons. Although Epacs activate numerous downstream signaling cascades, the intracellular signaling which mediates Epac-induced sensitization of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that selective activation of Epacs with 8-CPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP-AM (8CPT-AM) increases the number of action potentials (APs) generated by a ramp of depolarizing current and augments the evoked release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from isolated rat sensory neurons. Internal perfusion of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons with GDP-βS, substituted for GTP, blocks the ability of 8CPT-AM to increase AP firing, demonstrating that Epac-induced sensitization is G-protein dependent. Treatment with 8CPT-AM activates the small G-proteins Rap1 and Ras in cultures of sensory neurons. Inhibition of Rap1, by internal perfusion of a Rap1-neutralizing antibody or through a reduction in the expression of the protein using shRNA does not alter the Epac-induced enhancement of AP generation or CGRP release, despite the fact that in most other cell types, Epacs act as Rap-GEFs. In contrast, inhibition of Ras through expression of a dominant negative Ras (DN-Ras) or through internal perfusion of a Ras-neutralizing antibody blocks the increase in AP firing and attenuates the increase in the evoked release of CGRP induced by Epac activation. Thus, in this subpopulation of nociceptive sensory neurons, it is the novel interplay between Epacs and Ras, rather than the canonical Epacs and Rap1 pathway, that is critical for mediating Epac-induced sensitization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Epac activation sensitizes rat sensory neurons via activation of Ras

    PubMed Central

    Shariati, Behzad; Thompson, Eric L.; Nicol, Grant D.; Vasko, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors directly activated by cAMP (Epacs) have emerged as important signaling molecules mediating persistent hypersensitivity in animal models of inflammation, by augmenting the excitability of sensory neurons. Although Epacs activate numerous downstream signaling cascades, the intracellular signaling which mediates Epac-induced sensitization of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that selective activation of Epacs with 8-CPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP-AM (8CPT-AM) increases the number of action potentials (APs) generated by a ramp of depolarizing current and augments the evoked release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from isolated rat sensory neurons. Internal perfusion of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons with GDP-βS, substituted for GTP, blocks the ability of 8CPT-AM to increase AP firing, demonstrating that Epac-induced sensitization is G-protein dependent. Treatment with 8CPT-AM activates the small G-proteins Rap1 and Ras in cultures of sensory neurons. Inhibition of Rap1, by internal perfusion of a Rap1-neutralizing antibody or through a reduction in the expression of the protein using shRNA does not alter the Epac-induced enhancement of AP generation or CGRP release, despite the fact that in most other cell types, Epacs act as Rap-GEFs. In contrast, inhibition of Ras through expression of a dominant negative Ras (DN-Ras) or through internal perfusion of a Ras-neutralizing antibody blocks the increase in AP firing and attenuates the increase in the evoked release of CGRP induced by Epac activation. Thus, in this subpopulation of nociceptive sensory neurons, it is the novel interplay between Epacs and Ras, rather than the canonical Epacs and Rap1 pathway, that is critical for mediating Epac-induced sensitization. PMID:26596174

  19. Hypoglycemic neuronal death is triggered by glucose reperfusion and activation of neuronal NADPH oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Sang Won; Gum, Elizabeth T.; Hamby, Aaron M.; Chan, Pak H.; Swanson, Raymond A.

    2007-01-01

    Hypoglycemic coma and brain injury are potential complications of insulin therapy. Certain neurons in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex are uniquely vulnerable to hypoglycemic cell death, and oxidative stress is a key event in this cell death process. Here we show that hypoglycemia-induced oxidative stress and neuronal death are attributable primarily to the activation of neuronal NADPH oxidase during glucose reperfusion. Superoxide production and neuronal death were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin in both cell culture and in vivo models of insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Superoxide production and neuronal death were also blocked in studies using mice or cultured neurons deficient in the p47phox subunit of NADPH oxidase. Chelation of zinc with calcium disodium EDTA blocked both the assembly of the neuronal NADPH oxidase complex and superoxide production. Inhibition of the hexose monophosphate shunt, which utilizes glucose to regenerate NADPH, also prevented superoxide formation and neuronal death, suggesting a mechanism linking glucose reperfusion to superoxide formation. Moreover, the degree of superoxide production and neuronal death increased with increasing glucose concentrations during the reperfusion period. These results suggest that high blood glucose concentrations following hypoglycemic coma can initiate neuronal death by a mechanism involving extracellular zinc release and activation of neuronal NADPH oxidase. PMID:17404617

  20. Population activity structure of excitatory and inhibitory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Doiron, Brent

    2017-01-01

    Many studies use population analysis approaches, such as dimensionality reduction, to characterize the activity of large groups of neurons. To date, these methods have treated each neuron equally, without taking into account whether neurons are excitatory or inhibitory. We studied population activity structure as a function of neuron type by applying factor analysis to spontaneous activity from spiking networks with balanced excitation and inhibition. Throughout the study, we characterized population activity structure by measuring its dimensionality and the percentage of overall activity variance that is shared among neurons. First, by sampling only excitatory or only inhibitory neurons, we found that the activity structures of these two populations in balanced networks are measurably different. We also found that the population activity structure is dependent on the ratio of excitatory to inhibitory neurons sampled. Finally we classified neurons from extracellular recordings in the primary visual cortex of anesthetized macaques as putative excitatory or inhibitory using waveform classification, and found similarities with the neuron type-specific population activity structure of a balanced network with excitatory clustering. These results imply that knowledge of neuron type is important, and allows for stronger statistical tests, when interpreting population activity structure. PMID:28817581

  1. Coupled Activation of Primary Sensory Neurons Contributes to Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Shin; Anderson, Michael; Park, Kyoungsook; Zheng, Qin; Agarwal, Amit; Gong, Catherine; Saijilafu; Young, LeAnne; He, Shaoqiu; LaVinka, Pamela Colleen; Zhou, Fengquan; Bergles, Dwight; Hanani, Menachem; Guan, Yun; Spray, David C; Dong, Xinzhong

    2016-09-07

    Primary sensory neurons in the DRG play an essential role in initiating pain by detecting painful stimuli in the periphery. Tissue injury can sensitize DRG neurons, causing heightened pain sensitivity, often leading to chronic pain. Despite the functional importance, how DRG neurons function at a population level is unclear due to the lack of suitable tools. Here we developed an imaging technique that allowed us to simultaneously monitor the activities of >1,600 neurons/DRG in live mice and discovered a striking neuronal coupling phenomenon that adjacent neurons tend to activate together following tissue injury. This coupled activation occurs among various neurons and is mediated by an injury-induced upregulation of gap junctions in glial cells surrounding DRG neurons. Blocking gap junctions attenuated neuronal coupling and mechanical hyperalgesia. Therefore, neuronal coupling represents a new form of neuronal plasticity in the DRG and contributes to pain hypersensitivity by "hijacking" neighboring neurons through gap junctions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prediction of primary somatosensory neuron activity during active tactile exploration

    PubMed Central

    Campagner, Dario; Evans, Mathew Hywel; Bale, Michael Ross; Erskine, Andrew; Petersen, Rasmus Strange

    2016-01-01

    Primary sensory neurons form the interface between world and brain. Their function is well-understood during passive stimulation but, under natural behaving conditions, sense organs are under active, motor control. In an attempt to predict primary neuron firing under natural conditions of sensorimotor integration, we recorded from primary mechanosensory neurons of awake, head-fixed mice as they explored a pole with their whiskers, and simultaneously measured both whisker motion and forces with high-speed videography. Using Generalised Linear Models, we found that primary neuron responses were poorly predicted by whisker angle, but well-predicted by rotational forces acting on the whisker: both during touch and free-air whisker motion. These results are in apparent contrast to previous studies of passive stimulation, but could be reconciled by differences in the kinematics-force relationship between active and passive conditions. Thus, simple statistical models can predict rich neural activity elicited by natural, exploratory behaviour involving active movement of sense organs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10696.001 PMID:26880559

  3. GABAergic Neuron-Specific Loss of Ube3a Causes Angelman Syndrome-Like EEG Abnormalities and Enhances Seizure Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Judson, Matthew C; Wallace, Michael L; Sidorov, Michael S; Burette, Alain C; Gu, Bin; van Woerden, Geeske M; King, Ian F; Han, Ji Eun; Zylka, Mark J; Elgersma, Ype; Weinberg, Richard J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2016-04-06

    Loss of maternal UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with severe epilepsy. We previously implicated GABAergic deficits onto layer (L) 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the pathogenesis of neocortical hyperexcitability, and perhaps epilepsy, in AS model mice. Here we investigate consequences of selective Ube3a loss from either GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, focusing on the development of hyperexcitability within L2/3 neocortex and in broader circuit and behavioral contexts. We find that GABAergic Ube3a loss causes AS-like increases in neocortical EEG delta power, enhances seizure susceptibility, and leads to presynaptic accumulation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs)-all without decreasing GABAergic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Conversely, glutamatergic Ube3a loss fails to yield EEG abnormalities, seizures, or associated CCV phenotypes, despite impairing tonic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. These results substantiate GABAergic Ube3a loss as the principal cause of circuit hyperexcitability in AS mice, lending insight into ictogenic mechanisms in AS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. GABAergic neuron-specific loss of Ube3a causes Angelman syndrome-like EEG abnormalities and enhances seizure susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Matthew C.; Wallace, Michael L.; Sidorov, Michael S.; Burette, Alain C.; Gu, Bin; van Woerden, Geeske M.; King, Ian F.; Han, Ji Eun; Zylka, Mark J.; Elgersma, Ype; Weinberg, Richard J.; Philpot, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss of maternal UBE3A causes Angelman syndrome (AS), a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with severe epilepsy. We previously implicated GABAergic deficits onto layer (L) 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the pathogenesis of neocortical hyperexcitability, and perhaps epilepsy, in AS model mice. Here we investigate consequences of selective Ube3a loss from either GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons, focusing on the development of hyperexcitability within L2/3 neocortex and in broader circuit and behavioral contexts. We find that GABAergic Ube3a loss causes AS-like increases in neocortical EEG delta power, enhances seizure susceptibility, and leads to presynaptic accumulation of clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) – all without decreasing GABAergic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Conversely, glutamatergic Ube3a loss fails to yield EEG abnormalities, seizures, or associated CCV phenotypes, despite impairing tonic inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. These results substantiate GABAergic Ube3a loss as the principal cause of circuit hyperexcitability in AS mice, lending insight into ictogenic mechanisms in AS. PMID:27021170

  5. AP4M1 is abnormally expressed in oxygen-glucose deprived hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Cheng, X Y; Sheng, G Y

    2014-03-20

    AP4M1 mutations have been suggested to be associated with autosomal recessive cerebral palsy syndrome. But the pathogenic mechanism remains uncertain. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether and how AP4M1 expression is changed in injured neurons. Primary cultured hippocampal neurons were prepared for this experiment. They were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) leading to apoptosis, mimicking brain ischemia. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) was labeled immunofluorescently to confirm that the purity of neuron was higher than 90%. Real-time PCR and western blotting were performed to measure the gene expression. AP4M1 was labeled with MAP2 or Tau-1 to observe the distribution. We found that the AP4M1 protein levels immediately after the procedure were similar between the OGD group and the sham group. However, down-regulation was observed 12h after the reperfusion, and became more notable at 24h. The real-time PCR showed similar results, except that the down-regulation of mRNA was able to be detected immediately after the OGD. Immunofluorescent labeling revealed AP4M1 distributed in the dendrites of normal neurons, but it redistributed to the axons after the OGD procedure. In conclusion, AP4M1 is not only down-regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels, but also redistributed from dendrites to axons in oxygen-glucose deprived hippocampal neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Aberrant neuronal activity-induced signaling and gene expression in a mouse model of RASopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nakhaei-Rad, Saeideh; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Pina-Fernández, Eneko; Marini, Claudia; Santos, Monica; Ahmadian, Mohammad R.; Stork, Oliver; Zenker, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by reduced growth, craniofacial abnormalities, congenital heart defects, and variable cognitive deficits. NS belongs to the RASopathies, genetic conditions linked to mutations in components and regulators of the Ras signaling pathway. Approximately 50% of NS cases are caused by mutations in PTPN11. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying cognitive impairments in NS patients are still poorly understood. Here, we report the generation and characterization of a new conditional mouse strain that expresses the overactive Ptpn11D61Y allele only in the forebrain. Unlike mice with a global expression of this mutation, this strain is viable and without severe systemic phenotype, but shows lower exploratory activity and reduced memory specificity, which is in line with a causal role of disturbed neuronal Ptpn11 signaling in the development of NS-linked cognitive deficits. To explore the underlying mechanisms we investigated the neuronal activity-regulated Ras signaling in brains and neuronal cultures derived from this model. We observed an altered surface expression and trafficking of synaptic glutamate receptors, which are crucial for hippocampal neuronal plasticity. Furthermore, we show that the neuronal activity-induced ERK signaling, as well as the consecutive regulation of gene expression are strongly perturbed. Microarray-based hippocampal gene expression profiling revealed profound differences in the basal state and upon stimulation of neuronal activity. The neuronal activity-dependent gene regulation was strongly attenuated in Ptpn11D61Y neurons. In silico analysis of functional networks revealed changes in the cellular signaling beyond the dysregulation of Ras/MAPK signaling that is nearly exclusively discussed in the context of NS at present. Importantly, changes in PI3K/AKT/mTOR and JAK/STAT signaling were experimentally confirmed. In summary, this study uncovers aberrant neuronal activity-induced signaling and regulation

  7. GABA transporter currents activated by protein kinase A excite midbrain neurons during opioid withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Elena E; Gerke, Michelle B; Vaughan, Christopher W; Hack, Stephen P; Christie, MacDonald J

    2005-02-03

    Adaptations in neurons of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) induced by chronic morphine treatment mediate expression of many signs of opioid withdrawal. The abnormally elevated action potential rate of opioid-sensitive PAG neurons is a likely cellular mechanism for withdrawal expression. We report here that opioid withdrawal in vitro induced an opioid-sensitive cation current that was mediated by the GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1) and required activation of protein kinase A (PKA) for its expression. Inhibition of GAT-1 or PKA also prevented withdrawal-induced hyperexcitation of PAG neurons. Our findings indicate that GAT-1 currents can directly increase the action potential rates of neurons and that GAT-1 may be a target for therapy to alleviate opioid-withdrawal symptoms.

  8. Zebrafish embryos exposed to alcohol undergo abnormal development of motor neurons and muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Sylvain, Nicole J; Brewster, Daniel L; Ali, Declan W

    2010-01-01

    Children exposed to alcohol in utero have significantly delayed gross and fine motor skills, as well as deficiencies in reflex development. The reasons that underlie the motor deficits caused by ethanol (EtOH) exposure remain to be fully elucidated. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of embryonic alcohol exposure (1.5%, 2% and 2.5% EtOH) on motor neuron and muscle fiber morphology in 3 days post fertilization (dpf) larval zebrafish. EtOH treated fish exhibited morphological deformities and fewer bouts of swimming in response to touch, compared with untreated fish. Immunolabelling with anti-acetylated tubulin indicated that fish exposed to 2.5% EtOH had significantly higher rates of motor neuron axon defects. Immunolabelling of primary and secondary motor neurons, using znp-1 and zn-8, revealed that fish exposed to 2% and 2.5% EtOH exhibited significantly higher rates of primary and secondary motor neuron axon defects compared to controls. Examination of red and white muscle fibers revealed that fish exposed to EtOH had significantly smaller fibers compared with controls. These findings indicate that motor neuron and muscle fiber morphology is affected by early alcohol exposure in zebrafish embryos, and that this may be related to deficits in locomotion. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CRISPR Epigenome Editing of AKAP150 in DRG Neurons Abolishes Degenerative IVD-Induced Neuronal Activation.

    PubMed

    Stover, Joshua D; Farhang, Niloofar; Berrett, Kristofer C; Gertz, Jason; Lawrence, Brandon; Bowles, Robby D

    2017-09-06

    Back pain is a major contributor to disability and has significant socioeconomic impacts worldwide. The degenerative intervertebral disc (IVD) has been hypothesized to contribute to back pain, but a better understanding of the interactions between the degenerative IVD and nociceptive neurons innervating the disc and treatment strategies that directly target these interactions is needed to improve our understanding and treatment of back pain. We investigated degenerative IVD-induced changes to dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron activity and utilized CRISPR epigenome editing as a neuromodulation strategy. By exposing DRG neurons to degenerative IVD-conditioned media under both normal and pathological IVD pH levels, we demonstrate that degenerative IVDs trigger interleukin (IL)-6-induced increases in neuron activity to thermal stimuli, which is directly mediated by AKAP and enhanced by acidic pH. Utilizing this novel information on AKAP-mediated increases in nociceptive neuron activity, we developed lentiviral CRISPR epigenome editing vectors that modulate endogenous expression of AKAP150 by targeted promoter histone methylation. When delivered to DRG neurons, these epigenome-modifying vectors abolished degenerative IVD-induced DRG-elevated neuron activity while preserving non-pathologic neuron activity. This work elucidates the potential for CRISPR epigenome editing as a targeted gene-based pain neuromodulation strategy. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Coordinated neuronal activity enhances corticocortical communication

    PubMed Central

    Zandvakili, Amin; Kohn, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Summary Relaying neural signals between cortical areas is central to cognition and sensory processing. The temporal coordination of activity in a source population has been suggested to determine corticocortical signaling efficacy, but others have argued that coordination is functionally irrelevant. We reasoned that if coordination significantly influenced signaling, spiking in downstream networks should be preceded by transiently elevated coordination in a source population. We developed a metric to quantify network coordination in brief epochs, and applied it to simultaneous recordings of neuronal populations in cortical areas V1 and V2 of the macaque monkey. Spiking in the input layers of V2 was preceded by brief epochs of elevated V1 coordination, but this was not the case in other layers of V2. Our results indicate that V1 coordination influences its signaling to direct downstream targets, but that coordinated V1 epochs do not propagate through multiple downstream networks as in some corticocortical signaling schemes. PMID:26291164

  11. The emergence of spontaneous activity in neuronal cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandi, J. G.; Alvarez-Lacalle, E.; Teller, S.; Soriano, J.; Casademunt, J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro neuronal networks of dissociated hippocampal or cortical tissues are one of the most attractive model systems for the physics and neuroscience communities. Cultured neurons grow and mature, develop axons and dendrites, and quickly connect to their neighbors to establish a spontaneously active network within a week. The resulting neuronal network is characterized by a combination of excitatory and inhibitory neurons coupled through synaptic connections that interact in a highly nonlinear manner. The nonlinear behavior emerges from the dynamics of both the neurons' spiking activity and synaptic transmission, together with biological noise. These ingredients give rise to a rich repertoire of phenomena that are still poorly understood, including the emergence and maintenance of periodic spontaneous activity, avalanches, propagation of fronts and synchronization. In this work we present an overview on the rich activity of cultured neuronal networks, and detail the minimal theoretical considerations needed to describe experimental observations.

  12. Small reduction of neurokinin-1 receptor-expressing neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex area induces abnormal breathing periods in awake goats.

    PubMed

    Wenninger, J M; Pan, L G; Klum, L; Leekley, T; Bastastic, J; Hodges, M R; Feroah, T; Davis, S; Forster, H V

    2004-11-01

    In awake rats, >80% bilateral reduction of neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R)-expressing neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötzC) resulted in hypoventilation and an "ataxic" breathing pattern (Gray PA, Rekling JC, Bocchiaro CM, Feldman JL, Science 286: 1566-1568, 1999). Accordingly, the present study was designed to gain further insight into the role of the pre-BötzC area NK1R-expressing neurons in the control of breathing during physiological conditions. Microtubules were chronically implanted bilaterally into the medulla of adult goats. After recovery from surgery, the neurotoxin saporin conjugated to substance P, specific for NK1R-expressing neurons, was bilaterally injected (50 pM in 10 microl) into the pre-BötzC area during the awake state (n = 8). In unoperated goats, 34 +/- 0.01% of the pre-BötzC area neurons are immunoreactive for the NK1R, but, in goats after bilateral injection of SP-SAP into the pre-BötzC area, NK1R immunoreactivity was reduced to 22.5 +/- 2.5% (29% decrease, P < 0.01). Ten to fourteen days after the injection, the frequency of abnormal breathing periods was sixfold greater than before injection (107.8 +/- 21.8/h, P < 0.001). Fifty-six percent of these periods were breaths of varying duration and volume with an altered respiratory muscle activation pattern, whereas the remaining were rapid, complete breaths with coordinated inspiratory-expiratory cycles. The rate of occurrence and characteristics of abnormal breathing periods were not altered during a CO2 inhalation-induced hyperpnea. Pathological breathing patterns were eliminated during non-rapid eye movement sleep in seven of eight goats, but they frequently occurred on arousal from non-rapid eye movement sleep. We conclude that a moderate reduction in pre-BötzC NK1R-expressing neurons results in state-dependent transient changes in respiratory rhythm and/or eupneic respiratory muscle activation patterns.

  13. Abnormal tau phosphorylation in the thorny excrescences of CA3 hippocampal neurons in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; Merino-Serrais, Paula; Ávila, Jesús; DeFelipe, Javier

    2011-01-01

    A key symptom in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the loss of declarative memory. The anatomical substrate that supports this kind of memory involves the neural circuits of the medial temporal lobe, and in particular, of the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex. A main feature of AD is the abnormal phosphorylation of the tau protein and the presence of tangles. The sequence of cellular changes related to tau phosphorylation and tangle formation has been studied with an antibody that binds to diffuse phosphotau (AT8). Moreover, another tau antibody (PHF-1) has been used to follow the pathway of neurofibrillary (tau aggregation) degeneration in AD. We have used a variety of quantitative immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy to visualize and characterize neurons labeled with AT8 and PHF-1 antibodies. We present here the rather unexpected discovery that in AD, there is conspicuous abnormal phosphorylation of the tau protein in a selective subset of dendritic spines. We identified these spines as the typical thorny excrescences of hippocampal CA3 neurons in a pre-tangle state. Since thorny excrescences represent a major synaptic target of granule cell axons (mossy fibers), such aberrant phosphorylation may play an essential role in the memory impairment typical of AD patients.

  14. Abnormalities of thalamic activation and cognition in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Jessica; Wang, Lei; Csernansky, John G; Gado, Mokhtar H; Barch, Deanna M

    2006-03-01

    Functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to investigate relationships among structure, functional activation, and cognitive deficits related to the thalamus in individuals with schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects. Thirty-six schizophrenia subjects and 28 healthy comparison subjects matched by age, gender, race, and parental socioeconomic status underwent structural and functional MRI while performing a series of memory tasks, including an N-back task (working memory), intentional memorization of a series of pictures or words (episodic encoding), and a yes/no recognition task. Functional activation magnitudes in seven regions of interest within the thalamic complex, as defined by anatomical and functional criteria, were computed for each group. Participants with schizophrenia exhibited decreased activation within the whole thalamus, the anterior nuclei, and the medial dorsal nucleus. These nuclei overlap with subregions of the thalamic surface that the authors previously reported to exhibit morphological abnormalities in schizophrenia. However, there were no significant correlations between specific dimensions of thalamic shape variation (i.e., eigenvectors) and the activation patterns within thalamic regions of interest. Better performance on the working memory task among individuals with schizophrenia was significantly associated with increased activation in the anterior nuclei, the centromedian nucleus, the pulvinar, and the ventrolateral nuclei. These results suggest that there are limited relationships between morphological and functional abnormalities of the thalamus in schizophrenia subjects and highlight the importance of investigating relationships between brain structure and function.

  15. Knockout Mice for Dyslexia Susceptibility Gene Homologs KIAA0319 and KIAA0319L have Unaffected Neuronal Migration but Display Abnormal Auditory Processing

    PubMed Central

    Guidi, Luiz G; Mattley, Jane; Martinez-Garay, Isabel; Monaco, Anthony P; Linden, Jennifer F; Velayos-Baeza, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Developmental dyslexia is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects reading ability caused by genetic and non-genetic factors. Amongst the susceptibility genes identified to date, KIAA0319 is a prime candidate. RNA-interference experiments in rats suggested its involvement in cortical migration but we could not confirm these findings in Kiaa0319-mutant mice. Given its homologous gene Kiaa0319L (AU040320) has also been proposed to play a role in neuronal migration, we interrogated whether absence of AU040320 alone or together with KIAA0319 affects migration in the developing brain. Analyses of AU040320 and double Kiaa0319;AU040320 knockouts (dKO) revealed no evidence for impaired cortical lamination, neuronal migration, neurogenesis or other anatomical abnormalities. However, dKO mice displayed an auditory deficit in a behavioral gap-in-noise detection task. In addition, recordings of click-evoked auditory brainstem responses revealed suprathreshold deficits in wave III amplitude in AU040320-KO mice, and more general deficits in dKOs. These findings suggest that absence of AU040320 disrupts firing and/or synchrony of activity in the auditory brainstem, while loss of both proteins might affect both peripheral and central auditory function. Overall, these results stand against the proposed role of KIAA0319 and AU040320 in neuronal migration and outline their relationship with deficits in the auditory system. PMID:29045729

  16. A robust activity marking system for exploring active neuronal ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Andreas T; Cooper, Yonatan A; Baratta, Michael V; Weng, Feng-Ju; Zhang, Yuxiang; Ramamoorthi, Kartik; Fropf, Robin; LaVerriere, Emily; Xue, Jian; Young, Andrew; Schneider, Colleen; Gøtzsche, Casper René; Hemberg, Martin; Yin, Jerry CP; Maier, Steven F; Lin, Yingxi

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the brain captures transient experience and converts it into long lasting changes in neural circuits requires the identification and investigation of the specific ensembles of neurons that are responsible for the encoding of each experience. We have developed a Robust Activity Marking (RAM) system that allows for the identification and interrogation of ensembles of neurons. The RAM system provides unprecedented high sensitivity and selectivity through the use of an optimized synthetic activity-regulated promoter that is strongly induced by neuronal activity and a modified Tet-Off system that achieves improved temporal control. Due to its compact design, RAM can be packaged into a single adeno-associated virus (AAV), providing great versatility and ease of use, including application to mice, rats, flies, and potentially many other species. Cre-dependent RAM, CRAM, allows for the study of active ensembles of a specific cell type and anatomical connectivity, further expanding the RAM system’s versatility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13918.001 PMID:27661450

  17. Abnormal patterns of displacement activities: a review and reinterpretation.

    PubMed

    Anselme, Patrick

    2008-09-01

    A series of important theoretical contributions flourished in the years 1950-1970 about displacement activities -- those 'out-of-context' actions expressed by organisms in stressful situations. Nothing really new has appeared thereafter. Although the models address different issues, such as causal factors of displacement, it appears obvious that they do not provide a unified (coherent) approach; they often explain the same phenomena using very different means and turn out to be contradictory on several points. In addition, some problems currently remain unsolved, especially concerning the fact that displacement activities exhibit 'abnormalities' of expression in comparison with the same activities performed in usual context. Each model is here described and criticized in order to evaluate its explanatory power and allow the identification of specific limits. A new, integrative model -- the Anticipatory Dynamics Model (or ADM) -- then attempts to overcome the failures of previous models. The ADM suggests that abnormal patterns of displacement activities result from attentional interference caused by a thwarting experience or conflicting motivations. At least one theoretical prediction of the ADM can be differentiated from that of any other model.

  18. Abnormal activity in reward brain circuits in human narcolepsy with cataplexy.

    PubMed

    Ponz, Aurélie; Khatami, Ramin; Poryazova, Rositsa; Werth, Esther; Boesiger, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L; Schwartz, Sophie

    2010-02-01

    Hypothalamic hypocretins (or orexins) regulate energy metabolism and arousal maintenance. Recent animal research suggests that hypocretins may also influence reward-related behaviors. In humans, the loss of hypocretin-containing neurons results in a major sleep-wake disorder called narcolepsy-cataplexy, which is associated with emotional disturbances. Here, we aim to test whether narcoleptic patients show an abnormal pattern of brain activity during reward processing. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging in 12 unmedicated patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy to measure the neural responses to expectancy and experience of monetary gains and losses. We statistically compared the patients' data with those obtained in a group of 12 healthy matched controls. Our results reveal that activity in the dopaminergic ventral midbrain (ventral tegmental area) was not modulated in narcolepsy-cataplexy patients during high reward expectancy (unlike controls), and that ventral striatum activity was reduced during winning. By contrast, the patients showed abnormal activity increases in the amygdala and in dorsal striatum for positive outcomes. In addition, we found that activity in the nucleus accumbens and the ventral-medial prefrontal cortex correlated with disease duration, suggesting that an alternate neural circuit could be privileged over the years to control affective responses to emotional challenges and compensate for the lack of influence from ventral midbrain regions. Our study offers a detailed picture of the distributed brain network involved during distinct stages of reward processing and shows for the first time, to our knowledge, how this network is affected in hypocretin-deficient narcoleptic patients.

  19. Cell death in neural precursor cells and neurons before neurite formation prevents the emergence of abnormal neural structures in the Drosophila optic lobe.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yusuke; Sudo, Tatsuya; Togane, Yu; Akagawa, Hiromi; Tsujimura, Hidenobu

    2018-04-01

    Programmed cell death is a conserved strategy for neural development both in vertebrates and invertebrates and is recognized at various developmental stages in the brain from neurogenesis to adulthood. To understand the development of the central nervous system, it is essential to reveal not only molecular mechanisms but also the role of neural cell death (Pinto-Teixeira et al., 2016). To understand the role of cell death in neural development, we investigated the effect of inhibition of cell death on optic lobe development. Our data demonstrate that, in the optic lobe of Drosophila, cell death occurs in neural precursor cells and neurons before neurite formation and functions to prevent various developmental abnormalities. When neuronal cell death was inhibited by an effector caspase inhibitor, p35, multiple abnormal neuropil structures arose during optic lobe development-e.g., enlarged or fused neuropils, misrouted neurons and abnormal neurite lumps. Inhibition of cell death also induced morphogenetic defects in the lamina and medulla development-e.g., failures in the separation of the lamina and medulla cortices and the medulla rotation. These defects were reproduced in the mutant of an initiator caspase, dronc. If cell death was a mechanism for removing the abnormal neuropil structures, we would also expect to observe them in mutants defective for corpse clearance. However, they were not observed in these mutants. When dead cell-membranes were visualized with Apoliner, they were observed only in cortices and not in neuropils. These results suggest that the cell death occurs before mature neurite formation. Moreover, we found that inhibition of cell death induced ectopic neuroepithelial cells, neuroblasts and ganglion mother cells in late pupal stages, at sites where the outer and inner proliferation centers were located at earlier developmental stages. Caspase-3 activation was observed in the neuroepithelial cells and neuroblasts in the proliferation centers

  20. Abnormally increased and incoherent resting-state activity is shared between patients with schizophrenia and their unaffected siblings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Xue, Zhimin; Palaniyappan, Lena; Zhou, Li; Liu, Haihong; Qi, Chang; Wu, Guowei; Mwansisya, Tumbwene E; Tao, Haojuan; Chen, Xudong; Huang, Xiaojun; Liu, Zhening; Pu, Weidan

    2016-03-01

    Several resting-state neuroimaging studies in schizophrenia indicate an excessive brain activity while others report an incoherent brain activity at rest. No direct evidence for the simultaneous presence of both excessive and incoherent brain activity has been established to date. Moreover, it is unclear whether unaffected siblings of schizophrenia patients who share half of the affected patient's genotype also exhibit the excessive and incoherent brain activity that may render them vulnerable to the development of schizophrenia. 27 pairs of schizophrenia patients and their unaffected siblings, as well as 27 healthy controls, were scanned using gradient-echo echo-planar imaging at rest. By using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) and regional homogeneity (Reho), we investigated the intensity and synchronization of local spontaneous neuronal activity in three groups. We observed that increased amplitude and reduced synchronization (coherence) of spontaneous neuronal activity were shared by patients and their unaffected siblings. The key brain regions with this abnormal neural pattern in both patients and siblings included the middle temporal, orbito-frontal, inferior occipital and fronto-insular gyrus. This abnormal neural pattern of excessive and incoherent neuronal activity shared by schizophrenia patients and their healthy siblings may improve our understanding of neuropathology and genetic predisposition in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Rhythmic activities of hypothalamic magnocellular neurons: autocontrol mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Richard, P; Moos, F; Dayanithi, G; Gouzènes, L; Sabatier, N

    1997-12-01

    Electrophysiological recordings in lactating rats show that oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) neurons exhibit specific patterns of activities in relation to peripheral stimuli: periodic bursting firing for OT neurons during suckling, phasic firing for AVP neurons during hyperosmolarity (systemic injection of hypertonic saline). These activities are autocontrolled by OT and AVP released somato-dentritically within the hypothalamic magnocellular nuclei. In vivo, OT enhances the amplitude and frequency of bursts, an effect accompanied with an increase in basal firing rate. However, the characteristics of firing change as facilitation proceeds: the spike patterns become very irregular with clusters of spikes spaced by long silences; the firing rate is highly variable and clearly oscillates before facilitated bursts. This unstable behaviour dramatically decreases during intense tonic activation which temporarily interrupts bursting, and could therefore be a prerequisite for bursting. In vivo, the effects of AVP depend on the initial firing pattern of AVP neurons: AVP excites weakly active neurons (increasing duration of active periods and decreasing silences), inhibits highly active neurons, and does not affect neurons with intermediate phasic activity. AVP brings the entire population of AVP neurons to discharge with a medium phasic activity characterised by periods of firing and silence lasting 20-40 s, a pattern shown to optimise the release of AVP from the neurohypophysis. Each of the peptides (OT or AVP) induces an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, specifically in the neurons containing either OT or AVP respectively. OT evokes the release of Ca2+ from IP3-sensitive intracellular stores. AVP induces an influx of Ca2+ through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels of T-, L- and N-types. We postulate that the facilitatory autocontrol of OT and AVP neurons could be mediated by Ca2+ known to play a key role in the control of the patterns of phasic neurons.

  2. Reduced Activity of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Protects against Genetic Models of Motor Neuron Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lim, M. A.; Selak, M. A.; Xiang, Z.; Krainc, D.; Neve, R. L.; Kraemer, B. C.; Watts, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of research indicates that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients and mouse models of ALS exhibit metabolic dysfunction. A subpopulation of ALS patients possesses higher levels of resting energy expenditure and lower fat-free mass compared to healthy controls. Similarly, two mutant copper zinc superoxide dismutase 1 (mSOD1) mouse models of familial ALS possess a hypermetabolic phenotype. The pathophysiological relevance of the bioenergetic defects observed in ALS remains largely elusive. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of cellular energy status and thus might be activated in various models of ALS. Here, we report that AMPK activity is increased in spinal cord cultures expressing mSOD1, as well as in spinal cord lysates from mSOD1 mice. Reducing AMPK activity either pharmacologically or genetically prevents mSOD1-induced motor neuron death in vitro. To investigate the role of AMPK in vivo, we used Caenorhabditis elegans models of motor neuron disease. C. elegans engineered to express human mSOD1 (G85R) in neurons develops locomotor dysfunction and severe fecundity defects when compared to transgenic worms expressing human wild-type SOD1. Genetic reduction of aak-2, the ortholog of the AMPK α2 catalytic subunit in nematodes, improved locomotor behavior and fecundity in G85R animals. Similar observations were made with nematodes engineered to express mutant tat-activating regulatory (TAR) DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa molecular weight. Altogether, these data suggest that bioenergetic abnormalities are likely to be pathophysiologically relevant to motor neuron disease. PMID:22262909

  3. Potential Adverse Effects of Prolonged Sevoflurane Exposure on Developing Monkey Brain: From Abnormal Lipid Metabolism to Neuronal Damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Rainosek, Shuo W; Frisch-Daiello, Jessica L; Patterson, Tucker A; Paule, Merle G; Slikker, William; Wang, Cheng; Han, Xianlin

    2015-10-01

    Sevoflurane is a volatile anesthetic that has been widely used in general anesthesia, yet its safety in pediatric use is a public concern. This study sought to evaluate whether prolonged exposure of infant monkeys to a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane is associated with any adverse effects on the developing brain. Infant monkeys were exposed to 2.5% sevoflurane for 9 h, and frontal cortical tissues were harvested for DNA microarray, lipidomics, Luminex protein, and histological assays. DNA microarray analysis showed that sevoflurane exposure resulted in a broad identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the monkey brain. In general, these genes were associated with nervous system development, function, and neural cell viability. Notably, a number of DEGs were closely related to lipid metabolism. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that critical lipid components, (eg, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol) were significantly downregulated by prolonged exposure of sevoflurane. Luminex protein analysis indicated abnormal levels of cytokines in sevoflurane-exposed brains. Consistently, Fluoro-Jade C staining revealed more degenerating neurons after sevoflurane exposure. These data demonstrate that a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane (2.5%) is capable of inducing and maintaining an effective surgical plane of anesthesia in the developing nonhuman primate and that a prolonged exposure of 9 h resulted in profound changes in gene expression, cytokine levels, lipid metabolism, and subsequently, neuronal damage. Generally, sevoflurane-induced neuronal damage was also associated with changes in lipid content, composition, or both; and specific lipid changes could provide insights into the molecular mechanism(s) underlying anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity and may be sensitive biomarkers for the early detection of anesthetic-induced neuronal damage. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  4. Levetiracetam reduces abnormal network activations in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wandschneider, Britta; Stretton, Jason; Sidhu, Meneka; Centeno, Maria; Kozák, Lajos R; Symms, Mark; Thompson, Pamela J; Duncan, John S; Koepp, Matthias J

    2014-10-21

    We used functional MRI (fMRI) and a left-lateralizing verbal and a right-lateralizing visual-spatial working memory (WM) paradigm to investigate the effects of levetiracetam (LEV) on cognitive network activations in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In a retrospective study, we compared task-related fMRI activations and deactivations in 53 patients with left and 54 patients with right TLE treated with (59) or without (48) LEV. In patients on LEV, activation patterns were correlated with the daily LEV dose. We isolated task- and syndrome-specific effects. Patients on LEV showed normalization of functional network deactivations in the right temporal lobe in right TLE during the right-lateralizing visual-spatial task and in the left temporal lobe in left TLE during the verbal task. In a post hoc analysis, a significant dose-dependent effect was demonstrated in right TLE during the visual-spatial WM task: the lower the LEV dose, the greater the abnormal right hippocampal activation. At a less stringent threshold (p < 0.05, uncorrected for multiple comparisons), a similar dose effect was observed in left TLE during the verbal task: both hippocampi were more abnormally activated in patients with lower doses, but more prominently on the left. Our findings suggest that LEV is associated with restoration of normal activation patterns. Longitudinal studies are necessary to establish whether the neural patterns translate to drug response. This study provides Class III evidence that in patients with drug-resistant TLE, levetiracetam has a dose-dependent facilitation of deactivation of mesial temporal structures. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Measure of synchrony in the activity of intrinsic cardiac neurons

    PubMed Central

    Longpré, Jean-Philippe; Salavatian, Siamak; Beaumont, Eric; Armour, J. Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Jacquemet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Recent multielectrode array recordings in ganglionated plexi of canine atria have opened the way to the study of population dynamics of intrinsic cardiac neurons. These data provide critical insights into the role of local processing that these ganglia play in the regulation of cardiac function. Low firing rates, marked non-stationarity, interplay with the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems and artifacts generated by myocardial activity create new constraints not present in brain recordings for which almost all neuronal analysis techniques have been developed. We adapted and extended the jitter-based synchrony index (SI) to (1) provide a robust and computationally-efficient tool for assessing the level and statistical significance of SI between cardiac neurons, (2) estimate the bias on SI resulting from neuronal activity possibly hidden in myocardial artifacts, (3) quantify the synchrony or anti-synchrony between neuronal activity and the phase in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. The method was validated on firing time series from a total of 98 individual neurons identified in 8 dog experiments. SI ranged from −0.14 to 0.66, with 23 pairs of neurons with SI>0.1. The estimated bias due to artifacts was typically < 1%. Strongly cardiovascular- and pulmonary-related neurons (SI>0.5) were found. Results support the use of jitter-based synchrony index in the context of intrinsic cardiac neurons. PMID:24621585

  6. A simple method for characterizing passive and active neuronal properties: application to striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lepora, Nathan F; Blomeley, Craig P; Hoyland, Darren; Bracci, Enrico; Overton, Paul G; Gurney, Kevin

    2011-11-01

    The study of active and passive neuronal dynamics usually relies on a sophisticated array of electrophysiological, staining and pharmacological techniques. We describe here a simple complementary method that recovers many findings of these more complex methods but relies only on a basic patch-clamp recording approach. Somatic short and long current pulses were applied in vitro to striatal medium spiny (MS) and fast spiking (FS) neurons from juvenile rats. The passive dynamics were quantified by fitting two-compartment models to the short current pulse data. Lumped conductances for the active dynamics were then found by compensating this fitted passive dynamics within the current-voltage relationship from the long current pulse data. These estimated passive and active properties were consistent with previous more complex estimations of the neuron properties, supporting the approach. Relationships within the MS and FS neuron types were also evident, including a graduation of MS neuron properties consistent with recent findings about D1 and D2 dopamine receptor expression. Application of the method to simulated neuron data supported the hypothesis that it gives reasonable estimates of membrane properties and gross morphology. Therefore detailed information about the biophysics can be gained from this simple approach, which is useful for both classification of neuron type and biophysical modelling. Furthermore, because these methods rely upon no manipulations to the cell other than patch clamping, they are ideally suited to in vivo electrophysiology. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Sleep-Active Neurons: Conserved Motors of Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Bringmann, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    Sleep is crucial for survival and well-being. This behavioral and physiological state has been studied in all major genetically accessible model animals, including rodents, fish, flies, and worms. Genetic and optogenetic studies have identified several neurons that control sleep, making it now possible to compare circuit mechanisms across species. The “motor” of sleep across animal species is formed by neurons that depolarize at the onset of sleep to actively induce this state by directly inhibiting wakefulness. These sleep-inducing neurons are themselves controlled by inhibitory or activating upstream pathways, which act as the “drivers” of the sleep motor: arousal inhibits “sleep-active” neurons whereas various sleep-promoting “tiredness” pathways converge onto sleep-active neurons to depolarize them. This review provides the first overview of sleep-active neurons across the major model animals. The occurrence of sleep-active neurons and their regulation by upstream pathways in both vertebrate and invertebrate species suggests that these neurons are general and ancient components that evolved early in the history of nervous systems. PMID:29618588

  8. Prenatal Exposure to DEHP Induces Neuronal Degeneration and Neurobehavioral Abnormalities in Adult Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Radwa; Lin, Po-Ching; Park, Chan Jin; Best-Popescu, Catherine; Bakery, Hatem H; Abosalum, Mohamed E; Abdelaleem, Nabila M; Flaws, Jodi A; Ko, CheMyong

    2018-04-23

    Phthalates are a family of synthetic chemicals that are used in producing a variety of consumer products. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is an widely used phthalate and poses a public health concern. Prenatal exposure to DEHP has been shown to induce premature reproductive senescence in animal studies. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that prenatal exposure to DEHP impairs neurobehavior and recognition memory in her male offspring and we investigated one possible mechanism-oxidative damage in the hippocampus. Pregnant CD-1 female mice were orally administered 200μg, 500mg, or 750mg/kg/day DEHP or vehicle from gestational day 11 until birth. The neurobehavioral impact of the prenatal DEHP exposure was assessed at the ages of 16 to 22 months. Elevated plus maze and open field tests were used to measure anxiety levels. Y-maze and novel object recognition tests were employed to measure memory function. The oxidative damage in the hippocampus was measured by the levels of oxidative DNA damage and by SLIM microscopic counting of hippocampal neurons. Adult male mice that were prenatally exposed to DEHP exhibited anxious behaviors and impaired spatial and short-term recognition memory. The number of hippocampal pyramidal neurons was significantly decreased in the DEHP mice. Furthermore, DEHP mice expressed remarkably high levels of cyclooxygenase-2, 8-hydroxyguanine, and thymidine glycol in their hippocampal neurons. DEHP mice also had lower circulating testosterone concentrations and displayed a weaker immunoreactivity than the control mice to androgen receptor expression in the brain. This study found that prenatal exposure to DEHP caused elevated anxiety behavior and impaired recognition memory. These behavioral changes may originate from neurodegeneration caused by oxidative damage and inflammation in the hippocampus. Decreased circulating testosterone concentrations and decreased expression of androgen receptor in the brain also may be factors contributing

  9. Prolactin regulation of oxytocin neurone activity in pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Rachael A; Ladyman, Sharon R; Bouwer, Gregory T; Alyousif, Yousif; Sapsford, Tony J; Scott, Victoria; Kokay, Ilona C; Grattan, David R; Brown, Colin H

    2017-06-01

    During lactation, prolactin promotes milk synthesis and oxytocin stimulates milk ejection. In virgin rats, prolactin inhibits the activity of oxytocin-secreting neurones. We found that prolactin inhibition of oxytocin neurone activity is lost in lactation, and that some oxytocin neurones were excited by prolactin in lactating rats. The change in prolactin regulation of oxytocin neurone activity was not associated with a change in activation of intracellular signalling pathways known to couple to prolactin receptors. The change in prolactin regulation of oxytocin neurone activity in lactation might allow coordinated activation of both populations of neurones when required for successful lactation. Secretion of prolactin for milk synthesis and oxytocin for milk secretion is required for successful lactation. In virgin rats, prolactin inhibits oxytocin neurones but this effect would be counterproductive during lactation when secretion of both hormones is required for synthesis and delivery of milk to the newborn. Hence, we determined the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) prolactin on oxytocin neurones in urethane-anaesthetised virgin, pregnant and lactating rats. Prolactin (2 μg) consistently inhibited oxytocin neurones in virgin and pregnant rats (by 1.9 ± 0.4 and 1.8 ± 0.5 spikes s -1 , respectively), but not in lactating rats; indeed, prolactin excited six of 27 oxytocin neurones by >1 spike s -1 in lactating rats but excited none in virgin or pregnant rats (χ 2 2  = 7.2, P = 0.03). Vasopressin neurones were unaffected by prolactin (2 μg) in virgin rats but were inhibited by 1.1 ± 0.2 spikes s -1 in lactating rats. Immunohistochemistry showed that i.c.v. prolactin increased oxytocin expression in virgin and lactating rats and increased signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 phosphorylation to a similar extent in oxytocin neurones of virgin and lactating rats. Western blotting showed that i.c.v. prolactin did not affect

  10. Abnormal degradation of the neuronal stress-protective transcription factor HSF1 in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Pastor, Rocio; Burchfiel, Eileen T.; Neef, Daniel W.; Jaeger, Alex M.; Cabiscol, Elisa; McKinstry, Spencer U.; Doss, Argenia; Aballay, Alejandro; Lo, Donald C.; Akimov, Sergey S.; Ross, Christopher A.; Eroglu, Cagla; Thiele, Dennis J.

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's Disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by poly-glutamine expansion in the Htt protein, resulting in Htt misfolding and cell death. Expression of the cellular protein folding and pro-survival machinery by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) ameliorates biochemical and neurobiological defects caused by protein misfolding. We report that HSF1 is degraded in cells and mice expressing mutant Htt, in medium spiny neurons derived from human HD iPSCs and in brain samples from patients with HD. Mutant Htt increases CK2α′ kinase and Fbxw7 E3 ligase levels, phosphorylating HSF1 and promoting its proteasomal degradation. An HD mouse model heterozygous for CK2α′ shows increased HSF1 and chaperone levels, maintenance of striatal excitatory synapses, clearance of Htt aggregates and preserves body mass compared with HD mice homozygous for CK2α′. These results reveal a pathway that could be modulated to prevent neuronal dysfunction and muscle wasting caused by protein misfolding in HD. PMID:28194040

  11. Neuronal avalanches of a self-organized neural network with active-neuron-dominant structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiumin; Small, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Neuronal avalanche is a spontaneous neuronal activity which obeys a power-law distribution of population event sizes with an exponent of -3/2. It has been observed in the superficial layers of cortex both in vivo and in vitro. In this paper, we analyze the information transmission of a novel self-organized neural network with active-neuron-dominant structure. Neuronal avalanches can be observed in this network with appropriate input intensity. We find that the process of network learning via spike-timing dependent plasticity dramatically increases the complexity of network structure, which is finally self-organized to be active-neuron-dominant connectivity. Both the entropy of activity patterns and the complexity of their resulting post-synaptic inputs are maximized when the network dynamics are propagated as neuronal avalanches. This emergent topology is beneficial for information transmission with high efficiency and also could be responsible for the large information capacity of this network compared with alternative archetypal networks with different neural connectivity.

  12. Abnormal dendritic maturation of neurons under the influence of a Tilorone analogue (R 10.874).

    PubMed

    Pfau, D; Westphal, S; Bossanyi, P V; Dietzmann, K

    1995-11-01

    Tilorone analogue (R 10.874) has a close affinity to the lysosomal compartment of cells and forms a non degradable carbohydrate-lipid-drug complex accumulated within digesting organelles. Resembling biochemical and structural changes are seen in hereditary mucopolysaccharidoses accompanied with abnormal dendritogenesis. On the other hand, developmental toxicity (TERRY et al. 1992), antiproliferative effects (ALGARRA et al. 1993) and interactions with DNA (GELLER et al. 1985) are generated by tilorone. Therefore it should be interesting to know whether the amphiphilic cationic compound is able to produce an abnormal dendritogenesis as in storage diseases or an impaired arborisation of dendrites and what could be the reason for the misdevelopment. We demonstrate that there was a fetal retardation in the development of dendritic network, even under influence of low dosis of the analogue R 10.874. The dendritic dismaturation was concomitant with an increased amount of fatty acids and a slightly disarranged metabolic pathway of gangliosides. The dendritic arborisation closed the gap of retarded development between intrauterine treated and untreated rats after 7 days of postnatal drug elimination. We suppose that a fetotoxic effect and not the lysosomopathy is responsible for the reduced dendritic network.

  13. On the Dynamics of the Spontaneous Activity in Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bonifazi, Paolo; Ruaro, Maria Elisabetta; Torre, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Most neuronal networks, even in the absence of external stimuli, produce spontaneous bursts of spikes separated by periods of reduced activity. The origin and functional role of these neuronal events are still unclear. The present work shows that the spontaneous activity of two very different networks, intact leech ganglia and dissociated cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, share several features. Indeed, in both networks: i) the inter-spike intervals distribution of the spontaneous firing of single neurons is either regular or periodic or bursting, with the fraction of bursting neurons depending on the network activity; ii) bursts of spontaneous spikes have the same broad distributions of size and duration; iii) the degree of correlated activity increases with the bin width, and the power spectrum of the network firing rate has a 1/f behavior at low frequencies, indicating the existence of long-range temporal correlations; iv) the activity of excitatory synaptic pathways mediated by NMDA receptors is necessary for the onset of the long-range correlations and for the presence of large bursts; v) blockage of inhibitory synaptic pathways mediated by GABAA receptors causes instead an increase in the correlation among neurons and leads to a burst distribution composed only of very small and very large bursts. These results suggest that the spontaneous electrical activity in neuronal networks with different architectures and functions can have very similar properties and common dynamics. PMID:17502919

  14. Rostral dorsolateral pontine neurons with sympathetic nerve-related activity.

    PubMed

    Barman, S M; Gebber, G L; Kitchens, H

    1999-02-01

    Spike-triggered averaging, arterial pulse-triggered analysis, and coherence analysis were used to classify rostral dorsolateral pontine (RDLP) neurons into groups whose naturally occurring discharges were correlated to only the 10-Hz rhythm (n = 29), to only the cardiac-related rhythm (n = 15), and to both rhythms (n = 15) in inferior cardiac sympathetic nerve discharge (SND) of urethan-anesthetized cats. Most of the neurons with activity correlated to only the cardiac-related rhythm were located medial to the other two groups of neurons. The firing rates of most RDLP neurons with activity correlated to only the 10-Hz rhythm (9 of 12) or both rhythms (7 of 8) were decreased during baroreceptor reflex-induced inhibition of SND produced by aortic obstruction; thus, they are presumed to be sympathoexcitatory. The firing rates of four of seven RDLP neurons with activity correlated to only the cardiac-related rhythm increased during baroreceptor reflex activation; thus, they may be sympathoinhibitory. We conclude that the RDLP contains a functionally heterogeneous population of neurons with sympathetic nerve-related activity. These neurons could not be antidromically activated by stimulation of the thoracic spinal cord.

  15. Attenuation of dichlorvos-induced microglial activation and neuronal apoptosis by 4-hydroxy TEMPO.

    PubMed

    Sunkaria, Aditya; Sharma, Deep Raj; Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2014-02-01

    The neurotoxic consequences of acute high-level as well as chronic low-level organophosphates exposure are associated with a range of abnormalities in nerve functions. Previously, we have shown that after 24 h of dichlorvos exposure, microglia become activated and secrete pro-inflammatory molecules like nitric oxide, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. Here, we extended our findings and focused on the neuronal damage caused by dichlorvos via microglial activation. For this, neurons and microglia were isolated separately from 1-day-old Wistar rat pups. Microglia were treated with dichlorvos for 24 h and supernatant was collected (dichlorvos-induced conditioned medium, DCM). However, when 4-hydroxy TEMPO (4-HT) pretreatment was given, we observed significant attenuation of dichlorvos-induced microglial activation; we also collected the supernatant of this culture (4-HT + DCM, TDCM). Next, we checked the effects of DCM on neurons and found heavy loss in viability as evident from NF-H immunostaining and MTT results, whereas dichlorvos alone-treated neurons showed comparatively less damage. However, we observed significant increase in neuronal viability when cells were treated with TDCM. Semi-quantitative PCR and western blot results revealed significant increase in p53, Bax and cytochrome c levels along with caspase 3 activation after 24 h of DCM treatment. However, TDCM-treated neurons showed significant decrease in the expression of these pro-apoptotic molecules. Taken together, these findings suggest that 4-HT can significantly attenuate dichlorvos-induced microglial activation and prevent apoptotic neuronal cell death.

  16. Abnormalities in auditory efferent activities in children with selective mutism.

    PubMed

    Muchnik, Chava; Ari-Even Roth, Daphne; Hildesheimer, Minka; Arie, Miri; Bar-Haim, Yair; Henkin, Yael

    2013-01-01

    Two efferent feedback pathways to the auditory periphery may play a role in monitoring self-vocalization: the middle-ear acoustic reflex (MEAR) and the medial olivocochlear bundle (MOCB) reflex. Since most studies regarding the role of auditory efferent activity during self-vocalization were conducted in animals, human data are scarce. The working premise of the current study was that selective mutism (SM), a rare psychiatric disorder characterized by consistent failure to speak in specific social situations despite the ability to speak normally in other situations, may serve as a human model for studying the potential involvement of auditory efferent activity during self-vocalization. For this purpose, auditory efferent function was assessed in a group of 31 children with SM and compared to that of a group of 31 normally developing control children (mean age 8.9 and 8.8 years, respectively). All children exhibited normal hearing thresholds and type A tympanograms. MEAR and MOCB functions were evaluated by means of acoustic reflex thresholds and decay functions and the suppression of transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions, respectively. Auditory afferent function was tested by means of auditory brainstem responses (ABR). Results indicated a significantly higher proportion of children with abnormal MEAR and MOCB function in the SM group (58.6 and 38%, respectively) compared to controls (9.7 and 8%, respectively). The prevalence of abnormal MEAR and/or MOCB function was significantly higher in the SM group (71%) compared to controls (16%). Intact afferent function manifested in normal absolute and interpeak latencies of ABR components in all children. The finding of aberrant efferent auditory function in a large proportion of children with SM provides further support for the notion that MEAR and MOCB may play a significant role in the process of self-vocalization. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Manipulating neural activity in physiologically classified neurons: triumphs and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Felicity; Schwartz, Edmund C.; Salzman, C. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Understanding brain function requires knowing both how neural activity encodes information and how this activity generates appropriate responses. Electrophysiological, imaging and immediate early gene immunostaining studies have been instrumental in identifying and characterizing neurons that respond to different sensory stimuli, events and motor actions. Here we highlight approaches that have manipulated the activity of physiologically classified neurons to determine their role in the generation of behavioural responses. Previous experiments have often exploited the functional architecture observed in many cortical areas, where clusters of neurons share response properties. However, many brain structures do not exhibit such functional architecture. Instead, neurons with different response properties are anatomically intermingled. Emerging genetic approaches have enabled the identification and manipulation of neurons that respond to specific stimuli despite the lack of discernable anatomical organization. These approaches have advanced understanding of the circuits mediating sensory perception, learning and memory, and the generation of behavioural responses by providing causal evidence linking neural response properties to appropriate behavioural output. However, significant challenges remain for understanding cognitive processes that are probably mediated by neurons with more complex physiological response properties. Currently available strategies may prove inadequate for determining how activity in these neurons is causally related to cognitive behaviour. PMID:26240431

  18. Anti-Hu antibodies activate enteric and sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin; Michel, Klaus; Annahazi, Anita; Demir, Ihsan E.; Ceyhan, Güralp O.; Zeller, Florian; Komorowski, Lars; Stöcker, Winfried; Beyak, Michael J.; Grundy, David; Farrugia, Gianrico; De Giorgio, Roberto; Schemann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    IgG of type 1 anti-neuronal nuclear antibody (ANNA-1, anti-Hu) specificity is a serological marker of paraneoplastic neurological autoimmunity (including enteric/autonomic) usually related to small-cell lung carcinoma. We show here that IgG isolated from such sera and also affinity-purified anti-HuD label enteric neurons and cause an immediate spike discharge in enteric and visceral sensory neurons. Both labelling and activation of enteric neurons was prevented by preincubation with the HuD antigen. Activation of enteric neurons was inhibited by the nicotinic receptor antagonists hexamethonium and dihydro-β-erythroidine and reduced by the P2X antagonist pyridoxal phosphate-6-azo (benzene-2,4-disulfonic acid (PPADS) but not by the 5-HT3 antagonist tropisetron or the N-type Ca-channel blocker ω-Conotoxin GVIA. Ca++ imaging experiments confirmed activation of enteric neurons but not enteric glia. These findings demonstrate a direct excitatory action of ANNA-1, in particular anti-HuD, on visceral sensory and enteric neurons, which involves nicotinic and P2X receptors. The results provide evidence for a novel link between nerve activation and symptom generation in patients with antibody-mediated gut dysfunction. PMID:27905561

  19. Neuron matters: electric activation of neuronal tissue is dependent on the interaction between the neuron and the electric field.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hui; Steiger, Amanda

    2015-08-12

    In laboratory research and clinical practice, externally-applied electric fields have been widely used to control neuronal activity. It is generally accepted that neuronal excitability is controlled by electric current that depolarizes or hyperpolarizes the excitable cell membrane. What determines the amount of polarization? Research on the mechanisms of electric stimulation focus on the optimal control of the field properties (frequency, amplitude, and direction of the electric currents) to improve stimulation outcomes. Emerging evidence from modeling and experimental studies support the existence of interactions between the targeted neurons and the externally-applied electric fields. With cell-field interaction, we suggest a two-way process. When a neuron is positioned inside an electric field, the electric field will induce a change in the resting membrane potential by superimposing an electrically-induced transmembrane potential (ITP). At the same time, the electric field can be perturbed and re-distributed by the cell. This cell-field interaction may play a significant role in the overall effects of stimulation. The redistributed field can cause secondary effects to neighboring cells by altering their geometrical pattern and amount of membrane polarization. Neurons excited by the externally-applied electric field can also affect neighboring cells by ephaptic interaction. Both aspects of the cell-field interaction depend on the biophysical properties of the neuronal tissue, including geometric (i.e., size, shape, orientation to the field) and electric (i.e., conductivity and dielectricity) attributes of the cells. The biophysical basis of the cell-field interaction can be explained by the electromagnetism theory. Further experimental and simulation studies on electric stimulation of neuronal tissue should consider the prospect of a cell-field interaction, and a better understanding of tissue inhomogeneity and anisotropy is needed to fully appreciate the neural

  20. Mechanisms of specificity in neuronal activity-regulated gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Michelle R.; West, Anne E.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is a highly adaptable organ that is capable of converting sensory information into changes in neuronal function. This plasticity allows behavior to be accommodated to the environment, providing an important evolutionary advantage. Neurons convert environmental stimuli into long-lasting changes in their physiology in part through the synaptic activity-regulated transcription of new gene products. Since the neurotransmitter-dependent regulation of Fos transcription was first discovered nearly 25 years ago, a wealth of studies have enriched our understanding of the molecular pathways that mediate activity-regulated changes in gene transcription. These findings show that a broad range of signaling pathways and transcriptional regulators can be engaged by neuronal activity to sculpt complex programs of stimulus-regulated gene transcription. However, the shear scope of the transcriptional pathways engaged by neuronal activity raises the question of how specificity in the nature of the transcriptional response is achieved in order to encode physiologically relevant responses to divergent stimuli. Here we summarize the general paradigms by which neuronal activity regulates transcription while focusing on the molecular mechanisms that confer differential stimulus-, cell-type-, and developmental-specificity upon activity-regulated programs of neuronal gene transcription. In addition, we preview some of the new technologies that will advance our future understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of activity-regulated gene transcription in the brain. PMID:21620929

  1. GABAergic inhibition through synergistic astrocytic neuronal interaction transiently decreases vasopressin neuronal activity during hypoosmotic challenge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Feng; Sun, Min-Yu; Hou, Qiuling; Hamilton, Kathryn A

    2013-04-01

    The neuropeptide vasopressin is crucial to mammalian osmotic regulation. Local hypoosmotic challenge transiently decreases and then increases vasopressin secretion. To investigate mechanisms underlying this transient response, we examined the effects of hypoosmotic challenge on the electrical activity of rat hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus (SON) vasopressin neurons using patch-clamp recordings. We found that 5 min exposure of hypothalamic slices to hypoosmotic solution transiently increased inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSC) frequency and reduced the firing rate of vasopressin neurons. Recovery occurred by 10 min of exposure, even though the osmolality remained low. The γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor blocker, gabazine, blocked the IPSCs and the hypoosmotic suppression of firing. The gliotoxin l-aminoadipic acid blocked the increase in IPSC frequency at 5 min and the recovery of firing at 10 min, indicating astrocytic involvement in hypoosmotic modulation of vasopressin neuronal activity. Moreover, β-alanine, an osmolyte of astrocytes and GABA transporter (GAT) inhibitor, blocked the increase in IPSC frequency at 5 min of hypoosmotic challenge. Confocal microscopy of immunostained SON sections revealed that astrocytes and magnocellular neurons both showed positive staining of vesicular GATs (VGAT). Hypoosmotic stimulation in vivo reduced the number of VGAT-expressing neurons, and increased co-localisation and molecular association of VGAT with glial fibrillary acidic protein that increased significantly by 10 min. By 30 min, neuronal VGAT labelling was partially restored, and astrocytic VGAT was relocated to the ventral portion while it decreased in the somatic zone of the SON. Thus, synergistic astrocytic and neuronal GABAergic inhibition could ensure that vasopressin neuron firing is only transiently suppressed under hypoosmotic conditions. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Negative BOLD with Large Increases in Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Khubchandani, Manjula; Motelow, Joshua E.; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2008-01-01

    Blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is widely used in neuroscience to study brain activity. However, BOLD fMRI does not measure neuronal activity directly but depends on cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) consumption. Using fMRI, CBV, CBF, neuronal recordings, and CMRO2 modeling, we investigated how the signals are related during seizures in rats. We found that increases in hemodynamic, neuronal, and metabolic activity were associated with positive BOLD signals in the cortex, but with negative BOLD signals in hippocampus. Our data show that negative BOLD signals do not necessarily imply decreased neuronal activity or CBF, but can result from increased neuronal activity, depending on the interplay between hemodynamics and metabolism. Caution should be used in interpreting fMRI signals because the relationship between neuronal activity and BOLD signals may depend on brain region and state and can be different during normal and pathological conditions. PMID:18063563

  3. Neuronal activity-dependent membrane traffic at the neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Miana-Mena, Francisco Javier; Roux, Sylvie; Benichou, Jean-Claude; Osta, Rosario; Brûlet, Philippe

    2002-01-01

    During development and also in adulthood, synaptic connections are modulated by neuronal activity. To follow such modifications in vivo, new genetic tools are designed. The nontoxic C-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin (TTC) fused to a reporter gene such as LacZ retains the retrograde and transsynaptic transport abilities of the holotoxin itself. In this work, the hybrid protein is injected intramuscularly to analyze in vivo the mechanisms of intracellular and transneuronal traffics at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Traffic on both sides of the synapse are strongly dependent on presynaptic neural cell activity. In muscle, a directional membrane traffic concentrates β-galactosidase-TTC hybrid protein into the NMJ postsynaptic side. In neurons, the probe is sorted across the cell to dendrites and subsequently to an interconnected neuron. Such fusion protein, sensitive to presynaptic neuronal activity, would be extremely useful to analyze morphological changes and plasticity at the NMJ. PMID:11880654

  4. Excessive activation of AhR signaling disrupts neuronal migration in the hippocampal CA1 region in the developing mouse.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Eiki; Kubo, Ken-Ichiro; Endo, Toshihiro; Nakajima, Kazunori; Kakeyama, Masaki; Tohyama, Chiharu

    2017-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) avidly binds dioxin, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant. Disruption of downstream AhR signaling has been reported to alter neuronal development, and rodent offspring exposed to dioxin during gestation and lactation showed abnormalities in learning and memory, emotion, and social behavior. However, the mechanism behind the disrupted AhR signaling and developmental neurotoxicity induced by xenobiotic ligands remains elusive. Therefore, we studied how excessive AhR activation affects neuronal migration in the hippocampal CA1 region of the developing mouse brain. We transfected constitutively active (CA)-AhR, AhR, or control vector plasmids into neurons via in utero electroporation on gestational day 14 and analyzed neuronal positioning in the hippocampal CA1 region of offspring on postnatal day 14. CA-AhR transfection affected neuronal positioning, whereas no change was observed in AhR-transfected or control hippocampus. These results suggest that constitutively activated AhR signaling disrupts neuronal migration during hippocampal development. Further studies are needed to investigate whether such developmental disruption in the hippocampus leads to the abnormal cognition and behavior of rodent offspring upon maternal exposure to AhR xenobiotic ligands.

  5. Enhancement of oscillatory activity in the endopiriform nucleus of rats raised under abnormal oral conditions.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Hasumoto-Honjo, Miho; Sugai, Tokio; Segami, Natsuki; Kato, Nobuo

    2014-02-21

    Endopiriform nucleus (EPN) is located deep to the piriform cortex, and has neural connections with not only neighboring sensory areas but also subcortical areas where emotional and nociceptive information is processed. Well-balanced oral condition might play an important role in stability of brain activities. When the oral condition is impaired, several areas in the brain might be affected. In the present study, we investigated whether abnormal conditions of oral region influence neural activities in the EPN. Orthodontic appliance that generates continuous force and chronic pain-related stress was fixed to maxillary incisors of rats, and raised. Field potential recordings were made from the EPN of brain slices. We previously reported that the EPN has an ability to generate membrane potential oscillation. In the present study, we have applied the same methods to assess activities of neuron clusters in the EPN. In the case of normal rats, stable field potential oscillations were induced in the EPN by application of low-frequency electrical stimulation under the medium with caffeine. In the case of rats with the orthodontic appliance, stable field potential oscillations were also induced, but both duration of oscillatory activities and wavelet number were increased. The enhanced oscillations were depressed by blockade of NMDA receptors. Thus, impairment of oral health under application of continuous orthodontic force and chronic pain-related stress enhanced neural activities in the EPN, in which up-regulation of NMDA receptors may be concerned. These findings suggest that the EPN might be involved in information processing with regard to abnormal conditions of oral region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dopamine suppresses neuronal activity of Helisoma B5 neurons via a D2-like receptor, activating PLC and K channels.

    PubMed

    Zhong, L R; Artinian, L; Rehder, V

    2013-01-03

    Dopamine (DA) plays fundamental roles as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in the central nervous system. How DA modulates the electrical excitability of individual neurons to elicit various behaviors is of great interest in many systems. The buccal ganglion of the freshwater pond snail Helisoma trivolvis contains the neuronal circuitry for feeding and DA is known to modulate the feeding motor program in Helisoma. The buccal neuron B5 participates in the control of gut contractile activity and is surrounded by dopaminergic processes, which are expected to release DA. In order to study whether DA modulates the electrical activity of individual B5 neurons, we performed experiments on physically isolated B5 neurons in culture and on B5 neurons within the buccal ganglion in situ. We report that DA application elicited a strong hyperpolarization in both conditions and turned the electrical activity from a spontaneously firing state to an electrically silent state. Using the cell culture system, we demonstrated that the strong hyperpolarization was inhibited by the D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride and the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, indicating that DA affected the membrane potential of B5 neurons through the activation of a D2-like receptor and PLC. Further studies revealed that the DA-induced hyperpolarization was inhibited by the K channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and tetraethylammonium, suggesting that K channels might serve as the ultimate target of DA signaling. Through its modulatory effect on the electrical activity of B5 neurons, the release of DA in vivo may contribute to a neuronal output that results in a variable feeding motor program. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Methamphetamine Regulation of Firing Activity of Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Min; Sambo, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a substrate for the dopamine transporter that increases extracellular dopamine levels by competing with dopamine uptake and increasing reverse transport of dopamine via the transporter. METH has also been shown to alter the excitability of dopamine neurons. The mechanism of METH regulation of the intrinsic firing behaviors of dopamine neurons is less understood. Here we identified an unexpected and unique property of METH on the regulation of firing activity of mouse dopamine neurons. METH produced a transient augmentation of spontaneous spike activity of midbrain dopamine neurons that was followed by a progressive reduction of spontaneous spike activity. Inspection of action potential morphology revealed that METH increased the half-width and produced larger coefficients of variation of the interspike interval, suggesting that METH exposure affected the activity of voltage-dependent potassium channels in these neurons. Since METH has been shown to affect Ca2+ homeostasis, the unexpected findings that METH broadened the action potential and decreased the amplitude of afterhyperpolarization led us to ask whether METH alters the activity of Ca2+-activated potassium (BK) channels. First, we identified BK channels in dopamine neurons by their voltage dependence and their response to a BK channel blocker or opener. While METH suppressed the amplitude of BK channel-mediated unitary currents, the BK channel opener NS1619 attenuated the effects of METH on action potential broadening, afterhyperpolarization repression, and spontaneous spike activity reduction. Live-cell total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, electrophysiology, and biochemical analysis suggest METH exposure decreased the activity of BK channels by decreasing BK-α subunit levels at the plasma membrane. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Methamphetamine (METH) competes with dopamine uptake, increases dopamine efflux via the dopamine transporter, and affects the excitability of

  8. Basal Forebrain Gating by Somatostatin Neurons Drives Prefrontal Cortical Activity.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Nelson; Alonso, Alejandra; Morales, Cristian; Espinosa, Pedro; Chávez, Andrés E; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2017-11-17

    The basal forebrain provides modulatory input to the cortex regulating brain states and cognitive processing. Somatostatin-expressing neurons constitute a heterogeneous GABAergic population known to functionally inhibit basal forebrain cortically projecting cells thus favoring sleep and cortical synchronization. However, it remains unclear if somatostatin cells can regulate population activity patterns in the basal forebrain and modulate cortical dynamics. Here, we demonstrate that somatostatin neurons regulate the corticopetal synaptic output of the basal forebrain impinging on cortical activity and behavior. Optogenetic inactivation of somatostatin neurons in vivo rapidly modified neural activity in the basal forebrain, with the consequent enhancement and desynchronization of activity in the prefrontal cortex, reflected in both neuronal spiking and network oscillations. Cortical activation was partially dependent on cholinergic transmission, suppressing slow waves and potentiating gamma oscillations. In addition, recruitment dynamics was cell type-specific, with interneurons showing similar temporal profiles, but stronger responses than pyramidal cells. Finally, optogenetic stimulation of quiescent animals during resting periods prompted locomotor activity, suggesting generalized cortical activation and increased arousal. Altogether, we provide physiological and behavioral evidence indicating that somatostatin neurons are pivotal in gating the synaptic output of the basal forebrain, thus indirectly controlling cortical operations via both cholinergic and non-cholinergic mechanisms. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Neuronal Activity Promotes Glioma Growth through Neuroligin-3 Secretion.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Humsa S; Johung, Tessa B; Caretti, Viola; Noll, Alyssa; Tang, Yujie; Nagaraja, Surya; Gibson, Erin M; Mount, Christopher W; Polepalli, Jai; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Woo, Pamelyn J; Malenka, Robert C; Vogel, Hannes; Bredel, Markus; Mallick, Parag; Monje, Michelle

    2015-05-07

    Active neurons exert a mitogenic effect on normal neural precursor and oligodendroglial precursor cells, the putative cellular origins of high-grade glioma (HGG). By using optogenetic control of cortical neuronal activity in a patient-derived pediatric glioblastoma xenograft model, we demonstrate that active neurons similarly promote HGG proliferation and growth in vivo. Conditioned medium from optogenetically stimulated cortical slices promoted proliferation of pediatric and adult patient-derived HGG cultures, indicating secretion of activity-regulated mitogen(s). The synaptic protein neuroligin-3 (NLGN3) was identified as the leading candidate mitogen, and soluble NLGN3 was sufficient and necessary to promote robust HGG cell proliferation. NLGN3 induced PI3K-mTOR pathway activity and feedforward expression of NLGN3 in glioma cells. NLGN3 expression levels in human HGG negatively correlated with patient overall survival. These findings indicate the important role of active neurons in the brain tumor microenvironment and identify secreted NLGN3 as an unexpected mechanism promoting neuronal activity-regulated cancer growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cholinesterase inhibitors modify the activity of intrinsic cardiac neurons.

    PubMed

    Darvesh, Sultan; Arora, Rakesh C; Martin, Earl; Magee, David; Hopkins, David A; Armour, J Andrew

    2004-08-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors used to treat the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) inhibit both acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE), albeit to different degrees. Because central and peripheral neurons, including intrinsic cardiac neurons located on the surface of the mammalian heart, express both BuChE and AChE, we studied spontaneously active intrinsic cardiac neurons in the pig as a model to assess the effects of inhibition of AChE compared to BuChE. Neuroanatomical experiments showed that some porcine intrinsic cardiac neurons expressed AChE and/or BuChE. Enzyme kinetic experiments with cholinesterase inhibitors, namely, donepezil, galantamine, (+/-) huperzine A, metrifonate, rivastigmine, and tetrahydroaminoacridine, demonstrated that these compounds differentially inhibited porcine AChE and BuChE. Donepezil and (+/-) huperzine A were better reversible inhibitors of AChE, and galantamine equally inhibited both the enzymes. Tetrahydroaminoacridine was a better reversible inhibitor of BuChE. Rivastigmine caused more rapid inactivation of BuChE as compared to AChE. Neurophysiological studies showed that acetylcholine and butyrylcholine increase or decrease the spontaneous activity of the intrinsic cardiac neurons. Donepezil, galantamine, (+/-) huperzine A, and tetrahydroaminoacridine changed spontaneous neuronal activity by about 30-35 impulses per minute, while rivastigmine changed it by approximately 100 impulses per minute. It is concluded that (i) inhibition of AChE and BuChE directly affects the porcine intrinsic cardiac nervous system, (ii) the intrinsic cardiac nervous system represents a suitable model for examining the effects of cholinesterase inhibitors on mammalian neurons in vivo, and (iii) the activity of intrinsic cardiac neurons may be affected by pharmacological agents that inhibit cholinesterases.

  11. Activating neurons by light in free-moving adult flies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Chin; Hsiao, Po-Yen; Chu, Li-An; Lin, Yen-Yin; Fu, Chien-Chung; Chiang, Ann-Shyn

    2015-01-01

    In this presentation, we show our preliminary results which is related to neurons activation in vivo by laser. A laser scanning system was adopted to guide laser beam to an assigned fly and an assigned position. A 473-nm laser can be a heat punishment source to restrain a wild-type fly's moving area. Furthermore, neurons in optogenetics transgene flies can be triggered by the blue laser in this system.

  12. Neuronal activity determines distinct gliotransmitter release from a single astrocyte

    PubMed Central

    Covelo, Ana

    2018-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that astrocytes are actively involved in brain function by regulating synaptic activity and plasticity. Different gliotransmitters, such as glutamate, ATP, GABA or D-serine, released form astrocytes have been shown to induce different forms of synaptic regulation. However, whether a single astrocyte may release different gliotransmitters is unknown. Here we show that mouse hippocampal astrocytes activated by endogenous (neuron-released endocannabinoids or GABA) or exogenous (single astrocyte Ca2+ uncaging) stimuli modulate putative single CA3-CA1 hippocampal synapses. The astrocyte-mediated synaptic modulation was biphasic and consisted of an initial glutamate-mediated potentiation followed by a purinergic-mediated depression of neurotransmitter release. The temporal dynamic properties of this biphasic synaptic regulation depended on the firing frequency and duration of the neuronal activity that stimulated astrocytes. Present results indicate that single astrocytes can decode neuronal activity and, in response, release distinct gliotransmitters to differentially regulate neurotransmission at putative single synapses. PMID:29380725

  13. Brain state-dependent abnormal LFP activity in the auditory cortex of a schizophrenia mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Kazuhito; Nakazawa, Kazu

    2014-01-01

    In schizophrenia, evoked 40-Hz auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs) are impaired, which reflects the sensory deficits in this disorder, and baseline spontaneous oscillatory activity also appears to be abnormal. It has been debated whether the evoked ASSR impairments are due to the possible increase in baseline power. GABAergic interneuron-specific NMDA receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction mutant mice mimic some behavioral and pathophysiological aspects of schizophrenia. To determine the presence and extent of sensory deficits in these mutant mice, we recorded spontaneous local field potential (LFP) activity and its click-train evoked ASSRs from primary auditory cortex of awake, head-restrained mice. Baseline spontaneous LFP power in the pre-stimulus period before application of the first click trains was augmented at a wide range of frequencies. However, when repetitive ASSR stimuli were presented every 20 s, averaged spontaneous LFP power amplitudes during the inter-ASSR stimulus intervals in the mutant mice became indistinguishable from the levels of control mice. Nonetheless, the evoked 40-Hz ASSR power and their phase locking to click trains were robustly impaired in the mutants, although the evoked 20-Hz ASSRs were also somewhat diminished. These results suggested that NMDAR hypofunction in cortical GABAergic neurons confers two brain state-dependent LFP abnormalities in the auditory cortex; (1) a broadband increase in spontaneous LFP power in the absence of external inputs, and (2) a robust deficit in the evoked ASSR power and its phase-locking despite of normal baseline LFP power magnitude during the repetitive auditory stimuli. The “paradoxically” high spontaneous LFP activity of the primary auditory cortex in the absence of external stimuli may possibly contribute to the emergence of schizophrenia-related aberrant auditory perception. PMID:25018691

  14. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) controls diacylglycerol kinase activity in neurons.

    PubMed

    Tabet, Ricardos; Moutin, Enora; Becker, Jérôme A J; Heintz, Dimitri; Fouillen, Laetitia; Flatter, Eric; Krężel, Wojciech; Alunni, Violaine; Koebel, Pascale; Dembélé, Doulaye; Tassone, Flora; Bardoni, Barbara; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Vitale, Nicolas; Muller, Dominique; Le Merrer, Julie; Moine, Hervé

    2016-06-28

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by the absence of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) in neurons. In the mouse, the lack of FMRP is associated with an excessive translation of hundreds of neuronal proteins, notably including postsynaptic proteins. This local protein synthesis deregulation is proposed to underlie the observed defects of glutamatergic synapse maturation and function and to affect preferentially the hundreds of mRNA species that were reported to bind to FMRP. How FMRP impacts synaptic protein translation and which mRNAs are most important for the pathology remain unclear. Here we show by cross-linking immunoprecipitation in cortical neurons that FMRP is mostly associated with one unique mRNA: diacylglycerol kinase kappa (Dgkκ), a master regulator that controls the switch between diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid signaling pathways. The absence of FMRP in neurons abolishes group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent DGK activity combined with a loss of Dgkκ expression. The reduction of Dgkκ in neurons is sufficient to cause dendritic spine abnormalities, synaptic plasticity alterations, and behavior disorders similar to those observed in the FXS mouse model. Overexpression of Dgkκ in neurons is able to rescue the dendritic spine defects of the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 gene KO neurons. Together, these data suggest that Dgkκ deregulation contributes to FXS pathology and support a model where FMRP, by controlling the translation of Dgkκ, indirectly controls synaptic proteins translation and membrane properties by impacting lipid signaling in dendritic spine.

  15. Human single neuron activity precedes emergence of conscious perception.

    PubMed

    Gelbard-Sagiv, Hagar; Mudrik, Liad; Hill, Michael R; Koch, Christof; Fried, Itzhak

    2018-05-25

    Identifying the neuronal basis of spontaneous changes in conscious experience in the absence of changes in the external environment is a major challenge. Binocular rivalry, in which two stationary monocular images lead to continuously changing perception, provides a unique opportunity to address this issue. We studied the activity of human single neurons in the medial temporal and frontal lobes while patients were engaged in binocular rivalry. Here we report that internal changes in the content of perception are signaled by very early (~-2000 ms) nonselective medial frontal activity, followed by selective activity of medial temporal lobe neurons that precedes the perceptual change by ~1000 ms. Such early activations are not found for externally driven perceptual changes. These results suggest that a medial fronto-temporal network may be involved in the preconscious internal generation of perceptual transitions.

  16. PDF neuron firing phase-shifts key circadian activity neurons in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fang; Cerullo, Isadora; Chen, Xiao; Rosbash, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Our experiments address two long-standing models for the function of the Drosophila brain circadian network: a dual oscillator model, which emphasizes the primacy of PDF-containing neurons, and a cell-autonomous model for circadian phase adjustment. We identify five different circadian (E) neurons that are a major source of rhythmicity and locomotor activity. Brief firing of PDF cells at different times of day generates a phase response curve (PRC), which mimics a light-mediated PRC and requires PDF receptor expression in the five E neurons. Firing also resembles light by causing TIM degradation in downstream neurons. Unlike light however, firing-mediated phase-shifting is CRY-independent and exploits the E3 ligase component CUL-3 in the early night to degrade TIM. Our results suggest that PDF neurons integrate light information and then modulate the phase of E cell oscillations and behavioral rhythms. The results also explain how fly brain rhythms persist in constant darkness and without CRY. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02780.001 PMID:24939987

  17. PDF neuron firing phase-shifts key circadian activity neurons in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang; Cerullo, Isadora; Chen, Xiao; Rosbash, Michael

    2014-06-17

    Our experiments address two long-standing models for the function of the Drosophila brain circadian network: a dual oscillator model, which emphasizes the primacy of PDF-containing neurons, and a cell-autonomous model for circadian phase adjustment. We identify five different circadian (E) neurons that are a major source of rhythmicity and locomotor activity. Brief firing of PDF cells at different times of day generates a phase response curve (PRC), which mimics a light-mediated PRC and requires PDF receptor expression in the five E neurons. Firing also resembles light by causing TIM degradation in downstream neurons. Unlike light however, firing-mediated phase-shifting is CRY-independent and exploits the E3 ligase component CUL-3 in the early night to degrade TIM. Our results suggest that PDF neurons integrate light information and then modulate the phase of E cell oscillations and behavioral rhythms. The results also explain how fly brain rhythms persist in constant darkness and without CRY.

  18. Network activity of mirror neurons depends on experience.

    PubMed

    Ushakov, Vadim L; Kartashov, Sergey I; Zavyalova, Victoria V; Bezverhiy, Denis D; Posichanyuk, Vladimir I; Terentev, Vasliliy N; Anokhin, Konstantin V

    2013-03-01

    In this work, the investigation of network activity of mirror neurons systems in animal brains depending on experience (existence or absence performance of the shown actions) was carried out. It carried out the research of mirror neurons network in the C57/BL6 line mice in the supervision task of swimming mice-demonstrators in Morris water maze. It showed the presence of mirror neurons systems in the motor cortex M1, M2, cingular cortex, hippocampus in mice groups, having experience of the swimming and without it. The conclusion is drawn about the possibility of the new functional network systems formation by means of mirror neurons systems and the acquisition of new knowledge through supervision by the animals in non-specific tasks.

  19. Neuronal Activation After Prolonged Immobilization: Do the Same or Different Neurons Respond to a Novel Stressor?

    PubMed

    Marín-Blasco, Ignacio; Muñoz-Abellán, Cristina; Andero, Raül; Nadal, Roser; Armario, Antonio

    2018-04-01

    Despite extensive research on the impact of emotional stressors on brain function using immediate-early genes (e.g., c-fos), there are still important questions that remain unanswered such as the reason for the progressive decline of c-fos expression in response to prolonged stress and the neuronal populations activated by different stressors. This study tackles these 2 questions by evaluating c-fos expression in response to 2 different emotional stressors applied sequentially, and performing a fluorescent double labeling of c-Fos protein and c-fos mRNA on stress-related brain areas. Results were complemented with the assessment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation. We showed that the progressive decline of c-fos expression could be related to 2 differing mechanisms involving either transcriptional repression or changes in stimulatory inputs. Moreover, the neuronal populations that respond to the different stressors appear to be predominantly separated in high-level processing areas (e.g., medial prefrontal cortex). However, in low-hierarchy areas (e.g., paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus) neuronal populations appear to respond unspecifically. The data suggest that the distinct physiological and behavioral consequences of emotional stressors, and their implication in the development of psychopathologies, are likely to be closely associated with neuronal populations specifically activated by each stressor.

  20. PERSPECTIVE: Electrical activity enhances neuronal survival and regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corredor, Raul G.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2009-10-01

    The failure of regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) remains an enormous scientific and clinical challenge. After injury or in degenerative diseases, neurons in the adult mammalian CNS fail to regrow their axons and reconnect with their normal targets, and furthermore the neurons frequently die and are not normally replaced. While significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis for this lack of regenerative ability, a second approach has gained momentum: replacing lost neurons or lost connections with artificial electrical circuits that interface with the nervous system. In the visual system, gene therapy-based 'optogenetics' prostheses represent a competing technology. Now, the two approaches are converging, as recent data suggest that electrical activity itself, via the molecular signaling pathways such activity stimulates, is sufficient to induce neuronal survival and regeneration, particularly in retinal ganglion cells. Here, we review these data, discuss the effects of electrical activity on neurons' molecular signaling pathways and propose specific mechanisms by which exogenous electrical activity may be acting to enhance survival and regeneration.

  1. Spontaneous olfactory receptor neuron activity determines follower cell response properties

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Joby; Dunn, Felice A.; Stopfer, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Noisy or spontaneous activity is common in neural systems and poses a challenge to detecting and discriminating signals. Here we use the locust to answer fundamental questions about noise in the olfactory system: Where does spontaneous activity originate? How is this activity propagated or reduced throughout multiple stages of neural processing? What mechanisms favor the detection of signals despite the presence of spontaneous activity? We found that spontaneous activity long observed in the secondary projection neurons (PNs) originates almost entirely from the primary olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) rather than from spontaneous circuit interactions in the antennal lobe, and that spontaneous activity in ORNs tonically depolarizes the resting membrane potentials of their target PNs and local neurons (LNs), and indirectly tonically depolarizes tertiary Kenyon cells (KCs). However, because these neurons have different response thresholds, in the absence of odor stimulation, ORNs and PNs display a high spontaneous firing rate but KCs are nearly silent. Finally, we used a simulation of the olfactory network to show that discrimination of signal and noise in the KCs is best when threshold levels are set so that baseline activity in PNs persists. Our results show how the olfactory system benefits from making a signal detection decision after a point of maximal information convergence, e.g., after KCs pool inputs from many PNs. PMID:22357872

  2. Vasoactive intestinal peptide and electrical activity influence neuronal survival

    SciTech Connect

    Brenneman, D.E.; Eiden, L.E.

    1986-02-01

    Blockage of electrical activity in dissociated spinal cord cultures results in a significant loss of neurons during a critical period in development. Decreases in neuronal cell numbers and SVI-labeled tetanus toxin fixation produced by electrical blockage with tetrodotoxin (TTX) were prevented by addition of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) to the nutrient medium. The most effective concentration of VIP was 0.1 nM. At higher concentrations, the survival-enhancing effect of VIP on TTX-treated cultures was attenuated. Addition of the peptide alone had no significant effect on neuronal cell counts or tetanus toxin fixation. With the same experimental conditions, two closely related peptides,more » PHI-27 (peptide, histidyl-isoleucine amide) and secretin, were found not to increase the number of neurons in TTX-treated cultures. Interference with VIP action by VIP antiserum resulted in neuronal losses that were not significantly different from those observed after TTX treatment. These data indicate that under conditions of electrical blockade a neurotrophic action of VIP on neuronal survival can be demonstrated.« less

  3. Simultaneous profiling of activity patterns in multiple neuronal subclasses.

    PubMed

    Parrish, R Ryley; Grady, John; Codadu, Neela K; Trevelyan, Andrew J; Racca, Claudia

    2018-06-01

    Neuronal networks typically comprise heterogeneous populations of neurons. A core objective when seeking to understand such networks, therefore, is to identify what roles these different neuronal classes play. Acquiring single cell electrophysiology data for multiple cell classes can prove to be a large and daunting task. Alternatively, Ca 2+ network imaging provides activity profiles of large numbers of neurons simultaneously, but without distinguishing between cell classes. We therefore developed a strategy for combining cellular electrophysiology, Ca 2+ network imaging, and immunohistochemistry to provide activity profiles for multiple cell classes at once. This involves cross-referencing easily identifiable landmarks between imaging of the live and fixed tissue, and then using custom MATLAB functions to realign the two imaging data sets, to correct for distortions of the tissue introduced by the fixation or immunohistochemical processing. We illustrate the methodology for analyses of activity profiles during epileptiform events recorded in mouse brain slices. We further demonstrate the activity profile of a population of parvalbumin-positive interneurons prior, during, and following a seizure-like event. Current approaches to Ca 2+ network imaging analyses are severely limited in their ability to subclassify neurons, and often rely on transgenic approaches to identify cell classes. In contrast, our methodology is a generic, affordable, and flexible technique to characterize neuronal behaviour with respect to classification based on morphological and neurochemical identity. We present a new approach for analysing Ca 2+ network imaging datasets, and use this to explore the parvalbumin-positive interneuron activity during epileptiform events. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Theta synchronizes the activity of medial prefrontal neurons during learning

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Rony; Bauer, Elizabeth P.; Paré, Denis

    2008-01-01

    Memory consolidation is thought to involve the gradual transfer of transient hippocampal-dependent traces to distributed neocortical sites via the rhinal cortices. Recently, medial prefrontal (mPFC) neurons were shown to facilitate this process when their activity becomes synchronized. However, the mechanisms underlying this enhanced synchrony remain unclear. Because the hippocampus projects to the mPFC, we tested whether theta oscillations contribute to synchronize mPFC neurons during learning. Thus, we obtained field (LFP) and unit recordings from multiple mPFC sites during the acquisition of a trace-conditioning task, where a visual conditioned stimulus (CS) predicted reward delivery. In quiet waking, the activity of mPFC neurons was modulated by theta oscillations. During conditioning, CS presentation caused an increase in mPFC theta power that augmented as the CS gained predictive value for reward delivery. This increased theta power coincided with a transient theta phase locking at distributed mPFC sites, an effect that was also manifest in the timing of mPFC unit activity. Overall, these results show that theta oscillations contribute to synchronize neuronal activity at distributed mPFC sites, suggesting that the hippocampus, by generating a stronger theta source during learning, can synchronize mPFC activity, in turn facilitating rhinal transfer of its activity to the neocortex. PMID:18612069

  5. Cellular Links between Neuronal Activity and Energy Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Pavan K; Galeffi, Francesca; Turner, Dennis A

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal activity, astrocytic responses to this activity, and energy homeostasis are linked together during baseline, conscious conditions, and short-term rapid activation (as occurs with sensory or motor function). Nervous system energy homeostasis also varies during long-term physiological conditions (i.e., development and aging) and with adaptation to pathological conditions, such as ischemia or low glucose. Neuronal activation requires increased metabolism (i.e., ATP generation) which leads initially to substrate depletion, induction of a variety of signals for enhanced astrocytic function, and increased local blood flow and substrate delivery. Energy generation (particularly in mitochondria) and use during ATP hydrolysis also lead to considerable heat generation. The local increases in blood flow noted following neuronal activation can both enhance local substrate delivery but also provides a heat sink to help cool the brain and removal of waste by-products. In this review we highlight the interactions between short-term neuronal activity and energy metabolism with an emphasis on signals and factors regulating astrocyte function and substrate supply.

  6. Neuronal activity during development: permissive or instructive?

    PubMed

    Crair, M C

    1999-02-01

    Experimental studies over the past year have shown that neural activity has a range of effects on the development of neural pathways. Although activity appears unimportant for establishing many aspects of the gross morphology and topology of the brain, there are many cases where the presence of neural activity is essential for the formation of a mature system of neural connections; in some instances, the pattern of neural activity actually orchestrates the final arrangement of neural connections.

  7. Automated system for analyzing the activity of individual neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankman, Isaac N.; Johnson, Kenneth O.; Menkes, Alex M.; Diamond, Steve D.; Oshaughnessy, David M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a signal processing system that: (1) provides an efficient and reliable instrument for investigating the activity of neuronal assemblies in the brain; and (2) demonstrates the feasibility of generating the command signals of prostheses using the activity of relevant neurons in disabled subjects. The system operates online, in a fully automated manner and can recognize the transient waveforms of several neurons in extracellular neurophysiological recordings. Optimal algorithms for detection, classification, and resolution of overlapping waveforms are developed and evaluated. Full automation is made possible by an algorithm that can set appropriate decision thresholds and an algorithm that can generate templates on-line. The system is implemented with a fast IBM PC compatible processor board that allows on-line operation.

  8. Amyloid precursor protein controls cholesterol turnover needed for neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Pierrot, Nathalie; Tyteca, Donatienne; D'auria, Ludovic; Dewachter, Ilse; Gailly, Philippe; Hendrickx, Aurélie; Tasiaux, Bernadette; Haylani, Laetitia El; Muls, Nathalie; N'Kuli, Francisca; Laquerrière, Annie; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; Campion, Dominique; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Courtoy, Pierre J; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; Octave, Jean-Noël

    2013-01-01

    Perturbation of lipid metabolism favours progression of Alzheimer disease, in which processing of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) has important implications. APP cleavage is tightly regulated by cholesterol and APP fragments regulate lipid homeostasis. Here, we investigated whether up or down regulation of full-length APP expression affected neuronal lipid metabolism. Expression of APP decreased HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR)-mediated cholesterol biosynthesis and SREBP mRNA levels, while its down regulation had opposite effects. APP and SREBP1 co-immunoprecipitated and co-localized in the Golgi. This interaction prevented Site-2 protease-mediated processing of SREBP1, leading to inhibition of transcription of its target genes. A GXXXG motif in APP sequence was critical for regulation of HMGCR expression. In astrocytes, APP and SREBP1 did not interact nor did APP affect cholesterol biosynthesis. Neuronal expression of APP decreased both HMGCR and cholesterol 24-hydroxylase mRNA levels and consequently cholesterol turnover, leading to inhibition of neuronal activity, which was rescued by geranylgeraniol, generated in the mevalonate pathway, in both APP expressing and mevastatin treated neurons. We conclude that APP controls cholesterol turnover needed for neuronal activity. PMID:23554170

  9. Neuronal activity in somatosensory cortex related to tactile exploration

    PubMed Central

    Fortier-Poisson, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The very light contact forces (∼0.60 N) applied by the fingertips during tactile exploration reveal a clearly optimized sensorimotor strategy. To investigate the cortical mechanisms involved with this behavior, we recorded 230 neurons in the somatosensory cortex (S1), as two monkeys scanned different surfaces with the fingertips in search of a tactile target without visual feedback. During the exploration, the monkeys, like humans, carefully controlled the finger forces. High-friction surfaces offering greater tangential shear force resistance to the skin were associated with decreased normal contact forces. The activity of one group of neurons was modulated with either the normal or tangential force, with little or no influence from the orthogonal force component. A second group responded to kinetic friction or the ratio of tangential to normal forces rather than responding to a specific parameter, such as force magnitude or direction. A third group of S1 neurons appeared to respond to particular vectors of normal and tangential force on the skin. Although 45 neurons correlated with scanning speed, 32 were also modulated by finger forces, suggesting that forces on the finger should be considered as the primary parameter encoding the skin compliance and that finger speed is a secondary parameter that co-varies with finger forces. Neurons (102) were also tested with different textures, and the activity of 62 of these increased or decreased in relation to the surface friction. PMID:26467519

  10. Activity of Raphé Serotonergic Neurons Controls Emotional Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Teissier, Anne; Chemiakine, Alexei; Inbar, Benjamin; Bagchi, Sneha; Ray, Russell S; Palmiter, Richard D; Dymecki, Susan M; Moore, Holly; Ansorge, Mark S

    2015-12-01

    Despite the well-established role of serotonin signaling in mood regulation, causal relationships between serotonergic neuronal activity and behavior remain poorly understood. Using a pharmacogenetic approach, we find that selectively increasing serotonergic neuronal activity in wild-type mice is anxiogenic and reduces floating in the forced-swim test, whereas inhibition has no effect on the same measures. In a developmental mouse model of altered emotional behavior, increased anxiety and depression-like behaviors correlate with reduced dorsal raphé and increased median raphé serotonergic activity. These mice display blunted responses to serotonergic stimulation and behavioral rescues through serotonergic inhibition. Furthermore, we identify opposing consequences of dorsal versus median raphé serotonergic neuron inhibition on floating behavior, together suggesting that median raphé hyperactivity increases anxiety, whereas a low dorsal/median raphé serotonergic activity ratio increases depression-like behavior. Thus, we find a critical role of serotonergic neuronal activity in emotional regulation and uncover opposing roles of median and dorsal raphé function. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Spontaneous neuronal activity as a self-organized critical phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Arcangelis, L.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal avalanches are a novel mode of activity in neuronal networks, experimentally found in vitro and in vivo, and exhibit a robust critical behaviour. Avalanche activity can be modelled within the self-organized criticality framework, including threshold firing, refractory period and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. The size and duration distributions confirm that the system acts in a critical state, whose scaling behaviour is very robust. Next, we discuss the temporal organization of neuronal avalanches. This is given by the alternation between states of high and low activity, named up and down states, leading to a balance between excitation and inhibition controlled by a single parameter. During these periods both the single neuron state and the network excitability level, keeping memory of past activity, are tuned by homeostatic mechanisms. Finally, we verify if a system with no characteristic response can ever learn in a controlled and reproducible way. Learning in the model occurs via plastic adaptation of synaptic strengths by a non-uniform negative feedback mechanism. Learning is a truly collective process and the learning dynamics exhibits universal features. Even complex rules can be learned provided that the plastic adaptation is sufficiently slow.

  12. Enhanced conversion of induced neuronal cells (iN cells) from human fibroblasts: utility in uncovering cellular deficits in mental illness-associated chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Eleonora; Wilson, Ashley M.; Primerano, Amedeo; Kondo, Mari A.; Sengupta, Srona; Srivastava, Rupali; Koga, Minori; Obie, Cassandra; Zandi, Peter P.; Goes, Fernando S.; Valle, David; Rapoport, Judith L.; Sawa, Akira; Kano, Shin-ichi; Ishizuka, Koko

    2016-01-01

    The novel technology of induced neuronal cells (iN cells) is promising for translational neuroscience, as it allows the conversion of human fibroblasts into cells with postmitotic neuronal traits. However, a major technical barrier is the low conversion rate. To overcome this problem, we optimized the conversion media. Using our improved formulation, we studied how major mental illness-associated chromosomal abnormalities may impact the characteristics of iN cells. We demonstrated that our new iN cell culture protocol enabled us to obtain more precise measurement of neuronal cellular phenotypes than previous iN cell methods. Thus, this iN cell culture provides a platform to efficiently obtain possible cellular phenotypes caused by genetic differences, which can be more thoroughly studied in research using other human cell models such as induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26260244

  13. Computational implications of activity-dependent neuronal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Mark Steven

    Synapses, the connections between neurons, often fail to transmit a large percentage of the action potentials that they receive. I describe several models of synaptic transmission at a single stochastic synapse with an activity-dependent probability of transmission and demonstrate how synaptic transmission failures may increase the efficiency with which a synapse transmits information. Spike trains in the visual cortex of freely viewing monkeys have positive auto correlations that are indicative of a redundant representation of the information they contain. I show how a synapse with activity-dependent transmission failures modeled after those occurring in visual cortical synapses can remove this redundancy by transmitting a decorrelated subset of the spike trains it receives. I suggest that redundancy reduction at individual synapses saves synaptic resources while increasing the sensitivity of the postsynaptic neuron to information arriving along many inputs. For a neuron receiving input from many decorrelating synapses, my analysis leads to a prediction of the number of visual inputs to a neuron and the cross-correlations between these inputs and suggests that the time scale of synaptic dynamics observed in sensory areas corresponds to a fundamental time scale for processing sensory information. Systems with activity-dependent changes in their parameters, or plasticity, often display a wide variability in their individual components that belies the stability of their function, Motivated by experiments demonstrating that identified neurons with stereotyped function can have a large variability in the densities of their ion channels, or ionic conductances, I build a conductance-based model of a single neuron. The neuron's firing activity is relatively insensitive to changes in certain combinations of conductances, but markedly sensitive to changes in other combinations. Using a combined modeling and experimental approach, I show that neuromodulators and regulatory

  14. Intracellularly applied anti-P70 antibody blocks the induction of abnormal membrane properties by pentylenetetrazole in identified Euhadra neurons.

    PubMed

    Onozuka, M; Watanabe, K

    1996-04-15

    Using the voltage-clamp technique combined with pressure injection, we have studied the action of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) on identified Euhadra neurons by examining how the PTZ-induced changes in membrane properties are affected by an antibody against P70, a protein found in the experimentally-induced epileptogenic cortex of rats. Intracellular injection of anti-P70 antibody blocked the induction by PTZ; bursting activity with both of development of negative slope resistance region in the steady state 1-V curve and a reduction in the delayed outward potassium current. These results suggest a novel mechanism of action for PTZ, involving intracellular protein(s) which react with anti-P70 antibody.

  15. Methylphenidate modulates dorsal raphe neuronal activity: Behavioral and neuronal recordings from adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Kharas, Natasha; Whitt, Holly; Reyes-Vasquez, Cruz; Dafny, Nachum

    2017-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is a widely prescribed psychostimulants used for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD). Unlike the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamine, MPD does not exhibit direct actions on the serotonin transporter, however there is evidence suggesting that the therapeutic effects of MPD may be mediated in part by alterations in serotonin transmission. This study aimed to investigate the role of the dorsal raphe (DR) nucleus, one of the major sources of serotonergic innervation in the mammalian brain, in the response to MPD exposure. Freely behaving adolescent rats previously implanted bilaterally with permanent electrodes were used. An open field assay and a wireless neuronal recording system were used to concomitantly record behavioral and DR electrophysiological activity following acute and chronic MPD exposure. Four groups were used: one control (saline) and three experimental groups treated with 0.6, 2.5, and 10.0mg/kg MPD respectively. Animals received daily MPD or saline injections on experimental days 1-6, followed by 3 washout days and MPD rechallenge dose on experimental day (ED)10. The same chronic dose of MPD resulted in either behavioral sensitization or tolerance, and we found that neuronal activity recorded from the DR neuronal units of rats expressing behavioral sensitization to chronic MPD exposure responded significantly differently to MPD rechallenge on ED10 compared to the DR unit activity recorded from animals that expressed behavioral tolerance. This correlation between behavioral response and DR neuronal activity following chronic MPD exposure provides evidence that the DR is involved in the acute effects as well as the chronic effects of MPD in adolescent rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nucleus Ambiguus Cholinergic Neurons Activated by Acupuncture: Relation to Enkephalin

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhi-Ling; Li, Min; Longhurst, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Acupuncture regulates autonomic function. Our previous studies have shown that electroacupuncture (EA) at the Jianshi–Neiguan acupoints (P5–P6, underlying the median nerve) inhibits central sympathetic outflow and attenuates excitatory cardiovascular reflexes, in part, through an opioid mechanism. It is unknown if EA at these acupoints influences the parasympathetic system. Thus, using c-Fos expression, we examined activation of nucleus ambiguus (NAmb) neurons by EA, their relation to cholinergic (preganglionic parasympathetic) neurons and those containing enkephalin. To enhance detection of cell bodies containing enkephalin, colchicine (90–100 μg/kg) was administered into the subarachnoid space of cats 30 hr prior to EA or sham-operated controls for EA. Following bilateral barodenervation and cervical vagotomy, either EA for 30 min at P5–P6 acupoints or control stimulation (needle placement at P5–P6 without stimulation) was applied. While perikarya containing enkephalin were observed in some medullary nuclei (e.g., râphe), only enkephalin-containing neuronal processes were found in the NAmb. Compared to controls (n=4), more c-Fos immunoreactivity, located principally in close proximity to fibers containing enkephalin was noted in the NAmb of EA-treated cats (n=5; P<0.01). Moreover, neurons double-labeled with c-Fos and choline acetyltransferase in the NAmb were identified in EA-treated, but not the control animals. These data demonstrate for the first time that EA activates preganglionic parasympathetic neurons in the NAmb. Because of their close proximity, these EA-activated neurons likely interact with nerve fibers containing enkephalin. These results suggest that EA at the P5–P6 acupoints has the potential to influence parasympathetic outflow and cardiovascular function, likely through an enkephalinergic mechanism. PMID:22306033

  17. Astrocytic Activation Generates De Novo Neuronal Potentiation and Memory Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Adamsky, Adar; Kol, Adi; Kreisel, Tirzah; Doron, Adi; Ozeri-Engelhard, Nofar; Melcer, Talia; Refaeli, Ron; Horn, Henrike; Regev, Limor; Groysman, Maya; London, Michael; Goshen, Inbal

    2018-05-18

    Astrocytes respond to neuronal activity and were shown to be necessary for plasticity and memory. To test whether astrocytic activity is also sufficient to generate synaptic potentiation and enhance memory, we expressed the Gq-coupled receptor hM3Dq in CA1 astrocytes, allowing their activation by a designer drug. We discovered that astrocytic activation is not only necessary for synaptic plasticity, but also sufficient to induce NMDA-dependent de novo long-term potentiation in the hippocampus that persisted after astrocytic activation ceased. In vivo, astrocytic activation enhanced memory allocation; i.e., it increased neuronal activity in a task-specific way only when coupled with learning, but not in home-caged mice. Furthermore, astrocytic activation using either a chemogenetic or an optogenetic tool during acquisition resulted in memory recall enhancement on the following day. Conversely, directly increasing neuronal activity resulted in dramatic memory impairment. Our findings that astrocytes induce plasticity and enhance memory may have important clinical implications for cognitive augmentation treatments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pseudorabies Virus Infection Alters Neuronal Activity and Connectivity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Kelly M.; Tank, David W.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-herpesviruses, including human herpes simplex virus 1 & 2, varicella zoster virus and the swine pseudorabies virus (PRV), infect the peripheral nervous system of their hosts. Symptoms of infection often include itching, numbness, or pain indicative of altered neurological function. To determine if there is an in vitro electrophysiological correlate to these characteristic in vivo symptoms, we infected cultured rat sympathetic neurons with well-characterized strains of PRV known to produce virulent or attenuated symptoms in animals. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made at various times after infection. By 8 hours of infection with virulent PRV, action potential (AP) firing rates increased substantially and were accompanied by hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials and spikelet-like events. Coincident with the increase in AP firing rate, adjacent neurons exhibited coupled firing events, first with AP-spikelets and later with near identical resting membrane potentials and AP firing. Small fusion pores between adjacent cell bodies formed early after infection as demonstrated by transfer of the low molecular weight dye, Lucifer Yellow. Later, larger pores formed as demonstrated by transfer of high molecular weight Texas red-dextran conjugates between infected cells. Further evidence for viral-induced fusion pores was obtained by infecting neurons with a viral mutant defective for glycoprotein B, a component of the viral membrane fusion complex. These infected neurons were essentially identical to mock infected neurons: no increased AP firing, no spikelet-like events, and no electrical or dye transfer. Infection with PRV Bartha, an attenuated circuit-tracing strain delayed, but did not eliminate the increased neuronal activity and coupling events. We suggest that formation of fusion pores between infected neurons results in electrical coupling and elevated firing rates, and that these processes may contribute to the altered neural function seen in PRV

  19. A frightening thought: Neuronal activity enhances tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Emily G; Sontheimer, Harald

    2015-08-01

    Stem cells present in the adult brain are regulated by neuronal activity; malignant gliomas, which most likely originate from this population of cells, could also be regulated in this manner. A recent study by Venkatesh et al. published in Cell has identified Neuroligin-3 (NLGN3) as a mitogen promoting high-grade glioma growth.

  20. BAD and KATP channels regulate neuron excitability and epileptiform activity.

    PubMed

    Martínez-François, Juan Ramón; Fernández-Agüera, María Carmen; Nathwani, Nidhi; Lahmann, Carolina; Burnham, Veronica L; Danial, Nika N; Yellen, Gary

    2018-01-25

    Brain metabolism can profoundly influence neuronal excitability. Mice with genetic deletion or alteration of Bad ( B CL-2 a gonist of cell d eath) exhibit altered brain-cell fuel metabolism, accompanied by resistance to acutely induced epileptic seizures; this seizure protection is mediated by ATP-sensitive potassium (K ATP ) channels. Here we investigated the effect of BAD manipulation on K ATP channel activity and excitability in acute brain slices. We found that BAD's influence on neuronal K ATP channels was cell-autonomous and directly affected dentate granule neuron (DGN) excitability. To investigate the role of neuronal K ATP channels in the anticonvulsant effects of BAD, we imaged calcium during picrotoxin-induced epileptiform activity in entorhinal-hippocampal slices. BAD knockout reduced epileptiform activity, and this effect was lost upon knockout or pharmacological inhibition of K ATP channels. Targeted BAD knockout in DGNs alone was sufficient for the antiseizure effect in slices, consistent with a 'dentate gate' function that is reinforced by increased K ATP channel activity. © 2018, Martínez-François et al.

  1. Theta Synchronizes the Activity of Medial Prefrontal Neurons during Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paz, Rony; Bauer, Elizabeth P.; Pare, Denis

    2008-01-01

    Memory consolidation is thought to involve the gradual transfer of transient hippocampal-dependent traces to distributed neocortical sites via the rhinal cortices. Recently, medial prefrontal (mPFC) neurons were shown to facilitate this process when their activity becomes synchronized. However, the mechanisms underlying this enhanced synchrony…

  2. BAD and KATP channels regulate neuron excitability and epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Agüera, María Carmen; Nathwani, Nidhi; Lahmann, Carolina; Burnham, Veronica L

    2018-01-01

    Brain metabolism can profoundly influence neuronal excitability. Mice with genetic deletion or alteration of Bad (BCL-2 agonist of cell death) exhibit altered brain-cell fuel metabolism, accompanied by resistance to acutely induced epileptic seizures; this seizure protection is mediated by ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. Here we investigated the effect of BAD manipulation on KATP channel activity and excitability in acute brain slices. We found that BAD’s influence on neuronal KATP channels was cell-autonomous and directly affected dentate granule neuron (DGN) excitability. To investigate the role of neuronal KATP channels in the anticonvulsant effects of BAD, we imaged calcium during picrotoxin-induced epileptiform activity in entorhinal-hippocampal slices. BAD knockout reduced epileptiform activity, and this effect was lost upon knockout or pharmacological inhibition of KATP channels. Targeted BAD knockout in DGNs alone was sufficient for the antiseizure effect in slices, consistent with a ‘dentate gate’ function that is reinforced by increased KATP channel activity. PMID:29368690

  3. Scaling of Brain Metabolism with a Fixed Energy Budget per Neuron: Implications for Neuronal Activity, Plasticity and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2011-01-01

    It is usually considered that larger brains have larger neurons, which consume more energy individually, and are therefore accompanied by a larger number of glial cells per neuron. These notions, however, have never been tested. Based on glucose and oxygen metabolic rates in awake animals and their recently determined numbers of neurons, here I show that, contrary to the expected, the estimated glucose use per neuron is remarkably constant, varying only by 40% across the six species of rodents and primates (including humans). The estimated average glucose use per neuron does not correlate with neuronal density in any structure. This suggests that the energy budget of the whole brain per neuron is fixed across species and brain sizes, such that total glucose use by the brain as a whole, by the cerebral cortex and also by the cerebellum alone are linear functions of the number of neurons in the structures across the species (although the average glucose consumption per neuron is at least 10× higher in the cerebral cortex than in the cerebellum). These results indicate that the apparently remarkable use in humans of 20% of the whole body energy budget by a brain that represents only 2% of body mass is explained simply by its large number of neurons. Because synaptic activity is considered the major determinant of metabolic cost, a conserved energy budget per neuron has several profound implications for synaptic homeostasis and the regulation of firing rates, synaptic plasticity, brain imaging, pathologies, and for brain scaling in evolution. PMID:21390261

  4. Scaling of brain metabolism with a fixed energy budget per neuron: implications for neuronal activity, plasticity and evolution.

    PubMed

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2011-03-01

    It is usually considered that larger brains have larger neurons, which consume more energy individually, and are therefore accompanied by a larger number of glial cells per neuron. These notions, however, have never been tested. Based on glucose and oxygen metabolic rates in awake animals and their recently determined numbers of neurons, here I show that, contrary to the expected, the estimated glucose use per neuron is remarkably constant, varying only by 40% across the six species of rodents and primates (including humans). The estimated average glucose use per neuron does not correlate with neuronal density in any structure. This suggests that the energy budget of the whole brain per neuron is fixed across species and brain sizes, such that total glucose use by the brain as a whole, by the cerebral cortex and also by the cerebellum alone are linear functions of the number of neurons in the structures across the species (although the average glucose consumption per neuron is at least 10× higher in the cerebral cortex than in the cerebellum). These results indicate that the apparently remarkable use in humans of 20% of the whole body energy budget by a brain that represents only 2% of body mass is explained simply by its large number of neurons. Because synaptic activity is considered the major determinant of metabolic cost, a conserved energy budget per neuron has several profound implications for synaptic homeostasis and the regulation of firing rates, synaptic plasticity, brain imaging, pathologies, and for brain scaling in evolution.

  5. Activating STAT3 Alpha for Promoting Healing of Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Greg

    2008-01-01

    A method of promoting healing of injured or diseased neurons involves pharmacological activation of the STAT3 alpha protein. Usually, injured or diseased neurons heal incompletely or not at all for two reasons: (1) they are susceptible to apoptosis (cell death); and (2) they fail to engage in axogenesis that is, they fail to re-extend their axons to their original targets (e.g., muscles or other neurons) because of insufficiency of compounds, denoted neurotrophic factors, needed to stimulate such extension. The present method (see figure) of treatment takes advantage of prior research findings to the effect that the STAT3 alpha protein has anti-apoptotic and pro-axogenic properties.

  6. Activity patterns of serotonin neurons underlying cognitive flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Matias, Sara; Lottem, Eran; Dugué, Guillaume P; Mainen, Zachary F

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin is implicated in mood and affective disorders. However, growing evidence suggests that a core endogenous role is to promote flexible adaptation to changes in the causal structure of the environment, through behavioral inhibition and enhanced plasticity. We used long-term photometric recordings in mice to study a population of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons, whose activity we could link to normal reversal learning using pharmacogenetics. We found that these neurons are activated by both positive and negative prediction errors, and thus report signals similar to those proposed to promote learning in conditions of uncertainty. Furthermore, by comparing the cue responses of serotonin and dopamine neurons, we found differences in learning rates that could explain the importance of serotonin in inhibiting perseverative responding. Our findings show how the activity patterns of serotonin neurons support a role in cognitive flexibility, and suggest a revised model of dopamine–serotonin opponency with potential clinical implications. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20552.001 PMID:28322190

  7. Abnormal turning behaviour, GABAergic inhibition and the degeneration of astrocytes in ovine Tribulus terrestris motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Bourke, C A

    2006-01-01

    To observe the clinical signs of sheep affected by Tribulus terrestris motor neuron disease, to ascertain their response to striatal dopamine reducing drugs, and to examine their brains and spinal cords for microscopic changes. Twenty-eight sheep displaying well developed clinical signs of the disorder were observed. Twenty-two of these and 22 normal sheep were then randomly allocated to three groups and treated with diazepam, chlorpromazine, or xylazine. The time that it took an animal to return to a standing position following drug administration was recorded. The brain and complete spinal cord were removed from each of the other six affected sheep and fixed in formalin. Brains were sectioned throughout at 5 mm intervals and spinal cords at 10 mm intervals. All tissues were paraffin embedded and examined by light microscopy. A few samples were examined by electron microscopy. Clinical signs included postural asymmetry with a right:left body-side dominance within the group of 50:50, unequal flaccid paresis in the pelvic limbs, extensor muscle atrophy and adduction of the weaker pelvic limb, and concurrent abduction of the stronger. Forward motion followed either a fixed left or right hand curved trajectory, the sheep no longer being able to choose which. Twelve animals intermittently displayed rotational behaviour that involved loss of postural balance without locomotor activation. The administration of diazepam, chlorpromazine, or xylazine caused limb paresis and sedation, with affected sheep being slower than normal sheep by factors of 8, 3 and 2 respectively, to return to a standing position. There were scattered areas of mild Wallerian degeneration throughout the spinal cord, and in both the brain and the cord there were small numbers of degenerate astrocytes containing novel cytoplasmic pigment granules. Affected sheep had a dysfunction in the control of directional change and this provides a new insight into the normal mechanism for 'turning' in quadrupeds

  8. Abnormal neuronal response to rectal and anal stimuli in patients treated with primary radiotherapy for anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Haas, Susanne; Faaborg, Pia; Gram, Mikkel; Lundby, Lilli; Brock, Christina; Drewes, Anbjørn M; Laurberg, Søren; Krogh, Klaus; Christensen, Peter

    2018-04-26

    Sphincter-sparing radiotherapy or chemoradiation (RT/CRT) have become the standard treatments for most patients with anal cancer. Unfortunately, long-term survivors often suffer from severe bowel symptoms indicating sensory dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to characterize the sensory pathways of the brain-gut axis after radiotherapy for anal cancer. Cortical evoked potentials (CEPs) were recorded during repeated, rapid balloon distensions of the rectum and anal canal in 13 patients with anal cancer treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiation and in 17 healthy volunteers. Latencies and amplitudes of rectal CEPs were compared between the groups. CEPs from both rectal and anal distensions were examined using single sweep spectral band analysis to determine the relative amplitude of five spectral bands as a proxy of neuronal processing. Groups were comparable by age (62.4 ± 7.8 vs 58.9 ± 8.9, p < 0.32) and gender. Patients had a mean Wexner fecal incontinence score of 5.5 (±3.8) and median LARS Score of 29 (0-39). Rectal CEP latencies were prolonged in patients (F = 11.7; p < 0.001), whereas amplitudes were similar (F = 0.003; p = 0.96). Spectral analysis of CEPs from rectal distensions showed significant differences between groups in theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), beta (12-32 Hz) and gamma (32-70 Hz) bands (all p < 0.001) and CEPs from anal distensions showed significant differences in the alpha, beta and gamma bands (all p ≤ 0.002). Patients treated with RT/CRT for anal cancer have impaired ano-rectal sensory pathways and abnormal cortical processing. This may play a central role for the pathogenesis of late proctopathy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nitrergic ventro-medial medullary neurons activated during cholinergically induced active (REM) sleep in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Pose, Inés; Sampogna, Sharon; Chase, Michael H.; Morales, Francisco R.

    2010-01-01

    The rostral ventro-medial medullary reticular formation is a complex structure that is involved with a variety of motor functions. It contains glycinergic neurons that are activated during active (REM) sleep (AS); these neurons appear to be responsible for the postsynaptic inhibition of motoneurons that occurs during this state. We have reported that neurons in this same region contain nitric oxide (NO) synthase and that they innervate brainstem motor pools. In the present study we examined the c-fos expression of these neurons after carbachol-induced active sleep (C-AS). Three control and four experimental cats were employed to identify c-fos expressing nitrergic neurons using immunocytochemical techniques to detect the Fos protein together with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) or NADPH-diaphorase activity. The classical neurotransmitter content of the nitrergic cells in this region was examined through the combination of immunocytochemical techniques for the detection of glutamate, glycine, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), tyrosine hydroxilase (TH) or GABA together with nNOS. During C-AS, there was a 1074% increase in the number of nitrergic neurons that expressed c-fos. These neurons did not contain glycine, ChAT, TH or GABA, but a subpopulation (15%) of them displayed glutamate-like immunoreactivity. Therefore, some of these neurons contain both an excitatory neurotransmitter (glutamate) and an excitatory neuromodulator (NO); the neurotransmitter content of the rest of them remains to be determined. Because some of the nitrergic neurons innervate brainstem motoneurons it is possible that they participate in the generation of tonic and excitatory phasic motor events that occur during AS. We also suggest that these nitrergic neurons may be involved in autonomic regulation during this state. In addition, because NO has trophic effects on target neurons, the present findings represent the first, albeit indirect, evidence for a possible trophic function of

  10. Human Temporal Cortical Single Neuron Activity During Working Memory Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Zamora, Leona; Corina, David; Ojemann, George

    2016-01-01

    The Working Memory model of human memory, first introduced by Baddeley and Hitch (1974), has been one of the most influential psychological constructs in cognitive psychology and human neuroscience. However the neuronal correlates of core components of this model have yet to be fully elucidated. Here we present data from two studies where human temporal cortical single neuron activity was recorded during tasks differentially affecting the maintenance component of verbal working memory. In Study One we vary the presence or absence of distracting items for the entire period of memory storage. In Study Two we vary the duration of storage so that distractors filled all, or only one-third of the time the memory was stored. Extracellular single neuron recordings were obtained from 36 subjects undergoing awake temporal lobe resections for epilepsy, 25 in Study one, 11 in Study two. Recordings were obtained from a total of 166 lateral temporal cortex neurons during performance of one of these two tasks, 86 study one, 80 study two. Significant changes in activity with distractor manipulation were present in 74 of these neurons (45%), 38 Study one, 36 Study two. In 48 (65%) of those there was increased activity during the period when distracting items were absent, 26 Study One, 22 Study Two. The magnitude of this increase was greater for Study One, 47.6%, than Study Two, 8.1%, paralleling the reduction in memory errors in the absence of distracters, for Study One of 70.3%, Study Two 26.3% These findings establish that human lateral temporal cortex is part of the neural system for working memory, with activity during maintenance of that memory that parallels performance, suggesting it represents active rehearsal. In 31 of these neurons (65%) this activity was an extension of that during working memory encoding that differed significantly from the neural processes recorded during overt and silent language tasks without a recent memory component, 17 Study one, 14 Study two

  11. Direct evidence for activity-dependent glucose phosphorylation in neurons with implications for the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anant B; Lai, James C K; Chowdhury, Golam M I; Hyder, Fahmeed; Rothman, Douglas L; Shulman, Robert G; Behar, Kevin L

    2014-04-08

    Previous (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments have shown that over a wide range of neuronal activity, approximately one molecule of glucose is oxidized for every molecule of glutamate released by neurons and recycled through astrocytic glutamine. The measured kinetics were shown to agree with the stoichiometry of a hypothetical astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle model, which predicted negligible functional neuronal uptake of glucose. To test this model, we measured the uptake and phosphorylation of glucose in nerve terminals isolated from rats infused with the glucose analog, 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) in vivo. The concentrations of phosphorylated FDG (FDG6P), normalized with respect to known neuronal metabolites, were compared in nerve terminals, homogenate, and cortex of anesthetized rats with and without bicuculline-induced seizures. The increase in FDG6P in nerve terminals agreed well with the increase in cortical neuronal glucose oxidation measured previously under the same conditions in vivo, indicating that direct uptake and oxidation of glucose in nerve terminals is substantial under resting and activated conditions. These results suggest that neuronal glucose-derived pyruvate is the major oxidative fuel for activated neurons, not lactate-derived from astrocytes, contradicting predictions of the original astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle model under the range of study conditions.

  12. Direct evidence for activity-dependent glucose phosphorylation in neurons with implications for the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anant B.; Lai, James C. K.; Chowdhury, Golam M. I.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Rothman, Douglas L.; Shulman, Robert G.; Behar, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Previous 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments have shown that over a wide range of neuronal activity, approximately one molecule of glucose is oxidized for every molecule of glutamate released by neurons and recycled through astrocytic glutamine. The measured kinetics were shown to agree with the stoichiometry of a hypothetical astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle model, which predicted negligible functional neuronal uptake of glucose. To test this model, we measured the uptake and phosphorylation of glucose in nerve terminals isolated from rats infused with the glucose analog, 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) in vivo. The concentrations of phosphorylated FDG (FDG6P), normalized with respect to known neuronal metabolites, were compared in nerve terminals, homogenate, and cortex of anesthetized rats with and without bicuculline-induced seizures. The increase in FDG6P in nerve terminals agreed well with the increase in cortical neuronal glucose oxidation measured previously under the same conditions in vivo, indicating that direct uptake and oxidation of glucose in nerve terminals is substantial under resting and activated conditions. These results suggest that neuronal glucose-derived pyruvate is the major oxidative fuel for activated neurons, not lactate-derived from astrocytes, contradicting predictions of the original astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle model under the range of study conditions. PMID:24706914

  13. Sonic hedgehog pathway activation increases mitochondrial abundance and activity in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Pamela J.; Manor, Uri; Petralia, Ronald S.; Brose, Rebecca D.; Wu, Ryan T. Y.; Ott, Carolyn; Wang, Ya-Xian; Charnoff, Ari; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Mattson, Mark P.

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles whose biogenesis, structure, and function are regulated by many signaling pathways. We present evidence that, in hippocampal neurons, activation of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway affects multiple aspects of mitochondria. Mitochondrial mass was increased significantly in neurons treated with Shh. Using biochemical and fluorescence imaging analyses, we show that Shh signaling activity reduces mitochondrial fission and promotes mitochondrial elongation, at least in part, via suppression of the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-like GTPase Drp1. Mitochondria from Shh-treated neurons were more electron-dense, as revealed by electron microscopy, and had higher membrane potential and respiratory activity. We further show that Shh protects neurons against a variety of stresses, including the mitochondrial poison rotenone, amyloid β-peptide, hydrogen peroxide, and high levels of glutamate. Collectively our data suggest a link between Shh pathway activity and the physiological properties of mitochondria in hippocampal neurons. PMID:27932496

  14. Activity of nigral dopaminergic neurons after lesion of the neostriatum in rats.

    PubMed

    Doudet, D; Gross, C; Seal, J; Bioulac, B

    1984-06-04

    As shown by post-mortem analysis the major neuropathological trait of Huntington's chorea is a degeneration of the intrinsic neurons of the neostriatum (caudate nucleus and putamen). Such a situation can be reproduced by a destruction of the neostriatum by kainic acid. When injected into the caudate nucleus this excitatory amino acid destroys the intrinsic neurons of the neostriatum and spares fairly well the passing fibers. In the present work, we have chosen to examine the influence of neostriatal destruction on the activity of identified dopaminergic cells in the pars compacta of the substantia nigra. As a key element in the nigro-neostriato-nigral loop, this structure is a relevant site for observing the functional effects of neostriatal lesion. Our research hypothesis was based on the generally accepted view that the suppression of the important neostriato-nigral pathway and in particular the inhibitory GABAergic contingent, could generate a hyperactivity of nigral dopaminergic cells. One may therefore consider that the dopaminergic hyperactivity produces abnormal messages which can influence via several pathways the motoneurons, and which participates in the genesis of the hyperkinetic movements characteristic of chorea. After destruction of the neostriatum, we have shown that the pattern of discharge of most identified nigral dopaminergic neurons becomes greatly disorganized. This drastic change in the pattern of activity cannot be interpreted as the simple 'lift of a brake' on these cells by the suppression of the inhibitory GABAergic striato-nigral tract.

  15. Ectopic Expression of Nolz-1 in Neural Progenitors Promotes Cell Cycle Exit/Premature Neuronal Differentiation Accompanying with Abnormal Apoptosis in the Developing Mouse Telencephalon

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sunny Li-Yun; Chen, Shih-Yun; Huang, Huai-Huei; Ko, Hsin-An; Liu, Pei-Tsen; Liu, Ya-Chi; Chen, Ping-Hau; Liu, Fu-Chin

    2013-01-01

    Nolz-1, as a murine member of the NET zinc-finger protein family, is expressed in post-mitotic differentiating neurons of striatum during development. To explore the function of Nolz-1 in regulating the neurogenesis of forebrain, we studied the effects of ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors. We generated the Cre-loxP dependent conditional transgenic mice in which Nolz-1 was ectopically expressed in proliferative neural progenitors. Ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors by intercrossing the Nolz-1 conditional transgenic mice with the nestin-Cre mice resulted in hypoplasia of telencephalon in double transgenic mice. Decreased proliferation of neural progenitor cells were found in the telencephalon, as evidenced by the reduction of BrdU−, Ki67− and phospho-histone 3-positive cells in E11.5–12.5 germinal zone of telencephalon. Transgenic Nolz-1 also promoted cell cycle exit and as a consequence might facilitate premature differentiation of progenitors, because TuJ1-positive neurons were ectopically found in the ventricular zone and there was a general increase of TuJ1 immunoreactivity in the telencephalon. Moreover, clusters of strong TuJ1-expressing neurons were present in E12.5 germinal zone. Some of these strong TuJ1-positive clusters, however, contained apoptotic condensed DNA, suggesting that inappropriate premature differentiation may lead to abnormal apoptosis in some progenitor cells. Consistent with the transgenic mouse analysis in vivo, similar effects of Nozl-1 over-expression in induction of apoptosis, inhibition of cell proliferation and promotion of neuronal differentiation were also observed in three different N18, ST14A and N2A neural cell lines in vitro. Taken together, our study indicates that ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors promotes cell cycle exit/premature neuronal differentiation and induces abnormal apoptosis in the developing telencephalon. PMID:24073229

  16. Ectopic expression of nolz-1 in neural progenitors promotes cell cycle exit/premature neuronal differentiation accompanying with abnormal apoptosis in the developing mouse telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sunny Li-Yun; Chen, Shih-Yun; Huang, Huai-Huei; Ko, Hsin-An; Liu, Pei-Tsen; Liu, Ya-Chi; Chen, Ping-Hau; Liu, Fu-Chin

    2013-01-01

    Nolz-1, as a murine member of the NET zinc-finger protein family, is expressed in post-mitotic differentiating neurons of striatum during development. To explore the function of Nolz-1 in regulating the neurogenesis of forebrain, we studied the effects of ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors. We generated the Cre-loxP dependent conditional transgenic mice in which Nolz-1 was ectopically expressed in proliferative neural progenitors. Ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors by intercrossing the Nolz-1 conditional transgenic mice with the nestin-Cre mice resulted in hypoplasia of telencephalon in double transgenic mice. Decreased proliferation of neural progenitor cells were found in the telencephalon, as evidenced by the reduction of BrdU-, Ki67- and phospho-histone 3-positive cells in E11.5-12.5 germinal zone of telencephalon. Transgenic Nolz-1 also promoted cell cycle exit and as a consequence might facilitate premature differentiation of progenitors, because TuJ1-positive neurons were ectopically found in the ventricular zone and there was a general increase of TuJ1 immunoreactivity in the telencephalon. Moreover, clusters of strong TuJ1-expressing neurons were present in E12.5 germinal zone. Some of these strong TuJ1-positive clusters, however, contained apoptotic condensed DNA, suggesting that inappropriate premature differentiation may lead to abnormal apoptosis in some progenitor cells. Consistent with the transgenic mouse analysis in vivo, similar effects of Nozl-1 over-expression in induction of apoptosis, inhibition of cell proliferation and promotion of neuronal differentiation were also observed in three different N18, ST14A and N2A neural cell lines in vitro. Taken together, our study indicates that ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors promotes cell cycle exit/premature neuronal differentiation and induces abnormal apoptosis in the developing telencephalon.

  17. A Discrete Population of Neurons in the Lateral Amygdala Is Specifically Activated by Contextual Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Yvette M.; Murphy, Mark

    2009-01-01

    There is no clear identification of the neurons involved in fear conditioning in the amygdala. To search for these neurons, we have used a genetic approach, the "fos-tau-lacZ" (FTL) mouse, to map functionally activated expression in neurons following contextual fear conditioning. We have identified a discrete population of neurons in the lateral…

  18. Deep learning architecture for recognition of abnormal activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatrouch, Marwa; Gnouma, Mariem; Ejbali, Ridha; Zaied, Mourad

    2018-04-01

    The video surveillance is one of the key areas in computer vision researches. The scientific challenge in this field involves the implementation of automatic systems to obtain detailed information about individuals and groups behaviors. In particular, the detection of abnormal movements of groups or individuals requires a fine analysis of frames in the video stream. In this article, we propose a new method to detect anomalies in crowded scenes. We try to categorize the video in a supervised mode accompanied by unsupervised learning using the principle of the autoencoder. In order to construct an informative concept for the recognition of these behaviors, we use a technique of representation based on the superposition of human silhouettes. The evaluation of the UMN dataset demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  19. A novel framework for intelligent surveillance system based on abnormal human activity detection in academic environments.

    PubMed

    Al-Nawashi, Malek; Al-Hazaimeh, Obaida M; Saraee, Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal activity detection plays a crucial role in surveillance applications, and a surveillance system that can perform robustly in an academic environment has become an urgent need. In this paper, we propose a novel framework for an automatic real-time video-based surveillance system which can simultaneously perform the tracking, semantic scene learning, and abnormality detection in an academic environment. To develop our system, we have divided the work into three phases: preprocessing phase, abnormal human activity detection phase, and content-based image retrieval phase. For motion object detection, we used the temporal-differencing algorithm and then located the motions region using the Gaussian function. Furthermore, the shape model based on OMEGA equation was used as a filter for the detected objects (i.e., human and non-human). For object activities analysis, we evaluated and analyzed the human activities of the detected objects. We classified the human activities into two groups: normal activities and abnormal activities based on the support vector machine. The machine then provides an automatic warning in case of abnormal human activities. It also embeds a method to retrieve the detected object from the database for object recognition and identification using content-based image retrieval. Finally, a software-based simulation using MATLAB was performed and the results of the conducted experiments showed an excellent surveillance system that can simultaneously perform the tracking, semantic scene learning, and abnormality detection in an academic environment with no human intervention.

  20. Linking neuronal brain activity to the glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Energy homeostasis ensures the functionality of the entire organism. The human brain as a missing link in the global regulation of the complex whole body energy metabolism is subject to recent investigation. The goal of this study is to gain insight into the influence of neuronal brain activity on cerebral and peripheral energy metabolism. In particular, the tight link between brain energy supply and metabolic responses of the organism is of interest. We aim to identifying regulatory elements of the human brain in the whole body energy homeostasis. Methods First, we introduce a general mathematical model describing the human whole body energy metabolism. It takes into account the two central roles of the brain in terms of energy metabolism. The brain is considered as energy consumer as well as regulatory instance. Secondly, we validate our mathematical model by experimental data. Cerebral high-energy phosphate content and peripheral glucose metabolism are measured in healthy men upon neuronal activation induced by transcranial direct current stimulation versus sham stimulation. By parameter estimation we identify model parameters that provide insight into underlying neurophysiological processes. Identified parameters reveal effects of neuronal activity on regulatory mechanisms of systemic glucose metabolism. Results Our examinations support the view that the brain increases its glucose supply upon neuronal activation. The results indicate that the brain supplies itself with energy according to its needs, and preeminence of cerebral energy supply is reflected. This mechanism ensures balanced cerebral energy homeostasis. Conclusions The hypothesis of the central role of the brain in whole body energy homeostasis as active controller is supported. PMID:23988084

  1. Linking neuronal brain activity to the glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Britta; Oltmanns, Kerstin M; Chung, Matthias

    2013-08-29

    Energy homeostasis ensures the functionality of the entire organism. The human brain as a missing link in the global regulation of the complex whole body energy metabolism is subject to recent investigation. The goal of this study is to gain insight into the influence of neuronal brain activity on cerebral and peripheral energy metabolism. In particular, the tight link between brain energy supply and metabolic responses of the organism is of interest. We aim to identifying regulatory elements of the human brain in the whole body energy homeostasis. First, we introduce a general mathematical model describing the human whole body energy metabolism. It takes into account the two central roles of the brain in terms of energy metabolism. The brain is considered as energy consumer as well as regulatory instance. Secondly, we validate our mathematical model by experimental data. Cerebral high-energy phosphate content and peripheral glucose metabolism are measured in healthy men upon neuronal activation induced by transcranial direct current stimulation versus sham stimulation. By parameter estimation we identify model parameters that provide insight into underlying neurophysiological processes. Identified parameters reveal effects of neuronal activity on regulatory mechanisms of systemic glucose metabolism. Our examinations support the view that the brain increases its glucose supply upon neuronal activation. The results indicate that the brain supplies itself with energy according to its needs, and preeminence of cerebral energy supply is reflected. This mechanism ensures balanced cerebral energy homeostasis. The hypothesis of the central role of the brain in whole body energy homeostasis as active controller is supported.

  2. New neurons generated from running are broadly recruited into neuronal activation associated with three different hippocampus-involved tasks

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter J.; Bhattacharya, Tushar K.; Miller, Daniel S.; Kohman, Rachel A.; DeYoung, Erin K.; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2012-01-01

    Running increases the formation of new neurons in the adult rodent hippocampus. However, the function of new neurons generated from running is currently unknown. One hypothesis is that new neurons from running contribute to enhanced cognitive function by increasing plasticity in the adult hippocampus. An alternative hypothesis is that new neurons generated from running incorporate into experience-specific hippocampal networks that only become active during running. The purpose of this experiment was to determine if new neurons generated from running are selectively activated by running, or can become recruited into granule cell activity occurring during performance on other behavioral tasks that engage the hippocampus. Therefore, the activation of new 5–6 week neurons was detected using BrdU, NeuN, and Zif268 triple-label immunohistochemistry in cohorts of female running and sedentary adult C57BL/6J mice following participation in one of three different tasks: the Morris water maze, novel environment exploration, or wheel running. Results showed that running and sedentary mice displayed a nearly equivalent proportion of new neurons that expressed Zif268 following each task. Since running approximately doubled the number of new neurons, the results demonstrated that running mice had a greater number of new neurons recruited into the Zif268 induction in the granule cell layer following each task than sedentary mice. The results suggest that new neurons incorporated into hippocampal circuitry from running are not just activated by wheel running itself, but rather become broadly recruited into granule cell layer activity during distinct behavioral experiences. PMID:22467337

  3. Spontaneous, synchronous electrical activity in neonatal mouse cortical neurones

    PubMed Central

    Corlew, Rebekah; Bosma, Martha M; Moody, William J

    2004-01-01

    Spontaneous [Ca2+]i transients were measured in the mouse neocortex from embryonic day 16 (E16) to postnatal day 6 (P6). On the day of birth (P0), cortical neurones generated widespread, highly synchronous [Ca2+]i transients over large areas. On average, 52% of neurones participated in these transients, and in 20% of slices, an average of 80% participated. These transients were blocked by TTX and nifedipine, indicating that they resulted from Ca2+ influx during electrical activity, and occurred at a mean frequency of 0.91 min−1. The occurrence of this activity was highly centred at P0: at E16 and P2 an average of only 15% and 24% of neurones, respectively, participated in synchronous transients, and they occurred at much lower frequencies at both E16 and P2 than at P0. The overall frequency of [Ca2+]i transients in individual cells did not change between E16 and P2, just the degree of their synchronicity. The onset of this spontaneous, synchronous activity correlated with a large increase in Na+ current density that occurred just before P0, and its cessation with a large decrease in resting resistance that occurred just after P2. This widespread, synchronous activity may serve a variety of functions in the neonatal nervous system. PMID:15297578

  4. Transient extracellular application of gold nanostars increases hippocampal neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Kirstie; Kereselidze, Zurab; DeLuna, Frank; Peralta, Xomalin G; Santamaria, Fidel

    2014-08-20

    With the increased use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications there is a growing need to understand the effects that nanoparticles may have on cell function. Identifying these effects and understanding the mechanism through which nanoparticles interfere with the normal functioning of a cell is necessary for any therapeutic or diagnostic application. The aim of this study is to evaluate if gold nanoparticles can affect the normal function of neurons, namely their activity and coding properties. We synthesized star shaped gold nanoparticles of 180 nm average size. We applied the nanoparticles to acute mouse hippocampal slices while recording the action potentials from single neurons in the CA3 region. Our results show that CA3 hippocampal neurons increase their firing rate by 17% after the application of gold nanostars. The increase in excitability lasted for as much as 50 minutes after a transient 5 min application of the nanoparticles. Further analyses of the action potential shape and computational modeling suggest that nanoparticles block potassium channels responsible for the repolarization of the action potentials, thus allowing the cell to increase its firing rate. Our results show that gold nanoparticles can affect the coding properties of neurons by modifying their excitability.

  5. Behavioral State Modulates the Activity of Brainstem Sensorimotor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Kimberly L.

    2011-01-01

    Sensorimotor processing must be modulated according to the animal's behavioral state. A previous study demonstrated that motion responses were strongly state dependent in birds. Vestibular eye and head responses were significantly larger and more compensatory during simulated flight, and a flight-specific vestibular tail response was also characterized. In the current study, we investigated the neural substrates for these state-dependent vestibular behaviors by recording extracellularly from neurons in the vestibular nuclear complex and comparing their spontaneous activity and sensory responses during default and simulated flight states. We show that motion-sensitive neurons in the lateral vestibular nucleus are state dependent. Some neurons increased their spontaneous firing rates during flight, though their increased excitability was not reflected in higher sensory gains. However, other neurons exhibited state-dependent gating of sensory inputs, responding to rotational stimuli only during flight. These results demonstrate that vestibular processing in the brainstem is state dependent and lay the foundation for future studies to investigate the synaptic mechanisms responsible for these modifications. PMID:22090497

  6. Bioluminescence Monitoring of Neuronal Activity in Freely Moving Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Knafo, Steven; Prendergast, Andrew; Thouvenin, Olivier; Figueiredo, Sophie Nunes; Wyart, Claire

    2017-01-01

    The proof of concept for bioluminescence monitoring of neural activity in zebrafish with the genetically encoded calcium indicator GFP-aequorin has been previously described (Naumann et al., 2010) but challenges remain. First, bioluminescence signals originating from a single muscle fiber can constitute a major pitfall. Second, bioluminescence signals emanating from neurons only are very small. To improve signals while verifying specificity, we provide an optimized 4 steps protocol achieving: 1) selective expression of a zebrafish codon-optimized GFP-aequorin, 2) efficient soaking of larvae in GFP-aequorin substrate coelenterazine, 3) bioluminescence monitoring of neural activity from motor neurons in free-tailed moving animals performing acoustic escapes and 4) verification of the absence of muscle expression using immunohistochemistry. PMID:29130058

  7. Manipulating neuronal activity with low frequency transcranial ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Michele Elizabeth

    Stimulation of the rodent cerebral cortex is used to investigate the underlying biological basis for the restorative effects of slow wave sleep. Neuronal activation by optogenetic and ultrasound stimulation elicits changes in action potentials across the cerebral cortex that are recorded as electroencephalograms. Optogenetic stimulation requires an invasive implantation procedure limiting its application in human studies. We sought to determine whether ultrasound stimulation could be as effective as optogenetic techniques currently used, in an effort to further understand the physiological and metabolic requirements of sleep. We successfully recorded electroencephalograms in response to transcranial ultrasound stimulation of the barrel cortex at 1 and 7 Hz frequencies, comparing them to those recorded in response to optogenetic stimuli applied at the same frequencies. Our results showed application of a 473 nm blue LED positioned 6 cm above the skull and ultrasound stimulation at an output voltage of 1000 mVpp produced electroencephalograms with physiological responses of similar amplitude. We concluded that there exists an intensity-proportionate response in the optogenetic stimulation, but not with ultrasound stimulation at the frequencies we surveyed. Activation of neuronal cells in response to optogenetic stimulation in a Thy1-ChR2 transgenic mouse line is specifically targeted to pyramidal cells in the cerebral cortex. ChR2 responses to optogenetic stimulation are mediated by a focal activation of neuronal ion channels. We measured electrophysiological responses to ultrasound stimulation, comparing them to those recorded from optogenetic stimuli. Our results show striking similarities between ultrasound-induced responses and optogenetically-induced responses, which may indicate that transcranial ultrasound stimulation is also mediated by ion channel dependent processes in cerebral cortical neurons. The biophysical substrates for electrical excitability of

  8. Bifurcation analysis of the regulation of nociceptive neuronal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dik, O. E.

    2017-11-01

    A model of the membrane of a nociceptive neuron from a rat dorsal ganglion has been used to address the problem of analyzing the regulation of nociceptive signals by 5-hydroxy-γ-pyrone-2-carboxylic acid, which is the active pharmaceutic ingredient of the analgesic Anoceptin. The study has applied bifurcation analysis to report the relationship between the values of model parameters and the type of problem solution before and after the parameters change in response to analgesic modulation.

  9. Serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe mediate the anticataplectic action of orexin neurons by reducing amygdala activity.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Emi; Maejima, Takashi; Yoshida, Takayuki; Masseck, Olivia A; Herlitze, Stefan; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro; Sakurai, Takeshi; Mieda, Michihiro

    2017-04-25

    Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder caused by the loss of orexin (hypocretin)-producing neurons and marked by excessive daytime sleepiness and a sudden weakening of muscle tone, or cataplexy, often triggered by strong emotions. In a mouse model for narcolepsy, we previously demonstrated that serotonin neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) mediate the suppression of cataplexy-like episodes (CLEs) by orexin neurons. Using an optogenetic tool, in this paper we show that the acute activation of DRN serotonin neuron terminals in the amygdala, but not in nuclei involved in regulating rapid eye-movement sleep and atonia, suppressed CLEs. Not only did stimulating serotonin nerve terminals reduce amygdala activity, but the chemogenetic inhibition of the amygdala using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs also drastically decreased CLEs, whereas chemogenetic activation increased them. Moreover, the optogenetic inhibition of serotonin nerve terminals in the amygdala blocked the anticataplectic effects of orexin signaling in DRN serotonin neurons. Taken together, the results suggest that DRN serotonin neurons, as a downstream target of orexin neurons, inhibit cataplexy by reducing the activity of amygdala as a center for emotional processing.

  10. Serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe mediate the anticataplectic action of orexin neurons by reducing amygdala activity

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Emi; Maejima, Takashi; Yoshida, Takayuki; Herlitze, Stefan; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro; Sakurai, Takeshi; Mieda, Michihiro

    2017-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder caused by the loss of orexin (hypocretin)-producing neurons and marked by excessive daytime sleepiness and a sudden weakening of muscle tone, or cataplexy, often triggered by strong emotions. In a mouse model for narcolepsy, we previously demonstrated that serotonin neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) mediate the suppression of cataplexy-like episodes (CLEs) by orexin neurons. Using an optogenetic tool, in this paper we show that the acute activation of DRN serotonin neuron terminals in the amygdala, but not in nuclei involved in regulating rapid eye-movement sleep and atonia, suppressed CLEs. Not only did stimulating serotonin nerve terminals reduce amygdala activity, but the chemogenetic inhibition of the amygdala using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs also drastically decreased CLEs, whereas chemogenetic activation increased them. Moreover, the optogenetic inhibition of serotonin nerve terminals in the amygdala blocked the anticataplectic effects of orexin signaling in DRN serotonin neurons. Taken together, the results suggest that DRN serotonin neurons, as a downstream target of orexin neurons, inhibit cataplexy by reducing the activity of amygdala as a center for emotional processing. PMID:28396432

  11. Activity-dependent stochastic resonance in recurrent neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volman, Vladislav

    2009-03-01

    An important source of noise for neuronal networks is that of the stochastic nature of synaptic transmission. In particular, there can occur spontaneous asynchronous release of neurotransmitter at a rate that is strongly dependent on the presynaptic Ca2+ concentration and hence strongly dependent on the rate of spike induced Ca2+. Here it is shown that this noise can lead to a new form of stochastic resonance for local circuits consisting of roughly 100 neurons - a ``microcolumn''- coupled via noisy plastic synapses. Furthermore, due to the plastic coupling and activity-dependent noise component, the detection of weak stimuli will also depend on the structure of the latter. In addition, the circuit can exhibit short-term memory, by which we mean that spiking will continue to occur for a transient period following removal of the stimulus. These results can be directly tested in experiments on cultured networks.

  12. Activity-Dependent Neurorehabilitation Beyond Physical Trainings: "Mental Exercise" Through Mirror Neuron Activation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ti-Fei; Chen, Wei; Shan, Chunlei; Rocha, Nuno; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Paes, Flávia; de Sá, Alberto Souza; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The activity dependent brain repair mechanism has been widely adopted in many types of neurorehabilitation. The activity leads to target specific and non-specific beneficial effects in different brain regions, such as the releasing of neurotrophic factors, modulation of the cytokines and generation of new neurons in adult hood. However physical exercise program clinically are limited to some of the patients with preserved motor functions; while many patients suffered from paralysis cannot make such efforts. Here the authors proposed the employment of mirror neurons system in promoting brain rehabilitation by "observation based stimulation". Mirror neuron system has been considered as an important basis for action understanding and learning by mimicking others. During the action observation, mirror neuron system mediated the direct activation of the same group of motor neurons that are responsible for the observed action. The effect is clear, direct, specific and evolutionarily conserved. Moreover, recent evidences hinted for the beneficial effects on stroke patients after mirror neuron system activation therapy. Finally some music-relevant therapies were proposed to be related with mirror neuron system.

  13. [Intranasal epitalon infusion modulates neuronal activity in the rat neocortex].

    PubMed

    Sibarov, D A; Vol'nova, A B; Frolov, D S; Nosdrachev, A D

    2006-08-01

    Properties of tetrapeptide epitalon (Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly) constructed on the basis of pineal peptide extract, have been studied. The intranasal infusions: a noninvasive way to deliver this peptide to CNS hypassing the blood-brain barrier, was used. The aim of the study is to estimate epitalon action on rat motor cortex spontaneous activity. Wistar male rats were anesthetized with urethane (1 g/kg). Extracellular unit recording was made using glass microelectrodes (1-2 MOhm). After recording of spontaneous activity (10-15 min), epitalon intranasal infusion (2 ng) was followed by 30-minute recording. Within a few minutes after the infusion, significant activation of neural activity was observed (2-2.5-fold higher frequency of neuronal spikes). Complex response consisting of several phases was identified in some recordings. The spikes frequency growth during 5 to 7 min (first phase) after the infusion was followed by the second (11-12 min) and the third (17-18 min) phases. An increase of neuronal spontaneous activity was conditioned by the higher frequency of already active units and by the involvement of previously silent cells. At least the first phase of epitalon action can be explained by direct action of the peptide on the cells of the motor cortex.

  14. Toward a complex system understanding of bipolar disorder: A chaotic model of abnormal circadian activity rhythms in euthymic bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hadaeghi, Fatemeh; Hashemi Golpayegani, Mohammad Reza; Jafari, Sajad; Murray, Greg

    2016-08-01

    In the absence of a comprehensive neural model to explain the underlying mechanisms of disturbed circadian function in bipolar disorder, mathematical modeling is a helpful tool. Here, circadian activity as a response to exogenous daily cycles is proposed to be the product of interactions between neuronal networks in cortical (cognitive processing) and subcortical (pacemaker) areas of the brain. To investigate the dynamical aspects of the link between disturbed circadian activity rhythms and abnormalities of neurotransmitter functioning in frontal areas of the brain, we developed a novel mathematical model of a chaotic system which represents fluctuations in circadian activity in bipolar disorder as changes in the model's parameters. A novel map-based chaotic system was developed to capture disturbances in circadian activity across the two extreme mood states of bipolar disorder. The model uses chaos theory to characterize interplay between neurotransmitter functions and rhythm generation; it aims to illuminate key activity phenomenology in bipolar disorder, including prolonged sleep intervals, decreased total activity and attenuated amplitude of the diurnal activity rhythm. To test our new cortical-circadian mathematical model of bipolar disorder, we utilized previously collected locomotor activity data recorded from normal subjects and bipolar patients by wrist-worn actigraphs. All control parameters in the proposed model have an important role in replicating the different aspects of circadian activity rhythm generation in the brain. The model can successfully replicate deviations in sleep/wake time intervals corresponding to manic and depressive episodes of bipolar disorder, in which one of the excitatory or inhibitory pathways is abnormally dominant. Although neuroimaging research has strongly implicated a reciprocal interaction between cortical and subcortical regions as pathogenic in bipolar disorder, this is the first model to mathematically represent this

  15. Excessive Astrocyte-Derived Neurotrophin-3 Contributes to the Abnormal Neuronal Dendritic Development in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan-yan; Liu, Shui-bing; Wu, Yu-mei; Li, Xiao-qiang; Zhao, Ming-gao

    2012-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a form of inherited mental retardation in humans that results from expansion of a CGG repeat in the Fmr1 gene. Recent studies suggest a role of astrocytes in neuronal development. However, the mechanisms involved in the regulation process of astrocytes from FXS remain unclear. In this study, we found that astrocytes derived from a Fragile X model, the Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse which lacks FMRP expression, inhibited the proper elaboration of dendritic processes of neurons in vitro. Furthermore, astrocytic conditioned medium (ACM) from KO astrocytes inhibited proper dendritic growth of both wild-type (WT) and KO neurons. Inducing expression of FMRP by transfection of FMRP vectors in KO astrocytes restored dendritic morphology and levels of synaptic proteins. Further experiments revealed elevated levels of the neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in KO ACM and the prefrontal cortex of Fmr1 KO mice. However, the levels of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) were normal. FMRP has multiple RNA–binding motifs and is involved in translational regulation. RNA–binding protein immunoprecipitation (RIP) showed the NT-3 mRNA interacted with FMRP in WT astrocytes. Addition of high concentrations of exogenous NT-3 to culture medium reduced the dendrites of neurons and synaptic protein levels, whereas these measures were ameliorated by neutralizing antibody to NT-3 or knockdown of NT-3 expression in KO astrocytes through short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). Prefrontal cortex microinjection of WT astrocytes or NT-3 shRNA infected KO astrocytes rescued the deficit of trace fear memory in KO mice, concomitantly decreased the NT-3 levels in the prefrontal cortex. This study indicates that excessive NT-3 from astrocytes contributes to the abnormal neuronal dendritic development and that astrocytes could be a potential therapeutic target for FXS. PMID:23300470

  16. Impaired cortical activation in autistic children: is the mirror neuron system involved?

    PubMed

    Martineau, Joëlle; Cochin, Stéphanie; Magne, Rémy; Barthelemy, Catherine

    2008-04-01

    The inability to imitate becomes obvious early in autistic children and seems to contribute to learning delay and to disorders of communication and contact. Posture, motility and imitation disorders in autistic syndrome might be the consequence of an abnormality of sensori-motor integration, related to the visual perception of movement, and could reflect impairment of the mirror neuron system (MNS). We compared EEG activity during the observation of videos showing actions or still scenes in 14 right-handed autistic children and 14 right-handed, age- and gender-matched control children (3 girls and 11 boys, aged 5 years 3 months-7 years 11 months). We showed desynchronisation of the EEG in the motor cerebral cortex and the frontal and temporal areas during observation of human actions in the group of healthy children. No such desynchronisation was found in autistic children. Moreover, inversion of the pattern of hemispheric activation was found in autistic children, with increased cortical activity in the right hemisphere in the posterior region, including the centro-parietal and temporo-occipital sites. These results are in agreement with the hypothesis of impairment of the mirror neuron system in autistic disorder.

  17. Inhibition of propofol on single neuron and neuronal ensemble activity in prefrontal cortex of rats during working memory task.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinyu; Tian, Yu; Wang, Guolin; Tian, Xin

    2014-08-15

    Working memory (WM) refers to the temporary storage and manipulation of information necessary for performance of complex cognitive tasks. There is a growing interest in whether and how propofol anesthesia inhibits WM function. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible inhibition mechanism of propofol anesthesia from the view of single neuron and neuronal ensemble activities. Adult SD rats were randomly divided into two groups: propofol group (0.9 mg kg(-1)min(-1), 2h via a tail vein catheter) and control group. All the rats were tested for working memory performances in a Y-maze-rewarded alternation task (a task of delayed non-matched-to-sample) at 24, 48, 72 h after propofol anesthesia, and the behavior results of WM tasks were recorded at the same time. Spatio-temporal trains of action potentials were obtained from the original signals. Single neuron activity was characterized by peri-event time histograms analysis and neuron ensemble activities were characterized by Granger causality to describe the interactions within the neuron ensemble. The results show that: comparing with the control group, the percentage of neurons excited and related to WM was significantly decreased (p<0.01 in 24h, p<0.05 in 48 h); the interactions within neuron ensemble were significantly weakened (p<0.01 in 24h, p<0.05 in 48 h), whereas no significant difference in 72 h (p>0.05), which were consistent with the behavior results. These findings could lead to improved understanding of the mechanism of anesthesia inhibition on WM functions from the view of single neuron activity and neuron ensemble interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Thrombin-induced apoptosis in neurons through activation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Zu, Jie; He, Qianqian; Zhao, Hui; Zhou, Su; Ye, Xinchun; Yang, Xinxin; Zan, Kun; Zhang, Zuohui; Shi, Hongjuan; Cui, Guiyun

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown that thrombin activation played a central role in cell injuries associated with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Here, our study investigated the cytotoxicity of thrombin on neurons, and determined the involvement of JNK pathways in thrombin-induced neuronal apoptosis. Primary cultured neurons were treated with different doses of thrombin. Some neurons were given either SP600125 or vehicle. LDH release assay and flow cytometry were used to measure neuronal apoptosis caused by thrombin. The activation of JNK and capases-3 were measured by Western blot. Our results showed large doses of thrombin that increased the LDH release, the level of cleaved caspase-3 and apoptosis rate of neurons. JNK was activated by thrombin in a time-dependent manner. Administration of SP600125 protects neurons from thrombin-induced apoptosis. These data indicate that the activation of JNK is crucial for thrombin-induced neuronal apoptosis, and inhibition of JNK may be a potential therapeutic target for ICH.

  19. Activity of striatal neurons reflects social action and own reward.

    PubMed

    Báez-Mendoza, Raymundo; Harris, Christopher J; Schultz, Wolfram

    2013-10-08

    Social interactions provide agents with the opportunity to earn higher benefits than when acting alone and contribute to evolutionary stable strategies. A basic requirement for engaging in beneficial social interactions is to recognize the actor whose movement results in reward. Despite the recent interest in the neural basis of social interactions, the neurophysiological mechanisms identifying the actor in social reward situations are unknown. A brain structure well suited for exploring this issue is the striatum, which plays a role in movement, reward, and goal-directed behavior. In humans, the striatum is involved in social processes related to reward inequity, donations to charity, and observational learning. We studied the neurophysiology of social action for reward in rhesus monkeys performing a reward-giving task. The behavioral data showed that the animals distinguished between their own and the conspecific's reward and knew which individual acted. Striatal neurons coded primarily own reward but rarely other's reward. Importantly, the activations occurred preferentially, and in approximately similar fractions, when either the own or the conspecific's action was followed by own reward. Other striatal neurons showed social action coding without reward. Some of the social action coding disappeared when the conspecific's role was simulated by a computer, confirming a social rather than observational relationship. These findings demonstrate a role of striatal neurons in identifying the social actor and own reward in a social setting. These processes may provide basic building blocks underlying the brain's function in social interactions.

  20. Prenatal androgenization of female mice programs an increase in firing activity of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons that is reversed by metformin treatment in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Roland, Alison V; Moenter, Suzanne M

    2011-02-01

    Prenatal androgenization (PNA) of female mice with dihydrotestosterone programs reproductive dysfunction in adulthood, characterized by elevated luteinizing hormone levels, irregular estrous cycles, and central abnormalities. Here, we evaluated activity of GnRH neurons from PNA mice and the effects of in vivo treatment with metformin, an activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) that is commonly used to treat the fertility disorder polycystic ovary syndrome. Estrous cycles were monitored in PNA and control mice before and after metformin administration. Before metformin, cycles were longer in PNA mice and percent time in estrus lower; metformin normalized cycles in PNA mice. Extracellular recordings were used to monitor GnRH neuron firing activity in brain slices from diestrous mice. Firing rate was higher and quiescence lower in GnRH neurons from PNA mice, demonstrating increased GnRH neuron activity. Metformin treatment of PNA mice restored firing activity and LH to control levels. To assess whether AMPK activation contributed to the metformin-induced reduction in GnRH neuron activity, the AMPK antagonist compound C was acutely applied to cells. Compound C stimulated cells from metformin-treated, but not untreated, mice, suggesting that AMPK was activated in GnRH neurons, or afferent neurons, in the former group. GnRH neurons from metformin-treated mice also showed a reduced inhibitory response to low glucose. These studies indicate that PNA causes enhanced firing activity of GnRH neurons and elevated LH that are reversible by metformin, raising the possibility that central AMPK activation by metformin may play a role in its restoration of reproductive cycles in polycystic ovary syndrome.

  1. Abnormal gastric myoelectrical activity in postural tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seligman, William H; Low, David A; Asahina, Masato; Mathias, Christopher J

    2013-04-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (PoTS) is an important cause of orthostatic intolerance resulting from cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. In addition to postural symptoms, PoTS patients may have allied features, including gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, which have not yet been thoroughly investigated. We evaluated gastric myoelectrical activity in PoTS patients. Using cutaneous electrogastrography (EGG), we recorded gastric myoelectrical activity before and after standard liquid meal ingestion in 15 PoTS patients (age 27 ± 4 years); including 7 with and 8 without GI symptoms, and in 11 healthy individuals (age 23 ± 7 years). We performed spectral analysis of EGG recordings to obtain the dominant frequency of gastric pacemaker rhythm (DF), instability coefficient of DF (ICDF), and low (LFR%), normal (NFR%), and high (HFR%) range power percentages of the total power. Instability coefficient of DF, an index of variability of gastric pacemaker rhythm, was significantly elevated both pre- and post-prandially (30-45 min after the meal) in the PoTS group (8.8 ± 6, 10.0 ± 8 %) compared with controls (4.0 ± 3, 4.0 ± 3 %; both p < 0.05). Patients with GI symptoms had significantly higher post-prandial ICDF (15.0 ± 5 %) than those without GI symptoms (5.6 ± 4 %; p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in DF, LFR%, NFR% and HFR% before and after the meal between the PoTS and control groups, or between PoTS patients with and without GI symptoms. Our study revealed increased variability of gastric pacemaker rhythm in PoTS, and these findings might be related to pathophysiology of functional GI symptoms in PoTS.

  2. Abnormalities in Dynamic Brain Activity Caused by Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Are Partially Rescued by the Cannabinoid Type-2 Receptor Inverse Agonist SMM-189

    PubMed Central

    McAfee, Samuel S.; Guley, Natalie M.; Del Mar, Nobel; Bu, Wei; Heldt, Scott A.; Honig, Marcia G.; Moore, Bob M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) can cause severe long-term cognitive and emotional deficits, including impaired memory, depression, and persevering fear, but the neuropathological basis of these deficits is uncertain. As medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus play important roles in memory and emotion, we used multi-site, multi-electrode recordings of oscillatory neuronal activity in local field potentials (LFPs) in awake, head-fixed mice to determine if the functioning of these regions was abnormal after mTBI, using a closed-skull focal cranial blast model. We evaluated mPFC, hippocampus CA1, and primary somatosensory/visual cortical areas (S1/V1). Although mTBI did not alter the power of oscillations, it did cause increased coherence of θ (4-10 Hz) and β (10-30 Hz) oscillations within mPFC and S1/V1, reduced CA1 sharp-wave ripple (SWR)-evoked LFP activity in mPFC, downshifted SWR frequencies in CA1, and enhanced θ-γ phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) within mPFC. These abnormalities might be linked to the impaired memory, depression, and persevering fear seen after mTBI. Treatment with the cannabinoid type-2 (CB2) receptor inverse agonist SMM-189 has been shown to mitigate functional deficits and neuronal injury after mTBI in mice. We found that SMM-189 also reversed most of the observed neurophysiological abnormalities. This neurophysiological rescue is likely to stem from the previously reported reduction in neuron loss and/or the preservation of neuronal function and connectivity resulting from SMM-189 treatment, which appears to stem from the biasing of microglia from the proinflammatory M1 state to the prohealing M2 state by SMM-189. PMID:28828401

  3. Abnormalities in Dynamic Brain Activity Caused by Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Are Partially Rescued by the Cannabinoid Type-2 Receptor Inverse Agonist SMM-189.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; McAfee, Samuel S; Guley, Natalie M; Del Mar, Nobel; Bu, Wei; Heldt, Scott A; Honig, Marcia G; Moore, Bob M; Reiner, Anton; Heck, Detlef H

    2017-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) can cause severe long-term cognitive and emotional deficits, including impaired memory, depression, and persevering fear, but the neuropathological basis of these deficits is uncertain. As medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus play important roles in memory and emotion, we used multi-site, multi-electrode recordings of oscillatory neuronal activity in local field potentials (LFPs) in awake, head-fixed mice to determine if the functioning of these regions was abnormal after mTBI, using a closed-skull focal cranial blast model. We evaluated mPFC, hippocampus CA1, and primary somatosensory/visual cortical areas (S1/V1). Although mTBI did not alter the power of oscillations, it did cause increased coherence of θ (4-10 Hz) and β (10-30 Hz) oscillations within mPFC and S1/V1, reduced CA1 sharp-wave ripple (SWR)-evoked LFP activity in mPFC, downshifted SWR frequencies in CA1, and enhanced θ-γ phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) within mPFC. These abnormalities might be linked to the impaired memory, depression, and persevering fear seen after mTBI. Treatment with the cannabinoid type-2 (CB2) receptor inverse agonist SMM-189 has been shown to mitigate functional deficits and neuronal injury after mTBI in mice. We found that SMM-189 also reversed most of the observed neurophysiological abnormalities. This neurophysiological rescue is likely to stem from the previously reported reduction in neuron loss and/or the preservation of neuronal function and connectivity resulting from SMM-189 treatment, which appears to stem from the biasing of microglia from the proinflammatory M1 state to the prohealing M2 state by SMM-189.

  4. Temperature influences neuronal activity and CO2/pH sensitivity of locus coeruleus neurons in the bullfrog, Lithobates catesbeianus.

    PubMed

    Santin, Joseph M; Watters, Kayla C; Putnam, Robert W; Hartzler, Lynn K

    2013-12-15

    The locus coeruleus (LC) is a chemoreceptive brain stem region in anuran amphibians and contains neurons sensitive to physiological changes in CO2/pH. The ventilatory and central sensitivity to CO2/pH is proportional to the temperature in amphibians, i.e., sensitivity increases with increasing temperature. We hypothesized that LC neurons from bullfrogs, Lithobates catesbeianus, would increase CO2/pH sensitivity with increasing temperature and decrease CO2/pH sensitivity with decreasing temperature. Further, we hypothesized that cooling would decrease, while warming would increase, normocapnic firing rates of LC neurons. To test these hypotheses, we used whole cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to measure firing rate, membrane potential (V(m)), and input resistance (R(in)) in LC neurons in brain stem slices from adult bullfrogs over a physiological range of temperatures during normocapnia and hypercapnia. We found that cooling reduced chemosensitive responses of LC neurons as temperature decreased until elimination of CO2/pH sensitivity at 10°C. Chemosensitive responses increased at elevated temperatures. Surprisingly, chemosensitive LC neurons increased normocapnic firing rate and underwent membrane depolarization when cooled and decreased normocapnic firing rate and underwent membrane hyperpolarization when warmed. These responses to temperature were not observed in nonchemosensitive LC neurons or neurons in a brain stem slice 500 μm rostral to the LC. Our results indicate that modulation of cellular chemosensitivity within the LC during temperature changes may influence temperature-dependent respiratory drive during acid-base disturbances in amphibians. Additionally, cold-activated/warm-inhibited LC neurons introduce paradoxical temperature sensitivity in respiratory control neurons of amphibians.

  5. Salicylate-induced abnormal activity in the inferior colliculus of rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, G D; Jastreboff, P J

    1995-02-01

    The evaluation of the spontaneous activity of 471 units from the external nucleus of the IC revealed that salicylate induces an increase of the spontaneous activity and the emergence of a bursting type of activity longer than 4 spikes. For sharply tuned units, the affected cells were from the frequency range of 10-16 kHz, which corresponds to the behaviorally measured pitch of salicylate-induced tinnitus in rats. An exogenous calcium supplement, provided under the conditions shown to attenuate the behavioral manifestation of salicylate-induced tinnitus, abolished the modification of the spontaneous activity induced by salicylate. Finally, profound changes of activity were observed for cells not responding to contralateral sound. We propose that the observed long bursts of discharges represent tinnitus-related neuronal activity. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that GABA-mediated disinhibition is involved in the processing of tinnitus-related neuronal activity.

  6. Failure to suppress low-frequency neuronal oscillatory activity underlies the reduced effectiveness of random patterns of deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    McConnell, George C; So, Rosa Q; Grill, Warren M

    2016-06-01

    Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the mechanisms of action of DBS are unknown. Random temporal patterns of DBS are less effective than regular DBS, but the neuronal basis for this dependence on temporal pattern of stimulation is unclear. Using a rat model of PD, we quantified the changes in behavior and single-unit activity in globus pallidus externa and substantia nigra pars reticulata during high-frequency STN DBS with different degrees of irregularity. Although all stimulus trains had the same average rate, 130-Hz regular DBS more effectively reversed motor symptoms, including circling and akinesia, than 130-Hz irregular DBS. A mixture of excitatory and inhibitory neuronal responses was present during all stimulation patterns, and mean firing rate did not change during DBS. Low-frequency (7-10 Hz) oscillations of single-unit firing times present in hemiparkinsonian rats were suppressed by regular DBS, and neuronal firing patterns were entrained to 130 Hz. Irregular patterns of DBS less effectively suppressed 7- to 10-Hz oscillations and did not regularize firing patterns. Random DBS resulted in a larger proportion of neuron pairs with increased coherence at 7-10 Hz compared with regular 130-Hz DBS, which suggested that long pauses (interpulse interval >50 ms) during random DBS facilitated abnormal low-frequency oscillations in the basal ganglia. These results suggest that the efficacy of high-frequency DBS stems from its ability to regularize patterns of neuronal firing and thereby suppress abnormal oscillatory neural activity within the basal ganglia. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Multiplicative and additive modulation of neuronal tuning with population activity affects encoded information

    PubMed Central

    Arandia-Romero, Iñigo; Tanabe, Seiji; Drugowitsch, Jan; Kohn, Adam; Moreno-Bote, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that neuronal responses are modulated by stimulus properties, and also by the state of the local network. However, little is known about how activity fluctuations of neuronal populations modulate the sensory tuning of cells and affect their encoded information. We found that fluctuations in ongoing and stimulus-evoked population activity in primate visual cortex modulate the tuning of neurons in a multiplicative and additive manner. While distributed on a continuum, neurons with stronger multiplicative effects tended to have less additive modulation, and vice versa. The information encoded by multiplicatively-modulated neurons increased with greater population activity, while that of additively-modulated neurons decreased. These effects offset each other, so that population activity had little effect on total information. Our results thus suggest that intrinsic activity fluctuations may act as a `traffic light' that determines which subset of neurons are most informative. PMID:26924437

  8. Active transport of vesicles in neurons is modulated by mechanical tension.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wylie W; Saif, Taher A

    2014-03-27

    Effective intracellular transport of proteins and organelles is critical in cells, and is especially important for ensuring proper neuron functionality. In neurons, most proteins are synthesized in the cell body and must be transported through thin structures over long distances where normal diffusion is insufficient. Neurons transport subcellular cargo along axons and neurites through a stochastic interplay of active and passive transport. Mechanical tension is critical in maintaining proper function in neurons, but its role in transport is not well understood. To this end, we investigate the active and passive transport of vesicles in Aplysia neurons while changing neurite tension via applied strain, and quantify the resulting dynamics. We found that tension in neurons modulates active transport of vesicles by increasing the probability of active motion, effective diffusivity, and induces a retrograde bias. We show that mechanical tension modulates active transport processes in neurons and that external forces can couple to internal (subcellular) forces and change the overall transport dynamics.

  9. Active transport of vesicles in neurons is modulated by mechanical tension

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Wylie W.; Saif, Taher A.

    2014-01-01

    Effective intracellular transport of proteins and organelles is critical in cells, and is especially important for ensuring proper neuron functionality. In neurons, most proteins are synthesized in the cell body and must be transported through thin structures over long distances where normal diffusion is insufficient. Neurons transport subcellular cargo along axons and neurites through a stochastic interplay of active and passive transport. Mechanical tension is critical in maintaining proper function in neurons, but its role in transport is not well understood. To this end, we investigate the active and passive transport of vesicles in Aplysia neurons while changing neurite tension via applied strain, and quantify the resulting dynamics. We found that tension in neurons modulates active transport of vesicles by increasing the probability of active motion, effective diffusivity, and induces a retrograde bias. We show that mechanical tension modulates active transport processes in neurons and that external forces can couple to internal (subcellular) forces and change the overall transport dynamics. PMID:24670781

  10. Molecular and functional differences in voltage-activated sodium currents between GABA projection neurons and dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shengyuan; Wei, Wei

    2011-01-01

    GABA projection neurons (GABA neurons) in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) and dopamine projection neurons (DA neurons) in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) have strikingly different firing properties. SNc DA neurons fire low-frequency, long-duration spikes, whereas SNr GABA neurons fire high-frequency, short-duration spikes. Since voltage-activated sodium (NaV) channels are critical to spike generation, the different firing properties raise the possibility that, compared with DA neurons, NaV channels in SNr GABA neurons have higher density, faster kinetics, and less cumulative inactivation. Our quantitative RT-PCR analysis on immunohistochemically identified nigral neurons indicated that mRNAs for pore-forming NaV1.1 and NaV1.6 subunits and regulatory NaVβ1 and Navβ4 subunits are more abundant in SNr GABA neurons than SNc DA neurons. These α-subunits and β-subunits are key subunits for forming NaV channels conducting the transient NaV current (INaT), persistent Na current (INaP), and resurgent Na current (INaR). Nucleated patch-clamp recordings showed that INaT had a higher density, a steeper voltage-dependent activation, and a faster deactivation in SNr GABA neurons than in SNc DA neurons. INaT also recovered more quickly from inactivation and had less cumulative inactivation in SNr GABA neurons than in SNc DA neurons. Furthermore, compared with nigral DA neurons, SNr GABA neurons had a larger INaR and INaP. Blockade of INaP induced a larger hyperpolarization in SNr GABA neurons than in SNc DA neurons. Taken together, these results indicate that NaV channels expressed in fast-spiking SNr GABA neurons and slow-spiking SNc DA neurons are tailored to support their different spiking capabilities. PMID:21880943

  11. Synaptic and intrinsic activation of GABAergic neurons in the cardiorespiratory brainstem network.

    PubMed

    Frank, Julie G; Mendelowitz, David

    2012-01-01

    GABAergic pathways in the brainstem play an essential role in respiratory rhythmogenesis and interactions between the respiratory and cardiovascular neuronal control networks. However, little is known about the identity and function of these GABAergic inhibitory neurons and what determines their activity. In this study we have identified a population of GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral medulla that receive increased excitatory post-synaptic potentials during inspiration, but also have spontaneous firing in the absence of synaptic input. Using transgenic mice that express GFP under the control of the Gad1 (GAD67) gene promoter, we determined that this population of GABAergic neurons is in close apposition to cardioinhibitory parasympathetic cardiac neurons in the nucleus ambiguus (NA). These neurons fire in synchronization with inspiratory activity. Although they receive excitatory glutamatergic synaptic inputs during inspiration, this excitatory neurotransmission was not altered by blocking nicotinic receptors, and many of these GABAergic neurons continue to fire after synaptic blockade. The spontaneous firing in these GABAergic neurons was not altered by the voltage-gated calcium channel blocker cadmium chloride that blocks both neurotransmission to these neurons and voltage-gated Ca(2+) currents, but spontaneous firing was diminished by riluzole, demonstrating a role of persistent sodium channels in the spontaneous firing in these cardiorespiratory GABAergic neurons that possess a pacemaker phenotype. The spontaneously firing GABAergic neurons identified in this study that increase their activity during inspiration would support respiratory rhythm generation if they acted primarily to inhibit post-inspiratory neurons and thereby release inspiration neurons to increase their activity. This population of inspiratory-modulated GABAergic neurons could also play a role in inhibiting neurons that are most active during expiration and provide a framework for

  12. Direct neuronal glucose uptake heralds activity-dependent increases in cerebral metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Lundgaard, Iben; Li, Baoman; Xie, Lulu; Kang, Hongyi; Sanggaard, Simon; Haswell, John Douglas R; Sun, Wei; Goldman, Siri; Blekot, Solomiya; Nielsen, Michael; Takano, Takahiro; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2015-01-01

    Metabolically, the brain is a highly active organ that relies almost exclusively on glucose as its energy source. According to the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis, glucose is taken up by astrocytes and converted to lactate, which is then oxidized by neurons. Here we show, using 2-photon imaging of a near-infrared 2-deoxyglucose analogue (2DG-IR), that glucose is taken up preferentially by neurons in awake behaving mice. Anesthesia suppressed neuronal 2DG-IR uptake and sensory stimulation was associated with a sharp increase in neuronal, but not astrocytic, 2DG-IR uptake. Moreover, hexokinase, which catalyze the first enzymatic steps in glycolysis, was highly enriched in neurons compared with astrocytes, in mouse as well as in human cortex. These observations suggest that brain activity and neuronal glucose metabolism are directly linked, and identifies the neuron as the principal locus of glucose uptake as visualized by functional brain imaging. PMID:25904018

  13. Direct neuronal glucose uptake heralds activity-dependent increases in cerebral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lundgaard, Iben; Li, Baoman; Xie, Lulu; Kang, Hongyi; Sanggaard, Simon; Haswell, John D R; Sun, Wei; Goldman, Siri; Blekot, Solomiya; Nielsen, Michael; Takano, Takahiro; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2015-04-23

    Metabolically, the brain is a highly active organ that relies almost exclusively on glucose as its energy source. According to the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis, glucose is taken up by astrocytes and converted to lactate, which is then oxidized by neurons. Here we show, using two-photon imaging of a near-infrared 2-deoxyglucose analogue (2DG-IR), that glucose is taken up preferentially by neurons in awake behaving mice. Anaesthesia suppressed neuronal 2DG-IR uptake and sensory stimulation was associated with a sharp increase in neuronal, but not astrocytic, 2DG-IR uptake. Moreover, hexokinase, which catalyses the first enzymatic steps in glycolysis, was highly enriched in neurons compared with astrocytes, in mouse as well as in human cortex. These observations suggest that brain activity and neuronal glucose metabolism are directly linked, and identify the neuron as the principal locus of glucose uptake as visualized by functional brain imaging.

  14. Assessing the sensitivity of diffusion MRI to detect neuronal activity directly.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ruiliang; Stewart, Craig V; Plenz, Dietmar; Basser, Peter J

    2016-03-22

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is widely used to study brain function in the neurosciences. Unfortunately, conventional fMRI only indirectly assesses neuronal activity via hemodynamic coupling. Diffusion fMRI was proposed as a more direct and accurate fMRI method to detect neuronal activity, yet confirmative findings have proven difficult to obtain. Given that the underlying relation between tissue water diffusion changes and neuronal activity remains unclear, the rationale for using diffusion MRI to monitor neuronal activity has yet to be clearly established. Here, we studied the correlation between water diffusion and neuronal activity in vitro by simultaneous calcium fluorescence imaging and diffusion MR acquisition. We used organotypic cortical cultures from rat brains as a biological model system, in which spontaneous neuronal activity robustly emerges free of hemodynamic and other artifacts. Simultaneous fluorescent calcium images of neuronal activity are then directly correlated with diffusion MR signals now free of confounds typically encountered in vivo. Although a simultaneous increase of diffusion-weighted MR signals was observed together with the prolonged depolarization of neurons induced by pharmacological manipulations (in which cell swelling was demonstrated to play an important role), no evidence was found that diffusion MR signals directly correlate with normal spontaneous neuronal activity. These results suggest that, whereas current diffusion MR methods could monitor pathological conditions such as hyperexcitability, e.g., those seen in epilepsy, they do not appear to be sensitive or specific enough to detect or follow normal neuronal activity.

  15. Assessing the sensitivity of diffusion MRI to detect neuronal activity directly

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ruiliang; Stewart, Craig V.; Plenz, Dietmar; Basser, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is widely used to study brain function in the neurosciences. Unfortunately, conventional fMRI only indirectly assesses neuronal activity via hemodynamic coupling. Diffusion fMRI was proposed as a more direct and accurate fMRI method to detect neuronal activity, yet confirmative findings have proven difficult to obtain. Given that the underlying relation between tissue water diffusion changes and neuronal activity remains unclear, the rationale for using diffusion MRI to monitor neuronal activity has yet to be clearly established. Here, we studied the correlation between water diffusion and neuronal activity in vitro by simultaneous calcium fluorescence imaging and diffusion MR acquisition. We used organotypic cortical cultures from rat brains as a biological model system, in which spontaneous neuronal activity robustly emerges free of hemodynamic and other artifacts. Simultaneous fluorescent calcium images of neuronal activity are then directly correlated with diffusion MR signals now free of confounds typically encountered in vivo. Although a simultaneous increase of diffusion-weighted MR signals was observed together with the prolonged depolarization of neurons induced by pharmacological manipulations (in which cell swelling was demonstrated to play an important role), no evidence was found that diffusion MR signals directly correlate with normal spontaneous neuronal activity. These results suggest that, whereas current diffusion MR methods could monitor pathological conditions such as hyperexcitability, e.g., those seen in epilepsy, they do not appear to be sensitive or specific enough to detect or follow normal neuronal activity. PMID:26941239

  16. Direct Activation of Sleep-Promoting VLPO Neurons by Volatile Anesthetics Contributes to Anesthetic Hypnosis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jason T; Chen, Jingqiu; Han, Bo; Meng, Qing Cheng; Veasey, Sigrid C; Beck, Sheryl G; Kelz, Max B

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Despite seventeen decades of continuous clinical use, the neuronal mechanisms through which volatile anesthetics act to produce unconsciousness remain obscure. One emerging possibility is that anesthetics exert their hypnotic effects by hijacking endogenous arousal circuits. A key sleep-promoting component of this circuitry is the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO), a hypothalamic region containing both state-independent neurons and neurons that preferentially fire during natural sleep. Results Using c-Fos immunohistochemistry as a biomarker for antecedent neuronal activity, we show that isoflurane and halothane increase the number of active neurons in the VLPO, but only when mice are sedated or unconscious. Destroying VLPO neurons produces an acute resistance to isoflurane-induced hypnosis. Electrophysiological studies prove that the neurons depolarized by isoflurane belong to the subpopulation of VLPO neurons responsible for promoting natural sleep, while neighboring non-sleep-active VLPO neurons are unaffected by isoflurane. Finally, we show that this anesthetic-induced depolarization is not solely due to a presynaptic inhibition of wake-active neurons as previously hypothesized, but rather is due to a direct postsynaptic effect on VLPO neurons themselves arising from the closing of a background potassium conductance. Conclusions Cumulatively, this work demonstrates that anesthetics are capable of directly activating endogenous sleep-promoting networks and that such actions contribute to their hypnotic properties. PMID:23103189

  17. Direct activation of sleep-promoting VLPO neurons by volatile anesthetics contributes to anesthetic hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jason T; Chen, Jingqiu; Han, Bo; Meng, Qing Cheng; Veasey, Sigrid C; Beck, Sheryl G; Kelz, Max B

    2012-11-06

    Despite seventeen decades of continuous clinical use, the neuronal mechanisms through which volatile anesthetics act to produce unconsciousness remain obscure. One emerging possibility is that anesthetics exert their hypnotic effects by hijacking endogenous arousal circuits. A key sleep-promoting component of this circuitry is the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO), a hypothalamic region containing both state-independent neurons and neurons that preferentially fire during natural sleep. Using c-Fos immunohistochemistry as a biomarker for antecedent neuronal activity, we show that isoflurane and halothane increase the number of active neurons in the VLPO, but only when mice are sedated or unconscious. Destroying VLPO neurons produces an acute resistance to isoflurane-induced hypnosis. Electrophysiological studies prove that the neurons depolarized by isoflurane belong to the subpopulation of VLPO neurons responsible for promoting natural sleep, whereas neighboring non-sleep-active VLPO neurons are unaffected by isoflurane. Finally, we show that this anesthetic-induced depolarization is not solely due to a presynaptic inhibition of wake-active neurons as previously hypothesized but rather is due to a direct postsynaptic effect on VLPO neurons themselves arising from the closing of a background potassium conductance. Cumulatively, this work demonstrates that anesthetics are capable of directly activating endogenous sleep-promoting networks and that such actions contribute to their hypnotic properties. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuronal electrical ongoing activity as a signature of cortical areas.

    PubMed

    Cottone, Carlo; Porcaro, Camillo; Cancelli, Andrea; Olejarczyk, Elzbieta; Salustri, Carlo; Tecchio, Franca

    2017-07-01

    Brodmann's pioneering work resulted in the classification of cortical areas based on their cytoarchitecture and topology. Here, we aim at documenting that diverse cortical areas also display different neuronal electric activities. We investigated this notion in the hand-controlling sections of the primary somatosensory (S1) and motor (M1) areas, in both hemispheres. We identified S1 and M1 in 20 healthy volunteers by applying functional source separation (FSS) to their recorded electroencephalograms (EEG). Our results show that S1 and M1 can be clearly differentiated by their neuroelectric activities in both hemispheres and independently of the subject's state (i.e., at rest or performing movements or receiving external stimulations). In particular, S1 displayed higher relative power than M1 in the alpha and low beta frequency ranges (8-25 Hz, p < .003), whereas the opposite occurred in the high gamma band (52-90 Hz, p = .006). In addition, S1's activity had a smaller Higuchi's fractal dimensions (HFD) than M1's (p < .00001) in all subjects, permitting a reliable classification of the two areas. Moreover, HFD of M1's activity resulted correlated with the hand's fine motor control, as expressed by the 9-hole peg test scores. The present work is a first step toward the identification and classification of brain cortical areas based on neuronal dynamics rather than on cytoarchitectural features. We deem this step to be an improvement of our knowledge of the brain's structural-functional unity.

  19. Activation of D2 dopamine receptor-expressing neurons in the nucleus accumbens increases motivation

    PubMed Central

    Soares-Cunha, Carina; Coimbra, Barbara; David-Pereira, Ana; Borges, Sonia; Pinto, Luisa; Costa, Patricio; Sousa, Nuno; Rodrigues, Ana J.

    2016-01-01

    Striatal dopamine receptor D1-expressing neurons have been classically associated with positive reinforcement and reward, whereas D2 neurons are associated with negative reinforcement and aversion. Here we demonstrate that the pattern of activation of D1 and D2 neurons in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) predicts motivational drive, and that optogenetic activation of either neuronal population enhances motivation in mice. Using a different approach in rats, we further show that activating NAc D2 neurons increases cue-induced motivational drive in control animals and in a model that presents anhedonia and motivational deficits; conversely, optogenetic inhibition of D2 neurons decreases motivation. Our results suggest that the classic view of D1–D2 functional antagonism does not hold true for all dimensions of reward-related behaviours, and that D2 neurons may play a more prominent pro-motivation role than originally anticipated. PMID:27337658

  20. NAA and NAAG variation in neuronal activation during visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Castellano, G; Dias, C S B; Foerster, B; Li, L M; Covolan, R J M

    2012-11-01

    N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG) and its hydrolysis product N-acetyl-L-aspartate (NAA) are among the most important brain metabolites. NAA is a marker of neuron integrity and viability, while NAAG modulates glutamate release and may have a role in neuroprotection and synaptic plasticity. Investigating on a quantitative basis the role of these metabolites in brain metabolism in vivo by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a major challenge since the main signals of NAA and NAAG largely overlap. This is a preliminary study in which we evaluated NAA and NAAG changes during a visual stimulation experiment using functional MRS. The paradigm used consisted of a rest period (5 min and 20 s), followed by a stimulation period (10 min and 40 s) and another rest period (10 min and 40 s). MRS from 17 healthy subjects were acquired at 3T with TR/TE = 2000/288 ms. Spectra were averaged over subjects and quantified with LCModel. The main outcomes were that NAA concentration decreased by about 20% with the stimulus, while the concentration of NAAG concomitantly increased by about 200%. Such variations fall into models for the energy metabolism underlying neuronal activation that point to NAAG as being responsible for the hyperemic vascular response that causes the BOLD signal. They also agree with the fact that NAAG and NAA are present in the brain at a ratio of about 1:10, and with the fact that the only known metabolic pathway for NAAG synthesis is from NAA and glutamate.

  1. Loss of M5 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors leads to cerebrovascular and neuronal abnormalities and cognitive deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Araya, Runa; Noguchi, Takanori; Yuhki, Munehiro; Kitamura, Naohito; Higuchi, Makoto; Saido, Takaomi C; Seki, Kenjiro; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Kawano, Masako; Tanemura, Kentaro; Takashima, Akihiko; Yamada, Kazuyuki; Kondoh, Yasushi; Kanno, Iwao; Wess, Jürgen; Yamada, Masahisa

    2006-11-01

    The M5 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M5R) has been shown to play a crucial role in mediating acetylcholine-dependent dilation of cerebral blood vessels. We show that male M5R-/- mice displayed constitutive constriction of cerebral arteries using magnetic resonance angiography in vivo. Male M5R-/- mice exhibited a significantly reduced cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, basal ganglia, and thalamus. Cortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons from M5R-/- mice showed neuronal atrophy. Hippocampus-dependent spatial and nonspatial memory was also impaired in M5R-/- mice. In M5R-/- mice, CA3 pyramidal cells displayed a significantly attenuated frequency of the spontaneous postsynaptic current and long-term potentiation was significantly impaired at the mossy fiber-CA3 synapse. Our findings suggest that impaired M5R signaling may play a role in the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular deficits. The M5 receptor may represent an attractive novel therapeutic target to ameliorate memory deficits caused by impaired cerebrovascular function.

  2. Interneuron-mediated inhibition synchronizes neuronal activity during slow oscillation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Yung; Chauvette, Sylvain; Skorheim, Steven; Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2012-08-15

    The signature of slow-wave sleep in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is large-amplitude fluctuation of the field potential, which reflects synchronous alternation of activity and silence across cortical neurons. While initiation of the active cortical states during sleep slow oscillation has been intensively studied, the biological mechanisms which drive the network transition from an active state to silence remain poorly understood. In the current study, using a combination of in vivo electrophysiology and thalamocortical network simulation, we explored the impact of intrinsic and synaptic inhibition on state transition during sleep slow oscillation. We found that in normal physiological conditions, synaptic inhibition controls the duration and the synchrony of active state termination. The decline of interneuron-mediated inhibition led to asynchronous downward transition across the cortical network and broke the regular slow oscillation pattern. Furthermore, in both in vivo experiment and computational modelling, we revealed that when the level of synaptic inhibition was reduced significantly, it led to a recovery of synchronized oscillations in the form of seizure-like bursting activity. In this condition, the fast active state termination was mediated by intrinsic hyperpolarizing conductances. Our study highlights the significance of both intrinsic and synaptic inhibition in manipulating sleep slow rhythms.

  3. Interneuron-mediated inhibition synchronizes neuronal activity during slow oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jen-Yung; Chauvette, Sylvain; Skorheim, Steven; Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    The signature of slow-wave sleep in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is large-amplitude fluctuation of the field potential, which reflects synchronous alternation of activity and silence across cortical neurons. While initiation of the active cortical states during sleep slow oscillation has been intensively studied, the biological mechanisms which drive the network transition from an active state to silence remain poorly understood. In the current study, using a combination of in vivo electrophysiology and thalamocortical network simulation, we explored the impact of intrinsic and synaptic inhibition on state transition during sleep slow oscillation. We found that in normal physiological conditions, synaptic inhibition controls the duration and the synchrony of active state termination. The decline of interneuron-mediated inhibition led to asynchronous downward transition across the cortical network and broke the regular slow oscillation pattern. Furthermore, in both in vivo experiment and computational modelling, we revealed that when the level of synaptic inhibition was reduced significantly, it led to a recovery of synchronized oscillations in the form of seizure-like bursting activity. In this condition, the fast active state termination was mediated by intrinsic hyperpolarizing conductances. Our study highlights the significance of both intrinsic and synaptic inhibition in manipulating sleep slow rhythms. PMID:22641778

  4. Ketamine-dependent neuronal activation in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Höflich, Anna; Hahn, Andreas; Küblböck, Martin; Kranz, Georg S; Vanicek, Thomas; Ganger, Sebastian; Spies, Marie; Windischberger, Christian; Kasper, Siegfried; Winkler, Dietmar; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2017-04-01

    Over the last years, a number of studies have been conducted to clarify the neurobiological correlates of ketamine application. However, comprehensive information regarding the influence of ketamine on cortical activity is still lacking. Using resting-state functional MRI and integrating pharmacokinetic information, a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study was performed to determine the effects of ketamine on neuronal activation. During a 55 min resting-state fMRI scan, esketamine (Ketanest S ® ) was administered intravenously to 35 healthy volunteers. Neural activation as indicated by the BOLD signal using the pharmacokinetic curve of ketamine plasma levels as a regressor was computed. Compared with placebo, ketamine-dependent increases of neural activation were observed in the midcingulate cortex, the dorsal part of the anterior cingulate cortex, the insula bilaterally, and the thalamus (t values ranging between 5.95-9.78, p < 0.05; FWE-corrected). A significant decrease of neural activation in the ketamine condition compared to placebo was found in a cluster within the subgenual/subcallosal part of the anterior cingulate cortex, the orbitofrontal cortex and the gyrus rectus (t = 7.81, p < 0.05, FWE-corrected). Using an approach combining pharmacological and fMRI data, important information about the neurobiological correlates of the clinical antidepressant effects of ketamine could be revealed.

  5. Redox/methylation mediated abnormal DNA methylation as regulators of ambient fine particulate matter-induced neurodevelopment related impairment in human neuronal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hongying; Liang, Fan; Meng, Ge; Nie, Zhiqing; Zhou, Ren; Cheng, Wei; Wu, Xiaomeng; Feng, Yan; Wang, Yan

    2016-09-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has been implicated as a risk factor for neurodevelopmental disorders including autism in children. However, the underlying biological mechanism remains unclear. DNA methylation is suggested to be a fundamental mechanism for the neuronal responses to environmental cues. We prepared whole particle of PM2.5 (PM2.5), water-soluble extracts (Pw), organic extracts (Po) and carbon core component (Pc) and characterized their chemical constitutes. We found that PM2.5 induced significant redox imbalance, decreased the levels of intercellular methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine and caused global DNA hypomethylation. Furthermore, PM2.5 exposure triggered gene-specific promoter DNA hypo- or hypermethylation and abnormal mRNA expression of autism candidate genes. PM2.5-induced DNA hypermethylation in promoter regions of synapse related genes were associated with the decreases in their mRNA and protein expression. The inhibiting effects of antioxidative reagents, a methylation-supporting agent and a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor demonstrated the involvement of redox/methylation mechanism in PM2.5-induced abnormal DNA methylation patterns and synaptic protein expression. The biological effects above generally followed a sequence of PM2.5 ≥ Pwo > Po > Pw > Pc. Our results implicated a novel epigenetic mechanism for the neurodevelopmental toxicity of particulate air pollution, and that eliminating the chemical components could mitigate the neurotoxicity of PM2.5.

  6. Redox/methylation mediated abnormal DNA methylation as regulators of ambient fine particulate matter-induced neurodevelopment related impairment in human neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongying; Liang, Fan; Meng, Ge; Nie, Zhiqing; Zhou, Ren; Cheng, Wei; Wu, Xiaomeng; Feng, Yan; Wang, Yan

    2016-09-14

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has been implicated as a risk factor for neurodevelopmental disorders including autism in children. However, the underlying biological mechanism remains unclear. DNA methylation is suggested to be a fundamental mechanism for the neuronal responses to environmental cues. We prepared whole particle of PM2.5 (PM2.5), water-soluble extracts (Pw), organic extracts (Po) and carbon core component (Pc) and characterized their chemical constitutes. We found that PM2.5 induced significant redox imbalance, decreased the levels of intercellular methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine and caused global DNA hypomethylation. Furthermore, PM2.5 exposure triggered gene-specific promoter DNA hypo- or hypermethylation and abnormal mRNA expression of autism candidate genes. PM2.5-induced DNA hypermethylation in promoter regions of synapse related genes were associated with the decreases in their mRNA and protein expression. The inhibiting effects of antioxidative reagents, a methylation-supporting agent and a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor demonstrated the involvement of redox/methylation mechanism in PM2.5-induced abnormal DNA methylation patterns and synaptic protein expression. The biological effects above generally followed a sequence of PM2.5 ≥ Pwo > Po > Pw > Pc. Our results implicated a novel epigenetic mechanism for the neurodevelopmental toxicity of particulate air pollution, and that eliminating the chemical components could mitigate the neurotoxicity of PM2.5.

  7. Redox/methylation mediated abnormal DNA methylation as regulators of ambient fine particulate matter-induced neurodevelopment related impairment in human neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hongying; Liang, Fan; Meng, Ge; Nie, Zhiqing; Zhou, Ren; Cheng, Wei; Wu, Xiaomeng; Feng, Yan; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has been implicated as a risk factor for neurodevelopmental disorders including autism in children. However, the underlying biological mechanism remains unclear. DNA methylation is suggested to be a fundamental mechanism for the neuronal responses to environmental cues. We prepared whole particle of PM2.5 (PM2.5), water-soluble extracts (Pw), organic extracts (Po) and carbon core component (Pc) and characterized their chemical constitutes. We found that PM2.5 induced significant redox imbalance, decreased the levels of intercellular methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine and caused global DNA hypomethylation. Furthermore, PM2.5 exposure triggered gene-specific promoter DNA hypo- or hypermethylation and abnormal mRNA expression of autism candidate genes. PM2.5-induced DNA hypermethylation in promoter regions of synapse related genes were associated with the decreases in their mRNA and protein expression. The inhibiting effects of antioxidative reagents, a methylation-supporting agent and a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor demonstrated the involvement of redox/methylation mechanism in PM2.5-induced abnormal DNA methylation patterns and synaptic protein expression. The biological effects above generally followed a sequence of PM2.5 ≥ Pwo > Po > Pw > Pc. Our results implicated a novel epigenetic mechanism for the neurodevelopmental toxicity of particulate air pollution, and that eliminating the chemical components could mitigate the neurotoxicity of PM2.5. PMID:27624276

  8. Relationship between inter-stimulus-intervals and intervals of autonomous activities in a neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidekatsu; Minoshima, Wataru; Kudoh, Suguru N

    2015-08-01

    To investigate relationships between neuronal network activity and electrical stimulus, we analyzed autonomous activity before and after electrical stimulus. Recordings of autonomous activity were performed using dissociated culture of rat hippocampal neurons on a multi-electrodes array (MEA) dish. Single stimulus and pared stimuli were applied to a cultured neuronal network. Single stimulus was applied every 1 min, and paired stimuli was performed by two sequential stimuli every 1 min. As a result, the patterns of synchronized activities of a neuronal network were changed after stimulus. Especially, long range synchronous activities were induced by paired stimuli. When 1 s inter-stimulus-intervals (ISI) and 1.5 s ISI paired stimuli are applied to a neuronal network, relatively long range synchronous activities expressed in case of 1.5 s ISI. Temporal synchronous activity of neuronal network is changed according to inter-stimulus-intervals (ISI) of electrical stimulus. In other words, dissociated neuronal network can maintain given information in temporal pattern and a certain type of an information maintenance mechanism was considered to be implemented in a semi-artificial dissociated neuronal network. The result is useful toward manipulation technology of neuronal activity in a brain system.

  9. Network feedback regulates motor output across a range of modulatory neuron activity

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Modulatory projection neurons alter network neuron synaptic and intrinsic properties to elicit multiple different outputs. Sensory and other inputs elicit a range of modulatory neuron activity that is further shaped by network feedback, yet little is known regarding how the impact of network feedback on modulatory neurons regulates network output across a physiological range of modulatory neuron activity. Identified network neurons, a fully described connectome, and a well-characterized, identified modulatory projection neuron enabled us to address this issue in the crab (Cancer borealis) stomatogastric nervous system. The modulatory neuron modulatory commissural neuron 1 (MCN1) activates and modulates two networks that generate rhythms via different cellular mechanisms and at distinct frequencies. MCN1 is activated at rates of 5–35 Hz in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, network feedback elicits MCN1 activity time-locked to motor activity. We asked how network activation, rhythm speed, and neuron activity levels are regulated by the presence or absence of network feedback across a physiological range of MCN1 activity rates. There were both similarities and differences in responses of the two networks to MCN1 activity. Many parameters in both networks were sensitive to network feedback effects on MCN1 activity. However, for most parameters, MCN1 activity rate did not determine the extent to which network output was altered by the addition of network feedback. These data demonstrate that the influence of network feedback on modulatory neuron activity is an important determinant of network output and feedback can be effective in shaping network output regardless of the extent of network modulation. PMID:27030739

  10. Network feedback regulates motor output across a range of modulatory neuron activity.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Robert M; Blitz, Dawn M

    2016-06-01

    Modulatory projection neurons alter network neuron synaptic and intrinsic properties to elicit multiple different outputs. Sensory and other inputs elicit a range of modulatory neuron activity that is further shaped by network feedback, yet little is known regarding how the impact of network feedback on modulatory neurons regulates network output across a physiological range of modulatory neuron activity. Identified network neurons, a fully described connectome, and a well-characterized, identified modulatory projection neuron enabled us to address this issue in the crab (Cancer borealis) stomatogastric nervous system. The modulatory neuron modulatory commissural neuron 1 (MCN1) activates and modulates two networks that generate rhythms via different cellular mechanisms and at distinct frequencies. MCN1 is activated at rates of 5-35 Hz in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, network feedback elicits MCN1 activity time-locked to motor activity. We asked how network activation, rhythm speed, and neuron activity levels are regulated by the presence or absence of network feedback across a physiological range of MCN1 activity rates. There were both similarities and differences in responses of the two networks to MCN1 activity. Many parameters in both networks were sensitive to network feedback effects on MCN1 activity. However, for most parameters, MCN1 activity rate did not determine the extent to which network output was altered by the addition of network feedback. These data demonstrate that the influence of network feedback on modulatory neuron activity is an important determinant of network output and feedback can be effective in shaping network output regardless of the extent of network modulation. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Brain activity-induced neuronal glucose uptake/glycolysis: Is the lactate shuttle not required?

    PubMed

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2018-03-01

    The astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle (ANLS) hypothesis posits that during neuronal activation, astrocytic glycolysis consumes glucose and generates lactate, with the latter then imported by neurons as a preferred fuel. The hypothesis has been controversial, with multiple theoretical postulates for and against, and with empirical evidence that were either supportive or otherwise. Recent findings using direct in vivo imaging of lactate and glucose uptake as well as associated metabolic changes in neurons have now placed important constraints on the hypothesis. Here, I review these recent findings and discuss their implications on neuronal energetics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Asymmetric pallidal neuronal activity in patients with cervical dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Moll, Christian K. E.; Galindo-Leon, Edgar; Sharott, Andrew; Gulberti, Alessandro; Buhmann, Carsten; Koeppen, Johannes A.; Biermann, Maxine; Bäumer, Tobias; Zittel, Simone; Westphal, Manfred; Gerloff, Christian; Hamel, Wolfgang; Münchau, Alexander; Engel, Andreas K.

    2014-01-01

    The origin of asymmetric clinical manifestation of symptoms in patients suffering from cervical dystonia (CD) is hitherto poorly understood. Dysregulated neuronal activity in the basal ganglia has been suggested to have a role in the pathophysiology of CD. Here, we re-assessed the question to what extent relative changes occur in the direct vs. indirect basal ganglia pathway in CD, whether these circuit changes are lateralized, and how these alterations relate to CD symptoms. To this end, we recorded ongoing single cell and local field potential (LFP) activity from the external (GPe) and internal pallidal segment (GPi) of 13 CD patients undergoing microelectrode-guided stereotactic surgery for deep brain stimulation in the GPi. We compared pallidal recordings from CD patients operated under local anaesthesia (LA) with those obtained in CD patients operated under general anaesthesia (GA). In awake patients, mean GPe discharge rate (52 Hz) was lower than that of GPi (72 Hz). Mean GPi discharge ipsilateral to the side of head turning was higher than contralateral and correlated with torticollis symptom severity. Lateralized differences were absent at the level of the GPe and in recordings from patients operated under GA. Furthermore, in the GPi of CD patients there was a subpopulation of theta-oscillatory cells with unique bursting characteristics. Power and coherence of GPe– and GPi–LFPs were dominated by a theta peak and also exhibited band-specific interhemispheric differences. Strong cross-frequency coupling of low-gamma amplitude to theta phase was a feature of pallidal LFPs recorded under LA, but not GA. These results indicate that CD is associated with an asymmetric pallidal outflow. Based on the finding of symmetric neuronal discharges in the GPe, we propose that an imbalanced interhemispheric direct pathway gain may be involved in CD pathophysiology. PMID:24574981

  13. Abnormal Neural Activation to Faces in the Parents of Children with Autism.

    PubMed

    Yucel, G H; Belger, A; Bizzell, J; Parlier, M; Adolphs, R; Piven, J

    2015-12-01

    Parents of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show subtle deficits in aspects of social behavior and face processing, which resemble those seen in ASD, referred to as the "Broad Autism Phenotype " (BAP). While abnormal activation in ASD has been reported in several brain structures linked to social cognition, little is known regarding patterns in the BAP. We compared autism parents with control parents with no family history of ASD using 2 well-validated face-processing tasks. Results indicated increased activation in the autism parents to faces in the amygdala (AMY) and the fusiform gyrus (FG), 2 core face-processing regions. Exploratory analyses revealed hyper-activation of lateral occipital cortex (LOC) bilaterally in autism parents with aloof personality ("BAP+"). Findings suggest that abnormalities of the AMY and FG are related to underlying genetic liability for ASD, whereas abnormalities in the LOC and right FG are more specific to behavioral features of the BAP. Results extend our knowledge of neural circuitry underlying abnormal face processing beyond those previously reported in ASD to individuals with shared genetic liability for autism and a subset of genetically related individuals with the BAP. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Abnormal Neural Activation to Faces in the Parents of Children with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Yucel, G. H.; Belger, A.; Bizzell, J.; Parlier, M.; Adolphs, R.; Piven, J.

    2015-01-01

    Parents of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show subtle deficits in aspects of social behavior and face processing, which resemble those seen in ASD, referred to as the “Broad Autism Phenotype ” (BAP). While abnormal activation in ASD has been reported in several brain structures linked to social cognition, little is known regarding patterns in the BAP. We compared autism parents with control parents with no family history of ASD using 2 well-validated face-processing tasks. Results indicated increased activation in the autism parents to faces in the amygdala (AMY) and the fusiform gyrus (FG), 2 core face-processing regions. Exploratory analyses revealed hyper-activation of lateral occipital cortex (LOC) bilaterally in autism parents with aloof personality (“BAP+”). Findings suggest that abnormalities of the AMY and FG are related to underlying genetic liability for ASD, whereas abnormalities in the LOC and right FG are more specific to behavioral features of the BAP. Results extend our knowledge of neural circuitry underlying abnormal face processing beyond those previously reported in ASD to individuals with shared genetic liability for autism and a subset of genetically related individuals with the BAP. PMID:25056573

  15. Curtailing effect of awakening on visual responses of cortical neurons by cholinergic activation of inhibitory circuits.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Rui; Safari, Mir-Shahram; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Kimura, Rie; Ebina, Teppei; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Sohya, Kazuhiro; Tsumoto, Tadaharu

    2014-07-23

    Visual responsiveness of cortical neurons changes depending on the brain state. Neural circuit mechanism underlying this change is unclear. By applying the method of in vivo two-photon functional calcium imaging to transgenic rats in which GABAergic neurons express fluorescent protein, we analyzed changes in visual response properties of cortical neurons when animals became awakened from anesthesia. In the awake state, the magnitude and reliability of visual responses of GABAergic neurons increased whereas the decay of responses of excitatory neurons became faster. To test whether the basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic projection is involved in these changes, we analyzed effects of electrical and optogenetic activation of BF on visual responses of mouse cortical neurons with in vivo imaging and whole-cell recordings. Electrical BF stimulation in anesthetized animals induced the same direction of changes in visual responses of both groups of neurons as awakening. Optogenetic activation increased the frequency of visually evoked action potentials in GABAergic neurons but induced the delayed hyperpolarization that ceased the late generation of action potentials in excitatory neurons. Pharmacological analysis in slice preparations revealed that photoactivation-induced depolarization of layer 1 GABAergic neurons was blocked by a nicotinic receptor antagonist, whereas non-fast-spiking layer 2/3 GABAergic neurons was blocked only by the application of both nicotinic and muscarinic receptor antagonists. These results suggest that the effect of awakening is mediated mainly through nicotinic activation of layer 1 GABAergic neurons and mixed nicotinic/muscarinic activation of layer 2/3 non-fast-spiking GABAergic neurons, which together curtails the visual responses of excitatory neurons. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3410122-12$15.00/0.

  16. Calcium imaging of neuronal activity in the most rostral parafacial respiratory group of the newborn rat.

    PubMed

    Onimaru, Hiroshi; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    The parafacial respiratory group (pFRG) is thought to be involved in respiratory rhythm generation in neonates. This subgroup expresses the transcription factor, Phox2b, and contains intrinsically CO(2) sensitive neurons. Calcium imaging has been widely used for analysis of neuronal activity at the cellular and network level. In the present study, we applied calcium imaging to analyze neuronal activity of the most-rostral pFRG in an in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparation from neonatal rats. We detected strong pre-inspiratory neuron activity in the most rostral pFRG, suggesting that significant numbers of pre-inspiratory neurons are localized in the ventrolateral medulla near the rostral end of the medulla. We show that usage of calcium imaging would be very useful for analysis of neuronal activity over different time scales, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this method.

  17. Neuroligin-1 links neuronal activity to sleep-wake regulation.

    PubMed

    El Helou, Janine; Bélanger-Nelson, Erika; Freyburger, Marlène; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Curie, Thomas; La Spada, Francesco; Gaudreault, Pierre-Olivier; Beaumont, Éric; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric; Frank, Marcos G; Franken, Paul; Mongrain, Valérie

    2013-06-11

    Maintaining wakefulness is associated with a progressive increase in the need for sleep. This phenomenon has been linked to changes in synaptic function. The synaptic adhesion molecule Neuroligin-1 (NLG1) controls the activity and synaptic localization of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, which activity is impaired by prolonged wakefulness. We here highlight that this pathway may underlie both the adverse effects of sleep loss on cognition and the subsequent changes in cortical synchrony. We found that the expression of specific Nlg1 transcript variants is changed by sleep deprivation in three mouse strains. These observations were associated with strain-specific changes in synaptic NLG1 protein content. Importantly, we showed that Nlg1 knockout mice are not able to sustain wakefulness and spend more time in nonrapid eye movement sleep than wild-type mice. These changes occurred with modifications in waking quality as exemplified by low theta/alpha activity during wakefulness and poor preference for social novelty, as well as altered delta synchrony during sleep. Finally, we identified a transcriptional pathway that could underlie the sleep/wake-dependent changes in Nlg1 expression and that involves clock transcription factors. We thus suggest that NLG1 is an element that contributes to the coupling of neuronal activity to sleep/wake regulation.

  18. Neuroligin-1 links neuronal activity to sleep-wake regulation

    PubMed Central

    El Helou, Janine; Bélanger-Nelson, Erika; Freyburger, Marlène; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Curie, Thomas; La Spada, Francesco; Gaudreault, Pierre-Olivier; Beaumont, Éric; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric; Frank, Marcos G.; Franken, Paul; Mongrain, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining wakefulness is associated with a progressive increase in the need for sleep. This phenomenon has been linked to changes in synaptic function. The synaptic adhesion molecule Neuroligin-1 (NLG1) controls the activity and synaptic localization of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, which activity is impaired by prolonged wakefulness. We here highlight that this pathway may underlie both the adverse effects of sleep loss on cognition and the subsequent changes in cortical synchrony. We found that the expression of specific Nlg1 transcript variants is changed by sleep deprivation in three mouse strains. These observations were associated with strain-specific changes in synaptic NLG1 protein content. Importantly, we showed that Nlg1 knockout mice are not able to sustain wakefulness and spend more time in nonrapid eye movement sleep than wild-type mice. These changes occurred with modifications in waking quality as exemplified by low theta/alpha activity during wakefulness and poor preference for social novelty, as well as altered delta synchrony during sleep. Finally, we identified a transcriptional pathway that could underlie the sleep/wake-dependent changes in Nlg1 expression and that involves clock transcription factors. We thus suggest that NLG1 is an element that contributes to the coupling of neuronal activity to sleep/wake regulation. PMID:23716671

  19. Effects of intranasal administration of epitalon on neuron activity in the rat neocortex.

    PubMed

    Sibarov, D A; Vol'nova, A B; Frolov, D S; Nozdrachev, A D

    2007-11-01

    This report discusses the properties of the synthetic tetrapeptide epitalon (Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly), synthesized on the basis of an epiphyseal peptide extract. Intranasal administration of epitalon was selected as a noninvasive means of applying the agent to the CNS by bypassing the blood-brain barrier. The aim of the present work was to assess the characteristics of the action of epitalon on the frequency of spontaneous neuron activity in the cerebral cortex of white rats. Studies were performed using male Wistar rats anesthetized with urethane (1 g/kg). Extracellular activity of cortical neurons was recorded with a glass microelectrode of resistance 1-2 MOmega. Recording of spontaneous neuron discharges for 10-15 min was followed by intranasal administration of epitalon solution and recording of neuron activity to 30 min after doses of 30 ng per animal. Significant activation of neuron activity was seen several minutes after dosage, with an increase (by factors of 2-2.5) in discharge frequency. In some experiments, the effect of epitalon was multiphasic. The first peak of increased neuron discharge frequency at 5-7 min was followed by peaks at 11-12 and 17-18 min. The increase in discharge frequency occurred because of an increase in the discharge frequency of neurons which were already active and the recruitment of previously silent neurons. At least the first peak of increased neuron activity following exposure to epitalon was found to be associated with the direct action of the peptide on cortical cells.

  20. Neuronal Activity and the Expression of Clathrin Assembly Protein AP180

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fangbai; Mattson, Mark P.; Yao, Pamela J.

    2010-01-01

    The clathrin assembly protein AP180 is known to promote the assembly of clathrin-coated vesicles in the neuron. However, it is unknown whether the expression of AP180 is influenced by neuronal activity. In this study, we report that chronic depolarization results in a reduction of AP180 from hippocampal neurons, while acute depolarization causes a dispersed synaptic distribution of AP180. Activity-induced effects are observed only for AP180, but not for the structurally-related clathrin assembly proteins CALM, epsin1, or HIP1. These findings suggest that AP180 levels and synaptic distribution are highly sensitive to neuronal activity. PMID:20937255

  1. Delay activity of saccade-related neurons in the caudal dentate nucleus of the macaque cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Marc A.

    2013-01-01

    The caudal dentate nucleus (DN) in lateral cerebellum is connected with two visual/oculomotor areas of the cerebrum: the frontal eye field and lateral intraparietal cortex. Many neurons in frontal eye field and lateral intraparietal cortex produce “delay activity” between stimulus and response that correlates with processes such as motor planning. Our hypothesis was that caudal DN neurons would have prominent delay activity as well. From lesion studies, we predicted that this activity would be related to self-timing, i.e., the triggering of saccades based on the internal monitoring of time. We recorded from neurons in the caudal DN of monkeys (Macaca mulatta) that made delayed saccades with or without a self-timing requirement. Most (84%) of the caudal DN neurons had delay activity. These neurons conveyed at least three types of information. First, their activity was often correlated, trial by trial, with saccade initiation. Correlations were found more frequently in a task that required self-timing of saccades (53% of neurons) than in a task that did not (27% of neurons). Second, the delay activity was often tuned for saccade direction (in 65% of neurons). This tuning emerged continuously during a trial. Third, the time course of delay activity associated with self-timed saccades differed significantly from that associated with visually guided saccades (in 71% of neurons). A minority of neurons had sensory-related activity. None had presaccadic bursts, in contrast to DN neurons recorded more rostrally. We conclude that caudal DN neurons convey saccade-related delay activity that may contribute to the motor preparation of when and where to move. PMID:23365182

  2. Synaptic activation of putative sensory neurons by hexamethonium-sensitive nerve pathways in mouse colon.

    PubMed

    Hibberd, Timothy J; Travis, Lee; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Costa, Marcello; Brookes, Simon J H; Hu, Hongzhen; Keating, Damien J; Spencer, Nick J

    2018-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract contains its own independent population of sensory neurons within the gut wall. These sensory neurons have been referred to as intrinsic primary afferent neurons (IPANs) and can be identified by immunoreactivity to calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in mice. A common feature of IPANs is a paucity of fast synaptic inputs observed during sharp microelectrode recordings. Whether this is observed using different recording techniques is of particular interest for understanding the physiology of these neurons and neural circuit modeling. Here, we imaged spontaneous and evoked activation of myenteric neurons in isolated whole preparations of mouse colon and correlated recordings with CGRP and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunoreactivity, post hoc. Calcium indicator fluo 4 was used for this purpose. Calcium responses were recorded in nerve cell bodies located 5-10 mm oral to transmural electrical nerve stimuli. A total of 618 recorded neurons were classified for CGRP or NOS immunoreactivity. Aboral electrical stimulation evoked short-latency calcium transients in the majority of myenteric neurons, including ~90% of CGRP-immunoreactive Dogiel type II neurons. Activation of Dogiel type II neurons had a time course consistent with fast synaptic transmission and was always abolished by hexamethonium (300 μM) and by low-calcium Krebs solution. The nicotinic receptor agonist 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide (during synaptic blockade) directly activated Dogiel type II neurons. The present study suggests that murine colonic Dogiel type II neurons receive prominent fast excitatory synaptic inputs from hexamethonium-sensitive neural pathways. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Myenteric neurons in isolated mouse colon were recorded using calcium imaging and then neurochemically defined. Short-latency calcium transients were detected in >90% of calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactive neurons to electrical stimulation of hexamethonium-sensitive pathways

  3. Apolipoprotein A-IV inhibits AgRP/NPY neurons and activates POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV) in the brain potently suppresses food intake. However the mechanisms underlying its anorexigenic effects remain to be identified. We first examined the effects of apoA-IV on cellular activities in hypothalamic neurons that co-express agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and ne...

  4. Active Dentate Granule Cells Encode Experience to Promote the Addition of Adult-Born Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Gregory W.; Shen, Jia; Wang, Jia; Man, Guoming; Wu, Song

    2017-01-01

    The continuous addition of new dentate granule cells (DGCs), which is regulated exquisitely by brain activity, renders the hippocampus plastic. However, how neural circuits encode experiences to affect the addition of adult-born neurons remains unknown. Here, we used endoscopic Ca2+ imaging to track the real-time activity of individual DGCs in freely behaving mice. For the first time, we found that active DGCs responded to a novel experience by increasing their Ca2+ event frequency preferentially. This elevated activity, which we found to be associated with object exploration, returned to baseline by 1 h in the same environment, but could be dishabituated via introduction to a novel environment. To transition seamlessly between environments, we next established a freely controllable virtual reality system for unrestrained mice. We again observed increased firing of active neurons in a virtual enriched environment. Interestingly, multiple novel virtual experiences increased the number of newborn neurons accumulatively compared with a single experience. Finally, optogenetic silencing of existing DGCs during novel environmental exploration perturbed experience-induced neuronal addition. Our study shows that the adult brain conveys novel, enriched experiences to increase the addition of adult-born hippocampal neurons by increasing the firing of active DGCs. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Adult brains are constantly reshaping themselves from synapses to circuits as we encounter novel experiences from moment to moment. Importantly, this reshaping includes the addition of newborn hippocampal neurons. However, it remains largely unknown how our circuits encode experience-induced brain activity to govern the addition of new hippocampal neurons. By coupling in vivo Ca2+ imaging of dentate granule neurons with a novel, unrestrained virtual reality system for rodents, we discovered that a new experience increased firing of active dentate granule neurons rapidly and robustly

  5. Neurons have an active glycogen metabolism that contributes to tolerance to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Saez, Isabel; Duran, Jordi; Sinadinos, Christopher; Beltran, Antoni; Yanes, Oscar; Tevy, María F; Martínez-Pons, Carlos; Milán, Marco; Guinovart, Joan J

    2014-06-01

    Glycogen is present in the brain, where it has been found mainly in glial cells but not in neurons. Therefore, all physiologic roles of brain glycogen have been attributed exclusively to astrocytic glycogen. Working with primary cultured neurons, as well as with genetically modified mice and flies, here we report that-against general belief-neurons contain a low but measurable amount of glycogen. Moreover, we also show that these cells express the brain isoform of glycogen phosphorylase, allowing glycogen to be fully metabolized. Most importantly, we show an active neuronal glycogen metabolism that protects cultured neurons from hypoxia-induced death and flies from hypoxia-induced stupor. Our findings change the current view of the role of glycogen in the brain and reveal that endogenous neuronal glycogen metabolism participates in the neuronal tolerance to hypoxic stress.

  6. Neurons have an active glycogen metabolism that contributes to tolerance to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Saez, Isabel; Duran, Jordi; Sinadinos, Christopher; Beltran, Antoni; Yanes, Oscar; Tevy, María F; Martínez-Pons, Carlos; Milán, Marco; Guinovart, Joan J

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen is present in the brain, where it has been found mainly in glial cells but not in neurons. Therefore, all physiologic roles of brain glycogen have been attributed exclusively to astrocytic glycogen. Working with primary cultured neurons, as well as with genetically modified mice and flies, here we report that—against general belief—neurons contain a low but measurable amount of glycogen. Moreover, we also show that these cells express the brain isoform of glycogen phosphorylase, allowing glycogen to be fully metabolized. Most importantly, we show an active neuronal glycogen metabolism that protects cultured neurons from hypoxia-induced death and flies from hypoxia-induced stupor. Our findings change the current view of the role of glycogen in the brain and reveal that endogenous neuronal glycogen metabolism participates in the neuronal tolerance to hypoxic stress. PMID:24569689

  7. Glutamate receptor antibodies in neurological diseases: anti-AMPA-GluR3 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies, anti-mGluR1 antibodies or anti-mGluR5 antibodies are present in subpopulations of patients with either: epilepsy, encephalitis, cerebellar ataxia, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and neuropsychiatric SLE, Sjogren's syndrome, schizophrenia, mania or stroke. These autoimmune anti-glutamate receptor antibodies can bind neurons in few brain regions, activate glutamate receptors, decrease glutamate receptor's expression, impair glutamate-induced signaling and function, activate blood brain barrier endothelial cells, kill neurons, damage the brain, induce behavioral/psychiatric/cognitive abnormalities and ataxia in animal models, and can be removed or silenced in some patients by immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Levite, Mia

    2014-08-01

    pathological effects: they activate glutamate/AMPA receptors, kill neurons by 'Excitotoxicity', and/or by complement activation modulated by complement regulatory proteins, cause multiple brain damage, aggravate chemoconvulsant-induced seizures, and also induce behavioral/motor impairments. Some patients with 'Autoimmune Epilepsy' that have anti-AMPA-GluR3B antibodies respond well (although sometimes transiently) to immunotherapy, and thanks to that have reduced seizures and overall improved neurological functions. (2) Anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies are present in patients with autoimmune 'Anti-NMDA-receptor Encephalitis'. In humans, in animal models and in vitro the anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies can be very pathogenic since they can cause a pronounced decrease of surface NMDA receptors expressed in hippocampal neurons, and also decrease the cluster density and synaptic localization of the NMDA receptors. The anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies induce these effects by crosslinking and internalization of the NMDA receptors. Such changes can impair glutamate signaling via the NMDA receptors and lead to various neuronal/behavior/cognitive/psychiatric abnormalities. Anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies are frequently present in high levels in the CSF of the patients with 'Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis' due to their intrathecal production. Many patients with 'Anti-NMDA receptor Encephalitis' respond well to several modes of immunotherapy. (3) Anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies are present in a substantial number of patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) with or without neuropsychiatric problems. The exact percentage of SLE patients having anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies varies in different studies from 14 to 35%, and in one study such antibodies were found in 81% of patients with diffuse 'Neuropshychiatric SLE', and in 44% of patients with focal 'Neuropshychiatric SLE'. Anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies are also present in subpopulations of patients with Epilepsy of several types, Encephalitis of several types (e

  8. Abnormal Brain Activation During Theory of Mind Tasks in Schizophrenia: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kronbichler, Lisa; Tschernegg, Melanie; Martin, Anna Isabel; Schurz, Matthias; Kronbichler, Martin

    2017-10-21

    Social cognition abilities are severely impaired in schizophrenia (SZ). The current meta-analysis used foci of 21 individual studies on functional abnormalities in the schizophrenic brain in order to identify regions that reveal convergent under- or over-activation during theory of mind (TOM) tasks. Studies were included in the analyses when contrasting tasks that require the processing of mental states with tasks which did not. Only studies that investigated patients with an ICD or DSM diagnosis were included. Quantitative voxel-based meta-analyses were done using Seed-based d Mapping software. Common TOM regions like medial-prefrontal cortex and temporo-parietal junction revealed abnormal activation in schizophrenic patients: Under-activation was identified in the medial prefrontal cortex, left orbito-frontal cortex, and in a small section of the left posterior temporo-parietal junction. Remarkably, robust over-activation was identified in a more dorsal, bilateral section of the temporo-parietal junction. Further abnormal activation was identified in medial occipito-parietal cortex, right premotor areas, left cingulate gyrus, and lingual gyrus. The findings of this study suggest that SZ patients simultaneously show over- and under-activation in TOM-related regions. Especially interesting, temporo-parietal junction reveals diverging activation patterns with an under-activating left posterior and an over-activating bilateral dorsal section. In conclusion, SZ patients show less specialized brain activation in regions linked to TOM and increased activation in attention-related networks suggesting compensatory effects. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  9. Cultured Neuronal Networks Express Complex Patterns of Activity and Morphological Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raichman, Nadav; Rubinsky, Liel; Shein, Mark; Baruchi, Itay; Volman, Vladislav; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    The following sections are included: * Cultured Neuronal Networks * Recording the Network Activity * Network Engineering * The Formation of Synchronized Bursting Events * The Characterization of the SBEs * Highly-Active Neurons * Function-Form Relations in Cultured Networks * Analyzing the SBEs Motifs * Network Repertoire * Network under Hypothermia * Summary * Acknowledgments * References

  10. Common inputs in subthreshold membrane potential: The role of quiescent states in neuronal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montangie, Lisandro; Montani, Fernando

    2018-06-01

    Experiments in certain regions of the cerebral cortex suggest that the spiking activity of neuronal populations is regulated by common non-Gaussian inputs across neurons. We model these deviations from random-walk processes with q -Gaussian distributions into simple threshold neurons, and investigate the scaling properties in large neural populations. We show that deviations from the Gaussian statistics provide a natural framework to regulate population statistics such as sparsity, entropy, and specific heat. This type of description allows us to provide an adequate strategy to explain the information encoding in the case of low neuronal activity and its possible implications on information transmission.

  11. Abnormal thalamocortical activity in patients with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type I.

    PubMed

    Walton, K D; Dubois, M; Llinás, R R

    2010-07-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a neuropathic disease that presents a continuing challenge in terms of pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Recent studies of neuropathic pain, in both animals and patients, have established a direct relationship between abnormal thalamic rhythmicity related to Thalamo-cortical Dysrhythmia (TCD) and the occurrence of central pain. Here, this relationship has been examined using magneto-encephalographic (MEG) imaging in CRPS Type I, characterized by the absence of nerve lesions. The study addresses spontaneous MEG activity from 13 awake, adult patients (2 men, 11 women; age 15-62), with CRPS Type I of one extremity (duration range: 3months to 10years) and from 13 control subjects. All CRPS I patients demonstrated peaks in power spectrum in the delta (<4Hz) and/or theta (4-9Hz) frequency ranges resulting in a characteristically increased spectral power in those ranges when compared to control subjects. The localization of such abnormal activity, implemented using independent component analysis (ICA) of the sensor data, showed delta and/or theta range activity localized to the somatosensory cortex corresponding to the pain localization, and to orbitofrontal-temporal cortices related to the affective pain perception. Indeed, CRPS Type I patients presented abnormal brain activity typical of TCD, which has both diagnostic value indicating a central origin for this ailment and a potential treatment interest involving pharmacological and electrical stimulation therapies. Copyright 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Atomic basis for therapeutic activation of neuronal potassium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Robin Y.; Yau, Michael C.; Galpin, Jason D.; Seebohm, Guiscard; Ahern, Christopher A.; Pless, Stephan A.; Kurata, Harley T.

    2015-09-01

    Retigabine is a recently approved anticonvulsant that acts by potentiating neuronal M-current generated by KCNQ2-5 channels, interacting with a conserved Trp residue in the channel pore domain. Using unnatural amino-acid mutagenesis, we subtly altered the properties of this Trp to reveal specific chemical interactions required for retigabine action. Introduction of a non-natural isosteric H-bond-deficient Trp analogue abolishes channel potentiation, indicating that retigabine effects rely strongly on formation of a H-bond with the conserved pore Trp. Supporting this model, substitution with fluorinated Trp analogues, with increased H-bonding propensity, strengthens retigabine potency. In addition, potency of numerous retigabine analogues correlates with the negative electrostatic surface potential of a carbonyl/carbamate oxygen atom present in most KCNQ activators. These findings functionally pinpoint an atomic-scale interaction essential for effects of retigabine and provide stringent constraints that may guide rational improvement of the emerging drug class of KCNQ channel activators.

  13. Structure-activity relationship of sulfated hetero/galactofucan polysaccharides on dopaminergic neuron.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Huaide; Jin, Weihua; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Quanbin

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and more-widespread neuronal changes that cause complex symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the structure-activity relationship of sulfated hetero-polysaccharides (DF1) and sulfated galactofucan polysaccharides (DF2) on dopaminergic neuron in vivo and in vitro. Treatment with samples significantly ameliorated the depletion of both DA and TH-, Bcl-2- and Bax-positive neurons in MPTP-induced PD mice, DF1 showed the highest activity. The in vitro results found that DF1 and DF2 could reverse the decreased mitochondrial activity and the increased LDL release induced by MPP(+) (P<0.01 or P<0.001) which provides further evidence that DF1 and DF2 also exerts a direct protection against the neuronal injury caused by MPP(+). Furthermore, the administration of samples effectively decreased lipid peroxidation and increased the level/activities of GSH, GSH-PX, MDA and CAT in MPTP mice. Thus, the neuron protective effect may be mediated, in part, through antioxidant activity and the prevention of cell apoptosis. The chemical composition of DF1, DF2 and DF differed markedly, the DF1 fraction had the most complex chemical composition and showed the highest neuron protective activity. These results suggest that diverse monosaccharides and uronic acid might contribute to neuron protective activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Trigeminal Medullary Dorsal Horn Neurons Activated by Nasal Stimulation Coexpress AMPA, NMDA, and NK1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, P. F.; DiNovo, K. M.; Westerhaus, D. J.; Vizinas, T. A.; Peevey, J. F.; Lach, M. A.; Czarnocki, P.

    2013-01-01

    Afferent information initiating the cardiorespiratory responses during nasal stimulation projects from the nasal passages to neurons within the trigeminal medullary dorsal horn (MDH) via the anterior ethmoidal nerve (AEN). Central AEN terminals are thought to release glutamate to activate the MDH neurons. This study was designed to determine which neurotransmitter receptors (AMPA, kainate, or NMDA glutamate receptor subtypes or the Substance P receptor NK1) are expressed by these activated MDH neurons. Fos was used as a neuronal marker of activated neurons, and immunohistochemistry combined with epifluorescent microscopy was used to determine which neurotransmitter receptor subunits were coexpressed by activated MDH neurons. Results indicate that, during nasal stimulation with ammonia vapors in urethane-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats, activated neurons within the superficial MDH coexpress the AMPA glutamate receptor subunits GluA1 (95.8%) and GluA2/3 (88.2%), the NMDA glutamate receptor subunits GluN1 (89.1%) and GluN2A (41.4%), and NK1 receptors (64.0%). It is therefore likely that during nasal stimulation the central terminals of the AEN release glutamate and substance P that then produces activation of these MDH neurons. The involvement of AMPA and NMDA receptors may mediate fast and slow neurotransmission, respectively, while NK1 receptor involvement may indicate activation of a nociceptive pathway. PMID:24967301

  15. Neuronal activity in the globus pallidus internus in patients with tics.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, P; Hallett, M; Zhang, X; Li, J; Zhang, Y; Li, Y

    2009-10-01

    To explore the role of neuronal activity in the globus pallidus internus (GPi) in the generation of tic movements. 8 patients with Tourette's syndrome with medically intractable tics who underwent a unilateral pallidotomy for severe tics were studied. They ranged in age from 17 to 24 years; disease duration was 7-19 years. Microelectrode recording was performed in the GPi. The electromyogram (EMG) was simultaneously recorded in muscle groups appropriate for the patient's tics. The relationship between neuronal firing pattern and the EMG was studied. 232 neurons were recorded during tics from eight trajectories. Of these neurons, in addition to decreased neuronal firing rate and irregular firing pattern, 105 (45%) were tic related showing either a burst of activity or a pause in ongoing tonic activity. They could be synchronous (n = 75), earlier than EMG onset (n = 27) or following EMG onset (n = 3). The GPi neuronal bursts preceded EMG onset with decreased (n = 6) or increased activity (n = 21). The initial change in neural activity occurred about 50 ms to 2 s before the EMG onset. Although the data are descriptive and preliminary, the tic related neuronal activity observed in GPi appears to indicate that the basal ganglia motor circuit is involved in tic movements. The early neuronal activity seen in GPi may reflect premonitory sensations that precede a tic.

  16. The Group 2 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Agonist LY379268 Rescues Neuronal, Neurochemical and Motor Abnormalities in R6/2 Huntington’s Disease Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, A.; Lafferty, D.C.; Wang, H.B.; Del Mar, N.; Deng, Y.P.

    2012-01-01

    Excitotoxic injury to striatum by dysfunctional cortical input or aberrant glutamate uptake may contribute to Huntington’s Disease (HD) pathogenesis. Since corticostriatal terminals possess mGluR2/3 autoreceptors, whose activation dampens glutamate release, we tested the ability of the mGluR2/3 agonist LY379268 to improve the phenotype in R6/2 HD mice with 120–125 CAG repeats. Daily subcutaneous injection of a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of LY379268 (20mg/kg) had no evident adverse effects in WT mice, and diverse benefits in R6/2 mice, both in a cohort of mice tested behaviorally until the end of R6/2 lifespan and in a cohort sacrificed at 10 weeks of age for blinded histological analysis. MTD LY379268 yielded a significant 11% increase in R6/2 survival, an improvement on rotarod, normalization and/or improvement in locomotor parameters measured in open field (activity, speed, acceleration, endurance, and gait), a rescue of a 15–20% cortical and striatal neuron loss, normalization of SP striatal neuron neurochemistry, and to a lesser extent enkephalinergic striatal neuron neurochemistry. Deficits were greater in male than female R6/2 mice, and drug benefit tended to be greater in males. The improvements in SP striatal neurons, which facilitate movement, are consistent with the improved movement in LY379268-treated R6/2 mice. Our data indicate that mGluR2/3 agonists may be particularly useful for ameliorating the morphological, neurochemical and motor defects observed in HD. PMID:22472187

  17. Circadian Activators Are Expressed Days before They Initiate Clock Function in Late Pacemaker Neurons from Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianxin; Mahesh, Guruswamy; Houl, Jerry H; Hardin, Paul E

    2015-06-03

    Circadian pacemaker neurons in the Drosophila brain control daily rhythms in locomotor activity. These pacemaker neurons can be subdivided into early or late groups depending on whether rhythms in period (per) and timeless (tim) expression are initiated at the first instar (L1) larval stage or during metamorphosis, respectively. Because CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) heterodimers initiate circadian oscillator function by activating per and tim transcription, a Clk-GFP transgene was used to mark when late pacemaker neurons begin to develop. We were surprised to see that CLK-GFP was already expressed in four of five clusters of late pacemaker neurons during the third instar (L3) larval stage. CLK-GFP is only detected in postmitotic neurons from L3 larvae, suggesting that these four late pacemaker neuron clusters are formed before the L3 larval stage. A GFP-cyc transgene was used to show that CYC, like CLK, is also expressed exclusively in pacemaker neurons from L3 larval brains, demonstrating that CLK-CYC is not sufficient to activate per and tim in late pacemaker neurons at the L3 larval stage. These results suggest that most late pacemaker neurons develop days before novel factors activate circadian oscillator function during metamorphosis. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/358662-10$15.00/0.

  18. PhotoMEA: an opto-electronic biosensor for monitoring in vitro neuronal network activity.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, Diego; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Menegon, Andrea; Mantero, Sara; Valtorta, Flavia; Ferrigno, Giancarlo

    2007-02-01

    PhotoMEA is a biosensor useful for the analysis of an in vitro neuronal network, fully based on optical methods. Its function is based on the stimulation of neurons with caged glutamate and the recording of neuronal activity by Voltage-Sensitive fluorescent Dyes (VSD). The main advantage is that it will be possible to stimulate even at sub-single neuron level and to record with high resolution the activity of the entire network in the culture. A large-scale view of neuronal intercommunications offers a unique opportunity for testing the ability of drugs to affect neuronal properties as well as alterations in the behaviour of the entire network. The concept and a prototype for validation is described here in detail.

  19. Regular theta-firing neurons in the nucleus incertus during sustained hippocampal activation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bellver, Sergio; Cervera-Ferri, Ana; Martínez-Ricós, Joana; Ruiz-Torner, Amparo; Luque-Garcia, Aina; Luque-Martinez, Aina; Blasco-Serra, Arantxa; Guerrero-Martínez, Juan; Bataller-Mompeán, Manuel; Teruel-Martí, Vicent

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes the existence of theta-coupled neuronal activity in the nucleus incertus (NI). Theta rhythm is relevant for cognitive processes such as spatial navigation and memory processing, and can be recorded in a number of structures related to the hippocampal activation including the NI. Strong evidence supports the role of this tegmental nucleus in neural circuits integrating behavioural activation with the hippocampal theta rhythm. Theta oscillations have been recorded in the local field potential of the NI, highly coupled to the hippocampal waves, although no rhythmical activity has been reported in neurons of this nucleus. The present work analyses the neuronal activity in the NI in conditions leading to sustained hippocampal theta in the urethane-anaesthetised rat, in order to test whether such activation elicits a differential firing pattern. Wavelet analysis has been used to better define the neuronal activity already described in the nucleus, i.e., non-rhythmical neurons firing at theta frequency (type I neurons) and fast-firing rhythmical neurons (type II). However, the most remarkable finding was that sustained stimulation activated regular-theta neurons (type III), which were almost silent in baseline conditions and have not previously been reported. Thus, we describe the electrophysiological properties of type III neurons, focusing on their coupling to the hippocampal theta. Their spike rate, regularity and phase locking to the oscillations increased at the beginning of the stimulation, suggesting a role in the activation or reset of the oscillation. Further research is needed to address the specific contribution of these neurons to the entire circuit. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Structural abnormalities and altered regional brain activity in multiple sclerosis with simple spinal cord involvement.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ping; Liu, Yi; Xiong, Hua; Han, Yongliang; Sah, Shambhu Kumar; Zeng, Chun; Wang, Jingjie; Li, Yongmei

    2018-02-01

    To assess the changes of the structural and functional abnormalities in multiple sclerosis with simple spinal cord involvement (MS-SSCI) by using resting-state functional MRI (RS-fMRI), voxel based morphology (VBM) and diffusion tensor tractography. The amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) of 22 patients with MS-SSCI and 22 healthy controls (HCs) matched for age, gender and education were compared by using RS-fMRI. We also compared the volume, fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient of the brain regions in baseline brain activity by using VBM and diffusion tensor imaging. The relationships between the expanded disability states scale (EDSS) scores, changed parameters of structure and function were further explored. (1) Compared with HCs, the ALFF of the bilateral hippocampus and right middle temporal gyrus in MS-SSCI decreased significantly. However, patients exhibited increased ALFF in the left middle frontal gyrus, left posterior cingulate gyrus and right middle occipital gyrus ( two-sample t-test, after AlphaSim correction, p < 0.01, voxel size > 40). The volume of right middle frontal gyrus reduced significantly (p < 0.01). The FA and ADC of right hippocampus, the FA of left hippocampus and right middle temporal gyrus were significantly different. (2) A significant correlation between EDSS scores and ALFF was noted only in the left posterior cingulate gyrus. Our results detected structural and functional abnormalities in MS-SSCI and functional parameters were associated with clinical abnormalities. Multimodal imaging plays an important role in detecting structural and functional abnormalities in MS-SSCI. Advances in knowledge: This is the first time to apply RS-fMRI, VBM and diffusion tensor tractography to study the structural and functional abnormalities in MS-SSCI, and to explore its correlation with EDSS score.

  1. BDNF heightens the sensitivity of motor neurons to excitotoxic insults through activation of TrkB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Peter; Kalb, Robert G.; Walton, K. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The survival promoting and neuroprotective actions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are well known but under certain circumstances this growth factor can also exacerbate excitotoxic insults to neurons. Prior exploration of the receptor through which BDNF exerts this action on motor neurons deflects attention away from p75. Here we investigated the possibility that BDNF acts through the receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkB, to confer on motor neurons sensitivity to excitotoxic challenge. We blocked BDNF activation of TrkB using a dominant negative TrkB mutant or a TrkB function blocking antibody, and found that this protected motor neurons against excitotoxic insult in cultures of mixed spinal cord neurons. Addition of a function blocking antibody to BDNF to mixed spinal cord neuron cultures is also neuroprotective indicating that endogenously produced BDNF participates in vulnerability to excitotoxicity. We next examined the intracellular signaling cascades that are engaged upon TrkB activation. Previously we found that inhibition of the phosphatidylinositide-3'-kinase (PI3'K) pathway blocks BDNF-induced excitotoxic sensitivity. Here we show that expression of a constitutively active catalytic subunit of PI3'K, p110, confers excitotoxic sensitivity (ES) upon motor neurons not incubated with BDNF. Parallel studies with purified motor neurons confirm that these events are likely to be occuring specifically within motor neurons. The abrogation of BDNF's capacity to accentuate excitotoxic insults may make it a more attractive neuroprotective agent.

  2. Persistently active neurons in human medial frontal and medial temporal lobe support working memory

    PubMed Central

    Kamiński, J; Sullivan, S; Chung, JM; Ross, IB; Mamelak, AN; Rutishauser, U

    2017-01-01

    Persistent neural activity is a putative mechanism for the maintenance of working memories. Persistent activity relies on the activity of a distributed network of areas, but the differential contribution of each area remains unclear. We recorded single neurons in the human medial frontal cortex and the medial temporal lobe while subjects held up to three items in memory. We found persistently active neurons in both areas. Persistent activity of hippocampal and amygdala neurons was stimulus-specific, formed stable attractors, and was predictive of memory content. Medial frontal cortex persistent activity, on the other hand, was modulated by memory load and task set but was not stimulus-specific. Trial-by-trial variability in persistent activity in both areas was related to memory strength, because it predicted the speed and accuracy by which stimuli were remembered. This work reveals, in humans, direct evidence for a distributed network of persistently active neurons supporting working memory maintenance. PMID:28218914

  3. Meclozine Facilitates Proliferation and Differentiation of Chondrocytes by Attenuating Abnormally Activated FGFR3 Signaling in Achondroplasia

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Masaki; Kitoh, Hiroshi; Ohkawara, Bisei; Mishima, Kenichi; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2013-01-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH) is one of the most common skeletal dysplasias with short stature caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGFR3 encoding the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3. We used the drug repositioning strategy to identify an FDA-approved drug that suppresses abnormally activated FGFR3 signaling in ACH. We found that meclozine, an anti-histamine drug that has long been used for motion sickness, facilitates chondrocyte proliferation and mitigates loss of extracellular matrix in FGF2-treated rat chondrosarcoma (RCS) cells. Meclozine also ameliorated abnormally suppressed proliferation of human chondrosarcoma (HCS-2/8) cells that were infected with lentivirus expressing constitutively active mutants of FGFR3-K650E causing thanatophoric dysplasia, FGFR3-K650M causing SADDAN, and FGFR3-G380R causing ACH. Similarly, meclozine alleviated abnormally suppressed differentiation of ATDC5 chondrogenic cells expressing FGFR3-K650E and -G380R in micromass culture. We also confirmed that meclozine alleviates FGF2-mediated longitudinal growth inhibition of embryonic tibia in bone explant culture. Interestingly, meclozine enhanced growth of embryonic tibia in explant culture even in the absence of FGF2 treatment. Analyses of intracellular FGFR3 signaling disclosed that meclozine downregulates phosphorylation of ERK but not of MEK in FGF2-treated RCS cells. Similarly, meclozine enhanced proliferation of RCS cells expressing constitutively active mutants of MEK and RAF but not of ERK, which suggests that meclozine downregulates the FGFR3 signaling by possibly attenuating ERK phosphorylation. We used the C-natriuretic peptide (CNP) as a potent inhibitor of the FGFR3 signaling throughout our experiments, and found that meclozine was as efficient as CNP in attenuating the abnormal FGFR3 signaling. We propose that meclozine is a potential therapeutic agent for treating ACH and other FGFR3-related skeletal dysplasias. PMID:24324705

  4. Abnormal activation of the primary somatosensory cortex in spasmodic dysphonia: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Simonyan, Kristina; Ludlow, Christy L

    2010-11-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is a task-specific focal dystonia of unknown pathophysiology, characterized by involuntary spasms in the laryngeal muscles during speaking. Our aim was to identify symptom-specific functional brain activation abnormalities in adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) and abductor spasmodic dysphonia (ABSD). Both SD groups showed increased activation extent in the primary sensorimotor cortex, insula, and superior temporal gyrus during symptomatic and asymptomatic tasks and decreased activation extent in the basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum during asymptomatic tasks. Increased activation intensity in SD patients was found only in the primary somatosensory cortex during symptomatic voice production, which showed a tendency for correlation with ADSD symptoms. Both SD groups had lower correlation of activation intensities between the primary motor and sensory cortices and additional correlations between the basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum during symptomatic and asymptomatic tasks. Compared with ADSD patients, ABSD patients had larger activation extent in the primary sensorimotor cortex and ventral thalamus during symptomatic task and in the inferior temporal cortex and cerebellum during symptomatic and asymptomatic voice production. The primary somatosensory cortex shows consistent abnormalities in activation extent, intensity, correlation with other brain regions, and symptom severity in SD patients and, therefore, may be involved in the pathophysiology of SD.

  5. Abnormal Activation of the Primary Somatosensory Cortex in Spasmodic Dysphonia: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2010-01-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is a task-specific focal dystonia of unknown pathophysiology, characterized by involuntary spasms in the laryngeal muscles during speaking. Our aim was to identify symptom-specific functional brain activation abnormalities in adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) and abductor spasmodic dysphonia (ABSD). Both SD groups showed increased activation extent in the primary sensorimotor cortex, insula, and superior temporal gyrus during symptomatic and asymptomatic tasks and decreased activation extent in the basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum during asymptomatic tasks. Increased activation intensity in SD patients was found only in the primary somatosensory cortex during symptomatic voice production, which showed a tendency for correlation with ADSD symptoms. Both SD groups had lower correlation of activation intensities between the primary motor and sensory cortices and additional correlations between the basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum during symptomatic and asymptomatic tasks. Compared with ADSD patients, ABSD patients had larger activation extent in the primary sensorimotor cortex and ventral thalamus during symptomatic task and in the inferior temporal cortex and cerebellum during symptomatic and asymptomatic voice production. The primary somatosensory cortex shows consistent abnormalities in activation extent, intensity, correlation with other brain regions, and symptom severity in SD patients and, therefore, may be involved in the pathophysiology of SD. PMID:20194686

  6. Synaptic Activity in Serotonergic Neurons Is Required for Air-Puff Stimulated Flight in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Sadaf, Sufia; Birman, Serge; Hasan, Gaiti

    2012-01-01

    Background Flight is an integral component of many complex behavioral patterns in insects. The giant fiber circuit has been well studied in several insects including Drosophila. However, components of the insect flight circuit that respond to an air-puff stimulus and comprise the flight central pattern generator are poorly defined. Aminergic neurons have been implicated in locust, moth and Drosophila flight. Here we have investigated the requirement of neuronal activity in serotonergic neurons, during development and in adults, on air-puff induced flight in Drosophila. Methodology/Principal Findings To target serotonergic neurons specifically, a Drosophila strain that contains regulatory regions from the TRH (Tryptophan Hydroxylase) gene linked to the yeast transcription factor GAL4 was used. By blocking synaptic transmission from serotonergic neurons with a tetanus toxin transgene or by hyperpolarisation with Kir2.1, close to 50% adults became flightless. Temporal expression of a temperature sensitive Dynamin mutant transgene (Shits) suggests that synaptic function in serotonergic neurons is required both during development and in adults. Depletion of IP3R in serotonergic neurons via RNAi did not affect flight. Interestingly, at all stages a partial requirement for synaptic activity in serotonergic neurons was observed. The status of serotonergic neurons was investigated in the central nervous system of larvae and adults expressing tetanus toxin. A small but significant reduction was observed in serotonergic cell number in adult second thoracic segments from flightless tetanus toxin expressing animals. Conclusions These studies show that loss of synaptic activity in serotonergic neurons causes a flight deficit. The temporal focus of the flight deficit is during pupal development and in adults. The cause of the flight deficit is likely to be loss of neurons and reduced synaptic function. Based on the partial phenotypes, serotonergic neurons appear to be modulatory

  7. Activation of the Basal Forebrain by the Orexin/Hypocretin Neurons: Orexin International Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Arrigoni, Elda; Mochizuki, Takatoshi; Scammell, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    The orexin neurons play an essential role in driving arousal and in maintaining normal wakefulness. Lack of orexin neurotransmission produces a chronic state of hypoarousal characterized by excessive sleepiness, frequent transitions between wake and sleep, and episodes of cataplexy. A growing body of research now suggests that the basal forebrain (BF) may be a key site through which the orexin-producing neurons promote arousal. Here we review anatomical, pharmacological and electrophysiological studies on how the orexin neurons may promote arousal by exciting cortically-projecting neurons of the BF. Orexin fibers synapse on BF cholinergic neurons and orexin-A is released in the BF during waking. Local application of orexins excites BF cholinergic neurons, induces cortical release of acetylcholine, and promotes wakefulness. The orexin neurons also contain and probably co-release the inhibitory neuropeptide dynorphin. We found that orexin-A and dynorphin have specific effects on different classes of BF neurons that project to the cortex. Cholinergic neurons were directly excited by orexin-A, but did not respond to dynorphin. Non-cholinergic BF neurons that project to the cortex seem to comprise at least two populations with some directly excited by orexin that may represent wake-active, GABAergic neurons, whereas others did not respond to orexin but were inhibited by dynorphin and may be sleep-active, GABAergic neurons. This evidence suggests that the BF is a key site through which orexins activate the cortex and promotes behavioral arousal. In addition, orexins and dynorphin may act synergistically in the BF to promote arousal and improve cognitive performance. PMID:19723027

  8. The effects of sesquiterpenes-rich extract of Alpinia oxyphylla Miq. on amyloid-β-induced cognitive impairment and neuronal abnormalities in the cortex and hippocampus of mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shao-Huai; Zhao, Xu; Liu, Bing; Li, Huan; Liu, Ai-Jing; Wu, Bo; Bi, Kai-Shun; Jia, Ying

    2014-01-01

    As a kind of medicine which can also be used as food, Alpinia oxyphylla Miq. has a long clinical history in China. A variety of studies demonstrated the significant neuroprotective activity effects of chloroform (CF) extract from the fruits of Alpinia oxyphylla. In order to further elucidate the possible mechanisms of CF extract which mainly contains sesquiterpenes with neuroprotection on the cognitive ability, mice were injected with Aβ(1-42) and later with CF in this study. The results showed that the long-term treatment of CF enhanced the cognitive performances in behavior tests, increased activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) and decreased the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and amyloid-β (Aβ), and reversed the activation of microglia, degeneration of neuronal acidophilia, and nuclear condensation in the cortex and hippocampus. These results demonstrate that CF ameliorates learning and memory deficits by attenuating oxidative stress and regulating the activation of microglia and degeneration of neuronal acidophilia to reinforce cholinergic functions.

  9. The Effects of Sesquiterpenes-Rich Extract of Alpinia oxyphylla Miq. on Amyloid-β-Induced Cognitive Impairment and Neuronal Abnormalities in the Cortex and Hippocampus of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shao-Huai; Zhao, Xu; Liu, Bing; Li, Huan; Liu, Ai-Jing; Wu, Bo; Bi, Kai-Shun

    2014-01-01

    As a kind of medicine which can also be used as food, Alpinia oxyphylla Miq. has a long clinical history in China. A variety of studies demonstrated the significant neuroprotective activity effects of chloroform (CF) extract from the fruits of Alpinia oxyphylla. In order to further elucidate the possible mechanisms of CF extract which mainly contains sesquiterpenes with neuroprotection on the cognitive ability, mice were injected with Aβ 1−42 and later with CF in this study. The results showed that the long-term treatment of CF enhanced the cognitive performances in behavior tests, increased activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) and decreased the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and amyloid-β (Aβ), and reversed the activation of microglia, degeneration of neuronal acidophilia, and nuclear condensation in the cortex and hippocampus. These results demonstrate that CF ameliorates learning and memory deficits by attenuating oxidative stress and regulating the activation of microglia and degeneration of neuronal acidophilia to reinforce cholinergic functions. PMID:25180067

  10. Acquired granulocyte abnormality during drug allergic reactions: possible role of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Bowers, T K; Craddock, P R; Jacob, H S

    1977-01-01

    A profound defect in granulocyte chemotaxis was documented in an otherwise healthy 21-yr-old man who failed to localize granulocytes to an area of cellulitis during an allergic reaction to cephalothin. During the period of drug allergy, characterized by urticaria, eosinophilia, and profound hypocomplementemia, in vitro migration of the patient's granulocytes in the Boyden chamber was markedly impaired. Although devoid of hemolytic complement activity, the patient's serum possessed supranormal chemotactic activity, even following heat inactivation, suggesting the presence of chemotactically active complement split products. Chemotactic function improved concomitantly with steroid therapy and normalization of serum complement levels, and was entirely normal following clinical recovery and cessation of steroid therapy. The chemotactic abnormality noted in the patient's cells was reproduced in normal granulocytes by preincubation either with patient serum or with cobra venom-activated fresh (but not heated) normal serum, suggesting that in vivo exposure of granulocytes to activated complement was responsible for the patient's abnormal chemotactic response. This mechanism may contribute to the increased infection propensity noted in other conditions characterized by in vivo complement activation, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosis.

  11. Mediodorsal Thalamic Neurons Mirror the Activity of Medial Prefrontal Neurons Responding to Movement and Reinforcement during a Dynamic DNMTP Task.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rikki L A; Francoeur, Miranda J; Gibson, Brett M; Mair, Robert G

    2017-01-01

    The mediodorsal nucleus (MD) interacts with medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) to support learning and adaptive decision-making. MD receives driver (layer 5) and modulatory (layer 6) projections from PFC and is the main source of driver thalamic projections to middle cortical layers of PFC. Little is known about the activity of MD neurons and their influence on PFC during decision-making. We recorded MD neurons in rats performing a dynamic delayed nonmatching to position (dDNMTP) task and compared results to a previous study of mPFC with the same task (Onos et al., 2016). Criterion event-related responses were observed for 22% (254/1179) of neurons recorded in MD, 237 (93%) of which exhibited activity consistent with mPFC response types. More MD than mPFC neurons exhibited responses related to movement (45% vs. 29%) and reinforcement (51% vs. 27%). MD had few responses related to lever presses, and none related to preparation or memory delay, which constituted 43% of event-related activity in mPFC. Comparison of averaged normalized population activity and population response times confirmed the broad similarity of common response types in MD and mPFC and revealed differences in the onset and offset of some response types. Our results show that MD represents information about actions and outcomes essential for decision-making during dDNMTP, consistent with evidence from lesion studies that MD supports reward-based learning and action-selection. These findings support the hypothesis that MD reinforces task-relevant neural activity in PFC that gives rise to adaptive behavior.

  12. Mediodorsal Thalamic Neurons Mirror the Activity of Medial Prefrontal Neurons Responding to Movement and Reinforcement during a Dynamic DNMTP Task

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Rikki L.A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The mediodorsal nucleus (MD) interacts with medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) to support learning and adaptive decision-making. MD receives driver (layer 5) and modulatory (layer 6) projections from PFC and is the main source of driver thalamic projections to middle cortical layers of PFC. Little is known about the activity of MD neurons and their influence on PFC during decision-making. We recorded MD neurons in rats performing a dynamic delayed nonmatching to position (dDNMTP) task and compared results to a previous study of mPFC with the same task (Onos et al., 2016). Criterion event-related responses were observed for 22% (254/1179) of neurons recorded in MD, 237 (93%) of which exhibited activity consistent with mPFC response types. More MD than mPFC neurons exhibited responses related to movement (45% vs. 29%) and reinforcement (51% vs. 27%). MD had few responses related to lever presses, and none related to preparation or memory delay, which constituted 43% of event-related activity in mPFC. Comparison of averaged normalized population activity and population response times confirmed the broad similarity of common response types in MD and mPFC and revealed differences in the onset and offset of some response types. Our results show that MD represents information about actions and outcomes essential for decision-making during dDNMTP, consistent with evidence from lesion studies that MD supports reward-based learning and action-selection. These findings support the hypothesis that MD reinforces task-relevant neural activity in PFC that gives rise to adaptive behavior. PMID:29034318

  13. A RAB3GAP1 SINE Insertion in Alaskan Huskies with Polyneuropathy, Ocular Abnormalities, and Neuronal Vacuolation (POANV) Resembling Human Warburg Micro Syndrome 1 (WARBM1)

    PubMed Central

    Wiedmer, Michaela; Oevermann, Anna; Borer-Germann, Stephanie E.; Gorgas, Daniela; Shelton, G. Diane; Drögemüller, Michaela; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Henke, Diana; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-01-01

    We observed a hereditary phenotype in Alaskan Huskies that was characterized by polyneuropathy with ocular abnormalities and neuronal vacuolation (POANV). The affected dogs developed a progressive severe ataxia, which led to euthanasia between 8 and 16 months of age. The pedigrees were consistent with a monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance. We localized the causative genetic defect to a 4 Mb interval on chromosome 19 by a combined linkage and homozygosity mapping approach. Whole genome sequencing of one affected dog, an obligate carrier, and an unrelated control revealed a 218-bp SINE insertion into exon 7 of the RAB3GAP1 gene. The SINE insertion was perfectly associated with the disease phenotype in a cohort of 43 Alaskan Huskies, and it was absent from 541 control dogs of diverse other breeds. The SINE insertion induced aberrant splicing and led to a transcript with a greatly altered exon 7. RAB3GAP1 loss-of-function variants in humans cause Warburg Micro Syndrome 1 (WARBM1), which is characterized by additional developmental defects compared to canine POANV, whereas Rab3gap1-deficient mice have a much milder phenotype than either humans or dogs. Thus, the RAB3GAP1 mutant Alaskan Huskies provide an interesting intermediate phenotype that may help to better understand the function of RAB3GAP1 in development. Furthermore, the identification of the presumed causative genetic variant will enable genetic testing to avoid the nonintentional breeding of affected dogs. PMID:26596647

  14. Electrical activity controls area-specific expression of neuronal apoptosis in the mouse developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Blanquie, Oriane; Yang, Jenq-Wei; Kilb, Werner; Sharopov, Salim; Sinning, Anne; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2017-08-21

    Programmed cell death widely but heterogeneously affects the developing brain, causing the loss of up to 50% of neurons in rodents. However, whether this heterogeneity originates from neuronal identity and/or network-dependent processes is unknown. Here, we report that the primary motor cortex (M1) and primary somatosensory cortex (S1), two adjacent but functionally distinct areas, display striking differences in density of apoptotic neurons during the early postnatal period. These differences in rate of apoptosis negatively correlate with region-dependent levels of activity. Disrupting this activity either pharmacologically or by electrical stimulation alters the spatial pattern of apoptosis and sensory deprivation leads to exacerbated amounts of apoptotic neurons in the corresponding functional area of the neocortex. Thus, our data demonstrate that spontaneous and periphery-driven activity patterns are important for the structural and functional maturation of the neocortex by refining the final number of cortical neurons in a region-dependent manner.

  15. Naphthazarin protects against glutamate-induced neuronal death via activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Tae Gen; Kawamoto, Elisa M.; Yu, Qian-Sheng

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Naphthazarin activates the Nrf2/ARE pathway. •Naphthazarin induces Nrf2-driven genes in neurons and astrocytes. •Naphthazarin protects neurons against excitotoxicity. -- Abstract: Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway is an important cellular stress response pathway involved in neuroprotection. We previously screened several natural phytochemicals and identified plumbagin as a novel activator of the Nrf2/ARE pathway that can protect neurons against ischemic injury. Here we extended our studies to natural and synthetic derivatives of plumbagin. We found that 5,8-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (naphthazarin) is a potent activator of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, up-regulates the expression of Nrf2-driven genes in primary neuronal andmore » glial cultures, and protects neurons against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity.« less

  16. An Improved Ivermectin-activated Chloride Channel Receptor for Inhibiting Electrical Activity in Defined Neuronal Populations*

    PubMed Central

    Lynagh, Timothy; Lynch, Joseph W.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to silence the electrical activity of defined neuronal populations in vivo is dramatically advancing our understanding of brain function. This technology may eventually be useful clinically for treating a variety of neuropathological disorders caused by excessive neuronal activity. Several neuronal silencing methods have been developed, with the bacterial light-activated halorhodopsin and the invertebrate allatostatin-activated G protein-coupled receptor proving the most successful to date. However, both techniques may be difficult to implement clinically due to their requirement for surgically implanted stimulus delivery methods and their use of nonhuman receptors. A third silencing method, an invertebrate glutamate-gated chloride channel receptor (GluClR) activated by ivermectin, solves the stimulus delivery problem as ivermectin is a safe, well tolerated drug that reaches the brain following systemic administration. However, the limitations of this method include poor functional expression, possibly due to the requirement to coexpress two different subunits in individual neurons, and the nonhuman origin of GluClR. Here, we describe the development of a modified human α1 glycine receptor as an improved ivermectin-gated silencing receptor. The crucial development was the identification of a mutation, A288G, which increased ivermectin sensitivity almost 100-fold, rendering it similar to that of GluClR. Glycine sensitivity was eliminated via the F207A mutation. Its large unitary conductance, homomeric expression, and human origin may render the F207A/A288G α1 glycine receptor an improved silencing receptor for neuroscientific and clinical purposes. As all known highly ivermectin-sensitive GluClRs contain an endogenous glycine residue at the corresponding location, this residue appears essential for exquisite ivermectin sensitivity. PMID:20308070

  17. PPG neurons of the lower brain stem and their role in brain GLP-1 receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Cork, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    Within the brain, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) affects central autonomic neurons, including those controlling the cardiovascular system, thermogenesis, and energy balance. Additionally, GLP-1 influences the mesolimbic reward system to modulate the rewarding properties of palatable food. GLP-1 is produced in the gut and by hindbrain preproglucagon (PPG) neurons, located mainly in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and medullary intermediate reticular nucleus. Transgenic mice expressing glucagon promoter-driven yellow fluorescent protein revealed that PPG neurons not only project to central autonomic control regions and mesolimbic reward centers, but also strongly innervate spinal autonomic neurons. Therefore, these brain stem PPG neurons could directly modulate sympathetic outflow through their spinal inputs to sympathetic preganglionic neurons. Electrical recordings from PPG neurons in vitro have revealed that they receive synaptic inputs from vagal afferents entering via the solitary tract. Vagal afferents convey satiation to the brain from signals like postprandial gastric distention or activation of peripheral GLP-1 receptors. CCK and leptin, short- and long-term satiety peptides, respectively, increased the electrical activity of PPG neurons, while ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, had no effect. These findings indicate that satiation is a main driver of PPG neuronal activation. They also show that PPG neurons are in a prime position to respond to both immediate and long-term indicators of energy and feeding status, enabling regulation of both energy balance and general autonomic homeostasis. This review discusses the question of whether PPG neurons, rather than gut-derived GLP-1, are providing the physiological substrate for the effects elicited by central nervous system GLP-1 receptor activation. PMID:26290108

  18. PPG neurons of the lower brain stem and their role in brain GLP-1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Stefan; Cork, Simon C

    2015-10-15

    Within the brain, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) affects central autonomic neurons, including those controlling the cardiovascular system, thermogenesis, and energy balance. Additionally, GLP-1 influences the mesolimbic reward system to modulate the rewarding properties of palatable food. GLP-1 is produced in the gut and by hindbrain preproglucagon (PPG) neurons, located mainly in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and medullary intermediate reticular nucleus. Transgenic mice expressing glucagon promoter-driven yellow fluorescent protein revealed that PPG neurons not only project to central autonomic control regions and mesolimbic reward centers, but also strongly innervate spinal autonomic neurons. Therefore, these brain stem PPG neurons could directly modulate sympathetic outflow through their spinal inputs to sympathetic preganglionic neurons. Electrical recordings from PPG neurons in vitro have revealed that they receive synaptic inputs from vagal afferents entering via the solitary tract. Vagal afferents convey satiation to the brain from signals like postprandial gastric distention or activation of peripheral GLP-1 receptors. CCK and leptin, short- and long-term satiety peptides, respectively, increased the electrical activity of PPG neurons, while ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, had no effect. These findings indicate that satiation is a main driver of PPG neuronal activation. They also show that PPG neurons are in a prime position to respond to both immediate and long-term indicators of energy and feeding status, enabling regulation of both energy balance and general autonomic homeostasis. This review discusses the question of whether PPG neurons, rather than gut-derived GLP-1, are providing the physiological substrate for the effects elicited by central nervous system GLP-1 receptor activation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. CALHM1 deficiency impairs cerebral neuron activity and memory flexibility in mice.

    PubMed

    Vingtdeux, Valérie; Chang, Eric H; Frattini, Stephen A; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Adrien, Leslie; Strohl, Joshua J; Gibson, Elizabeth L; Ohmoto, Makoto; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Huerta, Patricio T; Marambaud, Philippe

    2016-04-12

    CALHM1 is a cell surface calcium channel expressed in cerebral neurons. CALHM1 function in the brain remains unknown, but recent results showed that neuronal CALHM1 controls intracellular calcium signaling and cell excitability, two mechanisms required for synaptic function. Here, we describe the generation of Calhm1 knockout (Calhm1(-/-)) mice and investigate CALHM1 role in neuronal and cognitive functions. Structural analysis revealed that Calhm1(-/-) brains had normal regional and cellular architecture, and showed no evidence of neuronal or synaptic loss, indicating that CALHM1 deficiency does not affect brain development or brain integrity in adulthood. However, Calhm1(-/-) mice showed a severe impairment in memory flexibility, assessed in the Morris water maze, and a significant disruption of long-term potentiation without alteration of long-term depression, measured in ex vivo hippocampal slices. Importantly, in primary neurons and hippocampal slices, CALHM1 activation facilitated the phosphorylation of NMDA and AMPA receptors by protein kinase A. Furthermore, neuronal CALHM1 activation potentiated the effect of glutamate on the expression of c-Fos and C/EBPβ, two immediate-early gene markers of neuronal activity. Thus, CALHM1 controls synaptic activity in cerebral neurons and is required for the flexible processing of memory in mice. These results shed light on CALHM1 physiology in the mammalian brain.

  20. A distinctive subpopulation of medial septal slow-firing neurons promote hippocampal activation and theta oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Chieh; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2011-01-01

    The medial septum-vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca (MSvDB) is important for normal hippocampal functions and theta oscillations. Although many previous studies have focused on understanding how MSVDB neurons fire rhythmic bursts to pace hippocampal theta oscillations, a significant portion of MSVDB neurons are slow-firing and thus do not pace theta oscillations. The function of these MSVDB neurons, especially their role in modulating hippocampal activity, remains unknown. We recorded MSVDB neuronal ensembles in behaving rats, and identified a distinct physiologically homogeneous subpopulation of slow-firing neurons (overall firing <4 Hz) that shared three features: 1) much higher firing rate during rapid eye movement sleep than during slow-wave (SW) sleep; 2) temporary activation associated with transient arousals during SW sleep; 3) brief responses (latency 15∼30 ms) to auditory stimuli. Analysis of the fine temporal relationship of their spiking and theta oscillations showed that unlike the theta-pacing neurons, the firing of these “pro-arousal” neurons follows theta oscillations. However, their activity precedes short-term increases in hippocampal oscillation power in the theta and gamma range lasting for a few seconds. Together, these results suggest that these pro-arousal slow-firing MSvDB neurons may function collectively to promote hippocampal activation. PMID:21865435

  1. Context Fear Learning Specifically Activates Distinct Populations of Neurons in Amygdala and Hypothalamus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trogrlic, Lidia; Wilson, Yvette M.; Newman, Andrew G.; Murphy, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The identity and distribution of neurons that are involved in any learning or memory event is not known. In previous studies, we identified a discrete population of neurons in the lateral amygdala that show learning-specific activation of a c-"fos"-regulated transgene following context fear conditioning. Here, we have extended these studies to…

  2. Developmental and hormonal regulation of thermosensitive neuron potential activity in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Belugin, S; Akino, K; Takamura, N; Mine, M; Romanovsky, D; Fedoseev, V; Kubarko, A; Kosaka, M; Yamashita, S

    1999-08-01

    To understand the involvement of thyroid hormone on the postnatal development of hypothalamic thermosensitive neurons, we focused on the analysis of thermosensitive neuronal activity in the preoptic and anterior hypothalamic (PO/AH) regions of developing rats with and without hypothyroidism. In euthyroid rats, the distribution of thermosensitive neurons in PO/AH showed that in 3-week-old rats (46 neurons tested), 19.5% were warm-sensitive and 80.5% were nonsensitive. In 5- to 12-week-old euthyroid rats (122 neurons), 33.6% were warm-sensitive and 66.4% were nonsensitive. In 5- to 12-week-old hypothyroid rats (108 neurons), however, 18.5% were warm-sensitive and 81.5% were nonsensitive. Temperature thresholds of warm-sensitive neurons were lower in 12-week-old euthyroid rats (36.4+/-0.2 degrees C, n = 15, p<0.01,) than in 3-week-old and in 5-week-old euthyroid rats (38.5+/-0.5 degrees C, n = 9 and 38.0+/-0.3 degrees C, n = 15, respectively). The temperature thresholds of warm-sensitive neurons in 12-week-old hypothyroid rats (39.5+/-0.3 degrees C, n = 8) were similar to that of warm-sensitive neurons of 3-week-old raats (euthyroid and hypothyroid). In contrast, there was no difference in the thresholds of warm-sensitive neurons between hypothyroid and euthyroid rats at the age of 3-5 weeks. In conclusion, monitoring the thermosensitive neuronal tissue activity demonstrated the evidence that thyroid hormone regulates the maturation of warm-sensitive hypothalamic neurons in developing rat brain by electrophysiological analysis.

  3. Abnormal medial prefrontal cortex activity in heavy cannabis users during conscious emotional evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wesley, Michael J; Lile, Joshua A; Hanlon, Colleen A; Porrino, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Long-term heavy cannabis users (cannabis users) who are not acutely intoxicated have diminished subconscious neural responsiveness to affective stimuli. This study sought to determine if abnormal processing extends to the conscious evaluation of emotional stimuli. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine brain activity as cannabis users (N = 16) and non-cannabis-using controls (N = 17) evaluated and categorized standardized International Affective Picture System (IAPS) stimuli. Individual judgments were used to isolate activity during the evaluation of emotional (i.e., emotional evaluation) or neutral (i.e., neutral evaluation) stimuli. Within- and between-group analyses were performed. Both groups judged the same stimuli as emotional and had activations in visual, midbrain, and middle cingulate cortices during emotional evaluation, relative to neutral. Within-group analyses also revealed amygdalar and inferior frontal gyrus activations in controls, but not cannabis users, and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) deactivations in cannabis users, but not controls, during emotional evaluation, relative to neutral. Between-group comparisons found that mPFC activity during positive and negative evaluation was significantly hypoactive in cannabis users, relative to controls. Abnormal neural processing of affective content extends to the level of consciousness in cannabis users. The hypoactive mPFC responses observed resembles the attenuated mPFC responses found during increased non-affective cognitive load in prior research. These findings suggest that abnormal mPFC singling in cannabis users during emotional evaluation might be associated with increased non-affective cognitive load.

  4. Abnormal Medial Prefrontal Cortex Activity in Heavy Cannabis Users During Conscious Emotional Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lile, Joshua A.; Hanlon, Colleen A.; Porrino, Linda J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Long-term heavy cannabis users (cannabis users) who are not acutely intoxicated have diminished subconscious neural responsiveness to affective stimuli. Objective This study sought to determine if abnormal processing extends to the conscious evaluation of emotional stimuli. Methods Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) was used to examine brain activity as cannabis users (N=16) and non-cannabis using controls (N=17) evaluated and categorized standardized International Affective Picture System (IAPS) stimuli. Individual judgments were used to isolate activity during the evaluation of emotional (i.e., emotional evaluation) or neutral (i.e., neutral evaluation) stimuli. Within- and between-group analyses were performed. Results Both groups judged the same stimuli as emotional and had activations in visual, midbrain, and middle cingulate cortices during emotional evaluation, relative to neutral. Within-group analyses also revealed amygdalar and inferior frontal gyrus activations in controls, but not cannabis users, and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) deactivations in cannabis users, but not controls, during emotional evaluation, relative to neutral. Between-group comparisons found that mPFC activity during positive and negative evaluation was significantly hypoactive in cannabis users, relative to controls. Conclusions Abnormal neural processing of affective content extends to the level of consciousness in cannabis users. The hypoactive mPFC responses observed resembles the attenuated mPFC responses found during increased non-affective cognitive load in prior research. These findings suggest that abnormal mPFC singling in cannabis users during emotional evaluation might be associated with increased non-affective cognitive load. PMID:26690589

  5. Modelling Feedback Excitation, Pacemaker Properties and Sensory Switching of Electrically Coupled Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Michael J.; Soffe, Stephen R.; Willshaw, David J.; Roberts, Alan

    2016-01-01

    What cellular and network properties allow reliable neuronal rhythm generation or firing that can be started and stopped by brief synaptic inputs? We investigate rhythmic activity in an electrically-coupled population of brainstem neurons driving swimming locomotion in young frog tadpoles, and how activity is switched on and off by brief sensory stimulation. We build a computational model of 30 electrically-coupled conditional pacemaker neurons on one side of the tadpole hindbrain and spinal cord. Based on experimental estimates for neuron properties, population sizes, synapse strengths and connections, we show that: long-lasting, mutual, glutamatergic excitation between the neurons allows the network to sustain rhythmic pacemaker firing at swimming frequencies following brief synaptic excitation; activity persists but rhythm breaks down without electrical coupling; NMDA voltage-dependency doubles the range of synaptic feedback strengths generating sustained rhythm. The network can be switched on and off at short latency by brief synaptic excitation and inhibition. We demonstrate that a population of generic Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons coupled by glutamatergic excitatory feedback can generate sustained asynchronous firing switched on and off synaptically. We conclude that networks of neurons with NMDAR mediated feedback excitation can generate self-sustained activity following brief synaptic excitation. The frequency of activity is limited by the kinetics of the neuron membrane channels and can be stopped by brief inhibitory input. Network activity can be rhythmic at lower frequencies if the neurons are electrically coupled. Our key finding is that excitatory synaptic feedback within a population of neurons can produce switchable, stable, sustained firing without synaptic inhibition. PMID:26824331

  6. Progesterone Directly and Rapidly Inhibits GnRH Neuronal Activity via Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1

    PubMed Central

    Bashour, Nicholas Michael

    2012-01-01

    GnRH neurons are essential for reproduction, being an integral component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Progesterone (P4), a steroid hormone, modulates reproductive behavior and is associated with rapid changes in GnRH secretion. However, a direct action of P4 on GnRH neurons has not been previously described. Receptors in the progestin/adipoQ receptor family (PAQR), as well as progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PgRMC1) and its partner serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E (nexin, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1) mRNA binding protein 1 (SERBP1), have been shown to mediate rapid progestin actions in various tissues, including the brain. This study shows that PgRMC1 and SERBP1, but not PAQR, are expressed in prenatal GnRH neurons. Expression of PgRMC1 and SERBP1 was verified in adult mouse GnRH neurons. To investigate the effect of P4 on GnRH neuronal activity, calcium imaging was used on primary GnRH neurons maintained in explants. Application of P4 significantly decreased the activity of GnRH neurons, independent of secretion of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic and glutamatergic input, suggesting a direct action of P4 on GnRH neurons. Inhibition was not blocked by RU486, an antagonist of the classic nuclear P4 receptor. Inhibition was also maintained after uncoupling of the inhibitory regulative G protein (Gi/o), the signal transduction pathway used by PAQR. However, AG-205, a PgRMC1 ligand and inhibitor, blocked the rapid P4-mediated inhibition, and inhibition of protein kinase G, thought to be activated downstream of PgRMC1, also blocked the inhibitory activity of P4. These data show for the first time that P4 can act directly on GnRH neurons through PgRMC1 to inhibit neuronal activity. PMID:22822163

  7. Dynamic synchronization of ongoing neuronal activity across spinal segments regulates sensory information flow

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Hernández, E; Chávez, D; Rudomin, P

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on the correlation between spontaneous cord dorsum potentials recorded in the lumbar spinal segments of anaesthetized cats suggested the operation of a population of dorsal horn neurones that modulates, in a differential manner, transmission along pathways mediating Ib non-reciprocal postsynaptic inhibition and pathways mediating primary afferent depolarization and presynaptic inhibition. In order to gain further insight into the possible neuronal mechanisms that underlie this process, we have measured changes in the correlation between the spontaneous activity of individual dorsal horn neurones and the cord dorsum potentials associated with intermittent activation of these inhibitory pathways. We found that high levels of neuronal synchronization within the dorsal horn are associated with states of incremented activity along the pathways mediating presynaptic inhibition relative to pathways mediating Ib postsynaptic inhibition. It is suggested that ongoing changes in the patterns of functional connectivity within a distributed ensemble of dorsal horn neurones play a relevant role in the state-dependent modulation of impulse transmission along inhibitory pathways, among them those involved in the central control of sensory information. This feature would allow the same neuronal network to be involved in different functional tasks. Key points We have examined, in the spinal cord of the anaesthetized cat, the relationship between ongoing correlated fluctuations of dorsal horn neuronal activity and state-dependent activation of inhibitory reflex pathways. We found that high levels of synchronization between the spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurones occur in association with the preferential activation of spinal pathways leading to primary afferent depolarization and presynaptic inhibition relative to activation of pathways mediating Ib postsynaptic inhibition. It is suggested that changes in synchronization of ongoing activity within a

  8. Reducing prefrontal gamma-aminobutyric acid activity induces cognitive, behavioral, and dopaminergic abnormalities that resemble schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Takeshi; Tse, Maric T; Floresco, Stan B

    2011-03-01

    Perturbations in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-related markers have been reported in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenic patients. However, a preclinical assessment of how suppression of prefrontal cortex GABA activity may reflect behavioral and cognitive pathologies observed in schizophrenia is forthcoming. We assessed the effects of pharmacologic blockade of prefrontal cortex GABA(A) receptors in rats on executive functions and other behaviors related to schizophrenia, as well as neural activity of midbrain dopamine neurons. Blockade of prefrontal cortex GABA(A) receptors with bicuculline (12.5-50 ng) did not affect working memory accuracy but did increase response latencies, resembling speed of processing deficits observed in schizophrenia. Prefrontal cortex GABA(A) blockade did not impede simple discrimination or reversal learning but did impair set-shifting in a manner dependent on when these treatments were given. Reducing GABA activity before the set-shift impaired the ability to acquire a novel strategy, whereas treatment before the initial discrimination increased perseveration during the shift. Latent inhibition was unaffected by bicuculline infusions before the preexposure/conditioning phases, suggesting that reduced prefrontal cortex GABA activity does not impair "learned irrelevance." GABA(A) blockade increased locomotor activity and showed synergic effects with a subthreshold dose of amphetamine. Furthermore, reducing medial prefrontal cortex GABA activity selectively increased phasic burst firing of ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons, without altering the their overall population activity. These results suggest that prefrontal cortex GABA hypofunction may be a key contributing factor to deficits in speed of processing, cognitive flexibility, and enhanced phasic dopamine activity observed in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2011 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Self-organization of synchronous activity propagation in neuronal networks driven by local excitation

    PubMed Central

    Bayati, Mehdi; Valizadeh, Alireza; Abbassian, Abdolhossein; Cheng, Sen

    2015-01-01

    Many experimental and theoretical studies have suggested that the reliable propagation of synchronous neural activity is crucial for neural information processing. The propagation of synchronous firing activity in so-called synfire chains has been studied extensively in feed-forward networks of spiking neurons. However, it remains unclear how such neural activity could emerge in recurrent neuronal networks through synaptic plasticity. In this study, we investigate whether local excitation, i.e., neurons that fire at a higher frequency than the other, spontaneously active neurons in the network, can shape a network to allow for synchronous activity propagation. We use two-dimensional, locally connected and heterogeneous neuronal networks with spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP). We find that, in our model, local excitation drives profound network changes within seconds. In the emergent network, neural activity propagates synchronously through the network. This activity originates from the site of the local excitation and propagates through the network. The synchronous activity propagation persists, even when the local excitation is removed, since it derives from the synaptic weight matrix. Importantly, once this connectivity is established it remains stable even in the presence of spontaneous activity. Our results suggest that synfire-chain-like activity can emerge in a relatively simple way in realistic neural networks by locally exciting the desired origin of the neuronal sequence. PMID:26089794

  10. Inhibiting cholesterol degradation induces neuronal sclerosis and epileptic activity in mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Chali, Farah; Djelti, Fathia; Eugene, Emmanuel; Valderrama, Mario; Marquer, Catherine; Aubourg, Patrick; Duykaerts, Charles; Miles, Richard; Cartier, Nathalie; Navarro, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Elevations in neuronal cholesterol have been associated with several degenerative diseases. An enhanced excitability and synchronous firing in surviving neurons are among the sequels of neuronal death in these diseases and also in some epileptic syndromes. Here, we attempted to increase neuronal cholesterol levels, using a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to suppress expression of the enzyme CYP46A1. This protein hydroxylates cholesterol and so facilitates trans-membrane extrusion. A sh-RNA CYP46A1construction coupled to an adeno-associated virus (AAV5) was injected focally and unilaterally into mouse hippocampus. It was selectively expressed first in neurons of the CA3a region. Cytoplasmic and membrane cholesterol increased, neuronal soma volume increased and then decreased before pyramidal cells died. As CA3a pyramidal cells died, inter-ictal EEG events occurred during exploration and non-REM sleep. With time, neuronal death spread to involve pyramidal cells and interneurons of the CA1 region. CA1 neuronal death was correlated with a delayed local expression of phosphorylated tau. Astrocytes were activated throughout the hippocampus and microglial activation was specific to regions of neuronal death. CA1 neuronal death was correlated with distinct aberrant EEG activity. During exploratory behaviour and rapid eye movement sleep, EEG oscillations at 7-10 Hz (theta) could accelerate to 14-21 Hz (beta) waves. They were accompanied by low amplitude, high-frequency oscillations of peak power at ~300Hz and a range of 250-350 Hz. While episodes of EEG acceleration were not correlated with changes in exploratory behaviour, they were followed in some animals by structured seizure-like discharges. These data strengthen links between increased cholesterol, neuronal sclerosis and epileptic behavior PMID:25847620

  11. Phasic Stimulation of Midbrain Dopamine Neuron Activity Reduces Salt Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Eleanor C.; Fernando, Anushka B. P.; Tossell, Kyoko; Kokkinou, Michelle; Glegola, Justyna; Howes, Oliver D.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Salt intake is an essential dietary requirement, but excessive consumption is implicated in hypertension and associated conditions. Little is known about the neural circuit mechanisms that control motivation to consume salt, although the midbrain dopamine system, which plays a key role in other reward-related behaviors, has been implicated. We, therefore, examined the effects on salt consumption of either optogenetic excitation or chemogenetic inhibition of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons in male mice. Strikingly, optogenetic excitation of dopamine neurons decreased salt intake in a rapid and reversible manner, despite a strong salt appetite. Importantly, optogenetic excitation was not aversive, did not induce hyperactivity, and did not alter salt concentration preferences in a need-free state. In addition, we found that chemogenetic inhibition of dopamine neurons had no effect on salt intake. Lastly, optogenetic excitation of dopamine neurons reduced consumption of sucrose following an overnight fast, suggesting a more general role of VTA dopamine neuron excitation in organizing motivated behaviors. PMID:29766048

  12. Matrix stiffness modulates formation and activity of neuronal networks of controlled architectures.

    PubMed

    Lantoine, Joséphine; Grevesse, Thomas; Villers, Agnès; Delhaye, Geoffrey; Mestdagh, Camille; Versaevel, Marie; Mohammed, Danahe; Bruyère, Céline; Alaimo, Laura; Lacour, Stéphanie P; Ris, Laurence; Gabriele, Sylvain

    2016-05-01

    The ability to construct easily in vitro networks of primary neurons organized with imposed topologies is required for neural tissue engineering as well as for the development of neuronal interfaces with desirable characteristics. However, accumulating evidence suggests that the mechanical properties of the culture matrix can modulate important neuronal functions such as growth, extension, branching and activity. Here we designed robust and reproducible laminin-polylysine grid micropatterns on cell culture substrates that have similar biochemical properties but a 100-fold difference in Young's modulus to investigate the role of the matrix rigidity on the formation and activity of cortical neuronal networks. We found that cell bodies of primary cortical neurons gradually accumulate in circular islands, whereas axonal extensions spread on linear tracks to connect circular islands. Our findings indicate that migration of cortical neurons is enhanced on soft substrates, leading to a faster formation of neuronal networks. Furthermore, the pre-synaptic density was two times higher on stiff substrates and consistently the number of action potentials and miniature synaptic currents was enhanced on stiff substrates. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence to indicate that matrix stiffness is a key parameter to modulate the growth dynamics, synaptic density and electrophysiological activity of cortical neuronal networks, thus providing useful information on scaffold design for neural tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Periodic activation function and a modified learning algorithm for the multivalued neuron.

    PubMed

    Aizenberg, Igor

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we consider a new periodic activation function for the multivalued neuron (MVN). The MVN is a neuron with complex-valued weights and inputs/output, which are located on the unit circle. Although the MVN outperforms many other neurons and MVN-based neural networks have shown their high potential, the MVN still has a limited capability of learning highly nonlinear functions. A periodic activation function, which is introduced in this paper, makes it possible to learn nonlinearly separable problems and non-threshold multiple-valued functions using a single multivalued neuron. We call this neuron a multivalued neuron with a periodic activation function (MVN-P). The MVN-Ps functionality is much higher than that of the regular MVN. The MVN-P is more efficient in solving various classification problems. A learning algorithm based on the error-correction rule for the MVN-P is also presented. It is shown that a single MVN-P can easily learn and solve those benchmark classification problems that were considered unsolvable using a single neuron. It is also shown that a universal binary neuron, which can learn nonlinearly separable Boolean functions, and a regular MVN are particular cases of the MVN-P.

  14. Improved expression of halorhodopsin for light-induced silencing of neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shengli; Cunha, Catarina; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Qun; Gloss, Bernd; Deisseroth, Karl; Augustine, George J.; Feng, Guoping

    2011-01-01

    The ability to control and manipulate neuronal activity within an intact mammalian brain is of key importance for mapping functional connectivity and for dissecting the neural circuitry underlying behaviors. We have previously generated transgenic mice that express channelrhodopsin-2 for light-induced activation of neurons and mapping of neural circuits. Here we describe transgenic mice that express halorhodopsin (NpHR), a light-driven chloride pump, that can be used to silence neuronal activity via light. Using the Thy-1 promoter to target NpHR expression to neurons, we found that neurons in these mice expressed high levels of NpHR-YFP and that illumination of cortical pyramidal neurons expressing NpHR-YFP led to rapid, reversible photoinhibition of action potential firing in these cells. However, NpHR-YFP expression led to the formation of numerous intracellular blebs, which may disrupt neuronal function. Labeling of various subcellular markers indicated that the blebs arise from retention of NpHR-YFP in the endoplasmic reticulum. By improving the signal peptide sequence and adding an ER export signal to NpHR-YFP, we eliminated the formation of blebs and dramatically increased the membrane expression of NpHR-YFP. Thus, the improved version of NpHR should serve as an excellent tool for neuronal silencing in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18931914

  15. Activation of oral trigeminal neurons by fatty acids is dependent upon intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian; Shah, Bhavik P; Hansen, Dane R; Park-York, MieJung; Gilbertson, Timothy A

    2012-08-01

    The chemoreception of dietary fat in the oral cavity has largely been attributed to activation of the somatosensory system that conveys the textural properties of fat. However, the ability of fatty acids, which are believed to represent the proximate stimulus for fat taste, to stimulate rat trigeminal neurons has remained unexplored. Here, we found that several free fatty acids are capable of activating trigeminal neurons with different kinetics. Further, a polyunsaturated fatty acid, linoleic acid (LA), activates trigeminal neurons by increasing intracellular calcium concentration and generating depolarizing receptor potentials. Ion substitution and pharmacological approaches reveal that intracellular calcium store depletion is crucial for LA-induced signaling in a subset of trigeminal neurons. Using pseudorabies virus (PrV) as a live cell tracer, we identified a subset of lingual nerve-innervated trigeminal neurons that respond to different subsets of fatty acids. Quantitative real-time PCR of several transient receptor potential channel markers in individual neurons validated that PrV labeled a subset but not the entire population of lingual-innervated trigeminal neurons. We further confirmed that the LA-induced intracellular calcium rise is exclusively coming from the release of calcium stores from the endoplasmic reticulum in this subset of lingual nerve-innervated trigeminal neurons.

  16. Importance of being Nernst: Synaptic activity and functional relevance in stem cell-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Aaron B; McNutt, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    Functional synaptogenesis and network emergence are signature endpoints of neurogenesis. These behaviors provide higher-order confirmation that biochemical and cellular processes necessary for neurotransmitter release, post-synaptic detection and network propagation of neuronal activity have been properly expressed and coordinated among cells. The development of synaptic neurotransmission can therefore be considered a defining property of neurons. Although dissociated primary neuron cultures readily form functioning synapses and network behaviors in vitro, continuously cultured neurogenic cell lines have historically failed to meet these criteria. Therefore, in vitro-derived neuron models that develop synaptic transmission are critically needed for a wide array of studies, including molecular neuroscience, developmental neurogenesis, disease research and neurotoxicology. Over the last decade, neurons derived from various stem cell lines have shown varying ability to develop into functionally mature neurons. In this review, we will discuss the neurogenic potential of various stem cells populations, addressing strengths and weaknesses of each, with particular attention to the emergence of functional behaviors. We will propose methods to functionally characterize new stem cell-derived neuron (SCN) platforms to improve their reliability as physiological relevant models. Finally, we will review how synaptically active SCNs can be applied to accelerate research in a variety of areas. Ultimately, emphasizing the critical importance of synaptic activity and network responses as a marker of neuronal maturation is anticipated to result in in vitro findings that better translate to efficacious clinical treatments. PMID:26240679

  17. The Itch-Producing Agents Histamine and Cowhage Activate Separate Populations of Primate Spinothalamic Tract Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Steve; Zhang, Xijing; Yoon, Chul H.; Khasabov, Sergey G.; Simone, Donald A.; Giesler, Glenn J.

    2010-01-01

    Itch is an everyday sensation, but when associated with disease or infection it can be chronic and debilitating. Several forms of itch can be blocked using antihistamines, but others cannot and these constitute an important clinical problem. Little information is available on the mechanisms underlying itch that is produced by nonhistaminergic mechanisms. We examined the responses of spinothalamic tract neurons to histaminergic and, for the first time, nonhistaminergic forms of itch stimuli. Fifty-seven primate spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons were identified using antidromic activation techniques and examined for their responses to histamine and cowhage, the nonhistaminergic itch-producing spicules covering the pod of the legume Mucuna pruriens. Each examined neuron had a receptive field on the hairy skin of the hindlimb and responded to noxious mechanical stimulation. STT neurons were tested with both pruritogens applied in a random order and we found 12 that responded to histamine and seven to cowhage. Each pruritogen-responsive STT neuron was activated by the chemical algogen capsaicin and two-thirds responded to noxious heat stimuli, demonstrating that these neurons convey chemical, thermal, and mechanical nociceptive information as well. Histamine or cowhage responsive STT neurons were found in both the marginal zone and the deep dorsal horn and were classified as high threshold and wide dynamic range. Unexpectedly, histamine and cowhage never activated the same cell. Our results demonstrate that the spinothalamic tract contains mutually exclusive populations of neurons responsive to histamine or the nonhistaminergic itch-producing agent cowhage. PMID:17855615

  18. Activation of Oral Trigeminal Neurons by Fatty Acids is Dependent upon Intracellular Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tian; Shah, Bhavik P.; Hansen, Dane R.; Park-York, MieJung; Gilbertson, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    The chemoreception of dietary fat in the oral cavity has largely been attributed to activation of the somatosensory system that conveys the textural properties of fat. However, the ability of fatty acids, which are believed to represent the proximate stimulus for fat taste, to stimulate rat trigeminal neurons has remained unexplored. Here, we found that several free fatty acids are capable of activating trigeminal neurons with different kinetics. Further, a polyunsaturated fatty acid, linoleic acid (LA), activates trigeminal neurons by increasing intracellular calcium concentration and generating depolarizing receptor potentials. Ion substitution and pharmacological approaches reveal that intracellular calcium store depletion is crucial for LA-induced signaling in a subset of trigeminal neurons. Using pseudorabies virus (PrV) as a live cell tracer, we identified a subset of lingual nerve-innervated trigeminal neurons that respond to different subsets of fatty acids. Quantitative real-time PCR of several transient receptor potential (TRP) channel markers in individual neurons validated that PrV labeled a subset but not the entire population of lingual-innervated trigeminal neurons. We further confirmed that the LA-induced intracellular calcium rise is exclusively coming from the release of calcium stores from the endoplasmic reticulum in this subset of lingual nerve-innervated trigeminal neurons. PMID:22644615

  19. Are barriers to physical activity similar for adults with and without abnormal glucose metabolism?

    PubMed

    Hume, Clare; Dunstan, David; Salmon, Jo; Healy, Genevieve; Andrianopoulos, Nick; Owen, Neville

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine perceived barriers to physical activity among adults with and without abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM), and whether barriers varied according to physical activity status. The 1999 to 2000 Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab) was a population-based cross-sectional study among adults aged > or =25 years. AGM was identified through an oral glucose tolerance test. The previous week's physical activity and individual, social, and environmental barriers to physical activity were self-reported. Logistic regression analyses examined differences in barriers to physical activity between those with and without AGM, and for those with and without AGM who did and did not meet the minimum recommendation of 150 minutes/week of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity. Of the 7088 participants (47.5 +/- 12.7 years; 46% male), 18.5% had AGM. Approximately 47.5% of those with AGM met the physical activity recommendation, compared to 54.7% of those without AGM (P < .001). Key barriers to physical activity included lack of time, other priorities, and being tired. Following adjustment for sociodemographic and behavioral factors, there were few differences in barriers to physical activity between those with and without AGM, even after stratifying according to physical activity. Adults with AGM report similar barriers to physical activity, as do those without AGM. Programs for those with AGM can therefore focus on the known generic adult-reported barriers to physical activity.

  20. Abnormal brain activation during directed forgetting of negative memory in depressed patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjing; Chen, Qunlin; Liu, Peiduo; Cheng, Hongsheng; Cui, Qian; Wei, Dongtao; Zhang, Qinglin; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-01-15

    The frequent occurrence of uncontrollable negative thoughts and memories is a troubling aspect of depression. Thus, knowledge on the mechanism underlying intentional forgetting of these thoughts and memories is crucial to develop an effective emotion regulation strategy for depressed individuals. Behavioral studies have demonstrated that depressed participants cannot intentionally forget negative memories. However, the neural mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, participants completed the directed forgetting task in which they were instructed to remember or forget neutral or negative words. Standard univariate analysis based on the General Linear Model showed that the depressed participants have higher activation in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), superior frontal gyrus (SFG), superior parietal gyrus (SPG), and inferior temporal gyrus (ITG) than the healthy individuals. The results indicated that depressed participants recruited more frontal and parietal inhibitory control resources to inhibit the TBF items, but the attempt still failed because of negative bias. We also used the Support Vector Machine to perform multivariate pattern classification based on the brain activation during directed forgetting. The pattern of brain activity in directed forgetting of negative words allowed correct group classification with an overall accuracy of 75% (P=0.012). The brain regions which are critical for this discrimination showed abnormal activation when depressed participants were attempting to forget negative words. These results indicated that the abnormal neural circuitry when depressed individuals tried to forget the negative words might provide neurobiological markers for depression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hypothermia-induced dystonia and abnormal cerebellar activity in a mouse model with a single disease-mutation in the sodium-potassium pump

    PubMed Central

    Isaksen, Toke Jost; Vedovato, Natascia; Vitenzon, Ariel; Gadsby, David C.; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the neuron-specific α3 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase are found in patients suffering from Rapid onset Dystonia Parkinsonism and Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood, two closely related movement disorders. We show that mice harboring a heterozygous hot spot disease mutation, D801Y (α3+/D801Y), suffer abrupt hypothermia-induced dystonia identified by electromyographic recordings. Single-neuron in vivo recordings in awake α3+/D801Y mice revealed irregular firing of Purkinje cells and their synaptic targets, the deep cerebellar nuclei neurons, which was further exacerbated during dystonia and evolved into abnormal high-frequency burst-like firing. Biophysically, we show that the D-to-Y mutation abolished pump-mediated Na+/K+ exchange, but allowed the pumps to bind Na+ and become phosphorylated. These findings implicate aberrant cerebellar activity in α3 isoform-related dystonia and add to the functional understanding of the scarce and severe mutations in the α3 isoform Na+/K+-ATPase. PMID:28472154

  2. Ran-dependent TPX2 activation promotes acentrosomal microtubule nucleation in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Shin; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Yung-An; Hsieh, Bing-Yuan; Chiu, Ho-Chieh; Kao, Pei-Ying; Chao, Chih-Yuan; Hwang, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is essential for the formation of morphologically appropriate neurons. The existence of the acentrosomal MT organizing center in neurons has been proposed but its identity remained elusive. Here we provide evidence showing that TPX2 is an important component of this acentrosomal MT organizing center. First, neurite elongation is compromised in TPX2-depleted neurons. In addition, TPX2 localizes to the centrosome and along the neurite shaft bound to MTs. Depleting TPX2 decreases MT formation frequency specifically at the tip and the base of the neurite, and these correlate precisely with the regions where active GTP-bound Ran proteins are enriched. Furthermore, overexpressing the downstream effector of Ran, importin, compromises MT formation and neuronal morphogenesis. Finally, applying a Ran-importin signaling interfering compound phenocopies the effect of TPX2 depletion on MT dynamics. Together, these data suggest a model in which Ran-dependent TPX2 activation promotes acentrosomal MT nucleation in neurons. PMID:28205572

  3. A new era for functional labeling of neurons: activity-dependent promoters have come of age

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Takashi; Okuno, Hiroyuki; Bito, Haruhiko

    2014-01-01

    Genetic labeling of neurons with a specific response feature is an emerging technology for precise dissection of brain circuits that are functionally heterogeneous at the single-cell level. While immediate early gene mapping has been widely used for decades to identify brain regions which are activated by external stimuli, recent characterization of the promoter and enhancer elements responsible for neuronal activity-dependent transcription have opened new avenues for live imaging of active neurons. Indeed, these advancements provided the basis for a growing repertoire of novel experiments to address the role of active neuronal networks in cognitive behaviors. In this review, we summarize the current literature on the usage and development of activity-dependent promoters and discuss the future directions of this expanding new field. PMID:24795570

  4. Neuronal activity related to spontaneous and capsaicin-induced rhythmical jaw movements in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ohta, M; Sasamoto, K; Kobayashi, J

    1998-02-01

    Intraoral capsaicin induced rhythmical jaw movements (RJM) in anesthetized rats. Neurons in the trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis or the cortico-peduncular (CP) axons were extracellularly recorded. Capsaicin excited dose-dependently most caudalis neurons, which were activated by stimulation of the oral cavity and/or the tooth pulp and activated during spontaneous or induced RJM. Ten of 55 CP axons were antidromically activated by stimulation of the contralateral trigeminal motor nucleus. All antidromic and 29 other CP axons discharged prior to the spontaneous RJM, but most of them did not during capsaicin-induced RJM. These neuronal activities possibly initiate spontaneous RJM although the activities of caudalis neurons are necessary for capsicin-induced RJM.

  5. Activation of anorexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin neurones during refeeding is independent of vagal and brainstem inputs.

    PubMed

    Fekete, C; Zséli, G; Singru, P S; Kádár, A; Wittmann, G; Füzesi, T; El-Bermani, W; Lechan, R M

    2012-11-01

    After fasting, satiety is observed within 2 h after reintroducing food, accompanied by activation of anorexigenic, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-synthesising neurones in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), indicative of the critical role that α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone has in the regulation of meal size during refeeding. To determine whether refeeding-induced activation of POMC neurones in the arcuate is dependent upon the vagus nerve and/or ascending brainstem pathways, bilateral subdiaphragmatic vagotomy or transection of the afferent brainstem input to one side of the ARC was performed. One day after vagotomy or 2 weeks after brain surgery, animals were fasted and then refed for 2 h. Sections containing the ARC from vagotomised animals or animals with effective transection were immunostained for c-Fos and POMC to detect refeeding-induced activation of POMC neurones. Quantitative analyses of double-labelled preparations demonstrated that sham-operated and vagotomised animals markedly increased the number of c-Fos-immunoreactive (-IR) POMC neurones with refeeding. Furthermore, transection of the ascending brainstem pathway had no effect on diminishing c-Fos-immunoreactivity in POMC neurones on either side of the ARC, although it did diminish activation in a separate, subpopulation of neurones in the dorsomedial posterior ARC (dmpARC) on the transected side. We conclude that inputs mediated via the vagus nerve and/or arising from the brainstem do not have a primary role in refeeding-induced activation of POMC neurones in the ARC, and propose that these neurones may be activated solely by direct effects of circulating hormones/metabolites during refeeding. Activation of the dmpARC by refeeding indicates a previously unrecognised role for these neurones in appetite regulation in the rat. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2012 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  6. Possible involvement of 12-lipoxygenase activation in glucose-deprivation/reload-treated neurons.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Kazuki; Kakuda, Taichi; Higashi, Youichirou; Fujimoto, Sadaki

    2007-12-18

    The aim of this study was to clarify whether 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) activation was involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, extensive poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation and neuronal death induced by glucose-deprivation, followed by glucose-reload (GD/R). The decrease of neuronal viability and accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose) induced by GD/R were prevented 3-aminobenzamide, a representative PARP inhibitor, demonstrating this treatment protocol caused the same oxidative stress with the previously reported one. The PARP activation, ROS generation and decrease of neuron viability induced by GD/R treatment were almost completely abolished by an extracellular zinc chelator, CaEDTA. p47(phox), a cytosolic component of NADPH oxidase was translocated the membrane fraction by GD/R, indicating its activation, but it did not generate detectable ROS. Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase with apocynin and AEBSF further decreased the decreased neuron viability induced by GD/R. On the other hand, AA861, a 12-LOX inhibitor, prevented ROS generation and decrease of neuron viability caused by GD/R. Interestingly, an antioxidant, N-acetyl-l-cysteine rescued the neurons from GD/R-induced oxidative stress, implying effectiveness of antioxidant administration. These findings suggested that activation of 12-LOX, but not NADPH oxidase, following to zinc release might play an important role in ROS generation and decrease of viability in GD/R-treated neurons.

  7. Motor neuronal activity varies least among individuals when it matters most for behavior

    PubMed Central

    Cullins, Miranda J.; Shaw, Kendrick M.; Gill, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    How does motor neuronal variability affect behavior? To explore this question, we quantified activity of multiple individual identified motor neurons mediating biting and swallowing in intact, behaving Aplysia californica by recording from the protractor muscle and the three nerves containing the majority of motor neurons controlling the feeding musculature. We measured multiple motor components: duration of the activity of identified motor neurons as well as their relative timing. At the same time, we measured behavioral efficacy: amplitude of grasping movement during biting and amplitude of net inward food movement during swallowing. We observed that the total duration of the behaviors varied: Within animals, biting duration shortened from the first to the second and third bites; between animals, biting and swallowing durations varied. To study other sources of variation, motor components were divided by behavior duration (i.e., normalized). Even after normalization, distributions of motor component durations could distinguish animals as unique individuals. However, the degree to which a motor component varied among individuals depended on the role of that motor component in a behavior. Motor neuronal activity that was essential for the expression of biting or swallowing was similar among animals, whereas motor neuronal activity that was not essential for that behavior varied more from individual to individual. These results suggest that motor neuronal activity that matters most for the expression of a particular behavior may vary least from individual to individual. Shaping individual variability to ensure behavioral efficacy may be a general principle for the operation of motor systems. PMID:25411463

  8. Reduction in voltage-gated K+ channel activity in primary sensory neurons in painful diabetic neuropathy: role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xue-Hong; Byun, Hee-Sun; Chen, Shao-Rui; Cai, You-Qing; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2010-09-01

    Abnormal hyperexcitability of primary sensory neurons plays an important role in neuropathic pain. Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels regulate neuronal excitability by affecting the resting membrane potential and influencing the repolarization and frequency of the action potential. In this study, we determined changes in Kv channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in a rat model of diabetic neuropathic pain. The densities of total Kv, A-type (IA) and sustained delayed (IK) currents were markedly reduced in medium- and large-, but not in small-, diameter DRG neurons in diabetic rats. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the mRNA levels of IA subunits, including Kv1.4, Kv3.4, Kv4.2, and Kv4.3, in the DRG were reduced approximately 50% in diabetic rats compared with those in control rats. However, there were no significant differences in the mRNA levels of IK subunits (Kv1.1, Kv1.2, Kv2.1, and Kv2.2) in the DRG between the two groups. Incubation with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) caused a large reduction in Kv currents, especially IA currents, in medium and large DRG neurons from control rats. Furthermore, the reductions in Kv currents and mRNA levels of IA subunits in diabetic rats were normalized by pre-treatment with anti-BDNF antibody or K252a, a TrkB tyrosine kinase inhibitor. In addition, the number of medium and large DRG neurons with BDNF immunoreactivity was greater in diabetic than control rats. Collectively, our findings suggest that diabetes primarily reduces Kv channel activity in medium and large DRG neurons. Increased BDNF activity in these neurons likely contributes to the reduction in Kv channel function through TrkB receptor stimulation in painful diabetic neuropathy.

  9. Neuropeptide S Activates Paraventricular Oxytocin Neurons to Induce Anxiolysis.

    PubMed

    Grund, Thomas; Goyon, Stephanie; Li, Yuting; Eliava, Marina; Liu, Haikun; Charlet, Alexandre; Grinevich, Valery; Neumann, Inga D

    2017-12-13

    Neuropeptides, such as neuropeptide S (NPS) and oxytocin (OXT), represent potential options for the treatment of anxiety disorders due to their potent anxiolytic profile. In this study, we aimed to reveal the mechanisms underlying the behavioral action of NPS, and present a chain of evidence that the effects of NPS within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) are mediated via actions on local OXT neurons in male Wistar rats. First, retrograde studies identified NPS fibers originating in the brainstem locus coeruleus, and projecting to the PVN. FACS identified prominent NPS receptor expression in PVN-OXT neurons. Using genetically encoded calcium indicators, we further demonstrated that NPS reliably induces a transient increase in intracellular Ca 2+ concentration in a subpopulation of OXT neurons, an effect mediated by NPS receptor. In addition, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) NPS evoked a significant somatodendritic release of OXT within the PVN as assessed by microdialysis in combination with a highly sensitive radioimmunoassay. Finally, we could show that the anxiolytic effect of NPS seen after i.c.v. or intra-PVN infusion requires responsive OXT neurons of the PVN and locally released OXT. Thus, pharmacological blockade of OXT receptors as well as chemogenetic silencing of OXT neurons within the PVN prevented the effect of synthetic NPS. In conclusion, our results indicate a significant role of the OXT system in mediating the effects of NPS on anxiety, and fill an important gap in our understanding of brain neuropeptide interactions in the context of regulation of emotional behavior within the hypothalamus. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Given the rising scientific interest in neuropeptide research in the context of emotional and stress-related behaviors, our findings demonstrate a novel intrahypothalamic mechanism involving paraventricular oxytocin neurons that express the neuropeptide S receptor. These neurons respond with transient Ca 2+ increase and

  10. BPA Directly Decreases GnRH Neuronal Activity via Noncanonical Pathway.

    PubMed

    Klenke, Ulrike; Constantin, Stephanie; Wray, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral feedback of gonadal estrogen to the hypothalamus is critical for reproduction. Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental pollutant with estrogenic actions, can disrupt this feedback and lead to infertility in both humans and animals. GnRH neurons are essential for reproduction, serving as an important link between brain, pituitary, and gonads. Because GnRH neurons express several receptors that bind estrogen, they are potential targets for endocrine disruptors. However, to date, direct effects of BPA on GnRH neurons have not been shown. This study investigated the effects of BPA on GnRH neuronal activity using an explant model in which large numbers of primary GnRH neurons are maintained and express many of the receptors found in vivo. Because oscillations in intracellular calcium have been shown to correlate with electrical activity in GnRH neurons, calcium imaging was used to assay the effects of BPA. Exposure to 50μM BPA significantly decreased GnRH calcium activity. Blockage of γ-aminobutyric acid ergic and glutamatergic input did not abrogate the inhibitory BPA effect, suggesting direct regulation of GnRH neurons by BPA. In addition to estrogen receptor-β, single-cell RT-PCR analysis confirmed that GnRH neurons express G protein-coupled receptor 30 (G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1) and estrogen-related receptor-γ, all potential targets for BPA. Perturbation studies of the signaling pathway revealed that the BPA-mediated inhibition of GnRH neuronal activity occurred independent of estrogen receptors, GPER, or estrogen-related receptor-γ, via a noncanonical pathway. These results provide the first evidence of a direct effect of BPA on GnRH neurons.

  11. BPA Directly Decreases GnRH Neuronal Activity via Noncanonical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Klenke, Ulrike; Constantin, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral feedback of gonadal estrogen to the hypothalamus is critical for reproduction. Bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental pollutant with estrogenic actions, can disrupt this feedback and lead to infertility in both humans and animals. GnRH neurons are essential for reproduction, serving as an important link between brain, pituitary, and gonads. Because GnRH neurons express several receptors that bind estrogen, they are potential targets for endocrine disruptors. However, to date, direct effects of BPA on GnRH neurons have not been shown. This study investigated the effects of BPA on GnRH neuronal activity using an explant model in which large numbers of primary GnRH neurons are maintained and express many of the receptors found in vivo. Because oscillations in intracellular calcium have been shown to correlate with electrical activity in GnRH neurons, calcium imaging was used to assay the effects of BPA. Exposure to 50μM BPA significantly decreased GnRH calcium activity. Blockage of γ-aminobutyric acid ergic and glutamatergic input did not abrogate the inhibitory BPA effect, suggesting direct regulation of GnRH neurons by BPA. In addition to estrogen receptor-β, single-cell RT-PCR analysis confirmed that GnRH neurons express G protein-coupled receptor 30 (G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1) and estrogen-related receptor-γ, all potential targets for BPA. Perturbation studies of the signaling pathway revealed that the BPA-mediated inhibition of GnRH neuronal activity occurred independent of estrogen receptors, GPER, or estrogen-related receptor-γ, via a noncanonical pathway. These results provide the first evidence of a direct effect of BPA on GnRH neurons. PMID:26934298

  12. Modulation and detection of single neuron activity using spin transfer nano-oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algarin, Jose Miguel; Ramaswamy, Bharath; Venuti, Lucy; Swierzbinski, Matthew; Villar, Pablo; Chen, Yu-Jin; Krivorotov, Ilya; Weinberg, Irving N.; Herberholz, Jens; Araneda, Ricardo; Shapiro, Benjamin; Waks, Edo

    2017-09-01

    The brain is a complex network of interconnected circuits that exchange electrical signals with each other. These electrical signals provide insight on how neural circuits code information, and give rise to sensations, thoughts, emotions and actions. Currents methods to detect and modulate these electrical signals use implanted electrodes or optical fields with light sensitive dyes in the brain. These techniques require complex surgeries or suffer low resolution. In this talk we explore a new method to both image and stimulate single neurons using spintronics. We propose using a Spin Transfer Nano-Oscillators (STNOs) as a nanoscale sensor that converts neuronal action potentials to microwave field oscillations that can be detected wirelessly by magnetic induction. We will describe our recent proof-of-concept demonstration of both detection and wireless modulation of neuronal activity using STNOs. For detection we use electrodes to connect a STNO to a lateral giant crayfish neuron. When we stimulate the neuron, the STNO responds to the neuronal activity with a corresponding microwave signal. For modulation, we stimulate the STNOs wirelessly using an inductively coupled solenoid. The STNO rectifies the induced microwave signal to produce a direct voltage. This direct voltage from the STNO, when applied in the vicinity of a mammalian neuron, changes the frequency of electrical signals produced by the neuron.

  13. Neuropeptide Secreted from a Pacemaker Activates Neurons to Control a Rhythmic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Girskis, Kelly; Janssen, Tom; Chan, Jason P.; Dasgupta, Krishnakali; Knowles, James A.; Schoofs, Liliane; Sieburth, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Rhythmic behaviors are driven by endogenous biological clocks in pacemakers, which must reliably transmit timing information to target tissues that execute rhythmic outputs. During the defecation motor program in C. elegans, calcium oscillations in the pacemaker (intestine), which occur about every 50 seconds, trigger rhythmic enteric muscle contractions through downstream GABAergic neurons that innervate enteric muscles. However, the identity of the timing signal released by the pacemaker and the mechanism underlying the delivery of timing information to the GABAergic neurons are unknown. Results Here we show that a neuropeptide-like protein (NLP-40) released by the pacemaker triggers a single rapid calcium transient in the GABAergic neurons during each defecation cycle. We find that mutants lacking nlp-40 have normal pacemaker function, but lack enteric muscle contractions. NLP-40 undergoes calcium-dependent release that is mediated by the calcium sensor, SNT-2/synaptotagmin. We identify AEX-2, the G protein-coupled receptor on the GABAergic neurons, as the receptor of NLP-40. Functional calcium imaging reveals that NLP-40 and AEX-2/GPCR are both necessary for rhythmic activation of these neurons. Furthermore, acute application of synthetic NLP-40-derived peptide depolarizes the GABAergic neurons in vivo. Conclusions Our results show that NLP-40 carries the timing information from the pacemaker via calcium-dependent release and delivers it to the GABAergic neurons by instructing their activation. Thus, we propose that rhythmic release of neuropeptides can deliver temporal information from pacemakers to downstream neurons to execute rhythmic behaviors. PMID:23583549

  14. Basal Ganglia Neuronal Activity during Scanning Eye Movements in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sieger, Tomáš; Bonnet, Cecilia; Serranová, Tereza; Wild, Jiří; Novák, Daniel; Růžička, Filip; Urgošík, Dušan; Růžička, Evžen; Gaymard, Bertrand; Jech, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The oculomotor role of the basal ganglia has been supported by extensive evidence, although their role in scanning eye movements is poorly understood. Nineteen Parkinsońs disease patients, which underwent implantation of deep brain stimulation electrodes, were investigated with simultaneous intraoperative microelectrode recordings and single channel electrooculography in a scanning eye movement task by viewing a series of colored pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System. Four patients additionally underwent a visually guided saccade task. Microelectrode recordings were analyzed selectively from the subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra pars reticulata and from the globus pallidus by the WaveClus program which allowed for detection and sorting of individual neurons. The relationship between neuronal firing rate and eye movements was studied by crosscorrelation analysis. Out of 183 neurons that were detected, 130 were found in the subthalamic nucleus, 30 in the substantia nigra and 23 in the globus pallidus. Twenty percent of the neurons in each of these structures showed eye movement-related activity. Neurons related to scanning eye movements were mostly unrelated to the visually guided saccades. We conclude that a relatively large number of basal ganglia neurons are involved in eye motion control. Surprisingly, neurons related to scanning eye movements differed from neurons activated during saccades suggesting functional specialization and segregation of both systems for eye movement control. PMID:24223158

  15. Cannabinoid effects on β amyloid fibril and aggregate formation, neuronal and microglial-activated neurotoxicity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Janefjord, Emelie; Mååg, Jesper L V; Harvey, Benjamin S; Smid, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid (CB) ligands have demonstrated neuroprotective properties. In this study we compared the effects of a diverse set of CB ligands against β amyloid-mediated neuronal toxicity and activated microglial-conditioned media-based neurotoxicity in vitro, and compared this with a capacity to directly alter β amyloid (Aβ) fibril or aggregate formation. Neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells were exposed to Aβ1-42 directly or microglial (BV-2 cells) conditioned media activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence of the CB1 receptor-selective agonist ACEA, CB2 receptor-selective agonist JWH-015, phytocannabinoids Δ(9)-THC and cannabidiol (CBD), the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) and anandamide or putative GPR18/GPR55 ligands O-1602 and abnormal-cannabidiol (Abn-CBD). TNF-α and nitrite production was measured in BV-2 cells to compare activation via LPS or albumin with Aβ1-42. Aβ1-42 evoked a concentration-dependent loss of cell viability in SH-SY5Y cells but negligible TNF-α and nitrite production in BV-2 cells compared to albumin or LPS. Both albumin and LPS-activated BV-2 conditioned media significantly reduced neuronal cell viability but were directly innocuous to SH-SY5Y cells. Of those CB ligands tested, only 2-AG and CBD were directly protective against Aβ-evoked SH-SY5Y cell viability, whereas JWH-015, THC, CBD, Abn-CBD and O-1602 all protected SH-SY5Y cells from BV-2 conditioned media activated via LPS. While CB ligands variably altered the morphology of Aβ fibrils and aggregates, there was no clear correlation between effects on Aβ morphology and neuroprotective actions. These findings indicate a neuroprotective action of CB ligands via actions at microglial and neuronal cells.

  16. GHRELIN ACTIVATES HYPOPHYSIOTROPIC CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING FACTOR NEURONS INDEPENDENTLY OF THE ARCUATE NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Agustina; Portiansky, Enrique; Sánchez-Jaramillo, Edith; Zigman, Jeffrey M.; Perello, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has established that the hormone ghrelin engages the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal neuroendocrine axis via activation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). The neuronal circuitry that mediates this effect of ghrelin is currently unknown. Here, we show that ghrelin-induced activation of PVN CRF neurons involved inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inputs, likely via ghrelin binding sites that were localized at GABAergic terminals within the PVN. While ghrelin activated PVN CRF neurons in the presence of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor antagonists or in arcuate nucleus (ARC)-ablated mice, it failed to do it so in mice with ghrelin receptor expression limited to ARC agouti gene related protein (AgRP)/NPY neurons. These data support the notion that ghrelin activates PVN CRF neurons via inhibition of local GABAergic tone, in an ARC-independent manner. Furthermore, these data suggest that the neuronal circuits mediating ghrelin’s orexigenic action vs. its role as a stress signal are anatomically dissociated. PMID:26874559

  17. Patterns of fast synaptic cholinergic activation of neurons in the celiac ganglia of cats.

    PubMed

    Niel, J P; Clerc, N; Jule, Y

    1988-12-01

    Fast nicotinic transmission was studied in vitro in neurons of isolated cat celiac ganglia. In the absence of nerve stimulation, neurons could be classified into three types: silent neurons, synaptically activated neurons, and spontaneously discharging neurons. In all three types, fast synaptic activation could be obtained in single neurons by stimulating with a single pulse both the splanchnic nerves or one of the peripheral nerves connected to the ganglia. During repetitive nerve stimulation, a gradual depression of the central and peripheral fast nicotinic activation occurred, which was not affected by phentolamine plus propranolol, domperidone, atropine, or naloxone. Repetitive nerve stimulation was followed by a long lasting discharge of excitatory postsynaptic potentials and action potentials that decreased gradually with time. This discharge, which was probably due to presynaptic or prejunctional facilitation of acetylcholine release from cholinergic terminals, was reduced by the application of phentolamine plus propranolol, domperidone, or atropine and increased with naloxone. The existence of the mechanisms described in this study reflects the complexity of the integrative processes at work in neurons of the cat celiac ganglia that involve fast synaptic cholinergic activation.

  18. Abnormal activation of the social brain during face perception in autism.

    PubMed

    Hadjikhani, Nouchine; Joseph, Robert M; Snyder, Josh; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2007-05-01

    ASD involves a fundamental impairment in processing social-communicative information from faces. Several recent studies have challenged earlier findings that individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have no activation of the fusiform gyrus (fusiform face area, FFA) when viewing faces. In this study, we examined activation to faces in the broader network of face-processing modules that comprise what is known as the social brain. Using 3T functional resonance imaging, we measured BOLD signal changes in 10 ASD subjects and 7 healthy controls passively viewing nonemotional faces. We replicated our original findings of significant activation of face identity-processing areas (FFA and inferior occipital gyrus, IOG) in ASD. However, in addition, we identified hypoactivation in a more widely distributed network of brain areas involved in face processing [including the right amygdala, inferior frontal cortex (IFC), superior temporal sulcus (STS), and face-related somatosensory and premotor cortex]. In ASD, we found functional correlations between a subgroup of areas in the social brain that belong to the mirror neuron system (IFC, STS) and other face-processing areas. The severity of the social symptoms measured by the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule was correlated with the right IFC cortical thickness and with functional activation in that area. When viewing faces, adults with ASD show atypical patterns of activation in regions forming the broader face-processing network and social brain, outside the core FFA and IOG regions. These patterns suggest that areas belonging to the mirror neuron system are involved in the face-processing disturbances in ASD.

  19. Mapping Kainate Activation of Inner Neurons in the Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Nivison-Smith, Lisa; Sun, Daniel; Fletcher, Erica L.; Marc, Robert E.; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Kainate receptors mediate fast, excitatory synaptic transmission for a range of inner neurons in the mammalian retina. However, allocation of functional kainate receptors to known cell types and their sensitivity remains unresolved. Using the cation channel probe 1-amino-4-guanidobutane agmatine (AGB), we investigated kainate sensitivity of neurochemically identified cell populations within the structurally intact rat retina. Most inner retinal neuron populations responded to kainate in a concentration-dependent manner. OFF cone bipolar cells demonstrated the highest sensitivity of all inner neurons to kainate. Immunocytochemical localization of AGB and macromolecular markers confirmed that type 2 bipolar cells were part of this kainate-sensitive population. The majority of amacrine (ACs) and ganglion cells (GCs) showed kainate responses with different sensitivities between major neurochemical classes (γ-aminobutyric acid [GABA]/glycine ACs > glycine ACs > GABA ACs; glutamate [Glu]/weakly GABA GCs > Glu GCs). Conventional and displaced cholinergic ACs were highly responsive to kainate, whereas dopaminergic ACs do not appear to express functional kainate receptors. These findings further contribute to our understanding of neuronal networks in complex multicellular tissues. PMID:23348566

  20. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase activity triggers neuronal differentiation of mouse neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kranenburg, O; Scharnhorst, V; Van der Eb, A J; Zantema, A

    1995-10-01

    Studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal differentiation are frequently performed using cell lines established from neuroblastomas. In this study we have used mouse N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells that undergo neuronal differentiation in response to DMSO. During differentiation, cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) activities decline and phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma gene product (pRb) is lost, leading to the appearance of a pRb-containing E2F DNA-binding complex. The loss of cdk2 activity is due to a decrease in cdk2 abundance whereas loss of cdk4 activity is caused by strong association with the cdk inhibitor (CKI) p27KIP1 and concurrent loss of cdk4 phosphorylation. Moreover, neuronal differentiation can be induced by overexpression of p27KIP1 or pRb, suggesting that inhibition of cdk activity leading to loss of pRb phosphorylation, is the major determinant for neuronal differentiation.

  1. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase activity triggers neuronal differentiation of mouse neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal differentiation are frequently performed using cell lines established from neuroblastomas. In this study we have used mouse N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells that undergo neuronal differentiation in response to DMSO. During differentiation, cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) activities decline and phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma gene product (pRb) is lost, leading to the appearance of a pRb-containing E2F DNA-binding complex. The loss of cdk2 activity is due to a decrease in cdk2 abundance whereas loss of cdk4 activity is caused by strong association with the cdk inhibitor (CKI) p27KIP1 and concurrent loss of cdk4 phosphorylation. Moreover, neuronal differentiation can be induced by overexpression of p27KIP1 or pRb, suggesting that inhibition of cdk activity leading to loss of pRb phosphorylation, is the major determinant for neuronal differentiation. PMID:7559779

  2. Pharmacogenetic stimulation of neuronal activity increases myelination in an axon-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Mitew, Stanislaw; Gobius, Ilan; Fenlon, Laura R; McDougall, Stuart J; Hawkes, David; Xing, Yao Lulu; Bujalka, Helena; Gundlach, Andrew L; Richards, Linda J; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Merson, Tobias D; Emery, Ben

    2018-01-22

    Mounting evidence suggests that neuronal activity influences myelination, potentially allowing for experience-driven modulation of neural circuitry. The degree to which neuronal activity is capable of regulating myelination at the individual axon level is unclear. Here we demonstrate that stimulation of somatosensory axons in the mouse brain increases proliferation and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) within the underlying white matter. Stimulated axons display an increased probability of being myelinated compared to neighboring non-stimulated axons, in addition to being ensheathed with thicker myelin. Conversely, attenuating neuronal firing reduces axonal myelination in a selective activity-dependent manner. Our findings reveal that the process of selecting axons for myelination is strongly influenced by the relative activity of individual axons within a population. These observed cellular changes are consistent with the emerging concept that adaptive myelination is a key mechanism for the fine-tuning of neuronal circuitry in the mammalian CNS.

  3. Neuron-derived IgG protects dopaminergic neurons from insult by 6-OHDA and activates microglia through the FcγR I and TLR4 pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Niu, Na; Wang, Mingyu; McNutt, Michael A; Zhang, Donghong; Zhang, Baogang; Lu, Shijun; Liu, Yuqing; Liu, Zhihui

    2013-08-01

    Oxidative and immune attacks from the environment or microglia have been implicated in the loss of dopaminergic neurons of Parkinson's disease. The role of IgG which is an important immunologic molecule in the process of Parkinson's disease has been unclear. Evidence suggests that IgG can be produced by neurons in addition to its traditionally recognized source B lymphocytes, but its function in neurons is poorly understood. In this study, extensive expression of neuron-derived IgG was demonstrated in dopaminergic neurons of human and rat mesencephalon. With an in vitro Parkinson's disease model, we found that neuron-derived IgG can improve the survival and reduce apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons induced by 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity, and also depress the release of NO from microglia triggered by 6-hydroxydopamine. Expression of TNF-α and IL-10 in microglia was elevated to protective levels by neuron-derived IgG at a physiologic level via the FcγR I and TLR4 pathways and microglial activation could be attenuated by IgG blocking. All these data suggested that neuron-derived IgG may exert a self-protective function by activating microglia properly, and IgG may be involved in maintaining immunity homeostasis in the central nervous system and serve as an active factor under pathological conditions such as Parkinson's disease. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Stress and Sucrose Intake Modulate Neuronal Activity in the Anterior Hypothalamic Area in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Arojit; Guèvremont, Geneviève; Timofeeva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The anterior hypothalamic area (AHA) is an important integrative relay structure for a variety of autonomic, endocrine, and behavioral responses including feeding behavior and response to stress. However, changes in the activity of the AHA neurons during stress and feeding in freely moving rats are not clear. The present study investigated the firing rate and burst activity of neurons in the central nucleus of the AHA (cAHA) during sucrose intake in non-stressful conditions and after acute stress in freely behaving rats. Rats were implanted with micro-electrodes into the cAHA, and extracellular multi-unit activity was recorded during 1-h access to 10% sucrose in non-stressful conditions or after acute foot shock stress. Acute stress significantly reduced sucrose intake, total sucrose lick number, and lick frequency in licking clusters, and increased inter-lick intervals. At the cluster start (CS) of sucrose licking, the cAHA neurons increased (CS-excited, 20% of the recorded neurons), decreased (CS-inhibited, 42% of the neurons) or did not change (CS-nonresponsive, 38% of the neurons) their firing rate. Stress resulted in a significant increase in the firing rate of the CS-inhibited neurons by decreasing inter-spike intervals within the burst firing of these neurons. This increase in the stress-induced firing rate of the CS-inhibited neurons was accompanied by a disruption of the correlation between the firing rate of CS-inhibited and CS-nonresponsive neurons that was observed in non-stressful conditions. Stress did not affect the firing rate of the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons. However, stress changed the pattern of burst firing of the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons by decreasing and increasing the burst number in the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons, respectively. These results suggest that the cAHA neurons integrate the signals related to stress and intake of palatable food and play a role in the stress- and eating-related circuitry

  5. Stress and Sucrose Intake Modulate Neuronal Activity in the Anterior Hypothalamic Area in Rats.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Arojit; Guèvremont, Geneviève; Timofeeva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The anterior hypothalamic area (AHA) is an important integrative relay structure for a variety of autonomic, endocrine, and behavioral responses including feeding behavior and response to stress. However, changes in the activity of the AHA neurons during stress and feeding in freely moving rats are not clear. The present study investigated the firing rate and burst activity of neurons in the central nucleus of the AHA (cAHA) during sucrose intake in non-stressful conditions and after acute stress in freely behaving rats. Rats were implanted with micro-electrodes into the cAHA, and extracellular multi-unit activity was recorded during 1-h access to 10% sucrose in non-stressful conditions or after acute foot shock stress. Acute stress significantly reduced sucrose intake, total sucrose lick number, and lick frequency in licking clusters, and increased inter-lick intervals. At the cluster start (CS) of sucrose licking, the cAHA neurons increased (CS-excited, 20% of the recorded neurons), decreased (CS-inhibited, 42% of the neurons) or did not change (CS-nonresponsive, 38% of the neurons) their firing rate. Stress resulted in a significant increase in the firing rate of the CS-inhibited neurons by decreasing inter-spike intervals within the burst firing of these neurons. This increase in the stress-induced firing rate of the CS-inhibited neurons was accompanied by a disruption of the correlation between the firing rate of CS-inhibited and CS-nonresponsive neurons that was observed in non-stressful conditions. Stress did not affect the firing rate of the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons. However, stress changed the pattern of burst firing of the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons by decreasing and increasing the burst number in the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons, respectively. These results suggest that the cAHA neurons integrate the signals related to stress and intake of palatable food and play a role in the stress- and eating-related circuitry.

  6. Are dragon-king neuronal avalanches dungeons for self-organized brain activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Arcangelis, L.

    2012-05-01

    Recent experiments have detected a novel form of spontaneous neuronal activity both in vitro and in vivo: neuronal avalanches. The statistical properties of this activity are typical of critical phenomena, with power laws characterizing the distributions of avalanche size and duration. A critical behaviour for the spontaneous brain activity has important consequences on stimulated activity and learning. Very interestingly, these statistical properties can be altered in significant ways in epilepsy and by pharmacological manipulations. In particular, there can be an increase in the number of large events anticipated by the power law, referred to herein as dragon-king avalanches. This behaviour, as verified by numerical models, can originate from a number of different mechanisms. For instance, it is observed experimentally that the emergence of a critical behaviour depends on the subtle balance between excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms acting in the system. Perturbing this balance, by increasing either synaptic excitation or the incidence of depolarized neuronal up-states causes frequent dragon-king avalanches. Conversely, an unbalanced GABAergic inhibition or long periods of low activity in the network give rise to sub-critical behaviour. Moreover, the existence of power laws, common to other stochastic processes, like earthquakes or solar flares, suggests that correlations are relevant in these phenomena. The dragon-king avalanches may then also be the expression of pathological correlations leading to frequent avalanches encompassing all neurons. We will review the statistics of neuronal avalanches in experimental systems. We then present numerical simulations of a neuronal network model introducing within the self-organized criticality framework ingredients from the physiology of real neurons, as the refractory period, synaptic plasticity and inhibitory synapses. The avalanche critical behaviour and the role of dragon-king avalanches will be discussed in

  7. The Mast Cell Degranulator Compound 48/80 Directly Activates Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Schemann, Michael; Kugler, Eva Maria; Buhner, Sabine; Eastwood, Christopher; Donovan, Jemma; Jiang, Wen; Grundy, David

    2012-01-01

    Background Compound 48/80 is widely used in animal and tissue models as a “selective” mast cell activator. With this study we demonstrate that compound 48/80 also directly activates enteric neurons and visceral afferents. Methodology/Principal Findings We used in vivo recordings from extrinsic intestinal afferents together with Ca++ imaging from primary cultures of DRG and nodose neurons. Enteric neuronal activation was examined by Ca++ and voltage sensitive dye imaging in isolated gut preparations and primary cultures of enteric neurons. Intraluminal application of compound 48/80 evoked marked afferent firing which desensitized on subsequent administration. In egg albumen-sensitized animals, intraluminal antigen evoked a similar pattern of afferent activation which also desensitized on subsequent exposure to antigen. In cross-desensitization experiments prior administration of compound 48/80 failed to influence the mast cell mediated response. Application of 1 and 10 µg/ml compound 48/80 evoked spike discharge and Ca++ transients in enteric neurons. The same nerve activating effect was observed in primary cultures of DRG and nodose ganglion cells. Enteric neuron cultures were devoid of mast cells confirmed by negative staining for c-kit or toluidine blue. In addition, in cultured enteric neurons the excitatory action of compound 48/80 was preserved in the presence of histamine H1 and H2 antagonists. The mast cell stabilizer cromolyn attenuated compound 48/80 and nicotine evoked Ca++ transients in mast cell-free enteric neuron cultures. Conclusions/Significance The results showed direct excitatory action of compound 48/80 on enteric neurons and visceral afferents. Therefore, functional changes measured in tissue or animal models may involve a mast cell independent effect of compound 48/80 and cromolyn. PMID:23272218

  8. Isolated dorsal root ganglion neurones inhibit receptor-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity in associated glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ng, KY; Yeung, BHS; Wong, YH; Wise, H

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hyper-nociceptive PGE2 EP4 receptors and prostacyclin (IP) receptors are present in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones and glial cells in culture. The present study has investigated the cell-specific expression of two other Gs-protein coupled hyper-nociceptive receptor systems: β-adrenoceptors and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors in isolated DRG cells and has examined the influence of neurone–glial cell interactions in regulating adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity. Experimental Approach Agonist-stimulated AC activity was determined in mixed DRG cell cultures from adult rats and compared with activity in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures and pure DRG glial cell cultures. Key Results Pharmacological analysis showed the presence of Gs-coupled β2-adrenoceptors and CGRP receptors, but not β1-adrenoceptors, in all three DRG cell preparations. Agonist-stimulated AC activity was weakest in DRG neurone-enriched cell cultures. DRG neurones inhibited IP receptor-stimulated glial cell AC activity by a process dependent on both cell–cell contact and neurone-derived soluble factors, but this is unlikely to involve purine or glutamine receptor activation. Conclusions and Implications Gs-coupled hyper-nociceptive receptors are readily expressed on DRG glial cells in isolated cell cultures and the activity of CGRP, EP4 and IP receptors, but not β2-adrenoceptors, in glial cells is inhibited by DRG neurones. Studies using isolated DRG cells should be aware that hyper-nociceptive ligands may stimulate receptors on glial cells in addition to neurones, and that variable numbers of neurones and glial cells will influence absolute measures of AC activity and affect downstream functional responses. PMID:22924655

  9. Dehydration-induced modulation of κ-opioid inhibition of vasopressin neurone activity

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Victoria; Bishop, Valerie R; Leng, Gareth; Brown, Colin H

    2009-01-01

    Dehydration increases vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone) secretion from the posterior pituitary gland to reduce water loss in the urine. Vasopressin secretion is determined by action potential firing in vasopressin neurones, which can exhibit continuous, phasic (alternating periods of activity and silence), or irregular activity. Autocrine κ-opioid inhibition contributes to the generation of activity patterning of vasopressin neurones under basal conditions and so we used in vivo extracellular single unit recording to test the hypothesis that changes in autocrine κ-opioid inhibition drive changes in activity patterning of vasopressin neurones during dehydration. Dehydration increased the firing rate of rat vasopressin neurones displaying continuous activity (from 7.1 ± 0.5 to 9.0 ± 0.6 spikes s−1) and phasic activity (from 4.2 ± 0.7 to 7.8 ± 0.9 spikes s−1), but not those displaying irregular activity. The dehydration-induced increase in phasic activity was via an increase in intraburst firing rate. The selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine increased the firing rate of phasic neurones in non-dehydrated rats (from 3.4 ± 0.8 to 5.3 ± 0.6 spikes s−1) and dehydrated rats (from 6.4 ± 0.5 to 9.1 ± 1.2 spikes s−1), indicating that κ-opioid feedback inhibition of phasic bursts is maintained during dehydration. In a separate series of experiments, prodynorphin mRNA expression was increased in vasopressin neurones of hyperosmotic rats, compared to hypo-osmotic rats. Hence, it appears that dynorphin expression in vasopressin neurones undergoes dynamic changes in proportion to the required secretion of vasopressin so that, even under stimulated conditions, autocrine feedback inhibition of vasopressin neurones prevents over-excitation. PMID:19822541

  10. Closed-form expressions of some stochastic adapting equations for nonlinear adaptive activation function neurons.

    PubMed

    Fiori, Simone

    2003-12-01

    In recent work, we introduced nonlinear adaptive activation function (FAN) artificial neuron models, which learn their activation functions in an unsupervised way by information-theoretic adapting rules. We also applied networks of these neurons to some blind signal processing problems, such as independent component analysis and blind deconvolution. The aim of this letter is to study some fundamental aspects of FAN units' learning by investigating the properties of the associated learning differential equation systems.

  11. Activation of 5-HT7 receptors reverses NMDA-R-dependent LTD by activating PKA in medial vestibular neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Hai; Han, Lei; Wu, Kenneth Lap Kei; Chan, Ying-Shing

    2017-09-01

    The medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) is a major output station for neurons that project to the vestibulo-spinal pathway. MVN neurons show capacity for long-term depression (LTD) during the juvenile period. We investigated LTD of MVN neurons using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. High frequency stimulation (HFS) robustly induced LTD in 90% of type B neurons in the MVN, while only 10% of type A neurons were responsive, indicating that type B neurons are the major contributors to LTD in the MVN. The neuromodulator serotonin (5-HT) is known to modulate LTD in neural circuits of the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. We therefore aim to determine the action of 5-HT on the LTD of type B MVN neurons and elucidate the relevant 5-HT receptor subtypes responsible for its action. Using specific agonists and antagonists of 5-HT receptors, we found that selective activation of 5-HT 7 receptor in type B neurons in the MVN of juvenile (P13-16) rats completely abolished NMDA-receptor-mediated LTD in a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent manner. Our finding that 5-HT restricts plasticity of type B MVN neurons via 5-HT 7 receptors offers a mechanism whereby vestibular tuning contributes to the maturation of the vestibulo-spinal circuit and highlights the role of 5-HT in postural control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Antiapoptotic property of human alpha-synuclein in neuronal cell lines is associated with the inhibition of caspase-3 but not caspase-9 activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenxue; Lee, Michael K

    2005-06-01

    Abnormalities of alpha-synuclein (alpha-Syn) are mechanistically linked to Parkinson's disease (PD) and other alpha-synucleinopathies. To gain additional insights into the relationships between alpha-Syn expression and cell death, we examined the effects of expressing human alpha-Syn (Hualpha-Syn) variants on the cellular vulnerability to apoptotic stimuli. We show that the expression of wild-type (WT) and A30P mutant, but not A53T mutant, Hualpha-Syn leads to the protection of neuronal cell lines from apoptosis but not necrosis. Significantly, Hualpha-Syn did not protect non-neuronal cell lines from apoptosis. We also show that A53T mutant is a loss of function in regards to the antiapoptotic property since the expression of WT Hualpha-Syn with an excess of A53T mutant Hualpha-Syn leads to protection of the cells from apoptosis. The antiapoptotic property is specific to human alpha-Syn as neither beta-Syn nor mouse alpha-Syn protected cells from apoptosis, and the carboxy-terminal 20 amino acids are required for the antiapoptotic property. Analyses of capase-3 and caspase-9 activation reveal that the antiapoptotic property of Hualpha-Syn in neuronal cell lines is associated with the attenuation of caspase-3 activity without affecting the caspase-9 activity or the levels of cleaved, active caspase-3. We conclude that Hualpha-Syn modulates the activity of cleaved caspase-3 product in neuronal cell lines.

  13. Activation of hypothalamic RIP-Cre neurons promotes beiging of WAT via sympathetic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baile; Li, Ang; Li, Xiaomu; Ho, Philip Wl; Wu, Donghai; Wang, Xiaoqi; Liu, Zhuohao; Wu, Kelvin Kl; Yau, Sonata Sy; Xu, Aimin; Cheng, Kenneth Ky

    2018-04-01

    Activation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) and beige fat by cold increases energy expenditure. Although their activation is known to be differentially regulated in part by hypothalamus, the underlying neural pathways and populations remain poorly characterized. Here, we show that activation of rat-insulin-promoter-Cre (RIP-Cre) neurons in ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) preferentially promotes recruitment of beige fat via a selective control of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) outflow to subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT), but has no effect on BAT Genetic ablation of APPL2 in RIP-Cre neurons diminishes beiging in sWAT without affecting BAT, leading to cold intolerance and obesity in mice. Such defects are reversed by activation of RIP-Cre neurons, inactivation of VMH AMPK, or treatment with a β3-adrenergic receptor agonist. Hypothalamic APPL2 enhances neuronal activation in VMH RIP-Cre neurons and raphe pallidus, thereby eliciting SNS outflow to sWAT and subsequent beiging. These data suggest that beige fat can be selectively activated by VMH RIP-Cre neurons, in which the APPL2-AMPK signaling axis is crucial for this defending mechanism to cold and obesity. © 2018 The Authors.

  14. Effect of light on the activity of motor cortex neurons during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Armer, Madison C.; Nilaweera, Wijitha U.; Rivers, Trevor J.; Dasgupta, Namrata M.; Beloozerova, Irina N.

    2013-01-01

    The motor cortex plays a critical role in accurate visually guided movements such as reaching and target stepping. However, the manner in which vision influences the movement-related activity of neurons in the motor cortex is not well understood. In this study we have investigated how the locomotion-related activity of neurons in the motor cortex is modified when subjects switch between walking in the darkness and in light. Three adult cats were trained to walk through corridors of an experimental chamber for a food reward. On randomly selected trials, lights were extinguished for approximately four seconds when the cat was in a straight portion of the chamber's corridor. Discharges of 146 neurons from layer V of the motor cortex, including 51 pyramidal tract cells (PTNs), were recorded and compared between light and dark conditions. It was found that while cats’ movements during locomotion in light and darkness were similar (as judged from the analysis of three-dimensional limb kinematics and the activity of limb muscles), the firing behavior of 49% (71/146) of neurons was different between the two walking conditions. This included differences in the mean discharge rate (19%, 28/146 of neurons), depth of stride-related frequency modulation (24%, 32/131), duration of the period of elevated firing ([PEF], 19%, 25/131), and number of PEFs among stride-related neurons (26%, 34/131). 20% of responding neurons exhibited more than one type of change. We conclude that visual input plays a very significant role in determining neuronal activity in the motor cortex during locomotion by altering one, or occasionally multiple, parameters of locomotion-related discharges of its neurons. PMID:23680161

  15. Effect of light on the activity of motor cortex neurons during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Armer, Madison C; Nilaweera, Wijitha U; Rivers, Trevor J; Dasgupta, Namrata M; Beloozerova, Irina N

    2013-08-01

    The motor cortex plays a critical role in accurate visually guided movements such as reaching and target stepping. However, the manner in which vision influences the movement-related activity of neurons in the motor cortex is not well understood. In this study we have investigated how the locomotion-related activity of neurons in the motor cortex is modified when subjects switch between walking in the darkness and in light. Three adult cats were trained to walk through corridors of an experimental chamber for a food reward. On randomly selected trials, lights were extinguished for approximately 4s when the cat was in a straight portion of the chamber's corridor. Discharges of 146 neurons from layer V of the motor cortex, including 51 pyramidal tract cells (PTNs), were recorded and compared between light and dark conditions. It was found that while cats' movements during locomotion in light and darkness were similar (as judged from the analysis of three-dimensional limb kinematics and the activity of limb muscles), the firing behavior of 49% (71/146) of neurons was different between the two walking conditions. This included differences in the mean discharge rate (19%, 28/146 of neurons), depth of stride-related frequency modulation (24%, 32/131), duration of the period of elevated firing ([PEF], 19%, 25/131), and number of PEFs among stride-related neurons (26%, 34/131). 20% of responding neurons exhibited more than one type of change. We conclude that visual input plays a very significant role in determining neuronal activity in the motor cortex during locomotion by altering one, or occasionally multiple, parameters of locomotion-related discharges of its neurons. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Vulnerability to glutamate toxicity of dopaminergic neurons is dependent on endogenous dopamine and MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Matsuo, Takaaki; Wakita, Seiko; Takeuchi, Hiroki; Kume, Toshiaki; Katsuki, Hiroshi; Sawada, Hideyuki; Akaike, Akinori

    2009-07-01

    Dopaminergic neurons are more vulnerable than other types of neurons in cases of Parkinson disease and ischemic brain disease. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that endogenous dopamine plays a role in the vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons. Although glutamate toxicity contributes to the pathogenesis of these disorders, the sensitivity of dopaminergic neurons to glutamate toxicity has not been clarified. In this study, we demonstrated that dopaminergic neurons were preferentially affected by glutamate toxicity in rat mesencephalic cultures. Glutamate toxicity in dopaminergic neurons was blocked by inhibiting extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAPK. Furthermore, depletion of dopamine by alpha-methyl-dl-p-tyrosine methyl ester (alpha-MT), an inhibitor of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), protected dopaminergic neurons from the neurotoxicity. Exposure to glutamate facilitated phosphoryration of TH at Ser31 by ERK, which contributes to the increased TH activity. Inhibition of ERK had no additive effect on the protection offered by alpha-MT, whereas alpha-MT and c-jun N-terminal kinase or p38 MAPK inhibitors had additive effects and yielded full protection. These data suggest that endogenous dopamine is responsible for the vulnerability to glutamate toxicity of dopaminergic neurons and one of the mechanisms may be an enhancement of dopamine synthesis mediated by ERK.

  17. Motor Neurons Tune Premotor Activity in a Vertebrate Central Pattern Generator

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Central patterns generators (CPGs) are neural circuits that drive rhythmic motor output without sensory feedback. Vertebrate CPGs are generally believed to operate in a top-down manner in which premotor interneurons activate motor neurons that in turn drive muscles. In contrast, the frog (Xenopus laevis) vocal CPG contains a functionally unexplored neuronal projection from the motor nucleus to the premotor nucleus, indicating a recurrent pathway that may contribute to rhythm generation. In this study, we characterized the function of this bottom-up connection. The X. laevis vocal CPG produces a 50–60 Hz “fast trill” song used by males during courtship. We recorded “fictive vocalizations” in the in vitro CPG from the laryngeal nerve while simultaneously recording premotor activity at the population and single-cell level. We show that transecting the motor-to-premotor projection eliminated the characteristic firing rate of premotor neurons. Silencing motor neurons with the intracellular sodium channel blocker QX-314 also disrupted premotor rhythms, as did blockade of nicotinic synapses in the motor nucleus (the putative location of motor neuron-to-interneuron connections). Electrically stimulating the laryngeal nerve elicited primarily IPSPs in premotor neurons that could be blocked by a nicotinic receptor antagonist. Our results indicate that an inhibitory signal, activated by motor neurons, is required for proper CPG function. To our knowledge, these findings represent the first example of a CPG in which precise premotor rhythms are tuned by motor neuron activity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Central pattern generators (CPGs) are neural circuits that produce rhythmic behaviors. In vertebrates, motor neurons are not commonly known to contribute to CPG function, with the exception of a few spinal circuits where the functional significance of motor neuron feedback is still poorly understood. The frog hindbrain vocal circuit contains a previously unexplored

  18. Palmitoylethanolamide Blunts Amyloid-β42-Induced Astrocyte Activation and Improves Neuronal Survival in Primary Mouse Cortical Astrocyte-Neuron Co-Cultures.

    PubMed

    Beggiato, Sarah; Borelli, Andrea Celeste; Ferraro, Luca; Tanganelli, Sergio; Antonelli, Tiziana; Tomasini, Maria Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Based on the pivotal role of astrocytes in brain homeostasis and the strong metabolic cooperation existing between neurons and astrocytes, it has been suggested that astrocytic dysfunctions might cause and/or contribute to neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative processes. Therapeutic approaches aimed at both neuroprotection and neuroinflammation reduction may prove particularly effective in slowing the progression of these diseases. The endogenous lipid mediator palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) displayed neuroprotective and anti(neuro)inflammatory properties, and demonstrated interesting potential as a novel treatment for Alzheimer's disease. We firstly evaluated whether astrocytes could participate in regulating the Aβ42-induced neuronal damage, by using primary mouse astrocytes cell cultures and mixed astrocytes-neurons cultures. Furthermore, the possible protective effects of PEA against Aβ42-induced neuronal toxicity have also been investigated by evaluating neuronal viability, apoptosis, and morphometric parameters. The presence of astrocytes pre-exposed to Aβ42 (0.5μM; 24 h) induced a reduction of neuronal viability in primary mouse astrocytes-neurons co-cultures. Furthermore, under these experimental conditions, an increase in the number of neuronal apoptotic nuclei and a decrease in the number of MAP-2 positive neurons were observed. Finally, astrocytic Aβ42 pre-exposure induced an increase in the number of neurite aggregations/100μm as compared to control (i.e., untreated) astrocytes-neurons co-cultures. These effects were not observed in neurons cultured in the presence of astrocytes pre-exposed to PEA (0.1μM), applied 1 h before and maintained during Aβ42 treatment. Astrocytes contribute to Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity and PEA, by blunting Aβ42-induced astrocyte activation, improved neuronal survival in mouse astrocyte-neuron co-cultures.

  19. Activity of Tachykinin1-Expressing Pet1 Raphe Neurons Modulates the Respiratory Chemoreflex

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Andrea E.; Brust, Rachael D.; Chang, YoonJeung; Nattie, Eugene E.

    2017-01-01

    Homeostatic control of breathing, heart rate, and body temperature relies on circuits within the brainstem modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT). Mounting evidence points to specialized neuronal subtypes within the serotonergic neuronal system, borne out in functional studies, for the modulation of distinct facets of homeostasis. Such functional differences, read out at the organismal level, are likely subserved by differences among 5-HT neuron subtypes at the cellular and molecular levels, including differences in the capacity to coexpress other neurotransmitters such as glutamate, GABA, thyrotropin releasing hormone, and substance P encoded by the Tachykinin-1 (Tac1) gene. Here, we characterize in mice a 5-HT neuron subtype identified by expression of Tac1 and the serotonergic transcription factor gene Pet1, referred to as the Tac1-Pet1 neuron subtype. Transgenic cell labeling showed Tac1-Pet1 soma resident largely in the caudal medulla. Chemogenetic [clozapine-N-oxide (CNO)-hM4Di] perturbation of Tac1-Pet1 neuron activity blunted the ventilatory response of the respiratory CO2 chemoreflex, which normally augments ventilation in response to hypercapnic acidosis to restore normal pH and PCO2. Tac1-Pet1 axonal boutons were found localized to brainstem areas implicated in respiratory modulation, with highest density in motor regions. These findings demonstrate that the activity of a Pet1 neuron subtype with the potential to release both 5-HT and substance P is necessary for normal respiratory dynamics, perhaps via motor outputs that engage muscles of respiration and maintain airway patency. These Tac1-Pet1 neurons may act downstream of Egr2-Pet1 serotonergic neurons, which were previously established in respiratory chemoreception, but do not innervate respiratory motor nuclei. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Serotonin (5-HT) neurons modulate physiological processes and behaviors as diverse as body temperature, respiration, aggression, and mood. Using genetic

  20. Activity of Tachykinin1-Expressing Pet1 Raphe Neurons Modulates the Respiratory Chemoreflex.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, Morgan L; Corcoran, Andrea E; Brust, Rachael D; Chang, YoonJeung; Nattie, Eugene E; Dymecki, Susan M

    2017-02-15

    Homeostatic control of breathing, heart rate, and body temperature relies on circuits within the brainstem modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT). Mounting evidence points to specialized neuronal subtypes within the serotonergic neuronal system, borne out in functional studies, for the modulation of distinct facets of homeostasis. Such functional differences, read out at the organismal level, are likely subserved by differences among 5-HT neuron subtypes at the cellular and molecular levels, including differences in the capacity to coexpress other neurotransmitters such as glutamate, GABA, thyrotropin releasing hormone, and substance P encoded by the Tachykinin-1 ( Tac1 ) gene. Here, we characterize in mice a 5-HT neuron subtype identified by expression of Tac1 and the serotonergic transcription factor gene Pet1 , referred to as the Tac1-Pet1 neuron subtype. Transgenic cell labeling showed Tac1-Pet1 soma resident largely in the caudal medulla. Chemogenetic [clozapine -N- oxide (CNO)-hM4Di] perturbation of Tac1-Pet1 neuron activity blunted the ventilatory response of the respiratory CO 2 chemoreflex, which normally augments ventilation in response to hypercapnic acidosis to restore normal pH and PCO 2 Tac1-Pet1 axonal boutons were found localized to brainstem areas implicated in respiratory modulation, with highest density in motor regions. These findings demonstrate that the activity of a Pet1 neuron subtype with the potential to release both 5-HT and substance P is necessary for normal respiratory dynamics, perhaps via motor outputs that engage muscles of respiration and maintain airway patency. These Tac1-Pet1 neurons may act downstream of Egr2-Pet1 serotonergic neurons, which were previously established in respiratory chemoreception, but do not innervate respiratory motor nuclei. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Serotonin (5-HT) neurons modulate physiological processes and behaviors as diverse as body temperature, respiration, aggression, and mood. Using

  1. Hydralazine administration activates sympathetic preganglionic neurons whose activity mobilizes glucose and increases cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Parker, Lindsay M; Damanhuri, Hanafi A; Fletcher, Sophie P S; Goodchild, Ann K

    2015-04-16

    Hypotensive drugs have been used to identify central neurons that mediate compensatory baroreceptor reflex responses. Such drugs also increase blood glucose. Our aim was to identify the neurochemical phenotypes of sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) and adrenal chromaffin cells activated following hydralazine (HDZ; 10mg/kg) administration in rats, and utilize this and SPN target organ destination to ascribe their function as cardiovascular or glucose regulating. Blood glucose was measured and adrenal chromaffin cell activation was assessed using c-Fos immunoreactivity (-ir) and phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase, respectively. The activation and neurochemical phenotype of SPN innervating the adrenal glands and celiac ganglia were determined using the retrograde tracer cholera toxin B subunit, in combination with in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Blood glucose was elevated at multiple time points following HDZ administration but little evidence of chromaffin cell activation was seen suggesting non-adrenal mechanisms contribute to the sustained hyperglycemia. 16±0.1% of T4-T11 SPN contained c-Fos and of these: 24.3±1.4% projected to adrenal glands and 29±5.5% projected to celiac ganglia with the rest innervating other targets. 62.8±1.4% of SPN innervating adrenal glands were activated and 29.9±3.3% expressed PPE mRNA whereas 53.2±8.6% of SPN innervating celiac ganglia were activated and 31.2±8.8% expressed PPE mRNA. CART-ir SPN innervating each target were also activated and did not co-express PPE mRNA. Neurochemical coding reveals that HDZ administration activates both PPE+SPN, whose activity increase glucose mobilization causing hyperglycemia, as well as CART+SPN whose activity drive vasomotor responses mediated by baroreceptor unloading to raise vascular tone and heart rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A Sodium Leak Current Regulates Pacemaker Activity of Adult Central Pattern Generator Neurons in Lymnaea Stagnalis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tom Z.; Feng, Zhong-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The resting membrane potential of the pacemaker neurons is one of the essential mechanisms underlying rhythm generation. In this study, we described the biophysical properties of an uncharacterized channel (U-type channel) and investigated the role of the channel in the rhythmic activity of a respiratory pacemaker neuron and the respiratory behaviour in adult freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Our results show that the channel conducts an inward leak current carried by Na+ (ILeak-Na). The ILeak-Na contributed to the resting membrane potential and was required for maintaining rhythmic action potential bursting activity of the identified pacemaker RPeD1 neurons. Partial knockdown of the U-type channel suppressed the aerial respiratory behaviour of the adult snail in vivo. These findings identified the Na+ leak conductance via the U-type channel, likely a NALCN-like channel, as one of the fundamental mechanisms regulating rhythm activity of pacemaker neurons and respiratory behaviour in adult animals. PMID:21526173

  3. A calcium-permeable cGMP-activated cation conductance in hippocampal neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leinders-Zufall, T.; Rosenboom, H.; Barnstable, C. J.; Shepherd, G. M.; Zufall, F.

    1995-01-01

    Whole-cell patch clamp recordings detected a previously unidentified cGMP-activated membrane conductance in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. This conductance is nonselectively permeable for cations and is completely but reversibly blocked by external Cd2+. The Ca2+ permeability of the hippocampal cGMP-activated conductance was examined in detail, indicating that the underlying ion channels display a high relative permeability for Ca2+. The results indicate that hippocampal neurons contain a cGMP-activated membrane conductance that has some properties similar to the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels previously shown in sensory receptor cells and retinal neurons. In hippocampal neurons this conductance similarly could mediate membrane depolarization and Ca2+ fluxes in response to intracellular cGMP elevation.

  4. The interplay of microRNA and neuronal activity in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Eacker, Stephen M.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small 19–23 nucleotide regulatory RNAs that function by modulating mRNA translation and/or turnover in a sequence-specific fashion. In the nervous system, miRNAs regulate the production of numerous proteins involved in synaptic transmission. In turn, neuronal activity can regulate the production and turnover of miRNA through a variety of mechanisms. In this way, miRNAs and neuronal activity are in a reciprocal homeostatic relationship that balances neuronal function. The miRNA function is critical in pathological states related to overexcitation such as epilepsy and stroke, suggesting miRNA’s potential as a therapeutic target. We review the current literature relating the interplay of miRNA and neuronal activity and provide future directions for defining miRNA’s role in disease. PMID:23986658

  5. Non-chemosensitive parafacial neurons simultaneously regulate active expiration and airway patency under hypercapnia in rats.

    PubMed

    de Britto, Alan A; Moraes, Davi J A

    2017-03-15

    Hypercapnia or parafacial respiratory group (pFRG) disinhibition at normocapnia evokes active expiration in rats by recruitment of pFRG late-expiratory (late-E) neurons. We show that hypercapnia simultaneously evoked active expiration and exaggerated glottal dilatation by late-E synaptic excitation of abdominal, hypoglossal and laryngeal motoneurons. Simultaneous rhythmic expiratory activity in previously silent pFRG late-E neurons, which did not express the marker of ventral medullary CO 2 -sensitive neurons (transcription factor Phox2b), was also evoked by hypercapnia. Hypercapnia-evoked active expiration, neural and neuronal late-E activities were eliminated by pFRG inhibition, but not after blockade of synaptic excitation. Hypercapnia produces disinhibition of non-chemosensitive pFRG late-E neurons to evoke active expiration and concomitant cranial motor respiratory responses controlling the oropharyngeal and upper airway patency. Hypercapnia produces active expiration in rats and the recruitment of late-expiratory (late-E) neurons located in the parafacial respiratory group (pFRG) of the ventral medullary brainstem. We tested the hypothesis that hypercapnia produces active expiration and concomitant cranial respiratory motor responses controlling the oropharyngeal and upper airway patency by disinhibition of pFRG late-E neurons, but not via synaptic excitation. Phrenic nerve, abdominal nerve (AbN), cranial respiratory motor nerves, subglottal pressure, and medullary and spinal neurons/motoneurons were recorded in in situ preparations of juvenile rats. Hypercapnia evoked AbN active expiration, exaggerated late-E discharges in cranial respiratory motor outflows, and glottal dilatation via late-E synaptic excitation of abdominal, hypoglossal and laryngeal motoneurons. Simultaneous rhythmic late-E activity in previously silent pFRG neurons, which did not express the marker of ventral medullary CO 2 -sensitive neurons (transcription factor Phox2b), was also evoked

  6. Differential receptor activation by cockroach adipokinetic hormones produces differential effects on ion currents, neuronal activity, and locomotion.

    PubMed

    Wicher, Dieter; Agricola, Hans-Jürgen; Söhler, Sandra; Gundel, Matthias; Heinemann, Stefan H; Wollweber, Leo; Stengl, Monika; Derst, Christian

    2006-04-01

    Adipokinetic hormone (AKH) peptides in insects serve the endocrine control of energy supply. They also produce, however, neuronal, vegetative, and motor effects, suggesting that AKHs orchestrate adaptive behavior by multiple actions. We have cloned, for Periplaneta americana, the AKH receptor to determine its localization and, based on current measurements in neurons and heterologous expression systems, the mechanisms of AKH actions. Apart from fat body, various neurons express the AKH receptor, among them abdominal dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons, which release the biogenic amine octopamine. They are part of the arousal system and are involved in the control of circulation and respiration. Both the two Periplaneta AKHs activate the Gs pathway, and AKH I also potently activates Gq. AKH I and--with much less efficacy--AKH II accelerate spiking of DUM neurons through an increase of the pacemaking Ca2+ current. Because the AKHs are released from the corpora cardiaca into the hemolymph, they must penetrate the blood-brain barrier for acting on neurons. That this happens was shown electrophysiologically by applying AKH I to an intact ganglion. Systemically injected AKH I stimulates locomotion potently in striking contrast to AKH II. This behavioral difference can be traced back conclusively to the different effectiveness of the AKHs on the level of G proteins. Our findings also show that AKHs act through the same basic mechanisms on neuronal and nonneuronal cells, and they support an integration of metabolic and neuronal effects in homoeostatic mechanisms.

  7. Abnormal neural activities of directional brain networks in patients with long-term bilateral hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Xu, Long-Chun; Zhang, Gang; Zou, Yue; Zhang, Min-Feng; Zhang, Dong-Sheng; Ma, Hua; Zhao, Wen-Bo; Zhang, Guang-Yu

    2017-10-13

    The objective of the study is to provide some implications for rehabilitation of hearing impairment by investigating changes of neural activities of directional brain networks in patients with long-term bilateral hearing loss. Firstly, we implemented neuropsychological tests of 21 subjects (11 patients with long-term bilateral hearing loss, and 10 subjects with normal hearing), and these tests revealed significant differences between the deaf group and the controls. Then we constructed the individual specific virtual brain based on functional magnetic resonance data of participants by utilizing effective connectivity and multivariate regression methods. We exerted the stimulating signal to the primary auditory cortices of the virtual brain and observed the brain region activations. We found that patients with long-term bilateral hearing loss presented weaker brain region activations in the auditory and language networks, but enhanced neural activities in the default mode network as compared with normally hearing subjects. Especially, the right cerebral hemisphere presented more changes than the left. Additionally, weaker neural activities in the primary auditor cortices were also strongly associated with poorer cognitive performance. Finally, causal analysis revealed several interactional circuits among activated brain regions, and these interregional causal interactions implied that abnormal neural activities of the directional brain networks in the deaf patients impacted cognitive function.

  8. Detection of Cardiopulmonary Activity and Related Abnormal Events Using Microsoft Kinect Sensor.

    PubMed

    Al-Naji, Ali; Chahl, Javaan

    2018-03-20

    Monitoring of cardiopulmonary activity is a challenge when attempted under adverse conditions, including different sleeping postures, environmental settings, and an unclear region of interest (ROI). This study proposes an efficient remote imaging system based on a Microsoft Kinect v2 sensor for the observation of cardiopulmonary-signal-and-detection-related abnormal cardiopulmonary events (e.g., tachycardia, bradycardia, tachypnea, bradypnea, and central apnoea) in many possible sleeping postures within varying environmental settings including in total darkness and whether the subject is covered by a blanket or not. The proposed system extracts the signal from the abdominal-thoracic region where cardiopulmonary activity is most pronounced, using a real-time image sequence captured by Kinect v2 sensor. The proposed system shows promising results in any sleep posture, regardless of illumination conditions and unclear ROI even in the presence of a blanket, whilst being reliable, safe, and cost-effective.

  9. Detection of Cardiopulmonary Activity and Related Abnormal Events Using Microsoft Kinect Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Chahl, Javaan

    2018-01-01

    Monitoring of cardiopulmonary activity is a challenge when attempted under adverse conditions, including different sleeping postures, environmental settings, and an unclear region of interest (ROI). This study proposes an efficient remote imaging system based on a Microsoft Kinect v2 sensor for the observation of cardiopulmonary-signal-and-detection-related abnormal cardiopulmonary events (e.g., tachycardia, bradycardia, tachypnea, bradypnea, and central apnoea) in many possible sleeping postures within varying environmental settings including in total darkness and whether the subject is covered by a blanket or not. The proposed system extracts the signal from the abdominal-thoracic region where cardiopulmonary activity is most pronounced, using a real-time image sequence captured by Kinect v2 sensor. The proposed system shows promising results in any sleep posture, regardless of illumination conditions and unclear ROI even in the presence of a blanket, whilst being reliable, safe, and cost-effective. PMID:29558414

  10. Developmentally induced microencephalopathy in guinea pigs--embryonic glial cell activation marks selective neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Rossner, S; Brückner, M K; Bigl, V

    2001-06-01

    We have recently shown that in utero treatment of guinea pigs with the DNA methylating substance methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM) on gestation day (GD) 24 results in neocortical microencephalopathy, increased protein kinase C activity and altered processing of the amyloid precursor protein in neocortex of the offsprings. In order to identify the primary neuronal lesions produced by MAM-treatment, we mapped the 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-incorporation in dividing neurons on GD 24 and we followed the effects of MAM-treatment on GD 24 on embryonic immediate early gene expression and on glial cell activation. BrdU injected on GD 24 labeled many neurons of the ventricular zone and of the intermediate zone but only scattered neurons of the cortical plate. When time-mated guinea pigs were injected intraperitoneally with MAM on GD 24, we observed the activation of microglial cells in the ventricular/intermediate zone and the appearence of astrocytes between the intermediate zone and the cortical plate, 48 h after intoxification. The activation of glial cells was accompanied by the neuronal expression of c-Fos but not of c-Jun in the ventricular/intermediate zone. Based on our observations on BrdU-incorporation and on the morphological outcome of MAM treatment in the juvenile guinea pig, our data presented here indicate that selective neurodegeneration during development induces the activation of both phagocytotic microglial cells and of astrocytes which might trophically support damaged neurons surviving this lesion procedure.

  11. Neuronal network model of interictal and recurrent ictal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, M. A.; Lee, K.-E.; Goltsev, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    We propose a neuronal network model which undergoes a saddle node on an invariant circle bifurcation as the mechanism of the transition from the interictal to the ictal (seizure) state. In the vicinity of this transition, the model captures important dynamical features of both interictal and ictal states. We study the nature of interictal spikes and early warnings of the transition predicted by this model. We further demonstrate that recurrent seizures emerge due to the interaction between two networks.

  12. Lack of GPR88 enhances medium spiny neuron activity and alters motor- and cue-dependent behaviors.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Albert; Sanz, Elisenda; Wang, Wengang; Storey, Granville P; Güler, Ali D; Wanat, Matthew J; Roller, Bryan A; La Torre, Anna; Amieux, Paul S; McKnight, G Stanley; Bamford, Nigel S; Palmiter, Richard D

    2012-11-01

    The striatum regulates motor control, reward and learning. Abnormal function of striatal GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs) is believed to contribute to the deficits in these processes that are observed in many neuropsychiatric diseases. The orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR88 is robustly expressed in MSNs and is regulated by neuropharmacological drugs, but its contribution to MSN physiology and behavior is unclear. We found that, in the absence of GPR88, MSNs showed increased glutamatergic excitation and reduced GABAergic inhibition, which promoted enhanced firing rates in vivo, resulting in hyperactivity, poor motor coordination and impaired cue-based learning in mice. Targeted viral expression of GPR88 in MSNs rescued the molecular and electrophysiological properties and normalized behavior, suggesting that aberrant MSN activation in the absence of GPR88 underlies behavioral deficits and its dysfunction may contribute to behaviors observed in neuropsychiatric disease.

  13. Behavior-dependent activity patterns of GABAergic long-range projecting neurons in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Katona, Linda; Micklem, Ben; Borhegyi, Zsolt; Swiejkowski, Daniel A; Valenti, Ornella; Viney, Tim J; Kotzadimitriou, Dimitrios; Klausberger, Thomas; Somogyi, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Long-range glutamatergic and GABAergic projections participate in temporal coordination of neuronal activity in distributed cortical areas. In the hippocampus, GABAergic neurons project to the medial septum and retrohippocampal areas. Many GABAergic projection cells express somatostatin (SOM+) and, together with locally terminating SOM+ bistratified and O-LM cells, contribute to dendritic inhibition of pyramidal cells. We tested the hypothesis that diversity in SOM+ cells reflects temporal specialization during behavior using extracellular single cell recording and juxtacellular neurobiotin-labeling in freely moving rats. We have demonstrated that rare GABAergic projection neurons discharge rhythmically and are remarkably diverse. During sharp wave-ripples, most projection cells, including a novel SOM+ GABAergic back-projecting cell, increased their activity similar to bistratified cells, but unlike O-LM cells. During movement, most projection cells discharged along the descending slope of theta cycles, but some fired at the trough jointly with bistratified and O-LM cells. The specialization of hippocampal SOM+ projection neurons complements the action of local interneurons in differentially phasing inputs from the CA3 area to CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites during sleep and wakefulness. Our observations suggest that GABAergic projection cells mediate the behavior- and network state-dependent binding of neuronal assemblies amongst functionally-related brain regions by transmitting local rhythmic entrainment of neurons in CA1 to neuronal populations in other areas. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Behavior‐dependent activity patterns of GABAergic long‐range projecting neurons in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Micklem, Ben; Borhegyi, Zsolt; Swiejkowski, Daniel A.; Valenti, Ornella; Viney, Tim J.; Kotzadimitriou, Dimitrios; Klausberger, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Long‐range glutamatergic and GABAergic projections participate in temporal coordination of neuronal activity in distributed cortical areas. In the hippocampus, GABAergic neurons project to the medial septum and retrohippocampal areas. Many GABAergic projection cells express somatostatin (SOM+) and, together with locally terminating SOM+ bistratified and O‐LM cells, contribute to dendritic inhibition of pyramidal cells. We tested the hypothesis that diversity in SOM+ cells reflects temporal specialization during behavior using extracellular single cell recording and juxtacellular neurobiotin‐labeling in freely moving rats. We have demonstrated that rare GABAergic projection neurons discharge rhythmically and are remarkably diverse. During sharp wave‐ripples, most projection cells, including a novel SOM+ GABAergic back‐projecting cell, increased their activity similar to bistratified cells, but unlike O‐LM cells. During movement, most projection cells discharged along the descending slope of theta cycles, but some fired at the trough jointly with bistratified and O‐LM cells. The specialization of hippocampal SOM+ projection neurons complements the action of local interneurons in differentially phasing inputs from the CA3 area to CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites during sleep and wakefulness. Our observations suggest that GABAergic projection cells mediate the behavior‐ and network state‐dependent binding of neuronal assemblies amongst functionally‐related brain regions by transmitting local rhythmic entrainment of neurons in CA1 to neuronal populations in other areas. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27997999

  15. [Effect of nootropic agents on impulse activity of cerebral cortex neurons].

    PubMed

    Iasnetsov, V V; Pravdivtsev, V A; Krylova, I N; Kozlov, S B; Provornova, N A; Ivanov, Iu V; Iasnetsov, V V

    2001-01-01

    The effect of nootropes (semax, mexidol, and GVS-111) on the activity of individual neurons in various cerebral cortex regions was studied by microelectrode and microionophoresis techniques in cats immobilized by myorelaxants. It was established that the inhibiting effect of mexidol upon neurons in more than half of cases is prevented or significantly decreased by the GABA antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin. The inhibiting effect of semax and GVS-111 upon neurons in more than half of cases is related to stimulation of the M-choline and NMDA receptors, respectively.

  16. Imaging of Neuronal Activity in Awake Mice by Measurements of Flavoprotein Autofluorescence Corrected for Cerebral Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Manami; Urushihata, Takuya; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Sakata, Kazumi; Takado, Yuhei; Shimizu, Eiji; Suhara, Tetsuya; Higuchi, Makoto; Ito, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Green fluorescence imaging (e.g., flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging, FAI) can be used to measure neuronal activity and oxygen metabolism in living brains without expressing fluorescence proteins. It is useful for understanding the mechanism of various brain functions and their abnormalities in age-related brain diseases. However, hemoglobin in cerebral blood vessels absorbs green fluorescence, hampering accurate assessments of brain function in animal models with cerebral blood vessel dysfunctions and subsequent cerebral blood flow (CBF) alterations. In the present study, we developed a new method to correct FAI signals for hemoglobin-dependent green fluorescence reductions by simultaneous measurements of green fluorescence and intrinsic optical signals. Intrinsic optical imaging enabled evaluations of light absorption and scatters by hemoglobin, which could then be applied to corrections of green fluorescence intensities. Using this method, enhanced flavoprotein autofluorescence by sensory stimuli was successfully detected in the brains of awake mice, despite increases of CBF, and hemoglobin interference. Moreover, flavoprotein autofluorescence could be properly quantified in a resting state and during sensory stimulation by a CO 2 inhalation challenge, which modified vascular responses without overtly affecting neuronal activities. The flavoprotein autofluorescence signal data obtained here were in good agreement with the previous findings from a condition with drug-induced blockade of cerebral vasodilation, justifying the current assaying methodology. Application of this technology to studies on animal models of brain diseases with possible changes of CBF, including age-related neurological disorders, would provide better understanding of the mechanisms of neurovascular coupling in pathological circumstances.

  17. ATRX tolerates activity-dependent histone H3 methyl/phos switching to maintain repetitive element silencing in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Kyung-Min; Zhao, Dan; Xiang, Bin; Wenderski, Wendy; Lewis, Peter W.; Shen, Li; Li, Haitao; Allis, C. David

    2015-01-01

    ATRX (the alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked protein) is a member of the switch2/sucrose nonfermentable2 (SWI2/SNF2) family of chromatin-remodeling proteins and primarily functions at heterochromatic loci via its recognition of “repressive” histone modifications [e.g., histone H3 lysine 9 tri-methylation (H3K9me3)]. Despite significant roles for ATRX during normal neural development, as well as its relationship to human disease, ATRX function in the central nervous system is not well understood. Here, we describe ATRX’s ability to recognize an activity-dependent combinatorial histone modification, histone H3 lysine 9 tri-methylation/serine 10 phosphorylation (H3K9me3S10ph), in postmitotic neurons. In neurons, this “methyl/phos” switch occurs exclusively after periods of stimulation and is highly enriched at heterochromatic repeats associated with centromeres. Using a multifaceted approach, we reveal that H3K9me3S10ph-bound Atrx represses noncoding transcription of centromeric minor satellite sequences during instances of heightened activity. Our results indicate an essential interaction between ATRX and a previously uncharacterized histone modification in the central nervous system and suggest a potential role for abnormal repetitive element transcription in pathological states manifested by ATRX dysfunction. PMID:25538301

  18. ATRX tolerates activity-dependent histone H3 methyl/phos switching to maintain repetitive element silencing in neurons.

    PubMed

    Noh, Kyung-Min; Maze, Ian; Zhao, Dan; Xiang, Bin; Wenderski, Wendy; Lewis, Peter W; Shen, Li; Li, Haitao; Allis, C David

    2015-06-02

    ATRX (the alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked protein) is a member of the switch2/sucrose nonfermentable2 (SWI2/SNF2) family of chromatin-remodeling proteins and primarily functions at heterochromatic loci via its recognition of "repressive" histone modifications [e.g., histone H3 lysine 9 tri-methylation (H3K9me3)]. Despite significant roles for ATRX during normal neural development, as well as its relationship to human disease, ATRX function in the central nervous system is not well understood. Here, we describe ATRX's ability to recognize an activity-dependent combinatorial histone modification, histone H3 lysine 9 tri-methylation/serine 10 phosphorylation (H3K9me3S10ph), in postmitotic neurons. In neurons, this "methyl/phos" switch occurs exclusively after periods of stimulation and is highly enriched at heterochromatic repeats associated with centromeres. Using a multifaceted approach, we reveal that H3K9me3S10ph-bound Atrx represses noncoding transcription of centromeric minor satellite sequences during instances of heightened activity. Our results indicate an essential interaction between ATRX and a previously uncharacterized histone modification in the central nervous system and suggest a potential role for abnormal repetitive element transcription in pathological states manifested by ATRX dysfunction.

  19. Neuronal pattern separation of motion-relevant input in LIP activity

    PubMed Central

    Berberian, Nareg; MacPherson, Amanda; Giraud, Eloïse; Richardson, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    In various regions of the brain, neurons discriminate sensory stimuli by decreasing the similarity between ambiguous input patterns. Here, we examine whether this process of pattern separation may drive the rapid discrimination of visual motion stimuli in the lateral intraparietal area (LIP). Starting with a simple mean-rate population model that captures neuronal activity in LIP, we show that overlapping input patterns can be reformatted dynamically to give rise to separated patterns of neuronal activity. The population model predicts that a key ingredient of pattern separation is the presence of heterogeneity in the response of individual units. Furthermore, the model proposes that pattern separation relies on heterogeneity in the temporal dynamics of neural activity and not merely in the mean firing rates of individual neurons over time. We confirm these predictions in recordings of macaque LIP neurons and show that the accuracy of pattern separation is a strong predictor of behavioral performance. Overall, results propose that LIP relies on neuronal pattern separation to facilitate decision-relevant discrimination of sensory stimuli. NEW & NOTEWORTHY A new hypothesis is proposed on the role of the lateral intraparietal (LIP) region of cortex during rapid decision making. This hypothesis suggests that LIP alters the representation of ambiguous inputs to reduce their overlap, thus improving sensory discrimination. A combination of computational modeling, theoretical analysis, and electrophysiological data shows that the pattern separation hypothesis links neural activity to behavior and offers novel predictions on the role of LIP during sensory discrimination. PMID:27881719

  20. A light- and calcium-gated transcription factor for imaging and manipulating activated neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W.; Wildes, C. P.; Pattarabanjird, T.; Sanchez, M. I.; Glober, G.F.; Matthews, G. A.; Tye, K. M.; Ting, A. Y

    2017-01-01

    Activity remodels neurons, altering their molecular, structural, and electrical characteristics. To enable the selective characterization and manipulation of these neurons, we present FLARE, an engineered transcription factor that drives expression of fluorescent proteins, opsins, and other genetically-encoded tools only in the subset of neurons that experienced activity during a user-defined time window. FLARE senses the coincidence of elevated cytosolic calcium and externally-applied blue light, which together produce translocation of a membrane-anchored transcription factor to the nucleus to drive expression of any transgene. In cultured rat neurons, FLARE gives a light-to-dark signal ratio of 120 and a high-to-low calcium signal ratio of 10 after 10 minutes of stimulation. Channelrhodopsin expression permitted functional manipulation of FLARE-marked neurons. In adult mice, FLARE also gave light- and motor activity-dependent transcription in the cortex. Due to its modular design, minute-scale temporal resolution, and minimal dark-state leak, FLARE should be useful for the study of activity-dependent processes in neurons and other cells that signal with calcium. PMID:28650461

  1. Activation of Strychnine-Sensitive Glycine Receptors by Shilajit on Preoptic Hypothalamic Neurons of Juvenile Mice.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Janardhan Prasad; Cho, Dong Hyu; Han, Seong Kyu

    2016-02-29

    Shilajit, a mineral pitch, has been used in Ayurveda and Siddha system of medicine to treat many human ailments, and is reported to contain at least 85 minerals in ionic form. This study examined the possible mechanism of Shilajit action on preoptic hypothalamic neurons using juvenile mice. The hypothalamic neurons are the key regulator of many hormonal systems. In voltage clamp mode at a holding potential of -60 mV, and under a high chloride pipette solution, Shilajit induced dose-dependent inward current. Shilajit-induced inward currents were reproducible and persisted in the presence of 0.5 μM tetrodotoxin (TTX) suggesting a postsynaptic action of Shilajit on hypothalamic neurons. The currents induced by Shilajit were almost completely blocked by 2 μM strychnine (Stry), a glycine receptor antagonist. In addition, Shilajit-induced inward currents were partially blocked by bicuculline. Under a gramicidin-perforated patch clamp mode, Shilajit induced membrane depolarization on juvenile neurons. These results show that Shilajit affects hypothalamic neuronal activities by activating the Stry-sensitive glycine receptor with α₂/α₂β subunit. Taken together, these results suggest that Shilajit contains some ingredients with possible glycine mimetic activities and might influence hypothalamic neurophysiology through activation of Stry-sensitive glycine receptor-mediated responses on hypothalamic neurons postsynaptically.

  2. A light- and calcium-gated transcription factor for imaging and manipulating activated neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjing; Wildes, Craig P; Pattarabanjird, Tanyaporn; Sanchez, Mateo I; Glober, Gordon F; Matthews, Gillian A; Tye, Kay M; Ting, Alice Y

    2017-09-01

    Activity remodels neurons, altering their molecular, structural, and electrical characteristics. To enable the selective characterization and manipulation of these neurons, we present FLARE, an engineered transcription factor that drives expression of fluorescent proteins, opsins, and other genetically encoded tools only in the subset of neurons that experienced activity during a user-defined time window. FLARE senses the coincidence of elevated cytosolic calcium and externally applied blue light, which together produce translocation of a membrane-anchored transcription factor to the nucleus to drive expression of any transgene. In cultured rat neurons, FLARE gives a light-to-dark signal ratio of 120 and a high- to low-calcium signal ratio of 10 after 10 min of stimulation. Opsin expression permitted functional manipulation of FLARE-marked neurons. In adult mice, FLARE also gave light- and motor-activity-dependent transcription in the cortex. Due to its modular design, minute-scale temporal resolution, and minimal dark-state leak, FLARE should be useful for the study of activity-dependent processes in neurons and other cells that signal with calcium.

  3. Causal relationships between neurons of the nucleus incertus and the hippocampal theta activity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bellver, Sergio; Cervera-Ferri, Ana; Luque-García, Aina; Martínez-Ricós, Joana; Valverde-Navarro, Alfonso; Bataller, Manuel; Guerrero, Juan; Teruel-Marti, Vicent

    2017-03-01

    The nucleus incertus is a key node of the brainstem circuitry involved in hippocampal theta rhythmicity. Synchronisation exists between the nucleus incertus and hippocampal activities during theta periods. By the Granger causality analysis, we demonstrated a directional information flow between theta rhythmical neurons in the nucleus incertus and the hippocampus in theta-on states. The electrical stimulation of the nucleus incertus is also able to evoke a phase reset of the hippocampal theta wave. Our data suggest that the nucleus incertus is a key node of theta generation and the modulation network. In recent years, a body of evidence has shown that the nucleus incertus (NI), in the dorsal tegmental pons, is a key node of the brainstem circuitry involved in hippocampal theta rhythmicity. Ascending reticular brainstem system activation evokes hippocampal theta rhythm with coupled neuronal activity in the NI. In a recent paper, we showed three populations of neurons in the NI with differential firing during hippocampal theta activation. The objective of this work was to better evaluate the causal relationship between the activity of NI neurons and the hippocampus during theta activation in order to further understand the role of the NI in the theta network. A Granger causality analysis was run to determine whether hippocampal theta activity with sensory-evoked theta depends on the neuronal activity of the NI, or vice versa. The analysis showed causal interdependence between the NI and the hippocampus during theta activity, whose directional flow depended on the different neuronal assemblies of the NI. Whereas type I and II NI neurons mainly acted as receptors of hippocampal information, type III neuronal activity was the predominant source of flow between the NI and the hippocampus in theta states. We further determined that the electrical activation of the NI was able to reset hippocampal waves with enhanced theta-band power, depending on the septal area

  4. Ultrafine carbon particles promote rotenone-induced dopamine neuronal loss through activating microglial NADPH oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yinxi; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Huifeng

    Background: Atmospheric ultrafine particles (UFPs) and pesticide rotenone were considered as potential environmental risk factors for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, whether and how UFPs alone and in combination with rotenone affect the pathogenesis of PD remains largely unknown. Methods: Ultrafine carbon black (ufCB, a surrogate of UFPs) and rotenone were used individually or in combination to determine their roles in chronic dopaminergic (DA) loss in neuron-glia, and neuron-enriched, mix-glia cultures. Immunochemistry using antibody against tyrosine hydroxylase was performed to detect DA neuronal loss. Measurement of extracellular superoxide and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were performed to examine activation of NADPHmore » oxidase. Genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase and MAC-1 receptor in microglia were employed to examine their role in DA neuronal loss triggered by ufCB and rotenone. Results: In rodent midbrain neuron-glia cultures, ufCB and rotenone alone caused neuronal death in a dose-dependent manner. In particularly, ufCB at doses of 50 and 100 μg/cm{sup 2} induced significant loss of DA neurons. More importantly, nontoxic doses of ufCB (10 μg/cm{sup 2}) and rotenone (2 nM) induced synergistic toxicity to DA neurons. Microglial activation was essential in this process. Furthermore, superoxide production from microglial NADPH oxidase was critical in ufCB/rotenone-induced neurotoxicity. Studies in mix-glia cultures showed that ufCB treatment activated microglial NADPH oxidase to induce superoxide production. Firstly, ufCB enhanced the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (gp91{sup phox}, p47{sup phox} and p40{sup phox}); secondly, ufCB was recognized by microglial surface MAC-1 receptor and consequently promoted rotenone-induced p47{sup phox} and p67{sup phox} translocation assembling active NADPH oxidase. Conclusion: ufCB and rotenone worked in synergy to activate NADPH oxidase in microglia, leading to

  5. Accurate means of detecting and characterizing abnormal patterns of ventricular activation by phase image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botvinick, E.H.; Frais, M.A.; Shosa, D.W.

    1982-08-01

    The ability of scintigraphic phase image analysis to characterize patterns of abnormal ventricular activation was investigated. The pattern of phase distribution and sequential phase changes over both right and left ventricular regions of interest were evaluated in 16 patients with normal electrical activation and wall motion and compared with those in 8 patients with an artificial pacemaker and 4 patients with sinus rhythm with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome and delta waves. Normally, the site of earliest phase angle was seen at the base of the interventricular septum, with sequential change affecting the body of the septum and the cardiac apex andmore » then spreading laterally to involve the body of both ventricles. The site of earliest phase angle was located at the apex of the right ventricle in seven patients with a right ventricular endocardial pacemaker and on the lateral left ventricular wall in one patient with a left ventricular epicardial pacemaker. In each case the site corresponded exactly to the position of the pacing electrode as seen on posteroanterior and left lateral chest X-ray films, and sequential phase changes spread from the initial focus to affect both ventricles. In each of the patients with the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, the site of earliest ventricular phase angle was located, and it corresponded exactly to the site of the bypass tract as determined by endocardial mapping. In this way, four bypass pathways, two posterior left paraseptal, one left lateral and one right lateral, were correctly localized scintigraphically. On the basis of the sequence of mechanical contraction, phase image analysis provides an accurate noninvasive method of detecting abnormal foci of ventricular activation.« less

  6. A receptor and neuron that activate a circuit limiting sucrose consumption.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Ryan M; Sun, Jennifer S; Tam, Edric; Carlson, John R

    2017-03-23

    The neural control of sugar consumption is critical for normal metabolism. In contrast to sugar-sensing taste neurons that promote consumption, we identify a taste neuron that limits sucrose consumption in Drosophila . Silencing of the neuron increases sucrose feeding; optogenetic activation decreases it. The feeding inhibition depends on the IR60b receptor, as shown by behavioral analysis and Ca 2+ imaging of an IR60b mutant. The IR60b phenotype shows a high degree of chemical specificity when tested with a broad panel of tastants. An automated analysis of feeding behavior in freely moving flies shows that IR60b limits the duration of individual feeding bouts. This receptor and neuron provide the molecular and cellular underpinnings of a new element in the circuit logic of feeding regulation. We propose a dynamic model in which sucrose acts via IR60b to activate a circuit that inhibits feeding and prevents overconsumption.

  7. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-induced preconditioning in primary cortical neurons involves activation of MCL-1.

    PubMed

    Anilkumar, Ujval; Weisová, Petronela; Düssmann, Heiko; Concannon, Caoimhín G; König, Hans-Georg; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2013-03-01

    Neuronal preconditioning is a phenomenon where a previous exposure to a sub-lethal stress stimulus increases the resistance of neurons towards a second, normally lethal stress stimulus. Activation of the energy stress sensor, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been shown to contribute to the protective effects of ischaemic and mitochondrial uncoupling-induced preconditioning in neurons, however, the molecular basis of AMPK-mediated preconditioning has been less well characterized. We investigated the effect of AMPK preconditioning using 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside (AICAR) in a model of NMDA-mediated excitotoxic injury in primary mouse cortical neurons. Activation of AMPK with low concentrations of AICAR (0.1 mM for 2 h) induced a transient increase in AMPK phosphorylation, protecting neurons against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. Analysing potential targets of AMPK activation, demonstrated a marked increase in mRNA expression and protein levels of the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family protein myeloid cell leukaemia sequence 1 (MCL-1) in AICAR-preconditioned neurons. Interestingly, over-expression of MCL-1 protected neurons against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity while MCL-1 gene silencing abolished the effect of AICAR preconditioning. Monitored intracellular Ca²⁺ levels during NMDA excitation revealed that MCL-1 over-expressing neurons exhibited improved bioenergetics and markedly reduced Ca²⁺ elevations, suggesting a potential mechanism through which MCL-1 confers neuroprotection. This study identifies MCL-1 as a key effector of AMPK-induced preconditioning in neurons. © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. Abnormal Frontostriatal Activity During Unexpected Reward Receipt in Depression and Schizophrenia: Relationship to Anhedonia.

    PubMed

    Segarra, Nuria; Metastasio, Antonio; Ziauddeen, Hisham; Spencer, Jennifer; Reinders, Niels R; Dudas, Robert B; Arrondo, Gonzalo; Robbins, Trevor W; Clark, Luke; Fletcher, Paul C; Murray, Graham K

    2016-07-01

    Alterations in reward processes may underlie motivational and anhedonic symptoms in depression and schizophrenia. However it remains unclear whether these alterations are disorder-specific or shared, and whether they clearly relate to symptom generation or not. We studied brain responses to unexpected rewards during a simulated slot-machine game in 24 patients with depression, 21 patients with schizophrenia, and 21 healthy controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We investigated relationships between brain activation, task-related motivation, and questionnaire rated anhedonia. There was reduced activation in the orbitofrontal cortex, ventral striatum, inferior temporal gyrus, and occipital cortex in both depression and schizophrenia in comparison with healthy participants during receipt of unexpected reward. In the medial prefrontal cortex both patient groups showed reduced activation, with activation significantly more abnormal in schizophrenia than depression. Anterior cingulate and medial frontal cortical activation predicted task-related motivation, which in turn predicted anhedonia severity in schizophrenia. Our findings provide evidence for overlapping hypofunction in ventral striatal and orbitofrontal regions in depression and schizophrenia during unexpected reward receipt, and for a relationship between unexpected reward processing in the medial prefrontal cortex and the generation of motivational states.

  9. Abnormal Frontostriatal Activity During Unexpected Reward Receipt in Depression and Schizophrenia: Relationship to Anhedonia

    PubMed Central

    Segarra, Nuria; Metastasio, Antonio; Ziauddeen, Hisham; Spencer, Jennifer; Reinders, Niels R; Dudas, Robert B; Arrondo, Gonzalo; Robbins, Trevor W; Clark, Luke; Fletcher, Paul C; Murray, Graham K

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in reward processes may underlie motivational and anhedonic symptoms in depression and schizophrenia. However it remains unclear whether these alterations are disorder-specific or shared, and whether they clearly relate to symptom generation or not. We studied brain responses to unexpected rewards during a simulated slot-machine game in 24 patients with depression, 21 patients with schizophrenia, and 21 healthy controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging. We investigated relationships between brain activation, task-related motivation, and questionnaire rated anhedonia. There was reduced activation in the orbitofrontal cortex, ventral striatum, inferior temporal gyrus, and occipital cortex in both depression and schizophrenia in comparison with healthy participants during receipt of unexpected reward. In the medial prefrontal cortex both patient groups showed reduced activation, with activation significantly more abnormal in schizophrenia than depression. Anterior cingulate and medial frontal cortical activation predicted task-related motivation, which in turn predicted anhedonia severity in schizophrenia. Our findings provide evidence for overlapping hypofunction in ventral striatal and orbitofrontal regions in depression and schizophrenia during unexpected reward receipt, and for a relationship between unexpected reward processing in the medial prefrontal cortex and the generation of motivational states. PMID:26708106

  10. Concentration-dependent activation of dopamine receptors differentially modulates GABA release onto orexin neurons

    PubMed Central

    Linehan, Victoria; Trask, Robert B.; Briggs, Chantalle; Rowe, Todd M.; Hirasawa, Michiru

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) and orexin neurons play important roles in reward and food intake. There are anatomical and functional connections between these two cell groups, where orexin peptides stimulate DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area and DA inhibits orexin neurons in the hypothalamus. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying DA action on orexin neurons remain incompletely understood. Therefore, the effect of DA on inhibitory transmission to orexin neurons was investigated in rat brain slices using whole cell patch clamp technique. We found that DA modulated the frequency of spontaneous and miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) in a concentration dependent, bidirectional manner. Low (1 μM) and high concentrations (100 μM) of DA decreased and increased IPSC frequency, respectively. These effects did not accompany a change in mIPSC amplitude and persisted in the presence of G protein signaling inhibitor GDPβS in the pipette, suggesting that DA acts presynaptically. The decrease in mIPSC frequency was mediated by D2 receptors, whereas the increase required co-activation of D1 and D2 receptors and subsequent activation of phospholipase C. In summary, our results suggest that DA has complex effects on GABAergic transmission to orexin neurons, involving cooperation of multiple receptor subtypes. The direction of dopaminergic influence on orexin neurons is dependent on the level of DA in the hypothalamus. At low levels DA disinhibits orexin neurons whereas at high levels it facilitates GABA release, which may act as negative feedback to curb the excitatory orexinergic output to DA neurons. These mechanisms may have implications for consummatory and motivated behaviours. PMID:26036709

  11. Concentration-dependent activation of dopamine receptors differentially modulates GABA release onto orexin neurons.

    PubMed

    Linehan, Victoria; Trask, Robert B; Briggs, Chantalle; Rowe, Todd M; Hirasawa, Michiru

    2015-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) and orexin neurons play important roles in reward and food intake. There are anatomical and functional connections between these two cell groups: orexin peptides stimulate DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area and DA inhibits orexin neurons in the hypothalamus. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying the action of DA on orexin neurons remain incompletely understood. Therefore, the effect of DA on inhibitory transmission to orexin neurons was investigated in rat brain slices using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We found that DA modulated the frequency of spontaneous and miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) in a concentration-dependent bidirectional manner. Low (1 μM) and high (100 μM) concentrations of DA decreased and increased IPSC frequency, respectively. These effects did not accompany a change in mIPSC amplitude and persisted in the presence of G-protein signaling inhibitor GDPβS in the pipette, suggesting that DA acts presynaptically. The decrease in mIPSC frequency was mediated by D2 receptors whereas the increase required co-activation of D1 and D2 receptors and subsequent activation of phospholipase C. In summary, our results suggest that DA has complex effects on GABAergic transmission to orexin neurons, involving cooperation of multiple receptor subtypes. The direction of dopaminergic influence on orexin neurons is dependent on the level of DA in the hypothalamus. At low levels DA disinhibits orexin neurons whereas at high levels it facilitates GABA release, which may act as negative feedback to curb the excitatory orexinergic output to DA neurons. These mechanisms may have implications for consummatory and motivated behaviours. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. GABAB-receptor activation alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons in the rat substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Engberg, G; Kling-Petersen, T; Nissbrandt, H

    1993-11-01

    Previous electrophysiological experiments have emphasized the importance of the firing pattern for the functioning of midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons. In this regard, excitatory amino acid receptors appear to constitute an important modulatory control mechanism. In the present study, extracellular recording techniques were used to investigate the significance of GABAB-receptor activation for the firing properties of DA neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) in the rat. Intravenous administration of the GABAB-receptor agonist baclofen (1-16 mg/kg) was associated with a dose-dependent regularization of the firing pattern, concomitant with a reduction in burst firing. At higher doses (16-32 mg/kg), the firing rate of the DA neurons was dose-dependently decreased. Also, microiontophoretic application of baclofen regularized the firing pattern of nigral DA neurons, including a reduction of burst firing. Both the regularization of the firing pattern and inhibition of firing rate produced by systemic baclofen administration was antagonized by the GABAB-receptor antagonist CGP 35348 (200 mg/kg, i.v.). The GABAA-receptor agonist muscimol produced effects on the firing properties of DA neurons that were opposite to those observed following baclofen, i.e., an increase in firing rate accompanied by a decreased regularity. The NMDA receptor antagonist MK 801 (0.4-3.2 mg/kg, i.v.) produced a moderate, dose-dependent increase in the firing rate of the nigral DA neurons as well as a slightly regularized firing pattern. Pretreatment with MK 801 (3.2 mg/kg, i.v., 3-10 min) did neither promote nor prevent the regularization of the firing pattern or inhibition of firing rate on the nigral DA neurons produced by baclofen. The present results clearly show that GABAB-receptors can alter the firing pattern of nigral DA neurons, hereby counterbalancing the previously described ability of glutamate to induce burst firing activity on these neurons.

  13. Substance P excites GABAergic neurons in the mouse central amygdala through neurokinin 1 receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Sosulina, L.; Strippel, C.; Romo-Parra, H.; Walter, A. L.; Kanyshkova, T.; Sartori, S. B.; Lange, M. D.; Singewald, N.

    2015-01-01

    Substance P (SP) is implicated in stress regulation and affective and anxiety-related behavior. Particularly high expression has been found in the main output region of the amygdala complex, the central amygdala (CE). Here we investigated the cellular mechanisms of SP in CE in vitro, taking advantage of glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein (GAD67-GFP) knockin mice that yield a reliable labeling of GABAergic neurons, which comprise 95% of the neuronal population in the lateral section of CE (CEl). In GFP-positive neurons within CEl, SP caused a membrane depolarization and increase in input resistance, associated with an increase in action potential firing frequency. Under voltage-clamp conditions, the SP-specific membrane current reversed at −101.5 ± 2.8 mV and displayed inwardly rectifying properties indicative of a membrane K+ conductance. Moreover, SP responses were blocked by the neurokinin type 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonist L-822429 and mimicked by the NK1R agonist [Sar9,Met(O2)11]-SP. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed localization of NK1R in GFP-positive neurons in CEl, predominantly in PKCδ-negative neurons (80%) and in few PKCδ-positive neurons (17%). Differences in SP responses were not observed between the major types of CEl neurons (late firing, regular spiking, low-threshold bursting). In addition, SP increased the frequency and amplitude of GABAergic synaptic events in CEl neurons depending on upstream spike activity. These data indicate a NK1R-mediated increase in excitability and GABAergic activity in CEl neurons, which seems to mostly involve the PKCδ-negative subpopulation. This influence can be assumed to increase reciprocal interactions between CElon and CEloff pathways, thereby boosting the medial CE (CEm) output pathway and contributing to the anxiogenic-like action of SP in the amygdala. PMID:26334021

  14. Substance P excites GABAergic neurons in the mouse central amygdala through neurokinin 1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Sosulina, L; Strippel, C; Romo-Parra, H; Walter, A L; Kanyshkova, T; Sartori, S B; Lange, M D; Singewald, N; Pape, H-C

    2015-10-01

    Substance P (SP) is implicated in stress regulation and affective and anxiety-related behavior. Particularly high expression has been found in the main output region of the amygdala complex, the central amygdala (CE). Here we investigated the cellular mechanisms of SP in CE in vitro, taking advantage of glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein (GAD67-GFP) knockin mice that yield a reliable labeling of GABAergic neurons, which comprise 95% of the neuronal population in the lateral section of CE (CEl). In GFP-positive neurons within CEl, SP caused a membrane depolarization and increase in input resistance, associated with an increase in action potential firing frequency. Under voltage-clamp conditions, the SP-specific membrane current reversed at -101.5 ± 2.8 mV and displayed inwardly rectifying properties indicative of a membrane K(+) conductance. Moreover, SP responses were blocked by the neurokinin type 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonist L-822429 and mimicked by the NK1R agonist [Sar(9),Met(O2)(11)]-SP. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed localization of NK1R in GFP-positive neurons in CEl, predominantly in PKCδ-negative neurons (80%) and in few PKCδ-positive neurons (17%). Differences in SP responses were not observed between the major types of CEl neurons (late firing, regular spiking, low-threshold bursting). In addition, SP increased the frequency and amplitude of GABAergic synaptic events in CEl neurons depending on upstream spike activity. These data indicate a NK1R-mediated increase in excitability and GABAergic activity in CEl neurons, which seems to mostly involve the PKCδ-negative subpopulation. This influence can be assumed to increase reciprocal interactions between CElon and CEloff pathways, thereby boosting the medial CE (CEm) output pathway and contributing to the anxiogenic-like action of SP in the amygdala. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. The synchronous activity of lateral habenular neurons is essential for regulating hippocampal theta oscillation.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Hidenori; Yanagihara, Shin; Kobayashi, Megumi; Niisato, Kazue; Takekawa, Takashi; Harukuni, Rie; McHugh, Thomas J; Fukai, Tomoki; Isomura, Yoshikazu; Okamoto, Hitoshi

    2013-05-15

    Lateral habenula (LHb) has attracted growing interest as a regulator of serotonergic and dopaminergic neurons in the CNS. However, it remains unclear how the LHb modulates brain states in animals. To identify the neural substrates that are under the influence of LHb regulation, we examined the effects of rat LHb lesions on the hippocampal oscillatory activity associated with the transition of brain states. Our results showed that the LHb lesion shortened the theta activity duration both in anesthetized and sleeping rats. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of LHb lesion on theta maintenance depended upon an intact serotonergic median raphe, suggesting that LHb activity plays an essential role in maintaining hippocampal theta oscillation via the serotonergic raphe. Multiunit recording of sleeping rats further revealed that firing of LHb neurons showed significant phase-locking activity at each theta oscillation cycle in the hippocampus. LHb neurons showing activity that was coordinated with that of the hippocampal theta were localized in the medial LHb division, which receives afferents from the diagonal band of Broca (DBB), a pacemaker region for the hippocampal theta oscillation. Thus, our findings indicate that the DBB may pace not only the hippocampus, but also the LHb, during rapid eye movement sleep. Since serotonin is known to negatively regulate theta oscillation in the hippocampus, phase-locking activity of the LHb neurons may act, under the influence of the DBB, to maintain the hippocampal theta oscillation by modulating the activity of serotonergic neurons.

  16. (S)Pot on Mitochondria: Cannabinoids Disrupt Cellular Respiration to Limit Neuronal Activity.

    PubMed

    Harkany, Tibor; Horvath, Tamas L

    2017-01-10

    Classical views posit G protein-coupled cannabinoid receptor 1s (CB1Rs) at the cell surface with cytosolic Giα-mediated signal transduction. Hebert-Chatelain et al. (2016) instead place CB 1 Rs at mitochondria limiting neuronal respiration by soluble adenylyl cyclase-dependent modulation of complex I activity. Thus, neuronal bioenergetics link to synaptic plasticity and, globally, learning and memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cytophotometric study of ATPase activity in brain neurons and gliocytes of paradoxical sleep-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Klenikova, V A; Taranova, N P

    1989-01-01

    Conditions were chosen for optimal demonstration of ATPases in brain slices by a modified method of Wachstein and Meisel, and the reaction was shown to obey the Bouguer-Beer laws, confirming that ATPase activity can be determined quantitatively in single cells by cytophotometry. In rats in a state of relative physiological rest specific activity of both Na+, K+-ATPase and Mg++-ATPase in gliocytes of the hippocampus and dorsal raphe was found to be considerably higher than in neurons. Deprivation of the paradoxical phase of sleep of the rats for 24 h led to a significant increase in Na+, K+-ATPase activity in hippocampal neurons and to a decrease in its activity in gliocytes of the hippocampus and dorsal nucleus raphe. It is suggested that these changes in Na+, K+-ATPase activity may be due to some extent to a change in excitability of neurons and depolarization of the glia when sleep is disturbed.

  18. Simultaneous multi-patch-clamp and extracellular-array recordings: Single neuron reflects network activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardi, Roni; Goldental, Amir; Sardi, Shira; Sheinin, Anton; Kanter, Ido

    2016-11-01

    The increasing number of recording electrodes enhances the capability of capturing the network’s cooperative activity, however, using too many monitors might alter the properties of the measured neural network and induce noise. Using a technique that merges simultaneous multi-patch-clamp and multi-electrode array recordings of neural networks in-vitro, we show that the membrane potential of a single neuron is a reliable and super-sensitive probe for monitoring such cooperative activities and their detailed rhythms. Specifically, the membrane potential and the spiking activity of a single neuron are either highly correlated or highly anti-correlated with the time-dependent macroscopic activity of the entire network. This surprising observation also sheds light on the cooperative origin of neuronal burst in cultured networks. Our findings present an alternative flexible approach to the technique based on a massive tiling of networks by large-scale arrays of electrodes to monitor their activity.

  19. Simultaneous multi-patch-clamp and extracellular-array recordings: Single neuron reflects network activity.

    PubMed

    Vardi, Roni; Goldental, Amir; Sardi, Shira; Sheinin, Anton; Kanter, Ido

    2016-11-08

    The increasing number of recording electrodes enhances the capability of capturing the network's cooperative activity, however, using too many monitors might alter the properties of the measured neural network and induce noise. Using a technique that merges simultaneous multi-patch-clamp and multi-electrode array recordings of neural networks in-vitro, we show that the membrane potential of a single neuron is a reliable and super-sensitive probe for monitoring such cooperative activities and their detailed rhythms. Specifically, the membrane potential and the spiking activity of a single neuron are either highly correlated or highly anti-correlated with the time-dependent macroscopic activity of the entire network. This surprising observation also sheds light on the cooperative origin of neuronal burst in cultured networks. Our findings present an alternative flexible approach to the technique based on a massive tiling of networks by large-scale arrays of electrodes to monitor their activity.

  20. Simultaneous multi-patch-clamp and extracellular-array recordings: Single neuron reflects network activity

    PubMed Central

    Vardi, Roni; Goldental, Amir; Sardi, Shira; Sheinin, Anton; Kanter, Ido

    2016-01-01

    The increasing number of recording electrodes enhances the capability of capturing the network’s cooperative activity, however, using too many monitors might alter the properties of the measured neural network and induce noise. Using a technique that merges simultaneous multi-patch-clamp and multi-electrode array recordings of neural networks in-vitro, we show that the membrane potential of a single neuron is a reliable and super-sensitive probe for monitoring such cooperative activities and their detailed rhythms. Specifically, the membrane potential and the spiking activity of a single neuron are either highly correlated or highly anti-correlated with the time-dependent macroscopic activity of the entire network. This surprising observation also sheds light on the cooperative origin of neuronal burst in cultured networks. Our findings present an alternative flexible approach to the technique based on a massive tiling of networks by large-scale arrays of electrodes to monitor their activity. PMID:27824075

  1. Plasticity of Neuron-Glial Transmission: Equipping Glia for Long-Term Integration of Network Activity.

    PubMed

    Croft, Wayne; Dobson, Katharine L; Bellamy, Tomas C

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of synaptic networks to express activity-dependent changes in strength and connectivity is essential for learning and memory processes. In recent years, glial cells (most notably astrocytes) have been recognized as active participants in the modulation of synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity, implicating these electrically nonexcitable cells in information processing in the brain. While the concept of bidirectional communication between neurons and glia and the mechanisms by which gliotransmission can modulate neuronal function are well established, less attention has been focussed on the computational potential of neuron-glial transmission itself. In particular, whether neuron-glial transmission is itself subject to activity-dependent plasticity and what the computational properties of such plasticity might be has not been explored in detail. In this review, we summarize current examples of plasticity in neuron-glial transmission, in many brain regions and neurotransmitter pathways. We argue that induction of glial plasticity typically requires repetitive neuronal firing over long time periods (minutes-hours) rather than the short-lived, stereotyped trigger typical of canonical long-term potentiation. We speculate that this equips glia with a mechanism for monitoring average firing rates in the synaptic network, which is suited to the longer term roles proposed for astrocytes in neurophysiology.

  2. Response of Electrical Activity in an Improved Neuron Model under Electromagnetic Radiation and Noise

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Feibiao; Liu, Shenquan

    2017-01-01

    Electrical activities are ubiquitous neuronal bioelectric phenomena, which have many different modes to encode the expression of biological information, and constitute the whole process of signal propagation between neurons. Therefore, we focus on the electrical activities of neurons, which is also causing widespread concern among neuroscientists. In this paper, we mainly investigate the electrical activities of the Morris-Lecar (M-L) model with electromagnetic radiation or Gaussian white noise, which can restore the authenticity of neurons in realistic neural network. First, we explore dynamical response of the whole system with electromagnetic induction (EMI) and Gaussian white noise. We find that there are slight differences in the discharge behaviors via comparing the response of original system with that of improved system, and electromagnetic induction can transform bursting or spiking state to quiescent state and vice versa. Furthermore, we research bursting transition mode and the corresponding periodic solution mechanism for the isolated neuron model with electromagnetic induction by using one-parameter and bi-parameters bifurcation analysis. Finally, we analyze the effects of Gaussian white noise on the original system and coupled system, which is conducive to understand the actual discharge properties of realistic neurons. PMID:29209192

  3. Response of Electrical Activity in an Improved Neuron Model under Electromagnetic Radiation and Noise.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Feibiao; Liu, Shenquan

    2017-01-01

    Electrical activities are ubiquitous neuronal bioelectric phenomena, which have many different modes to encode the expression of biological information, and constitute the whole process of signal propagation between neurons. Therefore, we focus on the electrical activities of neurons, which is also causing widespread concern among neuroscientists. In this paper, we mainly investigate the electrical activities of the Morris-Lecar (M-L) model with electromagnetic radiation or Gaussian white noise, which can restore the authenticity of neurons in realistic neural network. First, we explore dynamical response of the whole system with electromagnetic induction (EMI) and Gaussian white noise. We find that there are slight differences in the discharge behaviors via comparing the response of original system with that of improved system, and electromagnetic induction can transform bursting or spiking state to quiescent state and vice versa. Furthermore, we research bursting transition mode and the corresponding periodic solution mechanism for the isolated neuron model with electromagnetic induction by using one-parameter and bi-parameters bifurcation analysis. Finally, we analyze the effects of Gaussian white noise on the original system and coupled system, which is conducive to understand the actual discharge properties of realistic neurons.

  4. Activated microglia proliferate at neurites of mutant huntingtin-expressing neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Andrew D.; Kaltenbach, Linda S.; Lo, Donald C.; Harry, G. Jean

    2011-01-01

    In Huntington's disease (HD), mutated huntingtin (mhtt) causes striatal neurodegeneration which is paralleled by elevated microglia cell numbers. In vitro cortico-striatal slice and primary neuronal culture models, in which neuronal expression of mhtt fragments drives HD-like neurotoxicity, were employed to examine wild type microglia during both the initiation and progression of neuronal pathology. As neuronal pathology progressed, microglia initially localized in the vicinity of neurons expressing mhtt fragments increased in number, demonstrated morphological evidence of activation, and expressed the proliferation marker, Ki67. These microglia were positioned along irregular neurites, but did not localize with mhtt inclusions nor exacerbate mhtt fragment-induced neurotoxicity. Prior to neuronal pathology, microglia upregulated Iba1, signaling a functional shift. With neurodegeneration, interleukin-6 and complement component 1q were increased. The results suggest a stimulatory, proliferative signal for microglia present at the onset of mhtt fragment-induced neurodegeneration. Thus, microglia effect a localized inflammatory response to neuronal mhtt expression that may serve to direct microglial removal of dysfunctional neurites or aberrant synapses, as is required for reparative actions in vivo. PMID:21482444

  5. AMPK activation by Tanshinone IIA protects neuronal cells from oxygen-glucose deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Yingfeng; Lin, Jixian; Liu, Hui; Wu, Hui; Yan, Zhimin; Zhao, Jing

    2018-01-01

    The current study tested the potential neuroprotective function of Tanshinone IIA (ThIIA) in neuronal cells with oxygen-glucose deprivation (ODG) and re-oxygenation (OGDR). In SH-SY5Y neuronal cells and primary murine cortical neurons, ThIIA pre-treatment attenuated OGDR-induced viability reduction and apoptosis. Further, OGDR-induced mitochondrial depolarization, reactive oxygen species production, lipid peroxidation and DNA damages in neuronal cells were significantly attenuated by ThIIA. ThIIA activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, which was essential for neuroprotection against OGDR. AMPKα1 knockdown or complete knockout in SH-SY5Y cells abolished ThIIA-induced AMPK activation and neuroprotection against OGDR. Further studies found that ThIIA up-regulated microRNA-135b to downregulate the AMPK phosphatase Ppm1e. Notably, knockdown of Ppm1e by targeted shRNA or forced microRNA-135b expression also activated AMPK and protected SH-SY5Y cells from OGDR. Together, AMPK activation by ThIIA protects neuronal cells from OGDR. microRNA-135b-mediated silence of Ppm1e could be the key mechanism of AMPK activation by ThIIA. PMID:29435120

  6. In situ immunodetection of neuronal caspase-3 activation in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Selznick, L A; Holtzman, D M; Han, B H; Gökden, M; Srinivasan, A N; Johnson, E M; Roth, K A

    1999-09-01

    The mechanism by which cells die in Alzheimer disease (AD) is unknown. Several investigators speculate that much of the cell loss may be due to apoptosis, a highly regulated form of programmed cell death. Caspase-3 is a critical effector of neuronal apoptosis and may be inappropriately activated in AD. To address this possibility, we examined cortical and hippocampal brain sections from AD patients, as well as 2 animal models of AD, for in situ evidence of caspase-3 activation. We report here that senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the AD brain are not associated with caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, amyloid beta (A beta) deposition in the APPsw transgenic mouse model of AD does not result in caspase-3 activation despite the ability of A beta to induce caspase-3 activation and neuronal apoptosis in vitro. AD brain sections do, however, exhibit caspase-3 activation in hippocampal neurons undergoing granulovacuolar degeneration. Our data suggests that caspase-3 does not have a significant role in the widespread neuronal cell death that occurs in AD, but may contribute to the specific loss of hippocampal neurons involved in learning and memory.

  7. Brain innate immunity regulates hypothalamic arcuate neuronal activity and feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Reis, Wagner L; Yi, Chun-Xia; Gao, Yuanqing; Tschöp, Mathias H; Stern, Javier E

    2015-04-01

    Hypothalamic inflammation, involving microglia activation in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), is proposed as a novel underlying mechanism in obesity, insulin and leptin resistance. However, whether activated microglia affects ARC neuronal activity, and consequently basal and hormonal-induced food intake, is unknown. We show that lipopolysaccharide, an agonist of the toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), which we found to be expressed in ARC microglia, inhibited the firing activity of the majority of orexigenic agouti gene-related protein/neuropeptide Y neurons, whereas it increased the activity of the majority of anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin neurons. Lipopolysaccharide effects in agouti gene-related protein/neuropeptide Y (but not in proopiomelanocortin) neurons were occluded by inhibiting microglia function or by blocking TLR4 receptors. Finally, we report that inhibition of hypothalamic microglia altered basal food intake, also preventing central orexigenic responses to ghrelin. Our studies support a major role for a TLR4-mediated microglia signaling pathway in the control of ARC neuronal activity and feeding behavior.

  8. Ethanol exposure in early adolescence inhibits intrinsic neuronal plasticity via sigma-1 receptor activation in hippocampal CA1 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sabeti, Jilla

    2011-01-01

    Background We demonstrated previously that rats exposed to chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapors in early adolescence show increased magnitudes of long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory transmission when recorded at dendritic synapses in hippocampus. Large amplitude LTP following CIE exposure is mediated by sigma-1 receptors; however, not yet addressed is the role of sigma-1 receptors in modulating the intrinsic properties of neurons to alter their action potential firing during LTP. Methods Activity-induced plasticity of spike firing was investigated using rat hippocampal slice recordings to measure changes in both field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) and population spikes (pop. spikes) concomitantly at dendritic inputs and soma of CA1 pyramidal neurons, respectively. Results We observed unique modifications in plasticity of action potential firing in hippocampal slices from CIE exposed adolescent rats, where the induction of large amplitude LTP by 100 Hz stimulations was accompanied by reduced CA1 neuronal excitability—reflected as decreased pop. spike efficacy and impaired activity-induced fEPSP-to-spike (E-S) potentiation. By contrast, LTP induction in ethanol-naïve control slices resulted in increased spike efficacy and robust E-S potentiation. E-S potentiation impairments emerged at 24 hr after CIE treatment cessation, but not before the alcohol withdrawal period, and were restored with bath-application of the sigma-1 receptor selective antagonist BD1047, but not the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5. Further evidence revealed a significantly shortened somatic fEPSP time course in adolescent CIE-withdrawn hippocampal slices during LTP; however, paired-pulse data show no apparent correspondence between E-S dissociation and altered recurrent feedback inhibition. Conclusions Results here suggest that acute withdrawal from adolescent CIE exposure triggers sigma-1 receptors that act to depress the efficacy of excitatory inputs in triggering

  9. Inward rectifier potassium current IKir promotes intrinsic pacemaker activity of thalamocortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Amarillo, Yimy; Tissone, Angela I; Mato, Germán; Nadal, Marcela S

    2018-06-01

    Slow repetitive burst firing by hyperpolarized thalamocortical (TC) neurons correlates with global slow rhythms (<4 Hz), which are the physiological oscillations during non-rapid eye movement sleep or pathological oscillations during idiopathic epilepsy. The pacemaker activity of TC neurons depends on the expression of several subthreshold conductances, which are modulated in a behaviorally dependent manner. Here we show that upregulation of the small and neglected inward rectifier potassium current I Kir induces repetitive burst firing at slow and delta frequency bands. We demonstrate this in mouse TC neurons in brain slices by manipulating the Kir maximum conductance with dynamic clamp. We also performed a thorough theoretical analysis that explains how the unique properties of I Kir enable this current to induce slow periodic bursting in TC neurons. We describe a new ionic mechanism based on the voltage- and time-dependent interaction of I Kir and hyperpolarization-activated cationic current I h that endows TC neurons with the ability to oscillate spontaneously at very low frequencies, even below 0.5 Hz. Bifurcation analysis of conductance-based models of increasing complexity demonstrates that I Kir induces bistability of the membrane potential at the same time that it induces sustained oscillations in combination with I h and increases the robustness of low threshold-activated calcium current I T -mediated oscillations. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The strong inwardly rectifying potassium current I Kir of thalamocortical neurons displays a region of negative slope conductance in the current-voltage relationship that generates potassium currents activated by hyperpolarization. Bifurcation analysis shows that I Kir induces bistability of the membrane potential; generates sustained subthreshold oscillations by interacting with the hyperpolarization-activated cationic current I h ; and increases the robustness of oscillations mediated by the low threshold-activated calcium

  10. Response of Cultured Neuronal Network Activity After High-Intensity Power Frequency Magnetic Field Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Atsushi; Takahashi, Masayuki; Makino, Kei; Suzuki, Yukihisa; Jimbo, Yasuhiko; Nakasono, Satoshi

    2018-01-01

    High-intensity and low frequency (1–100 kHz) time-varying electromagnetic fields stimulate the human body through excitation of the nervous system. In power frequency range (50/60 Hz), a frequency-dependent threshold of the external electric field-induced neuronal modulation in cultured neuronal networks was used as one of the biological indicator in international guidelines; however, the threshold of the magnetic field-induced neuronal modulation has not been elucidated. In this study, we exposed rat brain-derived neuronal networks to a high-intensity power frequency magnetic field (hPF-MF), and evaluated the modulation of synchronized bursting activity using a multi-electrode array (MEA)-based extracellular recording technique. As a result of short-term hPF-MF exposure (50–400 mT root-mean-square (rms), 50 Hz, sinusoidal wave, 6 s), the synchronized bursting activity was increased in the 400 mT-exposed group. On the other hand, no change was observed in the 50–200 mT-exposed groups. In order to clarify the mechanisms of the 400 mT hPF-MF exposure-induced neuronal response, we evaluated it after blocking inhibitory synapses using bicuculline methiodide (BMI); subsequently, increase in bursting activity was observed with BMI application, and the response of 400 mT hPF-MF exposure disappeared. Therefore, it was suggested that the response of hPF-MF exposure was involved in the inhibitory input. Next, we screened the inhibitory pacemaker-like neuronal activity which showed autonomous 4–10 Hz firing with CNQX and D-AP5 application, and it was confirmed that the activity was reduced after 400 mT hPF-MF exposure. Comparison of these experimental results with estimated values of the induced electric field (E-field) in the culture medium revealed that the change in synchronized bursting activity occurred over 0.3 V/m, which was equivalent to the findings of a previous study that used the external electric fields. In addition, the results suggested that the

  11. Abnormal reflex activation of hamstring muscles in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Graham M; Granger, Nicolas; Langley-Hobbs, Sorrel J; Jeffery, Nick D

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms underlying cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) in dogs are poorly understood. In this study hamstring muscle reflexes in response to cranial tibial translation were analysed to determine whether these active stabilisers of the stifle joint are differently activated in dogs with CCLR compared to control dogs. In a prospective clinical study reflex muscle activity from the lateral and medial hamstring muscles (biceps femoris and semimembranosus) was recorded using surface electrodes in control dogs (n=21) and dogs with CCLR (n=22). These electromyographic recordings were analysed using an algorithm previously validated in humans. The hamstring reflex was reliably and reproducibly recorded in normal dogs. Both a short latency response (SLR, 17.6±2.1ms) and a medium latency response (MLR, 37.7±2.7ms) could be identified. In dogs with unilateral CCLR, the SLR and MLR were not significantly different between the affected and the unaffected limbs, but the MLR latency of both affected and unaffected limbs in CCLR dogs were significantly prolonged compared to controls. In conclusion, the hamstring reflex can be recorded in dogs and the MLR is prolonged in dogs with CCLR. Since both affected and unaffected limbs exhibit prolonged MLR, it is possible that abnormal hamstring reflex activation is a mechanism by which progressive CCL damage may occur. The methodology allows for further investigation of the relationship between neuromuscular imbalance and CCLR or limitations in functional recovery following surgical intervention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Artificial Induction of Associative Olfactory Memory by Optogenetic and Thermogenetic Activation of Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Octopaminergic Neurons in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Takato; Lee, Chi-Yu; Honjo, Ken; Furukubo-Tokunaga, Katsuo

    2016-01-01

    The larval brain of Drosophila melanogaster provides an excellent system for the study of the neurocircuitry mechanism of memory. Recent development of neurogenetic techniques in fruit flies enables manipulations of neuronal activities in freely behaving animals. This protocol describes detailed steps for artificial induction of olfactory associative memory in Drosophila larvae. In this protocol, the natural reward signal is substituted by thermogenetic activation of octopaminergic neurons in the brain. In parallel, the odor signal is substituted by optogenetic activation of a specific class of olfactory receptor neurons. Association of reward and odor stimuli is achieved with the concomitant application of blue light and heat that leads to activation of both sets of neurons in living transgenic larvae. Given its operational simplicity and robustness, this method could be utilized to further our knowledge on the neurocircuitry mechanism of memory in the fly brain. PMID:27445732

  13. Silibinin activates AMP-activated protein kinase to protect neuronal cells from oxygen and glucose deprivation-re-oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhi; Ding, Sheng-quan; Shen, Ya-fang

    2014-11-14

    In this study, we explored the cytoprotective potential of silibinin against oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal cell damages, and studied underling mechanisms. In vitro model of ischemic stroke was created by keeping neuronal cells (SH-SY5Y cells and primary mouse cortical neurons) in an OGD condition followed by re-oxygenation. Pre-treatment of silibinin significantly inhibited OGD/re-oxygenation-induced necrosis and apoptosis of neuronal cells. OGD/re-oxygenation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) reduction were also inhibited by silibinin. At the molecular level, silibinin treatment in SH-SY5Y cells and primary cortical neurons led to significant AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling activation, detected by phosphorylations of AMPKα1, its upstream kinase liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and the downstream target acetyl-CoA Carboxylase (ACC). Pharmacological inhibition or genetic depletion of AMPK alleviated the neuroprotective ability of silibinin against OGD/re-oxygenation. Further, ROS scavenging ability by silibinin was abolished with AMPK inhibition or silencing. While A-769662, the AMPK activator, mimicked silibinin actions and suppressed ROS production and neuronal cell death following OGD/re-oxygenation. Together, these results show that silibinin-mediated neuroprotection requires activation of AMPK signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Abnormal prefrontal and parietal activity linked to deficient active binding in working memory in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Grot, Stéphanie; Légaré, Virginie Petel; Lipp, Olivier; Soulières, Isabelle; Dolcos, Florin; Luck, David

    2017-10-01

    Working memory deficits have been widely reported in schizophrenia, and may result from inefficient binding processes. These processes, and their neural correlates, remain understudied in schizophrenia. Thus, we designed an FMRI study aimed at investigating the neural correlates of both passive and active binding in working memory in schizophrenia. Nineteen patients with schizophrenia and 23 matched controls were recruited to perform a working memory binding task, in which they were instructed to memorize three letters and three spatial locations. In the passive binding condition, letters and spatial locations were directly presented as bound. Conversely, in the active binding condition, words and spatial locations were presented as separated, and participants were instructed to intentionally create associations between them. Patients exhibited a similar performance to the controls for the passive binding condition, but a significantly lower performance for the active binding. FMRI analyses revealed that this active binding deficit was related to aberrant activity in the posterior parietal cortex and the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. This study provides initial evidence of a specific deficit for actively binding information in schizophrenia, which is linked to dysfunctions in the neural networks underlying attention, manipulation of information, and encoding strategies. Together, our results suggest that all these dysfunctions may be targets for neuromodulation interventions known to improve cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Spatio-temporal specialization of GABAergic septo-hippocampal neurons for rhythmic network activity.

    PubMed

    Unal, Gunes; Crump, Michael G; Viney, Tim J; Éltes, Tímea; Katona, Linda; Klausberger, Thomas; Somogyi, Peter

    2018-03-03

    Medial septal GABAergic neurons of the basal forebrain innervate the hippocampus and related cortical areas, contributing to the coordination of network activity, such as theta oscillations and sharp wave-ripple events, via a preferential innervation of GABAergic interneurons. Individual medial septal neurons display diverse activity patterns, which may be related to their termination in different cortical areas and/or to the different types of innervated interneurons. To test these hypotheses, we extracellularly recorded and juxtacellularly labeled single medial septal neurons in anesthetized rats in vivo during hippocampal theta and ripple oscillations, traced their axons to distant cortical target areas, and analyzed their postsynaptic interneurons. Medial septal GABAergic neurons exhibiting different hippocampal theta phase preferences and/or sharp wave-ripple related activity terminated in restricted hippocampal regions, and selectively targeted a limited number of interneuron types, as established on the basis of molecular markers. We demonstrate the preferential innervation of bistratified cells in CA1 and of basket cells in CA3 by individual axons. One group of septal neurons was suppressed during sharp wave-ripples, maintained their firing rate across theta and non-theta network states and mainly fired along the descending phase of CA1 theta oscillations. In contrast, neurons that were active during sharp wave-ripples increased their firing significantly during "theta" compared to "non-theta" states, with most firing during the ascending phase of theta oscillations. These results demonstrate that specialized septal GABAergic neurons contribute to the coordination of network activity through parallel, target area- and cell type-selective projections to the hippocampus.

  16. Modelling the Effects of Electrical Coupling between Unmyelinated Axons of Brainstem Neurons Controlling Rhythmic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Michael J.; Soffe, Stephen R.; Willshaw, David J.; Roberts, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Gap junctions between fine unmyelinated axons can electrically couple groups of brain neurons to synchronise firing and contribute to rhythmic activity. To explore the distribution and significance of electrical coupling, we modelled a well analysed, small population of brainstem neurons which drive swimming in young frog tadpoles. A passive network of 30 multicompartmental neurons with unmyelinated axons was used to infer that: axon-axon gap junctions close to the soma gave the best match to experimentally measured coupling coefficients; axon diameter had a strong influence on coupling; most neurons were coupled indirectly via the axons of other neurons. When active channels were added, gap junctions could make action potential propagation along the thin axons unreliable. Increased sodium and decreased potassium channel densities in the initial axon segment improved action potential propagation. Modelling suggested that the single spike firing to step current injection observed in whole-cell recordings is not a cellular property but a dynamic consequence of shunting resulting from electrical coupling. Without electrical coupling, firing of the population during depolarising current was unsynchronised; with coupling, the population showed synchronous recruitment and rhythmic firing. When activated instead by increasing levels of modelled sensory pathway input, the population without electrical coupling was recruited incrementally to unpatterned activity. However, when coupled, the population was recruited all-or-none at threshold into a rhythmic swimming pattern: the tadpole “decided” to swim. Modelling emphasises uncertainties about fine unmyelinated axon physiology but, when informed by biological data, makes general predictions about gap junctions: locations close to the soma; relatively small numbers; many indirect connections between neurons; cause of action potential propagation failure in fine axons; misleading alteration of intrinsic firing

  17. Influence of spaceflight on succinate dehydrogenase activity and soma size of rat ventral horn neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Ohira, Y.; Roy, R. R.; Nagaoka, S.; Sekiguchi, C.; Hinds, W. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1996-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities and soma cross-sectional areas (CSA) of neurons in the dorsolateral region of the ventral horn at the L5 segmental level of the spinal cord in the rat were determined after 14 days of spaceflight and after 9 days of recovery on earth. The results were compared to those in age-matched ground-based control rats. Spinal cords were quick-frozen, and the SDH activity and CSA of a sample of neurons with a visible nucleus were determined using a digitizer and a computer-assisted image analysis system. An inverse relationship between CSA and SDH activity of neurons was observed in all groups of rats. No change in mean CSA or mean SDH activity or in the size distribution of neurons was observed following spaceflight or recovery. However, there was a selective decrease in the SDH activity of neurons with soma CSA between 500 and 800 microns2 in the flight rats, and this effect persisted for at least 9 days following return to 1 g. It remains to be determined whether the selected population of motoneurons or the specific motor pools affected by spaceflight may be restricted to specific muscles.

  18. FlyMAD: rapid thermogenetic control of neuronal activity in freely walking Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bath, Daniel E; Stowers, John R; Hörmann, Dorothea; Poehlmann, Andreas; Dickson, Barry J; Straw, Andrew D

    2014-07-01

    Rapidly and selectively modulating the activity of defined neurons in unrestrained animals is a powerful approach in investigating the circuit mechanisms that shape behavior. In Drosophila melanogaster, temperature-sensitive silencers and activators are widely used to control the activities of genetically defined neuronal cell types. A limitation of these thermogenetic approaches, however, has been their poor temporal resolution. Here we introduce FlyMAD (the fly mind-altering device), which allows thermogenetic silencing or activation within seconds or even fractions of a second. Using computer vision, FlyMAD targets an infrared laser to freely walking flies. As a proof of principle, we demonstrated the rapid silencing and activation of neurons involved in locomotion, vision and courtship. The spatial resolution of the focused beam enabled preferential targeting of neurons in the brain or ventral nerve cord. Moreover, the high temporal resolution of FlyMAD allowed us to discover distinct timing relationships for two neuronal cell types previously linked to courtship song.

  19. Neuron activity in rat hippocampus and motor cortex during discrimination reversal.

    PubMed

    Disterhoft, J F; Segal, M

    1978-01-01

    Chronic unit activity and gross movement were recorded from rats during two discrimination reversals in a classical appetitive conditioning situation. The anticipatory movement decreased in response to the former CS+ tone and increased to the previous CS- tone after each reversal. Hippocampus and motor cortex were differently related to these two kinds of behavioral change. Response rates of hippocampal neurons were more closely related to the increased movement response to the former CS- which now signaled food. Motor cortex neuron responses were more closely correlated with the decrease in movement responses to the former CS+ which became neutral after the reversal. It appeared that hippocampal neurons could have been involved in one cognitive aspect of the situation, motor cortex neurons in another. The data were related to current functional concepts of these brain regions.

  20. Glucose level determines excitatory or inhibitory effects of adiponectin on arcuate POMC neuron activity and feeding

    PubMed Central

    Suyama, Shigetomo; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Maejima, Yuko; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, acting against metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence suggest that adiponectin acts on the brain including hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), where proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons play key roles in feeding regulation. Several studies have examined intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of adiponectin and reported opposite effects, increase or decrease of food intake. These reports used different nutritional states. The present study aimed to clarify whether adiponectin exerts distinct effects on food intake and ARC POMC neurons depending on the glucose concentration. Adiponectin was ICV injected with or without glucose for feeding experiments and administered to ARC slices with high or low glucose for patch clamp experiments. We found that adiponectin at high glucose inhibited POMC neurons and increased food intake while at low glucose it exerted opposite effects. The results demonstrate that glucose level determines excitatory or inhibitory effects of adiponectin on arcuate POMC neuron activity and feeding. PMID:27503800

  1. Regulation of Drosophila hematopoietic sites by Activin-β from active sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Makhijani, Kalpana; Alexander, Brandy; Rao, Deepti; Petraki, Sophia; Herboso, Leire; Kukar, Katelyn; Batool, Itrat; Wachner, Stephanie; Gold, Katrina S.; Wong, Corinna; O’Connor, Michael B.; Brückner, Katja

    2017-01-01

    An outstanding question in animal development, tissue homeostasis and disease is how cell populations adapt to sensory inputs. During Drosophila larval development, hematopoietic sites are in direct contact with sensory neuron clusters of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), and blood cells (hemocytes) require the PNS for their survival and recruitment to these microenvironments, known as Hematopoietic Pockets. Here we report that Activin-β, a TGF-β family ligand, is expressed by sensory neurons of the PNS and regulates the proliferation and adhesion of hemocytes. These hemocyte responses depend on PNS activity, as shown by agonist treatment and transient silencing of sensory neurons. Activin-β has a key role in this regulation, which is apparent from reporter expression and mutant analyses. This mechanism of local sensory neurons controlling blood cell adaptation invites evolutionary parallels with vertebrate hematopoietic progenitors and the independent myeloid system of tissue macrophages, whose regulation by local microenvironments remain undefined. PMID:28748922

  2. Glucose level determines excitatory or inhibitory effects of adiponectin on arcuate POMC neuron activity and feeding.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Shigetomo; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Maejima, Yuko; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-08-09

    Adiponectin regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, acting against metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence suggest that adiponectin acts on the brain including hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), where proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons play key roles in feeding regulation. Several studies have examined intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of adiponectin and reported opposite effects, increase or decrease of food intake. These reports used different nutritional states. The present study aimed to clarify whether adiponectin exerts distinct effects on food intake and ARC POMC neurons depending on the glucose concentration. Adiponectin was ICV injected with or without glucose for feeding experiments and administered to ARC slices with high or low glucose for patch clamp experiments. We found that adiponectin at high glucose inhibited POMC neurons and increased food intake while at low glucose it exerted opposite effects. The results demonstrate that glucose level determines excitatory or inhibitory effects of adiponectin on arcuate POMC neuron activity and feeding.

  3. p62 modulates Akt activity via association with PKC{zeta} in neuronal survival and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Joung, Insil; Kim, Hak Jae; Kwon, Yunhee Kim

    2005-08-26

    p62 is a ubiquitously expressed phosphoprotein that interacts with a number of signaling molecules and a major component of neurofibrillary tangles in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. It has been implicated in important cellular functions such as cell proliferation and anti-apoptotic pathways. In this study, we have addressed the potential role of p62 during neuronal differentiation and survival using HiB5, a rat neuronal progenitor cell. We generated a recombinant adenovirus encoding T7-epitope tagged p62 to reliably transfer p62 cDNA into the neuronal cells. The results show that an overexpression of p62 led not only to neuronal differentiation, but alsomore » to decreased cell death induced by serum withdrawal in HiB5 cells. In this process p62-dependent Akt phosphorylation occurred via the release of Akt from PKC{zeta} by association of p62 and PKC{zeta}, which is known as a negative regulator of Akt activation. These findings indicate that p62 facilitates cell survival through novel signaling cascades that result in Akt activation. Furthermore, we found that p62 expression was induced during neuronal differentiation. Taken together, the data suggest p62 is a regulator of neuronal cell survival and differentiation.« less

  4. Excitotoxicity-induced prostaglandin D2 production induces sustained microglial activation and delayed neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Iwasa, Kensuke; Yamamoto, Shinji; Yagishita, Sosuke; Maruyama, Kei; Yoshikawa, Keisuke

    2017-04-01

    Excitotoxicity is the pivotal mechanism of neuronal death. Prostaglandins (PGs) produced during excitotoxicity play important roles in neurodegenerative conditions. Previously, we demonstrated that initial burst productions of PGD 2 , PGE 2 , and PGF 2α are produced by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the hippocampus following a single systemic kainic acid (KA) administration. In addition, we showed that blocking of all PG productions ameliorated hippocampal delayed neuronal death at 30 days after KA administration. To investigate the role of individual PGs in the delayed neuronal death, we performed intracerebroventricular injection of PGD 2 , PGE 2 , or PGF 2α in rats whose hippocampal PG productions were entirely blocked by pretreatment of NS398, a COX-2 selective inhibitor. Administration of PGD 2 and PGF 2α had a latent contribution to the delayed neuronal death, sustained over 30 days after a single KA treatment. Furthermore, PGD 2 enhanced microglial activation, which may be involved in the delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus. These findings suggest that excitotoxic delayed neuronal death is mediated through microglia activated by PGD 2 . Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Antipsychotics Activate mTORC1-Dependent Translation to Enhance Neuronal Morphological Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, Heather; Zhang, Guoan; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Pérez-Cuesta, Luis M.; Deinhardt, Katrin; Hoeffer, Charles A.; Neubert, Thomas A.; Gan, Wen-biao; Klann, Eric; Chao, Moses V.

    2014-01-01

    Although antipsychotic drugs can reduce psychotic behavior within a few hours, full efficacy is not achieved for several weeks, implying that there may be rapid, short-term changes in neuronal function, which are consolidated into long-lasting changes. Here, we showed that the antipsychotic drug haloperidol, a dopamine receptor type 2 (D2R) antagonist, stimulated the kinase Akt to activate the mRNA translation pathway mediated by the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). In primary striatal D2R-positive neurons, haloperidol-mediated activation of mTORC1 resulted in increased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (S6) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4E-BP). Proteomic mass spectrometry revealed marked changes in the pattern of protein synthesis after acute exposure of cultured striatal neurons to haloperidol, including increased abundance of cytoskeletal proteins and proteins associated with translation machinery. These proteomic changes coincided with increased morphological complexity of neurons that was diminished by inhibition of downstream effectors of mTORC1, suggesting that mTORC1-dependent translation enhances neuronal complexity in response to haloperidol. In vivo, we observed rapid morphological changes with a concomitant increase in the abundance of cytoskeletal proteins in cortical neurons of haloperidol-injected mice. These results suggest a mechanism for both the acute and long-term actions of antipsychotics. PMID:24425786

  6. Mirror neuron activity associated with social impairments but not age in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Enticott, Peter G; Kennedy, Hayley A; Rinehart, Nicole J; Tonge, Bruce J; Bradshaw, John L; Taffe, John R; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2012-03-01

    The neurobiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is not particularly well understood, and biomedical treatment approaches are therefore extremely limited. A prominent explanatory model suggests that social-relating symptoms may arise from dysfunction within the mirror neuron system, while a recent neuroimaging study suggests that these impairments in ASD might reduce with age. Participants with autism spectrum disorder (i.e., DSM-IV autistic disorder or Asperger's disorder) (n = 34) and matched control subjects (n = 36) completed a transcranial magnetic stimulation study in which corticospinal excitability was assessed during the observation of hand gestures. Regression analyses revealed that the ASD group presented with significantly reduced corticospinal excitability during the observation of a transitive hand gesture (relative to observation of a static hand) (p < .05), which indicates reduced putative mirror neuron system activity within ventral premotor cortex/inferior frontal gyrus. Among the ASD group, there was also a negative association between putative mirror neuron activity and self-reported social-relating impairments, but there was no indication that mirror neuron impairments in ASD decrease with age. These data provide general support for the mirror neuron hypothesis of autism; researchers now must clarify the precise functional significance of mirror neurons to truly understand their role in the neuropathophysiology of ASD and to determine whether they should be used as targets for the treatment of ASD.

  7. Neural stem cells rescue nervous purkinje neurons by restoring molecular homeostasis of tissue plasminogen activator and downstream targets.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianxue; Imitola, Jaime; Snyder, Evan Y; Sidman, Richard L

    2006-07-26

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) offer special therapeutic prospects because they can be isolated from the CNS, expanded ex vivo, and re-implanted into diseased CNS where they not only migrate and differentiate according to cues from host tissue but also appear to be capable of affecting host cells. In nervous (nr) mutant mice Purkinje neuron (PN) mitochondria become abnormal by the second postnatal week, and a majority of PNs die in the fourth to fifth weeks. We previously identified in nr cerebellum a 10-fold increase in tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) as a key component of the mechanism causing nr PN death. Here we report that undifferentiated wild-type murine NSCs, when transplanted into the newborn nr cerebellar cortex, do not replace host PNs but contact imperiled PNs and support their mitochondrial function, dendritic growth, and synaptogenesis, subsequently leading to the rescue of host PNs and restoration of motor coordination. This protection of nr PNs also is verified by an in vitro organotypic slice model in which nr cerebellar slices are cocultured with NSCs. Most importantly, the integrated NSCs in young nr cerebellum rectify excessive tPA mRNA and protein to close to normal levels and protect the mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel and neurotrophins, downstream targets of the tPA/plasmin proteolytic system. This report demonstrates for the first time that NSCs can rescue imperiled host neurons by rectifying their gene expression, elevating somatic stem cell therapeutic potential beyond solely cell replacement strategy.

  8. Effects of Calcium Spikes in the Layer 5 Pyramidal Neuron on Coincidence Detection and Activity Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Yansong; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic spiking mechanisms in neural processing is so far poorly understood. To investigate the role of calcium spikes in the functional properties of the single neuron and recurrent networks, we investigated a three compartment neuron model of the layer 5 pyramidal neuron with calcium dynamics in the distal compartment. By performing single neuron simulations with noisy synaptic input and occasional large coincident input at either just the distal compartment or at both somatic and distal compartments, we show that the presence of calcium spikes confers a substantial advantage for coincidence detection in the former case and a lesser advantage in the latter. We further show that the experimentally observed critical frequency phenomenon, in which action potentials triggered by stimuli near the soma above a certain frequency trigger a calcium spike at distal dendrites, leading to further somatic depolarization, is not exhibited by a neuron receiving realistically noisy synaptic input, and so is unlikely to be a necessary component of coincidence detection. We next investigate the effect of calcium spikes in propagation of spiking activities in a feed-forward network (FFN) embedded in a balanced recurrent network. The excitatory neurons in the network are again connected to either just the distal, or both somatic and distal compartments. With purely distal connectivity, activity propagation is stable and distinguishable for a large range of recurrent synaptic strengths if the feed-forward connections are sufficiently strong, but propagation does not occur in the absence of calcium spikes. When connections are made to both the somatic and the distal compartments, activity propagation is achieved for neurons with active calcium dynamics at a much smaller number of neurons per pool, compared to a network of passive neurons, but quickly becomes unstable as the strength of recurrent synapses increases. Activity propagation at higher scaling factors can be

  9. Effects of Calcium Spikes in the Layer 5 Pyramidal Neuron on Coincidence Detection and Activity Propagation.

    PubMed

    Chua, Yansong; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic spiking mechanisms in neural processing is so far poorly understood. To investigate the role of calcium spikes in the functional properties of the single neuron and recurrent networks, we investigated a three compartment neuron model of the layer 5 pyramidal neuron with calcium dynamics in the distal compartment. By performing single neuron simulations with noisy synaptic input and occasional large coincident input at either just the distal compartment or at both somatic and distal compartments, we show that the presence of calcium spikes confers a substantial advantage for coincidence detection in the former case and a lesser advantage in the latter. We further show that the experimentally observed critical frequency phenomenon, in which action potentials triggered by stimuli near the soma above a certain frequency trigger a calcium spike at distal dendrites, leading to further somatic depolarization, is not exhibited by a neuron receiving realistically noisy synaptic input, and so is unlikely to be a necessary component of coincidence detection. We next investigate the effect of calcium spikes in propagation of spiking activities in a feed-forward network (FFN) embedded in a balanced recurrent network. The excitatory neurons in the network are again connected to either just the distal, or both somatic and distal compartments. With purely distal connectivity, activity propagation is stable and distinguishable for a large range of recurrent synaptic strengths if the feed-forward connections are sufficiently strong, but propagation does not occur in the absence of calcium spikes. When connections are made to both the somatic and the distal compartments, activity propagation is achieved for neurons with active calcium dynamics at a much smaller number of neurons per pool, compared to a network of passive neurons, but quickly becomes unstable as the strength of recurrent synapses increases. Activity propagation at higher scaling factors can be

  10. Abnormal Motor Activity and Thermoregulation in a Schizophrenia Rat Model for Translational Science

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is accompanied by altered motor activity and abnormal thermoregulation; therefore, the presence of these symptoms can enhance the face validity of a schizophrenia animal model. The goal was to characterize these parameters in freely moving condition of a new substrain of rats showing several schizophrenia-related alterations. Methods Male Wistar rats were used: the new substrain housed individually (for four weeks) and treated subchronically with ketamine, and naive animals without any manipulations. Adult animals were implanted with E-Mitter transponders intraabdominally to record body temperature and locomotor activity continuously. The circadian rhythm of these parameters and the acute effects of changes in light conditions were analyzed under undisturbed circumstances, and the effects of different interventions (handling, bed changing or intraperitoneal vehicle injection) were also determined. Results Decreased motor activity with fragmented pattern was observed in the new substrain. However, these animals had higher body temperature during the active phase, and they showed wider range of its alterations, too. The changes in light conditions and different interventions produced blunted hyperactivity and altered body temperature responses in the new substrain. Poincaré plot analysis of body temperature revealed enhanced short- and long-term variabilities during the active phase compared to the inactive phase in both groups. Furthermore, the new substrain showed increased short- and long-term variabilities with lower degree of asymmetry suggesting autonomic dysregulation. Conclusions In summary, the new substrain with schizophrenia-related phenomena showed disturbed motor activity and thermoregulation suggesting that these objectively determined parameters can be biomarkers in translational research. PMID:26629908

  11. Neuropeptide secreted from a pacemaker activates neurons to control a rhythmic behavior.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Girskis, Kelly; Janssen, Tom; Chan, Jason P; Dasgupta, Krishnakali; Knowles, James A; Schoofs, Liliane; Sieburth, Derek

    2013-05-06

    Rhythmic behaviors are driven by endogenous biological clocks in pacemakers, which must reliably transmit timing information to target tissues that execute rhythmic outputs. During the defecation motor program in C. elegans, calcium oscillations in the pacemaker (intestine), which occur about every 50 s, trigger rhythmic enteric muscle contractions through downstream GABAergic neurons that innervate enteric muscles. However, the identity of the timing signal released by the pacemaker and the mechanism underlying the delivery of timing information to the GABAergic neurons are unknown. Here, we show that a neuropeptide-like protein (NLP-40) released by the pacemaker triggers a single rapid calcium transient in the GABAergic neurons during each defecation cycle. We find that mutants lacking nlp-40 have normal pacemaker function, but lack enteric muscle contractions. NLP-40 undergoes calcium-dependent release that is mediated by the calcium sensor, SNT-2/synaptotagmin. We identify AEX-2, the G-protein-coupled receptor on the GABAergic neurons, as the receptor for NLP-40. Functional calcium imaging reveals that NLP-40 and AEX-2/GPCR are both necessary for rhythmic activation of these neurons. Furthermore, acute application of synthetic NLP-40-derived peptide depolarizes the GABAergic neurons in vivo. Our results show that NLP-40 carries the timing information from the pacemaker via calcium-dependent release and delivers it to the GABAergic neurons by instructing their activation. Thus, we propose that rhythmic release of neuropeptides can deliver temporal information from pacemakers to downstream neurons to execute rhythmic behaviors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High-resolution eye tracking using V1 neuron activity

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, James M.; Bondy, Adrian G.; Cumming, Bruce G.; Butts, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of high-acuity visual cortical processing have been limited by the inability to track eye position with sufficient accuracy to precisely reconstruct the visual stimulus on the retina. As a result, studies on primary visual cortex (V1) have been performed almost entirely on neurons outside the high-resolution central portion of the visual field (the fovea). Here we describe a procedure for inferring eye position using multi-electrode array recordings from V1 coupled with nonlinear stimulus processing models. We show that this method can be used to infer eye position with one arc-minute accuracy – significantly better than conventional techniques. This allows for analysis of foveal stimulus processing, and provides a means to correct for eye-movement induced biases present even outside the fovea. This method could thus reveal critical insights into the role of eye movements in cortical coding, as well as their contribution to measures of cortical variability. PMID:25197783

  13. Control of abdominal and expiratory intercostal muscle activity during vomiting - Role of ventral respiratory group expiratory neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.; Tan, L. K.; Suzuki, Ichiro

    1987-01-01

    The role of ventral respiratory group (VRG) expiratory (E) neurons in the control of abdominal and internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting was investigated in cats. Two series of experiments were performed: in one, the activity of VRG E neurons was recorded during fictive vomiting in cats that were decerebrated, paralyzed, and artificially ventilated; in the second, the abdominal muscle activity during vomiting was compared before and after sectioning the axons of descending VRG E neurons in decerebrate spontaneously breathing cats. The results show that about two-thirds of VRG E neurons that project at least as far caudally as the lower thoracic cord contribute to internal intercostal muscle activity during vomiting. The remaining VRG E neurons contribute to abdominal muscle activation. As shown by severing the axons of the VRG E neurons, other, as yet unidenified, inputs (either descending from the brain stem or arising from spinal reflexes) can also produce abdominal muscle activation.

  14. Nociceptive Afferent Activity Alters the SI RA Neuron Response to Mechanical Skin Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Favorov, O.V.; Li, Y.; Lee, J.; Quibrera, P.M.; Tommerdahl, M.

    2010-01-01

    Procedures that reliably evoke cutaneous pain in humans (i.e., 5–7 s skin contact with a 47–51 °C probe, intradermal algogen injection) are shown to decrease the mean spike firing rate (MFR) and degree to which the rapidly adapting (RA) neurons in areas 3b/1 of squirrel monkey primary somatosensory cortex (SI) entrain to a 25-Hz stimulus to the receptive field center (RFcenter) when stimulus amplitude is “near-threshold” (i.e., 10–50 μm). In contrast, RA neuron MFR and entrainment are either unaffected or enhanced by 47–51 °C contact or intradermal algogen injection when the amplitude of 25-Hz stimulation is 100–200 μm (suprathreshold). The results are attributed to an “activity dependence” of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) action on the GABAA receptors of RA neurons. The nociceptive afferent drive triggered by skin contact with a 47–51 °C probe or intradermal algogen is proposed to activate nociresponsive neurons in area 3a which, via corticocortical connections, leads to the release of GABA in areas 3b/1. It is hypothesized that GABA is hyperpolarizing/inhibitory and suppresses stimulus-evoked RA neuron MFR and entrainment whenever RA neuron activity is low (as when the RFcenter stimulus is weak/near-threshold) but is depolarizing/excitatory and augments MFR and entrainment when RA neuron activity is high (when the stimulus is strong/suprathreshold). PMID:20308203

  15. Active dendrites regulate the impact of gliotransmission on rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ashhad, Sufyan

    2016-01-01

    An important consequence of gliotransmission, a signaling mechanism that involves glial release of active transmitter molecules, is its manifestation as N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent slow inward currents in neurons. However, the intraneuronal spatial dynamics of these events or the role of active dendrites in regulating their amplitude and spatial spread have remained unexplored. Here, we used somatic and/or dendritic recordings from rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons and demonstrate that a majority of NMDAR-dependent spontaneous slow excitatory potentials (SEP) originate at dendritic locations and are significantly attenuated through their propagation across the neuronal arbor. We substantiated the astrocytic origin of SEPs through paired neuron–astrocyte recordings, where we found that specific infusion of inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) into either distal or proximal astrocytes enhanced the amplitude and frequency of neuronal SEPs. Importantly, SEPs recorded after InsP3 infusion into distal astrocytes exhibited significantly slower kinetics compared with those recorded after proximal infusion. Furthermore, using neuron-specific infusion of pharmacological agents and morphologically realistic conductance-based computational models, we demonstrate that dendritically expressed hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide–gated (HCN) and transient potassium channels play critical roles in regulating the strength, kinetics, and compartmentalization of neuronal SEPs. Finally, through the application of subtype-specific receptor blockers during paired neuron–astrocyte recordings, we provide evidence that GluN2B- and GluN2D-containing NMDARs predominantly mediate perisomatic and dendritic SEPs, respectively. Our results unveil an important role for active dendrites in regulating the impact of gliotransmission on neurons and suggest astrocytes as a source of dendritic plateau potentials that have been implicated in localized plasticity and place

  16. Early postnatal exposure to isoflurane causes cognitive deficits and disrupts development of newborn hippocampal neurons via activation of the mTOR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sanghee; Kwak, Minhye; Gray, Christy D.; Xu, Michael; Choi, Jun H.; Junn, Sue; Kim, Jieun; Xu, Jing; Schaefer, Michele; Johns, Roger A.; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-Li; Mintz, C. David

    2017-01-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies indicate that early postnatal exposure to anesthetics can lead to lasting deficits in learning and other cognitive processes. The mechanism underlying this phenomenon has not been clarified and there is no treatment currently available. Recent evidence suggests that anesthetics might cause persistent deficits in cognitive function by disrupting key events in brain development. The hippocampus, a brain region that is critical for learning and memory, contains a large number of neurons that develop in the early postnatal period, which are thus vulnerable to perturbation by anesthetic exposure. Using an in vivo mouse model we demonstrate abnormal development of dendrite arbors and dendritic spines in newly generated dentate gyrus granule cell neurons of the hippocampus after a clinically relevant isoflurane anesthesia exposure conducted at an early postnatal age. Furthermore, we find that isoflurane causes a sustained increase in activity in the mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway, and that inhibition of this pathway with rapamycin not only reverses the observed changes in neuronal development, but also substantially improves performance on behavioral tasks of spatial learning and memory that are impaired by isoflurane exposure. We conclude that isoflurane disrupts the development of hippocampal neurons generated in the early postnatal period by activating a well-defined neurodevelopmental disease pathway and that this phenotype can be reversed by pharmacologic inhibition. PMID:28683067

  17. ROCK1 in AgRP neurons regulates energy expenditure and locomotor activity in male mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hu; Lee, Seung Hwan; Ye, Chianping; Lima, Ines S; Oh, Byung-Chul; Lowell, Bradford B; Zabolotny, Janice M; Kim, Young-Bum

    2013-10-01

    Normal leptin signaling is essential for the maintenance of body weight homeostasis. Proopiomelanocortin- and agouti-related peptide (AgRP)-producing neurons play critical roles in regulating energy metabolism. Our recent work demonstrates that deletion of Rho-kinase 1 (ROCK1) in the AgRP neurons of mice increased body weight and adiposity. Here, we report that selective loss of ROCK1 in AgRP neurons caused a significant decrease in energy expenditure and locomotor activity of mice. These effects were independent of any change in food intake. Furthermore, AgRP neuron-specific ROCK1-deficient mice displayed central leptin resistance, as evidenced by impaired Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 activation in response to leptin administration. Leptin's ability to hyperpolarize and decrease firing rate of AgRP neurons was also abolished in the absence of ROCK1. Moreover, diet-induced and genetic forms of obesity resulted in reduced ROCK1 activity in murine arcuate nucleus. Of note, high-fat diet also impaired leptin-stimulated ROCK1 activity in arcuate nucleus, suggesting that a defect in hypothalamic ROCK1 activity may contribute to the pathogenesis of central leptin resistance in obesity. Together, these data demonstrate that ROCK1 activation in hypothalamic AgRP neurons is required for the homeostatic regulation of energy expenditure and adiposity. These results further support previous work identifying ROCK1 as a key regulator of energy balance and suggest that targeting ROCK1 in the hypothalamus may lead to development of antiobesity therapeutics.

  18. Abnormal activation of the occipital lobes during emotion picture processing in major depressive disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianying; Xu, Cheng; Cao, Xiaohua; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yanfang; Peng, Juyi; Zhang, Kerang

    2013-01-01

    A large number of studies have demonstrated that depression patients have cognitive dysfunction. With recently developed brain functional imaging, studies have focused on changes in brain function to investigate cognitive changes. However, there is still controversy regarding abnormalities in brain functions or correlation between cognitive impairment and brain function changes. Thus, it is important to design an emotion-related task for research into brain function changes. We selected positive, neutral, and negative pictures from the International Affective Picture System. Patients with major depressive disorder were asked to judge emotion pictures. In addition, functional MRI was performed to synchronously record behavior data and imaging data. Results showed that the total correct rate for recognizing pictures was lower in patients compared with normal controls. Moreover, the consistency for recognizing pictures for depressed patients was worse than normal controls, and they frequently recognized positive pictures as negative pictures. The consistency for recognizing pictures was negatively correlated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Functional MRI suggested that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, limbic lobe, and cerebellum was enhanced, but that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, parietal lobe and occipital lobe was weakened while the patients were watching positive and neutral pictures compared with normal controls. The activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, and limbic lobe was enhanced, but the activation of some areas in the occipital lobe were weakened while the patients were watching the negative pictures compared with normal controls. These findings indicate that patients with major depressive disorder have negative cognitive disorder and extensive brain dysfunction. Thus, reduced activation of the occipital lobe may be an initiating factor for

  19. FOXO transcription factors directly activate bim gene expression and promote apoptosis in sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gilley, Jonathan; Coffer, Paul J.; Ham, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Developing sympathetic neurons die by apoptosis when deprived of NGF. BIM, a BH3-only member of the BCL-2 family, is induced after NGF withdrawal in these cells and contributes to NGF withdrawal–induced death. Here, we have investigated the involvement of the Forkhead box, class O (FOXO) subfamily of Forkhead transcription factors in the regulation of BIM expression by NGF. We find that overexpression of FOXO transcription factors induces BIM expression and promotes death of sympathetic neurons in a BIM-dependent manner. In addition, we find that FKHRL1 (FOXO3a) directly activates the bim promoter via two conserved FOXO binding sites and that mutation of these sites abolishes bim promoter activation after NGF withdrawal. Finally, we show that FOXO activity contributes to the NGF deprivation–induced death of sympathetic neurons. PMID:12913110

  20. Timothy Syndrome is associated with activity-dependent dendritic retraction in rodent and human neurons

    PubMed Central

    Krey, Jocelyn F.; Pasca, Sergiu P.; Shcheglovitov, Aleksandr; Yazawa, Masayuki; Schwemberger, Rachel; Rasmusson, Randall; Dolmetsch, Ricardo E.

    2012-01-01

    L-type voltage gated calcium channels (LTCs) play an important role in neuronal development by promoting dendritic growth and arborization1–3. A point mutation in CaV1.2 causes Timothy Syndrome (TS)4, a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We report that channels with the TS mutation cause activity-dependent dendrite retraction in rodent neurons and in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs)– derived neurons from individuals with TS. Dendrite retraction is independent of calcium permeation through the mutant channel, is associated with ectopic activation of RhoA and is inhibited by over-expression of the channel associated GTPase Gem. These results suggest that CaV1.2 can activate RhoA signaling independently of Ca2+ and provide novel insights into the cellular basis of TS and other ASDs. PMID:23313911

  1. Brain stimulation used as biofeedback in neuronal activation of the temporal lobe area in autistic children.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vernon Furtado da; Calomeni, Mauricio Rocha; Nunes, Rodolfo Alkmim Moreira; Pimentel, Carlos Elias; Martins, Gabriela Paes; Oliveira, Patrícia da Cruz Araruna; Silva, Patrícia Bagno; Silva, Alair Pedro Ribeiro de Souza E

    2016-08-01

    This study focused upon the functional capacity of mirror neurons in autistic children. 30 individuals, 10 carriers of the autistic syndrome (GCA), 10 with intellectual impairments (GDI), and 10 non-autistics (GCN) had registered eletroencephalogram from the brain area theoretically related to mirror neurons. Data collection procedure occurred prior to brain stimulation and after the stimulation session. During the second session, participants had to alternately process figures evoking neutral, happy, and/or sorrowful feelings. Results proved that, for all groups, the stimulation process in fact produced additional activation in the neural area under study. The level of activation was related to the format of emotional stimuli and the likelihood of boosting such stimuli. Since the increase of activation occurred in a model similar to the one observed for the control group, we may suggest that the difficulty people with autism have at expressing emotions is not due to nonexistence of mirror neurons.

  2. Abnormal high-energy phosphate molecule metabolism during regional brain activation in patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, C; Du, F; Ravichandran, C; Goldbach, J R; Thida, T; Lin, P; Dora, B; Gelda, J; O'Connor, L; Sehovic, S; Gruber, S; Ongur, D; Cohen, B M

    2015-09-01

    Converging evidence suggests bioenergetic abnormalities in bipolar disorder (BD). In the brain, phosphocreatine (PCr) acts a reservoir of high-energy phosphate (HEP) bonds, and creatine kinases (CK) catalyze the transfer of HEP from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to PCr and from PCr back to ATP, at times of increased need. This study examined the activity of this mechanism in BD by measuring the levels of HEP molecules during a stimulus paradigm that increased local energy demand. Twenty-three patients diagnosed with BD-I and 22 healthy controls (HC) were included. Levels of phosphorus metabolites were measured at baseline and during visual stimulation in the occipital lobe using (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 4T. Changes in metabolite levels showed different patterns between the groups. During stimulation, HC had significant reductions in PCr but not in ATP, as expected. In contrast, BD patients had significant reductions in ATP but not in PCr. In addition, PCr/ATP ratio was lower at baseline in patients, and there was a higher change in this measure during stimulation. This pattern suggests a disease-related failure to replenish ATP from PCr through CK enzyme catalysis during tissue activation. Further studies measuring the CK flux in BD are required to confirm and extend this finding.

  3. Cognitive control dysfunction and abnormal frontal cortex activation in stimulant drug users and their biological siblings.

    PubMed

    Smith, D G; Jones, P S; Bullmore, E T; Robbins, T W; Ersche, K D

    2013-05-14

    Cognitive and neural abnormalities are known to accompany chronic drug abuse, with impairments in cognition and changes in cortical structure seen in stimulant-dependent individuals. However, premorbid differences have also been observed in the brains and behavior of individuals at risk for substance abuse, before they develop dependence. Endophenotype research has emerged as a useful method for assessing preclinical traits that may be risk factors for pathology by studying patient populations and their undiagnosed first-degree relatives. This study used the color-word Stroop task to assess executive functioning in stimulant-dependent individuals, their unaffected biological siblings and unrelated healthy control volunteers using a functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm. Both the stimulant-dependent and sibling participants demonstrated impairments in cognitive control and processing speed on the task, registering significantly longer response latencies. However, the two groups generated very different neural responses, with the sibling participants exhibiting a significant decrease in activation in the inferior frontal gyrus compared with both stimulant-dependent individuals and control participants. Both target groups also demonstrated a decrease in hemispheric laterality throughout the task, exhibiting a disproportionate increase in right hemispheric activation, which was associated with their behavioral inefficiencies. These findings not only suggest a possible risk factor for stimulant abuse of poor inhibitory control and cortical inefficiency but they also demonstrate possible adaptations in the brains of stimulant users.

  4. Activation of Brainstem Pro-opiomelanocortin Neurons Produces Opioidergic Analgesia, Bradycardia and Bradypnoea

    PubMed Central

    Hirschberg, Stefan; Hill, Rob; Balthasar, Nina; Pickering, Anthony E.

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are widely used medicinally as analgesics and abused for hedonic effects, actions that are each complicated by substantial risks such as cardiorespiratory depression. These drugs mimic peptides such as β-endorphin, which has a key role in endogenous analgesia. The β-endorphin in the central nervous system originates from pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the arcuate nucleus and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Relatively little is known about the NTSPOMC neurons but their position within the sensory nucleus of the vagus led us to test the hypothesis that they play a role in modulation of cardiorespiratory and nociceptive control. The NTSPOMC neurons were targeted using viral vectors in a POMC-Cre mouse line to express either opto-genetic (channelrhodopsin-2) or chemo-genetic (Pharmacologically Selective Actuator Modules). Opto-genetic activation of the NTSPOMC neurons in the working heart brainstem preparation (n = 21) evoked a reliable, titratable and time-locked respiratory inhibition (120% increase in inter-breath interval) with a bradycardia (125±26 beats per minute) and augmented respiratory sinus arrhythmia (58% increase). Chemo-genetic activation of NTSPOMC neurons in vivo was anti-nociceptive in the tail flick assay (latency increased by 126±65%, p<0.001; n = 8). All effects of NTSPOMC activation were blocked by systemic naloxone (opioid antagonist) but not by SHU9119 (melanocortin receptor antagonist). The NTSPOMC neurons were found to project to key brainstem structures involved in cardiorespiratory control (nucleus ambiguus and ventral respiratory group) and endogenous analgesia (periaqueductal gray and midline raphe). Thus the NTSPOMC neurons may be capable of tuning behaviour by an opioidergic modulation of nociceptive, respiratory and cardiac control. PMID:27077912

  5. Photostimulation of Phox2b medullary neurons activates cardiorespiratory function in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Kanbar, Roy; Stornetta, Ruth L; Cash, Devin R; Lewis, Stephen J; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2010-11-01

    Hypoventilation is typically treated with positive pressure ventilation or, in extreme cases, by phrenic nerve stimulation. This preclinical study explores whether direct stimulation of central chemoreceptors could be used as an alternative method to stimulate breathing. To determine whether activation of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), which is located in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), stimulates breathing with appropriate selectivity. A lentivirus was used to induce expression of the photoactivatable cationic channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) by RVLM Phox2b-containing neurons, a population that consists of central chemoreceptors (the ccRTN neurons) and blood pressure (BP)-regulating neurons (the C1 cells). The transfected neurons were activated with pulses of laser light. Respiratory effects were measured by plethysmography or diaphragmatic EMG recording and cardiovascular effects by monitoring BP, renal sympathetic nerve discharge, and the baroreflex. The RVLM contained 600 to 900 ChR2-transfected neurons (63% C1, 37% ccRTN). RVLM photostimulation significantly increased breathing rate (+42%), tidal volume (21%), minute volume (68%), and peak expiratory flow (48%). Photostimulation increased diaphragm EMG amplitude (19%) and frequency (21%). Photostimulation increased BP (4 mmHg) and renal sympathetic nerve discharge (43%) while decreasing heart rate (15 bpm). Photostimulation of ChR2-transfected RVLM Phox2b neurons produces a vigorous stimulation of breathing accompanied by a small sympathetically mediated increase in BP. These results demonstrate that breathing can be relatively selectively activated in resting unanesthetized mammals via optogenetic manipulation of RVLM neurons presumed to be central chemoreceptors. This methodology could perhaps be used in the future to enhance respiration in humans.

  6. Photostimulation of Phox2b Medullary Neurons Activates Cardiorespiratory Function in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kanbar, Roy; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Cash, Devin R.; Lewis, Stephen J.; Guyenet, Patrice G.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Hypoventilation is typically treated with positive pressure ventilation or, in extreme cases, by phrenic nerve stimulation. This preclinical study explores whether direct stimulation of central chemoreceptors could be used as an alternative method to stimulate breathing. Objectives: To determine whether activation of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), which is located in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), stimulates breathing with appropriate selectivity. Methods: A lentivirus was used to induce expression of the photoactivatable cationic channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) by RVLM Phox2b-containing neurons, a population that consists of central chemoreceptors (the ccRTN neurons) and blood pressure (BP)-regulating neurons (the C1 cells). The transfected neurons were activated with pulses of laser light. Respiratory effects were measured by plethysmography or diaphragmatic EMG recording and cardiovascular effects by monitoring BP, renal sympathetic nerve discharge, and the baroreflex. Measurements and Main Results: The RVLM contained 600 to 900 ChR2-transfected neurons (63% C1, 37% ccRTN). RVLM photostimulation significantly increased breathing rate (+42%), tidal volume (21%), minute volume (68%), and peak expiratory flow (48%). Photostimulation increased diaphragm EMG amplitude (19%) and frequency (21%). Photostimulation increased BP (4 mmHg) and renal sympathetic nerve discharge (43%) while decreasing heart rate (15 bpm). Conclusions: Photostimulation of ChR2-transfected RVLM Phox2b neurons produces a vigorous stimulation of breathing accompanied by a small sympathetically mediated increase in BP. These results demonstrate that breathing can be relatively selectively activated in resting unanesthetized mammals via optogenetic manipulation of RVLM neurons presumed to be central chemoreceptors. This methodology could perhaps be used in the future to enhance respiration in humans. PMID:20622037

  7. Orexin-A increases the firing activity of hippocampal CA1 neurons through orexin-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin-Yi; Chen, Lei; Du, Yi-Feng

    2017-07-01

    Orexins including two peptides, orexin-A and orexin-B, are produced in the posterior lateral hypothalamus. Much evidence has indicated that central orexinergic systems play numerous functions including energy metabolism, feeding behavior, sleep/wakefulness, and neuroendocrine and sympathetic activation. Morphological studies have shown that the hippocampal CA1 regions receive orexinergic innervation originating from the hypothalamus. Positive orexin-1 (OX 1 ) receptors are detected in the CA1 regions. Previous behavioral studies have shown that microinjection of OX 1 receptor antagonist into the hippocampus impairs acquisition and consolidation of spatial memory. However, up to now, little has been known about the direct electrophysiological effects of orexin-A on hippocampal CA1 neurons. Employing multibarrel single-unit extracellular recordings, the present study showed that micropressure administration of orexin-A significantly increased the spontaneous firing rate from 2.96 ± 0.85 to 8.45 ± 1.86 Hz (P < 0.001) in 15 out of the 23 hippocampal CA1 neurons in male rats. Furthermore, application of the specific OX 1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 alone significantly decreased the firing rate from 4.02 ± 1.08 to 2.11 ± 0.58 Hz in 7 out of the 17 neurons (P < 0.05), suggesting that endogenous orexinergic systems modulate the firing activity of CA1 neurons. Coapplication of SB-334867 completely blocked orexin-A-induced excitation of hippocampal CA1 neurons. The PLC pathway may be involved in activation of OX 1 receptor-induced excitation of CA1 neurons. Taken together, the present study's results suggest that orexin-A produces excitatory effects on hippocampal neurons via OX 1 receptors. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Glutamine-mediated protection from neuronal cell death depends on mitochondrial activity.

    PubMed

    Stelmashook, E V; Lozier, E R; Goryacheva, E S; Mergenthaler, P; Novikova, S V; Zorov, D B; Isaev, N K

    2010-09-27

    The specific aim of this study was to elucidate the role of mitochondria in a neuronal death caused by different metabolic effectors and possible role of intracellular calcium ions ([Ca(2+)](i)) and glutamine in mitochondria- and non-mitochondria-mediated cell death. Inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone was found to cause intensive death of cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) that was preceded by an increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). The neuronal death induced by rotenone was significantly potentiated by glutamine. In addition, inhibition of Na/K-ATPase by ouabain also caused [Ca(2+)](i) increase, but it induced neuronal cell death only in the absence of glucose. Treatment with glutamine prevented the toxic effect of ouabain and decreased [Ca(2+)](i). Blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors prevented neuronal death and significantly decreased [Ca(2+)](i), demonstrating that toxicity of rotenone and ouabain was at least partially mediated by activation of these receptors. Activation of glutamate receptors by NMDA increased [Ca(2+)](i) and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential leading to markedly decreased neuronal survival under glucose deprivation. Glutamine treatment under these conditions prevented cell death and significantly decreased the disturbances of [Ca(2+)](i) and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential caused by NMDA during hypoglycemia. Our results indicate that glutamine stimulates glutamate-dependent neuronal damage when mitochondrial respiration is impaired. However, when mitochondria are functionally active, glutamine can be used by mitochondria as an alternative substrate to maintain cellular energy levels and promote cell survival. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Attention-related changes in correlated neuronal activity arise from normalization mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Verhoef, Bram-Ernst; Maunsell, John H.R.

    2017-01-01

    Attention is believed to enhance perception by altering the correlations between pairs of neurons. How attention changes neuronal correlations is unknown. Using multi-electrodes in primate visual cortex, we measured spike-count correlations when single or multiple stimuli were presented, and stimuli were attended or unattended. When stimuli were unattended, adding a suppressive, non-preferred, stimulus beside a preferred stimulus increased spike-count correlations between pairs of similarly-tuned neurons, but decreased spike-count correlations between pairs of oppositely-tuned neurons. These changes are explained by a stochastic normalization model containing populations of oppositely-tuned, mutually-suppressive neurons. Importantly, this model also explains why attention decreased (attend preferred stimulus) or increased (attend non-preferred stimulus) correlations: as an indirect consequence of attention-related changes in the inputs to normalization mechanisms. Our findings link normalization mechanisms to correlated neuronal activity and attention, showing that normalization mechanisms shape response correlations and that these correlations change when attention biases normalization mechanisms. PMID:28553943

  10. The endogenous alkaloid harmane: acidifying and activity-reducing effects on hippocampal neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Udo; Scherbaum, Norbert; Wiemann, Martin

    2008-02-15

    The endogenous alkaloid harmane is enriched in plasma of patients with neurodegenerative or addictive disorders. As harmane affects neuronal activity and viability and because both parameters are strongly influenced by intracellular pH (pH(i)), we tested whether effects of harmane are correlated with altered pH(i) regulation. Pyramidal neurons in the CA3 field of hippocampal slices were investigated under bicarbonate-buffered conditions. Harmane (50 and 100 microM) reversibly decreased spontaneous firing of action potentials and caffeine-induced bursting of CA3 neurons. In parallel experiments, 50 and 100 microM harmane evoked a neuronal acidification of 0.12+/-0.08 and 0.18+/-0.07 pH units, respectively. Recovery from intracellular acidification subsequent to an ammonium prepulse was also impaired, suggesting an inhibition of transmembrane acid extrusion by harmane. Harmane may modulate neuronal functions via altered pH(i)-regulation. Implications of these findings for neuronal survival are discussed.

  11. Activation of murine pre-proglucagon-producing neurons reduces food intake and body weight.

    PubMed

    Gaykema, Ronald P; Newmyer, Brandon A; Ottolini, Matteo; Raje, Vidisha; Warthen, Daniel M; Lambeth, Philip S; Niccum, Maria; Yao, Ting; Huang, Yiru; Schulman, Ira G; Harris, Thurl E; Patel, Manoj K; Williams, Kevin W; Scott, Michael M

    2017-03-01

    Peptides derived from pre-proglucagon (GCG peptides) act in both the periphery and the CNS to change food intake, glucose homeostasis, and metabolic rate while playing a role in anxiety behaviors and physiological responses to stress. Although the actions of GCG peptides produced in the gut and pancreas are well described, the role of glutamatergic GGC peptide-secreting hindbrain neurons in regulating metabolic homeostasis has not been investigated. Here, we have shown that chemogenetic stimulation of GCG-producing neurons reduces metabolic rate and food intake in fed and fasted states and suppresses glucose production without an effect on glucose uptake. Stimulation of GCG neurons had no effect on corticosterone secretion, body weight, or conditioned taste aversion. In the diet-induced obese state, the effects of GCG neuronal stimulation on gluconeogenesis were lost, while the food intake-lowering effects remained, resulting in reductions in body weight and adiposity. Our work suggests that GCG peptide-expressing neurons can alter feeding, metabolic rate, and glucose production independent of their effects on hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation, aversive conditioning, or insulin secretion. We conclude that GCG neurons likely stimulate separate populations of downstream cells to produce a change in food intake and glucose homeostasis and that these effects depend on the metabolic state of the animal.

  12. Activation of murine pre-proglucagon–producing neurons reduces food intake and body weight

    PubMed Central

    Gaykema, Ronald P.; Newmyer, Brandon A.; Ottolini, Matteo; Warthen, Daniel M.; Lambeth, Philip S.; Niccum, Maria; Yao, Ting; Huang, Yiru; Schulman, Ira G.; Harris, Thurl E.; Patel, Manoj K.; Williams, Kevin W.

    2017-01-01

    Peptides derived from pre-proglucagon (GCG peptides) act in both the periphery and the CNS to change food intake, glucose homeostasis, and metabolic rate while playing a role in anxiety behaviors and physiological responses to stress. Although the actions of GCG peptides produced in the gut and pancreas are well described, the role of glutamatergic GGC peptide–secreting hindbrain neurons in regulating metabolic homeostasis has not been investigated. Here, we have shown that chemogenetic stimulation of GCG-producing neurons reduces metabolic rate and food intake in fed and fasted states and suppresses glucose production without an effect on glucose uptake. Stimulation of GCG neurons had no effect on corticosterone secretion, body weight, or conditioned taste aversion. In the diet-induced obese state, the effects of GCG neuronal stimulation on gluconeogenesis were lost, while the food intake–lowering effects remained, resulting in reductions in body weight and adiposity. Our work suggests that GCG peptide–expressing neurons can alter feeding, metabolic rate, and glucose production independent of their effects on hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation, aversive conditioning, or insulin secretion. We conclude that GCG neurons likely stimulate separate populations of downstream cells to produce a change in food intake and glucose homeostasis and that these effects depend on the metabolic state of the animal. PMID:28218622

  13. Converging Mechanisms of p53 Activation Drive Motor Neuron Degeneration in Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Simon, Christian M; Dai, Ya; Van Alstyne, Meaghan; Koutsioumpa, Charalampia; Pagiazitis, John G; Chalif, Joshua I; Wang, Xiaojian; Rabinowitz, Joseph E; Henderson, Christopher E; Pellizzoni, Livio; Mentis, George Z

    2017-12-26

    The hallmark of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), an inherited disease caused by ubiquitous deficiency in the SMN protein, is the selective degeneration of subsets of spinal motor neurons. Here, we show that cell-autonomous activation of p53 occurs in vulnerable but not resistant motor neurons of SMA mice at pre-symptomatic stages. Moreover, pharmacological or genetic inhibition of p53 prevents motor neuron death, demonstrating that induction of p53 signaling drives neurodegeneration. At late disease stages, however, nuclear accumulation of p53 extends to resistant motor neurons and spinal interneurons but is not associated with cell death. Importantly, we identify phosphorylation of serine 18 as a specific post-translational modification of p53 that exclusively marks vulnerable SMA motor neurons and provide evidence that amino-terminal phosphorylation of p53 is required for the neurodegenerative process. Our findings indicate that distinct events induced by SMN deficiency converge on p53 to trigger selective death of vulnerable SMA motor neurons. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Activation of temperature-sensitive TRPV1-like receptors in ARC POMC neurons reduces food intake

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jae Hoon; Lee, Dong Kun; Liu, Shun-Mei; Chua, Streamson C.; Schwartz, Gary J.

    2018-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) respond to numerous hormonal and neural signals, resulting in changes in food intake. Here, we demonstrate that ARC POMC neurons express capsaicin-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor (TRPV1)-like receptors. To show expression of TRPV1-like receptors in ARC POMC neurons, we use single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, electrophysiology, TRPV1 knock-out (KO), and TRPV1-Cre knock-in mice. A small elevation of temperature in the physiological range is enough to depolarize ARC POMC neurons. This depolarization is blocked by the TRPV1 receptor antagonist and by Trpv1 gene knockdown. Capsaicin-induced activation reduces food intake that is abolished by a melanocortin receptor antagonist. To selectively stimulate TRPV1-like receptor-expressing ARC POMC neurons in the ARC, we generate an adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) carrying a Cre-dependent channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)–enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) expression cassette under the control of the two neuronal POMC enhancers (nPEs). Optogenetic stimulation of TRPV1-like receptor-expressing POMC neurons decreases food intake. Hypothalamic temperature is rapidly elevated and reaches to approximately 39 °C during treadmill running. This elevation is associated with a reduction in food intake. Knockdown of the Trpv1 gene exclusively in ARC POMC neurons blocks the feeding inhibition produced by increased hypothalamic temperature. Taken together, our findings identify a melanocortinergic circuit that links acute elevations in hypothalamic temperature with acute reductions in food intake. PMID:29689050

  15. Activation of temperature-sensitive TRPV1-like receptors in ARC POMC neurons reduces food intake.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae Hoon; Lee, Dong Kun; Liu, Shun-Mei; Chua, Streamson C; Schwartz, Gary J; Jo, Young-Hwan

    2018-04-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) respond to numerous hormonal and neural signals, resulting in changes in food intake. Here, we demonstrate that ARC POMC neurons express capsaicin-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor (TRPV1)-like receptors. To show expression of TRPV1-like receptors in ARC POMC neurons, we use single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, electrophysiology, TRPV1 knock-out (KO), and TRPV1-Cre knock-in mice. A small elevation of temperature in the physiological range is enough to depolarize ARC POMC neurons. This depolarization is blocked by the TRPV1 receptor antagonist and by Trpv1 gene knockdown. Capsaicin-induced activation reduces food intake that is abolished by a melanocortin receptor antagonist. To selectively stimulate TRPV1-like receptor-expressing ARC POMC neurons in the ARC, we generate an adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) carrying a Cre-dependent channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) expression cassette under the control of the two neuronal POMC enhancers (nPEs). Optogenetic stimulation of TRPV1-like receptor-expressing POMC neurons decreases food intake. Hypothalamic temperature is rapidly elevated and reaches to approximately 39 °C during treadmill running. This elevation is associated with a reduction in food intake. Knockdown of the Trpv1 gene exclusively in ARC POMC neurons blocks the feeding inhibition produced by increased hypothalamic temperature. Taken together, our findings identify a melanocortinergic circuit that links acute elevations in hypothalamic temperature with acute reductions in food intake.

  16. Male mice ultrasonic vocalizations enhance female sexual approach and hypothalamic kisspeptin neuron activity.

    PubMed

    Asaba, Akari; Osakada, Takuya; Touhara, Kazushige; Kato, Masahiro; Mogi, Kazutaka; Kikusui, Takefumi

    2017-08-01

    Vocal communication in animals is important for ensuring reproductive success. Male mice emit song-like "ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs)" when they encounter female mice, and females show approach to the USVs. However, it is unclear whether USVs of male mice trigger female behavioral and endocrine responses in reproduction. In this study, we first investigated the relationship between the number of deliveries in breeding pairs for 4months and USVs syllables emitted from those paired males during 3min of sexual encounter with unfamiliar female mice. There was a positive correlation between these two indices, which suggests that breeding pairs in which males could emit USVs more frequently had more offspring. Further, we examined the effect of USVs of male mice on female sexual behavior. Female mice showed more approach behavior towards vocalizing males than devocalized males. Finally, to determine whether USVs of male mice could activate the neural system governing reproductive function in female mice, the activation of kisspeptin neurons, key neurons to drive gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the hypothalamus, was examined using dual-label immunocytochemistry with cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation (pCREB). In the arcuate nucleus (Arc), the number of kisspeptin neurons expressing pCREB significantly increased after exposure to USVs of male as compared with noise exposure group. In conclusion, our results suggest that USVs of male mice promote fertility in female mice by activating both their approaching behavior and central kisspeptin neurons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Interplay of activation kinetics and the derivative conductance determines resonance properties of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, Rodrigo F. O.; Ceballos, Cesar C.; Lima, Vinicius; Roque, Antonio C.

    2018-04-01

    In a neuron with hyperpolarization activated current (Ih), the correct input frequency leads to an enhancement of the output response. This behavior is known as resonance and is well described by the neuronal impedance. In a simple neuron model we derive equations for the neuron's resonance and we link its frequency and existence with the biophy