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Sample records for abnormal phenotypic expression

  1. Genomic imprinting as a probable explanation for variable intrafamilial phenotypic expression of an unusual chromosome 3 abnormality

    SciTech Connect

    Fryburg, J.S.; Shashi, V.; Kelly, T.E.

    1994-09-01

    We present a 4 generation family in which an abnormal chromosome 3 with dup(3)(q25) segregated from great-grandmother to grandmother to son without phenotypic effect. The son`s 2 daughters have dysmorphic features, mild developmental delays and congenital heart disease. Both girls have the abnormal chr. 3 but are the only family members with the abnormality to have phenotypic effects. An unaffected son of the father has normal chromosomes. FISH with whole chromosome paints for chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 14, 18, and 22 excluded these as the origin of the extra material. Chromosome 3-specific paint revealed a uniform pattern, suggestingmore » that the extra material is from chromosome 3. Comparative genomic hybridization and DNA studies are pending. Possible explanations for the discordance in phenotypes between the 4th generation offspring and the first 3 generations include: an undetected rearrangement in the previous generations that is unbalanced in the two affected individuals; the chromosome abnormality may be a benign variant and unrelated to the phenotype; or, most likely, genomic imprinting. Genomic imprinting is suggested by the observation that a phenotypic effect was only seen after the chromosome was inherited from the father. The mothers in the first two generations appear to have passed the abnormal chr. 3 on without effect. This is an opportunity to delineate a region of the human genome affected by paternal imprinting.« less

  2. Abnormal MicroRNA Expression in Ts65Dn Hippocampus and Whole Blood: Contributions to Down Syndrome Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Keck-Wherley, Jennifer; Grover, Deepak; Bhattacharyya, Sharmistha; Xu, Xiufen; Holman, Derek; Lombardini, Eric D.; Verma, Ranjana; Biswas, Roopa; Galdzicki, Zygmunt

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS; trisomy 21) is one of the most common genetic causes of intellectual disability, which is attributed to triplication of genes located on chromosome 21. Elevated levels of several microRNAs (miRNAs) located on chromosome 21 have been reported in human DS heart and brain tissues. The Ts65Dn mouse model is the most investigated DS model with a triplicated segment of mouse chromosome 16 harboring genes orthologous to those on human chromosome 21. Using ABI TaqMan miRNA arrays, we found a set of miRNAs that were significantly up- or downregulated in the Ts65Dn hippocampus compared to euploid controls. Furthermore, miR-155 and miR-802 showed significant overexpression in the Ts65Dn hippocampus, thereby confirming results of previous studies. Interestingly, miR-155 and miR-802 were also overexpressed in the Ts65Dn whole blood but not in lung tissue. We also found overexpression of the miR-155 precursors, pri- and pre-miR-155 derived from the miR-155 host gene, known as B cell integration cluster, suggesting enhanced biogenesis of miR-155. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that neurodevelopment, differentiation of neuroglia, apoptosis, cell cycle, and signaling pathways including ERK/MAPK, protein kinase C, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, m-TOR and calcium signaling are likely targets of these miRNAs. We selected some of these potential gene targets and found downregulation of mRNA encoding Ship1, Mecp2 and Ezh2 in Ts65Dn hippocampus. Interestingly, the miR-155 target gene Ship1 (inositol phosphatase) was also downregulated in Ts65Dn whole blood but not in lung tissue. Our findings provide insights into miRNA-mediated gene regulation in Ts65Dn mice and their potential contribution to impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis, as well as hemopoietic abnormalities observed in DS. PMID:22042248

  3. Duplication of the EFNB1 Gene in Familial Hypertelorism: Imbalance in Ephrin-B1 Expression and Abnormal Phenotypes in Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Babbs, Christian; Stewart, Helen S; Williams, Louise J; Connell, Lyndsey; Goriely, Anne; Twigg, Stephen RF; Smith, Kim; Lester, Tracy; Wilkie, Andrew OM

    2011-01-01

    Familial hypertelorism, characterized by widely spaced eyes, classically shows autosomal dominant inheritance (Teebi type), but some pedigrees are compatible with X-linkage. No mechanism has been described previously, but clinical similarity has been noted to craniofrontonasal syndrome (CFNS), which is caused by mutations in the X-linked EFNB1 gene. Here we report a family in which females in three generations presented with hypertelorism, but lacked either craniosynostosis or a grooved nasal tip, excluding CFNS. DNA sequencing of EFNB1 was normal, but further analysis revealed a duplication of 937 kb including EFNB1 and two flanking genes: PJA1 and STARD8. We found that the X chromosome bearing the duplication produces ∼1.6-fold more EFNB1 transcript than the normal X chromosome and propose that, in the context of X-inactivation, this difference in expression level of EFNB1 results in abnormal cell sorting leading to hypertelorism. To support this hypothesis, we provide evidence from a mouse model carrying a targeted human EFNB1 cDNA, that abnormal cell sorting occurs in the cranial region. Hence, we propose that X-linked cases resembling Teebi hypertelorism may have a similar mechanism to CFNS, and that cellular mosaicism for different levels of ephrin-B1 (as well as simple presence/absence) leads to craniofacial abnormalities. Hum Mutat 32:1–9, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21542058

  4. Fgf8 expression in the Tbx1 domain causes skeletal abnormalities and modifies the aortic arch but not the outflow tract phenotype of Tbx1 mutants

    PubMed Central

    Vitelli, Francesca; Zhang, Zhen; Huynh, Tuong; Sobotka, Angela; Mupo, Annalisa; Baldini, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Fgf8 and Tbx1 have been shown to interact in patterning the aortic arch, and both genes are required in formation and growth of the outflow tract of the heart. However, the nature of the interaction of the two genes is unclear. We have utilized a novel Tbx1Fgf8 allele which drives Fgf8 expression in Tbx1-positive cells and an inducible Cre-LoxP recombination system to address the role of Fgf8 in Tbx1 positive cells in modulating cardiovascular development. Results support a requirement of Fgf8 in Tbx1 expressing cells to finely control patterning of the aortic arch and great arteries specifically during the pharyngeal arch artery remodeling process and indicate that the endoderm is the most likely site of this interaction. Furthermore, our data suggest that Fgf8 and Tbx1 play independent roles in regulating outflow tract development. This finding is clinically relevant since TBX1 is the candidate for DGS/VCFS, characterized clinically by variable expressivity and reduced penetrance of cardiovascular defects; Fgf8 gene variants may provide molecular clues to this variability. PMID:16696966

  5. Association of abnormal plasma bilirubin with aggressive HCC phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Brian I.; Guerra, Vito; Giannini, Edoardo G.; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Rapaccini, Gian Ludovico; Marco, Maria Di; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Background Cirrhosis-related abnormal liver function is associated with predisposition to HCC, features in several HCC classification systems and is an HCC prognostic factor. Aims To examine the phenotypic tumor differences in HCC patients with normal or abnormal plasma bilirubin levels. Methods A 2,416 patient HCC cohort was studied and dichotomized into normal and abnormal plasma bilirubin groups. Their HCC characteristics were compared for tumor aggressiveness features, namely blood AFP levels, tumor size, presence of PVT and tumor multifocality. Results In the total cohort, elevated bilirubin levels were associated with higher AFP levels, increased PVT and multifocality and lower survival, despite similar tumor sizes. When different tumor size terciles were compared, similar results were found, even for small tumor size patients. A multiple logistic regression model for PVT or tumor multifocality showed increased OddsRatios for elevated levels of GGTP, bilirubin and AFP and for larger tumor sizes. Conclusions HCC patients with abnormal bilirubin levels had worse prognosis than patients with normal bilirubin. They also had increased incidence of PVT and tumor multifocality and higher AFP levels, in patients with both small and larger tumors. The results show an association between bilirubin levels and indices of HCC aggressiveness. PMID:24787296

  6. Prader-Willi-like phenotypes: a systematic review of their chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Rocha, C F; Paiva, C L A

    2014-03-31

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is caused by the lack of expression of genes located on paternal chromosome 15q11-q13. This lack of gene expression may be due to a deletion in this chromosomal segment, to maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15, or to a defect in the imprinting center on 15q11-q13. PWS is characterized by hypotonia during the neonatal stage and in childhood, accompanied by a delay in neuropsychomotor development. Overeating, obesity, and mental deficiency arise later on. The syndrome has a clinical overlap with other diseases, which makes it difficult to accurately diagnose. The purpose of this article is to review the Prader-Willi-like phenotype in the scientific literature from 2000 to 2013, i.e., to review the cases of PWS caused by chromosomal abnormalities different from those found on chromosome 15. A search was carried out using the "National Center for Biotechnology Information" (www.pubmed.com) and "Scientific Electronic Library Online (www.scielo.br) databases and combinations of key words such as "Prader-Willi-like phenotype" and "Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype". Editorials, letters, reviews, and guidelines were excluded. Articles chosen contained descriptions of patients diagnosed with the PWS phenotype but who were negative for alterations on 15q11-q13. Our search found 643 articles about PWS, but only 14 of these matched with the Prader-Willi-like phenotype and with the selected years of publication (2000-2013). If two or more articles reported the same chromosomal alterations for Prader-Willi-like phenotype, the most recent was chosen. Twelve articles of 14 were case reports and 2 reported series of cases.

  7. Phenotypic expression of polycystic ovary syndrome in South Asian women.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Jaya; Kamdar, Vikram; Dumesic, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) occurs in 6% to 10% of women and, as the most common worldwide endocrinopathy of reproductive-aged women, is linked to a constellation of reproductive and metabolic abnormalities, including anovulatory infertility, hirsutism, acne, and insulin resistance in association with metabolic syndrome. Despite a genetic component to PCOS, ethnicity plays an important role in the phenotypic expression of PCOS, with South Asian PCOS women having more severe reproductive and metabolic symptoms than other ethnic groups. South Asians with PCOS seek medical care at an earlier age for reproductive abnormalities; have a higher degree of hirsutism, infertility, and acne; and experience lower live birth rates following in vitro fertilization than do whites with PCOS. Similarly, South Asians with PCOS have a higher prevalence of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome than do other PCOS-related ethnic groups of a similar body mass index. Inheritance of PCOS appears to have a complex genetic basis, including genetic differences based on ethnicity, which interact with lifestyle and other environmental factors to affect PCOS phenotypic expression. Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Family Physicians Learning Objectives: After completing this CME activity, physicians should be better able to state an ethnic difference in reproductive dysfunction between South Asian and white women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), state an ethnic difference in metabolic dysfunction between South Asian and white women with PCOS, identify a genetic abnormality found in South Asian women with PCOS, and list 2 environmental factors that predispose South Asian women to metabolic dysfunction.

  8. Genetic abnormalities in bicuspid aortic valve root phenotype: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Girdauskas, Evaldas; Geist, Lisa; Disha, Kushtrim; Kazakbaev, Iliaz; Groß, Tatiana; Schulz, Solveig; Ungelenk, Martin; Kuntze, Thomas; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Kurth, Ingo

    2017-07-01

    Genetic defects associated with bicuspid aortopathy have been infrequently analysed. Our goal was to examine the prevalence of rare genetic variants in patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) with a root phenotype using next-generation sequencing technology. We investigated a total of 124 patients with BAV with a root dilatation phenotype who underwent aortic valve ± proximal aortic surgery at a single institution (BAV database, n  = 812) during a 20-year period (1995-2015). Cross-sectional follow-up revealed 63 (51%) patients who were still alive and willing to participate. Systematic follow-up visits were scheduled from March to December 2015 and included aortic imaging as well as peripheral blood sampling for genetic testing. Next-generation sequencing libraries were prepared using a custom-made HaloPlex HS gene panel and included 20 candidate genes known to be associated with aortopathy and BAV. The primary end-point was the prevalence of genetic defects in our study cohort. A total of 63 patients (mean age 46 ± 10 years, 92% men) with BAV root phenotype and mean post-aortic valve replacement follow-up of 10.3 ± 4.9 years were included. Our genetic analysis yielded a wide spectrum of rare, potentially or likely pathogenic variants in 19 (30%) patients, with NOTCH1 variants being the most common ( n  = 6). Moreover, deleterious variants were revealed in AXIN1 ( n  = 3), NOS3 ( n  = 3), ELN ( n  = 2), FBN1 ( n  = 2) , FN1 ( n  = 2) and rarely in other candidate genes. Our preliminary study demonstrates a high prevalence and a wide spectrum of rare genetic variants in patients with the BAV root phenotype, indicative of the potentially congenital origin of associated aortopathy in this specific BAV cohort. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  9. Three new PAX6 mutations including one causing an unusual ophthalmic phenotype associated with neurodevelopmental abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Dansault, Anouk; David, Gabriel; Schwartz, Claire; Jaliffa, Carolina; Vieira, Véronique; de la Houssaye, Guillaume; Bigot, Karine; Catin, Françise; Tattu, Laurent; Chopin, Catherine; Halimi, Philippe; Roche, Olivier; Van Regemorter, Nicole; Munier, Francis; Schorderet, Daniel; Dufier, Jean-Louis; Marsac, Cécile; Ricquier, Daniel; Menasche, Maurice; Penfornis, Alfred; Abitbol, Marc

    2007-04-02

    The PAX6 gene was first described as a candidate for human aniridia. However, PAX6 expression is not restricted to the eye and it appears to be crucial for brain development. We studied PAX6 mutations in a large spectrum of patients who presented with aniridia phenotypes, Peters' anomaly, and anterior segment malformations associated or not with neurological anomalies. Patients and related families were ophthalmologically phenotyped, and in some cases neurologically and endocrinologically examined. We screened the PAX6 gene by direct sequencing in three groups of patients: those affected by aniridia; those with diverse ocular manifestations; and those with Peters' anomaly. Two mutations were investigated by generating crystallographic representations of the amino acid changes. Three novel heterozygous mutations affecting three unrelated families were identified: the g.572T>C nucleotide change, located in exon 5, and corresponding to the Leucine 46 Proline amino-acid mutation (L46P); the g.655A>G nucleotide change, located in exon 6, and corresponding to the Serine 74 Glycine amino-acid mutation (S74G); and the nucleotide deletion 579delG del, located in exon 6, which induces a frameshift mutation leading to a stop codon (V48fsX53). The L46P mutation was identified in affected patients presenting bilateral microphthalmia, cataracts, and nystagmus. The S74G mutation was found in a large family that had congenital ocular abnormalities, diverse neurological manifestations, and variable cognitive impairments. The 579delG deletion (V48fsX53) caused in the affected members of the same family bilateral aniridia associated with congenital cataract, foveal hypolasia, and nystagmus. We also detected a novel intronic nucleotide change, IVS2+9G>A (very likely a mutation) in an apparently isolated patient affected by a complex ocular phenotype, characterized primarily by a bilateral microphthalmia. Whether this nucleotide change is indeed pathogenic remains to be demonstrated

  10. GPER and ERα expression in abnormal endometrial proliferations.

    PubMed

    Tica, Andrei Adrian; Tica, Oana Sorina; Georgescu, Claudia Valentina; Pirici, Daniel; Bogdan, Maria; Ciurea, Tudorel; Mogoantă, Stelian ŞtefăniŢă; Georgescu, Corneliu Cristian; Comănescu, Alexandru Cristian; Bălşeanu, Tudor Adrian; Ciurea, Raluca Niculina; Osiac, Eugen; Buga, Ana Maria; Ciurea, Marius Eugen

    2016-01-01

    G-protein coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER), a particular extranuclear estrogen receptor (ER), seems not to be significantly involved in normal female phenotype development but especially associated with severe genital malignancies. This study investigated the GPER expression in different types of normal and abnormal proliferative endometrium, and the correlation with the presence of ERα. GPER was much highly expressed in cytoplasm (than onto cell membrane), contrary to ERα, which was almost exclusively located in the nucleus. Both ERs' densities were higher in columnar epithelial then in stromal cells, according with higher estrogen-sensitivity of epithelial cells. GPER and ERα density decreased as follows: complex endometrial hyperplasia (CEH) > simple endometrial hyperplasia (SHE) > normal proliferative endometrium (NPE) > atypical endometrial hyperplasia (AEH), ERα' density being constantly higher. In endometrial adenocarcinomas, both ERs were significant lower expressed, and widely varied, but GPER÷ERα ratio was significantly increased in high-grade lesions. The nuclear ERα is responsible for the genomic (the most important) mechanism of action of estrogens, involved in cell growth and multiplication. In normal and benign proliferations, ERα expression is increased as an evidence of its effects on cells with conserved architecture, in atypical and especially in malignant cells ERα's (and GPER's) density being much lower. Cytoplasmic GPER probably interfere with different tyrosine÷protein kinases signaling pathways, also involved in cell growth and proliferation. In benign endometrial lesions, GPER's presence is, at least partially, the result of an inductor effect of ERα on GPER gene transcription. In high-grade lesions, GPER÷ERα ratio was increased, demonstrating that GPER is involved per se in malignant endometrial proliferations.

  11. Redox Abnormalities as a Vulnerability Phenotype for Autism and Related Alterations in CNS Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    the hypothesis that SJL mice would have impaired neuronal dendrite generation, as has been observed in autism . This was our prediction due to the...phenotype for Autism and related alterations in CNS development PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mark D. Noble, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE Redox abnormalities as a vulnerability phenotype for Autism 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER And related alterations in CNS development 5b. GRANT

  12. Redox Abnormalities as a Vulnerability Phenotype for Autism and Related Alterations in CNS Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    ming during pre- and post-natal neurodevelopment . Previously, we reported that many children with autism have abnormal plasma levels of metabolites...dysregulation in autism . 1. Introduction Autism is a behaviorally defined neurodevelopmental disor- der that usually presents in early childhood and is charac...Phenotype for Autism and Related Alterations in CNS Development PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Sandra Jill James, Ph.D

  13. Highly variable penetrance of abnormal phenotypes in embryonic lethal knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert; Geyer, Stefan H.; Reissig, Lukas; Rose, Julia; Szumska, Dorota; Hardman, Emily; Prin, Fabrice; McGuire, Christina; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; White, Jacqui; Galli, Antonella; Tudor, Catherine; Tuck, Elizabeth; Mazzeo, Cecilia Icoresi; Smith, James C.; Robertson, Elizabeth; Adams, David J.; Mohun, Timothy; Weninger, Wolfgang J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Identifying genes that are essential for mouse embryonic development and survival through term is a powerful and unbiased way to discover possible genetic determinants of human developmental disorders. Characterising the changes in mouse embryos that result from ablation of lethal genes is a necessary first step towards uncovering their role in normal embryonic development and establishing any correlates amongst human congenital abnormalities. Methods: Here we present results gathered to date in the Deciphering the Mechanisms of Developmental Disorders (DMDD) programme, cataloguing the morphological defects identified from comprehensive imaging of 220 homozygous mutant and 114 wild type embryos from 42 lethal and subviable lines, analysed at E14.5. Results: Virtually all mutant embryos show multiple abnormal phenotypes and amongst the 42 lines these affect most organ systems. Within each mutant line, the phenotypes of individual embryos form distinct but overlapping sets. Subcutaneous edema, malformations of the heart or great vessels, abnormalities in forebrain morphology and the musculature of the eyes are all prevalent phenotypes, as is loss or abnormal size of the hypoglossal nerve. Conclusions: Overall, the most striking finding is that no matter how profound the malformation, each phenotype shows highly variable penetrance within a mutant line. These findings have challenging implications for efforts to identify human disease correlates. PMID:27996060

  14. Three new PAX6 mutations including one causing an unusual ophthalmic phenotype associated with neurodevelopmental abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Dansault, Anouk; David, Gabriel; Schwartz, Claire; Jaliffa, Carolina; Vieira, Véronique; de la Houssaye, Guillaume; Bigot, Karine; Catin, Françise; Tattu, Laurent; Chopin, Catherine; Halimi, Philippe; Roche, Olivier; Van Regemorter, Nicole; Munier, Francis; Schorderet, Daniel; Dufier, Jean-Louis; Marsac, Cécile; Ricquier, Daniel; Menasche, Maurice; Penfornis, Alfred

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The PAX6 gene was first described as a candidate for human aniridia. However, PAX6 expression is not restricted to the eye and it appears to be crucial for brain development. We studied PAX6 mutations in a large spectrum of patients who presented with aniridia phenotypes, Peters' anomaly, and anterior segment malformations associated or not with neurological anomalies. Methods Patients and related families were ophthalmologically phenotyped, and in some cases neurologically and endocrinologically examined. We screened the PAX6 gene by direct sequencing in three groups of patients: those affected by aniridia; those with diverse ocular manifestations; and those with Peters' anomaly. Two mutations were investigated by generating crystallographic representations of the amino acid changes. Results Three novel heterozygous mutations affecting three unrelated families were identified: the g.572T>C nucleotide change, located in exon 5, and corresponding to the Leucine 46 Proline amino-acid mutation (L46P); the g.655A>G nucleotide change, located in exon 6, and corresponding to the Serine 74 Glycine amino-acid mutation (S74G); and the nucleotide deletion 579delG del, located in exon 6, which induces a frameshift mutation leading to a stop codon (V48fsX53). The L46P mutation was identified in affected patients presenting bilateral microphthalmia, cataracts, and nystagmus. The S74G mutation was found in a large family that had congenital ocular abnormalities, diverse neurological manifestations, and variable cognitive impairments. The 579delG deletion (V48fsX53) caused in the affected members of the same family bilateral aniridia associated with congenital cataract, foveal hypolasia, and nystagmus. We also detected a novel intronic nucleotide change, IVS2+9G>A (very likely a mutation) in an apparently isolated patient affected by a complex ocular phenotype, characterized primarily by a bilateral microphthalmia. Whether this nucleotide change is indeed pathogenic

  15. Patterns of magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in symptomatic patients with Krabbe disease correspond to phenotype.

    PubMed

    Abdelhalim, Ahmed N; Alberico, Ronald A; Barczykowski, Amy L; Duffner, Patricia K

    2014-02-01

    Initial magnetic resonance imaging studies of individuals with Krabbe disease were analyzed to determine whether the pattern of abnormalities corresponded to the phenotype. This was a retrospective, nonblinded study. Families/patients diagnosed with Krabbe disease submitted medical records and magnetic resonance imaging discs for central review. Institutional review board approval/informed consents were obtained. Sixty-four magnetic resonance imaging scans were reviewed by two neuroradiologists and a child neurologist according to phenotype: early infantile (onset 0-6 months) = 39 patients; late infantile (onset 7-12 months) = 10 patients; later onset (onset 13 months-10 years) = 11 patients; adolescent (onset 11-20 years) = one patient; and adult (21 years or greater) = three patients. Local interpretations were compared with central review. Magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities differed among phenotypes. Early infantile patients had a predominance of increased intensity in the dentate/cerebellar white matter as well as changes in the deep cerebral white matter. Later onset patients did not demonstrate involvement in the dentate/cerebellar white matter but had extensive involvement of the deep cerebral white matter, parieto-occipital region, and posterior corpus callosum. Late infantile patients exhibited a mixed pattern; 40% had dentate/cerebellar white matter involvement while all had involvement of the deep cerebral white matter. Adolescent/adult patients demonstrated isolated corticospinal tract involvement. Local and central reviews primarily differed in interpretation of the early infantile phenotype. Analysis of magnetic resonance imaging in a large cohort of symptomatic patients with Krabbe disease demonstrated imaging abnormalities correspond to specific phenotypes. Knowledge of these patterns along with typical clinical signs/symptoms should promote earlier diagnosis and facilitate treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Abnormal motor phenotype at adult stages in mice lacking type 2 deiodinase.

    PubMed

    Bárez-López, Soledad; Bosch-García, Daniel; Gómez-Andrés, David; Pulido-Valdeolivas, Irene; Montero-Pedrazuela, Ana; Obregon, Maria Jesus; Guadaño-Ferraz, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormones have a key role in both the developing and adult central nervous system and skeletal muscle. The thyroid gland produces mainly thyroxine (T4) but the intracellular concentrations of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3; the transcriptionally active hormone) in the central nervous system and skeletal muscle are modulated by the activity of type 2 deiodinase (D2). To date no neurological syndrome has been associated with mutations in the DIO2 gene and previous studies in young and juvenile D2-knockout mice (D2KO) did not find gross neurological alterations, possibly due to compensatory mechanisms. This study aims to analyze the motor phenotype of 3-and-6-month-old D2KO mice to evaluate the role of D2 on the motor system at adult stages in which compensatory mechanisms could have failed. Motor abilities were explored by validated tests. In the footprint test, D2KO showed an altered global gait pattern (mice walked slower, with shorter strides and with a hindlimb wider base of support than wild-type mice). No differences were detected in the balance beam test. However, a reduced latency to fall was found in the rotarod, coat-hanger and four limb hanging wire tests indicating impairment on coordination and prehensile reflex and a reduction of muscle strength. In histological analyses of cerebellum and skeletal muscle, D2KO mice did not present gross structural abnormalities. Thyroid hormones levels and deiodinases activities were also determined. In D2KO mice, despite euthyroid T3 and high T4 plasma levels, T3 levels were significantly reduced in cerebral cortex (48% reduction) and skeletal muscle (33% reduction), but not in the cerebellum where other deiodinase (type 1) is expressed. The motor alterations observed in D2KO mice indicate an important role for D2 in T3 availability to maintain motor function and muscle strength. Our results suggest a possible implication of D2 in motor disorders.

  17. Effect of chromosome constitution variations on the expression of Turner phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bispo, A V S; Dos Santos, L O; Burégio-Frota, P; Galdino, M B; Duarte, A R; Leal, G F; Araújo, J; Gomes, B; Soares-Ventura, E M; Muniz, M T C; Santos, N

    2013-03-13

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a chronic disease related to haploinsufficiency of genes that are normally expressed in both X chromosomes in patients with female phenotype that is associated with a wide range of somatic malformations. We made detailed cytogenetic and clinical analysis of 65 patients with TS from the region of Recife, Brazil, to determine the effects of different chromosome constitutions on expression of the TS phenotype. Overall, patients with X-monosomy exhibited a tendency to have more severe phenotypes with higher morbidity, showing its importance in TS prognosis. Additionally, we found rare genetic and phenotypic abnormalities associated with this syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of 45,X,t(11;12)(q22;q22) described as a TS karyotype. Turner patients usually have normal intelligence; however, moderate to severe levels of mental retardation were found in 5 TS cases, which is considerate a very uncommon feature in this syndrome.

  18. Sugar-sweetened beverages and prevalence of the metabolically abnormal phenotype in the Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Green, Angela K; Jacques, Paul F; Rogers, Gail; Fox, Caroline S; Meigs, James B; McKeown, Nicola M

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between usual sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and prevalence of abnormal metabolic health across body mass index (BMI) categories. The metabolic health of 6,842 non-diabetic adults was classified using cross-sectional data from the Framingham Heart Study Offspring (1998-2001) and Third Generation (2002-2005) cohorts. Adults were classified as normal weight, overweight or obese and, within these categories, metabolic health was defined based on five criteria-hypertension, elevated fasting glucose, elevated triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, and insulin resistance. Individuals without metabolic abnormalities were considered metabolically healthy. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations between categories of SSB consumption and risk of metabolic health after stratification by BMI. Comparing the highest category of SSB consumers (median of 7 SSB per week) to the lowest category (non-consumers), odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for metabolically abnormal phenotypes, compared to the metabolically normal, were 1.9 (1.1-3.4) among the obese, 2.0 (1.4-2.9) among the overweight, and 1.9 (1.4-2.6) among the normal weight individuals. In this cross-sectional analysis, it is observed that, irrespective of weight status, consumers of SSB were more likely to display metabolic abnormalities compared to non-consumers in a dose-dependent manner. Copyright © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  19. Abnormal Motor Phenotype at Adult Stages in Mice Lacking Type 2 Deiodinase

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Andrés, David; Pulido-Valdeolivas, Irene; Montero-Pedrazuela, Ana; Obregon, Maria Jesus; Guadaño-Ferraz, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormones have a key role in both the developing and adult central nervous system and skeletal muscle. The thyroid gland produces mainly thyroxine (T4) but the intracellular concentrations of 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine (T3; the transcriptionally active hormone) in the central nervous system and skeletal muscle are modulated by the activity of type 2 deiodinase (D2). To date no neurological syndrome has been associated with mutations in the DIO2 gene and previous studies in young and juvenile D2-knockout mice (D2KO) did not find gross neurological alterations, possibly due to compensatory mechanisms. Aim This study aims to analyze the motor phenotype of 3-and-6-month-old D2KO mice to evaluate the role of D2 on the motor system at adult stages in which compensatory mechanisms could have failed. Results Motor abilities were explored by validated tests. In the footprint test, D2KO showed an altered global gait pattern (mice walked slower, with shorter strides and with a hindlimb wider base of support than wild-type mice). No differences were detected in the balance beam test. However, a reduced latency to fall was found in the rotarod, coat-hanger and four limb hanging wire tests indicating impairment on coordination and prehensile reflex and a reduction of muscle strength. In histological analyses of cerebellum and skeletal muscle, D2KO mice did not present gross structural abnormalities. Thyroid hormones levels and deiodinases activities were also determined. In D2KO mice, despite euthyroid T3 and high T4 plasma levels, T3 levels were significantly reduced in cerebral cortex (48% reduction) and skeletal muscle (33% reduction), but not in the cerebellum where other deiodinase (type 1) is expressed. Conclusions The motor alterations observed in D2KO mice indicate an important role for D2 in T3 availability to maintain motor function and muscle strength. Our results suggest a possible implication of D2 in motor disorders. PMID:25083788

  20. Elevated stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 expression in skeletal muscle contributes to abnormal fatty acid partitioning in obese humans.

    PubMed

    Hulver, Matthew W; Berggren, Jason R; Carper, Michael J; Miyazaki, Makoto; Ntambi, James M; Hoffman, Eric P; Thyfault, John P; Stevens, Robert; Dohm, G Lynis; Houmard, Joseph A; Muoio, Deborah M

    2005-10-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are strongly associated with abnormal lipid metabolism and accumulation of intramyocellular triacylglycerol, but the underlying cause of these perturbations are yet unknown. Herein, we show that the lipogenic gene, stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1), is robustly up-regulated in skeletal muscle from extremely obese humans. High expression and activity of SCD1, an enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids, corresponded with low rates of fatty acid oxidation, increased triacylglycerol synthesis and increased monounsaturation of muscle lipids. Elevated SCD1 expression and abnormal lipid partitioning were retained in primary skeletal myocytes derived from obese compared to lean donors, implying that these traits might be driven by epigenetic and/or heritable mechanisms. Overexpression of human SCD1 in myotubes from lean subjects was sufficient to mimic the obese phenotype. These results suggest that elevated expression of SCD1 in skeletal muscle contributes to abnormal lipid metabolism and progression of obesity.

  1. Global gene expression profiling related to temperature-sensitive growth abnormalities in interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Kouhei; Ohno, Ryoko; Yoshida, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    Triploid wheat hybrids between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii sometimes show abnormal growth phenotypes, and the growth abnormalities inhibit generation of wheat synthetic hexaploids. In type II necrosis, one of the growth abnormalities, necrotic cell death accompanied by marked growth repression occurs only under low temperature conditions. At normal temperature, the type II necrosis lines show grass-clump dwarfism with no necrotic symptoms, excess tillers, severe dwarfism and delayed flowering. Here, we report comparative expression analyses to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the temperature-dependent phenotypic plasticity in the triploid wheat hybrids. We compared gene and small RNA expression profiles in crown tissues to characterize the temperature-dependent phenotypic plasticity. No up-regulation of defense-related genes was observed under the normal temperature, and down-regulation of wheat APETALA1-like MADS-box genes, considered to act as flowering promoters, was found in the grass-clump dwarf lines. Some microRNAs, including miR156, were up-regulated, whereas the levels of transcripts of the miR156 target genes SPLs, known to inhibit tiller and branch number, were reduced in crown tissues of the grass-clump dwarf lines at the normal temperature. Unusual expression of the miR156/SPLs module could explain the grass-clump dwarf phenotype. Dramatic alteration of gene expression profiles, including miRNA levels, in crown tissues is associated with the temperature-dependent phenotypic plasticity in type II necrosis/grass-clump dwarf wheat hybrids. PMID:28463975

  2. Phenotypical expression of reduced mobility during limb ontogeny in frogs: the knee-joint case

    PubMed Central

    Abdala, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    Movement is one of the most important epigenetic factors for normal development of the musculoskeletal system, particularly during genesis and joint development. Studies regarding alterations to embryonic mobility, performed on anurans, chickens and mammals, report important phenotypical similarities as a result of the reduction or absence of this stimulus. The precise stage of development at which the stimulus modification generates phenotypic modifications however, is yet to be determined. In this work we explore whether the developmental effects of abnormal mobility can appear at any time during development or whether they begin to express themselves in particular phases of tadpole ontogeny. We conducted five experiments that showed that morphological abnormalities are not visible until Stages 40–42. Morphology in earlier stages remains normal, probably due to the fact that the bones/muscles/tendons have not yet developed and therefore are not affected by immobilization. These results suggest the existence of a specific period of phenotypical expression in which normal limb movement is necessary for the correct development of the joint tissue framework. PMID:26925340

  3. Abnormalities in the basement membrane structure promote basal keratinocytes in the epidermis of hypertrophic scars to adopt a proliferative phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaowei; Sun, Yexiao; Geng, Zhijun; Ma, Kui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-05-01

    The majority of studies on scar formation have mainly focused on the dermis and little is known of the involvement of the epidermis. Previous research has demonstrated that the scar tissue-derived keratinocytes are different from normal cells at both the genetic and cell biological levels; however, the mechanisms responsible for the fundamental abnormalities in keratinocytes during scar development remain elusive. For this purpose, in this study, we used normal, wound edge and hypertrophic scar tissue to examine the morphological changes which occur during epidermal regeneration as part of the wound healing process and found that the histological structure of hypertrophic scar tissues differed from that of normal skin, with a significant increase in epidermal thickness. Notably, staining of the basement membrane (BM) appeared to be absent in the scar tissues. Moreover, immunofluorescence staining for cytokeratin (CK)10, CK14, CK5, CK19 and integrin-β1 indicated the differential expression of cell markers in the epidermal keratinocytes among the normal, wound edge and hypertrophic scar tissues, which corresponded with the altered BM structures. By using a panel of proteins associated with BM components, we validated our hypothesis that the BM plays a significant role in regulating the cell fate decision of epidermal keratinocytes during skin wound healing. Alterations in the structure of the BM promote basal keratinocytes to adopt a proliferative phenotype both in vivo and in vitro.

  4. Abnormalities in the basement membrane structure promote basal keratinocytes in the epidermis of hypertrophic scars to adopt a proliferative phenotype

    PubMed Central

    YANG, SHAOWEI; SUN, YEXIAO; GENG, ZHIJUN; MA, KUI; SUN, XIAOYAN; FU, XIAOBING

    2016-01-01

    The majority of studies on scar formation have mainly focused on the dermis and little is known of the involvement of the epidermis. Previous research has demonstrated that the scar tissue-derived keratinocytes are different from normal cells at both the genetic and cell biological levels; however, the mechanisms responsible for the fundamental abnormalities in keratinocytes during scar development remain elusive. For this purpose, in this study, we used normal, wound edge and hypertrophic scar tissue to examine the morphological changes which occur during epidermal regeneration as part of the wound healing process and found that the histological structure of hypertrophic scar tissues differed from that of normal skin, with a significant increase in epidermal thickness. Notably, staining of the basement membrane (BM) appeared to be absent in the scar tissues. Moreover, immunofluorescence staining for cytokeratin (CK)10, CK14, CK5, CK19 and integrin-β1 indicated the differential expression of cell markers in the epidermal keratinocytes among the normal, wound edge and hypertrophic scar tissues, which corresponded with the altered BM structures. By using a panel of proteins associated with BM components, we validated our hypothesis that the BM plays a significant role in regulating the cell fate decision of epidermal keratinocytes during skin wound healing. Alterations in the structure of the BM promote basal keratinocytes to adopt a proliferative phenotype both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26986690

  5. Complete trisomy 9 with unusual phenotypic associations: Dandy-Walker malformation, cleft lip and cleft palate, cardiovascular abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Tonni, Gabriele; Lituania, Mario; Chitayat, David; Bonasoni, Maria Paola; Keating, Sarah; Thompson, Megan; Shannon, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    Trisomy 9 is a rare chromosomal abnormality usually associated with first-trimester miscarriage; few fetuses survive until the second trimester. We report two new cases of complete trisomy 9 that both present unusual phenotypic associations, and we analyze the genetic pathway involved in this chromosomal abnormality. The first fetus investigated showed Dandy-Walker malformation, cleft lip, and cleft palate) at the second trimester scan. Cardiovascular abnormalities were characterized by a right-sided, U-shaped aortic arch associated with a ventricular septal defect (VSD). Symmetrical intrauterine growth restriction and multicystic dysplastic kidney disease were associated findings. The second fetus showed a dysmorphic face, bilateral cleft lip, hypoplastic corpus callosum, and a Dandy-Walker malformation. Postmortem examination revealed cardiovascular abnormalities such as persistent left superior vena cava draining into the coronary sinus, membranous ventricular septal defect, overriding aorta, pulmonary valve with two cusps and three sinuses, and the origin of the left subclavian artery distal to the junction of ductus arteriosus and aortic arch. Complete trisomy 9 may result in a wide spectrum of congenital abnormalities, and the presented case series contributes further details on the phenotype of this rare aneuploidy. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. PhenomeExpress: a refined network analysis of expression datasets by inclusion of known disease phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Soul, Jamie; Hardingham, Timothy E; Boot-Handford, Raymond P; Schwartz, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-29

    We describe a new method, PhenomeExpress, for the analysis of transcriptomic datasets to identify pathogenic disease mechanisms. Our analysis method includes input from both protein-protein interaction and phenotype similarity networks. This introduces valuable information from disease relevant phenotypes, which aids the identification of sub-networks that are significantly enriched in differentially expressed genes and are related to the disease relevant phenotypes. This contrasts with many active sub-network detection methods, which rely solely on protein-protein interaction networks derived from compounded data of many unrelated biological conditions and which are therefore not specific to the context of the experiment. PhenomeExpress thus exploits readily available animal model and human disease phenotype information. It combines this prior evidence of disease phenotypes with the experimentally derived disease data sets to provide a more targeted analysis. Two case studies, in subchondral bone in osteoarthritis and in Pax5 in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, demonstrate that PhenomeExpress identifies core disease pathways in both mouse and human disease expression datasets derived from different technologies. We also validate the approach by comparison to state-of-the-art active sub-network detection methods, which reveals how it may enhance the detection of molecular phenotypes and provide a more detailed context to those previously identified as possible candidates.

  7. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome-FAS Patients Have an Abnormal Regulatory T Cell (Treg) Phenotype but Display Normal Natural Treg-Suppressive Function on T Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mazerolles, Fabienne; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Pelle, Olivier; Picard, Capucine; Neven, Benedicte; Fischer, Alain; Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Rieux-Laucat, Frederic

    2018-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) with FAS mutation (ALPS-FAS) is a nonmalignant, noninfectious, lymphoproliferative disease with autoimmunity. Given the central role of natural regulatory T cells (nTregs) in the control of lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity, we assessed nTreg-suppressive function in 16 patients with ALPS-FAS. The proportion of CD25 high CD127 low Tregs was lower in ALPS-FAS patients than in healthy controls. This subset was correlated with a reduced CD25 expression in CD3 + CD4 + T cells from ALPS patients and thus an abnormally low proportion of CD25 high FOXP3 + Helios + T cells. The ALPS patients also displayed a high proportion of naïve Treg (FOXP3 low CD45RA + ) and an unusual subpopulation (CD4 + CD127 low CD15s + CD45RA + ). Despite this abnormal phenotype, the CD25 high CD127 low Tregs' suppressive function was unaffected. Furthermore, conventional T cells from FAS -mutated patients showed normal levels of sensitivity to Treg suppression. An abnormal Treg phenotype is observed in circulating lymphocytes of ALPS patients. However, these Tregs displayed a normal suppressive function on T effector proliferation in vitro . This is suggesting that lymphoproliferation observed in ALPS patients does not result from Tregs functional defect or T effector cells insensitivity to Tregs suppression.

  8. Reversal of Phenotypic Abnormalities by CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Gene Correction in Huntington Disease Patient-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohong; Tay, Yilin; Sim, Bernice; Yoon, Su-In; Huang, Yihui; Ooi, Jolene; Utami, Kagistia Hana; Ziaei, Amin; Ng, Bryan; Radulescu, Carola; Low, Donovan; Ng, Alvin Yu Jin; Loh, Marie; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Ginhoux, Florent; Augustine, George J; Pouladi, Mahmoud A

    2017-03-14

    Huntington disease (HD) is a dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in HTT. Here we report correction of HD human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) using a CRISPR-Cas9 and piggyBac transposon-based approach. We show that both HD and corrected isogenic hiPSCs can be differentiated into excitable, synaptically active forebrain neurons. We further demonstrate that phenotypic abnormalities in HD hiPSC-derived neural cells, including impaired neural rosette formation, increased susceptibility to growth factor withdrawal, and deficits in mitochondrial respiration, are rescued in isogenic controls. Importantly, using genome-wide expression analysis, we show that a number of apparent gene expression differences detected between HD and non-related healthy control lines are absent between HD and corrected lines, suggesting that these differences are likely related to genetic background rather than HD-specific effects. Our study demonstrates correction of HD hiPSCs and associated phenotypic abnormalities, and the importance of isogenic controls for disease modeling using hiPSCs. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reduced expression of the NMDA receptor-interacting protein SynGAP causes behavioral abnormalities that model symptoms of Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaochuan; Hamilton, Peter J; Reish, Nicholas J; Sweatt, J David; Miller, Courtney A; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2009-06-01

    Abnormal function of NMDA receptors is believed to be a contributing factor to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. NMDAR subunits and postsynaptic-interacting proteins of these channels are abnormally expressed in some patients with this illness. In mice, reduced NMDAR expression leads to behaviors analogous to symptoms of schizophrenia, but reports of animals with mutations in core postsynaptic density proteins having similar a phenotype have yet to be reported. Here we show that reduced expression of the neuronal RasGAP and NMDAR-associated protein, SynGAP, results in abnormal behaviors strikingly similar to that reported in mice with reduced NMDAR function. SynGAP mutant mice exhibited nonhabituating and persistent hyperactivity that was ameliorated by the antipsychotic clozapine. An NMDAR antagonist, MK-801, induced hyperactivity in normal mice but SynGAP mutants were less responsive, suggesting that NMDAR hypofunction contributes to this behavioral abnormality. SynGAP mutants exhibited enhanced startle reactivity and impaired sensory-motor gating. These mice also displayed a complete lack of social memory and a propensity toward social isolation. Finally, SynGAP mutants had deficits in cued fear conditioning and working memory, indicating abnormal function of circuits that control emotion and choice. Our results demonstrate that SynGAP mutant mice have gross neurological deficits similar to other mouse models of schizophrenia. Because SynGAP interacts with NMDARs, and the signaling activity of this protein is regulated by these channels, our data in dicate that SynGAP lies downstream of NMDARs and is a required intermediate for normal neural circuit function and behavior. Taken together, these data support the idea that schizophrenia may arise from abnormal signaling pathways that are mediated by NMDA receptors.

  10. Gene expression during skeletal development in three osteopetrotic rat mutations. Evidence for osteoblast abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Shalhoub, V; Jackson, M E; Lian, J B; Stein, G S; Marks, S C

    1991-05-25

    Osteopetrosis is a group of metabolic bone diseases characterized by reductions in osteoclast development and/or function. These aspects of osteoclast biology are known to be influenced by osteoblasts and their products. To ascertain whether osteoblast dysfunction contributes to aberrations in the structural and functional properties of osteoclasts in osteopetrosis, we systematically examined gene expression as reflected by mRNA levels for a series of cell growth- and tissue-related genes associated with the osteoblast phenotype during skeletal development in normal and mutant rats of three different osteopetrotic stocks. We show that the methods used permit the reproducible isolation of undegraded total cellular RNA from bone and that mRNA levels can be reliably quantitated in these preparations. Each osteopetrotic mutation exhibits a distinct aberrant pattern of osteoblast gene expression that may be correlated with and explain some abnormalities in extracellular matrix composition, mineralization, osteoclast development, and effects of elevated serum levels of 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, depending upon the mutation. Normal rats show minor variations in gene expression that reflect the genetic background (stock). This, the first comprehensive molecular analysis of osteoblast gene expression in osteopetrosis, suggests that some osteopetroses, particularly in the toothless rat, are associated with and potentially related to mechanisms associated with aberrations in osteoblast function. More generally, the present studies demonstrate alterations in gene expression as reflected by mRNA levels that are associated with functional properties of the osteoblast, particularly those contributing to the recruitment and/or differentiation of osteoclasts, thereby influencing skeletal modeling.

  11. Influence of abnormally high leptin levels during pregnancy on metabolic phenotypes in progeny mice.

    PubMed

    Makarova, Elena N; Chepeleva, Elena V; Panchenko, Polina E; Bazhan, Nadezhda M

    2013-12-01

    Maternal obesity increases the risk of obesity in offspring, and obesity is accompanied by an increase in blood leptin levels. The "yellow" mutation at the mouse agouti locus (A(y)) increases blood leptin levels in C57BL preobese pregnant mice without affecting other metabolic characteristics. We investigated the influence of the A(y) mutation or leptin injection at the end of pregnancy in C57BL mice on metabolic phenotypes and the susceptibility to diet-induced obesity (DIO) in offspring. In both C57BL-A(y) and leptin-treated mice, the maternal effect was more pronounced in male offspring. Compared with males born to control mothers, males born to A(y) mothers displayed equal food intake (FI) but decreased body weight (BW) gain after weaning, equal glucose tolerance, and enhanced FI-to-BW ratios on the standard diet but the same FI and BW on the high-fat diet. Males born to A(y) mothers were less responsive to the anorectic effect of exogenous leptin and less resistant to fasting (were not hyperphagic and gained less weight during refeeding after food deprivation) compared with males born to control mothers. However, all progeny displayed equal hypothalamic expression of Agouti gene-related protein (AgRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and equal plasma leptin and glucose levels after food deprivation. Leptin injections in C57BL mice on day 17 of pregnancy decreased BW in both male and female offspring but inhibited FI and DIO only in male offspring. Our results show that hyperleptinemia during pregnancy has sex-specific long-term effects on energy balance regulation in progeny and does not predispose offspring to developing obesity.

  12. Intranuclear inclusions of meningioma associated with abnormal cytoskeletal protein expression.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, T; Hirato, J; Sasaki, A; Yokoo, H; Nakazato, Y; Kurachi, H

    1999-01-01

    We describe a case of meningothelial meningioma with a large number of intranuclear inclusions. Morphologically, these are divided into cytoplasmic inclusions and nuclear vacuoles. The cytoplasmic inclusion has a limiting membrane with cell organelles and filaments. Inclusions of this type are generally eosinophilic, like the cytoplasm. However, there are many inclusions that are more eosinophilic than the cytoplasm or that have a ground-glass appearance. Some of them may contain fine or coarse granules. On the other hand, the nuclear vacuole lacks a limiting membrane and appears empty. In most of the inclusions of this type, there is a faintly basophilic substance in the margin. Generally, the cytoplasmic inclusions are as immunopositive as cytoplasm with vimentin, but some of these cytoplasmic inclusions are more reactive. Under the electron microscope, abnormal aggregation of intermediate filaments is recognized in the cytoplasmic inclusions. It is considered that a strong reaction of cytoplasmic inclusions with vimentin immunostaining is due to abnormal aggregation of intermediate filaments. The present study distinctly demonstrates abnormal localization of intermediate filaments in the cytoplasmic inclusions, and it is suggested that the cytoskeleton participates in the evolution of the cytoplasmic inclusions.

  13. Expression of DISC1-interactome members correlates with cognitive phenotypes related to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rampino, Antonio; Walker, Rosie May; Torrance, Helen Scott; Anderson, Susan Maguire; Fazio, Leonardo; Di Giorgio, Annabella; Taurisano, Paolo; Gelao, Barbara; Romano, Raffaella; Masellis, Rita; Ursini, Gianluca; Caforio, Grazia; Blasi, Giuseppe; Millar, J Kirsty; Porteous, David John; Thomson, Pippa Ann; Bertolino, Alessandro; Evans, Kathryn Louise

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is central to the schizophrenia phenotype. Genetic and functional studies have implicated Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), a leading candidate gene for schizophrenia and related psychiatric conditions, in cognitive function. Altered expression of DISC1 and DISC1-interactors has been identified in schizophrenia. Dysregulated expression of DISC1-interactome genes might, therefore, contribute to schizophrenia susceptibility via disruption of molecular systems required for normal cognitive function. Here, the blood RNA expression levels of DISC1 and DISC1-interacting proteins were measured in 63 control subjects. Cognitive function was assessed using neuropsychiatric tests and functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the activity of prefrontal cortical regions during the N-back working memory task, which is abnormal in schizophrenia. Pairwise correlations between gene expression levels and the relationship between gene expression levels and cognitive function and N-back-elicited brain activity were assessed. Finally, the expression levels of DISC1, AKAP9, FEZ1, NDEL1 and PCM1 were compared between 63 controls and 69 schizophrenic subjects. We found that DISC1-interactome genes showed correlated expression in the blood of healthy individuals. The expression levels of several interactome members were correlated with cognitive performance and N-back-elicited activity in the prefrontal cortex. In addition, DISC1 and NDEL1 showed decreased expression in schizophrenic subjects compared to healthy controls. Our findings highlight the importance of the coordinated expression of DISC1-interactome genes for normal cognitive function and suggest that dysregulated DISC1 and NDEL1 expression might, in part, contribute to susceptibility for schizophrenia via disruption of prefrontal cortex-dependent cognitive functions.

  14. Expression of DISC1-Interactome Members Correlates with Cognitive Phenotypes Related to Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Rampino, Antonio; Walker, Rosie May; Torrance, Helen Scott; Anderson, Susan Maguire; Fazio, Leonardo; Di Giorgio, Annabella; Taurisano, Paolo; Gelao, Barbara; Romano, Raffaella; Masellis, Rita; Ursini, Gianluca; Caforio, Grazia; Blasi, Giuseppe; Millar, J. Kirsty; Porteous, David John; Thomson, Pippa Ann; Bertolino, Alessandro; Evans, Kathryn Louise

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is central to the schizophrenia phenotype. Genetic and functional studies have implicated Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), a leading candidate gene for schizophrenia and related psychiatric conditions, in cognitive function. Altered expression of DISC1 and DISC1-interactors has been identified in schizophrenia. Dysregulated expression of DISC1-interactome genes might, therefore, contribute to schizophrenia susceptibility via disruption of molecular systems required for normal cognitive function. Here, the blood RNA expression levels of DISC1 and DISC1-interacting proteins were measured in 63 control subjects. Cognitive function was assessed using neuropsychiatric tests and functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the activity of prefrontal cortical regions during the N-back working memory task, which is abnormal in schizophrenia. Pairwise correlations between gene expression levels and the relationship between gene expression levels and cognitive function and N-back-elicited brain activity were assessed. Finally, the expression levels of DISC1, AKAP9, FEZ1, NDEL1 and PCM1 were compared between 63 controls and 69 schizophrenic subjects. We found that DISC1-interactome genes showed correlated expression in the blood of healthy individuals. The expression levels of several interactome members were correlated with cognitive performance and N-back-elicited activity in the prefrontal cortex. In addition, DISC1 and NDEL1 showed decreased expression in schizophrenic subjects compared to healthy controls. Our findings highlight the importance of the coordinated expression of DISC1-interactome genes for normal cognitive function and suggest that dysregulated DISC1 and NDEL1 expression might, in part, contribute to susceptibility for schizophrenia via disruption of prefrontal cortex-dependent cognitive functions. PMID:24940743

  15. Elevated stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 expression in skeletal muscle contributes to abnormal fatty acid partitioning in obese humans

    PubMed Central

    Hulver, Matthew W.; Berggren, Jason R.; Carper, Michael J.; Miyazaki, Makoto; Ntambi, James M.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Thyfault, John P.; Stevens, Robert; Dohm, G. Lynis; Houmard, Joseph A.; Muoio, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Obesity and type 2 diabetes are strongly associated with abnormal lipid metabolism and accumulation of intramyocellular triacylglycerol, but the underlying cause of these perturbations are yet unknown. Herein, we show that the lipogenic gene, stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1), is robustly up-regulated in skeletal muscle from extremely obese humans. High expression and activity of SCD1, an enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids, corresponded with low rates of fatty acid oxidation, increased triacylglycerol synthesis and increased monounsaturation of muscle lipids. Elevated SCD1 expression and abnormal lipid partitioning were retained in primary skeletal myocytes derived from obese compared to lean donors, implying that these traits might be driven by epigenetic and/or heritable mechanisms. Overexpression of human SCD1 in myotubes from lean subjects was sufficient to mimic the obese phenotype. These results suggest that elevated expression of SCD1 in skeletal muscle contributes to abnormal lipid metabolism and progression of obesity. PMID:16213227

  16. Sugar-sweetened beverages and prevalence of the metabolically abnormal phenotype in the Framingham Heart Study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between usual sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and prevalence of abnormal metabolic health across body mass index (BMI) categories. The metabolic health of 6,842 non-diabetic adults was classified using cross-sectional data from the...

  17. Neurofilament light polypeptide gene N98S mutation in mice leads to neurofilament network abnormalities and a Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 2E phenotype.

    PubMed

    Adebola, Adijat A; Di Castri, Theo; He, Chui-Zhen; Salvatierra, Laura A; Zhao, Jian; Brown, Kristy; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Worman, Howard J; Liem, Ronald K H

    2015-04-15

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most commonly inherited neurological disorder with a prevalence of 1 in 2500 people worldwide. Patients suffer from degeneration of the peripheral nerves that control sensory information of the foot/leg and hand/arm. Multiple mutations in the neurofilament light polypeptide gene, NEFL, cause CMT2E. Previous studies in transfected cells showed that expression of disease-associated neurofilament light chain variants results in abnormal intermediate filament networks associated with defects in axonal transport. We have now generated knock-in mice with two different point mutations in Nefl: P8R that has been reported in multiple families with variable age of onset and N98S that has been described as an early-onset, sporadic mutation in multiple individuals. Nefl(P8R/+) and Nefl(P8R/P8R) mice were indistinguishable from Nefl(+/+) in terms of behavioral phenotype. In contrast, Nefl(N98S/+) mice had a noticeable tremor, and most animals showed a hindlimb clasping phenotype. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed multiple inclusions in the cell bodies and proximal axons of spinal cord neurons, disorganized processes in the cerebellum and abnormal processes in the cerebral cortex and pons. Abnormal processes were observed as early as post-natal day 7. Electron microscopic analysis of sciatic nerves showed a reduction in the number of neurofilaments, an increase in the number of microtubules and a decrease in the axonal diameters. The Nefl(N98S/+) mice provide an excellent model to study the pathogenesis of CMT2E and should prove useful for testing potential therapies. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Growth retardation, intellectual disability, facial anomalies, cataract, thoracic hypoplasia and skeletal abnormalities: a novel phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Hitesh; Bens, Susanne; Caliebe, Almuth; Graham, John M.; Girisha, Katta Mohan

    2012-01-01

    We report a fourteen year old adolescent girl with growth deficiency, microcephaly, intellectual disability, distinctive dysmorphic features (bulbous nose with wide nasal base, hypotelorism, deeply set eyes, protruding cupped ears and thick lips), cataract, pigmentary retinopathy, hypoplastic thorax, kyphoscoliosis and unusual skeletal changes but without chromosomal imbalances detected by array-CGH who probably represents a novel phenotype. PMID:22987502

  19. Ectopic ERK Expression Induces Phenotypic Conversion of C10 Cells and Alters DNA Methyltransferase Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2012-05-04

    In some model systems constitutive extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) activation is sufficient to promote an oncogenic phenotype. Here we investigate whether constitutive ERK expression influences phenotypic conversion in murine C10 type II alveolar epithelial cells. C10 cells were stably transduced with an ERK1-green fluorescent protein (ERK1-GFP) chimera or empty vector and ectopic ERK expression was associated with the acquisition of soft agar focus-forming potential in late passage, but not early passage cells. Late passage ERK1-GFP cells exhibited a significant increase in the expression of DNA methyl transferases (DNMT1 and 3b) and a marked increase in sensitivity to 5-azacytidine (5-azaC)-mediatedmore » toxicity, relative to early passage ERK1-GFP cells and vector controls. The expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) were significantly increased in late passage cells, suggesting enhanced DNA damage recognition and repair activity which we interpret as a reflection of genomic instability. Phospho-ERK levels were dramatically decreased in late passage ERK1-GFP cells, relative to early passage and vector controls, and phospho-ERK levels were restored by treatment with sodium orthovanadate, indicating a role for phosphatase activity in this response. Collectively these observations suggest that ectopic ERK expression promotes phenotypic conversion of C10 cells that is associated with latent effects on epigenetic programming and phosphatase activities.« less

  20. Epigenetic abnormalities associated with a chromosome 18(q21-q22) inversion and a Gilles de la Tourette syndrome phenotype

    PubMed Central

    State, Matthew W.; Greally, John M.; Cuker, Adam; Bowers, Peter N.; Henegariu, Octavian; Morgan, Thomas M.; Gunel, Murat; DiLuna, Michael; King, Robert A.; Nelson, Carol; Donovan, Abigail; Anderson, George M.; Leckman, James F.; Hawkins, Trevor; Pauls, David L.; Lifton, Richard P.; Ward, David C.

    2003-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is a potentially debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder defined by the presence of both vocal and motor tics. Despite evidence that this and a related phenotypic spectrum, including chronic tics (CT) and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), are genetically mediated, no gene involved in disease etiology has been identified. Chromosomal abnormalities have long been proposed to play a causative role in isolated cases of GTS spectrum phenomena, but confirmation of this hypothesis has yet to be forthcoming. We describe an i(18q21.1-q22.2) inversion in a patient with CT and OCD. We have fine mapped the telomeric aspect of the rearrangement to within 1 Mb of a previously reported 18q22 breakpoint that cosegregated in a family with GTS and related phenotypes. A comprehensive characterization of this genomic interval led to the identification of two transcripts, neither of which was found to be structurally disrupted. Analysis of the epigenetic characteristics of the region demonstrated a significant increase in replication asynchrony in the patient compared to controls, with the inverted chromosome showing delayed replication timing across at least a 500-kb interval. These findings are consistent with long-range functional dysregulation of one or more genes in the region. Our data support a link between chromosomal aberrations and epigenetic mechanisms in GTS and suggest that the study of the functional consequences of balanced chromosomal rearrangements is warranted in patients with phenotypes of interest, irrespective of the findings regarding structurally disrupted transcripts. PMID:12682296

  1. Expression of the Broad Autism Phenotype in Simplex Autism Families from the Simons Simplex Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Julie; Goin-Kochel, Robin P.; Green-Snyder, Lee Anne; Hundley, Rachel J.; Warren, Zachary; Peters, Sarika U.

    2014-01-01

    The broad autism phenotype (BAP) refers to the phenotypic expression of an underlying genetic liability to autism, manifest in non-autistic relatives. This study examined the relationship among the "Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire" (BAPQ), "Social Responsiveness Scale: Adult Research Version" (SRS:ARV), and "Family…

  2. Abnormalities of the executive control network in multiple sclerosis phenotypes: An fMRI effective connectivity study.

    PubMed

    Dobryakova, Ekaterina; Rocca, Maria Assunta; Valsasina, Paola; Ghezzi, Angelo; Colombo, Bruno; Martinelli, Vittorio; Comi, Giancarlo; DeLuca, John; Filippi, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    The Stroop interference task is a cognitively demanding task of executive control, a cognitive ability that is often impaired in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to compare effective connectivity patterns within a network of brain regions involved in the Stroop task performance between MS patients with three disease clinical phenotypes [relapsing-remitting (RRMS), benign (BMS), and secondary progressive (SPMS)] and healthy subjects. Effective connectivity analysis was performed on Stroop task data using a novel method based on causal Bayes networks. Compared with controls, MS phenotypes were slower at performing the task and had reduced performance accuracy during incongruent trials that required increased cognitive control. MS phenotypes also exhibited connectivity abnormalities reflected as weaker shared connections, presence of extra connections (i.e., connections absent in the HC connectivity pattern), connection reversal, and loss. In SPMS and the BMS groups but not in the RRMS group, extra connections were associated with deficits in the Stroop task performance. In the BMS group, the response time associated with correct responses during the congruent condition showed a positive correlation with the left posterior parietal → dorsal anterior cingulate connection. In the SPMS group, performance accuracy during the congruent condition showed a negative correlation with the right insula → left insula connection. No associations between extra connections and behavioral performance measures were observed in the RRMS group. These results suggest that, depending on the phenotype, patients with MS use different strategies when cognitive control demands are high and rely on different network connections. Hum Brain Mapp, 37:2293-2304, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Characterization of Gene Expression Phenotype in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Weihua; Beers, David R.; Hooten, Kristopher G.; Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Zhang, Aijun; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Traini, Christopher M.; Halsey, Wendy S.; Hughes, Ashley M.; Sathe, Ganesh M.; Livi, George P.; Fan, Guo-Huang

    2017-01-01

    Importance Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a common adult-onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective loss of upper and lower motor neurons. Patients with ALS have persistent peripheral and central inflammatory responses including abnormally functioning T cells and activated microglia. However, much less is known about the inflammatory gene profile of circulating innate immune monocytes in these patients. Objective To characterize the transcriptomics of peripheral monocytes in patients with ALS. Design, Setting, and Participants Monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood of 43 patients with ALS and 22 healthy control individuals. Total RNA was extracted from the monocytes and subjected to deep RNA sequencing, and these results were validated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Main Outcomes and Measures The differential expressed gene signatures of these monocytes were identified using unbiased RNA sequencing strategy for gene expression profiling. Results The demographics between the patients with ALS (mean [SD] age, 58.8 [1.57] years; 55.8% were men and 44.2% were women; 90.7% were white, 4.65% were Hispanic, 2.33% were black, and 2.33% were Asian) and control individuals were similar (mean [SD] age, 57.6 [2.15] years; 50.0% were men and 50.0% were women; 90.9% were white, none were Hispanic, none were black, and 9.09% were Asian). RNA sequencing data from negative selected monocytes revealed 233 differential expressed genes in ALS monocytes compared with healthy control monocytes. Notably, ALS monocytes demonstrated a unique inflammation-related gene expression profile, the most prominent of which, including IL1B, IL8, FOSB, CXCL1, and CXCL2, were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (IL8, mean [SE], 1.00 [0.18]; P = .002; FOSB, 1.00 [0.21]; P = .009; CXCL1, 1.00 [0.14]; P = .002; and CXCL2, 1.00 [0.11]; P = .01). Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis monocytes

  4. Gene expression and the biological phenotype of papillary thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Delys, L; Detours, V; Franc, B; Thomas, G; Bogdanova, T; Tronko, M; Libert, F; Dumont, J E; Maenhaut, C

    2007-12-13

    The purpose of this paper is to correlate the molecular phenotype of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) to their biological pathology. We hybridized 26 PTC on microarrays and showed that nearly 44% of the transcriptome was regulated in these tumors. We then combined our data set with two published PTC microarray studies to produce a platform- and study-independent list of PTC-associated genes. We further confirmed the mRNA regulation of 15 genes from this list by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Analysis of this list with statistical tools led to several conclusions: (1) there is a change in cell population with an increased expression of genes involved in the immune response, reflecting lymphocyte infiltration in the tumor compared to the normal tissue. (2) The c-jun N-terminal kinase pathway is activated by overexpression of its components. (3) The activation of ERKK1/2 by genetic alterations is supplemented by activation of the epidermal growth factor but not of the insulin-like growth factor signaling pathway. (4) There is a downregulation of immediate early genes. (5) We observed an overexpression of many proteases in accordance with tumor remodeling, and suggested a probable role of S100 proteins and annexin A2 in this process. (6) Numerous overexpressed genes favor the hypothesis of a collective migration mode of tumor cells.

  5. Borderline Personality Disorder as a Female Phenotypic Expression of Psychopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Jenessa; Javdani, Shabnam; Sadeh, Naomi; Newman, Joseph P.; Verona, Edelyn

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the combination of the interpersonal-affective (F1) and impulsive-antisocial (F2) features of psychopathy may be associated with borderline personality disorder (BPD), specifically among women (e.g., Coid, 1993; Hicks, Vaidyana-than, & Patrick, 2010). However, empirical research explicitly examining gendered relationships between BPD and psychopathy factors is lacking. To further inform this area of research, we investigated the hypothesis that the interplay between the two psychopathy factors is associated with BPD among women across two studies. Study 1 consisted of a college sample of 318 adults (51% women), and Study 2 consisted of a large sample of 488 female prisoners. The interpersonal-affective (F1) and impulsiveantisocial psychopathy (F2) scores, measured with self-report and clinician-rated indices, respectively, were entered as explanatory variables in regression analyses to investigate their unique contributions to BPD traits. Across two independent samples, results indicated that the interaction of high F1 and F2 psychopathy scores was associated with BPD in women. This association was found to be specific to women in Study 1. These results suggest that BPD and psychopathy, at least as they are measured by current instruments, overlap in women and, accordingly, may reflect gender-differentiated phenotypic expressions of similar dispositional vulnerabilities. PMID:22452756

  6. MRI-leukoaraiosis thresholds and the phenotypic expression of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Sandra M.; Brumback, Babette; Tanner, Jared J.; Schmalfuss, Ilona; Lamar, Melissa; Giovannetti, Tania; Heilman, Kenneth M.; Libon, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the concept of leukoaraiosis thresholds on working memory, visuoconstruction, memory, and language in dementia. Methods: A consecutive series of 83 individuals with insidious onset/progressive dementia clinically diagnosed with Alzheimer disease (AD) or small vessel vascular dementia (VaD) completed neuropsychological measures assessing working memory, visuoconstruction, episodic memory, and language. A clinical MRI scan was used to quantify leukoaraiosis, total white matter, hippocampus, lacune, and intracranial volume. We performed analyses to detect the lowest level of leukoaraiosis associated with impairment on the neuropsychological measures. Results: Leukoaraiosis ranged from 0.63% to 23.74% of participants' white matter. Leukoaraiosis explained a significant amount of variance in working memory performance when it involved 3% or more of the white matter with curve estimations showing the relationship to be nonlinear in nature. Greater leukoaraiosis (13%) was implicated for impairment in visuoconstruction. Relationships between leukoaraiosis, episodic memory, and language measures were linear or flat. Conclusions: Leukoaraiosis involves specific threshold points for working memory and visuoconstructional tests in AD/VaD spectrum dementia. These data underscore the need to better understand the threshold at which leukoaraiosis affects and alters the phenotypic expression in insidious onset dementia syndromes. PMID:22843264

  7. Abnormal expression of leiomyoma cytoskeletal proteins involved in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Ura, Blendi; Scrimin, Federica; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Athanasakis, Emmanouil; Aloisio, Michelangelo; Monasta, Lorenzo; Ricci, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are monoclonal tumors. Several factors are involved in the neoplastic transformation of the myometrium. In our study we focused on dysregulated cytoskeletal proteins in the leiomyoma as compared to the myometrium. Paired tissue samples of ten leiomyomas and adjacent myometria were obtained and analyzed by two‑dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Mass spectrometry was used for protein identification, and western blotting for 2-DE data validation. The values of ten cytoskeletal proteins were found to be significantly different: eight proteins were upregulated in the leiomyoma and two proteins were downregulated. Three of the upregulated proteins (myosin regulatory light polypeptide 9, four and a half LIM domains protein 1 and LIM and SH3 domain protein 1) are involved in cell migration, while downregulated protein transgelin is involved in replicative senescence. Myosin regulatory light polypeptide 9 (MYL9) was further validated by western blotting because it is considered to be a cell migration marker in several cancers and could play a key role in leiomyoma development. Our data demonstrate significant alterations in the expression of cytoskeletal proteins involved in leiomyoma growth. A better understanding of the involvement of cytoskeletal proteins in leiomyoma pathogenesis may contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets and the development of new pharmacological approaches.

  8. Phenotypic Analysis of Korean Patients with Abnormal Chromosomal Microarray in Patients with Unexplained Developmental Delay/Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jeong; Park, Chang Il; Lim, Jae Woo; Lee, Gyung Min; Cho, Eunhae; Kim, Hyon J

    2018-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate chromosomal microarray (CMA) and clinical data in patients with unexplained developmental delay/intellectual disability (DD/ID) accompanying dysmorphism, congenital anomalies, or epilepsy. We also aimed to evaluate phenotypic clues in patients with pathogenic copy number variants (CNVs). We collected clinical and CMA data from patients at Konyang University Hospital between September 2013 and October 2014. We included patients who had taken the CMA test to evaluate the etiology of unexplained DD/ID. All of the 50 patients identified had DD/ID. Thirty-nine patients had dysmorphism, 19 patients suffered from epilepsy, and 12 patients had congenital anomalies. Twenty-nine of the 50 patients (58%) showed abnormal results. Eighteen (36%) were considered to have pathogenic CNVs. Dysmorphism (p=0.028) was significantly higher in patients with pathogenic CNVs than in those with normal CMA. Two or more clinical features were presented by 61.9% (13/21) of the patients with normal CMA and by 83.3% (15/18) of the patients with pathogenic CMA. Dysmorphism can be a phenotypic clue to pathogenic CNVs. Furthermore, pathogenic CNV might be more frequently found if patients have two or more clinical features in addition to DD/ID. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2018.

  9. Association of abnormal morphology and altered gene expression in human preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Wells, Dagan; Bermúdez, Mercedes G; Steuerwald, Nury; Malter, Henry E; Thornhill, Alan R; Cohen, Jacques

    2005-08-01

    We set out to characterize the expression of nine genes in human preimplantation embryos and determine whether abnormal morphology is associated with altered gene activity. Reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction were used to quantify the expression of multiple genes in each embryo. The genes studied have various important cellular roles (e.g., cell cycle regulation, DNA repair, and apoptosis). Research laboratory working closely with a clinical IVF practice. Over 50 embryos were donated by infertile patients (various etiologies). Among these, all major stages of preimplantation development and a variety of common morphologic abnormalities were represented. None. Quantification of mRNA transcripts. We detected an association between certain forms of abnormal morphology and disturbances of gene activity. Cellular fragmentation was associated with altered expression of several genes, including TP53, suggesting that fragmenting blastomeres are suffering stress of a type monitored by p53, possibly as a consequence of suboptimal culture conditions. Appropriate gene expression is vital for the regulation of metabolic pathways and key developmental events. Our data indicates a possible causal relationship between changes in gene expression and the formation of clinically relevant abnormal embryo morphologies. We hypothesize that embryos with expression profiles characteristic of good morphology and appropriate for their developmental stage have the greatest potential for implantation. If confirmed, this could lead to a new generation of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) tests for assessing embryo viability and predicting implantation potential.

  10. Redox Abnormalities as a Vulnerability Phenotype for Autism and Related Alterations in CNS Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    M. (2005). Epigenetic overlap in autism -spectrum neurodevelopmental disorders: MECP2 deficiency causes reduced expression of UBE3A and GABRB3. Human...chronic oxidative stress may contribute to immune dysregulation in autism . 1. Introduction Autism is a behaviorally defined neurodevelopmental disor...and risk of autism spectrum disorders,” Journal of Neurodevelop - mental Disorders, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 132–143, 2011. [18] S. Biswas, A. S. Chida, and

  11. Associations between pituitary imaging abnormalities and clinical and biochemical phenotypes in children with congenital growth hormone deficiency: data from an international observational study.

    PubMed

    Deal, Cheri; Hasselmann, Caroline; Pfäffle, Roland W; Zimmermann, Alan G; Quigley, Charmian A; Child, Christopher J; Shavrikova, Elena P; Cutler, Gordon B; Blum, Werner F

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to investigate the etiology of growth hormone deficiency (GHD). This study examined relationships between MRI findings and clinical/hormonal phenotypes in children with GHD in the observational Genetics and Neuroendocrinology of Short Stature International Study, GeNeSIS. Clinical presentation, hormonal status and first-year GH response were compared between patients with pituitary imaging abnormalities (n = 1,071), patients with mutations in genes involved in pituitary development/GH secretion (n = 120) and patients with idiopathic GHD (n = 7,039). Patients with hypothalamic-pituitary abnormalities had more severe phenotypes than patients with idiopathic GHD. Additional hormonal deficiencies were found in 35% of patients with structural abnormalities (thyroid-stimulating hormone > adrenocorticotropic hormone > luteinizing hormone/follicle-stimulating hormone > antidiuretic hormone), most frequently in patients with septo-optic dysplasia (SOD). Patients with the triad [ectopic posterior pituitary (EPP), pituitary aplasia/hypoplasia and stalk defects] had a more severe phenotype and better response to GH treatment than patients with isolated abnormalities. The sex ratio was approximately equal for patients with SOD, but there was a significantly higher proportion of males (approximately 70%) in the EPP, pituitary hypoplasia, stalk defects, and triad categories. This large, international database demonstrates the value of classification of GH-deficient patients by the presence and type of hypothalamic-pituitary imaging abnormalities. This information may assist family counseling and patient management. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Expression of human PQBP-1 in Drosophila impairs long-term memory and induces abnormal courtship.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Natsue; Horiuchi, Daisuke; Shibata, Masao; Saitoe, Minoru; Qi, Mei-Ling; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2006-04-17

    Frame shift mutations of the polyglutamine binding protein-1 (PQBP1) gene lead to total or partial truncation of the C-terminal domain (CTD) and cause mental retardation in human patients. Interestingly, normal Drosophila homologue of PQBP-1 lacks CTD. As a model to analyze the molecular network of PQBP-1 affecting intelligence, we generated transgenic flies expressing human PQBP-1 with CTD. Pavlovian olfactory conditioning revealed that the transgenic flies showed disturbance of long-term memory. In addition, they showed abnormal courtship that male flies follow male flies. Abnormal functions of PQBP-1 or its binding partner might be linked to these symptoms.

  13. CAFE: an R package for the detection of gross chromosomal abnormalities from gene expression microarray data.

    PubMed

    Bollen, Sander; Leddin, Mathias; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Mah, Nancy

    2014-05-15

    The current methods available to detect chromosomal abnormalities from DNA microarray expression data are cumbersome and inflexible. CAFE has been developed to alleviate these issues. It is implemented as an R package that analyzes Affymetrix *.CEL files and comes with flexible plotting functions, easing visualization of chromosomal abnormalities. CAFE is available from https://bitbucket.org/cob87icW6z/cafe/ as both source and compiled packages for Linux and Windows. It is released under the GPL version 3 license. CAFE will also be freely available from Bioconductor. sander.h.bollen@gmail.com or nancy.mah@mdc-berlin.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  14. Correlation between CD34 expression and chromosomal abnormalities but not clinical outcome in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fruchart, C; Lenormand, B; Bastard, C; Boulet, D; Lesesve, J F; Callat, M P; Stamatoullas, A; Monconduit, M; Tilly, H

    1996-11-01

    The hemopoietic stem cell marker CD34 has been reported to be a useful predictor of treatment outcome in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Previous data suggested that CD34 expression may be associated with other poor prognosis factors in AML such as undifferentiated leukemia, secondary AML (SAML), and clonal abnormalities involving chromosome 5 and 7. In order to analyze the correlations between the clinicopathologic features, cytogenetic and CD34 expression in AML, we retrospectively investigated 99 patients with newly diagnosed AML: 85 with de novo disease and 14 with secondary AML (SAML). Eighty-six patients who received the same induction chemotherapy were available for clinical outcome. Defining a case as positive when > or = 20% of bone marrow cells collected at diagnosis expressed the CD34 antigen, forty-five patients were included in the CD34 positive group. Ninety patients had adequate cytogenetic analysis. Thirty-two patients (72%) with CD34 positive AML exhibited an abnormal karyotype whereas 15 patients (28%) with CD34 negative AML had abnormal metaphases (P < 0.01). Monosomy 7/7q- or monosomy 5/5q- occurred in 10 patients and 8 of them expressed the CD34 antigen (P < 0.05). All patients with t(8;21) which is considered as a favorable factor in AML had levels of CD34 >/= 20% (P < 0.05). We did not find any association between CD34 expression and attainment of complete remission, overall survival, or disease-free survival. In conclusion, the variations of CD34 expression in AML are correlated with cytogenetic abnormalities associated both with poor and favorable outcome. The evaluation of the correlations between CD34 antigen and clinical outcome in AML should take into account the results of pretreatment karyotype.

  15. Mice over-expressing BDNF in forebrain neurons develop an altered behavioral phenotype with age.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Kate L; Buenaventura, Diego F; Chadman, Kathryn K

    2014-07-15

    Evidence from clinical studies suggests that abnormal activity of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) contributes to the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). A genetically modified line of mice over-expressing a BDNF transgene in forebrain neurons was used to investigate if this mutation leads to changes in behavior consistent with ASD. The mice used in these experiments were behaviorally tested past 5 months of age when spontaneous seizures were evident. These seizures were not observed in age-matched wildtype (WT) mice or younger mice from this transgenic line. The BDNF mice in these experiments weighed less than their WT littermates. The BDNF transgenic (BDNF-tg) mice demonstrated similar levels of sociability in the social approach test. Conversely, the BDNF-tg mice demonstrated less obsessive compulsive-like behavior in the marble burying test, less anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze test, and less depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test. Changes in behavior were found in these older mice that have not been observed in younger mice from this transgenic line, which may be due to the development of seizures as the mice age. These mice do not have an ASD phenotype but may be useful to study adult onset epilepsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Abnormal expression of ephrin-A5 affects brain development of congenital hypothyroidism rats.

    PubMed

    Suo, Guihai; Shen, Feifei; Sun, Baolan; Song, Honghua; Xu, Meiyu; Wu, Youjia

    2018-05-14

    EphA5 and its ligand ephrin-A5 interaction can trigger synaptogenesis during early hippocampus development. We have previously reported that abnormal EphA5 expression can result in synaptogenesis disorder in congenital hypothyroidism (CH) rats. To better understand its precise molecular mechanism, we further analyzed the characteristics of ephrin-A5 expression in the hippocampus of CH rats. Our study revealed that ephrin-A5 expression was downregulated by thyroid hormone deficiency in the developing hippocampus and hippocampal neurons in rats. Thyroxine treatment for hypothyroid hippocampus and triiodothyronine treatment for hypothyroid hippocampal neurons significantly improved ephrin-A5 expression but could not restore its expression to control levels. Hypothyroid hippocampal neurons in-vitro showed synaptogenesis disorder characterized by a reduction in the number and length of neurites. Furthermore, the synaptogenesis-associated molecular expressions of NMDAR-1 (NR1), PSD95 and CaMKII were all downregulated correspondingly. These results suggest that ephrin-A5 expression may be decreased in CH, and abnormal activation of ephrin-A5/EphA5 signaling affects synaptogenesis during brain development. Such findings provide an important basis for exploring the pathogenesis of CH genetically.

  17. Phenotypic expression of the HLA-linked iron-loading gene in the Afrikaner population of the western Cape.

    PubMed

    Meyer, T E; Baynes, R D; Bothwell, T H; Jenkins, T; Ballot, D; Jooste, P L; Green, A; Du Toit, E; Jacobs, P

    1988-03-05

    A previous study conducted on a group of Afrikaans-speaking subjects in the south-western Cape indicated a high frequency (0.115) of the HLA-linked iron-loading gene which causes idiopathic haemochromatosis. The results of phenotypic and genotypic studies on the first degree relatives of identified homozygotes and heterozygotes are now reported. There was considerable heterogeneity of phenotypic expression in the group of heterozygotes, with overlap between the homozygous and heterozygous subjects. The heterozygous relatives of heterozygous index cases, who had been identified on the basis of a serum ferritin concentration greater than 400 micrograms/l, appeared to have more frequent and more marked abnormalities of iron measurements than the heterozygote relatives of homozygous index cases (serum ferritin value greater than 400 micrograms/l, percentage transferrin saturation greater than 60). This suggests that the screening test was identifying a group of more significantly affected heterozygotes, with biochemical abnormalities that overlapped with the identified homozygotes. The index cases were followed up over a period of 5 years and during this time the 7 subjects diagnosed as heterozygotes showed a progressive increase in serum ferritin concentrations, which suggests some iron accumulation. Individual pedigrees included instances of gene recombination within the major histocompatibility complex, and of probable false-positive genotype assignment. The overall results confirm a high frequency of the gene in this particular community.

  18. White blood cell count may identify abnormal cardiometabolic phenotype and preclinical organ damage in overweight/obese children.

    PubMed

    Di Bonito, P; Pacifico, L; Chiesa, C; Invitti, C; Miraglia Del Giudice, E; Baroni, M G; Moio, N; Pellegrin, M C; Tomat, M; Licenziati, M R; Manco, M; Maffeis, C; Valerio, G

    2016-06-01

    Subclinical inflammation is a central component of cardiometabolic disease risk in obese subjects. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether the white blood cell count (WBCc) may help to identify an abnormal cardiometabolic phenotype in overweight (Ow) or obese (Ob) children. A cross-sectional sample of 2835 Ow/Ob children and adolescents (age 6-18 years) was recruited from 10 Italian centers for the care of obesity. Anthropometric and biochemical variables were assessed in the overall sample. Waist to height ratio (WhtR), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lipids, 2 h post-load plasma glucose (2hPG), left ventricular (LV) geometry and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) were assessed in 2128, 2300, 1834, 535 and 315 children, respectively. Insulin resistance and whole body insulin sensitivity index (WBISI) were analyzed using homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) and Matsuda's test. Groups divided in quartiles of WBCc significantly differed for body mass index, WhtR, 2hPG, HOMA-IR, WBISI, lipids, ALT, cIMT, LV mass and relative wall thickness. Children with high WBCc (≥8700 cell/mm(3)) showed a 1.3-2.5 fold increased probability of having high normal 2hPG, high ALT, high cIMT, or LV remodeling/concentric LV hypertrophy, after adjustment for age, gender, pubertal status, BMI and centers. This study shows that WBCc is associated with early derangements of glucose metabolism and preclinical signs of liver, vascular and cardiac damage. The WBCc may be an effective and low-cost tool for identifying Ow and Ob children at the greatest risk of potential complications. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A community-based exercise intervention transitions metabolically abnormal obese adults to a metabolically healthy obese phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Dalleck, Lance C; Van Guilder, Gary P; Richardson, Tara B; Bredle, Donald L; Janot, Jeffrey M

    2014-01-01

    Background Lower habitual physical activity and poor cardiorespiratory fitness are common features of the metabolically abnormal obese (MAO) phenotype that contribute to increased cardiovascular disease risk. The aims of the present study were to determine 1) whether community-based exercise training transitions MAO adults to metabolically healthy, and 2) whether the odds of transition to metabolically healthy were larger for obese individuals who performed higher volumes of exercise and/or experienced greater increases in fitness. Methods and results Metabolic syndrome components were measured in 332 adults (190 women, 142 men) before and after a supervised 14-week community-based exercise program designed to reduce cardiometabolic risk factors. Obese (body mass index ≥30 kg · m2) adults with two to four metabolic syndrome components were classified as MAO, whereas those with no or one component were classified as metabolically healthy but obese (MHO). After community exercise, 27/68 (40%) MAO individuals (P<0.05) transitioned to metabolically healthy, increasing the total number of MHO persons by 73% (from 37 to 64). Compared with the lowest quartiles of relative energy expenditure and change in fitness, participants in the highest quartiles were 11.6 (95% confidence interval: 2.1–65.4; P<0.05) and 7.5 (95% confidence interval: 1.5–37.5; P<0.05) times more likely to transition from MAO to MHO, respectively. Conclusion Community-based exercise transitions MAO adults to metabolically healthy. MAO adults who engaged in higher volumes of exercise and experienced the greatest increase in fitness were significantly more likely to become metabolically healthy. Community exercise may be an effective model for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25120373

  20. Expression of Mutant Human DISC1 in Mice Supports Abnormalities in Differentiation of Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Katsel, Pavel; Tan, Weilun; Abazyan, Bagrat; Davis, Kenneth L; Ross, Christopher; Pletnikov, Mikhail V; Haroutunian, Vahram

    2011-01-01

    Abnormalities in oligodendrocyte (OLG) differentiation and OLG gene expression deficit have been described in schizophrenia (SZ). Recent studies revealed a critical requirement for Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) in neural development. Transgenic mice with forebrain restricted expression of mutant human DISC1 (ΔhDISC1) are characterized by neuroanatomical and behavioral abnormalities reminiscent of some features of SZ. We sought to determine whether the expression of ΔhDISC1 may influence the development of OLGs in this mouse model. OLG- and cell cycle-associated gene and protein expression were characterized in the forebrain of ΔhDISC1 mice during different stages of neurodevelopment (E15 and P1 days) and in adulthood. The results suggest that the expression of ΔhDISC1 exerts a significant influence on oligodendrocyte differentiation and function, evidenced by premature OLG differentiation and increased proliferation of their progenitors. Additional findings showed that neuregulin 1 and its receptors may be contributing factors to the observed upregulation of OLG genes. Thus, OLG function may be perturbed by mutant hDISC1 in a model system that provides new avenues for studying aspects of the pathogenesis of SZ. PMID:21605958

  1. Variable p-CREB expression depicts different asthma phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Chiappara, G; Chanez, P; Bruno, A; Pace, E; Pompeo, F; Bousquet, J; Bonsignore, G; Gjomarkaj, M

    2007-07-01

    Chromatin modification may play a role in inflammatory gene regulation in asthma. Cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate response element-binding protein (CREB), with the specific co-activator, the CREB-binding protein (CBP), contributes to the acetylation of chromatin and to the transcription of pro-inflammatory genes. To evaluate the expression of CBP and of phospho-CREB (p-CREB) in bronchial biopsies and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of controls (C), untreated (UA), inhaled steroid treated (ICS) and steroid-dependent asthmatic (SDA) patients. We used immunohistochemistry in bronchial biopsies and western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry in PBMC. Cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate response element-binding protein expression, in the epithelium was similar in all groups, while p-CREB expression was increased in UA and in SDA in comparison with ICS and C subjects (C vs UA P = 0.002, C vs SDA P = 0.007), (ICS vs SDA P = 0.005), (ICS vs UA P = 0.001). Interestingly, also in the submucosa, p-CREB was increased in UA and SDA in comparison with ICS and C subjects (C vs UA P = 0.0004) (C vs SDA P < 0.0001) (ICS vs UA P = 0.002) (ICS vs SDA P < 0.0001) and positively correlated with leukocyte infiltration within the bronchi (CD45RB+ cells). Similar results were obtained with PBMC isolated from the same patient groups. Incubation of PBMC in vitro, with fluticasone propionate, decreased the p-CREB expression induced by cytokine activation (interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha). This study demonstrates that the expression of p-CREB is related, in asthma, to the persistent inflammation according to the disease severity. p-CREB expression can be modulated by glucocorticoids in responsive patients.

  2. Environmental and genetic modulation of the phenotypic expression of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Dan I

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Antibiotic resistance can be acquired by mutation or horizontal transfer of a resistance gene, and generally an acquired mechanism results in a predictable increase in phenotypic resistance. However, recent findings suggest that the environment and/or the genetic context can modify the phenotypic expression of specific resistance genes/mutations. An important implication from these findings is that a given genotype does not always result in the expected phenotype. This dissociation of genotype and phenotype has important consequences for clinical bacteriology and for our ability to predict resistance phenotypes from genetics and DNA sequences. A related problem concerns the degree to which the genes/mutations currently identified in vitro can fully explain the in vivo resistance phenotype, or whether there is a significant additional amount of presently unknown mutations/genes (genetic ‘dark matter’) that could contribute to resistance in clinical isolates. Finally, a very important question is whether/how we can identify the genetic features that contribute to making a successful pathogen, and predict why some resistant clones are very successful and spread globally? In this review, we describe different environmental and genetic factors that influence phenotypic expression of antibiotic resistance genes/mutations and how this information is needed to understand why particular resistant clones spread worldwide and to what extent we can use DNA sequences to predict evolutionary success. PMID:28333270

  3. Neurovisceral phenotypes in the expression of psychiatric symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, Jessica A.; Owens, Andrew P.; Mathias, Christopher J.; Umeda, Satoshi; Critchley, Hugo D.

    2015-01-01

    This review explores the proposal that vulnerability to psychological symptoms, particularly anxiety, originates in constitutional differences in the control of bodily state, exemplified by a set of conditions that include Joint Hypermobility, Postural Tachycardia Syndrome and Vasovagal Syncope. Research is revealing how brain-body mechanisms underlie individual differences in psychophysiological reactivity that can be important for predicting, stratifying and treating individuals with anxiety disorders and related conditions. One common constitutional difference is Joint Hypermobility, in which there is an increased range of joint movement as a result of a variant of collagen. Joint hypermobility is over-represented in people with anxiety, mood and neurodevelopmental disorders. It is also linked to stress-sensitive medical conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia. Structural differences in “emotional” brain regions are reported in hypermobile individuals, and many people with joint hypermobility manifest autonomic abnormalities, typically Postural Tachycardia Syndrome. Enhanced heart rate reactivity during postural change and as recently recognized factors causing vasodilatation (as noted post-prandially, post-exertion and with heat) is characteristic of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, and there is a phenomenological overlap with anxiety disorders, which may be partially accounted for by exaggerated neural reactivity within ventromedial prefrontal cortex. People who experience Vasovagal Syncope, a heritable tendency to fainting induced by emotional challenges (and needle/blood phobia), are also more vulnerable to anxiety disorders. Neuroimaging implicates brainstem differences in vulnerability to faints, yet the structural integrity of the caudate nucleus appears important for the control of fainting frequency in relation to parasympathetic tone and anxiety. Together there is clinical and neuroanatomical evidence to

  4. Minos-insertion mutant of the Drosophila GBA gene homologue showed abnormal phenotypes of climbing ability, sleep and life span with accumulation of hydroxy-glucocerebroside.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Haruhisa; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ito, Kumpei; Takahara, Tsubasa; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Sakata, Kazuki; Ishida, Norio

    2017-05-30

    Gaucher's disease in humans is considered a deficiency of glucocerebrosidase (GlcCerase) that result in the accumulation of its substrate, glucocerebroside (GlcCer). Although mouse models of Gaucher's disease have been reported from several laboratories, these models are limited due to the perinatal lethality of GlcCerase gene. Here, we examined phenotypes of Drosophila melanogaster homologues genes of the human Gaucher's disease gene by using Minos insertion. One of two Minos insertion mutants to unknown function gene (CG31414) accumulates the hydroxy-GlcCer in whole body of Drosophila melanogaster. This mutant showed abnormal phenotypes of climbing ability and sleep, and short lifespan. These abnormal phenotypes are very similar to that of Gaucher's disease in human. In contrast, another Minos insertion mutant (CG31148) and its RNAi line did not show such severe phenotype as observed in CG31414 gene mutation. The data suggests that Drosophila CG31414 gene mutation might be useful for unraveling the molecular mechanism of Gaucher's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Abnormal proliferation of CD4- CD8+ gammadelta+ T cells with chromosome 6 anomaly: role of Fas ligand expression in spontaneous regression of the cells.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, N; Kitano, K; Ito, T; Nakazawa, T; Shimodaira, S; Ishida, F; Kiyosawa, K

    1999-04-01

    We report a case of granular lymphocyte proliferative disorder accompanied with hemolytic anemia and neutropenia. Phenotypes of the cells were T cell receptor gammadelta+ CD3+ CD4- CD8+ CD16+ CD56- CD57-. Southern blot analysis of T cell receptor beta and gamma chains demonstrated rearranged bands in both. Chromosomal analysis after IL-2 stimulation showed deletion of chromosome 6. Sorted gammadelta+ T cells showed an increase in Fas ligand expression compared with the levels in sorted alphabeta+ T cells. The expression of Fas ligand on these gammadelta+ T cells increased after IL-2 stimulation. The patient's anemia improved along with a decrease in granular lymphocyte count and disappearance of the abnormal karyotype without treatment. The expression of Fas ligand may be involved in spontaneous regression of granular lymphocyte proliferation with hemolytic anemia.

  6. Female phenotype and multiple abnormalities in sibs with a Y chromosome and partial X chromosome duplication: H--Y antigen and Xg blood group findings.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, R; Jenkins, T; Dawson, B; Wagner, J; Dewald, G; Koo, G C; Wachtel, S S

    1980-01-01

    A mentally retarded female child with multiple congenital abnormalities had an abnormal X chromosome and a Y chromosome; the karyotype was interpreted as 46,dup(X)(p21 leads to pter)Y. Prenatal chromosome studies in a later pregnancy indicated the same chromosomal abnormality in the fetus. The fetus and proband had normal female genitalia and ovarian tissue. H--Y antigen was virtually absent in both sibs, a finding consistent with the view that testis-determining genes of the Y chromosome may be suppressed by regulatory elements of the X. The abnormal X chromosome was present in the mother, the maternal grandmother, and a female sib: all were phenotypically normal and showed the karyotype 46,Xdup(X)(p21 leads to pter) with non-random inactivation of the abnormal X. Anomalous segregation of the Xga allele suggests that the Xg locus was involved in the inactivation process or that crossing-over at meiosis occurred. Images PMID:7193738

  7. Colorectal tumor molecular phenotype and miRNA: expression profiles and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Herrick, Jennifer S; Mullany, Lila E; Wolff, Erica; Hoffman, Michael D; Pellatt, Daniel F; Stevens, John R; Wolff, Roger K

    2016-08-01

    MiRNAs regulate gene expression by post-transcriptionally suppressing mRNA translation or by causing mRNA degradation. It has been proposed that unique miRNAs influence specific tumor molecular phenotype. In this paper, we test the hypotheses that miRNA expression differs by tumor molecular phenotype and that those differences may influence prognosis. Data come from population-based studies of colorectal cancer conducted in Utah and the Northern California Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. A total of 1893 carcinoma samples were run on the Agilent Human miRNA Microarray V19.0 containing 2006 miRNAs. We assessed differences in miRNA expression between TP53-mutated and non-mutated, KRAS-mutated and non-mutated, BRAF-mutated and non-mutated, CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) high and CIMP low, and microsatellite instability (MSI) and microsatellite stable (MSS) colon and rectal tumors. Using a Cox proportional hazard model we evaluated if those miRNAs differentially expressed by tumor phenotype influenced survival after adjusting for age, sex, and AJCC stage. There were 22 differentially expressed miRNAs for TP53-mutated colon tumors and 5 for TP53-mutated rectal tumors with a fold change of >1.49 (or <0.67). Additionally, 13 miRNAS were differentially expressed for KRAS-mutated rectal tumors, 8 differentially expressed miRNAs for colon CIMP high tumors, and 2 differentially expressed miRNAs for BRAF-mutated colon tumors. The majority of differentially expressed miRNAS were observed between MSI and MSS tumors (94 differentially expressed miRNAs for colon; 41 differentially expressed miRNAs for rectal tumors). Of these miRNAs differentially expressed between MSI and MSS tumors, the majority were downregulated. Ten of the differentially expressed miRNAs were associated with survival; after adjustment for MSI status, five miRNAS, miR-196b-5p, miR-31-5p, miR-99b-5p, miR-636, and miR-192-3p, were significantly associated with survival. In summary, it appears that

  8. Cryptic deletions and inversions of chromosome 21 in a phenotypically normal infant with transient abnormal myelopoiesis: a molecular cytogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Kempski, H M; Craze, J L; Chessells, J M; Reeves, B R

    1998-11-01

    A case of transient abnormal myelopoiesis in a normal newborn without features of Down syndrome is described. The majority of bone marrow cells analysed belonged to a chromosomally abnormal clone with trisomy for chromosomes 18 and 21. Complex intrachromosomal rearrangements of one chromosome 21, demonstrated by fluorescence in situ hybridization using locus-specific probes, were found in a minor population of the clonal cells. These rearrangements involved loci previously shown to be rearranged in the leukaemic cells from patients with Down syndrome and leukaemia. However, the child's myeloproliferation resolved rapidly, with disappearance of the abnormal clone, and 3.5 years later she remains well.

  9. Neurochemical phenotype of cytoglobin-expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, Jens

    2014-09-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb), a novel oxygen-binding protein, is expressed in the majority of tissues and has been proposed to function in nitric oxide (NO) metabolism in the vasculature and to have cytoprotective properties. However, the overall functions of Cygb remain elusive. Cygb is also expressed in a subpopulation of brain neurons. Recently, it has been shown that stress upregulates Cygb expression in the brain and the majority of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-positive neurons, an enzyme that produces NO, co-express Cygb. However, there are more neurons expressing Cygb than nNOS, thus a large number of Cygb neurons remain uncharacterized by the neurochemical content. The aim of the present study was to provide an additional and more detailed neurochemical phenotype of Cygb-expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus. The rat hippocampus was chosen due to the abundance of Cygb, as well as this limbic structure being an important target in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Using triple immunohistochemistry, it was demonstrated that nearly all the parvalbumin- and heme oxygenase 1-positive neurons co-express Cygb and to a large extent, these neuron populations are distinct from the population of Cygb neurons co-expressing nNOS. Furthermore, it was shown that the majority of neurons expressing somastostatin and vasoactive intestinal peptide also co-express Cygb and nNOS. Detailed information regarding the neurochemical phenotype of Cygb neurons in the hippocampus can be a valuable tool in determining the function of Cygb in the brain.

  10. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding Is Associated With Increased BMP7 Expression in Human Endometrium.

    PubMed

    Richards, Elliott G; El-Nashar, Sherif A; Schoolmeester, John K; Keeney, Gary L; Mariani, Andrea; Hopkins, Matthew R; Dowdy, Sean C; Daftary, Gaurang S; Famuyide, Abimbola O

    2017-05-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB), a common health concern of women, is a heterogeneous clinical entity that is traditionally categorized into organic and nonorganic causes. Despite varied pharmacologic treatments, few offer sustained efficacy, as most are empiric, unfocused, and do not directly address underlying dysregulated molecular mechanisms. Characterization of such molecular derangements affords the opportunity to develop and use novel, more successful treatments for AUB. Given its implication in other organ systems, we hypothesized that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) expression is altered in patients with AUB and hence comprehensively investigated dysregulation of BMP signaling pathways by systematically screening 489 samples from 365 patients for differences in the expression of BMP2, 4, 6, and 7 ligands, BMPR1A and B receptors, and downstream SMAD4, 6, and 7 proteins. Expression analysis was correlated clinically with data abstracted from medical records, including bleeding history, age at procedure, ethnicity, body mass index, hormone treatment, and histological diagnosis of fibroids, polyps, adenomyosis, hyperplasia, and cancer. Expression of BMP7 ligand was significantly increased in patients with AUB (H-score: 18.0 vs 26.7; P < .0001). Patients reporting heavy menstrual bleeding (menorrhagia) as their specific AUB pattern demonstrated significantly higher BMP7 expression. Significantly, no differences in the expression of any other BMP ligands, receptors, or SMAD proteins were observed in this large patient cohort. However, expression of BMPR1A, BMPR1B, and SMAD4 was significantly decreased in cancer compared to benign samples. Our study demonstrates that BMP7 is a promising target for future investigation and pharmacologic treatment of AUB.

  11. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase enzymes in endometrium of women with abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Grzechocinska, Barbara; Dabrowski, Filip A; Chlebus, Marcin; Gondek, Agata; Czarzasta, Katarzyna; Michalowski, Lukasz; Cudnoch-Jedrzejewska, Agnieszka; Wielgos, Miroslaw

    2018-02-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is caused by derangement of physiological processes of tissue growth, shedding and regeneration. It is known that interplay between metalloproteinases (MMP's) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP's) may play a crucial role in its occurrence. To define if expression of proMMP-2, MMP-2 and TIMP-1 in endometrium of women with AUB is dependent on steroid sex hormone concentration and histopathological picture. Endometrial scraps were taken from 21 women with AUB and 19 controls. Samples were evaluated in light microscopy by a certified pathologist. Activity of proMMP-2 and MMP-2 proteins levels were evaluated by gelatin zymography and TIMP-1 by reversed zymography. The results has been correlated with serum estradiol and progesterone concentrations in linear regression model. Expression: of proMMP-2 in endometrium of women with AUB is correlated with estradiol concentration and inversely correlated with progesterone levels. It was significantly higher in women with dysfunctional endometrium (p<0.001). Expression of MMP-2 was highest in women with endometrial polyps and longer bleeding (p<0.01), while expression of TIMP-1 was independent from hormone concentration. Lack of correlation between proMMP-2 and MMP-2 levels suggest different pathway of their activation in AUB. ProMMP-2 is up regulated by estradiol and down regulated by progesterone while MMP-2 levels increase with the length of bleeding.

  12. GEOGLE: context mining tool for the correlation between gene expression and the phenotypic distinction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao; Tu, Kang; Zheng, Siyuan; Li, Yun; Ding, Guohui; Ping, Jie; Hao, Pei; Li, Yixue

    2009-08-25

    In the post-genomic era, the development of high-throughput gene expression detection technology provides huge amounts of experimental data, which challenges the traditional pipelines for data processing and analyzing in scientific researches. In our work, we integrated gene expression information from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), biomedical ontology from Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and signaling pathway knowledge from sigPathway entries to develop a context mining tool for gene expression analysis - GEOGLE. GEOGLE offers a rapid and convenient way for searching relevant experimental datasets, pathways and biological terms according to multiple types of queries: including biomedical vocabularies, GDS IDs, gene IDs, pathway names and signature list. Moreover, GEOGLE summarizes the signature genes from a subset of GDSes and estimates the correlation between gene expression and the phenotypic distinction with an integrated p value. This approach performing global searching of expression data may expand the traditional way of collecting heterogeneous gene expression experiment data. GEOGLE is a novel tool that provides researchers a quantitative way to understand the correlation between gene expression and phenotypic distinction through meta-analysis of gene expression datasets from different experiments, as well as the biological meaning behind. The web site and user guide of GEOGLE are available at: http://omics.biosino.org:14000/kweb/workflow.jsp?id=00020.

  13. Endothelial and Epithelial Cell Transition to a Mesenchymal Phenotype Was Delineated by Nestin Expression.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Andréanne; Hertig, Vanessa; Boscher, Elena; Nguyen, Quang Trinh; Boivin, Benoît; Chebli, Jasmine; Bissonnette, Lyse; Villeneuve, Louis; Brochiero, Emmanuelle; Dupuis, Jocelyn; Calderone, Angelino

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial and epithelial cell transition to a mesenchymal phenotype was identified as cellular paradigms implicated in the appearance of fibroblasts and development of reactive fibrosis in interstitial lung disease. The intermediate filament protein nestin was highly expressed in fibrotic tissue, detected in fibroblasts and participated in proliferation and migration. The present study tested the hypothesis that the transition of endothelial and epithelial cells to a mesenchymal phenotype was delineated by nestin expression. Three weeks following hypobaric hypoxia, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats characterized by alveolar and perivascular lung fibrosis were associated with increased nestin protein and mRNA levels and marked appearance of nestin/collagen type I((+))-fibroblasts. In the perivascular region of hypobaric hypoxic rats, displaced CD31((+))-endothelial cells were detected, exhibited a mesenchymal phenotype and co-expressed nestin. Likewise, epithelial cells in the lungs of hypobaric hypoxic rats transitioned to a mesenchymal phenotype distinguished by the co-expression of E-cadherin and collagen. Following the removal of FBS from primary passage rat alveolar epithelial cells, TGF-β1 was detected in the media and a subpopulation acquired a mesenchymal phenotype characterized by E-cadherin downregulation and concomitant induction of collagen and nestin. Bone morphogenic protein-7 treatment of alveolar epithelial cells prevented E-cadherin downregulation, suppressed collagen induction but partially inhibited nestin expression. These data support the premise that the transition of endothelial and epithelial cells to a mesenchymal cell may have contributed in part to the appearance nestin/collagen type I((+))-fibroblasts and the reactive fibrotic response in the lungs of hypobaric hypoxic rats. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Association of Cigarette Smoking and microRNA Expression in Rectal Cancer: Insight into Tumor Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Mullany, Lila E.; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Wolff, Roger K.; Stevens, John R.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is known to influence messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. As microRNAs (miRNAs) are known repressors of mRNAs, we hypothesize that smoking may influence miRNA expression, thus altering mRNA expression. Our sample consisted of 1447 CRC cases that had normal colorectal mucosa and carcinoma miRNA data and lifestyle data. We examined current smoking, current versus never and former versus never (C/F/N) smoking1, and pack-years smoked with miRNA expression in normal mucosa as well as differential miRNA expression between paired normal and carcinoma tissue for colon and rectal tissue to determine associations between smoking and miRNA expression. We adjusted for multiple comparisons using the Benjamini Hochberg false discovery rate (FDR). Significant associations were seen for rectal differential miRNA expression only. We analyzed miRNAs significantly associated with smoking with CIMP and MSI status, using a polytomous logistic regression. Two hundred and thirty-one miRNAs were differentially expressed with current smoking, 172 with C/F/N, and 206 with pack-years smoked; 111 were associated with all three. Forty-three miRNAs were unique to current smoking, 14 were unique to C/F/N and 57 were unique to pack years smoked. Of the 306 unique miRNAs associated with cigarette smoking, 41 were inversely associated and 200 were directly associated with CIMP high or MSI tumor molecular phenotype for either colon or rectal cancer. Our results suggest that cigarette smoking can alter miRNA expression and, given associations with CIMP high and MSI tumor molecular phenotype, it is possible that smoking influences tumor phenotype through altered miRNA expression. PMID:27780077

  15. Expanding the spectrum of phenotypes associated with germline PIGA mutations: a child with developmental delay, accelerated linear growth, facial dysmorphisms, elevated alkaline phosphatase, and progressive CNS abnormalities.

    PubMed

    van der Crabben, Saskia N; Harakalova, Magdalena; Brilstra, Eva H; van Berkestijn, Frédérique M C; Hofstede, Floris C; van Vught, Adrianus J; Cuppen, Edwin; Kloosterman, Wigard; Ploos van Amstel, Hans Kristian; van Haaften, Gijs; van Haelst, Mieke M

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidyl inositol glycan (PIG) enzyme subclasses are involved in distinct steps of glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol anchor protein biosynthesis. Glycolsyl phosphatidyl inositol-anchored proteins have heterogeneous functions; they can function as enzymes, adhesion molecules, complement regulators and co-receptors in signal transduction pathways. Germline mutations in genes encoding different members of the PIG family result in diverse conditions with (severe) developmental delay, (neonatal) seizures, hypotonia, CNS abnormalities, growth abnormalities, and congenital abnormalities as hallmark features. The variability of clinical features resembles the typical diversity of other glycosylation pathway deficiencies such as the congenital disorders of glycosylation. Here, we report the first germline missense mutation in the PIGA gene associated with accelerated linear growth, obesity, central hypotonia, severe refractory epilepsy, cardiac anomalies, mild facial dysmorphic features, mildly elevated alkaline phosphatase levels, and CNS anomalies consisting of progressive cerebral atrophy, insufficient myelinization, and cortical MRI signal abnormalities. X-exome sequencing in the proband identified a c.278C>T (p.Pro93Leu) mutation in the PIGA gene. The mother and maternal grandmother were unaffected carriers and the mother showed 100% skewing of the X-chromosome harboring the mutation. These results together with the clinical similarity of the patient reported here and the previously reported patients with a germline nonsense mutation in PIGA support the determination that this mutation caused the phenotype in this family. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Brain regions with abnormal network properties in severe epilepsy of Lennox-Gastaut phenotype: Multivariate analysis of task-free fMRI.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Mangor; Curwood, Evan K; Archer, John S; Abbott, David F; Jackson, Graeme D

    2015-11-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, and the similar but less tightly defined Lennox-Gastaut phenotype, describe patients with severe epilepsy, generalized epileptic discharges, and variable intellectual disability. Our previous functional neuroimaging studies suggest that abnormal diffuse association network activity underlies the epileptic discharges of this clinical phenotype. Herein we use a data-driven multivariate approach to determine the spatial changes in local and global networks of patients with severe epilepsy of the Lennox-Gastaut phenotype. We studied 9 adult patients and 14 controls. In 20 min of task-free blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging data, two metrics of functional connectivity were studied: Regional homogeneity or local connectivity, a measure of concordance between each voxel to a focal cluster of adjacent voxels; and eigenvector centrality, a global connectivity estimate designed to detect important neural hubs. Multivariate pattern analysis of these data in a machine-learning framework was used to identify spatial features that classified disease subjects. Multivariate pattern analysis was 95.7% accurate in classifying subjects for both local and global connectivity measures (22/23 subjects correctly classified). Maximal discriminating features were the following: increased local connectivity in frontoinsular and intraparietal areas; increased global connectivity in posterior association areas; decreased local connectivity in sensory (visual and auditory) and medial frontal cortices; and decreased global connectivity in the cingulate cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and pons. Using a data-driven analysis method in task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show increased connectivity in critical areas of association cortex and decreased connectivity in primary cortex. This supports previous findings of a critical role for these association cortical regions as a final common pathway in generating the Lennox

  17. Impaired leptin expression and abnormal response to fasting in corticotropin-releasing hormone-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyeong-Hoon; Sakihara, Satoru; Widmaier, Eric P; Majzoub, Joseph A

    2004-07-01

    Leptin has been postulated to comprise part of an adipostat, whereby during states of excessive energy storage, elevated levels of the hormone prevent further weight gain by inhibiting appetite. A physiological role for leptin in this regard remains unclear because the presence of excessive food, and therefore the need to restrain overeating under natural conditions, is doubtful. We have previously shown that CRH-deficient (Crh(-/-)) mice have glucocorticoid insufficiency and lack the fasting-induced increase in glucocorticoid, a hormone important in stimulating leptin synthesis and secretion. We hypothesized that these mice might have low circulating leptin. Indeed, Crh(-/-) mice exhibited no diurnal variation of leptin, whereas normal littermates showed a clear rhythm, and their leptin levels were lower than their counterparts. A continuous peripheral CRH infusion to Crh(-/-) mice not only restored corticosterone levels, but it also increased leptin expression to normal. Surprisingly, 36 h of fasting elevated leptin levels in Crh(-/-) mice, rather than falling as in normal mice. This abnormal leptin change during fasting in Crh(-/-) mice was corrected by corticosterone replacement. Furthermore, Crh(-/-) mice lost less body weight during 24 h of fasting and ate less food during refeeding than normal littermates. Taken together, we conclude that glucocorticoid insufficiency in Crh(-/-) mice results in impaired leptin production as well as an abnormal increase in leptin during fasting, and propose that the fast-induced physiological reduction in leptin may play an important role to stimulate food intake during the recovery from fasting.

  18. Gene expression abnormalities in histologically normal breast epithelium from patients with luminal type of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zubor, Pavol; Hatok, Jozef; Moricova, Petra; Kajo, Karol; Kapustova, Ivana; Mendelova, Andrea; Racay, Peter; Danko, Jan

    2015-05-01

    The gene expression profile of breast cancer has been described as a great breakthrough on the way to comprehend differences in cancer origin, behavior and therapy. However, gene expression profile in histologically normal epithelium (HNEpi) which could harbor genetic abnormalities predisposing breast tissue to develop malignancy was minor scope for scientists in the past. Thus, we aimed to analyze gene expressions in HNEpi and breast cancer tissue (BCTis) in order to establish its value as potential diagnostic marker for cancer development. We evaluated a panel of disease-specific genes in luminal type (A/B) of breast cancer and tumor surrounding HNEpi by qRT-PCR Array in 32 microdissected samples. There was 20.2 and 2.4% deregulation rate in genes with at least 2-fold or 5-fold over-expression between luminal (A/B) type breast carcinomas and tumor surrounding HNEpi, respectively. The high-grade luminal carcinomas showed higher number of deregulated genes compared to low-grade cases (50.6 vs. 23.8% with at least 2-fold deregulation rate). The main overexpressed genes in HNEpi were KLK5, SCGB1D2, GSN, EGFR and NGFR. The significant differences in gene expression between BCTis and HNEpi samples were revealed for BAG1, C3, CCNA2, CD44, FGF1, FOSL1, ID2, IL6R, NGFB, NGFR, PAPPA, PLAU, SERPINB5, THBS1 and TP53 gene (p < 0.05) and BCL2L2, CTSB, ITGB4, JUN, KIT, KLF5, SCGB1D2, SCGB2A1, SERPINE1 (p < 0.01), and EGFR, GABRP, GSN, MAP2K7 and THBS2 (p < 0.001), and GSN, KLK5 (p < 0.0001). The ontological gene analyses revealed high deregulations in gene group directly associated with breast cancer prognosis and origin.

  19. Geometric Morphometrics on Gene Expression Patterns Within Phenotypes: A Case Example on Limb Development

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Mateu, Roger; Niksic, Martina; Russo, Lucia; Sharpe, James

    2016-01-01

    How the genotype translates into the phenotype through development is critical to fully understand the evolution of phenotypes. We propose a novel approach to directly assess how changes in gene expression patterns are associated with changes in morphology using the limb as a case example. Our method combines molecular biology techniques, such as whole-mount in situ hybridization, with image and shape analysis, extending the use of Geometric Morphometrics to the analysis of nonanatomical shapes, such as gene expression domains. Elliptical Fourier and Procrustes-based semilandmark analyses were used to analyze the variation and covariation patterns of the limb bud shape with the expression patterns of two relevant genes for limb morphogenesis, Hoxa11 and Hoxa13. We devised a multiple thresholding method to semiautomatically segment gene domains at several expression levels in large samples of limb buds from C57Bl6 mouse embryos between 10 and 12 postfertilization days. Besides providing an accurate phenotyping tool to quantify the spatiotemporal dynamics of gene expression patterns within developing structures, our morphometric analyses revealed high, non-random, and gene-specific variation undergoing canalization during limb development. Our results demonstrate that Hoxa11 and Hoxa13, despite being paralogs with analogous functions in limb patterning, show clearly distinct dynamic patterns, both in shape and size, and are associated differently with the limb bud shape. The correspondence between our results and already well-established molecular processes underlying limb development confirms that this morphometric approach is a powerful tool to extract features of development regulating morphogenesis. Such multilevel analyses are promising in systems where not so much molecular information is available and will advance our understanding of the genotype–phenotype map. In systematics, this knowledge will increase our ability to infer how evolution modified a common

  20. Customized Molecular Phenotyping by Quantitative Gene Expression and Pattern Recognition Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Akilesh, Shreeram; Shaffer, Daniel J.; Roopenian, Derry

    2003-01-01

    Description of the molecular phenotypes of pathobiological processes in vivo is a pressing need in genomic biology. We have implemented a high-throughput real-time PCR strategy to establish quantitative expression profiles of a customized set of target genes. It enables rapid, reproducible data acquisition from limited quantities of RNA, permitting serial sampling of mouse blood during disease progression. We developed an easy to use statistical algorithm—Global Pattern Recognition—to readily identify genes whose expression has changed significantly from healthy baseline profiles. This approach provides unique molecular signatures for rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and graft versus host disease, and can also be applied to defining the molecular phenotype of a variety of other normal and pathological processes. PMID:12840047

  1. Prenatal exposure to phencyclidine produces abnormal behaviour and NMDA receptor expression in postpubertal mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lingling; Mamiya, Takayoshi; Lu, Ping; Toriumi, Kazuya; Mouri, Akihiro; Hiramatsu, Masayuki; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Zou, Li-Bo; Nagai, Taku; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2010-08-01

    Several studies have shown the disruptive effects of non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists on neurobehavioural development. Based on the neurodevelopment hypothesis of schizophrenia, there is growing interest in animal models treated with NMDA antagonists at developing stages to investigate the pathogenesis of psychological disturbances in humans. Previous studies have reported that perinatal treatment with phencyclidine (PCP) impairs the development of neuronal systems and induces schizophrenia-like behaviour. However, the adverse effects of prenatal exposure to PCP on behaviour and the function of NMDA receptors are not well understood. This study investigated the long-term effects of prenatal exposure to PCP in mice. The prenatal PCP-treated mice showed hypersensitivity to a low dose of PCP in locomotor activity and impairment of recognition memory in the novel object recognition test at age 7 wk. Meanwhile, the prenatal exposure reduced the phosphorylation of NR1, although it increased the expression of NR1 itself. Furthermore, these behavioural changes were attenuated by atypical antipsychotic treatment. Taken together, prenatal exposure to PCP produced long-lasting behavioural deficits, accompanied by the abnormal expression and dysfunction of NMDA receptors in postpubertal mice. It is worth investigating the influences of disrupted NMDA receptors during the prenatal period on behaviour in later life.

  2. The spectrum of renal involvement in male patients with infertility related to excretory-system abnormalities: phenotypes, genotypes, and genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Mieusset, Roger; Fauquet, Isabelle; Chauveau, Dominique; Monteil, Laetitia; Chassaing, Nicolas; Daudin, Myriam; Huart, Antoine; Isus, François; Prouheze, Cathy; Calvas, Patrick; Bieth, Eric; Bujan, Louis; Faguer, Stanislas

    2017-04-01

    While reproductive technologies are increasingly used worldwide, epidemiologic, clinical and genetic data regarding infertile men with combined genital tract and renal abnormalities remain scarce, preventing adequate genetic counseling. In a cohort-based study, we assessed the prevalence (1995-2014) and the clinical characteristics of renal disorders in infertile males with genital tract malformation. In a subset of 34 patients, we performed a detailed phenotype analysis of renal and genital tract disorders. Among the 180 patients with congenital uni- or bilateral absence of vas deferens (CU/BAVD), 45 (25 %) had a renal malformation. We also identified 14 infertile men with combined seminal vesicle (SV) and renal malformation but no CU/BAVD. Among the 34 patients with detailed clinical description, renal disease was unknown before the assessment of the infertility in 27 (79.4 %), and 7 (20.6 %) had chronic renal failure. Four main renal phenotypes were observed: solitary kidney (47 %); autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD, 0.6 %); uni- or bilateral hypoplastic kidneys (20.6 %); and a complex renal phenotype associated with a mutation of the HNF1B gene (5.8 %). Absence of SV and azoospermia were significantly associated with the presence of a solitary kidney, while dilatation of SV and necroasthenozoospermia were suggestive of ADPKD. A dominantly inherited renal disease (ADPKD or HNF1B-related nephropathy) is frequent in males with infertility and combined renal and genital tract abnormalities (26 %). A systematic renal screening should be proposed in infertile males with CU/BAVD or SV disorders.

  3. Meta-analysis of the prognostic value of abnormally expressed lncRNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhen; Yuan, Chun-Hui; Yin, Chang-Qing; Guan, Qing; Chen, Hao; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Many long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been reported to be abnormally expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and may have the potential to serve as prognostic markers. In this study, a meta-analysis was conducted to systematically evaluate the prognostic value of various lncRNAs in HCC. Eligible literatures were systematically collected from PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library (up to December 30, 2015). The main outcomes including overall survival, relapse-free survival, and disease-free survival were analyzed. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using random- or fixed-effects models. A total of 2,991 patients with HCC in People's Republic of China from 27 studies were included in the analysis. The level of lncRNAs showed a significant association with clinical outcomes. Abnormally elevated lncRNA transcription level predicted poor overall survival (HR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.20-2.34, P=0.002; I (2)=75.5%, P=0.000) and relapse-free survival (HR: 2.08, 95% CI: 1.65-2.61, P<0.001; I (2)=24.0%, P=0.215), while no association was observed with disease-free survival of HCC patients (HR: 1.39, 95% CI: 0.51-3.78, P=0.524; I (2)=81.3%, P=0.005). Subgroup analysis further showed that lncRNA transcription level was significantly associated with tumor size (relative risk [RR]: 1.19, 95% CI: 1.01-1.39, P=0.035), microvascular invasion (RR: 1.44, 95% CI: 1.10-1.89, P=0.009), and portal vein tumor thrombus (RR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.03-2.20, P=0.036). Publication bias and sensitivity analysis further confirmed the stability of our results. Our present meta-analysis indicates that abnormal lncRNA transcription level may serve as a promising indicator for prognostic evaluation of patients with HCC in People's Republic of China.

  4. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of transgenic wheat and sorghum events expressing the barley alanine aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Peña, Pamela A; Quach, Truyen; Sato, Shirley; Ge, Zhengxiang; Nersesian, Natalya; Dweikat, Ismail M; Soundararajan, Madhavan; Clemente, Tom

    2017-12-01

    The expression of a barley alanine aminotransferase gene impacts agronomic outcomes in a C3 crop, wheat. The use of nitrogen-based fertilizers has become one of the major agronomic inputs in crop production systems. Strategies to enhance nitrogen assimilation and flux in planta are being pursued through the introduction of novel genetic alleles. Here an Agrobacterium-mediated approach was employed to introduce the alanine aminotransferase from barley (Hordeum vulgare), HvAlaAT, into wheat (Triticum aestivum) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), regulated by either constitutive or root preferred promoter elements. Plants harboring the transgenic HvAlaAT alleles displayed increased alanine aminotransferase (alt) activity. The enhanced alt activity impacted height, tillering and significantly boosted vegetative biomass relative to controls in wheat evaluated under hydroponic conditions, where the phenotypic outcome across these parameters varied relative to time of year study was conducted. Constitutive expression of HvAlaAT translated to elevation in wheat grain yield under field conditions. In sorghum, expression of HvAlaAT enhanced enzymatic activity, but no changes in phenotypic outcomes were observed. Taken together these results suggest that positive agronomic outcomes can be achieved through enhanced alt activity in a C3 crop, wheat. However, the variability observed across experiments under greenhouse conditions implies the phenotypic outcomes imparted by the HvAlaAT allele in wheat may be impacted by environment.

  5. Expression of regulatory proteins and proliferative activity in relation to phenotypic characteristics of upper urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dolićanin, Zana; Velicković, Ljubinka Janković; Djordjević, Biljana; Visnjić, Milan; Pesić, Ivana; Ristić, Ana; Marjanović, Vesna

    2011-07-01

    Deregulation of the normal cell cycle is common in upper urothelial carcinoma (UUC). The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of regulatory proteins of the cell cycle (p53, p16, cyclin D1, HER-2) and proliferative Ki-67 activity in UUC, and to determine their interaction and influence on the phenotypic characteristics of UUC. In 44 patients with UUC, histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses (p53, p16, cyclin D1, HER-2, and Ki-67) of tumors were done. Overexpression/altered expression of p53, p16, cyclin D1 or HER-2 was detected in 20%, 57%, 64%, and 57% of tumors, respectively. Eleven (25%) UUC had a high proliferative Ki-67 index. Forty patients (91%) had at least one marker altered, while four (9%) tumors had a wild-type status. Analysis of relationship between expressions of molecular markers showed that only high expression of p53 was significantly associated with altered p16 activity (p < 0.05). High Ki-67 index was associated with the high stage (p < 0.005), solid growth (p < 0.01), high grade (p < 0.05), and multifocality p < 0.05) of UUC, while high expression of p53 was associated with the solid growth (p < 0.05). In regression models that included all molecular markers and phenotypic characteristics, only Ki-67 correlated with the growth (p < 0.0001), stage (p < 0.01), grade (p < 0.05) and multifocality (p < 0.05) of UCC; (Ki-67 and HER-2 expression correlated with the lymphovascular invasion (p < 0.05). This investigation showed that only negative regulatory proteins of the cell cycle, p53 and p16, were significantly associated in UUC, while proliferative marker Ki-67 was in relation to the key phenotypic characteristics of UUC in the best way.

  6. Expression of EGFP and NPTII protein is not associated with organ abnormalities in deceased transgenic cloned cattle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Wu, Qian; Cui, Huiting; Li, Qinghe; Zhao, Yiqiang; Luo, Juan; Liu, Qiuyue; Sun, Xiuzhu; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Lei; Dai, Yunping; Li, Ning

    2008-12-01

    Both enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) and neomycin phosphotransferase type II enzyme (NPTII) are widely used in transgenic studies, but their side effects have not been extensively investigated. In this study, we evaluated the expression profiles of the two marker genes and the relationship between their expression and organ abnormalities. Eight transgenic cloned cattle were studied, four harboring both EGFP and NPTII, and four harboring only the NPTII gene. Four age-matched cloned cattle were used as controls. EGFP and NPTII expression were measured and detected by Q-PCR, Western blot, ELISA, and RIA in heart, liver, and lungs, and the values ranged from 0.3 to 5 microg/g. The expression profiles exhibited differential or mosaic pattern between the organs, the pathologic symptoms of which were identified, but were similar to those of age-matched cloned cattle. All data indicated that the expression of EGFP and NPTII is not associated with organ abnormalities in transgenic cloned cattle.

  7. Leptospira interrogans induces uterine inflammatory responses and abnormal expression of extracellular matrix proteins in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Gao, Xuejiao; Guo, Mengyao; Zhang, Wenlong; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Zecai; Jiang, Haichao; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans), a worldwide zoonosis, infect humans and animals. In dogs, four syndromes caused by leptospirosis have been identified: icteric, hemorrhagic, uremic (Stuttgart disease) and reproductive (abortion and premature or weak pups), and also it caused inflammation. Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex mixture of matrix molecules that is crucial to the reproduction. Both inflammatory response and ECM are closed relative to reproductive. The aim of this study was to clarify how L. interrogans affected the uterus of dogs, by focusing on the inflammatory responses, and ECM expression in dogs uterine tissue infected by L. interrogans. In the present study, 27 dogs were divided into 3 groups, intrauterine infusion with L. interrogans, to make uterine infection, sterile EMJH, and normal saline as a control, respectively. The uteruses were removed by surgical operation in 10, 20, and 30 days, respectively. The methods of histopathological analysis, ELISA, Western blot and qPCR were used. The results showed that L. interrogans induced significantly inflammatory responses, which were characterized by inflammatory cellular infiltration and high expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in uterine tissue of these dogs. Furthermore, L. interrogans strongly down-regulated the expression of ECM (collagens (CL) IV, fibronectins (FN) and laminins (LN)) in mRNA and protein levels. These data indicated that strongly inflammatory responses, and abnormal regulation of ECM might contribute to the proliferation of dogs infected by L. interrogans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Gelam honey potentiates ex vivo corneal keratocytes proliferation with desirable phenotype expression.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Alia Md; Abd Ghafar, Norzana; Kamarudin, Taty Anna; Hui, Chua Kien; Yusof, Yasmin Anum Mohd

    2016-02-24

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Gelam honey on corneal keratocytes proliferative capacity and phenotypic characterization via MTT assay, gene expression and immunocytochemistry. Corneal keratocytes from New Zealand white rabbits were cultured in basal medium (BM) and serum enriched medium (BMS). Serial dilutions of Gelam honey (GH) were added to both media and cells were cultured until passage 1. MTT assay was performed on corneal keratocytes in both media to ascertain the optimal dose of GH that produced maximum proliferation. Gelam honey at the concentration of 0.0015% in both media showed the highest proliferative capacity with no morphological changes compared to their respective controls. The gene expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), a marker for quiescent keratocytes and vimentin, a marker for fibroblast, were higher in the GH enriched groups. The alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, marker for myofibroblast, was lower in GH treated groups compared to the controls. Immunocytochemistry results were in accordance to the gene expression analyses. Gelam honey at a concentration of 0.0015% promotes ex vivo corneal keratocytes proliferation while retaining desirable phenotype expression. The results serve as a basis for the development of Gelam honey as a potential natural product in promoting corneal wound healing.

  9. Pathway-based factor analysis of gene expression data produces highly heritable phenotypes that associate with age.

    PubMed

    Anand Brown, Andrew; Ding, Zhihao; Viñuela, Ana; Glass, Dan; Parts, Leopold; Spector, Tim; Winn, John; Durbin, Richard

    2015-03-09

    Statistical factor analysis methods have previously been used to remove noise components from high-dimensional data prior to genetic association mapping and, in a guided fashion, to summarize biologically relevant sources of variation. Here, we show how the derived factors summarizing pathway expression can be used to analyze the relationships between expression, heritability, and aging. We used skin gene expression data from 647 twins from the MuTHER Consortium and applied factor analysis to concisely summarize patterns of gene expression to remove broad confounding influences and to produce concise pathway-level phenotypes. We derived 930 "pathway phenotypes" that summarized patterns of variation across 186 KEGG pathways (five phenotypes per pathway). We identified 69 significant associations of age with phenotype from 57 distinct KEGG pathways at a stringent Bonferroni threshold ([Formula: see text]). These phenotypes are more heritable ([Formula: see text]) than gene expression levels. On average, expression levels of 16% of genes within these pathways are associated with age. Several significant pathways relate to metabolizing sugars and fatty acids; others relate to insulin signaling. We have demonstrated that factor analysis methods combined with biological knowledge can produce more reliable phenotypes with less stochastic noise than the individual gene expression levels, which increases our power to discover biologically relevant associations. These phenotypes could also be applied to discover associations with other environmental factors. Copyright © 2015 Brown et al.

  10. Altered Phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Heterologous Expression of Basidiomycete Moniliophthora perniciosa SOD2 Gene.

    PubMed

    Melo, Sônia C; Santos, Regineide X; Melgaço, Ana C; Pereira, Alanna C F; Pungartnik, Cristina; Brendel, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Heterologous expression of a putative manganese superoxide dismutase gene (SOD2) of the basidiomycete Moniliophthora perniciosa complemented the phenotypes of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae sod2Δ mutant. Sequence analysis of the cloned M. perniciosa cDNA revealed an open reading frame (ORF) coding for a 176 amino acid polypeptide with the typical metal-binding motifs of a SOD2 gene, named MpSOD2. Phylogenetic comparison with known manganese superoxide dismutases (MnSODs) located the protein of M. perniciosa (MpSod2p) in a clade with the basidiomycete fungi Coprinopsis cinerea and Laccaria bicolor. Haploid wild-type yeast transformants containing a single copy of MpSOD2 showed increased resistance phenotypes against oxidative stress-inducing hydrogen peroxide and paraquat, but had unaltered phenotype against ultraviolet-C (UVC) radiation. The same transformants exhibited high sensitivity against treatment with the pro-mutagen diethylnitrosamine (DEN) that requires oxidation to become an active mutagen/carcinogen. Absence of MpSOD2 in the yeast sod2Δ mutant led to DEN hyper-resistance while introduction of a single copy of this gene restored the yeast wild-type phenotype. The haploid yeast wild-type transformant containing two SOD2 gene copies, one from M. perniciosa and one from its own, exhibited DEN super-sensitivity. This transformant also showed enhanced growth at 37 °C on the non-fermentable carbon source lactate, indicating functional expression of MpSod2p. The pro-mutagen dihydroethidium (DHE)-based fluorescence assay monitored basal level of yeast cell oxidative stress. Compared to the wild type, the yeast sod2Δ mutant had a much higher level of intrinsic oxidative stress, which was reduced to wild type (WT) level by introduction of one copy of the MpSOD2 gene. Taken together our data indicates functional expression of MpSod2 protein in the yeast S. cerevisiae.

  11. Altered Phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Heterologous Expression of Basidiomycete Moniliophthora perniciosa SOD2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Sônia C.; Santos, Regineide X.; Melgaço, Ana C.; Pereira, Alanna C. F.; Pungartnik, Cristina; Brendel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Heterologous expression of a putative manganese superoxide dismutase gene (SOD2) of the basidiomycete Moniliophthora perniciosa complemented the phenotypes of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae sod2Δ mutant. Sequence analysis of the cloned M. perniciosa cDNA revealed an open reading frame (ORF) coding for a 176 amino acid polypeptide with the typical metal-binding motifs of a SOD2 gene, named MpSOD2. Phylogenetic comparison with known manganese superoxide dismutases (MnSODs) located the protein of M. perniciosa (MpSod2p) in a clade with the basidiomycete fungi Coprinopsis cinerea and Laccaria bicolor. Haploid wild-type yeast transformants containing a single copy of MpSOD2 showed increased resistance phenotypes against oxidative stress-inducing hydrogen peroxide and paraquat, but had unaltered phenotype against ultraviolet–C (UVC) radiation. The same transformants exhibited high sensitivity against treatment with the pro-mutagen diethylnitrosamine (DEN) that requires oxidation to become an active mutagen/carcinogen. Absence of MpSOD2 in the yeast sod2Δ mutant led to DEN hyper-resistance while introduction of a single copy of this gene restored the yeast wild-type phenotype. The haploid yeast wild-type transformant containing two SOD2 gene copies, one from M. perniciosa and one from its own, exhibited DEN super-sensitivity. This transformant also showed enhanced growth at 37 °C on the non-fermentable carbon source lactate, indicating functional expression of MpSod2p. The pro-mutagen dihydroethidium (DHE)-based fluorescence assay monitored basal level of yeast cell oxidative stress. Compared to the wild type, the yeast sod2Δ mutant had a much higher level of intrinsic oxidative stress, which was reduced to wild type (WT) level by introduction of one copy of the MpSOD2 gene. Taken together our data indicates functional expression of MpSod2 protein in the yeast S. cerevisiae. PMID:26039235

  12. Phenotypic differences between oral and skin fibroblasts in wound contraction and growth factor expression.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Diane B; McKeown, Scott T W; Lundy, Fionnuala T; Irwin, Chris R

    2006-01-01

    Wounds of the oral mucosa heal in an accelerated fashion with reduced scarring compared with cutaneous wounds. The differences in healing outcome between oral mucosa and skin could be because of phenotypic differences between the respective fibroblast populations. This study compared paired mucosal and dermal fibroblasts in terms of collagen gel contraction, alpha-smooth muscle actin expression (alpha-SMA), and production of the epithelial growth factors: keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) and hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF). The effects of transforming growth factor -beta1 and -beta3 on each parameter were also determined. Gel contraction in floating collagen lattices was determined over a 7-day period. alpha-SMA expression by fibroblasts was determined by Western blotting. KGF and HGF expression were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Oral fibroblasts induced accelerated collagen gel contraction, yet surprisingly expressed lower levels of alpha-SMA. Oral cells also produced significantly greater levels of both KGF and HGF than their dermal counterparts. Transforming growth factor-beta1 and -beta3, over the concentration range of 0.1-10 ng/mL, had similar effects on cell function, stimulating both gel contraction and alpha-SMA production, but inhibiting KGF and HGF production by both cell types. These data indicate phenotypic differences between oral and dermal fibroblasts that may well contribute to the differences in healing outcome between these two tissues.

  13. Glucose deprivation elicits phenotypic plasticity via ZEB1-mediated expression of NNMT

    PubMed Central

    Kanska, Justyna; Aspuria, Paul-Joseph P.; Taylor-Harding, Barbie; Spurka, Lindsay; Funari, Vincent; Orsulic, Sandra; Karlan, Beth Y.; Wiedemeyer, W. Ruprecht

    2017-01-01

    Glucose is considered the primary energy source for all cells, and some cancers are addicted to glucose. Here, we investigated the functional consequences of chronic glucose deprivation in serous ovarian cancer cells. We found that cells resistant to glucose starvation (glucose-restricted cells) demonstrated increased metabolic plasticity that was dependent on NNMT (Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase) expression. We further show that ZEB1 induced NNMT, rendered cells resistant to glucose deprivation and recapitulated metabolic adaptations and mesenchymal gene expression observed in glucose-restricted cells. NNMT depletion reversed metabolic plasticity in glucose-restricted cells and prevented de novo formation of glucose-restricted colonies. In addition to its role in glucose independence, we found that NNMT was required for other ZEB1-induced phenotypes, such as increased migration. NNMT protein levels were also elevated in metastatic and recurrent tumors compared to matched primary carcinomas, while normal ovary and fallopian tube tissue had no detectable NNMT expression. Our studies define a novel ZEB1/NNMT signaling axis, which elicits mesenchymal gene expression, as well as phenotypic and metabolic plasticity in ovarian cancer cells upon chronic glucose starvation. Understanding the causes of cancer cell plasticity is crucial for the development of therapeutic strategies to counter intratumoral heterogeneity, acquired drug resistance and recurrence in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC). PMID:28412735

  14. CD32-Expressing CD4 T Cells Are Phenotypically Diverse and Can Contain Proviral HIV DNA.

    PubMed

    Martin, Genevieve E; Pace, Matthew; Thornhill, John P; Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Gossez, Morgane; Brown, Helen; Olejniczak, Natalia; Lwanga, Julianne; Ramjee, Gita; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Porter, Kholoud; Willberg, Christian B; Klenerman, Paul; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah; Frater, John

    2018-01-01

    Efforts to both characterize and eradicate the HIV reservoir have been limited by the rarity of latently infected cells and the absence of a specific denoting biomarker. CD32a (FcγRIIa) has been proposed to be a marker for an enriched CD4 T cell HIV reservoir, but this finding remains controversial. Here, we explore the expression of CD32 on CD3 + CD4 + cells in participants from two primary HIV infection studies and identify at least three distinct phenotypes (CD32 low , CD32 + CD14 + , and CD32 high ). Of note, CD4 negative enrichment kits remove the majority of CD4 + CD32 + T cells, potentially skewing subsequent analyses if used. CD32 high CD4 T cells had higher levels of HLA-DR and HIV co-receptor expression than other subsets, compatible with their being more susceptible to infection. Surprisingly, they also expressed high levels of CD20, TCRαβ, IgD, and IgM (but not IgG), markers for both T cells and naïve B cells. Compared with other populations, CD32 low cells had a more differentiated memory phenotype and high levels of immune checkpoint receptors, programmed death receptor-1 (PD-1), Tim-3, and TIGIT. Within all three CD3 + CD4 + CD32 + phenotypes, cells could be identified in infected participants, which contained HIV DNA. CD32 expression on CD4 T cells did not correlate with HIV DNA or cell-associated HIV RNA (both surrogate measures of overall reservoir size) or predict time to rebound viremia following treatment interruption, suggesting that it is not a dominant biomarker for HIV persistence. Our data suggest that while CD32 + T cells can be infected with HIV, CD32 is not a specific marker of the reservoir although it might identify a population of HIV enriched cells in certain situations.

  15. Iron-Regulated Expression of Alginate Production, Mucoid Phenotype, and Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Jacinta R.; Vasil, Adriana I.; Schurr, Michael J.; Vasil, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains of non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) origin do not produce significant amounts of extracellular alginate and are nonmucoid. In CF, such isolates can become mucoid through mutation of one of the genes (mucA, mucB, mucC, or mucD) that produce regulatory factors that sequester AlgU, required for increased expression of alginate genes. Mutation of the muc genes in the nonmucoid PAO1, PA14, PAKS-1, and Ps388 strains led to increased levels of extracellular alginate and an obvious mucoid phenotype, but only under iron-limiting growth conditions (≤5 µM), not under iron-replete conditions (≥10 µM). In contrast, >50% of P. aeruginosa isolates from chronic CF pulmonary infections expressed increased levels of alginate and mucoidy both under iron-limiting and iron-replete conditions (i.e., iron-constitutive phenotype). No single iron regulatory factor (e.g., Fur, PvdS) was associated with this loss of iron-regulated alginate expression and mucoidy in these CF isolates. However, the loss of only pyoverdine production, or its uptake, abrogated the ability of P. aeruginosa to produce a robust biofilm that represents the Psl-type of biofilm. In contrast, we show that mutation of the pyoverdine and pyochelin biosynthesis genes and the pyoverdine receptor (FpvA) lead to iron-constitutive expression of the key alginate biosynthesis gene, algD, and an explicitly mucoid phenotype in both iron-limiting and iron-replete conditions. These data indicate that alginate production and mucoidy, in contrast to other types of biofilms produced by P. aeruginosa, are substantially enhanced under iron limitation. These results also have compelling implications in relation to the use of iron chelators in the treatment of P. aeruginosa CF infections. PMID:24496793

  16. Differential Expression of Ecdysone Receptor Leads to Variation in Phenotypic Plasticity across Serial Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xiaoling; Bear, Ashley; Liew, Seng Fatt; Bhardwaj, Shivam; Wasik, Bethany R.; Dinwiddie, April; Bastianelli, Carole; Cheong, Wei Fun; Wenk, Markus R.; Cao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Bodies are often made of repeated units, or serial homologs, that develop using the same core gene regulatory network. Local inputs and modifications to this network allow serial homologs to evolve different morphologies, but currently we do not understand which modifications allow these repeated traits to evolve different levels of phenotypic plasticity. Here we describe variation in phenotypic plasticity across serial homologous eyespots of the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, hypothesized to be under selection for similar or different functions in the wet and dry seasonal forms. Specifically, we document the presence of eyespot size and scale brightness plasticity in hindwing eyespots hypothesized to vary in function across seasons, and reduced size plasticity and absence of brightness plasticity in forewing eyespots hypothesized to have the same function across seasons. By exploring the molecular and physiological causes of this variation in plasticity across fore and hindwing serial homologs we discover that: 1) temperature experienced during the wandering stages of larval development alters titers of an ecdysteroid hormone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), in the hemolymph of wet and dry seasonal forms at that stage; 2) the 20E receptor (EcR) is differentially expressed in the forewing and hindwing eyespot centers of both seasonal forms during this critical developmental stage; and 3) manipulations of EcR signaling disproportionately affected hindwing eyespots relative to forewing eyespots. We propose that differential EcR expression across forewing and hindwing eyespots at a critical stage of development explains the variation in levels of phenotypic plasticity across these serial homologues. This finding provides a novel signaling pathway, 20E, and a novel molecular candidate, EcR, for the regulation of levels of phenotypic plasticity across body parts or serial homologs. PMID:26405828

  17. Pathway-Based Factor Analysis of Gene Expression Data Produces Highly Heritable Phenotypes That Associate with Age

    PubMed Central

    Anand Brown, Andrew; Ding, Zhihao; Viñuela, Ana; Glass, Dan; Parts, Leopold; Spector, Tim; Winn, John; Durbin, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Statistical factor analysis methods have previously been used to remove noise components from high-dimensional data prior to genetic association mapping and, in a guided fashion, to summarize biologically relevant sources of variation. Here, we show how the derived factors summarizing pathway expression can be used to analyze the relationships between expression, heritability, and aging. We used skin gene expression data from 647 twins from the MuTHER Consortium and applied factor analysis to concisely summarize patterns of gene expression to remove broad confounding influences and to produce concise pathway-level phenotypes. We derived 930 “pathway phenotypes” that summarized patterns of variation across 186 KEGG pathways (five phenotypes per pathway). We identified 69 significant associations of age with phenotype from 57 distinct KEGG pathways at a stringent Bonferroni threshold (P<5.38×10−5). These phenotypes are more heritable (h2=0.32) than gene expression levels. On average, expression levels of 16% of genes within these pathways are associated with age. Several significant pathways relate to metabolizing sugars and fatty acids; others relate to insulin signaling. We have demonstrated that factor analysis methods combined with biological knowledge can produce more reliable phenotypes with less stochastic noise than the individual gene expression levels, which increases our power to discover biologically relevant associations. These phenotypes could also be applied to discover associations with other environmental factors. PMID:25758824

  18. Transgenic expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) causes premature aging phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joohwee; Vaish, Vivek; Feng, Mingxiao; Field, Kevin; Chatzistamou, Ioulia; Shim, Minsub

    2016-10-07

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of prostanoids, lipid signaling molecules that regulate various physiological processes. COX2, one of the isoforms of COX, is highly inducible in response to a wide variety of cellular and environmental stresses. Increased COX2 expression is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of many age-related diseases. COX2 expression is also reported to be increased in the tissues of aged humans and mice, which suggests the involvement of COX2 in the aging process. However, it is not clear whether the increased COX2 expression is causal to or a result of aging. We have now addressed this question by creating an inducible COX2 transgenic mouse model. Here we show that post-natal expression of COX2 led to a panel of aging-related phenotypes. The expression of p16, p53, and phospho-H2AX was increased in the tissues of COX2 transgenic mice. Additionally, adult mouse lung fibroblasts from COX2 transgenic mice exhibited increased expression of the senescence-associated β-galactosidase. Our study reveals that the increased COX2 expression has an impact on the aging process and suggests that modulation of COX2 and its downstream signaling may be an approach for intervention of age-related disorders.

  19. Genetic localization and phenotypic expression of X-linked cataract (Xcat) in Mus musculus.

    PubMed

    Favor, J; Pretsch, W

    1990-01-01

    Linkage data relative to the markers tabby and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase are presented to locate X-linked cataract (Xcat) in the distal portion of the mouse X-chromosome between jimpy and hypophosphatemia. The human X-linked cataract-dental syndrome, Nance-Horan Syndrome, also maps closely to human hypophosphatemia and would suggest homology between mouse Xcat and human Nance-Horan Syndrome genes. In hemizygous males and homozygous females penetrance is complete with only slight variation in the degree of expression. Phenotypic expression in Xcat heterozygous females ranges from totally clear to totally opaque lenses. The phenotypic expression between the two lenses of a heterozygous individual could also vary between totally clear and totally opaque lenses. However, a correlation in the degree of expression between the eyes of an individual was observed. A variegated pattern of lens opacity was evident in female heterozygotes. Based on these observations, the site of gene action for the Xcat locus is suggested to be endogenous to the lens cells and the precursor cell population of the lens is concluded to be small. The identification of an X-linked cataract locus is an important contribution to the estimate of the number of mutable loci resulting in cataract, an estimate required so that dominant cataract mutagenesis results may be expressed on a per locus basis. The Xcat mutation may be a useful marker for a distal region of the mouse X-chromosome which is relatively sparsely marked and the X-linked cataract mutation may be employed in gene expression and lens development studies.

  20. Elevated expression of Thoc1 is associated with aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chenchen; Yue, Ben; Yuan, Chenwei

    The THO complex 1 (Thoc1) is a nuclear matrix protein playing vital roles in transcription elongation and mRNA export. Recently, aberrant expression of Thoc1 has been reported in an increasing array of tumor types. However, the clinical significance of Thoc1 expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) is still unknown. The present study aimed to characterize the expression of Thoc1 in human CRC and evaluate its clinical significance. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting analyses showed that the mRNA and protein expression of Thoc1 in CRC specimens was significantly higher than that in adjacent normal colon mucosae. Immunohistochemistry (IHC)more » was conducted to characterize the expression pattern of Thoc1 in 185 archived paraffin-embedded CRC specimens. Statistical analyses revealed that high levels of Thoc1 expression were associated with the clinical stages and tumor differentiation. CRC patients with high levels of Thoc1 expression had poorer overall-survival and disease-free survival, whereas those with lower levels of Thoc1 expression survived longer. Furthermore, multivariate Cox regression analyses demonstrated that Thoc1 expression remained an independent prognostic factor for increased disease recurrence and decreased survival. Our results suggest for the first time that Thoc1 is involved in the development and progression of CRC, and elevated expression of Thoc1 is associated with aggressive phenotype and poor prognosis in CRC. These findings may prove to be clinically useful for developing a new therapeutic target of CRC treatment.« less

  1. Compound Heterozygous Desmoplakin Mutations Result in a Phenotype with a Combination of Myocardial, Skin, Hair, and Enamel Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Mỹ G.; Sadowski, Sara; Brennan, Donna; Pikander, Pekka; Saukko, Pekka; Wahl, James; Aho, Heikki; Heikinheimo, Kristiina; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Fertala, Andrzej; Peltonen, Juha; Uitto, Jouni; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2014-01-01

    Desmoplakin (DP) anchors the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to the desmosomal cadherins and thereby confers structural stability to tissues. In this study, we present a patient with extensive mucocutaneous blisters, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, nail dystrophy, enamel dysplasia, and sparse woolly hair. The patient died at the age of 14 years from undiagnosed cardiomyopathy. The skin showed hyperplasia and acantholysis in the mid- and lower epidermal layers, whereas the heart showed extensive fibrosis and fibrofatty replacement in both ventricles. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed a reduction in the C-terminal domain of DP in the skin and oral mucosa. Sequencing of the DP gene showed undescribed mutations in the maternal and paternal alleles. Both mutations affected exon 24 encoding the C-terminal domain. The paternal mutation, c.6310delA, leads to a premature stop codon. The maternal mutation, c.7964 C to A, results in a substitution of an aspartic acid for a conserved alanine residue at amino acid 2655 (A2655D). Structural modeling indicated that this mutation changes the electrostatic potential of the mutated region of DP, possibly altering functions that depend on intermolecular interactions. To conclude, we describe a combination of DP mutation phenotypes affecting the skin, heart, hair, and teeth. This patient case emphasizes the importance of heart examination of patients with desmosomal genodermatoses. PMID:19924139

  2. GExplore: a web server for integrated queries of protein domains, gene expression and mutant phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The majority of the genes even in well-studied multi-cellular model organisms have not been functionally characterized yet. Mining the numerous genome wide data sets related to protein function to retrieve potential candidate genes for a particular biological process remains a challenge. Description GExplore has been developed to provide a user-friendly database interface for data mining at the gene expression/protein function level to help in hypothesis development and experiment design. It supports combinatorial searches for proteins with certain domains, tissue- or developmental stage-specific expression patterns, and mutant phenotypes. GExplore operates on a stand-alone database and has fast response times, which is essential for exploratory searches. The interface is not only user-friendly, but also modular so that it accommodates additional data sets in the future. Conclusion GExplore is an online database for quick mining of data related to gene and protein function, providing a multi-gene display of data sets related to the domain composition of proteins as well as expression and phenotype data. GExplore is publicly available at: http://genome.sfu.ca/gexplore/ PMID:19917126

  3. Expression of the Beet necrotic yellow vein virus p25 protein induces hormonal changes and a root branching phenotype in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Claire; Schmidlin, Laure; Klein, Elodie; Taconnat, Ludivine; Prinsen, Els; Erhardt, Mathieu; Heintz, Dimitri; Weyens, Guy; Lefebvre, Marc; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Gilmer, David

    2011-06-01

    The RNA-3-encoded p25 protein was previously characterized as one of the major symptom determinants of the Beet necrotic yellow vein virus. Previous analyses reported the influence of the p25 protein in root proliferation phenotype observed in rhizomania disease on infected sugar beets (Beta vulgaris). A transgenic approach was developed, in which the p25 protein was constitutively expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia (Col-0) ecotype in order to provide new clues as to how the p25 protein might promote alone disease development and symptom expression. Transgenic plants were characterized by Southern blot and independent lines carrying single and multiple copies of the transgene were selected. Mapping of the T-DNA insertion was performed on the monocopy homozygote lines. P25 protein was localized both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm of epidermal and root cells of transgenic plants. Although A. thaliana was not described as a susceptible host for BNYVV infection, abnormal root branching was observed on p25 protein-expressing A. thaliana plants. Moreover, these transgenic plants were more susceptible than wild-type plants to auxin analog treatment (2,4-D) but more resistant to methyl jasmonate (MeJA), abscisic acid (ABA) and to lesser extend to salicylic acid (SA). Hormonal content assays measuring plant levels of auxin (IAA), jasmonate (JA) and ethylene precursor (ACC) revealed major hormonal changes. Global transcript profiling analyses on roots displayed differential gene expressions that could corroborate root branching phenotype and stress signaling modifications.

  4. Gene Expression Profiling Differentiates Autism Case–Controls and Phenotypic Variants of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Evidence for Circadian Rhythm Dysfunction in Severe Autism

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Valerie W.; Sarachana, Tewarit; Kim, Kyung Soon; Nguyen, AnhThu; Kulkarni, Shreya; Steinberg, Mara E.; Luu, Truong; Lai, Yinglei; Lee, Norman H.

    2009-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by delayed/abnormal language development, deficits in social interaction, repetitive behaviors and restricted interests. The heterogeneity in clinical presentation of ASD, likely due to different etiologies, complicates genetic/biological analyses of these disorders. DNA microarray analyses were conducted on 116 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) from individuals with idiopathic autism who are divided into three phenotypic subgroups according to severity scores from the commonly used Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised questionnaire and age-matched, nonautistic controls. Statistical analyses of gene expression data from control LCL against that of LCL from ASD probands identify genes for which expression levels are either quantitatively or qualitatively associated with phenotypic severity. Comparison of the significant differentially expressed genes from each subgroup relative to the control group reveals differentially expressed genes unique to each subgroup as well as genes in common across subgroups. Among the findings unique to the most severely affected ASD group are 15 genes that regulate circadian rhythm, which has been shown to have multiple effects on neurological as well as metabolic functions commonly dysregulated in autism. Among the genes common to all three subgroups of ASD are 20 novel genes mostly in putative noncoding regions, which appear to associate with androgen sensitivity and which may underlie the strong 4:1 bias toward affected males. PMID:19418574

  5. Abnormal costimulatory phenotype and function of dendritic cells before and after the onset of severe murine lupus

    PubMed Central

    Colonna, Lucrezia; Dinnall, Joudy-Ann; Shivers, Debra K; Frisoni, Lorenza; Caricchio, Roberto; Gallucci, Stefania

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed the activation and function of dendritic cells (DCs) in the spleens of diseased, lupus-prone NZM2410 and NZB-W/F1 mice and age-matched BALB/c and C57BL/6 control mice. Lupus DCs showed an altered ex vivo costimulatory profile, with a significant increase in the expression of CD40, decreased expression of CD80 and CD54, and normal expression of CD86. DCs from young lupus-prone NZM2410 mice, before the development of the disease, expressed normal levels of CD80 and CD86 but already overexpressed CD40. The increase in CD40-positive cells was specific for DCs and involved the subset of myeloid and CD8α+ DCs before disease onset, with a small involvement of plasmacytoid DCs in diseased mice. In vitro data from bone marrow-derived DCs and splenic myeloid DCs suggest that the overexpression of CD40 is not due to a primary alteration of CD40 regulation in DCs but rather to an extrinsic stimulus. Our analyses suggest that the defect of CD80 in NZM2410 and NZB-W/F1 mice, which closely resembles the costimulatory defect found in DCs from humans with systemic lupus erythematosus, is linked to the autoimmune disease. The increase in CD40 may instead participate in disease pathogenesis, being present months before any sign of autoimmunity, and its downregulation should be explored as an alternative to treatment with anti-CD40 ligand in lupus. PMID:16507174

  6. Abnormal expression of Nrf2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ning; Du, Baoying; Zhou, Hao; Shen, Fengxian; Li, Juan; Xie, Zhenwei

    2017-01-01

    To explore the expression level of Nrf2 in adenomyosis and study the mechanism of abnormal expression of Nrf2 in the pathogenesis of adenomyosis. Western blot, immunohistochemistry(IHC) and real time PCR were used to measure Nrf2 expression levels in tissue and cell samples. Knockdown and overexpression of Nrf2 were used to investigate the variation of migration ability of endometrial glandular cells as well as the regulatory mechanism. Nrf2 protein levels were significantly higher in the eutopic and ectopic endometrial glands when compared with control cases using IHC and western blot methods. (p< 0.05). However, there was no statistical difference in Nrf2 mRNA expression levels between the adenomyosis and control groups. Using an agonist and Nrf2 siRNA, we regulated the Nrf2 protein levels of primary cultured endometrial glandular cells. With increased expression of Nrf2, cell scratch assay showed that the agonist-treated group migrated significantly faster than the control group, with MMP9 protein level markedly elevated. In contrast, Nrf2 siRNA-treated group migrated slower than the control group, with decreased expression of MMP9 protein. All of the scratching healing spaces and protein levels between the treated and control groups were statistically significant (p< 0.05). Abnormal expression of Nrf2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of adenomyosis. Specified reduction of Nrf2 expression could prove to be a new therapeutic target in the clinical treatment of adenomyosis.

  7. Hepatic Transporter Expression in Metabolic Syndrome: Phenotype, Serum Metabolic Hormones, and Transcription Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Donepudi, Ajay C.; Cheng, Qiuqiong; Lu, Zhenqiang James; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a multifactorial disease associated with obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and the alteration of multiple metabolic hormones. Obesity rates have been rising worldwide, which increases our need to understand how this population will respond to drugs and exposure to other chemicals. The purpose of this study was to determine in lean and obese mice the ontogeny of clinical biomarkers such as serum hormone and blood glucose levels as well as the physiologic markers that correlate with nuclear receptor– and transporter-related pathways. Livers from male and female wild-type (WT) (C57BL/6) and ob/ob mice littermates were collected before, during, and after the onset of obesity. Serum hormone and mRNA levels were analyzed. Physiologic changes and gene expression during maturation and progression to obesity were performed and correlation analysis was performed using canonical correlations. Significant ontogenic changes in both WT and ob/ob mice were observed and these ontogenic changes differ in ob/ob mice with the development of obesity. In males and females, the ontogenic pattern of the expression of genes such as Abcc3, 4, Abcg2, Cyp2b10, and 4a14 started to differ from week 3, and became significant at weeks 4 and 8 in ob/ob mice compared with WT mice. In obese males, serum resistin, glucagon, and glucose levels correlated with the expression of most hepatic ATP-binding cassette (Abc) transporters, whereas in obese females, serum glucagon-like peptide 1 levels were correlated with most hepatic uptake transporters and P450 enzymes. Overall, the correlation between physiologic changes and gene expression indicate that metabolism-related hormones may play a role in regulating the genes involved in drug metabolism and transport. PMID:26847773

  8. Hepatic Transporter Expression in Metabolic Syndrome: Phenotype, Serum Metabolic Hormones, and Transcription Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Donepudi, Ajay C; Cheng, Qiuqiong; Lu, Zhenqiang James; Cherrington, Nathan J; Slitt, Angela L

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a multifactorial disease associated with obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, and the alteration of multiple metabolic hormones. Obesity rates have been rising worldwide, which increases our need to understand how this population will respond to drugs and exposure to other chemicals. The purpose of this study was to determine in lean and obese mice the ontogeny of clinical biomarkers such as serum hormone and blood glucose levels as well as the physiologic markers that correlate with nuclear receptor- and transporter-related pathways. Livers from male and female wild-type (WT) (C57BL/6) and ob/ob mice littermates were collected before, during, and after the onset of obesity. Serum hormone and mRNA levels were analyzed. Physiologic changes and gene expression during maturation and progression to obesity were performed and correlation analysis was performed using canonical correlations. Significant ontogenic changes in both WT and ob/ob mice were observed and these ontogenic changes differ in ob/ob mice with the development of obesity. In males and females, the ontogenic pattern of the expression of genes such as Abcc3, 4, Abcg2, Cyp2b10, and 4a14 started to differ from week 3, and became significant at weeks 4 and 8 in ob/ob mice compared with WT mice. In obese males, serum resistin, glucagon, and glucose levels correlated with the expression of most hepatic ATP-binding cassette (Abc) transporters, whereas in obese females, serum glucagon-like peptide 1 levels were correlated with most hepatic uptake transporters and P450 enzymes. Overall, the correlation between physiologic changes and gene expression indicate that metabolism-related hormones may play a role in regulating the genes involved in drug metabolism and transport. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  9. Prostate cancer cell response to paclitaxel is affected by abnormally expressed securin PTTG1.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Carolina; Flores, M Luz; Medina, Rafael; Pérez-Valderrama, Begoña; Romero, Francisco; Tortolero, María; Japón, Miguel A; Sáez, Carmen

    2014-10-01

    PTTG1 protein, the human securin, has a central role in sister chromatid separation during mitosis, and its altered expression has been reported in many tumor types. Paclitaxel is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug, whose mechanism of action is related to its ability to arrest cells in mitosis and the subsequent induction of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. By using two prostate cancer cell lines with different responses to paclitaxel treatment, we have identified two situations in which PTTG1 influences cell fate differentially. In slippage-prone PC3 cells, both PTTG1 downregulation and overexpression induce an increase in mitotic cells that is associated with diminished apoptosis after paclitaxel treatment. In LNCaP cells, however, PTTG1 downregulation prevents mitotic entry and, subsequently, inhibits mitosis-associated, paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, PTTG1 overexpression induces an increase in mitotic cells and apoptosis after paclitaxel treatment. We have also identified a role for Mcl-1 protein in preventing apoptosis during mitosis in PC3 cells, as simultaneous PTTG1 and Mcl-1 silencing enhances mitosis-associated apoptosis after paclitaxel treatment. The finding that a more efficient mitotic arrest alone in PC3 cells is not enough to increase apoptosis was also confirmed with the observation that a selected paclitaxel-resistant PC3 cell line showed an apoptosis-resistant phenotype associated with increased mitosis upon paclitaxel treatment. These findings could contribute to identify putative responsive and nonresponsive cells and help us to approach incomplete responses to paclitaxel in the clinical setting. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Neuropeptide S Receptor Induces Neuropeptide Expression and Associates with Intermediate Phenotypes of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Carlson, Paula; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; McKinzie, Sanna; Busciglio, Irene; Burton, Duane; Zucchelli, Marco; D’Amato, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims NPSR1, the receptor for neuropeptide S (NPS), is expressed by gastrointestinal (GI) enteroendocrine (EE) cells, and is involved in inflammation, anxiety and nociception. NPSR1 polymorphisms are associated with asthma and inflammatory bowel disease. We aimed to determine whether NPS induces expression of GI neuropeptides; and to associate NPSR1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with symptom phenotype and GI functions in health and functional GI disorders (FGID). Methods The effect of NPS on mRNA expression of neuropeptides was assessed using real-time PCR in NPSR1-tranfected HEK293 cells. Seventeen NPSR1 SNPs were successfully genotyped in 699 subjects from a regional cohort of 466 FGID patients and 233 healthy controls. Associations were sought using sex-adjusted regression analysis and false discovery rate (FDR) correction. Results NPS-NPSR1 signaling induced increased expression of CCK, VIP, PYY, and somatostatin. There were no significant associations with phenotypes of FGID symptoms. There were several NPSR1 SNPs associated with individual motor or sensory functions; the associations of SNPs rs2609234, rs6972158 and rs1379928 with colonic transit rate remained significant after FDR correction. The rs1379928 polymorphism was also associated with pain, gas and urgency sensory ratings at 36 mm Hg distension, the level pre-specified for formal testing. Associations with rectal sensory ratings were not significant after FDR correction. Conclusions Expression of several neuropeptides is induced upon NPS-NPSR1 signaling; NPSR1 variants are associated with colonic transit in FGID. The role of the NPS system in FGID deserves further study. PMID:19732772

  11. Biochemical phenotyping unravels novel metabolic abnormalities and potential biomarkers associated with treatment of GLUT1 deficiency with ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Cappuccio, Gerarda; Pinelli, Michele; Alagia, Marianna; Donti, Taraka; Day-Salvatore, Debra-Lynn; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; De Giorgis, Valentina; Lunghi, Simona; Vari, Maria Stella; Striano, Pasquale; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Kennedy, Adam D; Elsea, Sarah H

    2017-01-01

    Global metabolomic profiling offers novel opportunities for the discovery of biomarkers and for the elucidation of pathogenic mechanisms that might lead to the development of novel therapies. GLUT1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is an inborn error of metabolism due to reduced function of glucose transporter type 1. Clinical presentation of GLUT1-DS is heterogeneous and the disorder mirrors patients with epilepsy, movement disorders, or any paroxysmal events or unexplained neurological manifestation triggered by exercise or fasting. The diagnostic biochemical hallmark of the disease is a reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/blood glucose ratio and the only available treatment is ketogenic diet. This study aimed at advancing our understanding of the biochemical perturbations in GLUT1-DS pathogenesis through biochemical phenotyping and the treatment of GLUT1-DS with a ketogenic diet. Metabolomic analysis of three CSF samples from GLUT1-DS patients not on ketogenic diet was feasible inasmuch as CSF sampling was used for diagnosis before to start with ketogenic diet. The analysis of plasma and urine samples obtained from GLUT1-DS patients treated with a ketogenic diet showed alterations in lipid and amino acid profiles. While subtle, these were consistent findings across the patients with GLUT1-DS on ketogenic diet, suggesting impacts on mitochondrial physiology. Moreover, low levels of free carnitine were present suggesting its consumption in GLUT1-DS on ketogenic diet. 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-hydroxybutyrylcarnitine, 3-methyladipate, and N-acetylglycine were identified as potential biomarkers of GLUT1-DS on ketogenic diet. This is the first study to identify CSF, plasma, and urine metabolites associated with GLUT1-DS, as well as biochemical changes impacted by a ketogenic diet. Potential biomarkers and metabolic insights deserve further investigation.

  12. Biochemical phenotyping unravels novel metabolic abnormalities and potential biomarkers associated with treatment of GLUT1 deficiency with ketogenic diet

    PubMed Central

    Cappuccio, Gerarda; Pinelli, Michele; Alagia, Marianna; Donti, Taraka; Day-Salvatore, Debra-Lynn; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; De Giorgis, Valentina; Lunghi, Simona; Vari, Maria Stella; Striano, Pasquale; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Kennedy, Adam D.

    2017-01-01

    Global metabolomic profiling offers novel opportunities for the discovery of biomarkers and for the elucidation of pathogenic mechanisms that might lead to the development of novel therapies. GLUT1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is an inborn error of metabolism due to reduced function of glucose transporter type 1. Clinical presentation of GLUT1-DS is heterogeneous and the disorder mirrors patients with epilepsy, movement disorders, or any paroxysmal events or unexplained neurological manifestation triggered by exercise or fasting. The diagnostic biochemical hallmark of the disease is a reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/blood glucose ratio and the only available treatment is ketogenic diet. This study aimed at advancing our understanding of the biochemical perturbations in GLUT1-DS pathogenesis through biochemical phenotyping and the treatment of GLUT1-DS with a ketogenic diet. Metabolomic analysis of three CSF samples from GLUT1-DS patients not on ketogenic diet was feasible inasmuch as CSF sampling was used for diagnosis before to start with ketogenic diet. The analysis of plasma and urine samples obtained from GLUT1-DS patients treated with a ketogenic diet showed alterations in lipid and amino acid profiles. While subtle, these were consistent findings across the patients with GLUT1-DS on ketogenic diet, suggesting impacts on mitochondrial physiology. Moreover, low levels of free carnitine were present suggesting its consumption in GLUT1-DS on ketogenic diet. 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-hydroxybutyrylcarnitine, 3-methyladipate, and N-acetylglycine were identified as potential biomarkers of GLUT1-DS on ketogenic diet. This is the first study to identify CSF, plasma, and urine metabolites associated with GLUT1-DS, as well as biochemical changes impacted by a ketogenic diet. Potential biomarkers and metabolic insights deserve further investigation. PMID:28961260

  13. Influence of oral contraceptive pills on phenotype expression in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mulders, Annemarie G M; ten Kate-Booij, Marianne; Pal, Richard; De Kruif, Marjolijn; Nekrui, Lizka; Oostra, Ben A; Fauser, Bart C J M; Laven, Joop S E

    2005-12-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by a heterogeneous phenotype including chronic anovulation, hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovaries. The use of oral contraceptive pills (OCP) alters features characteristic for the syndrome. In the present study, PCOS features were compared between women using or not using OCP at the time of the study. One hundred and one women diagnosed with normogonadotrophic anovulatory infertility were included. A total of 81 (80%) women were diagnosed with PCOS (revised 2003 criteria). From these women, a total of 54 did not use OCP, whereas 27 women did. Corrected for age, women taking OCP had increased serum concentrations of sex hormone-binding globulin (P < 0.001). Serum concentrations of testosterone (P = 0.04) and androstenedione (P = 0.01) were decreased. These differences resulted in a decreased free androgen index for women currently taking OCP compared with women without (P < 0.001). The mean ovarian volume/ovary and the mean follicle number/ovary were not different. Use of OCP influences phenotype expression (the observable trait) of individual women known to suffer from PCOS by reducing hyperandrogenism. Despite taking OCP, women still fulfilled the revised 2003 criteria for the syndrome, as PCO morphology was still present. Hence, OCP use does not appreciably affect the PCOS phenotype.

  14. Simultaneous clustering of gene expression data with clinical chemistry and pathological evaluations reveals phenotypic prototypes

    PubMed Central

    Bushel, Pierre R; Wolfinger, Russell D; Gibson, Greg

    2007-01-01

    Background Commonly employed clustering methods for analysis of gene expression data do not directly incorporate phenotypic data about the samples. Furthermore, clustering of samples with known phenotypes is typically performed in an informal fashion. The inability of clustering algorithms to incorporate biological data in the grouping process can limit proper interpretation of the data and its underlying biology. Results We present a more formal approach, the modk-prototypes algorithm, for clustering biological samples based on simultaneously considering microarray gene expression data and classes of known phenotypic variables such as clinical chemistry evaluations and histopathologic observations. The strategy involves constructing an objective function with the sum of the squared Euclidean distances for numeric microarray and clinical chemistry data and simple matching for histopathology categorical values in order to measure dissimilarity of the samples. Separate weighting terms are used for microarray, clinical chemistry and histopathology measurements to control the influence of each data domain on the clustering of the samples. The dynamic validity index for numeric data was modified with a category utility measure for determining the number of clusters in the data sets. A cluster's prototype, formed from the mean of the values for numeric features and the mode of the categorical values of all the samples in the group, is representative of the phenotype of the cluster members. The approach is shown to work well with a simulated mixed data set and two real data examples containing numeric and categorical data types. One from a heart disease study and another from acetaminophen (an analgesic) exposure in rat liver that causes centrilobular necrosis. Conclusion The modk-prototypes algorithm partitioned the simulated data into clusters with samples in their respective class group and the heart disease samples into two groups (sick and buff denoting samples

  15. Suppression of abnormal morphology and extracytoplasmic function sigma activity in Bacillus subtilis ugtP mutant cells by expression of heterologous glucolipid synthases from Acholeplasma laidlawii.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Satoshi; Seki, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Kouji; Hara, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Glucolipids in Bacillus subtilis are synthesized by UgtP processively transferring glucose from UDP-glucose to diacylglycerol. Here we conclude that the abnormal morphology of a ugtP mutant is caused by lack of glucolipids, since the same morphology arises after abolition of glucolipid production by disruption of pgcA and gtaB, which are involved in UDP-glucose synthesis. Conversely, expression of a monoglucosyldiacylglycerol (MGlcDG) produced by 1,2-diacylglycerol 3-glucosyltransferase from Acholeplasma laidlawii (alMGS) almost completely suppressed the ugtP disruptant phenotype. Activation of extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigmas (SigM, SigV, and SigX) in the ugtP mutant was decreased by alMGS expression, and was suppressed to low levels by MgSO 4 addition. When alMGS and alDGS (A. laidlawii 1,2-diacylglycerol-3-glucose (1-2)-glucosyltransferase producing diglucosyldiacylglycerol (DGlcDG)) were simultaneously expressed, SigX activation was repressed to wild type level. These observations suggest that MGlcDG molecules are required for maintenance of B. subtilis cell shape and regulation of ECF sigmas, and DGlcDG regulates SigX activity.

  16. Phenotype, effector function, and tissue localization of PD-1-expressing human follicular helper T cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is well established that PD-1 is expressed by follicular T cells but its function in regulation of human T helper cells has been unclear. We investigated the expression modality and function of PD-1 expressed by human T cells specialized in helping B cells. Results We found that PD-1-expressing T cells are heterogeneous in PD-1 expression. We identified three different PD-1-expressing memory T cell subsets (i.e. PD-1low (+), PD-1medium (++), and PD-1high (+++) cells). PD-1+++ T cells expressed CXCR5 and CXCR4 and were localized in the rim of germinal centers. PD-1+ or PD-1++ cells expressed CCR7 and were present mainly in the T cell area or other parts of the B cell follicles. Utilizing a novel antigen density-dependent magnetic sorting (ADD-MS) method, we isolated the three T cell subsets for functional characterization. The germinal center-located PD-1+++ T cells were most efficient in helping B cells and in producing IL-21 and CXCL13. Other PD-1-expressing T cells, enriched with Th1 and Th17 cells, were less efficient than PD-1+++ T cells in these capacities. PD-1+++ T cells highly expressed Ki-67 and therefore appear active in cell activation and proliferation in vivo. IL-2 is a cytokine important for proliferation and survival of the PD-1+++ T cells. In contrast, IL-21, while a major effector cytokine produced by the PD-1-expressing T helper cells, had no function in generation, survival, or proliferation of the PD-1-expressing helper T cells at least in vitro. PD-1 triggering has a suppressive effect on the proliferation and B cell-helping function of PD-1+++ germinal center T cells. Conclusion Our results revealed the phenotype and effector function of PD-1-expressing T helper cell subsets and indicate that PD-1 restrains the B cell-helping function of germinal center-localized T cells to prevent excessive antibody response. PMID:21914188

  17. Variable phenotypic expression and onset in MYH14 distal hereditary motor neuropathy phenotype in a large, multigenerational North American family.

    PubMed

    Iyadurai, Stanley; Arnold, W David; Kissel, John T; Ruhno, Corey; Mcgovern, Vicki L; Snyder, Pamela J; Prior, Thomas W; Roggenbuck, Jennifer; Burghes, Arthur H; Kolb, Stephen J

    2017-08-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) causes distal-predominant weakness without prominent sensory loss. Myosin heavy chain disorders most commonly result in distal myopathy and cardiomyopathy with or without hearing loss, but a complex phenotype with dHMN, myopathy, hoarseness, and hearing loss was reported in a Korean family with a c.2822G>T mutation in MYH14. In this study we report phenotypic features in a North American family with the c.2822G>T in MYH14. Clinical and molecular characterization was performed in a large, 6-generation, Caucasian family with MYH14 dHMN. A total of 11 affected and 7 unaffected individuals were evaluated and showed varying age of onset and severity of weakness. Genotypic concordance was confirmed with molecular analysis. Electrophysiological studies demonstrated distal motor axonal degeneration without myopathy in all affected subjects tested. Mutation of MYH14 can result in a range of neuromuscular phenotypes that includes a dHMN and hearing loss phenotype with variable age of onset. Muscle Nerve 56: 341-345, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Alteration of Hepatic Gene Expression along with the Inherited Phenotype of Acquired Fatty Liver in Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yonghong; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Ranran; Wang, Jie; Zheng, Maiqing; Li, Qinghe; Cui, Huanxian; Zhao, Guiping; Wen, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Fatty liver is a widespread disease in chickens that causes a decrease in egg production and even death. The characteristics of the inherited phenotype of acquired fatty liver and the molecular mechanisms underlying it, however, are largely unknown. In the current study, fatty liver was induced in 3 breeds by a high-fat (HF) diet and a methionine choline-deficient (MCD) diet. The results showed that the dwarf Jingxing-Huang (JXH) chicken was more susceptible to fatty liver compared with the layer White Leghorns (WL) and local Beijing-You (BJY) breeds. In addition, it was found that the paternal fatty livers induced by HF diet in JXH chickens were inherited. Compared to birds without fatty liver in the control group, both offsprings and their sires with fatty livers in the paternal group exhibited altered hepatic gene expression profiles, including upregulation of several key genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, lipid metabolism and glucose metabolism (ACACA, FASN, SCD, ACSL5, FADS2, FABP1, APOA4 and ME1). This study uniquely revealed that acquired fatty liver in cocks can be inherited. The hepatic gene expression profiles were altered in chickens with the inherited phenotype of acquired paternal fatty liver and several genes could be candidate biomarkers. PMID:29642504

  19. Constitutive expression of thymidylate synthase from LCDV-C induces a transformed phenotype in fish cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhe; Shi, Yan; Ke, Fei; Wei, Sun; Gui, Jianfang; Zhang, Qiya

    2008-03-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS), an essential enzyme in DNA synthesis and repair, plays a key role in the events of cell cycle regulation and tumor formation. Here, an investigation was presented about subcellular location and biological function of viral TS from lymphocystis disease virus from China (LCDV-C) in fish cells. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that LCDV-C TS was predominantly localized in the cytoplasm in fish cells. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that LCDV-C TS promoted cell cycle progression into S and G2/M phase in the constitutive expressed cells. As a result, the cells have a faster growth rate compared with the control cells as revealed by cell growth curves. For foci assay, the TS-expressed cells gave rise to foci 4-5 weeks after incubation. Microscopic examination of the TS-induced foci revealed multilayered growth and crisscross morphology characteristic of transformed cells. Moreover, LCDV-C TS predisposed the transfected cells to acquire an anchorage-independent phenotype and could grow in 0.3% soft agar. So the data reveal LCDV-C TS is sufficient to induce a transformed phenotype in fish cells in vitro and exhibits its potential ability in cell transformation. To our knowledge, it is the first report on viral TS sequences associated with transforming activity.

  20. Alteration of Hepatic Gene Expression along with the Inherited Phenotype of Acquired Fatty Liver in Chicken.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Ranran; Wang, Jie; Zheng, Maiqing; Li, Qinghe; Cui, Huanxian; Zhao, Guiping; Wen, Jie

    2018-04-08

    Fatty liver is a widespread disease in chickens that causes a decrease in egg production and even death. The characteristics of the inherited phenotype of acquired fatty liver and the molecular mechanisms underlying it, however, are largely unknown. In the current study, fatty liver was induced in 3 breeds by a high-fat (HF) diet and a methionine choline-deficient (MCD) diet. The results showed that the dwarf Jingxing-Huang (JXH) chicken was more susceptible to fatty liver compared with the layer White Leghorns (WL) and local Beijing-You (BJY) breeds. In addition, it was found that the paternal fatty livers induced by HF diet in JXH chickens were inherited. Compared to birds without fatty liver in the control group, both offsprings and their sires with fatty livers in the paternal group exhibited altered hepatic gene expression profiles, including upregulation of several key genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, lipid metabolism and glucose metabolism ( ACACA , FASN , SCD , ACSL5 , FADS2 , FABP1 , APOA4 and ME1 ). This study uniquely revealed that acquired fatty liver in cocks can be inherited. The hepatic gene expression profiles were altered in chickens with the inherited phenotype of acquired paternal fatty liver and several genes could be candidate biomarkers.

  1. Microbial forensics: predicting phenotypic characteristics and environmental conditions from large-scale gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minseung; Zorraquino, Violeta; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2015-03-01

    A tantalizing question in cellular physiology is whether the cellular state and environmental conditions can be inferred by the expression signature of an organism. To investigate this relationship, we created an extensive normalized gene expression compendium for the bacterium Escherichia coli that was further enriched with meta-information through an iterative learning procedure. We then constructed an ensemble method to predict environmental and cellular state, including strain, growth phase, medium, oxygen level, antibiotic and carbon source presence. Results show that gene expression is an excellent predictor of environmental structure, with multi-class ensemble models achieving balanced accuracy between 70.0% (±3.5%) to 98.3% (±2.3%) for the various characteristics. Interestingly, this performance can be significantly boosted when environmental and strain characteristics are simultaneously considered, as a composite classifier that captures the inter-dependencies of three characteristics (medium, phase and strain) achieved 10.6% (±1.0%) higher performance than any individual models. Contrary to expectations, only 59% of the top informative genes were also identified as differentially expressed under the respective conditions. Functional analysis of the respective genetic signatures implicates a wide spectrum of Gene Ontology terms and KEGG pathways with condition-specific information content, including iron transport, transferases, and enterobactin synthesis. Further experimental phenotypic-to-genotypic mapping that we conducted for knock-out mutants argues for the information content of top-ranked genes. This work demonstrates the degree at which genome-scale transcriptional information can be predictive of latent, heterogeneous and seemingly disparate phenotypic and environmental characteristics, with far-reaching applications.

  2. The use of magnetic resonance imaging to characterize abnormal body composition phenotypes in youth with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Orsso, Camila E; Mackenzie, Michelle; Alberga, Angela S; Sharma, Arya M; Richer, Lawrence; Rubin, Daniela A; Prado, Carla M; Haqq, Andrea M

    2017-04-01

    improved metabolic profile for the level of adiposity present; however, elevated ratios of AT to skeletal muscle suggest a sarcopenic obesity-like phenotype, which could lead to worse health outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Abnormal levels of expression of plasma microRNA-33 in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, S; Arias-Santiago, S; Orgaz-Molina, J; Magro-Checa, C; Valenzuela, I; Navarro, P; Naranjo-Sintes, R; Sancho, J; Zubiaur, M

    2014-06-01

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNA) are involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of genes associated with lipid metabolism (miRNA-33) and vascular function and angiogenesis (miRNA-126). The objective of this exploratory study was to measure plasma levels of miRNA-33 and miRNA-126 in patients with plaque psoriasis and evaluate their association with clinical parameters. We studied 11 patients with plaque psoriasis. The median Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) was 13 (interquartile range [IQR], 9-14) and body surface area involvement was 12 (IQR, 11-15). Eleven healthy controls matched for age and sex were also included. We analyzed cardiovascular risk factors and subclinical carotid atheromatosis. Plasma miRNAs were evaluated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Carotid intima-media thickness was greater in patients (0.57mm; IQR, 0.54-0.61; n=11) than in controls (0.50mm; IQR, 0.48-0.54; data available for 9 controls) (P=.0055, Mann-Whitney). Expression of miRNA-33 in patients (5.34; IQR, 3.12-7.96; n=11) was significantly higher than in controls (2.33; IQR, 1.71-2.84; only detected in 7 of 11 controls) (P=.0049, Wilcoxon signed rank). No differences in miRNA-126 levels were observed between patients and controls. In patients (n=11), we observed a positive correlation between miRNA-33 and insulin levels (r=0.7289, P=.0109) and a negative correlation between miRNA-126 and carotid intima-media thickness (r=-0.6181, P=.0426). In psoriasis patients plasma levels of lipid and glucose metabolism-related miRNA-33 are increased and correlated with insulin. The study of circulating miRNA-33 in psoriasis may provide new insights about the associated systemic inflammatory abnormalities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  4. A Model-Based Joint Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes and Phenotype-Associated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Minseok; Shin, Su-kyung; Kwon, Eun-Young; Kim, Sung-Eun; Bae, Yun-Jung; Lee, Seungyeoun; Sung, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Myung-Sook; Park, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, many analytical methods and tools have been developed for microarray data. The detection of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) among different treatment groups is often a primary purpose of microarray data analysis. In addition, association studies investigating the relationship between genes and a phenotype of interest such as survival time are also popular in microarray data analysis. Phenotype association analysis provides a list of phenotype-associated genes (PAGs). However, it is sometimes necessary to identify genes that are both DEGs and PAGs. We consider the joint identification of DEGs and PAGs in microarray data analyses. The first approach we used was a naïve approach that detects DEGs and PAGs separately and then identifies the genes in an intersection of the list of PAGs and DEGs. The second approach we considered was a hierarchical approach that detects DEGs first and then chooses PAGs from among the DEGs or vice versa. In this study, we propose a new model-based approach for the joint identification of DEGs and PAGs. Unlike the previous two-step approaches, the proposed method identifies genes simultaneously that are DEGs and PAGs. This method uses standard regression models but adopts different null hypothesis from ordinary regression models, which allows us to perform joint identification in one-step. The proposed model-based methods were evaluated using experimental data and simulation studies. The proposed methods were used to analyze a microarray experiment in which the main interest lies in detecting genes that are both DEGs and PAGs, where DEGs are identified between two diet groups and PAGs are associated with four phenotypes reflecting the expression of leptin, adiponectin, insulin-like growth factor 1, and insulin. Model-based approaches provided a larger number of genes, which are both DEGs and PAGs, than other methods. Simulation studies showed that they have more power than other methods. Through analysis of

  5. From Cortical and Subcortical Grey Matter Abnormalities to Neurobehavioral Phenotype of Angelman Syndrome: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Aghakhanyan, Gayane; Bonanni, Paolo; Randazzo, Giovanna; Nappi, Sara; Tessarotto, Federica; De Martin, Lara; Frijia, Francesca; De Marchi, Daniele; De Masi, Francesco; Kuppers, Beate; Lombardo, Francesco; Caramella, Davide; Montanaro, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a rare neurogenetic disorder due to loss of expression of maternal ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene. It is characterized by severe developmental delay, speech impairment, movement or balance disorder and typical behavioral uniqueness. Affected individuals show normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, although mild dysmyelination may be observed. In this study, we adopted a quantitative MRI analysis with voxel-based morphometry (FSL-VBM) method to investigate disease-related changes in the cortical/subcortical grey matter (GM) structures. Since 2006 to 2013 twenty-six AS patients were assessed by our multidisciplinary team. From those, sixteen AS children with confirmed maternal 15q11-q13 deletions (mean age 7.7 ± 3.6 years) and twenty-one age-matched controls were recruited. The developmental delay and motor dysfunction were assessed using Bayley III and Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the clinical and neuropsychological datasets. High-resolution T1-weighted images were acquired and FSL-VBM approach was applied to investigate differences in the local GM volume and to correlate clinical and neuropsychological changes in the regional distribution of GM. We found bilateral GM volume loss in AS compared to control children in the striatum, limbic structures, insular and orbitofrontal cortices. Voxel-wise correlation analysis with the principal components of the PCA output revealed a strong relationship with GM volume in the superior parietal lobule and precuneus on the left hemisphere. The anatomical distribution of cortical/subcortical GM changes plausibly related to several clinical features of the disease and may provide an important morphological underpinning for clinical and neurobehavioral symptoms in children with AS. PMID:27626634

  6. Variable Expression of PIK3R3 and PTEN in Ewing Sarcoma Impacts Oncogenic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Niemeyer, Brian F.; Parrish, Janet K.; Spoelstra, Nicole S.; Joyal, Teresa; Richer, Jennifer K.; Jedlicka, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Ewing Sarcoma is an aggressive malignancy of bone and soft tissue affecting children and young adults. Ewing Sarcoma is driven by EWS/Ets fusion oncoproteins, which cause widespread alterations in gene expression in the cell. Dysregulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, particularly involving IGF-1R, also plays an important role in Ewing Sarcoma pathogenesis. However, the basis of this dysregulation, including the relative contribution of EWS/Ets-dependent and independent mechanisms, is not well understood. In the present study, we identify variable expression of two modifiers of PI3K signaling activity, PIK3R3 and PTEN, in Ewing Sarcoma, and examine the consequences of this on PI3K pathway regulation and oncogenic phenotypes. Our findings indicate that PIK3R3 plays a growth-promotional role in Ewing Sarcoma, but suggest that this role is not strictly dependent on regulation of PI3K pathway activity. We further show that expression of PTEN, a well-established, potent tumor suppressor, is lost in a subset of Ewing Sarcomas, and that this loss strongly correlates with high baseline PI3K pathway activity in cell lines. In support of functional importance of PTEN loss in Ewing Sarcoma, we show that re-introduction of PTEN into two different PTEN-negative Ewing Sarcoma cell lines results in downregulation of PI3K pathway activity, and sensitization to the IGF-1R small molecule inhibitor OSI-906. Our findings also suggest that PTEN levels may contribute to sensitivity of Ewing Sarcoma cells to the microtubule inhibitor vincristine, a relevant chemotherapeutic agent in this cancer. Our studies thus identify PIK3R3 and PTEN as modifiers of oncogenic phenotypes in Ewing Sarcoma, with potential clinical implications. PMID:25603314

  7. Phenotype and Tissue Expression as a Function of Genetic Risk in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pau, Cindy T.; Mosbruger, Tim; Saxena, Richa; Welt, Corrine K.

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies and replication analyses have identified (n = 5) or replicated (n = 10) DNA variants associated with risk for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in European women. However, the causal gene and underlying mechanism for PCOS risk at these loci have not been determined. We hypothesized that analysis of phenotype, gene expression and metformin response as a function of genotype would identify candidate genes and pathways that could provide insight into the underlying mechanism for risk at these loci. To test the hypothesis, subjects with PCOS (n = 427) diagnosed according to the NIH criteria (< 9 menses per year and clinical or biochemical hyperandrogenism) and controls (n = 407) with extensive phenotyping were studied. A subset of subjects (n = 38) underwent a subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsy for RNA sequencing and were subsequently treated with metformin for 12 weeks with standardized outcomes measured. Data were analyzed according to genotype at PCOS risk loci and adjusted for the false discovery rate. A gene variant in the THADA locus was associated with response to metformin and metformin was a predicted upstream regulator at the same locus. Genotype at the FSHB locus was associated with LH levels. Genes near the PCOS risk loci demonstrated differences in expression as a function of genotype in adipose including BLK and NEIL2 (GATA4 locus), GLIPR1 and PHLDA1 (KRR1 locus). Based on the phenotypes, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), and upstream regulatory and pathway analyses we hypothesize that there are PCOS subtypes. FSHB, FHSR and LHR loci may influence PCOS risk based on their relationship to gonadotropin levels. The THADA, GATA4, ERBB4, SUMO1P1, KRR1 and RAB5B loci appear to confer risk through metabolic mechanisms. The IRF1, SUMO1P1 and KRR1 loci may confer PCOS risk in development. The TOX3 and GATA4 loci appear to be involved in inflammation and its consequences. The data suggest potential PCOS subtypes and point to

  8. Slower skeletal muscle phenotypes are critical for constitutive expression of Hsp70 in overloaded rat plantaris muscle.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, David E T; Aubrey, F Kris; Zeldin, David A; Michel, Robin N; Noble, Earl G

    2006-03-01

    Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp70) is constitutively expressed in rat hindlimb muscles, reportedly in proportion to their content of type I myosin heavy chain. This distribution pattern has been suggested to result from the higher recruitment and activity of such muscles and/or a specific relationship between myosin phenotype and Hsp70 content. To differentiate between these possibilities, the fiber-specific distribution of Hsp70 was examined in male Sprague-Dawley rat plantaris under control conditions, following a fast-to-slow phenotypic shift in response to surgically induced overload (O) and in response to O when the phenotypic shift was prevented by 3,5,3'-triiodo-dl-thyronine administration. Constitutive expression of Hsp70 was restricted to type I and IIa fibers in plantaris from control rats, and this fiber-specific pattern of expression was maintained following O of up to 28 days, although Hsp70 content in the O muscle doubled. When O (for 40 days) of the plantaris was combined with 3,5,3'-triiodo-dl-thyronine administration, despite typical hypertrophy in the overloaded plantaris, prevention of the normal phenotypic transformation also blocked the increased expression of Hsp70 observed in euthyroid controls. Collectively, these data suggest that chronic changes in constitutive expression of Hsp70 with altered contractile activity appear critically dependent on fast-to-slow phenotypic remodeling.

  9. Robust diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma phenotypes validated on gene expression data from different laboratories.

    PubMed

    Bhanot, Gyan; Alexe, Gabriela; Levine, Arnold J; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2005-01-01

    A major challenge in cancer diagnosis from microarray data is the need for robust, accurate, classification models which are independent of the analysis techniques used and can combine data from different laboratories. We propose such a classification scheme originally developed for phenotype identification from mass spectrometry data. The method uses a robust multivariate gene selection procedure and combines the results of several machine learning tools trained on raw and pattern data to produce an accurate meta-classifier. We illustrate and validate our method by applying it to gene expression datasets: the oligonucleotide HuGeneFL microarray dataset of Shipp et al. (www.genome.wi.mit.du/MPR/lymphoma) and the Hu95Av2 Affymetrix dataset (DallaFavera's laboratory, Columbia University). Our pattern-based meta-classification technique achieves higher predictive accuracies than each of the individual classifiers , is robust against data perturbations and provides subsets of related predictive genes. Our techniques predict that combinations of some genes in the p53 pathway are highly predictive of phenotype. In particular, we find that in 80% of DLBCL cases the mRNA level of at least one of the three genes p53, PLK1 and CDK2 is elevated, while in 80% of FL cases, the mRNA level of at most one of them is elevated.

  10. Abnormal expression of Nrf2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of adenomyosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hao; Shen, Fengxian; Li, Juan; Xie, Zhenwei

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore the expression level of Nrf2 in adenomyosis and study the mechanism of abnormal expression of Nrf2 in the pathogenesis of adenomyosis. Methods Western blot, immunohistochemistry(IHC) and real time PCR were used to measure Nrf2 expression levels in tissue and cell samples. Knockdown and overexpression of Nrf2 were used to investigate the variation of migration ability of endometrial glandular cells as well as the regulatory mechanism. Results Nrf2 protein levels were significantly higher in the eutopic and ectopic endometrial glands when compared with control cases using IHC and western blot methods. (p< 0.05). However, there was no statistical difference in Nrf2 mRNA expression levels between the adenomyosis and control groups. Using an agonist and Nrf2 siRNA, we regulated the Nrf2 protein levels of primary cultured endometrial glandular cells. With increased expression of Nrf2, cell scratch assay showed that the agonist-treated group migrated significantly faster than the control group, with MMP9 protein level markedly elevated. In contrast, Nrf2 siRNA-treated group migrated slower than the control group, with decreased expression of MMP9 protein. All of the scratching healing spaces and protein levels between the treated and control groups were statistically significant (p< 0.05). Conclusions Abnormal expression of Nrf2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of adenomyosis. Specified reduction of Nrf2 expression could prove to be a new therapeutic target in the clinical treatment of adenomyosis. PMID:28817677

  11. Ubiquitin over-expression phenotypes and ubiquitin gene molecular misreading during aging in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Hoe, Nicholas; Huang, Chung M.; Landis, Gary; Verhage, Marian; Ford, Daniel; Yang, Junsheng; van Leeuwen, Fred W.; Tower, John

    2011-01-01

    Molecular Misreading (MM) is the inaccurate conversion of genomic information into aberrant proteins. For example, when RNA polymerase II transcribes a GAGAG motif it synthesizes at low frequency RNA with a two-base deletion. If the deletion occurs in a coding region, translation will result in production of misframed proteins. During mammalian aging, misframed versions of human amyloid precursor protein (hApp) and ubiquitin (hUbb) accumulate in the aggregates characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases, suggesting dysfunctional degradation or clearance. Here cDNA clones encoding wild-type hUbb and the frame-shifted version hUbb+1 were expressed in transgenic Drosophila using the doxycycline-regulated system. Misframed proteins were abundantly produced, both from the transgenes and from endogenous Drosophila ubiquitin-encoding genes, and their abundance increased during aging in whole-fly extracts. Over-expression of wild-type hUbb, but not hUbb+1, was toxic during fly development. In contrast, when over-expressed specifically in adult flies, hUbb+1 caused small decreases in life span, whereas hUbb was associated with small increases, preferentially in males. The data suggest that MM occurs in Drosophila and that the resultant misframed proteins accumulate with age. MM of the ubiquitin gene can produce alternative ubiquitin gene products with different and sometimes opposing phenotypic effects. PMID:21415465

  12. The life of a dead ant: the expression of an adaptive extended phenotype.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Sandra B; Gerritsma, Sylvia; Yusah, Kalsum M; Mayntz, David; Hywel-Jones, Nigel L; Billen, Johan; Boomsma, Jacobus J; Hughes, David P

    2009-09-01

    Specialized parasites are expected to express complex adaptations to their hosts. Manipulation of host behavior is such an adaptation. We studied the fungus Ophiocordyceps unilateralis, a locally specialized parasite of arboreal Camponotus leonardi ants. Ant-infecting Ophiocordyceps are known to make hosts bite onto vegetation before killing them. We show that this represents a fine-tuned fungal adaptation: an extended phenotype. Dead ants were found under leaves, attached by their mandibles, on the northern side of saplings approximately 25 cm above the soil, where temperature and humidity conditions were optimal for fungal growth. Experimental relocation confirmed that parasite fitness was lower outside this manipulative zone. Host resources were rapidly colonized and further secured by extensive internal structuring. Nutritional composition analysis indicated that such structuring allows the parasite to produce a large fruiting body for spore production. Our findings suggest that the osmotrophic lifestyle of fungi may have facilitated novel exploitation strategies.

  13. 3-Deazaneplanocin A suppresses aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Hatta, Mitsutoki, E-mail: hatta@college.fdcnet.ac.jp; Naganuma, Kaori; Kato, Kenichi

    In tumor tissues, alterations of gene expression caused by aberrant epigenetic modifications confer phenotypic diversity on malignant cells. Although 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) has been shown to reactivate tumor suppressor genes in several cancer cells, it remains unclear whether DZNep attenuates the malignant phenotypes of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of DZNep on the expression of genes related to aggressive phenotypes, such as epithelial–mesenchymal transition, in OSCC cells. We found that DZNep reduced the cellular levels of polycomb group proteins (EZH2, SUZ12, BMI1, and RING1A) and the associated trimethylation of Lys27 on histonemore » H3 and monoubiquitination of Lys119 on histone H2A in the poorly differentiated OSCC cell line SAS. Immunocytochemical staining demonstrated that DZNep induced the reorganization of filamentous actin and the membrane localization of E-cadherin associated with cell–cell adhesions. We also found an inhibitory effect of DZNep on cell proliferation using a WST assay. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that genes involved in the aggressive phenotypes (TWIST2, EGFR, ACTA2, TGFB1, WNT5B, and APLIN) were down-regulated, whereas epithelial phenotype genes (CDH1, CLDN4, IVL, and TGM1) were up-regulated in SAS cells treated with DZNep. Collectively, our findings suggest that DZNep reverses the aggressive characteristics of OSCC cells through the dynamic regulation of epithelial plasticity via the reprogramming of gene expression patterns. - Highlights: • DZNep reduced PcG proteins and associated histone modifications in OSCC cells. • DZNep enhanced cell–cell adhesion indicative of epithelial phenotype in OSCC cells. • DZNep suppressed the aggressive phenotype-related gene expression in OSCC cells. • DZNep activated the gene expression of epithelial markers in OSCC cells.« less

  14. Phenotypic plasticity in opsin expression in a butterfly compound eye complements sex role reversal

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Animals often display phenotypic plasticity in morphologies and behaviors that result in distinct adaptations to fluctuating seasonal environments. The butterfly Bicyclus anynana has two seasonal forms, wet and dry, that vary in wing ornament brightness and in the identity of the sex that performs the most courting and choosing. Rearing temperature is the cue for producing these alternative seasonal forms. We hypothesized that, barring any developmental constraints, vision should be enhanced in the choosy individuals but diminished in the non-choosy individuals due to physiological costs. As a proxy of visual performance we measured eye size, facet lens size, and sensitivity to light, e.g., the expression levels of all opsins, in males and females of both seasonal forms. Results We found that B. anynana eyes displayed significant sexual dimorphism and phenotypic plasticity for both morphology and opsin expression levels, but not all results conformed to our prediction. Males had larger eyes than females across rearing temperatures, and increases in temperature produced larger eyes in both sexes, mostly via increases in facet number. Ommatidia were larger in the choosy dry season (DS) males and transcript levels for all three opsins were significantly lower in the less choosy DS females. Conclusions Opsin level plasticity in females, and ommatidia size plasticity in males supported our visual plasticity hypothesis but males appear to maintain high visual function across both seasons. We discuss our results in the context of distinct sexual and natural selection pressures that may be facing each sex in the wild in each season. PMID:23194112

  15. Phenotypic variation and differentiated gene expression of Australian plants in response to declining rainfall

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, William; Lim, Sim Lin; Enright, Neal; He, Tianhua

    2016-01-01

    Declining rainfall is projected to have negative impacts on the demographic performance of plant species. Little is known about the adaptive capacity of species to respond to drying climates, and whether adaptation can keep pace with climate change. In fire-prone ecosystems, episodic recruitment of perennial plant species in the first year post-fire imposes a specific selection environment, offering a unique opportunity to quantify the scope for adaptive response to climate change. We examined the growth of seedlings of four fire-killed species under control and drought conditions for seeds from populations established in years following fire receiving average-to-above-average winter rainfall, or well-below-average winter rainfall. We show that offspring of plants that had established under drought had more efficient water uptake, and/or stored more water per unit biomass, or developed denser leaves, and all maintained higher survival in simulated drought than did offspring of plants established in average annual rainfall years. Adaptive phenotypic responses were not consistent across all traits and species, while plants that had established under severe drought or established in years with average-to-above-average rainfall had an overall different physiological response when growing either with or without water constraints. Seedlings descended from plants established under severe drought also had elevated gene expression in key pathways relating to stress response. Our results demonstrate the capacity for rapid adaptation to climate change through phenotypic variation and regulation of gene expression. However, effective and rapid adaptation to climate change may vary among species depending on their capacity to maintain robust populations under multiple stresses. PMID:28018654

  16. Manipulation of MKS1 gene expression affects Kalanchoë blossfeldiana and Petunia hybrida phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gargul, Joanna Maria; Mibus, Heiko; Serek, Margrethe

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of alternative methods to chemical treatments for growth retardation and pathogen protection in ornamental plant production has become a major goal in recent breeding programmes. This study evaluates the effect of manipulating MAP kinase 4 nuclear substrate 1 (MKS1) expression in Kalanchoë blossfeldiana and Petunia hybrida. The Arabidopsis thaliana MKS1 gene was overexpressed in both species via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, resulting in dwarfed phenotypes and delayed flowering in both species and increased tolerance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in transgenic Petunia plants. The lengths of the stems and internodes were decreased, while the number of nodes in the transgenic plants was similar to that of the control plants in both species. The transgenic Kalanchoë flowers had an increased anthocyanin concentration, and the length of the inflorescence stem was decreased. The morphology of transgenic Petunia flowers was not altered. The results of the Pseudomonas syringae tolerance test showed that Petunia plants with one copy of the transgene reacted similarly to the nontransgenic control plants; however, plants with four copies of the transgene exhibited considerably higher tolerance to bacterial attack. Transgene integration and expression was determined by Southern blot hybridization and RT-PCR analyses. MKS1 in wild-type Petunia plants was down-regulated through a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) method using tobacco rattle virus vectors. There were no significant phenotypic differences between the plants with silenced MKS1 genes and the controls. The relative concentration of the MKS1 transcript in VIGS-treated plants was estimated by quantitative RT-PCR. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Phenotypic variation and differentiated gene expression of Australian plants in response to declining rainfall.

    PubMed

    D'Agui, Haylee; Fowler, William; Lim, Sim Lin; Enright, Neal; He, Tianhua

    2016-11-01

    Declining rainfall is projected to have negative impacts on the demographic performance of plant species. Little is known about the adaptive capacity of species to respond to drying climates, and whether adaptation can keep pace with climate change. In fire-prone ecosystems, episodic recruitment of perennial plant species in the first year post-fire imposes a specific selection environment, offering a unique opportunity to quantify the scope for adaptive response to climate change. We examined the growth of seedlings of four fire-killed species under control and drought conditions for seeds from populations established in years following fire receiving average-to-above-average winter rainfall, or well-below-average winter rainfall. We show that offspring of plants that had established under drought had more efficient water uptake, and/or stored more water per unit biomass, or developed denser leaves, and all maintained higher survival in simulated drought than did offspring of plants established in average annual rainfall years. Adaptive phenotypic responses were not consistent across all traits and species, while plants that had established under severe drought or established in years with average-to-above-average rainfall had an overall different physiological response when growing either with or without water constraints. Seedlings descended from plants established under severe drought also had elevated gene expression in key pathways relating to stress response. Our results demonstrate the capacity for rapid adaptation to climate change through phenotypic variation and regulation of gene expression. However, effective and rapid adaptation to climate change may vary among species depending on their capacity to maintain robust populations under multiple stresses.

  18. Rescue of protein expression defects may not be enough to abolish the pro-arrhythmic phenotype of long QT type 2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Perry, Matthew D; Ng, Chai Ann; Phan, Kevin; David, Erikka; Steer, Kieran; Hunter, Mark J; Mann, Stefan A; Imtiaz, Mohammad; Hill, Adam P; Ke, Ying; Vandenberg, Jamie I

    2016-07-15

    Most missense long QT syndrome type 2 (LQTS2) mutations result in Kv11.1 channels that show reduced levels of membrane expression. Pharmacological chaperones that rescue mutant channel expression could have therapeutic potential to reduce the risk of LQTS2-associated arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, but only if the mutant Kv11.1 channels function normally (i.e. like WT channels) after membrane expression is restored. Fewer than half of mutant channels exhibit relatively normal function after rescue by low temperature. The remaining rescued missense mutant Kv11.1 channels have perturbed gating and/or ion selectivity characteristics. Co-expression of WT subunits with gating defective missense mutations ameliorates but does not eliminate the functional abnormalities observed for most mutant channels. For patients with mutations that affect gating in addition to expression, it may be necessary to use a combination therapy to restore both normal function and normal expression of the channel protein. In the heart, Kv11.1 channels pass the rapid delayed rectifier current (IKr ) which plays critical roles in repolarization of the cardiac action potential and in the suppression of arrhythmias caused by premature stimuli. Over 500 inherited mutations in Kv11.1 are known to cause long QT syndrome type 2 (LQTS2), a cardiac electrical disorder associated with an increased risk of life threatening arrhythmias. Most missense mutations in Kv11.1 reduce the amount of channel protein expressed at the membrane and, as a consequence, there has been considerable interest in developing pharmacological agents to rescue the expression of these channels. However, pharmacological chaperones will only have clinical utility if the mutant Kv11.1 channels function normally after membrane expression is restored. The aim of this study was to characterize the gating phenotype for a subset of LQTS2 mutations to assess what proportion of mutations may be suitable for rescue. As an initial

  19. Mice Lacking the Giant Protocadherin mFAT1 Exhibit Renal Slit Junction Abnormalities and a Partially Penetrant Cyclopia and Anophthalmia Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Lorenza; Patel, Anjla; Allen, Nicholas D.; ffrench-Constant, Charles

    2003-01-01

    While roles in adhesion and morphogenesis have been documented for classical cadherins, the nonclassical cadherins are much less well understood. Here we have examined the functions of the giant protocadherin FAT by generating a transgenic mouse lacking mFAT1. These mice exhibit perinatal lethality, most probably caused by loss of the renal glomerular slit junctions and fusion of glomerular epithelial cell processes (podocytes). In addition, some mFAT1−/− mice show defects in forebrain development (holoprosencephaly) and failure of eye development (anophthalmia). In contrast to Drosophila, where FAT acts as a tumor suppressor gene, we found no evidence for abnormalities of proliferation in two tissues (skin and central nervous system [CNS]) containing stem and precursor cell populations and in which FAT is expressed strongly. Our results confirm a necessary role for FAT1 in the modified adhesion junctions of the renal glomerular epithelial cell and reveal hitherto unsuspected roles for FAT1 in CNS development. PMID:12724416

  20. Myosin-binding Protein C Compound Heterozygous Variant Effect on the Phenotypic Expression of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Julianny Freitas; Cruz, Fernando Eugênio Dos Santos; Carvalho, Antônio Carlos Campos de; Gottlieb, Ilan; Cazelli, José Guilherme; Siciliano, Ana Paula; Dias, Glauber Monteiro

    2017-04-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease caused by mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins. It is the major cause of sudden cardiac death in young high-level athletes. Studies have demonstrated a poorer prognosis when associated with specific mutations. The association between HCM genotype and phenotype has been the subject of several studies since the discovery of the genetic nature of the disease. This study shows the effect of a MYBPC3 compound variant on the phenotypic HCM expression. A family in which a young man had a clinical diagnosis of HCM underwent clinical and genetic investigations. The coding regions of the MYH7, MYBPC3 and TNNT2 genes were sequenced and analyzed. The proband present a malignant manifestation of the disease, and is the only one to express HCM in his family. The genetic analysis through direct sequencing of the three main genes related to this disease identified a compound heterozygous variant (p.E542Q and p.D610H) in MYBPC3. A family analysis indicated that the p.E542Q and p.D610H alleles have paternal and maternal origin, respectively. No family member carrier of one of the variant alleles manifested clinical signs of HCM. We suggest that the MYBPC3-biallelic heterozygous expression of p.E542Q and p.D610H may cause the severe disease phenotype seen in the proband. Resumo A cardiomiopatia hipertrófica (CMH) é uma doença autossômica dominante causada por mutações em genes que codificam as proteínas dos sarcômeros. É a principal causa de morte súbita cardíaca em atletas jovens de alto nível. Estudos têm demonstrado um pior prognóstico associado a mutações específicas. A associação entre genótipo e fenótipo em CMH tem sido objeto de diversos estudos desde a descoberta da origem genética dessa doença. Este trabalho apresenta o efeito de uma mutação composta em MYBPC3 na expressão fenotípica da CMH. Uma família na qual um jovem tem o diagnóstico clínico de CMH foi

  1. Hypoxia-mediated upregulation of MCT1 expression supports the glycolytic phenotype of glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Gonçalves, Vera; Granja, Sara; Martinho, Olga; Honavar, Mrinalini; Pojo, Marta; Costa, Bruno M; Pires, Manuel M; Pinheiro, Célia; Cordeiro, Michelle; Bebiano, Gil; Costa, Paulo; Reis, Rui M; Baltazar, Fátima

    2016-07-19

    Glioblastomas (GBM) present a high cellular heterogeneity with conspicuous necrotic regions associated with hypoxia, which is related to tumor aggressiveness. GBM tumors exhibit high glycolytic metabolism with increased lactate production that is extruded to the tumor microenvironment through monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). While hypoxia-mediated regulation of MCT4 has been characterized, the role of MCT1 is still controversial. Thus, we aimed to understand the role of hypoxia in the regulation of MCT expression and function in GBM, MCT1 in particular. Expression of hypoxia- and glycolytic-related markers, as well as MCT1 and MCT4 isoforms was assessed in in vitro and in vivo orthotopic glioma models, and also in human GBM tissues by immunofluorescence/immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Following MCT1 inhibition, either pharmacologically with CHC (α-cyano-4-hydroxynnamic acid) or genetically with siRNAs, we assessed GBM cell viability, proliferation, metabolism, migration and invasion, under normoxia and hypoxia conditions. Hypoxia induced an increase in MCT1 plasma membrane expression in glioma cells, both in in vitro and in vivo models. Additionally, treatment with CHC and downregulation of MCT1 in glioma cells decreased lactate production, cell proliferation and invasion under hypoxia. Moreover, in the in vivo orthotopic model and in human GBM tissues, there was extensive co-expression of MCT1, but not MCT4, with the GBM hypoxia marker CAIX. Hypoxia-induced MCT1 supports GBM glycolytic phenotype, being responsible for lactate efflux and an important mediator of cell survival and aggressiveness. Therefore, MCT1 constitutes a promising therapeutic target in GBM.

  2. Hypoxia-mediated upregulation of MCT1 expression supports the glycolytic phenotype of glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Gonçalves, Vera; Granja, Sara; Martinho, Olga; Honavar, Mrinalini; Pojo, Marta; Costa, Bruno M.; Pires, Manuel M.; Pinheiro, Célia; Cordeiro, Michelle; Bebiano, Gil; Costa, Paulo; Reis, Rui M.; Baltazar, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Background Glioblastomas (GBM) present a high cellular heterogeneity with conspicuous necrotic regions associated with hypoxia, which is related to tumor aggressiveness. GBM tumors exhibit high glycolytic metabolism with increased lactate production that is extruded to the tumor microenvironment through monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). While hypoxia-mediated regulation of MCT4 has been characterized, the role of MCT1 is still controversial. Thus, we aimed to understand the role of hypoxia in the regulation of MCT expression and function in GBM, MCT1 in particular. Methods Expression of hypoxia- and glycolytic-related markers, as well as MCT1 and MCT4 isoforms was assessed in in vitro and in vivo orthotopic glioma models, and also in human GBM tissues by immunofluorescence/immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Following MCT1 inhibition, either pharmacologically with CHC (α-cyano-4-hydroxynnamic acid) or genetically with siRNAs, we assessed GBM cell viability, proliferation, metabolism, migration and invasion, under normoxia and hypoxia conditions. Results Hypoxia induced an increase in MCT1 plasma membrane expression in glioma cells, both in in vitro and in vivo models. Additionally, treatment with CHC and downregulation of MCT1 in glioma cells decreased lactate production, cell proliferation and invasion under hypoxia. Moreover, in the in vivo orthotopic model and in human GBM tissues, there was extensive co-expression of MCT1, but not MCT4, with the GBM hypoxia marker CAIX. Conclusion Hypoxia-induced MCT1 supports GBM glycolytic phenotype, being responsible for lactate efflux and an important mediator of cell survival and aggressiveness. Therefore, MCT1 constitutes a promising therapeutic target in GBM. PMID:27331625

  3. Galunisertib suppresses the staminal phenotype in hepatocellular carcinoma by modulating CD44 expression.

    PubMed

    Rani, Bhavna; Malfettone, Andrea; Dituri, Francesco; Soukupova, Jitka; Lupo, Luigi; Mancarella, Serena; Fabregat, Isabel; Giannelli, Gianluigi

    2018-03-07

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) niche in the tumor microenvironment is responsible for cancer recurrence and therapy failure. To better understand its molecular and biological involvement in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression, one can design more effective therapies and tailored then to individual patients. While sorafenib is currently the only approved drug for first-line treatment of advanced stage HCC, its role in modulating the CSC niche is estimated to be small. By contrast, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β pathway seems to influence the CSC and thus may impact hallmarks of HCC, such as liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and tumor progression. Therefore, blocking this pathway may offer an appealing and druggable target. In our study, we have used galunisertib (LY2157299), a selective ATP-mimetic inhibitor of TGF-β receptor I (TGFβI/ALK5) activation, currently under clinical investigation in HCC patients. Because the drug resistance is mainly mediated by CSCs, we tested the effects of galunisertib on stemness phenotype in HCC cells to determine whether TGF-β signaling modulates CSC niche and drug resistance. Galunisertib modulated the expression of stemness-related genes only in the invasive (HLE and HLF) HCC cells inducing a decreased expression of CD44 and THY1. Furthermore, galunisertib also reduced the stemness-related functions of invasive HCC cells decreasing the formation of colonies, liver spheroids and invasive growth ability. Interestingly, CD44 loss of function mimicked the galunisertib effects on HCC stemness-related functions. Galunisertib treatment also reduced the expression of stemness-related genes in ex vivo human HCC specimens. Our observations are the first evidence that galunisertib effectiveness overcomes stemness-derived aggressiveness via decreased expression CD44 and THY1.

  4. Endometrial gene expression profile of pregnant sows with extreme phenotypes for reproductive efficiency.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, S; Balcells, I; Castelló, A; Ovilo, C; Noguera, J L; Timoneda, O; Sánchez, A

    2015-10-05

    Prolificacy can directly impact porcine profitability, but large genetic variation and low heritability have been found regarding litter size among porcine breeds. To identify key differences in gene expression associated to swine reproductive efficiency, we performed a transcriptome analysis of sows' endometrium from an Iberian x Meishan F2 population at day 30-32 of gestation, classified according to their estimated breeding value (EBV) as high (H, EBV > 0) and low (L, EBV < 0) prolificacy phenotypes. For each sample, mRNA and small RNA libraries were RNA-sequenced, identifying 141 genes and 10 miRNAs differentially expressed between H and L groups. We selected four miRNAs based on their role in reproduction, and five genes displaying the highest differences and a positive mapping into known reproductive QTLs for RT-qPCR validation on the whole extreme population. Significant differences were validated for genes: PTGS2 (p = 0.03; H/L ratio = 3.50), PTHLH (p = 0.03; H/L ratio = 3.69), MMP8 (p = 0.01; H/L ratio =4.41) and SCNN1G (p = 0.04; H/L ratio = 3.42). Although selected miRNAs showed similar expression levels between H and L groups, significant correlation was found between the expression level of ssc-miR-133a (p < 0.01) and ssc-miR-92a (p < 0.01) and validated genes. These results provide a better understanding of the genetic architecture of prolificacy-related traits and embryo implantation failure in pigs.

  5. Adult Restoration of Shank3 Expression Rescues Selective Autistic-Like Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yuan; Monteiro, Patricia; Zhou, Yang; Kim, Jin-Ah; Gao, Xian; Fu, Zhanyan; Feng, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Because ASD is a neurodevelopmental disorder and patients typically display symptoms before the age of three1, one of the key questions in autism research is whether the pathology is reversible in adults. Here we investigated the developmental requirement of Shank3, one of the most prominent monogenic ASD genes that is estimated to contribute to ~1% of all ASD cases2–6. SHANK3 is a postsynaptic scaffold protein that regulates synaptic development, function and plasticity by orchestrating the assembly of postsynaptic density (PSD) macromolecular signaling complex7–9. Disruptions of the Shank3 gene in mouse models have resulted in synaptic defects and autistic-like behaviors including anxiety, social interaction deficits, and repetitive behavior10–13. We generated a novel Shank3 conditional knock-in mouse model and used it to demonstrate that re-expression of the Shank3 gene in adult led to improvements in synaptic protein composition, spine density and neural function in the striatum. We also provided behavioral evidence that certain behavioral abnormalities including social interaction deficit and repetitive grooming behavior could be rescued, while anxiety and motor coordination deficit could not be recovered in adulthood. Together, these results elucidate the profound impact of post-developmental activation of Shank3 expression on neural function and demonstrate certain degree of continued plasticity in the adult diseased brain. PMID:26886798

  6. In vivo cell-autonomous transcriptional abnormalities revealed in mice expressing mutant huntingtin in striatal but not cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Elizabeth A; Coppola, Giovanni; Tang, Bin; Kuhn, Alexandre; Kim, SoongHo; Geschwind, Daniel H; Brown, Timothy B; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Ehrlich, Michelle E

    2011-03-15

    Huntington's disease (HD), caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin (HTT) gene, is characterized by abnormal protein aggregates and motor and cognitive dysfunction. Htt protein is ubiquitously expressed, but the striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) is most susceptible to dysfunction and death. Abnormal gene expression represents a core pathogenic feature of HD, but the relative roles of cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous effects on transcription remain unclear. To determine the extent of cell-autonomous dysregulation in the striatum in vivo, we examined genome-wide RNA expression in symptomatic D9-N171-98Q (a.k.a. DE5) transgenic mice in which the forebrain expression of the first 171 amino acids of human Htt with a 98Q repeat expansion is limited to MSNs. Microarray data generated from these mice were compared with those generated on the identical array platform from a pan-neuronal HD mouse model, R6/2, carrying two different CAG repeat lengths, and a relatively high degree of overlap of changes in gene expression was revealed. We further focused on known canonical pathways associated with excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, dopamine signaling and trophic support. While genes related to excitotoxicity, dopamine signaling and trophic support were altered in both DE5 and R6/2 mice, which may be either cell autonomous or non-cell autonomous, genes related to mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor are primarily affected in DE5 transgenic mice, indicating cell-autonomous mechanisms. Overall, HD-induced dysregulation of the striatal transcriptome can be largely attributed to intrinsic effects of mutant Htt, in the absence of expression in cortical neurons.

  7. Positive attitude towards life and emotional expression as personality phenotypes for centenarians

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kaori; Zweig, Richard; Barzilai, Nir; Atzmon, Gil

    2012-01-01

    Centenarians have been reported to share particular personality traits including low neuroticism and high extraversion and conscientiousness. Since these traits have moderate to high heritability and are associated with various health outcomes, personality appears linked to bio-genetic mechanisms which may contribute to exceptional longevity. Therefore, the present study sought to detect genetically-based personality phenotypes in a genetically homogeneous sample of centenarians through developing and examining psychometric properties of a brief measure of the personality of centenarians, the Personality Outlook Profile Scale (POPS). The results generated two personality characteristics/domains, Positive Attitude Towards Life (PATL: optimism, easygoing, laughter, and introversion/outgoing) and Emotional Expression (EE: expressing emotions openly and not bottling up emotions). These domains demonstrated acceptable concurrent validity with two established personality measures, the NEO-Five Factor Inventory and Life Orientation Test-Revised. Additionally, centenarians in both groups had lower neuroticism and higher conscientiousness than the US adult population. Findings suggest that the POPS is a psychometrically sound measure of personality in centenarians and capture personality aspects of extraversion, neuroticism, and conscientiousness, as well as dispositional optimism which may contribute to successful aging. PMID:22626632

  8. Global Gene Expression Differences in Joints of Mice with Divergent Post Traumatic Osteoarthritis Phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Kibui, J.

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitating joint disease characterized by cartilage degradation which prompts pain, stiffness and swelling. Contributing factors include age, genetics, obesity, injury and overuse of joints. OA is defined by an acute phase and a chronic phase whereby inflammation and degeneration of articular cartilage and other tissues is followed by joint pain and limited mobility. Patients remain asymptomatic until substantial joint damage has occurred and therefore rely on long term surgical joint replacement and pain management as their sole treatment options. For this reason, there is an increasing need to identify early stage osteoarthritis biomarkers. Our study aimedmore » to identify and characterize gene expression variances in 3 different mouse strains (STR/ort, C57BL/6 and MRL/MpJ) with different susceptibility to post traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Through RNA sequence analysis of whole knee joint RNA, we identified differentially expressed genes associated with the initial stages of PTOA in relation to mice with divergent phenotypes. These results will help elucidate potential mechanisms responsible for PTOA outcomes.« less

  9. Bmp2 Deletion Causes an Amelogenesis Imperfecta Phenotype Via Regulating Enamel Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    GUO, FENG; FENG, JUNSHENG; WANG, FENG; LI, WENTONG; GAO, QINGPING; CHEN, ZHUO; SHOFF, LISA; DONLY, KEVIN J.; GLUHAK-HEINRICH, JELICA; CHUN, YONG HEE PATRICIA; HARRIS, STEPHEN E.; MACDOUGALL, MARY; CHEN, SHUO

    2015-01-01

    Although Bmp2 is essential for tooth formation, the role of Bmp2 during enamel formation remains unknown in vivo. In this study, the role of Bmp2 in regulation of enamel formation was investigated by the Bmp2 conditional knock out (Bmp2 cKO) mice. Teeth of Bmp2 cKO mice displayed severe and profound phenotypes with asymmetric and misshaped incisors as well as abrasion of incisors and molars. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the enamel layer was hypoplastic and enamel lacked a typical prismatic pattern. Teeth from null mice were much more brittle as tested by shear and compressive moduli. Expression of enamel matrix protein genes, amelogenin, enamelin, and enamel-processing proteases, Mmp-20 and Klk4 was reduced in the Bmp2 cKO teeth as reflected in a reduced enamel formation. Exogenous Bmp2 up-regulated those gene expressions in mouse enamel organ epithelial cells. This result for the first time indicates Bmp2 signaling is essential for proper enamel development and mineralization in vivo. PMID:25545831

  10. Bmp2 deletion causes an amelogenesis imperfecta phenotype via regulating enamel gene expression.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Feng, Junsheng; Wang, Feng; Li, Wentong; Gao, Qingping; Chen, Zhuo; Shoff, Lisa; Donly, Kevin J; Gluhak-Heinrich, Jelica; Chun, Yong Hee Patricia; Harris, Stephen E; MacDougall, Mary; Chen, Shuo

    2015-08-01

    Although Bmp2 is essential for tooth formation, the role of Bmp2 during enamel formation remains unknown in vivo. In this study, the role of Bmp2 in regulation of enamel formation was investigated by the Bmp2 conditional knock out (Bmp2 cKO) mice. Teeth of Bmp2 cKO mice displayed severe and profound phenotypes with asymmetric and misshaped incisors as well as abrasion of incisors and molars. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the enamel layer was hypoplastic and enamel lacked a typical prismatic pattern. Teeth from null mice were much more brittle as tested by shear and compressive moduli. Expression of enamel matrix protein genes, amelogenin, enamelin, and enamel-processing proteases, Mmp-20 and Klk4 was reduced in the Bmp2 cKO teeth as reflected in a reduced enamel formation. Exogenous Bmp2 up-regulated those gene expressions in mouse enamel organ epithelial cells. This result for the first time indicates Bmp2 signaling is essential for proper enamel development and mineralization in vivo. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Phenotypical expression of CYP2D6 in amerindians of tepehuano origin from Durango, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Lares-Asseff, Ismael; Sosa-Macías, Martha; Elizondo-Azuela, Guillermo; Flores-Pérez, Carmen; Flores-Pérez, Janett; Bradley-Alvarez, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Cytochrome P4502D6 (CYP2D6) shows genetic polymorphism, which is clinically important in the metabolism of drugs and other xenobiotics. Dextrometorphan (DM) has been used as a test compound to evaluate the in vivo activity of CYP2D6. Phenotypical frequencies of CYP2D6 have been determined in some populations, but little is known about them in native populations. The object of this study was to characterize the phenotypical expression of CYP2D6 in Amerindian subjects of Tepehuano origin from the State of Durango, using DM as metabolic marker, as well as the effect of age, sex and nutritional status on this activity. Three hr after oral administration of a single 30 mg dose of DM, the plasma concentration of DM and its metabolite dextrophan (DX) were determined with HPLC in 55 Tepehuano subjects. All subjects were extensive metabolizers (metabolic ratio MR < 0.3). No correlation of age, sex or nutritional status was found with the DM/DX metabolic ratio. However, we found a monoexponential relationship between the metabolic ratio of DM and DX, and their concentrations respectively, which can have clinical applications, since metabolic ratio can be predicted from a known DM or DX concentration. Three hr after ingestion of DM, 18 individuals showed DM plasma concentrations of 5 to 10 ng/mL, 15 subjects of 11 to 20 ng/mL, 8 subjects of 21 to 50 ng/mL and 14 subjects >51 ng/mL pointing out that DM concentrations and MR must be determined to establish toxicity risk levels.

  12. Clausa, a Tomato Mutant with a Wide Range of Phenotypic Perturbations, Displays a Cell Type-Dependent Expression of the Homeobox Gene LeT6/TKn21

    PubMed Central

    Avivi, Yigal; Lev-Yadun, Simcha; Morozova, Nadya; Libs, Laurence; Williams, Leor; Zhao, Jing; Varghese, George; Grafi, Gideon

    2000-01-01

    Class I knox genes play an important role in shoot meristem function and are thus involved in the ordered development of stems, leaves, and reproductive organs. To elucidate the mechanism underlying the expression pattern of these homeobox genes, we studied a spontaneous tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) mutant that phenotypically resembles, though is more extreme than, transgenic plants misexpressing class I knox genes. This mutant was found to carry a recessive allele, denoted clausa:shootyleaf (clau:shl)—a newly identified allele of clausa. Mutant plants exhibited abnormal leaf and flower morphology, epiphyllus inflorescences, fusion of organs, calyx asymmetry, and navel-like fruits. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy revealed that such fruits carried ectopic ovules, various vegetative primordia, as well as “forests” of stalked glandular trichomes. In situ RNA hybridization showed a peculiar expression pattern of the class I knox gene LeT6/TKn2; expression was restricted to the vascular system and palisade layer of mature leaves and to the inner part of ovules integuments. We conclude that CLAUSA regulates various aspects of tomato plant development, at least partly, by rendering the LeT6/TKn2 gene silent in specific tissues during development. Considering the expression pattern of LeT6/TKn2 in the clausa mutant, we suggest that the control over a given homeobox gene is maintained by several different regulatory mechanisms, in a cell type-dependent manner. PMID:11027705

  13. G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor (GPER) Expression in Normal and Abnormal Endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Lessey, Bruce A.; Taylor, Robert N.; Wang, Wei; Bagchi, Milan K.; Yuan, Lingwen; Scotchie, Jessica; Fritz, Marc A.; Young, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid estrogen effects are mediated by membrane receptors, and evidence suggests a role for both a membrane-associated form of estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1; ERα) and G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPER; GPR30). Considering estrogen’s importance in endometrial physiology and endometriosis pathophysiology, we hypothesized that GPER could be involved in both cyclic changes in endometrial estrogen action and that aberrant expression might be seen in the eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis. Using real-time reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical analysis of normal endometrium, endometrial samples demonstrated cycle-regulated expression of GPER, with maximal expression in the proliferative phase. Eutopic and ectopic endometrium from women with endometriosis overexpressed GPER as compared to eutopic endometrium of normal participants. Ishikawa cells, an adenocarcinoma cell line, expressed GPER, with increased expression upon treatment with estrogen or an ESR1 agonist, but not with a GPER-specific agonist. Decreased expression was seen in Ishikawa cells stably transfected with progesterone receptor A. Together, these data suggest that normal endometrial GPER expression is cyclic and regulated by nuclear estrogen and progesterone receptors, while expression is dysregulated in endometriosis. PMID:22378861

  14. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) expression in normal and abnormal endometrium.

    PubMed

    Plante, Beth J; Lessey, Bruce A; Taylor, Robert N; Wang, Wei; Bagchi, Milan K; Yuan, Lingwen; Scotchie, Jessica; Fritz, Marc A; Young, Steven L

    2012-07-01

    Rapid estrogen effects are mediated by membrane receptors, and evidence suggests a role for both a membrane-associated form of estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1; ERα) and G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPER; GPR30). Considering estrogen's importance in endometrial physiology and endometriosis pathophysiology, we hypothesized that GPER could be involved in both cyclic changes in endometrial estrogen action and that aberrant expression might be seen in the eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis. Using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical analysis of normal endometrium, endometrial samples demonstrated cycle-regulated expression of GPER, with maximal expression in the proliferative phase. Eutopic and ectopic endometrium from women with endometriosis overexpressed GPER as compared to eutopic endometrium of normal participants. Ishikawa cells, an adenocarcinoma cell line, expressed GPER, with increased expression upon treatment with estrogen or an ESR1 agonist, but not with a GPER-specific agonist. Decreased expression was seen in Ishikawa cells stably transfected with progesterone receptor A. Together, these data suggest that normal endometrial GPER expression is cyclic and regulated by nuclear estrogen and progesterone receptors, while expression is dysregulated in endometriosis.

  15. Temporal Expression Profiling Identifies Pathways Mediating Effect of Causal Variant on Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saumya; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Raharja-Liu, Pandu; Lin, Gen; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Gagneur, Julien; Sinha, Himanshu

    2015-01-01

    Even with identification of multiple causal genetic variants for common human diseases, understanding the molecular processes mediating the causal variants’ effect on the disease remains a challenge. This understanding is crucial for the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat disease. While static profiling of gene expression is primarily used to get insights into the biological bases of diseases, it makes differentiating the causative from the correlative effects difficult, as the dynamics of the underlying biological processes are not monitored. Using yeast as a model, we studied genome-wide gene expression dynamics in the presence of a causal variant as the sole genetic determinant, and performed allele-specific functional validation to delineate the causal effects of the genetic variant on the phenotype. Here, we characterized the precise genetic effects of a functional MKT1 allelic variant in sporulation efficiency variation. A mathematical model describing meiotic landmark events and conditional activation of MKT1 expression during sporulation specified an early meiotic role of this variant. By analyzing the early meiotic genome-wide transcriptional response, we demonstrate an MKT1-dependent role of novel modulators, namely, RTG1/3, regulators of mitochondrial retrograde signaling, and DAL82, regulator of nitrogen starvation, in additively effecting sporulation efficiency. In the presence of functional MKT1 allele, better respiration during early sporulation was observed, which was dependent on the mitochondrial retrograde regulator, RTG3. Furthermore, our approach showed that MKT1 contributes to sporulation independent of Puf3, an RNA-binding protein that steady-state transcription profiling studies have suggested to mediate MKT1-pleiotropic effects during mitotic growth. These results uncover interesting regulatory links between meiosis and mitochondrial retrograde signaling. In this study, we highlight the advantage of analyzing

  16. Differential gene expression underlying ovarian phenotype determination in honey bee, Apis mellifera L., caste development.

    PubMed

    Lago, Denyse Cavalcante; Humann, Fernanda Carvalho; Barchuk, Angel Roberto; Abraham, Kuruvilla Joseph; Hartfelder, Klaus

    2016-12-01

    Adult honey bee queens and workers drastically differ in ovary size. This adult ovary phenotype difference becomes established during the final larval instar, when massive programmed cell death leads to the degeneration of 95-99% of the ovariole anlagen in workers. The higher juvenile hormone (JH) levels in queen larvae protect the ovaries against such degeneration. To gain insights into the molecular architecture underlying this divergence critical for adult caste fate and worker sterility, we performed a microarray analysis on fourth and early fifth instar queen and worker ovaries. For the fourth instar we found nine differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with log 2 FC > 1.0, but this number increased to 56 in early fifth-instar ovaries. We selected 15 DEGs for quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis. Nine differed significantly by the variables caste and/or development. Interestingly, genes with enzyme functions were higher expressed in workers, while those related to transcription and signaling had higher transcript levels in queens. For the RT-qPCR confirmed genes we analyzed their response to JH. This revealed a significant up-regulation for two genes, a short chain dehydrogenase reductase (sdr) and a heat shock protein 90 (hsp90). Five other genes, including hsp60 and hexamerin 70b (hex70b), were significantly down-regulated by JH. The sdr gene had previously come up as differentially expressed in other transcriptome analyses on honey bee larvae and heat shock proteins are frequently involved in insect hormone responses, this making them interesting candidates for further functional assays. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Inferring gene dependency network specific to phenotypic alteration based on gene expression data and clinical information of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xionghui; Liu, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Although many methods have been proposed to reconstruct gene regulatory network, most of them, when applied in the sample-based data, can not reveal the gene regulatory relations underlying the phenotypic change (e.g. normal versus cancer). In this paper, we adopt phenotype as a variable when constructing the gene regulatory network, while former researches either neglected it or only used it to select the differentially expressed genes as the inputs to construct the gene regulatory network. To be specific, we integrate phenotype information with gene expression data to identify the gene dependency pairs by using the method of conditional mutual information. A gene dependency pair (A,B) means that the influence of gene A on the phenotype depends on gene B. All identified gene dependency pairs constitute a directed network underlying the phenotype, namely gene dependency network. By this way, we have constructed gene dependency network of breast cancer from gene expression data along with two different phenotype states (metastasis and non-metastasis). Moreover, we have found the network scale free, indicating that its hub genes with high out-degrees may play critical roles in the network. After functional investigation, these hub genes are found to be biologically significant and specially related to breast cancer, which suggests that our gene dependency network is meaningful. The validity has also been justified by literature investigation. From the network, we have selected 43 discriminative hubs as signature to build the classification model for distinguishing the distant metastasis risks of breast cancer patients, and the result outperforms those classification models with published signatures. In conclusion, we have proposed a promising way to construct the gene regulatory network by using sample-based data, which has been shown to be effective and accurate in uncovering the hidden mechanism of the biological process and identifying the gene signature for

  18. Pericellular innervation of neurons expressing abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in the hippocampal formation of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; Defelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) represent one of the main neuropathological features in the cerebral cortex associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This neurofibrillary lesion involves the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated or abnormally phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau into paired helical filaments (PHF-tau) within neurons. We have used immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy reconstructions to examine the distribution of PHF-tau-immunoreactive (ir) cells, and their perisomatic GABAergic and glutamatergic innervations in the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, correlative light and electron microscopy was employed to examine these neurons and the perisomatic synapses. We observed two patterns of staining in PHF-tau-ir neurons, pattern I (without NFT) and pattern II (with NFT), the distribution of which varies according to the cortical layer and area. Furthermore, the distribution of both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals around the soma and proximal processes of PHF-tau-ir neurons does not seem to be altered as it is indistinguishable from both control cases and from adjacent neurons that did not contain PHF-tau. At the electron microscope level, a normal looking neuropil with typical symmetric and asymmetric synapses was observed around PHF-tau-ir neurons. These observations suggest that the synaptic connectivity around the perisomatic region of these PHF-tau-ir neurons was apparently unaltered.

  19. Gene Expression Signatures Characterized by Longitudinal Stability and Interindividual Variability Delineate Baseline Phenotypic Groups with Distinct Responses to Immune Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Scheid, Adam D; Van Keulen, Virginia P; Felts, Sara J; Neier, Steven C; Middha, Sumit; Nair, Asha A; Techentin, Robert W; Gilbert, Barry K; Jen, Jin; Neuhauser, Claudia; Zhang, Yuji; Pease, Larry R

    2018-03-01

    Human immunity exhibits remarkable heterogeneity among individuals, which engenders variable responses to immune perturbations in human populations. Population studies reveal that, in addition to interindividual heterogeneity, systemic immune signatures display longitudinal stability within individuals, and these signatures may reliably dictate how given individuals respond to immune perturbations. We hypothesize that analyzing relationships among these signatures at the population level may uncover baseline immune phenotypes that correspond with response outcomes to immune stimuli. To test this, we quantified global gene expression in peripheral blood CD4 + cells from healthy individuals at baseline and following CD3/CD28 stimulation at two time points 1 mo apart. Systemic CD4 + cell baseline and poststimulation molecular immune response signatures (MIRS) were defined by identifying genes expressed at levels that were stable between time points within individuals and differential among individuals in each state. Iterative differential gene expression analyses between all possible phenotypic groupings of at least three individuals using the baseline and stimulated MIRS gene sets revealed shared baseline and response phenotypic groupings, indicating the baseline MIRS contained determinants of immune responsiveness. Furthermore, significant numbers of shared phenotype-defining sets of determinants were identified in baseline data across independent healthy cohorts. Combining the cohorts and repeating the analyses resulted in identification of over 6000 baseline immune phenotypic groups, implying that the MIRS concept may be useful in many immune perturbation contexts. These findings demonstrate that patterns in complex gene expression variability can be used to define immune phenotypes and discover determinants of immune responsiveness. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Decreased SAP Expression in T Cells from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Contributes to Early Signaling Abnormalities and Reduced IL-2 Production.

    PubMed

    Karampetsou, Maria P; Comte, Denis; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C; Tsokos, George C

    2016-06-15

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of abnormalities, including increased early signaling events following engagement of the TCR. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family cell surface receptors and the X-chromosome-defined signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) adaptor are important in the development of several immunocyte lineages and modulating the immune response. We present evidence that SAP protein levels are decreased in T cells and in their main subsets isolated from 32 women and three men with SLE, independent of disease activity. In SLE T cells, SAP protein is also subject to increased degradation by caspase-3. Forced expression of SAP in SLE T cells normalized IL-2 production, calcium (Ca(2+)) responses, and tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of proteins. Exposure of normal T cells to SLE serum IgG, known to contain anti-CD3/TCR Abs, resulted in SAP downregulation. We conclude that SLE T cells display reduced levels of the adaptor protein SAP, probably as a result of continuous T cell activation and degradation by caspase-3. Restoration of SAP levels in SLE T cells corrects the overexcitable lupus T cell phenotype. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. Mouse and human BAC transgenes recapitulate tissue-specific expression of the vitamin D receptor in mice and rescue the VDR-null phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong Min; Bishop, Kathleen A; Goellner, Joseph J; O'Brien, Charles A; Pike, J Wesley

    2014-06-01

    The biological actions of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) are mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR), which is expressed in numerous target tissues in a cell type-selective manner. Recent studies using genomic analyses and recombineered bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) have defined the specific features of mouse and human VDR gene loci in vitro. In the current study, we introduced recombineered mouse and human VDR BACs as transgenes into mice and explored their expression capabilities in vivo. Individual transgenic mouse strains selectively expressed BAC-derived mouse or human VDR proteins in appropriate vitamin D target tissues, thereby recapitulating the tissue-specific expression of endogenous mouse VDR. The mouse VDR transgene was also regulated by 1,25(OH)2D3 and dibutyryl-cAMP. When crossed into a VDR-null mouse background, both transgenes restored wild-type basal as well as 1,25(OH)2D3-inducible gene expression patterns in the appropriate tissues. This maneuver resulted in the complete rescue of the aberrant phenotype noted in the VDR-null mouse, including systemic features associated with altered calcium and phosphorus homeostasis and disrupted production of parathyroid hormone and fibroblast growth factor 23, and abnormalities associated with the skeleton, kidney, parathyroid gland, and the skin. This study suggests that both mouse and human VDR transgenes are capable of recapitulating basal and regulated expression of the VDR in the appropriate mouse tissues and restore 1,25(OH)2D3 function. These results provide a baseline for further dissection of mechanisms integral to mouse and human VDR gene expression and offer the potential to explore the consequence of selective mutations in VDR proteins in vivo.

  2. [Abnormality of TOP2A expression and its gene copy number variations in neuroblastic tumors].

    PubMed

    Chen, J M; Zhou, C J; Ma, X L; Guan, D D; Yang, L Y; Yue, P; Gong, L P

    2016-11-08

    Objective: To detect TOP2A protein expression and gene copy number alterations, and to analyze related clinical and pathological implications in pediatric neuroblastic tumors (NT). Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to detect TOP2A protein expression. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to detect numerical aberrations of TOP2A. Results: TOP2A protein was expressed in 59.1%(52/88) of cases, which was associated with differentiation ( P =0.006), Ki-67 index ( P <0.01) and MKI ( P =0.001). Twenty-eight cases (35.0%, 28/88) showed TOP2A gene amplification, which was correlated with the age ( P <0.01), clinical stage ( P =0.028), high risk group ( P =0.001), Ki-67 index ( P =0.040) and differentiation ( P =0.014). Survival analysis showed that TOP2A expression was related to survival rate. Multivariate analyses showed that TOP2A expression was an independent predictor for poor prognosis ( P =0.010). Conclusions: More than half of the cases show TOP2A expression, which is more likely associated with NB, high Ki-67 index and high MKI. Cases with TOP2A expression have shorter survivals and poorer prognosis. TOP2A amplification is seen in 35% and likely occurs in patients older than 18 months and at advanced INSS stages (Ⅲ and Ⅳ). As a target of the anthracycline-based adjuvant drugs, TOP2A test can be used to select patient with NT for the therapy.

  3. Skeletal Phenotype of Transgenic Mice Expressing the Beta1 Integrin Cytoplasmic Tail In Osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, R. K.; vanderMeulen, M. C. H.; Damsky, D.; Kim, J.-B.; Amblard, D.; Amblard, D.; Nishimura, Y.; Almeida, E.; Iwaniec, U. T.; Wronski, T. J.; hide

    2002-01-01

    To define the physiologic role of beta1 integrin in bone formation and mechanical loading, transgenic mice were generated by expressing the cytoplasmic tall and transmembrane domain of Beta1 integrin under the control of the osteocalcin promoter. In cultured cells, this truncated fragment of Beta1 can act as a dominant negative. Previously, the matrix of calvariae was shown to be abnormal in transgenic (TG) compared to wildtype (WT) mice. In this study, we analyzed appendicular bone in TG and WT, male and female mice at 14, 35, 63, 90 and 365 days old (n=8-12/gp). To assess beta1 integrin function in mechanical loading, a pilot study using hindlimb unloading by tail suspension was performed. 35d old TG and WT females were hindlimb unloaded for 4 wks (n=3-5). Body mass, bone mineral content, histomorphometric (distal femur) and biomechanical parameters were analyzed. Statistical significance (P less than.05) was defined by ANOVA using the Tukey-Kramer post-hoc test. We confirmed transgene expression by immunoprecipitating then immunoblotting bone lysates using an antibody against the beta1 tail. Body masses of TG mice at 63, 90 and 365d old were greater (16-25%) than WT. Some TG female mice at 365d appeared obese; mean abdominal fat mass was 415% greater in TG than WT mice. Tibiae were longer (5-7%) in TG than WT mice at 63 and 90d. Tibial mineral mass of 35d males was 7% lower in TG than WT mice, but at 63d was 21% higher. The % osteoblast surface in 35d TG mice was 20% higher than WT, and at 63d was 17% lower, while % osteoclast surface did not differ. In 365d mice, cancellous bone volume (125%) and endocortical mineral apposition rate (40%) were greater in TG than WT males but not females. In WT mice, hindlimb unloading caused a reduction in mineral mass of tibiae (-20%) and lumbar vertebrae (-22%) relative to normally loaded controls. Surprisingly, hindlimb unloading also caused a relative reduction (-13%) in humerus mass. The effects of hindlimb unloading on

  4. Prenatal ethanol induces an anxiety phenotype and alters expression of dynorphin & nociceptin/orphanin FQ genes.

    PubMed

    Wille-Bille, Aranza; Miranda-Morales, Roberto Sebastián; Pucci, Mariangela; Bellia, Fabio; D'Addario, Claudio; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2018-07-13

    Animal models have suggested that prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) alters the κ opioid receptor system. The present study investigated the brain expression of dynorphin and nociceptin/orphanin FQ related genes and assessed anxiety-like behavior in the light-dark box (LDB), shelter-seeking and risk-taking behaviors in the concentric square field (CSF) test, and ethanol-induced locomotion in the open field (OF), in infant or adolescent Wistar rats that were exposed to PEE (0.0 or 2.0 g/kg, intragastrically, gestational days 17-20). We measured brain mRNA levels of prodynorphin (PDYN), κ opioid receptors (KOR), the nociceptin/orphanin FQ opioid peptide precursor prepronociceptin (ppN/OFQ) and nociceptine/orphanin FQ receptors (NOR). Prenatal ethanol exposure upregulated PDYN and KOR mRNA levels in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) in infant and adolescent rats and KOR mRNA levels in the prefrontal cortex in infant rats. The changes in gene expression in the VTA were accompanied by a reduction of DNA methylation at the PDYN gene promoter, and by a reduction of DNA methylation at the KOR gene promoter. The PEE-induced upregulation of PDYN/KOR in the VTA was accompanied by lower NOR gene expression in the VTA, and lower PDYN gene expression in the nucleus accumbens. PEE rats exhibited hypolocomotion in the OF, greater avoidance of the white and brightly lit areas in the LDB and CSF, and greater preference for the sheltered area in the CSF test. These results suggest that PEE upregulates the dynorphin system, resulting in an anxiety-prone phenotype and triggering compensatory responses in the nociceptin/orphanin FQ system. These findings may help elucidate the mechanisms that underlie the effects of PEE and suggest that the dynorphin and nociceptin/orphanin FQ systems may be possible targets for the prevention and treatment of PEE-induced alterations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Temperature control of molecular circuit switch responsible for virulent phenotype expression in uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilov, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The behavior and fate of biological organisms are to a large extent dictated by their environment, which can be often viewed as a collection of features and constraints governed by physics laws. Since biological systems comprise networks of molecular interactions, one such key physical property is temperature, whose variations directly affect the rates of biochemical reactions involved. For instance, temperature is known to control many gene regulatory circuits responsible for pathogenicity in bacteria. One such example is type 1 fimbriae (T1F) -- the foremost virulence factor in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), which accounts for 80-90% of all community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). The expression of T1F is randomly `phase variable', i.e. individual cells switch between virulent/fimbriate and avirulent/afimbriate phenotypes, with rates regulated by temperature. Our computational investigation of this process, which is based on FimB/FimE recombinase-mediated inversion of fimS DNA element, offers new insights into its discrete-stochastic kinetics. In particular, it elucidates the logic of T1F control optimization to the host temperature and contributes further understanding toward the development of novel therapeutic approaches to UPEC-caused UTIs.

  6. Recombination and the evolution of coordinated phenotypic expression in a frequency-dependent game

    PubMed Central

    Arbilly, Michal; Motro, Uzi; Feldman, Marcus W.; Lotem, Arnon

    2011-01-01

    A long standing question in evolutionary biology concerns the maintenance of adaptive combinations of traits in the presence of recombination. This problem may be solved if positive epistasis selects for reducing the rate of recombination between such traits, but this requires sufficiently strong epistasis. Here we use a model that we developed previously to analyze a frequency-dependent strategy game in asexual populations, to study how adaptive combinations of traits may be maintained in the presence of recombination when epistasis is too weak to select for genetic linkage. Previously, in the asexual case, our model demonstrated the evolution of adaptive associations between social foraging strategies and learning rules. We verify that these adaptive associations, which are represented by different two-locus haplotypes, can easily be broken by genetic recombination. We also confirm that a modifier allele that reduces the rate of recombination fails to evolve (due to weak epistasis). However, we find that under the same conditions of weak epistasis, there is an alternative mechanism that allows association between traits to evolve. This is based on a genetic switch that responds to the presence of one social foraging allele by activating one of two alternative learning alleles that are carried by all individuals. We suggest that such coordinated phenotypic expression by genetic switches offers a general and robust mechanism for the evolution of adaptive combinations of traits in the presence of recombination. PMID:21945887

  7. The transgenic expression of LARGE exacerbates the muscle phenotype of dystroglycanopathy mice.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Charlotte; Fernandez-Fuente, Marta; Booler, Helen; Parr, Callum; Kavishwar, Manoli; Ashraf, Attia; Lacey, Erica; Kim, Jihee; Terry, Rebecca; Ackroyd, Mark R; Wells, Kim E; Muntoni, Francesco; Wells, Dominic J; Brown, Susan C

    2014-04-01

    Mutations in fukutin-related protein (FKRP) underlie a group of muscular dystrophies associated with the hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG), a proportion of which show central nervous system involvement. Our original FKRP knock-down mouse (FKRP(KD)) replicated many of the characteristics seen in patients at the severe end of the dystroglycanopathy spectrum but died perinatally precluding its full phenotyping and use in testing potential therapies. We have now overcome this by crossing FKRP(KD) mice with those expressing Cre recombinase under the Sox1 promoter. Owing to our original targeting strategy, this has resulted in the restoration of Fkrp levels in the central nervous system but not the muscle, thereby generating a new model (FKRP(MD)) which develops a progressive muscular dystrophy resembling what is observed in limb girdle muscular dystrophy. Like-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (LARGE) is a bifunctional glycosyltransferase previously shown to hyperglycosylate α-DG. To investigate the therapeutic potential of LARGE up-regulation, we have now crossed the FKRP(MD) line with one overexpressing LARGE and show that, contrary to expectation, this results in a worsening of the muscle pathology implying that any future strategies based upon LARGE up-regulation require careful management.

  8. Expression Variants of the Lipogenic AGPAT6 Gene Affect Diverse Milk Composition Phenotypes in Bos taurus

    PubMed Central

    Littlejohn, Mathew D.; Tiplady, Kathryn; Lopdell, Thomas; Law, Tania A.; Scott, Andrew; Harland, Chad; Sherlock, Ric; Henty, Kristen; Obolonkin, Vlad; Lehnert, Klaus; MacGibbon, Alistair; Spelman, Richard J.; Davis, Stephen R.; Snell, Russell G.

    2014-01-01

    Milk is composed of a complex mixture of lipids, proteins, carbohydrates and various vitamins and minerals as a source of nutrition for young mammals. The composition of milk varies between individuals, with lipid composition in particular being highly heritable. Recent reports have highlighted a region of bovine chromosome 27 harbouring variants affecting milk fat percentage and fatty acid content. We aimed to further investigate this locus in two independent cattle populations, consisting of a Holstein-Friesian x Jersey crossbreed pedigree of 711 F2 cows, and a collection of 32,530 mixed ancestry Bos taurus cows. Bayesian genome-wide association mapping using markers imputed from the Illumina BovineHD chip revealed a large quantitative trait locus (QTL) for milk fat percentage on chromosome 27, present in both populations. We also investigated a range of other milk composition phenotypes, and report additional associations at this locus for fat yield, protein percentage and yield, lactose percentage and yield, milk volume, and the proportions of numerous milk fatty acids. We then used mammary RNA sequence data from 212 lactating cows to assess the transcript abundance of genes located in the milk fat percentage QTL interval. This analysis revealed a strong eQTL for AGPAT6, demonstrating that high milk fat percentage genotype is also additively associated with increased expression of the AGPAT6 gene. Finally, we used whole genome sequence data from six F1 sires to target a panel of novel AGPAT6 locus variants for genotyping in the F2 crossbreed population. Association analysis of 58 of these variants revealed highly significant association for polymorphisms mapping to the 5′UTR exons and intron 1 of AGPAT6. Taken together, these data suggest that variants affecting the expression of AGPAT6 are causally involved in differential milk fat synthesis, with pleiotropic consequences for a diverse range of other milk components. PMID:24465687

  9. Phenotypic and gene expression responses of E. coli to antibiotics during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zea, Luis

    Bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics has been shown in vitro to be reduced during spaceflight; however, the underlying mechanisms responsible for this outcome are not fully understood. In particular, it is not yet clear whether this observed response is due to increased drug resistance (a microbial defense response) or decreased drug efficacy (a microgravity biophysical mass transport effect). To gain insight into the differentiation between these two potential causes, an investigation was undertaken onboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2014 termed Antibiotic Effectiveness in Space-1 (AES-1). For this purpose, E. coli was challenged with two antibiotics, Gentamicin Sulfate and Colistin Sulfate, at concentrations higher than those needed to inhibit growth on Earth. Phenotypic parameters (cell size, cell envelope thickness, population density and lag phase duration) and gene expression were compared between the spaceflight samples and ground controls cultured in varying levels of drug concentration. It was observed that flight samples proliferated in antibiotic concentrations that were inhibitory on Earth, growing on average to a 13-fold greater concentration than matched 1g controls. Furthermore, at the highest drug concentrations in space, E. coli cells were observed to aggregate into visible clusters. In spaceflight, cell size was significantly reduced, translating to a decrease in cell surface area to about one half of the ground controls. Smaller cell surface area can in turn proportionally reduce the rate of antibiotic molecules reaching the cell. Additionally, it was observed that genes --- in some cases more than 2000 --- were overexpressed in space with respect to ground controls. Up-regulated genes include poxB, which helps catabolize glucose into organic acids that alter acidity around and inside the cell, and the gadABC family genes, which confer resistance to extreme acid conditions. The next step is to characterize the mechanisms behind

  10. Abnormal gene expression profiles in human ovaries from polycystic ovary syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Erik; Laven, Joop S E; Dommerholt, Henri B R; Polman, Jan; van Rijt, Cindy; van den Hurk, Caroline; Westland, Jolanda; Mosselman, Sietse; Fauser, Bart C J M

    2004-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) represents the most common cause of anovulatory infertility and affects 5-10% of women of reproductive age. The etiology of PCOS is still unknown. The current study is the first to describe consistent differences in gene expression profiles in human ovaries comparing PCOS patients vs. healthy normoovulatory individuals. The microarray analysis of PCOS vs. normal ovaries identifies dysregulated expression of genes encoding components of several biological pathways or systems such as Wnt signaling, extracellular matrix components, and immunological factors. Resulting data may provide novel clues for ovarian dysfunction in PCOS. Intriguingly, the gene expression profiles of ovaries from (long-term) androgen-treated female-to-male transsexuals (TSX) show considerable overlap with PCOS. This observation provides supportive evidence that androgens play a key role in the pathogenesis of PCOS. Presented data may contribute to a better understanding of dysregulated pathways in PCOS, which might ultimately reveal novel leads for therapeutic intervention.

  11. Abnormal Amygdala and Prefrontal Cortex Activation to Facial Expressions in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Amy S.; Reiss, Allan L.; Howe, Meghan E.; Kelley, Ryan G.; Singh, Manpreet K.; Adleman, Nancy E.; Karchemskiy, Asya; Chang, Kiki D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in pediatric bipolar disorder (BD) have reported greater amygdala and less dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activation to facial expressions compared to healthy controls. The current study investigates whether these differences are associated with the early or late…

  12. The Zebrafish Model Organism Database: new support for human disease models, mutation details, gene expression phenotypes and searching

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Douglas G.; Bradford, Yvonne M.; Eagle, Anne; Fashena, David; Frazer, Ken; Kalita, Patrick; Mani, Prita; Martin, Ryan; Moxon, Sierra Taylor; Paddock, Holly; Pich, Christian; Ramachandran, Sridhar; Ruzicka, Leyla; Schaper, Kevin; Shao, Xiang; Singer, Amy; Toro, Sabrina; Van Slyke, Ceri; Westerfield, Monte

    2017-01-01

    The Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN; http://zfin.org) is the central resource for zebrafish (Danio rerio) genetic, genomic, phenotypic and developmental data. ZFIN curators provide expert manual curation and integration of comprehensive data involving zebrafish genes, mutants, transgenic constructs and lines, phenotypes, genotypes, gene expressions, morpholinos, TALENs, CRISPRs, antibodies, anatomical structures, models of human disease and publications. We integrate curated, directly submitted, and collaboratively generated data, making these available to zebrafish research community. Among the vertebrate model organisms, zebrafish are superbly suited for rapid generation of sequence-targeted mutant lines, characterization of phenotypes including gene expression patterns, and generation of human disease models. The recent rapid adoption of zebrafish as human disease models is making management of these data particularly important to both the research and clinical communities. Here, we describe recent enhancements to ZFIN including use of the zebrafish experimental conditions ontology, ‘Fish’ records in the ZFIN database, support for gene expression phenotypes, models of human disease, mutation details at the DNA, RNA and protein levels, and updates to the ZFIN single box search. PMID:27899582

  13. Elevated CD26 Expression by Skin Fibroblasts Distinguishes a Profibrotic Phenotype Involved in Scar Formation Compared to Gingival Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mah, Wesley; Jiang, Guoqiao; Olver, Dylan; Gallant-Behm, Corrie; Wiebe, Colin; Hart, David A; Koivisto, Leeni; Larjava, Hannu; Häkkinen, Lari

    2017-08-01

    Compared to skin, wound healing in oral mucosa is faster and produces less scarring, but the mechanisms involved are incompletely understood. Studies in mice have linked high expression of CD26 to a profibrotic fibroblast phenotype, but this has not been tested in models more relevant for humans. We hypothesized that CD26 is highly expressed by human skin fibroblasts (SFBLs), and this associates with a profibrotic phenotype distinct from gingival fibroblasts (GFBLs). We compared CD26 expression in human gingiva and skin and in gingival and hypertrophic-like scar-forming skin wound healing in a pig model, and used three-dimensional cultures of human GFBLs and SFBLs. In both humans and pigs, nonwounded skin contained abundantly CD26-positive fibroblasts, whereas in gingiva they were rare. During skin wound healing, CD26-positive cells accumulated over time and persisted in forming hypertrophic-like scars, whereas few CD26-positive cells were present in the regenerated gingival wounds. Cultured human SFBLs displayed significantly higher levels of CD26 than GFBLs. This was associated with an increased expression of profibrotic genes and transforming growth factor-β signaling in SFBLs. The profibrotic phenotype of SFBLs partially depended on expression of CD26, but was independent of its catalytic activity. Thus, a CD26-positive fibroblast population that is abundant in human skin but not in gingiva may drive the profibrotic response leading to excessive scarring. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Repressed expression of a gene for a basic helix-loop-helix protein causes a white flower phenotype in carnation

    PubMed Central

    Totsuka, Akane; Okamoto, Emi; Miyahara, Taira; Kouno, Takanobu; Cano, Emilio A.; Sasaki, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Aiko; Tasaki, Keisuke; Nishihara, Masahiro; Ozeki, Yoshihiro

    2018-01-01

    In a previous study, two genes responsible for white flower phenotypes in carnation were identified. These genes encoded enzymes involved in anthocyanin synthesis, namely, flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H) and dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR), and showed reduced expression in the white flower phenotypes. Here, we identify another candidate gene for white phenotype in carnation flowers using an RNA-seq analysis followed by RT-PCR. This candidate gene encodes a transcriptional regulatory factor of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) type. In the cultivar examined here, both F3H and DFR genes produced active enzyme proteins; however, expression of DFR and of genes for enzymes involved in the downstream anthocyanin synthetic pathway from DFR was repressed in the absence of bHLH expression. Occasionally, flowers of the white flowered cultivar used here have red speckles and stripes on the white petals. We found that expression of bHLH occurred in these red petal segments and induced expression of DFR and the following downstream enzymes. Our results indicate that a member of the bHLH superfamily is another gene involved in anthocyanin synthesis in addition to structural genes encoding enzymes. PMID:29681756

  15. Frequency and expression of mutacin biosynthesis genes in isolates of Streptococcus mutans with different mutacin-producing phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Regianne Umeko; Höfling, José Francisco; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the frequency and expression of biosynthesis genes in 47 Streptococcus mutans isolates with different mutacin-producing phenotypes. Detection of the frequency and expression of genes encoding mutacin types I, II, III and IV were carried out by PCR and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, respectively, using primers specific for each type of biosynthesis gene. In addition, a further eight genes encoding putative bacteriocins, designated bsm 283, bsm 299, bsm 423, bsm 1889c, bsm 1892c, bsm 1896, bsm 1906c and bsm 1914, were also screened. There was a high phenotypic diversity; some Streptococcus mutans isolates presented broad antimicrobial spectra against other Streptococcus mutans clinical isolates, including bacteria resistant to common antibiotics, as well as Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus pyogenes. The expression frequency of the bsm gene was higher than that of the previously characterized mutacins (I-IV). There was no positive correlation between the number of indicator strains inhibited (antimicrobial spectra) and the number of biosynthesis genes expressed (Spearman correlation test, r=-0.03, P>0.05). In conclusion, the high diversity of mutacin-producing phenotypes, associated with high frequency of expression of the biosynthesis genes screened, reveals a broad repertoire of genetic determinants encoding antimicrobial peptides that can act in different combinations.

  16. Study on the relationship between the expression of IGF-1 in umbilical cord blood and abnormal glucose metabolism during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, K; Wu, H-Y; Xu, Y-H

    2017-02-01

    To explore the relationship between the expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in neonatal umbilical cord blood and abnormal glucose metabolism during pregnancy. We have selected 63 cases of delivery randomly, term birth and maternal from January 2015 to January 2016 in our hospital, gestational diabetes mellitus for Group A, abnormal gestational glucose tolerance for Group B and normal for Group C with 21 cases in each group. The venous blood samples were collected from all the pregnant females 2 weeks before delivery, and the levels of HbA1c in serum were detected by Elisa method. During the delivery, the umbilical cord blood was collected and the levels of IGF-1 were measured by double site immune enzyme analysis. The neonatal weight was recorded and the correlation analysis was made in respect of the measurement results. The level of HbA1c in Group A was significantly higher than that in Group C (p < 0.05); IGF-1 level and neonatal weight of Group B were significantly higher than that of Group C (p < 0.05), IGF-1 has a significant correlation with neonatal weight in Group C, and HbA1c and IGF-1 were positively correlated (p < 0.05); IGF-1 was positively correlated with neonatal weight in Group A and Group B (p < 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between the IGF-1 level of neonatal umbilical cord blood and the neonatal weight (p < 0.05). Also, the level of HbA1c was positively correlated with the level of IGF-1 in neonatal umbilical cord blood at the end of pregnancy (p < 0.05). The expression level of IGF-1 in the final stage of pregnant females can be detected to predict the expression level of IGF-1 in newborn infants and then the growth status of the fetus can be obtained.

  17. Factors Influencing the Phenotypic Expression of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in Genetic Carriers.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sánchez, Inmaculada; Romero-Puche, Antonio José; García-Molina Sáez, Esperanza; Sabater-Molina, María; López-Ayala, José María; Muñoz-Esparza, Carmen; López-Cuenca, David; de la Morena, Gonzalo; Castro-García, Francisco José; Gimeno-Blanes, Juan Ramón

    2018-03-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disorder with variable expression. It is mainly caused by mutations in sarcomeric genes but the phenotype could be modulated by other factors. The aim of this study was to determine whether factors such as sex, systemic hypertension, or physical activity are modifiers of disease severity and to establish their role in age-related penetrance of HCM. We evaluated 272 individuals (mean age 49 ± 17 years, 57% males) from 72 families with causative mutations. The relationship between sex, hypertension, physical activity, and left ventricular hypertrophy was studied. The proportion of affected individuals increased with age. Men developed the disease 12.5 years earlier than women (adjusted median, 95%CI, -17.52 to -6.48; P < .001). Hypertensive patients were diagnosed with HCM later (10.8 years of delay) than normotensive patients (adjusted median, 95%CI, 6.28-17.09; P < .001). Individuals who performed physical activity were diagnosed with HCM significantly earlier (7.3 years, adjusted median, 95%CI, -14.49 to -1.51; P = .016). Sex, hypertension, and the degree of physical activity were not significantly associated with the severity of left ventricular hypertrophy. Adjusted survival both free from sudden death and from the combined event were not influenced by any of the exploratory variables. Men and athletes who are carriers of sarcomeric mutations are diagnosed earlier than women and sedentary individuals. Hypertensive carriers of sarcomeric mutations have a delayed diagnosis. Sex, hypertension, and physical activity are not associated with disease severity in carriers of HCM causative mutations. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. AP4M1 is abnormally expressed in oxygen-glucose deprived hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Cheng, X Y; Sheng, G Y

    2014-03-20

    AP4M1 mutations have been suggested to be associated with autosomal recessive cerebral palsy syndrome. But the pathogenic mechanism remains uncertain. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether and how AP4M1 expression is changed in injured neurons. Primary cultured hippocampal neurons were prepared for this experiment. They were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) leading to apoptosis, mimicking brain ischemia. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) was labeled immunofluorescently to confirm that the purity of neuron was higher than 90%. Real-time PCR and western blotting were performed to measure the gene expression. AP4M1 was labeled with MAP2 or Tau-1 to observe the distribution. We found that the AP4M1 protein levels immediately after the procedure were similar between the OGD group and the sham group. However, down-regulation was observed 12h after the reperfusion, and became more notable at 24h. The real-time PCR showed similar results, except that the down-regulation of mRNA was able to be detected immediately after the OGD. Immunofluorescent labeling revealed AP4M1 distributed in the dendrites of normal neurons, but it redistributed to the axons after the OGD procedure. In conclusion, AP4M1 is not only down-regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels, but also redistributed from dendrites to axons in oxygen-glucose deprived hippocampal neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dilute passage promotes expression of genetic and phenotypic variants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in cell culture.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Palomino, S; Rojas, J M; Martínez, M A; Fenyö, E M; Nájera, R; Domingo, E; López-Galíndez, C

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the extent of genetic and phenotypic diversification of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) upon 15 serial passages of clonal viral populations in MT-4 cell cultures. Several genetic and phenotypic modifications previously noted during evolution of HIV-1 in infected humans were also observed upon passages of the virus in cell culture. Notably, the transition from non-syncytium-inducing to syncytium-inducing phenotype (previously observed during disease progression) and fixation of amino acid substitutions at the main antigenic loop V3 of gp120 were observed in the course of replication of the virus in MT-4 cell cultures in the absence of immune selection. Interestingly, most genetic and phenotypic alterations occurred upon passage of the virus at a low multiplicity of infection (0.001 infectious particles per cell) rather than at a higher multiplicity of infection (0.1 infectious particles per cell). The degree of genetic diversification attained by HIV-1, estimated by the RNase A mismatch cleavage method and by nucleotide sequencing, is of about 0.03% of genomic sites mutated after 15 serial passages. This value is not significantly different from previous estimates for foot-and-mouth disease virus when subjected to a similar process and analysis. We conclude that several genetic and phenotypic modifications of HIV-1 previously observed in vivo occur also in the constant environment provided by a cell culture system. Dilute passage promotes in a highly significant way the expression of deviant HIV-1 genomes. Images PMID:8474182

  20. Manipulation of DET1 expression in tomato results in photomorphogenic phenotypes caused by post-transcriptional gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Davuluri, Ganga Rao; van Tuinen, Ageeth; Mustilli, Anna Chiara; Manfredonia, Alessandro; Newman, Robert; Burgess, Diane; Brummell, David A.; King, Stephen R.; Palys, Joe; Uhlig, John; Pennings, Henk M. J.; Bowler, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Summary The tomato HIGH PIGMENT-2 gene encodes an orthologue of the Arabidopsis nuclear protein DE-ETIOLATED 1 (DET1). From genetic analyses it has been proposed that DET1 is a negative regulator of light signal transduction, and recent results indicate that it may control light-regulated gene expression at the level of chromatin remodelling. To gain further understanding about the function of DET1 during plant development, we generated a range of overexpression constructs and introduced them into tomato. Unexpectedly, we only observed phenotypes characteristic of DET1 inactivation, i.e. hyper-responsiveness to light. Molecular analysis indicated in all cases that these phenotypes were a result of suppression of endogenous DET1 expression, due to post-transcriptional gene silencing. DET1 silencing was often lethal when it occurred at relatively early stages of plant development, whereas light hyper-responsive phenotypes were obtained when silencing occurred later on. The appearance of phenotypes correlated with the generation of siRNAs but not DNA hypermethylation, and was most efficient when using constructs with mutations in the DET1 coding sequence or with constructs containing only the 3′-terminal portion of the gene. These results indicate an important function for DET1 throughout plant development and demonstrate that silencing of DET1 in fruits results in increased carotenoids, which may have biotechnological potential. PMID:15469492

  1. Common idiotypes expressed on human, monoclonal, abnormal immunoglobulins and cryoglobulins with polyreactive autoantibody activities.

    PubMed Central

    Barbouche, M R; Guilbert, B; Makni, S; Gorgi, Y; Ayed, K; Avrameas, S

    1993-01-01

    Several human monoclonal immunoglobulins with the same autoantibody activity have been shown to have cross-reactive idiotypes (CRI). In this study, using polyclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies, we found that 28% of human monoclonal immunoglobulins with polyreactive autoantibody activity from myeloma, Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia and cryoglobulinaemia patients shared common idiotype(s). Furthermore, the latter were expressed on human and murine natural MoAbs (respectively in 12% and 22% of the clones tested) and on human IgG preparations used for therapeutic intravenous injections (IVIg) and which contain natural antibodies. These findings suggest that monoclonal immunoglobulins could arise from the proliferation of a clone that normally produces a natural antibody. The existence of common idiotype(s) between monoclonal immunoglobulins and IVIg could be relevant to the improvement noted after treatment with IVIg in patients suffering from peripheral neuropathies associated with monoclonal gammopathy. PMID:8428386

  2. Androgen receptor expression in breast cancer in relation to molecular phenotype: results from the Nurses' Health Study.

    PubMed

    Collins, Laura C; Cole, Kimberly S; Marotti, Jonathan D; Hu, Rong; Schnitt, Stuart J; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2011-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that androgen receptor is expressed in many breast cancers, but its expression in relation to the various breast cancer subtypes as defined by molecular profiling has not been studied in detail. We constructed tissue microarrays from 3093 breast cancers that developed in women enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study. Tissue microarray sections were immunostained for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), cytokeratin 5/6, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and androgen receptor (ER). Immunostain results were used to categorize each cancer as luminal A or B, HER2 and basal like. The relationships between androgen receptor expression and molecular subtype were analyzed. Overall, 77% of the invasive breast carcinomas were androgen receptor positive. Among 2171 invasive cancers, 64% were luminal A, 15% luminal B, 6% HER2 and 11% basal like. The frequency of androgen receptor expression varied significantly across the molecular phenotypes (P<0.0001). In particular, androgen receptor expression was commonly observed in luminal A (91%) and B (68%) cancers, but was less frequently seen in HER2 cancers (59%). Despite being defined by the absence of ER and PR expression and being considered hormonally unresponsive, 32% of basal-like cancers expressed androgen receptor. Among 246 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ, 86% were androgen receptor positive, but the frequency of androgen receptor expression differed significantly across the molecular phenotypes (P=0.001), and high nuclear grade lesions were less likely to be androgen receptor positive compared with lower-grade lesions. Androgen receptor expression is most commonly seen in luminal A and B invasive breast cancers. However, expression of androgen receptor is also seen in approximately one-third of basal-like cancers, providing further evidence that basal-like cancers represent a heterogeneous group. Our findings raise the

  3. Distinct Expression of Phenotypic Markers in Placodes- and Neural Crest-Derived Afferent Neurons Innervating the Rat Stomach.

    PubMed

    Trancikova, Alzbeta; Kovacova, Eva; Ru, Fei; Varga, Kristian; Brozmanova, Mariana; Tatar, Milos; Kollarik, Marian

    2018-02-01

    Visceral pain is initiated by activation of primary afferent neurons among which the capsaicin-sensitive (TRPV1-positive) neurons play an important role. The stomach is a common source of visceral pain. Similar to other organs, the stomach receives dual spinal and vagal afferent innervation. Developmentally, spinal dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and vagal jugular neurons originate from embryonic neural crest and vagal nodose neurons originate from placodes. In thoracic organs the neural crest- and placodes-derived TRPV1-positive neurons have distinct phenotypes differing in activation profile, neurotrophic regulation and reflex responses. It is unknown to whether such distinction exists in the stomach. We hypothesized that gastric neural crest- and placodes-derived TRPV1-positive neurons express phenotypic markers indicative of placodes and neural crest phenotypes. Gastric DRG and vagal neurons were retrogradely traced by DiI injected into the rat stomach wall. Single-cell RT-PCR was performed on traced gastric neurons. Retrograde tracing demonstrated that vagal gastric neurons locate exclusively into the nodose portion of the rat jugular/petrosal/nodose complex. Gastric DRG TRPV1-positive neurons preferentially expressed markers PPT-A, TrkA and GFRα 3 typical for neural crest-derived TRPV1-positive visceral neurons. In contrast, gastric nodose TRPV1-positive neurons preferentially expressed markers P2X 2 and TrkB typical for placodes-derived TRPV1-positive visceral neurons. Differential expression of neural crest and placodes markers was less pronounced in TRPV1-negative DRG and nodose populations. There are phenotypic distinctions between the neural crest-derived DRG and placodes-derived vagal nodose TRPV1-positive neurons innervating the rat stomach that are similar to those described in thoracic organs.

  4. Abnormal Expressions of DNA Glycosylase Genes NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 Are Associated with Somatic Mutation Loads in Human Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shinmura, Kazuya; Kato, Hisami; Kawanishi, Yuichi; Igarashi, Hisaki; Goto, Masanori; Tao, Hong; Inoue, Yusuke; Nakamura, Satoki; Misawa, Kiyoshi; Mineta, Hiroyuki; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of abnormalities in the DNA glycosylases NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 on human cancer have not been fully elucidated. In this paper, we found that the median somatic total mutation loads and the median somatic single nucleotide mutation loads exhibited significant inverse correlations with the median NEIL1 and NEIL2 expression levels and a significant positive correlation with the median NEIL3 expression level using data for 13 cancer types from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. A subset of the cancer types exhibited reduced NEIL1 and NEIL2 expressions and elevated NEIL3 expression, and such abnormal expressions of NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 were also significantly associated with the mutation loads in cancer. As a mechanism underlying the reduced expression of NEIL1 in cancer, the epigenetic silencing of NEIL1 through promoter hypermethylation was found. Finally, we investigated the reason why an elevated NEIL3 expression level was associated with an increased number of somatic mutations in cancer and found that NEIL3 expression was positively correlated with the expression of APOBEC3B, a potent inducer of mutations, in diverse cancers. These results suggested that the abnormal expressions of NEIL1, NEIL2, and NEIL3 are involved in cancer through their association with the somatic mutation load.

  5. Correlation of plasma nitrite/nitrate levels and inducible nitric oxide gene expression among women with cervical abnormalities and cancer.

    PubMed

    Sowjanya, A Pavani; Rao, Meera; Vedantham, Haripriya; Kalpana, Basany; Poli, Usha Rani; Marks, Morgan A; Sujatha, M

    2016-01-30

    Cervical cancer is caused by infection with high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV). Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a soluble factor involved in chronic inflammation, may modulate cervical cancer risk among HPV infected women. The aim of the study was to measure and correlate plasma nitrite/nitrate levels with tissue specific expression of iNOS mRNA among women with different grades of cervical lesions and cervical cancer. Tissue biopsy and plasma specimens were collected from 120 women with cervical neoplasia or cancer (ASCUS, LSIL, HSIL and invasive cancer) and 35 women without cervical abnormalities. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA from biopsy and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels of the same study subjects were measured. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was performed on the promoter region and Ser608Leu (rs2297518) in exon 16 of the iNOS gene. Differences in iNOS gene expression and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels were compared across disease stage using linear and logistic regression analysis. Compared to normal controls, women diagnosed with HSIL or invasive cancer had a significantly higher concentration of plasma nitrite/nitrate and a higher median fold-change in iNOS mRNA gene expression. Genotyping of the promoter region showed three different variations: A pentanucleotide repeat (CCTTT) n, -1026T > G (rs2779249) and a novel variant -1153T > A. These variants were associated with increased levels of plasma nitrite/nitrate across all disease stages. The higher expression of iNOS mRNA and plasma nitrite/nitrate among women with pre-cancerous lesions suggests a role for nitric oxide in the natural history of cervical cancer. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Over-expression of a grape stilbene synthase gene in tomato induces parthenocarpy and causes abnormal pollen development.

    PubMed

    Ingrosso, Ilaria; Bonsegna, Stefania; De Domenico, Stefania; Laddomada, Barbara; Blando, Federica; Santino, Angelo; Giovinazzo, Giovanna

    2011-10-01

    A novel strategy to induce parthenocarpy in tomato fruits by the induction of resveratrol biosynthesis in flower tissues was exploited. Two transgenic tomato lines were considered: a higher resveratrol-producing (35SS) line, constitutively expressing a grape stilbene synthase cDNA, and a lower resveratrol-producing (LoxS) line, expressing stilbene synthase under a fruit-specific promoter. The expression of the stilbene synthase gene affected flavonoid metabolism in a different manner in the transgenic lines, and in one of these, the 35SS line, resulted in complete male sterility. Resveratrol was synthesised either in 35SS or LoxS tomato flowers, at an even higher extent (about 8-10 times) in the former line. We further investigated whether stilbene synthase expression may have resulted in impaired naringenin accumulation during flower development. In the 35SS flowers, naringenin was significantly impaired by about 50%, probably due to metabolic competition. Conversely, the amount of glycosylated flavonols increased in transgenic flowers, thereby excluding the diminished production of flavonols as a reason for parthenocarpy in tomato. We further investigated whether resveratrol synthesis may have resulted changes to pollen structure. Microscopic observations revealed the presence of few and abnormal flake-like pollen grains in 35SS flowers with no germination capability. Finally, the analysis of coumaric and ferulic acids, the precursors of lignin and sporopollenin biosynthesis, revealed significant depletion of these compounds, therefore suggesting an impairment in structural compounds as a reason for pollen ablation. These overall outcomes, to the best of our knowledge, reveal for the first time the major role displayed by resveratrol synthesis on parthenocarpy in tomato fruits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. FXIIIA and TGF-beta over-expression produces normal musculo-skeletal phenotype in TG2-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Tarantino, U; Oliva, F; Taurisano, G; Orlandi, A; Pietroni, V; Candi, E; Melino, G; Maffulli, N

    2009-04-01

    Transglutaminase (TGs) enzymes and proteins crosslinking have for long time been implicated in the formation of hard tissue development, matrix maturation and mineralization. Among the TGs family members, in the context of connective tissue formation, TG2 and Factor XIII are expressed in cartilage by hypertrophic chondrocytes. Here, we analyse the morphological consequences of TG2 deficiency, during the development of skeletal elements. When TG2 is absent, there are not gross abnormalities in the development of the skeletal system, probably from compensatory mechanisms resulting in increased expression of FXIIIA and TGF-beta 1. In vivo other TGs may be involved in promoting chondrocytes and osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralisation.

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor-induced psoriasiform dermatitis resembles psoriasis with regard to abnormal cytokine expression and epidermal activation.

    PubMed

    Mössner, R; Beckmann, I; Hallermann, C; Neumann, C; Reich, K

    2004-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder characterized by accumulation of Th1-type T cells and neutrophils, regenerative keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation, and enhanced epidermal production of antimicrobial peptides. The underlying cause is unknown, but there are some similarities with the immunologic defense program against bacteria. Development of psoriasiform skin lesions has been reported after administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a cytokine induced in monocytes by bacterial antigens. To further investigate the relation between this type of cytokine-induced dermatitis and psoriasis, we analyzed the cutaneous cytokine profile [tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon-gamma, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-12p35 and p40, and IL-8] and expression of markers of epidermal activation [Ki-67, cytokeratin-16, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)] in a patient who developed G-CSF-induced psoriasiform dermatitis by using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistology. The histologic picture resembled psoriasis with regard to epidermal hyperparakeratosis and the accumulation of lymphocytes in the upper corium. CD8(+) T cells were found to infiltrate the epidermis which was associated with an aberrant expression of Ki-67, cytokeratin-16, MHC class II, and ICAM-1 on adjacent keratinocytes. As compared to normal skin (n = 7), there was an increased expression of TNF-alpha, IL-12p40, and IL-8, a decreased expression of TGF-beta1, and a lack of IL-10, similar to the findings in active psoriasis (n = 8). Therefore, G-CSF may cause a lymphocytic dermatitis that, similar to psoriasis, is characterized by a pro-inflammatory Th1-type cytokine milieu and an epidermal phenotype indicative of aberrant maturation and acquisition of non-professional immune functions.

  9. Recognition of emotional facial expressions and broad autism phenotype in parents of children diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Kadak, Muhammed Tayyib; Demirel, Omer Faruk; Yavuz, Mesut; Demir, Türkay

    2014-07-01

    Research findings debate about features of broad autism phenotype. In this study, we tested whether parents of children with autism have problems recognizing emotional facial expression and the contribution of such an impairment to the broad phenotype of autism. Seventy-two parents of children with autistic spectrum disorder and 38 parents of control group participated in the study. Broad autism features was measured with Autism Quotient (AQ). Recognition of Emotional Face Expression Test was assessed with the Emotion Recognition Test, consisting a set of photographs from Ekman & Friesen's. In a two-tailed analysis of variance of AQ, there was a significant difference for social skills (F(1, 106)=6.095; p<.05). Analyses of variance revealed significant difference in the recognition of happy, surprised and neutral expressions (F(1, 106)=4.068, p=.046; F(1, 106)=4.068, p=.046; F(1, 106)=6.064, p=.016). According to our findings, social impairment could be considered a characteristic feature of BAP. ASD parents had difficulty recognizing neutral expressions, suggesting that ASD parents may have impaired recognition of ambiguous expressions as do autistic children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Resveratrol-Mediated Expression of KLF15 in the Ischemic Myocardium is Associated with an Improved Cardiac Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Russell G; Otis, Jeffrey S

    2017-02-01

    Myocardial infarction results in physiological derangements that lead to structural and functional alterations to the myocardium. In addition, oxidative stress potentiates cardiac remodeling and drives disease progression. Unfortunately, treatment with antioxidants in clinical trials have failed to show any therapeutic benefits despite the positive results reported in animal studies, which warrants further investigation into their mechanism(s) of action. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to elucidate a previously unknown mechanism of action for the antioxidant, resveratrol, in the treatment of the ischemic heart. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent four weeks of chronic myocardial ischemia with or without daily resveratrol treatment (10 mg/kg/day). The expression and signaling of Krüppel-like factor 15 (KLF15) were determined by immunoblot and qPCR analyses, respectively. Chronic myocardial ischemia reduced the protein expression of KLF15. In parallel, mRNA transcripts of KLF15 gene targets actively involved in cardiac remodeling were robustly increased in untreated hearts. Importantly, daily treatment with resveratrol stimulated KLF15 expression, which was associated with attenuated gene expression and an improved cardiac phenotype. Additionally, we describe a novel role for KLF15 in the regulation of redox homeostasis. Based on our current findings, it appears that resveratrol treatment induces KLF15 expression, which may, in part, explain its therapeutic efficacy to improve the cardiac phenotype following ischemic injury.

  11. Correlation between dopamine receptor D2 expression and presence of abnormal involuntary movements in Wistar rats with hemiparkinsonism and dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Caro Aponte, P A; Otálora, C A; Guzmán, J C; Turner, L F; Alcázar, J P; Mayorga, E L

    2018-03-07

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterised by motor alterations, which are commonly treated with L-DOPA. However, long-term L-DOPA use may cause dyskinesia. Although the pathogenic mechanism of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia is unclear, the condition has been associated with alterations in dopamine receptors, among which D2 receptors (D2R) have received little attention. This study aims to: (i)develop and standardise an experimental model of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in rats with hemiparkinsonism; and (ii)evaluate the correlation between D2R expression and presence of abnormal involuntary movements (AIM). We allocated 21 male Wistar rats into 3 groups: intact controls, lesioned rats (with neurotoxin 6-OHDA), and dyskinetic rats (injected with L-DOPA for 19 days). Sensorimotor impairment was assessed with behavioural tests. Dyskinetic rats gradually developed AIMs during the treatment period; front leg AIMs were more severe and locomotor AIMs less severe (P<.05). All AIMs were significantly evident from day 5 and persisted until the last day of injection. D2R density was greater in the striatum and the medial anterior brain of the lesioned and dyskinetic rats than in those of controls. Our results suggest an association between D2R expression and locomotor AIMs. We conclude that RD2 is involved in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Expression of fungal pectin methylesterase in transgenic tobacco leads to alteration in cell wall metabolism and a dwarf phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Fukusaki, Ei-ichiro; Kobayashi, Akio

    2004-08-05

    A transgenic tobacco plant (Nicotiana tabacum L.) expressing a fungal pectin methylesterase (PME; EC 3.1.1.11) gene derived from a black filamentous fungus, Aspergillus niger was created. Fungal PME should have a wider range of adaptability to substrate pectin compared with plant PME. As expected, the proportion of methyl esters in pectin was reduced in the transgenic tobacco. Consequently, the transgenic plant showed short internodes, small leaves and a dwarf phenotype. At a cellular level, the longitudinal lengths of stem epidermal cells were shorter than those of control plants. This is the first report that fungal PME promotes dwarfism in plants. It is worth noting that in the PME-expressing dwarf plant, the expression levels of cell wall metabolism related genes that included endo-1,4-beta-glucanase, cellulose synthase, endo-xyloglucan transferase and expansin gene were decreased. These results suggest that the expression of fungal PME in plants affects the cell wall metabolism.

  13. Glucocorticoids promote development of the osteoblast phenotype by selectively modulating expression of cell growth and differentiation associated genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shalhoub, V.; Conlon, D.; Tassinari, M.; Quinn, C.; Partridge, N.; Stein, G. S.; Lian, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms by which glucocorticoids promote differentiation of fetal rat calvaria derived osteoblasts to produce bone-like mineralized nodules in vitro, a panel of osteoblast growth and differentiation related genes that characterize development of the osteoblast phenotype has been quantitated in glucocorticoid-treated cultures. We compared the mRNA levels of osteoblast expressed genes in control cultures of subcultivated cells where nodule formation is diminished, to cells continuously (35 days) exposed to 10(-7) M dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid, which promotes nodule formation to levels usually the extent observed in primary cultures. Tritiated thymidine labelling revealed a selective inhibition of internodule cell proliferation and promotion of proliferation and differentiation of cells forming bone nodules. Fibronectin, osteopontin, and c-fos expression were increased in the nodule forming period. Alkaline phosphatase and type I collagen expression were initially inhibited in proliferating cells, then increased after nodule formation to support further growth and mineralization of the nodule. Expression of osteocalcin was 1,000-fold elevated in glucocorticoid-differentiated cultures in relation to nodule formation. Collagenase gene expression was also greater than controls (fivefold) with the highest levels observed in mature cultures (day 35). At this time, a rise in collagen and TGF beta was also observed suggesting turnover of the matrix. Short term (48 h) effects of glucocorticoid on histone H4 (reflecting cell proliferation), alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteocalcin mRNA levels reveal both up or down regulation as a function of the developmental stage of the osteoblast phenotype. A comparison of transcriptional levels of these genes by nuclear run-on assays to mRNA levels indicates that glucocorticoids exert both transcriptional and post-transcriptional effects. Further, the presence of glucocorticoids enhances the

  14. Use of gene expression data to determine effects on gonad phenotype in Japanese medaka after exposure to trenbolone or estradiol.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Kevin; Swintek, Joe; Johnson, Rodney

    2013-06-01

    Various aquatic bioassays using one of several fish species have been developed or are in the process of being developed by organizations like the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Office of Economic Cooperation and Development for testing potential endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Often, these involve assessment of the gonad phenotype of individuals as a key endpoint that is inputted into a risk or hazard assessment. Typically, gonad phenotype is determined histologically, which involves specialized and time-consuming techniques. The methods detailed here utilize an entirely different methodology, reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, to determine the relative expression levels of 4 genes after exposure to either 17β-estradiol or 17β-trenbolone and, by extension, the effects of EDCs on the phenotypic status of the gonad. The 4 genes quantified, Sox9b, protamine, Fig1α, and ZPC1, are all involved in gonad development and maintenance in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes); these data were then inputted into a permutational multivariate analysis of variance to determine whether significant differences exist between treatment groups. This information in conjunction with the sexual genotype, which can be determined in medaka, can be used to determine adverse effects of exposure to EDCs in a similar fashion to the histologically determined gonad phenotype. Copyright © 2013 SETAC.

  15. Characterization and consumer acceptance of three muscles from Hampshire x Rambouillet cross sheep expressing the callipyge phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kerth, C R; Jackson, S P; Ramsey, C B; Miller, M F

    2003-09-01

    Eight Hampshire x Rambouillet crossbred wethers expressing the callipyge phenotype and eight Hampshire x Rambouillet half-sibling wethers with a normal phenotype were slaughtered when they reached 59 kg. The supraspinatus (SPM), longissimus (LM), and semitendinosus (STM) muscles were analyzed to determine callipyge effects on calpain and calpastatin activities, sarcomere length, percentage of muscle fiber types, and muscle fiber areas. After 14 d of aging, chops were frozen until analyses for trained sensory panel evaluations, Warner-Bratzler shear force values, and consumer perceptions of tenderness, flavor, juiciness, and overall satisfaction of chops were conducted. Calpastatin activity was 57% greater (P < 0.05) and m-calpain activity was 33% greater (P < 0.05) in muscles from carcasses of callipyge than normal sheep. Sarcomeres were shorter (P < 0.001) in the LM than the SPM or STM, regardless of phenotype. Muscle fiber area was 76% larger (P < 0.05) in the LM of callipyge than normal sheep, but muscle fiber area was not affected (P > 0.05) by phenotype in the SPM or STM. Phenotype had no effect (P = 0.12) on the percentage of slow-twitch, oxidative fiber types in any of the three muscles. In STM and LM from callipyge lambs, the percentage of fast-twitch, oxidative/glycolytic fibers was lower (P < 0.05) and that of fast-twitch-glycolytic fibers was higher (P < 0.05) than in their normal counterparts. Phenotype did not affect (P = 0.90) the fiber type percentage in the SPM. Callipyge LM were less tender and normal LM were more tender than other chops (P < 0.05). Callipyge loin chops had higher Warner-Bratzler shear force values than other chops (P < 0.001). Consumers rated fewer (P < 0.05) callipyge loin and shoulder chops acceptable in juiciness, tenderness, and overall acceptability than normal chops, but phenotype did not affect (P > 0.05) consumer acceptability of leg chops. These results indicate that LM from Hampshire x Rambouillet sheep displaying the

  16. Lifespan analysis of brain development, gene expression and behavioral phenotypes in the Ts1Cje, Ts65Dn and Dp(16)1/Yey mouse models of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Nadine M; Guedj, Faycal; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Olmos-Serrano, Jose Luis; Siegel, Ashley; Haydar, Tarik F; Bianchi, Diana W

    2018-06-12

    Down syndrome (DS) results from triplication of human chromosome 21. Neuropathological hallmarks of DS include atypical central nervous system development that manifests prenatally and extends throughout life. As a result, individuals with DS exhibit cognitive and motor deficits, and have delays in achieving developmental milestones. To determine whether different mouse models of DS recapitulate the human prenatal and postnatal phenotypes, here, we directly compared brain histogenesis, gene expression and behavior over the lifespan of three cytogenetically distinct mouse models of DS: Ts1Cje, Ts65Dn and Dp(16)1/Yey. Histological data indicated that Ts65Dn mice were the most consistently affected with respect to somatic growth, neurogenesis and brain morphogenesis. Embryonic and adult gene expression results showed that Ts1Cje and Ts65Dn brains had considerably more differentially expressed (DEX) genes compared with Dp(16)1/Yey mice, despite the larger number of triplicated genes in the latter model. In addition, DEX genes showed little overlap in identity and chromosomal distribution in the three models, leading to dissimilarities in affected functional pathways. Perinatal and adult behavioral testing also highlighted differences among the models in their abilities to achieve various developmental milestones and perform hippocampal- and motor-based tasks. Interestingly, Dp(16)1/Yey mice showed no abnormalities in prenatal brain phenotypes, yet they manifested behavioral deficits starting at postnatal day 15 that continued through adulthood. In contrast, Ts1Cje mice showed mildly abnormal embryonic brain phenotypes, but only select behavioral deficits as neonates and adults. Altogether, our data showed widespread and unexpected fundamental differences in behavioral, gene expression and brain development phenotypes between these three mouse models. Our findings illustrate unique limitations of each model when studying aspects of brain development and function in DS

  17. Opposite regulation of MDM2 and MDMX expression in acquisition of mesenchymal phenotype in benign and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Slabáková, Eva; Kharaishvili, Gvantsa; Smějová, Monika; Pernicová, Zuzana; Suchánková, Tereza; Remšík, Ján; Lerch, Stanislav; Straková, Nicol; Bouchal, Jan; Král, Milan; Culig, Zoran; Kozubík, Alois; Souček, Karel

    2015-11-03

    Plasticity of cancer cells, manifested by transitions between epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes, represents a challenging issue in the treatment of neoplasias. Both epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) are implicated in the processes of metastasis formation and acquisition of stem cell-like properties. Mouse double minute (MDM) 2 and MDMX are important players in cancer progression, as they act as regulators of p53, but their function in EMT and metastasis may be contradictory. Here, we show that the EMT phenotype in multiple cellular models and in clinical prostate and breast cancer samples is associated with a decrease in MDM2 and increase in MDMX expression. Modulation of EMT-accompanying changes in MDM2 expression in benign and transformed prostate epithelial cells influences their migration capacity and sensitivity to docetaxel. Analysis of putative mechanisms of MDM2 expression control demonstrates that in the context of defective p53 function, MDM2 expression is regulated by EMT-inducing transcription factors Slug and Twist. These results provide an alternative context-specific role of MDM2 in EMT, cell migration, metastasis, and therapy resistance.

  18. Temperature and leaf wetness duration affect phenotypic expression of Rlm6-mediated resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong-Ju; Evans, Neal; Li, Zi-Qin; Eckert, Maria; Chèvre, Anne-Marie; Renard, Michel; Fitt, Bruce D L

    2006-01-01

    Near-isogenic Brassica napus lines carrying/lacking resistance gene Rlm6 were used to investigate the effects of temperature and leaf wetness duration on phenotypic expression of Rlm6-mediated resistance. Leaves were inoculated with ascospores or conidia of Leptosphaeria maculans carrying the effector gene AvrLm6. Incubation period to the onset of lesion development, number of lesions and lesion diameter were assessed. Symptomless growth of L. maculans from leaf lesions to stems was investigated using a green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing isolate carrying AvrLm6. L. maculans produced large grey lesions on Darmor (lacking Rlm6) at 5-25 degrees C and DarmorMX (carrying Rlm6) at 25 degrees C, but small dark spots and 'green islands' on DarmorMX at 5-20 degrees C. With increasing temperature/wetness duration, numbers of lesions/spots generally increased. GFP-expressing L. maculans grew from leaf lesions down leaf petioles to stems on DarmorMX at 25 degrees C but not at 15 degrees C. We conclude that temperature and leaf wetness duration affect the phenotypic expression of Rlm6-mediated resistance in leaves and subsequent L. maculans spread down petioles to produce stem cankers.

  19. Increased mitochondrial calcium sensitivity and abnormal expression of innate immunity genes precede dopaminergic defects in Pink1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Akundi, Ravi S; Huang, Zhenyu; Eason, Joshua; Pandya, Jignesh D; Zhi, Lianteng; Cass, Wayne A; Sullivan, Patrick G; Büeler, Hansruedi

    2011-01-13

    PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) is linked to recessive Parkinsonism (EOPD). Pink1 deletion results in impaired dopamine (DA) release and decreased mitochondrial respiration in the striatum of mice. To reveal additional mechanisms of Pink1-related dopaminergic dysfunction, we studied Ca²+ vulnerability of purified brain mitochondria, DA levels and metabolism and whether signaling pathways implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) display altered activity in the nigrostriatal system of Pink1⁻/⁻ mice. Purified brain mitochondria of Pink1⁻/⁻ mice showed impaired Ca²+ storage capacity, resulting in increased Ca²+ induced mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) that was rescued by cyclosporine A. A subpopulation of neurons in the substantia nigra of Pink1⁻/⁻ mice accumulated phospho-c-Jun, showing that Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity is increased. Pink1⁻/⁻ mice 6 months and older displayed reduced DA levels associated with increased DA turnover. Moreover, Pink1⁻/⁻ mice had increased levels of IL-1β, IL-12 and IL-10 in the striatum after peripheral challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and Pink1⁻/⁻ embryonic fibroblasts showed decreased basal and inflammatory cytokine-induced nuclear factor kappa-β (NF-κB) activity. Quantitative transcriptional profiling in the striatum revealed that Pink1⁻/⁻ mice differentially express genes that (i) are upregulated in animals with experimentally induced dopaminergic lesions, (ii) regulate innate immune responses and/or apoptosis and (iii) promote axonal regeneration and sprouting. Increased mitochondrial Ca²+ sensitivity and JNK activity are early defects in Pink1⁻/⁻ mice that precede reduced DA levels and abnormal DA homeostasis and may contribute to neuronal dysfunction in familial PD. Differential gene expression in the nigrostriatal system of Pink1⁻/⁻ mice supports early dopaminergic dysfunction and shows that Pink1 deletion causes aberrant expression of genes that regulate innate

  20. Increased Mitochondrial Calcium Sensitivity and Abnormal Expression of Innate Immunity Genes Precede Dopaminergic Defects in Pink1-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Akundi, Ravi S.; Huang, Zhenyu; Eason, Joshua; Pandya, Jignesh D.; Zhi, Lianteng; Cass, Wayne A.; Sullivan, Patrick G.; Büeler, Hansruedi

    2011-01-01

    Background PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) is linked to recessive Parkinsonism (EOPD). Pink1 deletion results in impaired dopamine (DA) release and decreased mitochondrial respiration in the striatum of mice. To reveal additional mechanisms of Pink1-related dopaminergic dysfunction, we studied Ca2+ vulnerability of purified brain mitochondria, DA levels and metabolism and whether signaling pathways implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) display altered activity in the nigrostriatal system of Pink1−/− mice. Methods and Findings Purified brain mitochondria of Pink1−/− mice showed impaired Ca2+ storage capacity, resulting in increased Ca2+ induced mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) that was rescued by cyclosporine A. A subpopulation of neurons in the substantia nigra of Pink1−/− mice accumulated phospho-c-Jun, showing that Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity is increased. Pink1−/− mice 6 months and older displayed reduced DA levels associated with increased DA turnover. Moreover, Pink1−/− mice had increased levels of IL-1β, IL-12 and IL-10 in the striatum after peripheral challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and Pink1−/− embryonic fibroblasts showed decreased basal and inflammatory cytokine-induced nuclear factor kappa-β (NF-κB) activity. Quantitative transcriptional profiling in the striatum revealed that Pink1−/− mice differentially express genes that (i) are upregulated in animals with experimentally induced dopaminergic lesions, (ii) regulate innate immune responses and/or apoptosis and (iii) promote axonal regeneration and sprouting. Conclusions Increased mitochondrial Ca2+ sensitivity and JNK activity are early defects in Pink1−/− mice that precede reduced DA levels and abnormal DA homeostasis and may contribute to neuronal dysfunction in familial PD. Differential gene expression in the nigrostriatal system of Pink1−/− mice supports early dopaminergic dysfunction and shows that Pink1 deletion causes aberrant

  1. Mutants of the Paf1 Complex Alter Phenotypic Expression of the Yeast Prion [PSI+

    PubMed Central

    Strawn, Lisa A.; Lin, Changyi A.; Tank, Elizabeth M.H.; Osman, Morwan M.; Simpson, Sarah A.

    2009-01-01

    The yeast [PSI+] prion is an epigenetic modifier of translation termination fidelity that causes nonsense suppression. The prion [PSI+] forms when the translation termination factor Sup35p adopts a self-propagating conformation. The presence of the [PSI+] prion modulates survivability in a variety of growth conditions. Nonsense suppression is essential for many [PSI+]-mediated phenotypes, but many do not appear to be due to read-through of a single stop codon, but instead are multigenic traits. We hypothesized that other global mechanisms act in concert with [PSI+] to influence [PSI+]-mediated phenotypes. We have identified one such global regulator, the Paf1 complex (Paf1C). Paf1C is conserved in eukaryotes and has been implicated in several aspects of transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation. Mutations in Ctr9p and other Paf1C components reduced [PSI+]-mediated nonsense suppression. The CTR9 deletion also alters nonsense suppression afforded by other genetic mutations but not always to the same extent as the effects on [PSI+]-mediated read-through. Our data suggest that the Paf1 complex influences mRNA translatability but not solely through changes in transcript stability or abundance. Finally, we demonstrate that the CTR9 deletion alters several [PSI+]-dependent phenotypes. This provides one example of how [PSI+] and genetic modifiers can interact to uncover and regulate phenotypic variability. PMID:19225160

  2. Phenotypic variability in Patau syndrome.

    PubMed

    Caba, Lavinia; Rusu, Cristina; Butnariu, Lacramioara; Panzaru, Monica; Braha, Elena; Volosciuc, M; Popescu, Roxana; Gramescu, Mihaela; Bujoran, C; Martiniuc, Violeta; Covic, M; Gorduza, E V

    2013-01-01

    Patau syndrome has an incidence of 1/10.000-20.000, the clinical diagnosis being suggested by the triad cleft lip and palate, microphthalmia/anophthalmia and postaxial polydactyly. Most frequent cytogenetic abnormality is free and homogeneous trisomy 13 (80.0%), rarely being detected trisomy mosaics or Robertsonian translocations. The objective of the study was to identify phenotypic features of trisomy 13. The retrospective study was conducted on a trial group of 14 cases diagnosed cytogenetically with trisomy 13 between January 2000 and December 2012 at lasi Medical Genetics Centre. Of the 14 cases, 3 were evaluated pathologically (two aborted foetuses and one stillborn), 8 cases were detected in the neonatal period, and 3 in infancy. Clinical diagnosis was supported by the identification of a model of abnormal development, mainly characterized by: maxillary cleft (lip and palate--5 cases; lip--1 case), ocular abnormalities (microphthalmia/anophthalmia--7 cases; cyclopia--1 case), postaxial polydactyly (7 cases), scalp defects (6 cases), congenital heart anomalies (10 cases, 6 patients with atrial septal defect), complete holoprosencephaly (4 cases), ear abnormalities (11 cases), broad nasal root (10 cases). An important issue in confirming the phenotypic variability of Patau syndrome is that the classic clinical triad was identified only in one case. Patau syndrome is a disease with variable expression and is characterized by a pattern of abnormal prenatal development characterized by facial dysmorphia, polydactyly and severe birth defects (heart, brain) that generate an increased in utero and perinatal mortality.

  3. Dynamic Hydrostatic Pressure Regulates Nucleus Pulposus Phenotypic Expression and Metabolism in a Cell Density-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Shah, Bhranti S; Chahine, Nadeen O

    2018-02-01

    Dynamic hydrostatic pressure (HP) loading can modulate nucleus pulposus (NP) cell metabolism, extracellular matrix (ECM) composition, and induce transformation of notochordal NP cells into mature phenotype. However, the effects of varying cell density and dynamic HP magnitude on NP phenotype and metabolism are unknown. This study examined the effects of physiological magnitudes of HP loading applied to bovine NP cells encapsulated within three-dimensional (3D) alginate beads. Study 1: seeding density (1 M/mL versus 4 M/mL) was evaluated in unloaded and loaded (0.1 MPa, 0.1 Hz) conditions. Study 2: loading magnitude (0, 0.1, and 0.6 MPa) applied at 0.1 Hz to 1 M/mL for 7 days was evaluated. Study 1: 4 M/mL cell density had significantly lower adenosine triphosphate (ATP), glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen content, and increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). HP loading significantly increased ATP levels, and expression of aggrecan, collagen I, keratin-19, and N-cadherin in HP loaded versus unloaded groups. Study 2: aggrecan expression increased in a dose dependent manner with HP magnitude, whereas N-cadherin and keratin-19 expression were greatest in low HP loading compared to unloaded. Overall, the findings of the current study indicate that cell seeding density within a 3D construct is a critical variable influencing the mechanobiological response of NP cells to HP loading. NP mechanobiology and phenotypic expression was also found to be dependent on the magnitude of HP loading. These findings suggest that HP loading and culture conditions of NP cells may require complex optimization for engineering an NP replacement tissue.

  4. Changing phenotypic expression in a patient with a mitochondrial encephalopathy due to 13042G>A de novo mutation--a 5 year follow up.

    PubMed

    Schinwelski, M; Kierdaszuk, B; Dulski, J; Tońska, K; Kodroń, A; Sitek, E J; Bartnik, E; Kamińska, A; Kwieciński, H; Sławek, J

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in NADH dehydrogenase (ND) subunits of complex I lead to mitochondrial encephalomyopathies associated with various phenotypes. This report aims to present the patient's clinical symptomatology in the context of a very rare 13042G>A de novo mutation and with an emphasis on changing phenotypic expression and pronounced, long-standing response to levetiracetam.

  5. Integrative DNA methylation and gene expression analysis to assess the universality of the CpG island methylator phenotype.

    PubMed

    Moarii, Matahi; Reyal, Fabien; Vert, Jean-Philippe

    2015-10-13

    The CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) was first characterized in colorectal cancer but since has been extensively studied in several other tumor types such as breast, bladder, lung, and gastric. CIMP is of clinical importance as it has been reported to be associated with prognosis or response to treatment. However, the identification of a universal molecular basis to define CIMP across tumors has remained elusive. We perform a genome-wide methylation analysis of over 2000 tumor samples from 5 cancer sites to assess the existence of a CIMP with common molecular basis across cancers. We then show that the CIMP phenotype is associated with specific gene expression variations. However, we do not find a common genetic signature in all tissues associated with CIMP. Our results suggest the existence of a universal epigenetic and transcriptomic signature that defines the CIMP across several tumor types but does not indicate the existence of a common genetic signature of CIMP.

  6. Phenotypic expressions of a Gly154Arg mutation in type II collagen in two unrelated patients with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia (SEMD)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaitila, I.; Marttinen, E.; Koerkkoe, J.

    1996-05-03

    Type II collagenopathies consist of chondrodysplasia ranging from lethal to mild in severity. A large number of mutations has been found in the COL2A1 gene. Glycine substitutions have been the most common types of mutation. Genotype-phenotype correlations in type II collagenopathies have not been established, partly because of insufficient clinical and radiographic description of the patients. We found a glycine-to-arginine substitution at position 154 in type II collagen in two unrelated isolated propositi with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia and provide a comparative clinical and radiographic analysis from birth to young adulthood for this condition. The clinical phenotype was disproportionate short stature withmore » varus/valgus deformities of the lower limbs requiring corrective osteotomies, and lumbar lordosis. The skeletal radiographs showed an evolution from short tubular bones, delayed epiphyseal development, and mild vertebral involvement to severe metaphyseal dysplasia with dappling irregularities, and hip {open_quotes}dysplasia.{close_quotes} The metaphyseal abnormalities disappeared by adulthood. 27 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.« less

  7. PAX3 is expressed in the stromal compartment of the developing kidney and in Wilms tumors with myogenic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hueber, Pierre-Alain; Fukuzawa, Ryuji; Elkares, Reyhan; Chu, Leelee; Blumentkrantz, Miriam; He, Shu-Jie; Anaka, Matthew R; Reeve, Anthony E; Eccles, Michael; Jabado, Nada; Iglesias, Diana M; Goodyer, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is the most frequent renal neoplasm of childhood; a myogenic component is observed in 5% to 10% of tumors. We demonstrate for the first time that myogenic WTs are associated with expression of PAX3, a transcription factor known to specify myoblast cell fate during muscle development. In a panel of 20 WTs, PAX3 was identified in 13 of 13 tumor samples with myogenic histopathology but was absent in 7 of 7 tumors lacking a myogenic component. Furthermore, we show that PAX3 is expressed in the metanephric mesenchyme and stromal compartment of developing mouse kidney. Modulation of endogenous PAX3 expression in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells influenced cell migration in in vitro assays. Mutations of WT1 were consistently associated with PAX3 expression in WTs, and modulation of WT1 expression in HEK293 cells was inversely correlated with the level of endogenous PAX3 protein. We demonstrate abundant PAX3 and absence of PAX2 expression in a novel cell line (WitP3) isolated from the stromal portion of a WT bearing a homozygous deletion of the WT1 gene. We hypothesize that PAX3 sets stromal cell fate in developing kidney but is normally suppressed by WT1 during the mesenchyme-to-epithelium transition leading to nephrogenesis. Loss of WT1 permits aberrant PAX3 expression in a subset of WTs with myogenic phenotype.

  8. Structures of Rotavirus Reassortants Demonstrate Correlation of Altered Conformation of the VP4 Spike and Expression of Unexpected VP4-Associated Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Pesavento, Joseph B.; Billingsley, Angela M.; Roberts, Ed J.; Ramig, Robert F.; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram

    2003-01-01

    Numerous prior studies have indicated that viable rotavirus reassortants containing structural proteins of heterologous parental origin may express unexpected phenotypes, such as changes in infectivity and immunogenicity. To provide a structural basis for alterations in phenotypic expression, a three-dimensional structural analysis of these reassortants was conducted. The structures of the reassortants show that while VP4 generally maintains the parental structure when moved to a heterologous protein background, in certain reassortants, there are subtle alterations in the conformation of VP4. The alterations in VP4 conformation correlated with expression of unexpected VP4-associated phenotypes. Interactions between heterologous VP4 and VP7 in reassortants expressing unexpected phenotypes appeared to induce the conformational alterations seen in VP4. PMID:12584352

  9. Tomato Flower Abnormalities Induced by Low Temperatures Are Associated with Changes of Expression of MADS-Box Genes1

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Rafael; Angosto, Trinidad; Gómez, Pedro; Payán, Carmen; Capel, Juan; Huijser, Peter; Salinas, Julio; Martínez-Zapater, José M.

    1998-01-01

    Flower and fruit development in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were severely affected when plants were grown at low temperatures, displaying homeotic and meristic transformations and alterations in the fusion pattern of the organs. Most of these homeotic transformations modified the identity of stamens and carpels, giving rise to intermediate organs. Complete homeotic transformations were rarely found and always affected organs of the reproductive whorls. Meristic transformations were also commonly observed in the reproductive whorls, which developed with an excessive number of organs. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that meristic transformations take place very early in the development of the flower and are related to a significant increase in the floral meristem size. However, homeotic transformations should occur later during the development of the organ primordia. Steady-state levels of transcripts corresponding to tomato MADS-box genes TM4, TM5, TM6, and TAG1 were greatly increased by low temperatures and could be related to these flower abnormalities. Moreover, in situ hybridization analyses showed that low temperatures also altered the stage-specific expression of TM4. PMID:9576778

  10. Abnormal circadian locomotor rhythms and Per gene expression in six-month-old triple transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meina; Zhou, Fang; Cao, Xiuli; Yang, Junting; Bai, Yu; Yan, Xudong; Cao, Jimin; Qi, Jinshun

    2018-05-29

    Circadian rhythm disturbance (CRD) is one of the iconic manifestations in Alzheimer's disease (AD), a disease tightly associated with age, but the characteristics and gender difference of CRD occurred in AD have not been well demonstrated. Using 6-month-old triple transgenic AD mouse model (3xTg-AD) without obvious brain pathological changes, we demonstrated the gender difference of CRD at this age. We further showed abnormal Per gene expression in the central clock suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the 3xTg-AD mice. Specifically, compared with the wide type (WT) mice, the 3xTg-AD mice showed disrupted circadian locomotor rhythms both at LD (light-dark 12 h:12 h) and DD (constant dark) conditions, such as increased activities in the resting phase, decreased and scattered activities in the active phase, decreased overall activity intensities, amplitude, robustness, and increased intradaily variability. We further observed that 3xTg-AD female mice showed obviously less CRD compared with the 3xTg-AD male mice, and female mice of both WT and 3xTg-AD were more active in locomotor activity. Accordingly, 3xTg-AD mice showed a phase delay in the expression of Per1 and Per2 mRNA in the SCN, with the levels of Per1 and Per2 mRNA were significantly lower than that of WT mice at specific time points. We conclude that 3xTg-AD mice exhibit behavioral CRD at the age of six months with male gender preference, and these phenomena are at least partly associated with the alteration of Per1 and Per2 transcription patterns in the SCN. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Proteins associated with critical sperm functions and sperm head shape are differentially expressed in morphologically abnormal bovine sperm induced by scrotal insulation.

    PubMed

    Shojaei Saadi, Habib A; van Riemsdijk, Evine; Dance, Alysha L; Rajamanickam, Gayathri D; Kastelic, John P; Thundathil, Jacob C

    2013-04-26

    The objective was to investigate expression patterns of proteins in pyriform sperm, a common morphological abnormality in bull sperm. Ejaculates were collected from sexually mature Holstein bulls (n=3) twice weekly for 10 weeks (pre-thermal insult samples). Testicular temperature was elevated in all bulls by scrotal insulation for 72 consecutive hours during week 2. Total sperm proteins were extracted from pre- and post-thermal insult sperm samples and subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Among the protein spots detected, 131 spots were significantly expressed (False Detection Rate <0.01) with ≥ 2 fold changes between normal and pyriform sperm. Among them, 25 spots with ≥ 4 fold difference in expression patterns were identified using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Expression of several proteins involved in sperm capacitation, sperm-egg interaction and sperm cytoskeletal structure was decreased in pyriform sperm, whereas proteins regulating antioxidant activity, apoptosis and metabolic activity were increased. Contents of reactive oxygen species and ubiquitinated proteins were higher in pyriform sperm. In addition to understanding the molecular basis of functional deficiencies in sperm with specific morphological abnormalities, comparing normal versus morphologically abnormal sperm appeared to be a suitable experimental model for identifying important sperm functional proteins. To our knowledge, this study is the first report on differential expression of proteins in pyriform bovine sperm versus morphologically normal sperm. We report that expression of several proteins involved in sperm capacitation, sperm-egg interaction and sperm cytoskeletal structure was decreased in pyriform sperm, whereas proteins which regulate antioxidant activity, apoptosis and metabolic activity were increased. Contents of reactive oxygen species and ubiquitinated proteins were higher in pyriform sperm. In addition to understanding

  12. Decreased SAP expression in T cells from patients with SLE contributes to early signaling abnormalities and reduced IL-2 production

    PubMed Central

    Karampetsou, Maria P.; Comte, Denis; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C.; Tsokos, George C.

    2016-01-01

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of functions including increased early signaling events following engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR). Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family (SLAMF) cell surface receptors and the X-chromosome-defined signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) adaptor are important in the development of several immunocyte lineages and modulating immune response. Here we present evidence that SAP protein levels are decreased in T cells and in their main subsets isolated from 32 women and 3 men with SLE independently of disease activity. In SLE T cells the SAP protein is also subject to increased degradation by a caspase-3. Forced expression of SAP in SLE T cells simultaneously heightened IL-2 production, calcium (Ca2+) responses and tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of proteins. Exposure of normal T cells to SLE serum IgG, known to contain anti-CD3/TCR antibodies, resulted in SAP downregulation. We conclude that SLE T cells display reduced levels of the adaptor protein SAP probably as a result of continuous T cell activation and degradation by caspase-3. Restoration of SAP levels in SLE T cells corrects the overexcitable lupus T cell phenotype. PMID:27183584

  13. Gallic acid modulates phenotypic behavior and gene expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells by interfering with leptin pathway.

    PubMed

    Santos, Eliane Macedo Sobrinho; da Rocha, Rogério Gonçalves; Santos, Hércules Otacílio; Guimarães, Talita Antunes; de Carvalho Fraga, Carlos Alberto; da Silveira, Luiz Henrique; Batista, Paulo Ricardo; de Oliveira, Paulo Sérgio Lopes; Melo, Geraldo Aclécio; Santos, Sérgio Henrique; de Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista; Guimarães, André Luiz Sena; Farias, Lucyana Conceição

    2018-01-01

    Gallic acid is a polyphenolic compost appointed to interfere with neoplastic cells behavior. Evidence suggests an important role of leptin in carcinogenesis pathways, inducing a proliferative phenotype. We investigated the potential of gallic acid to modulate leptin-induced cell proliferation and migration of oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines. The gallic acid effect on leptin secretion by oral squamous cell carcinoma cells, as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms, was also assessed. For this, we performed proliferation, migration, immunocytochemical and qPCR assays. The expression levels of cell migration-related genes (MMP2, MMP9, Col1A1, and E-cadherin), angiogenesis (HIF-1α, mir210), leptin signaling (LepR, p44/42 MAPK), apoptosis (casp-3), and secreted leptin levels by oral squamous cell carcinoma cells were also measured. Gallic acid decreased proliferation and migration of leptin-treated oral squamous cell carcinoma cells, and reduced mRNA expression of MMP2, MMP9, Col1A1, mir210, but did not change HIF-1α. Gallic acid decreased levels of leptin secreted by oral squamous cell carcinoma cells, accordingly with downregulation of p44/42 MAPK expression. Thus, gallic acid appears to break down neoplastic phenotype of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells by interfering with leptin pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Phenotypes, antioxidant responses, and gene expression changes accompanying a sugar-only diet in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Er-Hu; Hou, Qiu-Li; Wei, Dan-Dan; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-08-17

    Diet composition (yeast:carbohydrate ratio) is an important determinant of growth, development, and reproduction. Recent studies have shown that decreased yeast intake elicits numerous transcriptomic changes and enhances somatic maintenance and lifespan, which in turn reduces reproduction in various insects. However, our understanding of the responses leading to a decrease in yeast ratio to 0% is limited. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a sugar-only diet (SD) on the gene expression patterns of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), one of the most economically important pests in the family Tephritidae. RNA sequencing analyses showed that flies reared on an SD induced significant changes in the expression levels of genes associated with specific metabolic as well as cell growth and death pathways. Moreover, the observed upregulated genes in energy production and downregulated genes associated with reproduction suggested that SD affects somatic maintenance and reproduction in B. dorsalis. As expected, we observed that SD altered B. dorsalis phenotypes by significantly increasing stress (starvation and desiccation) resistance, decreasing reproduction, but did not extend lifespan compared to those that received a normal diet (ND) regime. In addition, administration of an SD resulted in a reduction in antioxidant enzyme activities and an increase in MDA concentrations, thereby suggesting that antioxidants cannot keep up with the increase in oxidative damage induced by SD regime. The application of an SD diet induces changes in phenotypes, antioxidant responses, and gene expressions in B. dorsalis. Previous studies have associated extended lifespan with reduced fecundity. The current study did not observe a prolongation of lifespan in B. dorsalis, which instead incurred oxidative damage. The findings of the present study improve our understanding of the molecular, biochemical, and phenotypic response of B. dorsalis to an SD diet.

  15. MicroRNA-122 Influences the Development of Sperm Abnormalities from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Regulating TNP2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongyi; Liu, Jianjun; Zhao, Yanhui; Jiang, Lizhen; Huang, Qin

    2013-01-01

    Sperm abnormalities are one of the main factors responsible for male infertility; however, their pathogenesis remains unclear. The role of microRNAs in the development of sperm abnormalities in infertile men has not yet been investigated. Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells to investigate the influence of miR-122 expression on the differentiation of these cells into spermatozoa-like cells in vitro. After induction, mutant miR-122-transfected cells formed spermatozoa-like cells. Flow cytometry of DNA content revealed a significant increase in the haploid cell population in spermatozoa-like cells derived from mutant miR-122-transfected cells as compared to those derived from miR-122-transfected cells. During induction, TNP2 and protamine mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher in mutant miR-122-transfected cells than in miR-122-transfected cells. High-throughput isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification were used to identify and quantify the different protein expression levels in miR-122- and mutant miR-122-transfected cells. Among all the proteins analyzed, the expression of lipoproteins, for example, APOB and APOA1, showed the most significant difference between the two groups. This study illustrates that miR-122 expression is associated with abnormal sperm development. MiR-122 may influence spermatozoa-like cells by suppressing TNP2 expression and inhibiting the expression of proteins associated with sperm development. PMID:23327642

  16. Expression and imprinting of MAGEL2 suggest a role in Prader-willi syndrome and the homologous murine imprinting phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lee, S; Kozlov, S; Hernandez, L; Chamberlain, S J; Brannan, C I; Stewart, C L; Wevrick, R

    2000-07-22

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is caused by the loss of expression of imprinted genes in chromosome 15q11-q13. Affected individuals exhibit neonatal hypotonia, developmental delay and childhood-onset obesity. Necdin, a protein implicated in the terminal differentiation of neurons, is the only PWS candidate gene to reduce viability when disrupted in a mouse model. In this study, we have characterized MAGEL2 (also known as NDNL1), a gene with 51% amino acid sequence similarity to necdin and located 41 kb distal to NDN in the PWS deletion region. MAGEL2 is expressed predominantly in brain, the primary tissue affected in PWS and in several fetal tissues as shown by northern blot analysis. MAGEL2 is imprinted with monoallelic expression in control brain, and paternal-only expression in the central nervous system as demonstrated by its lack of expression in brain from a PWS-affected individual. The orthologous mouse gene (Magel2) is located within 150 kb of NDN:, is imprinted with paternal-only expression and is expressed predominantly in late developmental stages and adult brain as shown by northern blotting, RT-PCR and whole-mount RNA in situ hybridization. Magel2 distribution partially overlaps that of NDN:, with strong expression being detected in the central nervous system in mid-gestation mouse embryos by in situ hybridization. We hypothesize that, although loss of necdin expression may be important in the neonatal presentation of PWS, loss of MAGEL2 may be critical to abnormalities in brain development and dysmorphic features in individuals with PWS.

  17. Phenotypic expression of partial AZFc deletions is independent of the variations in DAZL and BOULE in a Han population.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pu; Ma, Mingyi; Li, Lei; Zhang, Sizhong; Su, Dan; Ma, Yongxin; Liu, Yunqiang; Tao, Dachang; Lin, Li; Yang, Yuan

    2010-01-01

    DAZ on the Y chromosome and 2 autosomal ancestral genes DAZL and BOULE are suggested to represent functional conservation in spermatogenesis. The partial AZFc deletion, a common mutation of the Y chromosome, always involves 2 DAZ copies and represents a different spermatogenic phenotype in the populations studied. To investigate whether the variations in DAZL and BOULE influence partial AZFc deletion phenotype, the genotyping of 15 loci variations, including 4 known mutations and 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), was carried out in 157 azoo-/oligzoospermic men and 57 normozoospermic men, both groups with partial AZFc deletions. The frequencies of the alleles, genotypes, and haplotypes of the variations were compared between the 2 groups. As a result, for 9 exonic variations in DAZL and BOULE, only T12A was observed in both groups with similar frequency, and I71V was identified in an azoospermic man with b2/b3 deletion, whereas the rest were absent in the population. The distribution of DAZL haplotypes from 4 variations, including T12A, and of BOULE haplotypes from 2 SNPs was similar between men with normozoospermia and spermatogenic failure. Our findings indicate that the contribution of DAZL and BOULE variations to spermatogenic impairment in men with the DAZ defect is greatly limited, suggesting that expression of spermatogenic phenotypes of partial AZFc deletions is independent of the variations in DAZL and BOULE in the Han population.

  18. Identification of distinct molecular phenotypes in acute megakaryoblastic leukemia by gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Subramanian, Aravind; Langebrake, Claudia; Reinhardt, Dirk; Bernard, Olivier; Ballerini, Paola; Baruchel, André; Cavé, Hélène; Dastugue, Nicole; Hasle, Henrik; Kaspers, Gertjan L.; Lessard, Michel; Michaux, Lucienne; Vyas, Paresh; van Wering, Elisabeth; Zwaan, Christian M.; Golub, Todd R.; Orkin, Stuart H.

    2006-01-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) are predisposed to develop acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL), characterized by expression of truncated GATA1 transcription factor protein (GATA1s) due to somatic mutation. The treatment outcome for DS-AMKL is more favorable than for AMKL in non-DS patients. To gain insight into gene expression differences in AMKL, we compared 24 DS and 39 non-DS AMKL samples. We found that non-DS-AMKL samples cluster in two groups, characterized by differences in expression of HOX/TALE family members. Both of these groups are distinct from DS-AMKL, independent of chromosome 21 gene expression. To explore alterations of the GATA1 transcriptome, we used cross-species comparison with genes regulated by GATA1 expression in murine erythroid precursors. Genes repressed after GATA1 induction in the murine system, most notably GATA-2, MYC, and KIT, show increased expression in DS-AMKL, suggesting that GATA1s fail to repress this class of genes. Only a subset of genes that are up-regulated upon GATA1 induction in the murine system show increased expression in DS-AMKL, including GATA1 and BACH1, a probable negative regulator of megakaryocytic differentiation located on chromosome 21. Surprisingly, expression of the chromosome 21 gene RUNX1, a known regulator of megakaryopoiesis, was not elevated in DS-AMKL. Our results identify relevant signatures for distinct AMKL entities and provide insight into gene expression changes associated with these related leukemias. PMID:16492768

  19. Sex-specific Effects of Exercise Ancestry on Metabolic, Morphological, and Gene Expression Phenotypes in Multiple Generations of Mouse Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Guth, Lisa M.; Ludlow, Andrew T.; Witkowski, Sarah; Marshall, Mallory R.; Lima, Laila C. J.; Venezia, Andrew C.; Xiao, Tao; Lee, Mei-Ling Ting; Spangenburg, Espen E.; Roth, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Early life and pre-conception environmental stimuli can affect adult health-related phenotypes. Exercise training is an environmental stimulus affecting many systems throughout the body and appears to alter offspring phenotypes. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of parental exercise training, or “exercise ancestry,” on morphological and metabolic phenotypes in two generations of mouse offspring. F0 C57BL/6 mice were exposed to voluntary exercise or sedentary lifestyle and bred with like-exposed mates to produce an F1 generation. F1 mice of both ancestries were sedentary and sacrificed at 8 wk or bred with littermates to produce an F2 generation, which was also sedentary and sacrificed at 8 wk. Small, but broad generation- and sex-specific effects of exercise ancestry were observed for body mass, fat and muscle mass, serum insulin, glucose tolerance, and muscle gene expression. F1 EX females were lighter than F1 SED females, and had lower absolute tibialis anterior and omental fat masses. Serum insulin was higher in F1 EX females compared to F1 SED females. F2 EX females had impaired glucose tolerance compared to F2 SED females. Analysis of skeletal muscle mRNA levels revealed several generation- and sex-specific differences in mRNA levels for multiple genes, especially those related to metabolic genes (e.g., F1 EX males had lower mRNA levels of Hk2, Ppard, Ppargc1α, Adipoq, and Scd1 than F1 SED males). These results provide preliminary evidence that parental exercise training can influence health-related phenotypes in mouse offspring. PMID:23771910

  20. A multi-phenotypic imaging screen to identify bacterial effectors by exogenous expression in a HeLa cell line.

    PubMed

    Collins, Adam; Huett, Alan

    2018-05-15

    We present a high-content screen (HCS) for the simultaneous analysis of multiple phenotypes in HeLa cells expressing an autophagy reporter (mcherry-LC3) and one of 224 GFP-fused proteins from the Crohn's Disease (CD)-associated bacterium, Adherent Invasive E. coli (AIEC) strain LF82. Using automated confocal microscopy and image analysis (CellProfiler), we localised GFP fusions within cells, and monitored their effects upon autophagy (an important innate cellular defence mechanism), cellular and nuclear morphology, and the actin cytoskeleton. This data will provide an atlas for the localisation of 224 AIEC proteins within human cells, as well as a dataset to analyse their effects upon many aspects of host cell morphology. We also describe an open-source, automated, image-analysis workflow to identify bacterial effectors and their roles via the perturbations induced in reporter cell lines when candidate effectors are exogenously expressed.

  1. Use of expression constructs to dissect the functional domains of the CHS/beige protein: identification of multiple phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ward, Diane McVey; Shiflett, Shelly L; Huynh, Dinh; Vaughn, Michael B; Prestwich, Glenn; Kaplan, Jerry

    2003-06-01

    The Chediak-Higashi Syndrome (CHS) and the orthologous murine disorder beige are characterized at the cellular level by the presence of giant lysosomes. The CHS1/Beige protein is a 3787 amino acid protein of unknown function. To determine functional domains of the CHS1/Beige protein, we generated truncated constructs of the gene/protein. These truncated proteins were transiently expressed in Cos-7 or HeLa cells and their effect on membrane trafficking was examined. Beige is apparently a cytosolic protein, as are most transiently expressed truncated Beige constructs. Expression of the Beige construct FM (amino acids 1-2037) in wild-type cells led to enlarged lysosomes. Similarly, expression of a 5.5-kb region (amino acids 2035-3787) of the carboxyl terminal of Beige (22B) also resulted in enlarged lysosomes. Expression of FM solely affected lysosome size, whereas expression of 22B led to alterations in lysosome size, changes in the Golgi and eventually cell death. The two constructs could be used to further dissect phenotypes resulting from loss of the Beige protein. CHS or beigej fibroblasts show an absence of nuclear staining using a monoclonal antibody directed against phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5) P2]. Transformation of beige j fibroblasts with a YAC containing the full-length Beige gene resulted in the normalization of lysosome size and nuclear PtdIns(4,5)P2 staining. Expression of the carboxyl dominant negative construct 22B led to loss of nuclear PtdIns(4,5)P2 staining. Expression of the FM dominant negative clone did not alter nuclear PtdIns(4,5) P2 localization. These results suggest that the Beige protein interacts with at least two different partners and that the Beige protein affects cellular events, such as nuclear PtdIns(4,5)P2 localization, in addition to lysosome size.

  2. Sox11 expression in astrocytic gliomas: correlation with nestin/c-Met/IDH1-R132H expression phenotypes, p-Stat-3 and survival

    PubMed Central

    Korkolopoulou, P; Levidou, G; El-Habr, E A; Adamopoulos, C; Fragkou, P; Boviatsis, E; Themistocleous, M S; Petraki, K; Vrettakos, G; Sakalidou, M; Samaras, V; Zisakis, A; Saetta, A; Chatziandreou, I; Patsouris, E; Piperi, C

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sox11 is a transcription factor expressed in foetal and neoplastic brain tissue, including gliomas. It has been shown to suppress the tumourigenicity of glioma stem cells in vivo, thereby being hypothesised to function as a tumour suppressor. Methods: We investigated the expression of Sox11 in 132 diffuse astrocytomas in relation to the regulator cell marker nestin, c-Met and IDH1-R132H, which have shown to be differentially expressed among the molecular subgroups of malignant gliomas, as well as to an inducer of astrocytic differentiation, that is, signal transducer and activator of transcription (p-STAT-3), clinicopathological features and survival. Results: Sox11 immunoreactivity was identified in all tumours irrespective of grade, but being correlated with p-STAT-3. Three out of seven cases showed partial Sox11 promoter methylation. In >50% of our cases neoplastic cells coexpressed Sox11 and nestin, a finding further confirmed in primary glioblastoma cell cultures. Furthermore, nestin, c-Met and IDH1-R132H expression differed among grade categories. Cluster analysis identified four groups of patients according to c-Met, nestin and IDH1-R132H expression. The c-Met/nestin high-expressor group displayed a higher Sox11 expression. Sox11 expression was an indicator of favourable prognosis in glioblastomas, which remained in multivariate analysis and validated in an independent set of 72 cases. The c-Met/nestin high-expressor group was marginally with shorter survival in univariate analysis. Conclusions: We highlight the importance of Sox11 expression as a favourable prognosticator in glioblastomas. c-Met/nestin/IDH1-R132H expression phenotypes recapitulate the molecular subgroups of malignant glioma. PMID:23619925

  3. Sox11 expression in astrocytic gliomas: correlation with nestin/c-Met/IDH1-R132H expression phenotypes, p-Stat-3 and survival.

    PubMed

    Korkolopoulou, P; Levidou, G; El-Habr, E A; Adamopoulos, C; Fragkou, P; Boviatsis, E; Themistocleous, M S; Petraki, K; Vrettakos, G; Sakalidou, M; Samaras, V; Zisakis, A; Saetta, A; Chatziandreou, I; Patsouris, E; Piperi, C

    2013-05-28

    Sox11 is a transcription factor expressed in foetal and neoplastic brain tissue, including gliomas. It has been shown to suppress the tumourigenicity of glioma stem cells in vivo, thereby being hypothesised to function as a tumour suppressor. We investigated the expression of Sox11 in 132 diffuse astrocytomas in relation to the regulator cell marker nestin, c-Met and IDH1-R132H, which have shown to be differentially expressed among the molecular subgroups of malignant gliomas, as well as to an inducer of astrocytic differentiation, that is, signal transducer and activator of transcription (p-STAT-3), clinicopathological features and survival. Sox11 immunoreactivity was identified in all tumours irrespective of grade, but being correlated with p-STAT-3. Three out of seven cases showed partial Sox11 promoter methylation. In >50% of our cases neoplastic cells coexpressed Sox11 and nestin, a finding further confirmed in primary glioblastoma cell cultures. Furthermore, nestin, c-Met and IDH1-R132H expression differed among grade categories. Cluster analysis identified four groups of patients according to c-Met, nestin and IDH1-R132H expression. The c-Met/nestin high-expressor group displayed a higher Sox11 expression. Sox11 expression was an indicator of favourable prognosis in glioblastomas, which remained in multivariate analysis and validated in an independent set of 72 cases. The c-Met/nestin high-expressor group was marginally with shorter survival in univariate analysis. We highlight the importance of Sox11 expression as a favourable prognosticator in glioblastomas. c-Met/nestin/IDH1-R132H expression phenotypes recapitulate the molecular subgroups of malignant glioma.

  4. Pervasive effects of a dominant foliar endophytic fungus on host genetic and phenotypic expression in a tropical tree

    PubMed Central

    Mejía, Luis C.; Herre, Edward A.; Sparks, Jed P.; Winter, Klaus; García, Milton N.; Van Bael, Sunshine A.; Stitt, Joseph; Shi, Zi; Zhang, Yufan; Guiltinan, Mark J.; Maximova, Siela N.

    2014-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that macro-organisms (corals, insects, plants, vertebrates) consist of both host tissues and multiple microbial symbionts that play essential roles in their host's ecological and evolutionary success. Consequently, identifying benefits and costs of symbioses, as well as mechanisms underlying them are research priorities. All plants surveyed under natural conditions harbor foliar endophytic fungi (FEF) in their leaf tissues, often at high densities. Despite producing no visible effects on their hosts, experiments have nonetheless shown that FEF reduce pathogen and herbivore damage. Here, combining results from three genomic, and two physiological experiments, we demonstrate pervasive genetic and phenotypic effects of the apparently asymptomatic endophytes on their hosts. Specifically, inoculation of endophyte-free (E−) Theobroma cacao leaves with Colletotrichum tropicale (E+), the dominant FEF species in healthy T. cacao, induces consistent changes in the expression of hundreds of host genes, including many with known defensive functions. Further, E+ plants exhibited increased lignin and cellulose content, reduced maximum rates of photosynthesis (Amax), and enrichment of nitrogen-15 and carbon-13 isotopes. These phenotypic changes observed in E+ plants correspond to changes in expression of specific functional genes in related pathways. Moreover, a cacao gene (Tc00g04254) highly up-regulated by C. tropicale also confers resistance to pathogen damage in the absence of endophytes or their products in host tissues. Thus, the benefits of increased pathogen resistance in E+ plants are derived in part from up-regulation of intrinsic host defense responses, and appear to be offset by potential costs including reduced photosynthesis, altered host nitrogen metabolism, and endophyte heterotrophy of host tissues. Similar effects are likely in most plant-endophyte interactions, and should be recognized in the design and interpretation of genetic

  5. Peripuberty stress leads to abnormal aggression, altered amygdala and orbitofrontal reactivity and increased prefrontal MAOA gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, C; Poirier, G L; Cordero, M I; Larsen, M H; Groner, A; Marquis, J; Magistretti, P J; Trono, D; Sandi, C

    2013-01-01

    Although adverse early life experiences have been found to increase lifetime risk to develop violent behaviors, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these long-term effects remain unclear. We present a novel animal model for pathological aggression induced by peripubertal exposure to stress with face, construct and predictive validity. We show that male rats submitted to fear-induction experiences during the peripubertal period exhibit high and sustained rates of increased aggression at adulthood, even against unthreatening individuals, and increased testosterone/corticosterone ratio. They also exhibit hyperactivity in the amygdala under both basal conditions (evaluated by 2-deoxy-glucose autoradiography) and after a resident–intruder (RI) test (evaluated by c-Fos immunohistochemistry), and hypoactivation of the medial orbitofrontal (MO) cortex after the social challenge. Alterations in the connectivity between the orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala were linked to the aggressive phenotype. Increased and sustained expression levels of the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene were found in the prefrontal cortex but not in the amygdala of peripubertally stressed animals. They were accompanied by increased activatory acetylation of histone H3, but not H4, at the promoter of the MAOA gene. Treatment with an MAOA inhibitor during adulthood reversed the peripuberty stress-induced antisocial behaviors. Beyond the characterization and validation of the model, we present novel data highlighting changes in the serotonergic system in the prefrontal cortex—and pointing at epigenetic control of the MAOA gene—in the establishment of the link between peripubertal stress and later pathological aggression. Our data emphasize the impact of biological factors triggered by peripubertal adverse experiences on the emergence of violent behaviors. PMID:23321813

  6. Peripuberty stress leads to abnormal aggression, altered amygdala and orbitofrontal reactivity and increased prefrontal MAOA gene expression.

    PubMed

    Márquez, C; Poirier, G L; Cordero, M I; Larsen, M H; Groner, A; Marquis, J; Magistretti, P J; Trono, D; Sandi, C

    2013-01-15

    Although adverse early life experiences have been found to increase lifetime risk to develop violent behaviors, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these long-term effects remain unclear. We present a novel animal model for pathological aggression induced by peripubertal exposure to stress with face, construct and predictive validity. We show that male rats submitted to fear-induction experiences during the peripubertal period exhibit high and sustained rates of increased aggression at adulthood, even against unthreatening individuals, and increased testosterone/corticosterone ratio. They also exhibit hyperactivity in the amygdala under both basal conditions (evaluated by 2-deoxy-glucose autoradiography) and after a resident-intruder (RI) test (evaluated by c-Fos immunohistochemistry), and hypoactivation of the medial orbitofrontal (MO) cortex after the social challenge. Alterations in the connectivity between the orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala were linked to the aggressive phenotype. Increased and sustained expression levels of the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene were found in the prefrontal cortex but not in the amygdala of peripubertally stressed animals. They were accompanied by increased activatory acetylation of histone H3, but not H4, at the promoter of the MAOA gene. Treatment with an MAOA inhibitor during adulthood reversed the peripuberty stress-induced antisocial behaviors. Beyond the characterization and validation of the model, we present novel data highlighting changes in the serotonergic system in the prefrontal cortex-and pointing at epigenetic control of the MAOA gene-in the establishment of the link between peripubertal stress and later pathological aggression. Our data emphasize the impact of biological factors triggered by peripubertal adverse experiences on the emergence of violent behaviors.

  7. Variation of Keratin 7 Expression and Other Phenotypic Characteristics of Independent Isolates of Cadmium Transformed Human Urothelial Cells (UROtsa)

    PubMed Central

    Somji, Seema; Zhou, Xu Dong; Mehus, Aaron; Sens, Mary Ann; Garrett, Scott H.; Lutz, Krista L.; Dunlevy, Jane R.; Zheng, Yun; Sens, Donald. A.

    2009-01-01

    This laboratory has shown that a human urothelial cell line (UROtsa) transformed by cadmium (Cd+2) produced subcutaneous tumor heterotransplants that resemble human transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). In the present study, additional Cd+2 transformed cell lines were isolated to determine if independent exposures of the cell line to Cd+2 would result in malignantly transformed cell lines possessing similar phenotypic properties. Seven independent isolates were isolated and assessed for their doubling times, morphology, ability to heterotransplant subcutaneously and in the peritoneal cavity of nude mice and for the expression keratin 7. The 7 cell lines all displayed an epithelial morphology with no evidence of squamous differentiation. Doubling times were variable among the isolates, being significantly reduced or similar to the parental cells. All 7 isolates were able to form subcutaneous tumor heterotransplants with a TCC morphology and all heterotransplants displayed areas of squamous differentiation of the transitional cells. The degree of squamous differentiation varied among the isolates. In contrast to subcutaneous tumor formation, only 1 isolate of the Cd+2 transformed cells (UTCd#1) was able to effectively colonize multiple sites within the peritoneal cavity. An analysis of keratin 7 expression showed no correlation with squamous differentiation for the subcutaneous heterotransplants generated from the 7 cell lines. Keratin 7 was expressed in 6 of the 7 cell lines and their subcutaneous tumor heterotransplants. Keratin 7 was not expressed in the cell line that was able to form tumors within the peritoneal cavity. These results show that individual isolates of Cd+2 transformed cells have both similarities and differences in their phenotype. PMID:19921857

  8. Modeling a linkage between blood transcriptional expression and activity in brain regions to infer the phenotype of schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, El Chérif; Guillemot, Vincent; Comte, Magali; Tenenhaus, Arthur; Zendjidjian, Xavier Yves; Cancel, Aida; Belzeaux, Raoul; Sauvanaud, Florence; Blin, Olivier; Frouin, Vincent; Fakra, Eric

    2017-09-07

    Hundreds of genetic loci participate to schizophrenia liability. It is also known that impaired cerebral connectivity is directly related to the cognitive and affective disturbances in schizophrenia. How genetic susceptibility and brain neural networks interact to specify a pathological phenotype in schizophrenia remains elusive. Imaging genetics, highlighting brain variations, has proven effective to establish links between vulnerability loci and associated clinical traits. As previous imaging genetics works in schizophrenia have essentially focused on structural DNA variants, these findings could be blurred by epigenetic mechanisms taking place during gene expression. We explored the meaningful links between genetic data from peripheral blood tissues on one hand, and regional brain reactivity to emotion task assayed by blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging on the other hand, in schizophrenia patients and matched healthy volunteers. We applied Sparse Generalized Canonical Correlation Analysis to identify joint signals between two blocks of variables: (i) the transcriptional expression of 33 candidate genes, and (ii) the blood oxygen level-dependent activity in 16 region of interest. Results suggested that peripheral transcriptional expression is related to brain imaging variations through a sequential pathway, ending with the schizophrenia phenotype. Generalization of such an approach to larger data sets should thus help in outlining the pathways involved in psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia. SEARCHING FOR LINKS TO AID DIAGNOSIS: Researchers explore links between the expression of genes associated with schizophrenia in blood cells and variations in brain activity during emotion processing. El Chérif Ibrahim and Eric Fakra at Aix-Marseille Université, France, and colleagues have developed a method to relate the expression levels of 33 schizophrenia susceptibility genes in blood cells and functional magnetic resonance imaging

  9. High expression of hexokinase domain containing 1 is associated with poor prognosis and aggressive phenotype in hepatocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zijian; Huang, Shanzhou; Wang, Huanyu

    Rapid progress and metastasis remain the major treatment failure modes of hepatocarcinoma (HCC). Unfortunately, the underlying molecular mechanisms of hepatoma cell proliferation and migration are poorly understood. Metabolic abnormalities play critical roles in tumorigenesis and progression. Hexokinase domain containing 1 (HKDC1) catalyzes the phosphorylation of glucose. However, the functions and mechanisms of HKDC1 in cancer remain unknown. In this study, real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting assays were used to detect the HKDC1 expression levels in HCC tissues and cell lines. The Oncomine™ Cancer Microarray Database was applied to analysis the correlations between HKDC1 expression and HCC clinical characteristics. MTT andmore » Transwell migration assays were performed to determine the functions of HKDC1 in HCC cells. The effect of HKDC1 on Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was assessed using Western blotting assay. In this study, we found that HKDC1 expression levels were elevated in HCC tissues compared with the adjacent tissues. HCC patients with high expression levels of HKDC1 had poor overall survival (OS). Furthermore, higher HKDC1 levels also predicted a worse OS of patients within solitary, elevated pre-operated serum alpha fetoprotein (AFP) level and higher tumor diameter. Moreover, silencing HKDC1 suppressed HCC cells proliferation and migration in vitro. Downregulated HKDC1 expression repressed β-Catenin and c-Myc expression, which indicates that silencing HKDC1 may reduce proliferation and migration via inhibiting the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in HCC. In summary, HKDC1 provides further insight into HCC tumor progression and may provide a novel prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for HCC treatment. -- Highlights: •HKDC1 is upregulated in HCC. •Patients with high HKDC1 expressions perform worse OS. •Silencing HKDC1 suppresses proliferation and migration. •Silencing HKDC1 represses Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.« less

  10. Normal female phenotype and ovarian development despite the ovarian expression of the sex-determining region of Y chromosome (SRY) in a 46,XX/69,XXY diploid/triploid mosaic child conceived after in vitro fertilization-intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    PubMed

    Oktem, Ozgur; Paduch, Darius A; Xu, Kangpu; Mielnik, Anna; Oktay, Kutluk

    2007-03-01

    Diploid/triploid mosaicism (mixoploidy) is a rare chromosomal abnormality characterized by mental and growth retardation, hypotonia, and dysmorphic features such as facial asymmetry, low-set ears, and syndactyly. All 46,XX/69,XXY cases fall into three phenotypic groups: male with testicular development, ovotestis disorder of sex development (DSD), or undervirilized male DSD. All phenotypic females with diploid/triploid mosaic reported so far had 46,XX/69,XXX karyotype. We report an 8-year-old girl conceived after in vitro fertilization-intracytoplasmic sperm injection with normal internal/external genital and ovarian development despite 46,XX/69,XXY mosaicism and normal expression of sex-determining region of Y chromosome (SRY) in her gonads. Because of the increased risk of gonadoblastoma resulting from Y chromosome mosaicism, her ovaries were removed by laparoscopy. Ovarian tissue was analyzed histologically as well as by fluorescence in situ hybridization, PCR, and RT-PCR amplification to determine the localization of Y chromosome and expression of SRY and DAX1 mRNA. Methylation-specific PCR was used to assess the inactivation pattern of X chromosomes. By laparoscopy, internal female genital anatomy appeared to be normal. Cytogenetic and molecular methods confirmed the presence of intact and functionally active Y chromosome in the ovary. Strikingly, histological assessment of the gonads showed normal ovarian architecture with abundant primordial follicles despite the presence of the Y chromosome in ovarian follicles and the expression of SRY mRNA in gonadal tissue. This case illustrates that normal ovarian development is possible in the presence of Y chromosome in ovarian follicles and despite the expression of SRY in ovarian tissue. Furthermore, this is the first documented case of mixoploidy after in vitro fertilization-intracytoplasmic sperm injection and the only phenotypic female with 46,XX/69,XXY karyotype.

  11. Increasing expression and decreasing degradation of SMN ameliorate the spinal muscular atrophy phenotype in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Deborah Y.; Motley, William W.; Fischbeck, Kenneth H.; Burnett, Barrington G.

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder caused by reduced levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. Here we show that the proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, increases SMN in cultured cells and in peripheral tissues of SMA model mice. Bortezomib-treated animals had improved motor function, which was associated with reduced spinal cord and muscle pathology and improved neuromuscular junction size, but no change in survival. Combining bortezomib with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) resulted in a synergistic increase in SMN protein levels in mouse tissue and extended survival of SMA mice more than TSA alone. Our results demonstrate that a combined regimen of drugs that decrease SMN protein degradation and increase SMN gene transcription synergistically increases SMN levels and improves the lifespan of SMA model mice. Moreover, this study indicates that while increasing SMN levels in the central nervous system may help extend survival, peripheral tissues can also be targeted to improve the SMA disease phenotype. PMID:21693563

  12. An innovative way to highlight the power of each polymorphism on elite athletes phenotype expression.

    PubMed

    Contrò, Valentina; Schiera, Gabriella; Abbruzzo, Antonino; Bianco, Antonino; Amato, Alessandra; Sacco, Alessia; Macchiarella, Alessandra; Palma, Antonio; Proia, Patrizia

    2018-01-12

    The purpose of this study was to determine the probability of soccer players having the best genetic background that could increase performance, evaluating the polymorphism that are considered Performance Enhancing Polymorphism (PEPs) distributed on five genes: PPARα, PPARGC1A, NRF2, ACE e CKMM. Particularly, we investigated how each polymorphism works directly or through another polymorphism to distinguish elite athletes from non-athletic population. Sixty professional soccer players (age 22.5 ± 2.2) and sixty healthy volunteers (age 21.2± 2.3) were enrolled. Samples of venous blood was used to prepare genomic DNA. The polymorphic sites were scanned using PCR-RFLP protocols with different enzyme. We used a multivariate logistic regression analysis to demonstrate an association between the five PEPs and elite phenotype. We found statistical significance in NRF2 (AG/GG genotype) polymorphism/soccer players association (p < 0.05) as well as a stronger association in ACE polymorphism (p =0.02). Particularly, we noticed that the ACE ID genotype and even more the II genotype are associated with soccer player phenotype. Although the other PEPs had no statistical significance, we proved that some of these may work indirectly, amplifying the effect of another polymorphism; for example, seems that PPARα could acts on NRF2 (GG) enhancing the effect of the latter, notwithstanding it had not shown a statistical significance. In conclusion, to establish if a polymorphism can influence the performance, it is necessary to understand how they act and interact, directly and indirectly, on each other.

  13. Towards systems genetic analyses in barley: Integration of phenotypic, expression and genotype data into GeneNetwork

    PubMed Central

    Druka, Arnis; Druka, Ilze; Centeno, Arthur G; Li, Hongqiang; Sun, Zhaohui; Thomas, William TB; Bonar, Nicola; Steffenson, Brian J; Ullrich, Steven E; Kleinhofs, Andris; Wise, Roger P; Close, Timothy J; Potokina, Elena; Luo, Zewei; Wagner, Carola; Schweizer, Günther F; Marshall, David F; Kearsey, Michael J; Williams, Robert W; Waugh, Robbie

    2008-01-01

    Background A typical genetical genomics experiment results in four separate data sets; genotype, gene expression, higher-order phenotypic data and metadata that describe the protocols, processing and the array platform. Used in concert, these data sets provide the opportunity to perform genetic analysis at a systems level. Their predictive power is largely determined by the gene expression dataset where tens of millions of data points can be generated using currently available mRNA profiling technologies. Such large, multidimensional data sets often have value beyond that extracted during their initial analysis and interpretation, particularly if conducted on widely distributed reference genetic materials. Besides quality and scale, access to the data is of primary importance as accessibility potentially allows the extraction of considerable added value from the same primary dataset by the wider research community. Although the number of genetical genomics experiments in different plant species is rapidly increasing, none to date has been presented in a form that allows quick and efficient on-line testing for possible associations between genes, loci and traits of interest by an entire research community. Description Using a reference population of 150 recombinant doubled haploid barley lines we generated novel phenotypic, mRNA abundance and SNP-based genotyping data sets, added them to a considerable volume of legacy trait data and entered them into the GeneNetwork . GeneNetwork is a unified on-line analytical environment that enables the user to test genetic hypotheses about how component traits, such as mRNA abundance, may interact to condition more complex biological phenotypes (higher-order traits). Here we describe these barley data sets and demonstrate some of the functionalities GeneNetwork provides as an easily accessible and integrated analytical environment for exploring them. Conclusion By integrating barley genotypic, phenotypic and mRNA abundance data

  14. Towards systems genetic analyses in barley: Integration of phenotypic, expression and genotype data into GeneNetwork.

    PubMed

    Druka, Arnis; Druka, Ilze; Centeno, Arthur G; Li, Hongqiang; Sun, Zhaohui; Thomas, William T B; Bonar, Nicola; Steffenson, Brian J; Ullrich, Steven E; Kleinhofs, Andris; Wise, Roger P; Close, Timothy J; Potokina, Elena; Luo, Zewei; Wagner, Carola; Schweizer, Günther F; Marshall, David F; Kearsey, Michael J; Williams, Robert W; Waugh, Robbie

    2008-11-18

    A typical genetical genomics experiment results in four separate data sets; genotype, gene expression, higher-order phenotypic data and metadata that describe the protocols, processing and the array platform. Used in concert, these data sets provide the opportunity to perform genetic analysis at a systems level. Their predictive power is largely determined by the gene expression dataset where tens of millions of data points can be generated using currently available mRNA profiling technologies. Such large, multidimensional data sets often have value beyond that extracted during their initial analysis and interpretation, particularly if conducted on widely distributed reference genetic materials. Besides quality and scale, access to the data is of primary importance as accessibility potentially allows the extraction of considerable added value from the same primary dataset by the wider research community. Although the number of genetical genomics experiments in different plant species is rapidly increasing, none to date has been presented in a form that allows quick and efficient on-line testing for possible associations between genes, loci and traits of interest by an entire research community. Using a reference population of 150 recombinant doubled haploid barley lines we generated novel phenotypic, mRNA abundance and SNP-based genotyping data sets, added them to a considerable volume of legacy trait data and entered them into the GeneNetwork http://www.genenetwork.org. GeneNetwork is a unified on-line analytical environment that enables the user to test genetic hypotheses about how component traits, such as mRNA abundance, may interact to condition more complex biological phenotypes (higher-order traits). Here we describe these barley data sets and demonstrate some of the functionalities GeneNetwork provides as an easily accessible and integrated analytical environment for exploring them. By integrating barley genotypic, phenotypic and mRNA abundance data sets

  15. Temporal, spatial, and phenotypical changes of PDGFRα expressing fibroblasts during late lung development.

    PubMed

    Endale, Mehari; Ahlfeld, Shawn; Bao, Erik; Chen, Xiaoting; Green, Jenna; Bess, Zach; Weirauch, Matthew T; Xu, Yan; Perl, Anne Karina

    2017-05-15

    Many studies have investigated the source and role of epithelial progenitors during lung development; such information is limited for fibroblast populations and their complex role in the developing lung. In this study, we characterized the spatial location, mRNA expression and Immunophenotyping of PDGFRα + fibroblasts during sacculation and alveolarization. Confocal microscopy identified spatial association of PDGFRα expressing fibroblasts with proximal epithelial cells of the branching bronchioles and the dilating acinar tubules at E16.5; with distal terminal saccules at E18.5; and with alveolar epithelial cells at PN7 and PN28. Immunohistochemistry for alpha smooth muscle actin revealed that PDGFRα + fibroblasts contribute to proximal peribronchiolar smooth muscle at E16.5 and to transient distal alveolar myofibroblasts at PN7. Time series RNA-Seq analyses of PDGFRα + fibroblasts identified differentially expressed genes that, based on gene expression similarity were clustered into 7 major gene expression profile patterns. The presence of myofibroblast and smooth muscle precursors at E16.5 and PN7 was reflected by a two-peak gene expression profile on these days and gene ontology enrichment in muscle contraction. Additional molecular and functional differences between peribronchiolar smooth muscle cells at E16.5 and transient intraseptal myofibroblasts at PN7 were suggested by a single peak in gene expression at PN7 with functional enrichment in cell projection and muscle cell differentiation. Immunophenotyping of subsets of PDGFRα + fibroblasts by flow cytometry confirmed the predicted increase in proliferation at E16.5 and PN7, and identified subsets of CD29 + myofibroblasts and CD34 + lipofibroblasts. These data can be further mined to develop novel hypotheses and valuable understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of alveolarization. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Temporal, spatial, and phenotypical changes of PDGFRα expressing fibroblasts during late lung development☆

    PubMed Central

    Endale, Mehari; Ahlfeld, Shawn; Bao, Erik; Chen, Xiaoting; Green, Jenna; Bess, Zach; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Xu, Yan; Perl, Anne Karina

    2017-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the source and role of epithelial progenitors during lung development; such information is limited for fibroblast populations and their complex role in the developing lung. In this study, we characterized the spatial location, mRNA expression and Immunophenotyping of PDGFRα+ fibroblasts during sacculation and alveolarization. Confocal microscopy identified spatial association of PDGFRα expressing fibroblasts with proximal epithelial cells of the branching bronchioles and the dilating acinar tubules at E16.5; with distal terminal saccules at E18.5; and with alveolar epithelial cells at PN7 and PN28. Immunohistochemistry for alpha smooth muscle actin revealed that PDGFRα+ fibroblasts contribute to proximal peribronchiolar smooth muscle at E16.5 and to transient distal alveolar myofibroblasts at PN7. Time series RNA-Seq analyses of PDGFRα+ fibroblasts identified differentially expressed genes that, based on gene expression similarity were clustered into 7 major gene expression profile patterns. The presence of myofibroblast and smooth muscle precursors at E16.5 and PN7 was reflected by a two-peak gene expression profile on these days and gene ontology enrichment in muscle contraction. Additional molecular and functional differences between peribronchiolar smooth muscle cells at E16.5 and transient intraseptal myofibroblasts at PN7 were suggested by a single peak in gene expression at PN7 with functional enrichment in cell projection and muscle cell differentiation. Immunophenotyping of subsets of PDGFRα+ fibroblasts by flow cytometry confirmed the predicted increase in proliferation at E16.5 and PN7, and identified subsets of CD29+ myofibroblasts and CD34+ lipofibroblasts. These data can be further mined to develop novel hypotheses and valuable understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of alveolarization. PMID:28408205

  17. Phenotype discovery by gene expression profiling: mapping of biological processes linked to BMP-2-mediated osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Balint, Eva; Lapointe, David; Drissi, Hicham; van der Meijden, Caroline; Young, Daniel W; van Wijnen, Andre J; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S; Lian, Jane B

    2003-05-15

    Understanding physiological control of osteoblast differentiation necessitates characterization of the regulatory signals that initiate the events directing a cell to lineage commitment and establishing competency for bone formation. The bone morphogenetic protein, BMP-2, a member of the TGFbeta superfamily, induces osteoblast differentiation and functions through the Smad signal transduction pathway during in vivo bone formation. However, the molecular targets of BMP-mediated gene transcription during the process of osteoblast differentiation have not been comprehensively identified. In the present study, BMP-2 responsive factors involved in the early stages of commitment and differentiation to the osteoblast phenotype were analyzed by microarray gene expression profiling in samples ranging from 1 to 24 h following BMP-2 dependent differentiation of C2C12 premyoblasts into the osteogenic lineage. A total of 1,800 genes were responsive to BMP-2 and expression was modulated from 3- to 14-fold for less than 100 genes during the time course. Approximately 50% of these 100 genes are either up- or downregulated. Major events associated with phenotypic changes towards the osteogenic lineage were identified from hierarchical and functional clustering analyses. BMP-2 immediately responsive genes (1-4 h), which exhibited either transient or sustained expression, reflect activation and repression of non-osseous BMP-2 developmental systems. This initial response was followed by waves of expression of nuclear proteins and developmental regulatory factors including inhibitors of DNA binding, Runx2, C/EBP, Zn finger binding proteins, forkhead, and numerous homeobox proteins (e.g., CDP/cut, paired, distaless, Hox) which are expressed at characterized stages during osteoblast differentiation. A sequential profile of genes mediating changes in cell morphology, cell growth, and basement membrane formation is observed as a secondary transient early response (2-8 h). Commitment to the

  18. Abnormal structural luteolysis in ovaries of the senescence accelerated mouse (SAM): expression of Fas ligand/Fas-mediated apoptosis signaling molecules in luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Kiso, Minako; Manabe, Noboru; Komatsu, Kohji; Shimabe, Munetake; Miyamoto, Hajime

    2003-12-01

    Senescence accelerated mouse-prone (SAMP) mice with a shortened life span show accelerated changes in many of the signs of aging and a shorter reproductive life span than SAM-resistant (SAMR) controls. We previously showed that functional regression (progesterone dissimilation) occurs in abnormally accumulated luteal bodies (aaLBs) of SAMP mice, but structural regression of luteal cells in aaLB is inhibited. A deficiency of luteal cell apoptosis causes the abnormal accumulation of LBs in SAMP ovaries. In the present study, to show the abnormality of Fas ligand (FasL)/Fas-mediated apoptosis signal transducing factors in the aaLBs of the SAMP ovaries, we assessed the changes in the expression of FasL, Fas, caspase-8 and caspase-3 mRNAs by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and in the expression and localization of FasL, Fas and activated caspase-3 proteins by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively, during the estrus cycle/luteolysis. These mRNAs and proteins were expressed in normal LBs of both SAMP and SAMR ovaries, but not at all or only in trace amounts in aaLBs of SAMP, indicating that structural regression is inhibited by blockage of the expression of these transducing factors in luteal cells of aaLBs in SAMP mice.

  19. Targeted deletion of Vglut2 expression in the embryonal telencephalon promotes an anxiolytic phenotype of the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Nordenankar, Karin; Bergfors, Assar; Wallén-Mackenzie, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety is a natural emotion experienced by all individuals. However, when anxiety becomes excessive, it contributes to the substantial group of anxiety disorders that affect one in three people and thus are among the most common psychiatric disorders. Anxiolysis, the reduction of anxiety, is mediated via several large groups of therapeutical compounds, but the relief is often only temporary, and increased knowledge of the neurobiology underlying anxiety is needed in order to improve future therapies. We previously demonstrated that mice lacking forebrain expression of the Vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (Vglut2) from adolescence showed a strong anxiolytic behaviour as adults. In the current study, we wished to analyse if removal of Vglut2 expression already from mid-gestation of the mouse embryo would give rise to similar anxiolysis in the adult mouse. We produced transgenic mice lacking Vglut2 from mid-gestation and analysed their affective behaviour, including anxiety, when they had reached adulthood. The transgenic mice lacking Vglut2 expression from mid-gestation showed certain signs of anxiolytic behaviour, but this phenotype was not as prominent as when Vglut2 was removed during adolescence. Our results suggest that both embryonal and adolescent forebrain expression of Vglut2 normally contributes to balancing the level of anxiety. As the neurobiological basis for anxiety is similar across species, our results in mice may help improve the current understanding of the neurocircuitry of anxiety, and hence anxiolysis, also in humans.

  20. Correlation of Biomarker Expression in Colonic Mucosa with Disease Phenotype in Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Maria E C; Rogier, Eric W; Arsenescu, Razvan I; Flomenhoft, Deborah R; Kurkjian, Cathryn J; Ellis, Gavin I; Kaetzel, Charlotte S

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation due to immunological, microbial, and environmental factors in genetically predisposed individuals. Advances in the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of IBD require the identification of robust biomarkers that can be used for molecular classification of diverse disease presentations. We previously identified five genes, RELA, TNFAIP3 (A20), PIGR, TNF, and IL8, whose mRNA levels in colonic mucosal biopsies could be used in a multivariate analysis to classify patients with CD based on disease behavior and responses to therapy. We compared expression of these five biomarkers in IBD patients classified as having CD or UC, and in healthy controls. Patients with CD were characterized as having decreased median expression of TNFAIP3, PIGR, and TNF in non-inflamed colonic mucosa as compared to healthy controls. By contrast, UC patients exhibited decreased expression of PIGR and elevated expression of IL8 in colonic mucosa compared to healthy controls. A multivariate analysis combining mRNA levels for all five genes resulted in segregation of individuals based on disease presentation (CD vs. UC) as well as severity, i.e., patients in remission versus those with acute colitis at the time of biopsy. We propose that this approach could be used as a model for molecular classification of IBD patients, which could further be enhanced by the inclusion of additional genes that are identified by functional studies, global gene expression analyses, and genome-wide association studies.

  1. [Construction of transgenic tobacco expressing popW and analysis of its biological phenotype].

    PubMed

    Wang, Cui; Liu, Hongxia; Cao, Jing; Wang, Chao; Guo, Jianhua

    2014-04-01

    In a previous study, we cloned popW from Ralstonia solanacearum strain ZJ3721, coding PopW, a new harpin protein. The procaryotically expressed PopW can induce resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), enhance growth and improve quality of tobacco, when sprayed onto tobacco leaves. Here, we constructed an expression vector pB- popW by cloning popW into the bionary vector pBI121 and transformed it into Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA105 via freeze-thaw method. Tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum cv. Xanthi nc.) transformation was conducted by infection of tobacco leaf discs with recombinant A. tumefaciens. After screening on MS medium containing kanamycin, PCR and RT-PCR analysis, 21 T3 lines were identified as positive transgenic. Genomic intergration and expression of the transferred gene were determined by PCR and RT-PCR. And GUS staining analysis indicated that the protein expressed in transgenic tobacco was bioactive and exhibited different expression levels among lines. Disease bioassays showed that the transgenic tobacco had enhanced resistance to TMV with biocontrol efficiency up to 54.25%. Transgenic tobacco also exhibited enhanced plant growth, the root length of 15 d old seedlings was 1.7 times longer than that of wild type tobacco. 60 d after transplanting to pots, the height, fresh weight and dry weight of transgenic tobacco were 1.4, 1.7, 1.8 times larger than that of wild type tobacco, respectively.

  2. LMTK3 expression in breast cancer: association with tumor phenotype and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Stebbing, Justin; Filipovic, Aleksandra; Ellis, Ian O; Green, Andrew R; D'Silva, Tanya Rapoz; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Coombes, R Charles; Wang, Tingting; Lee, Soo-Chin; Giamas, Georgios

    2012-04-01

    Interactions between kinases and the estrogen receptor α (ERα) are thought to be a critical signaling pathway in the majority of human breast cancers. We have recently identified a previously uncharacterized molecule, lemur tyrosine kinase-3 (LMTK3) as a prognostic and predictive oncogenic ERα regulator with a central role in endocrine resistance. Unusually this protein has undergone Darwinian positive selection between Chimpanzees and humans suggesting it may contribute to human susceptibility to ERα-positive tumors. Using over 600 European primary breast cancer cases, we wished to establish tumor characteristics associated with both cytoplasmic and nuclear LMTK3 expression, and then externally validate our observed European clinical outcomes with samples from Asian individuals receiving chemotherapy. Both nuclear and cytoplasmic expression correlated with tumor grade (P < 0.001) and in the Asian cohort, independent blinded analyses demonstrated that high basal LMTK3 expression was associated with advanced stage of primary breast cancers as well as decreased overall (P = 0.03) and disease-free survival (P = 0.006). In summary, higher LMTK3 expression is associated with more aggressive cancers. These data support our previous findings and suggest LMTK3 expression may be a reliable new biomarker in breast cancer.

  3. Macrophages of multiple sclerosis patients display deficient SHP-1 expression and enhanced inflammatory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Christophi, George P; Panos, Michael; Hudson, Chad A; Christophi, Rebecca L; Gruber, Ross C; Mersich, Akos T; Blystone, Scott D; Jubelt, Burk; Massa, Paul T

    2009-07-01

    Recent studies in mice have demonstrated that the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 is a crucial negative regulator of proinflammatory cytokine signaling, TLR signaling, and inflammatory gene expression. Furthermore, mice genetically lacking SHP-1 (me/me) display a profound susceptibility to inflammatory CNS demyelination relative to wild-type mice. In particular, SHP-1 deficiency may act predominantly in inflammatory macrophages to increase CNS demyelination as SHP-1-deficient macrophages display coexpression of inflammatory effector molecules and increased demyelinating activity in me/me mice. Recently, we reported that PBMCs of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have a deficiency in SHP-1 expression relative to normal control subjects indicating that SHP-1 deficiency may play a similar role in MS as to that seen in mice. Therefore, it became essential to examine the specific expression and function of SHP-1 in macrophages from MS patients. Herein, we document that macrophages of MS patients have deficient SHP-1 protein and mRNA expression relative to those of normal control subjects. To examine functional consequences of the lower SHP-1, the activation of STAT6, STAT1, and NF-kappaB was quantified and macrophages of MS patients showed increased activation of these transcription factors. In accordance with this observation, several STAT6-, STAT1-, and NF-kappaB-responsive genes that mediate inflammatory demyelination were increased in macrophages of MS patients following cytokine and TLR agonist stimulation. Supporting a direct role of SHP-1 deficiency in altered macrophage function, experimental depletion of SHP-1 in normal subject macrophages resulted in an increased STAT/NF-kappaB activation and increased inflammatory gene expression to levels seen in macrophages of MS patients. In conclusion, macrophages of MS patients display a deficiency of SHP-1 expression, heightened activation of STAT6, STAT1, and NF-kappaB and a corresponding inflammatory profile that

  4. Possible influences on the expression of X chromosome-linked dystrophin abnormalities by heterozygosity for autosomal recessive Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, A.H.; Neumann, P.E.; Anderson, M.S.

    1992-01-15

    Abnormalities of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein of muscle and nerve, are generally considered specific for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. However, several patients have recently been identified with dystrophin deficiency who, before dystrophin testing, were considered to have Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) on the basis of clinical findings. Epidemiologic data suggest that only 1/3,500 males with autosomal recessive FCMD should have abnormal dystrophin. To explain the observation of 3/23 FCMD males with abnormal dystrophin, the authors propose that dystrophin and the FCMD gene product interact and that the earlier onset and greater severity of these patients' phenotype (relative tomore » Duchenne muscular dystrophy) are due to their being heterozygous for the FCMD mutation in addition to being hemizygous for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a genotype that is predicted to occur in 1/175,000 Japanese males. This model may help explain the genetic basis for some of the clinical and pathological variability seen among patients with FCMD, and it has potential implications for understanding the inheritance of other autosomal recessive disorders in general. For example, sex ratios for rare autosomal recessive disorders caused by mutations in proteins that interact with X chromosome-linked gene products may display predictable deviation from 1:1.« less

  5. Blood expression profiles of fragile X premutation carriers identify candidate genes involved in neurodegenerative and infertility phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Mateu-Huertas, Elisabet; Rodriguez-Revenga, Laia; Alvarez-Mora, Maria Isabel; Madrigal, Irene; Willemsen, Rob; Milà, Montserrat; Martí, Eulàlia; Estivill, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Male premutation carriers presenting between 55 and 200 CGG repeats in the Fragile-X-associated (FMR1) gene are at risk of developing Fragile X Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS), and females undergo Premature Ovarian Failure (POF1). Here, we have evaluated gene expression profiles from blood in male FMR1 premutation carriers and detected a strong deregulation of genes enriched in FXTAS relevant biological pathways, including inflammation, neuronal homeostasis and viability. Gene expression profiling distinguished between control individuals, carriers with FXTAS and carriers without FXTAS, with levels of expanded FMR1 mRNA being increased in FXTAS patients. In vitro studies in a neuronal cell model indicate that expression levels of expanded FMR1 5'-UTR are relevant in modulating the transcriptome. Thus, perturbations of the transcriptome may be an interplay between the CGG expansion size and FMR1 expression levels. Several deregulated genes (DFFA, BCL2L11, BCL2L1, APP, SOD1, RNF10, HDAC5, KCNC3, ATXN7, ATXN3 and EAP1) were validated in brain samples of a FXTAS mouse model. Downregulation of EAP1, a gene involved in the female reproductive system physiology, was confirmed in female carriers. Decreased levels were detected in female carriers with POF1 compared to those without POF1, suggesting that EAP1 levels contribute to ovarian insufficiency. In summary, gene expression profiling in blood has uncovered mechanisms that may underlie different pathological aspects of the premutation. A better understanding of the transcriptome dynamics in relation with expanded FMR1 mRNA expression levels and CGG expansion size may provide mechanistic insights into the disease process and a more accurate FXTAS diagnosis to the myriad of phenotypes associated with the premutation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Abnormal mRNA Expression Levels of Telomere-Binding Proteins Represent Biomarkers in Myelodysplastic Syndromes: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoshan; Yan, Rongdi; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Bin; Sun, Hu; Cui, Xing

    2017-08-02

    As evidence was shown that abnormal shortening of telomeres begins to accumulate in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients, this study was conducted to determine the relationship between the mRNA expression levels of telomere-binding proteins (TRF1/TRF2/TIN2/TPP1/POT1/RAP1) and the risk level in MDS. There were 40 patients with MDS and 40 normal controls in this study. Methods including telomere content assays and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to examine the mRNA levels of TRF1/TRF2/TIN2/TPP1/POT1/RAP1 in patients with MDS. Compared to the normal group used as a control, the mRNA expression levels of RAP1/POT1/TPP1 of the patients with MDS were decreased, whereas their levels of TRF1/TRF2 and TIN2 were increased. A positive correlation was found between the TRF1, TRF2, and TIN2 mRNA expression levels and the risk level of the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and the World Health Organization Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) criteria; however, a negative correlation was found between RAP1/POT1/TPP1 mRNA expression levels and the risk levels of IPSS and WPSS criteria. Because the reduction of TRF1/TRF2/TIN2 mRNA expression and the increase of RAP1/POT1/TPP1 mRNA expression are closely related to the risk levels of the IPSS and WPSS criteria in MDS, it is thought that these telomere-binding proteins could lead to abnormal telomere length and function, which cause chromosomal abnormalities in MDS. With this evidence, we suggest that those proteins' mRNA expressions could be used as biomarkers for the assessment of the risk degree of MDS patients.

  7. The Expression of TALEN before Fertilization Provides a Rapid Knock-Out Phenotype in Xenopus laevis Founder Embryos.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Kei; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi T; Suzuki, Miyuki; Sakane, Yuto; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Herberg, Sarah; Simeone, Angela; Simpson, David; Jullien, Jerome; Yamamoto, Takashi; Gurdon, J B

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genome editing using programmable nucleases have revolutionized gene targeting in various organisms. Successful gene knock-out has been shown in Xenopus, a widely used model organism, although a system enabling less mosaic knock-out in founder embryos (F0) needs to be explored in order to judge phenotypes in the F0 generation. Here, we injected modified highly active transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) mRNA to oocytes at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage, followed by in vitro maturation and intracytoplasmic sperm injection, to achieve a full knock-out in F0 embryos. Unlike conventional injection methods to fertilized embryos, the injection of TALEN mRNA into GV oocytes allows expression of nucleases before fertilization, enabling them to work from an earlier stage. Using this procedure, most of developed embryos showed full knock-out phenotypes of the pigmentation gene tyrosinase and/or embryonic lethal gene pax6 in the founder generation. In addition, our method permitted a large 1 kb deletion. Thus, we describe nearly complete gene knock-out phenotypes in Xenopus laevis F0 embryos. The presented method will help to accelerate the production of knock-out frogs since we can bypass an extra generation of about 1 year in Xenopus laevis. Meantime, our method provides a unique opportunity to rapidly test the developmental effects of disrupting those genes that do not permit growth to an adult able to reproduce. In addition, the protocol shown here is considerably less invasive than the previously used host transfer since our protocol does not require surgery. The experimental scheme presented is potentially applicable to other organisms such as mammals and fish to resolve common issues of mosaicism in founders.

  8. VGLL3 expression is associated with a tumor suppressor phenotype in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gambaro, Karen; Quinn, Michael C J; Wojnarowicz, Paulina M; Arcand, Suzanna L; de Ladurantaye, Manon; Barrès, Véronique; Ripeau, Jean-Sébastien; Killary, Ann M; Davis, Elaine C; Lavoie, Josée; Provencher, Diane M; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Chevrette, Mario; Tonin, Patricia N

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies have implicated vestigial like 3 (VGLL3), a chromosome 3p12.3 gene that encodes a putative transcription co-factor, as a candidate tumor suppressor gene (TSG) in high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (HGSC), the most common type of epithelial ovarian cancer. A complementation analysis based on microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT) using a centric fragment of chromosome 3 (der3p12-q12.1) into the OV-90 ovarian cancer cell line haploinsufficient for 3p and lacking VGLL3 expression was performed to assess the effect on tumorigenic potential and growth characteristics. Genetic characterization of the derived MMCT hybrids revealed that only the hybrid that contained an intact VGLL3 locus exhibited alterations of tumorigenic potential in a nude mouse xenograft model and various in vitro growth characteristics. Only stable OV-90 transfectant clones expressing low levels of VGLL3 were derived. These clones exhibited an altered cytoplasmic morphology characterized by numerous single membrane bound multivesicular-bodies (MVB) that were not attributed to autophagy. Overexpression of VGLL3 in OV-90 was achieved using a lentivirus-based tetracycline inducible gene expression system, which also resulted in MVB formation in the infected cell population. Though there was no significant differences in various in vitro and in vivo growth characteristics in a comparison of VGLL3-expressing clones with empty vector transfectant controls, loss of VGLL3 expression was observed in tumors derived from mouse xenograft models. VGLL3 gene and protein expression was significantly reduced in HGSC samples (>98%, p < 0.05) relative to either normal ovarian surface epithelial cells or epithelial cells of the fallopian tube, possible tissues of origin of HGSC. Also, there appeared to be to be more cases with higher staining levels in stromal tissue component from HGSC cases that had a prolonged disease-free survival. The results taken together suggest that VGLL3 is involved

  9. Biofilm formation, phenotypic production of cellulose and gene expression in Salmonella enterica decrease under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lamas, A; Miranda, J M; Vázquez, B; Cepeda, A; Franco, C M

    2016-12-05

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica is one of the main food-borne pathogens. This microorganism combines an aerobic life outside the host with an anaerobic life within the host. One of the main concerns related to S. enterica is biofilm formation and cellulose production. In this study, biofilm formation, morphotype, cellulose production and transcription of biofilm and quorum sensing-related genes of 11 S. enterica strains were tested under three different conditions: aerobiosis, microaerobiosis, and anaerobiosis. The results showed an influence of oxygen levels on biofilm production. Biofilm formation was significantly higher (P<0.05) in aerobiosis than in microaerobiosis and anaerobiosis. Cellulose production and RDAR (red, dry, and rough) were expressed only in aerobiosis. In microaerobiosis, the strains expressed the SAW (smooth and white) morphotype, while in anaerobiosis the colonies appeared small and red. The expression of genes involved in cellulose synthesis (csgD and adrA) and quorum sensing (sdiA and luxS) was reduced in microaerobiosis and anaerobiosis in all S. enterica strains tested. This gene expression levels were less reduced in S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis compared to the tested serotypes. There was a relationship between the expression of biofilm and quorum sensing-related genes. Thus, the results from this study indicate that biofilm formation and cellulose production are highly influenced by atmospheric conditions. This must be taken into account as contamination with these bacteria can occur during food processing under vacuum or modified atmospheres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Expression of a dominant negative PKA mutation in the kidney elicits a diabetes insipidus phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Merle L.; Yang, Linghai; Su, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    PKA plays a critical role in water excretion through regulation of the production and action of the antidiuretic hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP). The AVP prohormone is produced in the hypothalamus, where its transcription is regulated by cAMP. Once released into the circulation, AVP stimulates antidiuresis through activation of vasopressin 2 receptors in renal principal cells. Vasopressin 2 receptor activation increases cAMP and activates PKA, which, in turn, phosphorylates aquaporin (AQP)2, triggering apical membrane accumulation, increased collecting duct permeability, and water reabsorption. We used single-minded homolog 1 (Sim1)-Cre recombinase-mediated expression of a dominant negative PKA regulatory subunit (RIαB) to disrupt kinase activity in vivo and assess the role of PKA in fluid homeostasis. RIαB expression gave rise to marked polydipsia and polyuria; however, neither hypothalamic Avp mRNA expression nor urinary AVP levels were attenuated, indicating a primary physiological effect on the kidney. RIαB mice displayed a marked deficit in urinary concentrating ability and greatly reduced levels of AQP2 and phospho-AQP2. Dehydration induced Aqp2 mRNA in the kidney of both control and RIαB-expressing mice, but AQP2 protein levels were still reduced in RIαB-expressing mutants, and mice were unable to fully concentrate their urine and conserve water. We conclude that partial PKA inhibition in the kidney leads to posttranslational effects that reduce AQP2 protein levels and interfere with apical membrane localization. These findings demonstrate a distinct physiological role for PKA signaling in both short- and long-term regulation of AQP2 and characterize a novel mouse model of diabetes insipidus. PMID:25587115

  11. Amniotic fluid RNA gene expression profiling provides insights into the phenotype of Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Massingham, Lauren J; Johnson, Kirby L; Scholl, Thomas M; Slonim, Donna K; Wick, Heather C; Bianchi, Diana W

    2014-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a sex chromosome aneuploidy with characteristic malformations. Amniotic fluid, a complex biological material, could contribute to the understanding of Turner syndrome pathogenesis. In this pilot study, global gene expression analysis of cell-free RNA in amniotic fluid supernatant was utilized to identify specific genes/organ systems that may play a role in Turner syndrome pathophysiology. Cell-free RNA from amniotic fluid of five mid-trimester Turner syndrome fetuses and five euploid female fetuses matched for gestational age was extracted, amplified, and hybridized onto Affymetrix(®) U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Significantly differentially regulated genes were identified using paired t tests. Biological interpretation was performed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and BioGPS gene expression atlas. There were 470 statistically significantly differentially expressed genes identified. They were widely distributed across the genome. XIST was significantly down-regulated (p < 0.0001); SHOX was not differentially expressed. One of the most highly represented organ systems was the hematologic/immune system, distinguishing the Turner syndrome transcriptome from other aneuploidies we previously studied. Manual curation of the differentially expressed gene list identified genes of possible pathologic significance, including NFATC3, IGFBP5, and LDLR. Transcriptomic differences in the amniotic fluid of Turner syndrome fetuses are due to genome-wide dysregulation. The hematologic/immune system differences may play a role in early-onset autoimmune dysfunction. Other genes identified with possible pathologic significance are associated with cardiac and skeletal systems, which are known to be affected in females with Turner syndrome. The discovery-driven approach described here may be useful in elucidating novel mechanisms of disease in Turner syndrome.

  12. Phenotypic Correction of Hemophilia A in Sheep by Postnatal Intraperitoneal Transplantation of FVIII-Expressing MSC

    PubMed Central

    Porada, Christopher D.; Sanada, Chad; Kuo, Chung-Jung; Colletti, Evan; Mandeville, Walter; Hasenau, John; Zanjani, Esmail D.; Moot, Robert; Doering, Christopher; Spencer, H. Trent; Almeida-Porada, Graça

    2011-01-01

    We recently re-established a line of sheep that accurately mimics the clinical symptoms and genetics of severe hemophilia A (HA). Herein, we tested a novel, non-ablative transplant therapy in 2 pediatric HA animals. Paternal mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were transduced with a porcine FVIII-encoding lentivector, and transplanted via the intraperitoneal route, without preconditioning. At the time of transplantation, these animals had received multiple hFVIII treatments for various spontaneous bleeds, and had developed debilitating hemarthroses which produced severe defects in posture and gait. Transplantation of transduced MSC resolved all existent hemarthroses, and spontaneous bleeds ceased. Damaged joints recovered fully; the animals regained normal posture and gait and resumed normal activity. Despite achieving factor-independence, a sharp rise in pre-existent Bethesda titers occurred following transplantation, decreasing the effectiveness and duration of therapy. Post-mortem examination revealed widespread engraftment, with MSC present within the lung, liver, intestine, and thymus, but particularly within joints affected at the time of transplantation, suggesting MSC homed to sites of ongoing injury/inflammation to release FVIII, explaining the dramatic improvement in hemarthrotic joints. In summary, this novel, non-ablative MSC transplantation was straightforward, safe, and converted life-threatening, debilitating HA to a moderate phenotype in a large animal model. PMID:21906573

  13. Effects of theophylline on expression of the long cilia phenotype in sand dollar blastulae.

    PubMed

    Riederer-Henderson, M A

    1988-04-01

    Previously, increases in ciliary length have only been obtained through genetic mutation in Chlamydomonas or by incubation of swimming echinoderm blastulae in trypsin or elastase. We have found that the phenotypic switch from short to long cilia on sand dollar blastulae can also be effected by incubation in theophylline. Cilia detached from control blastulae have a mean length of 21 +/- 7 microns with 10% of the cilia being greater than 30 microns. Upon incubation in 10 mM theophylline additional long cilia appeared after 10 hours and by 24-32 hours 1/2-3/4 of the embryo was covered with long cilia. The percentage of long cilia increased to 65% with a mean length of 40.0 +/- 17.6 microns. Incubation in other methylxanthines, such as aminophylline, caffeine, or isobutylmethylxanthine, inhibited development but had no effect on ciliary length distribution. Dibutyryl cAMP, 8-bromoadenosine, and calcium ionophore also had no effect on ciliary length. Cyclic AMP levels were measured and showed only slight differences among controls and embryos incubated in trypsin, caffeine, or theophylline. These data suggest that theophylline may be altering ciliary length control through some mechanism other than elevations in cAMP.

  14. Delayed Phenotypic Expression of Growth Hormone Transgenesis during Early Ontogeny in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)?

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Darek T. R.; Gamperl, A. Kurt; Fletcher, Garth L.; Fleming, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Should growth hormone (GH) transgenic Atlantic salmon escape, there may be the potential for ecological and genetic impacts on wild populations. This study compared the developmental rate and respiratory metabolism of GH transgenic and non-transgenic full sibling Atlantic salmon during early ontogeny; a life history period of intense selection that may provide critical insight into the fitness consequences of escaped transgenics. Transgenesis did not affect the routine oxygen consumption of eyed embryos, newly hatched larvae or first-feeding juveniles. Moreover, the timing of early life history events was similar, with transgenic fish hatching less than one day earlier, on average, than their non-transgenic siblings. As the start of exogenous feeding neared, however, transgenic fish were somewhat developmentally behind, having more unused yolk and being slightly smaller than their non-transgenic siblings. Although such differences were found between transgenic and non-transgenic siblings, family differences were more important in explaining phenotypic variation. These findings suggest that biologically significant differences in fitness-related traits between GH transgenic and non-transgenic Atlantic salmon were less than family differences during the earliest life stages. The implications of these results are discussed in light of the ecological risk assessment of genetically modified animals. PMID:24763675

  15. Delayed phenotypic expression of growth hormone transgenesis during early ontogeny in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)?

    PubMed

    Moreau, Darek T R; Gamperl, A Kurt; Fletcher, Garth L; Fleming, Ian A

    2014-01-01

    Should growth hormone (GH) transgenic Atlantic salmon escape, there may be the potential for ecological and genetic impacts on wild populations. This study compared the developmental rate and respiratory metabolism of GH transgenic and non-transgenic full sibling Atlantic salmon during early ontogeny; a life history period of intense selection that may provide critical insight into the fitness consequences of escaped transgenics. Transgenesis did not affect the routine oxygen consumption of eyed embryos, newly hatched larvae or first-feeding juveniles. Moreover, the timing of early life history events was similar, with transgenic fish hatching less than one day earlier, on average, than their non-transgenic siblings. As the start of exogenous feeding neared, however, transgenic fish were somewhat developmentally behind, having more unused yolk and being slightly smaller than their non-transgenic siblings. Although such differences were found between transgenic and non-transgenic siblings, family differences were more important in explaining phenotypic variation. These findings suggest that biologically significant differences in fitness-related traits between GH transgenic and non-transgenic Atlantic salmon were less than family differences during the earliest life stages. The implications of these results are discussed in light of the ecological risk assessment of genetically modified animals.

  16. Unusual phenotypic expression of an XLRS1 mutation in X-linked juvenile retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Dodds, Jodi A; Srivastava, Anand K; Holden, Kenton R

    2006-04-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis is a rare progressive vitreoretinal degenerative process that appears in early childhood, results in decreased visual acuity and blindness (if severe), and is caused by various mutations within the XLRS1 gene at Xp22.2. We report an affected family of Western European ancestry with X-linked juvenile retinoschisis. The family was found to carry a 304C-->T substitution in exon 4 of the XLRS1 gene, resulting in an Arg102Trp amino acid substitution. Two of the four available clinical cases in this family were found to carry the mutation. All available mothers of affected males were found to be unaffected carriers of the mutation, a typical feature of X-linked diseases. Two new female carriers, sisters of affected males, were identified and counseled accordingly. Questionnaires on visual functioning were given to the affected family members to examine the psychologic and sociologic impact of X-linked juvenile retinoschisis, which documented an associated stigma even when affected with a "mild" phenotype.

  17. Clonal Expansion of the Pseudogymnoascus destructans Genotype in North America Is Accompanied by Significant Variation in Phenotypic Expression

    PubMed Central

    Khankhet, Jordan; Vanderwolf, Karen J.; McAlpine, Donald F.; McBurney, Scott; Overy, David P.; Slavic, Durda; Xu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Pseudogymnoascus destructans is the causative agent of an emerging infectious disease that threatens populations of several North American bat species. The fungal disease was first observed in 2006 and has since caused the death of nearly six million bats. The disease, commonly known as white-nose syndrome, is characterized by a cutaneous infection with P. destructans causing erosions and ulcers in the skin of nose, ears and/or wings of bats. Previous studies based on sequences from eight loci have found that isolates of P. destructans from bats in the US all belong to one multilocus genotype. Using the same multilocus sequence typing method, we found that isolates from eastern and central Canada also had the same genotype as those from the US, consistent with the clonal expansion of P. destructans into Canada. However, our PCR fingerprinting revealed that among the 112 North American isolates we analyzed, three, all from Canada, showed minor genetic variation. Furthermore, we found significant variations among isolates in mycelial growth rate; the production of mycelial exudates; and pigment production and diffusion into agar media. These phenotypic differences were influenced by culture medium and incubation temperature, indicating significant variation in environmental condition - dependent phenotypic expression among isolates of the clonal P. destructans genotype in North America. PMID:25122221

  18. Clonal expansion of the Pseudogymnoascus destructans genotype in North America is accompanied by significant variation in phenotypic expression.

    PubMed

    Khankhet, Jordan; Vanderwolf, Karen J; McAlpine, Donald F; McBurney, Scott; Overy, David P; Slavic, Durda; Xu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Pseudogymnoascus destructans is the causative agent of an emerging infectious disease that threatens populations of several North American bat species. The fungal disease was first observed in 2006 and has since caused the death of nearly six million bats. The disease, commonly known as white-nose syndrome, is characterized by a cutaneous infection with P. destructans causing erosions and ulcers in the skin of nose, ears and/or wings of bats. Previous studies based on sequences from eight loci have found that isolates of P. destructans from bats in the US all belong to one multilocus genotype. Using the same multilocus sequence typing method, we found that isolates from eastern and central Canada also had the same genotype as those from the US, consistent with the clonal expansion of P. destructans into Canada. However, our PCR fingerprinting revealed that among the 112 North American isolates we analyzed, three, all from Canada, showed minor genetic variation. Furthermore, we found significant variations among isolates in mycelial growth rate; the production of mycelial exudates; and pigment production and diffusion into agar media. These phenotypic differences were influenced by culture medium and incubation temperature, indicating significant variation in environmental condition--dependent phenotypic expression among isolates of the clonal P. destructans genotype in North America.

  19. High levels of bcl-2 protein expression do not correlate with genetic abnormalities but predict worse prognosis in patients with lymphoblastic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yajun; Pan, Yi; Meng, Bin; Guan, Bingxin; Fu, Kai; Sun, Baocun; Zheng, Fang

    2013-06-01

    We aimed to investigate bcl-2, bcl-6, and c-myc rearrangements in patients with lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL), especially focus on the correlation of protein expression with genetic abnormalities. Moreover, their prognostic significance was further analyzed in LBL. Protein expression and genetic abnormalities of bcl-2, bcl-6, and c-myc were investigated in microarrayed tumors from 33 cases of T cell LBL and eight cases of B cell lineage. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining was performed to evaluate protein expression, including bcl-2, bcl-6, c-myc, TdT, CD1α, CD34, Ki-67, PAX-5, CD2, CD3, CD4, CD8, and CD20. Genetic abnormalities of bcl-2, bcl-6, and c-myc were detected by dual color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Bcl-2 protein was positive in 51.2 % (21/41) of the patients, bcl-6 protein in 7.3 % (three out of 41), and c-myc protein in 78.0 % (32/41). Bcl-2 breakpoint was found in two cases by FISH analysis. There was no evidence of bcl-6 or c-myc rearrangement in patients with LBL. However, both gene gain and loss events occurred in bcl-2, bcl-6, and c-myc. A univariate analysis showed that stage III or IV, elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and positivity for bcl-2 protein were associated with shorter survival (p<0.05). Enhanced protein expression and detectable genetic abnormalities of bcl-2, bcl-6, and c-myc were observed in patients with LBL. No statistical correlation was found between IHC results and cytogenetic findings. Stage III or IV, elevated LDH, and positivity for bcl-2 protein were identified as adverse prognostic factors. The patients with more adverse factors would have increasingly worse prognosis.

  20. HIV Nef-mediated cellular phenotypes are differentially expressed as a function of intracellular Nef concentrations.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Schrager, J A; Lange, G D; Marsh, J W

    2001-08-31

    Nef is a regulatory protein encoded by the genome of both human and simian immunodeficiency virus. Its expression in T cells leads to CD4 and major histocompatibility complex class I modulation and either enhancement or suppression of T cell activation. How this viral protein achieves multiple and at times opposing activities has been unclear. Through direct measurements of Nef and the Nef-GFP fusion protein, we find that these events are mediated by different Nef concentrations. Relative to the intracellular concentration that down-modulates surface CD4, an order of magnitude increase in Nef-GFP expression is required for a comparable modulation of major histocompatibility complex class I, and a further 3-fold increase is necessary to suppress T cell activation.

  1. MCSF expression is induced in healing myocardial infarcts and may regulate monocyte and endothelial cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G; Mendoza, Leonardo H; Ren, Guofeng; Akrivakis, Spyridon; Jackson, Peggy L; Michael, Lloyd H; Smith, C Wayne; Entman, Mark L

    2003-08-01

    Myocardial infarction is associated with the rapid induction of mononuclear cell chemoattractants that promote monocyte infiltration into the injured area. Monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation and macrophage proliferation allow a long survival of monocytic cells, critical for effective healing of the infarct. In a canine infarction-reperfusion model, newly recruited myeloid leukocytes were markedly augmented during early reperfusion (5-72 h). By 7 days, the number of newly recruited myeloid cells was reduced, and the majority of the inflammatory cells remaining in the infarct were mature macrophages. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF) is known to facilitate monocyte survival, monocyte-to-macrophage conversion, and macrophage proliferation. We demonstrated marked induction of MCSF mRNA in ischemic segments persisting for at least 5 days after reperfusion. MCSF expression was predominantly localized to mature macrophages infiltrating the infarcted myocardium; the expression of the MCSF receptor, c-Fms, a protein with tyrosine kinase activity, was found in these macrophages but was also observed in a subset of microvessels within the infarct. Many infarct macrophages expressed proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a marker of proliferative activity. In vitro MCSF induced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 synthesis in canine venous endothelial cells. MCSF-induced endothelial monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 upregulation was inhibited by herbimycin A, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and by LY-294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase inhibitor. We suggest that upregulation of MCSF in the infarcted myocardium may have an active role in healing not only through its effects on cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage, but also by regulating endothelial cell chemokine expression.

  2. Bridging the Gap between Gene Expression and Metabolic Phenotype via Kinetic Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-22

    construction of large-scale kinetic models of metabolism, namely, the detailed definition of appro- priate reaction rate expressions and the determination...mole of bio- mass precursor, and the summation included only the drain fluxes to biomass. Note that this definition of the biomass growth rate can... 4P G ly co ly si s Glu Pro Arg Lys Glucose-6P Carbohydrates RNA Lipids Acetaldehyde Figure 2 Metabolic network of the central carbon

  3. Decreased Expression of the Early Mitotic Gene, CHFR, Contributes to the Acquisition of Breast Cancer Phenotypes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    immortalization with the human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 and E7 proteins, which had decreased CHFR expression by RNAi did not have an altered apoptotic response...septation initiation network (SIN). Dev Cell 2002; 3:779–90. 40. Band V, Zajchowski D, Kulesa V, Sager R. Human papilloma virus DNAs immortalize normal... papilloma virus (HPV)–immortalized series of nontumorigenic mammary cell lines were developed and provided by S.P. Ethier, Karmanos Cancer Institute

  4. Inhibition of GSK3β-mediated BACE1 expression reduces Alzheimer-associated phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Philip T.T.; Wu, Yili; Zou, Haiyan; Wang, Ruitao; Zhou, Weihui; Kinoshita, Ayae; Zhang, Mingming; Yang, Yi; Cai, Fang; Woodgett, James; Song, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Deposition of amyloid β protein (Aβ) to form neuritic plaques in the brain is the pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Aβ is generated from sequential cleavages of the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the β- and γ-secretases, and β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is the β-secretase essential for Aβ generation. Previous studies have indicated that glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) may play a role in APP processing by modulating γ-secretase activity, thereby facilitating Aβ production. There are two highly conserved isoforms of GSK3: GSK3α and GSK3β. We now report that specific inhibition of GSK3β, but not GSK3α, reduced BACE1-mediated cleavage of APP and Aβ production by decreasing BACE1 gene transcription and expression. The regulation of BACE1 gene expression by GSK3β was dependent on NF-κB signaling. Inhibition of GSK3 signaling markedly reduced Aβ deposition and neuritic plaque formation, and rescued memory deficits in the double transgenic AD model mice. These data provide evidence for regulation of BACE1 expression and AD pathogenesis by GSK3β and that inhibition of GSK3 signaling can reduce Aβ neuropathology and alleviate memory deficits in AD model mice. Our study suggests that interventions that specifically target the β-isoform of GSK3 may be a safe and effective approach for treating AD. PMID:23202730

  5. Invariant NKT cells from HIV-1 or Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected patients express an activated phenotype.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Carlos J; Cataño, Juan C; Ramirez, Zoraida; Rugeles, Maria T; Wilson, S Brian; Landay, Alan L

    2008-04-01

    The frequency, subsets and activation status of peripheral blood invariant NKT (iNKT) cells were evaluated in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients and in chronically HIV-1-infected subjects. The absolute numbers of iNKT cells were significantly decreased in TB patients and in HIV-1+ individuals who were antiretroviral therapy naive or had detectable viremia despite receiving HAART. iNKT cell subset analysis demonstrated a decreased percentage of CD4(+) iNKT cells in HIV-1+ subjects, and a decreased percentage of double negative iNKT cells in TB patients. Peripheral blood iNKT cells from HIV-1+ and TB patients had significantly increased expression of CD69, CD38, HLA-DR, CD16, CD56, and CD62L. The expression of CD25 was significantly increased only on iNKT cells from TB patients. These findings indicate that peripheral blood iNKT cells in these two chronic infections show an up-regulated expression of activation markers, suggesting their role in the immune response to infection.

  6. Phenotypic expression of autoimmune autistic disorder (AAD): a major subset of autism.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijendra K

    2009-01-01

    Autism causes incapacitating neurologic problems in children that last a lifetime. The author of this article previously hypothesized that autism may be caused by autoimmunity to the brain, possibly triggered by a viral infection. This article is a summary of laboratory findings to date plus new data in support of an autoimmune pathogenesis for autism. Autoimmune markers were analyzed in the sera of autistic and normal children, but the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of some autistic children was also analyzed. Laboratory procedures included enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and protein immunoblotting assay. Autoimmunity was demonstrated by the presence of brain autoantibodies, abnormal viral serology, brain and viral antibodies in CSF, a positive correlation between brain autoantibodies and viral serology, elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines and acute-phase reactants, and a positive response to immunotherapy. Many autistic children harbored brain myelin basic protein autoantibodies and elevated levels of antibodies to measles virus and measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Measles might be etiologically linked to autism because measles and MMR antibodies (a viral marker) correlated positively to brain autoantibodies (an autoimmune marker)--salient features that characterize autoimmune pathology in autism. Autistic children also showed elevated levels of acute-phase reactants--a marker of systemic inflammation. The scientific evidence is quite credible for our autoimmune hypothesis, leading to the identification of autoimmune autistic disorder (AAD) as a major subset of autism. AAD can be identified by immune tests to determine immune problems before administering immunotherapy. The author has advanced a speculative neuroautoimmune (NAI) model for autism, in which virus-induced autoimmunity is a key player. The latter should be targeted by immunotherapy to help children with autism.

  7. Toll-like receptor 4 gene polymorphism modulates phenotypic expression in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Krayenbuehl, Pierre-Alexandre; Hersberger, Martin; Truninger, Kaspar; Müllhaupt, Beat; Maly, Friedrich E; Bargetzi, Mario; Schulthess, Georg

    2010-07-01

    Clinical penetrance of hereditary hemochromatosis is highly variable. We hypothesized that it might be modified by factors involved in the cellular immune response, such as toll-like receptors (TLRs) or nucleotide oligomerization domain proteins (NODs). Clinical expression of hemochromatosis was assessed as a function of TLR4, TLR9, and NOD2 polymorphisms in 99 homozygous carriers of the HFE C282Y mutation with mild-to-severe iron overload. Thirteen (13%) of the 99 hemochromatosis patients were heterozygous for a TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphism and 86 (87%) were TLR4 wild-type-only carriers. Clinical expression of hemochromatosis was observed more frequently in carriers of the TLR4 polymorphism (100%) than in TLR4 wild-type carriers (56%, P = 0.002). This was based on higher prevalences of liver disease (92 vs. 45%, P = 0.002) and arthropathy of metacarpophalangeal joints (69 vs. 35%, P = 0.018) in TLR4 polymorphism carriers. The finding was strengthened by the strong association of TLR4 polymorphism with liver fibrosis in the subgroup of 52 patients who underwent a liver biopsy (P = 0.011). The TLR4 polymorphism did, however, not correlate with body iron overload. The study results remained significant in multiple regression analyses after excluding possible confounding effects, such as age, sex, alcohol, or meat intake, and in the subgroup of 84 patients presenting as the first members of their families. TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphism modulates clinical expression in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis. The polymorphism does not correlate with iron overload suggesting that TLR4 plays a role in an inflammatory process arising from toxic effects of iron accumulation.

  8. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of transgenic soybean expressing the Arabidopsis ferric chelate reductase gene, FRO2.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Marta; Eckert, Helene; Arahana, Venancio; Graef, George; Grusak, Michael A; Clemente, Tom

    2006-10-01

    Soybean (Glycine max Merr.) production is reduced under iron-limiting calcareous soils throughout the upper Midwest regions of the US. Like other dicotyledonous plants, soybean responds to iron-limiting environments by induction of an active proton pump, a ferric iron reductase and an iron transporter. Here we demonstrate that heterologous expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana ferric chelate reductase gene, FRO2, in transgenic soybean significantly enhances Fe(+3) reduction in roots and leaves. Root ferric reductase activity was up to tenfold higher in transgenic plants and was not subjected to post-transcriptional regulation. In leaves, reductase activity was threefold higher in the transgenic plants when compared to control. The enhanced ferric reductase activity led to reduced chlorosis, increased chlorophyll concentration and a lessening in biomass loss in the transgenic events between Fe treatments as compared to control plants grown under hydroponics that mimicked Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient soil environments. However, the data indicate that constitutive FRO2 expression under non-iron stress conditions may lead to a decrease in plant productivity as reflected by reduced biomass accumulation in the transgenic events under non-iron stress conditions. When grown at Fe(III)-EDDHA levels greater than 10 microM, iron concentration in the shoots of transgenic plants was significantly higher than control. The same observation was found in the roots in plants grown at iron levels higher than 32 microM Fe(III)-EDDHA. These results suggest that heterologous expression of an iron chelate reductase in soybean can provide a route to alleviate iron deficiency chlorosis.

  9. Gastrointestinal Fibroblasts Have Specialized, Diverse Transcriptional Phenotypes: A Comprehensive Gene Expression Analysis of Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Genichiro; Aoyagi, Kazuhiko; Sasaki, Hiroki; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Background Fibroblasts are the principal stromal cells that exist in whole organs and play vital roles in many biological processes. Although the functional diversity of fibroblasts has been estimated, a comprehensive analysis of fibroblasts from the whole body has not been performed and their transcriptional diversity has not been sufficiently explored. The aim of this study was to elucidate the transcriptional diversity of human fibroblasts within the whole body. Methods Global gene expression analysis was performed on 63 human primary fibroblasts from 13 organs. Of these, 32 fibroblasts from gastrointestinal organs (gastrointestinal fibroblasts: GIFs) were obtained from a pair of 2 anatomical sites: the submucosal layer (submucosal fibroblasts: SMFs) and the subperitoneal layer (subperitoneal fibroblasts: SPFs). Using hierarchical clustering analysis, we elucidated identifiable subgroups of fibroblasts and analyzed the transcriptional character of each subgroup. Results In unsupervised clustering, 2 major clusters that separate GIFs and non-GIFs were observed. Organ- and anatomical site-dependent clusters within GIFs were also observed. The signature genes that discriminated GIFs from non-GIFs, SMFs from SPFs, and the fibroblasts of one organ from another organ consisted of genes associated with transcriptional regulation, signaling ligands, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Conclusions GIFs are characteristic fibroblasts with specific gene expressions from transcriptional regulation, signaling ligands, and extracellular matrix remodeling related genes. In addition, the anatomical site- and organ-dependent diversity of GIFs was also discovered. These features of GIFs contribute to their specific physiological function and homeostatic maintenance, and create a functional diversity of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26046848

  10. An Engineered Survival-Selection Assay for Extracellular Protein Expression Uncovers Hypersecretory Phenotypes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Aravind; Haitjema, Charles H; Lee, Robert; Boock, Jason T; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2017-05-19

    The extracellular expression of recombinant proteins using laboratory strains of Escherichia coli is now routinely achieved using naturally secreted substrates, such as YebF or the osmotically inducible protein Y (OsmY), as carrier molecules. However, secretion efficiency through these pathways needs to be improved for most synthetic biology and metabolic engineering applications. To address this challenge, we developed a generalizable survival-based selection strategy that effectively couples extracellular protein secretion to antibiotic resistance and enables facile isolation of rare mutants from very large populations (i.e., 10 10-12 clones) based simply on cell growth. Using this strategy in the context of the YebF pathway, a comprehensive library of E. coli single-gene knockout mutants was screened and several gain-of-function mutations were isolated that increased the efficiency of extracellular expression without compromising the integrity of the outer membrane. We anticipate that this user-friendly strategy could be leveraged to better understand the YebF pathway and other secretory mechanisms-enabling the exploration of protein secretion in pathogenesis as well as the creation of designer E. coli strains with greatly expanded secretomes-all without the need for expensive exogenous reagents, assay instruments, or robotic automation.

  11. Retinal phenotype-genotype correlation of pediatric patients expressing mutations in the Norrie disease gene.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Chi; Drenser, Kimberly; Trese, Michael; Capone, Antonio; Dailey, Wendy

    2007-02-01

    To correlate the ophthalmic findings of patients with pediatric vitreoretinopathies with mutations occurring in the Norrie disease gene (NDP). One hundred nine subjects with diverse pediatric vitreoretinopathies and 54 control subjects were enrolled in the study. Diagnoses were based on retinal findings at each patient's first examination. Samples of DNA from each patient underwent polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing of the NDP gene. Eleven male patients expressing mutations in the NDP gene were identified in the test group, whereas the controls demonstrated wild-type NDP. All patients diagnosed as having Norrie disease had mutations in the NDP gene. Four of the patients with Norrie disease had mutations involving a cysteine residue in the cysteine-knot motif. Four patients diagnosed as having familial exudative vitreoretinopathy were found to have noncysteine mutations. One patient with retinopathy of prematurity had a 14-base deletion in the 5' untranslated region (exon 1), and 1 patient with bilateral persistent fetal vasculature syndrome expressed a noncysteine mutation in the second exon. Mutations disrupting the cysteine-knot motif corresponded to severe retinal dysgenesis, whereas patients with noncysteine mutations had varying degrees of avascular peripheral retina, extraretinal vasculature, and subretinal exudate. Patients exhibiting severe retinal dysgenesis should be suspected of carrying a mutation that disrupts the cysteine-knot motif in the NDP gene.

  12. Phenotypic Characteristics of PD-1 and CTLA-4 Expression in Symptomatic Acute Hepatitis A.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyosun; Kang, Hyojeung; Kim, Chang Wook; Kim, Hee Yeon; Jang, Jeong Won; Yoon, Seung Kew; Lee, Chang Don

    2016-03-01

    The immunoregulatory molecules programmed death 1 (PD-1) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) are associated with the dysfunction of antiviral effector T-cells, which leads to T-cell exhaustion and persistent viral infection in patients with chronic hepatitis C and chronic hepatitis B. Little is known about the role of PD-1 and CTLA-4 in patients with symptomatic acute hepatitis A (AHA). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from seven patients with AHA and from six patients with nonviral acute toxic hepatitis (ATH) during the symptomatic and convalescent phases of the respective diseases; five healthy subjects acted as controls. The expression of PD-1 and CTLA-4 on T-cells was measured by flow cytometry. PD-1 and CTLA-4 expression during the symptomatic phase was significantly higher in the T-cells of AHA patients than in those of ATH patients or healthy controls (PD-1 18.3% vs 3.7% vs 1.6%, respectively, p<0.05; CTLA-4 23.5% vs 6.1% vs 5.9%, respectively, p<0.05). The levels of both molecules decreased dramatically during the convalescent phase of AHA, whereas a similar pattern was not seen in ATH. Our findings are consistent with a viral-protective effect of PD-1 and CTLA-4 as inhibitory molecules that suppress cytotoxic T-cells and thereby prevent the destruction of virus-infected hepatocytes in AHA.

  13. Phenotypic and Gene Expression Modification with Normal Brain Aging in GFAP-Positive Astrocytes and Neural Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Giovanna M.; Peterson, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Astrocytes secrete growth factors that are both neuroprotective and supportive for the local environment. Identified by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, astrocytes exhibit heterogeneity in morphology and in expression of phenotypic markers and growth factors throughout different adult brain regions. In adult neurogenic niches, astrocytes secrete vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) within the neurogenic niche, and are also a source of special GFAP-positive multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs). Normal aging is accompanied by a decline in CNS function and reduced neurogenesis. We asked if a decreased availability of astrocyte-derived factors may contribute to the age-related decline in neurogenesis. Determining alterations of astrocytic activity in the aging brain is crucial for understanding CNS homeostasis in aging and for assessing appropriate therapeutic targets for an aging population. We found region-specific alterations in gene expression of GFAP, VEGF and FGF-2 and their receptors in the aged brain corresponding to changes in astrocytic reactivity, supporting astrocytic heterogeneity and demonstrating a differential aging effect. We found that GFAP-positive NSCs uniquely coexpress both VEGF and its key mitotic receptor Flk-1 in both young and aged hippocampus, indicating a possible autocrine/paracrine signaling mechanism. VEGF expression is lost once NSCs commit to a neuronal fate, but Flk-1-mediated sensitivity to VEGF signaling is maintained. We propose that age-related astrocytic changes result in reduced VEGF and FGF-2 signaling, which in turn limits neural stem cell and progenitor cell maintenance and contributes to decreased neurogenesis. PMID:21385309

  14. Phenotypic and gene expression modification with normal brain aging in GFAP-positive astrocytes and neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Giovanna M; Peterson, Daniel A

    2011-06-01

    Astrocytes secrete growth factors that are both neuroprotective and supportive for the local environment. Identified by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, astrocytes exhibit heterogeneity in morphology and in the expression of phenotypic markers and growth factors throughout different adult brain regions. In adult neurogenic niches, astrocytes secrete vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) within the neurogenic niche and are also a source of special GFAP-positive multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs). Normal aging is accompanied by a decline in CNS function and reduced neurogenesis. We asked whether a decreased availability of astrocyte-derived factors may contribute to the age-related decline in neurogenesis. Determining alterations of astrocytic activity in the aging brain is crucial for understanding CNS homeostasis in aging and for assessing appropriate therapeutic targets for an aging population. We found region-specific alterations in the gene expression of GFAP, VEGF, and FGF-2 and their receptors in the aged brain corresponding to changes in astrocytic reactivity, supporting astrocytic heterogeneity and demonstrating a differential aging effect. We found that GFAP-positive NSCs uniquely coexpress both VEGF and its key mitotic receptor Flk-1 in both young and aged hippocampus, indicating a possible autocrine/paracrine signaling mechanism. VEGF expression is lost once NSCs commit to a neuronal fate, but Flk-1-mediated sensitivity to VEGF signaling is maintained. We propose that age-related astrocytic changes result in reduced VEGF and FGF-2 signaling, which in turn limits NSC and progenitor cell maintenance and contributes to decreased neurogenesis. © 2011 The Authors. Aging Cell © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  15. Over-expression of FoxM1 leads to epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell phenotype in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Bin; Wang, Zhiwei; Ali, Shadan; Kong, Dejuan; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Ahmad, Aamir; Li, Yiwei; Azmi, Asfar S.; Miele, Lucio; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2011-01-01

    FoxM1 is known to play important role in the development and progression of many malignancies including pancreatic cancer. Studies have shown that the acquisition of Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype and induction of cancer stem cell (CSC) or cancer stem-like cell phenotypes are highly inter-related, and contributes to drug resistance, tumor recurrence and metastasis. The molecular mechanism(s) by which FoxM1 contributes to the acquisition of EMT phenotype and induction of CSC self-renewal capacity is poorly understood. Therefore, we established FoxM1 over-expressing pancreatic cancer (AsPC-1) cells, which showed increased cell growth, clonogenicity and cell migration. Moreover, over-expression of FoxM1 led to the acquisition of EMT phenotype by activation of mesenchymal cell markers, ZEB1, ZEB2, Snail2, E-cadherin, and vimentin, which is consistent with increased sphere-forming (pancreatospheres) capacity and expression of CSC surface markers (CD44 and EpCAM). We also found that over-expression of FoxM1 led to decreased expression of miRNAs (let-7a, let-7b, let-7c, miR-200b and miR-200c); however, re-expression of miR-200b inhibited the expression of ZEB1, ZEB2, vimentin as well as FoxM1, and induced the expression of E-cadherin, leading to the reversal of EMT phenotype. Finally, we found that genistein, a natural chemo-preventive agent, inhibited cell growth, clonogenicity, cell migration and invasion, EMT phenotype, and formation of pancreatospheres consistent with reduced expression of CD44 and EpCAM. These results suggest, for the first time, that FoxM1 over-expression is responsible for the acquisition of EMT and CSC phenotype, which is in part mediated through the regulation of miR-200b and these processes, could be easily attenuated by genistein. PMID:21503965

  16. Maillard reaction products enriched food extract reduce the expression of myofibroblast phenotype markers.

    PubMed

    Ruhs, Stefanie; Nass, Norbert; Somoza, Veronika; Friess, Ulrich; Schinzel, Reinhard; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Simm, Andreas

    2007-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGE) are associated with a wide range of degenerative diseases. The present investigation aimed at analysing the influence of AGE containing nutritional extracts on cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) as the major cell type responsible for cardiac fibrosis. Mice CFs were treated with bread crust extract (BCE) which contained significant amounts of a variety of AGE modifications. BCE treatment with up to 30 mg/mL did not impair cell viability. Furthermore, BCE induced a moderate elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and activation of redox sensitive pathways like the p42/44(MAPK), p38(MAPK) and NF-kappaB but did not alter Akt kinase phosphorylation. Expression of smooth muscle alpha-actin and tropomyosin-1, which represent markers for myofibroblast differentiation, was reduced after bread crust treatment. These data suggest a putative antifibrotic effect of melanoidin-rich food.

  17. The phenotype masks the genotype: A possible new expression of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mimbacas, Adriana; Vitarella, Graciela; Souto, Jorge; Reyes, Ana Laura; Farias, Joaquina; Fernández, Mariana; Fabregat, Matias; Javiel, Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a new form of diabetes, with signs of both types 1 and 2, has not been often considered, until recently. It is of immense interest to explore the role of the admixture that characterizes the Uruguayan population (higher and different from other Latin America countries) for the presence of such expression of that particular disease. We describe here a child who possibly presents with this expression. He had typical signs of both diabetic conditions: type 1 (young age, positive immunologic and genetic markers, ketoacidosis) and type 2 (obesity [body mass index = 36 kg/m2] and acanthosis nigricans). In spite of complying with the established guidelines, therapeutic and nutritional control, quality of life and good metabolic control, the patient's obesity had been continually increasing. Looking for a genetic explanation, we studied three single nucleotide polymorphisms involved in three different metabolic pathways (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2, insulin receptor substrate-1 and uncoupling protein-2) associated with insulin resistance. Our patient showed three mutations, GG, GA, GG, associated with insulin resistance that explains obesity associated with limited response to the commonly used drugs. According to the clinical presentation and the genetic and immunological background, we considered that this patient presents with a new form of diabetes. We have termed this particular disease “hybrid diabetes” because of the involvement of genes associated with both the classical type of diabetes. However, at least in an admixed population such as in Uruguay, clinical classification would not strictly dictate the choice of treatment. PMID:27625813

  18. Chromatin remodeling by rosuvastatin normalizes TSC2-/meth cell phenotype through the expression of tuberin.

    PubMed

    Lesma, Elena; Ancona, Silvia; Orpianesi, Emanuela; Grande, Vera; Di Giulio, Anna Maria; Gorio, Alfredo

    2013-05-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multi-systemic syndrome caused by mutations in TSC1 or TSC2 gene. In TSC2-null cells, Rheb, a member of the Ras family of GTPases, is constitutively activated. Statins inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and block the synthesis of isoprenoid lipids with inhibition of Rheb farnesylation and RhoA geranylgeranylation. The effects of rosuvastatin on the function of human TSC2(-/-) and TSC2(-/meth) α-actin smooth muscle (ASM) cells have been investigated. The TSC2(-/-) and TSC2(-/meth) ASM cells, previously isolated in our laboratory from the renal angiomyolipoma of two TSC patients, do not express tuberin and bear loss of heterozigosity caused by a double hit on TSC2 and methylation of TSC2 promoter, respectively. Exposure to rosuvastatin affected TSC2(-/meth) ASM cell growth and promoted tuberin expression by acting as a demethylating agent. This occurred without changes in interleukin release. Rosuvastatin also reduced RhoA activation in TSC2(-/meth) ASM cells, and it required coadministration with the specific mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor rapamycin to be effective in TSC2(-/-) ASM cells. Rapamycin enhanced rosuvastatin effect in inhibiting cell proliferation in TSC2(-/-) and TSC2(-/meth) ASM cells. Rosuvastatin alone did not alter phosphorylation of S6 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and at the higher concentration, rosuvastatin and rapamycin slightly decreased ERK phosphorylation. These results suggest that rosuvastatin may potentially represent a treatment adjunct to the therapy with mTOR inhibitors now in clinical development for TSC. In particular, rosuvastatin appears useful when the disease is originated by epigenetic defects.

  19. Tualang Honey Protects against BPA-Induced Morphological Abnormalities and Disruption of ERα, ERβ, and C3 mRNA and Protein Expressions in the Uterus of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad Zaid, Siti Sarah; Kassim, Normadiah M.; Othman, Shatrah

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) that can disrupt the normal functions of the reproductive system. The objective of the study is to investigate the potential protective effects of Tualang honey against BPA-induced uterine toxicity in pubertal rats. The rats were administered with BPA by oral gavage over a period of six weeks. Uterine toxicity in BPA-exposed rats was determined by the degree of the morphological abnormalities, increased lipid peroxidation, and dysregulated expression and distribution of ERα, ERβ, and C3 as compared to the control rats. Concurrent treatment of rats with BPA and Tualang honey significantly improved the uterine morphological abnormalities, reduced lipid peroxidation, and normalized ERα, ERβ, and C3 expressions and distribution. There were no abnormal changes observed in rats treated with Tualang honey alone, comparable with the control rats. In conclusion, Tualang honey has potential roles in protecting the uterus from BPA-induced toxicity, possibly accounted for by its phytochemical properties. PMID:26788107

  20. Phenotypic correction of von Willebrand disease type 3 blood-derived endothelial cells with lentiviral vectors expressing von Willebrand factor

    PubMed Central

    De Meyer, Simon F.; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen; Chuah, Marinee K.; Pareyn, Inge; Gillijns, Veerle; Hebbel, Robert P.; Collen, Désiré; Deckmyn, Hans; VandenDriessche, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) is an inherited bleeding disorder, caused by quantitative (type 1 and 3) or qualitative (type 2) defects in von Willebrand factor (VWF). Gene therapy is an appealing strategy for treatment of VWD because it is caused by a single gene defect and because VWF is secreted into the circulation, obviating the need for targeting specific organs or tissues. However, development of gene therapy for VWD has been hampered by the considerable length of the VWF cDNA (8.4 kb [kilobase]) and the inherent complexity of the VWF protein that requires extensive posttranslational processing. In this study, a gene-based approach for VWD was developed using lentiviral transduction of blood-outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) to express functional VWF. A lentiviral vector encoding complete human VWF was used to transduce BOECs isolated from type 3 VWD dogs resulting in high-transduction efficiencies (95.6% ± 2.2%). Transduced VWD BOECs efficiently expressed functional vector-encoded VWF (4.6 ± 0.4 U/24 hour per 106 cells), with normal binding to GPIbα and collagen and synthesis of a broad range of multimers resulting in phenotypic correction of these cells. These results indicate for the first time that gene therapy of type 3 VWD is feasible and that BOECs are attractive target cells for this purpose. PMID:16478886

  1. A membrane lipid imbalance plays a role in the phenotypic expression of cystic fibrosis in cftr−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Steven D.; Katz, Mark H.; Parker, Eliza M.; Laposata, Michael; Urman, Mark Y.; Alvarez, Juan G.

    1999-01-01

    A deficiency in essential fatty acid metabolism has been reported in plasma from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, its etiology and role in the expression of disease is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine whether alterations in fatty acid metabolism are specific to CF-regulated organs and whether they play a role in the expression of disease. A membrane lipid imbalance was found in ileum, pancreas, and lung from cftr−/− mice characterized by an increase in phospholipid-bound arachidonic acid and a decrease in phospholipid-bound docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). This lipid imbalance was observed in organs pathologically affected by CF including lung, pancreas, and ileum and was not secondary to impaired intestinal absorption or hepatic biosynthesis of DHA. As proof of concept, oral administration of DHA to cftr−/− mice corrected this lipid imbalance and reversed the observed pathological manifestations. These results strongly suggest that certain phenotypic manifestations of CF may result from remediable alterations in phospholipid-bound arachidonic acid and DHA levels. PMID:10570187

  2. Experimental sheep BSE prions generate the vCJD phenotype when serially passaged in transgenic mice expressing human prion protein.

    PubMed

    Joiner, Susan; Asante, Emmanuel A; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Brock, Lara; Brandner, Sebastian; Bellworthy, Susan J; Simmons, Marion M; Hope, James; Collinge, John; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F

    2018-03-15

    The epizootic prion disease of cattle, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), causes variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans following dietary exposure. While it is assumed that all cases of vCJD attributed to a dietary aetiology are related to cattle BSE, sheep and goats are susceptible to experimental oral challenge with cattle BSE prions and farmed animals in the UK were undoubtedly exposed to BSE-contaminated meat and bone meal during the late 1980s and early 1990s. Although no natural field cases of sheep BSE have been identified, it cannot be excluded that some BSE-infected sheep might have entered the European human food chain. Evaluation of the zoonotic potential of sheep BSE prions has been addressed by examining the transmission properties of experimental brain isolates in transgenic mice that express human prion protein, however to-date there have been relatively few studies. Here we report that serial passage of experimental sheep BSE prions in transgenic mice expressing human prion protein with methionine at residue 129 produces the vCJD phenotype that mirrors that seen when the same mice are challenged with vCJD prions from patient brain. These findings are congruent with those reported previously by another laboratory, and thereby strongly reinforce the view that sheep BSE prions could have acted as a causal agent of vCJD within Europe. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Developmental Connectivity and Molecular Phenotypes of Unique Cortical Projection Neurons that Express a Synapse-Associated Receptor Tyrosine Kinase.

    PubMed

    Kast, Ryan J; Wu, Hsiao-Huei; Levitt, Pat

    2017-11-28

    The complex circuitry and cell-type diversity of the cerebral cortex are required for its high-level functions. The mechanisms underlying the diversification of cortical neurons during prenatal development have received substantial attention, but understanding of neuronal heterogeneity is more limited during later periods of cortical circuit maturation. To address this knowledge gap, connectivity analysis and molecular phenotyping of cortical neuron subtypes that express the developing synapse-enriched MET receptor tyrosine kinase were performed. Experiments used a MetGFP transgenic mouse line, combined with coexpression analysis of class-specific molecular markers and retrograde connectivity mapping. The results reveal that MET is expressed by a minor subset of subcerebral and a larger number of intratelencephalic projection neurons. Remarkably, MET is excluded from most layer 6 corticothalamic neurons. These findings are particularly relevant for understanding the maturation of discrete cortical circuits, given converging evidence that MET influences dendritic elaboration and glutamatergic synapse maturation. The data suggest that classically defined cortical projection classes can be further subdivided based on molecular characteristics that likely influence synaptic maturation and circuit wiring. Additionally, given that MET is classified as a high confidence autism risk gene, the data suggest that projection neuron subpopulations may be differentially vulnerable to disorder-associated genetic variation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Ectopic Expression of Nolz-1 in Neural Progenitors Promotes Cell Cycle Exit/Premature Neuronal Differentiation Accompanying with Abnormal Apoptosis in the Developing Mouse Telencephalon

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sunny Li-Yun; Chen, Shih-Yun; Huang, Huai-Huei; Ko, Hsin-An; Liu, Pei-Tsen; Liu, Ya-Chi; Chen, Ping-Hau; Liu, Fu-Chin

    2013-01-01

    Nolz-1, as a murine member of the NET zinc-finger protein family, is expressed in post-mitotic differentiating neurons of striatum during development. To explore the function of Nolz-1 in regulating the neurogenesis of forebrain, we studied the effects of ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors. We generated the Cre-loxP dependent conditional transgenic mice in which Nolz-1 was ectopically expressed in proliferative neural progenitors. Ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors by intercrossing the Nolz-1 conditional transgenic mice with the nestin-Cre mice resulted in hypoplasia of telencephalon in double transgenic mice. Decreased proliferation of neural progenitor cells were found in the telencephalon, as evidenced by the reduction of BrdU−, Ki67− and phospho-histone 3-positive cells in E11.5–12.5 germinal zone of telencephalon. Transgenic Nolz-1 also promoted cell cycle exit and as a consequence might facilitate premature differentiation of progenitors, because TuJ1-positive neurons were ectopically found in the ventricular zone and there was a general increase of TuJ1 immunoreactivity in the telencephalon. Moreover, clusters of strong TuJ1-expressing neurons were present in E12.5 germinal zone. Some of these strong TuJ1-positive clusters, however, contained apoptotic condensed DNA, suggesting that inappropriate premature differentiation may lead to abnormal apoptosis in some progenitor cells. Consistent with the transgenic mouse analysis in vivo, similar effects of Nozl-1 over-expression in induction of apoptosis, inhibition of cell proliferation and promotion of neuronal differentiation were also observed in three different N18, ST14A and N2A neural cell lines in vitro. Taken together, our study indicates that ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors promotes cell cycle exit/premature neuronal differentiation and induces abnormal apoptosis in the developing telencephalon. PMID:24073229

  5. Ectopic expression of nolz-1 in neural progenitors promotes cell cycle exit/premature neuronal differentiation accompanying with abnormal apoptosis in the developing mouse telencephalon.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sunny Li-Yun; Chen, Shih-Yun; Huang, Huai-Huei; Ko, Hsin-An; Liu, Pei-Tsen; Liu, Ya-Chi; Chen, Ping-Hau; Liu, Fu-Chin

    2013-01-01

    Nolz-1, as a murine member of the NET zinc-finger protein family, is expressed in post-mitotic differentiating neurons of striatum during development. To explore the function of Nolz-1 in regulating the neurogenesis of forebrain, we studied the effects of ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors. We generated the Cre-loxP dependent conditional transgenic mice in which Nolz-1 was ectopically expressed in proliferative neural progenitors. Ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors by intercrossing the Nolz-1 conditional transgenic mice with the nestin-Cre mice resulted in hypoplasia of telencephalon in double transgenic mice. Decreased proliferation of neural progenitor cells were found in the telencephalon, as evidenced by the reduction of BrdU-, Ki67- and phospho-histone 3-positive cells in E11.5-12.5 germinal zone of telencephalon. Transgenic Nolz-1 also promoted cell cycle exit and as a consequence might facilitate premature differentiation of progenitors, because TuJ1-positive neurons were ectopically found in the ventricular zone and there was a general increase of TuJ1 immunoreactivity in the telencephalon. Moreover, clusters of strong TuJ1-expressing neurons were present in E12.5 germinal zone. Some of these strong TuJ1-positive clusters, however, contained apoptotic condensed DNA, suggesting that inappropriate premature differentiation may lead to abnormal apoptosis in some progenitor cells. Consistent with the transgenic mouse analysis in vivo, similar effects of Nozl-1 over-expression in induction of apoptosis, inhibition of cell proliferation and promotion of neuronal differentiation were also observed in three different N18, ST14A and N2A neural cell lines in vitro. Taken together, our study indicates that ectopic expression of Nolz-1 in neural progenitors promotes cell cycle exit/premature neuronal differentiation and induces abnormal apoptosis in the developing telencephalon.

  6. The effect of globin scaffold on osteoblast adhesion and phenotype expression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Ahmad A; Loty, Sabine; Isaac, Juliane; Tayot, Jean-Louis; Bouchard, Philippe; Khraisat, Ameen; Bedral, Ariane; Sautier, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    Different synthetic and natural biomaterials have been used in bone tissue regeneration. However, several limitations are associated with the use of synthetic as well as allogenous or xenogenous natural materials. This study evaluated, in an in vitro model, the behavior of rat osteoblastic cells cultured on a human globin scaffold. Rat osteoblastic cells were isolated from the calvaria of 21-day-old fetal Sprague-Dawley rats. They were then grown in the presence of globin. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to study the expression of cyclin D1, integrin Β1, Msx2, Dlx5, Runx2, and osteocalcin on days 1, 5, and 9. Moreover, alkaline phosphatase activity was measured on days 1, 3, 5, and 7. Alizarin red staining was performed on day 9 to observe calcium deposition. Cells were able to adhere, proliferate, and differentiate on globin scaffolds. Moreover, RT-PCR showed that globin may stimulate some key genes of osteoblastic differentiation (Runx2, osteocalcin, Dlx5). Globin had an inhibitory effect on alkaline phosphatase activity. Calcium deposits were seen after 9 days of culture. These results indicate that purified human globin might be a suitable scaffold for bone tissue regeneration.

  7. A biological network-based regularized artificial neural network model for robust phenotype prediction from gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tianyu; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Luoyan; Ziemek, Daniel; Zarringhalam, Kourosh

    2017-12-19

    Stratification of patient subpopulations that respond favorably to treatment or experience and adverse reaction is an essential step toward development of new personalized therapies and diagnostics. It is currently feasible to generate omic-scale biological measurements for all patients in a study, providing an opportunity for machine learning models to identify molecular markers for disease diagnosis and progression. However, the high variability of genetic background in human populations hampers the reproducibility of omic-scale markers. In this paper, we develop a biological network-based regularized artificial neural network model for prediction of phenotype from transcriptomic measurements in clinical trials. To improve model sparsity and the overall reproducibility of the model, we incorporate regularization for simultaneous shrinkage of gene sets based on active upstream regulatory mechanisms into the model. We benchmark our method against various regression, support vector machines and artificial neural network models and demonstrate the ability of our method in predicting the clinical outcomes using clinical trial data on acute rejection in kidney transplantation and response to Infliximab in ulcerative colitis. We show that integration of prior biological knowledge into the classification as developed in this paper, significantly improves the robustness and generalizability of predictions to independent datasets. We provide a Java code of our algorithm along with a parsed version of the STRING DB database. In summary, we present a method for prediction of clinical phenotypes using baseline genome-wide expression data that makes use of prior biological knowledge on gene-regulatory interactions in order to increase robustness and reproducibility of omic-scale markers. The integrated group-wise regularization methods increases the interpretability of biological signatures and gives stable performance estimates across independent test sets.

  8. Prognostic Value of Abnormal p53 Expression in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Treated With Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy: A Study Based on RTOG 9202

    SciTech Connect

    Che Mingxin; DeSilvio, Michelle; Pollack, Alan

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to verify the significance of p53 as a prognostic factor in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9202, which compared short-term androgen deprivation (STAD) with radiation therapy (RT) to long-term androgen deprivation + RT in men with locally advanced prostate cancer (Pca). Methods and Materials: Tumor tissue was sufficient for p53 analysis in 777 cases. p53 status was determined by immunohistochemistry. Abnormal p53 expression was defined as 20% or more tumor cells with positive nuclei. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the relationships of p53 status to patient outcomes. Results:more » Abnormal p53 was detected in 168 of 777 (21.6%) cases, and was significantly associated with cause-specific mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.89; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14 - 3.14; p = 0.014) and distant metastasis (adjusted HR = 1.72; 95% CI 1.13-2.62; p = 0.013). When patients were divided into subgroups according to assigned treatment, only the subgroup of patients who underwent STAD + RT showed significant correlation between p53 status and cause-specific mortality (adjusted HR = 2.43; 95% CI = 1.32-4.49; p = 0.0044). When patients were divided into subgroups according to p53 status, only the subgroup of patients with abnormal p53 showed significant association between assigned treatment and cause-specific mortality (adjusted HR = 3.81; 95% CI 1.40-10.37; p = 0.0087). Conclusions: Abnormal p53 is a significant prognostic factor for patients with prostate cancer who undergo short-term androgen deprivation and radiotherapy. Long-term androgen deprivation may significantly improve the cause-specific survival for those with abnormal p53.« less

  9. Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Bovine Leukemia Virus Exhibit Abnormal B- and T-Cell Phenotypes after Primary and Secondary Exposures to Keyhole Limpet Hemocyanin

    PubMed Central

    Frie, Meredith C.; Sporer, Kelly R. B.; Benitez, Oscar J.; Wallace, Joseph C.; Droscha, Casey J.; Bartlett, Paul C.; Coussens, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is a retrovirus that is highly prevalent in US dairy herds: over 83% are BLV infected and the within-herd infection rate can be almost 50% on average. While BLV is known to cause lymphosarcomas, only 5% or fewer infected cattle will develop lymphoma; this low prevalence of cancer has historically not been a concern to dairy producers. However, more recent research has found that BLV+ cows without lymphoma produce less milk and have shorter lifespans than uninfected herdmates. It has been hypothesized that BLV infection interferes with normal immune function in infected cattle, and this could lead to reduced dairy production. To assess how naturally infected BLV+ cows responded to a primary and secondary immune challenge, 10 BLV+ and 10 BLV− cows were injected subcutaneously with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide. B- and T-cell responses were characterized over the following 28 days. A total of 56 days after primary KLH exposure, cows were re-injected with KLH and B- and T-cell responses were characterized again over the following 28 days. BLV+ cows produced less KLH-specific IgM after primary immune stimulation; demonstrated fewer CD45R0+ B cells, altered proportions of CD5+ B cells, altered expression of CD5 on CD5+ B cells, and reduced MHCII surface expression on B cells ex vivo; exhibited reduced B-cell activation in vitro; and displayed an increase in BLV proviral load after KLH exposure. In addition, BLV+ cows had a reduced CD45R0+γδ+ T-cell population in the periphery and demonstrated a greater prevalence of IL4-producing T cells in vitro. All together, our results demonstrate that both B- and T-cell immunities are disrupted in BLV+ cows and that antigen-specific deficiencies can be detected in BLV+ cows even after a primary immune exposure. PMID:28770217

  10. The Cellular Phenotype of Roberts Syndrome Fibroblasts as Revealed by Ectopic Expression of ESCO2

    PubMed Central

    van der Lelij, Petra; van Gosliga, Djoke; Oostra, Anneke B.; Steltenpool, Jûrgen; de Groot, Jan; Scheper, Rik J.; Wolthuis, Rob M.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Darroudi, Firouz; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P.

    2009-01-01

    Cohesion between sister chromatids is essential for faithful chromosome segregation. In budding yeast, the acetyltransferase Eco1/Ctf7 establishes cohesion during DNA replication in S phase and in response to DNA double strand breaks in G2/M phase. In humans two Eco1 orthologs exist: ESCO1 and ESCO2. Both proteins are required for proper sister chromatid cohesion, but their exact function is unclear at present. Since ESCO2 has been identified as the gene defective in the rare autosomal recessive cohesinopathy Roberts syndrome (RBS), cells from RBS patients can be used to elucidate the role of ESCO2. We investigated for the first time RBS cells in comparison to isogenic controls that stably express V5- or GFP-tagged ESCO2. We show that the sister chromatid cohesion defect in the transfected cell lines is rescued and suggest that ESCO2 is regulated by proteasomal degradation in a cell cycle-dependent manner. In comparison to the corrected cells RBS cells were hypersensitive to the DNA-damaging agents mitomycin C, camptothecin and etoposide, while no particular sensitivity to UV, ionizing radiation, hydroxyurea or aphidicolin was found. The cohesion defect of RBS cells and their hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents were not corrected by a patient-derived ESCO2 acetyltransferase mutant (W539G), indicating that the acetyltransferase activity of ESCO2 is essential for its function. In contrast to a previous study on cells from patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome, another cohesinopathy, RBS cells failed to exhibit excessive chromosome aberrations after irradiation in G2 phase of the cell cycle. Our results point at an S phase-specific role for ESCO2 in the maintenance of genome stability. PMID:19738907

  11. Galectin-1 expression imprints a neurovascular phenotype in proliferative retinopathies and delineates responses to anti-VEGF.

    PubMed

    Ridano, Magali E; Subirada, Paula V; Paz, María C; Lorenc, Valeria E; Stupirski, Juan C; Gramajo, Ana L; Luna, José D; Croci, Diego O; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Sánchez, María C

    2017-05-16

    Neovascular retinopathies are leading causes of irreversible blindness. Although vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors have been established as the mainstay of current treatment, clinical management of these diseases is still limited. As retinal impairment involves abnormal neovascularization and neuronal degeneration, we evaluated here the involvement of galectin-1 in vascular and non-vascular alterations associated with retinopathies, using the oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model. Postnatal day 17 OIR mouse retinas showed the highest neovascular profile and exhibited neuro-glial injury as well as retinal functional loss, which persisted until P26 OIR. Concomitant to VEGF up-regulation, galectin-1 was highly expressed in P17 OIR retinas and it was mainly localized in neovascular tufts. In addition, OIR induced remodelling of cell surface glycophenotype leading to exposure of galectin-1-specific glycan epitopes. Whereas VEGF returned to baseline levels at P26, increased galectin-1 expression persisted until this time period. Remarkably, although anti-VEGF treatment in P17 OIR improved retinal vascularization, neither galectin-1 expression nor non-vascular and functional alterations were attenuated. However, this functional defect was partially prevented in galectin-1-deficient (Lgals1-/-) OIR mice, suggesting the importance of targeting both VEGF and galectin-1 as non-redundant independent pathways. Supporting the clinical relevance of these findings, we found increased levels of galectin-1 in aqueous humor from patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy and neovascular glaucoma. Thus, using an OIR model and human samples, we identified a role for galectin-1 accompanying vascular and non-vascular retinal alterations in neovascular retinopathies.

  12. Identification of predictive markers of cytarabine response in AML by integrative analysis of gene-expression profiles with multiple phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Jatinder K; Crews, Kristine R; Pounds, Stanley B; Cao, Xueyuan; Gandhi, Varsha; Plunkett, William; Razzouk, Bassem I; Lamba, Vishal; Baker, Sharyn D; Raimondi, Susana C; Campana, Dario; Pui, Ching-Hon; Downing, James R; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Ribeiro, Raul C

    2011-01-01

    Aim To identify gene-expression signatures predicting cytarabine response by an integrative analysis of multiple clinical and pharmacological end points in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Materials & methods We performed an integrated analysis to associate the gene expression of diagnostic bone marrow blasts from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients treated in the discovery set (AML97; n = 42) and in the independent validation set (AML02; n = 46) with multiple clinical and pharmacological end points. Based on prior biological knowledge, we defined a gene to show a therapeutically beneficial (detrimental) pattern of association of its expression positively (negatively) correlated with favorable phenotypes such as intracellular cytarabine 5´-triphosphate levels, morphological response and event-free survival, and negatively (positively) correlated with unfavorable end points such as post-cytarabine DNA synthesis levels, minimal residual disease and cytarabine LC50. Results We identified 240 probe sets predicting a therapeutically beneficial pattern and 97 predicting detrimental pattern (p ≤ 0.005) in the discovery set. Of these, 60 were confirmed in the independent validation set. The validated probe sets correspond to genes involved in PIK3/PTEN/AKT/mTOR signaling, G-protein-coupled receptor signaling and leukemogenesis. This suggests that targeting these pathways as potential pharmacogenomic and therapeutic candidates could be useful for improving treatment outcomes in AML. Conclusion This study illustrates the power of integrated data analysis of genomic data as well as multiple clinical and pharmacologic end points in the identification of genes and pathways of biological relevance. PMID:21449673

  13. Suppression of calbindin-D28k expression exacerbates SCA1 phenotype in a disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Vig, Parminder J S; Wei, Jinrong; Shao, Qingmei; Lopez, Maripar E; Halperin, Rebecca; Gerber, Jill

    2012-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is an autosomal dominant neurological disorder caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine tract in the mutant protein ataxin-1. The cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) are the major targets of mutant ataxin-1. The mechanism of PC death in SCA1 is not known; however, previous work indicates that downregulation of specific proteins involved in calcium homeostasis and signaling by mutant ataxin-1 is the probable cause of PC degeneration in SCA1. In this study, we explored if targeted deprivation of PC specific calcium-binding protein calbindin-D28k (CaB) exacerbates ataxin-1 mediated toxicity in SCA1 transgenic (Tg) mice. Using behavioral tests, we found that though both SCA1/+ and SCA1/+: CaB null (-/+) double mutants exhibited progressive impaired performance on the rotating rod, a simultaneous enhancement of exploratory activity, and absence of deficits in coordination, the double mutants were more severely impaired than SCA1/+ mice. With increasing age, SCA1/+ mice showed a progressive loss in the expression and localization of CaB and other PC specific calcium-binding and signaling proteins. In double mutants, these changes were more pronounced and had an earlier onset. Gene expression profiling of young mice exhibiting no behavior or biochemical deficits revealed a differential expression of many genes common to SCA1/+ and CaB-/+ lines, and unique to SCA1/+: CaB-/+ phenotype. Our study provides further evidence for a critical role of CaB in SCA1 pathogenesis, which may help identify new therapeutic targets to treat SCA1 or other cerebellar ataxias.

  14. Disruption of the midkine gene (Mdk) resulted in altered expression of a calcium binding protein in the hippocampus of infant mice and their abnormal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, E; Kadomatsu, K; Yuasa, S; Muramatsu, H; Mamiya, T; Nabeshima, T; Fan, Q W; Ishiguro, K; Igakura, T; Matsubara, S; Kaname, T; Horiba, M; Saito, H; Muramatsu, T

    1998-12-01

    Midkine (MK) is a growth factor implicated in the development and repair of various tissues, especially neural tissues. However, its in vivo function has not been clarified. Knockout mice lacking the MK gene (Mdk) showed no gross abnormalities. We closely analysed postnatal brain development in Mdk(-/-) mice using calcium binding proteins as markers to distinguish neuronal subpopulations. Intense and prolonged calretinin expression was found in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer of the hippocampus of infant Mdk(-/-) mice. In infant Mdk(+/+) mice, calretinin expression in the granule cell layer was weaker, and had disappeared by 4 weeks after birth, when calretinin expression still persisted in Mdk(-/-) mice. Furthermore, 4 weeks after birth, Mdk(-/-) mice showed a deficit in their working memory, as revealed by a Y-maze test, and had an increased anxiety, as demonstrated by the elevated plus-maze test. Midkine plays an important role in the regulation of postnatal development of the hippocampus.

  15. The effect of variation in physical properties of porous bioactive glass on the expression and maintenance of the osteoblastic phenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Effah Kaufmann, Elsie Akosua Biraa

    pore sizes and porosity and determined the effect of substrate properties on the expression and maintenance of the osteoblastic phenotype, using an in vitro culture of osteoblast-like cells. Our data showed that porous bioactive glass substrates support the proliferation and maturation of osteoblast-like cells. Within the conditions of the experiment, we also found that at a given porosity of 44% the pore size of bioactive glass neither directs nor modulates the in vitro expression of the osteoblastic phenotype. On the other hand, at an average pore size of 92 mum, when cultures are maintained for 14 days, cell activity is greatly affected by the substrate porosity. As the porosity increases from 35% to 59%, osteoblast activity is adversely affected. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  16. Skeletal phenotype of growing transgenic mice that express a function-perturbing form of beta1 integrin in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, R. K.; Amblard, D.; Nishimura, Y.; Iwaniec, U. T.; Kim, J-B; Almeida, E. A. C.; Damsky, C. D.; Wronski, T. J.; van der Meulen, M. C. H.

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal modeling entails the deposition of large amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) to form structures tailored to withstand increasing mechanical loads during rapid growth. Specific ECM molecules bind to integrin receptors on the cell surface, thereby triggering a cascade of signaling events that affect critical cell functions. To evaluate the role of integrins during skeletal growth, transgenic mice were engineered to express a function-perturbing fragment of beta1 integrin consisting of the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail under the control of the osteocalcin promoter (TG mice). Thus, transgene expression was targeted to mature cells of the osteoblast lineage, and herein we show that cultured cells resembling osteocytes from 90-day-old TG mice display impaired adhesion to collagen I, a ligand for beta1 integrin. To determine the influence of beta1 integrin on bones that are responsible for providing structural support during periods of rapid growth, we examined the phenotype of the appendicular skeleton in TG mice compared to wild type (WT) mice. According to radiographs, bones from mice of both genotypes between 14 and 90 days of age appeared similar in gross structure and density, although proximal tibiae from 35-90 days old TG mice were less curved than those of WT mice (72-92% TG/WT). Although there were only mild and transient differences in absolute bone mass and strength, once normalized to body mass, the tibial dry mass (79.1% TG/WT females), ash mass (78.5% TG/WT females), and femoral strength in torsion (71.6% TG/WT females) were reduced in TG mice compared to WT mice at 90 days of age. Similar effects of genotype on bone mass and curvature were observed in 1-year-old retired breeders, indicating that these phenotypic differences between TG and WT mice were stable well into adulthood. Effects of genotype on histomorphometric indices of cancellous bone turnover were minimal and evident only transiently during growth, but when present they

  17. A Complex Structural Variation on Chromosome 27 Leads to the Ectopic Expression of HOXB8 and the Muffs and Beard Phenotype in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanqiang; Luo, Chenglong; Liu, Ranran; Qu, Hao; Shu, Dingming; Wen, Jie; Crooijmans, Richard P. M. A.; Zhao, Yiqiang; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Li, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Muffs and beard (Mb) is a phenotype in chickens where groups of elongated feathers gather from both sides of the face (muffs) and below the beak (beard). It is an autosomal, incomplete dominant phenotype encoded by the Muffs and beard (Mb) locus. Here we use genome-wide association (GWA) analysis, linkage analysis, Identity-by-Descent (IBD) mapping, array-CGH, genome re-sequencing and expression analysis to show that the Mb allele causing the Mb phenotype is a derived allele where a complex structural variation (SV) on GGA27 leads to an altered expression of the gene HOXB8. This Mb allele was shown to be completely associated with the Mb phenotype in nine other independent Mb chicken breeds. The Mb allele differs from the wild-type mb allele by three duplications, one in tandem and two that are translocated to that of the tandem repeat around 1.70 Mb on GGA27. The duplications contain total seven annotated genes and their expression was tested during distinct stages of Mb morphogenesis. A continuous high ectopic expression of HOXB8 was found in the facial skin of Mb chickens, strongly suggesting that HOXB8 directs this regional feather-development. In conclusion, our results provide an interesting example of how genomic structural rearrangements alter the regulation of genes leading to novel phenotypes. Further, it again illustrates the value of utilizing derived phenotypes in domestic animals to dissect the genetic basis of developmental traits, herein providing novel insights into the likely role of HOXB8 in feather development and differentiation. PMID:27253709

  18. Static compression down-regulates N-cadherin expression and facilitates loss of cell phenotype of nucleus pulposus cells in a disc perfusion culture.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haibo; Shi, Jianmin; Zhang, Chao; Li, Pei

    2018-02-28

    Mechanical compression often induces degenerative changes of disc nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue. It has been indicated that N-cadherin (N-CDH)-mediated signaling helps to preserve the NP cell phenotype. However, N-CDH expression and the resulting NP-specific phenotype alteration under the static compression and dynamic compression remain unclear. To study the effects of static compression and dynamic compression on N-CDH expression and NP-specific phenotype in an in vitro disc organ culture. Porcine discs were organ cultured in a self-developed mechanically active bioreactor for 7 days and subjected to static or dynamic compression (0.4 MPa for 2 h once per day). The noncompressed discs were used as controls. Compared with the dynamic compression, static compression significantly down-regulated the expression of N-CDH and NP-specific markers (laminin, brachyury, and keratin 19); decreased the Alcian Blue staining intensity, glycosaminoglycan and hydroxyproline contents; and declined the matrix macromolecule (aggrecan and collagen II) expression. Compared with the dynamic compression, static compression causes N-CDH down-regulation, loss of NP-specific phenotype, and the resulting decrease in NP matrix synthesis. © 2018 The Author(s).

  19. Effects of prenatal low protein and postnatal high fat diets on visceral adipose tissue macrophage phenotypes and IL-6 expression in Sprague Dawley rat offspring

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) are implicated in adipose tissue inflammation and obesity-related insulin resistance. Maternal low protein models result in fetal programming of obesity. However, it is not known whether maternal undernutrition increases ATM phenotypic expression in F1 offspring. Us...

  20. PRKC-ζ Expression Promotes the Aggressive Phenotype of Human Prostate Cancer Cells and Is a Novel Target for Therapeutic Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Sheng; Bee, Alix; Brewer, Daniel; Dodson, Andrew; Beesley, Carol; Ke, Youqiang; Ambroisine, Laurence; Fisher, Gabrielle; Møller, Heinrich; Dickinson, Tim; Gerard, Patricia; Lian, Lu-Yu; Risk, Janet; Lane, Brian; Smith, Paul; Reuter, Victor; Berney, Daniel; Gosden, Christine; Scardino, Peter; Cuzick, Jack; Djamgoz, Mustafa B.A.; Cooper, Colin; Foster, Christopher S.

    2010-01-01

    We show protein kinase C–zeta (PKC-ζ) to be a novel predictive biomarker for survival from prostate cancer (P < 0.001). We also confirm that transcription of the PRKC-ζ gene is crucial to the malignant phenotype of human prostate cancer. Following siRNA silencing of PRKC-ζ in PC3-M prostate cancer cells, stable transfectant cell line si-PRKC-ζ-PC3-MT1-6 is phenotypically nonmalignant in vitro and in vivo. Genome-wide expression analysis identified 373 genes to be differentially expressed in the knockdown cells and 4 key gene networks to be significantly perturbed during phenotype modulation. Functional interconnection between some of the modulated genes is revealed, although these may be within different regulatory pathways, emphasizing the complexity of their mutual interdependence. Genes with altered expression following PRKC-ζ knockdown include HSPB1, RAD51, and ID1 that we have previously described to be critical in prostatic malignancy. Because expression of PRKC-ζ is functionally involved in promoting the malignant phenotype, we propose PKC-ζ as a novel and biologically relevant target for therapeutic intervention in prostate cancer. PMID:21779455

  1. Correlation Analysis Between Expression Levels of Hepatic Growth Hormone Receptor, Janus Kinase 2, Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Genes and Dwarfism Phenotype in Bama Minipig.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haowen; Jiang, Qinyang; Wu, Dan; Lan, Ganqiu; Fan, Jing; Guo, Yafen; Chen, Baojian; Yang, Xiurong; Jiang, Hesheng

    2015-02-01

    Animal growth and development are complex and sophisticated biological metabolic processes, in which genes plays an important role. In this paper, we employed real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) to analyze the expression levels of hepatic GHR, JAK2 and IGF-I genes in 1, 30, 180 day of Bama minipig and Landrace with attempt to verify the correlation between the expression of these growth-associated genes and the dwarfism phenotype of Bama minipig. The results showed that the expression levels of these 3 genes in Bama minipigs were down-regulated expressed from 1 day to 30 day, and which was up-regulated expressed in Landrace. The expression levels of the 3 genes on 1, 30, 180 day were prominently higher in Landrace than in Bama minipigs. The significant differences of the 3 genes expression levels on 1 day between this two breeds indicate that different expressions of these genes might occur before birth. It is speculated that the down-regulated expression of the 3 genes may have a close correlation with the dwarfism phenotype of Bama minipig. More investigations in depth of this study is under progress with the help of biochip nanotechnology.

  2. Bioinformatics approach to evaluate differential gene expression of M1/M2 macrophage phenotypes and antioxidant genes in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Ricardo Fagundes; De Bastiani, Marco Antônio; Klamt, Fábio

    2014-11-01

    Atherosclerosis is a pro-inflammatory process intrinsically related to systemic redox impairments. Macrophages play a major role on disease development. The specific involvement of classically activated, M1 (pro-inflammatory), or the alternatively activated, M2 (anti-inflammatory), on plaque formation and disease progression are still not established. Thus, based on meta-data analysis of public micro-array datasets, we compared differential gene expression levels of the human antioxidant genes (HAG) and M1/M2 genes between early and advanced human atherosclerotic plaques, and among peripheric macrophages (with or without foam cells induction by oxidized low density lipoprotein, oxLDL) from healthy and atherosclerotic subjects. Two independent datasets, GSE28829 and GSE9874, were selected from gene expression omnibus (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) repository. Functional interactions were obtained with STRING (http://string-db.org/) and Medusa (http://coot.embl.de/medusa/). Statistical analysis was performed with ViaComplex(®) (http://lief.if.ufrgs.br/pub/biosoftwares/viacomplex/) and gene score enrichment analysis (http://www.broadinstitute.org/gsea/index.jsp). Bootstrap analysis demonstrated that the activity (expression) of HAG and M1 gene sets were significantly increased in advance compared to early atherosclerotic plaque. Increased expressions of HAG, M1, and M2 gene sets were found in peripheric macrophages from atherosclerotic subjects compared to peripheric macrophages from healthy subjects, while only M1 gene set was increased in foam cells from atherosclerotic subjects compared to foam cells from healthy subjects. However, M1 gene set was decreased in foam cells from healthy subjects compared to peripheric macrophages from healthy subjects, while no differences were found in foam cells from atherosclerotic subjects compared to peripheric macrophages from atherosclerotic subjects. Our data suggest that, different to cancer, in atherosclerosis there is

  3. NCR1 Expression Identifies Canine Natural Killer Cell Subsets with Phenotypic Similarity to Human Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Jennifer A.; Somanchi, Srinivas S.; Yang, Yanwen; Aquino-Lopez, Arianexys; Bishop, Erin E.; Lee, Dean A.

    2016-01-01

    Canines spontaneously develop many cancers similar to humans – including osteosarcoma, leukemia, and lymphoma – offering the opportunity to study immune therapies in a genetically heterogeneous and immunocompetent environment. However, a lack of antibodies recognizing canine NK cell markers has resulted in suboptimal characterization and unknown purity of NK cell products, hindering the development of canine models of NK cell adoptive immunotherapy. To this end, we generated a novel antibody to canine NCR1 (NKp46), the putative species-wide marker of NK cells, enabling purification of NK cells for further characterization. We demonstrate that CD3−/NKp46+ cells in healthy and osteosarcoma-bearing canines have phenotypic similarity to human CD3−/NKp46+ NK cells, expressing mRNA for CD16 and the natural cytotoxicity receptors NKp30, NKp44, and NKp80. Functionally, we demonstrate with the calcein release assay that canine CD3−/NKp46+ cells kill canine tumor cell lines without prior sensitization and secrete IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-10, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor as measured by Luminex. Similar to human NK cells, CD3−/NKp46+ cells expand rapidly on feeder cells expressing 4-1BBL and membrane-bound IL-21 (median = 20,283-fold in 21 days). Furthermore, we identify a minor Null population (CD3−/CD21−/CD14−/NKp46−) with reduced cytotoxicity against osteosarcoma cells, but similar cytokine secretion as CD3−/NKp46+ cells. Null cells in canines and humans have reduced expression of NKG2D, NKp44, and CD16 compared to NKp46+ NK cells and can be induced to express NKp46 with further expansion on feeder cells. In conclusion, we have identified and characterized canine NK cells, including an NKp46− subset of canine and human NK cells, using a novel anti-canine NKp46 antibody, and report robust ex vivo expansion of canine NK cells sufficient for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27933061

  4. CRH Affects the Phenotypic Expression of Sepsis-Associated Virulence Factors by Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 1 In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ngo Ndjom, Colette G.; Kantor, Lindsay V.; Jones, Harlan P.

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a life-threatening health condition caused by infectious pathogens of the respiratory tract, and accounts for 28–50% of annual deaths in the US alone. Current treatment regimen advocates the use of corticosteroids as adjunct treatment with antibiotics, for their broad inhibitory effect on the activity and production of pro-inflammatory mediators. However, despite their use, corticosteroids have not proven to be able to reverse the death incidence among septic patients. We have previously demonstrated the potential for neuroendocrine factors to directly influence Streptococcus pneumoniae virulence, which may in turn mediate disease outcome leading to sepsis and septic shock. The current study investigated the role of Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in mediating key markers of pneumococcal virulence as important phenotypic determinants of sepsis and septic shock risks. In vitro cultures of serotype 1 pneumococcal strain with CRH promoted growth rate, increased capsule thickness and penicillin resistance, as well as induced pneumolysin gene expression. These results thus provide significant insights of CRH–pathogen interactions useful in understanding the underlying mechanisms of neuroendocrine factor's role in the onset of community acquired pneumonias (CAP), sepsis and septic shock. PMID:28690980

  5. Chronic cold stress in mice induces a regulatory phenotype in macrophages: correlation with increased 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase expression.

    PubMed

    Sesti-Costa, R; Ignacchiti, M D C; Chedraoui-Silva, S; Marchi, L F; Mantovani, B

    2012-01-01

    Susceptibility to infections, autoimmune disorders and tumor progression is strongly influenced by the activity of the endocrine and nervous systems in response to a stressful stimulus. When the adaptive system is switched on and off efficiently, the body is able to recover from the stress imposed. However, when the system is activated repeatedly or the activity is sustained, as during chronic or excessive stress, an allostatic load is generated, which can lead to disease over long periods of time. We investigated the effects of chronic cold stress in BALB/c mice (4°C/4 h daily for 7 days) on functions of macrophages. We found that chronic cold stress induced a regulatory phenotype in macrophages, characterized by diminished phagocytic ability, decreased TNF-α and IL-6 and increased IL-10 production. In addition, resting macrophages from mice exposed to cold stress stimulated spleen cells to produce regulatory cytokines, and an immunosuppressive state that impaired stressed mice to control Trypanosoma cruzi proliferation. These regulatory effects correlated with an increase in macrophage expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, an enzyme that converts inactive glucocorticoid into its active form. As stress is a common aspect of modern life and plays a role in the etiology of many diseases, the results of this study are important for improving knowledge regarding the neuro-immune-endocrine interactions that occur during stress and to highlight the role of macrophages in the immunosuppression induced by chronic stress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bioreactor-based bone tissue engineering: The influence of dynamic flow on osteoblast phenotypic expression and matrix mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaojun; Botchwey, Edward A.; Levine, Elliot M.; Pollack, Solomon R.; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2004-01-01

    An important issue in tissue engineering concerns the possibility of limited tissue ingrowth in tissue-engineered constructs because of insufficient nutrient transport. We report a dynamic flow culture system using high-aspect-ratio vessel rotating bioreactors and 3D scaffolds for culturing rat calvarial osteoblast cells. 3D scaffolds were designed by mixing lighter-than-water (density, <1g/ml) and heavier-than-water (density, >1g/ml) microspheres of 85:15 poly(lactide-co-glycolide). We quantified the rate of 3D flow through the scaffolds by using a particle-tracking system, and the results suggest that motion trajectories and, therefore, the flow velocity around and through scaffolds in rotating bioreactors can be manipulated by varying the ratio of heavier-than-water to lighter-than-water microspheres. When rat primary calvarial cells were cultured on the scaffolds in bioreactors for 7 days, the 3D dynamic flow environment affected bone cell distribution and enhanced cell phenotypic expression and mineralized matrix synthesis within tissue-engineered constructs compared with static conditions. These studies provide a foundation for exploring the effects of dynamic flow on osteoblast function and provide important insight into the design and optimization of 3D scaffolds suitable in bioreactors for in vitro tissue engineering of bone. PMID:15277663

  7. Kupffer cells express a unique combination of phenotypic and functional characteristics compared with splenic and peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Movita, Dowty; Kreefft, Kim; Biesta, Paula; van Oudenaren, Adri; Leenen, Pieter J M; Janssen, Harry L A; Boonstra, Andre

    2012-10-01

    The immunostimulatory role of Kupffer cells in various inflammatory liver diseases is still not fully understood. In this study, phenotypic and functional aspects of Kupffer cells from healthy C57BL/6 mice were analyzed and compared with those of splenic and peritoneal macrophages to generate a blueprint of the cells under steady-state conditions. In the mouse liver, only one population of Kupffer cells was identified as F4/80(high)CD11b(low) cells. We observed that freshy isolated Kupffer cells are endocytic and show a relatively high basal ROS content. Interestingly, despite expression of TLR mRNA on Kupffer cells, ligation of TLR4, TLR7/8, and TLR9 resulted in a weak induction of IL-10, low or undetectable levels of IL-12p40 and TNF, and up-regulation of CD40 on the surface. Kupffer cells and splenic macrophages show functional similarities, in comparison with peritoneal macrophages, as reflected by comparable levels of TLR4, TLR7/8, and TLR9 mRNA and low or undetectable levels of TNF and IL-12p40 produced upon TLR ligation. The unique, functional characteristics of Kupffer cells, demonstrated in this study, suggest that Kupffer cells under steady-state conditions are specialized as phagocytes to clear and degrade particulates and only play a limited immunoregulatory role via the release of soluble mediators.

  8. Pax8 modulates the expression of Wnt4 that is necessary for the maintenance of the epithelial phenotype of thyroid cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The transcription factor Pax8 is expressed during thyroid development and is involved in the morphogenesis of the thyroid gland and maintenance of the differentiated phenotype. In particular, Pax8 has been shown to regulate genes that are considered markers of thyroid differentiation. Recently, the analysis of the gene expression profile of FRTL-5 differentiated thyroid cells after the silencing of Pax8 identified Wnt4 as a novel target. Like the other members of the Wnt family, Wnt4 has been implicated in several developmental processes including regulation of cell fate and patterning during embryogenesis. To date, the only evidence on Wnt4 in thyroid concerns its down-regulation necessary for the progression of thyroid epithelial tumors. Results Here we demonstrate that Pax8 is involved in the transcriptional modulation of Wnt4 gene expression directly binding to its 5’-flanking region, and that Wnt4 expression in FRTL-5 cells is TSH-dependent. Interestingly, we also show that in thyroid cells a reduced expression of Wnt4 correlates with the alteration of the epithelial phenotype and that the overexpression of Wnt4 in thyroid cancer cells is able to inhibit cellular migration. Conclusions We have identified and characterized a functional Pax8 binding site in the 5’-flanking region of the Wnt4 gene and we show that Pax8 modulates the expression of Wnt4 in thyroid cells. Taken together, our results suggest that in thyroid cells Wnt4 expression correlates with the integrity of the epithelial phenotype and is reduced when this integrity is perturbed. In the end, we would like to suggest that the overexpression of Wnt4 in thyroid cancer cells is able to revert the mesenchymal phenotype. PMID:25270402

  9. Hepatic Oval Cells Have the Side Population Phenotype Defined by Expression of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter ABCG2/BCRP1

    PubMed Central

    Shimano, Koichi; Satake, Makoto; Okaya, Atsuhito; Kitanaka, Junichi; Kitanaka, Nobue; Takemura, Motohiko; Sakagami, Masafumi; Terada, Nobuyuki; Tsujimura, Tohru

    2003-01-01

    Organ-specific stem cells can be identified by the side population (SP) phenotype, which is defined by the property to effectively exclude the Hoechst 33342 dye. The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG2/BCRP1 mediates the SP phenotype. Because hepatic oval cells possess several characteristics of stem cells, we examined whether they have the SP phenotype using the 2-acetylaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy (PH) model. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis showed that a population of non-parenchymal cells containing oval cells, prepared on day 7 after PH, carried a significant number of SP cells, whereas that of non-parenchymal cells without oval cells, prepared on day 0 after PH, did not. Northern blot analysis using total liver RNA obtained on various days after PH showed that the expression of ABCG2/BCRP1 mRNA increased after PH, reaching the highest level on day 7, and then gradually decreased. This pattern of changes in the ABCG2/BCRP1 mRNA level was well correlated to that in the number of oval cells. Furthermore, in situ hybridization revealed that oval cells were the sites of expression of ABCG2/BCRP1 mRNA. These results indicate that oval cells have the SP phenotype defined by expression of ABCG2/BCRP1, suggesting that oval cells may represent stem cells in the liver. PMID:12819005

  10. DEL phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Dong H; Sandler, S G; Flegel, Willy A

    2017-09-01

    DEL red blood cells (RBCs) type as D- by routine serologic methods and are transfused routinely, without being identified as expressing a very weak D antigen, to D- recipients. DEL RBCs are detected only by adsorption and elution of anti-D or by molecular methods. Most DEL phenotypes have been reported in population studies conducted in East Asia, although DEL phenotypes have been detected also among Caucasian individuals. Approximately 98 percent of DEL phenotypes in East Asians are associated with the RHD*DEL1 or RHD*01EL.01 allele. The prevalence of DEL phenotypes has been reported among D- Han Chinese (30%), Japanese (28%), and Korean (17%) populations. The prevalence of DEL phenotypes is significantly lower among D- Caucasian populations (0.1%). Among the 3-5 percent of African individuals who are D-, there are no reports of the DEL phenotype. Case reports from East Asia indicate that transfusion of DEL RBCs to D- recipients has been associated with D alloimmunization. East Asian immigrants constitute 2.1 percent of the 318.9 million persons residing in the United States, and an estimated 2.8 percent are blood donors. Using these statistics, we estimate that 68-683 units of DEL RBCs from donors of East Asian ancestry are transfused as D- annually in the United States. Given the reports from East Asia of D alloimmunization attributed to transfusion of DEL RBCs, one would expect an occasional report of D alloimmunization in the United States following transfusion of DEL RBCs to a D- recipient. If such cases do occur, the most likely reason that they are not detected is the absence of active post-transfusion monitoring for formation of anti-D.

  11. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Fluid shear stress as a regulator of gene expression in vascular cells: possible correlations with diabetic abnormalities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Eskin, S. G.; Ruef, J.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    1999-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased frequency, severity and more rapid progression of cardiovascular diseases. Metabolic perturbations from hyperglycemia result in disturbed endothelium-dependent relaxation, activation of coagulation pathways, depressed fibrinolysis, and other abnormalities in vascular homeostasis. Atherosclerosis is localized mainly at areas of geometric irregularity at which blood vessels branch, curve and change diameter, and where blood is subjected to sudden changes in velocity and/or direction of flow. Shear stress resulting from blood flow is a well known modulator of vascular cell function. This paper presents what is currently known regarding the molecular mechanisms responsible for signal transduction and gene regulation in vascular cells exposed to shear stress. Considering the importance of the hemodynamic environment of vascular cells might be vital to increasing our understanding of diabetes.

  13. Responses of Myosin Heavy Chain Phenotypes and Gene Expressions in Neck Muscle to Micro- an Hyper-Gravity in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Tomotaka; Ohira, Takashi; Kawano, F.; Shibaguchi, T.; Okabe, H.; Ohno, Y.; Nakai, N.; Ochiai, T.; Goto, K.; Ohira, Y.

    2013-02-01

    Neck muscles are known to play important roles in the maintenance of head posture against gravity. However, it is not known how the properties of neck muscle are influenced by gravity. Therefore, the current study was performed to investigate the responses of neck muscle (rhomboideus capitis) in mice to inhibition of gravity and/or increase to 2-G for 3 months to test the hypothesis that the properties of neck muscles are regulated in response to the level of mechanical load applied by the gravitational load. Three male wild type C57BL/10J mice (8 weeks old) were launched by space shuttle Discovery (STS-128) and housed in Japanese Experimental Module “KIBO” on the International Space Station in mouse drawer system (MDS) project, which was organized by Italian Space Agency. Only 1 mouse returned to the Earth alive after 3 months by space shuttle Atlantis (STS-129). Neck muscles were sampled from both sides within 3 hours after landing. Cage and laboratory control experiments were also performed on the ground. Further, 3-month ground-based control experiments were performed with 6 groups, i.e. pre-experiment, 3-month hindlimb suspension, 2-G exposure by using animal centrifuge, and vivarium control (n=5 each group). Five mice were allowed to recover from hindlimb suspension (including 5 cage control) for 3 months in the cage. Neck muscles were sampled bilaterally before and after 3-month suspension and 2-G exposure, and at the end of 3-month ambulation recovery. Spaceflight-associated shift of myosin heavy chain phenotype from type I to II and atrophy of type I fibers were observed. In response to spaceflight, 17 genes were up-regulated and 13 genes were down-regulated vs. those in the laboratory control. Expression of 6 genes were up-regulated and that of 88 genes were down-regulated by 3-month exposure to 2-G vs. the age-matched cage control. In response to chronic hindlimb suspension, 4 and 20 genes were up- or down-regulated. Further, 98 genes responded

  14. Functional effect of mir-27b on myostatin expression: a relationship in piedmontese cattle with double-muscled phenotype

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Piedmontese cattle the double-muscled phenotype is an inherited condition associated to a point mutation in the myostatin (MSTN) gene. The Piedmontese MSTN missense mutation G938A is translated to C313Y myostatin protein. This mutation alters MSTN function as a negative regulator of muscle growth, thereby inducing muscle hypertrophy. MiRNAs could play a role in skeletal muscle hypertrophy modulation by down-regulating gene expression. Results After identifying a 3′-UTR consensus sequence of several negative and positive modulator genes involved in the skeletal muscle hypertrophy pathway, such as IGF1, IGF1R, PPP3CA, NFATc1, MEF2C, GSK3b, TEAD1 and MSTN, we screened miRNAs matching to it. This analysis led to the identification of miR-27b, miR-132, miR-186 and miR-199b-5p as possible candidates. We collected samples of longissimus thoracis from twenty Piedmontese and twenty Friesian male bovines. In Piedmontese group miR-27b was up-regulated 7.4-fold (p < 0.05). Further, we report that the level of MSTN mRNA was about 5-fold lower in Piedmontese cattle vs Friesian cattle (p < 0.0001) and that less mature MSTN protein was detected in the Piedmontese one (p < 0.0001). Cotransfection of miR-27b and psi-check2 vector with the luciferase reporter gene linked to the bovine wild-type 3′-UTR of MSTN strongly inhibited the luciferase activity (79%, p < 0.0001). Conclusions These data demonstrate that bovine MSTN is a specific target of miR-27b and that miRNAs contribute to explain additive phenotypic hypertrophy in Piedmontese cattle selected for the MSTN gene mutation, possibly outlining a more precise genetic signature able to elucidate differences in muscle conformation. PMID:23510267

  15. Abnormal expression of p27kip1 protein in levator ani muscle of aging women with pelvic floor disorders – a relationship to the cellular differentiation and degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bukovsky, Antonin; Copas, Pleas; Caudle, Michael R; Cekanova, Maria; Dassanayake, Tamara; Asbury, Bridgett; Van Meter, Stuart E; Elder, Robert F; Brown, Jeffrey B; Cross, Stephanie B

    2001-01-01

    Background Pelvic floor disorders affect almost 50% of aging women. An important role in the pelvic floor support belongs to the levator ani muscle. The p27/kip1 (p27) protein, multifunctional cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, shows changing expression in differentiating skeletal muscle cells during development, and relatively high levels of p27 RNA were detected in the normal human skeletal muscles. Methods Biopsy samples of levator ani muscle were obtained from 22 symptomatic patients with stress urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, and overlaps (age range 38–74), and nine asymptomatic women (age 31–49). Cryostat sections were investigated for p27 protein expression and type I (slow twitch) and type II (fast twitch) fibers. Results All fibers exhibited strong plasma membrane (and nuclear) p27 protein expression. cytoplasmic p27 expression was virtually absent in asymptomatic women. In perimenopausal symptomatic patients (ages 38–55), muscle fibers showed hypertrophy and moderate cytoplasmic p27 staining accompanied by diminution of type II fibers. Older symptomatic patients (ages 57–74) showed cytoplasmic p27 overexpression accompanied by shrinking, cytoplasmic vacuolization and fragmentation of muscle cells. The plasma membrane and cytoplasmic p27 expression was not unique to the muscle cells. Under certain circumstances, it was also detected in other cell types (epithelium of ectocervix and luteal cells). Conclusions This is the first report on the unusual (plasma membrane and cytoplasmic) expression of p27 protein in normal and abnormal human striated muscle cells in vivo. Our data indicate that pelvic floor disorders are in perimenopausal patients associated with an appearance of moderate cytoplasmic p27 expression, accompanying hypertrophy and transition of type II into type I fibers. The patients in advanced postmenopause show shrinking and fragmentation of muscle fibers associated with strong cytoplasmic p27 expression. PMID:11696252

  16. Flow cytometric characterization of phenotype, DNA indices and p53 gene expression in 55 cases of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Powari, Manish; Varma, Neelam; Varma, Subhash; Marwaha, Ram Kumar; Sandhu, Harpreet; Ganguly, Nirmal Kumar

    2002-06-01

    To characterize the phenotype of acute leukemia cases using flow cytometry, to detect mixed lineage cases and to use DNA index determination, including S-phase fraction (SPF) and p53 detection, to find if there was any correlation of SPF and p53 expression with outcome. Fifty-five cases of acute leukemia were enrolled in this study. A complete hemogram and routine bone marrow examination, including cytochemistry, was done. Mycloperoxidase-negative cases were evaluated on a flow cytometer using monoclonal antibodies. DNA indices were determined by flow cytometry in all cases, and p53 was detected immunohistochemically using the alkaline phosphatase/antialkaline phosphatase technique. Acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) was diagnosed in 32 cases; acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was diagnosed in 18 (14 B lineage and 4 T line age). Four cases showed mixed lineage leukemia, and undifferentiated acute leukemia was diagnosed in one case. The mean/range of SPF for these groups were 3.76/0.33-6.91, 6.25/0.15-21.4, 2.89/0.35-10.64, 2.60/0.72-6.94 and 7.34, respectively. Aneuploidy was detected in two cases of B-lineage ALL and tetraploidy in a case of AML-M7, while all others were diploid p53. Was detected in 6 of 55 cases (10.90%). Follow-up was available for 24 patients. Five patients relapsed, and four had B-cell type ALL and were diploid and expressed no p53 gene. SPF% did not show any correlation with outcome. These data suggest that within acute leukemia subtypes, there is a wide variation in SPF. SPF does not seem to correlate with outcome. Immunophenotyping is essential to determine the lineage in myeloperoxidase-negative cases. It is perhaps the only way to diagnose mixed lineage leukemia and aberrant expression of markers presently. The p53 gene was detected less frequently. However, more studies are required from different centers with longer follow-up to evaluate prognostic significance.

  17. Inactivation of Bmp4 from the Tbx1 Expression Domain Causes Abnormal Pharyngeal Arch Artery and Cardiac Outflow Tract Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Xuguang; Brown, Christopher B.; Wang, Qin; Jiao, Kai

    2011-01-01

    Maldevelopment of outflow tract and aortic arch arteries is among the most common forms of human congenital heart diseases. Both Bmp4 and Tbx1 are known to play critical roles during cardiovascular development. Expression of these two genes partially overlaps in pharyngeal arch areas in mouse embryos. In this study, we applied a conditional gene inactivation approach to test the hypothesis that Bmp4 expressed from the Tbx1 expression domain plays a critical role for normal development of outflow tract and pharyngeal arch arteries. We showed that inactivation of Bmp4 from Tbx1-expressing cells leads to the spectrum of deformities resembling the cardiovascular defects observed in human DiGeorge syndrome patients. Inactivation of Bmp4 from the Tbx1 expression domain did not cause patterning defects, but affected remodeling of outflow tract and pharyngeal arch arteries. Our further examination revealed that Bmp4 is required for normal recruitment/differentiation of smooth muscle cells surrounding the PAA4 and survival of outflow tract cushion mesenchymal cells. PMID:21123999

  18. Presentations: Adverse Outcome Pathways for Abnormal Phenotypes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Birth defects affect many infants and the etiology for most are unknown. Although environmental factors are known to influence pregnancy outcome, thousands of chemicals, present in the environment, are untested for developmental toxicity potential. Application of computational p...

  19. Forkhead box protein A2, a pioneer factor for hepatogenesis, is involved in the expression of hepatic phenotype of alpha-fetoprotein-producing adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Nobuhisa; Fugo, Kazunori; Kishimoto, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-producing adenocarcinoma is a high-malignant variant of adenocarcinoma with a hepatic or fetal-intestinal phenotype. The number of cases of AFP-producing adenocarcinomas is increasing, but the molecular mechanism underlying the aberrant production of AFP is unclear. Here we sought to assess the role of Forkhead box A (FoxA)2, which is a pioneer transcription factor in the differentiation of hepatoblasts. FoxA2 expression was investigated in five cases of AFP-producing gastric adenocarcinomas by immunohistochemistry, and all cases showed FoxA2 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed the DNA binding of FoxA2 on the regulatory element of AFP gene in AFP-producing adenocarcinoma cells. The inhibition of FoxA2 expression with siRNA reduced the mRNA expression of liver-specific proteins, including AFP, albumin, and transferrin. The inhibition of FoxA2 also reduced the expressions of liver-enriched nuclear factors, i.e., hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4α and HNF6, although the expressions of HNF1α and HNF1β were not affected. The same effect as FoxA2 knockdown in AFP producing adenocarcinoma cells was also observed in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Our results suggest that FoxA2 plays a key role in the expression of hepatic phenotype of AFP-producing adenocarcinomas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Differences in MYB expression and gene abnormalities further confirm that salivary cribriform basal cell tumors and adenoid cystic carcinoma are two distinct tumor entities.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhen; Li, Lei; Zhang, Chun-Ye; Gu, Ting; Li, Jiang

    2016-10-01

    In practices, some cases of salivary basal cell tumors that consist mainly of cribriform growth pattern are difficult to differentiate from adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC). Identification of reliable molecular biomarkers for the differential diagnosis between them is required. Twenty-two cases of cribriform salivary basal cell tumors (at least 10% cribriform pattern present in each tumor) comprising 18 cases of basal cell adenoma (BCA) and four cases of basal cell adenocarcinoma (BcAC) were collected between 1985 and 2008. Twenty cases of cribriform AdCC were retrieved from our archives. MYB protein expression and gene abnormalities were detected in all cases by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, respectively. Neither MYB protein nor split genes were detected in any of the cases of cribriform basal cell tumors, while 55% (11/20) of cases of cribriform AdCC had MYB protein expression. High MYB expression was detected in 81.8% (9/11) cases, while low expression was found in the remaining cases. FISH analysis indicated that nine AdCC tumors with high MYB protein expression were split gene-positive, while MYB gene splitting was not detected in the 11 cases with low or absent MYB protein expression. The molecular changes in AdCC differ from those associated with cribriform basal cell tumors, which further confirms that cribriform basal cell tumors and AdCC are two distinct tumor entities. Simultaneous detection of MYB protein expression and the associated molecular changes could be beneficial in differentiating salivary cribriform basal cell tumors from AdCC. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Activation of the hexosamine pathway causes oxidative stress and abnormal embryo gene expression: involvement in diabetic teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Horal, Melissa; Zhang, Zhiquan; Stanton, Robert; Virkamäki, Antti; Loeken, Mary R

    2004-08-01

    Oxidative stress is critical to the teratogenic effects of diabetic pregnancy, yet the specific biochemical pathways responsible for oxidative stress have not been fully elucidated. The hexosamine pathway is activated in many tissues during diabetes and could contribute to oxidative stress by inhibiting the pentose shunt pathway, thereby diminishing production of the cellular antioxidant, reduced glutathione (GSH). To test the hypothesis that activation of the hexosamine pathway might contribute to the teratogenic effects of diabetic pregnancy, pregnant mice were injected with glucose, to induce hyperglycemia, or glucosamine, to directly activate the hexosamine pathway. Embryo tissue fragments were also cultured in physiological glucose, high glucose, or physiological glucose plus glucosamine, to test effects on oxidative stress and embryo gene expression. Glucosamine increased hexosamine synthesis and inhibited pentose shunt activity. There was a trend for transient hyperglycemia to have the same effects, but they did not reach statistical significance. However, both glucose and glucosamine significantly decreased GSH, and increased oxidative stress, as indicated by 2',7'-dichloro-dihydrofluorescein fluorescence. Glucose and glucosamine inhibited expression of Pax-3, a gene required for neural tube closure both in vivo and in vitro, and increased neural tube defects (NTDs) in vivo; these effects were prevented by GSH ethyl ester. High glucose and glucosamine inhibited Pax-3 expression by embryo culture, but culture in glutamine-free media to block the hexosamine pathway prevented the inhibition of Pax-3 expression by high glucose. Activation of the hexosamine pathway causes oxidative stress through depletion of GSH and consequent disruption of embryo gene expression. Activation of this pathway may contribute to diabetic teratogenesis.

  2. Abnormality of autophagic function and cathepsin expression in the liver from patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Fukuo, Yuka; Yamashina, Shunhei; Sonoue, Hiroshi; Arakawa, Atsushi; Nakadera, Eisuke; Aoyama, Tomonori; Uchiyama, Akira; Kon, Kazuyoshi; Ikejima, Kenichi; Watanabe, Sumio

    2014-09-01

    Recent evidences indicate that hepatic steatosis suppresses autophagic proteolysis. The present study evaluated the correlation between autophagic function and cathepsin expression in the liver from patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Liver biopsy specimens were obtained from patients with chronic liver diseases (chronic hepatitis C [CHC; n = 20], chronic hepatitis B [CHB; n = 16], primary biliary cirrhosis [PBC; n = 23], NAFLD [n = 22] and control [n = 14]). The number of autophagic vesicles in hepatocytes was counted by using transmission electron microscopy. Expression of cathepsin B, D, L and p62 in the liver section was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining. The histological severity of NAFLD is assessed by NAFLD activity score (NAS). The number of autophagic vesicles in hepatocytes was significantly increased in both CHC and NAFLD groups, but not CHB and PBC, more than control. Although hepatocytes with aggregation of p62 were observed in less than 15% of CHC, p62 aggregation was detected in approximately 65% of NAFLD. Cathepsin B, D and L expression was significantly suppressed in the liver from NAFLD patients. Suppression of cathepsin B, D and L expression was not observed in CHB, CHC and PBC. In NAFLD patients, p62 aggregation was correlated with serum alanine aminotransferase value and inflammatory activity by NAS. These results indicate that a decrease in hepatic cathepsin expression in NAFLD is associated with autophagic dysfunction. Hepatic inflammation correlates with autophagic dysfunction in NAFLD. These findings indicate that the suppression of autophagic proteolysis by hepatic steatosis is involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. © 2013 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  3. The effects of abnormalities of glucose homeostasis on the expression and binding of muscarinic receptors in cerebral cortex of rats.

    PubMed

    Sherin, Antony; Peeyush, Kumar T; Naijil, George; Nandhu, Mohan Sobhana; Jayanarayanan, Sadanandan; Jes, Paul; Paulose, Cheramadathikudiyil Skaria

    2011-01-25

    Glucose homeostasis in humans is an important factor for the functioning of nervous system. Both hypo and hyperglycemia contributes to neuronal functional deficit. In the present study, effect of insulin induced hypoglycemia and streptozotocin induced diabetes on muscarinic receptor binding, cholinergic enzymes; AChE, ChAT expression and GLUT3 in the cerebral cortex of experimental rats were analysed. Total muscarinic, muscarinic M(1) receptor showed a significant decrease and muscarinic M(3) receptor subtype showed a significant increased binding in the cerebral cortex of hypoglycemic rats compared to diabetic and control. Real-Time PCR analysis of muscarinic M(1), M(3) receptor subtypes confirmed the receptor binding studies. Immunohistochemistry of muscarinic M(1), M(3) receptors using specific antibodies were also carried out. AChE and GLUT3 expression up regulated and ChAT expression down regulated in hypoglycemic rats compared to diabetic and control rats. Our results showed that hypo/hyperglycemia caused impaired glucose transport in neuronal cells as shown by altered expression of GLUT3. Increased AChE and decreased ChAT expression is suggested to alter cortical acetylcholine metabolism in experimental rats along with altered muscarinic receptor binding in hypo/hyperglycemic rats, impair cholinergic transmission, which subsequently lead to cholinergic dysfunction thereby causing learning and memory deficits. We observed a prominent cholinergic functional disturbance in hypoglycemic condition than in hyperglycemia. Hypoglycemia exacerbated the neurochemical changes in cerebral cortex induced by hyperglycemia. These findings have implications for both therapy and identification of causes contributing to neuronal dysfunction in diabetes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Low Fluid Shear Culture of Staphylococcus Aureus Represses hfq Expression and Induces an Attachment-Independent Biofilm Phenotype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. Mark; Castro, S. L.; Nickerson, C. A.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The opportunistic pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, experiences fluctuations in fluid shear during infection and colonization of a human host. Colonization frequently occurs at mucus membrane sites such as in the gastrointestinal tract where the bacterium may experience low levels of fluid shear. The response of S. aureus to low fluid shear remains unclear. Methods: S. aureus was cultured to stationary phase using Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) bioreactors which produce a physiologically relevant low fluid shear environment. The bacterial aggregates that developed in the RWV were evaluated by electron microscopy as well as for antibiotic resistance and other virulence-associated stressors. Genetic expression profiles for the low-shear cultured S. aureus were determined by microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Planktonic S. aureus cultures in the low-shear environment formed aggregates completely encased in high amounts of extracellular polymeric substances. In addition, these aggregates demonstrated increased antibiotic resistance indicating attachment-independent biofilm formation. Carotenoid production in the low-shear cultured S. aureus was significantly decreased, and these cultures displayed an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and killing by whole blood. The hfq gene, associated with low-shear growth in Gram negative organisms, was also found to be down-regulated in S. aureus. Conclusions: Collectively, this data suggests that S. aureus decreases virulence characteristics in favor of a biofilm-dwelling colonization phenotype in response to a low fluid shear environment. Furthermore, the identification of an Hfq response to low-shear culture in S. aureus, in addition to the previously reported responses in Gram negative organisms, strongly suggests an evolutionarily conserved response to mechanical stimuli among structurally diverse prokaryotes.

  5. Expression profile of doublesex/male abnormal-3-related transcription factor-1 during gonadal sex change in the protogynous wrasse, Halichoeres trimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Nozu, Ryo; Horiguchi, Ryo; Kobayashi, Yasuhisa; Nakamura, Masaru

    2015-11-01

    Sex change in fish involves a dramatic transformation of gonadal tissue and a switch in gametogenesis. Doublesex/male abnormal-3-related transcription factor-1 (DMRT1), encoded by the DMRT1 gene, is involved in testicular differentiation in a wide range of vertebrates as well as in sexual differentiation and gonadal sex change. In the present study, we investigated changes in the expression of dmrt1 during artificial gonadal sex change in the three-spot wrasse, Halichoeres trimaculatus, by real-time quantitative PCR and immunolocalization, using an anti-wrasse-Dmrt1 antibody that we prepared. We found that dmrt1 expression was predominantly observed in the testes, and that Dmrt1 was expressed in Sertoli cells of testes and a few granulosa cells surrounding vitellogenic oocytes of the ovary. Additionally, the upregulation of dmrt1 expression was consistent with an increase in spermatogenic cyst quantity rather than proliferation of presumptive spermatogonia, suggesting that dmrt1 is involved in the progression of spermatogenesis during sex change. Changes in the localization of Dmrt1 during gonadal sex change further implied that Sertoli cells originate from somatic cells adjacent to gonial germ cells during testicular formation in the three-spot wrasse. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Arnica montana Stimulates Extracellular Matrix Gene Expression in a Macrophage Cell Line Differentiated to Wound-Healing Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Marzotto, Marta; Bonafini, Clara; Olioso, Debora; Baruzzi, Anna; Bettinetti, Laura; Di Leva, Francesca; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Bellavite, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Arnica montana (Arnica m.) is used for its purported anti-inflammatory and tissue healing actions after trauma, bruises, or tissue injuries, but its cellular and molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. This work tested Arnica m. effects on gene expression using an in vitro model of macrophages polarized towards a “wound-healing” phenotype. The monocyte-macrophage human THP-1 cell line was cultured and differentiated with phorbol-myristate acetate and Interleukin-4, then exposed for 24h to Arnica m. centesimal (c) dilutions 2c, 3c, 5c, 9c, 15c or Control. Total RNA was isolated and cDNA libraries were sequenced with a NextSeq500 sequencer. Genes with significantly positive (up-regulated) or negative (down-regulated) fold changes were defined as differentially expressed genes (DEGs). A total of 20 DEGs were identified in Arnica m. 2c treated cells. Of these, 7 genes were up-regulated and 13 were down-regulated. The most significantly up-regulated function concerned 4 genes with a conserved site of epidermal growth factor-like region (p<0.001) and three genes of proteinaceous extracellular matrix, including heparin sulphate proteoglycan 2 (HSPG2), fibrillin 2 (FBN2), and fibronectin (FN1) (p<0.01). Protein assay confirmed a statistically significant increase of fibronectin production (p<0.05). The down-regulated transcripts derived from mitochondrial genes coding for some components of electron transport chain. The same groups of genes were also regulated by increasing dilutions of Arnica m. (3c, 5c, 9c, 15c), although with a lower effect size. We further tested the healing potential of Arnica m. 2c in a scratch model of wound closure based on the motility of bone marrow-derived macrophages and found evidence of an accelerating effect on cell migration in this system. The results of this work, taken together, provide new insights into the action of Arnica m. in tissue healing and repair, and identify extracellular matrix regulation by macrophages as a

  7. Expression of Wild-Type Rp1 Protein in Rp1 Knock-in Mice Rescues the Retinal Degeneration Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qin; Collin, Rob W. J.; Cremers, Frans P. M.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Pierce, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the retinitis pigmentosa 1 (RP1) gene are a common cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), and have also been found to cause autosomal recessive RP (arRP) in a few families. The 33 dominant mutations and 6 recessive RP1 mutations identified to date are all nonsense or frameshift mutations, and almost exclusively (38 out of 39) are located in the 4th and final exon of RP1. To better understand the underlying disease mechanisms of and help develop therapeutic strategies for RP1 disease, we performed a series of human genetic and animal studies using gene targeted and transgenic mice. Here we report that a frameshift mutation in the 3rd exon of RP1 (c.686delC; p.P229QfsX35) found in a patient with recessive RP1 disease causes RP in the homozygous state, whereas the heterozygous carriers are unaffected, confirming that haploinsufficiency is not the causative mechanism for RP1 disease. We then generated Rp1 knock-in mice with a nonsense Q662X mutation in exon 4, as well as Rp1 transgenic mice carrying a wild-type BAC Rp1 transgene. The Rp1-Q662X allele produces a truncated Rp1 protein, and homozygous Rp1-Q662X mice experience a progressive photoreceptor degeneration characterized disorganization of photoreceptor outer segments. This phenotype could be prevented by expression of a normal amount of Rp1 protein from the BAC transgene without removal of the mutant Rp1-Q662X protein. Over-expression of Rp1 protein in additional BAC Rp1 transgenic lines resulted in retinal degeneration. These findings suggest that the truncated Rp1-Q662X protein does not exert a toxic gain-of-function effect. These results also imply that in principle gene augmentation therapy could be beneficial for both recessive and dominant RP1 patients, but the levels of RP1 protein delivered for therapy will have to be carefully controlled. PMID:22927954

  8. Arnica montana Stimulates Extracellular Matrix Gene Expression in a Macrophage Cell Line Differentiated to Wound-Healing Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Marzotto, Marta; Bonafini, Clara; Olioso, Debora; Baruzzi, Anna; Bettinetti, Laura; Di Leva, Francesca; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Bellavite, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Arnica montana (Arnica m.) is used for its purported anti-inflammatory and tissue healing actions after trauma, bruises, or tissue injuries, but its cellular and molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. This work tested Arnica m. effects on gene expression using an in vitro model of macrophages polarized towards a "wound-healing" phenotype. The monocyte-macrophage human THP-1 cell line was cultured and differentiated with phorbol-myristate acetate and Interleukin-4, then exposed for 24h to Arnica m. centesimal (c) dilutions 2c, 3c, 5c, 9c, 15c or Control. Total RNA was isolated and cDNA libraries were sequenced with a NextSeq500 sequencer. Genes with significantly positive (up-regulated) or negative (down-regulated) fold changes were defined as differentially expressed genes (DEGs). A total of 20 DEGs were identified in Arnica m. 2c treated cells. Of these, 7 genes were up-regulated and 13 were down-regulated. The most significantly up-regulated function concerned 4 genes with a conserved site of epidermal growth factor-like region (p<0.001) and three genes of proteinaceous extracellular matrix, including heparin sulphate proteoglycan 2 (HSPG2), fibrillin 2 (FBN2), and fibronectin (FN1) (p<0.01). Protein assay confirmed a statistically significant increase of fibronectin production (p<0.05). The down-regulated transcripts derived from mitochondrial genes coding for some components of electron transport chain. The same groups of genes were also regulated by increasing dilutions of Arnica m. (3c, 5c, 9c, 15c), although with a lower effect size. We further tested the healing potential of Arnica m. 2c in a scratch model of wound closure based on the motility of bone marrow-derived macrophages and found evidence of an accelerating effect on cell migration in this system. The results of this work, taken together, provide new insights into the action of Arnica m. in tissue healing and repair, and identify extracellular matrix regulation by macrophages as a therapeutic

  9. A novel mechanism of protamine expression deregulation highlighted by abnormal protamine transcript retention in infertile human males with sperm protamine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Aoki, V W; Liu, L; Carrell, D T

    2006-01-01

    Sperm protamine deficiency has been associated with human male infertility. However, the aetiology of deregulated protamine expression remains elusive. The objective of this study was to evaluate the underlying aetiology of protamine deficiency in male infertility patients with deregulated protamine expression. Protamine-1 (P1) and protamine-2 (P2) protein concentrations were compared against P1 and P2 mRNA levels in the sperm of 166 male infertility patients and 27 men of known fertility. Protamine protein concentrations were quantified by nuclear protein extraction, gel electrophoresis and densitometry analysis. Semi-quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to quantify P1 and P2 mRNA levels. P1 mRNA concentrations were significantly increased in patients underexpressing P1 protein versus those with normal and increased P1 levels. In patients with an abnormally low ratio of P1 to P2 (P1/P2 <0.8), there was a significant increase in P1 mRNA retention. Patients underexpressing P2 also had significantly increased mean P2 mRNA levels, although the majority of these P2-deficient patients showed an increased frequency of significantly reduced P2 mRNA levels. This is the first study to concomitantly evaluate P1 and P2 protein and mRNA levels in mature human sperm. Abnormally elevated protamine mRNA retention appears to be associated with aberrant protamine expression in infertile human males. These data suggest that defects in protamine translation regulation may contribute to protamine deficiency in infertile males.

  10. Abnormal histopathology, fat percent and hepatic apolipoprotein A I and apolipoprotein B100 mRNA expression in fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome and their improvement by soybean lecithin.

    PubMed

    Song, Yalu; Ruan, Jiming; Luo, Junrong; Wang, Tiancheng; Yang, Fei; Cao, Huabin; Huang, Jianzhen; Hu, Guoliang

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the etiopathogenesis of fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome (FLHS) and the protective effects of soybean lecithin against FLHS in laying hens, 135 healthy 300-day-old Hyline laying hens were randomly divided into groups: control (group 1), diseased (group 2), and protected (group 3). Each group contained 45 layers with 3 replicates. The birds in these 3 groups were fed a control diet, a high-energy/low-protein (HELP) diet or the HELP diet supplemented with 3% soybean lecithin instead of maize. The fat percent in the liver was calculated. Histopathological changes in the liver were determined by staining, and the mRNA expression levels of apolipoproteinA I (apoA I) and apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) in the liver were determined by RT-PCR. The results showed that the fat percent in the liver of group 2 was much higher (P < 0.01) than that of group 1 and group 2 on d 30 and 60. The histology of the liver in group 2 on d 30 and 60 displayed various degrees of liver lesions, while the hepatocytes showed a normal structure in group 3 with mild microvesicular steatosis in the liver cell on d 30 and 60. The mRNA expression levels of apoA I and apoB100 in the livers were variable throughout the experiment. The expression level of apoA I in group 2 significantly decreased on d 60 (P < 0.05); the expression level of apoB100 slightly increased on d 30 in group 2, while it sharply decreased on d 60. Compared to group 1, the expression level of apoB100 showed no significant difference in group 3 (P < 0.05). This study indicated that FLHS induced pathological changes and abnormal expression of apoA I and apoB100 in the livers of laying hens and that soybean lecithin alleviated these abnormal changes. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  11. Abnormal expression and functional characteristics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein in postmortem brain of suicide subjects.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Yogesh; Rao, Jagadeesh Sridhara; Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Kotowski, Jacek; Conley, Robert R; Roberts, Rosalinda C; Tamminga, Carol A; Pandey, Ghanshyam N

    2003-03-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) is a transcription factor that, on phosphorylation by protein kinases, is activated, and in response, regulates the transcription of many neuronally expressed genes. In view of the recent observations that catalytic properties and/or expression of many kinases that mediate their physiological responses through the activation of CREB are altered in the postmortem brain of subjects who commit suicide (hereafter referred to as suicide subjects), we examined the status of CREB in suicidal behavior. These studies were performed in Brodmann area (BA) 9 and hippocampus obtained from 26 suicide subjects and 20 nonpsychiatric healthy control subjects. Messenger RNA levels of CREB and neuron-specific enolase were determined in total RNA by means of quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Protein levels and the functional characteristics of CREB were determined in nuclear fractions by means of Western blot and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element (CRE)-DNA binding activity, respectively. In the same nuclear fraction, we determined the catalytic activity of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-stimulated protein kinase A by means of enzymatic assay. We observed a significant reduction in messenger RNA and protein levels of CREB, CRE-DNA binding activity, and basal and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-stimulated protein kinase A activity in BA 9 and hippocampus of suicide subjects, without any change in messenger RNA levels of neuron-specific enolase in BA 9. Except for protein kinase A activity, changes in CREB expression and CRE-DNA binding activity were present in all suicide subjects, irrespective of diagnosis. These changes were unrelated to postmortem intervals, age, sex, or antidepressant treatment. Given the significance of CREB in mediating various physiological functions through gene transcription, our results of decreased expression and functional characteristics of CREB

  12. Abnormally high expression of POLD1, MCM2, and PLK4 promotes relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Wang, Chengzhong; Wang, Weikai; Liu, Weidong; Zhang, Guiqin

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to explore the underlying mechanism of relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).Datasets of GSE28460 and GSE18497 were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between diagnostic and relapsed ALL samples were identified using Limma package in R, and a Venn diagram was drawn. Next, functional enrichment analyses of co-regulated DEGs were performed. Based on the String database, protein-protein interaction network and module analyses were also conducted. Moreover, transcription factors and miRNAs targeting co-regulated DEGs were predicted using the WebGestalt online tool.A total of 71 co-regulated DEGs were identified, including 56 co-upregulated genes and 15 co-downregulated genes. Functional enrichment analyses showed that upregulated DEGs were significantly enriched in the cell cycle, and DNA replication, and repair related pathways. POLD1, MCM2, and PLK4 were hub proteins in both protein-protein interaction network and module, and might be potential targets of E2F. Additionally, POLD1 and MCM2 were found to be regulated by miR-520H via E2F1.High expression of POLD1, MCM2, and PLK4 might play positive roles in the recurrence of ALL, and could serve as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of relapsed ALL.

  13. Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) and Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-2 (TREM-2) Activation Balance Astrocyte Polarization into a Proinflammatory Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Rosciszewski, Gerardo; Cadena, Vanesa; Murta, Veronica; Lukin, Jeronimo; Villarreal, Alejandro; Roger, Thierry; Ramos, Alberto Javier

    2018-05-01

    Astrocytes react to brain injury with a generic response known as reactive gliosis, which involves activation of multiple intracellular pathways including several that may be beneficial for neuronal survival. However, by unknown mechanisms, reactive astrocytes can polarize into a proinflammatory phenotype that induces neurodegeneration. In order to study reactive gliosis and astroglial polarization into a proinflammatory phenotype, we used cortical devascularization-induced brain ischemia in Wistar rats and primary astroglial cell cultures exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). We analyzed the profile of TLR4 expression and the consequences of its activation by gain- and loss-of-function studies, and the effects produced by the activation of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM-2), a negative regulator of TLR4 signaling. Both OGD exposure on primary astroglial cell cultures and cortical devascularization brain ischemia in rats induced TLR4 expression in astrocytes. In vivo, astroglial TLR4 expression was specifically observed in the ischemic penumbra surrounding necrotic core. Functional studies showed that OGD increased the astroglial response to the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and conversely, TLR4 knockout primary astrocytes had impaired nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation when exposed to LPS. In gain-of-function studies, plasmid-mediated TLR4 over-expression exacerbated astroglial response to LPS as shown by sustained NF-κB activation and increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNFα. TREM-2 expression, although present in naïve primary astrocytes, was induced by OGD, LPS, or high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB-1) exposure. TREM-2 activation by antibody cross-linking or the overexpression of TREM-2 intracellular adaptor, DAP12, partially suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activation in purified astrocytic cultures. In vivo, TREM-2 expression was observed in macrophages and astrocytes located in the

  14. Dysregulated RNA-Induced Silencing Complex (RISC) Assembly within CNS Corresponds with Abnormal miRNA Expression during Autoimmune Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Lewkowicz, Przemysław; Cwiklińska, Hanna; Mycko, Marcin P; Cichalewska, Maria; Domowicz, Małgorzata; Lewkowicz, Natalia; Jurewicz, Anna; Selmaj, Krzysztof W

    2015-05-13

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) associate with Argonaute (Ago), GW182, and FXR1 proteins to form RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs). RISCs represent a critical checkpoint in the regulation and bioavailability of miRNAs. Recent studies have revealed dysregulation of miRNAs in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE); however, the function of RISCs in EAE and MS is largely unknown. Here, we examined the expression of Ago, GW182, and FXR1 in CNS tissue, oligodendrocytes (OLs), brain-infiltrating T lymphocytes, and CD3(+)splenocytes (SCs) of EAE mic, and found that global RISC protein levels were significantly dysregulated. Specifically, Ago2 and FXR1 levels were decreased in OLs and brain-infiltrating T cells in EAE mice. Accordingly, assembly of Ago2/GW182/FXR1 complexes in EAE brain tissues was disrupted, as confirmed by immunoprecipitation experiments. In parallel with alterations in RISC complex content in OLs, we found downregulation of miRNAs essential for differentiation and survival of OLs and myelin synthesis. In brain-infiltrating T lymphocytes, aberrant RISC formation contributed to miRNA-dependent proinflammatory helper T-cell polarization. In CD3(+) SCs, we found increased expression of both Ago2 and FXR1 in EAE compared with nonimmunized mice. Therefore, our results demonstrate a gradient in expression of miRNA between primary activated T cells in the periphery and polarized CNS-infiltrating T cells. These results suggest that, in polarized autoreactive effector T cells, miRNA synthesis is inhibited in response to dysregulated RISC assembly, allowing these cells to maintain a highly specific proinflammatory program. Therefore, our findings may provide a mechanism that leads to miRNA dysregulation in EAE/MS. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357521-17$15.00/0.

  15. Comparison of DNA aneuploidy, chromosome 1 abnormalities, MYCN amplification and CD44 expression as prognostic factors in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, H; Sahin, K; Berthold, F; Hero, B; Terpe, H J; Lampert, F

    1995-01-01

    A comparison of the prognostic impact of five molecular variables in a large series was made, including tests of their nonrandom association and multivariate analysis. Molecular data were available for 377 patients and MYCN amplification, cytogenetic chromosome 1p deletion, loss of chromosome 1p heterozygosity, DNA ploidy and CD44 expression were investigated. Their interdependence and influence on event-free survival was tested uni- and multivariately using Pearson's chi 2-test, Kaplan-Meier estimates, log rank tests and the Cox's regression model. MYCN amplification was present in 18% (58/322) of cases and predicted poorer prognosis in localised (P < 0.001), metastatic (P = 0.002) and even 4S (P = 0.040) disease. CD44 expression was found in 86% (127/148) of cases, and was a marker for favourable outcome in patients with neuroblastoma stages 1-3 (P = 0.003) and 4 (P = 0.017). Chromosome 1p deletion was cytogenetically detected in 51% (28/55), and indicated reduced event-free survival in localised neuroblastoma (P = 0.020). DNA ploidy and loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 1p were of less prognostic value. Most factors of prognostic significance were associated with each other. By multivariate analysis, MYCN was selected as the only relevant factor. Risk estimation of high discriminating power is, therefore, possible for patients with localised and metastatic neuroblastoma using stage and MYCN.

  16. Abnormal iron metabolism and oxidative stress in mice expressing a mutant form of the ferritin light polypeptide gene

    PubMed Central

    Barbeito, Ana G.; Garringer, Holly J.; Baraibar, Martin A.; Gao, Xiaoying; Arredondo, Miguel; Núñez, Marco T.; Smith, Mark A.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Vidal, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    Insertional mutations in exon 4 of the ferritin light chain (FTL) gene are associated with hereditary ferritinopathy (HF) or neuroferritinopathy, an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive impairment of motor and cognitive functions. To determine the pathogenic mechanisms by which mutations in FTL lead to neurodegeneration, we investigated iron metabolism and markers of oxidative stress in the brain of transgenic (Tg) mice that express the mutant human FTL498-499InsTC cDNA. Compared with wild-type mice, brain extracts from Tg (FTL-Tg) mice showed an increase in the cytoplasmic levels of both FTL and ferritin heavy chain polypeptides, a decrease in the protein and mRNA levels of transferrin receptor-1, and a significant increase in iron levels. Transgenic mice also showed the presence of markers for lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls, and nitrone–protein adducts in the brain. However, gene expression analysis of iron management proteins in the liver of Tg mice indicates that the FTL-Tg mouse liver is iron deficient. Our data suggest that disruption of iron metabolism in the brain has a primary role in the process of neurodegeneration in HF and that the pathogenesis of HF is likely to result from a combination of reduction in iron storage function and enhanced toxicity associated with iron-induced ferritin aggregates in the brain. PMID:19519778

  17. Abnormal expression and mutation of p53 in cervical cancer--a study at protein, RNA and DNA levels.

    PubMed

    Ngan, H Y; Tsao, S W; Liu, S S; Stanley, M

    1997-02-01

    The objectives of this study are to document the status of p53 expression and mutation in cervical cancer at protein, RNA and DNA levels and to relate this to the presence of HPV. Biopsy specimens from one hundred and three squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix and histologically normal ectocervix were analysed. Fresh tissues were extracted for protein, RNA and DNA and flash frozen tissue cryostat sectioned for immunohistochemical staining. HPV DNA status was determined by PCR using L1 consensus primers and typed for HPV 16 and 18 with E6 specific primers. p53 expression was determined at the protein level by Western blotting on protein extracts and at RNA level by Northern blotting. There was no p53 overexpression or mutation detectable in the protein extracts. Three of 65 (4.6%) of the carcinomas were positive for p53 by immunostaining with the polyclonal antibody CM1. Overexpression at the RNA level was detected in 2 of 32 (6.3%) carcinomas. p53 mutation was screened for by PCR/SSCP (single strand conformation polymorphism) followed by sequencing to define the site of mutation. Two of the cervical cancers (2.0%) showed mutation in p53 in exons 7 or 8. The mutation rate in HPV positive tumours was 1.2% (1/81) and in HPV negative tumours was 5.2% (1/19). p53 overexpression or mutation does not seem to play a significant role in cervical carcinomas.

  18. Heat exposure in female rats elicits abnormal fear expression and cellular changes in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gruene, Tina M; Lipps, Jennifer; Rey, Colin D; Bouck, Anna; Shansky, Rebecca M

    2014-11-01

    Despite a twofold higher prevalence of fear-related disorders in women, the neurobiological factors that modulate and drive fear expression are rarely studied in female animals. Fear conditioning and extinction are useful tools for dissecting these mechanisms, and here we tested the effects of environmental manipulations - four days of exposure to 31°C temperatures in the animal housing facility - on fear learning and memory exclusively in female rats. We found that heat exposure disrupted freezing to tone during fear conditioning, and elicited enhanced freezing during extinction and extinction retrieval. We also performed immunohistochemistry for c-fos expression in the infralimbic (IL) and prelimbic (PL) regions of the prefrontal cortex during extinction retrieval, and found that heat exposure induced a switch from IL-dominated activity to PL-dominated activity. Finally, morphological analysis of spines in hippocampal CA3 neurons revealed an increase in spine head diameter in heat-exposed animals, which may partly underlie the persistent freezing observed in these animals. Together, our data show that heat exposure can induce changes at behavioral, physiological, and structural levels, and add to a woefully lacking body of literature on fear processes in female animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Abnormal expression of genes that regulate retinoid metabolism and signaling in non-small-cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, E S; Zinovieva, O L; Oparina, N Yu; Prokofjeva, M M; Spirin, P V; Favorskaya, I A; Zborovskaya, I B; Lisitsyn, N A; Prassolov, V S; Mashkova, T D

    2016-01-01

    Retinoids are signaling molecules that control a wide variety of cellular processes and possess antitumor activity. This work presents a comprehensive description of changes in the expression of 23 genes that regulate retinoid metabolism and signaling in non-small-cell lung cancer tumors compared to adjacent normal tissues obtained using RT-PCR. Even at early stages of malignant transformation, a significant decrease in ADH1B, ADH3, RDHL, and RALDH1 mRNA levels was observed in 82, 79, 73, and 64% of tumor specimens, respectively, and a considerable increase in AKR1B10 mRNA content was observed in 80% of tumors. Dramatic changes in the levels of these mRNAs can impair the synthesis of all-trans retinoic acid, a key natural regulatory retinoid. Apart from that, it was found that mRNA levels of nuclear retinoid receptor genes RXRγ, RARα, RXRα, and gene RDH11 were significantly decreased in 80, 67, 57, and 66% of tumor specimens, respectively. Thus, neoplastic transformation of lung tissue cells is accompanied with deregulated expression of key genes of retinoid metabolism and function.

  20. Variations in endothelin receptor B subtype 2 (EDNRB2) coding sequences and mRNA expression levels in 4 Muscovy duck plumage colour phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Wu, N; Qin, H; Wang, M; Bian, Y; Dong, B; Sun, G; Zhao, W; Chang, G; Xu, Q; Chen, G

    2017-04-01

    1. Endothelin receptor B subtype 2 (EDNRB2) is a paralog of EDNRB, which encodes a 7-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptor. Previous studies reported that EDNRB was essential for melanoblast migration in mammals and ducks. 2. Muscovy ducks have different plumage colour phenotypes. Variations in EDNRB2 coding sequences (CDSs) and mRNA expression levels were investigated in 4 different Muscovy duck plumage colour phenotypes, including black, black mutant, silver and white head. 3. The EDNRB2 gene from Muscovy duck was cloned; it had a length of 6435 bp and encoded 437 amino acids. The coding region was screened and potential single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. Eight mutations were obtained, including one missense variant (c.64C > T) and 7 synonymous substitutions. The substitutions were associated with plumage colour phenotypes. 4. The EDNRB2 mRNA expression levels were compared between feather pulp from black birds and black mutant birds. The results indicated that EDNRB2 transcripts in feather pulp were significantly higher in black feathers than in white feathers. 5. The results determined the variation of EDNRB2 CDS and mRNA expression in Muscovy ducks of various plumage colours.

  1. Human endothelial cell growth and phenotypic expression on three dimensional poly(lactide-co-glycolide) sintered microsphere scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan; Jiang, Tao; Deng, Meng; Nair, Lakshmi S; Khan, Yusuf M; Laurencin, Cato T

    2007-12-01

    Bone tissue engineering offers promising alternatives to repair and restore tissues. Our laboratory has employed poly(lactide-co-glycolide) PLAGA microspheres to develop a three dimensional (3-D) porous bioresorbable scaffold with a biomimetic pore structure. Osseous healing and integration with the surrounding tissue depends in part on new blood vessel formation within the porous structure. Since endothelial cells play a key role in angiogenesis (formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vasculature), the purpose of this study was to better understand human endothelial cell attachment, viability, growth, and phenotypic expression on sintered PLAGA microsphere scaffold. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination showed cells attaching to the surface of microspheres and bridging the pores between the microspheres. Cell proliferation studies indicated that cell number increased during early stages and reached a plateau between days 10 and 14. Immunofluorescent staining for actin showed that cells were proliferating three dimensionally through the scaffolds while staining for PECAM-1 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule) displayed typical localization at cell-cell contacts. Gene expression analysis showed that endothelial cells grown on PLAGA scaffolds maintained their normal characteristic phenotype. The cell proliferation and phenotypic expression were independent of scaffold pore architecture. These results demonstrate that PLAGA sintered microsphere scaffolds can support the growth and biological functions of human endothelial cells. The insights from this study should aid future studies aimed at enhancing angiogenesis in three dimensional tissue engineered scaffolds.

  2. Identification of a subset of human natural killer cells expressing high levels of programmed death 1: A phenotypic and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Silvia; Greppi, Marco; Tabellini, Giovanna; Rampinelli, Fabio; Parolini, Silvia; Olive, Daniel; Moretta, Lorenzo; Moretta, Alessandro; Marcenaro, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1) is an immunologic checkpoint that limits immune responses by delivering potent inhibitory signals to T cells on interaction with specific ligands expressed on tumor/virus-infected cells, thus contributing to immune escape mechanisms. Therapeutic PD-1 blockade has been shown to mediate tumor eradication with impressive clinical results. Little is known about the expression/function of PD-1 on human natural killer (NK) cells. We sought to clarify whether human NK cells can express PD-1 and analyze their phenotypic/functional features. We performed multiparametric cytofluorimetric analysis of PD-1 + NK cells and their functional characterization using degranulation, cytokine production, and proliferation assays. We provide unequivocal evidence that PD-1 is highly expressed (PD-1 bright ) on an NK cell subset detectable in the peripheral blood of approximately one fourth of healthy subjects. These donors are always serologically positive for human cytomegalovirus. PD-1 is expressed by CD56 dim but not CD56 bright NK cells and is confined to fully mature NK cells characterized by the NKG2A - KIR + CD57 + phenotype. Proportions of PD-1 bright NK cells were higher in the ascites of a cohort of patients with ovarian carcinoma, suggesting their possible induction/expansion in tumor environments. Functional analysis revealed a reduced proliferative capability in response to cytokines, low degranulation, and impaired cytokine production on interaction with tumor targets. We have identified and characterized a novel subpopulation of human NK cells expressing high levels of PD-1. These cells have the phenotypic characteristics of fully mature NK cells and are increased in patients with ovarian carcinoma. They display low proliferative responses and impaired antitumor activity that can be partially restored by antibody-mediated disruption of PD-1/programmed death ligand interaction. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

  3. CK2 phosphorylates and inhibits TAp73 tumor suppressor function to promote expression of cancer stem cell genes and phenotype in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hai; Yan, Carol; Quan, Xin Xin; Yang, Xinping; Zhang, Jialing; Bian, Yansong; Chen, Zhong; Van Waes, Carter

    2014-10-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) and genes have been linked to cancer development and therapeutic resistance, but the signaling mechanisms regulating CSC genes and phenotype are incompletely understood. CK2 has emerged as a key signal serine/threonine kinase that modulates diverse signal cascades regulating cell fate and growth. We previously showed that CK2 is often aberrantly expressed and activated in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), concomitantly with mutant (mt) tumor suppressor TP53, and inactivation of its family member, TAp73. Unexpectedly, we observed that classical stem cell genes Nanog, Sox2, and Oct4, are overexpressed in HNSCC with inactivated TAp73 and mtTP53. However, the potential relationship between CK2, TAp73 inactivation, and CSC phenotype is unknown. We reveal that inhibition of CK2 by pharmacologic inhibitors or siRNA inhibits the expression of CSC genes and side population (SP), while enhancing TAp73 mRNA and protein expression. Conversely, CK2 inhibitor attenuation of CSC protein expression and the SP by was abrogated by TAp73 siRNA. Bioinformatic analysis uncovered a single predicted CK2 threonine phosphorylation site (T27) within the N-terminal transactivation domain of TAp73. Nuclear CK2 and TAp73 interaction, confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation, was attenuated by CK2 inhibitor, or a T27A point-mutation of this predicted CK2 threonine phospho-acceptor site of TAp73. Further, T27A mutation attenuated phosphorylation, while enhancing TAp73 function in repressing CSC gene expression and SP cells. A new CK2 inhibitor, CX-4945, inhibited CSC related SP cells, clonogenic survival, and spheroid formation. Our study unveils a novel regulatory mechanism whereby aberrant CK2 signaling inhibits TAp73 to promote the expression of CSC genes and phenotype.

  4. Dysregulation of gene expression in the striatum of BACHD rats expressing full-length mutant huntingtin and associated abnormalities on molecular and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Yu-Taeger, Libo; Bonin, Michael; Stricker-Shaver, Janice; Riess, Olaf; Nguyen, Hoa Huu Phuc

    2017-05-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the gene coding for the huntingtin protein (HTT). Mutant HTT (mHTT) has been proposed to cause neuronal dysfunction and neuronal loss through multiple mechanisms. Transcriptional changes may be a core pathogenic feature of HD. Utilizing the Affymetrix platform we performed a genome-wide RNA expression analysis in two BACHD transgenic rat lines (TG5 and TG9) at 12 months of age, both of which carry full-length human mHTT but with different expression levels. By defining the threshold of significance at p < 0.01, we found 1608 genes and 871 genes differentially expressed in both TG5 and TG9 rats when compared to the wild type littermates, respectively. We only chose the highly up-/down-regulated genes for further analysis by setting an additional threshold of 1.5 fold change. Comparing gene expression profiles of human HD brains and BACHD rats revealed a high concordance in both functional and IPA (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) canonical pathways relevant to HD. In addition, we investigated the causes leading to gene expression changes at molecular and protein levels in BACHD rats including the involvement of polyQ-containing transcription factors TATA box-binding protein (TBP), Sp1 and CBP as well as the chromatin structure. We demonstrate that the BACHD rat model recapitulates the gene expression changes of the human disease supporting its role as a preclinical research animal model. We also show for the first time that TFIID complex formation is reduced, while soluble TBP is increased in an HD model. This finding suggests that mHTT is a competitor instead of a recruiter of polyQ-containing transcription factors in the transcription process in HD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Expression of Human Complement Factor H Prevents Age-Related Macular Degeneration–Like Retina Damage and Kidney Abnormalities in Aged Cfh Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jin-Dong; Kelly, Una; Landowski, Michael; Toomey, Christopher B.; Groelle, Marybeth; Miller, Chelsey; Smith, Stephanie G.; Klingeborn, Mikael; Singhapricha, Terry; Jiang, Haixiang; Frank, Michael M.; Bowes Rickman, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is an important regulatory protein in the alternative pathway of the complement system, and CFH polymorphisms increase the genetic risk of age-related macular degeneration dramatically. These same human CFH variants have also been associated with dense deposit disease. To mechanistically study the function of CFH in the pathogenesis of these diseases, we created transgenic mouse lines using human CFH bacterial artificial chromosomes expressing full-length human CFH variants and crossed these to Cfh knockout (Cfh−/−) mice. Human CFH protein inhibited cleavage of mouse complement component 3 and factor B in plasma and in retinal pigment epithelium/choroid/sclera, establishing that human CFH regulates activation of the mouse alternative pathway. One of the mouse lines, which express relatively higher levels of CFH, demonstrated functional and structural protection of the retina owing to the Cfh deletion. Impaired visual function, detected as a deficit in the scotopic electroretinographic response, was improved in this transgenic mouse line compared with Cfh−/− mice, and transgenics had a thicker outer nuclear layer and less sub–retinal pigment epithelium deposit accumulation. In addition, expression of human CFH also completely protected the mice from developing kidney abnormalities associated with loss of CFH. These humanized CFH mice present a valuable model for study of the molecular mechanisms of age-related macular degeneration and dense deposit disease and for testing therapeutic targets. PMID:25447048

  6. Effects of simulated microgravity on gene expression and biological phenotypes of a single generation Caenorhabditis elegans cultured on 2 different media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tee, Ling Fei; Neoh, Hui-min; Then, Sue Mian; Murad, Nor Azian; Asillam, Mohd Fairos; Hashim, Mohd Helmy; Nathan, Sheila; Jamal, Rahman

    2017-11-01

    Studies of multigenerational Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to long-term spaceflight have revealed expression changes of genes involved in longevity, DNA repair, and locomotion. However, results from spaceflight experiments are difficult to reproduce as space missions are costly and opportunities are rather limited for researchers. In addition, multigenerational cultures of C. elegans used in previous studies contribute to mixture of gene expression profiles from both larvae and adult worms, which were recently reported to be different. Usage of different culture media during microgravity simulation experiments might also give rise to differences in the gene expression and biological phenotypes of the worms. In this study, we investigated the effects of simulated microgravity on the gene expression and biological phenotype profiles of a single generation of C. elegans worms cultured on 2 different culture media. A desktop Random Positioning Machine (RPM) was used to simulate microgravity on the worms for approximately 52 to 54 h. Gene expression profile was analysed using the Affymetrix GeneChip® C. elegans 1.0 ST Array. Only one gene (R01H2.2) was found to be downregulated in nematode growth medium (NGM)-cultured worms exposed to simulated microgravity. On the other hand, eight genes were differentially expressed for C. elegans Maintenance Medium (CeMM)-cultured worms in microgravity; six were upregulated, while two were downregulated. Five of the upregulated genes (C07E3.15, C34H3.21, C32D5.16, F35H8.9 and C34F11.17) encode non-coding RNAs. In terms of biological phenotype, we observed that microgravity-simulated worms experienced minimal changes in terms of lifespan, locomotion and reproductive capabilities in comparison with the ground controls. Taking it all together, simulated microgravity on a single generation of C. elegans did not confer major changes to their gene expression and biological phenotype. Nevertheless, exposure of the worms to microgravity

  7. SRRM4 Expression and the Loss of REST Activity May Promote the Emergence of the Neuroendocrine Phenotype in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaotun; Coleman, Ilsa M; Brown, Lisha G; True, Lawrence D; Kollath, Lori; Lucas, Jared M; Lam, Hung-Ming; Dumpit, Ruth; Corey, Eva; Chéry, Lisly; Lakely, Bryce; Higano, Celestia S; Montgomery, Bruce; Roudier, Martine; Lange, Paul H; Nelson, Peter S; Vessella, Robert L; Morrissey, Colm

    2015-10-15

    The neuroendocrine phenotype is associated with the development of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Our objective was to characterize the molecular features of the neuroendocrine phenotype in CRPC. Expression of chromogranin A (CHGA), synaptophysin (SYP), androgen receptor (AR), and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was analyzed by IHC in 155 CRPC metastases from 50 patients and in 24 LuCaP prostate cancer patient-derived xenografts (PDX). Seventy-one of 155 metastases and the 24 LuCaP xenograft lines were analyzed by whole-genome microarrays. REST splicing was verified by PCR. Coexpression of CHGA and SYP in >30% of cells was observed in 22 of 155 metastases (9 patients); 11 of the 22 metastases were AR(+)/PSA(+) (6 patients), 11/22 were AR-/PSA- (4 patients), and 4/24 LuCaP PDXs were AR(-)/PSA(-). By IHC, of the 71 metastases analyzed by whole-genome microarrays, 5 metastases were CHGA(+)/SYP(+)/AR(-), and 5 were CHGA(+)/SYP(+)/AR(+). Only CHGA(+)/SYP(+) metastases had a neuroendocrine transcript signature. The neuronal transcriptional regulator SRRM4 transcript was associated with the neuroendocrine signature in CHGA(+)/SYP(+) metastases and all CHGA(+)/SYP(+) LuCaP xenografts. In addition, expression of SRRM4 in LuCaP neuroendocrine xenografts correlated with a splice variant of REST that lacks the transcriptional repressor domain. (i) Metastatic neuroendocrine status can be heterogeneous in the same patient, (ii) the CRPC neuroendocrine molecular phenotype can be defined by CHGA(+)/SYP(+) dual positivity, (iii) the neuroendocrine phenotype is not necessarily associated with the loss of AR activity, and (iv) the splicing of REST by SRRM4 could promote the neuroendocrine phenotype in CRPC. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Modeling pulmonary fibrosis by abnormal expression of telomerase/apoptosis/collagen V in experimental usual interstitial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Parra, E.R.; Pincelli, M.S.; Teodoro, W.R.; Velosa, A.P.P.; Martins, V.; Rangel, M.P.; Barbas-Filho, J.V.; Capelozzi, V.L.

    2014-01-01

    Limitations on tissue proliferation capacity determined by telomerase/apoptosis balance have been implicated in pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. In addition, collagen V shows promise as an inductor of apoptosis. We evaluated the quantitative relationship between the telomerase/apoptosis index, collagen V synthesis, and epithelial/fibroblast replication in mice exposed to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) at high oxygen concentration. Two groups of mice were analyzed: 20 mice received BHT, and 10 control mice received corn oil. Telomerase expression, apoptosis, collagen I, III, and V fibers, and hydroxyproline were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, in situ detection of apoptosis, electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and histomorphometry. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of increased alveolar epithelial cells type 1 (AEC1) in apoptosis. Immunostaining showed increased nuclear expression of telomerase in AEC type 2 (AEC2) between normal and chronic scarring areas of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Control lungs and normal areas from UIP lungs showed weak green birefringence of type I and III collagens in the alveolar wall and type V collagen in the basement membrane of alveolar capillaries. The increase in collagen V was greater than collagens I and III in scarring areas of UIP. A significant direct association was found between collagen V and AEC2 apoptosis. We concluded that telomerase, collagen V fiber density, and apoptosis evaluation in experimental UIP offers the potential to control reepithelization of alveolar septa and fibroblast proliferation. Strategies aimed at preventing high rates of collagen V synthesis, or local responses to high rates of cell apoptosis, may have a significant impact in pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24919172

  9. Hypothalamic transcriptional expression of the kisspeptin system and sex steroid receptors differs among polycystic ovary syndrome rat models with different endocrine phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, Rodrigo Rodrigues; Carvalho, Kátia Cândido; Giannocco, Gisele; Duarte, Daniele Coelho; Garcia, Natália; Soares-Junior, José Maria; da Silva, Ismael Dale Cotrim Guerreiro; Maliqueo, Manuel; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Maciel, Gustavo Arantes Rosa

    2017-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a heterogeneous endocrine disorder that affects reproductive-age women. The mechanisms underlying the endocrine heterogeneity and neuroendocrinology of polycystic ovary syndrome are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the expression of the kisspeptin system and gonadotropin-releasing hormone pulse regulators in the hypothalamus as well as factors related to luteinizing hormone secretion in the pituitary of polycystic ovary syndrome rat models induced by testosterone or estradiol. A single injection of testosterone propionate (1.25 mg) (n=10) or estradiol benzoate (0.5 mg) (n=10) was administered to female rats at 2 days of age to induce experimental polycystic ovary syndrome. Controls were injected with a vehicle (n=10). Animals were euthanized at 90-94 days of age, and the hypothalamus and pituitary gland were used for gene expression analysis. Rats exposed to testosterone exhibited increased transcriptional expression of the androgen receptor and estrogen receptor-β and reduced expression of kisspeptin in the hypothalamus. However, rats exposed to estradiol did not show any significant changes in hormone levels relative to controls but exhibited hypothalamic downregulation of kisspeptin, tachykinin 3 and estrogen receptor-α genes and upregulation of the gene that encodes the kisspeptin receptor. Testosterone- and estradiol-exposed rats with different endocrine phenotypes showed differential transcriptional expression of members of the kisspeptin system and sex steroid receptors in the hypothalamus. These differences might account for the different endocrine phenotypes found in testosterone- and estradiol-induced polycystic ovary syndrome rats.

  10. Type 3 Fimbriae Encoded on Plasmids Are Expressed from a Unique Promoter without Affecting Host Motility, Facilitating an Exceptional Phenotype That Enhances Conjugal Plasmid Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Riber, Leise; Kot, Witold; Basfeld, Alrun; Burmølle, Mette; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the transmission of genetic material to a recipient that is not the progeny of the donor, is fundamental in bacterial evolution. HGT is often mediated by mobile genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids, which may be in conflict with the chromosomal elements of the genome because they are independent replicons that may petition their own evolutionary strategy. Here we study differences between type 3 fimbriae encoded on wild type plasmids and in chromosomes. Using known and newly characterized plasmids we show that the expression of type 3 fimbriae encoded on plasmids is systematically different, as MrkH, a c-di-GMP dependent transcriptional activator is not needed for strong expression of the fimbriae. MrkH is required for expression of type 3 fimbriae of the Klebsiella pneumoniae chromosome, wherefrom the fimbriae operon (mrkABCDF) of plasmids is believed to have originated. We find that mrkABCDFs of plasmids are highly expressed via a unique promoter that differs from the original Klebsiella promoter resulting in fundamental behavioral consequences. Plasmid associated mrkABCDFs did not influence the swimming behavior of the host, that hereby acquired an exceptional phenotype being able to both actively swim (planktonic behavior) and express biofilm associated fimbriae (sessile behavior). We show that this exceptional phenotype enhances the conjugal transfer of the plasmid. PMID:27627107

  11. Small reduction of neurokinin-1 receptor-expressing neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex area induces abnormal breathing periods in awake goats.

    PubMed

    Wenninger, J M; Pan, L G; Klum, L; Leekley, T; Bastastic, J; Hodges, M R; Feroah, T; Davis, S; Forster, H V

    2004-11-01

    In awake rats, >80% bilateral reduction of neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R)-expressing neurons in the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötzC) resulted in hypoventilation and an "ataxic" breathing pattern (Gray PA, Rekling JC, Bocchiaro CM, Feldman JL, Science 286: 1566-1568, 1999). Accordingly, the present study was designed to gain further insight into the role of the pre-BötzC area NK1R-expressing neurons in the control of breathing during physiological conditions. Microtubules were chronically implanted bilaterally into the medulla of adult goats. After recovery from surgery, the neurotoxin saporin conjugated to substance P, specific for NK1R-expressing neurons, was bilaterally injected (50 pM in 10 microl) into the pre-BötzC area during the awake state (n = 8). In unoperated goats, 34 +/- 0.01% of the pre-BötzC area neurons are immunoreactive for the NK1R, but, in goats after bilateral injection of SP-SAP into the pre-BötzC area, NK1R immunoreactivity was reduced to 22.5 +/- 2.5% (29% decrease, P < 0.01). Ten to fourteen days after the injection, the frequency of abnormal breathing periods was sixfold greater than before injection (107.8 +/- 21.8/h, P < 0.001). Fifty-six percent of these periods were breaths of varying duration and volume with an altered respiratory muscle activation pattern, whereas the remaining were rapid, complete breaths with coordinated inspiratory-expiratory cycles. The rate of occurrence and characteristics of abnormal breathing periods were not altered during a CO2 inhalation-induced hyperpnea. Pathological breathing patterns were eliminated during non-rapid eye movement sleep in seven of eight goats, but they frequently occurred on arousal from non-rapid eye movement sleep. We conclude that a moderate reduction in pre-BötzC NK1R-expressing neurons results in state-dependent transient changes in respiratory rhythm and/or eupneic respiratory muscle activation patterns.

  12. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube defects. However, there is also a genetic influence to this type of congenital anomaly. Unknown Causes The vast majority of congenital abnormalities have no known cause. This is particularly troubling for parents who plan to have more children, because there is no way to predict if ...

  13. Transgenic expression of neuronal dystonin isoform 2 partially rescues the disease phenotype of the dystonia musculorum mouse model of hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy VI

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, Andrew; Sato, Tadasu; De Repentigny, Yves; Gibeault, Sabrina; Bhanot, Kunal; O'Meara, Ryan W.; Lynch-Godrei, Anisha; Kornfeld, Samantha F.; Young, Kevin G.; Kothary, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    A newly identified lethal form of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN), designated HSAN-VI, is caused by a homozygous mutation in the bullous pemphigoid antigen 1 (BPAG1)/dystonin gene (DST). The HSAN-VI mutation impacts all major neuronal BPAG1/dystonin protein isoforms: dystonin-a1, -a2 and -a3. Homozygous mutations in the murine Dst gene cause a severe sensory neuropathy termed dystonia musculorum (dt). Phenotypically, dt mice are similar to HSAN-VI patients, manifesting progressive limb contractures, dystonia, dysautonomia and early postnatal death. To obtain a better molecular understanding of disease pathogenesis in HSAN-VI patients and the dt disorder, we generated transgenic mice expressing a myc-tagged dystonin-a2 protein under the regulation of the neuronal prion protein promoter on the dtTg4/Tg4 background, which is devoid of endogenous dystonin-a1 and -a2, but does express dystonin-a3. Restoring dystonin-a2 expression in the nervous system, particularly within sensory neurons, prevented the disorganization of organelle membranes and microtubule networks, attenuated the degeneration of sensory neuron subtypes and ameliorated the phenotype and increased life span in these mice. Despite these improvements, complete rescue was not observed likely because of inadequate expression of the transgene. Taken together, this study provides needed insight into the molecular basis of the dt disorder and other peripheral neuropathies including HSAN-VI. PMID:24381311

  14. A mesenchymal-like phenotype and expression of CD44 predict lack of apoptotic response to sorafenib in liver tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Joan; Malfettone, Andrea; Cepeda, Edgar B; Vilarrasa-Blasi, Roser; Bertran, Esther; Raimondi, Giulia; Fabra, Àngels; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Fernández-Salguero, Pedro; Fernández-Rodríguez, Conrado M; Giannelli, Gianluigi; Sancho, Patricia; Fabregat, Isabel

    2015-02-15

    The multikinase inhibitor sorafenib is the only effective drug in advanced cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, response differs among patients and effectiveness only implies a delay. We have recently described that sorafenib sensitizes HCC cells to apoptosis. In this work, we have explored the response to this drug of six different liver tumor cell lines to define a phenotypic signature that may predict lack of response in HCC patients. Results have indicated that liver tumor cells that show a mesenchymal-like phenotype, resistance to the suppressor effects of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) and high expression of the stem cell marker CD44 were refractory to sorafenib-induced cell death in in vitro studies, which correlated with lack of response to sorafenib in nude mice xenograft models of human HCC. In contrast, epithelial-like cells expressing the stem-related proteins EpCAM or CD133 were sensitive to sorafenib-induced apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. A cross-talk between the TGF-β pathway and the acquisition of a mesenchymal-like phenotype with up-regulation of CD44 expression was found in the HCC cell lines. Targeted CD44 knock-down in the mesenchymal-like cells indicated that CD44 plays an active role in protecting HCC cells from sorafenib-induced apoptosis. However, CD44 effect requires a TGF-β-induced mesenchymal background, since the only overexpression of CD44 in epithelial-like HCC cells is not sufficient to impair sorafenib-induced cell death. In conclusion, a mesenchymal profile and expression of CD44, linked to activation of the TGF-β pathway, may predict lack of response to sorafenib in HCC patients. © 2014 UICC.

  15. Long term storage in liquid nitrogen leads to only minor phenotypic and gene expression changes in the mammary carcinoma model cell line BT474.

    PubMed

    Fazekas, Judit; Grunt, Thomas W; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Singer, Josef

    2017-05-23

    Cancer cell lines are indispensible surrogate models in cancer research, as they can be used off-the-shelf, expanded to the desired extent, easily modified and exchanged between research groups for affirmation, reproduction or follow-up experiments.As malignant cells are prone to genomic instability, phenotypical changes may occur after certain passages in culture. Thus, cell lines have to be regularly authenticated to ensure data quality. In between experiments these cell lines are often stored in liquid nitrogen for extended time periods.Although freezing of cells is a necessary evil, little research is performed on how long-term storage affects cancer cell lines. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of a 28-year long liquid nitrogen storage period on BT474 cells with regard to phenotypical changes, differences in cell-surface receptor expression as well as cytokine and gene expressional variations. Two batches of BT474 cells, one frozen in 1986, the other directly purchased from ATCC were investigated by light microscopy, cell growth analysis, flow cytometry and cytokine as well as whole-transcriptome expression profiling. The cell lines were morphologically indifferent and showed similar growth rates and similar cell-surface receptor expression. Transcriptome analysis revealed significant differences in only 26 of 40,716 investigated RefSeq transcripts with 4 of them being up-regulated and 22 down-regulated. This study demonstrates that even after very long periods of storage in liquid nitrogen, cancer cell lines display only minimal changes in their gene expression profiles. However, also such minor changes should be carefully assessed before continuation of experiments, especially if phenotypic alterations can be additionally observed.

  16. Effect of sporophytic PIRL9 genotype on post-meiotic expression of the Arabidopsis pirl1;pirl9 mutant pollen phenotype.

    PubMed

    Forsthoefel, Nancy R; Vernon, Daniel M

    2011-02-01

    Plant intracellular ras-group-related leucine-rich repeat proteins (PIRLs) are a novel class of plant leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins structurally related to animal ras-group LRRs involved in cell signaling and gene regulation. Gene knockout analysis has shown that two members of the Arabidopsis thaliana PIRL gene family, PIRL1 and PIRL9, are redundant and essential for pollen development and viability: pirl1;pirl9 microspores produced by pirl1/PIRL1;pirl9 plants consistently abort just before pollen mitosis I. qrt1 tetrad analysis demonstrated that the genes become essential after meiosis, during anther stage 10. In this study, we characterized the phenotype of pirl1;pirl9 pollen produced by plants heterozygous for pirl9 (pirl1;pirl9/PIRL9). Alexander's staining, scanning electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy indicated that pirl1;pirl9 double mutants produced by pirl9 heterozygotes have a less severe phenotype and more variable morphology than pirl1;pirl9 pollen from pirl1/PIRL1;pirl9 plants. Mutant pollen underwent developmental arrest with variable timing, often progressing beyond pollen mitosis I and arresting at the binucleate stage. Thus, although the pirl1 and pirl9 mutations act post-meiosis, the timing and expressivity of the pirl1;pirl9 pollen phenotype depends on the pirl9 genotype of the parent plant. These results suggest a continued requirement for PIRL1 and PIRL9 beyond the initiation of pollen mitosis. Furthermore, they reveal a modest but novel sporophytic effect in which parent plant genotype influences a mutant phenotype expressed in the haploid generation.

  17. Phenotypic Heterogeneity in Expression of the K1 Polysaccharide Capsule of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Downregulation of the Capsule Genes during Growth in Urine.

    PubMed

    King, Jane E; Aal Owaif, Hasan A; Jia, Jia; Roberts, Ian S

    2015-07-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the major causative agent of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI). The K1 capsule on the surface of UPEC strains is a key virulence factor, and its expression may be important in the onset and progression of UTI. In order to understand capsule expression in more detail, we analyzed its expression in the UPEC strain UTI89 during growth in rich medium (LB medium) and urine and during infection of a bladder epithelial cell line. Comparison of capsule gene transcription using a chromosomal gfp reporter fusion showed a significant reduction in transcription during growth in urine compared to that during growth in LB medium. When examined at the single-cell level, following growth in both media, capsule gene expression appears to be heterogeneous, with two distinct green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing populations. Using anti-K1 antibody, we showed that this heterogeneity in gene expression results in two populations of encapsulated and unencapsulated cells. We demonstrated that the capsule hinders attachment to and invasion of epithelial cells and that the unencapsulated cells within the population preferentially adhere to and invade bladder epithelial cells. We found that once internalized, UTI89 starts to produce capsule to aid in its intracellular survival and spread. We propose that this observed phenotypic diversity in capsule expression is a fitness strategy used by the bacterium to deal with the constantly changing environment of the urinary tract. Copyright © 2015 King et al.

  18. A Single-Wing Removal Method to Assess Correspondence Between Gene Expression and Phenotype in Butterflies: The Case of Distal-less.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kiran; Otaki, Joji M

    2016-02-01

    It is often desirable but difficult to retrieve information on the mature phenotype of an immature tissue sample that has been subjected to gene expression analysis. This problem cannot be ignored when individual variation within a species is large. To circumvent this problem in the butterfly wing system, we developed a new surgical method for removing a single forewing from a pupa using Junonia orithya; the operated pupa was left to develop to an adult without eclosion. The removed right forewing was subjected to gene expression analysis, whereas the non-removed left forewing was examined for color patterns. As a test case, we focused on Distal-less (Dll), which likely plays an active role in inducing elemental patterns, including eyespots. The Dll expression level in forewings was paired with eyespot size data from the same individual. One third of the operated pupae survived and developed wing color patterns. Dll expression levels were significantly higher in males than in females, although male eyespots were smaller in size than female eyespots. Eyespot size data showed weak but significant correlations with the Dll expression level in females. These results demonstrate that a single-wing removal method was successfully applied to the butterfly wing system and suggest the weak and non-exclusive contribution of Dll to eyespot size determination in this butterfly. Our novel methodology for establishing correspondence between gene expression and phenotype can be applied to other candidate genes for color pattern development in butterflies. Conceptually similar methods may also be applicable in other developmental systems.

  19. Progestins Upregulate FKBP51 Expression in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells to Induce Functional Progesterone and Glucocorticoid Withdrawal: Implications for Contraceptive- Associated Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Guzeloglu Kayisli, Ozlem; Kayisli, Umit A; Basar, Murat; Semerci, Nihan; Schatz, Frederick; Lockwood, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Use of long-acting progestin only contraceptives (LAPCs) offers a discrete and highly effective family planning method. Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is the major side effect of, and cause for, discontinuation of LAPCs. The endometria of LAPC-treated women display abnormally enlarged, fragile blood vessels, decreased endometrial blood flow and oxidative stress. To understanding to mechanisms underlying AUB, we propose to identify LAPC-modulated unique gene cluster(s) in human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs). Protein and RNA isolated from cultured HESCs treated 7 days with estradiol (E2) or E2+ medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) or E2+ etonogestrel (ETO) or E2+ progesterone (P4) were analyzed by quantitative Real-time (q)-PCR and immunoblotting. HSCORES were determined for immunostained-paired endometria of pre-and 3 months post-Depot MPA (DMPA) treated women and ovariectomized guinea pigs (GPs) treated with placebo or E2 or MPA or E2+MPA for 21 days. In HESCs, whole genome analysis identified a 67 gene group regulated by all three progestins, whereas a 235 gene group was regulated by E2+ETO and E2+MPA, but not E2+P4. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation as one of upstream regulators of the 235 MPA and ETO-specific genes. Among these, microarray results demonstrated significant enhancement of FKBP51, a repressor of PR/GR transcriptional activity, by both MPA and ETO. q-PCR and immunoblot analysis confirmed the microarray results. In endometria of post-DMPA versus pre-DMPA administered women, FKBP51 expression was significantly increased in endometrial stromal and glandular cells. In GPs, E2+MPA or MPA significantly increased FKBP51 immunoreactivity in endometrial stromal and glandular cells versus placebo- and E2-administered groups. MPA or ETO administration activates GR signaling and increases endometrial FKBP51 expression, which could be one of the mechanisms causing AUB by inhibiting PR and GR-mediated transcription

  20. Disease expression in Usher syndrome caused by VLGR1 gene mutation (USH2C) and comparison with USH2A phenotype.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Sharon B; Aleman, Tomas S; Cideciyan, Artur V; Windsor, Elizabeth A M; Sumaroka, Alexander; Roman, Alejandro J; Rane, Tej; Smilko, Elaine E; Bennett, Jean; Stone, Edwin M; Kimberling, William J; Liu, Xue-Zhong; Jacobson, Samuel G

    2005-02-01

    To investigate the retinal disease expression in USH2C, the subtype of Usher syndrome type 2 recently shown to be caused by mutation in the VLGR1 gene, and compare results with those from USH2A, a more common cause of Usher syndrome. Three siblings with USH2C and 14 patients with USH2A were studied. Visual function was measured by kinetic perimetry, static chromatic perimetry, and electroretinography (ERG). Central retinal microstructure was studied with optical coherence tomography (OCT). The siblings with VLGR1 mutation showed abnormal photoreceptor-mediated function in all retinal regions, and there was greater rod than cone dysfunction. USH2A had a wider spectrum of disease expression and included patients with normal function in some retinal regions. When abnormalities were detected, there was more rod than cone dysfunction. Retinal microstructure in both USH2C and USH2A shared the abnormality of loss of outer nuclear layer thickness. Central retinal structure in both genotypes was complicated by cystic macular lesions. A coincidental finding in an USH2C patient was that oral intake of antihistamines was associated with temporary resolution of the macular cystic change. USH2C and USH2A manifest photoreceptor disease with rod- and cone-mediated visual losses and thinning of the outer nuclear layer. An orderly progression through disease stages was estimated from cross-sectional and limited longitudinal data. Intrafamilial and interfamilial variation in retinal severity in USH2A, however, suggests that genetic or nongenetic modifiers may be involved in the disease expression.

  1. Hepcidin expression does not rescue the iron-poor phenotype of Kupffer cells in Hfe-null mice after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Garuti, Cinzia; Tian, Yinghua; Montosi, Giuliana; Sabelli, Manuela; Corradini, Elena; Graf, Rolf; Ventura, Paolo; Vegetti, Alberto; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Pietrangelo, Antonello

    2010-07-01

    Hemochromatosis is a common hereditary disease caused by mutations in HFE and characterized by increased absorption of iron in the intestine. However, the intestine does not appear to be the site of mutant HFE activity in the disease; we investigated the role of the liver-the source of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin-in pathogenesis in mice. We exchanged livers between Hfe wild-type (+/+) and Hfe null (-/-) mice by orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) and assessed histopathology, serum and tissue iron parameters, and hepatic hepcidin messenger RNA expression. At 6-8 months after OLT, Hfe(-/-) mice that received Hfe(-/-) livers maintained the hemochromatosis phenotype: iron accumulation in hepatocytes but not Kupffer cells (KC), increased transferrin levels, and low levels of iron in the spleen. Hfe(+/+) mice that received Hfe(-/-) livers had increased levels of iron in serum and liver and low levels of iron in spleen. However, they did not develop the iron-poor KCs that characterize hemochromatosis: KCs appeared iron rich, although hepatic hepcidin expression was low. Transplantation of Hfe(+/+) livers into Hfe(-/-) mice prevented hepatic iron accumulation but did not return spleen and plasma levels of iron to normal; KCs still appeared to be iron poor, despite normal hepcidin expression. In Hfe(-/-) mice, transplantation of livers from Hfe(+/+) mice reversed the iron-loading phenotype associated with hemochromatosis (regardless of Hfe expression in intestine). However, KCs still had low levels of iron that were not affected by hepatic hepcidin expression. These findings indicate an independent, iron-modifying effect of HFE in KCs. Copyright 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular phenotype of zebrafish ovarian follicle by serial analysis of gene expression and proteomic profiling, and comparison with the transcriptomes of other animals

    PubMed Central

    Knoll-Gellida, Anja; André, Michèle; Gattegno, Tamar; Forgue, Jean; Admon, Arie; Babin, Patrick J

    2006-01-01

    Background The ability of an oocyte to develop into a viable embryo depends on the accumulation of specific maternal information and molecules, such as RNAs and proteins. A serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was carried out in parallel with proteomic analysis on fully-grown ovarian follicles from zebrafish (Danio rerio). The data obtained were compared with ovary/follicle/egg molecular phenotypes of other animals, published or available in public sequence databases. Results Sequencing of 27,486 SAGE tags identified 11,399 different ones, including 3,329 tags with an occurrence superior to one. Fifty-eight genes were expressed at over 0.15% of the total population and represented 17.34% of the mRNA population identified. The three most expressed transcripts were a rhamnose-binding lectin, beta-actin 2, and a transcribed locus similar to the H2B histone family. Comparison with the large-scale expressed sequence tags sequencing approach revealed highly expressed transcripts that were not previously known to be expressed at high levels in fish ovaries, like the short-sized polarized metallothionein 2 transcript. A higher sensitivity for the detection of transcripts with a characterized maternal genetic contribution was also demonstrated compared to large-scale sequencing of cDNA libraries. Ferritin heavy polypeptide 1, heat shock protein 90-beta, lactate dehydrogenase B4, beta-actin isoforms, tubulin beta 2, ATP synthase subunit 9, together with 40 S ribosomal protein S27a, were common highly-expressed transcripts of vertebrate ovary/unfertilized egg. Comparison of transcriptome and proteome data revealed that transcript levels provide little predictive value with respect to the extent of protein abundance. All the proteins identified by proteomic analysis of fully-grown zebrafish follicles had at least one transcript counterpart, with two exceptions: eosinophil chemotactic cytokine and nothepsin. Conclusion This study provides a complete sequence data set of

  3. Dietary Glutamate Supplementation Ameliorates Mycotoxin-Induced Abnormalities in the Intestinal Structure and Expression of Amino Acid Transporters in Young Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Miaomiao; Liao, Peng; Deng, Dun; Liu, Gang; Wen, Qingqi; Wang, Yongfei; Qiu, Wei; Liu, Yan; Wu, Xingli; Ren, Wenkai; Tan, Bie; Chen, Minghong; Xiao, Hao; Wu, Li; Li, Tiejun; Nyachoti, Charles M.; Adeola, Olayiwola; Yin, Yulong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with glutamic acid has beneficial effects on growth performance, antioxidant system, intestinal morphology, serum amino acid profile and the gene expression of intestinal amino acid transporters in growing swine fed mold-contaminated feed. Fifteen pigs (Landrace×Large White) with a mean body weight (BW) of 55 kg were randomly divided into control group (basal feed), mycotoxin group (contaminated feed) and glutamate group (2% glutamate+contaminated feed). Compared with control group, mold-contaminated feed decreased average daily gain (ADG) and increased feed conversion rate (FCR). Meanwhile, fed mold-contaminated feed impaired anti-oxidative system and intestinal morphology, as well as modified the serum amino acid profile in growing pigs. However, supplementation with glutamate exhibited potential positive effects on growth performance of pigs fed mold-contaminated feed, ameliorated the imbalance antioxidant system and abnormalities of intestinal structure caused by mycotoxins. In addition, dietary glutamate supplementation to some extent restored changed serum amino acid profile caused by mold-contaminated feed. In conclusion, glutamic acid may be act as a nutritional regulating factor to ameliorate the adverse effects induced by mycotoxins. PMID:25405987

  4. An XPA gene splicing mutation resulting in trace protein expression in an elderly patient with xeroderma pigmentosum group A without neurological abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Endo, Y; Kusaka-Kikushima, A; Nakamaura, S; Nakazawa, Y; Ogi, T; Uryu, M; Tsuji, G; Furue, M; Moriwaki, S

    2017-07-01

    A certain relationship between XPA gene mutations and the severity of symptoms has been observed in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XP-A). Patients with mutations within the DNA-binding domain usually exhibit severe symptoms, whereas splicing mutations in the same domain sometimes cause very mild symptoms. This inconsistency can be explained by a small amount of functional XPA protein produced from normally spliced transcripts. We herein report the case of an adult Japanese patient with XP-A with unusually mild symptoms. We identified a homozygous c.529G>A mutation in exon 4 of the XPA gene, which resulted in aberrant splicing with a 29-bp deletion in exon 4 causing a frameshift. Intact mRNA was observable, but a Western blot analysis failed to detect any normal XPA protein. We therefore evaluated the DNA repair capacity in normal cells in which the XPA expression was artificially diminished. The repair capacity was still present in cells with trace levels of the XPA protein. The repair capacity of the cells derived from our patient with mild symptoms was poor by comparison, but still significant compared with that of the cells derived from a patient with XP-A with severe symptoms. These results provide strong evidence that a trace level of XPA protein can still exert a relatively strong repair capacity, resulting in only a mild phenotype. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  5. Two stable variants of Burkholderia pseudomallei strain MSHR5848 express broadly divergent in vitro phenotypes associated with their virulence differences.

    PubMed

    Shea, A A; Bernhards, R C; Cote, C K; Chase, C J; Koehler, J W; Klimko, C P; Ladner, J T; Rozak, D A; Wolcott, M J; Fetterer, D P; Kern, S J; Koroleva, G I; Lovett, S P; Palacios, G F; Toothman, R G; Bozue, J A; Worsham, P L; Welkos, S L

    2017-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp), the agent of melioidosis, causes disease ranging from acute and rapidly fatal to protracted and chronic. Bp is highly infectious by aerosol, can cause severe disease with nonspecific symptoms, and is naturally resistant to multiple antibiotics. However, no vaccine exists. Unlike many Bp strains, which exhibit random variability in traits such as colony morphology, Bp strain MSHR5848 exhibited two distinct and relatively stable colony morphologies on sheep blood agar plates: a smooth, glossy, pale yellow colony and a flat, rough, white colony. Passage of the two variants, designated "Smooth" and "Rough", under standard laboratory conditions produced cultures composed of > 99.9% of the single corresponding type; however, both could switch to the other type at different frequencies when incubated in certain nutritionally stringent or stressful growth conditions. These MSHR5848 derivatives were extensively characterized to identify variant-associated differences. Microscopic and colony morphology differences on six differential media were observed and only the Rough variant metabolized sugars in selective agar. Antimicrobial susceptibilities and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) features were characterized and phenotype microarray profiles revealed distinct metabolic and susceptibility disparities between the variants. Results using the phenotype microarray system narrowed the 1,920 substrates to a subset which differentiated the two variants. Smooth grew more rapidly in vitro than Rough, yet the latter exhibited a nearly 10-fold lower lethal dose for mice than Smooth. Finally, the Smooth variant was phagocytosed and replicated to a greater extent and was more cytotoxic than Rough in macrophages. In contrast, multiple locus sequence type (MLST) analysis, ribotyping, and whole genome sequence analysis demonstrated the variants' genetic conservation; only a single consistent genetic difference between the two was identified for further study. These

  6. Abnormal placentation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Samuel T; Bonanno, Clarissa

    2009-04-01

    Abnormal placentation poses a diagnostic and treatment challenge for all providers caring for pregnant women. As one of the leading causes of postpartum hemorrhage, abnormal placentation involves the attachment of placental villi directly to the myometrium with potentially deeper invasion into the uterine wall or surrounding organs. Surgical procedures that disrupt the integrity of uterus, including cesarean section, dilatation and curettage, and myomectomy, have been implicated as key risk factors for placenta accreta. The diagnosis is typically made by gray-scale ultrasound and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging, which may better delineate the extent of placental invasion. It is critical to make the diagnosis before delivery because preoperative planning can significantly decrease blood loss and avoid substantial morbidity associated with placenta accreta. Aggressive management of hemorrhage through the use of uterotonics, fluid resuscitation, blood products, planned hysterectomy, and surgical hemostatic agents can be life-saving for these patients. Conservative management, including the use of uterine and placental preservation and subsequent methotrexate therapy or pelvic artery embolization, may be considered when a focal accreta is suspected; however, surgical management remains the current standard of care.

  7. HOX gene expression in phenotypic and genotypic subgroups and low HOXA gene expression as an adverse prognostic factor in pediatric ALL.

    PubMed

    Starkova, Julia; Zamostna, Blanka; Mejstrikova, Ester; Krejci, Roman; Drabkin, Harry A; Trka, Jan

    2010-12-01

    HOX genes play an important role in both normal lymphopoiesis and leukemogenesis. However, HOX expression patterns in leukemia cells compared to normal lymphoid progenitors have not been systematically studied in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) subtypes. The RNA expression levels of HOXA, HOXB, and CDX1/2 genes were analyzed by qRT-PCR in a cohort of 61 diagnostic pediatric ALL samples and FACS-sorted subpopulations of normal lymphoid progenitors. The RNA expression of HOXA7-10, HOXA13, and HOXB2-4 genes was exclusively detected in leukemic cells and immature progenitors. The RNA expression of HOXB6 and CDX2 genes was exclusively detected in leukemic cells but not in B-lineage cells at any of the studied developmental stages. HOXA3-4, HOXA7, and HOXB3-4 genes were differentially expressed between BCP-ALL and T-ALL subgroups, and among genotypically defined MLL/AF4, TEL/AML1, BCR/ABL, hyperdiploid and normal karyotype subgroups. However, this differential expression did not define specific clusters in hierarchical cluster analysis. HOXA7 gene was low expressed at the RNA level in patients with hyperdiploid leukemia, whereas HOXB7 and CDX2 genes were low expressed in TEL/AML1-positive and BCR/ABL-positive cases, respectively. In contrast to previous findings in acute myeloid leukemia, high HOXA RNA expression was associated with an excellent prognosis in Cox's regression model (P = 0.03). In MLL/AF4-positive ALL, lower HOXA RNA expression correlated with the methylation status of their promoters. HOX gene RNA expression cannot discriminate leukemia subgroups or relative maturity of leukemic cells. However, HOXA RNA expression correlates with prognosis, and particular HOX genes are expressed in specific genotypically characterized subgroups.

  8. Differential expression pattern of heat shock protein 70 gene in tissues and heat stress phenotypes in goats during peak heat stress period.

    PubMed

    Rout, P K; Kaushik, R; Ramachandran, N

    2016-07-01

    It has been established that the synthesis of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is temperature-dependent. The Hsp70 response is considered as a cellular thermometer in response to heat stress and other stimuli. The variation in Hsp70 gene expression has been positively correlated with thermotolerance in Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, rodents and human. Goats have a wide range of ecological adaptability due to their anatomical and physiological characteristics; however, the productivity of the individual declines during thermal stress. The present study was carried out to analyze the expression of heat shock proteins in different tissues and to contrast heat stress phenotypes in response to chronic heat stress. The investigation has been carried out in Jamunapari, Barbari, Jakhrana and Sirohi goats. These breeds differ in size, coat colour and production performance. The heat stress assessment in goats was carried out at a temperature humidity index (THI) ranging from 85.36-89.80 over the period. Phenotyping for heat stress susceptibility was carried out by combining respiration rate (RR) and heart rate (HR). Based on the distribution of RR and HR over the breeds in the population, individual animals were recognized as heat stress-susceptible (HSS) and heat stress-tolerant (HST). Based on their physiological responses, the selected animals were slaughtered for tissue collection during peak heat stress periods. The tissue samples from different organs such as liver, spleen, heart, testis, brain and lungs were collected and stored at -70 °C for future use. Hsp70 concentrations were analyzed from tissue extract with ELISA. mRNA expression levels were evaluated using the SYBR green method. Kidney, liver and heart had 1.5-2.0-fold higher Hsp70 concentrations as compared to other organs in the tissue extracts. Similarly, the gene expression pattern of Hsp70 in different organs indicated that the liver, spleen, brain and kidney exhibited 5.94, 4.96, 5

  9. p21WAF1 expression induced by MEK/ERK pathway activation or inhibition correlates with growth arrest, myogenic differentiation and onco-phenotype reversal in rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarelli, Carmela; Marampon, Francesco; Scoglio, Arianna; Mauro, Annunziata; Giacinti, Cristina; De Cesaris, Paola; Zani, Bianca M

    2005-01-01

    myogenic transcription factors. Notably, the forced expression of p21WAF1 in RD cells causes growth arrest and the reversion of anchorage-independent growth. Conclusion Our data provide evidence of the key role played by the MEK/ERK pathway in the growth arrest of Rhabdomyosarcoma cells. The results of this study suggest that the targeting of MEK/ERKs to rescue p21WAF1 expression and myogenic transcription factor functions leads to the reversal of the Rhabdomyosarcoma phenotype. PMID:16351709

  10. p21WAF1 expression induced by MEK/ERK pathway activation or inhibition correlates with growth arrest, myogenic differentiation and onco-phenotype reversal in rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, Carmela; Marampon, Francesco; Scoglio, Arianna; Mauro, Annunziata; Giacinti, Cristina; De Cesaris, Paola; Zani, Bianca M

    2005-12-13

    transcription factors. Notably, the forced expression of p21WAF1 in RD cells causes growth arrest and the reversion of anchorage-independent growth. Our data provide evidence of the key role played by the MEK/ERK pathway in the growth arrest of Rhabdomyosarcoma cells. The results of this study suggest that the targeting of MEK/ERKs to rescue p21WAF1 expression and myogenic transcription factor functions leads to the reversal of the Rhabdomyosarcoma phenotype.

  11. Beyond Punnett Squares: Student Word Association and Explanations of Phenotypic Variation through an Integrative Quantitative Genetics Unit Investigating Anthocyanin Inheritance and Expression in Brassica rapa Fast Plants

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amber R.; Williams, Paul H.; McGee, Seth A.; Dósa, Katalin; Pfammatter, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Genetics instruction in introductory biology is often confined to Mendelian genetics and avoids the complexities of variation in quantitative traits. Given the driving question “What determines variation in phenotype (Pv)? (Pv=Genotypic variation Gv + environmental variation Ev),” we developed a 4-wk unit for an inquiry-based laboratory course focused on the inheritance and expression of a quantitative trait in varying environments. We utilized Brassica rapa Fast Plants as a model organism to study variation in the phenotype anthocyanin pigment intensity. As an initial curriculum assessment, we used free word association to examine students’ cognitive structures before and after the unit and explanations in students’ final research posters with particular focus on variation (Pv = Gv + Ev). Comparison of pre- and postunit word frequency revealed a shift in words and a pattern of co-occurring concepts indicative of change in cognitive structure, with particular focus on “variation” as a proposed threshold concept and primary goal for students’ explanations. Given review of 53 posters, we found ∼50% of students capable of intermediate to high-level explanations combining both Gv and Ev influence on expression of anthocyanin intensity (Pv). While far from “plug and play,” this conceptually rich, inquiry-based unit holds promise for effective integration of quantitative and Mendelian genetics. PMID:25185225

  12. Phenotypic and genotypic expression of self-incompatibility haplotypes in Arabidopsis lyrata suggests unique origin of alleles in different dominance classes.

    PubMed

    Prigoda, Nadia L; Nassuth, Annette; Mable, Barbara K

    2005-07-01

    The highly divergent alleles of the SRK gene in outcrossing Arabidopsis lyrata have provided important insights into the evolutionary history of self-incompatibility (SI) alleles and serve as an ideal model for studies of the evolutionary and molecular interactions between alleles in cell-cell recognition systems in general. One tantalizing question is how new specificities arise in systems that require coordination between male and female components. Allelic recruitment via gene conversion has been proposed as one possibility, based on the division of DNA sequences at the SRK locus into two distinctive groups: (1) sequences whose relationships are not well resolved and display the long branch lengths expected for a gene under balancing selection (Class A); and (2) sequences falling into a well-supported group with shorter branch lengths (Class B) that are closely related to an unlinked paralogous locus. The purpose of this study was to determine if differences in phenotype (site of expression assayed using allele-specific reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) or function (dominance relationships assayed through controlled pollinations) accompany the sequence-based classification. Expression of Class A alleles was restricted to floral tissues, as predicted for genes involved in the SI response. In contrast, Class B alleles, despite being tightly linked to the SI phenotype, were unexpectedly expressed in both leaves and floral tissues; the same pattern found for a related unlinked paralogous sequence. Whereas Class A included haplotypes in three different dominance classes, all Class B haplotypes were found to be recessive to all except one Class A haplotype. In addition, mapping of expression and dominance patterns onto an S-domain-based genealogy suggested that allelic dominance may be determined more by evolutionary history than by frequency-dependent selection for lowered dominance as some theories suggest. The possibility that interlocus gene

  13. Correlation of beta-catenin localization with cyclooxygenase-2 expression and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takako; Nosho, Katsuhiko; Ohnishi, Mutsuko; Suemoto, Yuko; Kirkner, Gregory J; Dehari, Reiko; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Fuchs, Charles S; Ogino, Shuji

    2007-07-01

    The WNT/beta-catenin (CTNNB1) pathway is commonly activated in the carcinogenic process. Cross-talks between the WNT and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 or PTGS2)/prostaglandin pathways have been suggested. The relationship between beta-catenin activation and microsatellite instability (MSI) in colorectal cancer has been controversial. The CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP or CIMP-high) with widespread promoter methylation is a distinct epigenetic phenotype in colorectal cancer, which is associated with MSI-high. However, no study has examined the relationship between beta-catenin activation and CIMP status. Using 832 population-based colorectal cancer specimens, we assessed beta-catenin localization by immunohistochemistry. We quantified DNA methylation in eight CIMP-specific promoters [CACNA1G, CDKN2A(p16), CRABP1, IGF2, MLH1, NEUROG1, RUNX3, and SOCS1] by real-time polymerase chain reaction (MethyLight). MSI-high, CIMP-high, and BRAF mutation were associated inversely with cytoplasmic and nuclear beta-catenin expressions (i.e., beta-catenin activation) and associated positively with membrane expression. The inverse relation between beta-catenin activation and CIMP was independent of MSI. COX-2 overexpression correlated with cytoplasmic beta-catenin expression (even after tumors were stratified by CIMP status), but did not correlate significantly with nuclear or membrane expression. In conclusion, beta-catenin activation is inversely associated with CIMP-high independent of MSI status. Cytoplasmic beta-catenin is associated with COX-2 overexpression, supporting the role of cytoplasmic beta-catenin in stabilizing PTGS2 (COX-2) mRNA.

  14. Estrogen receptor-beta expression in invasive breast cancer in relation to molecular phenotype: results from the Nurses' Health Study.

    PubMed

    Marotti, Jonathan D; Collins, Laura C; Hu, Rong; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2010-02-01

    The expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-alpha) and related genes has emerged as one of the major determinants of molecular classification of invasive breast cancers. Expression of a second ER, estrogen receptor-beta (ER-beta), has not been previously evaluated in a large population-based study. Therefore, we examined ER-beta expression in a large population of women with breast cancer to assess its relationship to molecular categories of invasive breast cancer. We constructed tissue microarrays from paraffin blocks of 3093 breast cancers that developed in women enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study. Tissue microarray sections were immunostained for ER-alpha, progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), cytokeratin 5/6, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and with a monoclonal antibody to ER-beta. Cancers were categorized as luminal A (ER-alpha+ and/or PR+ and HER2-); luminal B (ER-alpha+ and/or PR+ and HER2+); HER2 (ER-alpha- and PR- and HER2+); and basal-like (ER-alpha-, PR-, HER2- and EGFR or cytokeratin 5/6+). The relationship between expression of ER-beta and molecular class of invasive breast cancer was analyzed. Overall, 68% of breast carcinomas were ER-beta+. Expression of ER-beta was significantly associated with expression of ER-alpha (P<0.0001) and PR (P<0.0001), and was inversely related to expression of HER2 (P=0.004), CK5/6 (P=0.02) and EGFR (P=0.006). Among 2170 invasive cancers with complete immunophenotypic data, 73% were luminal A, 5% luminal B, 6 % HER2 and 11% basal-like. ER-beta expression was significantly related to molecular category (P<0.0001) and was more common in luminal A (72% of cases) and B (68% of cases) than in HER2 or basal-like types. However, despite their being defined by the absence of ER-alpha expression, 55% of HER2-type and 60% of basal-like cancers showed expression of ER-beta. The role of ER-beta in the development and progression of breast cancers defined by lack of expression of ER

  15. High expression of forkhead box protein C2 is associated with aggressive phenotypes and poor prognosis in clinical hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Yuki; Ubukata, Yasunari; Handa, Tadashi; Yokobori, Takehiko; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Gantumur, Dolgormaa; Hagiwara, Kei; Yamanaka, Takahiro; Tsukagoshi, Mariko; Igarashi, Takamichi; Watanabe, Akira; Kubo, Norio; Araki, Kenichiro; Harimoto, Norifumi; Katayama, Ayaka; Hikino, Toshiaki; Sano, Takaaki; Ogata, Kyoichi; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Shirabe, Ken; Oyama, Tetsunari

    2018-05-25

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major causes of tumor death; thus, the identification of markers related to its diagnosis and prognosis is critical. Previous studies have revealed that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in tumor invasion and metastasis, and the forkhead box protein C2 (FOXC2) has been shown to promote tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and EMT. In the present study, we examined the clinicopathological significance of FOXC2 and EMT-related markers in clinical HCC specimens and identified factors related to the diagnosis and prognosis of HCC. The expression of FOXC2 and EMT-related markers was evaluated by immunohistochemistry in 84 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma. A high expression of FOXC2 was observed in 26 of 84 cases, and expression was significantly correlated with background liver cirrhosis, poor tumor differentiation, high serum AFP, and elevated cell proliferation markers. In addition, this high expression was related to the induction of the Cadherin switch and vimentin expression and was an independent predictor for poor prognosis. The high expression of FOXC2 in HCC is correlated with tumor malignancy and poor prognosis, suggesting that FOXC2 may be an important prognostic factor for HCC.

  16. Expression of the Homeobox Gene HOXA9 in Ovarian Cancer Induces Peritoneal Macrophages to Acquire an M2 Tumor-Promoting Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Song Yi; Ladanyi, Andras; Lengyel, Ernst; Naora, Honami

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) exhibit an M2 macrophage phenotype that suppresses anti-tumor immune responses and often correlates with poor outcomes in patients with cancer. Patients with ovarian cancer frequently present with peritoneal carcinomatosis, but the mechanisms that induce naïve peritoneal macrophages into TAMs are poorly understood. In this study, we found an increased abundance of TAMs in mouse i.p. xenograft models of ovarian cancer that expressed HOXA9, a homeobox gene that is associated with poor prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer. HOXA9 expression in ovarian cancer cells stimulated chemotaxis of peritoneal macrophages and induced macrophages to acquire TAM-like features. These features included induction of the M2 markers, CD163 and CD206, and the immunosuppressive cytokines, IL-10 and chemokine ligand 17, and down-regulation of the immunostimulatory cytokine, IL-12. HOXA9-mediated induction of TAMs was primarily due to the combinatorial effects of HOXA9-induced, tumor-derived transforming growth factor-β2 and chemokine ligand 2 levels. High HOXA9 expression in clinical specimens of ovarian cancer was strongly associated with increased abundance of TAMs and intratumoral T-regulatory cells and decreased abundance of CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Levels of immunosuppressive cytokines were also elevated in ascites fluid of patients with tumors that highly expressed HOXA9. HOXA9 may, therefore, stimulate ovarian cancer progression by promoting an immunosuppressive microenvironment via paracrine effects on peritoneal macrophages. PMID:24332016

  17. Metabolomic analysis of the selection response of Drosophila melanogaster to environmental stress: are there links to gene expression and phenotypic traits?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmendal, Anders; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Overgaard, Johannes; Holmstrup, Martin; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Loeschcke, Volker

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the global metabolite response to artificial selection for tolerance to stressful conditions such as cold, heat, starvation, and desiccation, and for longevity in Drosophila melanogaster. Our findings were compared to data from other levels of biological organization, including gene expression, physiological traits, and organismal stress tolerance phenotype. Overall, we found that selection for environmental stress tolerance changes the metabolomic 1H NMR fingerprint largely in a similar manner independent of the trait selected for, indicating that experimental evolution led to a general stress selection response at the metabolomic level. Integrative analyses across data sets showed little similarity when general correlations between selection effects at the level of the metabolome and gene expression were compared. This is likely due to the fact that the changes caused by these selection regimes were rather mild and/or that the dominating determinants for gene expression and metabolite levels were different. However, expression of a number of genes was correlated with the metabolite data. Many of the identified genes were general stress response genes that are down-regulated in response to selection for some of the stresses in this study. Overall, the results illustrate that selection markedly alters the metabolite profile and that the coupling between different levels of biological organization indeed is present though not very strong for stress selection at this level. The results highlight the extreme complexity of environmental stress adaptation and the difficulty of extrapolating and interpreting responses across levels of biological organization.

  18. Single-nucleotide polymorphism-gene intermixed networking reveals co-linkers connected to multiple gene expression phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Bin-Sheng; Zhang, Qing-Pu; Zhang, Guang-Mei; Zhang, Shao-Jun; Zhang, Wei; Lv, Hong-Chao; Zhang, Fan; Lv, Sa-Li; Li, Chuan-Xing; Rao, Shao-Qi; Li, Xia

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression profiles and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) profiles are modern data for genetic analysis. It is possible to use the two types of information to analyze the relationships among genes by some genetical genomics approaches. In this study, gene expression profiles were used as expression traits. And relationships among the genes, which were co-linked to a common SNP(s), were identified by integrating the two types of information. Further research on the co-expressions among the co-linked genes was carried out after the gene-SNP relationships were established using the Haseman-Elston sib-pair regression. The results showed that the co-expressions among the co-linked genes were significantly higher if the number of connections between the genes and a SNP(s) was more than six. Then, the genes were interconnected via one or more SNP co-linkers to construct a gene-SNP intermixed network. The genes sharing more SNPs tended to have a stronger correlation. Finally, a gene-gene network was constructed with their intensities of relationships (the number of SNP co-linkers shared) as the weights for the edges. PMID:18466544

  19. Inverse Relationship of the CMKLR1 Relative Expression and Chemerin Serum Levels in Obesity with Dysmetabolic Phenotype and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Corona-Meraz, Fernanda-Isadora; Navarro-Hernández, Rosa-Elena; Ruíz-Quezada, Sandra-Luz; Madrigal-Ruíz, Perla-Monserrat; Castro-Albarrán, Jorge; Chavarría-Ávila, Efraín; Guzmán-Ornelas, Milton-Omar; Gómez-Bañuelos, Eduardo; Petri, Marcelo-Herón; Ramírez-Cedano, Joel-Isidro; Aguilar-Aldrete, María-Elena; Ríos-Ibarra, Clara; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Background. In obesity there is a subclinical chronic low-grade inflammatory response where insulin resistance (IR) may develop. Chemerin is secreted in white adipose tissue and promotes low-grade inflammatory process, where it expressed CMKLR1 receptor. The role of chemerin and CMKLR1 in inflammatory process secondary to obesity is not defined yet. Methods. Cross-sectional study with 134 individuals classified as with and without obesity by body mass index (BMI) and IR. Body fat storage measurements and metabolic and inflammatory markers were measured by routine methods. Soluble chemerin and basal levels of insulin by ELISA and relative expression of CMKLR1 were evaluated with qPCR and 2−ΔΔCT method. Results. Differences (P < 0.05) were observed between obesity and lean individuals in body fat storage measurements and metabolic-inflammatory markers. Both CMKLR1 expression and chemerin levels were increased in obesity without IR. Soluble chemerin levels correlate with adiposity and metabolic markers (r = 8.8% to 38.5%), P < 0.05. Conclusion. The increment of CMKLR1 expression was associated with insulin production. Increased serum levels of chemerin in obesity were observed, favoring a dysmetabolic response. The results observed in this study suggest that both chemerin and CMKLR1 have opposite expression in the context of low-grade inflammatory response manifested in the development of IR. PMID:27239101

  20. Resveratrol induces expression of the slow, oxidative phenotype in mdx mouse muscle together with enhanced activity of the SIRT1-PGC-1α axis.

    PubMed

    Ljubicic, Vladimir; Burt, Matthew; Lunde, John A; Jasmin, Bernard J

    2014-07-01

    Slower, more oxidative muscle fibers are more resistant to the dystrophic pathology in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients as well as in the preclinical mdx mouse model of DMD. Therefore, one therapeutic strategy for DMD focuses on promoting expression of the slow, oxidative myogenic program. In the current study, we explored the therapeutic potential of stimulating the slow, oxidative phenotype in mdx mice by feeding 6-wk-old animals with the natural phenol resveratrol (RSV; ~100 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) for 6 wk. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activity and protein levels increased significantly, as well as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) activity, in the absence of alterations in AMPK signaling. These adaptations occurred concomitant with evidence of a fast, glycolytic, to slower, more oxidative fiber type conversion, including mitochondrial biogenesis and increased expression of slower myosin heavy chain isoforms. These positive findings raised the question of whether increased exposure to RSV would result in greater therapeutic benefits. We discovered that an elevated RSV dose of ~500 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) across a duration of 12 wk was clearly less effective at muscle remodeling in mdx mice. This treatment protocol failed to influence SIRT1 or AMPK signaling and did not result in a shift towards a slower, more oxidative phenotype. Taken together, this study demonstrates that RSV can stimulate SIRT1 and PGC-1α activation, which in turn may promote expression of the slow, oxidative myogenic program in mdx mouse muscle. The data also highlight the importance of selecting an appropriate dosage regimen of RSV to maximize its potential therapeutic effectiveness for future application in DMD patients. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Resveratrol induces expression of the slow, oxidative phenotype in mdx mouse muscle together with enhanced activity of the SIRT1-PGC-1α axis

    PubMed Central

    Ljubicic, Vladimir; Burt, Matthew; Lunde, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Slower, more oxidative muscle fibers are more resistant to the dystrophic pathology in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients as well as in the preclinical mdx mouse model of DMD. Therefore, one therapeutic strategy for DMD focuses on promoting expression of the slow, oxidative myogenic program. In the current study, we explored the therapeutic potential of stimulating the slow, oxidative phenotype in mdx mice by feeding 6-wk-old animals with the natural phenol resveratrol (RSV; ∼100 mg·kg−1·day−1) for 6 wk. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activity and protein levels increased significantly, as well as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) activity, in the absence of alterations in AMPK signaling. These adaptations occurred concomitant with evidence of a fast, glycolytic, to slower, more oxidative fiber type conversion, including mitochondrial biogenesis and increased expression of slower myosin heavy chain isoforms. These positive findings raised the question of whether increased exposure to RSV would result in greater therapeutic benefits. We discovered that an elevated RSV dose of ∼500 mg·kg−1·day−1 across a duration of 12 wk was clearly less effective at muscle remodeling in mdx mice. This treatment protocol failed to influence SIRT1 or AMPK signaling and did not result in a shift towards a slower, more oxidative phenotype. Taken together, this study demonstrates that RSV can stimulate SIRT1 and PGC-1α activation, which in turn may promote expression of the slow, oxidative myogenic program in mdx mouse muscle. The data also highlight the importance of selecting an appropriate dosage regimen of RSV to maximize its potential therapeutic effectiveness for future application in DMD patients. PMID:24760981

  2. Nine known and five novel mutations in the erythroid transcription factor KLF1 gene and phenotypic expression of fetal hemoglobin in hemoglobin E disorder.

    PubMed

    Tepakhan, Wanicha; Yamsri, Supawadee; Sanchaisuriya, Kanokwan; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Xu, Xiangmin; Fucharoen, Supan

    2016-07-01

    Hemoglobin E is the most common Hb variant found in South East Asia. Variation of Hb F expression in Hb E syndrome is associated with several genetic modifiers. We report several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including nine known and five novel mutations of the Krüppel-like factor 1 (KLF1; an erythroid specific transcription factor) gene and determine their associations with phenotypic expression of Hb F in Hb E disorders. KLF1 mutations were examined using high resolution melting (HRM) assay and DNA sequencing in 575 homozygous Hb E, 278 heterozygous Hb E and 100 normal subjects. Fourteen mutations were mostly observed in subjects with elevated Hb F, including nine known mutations (G176AfsX179, T334R, R238H, -154 (C>T), A298P, S270W, R301H, -148 (G>A) and G335R and five novel mutations (Q217X, Q223X, Y290_S293del, K307N, and M358I). None of them, but the -148 (G>A), were observed in normal controls to have Hb F <1%. Combined KLF1 mutations with other SNPs including (G)γ-XmnI, BCL11A and HBS1L-MYB were associated with higher Hb F levels. KLF1 is therefore an important genetic factor associated with increased Hb F and in combination with other modifying factors could explain the phenotypic variation of Hb F expression in this common hemoglobinopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Expression of PEP carboxylase from Escherichia coli complements the phenotypic effects of pyruvate carboxylase mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Flores, C L; Gancedo, C

    1997-08-04

    We investigated the effects of the expression of the Escherichia coli ppc gene encoding PEP carboxylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants devoid of pyruvate carboxylase. Functional expression of the ppc gene restored the ability of the yeast mutants to grow in glucose-ammonium medium. Growth yield in this medium was the same in the transformed yeast than in the wild type although the growth rate of the transformed yeast was slower. Growth in pyruvate was slowed down in the transformed strain, likely due to a futile cycle produced by the simultaneous action of PEP carboxykinase and PEP carboxylase.

  4. miRNA-135b Contributes to Triple Negative Breast Cancer Molecular Heterogeneity: Different Expression Profile in Basal-like Versus non-Basal-like Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Uva, Paolo; Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Loi, Federica; Pira, Giovanna; Murgia, Luciano; Orrù, Sandra; Floris, Matteo; Muroni, Maria Rosaria; Sanges, Francesca; Carru, Ciriaco; Angius, Andrea; De Miglio, Maria Rosaria

    2018-01-01

    The clinical and genetic heterogeneity of Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) and the lack of unambiguous molecular targets contribute to the inadequacy of current therapeutic options for these variants. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are a class of small highly conserved regulatory endogenous non-coding RNA, which can alter the expression of genes encoding proteins and may play a role in the dysregulation of cellular pathways. Our goal was to improve the knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of TNBC subgroups analyzing the miRNA expression profile, and to identify new prognostic and predictive biomarkers. We conducted a human miRNome analysis by TaqMan Low Density Array comparing different TNBC subtypes, defined by immunohistochemical basal markers EGFR and CK5/6. RT-qPCR confirmed differential expression of microRNAs. To inspect the function of the selected targets we perform Gene Ontology and KEGG enrichment analysis. We identified a single miRNA signature given by miR-135b expression level, which was strictly related to TNBC with basal-like phenotype. miR-135b target analysis revealed a role in the TGF-beta, WNT and ERBB pathways. A significant positive correlation was identified between neoplastic proliferative index and miR-135b expression. These findings confirm the oncogenic roles of miR-135b in the pathogenesis of TNBC expressing basal markers. A potential negative prognostic role of miR-135b overexpression might be related to the positive correlation with high proliferative index. Our study implies potential clinical applications: miR-135b could be a potential therapeutic target in basal-like TNBCs.

  5. miRNA-135b Contributes to Triple Negative Breast Cancer Molecular Heterogeneity: Different Expression Profile in Basal-like Versus non-Basal-like Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Uva, Paolo; Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Loi, Federica; Pira, Giovanna; Murgia, Luciano; Orrù, Sandra; Floris, Matteo; Muroni, Maria Rosaria; Sanges, Francesca; Carru, Ciriaco; Angius, Andrea; De Miglio, Maria Rosaria

    2018-01-01

    The clinical and genetic heterogeneity of Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) and the lack of unambiguous molecular targets contribute to the inadequacy of current therapeutic options for these variants. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are a class of small highly conserved regulatory endogenous non-coding RNA, which can alter the expression of genes encoding proteins and may play a role in the dysregulation of cellular pathways. Our goal was to improve the knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of TNBC subgroups analyzing the miRNA expression profile, and to identify new prognostic and predictive biomarkers. We conducted a human miRNome analysis by TaqMan Low Density Array comparing different TNBC subtypes, defined by immunohistochemical basal markers EGFR and CK5/6. RT-qPCR confirmed differential expression of microRNAs. To inspect the function of the selected targets we perform Gene Ontology and KEGG enrichment analysis. We identified a single miRNA signature given by miR-135b expression level, which was strictly related to TNBC with basal-like phenotype. miR-135b target analysis revealed a role in the TGF-beta, WNT and ERBB pathways. A significant positive correlation was identified between neoplastic proliferative index and miR-135b expression. These findings confirm the oncogenic roles of miR-135b in the pathogenesis of TNBC expressing basal markers. A potential negative prognostic role of miR-135b overexpression might be related to the positive correlation with high proliferative index. Our study implies potential clinical applications: miR-135b could be a potential therapeutic target in basal-like TNBCs. PMID:29725243

  6. Formation of surface reaction products on bioactive glass and their effects on the expression of the osteoblastic phenotype and the deposition of mineralized extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    el-Ghannam, A; Ducheyne, P; Shapiro, I M

    1997-02-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the effect of alkali ion release, pH control and buffer capacity on the expression of the osteoblastic phenotype. In addition we determined the importance of modifications of the surface of porous bioactive glass (BG) on the activity of rat calvaria osteoblasts in vitro. We found that at a low tissue culture medium (TCM) volume to BG surface area (Vol/SA) ratio, the products of glass corrosion elevated the pH of the TCM to a value that adversely affected cellular activity; thus, the matrix synthesized by the cells was non-mineralized. On the other hand, when the Vol/SA was high and the buffer capacity of the medium was not exceeded, the cells generated a mineralized extracellular matrix. Addressing the second issue, we observed that modification of the composition of the BG surface markedly influenced osteoblast activity. BG that was coated with either a calcium phosphate-rich layer only or a serum protein layer changed the phenotypic characteristics of the osteoblasts. The presence of either of these surfaces lowered the alkaline phosphatase activity of the attached cells; this finding indicated that the osteoblast phenotype was not conserved. However, when the BG was coated with a bilayer of calcium phosphate and serum proteins, the alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity was elevated and the extracellular matrix contained characteristic bone markers. Our findings indicate that the calcium phosphate-rich layer promotes adsorption and concentration of proteins from the TCM, and it is utilized by the osteoblasts to form the mineralized extracellular matrix.

  7. Stable expression and phenotypic impact of attacin E transgene in orchard grown apple trees over a 12 year period.

    PubMed

    Borejsza-Wysocka, Ewa; Norelli, John L; Aldwinckle, Herb S; Malnoy, Mickael

    2010-06-03

    Transgenic trees currently are being produced by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and biolistics. The future use of transformed trees on a commercial basis depends upon thorough evaluation of the potential environmental and public health risk of the modified plants, transgene stability over a prolonged period of time and the effect of the gene on tree and fruit characteristics. We studied the stability of expression and the effect on resistance to the fire blight disease of the lytic protein gene, attacin E, in the apple cultivar 'Galaxy' grown in the field for 12 years. Using Southern and western blot analysis, we compared transgene copy number and observed stability of expression of this gene in the leaves and fruit in several transformed lines during a 12 year period. No silenced transgenic plant was detected. Also the expression of this gene resulted in an increase in resistance to fire blight throughout 12 years of orchard trial and did not affect fruit shape, size, acidity, firmness, weight or sugar level, tree morphology, leaf shape or flower morphology or color compared to the control. Overall, these results suggest that transgene expression in perennial species, such as fruit trees, remains stable in time and space, over extended periods and in different organs. This report shows that it is possible to improve a desirable trait in apple, such as the resistance to a pathogen, through genetic engineering, without adverse alteration of fruit characteristics and tree shape.

  8. HER2 isoforms co-expression differently tunes mammary tumor phenotypes affecting onset, vasculature and therapeutic response

    PubMed Central

    Balboni, Tania; Ianzano, Marianna L.; Laranga, Roberta; Landuzzi, Lorena; Giusti, Veronica; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Santini, Donatella; Taffurelli, Mario; Di Oto, Enrico; Asioli, Sofia; Amici, Augusto; Pupa, Serenella M.; De Giovanni, Carla; Tagliabue, Elda; Iezzi, Manuela; Nanni, Patrizia; Lollini, Pier-Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Full-length HER2 oncoprotein and splice variant Delta16 are co-expressed in human breast cancer. We studied their interaction in hybrid transgenic mice bearing human full-length HER2 and Delta16 (F1 HER2/Delta16) in comparison to parental HER2 and Delta16 transgenic mice. Mammary carcinomas onset was faster in F1 HER2/Delta16 and Delta16 than in HER2 mice, however tumor growth was slower, and metastatic spread was comparable in all transgenic mice. Full-length HER2 tumors contained few large vessels or vascular lacunae, whereas Delta16 tumors presented a more regular vascularization with numerous endothelium-lined small vessels. Delta16-expressing tumors showed a higher accumulation of i.v. injected doxorubicin than tumors expressing full-length HER2. F1 HER2/Delta16 tumors with high full-length HER2 expression made few large vessels, whereas tumors with low full-length HER2 and high Delta16 contained numerous small vessels and expressed higher levels of VEGF and VEGFR2. Trastuzumab strongly inhibited tumor onset in F1 HER2/Delta16 and Delta16 mice, but not in full-length HER2 mice. Addiction of F1 tumors to Delta16 was also shown by long-term stability of Delta16 levels during serial transplants, in contrast full-length HER2 levels underwent wide fluctuations. In conclusion, full-length HER2 leads to a faster tumor growth and to an irregular vascularization, whereas Delta16 leads to a faster tumor onset, with more regular vessels, which in turn could better transport cytotoxic drugs within the tumor, and to a higher sensitivity to targeted therapeutic agents. F1 HER2/Delta16 mice are a new immunocompetent mouse model, complementary to patient-derived xenografts, for studies of mammary carcinoma onset, prevention and therapy. PMID:28903354

  9. Bioreactor-engineered cancer tissue-like structures mimic phenotypes, gene expression profiles and drug resistance patterns observed "in vivo".

    PubMed

    Hirt, Christian; Papadimitropoulos, Adam; Muraro, Manuele G; Mele, Valentina; Panopoulos, Evangelos; Cremonesi, Eleonora; Ivanek, Robert; Schultz-Thater, Elke; Droeser, Raoul A; Mengus, Chantal; Heberer, Michael; Oertli, Daniel; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Zajac, Paul; Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Tornillo, Luigi; Terracciano, Luigi; Martin, Ivan; Spagnoli, Giulio C

    2015-09-01

    Anticancer compound screening on 2D cell cultures poorly predicts "in vivo" performance, while conventional 3D culture systems are usually characterized by limited cell proliferation, failing to produce tissue-like-structures (TLS) suitable for drug testing. We addressed engineering of TLS by culturing cancer cells in porous scaffolds under perfusion flow. Colorectal cancer (CRC) HT-29 cells were cultured in 2D, on collagen sponges in static conditions or in perfused bioreactors, or injected subcutaneously in immunodeficient mice. Perfused 3D (p3D) cultures resulted in significantly higher (p < 0.0001) cell proliferation than static 3D (s3D) cultures and yielded more homogeneous TLS, with morphology and phenotypes similar to xenografts. Transcriptome analysis revealed a high correlation between xenografts and p3D cultures, particularly for gene clusters regulating apoptotic processes and response to hypoxia. Treatment with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), a frequently used but often clinically ineffective chemotherapy drug, induced apoptosis, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes (BCL-2, TRAF1, and c-FLIP) and decreased cell numbers in 2D, but only "nucleolar stress" in p3D and xenografts. Conversely, BCL-2 inhibitor ABT-199 induced cytotoxic effects in p3D but not in 2D cultures. Our findings advocate the importance of perfusion flow in 3D cultures of tumor cells to efficiently mimic functional features observed "in vivo" and to test anticancer compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Selection for breed-specific long-bodied phenotypes is associated with increased expression of canine hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Taryn; McGreevy, Paul D

    2010-03-01

    Hip dysplasia (HD) is the most common skeletal disease in purebred dogs. Radiographic schemes developed to reduce prevalence through selective breeding have had limited success, but the role of selecting for morphological characteristics prized in the show-ring and dictated by breed standards has not been fully explored. This study correlated published scores of hip pathology with measurements of body length to height ratio from photographs of Best-of-Breed specimens from 30 breeds (n=12/breed) to establish whether selection criteria could be compromising welfare by increasing susceptibility to HD. Relative body length correlated strongly with higher rates of HD by breed data from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (Spearman r=0.727, P<0.001), the British Veterinary Association (r=0.701, P<0.001), and the Australian Veterinary Association (r=0.577, P<0.01). By favouring body shapes that are longer than they are tall, judges may be inadvertently selecting for conformational attributes predisposing dogs to HD, suggesting that ambiguity in breed standards and extreme relative body length phenotypes can engender serious welfare consequences and need to be re-evaluated. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hemolytic activity in Flavobacterium psychrophilum is a contact-dependent, two-step mechanism and differently expressed in smooth and rough phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Högfors-Rönnholm, Eva; Wiklund, Tom

    2010-12-01

    The hemolytic activity of cells of smooth and rough phenotypic variants of the Gram-negative fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum was investigated in two different assays, a microplate and an agarose hemolysis assay, using rainbow trout erythrocytes. The smooth cells showed a high and the rough cells a negligible, concentration dependent, hemolytic activity in the microplate assay. Both smooth and rough cells showed a rather weak hemolytic activity, with two distinct hemolytic patterns, in the agarose assay. The hemolytic activity of the cells was not regulated by iron availability and cell-free extracellular products did not show any hemolytic activity. The smooth cells, in contrast to the rough cells, showed a high ability to agglutinate erythrocytes and both hemagglutination and hemolytic activity was impaired by treatment of the cells with sialic acid. The hemolytic activity was furthermore reduced after proteolytic and heat treatment of the cells. The results from the present study suggest that the hemolytic activity in F. psychrophilum is highly expressed in the smooth phenotype, and that it is a contact-dependent and two-step mechanism that is initiated by the binding of the bacterial cells to the erythrocytes through sialic acid-binding lectins and then executed by thermolabile proteinaceous hemolysins. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Dwarf Phenotype in GH240B Mice, Haploinsufficient for the Autism Candidate Gene Neurobeachin, Is Caused by Ectopic Expression of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Quili; Stijnen, Pieter; Pruniau, Vincent; Meulemans, Sandra; Vankelecom, Hugo; Creemers, John W. M.

    2014-01-01

    Two knockout mouse models for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin (Nbea) have been generated independently. Although both models have similar phenotypes, one striking difference is the dwarf phenotype observed in the heterozygous configuration of the GH240B model that is generated by the serendipitous insertion of a promoterless human growth hormone (hGH) genomic fragment in the Nbea gene. In order to elucidate this discrepancy, the dwarfism present in this Nbea mouse model was investigated in detail. The growth deficiency in Nbea +/− mice coincided with an increased percentage of fat mass and a decrease in bone mineral density. Low but detectable levels of hGH were detected in the pituitary and hypothalamus of Nbea +/− mice but not in liver, hippocampus nor in serum. As a consequence, several members of the mouse growth hormone (mGH) signaling cascade showed altered mRNA levels, including a reduction in growth hormone-releasing hormone mRNA in the hypothalamus. Moreover, somatotrope cells were less numerous in the pituitary of Nbea +/− mice and both contained and secreted significantly less mGH resulting in reduced levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1. These findings demonstrate that the random integration of the hGH transgene in this mouse model has not only inactivated Nbea but has also resulted in the tissue-specific expression of hGH causing a negative feedback loop, mGH hyposecretion and dwarfism. PMID:25333629

  13. The dwarf phenotype in GH240B mice, haploinsufficient for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin, is caused by ectopic expression of recombinant human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Nuytens, Kim; Tuand, Krizia; Fu, Quili; Stijnen, Pieter; Pruniau, Vincent; Meulemans, Sandra; Vankelecom, Hugo; Creemers, John W M

    2014-01-01

    Two knockout mouse models for the autism candidate gene Neurobeachin (Nbea) have been generated independently. Although both models have similar phenotypes, one striking difference is the dwarf phenotype observed in the heterozygous configuration of the GH240B model that is generated by the serendipitous insertion of a promoterless human growth hormone (hGH) genomic fragment in the Nbea gene. In order to elucidate this discrepancy, the dwarfism present in this Nbea mouse model was investigated in detail. The growth deficiency in Nbea+/- mice coincided with an increased percentage of fat mass and a decrease in bone mineral density. Low but detectable levels of hGH were detected in the pituitary and hypothalamus of Nbea+/- mice but not in liver, hippocampus nor in serum. As a consequence, several members of the mouse growth hormone (mGH) signaling cascade showed altered mRNA levels, including a reduction in growth hormone-releasing hormone mRNA in the hypothalamus. Moreover, somatotrope cells were less numerous in the pituitary of Nbea+/- mice and both contained and secreted significantly less mGH resulting in reduced levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1. These findings demonstrate that the random integration of the hGH transgene in this mouse model has not only inactivated Nbea but has also resulted in the tissue-specific expression of hGH causing a negative feedback loop, mGH hyposecretion and dwarfism.

  14. Monocytes Phenotype and Cytokine Production in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Infected Patients Receiving a Modified Vaccinia Ankara-Based HIV-1 Vaccine: Relationship to CD300 Molecules Expression.

    PubMed

    Vitallé, Joana; Zenarruzabeitia, Olatz; Terrén, Iñigo; Plana, Montserrat; Guardo, Alberto C; Leal, Lorna; Peña, José; García, Felipe; Borrego, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    A modified vaccinia Ankara-based HIV-1 vaccine clade B (MVA-B) has been tested for safety and immunogenicity in low-risk human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-uninfected individuals and as a therapeutic vaccine in HIV-1-infected individuals on combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). As a therapeutic vaccine, MVA-B was safe and broadly immunogenic; however, patients still showed a viral rebound upon treatment interruption. Monocytes are an important part of the viral reservoir and several studies suggest that they are partly responsible for the chronic inflammation observed in cART-treated HIV-infected people. The CD300 family of receptors has an important role in several diseases, including viral infections. Monocytes express CD300a, c, e, and f molecules and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and other stimuli regulate their expression. However, the expression and function of CD300 receptors on monocytes in HIV infection is still unknown. In this work, we investigated for the first time the expression of CD300 molecules and the cytokine production in response to LPS on monocytes from HIV-1-infected patients before and after vaccination with MVA-B. Our results showed that CD300 receptors expression on monocytes from HIV-1-infected patients correlates with markers of HIV infection progression and immune inflammation. Specifically, we observed a positive correlation between the expression of CD300e and CD300f receptors on monocytes with the number of CD4+ T cells of HIV-1-infected patients before vaccination. We also saw a positive correlation between the expression of the inhibitory receptor CD300f and the expression of CD163 on monocytes from HIV-1-infected individuals before and after vaccination. In addition, monocytes exhibited a higher cytokine production in response to LPS after vaccination, almost at the same levels of monocytes from healthy donors. Furthermore, we also described a correlation in the expression of CD300e and CD300f receptors with TNF-α production in

  15. Cellular Phenotype-Dependent and -Independent Effects of Vitamin C on the Renewal and Gene Expression of Mouse Embryonic Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Shiu-Ming; Burl, Lana R.; Hu, Zihua

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin C has been shown to delay the cellular senescence and was considered a candidate for chemoprevention and cancer therapy. To understand the reported contrasting roles of vitamin C: growth-promoting in the primary cells and growth-inhibiting in cancer cells, primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and their isogenic spontaneously immortalized fibroblasts with unlimited cell division potential were used as the model pair. We used microarray gene expression profiling to show that the immortalized MEF possess human cancer gene expression fingerprints including a pattern of up-regulation of inflammatory response-related genes. Using the MEF model, we found that a physiological treatment level of vitamin C (10−5 M), but not other unrelated antioxidants, enhanced cell growth. The growth-promoting effect was associated with a pattern of enhanced expression of cell cycle- and cell division-related genes in both primary and immortalized cells. In the immortalized MEF, physiological treatment levels of vitamin C also enhanced the expression of immortalization-associated genes including a down-regulation of genes in the extracellular matrix functional category. In contrast, confocal immunofluorescence imaging of the primary MEF suggested an increase in collagen IV protein upon vitamin C treatment. Similar to the cancer cells, the growth-inhibitory effect of the redox-active form of vitamin C was preferentially observed in immortalized MEF. All effects of vitamin C required its intracellular presence since the transporter-deficient SVCT2−/− MEF did not respond to vitamin C. SVCT2−/− MEF divided and became immortalized readily indicating little dependence on vitamin C for the cell division. Immortalized SVCT2−/− MEF required higher concentration of vitamin C for the growth inhibition compared to the immortalized wildtype MEF suggesting an intracellular vitamin C toxicity. The relevance of our observation in aging and human cancer prevention was discussed

  16. Ontogenic development of kidney, thymus and spleen and phenotypic expression of CD3 and CD4 receptors on the lymphocytes of cobia (Rachycentroncanadum).

    PubMed

    Klosterhoff, Marta C; Pereira Júnior, Joaber; Rodrigues, Ricardo V; Gusmão, Emeline P; Sampaio, Luís A; Tesser, Marcelo B; Romano, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    In the present study was evaluated the ontogenic of immunocompetent organs of cobia up to 53 days after hatching (dah) through histology and immunohistochemistry techniques. The kidney was the first lymphohematopoietic organ to appear, at 1 dah, followed by the spleen at 5 dah and the thymus at 7 dah. The first CD3 receptors on the lymphocytes were observed in 27% of the thymic tissue at 7 dah and in 99% at 53 dah. The phenotypic expression of CD3 receptors was registered in 10% of the kidney at 8 dah and in 32% at 53 dah. CD4 receptors were observed in 5% and 63% of the thymic area at 7 and 53 dah, respectively. In the kidney, T4 lymphocytes were first observed at 13 dah in 9% of the organ and in 28% at 53 dah, defining the functional development of the specific system associated with immunological memory capacity.

  17. Interferon modulation of c-myc expression in cloned Daudi cells: relationship to the phenotype of interferon resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Dron, M; Modjtahedi, N; Brison, O; Tovey, M G

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of interferon-sensitive Daudi cell with electrophoretically pure human interferon alpha markedly reduced the level of c-myc mRNA, increased the level of class I histocompatibility antigen (HLA) mRNA, and did not affect the level of actin mRNA within the same cells. In contrast, the level of c-myc mRNA or HLA mRNA did not change significantly following interferon treatment in different clones of Daudi cells selected for resistance to the antiproliferative action of interferon. These cells possessed interferon receptors, however, and responded to interferon modulation of other genes, including 2',5' oligoisoadenylate synthetase (M. G. Tovey, M. Dron, K. E. Mogensen, B. Lebleu, N. Metchi, and J. Begon-Lours, Guymarho, J. Gen. Virol., 64:2649-2653, 1983; M. Dron, M. G. Tovey, and P. Eid, J. Gen. Virol., 66:787-795, 1985). A clone of interferon-resistant Daudi cells which had reverted to almost complete sensitivity to both the antiproliferative action of interferon and the interferon-enhanced expression of HLA mRNA remained refractory, however, to interferon modulation of c-myc expression, suggesting that a reduced level of c-myc mRNA may not be a prerequisite for inhibition of cell proliferation in interferon-treated cells. Our results do not exclude the possibility, however, that posttranscriptional modification(s) of c-myc expression may precede an inhibition of cell proliferation in interferon-treated cells. Images PMID:3785169

  18. Interferon modulation of c-myc expression in cloned Daudi cells: relationship to the phenotype of interferon resistance.

    PubMed

    Dron, M; Modjtahedi, N; Brison, O; Tovey, M G

    1986-05-01

    Treatment of interferon-sensitive Daudi cell with electrophoretically pure human interferon alpha markedly reduced the level of c-myc mRNA, increased the level of class I histocompatibility antigen (HLA) mRNA, and did not affect the level of actin mRNA within the same cells. In contrast, the level of c-myc mRNA or HLA mRNA did not change significantly following interferon treatment in different clones of Daudi cells selected for resistance to the antiproliferative action of interferon. These cells possessed interferon receptors, however, and responded to interferon modulation of other genes, including 2',5' oligoisoadenylate synthetase (M. G. Tovey, M. Dron, K. E. Mogensen, B. Lebleu, N. Metchi, and J. Begon-Lours, Guymarho, J. Gen. Virol., 64:2649-2653, 1983; M. Dron, M. G. Tovey, and P. Eid, J. Gen. Virol., 66:787-795, 1985). A clone of interferon-resistant Daudi cells which had reverted to almost complete sensitivity to both the antiproliferative action of interferon and the interferon-enhanced expression of HLA mRNA remained refractory, however, to interferon modulation of c-myc expression, suggesting that a reduced level of c-myc mRNA may not be a prerequisite for inhibition of cell proliferation in interferon-treated cells. Our results do not exclude the possibility, however, that posttranscriptional modification(s) of c-myc expression may precede an inhibition of cell proliferation in interferon-treated cells.

  19. Up-regulation of GLT1 expression increases glutamate uptake and attenuates the Huntington's disease phenotype in the R6/2 mouse.

    PubMed

    Miller, B R; Dorner, J L; Shou, M; Sari, Y; Barton, S J; Sengelaub, D R; Kennedy, R T; Rebec, G V

    2008-04-22

    The striatum, which processes cortical information for behavioral output, is a key target of Huntington's disease (HD), an autosomal dominant condition characterized by cognitive decline and progressive loss of motor control. Increasing evidence implicates deficient glutamate uptake caused by a down-regulation of GLT1, the primary astroglial glutamate transporter. To test this hypothesis, we administered ceftriaxone, a beta-lactam antibiotic known to elevate GLT1 expression (200 mg/kg, i.p., for 5 days), to symptomatic R6/2 mice, a widely studied transgenic model of HD. Relative to vehicle, ceftriaxone attenuated several HD behavioral signs: paw clasping and twitching were reduced, while motor flexibility, as measured in a plus maze, and open-field climbing were increased. Assessment of GLT1 expression in striatum confirmed a ceftriaxone-induced increase relative to vehicle. To determine if the change in behavior and GLT1 expression represented a change in striatal glutamate handling, separate groups of behaving mice were evaluated with no-net-flux microdialysis. Vehicle treatment revealed a glutamate uptake deficit in R6/2 mice relative to wild-type controls that was reversed by ceftriaxone. Vehicle-treated animals, however, did not differ in GLT1 expression, suggesting that the glutamate uptake deficit in R6/2 mice reflects dysfunctional rather than missing GLT1. Our results indicate that impaired glutamate uptake is a major factor underlying HD pathophysiology and symptomology. The glutamate uptake deficit, moreover, is present in symptomatic HD mice and reversal of this deficit by up-regulating the functional expression of GLT1 with ceftriaxone attenuates the HD phenotype.

  20. Aberrant cognitive phenotypes and altered hippocampal BDNF expression related to epigenetic modifications in mice lacking the post-synaptic scaffolding protein SHANK1: Implications for autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Sungur, A Özge; Jochner, Magdalena C E; Harb, Hani; Kılıç, Ayşe; Garn, Holger; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Wöhr, Markus

    2017-08-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a class of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by persistent deficits in social communication/interaction, together with restricted/repetitive patterns of behavior. ASD is among the most heritable neuropsychiatric conditions, and while available evidence points to a complex set of genetic factors, the SHANK gene family has emerged as one of the most promising candidates. Here, we assessed ASD-related phenotypes with particular emphasis on social behavior and cognition in Shank1 mouse mutants in comparison to heterozygous and wildtype littermate controls across development in both sexes. While social approach behavior was evident in all experimental conditions and social recognition was only mildly affected by genotype, Shank1 -/- null mutant mice were severely impaired in object recognition memory. This effect was particularly prominent in juveniles, not due to impairments in object discrimination, and replicated in independent mouse cohorts. At the neurobiological level, object recognition deficits were paralleled by increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein expression in the hippocampus of Shank1 -/- mice; yet BDNF levels did not differ under baseline conditions. We therefore investigated changes in the epigenetic regulation of hippocampal BDNF expression and detected an enrichment of histone H3 acetylation at the Bdnf promoter1 in Shank1 -/- mice, consistent with increased learning-associated BDNF. Together, our findings indicate that Shank1 deletions lead to an aberrant cognitive phenotype characterized by severe impairments in object recognition memory and increased hippocampal BDNF levels, possibly due to epigenetic modifications. This result supports the link between ASD and intellectual disability, and suggests epigenetic regulation as a potential therapeutic target. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Culture site dependence on pearl size realization in Pinctada margaritifera in relation to recipient oyster growth and mantle graft biomineralization gene expression using the same donor phenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pabic, Lore; Parrad, Sophie; Sham Koua, Manaarii; Nakasai, Seiji; Saulnier, Denis; Devaux, Dominique; Ky, Chin-Long

    2016-12-01

    Size is the most important and valuable quality of the cultured black-lip pearl, Pinctada margaritifera. As this pearl aquaculture is carried out at numerous grow-out sites, this study analyzes the environmental influence on pearl size parameters (nacre weight and thickness) in relation to the recipient oyster biometric parameters (shell thickness, height, width, and oyster weight) at harvest time. Toward this end, an experimental graft was designed by using a homogeneous donor oyster phenotype. The recipient oysters were randomly and equally transferred and reared in five commercial and contrasting grow-out locations. Overall inter-site comparisons revealed that the cultured pearl size (N = 2168) and the biometric parameters of the recipient oysters were highest for sites with warmer temperatures with low seasonal variation in comparison to the southern latitude sites. These results were supported by positive correlations between pearl nacre thickness and recipient oyster shell thickness, height, and width. In parallel, the biomineralization potential of the mantle graft was screened through four genes encoding aragonite (Pif 177, MSI60) and calcite (shematrin 9, aspein). As the gene expression levels were the same among all the donor oysters, this finding demonstrates that: 1) the pearl sac that originated from the mantle graft was not isolated from environmental variations during the culture period and 2) the phenotypic expressions of the two biomineralizing tissues in the recipient oyster were consistent (shell and pearl). In the near future, this knowledge will be helpful at the production sites of genetically selected donor oyster lines for growth produced in hatchery systems.

  2. Enforced IL-10 Expression Confers Type 1 Regulatory T Cell (Tr1) Phenotype and Function to Human CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Andolfi, Grazia; Fousteri, Georgia; Rossetti, Maura; Magnani, Chiara F; Jofra, Tatiana; Locafaro, Grazia; Bondanza, Attilio; Gregori, Silvia; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells are an inducible subset of CD4+ Tr cells characterized by high levels of interleukin (IL)-10 production and regulatory properties. Several protocols to generate human Tr1 cells have been developed in vitro. However, the resulting population includes a significant fraction of contaminating non-Tr1 cells, representing a major bottleneck for clinical application of Tr1 cell therapy. We generated an homogeneous IL-10–producing Tr1 cell population by transducing human CD4+ T cells with a bidirectional lentiviral vector (LV) encoding for human IL-10 and the marker gene, green fluorescent protein (GFP), which are independently coexpressed. The resulting GFP+ LV-IL-10–transduced human CD4+ T (CD4LV-IL-10) cells expressed, upon T-cell receptor (TCR) activation, high levels of IL-10 and concomitant low levels of IL-4, and markers associated with IL-10. Moreover, CD4LV-IL-10 T cells displayed typical Tr1 features: the anergic phenotype, the IL-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β dependent suppression of allogeneic T-cell responses, and the ability to suppress in a cell-to-cell contact independent manner in vitro. CD4LV-IL-10 T cells were able to control xeno graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), demonstrating their suppressive function in vivo. These results show that constitutive over-expression of IL-10 in human CD4+ T cells leads to a stable cell population that recapitulates the phenotype and function of Tr1 cells. PMID:22692497

  3. Beyond Punnett squares: Student word association and explanations of phenotypic variation through an integrative quantitative genetics unit investigating anthocyanin inheritance and expression in Brassica rapa Fast plants.

    PubMed

    Batzli, Janet M; Smith, Amber R; Williams, Paul H; McGee, Seth A; Dósa, Katalin; Pfammatter, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Genetics instruction in introductory biology is often confined to Mendelian genetics and avoids the complexities of variation in quantitative traits. Given the driving question "What determines variation in phenotype (Pv)? (Pv=Genotypic variation Gv + environmental variation Ev)," we developed a 4-wk unit for an inquiry-based laboratory course focused on the inheritance and expression of a quantitative trait in varying environments. We utilized Brassica rapa Fast Plants as a model organism to study variation in the phenotype anthocyanin pigment intensity. As an initial curriculum assessment, we used free word association to examine students' cognitive structures before and after the unit and explanations in students' final research posters with particular focus on variation (Pv = Gv + Ev). Comparison of pre- and postunit word frequency revealed a shift in words and a pattern of co-occurring concepts indicative of change in cognitive structure, with particular focus on "variation" as a proposed threshold concept and primary goal for students' explanations. Given review of 53 posters, we found ∼50% of students capable of intermediate to high-level explanations combining both Gv and Ev influence on expression of anthocyanin intensity (Pv). While far from "plug and play," this conceptually rich, inquiry-based unit holds promise for effective integration of quantitative and Mendelian genetics. © 2014 J. M. Batzli et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2014 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Analysis of cell cycle-related proteins in gastric intramucosal differentiated-type cancers based on mucin phenotypes: a novel hypothesis of early gastric carcinogenesis based on mucin phenotype

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Abnormalities of cell cycle regulators are common features in human cancers, and several of these factors are associated with the early development of gastric cancers. However, recent studies have shown that gastric cancer tumorigenesis was characterized by mucin expression. Thus, expression patterns of cell cycle-related proteins were investigated in the early phase of differentiated-type gastric cancers to ascertain any mechanistic relationships with mucin phenotypes. Methods Immunostaining for Cyclins D1, A, E, and p21, p27, p53 and β-catenin was used to examine impairments of the cell cycle in 190 gastric intramucosal differentiated-type cancers. Mucin phenotypes were determined by the expressions of MUC5AC, MUC6, MUC2 and CD10. A Ki-67 positive rate (PR) was also examined. Results Overexpressions of p53, cyclin D1 and cyclin A were significantly more frequent in a gastric phenotype than an intestinal phenotype. Cyclin A was overexpressed in a mixed phenotype compared with an intestinal phenotype, while p27 overexpression was more frequent in an intestinal phenotype than in a mixed phenotype. Reduction of p21 was a common feature of the gastric intramucosal differentiated-type cancers examined. Conclusions Our results suggest that the levels of some cell cycle regulators appear to be associated with mucin phenotypes of early gastric differentiated-type cancers. PMID:20525401

  5. Variable phenotypic expressivity in inbred retinal degeneration mouse lines: A comparative study of C3H/HeOu and FVB/N rd1 mice.

    PubMed

    van Wyk, Michiel; Schneider, Sabine; Kleinlogel, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in optogenetics and gene therapy have led to promising new treatment strategies for blindness caused by retinal photoreceptor loss. Preclinical studies often rely on the retinal degeneration 1 (rd1 or Pde6b(rd1)) retinitis pigmentosa (RP) mouse model. The rd1 founder mutation is present in more than 100 actively used mouse lines. Since secondary genetic traits are well-known to modify the phenotypic progression of photoreceptor degeneration in animal models and human patients with RP, negligence of the genetic background in the rd1 mouse model is unwarranted. Moreover, the success of various potential therapies, including optogenetic gene therapy and prosthetic implants, depends on the progress of retinal degeneration, which might differ between rd1 mice. To examine the prospect of phenotypic expressivity in the rd1 mouse model, we compared the progress of retinal degeneration in two common rd1 lines, C3H/HeOu and FVB/N. We followed retinal degeneration over 24 weeks in FVB/N, C3H/HeOu, and congenic Pde6b(+) seeing mouse lines, using a range of experimental techniques including extracellular recordings from retinal ganglion cells, PCR quantification of cone opsin and Pde6b transcripts, in vivo flash electroretinogram (ERG), and behavioral optokinetic reflex (OKR) recordings. We demonstrated a substantial difference in the speed of retinal degeneration and accompanying loss of visual function between the two rd1 lines. Photoreceptor degeneration and loss of vision were faster with an earlier onset in the FVB/N mice compared to C3H/HeOu mice, whereas the performance of the Pde6b(+) mice did not differ significantly in any of the tests. By postnatal week 4, the FVB/N mice expressed significantly less cone opsin and Pde6b mRNA and had neither ERG nor OKR responses. At 12 weeks of age, the retinal ganglion cells of the FVB/N mice had lost all light responses. In contrast, 4-week-old C3H/HeOu mice still had ERG and OKR responses, and we still recorded

  6. Attachment, invasion, chemotaxis, and proteinase expression of B16-BL6 melanoma cells exhibiting a low metastatic phenotype after exposure to dietary restriction of tyrosine and phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Uhlenkott, C E; Huijzer, J C; Cardeiro, D J; Elstad, C A; Meadows, G G

    1996-03-01

    We previously reported that low levels of tyrosine (Tyr) and phenylalanine (Phe) alter the metastatic phenotype of B16-BL6 (BL6) murine melanoma and select for tumor cell populations with decreased lung colonizing ability. To more specifically characterize the effects of Tyr and Phe restriction on the malignant phenotype of BL6, we investigated in vitro attachment, invasion, proteinase expression, and chemotaxis of high and low metastatic BL6 variants. High metastatic variant cells were isolated from subcutaneous tumors of mice fed a nutritionally complete diet (ND cells) and low metastatic variant cells were isolated from mice fed a diet restricted in Tyr and Phe (LTP cells). Results indicate that attachment to reconstituted basement membrane (Matrigel) was significantly reduced in LTP cells as compared to ND cells. Attachment to collagen IV, laminin, and fibronectin were similar between the two variants. Invasion through Matrigel and growth factor-reduced Matrigel were significantly decreased in LTP cells as compared to ND cells. Zymography revealed the presence of M(r) 92,000 and M(r) 72,000 progelatinases, tissue plasminogen activator, and urokinase plasminogen activator in the conditioned medium of both variants; however, there were no differences in activity of these secreted proteinases between the two variants. Growth of the variants on growth factor-reduced Matrigel similarly induced expression of the M(r) 92,000 progelatinase. The variants exhibited similar chemotactic responses toward laminin. However