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Sample records for abnormal plasma cells

  1. Burden of cytogenetically abnormal plasma cells in light chain amyloidosis and their prognostic relevance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon Young; Im, Kyongok; Park, Si Nae; Kim, Jung-Ah; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Lee, Dong Soon

    2016-05-01

    We performed cytoplasmic fluorescence in situ hybridization assays of light chain amyloidosis (AL). In total, 234 patients were enrolled: 28 patients with AL, 24 with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), and 182 with multiple myeloma (MM). Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 13 of 22 (59%) AL patients without MM. All 13 patients demonstrated IGH rearrangement, and t(11;14)/IGH-CCND1 was most frequent (32%). Chromosome gain was not observed in AL patients without MM. These findings were dissimilar to findings in MGUS patients, in whom trisomy 9 was the most frequent abnormality. Of 6 AL patients with MM, 5 (83%) patients had cytogenetic abnormalities: 1q gain (4/6, 67%), gains of chromosome 9 (3/6, 50%), IGH rearrangement and RB1 (13q) deletions (2/6 each, 33%). The percentage of clonal plasma cells among total plasma cells was variable (median, 75%; range, 16-100%) for AL patients without MM, which was lower than the results for MM patients (median 100%). The overall survival of AL patients without MM was not significantly different according to the presence of cytogenetic abnormalities (P=0.510). In summary, among Korean AL patients, IGH rearrangement was the most frequent cytogenetic abnormality and cytogenetic aberration patterns differ compared with MGUS and MM patients. PMID:27015231

  2. Abnormalities in plasma and red blood cell fatty acid profiles of patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Baró, L.; Hermoso, J. C.; Núñez, M. C.; Jiménez-Rios, J. A.; Gil, A.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated total plasma fatty acid concentrations and percentages, and the fatty acid profiles for the different plasma lipid fractions and red blood cell lipids, in 17 patients with untreated colorectal cancer and 12 age-matched controls with no malignant diseases, from the same geographical area. Cancer patients had significantly lower total plasma concentrations of saturated, monounsaturated and essential fatty acids and their polyunsaturated derivatives than healthy controls; when the values were expressed as relative percentages, cancer patients had significantly higher proportions of oleic acid and lower levels of linoleic acid than controls. With regard to lipid fractions, cancer patients had higher proportions of oleic acid in plasma phospholipids, triglycerides and cholesterol esters, and lower percentages of linoleic acid and its derivatives. On the other hand, alpha-linolenic acid was significantly lower in triglycerides from cancer patients and tended to be lower in phospholipids. Its derivatives also tended to be lower in phospholipids and triglycerides from cancer patients. Our findings suggest that colorectal cancer patients present abnormalities in plasma and red blood cell fatty acid profiles characterized by lower amounts of most saturated, monounsaturated and essential fatty acids and their polyunsaturated derivatives, especially members of the n-6 series, than their healthy age-matched counterparts. These changes are probably due to metabolic changes caused by the illness per se but not to malnutrition. PMID:9667678

  3. Flow cytometric differentiation of abnormal and normal plasma cells in the bone marrow in patients with multiple myeloma and its precursor diseases.

    PubMed

    Tembhare, Prashant R; Yuan, Constance M; Venzon, David; Braylan, Raul; Korde, Neha; Manasanch, Elisabet; Zuchlinsky, Diamond; Calvo, Katherine; Kurlander, Roger; Bhutani, Manisha; Tageja, Nishant; Maric, Irina; Mulquin, Marcia; Roschewski, Mark; Kwok, Mary; Liewehr, David; Landgren, Ola; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice

    2014-03-01

    Flow cytometric (FC) enumeration of abnormal plasma cells (APCs) for diagnosis and prognostication of plasma cell dyscrasias (PCD) is challenging. We studied antigen expression in normal plasma cells (NPC) (N = 34) and APC in a series of unselected PCD (N = 59). NPC subpopulations often demonstrated CD19(-), CD20(+), CD45(-) or dim and CD56(+), an immunophenotype observed in PCD. However abnormal CD81 was only observed in APCs (APC detection sensitivity 95%; specificity 100%). We evaluated differences in antigen expression patterns among MGUS (N = 14), SMM (N = 35) and MM (N = 10), finding the combination of CD45 and CD56 helpful in differentiating MGUS from SMM and MM (p = 0.0002). PMID:24462038

  4. Plasma Cell Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... microorganisms to which the body is exposed. In plasma cell disorders, one clone of plasma cells multiplies uncontrollably. As a result, this clone ... a light chain and heavy chain). These abnormal plasma cells and the ... produce are limited to one type, and levels of other types of antibodies ...

  5. Abnormal energy deposition on the wall through plasma disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Schmidt, G. L.

    1984-12-01

    The dissipation of plasma kinetic and magnetic energy during sawtooth oscillations and disruptions in tokamaks is analyzed using Kadomtsev's disruption model and the plasma-circuit equations. New simple scalings of several characteristic times are obtained for sawteeth and for thermal and magnetic energy quenches of disruptions. The abnormal energy deposition on the wall during major or minor disruptions, estimated from this analysis, is compared with bolometric measurements in the PDX tokamak. Especially, magnetic energy dissipation during the current termination period is shown to be reduced by the strong coupling of the plasma current with external circuits. These analyses are found to be useful to predict the phenomenological behavior of plasma disruptions in large future tokamaks, and to estimate abnormal heat deposition on the wall during plasma disruptions.

  6. Abnormal energy deposition on the wall through plasma disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Schmidt, G. L.

    1984-06-01

    The dissipation of plasma kinetic and magnetic energy during sawtooth oscillations and disruptions in Tokamaks is analyzed using Kadomtsev's disruption model and the plasma-circuit equations. New simple scalings of several characteristic times are obtained for sawteeth and for thermal and magnetic energy quenches of disruptions. The abnormal energy deposition on the wall during major or minor disruptions, estimated from this analysis, is compared with bolometric measurements in the PDX Tokamak. Especially, magnetic energy dissipation during the current termination period is shown to be reduced by the strong coupling of the plasma current with external circuits. These analyses are found to be useful to predict the phenomenological behavior of plasma disruptions in large future Tokamaks, and to estimate abnormal heat deposition on the wall during plasma disruptions.

  7. Association of abnormal plasma bilirubin with aggressive HCC phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Brian I.; Guerra, Vito; Giannini, Edoardo G.; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Rapaccini, Gian Ludovico; Marco, Maria Di; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Background Cirrhosis-related abnormal liver function is associated with predisposition to HCC, features in several HCC classification systems and is an HCC prognostic factor. Aims To examine the phenotypic tumor differences in HCC patients with normal or abnormal plasma bilirubin levels. Methods A 2,416 patient HCC cohort was studied and dichotomized into normal and abnormal plasma bilirubin groups. Their HCC characteristics were compared for tumor aggressiveness features, namely blood AFP levels, tumor size, presence of PVT and tumor multifocality. Results In the total cohort, elevated bilirubin levels were associated with higher AFP levels, increased PVT and multifocality and lower survival, despite similar tumor sizes. When different tumor size terciles were compared, similar results were found, even for small tumor size patients. A multiple logistic regression model for PVT or tumor multifocality showed increased OddsRatios for elevated levels of GGTP, bilirubin and AFP and for larger tumor sizes. Conclusions HCC patients with abnormal bilirubin levels had worse prognosis than patients with normal bilirubin. They also had increased incidence of PVT and tumor multifocality and higher AFP levels, in patients with both small and larger tumors. The results show an association between bilirubin levels and indices of HCC aggressiveness. PMID:24787296

  8. Association of abnormal plasma bilirubin with aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype.

    PubMed

    Carr, Brian I; Guerra, Vito; Giannini, Edoardo G; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Ludovico Rapaccini, Gian; Di Marco, Maria; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-04-01

    Cirrhosis-related abnormal liver function is associated with predisposition to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It features in several HCC classification systems and is an HCC prognostic factor. The aim of the present study was to examine the phenotypic tumor differences in HCC patients with normal or abnormal plasma bilirubin levels. A 2,416-patient HCC cohort was studied and dichotomized into normal and abnormal plasma bilirubin groups. Their HCC characteristics were compared for tumor aggressiveness features, namely, blood alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, tumor size, presence of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and tumor multifocality. In the total cohort, elevated bilirubin levels were associated with higher AFP levels, increased PVT and multifocality, and lower survival, despite similar tumor sizes. When different tumor size terciles were compared, similar results were found, even among patients with small tumors. A multiple logistic regression model for PVT or tumor multifocality showed increased odds ratios for elevated levels of gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), bilirubin, and AFP and for larger tumor sizes. We conclude that HCC patients with abnormal bilirubin levels had worse prognosis than patients with normal bilirubin. They also had an increased incidence of PVT and tumor multifocality, and higher AFP levels, in patients with both small and larger tumors. The results show an association between bilirubin levels and indices of HCC aggressiveness. PMID:24787296

  9. Association of abnormal plasma bilirubin with aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype.

    PubMed

    Carr, Brian I; Guerra, Vito; Giannini, Edoardo G; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Ludovico Rapaccini, Gian; Di Marco, Maria; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-04-01

    Cirrhosis-related abnormal liver function is associated with predisposition to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It features in several HCC classification systems and is an HCC prognostic factor. The aim of the present study was to examine the phenotypic tumor differences in HCC patients with normal or abnormal plasma bilirubin levels. A 2,416-patient HCC cohort was studied and dichotomized into normal and abnormal plasma bilirubin groups. Their HCC characteristics were compared for tumor aggressiveness features, namely, blood alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, tumor size, presence of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and tumor multifocality. In the total cohort, elevated bilirubin levels were associated with higher AFP levels, increased PVT and multifocality, and lower survival, despite similar tumor sizes. When different tumor size terciles were compared, similar results were found, even among patients with small tumors. A multiple logistic regression model for PVT or tumor multifocality showed increased odds ratios for elevated levels of gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), bilirubin, and AFP and for larger tumor sizes. We conclude that HCC patients with abnormal bilirubin levels had worse prognosis than patients with normal bilirubin. They also had an increased incidence of PVT and tumor multifocality, and higher AFP levels, in patients with both small and larger tumors. The results show an association between bilirubin levels and indices of HCC aggressiveness.

  10. Noninvasive detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities by semiconductor sequencing of maternal plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ai-hua; Peng, Chun-fang; Zhao, Xin; Caughey, Bennett A; Yang, Jie-xia; Liu, Jian; Huang, Wei-wei; Liu, Chang; Luo, Dong-hong; Liu, Hai-liang; Chen, Yang-yi; Wu, Jing; Hou, Rui; Zhang, Mindy; Ai, Michael; Zheng, Lianghong; Xue, Rachel Q; Mai, Ming-qin; Guo, Fang-fang; Qi, Yi-ming; Wang, Dong-mei; Krawczyk, Michal; Zhang, Daniel; Wang, Yu-nan; Huang, Quan-fei; Karin, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2015-11-24

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using sequencing of fetal cell-free DNA from maternal plasma has enabled accurate prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy and become increasingly accepted in clinical practice. We investigated whether NIPT using semiconductor sequencing platform (SSP) could reliably detect subchromosomal deletions/duplications in women carrying high-risk fetuses. We first showed that increasing concentration of abnormal DNA and sequencing depth improved detection. Subsequently, we analyzed plasma from 1,456 pregnant women to develop a method for estimating fetal DNA concentration based on the size distribution of DNA fragments. Finally, we collected plasma from 1,476 pregnant women with fetal structural abnormalities detected on ultrasound who also underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure. We used SSP of maternal plasma DNA to detect subchromosomal abnormalities and validated our results with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). With 3.5 million reads, SSP detected 56 of 78 (71.8%) subchromosomal abnormalities detected by aCGH. With increased sequencing depth up to 10 million reads and restriction of the size of abnormalities to more than 1 Mb, sensitivity improved to 69 of 73 (94.5%). Of 55 false-positive samples, 35 were caused by deletions/duplications present in maternal DNA, indicating the necessity of a validation test to exclude maternal karyotype abnormalities. This study shows that detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities is a viable extension of NIPT based on SSP. Although we focused on the application of cell-free DNA sequencing for NIPT, we believe that this method has broader applications for genetic diagnosis, such as analysis of circulating tumor DNA for detection of cancer. PMID:26554006

  11. Noninvasive detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities by semiconductor sequencing of maternal plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ai-hua; Peng, Chun-fang; Zhao, Xin; Caughey, Bennett A; Yang, Jie-xia; Liu, Jian; Huang, Wei-wei; Liu, Chang; Luo, Dong-hong; Liu, Hai-liang; Chen, Yang-yi; Wu, Jing; Hou, Rui; Zhang, Mindy; Ai, Michael; Zheng, Lianghong; Xue, Rachel Q; Mai, Ming-qin; Guo, Fang-fang; Qi, Yi-ming; Wang, Dong-mei; Krawczyk, Michal; Zhang, Daniel; Wang, Yu-nan; Huang, Quan-fei; Karin, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2015-11-24

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using sequencing of fetal cell-free DNA from maternal plasma has enabled accurate prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy and become increasingly accepted in clinical practice. We investigated whether NIPT using semiconductor sequencing platform (SSP) could reliably detect subchromosomal deletions/duplications in women carrying high-risk fetuses. We first showed that increasing concentration of abnormal DNA and sequencing depth improved detection. Subsequently, we analyzed plasma from 1,456 pregnant women to develop a method for estimating fetal DNA concentration based on the size distribution of DNA fragments. Finally, we collected plasma from 1,476 pregnant women with fetal structural abnormalities detected on ultrasound who also underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure. We used SSP of maternal plasma DNA to detect subchromosomal abnormalities and validated our results with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). With 3.5 million reads, SSP detected 56 of 78 (71.8%) subchromosomal abnormalities detected by aCGH. With increased sequencing depth up to 10 million reads and restriction of the size of abnormalities to more than 1 Mb, sensitivity improved to 69 of 73 (94.5%). Of 55 false-positive samples, 35 were caused by deletions/duplications present in maternal DNA, indicating the necessity of a validation test to exclude maternal karyotype abnormalities. This study shows that detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities is a viable extension of NIPT based on SSP. Although we focused on the application of cell-free DNA sequencing for NIPT, we believe that this method has broader applications for genetic diagnosis, such as analysis of circulating tumor DNA for detection of cancer.

  12. Noninvasive detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities by semiconductor sequencing of maternal plasma DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ai-hua; Peng, Chun-fang; Zhao, Xin; Caughey, Bennett A.; Yang, Jie-xia; Liu, Jian; Huang, Wei-wei; Liu, Chang; Luo, Dong-hong; Liu, Hai-liang; Chen, Yang-yi; Wu, Jing; Hou, Rui; Zhang, Mindy; Ai, Michael; Zheng, Lianghong; Xue, Rachel Q.; Mai, Ming-qin; Guo, Fang-fang; Qi, Yi-ming; Wang, Dong-mei; Krawczyk, Michal; Zhang, Daniel; Wang, Yu-nan; Huang, Quan-fei; Karin, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using sequencing of fetal cell-free DNA from maternal plasma has enabled accurate prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy and become increasingly accepted in clinical practice. We investigated whether NIPT using semiconductor sequencing platform (SSP) could reliably detect subchromosomal deletions/duplications in women carrying high-risk fetuses. We first showed that increasing concentration of abnormal DNA and sequencing depth improved detection. Subsequently, we analyzed plasma from 1,456 pregnant women to develop a method for estimating fetal DNA concentration based on the size distribution of DNA fragments. Finally, we collected plasma from 1,476 pregnant women with fetal structural abnormalities detected on ultrasound who also underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure. We used SSP of maternal plasma DNA to detect subchromosomal abnormalities and validated our results with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). With 3.5 million reads, SSP detected 56 of 78 (71.8%) subchromosomal abnormalities detected by aCGH. With increased sequencing depth up to 10 million reads and restriction of the size of abnormalities to more than 1 Mb, sensitivity improved to 69 of 73 (94.5%). Of 55 false-positive samples, 35 were caused by deletions/duplications present in maternal DNA, indicating the necessity of a validation test to exclude maternal karyotype abnormalities. This study shows that detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities is a viable extension of NIPT based on SSP. Although we focused on the application of cell-free DNA sequencing for NIPT, we believe that this method has broader applications for genetic diagnosis, such as analysis of circulating tumor DNA for detection of cancer. PMID:26554006

  13. B cell abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by the differentiation of short- and long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells that secrete pathogenic autoantibodies. Ectopic germinal centers and plasma cells secreting autoantibodies have been observed in lupus nephritis kidneys. Candidate genetic susceptibility loci for SLE include genes that affect differentiation and survival of plasma cells, such as those that influence activation, proliferation, cytokine and chemokine secretion/responsiveness, and apoptosis of the T and B cells that are involved in humoral immunity generated in germinal centers, as well as genes that are involved in presentation and clearance of apoptotic material and autoantigens by antigen presenting cells and other phagocytes. Emerging data have demonstrated that B lymphocytes are active participants in humoral immune responses that lead to T-dependent and T-independent differentiation of immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells by homotypic CD154–CD40 interactions as well as continued stimulation by B cell activating factor through B cell maturation antigen, B cell activating factor receptor and transmembrane activater. PMID:15180894

  14. B cell abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Amrie C; Lipsky, Peter E

    2003-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by the differentiation of short- and long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells that secrete pathogenic autoantibodies. Ectopic germinal centers and plasma cells secreting autoantibodies have been observed in lupus nephritis kidneys. Candidate genetic susceptibility loci for SLE include genes that affect differentiation and survival of plasma cells, such as those that influence activation, proliferation, cytokine and chemokine secretion/responsiveness, and apoptosis of the T and B cells that are involved in humoral immunity generated in germinal centers, as well as genes that are involved in presentation and clearance of apoptotic material and autoantigens by antigen presenting cells and other phagocytes. Emerging data have demonstrated that B lymphocytes are active participants in humoral immune responses that lead to T-dependent and T-independent differentiation of immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells by homotypic CD154-CD40 interactions as well as continued stimulation by B cell activating factor through B cell maturation antigen, B cell activating factor receptor and transmembrane activater.

  15. Plasma concentrations of endothelin in patients with abnormal vascular reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Predel, H.G.; Meyer-Lehnert, H.; Baecker, A.; Stelkens, H.; Kramer, H.J. )

    1990-01-01

    We measured circulating concentrations of endothelin in healthy subjects and in patients with abnormal vascular reactivity. Endothelin concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay after extraction of plasma using Sep-Pak C-18 cartridges in healthy subjects, in patients with diabetes mellitus type I, in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension and in non-dialyzed patients with stable chronic renal failure. Plasma concentrations were similar in healthy controls, in diabetics and in hypertensive patients averaging 5.0{plus minus}0.6 pg/ml, 4.7{plus minus}0.2 pg/ml and 6.5{plus minus}1.0 pg/ml, respectively. In contrast, plasma concentrations of endothelin were markedly elevated in patients with chronic renal failure averaging 16.6{plus minus}2.9 pg/ml. No correlations were observed between serum creatinine concentrations ranging from 124 to 850 {mu}mol/l or blood pressure and plasma concentrations of endothelin. Bicycle ergometric exercise in six healthy subjects and an acute modest i.v. saline load of 1,000 ml of 0.45% NaCl administered within 60 min in six patients with mild essential hypertension did not affect plasma concentrations of endothelin.

  16. Abnormal plasma prothrombin (PIVKA-II) levels in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Y

    1989-05-01

    The concentration of abnormal prothrombin, or the protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist II (PIVKA-II) in 102 patients with hepatic disorders was measured by an enzyme immunoassay method. The concentration of PIVKA-II in the plasma was elevated in 11 out of 18 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and also in a patient with hepatoblastoma. There was no correlation between serum alpha-fetoprotein and plasma PIVKA-II levels. The PIVKA-II level was normal in 11 patients who had metastatic carcinoma or cholangiocellular carcinoma. Moreover, benign diseases of the liver did not cause an elevation in PIVKA-II. PIVKA-II might be an useful marker of hepatocellular carcinoma because, like alpha-fetoprotein, its level changes in close relation to the effects of treatment.

  17. Abnormal rheology of oxygenated blood in sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Shu; Usami, Shunichi; Bertles, John F.

    1970-01-01

    The viscosity of oxygenated blood from patients with sickle cell anemia (Hb SS disease) was found to be abnormally increased, a property which contrasts with the well recognized viscous aberration produced by deoxygenation of Hb SS blood. Experiments designed to explain this finding led to considerations of deformation and aggregation, primary determinants of the rheologic behavior of erythrocytes as they traverse the microcirculation. Deformability of erythrocytes is in turn dependent upon internal viscosity (i.e. the state and concentration of hemoglobin in solution) and membrane flexibility. Definition of the contribution made by each of these properties to the abnormal viscosity of oxygenated Hb SS blood was made possible by analysis of viscosity measurements, made over a wide range of shear rates and cell concentrations, on Hb SS erythrocytes and normal erythrocytes suspended in Ringer's solution (where aggregation does not occur) and in plasma. Similar measurements were made on the two cell types separated by ultracentrifugation of Hb SS erythrocytes: high density erythrocytes composed of 50 to 70% irreversibly “sickled” cells (ISC) and low density erythrocytes composed of over 95% non-ISC. Under all experimental conditions (hematocrit, shear rate, and suspending medium) the viscosity of ISC exceeds that of normal erythrocytes. The viscosity of non-ISC is elevated only in the absence of aggregation and over intermediate ranges of hematocrit. Analyses of the data reveal (a) an elevated internal viscosity of ISC: (b) a reduced membrane flexibility of both ISC and non-ISC, particularly at low shear rates; and (c) a reduced tendency for aggregation displayed by both cell types. The abnormal viscosity of oxygenated Hb SS blood can be attributed to the altered rheology of ISC and, to a lesser extent, of non-ISC. These studies assign a role to the abnormal rheology of Hb SS erythrocytes in the pathogenesis of sickle cell anemia, even under conditions of complete

  18. Choroideremia Is a Systemic Disease With Lymphocyte Crystals and Plasma Lipid and RBC Membrane Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Alice Yang; Mysore, Naveen; Vali, Hojatollah; Koenekoop, Jamie; Cao, Sang Ni; Li, Shen; Ren, Huanan; Keser, Vafa; Lopez-Solache, Irma; Siddiqui, Sorath Noorani; Khan, Ayesha; Mui, Jeannie; Sears, Kelly; Dixon, Jim; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Majewski, Jacek; Braverman, Nancy; Koenekoop, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Photoreceptor neuronal degenerations are common, incurable causes of human blindness affecting 1 in 2000 patients worldwide. Only half of all patients are associated with known mutations in over 250 disease genes, prompting our research program to identify the remaining new genes. Most retinal degenerations are restricted to the retina, but photoreceptor degenerations can also be found in a wide variety of systemic diseases. We identified an X-linked family from Sri Lanka with a severe choroidal degeneration and postulated a new disease entity. Because of phenotypic overlaps with Bietti's crystalline dystrophy, which was recently found to have systemic features, we hypothesized that a systemic disease may be present in this new disease as well. Methods For phenotyping, we performed detailed eye exams with in vivo retinal imaging by optical coherence tomography. For genotyping, we performed whole exome sequencing, followed by Sanger sequencing confirmations and cosegregation. Systemic investigations included electron microscopy studies of peripheral blood cells in patients and in normal controls and detailed fatty acid profiles (both plasma and red blood cell [RBC] membranes). Fatty acid levels were compared to normal controls, and only values two standard deviations above or below normal controls were further evaluated. Results The family segregated a REP1 mutation, suggesting choroideremia (CHM). We then found crystals in peripheral blood lymphocytes and discovered significant plasma fatty acid abnormalities and RBC membrane abnormalities (i.e., elevated plasmalogens). To replicate our discoveries, we expanded the cohort to nine CHM patients, genotyped them for REP1 mutations, and found the same abnormalities (crystals and fatty acid abnormalities) in all patients. Conclusions Previously, CHM was thought to be restricted to the retina. We show, to our knowledge for the first time, that CHM is a systemic condition with prominent crystals in lymphocytes and

  19. Plasma genetic and genomic abnormalities predict treatment response and clinical outcome in advanced prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Meijun; Dittmar, Rachel L.; Lee, Adam; Nandy, Debashis; Yuan, Tiezheng; Guo, Yongchen; Wang, Yuan; Tschannen, Michael R.; Worthey, Elizabeth; Jacob, Howard; See, William; Kilari, Deepak; Wang, Xuexia; Hovey, Raymond L.; Huang, Chiang-Ching; Wang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Liquid biopsies, examinations of tumor components in body fluids, have shown promise for predicting clinical outcomes. To evaluate tumor-associated genomic and genetic variations in plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and their associations with treatment response and overall survival, we applied whole genome and targeted sequencing to examine the plasma cfDNAs derived from 20 patients with advanced prostate cancer. Sequencing-based genomic abnormality analysis revealed locus-specific gains or losses that were common in prostate cancer, such as 8q gains, AR amplifications, PTEN losses and TMPRSS2-ERG fusions. To estimate tumor burden in cfDNA, we developed a Plasma Genomic Abnormality (PGA) score by summing the most significant copy number variations. Cox regression analysis showed that PGA scores were significantly associated with overall survival (p < 0.04). After androgen deprivation therapy or chemotherapy, targeted sequencing showed significant mutational profile changes in genes involved in androgen biosynthesis, AR activation, DNA repair, and chemotherapy resistance. These changes may reflect the dynamic evolution of heterozygous tumor populations in response to these treatments. These results strongly support the feasibility of using non-invasive liquid biopsies as potential tools to study biological mechanisms underlying therapy-specific resistance and to predict disease progression in advanced prostate cancer. PMID:25915538

  20. Plasma transfusions prior to insertion of central lines for patients with abnormal coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, David P; Estcourt, Lise J; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Walsh, Timothy S

    2015-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effect of different prophylactic plasma transfusion regimens prior to central line insertion in patients with abnormal coagulation. PMID:27057149

  1. Expression of an Arabidopsis plasma membrane aquaporin in Dictyostelium results in hypoosmotic sensitivity and developmental abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Chaumont, F; Loomis, W F; Chrispeels, M J

    1997-06-10

    The rd28 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana encodes a water channel protein, or aquaporin, of the plasma membrane. A construct in which transcription of the rd28 cDNA is controlled by the Dictyostelium actin15 promoter was transformed into Dictyostelium discoideum cells. Transformants contained RD28 protein in their plasma membranes. When shifted to a low-osmotic-strength buffer, cells expressing rd28 swelled rapidly and burst, indicating that the plant aquaporin allowed rapid water entry in the amoebae. The rate of osmotic lysis was a function of the osmotic pressure of the buffer. We also selected transformants in which the expression of the rd28 cDNA is driven by the promoter of the prespore cotB gene. These transformants accumulated rd28 mRNA uniquely in prespore cells. In low-osmotic-strength buffer, the cotB::rd28 cells aggregated and formed normally proportioned slugs but failed to form normal fruiting bodies. The number of spores was reduced 20-fold, and the stalks of the fruiting bodies were abnormally short. The consequences of expressing RD28 in prespore cells could be partially overcome by increasing the osmolarity of the medium. Under these conditions, the cotB::rd28 cells formed fruiting bodies of more normal appearance, and the number of viable spores increased slightly. Because prespore cells have to shrink and dehydrate to form spores, it was not unexpected that expression of an aquaporin would disrupt this process, but it was surprising to find that stalk differentiation was also affected by expression of rd28 in prespore cells. It appears that osmotic stress on prespore cells alters their ability to signal terminal differentiation in prestalk cells. The results provide independent confirmation that plant aquaporins can function in the cells of other organisms, and that D. discoideum can be used to study the properties of these water channels.

  2. Visualizing how cancer chromosome abnormalities form in living cells

    Cancer.gov

    For the first time, scientists have directly observed events that lead to the formation of a chromosome abnormality that is often found in cancer cells. The abnormality, called a translocation, occurs when part of a chromosome breaks off and becomes attac

  3. The effect of abnormal cell proportion on specimen classifier performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; White, B. S.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the results obtained from a cell classifier which is confronted with an abnormal/normal cell ratio which is different from the ratio assumed in the calibration of the classifier. False negative and false positive error rates are determined in advance for classifier operation, along with the necessary sample size in order to validate the predicted distributions. Changes are demonstrated to happen only regarding the false negative rate, where reductions in the abnormal cell rate below the expected rates would cause totally unreliable data. Substantial overproduction of abnormal cells would be quickly noticeable, while production rates beyond, but close to, the expected rates would only require more extensive sampling. Classifier systems for 10% proportions of abnormal cells are concluded to be possible, but difficulties are present with much lower rates

  4. Plasma cell gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Chandershekhar; Shukla, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the article is to present a report on the clinical presentation of plasma cell gingivitis with the use of herbal toothpowder. Plasma cell gingivitis [PCG] is a rare benign condition of the gingiva characterized by sharply demarcated erythematous and edematous gingivitis often extending to the mucogingival junction. As the name suggests it is diffuse and massive infiltration of plasma cells into the sub-epithelial gingival tissue. It is a hypersensitivity reaction to some antigen, often flavouring agents or spices found in chewing gums, toothpastes and lorenzes. A 27-yr old male with a chief complaint of painful, bleeding swollen mass in his lower front teeth region with prolong use of herbal toothpowder. The gingiva bled readily on probing. Patient was advised to refrain from the use of herbal toothpowder and along with periodontal treatment, no further reoccurrence was found. as more and more herbal products are gaining popularity, clinicians should be aware of effects of these products. Early diagnosis is essential as plasma cell gingivitis has similar pathologic changes seen clinically as in leukemia, HIV infection, discoid lupus erythematosis, atrophic lichen planus, desquamative gingivitis, or cicatrical pemphigoid which must be differentiated through hematologic and serologic testing. PMID:26015677

  5. Acne is not associated with abnormal plasma androgens.

    PubMed

    Levell, M J; Cawood, M L; Burke, B; Cunliffe, W J

    1989-05-01

    Plasma dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, androstenedione, testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) have been measured in 64 females and 26 males aged less than 25 years and with acne vulgaris. Oestradiol was measured in the males. Free T and free DHT were calculated. Acne was graded on three sites and the sebum excretion rate (SER) was measured in most patients. With the possible exception of free DHT, none of the plasma steroids or SHBG correlated with acne severity or with SER. Free DHT in the females showed a possible, but weak, correlation with total acne (r = 0.25, P = 0.07), but comparison with male data showed that this was not causative. The role of androgens in acne is permissive and plasma androgen measurements usually have no place in its management. PMID:2527050

  6. PLASMA CELL LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    de Larrea, Carlos Fernandez; Kyle, Robert A.; Durie, Brian GM; Ludwig, Heinz; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H.; Hajek, Roman; Miguel, Jésus San; Sezer, Orhan; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kumar, Shaji K.; Mahindra, Anuj; Comenzo, Ray; Palumbo, Antonio; Mazumber, Amitabha; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Caers, Jo; Cavo, Michele; LeLeu, Xavier; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Chim, CS; Schots, Rik; Noeul, Amara; Fantl, Dorotea; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Landgren, Ola; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Moreau, Philippe; Fonseca, Rafael; Merlini, Giampaolo; Lahuerta, JJ; Bladé, Joan; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Shah, Jatin J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathologic entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10 9/L) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be reexamined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL. PMID:23288300

  7. Quantifying the abnormal hemodynamics of sickle cell anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan; Karniadakis, George

    2012-02-01

    Sickle red blood cells (SS-RBC) exhibit heterogeneous morphologies and abnormal hemodynamics in deoxygenated states. A multi-scale model for SS-RBC is developed based on the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method. Different cell morphologies (sickle, granular, elongated shapes) typically observed in deoxygenated states are constructed and quantified by the Asphericity and Elliptical shape factors. The hemodynamics of SS-RBC suspensions is studied in both shear and pipe flow systems. The flow resistance obtained from both systems exhibits a larger value than the healthy blood flow due to the abnormal cell properties. Moreover, SS-RBCs exhibit abnormal adhesive interactions with both the vessel endothelium cells and the leukocytes. The effect of the abnormal adhesive interactions on the hemodynamics of sickle blood is investigated using the current model. It is found that both the SS-RBC - endothelium and the SS-RBC - leukocytes interactions, can potentially trigger the vicious ``sickling and entrapment'' cycles, resulting in vaso-occlusion phenomena widely observed in micro-circulation experiments.

  8. Daclizumab reverses intrathecal immune cell abnormalities in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yen Chih; Winokur, Paige; Blake, Andrew; Wu, Tianxia; Romm, Elena; Bielekova, Bibiana

    2015-01-01

    Objective Novel treatments such as natalizumab and fingolimod achieve their therapeutic efficacy in multiple sclerosis (MS) by blocking access of subsets of immune cells into the central nervous system, thus creating nonphysiological intrathecal immunity. In contrast, daclizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the alpha chain of the IL-2 receptor, has a unique mechanism of action with multiple direct effects on innate immunity. As cellular intrathecal abnormalities corresponding to MS have been well defined, we asked how daclizumab therapy affects these immunological hallmarks of the MS disease process. Methods Nineteen subpopulations of immune cells were assessed in a blinded fashion in the blood and 50-fold concentrated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cell pellet in 32 patients with untreated relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), 22 daclizumab-treated RRMS patients, and 11 healthy donors (HDs) using 12-color flow cytometry. Results Long-term daclizumab therapy normalized all immunophenotyping abnormalities differentiating untreated RRMS patients from HDs. Specifically, strong enrichment of adaptive immune cells (CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and B cells) in the CSF was reversed. Similarly, daclizumab controlled MS-related increases in the innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and lymphoid tissue inducer cells in the blood and CSF, and reverted the diminished proportion of intrathecal monocytes. The only marker that distinguished daclizumab-treated MS patients from HDs was the expansion of immunoregulatory CD56bright NK cells. Interpretation Normalization of immunological abnormalities associated with MS by long-term daclizumab therapy suggests that this drug's effects on ILCs, NK cells, and dendritic cell-mediated antigen presentation to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are critical in regulating the MS disease process. PMID:26000318

  9. Cartilage tissue engineering identifies abnormal human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Liu, Shiying; Woltjen, Knut; Thomas, Bradley; Meng, Guoliang; Hotta, Akitsu; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Ellis, James; Yamanaka, Shinya; Rancourt, Derrick E

    2013-01-01

    Safety is the foremost issue in all human cell therapies, but human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) currently lack a useful safety indicator. Studies in chimeric mice have demonstrated that certain lines of iPSCs are tumorigenic; however a similar screen has not been developed for human iPSCs. Here, we show that in vitro cartilage tissue engineering is an excellent tool for screening human iPSC lines for tumorigenic potential. Although all human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and most iPSC lines tested formed cartilage safely, certain human iPSCs displayed a pro-oncogenic state, as indicated by the presence of secretory tumors during cartilage differentiation in vitro. We observed five abnormal iPSC clones amoungst 21 lines derived from five different reprogramming methods using three cellular origins. We conclude that in vitro cartilage tissue engineering is a useful approach to identify abnormal human iPSC lines.

  10. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    DOEpatents

    Manning, Thomas J.; Palmer, Byron A.; Hof, Douglas E.

    1990-01-01

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy.

  11. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    DOEpatents

    Manning, T.J.; Palmer, B.A.; Hof, D.E.

    1990-11-06

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies is disclosed. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy. 1 fig.

  12. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are abnormal in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Corre, J; Mahtouk, K; Attal, M; Gadelorge, M; Huynh, A; Fleury-Cappellesso, S; Danho, C; Laharrague, P; Klein, B; Rème, T; Bourin, P

    2007-05-01

    Recent literature suggested that cells of the microenvironment of tumors could be abnormal as well. To address this hypothesis in multiple myeloma (MM), we studied bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), the only long-lived cells of the bone marrow microenvironment, by gene expression profiling and phenotypic and functional studies in three groups of individuals: patients with MM, patients with monoclonal gamopathy of undefined significance (MGUS) and healthy age-matched subjects. Gene expression profile independently classified the BMMSCs of these individuals in a normal and in an MM group. MGUS BMMSCs were interspersed between these two groups. Among the 145 distinct genes differentially expressed in MM and normal BMMSCs, 46% may account for a tumor-microenvironment cross-talk. Known soluble factors implicated in MM pathophysiologic features (i.e. IL (interleukin)-6, DKK1) were revealed and new ones were found which are involved in angiogenesis, osteogenic differentiation or tumor growth. In particular, GDF15 was found to induce dose-dependent growth of MOLP-6, a stromal cell-dependent myeloma cell line. Functionally, MM BMMSCs induced an overgrowth of MOLP-6, and their capacity to differentiate into an osteoblastic lineage was impaired. Thus, MM BMMSCs are abnormal and could create a very efficient niche to support the survival and proliferation of the myeloma cells.

  13. Plasma Etching Improves Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunyan, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    Etching front surfaces of screen-printed silicon photovoltaic cells with sulfur hexafluoride plasma found to increase cell performance while maintaining integrity of screen-printed silver contacts. Replacement of evaporated-metal contacts with screen-printed metal contacts proposed as one way to reduce cost of solar cells for terrestrial applications.

  14. ETOPOSIDE INDUCES CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN SPERMATOCYTES AND SPERMATOGONIAL STEM CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Pearson, F S; Bishop, J B; Wyrobek, A J

    2005-07-15

    Etoposide (ET) is a chemotherapeutic agent widely used in the treatment of leukemia, lymphomas and many solid tumors, such as testicular and ovarian cancers, that affect patients in their reproductive years. The purpose of the study was to use sperm FISH analyses to characterize the long-term effects of ET on male germ cells. We used a mouse model to characterize the induction of chromosomal aberrations (partial duplications and deletions) and whole chromosomal aneuploidies in sperm of mice treated with a clinical dose of ET. Semen samples were collected at 25 and 49 days after dosing to investigate the effects of ET on meiotic pachytene cells and spermatogonial stem-cells, respectively. ET treatment resulted in major increases in the frequencies of sperm carrying chromosomal aberrations in both meiotic pachytene (27- to 578-fold) and spermatogonial stem-cells (8- to 16-fold), but aneuploid sperm were induced only after treatment of meiotic cells (27-fold) with no persistent effects in stem cells. These results demonstrate that male meiotic germ cells are considerably more sensitive to ET than spermatogonial stem-cell and that increased frequencies of sperm with structural aberrations persist after spermatogonial stem-cell treatment. These findings predict that patients who undergo chemotherapy with ET may have transient elevations in the frequencies of aneuploid sperm, but more importantly, may have persistent elevations in the frequencies of sperm with chromosomal aberrations, placing them at higher risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes long after the end of their chemotherapy.

  15. Cardiac abnormalities in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Lester, L A; Sodt, P C; Hutcheon, N; Arcilla, R A

    1990-11-01

    The cardiac status of 64 children (ages 0.2 to 18 yr) with sickle cell anemia documented by hemoglobin electrophoresis was evaluated by echocardiography. Left atrial, left ventricular and aortic root dimensions were significantly increased in over 60 percent of these children at all ages compared to values for 99 normal black (non-SCA) control subjects. Left ventricular wall thickness was increased in only 20 percent of older children with sickle cell anemia. Estimated LV mass/m2 and left ventricular cardiac index were increased compared to control subjects (p less than 0.001). Left heart abnormalities expressed as a single composite function, derived from multivariate regression analysis, correlated well with severity of anemia expressed as grams of hemoglobin (r = -0.52, p = less than 0.001) and with percentage of hemoglobin S (r = 0.51, p less than 0.001), but not to the same extent with age. Echocardiographically assessed left ventricular function at rest was comparable to that of control subjects. These data suggest that the major cardiac abnormalities in children are related to the volume overload effects of chronic anemia, and that in this age group, there is no evidence for a distinct "sickle cell cardiomyopathy" or cardiac dysfunction.

  16. Abnormal plasma monoamine metabolism in schizophrenia and its correlation with clinical responses to risperidone treatment.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hua-Lin; Fang, Ping-Fei; Li, Huan-De; Zhang, Xiang-Hui; Hu, Li; Yang, Wen; Ye, Hai-Sen

    2011-07-30

    Abnormalities in plasma monoamine metabolism reflect partly the illness of schizophrenia and sometimes the symptoms. Such studies have been repeatedly reported but have rarely taken both metabolites and parent amines or inter-amine activity ratios into account. In this study, the monoamines, their metabolites, turnovers and between-metabolite ratios in plasma were measured longitudinally in 32 schizophrenic patients treated with risperidone for 6 weeks, to examine possible biochemical alterations in schizophrenia, and to examine the association between treatment responses and psychopathology assessed according to the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). The results showed lower level of plasma 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in relapsed versus first-episode schizophrenic patients, higher norepinephrine (NE) turnover rate (TR) in undifferentiated in comparison to paranoid schizophrenic patients and relatively higher metabolic activity of dopamine (DA) to serotonin (5-HT) in first-episode versus relapsed schizophrenic patients. Risperidone treatment induced a decrement of plasma DA levels and increments of plasma DOPAC and DA TR in the total group of schizophrenic patients. The turnover rate of 5-HT was was reduced in undifferentiated and relapsed subgroups of schizophrenic patients. The linkages between 5-HT TR, DA/NE relative activity and clinical symptomatology were also identified. These findings are consistent with an involvement of these systems in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia as well as in the responses to treatment, and the usefulness of certain biochemical indices as markers for subgrouping.

  17. Abnormal apocrine secretory cell mitochondria in a Huntington disease patient.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulos, Christos; LeWitt, Peter; Hashimoto, Ken

    2012-12-15

    Over two decades, a 42-year old woman experienced the gradual onset of choreic involuntary movements, dystonia, and tics. Decreased caudate nucleus metabolism on 2-deoxyglucose PET scan and a heterozygous 49-CAG repeat expansion within the HTT gene established the diagnosis of HD, although no other family history was known. An axillary skin biopsy revealed a distinctive abnormality of mitochondria limited to the apocrine secretory cells on electron microscopy. All mitochondria were transformed into rounded structures with disrupted cristae and prominent myelin figures; many were enlarged up to 4 times the normal. Cytoplasm of apocrine secretory cells showed an abundance of lipid vacuoles, empty vesicles, and dense bodies. Biopsied skeletal muscle histology (light microscopy) was normal, as was a mitochondrial metabolism study. Biopsies from other HD patients have shown similar mitochondrial changes in cerebral neurons, muscle, fibroblasts, and lymphoblasts, adding to evidence for a systemic disturbance of mitochondria in HD.

  18. Clinical evaluation of plasma abnormal prothrombin (PIVKA-II) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fujiyama, S; Morishita, T; Sagara, K; Sato, T; Motohara, K; Matsuda, I

    1986-10-01

    The clinical usefulness of plasma abnormal prothrombin, defined as a protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonist-II: PIVKA-II, as a tumor marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), was evaluated. Plasma PIVKA-II concentration was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a monoclonal antibody specific for PIVKA-II. Forty-one (65%) out of 63 patients with HCC had an abnormal PIVKA-II level above 0.13 arbitrary units (AU)/ml; the level was above 0.3 AU/ml in 33 patients (52%) and above 0.5 AU/ml in 27 patients (43%). On the other hand, most of the 282 patients with various liver diseases other than HCC had normal or slightly elevated levels of PIVKA-II. Their values were all below 0.5 AU/ml, with the exception of 2 patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis. The patients with PIVKA-II values above 0.5 AU/ml were strongly suspected of having HCC. Plasma PIVKA-II levels were not related to serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, but were above 0.5 AU/ml in 14 (44%) out of the 32 patients whose serum AFP levels were below 400 ng/ml. In some patients with HCC, PIVKA-II was increased throughout the course of the disease, and in others it normalized after surgical resection of the tumor. We conclude that the plasma PIVKA-II assay by the ELISA method using a monoclonal antibody is a useful diagnostic tool for monitoring HCC, particularly in HCC patients with low AFP levels.

  19. Real-Time Plasma Process Condition Sensing and Abnormal Process Detection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ryan; Chen, Rongshun

    2010-01-01

    The plasma process is often used in the fabrication of semiconductor wafers. However, due to the lack of real-time etching control, this may result in some unacceptable process performances and thus leads to significant waste and lower wafer yield. In order to maximize the product wafer yield, a timely and accurately process fault or abnormal detection in a plasma reactor is needed. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is one of the most frequently used metrologies in in-situ process monitoring. Even though OES has the advantage of non-invasiveness, it is required to provide a huge amount of information. As a result, the data analysis of OES becomes a big challenge. To accomplish real-time detection, this work employed the sigma matching method technique, which is the time series of OES full spectrum intensity. First, the response model of a healthy plasma spectrum was developed. Then, we defined a matching rate as an indictor for comparing the difference between the tested wafers response and the health sigma model. The experimental results showed that this proposal method can detect process faults in real-time, even in plasma etching tools. PMID:22219683

  20. Normal and abnormal evolution of argon metastable density in high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; You, S. J.

    2015-05-15

    A controversial problem on the evolution of Ar metastable density as a function of electron density (increasing trend versus decreasing trend) was resolved by discovering the anomalous evolution of the argon metastable density with increasing electron density (discharge power), including both trends of the metastable density [Daltrini et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 061504 (2008)]. Later, by virtue of an adequate physical explanation based on a simple global model, both evolutions of the metastable density were comprehensively understood as part of the abnormal evolution occurring at low- and high-density regimes, respectively, and thus the physics behind the metastable evolution has seemed to be clearly disclosed. In this study, however, a remarkable result for the metastable density behavior with increasing electron density was observed: even in the same electron density regime, there are both normal and abnormal evolutions of metastable-state density with electron density depending on the measurement position: The metastable density increases with increasing electron density at a position far from the inductively coupled plasma antenna but decreases at a position close to the antenna. The effect of electron temperature, which is spatially nonuniform in the plasma, on the electron population and depopulation processes of Argon metastable atoms with increasing electron density is a clue to understanding the results. The calculated results of the global model, including multistep ionization for the argon metastable state and measured electron temperature, are in a good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Abnormal Pulmonary Function in Adults with Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Klings, Elizabeth S.; Wyszynski, Diego F.; Nolan, Vikki G.; Steinberg, Martin H.

    2006-01-01

    Rationale: Pulmonary complications of sickle cell anemia (Hb-SS) commonly cause morbidity, yet few large studies of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in this population have been reported. Objectives: PFTs (spirometry, lung volumes, and diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide [DLCO]) from 310 adults with Hb-SS were analyzed to determine the pattern of pulmonary dysfunction and their association with other systemic complications of sickle cell disease. Methods: Raw PFT data were compared with predicted values. Each subject was subclassified into one of five groups: obstructive physiology, restrictive physiology, mixed obstructive/restrictive physiology, isolated low DLCO, or normal. The association between laboratory data of patients with decreased DLCO or restrictive physiology and those of normal subjects was assessed by multivariate linear regression. Measurements and Main Results: Normal PFTs were present in only 31 of 310 (10%) patients. Overall, adults with Hb-SS were characterized by decreased total lung capacities (70.2 ± 14.7% predicted) and DlCO (64.5 ± 19.9%). The most common PFT patterns were restrictive physiology (74%) and isolated low DlCO (13%). Decreased DLCO was associated with thrombocytosis (p = 0.05), with hepatic dysfunction (elevated alanine aminotransferase; p = 0.07), and a trend toward renal dysfunction (elevated blood urea nitrogen and creatinine; p = 0.05 and 0.07, respectively). Conclusions: Pulmonary function is abnormal in 90% of adult patients with Hb-SS. Common abnormalities include restrictive physiology and decreased DLCO. Decreased DLCO may indicate more severe sickle vasculopathy characterized by impaired hepatic and renal function. PMID:16556694

  2. Haemolysis and abnormal haemorheology in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Connes, Philippe; Lamarre, Yann; Waltz, Xavier; Ballas, Samir K; Lemonne, Nathalie; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Hue, Olivier; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Romana, Marc

    2014-05-01

    Although pulmonary hypertension, leg ulcers, priapism, stroke and glomerulopathy in sickle cell anaemia (SCA) result from the adverse effects of chronic haemolysis on vascular function (haemolytic phenotype), osteonecrosis, acute chest syndrome and painful vaso-occlusive crises are caused by abnormal vascular cell adhesion and increased blood viscosity (viscosity-vaso-occlusion phenotype). However, this model with two sub-phenotypes does not take into account the haemorheological dimension. We tested the relationships between the biological parameters reflecting the haemolytic rate (haemolytic component) and red blood cell (RBC) rheological characteristics in 97 adults with SCA. No significant difference in the proportion of patients with low or high haemolytic component in the low and high blood viscosity groups was observed. The RBC elongation index (i.e. deformability) was negatively correlated with the haemolytic component. The RBC aggregates strength (i.e. RBC aggregates robustness) was negatively correlated with RBC elongation index. Sickle RBCs with high density had lower elongation index and higher aggregates strength. In conclusion, (i) the 'haemolytic' phenotype is characterized by decreased RBC deformability and increased RBC aggregates strength and (ii) the viscosity-vaso-occlusive phenotype is characterized by increased RBC deformability but not always by increased blood viscosity. α-thalassaemia modulates the haemorheological properties but other factors seem to be involved.

  3. Plasma TGF-β1 Levels Are Elevated in Down Syndrome Infants with Transient Abnormal Myelopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hajime; Go, Hayato; Imamura, Takashi; Sato, Maki; Momoi, Nobuo; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Infants with Down syndrome (DS) are at risk of developing a transient myeloproliferative disorder during the neonatal period, known as transient abnormal myelopoiesis (TAM). It is characterized by clonal myeloproliferation and is typically self-limiting. However, TAM can be a life-threatening disorder, when complicated by liver fibrosis. Here, we evaluated cytokine profiles in two male DS infants having TAM with or without liver dysfunction. The first patient, Patient 1, had hyperleukocytosis with cholestatic liver dysfunction, coagulopathy, and increased counts of blasts and was treated with exchange transfusion (ExT) due to the serious general condition. In Patient 1, serum interleukin (IL)-8 and plasma transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 levels were markedly elevated before ExT (1,518.2 pg/mL and 17,635 pg/mL, respectively). After ExT, serum IL-8 and plasma TGF-β1 levels decreased to 40.7 pg/mL and 6,847 pg/mL, respectively. However, Patient 1 died on day 56 due to cholestatic liver dysfunction; namely, this patient represents fatal TAM. The second patient, Patient 2, had hyperleukocytosis with increased counts of blasts without liver dysfunction and was treated with cytarabine. In Patient 2, plasma TGF-β1 levels, but not plasma IL-8, were elevated (9,068 pg/mL and 28 pg/mL, respectively). Patient 2 was discharged on day 47. In summary, plasma TGF-β1 levels were elevated in the two DS infants with TAM, regardless of the presence or absence of hepatic fibrosis. Importantly, fatal TAM is assoicated with the elevated serum level of IL-8. We thus propose that IL-8 may be involved in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. PMID:27546516

  4. Cardiac abnormalities in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Batra, Anjan S; Acherman, Ruben J; Wong, Wing-yen; Wood, John C; Chan, Linda S; Ramicone, Emily; Ebrahimi, Mahmood; Wong, Pierre C

    2002-08-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) results in chronic volume overload of the heart due to hemodilution. Previous echocardiographic studies of cardiac function in children with SCA have not accounted for these abnormal loading conditions. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine how the degree of anemia and transfusion status relate to cardiac findings and (2) evaluate cardiac function using load-independent parameters of function. We evaluated 77 patients with SCA, ages 2 to 22 years (mean +/- SD = 11.7 +/- 4.7), using physical examination, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. We compared two groups of patients. Group 1 consisted of 57 non-transfused patients, and Group 2 consisted of 20 patients on a chronic transfusion protocol. Group 1 patients exhibited a significantly lower hemoglobin, higher cardiac output, and larger left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic dimension and LV mass than groups 2 (P < 0.05). However, the velocity of circumferential fiber shortening-wall stress index (a load-independent measure of systolic function) was normal and not statistically different between the two groups. Conversely, the LV myocardial performance index (a measure of combined systolic and diastolic function) was significantly higher in Group 2 (P < 0.001), possibly indicating impaired myocardial diastolic function. SCA in children results in a volume-overloaded heart with a significant increase in LV dimensions and mass, both proportional to the degree of anemia. Despite these abnormal loading conditions, systolic function is preserved. Patients on a chronic transfusion protocol may develop diastolic dysfunction despite iron chelation therapy. PMID:12210812

  5. Raman Spectroscopy of DNA Packaging in Individual Human Sperm Cells distinguishes Normal from Abnormal Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huser, T; Orme, C; Hollars, C; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R

    2009-03-09

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  6. Abnormal Patterns of Lipoprotein Lipase Release into the Plasma in GPIHBP1-deficient Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Michael M.; Yin, Liya; Beigneux, Anne P.; Davies, Brandon S. J.; Gin, Peter; Estrada, Kristine; Melford, Kristan; Bishop, Joseph R.; Esko, Jeffrey D.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Fong, Loren G.; Bensadoun, André; Young, Stephen G.

    2008-01-01

    GPIHBP1-deficient mice (Gpihbp1–/–) exhibit severe chylomicronemia. GPIHBP1 is located within capillaries of muscle and adipose tissue, and expression of GPIHBP1 in Chinese hamster ovary cells confers upon those cells the ability to bind lipoprotein lipase (LPL). However, there has been absolutely no evidence that GPIHBP1 actually interacts with LPL in vivo. Heparin is known to release LPL from its in vivo binding sites, allowing it to enter the plasma. After an injection of heparin, we reasoned that LPL bound to GPIHBP1 in capillaries would be released very quickly, and we hypothesized that the kinetics of LPL entry into the plasma would differ in Gpihbp1–/– and control mice. Indeed, plasma LPL levels peaked very rapidly (within 1 min) after heparin in control mice. In contrast, plasma LPL levels in Gpihbp1–/– mice were much lower 1 min after heparin and increased slowly over 15 min. In keeping with that result, plasma triglycerides fell sharply within 10 min after heparin in wild-type mice, but were negligibly altered in the first 15 min after heparin in Gpihbp1–/– mice. Also, an injection of Intralipid released LPL into the plasma of wild-type mice but was ineffective in releasing LPL in Gpihbp1–/– mice. The observed differences in LPL release cannot be ascribed to different tissue stores of LPL, as LPL mass levels in tissues were similar in Gpihbp1–/– and control mice. The differences in LPL release after intravenous heparin and Intralipid strongly suggest that GPIHBP1 represents an important binding site for LPL in vivo. PMID:18845532

  7. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-{alpha}-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-{alpha} and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction.

  8. Cell phone radiation effects on cytogenetic abnormalities of oral mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Daroit, Natália Batista; Visioli, Fernanda; Magnusson, Alessandra Selinger; Vieira, Geila Radunz; Rados, Pantelis Varvaki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of exposure to cell phone electromagnetic radiation on the frequency of micronuclei, broken eggs cells, binucleated cells, and karyorrhexis in epithelial cells of the oral mucosa. The sample was composed of 60 cell phone users, who were non-smokers and non-drinkers, and had no clinically visible oral lesions. Cells were obtained from anatomical sites with the highest incidence of oral cancer: lower lip, border of the tongue, and floor of the mouth. The Feulgen reaction was used for quantification of nuclear anomalies in 1,000 cells/slide. A slightly increase in the number of micronucleated cells in the lower lip and in binucleated cells on the floor of the mouth was observed in individuals who used their phones > 60 minutes/week. The analysis also revealed an increased number of broken eggs in the tongue of individuals owning a cell phone for over eight years. Results suggest that exposure to electromagnetic waves emitted by cell phones can increase nuclear abnormalities in individuals who use a cell phone for more than 60 minutes per week and for over eight years. Based on the present findings, we suggest that exposure to electromagnetic radiation emitted by cell phones may interfere with the development of metanuclear anomalies. Therefore, it is demonstrated that, despite a significant increase in these anomalies, the radiation emitted by cell phones among frequent users is within acceptable physiological limits.

  9. Cell phone radiation effects on cytogenetic abnormalities of oral mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Daroit, Natália Batista; Visioli, Fernanda; Magnusson, Alessandra Selinger; Vieira, Geila Radunz; Rados, Pantelis Varvaki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of exposure to cell phone electromagnetic radiation on the frequency of micronuclei, broken eggs cells, binucleated cells, and karyorrhexis in epithelial cells of the oral mucosa. The sample was composed of 60 cell phone users, who were non-smokers and non-drinkers, and had no clinically visible oral lesions. Cells were obtained from anatomical sites with the highest incidence of oral cancer: lower lip, border of the tongue, and floor of the mouth. The Feulgen reaction was used for quantification of nuclear anomalies in 1,000 cells/slide. A slightly increase in the number of micronucleated cells in the lower lip and in binucleated cells on the floor of the mouth was observed in individuals who used their phones > 60 minutes/week. The analysis also revealed an increased number of broken eggs in the tongue of individuals owning a cell phone for over eight years. Results suggest that exposure to electromagnetic waves emitted by cell phones can increase nuclear abnormalities in individuals who use a cell phone for more than 60 minutes per week and for over eight years. Based on the present findings, we suggest that exposure to electromagnetic radiation emitted by cell phones may interfere with the development of metanuclear anomalies. Therefore, it is demonstrated that, despite a significant increase in these anomalies, the radiation emitted by cell phones among frequent users is within acceptable physiological limits. PMID:26486771

  10. Abnormalities in centrosome number in human embryos and embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yi-Fan; OuYang, Qi; Dai, Can; Lu, Chang-Fu; Lin, Ge; Gong, Fei; Lu, Guang-Xiu

    2016-05-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are common in human embryos. Previous studies have suggested links between centrosome number and chromosome abnormalities, but information regarding abnormalities in centrosome number in human embryos is limited. We analyzed abnormalities in centrosome number in human embryos and embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Following normal fertilization, supernumerary centrosomes were present at rates of 7.3% in two-pronucleus (2PN)-stage zygotes and 6.5% in first-cleavage zygotes. Supernumerary centrosomes were also detected in 24.4% of blastomeres from 60% of embryos derived from 2PN zygotes. Conversely, in mono- (1PN) and tri-pronucleus (3PN) zygotes, the frequency of abnormal centrosome number increased substantially at first cleavage. Rates in blastomeres of Day-3 embryos, however, were about the same between embryos derived from 1PN and 2PN zygotes, whereas abnormalities in centrosome number were higher in those from 3PN zygotes. By comparison, the rate of abnormal centrosome numbers in hESCs was 1.5-11.2%. Thus, abnormalities in centrosome number existed in human zygotes and cleaved embryos-especially those resulting from aberrant fertilization-but the frequency of such abnormalities was lower in hESCs derived from these embryos. These findings identify a source of the chromosomal instability in human embryos and hESCs, and highlight new safety issues for human assisted reproductive technology. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 392-404, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Phenotypic abnormalities observed in aged cloned mice from embryonic stem cells after long-term maintenance.

    PubMed

    Shimozawa, Nobuhiro; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Eguchi, Natsuko; Suzuki, Shuzo; Hioki, Kyoji; Usui, Toshimi; Kono, Tomohiro; Ito, Mamoru

    2006-09-01

    Somatic/embryonic stem cell cloning has made it possible to produce an individual genomically identical to another individual. However, the cloned animals have a variety of abnormalities caused by the aberrant gene modification, with insufficient reprogramming in cloning. We previously reported abnormalities in cloned mice at birth. In this study, we examined what abnormalities could be seen in cloned mice after long-term maintenance. The aged cloned mice showed multiple abnormalities: increase of body weight, some phenotypic abnormalities in the kidneys, testes and thymus, and lower urea nitrogen in their serum biochemical values. The kidneys of all cloned mice were hypertrophied, with a metamorphic or whitish appearance. The multiple lesions, including the enlarged renal pelvis and distension of the renal veins in histology, might be the result of urine accumulation by urinary tract obstruction. The testes of the cloned mice were atrophied, and showed no sperm formation in histology. In contrast, the thymus was rather hypertrophied, and a comparably increased number of lymphocytes were observed in the medulla, consisting mainly of T cells. By conducting a progeny test between the cloned mice, it was confirmed that these abnormalities in the aged cloned mice were not transmitted to their offspring, indicating that the incomplete reprogramming in clones might be in part responsible for the abnormalities detected in aged clones. These results indicate that the postnatal abnormalities observed in aged cloned mice are varied and can be restored through the germ line. PMID:16940284

  12. A cell junction pathology of neural stem cells leads to abnormal neurogenesis and hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Esteban M; Guerra, María M; Vío, Karin; González, César; Ortloff, Alexander; Bátiz, Luis F; Rodríguez, Sara; Jara, María C; Muñoz, Rosa I; Ortega, Eduardo; Jaque, Jaime; Guerra, Francisco; Sival, Deborah A; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Jiménez, Antonio J; Domínguez-Pinos, María D; Pérez-Fígares, José M; McAllister, James P; Johanson, Conrad

    2012-01-01

    Most cells of the developing mammalian brain derive from the ventricular (VZ) and the subventricular (SVZ) zones. The VZ is formed by the multipotent radial glia/neural stem cells (NSCs) while the SVZ harbors the rapidly proliferative neural precursor cells (NPCs). Evidence from human and animal models indicates that the common history of hydrocephalus and brain maldevelopment starts early in embryonic life with disruption of the VZ and SVZ. We propose that a "cell junction pathology" involving adherent and gap junctions is a final common outcome of a wide range of gene mutations resulting in proteins abnormally expressed by the VZ cells undergoing disruption. Disruption of the VZ during fetal development implies the loss of NSCs whereas VZ disruption during the perinatal period implies the loss of ependyma. The process of disruption occurs in specific regions of the ventricular system and at specific stages of brain development. This explains why only certain brain structures have an abnormal development, which in turn results in a specific neurological impairment of the newborn. Disruption of the VZ of the Sylvian aqueduct (SA) leads to aqueductal stenosis and hydrocephalus, while disruption of the VZ of telencephalon impairs neurogenesis. We are currently investigating whether grafting of NSCs/neurospheres from normal rats into the CSF of hydrocephalic mutants helps to diminish/repair the outcomes of VZ disruption.

  13. Abnormal mitosis triggers p53-dependent cell cycle arrest in human tetraploid cells.

    PubMed

    Kuffer, Christian; Kuznetsova, Anastasia Yurievna; Storchová, Zuzana

    2013-08-01

    Erroneously arising tetraploid mammalian cells are chromosomally instable and may facilitate cell transformation. An increasing body of evidence shows that the propagation of mammalian tetraploid cells is limited by a p53-dependent arrest. The trigger of this arrest has not been identified so far. Here we show by live cell imaging of tetraploid cells generated by an induced cytokinesis failure that most tetraploids arrest and die in a p53-dependent manner after the first tetraploid mitosis. Furthermore, we found that the main trigger is a mitotic defect, in particular, chromosome missegregation during bipolar mitosis or spindle multipolarity. Both a transient multipolar spindle followed by efficient clustering in anaphase as well as a multipolar spindle followed by multipolar mitosis inhibited subsequent proliferation to a similar degree. We found that the tetraploid cells did not accumulate double-strand breaks that could cause the cell cycle arrest after tetraploid mitosis. In contrast, tetraploid cells showed increased levels of oxidative DNA damage coinciding with the p53 activation. To further elucidate the pathways involved in the proliferation control of tetraploid cells, we knocked down specific kinases that had been previously linked to the cell cycle arrest and p53 phosphorylation. Our results suggest that the checkpoint kinase ATM phosphorylates p53 in tetraploid cells after abnormal mitosis and thus contributes to proliferation control of human aberrantly arising tetraploids.

  14. Drugs Approved for Multiple Myeloma and Other Plasma Cell Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Multiple Myeloma and Other Plasma Cell ... plasma cell neoplasms that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Multiple Myeloma and Other Plasma Cell ...

  15. Ulcerative colitis--a disease characterised by the abnormal colonic epithelial cell?

    PubMed

    Gibson, P R; van de Pol, E; Barratt, P J; Doe, W F

    1988-04-01

    The leakiness of the cell membranes of colonic epithelial cells isolated by the collagenase/Dispase technique from normal or diseased colons was assessed in a 4 h 51Cr release assay. Cells from normal, adenoma bearing or cancer bearing colons showed 51Cr release of 8% or less in almost all of 46 cell populations tested. In contrast, cells from mucosa affected by ulcerative colitis [11.9 (4.3%) n = 23] or Crohn's disease [8.4 (2.7%) n = 18] released significantly more 51Cr than the non-inflamed groups. Values are expressed as mean (SD). Overall, release values were greater in ulcerative colitis than Crohn's disease (p less than 0.01). In Crohn's disease, cells obtained from histologically inflamed mucosa released significantly more 51Cr [9.7 (2.5%) n = 11] than those from non-inflamed mucosa [6.4 (1.5%) n = 7, p less than 0.02] whereas, in ulcerative colitis, abnormal release values were found in 8 of 13 cell populations isolated from mucosa showing no histological evidence of active disease. In five patients with distal ulcerative colitis, cells from mucosa not apparently involved demonstrated normal 51Cr release in four of five studies despite abnormal release from cells from involved mucosa suggesting that a diffuse abnormality of the colonic epithelial cell is not usually present. These data indicate that chronic mucosal inflammation per se is associated with abnormalities of the colonic epithelial cell but that, in ulcerative colitis, the abnormality remains in many patients with quiescent disease. Identification of the local factors responsible for such an abnormality may contribute to an understanding of the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. PMID:3371720

  16. Plasma stencilling methods for cell patterning.

    PubMed

    Frimat, Jean-Philippe; Menne, Heike; Michels, Antje; Kittel, Silke; Kettler, Raffael; Borgmann, Sabine; Franzke, Joachim; West, Jonathan

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we describe plasma stencilling techniques for patterning 10 mammalian cell lines on hydrophobic and cell repellent poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), methylated glass and bacterial grade polystyrene surfaces. An air plasma produced with a Tesla generator operating at atmospheric pressure was used with microengineered stencils for patterned surface oxidation, selectively transforming the surface to a hydrophilic state to enable cell adhesion and growth. Plasma stencilling obviates the need for directly patterning cell adhesion molecules. Instead, during cell culture, adhesion proteins from the media assemble in a bioactive form on the hydrophilic regions. Critically, the removal of protein patterning prior to cell culture provides the option to also use PDMS-PDMS plasma bonding to incorporate cell patterns within microfluidic systems. Linear patterns were generated using PDMS microchannel stencils, and polyimide stencils with through holes were used for the production of cellular arrays. For the production of smaller cellular arrays, a novel microcapillary-based dielectric barrier discharge system was developed. A numerical method to characterise the cell patterns is also introduced and was used to demonstrate that plasma stencilling is highly effective, with complete patterns confined during long term cell culture (>10 days). In summary, plasma stencilling is simple, rapid, inexpensive, reproducible and a potentially universal cell line patterning capability.

  17. Abnormal Red Cell Structure and Function in Neuroacanthocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Cluitmans, Judith C. A.; Tomelleri, Carlo; Yapici, Zuhal; Dinkla, Sip; Bovee-Geurts, Petra; Chokkalingam, Venkatachalam; De Franceschi, Lucia; Brock, Roland; Bosman, Giel J. G. C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) belongs to a group of hereditary neurodegenerative disorders known as neuroacanthocytosis (NA). This genetically heterogeneous group of diseases is characterized by degeneration of neurons in the basal ganglia and by the presence of deformed red blood cells with thorny protrusions, acanthocytes, in the circulation. Objective The goal of our study is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying this aberrant red cell morphology and the corresponding functional consequences. This could shed light on the etiology of the neurodegeneration. Methods We performed a qualitative and semi-quantitative morphological, immunofluorescent, biochemical and functional analysis of the red cells of several patients with PKAN and, for the first time, of the red cells of their family members. Results We show that the blood of patients with PKAN contains not only variable numbers of acanthocytes, but also a wide range of other misshapen red cells. Immunofluorescent and immunoblot analyses suggest an altered membrane organization, rather than quantitative changes in protein expression. Strikingly, these changes are not limited to the red blood cells of PKAN patients, but are also present in the red cells of heterozygous carriers without neurological problems. Furthermore, changes are not only present in acanthocytes, but also in other red cells, including discocytes. The patients’ cells, however, are more fragile, as observed in a spleen-mimicking device. Conclusion These morphological, molecular and functional characteristics of red cells in patients with PKAN and their family members offer new tools for diagnosis and present a window into the pathophysiology of neuroacanthocytosis. PMID:25933379

  18. Plasma interactions with biased concentrator solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillwell, R. P.; Stevens, N. J.

    1986-12-01

    Concentrator solar arrays are being proposed for future space missions as replacements for less efficient (power/mass) planar arrays. While planar solar arrays have been used in space and their characteristics evaluated, concentrator cell interactions have not. This study investigates the possible interactions between a biased concentrator cell and a plasma environment. This study involved experimental and preliminary analytical work. It has been found that the electric fields associated with the biased cell are confined to the light collector region of the cell configuration, and that the cell arcs in dense plasma environments, at negative voltages of less than -200 volts, in a way similar to the arcing experienced by planar cells.

  19. Plasma antibodies to heat shock protein 60 and heat shock protein 70 are associated with increased risk of electrocardiograph abnormalities in automobile workers exposed to noise.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Yang, Miao; Yao, Huiling; Zheng, Jianru; Yang, Qiaoling; Chen, Sheng; Wei, Qingyi; Tanguay, Robert M; Wu, Tangchun

    2005-01-01

    In the living and working environment, stressful factors, such as noise, can cause health problems including cardiovascular diseases and noise-induced hearing loss. Some heat shock proteins (Hsps) play an important role in protecting cardiac cells against ischemic injury, and antibodies against these Hsps are associated with the development and prognosis of atherogenesis, coronary heart disease, and hypertension. Whether the presence of such antibodies is associated with abnormal electrocardiography (ECG) in stressed autoworkers exposed to chronic noise is presently unknown. Therefore, we investigated the association between the levels of plasma anti-Hsp60 and anti-Hsp70 with electrocardiograph abnormality in 396 autoworkers exposed to different noise levels by using Western blot, ECG, and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The results showed that the increase in levels of anti-Hsp70 was associated with a higher risk of ECG abnormalities characteristic of chronic myocardial ischemia (P < 0.05), conductive abnormality (P < 0.01), or heart displacement (P < 0.05); in contrast, elevated anti-Hsp60 was related to ECG abnormalities characteristic of sinus arrhythmia, chronic myocardial ischemia, and ectopic rhythm (P < 0.01 for all). Overall, high levels of both anti-Hsp70 and anti-Hsp60 were associated with significantly increased risk of ECG abnormalities (odds ratio [OR] = 1.73 and 95% confidence interval [Cl] = 1.04-2.86 for anti-Hsp70 and OR = 1.36 and 95% Cl = 1.07-1.72 for anti-Hsp60) with and without adjustment for cumulative noise exposure (OR = 1.96 and 95% Cl = 1.20-3.21 for anti-Hsp70 and OR = 3.93 and 95% Cl = 1.72-8.92 for anti-Hsp60). These findings suggest that the production of both anti-Hsp70 and anti-Hsp60 may be independent risk factors for the development and progression of abnormal ECG and therefore possibly cardiovascular diseases in autoworkers exposed to occupational noise.

  20. Cell Junction Pathology of Neural Stem Cells Is Associated With Ventricular Zone Disruption, Hydrocephalus, and Abnormal Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guerra, María Montserrat; Henzi, Roberto; Ortloff, Alexander; Lichtin, Nicole; Vío, Karin; Jiménez, Antonio J; Dominguez-Pinos, María Dolores; González, César; Jara, Maria Clara; Hinostroza, Fernando; Rodríguez, Sara; Jara, Maryoris; Ortega, Eduardo; Guerra, Francisco; Sival, Deborah A; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Pérez-Fígares, José M; McAllister, James P; Johanson, Conrad E; Rodríguez, Esteban M

    2015-07-01

    Fetal-onset hydrocephalus affects 1 to 3 per 1,000 live births. It is not only a disorder of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics but also a brain disorder that corrective surgery does not ameliorate. We hypothesized that cell junction abnormalities of neural stem cells (NSCs) lead to the inseparable phenomena of fetal-onset hydrocephalus and abnormal neurogenesis. We used bromodeoxyuridine labeling, immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy, and cell culture to study the telencephalon of hydrocephalic HTx rats and correlated our findings with those in human hydrocephalic and nonhydrocephalic human fetal brains (n = 12 each). Our results suggest that abnormal expression of the intercellular junction proteins N-cadherin and connexin-43 in NSC leads to 1) disruption of the ventricular and subventricular zones, loss of NSCs and neural progenitor cells; and 2) abnormalities in neurogenesis such as periventricular heterotopias and abnormal neuroblast migration. In HTx rats, the disrupted NSC and progenitor cells are shed into the cerebrospinal fluid and can be grown into neurospheres that display intercellular junction abnormalities similar to those of NSC of the disrupted ventricular zone; nevertheless, they maintain their potential for differentiating into neurons and glia. These NSCs can be used to investigate cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this condition, thereby opening the avenue for stem cell therapy.

  1. Cell Junction Pathology of Neural Stem Cells Is Associated With Ventricular Zone Disruption, Hydrocephalus, and Abnormal Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guerra, María Montserrat; Henzi, Roberto; Ortloff, Alexander; Lichtin, Nicole; Vío, Karin; Jiménez, Antonio J; Dominguez-Pinos, María Dolores; González, César; Jara, Maria Clara; Hinostroza, Fernando; Rodríguez, Sara; Jara, Maryoris; Ortega, Eduardo; Guerra, Francisco; Sival, Deborah A; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Pérez-Fígares, José M; McAllister, James P; Johanson, Conrad E; Rodríguez, Esteban M

    2015-07-01

    Fetal-onset hydrocephalus affects 1 to 3 per 1,000 live births. It is not only a disorder of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics but also a brain disorder that corrective surgery does not ameliorate. We hypothesized that cell junction abnormalities of neural stem cells (NSCs) lead to the inseparable phenomena of fetal-onset hydrocephalus and abnormal neurogenesis. We used bromodeoxyuridine labeling, immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy, and cell culture to study the telencephalon of hydrocephalic HTx rats and correlated our findings with those in human hydrocephalic and nonhydrocephalic human fetal brains (n = 12 each). Our results suggest that abnormal expression of the intercellular junction proteins N-cadherin and connexin-43 in NSC leads to 1) disruption of the ventricular and subventricular zones, loss of NSCs and neural progenitor cells; and 2) abnormalities in neurogenesis such as periventricular heterotopias and abnormal neuroblast migration. In HTx rats, the disrupted NSC and progenitor cells are shed into the cerebrospinal fluid and can be grown into neurospheres that display intercellular junction abnormalities similar to those of NSC of the disrupted ventricular zone; nevertheless, they maintain their potential for differentiating into neurons and glia. These NSCs can be used to investigate cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this condition, thereby opening the avenue for stem cell therapy. PMID:26079447

  2. Human mesenchymal stem cells are sensitive to abnormal gravity and exhibit classic apoptotic features.

    PubMed

    Meng, Rui; Xu, Hui-yun; Di, Sheng-meng; Shi, Dong-yan; Qian, Ai-rong; Wang, Jin-fu; Shang, Peng

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of abnormal gravity on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Strong magnetic field and magnetic field gradient generate a magnetic force that can add to or subtract from the gravitational force. In this study, this is defined as a high-magneto-gravitational environment (HMGE). The HMGE provides three apparent gravity levels, i.e. hypogravity (μg), hypergravity (2g) and normal gravity with strong magnetic field (1g) conditions. After hMSCs were subject to HMGE for 12 h, the proliferation, morphology, structure and apoptosis were investigated. Results showed that the proliferation of hMSCs was inhibited under μg condition. The abnormal gravity induced morphologic characteristics of apoptosis cells, such as cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, nuclear chromatin condensation and margination, decreased cell viability, and increased caspase-3/7 activity. The rate of apoptosis under μg condition is up to 56.95%. The F-actin stress fibers and microtubules were disrupted under abnormal gravity condition. Under μg-condition, the expression of p53 at mRNA and protein levels was up-regulated more than 9- and 6 folds, respectively. The Pifithrin-α, an specific inhibitor of p53, inhibited the apoptosis and prevented the disruption of cytoskeleton induced by abnormal gravity. These results implied that hMSCs were sensitive to abnormal gravity and exhibited classic apoptotic features, which might be associated with p53 signaling.

  3. Correlation of plasma nitrite/nitrate levels and inducible nitric oxide gene expression among women with cervical abnormalities and cancer.

    PubMed

    Sowjanya, A Pavani; Rao, Meera; Vedantham, Haripriya; Kalpana, Basany; Poli, Usha Rani; Marks, Morgan A; Sujatha, M

    2016-01-30

    Cervical cancer is caused by infection with high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV). Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a soluble factor involved in chronic inflammation, may modulate cervical cancer risk among HPV infected women. The aim of the study was to measure and correlate plasma nitrite/nitrate levels with tissue specific expression of iNOS mRNA among women with different grades of cervical lesions and cervical cancer. Tissue biopsy and plasma specimens were collected from 120 women with cervical neoplasia or cancer (ASCUS, LSIL, HSIL and invasive cancer) and 35 women without cervical abnormalities. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA from biopsy and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels of the same study subjects were measured. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was performed on the promoter region and Ser608Leu (rs2297518) in exon 16 of the iNOS gene. Differences in iNOS gene expression and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels were compared across disease stage using linear and logistic regression analysis. Compared to normal controls, women diagnosed with HSIL or invasive cancer had a significantly higher concentration of plasma nitrite/nitrate and a higher median fold-change in iNOS mRNA gene expression. Genotyping of the promoter region showed three different variations: A pentanucleotide repeat (CCTTT) n, -1026T > G (rs2779249) and a novel variant -1153T > A. These variants were associated with increased levels of plasma nitrite/nitrate across all disease stages. The higher expression of iNOS mRNA and plasma nitrite/nitrate among women with pre-cancerous lesions suggests a role for nitric oxide in the natural history of cervical cancer. PMID:26435258

  4. Correlation of plasma nitrite/nitrate levels and inducible nitric oxide gene expression among women with cervical abnormalities and cancer.

    PubMed

    Sowjanya, A Pavani; Rao, Meera; Vedantham, Haripriya; Kalpana, Basany; Poli, Usha Rani; Marks, Morgan A; Sujatha, M

    2016-01-30

    Cervical cancer is caused by infection with high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV). Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a soluble factor involved in chronic inflammation, may modulate cervical cancer risk among HPV infected women. The aim of the study was to measure and correlate plasma nitrite/nitrate levels with tissue specific expression of iNOS mRNA among women with different grades of cervical lesions and cervical cancer. Tissue biopsy and plasma specimens were collected from 120 women with cervical neoplasia or cancer (ASCUS, LSIL, HSIL and invasive cancer) and 35 women without cervical abnormalities. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA from biopsy and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels of the same study subjects were measured. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was performed on the promoter region and Ser608Leu (rs2297518) in exon 16 of the iNOS gene. Differences in iNOS gene expression and plasma nitrite/nitrate levels were compared across disease stage using linear and logistic regression analysis. Compared to normal controls, women diagnosed with HSIL or invasive cancer had a significantly higher concentration of plasma nitrite/nitrate and a higher median fold-change in iNOS mRNA gene expression. Genotyping of the promoter region showed three different variations: A pentanucleotide repeat (CCTTT) n, -1026T > G (rs2779249) and a novel variant -1153T > A. These variants were associated with increased levels of plasma nitrite/nitrate across all disease stages. The higher expression of iNOS mRNA and plasma nitrite/nitrate among women with pre-cancerous lesions suggests a role for nitric oxide in the natural history of cervical cancer.

  5. Plasma and red blood cell fatty acids in peroxisomal disorders.

    PubMed

    Moser, A B; Jones, D S; Raymond, G V; Moser, H W

    1999-02-01

    The demonstration of abnormal levels of fatty acids or plasmalogens in plasma or red blood cells is key to the diagnosis of peroxisomal disorders. We report the levels of 62 fatty acids and plasmalogens in patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), Zellweger syndrome (ZS), neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD), and infantile Refsum disease (IRD), both at baseline and after dietary interventions. "Lorenzo's Oil" therapy in X-ALD normalizes the levels of saturated very long chain fatty acids in plasma, but leads to reduced levels of omega 6 and other omega 3 fatty acids, and requires monitoring and appropriate dietary supplements. Patients with ZS, NALD and IRD have reduced levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) which can be normalized by the oral administration of microencapsulated DHA and AA.

  6. [Alpha-lipoic acid triggers elimination of cells with abnormal nuclei in human carcinoma epidermoid cell line].

    PubMed

    Kisurina-Evgen'eva, O P; Onishchenko, G E

    2010-01-01

    The skin is usually exposed to adverse environmental conditions that may cause pathological cell proliferation and cellular transformations leading to the formation of malignant cells. Antioxidants may affect these processes and induce the elimination of transformed cell. The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of alfa-lipoic acid on human carcinoma epidermoid cell line A431. Our results showed that alfa-lipoic acid induced inhibition of cell proliferation or stimulated apoptotic cell death. Cells with abnormal nuclei were eliminated by apoptosis. Electron microscopy showed that survived cells had typical for control cells shape and organization of the nuclei, organization of the cytoplasm and organelles. Thus, alfa-lipoic acid not only triggered apoptosis of carcinoma cells, but it may also activate the mechanism of elimination of cells with abnormal chromosome number.

  7. Accumulation of abnormal adult-generated hippocampal granule cells predicts seizure frequency and severity

    PubMed Central

    Hester, Michael S.; Danzer, Steve C.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of abnormally integrated, adult-born, hippocampal dentate granule cells (DGC) is hypothesized to contribute to the development of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). DGCs have long been implicated in TLE, as they regulate excitatory signaling through the hippocampus and exhibit neuroplastic changes during epileptogenesis. Furthermore, DGCs are unusual in that they are continually generated throughout life, with aberrant integration of new cells underlying the majority of restructuring in the dentate during epileptogenesis. While it is known that these abnormal networks promote abnormal neuronal firing and hyperexcitability, it has yet to be established whether they directly contribute to seizure generation. If abnormal DGCs do contribute, a reasonable prediction would be that the severity of epilepsy will be correlated with the number or load of abnormal DGCs. To test this prediction, we utilized a conditional, inducible transgenic mouse model to fate-map adult-generated DGCs. Mossy cell loss, also implicated in epileptogenesis, was assessed as well. Transgenic mice rendered epileptic using the pilocarpine-status epilepticus model of epilepsy were monitored 24/7 by video/EEG for four weeks to determine seizure frequency and severity. Positive correlations were found between seizure frequency and: 1) the percentage of hilar ectopic DGCs, 2) the amount of mossy fiber sprouting and 3) the extent of mossy cell death. In addition, mossy fiber sprouting and mossy cell death were correlated with seizure severity. These studies provide correlative evidence in support of the hypothesis that abnormal DGCs contribute to the development of TLE, and also support a role for mossy cell loss. PMID:23699504

  8. Growth and differentiation of circulating hemopoietic stem cells with atomic bomb irradiation-induced chromosome abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Amenomori, T.; Honda, T.; Otake, M.; Tomonaga, M.; Ichimaru, M.

    1988-11-01

    The effects of atomic bomb irradiation on hemopoietic stem cells were studied cytogenetically using single colonies derived from hemopoietic progenitor cells. The subjects studied were 21 healthy atomic bomb survivors (10 males and 11 females) in the high dose exposure group (100+ rad) with a known high incidence (10% or more) of radiation-induced chromosome abnormalities in their peripheral blood lymphocytes (stimulated with phytohemagglutinin), and 11 nonexposed healthy controls (5 males and 6 females). Colony formation by circulating granulocyte-macrophage (GM-CFC) and erythroid (BFU-E) progenitor cells was made by the methylcellulose method using peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Chromosome specimens were prepared from single colonies by our micromethod. The total number of colonies analyzed in the exposed group was 131 for GM-CFC and 75 for BFU-E. Chromosome abnormalities were observed in 15 (11.5%) and 9 (12.0%) colonies, respectively. In the control group, the total number of colonies analyzed was 61 for GM-CFC and 41 for BFU-E. None of these colonies showed chromosome abnormalities. The difference in incidence of chromosome abnormalities was highly significant by an exact test; p = 0.003 for GM-CFC and 0.017 for BFU-E. The karyotypes of chromosome abnormalities obtained from the colonies in the exposed group were mostly translocations, but deletion and marker chromosomes were also observed. In two individuals, such karyotypic abnormalities as observed in the peripheral lymphocytes were also seen in the myeloid progenitor cells. This finding suggests that atomic bomb irradiation produced a chromosome aberration on multipotent hemopoietic stem cells common to myeloid and lymphoid lineages.

  9. Tumor-derived endothelial cells exhibit aberrant Rho-mediated mechanosensing and abnormal angiogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kaustabh; Thodeti, Charles K; Dudley, Andrew C; Mammoto, Akiko; Klagsbrun, Michael; Ingber, Donald E

    2008-08-12

    Tumor blood vessels exhibit abnormal structure and function that cause disturbed blood flow and high interstitial pressure, which impair delivery of anti-cancer agents. Past efforts to normalize the tumor vasculature have focused on inhibition of soluble angiogenic factors, such as VEGF; however, capillary endothelial (CE) cell growth and differentiation during angiogenesis are also influenced by mechanical forces conveyed by the extracellular matrix (ECM). Here, we explored the possibility that tumor CE cells form abnormal vessels because they lose their ability to sense and respond to these physical cues. These studies reveal that, in contrast to normal CE cells, tumor-derived CE cells fail to reorient their actin cytoskeleton when exposed to uniaxial cyclic strain, exhibit distinct shape sensitivity to variations in ECM elasticity, exert greater traction force, and display an enhanced ability to retract flexible ECM substrates and reorganize into tubular networks in vitro. These behaviors correlate with a constitutively high level of baseline activity of the small GTPase Rho and its downstream effector, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). Moreover, decreasing Rho-mediated tension by using the ROCK inhibitor, Y27632, can reprogram the tumor CE cells so that they normalize their reorientation response to uniaxial cyclic strain and their ability to form tubular networks on ECM gels. Abnormal Rho-mediated sensing of mechanical cues in the tumor microenvironment may therefore contribute to the aberrant behaviors of tumor CE cells that result in the development of structural abnormalities in the cancer microvasculature.

  10. 'Unilateral cone dystrophy': ERG changes implicate abnormal signaling by hyperpolarizing bipolar and/or horizontal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sieving, P A

    1994-01-01

    The two cases described here appear to represent the infrequently reported entity of "unilateral cone (cone-rod) dystrophy." Both cases give the suggestion that daylight vision can be affected by abnormalities in visual signals in the proximal retina, after they leave the cone photoreceptors themselves. The ERG waveform changes in these two cases are consistent with a deficit in signaling by the hyperpolarizing bipolar cells, and the complaint of abnormal color perception in both cases presented here raises the possibility that the OFF-pathway through hyperpolarizing bipolar cells may be important for color processing. PMID:7886877

  11. Nonthermal Plasma-Mediated Cancer Cell Death; Targeted Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byul-Bora; Choi, Yeon-Sik; Lee, Hae-Jun; Lee, Jae-Koo; Kim, Uk-Kyu; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon

    Non-thermal air plasma can kill cancer cells. However, there is no selectivity between normal and cancer cells. Therefore, cancer specific antibody conjugated gold nanoparticle (GNP) was pretreated before plasma irradiation. Stimulation of antibody conjugated GNP by plasma treatment resulted in a significant decrease in viability of cancer cells. This technology shows the feasibility of using plasma therapy for killing cancer cells selectively.

  12. Abnormal hepatic copper accumulation of spheroid composed of liver cells from LEC rats in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ueno, K; Yoshizawa, M; Satoh, T; Yoneda, S; Ohmichi, M; Yamazaki, M; Mori, Y; Suzuki, K T

    1995-11-01

    The LEC rat is a mutant strain displaying hereditary hepatitis, and shows abnormal accumulation of copper (Cu) similar to that occurring in Wilson's disease. We prepared a multicellular spheroid composed of LEC rat liver cells to investigate the mechanism for abnormal accumulation of Cu. These multicellular spheroids were prepared by detaching the monolayer on the collagen-conjugated thermo-responsive polymer coated culture dish at a temperature below the critical solution temperature and culturing on the non-adhesive substratum. Long-term cultured spheroids of LEC rat liver cells as well as SD rat liver cells were attempted. Non-parenchymal cells obtained by collagenase perfusion from the LEC liver were fewer than those from the SD liver. Cells from the LEC rat, over 11 weeks of age, did not form a cell sheet; however, a mixture of parenchymal cells from LEC rats over aged 11 weeks and non-parenchymal cells from SD rats of any age yielded intact spheroids. We examined the toxicity, the accumulation and distribution of Cu in spheroids. The accumulation of Cu in LEC spheroids was higher than that in SD spheroids. Results suggest that spheroids consisting of LEC liver cells are useful as an alternative model to in vivo tests to investigate the mechanism for abnormal accumulation of Cu in liver.

  13. [Effects of abnormal Hb on red cell membranes].

    PubMed

    Ideguchi, H

    1999-03-01

    Unstable hemoglobin disorders are due to substitutions or deletions of amino acids which alter the normal tertiary structure of hemoglobin and/or decrease heme-binding to globin. These changes result in enhanced oxidation to methemoglobin, rapid conversion of methemoglobin to hemichrome and sometimes heme loss, which leads to denaturation and precipitation as Heinz bodies. This process is associated with marked oxidative membrane damage, such as crosslinking of membrane proteins, membrane lipid peroxidation, hemin-induced destabilization of cytoskeletal protein interactions, and increased permeability to potassium ions. The damaged erythrocytes are sequestered in the spleen, where Heinz bodies are "pitted" or the entire cell is phagocytized by macrophages. The precise mechanisms leading to hemolysis are not fully understood. However, one hypothesis involves hemichrome binding to the cytoplasmic domain of band 3, leading to clustering of band 3 in the membrane and immunologic recognition of the redistributed band 3 by autologous senescent antibodies. This theory is based on immunologic findings rather than deformability changes, and it is consistent with many features of unstable hemoglobins.

  14. The development of hepatic stellate cells in normal and abnormal human fetuses – an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Christine K C; Pereira, Tamara N; Pozniak, Katarzyna N; Ramsing, Mette; Vogel, Ida; Ramm, Grant A

    2015-01-01

    The precise embryological origin and development of hepatic stellate cells is not established. Animal studies and observations on human fetuses suggest that they derive from posterior mesodermal cells that migrate via the septum transversum and developing diaphragm to form submesothelial cells beneath the liver capsule, which give rise to mesenchymal cells including hepatic stellate cells. However, it is unclear if these are similar to hepatic stellate cells in adults or if this is the only source of stellate cells. We have studied hepatic stellate cells by immunohistochemistry, in developing human liver from autopsies of fetuses with and without malformations and growth restriction, using cellular Retinol Binding Protein-1 (cRBP-1), Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), and α-Smooth Muscle Actin (αSMA) antibodies, to identify factors that influence their development. We found that hepatic stellate cells expressing cRBP-1 are present from the end of the first trimester of gestation and reduce in density throughout gestation. They appear abnormally formed and variably reduced in number in fetuses with abnormal mesothelial Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) function, diaphragmatic hernia and in ectopic liver nodules without mesothelium. Stellate cells showed similarities to intravascular cells and their presence in a fetus with diaphragm agenesis suggests they may be derived from circulating stem cells. Our observations suggest circulating stem cells as well as mesothelium can give rise to hepatic stellate cells, and that they require normal mesothelial function for their development. PMID:26265759

  15. Kidney disease associated with plasma cell dyscrasias

    PubMed Central

    Goes, Nelson B.; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Raje, Noopur S.; Humphreys, Benjamin D.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma cell dyscrasias are frequently encountered malignancies often associated with kidney disease through the production of monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig). Paraproteins can cause a remarkably diverse set of pathologic patterns in the kidney and recent progress has been made in explaining the molecular mechanisms of paraprotein-mediated kidney injury. Other recent advances in the field include the introduction of an assay for free light chains and the use of novel antiplasma cell agents that can reverse renal failure in some cases. The role of stem cell transplantation, plasma exchange, and kidney transplantation in the management of patients with paraprotein-related kidney disease continues to evolve. PMID:20462963

  16. T-cell abnormalities in common variable immunodeficiency: the hidden defect

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Gabriel K; Huissoon, Aarnoud P

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses how the T-cell compartment in common variable immunodeficiency is marked by the premature arrest in thymic output, leading to T-cell exhaustion and immune dysregulation. Although B cells have been the main focus of the disorder, ample experimental data suggest that T-cell abnormalities can be seen in a large proportion of Freiburg Group 1a patients and those suffering from inflammatory complications. The reductions in T-cell receptor excision circles, naïve T cells, invariant NKT cells and regulatory T cells suggest a diminished thymic output, while CD8 T cells are driven towards exhaustion either via an antigen-dependent or an antigen-independent manner. The theoretical risk of anti-T-cell therapies is discussed, highlighting the need for an international effort in generating longitudinal data in addition to better-defined underlying molecular characterisation. PMID:27153873

  17. Expression of abnormal von Willebrand factor by endothelial cells from a patient with type IIA von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed Central

    Levene, R B; Booyse, F M; Chediak, J; Zimmerman, T S; Livingston, D M; Lynch, D C

    1987-01-01

    Studies were conducted to characterize the biosynthesis of von Willebrand factor (vWf) by cultured endothelial cells (EC) derived from the umbilical vein of a patient with type IIA von Willebrand disease. The patient's EC, compared with those from normal individuals, produced vWf that had decreased amounts of large multimers and an increase in rapidly migrating satellite species, features characteristic of plasma vWf from patients with type IIA von Willebrand disease. The type IIA EC did produce a full spectrum of vWf multimers in both cell lysates and postculture medium, although the relative amounts of the largest species were decreased. The large multimers were degraded in conjunction with the appearance of rapidly migrating satellites that contained approximately equal to 170-kDa proteolytic fragments, suggesting that this patient's functional defect is due to abnormal proteolysis and not to a primary failure of vWf subunit oligomerization. Moreover, the observed degradation appears to result from an abnormal vWf molecule and not elevated protease levels. These results suggest that this patient's von Willebrand disease phenotype is caused by increased proteolytic sensitivity of his vWf protein. Images PMID:3306682

  18. Role of abnormal Langerhans cells in oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Shyamsundar Vidya; Aravindha, Babu; Leena, Sankari; Balachander, Nandagopal; Malathi, Letchumana Kumar; Masthan, Mahaboob Kadar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), although initiated by tobacco carcinogens, their progression is due to inability of Langerhans cells (LCs) to detect these abnormal cells and promote lymphocytes to destroy these cells. We assessed and quantified the tumor associated LCs and inflammation in OED and OSCC to understand their role. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five microscopic sections were assessed (27 OED and 28 OSCC). The LCs were detected using S-100 immunohistochemical marker. The number of tumor associated LCs were counted. The presence of abnormal appearing large cells and its relation to histopathologic grade and inflammation was assessed. Results: Significant increase in the LC count was observed in OSCC when compared to dysplasia. Large, abnormal appearing cells were observed in dysplasia and carcinomas however, these were more pronounced in moderate dysplasia and poorly-differentiated carcinomas. The presence of these abnormal appearing cells was associated with decrease in lymphocytic infiltrate. Conclusion: The present study indicates more LC are recruited into the carcinoma. These accumulated nonfunctional LC in the tumor tissue are indicative of aggressive tumor with potential malignant transformation. PMID:26604600

  19. Solar cell modules for plasma interaction evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A plasma interaction analysis in support of the solar electric propulsion subsystem examined the effects of a large high voltage solar array interacting with an ion thruster produced plasma. Two solar array test modules consisting of 36 large area wraparound contact solar cells welded to a flexible Kapton integrated circuit substrate were abricated. The modules contained certain features of the effects of insulation, din-holes, and bonding of the cell to the substrate and a ground plane. The possibility of a significant power loss occurring due to the collection of charged particles on the solar array interconnects was the focus of the research.

  20. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2013-09-01

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) has been shown to effectively induce DNA double strand breaks in SCC-25 oral cancer cells. The APPJ source constructed in our laboratory consists of two external electrodes wrapping around a quartz tube and nitrogen as a feed gas and operates based on dielectric barrier gas discharge. Generally, it is more challenging to ignite plasma in N2 atmosphere than in noble gases. However, this design provides additional advantages such as lower costs compared to the noble gases for future clinical operation. Different parameters of the APPJ configuration were tested in order to determine radiation dosage. To explore the effects of delayed damage and cell self-repairing, various incubation times of cells after plasma treatment were also performed. Reactive species generated in plasma jet and in liquid environment are essential to be identified and quantified, with the aim of unfolding the mystery of detailed mechanisms for plasma-induced cell apoptosis. Moreover, from the comparison of plasma treatment effect on normal oral cells OKF6T, an insight to the selectivity for cancer treatment by APPJ can be explored. All of these studies are critical to better understand the damage responses of normal and abnormal cellular systems to plasma radiation, which are useful for the development of advanced plasma therapy for cancer treatment at a later stage.

  1. Cytology of plasma cell rich effusion in cases of plasma cell neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Gochhait, Debasis; Dey, Pranab; Verma, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple myeloma or plasmacytoma resulting in malignant effusion is rarely described in literature. Aims: In this paper, we have studied the seven rare cases of plasma cell infiltration in effusion fluid. Materials and Methods: We studied six cases of pleural fluid and one case of ascetic fluid. Detailed cytological features, clinical history, bone marrow examinations, serum electrophoresis, and immunofixation data were analyzed. Result: There were two cases of plasmacytoma, four cases of multiple myeloma, and one case of plasmablastic lymphoma. On cytology, all the cases showed excess plasma cells along with mesothelial cells and lymphocytes on effusion cytology smear. Conclusion: Plasma cell rich effusion in cases of plasma cell tumor is rare. However, on cytology these cases do not pose much problem if relevant history is known.

  2. Immune Dysfunction Associated with Abnormal Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stroma Cells in Senescence Accelerated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Guo, Kequan; Adachi, Yasushi; Ikehara, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Senescence accelerated mice (SAM) are a group of mice that show aging-related diseases, and SAM prone 10 (SAMP10) show spontaneous brain atrophy and defects in learning and memory. Our previous report showed that the thymus and the percentage of T lymphocytes are abnormal in the SAMP10, but it was unclear whether the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stroma cells (BMMSCs) were abnormal, and whether they played an important role in regenerative medicine. We thus compared BMMSCs from SAMP10 and their control, SAM-resistant (SAMR1), in terms of cell cycle, oxidative stress, and the expression of PI3K and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Our cell cycle analysis showed that cell cycle arrest occurred in the G0/G1 phase in the SAMP10. We also found increased reactive oxygen stress and decreased PI3K and MAPK on the BMMSCs. These results suggested the BMMSCs were abnormal in SAMP10, and that this might be related to the immune system dysfunction in these mice. PMID:26840301

  3. Automatic recognition of abnormal cells in cytological tests using multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertych, A.; Galliano, G.; Bose, S.; Farkas, D. L.

    2010-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of gynecologic disease-related death worldwide, but is almost completely preventable with regular screening, for which cytological testing is a method of choice. Although such testing has radically lowered the death rate from cervical cancer, it is plagued by low sensitivity and inter-observer variability. Moreover, its effectiveness is still restricted because the recognition of shape and morphology of nuclei is compromised by overlapping and clumped cells. Multispectral imaging can aid enhanced morphological characterization of cytological specimens. Features including spectral intensity and texture, reflecting relevant morphological differences between normal and abnormal cells, can be derived from cytopathology images and utilized in a detection/classification scheme. Our automated processing of multispectral image cubes yields nuclear objects which are subjected to classification facilitated by a library of spectral signatures obtained from normal and abnormal cells, as marked by experts. Clumps are processed separately with reduced set of signatures. Implementation of this method yields high rate of successful detection and classification of nuclei into predefined malignant and premalignant types and correlates well with those obtained by an expert. Our multispectral approach may have an impact on the diagnostic workflow of cytological tests. Abnormal cells can be automatically highlighted and quantified, thus objectivity and performance of the reading can be improved in a way which is currently unavailable in clinical setting.

  4. Comparison of Efficacy in Abnormal Cervical Cell Detection between Liquid-based Cytology and Conventional Cytology.

    PubMed

    Tanabodee, Jitraporn; Thepsuwan, Kitisak; Karalak, Anant; Laoaree, Orawan; Krachang, Anong; Manmatt, Kittipong; Anontwatanawong, Nualpan

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to 1206 women who had cervical cancer screening at Chonburi Cancer Hospital. The spilt-sample study aimed to compare the efficacy of abnormal cervical cells detection between liquid-based cytology (LBC) and conventional cytology (CC). The collection of cervical cells was performed by broom and directly smeared on a glass slide for CC then the rest of specimen was prepared for LBC. All slides were evaluated and classified by The Bethesda System. The results of the two cytological tests were compared to the gold standard. The LBC smear significantly decreased inflammatory cell and thick smear on slides. These two techniques were not difference in detection rate of abnormal cytology and had high cytological diagnostic agreement of 95.7%. The histologic diagnosis of cervical tissue was used as the gold standard in 103 cases. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, false positive, false negative and accuracy of LBC at ASC-US cut off were 81.4, 75.0, 70.0, 84.9, 25.0, 18.6 and 77.7%, respectively. CC had higher false positive and false negative than LBC. LBC had shown higher sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy than CC but no statistical significance. In conclusion, LBC method can improve specimen quality, more sensitive, specific and accurate at ASC-US cut off and as effective as CC in detecting cervical epithelial cell abnormalities. PMID:26514540

  5. Induced pluripotent stem cells as a model for telomeric abnormalities in ICF type I syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sagie, Shira; Ellran, Erika; Katzir, Hagar; Shaked, Rony; Yehezkel, Shiran; Laevsky, Ilana; Ghanayim, Alaa; Geiger, Dan; Tzukerman, Maty; Selig, Sara

    2014-07-15

    Human telomeric regions are packaged as constitutive heterochromatin, characterized by extensive subtelomeric DNA methylation and specific histone modifications. ICF (immunodeficiency, centromeric instability, facial anomalies) type I patients carry mutations in DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) that methylates de novo repetitive sequences during early embryonic development. ICF type I patient fibroblasts display hypomethylated subtelomeres, abnormally short telomeres and premature senescence. In order to study the molecular mechanism by which the failure to de novo methylate subtelomeres results in accelerated telomere shortening, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from 3 ICF type I patients. Telomeres were elongated in ICF-iPSCs during reprogramming, and the senescence phenotype was abolished despite sustained subtelomeric hypomethylation and high TERRA levels. Fibroblast-like cells (FLs) isolated from differentiated ICF-iPSCs maintained abnormally high TERRA levels, and telomeres in these cells shortened at an accelerated rate, leading to early senescence, thus recapitulating the telomeric phenotype of the parental fibroblasts. These findings demonstrate that the abnormal telomere phenotype associated with subtelomeric hypomethylation is overridden in cells expressing telomerase, therefore excluding telomerase inhibition by TERRA as a central mechanism responsible for telomere shortening in ICF syndrome. The data in the current study lend support to the use of ICF-iPSCs for modeling of phenotypic and molecular defects in ICF syndrome and for unraveling the mechanism whereby subtelomeric hypomethylation is linked to accelerated telomeric loss in this syndrome.

  6. Spectral Cytopathology of Cervical Samples: Detecting Cellular Abnormalities in Cytologically Normal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Jennifer M.; Bird, Benjamin; Papamarkakis, Kostas; Miljković, Miloš; Bedrossian, Kristi; Laver, Nora; Diem, Max

    2010-01-01

    Aim Spectral Cytopathology (SCP) is a novel spectroscopic method for objective and unsupervised classification of individual exfoliated cells. The limitations of conventional cytopathology are well-recognized within the pathology community. In SCP, cellular differentiation is made by observing molecular changes in the nucleus and the cytoplasm, which may or may not produce morphological changes detectable by conventional cytopathology. This proof of concept study demonstrates SCP’s potential as an enhancing tool for cytopathologists by aiding in the accurate and reproducible diagnosis of cells in all states of disease. Method Infrared spectra are collected from cervical cells deposited onto reflectively coated glass slides. Each cell has a corresponding infrared spectrum that describes its unique biochemical composition. Spectral data are processed and analyzed by an unsupervised chemometric algorithm, Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Results In this blind study, cervical samples are classified by analyzing the spectra of morphologically normal looking squamous cells from normal samples and samples diagnosed by conventional cytopathology with low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL). SCP discriminated cytopathological diagnoses amongst twelve different cervical samples with a high degree of specificity and sensitivity. SCP also correlated two samples with abnormal spectral changes: these samples had a normal cytopathological diagnosis but had a history of abnormal cervical cytology. The spectral changes observed in the morphologically normal looking cells are most likely due to an infection with human papillomavirus, HPV. HPV DNA testing was conducted on five additional samples, and SCP accurately differentiated these samples by their HPV status. Conclusions SCP tracks biochemical variations in cells that are consistent with the onset of disease. HPV has been implicated as the cause of these changes detected spectroscopically. SCP does not depend on

  7. Generation of a novel, multi-stage, progressive, and transplantable model of plasma cell neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Takashi; Hatlen, Megan A.; Lossos, Chen; Ndiaye-Lobry, Delphine; Deblasio, Anthony; Murata, Kazunori; Fleisher, Martin; Cortizas, Elena M.; Verdun, Ramiro E.; Petrini, John; Nimer, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell neoplasm with an extremely variable clinical course. Animal models are needed to better understand its pathophysiology and for preclinical testing of potential therapeutic agents. Hematopoietic cells expressing the hypermorphic Rad50s allele show hematopoietic failure, which can be mitigated by the lack of a transcription factor, Mef/Elf4. However, we find that 70% of Mef−/−Rad50s/s mice die from multiple myeloma or other plasma cell neoplasms. These mice initially show an abnormal plasma cell proliferation and monoclonal protein production, and then develop anemia and a decreased bone mineral density. Tumor cells can be serially transplanted and according to array CGH and whole exome sequencing, the pathogenesis of plasma cell neoplasms in these mice is not linked to activation of a specific oncogene, or inactivation of a specific tumor suppressor. This model recapitulates the systemic manifestations of human plasma cell neoplasms, and implicates cooperativity between the Rad50s and Mef/Elf4 pathways in initiating myelomagenic mutations that promote plasma cell transformation. PMID:26961797

  8. Rapid degradation of abnormal proteins in vacuoles from Acer pseudoplatanus L. cells

    SciTech Connect

    Canut, H.; Alibert, G.; Carrasco, A.; Boudet, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    In Acer pseudoplatanus cells, the proteins synthesized in the presence of an amino acid analog ((/sup 14/C)p-fluorophenylalanine), were degraded more rapidly than normal ones ((/sup 14/C)phenylalanine as precursor). The degradation of an important part of these abnormal proteins occurred inside the vacuoles. The degradation process was not apparently associated to a specific proteolytic system but was related to a preferential transfer of these aberrant proteins from the cytoplasm to the vacuole.

  9. Sequence-dependent abnormal aggregation of human Tau fragment in an inducible cell model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ling; Hu, Ji-Ying; Hu, Meng-Yun; Zhang, Yi; Hong, Zheng-Yuan; Cheng, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Jie; Pang, Dai-Wen; Liang, Yi

    2015-08-01

    A pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD) is the accumulation of misfolded hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein Tau within neurons, forming neurofibrillary tangles and leading to synaptic dysfunction and neuronal death. Here we study sequence-dependent abnormal aggregation of human fragment Tau244-372 in an inducible cell model. As evidenced by confocal laser scanning microscopy, Western blot, and immunogold electron microscopy, fibril-forming motifs are essential and sufficient for abnormal aggregation of Tau244-372 in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells induced by Congo red: when its two fibril-forming segments PHF6 and PHF6* are deleted, Tau244-372 does lose its ability to form fibrils in SH-SY5Y cells, and the replacement of PHF6 and PHF6* with an unrelated amyloidogenic sequence IFQINS from human lysozyme does rescue the fibril-forming ability of Tau244-372 in SH-SY5Y cells. By contrast, insertion of a non-fibril forming peptide GGGGGG does not drive the disabled Tau244-372 to misfold in SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, as revealed by quantum dots based probes combined with annexin V staining, annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection assay, and immunofluorescence, fibril-forming motifs are essential and sufficient for early apoptosis of living SH-SY5Y cells induced by abnormal aggregation of Tau244-372. Our results suggest that fibril-forming motifs could be the determinants of Tau protein tending to misfold in living cells, thereby inducing neuronal apoptosis and causing the initiation and development of AD.

  10. Significance of Persistent Cytogenetic Abnormalities at Myeloablative Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in First Complete Remission

    PubMed Central

    Oran, Betul; Popat, Uday; Rondon, Gabriella; Ravandi, Farhad; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Abruzzo, Lynn; Andersson, Borje S.; Bashir, Qaiser; Chen, Julianne; Kebriaei, Partow; Khouri, Issa F.; Koca, Ebru; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H.; Champlin, Richard; de Lima, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Risk stratification is important to identify acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients that might benefit from allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) in first complete remission (CR1). We retrospectively studied 150 AML patients with diagnostic cytogenetic abnormalities receiving myeloablative allo-HCT in CR1 to determine the prognostic impact of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at allo-HCT. Three risk groups were identified: First group of patients with favorable/intermediate cytogenetics at diagnosis (n=49) and the second group with unfavorable cytogenetics at diagnosis but without the presence of persistent abnormal clone at allo-HCT (n=83) had similar 3-year leukemia free survival (LFS) of 58%-60% despite increased 3-year relapse incidence (RI) of 32.3% observed in the second risk group versus 16.8% in the first group. Third group of patients with unfavorable cytogenetics at diagnosis and persistence of that clone at allo-HCT (n=15) represented the worst prognostic group with 3-year RI of 57.5% and 3-year LFS of 29.2%. These data suggest that AML patients with unfavorable cytogenetics at diagnosis and persistence of abnormal clone at allo-HCT have high risk of relapse after allo-HCT. These patients should be considered for clinical trials designed to optimize conditioning regimens and/or to use preemptive strategies in the post-transplant setting to decrease the relapse incidence. PMID:22982533

  11. Transmission of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells surviving radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Daniela; Ritter, Sylvia; Durante, Marco; Seifried, Erhard; Fournier, Claudia; Tonn, Torsten

    2015-07-01

    In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (rAML), clonal chromosomal abnormalities are often observed in bone marrow cells of patients, suggesting that their formation is crucial in the development of the disease. Since rAML is considered to originate from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), we investigated the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosomal abnormalities in human CD34(+) cells. We then measured stable chromosomal abnormalities, a possible biomarker of leukemia risk, in clonally expanded cell populations which were grown for 14 days in a 3D-matrix (CFU-assay). We compared two radiation qualities used in radiotherapy, sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions (29 and 60-85 keV/μm, doses between 0.5 and 4 Gy). Only a negligible number of de novo arising, unstable aberrations (≤ 0.05 aberrations/cell, 97% breaks) were measured in the descendants of irradiated HSPC. However, stable aberrations were detected in colonies formed by irradiated HSPC. All cells of the affected colonies exhibited one or more identical aberrations, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of the clonal rearrangements (92%) were simple exchanges such as translocations (77%) and pericentric inversions (15%), which are known to contribute to the development of rAML. Carbon ions were more efficient in inducing cell killing (maximum of ∼ 30-35% apoptotic cells for 2 Gy carbon ions compared to ∼ 25% for X-rays) and chromosomal aberrations in the first cell-cycle after exposure (∼ 70% and ∼ 40% for 1 Gy of carbon ions and X-rays, respectively), with a higher fraction of non-transmissible aberrations. In contrast, for both radiation qualities the percentage of clones with chromosomal abnormalities was similar (40%). Using the frequency of colonies with clonal aberrations as a surrogate marker for the leukemia risk following radiotherapy of solid tumors, charged particle therapy is not expected to lead to an increased risk of

  12. Transmission of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells surviving radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Daniela; Ritter, Sylvia; Durante, Marco; Seifried, Erhard; Fournier, Claudia; Tonn, Torsten

    2015-07-01

    In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (rAML), clonal chromosomal abnormalities are often observed in bone marrow cells of patients, suggesting that their formation is crucial in the development of the disease. Since rAML is considered to originate from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), we investigated the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosomal abnormalities in human CD34(+) cells. We then measured stable chromosomal abnormalities, a possible biomarker of leukemia risk, in clonally expanded cell populations which were grown for 14 days in a 3D-matrix (CFU-assay). We compared two radiation qualities used in radiotherapy, sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions (29 and 60-85 keV/μm, doses between 0.5 and 4 Gy). Only a negligible number of de novo arising, unstable aberrations (≤ 0.05 aberrations/cell, 97% breaks) were measured in the descendants of irradiated HSPC. However, stable aberrations were detected in colonies formed by irradiated HSPC. All cells of the affected colonies exhibited one or more identical aberrations, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of the clonal rearrangements (92%) were simple exchanges such as translocations (77%) and pericentric inversions (15%), which are known to contribute to the development of rAML. Carbon ions were more efficient in inducing cell killing (maximum of ∼ 30-35% apoptotic cells for 2 Gy carbon ions compared to ∼ 25% for X-rays) and chromosomal aberrations in the first cell-cycle after exposure (∼ 70% and ∼ 40% for 1 Gy of carbon ions and X-rays, respectively), with a higher fraction of non-transmissible aberrations. In contrast, for both radiation qualities the percentage of clones with chromosomal abnormalities was similar (40%). Using the frequency of colonies with clonal aberrations as a surrogate marker for the leukemia risk following radiotherapy of solid tumors, charged particle therapy is not expected to lead to an increased risk of

  13. Abnormal cell surface antigen expression in individuals with variant CD45 splicing and histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Boxall, Sally; McCormick, James; Beverley, Peter; Strobel, Stephan; De Filippi, Paola; Dawes, Ritu; Klersy, Catherine; Clementi, Rita; De Juli, Emanuella; Ferster, Aline; Wallace, Diana; Aricò, Maurizio; Danesino, Cezare; Tchilian, Elma

    2004-03-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) are members of a group of rare heterogenous disorders, the histiocytoses, characterized by uncontrolled accumulation of pleomorphic infiltrates of leukocytes. The etiology of these diseases is mainly unknown. CD45 is a hemopoietic cell specific tyrosine phosphatase essential for antigen receptor mediated signaling in lymphocytes and different patterns of CD45 splicing are associated with distinct functions. Recently a polymorphism (C77G) in exon 4 of CD45 causing abnormal CD45 splicing and a point mutation affecting CD45 dimerization were implicated in multiple sclerosis in humans and lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity in mice respectively. Here we show that two patients with HLH exhibited abnormal CD45 splicing caused by the C77G variant allele, while a further 21 HLH patients have normal CD45. We have also examined 62 LCH patients and found three to have the C77G mutation. Peripheral blood thymus-derived (T) CD8(+) cells from normal individuals carrying the C77G mutation show a significant decrease in the proportion of cells expressing L-selectin and increased frequency of cells with LFA-1(hi) expression. It remains to be established whether C77G is a contributing factor in these histiocytic disorders. PMID:14630980

  14. Canine Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. TRANSMISSION OF SEROLOGIC ABNORMALITIES BY CELL-FREE FILTRATES

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Robert M.; Andre-Schwartz, Janine; Harbis, Gerald S.; Hirsch, Martin S.; Black, Paul H.; Schwartz, Robert S.

    1973-01-01

    The presence of viruses was sought in a colony of dogs bred from parents with systemic lupus crythematosus (SLE). Cell-free filtrates prepared from the spleens of these animals were injected into newborn dogs, mice, and rats. The canine recipients developed antinuclear antibody (ANA) and positive lupus erythematosus (LE) cell tests: ANA and, in some cases, antinative DNA antibodies were produced by the murine recipients: no abnormalities were detected in the rats. Serial passage of spleen cells or cell-free filtrates of spleen tissue in syngeneic mice reduced the time required for appearance of ANA from 9 to 4 mo. Some murine recipients of the canine filtrate developed malignant lymphomas. Murine leukemia viruses were identified in these tumors by electron microscopic, virologic, and serologic technics. These neoplasms, but not other tumors known to contain murine leukemia viruses, were associated with the production of ANA. Puppies inoculated with the canine filtrate-induced mouse lymphoma developed ANA and positive LE cell tests within 4 mo. The results were interpreted to indicate the presence in canine SLE of a virus capable of: (a) inducing the serologic abnormalities of SLE in normal dogs and mice: (b) activating latent murine leukemia viruses: and (c) spreading by both horizonal and vertical routes. Images PMID:4124208

  15. Egestion of asbestos fibers in Tetrahymena results in early morphological abnormalities. A step in the induction of heterogeneous cell lines?

    PubMed

    Hjelm, K K

    1989-01-01

    In Tetrahymena populations exposed to crocidolite asbestos fibers, many cells develop morphological abnormalities within 1-2 hours. The abnormalities are mainly large or small protrusions or indentations, or flattened parts of the cell surface and most often located in the posterior part of the cell. They are formed repeatedly in all cells but are also continuously repaired so that the fraction of cells affected represents an equilibrium between these two processes. Their formation is connected with egestion of the large bundles of fibers formed by phagocytosis. Such effects of egestion of fibers do not seem to have been reported previously. Egestion of a bundle of fibers is much slower than for other types of undigestible residues. In contrast to normal exocytosis occurring invariably at the cytoproct, egestion of asbestos often occurs in the posterior part of the cell outside the cytoproct. To my knowledge this is the first reported case of either very slow or extra-cytoproctal egestion in Tetrahymena. Cells with large abnormalities have a greater tendency to develop into "early heterogeneous" cells than the average abnormal cell. Some of these give rise to hereditarily stable heterogeneous cell lines of Tetrahymena. The morphological abnormalities are probably caused by mechanical action of the crocidolite fibers resulting in local damage of the cytoskeletal elements responsible for normal cell shape. The heterogenous cell lines may arise when cellular structures carrying non-genic cytotactically inherited information are modified. The relevance of these ideas to the induction of cancer by asbestos is briefly discussed.

  16. Plasma Cell Gingivitis: An Occasional Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mishra, M B; Sharma, Swati; Sharma, Alok

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell gingivitis, an infrequently observed oral condition, has been clinically characterized by diffuse gingival enlargement, erythema and sometimes desquamation. These lesions are usually asymptomatic, but invariably the patient will complain of a burning sensation in the gingiva and bleeding from the mouth. The diagnosis requires hematological screening in addition to clinical and histopathological examinations. This case report outlines one such case of plasma cell gingivitis in a 15-year-old female caused by use of an herbal, homemade toothpowder. The case presented here highlights the adverse effects and irrational use of herbal agents in dentifrices. At the same time, it emphasizes the need for comprehensive history taking, careful clinical examination and appropriate diagnostic tests in order to arrive at a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan for gingival conditions that are refractory to conventional therapy and to exclude certain malignancies and oral manifestations of systemic diseases.

  17. Abnormal climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synaptic connections in the essential tremor cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Ying; Louis, Elan D.; Faust, Phyllis L.; Koeppen, Arnulf H.; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Structural changes in Purkinje cells have been identified in the essential tremor cerebellum, although the mechanisms that underlie these changes remain poorly understood. Climbing fibres provide one of the major excitatory inputs to Purkinje cells, and climbing fibre-Purkinje cell connections are essential for normal cerebellar-mediated motor control. The distribution of climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synapses on Purkinje cell dendrites is dynamically regulated and may be altered in disease states. The aim of the present study was to examine the density and distribution of climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synapses using post-mortem cerebellar tissue of essential tremor cases and controls. Using vesicular glutamate transporter type 2 immunohistochemistry, we labelled climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synapses of 12 essential tremor cases and 13 age-matched controls from the New York Brain Bank. Normally, climbing fibres form synapses mainly on the thick, proximal Purkinje cell dendrites in the inner portion of the molecular layer, whereas parallel fibres form synapses on the thin, distal Purkinje cell spiny branchlets. We observed that, compared with controls, essential tremor cases had decreased climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synaptic density, more climbing fibres extending to the outer portion of the molecular layer, and more climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synapses on the thin Purkinje cell spiny branchlets. Interestingly, in essential tremor, the increased distribution of climbing fibre-Purkinje cell synapses on the thin Purkinje cell branchlets was inversely associated with clinical tremor severity, indicating a close relationship between the altered distribution of climbing fibre-Purkinje cell connections and tremor. These findings suggest that abnormal climbing fibre-Purkinje cell connections could be of importance in the pathogenesis of essential tremor. PMID:25273997

  18. Presence of circulating abnormal CD34+ progenitors in adult Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    MISERY, L; ROUGIER, N; CRESTANI, B; FAURE, M; CLAUDY, A; SCHMITT, D; VINCENT, C

    1999-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is related to the proliferation of cells, which are similar to Langerhans cells (LC) but possess many abnormal characteristics. Lesions are widespread and this fact suggests that LCH cells or their precursors are present in the blood of patients. In five adult patients, we have isolated and cultured CD34+ blood progenitors of dendritic cells. We studied their phenotype by flow cytometry and their functional properties in mixed culture with heterologous lymphocytes and with autologous lymphocytes in the presence of tri-nitro-phenyl antigen (TNP). The amount of CD34+ precursors was dramatically higher than controls but a high mortality occurred during the in vitro differentiation. The phenotype of surviving cells was similar to LC phenotype (CD1a+, CD83+, Lag+) but some of them expressed CD2. These cells were able to induce T cell proliferation in mixed culture. They could not initiate primary response to TNP, except in a patient treated with thalidomide. In our hands, these CD34+ cells may be precursors of LCH cells. PMID:10403933

  19. 3D culture model of fibroblast-mediated collagen creep to identify abnormal cell behaviour.

    PubMed

    Kureshi, A K; Afoke, A; Wohlert, S; Barker, S; Brown, R A

    2015-11-01

    Native collagen gels are important biomimetic cell support scaffolds, and a plastic compression process can now be used to rapidly remove fluid to any required collagen density, producing strong 3D tissue-like models. This study aimed to measure the mechanical creep properties of such scaffolds and to quantify any enhanced creep occurring in the presence of cells (cell-mediated creep). The test rig developed applies constant creep tension during culture and measures real-time extension due to cell action. This was used to model extracellular matrix creep, implicated in the transversalis fascia (TF) in inguinal hernia. Experiments showed that at an applied tension equivalent to 15% break strength, cell-mediated creep over 24-h culture periods was identified at creep rates of 0.46 and 0.38%/h for normal TF and human dermal fibroblasts, respectively. However, hernia TF fibroblasts produced negligible cell-mediated creep levels under the same conditions. Raising the cell culture temperature from 4 to 37 °C was used to demonstrate live cell dependence of this creep. This represents the first in vitro demonstration of TF cell-mediated collagen creep and to our knowledge the first demonstration of a functional, hernia-related cell abnormality. PMID:25862069

  20. Polycythemia vera. The in vitro response of normal and abnormal stem cell lines to erythropoietin.

    PubMed Central

    Prchal, J F; Adamson, J W; Murphy, S; Steinmann, L; Fialkow, P J

    1978-01-01

    Bone marrow cells from two glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) heterozygotes with polycythemia vera were cultured to determine whether progenitors which wre not of the polycythemia vera clone were present, and, if present, which cell lines contributed to the increase in erythroid colonies observed in response to added erythropoietin (ESF). To accomplish this, the G-6-PD isoenzyme activity of individual erythroid colonies was determined. All of the erythroid colonies analyzed in cultures without added ESF, contained the G-6-PD isoenzyme type characteristic of the abnormal clone. With higher ESF concentrations in the culture, however, there was an increase in the colonies that were not of the polycythemia vera clone. Analysis of the ratio of the various types of colonies indicated that normal and polycythemia vera cells are capable of responding to ESF in vitro. In selected patients, this technique permits analysis of the ratios of normal to abnormal cells during the course of the disease, in response to therapy and during late complications, such as myelofibrosis or leukemic transformation. PMID:659576

  1. Interaction between clonal plasma cells and the immune system in plasma cell dyscrasias.

    PubMed

    Perez-Andres, M; Almeida, J; Martin-Ayuso, M; Moro, M J; Garcia-Marcos, M A; Moreno, I; Dominguez, M; Galende, J; Heras, N; Gonzalez, M I; San Miguel, J F; Orfao, A

    2004-01-01

    The term "monoclonal gammopathy" (MG) includes a group of clonal plasma cell disorders, which show heterogeneous clinical behavior. While multiple myeloma (MM) and plasma cell leukemia (PCL) are incurable malignant diseases, most patients with MG of undetermined significance (MGUS) show an indolent/benign clinical course. Evidence has accumulated which supports the role of the bone marrow microenvironment in MG. Accordingly, the survival, drug-resistance and proliferation of MM cells have been shown to be largely dependent on a supportive microenvironment. Among the different environment-associated parameters, those related to the status/activity of the immune system are particularly relevant. This review focuses on the different ways clonal plasma cells (PC) interact with the immune system in different models of MG, to characterize crucial events in the development and progression of MG. These advances may support the design of novel therapeutic approaches in patients with MG. PMID:15471221

  2. Asymmetric cell-matrix and biomechanical abnormalities in elastin insufficiency induced aortopathy.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Varun K; Evans, Ashlie N; Wansapura, Janaka P; Osinska, Hanna; Maddy, Kelsey E; Biechler, Stefanie V; Narmoneva, Daria A; Goodwin, Richard L; Hinton, Robert B

    2014-10-01

    Aortopathy is characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) abnormalities and elastic fiber fragmentation. Elastin insufficient (Eln (+/-)) mice demonstrate latent aortopathy similar to human disease. We hypothesized that aortopathy manifests primarily in the aorto-pulmonary septal (APS) side of the thoracic aorta due to asymmetric cardiac neural crest (CNC) distribution. Anatomic (aortic root vs. ascending aorta) and molecular (APS vs. non-APS) regions of proximal aorta tissue were examined in adult and aged wild type (WT) and mutant (Eln (+/-)) mice. CNC, VSMCs, elastic fiber architecture, proteoglycan expression, morphometrics and biomechanical properties were examined using histology, 3D reconstruction, micropipette aspiration and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the APS side of Eln (+/-) aorta, Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) is decreased while SM22 is increased. Elastic fiber architecture abnormalities are present in the Eln (+/-) aortic root and APS ascending aorta, and biglycan is increased in the aortic root while aggrecan is increased in the APS aorta. The Eln (+/-) ascending aorta is stiffer than the aortic root, the APS side is thicker and stiffer than the non-APS side, and significant differences in the individual aortic root sinuses are observed. Asymmetric structure-function abnormalities implicate regional CNC dysregulation in the development and progression of aortopathy.

  3. Abnormal NF-kappa B function characterizes human type 1 diabetes dendritic cells and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Mollah, Zia U A; Pai, Saparna; Moore, Craig; O'Sullivan, Brendan J; Harrison, Matthew J; Peng, Judy; Phillips, Karen; Prins, Johannes B; Cardinal, John; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2008-03-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) differentiation is abnormal in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, the nature of the relationship between this abnormality and disease pathogenesis is unknown. We studied the LPS response in monocytes and monocyte-derived DCs isolated from T1DM patients and from non-T1DM controls. In T1DM patients, late LPS-mediated nuclear DNA binding by RelA, p50, c-Rel, and RelB was impaired as compared with type 2 DM, rheumatoid arthritis, and healthy subjects, associated with impaired DC CD40 and MHC class I induction but normal cytokine production. In TIDM monocytes, RelA and RelB were constitutively activated, and the src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-1), a negative regulator of NF-kappaB, was overexpressed. Addition of sodium stibogluconate, a SHP-1 inhibitor, to DCs differentiating from monocyte precursors restored their capacity to respond to LPS in approximately 60% of patients. The monocyte and DC NF-kappaB response to LPS is thus a novel phenotypic and likely pathogenetic marker for human T1DM. SHP-1 is at least one NF-kappaB regulatory mechanism which might be induced as a result of abnormal inflammatory signaling responses in T1DM monocytes. PMID:18292540

  4. L-asparaginase-induced abnormality in plasma glucose level in patients of acute lymphoblastic leukemia admitted to a tertiary care hospital of Odisha

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Mousumee; Swain, Trupti Rekha; Jena, Rabindra Kumar; Panigrahi, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate any abnormal change in plasma glucose levels in patients treated with L-asparaginase (L-Asp)-based chemotherapy regimen in patients of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Materials and Methods: This retrospective, hospital-based study was conducted in patients of ALL, admitted to the Clinical Haematology Department of a tertiary care hospital of Odisha from August 2014 to July 2015. Indoor records of 146 patients on multi-centered protocol-841 were evaluated for any alteration in plasma glucose level, time of onset of hypo/hyperglycemia, and persistence of plasma glucose alteration. Results: Twenty-one percent of patients showed abnormal plasma glucose level. Most of these patients developed hypoglycemia and were of lower age group. Most of these patients developed hypoglycemia and were of lower age group, whereas a majority of higher age group patients developed hyperglycemia. In majority of the cases, abnormal glucose developed after three doses of L-Asp. Hypoglycemia subsided whereas hyperglycemia persisted till the end of our observation period. Conclusions: L-Asp produces more incidences of hypoglycemia than hyperglycemia in a good number of ALL patients towards which clinicians should be more vigilant. However, hyperglycemia persists for a longer duration than hypoglycemia. PMID:27721550

  5. At the border: the plasma membrane-cell wall continuum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengyu; Persson, Staffan; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara

    2015-03-01

    Plant cells rely on their cell walls for directed growth and environmental adaptation. Synthesis and remodelling of the cell walls are membrane-related processes. During cell growth and exposure to external stimuli, there is a constant exchange of lipids, proteins, and other cell wall components between the cytosol and the plasma membrane/apoplast. This exchange of material and the localization of cell wall proteins at certain spots in the plasma membrane seem to rely on a particular membrane composition. In addition, sensors at the plasma membrane detect changes in the cell wall architecture, and activate cytoplasmic signalling schemes and ultimately cell wall remodelling. The apoplastic polysaccharide matrix is, on the other hand, crucial for preventing proteins diffusing uncontrollably in the membrane. Therefore, the cell wall-plasma membrane link is essential for plant development and responses to external stimuli. This review focuses on the relationship between the cell wall and plasma membrane, and its importance for plant tissue organization.

  6. Forced KLF4 expression increases the generation of mature plasma cells and uncovers a network linked with plasma cell stage.

    PubMed

    Schoenhals, Matthieu; Jourdan, Michel; Seckinger, Anja; Pantesco, Véronique; Hose, Dirk; Kassambara, Alboukadel; Moreaux, Jérôme; Klein, Bernard

    2016-07-17

    A role of the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) in the generation of mature plasma cells (PC) is unknown. Indeed, KLF4 is critical in controlling the differentiation of various cell linages, particularly monocytes and epithelial cells. KLF4 is expressed at low levels in pro-B cells and its expression increases as they mature into pre-B cells, resting naïve B cells and memory B cells. We show here that KLF4 is expressed in human bone marrow plasma cells and its function was studied using an in vitro model of differentiation of memory B cells into long lived plasma cells. KLF4 is rapidly lost when memory B cells differentiate into highly cell cycling plasmablasts, poorly cycling early plasma cells and then quiescent long-lived plasma cells. A forced expression of KLF4 in plasmablasts enhances the yield of their differentiation into early plasma cell and long lived plasma cells, by inhibiting apoptosis and upregulating previously unknown plasma cell pathways.

  7. Abnormal differentiation of newborn granule cells in age-related working memory impairments.

    PubMed

    Nyffeler, Myriel; Yee, Benjamin K; Feldon, Joram; Knuesel, Irene

    2010-11-01

    Age-related declines in spatial memory have been linked to abnormal functional properties and connectivity of newborn granule cells. However, the relationship between adult neurogenesis, aging, and cognitive performance seems more complex than previously anticipated, likely due to the difficulty of disentangling alterations related to training as such and those associated with cognitive performance. Here, we investigated how different aspects of adult neurogenesis might be related to training, age and cognitive performance amongst aged subjects by comparing behaviourally naïve and tested rats of 3, 6, 24mo of age. We separated aged rats into learning-impaired and -unimpaired groups based on their performance in the Morris water maze to investigate neurogenesis-related morphological and neurochemical changes. We report an age-related decline in cell proliferation and maturation independent of cognitive performance and testing. We confirm an age-related altered differentiation of newborn neurons which was particularly prominent in learning-impaired rats. This was associated with an abnormally prolonged expression of the early progenitor marker Nestin, potentially also affecting maturation, survival/integration of newborn neurons into existing neuronal networks, which might underlie the individual differences in cognitive performance during aging.

  8. Assessment of nuclear abnormalities in exfoliated cells from the oral epithelium of mobile phone users.

    PubMed

    Souza, Leonardo da Cunha Menezes; Cerqueira, Eneida de Moraes Marcílio; Meireles, José Roberto Cardoso

    2014-06-01

    Transmission and reception of mobile telephony signals take place through electromagnetic wave radiation, or electromagnetic radiofrequency fields, between the mobile terminal and the radio base station. Based on reports in the literature on adverse effects from exposure to this type of radiation, the objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic and cytotoxic potential of such exposure, by means of the micronucleus test on exfoliated cells from the oral epithelium. The sample included 45 individuals distributed in 3 groups according to the amount of time in hours per week (t) spent using mobile phones: group I, t > 5 h; group II, t > 1 h and ≤ 5 h; and group III, t ≤ 1 h. Cells from the oral mucosa were analyzed to assess the numbers of micronuclei, broken egg structures and degenerative nuclear abnormalities indicative of apoptosis (condensed chromatin, karyorrhexis and pyknosis) or necrosis (karyolysis in addition to these changes). The occurrences of micronuclei and degenerative nuclear abnormalities did not differ between the groups, but the number of broken egg (structures that may be associated with gene amplification) was significantly greater in the individuals in group I (p < 0.05).

  9. Cell Adhesion to Plasma-Coated PVC

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Elidiane C.; de Souza, Eduardo S.; de Moraes, Francine S.; Duek, Eliana A. R.; Lucchesi, Carolina; Schreiner, Wido H.; Durrant, Steven F.; Cruz, Nilson C.

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, PAr, was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with PAr between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing PAr, except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices. PMID:25247202

  10. Modeling abnormal early development with induced pluripotent stem cells from aneuploid syndromes.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Wang, Xianming; Fan, Wenxia; Zhao, Ping; Chan, Yau-Chi; Chen, Shen; Zhang, Shiqiang; Guo, Xiangpeng; Zhang, Ya; Li, Yanhua; Cai, Jinglei; Qin, Dajiang; Li, Xingyan; Yang, Jiayin; Peng, Tianran; Zychlinski, Daniela; Hoffmann, Dirk; Zhang, Ruosi; Deng, Kang; Ng, Kwong-Man; Menten, Bjorn; Zhong, Mei; Wu, Jiayan; Li, Zhiyuan; Chen, Yonglong; Schambach, Axel; Tse, Hung-Fat; Pei, Duanqing; Esteban, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    Many human diseases share a developmental origin that manifests during childhood or maturity. Aneuploid syndromes are caused by supernumerary or reduced number of chromosomes and represent an extreme example of developmental disease, as they have devastating consequences before and after birth. Investigating how alterations in gene dosage drive these conditions is relevant because it might help treat some clinical aspects. It may also provide explanations as to how quantitative differences in gene expression determine phenotypic diversity and disease susceptibility among natural populations. Here, we aimed to produce induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines that can be used to improve our understanding of aneuploid syndromes. We have generated iPSCs from monosomy X [Turner syndrome (TS)], trisomy 8 (Warkany syndrome 2), trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and partial trisomy 11;22 (Emanuel syndrome), using either skin fibroblasts from affected individuals or amniocytes from antenatal diagnostic tests. These cell lines stably maintain the karyotype of the donors and behave like embryonic stem cells in all tested assays. TS iPSCs were used for further studies including global gene expression analysis and tissue-specific directed differentiation. Multiple clones displayed lower levels of the pseudoautosomal genes ASMTL and PPP2R3B than the controls. Moreover, they could be transformed into neural-like, hepatocyte-like and heart-like cells, but displayed insufficient up-regulation of the pseudoautosomal placental gene CSF2RA during embryoid body formation. These data support that abnormal organogenesis and early lethality in TS are not caused by a tissue-specific differentiation blockade, but rather involves other abnormalities including impaired placentation.

  11. Cell-specific abnormalities of glutamate transporters in schizophrenia: sick astrocytes and compensating relay neurons?

    PubMed

    McCullumsmith, R E; O'Donovan, S M; Drummond, J B; Benesh, F S; Simmons, M; Roberts, R; Lauriat, T; Haroutunian, V; Meador-Woodruff, J H

    2016-06-01

    Excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAATs) bind and transport glutamate, limiting spillover from synapses due to their dense perisynaptic expression primarily on astroglia. Converging evidence suggests that abnormalities in the astroglial glutamate transporter localization and function may underlie a disease mechanism with pathological glutamate spillover as well as alterations in the kinetics of perisynaptic glutamate buffering and uptake contributing to dysfunction of thalamo-cortical circuits in schizophrenia. We explored this hypothesis by performing cell- and region-level studies of EAAT1 and EAAT2 expression in the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus in an elderly cohort of subjects with schizophrenia. We found decreased protein expression for the typically astroglial-localized glutamate transporters in the mediodorsal and ventral tier nuclei. We next used laser-capture microdissection and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to assess cell-level expression of the transporters and their splice variants. In the mediodorsal nucleus, we found lower expression of transporter transcripts in a population of cells enriched for astrocytes, and higher expression of transporter transcripts in a population of cells enriched for relay neurons. We confirmed expression of transporter protein in neurons in schizophrenia using dual-label immunofluorescence. Finally, the pattern of transporter mRNA and protein expression in rodents treated for 9 months with antipsychotic medication suggests that our findings are not due to the effects of antipsychotic treatment. We found a compensatory increase in transporter expression in neurons that might be secondary to a loss of transporter expression in astrocytes. These changes suggest a profound abnormality in astrocyte functions that support, nourish and maintain neuronal fidelity and synaptic activity.

  12. Abnormal intracellular calcium homeostasis associated with vulnerability in the nerve cells from heroin-dependent rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoshan; Wang, Guangyong; Pu, Hongwei; Jing, Hualan

    2014-07-14

    The cellular mechanisms by which opiate addiction develops with repetitive use remain largely unresolved. Intercellular calcium homeostasis is one of the most critical elements to determine neuroadaptive changes and neuronal fate. Heroin, one of the most addictive opiates, may induce neurotoxicity potentially inducing brain impairment, especially for those chronic users who get an overdose. Here we examined changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) after repeated exposure to heroin using cultured cerebral cortical neurons. Dynamic changes in [Ca2+]i indicated by fluo-3-AM were monitored using confocal laser scan microscopy, followed by cytotoxicity assessments. It showed that the cells dissociated from heroin-dependent rats had a smaller depolarization-induced [Ca2+]i responses, and a higher elevation in [Ca2+]i when challenged with a high concentration of heroin (500 μM). The restoration ability to remove calcium after washout of these stimulants was impaired. Calcium channel blocker verapamil inhibited the heroin-induced [Ca2+]i elevations as well as the heroin-induced cell damage. The relative [Ca2+]i of the nerve cells closely correlated with the number of damaged cells induced by heroin. These results demonstrate that nerve cells from heroin-dependent rats manifest abnormal [Ca2+]i homeostasis, as well as vulnerability to heroin overdose, suggesting involvement of [Ca2+]i regulation mechanisms in heroin addiction and neurotoxicity.

  13. Plasmocytoma, multiple myeloma and plasma cell neoplasms in orofacial region.

    PubMed

    Zajko, J; Czako, L; Galis, B

    2016-01-01

    A neoplastic proliferation of B cell lymphocyte is called plasma cell neoplasms, results from malignant plasma cells transformation in bone marrow. The authors present a clinical study and overview of this pathology in maxillofacial region for six years (Tab. 2, Ref. 14). PMID:27546545

  14. [Plasma cell dyscrasias and renal damage].

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Sonia; Iannuzzella, Francesco; Somenzi, Danio; Mattei, Silvia; Bovino, Achiropita; Corradini, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Kidney damage caused by immunoglobulin free light chains in the setting of plasma cell dyscrasias is common and may involve all renal compartments, from the glomerulus to the tubulointerstitium, in a wide variety of histomorphological and clinical patterns. The knowledge of how free light chains can promote kidney injury is growing: they can cause functional changes, be processed and deposited, mediate inflammation, apoptosis and fibrosis, and obstruct nephrons. Each clone of the free light chain is unique and its primary structure and post-translation modification can determine the type of renal disease. Measurement of serum free light chain concentrations and calculation of the serum kappa/lambda ratio, together with renal biopsy, represent essential diagnostic tools. An early and correct diagnosis of renal lesions due to plasma cell dyscrasias will allow early initiation of disease-specific treatment strategies. The treatment of free light chain nephropathies is evolving and knowledge of the pathways that promote renal damage should lead to further therapeutic developments.

  15. Abnormal pulmonary function and associated risk factors in children and adolescents with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Arteta, Manuel; Campbell, Andrew; Nouraie, Mehdi; Rana, Sohail; Onyekwere, Onyinye C; Ensing, Gregory; Sable, Craig; Dham, Niti; Darbari, Deepika; Luchtman-Jones, Lori; Kato, Gregory J; Gladwin, Mark T; Castro, Oswaldo L; Minniti, Caterina P; Gordeuk, Victor R

    2014-04-01

    Obstructive and restrictive pulmonary changes develop in children with sickle cell disease, but reports conflict as to the type of change that predominates. We prospectively performed spirometry, plethysmography, and lung diffusing capacity in 146 children aged 7 to 20 years with hemoglobin SS or Sβ(0)-thalassemia. Nineteen percent of the patients had obstructive physiology as defined according to guidelines of the American Thoracic Society. In addition, 9% had restrictive physiology and 11% had abnormal but not categorized physiology. Increasing age, patient-reported or family-reported history of asthma or wheezing, and higher lactate dehydrogenase concentration were independent predictors of obstruction as reflected in lower forced expiratory volume in the first second/forced vital capacity. In conclusion, abnormal pulmonary function, most often obstructive, is common in children with hemoglobin SS and Sβ(0)-thalassemia. Full pulmonary function testing should be performed in children with hemoglobin SS or Sβ(0)-thalassemia, especially with history of asthma or wheezing and accentuated elevations in hemolytic markers.

  16. Galactosylceramidase deficiency causes sperm abnormalities in the mouse model of globoid cell leukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Luddi, A.; Strazza, M.; Carbone, M.; Moretti, E.; Costantino-Ceccarini, E. . E-mail: costantino@unisi.it

    2005-03-10

    The classical recessive mouse mutant, 'the twitcher,' is one of the several animal models of the human globoid cell leukodystrophy (Krabbe disease) caused by a deficiency in the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme galactosylceramidase (GALC). The failure to hydrolyze galactosylceramide (gal-cer) and galactosylsphingosine (psychosine) leads to degeneration of oligodendrocytes and severe demyelination. Substrate for GALC is also the galactosyl-alkyl-acyl-glycerol (GalAAG), precursor of the seminolipid, the most abundant glycolipid in spermatozoa of mammals. In this paper, we report the pathobiology of the testis and sperm in the twitcher mouse and demonstrate the importance of GALC for normal sperm maturation and function. The GALC deficit results in accumulation of GalAAG in the testis of the twitcher mouse. Morphological studies revealed that affected spermatozoa have abnormally swollen acrosomes and angulation of the flagellum mainly at midpiece-principal piece junction. Multiple folding of the principal piece was also observed. Electron microscopy analysis showed that in the twitcher sperm, acrosomal membrane is redundant, detached from the nucleus and folded over. Disorganization and abnormal arrangements of the axoneme components were also detected. These results provide in vivo evidence that GALC plays a critical role in spermiogenesis.

  17. [Distribution of abnormal cell clone with deletion of chromosome 20q in marrow cell lineages and apoptosis cells in myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Qin, Ling; Wang, Chun; Qin, You-Wen; Xie, Kuang-Cheng; Yan, Shi-Ke; Gao, Yan-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Rui; Zhao, Chu-Xian

    2008-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of abnormal clone in marrow cell lineages and apoptosis cells in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with deletion of chromosome 20q. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing myeloid precursors (CD15), erythroid precursors (GPA), T cells (CD3(+)CD56(-)CD16(-)), B cells (CD19), NK cells (CD3(-)CD56(+)CD16(+)) were used to sort bone marrow cells in a MDS patient with del (20q) by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Annexin V-FITC and PI were used to sort bone marrow Annexin V(+)PI(-) and Annexin V(-)PI(-) cells by FACS. The sorted positive cells were detected by interphase dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (D-FISH) using a LSI D20S108 probe (Spectrum Orange) and a Telvysion TM 20p probe (Spectrum Green). FACS and FISH analysis were also performed on the samples from 4 cases with normal karyotype. The results showed that the proportions of MDS clone in the myeloid and erythroid precursors were 70.50% and 93.33% respectively, in the RAEB-1 patient with del (20q) and were obviously higher than that in control group (5.39% and 6.17%). The proportions of abnormal clone in T, B and NK cells were 3.23%, 4.32% and 5.77% respectively and were less than that in control group (5.76%, 4.85%, 6.36%). The percentage of apoptotic cells in the bone marrow nucleated cells was 16.09%. The proportions of MDS clone in Annexin V(+)PI(-) and Annexin V(-)PI(-) cells were 32.48% and 70.11%, respectively. It is concluded that most myeloid and erythroid precursors are originated from the abnormal clone in MDS with del (20q). A little part of apoptotic cells are derived from the abnormal clone.

  18. B cell–intrinsic deficiency of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) causes severe abnormalities of the peripheral B-cell compartment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Recher, Mike; Burns, Siobhan O.; de la Fuente, Miguel A.; Volpi, Stefano; Dahlberg, Carin; Walter, Jolan E.; Moffitt, Kristin; Mathew, Divij; Honke, Nadine; Lang, Philipp A.; Patrizi, Laura; Falet, Hervé; Keszei, Marton; Mizui, Masayuki; Csizmadia, Eva; Candotti, Fabio; Nadeau, Kari; Bouma, Gerben; Delmonte, Ottavia M.; Frugoni, Francesco; Fomin, Angela B. Ferraz; Buchbinder, David; Lundequist, Emma Maria; Massaad, Michel J.; Tsokos, George C.; Hartwig, John; Manis, John; Terhorst, Cox; Geha, Raif S.; Snapper, Scott; Lang, Karl S.; Malley, Richard; Westerberg, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Wiskott Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is caused by mutations in the WAS gene that encodes for a protein (WASp) involved in cytoskeleton organization in hematopoietic cells. Several distinctive abnormalities of T, B, and natural killer lymphocytes; dendritic cells; and phagocytes have been found in WASp-deficient patients and mice; however, the in vivo consequence of WASp deficiency within individual blood cell lineages has not been definitively evaluated. By conditional gene deletion we have generated mice with selective deficiency of WASp in the B-cell lineage (B/WcKO mice). We show that this is sufficient to cause a severe reduction of marginal zone B cells and inability to respond to type II T-independent Ags, thereby recapitulating phenotypic features of complete WASp deficiency. In addition, B/WcKO mice showed prominent signs of B-cell dysregulation, as indicated by an increase in serum IgM levels, expansion of germinal center B cells and plasma cells, and elevated autoantibody production. These findings are accompanied by hyperproliferation of WASp-deficient follicular and germinal center B cells in heterozygous B/WcKO mice in vivo and excessive differentiation of WASp-deficient B cells into class-switched plasmablasts in vitro, suggesting that WASp-dependent B cell–intrinsic mechanisms critically contribute to WAS-associated autoimmunity. PMID:22302739

  19. Development of plasma-on-chip: Plasma treatment for individual cells cultured in media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Shinya; Chang, Chun-Yao; Jeong, Jonghyeon; Kobayashi, Mime; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    A device consisting of Si microwells and microplasma sources has been fabricated for plasma treatment of individual cells cultured in media. We named the device plasma-on-chip. The microwells have through-holes at the bottom where gas-liquid interfaces form when they are filled with media containing biological samples. The microplasma sources, which supply reactive species, are located on the back of each microwell. Through the gas-liquid interface, the reactive species are supplied to the cells. Chlorella cells were used to demonstrate the feasibility of the device and after three minutes of plasma treatment, the fluorescence intensity of Chlorella cells appeared to be decreased. Optical emission spectroscopy identified O and OH radicals in the plasma, which can affect the cells. In the analysis of biological samples such as human cells or tissues, this device raises the possibility of revealing the mechanisms of plasma medicine in more detail.

  20. Development of plasma-on-chip: Plasma treatment for individual cells cultured in media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Shinya; Chang, Chun-Yao; Jeong, Jonghyeon; Kobayashi, Mime; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    A device consisting of Si microwells and microplasma sources has been fabricated for plasma treatment of individual cells cultured in media. We named the device plasma-on-chip. The microwells have through-holes at the bottom where gas–liquid interfaces form when they are filled with media containing biological samples. The microplasma sources, which supply reactive species, are located on the back of each microwell. Through the gas–liquid interface, the reactive species are supplied to the cells. Chlorella cells were used to demonstrate the feasibility of the device and after three minutes of plasma treatment, the fluorescence intensity of Chlorella cells appeared to be decreased. Optical emission spectroscopy identified O and OH radicals in the plasma, which can affect the cells. In the analysis of biological samples such as human cells or tissues, this device raises the possibility of revealing the mechanisms of plasma medicine in more detail.

  1. Towards Stratified Medicine in Plasma Cell Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Philip; Drain, Stephen; Conway, Caroline; Bjourson, Anthony J.; Alexander, H. Denis

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell myeloma is a clinically heterogeneous malignancy accounting for approximately one to 2% of newly diagnosed cases of cancer worldwide. Treatment options, in addition to long-established cytotoxic drugs, include autologous stem cell transplant, immune modulators, proteasome inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, plus further targeted therapies currently in clinical trials. Whilst treatment decisions are mostly based on a patient’s age, fitness, including the presence of co-morbidities, and tumour burden, significant scope exists for better risk stratification, sub-classification of disease, and predictors of response to specific therapies. Clinical staging, recurring acquired cytogenetic aberrations, and serum biomarkers such as β-2 microglobulin, and free light chains are in widespread use but often fail to predict the disease progression or inform treatment decision making. Recent scientific advances have provided considerable insight into the biology of myeloma. For example, gene expression profiling is already making a contribution to enhanced understanding of the biology of the disease whilst Next Generation Sequencing has revealed great genomic complexity and heterogeneity. Pathways involved in the oncogenesis, proliferation of the tumour and its resistance to apoptosis are being unravelled. Furthermore, knowledge of the tumour cell surface and its interactions with bystander cells and the bone marrow stroma enhance this understanding and provide novel targets for cell and antibody-based therapies. This review will discuss the development in understanding of the biology of the tumour cell and its environment in the bone marrow, the implementation of new therapeutic options contributing to significantly improved outcomes, and the progression towards more personalised medicine in this disorder. PMID:27775669

  2. Abnormal expression of TIP30 and arrested nucleocytoplasmic transport within oligodendrocyte precursor cells in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Jin; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Nawa, Mikiro; Aiso, Sadakazu; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2008-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) persist near the demyelinated axons arising in MS but inefficiently differentiate into oligodendrocytes and remyelinate these axons. The pathogenesis of differentiation failure remains elusive. We initially hypothesized that injured axons fail to present Contactin, a positive ligand for the oligodendroglial Notch1 receptor to induce myelination, and thus tracked axoglial Contactin/Notch1 signaling in situ, using immunohistochemistry in brain tissue from MS patients containing chronic demyelinated lesions. Instead, we found that Contactin was saturated on demyelinated axons, Notch1-positive OPCs accumulated in Contactin-positive lesions, and the receptor was engaged, as demonstrated by cleavage to Notch1-intracellular domain (NICD). However, nuclear translocalization of NICD, required for myelinogenesis, was virtually absent in these cells. NICD and related proteins carrying nuclear localization signals were associated with the nuclear transporter Importin but were trapped in the cytoplasm. Abnormal expression of TIP30, a direct inhibitor of Importin, was observed in these OPCs. Overexpression of TIP30 in a rat OPC cell line resulted in cytoplasmic entrapment of NICD and arrest of differentiation upon stimulation with Contactin-Fc. Our results suggest that extracellular inhibitory factors as well as an intrinsic nucleocytoplasmic transport blockade within OPCs may be involved in the pathogenesis of remyelination failure in MS. PMID:19104151

  3. Strain-Dependent Effect of Macroautophagy on Abnormally Folded Prion Protein Degradation in Infected Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Daisuke; Homma, Takujiro; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Fuse, Takayuki; Sano, Kazunori; Takatsuki, Hanae; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are neurodegenerative disorders caused by the accumulation of abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) in the central nervous system. With the aim of elucidating the mechanism underlying the accumulation and degradation of PrPSc, we investigated the role of autophagy in its degradation, using cultured cells stably infected with distinct prion strains. The effects of pharmacological compounds that inhibit or stimulate the cellular signal transduction pathways that mediate autophagy during PrPSc degradation were evaluated. The accumulation of PrPSc in cells persistently infected with the prion strain Fukuoka-1 (FK), derived from a patient with Gerstmann–Sträussler–Scheinker syndrome, was significantly increased in cultures treated with the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3MA) but substantially reduced in those treated with the macroautophagy inducer rapamycin. The decrease in FK-derived PrPSc levels was mediated, at least in part, by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/MEK signalling pathway. By contrast, neither rapamycin nor 3MA had any apparently effect on PrPSc from either the 22L or the Chandler strain, indicating that the degradation of PrPSc in host cells might be strain-dependent. PMID:26368533

  4. Strain-Dependent Effect of Macroautophagy on Abnormally Folded Prion Protein Degradation in Infected Neuronal Cells.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Daisuke; Homma, Takujiro; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Fuse, Takayuki; Sano, Kazunori; Takatsuki, Hanae; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are neurodegenerative disorders caused by the accumulation of abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) in the central nervous system. With the aim of elucidating the mechanism underlying the accumulation and degradation of PrPSc, we investigated the role of autophagy in its degradation, using cultured cells stably infected with distinct prion strains. The effects of pharmacological compounds that inhibit or stimulate the cellular signal transduction pathways that mediate autophagy during PrPSc degradation were evaluated. The accumulation of PrPSc in cells persistently infected with the prion strain Fukuoka-1 (FK), derived from a patient with Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, was significantly increased in cultures treated with the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3MA) but substantially reduced in those treated with the macroautophagy inducer rapamycin. The decrease in FK-derived PrPSc levels was mediated, at least in part, by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/MEK signalling pathway. By contrast, neither rapamycin nor 3MA had any apparently effect on PrPSc from either the 22L or the Chandler strain, indicating that the degradation of PrPSc in host cells might be strain-dependent. PMID:26368533

  5. Molecular Characterization of Circulating Plasma Cells in Patients with Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lugar, Patricia L.; Love, Cassandra; Grammer, Amrie C.; Dave, Sandeep S.; Lipsky, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a generalized autoimmune disease characterized by abnormal B cell activation and the occurrence of increased frequencies of circulating plasma cells (PC). The molecular characteristics and nature of circulating PC and B cells in SLE have not been completely characterized. Microarray analysis of gene expression was used to characterize circulating PC in subjects with active SLE. Flow cytometry was used to sort PC and comparator B cell populations from active SLE blood, normal blood and normal tonsil. The gene expression profiles of the sorted B cell populations were then compared. SLE PC exhibited a similar gene expression signature as tonsil PC. The differences in gene expression between SLE PC and normal tonsil PC and tonsil plasmablasts (PB) suggest a mature Ig secreting cell phenotype in the former population. Despite this, SLE PC differed in expression of about half the genes from previously published gene expression profiles of normal bone marrow PC, indicating that these cells had not achieved a fully mature status. Abnormal expression of several genes, including CXCR4 and S1P1, suggests a mechanism for the persistence of SLE PC in the circulation. All SLE B cell populations revealed an interferon (IFN) gene signature previously only reported in unseparated SLE peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These data indicate that SLE PC are a unique population of Ig secreting cells with a gene expression profile indicative of a mature, but not fully differentiated phenotype. PMID:23028528

  6. Molecular characterization of circulating plasma cells in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lugar, Patricia L; Love, Cassandra; Grammer, Amrie C; Dave, Sandeep S; Lipsky, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a generalized autoimmune disease characterized by abnormal B cell activation and the occurrence of increased frequencies of circulating plasma cells (PC). The molecular characteristics and nature of circulating PC and B cells in SLE have not been completely characterized. Microarray analysis of gene expression was used to characterize circulating PC in subjects with active SLE. Flow cytometry was used to sort PC and comparator B cell populations from active SLE blood, normal blood and normal tonsil. The gene expression profiles of the sorted B cell populations were then compared. SLE PC exhibited a similar gene expression signature as tonsil PC. The differences in gene expression between SLE PC and normal tonsil PC and tonsil plasmablasts (PB) suggest a mature Ig secreting cell phenotype in the former population. Despite this, SLE PC differed in expression of about half the genes from previously published gene expression profiles of normal bone marrow PC, indicating that these cells had not achieved a fully mature status. Abnormal expression of several genes, including CXCR4 and S1P(1), suggests a mechanism for the persistence of SLE PC in the circulation. All SLE B cell populations revealed an interferon (IFN) gene signature previously only reported in unseparated SLE peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These data indicate that SLE PC are a unique population of Ig secreting cells with a gene expression profile indicative of a mature, but not fully differentiated phenotype.

  7. Micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities in buccal mucosa cells in patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Pacheco-Gutiérrez, Angélica Guadalupe; Vázquez-Valls, Eduardo; Ramos-Ibarra, María Luisa; Torres-Mendoza, Blanca Miriam

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the frequency of micronucleated cell (MNC) and nuclear abnormalities (NA) in the buccal mucosa cells of females with anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN), compared with healthy women. Individuals with AN and BN have inadequate feeding and compensatory behaviour to avoid weight gain. These behaviours can cause extreme body stress, thereby inducing DNA damage. In a cross-sectional study, we assessed the frequency of MNC and NA in the buccal mucosa cells of female participants with AN or BN. All of these patients had been admitted to a private clinic for the treatment of eating disorders after diagnosis with AN (n = 10) or BN (n = 7) according to the DSM-IV. Age-matched healthy female participants (n = 17) composed the control group. Oral mucosa samples were collected, fixed, stained by aceto-orcein/fast green and microscopically examined. Normal cells, MNC and NAs were counted within a 2000 cell sample. The results were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Differences were observed in the frequency of MNC in healthy females (1.2±0.9) versus that of patients with AN (3.4±1.5) (P < 0.0001) and BN (4.1±2.2) (P < 0.001). No differences were found among these groups in terms of NA. AN and BN are related to the loss of genetic material through chromosomal fractures and/or damage to the mitotic spindle (i.e. possibly a result of a deficiency in DNA precursors). Self-imposed compensatory behaviours in AN and BN, such as severe food restriction, potential malnutrition, vomiting, use of diuretics and laxatives and acute exhaustive exercise, are possible inducers of MNC and genotoxic damage. Of these compensatory behaviours, only vomiting has not been linked to genotoxic damage. This is the first report in women with BN, which should be studied in the future.

  8. Immunophenotyping in multiple myeloma and related plasma cell disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shaji; Kimlinger, Teresa; Morice, William

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Plasma cell disorders form a spectrum ranging from the asymptomatic presence of small monoclonal populations of plasma cells to conditions like plasma cell leukemia and multiple myeloma, in which the bone marrow can be replaced by the accumulation of neoplastic plasma cells. Immunophenotyping has become an invaluable tool in the management of hematological malignancies and is increasingly finding a role in the diagnosis and monitoring of plasma cell disorders. Multiparameter flow cytometry has evolved considerably during the past decade with an increasing ability to screen large numbers of events and to detect multiple antigens at the same time. This, along with a better understanding of the phenotypic heterogeneity of the clonal plasma cells in different disorders, has made immunophenotyping an indispensible tool in the diagnosis, prognostic classification and management of plasma cell disorders. This book chapter addresses the approaches taken to evaluate monoclonal plasma cell disorders, and the different markers and techniques that are important for the study of these diseases. PMID:21112041

  9. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating. pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal.

  10. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode Pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, M.A.

    1995-04-25

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal. 5 figs.

  11. JAK2V617F-positive endothelial cells contribute to clotting abnormalities in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Etheridge, S. Leah; Roh, Michelle E.; Cosgrove, Megan E.; Sangkhae, Veena; Fox, Norma E.; Chen, Junmei; López, José A.; Kaushansky, Kenneth; Hitchcock, Ian S.

    2014-01-01

    The Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) V617F mutation is the primary pathogenic mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). Although thrombohemorrhagic incidents are the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with MPNs, the events causing these clotting abnormalities remain unclear. To identify the cells responsible for the dysfunctional hemostasis, we used transgenic mice expressing JAK2V617F in specific lineages involved in thrombosis and hemostasis. When JAK2V617F was expressed in both hematopoietic and endothelial cells (ECs), the mice developed a significant MPN, characterized by thrombocytosis, neutrophilia, and splenomegaly. However, despite having significantly higher platelet counts than controls, these mice showed severely attenuated thrombosis following injury. Interestingly, platelet activation and aggregation in response to agonists was unaltered by JAK2V617F expression. Subsequent bone marrow transplants revealed the contribution of both endothelial and hematopoietic compartments to the attenuated thrombosis. Furthermore, we identified a potential mechanism for this phenotype through JAK2V617F-regulated inhibition of von Willebrand factor (VWF) function and/or secretion. JAK2V617F+ mice display a condition similar to acquired von Willebrand syndrome, exhibiting significantly less high molecular weight VWF and reduced agglutination to ristocetin. These findings greatly advance our understanding of thrombohemorrhagic events in MPNs and highlight the critical role of ECs in the pathology of hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:24469804

  12. Autoimmune gastritis and parietal cell reactivity in two children with abnormal intestinal permeability.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Deanne L V; Crock, Patricia; Braye, Stephen; Davidson, Patricia; Sentry, John W

    2008-08-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is characterised by lymphocytic infiltration of the gastric submucosa, with loss of parietal and chief cells and achlorhydria. Often, gastritis is expressed clinically as cobalamin deficiency with megaloblastic anaemia, which is generally described as a disease of the elderly. Here, we report on two prepubertal children who developed autoimmune gastritis. One child developed autoimmune gastritis as part of a polyglandular autoimmune disease from a family with polyglandular autoimmune disease type II (PGA type II) and the other as part of a classic "thyro-gastric cluster," which may have been triggered by emotional trauma. Both children presented with normal small bowel biopsies, with abnormal gut permeability, which subsequently resolved. These patients are among the youngest reported to date. The immune systems targetted the gastric parietal cell autoantigens (ATP4A and ATP4B) in both children, similar to the elderly. The study of children with autoimmune gastritis and their families may provide additional insights into the disease's pathogenesis and may also lead to the identification of inheritable factors influencing susceptibility. This report underlines the necessity to screen paediatric patients with organ-specific autoimmune diseases for co-existent conditions. Children with polyglandular autoimmune disease are at particularly high risk.

  13. Micronuclei Frequencies and Nuclear Abnormalities in Oral Exfoliated Cells of Nuclear Power Plant Workers

    PubMed Central

    Babannavar, Roopa; Lohra, Abhishek; Kodgi, Ashwin; Bapure, Sunil; Rao, Yogesh; J., Arun; Malghan, Manjunath

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Biomonitoring provides a useful tool to estimate the genetic risk from exposure to genotoxic agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequencies of Micronuclei (MN) and other Nuclear abnormalities (NA) from exfoliated oral mucosal cells in Nuclear Power Station (NPS) workers. Materials and Methods: Micronucleus frequencies in oral exfoliated cells were done from individuals not known to be exposed to either environmental or occupational carcinogens (Group I). Similarly samples were obtained from full-time Nuclear Power Station (NPS) workers with absence of Leukemia and any malignancy (Group II) and workers diagnosed as leukemic patients and undergoing treatment (Group III). Results: There was statistically significant difference between Group I, Group II & Group III. MN and NA frequencies in Leukemic Patients were significantly higher than those in exposed workers &control groups (p < 0.05). Conclusion: MN and other NA reflect genetic changes, events associated with malignancies. Therefore, there is a need to educate those who work in NPS about the potential hazard of occupational exposure and the importance of using protective measures. PMID:25654022

  14. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  15. Neurologic, neuropsychologic, and computed cranial tomography scan abnormalities in 2- to 10-year survivors of small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B E; Becker, B; Goff, W B; Petronas, N; Krehbiel, M A; Makuch, R W; McKenna, G; Glatstein, E; Ihde, D C

    1985-12-01

    In order to evaluate the relationship between neurologic function and cranial irradiation, 20 patients treated on National Cancer Institute (NCI) small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) trials who were alive and free of cancer 2.4 to 10.6 years (median, 6.2) from the start of therapy were studied. All were tested with a neurologic history and examination, mental status examination, neuropsychologic testing, and review of serial computed cranial tomography (CCT) scans. Fifteen patients had been treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI), two patients with therapeutic cranial irradiation, and three received no cranial irradiation. All patients but one were ambulatory and none were institutionalized. Fifteen patients (75%) had neurologic complaints, 13 (65%) had abnormal neurologic examinations, 12 (60%) had abnormal mental status examinations, 13 (65%) had abnormal neuropsychologic testing, and 15 (75%) had abnormal CCT scans. Compared with those given low-dose maintenance chemotherapy during PCI using 200 to 300 rad per fraction, patients who were given high-dose induction chemotherapy during the time of cranial irradiation or large radiotherapy fractions (400 rad) were more likely to have abnormal mental status examinations (6/6 v 4/9) and abnormal neuropsychologic tests (6/6 v 4/9), but no major difference in CCT findings was present. CCT scans in the majority of cases (11/18) showed progressive ventricular dilatation or cerebral atrophy up to 8 years after stopping therapy. We conclude neurologic abnormalities are common in long-term survivors of SCLC, and may be more prominent in patients given high-dose chemotherapy during cranial irradiation or treated with large radiotherapy fractions. The CCT scan abnormalities are common and progressive years after prophylactic cranial irradiation and chemotherapy are stopped.

  16. Molecular detection of chromosomal abnormalities in germ and somatic cells of aged male mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, X.; Baulch, J.; Quintana, L.; Ramsey, M.; Breneman, J.; Tucker, J.; Wyrobek, A.; Collins, B.; Allen, J.; Holland, N.

    1994-12-31

    Three cytogenetic methods were applied to eight B6C3F1 male mice aged 22.5 - 30.5mo to determine if advanced age was associated with an elevated risk of producing chromosomally defective germinal and somatic cells; sperm aneuploidy analysis by multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization for three chromosomes, spermatid micronucleus analysis with anti-kinetochore antibodies, and translocation analysis of somatic metaphases by {open_quotes}painting{close_quotes} for two chromosomes. Eight mice aged 2.4mo served as controls. Sperm aneuploidy was measured by multi-color fluorescence in situ co-hybridization with DNA probes specific for chromosomes X, Y and 8, scoring 10,000 cells per animal. The aged group showed significant 1.5 - 2.0 fold increases in the hyperhaploidy phenotypes X-X-8, Y-Y-8, 8-8-Y, and 8-8-X with the greater effects appearing in animals aged >29mo. The aged group also showed significantly increased frequencies of micronucleated spermatids (2.0 vs 0.4 per 1000; all were kinetochore negative). Analysis of metaphase chromosomes from blood by {open_quotes}painting{close_quotes} of chromosomes 2 and 8 yielded 4 translocation per 858 cell-equivalents in the aged group which was a non-significant elevation over 0/202 in controls. Although interpretation must be cautious due to the small number of animals analyzed, these findings suggest that advanced paternal age may be a risk factor for chromosomal abnormalities of reproductive and somatic importance.

  17. Differential effects of lenalidomide during plasma cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jourdan, Michel; Cren, Maïlys; Schafer, Peter; Robert, Nicolas; Duperray, Christophe; Vincent, Laure; Ceballos, Patrice; Cartron, Guillaume; Rossi, Jean-François; Moreaux, Jérôme; Chopra, Rajesh; Klein, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide have greatly improved the outcome of patients with multiple myeloma. However, their effects on plasma cells, the healthy counterpart of myeloma cells, are unknown. Here, we investigated lenalidomide effects on normal human plasma cell generation using an in vitro model. Lenalidomide inhibited the generation of pre-plasmablasts and early plasma cells, while it moderately affected plasmablast production. It also reduced the expression level of Ikaros, Aiolos, and IRF4 transcription factors, in plasmablasts and early plasma cells. This suggests that their differential sensitivity to lenalidomide is not due to a difference in Ikaros or Aiolos degradation. Lenalidomide also inhibited long-lived plasma cell generation, but did not impair their long-term survival once generated. This last observation is in agreement with the finding that lenalidomide treatment for 3-18 months did not affect the bone marrow healthy plasma cell count in allografted patients with multiple myeloma. Our findings should prompt to investigate whether lenalidomide resistance in patients with multiple myeloma could be associated with the emergence of malignant plasmablasts or long-lived plasma cells that are less sensitive to lenalidomide. PMID:27057635

  18. Segmentation of cytoplasm and nuclei of abnormal cells in cervical cytology using global and local graph cuts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Kong, Hui; Chin, Chien Ting; Liu, Shaoxiong; Chen, Zhi; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Siping

    2014-07-01

    Automation-assisted reading (AAR) techniques have the potential to reduce errors and increase productivity in cervical cancer screening. The sensitivity of AAR relies heavily on automated segmentation of abnormal cervical cells, which is handled poorly by current segmentation algorithms. In this paper, a global and local scheme based on graph cut approach is proposed to segment cervical cells in images with a mix of healthy and abnormal cells. For cytoplasm segmentation, the multi-way graph cut is performed globally on the a* channel enhanced image, which can be effective when the image histogram presents a non-bimodal distribution. For segmentation of nuclei, especially when they are abnormal, we propose to use graph cut adaptively and locally, which allows the combination of intensity, texture, boundary and region information. Two concave points-based approaches are integrated to split the touching-nuclei. As part of an ongoing clinical trial, preliminary validation results obtained from 21 cervical cell images with non-ideal imaging condition and pathology show that our segmentation method achieved 93% accuracy for cytoplasm, and 88.4% F-measure for abnormal nuclei, outperforming state of the art methods in terms of accuracy. Our method has the potential to improve the sensitivity of AAR in screening for cervical cancer.

  19. Chronic plasma cell endometritis in hysterectomy specimens of HIV-infected women: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Kerr-Layton, J A; Stamm, C A; Peterson, L S; McGregor, J A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Abnormal uterine bleeding is a common and troublesome problem in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women. We sought to evaluate endometrial pathology among HIV-infected women requiring hysterectomy to explore if endometritis may be common among these patients. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of uterine pathology specimens obtained from HIV-infected and control patients requiring hysterectomy in two urban hospitals between 1988 and 1997 matched for age, surgical indication, and history of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) use. Cases were evaluated for the presence of plasma cells and assigned a grade between 0 and 3. RESULTS: Indications included cervical dysplasia (4), carcinoma in situ (2), abnormal uterine bleeding (3), and adnexal mass (3). Some degree of abnormal uterine bleeding occurred in all cases. Plasma cell endometritis was twice as common in HIV-infected women compared to HIV-negative specimens (11/11 versus 11/22) (P < 0.05). Plasma cell endometritis was also of a higher grade in specimens from HIV-infected women than in controls (P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Chronic endometritis was common and of a higher grade among HIV-infected women requiring hysterectomy in our series. Diagnosis and treatment of endometritis should be considered in HIV-infected women with uterine bleeding and/or tenderness. We speculate that antiretroviral and/or antimicrobial treatment for endometritis may effectively treat endometritis and eliminate the need for surgery in some HIV-infected women. We suggest that consideration and treatment of endometritis in HIV-1 infected women being evaluated for possible hysterectomy has the potential to reduce costs and morbidity for patients and providers who may be exposed during surgical procedures. PMID:9812252

  20. Development of plasma apparatus for plasma irradiation to living cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Ryo; Tanoue, Hideto; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Tero, Ryugo

    2012-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma has been studied for the industrial applications of biotechnology and medical care. For the development of these fields, understanding the influence of atmospheric pressure plasma on living cell and the mechanism of cell death is necessary. We focus on a basic structure of cell membrane, called lipid bilayer. Lipid bilayer is composed of lipid molecules with an amphipathic property and can be formed on hydrophilic substrates. In this paper, we report the development of the plasma apparatus for the treatment of lipid bilayer. The plasma apparatus uses a typical dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system and employs parallel plate electrodes with a gap distance of 1 mm [1]. Each electrode is covered with a quartz plate and the substrate temperature is kept constant by cooling medium. The lower quartz electrode has a dimple, in which the substrate coated with a lipid bilayer and buffer fluid are mounted. [4pt] [1] Y. Sugioka, et al, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., in press

  1. Potential Uses, Limitations, and Basic Procedures of Micronuclei and Nuclear Abnormalities in Buccal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe; Nava, Arnulfo; Flores-García, Aurelio; Ramos-Ibarra, María Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The use of biomarkers as tools to evaluate genotoxicity is increasing recently. Methods that have been used previously to evaluate genomic instability are frequently expensive, complicated, and invasive. The micronuclei (MN) and nuclear abnormalities (NA) technique in buccal cells offers a great opportunity to evaluate in a clear and precise way the appearance of genetic damage whether it is present as a consequence of occupational or environmental risk. This technique is reliable, fast, relatively simple, cheap, and minimally invasive and causes no pain. So, it is well accepted by patients; it can also be used to assess the genotoxic effect derived from drug use or as a result of having a chronic disease. Furthermore the beneficial effects derived from changes in life style or taking additional supplements can also be evaluated. In the present paper, we aim to focus on the explanation of MN test and its usefulness as a biomarker; we further give details about procedures to perform and interpret the results of the test and review some factors that could have an influence on the results of the technique. PMID:24778463

  2. Potential uses, limitations, and basic procedures of micronuclei and nuclear abnormalities in buccal cells.

    PubMed

    Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe; Nava, Arnulfo; Flores-García, Aurelio; Ramos-Ibarra, María Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The use of biomarkers as tools to evaluate genotoxicity is increasing recently. Methods that have been used previously to evaluate genomic instability are frequently expensive, complicated, and invasive. The micronuclei (MN) and nuclear abnormalities (NA) technique in buccal cells offers a great opportunity to evaluate in a clear and precise way the appearance of genetic damage whether it is present as a consequence of occupational or environmental risk. This technique is reliable, fast, relatively simple, cheap, and minimally invasive and causes no pain. So, it is well accepted by patients; it can also be used to assess the genotoxic effect derived from drug use or as a result of having a chronic disease. Furthermore the beneficial effects derived from changes in life style or taking additional supplements can also be evaluated. In the present paper, we aim to focus on the explanation of MN test and its usefulness as a biomarker; we further give details about procedures to perform and interpret the results of the test and review some factors that could have an influence on the results of the technique.

  3. Antibacterial plasma at safe levels for skin cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekema, B. K. H. L.; Hofmann, S.; van Ham, B. J. T.; Bruggeman, P. J.; Middelkoop, E.

    2013-10-01

    Plasmas produce various reactive species, which are known to be very effective in killing bacteria. Plasma conditions, at which efficient bacterial inactivation is observed, are often not compatible with leaving human cells unharmed. The purpose of this study was to determine plasma settings for inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, without damaging skin cells in vitro under the same treatment conditions. An RF argon plasma jet excited with either continuous or time modulated (20 kHz, 20% duty cycle) voltages was used. To compare these two operation modes, only the input voltage was adjusted in order to obtain the same average power (1.7 W) for both modes. All other settings, i.e. gas flow, distance plasma tip to liquid surface, were kept constant. Bacteria or skin cells in physiological salt solution were exposed to direct non-contact plasma treatments. Short plasma treatments of up to 2 min resulted in a high reduction of bacterial numbers and did not affect dermal fibroblasts or keratinocytes. Bacterial inactivation has been previously ascribed to peroxynitrite, nitrite and H2O2 while eukaryotic cell viability is proposed to be reduced in the long term by the presence of H2O2 and is less affected by reactive nitrogen species. The remote RF plasma jet treatment was highly effective for bacterial inactivation while skin cell viability was preserved.

  4. Pentoxifylline Reverses Chronic Experimental Chagasic Cardiomyopathy in Association with Repositioning of Abnormal CD8+ T-Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Isabela Resende; Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Moreira, Otacilio Cruz; Ramos, Isalira Peroba; Gibaldi, Daniel; Britto, Constança; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC), the main clinical sign of Chagas disease, is associated with systemic CD8+ T-cell abnormalities and CD8-enriched myocarditis occurring in an inflammatory milieu. Pentoxifylline (PTX), a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, has immunoregulatory and cardioprotective properties. Here, we tested PTX effects on CD8+ T-cell abnormalities and cardiac alterations using a model of experimental Chagas’ heart disease. Methodology/Principal Findings C57BL/6 mice chronically infected by the Colombian Trypanosoma cruzi strain and presenting signs of CCC were treated with PTX. The downmodulation of T-cell receptors on CD8+ cells induced by T. cruzi infection was rescued by PTX therapy. Also, PTX reduced the frequency of CD8+ T-cells expressing activation and migration markers in the spleen and the activation of blood vessel endothelial cells and the intensity of inflammation in the heart tissue. Although preserved interferon-gamma production systemically and in the cardiac tissue, PTX therapy reduced the number of perforin+ cells invading this tissue. PTX did not alter parasite load, but hampered the progression of heart injury, improving connexin 43 expression and decreasing fibronectin overdeposition. Further, PTX reversed electrical abnormalities as bradycardia and prolonged PR, QTc and QRS intervals in chronically infected mice. Moreover, PTX therapy improved heart remodeling since reduced left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and restored the decreased LV ejection fraction. Conclusions/Significance PTX therapy ameliorates critical aspects of CCC and repositioned CD8+ T-cell response towards homeostasis, reinforcing that immunological abnormalities are crucially linked, as cause or effect, to CCC. Therefore, PTX emerges as a candidate to treat the non-beneficial immune deregulation associated with chronic Chagas' heart disease and to improve prognosis. PMID:25789471

  5. Proteomic analysis identifies interleukin 11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in human endometrial epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During the peri-implantation period, the embryo adheres to an adequately prepared or receptive endometrial surface epithelium. Abnormal embryo adhesion to the endometrium results in embryo implantation failure and infertility. Endometrial epithelial cell plasma membrane proteins critical in regulating adhesion may potentially be infertility biomarkers or targets for treating infertility. Interleukin (IL) 11 regulates human endometrial epithelial cells (hEEC) adhesion. Its production is abnormal in women with infertility. The objective of the study was to identify IL11 regulated plasma membrane proteins in hEEC in vitro using a proteomic approach. Methods Using a 2D-differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) electrophoresis combined with LCMS/MS mass spectrometry approach, we identified 20 unique plasma membrane proteins differentially regulated by IL11 in ECC-1 cells, a hEEC derived cell line. Two IL11 regulated proteins with known roles in cell adhesion, annexin A2 (ANXA2) and flotillin-1 (FLOT1), were validated by Western blot and immunocytochemistry in hEEC lines (ECC-1 and an additional cell line, Ishikawa) and primary hEEC. Flotilin-1 was further validated by immunohistochemistry in human endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle (n = 6-8/cycle). Results 2D-DIGE analysis identified 4 spots that were significantly different between control and IL11 treated group. Of these 4 spots, there were 20 proteins that were identified with LCMS/MS. Two proteins; ANXA2 and FLOT1 were chosen for further analyses and have found to be significantly up-regulated following IL11 treatment. Western blot analysis showed a 2-fold and a 2.5-fold increase of ANXA2 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. Similarly, a 1.8-fold and a 2.3/2.4-fold increase was also observed for FLOT1 in hEEC membrane fraction of ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells respectively. In vitro, IL11 induced stronger ANXA2 expression on cell surface of primary hEEC and ECC-1 whilst

  6. Plasma cell gingivitis with severe alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek; Tripathi, Amitandra Kumar; Saimbi, Charanjit Singh; Sinha, Jolly

    2015-01-16

    Plasma cell gingivitis is a rare benign condition of the gingiva characterised by sharply demarcated erythaematous and oedematous gingiva often extending up to the muco gingival junction. It is considered a hypersensitive reaction. It presents clinically as a diffuse, erythaematous and papillary lesion of the gingiva, which frequently bleeds, with minimal trauma. This paper presents a case of a 42-year-old man who was diagnosed with plasma cell gingivitis, based on the presence of plasma cells in histological sections, and severe alveolar bone loss at the affected site, which was managed by surgical intervention.

  7. Disseminated plasma cell myeloma presenting as massive pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Kanahasubramanian Anand; Sundararajan, Lakshmikanthan; Prabu, Pandurangan; Parameswaran, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell myeloma (PCM) is a hematologic malignancy of plasma cell origin and usually associated with the presence of lytic bone lesions. Pleural effusions are rarely associated with PCM and most often signify a concurrent disease process. Malignant myelomatous pleural effusions are even more unusual and carry a poor prognosis. We report a unique case of unsuspected PCM with thoracic involvement in the form of massive left side pleural effusion. Pleural fluid cytology revealed numerous atypical plasma cells. Subsequently on further workup, urine Bence Jones protein was positive. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy and computed tomography of the chest and abdomen revealed features consistent with multiple myeloma. PMID:26664659

  8. Cardiac troponin I is abnormally expressed in non-small cell lung cancer tissues and human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Liu, Jia-Bao; Bian, Zhi-Ping; Xu, Jin-Dan; Wu, Heng-Fang; Gu, Chun-Rong; Shi, Yi; Zhang, Ji-Nan; Chen, Xiang-Jian; Yang, Di

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is the only sarcomeric protein identified to date that is expressed exclusively in cardiac muscle. Its expression in cancer tissues has not been reported. Herein, we examined cTnI expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues, human adenocarcinoma cells SPCA-1 (lung) and BGC 823 (gastric) by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and real-time PCR. Immunopositivity for cTnI was demonstrated in 69.4% (34/49) NSCLC tissues evaluated, and was strong intensity in 35.3% (6/17) lung squamous cell carcinoma cases. The non-cancer-bearing lung tissues except tuberculosis (9/9, 100%) showed negative staining for cTnI. Seven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human cTnI were applied in immunofluorescence. The result showed that the staining pattern within SPCA-1 and BGC 823 was dependent on the epitope of the cTnI mAbs. The membrane and nucleus of cancer cells were stained by mAbs against N-terminal peptides of cTnI, and cytoplasm was stained by mAbs against the middle and C-terminal peptides of cTnI. A ~25 kD band was identified by anti-cTnI mAb in SPCA-1 and BGC 823 extracts by western blot, as well as in cardiomyocyte extracts. The cTnI mRNA expressions in SPCA-1 and BGC 823 cells were about ten thousand times less than that in cardiomyocytes. Our study shows for the first time that cTnI protein and mRNA were abnormally expressed in NSCLC tissues, SPCA-1 and BGC 823 cells. These findings challenge the conventional view of cTnI as a cardiac-specific protein, enabling the potential use of cTnI as a diagnostic marker or targeted therapy for cancer.

  9. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of plasma reveals abnormalities in lipid metabolism proteins in chronic kidney disease-related atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luczak, Magdalena; Formanowicz, Dorota; Marczak, Łukasz; Suszyńska-Zajczyk, Joanna; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a considerably higher risk of death due to cardiovascular causes. Using an iTRAQ MS/MS approach, we investigated the alterations in plasma protein accumulation in patients with CKD and classical cardiovascular disease (CVD) without CKD. The proteomic analysis led to the identification of 130 differentially expressed proteins among CVD and CKD patients and healthy volunteers. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 29 differentially expressed proteins were involved in lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis, 20 of which were apolipoproteins and constituents of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Although dyslipidemia is common in CKD patients, we found that significant changes in apolipoproteins were not strictly associated with changes in plasma lipid levels. A lack of correlation between apoB and LDL concentration and an inverse relationship of some proteins with the HDL level were revealed. An increased level of apolipoprotein AIV, adiponectin, or apolipoprotein C, despite their anti-atherogenic properties, was not associated with a decrease in cardiovascular event risk in CKD patients. The presence of the distinctive pattern of apolipoproteins demonstrated in this study may suggest that lipid abnormalities in CKD are characterized by more qualitative abnormalities and may be related to HDL function rather than HDL deficiency.

  10. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of plasma reveals abnormalities in lipid metabolism proteins in chronic kidney disease-related atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Luczak, Magdalena; Formanowicz, Dorota; Marczak, Łukasz; Suszyńska-Zajczyk, Joanna; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a considerably higher risk of death due to cardiovascular causes. Using an iTRAQ MS/MS approach, we investigated the alterations in plasma protein accumulation in patients with CKD and classical cardiovascular disease (CVD) without CKD. The proteomic analysis led to the identification of 130 differentially expressed proteins among CVD and CKD patients and healthy volunteers. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 29 differentially expressed proteins were involved in lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis, 20 of which were apolipoproteins and constituents of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Although dyslipidemia is common in CKD patients, we found that significant changes in apolipoproteins were not strictly associated with changes in plasma lipid levels. A lack of correlation between apoB and LDL concentration and an inverse relationship of some proteins with the HDL level were revealed. An increased level of apolipoprotein AIV, adiponectin, or apolipoprotein C, despite their anti-atherogenic properties, was not associated with a decrease in cardiovascular event risk in CKD patients. The presence of the distinctive pattern of apolipoproteins demonstrated in this study may suggest that lipid abnormalities in CKD are characterized by more qualitative abnormalities and may be related to HDL function rather than HDL deficiency. PMID:27600335

  11. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of plasma reveals abnormalities in lipid metabolism proteins in chronic kidney disease-related atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Luczak, Magdalena; Formanowicz, Dorota; Marczak, Łukasz; Suszyńska-Zajczyk, Joanna; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a considerably higher risk of death due to cardiovascular causes. Using an iTRAQ MS/MS approach, we investigated the alterations in plasma protein accumulation in patients with CKD and classical cardiovascular disease (CVD) without CKD. The proteomic analysis led to the identification of 130 differentially expressed proteins among CVD and CKD patients and healthy volunteers. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 29 differentially expressed proteins were involved in lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis, 20 of which were apolipoproteins and constituents of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Although dyslipidemia is common in CKD patients, we found that significant changes in apolipoproteins were not strictly associated with changes in plasma lipid levels. A lack of correlation between apoB and LDL concentration and an inverse relationship of some proteins with the HDL level were revealed. An increased level of apolipoprotein AIV, adiponectin, or apolipoprotein C, despite their anti-atherogenic properties, was not associated with a decrease in cardiovascular event risk in CKD patients. The presence of the distinctive pattern of apolipoproteins demonstrated in this study may suggest that lipid abnormalities in CKD are characterized by more qualitative abnormalities and may be related to HDL function rather than HDL deficiency. PMID:27600335

  12. Subpopulations of human T lymphocytes. XVI. Maldistribution of T cell subsets associated with abnormal locomotion of T cells in untreated adult patients with Hodgkin's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S.

    1980-01-01

    Peripheral blood and splenic T cells from adult patients with Hodgkin's disease were examined for the proportions and numbers of T cells with receptors for IgM (Tμ) or IgG (Tγ) and their locomotor responses to chemotactic stimuli of casein and endotoxin-activated serum (EAS). Thirty per cent of patients had absolute lymphopenia in the peripheral blood. The proportion of Tμ cells was comparable but the proportion of Tγ cells was significantly increased (P<0·001) resulting in an abnormally low ratio of Tμ/Tγ cells when compared to those for age- and sex-matched controls. In the spleens, the proportions of T cells and Tμ cells were significantly increased (P<0·001) and Tγ cells significantly decreased (P<0·001) resulting in an abnormally high ratio of Tμ/Tγ cells when compared with normal spleens. In the peripheral blood both Tμ and Tγ cells were increased and T cells lacking either receptor (Tφ) were significantly decreased in patients in whom spleens were involved by the tumour when compared to those in whom spleens were not involved by the tumour. Peripheral blood T cells from patients with Hodgkin's disease responded poorly to the chemotactic stimuli when compared to T cells from normal controls or T cells from the spleens of the same patients. Tμ cell proportions in patients with combined stages III and IV were significantly lower (P<0·025) than those in the peripheral blood of patients in combined stages I and II. No correlation was observed between the above parameters and histopathological types of Hodgkin's disease. This study demonstrates an abnormal distribution of T cell subsets and abnormality of locomotion of T cells between peripheral blood and spleens in patients with Hodgkin's disease. This might explain the cellular basis of at least certain immunodeficiencies so commonly associated with Hodgkin's disease. PMID:6970098

  13. Splenic Long-Lived Plasma Cells Promote the Development of Follicular Helper T Cells during Autoimmune Responses.

    PubMed

    Jang, Eunkyeong; Cho, Wang Sik; Oh, Yeon-Kyung; Cho, Mi-La; Kim, Jung Mogg; Paik, Doo-Jin; Youn, Jeehee

    2016-02-01

    Long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs) develop under the help of follicular helper T (Tfh) cells and reside mainly in the bone marrow. However, these cells are unusually abundant in the spleen of several autoimmune models including K/BxNsf mice, yet their pathogenic impact remains unknown. To investigate a previously unappreciated role of splenic LLPCs, we sorted splenic plasma cells (PCs) from K/BxNsf and K/BxN mice, corresponding to LLPCs and conventional short-lived PCs, respectively, and compared their phenotypes and ability to prime and induce the differentiation of naive CD4(+) T cells into effector cells in vitro and in vivo. We found that K/BxNsf PCs had lower levels of the Ag presentation machinery and costimulators than K/BxN PCs, and also a lower CD4(+) T cell priming capacity. Autoantigen-pulsed K/BxNsf PCs selectively polarized cognate CD4(+) T cells toward the expression of molecules necessary for Tfh development and function. As a result, the K/BxNsf PC-primed CD4(+) T cells were more effective in stimulating B cells to produce autoantigen-specific IgGs than K/BxN PCs or even dendritic cells. Adoptive transfer of K/BxNsf PCs, but not K/BxN PCs, to K/BxN mice increased numbers of Tfh cells in draining lymph nodes. These results propose that abnormal accumulation of LLPCs in the spleen of autoimmune models drives the differentiation of autoantigen-primed CD4(+) T cells to Tfh cells. This positive feedback loop between splenic LLPCs and Tfh cells may contribute to the persistence of humoral autoimmunity. PMID:26729802

  14. Effect of Lycium bararum polysaccharides on methylmercury-induced abnormal differentiation of hippocampal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jian-Ying; Chen, Wei-Wei; Cui, Jing; Wang, Hao; Chao, Ci; Lu, Zhi-Yan; Bi, Yong-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the effects of a general extract of Lycium bararum polysaccharides (LBPs) on methylmercury (MeHg)-induced damage in hippocampus neural stem cells (hNSCs). The hippocampal tissues of embryonic day 16 Sprague-Dawley rats were extracted for the isolation, purification and cloning of hNSCs. Following passage and proliferation for 10 days, the cells were allocated at random into the following groups: Control, LBPs, MeHg and MeHg + LBPs. MTT and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2)/glial fibrillary acidic protein/Hoechst immunofluorescence tests were performed to detect the differentiation and growth of hNSCs in the various groups. The differentiation rate of MeHg-treated hNSCs and the perimeter of MAP-2-positive neurons were 3.632±0.63% and 62.36±5.58 µm, respectively, significantly lower compared with the control group values of 6.500±0.81% and 166±8.16 µm (P<0.05). Furthermore, the differentiation rate and the perimeter of MAP-2-positive neurons in LBPs groups cells was 7.75±0.59% and 253.3±11.21 µm, respectively, significantly higher compared with the control group (P<0.05). The same parameters in the MeHg + LBPs group were 5.92±0.98% and 111.9±6.07 µm, respectively, significantly higher than the MeHg group (P<0.05). The astrocyte differentiation rates in the MeHg and MeHg + LBPs group were 41.19±2.14 and 34.58±1.70, respectively (P<0.05). These results suggest that LBPs may promote the generation and development of new neurons and inhibit the MeHg-induced abnormal differentiation of astrocytes. Thus, LBPs may be considered to be a potential new treatment for MeHg-induced neurotoxicity in hNSCs. PMID:27446261

  15. Plasma cell toll-like receptor (TLR) expression differs from that of B cells, and plasma cell TLR triggering enhances immunoglobulin production

    PubMed Central

    Dorner, Marcus; Brandt, Simone; Tinguely, Marianne; Zucol, Franziska; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Zauner, Ludwig; Berger, Christoph; Bernasconi, Michele; Speck, Roberto F; Nadal, David

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key receptors of the innate immune system and show cell subset-specific expression. We investigated the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of TLR genes in human haematopoietic stem cells (HSC), in naïve B cells, in memory B cells, in plasma cells from palatine tonsils and in plasma cells from peripheral blood. HSC and plasma cells showed unrestricted expression of TLR1–TLR9, in contrast to B cells which lacked TLR3, TLR4 and TLR8 but expressed mRNA of all other TLRs. We demonstrated, for the first time, that TLR triggering of terminally differentiated plasma cells augments immunoglobulin production. Thus, boosting the immediate antibody response by plasma cells upon pathogen recognition may point to a novel role of TLRs. PMID:19950420

  16. Induction of Aneuploidy, Centrosome Abnormality, Multipolar Spindle, and Multipolar Division in Cultured Mammalian Cells Exposed to an Arsenic Metabolite, Dimethylarsinate.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    Toxicological studies of arsenic compounds were conducted in cultured mammalian cells to investigate the effects of glutathione (GSH) depletion. Dimethylarsinate DMA(V) was not cytotoxic in cells depleted of GSH, but was found to be cytotoxic when GSH was present outside the cells. The results suggested that a reactive form of DMA(V) was generated through interaction with GSH. Dimethylarsine iodide DMI(III) was used as a model compound of DMA(III), and the biological effects were investigated. DMI(III) was about 10000 times more toxic to the cells than DMA(V). Chromosome structural aberrations and numerical changes, such as aneuploidy, were induced by DMI(III). DMA(V) induced multiple foci of the centrosome protein, γ-tubulin, which were colocalized with multipolar spindles in mitotic cells. The multiple foci coalesced into a single dot on disruption of the microtubules (MT). However, reorganization of the MT caused multiple foci of γ-tubulin, suggesting that the induction of centrosome abnormalities by DMA(V) required intact MT. Inhibition of the MT-dependent motor, kinesin, prevented formation of multiple foci of γ-tubulin, which pointed to the involvement of the MT-dependent mitotic motor, kinesin, in the maintenance of centrosome abnormalities. DMI(III) caused abnormal cytokinesis (multipolar division). In addition, DMI(III) caused morphological transformation in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Consideration of the overall process following the centrosome abnormalities caused by DMA(V) suggested a mode of cytotoxicity in which the mitotic centrosome is a critical target. PMID:27252065

  17. General Information about Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma Cell Neoplasms Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  18. Epidemiology of the plasma-cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Robert A; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2007-12-01

    This review of the plasma-cell disorders begins with the definition of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). The prevalence of MGUS in white and black populations is described. MGUS is a common finding in the medical practice of all physicians, and thus it is important to both the patient and the physician to determine whether the monoclonal protein remains stable or progresses to multiple myeloma (MM), Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM), primary systemic amyloidosis (AL), or a related disorder. The long-term (almost 40 years) follow-up data of 241 patients in the Mayo Clinic population is provided. In a large study of 1384 patients with MGUS from southeastern Minnesota, the risk of progression to MM, WM, AL, or other disorders was approximately 1% per year. Risk factors for progression are provided. The incidence of MM in Olmsted County, Minnesota, remained stable for the 56-year span 1945-2001. The apparent increase in incidence and mortality rates among patients with MM in many studies is due to improved case ascertainment, especially among the elderly. The incidence and mortality rates of MM in the United States and other countries are presented. The major emphasis is on the cause of MM, which is unclear. Exposure to radiation from atomic bombs, therapeutic and diagnostic radiation, and in workers in the nuclear industry field are addressed. Many studies involving agricultural occupations, exposure to benzene, petroleum products, and engine exhaust and other industrial exposures are discussed. Tobacco use, obesity, diet, and alcohol ingestion are all possible causes of MM. Clusters of MM have been noted. Multiple cases of MM have been found in first-degree relatives.

  19. DASAF: An R Package for Deep Sequencing-Based Detection of Fetal Autosomal Abnormalities from Maternal Cell-Free DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baohong; Tang, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Feng; Tao, Chunmei; Gao, Junhui; Ma, Mengmeng; Zhong, Tingyan; Cai, JianPing; Li, Yixue; Ding, Guohui

    2016-01-01

    Background. With the development of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), noninvasive prenatal diagnosis using maternal cell-free DNA is fast becoming the preferred method of fetal chromosomal abnormality detection, due to its inherent high accuracy and low risk. Typically, MPS data is parsed to calculate a risk score, which is used to predict whether a fetal chromosome is normal or not. Although there are several highly sensitive and specific MPS data-parsing algorithms, there are currently no tools that implement these methods. Results. We developed an R package, detection of autosomal abnormalities for fetus (DASAF), that implements the three most popular trisomy detection methods-the standard Z-score (STDZ) method, the GC correction Z-score (GCCZ) method, and the internal reference Z-score (IRZ) method-together with one subchromosome abnormality identification method (SCAZ). Conclusions. With the cost of DNA sequencing declining and with advances in personalized medicine, the demand for noninvasive prenatal testing will undoubtedly increase, which will in turn trigger an increase in the tools available for subsequent analysis. DASAF is a user-friendly tool, implemented in R, that supports identification of whole-chromosome as well as subchromosome abnormalities, based on maternal cell-free DNA sequencing data after genome mapping. PMID:27437397

  20. DASAF: An R Package for Deep Sequencing-Based Detection of Fetal Autosomal Abnormalities from Maternal Cell-Free DNA

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Feng; Tao, Chunmei; Gao, Junhui; Ma, Mengmeng; Zhong, Tingyan; Cai, JianPing; Li, Yixue

    2016-01-01

    Background. With the development of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), noninvasive prenatal diagnosis using maternal cell-free DNA is fast becoming the preferred method of fetal chromosomal abnormality detection, due to its inherent high accuracy and low risk. Typically, MPS data is parsed to calculate a risk score, which is used to predict whether a fetal chromosome is normal or not. Although there are several highly sensitive and specific MPS data-parsing algorithms, there are currently no tools that implement these methods. Results. We developed an R package, detection of autosomal abnormalities for fetus (DASAF), that implements the three most popular trisomy detection methods—the standard Z-score (STDZ) method, the GC correction Z-score (GCCZ) method, and the internal reference Z-score (IRZ) method—together with one subchromosome abnormality identification method (SCAZ). Conclusions. With the cost of DNA sequencing declining and with advances in personalized medicine, the demand for noninvasive prenatal testing will undoubtedly increase, which will in turn trigger an increase in the tools available for subsequent analysis. DASAF is a user-friendly tool, implemented in R, that supports identification of whole-chromosome as well as subchromosome abnormalities, based on maternal cell-free DNA sequencing data after genome mapping. PMID:27437397

  1. Aberrant expression of the neuronal transcription factor FOXP2 in neoplastic plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Andrew J; Lyne, Linden; Brown, Philip J; Launchbury, Rosalind J; Bignone, Paola; Chi, Jianxiang; Roncador, Giovanna; Lawrie, Charles H; Gatter, Kevin C; Kusec, Rajko; Banham, Alison H

    2010-04-01

    FOXP2 mutation causes a severe inherited speech and language defect, while the related transcription factors FOXP1, FOXP3 and FOXP4 are implicated in cancer. FOXP2 mRNA and protein expression were characterised in normal human tissues, haematological cell lines and multiple myeloma (MM) patients' samples. FOXP2 mRNA and protein were absent in mononuclear cells from different anatomical sites, lineages and stages of differentiation. However, FOXP2 mRNA and protein was detected in several lymphoma (8/20) and all MM-derived cell lines (n = 4). FOXP2 mRNA was expressed in bone marrow samples from 96% of MM patients (24/25), 66.7% of patients with the pre-neoplastic plasma cell proliferation monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) (6/9), but not in reactive plasma cells. The frequency of FOXP2 protein expression in CD138(+) plasma cells was significantly higher in MGUS (P = 0.0005; mean 46.4%) and MM patients (P < or = 0.0001; mean 57.3%) than in reactive marrows (mean 2.5%). FOXP2 (>10% nuclear positivity) was detectable in 90.2% of MM (55/61) and 90.9% of MGUS (10/11) patients, showing more frequent expression than CD56 and labelling 75% of CD56-negative MM (9/12). FOXP2 represents the first transcription factor whose expression consistently differentiates normal and abnormal plasma cells and FOXP2 target genes are implicated in MM pathogenesis.

  2. Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia: Identity Card 2016.

    PubMed

    Musto, Pellegrino; Simeon, Vittorio; Todoerti, Katia; Neri, Antonino

    2016-04-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (PPCL) is an aggressive and rare variant of multiple myeloma (MM), characterized by peculiar adverse clinical and biological features. Though the poor outcome of PPCL has been slightly improved by novel treatments during the last 10 years, due to the limited number of available studies in this uncommon disease, optimal therapy remains a classic unmet clinical need. Anyway, in the real-life practice, induction with a bortezomib-based three-drug combination, including dexamethasone and, possibly, lenalidomide, or, alternatively, thalidomide, cyclophosphamide, or doxorubicin, is a reasonable first-line option. This approach may be particularly advisable for patients with adverse cytogenetics, hyperleucocytosis, and rapidly progressive disease, in whom a fast response is required, or for those with suboptimal renal function, where, however, lenalidomide should be used with caution until renal activity is restored. In younger subjects, leukemia/lymphoma-like more intensive regimens, including hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone or continue-infusion cisplatin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide, may be also combined with bortezomib +/- thalidomide. Treatment must be started immediately after a diagnosis of PPCL is made to avoid the risk of irreversible disease complications and, in such a context, the prevention of tumor lysis syndrome is mandatory. In patients eligible for autologous stem cell transplantation (AuSCT), other alkylating agents, in particular melphalan, should be initially avoided in order to allow adequate collections of CD34+ peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). A combination of lenalidomide and dexamethasone may be a valuable alternative option to manage older or unfit patients or those with slower disease evolution or with signs of neuropathy, contraindicating the use of bortezomib. Patients not suitable for transplant procedures should continue the treatment, if a

  3. Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia: Identity Card 2016.

    PubMed

    Musto, Pellegrino; Simeon, Vittorio; Todoerti, Katia; Neri, Antonino

    2016-04-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (PPCL) is an aggressive and rare variant of multiple myeloma (MM), characterized by peculiar adverse clinical and biological features. Though the poor outcome of PPCL has been slightly improved by novel treatments during the last 10 years, due to the limited number of available studies in this uncommon disease, optimal therapy remains a classic unmet clinical need. Anyway, in the real-life practice, induction with a bortezomib-based three-drug combination, including dexamethasone and, possibly, lenalidomide, or, alternatively, thalidomide, cyclophosphamide, or doxorubicin, is a reasonable first-line option. This approach may be particularly advisable for patients with adverse cytogenetics, hyperleucocytosis, and rapidly progressive disease, in whom a fast response is required, or for those with suboptimal renal function, where, however, lenalidomide should be used with caution until renal activity is restored. In younger subjects, leukemia/lymphoma-like more intensive regimens, including hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone or continue-infusion cisplatin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide, may be also combined with bortezomib +/- thalidomide. Treatment must be started immediately after a diagnosis of PPCL is made to avoid the risk of irreversible disease complications and, in such a context, the prevention of tumor lysis syndrome is mandatory. In patients eligible for autologous stem cell transplantation (AuSCT), other alkylating agents, in particular melphalan, should be initially avoided in order to allow adequate collections of CD34+ peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). A combination of lenalidomide and dexamethasone may be a valuable alternative option to manage older or unfit patients or those with slower disease evolution or with signs of neuropathy, contraindicating the use of bortezomib. Patients not suitable for transplant procedures should continue the treatment, if a

  4. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF PLASMA-CELL TUMORS OF THE MOUSE

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, D. F.; Darden, E. B.; Lindsley, D. L.; Pratt, Guthrie T.

    1961-01-01

    An electron microscope study was made of a series of transplanted MPC-1 plasma-cell tumors carried by BALB/c mice. Large numbers of particles similar in morphology to virus particles were present inside the endoplasmic reticulum of tumor plasma cells. Very few particles were seen outside the cells or in ultracentrifuged preparations of the plasma or ascites fluid. In very early tumors particles were occasionally seen free in the cytoplasm adjacent to finely granular material. In general, the distribution of these particles inside endoplasmic reticulum is similar in early and late tumors. A few transplanted X5563 tumors of C3H mice were also examined. Large numbers of particles were found in the region of the Golgi apparatus in late X5663 tumors. A newly described cytoplasmic structure of plasma cells, here called a "granular body," appears to be associated with the formation of the particles. Particles present in MPC-1 tumors are exclusively of a doughnut form, whereas some of those in the inclusions of the late X5563 tumors show a dense center. Normal plasma cells, produced by inoculation of a modified Freund adjuvant into BALB/c mice. have been compared morphologically with tumor plasma cells of both tumor lines. PMID:13733008

  5. Plasma membrane-cell wall connections: roles in mitosis and cytokinesis revealed by plasmolysis of Tradescantia virginiana leaf epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Cleary, A L

    2001-01-01

    Tradescantia virginiana leaf epidermal cells were plasmolysed by sequential treatment with 0.8 M and 0.3 M sucrose. Plasmolysis revealed adhesion of the plasma membrane to the cell wall at sites coinciding with cytoskeletal arrays involved in the polarisation of cells undergoing asymmetric divisions--cortical actin patch--and in the establishment and maintenance of the division site--preprophase band of microtubules and filamentous (F) actin. The majority of cells retained adhesions at the actin patch throughout mitosis. However, only approximately 13% of cells formed or retained attachments at the site of the preprophase band. After the breakdown of the nuclear envelope, plasmolysis had a dramatic effect on spindle orientation, cell plate formation, and the plane of cytokinesis. Spindles were rotated at abnormal angles including tilted into the plane of the epidermis. Cell plates formed but were quickly replaced by vacuole-like intercellular compartments containing no Tinopal-stainable cell wall material. This compartment usually opened to the apoplast at one side, and cytokinesis was completed by the furrow extending across the protoplast. This atypical cytokinesis was facilitated by a phragmoplast containing microtubules and F-actin. Progression of the furrow was unaffected by 25 micrograms of cytochalasin B per ml but inhibited by 10 microM oryzalin. Phragmoplasts were contorted and misguided and cytokinesis prolonged, indicating severe disruption to the guidance mechanisms controlling phragmoplast expansion. These results are discussed in terms of cytoskeleton-plasma membrane-cell wall connections that could be important to the localisation of plasma membrane molecules defining the cortical division site and hence providing positional information to the cytokinetic apparatus, and/or for providing an anchor for cytoplasmic F-actin necessary to generate tension on the phragmoplast and facilitate its directed, planar expansion.

  6. Abnormal concentrations of B vitamins and amino acids in plasma and B vitamins in bile of rabbits with aflatoxicosis.

    PubMed Central

    Viogt, M N; Clarke, J D; Jain, A V; Ayres, J C; Koehler, P E; Hatch, R C

    1981-01-01

    The dosages of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) required to produce significant changes in concentrations of B vitamins in plasma and bile and of amino acids in plasma of rabbits were determined. Folate increased by 98% in plasma, whereas concentration of thiamine, vitamin B6, and biotin decreased by more than 50%. In bile, choline and biotin increased 14- and 18-fold, respectively, whereas folate and niacin decreased by more than 50%. All amino acids in plasma increased between 76 and 155%. The dosages of AFB1 required to induce these changes were usually between 12.5 and 37.5 microgram/kg of body weight per day. Except for changes in biliary concentrations of pantothenic acid, folic acid, and biotin, lower threshold dosages of aflatoxin were required to produce weight loss and anorexia (5.0 and 8.5 microgram of AFB1/kg per day, respectively) than for changes in vitamins and amino acids (approximately 25 to 50 microgram of AFB1/kg per day). The data indicated that AFB1 interfered with the metabolism of B vitamins and amino acids in rabbits. PMID:6786221

  7. Microarray-based understanding of normal and malignant plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, John; Hose, Dirk; Rème, Thierry; Tarte, Karin; Moreaux, Jérôme; Mahtouk, Karéne; Jourdan, Michel; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Rossi, Jean-François; Cremer, Friedrich W.; Klein, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Plasma cells develop from B-lymphocytes following stimulation by antigen and express a genetic program aimed at the synthesis of immunoglobulins. This program includes the induction of genes coding for transcription factors such as PRDM1 and XBP1, cell-surface molecules such as CD138/syndecan-1 and for the unfolded protein response (UPR). We review how the microarray technology has recently contributed to the understanding of the biology of this rare but essential cell population and its transformation into pre-malignant and malignant plasma cells. PMID:16623766

  8. Plasma cell morphology in multiple myeloma and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Ribourtout, B; Zandecki, M

    2015-06-01

    Normal and reactive plasma cells (PC) are easy to ascertain on human bone marrow films, due to their small mature-appearing nucleus and large cytoplasm, the latter usually deep blue after Giemsa staining. Cytoplasm is filled with long strands of rough endoplasmic reticulum and one large Golgi apparatus (paranuclear hof), demonstrating that PC are dedicated mainly to protein synthesis and excretion (immunoglobulin). Deregulation of the genome may induce clonal expansion of one PC that will lead to immunoglobulin overproduction and eventually to one among the so-called PC neoplasms. In multiple myeloma (MM), the number of PC is over 10% in most patients studied. Changes in the morphology of myeloma PC may be inconspicuous as compared to normal PC (30-50% patients). In other instances PC show one or several morphological changes. One is related to low amount of cytoplasm, defining lymphoplasmacytoid myeloma (10-15% patients). In other cases (40-50% patients), named immature myeloma cases, nuclear-cytoplasmic asynchrony is observed: presence of one nucleolus, finely dispersed chromatin and/or irregular nuclear contour contrast with a still large and blue (mature) cytoplasm. A peculiar morphological change, corresponding to the presence of very immature PC named plasmablasts, is observed in 10-15% cases. Several prognostic morphological classifications have been published, as mature myeloma is related to favorable outcome and immature myeloma, peculiarly plasmablastic myeloma, is related to dismal prognosis. However, such classifications are no longer included in current prognostic schemes. Changes related to the nucleus are very rare in monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS). In contrast, anomalies related to the cytoplasm of PC, including color (flaming cells), round inclusions (Mott cells, Russell bodies), Auer rod-like or crystalline inclusions, are reported in myeloma cases as well as in MGUS and at times in reactive disorders. They do not correspond

  9. Hemorheological abnormalities in human arterial hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Hopps, Eugenia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Blood rheology is impaired in hypertensive patients. The alteration involves blood and plasma viscosity, and the erythrocyte behaviour is often abnormal. The hemorheological pattern appears to be related to some pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension and to organ damage, in particular left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. Abnormalities have been observed in erythrocyte membrane fluidity, explored by fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance. This may be relevant for red cell flow in microvessels and oxygen delivery to tissues. Although blood viscosity is not a direct target of antihypertensive therapy, the rheological properties of blood play a role in the pathophysiology of arterial hypertension and its vascular complications.

  10. Biomedical Applications of the Cold Atmospheric Plasma: Cell Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volotskova, Olga

    Current breakthrough research on cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) demonstrates that CAP has great potential in various areas, including medicine and biology, thus providing a new tool for living tissue treatment. Depending on the configuration the cold plasma sources can be used in the following areas: wound healing, skin diseases, hospital hygiene, sterilization, antifungal treatments, dental care, cosmetics targeted cell/tissue removal, and cancer treatments. This dissertation is focused on the studies of biomedical applications of cold atmospheric plasma jet based on helium flow and resultant cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. The studies were carried out on extra-cellular and intra-cellular levels in vitro. The main practical applications are wound healing and alternative to existing cancer therapy methods, areas of great interest and significant challenges. The CAP jet was built in the Micropropulsion and Nanotechnology Laboratory of Dr. Michael Keidar, as a part of multidisciplinary collaboration with the GW Medical School (Dr. M.A. Stepp) concerned with plasma medicine and bioengineering studies. Normal and cancer cells have two fundamental behavioral properties, proliferation and motility, which can be evaluated through cell migration rates and cell cycle progression. Various microscopic, spectroscopic and flow cytometry techniques were used to characterize cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. It was found that CAP effect on the cells is localized within the area of the treatment (of around ˜ 5mm in diameter). The migration rates of the normal skin cells can be reduced up to ˜ 40%. However, depending on the cell type the required treatment time is different, thus differential treatment of various cells presented in tissue is possible. The CAP effect on the migration was explained through the changes of the cell surface proteins/integrins. It was also found that normal and cancer cells respond differently to the CAP treatment under the same

  11. Low Temperature Plasma Kills SCaBER Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barekzi, Nazir; van Way, Lucas; Laroussi, Mounir

    2013-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder is a rare type of bladder cancer that forms as a result of chronic irritation of the epithelial lining of the bladder. The cell line used in this study is SCaBER (ATCC® HTB-3™) derived from squamous cell carcinoma of the human urinary bladder. Current treatments of bladder cancer include surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. However, the cost of these treatments, the potential toxicity of the chemotherapeutic agents and the systemic side-effects warrant an alternative to current cancer treatment. This paper represents preliminary studies to determine the effects of biologically tolerant plasma (BTP) on a cell line of human bladder cancer cells. Previous work by our group using the plasma pencil revealed the efficacy of BTP on leukemia cells suspended in solution. Based on these earlier findings we hypothesized that the plasma exposure would elicit a similar programmed cell death in the SCaBER cells. Trypan blue exclusion and MTT assays revealed the cell killing after exposure to BTP. Our study indicates that low temperature plasma generated by ionizing helium gas and the reactive species may be a suitable and safe alternative for cancer therapy.

  12. The division abnormally delayed (dally) gene: a putative integral membrane proteoglycan required for cell division patterning during postembryonic development of the nervous system in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Nakato, H; Futch, T A; Selleck, S B

    1995-11-01

    We have devised a genetic screen to obtain mutants affecting cell division patterning in the developing central nervous system of Drosophila. The division abnormally delayed (dally) locus was identified using a combination of "enhancer trap" and behavioral screening methods. The ordered cell cycle progression of lamina precursor cells, which generate synaptic target neurons for photoreceptors, is disrupted in dally mutants. The first of two lamina precursor cell divisions shows a delayed entry into mitosis. The second division, one that is triggered by an intercellular signal from photoreceptor axons, fails to take place. Similar to lamina precursors, cells that generate the ommatidia of the adult eye show two synchronized divisions found along the morphogenetic furrow in the eye disc and the first division cycle in dally mutants displays a delayed progression into M phase like that found in the first lamina precursor cell division. dally mutations also affect viability and produce morphological defects in several adult tissues, including the eye, antenna, wing and genitalia. Sequencing of a dally cDNA reveals a potential open reading frame of 626 amino acids with homology to a family of Glypican-related integral membrane proteoglycans. These heparan sulfate-containing proteins are attached to the external leaflet of the plasma membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol linkage. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans may serve as co-receptors for a variety of secreted proteins including fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and members of the Wnt, TGF-beta and Hedgehog families. The cell division defects found in dally mutants implicate the Glypican group of integral membrane proteoglycans in the control of cell division during development.

  13. Plasma miRNA-506 as a Prognostic Biomarker for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Ping; Su, Hong-Xin; Zhao, Da; Guan, Quan-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are responsible for regulating proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, invasion, and metastasis in tumor cells. miRNA-506 is abnormally expressed in multiple tumors, indicating that it might be oncogenic or tumor-suppressive. However, little is known about the association between miRNA-506 expression and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Material/Methods We examined the expression of miRNA-506 in the plasma of ESCC patients using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to determine the association between miRNA-506 expression and clinicopathological features of ESCC. ROC curves were produced for ESCC diagnosis by plasma miRNA-506 and the area under curve was calculated to explore its diagnostic value. Results Average miRNA-506 expression levels were remarkably higher in the plasma of ESCC patients than in healthy volunteers (P<0.001). The expression of miRNA-506 in the plasma was closely associated with lymph node status (P=0.004), TNM stage (P=0.031), and tumor length (P<0.001). According to ROC curves, the area under the curve for plasma miRNA-506 was 0.835, indicating statistical significance for ESCC diagnosis by plasma miRNA-506 (P<0.001). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with high miRNA-506 expression had significantly shorter survival time than those with low miRNA-506 expression. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that T stage, N stage, tumor length, and miRNA-506 expression levels were significantly correlated with prognosis in ESCC patients. Conclusions miRNA-506 can serve as an important molecular marker for diagnosis and prognostic prediction of ESCC. PMID:27345473

  14. Inhibition of Vpr-induced cell cycle abnormality by quercetin: a novel strategy for searching compounds targeting Vpr.

    PubMed

    Shimura, M; Zhou, Y; Asada, Y; Yoshikawa, T; Hatake, K; Takaku, F; Ishizaka, Y

    1999-08-01

    Vpr, an accessory gene product of HIV-1 which induces cell cycle abnormality leading to the increased HIV replication, is supposed to be a possible target for anti-AIDS drugs. We recently established a cell line (MIT-23) in which Vpr-induced cell cycle perturbation could be manipulated by a tetracycline promoter. Here, we screened anti-Vpr activity in 27 kinds of herb drugs using MIT-23 cells. One of the extracts prepared from Houttuyniae herba showed an inhibitory activity. Quercetin (QCT), a compound of this crude drug, efficiently inhibited Vpr function without affecting its expression. Furthermore, data suggested that Vpr-induced transcription from HIV-LTR was considerably abrogated by QCT. These data indicate that QCT, a flavonoid previously reported to inhibit HIV replication, also targets Vpr, implicating that MIT-23 cell provides a novel strategy for screening compounds possessing anti-Vpr activity which would be in turn utilized for clarifying the mechanism of Vpr function.

  15. Measurement of apoptosis and proliferation of bone marrow plasma cells in patients with plasma cell proliferative disorders.

    PubMed

    Witzig, T E; Timm, M; Larson, D; Therneau, T; Greipp, P R

    1999-01-01

    The proliferative rate of malignant plasma cells, as measured by the plasma cell labelling index (PCLI), is an important prognostic factor in multiple myeloma (MM); however, the PCLI alone is probably Inadequate to describe tumour growth because it ignores the idea that myeloma cells may have a reduced rate of apoptosis. The aims of this study were to develop a flow cytometric method to measure the apoptosis index of fresh marrow plasma cells and develop a plasma cell growth index (PCGI) that related both proliferation and apoptosis to disease activity. Marrow aspirates were obtained from 91 patients with plasma cell disorders and the plasma cells in apoptosis were identified by either 7-amino actinomycin-D (7-AAD) or annexin V-FITC three-colour flow cytometry. The median plasma cell apoptotic index (PCAI) for patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smouldering or indolent myeloma (SMM/IMM), and new multiple myeloma (MM) was 5.2, 3.4 and 2.4, respectively (P=0.03, MGUS v MM). The median PCLI for these same patient groups was 0.0, 0.2 and 0.6, respectively (P<0.001, MGUS v MM). The paired PCLI and PCAI for each sample were used to derive the PCGI=2 + [PCLI-(O.1)(PCAI)]. The median PCGI for patients with inactive disease (MGUS, SMM/IMM or amyloidosis) was 1.8 compared to 2.4 for those with active disease (new or relapsed MM) (P<0.001). These results suggest that a decrease in the PCAI may be a factor in the progression from MGUS to SMM to overt MM. PMID:10027725

  16. Human red blood cells' physiological water exchange with the plasma.

    PubMed

    Kargol, M; Kargol, A; Przestalski, M; Siedlecki, J; Karpińska, M; Rogowski, M

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, fundamental issues related to the mechanisms of human red blood cells' physiological water exchange with the plasma (for the stationary conditions) have been discussed. It has been demonstrated, on the basis of mechanistic transport equations for membrane transport that red blood cells are capable of exchanging considerable amounts of water with the plasma. Water absorption is osmosis-driven, and its removal occurs according to the hydromechanics principle, i.e. is driven by the turgor pressure of red blood cells. This newly-acquired knowledge of these issues may appear highly useful for clinical diagnosis of blood diseases and blood circulation failures. PMID:16358974

  17. Plasma cell granuloma of the lung (inflammatory pseudotumor).

    PubMed

    Fassina, A S; Rugge, M; Scapinello, A; Viale, G; Dell'Orto, P; Ninfo, V

    1986-10-31

    A case of plasma cell granuloma (PCG) of the lung in a 54-year old man is reported. PCG is a rare benign lesion that usually presents as a solitary nodule in the lung (coin lesion) at routine X-ray examination. Microscopically it consists of a granulomatous tissue where the major components are mature plasma cells. The immunohistochemical demonstration of polyclonality of plasma cells, excluding the diagnosis of plasmacytoma, confirms the inflammatory pseudotumoral nature of this lesion, although the etiology remains obscure. The presence of lymphocytes, histiocytes, macrophages, blood vessels with prominent endothelial cells and peripheral sclero-hyalinized connective tissue may pose problems in the differential diagnosis with sclerosing hemangioma, pseudolymphoma, nodular amyloidosis, pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma, chronic abscess and neoplasms of true histiocytic origin. The term inflammatory pseudotumor is preferable in describing this type of lesion. PMID:3798575

  18. Abnormal osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells from patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in response to melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong; Xu, Caixia; Zhou, Taifeng; Gao, Bo; Zhou, Hang; Chen, Changhua; Zhang, Changli; Huang, Dongsheng; Su, Peiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities of membranous and endochondral ossification in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) remain incompletely understood. To investigate abnormalities in the melatonin signaling pathway and cellular response to melatonin in AIS, a case-control study of osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation was performed using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). AIS was diagnosed by physical and radiographic examination. hMSCs were isolated from the bone marrow of patients with AIS and control subjects (n=12 each), and purified by density gradient centrifugation. The expression levels of melatonin receptors (MTs) 1 and 2 were detected by western blotting. Osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation was induced by culturing hMSCs in osteogenic and chondrogenic media containing vehicle or 50 nM melatonin. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assays, quantitative glycosaminoglycan (GAG) analysis, and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis were performed. Compared with controls, MT2 demonstrated low expression in the AIS group. Melatonin increased ALP activity, GAG synthesis and upregulated the expression of genes involved in osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation including, ALP, osteopontin, osteocalcin, runt-related transcription factor 2, collagen type II, collagen type X, aggrecan and sex-determining region Y-box 9 in the normal control hMSCs, but did not affect the AIS groups. Thus, AIS hMSCs exhibit abnormal cellular responses to melatonin during osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation, which may be associated with abnormal membranous and endochondral ossification, and skeletal growth. These results indicate a potential modulating role of melatonin via the MT2 receptor on abnormal osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiaation in patients with AIS. PMID:27314307

  19. Targeted disruption of the LAMA3 gene in mice reveals abnormalities in survival and late stage differentiation of epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, M C; Lee, K; Miyashita, Y; Carter, W G

    1999-06-14

    Laminin 5 regulates anchorage and motility of epithelial cells through integrins alpha6beta4 and alpha3beta1, respectively. We used targeted disruption of the LAMA3 gene, which encodes the alpha3 subunit of laminin 5 and other isoforms, to examine developmental functions that are regulated by adhesion to the basement membrane (BM). In homozygous null animals, profound epithelial abnormalities were detected that resulted in neonatal lethality, consistent with removal of all alpha3-laminin isoforms from epithelial BMs. Alterations in three different cellular functions were identified. First, using a novel tissue adhesion assay, we found that the mutant BM could not induce stable adhesion by integrin alpha6beta4, consistent with the presence of junctional blisters and abnormal hemidesmosomes. In the absence of laminin 5 function, we were able to detect a new ligand for integrin alpha3beta1 in the epidermal BM, suggesting that basal keratinocytes can utilize integrin alpha3beta1 to interact with an alternative ligand. Second, we identified a survival defect in mutant epithelial cells that could be rescued by exogenous laminin 5, collagen, or an antibody against integrin alpha6beta4, suggesting that signaling through beta1 or beta4 integrins is sufficient for survival. Third, we detected abnormalities in ameloblast differentiation in developing mutant incisors indicating that events downstream of adhesion are affected in mutant animals. These results indicate that laminin 5 has an important role in regulating tissue organization, gene expression, and survival of epithelium. PMID:10366601

  20. Dry plasma processing for industrial crystalline silicon solar cell production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, M.; Rentsch, J.; Preu, R.

    2010-10-01

    This paper gives an overview on the standard crystalline silicon solar cell manufacturing processes typically applied in industry. Main focus has been put on plasma processes which can replace existing, mainly wet chemical processes within the standard process flow. Finally, additional plasma processes are presented which are suited for higher-efficient solar cells, i.e. for the “passivated emitter and rear cell” concept (PERC) or the “heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer” approach (HIT). Plasma processes for the deposition of thin dielectric or semiconducting layers for surface passivation, emitter deposition or anti-reflective coating purposes are presented. Plasma etching processes for the removal of phosphorus silicate glass or parasitic emitters, for wafer cleaning and masked and mask-free surface texturisation are discussed.

  1. Arsenic trioxide and melarsoprol induce apoptosis in plasma cell lines and in plasma cells from myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Rousselot, P; Labaume, S; Marolleau, J P; Larghero, J; Noguera, M H; Brouet, J C; Fermand, J P

    1999-03-01

    Recent data have renewed the interest for arsenic-containing compounds as anticancer agents. In particular, arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been demonstrated to be an effective drug in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia by inducing programmed cell death in leukemic cells both in vitro and in vivo. This prompted us to study the in vitro effects of As2O3 and of another arsenical derivative, the organic compound melarsoprol, on human myeloma cells and on the plasma cell differentiation of normal B cells. At pharmacological concentrations (10(-8) to 10(-6) mol/L), As2O3 and melarsoprol caused a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of survival and growth in myeloma cell lines that was, in some, similar to that of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells. Both arsenical compounds induced plasma cell apoptosis, as assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining, detection of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface using annexin V, and by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling assay. As2O3 and melarsoprol also inhibited viability and growth and induced apoptosis in plasma-cell enriched preparations from the bone marrow or blood of myeloma patients. In nonseparated bone marrow samples, both arsenical compounds triggered death in myeloma cells while sparing most myeloid cells, as demonstrated by double staining with annexin V and CD38 or CD15 antibodies. In primary myeloma cells as in cell lines, interleukin 6 did not prevent arsenic-induced cell death or growth inhibition, and no synergistic effect was observed with IFN-alpha. In contrast to As2O3, melarsoprol only slightly reduced the plasma cell differentiation of normal B cells induced by pokeweed mitogen. Both pokeweed mitogen-induced normal plasma cells and malignant plasma cells showed a normal nuclear distribution of PML protein, which was disrupted by As2O3 but not by melarsoprol, suggesting that the two arsenical derivatives acted by different mechanisms. These results point to the

  2. Does ATP cross the cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Chaudry, I. H.

    1982-01-01

    Although there is an abundance of evidence which indicates that ATP is released as well as taken up by cells, the concept that ATP cannot cross the cell membrane has tended to prevail. This article reviews the evidence for the release as well as uptake of ATP by cells. The evidence presented by various investigators clearly indicates that ATP can cross the cell membrane and suggests that the release and uptake of ATP are physiological processes. PMID:7051582

  3. Plasma cell-free DNA in patients needing mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Concentrations of plasma cell-free DNA are increased in various diseases and have shown some prognostic value in many patient groups, including critically ill patients. Pathophysiological processes behind the need for mechanical ventilation and the treatment itself could raise plasma levels of cell-free DNA. We evaluated levels of plasma cell-free DNA and their prognostic value in patients needing mechanical ventilation. Methods We studied prospectively 580 mechanically ventilated critically ill patients. Blood samples were taken at study admission (Day 0) and on Day 2. Plasma cell-free DNA concentrations were measured by real-time quantitative PCR assay for the β-globin gene and are expressed as genome equivalents (GE)/ml. Results Median (interquartile range, IQR) plasma cell-free DNA concentration was 11,853 GE/ml (5,304 to 24,620 GE/mL) at study admission, and 11,610 GE/mL (6,411 to 21,558 GE/mL) on Day 2. Concentrations at admission were significantly higher in 90-day non-survivors than survivors, 16,936 GE/mL (7,262 to 46,866 GE/mL) versus 10,026 GE/mL (4,870 to 19,820 GE/mL), P < 0.001. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis plasma cell-free DNA concentration over 16,000 GE/ml remained an independent predictor of 90-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio 2.16, 95% confidence interval CI 1.37 to 3.40). Positive likelihood ratio of plasma cell-free DNA at admission for the prediction of 90-day mortality was 1.72 (95% CI 1.40 to 2.11). Conclusions Plasma levels of cell-free DNA were significantly higher in non-survivors than survivors. Plasma DNA level at baseline was an independent predictor of 90-day mortality. However, its clinical benefit as a prognostic marker seems to be limited. PMID:21838858

  4. Plasma-activated medium induced apoptosis on tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masaru; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kano, Hiroyuki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2013-09-01

    The non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP) has attracted attention in cancer therapy. In this study, the fresh medium was treated with our developed NEAPP, ultra-high electron density (approximately 2 × 1016 cm-3). The medium called the plasma-activated medium (PAM) killed not normal cells but tumor cells through induction of apoptosis. Cell proliferation assays showed that the tumor cells were selectively killed by the PAM. Those cells induced apoptosis using an apoptotic molecular marker, cleaved Caspase3/7. The molecular mechanisms of PAM-mediated apoptosis in the tumor cells were also found that the PAM downregulated the expression of AKT kinase, a marker molecule in a survival signal transduction pathway. These results suggest that PAM may be a promising tool for tumor therapy by downregulating the survival signals in cancers.

  5. Predicting hydrogen isotope inventory in plasma-facing components during normal and abnormal operations in fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Alice; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen isotope behavior and inventory in plasma-facing components (PFCs) of fusion devices are key concerns for safe, reliable, and economical operation. To accurately estimate hydrogen isotope retention and recovery in tungsten (the current leading candidate as a PFC), we have developed a model that was recently benchmarked against isotope depth profile and retention level in a tungsten target under various conditions and compared with both experimental data and simulation results. In this research, we have extended the model to include details of transient events. Therefore, one can use this model to estimate hydrogen isotope retention behavior in tungsten and potential other PFC candidates during normal operational pulse, effects of edge-localized modes (ELMs), and a possible cleaning processes scenario.

  6. Nuclear abnormalities in buccal mucosa cells of patients with type I and II diabetes treated with folic acid.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Meda, B C; Zamora-Perez, A L; Muñoz-Magallanes, T; Sánchez-Parada, M G; García Bañuelos, J J; Guerrero-Velázquez, C; Sánchez-Orozco, L V; Vera-Cruz, J M; Armendáriz-Borunda, J; Zúñiga-González, G M

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is characterized by high blood glucose. Excessive production of free radicals may cause oxidative damage to DNA and other molecules, leading to complications of the disease. It may be possible to delay or reduce such damage by administration of antioxidants such as folic acid (FA). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of FA on nuclear abnormalities (NAs) in the oral mucosa of patients with DM. NAs (micronucleated cells, binucleated cells, pyknotic nuclei, karyorrhexis, karyolysis, abnormally condensed chromatin, and nuclear buds) were analyzed in 2000 cells from 45 healthy individuals (control group) and 55 patients with controlled or uncontrolled type I or II DM; 35 patients in the latter group were treated with FA. Samples were taken from the FA group before and after treatment. An increased rate of NAs was found in patients with DM in comparison with that of the control group (P<0.001). FA supplementation in patients with DM reduced the frequency of NAs (20.4 ± 8.0 before treatment vs. 10.5 ± 5.2 after treatment; P<0.001). The type I and type II DM and controlled and uncontrolled DM subgroups were analyzed in terms of sex, age, and smoking habit. The significantly reduced frequencies of buccal mucosa cells with micronuclei, binucleation, pyknosis, karyorrhexis, karyorrhexis+abnormally condensed chromatin, karyolysis, and nuclear buds produced by FA supplementation in DM patients (P<0.02) are consistent with the idea that free radicals are responsible for the increased frequency of NAs in DM patients.

  7. Nuclear abnormalities in buccal mucosa cells of patients with type I and II diabetes treated with folic acid.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Meda, B C; Zamora-Perez, A L; Muñoz-Magallanes, T; Sánchez-Parada, M G; García Bañuelos, J J; Guerrero-Velázquez, C; Sánchez-Orozco, L V; Vera-Cruz, J M; Armendáriz-Borunda, J; Zúñiga-González, G M

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is characterized by high blood glucose. Excessive production of free radicals may cause oxidative damage to DNA and other molecules, leading to complications of the disease. It may be possible to delay or reduce such damage by administration of antioxidants such as folic acid (FA). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of FA on nuclear abnormalities (NAs) in the oral mucosa of patients with DM. NAs (micronucleated cells, binucleated cells, pyknotic nuclei, karyorrhexis, karyolysis, abnormally condensed chromatin, and nuclear buds) were analyzed in 2000 cells from 45 healthy individuals (control group) and 55 patients with controlled or uncontrolled type I or II DM; 35 patients in the latter group were treated with FA. Samples were taken from the FA group before and after treatment. An increased rate of NAs was found in patients with DM in comparison with that of the control group (P<0.001). FA supplementation in patients with DM reduced the frequency of NAs (20.4 ± 8.0 before treatment vs. 10.5 ± 5.2 after treatment; P<0.001). The type I and type II DM and controlled and uncontrolled DM subgroups were analyzed in terms of sex, age, and smoking habit. The significantly reduced frequencies of buccal mucosa cells with micronuclei, binucleation, pyknosis, karyorrhexis, karyorrhexis+abnormally condensed chromatin, karyolysis, and nuclear buds produced by FA supplementation in DM patients (P<0.02) are consistent with the idea that free radicals are responsible for the increased frequency of NAs in DM patients. PMID:26921015

  8. Analysis of non-thermal plasma-induced cell injury in human lung cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Sano, Kaori; Wada, Motoi; Mizuno, Kazue; Ono, Ryo; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Recent progress of biomedical application of atmospheric pressure plasma shows that the biological effects are mainly due to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in liquid produced by the plasma exposure. To elucidate the cellular responses induced by exposure to the plasma, we focused on identification and quantification of reactive chemical species in plasma-exposed cell culture medium, and cell injury in mammalian cells after treatment of the plasma-exposed medium. In this study, we examined human lung cancer cell lines. The contribution of H2O2 to the cellular responses was considered. Here, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) sustained by a pulsed power supply in argon was used. After APPJ exposure to cell culture medium, RONS detection in liquid was conducted. It showed that OH radical, ONOO-, NO2-, NO3-, and H2O2 were produced in the plasma-exposed medium. Cellular responses of human lung cancer cell lines to the plasma-exposed medium in a concentration-dependence manner were also studied. It showed that the plasma-exposed medium and the H2O2 treatment gave similar reduction in viability and induction of apoptosis. This work was partly supported by MEXT KAKENHI Grant Number 24108005 and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26390096.

  9. A Comprehensive Update on Molecular and Cytogenetic Abnormalities in T-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia (T-pll).

    PubMed

    Delgado, Paul; Starshak, Phillip; Rao, Nagesh; Tirado, Carlos A

    2012-01-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is a rare form of leukemia composed of mature T-cells that usually presents in older people (median age of 65) with initial high white cell counts, massive splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and skin lesions. One of the cornerstones for diagnosing T-PLL includes cytogenetic studies. Most cases of T-PLL will harbor characteristic chromosomal abnormalities involving 14q11. 2 (TCR alpha/delta), 14q32 (TCL1 gene) or Xq28 (MTCP-1 gene), abnormalities of chromosome 8, 12p, and deletions of the long arm of chromosomes 5, 6, 11, and 13. In searching for new T-PLL target genes, recent studies have used techniques such as comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), 50k single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays with gene expression analysis. More recently, SNP arrays with higher resolution analysis have frequently provided more precise information about submicroscopic gene and genomic lesions as well as breakpoints involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. Herein, we summarize a review of the current literature of cytogenetic findings in T-PLL emphasizing those that may relate to the underlying mechanisms of leukemogenesis in T-PLL. Additionally, we stress the importance of karyotype characterization to accurately diagnose this disease because it usually carries a dismal prognosis that requires aggressive treatment strategies as it is poorly responsive to conventional chemotherapy used for other mature T-cell malignancies.

  10. Anti-cancer efficacy of nonthermal plasma dissolved in a liquid, liquid plasma in heterogeneous cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ngoc Hoan; Park, Hyung Jun; Yang, Sang Sik; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of nonthermal plasma for cancer treatment has been reported recently. The heterogeneity of cancer cells need to be addressed to design effective anticancer treatments. Here, we show that treatment with nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma dissolved in a liquid (liquid plasma) induces oxidative stress in heterogeneous populations of cancer cells and ultimately kills these cells via apoptosis, regardless of genetic status, e.g., mutations in p53 and other DNA-damage-response genes. We found that liquid plasma markedly increased the concentration of intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), reflecting an influx from the extracellular milieu. Liquid plasma contributed to mitochondrial accumulation of ROS and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential with consequent cell death. Healthy normal cells, however, were hardly affected by the liquid-plasma treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine blocked liquid-plasma-induced cell death. A knockdown of CuZn-superoxide dismutase or Mn-SOD enhanced the plasma-induced cell death, whereas expression of exogenous CuZn-SOD, Mn-SOD, or catalase blocked the cell death. These results suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction mediated by ROS production is a key contributor to liquid-plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, regardless of genetic variation. Thus, liquid plasma may have clinical applications, e.g., the development of therapeutic strategies and prevention of disease progression despite tumor heterogeneity. PMID:27364630

  11. Anti-cancer efficacy of nonthermal plasma dissolved in a liquid, liquid plasma in heterogeneous cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc Hoan; Park, Hyung Jun; Yang, Sang Sik; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of nonthermal plasma for cancer treatment has been reported recently. The heterogeneity of cancer cells need to be addressed to design effective anticancer treatments. Here, we show that treatment with nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma dissolved in a liquid (liquid plasma) induces oxidative stress in heterogeneous populations of cancer cells and ultimately kills these cells via apoptosis, regardless of genetic status, e.g., mutations in p53 and other DNA-damage-response genes. We found that liquid plasma markedly increased the concentration of intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), reflecting an influx from the extracellular milieu. Liquid plasma contributed to mitochondrial accumulation of ROS and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential with consequent cell death. Healthy normal cells, however, were hardly affected by the liquid-plasma treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine blocked liquid-plasma-induced cell death. A knockdown of CuZn-superoxide dismutase or Mn-SOD enhanced the plasma-induced cell death, whereas expression of exogenous CuZn-SOD, Mn-SOD, or catalase blocked the cell death. These results suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction mediated by ROS production is a key contributor to liquid-plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, regardless of genetic variation. Thus, liquid plasma may have clinical applications, e.g., the development of therapeutic strategies and prevention of disease progression despite tumor heterogeneity.

  12. Localized plasma irradiation through a micronozzle for individual cell treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimane, Ryutaro; Kumagai, Shinya; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi; Hori, Masaru; Sasaki, Minoru

    2014-11-01

    A micronozzle device was fabricated for the localized plasma treatment of a cell. The device was attached to the tips of two ϕ1.5 mm capillary tubes injecting and evacuating the discharging plasma gas. At the bottom of the channel where the discharging gas flows, nozzle holes (ϕ2-30 µm) were prepared. Controlling the injecting and evacuating gas flows made the pressure in the channel negative or positive relative to the atmosphere. The cells were trapped or released through the nozzle holes. When the cells were trapped, the nozzle hole also defined the area of plasma treatment. An atmospheric-pressure microplasma was generated (He: 0.3 L/min, power: 30 W) for localized treatment. The test specimen was a plant cell, lily pollen (length: 100-140 µm). No burning of the pollen was observed during the 10 min plasma treatment. Only part of the surface reacted with the plasma irradiation. The depth of removal was about 1.5 µm.

  13. Probing cell migration in confined environments by plasma lithography.

    PubMed

    Junkin, Michael; Wong, Pak Kin

    2011-03-01

    Cellular processes are regulated by various mechanical and physical factors in their local microenvironment such as geometric confinements, cell-substrate interactions, and cell-cell contact. Systematic elucidation of these regulatory mechanisms is crucial for fundamental understanding of cell biology and for rational design of biomedical devices and regenerative medicine. Here, we report a generally applicable plasma lithography technique, which performs selective surface functionalization on large substrate areas, for achieving long-term, stable confinements with length scales from 100 nm to 1 cm toward the investigation of cell-microenvironment interactions. In particular, we applied plasma lithography for cellular confinement of neuroblastomas, myoblasts, endothelial cells, and mammary gland epithelial cells, and examined the motion of mouse embryonic fibroblasts in directionality-confined environments for studying the effect of confinements on migratory behavior. In conjunction with live cell imaging, the distance traveled, velocity, and angular motion of individual cells and collective cell migration behaviors were measured in confined environments with dimensions comparable to a cell. A critical length scale that a cell could conceivably occupy and migrate to was also identified by investigating the behaviors of cells using confined environments with subcellular length scales.

  14. Collision Tumor With Renal Cell Carcinoma and Plasmacytoma: Further Evidence of a Renal Cell and Plasma Cell Neoplasm Relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Berquist, Sean W.; Hassan, Abd-elrahman Said; Miakicheva, Olga; Dufour, Catherine; Hamilton, Zachary; Shabaik, Ahmed; Derweesh, Ithaar H.

    2016-01-01

    Renal solitary extramedullary plasmacytomas belong to a group of plasma cell neoplasms, which generally have been associated with renal cell carcinoma. We present a case report of a patient with collision tumor histology of extramedullary plasmacytoma and clear cell renal cell carcinoma, the first in the known literature. Standard work-up for a plasma cell neoplasm was conducted and the mass was resected. The patient remains disease-free at 28 months post-surgery. The report calls into question pre-surgical renal mass biopsy protocol and suggests a relationship between renal cell carcinoma and plasma cell neoplasms. PMID:27175345

  15. Transient disruptions of aortic endothelial cell plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Q. C.; McNeil, P. L.

    1992-01-01

    Cells of gut, skin, and muscle frequently suffer transient survivable plasma membrane disruptions ("wounds") under physiological conditions, but it is not known whether endothelial cells of the aorta, which are constantly exposed to hemodynamically generated mechanical forces, similarly are injured in vivo. We have used serum albumin as a molecular probe for identifying endothelial cells of the rat aorta that incurred and survived transient plasma membrane wounds in vivo. Such wounded endothelial cells were in fact observed in the aortas of all rats examined. However, the percentage of wounded cells in the total aortic endothelial population varied remarkably between individuals ranging from 1.4% to 17.9% with a mean of 6.5% (+/- 4.6% SD). Wounded endothelial cells were heterogeneously distributed, being found in distinct clusters often in the shape of streaks aligned with the long axis of the vessel, or in the shape of partial or complete rims surrounding bifurcation openings, such as the ostia of the intercostal arteries. Physical exercise (running) did not increase the frequency of aortic endothelial cell membrane wounding, nor did spontaneous hypertension. Surprisingly, 80% of mitotic endothelial cell figures were identified as wounded. This article identified a previously unrecognized form of endothelial cell injury, survivable disruptions of the plasma membrane, and shows that injury to the endothelial cells of the normal aorta is far more commonplace than previously suspected. Plasma membrane wounding of endothelial cells could be linked to the initiation of atherosclerosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 11 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:1466399

  16. Plasma-cell gingivitis. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Lubow, R M; Cooley, R L; Hartman, K S; McDaniel, R K

    1984-04-01

    A well-documented case of plasma-cell gingivitis is presented. When viewed in a total perspective, the clinical examination, history of usage of a popular mint , laboratory data and histologic examination provide support for this diagnosis. This patient did not exhibit any evidence of glossitis or cheilitis as is often reported in the literature; however, a positive history to psoriasis was noted. The occurrence of plasma-cell gingivitis in a patient with documented psoriasis provides some interesting speculation regarding the etiologic picture of this condition. PMID:6585542

  17. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Atypical refsum disease with pipecolic acidemia and abnormal catalase distribution.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, M R; Jansen, G A; Verhoeven, N M; Mooyer, P A; Jakobs, C; Roels, F; Espeel, M; Fourmaintraux, A; Bellet, H; Wanders, R J; Saudubray, J M

    2000-01-01

    We describe an 18-year-old patient with psychomotor retardation and abnormally short metatarsi and metacarpals but no other signs of classic Refsum disease. Molecular analysis of the phytanoyl-coenzyme A hydroxylase gene revealed a homozygous deletion causing a frameshift. Surprisingly, L-pipecolic acid was elevated in plasma, and microscopy of the liver showed a reduced number of peroxisomes per cell and a larger average peroxisome size. These abnormal peroxisomes lacked catalase as did peroxisomes in fibroblasts of this patient. Such generalized peroxisomal abnormalities are not present in classic Refsum disease.

  19. Abnormalities of follicular helper T-cell number and function in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Dai, Rongxin; Li, Wenyan; Zhao, Hongyi; Zhang, Yongjie; Zhou, Lina; Du, Hongqiang; Luo, Guangjin; Wu, Junfeng; Niu, Linlin; An, Yunfei; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ding, Yuan; Song, Wenxia; Liu, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) is a hematopoietic-specific regulator of actin nucleation. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) patients show immunodeficiencies, most of which have been attributed to defective T-cell functions. T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are the major CD4+ T-cell subset with specialized B-cell helper capabilities. Aberrant Tfh cells activities are involved in immunopathologies such as autoimmunity, immunodeficiencies, and lymphomas. We found that in WAS patients, the number of circulating Tfh cells was significantly reduced due to reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis, and Tfh cells were Th2 and Th17 polarized. The expression of inducible costimulator (ICOS) in circulating Tfh cells was higher in WAS patients than in controls. BCL6 expression was decreased in total CD4+ T and Tfh cells of WAS patients. Mirroring the results in patients, the frequency of Tfh cells in WAS knockout (KO) mice was decreased, as was the frequency of BCL6+ Tfh cells, but the frequency of ICOS+ Tfh cells was increased. Using WAS chimera mice, we found that the number of ICOS+ Tfh cells was decreased in WAS chimera mice, indicating that the increase in ICOS+ Tfh cells in WAS KO mice was cell extrinsic. The data from in vivo CD4+ naive T-cell adoptive transfer mice as well as in vitro coculture of naive B and Tfh cells showed that the defective function of WASp-deficient Tfh cells was T-cell intrinsic. Consistent findings in both WAS patients and WAS KO mice suggested an essential role for WASp in the development and memory response of Tfh cells and that WASp deficiency causes a deficient differentiation defect in Tfh cells by downregulating the transcription level of BCL6. PMID:27170596

  20. Plasma abnormal prothrombin (PIVKA-II): a new and reliable marker for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Takikawa, Y; Suzuki, K; Yamazaki, K; Goto, T; Madarame, T; Miura, Y; Yoshida, T; Kashiwabara, T; Sato, S

    1992-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical usefulness of a protein induced by vitamin K absence, antagonist-prothrombin (PIVKA-II), in detecting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) specifically in patients with liver cirrhosis, and the possible correlation between levels of PIVKA-II and pathological features of HCC. Plasma levels of PIVKA-II and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) were measured in 628 patients with various diseases, including 253 with liver cirrhosis and 116 with HCC. PIVKA-II was detected (greater than or equal to 0.1 arbitrary unit/mL) in 54.3% of HCC and the concentration showed a positive correlation with the tumour size. As a screening test for the detection of HCC, PIVKA-II produced values comparable with those of AFP with a sensitivity, specificity and validity of 52.8, 98.8 and 51.6% respectively. Sixteen of 45 patients (37%) with HCC who had low AFP (less than 100 ng/mL) levels were positive for PIVKA-II. No apparent relationship, however, could be found between the levels of PIVKA-II and the aetiology or pathological findings of HCC. These results suggest that PIVKA-II can be a reliable marker for detecting HCC in patients with liver cirrhosis.

  1. Plasma Treatment of Single-Cell Niobium SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    J. Upadhyay, M. Nikolić, S. Popović, L. Vušković, H.L. Phillips, A-M. Valente-Feliciano

    2011-03-01

    Superconducting radio frequency cavities of bulk Niobium are integral components of particle accelerators based on superconducting technology. Wet chemical processing is the commonly used procedure for impurities and surface defects removal and surface roughness improvement , both required to improve the RF performance of the cavity. We are studying plasma etching as an alternate technique to process these cavities. The uniformity of the plasma sheath at the inner wall of the cavity is one prerequisite for its uniform etching. We are developing electro-optic diagnostic techniques to assess the plasma uniformity. Multiple electro-optical probes are placed at different locations of the single cell cavity to diagnose the electrical and optical properties of the plasma. The electrical parameters are required to understand the kinetic nature of the plasma and the optical emission spectroscopy provides the spatial distribution of radicals in the plasma. The spatial variation of the plasma parameters inside the cavity and their effect on the etching of niobium samples placed at different locations in the cavity will be presented.

  2. Red Blood Cells from Individuals with Abdominal Obesity or Metabolic Abnormalities Exhibit Less Deformability upon Entering a Constriction

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Nancy F.; Mancuso, Jordan E.; Zivkovic, Angela M.; Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Ristenpart, William D.

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS) are multifactorial conditions associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes mellitus. Previous work has demonstrated that the hemorheological profile is altered in patients with abdominal obesity and MS, as evidenced for example by increased whole blood viscosity. To date, however, no studies have examined red blood cell (RBC) deformability of blood from individuals with obesity or metabolic abnormalities under typical physiological flow conditions. In this study, we pumped RBCs through a constriction in a microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the mechanical behavior of ~8,000 RBCs obtained from either healthy individuals (n = 5) or obese participants with metabolic abnormalities (OMA) (n = 4). We demonstrate that the OMA+ cells stretched on average about 25% less than the healthy controls. Furthermore, we examined the effects of ingesting a high-fat meal on RBC mechanical dynamics, and found that the postprandial period has only a weak effect on the stretching dynamics exhibited by OMA+ cells. The results suggest that chronic rigidification of RBCs plays a key role in the increased blood pressure and increased whole blood viscosity observed in OMA individuals and was independent of an acute response triggered by consumption of a high-fat meal. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01803633 PMID:27258098

  3. Fluid shear stress as a regulator of gene expression in vascular cells: possible correlations with diabetic abnormalities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Eskin, S. G.; Ruef, J.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    1999-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased frequency, severity and more rapid progression of cardiovascular diseases. Metabolic perturbations from hyperglycemia result in disturbed endothelium-dependent relaxation, activation of coagulation pathways, depressed fibrinolysis, and other abnormalities in vascular homeostasis. Atherosclerosis is localized mainly at areas of geometric irregularity at which blood vessels branch, curve and change diameter, and where blood is subjected to sudden changes in velocity and/or direction of flow. Shear stress resulting from blood flow is a well known modulator of vascular cell function. This paper presents what is currently known regarding the molecular mechanisms responsible for signal transduction and gene regulation in vascular cells exposed to shear stress. Considering the importance of the hemodynamic environment of vascular cells might be vital to increasing our understanding of diabetes.

  4. Dominant expansion of a cryptic subclone with an abnormal karyotype in B lymphoblastoid cell lines during culture.

    PubMed

    Danjoh, I; Shirota, R; Hiroyama, T; Nakamura, Y

    2013-01-01

    Although B lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCLs) are thought to maintain their original genomic structures during long-term culture, there has been considerable disagreement on the actual genomic stability of these cells. This study was initiated to determine whether B-LCLs develop cell populations with abnormal genomes during culture and to search for factors important to the maintenance of the original genome. We established continuous cultures of B-LCLs for more than 6 months and analyzed the cells using array-based comparative genome hybridization (CGH) analysis, conventional karyotyping and analysis of V(D)J recombination in the immunoglobulin (Ig) gene. We found that one B-LCL acquired an extra chromosome 4 without any other genomic rearrangements at passage 16 of continuous culture. At the Ig light- and heavy-chain loci, analysis of the major cell population showed a difference between cultures at early and later passages. Another aneuploid line was detected among B-LCLs established elsewhere and deposited previously into the RIKEN Cell Bank. Our findings indicate that some of the genomic rearrangements in B-LCLs are not caused by gradual accumulation of mutations and rearrangements during the B-LCL establishment processes, but rather as a result of a change in the cell population from clones with a normal genome to clones with de novo rearrangements. It is therefore feasible to maintain B-LCLs with a normal genomic structure by cell cloning or similar treatment.

  5. Expansion of cytokine-producing CD4-CD8- T cells associated with abnormal Fas expression and hypereosinophilia

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms of sustained overproduction of eosinophils in the idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome and in some human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected individuals are largely unknown. We hypothesized that T cells may release soluble products that regulate eosinophilia in these patients, as has been previously shown in bronchial asthma. We identified one patient with idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome and one HIV-1-infected individual with associated hypereosinophilia who demonstrated high numbers of CD4-CD8- T cells in peripheral blood. CD4-CD8- T cells from both patients, although highly activated, did not express functional Fas receptors. In one case, the lack of functional Fas receptors was associated with failure of Fas mRNA and protein expression, and in another, expression of a soluble form of the Fas molecule that may have antagonized normal signaling of Fas ligand. In contrast to the recently described lymphoproliferative/autoimmune syndrome, which is characterized by accumulation of CD4-CD8- T cells and mutations within the Fas gene, this study suggests somatic variations in Fas expression and function quite late in life. Both genetic and somatic abnormalities in regulation of the Fas gene are therefore associated with failures to undergo T cell apoptosis. Furthermore, the expanded population of CD4- CD8- T cells from both patients elaborated cytokines with antiapoptotic properties for eosinophils, indicating a major role of these T cells in the development of eosinophilia. Thus, this study demonstrates a sequential dysregulation of apoptosis in different cell types. PMID:8642249

  6. T cell-dependent survival of CD20+ and CD20- plasma cells in human secondary lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed

    Withers, David R; Fiorini, Claudia; Fischer, Randy T; Ettinger, Rachel; Lipsky, Peter E; Grammer, Amrie C

    2007-06-01

    The signals mediating human plasma cell survival in vivo, particularly within secondary lymphoid tissue, are unclear. Human tonsils grafted into immunodeficient mice were therefore used to delineate the mechanisms promoting the survival of plasma cells. Tonsillar plasma cells were maintained within the grafts and the majority were nonproliferating, indicating a long-lived phenotype. A significant depletion of graft plasma cells was observed after anti-CD20 treatment, consistent with the expression of CD20 by most of the cells. Moreover, anti-CD52 treatment caused the complete loss of all graft lymphocytes, including plasma cells. Unexpectedly, anti-CD3, but not anti-CD154, treatment caused the complete loss of plasma cells, indicating an essential role for T cells, but not CD40-CD154 interactions in plasma cell survival. The in vitro coculture of purified tonsillar plasma cells and T cells revealed a T-cell survival signal requiring cell contact. Furthermore, immunofluorescence studies detected a close association between human plasma cells and T cells in vivo. These data reveal that human tonsil contains long-lived plasma cells, the majority of which express CD20 and can be deleted with anti-CD20 therapy. In addition, an important role for contact-dependent interactions with T cells in human plasma cell survival within secondary lymphoid tissue was identified.

  7. Abnormal expression of PTEN and PIK3CA in pemetrexed-resistant human pancreatic cancer cell line Patu8988.

    PubMed

    Shi, X; Gu, H T; Lin, S B; Zhang, Y; Yang, J; Qian, C J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of PTEN and PIK3CA in the pemetrexed-resistant human pancreatic cancer cell line Patu8988, and to evaluate their effects on the biological behavior of pancreatic cancer cells. PTEN and PIK3CA gene and protein expressions were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot, respectively, in a pemetrexed-resistant pancreatic cancer cell line and in the parent strain of the pancreatic cancer cells. The discrepancies between the two types of cell lines were detected by a transwell test. RT-PCR and western blot analyses revealed that PTEN and PIK3CA were overexpressed in the pemetrexed-resistant pancreatic cancer cell line. PTEN and PIK3CA were shown to be upregulated by 89 and 76% (western blot), respectively, in the pemetrexed-resistant cell line, compared to the normal pancreatic cancer cell line. The migratory and invasive abilities of the pemetrexed-resistant pancreatic cancer cell were significantly reduced compared to those of the parent strain (P < 0.05; transwell assay). Both PTEN and PIK3CA expression was abnormally enhanced in the pemetrexed-resistant cell line Patu8988; the co-existence of high levels of PTEN and PIK3CA in the pemetrexed-resistant pancreatic cancer line cells induced a significant decrease in their migratory and invasive capacities. This suggested that the mechanism of pemetrexed resistant may be affected by PTEN and PIK3CA, and that these may alter the biological behavior of cancer cells. PMID:27525871

  8. Abnormal regulation of DNA replication and increased lethality in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to carcinogenic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Jaspers, N.G.; de Wit, J.; Regulski, M.R.; Bootsma, D.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of different carcinogenic agents on the rate of semiconservative DNA replication in normal and ataxia telangiectasis (AT) cells was investigated. The rate of DNA synthesis in all AT cell strains tested was depressed to a significantly lesser extent than in normal cells after exposure to X-rays under oxia or hypoxia or to bleomycin, agents to which AT cells are hypersensitive. In contrast, inhibition of DNA replication in normal human and AT cells was similar after treatment with some DNA-methylating agents or mitomycin C. Colony-forming ability of AT cells treated with these agents was not different from normal cells. Treatment with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide elicited a variable response in both AT and normal cell strains. In some strains, including those shown to be hypersensitive to the drug by other workers, the inhibition of DNA synthesis was more pronounced than in other cell strains, but no significant difference between AT and normal cells could be detected. The rejoining of DNA strand breaks induced by X-rays, measured by DNA elution techniques, occurred within l2 hr after treatment and could not be correlated with the difference in DNA synthesis inhibition in AT and normal cells. After low doses of X-rays, AT cells rejoined single-strand breaks slightly more slowly than did normal cells. The rate of DNA replication in X-irradiation AT and normal cells was not affected by nicotinamide, an inhibitor of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis. These data indicate that the diminished inhibition of DNA replication in carcinogen-treated AT cells (a) is a general characteristic of all AT cell strains, (b) correlates with AT cellular hypersensitivity, (c) is not directly caused by the bulk of the DNA strand breaks produced by carcinogenic agents, and (d) is not based on differences in the induction of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis between X-irradiated AT and normal cells.

  9. Targeting the cancer cell cycle by cold atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volotskova, O.; Hawley, T. S.; Stepp, M. A.; Keidar, M.

    2012-09-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), a technology based on quasi-neutral ionized gas at low temperatures, is currently being evaluated as a new highly selective alternative addition to existing cancer therapies. Here, we present a first attempt to identify the mechanism of CAP action. CAP induced a robust ~2-fold G2/M increase in two different types of cancer cells with different degrees of tumorigenicity. We hypothesize that the increased sensitivity of cancer cells to CAP treatment is caused by differences in the distribution of cancer cells and normal cells within the cell cycle. The expression of γH2A.X (pSer139), an oxidative stress reporter indicating S-phase damage, is enhanced specifically within CAP treated cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. Together with a significant decrease in EdU-incorporation after CAP, these data suggest that tumorigenic cancer cells are more susceptible to CAP treatment.

  10. Fyn kinase genetic ablation causes structural abnormalities in mature retina and defective Müller cell function.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Solano, Marbella; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo; Treviño, Mario; Gonzalez-Espinosa, Claudia; Lamas, Monica

    2016-04-01

    Fyn kinase is widely expressed in neuronal and glial cells of the brain, where it exerts multiple functional roles that affect fundamental physiological processes. The aim of our study was to investigate the, so far unknown, functional role of Fyn in the retina. We report that Fyn is expressed, in vivo, in a subpopulation of Müller glia. We used a mouse model of Fyn genetic ablation and Müller-enriched primary cultures to demonstrate that Fyn deficiency induces morphological alterations in the mature retina, a reduction in the thickness of the outer and inner nuclear layers and alterations in postnatal Müller cell physiology. These include shortening of Müller cell processes, a decrease in cell proliferation, inactivation of the Akt signal transduction pathway, a reduced number of focal adhesions points and decreased adhesion of these cells to the ECM. As abnormalities in Müller cell physiology have been previously associated to a compromised retinal function we evaluated behavioral responses to visual stimulation. Our results associate Fyn deficiency with impaired visual optokinetic responses under scotopic and photopic light conditions. Our study reveals novel roles for Fyn kinase in retinal morphology and Müller cell physiology and suggests that Fyn is required for optimal visual processing.

  11. Fyn kinase genetic ablation causes structural abnormalities in mature retina and defective Müller cell function.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Solano, Marbella; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo; Treviño, Mario; Gonzalez-Espinosa, Claudia; Lamas, Monica

    2016-04-01

    Fyn kinase is widely expressed in neuronal and glial cells of the brain, where it exerts multiple functional roles that affect fundamental physiological processes. The aim of our study was to investigate the, so far unknown, functional role of Fyn in the retina. We report that Fyn is expressed, in vivo, in a subpopulation of Müller glia. We used a mouse model of Fyn genetic ablation and Müller-enriched primary cultures to demonstrate that Fyn deficiency induces morphological alterations in the mature retina, a reduction in the thickness of the outer and inner nuclear layers and alterations in postnatal Müller cell physiology. These include shortening of Müller cell processes, a decrease in cell proliferation, inactivation of the Akt signal transduction pathway, a reduced number of focal adhesions points and decreased adhesion of these cells to the ECM. As abnormalities in Müller cell physiology have been previously associated to a compromised retinal function we evaluated behavioral responses to visual stimulation. Our results associate Fyn deficiency with impaired visual optokinetic responses under scotopic and photopic light conditions. Our study reveals novel roles for Fyn kinase in retinal morphology and Müller cell physiology and suggests that Fyn is required for optimal visual processing. PMID:26808221

  12. Systematization of the Mechanism by Which Plasma Irradiation Causes Cell Growth and Tumor Cell Death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    New methods and technologies have improved minimally invasive surgical treatment and saved numerous patients. Recently, plasma irradiation has been demonstrated that might be useful in medical field and the plasma irradiation device is expected to become practically applicable. Mild plasma coagulator showed some advantages such as hemostasis and adhesion reduction in experimental animal model, but the mechanism of plasma irradiation remains unclear. Our study group aim to clarify the mechanism of plasma irradiation effects, mainly focusing on oxidative stress using cultured cell lines and small animal model. First, a study using cultured cell lines showed that the culture medium that was activated by plasma irradiation (we called this kind of medium as ``PAM'' -plasma activated medium-) induced tumor cell death. Although this effect was mainly found to be due to hydrogen peroxide, the remaining portion was considered as the specific effect of the plasma irradiation and we are now studying focusing on this effect. Second, we established a mouse intra-peritoneal adhesion model and checked biological reaction that occurred in the adhesion part. Histopathological study showed inflammatory cells infiltration into adhesion part and the expression of PTX3 that might involve tissue repair around adhesion part. We also confirmed that cytokines IL-6 and IL-10 might be useful as a marker of adhesion formation in this model. Applying ``PAM'' or mild plasma irradiation in this model, we examine the effects of plasma on inflamed cells. The samples in these experiments would be applied to targeted proteomics analysis, and we aim to demonstrate the systematization of the cell's reaction by plasma irradiation.

  13. Abnormal centrosome amplification in cells through the targeting of Ran-binding protein-1 by the human T cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Peloponese, Jean-Marie; Haller, Kerstin; Miyazato, Akiko; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2005-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus etiologically causal of adult T cell leukemia. The virus encodes a Tax oncoprotein that functions in transcriptional regulation, cell cycle control, and transformation. Because adult T cell leukemia like many other human cancers is a disease of genomic instability with frequent gains and losses of chromosomes, to understand this disease it is important to comprehend how HTLV-1 engenders aneuploidy in host cells. In this regard, loss of cell cycle checkpoints permits tolerance of aneuploidy but does not explain how aneuploidy is created. We show here that HTLV-1 Tax causes abnormal centrosome fragmentation in the mitotic phase of the cell cycle. We report that Tax directly binds Ran and Ran-binding protein-1, locates to centrosomes/spindle poles, and causes supernumerary centrosomes. PMID:16365316

  14. Cerebellar cortex development in the weaver condition presents regional and age-dependent abnormalities without differences in Purkinje cells neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, María C; Hervás, José P; Bayer, Shirley A; Villegas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Ataxias are neurological disorders associated with the degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs). Homozygous weaver mice (wv/wv) have been proposed as a model for hereditary cerebellar ataxia because they present motor abnormalities and PC loss. To ascertain the physiopathology of the weaver condition, the development of the cerebellar cortex lobes was examined at postnatal day (P): P8, P20 and P90. Three approaches were used: 1) quantitative determination of several cerebellar features; 2) qualitative evaluation of the developmental changes occurring in the cortical lobes; and 3) autoradiographic analyses of PC generation and placement. Our results revealed a reduction in the size of the wv/wv cerebellum as a whole, confirming previous results. However, as distinguished from these reports, we observed that quantified parameters contribute differently to the abnormal growth of the wv/wv cerebellar lobes. Qualitative analysis showed anomalies in wv/wv cerebellar cytoarchitecture, depending on the age and lobe analyzed. Such abnormalities included the presence of the external granular layer after P20 and, at P90, ectopic cells located in the molecular layer following several placement patterns. Finally, we obtained autoradiographic evidence that wild-type and wv/wv PCs presented similar neurogenetic timetables, as reported. However, the innovative character of this current work lies in the fact that the neurogenetic gradients of wv/wv PCs were not modified from P8 to P90. A tendency for the accumulation of late-formed PCs in the anterior and posterior lobes was found, whereas early-generated PCs were concentrated in the central and inferior lobes. These data suggested that wv/wv PCs may migrate properly to their final destinations. The extrapolation of our results to patients affected with cerebellar ataxias suggests that all cerebellar cortex lobes are affected with several age-dependent alterations in cytoarchitectonics. We also propose that PC loss may be regionally

  15. Cerebellar cortex development in the weaver condition presents regional and age-dependent abnormalities without differences in Purkinje cells neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, María C; Hervás, José P; Bayer, Shirley A; Villegas, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Ataxias are neurological disorders associated with the degeneration of Purkinje cells (PCs). Homozygous weaver mice (wv/wv) have been proposed as a model for hereditary cerebellar ataxia because they present motor abnormalities and PC loss. To ascertain the physiopathology of the weaver condition, the development of the cerebellar cortex lobes was examined at postnatal day (P): P8, P20 and P90. Three approaches were used: 1) quantitative determination of several cerebellar features; 2) qualitative evaluation of the developmental changes occurring in the cortical lobes; and 3) autoradiographic analyses of PC generation and placement. Our results revealed a reduction in the size of the wv/wv cerebellum as a whole, confirming previous results. However, as distinguished from these reports, we observed that quantified parameters contribute differently to the abnormal growth of the wv/wv cerebellar lobes. Qualitative analysis showed anomalies in wv/wv cerebellar cytoarchitecture, depending on the age and lobe analyzed. Such abnormalities included the presence of the external granular layer after P20 and, at P90, ectopic cells located in the molecular layer following several placement patterns. Finally, we obtained autoradiographic evidence that wild-type and wv/wv PCs presented similar neurogenetic timetables, as reported. However, the innovative character of this current work lies in the fact that the neurogenetic gradients of wv/wv PCs were not modified from P8 to P90. A tendency for the accumulation of late-formed PCs in the anterior and posterior lobes was found, whereas early-generated PCs were concentrated in the central and inferior lobes. These data suggested that wv/wv PCs may migrate properly to their final destinations. The extrapolation of our results to patients affected with cerebellar ataxias suggests that all cerebellar cortex lobes are affected with several age-dependent alterations in cytoarchitectonics. We also propose that PC loss may be regionally

  16. Potassium plasma cell facilitates thermionic energy conversion process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, H. K.

    1967-01-01

    Thermionic energy converter converts nuclear generated heat directly into high frequency and direct current output. It consists of a potassium plasma cell, a tantalum emitter, and a silver plated copper collector. This conversion process eliminates the steam interface usually required between the atomic heat source and the electrical conversion system.

  17. Abnormal tuning of saccade-related cells in pontine reticular formation of strabismic monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mustari, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Strabismus is a common disorder, characterized by a chronic misalignment of the eyes and numerous visual and oculomotor abnormalities. For example, saccades are often highly disconjugate. For humans with pattern strabismus, the horizontal and vertical disconjugacies vary with eye position. In monkeys, manipulations that disturb binocular vision during the first several weeks of life result in a chronic strabismus with characteristics that closely match those in human patients. Early onset strabismus is associated with altered binocular sensitivity of neurons in visual cortex. Here we test the hypothesis that brain stem circuits specific to saccadic eye movements are abnormal. We targeted the pontine paramedian reticular formation, a structure that directly projects to the ipsilateral abducens nucleus. In normal animals, neurons in this structure are characterized by a high-frequency burst of spikes associated with ipsiversive saccades. We recorded single-unit activity from 84 neurons from four monkeys (two normal, one exotrope, and one esotrope), while they made saccades to a visual target on a tangent screen. All 24 neurons recorded from the normal animals had preferred directions within 30° of pure horizontal. For the strabismic animals, the distribution of preferred directions was normal on one side of the brain, but highly variable on the other. In fact, 12/60 neurons recorded from the strabismic animals preferred vertical saccades. Many also had unusually weak or strong bursts. These data suggest that the loss of corresponding binocular vision during infancy impairs the development of normal tuning characteristics for saccade-related neurons in brain stem. PMID:26063778

  18. Serum copper and zinc content in non-small cell lung cancer: abnormalities and clinical correlates.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, D; Buccheri, G; Camilla, T

    1999-06-01

    This study was carried out in order to assess the potential prognostic significance of serum copper (SCL) and zinc levels (SZL) and the copper/zinc ratio in 145 consecutive patients, seen for a new lung cancer during the last 2 yrs. SCL and SZL, along with 26 other clinical parameters (anthropometric, clinical and laboratory variables) were prospectively recorded in all the patients. Mean SCL and SZL were, respectively, 140.4 micrograms.dL-1 (134.7-146.1, 95% confidence interval (CI), and 71.4 micrograms.dL-1 (66.8-75.9, 95% CI). Patients, 28%, showed abnormally elevated SCLs, and 57% of patients had abnormally low SZLs. The mean Cu/Zn ratio was 2.28 (2.10-2.46, 95% CI). Univariate analyses of survival showed that patients with either an SCL > 138 micrograms.dL-1 or an ZSL < 66 micrograms.dL-1 survived significantly shorter times (p = 0.03, log rank test). Elevated Cu/Zn ratios (> 2.075) were associated with a median survival of 25.39 weeks, as compared to the 40.85 weeks of subjects with lower ratios (p = 0.01). A multivariate analysis of survival (Cox's proportional hazards regression analysis) selected, in decreasing order of significance, the following variables: 1) stage of disease; 2) Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status; 3) sex; 4) Cu/Zn ratio; 5) lymphocyte count; 6) histology; and 7) tissue polypeptide antigen levels. It is concluded that SCL, SZL and the Cu/Zn ratio are simple and inexpensive determinations, and do have some prognostic significance in lung cancer.

  19. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  20. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  1. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  2. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... Just like the skin, the fingernails tell a lot about your health: ... the fingernail. These lines can occur after illness, injury to ...

  3. Junctional abnormalities in human airway epithelial cells expressing F508del CFTR

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Brandon; Moriarty, Hannah K.; Kim, Agnes H.; McCarty, Nael A.; Koval, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) has a profound impact on airway physiology. Accumulating evidence suggests that intercellular junctions are impaired in CF. We examined changes to CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function, tight junctions, and gap junctions in NuLi-1 (CFTRwt/wt) and CuFi-5 (CFTRΔF508/ΔF508) cells. Cells were studied at air-liquid interface (ALI) and compared with primary human bronchial epithelial cells. On the basis of fluorescent lectin binding, the phenotype of the NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells at week 8 resembled that of serous, glycoprotein-rich airway cells. After week 7, CuFi-5 cells possessed 130% of the epithelial Na+ channel activity and 17% of the CFTR activity of NuLi-1 cells. In both cell types, expression levels of CFTR were comparable to those in primary airway epithelia. Transepithelial resistance of NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells stabilized during maturation in ALI culture, with significantly lower transepithelial resistance for CuFi-5 than NuLi-1 cells. We also found that F508del CFTR negatively affects gap junction function in the airway. NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells express the connexins Cx43 and Cx26. While both connexins were properly trafficked by NuLi-1 cells, Cx43 was mistrafficked by CuFi-5 cells. Cx43 trafficking was rescued in CuFi-5 cells treated with 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA), as assessed by intracellular dye transfer. 4-PBA-treated CuFi-5 cells also exhibited an increase in forskolin-induced CFTR-mediated currents. The Cx43 trafficking defect was confirmed using IB3-1 cells and found to be corrected by 4-PBA treatment. These data support the use of NuLi-1 and CuFi-5 cells to examine the effects of F508del CFTR expression on tight junction and gap junction function in the context of serous human airway cells. PMID:26115671

  4. Abnormal ion content, hydration and granule expansion of the secretory granules from cystic fibrosis airway glandular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baconnais, S.; Delavoie, F. |; Zahm, J.M.; Milliot, M.; Castillon, N.; Terryn, C.; Banchet, V.; Michel, J.; Danos, O.; Merten, M.; Chinet, T.; Zierold, K.; Bonnet, N.; Puchelle, E. , E-Mail: edith.puchelle@univ-reims.fr; Balossier, G.

    2005-10-01

    The absence or decreased expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) induces increased Na{sup +} absorption and hyperabsorption of the airway surface liquid (ASL) resulting in a dehydrated and hyperviscous ASL. Although the implication of abnormal airway submucosal gland function has been suggested, the ion and water content in the Cystic Fibrosis (CF) glandular secretory granules, before exocytosis, is unknown. We analyzed, in non-CF and CF human airway glandular cell lines (MM-39 and KM4, respectively), the ion content in the secretory granules by electron probe X-ray microanalysis and the water content by quantitative dark field imaging on freeze-dried cryosections. We demonstrated that the ion content (Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, P, S and Cl{sup -}) is significantly higher and the water content significantly lower in secretory granules from the CF cell line compared to the non-CF cell line. Using videomicroscopy, we observed that the secretory granule expansion was deficient in CF glandular cells. Transfection of CF cells with CFTR cDNA or inhibition of non-CF cells with CFTR{sub inh}-172, respectively restored or decreased the water content and granule expansion, in parallel with changes in ion content. We hypothesize that the decreased water and increased ion content in glandular secretory granules may contribute to the dehydration and increased viscosity of the ASL in CF.

  5. Measurement of plasma-generated RONS in the cancer cells exposed by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Hea Min; Baek, Eun Jeong; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, Tae Hun

    2015-09-01

    The plasma-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) could result in cellular responses including DNA damages and apoptotic cell death. These chemical species, O, O2-,OH, NO, and NO2-,exhibit strong oxidative stress and/or trigger signaling pathways in biological cells. Each plasma-generated chemical species having biological implication should be identified and quantitatively measured. For quantitative measurement of RONS, this study is divided into three stages; plasma diagnostics, plasma-liquid interactions, plasma-liquid-cell interactions. First, the optical characteristics of the discharges were obtained by optical emission spectroscopy to identify various excited plasma species. And the characteristics of voltage-current waveforms, gas temperature, and plume length with varying control parameters were measured. Next, atmospheric pressure plasma jet was applied on the liquid. The estimated OH radical densities were obtained by ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy at the liquid surface. And NO2-is detected by Griess test and compared between the pure liquid and the cell-containing liquid. Finally, bio-assays were performed on plasma treated human lung cancer cells (A549). Intracellular ROS production was measured using DCF-DA. Among these RONS, productions of NO and OH within cells were measured by DAF-2DA and APF, respectively. The data are very suggestive that there is a strong correlation among the production of RONS in the plasmas, liquids, and cells.

  6. Plasma Texturing of Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, Mohan; Roy, Madhu; Ruby, Douglas S.; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    1999-07-20

    Surface texture promotes enhanced light absorption in Si solar cells. The quality of lower cost multicrystalline-silicon (mc-Si) has increased to the point that its cell performance is close to that of single c-Si cells, with the major difference resulting from the inability to texture mc-Si affordably. This has reduced the cost-per-watt advantage of mc-Si. Surface texturing aimed at enhanced absorption in Si has been historically obtained by creating multimicrometer-sized pyramids using anisotropic wet etchants on single-crystalline silicon that take advantage of its single crystalline orientation. Since the surface feature sizes are several times the length of the incident solar wavelengths involved, the optical analysis of the reflected and absorbed light can be understood using geometrical optics. Geometrical textures reduce reflection and improve absorption by double-bounce and oblique light coupling into the semiconductor. However, geometrical texturing suffers from several disadvantages that limit its effectiveness. Some of these are listed below: (a) Wet-chemical anisotropic etching used to form random pyramids on <100> crystal orientation is not effective in the texturing of low-cost multicrystalline wafers, (b) Anti-reflection films deposited on random features to reduce reflection have a resonant structure limiting their effectiveness to a narrow range of angles and wavelengths. Various forms of surface texturing have been applied to mc-Si in research, including laser-structuring, mechanical grinding, porous-Si etching, and photolithographically defined etching. However, these may be too costly to ever be used in large-scale production. A Japanese firm has reported the development of an RIE process using Cl{sub 2} gas, which textures multiple wafers per batch, making it attractive for mass-production [1]. Using this process, they have produced a 17.1% efficient 225-cm{sup 2} mc-Si cell, which is the highest efficiency mc-Si cell of its size ever reported

  7. NKCC1-Deficiency Results in Abnormal Proliferation of Neural Progenitor Cells of the Lateral Ganglionic Eminence

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Ana Cathia; Rivera, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The proliferative pool of neural progenitor cells is maintained by exquisitely controlled mechanisms for cell cycle regulation. The Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC1) is important for regulating cell volume and the proliferation of different cell types in vitro. NKCC1 is expressed in ventral telencephalon of embryonic brains suggesting a potential role in neural development of this region. The ventral telencephalon is a major source for both interneuron and oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Whether NKCC1 is involved in the proliferation of these cell populations remains unknown. In order to assess this question, we monitored several markers for neural, neuronal, and proliferating cells in wild-type (WT) and NKCC1 knockout (KO) mouse brains. We found that NKCC1 was expressed in neural progenitor cells from the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) at E12.5. Mice lacking NKCC1 expression displayed reduced phospho-Histone H3 (PH3)-labeled mitotic cells in the ventricular zone (VZ) and reduced cell cycle reentry. Accordingly, we found a significant reduction of Sp8-labeled immature interneurons migrating from the dorsal LGE in NKCC1-deficient mice at a later developmental stage. Interestingly, at E14.5, NKCC1 regulated also the formation of Olig2-labeled oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Collectively, these findings show that NKCC1 serves in vivo as a modulator of the cell cycle decision in the developing ventral telencephalon at the early stage of neurogenesis. These results present a novel mechanistic avenue to be considered in the recent proposed involvement of chloride transporters in a number of developmentally related diseases, such as epilepsy, autism, and schizophrenia. PMID:27582690

  8. NKCC1-Deficiency Results in Abnormal Proliferation of Neural Progenitor Cells of the Lateral Ganglionic Eminence.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Ana Cathia; Rivera, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The proliferative pool of neural progenitor cells is maintained by exquisitely controlled mechanisms for cell cycle regulation. The Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC1) is important for regulating cell volume and the proliferation of different cell types in vitro. NKCC1 is expressed in ventral telencephalon of embryonic brains suggesting a potential role in neural development of this region. The ventral telencephalon is a major source for both interneuron and oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Whether NKCC1 is involved in the proliferation of these cell populations remains unknown. In order to assess this question, we monitored several markers for neural, neuronal, and proliferating cells in wild-type (WT) and NKCC1 knockout (KO) mouse brains. We found that NKCC1 was expressed in neural progenitor cells from the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) at E12.5. Mice lacking NKCC1 expression displayed reduced phospho-Histone H3 (PH3)-labeled mitotic cells in the ventricular zone (VZ) and reduced cell cycle reentry. Accordingly, we found a significant reduction of Sp8-labeled immature interneurons migrating from the dorsal LGE in NKCC1-deficient mice at a later developmental stage. Interestingly, at E14.5, NKCC1 regulated also the formation of Olig2-labeled oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Collectively, these findings show that NKCC1 serves in vivo as a modulator of the cell cycle decision in the developing ventral telencephalon at the early stage of neurogenesis. These results present a novel mechanistic avenue to be considered in the recent proposed involvement of chloride transporters in a number of developmentally related diseases, such as epilepsy, autism, and schizophrenia. PMID:27582690

  9. Bcl-2+ tonsillar plasma cells are rescued from apoptosis by bone marrow fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Plasma cells represent the final stage of B lymphocyte differentiation. Most plasma cells in secondary lymphoid tissues live for a few days, whereas those in the lamina propria of mucosa and in bone marrow live for several weeks. To investigate the regulation of human plasma cell survival, plasma cells were isolated from tonsils according to high CD38 and low CD20 expression. Tonsillar plasma cells express CD9, CD19, CD24, CD37, CD40, CD74, and HLA-DR, but not CD10, HLA-DQ, CD28, CD56, and Fas/CD95. Although plasma cells express intracytoplasmic Bcl-2, they undergo swift apoptosis in vitro and do not respond to CD40 triggering. Bone marrow fibroblasts and rheumatoid synoviocytes, however, prevented plasma cells from undergoing apoptosis in a contact- dependent fashion. These data indicate that fibroblasts may form a microenvironment favorable for plasma cell survival under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:8551226

  10. Evolution of Abnormal Plasma Glucagon Responses to Mixed-Meal Feedings in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes During the First 2 Years After Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sherr, Jennifer; Tsalikian, Eva; Fox, Larry; Buckingham, Bruce; Weinzimer, Stuart; Tamborlane, William V.; White, Neil H.; Arbelaez, Ana Maria; Kollman, Craig; Ruedy, Katrina J.; Cheng, Peiyao; Beck, Roy W.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the evolution of the dysregulated glucagon responses to mixed-meal tolerance tests (MMTTs) in youth with recent-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS MMTTs were performed in 25 youth (9–18 years of age) with 1.5–12 months disease duration (year 1); 22 subjects were restudied 1 year later (year 2). Twenty nondiabetic (ND) control children were also studied. RESULTS In T1D children, MMTT-stimulated increases in glucagon were significantly greater than that in ND children (median increments: year 1, 21 pg/mL [16–30]; year 2, 25 pg/mL [16–30]; ND, 9 pg/mL [5–16]; P = 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS In comparison with ND control children, exaggerated plasma glucagon responses to mixed-meal feedings are observed in youth with T1D within the first 2 years of diagnosis. Further studies to determine whether suppression of these abnormal responses may help to improve glycemic control are warranted. PMID:24696460

  11. Prostate cancer cell response to paclitaxel is affected by abnormally expressed securin PTTG1.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Carolina; Flores, M Luz; Medina, Rafael; Pérez-Valderrama, Begoña; Romero, Francisco; Tortolero, María; Japón, Miguel A; Sáez, Carmen

    2014-10-01

    PTTG1 protein, the human securin, has a central role in sister chromatid separation during mitosis, and its altered expression has been reported in many tumor types. Paclitaxel is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug, whose mechanism of action is related to its ability to arrest cells in mitosis and the subsequent induction of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. By using two prostate cancer cell lines with different responses to paclitaxel treatment, we have identified two situations in which PTTG1 influences cell fate differentially. In slippage-prone PC3 cells, both PTTG1 downregulation and overexpression induce an increase in mitotic cells that is associated with diminished apoptosis after paclitaxel treatment. In LNCaP cells, however, PTTG1 downregulation prevents mitotic entry and, subsequently, inhibits mitosis-associated, paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, PTTG1 overexpression induces an increase in mitotic cells and apoptosis after paclitaxel treatment. We have also identified a role for Mcl-1 protein in preventing apoptosis during mitosis in PC3 cells, as simultaneous PTTG1 and Mcl-1 silencing enhances mitosis-associated apoptosis after paclitaxel treatment. The finding that a more efficient mitotic arrest alone in PC3 cells is not enough to increase apoptosis was also confirmed with the observation that a selected paclitaxel-resistant PC3 cell line showed an apoptosis-resistant phenotype associated with increased mitosis upon paclitaxel treatment. These findings could contribute to identify putative responsive and nonresponsive cells and help us to approach incomplete responses to paclitaxel in the clinical setting. PMID:25122070

  12. Treatment of prostate cancer cell lines and primary cells using low temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Deborah; Hirst, Adam; Frame, Fiona F.; Maitland, Norman J.

    2014-10-01

    The mechanisms of cell death after plasma treatment of both benign and cancerous prostate epithelial cells are investigated. Prostate cancer tissue was obtained with patient consent from targeted needle core biopsies following radical prostatectomy. Primary cells were cultured from cancer tissue and plated onto a chamber slide at a density of 10,000 cells per well in 200 microliter of stem cell media (SCM). The treated sample was previously identified as Gleason grade 7 cancer through tissue histo-pathology. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet configuration, with helium as a carrier gas, and 0.3% O2 admixture was used for treating the cells. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) produced by the plasma are believed to be the main mediators of the plasma-cell interaction and response. We found the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced inside the cells increased with plasma exposure. Exposure to the plasma for >3 minutes showed high levels of DNA damage compared to untreated and hydrogen peroxide controls. Cell viability and cellular recovery are also investigated and will be presented. All findings were common to both cell lines, suggesting the potential of LTP therapy for both benign and malignant disease.

  13. Effects of plasma etching solar cell front surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, W.E.; Bunyan, S.M.; Olson, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    A front surface plasma etch with Freon 14+8% O/sub 2/ or sulfur hexafluoride (SF/sub 6/) was found to improve terrestrial solar cell output. SEM studies of these samples revealed surface pitting on Freon 14 etched samples. About 50% of the improvement from Freon etched samples can be attributed to the light capturing effects of surface pits. Output increases from SF/sub 6/ plasma etched cells were found to be comparable with Freon etched cells after subtraction of the light trapping effects. The excess output improvement might be attributed to reduced junction depth or removal of near surface lattice damage. Investigations attempting to identify the cause are described. 1 ref.

  14. Cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy.

  15. Pericentrin Is Related to Abnormal β-Cell Insulin Secretion through F-Actin Regulation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Lijuan; Lv, Yang; Cui, Shaoyuan; Jin, Xinye; Li, Chunlin; Chen, Xiangmei

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the regulating effect of pericentrin (PCNT) on insulin secretion in the development of insulin resistance and to determine the underlying mechanism. PCNT expression was studied in different tissues of C57/B6 mice by reverse transcriptase-PCR and immunofluorescence. PCNT was highly expressed in organs involved in the regulation of metabolism, while cytoplasmic expression was only enriched in islet cells. PCNT expression was significantly lower in the central regions of insulin resistance (IR) mouse islets than in those of control mouse islets. PCNT expression was further studied in mouse MIN6 cells exposed to glucose stimulation, small interfering RNA (siRNA) against PCNT, and an ERK inhibitor (PD98095). The results revealed that PCNT expression in glucose-stimulated MIN6 cells reduced linearly with cytoplasmic insulin levels. MIN6 cells transfected with PCNT siRNA showed significantly decreased intracellular insulin and F-actin expression. The change in F-actin expression in MIN6 cells during PCNT siRNA interference showed a linear relationship with PCNT expression at different time points. The ERK inhibitor affected PCNT expression and F-actin expression linearly. The abnormal insulin secretion observed both in vivo and in vitro was associated with decreased PCNT expression, and F-actin was found to be the target of PCNT regulation. PMID:26083368

  16. Abnormal development of glomerular endothelial and mesangial cells in mice with targeted disruption of the lama3 gene.

    PubMed

    Abrass, C K; Berfield, A K; Ryan, M C; Carter, W G; Hansen, K M

    2006-09-01

    Mice with targeted disruption of the lama3 gene, which encodes the alpha3 chain of laminin-5 (alpha3beta3gamma2, 332), develop a blistering skin disease similar to junctional epidermolysis bullosa in humans. These animals also develop abnormalities in glomerulogenesis. In both wild-type and mutant animals (lama3(-/-)), podocytes secrete glomerular basement membrane and develop foot processes. Endothelial cells migrate into this scaffolding and secrete a layer of basement membrane that fuses with the one formed by the podocyte. In lama3(-/-) animals, glomerular maturation arrests at this stage. Endothelial cells do not attenuate, develop fenestrae, or form typical lumens, and mesangial cells (MCs) were not identified. LN alpha3 subunit (LAMA3) protein was identified in the basement membrane adjacent to glomerular endothelial cells (GEnCs) in normal rats and mice. In developing rat glomeruli, the LAMA3 subunit was first detectable in the early capillary loop stage, which corresponds to the stage at which maturation arrest was observed in the mutant mice. Lama3 mRNA and protein were identified in isolated rat and mouse glomeruli and cultured rat GEnCs, but not MC. These data document expression of LAMA3 in glomeruli and support a critical role for it in GEnC differentiation. Furthermore, LAMA3 chain expression and/or another product of endothelial cells are required for MC migration into the developing glomerulus. PMID:16850021

  17. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    GUERRERO-PRESTON, RAFAEL; OGAWA, TAKENORI; UEMURA, MAMORU; SHUMULINSKY, GARY; VALLE, BLANCA L.; PIRINI, FRANCESCA; RAVI, RAJANI; SIDRANSKY, DAVID; KEIDAR, MICHAEL; TRINK, BARRY

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min−1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines. PMID:25050490

  18. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Ogawa, Takenori; Uemura, Mamoru; Shumulinsky, Gary; Valle, Blanca L; Pirini, Francesca; Ravi, Rajani; Sidransky, David; Keidar, Michael; Trink, Barry

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min-1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines.

  19. Cell-specific abnormal prenylation of Rab proteins in platelets and melanocytes of the gunmetal mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Zhen, Lijie; Li, Wei; Novak, Edward K; Collinson, Lucy M; Jang, Elliott K; Haslam, Richard J; Elliott, Rosemary W; Swank, Richard T

    2002-05-01

    The mutant gunmetal mouse exhibits reduced rates of platelet synthesis, abnormalities of platelet alpha and dense granules and hypopigmentation. Several of these features resemble those of human alpha/delta platelet storage pool disease, grey platelet syndrome and Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. Gunmetal mice have reduced levels of Rab geranylgeranyltransferase (RabGGTase), which adds lipophilic prenyl groups to the carboxyl terminus of Rab proteins. The degree of prenylation and the subcellular distribution of several Rab proteins were evaluated in mutant platelets, melanocytes and other tissues. Significant deficits in prenylation and membrane binding of most Rabs were observed in platelets and melanocytes. In contrast, minimal alterations in Rab prenylation were apparent in several other gunmetal tissues despite the fact that RabGGTase activity was equally diminished in these tissues. The mutant tissue-specific effects are probably due to increased concentrations of Rab proteins in platelets and melanocytes. These experiments show that Rab proteins are differentially sensitive to levels of RabGGTase activity and that normal platelet synthesis, platelet organelle function and normal pigmentation are highly sensitive to the degree of prenylation and membrane association of Rab proteins. Further, the tissue-specific effects of the gunmetal mutation suggest that RabGGTase is a potential target for therapy of thrombocytosis.

  20. Abnormal centrosomal structure and duplication in Cep135-deficient vertebrate cells.

    PubMed

    Inanç, Burcu; Pütz, Monika; Lalor, Pierce; Dockery, Peter; Kuriyama, Ryoko; Gergely, Fanni; Morrison, Ciaran G

    2013-09-01

    Centrosomes are key microtubule-organizing centers that contain a pair of centrioles, conserved cylindrical, microtubule-based structures. Centrosome duplication occurs once per cell cycle and relies on templated centriole assembly. In many animal cells this process starts with the formation of a radially symmetrical cartwheel structure. The centrosomal protein Cep135 localizes to this cartwheel, but its role in vertebrates is not well understood. Here we examine the involvement of Cep135 in centriole function by disrupting the Cep135 gene in the DT40 chicken B-cell line. DT40 cells that lack Cep135 are viable and show no major defects in centrosome composition or function, although we note a small decrease in centriole numbers and a concomitant increase in the frequency of monopolar spindles. Furthermore, electron microscopy reveals an atypical structure in the lumen of Cep135-deficient centrioles. Centrosome amplification after hydroxyurea treatment increases significantly in Cep135-deficient cells, suggesting an inhibitory role for the protein in centrosome reduplication during S-phase delay. We propose that Cep135 is required for the structural integrity of centrioles in proliferating vertebrate cells, a role that also limits centrosome amplification in S-phase-arrested cells.

  1. T-cell abnormalities after mediastinal irradiation for lung cancer. The in vitro influence of synthetic thymosin alpha-1

    SciTech Connect

    Schulof, R.S.; Chorba, T.L.; Cleary, P.A.; Palaszynski, S.R.; Alabaster, O.; Goldstein, A.L.

    1985-03-01

    The effects of mediastinal irradiation (RT) on the numbers and functions of purified peripheral blood T-lymphocytes from patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer were evaluated. The patients were candidates for a randomized trial to evaluate the immunorestorative properties of synthetic thymosin alpha-1. Twenty-one patients studied before RT did not exhibit any significant difference in T-cell numbers or function compared to age-matched healthy subjects. However, 41 patients studied within 1 week after completing RT exhibited significant depressions of E-rosette-forming cells at 4 degrees C (E4 degrees-RFC)/mm3, E-rosette-forming cells at 29 degrees C (E29 degrees-RFC)/mm3, OKT3/mm3, OKT4/mm3, and OKT8/mm3 (P . 0.0001); total T-cell percentages (%OKT3, P . 0.01); and T-cell proliferative responses in mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLR) (P . 0.01) and to the mitogen phytohemagglutinin under suboptimal conditions (P less than or equal to 0.03). Nine patients studied before and after RT showed a significant increase in OKT4/OKT8 (P . 0.01) following RT. A short-term in vitro incubation with thymosin alpha-1 could enhance MLR of T-cells in 12 of 27 patients with post-RT abnormalities. In 13 patients who were treated with placebo, the RT-induced depression of T-cell numbers and function persisted for at least 3 to 4 months. In addition, in 12 patients progressive decreases developed in %E4 degrees-RFC, %OKT3, %OKT4, and OKT4/OKT8, which always preceded clinical relapse.

  2. Selective killing of ovarian cancer cells through induction of apoptosis by nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Iseki, Sachiko; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru; Nakamura, Kae; Hayashi, Moemi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Kano, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-12

    Two independent ovarian cancer cell lines and fibroblast controls were treated with nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). Most ovarian cancer cells were detached from the culture dish by continuous plasma treatment to a single spot on the dish. Next, the plasma source was applied over the whole dish using a robot arm. In vitro cell proliferation assays showed that plasma treatments significantly decreased proliferation rates of ovarian cancer cells compared to fibroblast cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that plasma treatment of ovarian cancer cells induced apoptosis. NEAPP could be a promising tool for therapy for ovarian cancers.

  3. Spatial Intensity Distribution Analysis Reveals Abnormal Oligomerization of Proteins in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Godin, Antoine G; Rappaz, Benjamin; Potvin-Trottier, Laurent; Kennedy, Timothy E; De Koninck, Yves; Wiseman, Paul W

    2015-08-18

    Knowledge of membrane receptor organization is essential for understanding the initial steps in cell signaling and trafficking mechanisms, but quantitative analysis of receptor interactions at the single-cell level and in different cellular compartments has remained highly challenging. To achieve this, we apply a quantitative image analysis technique-spatial intensity distribution analysis (SpIDA)-that can measure fluorescent particle concentrations and oligomerization states within different subcellular compartments in live cells. An important technical challenge faced by fluorescence microscopy-based measurement of oligomerization is the fidelity of receptor labeling. In practice, imperfect labeling biases the distribution of oligomeric states measured within an aggregated system. We extend SpIDA to enable analysis of high-order oligomers from fluorescence microscopy images, by including a probability weighted correction algorithm for nonemitting labels. We demonstrated that this fraction of nonemitting probes could be estimated in single cells using SpIDA measurements on model systems with known oligomerization state. Previously, this artifact was measured using single-step photobleaching. This approach was validated using computer-simulated data and the imperfect labeling was quantified in cells with ion channels of known oligomer subunit count. It was then applied to quantify the oligomerization states in different cell compartments of the proteolipid protein (PLP) expressed in COS-7 cells. Expression of a mutant PLP linked to impaired trafficking resulted in the detection of PLP tetramers that persist in the endoplasmic reticulum, while no difference was measured at the membrane between the distributions of wild-type and mutated PLPs. Our results demonstrate that SpIDA allows measurement of protein oligomerization in different compartments of intact cells, even when fractional mislabeling occurs as well as photobleaching during the imaging process, and

  4. Influence of electron injection into 27 cm audio plasma cell on the plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haleem, N. A.; El Fiki, S. A.; Nouh, S. A.; El Disoki, T. M.; Ragheb, M. S.; Zakhary, S. G.

    2013-08-01

    In this article, the plasma is created in a Pyrex tube (L = 27 cm, ϕ = 4 cm) as a single cell, by a capacitive audio frequency (AF) discharge (f = 10-100 kHz), at a definite pressure of ˜0.2 Torr. A couple of tube linear and deviating arrangements show plasma characteristic conformity. The applied AF plasma and the injection of electrons into two gas mediums Ar and N2 revealed the increase of electron density at distinct tube regions by one order to attain 1013/cm3. The electrons temperature and density strengths are in contrast to each other. While their distributions differ along the plasma tube length, they show a decaying sinusoidal shape where their peaks position varies by the gas type. The electrons injection moderates electron temperature and expands their density. The later highest peak holds for the N2 gas, at electrons injection it changes to hold for the Ar. The sinusoidal decaying density behavior generates electric fields depending on the gas used and independent of tube geometry. The effect of the injected electrons performs a responsive impact on electrons density not attributed to the gas discharge. Analytical tools investigate the interaction of the plasma, the discharge current, and the gas used on the electrodes. It points to the emigration of atoms from each one but for greater majority they behave to a preferred direction. Meanwhile, only in the linear regime, small percentage of atoms still moves in reverse direction. Traces of gas atoms revealed on both electrodes due to sheath regions denote lack of their participation in the discharge current. In addition, atoms travel from one electrode to the other by overcoming the sheaths regions occurring transportation of particles agglomeration from one electrode to the other. The electrons injection has contributed to increase the plasma electron density peaks. These electrons populations have raised the generated electrostatic fields assisting the elemental ions emigration to a preferred

  5. Influence of electron injection into 27 cm audio plasma cell on the plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Haleem, N. A.; Ragheb, M. S.; Zakhary, S. G.; El Fiki, S. A.; Nouh, S. A.; El Disoki, T. M.

    2013-08-15

    In this article, the plasma is created in a Pyrex tube (L = 27 cm, φ= 4 cm) as a single cell, by a capacitive audio frequency (AF) discharge (f = 10–100 kHz), at a definite pressure of ∼0.2 Torr. A couple of tube linear and deviating arrangements show plasma characteristic conformity. The applied AF plasma and the injection of electrons into two gas mediums Ar and N{sub 2} revealed the increase of electron density at distinct tube regions by one order to attain 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 3}. The electrons temperature and density strengths are in contrast to each other. While their distributions differ along the plasma tube length, they show a decaying sinusoidal shape where their peaks position varies by the gas type. The electrons injection moderates electron temperature and expands their density. The later highest peak holds for the N{sub 2} gas, at electrons injection it changes to hold for the Ar. The sinusoidal decaying density behavior generates electric fields depending on the gas used and independent of tube geometry. The effect of the injected electrons performs a responsive impact on electrons density not attributed to the gas discharge. Analytical tools investigate the interaction of the plasma, the discharge current, and the gas used on the electrodes. It points to the emigration of atoms from each one but for greater majority they behave to a preferred direction. Meanwhile, only in the linear regime, small percentage of atoms still moves in reverse direction. Traces of gas atoms revealed on both electrodes due to sheath regions denote lack of their participation in the discharge current. In addition, atoms travel from one electrode to the other by overcoming the sheaths regions occurring transportation of particles agglomeration from one electrode to the other. The electrons injection has contributed to increase the plasma electron density peaks. These electrons populations have raised the generated electrostatic fields assisting the elemental ions

  6. Lipid signalling dynamics at the β-cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic β-cells are clustered in islets of Langerhans and secrete insulin in response to increased concentrations of circulating glucose. Insulin in turn acts on liver, muscle and fat tissue to store energy and normalize the blood glucose level. Inappropriate insulin release may lead to impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. In addition to glucose, other nutrients, neural stimuli and hormonal stimuli control insulin secretion. Many of these signals are perceived at the plasma membrane, which is also the site where insulin granules undergo exocytosis. Therefore, it is not surprising that membrane lipids play an important role in the regulation of insulin secretion. β-cells release insulin in a pulsatile fashion. Signalling lipids integrate the nutrient and neurohormonal inputs to fine-tune, shape and co-ordinate the pulsatility. An important group of signalling lipids are phosphoinositides and their downstream messengers. This MiniReview will discuss new insights into lipid signalling dynamics in β-cells obtained from live-cell imaging experiments with fluorescent translocation biosensors. The plasma membrane concentration of several phosphoinositides and of their downstream messengers changes rapidly upon nutrient or neurohormonal stimulation. Glucose induces the most complex spatio-temporal patterns, typically involving oscillations of messenger concentrations, which sometimes are locally restricted. The tightly controlled levels of lipid messengers can mediate specific binding of downstream effectors to the plasma membrane, contributing to the appropriate regulation of insulin secretion.

  7. Particle-in-cell simulations of Hall plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Rodrigo; Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Martins, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Hall plasma thrusters can be modelled using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In these simulations, the plasma is described by a set of equations which represent a coupled system of charged particles and electromagnetic fields. The fields are computed using a spatial grid (i.e., a discretization in space), whereas the particles can move continuously in space. Briefly, the particle and fields dynamics are computed as follows. First, forces due to electric and magnetic fields are employed to calculate the velocities and positions of particles. Next, the velocities and positions of particles are used to compute the charge and current densities at discrete positions in space. Finally, these densities are used to solve the electromagnetic field equations in the grid, which are interpolated at the position of the particles to obtain the acting forces, and restart this cycle. We will present numerical simulations using software for PIC simulations to study turbulence, wave and instabilities that arise in Hall plasma thrusters. We have sucessfully reproduced a numerical simulation of a SPT-100 Hall thruster using a two-dimensional (2D) model. In addition, we are developing a 2D model of a cylindrical Hall thruster. The results of these simulations will contribute to improve the performance of plasma thrusters to be used in Cubesats satellites currenty in development at the Plasma Laboratory at University of Brasília.

  8. Detection of numerical chromosomal abnormalities (chr. 1 and 18) before and after photodynamic therapy of human bladder carcinoma cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachor, Ruediger; Reich, Ella D.; Kleinschmidt, Klaus; Hautmann, Richard E.

    1997-12-01

    The application of nonradioactive in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific probes for cytogenetic analysis has increased significantly in recent years. In the field of photodynamic therapy (PDT) the hypothesis is that after PDT the remaining viable malignant cells are potentially metastatic cells. Therefore, we performed in vitro experiments on human bladder carcinoma cells to evaluate numerical chromosomal abnormalities before and after PDT. The possible genotoxic effect of PDT with porphycene (AamTPPn) appears to be small based on criteria such as numerical chromosomal abnormalities for chromosome 1 and 18.

  9. Apoptosis in vascular cells induced by cold atmospheric plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladek, Raymond; Stoffels, Eva

    2006-10-01

    Apoptosis is a natural mechanism of cellular self-destruction. It can be triggered by moderate, yet irreversible damage. Apoptosis plays a major role in tissue renewal. Artificial apoptosis induction will become a novel therapy that meets all requirements for tissue-saving surgery. Diseased tissues can disappear without inflammation and scarring. This is particularly important in treatment of blockages in body tracts (e.g. cardiovascular diseases). Artificial induction of apoptosis can be achieved by means of cold plasma treatment. In this work an atmospheric micro-plasma operated in helium/air has been used to induce apoptosis in vascular cells. Parametric studies of apoptosis induction have been conducted; the efficiency is almost 100%. The apoptotic factors are ROS/RNS (reactive oxygen and nitrogen species). Their densities in the plasma have been measured by mass spectrometry. For apoptosis induction, RNS seem to be more important than ROS, because of their relative abundance. Moreover, addition of a ROS scavenger (ascorbic acid) to the cell culture medium does not reduce the occurrence of apoptosis. Cold plasma is a very efficient tool for fundamental studies of apoptosis, and later, for controlled tissue removal in vivo.

  10. MicroRNA-122 Influences the Development of Sperm Abnormalities from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Regulating TNP2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongyi; Liu, Jianjun; Zhao, Yanhui; Jiang, Lizhen; Huang, Qin

    2013-01-01

    Sperm abnormalities are one of the main factors responsible for male infertility; however, their pathogenesis remains unclear. The role of microRNAs in the development of sperm abnormalities in infertile men has not yet been investigated. Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells to investigate the influence of miR-122 expression on the differentiation of these cells into spermatozoa-like cells in vitro. After induction, mutant miR-122-transfected cells formed spermatozoa-like cells. Flow cytometry of DNA content revealed a significant increase in the haploid cell population in spermatozoa-like cells derived from mutant miR-122-transfected cells as compared to those derived from miR-122-transfected cells. During induction, TNP2 and protamine mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher in mutant miR-122-transfected cells than in miR-122-transfected cells. High-throughput isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification were used to identify and quantify the different protein expression levels in miR-122- and mutant miR-122-transfected cells. Among all the proteins analyzed, the expression of lipoproteins, for example, APOB and APOA1, showed the most significant difference between the two groups. This study illustrates that miR-122 expression is associated with abnormal sperm development. MiR-122 may influence spermatozoa-like cells by suppressing TNP2 expression and inhibiting the expression of proteins associated with sperm development. PMID:23327642

  11. Cancer-associated immunodeficiency and dendritic cell abnormalities mediated by the prostaglandin EP2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Yamagata, Noboru; Yadav, Rajwardhan; Brandon, Suzanne; Courtney, Regina L.; Morrow, Jason D.; Shyr, Yu; Boothby, Mark; Joyce, Sebastian; Carbone, David P.; Breyer, Richard M.

    2003-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major COX metabolite, plays important roles in several facets of tumor biology. We characterized the contribution of the PGE2 EP2 receptor to cancer-associated immune deficiency using EP2–/– mice. EP2–/– mice exhibited significantly attenuated tumor growth and longer survival times when challenged with MC26 or Lewis lung carcinoma cell lines as compared with their wild-type littermates. While no differences in T cell function were observed, PGE2 suppressed differentiation of DCs from wild-type bone marrow progenitors, whereas EP2-null cells were refractory to this effect. Stimulation of cells in mixed lymphocyte reactions by wild-type DCs was suppressed by treatment with PGE2, while EP2–/–-derived DCs were resistant to this effect. In vivo, DCs, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells were significantly more abundant in draining lymph nodes of tumor-bearing EP2–/– mice than in tumor-bearing wild-type mice, and a significant antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte response could be observed only in the EP2–/– animals. Our data demonstrate an important role for the EP2 receptor in PGE2-induced inhibition of DC differentiation and function and the diminished antitumor cellular immune responses in vivo. PMID:12618527

  12. Heterogeneous abnormalities of CCND1 and RB1 in primary cutaneous T-Cell lymphomas suggesting impaired cell cycle control in disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xin; Orchard, Guy; Vonderheid, Eric C; Nowell, Peter C; Bagot, Martine; Bensussan, Armand; Russell-Jones, Robin; Young, Bryan D; Whittaker, Sean J

    2006-06-01

    Upregulation of cyclin D1/B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1 (CCND1/BCL1) is present in most mantle cell lymphomas with the t(11;14)(q13;q32) translocation. However, little is known about the abnormalities of CCND1 and its regulator RB1 in primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL). We analyzed CCND and RB status in CTCL using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and Affymetrix expression microarray. FISH revealed loss of CCND1/BCL1 in five of nine Sézary syndrome (SS) cases but gain in two cases, and RB1 loss in four of seven SS cases. IHC showed absent CCND1/BCL1 expression in 18 of 30 SS, 10 of 23 mycosis fungoides (MF), and three of 10 primary cutaneous CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (C-ALCL). Increased CCND1/BCL1 expression was seen in nine MF, seven C-ALCL, and six SS cases. Absent RB1 expression was detected in 8 of 12 MF and 7 of 9 SS cases, and raised RB1 expression in 7 of 8 C-ALCL. Affymetrix revealed increased gene expression of CCND2 in four of eight CTCL cases, CCND3 in three cases, and CDKN2C in two cases with a normal expression of CCND1 and RB1. These findings suggest heterogeneous abnormalities of CCND and RB in CTCL, in which dysregulated CCND and RB1 may lead to impaired cell cycle control.

  13. Abnormalities of AMPK Activation and Glucose Uptake in Cultured Skeletal Muscle Cells from Individuals with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Audrey E.; Jones, David E.; Walker, Mark; Newton, Julia L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Post exertional muscle fatigue is a key feature in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). Abnormalities of skeletal muscle function have been identified in some but not all patients with CFS. To try to limit potential confounders that might contribute to this clinical heterogeneity, we developed a novel in vitro system that allows comparison of AMP kinase (AMPK) activation and metabolic responses to exercise in cultured skeletal muscle cells from CFS patients and control subjects. Methods Skeletal muscle cell cultures were established from 10 subjects with CFS and 7 age-matched controls, subjected to electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) for up to 24h and examined for changes associated with exercise. Results In the basal state, CFS cultures showed increased myogenin expression but decreased IL6 secretion during differentiation compared with control cultures. Control cultures subjected to 16h EPS showed a significant increase in both AMPK phosphorylation and glucose uptake compared with unstimulated cells. In contrast, CFS cultures showed no increase in AMPK phosphorylation or glucose uptake after 16h EPS. However, glucose uptake remained responsive to insulin in the CFS cells pointing to an exercise-related defect. IL6 secretion in response to EPS was significantly reduced in CFS compared with control cultures at all time points measured. Conclusion EPS is an effective model for eliciting muscle contraction and the metabolic changes associated with exercise in cultured skeletal muscle cells. We found four main differences in cultured skeletal muscle cells from subjects with CFS; increased myogenin expression in the basal state, impaired activation of AMPK, impaired stimulation of glucose uptake and diminished release of IL6. The retention of these differences in cultured muscle cells from CFS subjects points to a genetic/epigenetic mechanism, and provides a system to identify novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25836975

  14. Abnormal mitotic spindle assembly and cytokinesis induced by D-Limonene in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Maurizio; Catanzaro, Irene; Naselli, Flores; Sciandrello, Giulia; Caradonna, Fabio

    2013-11-01

    D-Limonene is found widely in citrus and many other plant species; it is a major constituent of many essential oils and is used as a solvent for commercial purposes. With the discovery of its chemotherapeutic properties against cancer, it is important to investigate the biological effects of the exposure to D-Limonene and elucidate its, as yet unknown, mechanism of action. We reported here that D-Limonene is toxic in V79 Chinese hamster cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, to determine the cellular target of D-Limonene, we performed morphological observations and immunocytochemical analysis and we showed that this drug has a direct effect on dividing cells preventing assembly of mitotic spindle microtubules. This affects both chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, resulting in aneuploidy that in turn can lead to cell death or genomic instability. PMID:23913329

  15. Abnormal expression of Tim-3 antigen on peripheral blood T cells is associated with progressive disease in osteosarcoma patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongliang; Zhi, Liqiang; Duan, Ning; Su, Pengxiao

    2016-08-01

    T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain-3-containing molecule 3 (TIM-3) plays a pivotal role in immune regulation and has been found in various tumors. However, the prevalence and distribution of Tim-3 in osteosarcoma (OS) is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and distribution of Tim-3 in OS. Tim-3 on peripheral T cells from 82 OS patients and 60 healthy controls were examined by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were measured by ELSIA. Tim-3 on both CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cells were significantly upregulated in OS patients compared with healthy controls, Tim-3(+) CD4(+) T, and Tim-3(+) CD8(+) T cells were both negatively associated with serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ and TNF-α. In addition, Tim-3 showed similar levels in patients with different tumor sites. Nevertheless, patients with advanced tumor stage, metastasis, and pathological tumor fracture displayed significantly higher Tim-3 on both CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells than those with early tumor stage, without metastasis and pathological tumor fracture. Moreover, high Tim-3 on peripheral CD4(+) T cells or CD8(+) T were significantly related to poor overall survival (P = 0.014, P = 0.035, respectively). In conclusion, Tim-3 may be a potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for OS progression.

  16. Abnormal expression of Tim-3 antigen on peripheral blood T cells is associated with progressive disease in osteosarcoma patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongliang; Zhi, Liqiang; Duan, Ning; Su, Pengxiao

    2016-08-01

    T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain-3-containing molecule 3 (TIM-3) plays a pivotal role in immune regulation and has been found in various tumors. However, the prevalence and distribution of Tim-3 in osteosarcoma (OS) is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and distribution of Tim-3 in OS. Tim-3 on peripheral T cells from 82 OS patients and 60 healthy controls were examined by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were measured by ELSIA. Tim-3 on both CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cells were significantly upregulated in OS patients compared with healthy controls, Tim-3(+) CD4(+) T, and Tim-3(+) CD8(+) T cells were both negatively associated with serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ and TNF-α. In addition, Tim-3 showed similar levels in patients with different tumor sites. Nevertheless, patients with advanced tumor stage, metastasis, and pathological tumor fracture displayed significantly higher Tim-3 on both CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells than those with early tumor stage, without metastasis and pathological tumor fracture. Moreover, high Tim-3 on peripheral CD4(+) T cells or CD8(+) T were significantly related to poor overall survival (P = 0.014, P = 0.035, respectively). In conclusion, Tim-3 may be a potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for OS progression. PMID:27516959

  17. Abnormal T-cell subpopulations in hemophilic patients receiving factor VIII concentrates from voluntary donors.

    PubMed

    Wearne, A; Joshua, D E; Rickard, K A; Kronenberg, H

    1984-04-01

    Recently, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) has been reported in hemophiliacs in the USA, Canada and Spain, and this has caused considerable concern amongst hemophiliacs regarding the use of factor VIII concentrates. The aim of this study was to determine whether hemophiliacs in Australia have T-lymphocyte subpopulation changes similar to those observed in patients with AIDS. Factor VIII produced in Australia is derived from a totally volunteer blood donor system and none of the hemophiliacs in this study had received commercial blood products. For the hemophiliacs, the T-helper cell to T-suppressor cell ratio was 1.1 +/- 0.6 (mean +/- SD) which was significantly less (p less than 0.001) than that of the normal age and sex-matched controls. There was a significant relative (p less than 0.001) and absolute (p less than 0.05) reduction of the helper cell subsets and a significant relative (p less than 0.001) and absolute (p less than 0.05) increase of the suppressor cell subsets, in the hemophiliacs compared to the normal controls. There appears to be no correlation between the amount of factor VIII therapy received during the last three years and the T-cell subset changes. All patients with Christmas disease had T-cell subsets within the normal range. All patients were negative for the hepatitis B virus antigen, but all were positive for the antibody, indicating that there had been exposure to the hepatitis virus in all cases. Cytomegalovirus titres were uniformly low and immunoglobulin levels were normal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Bleeding and thrombosis in multiple myeloma and related plasma cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Antonio; Tufano, Antonella; Di Capua, Mirko; Franchini, Massimo

    2011-11-01

    A variety of disease- and treatment-related factors affect the coagulation system and the risk of bleeding and thrombotic complications in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and related plasma cell disorders (PCD). As commonly observed in other cancer settings, the malignant clone induces a cytokine environment responsible for a hypercoagulable state. The increase of blood viscosity and impairment of platelet and coagulation function due to circulating monoclonal proteins are considered key mechanisms in the hemostatic abnormalities frequently detected in patients with PCD. However, clinically significant bleeding is relatively rare and poorly correlated with these abnormalities. Management is often challenging because of the multifactorial pathogenesis and underestimation or misdiagnosis of acquired bleeding disorders, particularly acquired von Willebrand syndrome. In recent years, growing interest in thromboembolic risk has emerged after the introduction of novel and more effective antimyeloma agents (thalidomide and lenalidomide), which was associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism, particularly when associated with dexamethasone and multiagent chemotherapy in newly diagnosed patients. The clinical impact of bleeding and thrombotic complications in patients with PCD, with emphasis on MM, will be discussed in this review, reporting the current knowledge about pathophysiologic mechanisms and implications for management.

  19. Sclerostin is overexpressed by plasma cells from multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Giacomina; Oranger, Angela; Mori, Giorgio; Specchia, Giorgina; Rinaldi, Erminia; Curci, Paola; Zallone, Alberta; Rizzi, Rita; Grano, Maria; Colucci, Silvia

    2011-11-01

    Sclerostin, an osteocyte-expressed negative regulator of bone formation, is one of the inhibitors of Wnt signaling that is a critical pathway in the correct process of osteoblast differentiation. It has been demonstrated that Wnt signaling through the secretion of Wnt inhibitors, such as DKK1, sFRP-2, and sFRP-3, plays a key role in the decreased osteoblast activity associated with multiple myeloma (MM) bone disease. We provide evidence that sclerostin is expressed by myeloma cells that are human myeloma cell lines and plasma cells (CD138(+) cells) obtained from the bone marrow (BM) of a large number of MM patients with bone disease. Moreover, we show that there are no differences in sclerostin serum levels between MM patients and controls. Thus, our data indicate that MM cells, as a sclerostin source in the BM, could create a microenvironment with high sclerostin concentration that could contribute toward inhibiting osteoblast differentiation.

  20. Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Patterns for Enhancing Early Cell Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunqi; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping; Ji, Fang; Li, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Titanium coating has been widely used as a biocompatible metal in biomedical applications. However, the early cell responses and long-term fixation of titanium implants are not satisfied. To obviate these defects, in this paper, micro-post arrays with various widths (150-1000 μm) and intervals (100-300 μm) were fabricated on the titanium substrate by template-assisted plasma spraying technology. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited significantly higher osteogenic differentiation as well as slightly improved adhesion and proliferation on the micro-patterned coatings compared with the traditional one. The cell number on the pattern with 1000 µm width reached 130% after 6 days of incubation, and the expressions of osteopontin (OPN) as well as osteocalcin (OC) were doubled. No obvious difference was found in cell adhesion on various size patterns. The present micro-patterned coatings proposed a new modification method for the traditional plasma spraying technology to enhance the early cell responses and convenience for the bone in-growth.

  1. Blimp-1 controls plasma cell function through regulation of immunoglobulin secretion and the unfolded protein response

    PubMed Central

    Tellier, Julie; Shi, Wei; Minnich, Martina; Liao, Yang; Crawford, Simon; Smyth, Gordon K; Kallies, Axel; Busslinger, Meinrad; Nutt, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell differentiation requires silencing of B cell transcription, while establishing antibody-secretory function and long-term survival. The transcription factors Blimp-1 and IRF4 are essential for plasma cell generation, however their function in mature plasma cells has remained elusive. We have found that while IRF4 was essential for plasma cell survival, Blimp-1 was dispensable. Blimp-1-deficient plasma cells retained their transcriptional identity, but lost the ability to secrete antibody. Blimp-1 regulated many components of the unfolded protein response (UPR), including XBP-1 and ATF6. The overlap of Blimp-1 and XBP-1 function was restricted to the UPR, with Blimp-1 uniquely regulating mTOR activity and plasma cell size. Thus, Blimp-1 is required for the unique physiological capacity of plasma cells that enables the secretion of protective antibody. PMID:26779600

  2. Abnormal expression of calcyphosine is associated with poor prognosis and cell biology function in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Weiwei; Wang, Quhui; Wang, Feiran; Jiang, Yasu; Xu, Meirong; Xu, Junfei

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the calcyphosine (CAPS) expression in human colorectal cancer (CRC) and to explore its clinical and prognostic significances. CAPS expression was measured by Western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, and immunohistochemistry. The relationships between the CAPS expression levels and the clinicopathological factors were investigated. The Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test were used to investigate the overall survival of the patients. Moreover, the effects of CAPS on biological roles of CRC cells were also evaluated by MTT assay, colony formation assay, and transwell assay. CAPS was significantly overexpressed in cancerous tissue and CRC cell lines compared with adjacent nontumor tissue and a normal human intestinal epithelial cell line. Overexpression of CAPS was significantly associated with histological grade (P=0.004), invasive depth (P<0.001), lymph node metastasis (P=0.003), tumor node metastasis stage (P=0.017), and distant metastasis (P=0.042). Furthermore, silencing of CAPS expression in CRC cells inhibited their proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that high CAPS expression might demonstrate poor prognosis in CRC patients. Cox regression analysis revealed that CAPS expression was an independent prognostic factor of CRC. Our data suggested that the upregulation of CAPS might play a role in the carcinogenesis and progression of CRC. CAPS could be used as a potential diagnostic factor and be an independent good prognostic indicator for CRC patients. PMID:26889086

  3. Nanodomain stabilization dynamics in plasma membranes of biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tamal; Maiti, Tapas K.; Chakraborty, Suman

    2011-02-01

    We discover that a synergistically amplifying role of stabilizing membrane proteins and continuous lipid recycling can explain the physics governing the stability, polydispersity, and dynamics of lipid raft domains in plasma membranes of biological cells. We establish the conjecture using a generalized order parameter based on theoretical formalism, endorsed by detailed scaling arguments and domain mapping. Quantitative agreements with morphological distributions of raft complexes, as obtained from Förster resonance energy transfer based visualization, support the present theoretical conjecture.

  4. Distinct mechanisms account for acquired von Willebrand syndrome in plasma cell dyscrasias.

    PubMed

    Dicke, Christina; Schneppenheim, Sonja; Holstein, Katharina; Spath, Brigitte; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Dittmer, Rita; Budde, Ulrich; Langer, Florian

    2016-05-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) is a rare bleeding disorder that may cause life-threatening hemorrhages in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias (PCDs). Early diagnosis and treatment require a thorough understanding of its underlying pathophysiology. Two patients with IgG MGUS presented with dramatically decreased plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF) and a severe type-1 pattern on multimer analysis. A prompt response to intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG), but not to VWF/FVIII, was consistent with accelerated immunologic clearance of plasma VWF. Another IgG MGUS patient showed a type-2 pattern and a less pronounced response to IVIG, suggesting that additional mechanism(s) contributed to AVWS evolution. In a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia and severe depletion of plasma VWF, multimer analysis indicated association of the IgM paraprotein with VWF before, but not after plasmapheresis, resulting in destruction of the agarose gel and a characteristically distorted band structure of VWF multimers. A type-2 pattern with highly abnormal VWF triplets and laboratory evidence of excessive fibrinolytic activity suggested that plasmin-mediated VWF degradation contributed to AVWS in a patient with multiple myeloma (MM) and AL amyloidosis. Finally, in a patient with IgG MM, maximally prolonged PFA-100® closure times and a specific defect in ristocetin-induced platelet agglutination, both of which resolved after remission induction, indicated interference of the paraprotein with VWF binding to platelet GPIb. Importantly, in none of the six patients, circulating autoantibodies to VWF were detected by a specific in-house ELISA. In summary, when evaluating PCD patients with severe bleeding symptoms, AVWS due to various pathogenic mechanisms should be considered. PMID:27040683

  5. Normal Muscle Oxygen Consumption and Fatigability in Sickle Cell Patients Despite Reduced Microvascular Oxygenation and Hemorheological Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Waltz, Xavier; Pichon, Aurélien; Lemonne, Nathalie; Mougenel, Danièle; Lalanne-Mistrih, Marie-Laure; Lamarre, Yann; Tarer, Vanessa; Tressières, Benoit; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Hue, Olivier; Connes, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Although it has been hypothesized that muscle metabolism and fatigability could be impaired in sickle cell patients, no study has addressed this issue. Methods We compared muscle metabolism and function (muscle microvascular oxygenation, microvascular blood flow, muscle oxygen consumption and muscle microvascular oxygenation variability, which reflects vasomotion activity, maximal muscle force and local muscle fatigability) and the hemorheological profile at rest between 16 healthy subjects (AA), 20 sickle cell-hemoglobin C disease (SC) patients and 16 sickle cell anemia (SS) patients. Results Muscle microvascular oxygenation was reduced in SS patients compared to the SC and AA groups and this reduction was not related to hemorhelogical abnormalities. No difference was observed between the three groups for oxygen consumption and vasomotion activity. Muscle microvascular blood flow was higher in SS patients compared to the AA group, and tended to be higher compared to the SC group. Multivariate analysis revealed that muscle oxygen consumption was independently associated with muscle microvascular blood flow in the two sickle cell groups (SC and SS). Finally, despite reduced muscle force in sickle cell patients, their local muscle fatigability was similar to that of the healthy subjects. Conclusions Sickle cell patients have normal resting muscle oxygen consumption and fatigability despite hemorheological alterations and, for SS patients only, reduced muscle microvascular oxygenation and increased microvascular blood flow. Two alternative mechanisms can be proposed for SS patients: 1) the increased muscle microvascular blood flow is a way to compensate for the lower muscle microvascular oxygenation to maintain muscle oxygen consumption to normal values or 2) the reduced microvascular oxygenation coupled with a normal resting muscle oxygen consumption could indicate that there is slight hypoxia within the muscle which is not sufficient to limit

  6. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G. J.; Lee, J. K.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.

    2010-01-11

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  7. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. J.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.; Lee, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  8. Biomedical Applications of Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas to Cancerous Cell Treatment and Tooth Bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Koo; Kim, Myoung Soo; Byun, June Ho; Kim, Kyong Tai; Kim, Gyoo Cheon; Park, Gan Young

    2011-08-01

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have attracted great interests and they have been widely applied to biomedical applications to interact with living tissues, cells, and bacteria due to their non-thermal property. This paper reviews the biomedical applications of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas to cancerous cell treatment and tooth bleaching. Gold nanoparticles conjugated with cancer-specific antibodies have been introduced to cancerous cells to enhance selective killing of cells, and the mechanism of cell apoptosis induced by plasma has been investigated. Tooth exposed to helium plasma jet with hydrogen peroxide has become brighter and the productions of hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide have been enhanced by plasma exposure.

  9. P53 functional abnormality in mesenchymal stem cells promotes osteosarcoma development

    PubMed Central

    Velletri, T; Xie, N; Wang, Y; Huang, Y; Yang, Q; Chen, X; Chen, Q; Shou, P; Gan, Y; Cao, G; Melino, G; Shi, Y

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that p53 has a critical role in the differentiation and functionality of various multipotent progenitor cells. P53 mutations can lead to genome instability and subsequent functional alterations and aberrant transformation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The significance of p53 in safeguarding our body from developing osteosarcoma (OS) is well recognized. During bone remodeling, p53 has a key role in negatively regulating key factors orchestrating the early stages of osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Interestingly, changes in the p53 status can compromise bone homeostasis and affect the tumor microenvironment. This review aims to provide a unique opportunity to study the p53 function in MSCs and OS. In the context of loss of function of p53, we provide a model for two sources of OS: MSCs as progenitor cells of osteoblasts and bone tumor microenvironment components. Standing at the bone remodeling point of view, in this review we will first explain the determinant function of p53 in OS development. We will then summarize the role of p53 in monitoring MSC fidelity and in regulating MSC differentiation programs during osteogenesis. Finally, we will discuss the importance of loss of p53 function in tissue microenvironment. We expect that the information provided herein could lead to better understanding and treatment of OS. PMID:26775693

  10. Fat, Stem Cells, and Platelet-Rich Plasma.

    PubMed

    James, Isaac B; Coleman, Sydney R; Rubin, J Peter

    2016-07-01

    The ideal filler for aesthetic surgery is inexpensive and easy to obtain, natural in appearance and texture, immunologically compatible, and long lasting without risk of infection. By most metrics, autologous fat grafts meet these criteria perfectly. Although facial fat grafting is now a commonly accepted surgical procedure, there has been a wave of activity applying stem cells and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapies to aesthetic practice. This article addresses technical considerations in the use of autologous fat transfer for facial rejuvenation, and also explores the current evidence for these stem cell and PRP therapies in aesthetic practice.

  11. The effect of jet and DBD plasma on NCI-78 blood cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Kaushik, Neha; Choi, Eun Ha

    2013-06-01

    In this study we describe the effects of a nonthermal jet and dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma on the T98G brain cancer cell line. The results of this study reveal that the jet and DBD plasma inhibits NCI-78 blood cancer cells growth efficiently with the loss of metabolic viability of cells. The main goal of this study is to induce cell death in NCI-78 blood cancer cells by the toxic effect of jet and DBD plasma.

  12. Development of a microfluidic device for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation.

    PubMed

    Maria, M Sneha; Kumar, B S; Chandra, T S; Sen, A K

    2015-12-01

    This work presents design, fabrication and test of a microfluidic device which employs Fahraeus-Lindqvist and Zweifach-Fung effects for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation. The device design comprises a straight main channel with a series of branched channels placed symmetrically on both sides of the main channel. The design implements constrictions before each junction (branching point) in order to direct cells that would have migrated closer to the wall (naturally or after liquid extraction at a junction) towards the centre of the main channel. Theoretical and numerical analysis are performed for design of the microchannel network to ensure that a minimum flow rate ratio (of 2.5:1, main channel-to-side channels) is maintained at each junction and predict flow rate at the plasma outlet. The dimensions and location of the constrictions were determined using numerical simulations. The effect of presence of constrictions before the junctions was demonstrated by comparing the performances of the device with and without constrictions. To demonstrate the performance of the device, initial experiments were performed with polystyrene microbeads (10 and 15 μm size) and droplets. Finally, the device was used for concentration of HL60 cells and separation of plasma and cells in diluted blood samples. The cell concentration and blood-plasma purification efficiency was quantified using Haemocytometer and Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorter (FACS). A seven-fold cell concentration was obtained with HL60 cells and a purification efficiency of 70 % and plasma recovery of 80 % was observed for diluted (1:20) blood sample. FACS was used to identify cell lysis and the cell viability was checked using Trypan Blue test which showed that more than 99 % cells are alive indicating the suitability of the device for practical use. The proposed device has potential to be used as a sample preparation module in lab on chip based diagnostic platforms.

  13. Selective cytotoxicity of indirect nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma against ovarian clear-cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Fumi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Kae; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Hori, Masaru; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is a histological type of epithelial ovarian cancer that is less responsive to chemotherapy and associated with a poorer prognosis than serous and endometrioid carcinoma. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma which produces reactive species has recently led to an explosion of research in plasma medicine. Plasma treatment can be applied to cancer treatment to induce apoptosis and tumor growth arrest. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that a medium exposed to plasma also has an anti-proliferative effect against cancer in the absence of direct exposure to plasma. In this study, we confirmed whether this indirect plasma has an anti-tumor effect against CCC, and investigated whether this efficacy is selective for cancer cells. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma induced apoptosis in CCC cells, while human peritoneal mesothelial cells remained viable. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma exhibits selective cytotoxicity against CCC cells which are resistant to chemotherapy.

  14. Fractionated stem cell infusions for patients with plasma cell myeloma undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Landau, Heather; Wood, Kevin; Chung, David J; Koehne, Guenther; Lendvai, Nikoletta; Hassoun, Hani; Lesokhin, Alexander; Hoover, Elizabeth; Zheng, Junting; Devlin, Sean M; Giralt, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    We conducted a phase II trial investigating the impact of fractionated hematopoietic cell infusions on engraftment kinetics and symptom burden in patients with plasma cell myeloma (PCM) undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (AHCT). We hypothesized that multiple hematopoietic cell infusions would reduce duration of neutropenia and enhance immune recovery resulting in a better tolerated procedure. Twenty-six patients received high-dose melphalan followed by multiple cell infusions (Days 0, +2, +4, +6) and were compared to PCM patients (N = 77) who received high-dose melphalan and a single infusion (Day 0) (concurrent control group). The primary endpoint was number of days with ANC <500K/mcL. Symptom burden was assessed using the MSK-modified MD Anderson Symptom Inventory. Median duration of neutropenia was similar in study (4 days, range 3-5) and control patients (4 days, range 3-9) (p = 0.654). There was no significant difference in the number of red cell or platelet transfusions, days of fever, diarrhea, antibiotics, number of documented infections, or length of admission. Symptom burden surveys showed that AHCT was well-tolerated in both study and control patients. We conclude that fractionated stem cell infusions following high-dose melphalan do not enhance engraftment kinetics or significantly alter patients' clinical course following AHCT in PCM.

  15. Shared clonal cytogenetic abnormalities in aberrant mast cells and leukemic myeloid blasts detected by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based whole-genome scanning.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, John K; Shao, Lina; Bixby, Dale L; Ross, Charles W

    2016-04-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is characterized by a clonal proliferation of aberrant mast cells within extracutaneous sites. In a subset of SM cases, a second associated hematologic non-mast cell disease (AHNMD) is also present, usually of myeloid origin. Polymerase chain reaction and targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization studies have provided evidence that, in at least some cases, the aberrant mast cells are related clonally to the neoplastic cells of the AHNMD. In this work, a single nucleotide polymorphism microarray (SNP-A) was used to characterize the cytogenetics of the aberrant mast cells from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia and concomitant mast cell leukemia associated with a KIT D816A mutation. The results demonstrate the presence of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the mast cells and myeloid blasts, as well as additional abnormalities within mast cells (copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity) not detectable by routine karyotypic analysis. To our knowledge, this work represents the first application of SNP-A whole-genome scanning to the detection of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the two components of a case of SM-AHNMD. The findings provide additional evidence of a frequent clonal link between aberrant mast cells and cells of myeloid AHNMDs, and also highlight the importance of direct sequencing for identifying uncommon activating KIT mutations.

  16. The Effect of Tuning Cold Plasma Composition on Glioblastoma Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaoqian; Sherman, Jonathan; Murphy, William; Ratovitski, Edward; Canady, Jerome; Keidar, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Previous research in cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) and cancer cell interaction has repeatedly proven that the cold plasma induced cell death. It is postulated that the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) play a major role in the CAP cancer therapy. In this paper, we seek to determine a mechanism of CAP therapy on glioblastoma cells (U87) through an understanding of the composition of the plasma, including treatment time, voltage, flow-rate and plasma-gas composition. In order to determine the threshold of plasma treatment on U87, normal human astrocytes (E6/E7) were used as the comparison cell line. Our data showed that the 30 sec plasma treatment caused 3-fold cell death in the U87 cells compared to the E6/E7 cells. All the other compositions of cold plasma were performed based on this result: plasma treatment time was maintained at 30 s per well while other plasma characteristics such as voltage, flow rate of source gas, and composition of source gas were changed one at a time to vary the intensity of the reactive species composition in the plasma jet, which may finally have various effect on cells reflected by cell viability. We defined a term “plasma dosage” to summarize the relationship of all the characteristics and cell viability. PMID:24878760

  17. B cell homeostasis and plasma cell homing controlled by Krüppel-like factor 2.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Rebecca; Sandrock, Lena; Porstner, Martina; Roth, Edith; Mathews, Martina; Hobeika, Elias; Reth, Michael; Kahn, Mark L; Schuh, Wolfgang; Jäck, Hans-Martin

    2011-01-11

    Krüppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) controls T lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs by regulating sphingosin-1 phosphate receptor 1 (S1Pr1). Here we show that this is not the case for B cells. Instead, KLF2 controls homeostasis of B cells in peripheral lymphatic organs and homing of plasma cells to the bone marrow, presumably by controlling the expression of β(7)-integrin. In mice with a B cell-specific deletion of KLF2, S1Pr1 expression on B cells was only slightly affected. Accordingly, all splenic B cell subsets including B1 cells were present, but their numbers were increased with a clear bias for marginal zone (MZ) B cells. In contrast, fewer peyers patches harboring fewer B cells were found, and fewer B1 cells in the peritoneal cavity as well as recirculating B cells in the bone marrow were detected. Upon thymus-dependent immunization, IgG titers were diminished, and antigen-specific plasma cells were absent in the bone marrow, although numbers of antigen-specific splenic plasmablasts were normal. KLF2 plays also a role in determining the identity of follicular B cells, as KLF2-deficient follicular B cells showed calcium responses similar to those of MZ B cells and failed to down-regulate MZ B cell signature genes, such as CD21 and CXCR7. PMID:21187409

  18. Pulmonary function abnormalities and asthma are prevalent in children with sickle cell disease and are associated with acute chest syndrome.

    PubMed

    Intzes, Stefanos; Kalpatthi, Ram V; Short, Robert; Imran, Hamayun

    2013-11-01

    Pulmonary diseases form major sources of morbidity and mortality in children with sickle cell disease (SCD). The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of lung function abnormalities and asthma and their association with acute chest syndrome (ACS) in children with SCD. This was a cross-sectional retrospective study of 127 children with SCD; we collected information regarding ACS and asthma and pulmonary function test (PFT) data. Based on PFT results, the patients were assigned to one pattern of lung function [normal, obstructive lung disease (OLD), restrictive lung disease (RLD)]. Statistical analyses included Pearson correlation, prevalence odds ratio (POR), cross-tabulation, and multiple binary logistic regression. OLD was noted in 35% and RLD in 23% of the patients, with the remainder exhibiting a normal PFT pattern. Forty-six percent of patients had asthma, 64% of whom had a history of ACS. OLD (r = .244, P = .008, POR = 2.8) and asthma (r = .395, P < .001, POR = 5.4) were significantly associated with a history of ACS. There was a negative correlation between having normal PFT data and a history of ACS (r = -.289, P = .002, POR = .3). Asthma and pulmonary function abnormalities are prevalent in children with SCD, with OLD being more common than RLD. There is an association between asthma, OLD, and ACS, however causality cannot be proven due to the study design. We stress the importance of actively investigating for a clinical diagnosis of asthma in all patients with SCD and suggest that PFT data may help detect patients at lower risk for ACS.

  19. Novel Metabolic Abnormalities in the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Peripheral Cells From Huntington's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Nima N; Bonica, Joseph; Xu, Hui; Park, Larry C; Arjomand, Jamshid; Chen, Zhengming; Gibson, Gary E

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction is well-documented in Huntington's disease (HD). However, the link between the mutant huntingtin (mHTT) gene and the pathology is unknown. The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the main metabolic pathway for the production of NADH for conversion to ATP via the electron transport chain (ETC). The objective of this study was to test for differences in enzyme activities, mRNAs and protein levels related to the TCA cycle between lymphoblasts from healthy subjects and from patients with HD. The experiments utilize the advantages of lymphoblasts to reveal new insights about HD. The large quantity of homogeneous cell populations permits multiple dynamic measures to be made on exactly comparable tissues. The activities of nine enzymes related to the TCA cycle and the expression of twenty-nine mRNAs encoding for these enzymes and enzyme complexes were measured. Cells were studied under baseline conditions and during metabolic stress. The results support our recent findings that the activities of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) are elevated in HD. The data also show a large unexpected depression in MDH activities. Furthermore, message levels for isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) were markedly increased in in HD lymphoblasts and were responsive to treatments. The use of lymphoblasts allowed us to clarify that the reported decrease in aconitase activity in HD autopsy brains is likely due to secondary hypoxic effects. These results demonstrate the mRNA and enzymes of the TCA cycle are critical therapeutic targets that have been understudied in HD. PMID:27611087

  20. Trivalent dimethylarsenic compound induces histone H3 phosphorylation and abnormal localization of Aurora B kinase in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshihide; Miyazaki, Koichi; Kita, Kayoko; Ochi, Takafumi

    2009-12-15

    Trivalent dimethylarsinous acid [DMA(III)] has been shown to induce mitotic abnormalities, such as centrosome abnormality, multipolar spindles, multipolar division, and aneuploidy, in several cell lines. In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying these mitotic abnormalities, we investigated DMA(III)-mediated changes in histone H3 phosphorylation and localization of Aurora B kinase, which is a key molecule in cell mitosis. DMA(III) caused the phosphorylation of histone H3 (ser10) and was distributed predominantly in mitotic cells, especially in prometaphase cells. By contrast, most of the phospho-histone H3 was found to be localized in interphase cells after treatment with inorganic arsenite [iAs(III)], suggesting the involvement of a different pathway in phosphorylation. DMA(III) activated Aurora B kinase and slightly activated ERK MAP kinase. Phosphorylation of histone H3 by DMA(III) was effectively reduced by ZM447439 (Aurora kinase inhibitor) and slightly reduced by U0126 (MEK inhibitor). By contrast, iAs(III)-dependent histone H3 phosphorylation was markedly reduced by U0126. Aurora B kinase is generally localized in the midbody during telophase and plays an important role in cytokinesis. However, in some cells treated with DMA(III), Aurora B was not localized in the midbody of telophase cells. These findings suggested that DMA(III) induced a spindle abnormality, thereby activating the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) through the Aurora B kinase pathway. In addition, cytokinesis was not completed because of the abnormal localization of Aurora B kinase by DMA(III), thereby resulting in the generation of multinucleated cells. These results provide insight into the mechanism of arsenic tumorigenesis.

  1. Automated identification of abnormal metaphase chromosome cells for the detection of chronic myeloid leukemia using microscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Mulvihill, John J.; Chen, Xiaodong; Liu, Hong

    2010-07-01

    Karyotyping is an important process to classify chromosomes into standard classes and the results are routinely used by the clinicians to diagnose cancers and genetic diseases. However, visual karyotyping using microscopic images is time-consuming and tedious, which reduces the diagnostic efficiency and accuracy. Although many efforts have been made to develop computerized schemes for automated karyotyping, no schemes can get be performed without substantial human intervention. Instead of developing a method to classify all chromosome classes, we develop an automatic scheme to detect abnormal metaphase cells by identifying a specific class of chromosomes (class 22) and prescreen for suspicious chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The scheme includes three steps: (1) iteratively segment randomly distributed individual chromosomes, (2) process segmented chromosomes and compute image features to identify the candidates, and (3) apply an adaptive matching template to identify chromosomes of class 22. An image data set of 451 metaphase cells extracted from bone marrow specimens of 30 positive and 30 negative cases for CML is selected to test the scheme's performance. The overall case-based classification accuracy is 93.3% (100% sensitivity and 86.7% specificity). The results demonstrate the feasibility of applying an automated scheme to detect or prescreen the suspicious cancer cases.

  2. An antigenic study of human plasma cells in normal tissue and in myeloma: identification of a novel plasma cell associated antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, P D; Walker, L; Hardie, D; Richardson, P; Khan, M; Johnson, G D; Ling, N R

    1986-01-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody named BU11 which detects an antigen strongly expressed on human plasma cells is described. The antibody stains plasma cells in tonsil sections, fresh and cultured plasmacytoid cells from the bone marrow of patients with multiple myeloma and cells of the plasmacytoid cell line RPMI 8226 used as the immunogen. In vitro studies of pokeweed mitogen (PWM) stimulated peripheral blood B cells and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) stimulated tonsil B cells show that the antigen is present mainly on cells coexpressing the OKT10 antigen and containing cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg). The BU11 antigen is expressed weakly on some normal B cells and is not present on T cells, monocytes or granulocytes. The antigen is of molecular weight 58kD under reducing conditions and is biochemically distinct from previously described plasma cell antigens. Images Fig. 4 PMID:3024883

  3. High-contrast plasma-electrode Pockels cell.

    PubMed

    Kruschwitz, B E; Kelly, J H; Shoup Iii, M J; Waxer, L J; Cost, E C; Green, E T; Hoyt, Z M; Taniguchi, J; Walker, T W

    2007-03-10

    A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) has been developed for use on the OMEGA extended performance (EP) laser system that can be used in a high-contrast optical switch, as required for isolation of the system from retroreflected pulses. Contrast ratios reliably exceeded 500:1 locally everywhere in the clear aperture. The key to achieving this improvement was the use of circular windows simply supported on compliant O rings, which is shown to produce very low stress-induced birefringence despite vacuum loading. Reliable operation was achieved operating at a relatively high operating pressure, low operating pressures being found to be strongly correlated to occurrences of local loss of plasma density. PMID:17318253

  4. High-contrast plasma-electrode Pockels cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kruschwitz, B. E.; Kelly, J. H.; Shoup, M. J. III; Waxer, L. J.; Cost, E. C.; Green, E. T.; Hoyt, Z. M.; Taniguchi, J.; Walker, T. W

    2007-03-10

    A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) has been developed for use on the OMEGA extended performance (EP)laser system that can be used in a high-contrast optical switch, as required for isolation of the system from retroreflected pulses. Contrast ratios reliably exceeded 500:1 locally everywhere in the clear aperture. The key to achieving this improvement was the use of circular windows simply supported on compliant O rings, which is shown to produce very low stress-induced birefringence despite vacuum loading. Reliable operation was achieved operating at a relatively high operating pressure, low operating pressures being found to be strongly correlated to occurrences of local loss of plasma density.

  5. The hormesis effect of plasma-elevated intracellular ROS on HaCaT cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szili, Endre J.; Harding, Frances J.; Hong, Sung-Ha; Herrmann, Franziska; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Short, Robert D.

    2015-12-01

    We have examined the link between ionized-gas plasma delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) cells and cell fate, defined in terms of cell viability versus death. Phospholipid vesicles were used as cell mimics to measure the possible intracellular ROS concentration, [ROSi], delivered by various plasma treatments. Cells were exposed to a helium cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) jet for different plasma exposure times (5-60 s) and gas flow rates (50-1000 ml min-1). Based upon the [ROSi] data we argue that plasma-generated ROS in the cell culture medium can readily diffuse into real cells. Plasma exposure that equated to an [ROSi] in the range of 3.81  ×  10-10-9.47  ×  10-8 M, measured at 1 h after the plasma exposure, resulted in increased cell viability at 72 h; whereas a higher [ROSi] at 1 h decreased cell viability after 72 h of culture. This may be because of the manner in which the ROS are delivered by the plasma: HaCaT cells better tolerate a low ROS flux over an extended plasma exposure period of 1 min, compared to a high flux delivered in a few seconds, although the final [ROSi] may be the same. Our results suggest that plasma stimulation of HaCaT cells follows the principle of hormesis.

  6. Abnormal autonomic cardiac response to transient hypoxia in sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sangkatumvong, S; Coates, T D; Khoo, M C K

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to non-invasively assess cardiac autonomic control in subjects with sickle cell anemia (SCA) by tracking the changes in heart rate variability (HRV) that occur following brief exposure to a hypoxic stimulus. Five African–American SCA patients and seven healthy control subjects were recruited to participate in this study. Each subject was exposed to a controlled hypoxic stimulus consisting of five breaths of nitrogen. Time-varying spectral analysis of HRV was applied to estimate the cardiac autonomic response to the transient episode of hypoxia. The confounding effects of changes in respiration on the HRV spectral indices were reduced by using a computational model. A significant decrease in the parameters related to parasympathetic control was detected in the post-hypoxic responses of the SCA subjects relative to normal controls. The spectral index related to sympathetic activity, on the other hand, showed a tendency to increase the following hypoxic stimulation, but the change was not significant. This study suggests that there is some degree of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in SCA that is revealed by the response to transient hypoxia. PMID:18460753

  7. Regulation of germinal center responses, memory B cells and plasma cell formation-an update.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Lynn M; Tarlinton, David M

    2016-04-01

    Progress in understanding humoral immunity has been accelerated by the powerful experimental approaches of genetics, genomics and imaging. Excellent reviews of these advances appeared in 2015 in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the discovery of B cell and T cell lineages in the chicken. Here we provide a contemporary model of B cell differentiation, highlighting recent publications illuminating germinal center (GC), memory B cell and antibody-secreting plasma cell biology. The important contributions of CD4T cells to antibody responses have been thoroughly reviewed elsewhere.

  8. Cell-Cycle-Dependent Reconfiguration of the DNA Methylome during Terminal Differentiation of Human B Cells into Plasma Cells.

    PubMed

    Caron, Gersende; Hussein, Mourad; Kulis, Marta; Delaloy, Céline; Chatonnet, Fabrice; Pignarre, Amandine; Avner, Stéphane; Lemarié, Maud; Mahé, Elise A; Verdaguer-Dot, Núria; Queirós, Ana C; Tarte, Karin; Martín-Subero, José I; Salbert, Gilles; Fest, Thierry

    2015-11-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells are major determinants of adaptive immunity but remain only partially understood. Here we present the transcriptional and epigenomic landscapes of cell subsets arising from activation of human naive B cells and differentiation into plasmablasts. Cell proliferation of activated B cells was linked to a slight decrease in DNA methylation levels, but followed by a committal step in which an S phase-synchronized differentiation switch was associated with an extensive DNA demethylation and local acquisition of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at enhancers and genes related to plasma cell identity. Downregulation of both TGF-?1/SMAD3 signaling and p53 pathway supported this final step, allowing the emergence of a CD23-negative subpopulation in transition from B cells to plasma cells. Remarkably, hydroxymethylation of PRDM1, a gene essential for plasma cell fate, was coupled to progression in S phase, revealing an intricate connection among cell cycle, DNA (hydroxy)methylation, and cell fate determination.

  9. Micro-Biocidal Activity of Yeast Cells by Needle Plasma Irradiation at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurumi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Taima, Tomohito; Suzuki, Kaoru; Hirose, Hideharu; Masutani, Shigeyuki

    In this study, we report on the biocidal activity technique by needle helium plasma irradiation at atmospheric pressure using borosilicate capillary nozzle to apply for the oral surgery. The diameter of needle plasma was less than 50 µm, and temperature of plasma irradiated area was less than body temperature. Needle plasma showed emission due to OH and O radical. Raman spectra and methylene blue stain showed yeast cells were inactivated by needle plasma irradiation.

  10. 3D Mapping of plasma effective areas via detection of cancer cell damage induced by atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Liu, Yueing; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, a nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used for irradiation of oral cancer cells. Since cancer cells are very susceptible to plasma treatment, they can be used as a tool for detection of APPJ-effective areas, which extended much further than the visible part of the APPJ. An immunofluorescence assay was used for DNA damage identification, visualization and quantification. Thus, the effective damage area and damage level were determined and plotted as 3D images.

  11. Identification of Ly-6K as a novel marker for mouse plasma cells.

    PubMed

    von Allmen, Caroline E; Bauer, Monika; Dietmeier, Klaus; Buser, Regula B; Gwerder, Myriam; Muntwiler, Simone; Utzinger, Stephan; Saudan, Philippe; Bachmann, Martin F; Beerli, Roger R

    2008-05-01

    Plasma cells are the main producers of antibody and key effector cells of the immune system. Despite their importance, analytics of plasma cells still suffers from the limited availability of specific markers. Currently, plasma cell identification relies on the expression of a single marker, CD138/syndecan-1. However, syndecan-1 is widely expressed on various cell types outside the hematopoietic compartment, and furthermore, not expressed on all subsets of plasma cells. To discover novel surface markers, a differential screening followed by signal sequence trap cloning was developed, leading to the identification of mouse Ly-6K (mLy-6K). Expression profiling confirmed that mLy-6K is expressed by plasma cells but not B cells or tissues not containing plasma cells. Expression at the surface of plasma cells isolated from spleen, lymph node, bone marrow, and lamina propria of the small intestine was demonstrated at the protein level using a polyclonal rabbit antibody. This novel plasma cell marker shows promise to help broaden our understanding of plasma cell differentiation and function.

  12. Aberrant gene expression patterns in placentomes are associated with phenotypically normal and abnormal cattle cloned by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Everts, Robin E; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale; Razzak, Anthony; Hue, Isabelle; Green, Cheryl A; Oliveira, Rosane; Vignon, Xavier; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Tian, X Cindy; Yang, Xiangzhong; Renard, Jean-Paul; Lewin, Harris A

    2008-03-14

    Transcription profiling of placentomes derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT, n = 20), in vitro fertilization (IVF, n = 9), and artificial insemination (AI, n = 9) at or near term development was performed to better understand why SCNT and IVF often result in placental defects, hydrops, and large offspring syndrome (LOS). Multivariate analysis of variance was used to distinguish the effects of SCNT, IVF, and AI on gene expression, taking into account the effects of parturition (term or preterm), sex of fetus, breed of dam, breed of fetus, and pathological finding in the offspring (hydrops, normal, or other abnormalities). Differential expression of 20 physiologically important genes was confirmed with quantitative PCR. The largest effect on placentome gene expression was attributable to whether placentas were collected at term or preterm (i.e., whether the collection was because of disease or to obtain stage-matched controls) followed by placentome source (AI, IVF, or SCNT). Gene expression in SCNT placentomes was dramatically different from AI (n = 336 genes; 276 >2-fold) and from IVF (n = 733 genes; 162 >2-fold) placentomes. Functional analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEG) showed that IVF has significant effects on genes associated with cellular metabolism. In contrast, DEG associated with SCNT are involved in multiple pathways, including cell cycle, cell death, and gene expression. Many DEG were shared between the gene lists for IVF and SCNT comparisons, suggesting that common pathways are affected by the embryo culture methods used for IVF and SCNT. However, the many unique gene functions and pathways affected by SCNT suggest that cloned fetuses may be starved and accumulating toxic wastes due to placental insufficiency caused by reprogramming errors. Many of these genes are candidates for hydrops and LOS.

  13. Plasma etching, texturing, and passivation of silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby, D.S.; Yang, P.; Zaidi, S.; Brueck, S.; Roy, M.; Narayanan, S.

    1998-11-01

    The authors improved a self-aligned emitter etchback technique that requires only a single emitter diffusion and no alignments to form self-aligned, patterned-emitter profiles. Standard commercial screen-printed gridlines mask a plasma-etchback of the emitter. A subsequent PECVD-nitride deposition provides good surface and bulk passivation and an antireflection coating. The authors used full-size multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) cells processed in a commercial production line and performed a statistically designed multiparameter experiment to optimize the use of a hydrogenation treatment to increase performance. They obtained an improvement of almost a full percentage point in cell efficiency when the self-aligned emitter etchback was combined with an optimized 3-step PECVD-nitride surface passivation and hydrogenation treatment. They also investigated the inclusion of a plasma-etching process that results in a low-reflectance, textured surface on multicrystalline silicon cells. Preliminary results indicate reflectance can be significantly reduced without etching away the emitter diffusion.

  14. Chromosome 1 abnormalities in elderly patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma treated with novel therapies

    PubMed Central

    Caltagirone, Simona; Ruggeri, Marina; Aschero, Simona; Gilestro, Milena; Oddolo, Daniela; Gay, Francesca; Bringhen, Sara; Musolino, Caterina; Baldini, Luca; Musto, Pellegrino; Petrucci, Maria T.; Gaidano, Gianluca; Passera, Roberto; Bruno, Benedetto; Palumbo, Antonio; Boccadoro, Mario; Omedè, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell disorder characterized by malignant plasma cell infiltration in the bone marrow, serum and/or urine monoclonal protein and organ damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of chromosome 1 abnormalities in a group of elderly patients (>65 years) with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma enrolled in the GIMEMA-MM-03-05 trial and treated with bortezomib, melphalan and prednisone or bortezomib, melphalan, prednisone and thalidomide followed by bortezomib and thalidomide maintenance. We also evaluated the link between chromosome 1 abnormalities and other clinical, genetic and immunophenotypic features by a multivariate logistic regression model. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization on immunomagnetically purified plasma cells and bone marrow multiparameter flow cytometry were employed. A multivariate Cox model showed that chromosome 1 abnormalities, age >75 years and a CD19+/CD117− immunophenotype of bone marrow plasma cells were independent risk factors for overall survival in elderly patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Moreover, a detrimental effect of thalidomide, even when administered in association with bortezomib, was observed in patients with abnormal chromosome 1 as well as in those with 17p deletion, while the benefit of adding thalidomide to the bortezomib-melphalan-prednisone regimen was noted in patients carrying an aggressive CD19+/CD117− bone marrow plasma cell immunophenotype. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltri-als.gov as #NCT01063179. PMID:25015938

  15. Abnormal gene expression profile reveals the common key signatures associated with clear cell renal cell carcinoma: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H J; Sun, Z Q; Qian, W Q; Sheng, L

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the common gene signatures of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC), and to expand the respective protein-protein interaction networks associated with CCRCC regulation. For the latter, we utilized multiple gene expression data sets from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), with which we could analyze the aberrant gene expression patterns at the transcriptome level that distinguish cancer from normal samples. We obtained the GSE781 and GSE6344 clear cell renal cell carcinoma gene expression datasets from GEO, which contained a total of 37 cancer and 37 normal samples. Subsequent R language analysis allowed identification of the differentially expressed genes. The genes that exhibited significant up or downregulation in cancers were entered into the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery to perform analysis of gene functional annotations, resulting in the generation of two protein-protein interaction networks that included the most significantly up or downregulated genes in CCRCC. These allowed us to identify the key factor genes, which could potentially be utilized to separate cancer versus normal samples. The differentially regulated genes are also highly likely to be functionally important regulatory factors in renal cell carcinoma: cell functions showing enrichment of these genes include amine biosynthetic and vitamin metabolic processes, ion binding, extracellular transport function, and regulation of biosynthesis. Together, the results from our study offer further reason to pursue diagnosis and therapy of CCRCC at the molecular level. PMID:25867368

  16. Analysis of plasma membrane phosphoinositides from fusogenic carrot cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, J.J.; Boss, W.F.

    1987-04-01

    Phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/) were found to be associated with the plasma membrane-rich fractions isolated by aqueous polymer two-phase partitioning from fusogenic cells. They represented at least 5% and 0.7% of the total inositol-labeled lipids in the plasma membrane-rich fractions, respectively, and were present in a ratio of about 7:1 (PIP:PIP/sub 2/). In addition, two unidentified inositol-labeled compounds, which together were approximately 3% of the inositol-labeled lipids, were found predominantly in the plasma membrane-rich fractions and migrated between PIP/sub 2/ and PIP. The R/sub f/s of these compounds were approximately 0.31 and 0.34 in the solvent system CHCl/sub 3/:MeOH:15N NH/sub 4/OH:H/sub 2/O (90:90:7:22) using LK5 plates presoaked in 1% potassium oxalate. These compounds incorporated /sup 32/P/sub i/, (/sup 3/H)inositol and were hydrolyzed in mild base. These data suggested that they were glycero-phospholipids. Although the compounds did not comigrate with lysoPIP obtained from bovine brain (R/sub f/ approx. 0.35), when endogenous PIP was hydrolyzed to lysoPIP, the breakdown product migrated in the region of the unidentified inositol lipids.

  17. The effect of plasma on solar cell array arc characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Tyree, E.

    1985-01-01

    The influence from the ambient plasma on the arc characteristics of a negatively biased solar cell array was investigated. The arc characteristics examined were the peak current during an arc, the decay time as the arc terminates, and the charge lost during the arc. These arc characteristics were examined in a nitrogen plasma with charge densities ranging from 15,000 to 45,000 cu cm. Background gas pressures ranged from 8x1,000,000 to 6x100,000 torr. Over these ranges of parameters no significant effect on the arc characteristics were seen. Arc characteristics were also examined for three gas species: helium, nitrogen and argon. The helium arcs have higher peak currents and shorter decay times than nitrogen and argon arcs. There are slight differences in the arc characteristics between nitrogen and argon. These differences may be caused by the differences in mass of the respective species. Also, evidence is presented for an electron emission mechanism appearing as a precursor to solar array arcs. Occasionally the plasma generator could be turned off, and currents could still be detected in the vacuum system. When these currents are presented, arcs may occur.

  18. The effect of plasma on solar cell array arc characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Tyree, E.

    1984-01-01

    The influence from the ambient plasma on the arc characteristics of a negatively biased solar cell array was investigated. The arc characteristics examined were the peak current during an arc, the decay time as the arc terminates, and the charge lost during the arc. These arc characteristics were examined in a nitrogen plasma with charge densities ranging from 15,000 to 45,000 cu cm. Background gas pressures ranged from 8x1,000,000 to 6x100,000 torr. Over these ranges of parameters no significant effect on the arc characteristics were seen. Arc characteristics were also examined for three gas species: helium, nitrogen and argon. The helium arcs have higher peak currents and shorter decay times than nitrogen and argon arcs. There are slight differences in the arc characteristics between nitrogen and argon. These differences may be caused by the differences in mass of the respective species. Also, evidence is presented for an electron emission mechanism appearing as a precursor to solar array arcs. Occassionally the plasma generator could be turned off, and currents could still be detected in the vacuum system. When these currents are presented, arcs may occur.

  19. Cold atmospheric plasma jet-generated RONS and their selective effects on normal and carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric helium plasma jets were fabricated and utilized for plasma-cell interactions. The effect of operating parameters and jet design on the generation of specific reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) within cells and cellular response were investigated. It was found that plasma treatment induced the overproduction of RONS in various cancer cell lines selectively. The plasma under a relatively low applied voltage induced the detachment of cells, a reduction in cell viability, and apoptosis, while the plasma under higher applied voltage led to cellular necrosis in our case. To determine whether plasma-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation occurs through interfering with mitochondria-related cellular response, we examined the plasma effects on ROS generation in both parental A549 cells and A549 ρ(0) cells. It was observed that cancer cells were more susceptible to plasma-induced RONS (especially nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2(-)) radicals) than normal cells, and consequently, plasma induced apoptotic cell responses mainly in cancer cells.

  20. Non-thermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Melanoma Cells via Production of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Sensenig, Rachel; Kalghatgi, Sameer; Cerchar, Ekaterina; Fridman, Gregory; Shereshevsky, Alexey; Torabi, Behzad; Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Podolsky, Erica; Fridman, Alexander; Friedman, Gary; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane; Brooks, Ari D.

    2012-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma may provide a novel approach to treat malignancies via induction of apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of DBD plasma to induce apoptosis in melanoma cells. Melanoma cells were exposed to plasma at doses that did not induce necrosis, and cell viability and apoptotic activity were evaluated by Trypan blue exclusion test, Annexin-V/PI staining, caspase-3 cleavage, and TUNEL® analysis. Trypan blue staining revealed that non-thermal plasma treatment significantly decreased the viability of cells in a dose-dependent manner 3 and 24 h after plasma treatment. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed a significant increase in apoptosis in plasma-treated cells at 24, 48, and 72 h post-treatment (p<0.001). Caspase-3 cleavage was observed 48 h post-plasma treatment at a dose of 15 J/cm2. TUNEL® analysis of plasma-treated cells demonstrated an increase in apoptosis at 48 and 72 h post-treatment (p<0.001) at a dose of 15 J/cm2. Pre-treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), an intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, significantly decreased apoptosis in plasma-treated cells at 5 and 15 J/cm2. Plasma treatment induces apoptosis in melanoma cells through a pathway that appears to be dependent on production of intracellular ROS. DBD plasma production of intracellular ROS leads to dose-dependent DNA damage in melanoma cells, detected by γ-H2AX, which was completely abrogated by pre-treating cells with ROS scavenger, NAC. Plasma-induced DNA damage in turn may lead to the observed plasma-induced apoptosis. Since plasma is non-thermal, it may be used to selectively treat malignancies. PMID:21046465

  1. Effects of atmospheric nonthermal plasma on invasion of colorectal cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chul-Ho; Kwon, Seyeoul; Bahn, Jae Hoon; Lee, Keunho; Jun, Seung Ik; Rack, Philip D.; Baek, Seung Joon

    2010-06-01

    The effect that the gas content and plasma power of atmospheric, nonthermal plasma has on the invasion activity in colorectal cancer cells has been studied. Helium and helium plus oxygen plasmas were induced through a nozzle and operated with an ac power of less than 10 kV which exhibited a length of 2.5 cm and a diameter of 3-4 mm in ambient air. Treatment of cancer cells with the plasma jet resulted in a decrease in cell migration/invasion with higher plasma intensity and the addition of oxygen to the He flow gas.

  2. Induction of Embryogenesis in Brassica Napus Microspores Produces a Callosic Subintinal Layer and Abnormal Cell Walls with Altered Levels of Callose and Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Parra-Vega, Verónica; Corral-Martínez, Patricia; Rivas-Sendra, Alba; Seguí-Simarro, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    The induction of microspore embryogenesis produces dramatic changes in different aspects of the cell physiology and structure. Changes at the cell wall level are among the most intriguing and poorly understood. In this work, we used high pressure freezing and freeze substitution, immunolocalization, confocal, and electron microscopy to analyze the structure and composition of the first cell walls formed during conventional Brassica napus microspore embryogenesis, and in cultures treated to alter the intracellular Ca2+ levels. Our results revealed that one of the first signs of embryogenic commitment is the formation of a callose-rich, cellulose-deficient layer beneath the intine (the subintinal layer), and of irregular, incomplete cell walls. In these events, Ca2+ may have a role. We propose that abnormal cell walls are due to a massive callose synthesis and deposition of excreted cytoplasmic material, and the parallel inhibition of cellulose synthesis. These features were absent in pollen-like structures and in microspore-derived embryos, few days after the end of the heat shock, where abnormal cell walls were no longer produced. Together, our results provide an explanation to a series of relevant aspects of microspore embryogenesis including the role of Ca2+ and the occurrence of abnormal cell walls. In addition, our discovery may be the explanation to why nuclear fusions take place during microspore embryogenesis. PMID:26635844

  3. Ectopic Cerebellar Cell Migration Causes Maldevelopment of Purkinje Cells and Abnormal Motor Behaviour in Cxcr4 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guo-Jen; Edwards, Andrew; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Lee, Yi-Shin; Peng, Lei; Era, Takumi; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Tsai, Ching-Yen; Nishikawa, Shin-Ichi; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Chen, Shu-Jen; Flint, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    SDF-1/CXCR4 signalling plays an important role in neuronal cell migration and brain development. However, the impact of CXCR4 deficiency in the postnatal mouse brain is still poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the importance of CXCR4 on cerebellar development and motor behaviour by conditional inactivation of Cxcr4 in the central nervous system. We found CXCR4 plays a key role in cerebellar development. Its loss leads to defects in Purkinje cell dentritogenesis and axonal projection in vivo but not in cell culture. Transcriptome analysis revealed the most significantly affected pathways in the Cxcr4 deficient developing cerebellum are involved in extra cellular matrix receptor interactions and focal adhesion. Consistent with functional impairment of the cerebellum, Cxcr4 knockout mice have poor coordination and balance performance in skilled motor tests. Together, these results suggest ectopic the migration of granule cells impairs development of Purkinje cells, causes gross cerebellar anatomical disruption and leads to behavioural motor defects in Cxcr4 null mice. PMID:24516532

  4. Deletion of Brg1 causes abnormal hair cell planer polarity, hair cell anchorage, and scar formation in mouse cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yecheng; Ren, Naixia; Li, Shiwei; Fu, Xiaolong; Sun, Xiaoyang; Men, Yuqin; Xu, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian; Xie, Yue; Xia, Ming; Gao, Jiangang

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells (HCs) are mechanosensors that play crucial roles in perceiving sound, acceleration, and fluid motion. The precise architecture of the auditory epithelium and its repair after HC loss is indispensable to the function of organ of Corti (OC). In this study, we showed that Brg1 was highly expressed in auditory HCs. Specific deletion of Brg1 in postnatal HCs resulted in rapid HC degeneration and profound deafness in mice. Further experiments showed that cell-intrinsic polarity of HCs was abolished, docking of outer hair cells (OHCs) by Deiter’s cells (DCs) failed, and scar formation in the reticular lamina was deficient. We demonstrated that Brg1 ablation disrupted the Gαi/Insc/LGN and aPKC asymmetric distributions, without overt effects on the core planer cell polarity (PCP) pathway. We also demonstrated that Brg1-deficient HCs underwent apoptosis, and that leakage in the reticular lamina caused by deficient scar formation shifted the mode of OHC death from apoptosis to necrosis. Together, these data demonstrated a requirement for Brg1 activity in HC development and suggested a role for Brg1 in the proper cellular structure formation of HCs. PMID:27255603

  5. Differential gene expression in pulmonary artery endothelial cells exposed to sickle cell plasma.

    PubMed

    Klings, Elizabeth S; Safaya, Surinder; Adewoye, Adeboye H; Odhiambo, Adam; Frampton, Garrett; Lenburg, Marc; Gerry, Norman; Sebastiani, Paola; Steinberg, Martin H; Farber, Harrison W

    2005-05-11

    Clinical variability in sickle cell disease (SCD) suggests a role for extra-erythrocytic factors in the pathogenesis of vasoocclusion. We hypothesized that endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction, one possible modifier of disease variability, results from induction of phenotypic changes by circulating factors. Accordingly, we analyzed gene expression in cultured human pulmonary artery ECs (HPAEC) exposed to plasma from 1) sickle acute chest syndrome (ACS) patients, 2) SCD patients at steady state, 3) normal volunteers, and 4) serum-free media, using whole genome microarrays (U133A-B GeneChip, Affymetrix). Data were analyzed by Bayesian analysis of differential gene expression (BADGE). Differential expression was defined by the probability of >1.5 fold change in signal intensity greater than 0.999 and a predicted score of 70-100, measured by cross-validation. Compared with normal plasma, plasma from SCD patients (steady state) resulted in differential expression of 50 genes in HPAEC. Of these genes, molecules involved in cholesterol biosynthesis and lipid transport, the cellular stress response, and extracellular matrix proteins were most prominent. Another 58 genes were differentially expressed in HPAEC exposed to plasma from ACS patients. The pattern of altered gene expression suggests that plasma from SCD patients induces an EC phenotype which is anti-apoptotic and favors cholesterol biosynthesis. An altered EC phenotype elicited by SCD plasma may contribute to the pathogenesis of sickle vasoocclusion.

  6. Augmented Indian hedgehog signaling in cranial neural crest cells leads to craniofacial abnormalities and dysplastic temporomandibular joint in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ling; Gu, Shuping; Ye, Wenduo; Song, Yingnan; Chen, YiPing

    2016-01-01

    Extensive studies have pinpointed the crucial role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling in the development of the appendicular skeleton and the essential function of Ihh in the formation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this study, we have investigated the effect of augmented Ihh signaling in TMJ development. We took a transgenic gain-of-function approach by overexpressing Ihh in the cranial neural crest (CNC) cells using a conditional Ihh transgenic allele and the Wnt1-Cre allele. We found that Wnt1-Cre-mediated tissue-specific overexpression of Ihh in the CNC lineage caused severe craniofacial abnormalities, including cleft lip/palate, encephalocele, anophthalmos, micrognathia, and defective TMJ development. In the mutant TMJ, the glenoid fossa was completely absent, whereas the condyle and the articular disc appeared relatively normal with slightly delayed chondrocyte differentiation. Our findings thus demonstrate that augmented Ihh signaling is detrimental to craniofacial development, and that finely tuned Ihh signaling is critical for TMJ formation. Our results also provide additional evidence that the development of the condyle and articular disc is independent of the glenoid fossa. PMID:26553654

  7. Development of plasma cleaning and plasma enhanced close space sublimation hardware for improving CdS/CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Drew

    A scalable photovoltaic manufacturing process that employs a heated pocket deposition technique has been developed at Colorado State University. It allows for the economical manufacturing of single-junction thin-film CdTe solar cells with efficiencies over 13%. New techniques that further increase cell efficiency and reduce production expenses are required to make solar energy more affordable. To address this need a hollow-cathode plasma source was added to the load-lock region of the CSU single-vacuum in-line CdTe-cell fabrication system. This plasma source is used to clean the transparent-conductive-oxide layer of the cell prior to the deposition of the CdS and CdTe layers. Plasma cleaning enables a reduction in CdS thickness by approximately 20 nm, while maintaining an improved cell voltage. Cell current was improved and cell efficiency was increased by 1.5%. Maps generated by scanning white-light interferometry, electroluminescence, and light-beam-induced current all show uniformity improvement with plasma cleaning treatment. To further increase cell efficiency a hollow-cathode plasma-enhanced close space sublimation (PECSS) source was utilized to modify the CdS window layer material as it was being deposited. This was done by integrating PECSS into the CSU inline CdS/CdTe-cell fabricating system and by sublimating the CdS semiconductor material through a plasma discharge. To date oxygenated CdS (CdS:O) cells have been grown by sublimating CdS through a PECSS source operated on oxygen. Data are presented showing that PECSS CdS:O films have increased the band gap of the window layer therefore reducing absorption loss, increasing cell current, and improving efficiency by 1.2%.

  8. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol elicits neuroprotective effects on excitotoxically lesioned dentate gyrus granule cells via abnormal-cannabidiol-sensitive receptors on microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Susanne; Koch, Marco; Böttger, Charlotte; Ghadban, Chalid; Korf, Horst-Werner; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2009-02-01

    Endocannabinoids like 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) exert neuroprotective effects after brain injuries. According to current concepts, these neuroprotective effects are due to interactions between 2-AG and cannabinoid (CB)1 receptors on neurons. Moreover, 2-AG modulates migration and proliferation of microglial cells which are rapidly activated after brain lesion. This effect is mediated via CB2- and abnormal-cannabidiol (abn-CBD)-sensitive receptors. In the present study, we investigated whether the abn-CBD-sensitive receptor on microglial cells contributes to 2-AG-mediated neuroprotection in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) after excitotoxic lesion induced by NMDA (50 microM) application for 4 h. This lesion caused neuronal damage and accumulation of microglial cells within the granule cell layer. To analyze the role of abn-CBD-sensitive receptors for neuroprotection and microglial cell accumulation, two agonists of the abn-CBD-sensitive receptor, abn-CBD or 2-AG, two antagonists, 1,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-2-[(1R,6R)-3-methyl-6-(1-methylethenyl)-2-cyclohexen1-yl]-benzene (O-1918) or cannabidiol (CBD), and the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251, were applied to NMDA-lesioned OHSC. Propidium iodide (PI) labeling was used as a marker of degenerating neurons and isolectin B(4) (IB(4)) as a marker of microglial cells. Application of both, abn-CBD or 2-AG to lesioned OHSC significantly decreased the number of IB(4)(+) microglial cells and PI(+) neurons in the dentate gyrus. In contrast to AM251, application of O-1918 or CBD antagonized these effects. When microglial cells were depleted by preincubation of OHSC with the bisphosphonate clodronate (100 microg/mL) for 5 days before excitotoxic lesion, 2-AG and abn-CBD lost their neuroprotective effects. We therefore propose that the endocannabinoid 2-AG exerts its neuroprotective effects via activation of abn-CBD-sensitive receptors on microglial cells.

  9. Exercise protects against obesity induced semen abnormalities via downregulating stem cell factor, upregulating Ghrelin and normalizing oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Alhashem, Fahaid; Alkhateeb, Mahmoud; Sakr, Hussein; Alshahrani, Mesfer; Alsunaidi, Mohammad; Elrefaey, Hesham; Alessa, Riyad; Sarhan, Mohammad; Eleawa, Samy M; Khalil, Mohammad A.

    2014-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress and hormonal imbalance have been hypothesized to underlie infertility in obese animals. However, recent evidence suggests that Ghrelin and Stem Cell Factor (SCF) play an important role in fertility, in lean individuals. Therefore, this study aimed at investigating whether changes in the levels of Ghrelin and SCF in rat testes underlie semen abnormal parameters observed in obese rats, and secondly, whether endurance exercise or Orlistat can protect against changes in Ghrelin, SCF, and/or semen parameters in diet induced obese rats. Obesity was modelled in male Wistar rats using High Fat Diet (HFD) 12-week protocol. Eight week-old rats (n=40) were divided into four groups, namely, Group I: fed with a standard diet (12 % of calories as fat); Group II: fed HFD (40 % of calories as fat); Group III: fed the HFD with a concomitant dose of Orlistat (200 mg/kg); and Group IV: fed the HFD and underwent 30 min daily swimming exercise. The model was validated by measuring the levels of testosterone, FSH, LH, estradiol, leptin, triglycerides, total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol, and final change in body weight. Levels were consistent with published obesity models (see Results). As predicted, the HFD group had a 76.8 % decrease in sperm count, 44.72 % decrease in sperm motility, as well as 47.09 % increase in abnormal sperm morphology. Unlike the control group, in the HFD group (i.e. obese rats) Ghrelin mRNA and protein were elevated, while SCF mRNA and protein were diminished in the testes. Furthermore, in the HFD group, SOD and GPx activities were significantly reduced, 48.5±5.8 % (P=0.0012) and 45.6±4.6 % (P=0.0019), respectively, while TBARS levels were significantly increased (112.7±8.9 %, P=0.0001). Finally, endurance exercise training and Orlistat administration individually and differentially protected semen parameters in obese rats. The mechanism includes, but is not limited to, normalizing the levels of Ghrelin, SCF, SOD, GPx and TBARS. In rat

  10. Exercise protects against obesity induced semen abnormalities via downregulating stem cell factor, upregulating Ghrelin and normalizing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Alhashem, Fahaid; Alkhateeb, Mahmoud; Sakr, Hussein; Alshahrani, Mesfer; Alsunaidi, Mohammad; Elrefaey, Hesham; Alessa, Riyad; Sarhan, Mohammad; Eleawa, Samy M; Khalil, Mohammad A

    2014-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress and hormonal imbalance have been hypothesized to underlie infertility in obese animals. However, recent evidence suggests that Ghrelin and Stem Cell Factor (SCF) play an important role in fertility, in lean individuals. Therefore, this study aimed at investigating whether changes in the levels of Ghrelin and SCF in rat testes underlie semen abnormal parameters observed in obese rats, and secondly, whether endurance exercise or Orlistat can protect against changes in Ghrelin, SCF, and/or semen parameters in diet induced obese rats. Obesity was modelled in male Wistar rats using High Fat Diet (HFD) 12-week protocol. Eight week-old rats (n=40) were divided into four groups, namely, Group I: fed with a standard diet (12 % of calories as fat); Group II: fed HFD (40 % of calories as fat); Group III: fed the HFD with a concomitant dose of Orlistat (200 mg/kg); and Group IV: fed the HFD and underwent 30 min daily swimming exercise. The model was validated by measuring the levels of testosterone, FSH, LH, estradiol, leptin, triglycerides, total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol, and final change in body weight. Levels were consistent with published obesity models (see Results). As predicted, the HFD group had a 76.8 % decrease in sperm count, 44.72 % decrease in sperm motility, as well as 47.09 % increase in abnormal sperm morphology. Unlike the control group, in the HFD group (i.e. obese rats) Ghrelin mRNA and protein were elevated, while SCF mRNA and protein were diminished in the testes. Furthermore, in the HFD group, SOD and GPx activities were significantly reduced, 48.5±5.8 % (P=0.0012) and 45.6±4.6 % (P=0.0019), respectively, while TBARS levels were significantly increased (112.7±8.9 %, P=0.0001). Finally, endurance exercise training and Orlistat administration individually and differentially protected semen parameters in obese rats. The mechanism includes, but is not limited to, normalizing the levels of Ghrelin, SCF, SOD, GPx and TBARS. In rat

  11. Increased CXCR3 Expression of Infiltrating Plasma Cells in Hunner Type Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Yoshiyuki; Morikawa, Teppei; Maeda, Daichi; Shintani, Yukako; Niimi, Aya; Nomiya, Akira; Nakayama, Atsuhito; Igawa, Yasuhiko; Fukayama, Masashi; Homma, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    An up-regulated CXCR3 pathway and affluent plasma cell infiltration are characteristic features of Hunner type interstitial cystitis (HIC). We further examined these two features using bladder biopsy samples taken from 27 patients with HIC and 15 patients with non-IC cystitis as a control. The number of CD3-positive T lymphocytes, CD20-positive B lymphocytes, CD138-positive plasma cells, and CXCR3-positive cells was quantified by digital image analysis. Double-immunofluorescence for CXCR3 and CD138 was used to detect CXCR3 expression in plasma cells. Correlations between CXCR3 positivity and lymphocytic and plasma cell numbers and clinical parameters were explored. The density of CXCR3-positive cells showed no significant differences between HIC and non-IC cystitis specimens. However, distribution of CXCR3-positivity in plasma cells indicated co-localization of CXCR3 with CD138 in HIC specimens, but not in non-IC cystitis specimens. The number of CXCR3-positive cells correlated with plasma cells in HIC specimens alone. Infiltration of CXCR3-positive cells was unrelated to clinical parameters of patients with HIC. These results suggest that infiltration of CXCR3-positive plasma cells is a characteristic feature of HIC. The CXCR3 pathway and specific immune responses may be involved in accumulation/retention of plasma cells and pathophysiology of the HIC bladder. PMID:27339056

  12. Simplex-in-cell technique for collisionless plasma simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kates-Harbeck, Julian; Totorica, Samuel; Zrake, Jonathan; Abel, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We extend the simplex-in-cell (SIC) technique recently introduced in the context of collisionless dark matter fluids [1,2] to the case of collisionless plasmas. The six-dimensional phase space distribution function f (x , v) is represented by an ensemble of three-dimensional manifolds, which we refer to as sheets. The electric potential field is obtained by solving the Poisson equation on a uniform mesh, where the charge density is evaluated by a spatial projection of the phase space sheets. The SIC representation of phase space density facilitates robust, high accuracy numerical evolution of the Vlasov-Poisson system using significantly fewer tracer particles than comparable particle-in-cell (PIC) approaches by reducing the numerical shot-noise associated with the latter. We introduce the SIC formulation and describe its implementation in a new code, which we validate using standard test problems including plasma oscillations, Landau damping, and two stream instabilities in one dimension. Merits of the new scheme are shown to include higher accuracy and faster convergence rates in the number of particles. We finally motivate and outline the efficient application of SIC to higher dimensional problems.

  13. Characterization of plasma-induced cell membrane permeabilization: focus on OH radical distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shota; Honda, Ryosuke; Hokari, Yutaro; Takashima, Keisuke; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-08-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) is used medically for plasma-induced cell permeabilization. However, how plasma irradiation specifically triggers permeabilization remains unclear. In an attempt to identify the dominant factor(s), the distribution of plasma-produced reactive species was investigated, primarily focusing on OH radicals. A stronger plasma discharge, which produced more OH radicals in the gas phase, also produced more OH radicals in the liquid phase (OHaq), enhancing the cell membrane permeability. In addition, plasma irradiation-induced enhancement of cell membrane permeability decreased markedly with increased solution thickness (<1 mm), and the plasma-produced OHaq decayed in solution (diffusion length on the order of several hundred micrometers). Furthermore, the horizontally center-localized distribution of OHaq corresponded with the distribution of the permeabilized cells by plasma irradiation, while the overall plasma-produced oxidizing species in solution (detected by iodine-starch reaction) exhibited a doughnut-shaped horizontal distribution. These results suggest that OHaq, among the plasma-produced oxidizing species, represents the dominant factor in plasma-induced cell permeabilization. These results enhance the current understanding of the mechanism of APP as a cell-permeabilization tool.

  14. Native fluorescence characterization of human liver abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Singaravelu; Madhuri, S.; Aruna, Prakasa R.; Suchitra, S.; Srinivasan, T. G.

    1999-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy of intrinsic biomolecules has been extensively used in biology and medicine for the past several decades. In the present study, we report the native fluorescence characteristics of blood plasma from normal human subjects and patients with different liver abnormalities such as hepatitis, leptospirosis, jaundice, cirrhosis and liver cell failure. Native fluorescence spectra of blood plasma -- acetone extract were measured at 405 nm excitation. The average spectrum of normal blood plasma has a prominent emission peak around 464 nm whereas in the case of liver diseased subjects, the primary peak is red shifted with respect to normal. In addition, liver diseased cases show distinct secondary emission peak around 615 nm, which may be attributed to the presence of endogenous porphyrins. The red shift of the prominent emission peak with respect to normal is found to be maximum for hepatitis and minimum for cirrhosis whereas the secondary emission peak around 615 nm was found to be more prominent in the case of cirrhosis than the rest. The ratio parameter I465/I615 is found to be statistically significant (p less than 0.001) in discriminating liver abnormalities from normal.

  15. Micronucleus formation induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma exposure in brain cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Uhm, Hansup; Ha Choi, Eun

    2012-02-01

    Induction of micronucleus formation (cytogenetic damage) in brain cancer cells upon exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma has been investigated. We have investigated the influence of exposure and incubation times on T98G brain cancer cells by using growth kinetic, clonogenic, and micronucleus formation assay. We found that micronucleus formation rate directly depends on the plasma exposure time. It is also shown that colony formation capacity of cells has been inhibited by the treatment of plasma at all doses. Cell death and micronucleus formation are shown to be significantly elevated by 120 and 240 s exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

  16. Persistence of Cytogenetic Abnormalities at Complete Remission After Induction in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Prognostic Significance and the Potential Role of Allogeneic Stem-Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiming; Cortes, Jorge; Estrov, Zeev; Faderl, Stefan; Qiao, Wei; Abruzzo, Lynne; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Pierce, Sherry; Huang, Xuelin; Kebriaei, Partow; Kadia, Tapan; De Lima, Marcos; Kantarjian, Hagop; Ravandi, Farhad

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prognostic impact of persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at complete remission (CR) on relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to examine the potential role of allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (SCT) in this setting. Patients and Methods Data from 254 adult patients with AML (excluding acute promyelocytic leukemia) who achieved CR after induction chemotherapy on various first-line protocols were examined. Results Median follow-up for surviving patients was 43 months. Patients with cytogenetic abnormalities at CR (n = 71) had significantly shorter RFS (P = .001) and OS (P < .001) compared with patients with normal cytogenetics at CR (n = 183); 3-year RFS was 15% and 45%, and 3-year OS was 15% and 56%, respectively. Among the patients with persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at CR, those who underwent SCT in first CR (CR1; n = 15) had better RFS and OS compared to those without SCT (n = 56; P = .04 and .06, respectively). In multivariate analysis, persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at CR was an independent predictor for RFS (P < .001) and OS (P = .001), but among patients with persistent cytogenetic abnormalities at CR, no significant differences in OS (P = .25) was observed between those who did or did not receive SCT with a trend favoring SCT for RFS (P = .08). Conclusion Persistent cytogenetically abnormal cells at CR predict a significantly shorter RFS and OS. SCT in CR1 may improve the clinical outcome of patients lacking cytogenetic remission after induction although this depends on patient selection. PMID:21555694

  17. Cold atmospheric plasma jet-generated RONS and their selective effects on normal and carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric helium plasma jets were fabricated and utilized for plasma–cell interactions. The effect of operating parameters and jet design on the generation of specific reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) within cells and cellular response were investigated. It was found that plasma treatment induced the overproduction of RONS in various cancer cell lines selectively. The plasma under a relatively low applied voltage induced the detachment of cells, a reduction in cell viability, and apoptosis, while the plasma under higher applied voltage led to cellular necrosis in our case. To determine whether plasma-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation occurs through interfering with mitochondria-related cellular response, we examined the plasma effects on ROS generation in both parental A549 cells and A549 ρ0 cells. It was observed that cancer cells were more susceptible to plasma-induced RONS (especially nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2−) radicals) than normal cells, and consequently, plasma induced apoptotic cell responses mainly in cancer cells. PMID:26838306

  18. Predictors of plasma cell disorders among African American patients: a community practice perspective.

    PubMed

    Tun, Nay Min; Joseph, Gardith; Soe, Aye Min; Ford, Jean G

    2014-06-01

    African Americans have two- to three-fold higher incidence of multiple myeloma and MGUS compared to other ethnic groups in the USA. Some physicians often perform diagnostic evaluations for plasma cell disorders (PCD) in African American patients on the basis of hematological abnormalities (thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, etc.) even in the absence of traditional triggers such as anemia, renal impairment, hypercalcemia, hyperglobulinemia, and lytic bone disease. Whether these nontraditional triggers have any significant association with PCD in African American population is not known. In addition, whether this approach could detect more asymptomatic PCD than black population prevalence is questionable. Moreover, the association between traditional triggers and PCD particularly in blacks has not been clearly delineated. Hence, we have carried out a retrospective study in an attempt to answer these questions. Two hundred fifty-four patients were eligible. Multiple myeloma workup based on parameters other than traditional triggers did not detect more asymptomatic PCD than what is expected of black population prevalence (p = 0.19). Of traditional triggers, the finding of only anemia or hyperglobulinemia seemed to be nonspecific in black population (p = 0.17 and 0.85, respectively). However, the presence of serum creatinine >2 mg/dL or corrected serum calcium >10.5 mg/dL or a combination of traditional triggers appeared to be strongly predictive of PCD (odds ratio of 6.9, 4.2, and 3, respectively). The number of trigger variables was positively correlated with the likelihood of PCD (p < 0.001). Light-chain-only PCD, renal disease, and abnormal free light chain ratio seemed to be higher in black patients than their white counterparts.

  19. Induction of angiogenesis by normal and malignant plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Hose, Dirk; Moreaux, Jérôme; Meissner, Tobias; Seckinger, Anja; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Benner, Axel; Mahtouk, Karène; Hillengass, Jens; Rème, Thierry; De Vos, John; Hundemer, Michael; Condomines, Maud; Bertsch, Uta; Rossi, Jean-François; Jauch, Anna; Klein, Bernard; Möhler, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    Abundant bone marrow angiogenesis is present in almost all myeloma patients requiring therapy and correlated to treatment response and survival. We assessed the expression of 402 angiogenesis-associated genes by Affymetrix DNA microarrays in 466 samples, including CD138-purified myeloma cells (MMCs) from 300 previously untreated patients, in vivo microcirculation by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, and in vitro angiogenesis (AngioKit-assay). Normal bone marrow plasma cells (BMPCs) express a median of 39 proangiogenic (eg, VEGFA, ADM, IGF-1) and 28 antiangiogenic genes (eg, TIMP1, TIMP2). Supernatants of BMPCs unlike those of memory B cells induce angiogenesis in vitro. MMCs do not show a significantly higher median number of expressed proangiogenic (45) or antiangiogenic (31) genes, but 97% of MMC samples aberrantly express at least one of the angiogenic factors HGF, IL-15, ANG, APRIL, CTGF, or TGFA. Supernatants of MMCs and human myeloma cell lines induce significantly higher in vitro angiogenesis compared with BMPCs. In conclusion, BMPCs express a surplus of proangiogenic over antiangiogenic genes transmitting to the ability to induce in vitro angiogenesis. Aberrant expression of proangiogenic and down-regulation of antiangiogenic genes by MMCs further increases the angiogenic stimulus, together leading to bone marrow angiogenesis at various degrees in all myeloma patients.

  20. Graphene Oxide Modulates B Cell Surface Phenotype and Impairs Immunoglobulin Secretion in Plasma Cell.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shaohai; Xu, Shengmin; Chen, Shaopeng; Fan, Huadong; Luo, Xun; Yang, Xiaoyao; Wang, Jun; Yuan, Hang; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun

    2016-04-01

    Since discovery, graphene oxide (GO) has been used in all aspects of human life and revealed promising applications in biomedicine. Nevertheless, the potential risks of GO were always being revealed. Although GO was found to induce immune cell death and innate immune response, little is known regarding its toxicity to the specific adaptive immune system that is crucial for protecting against exotic invasion. The B-cell mediated adaptive immune system, which composed of highly specialized cells (B and plasma cell) and specific immune response (antibody response) is the focus in our present study. Using diverse standard immunological techniques, we found that GO modulated B cell surface phenotype, both costimulatory molecules (CD80, CD86 and especially CD40) and antigen presenting molecules (both classical and nonclassical) under the condition without causing cell death. Meanwhile, the terminal differentiated immunoglobulin (Ig) secreting plasma cell was affected by GO, which displayed a less secretion of Ig and more severe ER stress caused by the retention of the secreted form of Ig in cell compartment. The combined data reveal that GO has a particular adverse effect to B cell and the humoral immunity, directly demonstrating the potential risk of GO to the specific adaptive immunity. PMID:27451788

  1. Hydrogen peroxide: A central player in physical plasma-induced oxidative stress in human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Bekeschus, S; Kolata, J; Winterbourn, C; Kramer, A; Turner, R; Weltmann, K D; Bröker, B; Masur, K

    2014-05-01

    Plasma medicine is an interdisciplinary field and recent clinical studies showed benefits of topical plasma application to chronic wounds. Whereas most investigations have focused on plasma-skin cell interaction, immune cells are omnipresent in most tissues as well. They not only elicit specific immune responses but also regulate inflammation, which is central in healing and regeneration. Plasma generates short-lived radicals and species in the gas phase. Mechanisms of plasma-cell interactions are not fully understood but it is hypothesized that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) mediate effects of plasma on cells. In this study human blood cells were investigated after cold atmospheric plasma treatment with regard to oxidation and viability. Plasma generates hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the responses were similar in cells treated with concentration-matched H2O2. Both treatments gave an equivalent reduction in viability and this was completely abrogated if catalase was added prior to plasma exposure. Further, five oxidation probes were utilized and fluorescence increase was observed in plasma-treated cells. Dye-dependent addition of catalase diminished most but not all of the probe fluorescence, assigning H2O2 a dominant but not exclusive role in cellular oxidation by plasma. Investigations for other species revealed generation of nitrite and formation of 3-nitrotyrosine but not 3-chlorotyrosine after plasma treatment indicating presence of RNS which may contribute to cellular redox changes observed. Together, these results will help to clarify how oxidative stress associates with physical plasma treatment in wound relevant cells. PMID:24528134

  2. Plasma cell differentiation is coupled to division-dependent DNA hypomethylation and gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Barwick, Benjamin G; Scharer, Christopher D; Bally, Alexander P R; Boss, Jeremy M

    2016-10-01

    The epigenetic processes that regulate antibody-secreting plasma cells are not well understood. Here, analysis of plasma cell differentiation revealed DNA hypomethylation of 10% of CpG loci that were overrepresented at enhancers. Inhibition of DNA methylation enhanced plasma cell commitment in a cell-division-dependent manner. Analysis of B cells differentiating in vivo stratified by cell division revealed a fivefold increase in mRNA transcription coupled to DNA hypomethylation. Demethylation occurred first at binding motifs for the transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1 and later at those for the transcription factors IRF and Oct-2 and was coincident with activation and differentiation gene-expression programs in a cell-division-dependent manner. These data provide mechanistic insight into cell-division-coupled transcriptional and epigenetic reprogramming and suggest that DNA hypomethylation reflects the cis-regulatory history of plasma cell differentiation.

  3. The transcription factors IRF8 and PU.1 negatively regulate plasma cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Carotta, Sebastian; Willis, Simon N; Hasbold, Jhagvaral; Inouye, Michael; Pang, Swee Heng Milon; Emslie, Dianne; Light, Amanda; Chopin, Michael; Shi, Wei; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C; Tarlinton, David M; Corcoran, Lynn M; Hodgkin, Philip D; Nutt, Stephen L

    2014-10-20

    Activated B cells undergo immunoglobulin class-switch recombination (CSR) and differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells. The distinct transcriptomes of B cells and plasma cells are maintained by the antagonistic influences of two groups of transcription factors: those that maintain the B cell program, including BCL6 and PAX5, and plasma cell-promoting factors, such as IRF4 and BLIMP-1. We show that the complex of IRF8 and PU.1 controls the propensity of B cells to undergo CSR and plasma cell differentiation by concurrently promoting the expression of BCL6 and PAX5 and repressing AID and BLIMP-1. As the PU.1-IRF8 complex functions in a reciprocal manner to IRF4, we propose that concentration-dependent competition between these factors controls B cell terminal differentiation.

  4. Apoptotic effects on cultured cells of atmospheric-pressure plasma produced using various gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominami, Kanako; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Kudo, Tada-aki; Sasaki, Shota; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma on various cells such as rat fibroblastic Rat-1 cell line, rat neuroblastoma-like PC12 cell line, and rat macrophage-like NR8383 cell line. The plasma was irradiated directly to a culture medium containing plated cells for 0-20 s. The applied voltage, excitation frequency, and argon or helium gas flow were, respectively, 3-6 kV, 10 kHz, and 3 L/min. Cell viability and apoptotic activity were evaluated using annexin-V/propidium iodide staining. Results showed that the low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma irradiation promoted cell death in a discharge-voltage-dependent and irradiation-time-dependent manner. Furthermore, different effects are produced depending on the cell type. Moreover, entirely different mechanisms might be responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cells by helium and argon plasma.

  5. Effects of atmospheric pressure cold plasma on human hepatocarcinoma cell and its 5-fluorouracil resistant cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Lu, R.; Xian, Y.; Gan, L.; Lu, X.; Yang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure cold plasma showed selective killing efficiency on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which makes plasma a potential option for cancer therapy. However, the plasma effects on chemotherapeutic drugs-resistant cells are rarely to be found. In this paper, the effects of plasma on human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel7402 cells and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant Bel7402/5FU cells were intensively investigated. The results showed that plasma induced superior toxicity to Bel7402 cells compared with Bel7402/5FU cells. Incubation with plasma-treated medium for 20 s induced more than 85% death rate in Bel7402 cells, while the same death ratio was achieved when Bel7402/5FU cells were treated for as long as 300 s. The hydrogen peroxide in the medium played a leading role in the cytotoxicity effects. Further studies implicated that when the treatment time was shorter than 60 s, the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis occurred through the intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation in Bel7402 cells. Molecular analysis showed an increase in the transcription factor activity for AP-1, NF-кB, and p53 in Bel7402 cells. No obvious damage could be detected in plasma-treated Bel7402/5FU cells due to the strong intracellular reactive oxygen stress scavenger system.

  6. Effects of atmospheric pressure cold plasma on human hepatocarcinoma cell and its 5-fluorouracil resistant cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.; Gan, L.; Yang, X. E-mail: yangxl@mail.hust.edu.cn; Lu, R.; Xian, Y.; Lu, X. E-mail: yangxl@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure cold plasma showed selective killing efficiency on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which makes plasma a potential option for cancer therapy. However, the plasma effects on chemotherapeutic drugs-resistant cells are rarely to be found. In this paper, the effects of plasma on human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel7402 cells and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant Bel7402/5FU cells were intensively investigated. The results showed that plasma induced superior toxicity to Bel7402 cells compared with Bel7402/5FU cells. Incubation with plasma-treated medium for 20 s induced more than 85% death rate in Bel7402 cells, while the same death ratio was achieved when Bel7402/5FU cells were treated for as long as 300 s. The hydrogen peroxide in the medium played a leading role in the cytotoxicity effects. Further studies implicated that when the treatment time was shorter than 60 s, the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis occurred through the intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation in Bel7402 cells. Molecular analysis showed an increase in the transcription factor activity for AP-1, NF-kB, and p53 in Bel7402 cells. No obvious damage could be detected in plasma-treated Bel7402/5FU cells due to the strong intracellular reactive oxygen stress scavenger system.

  7. Plasma RF Switching Elements for Cell Phone Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linardakis, Peter; Borg, Gerard G.; Harris, Jeffrey H.

    2002-10-01

    The functionality of modern multi-band, multi-system cell phones is provided by a large number of RF switches. Future phones will require an even greater number of these switches to implement hardware such as agile antennas. The ever increasing need for higher performance and lower power consumption have brought the RF PIN diode to the edge of its capabilities in these applications. RF micro-electromechanical (MEMS) switches can easily provide the required low insertion loss, low inter-modulation and low power consumption combination, but their reliability limits are not yet satisfactory to industry. In conjunction with Motorola Personal Communications Sector (PCS), PRL is undertaking a project to examine the possibility of using plasma in a completely novel type of RF switch. A basic concept of variable ``plasma capacitors'' constructed from DC commercial fluorescent tubes has been analyzed up to 1.3 GHz. The four different configurations tested show some consistent behavior and a definite impedance change between the on and off states. A simple model reliant on RF sheath theory also shows some agreement.

  8. Pulsed Power Aspects of the NIF Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, P A; Ollis, C W; Hinz, A F; Barbosa, F; Fulkerson, E S

    2005-06-09

    The Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) embodies technology essential to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Together with a thin-film polarizer, PEPC functions as an optical switch for the main amplifier cavity, allowing optical pulses to be trapped, and then released, and enabling NIF to take advantage of the attendant gain and cost-savings. Details of the genesis, development, and prototyping of the PEPC are well documented. After moving from its laboratory setting to the NIF facility, PEPC--via its performance during the two-year NIF Early Light (NEL) campaign and its ongoing operation during facility build-out--has proven to be a fully functional system. When complete, NIF will accommodate 192 beams, capable of delivering 1.8 MJ to a fusion target. Forty-eight Plasma Electrode Pockels--driven by nearly 300 high-power, high-voltage pulse generators--will support this complement of beams. As deployed, PEPC is a complex association of state-of-the-art optics; low-voltage and high-voltage electronics; and mechanical, gas, and vacuum subsystems--all under computer control. In this paper, we briefly describe each of these elements, but focus on the pulse power aspects of the PEPC system.

  9. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B; Bowman, Frederick P; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Waxman, Aaron B; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A; Maron, Bradley A

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10(-9) to 10(-7) M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor-small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.-Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth

  10. Cell volume and plasma membrane osmotic water permeability in epithelial cell layers measured by interferometry.

    PubMed Central

    Farinas, J; Verkman, A S

    1996-01-01

    The development of strategies to measure plasma membrane osmotic water permeability (Pf) in epithelial cells has been motivated by the identification of a family of molecular water channels. A general approach utilizing interferometry to measure cell shape and volume was developed and applied to measure Pf in cell layers. The method is based on the cell volume dependence of optical path length (OPL) for a light beam passing through the cell. The small changes in OPL were measured by interferometry. A mathematical model was developed to relate the interference signal to cell volume changes for cells of arbitrary shape and size. To validate the model, a Mach-Zehnder interference microscope was used to image OPL in an Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell layer and to reconstruct the three-dimensional cell shape (OPL resolution < lambda/25). As predicted by the model, a doubling of cell volume resulted in a change in OPL that was proportional to the difference in refractive indices between water and the extracellular medium. The time course of relative cell volume in response to an osmotic gradient was computed from serial interference images. To measure cell volume without microscopy and image analysis, a Mach-Zehnder interferometer was constructed in which one of two interfering laser beams passed through a flow chamber containing the cell layer. The interference signal in response to an osmotic gradient was analyzed to quantify the time course of relative cell volume. The calculated MDCK cell plasma membrane Pf of 6.1 x 10(-4) cm/s at 24 degrees C agreed with that obtained by interference microscopy and by a total internal reflection fluorescence method. Interferometry was also applied to measure the apical plasma membrane water permeability of intact toad urinary bladder; Pf increased fivefold after forskolin stimulation to 0.04 cm/s at 23 degrees C. These results establish and validate the application of interferometry to quantify cell volume and osmotic water

  11. Intracellular effects of atmospheric-pressure plasmas on melanoma cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishaq, M.; Bazaka, K.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-12-01

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown as a promising tool for cancer treatment. The mechanism of the plasma action is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, electric fields, charges, and photons. The relative importance of different modes of action of atmospheric-pressure plasmas depends on the process parameters and specific treatment objects. Hence, an in-depth understanding of biological mechanisms that underpin plasma-induced death in cancer cells is required to optimise plasma processing conditions. Here, the intracellular factors involved in the observed anti-cancer activity in melanoma Mel007 cells are studied, focusing on the effect of the plasma treatment dose on the expression of tumour suppressor protein TP73. Over-expression of TP73 causes cell growth arrest and/or apoptosis, and hence can potentially be targeted to enhance killing efficacy and selectivity of the plasma treatment. It is shown that the plasma treatment induces dose-dependent up-regulation of TP73 gene expression, resulting in significantly elevated levels of TP73 RNA and protein in plasma-treated melanoma cells. Silencing of TP73 expression by means of RNA interference inhibited the anticancer effects of the plasma, similar to the effect of caspase inhibitor z-VAD or ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. These results confirm the role of TP73 protein in dose-dependent regulation of anticancer activity of atmospheric-pressure plasmas.

  12. Intracellular effects of atmospheric-pressure plasmas on melanoma cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ishaq, M.; Bazaka, K.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-12-15

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown as a promising tool for cancer treatment. The mechanism of the plasma action is attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, electric fields, charges, and photons. The relative importance of different modes of action of atmospheric-pressure plasmas depends on the process parameters and specific treatment objects. Hence, an in-depth understanding of biological mechanisms that underpin plasma-induced death in cancer cells is required to optimise plasma processing conditions. Here, the intracellular factors involved in the observed anti-cancer activity in melanoma Mel007 cells are studied, focusing on the effect of the plasma treatment dose on the expression of tumour suppressor protein TP73. Over-expression of TP73 causes cell growth arrest and/or apoptosis, and hence can potentially be targeted to enhance killing efficacy and selectivity of the plasma treatment. It is shown that the plasma treatment induces dose-dependent up-regulation of TP73 gene expression, resulting in significantly elevated levels of TP73 RNA and protein in plasma-treated melanoma cells. Silencing of TP73 expression by means of RNA interference inhibited the anticancer effects of the plasma, similar to the effect of caspase inhibitor z-VAD or ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. These results confirm the role of TP73 protein in dose-dependent regulation of anticancer activity of atmospheric-pressure plasmas.

  13. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohades, S.; Laroussi, M.; Sears, J.; Barekzi, N.; Razavi, H.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs.

  14. Deactivation of A549 cancer cells in vitro by a dielectric barrier discharge plasma needle

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jun; Chen Wei; Li Hui; Wang Xingquan; Lv Guohua; Wang Pengye; Khohsa, M. Latif; Guo Ming; Feng Kecheng; Yang Size

    2011-03-01

    An inactivation mechanism study on A549 cancer cells by means of a dielectric barrier discharge plasma needle is presented. The neutral red uptake assay provides a quantitative estimation of cell viability after plasma treatment. Experimental results show that the efficiency of argon plasma for the inactivation process is very dependent on power and treatment time. A 27 W power and 120 s treatment time along with 900 standard cubic centimeter per minute Ar flow and a nozzle-to-sample separation of 3 mm are the best parameters of the process. According to the argon emission spectra of the plasma jet and the optical microscope images of the A549 cells after plasma treatment, it is concluded that the reactive species (for example, OH and O) in the argon plasma play a major role in the cell deactivation.

  15. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mohades, S.; Laroussi, M. Sears, J.; Barekzi, N.; Razavi, H.

    2015-12-15

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs.

  16. Plasma membranes modified by plasma treatment or deposition as solid electrolytes for potential application in solid alkaline fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Reinholdt, Marc; Ilie, Alina; Roualdès, Stéphanie; Frugier, Jérémy; Schieda, Mauricio; Coutanceau, Christophe; Martemianov, Serguei; Flaud, Valérie; Beche, Eric; Durand, Jean

    2012-07-30

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether) polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention) of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane.

  17. Plasma Membranes Modified by Plasma Treatment or Deposition as Solid Electrolytes for Potential Application in Solid Alkaline Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinholdt, Marc; Ilie, Alina; Roualdès, Stéphanie; Frugier, Jérémy; Schieda, Mauricio; Coutanceau, Christophe; Martemianov, Serguei; Flaud, Valérie; Beche, Eric; Durand, Jean

    2012-01-01

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether) polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention) of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane. PMID:24958295

  18. Plasma membranes modified by plasma treatment or deposition as solid electrolytes for potential application in solid alkaline fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Reinholdt, Marc; Ilie, Alina; Roualdès, Stéphanie; Frugier, Jérémy; Schieda, Mauricio; Coutanceau, Christophe; Martemianov, Serguei; Flaud, Valérie; Beche, Eric; Durand, Jean

    2012-01-01

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether) polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention) of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane. PMID:24958295

  19. Multiple defects occur in the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein system in liver plasma membranes of obese (fa/fa) but not lean (Fa/Fa) Zucker rats: loss of functional Gi and abnormal Gs function.

    PubMed

    Houslay, M D; Gawler, D J; Milligan, G; Wilson, A

    1989-01-01

    Hepatocyte membranes from both lean and obese Zucker rats exhibited adenylate cyclase activity that could be stimulated by glucagon, forskolin, NaF and elevated concentrations of p[NH]ppG. In membranes from lean animals, functional Gi was detected by the ability of low concentrations of p[NH]ppG to inhibit forskolin-activated adenylate cyclase. This activity was abolished by treatment of hepatocytes with either pertussis toxin or the phorbol ester TPA, prior to making membranes for assay of adenylate cyclase activity. In hepatocyte membranes from obese animals no functional Gi activity was detected. Quantitative immunoblotting, using an antibody able to detect the alpha subunit of Gi, showed that hepatocyte plasma membranes from both lean and obese Zucker rats had similar amounts of Gi-alpha subunit. This was 6.2 pmol/mg plasma membrane for lean and 6.5 pmol/mg plasma membrane for obese animals. Using thiol pre-activated pertussis toxin and [32P]-NAD+, similar degrees of labelling of the 40 kDa alpha subunit of Gi were found using plasma membranes of both lean and obese Zucker rats. We suggest that liver plasma membranes from obese Zucker rats express an inactive Gi alpha subunit. Thus lesions in liver Gi functioning are seen in insulin-resistant obese rats and in alloxan- and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats which also show resistance as regards the acute actions of insulin. Liver plasma membranes of obese animals also showed an impairment in the coupling of glucagon receptors to Gs-controlled adenylate cyclase, with the Kd values for activation by glucagon being 17.3 and 126 nM for lean and obese animals respectively. Membranes from obese animals also showed a reduced ability for high concentration of p[NH]ppG to activate adenylate cyclase. The use of [32P]-NAD+ and thiol-preactivated cholera toxin to label the 43 kDa and 52 kDa forms of the alpha-subunit of Gs showed that a reduced labelling occurred using liver plasma membranes from obese animals. It is

  20. Frequency of cell treatment with cold microwave argon plasma is important for the final outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sysolyatina, E.; Vasiliev, M.; Kurnaeva, M.; Kornienko, I.; Petrov, O.; Fortov, V.; Gintsburg, A.; Petersen, E.; Ermolaeva, S.

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to establish the influence of a regime of cold microwave argon plasma treatments on the physiological characteristics of human fibroblasts and keratinocytes. We used three regimes of plasma application: a single treatment, double treatment with a 48 h interval, and daily treatments for 3 d. Cell proliferation after plasma application was quantified in real time, and immunohistochemistry was used to establish the viability of the cells and determine changes in their physiology. It was established that the frequency of cell treatments is important for the outcome. In the samples treated with single plasma application and double plasma applications with a 48 h interval, a 42.6% and 32.0% increase was observed in the number of cells, respectively. In addition, there were no signs of deoxyribonucleic acid breaks immediately after plasma application. In contrast, plasma application increased the accumulation of cells in the active phases of the cell cycle. The activation of proliferation correlated with a decrease in the level of β-galactosidase, a senescence marker. This could be due to cell renovation after plasma application. Daily treatment decreased cell proliferation up to 29.1% in comparison with the control after 3 d.

  1. T cell–dependent survival of CD20+ and CD20− plasma cells in human secondary lymphoid tissue

    PubMed Central

    Withers, David R.; Fiorini, Claudia; Fischer, Randy T.; Ettinger, Rachel; Grammer, Amrie C.

    2007-01-01

    The signals mediating human plasma cell survival in vivo, particularly within secondary lymphoid tissue, are unclear. Human tonsils grafted into immunodeficient mice were therefore used to delineate the mechanisms promoting the survival of plasma cells. Tonsillar plasma cells were maintained within the grafts and the majority were nonproliferating, indicating a long-lived phenotype. A significant depletion of graft plasma cells was observed after anti-CD20 treatment, consistent with the expression of CD20 by most of the cells. Moreover, anti-CD52 treatment caused the complete loss of all graft lymphocytes, including plasma cells. Unexpectedly, anti-CD3, but not anti-CD154, treatment caused the complete loss of plasma cells, indicating an essential role for T cells, but not CD40-CD154 interactions in plasma cell survival. The in vitro coculture of purified tonsillar plasma cells and T cells revealed a T-cell survival signal requiring cell contact. Furthermore, immunofluorescence studies detected a close association between human plasma cells and T cells in vivo. These data reveal that human tonsil contains long-lived plasma cells, the majority of which express CD20 and can be deleted with anti-CD20 therapy. In addition, an important role for contact-dependent interactions with T cells in human plasma cell survival within secondary lymphoid tissue was identified. PMID:17299094

  2. Efficient Methods To Isolate Human Monoclonal Antibodies from Memory B Cells and Plasma Cells.

    PubMed

    Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    In this article, we highlight the advantages of isolating human monoclonal antibodies from the human memory B cells and plasma cell repertoires by using high-throughput cellular screens. Memory B cells are immortalized with high efficiency using Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the presence of a toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, while plasma cells are maintained in single-cell cultures by using interleukin 6 (IL-6) or stromal cells. In both cases, multiple parallel assays, including functional assays, can be used to identify rare cells that produce antibodies with unique properties. Using these methods, we have isolated potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies against a variety of viruses, in particular, a pan-influenza-A-neutralizing antibody and an antibody that neutralizes four different paramyxoviruses. Given the high throughput and the possibility of directly screening for function (rather than just binding), these methods are instrumental to implement a target-agnostic approach to identify the most effective antibodies and, consequently, the most promising targets for vaccine design. This approach is exemplified by the identification of unusually potent cytomegalovirus-neutralizing antibodies that led to the identification of the target, a pentameric complex that we are developing as a candidate vaccine. PMID:26104354

  3. Induction of growth arrest in colorectal cancer cells by cold plasma and gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Shiva; Shahmirani, Zhohreh; Mirpoor, Shahriar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Guided treatments with nanoparticles and cold atmospheric plasma are a new approach in cancer therapy. Plasma is an ionized gas that has reactive and energetic particles and can be produced in the laboratory by different methods. Material and methods Plasma jet therapy was employed to irradiate HCT-116 cells (human colorectal cancer cells) which were cultured in the presence of gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Cell cytotoxicity was tested with 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), and cancerous cell apoptosis was shown by 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. Results The results showed that cell death was increased significantly with p < 0.001 by cold atmospheric plasma in the presence of gold nanoparticles. Conclusions It appears that non-thermal plasma and gold nanoparticles synergism is a promising approach in colon cancer therapy. PMID:26788092

  4. Abnormal structural luteolysis in ovaries of the senescence accelerated mouse (SAM): expression of Fas ligand/Fas-mediated apoptosis signaling molecules in luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Kiso, Minako; Manabe, Noboru; Komatsu, Kohji; Shimabe, Munetake; Miyamoto, Hajime

    2003-12-01

    Senescence accelerated mouse-prone (SAMP) mice with a shortened life span show accelerated changes in many of the signs of aging and a shorter reproductive life span than SAM-resistant (SAMR) controls. We previously showed that functional regression (progesterone dissimilation) occurs in abnormally accumulated luteal bodies (aaLBs) of SAMP mice, but structural regression of luteal cells in aaLB is inhibited. A deficiency of luteal cell apoptosis causes the abnormal accumulation of LBs in SAMP ovaries. In the present study, to show the abnormality of Fas ligand (FasL)/Fas-mediated apoptosis signal transducing factors in the aaLBs of the SAMP ovaries, we assessed the changes in the expression of FasL, Fas, caspase-8 and caspase-3 mRNAs by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and in the expression and localization of FasL, Fas and activated caspase-3 proteins by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively, during the estrus cycle/luteolysis. These mRNAs and proteins were expressed in normal LBs of both SAMP and SAMR ovaries, but not at all or only in trace amounts in aaLBs of SAMP, indicating that structural regression is inhibited by blockage of the expression of these transducing factors in luteal cells of aaLBs in SAMP mice. PMID:14967896

  5. Genome-wide analysis reveals recurrent structural abnormalities of TP63 and other p53-related genes in peripheral T-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Vasmatzis, George; Johnson, Sarah H.; Knudson, Ryan A.; Ketterling, Rhett P.; Braggio, Esteban; Fonseca, Rafael; Viswanatha, David S.; Law, Mark E.; Kip, N. Sertac; Özsan, Nazan; Grebe, Stefan K.; Frederick, Lori A.; Eckloff, Bruce W.; Thompson, E. Aubrey; Kadin, Marshall E.; Milosevic, Dragana; Porcher, Julie C.; Asmann, Yan W.; Smith, David I.; Kovtun, Irina V.; Ansell, Stephen M.; Dogan, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive malignancies of mature T lymphocytes with 5-year overall survival rates of only ∼ 35%. Improvement in outcomes has been stymied by poor understanding of the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of PTCL, with a resulting paucity of molecular targets for therapy. We developed bioinformatic tools to identify chromosomal rearrangements using genome-wide, next-generation sequencing analysis of mate-pair DNA libraries and applied these tools to 16 PTCL patient tissue samples and 6 PTCL cell lines. Thirteen recurrent abnormalities were identified, of which 5 involved p53-related genes (TP53, TP63, CDKN2A, WWOX, and ANKRD11). Among these abnormalities were novel TP63 rearrangements encoding fusion proteins homologous to ΔNp63, a dominant-negative p63 isoform that inhibits the p53 pathway. TP63 rearrangements were seen in 11 (5.8%) of 190 PTCLs and were associated with inferior overall survival; they also were detected in 2 (1.2%) of 164 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. As TP53 mutations are rare in PTCL compared with other malignancies, our findings suggest that a constellation of alternate genetic abnormalities may contribute to disruption of p53-associated tumor suppressor function in PTCL. PMID:22855598

  6. Thymic abnormalities and enhanced apoptosis of thymocytes and bone marrow cells in transgenic mice overexpressing Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase: implications for Down syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Peled-Kamar, M; Lotem, J; Okon, E; Sachs, L; Groner, Y

    1995-01-01

    The copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) gene resides on chromosome 21 and is overexpressed in Down syndrome (DS) patients. Transgenic CuZnSOD mice with elevated levels of CuZnSOD were used to determine whether, as in DS, overexpression of CuZnSOD was also associated with thymus and bone marrow abnormalities. Three independently derived transgenic CuZnSOD strains had abnormal thymi showing diminution of the cortex and loss of corticomedullary demarcation, resembling thymic defects in children with DS. Transgenic CuZnSOD mice were also more sensitive than control mice to in vivo injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), reflected by an earlier onset and enhanced apoptotic cell death in the thymus. This higher susceptibility to LPS-induced apoptosis was associated with an increased production of hydrogen peroxide and a higher degree of lipid peroxidation. When cultured under suboptimal concentrations of interleukin 3 or in the presence of tumour necrosis factor, bone marrow cells from transgenic CuZnSOD mice produced 2- to 3-fold less granulocyte and macrophage colonies than control. The results indicate that transgenic CuZnSOD mice have certain thymus and bone marrow abnormalities which are similar to those found in DS patients, and that the defects are presumably due to an increased oxidative damage resulting in enhanced cell death by apoptosis. Images PMID:7588627

  7. miRNA-mRNA integrative analysis in primary myelofibrosis CD34+ cells: role of miR-155/JARID2 axis in abnormal megakaryopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Norfo, Ruggiero; Zini, Roberta; Pennucci, Valentina; Bianchi, Elisa; Salati, Simona; Guglielmelli, Paola; Bogani, Costanza; Fanelli, Tiziana; Mannarelli, Carmela; Rosti, Vittorio; Pietra, Daniela; Salmoiraghi, Silvia; Bisognin, Andrea; Ruberti, Samantha; Rontauroli, Sebastiano; Sacchi, Giorgia; Prudente, Zelia; Barosi, Giovanni; Cazzola, Mario; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Ferrari, Sergio; Tagliafico, Enrico; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Manfredini, Rossella

    2014-09-25

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by megakaryocyte (MK) hyperplasia, bone marrow fibrosis, and abnormal stem cell trafficking. PMF may be associated with somatic mutations in JAK2, MPL, or CALR. Previous studies have shown that abnormal MKs play a central role in the pathophysiology of PMF. In this work, we studied both gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles in CD34(+) cells from PMF patients. We identified several biomarkers and putative molecular targets such as FGR, LCN2, and OLFM4. By means of miRNA-gene expression integrative analysis, we found different regulatory networks involved in the dysregulation of transcriptional control and chromatin remodeling. In particular, we identified a network gathering several miRNAs with oncogenic potential (eg, miR-155-5p) and targeted genes whose abnormal function has been previously associated with myeloid neoplasms, including JARID2, NR4A3, CDC42, and HMGB3. Because the validation of miRNA-target interactions unveiled JARID2/miR-155-5p as the strongest relationship in the network, we studied the function of this axis in normal and PMF CD34(+) cells. We showed that JARID2 downregulation mediated by miR-155-5p overexpression leads to increased in vitro formation of CD41(+) MK precursors. These findings suggest that overexpression of miR-155-5p and the resulting downregulation of JARID2 may contribute to MK hyperplasia in PMF.

  8. Spi-B inhibits human plasma cell differentiation by repressing BLIMP1 and XBP-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Schmidlin, Heike; Diehl, Sean A; Nagasawa, Maho; Scheeren, Ferenc A; Schotte, Remko; Uittenbogaart, Christel H; Spits, Hergen; Blom, Bianca

    2008-09-01

    The terminal differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells is tightly regulated by a complex network of transcription factors. Here we evaluated the role of the Ets factor Spi-B during terminal differentiation of human B cells. All mature tonsil and peripheral blood B-cell subsets expressed Spi-B, with the exception of plasma cells. Overexpression of Spi-B in CD19(+) B cells inhibited, similar to the known inhibitor BCL-6, the expression of plasma cell-associated surface markers and transcription factors as well as immunoglobulin production, ie, in vitro plasma cell differentiation. The arrest in B-cell differentiation enforced by Spi-B was independent of the transactivation domain, but dependent on the Ets-domain. By chromatin immunoprecipitation and assays using an inducible Spi-B construct BLIMP1 and XBP-1 were identified as direct target genes of Spi-B mediated repression. We propose a novel role for Spi-B in maintenance of germinal center and memory B cells by direct repression of major plasma cell factors and thereby plasma cell differentiation.

  9. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Induces a Predominantly Necrotic Cell Death via the Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Cousty, Sarah; Cambus, Jean-Pierre; Valentin, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cold plasma is a partially ionized gas generated by an electric field at atmospheric pressure that was initially used in medicine for decontamination and sterilization of inert surfaces. There is currently growing interest in using cold plasma for more direct medical applications, mainly due to the possibility of tuning it to obtain selective biological effects in absence of toxicity for surrounding normal tissues,. While the therapeutic potential of cold plasma in chronic wound, blood coagulation, and cancer treatment is beginning to be documented, information on plasma/cell interaction is so far limited and controversial. Methods and Results Using normal primary human fibroblast cultures isolated from oral tissue, we sought to decipher the effects on cell behavior of a proprietary cold plasma device generating guided ionization waves carried by helium. In this model, cold plasma treatment induces a predominantly necrotic cell death. Interestingly, death is not triggered by a direct interaction of the cold plasma with cells, but rather via a transient modification in the microenvironment. We show that modification of the microenvironment redox status suppresses treatment toxicity and protects cells from death. Moreover, necrosis is not accidental and seems to be an active response to an environmental cue, as its execution can be inhibited to rescue cells. Conclusion These observations will need to be taken into account when studying in vitro plasma/cell interaction and may have implications for the design and future evaluation of the efficacy and safety of this new treatment strategy. PMID:26275141

  10. Efficient Plasma Cell Differentiation and Trafficking Require Cxcr4 Desensitization.

    PubMed

    Biajoux, Vincent; Natt, Jessica; Freitas, Christelle; Alouche, Nagham; Sacquin, Antoine; Hemon, Patrice; Gaudin, Françoise; Fazilleau, Nicolas; Espéli, Marion; Balabanian, Karl

    2016-09-27

    CXCR4 plays a central role in B cell immune response, notably by promoting plasma cell (PC) migration and maintenance in the bone marrow (BM). Gain-of-function mutations in CXCR4 affecting receptor desensitization have been reported in the rare immunodeficiency called WHIM syndrome (WS). Despite lymphopenia, patients mount an immune response but fail to maintain it over time. Using a knockin mouse model phenocopying WS, we showed that, counter-intuitively, a gain of Cxcr4 function inhibited the maintenance of antibody titers after immunization. Although the Cxcr4 mutation intrinsically and locally promoted germinal center response and PC differentiation, antigen-specific PCs were barely detected in the BM, a defect mirrored by early accumulation of immature plasmablasts potentially occupying the survival niches for long-lived PCs. Therefore, fine-tuning of Cxcr4 desensitization is critically required for efficient PC differentiation and maintenance, and absence of such a regulatory process may account for the defective humoral immunity observed in WS patients. PMID:27681431

  11. Identification of human plasma cells with a lamprey monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cuiling; Liu, Yanling; Chan, Justin Tze Ho; Tong, Jiefei; Li, Zhihua; Shi, Mengyao; Davani, Dariush; Parsons, Marion; Khan, Srijit; Zhan, Wei; Kyu, Shuya; Grunebaum, Eyal; Campisi, Paolo; Propst, Evan J.; Jaye, David L.; Trudel, Suzanne; Moran, Michael F.; Ostrowski, Mario; Herrin, Brantley R.; Lee, F. Eun-Hyung; Sanz, Ignacio; Cooper, Max D.; Ehrhardt, Götz R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Ab-producing plasma cells (PCs) serve as key participants in countering pathogenic challenges as well as being contributors to autoimmune and malignant disorders. Thus far, only a limited number of PC–specific markers have been identified. The characterization of the unique variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) Abs that are made by evolutionarily distant jawless vertebrates prompted us to investigate whether VLR Abs could detect novel PC antigens that have not been recognized by conventional Abs. Here, we describe a monoclonal lamprey Ab, VLRB MM3, that was raised against primary multiple myeloma cells. VLRB MM3 recognizes a unique epitope of the CD38 ectoenzyme that is present on plasmablasts and PCs from healthy individuals and on most, but not all, multiple myelomas. Binding by the VLRB MM3 Ab coincides with CD38 dimerization and NAD glycohydrolase activity. Our data demonstrate that the lamprey VLRB MM3 Ab is a unique reagent for the identification of plasmablasts and PCs, with potential applications in the diagnosis and therapeutic intervention of PC or autoimmune disorders. PMID:27152361

  12. Long and short term effects of plasma treatment on meristematic plant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puač, N.; Živković, S.; Selaković, N.; Milutinović, M.; Boljević, J.; Malović, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we will present results of plasma treatments of meristematic cells of Daucus carota. Plasma needle was used as an atmospheric pressure/gas composition source of non-equilibrium plasma in all treatments. Activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase was measured immediately after plasma treatment and after two weeks following the treatment. Superoxide dismutase activity was increased in samples immediately after the plasma treatment. On the other hand, catalase activity was much higher in treated samples when measured two weeks after plasma treatment. These results show that there is a direct proof of the triggering of signal transduction in the cells by two reactive oxygen species H2O2 and O2-, causing enzyme activity and short and long term effects even during the growth of calli, where the information is passed to newborn cells over the period of two weeks.

  13. Transcriptional control of MHC class II gene expression during differentiation from B cells to plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Dellabona, P; Latron, F; Maffei, A; Scarpellino, L; Accolla, R S

    1989-04-15

    In this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms responsible for the extinction of the constitutive MHC class II gene expression of human B cells on somatic cell hybridization with murine plasmocytoma cells. We found that this event is due to trans-acting suppressor functions of mouse origin pre-existing in the plasmocytoma cells and acting at transcriptional level. Transcription of the entire family of human class II genes is suppressed, including genes as DO beta for which a distinct regulation of expression in B cells had been previously demonstrated. Suppression appears specific for class II genes because in the hybrids expression of MHC class I genes of mouse is unaffected and of human only partially reduced. Interestingly, also murine invariant chain gene is expressed in both parental plasmocytoma and hybrid cells although at reduced amounts as compared to a murine class II positive B cell line. The class II negative phenotype of hybrid cells and parental plasmocytoma cells is highly stable and unaffected by treatment with protein synthesis inhibitors, suggesting that the transcriptional suppressor function is not mediated by rapid, labile turning-over proteins. Possible mechanisms responsible for transcriptional regulation of MHC class II gene expression during terminal differentiation of B cells to plasma cells are discussed. PMID:2495328

  14. Comparing plasma and X-ray exposure and identifying vulnerable cell parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Bill

    2012-10-01

    Here two issues in plasma medicine that are being addressed in a collaboration between the Centre of Plasma Physics and the School of Pharmacy at Queen's University Belfast and the Plasma Institute at York University UK will be discussed. Recent measurements of the interaction of plasmas created directly in DMEM cell medium and MDAMB-231, a human breast cancer cell line, showed evidence of reduced cell viability and of DNA damage. The same set of experiments were undertaken but with X-ray exposure. A correlation of the dependence on plasma exposure time and X-ray dose was observed which might point the way to dose definition in plasma medicine. We have also been working to identify the cell parts most vulnerable to plasma exposure. In this study a 10 kHz atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma jet, operating in He/0.5%O2 and characterized to determine the behavior of many of the plasma species, was incident onto the surface of media containing either bacterial strains, in their planktonic and biofilm forms, or isolated bacterial plasmid DNA. The results of measurements to look for changes in plasmid structural conformation, rates of single and double strand breaks, the catalytic activity of certain bacterial enzymes, the peroxidation of lipid content of the bacterial cells, the leakage of ATP and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images will be discussed.

  15. Effect of cold plasma on glial cell morphology studied by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Recek, Nina; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Keidar, Michael; Cvelbar, Uros; Vesel, Alenka; Mozetic, Miran; Sherman, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is broadly used to study the morphology of cells. The morphological characteristics and differences of the cell membrane between normal human astrocytes and glial tumor cells are not well explored. Following treatment with cold atmospheric plasma, evaluation of the selective effect of plasma on cell viability of tumor cells is poorly understood and requires further evaluation. Using AFM we imaged morphology of glial cells before and after cold atmospheric plasma treatment. To look more closely at the effect of plasma on cell membrane, high resolution imaging was used. We report the differences between normal human astrocytes and human glioblastoma cells by considering the membrane surface details. Our data, obtained for the first time on these cells using atomic force microscopy, argue for an architectural feature on the cell membrane, i.e. brush layers, different in normal human astrocytes as compared to glioblastoma cells. The brush layer disappears from the cell membrane surface of normal E6/E7 cells and is maintained in the glioblastoma U87 cells after plasma treatment.

  16. Effect of Cold Plasma on Glial Cell Morphology Studied by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Recek, Nina; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Keidar, Michael; Cvelbar, Uros; Vesel, Alenka; Mozetic, Miran; Sherman, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is broadly used to study the morphology of cells. The morphological characteristics and differences of the cell membrane between normal human astrocytes and glial tumor cells are not well explored. Following treatment with cold atmospheric plasma, evaluation of the selective effect of plasma on cell viability of tumor cells is poorly understood and requires further evaluation. Using AFM we imaged morphology of glial cells before and after cold atmospheric plasma treatment. To look more closely at the effect of plasma on cell membrane, high resolution imaging was used. We report the differences between normal human astrocytes and human glioblastoma cells by considering the membrane surface details. Our data, obtained for the first time on these cells using atomic force microscopy, argue for an architectural feature on the cell membrane, i.e. brush layers, different in normal human astrocytes as compared to glioblastoma cells. The brush layer disappears from the cell membrane surface of normal E6/E7 cells and is maintained in the glioblastoma U87 cells after plasma treatment. PMID:25803024

  17. B-cell lymphomas with concurrent MYC and BCL2 abnormalities other than translocations behave similarly to MYC/BCL2 double-hit lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoying; Seegmiller, Adam C; Lin, Pei; Wang, Xuan J; Miranda, Roberto N; Bhagavathi, Sharathkumar; Medeiros, L Jeffrey

    2015-02-01

    Large B-cell lymphomas with IGH@BCL2 and MYC rearrangement, known as double-hit lymphoma (DHL), are clinically aggressive neoplasms with a poor prognosis. Some large B-cell lymphomas have concurrent abnormalities of MYC and BCL2 other than coexistent translocations. Little is known about patients with these lymphomas designated here as atypical DHL. We studied 40 patients of atypical DHL including 21 men and 19 women, with a median age of 60 years. Nine (23%) patients had a history of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. There were 30 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 7 B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between DLBCL and Burkitt lymphoma, and 3 DLBCL with coexistent follicular lymphoma. CD10, BCL2, and MYC were expressed in 28/39 (72%), 33/35 (94%), and 14/20 (70%) cases, respectively. Patients were treated with standard (n=14) or more aggressive chemotherapy regimens (n=17). We compared the atypical DHL group with 76 patients with DHLand 35 patients with DLBCL lacking MYC and BCL2 abnormalities. The clinicopathologic features and therapies were similar between patients with atypical and typical DHL. The overall survival of patients with atypical double-hit lymphoma was similar to that of patients with double-hit lymphoma (P=0.47) and significantly worse than that of patients with DLBCL with normal MYC and BCL2 (P=0.02). There were some minor differences. Cases of atypical double-hit lymphoma more often have DLBCL morphology (P<0.01), less frequently expressed CD10 (P<0.01), and patients less often had an elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase level (P=0.01). In aggregate, these results support expanding the category of MYC/BCL2 DHL to include large B-cell lymphomas with coexistent MYC and BCL2 abnormalities other than concurrent translocations. PMID:25103070

  18. A rare case of plasma cell leukemia in a 35 year old.

    PubMed

    Dosi, Rupal V; Ambaliya, Annirudh; Patell, Rushad D; Joshi, Harshal J

    2010-06-01

    Plasma cell leukemia is a rare, aggressive form of multiple myeloma. A 35-year-old male presented with backache, generalized weakness, and facial puffiness. His complete blood count showed anemia and a high WBC count with atypical cells on peripheral smear. Bone marrow examination showed more than 90% of atypical plasma cells, confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell leukemia. Patient also had azotemia, hypercalcemia, and hyperuricemia. The patient was started on chemotherapy along with supportive care. Patient improved dramatically and he was discharged on regular follow-up.

  19. The effects of cold atmospheric plasma on cell adhesion, differentiation, migration, apoptosis and drug sensitivity of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dehui; Luo, Xiaohui; Xu, Yujing; Cui, Qingjie; Yang, Yanjie; Liu, Dingxin; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G

    2016-05-13

    Cold atmospheric plasma was shown to induce cell apoptosis in numerous tumor cells. Recently, some other biological effects, such as induction of membrane permeation and suppression of migration, were discovered by plasma treatment in some types of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of plasma treatment on multiple myeloma cells. We detected the detachment of adherent myeloma cells by plasma, and the detachment area was correlated with higher density of hydroxyl radical in the gas phase of the plasma. Meanwhile, plasma could promote myeloma differentiation by up-regulating Blimp-1 and XBP-1 expression. The migration ability was suppressed by plasma treatment through decreasing of MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion. In addition, plasma could increase bortezomib sensitivity and induce myeloma cell apoptosis. Taking together, combination with plasma treatment may enhance current chemotherapy and probably improve the outcomes. PMID:27067049

  20. The effects of cold atmospheric plasma on cell adhesion, differentiation, migration, apoptosis and drug sensitivity of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dehui; Luo, Xiaohui; Xu, Yujing; Cui, Qingjie; Yang, Yanjie; Liu, Dingxin; Chen, Hailan; Kong, Michael G

    2016-05-13

    Cold atmospheric plasma was shown to induce cell apoptosis in numerous tumor cells. Recently, some other biological effects, such as induction of membrane permeation and suppression of migration, were discovered by plasma treatment in some types of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of plasma treatment on multiple myeloma cells. We detected the detachment of adherent myeloma cells by plasma, and the detachment area was correlated with higher density of hydroxyl radical in the gas phase of the plasma. Meanwhile, plasma could promote myeloma differentiation by up-regulating Blimp-1 and XBP-1 expression. The migration ability was suppressed by plasma treatment through decreasing of MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretion. In addition, plasma could increase bortezomib sensitivity and induce myeloma cell apoptosis. Taking together, combination with plasma treatment may enhance current chemotherapy and probably improve the outcomes.

  1. Characterization of plasma cell populations at autopsy after human allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Cousineau, S.; Belanger, R.; Perreault, C.

    1986-01-01

    Postmortem fixed tissue sections of the lymphoid and digestive systems of eight consecutive leukemic patients dying of various diseases after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) were analyzed for the presence of the heavy chains gamma, alpha, mu, delta, and epsilon and light chains kappa and lambda, with the use of a standard immunoperoxidase method. Two distinct types of plasma cell populations were found. The first type was a widely distributed polyclonal plasma cell population, lacking IgD-positive plasma cells and germinal centers. The second type of plasma cell population, found in 6 of 8 patients, was a group of monoclonal plasma cell populations positive for the heavy chains gamma, alpha, mu, or delta. Recent immunohistologic observations of the human lymph node suggest that the first type of polyclonal plasma cell population could arise from a nonspecific expansion of sIgM+, sIgD- B lymphocytes. The lack of germinal centers, a structure closely involved in specific-antibody production, may correlate with the poor specific-antibody response documented in patients after BMT. The monoclonal plasma cell populations, found with an unexpectedly high frequency, are probably related to a functional T-cell defect. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3089020

  2. Evaluation of the Efficacy of the Plasma Pencil Against Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohades, Soheila; Barekzi, Nazir; Razavi, Hamid; Laroussi, Mounir

    2014-10-01

    The plasma pencil generates low temperature and atmospheric pressure plasma. To generate the plasma, high voltage pulses with short width (from nanosecond to microsecond) are applied to a noble gas. The working gas can be helium, argon or a mixture of these with air or oxygen. Generating plasma with helium provides a tolerable temperature for biological cells and tissues. Diagnostic measurements on the plasma plume has revealed the presence of active agents such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen reactive species (RNS), which are known to have biological implications. Recently, low temperature plasma has drawn attention to its potential in cancer therapy. In our lab, the plasma pencil has been used to treat leukemia, prostate and epithelial cancer cells. The cancer cell line used here is the SCaBER (ATCC®HTB3™) cell line originating from a human bladder cancer. The results indicate that specific species induce the molecular mechanisms associated with cell death. The death of cells after plasma treatment will be studied using assays, such as DNA laddering and Caspase-3 activation, to elucidate the mechanism of the apoptotic or necrotic pathways.

  3. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  4. Variable susceptibility of ovarian cancer cells to non-thermal plasma-activated medium

    PubMed Central

    UTSUMI, FUMI; KAJIYAMA, HIROAKI; NAKAMURA, KAE; TANAKA, HIROMASA; MIZUNO, MASAAKI; TOYOKUNI, SHINNYA; HORI, MASARU; KIKKAWA, FUMITAKA

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma has been widely studied in recent years in many fields, including cancer treatment. However, its efficiency for inducing apoptosis sometimes varies depending on the cell species and experimental conditions. The aim of this study was to elucidate what causes these differences in responses to plasma treatment. Using four ovarian cancer cell lines, the cell density had a markedly negative impact on the proliferation inhibition rate (PIR) and it was more obvious in OVCAR-3 and NOS2 cells. Furthermore, TOV21G and ES-2 cells were drastically sensitive to plasma-activated medium (PAM) compared with the other two cell lines. We demonstrated that the proportion of reactive oxygen species and cell number had a marked impact on the effect of PAM against ovarian cancer cells. Additionally it was suggested that the morphological features of cells were also closely related PMID:27035127

  5. Low Temperature Plasma Causes Double-Strand Break DNA Damage in Primary Epithelial Cells Cultured from a Human Prostate Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, Adam M.; Frame, Fiona M.; Maitland, Norman J.; O’Connell, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Research in the new field of plasma medicine continues to demonstrate the efficacy of low temperature plasmas for numerous biomedical applications. Responses such as reduction in cell viability and cell death for cancer therapy, cell proliferation for wound healing, and bacterial inactivation have been observed as a result of plasma treatment. In this study we applied low temperature plasma to prostate cancer primary cells and tissue to inflict irreparable DNA damage. PMID:26819484

  6. Sustained secretion of immunoglobulin by long-lived human tonsil plasma cells.

    PubMed

    van Laar, Jacob M; Melchers, Marc; Teng, Y K Onno; van der Zouwen, Boris; Mohammadi, Rozbeh; Fischer, Randy; Margolis, Leonid; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Lipsky, Peter E; Grammer, Amrie C

    2007-09-01

    Immunoglobulin-secreting cells comprise both short-lived proliferating plasmablasts and long-lived nonproliferating plasma cells. To determine the phenotype and functional activity of Ig-secreting cells in human lymphoid tissue, we used a tonsillar organ culture model. A significant proportion of IgA and IgG secretion was shown to be mediated by long-lived, nonproliferating plasma cells that coexpressed high levels of CD27 and CD38. The presence of such cells was further corroborated by the finding of enhanced expression in the CD19(+) B-cell population of XBP-1, IRF-4, and particularly Blimp-1 genes involved in the differentiation of plasma cells. Intact tissue seemed to be necessary for optimal functional activity of plasma cells. A strong correlation was found between concentrations of interleukin-6 and IgA or IgG, but not IgM, in culture supernatants suggesting a role for interleukin-6 in the survival of long-lived plasma cells. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that human lymphoid tissue harbors a population of nonproliferating plasma cells that are dependent on an intact microenvironment for ongoing Ig secretion.

  7. Platelet-rich plasma gel in combination with Schwann cells for repair of sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fagang; Li, Haiyan; Qiao, Guangxi; Chen, Feng; Tao, Hao; Ji, Aiyu; Hu, Yanling

    2012-10-15

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from New Zealand white rabbits, culture-expanded and differentiated into Schwann cell-like cells. Autologous platelet-rich plasma and Schwann cell-like cells were mixed in suspension at a density of 1 × 10(6) cells/mL, prior to introduction into a poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) conduit. Fabricated tissue-engineered nerves were implanted into rabbits to bridge 10 mm sciatic nerve defects (platelet-rich plasma group). Controls were established using fibrin as the seeding matrix for Schwann cell-like cells at identical density to construct tissue-engineered nerves (fibrin group). Twelve weeks after implantation, toluidine blue staining and scanning electron microscopy were used to demonstrate an increase in the number of regenerating nerve fibers and thickness of the myelin sheath in the platelet-rich plasma group compared with the fibrin group. Fluoro-gold retrograde labeling revealed that the number of Fluoro-gold-positive neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and the spinal cord anterior horn was greater in the platelet-rich plasma group than in the fibrin group. Electrophysiological examination confirmed that compound muscle action potential and nerve conduction velocity were superior in the platelet-rich plasma group compared with the fibrin group. These results indicate that autologous platelet-rich plasma gel can effectively serve as a seeding matrix for Schwann cell-like cells to construct tissue-engineered nerves to promote peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:25538751

  8. Sustained Secretion of Immunoglobulin by Long-Lived Human Tonsil Plasma Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Laar, Jacob M.; Melchers, Marc; Teng, Y. K. Onno; van der Zouwen, Boris; Mohammadi, Rozbeh; Fischer, Randy; Margolis, Leonid; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Lipsky, Peter E.; Grammer, Amrie C.

    2007-01-01

    Immunoglobulin-secreting cells comprise both short-lived proliferating plasmablasts and long-lived nonproliferating plasma cells. To determine the phenotype and functional activity of Ig-secreting cells in human lymphoid tissue, we used a tonsillar organ culture model. A significant proportion of IgA and IgG secretion was shown to be mediated by long-lived, nonproliferating plasma cells that coexpressed high levels of CD27 and CD38. The presence of such cells was further corroborated by the finding of enhanced expression in the CD19+ B-cell population of XBP-1, IRF-4, and particularly Blimp-1 genes involved in the differentiation of plasma cells. Intact tissue seemed to be necessary for optimal functional activity of plasma cells. A strong correlation was found between concentrations of interleukin-6 and IgA or IgG, but not IgM, in culture supernatants suggesting a role for interleukin-6 in the survival of long-lived plasma cells. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that human lymphoid tissue harbors a population of nonproliferating plasma cells that are dependent on an intact microenvironment for ongoing Ig secretion. PMID:17690187

  9. Ionized gas (plasma) delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) into artificial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Szili, Endre J.; Jenkins, A. Toby A.; Short, Robert D.

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to enhance our understanding of how reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated ex situ by ionized gas (plasma), can affect the regulation of signalling processes within cells. A model system, comprising of a suspension of phospholipid vesicles (cell mimics) encapsulating a ROS reporter, was developed to study the plasma delivery of ROS into cells. For the first time it was shown that plasma unequivocally delivers ROS into cells over a sustained period and without compromising cell membrane integrity. An important consideration in cell and biological assays is the presence of serum, which significantly reduced the transfer efficiency of ROS into the vesicles. These results are key to understanding how plasma treatments can be tailored for specific medical or biotechnology applications. Further, the phospholipid vesicle ROS reporter system may find use in other studies involving the application of free radicals in biology and medicine.

  10. Rapid preparation of plasma membranes from avian lymphoid cells and fibroblasts for virus binding studies.

    PubMed

    Nieper, H; Müller, H

    1998-06-01

    A simple and rapid protocol for the preparation of plasma membranes from chicken embryo fibroblasts and chicken lymphoid cells was developed. Characterization of the preparations by morphological, biochemical and serological methods indicated the specific enrichment of the plasma membranes as well as cell surface proteins. Binding of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) particles was demonstrated after immobilization of the plasma membranes, and cell type-specific differences were observed. Although the results of these studies reflect the interaction between IBDV and isolated cells only partially, the advantages of these plasma membrane preparations, the specific enrichment of cell surface proteins, their constant quality and the possibility to store aliquots over several months, make them a useful tool for virus binding studies with avian cells. PMID:9694323

  11. The effects of non-thermal plasmas on selected mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, Mathieu

    Non-thermal plasma surface modifications have become indispensable processing steps in various industry and research sectors. Applications range from semiconductor processing to biotechnology and recently, plasma medicine. Non-thermal plasma sources have the advantage that a number of electron-driven chemical reactions can be produced while maintaining the gas (heavy species) temperature low, thus enabling the treatment of temperature-sensitive surfaces such as polymers, tissues and live cells. In the fields of biology and medicine, non-thermal plasmas have been primarily used for the deposition or modification of biocompatible polymers and for sterilization. Recently, non-thermal plasmas have been used to treat tissues and cells. A new field of research has emerged, Plasma Medicine, which studies the effects of non-thermal plasmas on cells and tissues for clinical applications. The Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge torch (APGD-t), a non-thermal plasma source, built in our laboratory was used to study the effects of non-thermal plasmas on mammalian cells. In its first application, we indirectly used the APGD-t to deposit a plasma-polymer on a glass surface and studied its effects on cultured cells. It was shown that the cells grew preferentially on the plasma-polymer, and their proliferation rate increased. The second application of the APGD-t was to further investigate previous observations of cell permeabilization obtained by plasma treatments and to apply non-thermal plasmas to cell transfection. It was demonstrated that the APGD-t is able to locally transfect adherent cells. We estimated the diameter of the pores created to be below 10 nm and that the pores remain open for less than 5 seconds. However, while investigating the mechanisms involved in cell transfection we observed that the use of higher gas flows in the negative controls (using the APGD-t but with the plasma turned off) also resulted in cell transfection. To further study this phenomena, we

  12. Plasmolysis, red blood cell partitioning, and plasma protein binding of etofibrate, clofibrate, and their degradation products.

    PubMed

    Altmayer, P; Garrett, E R

    1983-11-01

    Etofibrate (I), the ethylene glycol diester of clofibric and nicotinic acids, degrades almost equally through both half-esters with half-lives of approximately 10 and 1 min in fresh dog and human plasma, respectively. The nicotinate V degrades with half-lives of approximately 12 hr and 50 min in fresh dog and human plasma, respectively. Ester III and clofibrate VI degrade by saturable Michaelis-Menten kinetics in fresh human plasma, with similar maximum initial rates and respective terminal first-order half-lives of 12 and 26 min. Tetraethyl pyrophosphate at 100 micrograms/ml inhibited human plasma and red blood cell esterases permitting plasma protein binding and red blood cell partitioning studies. The red blood cell-plasma water partition coefficient was 5.4 for 0.2-80 micrograms/ml of I. Clofibrate (VI) showed a saturable erythrocyte partitioning that decreased from 7.8 (10 micrograms/ml) to 1 (50 micrograms/ml). The strong binding of I and VI to ultrafiltration membranes necessitated the determination of their plasma protein binding by the method of variable plasma concentrations of erythrocyte suspensions to give 96.6% (0.2-80 micrograms/ml) and 98.2% (13.6-108.4 micrograms/ml) binding, respectively. Methods for the determination of the parameters of saturable and nonsaturable plasma protein binding for unstable and membrane-binding drugs by the method of variable plasma concentrations in partitioning erythrocyte suspensions are presented.

  13. Nonthermal atmospheric plasma rapidly disinfects multidrug-resistant microbes by inducing cell surface damage.

    PubMed

    Kvam, Erik; Davis, Brian; Mondello, Frank; Garner, Allen L

    2012-04-01

    Plasma, a unique state of matter with properties similar to those of ionized gas, is an effective biological disinfectant. However, the mechanism through which nonthermal or "cold" plasma inactivates microbes on surfaces is poorly understood, due in part to challenges associated with processing and analyzing live cells on surfaces rather than in aqueous solution. Here, we employ membrane adsorption techniques to visualize the cellular effects of plasma on representative clinical isolates of drug-resistant microbes. Through direct fluorescent imaging, we demonstrate that plasma rapidly inactivates planktonic cultures, with >5 log(10) kill in 30 s by damaging the cell surface in a time-dependent manner, resulting in a loss of membrane integrity, leakage of intracellular components (nucleic acid, protein, ATP), and ultimately focal dissolution of the cell surface with longer exposure time. This occurred with similar kinetic rates among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. We observed no correlative evidence that plasma induced widespread genomic damage or oxidative protein modification prior to the onset of membrane damage. Consistent with the notion that plasma is superficial, plasma-mediated sterilization was dramatically reduced when microbial cells were enveloped in aqueous buffer prior to treatment. These results support the use of nonthermal plasmas for disinfecting multidrug-resistant microbes in environmental settings and substantiate ongoing clinical applications for plasma devices.

  14. Nonthermal Atmospheric Plasma Rapidly Disinfects Multidrug-Resistant Microbes by Inducing Cell Surface Damage

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Brian; Mondello, Frank; Garner, Allen L.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma, a unique state of matter with properties similar to those of ionized gas, is an effective biological disinfectant. However, the mechanism through which nonthermal or “cold” plasma inactivates microbes on surfaces is poorly understood, due in part to challenges associated with processing and analyzing live cells on surfaces rather than in aqueous solution. Here, we employ membrane adsorption techniques to visualize the cellular effects of plasma on representative clinical isolates of drug-resistant microbes. Through direct fluorescent imaging, we demonstrate that plasma rapidly inactivates planktonic cultures, with >5 log10 kill in 30 s by damaging the cell surface in a time-dependent manner, resulting in a loss of membrane integrity, leakage of intracellular components (nucleic acid, protein, ATP), and ultimately focal dissolution of the cell surface with longer exposure time. This occurred with similar kinetic rates among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. We observed no correlative evidence that plasma induced widespread genomic damage or oxidative protein modification prior to the onset of membrane damage. Consistent with the notion that plasma is superficial, plasma-mediated sterilization was dramatically reduced when microbial cells were enveloped in aqueous buffer prior to treatment. These results support the use of nonthermal plasmas for disinfecting multidrug-resistant microbes in environmental settings and substantiate ongoing clinical applications for plasma devices. PMID:22232292

  15. Circulating plasma cells in multiple myeloma: characterization and correlation with disease stage.

    PubMed

    Rawstron, A C; Owen, R G; Davies, F E; Johnson, R J; Jones, R A; Richards, S J; Evans, P A; Child, J A; Smith, G M; Jack, A S; Morgan, G J

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a flow cytometric test to quantitate low levels of circulating myeloma plasma cells, and to determine the relationship of these cells with disease stage. Cells were characterized using five-parameter flow cytometric analysis with a panel of antibodies, and results were evaluated by comparison with fluorescent consensus-primer IgH-PCR. Bone marrow myeloma plasma cells, defined by high CD38 and Syndecan-1 expression, did not express CD10, 23, 30, 34 or 45RO, and demonstrated weak expression of CD37 and CD45. 65% of patients had CD19- 56+ plasma cells, 30% CD19- 56(low), and 5% CD19+ 56+, and these two antigens discriminated myeloma from normal plasma cells, which were all CD19+ 56(low). Peripheral blood myeloma plasma cells had the same composite phenotype, but expressed significantly lower levels of CD56 and Syndecan-1, and were detected in 75% (38/51) of patients at presentation, 92% (11/12) of patients in relapse, and 40% (4/10) of stem cell harvests. Circulating plasma cells were not detectable in patients in CR (n = 9) or normals (n = 10), at a sensitivity of up to 1 in 10,000 cells. There was good correlation between the flow cytometric test and IgH-PCR results: myeloma plasma cells were detectable by flow cytometry in all PCR positive samples, and samples with no detectable myeloma plasma cells were PCR negative. Absolute numbers decreased in patients responding to treatment, remained elevated in patients with refractory disease, and increased in patients undergoing relapse. We conclude that flow cytometry can provide an effective aternative to IgH-PCR that will allow quantitative assessment of low levels of residual disease.

  16. Helium generated cold plasma finely regulates activation of human fibroblast-like primary cells.

    PubMed

    Brun, Paola; Pathak, Surajit; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Palù, Giorgio; Brun, Paola; Zuin, Matteo; Cavazzana, Roberto; Martines, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are being developed for a wide range of health care applications, including wound healing. However in order to exploit the potential of plasma for clinical applications, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-induced activation of fibroblasts, the cells active in the healing process, is mandatory. In this study, the role of helium generated plasma in the tissue repairing process was investigated in cultured human fibroblast-like primary cells, and specifically in hepatic stellate cells and intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts. Five minutes after treatment, plasma induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured cells, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of fluorescence-activated 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe. Plasma-induced intracellular ROS were characterized by lower concentrations and shorter half-lives with respect to hydrogen peroxide-induced ROS. Moreover ROS generated by plasma treatment increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, nuclear receptor that modulates the inflammatory responses. Plasma exposure promoted wound healing in an in vitro model and induced fibroblast migration and proliferation, as demonstrated, respectively, by trans-well assay and partitioning between daughter cells of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester fluorescent dye. Plasma-induced fibroblast migration and proliferation were found to be ROS-dependent as cellular incubation with antioxidant agents (e.g. N-acetyl L-cysteine) cancelled the biological effects. This study provides evidence that helium generated plasma promotes proliferation and migration in liver and intestinal fibroblast-like primary cells mainly by increasing intracellular ROS levels. Since plasma-evoked ROS are time-restricted and elicit the PPAR-γ anti-inflammatory molecular pathway, this strategy ensures precise regulation of human fibroblast activation and can be considered a

  17. Helium generated cold plasma finely regulates activation of human fibroblast-like primary cells.

    PubMed

    Brun, Paola; Pathak, Surajit; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Palù, Giorgio; Brun, Paola; Zuin, Matteo; Cavazzana, Roberto; Martines, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are being developed for a wide range of health care applications, including wound healing. However in order to exploit the potential of plasma for clinical applications, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-induced activation of fibroblasts, the cells active in the healing process, is mandatory. In this study, the role of helium generated plasma in the tissue repairing process was investigated in cultured human fibroblast-like primary cells, and specifically in hepatic stellate cells and intestinal subepithelial myofibroblasts. Five minutes after treatment, plasma induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured cells, as assessed by flow cytometric analysis of fluorescence-activated 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe. Plasma-induced intracellular ROS were characterized by lower concentrations and shorter half-lives with respect to hydrogen peroxide-induced ROS. Moreover ROS generated by plasma treatment increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, nuclear receptor that modulates the inflammatory responses. Plasma exposure promoted wound healing in an in vitro model and induced fibroblast migration and proliferation, as demonstrated, respectively, by trans-well assay and partitioning between daughter cells of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester fluorescent dye. Plasma-induced fibroblast migration and proliferation were found to be ROS-dependent as cellular incubation with antioxidant agents (e.g. N-acetyl L-cysteine) cancelled the biological effects. This study provides evidence that helium generated plasma promotes proliferation and migration in liver and intestinal fibroblast-like primary cells mainly by increasing intracellular ROS levels. Since plasma-evoked ROS are time-restricted and elicit the PPAR-γ anti-inflammatory molecular pathway, this strategy ensures precise regulation of human fibroblast activation and can be considered a

  18. Regulation of human amnion cell growth and morphology by sera, plasma, and growth factors.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, E V; Grimaldi, M A

    1981-01-01

    The requirements of human epithelial cells derived from the amnion membrane for serum factors were investigated. The growth promoting effects of human whole blood serum (WBS), platelet-poor defibrinogenated plasma, and plasma-derived serum (PDS) were examined in primary cultures of these ectodermal cells. The numbers of population doublings recorded after 10 days in the presence of 10% WBS, defibrinogenated plasma, or PDS were 2.3, 2.0 or 1.5, respectively. Although dialysis of sera or plasma had little effect on growth promotion, it markedly decreased the capacity of plasma to maintain cells in culture beyond 10 days. The differences in growth activities could not be attributed to the presence of anticoagulant in plasma and PDS or to the presence of excess calcium in PDS. Platelet lysates and purified platelet-derived growth factor had no effect on growth. Amnion cell growth was enhanced by epidermal growth factor (EGF) or hydrocortisone, but the glucocorticoid did not condition cells to respond to growth factors. Insulin and fibroblast growth factor singly or in combination had no effect on cell replication. Giant cell formation accompanied maintenance in hydrocortisone with defibrinogenated plasma and PDS. Discrete regions of dense population appeared in the presence of hydrocortisone, EGF, and undialyzed supplements.

  19. Plasma treatment of biomaterials to direct the differentiation of embryonic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, Erik

    In this work, we explore how embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation patterns are affected by surface interactions with plasma-processed materials. We hypothesize that mouse embryonic stem-cell exposure to certain plasma-polymerized tetraglyme surfaces will direct their differentiation into endothelial cells. R1 mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were plated on surfaces onto which tetraglyme was deposited by plasma polymerization. In addition, tissue-treated polystyrene and control glass cover slips were also examined. Some samples were fixed three days after plating and immunofluorescence stained with platelet endothelial-cell adhesion molecule, while the others were fixed seven days after plating and immunofluorescence stained with von Willebrand Factor. Positive results seen by ES cell derivatives precociously expressing the vWF and PECAM genetic markers on the plasma-polymerized tetraglyme treated surfaces suggest that the plasma-polymerized surfaces direct differentiation of ES cells into endothelial cells. Research goals of this dissertation include: characterization of the material properties of the plasma-polymerized tetraglyme surfaces that induce directed differentiation of ES cells into endothelial cells, optimization of the plasma-polymerization process to maximize the number of endothelial cells derived from R1 ES cells, and biological experimentation to characterize properties of the mechanism of directed differentiation. A potential application of this work is in the design and construction of an artificial blood vessel. Current small-scale arterial substitutes have proved inadequate because of thrombogenicity and infection. Moreover, the lower blood flow velocities of smaller vessels pose a different set of design criteria and introduce new problems not encountered in large arterial substitutes. By utilizing a tissue engineering approach that incorporates embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells, the longevity of the prosthesis can be ensured.

  20. Dopamine and T cells: dopamine receptors and potent effects on T cells, dopamine production in T cells, and abnormalities in the dopaminergic system in T cells in autoimmune, neurological and psychiatric diseases.

    PubMed

    Levite, M

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine, a principal neurotransmitter, deserves upgrading to 'NeuroImmunotransmitter' thanks to its multiple, direct and powerful effects on most/all immune cells. Dopamine by itself is a potent activator of resting effector T cells (Teffs), via two independent ways: direct Teffs activation, and indirect Teffs activation by suppression of regulatory T cells (Tregs). The review covers the following findings: (i) T cells express functional dopamine receptors (DRs) D1R-D5R, but their level and function are dynamic and context-sensitive, (ii) DR membranal protein levels do not necessarily correlate with DR mRNA levels, (iii) different T cell types/subtypes have different DR levels and composition and different responses to dopamine, (iv) autoimmune and pro-inflammatory T cells and T cell leukaemia/lymphoma also express functional DRs, (v) dopamine (~10(-8) M) activates resting/naive Teffs (CD8(+) >CD4(+) ), (vi) dopamine affects Th1/Th2/Th17 differentiation, (vii) dopamine inhibits already activated Teffs (i.e. T cells that have been already activated by either antigen, mitogen, anti-CD3 antibodies cytokines or other molecules), (viii) dopamine inhibits activated Tregs in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Thus, dopamine 'suppresses the suppressors' and releases the inhibition they exert on Teffs, (ix) dopamine affects intracellular signalling molecules and cascades in T cells (e.g. ERK, Lck, Fyn, NF-κB, KLF2), (x) T cells produce dopamine (Tregs>Teffs), can release dopamine, mainly after activation (by antigen, mitogen, anti-CD3 antibodies, PKC activators or other), uptake extracellular dopamine, and most probably need dopamine, (xi) dopamine is important for antigen-specific interactions between T cells and dendritic cells, (xii) in few autoimmune diseases (e.g. multiple sclerosis/SLE/rheumatoid arthritis), and neurological/psychiatric diseases (e.g. Parkinson disease, Alzheimer's disease, Schizophrenia and Tourette), patient's T cells seem to have abnormal DRs

  1. Plasma cell neoplasms in US solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Engels, Eric A; Clarke, Christina A; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Lynch, Charles F; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Gibson, Todd M; Landgren, Ola; Morton, Lindsay M

    2013-06-01

    Transplant recipients have elevated risk for plasma cell neoplasms (PCNs, comprising multiple myeloma and plasmacytoma), but little is known about risk factors in the transplant setting. Through linkage of the US solid organ transplant registry with 15 state/regional cancer registries, we identified 140 PCNs in 202 600 recipients (1987-2009). PCN risk was 1.8-fold increased relative to the general population (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] 1.80, 95%CI 1.51-2.12). Among cases, 102 were multiple myeloma (SIR 1.41) and 38 were plasmacytoma (SIR 7.06). PCN incidence increased with age, but due to the rarity of PCNs in younger people in the general population, SIRs were highest in younger transplant recipients (p = 0.03). PCN risk was especially high in recipients who were Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) seronegative at transplantation (SIR 3.93). EBV status was known for 18 tumors, of which 7 (39%) were EBV positive. Following liver transplantation, PCN risk was higher in recipients with cholestatic liver disease (SIR 2.78); five of these cases had primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). A role for primary EBV infection after transplantation is supported by the increased PCN risk in young EBV seronegative recipients and the presence of EBV in tumors. PBC may be another risk factor, perhaps by causing chronic immune activation. PMID:23635036

  2. Decreased SAP Expression in T Cells from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Contributes to Early Signaling Abnormalities and Reduced IL-2 Production.

    PubMed

    Karampetsou, Maria P; Comte, Denis; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C; Tsokos, George C

    2016-06-15

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of abnormalities, including increased early signaling events following engagement of the TCR. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family cell surface receptors and the X-chromosome-defined signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) adaptor are important in the development of several immunocyte lineages and modulating the immune response. We present evidence that SAP protein levels are decreased in T cells and in their main subsets isolated from 32 women and three men with SLE, independent of disease activity. In SLE T cells, SAP protein is also subject to increased degradation by caspase-3. Forced expression of SAP in SLE T cells normalized IL-2 production, calcium (Ca(2+)) responses, and tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of proteins. Exposure of normal T cells to SLE serum IgG, known to contain anti-CD3/TCR Abs, resulted in SAP downregulation. We conclude that SLE T cells display reduced levels of the adaptor protein SAP, probably as a result of continuous T cell activation and degradation by caspase-3. Restoration of SAP levels in SLE T cells corrects the overexcitable lupus T cell phenotype.

  3. Decreased SAP Expression in T Cells from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Contributes to Early Signaling Abnormalities and Reduced IL-2 Production.

    PubMed

    Karampetsou, Maria P; Comte, Denis; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C; Tsokos, George C

    2016-06-15

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of abnormalities, including increased early signaling events following engagement of the TCR. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family cell surface receptors and the X-chromosome-defined signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) adaptor are important in the development of several immunocyte lineages and modulating the immune response. We present evidence that SAP protein levels are decreased in T cells and in their main subsets isolated from 32 women and three men with SLE, independent of disease activity. In SLE T cells, SAP protein is also subject to increased degradation by caspase-3. Forced expression of SAP in SLE T cells normalized IL-2 production, calcium (Ca(2+)) responses, and tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of proteins. Exposure of normal T cells to SLE serum IgG, known to contain anti-CD3/TCR Abs, resulted in SAP downregulation. We conclude that SLE T cells display reduced levels of the adaptor protein SAP, probably as a result of continuous T cell activation and degradation by caspase-3. Restoration of SAP levels in SLE T cells corrects the overexcitable lupus T cell phenotype. PMID:27183584

  4. Improvement of early cell adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface by low energy plasma.

    PubMed

    Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Mongkolnavin, Rattachat; Kanokpanont, Sorada; Panpranot, Joongjai; Wong, Chiow San; Damrongsakkul, Siriporn

    2013-11-01

    Low energy plasma has been introduced to treat the surface of Thai silk fibroin which should be enhanced for cell adhesion due to its native hydrophobic surface. Plasma surface treatment could introduce desirable hydrophilic functionalities on the surface without using any chemicals. In this work, nitrogen glow discharge plasma was generated by a low energy AC50Hz power supply system. The plasma operating conditions were optimized to reach the highest nitrogen active species by using optical emission spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that amine, hydroxyl, ether, and carboxyl groups were induced on Thai silk fibroin surface after plasma treatment. The results on Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy confirmed that the plasma treated effects were only on the outermost layer since there was no change in the bulk chemistry. The surface topography was insignificantly changed from the detection with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The plasma-treated effects were the improved surface wettability and cell adhesion. After a 90-s treatment, the water contact angle was at 20°, while the untreated surface was at 70°. The early cell adhesion of L929 mouse fibroblast was accelerated. L929 cells only took 3h to reach 100% cell adhesion on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface, while there was less than 50% cell adhesion on the untreated Thai silk fibroin surface after 6h of culture. The cell adhesion results were in agreement with the cytoskeleton development. L929 F-actin was more evident on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface than others. It could be concluded that a lower energy AC50Hz plasma system enhanced early L929 mouse fibroblast adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface without any significant change in surface topography and bulk chemistry. PMID:23893032

  5. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Xu; Ptasinska, Sylwia; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Sharon Stack, M.

    2013-06-10

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was applied to induce DNA damage of SCC-25 oral cancer cells. Optical emission spectra were taken to characterize the reactive species produced in APPJ. In order to explore the spatial distribution of plasma effects, cells were placed onto photo-etched grid slides and the antibody H2A.X was used to locate double strand breaks of DNA inside nuclei using an immunofluorescence assay. The number of cells with double strand breaks in DNA was observed to be varied due to the distance from the irradiation center and duration of plasma treatment.

  6. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Sharon Stack, M.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2013-06-01

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was applied to induce DNA damage of SCC-25 oral cancer cells. Optical emission spectra were taken to characterize the reactive species produced in APPJ. In order to explore the spatial distribution of plasma effects, cells were placed onto photo-etched grid slides and the antibody H2A.X was used to locate double strand breaks of DNA inside nuclei using an immunofluorescence assay. The number of cells with double strand breaks in DNA was observed to be varied due to the distance from the irradiation center and duration of plasma treatment.

  7. Elisidepsin Interacts Directly with Glycosylceramides in the Plasma Membrane of Tumor Cells to Induce Necrotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Guijarro, José Manuel; García, Carolina; Macías, Álvaro; García-Fernández, Luis Francisco; Moreno, Cristina; Reyes, Fernando; Martínez-Leal, Juan Fernando; Fernández, Rogelio; Martínez, Valentín; Valenzuela, Carmen; Lillo, M. Pilar; Galmarini, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane integrity is essential for cell life. Any major break on it immediately induces the death of the affected cell. Different molecules were described as disrupting this cell structure and thus showing antitumor activity. We have previously defined that elisidepsin (Irvalec®, PM02734) inserts and self-organizes in the plasma membrane of tumor cells, inducing a rapid loss of membrane integrity, cell permeabilization and necrotic death. Here we show that, in sensitive HCT-116 colorectal cells, all these effects are consequence of the interaction of elisidepsin with glycosylceramides in the cell membrane. Of note, an elisidepsin-resistant subline (HCT-116-Irv) presented reduced levels of glycosylceramides and no accumulation of elisidepsin in the plasma membrane. Consequently, drug treatment did not induce the characteristic necrotic cell death. Furthermore, GM95, a mutant derivative from B16 mouse melanoma cells lacking ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG) activity and thus the synthesis of glycosylceramides, was also resistant to elisidepsin. Over-expression of UGCG gene in these deficient cells restored glycosylceramides synthesis, rendering them sensitive to elisidepsin, at a similar level than parental B16 cells. These results indicate that glycosylceramides act as membrane targets of elisidepsin, facilitating its insertion in the plasma membrane and the subsequent membrane permeabilization that leads to drug-induced cell death. They also indicate that cell membrane lipids are a plausible target for antineoplastic therapy. PMID:26474061

  8. Skeletal cell differentiation is enhanced by atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Steinbeck, Marla J; Chernets, Natalie; Zhang, Jun; Kurpad, Deepa S; Fridman, Gregory; Fridman, Alexander; Freeman, Theresa A

    2013-01-01

    Enhancing chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation is of paramount importance in providing effective regenerative therapies and improving the rate of fracture healing. This study investigated the potential of non-thermal atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma (NT-plasma) to enhance chondrocyte and osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Although the exact mechanism by which NT-plasma interacts with cells is undefined, it is known that during treatment the atmosphere is ionized generating extracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) and an electric field. Appropriate NT-plasma conditions were determined using lactate-dehydrogenase release, flow cytometric live/dead assay, flow cytometric cell cycle analysis, and Western blots to evaluate DNA damage and mitochondrial integrity. We observed that specific NT-plasma conditions were required to prevent cell death, and that loss of pre-osteoblastic cell viability was dependent on intracellular ROS and RNS production. To further investigate the involvement of intracellular ROS, fluorescent intracellular dyes Mitosox (superoxide) and dihydrorhodamine (peroxide) were used to assess onset and duration after NT-plasma treatment. Both intracellular superoxide and peroxide were found to increase immediately post NT-plasma treatment. These increases were sustained for one hour but returned to control levels by 24 hr. Using the same treatment conditions, osteogenic differentiation by NT-plasma was assessed and compared to peroxide or osteogenic media containing β-glycerolphosphate. Although both NT-plasma and peroxide induced differentiation-specific gene expression, neither was as effective as the osteogenic media. However, treatment of cells with NT-plasma after 24 hr in osteogenic or chondrogenic media significantly enhanced differentiation as compared to differentiation media alone. The results of this study show that NT-plasma can selectively initiate and amplify ROS signaling to enhance

  9. Phosphatidic acid phosphatase and phospholipdase A activities in plasma membranes from fusing muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kent, C; Vagelos, P R

    1976-06-17

    Plasma membrane from fusing embryonic muscle cells were assayed for phospholipase A activity to determine if this enzyme plays a role in cell fusion. The membranes were assayed under a variety of conditions with phosphatidylcholine as the substrate and no phospholipase A activity was found. The plasma membranes did contain a phosphatidic acid phosphatase which was optimally active in the presence of Triton X-100 and glycerol. The enzyme activity was constant from pH 5.2 to 7.0, and did not require divalent cations. Over 97% of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity was in the particulate fraction. The subcellular distribution of the phosphatidic acid phosphatase was the same as the distributions of the plasma membrane markers, (Na+ + k+)-ATPase and the acetylcholine receptor, which indicates that this phosphatase is located exclusively in the plasma membranes. There was no detectable difference in the phosphatidic acid phosphatase activities of plasma membranes from fusing and non-fusing cells.

  10. Comparison of gene expression profiling between malignant and normal plasma cells with oligonucleotide arrays.

    PubMed

    De Vos, John; Thykjaer, Thomas; Tarte, Karin; Ensslen, Matthias; Raynaud, Pierre; Requirand, Guilhem; Pellet, Florence; Pantesco, Véronique; Rème, Thierry; Jourdan, Michel; Rossi, Jean-François; Ørntoft, Torben; Klein, Bernard

    2002-10-01

    The DNA microarray technology enables the identification of the large number of genes involved in the complex deregulation of cell homeostasis taking place in cancer. Using Affymetrix microarrays, we have compared the gene expression profiles of highly purified malignant plasma cells from nine patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and eight myeloma cell lines to those of highly purified nonmalignant plasma cells (eight samples) obtained by in vitro differentiation of peripheral blood B cells. Two unsupervised clustering algorithms classified these 25 samples into two distinct clusters: a malignant plasma cell cluster and a normal plasma cell cluster. Two hundred and fifty genes were significantly up-regulated and 159 down-regulated in malignant plasma samples compared to normal plasma samples. For some of these genes, an overexpression or downregulation of the encoded protein was confirmed (cyclin D1, c-myc, BMI-1, cystatin c, SPARC, RB). Two genes overexpressed in myeloma cells (ABL and cystathionine beta synthase) code for enzymes that could be a therapeutic target with specific drugs. These data provide a new insight into the understanding of myeloma disease and prefigure that the development of DNA microarray could help to develop an 'à la carte' treatment in cancer disease.

  11. Abnormal Changes of Brain Cortical Anatomy and the Association with Plasma MicroRNA107 Level in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Shi, Feng; Jin, Yan; Jiang, Weixiong; Shen, Dinggang; Xiao, Shifu

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA107 (Mir107) has been thought to relate to the brain structure phenotype of Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, we evaluated the cortical anatomy in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and the relation between cortical anatomy and plasma levels of Mir107 and beta-site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). Twenty aMCI (20 aMCI) and 24 cognitively normal control (NC) subjects were recruited, and T1-weighted MR images were acquired. Cortical anatomical measurements, including cortical thickness (CT), surface area (SA), and local gyrification index (LGI), were assessed. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to examine plasma expression of Mir107, BACE1 mRNA. Thinner cortex was found in aMCI in areas associated with episodic memory and language, but with thicker cortex in other areas. SA decreased in aMCI in the areas associated with working memory and emotion. LGI showed a significant reduction in aMCI in the areas involved in language function. Changes in Mir107 and BACE1 messenger RNA plasma expression were correlated with changes in CT and SA. We found alterations in key left brain regions associated with memory, language, and emotion in aMCI that were significantly correlated with plasma expression of Mir107 and BACE1 mRNA. This combination study of brain anatomical alterations and gene information may shed lights on our understanding of the pathology of AD. Clinical Trial Registration: http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT01819545. PMID:27242521

  12. Gammaherpesvirus-driven plasma cell differentiation regulates virus reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaozhen; Collins, Christopher M; Mendel, Justin B; Iwakoshi, Neal N; Speck, Samuel H

    2009-11-01

    Gammaherpesviruses chronically infect their host and are tightly associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas, as well as several other types of cancer. Mechanisms involved in maintaining chronic gammaherpesvirus infections are poorly understood and, in particular, little is known about the mechanisms involved in controlling gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells in vivo. Recent evidence has linked plasma cell differentiation with reactivation of the human gammaherpesviruses EBV and KSHV through induction of the immediate-early viral transcriptional activators by the plasma cell-specific transcription factor XBP-1s. We now extend those findings to document a role for a gammaherpesvirus gene product in regulating plasma cell differentiation and thus virus reactivation. We have previously shown that the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) gene product M2 is dispensable for virus replication in permissive cells, but plays a critical role in virus reactivation from latently infected B cells. Here we show that in mice infected with wild type MHV68, virus infected plasma cells (ca. 8% of virus infected splenocytes at the peak of viral latency) account for the majority of reactivation observed upon explant of splenocytes. In contrast, there is an absence of virus infected plasma cells at the peak of latency in mice infected with a M2 null MHV68. Furthermore, we show that the M2 protein can drive plasma cell differentiation in a B lymphoma cell line in the absence of any other MHV68 gene products. Thus, the role of M2 in MHV68 reactivation can be attributed to its ability to manipulate plasma cell differentiation, providing a novel viral strategy to regulate gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells. We postulate that M2 represents a new class of herpesvirus gene products (reactivation conditioners) that do not directly participate in virus replication, but rather facilitate virus reactivation by

  13. Targeting cancer cells with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by atmospheric-pressure air plasma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hak Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Hoan, Nguyen Ngoc; Kim, Churl Ho; Moon, Eunpyo; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for cancer. Anticancer activity of plasma has been reported to involve mitochondrial dysfunction. However, what constituents generated by plasma is linked to this anticancer process and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we report that the therapeutic effects of air plasma result from generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) including H2O2, Ox, OH-, •O2, NOx, leading to depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Simultaneously, ROS/RNS activate c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase. As a consequence, treatment with air plasma jets induces apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants, JNK and p38 inhibitors, or JNK and p38 siRNA abrogates the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and impairs the air plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that the ROS/RNS generated by plasma trigger signaling pathways involving JNK and p38 and promote mitochondrial perturbation, leading to apoptosis. Therefore, administration of air plasma may be a feasible strategy to eliminate cancer cells.

  14. Functional granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor is constitutively expressed on neoplastic plasma cells and mediates tumour cell longevity.

    PubMed

    Villunger, A; Egle, A; Kos, M; Egle, D; Tinhofer, I; Henn, T; Uberall, F; Maly, K; Greil, R

    1998-09-01

    It has been shown that granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is able to support myeloma cell propagation in cooperation with interleukin (IL)-6, the major growth factor for malignant plasma cells, although the biological mechanisms involved remain unknown. Therefore we investigated (i) the expression levels of the GM-CSF receptor (GM-CSFR) constituents in three malignant plasma cell lines and in native malignant plasma cells, (ii) the ability of the receptor to mediate common signalling pathways regulating proliferation and cell survival in malignant plasma cell lines, and (iii) the effects of GM-CSF on tumour cell biology. The GM-CSFRalpha subunit was detected in the malignant plasma cell lines RPMI-8226, MC/CAR, IM-9 as well as 6/6 native myeloma cell samples derived from the bone marrow of patients with overt disease. Furthermore, GM-CSFR expression was also detected in the CD19+ fraction from 2/3 bone marrow samples and 5/8 peripheral blood samples derived from patients with malignant plasma cell disorders, but not in the CD19+ fraction of peripheral blood from healthy donors. The expressed cytokine receptor alpha-subunit was able to constitute a functional signalling complex with the ubiquitously expressed GM-CSFRbeta subunit, as demonstrated by the fact that GM-CSF induced the p21-ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling cascade in malignant plasma cell lines. Since this signalling cascade plays an essential role in the mediation of both proliferation and cell survival, we investigated the impact of GM-CSF on these two events. Application of GM-CSF led to an increase of DNA-synthesis in MC/CAR, IM-9 and RPMI-8226 cells. Furthermore, it increased longevity of these malignant plasma cell lines by reducing the rates of spontaneous apoptosis. We conclude that (i) the functional GM-CSFR is commonly expressed on malignant plasma cells and that (ii) GM-CSF promotes the clonal expansion of myeloma cells by inhibiting spontaneous

  15. The connection of cytoskeletal network with plasma membrane and the cell wall

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zengyu; Persson, Staffan; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall provides external support of the plant cells, while the cytoskeletons including the microtubules and the actin filaments constitute an internal framework. The cytoskeletons contribute to the cell wall biosynthesis by spatially and temporarily regulating the transportation and deposition of cell wall components. This tight control is achieved by the dynamic behavior of the cytoskeletons, but also through the tethering of these structures to the plasma membrane. This tethering may also extend beyond the plasma membrane and impact on the cell wall, possibly in the form of a feedback loop. In this review, we discuss the linking components between the cytoskeletons and the plasma membrane, and/or the cell wall. We also discuss the prospective roles of these components in cell wall biosynthesis and modifications, and aim to provide a platform for further studies in this field. PMID:25693826

  16. The connection of cytoskeletal network with plasma membrane and the cell wall.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengyu; Persson, Staffan; Zhang, Yi

    2015-04-01

    The cell wall provides external support of the plant cells, while the cytoskeletons including the microtubules and the actin filaments constitute an internal framework. The cytoskeletons contribute to the cell wall biosynthesis by spatially and temporarily regulating the transportation and deposition of cell wall components. This tight control is achieved by the dynamic behavior of the cytoskeletons, but also through the tethering of these structures to the plasma membrane. This tethering may also extend beyond the plasma membrane and impact on the cell wall, possibly in the form of a feedback loop. In this review, we discuss the linking components between the cytoskeletons and the plasma membrane, and/or the cell wall. We also discuss the prospective roles of these components in cell wall biosynthesis and modifications, and aim to provide a platform for further studies in this field.

  17. Treatment of oral cancer cells with nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurkovich, James; Han, Xu; Coffey, Benjamin; Klas, Matej; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2012-10-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas are specialized types of plasma that are proposed as a new agent to induce death in cancer cells. The experimental phase of this study will test the application of such plasma to SCC-25 oral cancer cells to determine if it is possible to induce apoptosis or necrosis. Different sources are used on the cells to find a configuration which kills cancer cells but has no effect on normal cells. The sources have been developed based on the dielectric barrier discharge between two external electrodes surrounding a dielectric tube; such a configuration has been shown to induce breaks in DNA strands. Each configuration is characterized using an optical emission spectrophotometer and iCCD camera to determine the optimal conditions for inducing cell death. The cells are incubated after irradiation with plasma, and cell death is determined using microscopy imaging to identify antibody interaction within the cells. These studies are important for better understanding of plasma species interactions with cancer cells and mechanisms of DNA damage and at latter stage they will be useful for the development of advanced cancer therapy.

  18. Roles of the plasma membrane and the cell wall in the responses of plant cells to freezing.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tomoyoshi; Kuroda, Katsushi; Jitsuyama, Yutaka; Takezawa, Daisuke; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2002-09-01

    In an effort to clarify the responses of a wide range of plant cells to freezing, we examined the responses to freezing of the cells of chilling-sensitive and chilling-resistant tropical and subtropical plants. Among the cells of the plants that we examined, those of African violet ( Saintpaulia grotei Engl.) leaves were most chilling-sensitive, those of hypocotyls in mungbean [ Vigna radiata (L.) R. Wilcz.] seedlings were moderately chilling-sensitive, and those of orchid [ Paphiopedilum insigne (Wallich ex Lindl.) Pfitz.] leaves were chilling-resistant, when all were chilled at -2 degrees C. By contrast, all these plant cells were freezing-sensitive and suffered extensive damage when they were frozen at -2 degrees C. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM) confirmed that, upon chilling at -2 degrees C, both chilling-sensitive and chilling-resistant plant cells were supercooled. Upon freezing at -2 degrees C, by contrast, intracellular freezing occurred in Saintpaulia leaf cells, frost plasmolysis followed by intracellular freezing occurred in mungbean seedling cells, and extracellular freezing (cytorrhysis) occurred in orchid leaf cells. We postulate that chilling-related destabilization of membranes might result in the loss of the ability of the plasma membrane to act as a barrier against the propagation of extracellular ice in chilling-sensitive plant cells. We also examined the role of cell walls in the response to freezing using cells in which the plasma membrane had been disrupted by repeated freezing and thawing. In chilling-sensitive Saintpaulia and mungbean cells, the cells with a disrupted plasma membrane responded to freezing at -2 degrees C by intracellular freezing. By contrast, in chilling-resistant orchid cells, as well as in other cells of chilling-resistant and freezing-resistant plant tissues, including leaves of orchard grass ( Dactylis glomerata L.), leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and cortical tissues of mulberry ( Morus

  19. Evaluation of Endometrium for Chronic Endometritis by Using Syndecan-1 in Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kannar, Vidyavathi; Lingaiah, Harendra Kumar Malligere; Sunita, Venigalla

    2012-01-01

    Context: Chronic endometritis is a condition observed in 3-10% of women with abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB). Diagnosis depends upon the histological detection of plasma cells within the inflammatory infiltrate in the endometrium. Plasma cells on H and E may be obscured by a mononuclear infiltrate, plasmacytoid stromal cells, abundant stromal mitosis, a pronounced predecidual reaction, menstrual features or secondary changes due to exogenous progesterone treatment prior to biopsy. Aims: The objective of this study was to determine utility of syndecan-1 in diagnosis of chronic endometritis in patients with AUB, and to see if any of the secondary histologic features in endometrial biopsy, correlated with the presence of plasma cells on immunohistochemistry (IHC). Materials and Methods: Fifty endometrial biopsies with a clinical diagnosis of AUB were taken. Endometrium in proliferative phase, secretory phase, endometrial polyps, and disordered proliferative endometrium were studied for the presence of plasma cells. IHC was done using syndecan-1. The secondary histologic features of chronic endometritis like gland architectural irregularity, spindled stroma, stromal edema and hemorrhage with the presence of plasma cells was statistically analysed. Values of P < 0.05 were considered as significant. Results: Plasma cells were seen in 11 (69%) of DPE, 8 (66%) of PEB, and 1 (7%) of normal proliferative endometrium and in 2 (40%) of secretory endometrium. Presence of stromal breakdown showed a significant association with plasma cells (P = 0.02) whereas gland architecture irregularity (P = 0.28), stromal edema (P = 0.71) and spindled stromal (P = 0.72) did not show a significant association. Conclusions: Plasma cells were significantly present in AUB patients. Syndecan-1 maybe helpful in unusual cases, where chronic endometritis is suspected as the cause of clinically significant ongoing abnormal bleeding. PMID:23440678

  20. Comparison of the characteristics of atmospheric pressure plasma jets using different working gases and applications to plasma-cancer cell interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Leem, S. H.

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets employing nitrogen, helium, or argon gases driven by low-frequency (several tens of kilohertz) ac voltage and pulsed dc voltage were fabricated and characterized. The changes in discharge current, optical emission intensities from reactive radicals, gas temperature, and plume length of plasma jets with the control parameters were measured and compared. The control parameters include applied voltage, working gas, and gas flow rate. As an application to plasma-cancer cell interactions, the effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on the morphology and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level of human lung adenocarcinoma cell (A549) and human bladder cancer cell (EJ) were explored. The experimental results show that the plasma can effectively control the intracellular concentrations of ROS. Although there exist slight differences in the production of ROS, helium, argon, or nitrogen plasma jets are found to be useful in enhancing the intracellular ROS concentrations in cancer cells.

  1. High risk human papillomavirus type 16 and 18 infection in the cervical lesions of women with epithelial cell abnormality in Pap smear: A cytohistomorphologic association in Bangladeshi women

    PubMed Central

    Banik, Urmila; Ahamad, M. Shahab Uddin; Bhattacharjee, Pradip; Adhikary, Arun Kumar; Rahman, Zillur

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to find out the extent of high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) type 16/18 infection in the cervical tissue of women with epithelial cell abnormality in Pap smear and to establish an association between hrHPV type 16/18 infection and cytohistomorphology. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out in 1699 patients who went through Pap smear examination. Prevalence of epithelial cell abnormality was calculated. Forty eight of these women underwent routine histopathology and 47 were evaluated for human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16/18 by polymerase chain reaction assay. Results: Total 139 women revealed epithelial cell abnormality. Histopathology showed simple inflammation to malignancy. HPV type 16/18 infection was detected in 40.42% (19/47) of the patients. Individually type 16 and 18 were positive in 7 (14.9%) cases each and dual infection with type 16 and 18 were seen in 5 (10.6%) cases. While cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 1 (CIN 1) and < CIN 1 lesions showed 18.75% (3 out of 16) and 35% (7 out of 20) positivity respectively, ≥CIN 2 lesions revealed positivity of 81.82% (9 out of 11). Eighty percent HPV 16/18 positivity was seen in women of < 30 years of age. Conclusion: The findings of this study will contribute to HPV 16/18 knowledge in Bangladesh that will be useful in assessing the success of current vaccines with limited type spectra and augmenting cervical cancer screening strategies. PMID:23976895

  2. Host Cell Plasma Membrane Phosphatidylserine Regulates the Assembly and Budding of Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Adu-Gyamfi, Emmanuel; Johnson, Kristen A.; Fraser, Mark E.; Scott, Jordan L.; Soni, Smita P.; Jones, Keaton R.; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Tessier, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipid-enveloped viruses replicate and bud from the host cell where they acquire their lipid coat. Ebola virus, which buds from the plasma membrane of the host cell, causes viral hemorrhagic fever and has a high fatality rate. To date, little has been known about how budding and egress of Ebola virus are mediated at the plasma membrane. We have found that the lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) regulates the assembly of Ebola virus matrix protein VP40. VP40 binds PS-containing membranes with nanomolar affinity, and binding of PS regulates VP40 localization and oligomerization on the plasma membrane inner leaflet. Further, alteration of PS levels in mammalian cells inhibits assembly and egress of VP40. Notably, interactions of VP40 with the plasma membrane induced exposure of PS on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane at sites of egress, whereas PS is typically found only on the inner leaflet. Taking the data together, we present a model accounting for the role of plasma membrane PS in assembly of Ebola virus-like particles. IMPORTANCE The lipid-enveloped Ebola virus causes severe infection with a high mortality rate and currently lacks FDA-approved therapeutics or vaccines. Ebola virus harbors just seven genes in its genome, and there is a critical requirement for acquisition of its lipid envelope from the plasma membrane of the human cell that it infects during the replication process. There is, however, a dearth of information available on the required contents of this envelope for egress and subsequent attachment and entry. Here we demonstrate that plasma membrane phosphatidylserine is critical for Ebola virus budding from the host cell plasma membrane. This report, to our knowledge, is the first to highlight the role of lipids in human cell membranes in the Ebola virus replication cycle and draws a clear link between selective binding and transport of a lipid across the membrane of the human cell and use of that lipid for subsequent viral entry. PMID

  3. Evaluation of the sensitivity of bacterial and yeast cells to cold atmospheric plasma jet treatments.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Michael A; Chebbi, Ahmed; McDonnell, Kevin A; Staunton, Claire; Dowling, Denis P

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this research was first to determine the influence of the atmospheric plasma drive frequency on the generation of atomic oxygen species and its correlation with the reduction of bacterial load after treatment in vitro. The treatments were carried out using a helium-plasma jet source called PlasmaStream™. The susceptibility of multiple microbial cell lines was investigated in order to compare the response of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, as well as a yeast cell line to the atmospheric plasma treatment. It was observed for the source evaluated that at a frequency of 160 kHz, increased levels of oxygen-laden active species (i.e., OH, NO) were generated. At this frequency, the maximum level of bacterial inactivation in vitro was also achieved. Ex vivo studies (using freshly excised porcine skin as a human analog) were also carried out to verify the antibacterial effect of the plasma jet treatment at this optimal operational frequency and to investigate the effect of treatment duration on the reduction of bacterial load. The plasma jet treatment was found to yield a 4 log reduction in bacterial load after 6 min of treatment, with no observable adverse effects on the treatment surface. The gram-negative bacterial cell lines were found to be far more susceptible to the atmospheric plasma treatments than the gram-positive bacteria. Flow cytometric analysis of plasma treated bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) was conducted in order to attain a fundamental understanding of the mode of action of the treatment on bacteria at a cellular level. This study showed that after treatment with the plasma jet, E. coli cells progressed through the following steps of cell death; the inactivation of transport systems, followed by depolarization of the cytoplasmic membrane, and finally permeabilization of the cell wall.

  4. Parent-of-origin effects of A1CF and AGO2 on testicular germ-cell tumors, testicular abnormalities, and fertilization bias.

    PubMed

    Carouge, Delphine; Blanc, Valerie; Knoblaugh, Sue E; Hunter, Robert J; Davidson, Nicholas O; Nadeau, Joseph H

    2016-09-13

    Testicular tumors, the most common cancer in young men, arise from abnormalities in germ cells during fetal development. Unconventional inheritance for testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) risk both in humans and mice implicates epigenetic mechanisms. Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme complex 1 (APOBEC1) cytidine deaminase and Deadend-1, which are involved in C-to-U RNA editing and microRNA-dependent mRNA silencing, respectively, are potent epigenetic modifiers of TGCT susceptibility in the genetically predisposed 129/Sv inbred mouse strain. Here, we show that partial loss of either APOBEC1 complementation factor (A1CF), the RNA-binding cofactor of APOBEC1 in RNA editing, or Argonaute 2 (AGO2), a key factor in the biogenesis of certain noncoding RNAs, modulates risk for TGCTs and testicular abnormalities in both parent-of-origin and conventional genetic manners. In addition, non-Mendelian inheritance was found among progeny of A1cf and Ago2 mutant intercrosses but not in backcrosses and without fetal loss. Together these findings suggest nonrandom union of gametes rather than meiotic drive or preferential lethality. Finally, this survey also suggested that A1CF contributes to long-term reproductive performance. These results directly implicate the RNA-binding proteins A1CF and AGO2 in the epigenetic control of germ-cell fate, urogenital development, and gamete functions. PMID:27582469

  5. Specific N-glycans of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Surface and the Abnormal Increase of Core-α-1, 6-fucosylated Triantennary Glycan via N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases-IVa Regulation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Huan; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Yubao; Li, Tingting; Zhan, Chao; Huo, Wenjuan; He, Anshun; Yao, Yuanfei; Jin, Yu; Qu, Youpeng; Sun, Xue-Long; Li, Yu

    2015-11-05

    Glycosylation alterations of cell surface proteins are often observed during the progression of malignancies. The specific cell surface N-glycans were profiled in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with clinical tissues (88 tumor and adjacent normal tissues) and the corresponding serum samples of HCC patients. The level of core-α-1,6-fucosylated triantennary glycan (NA3Fb) increased both on the cell surface and in the serum samples of HCC patients (p < 0.01). Additionally, the change of NA3Fb was not influenced by Hepatitis B virus (HBV)and cirrhosis. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase IVa (GnT-IVa), which was related to the synthesis of the NA3Fb, was substantially increased in HCC tissues. Knockdown of GnT-IVa leads to a decreased level of NA3Fb and decreased ability of invasion and migration in HCC cells. NA3Fb can be regarded as a specific cell surface N-glycan of HCC. The high expression of GnT-IVa is the cause of the abnormal increase of NA3Fb on the HCC cell surface, which regulates cell migration. This study demonstrated the specific N-glycans of the cell surface and the mechanisms of altered glycoform related with HCC. These findings lead to better understanding of the function of glycan and glycosyltransferase in the tumorigenesis, progression and metastasis of HCC.

  6. Galvanic cell having a saturated fluorocarbon plasma-treated sealing gasket

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, H.; van Lier, J. A.

    1985-02-26

    Galvanic cells employing compressible gaskets having at least a portion of the sealing areas of such gaskets coated with plasma deposited fluorine atoms demonstrate increased resistance to electrolyte leakage.

  7. AT14A mediates the cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton continuum in Arabidopsis thaliana cells.

    PubMed

    Lü, Bing; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Hongcheng; Liang, Jiansheng; Zhang, Jianhua

    2012-06-01

    AT14A has a small domain that has sequence similarities to integrins from animals. Integrins serve as a transmembrane linker between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton, which play critical roles in a variety of biological processes. Because the function of AT14A is unknown, Arabidopsis thaliana AT14A, which is a transmembrane receptor for cell adhesion molecules and a middle member of the cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton continuum in plants, has been described. AT14A, co-expressed with green fluorescent protein (GFP), was found to localize mainly to the plasma membrane. The mutant Arabidopsis at14a-1 cells exhibit various phenotypes with cell shape, cell cluster size, thickness, and cellulose content of cell wall, the adhesion between cells, and the adhesion of plasma membrane to cell wall varied by plasmolysis. Using direct staining of filamentous actin and indirect immunofluorescence staining of microtubules, cortical actin filaments and microtubules arrays were significantly altered in cells, either where AT14A was absent or over-expressed. It is concluded that AT14A may be a substantial middle member of the cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton continuum and play an important role in the continuum by regulating cell wall and cortical cytoskeleton organization. PMID:22456678

  8. p27KIP1 is abnormally expressed in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas and is associated with an adverse clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Sáez, Al; Sánchez, E; Sánchez-Beato, M; Cruz, M A; Chacón, I; Muñoz, E; Camacho, F I; Martínez-Montero, J C; Mollejo, M; Garcia, J F; Piris, M A

    1999-01-01

    Cell cycle progression is regulated by the combined action of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), and CDK-inhibitors (CDKi), which are negative cell cycle regulators. p27KIP1 is a CDKi key in cell cycle regulation, whose degradation is required for G1/S transition. In spite of the absence of p27KIP1 expression in proliferating lymphocytes, some aggressive B-cell lymphomas have been reported to show an anomalous p27KIP1 staining. We analysed p27KIP1 expression in a series of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), correlating it with the proliferative index and clinical outcome, to characterize the implications of this anomalous staining in lymphomagenesis in greater depth. For the above mentioned purposes, an immunohistochemical technique in paraffin-embedded tissues was employed, using commercially available antibodies, in a series of 133 patients with known clinical outcomes. Statistical analysis was performed in order to ascertain which clinical and molecular variables may influence outcome, in terms of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). The relationships between p27KIP1 and MIB-1 (Ki-67) were also tested. An abnormally high expression of p27KIP1 was found in lymphomas of this type. The overall correlation between p27KIP1 and MIB-1 showed there to be no significant relationship between these two parameters, this differing from observations in reactive lymphoid and other tissues. Analysis of the clinical relevance of these findings showed that a high level of p27KIP1 expression in this type of tumour is an adverse prognostic marker, in both univariate and multivariate analysis. These results show that there is abnormal p27KIP1 expression in DLBCL, with adverse clinical significance, suggesting that this anomalous p27KIP1 protein may be rendered non-functional through interaction with other cell cycle regulator proteins. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10424746

  9. CD229 is expressed on the surface of plasma cells carrying an aberrant phenotype and chemotherapy-resistant precursor cells in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Yousef, Sara; Kovacsovics-Bankowski, Magdalena; Salama, Mohamed E; Bhardwaj, Neelam; Steinbach, Mary; Langemo, Amanda; Kovacsovics, Tibor; Marvin, James; Binder, Mascha; Panse, Jens; Kröger, Nicolaus; Luetkens, Tim; Atanackovic, Djordje

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell (PC) malignancy, which despite significant therapeutic advances, is still considered incurable. This is due to the persistence of chemotherapy-resistant minimal residual disease in the patients' bone marrow (BM) after an effective induction therapy. Immunotherapies targeting surface molecules expressed on the bulk of tumor cells and the chemotherapy-resistant, myeloma-propagating cells could play a central role in this clinical setting. We recently described surface molecule CD229 as a potential therapeutic target for MM. In our current study we assessed the expression of CD229 on different PC subtypes and on cells with a myeloma-propagating phenotype in a total of 77 patients with PC dyscrasias independently at 2 different cancer centers. We found that CD229 was strongly and homogeneously overexpressed on the PC of patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering myeloma, MM, and PC leukemia. CD229 was particularly overexpressed on those PC showing an abnormal phenotype such as expression of CD56. Most importantly, CD229 was also highly expressed on those cells in the patients' BM displaying the phenotype of chemotherapy-resistant and myeloma-propagating cells. In conclusion, our combined findings suggest that immunotherapies targeting CD229 will not only be effective for the bulk of tumor cells but will also help to eradicate chemotherapy-resistant cells remaining in the patients' BM after induction treatment. Hopefully, the design of CD229-specific monoclonal antibodies or chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells will help to achieve prolonged remissions or even cures in MM patients. PMID:26001047

  10. The relation between doses or post-plasma time points and apoptosis of leukemia cells induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Haixia; Xue, Zhixiao; Yin, Huijuan; Niu, Qing; Chen, Hongli

    2015-12-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma was applied to induce apoptosis of LT-12 leukemia cells. Plasma effects on cell death was evaluated by MTT assay and FCM apoptosis assay with Annexin V/PI double staining, suggesting that plasma killing cells rate and inducing cell apoptosis rate both positively were related to the plasma doses or the post-plasma time points. The cell death rates increased from 15.2% to 33.1% and the apoptosis rate raise from 23.8% to 28% when the dose raise from 60s to 120 s at 8 h post-plasma, while they increased from 15.4% to 34.9% and from 48% to 55.3% respectively at the same doses at 12 h post-plasma. Furthermore, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members were measured for exploring the related apoptotic mechanisms phenomenon. We found ROS immediately increased to 1.24 times of the original amount, then increasing to 5.39-fold at 20 h after treatment. The gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members are very active at 8-12 h post-plasma. Our results demonstrate that DBD plasma can effectively induce tumor cell death through primarily related apoptotic mechanisms.

  11. Plasma-on-chip device for stable irradiation of cells cultured in media with a low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Okada, Tomohiro; Chang, Chun-Yao; Kobayashi, Mime; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Minoru; Kumagai, Shinya

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) device which enables plasma treatment for cells cultured in media. The device, referred to as the plasma-on-chip, comprises microwells and microplasma sources fabricated together in a single chip. The microwells have through-holes between the microwells and microplasma sources. Each microplasma source is located on the backside of each microwells. The reactive components generated by the microplasma sources pass through the through-holes and reach cells cultured in the microwells. In this study, a plasma-on-chip device was modified for a stable plasma treatment. The use of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) technique allowed a stable plasma treatment up to 3 min. The plasma-on-chip with the original electrode configuration typically had the maximum stable operation time of around 1 min. Spectral analysis of the plasma identified reactive species such as O and OH radicals that can affect the activity of cells. Plasma treatment was successfully performed on yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and green algae (Chlorella) cells. While no apparent change was observed with yeast, the treatment degraded the activity of the Chlorella cells and decreased their fluorescence. The device has the potential to help understand interactions between plasma and cells.

  12. Interaction of cold plasmas with biological cells: What we have learned so far

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, Mounir

    2006-10-01

    In the last two decades, non-equilibrium, low temperature, atmospheric pressure plasmas have gained acceptance as an attractive technological solution in industrial applications such as the surface modification of polymers and the cleaning of flue gases. As more reliable ``cold'' plasma sources are developed, new and interesting applications continue to emerge. Amongst the more recent applications, the use of atmospheric pressure cold plasmas in the biomedical field is presently experiencing a heightened interest from the plasma science research community. This is due to promising possibilities to use these plasmas in medical research such as wound healing, tissue engineering, surface modification of biocompatible materials, and the sterilization of reusable heat-sensitive medical instruments. However, before any of these exciting possibilities become reality, an in-depth understanding of the effects of plasma on the cellular and sub-cellular levels has to be achieved. In this paper, a review of the knowledge that has been gained during the last few years will be presented. First an overview of research efforts on the inactivation of bacterial cells will be presented. This includes the evaluation of the inactivation kinetics and the roles played by the various plasma agents (such as UV photons and free radicals) in the inactivation process. In the second part of this talk, plasma sub-lethal effects on both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells will be discussed. Finally, the prospects of the use of ``cold'' plasmas in the biomedical field are outlined.

  13. Stages of Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  14. Treatment Options for Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Plasma Cell Neoplasms Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  16. Application of atmospheric plasma sources in growth and differentiation of plant and mammalian stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puac, Nevena

    2014-10-01

    The expansion of the plasma medicine and its demand for in-vivo treatments resulted in fast development of various plasma devices that operate at atmospheric pressure. These sources have to fulfill all demands for application on biological samples. One of the sources that meet all the requirements needed for treatment of biological material is plasma needle. Previously, we have used this device for sterilization of planctonic samples of bacteria, MRSA biofilm, for improved differentiation of human periodontal stem cells into osteogenic line and for treatment of plant meristematic cells. It is well known that plasma generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that strongly affect metabolism of living cells. One of the open issues is to correlate external plasma products (electrons, ions, RNS, ROS, photons, strong fields etc.) with the immediate internal response which triggers or induces effects in the living cell. For that purpose we have studied the kinetics of enzymes which are typical indicators of the identity of reactive species from the plasma created environment that can trigger signal transduction in the cell and ensue cell activity. In collaboration with Suzana Zivkovicm, Institute for Biological Research ``Sinisa Stankovic,'' University of Belgrade; Nenad Selakovic, Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade; Milica Milutinovic, Jelena Boljevic, Institute for Biological Research ``Sinisa Stankovic,'' University of Belgrade; and Gordana Malovic, Zoran Lj. Petrovic, Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade. Grants III41011, ON171037 and ON173024, MESTD, Serbia.

  17. Phase imaging microscopy for the diagnostics of plasma-cell interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohene, Yolanda; Marinov, Ilya; de Laulanié, Lucie; Dupuy, Corinne; Wattelier, Benoit; Starikovskaia, Svetlana

    2015-06-01

    Phase images of biological specimens were obtained by the method of Quadriwave Lateral Shearing Interferometry (QWLSI). The QWLSI technique produces, at high resolution, phase images of the cells having been exposed to a plasma treatment and enables the quantitative analysis of the changes in the surface area of the cells over time. Morphological changes in the HTori normal thyroid cells were demonstrated using this method. There was a comparison of the cell behaviour between control cells, cells treated by plasma of a nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge, including cells pre-treated by catalase, and cells treated with an equivalent amount of H2O2. The major changes in the cell membrane morphology were observed at only 5 min after the plasma treatment. The primary role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in this degradation is suggested. Deformation and condensation of the cell nucleus were observed 2-3 h after the treatment and are supposedly related to apoptosis induction. The coupling of the phase QWLSI with immunofluorescence imaging would give a deeper insight into the mechanisms of plasma induced cell death.

  18. Differential Plasma-cell evolution is linked with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus immunotherapy response

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Tahia D.; Gómez, Enrique; Doña, Inmaculada; Campo, Paloma; Rondon, Carmen; Gonzalez, Miguel; Gomez, Francisca; Palomares, Francisca; Salas, Maria; Blanca, Miguel; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Torres, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is highly prevalent worldwide. Immunotherapy has been shown to control its symptoms, however, up to 30% of patients may not respond. Previous studies of the immunological mechanisms involved in allergen-immunotherapy (AIT) have focused on the humoral and T-cell response and several studies have evaluated some B-cell subpopulations during AIT and their role in immunological tolerance. However, although B and plasma-cell subpopulations are two of the most important cellular subtypes involved in allergic reactions, their relation with AIT efficacy remains unelucidated. The objective was to analyze the effects of immunotherapy on different B and plasma-cell subpopulations and whether these changes correlate with the clinical response to the treatment. Although no changes are found in B-cell subpopulations, responder patients show increased levels of memory B-cells even before the beginning of treatment. Changes in plasma-cell subpopulations are found, mainly in circulating inflammatory plasma-cells that could affect the response to the allergen. Moreover, an early increase of specific-IgG4 and IgG4 secreting-cells was found. All these suggest that the determination of the memory B-cells before the initiation of the treatment, and the quantification of IgG4 and IgG4-secreting-cells in the first months of immunotherapy, could serve as markers for the clinical response to treatment. PMID:26416023

  19. Silicon solar cells made by a self-aligned, selective-emitter, plasma-etchback process

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, Douglas S.; Schubert, William K.; Gee, James M.

    1999-01-01

    A potentially low-cost process for forming and passivating a selective emitter. The process uses a plasma etch of the heavily doped emitter to improve its performance. The grids of the solar cell are used to mask the plasma etch so that only the emitter in the region between the grids is etched, while the region beneath the grids remains heavily doped for low contact resistance. This process is potentially low-cost because it requires no alignment. After the emitter etch, a silicon nitride layer is deposited by plasma-enhanced, chemical vapor deposition, and the solar cell is annealed in a forming gas.

  20. Silicon solar cells made by a self-aligned, selective-emitter, plasma-etchback process

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, D.S.; Schubert, W.K.; Gee, J.M.

    1999-02-16

    A potentially low-cost process for forming and passivating a selective emitter. The process uses a plasma etch of the heavily doped emitter to improve its performance. The grids of the solar cell are used to mask the plasma etch so that only the emitter in the region between the grids is etched, while the region beneath the grids remains heavily doped for low contact resistance. This process is potentially low-cost because it requires no alignment. After the emitter etch, a silicon nitride layer is deposited by plasma-enhanced, chemical vapor deposition, and the solar cell is annealed in a forming gas. 5 figs.

  1. An evaluation of anti-oxidative protection for cells against atmospheric pressure cold plasma treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Ruonan; Zhang Qian; Feng Hongqing; Liang Yongdong; Li Fangting; Zhu Weidong; Zhang Jue; Fang Jing; Becker, Kurt H.

    2012-03-19

    With the development of plasma medicine, safety issues are emerging as a serious concern. In this study, both intracellular (genetic engineering) and extracellular (scavengers) measures were tested in an effort to determine the best protection for cells against plasma-induced oxidative stress. All results of immediate reactive species detection, short term survival and long term proliferation, suggest that intracellular pathways are superior in reducing oxidative stress and cell death. This work provides a potential mechanism to enhance safety and identifies precautionary measures that should be taken in future clinical applications of plasmas.

  2. Syntaxin-4 is essential for IgE secretion by plasma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Arman; DeCourcey, Joseph; Larbi, Nadia Ben; Loughran, Sinéad T.; Walls, Dermot; Loscher, Christine E.

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Knock-down of syntaxin-4 in U266 plasma cells resulted in reduction of IgE secretion. •Knock-down of syntaxin-4 also leads to the accumulation of IgE in the cell. •Immuno-fluorescence staining shows co-localisation of IgE and syntaxin-4 in U266 cells. •Findings suggest a critical requirement for syntaxin-4 in IgE secretion from plasma cells. -- Abstract: The humoral immune system provides a crucial first defense against the invasion of microbial pathogens via the secretion of antigen specific immunoglobulins (Ig). The secretion of Ig is carried out by terminally differentiated B-lymphocytes called plasma cells. Despite the key role of plasma cells in the immune response, the mechanisms by which they constitutively traffic large volumes of Ig out of the cell is poorly understood. The involvement of Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins in the regulation of protein trafficking from cells has been well documented. Syntaxin-4, a member of the Qa SNARE syntaxin family has been implicated in fusion events at the plasma membrane in a number of cells in the immune system. In this work we show that knock-down of syntaxin-4 in the multiple myeloma U266 human plasma cell line results in a loss of IgE secretion and accumulation of IgE within the cells. Furthermore, we show that IgE co-localises with syntaxin-4 in U266 plasma cells suggesting direct involvement in secretion at the plasma membrane. This study demonstrates that syntaxin-4 plays a critical role in the secretion of IgE from plasma cells and sheds some light on the mechanisms by which these cells constitutively traffic vesicles to the surface for secretion. An understanding of this machinery may be beneficial in identifying potential therapeutic targets in multiple myeloma and autoimmune disease where over-production of Ig leads to severe pathology in patients.

  3. Developmental Outcome and Related Abnormalities in Goats: Comparison Between Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer- and In Vivo-Derived Concepti During Pregnancy Through Term.

    PubMed

    Martins, Leonardo Tondello; Neto, Saul Gaudêncio; Tavares, Kaio César Simiano; Calderón, Carlos Enrique Méndez; Aguiar, Luis Henrique; Lazzarotto, Cícera Regina; Ongaratto, Felipe Ledur; Rodrigues, Victor Hugo Vieira; Carneiro, Igor de Sá; Rossetto, Rafael; Almeida, Anderson Pinto; Fernandes, César Carneiro Linhares; Rondina, Davide; Dias, Ana Christina Oliveira; Chies, Jocelei Maria; Polejaeva, Irina A; Rodrigues, José Luiz; Forell, Fabiana; Bertolini, Luciana Relly; Bertolini, Marcelo

    2016-08-01

    Cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is characterized by low efficiency and the occurrence of developmental abnormalities, which are rather poorly studied phenomena in goats. This study aimed at comparing overall SCNT efficiency in goats by using in vitro-matured (IVM) or in vivo-matured oocytes and fibroblast donor cells (mock transfected, transgenic, or wild type), also characterizing symptoms of the Abnormal Offspring Syndrome (AOS) in development, comparing results with pregnancies produced by artificial insemination (AI) and in vivo-derived (IVD) embryos. The SCNT group had lower pregnancy rate (18.3%, 11/60), total number of concepti (20.0%, 12/60), term births (3.3%, 2/60), and live births (1.7%, 1/60) than both the IVD (77.8%, 7/9; 155.5%, 14/9; 122.2%, 11/9; 88.8%, 8/9) and the AI (71.4%, 10/14; 121.4%, 17/14; 100%, 14/14; 78.5%, 11/14) groups, respectively (p < 0.05). No SCNT pregnancies reached term using IVM oocytes, but in vivo-matured oocytes resulted in two term transgenic cloned kids. The proportion fetal membrane (FM) weight/birth weight reflected an increase in FM size and cotyledonary enlargement in clones, for disproportionally bigger newborns in relation to cotyledonary numbers. Overall, goat cloning showed losses and abnormality patterns similar to the AOS in cloned cattle and sheep, which have not been previously well recognized in goats. PMID:27362734

  4. Effect of plasma membrane fluidity on serotonin transport by endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Block, E.R.; Edwards, D. )

    1987-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of plasma membrane fluidity of lung endothelial cells on serotonin transport, porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were incubated for 3 h with either 0.1 mM cholesterol hemisuccinate, 0.1 mM cis-vaccenic acid, or vehicle (control), after which plasma membrane fluidity and serotinin transport were measured. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure fluidity in the plasma membrane. Serotonin uptake was calculated from the disappearance of ({sup 14}C)-serotonin from the culture medium. Cholesterol decreased fluidity in the subpolar head group and central and midacyl side-chain regions of the plasma membrane and decreased serotonin transport, whereas cis-vaccenic acid increased fluidity in the central and midacyl side-chain regions of the plasma membrane and also increased serotonin transport. Cis-vaccenic acid had no effect of fluidity in the subpolar head group region of the plasma membrane. These results provide evidence that the physical state of the central and midacyl chains within the pulmonary artery endothelial cell plasma membrane lipid bilayer modulates transmembrane transport of serotonin by these cells.

  5. Production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and change of cell viability induced by atmospheric pressure plasma in normal and cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ja Kim, Sun; Min Joh, Hea; Chung, T. H.

    2013-10-01

    The effects of atmospheric pressure plasma jet on cancer cells (human lung carcinoma cells) and normal cells (embryonic kidney cells and bronchial epithelial cells) were investigated. Using a detection dye, the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found to be increased in plasma-treated cells compared to non-treated and gas flow-treated cells. A significant overproduction of ROS and a reduction in cell viability were induced by plasma exposure on cancer cells. Normal cells were observed to be less affected by the plasma-mediated ROS, and cell viability was less changed. The selective effect on cancer and normal cells provides a promising prospect of cold plasma as a cancer therapy.

  6. Mechanisms of interaction of non-thermal plasma with living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalghatgi, Sameer Ulhas

    Thermal plasmas and lasers have been widely used in medicine to cut, ablate and cauterize tissues through heating; in contrast, non-thermal plasma produces various highly active molecules and atoms without heat. As a result, its effects on living cells and tissues could be selective and tunable. This makes non-thermal plasma very attractive for medical applications. However, despite several interesting demonstrations of non-thermal plasma in blood coagulation and tissue sterilization, the biological and physical mechanisms of its interaction with living cells are still poorly understood impeding further development of non-thermal plasma as a clinical tool. Although several possible mechanisms of interaction have been suggested, no systematic experimental work has been performed to verify these hypotheses. Using cells in culture, it is shown in this work that non-thermal plasma created by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has dose-dependent effects ranging from increasing cell proliferation to inducing apoptosis which are consistent with the effects of oxidative stress. DNA damage is chosen as a marker to assess the effects of oxidative stress in a quantitative manner. It is demonstrated here that plasma induced DNA damage as well as other effects ranging from cell proliferation to apoptosis are indeed due to production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). We found that DNA damage is initiated primarily by plasma generated active neutral species which cannot be attributed to ozone alone. Moreover, it is found that extracellular media and its components play a critical role in the transfer of the non-thermal plasma initiated oxidative stress into cells. Specifically, it is found that the peroxidation efficiency of amino acids is the sole predictor of the ability of the medium to transfer the oxidative stress induced by non-thermal plasma. Phosphorylation of H2AX, a DNA damage marker, following plasma treatment is found to be ATR dependent and ATM

  7. Abnormal relationship between dietary sodium intake and red cell sodium transport in salt-sensitive patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Saito, K; Furuta, Y; Sano, H; Okishio, T; Fukuzaki, H

    1985-01-01

    The effects of high sodium intake on erythrocyte 22Na efflux rate constants were studied in 25 patients with essential hypertension and 9 normal subjects. With changes in sodium intake from 100 mEq to 300 mEq/day, both total and ouabain sensitive 22Na efflux rate constants decreased significantly (p less than 0.001) in "salt-sensitive" patients (-0.031 +/- 0.005 and -0.035 +/- 0.006 /hr, respectively), but these responses were variable in "nonsalt-sensitive" patients and in normal subjects. The "salt-sensitive" patients showed a significant increase in their body weight, while intraerythrocyte sodium contents remained unchanged in the both groups. These results suggest that the abnormal change in membrane Na-K-ATPase activity may, at least in part, be involved in the mechanism of sodium susceptibility in patients with essential hypertension.

  8. Studies of micronuclei and other nuclear abnormalities in red blood cells of Colossoma macropomum exposed to methylmercury

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, Carlos Alberto Machado; da Cunha, Lorena Araújo; da Silva Pinheiro, Raul Henrique; de Oliveira Bahia, Marcelo; Burbano, Rommel Mario Rodríguez

    2011-01-01

    The frequencies of micronuclei (MN) and morphological nuclear abnormalities (NA) in erythrocytes in the peripheral blood of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum), treated with 2 mg.L−1 methylmercury (MeHg), were analyzed. Two groups (nine specimens in each) were exposed to MeHg for different periods (group A - 24 h; group B - 120 h). A third group served as negative control (group C, untreated; n = 9). Although, when compared to the control group there were no significant differences in MN frequency in the treated groups, for NA, the differences between the frequencies of group B (treated for 120 h) and the control group were extremely significant (p < 0.02), thus demonstrating the potentially adverse effects of MeHg on C. macropomum erythrocytes after prolonged exposure. PMID:22215976

  9. Impact of PTEN abnormalities on outcome in pediatric patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated on the MRC UKALL2003 trial.

    PubMed

    Jenkinson, S; Kirkwood, A A; Goulden, N; Vora, A; Linch, D C; Gale, R E

    2016-01-01

    PTEN gene inactivation by mutation or deletion is common in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), but the impact on outcome is unclear, particularly in patients with NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations. We screened samples from 145 patients treated on the MRC UKALL2003 trial for PTEN mutations using heteroduplex analysis and gene deletions using single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, and related genotype to response to therapy and long-term outcome. PTEN loss-of-function mutations/gene deletions were detected in 22% (PTEN(ABN)). Quantification of mutant level indicated that 67% of mutated cases harbored more than one mutant, with up to four mutants detected, consistent with the presence of multiple leukemic sub-clones. Overall, 41% of PTEN(ABN) cases were considered to have biallelic abnormalities (mutation and/or deletion) with complete loss of PTEN in a proportion of cells. In addition, 9% of cases had N- or K-RAS mutations. Neither PTEN nor RAS genotype significantly impacted on response to therapy or long-term outcome, irrespective of mutant level, and there was no evidence that they changed the highly favorable outcome of patients with double NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations. These results indicate that, for pediatric patients treated according to current protocols, routine screening for PTEN or RAS abnormalities at diagnosis is not warranted to further refine risk stratification.

  10. Red cell volume with changes in plasma osmolarity during maximal exercise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Beaumont, W.

    1973-01-01

    The volume of the red cell in vivo was measured during acute changes in plasma osmolarity evoked through short (6 to 8 min) maximal exercise in six male volunteer subjects. Simultaneous measurements of mean corpuscular red cell volume (MCV), hematocrit, blood hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and plasma osmolarity showed that there was no change in the MCV or MCHC with a concomitant rise of nearly 6% in plasma osmolarity. Apparently, in vivo, the volume of the red cell in exercising healthy human subjects does not change measurably, in spite of significant changes in osmotic pressure of the surrounding medium. Consequently, it is not justified to correct postexercise hematocrit measurements for changes in plasma osmolarity.

  11. Plasma functionalization of poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel for cell adhesion enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Ino, Julia M.; Chevallier, Pascale; Letourneur, Didier; Mantovani, Diego; Le Visage, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Tailoring the interface interactions between a biomaterial and the surrounding tissue is a capital aspect to consider for the design of medical devices. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels present suitable mechanical properties for various biological substitutes, however the lack of cell adhesion on their surface is often a problem. The common approach is to incorporate biomolecules, either by blending or coupling. But these modifications disrupt PVA intra- and intermolecular interactions leading therefore to a loss of its original mechanical properties. In this work, surface modification by glow discharge plasma, technique known to modify only the surface without altering the bulk properties, has been investigated to promote cell attachment on PVA substrates. N2/H2 microwave plasma treatment has been performed, and the chemical composition of PVA surface has been investigated. X-ray photoelectron and Fourier transform infrared analyses on the plasma-treated films revealed the presence of carbonyl and nitrogen species, including amine and amide groups, while the main structure of PVA was unchanged. Plasma modification induced an increase in the PVA surface wettability with no significant change in surface roughness. In contrast to untreated PVA, plasma-modified films allowed successful culture of mouse fibroblasts and human endothelial cells. These results evidenced that the grafting was stable after rehydration and that it displayed cell adhesive properties. Thus plasma amination of PVA is a promising approach to improve cell behavior on contact with synthetic hydrogels for tissue engineering. PMID:23989063

  12. Structural Rearrangements in CHO Cells After Disruption of Individual Cytoskeletal Elements and Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Jokhadar, Špela Zemljič; Derganc, Jure

    2015-04-01

    Cellular structural integrity is provided primarily by the cytoskeleton, which comprises microtubules, actin filaments, and intermediate filaments. The plasma membrane has been also recognized as a mediator of physical forces, yet its contribution to the structural integrity of the cell as a whole is less clear. In order to investigate the relationship between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton, we selectively disrupted the plasma membrane and each of the cytoskeletal elements in Chinese hamster ovary cells and assessed subsequent changes in cellular structural integrity. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize cytoskeletal rearrangements, and optical tweezers were utilized to quantify membrane tether extraction. We found that cholesterol depletion from the plasma membrane resulted in rearrangements of all cytoskeletal elements. Conversely, the state of the plasma membrane, as assessed by tether extraction, was affected by disruption of any of the cytoskeletal elements, including microtubules and intermediate filaments, which are located mainly in the cell interior. The results demonstrate that, besides the cytoskeleton, the plasma membrane is an important contributor to cellular integrity, possibly by acting as an essential framework for cytoskeletal anchoring. In agreement with the tensegrity model of cell mechanics, our results support the notion of the cell as a prestressed structure. PMID:25395197

  13. Microwave-Induced Structural and Functional Injury of Hippocampal and PC12 Cells Is Accompanied by Abnormal Changes in the NMDAR-PSD95-CaMKII Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Feng; Wei, Li; Qiao, Si-Mo; Gao, Xiao-Na; Gao, Ya-Bing; Wang, Shui-Ming; Zhao, Li; Dong, Ji; Xu, Xin-Ping; Zhou, Hong-Mei; Hu, Xiang-Jun; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the important role of the postsynaptic NMDAR-PSD95-CaMKII pathway for synaptic transmission and related neuronal injury. Here, we tested changes in the components of this pathway upon microwave-induced neuronal structure and function impairments. Ultrastructural and functional changes were induced in hippocampal neurons of rats and in PC12 cells exposed to microwave radiation. We detected abnormal protein and mRNA expression, as well as posttranslational modifications in the NMDAR-PSD95-CaMKII pathway and its associated components, such as synapsin I, following microwave radiation exposure of rats and PC12 cells. Thus, microwave radiation may induce neuronal injury via changes in the molecular organization of postsynaptic density and modulation of the biochemical cascade that potentiates synaptic transmission.

  14. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets

    PubMed Central

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated. PMID:27517914

  15. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    PubMed

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated. PMID:27517914

  16. The other side of abnormal: a case series of low transcranial Doppler velocities associated with stroke in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Iris D; James-Herry, Anne; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence of cerebrovascular events in sickle cell disease (SCD) can be as low as 10% by the age of 18 for overt cerebral infarction or strokes, up to 35% for silent cerebral infarction, and as high as 43/100 patient years for acute silent cerebral ischemic events. These events typically occur during childhood with a peak incidence between the age of 4 and 7 years. The cumulative risk of central nervous system events in SCD increases with age. Transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography is an established screening tool for detecting children with SCD at highest risk for stroke by measuring the flow velocity in the large intracranial vessels. Velocities are considered abnormal with readings >200 cm/s and chronic red cell transfusions are recommended to reduce further risk or progression. Red cell transfusions have reduced the rate of cerebrovascular accidents by 90%. We describe the case of 5 children with sickle cell anemia, whose antecedent screening TCD velocities were measured to be ≤70 cm/s in the study. All patients developed some form of cerebral insults, an overt cerebral infarctions, silent stroke or transient ischemic attack, and are now receiving chronic transfusion to prevent further progression. On the basis of these cases, low TCD velocities may identify another group of children at risk for cerebrovascular disease. We suggest TCD velocities <70 cm/s in major vessels (MCA, ACA, and ICA) be considered another type of "abnormal," prompting more sensitive evaluations (such as a brain MRI and MRA) for the presence of central nervous system disease, and, if negative, decrease intervals between subsequent TCD assessments.

  17. Plasma Jet (V)UV-Radiation Impact on Biologically Relevant Liquids and Cell Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresp, H.; Bussiahn, R.; Bundscherer, L.; Monden, A.; Hammer, M. U.; Masur, K.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Woedtke, Th. V.; Reuter, S.

    2014-10-01

    In this study the generation of radicals in plasma treated liquids has been investigated. To quantify the contribution of plasma vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the species investigated, three cases have been studied: UV of plasma jet only, UV and VUV of plasma jet combined, and the plasma effluent including all reactive components. The emitted VUV has been observed by optical emission spectroscopy and its effect on radical formation in liquids has been analyzed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Radicals have been determined in ultrapure water (dH2O), as well as in more complex, biorelevant solutions like phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, and two different cell culture media. Various compositions lead to different reactive species formation, e.g. in PBS superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals have been detected, in cell suspension also glutathione thiyl radicals have been found. This study highlights that UV has no impact on radical generation, whereas VUV is relevant for producing radicals. VUV treatment of dH2O generates one third of the radical concentration produced by plasma-effluent treatment. It is relevant for plasma medicine because although plasma sources are operated in open air atmosphere, still VUV can lead to formation of biorelevant radicals. This work is funded by German Federal Ministry of Education a Research (BMBF) (Grant # 03Z2DN12+11).

  18. Differential Epigenetic Effects of Atmospheric Cold Plasma on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Bin; Kim, Byungtak; Bae, Hansol; Lee, Hyunkyung; Lee, Seungyeon; Choi, Eun H.; Kim, Sun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (plasma) has emerged as a novel tool for a cancer treatment option, having been successfully applied to a few types of cancer cells, as well as tissues. However, to date, no studies have been performed to examine the effect of plasma on epigenetic alterations, including CpG methylation. In this study, the effects of plasma on DNA methylation changes in breast cancer cells were examined by treating cultured MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, representing estrogen-positive and estrogen-negative cancer cells, respectively, with plasma. A pyrosequencing analysis of Alu indicated that a specific CpG site was induced to be hypomethylated from 23.4 to 20.3% (p < 0.05) by plasma treatment in the estrogen-negative MDA-MB-231 cells only. A genome-wide methylation analysis identified “cellular movement, connective tissue development and function, tissue development” and “cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cell death and survival, cellular development” as the top networks. Of the two cell types, the MDA-MB-231 cells underwent a higher rate of apoptosis and a decreased proliferation rate upon plasma treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that plasma induces epigenetic and cellular changes in a cell type-specific manner, suggesting that a careful screening of target cells and tissues is necessary for the potential application of plasma as a cancer treatment option. PMID:26042423

  19. Differential Epigenetic Effects of Atmospheric Cold Plasma on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Bin; Kim, Byungtak; Bae, Hansol; Lee, Hyunkyung; Lee, Seungyeon; Choi, Eun H; Kim, Sun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (plasma) has emerged as a novel tool for a cancer treatment option, having been successfully applied to a few types of cancer cells, as well as tissues. However, to date, no studies have been performed to examine the effect of plasma on epigenetic alterations, including CpG methylation. In this study, the effects of plasma on DNA methylation changes in breast cancer cells were examined by treating cultured MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, representing estrogen-positive and estrogen-negative cancer cells, respectively, with plasma. A pyrosequencing analysis of Alu indicated that a specific CpG site was induced to be hypomethylated from 23.4 to 20.3% (p < 0.05) by plasma treatment in the estrogen-negative MDA-MB-231 cells only. A genome-wide methylation analysis identified "cellular movement, connective tissue development and function, tissue development" and "cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cell death and survival, cellular development" as the top networks. Of the two cell types, the MDA-MB-231 cells underwent a higher rate of apoptosis and a decreased proliferation rate upon plasma treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that plasma induces epigenetic and cellular changes in a cell type-specific manner, suggesting that a careful screening of target cells and tissues is necessary for the potential application of plasma as a cancer treatment option.

  20. The effect of hemolysis on plasma oxidation and nitration in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kupesiz, Alphan; Celmeli, Gamze; Dogan, Serdar; Antmen, Bulent; Aslan, Mutay

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of haemolysis on plasma oxidation and nitration in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Blood was collected from haemoglobin (Hb)A volunteers and homozygous HbSS patients who had not received blood transfusions in the last 3 months. Haemolysis was characterised by low levels of haemoglobin and haptoglobin and high levels of reticulocyte, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH), plasma cell-free haemoglobin, bilirubin, total lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and dominance of LDH-1 isoenzyme. Plasma 8-isoprostane, protein carbonyl and nitrotyrosine levels were measured to evaluate oxidised lipids, oxidised and nitrated proteins, respectively. Plasma nitrite-nitrate levels were also determined to assess nitric oxide (NO) production in both SCD patients and controls. Markers of haemolysis were significantly evident in SCD patients compared to controls. Plasma 8-isoprostane, protein carbonyl and nitrotyrosine levels were markedly elevated in SCD patients compared to controls. Linear regression analysis revealed a significant inverse correlation between haemoglobin and reticulocyte counts and a significant positive correlation of plasma cell-free haemoglobin with protein carbonyl and nitrotyrosine levels. The obtained data shows that increased haemolysis in SCD increases plasma protein oxidation and nitration.

  1. [Abnormality of blood coagulation indexes in patients with de novo acute leukemia and its clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fang-Fang; Hu, Kai-Xun; Guo, Mei; Qiao, Jian-Hui; Sun, Qi-Yun; Ai, Hui-Sheng; Yu, Chang-Lin

    2013-04-01

    To explore hemorrhage risk and the clinical significance of abnormal change of prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), plasma fibrinogen (FIB), plasma thrombin time (TT) and d-dimer (D-D) in de novo acute leukemia (except for APL), the different bleeding manifestations of 114 cases of de novo acute leukemia with different coagulation indexes were analyzed retrospectively. The correlation between these blood coagulation indexes and the possible correlative clinical characteristics were analysed, including age, sex, type of acute leukemia, initial white blood cell(WBC) and platelet(Plt) count, the proportion of blast cells in bone marrow and cytogenetic abnormality of patients at diagnosis. The results indicated that the incidence of abnormal blood coagulation was as high as 78.1% for de novo AL patients. These patients with 5 normal blood coagulation indexes may have mild bleeding manifestation, but the more abnormal indexes, the more severe bleeding. Both PT and D-D were sensitive indexes for diagnosis of level II bleeding. Incidence of abnormal blood coagulation significantly correlates with the proportion of blast cells in bone marrow (χ(2) = 4.184, OR = 1.021, P < 0.05) and more with D-D (P < 0.01), while age, sex, type of AL, WBC count, Plt count and abnormality of cytogenetics did not correlate with abnormal blood coagulation. It is concluded that the coagulation and fibrinolysis are abnormal in most patients with de novo acute leukemia. More abnormal indexes indicate more severe bleeding, and both PT and D-D are sensitive indexes for diagnosis of level II bleeding. Higher proportion of blast cells in bone marrow predicts higher incidence of abnormal blood clotting. Acute leukemia with elderly age, high white blood cell count and adverse cytogenetics do not predict severer abnormal blood clotting. Detection of PT, APTT, TT, FIB, and D-D may help to judge whether the patients are in a state of hypercoagulability or disseminated

  2. Small unilamellar liposomes as a membrane model for cell inactivation by cold atmospheric plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheux, S.; Frache, G.; Thomann, J. S.; Clément, F.; Penny, C.; Belmonte, T.; Duday, D.

    2016-09-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma is thought to be a promising tool for numerous biomedical applications due to its ability to generate a large diversity of reactive species in a controlled way. In some cases, it can also generate pulsed electric fields at the zone of treatment, which can induce processes such as electroporation in cell membranes. However, the interaction of these reactive species and the pulse electric field with cells in a physiological medium is very complex, and we still need a better understanding in order to be useful for future applications. A way to reach this goal is to work with model cell membranes such as liposomes, with the simplest physiological liquid and in a controlled atmosphere in order to limit the number of parallel reactions and processes. In this paper, where this approach has been chosen, 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) have been synthesized in a phosphate buffered aqueous solution, and this solution has been treated by a nanosecond pulsed plasma jet under a pure nitrogen atmosphere. It is only the composition of the plasma gas that has been changed in order to generate different cocktails of reactive species. After the quantification of the main plasma reactive species in the phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, structural, surface charge state, and chemical modifications generated on the plasma treated liposomes, due to the interaction with the plasma reactive species, have been carefully characterized. These results allow us to further understand the effect of plasma reactive species on model cell membranes in physiological liquids. The permeation through the liposomal membrane and the reaction of plasma reactive species with molecules encapsulated inside the liposomes have also been evaluated. New processes of degradation are finally presented and discussed, which come from the specific conditions of plasma treatment under the pure nitrogen atmosphere.

  3. Abnormal T cell subpopulations and circulating immune complexes in the Guillain-Barré syndrome and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Chenais, F; Carnes, J E; Hames, C G; Fudenberg, H H; Hogan, E L

    1978-05-01

    Immunologic studies were performed in 21 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 16 with the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Levels of thymus-derived (T) cells measured by "total" and "active" rosette formation between sheep erythrocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (TEt, TEa) were within normal limits in all the patients, with the exception of four GBS patients, including one who also had received chemotherapy for lymphoma and three who were receiving steroids. When lymphocytes from the 21 patients were incubated with the bone-marrow-derived (B) lymphoblastoid cell line PGLC-33H, there were, for 12 of 18 MS patients and 11 of 16 GBS patients, significant decreases in a subpopulation of peripheral blood T lymphocytes that form "PGLC rosettes" (PGR) with the PGLC-33H cells. (Peripheral blood T cells from normal individuals formed PGR with 23.9 +/- 3.8 percent of PGLC-33H cells.) Using the 125l-C1q binding assay, immune complexes were detected in the serum of 14 of 19 MS patients and 15 of 16 GBS patients. An association between increased C1q binding and decreased PGR values was found in 10 of 18 MS patients and 12 of 17 GBS patients. The results suggest that in both diseases the etiology may involve a decrease in the subset of T cells that bind to the IgM-producing cell line PGLC-33H, in association with the appearance of circulating immune complexes containing the infectious viral agent. PMID:306075

  4. Atmospheric-pressure plasma-jet from micronozzle array and its biological effects on living cells for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kangil; Kim, Geunyoung; Yang, Sang Sik; Choi, Jae Duk; Hong, Yong Cheol; Noh, Eun Joo; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2011-02-14

    We propose a plasma-jet device with a micrometer-sized nozzle array for use in a cancer therapy. Also, we show the biological effects of atmospheric-pressure plasma on living cells. Nitrogen-plasma activated a surrogate DNA damage signal transduction pathway, called the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-checkpoint kinase 2 pathway, suggesting that the nitrogen-plasma generates DNA double-strand breaks. Phosphorylation of H2AX and p53 was detected in the plasma-treated cells, leading to apoptotic cell death. Thus, an effect for the nitrogen plasma in the control of apoptotic cell death provides insight into the how biological effects of the nitrogen-plasma can be applied to the control of cell survival, a finding with potential therapeutic implications.

  5. Atmospheric-pressure plasma-jet from micronozzle array and its biological effects on living cells for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kangil; Choi, Jae Duk; Hong, Yong Cheol; Kim, Geunyoung; Noh, Eun Joo; Lee, Jong-Soo; Yang, Sang Sik

    2011-02-01

    We propose a plasma-jet device with a micrometer-sized nozzle array for use in a cancer therapy. Also, we show the biological effects of atmospheric-pressure plasma on living cells. Nitrogen-plasma activated a surrogate DNA damage signal transduction pathway, called the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-checkpoint kinase 2 pathway, suggesting that the nitrogen-plasma generates DNA double-strand breaks. Phosphorylation of H2AX and p53 was detected in the plasma-treated cells, leading to apoptotic cell death. Thus, an effect for the nitrogen plasma in the control of apoptotic cell death provides insight into the how biological effects of the nitrogen-plasma can be applied to the control of cell survival, a finding with potential therapeutic implications.

  6. Deubiquitinating enzyme CYLD negatively regulates the ubiquitin-dependent kinase Tak1 and prevents abnormal T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Reiley, William W.; Jin, Wei; Lee, Andrew Joon; Wright, Ato; Wu, Xuefeng; Tewalt, Eric F.; Leonard, Timothy O.; Norbury, Christopher C.; Fitzpatrick, Leo; Zhang, Minying; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2007-01-01

    The deubiquitinating enzyme CYLD has recently been implicated in the regulation of signal transduction, but its physiological function and mechanism of action are still elusive. In this study, we show that CYLD plays a pivotal role in regulating T cell activation and homeostasis. T cells derived from Cyld knockout mice display a hyperresponsive phenotype and mediate the spontaneous development of intestinal inflammation. Interestingly, CYLD targets a ubiquitin-dependent kinase, transforming growth factor–β-activated kinase 1 (Tak1), and inhibits its ubiquitination and autoactivation. Cyld-deficient T cells exhibit constitutively active Tak1 and its downstream kinases c-Jun N-terminal kinase and IκB kinase β. These results emphasize a critical role for CYLD in preventing spontaneous activation of the Tak1 axis of T cell signaling and, thereby, maintaining normal T cell function. PMID:17548520

  7. An Adult Male Presenting with Concurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma Involving a CCND1-IGH Translocation and Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia with a Variant (9;22) Translocation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Peter M; Siangchin, Ken; Song, Sophie; Shabsovich, David; Naeini, Yalda; Tirado, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    The t(11;14)(q13;q32) involving IGH and CCND1 a nd t(9;22) (q34;q11.2) involving BCR and ABL1 are common abnormalities in plasma cell myeloma (PCM) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), respectively. However, the concurrence of the two malignancies is extremely rare. Herein, we present a case of an 87-year-old male who presented with anemia and monocytosis. FISH studies on a bone marrow sample enriched for plasma cells detected a t(11;14) positive for IGH and CCND1 fusion in 92% of nuclei. However, cytogenetic analysis of the bone marrow revealed a t(9;22)(q34;q11.2) in 40% of the metaphases. Interphase and metaphase FISH studies on the sample confirmed the presence of the BCR-ABL1 fusion in 88% of nuclei but did not show any signals corresponding to the derivative 9, suggesting a variant t(9;22) with a deletion or additional material of unknown origin at the 9q34 band of the derivative 9 and a derivative 22 bearing the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene. The concurrence of plasma cell myeloma and chronic myelogenous leukemia is extremely rare with less than 20 cases reported. The molecular pathway in which the multiple malignancies arise is still poorly understood, and this case provides insight into the concurrence of PCM and CML. PMID:27584682

  8. Molecular phenotyping of immune cells from young NOD mice reveals abnormal metabolic pathways in the early induction phase of autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Kakoola, Dorothy N; Lenchik, Nataliya I; Desiderio, Dominic M; Marshall, Dana R; Gerling, Ivan C

    2012-01-01

    Islet leukocytic infiltration (insulitis) is first obvious at around 4 weeks of age in the NOD mouse--a model for human type 1 diabetes (T1D). The molecular events that lead to insulitis and initiate autoimmune diabetes are poorly understood. Since TID is caused by numerous genes, we hypothesized that multiple molecular pathways are altered and interact to initiate this disease. We evaluated the molecular phenotype (mRNA and protein expression) and molecular networks of ex vivo unfractionated spleen leukocytes from 2 and 4 week-old NOD mice in comparison to two control strains. Analysis of the global gene expression profiles and hierarchical clustering revealed that the majority (~90%) of the differentially expressed genes in NOD mice were repressed. Furthermore, analysis using a modern suite of multiple bioinformatics approaches identified abnormal molecular pathways that can be divided broadly into 2 categories: metabolic pathways, which were predominant at 2 weeks, and immune response pathways, which were predominant at 4 weeks. Network analysis by Ingenuity pathway analysis identified key genes/molecules that may play a role in regulating these pathways. These included five that were common to both ages (TNF, HNF4A, IL15, Progesterone, and YWHAZ), and others that were unique to 2 weeks (e.g. MYC/MYCN, TGFB1, and IL2) and to 4 weeks (e.g. IFNG, beta-estradiol, p53, NFKB, AKT, PRKCA, IL12, and HLA-C). Based on the literature, genes that may play a role in regulating metabolic pathways at 2 weeks include Myc and HNF4A, and at 4 weeks, beta-estradiol, p53, Akt, HNF4A and AR. Our data suggest that abnormalities in regulation of metabolic pathways in the immune cells of young NOD mice lead to abnormalities in the immune response pathways and as such may play a role in the initiation of autoimmune diabetes. Thus, targeting metabolism may provide novel approaches to preventing and/or treating autoimmune diabetes.

  9. Negative regulation of erythroblast maturation by Fas-L(+)/TRAIL(+) highly malignant plasma cells: a major pathogenetic mechanism of anemia in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Silvestris, Franco; Cafforio, Paola; Tucci, Marco; Dammacco, Franco

    2002-02-15

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is associated with severe normochromic/normocytic anemia. This study demonstrates that the abnormal up-regulation of apoptogenic receptors, including both Fas ligand (L) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), by highly malignant myeloma cells is involved in the pathogenesis of the ineffective erythropoiesis and chronic exhaustion of the erythroid matrix. By measuring Fas-L and TRAIL in plasma cells and the content of glycophorin A (GpA) in erythroblasts from a cohort of 28 untreated, newly diagnosed patients with MM and 7 with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), selected in relation to their peripheral hemoglobin values, results showed that both receptors occurred at high levels in 15 severely anemic MM patients. Their marrow erythropoietic component was low and included predominantly immature GpA(+dim) erythroblasts, in contrast with the higher relative numbers of mature GpA(+bright) erythroid cells observed in the nonanemic patients and those with MGUS. In cocultures with autologous Fas-L(+)/TRAIL(+) myeloma cells, the expanded GpA(+dim) erythroid population underwent prompt apoptosis after direct exposure to malignant plasma cells, whereas erythroblasts from nonanemic patients were scarcely affected. The evidence that Fas-L(+)/TRAIL(+) malignant plasma cells prime erythroblast apoptosis by direct cytotoxicity was also supported by the increase of FLICE in fresh immature GpA(+dim) erythroid cells, whereas ICE and caspase-10 increased in subsequent maturative forms. In addition, GATA-1, a survival factor for erythroid precursors, was remarkably down-regulated in fresh erythroblasts from the severely anemic patients. These results indicate that progressive destruction of the erythroid matrix in aggressive