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Sample records for abnormal pore pressure

  1. Correlation between abnormal pore pressure and tectonic jointing in the Devonian Catskill Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelder, Terry; Oertel, Gerhard

    1985-12-01

    Using the preferred orientation of chlorite, we measured vertical compaction in 53 samples from the Devonian Catskill Delta in central New York State. The marine part of this delta contains three levels based on different amounts of vertical compaction. These levels correspond roughly to (1) black shales at the base, (2) prodelta turbidites, and (3) a cap of shallow-water sediments including abundant storm-washed shell hashes deposited within the wave base. The cap is normally compacted, whereas the lower two levels are undercompacted. Tectonic (cross-fold) joints that propagated during the late Paleozoic Alleghanian orogeny are restricted to the deeper, undercompacted levels of the Catskill Delta, whereas unloading (cross-fold) joints pervade the cap. The correlation between undercompaction and the distribution of tectonic joints indicates that abnormal fluid pressure was a key mechanism during the propagation of these joints.

  2. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  3. Gas Hydrate and Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinivella, Umberta; Giustiniani, Michela

    2014-05-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to quantify excess pore pressures related to gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments below the BSR using several approaches. Dissociation of gas hydrates in proximity of the BSR, in response to a change in the physical environment (i.e., temperature and/or pressure regime), can liberate excess gas incrising the local pore fluid pressure in the sediment, so decreasing the effective normal stress. So, gas hydrate dissociation may lead to excess pore pressure resulting in sediment deformation or failure, such as submarine landslides, sediment slumping, pockmarks and mud volcanoes, soft-sediment deformation and giant hummocks. Moreover, excess pore pressure may be the result of gas hydrate dissociation due to continuous sedimentation, tectonic uplift, sea level fall, heating or inhibitor injection. In order to detect the presence of the overpressure below the BSR, we propose two approachs. The fist approach models the BSR depth versus pore pressure; in fact, if the free gas below the BSR is in overpressure condition, the base of the gas hydrate stability is deeper with respect to the hydrostatic case. This effect causes a discrepancy between seismic and theoretical BSR depths. The second approach models the velocities versus gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and pore pressure, considering the approximation of the Biot theory in case of low frequency, i.e. seismic frequency. Knowing the P and S seismic velocity from seismic data analysis, it is possibile to jointly estimate the gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and the pore pressure regime. Alternatively, if the S-wave velocity is not availbale (due to lack of OBS/OBC data), an AVO analysis can be performed in order to extract information about Poisson ratio. Our modeling suggests that the areas characterized by shallow waters (i.e., areas in which human infrastructures, such as pipelines, are present) are significantly affected by the presence of overpressure condition

  4. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  5. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  6. Pore pressure embrittlement in a volcanic edifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Heap, Michael J.; Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry; Varley, Nick R.

    2016-01-01

    The failure mode of porous rock in compression—dilatant or compactant—is largely governed by the overlying lithostatic pressure and the pressure of pore fluids within the rock (Wong, Solid Earth 102:3009-3025, 1997), both of which are subject to change in space and time within a volcanic edifice. While lithostatic pressure will tend to increase monotonously with depth due to the progressive accumulation of erupted products, pore pressures are prone to fluctuations (during periods of volcanic unrest, for example). An increase in pore fluid pressure can result in rock fracture, even at depths where the lithostatic pressure would otherwise preclude such dilatant behaviour—a process termed pore fluid-induced embrittlement. We explore this phenomenon through a series of targeted triaxial experiments on typical edifice-forming andesites (from Volcán de Colima, Mexico). We first show that increasing pore pressure over a range of timescales (on the order of 1 min to 1 day) can culminate in brittle failure of otherwise intact rock. Irrespective of the pore pressure increase rate, we record comparable accelerations in acoustic emission and strain prior to macroscopic failure. We further show that oscillating pore fluid pressures can cause iterative and cumulative damage, ultimately resulting in brittle failure under relatively low effective mean stress conditions. We find that macroscopic failure occurs once a critical threshold of damage is surpassed, suggesting that only small increases in pore pressure may be necessary to trigger failure in previously damaged rocks. Finally, we observe that inelastic compaction of volcanic rock (as we may expect in much of the deep edifice) can be overprinted by shear fractures due to this mechanism of embrittlement. Pore fluid-induced embrittlement of edifice rock during volcanic unrest is anticipated to be highest closer to the conduit and, as a result, may assist in the development of a fractured halo zone surrounding the

  7. Influence of pore pressure and production-induced changes in pore pressure on in situ stress

    SciTech Connect

    Teufel, L.W.

    1996-02-01

    Knowledge of in situ stress and how stress changes with reservoir depletion and pore pressure drawdown is important in a multi-disciplinary approach to reservoir characterization, reservoir management, and improved oil recovery projects. This report summarizes a compilation of in situ stress data from six fields showing the effects of pore pressure and production-induced changes in pore pressure on the minimum horizontal stress. The in situ stress data and corresponding pore pressure data were obtained from field records of the operating companies and published reports. Horizontal stress was determined from closure pressure data of hydraulic fractures and leak-off tests. The stress measurements clearly demonstrate that the total minimum-horizontal stress is dependent on pore pressure. A decrease in pore pressure either by geologic processes or production of a reservoir will result in a decrease in the total minimum-horizontal stress. The magnitude of changes in stress state with net changes in pore pressure is dependent on local field conditions and cannot be accurately predicted by the uniaxial strain model that is commonly used by the petroleum industry.

  8. Effect of pore pressure buildup on slowness of rupture propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ougier-Simonin, A.; Zhu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Pore fluid pressure is known to play an important role in brittle fracture initiation and propagation, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We conducted triaxial experiments on saturated porous sandstones to investigate effects of pore pressure buildup on the slowness of shear rupture propagation at different confining pressures. At low to intermediate confinements, rocks fail by brittle faulting, and pore pressure buildup causes a reduction in rock's shear strength but does not induce measurable differences in slip behavior. When the confinement is high enough to prohibit dynamic faulting, rocks fail in the brittle-ductile transitional regime. In the transitional regime, pore pressure buildup promotes slip instability on an otherwise stably sliding fracture. Compared to those observed in the brittle regime, the slip rate, stress drop, and energy dissipated during rupture propagation with concurrent pore pressure buildup in the transitional regime are distinctively different. When decreasing confining pressure instead, the slip behavior resembles the ones of the brittle regime, emphasizing how the observed slowness is related to excess pore pressure beyond the effective pressure phenomenon. Analysis of the mechanical data using existing theoretical models confirms these observations. Quantitative microstructural analyses reveal that increasing pore pressure lessens the dilatancy hardening during failure, thus enhances slip along the localized zone in the transitional regime. Our experimental results suggest that pore pressure buildup induces slow slip in the transitional regime, and slip rates along a shear fracture may vary considerably depending on effective stress states.

  9. Effective stress and pore pressure in the Nankai accretionary prism off the Muroto Peninsula, southwestern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Takeshi; Tokuyama, Hidekazu; Costa Pisani, Patrizia; Moore, Gregory

    2008-11-01

    We developed a theoretical method for predicting effective stress and pore pressure based on rock physics model. We applied the method to reveal the pore pressure distribution within the Nankai accretionary prism off southwestern Japan and to investigate variations in pore pressure associated with evolution of the plate boundary décollement. From the crack aspect ratio spectrum estimated from laboratory and well-log data, we calculated a theoretical relationship between acoustic velocity and mean effective stress by using differential effective medium theory. By iteratively fitting the theoretically calculated velocity to the seismic velocities derived from 3D tomographic inversion, we estimated in situ mean effective stress within the accretionary prism. Pore pressure is then the difference between the effective stress and the confining stress. When we calculated pore pressure, we considered compressive state of stress in the accretionary prism. Our results confirm that pore fluid pressure is high within the subducting sedimentary sequence below the décollement; we determined a normalized pore pressure ratio (λ*) of 0.4-0.7. Abnormal pore pressures develop in the underthrust sequence as a result of the increase in overburden load because of the thickened overlying prism and a low permeability barrier across the décollement. Overpressuring within the accreted sequence is initiated at the deformation front and proceeds landward. The increase in horizontal compaction within the accreted sequence may raise pore pressures within the accreted sequence, and the pore pressure (mean effective stress) contrast at the décollement becomes smaller landward of the deformation front.

  10. Connecting Wastewater Injection and Seismicity through Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, S.; Weingarten, M.; Person, M. A.; Bekins, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Increased seismicity in recent years in some geologically quiescent regions in the US has been linked to wastewater injection associated with oil and gas production. While seismicity in some cases appears to be well correlated with injection activities, in many other injection locations no seismicity has been reported. How pore pressures generated from injection propagate spatially and evolve temporally is likely a key control in inducing earthquakes, providing a physical linkage between injection activity and seismicity occurrence. Yet, the linkage remains controversial and inconclusive, in spite of the basic physics of pore pressure propagation being well established. This study aims at better understanding the physical processes of pore pressure propagation around injection sites and identifying factors that are most likely contributors to induced seismicity. Numerical modeling suggests that pore pressure increases in the Jones seismicity swarm northeast of Oklahoma City were primarily from several high rate injection wells. Preliminary analysis on injection and seismicity data from Greeley, Colorado also points to a potential pore pressure link between high injection rates and seismicity. Modeling of pore pressures in the Lake County, Ohio, illustrates that permeable faults in the crystalline basement could facilitate pore pressure propagation from injection in the basal aquifer and host earthquakes, which could explain the earthquakes that occurred in the mid-1980s. In many of the above examples, wastewater injection in basal aquifers promoted downward propagation of pore pressures into the crystalline basement. In connecting injection and seismicity through pore pressure propagation, high rate injection wells and permeable basement faults are merging as important players contributing to induced seismicity. It is the intention of this study that findings like these would provide a scientific basis to inform future regulations and policies on wastewater

  11. Abnormal treating pressures in MHF treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Medlin, W.L.; Fitch, J.L.

    1983-10-01

    Abnormal treating pressures are observed during massive hydraulic fracturing (MHF) treatments in the Mesa Verde formation of the Piceance Basin, Colorado. Data from three widely separated wells and in several zones per well all show a pressure increase during MHF treatments which the authors call ''pressure growth''. This pressure growth is at least semi-permanent. The elevated instantaneous shut-in pressures do not return to initial values over periods of several days. The magnitude of this pressure growth is highly variable. When its value is less than about 2300 psi the MHF treatments are usually completed and results are obtained which are within normal expectations. When its value exceeds 2300 psi, sandout occurs and the fracture length estimated from production data is much less than that calculated using crack propagation models. Temperature logs indicate little or only modest vertical extension of the fractures above the perforations. These data, along with sandouts, point to a large increase in width of the fractures in response to pressure growth. One possible cause of pressure growth is fracture branching. A multiplicity of branches could produce a plastic-like effect. Laboratory measurements have ruled out plasticity as the cause. The stress-strain behavior of the rock is similar to that of rocks where no pressure growth occurs. Pressure growth seems to be dependent on both pumping rate and fluid viscosity. Thus, there is some hope for its mitigation through treatment design. Also, pressure growth appears to correlate negatively with pay zone quality. This suggests that the phenomenon can be exploited as a fluid diversion technique.

  12. Regulation of landslide motion by dilatancy and pore pressure feedback

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    A new mathematical model clarifies how diverse styles and rates of landslide motion can result from regulation of Coulomb friction by dilation or contraction of water-saturated basal shear zones. Normalization of the model equations shows that feedback due to coupling between landslide motion, shear zone volume change, and pore pressure change depends on a single dimensionless parameter ??, which, in turn, depends on the dilatancy angle ?? and the intrinsic timescales for pore pressure generation and dissipation. If shear zone soil contracts during slope failure, then ?? 0, and negative feedback permits slow, steady landslide motion to occur while positive pore pressure is supplied by rain infiltration. Steady state slip velocities v0 obey v0 = -(K/??) p*e, where K is the hydraulic conductivity and p*e is the normalized (dimensionless) negative pore pressure generated by dilation. If rain infiltration and attendant pore pressure growth continue unabated, however, their influence ultimately overwhelms the stabilizing influence of negative p*e. Then, unbounded landslide acceleration occurs, accentuated by an instability that develops if ?? diminishes as landslide motion proceeds. Nonetheless, numerical solutions of the model equations show that slow, nearly steady motion of a clay-rich landslide may persist for many months as a result of negative pore pressure feedback that regulates basal Coulomb friction. Similarly stabilized motion is less likely to occur in sand-rich landslides that are characterized by weaker negative feedback.

  13. Quantification of subsurface pore pressure through IODP drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffer, D. M.; Flemings, P. B.

    2010-12-01

    It is critical to understand the magnitude and distribution of subsurface pore fluid pressure: it controls effective stress and thus mechanical strength, slope stability, and sediment compaction. Elevated pore pressures also drive fluid flows that serve as agents of mass, solute, and heat fluxes. The Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) have provided important avenues to quantify pore pressure in a range of geologic and tectonic settings. These approaches include 1) analysis of continuous downhole logs and shipboard physical properties data to infer compaction state and in situ pressure and stress, 2) laboratory consolidation testing of core samples collected by drilling, 3) direct downhole measurements using pore pressure probes, 3) pore pressure and stress measurements using downhole tools that can be deployed in wide diameter pipe recently acquired for riser drilling, and 4) long-term monitoring of formation pore pressure in sealed boreholes within hydraulically isolated intervals. Here, we summarize key advances in quantification of subsurface pore pressure rooted in scientific drilling, highlighting with examples from subduction zones, the Gulf of Mexico, and the New Jersey continental shelf. At the Nankai, Costa Rican, and Barbados subduction zones, consolidation testing of cores samples, combined with analysis of physical properties data, indicates that even within a few km landward of the trench, pore pressures in and below plate boundary décollement zones reach a significant fraction of the lithostatic load (λ*=0.25-0.91). These results document a viable and quantifiable mechanism to explain the mechanical weakness of subduction décollements, and are corroborated by a small number of direct measurements in sealed boreholes and by inferences from seismic reflection data. Recent downhole measurements conducted during riser drilling using the modular formation dynamics tester wireline tool (MDT) in a forearc basin ~50

  14. Optimization of a pressurization methodology for extracting pore-water.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Isabel; Ribeiro, Rui

    2005-12-01

    Sediment toxicity can be assessed by conducting pore-water toxicity assays with standard water column organisms. Several methods have been developed for sampling pore-water. Centrifugation and pressurization methods are recommended when large volumes of pore-water are required to perform toxicity assays. Nevertheless, these methods involve sediment transportation and storage in laboratory, which can alter sediment toxicity. Therefore, an extraction method for large volumes that could be employed in the field site would be highly desirable. This study aimed to optimize and further evaluate an existing sediment pressurizing device with low construction costs, easy to carry and operate in the field, and presenting minimal chemical reactivity. The latter characteristic was achieved by lining the device interior with Teflon, by using large pore filters (50 microm), and by using an inert gas (nitrogen). Pore-water extraction efficiency and the toxicities of pore-water samples obtained by pressurization and by refrigerated centrifugation were compared. An artificial sediment (70% sand, 20% kaolin and 10% alpha-cellulose) spiked with an alcohol (phenol), a surfactant (SDS), a metal (copper), an organophosphate pesticide (parathion), and a natural sediment contaminated with acid mine drainage, were assayed for toxicity using Microtox assays. Sediment pressurization was found to be as efficient to extract pore-water as centrifugation, being more cost effective and adequate for field use.

  15. Evidence for excess pore pressures in southwest Indian Ocean sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, D.; Menke, W.; Hobart, M.; Anderson, R.

    1981-03-10

    Brown clay cores from the Madagascar and Crozet basins show the following evidence of excess pore pressures: large amounts of flow-in, increasing average sedimentation rate with age, and nonlinear temperature gradients. Additionally, many hilltops in these basins have no visible sediment cover. The bare hilltops may result from periodic slumping caused by excess pore pressures. Calculated excess pore pressures which equal or exceed the overburden pressure were inferred from water fluxes predicted by nonlinear temperature gradients and laboratory permeability measurements by using Darcy's law. Since pore pressures which exceed the overburden pressure are unreasonable, we attribute this discrepancy to laboratory measures which underestimate the in situ permeability. The widespread presence of overpressured sediments in areas of irregular topography provides a process for resuspension of clay-sized particles. This mechanism does not require high current velocities for the erosion of clay and therefore can be applied to many areas where no strong currents are evident. Carbonate-rich sediments from the Madagascar Ridge, the Mozambique Ridge, and the Agulhas Plateau had almost no flow-in and occurred in areas where all topography was thickly draped with sediment, Since the age and tectonic location of the ridges and plateaus preclude water circulation in the basement, we attribute these differences between the brown clay and the carbonate-rich material to an absence of significant excess pore pressures in the plateau and ridge sediments.

  16. Pore fluid pressure, apparent friction, and Coulomb failure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Simpson, R.W.; Hickman, S.H.; Lockner, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    Many recent studies of stress-triggered seismicity rely on a fault failure model with a single free parameter, the apparent coefficient of friction, presumed to be a material constant with possible values 0 ≤ μ′ ≤ 1. These studies may present a misleading view of fault strength and the role of pore fluid pressure in earthquake failure. The parameter μ′ is intended to incorporate the effects of both friction and pore pressure, but is a material constant only if changes in pore fluid pressure induced by changes in stress are proportional to the normal stress change across the potential failure plane. Although specific models of fault zones permit such a relation, neither is it known that fault zones within the Earth behave this way, nor is this behavior expected in all cases. In contrast, for an isotropic homogeneous poroelastic model the pore pressure changes are proportional to changes in mean stress, μ′ is not a material constant, and −∞ ≤ μ′ ≤ +∞. Analysis of the change in Coulomb failure stress for tectonically loaded reverse and strike-slip faults shows considerable differences between these two pore pressure models, suggesting that such models might be distinguished from one another using observations of triggered seismicity (e.g., aftershocks). We conclude that using the constant apparent friction model exclusively in studies of Coulomb failure stress is unwise and could lead to significant errors in estimated stress change and seismic hazard.

  17. Dynamic pore-pressure fluctuations in rapidly shearing granular materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; LaHusen, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    Results from two types of experiments show that intergranular pore pressures fluctuated dynamically during rapid, steady shear deformation of water-saturated granular materials. During some fluctuations, the pore water locally supported all normal and shear stresses, while grain-contact stresses transiently fell to zero. Fluctuations also propagated outward from the shear zone; this process modifies grain-contact stresses in adjacent areas and potentially instigates shear-zone growth.

  18. Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27

    SciTech Connect

    Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-10-01

    This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

  19. High-pressure alchemy on a small-pore zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.

    2011-12-01

    While an ever-expanding variety of zeolites with a wide range of framework topology is available, it is desirable to have a way to tailor the chemistry of the zeolitic nanopores for a given framework topology via controlling both the coordination-inclusion chemistry and framework distortion/relaxation. This is, however, subjected to the ability of a zeolitic nanopore to allow the redistribution of cations-water assembly and/or insertion of foreign molecules into the pores and channels. Small-pore zeolites such as natrolite (Na16Al16Si24O80x16H2O), however, have been known to show very limited capacity for any changes in the confinement chemistry. We have recently shown that various cation-exchanged natrolites can be prepared under modest conditions from natural sodium natrolite and exhibit cation-dependent volume expansions by up to 18.5% via converting the elliptical channels into progressively circular ones. Here, we show that pressure can be used as a unique and clean tool to further manipulate the chemistry of the natrolite nanopores. Our recent crystallographic and spectroscopic studies of pressure-insertion of foreign molecules, trivalent-cation exchange under pressure, and pressure-induced inversion of cation-water coordination and pore geometry in various cation-exchanged natrolites will be presented.

  20. Pore Pressure Distribution and Flank Instability in Hydrothermally Altered Stratovolcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. L.; Taron, J.; Hurwitz, S.; Reid, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    Field and geophysical investigations of stratovolcanoes with long-lived hydrothermal systems commonly reveal that initially permeable regions (such as brecciated layers of pyroclastic material) can become both altered and water-bearing. Hydrothermal alteration in these regions, including clay formation, can turn them into low-permeability barriers to fluid flow, which could increase pore fluid pressures resulting in flank slope instability. We examined elevated pore pressure conditions using numerical models of hydrothermal flow in stratovolcanoes, informed by geophysical data about internal structures and deposits. Idealized radially symmetric meshes were developed based on cross-sectional profiles and alteration/permeability structures of Cascade Range stratovolcanoes. We used the OpenGeoSys model to simulate variably saturated conditions in volcanoes heated only by regional heat fluxes, as well as 650°C intrusions at two km depth below the surface. Meteoric recharge was estimated from precipitation rates in the Cascade Range. Preliminary results indicate zones of elevated pore pressures form: 1) where slopes are underlain by continuous low-permeability altered layers, or 2) when the edifice has an altered core with saturated, less permeable limbs. The first scenario might control shallow collapses on the slopes above the altered layers. The second could promote deeper flank collapses that are initially limited to the summit and upper slopes, but could progress to the core of an edifice. In both scenarios, pore pressures can be further elevated by shallow intrusions, or evolve over longer time scales under forcing from regional heat flux. Geometries without confining low-permeability layers do not show these pressure effects. Our initial scenarios use radially symmetric models, but we are also simulating hydrothermal flow under real 3D geometries with asymmetric subsurface structures (Mount Adams). Simulation results will be used to inform 3D slope

  1. Reservoir transport and poroelastic properties from oscillating pore pressure experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanov, Azar K.

    Hydraulic transport properties of reservoir rocks, permeability and storage capacity are traditionally defined as rock properties, responsible for the passage of fluids through the porous rock sample, as well as their storage. The evaluation of both is an important part of any reservoir characterization workflow. Moreover, permeability and storage capacity are main inputs into any reservoir simulation study, routinely performed by reservoir engineers on almost any major oil and gas field in the world. An accurate reservoir simulation is essential for production forecast and economic analysis, hence the transport properties directly control the profitability of the petroleum reservoir and their estimation is vital for oil and gas industry. This thesis is devoted to an integrated study of reservoir rocks' hydraulic, streaming potential and poroelastic properties as measured with the oscillating pore pressure experiment. The oscillating pore pressure method is traditionally used to measure hydraulic transport properties. We modified the method and built an experimental setup, capable of measuring all aforementioned rock properties simultaneously. The measurements were carried out for four conventional reservoir-rock quality samples at a range of oscillation frequencies and effective stresses. An apparent frequency dependence of permeability and streaming potential coupling coefficient was observed. Measured frequency dispersion of drained poroelastic properties indicates an intrinsically inelastic nature of the porous mineral rock frame. Standard Linear Model demonstrated the best fit to the experimental dispersion data. Pore collapse and grain crushing effects took place during hydrostatic loading of the dolomitic sample and were observed in permeability, coupling coefficient and poroelastic measurements simultaneously. I established that hydraulically-measured storage capacities are overestimated by almost one order of magnitude when compared to elastically

  2. Abnormal treating pressures in MHF (massive hydraulic fracturing) treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Medlin, W.L.; Fitch, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    Abnormal treating pressures are observed during massive hydraulic fracturing (MHF) treatments in the Mesa Verde Formation of the Piceance Basin, Colorado. Data from 3 widely separated wells and in several zones per well all show a pressure increase during MHF treatments, called pressure growth. This pressure growth is at least semi-permanent. The elevated instantaneous shut-in pressures do not return to initial values over periods of several days. The magnitude of this pressure growth is highly variable. One possible cause of pressure growth is fracture branching. Pressure growth seems to be dependent on both pumping rate and fluid viscosity. 16 references.

  3. Explicit Pore Pressure Material Model in Carbon-Cloth Phenolic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Lemini, Danton; Ehle, Curt

    2003-01-01

    An explicit material model that uses predicted pressure in the pores of a carbon-cloth phenolic (CCP) composite has been developed. This model is intended to be used within a finite-element model to predict phenomena specific to CCP components of solid-fuel-rocket nozzles subjected to high operating temperatures and to mechanical stresses that can be great enough to cause structural failures. Phenomena that can be predicted with the help of this model include failures of specimens in restrained-thermal-growth (RTG) tests, pocketing erosion, and ply lifting

  4. Evaluation Of Liner Back-pressure Due To Concrete Pore Pressure At Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.J.; Rashid, Y.R.; Liu, A.S.; Gou, B.

    2006-07-01

    GE's latest evolution of the boiling water reactor, the ESBWR, has innovative passive design features that reduce the number and complexity of active systems, which in turn provide economic advantages while also increasing safety. These passive systems used for emergency cooling also mean that the primary containment system will experience elevated temperatures with longer durations than conventional plants in the event of design basis accidents. During a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), the drywell in the primary containment structure for the ESBWR will be exposed to saturated steam conditions for up to 72 hours following the accident. A containment spray system may be activated that sprays the drywell area with water to condense the steam as part of the recovery operations. The liner back-pressure will build up gradually over the 72 hours as the concrete temperatures increase, and a sudden cool down could cause excessive differential pressure on the liner to develop. For this analysis, it is assumed that the containment spray is activated at the end of the 72-hour period. A back-pressure, acting between the liner and the concrete wall of the containment, can occur as a result of elevated temperatures in the concrete causing steam and saturated vapor pressures to develop from the free water remaining in the pores of the concrete. Additional pore pressure also develops under the elevated temperatures from the non-condensable gases trapped in the concrete pores during the concrete curing process. Any buildup of this pore pressure next to the liner, in excess of the drywell internal pressure, will act to push the liner away from the concrete with a potential for tearing at the liner anchorages. This paper describes the methods and analyses used to quantify this liner back-pressure so that appropriate measures are included in the design of the liner and anchorage system. A pore pressure model is developed that calculates the pressure distribution across the concrete

  5. Surge dynamics coupled to pore-pressure evolution in debris flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, S.B.; Iverson, R.M.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Temporally and spatially varying pore-fluid pressures exert strong controls on debris-flow motion by mediating internal and basal friction at grain contacts. We analyze these effects by deriving a one-dimensional model of pore-pressure diffusion explicitly coupled to changes in debris-flow thickness. The new pore-pressure equation is combined with Iverson's (1997) extension of the depth-averaged Savage-Hutter (1989, 1991) granular avalanche equations to predict motion of unsteady debris-flow surges with evolving pore-pressure distributions. Computational results illustrate the profound effects of pore-pressure diffusivities on debris-flow surge depths and velocities. ?? 2003 Millpress,.

  6. Integrated landslide monitoring: rainfalls, pore water pressures and surface movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, M.; Casula, G.; Elmi, C.; Fabris, M.; Ghirotti, M.; Loddo, F.; Mora, P.; Pesci, A.; Simoni, A.

    2003-04-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides involving clay-rich soils are widely represented in the Apennines. They cover up to 30% of the slopes forming the relief constituted by chaotic clayey units and are typically subject to repeated reactivations of the movement which are often triggered by a series of discrete failures located in the upper part (headscarp). Failures and movement can then propagate downslope and reactivate the whole landslide deposit which displays a typical elongated body, limited depth and a fan-shaped toe as a result of successive slow earth-flow like movements. An experimental monitoring programme was designed and is currently operating on the Rocca Pitigliana landslide whose characteristics well represent the above described type of movements. Its last parossistic movement date back to 1999 and, since then, remedial works were realized on behalf of local authorities. They basically consist of surficial and deep drainage works located on the landslide body. Experimental activities focus on the main headscarp whose morphology and sub-surface water circulation scheme were unaffected by the interventions. The monitoring approach includes measuring rainfalls and pore-pressure responses in both saturated and unsaturated soils. Surficial movements are continuously measured by means of GPS permanent stations and by wire extensometers which allow real time control of headscarp activity. Main aim of the monitoring activities is to provide experimental data, which can be used to test various existing hydrologic models and to identify triggering conditions. Since the ‘70s, many hydrologic models have been proposed to describe the pore water pressure distribution within the soil and its response to precipitation. The topic has recently drawn growing attention because of the recognized importance in landslide triggering but still experimental data are very much needed in order to obtain and validate capable predicting tools. This is mostly due to the multiple and

  7. Postoperative chronic pressure abnormalities in the vitreon study.

    PubMed

    Adile, S L; Peyman, G A; Greve, M D; Millsap, C M; Verma, L K; Wafapoor, H; Soheilian, M

    1994-01-01

    Perfluoroperhydrophenanthrene (Vitreon) was used as an intraoperative hydrokinetic retinal manipulator, followed by C3F8 or SF6 gases, silicone oil, or Vitreon as postoperative tamponading agents in 234 eyes. Two chronic intraoperative pressure abnormalities were defined: hypotony (5 mm Hg or less) and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) (25 mm Hg or more at three or more postoperative visits). Postoperatively, 28 eyes (12%) had chronically elevated IOP, and 41 (18%) had chronic hypotony. There was no significant difference in the incidence of abnormal IOP among the groups of eyes in which the various tamponading agents had been used. In particular, the use of Vitreon as an intraoperative tool or as a short-term tamponade did not affect the incidence of chronic abnormal IOP any more than did the use of silicone oil, C3F8, or SF6 as tamponading agents.

  8. Postoperative chronic pressure abnormalities in the vitreon study.

    PubMed

    Adile, S L; Peyman, G A; Greve, M D; Millsap, C M; Verma, L K; Wafapoor, H; Soheilian, M

    1994-01-01

    Perfluoroperhydrophenanthrene (Vitreon) was used as an intraoperative hydrokinetic retinal manipulator, followed by C3F8 or SF6 gases, silicone oil, or Vitreon as postoperative tamponading agents in 234 eyes. Two chronic intraoperative pressure abnormalities were defined: hypotony (5 mm Hg or less) and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) (25 mm Hg or more at three or more postoperative visits). Postoperatively, 28 eyes (12%) had chronically elevated IOP, and 41 (18%) had chronic hypotony. There was no significant difference in the incidence of abnormal IOP among the groups of eyes in which the various tamponading agents had been used. In particular, the use of Vitreon as an intraoperative tool or as a short-term tamponade did not affect the incidence of chronic abnormal IOP any more than did the use of silicone oil, C3F8, or SF6 as tamponading agents. PMID:7830998

  9. Simulation of the Effects of Elevated Pore Pressure on Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foxall, W.; Johnson, S.; Hutchings, L. J.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.; Dieterich, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Risks associated with induced seismicity are a significant factor in the design, permitting and operation of stimulation and other fluid injection operations, especially enhanced geothermal, geological CO2 sequestration and wastewater disposal. Conventional risk assessment for such operations usually neglects treatment of site-specific conditions, such as in situ stress, pore pressure evolution, and the mechanical and hydrologic properties of the reservoir. As one component of a physics-based probabilistic seismic hazard approach designed to address these issues, we discuss the development of an induced earthquake simulation method that represents hydromechanical effects explicitly. This capability is developed within the GEOS framework [Settgast and Johnson, 37th Stanford Geothermal Workshop, 2012], and is based on the earthquake simulation code RSQSim [Dieterich and Richards-Dinger, PAGEOP, 2010]. The GEOS implementation augments RSQSim by coupling an evolving pore pressure distribution into the fault response via multi-phase flow simulations of fluid injection and plume migration over relevant time scales. The present implementation is uni-directional (effective stress effects) with no feedback to the permeability response. The application allows for the use of realistic fault geometries and fractal spatial distributions of constitutive properties generated along two-dimensional fault surfaces. Constant strain rate boundary conditions are applied to mimic regional tectonic loading. RSQSim uses a rate- and state-dependent friction law to evolve the stresses along the fault. In general, significant uncertainties remain in the scaling of empirically determined constitutive parameters from laboratory to field scale, particularly at the shallow crustal depths characteristic of injection-induced seismicity. In order to understand the sensitivity of the simulations to these parameters, we have sampled multiple model realizations using Livermore's PSUADE code [Tong

  10. Revisiting the Hubbert-Rubey pore pressure model for overthrust faulting: Inferences from bedding-parallel detachment surfaces within Middle Devonian gas shale, the Appalachian Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Murat G.; Engelder, Terry

    2014-12-01

    Both bedding-parallel slickensides and cleavage duplexes are forms of mesoscopic-scale detachment faulting populating black (Marcellus and Geneseo/Burket) and intervening gray (Mahantango) shales of the Middle Devonian, a section known for abnormal pore pressure below the Appalachian Plateau. The abundance and the orientation of slickensides and cleavage duplexes in the more organic-rich black shale relative to gray shale suggests that maturation-related abnormal pore pressure facilitates detachment, a mesoscopic manifestation of the Hubbert-Rubey pore pressure model for overthrust faulting. The former are discrete slip surfaces whereas the latter consists of nested, anastomosing slip surfaces, either cutting through bedding or on disrupted bedding surfaces stacked as mesoscopic versions of thrust duplexes. Cleavage duplexes are between a few cm and over 1 m thick with their hanging walls commonly transported toward the Appalachian foreland, regardless of local limb dip. Cleavage duplexes are most common near the stratigraphic maximum flooding surface, the organic-rich section most prone to develop maturation-related pore pressure in the Middle Devonian gas shales. Bedding-parallel slickensides are somewhat more evenly distributed in the black shale but also found in overlying gray shale. In both black and gray shales, slickensides are more abundant on the limbs of folds, an indication of pore-pressure-related flexural-slip folding. On the macroscopic scale, the Pine Mountain Block of the Southern Appalachian Mountains was enabled by a basal detachment cutting along the Upper Devonian Chattanooga black shale which has a thermal maturity sufficient for the generation of abnormal pore pressure. The Pine Mountain block is a large-scale overthrust showing little evidence of collapse of the hinterland side, a credible example of a pore-pressure-aided overthrust fault block of the type envisioned by the Hubbert-Rubey model.

  11. Sensitivity of stress inversion of focal mechanisms to pore pressure changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Garzón, Patricia; Vavryčuk, Václav; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Bohnhoff, Marco

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of stress inversion from focal mechanisms to pore pressure changes. Synthetic tests reveal that pore pressure variations can cause apparent changes in the retrieved stress ratio R relating the magnitude of the intermediate principal stress with respect to the maximum and minimum principal stresses. Pore pressure and retrieved R are negatively correlated when R is low (R < 0.6). The spurious variations in retrieved R are suppressed when R > 0.6. This observation is independent of faulting style, and it may be related to different performance of the fault plane selection criterion and variability in orientation of activated faults under different pore pressures. Our findings from synthetic data are supported by results obtained from induced seismicity at The Geysers geothermal field. Therefore, the retrieved stress ratio variations can be utilized for monitoring pore pressure changes at seismogenic depth in stress domains with overall low R.

  12. Pore Water Pressure Response of a Soil Subjected to Traffic Loading under Saturated and Unsaturated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cary, Carlos

    This study presents the results of one of the first attempts to characterize the pore water pressure response of soils subjected to traffic loading under saturated and unsaturated conditions. It is widely known that pore water pressure develops within the soil pores as a response to external stimulus. Also, it has been recognized that the development of pores water pressure contributes to the degradation of the resilient modulus of unbound materials. In the last decades several efforts have been directed to model the effect of air and water pore pressures upon resilient modulus. However, none of them consider dynamic variations in pressures but rather are based on equilibrium values corresponding to initial conditions. The measurement of this response is challenging especially in soils under unsaturated conditions. Models are needed not only to overcome testing limitations but also to understand the dynamic behavior of internal pore pressures that under critical conditions may even lead to failure. A testing program was conducted to characterize the pore water pressure response of a low plasticity fine clayey sand subjected to dynamic loading. The bulk stress, initial matric suction and dwelling time parameters were controlled and their effects were analyzed. The results were used to attempt models capable of predicting the accumulated excess pore pressure at any given time during the traffic loading and unloading phases. Important findings regarding the influence of the controlled variables challenge common beliefs. The accumulated excess pore water pressure was found to be higher for unsaturated soil specimens than for saturated soil specimens. The maximum pore water pressure always increased when the high bulk stress level was applied. Higher dwelling time was found to decelerate the accumulation of pore water pressure. In addition, it was found that the higher the dwelling time, the lower the maximum pore water pressure. It was concluded that upon further

  13. Abnormal treating pressures in massive hydraulic fracturing treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Medlin, W.L.; Fitch, J.L.

    1988-05-01

    Abnormal treating pressures were observed during massive hydraulic fracturing (MHF) treatments in the Mesa Verde formation of the Piceance basin, CO. Data from three widely separated wells and in several zones per well showed a pressure increase during MHF treatments that the authors call ''pressure growth.'' This pressure growth was at least semipermanent. The elevated instantaneous shut-in pressures (ISIP's) did not return to initial values over periods of several days. The magnitude of this pressure growth is highly variable. When its value is less than about 2,300 psi (15.9 MPa), the MHF treatments are usually completed and results are obtained that are within normal expectations. When its value exceeds 2,300 psi (15.9 MPa), sandout occurs and the fracture length estimated from production data is much less than that calculated with crack propagation models. Temperature logs indicate little or only modest vertical extension of the fractures above the perforations. These data, along with sandouts, point to a large increase in fracture width in response to pressure growth. One possible cause of pressure growth is fracture branching. A multiplicity of branches could produce a plastic-like effect. Laboratory measurements have ruled out plasticity as the cause. The stress/strain behavior of the rock is similar to that of rocks where no pressure growth occurs. Pressure growth seems to depend on both pumping rate and fluid viscosity. Thus, there is some hope for its mitigation through treatment design. Also, pressure growth appears to correlate negatively with pay-zone quality. This suggests that the phenomenon can be exploited as a fluid-diversion technique.

  14. Compaction and Permeability Reduction of Castlegate Sandstone under Pore Pressure Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate time-dependent compaction and permeability changes by cycling pore pressure with application to compressed air energy storage (CAES) in a reservoir. Preliminary experiments capture the impacts of hydrostatic stress, pore water pressure, pore pressure cycling, chemical, and time-dependent considerations near a borehole in a CAES reservoir analog. CAES involves creating an air bubble in a reservoir. The high pressure bubble serves as a mechanical battery to store potential energy. When there is excess grid energy, bubble pressure is increased by air compression, and when there is energy needed on the grid, stored air pressure is released through turbines to generate electricity. The analog conditions considered are depth ~1 km, overburden stress ~20 MPa and a pore pressure ~10MPa. Pore pressure is cycled daily or more frequently between ~10 MPa and 6 MPa, consistent with operations of a CAES facility at this depth and may continue for operational lifetime (25 years). The rock can vary from initially fully-to-partially saturated. Pore pressure cycling changes the effective stress.Jacketed, room temperature tap water-saturated samples of Castlegate Sandstone are hydrostatically confined (20 MPa) and subjected to a pore pressure resulting in an effective pressure of ~10 MPa. Pore pressure is cycled between 6 to 10 MPa. Sample displacement measurements yielded determinations of volumetric strain and from water flow measurements permeability was determined. Experiments ran for two to four weeks, with 2 to 3 pore pressure cycles per day. The Castlegate is a fluvial high porosity (>20%) primarily quartz sandstone, loosely calcite cemented, containing a small amount of clay.Pore pressure cycling induces compaction (~.1%) and permeability decreases (~20%). The results imply that time-dependent compactive processes are operative. The load path, of increasing and decreasing pore pressure, may facilitate local loosening and grain readjustments that results in the

  15. Prediabetes is associated with abnormal circadian blood pressure variability.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Greenway, F L; Cornelissen, G; Pan, W; Halberg, F

    2008-09-01

    Blood pressure (BP) exhibits a circadian variation characterized by a morning increase, followed by a small postprandial valley and a deeper descent during nocturnal rest. Although abnormal 24-h variability (abnormal circadian variability (ACV)) predicts adverse cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes, a 7-day automatic ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) and subsequent chronobiologic analysis of the gathered data, permits identification of consistency of any abnormal circadian variation. To test whether normal overweight healthy men and women with prediabetes differed from subjects with normoglycemia in having ACV with a 7-day ABPM. Consent for a 7-day ABPM was obtained from subjects with family history of diabetes mellitus, who were participating in the screening phase for a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled weight loss trial in prediabetics to prevent progression to diabetes mellitus. The automatic 7-day ABPM device recorded BP and heart rate every 30 min during the day and every 60 min during the night. Normoglycemic and prediabetic subjects matched for age, sex, race, BP, BMI, waist circumference and glycemic control, differed statistically significantly only in their fasting and/or 2-h postprandial serum glucose concentrations. Chronobiologically-interpreted 7-day ABPM uncovered no abnormalities in normoglycemics, whereas prediabetics had a statistically significantly higher incidence of high mean BP (MESOR-hypertension), excessive pulse pressure and/or circadian hyper-amplitude-tension (CHAT) (P<0.001). ACV detected with 7-day ABPM may account for the enhanced CVD risk in prediabetes. These findings provide a basis for larger-scale studies to assess the predictive value of 7-day ABPM over the long term. PMID:18480832

  16. 14 CFR 91.144 - Temporary restriction on flight operations during abnormally high barometric pressure conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... during abnormally high barometric pressure conditions. 91.144 Section 91.144 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL... flight operations during abnormally high barometric pressure conditions. (a) Special flight...

  17. Condensation pressures in small pores: An analytical model based on density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    R. H. Nilson; S. K. Griffiths

    1999-02-01

    Adsorption and condensation are critical to many applications of porous materials including filtration, separation, and the storage of gases. Integral methods are used to derive an analytical expression describing fluid condensation pressures in slit pores bounded by parallel plane walls. To obtain this result, the governing equations of Density Functional Theory (DFT) are integrated across the pore width assuming that fluid densities within adsorbed layers are spatially uniform. The thickness, density, and energy of these layers are expressed as composite functions constructed from asymptotic limits applicable to small and large pores. By equating the total energy of the adsorbed layers to that of a liquid-full pore, the authors arrive at a closed-form expression for the condensation pressure in terms of the pore size, surface tension, and Lennard-Jones parameters of the adsorbent and adsorbate molecules. The resulting equation reduces to the Kelvin equation in the large-pore limit. It further reproduces the condensation pressures computed by means of the full DFT equations for all pore sizes in which phase transitions are abrupt. Finally, in the limit of extremely small pores, for which phase transitions may be smooth and continuous, this simple analytical expression provides a good approximation to the apparent condensation pressure indicated by the steepest portion of the adsorption isotherm computed via DFT.

  18. Effect of Processing Pressure on Isolated Pore Formation during Controlled Directional Solidification in Small Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Matthew C.; Anilkumar, Amrutur V.; Grugel, RIchard N.; Lee, Chun P.

    2008-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments were performed, using succinonitrile saturated with nitrogen gas, to examine the effects of in-situ processing pressure changes on the formation growth, and evolution of an isolated, cylindrical gaseous pore. A novel solidification facility, capable of processing thin cylindrical samples (I.D. < 1.0 mm), under controlled pressure conditions, was used for the experiments. A new experimental method for growing the isolated pore from a seed bubble is introduced. The experimental results indicate that an in-situ processing pressure change will result in either a transient change in pore diameter or a complete termination of pore growth, indicating that pressure changes can be used as a control parameter to terminate bubble growth. A simple analytical model has been introduced to explain the experimental observations.

  19. The impact of wave loads and pore-water pressure generation on initiation of sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clukey, E.C.; Kulhawy, F.H.; Liu, P.L.-F.; Tate, G.B.

    1985-01-01

    The build-up of pore-water pressure by waves can lead to sediment liquefaction and subsequent transport by traction currents. This process was investigated by measuring pore-water pressures both in a field experiment and laboratory wave tank tests. Liquefaction was observed in the wave tank tests. The results suggest that sand is less susceptible than silts to wave-induced liquefaction because of the tendency to partially dissipate pore-water pressures. However, previous studies have determined that pore-water pressures must approach liquefaction before current velocities necessary to initiate transport are reduced. Once liquefaction has occurred more sediment can be transported. ?? 1985 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  20. Debris-flow deposition: Effects of pore-fluid pressure and friction concentrated at flow margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Iverson, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of pore-fluid pressure and total bed-normal stress at the base of several ???10 m3 experimental debris flows provide new insight into the process of debris-flow deposition. Pore-fluid pressures nearly sufficient to cause liquefaction were developed and maintained during flow mobilization and acceleration, persisted in debris-flow interiors during flow deceleration and deposition, and dissipated significantly only during postdepositional sediment consolidation. In contrast, leading edges of debris flows exhibited little or no positive pore-fluid pressure. Deposition therefore resulted from grain-contact friction and bed friction concentrated at flow margins. This finding contradicts models that invoke widespread decay of excess pore-fluid pressure, uniform viscoplastic yield strength, or pervasive grain-collision stresses to explain debris-flow deposition. Furthermore, the finding demonstrates that deposit thickness cannot be used to infer the strength of flowing debris.

  1. Pore-pressure gradients in the proximity of a submarine buried pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Magda, W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper is concerned with the two-dimensional finite-element modeling of the wave-induced pore-pressure field in the proximity of a submarine pipeline buried in sandy seabed sediments subject to continuous loading of regular surface waves. Neglecting inertial forces, a linear elastic stress-strain relationship for the soil, and Darcy`s law for the flow of pore-fluid are assumed. The model takes into account the compressibility of both components (i.e., pore-fluid and soil skeleton) of the two-phase medium. The results of numerical computations are discussed with respect to the hydraulic gradient in the upper part of seabed sediments just above the buried submarine pipeline. The pore-pressure gradient is studied as a function of geometry (depth of burial) as well as soil and pore-fluid compressibility parameters where the later of which is defined in terms of soil saturation conditions.

  2. Influence of fluid pore pressure on chaotic sliding of tectonic faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turuntaev, Sergey; Riga, Vasily

    2016-04-01

    The problem of permeable rock pore pressure variation influence on tectonic fault sliding and generation of seismic events was studied in the scope of rate-and-state friction model with two-parametric friction law. The coupled problem of pore-elasticity and fault sliding governed by two-parametric rate-and-state equation was studied numerically. The main modes of the fault sliding were found, and transitions from one mode to another due to the fluid pore pressure change were observed. The conditions for transition from stable to chaotic sliding (considered as an analog of seismic event generations) were found. It was shown, that chaotic sliding has features of Poincare stability and can be characterized by finite values of correlation integral and embedding dimension, which depend on critical shear stresses. Change of the effective critical stresses by the pore pressure variation will result in change of the tectonic fault sliding mode and consequently change of the seismic regime.

  3. Abnormal elastic and vibrational behaviors of magnetite at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Wu, Junjie; Zhu, Jie; Mao, Zhu; Said, Ayman H; Leu, Bogdan M; Cheng, Jinguang; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Jin, Changqing; Zhou, Jianshi

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite exhibits unique electronic, magnetic, and structural properties in extreme conditions that are of great research interest. Previous studies have suggested a number of transitional models, although the nature of magnetite at high pressure remains elusive. We have studied a highly stoichiometric magnetite using inelastic X-ray scattering, X-ray diffraction and emission, and Raman spectroscopies in diamond anvil cells up to ~20 GPa, while complementary electrical conductivity measurements were conducted in a cubic anvil cell up to 8.5 GPa. We have observed an elastic softening in the diagonal elastic constants (C11 and C44) and a hardening in the off-diagonal constant (C12) at ~8 GPa where significant elastic anisotropies in longitudinal and transverse acoustic waves occur, especially along the [110] direction. An additional vibrational Raman band between the A1g and T2g modes was also detected at the transition pressure. These abnormal elastic and vibrational behaviors of magnetite are attributed to the occurrence of the octahedrally-coordinated Fe(2+)-Fe(3+)-Fe(2+) ions charge-ordering along the [110] direction in the inverse spinel structure. We propose a new phase diagram of magnetite in which the temperature for the metal-insulator and distorted structural transitions decreases with increasing pressure while the charge-ordering transition occurs at ~8 GPa and room temperature. PMID:25186916

  4. Abnormal Elastic and Vibrational Behaviors of Magnetite at High Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Wu, Junjie; Zhu, Jie; Mao, Zhu; Said, Ayman H.; Leu, Bogdan M.; Cheng, Jinguang; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Jin, Changqing; Zhou, Jianshi

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite exhibits unique electronic, magnetic, and structural properties in extreme conditions that are of great research interest. Previous studies have suggested a number of transitional models, although the nature of magnetite at high pressure remains elusive. We have studied a highly stoichiometric magnetite using inelastic X-ray scattering, X-ray diffraction and emission, and Raman spectroscopies in diamond anvil cells up to ~20 GPa, while complementary electrical conductivity measurements were conducted in a cubic anvil cell up to 8.5 GPa. We have observed an elastic softening in the diagonal elastic constants (C11 and C44) and a hardening in the off-diagonal constant (C12) at ~8 GPa where significant elastic anisotropies in longitudinal and transverse acoustic waves occur, especially along the [110] direction. An additional vibrational Raman band between the A1g and T2g modes was also detected at the transition pressure. These abnormal elastic and vibrational behaviors of magnetite are attributed to the occurrence of the octahedrally-coordinated Fe2+-Fe3+-Fe2+ ions charge-ordering along the [110] direction in the inverse spinel structure. We propose a new phase diagram of magnetite in which the temperature for the metal-insulator and distorted structural transitions decreases with increasing pressure while the charge-ordering transition occurs at ~8 GPa and room temperature. PMID:25186916

  5. Predicting abnormal pressure from 2-D seismic velocity modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Grauls, D.; Dunand, J.P.; Beaufort, D.

    1995-12-01

    Seismic velocities are the only data available, before drilling, on which to base a quantitative, present-day estimate of abnormal pressure. Recent advances in seismic velocity processing have enabled them to obtain, using an in-house approach, an optimized 2-D interval velocity field and consequently to better define the lateral extension of pressure regimes. The methodology, interpretation and quantification of overpressure-related anomalies are supported by case studies, selected in sand-shale dominated Tertiary basins, offshore West Africa. Another advantage of this approach is that it can also account for the presence of reservoir-potential intervals at great depth and thus provide significant insight, from a prospective standpoint, into very poorly explored areas. Although at the outset the 2-D seismic tool legitimately merits being favored, optimization of the final predictive pressure model, prior to drilling, will depend upon the success of its combined use with other concepts and approaches, pertaining to structural geology, sedimentology, rock mechanics and fluid dynamics.

  6. Change of permeability caused by 2011 Tohoku earthquake detected from pore pressure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, C.; Kano, Y.; Ito, H.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquake-induced groundwater changes which are the pre- and co-seismic changes have been long reported (e.g. Roeloffs, 1996). For example, 1995 Kobe earthquake, water inflow into observation tunnel changed at Rokko (Fujimori et al., 1995), at the times of 1964 Alaska earthquake (M8.6) (Coble, 1967) and 1999 Taiwan Chi-Chi earthquake (M7.6) (Chia et al., 2001), groundwater leve were fluctuated. The shaking of seismic waves and crack formation by crustal deformation are proposed as one causes but the mechanism is controversial. We are monitoring pore pressure from 2005 to measure the stress changes at Kamioka mine, Gifu prefecture, central Japan. Barometric pressure and strain are observed to correct the pore pressure data. In general, the pore pressure changes associate with the meteorological effects, Earth tides and crustal deformation. Increase of pore pressure depends on the precipitation which flows into the ground. Especially, snow effects are bigger than the usual rainfall because our observation site has heavy snow in winter season. Melted snow flows in the ground and pore pressure increases at the March to April every year. When the 2011 Tohoku earthquake (M9.0) occurred, pore pressure remarkably decreased because the permeability increases by crustal deformation at Kamioka region. Thus, we estimated the hydraulic diffusivity before and after the earthquake from pore pressure response to crustal deformation. We made separated analyses on three frequency bands. First is the high frequency band, especially, seismic response. Second is response to Earth tides. Third frequency band is that of barometric response which is lower than other two bands. At high frequency band, we confirmed that the deformation occurred under undrained condition and estimated the bulk modulus from pore pressure and strain data. Next, tidal response is extracted from pore pressure which applied to every three months data of pore pressure, barometric pressure and strain. Time window

  7. Temporal and Spatial Pore Water Pressure Distribution Surrounding a Vertical Landfill Leachate Recirculation Well

    PubMed Central

    Kadambala, Ravi; Townsend, Timothy G.; Jain, Pradeep; Singh, Karamjit

    2011-01-01

    Addition of liquids into landfilled waste can result in an increase in pore water pressure, and this in turn may increase concerns with respect to geotechnical stability of the landfilled waste mass. While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill pore water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported. Pressure readings from vibrating wire piezometers placed in the waste surrounding a liquids addition well at a full-scale operating landfill in Florida were recorded over a 2-year period. Prior to the addition of liquids, measured pore pressures were found to increase with landfill depth, an indication of gas pressure increase and decreasing waste permeability with depth. When liquid addition commenced, piezometers located closer to either the leachate injection well or the landfill surface responded more rapidly to leachate addition relative to those far from the well and those at deeper locations. After liquid addition stopped, measured pore pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time. Despite the large pressures present at the bottom of the liquid addition well, much smaller pressures were measured in the surrounding waste. The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth. PMID:21655145

  8. Temporal and spatial pore water pressure distribution surrounding a vertical landfill leachate recirculation well.

    PubMed

    Kadambala, Ravi; Townsend, Timothy G; Jain, Pradeep; Singh, Karamjit

    2011-05-01

    Addition of liquids into landfilled waste can result in an increase in pore water pressure, and this in turn may increase concerns with respect to geotechnical stability of the landfilled waste mass. While the impact of vertical well leachate recirculation on landfill pore water pressures has been mathematically modeled, measurements of these systems in operating landfills have not been reported. Pressure readings from vibrating wire piezometers placed in the waste surrounding a liquids addition well at a full-scale operating landfill in Florida were recorded over a 2-year period. Prior to the addition of liquids, measured pore pressures were found to increase with landfill depth, an indication of gas pressure increase and decreasing waste permeability with depth. When liquid addition commenced, piezometers located closer to either the leachate injection well or the landfill surface responded more rapidly to leachate addition relative to those far from the well and those at deeper locations. After liquid addition stopped, measured pore pressures did not immediately drop, but slowly decreased with time. Despite the large pressures present at the bottom of the liquid addition well, much smaller pressures were measured in the surrounding waste. The spatial variation of the pressures recorded in this study suggests that waste permeability is anisotropic and decreases with depth. PMID:21655145

  9. The change in orientation of subsidiary shears near faults containing pore fluid under high pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.

    1992-01-01

    Byerlee, J., 1992. The change in orientation of subsidiary shears near faults containing pore fluid under high pressure. In: T. Mikumo, K. Aki, M. Ohnaka, L.J. Ruff and P.K.P. Spudich (Editors), Earthquake Source Physics and Earthquake Precursors. Tectonophysics, 211: 295-303. The mechanical effects of a fault containing near-lithostatic fluid pressure in which fluid pressure decreases monotonically from the core of the fault zone to the adjacent country rock is considered. This fluid pressure distribution has mechanical implications for the orientation of subsidiary shears around a fault. Analysis shows that the maximum principal stress is oriented at a high angle to the fault in the country rock where the pore pressure is hydrostatic, and rotates to 45?? to the fault within the fault zone where the pore pressure is much higher. This analysis suggests that on the San Andreas fault, where heat flow constraints require that the coefficient of friction for slip on the fault be less than 0.1, the pore fluid pressure on the main fault is 85% of the lithostatic pressure. The observed geometry of the subsidiary shears in the creeping section of the San Andreas are broadly consistent with this model, with differences that may be due to the heterogeneous nature of the fault. ?? 1992.

  10. Fluid displacement fronts in porous media: pore scale interfacial jumps, pressure bursts and acoustic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, Franziska; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    The macroscopically smooth and regular motion of fluid fronts in porous media is composed of numerous rapid pore-scale interfacial jumps and pressure bursts that involve intense interfacial energy release in the form of acoustic emissions. The characteristics of these pore scale events affect residual phase entrapment and transport properties behind the front. We present experimental studies using acoustic emission technique (AE), rapid imaging, and liquid pressure measurements to characterize these processes during drainage and imbibition in simple porous media. Imbibition and drainage produce different AE signatures (AE amplitudes obey a power law). For rapid drainage, AE signals persist long after cessation of front motion reflecting fluid redistribution and interfacial relaxation. Imaging revealed that the velocity of interfacial jumps often exceeds front velocity by more than 50 fold and is highly inertial component (Re>1000). Pore invasion volumes reduced deduced from pressure fluctuations waiting times (for constant withdrawal rates) show remarkable agreement with geometrically-deduced pore volumes. Discrepancies between invaded volumes and geometrical pores increase with increasing capillary numbers due to constraints on evacuation opportunity times and simultaneous invasion events. A mechanistic model for interfacial motions in a pore-throat network was developed to investigate interfacial dynamics focusing on the role of inertia. Results suggest that while pore scale dynamics were sensitive to variations in pore geometry and boundary conditions, inertia exerted only a minor effect on phase entrapment. The study on pore scale invasion events paints a complex picture of rapid and inertial motions and provides new insights on mechanisms at displacement fronts that are essential for improved macroscopic description of multiphase flows in porous media.

  11. Solute dispersion under electric and pressure driven flows; pore scale processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuai; Raoof, Amir; Schotting, Ruud

    2014-09-01

    Solute dispersion is one of the major mixing mechanisms in transport through porous media, originating from velocity variations at different scales, starting from the pore scale. Different driving forces, such as pressure driven flow (PDF) and electro-osmotic flow (EOF), establish different velocity profiles within individual pores, resulting in different spreading of solutes at this scale. While the velocity profile in PDF is parabolic due to the wall friction effects, the velocity in EOF is typically plug flow, due to the wall charge effects. In this study, we applied a pore network modeling formulation to simulate the velocity field driven by pressure and electric potential to calculate and compare the corresponding average solute dispersivity values. The influence of different driving forces on the hydrodynamic dispersion of a tracer solute is investigated. Applying the pore network modeling, we could capture the velocity variations among different pores, which is the main contribution for the dispersion coefficient. The correlation between pore velocities against pore sizes is found to be different for EOF and PDF, causing different solute dispersion coefficients. The results can provide insight into modeling of electrokinetic remediation for contaminant cleanup in low permeable soils.

  12. Modified Newmark method involving excess pore pressure to express unlimited landslide displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, H.; Tsukui, A.

    2012-12-01

    Newmark method is the most popular approach to assess the displacement of landslides induced by earthquakes using seismic acceleration, slope inclination, and friction parameters. However, this method always shows limited shear displacement no matter how the acceleration is large and duration is long. This is partly because it does not include any pore pressure, especially excess pore water pressure generated under long shear displacement. As shown by series of earthquake wave-form loading undrained ring shear tests by Disaster Prevention Research Institute of Kyoto University, grain crushing or soil skelton collapse can contribute to generation of high excess pore pressure and let the soil to reach liquefaction state ("Sliding surface liquefaction"). Many of unlimited landslide displacement have been revealed that this phenomena must be the key mechanism. In the test series of mixture of silica sands and dry-ice pellets (frozen carbon-dioxide), for studying the mechanism of the gasification of methane hydrates in the submarine landslides which likely to trigger large scale submarine landslides, authors have found linear relationship between log of excess pore pressure ratio (generated pore pressure / initial effective normal stress) and log of shear displacement. By embedding this relation into the Newmark method, unlimited shear displacement can appear under certain slope inclination and exaggerated acceleration. Authors show there is critical slope inclination for unlimited displacement when given acceleration waveform.

  13. Evolution of pore fluid pressures in a stimulated geothermal reservoir inferred from earthquake focal mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakawa, T.; Deichmann, N.

    2014-12-01

    We developed an inversion method to estimate the evolution of pore fluid pressure fields from earthquake focal mechanism solutions based on the Bayesian statistical inference and Akaike's Bayesian information criterion (ABIC). This method's application to induced seismicity in the Basel enhanced geothermal system in Switzerland shows the evolution of pore fluid pressures in response to fluid injection experiments. For a few days following the initiation of the fluid injection, overpressurized fluids are concentrated around the borehole and then anisotropically propagate within the reservoir until the bleed-off time. Then, the pore fluid pressure in the vicinity of the borehole drastically decreases, and overpressurized fluids become isolated in a few major fluid pockets. The pore fluid pressure in these pockets gradually decreases with time. The pore fluid pressure in the reservoir is less than the minimum principal stress at each depth, indicating that the hydraulic fracturing did not occur during stimulation. This suggests that seismic events may play an important role to promote the development of permeable channels, particularly southeast of the borehole where the largest seismic event (ML 3.4) occurred. This is not directly related to a drastic decrease in fault strength at the hypocenter, but rather the positive feedback between permeability enhancement and poro-elastic and stress transfer loading from slipping interfaces. These processes likely contribute to this event's nucleation.

  14. Effects of Pore Distributions on Ductility of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die-Cast Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Li, Mei; Allison, John

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a microstructure-based three-dimensional (3D) finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die-cast (HPDC) Magnesium alloys on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope and X-ray tomography to obtain the general information on the pore distribution features. The experimentally observed pore distribution features are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element models with different pore volume fractions and pore distribution features. Shear and ductile damage models are adopted in the finite element analyses to induce the fracture by element removal, leading to the prediction of ductility. The results in this study show that the ductility monotonically decreases as the pore volume fraction increases and that the effect of ‘skin region’ on the ductility is noticeable under the condition of same local pore volume fraction in the center region of the sample and its existence can be beneficial for the improvement of ductility. The further synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element analyses are planned to investigate the effects of pore size and pore size distribution.

  15. Undrained heating and anomalous pore-fluid pressurization of a hardened cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabezloo, S.; Sulem, J.; Saint-Marc, J.

    2009-04-01

    Temperature increase in a fluid-saturated porous material in undrained condition leads to volume change and pore pressure increase due to the discrepancy between the thermal expansion coefficients of the pore fluid and of the pore volume. This increase of the pore fluid pressure induces a reduction of the effective mean stress, and can lead to shear failure or hydraulic fracturing. This phenomenon is important is important in environmental engineering for radioactive (exothermal) waste disposal in deep clay geological formations as well as in geophysics in the studies of rapid fault slip events when shear heating tends to increase the pore pressure and to decrease the effective compressive stress and the shearing resistance of the fault material (Sulem et al. 2007). This is also important in petroleum engineering where the reservoir rock and the well cement lining undergo sudden temperature changes for example when extracting heavy oils by steam injection methods. This rapid increase of temperature could damage cement sheath integrity of wells and lead to loss of zonal isolation. The values of the thermal pressurization coefficient, defined as the pore pressure increase due to a unit temperature increase in undrained condition, is largely dependent upon the nature of the material, the state of stress, the range of temperature change, the induced damage. The large variability of the thermal pressurization coefficient reported in the literature for different porous materials with values from 0.01MPa/°C to 1.5MPa/°C highlights the necessity of laboratory studies. This phenomenon of thermal pressurization is studied experimentally for a fluid-saturated hardened cement paste in an undrained heating test. Careful analysis of the effect of the dead volume of the drainage system of the triaxial cell has been performed based on a simple correction method proposed by Ghabezloo and Sulem (2008, 2009). The drained and undrained thermal expansion coefficients of the hardened

  16. 14 CFR 91.144 - Temporary restriction on flight operations during abnormally high barometric pressure conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... during abnormally high barometric pressure conditions. 91.144 Section 91.144 Aeronautics and Space... flight operations during abnormally high barometric pressure conditions. (a) Special flight restrictions. When any information indicates that barometric pressure on the route of flight currently exceeds...

  17. 14 CFR 91.144 - Temporary restriction on flight operations during abnormally high barometric pressure conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... during abnormally high barometric pressure conditions. 91.144 Section 91.144 Aeronautics and Space... flight operations during abnormally high barometric pressure conditions. (a) Special flight restrictions. When any information indicates that barometric pressure on the route of flight currently exceeds...

  18. 14 CFR 91.144 - Temporary restriction on flight operations during abnormally high barometric pressure conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... during abnormally high barometric pressure conditions. 91.144 Section 91.144 Aeronautics and Space... flight operations during abnormally high barometric pressure conditions. (a) Special flight restrictions. When any information indicates that barometric pressure on the route of flight currently exceeds...

  19. 14 CFR 91.144 - Temporary restriction on flight operations during abnormally high barometric pressure conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... during abnormally high barometric pressure conditions. 91.144 Section 91.144 Aeronautics and Space... flight operations during abnormally high barometric pressure conditions. (a) Special flight restrictions. When any information indicates that barometric pressure on the route of flight currently exceeds...

  20. Prediction of pore-water pressure response to rainfall using support vector regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babangida, Nuraddeen Muhammad; Mustafa, Muhammad Raza Ul; Yusuf, Khamaruzaman Wan; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinear complex behavior of pore-water pressure responses to rainfall was modelled using support vector regression (SVR). Pore-water pressure can rise to disturbing levels that may result in slope failure during or after rainfall. Traditionally, monitoring slope pore-water pressure responses to rainfall is tedious and expensive, in that the slope must be instrumented with necessary monitors. Data on rainfall and corresponding responses of pore-water pressure were collected from such a monitoring program at a slope site in Malaysia and used to develop SVR models to predict pore-water pressure fluctuations. Three models, based on their different input configurations, were developed. SVR optimum meta-parameters were obtained using k-fold cross validation and a grid search. Model type 3 was adjudged the best among the models and was used to predict three other points on the slope. For each point, lag intervals of 30 min, 1 h and 2 h were used to make the predictions. The SVR model predictions were compared with predictions made by an artificial neural network model; overall, the SVR model showed slightly better results. Uncertainty quantification analysis was also performed for further model assessment. The uncertainty components were found to be low and tolerable, with d-factor of 0.14 and 74 % of observed data falling within the 95 % confidence bound. The study demonstrated that the SVR model is effective in providing an accurate and quick means of obtaining pore-water pressure response, which may be vital in systems where response information is urgently needed.

  1. Temperature and pore pressure distribution in a concrete slab during the microwave decontamination process

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Ebadian, M.A.; White, T.L.; Grubb, R.G.; Foster, D. Jr.

    1994-10-01

    As an application of microwave engineering, the new technology of concrete decontamination and decommissioning using microwave energy has been recently developed. The temperature and pore pressure within the concrete are studied theoretically in this paper. The heat and mass transfer within the porous concrete, coupled with temperature dependent dielectric property are investigated. The effects of microwave frequency (f), microwave power intensity (Q{sub 0,ave}), concrete porosity ({phi}) on the temperature and pore pressure distributions and their variations are fully discussed. The effects of the variation of complex dielectric permittivity ({epsilon}) and presentation of different steel reinforcements are also illustrated.

  2. The relationship between pore-pressure and the elastic-wave velocities of TCDP-cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, K.; Takahashi, M.; Masuda, K.; Ito, H.; Song, S.; Wang, C.

    2005-12-01

    The elastic-wave velocities and the permeability of fault-related rocks are essential keys to reveal the earthquake process. We measured these parameters of boring-cores of the Chelungpu-fault (TCDP-cores) that is the earthquake-source fault of the 1999 Chi-Chi earthquake in Taiwan under high-pressure conditions. Experimental apparatus we used is the gas-medium, high-pressure and high-temperature deformation apparatus at the AIST Japan. We measured elastic-wave velocities and permeability simultaneously with decreasing pore-pressure (Pp) from 20 to 0 MPa under the constant confining-pressure and temperature condition (30 MPa and 25C). We measured compressional-wave velocities (Vp) and shear-wave velocities (Vs) at once. We adopted the oscillation method to measure the permeability because this method can measure the low-permeability with relatively short time, under high pore pressure conditions. We obtained 18 experimental cylindrical specimens sized 20 mm in diameter and 20 mm long, sampled from 482 m to 1316 m depth of the TCDP-core archives (mainly silty-sandstone and sandstone). It would be the first report to refer a relation between these physical properties of porous sediments. The results of our elastic-wave velocities measurement indicate the strong effect of pore-pressure on elastic-wave velocities. They increased rapidly with decreasing Pp down to 10 MPa. The elastic-wave velocities didn_ft change with decreasing Pp from 10 to 0 MPa. All samples showed similar pore pressure- velocity curves but different ratios of dV/dPp. It is considered that the volume of pores and crack decreased with decrease of pore-pressure. It can be said the pressurization effect on the elastic wave velocity would reflect significantly on the bulk density of sedimentary rocks. The Vp- and Vs-values decreased successively from silty-sandstone to sandstone at low-Pp condition (10-0 MPa). These results indicate that the Vp- and Vs-values are controlled by lithology under low

  3. A two-dimensional finite difference model of pore pressure evolution within and below a moving thrust sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Wiltschko, D.V. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    The authors have investigated the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of excess pore pressures within and beneath a ramping thrust sheet and the sensitivity of pore pressure to a variety of physical parameters. Coupled pore pressure and temperature equations were solved numerically in two dimensions using a generalized hydrostratigraphy of North American thrust belts; both deposition and thrust loading were modeled. The dominant mechanisms controlling pore pressure evolution were fluid flow and compression of pore space by vertical loading; thermal expansion of the fluids was found to be insignificant in generating excess pore pressures. The results of the modeling predict that it is possible to generate high pore pressure to lithostatic pressure ratios R within thrust belts by depositional loading prior to thrusting. High values of R are generated and maintained during thrust loading for reasonable assumptions about the conditions thought to have existed in thrust belts. Values of R were not constant throughout the model. The highest R values tended to concentrate near the surface of the model and within and below the toe of the thrust sheet. The magnitude and distribution of excess pore pressures and R values were found to be especially sensitive to variations in permeability. Excess pore pressure generation by compression exceeded pore pressure dissipation by fluid flow for permeabilities greater than approximately 10[sup [minus]16] m[sup 2] produced hydrostatic pore pressure gradients. The models demonstrate that permeability anisotropy and inhomogeneity due to lithologic variations may exert a strong control on the magnitude and spatial distribution of excess pore pressures within thrust belts.

  4. Post-earthquake ground movements correlated to pore-pressure transients.

    PubMed

    Jónsson, Sigurjón; Segall, Paul; Pedersen, Rikke; Björnsson, Grímur

    2003-07-10

    Large earthquakes alter the stress in the surrounding crust, leading to triggered earthquakes and aftershocks. A number of time-dependent processes, including afterslip, pore-fluid flow and viscous relaxation of the lower crust and upper mantle, further modify the stress and pore pressure near the fault, and hence the tendency for triggered earthquakes. It has proved difficult, however, to distinguish between these processes on the basis of direct field observations, despite considerable effort. Here we present a unique combination of measurements consisting of satellite radar interferograms and water-level changes in geothermal wells following two magnitude-6.5 earthquakes in the south Iceland seismic zone. The deformation recorded in the interferograms cannot be explained by either afterslip or visco-elastic relaxation, but is consistent with rebound of a porous elastic material in the first 1-2 months following the earthquakes. This interpretation is confirmed by direct measurements which show rapid (1-2-month) recovery of the earthquake-induced water-level changes. In contrast, the duration of the aftershock sequence is projected to be approximately 3.5 years, suggesting that pore-fluid flow does not control aftershock duration. But because the surface strains are dominated by pore-pressure changes in the shallow crust, we cannot rule out a longer pore-pressure transient at the depth of the aftershocks. The aftershock duration is consistent with models of seismicity rate variations based on rate- and state-dependent friction laws.

  5. Temporal pore pressure induced stress changes during injection and depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Birgit; Heidbach, Oliver; Schilling, Frank; Fuchs, Karl; Röckel, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Induced seismicity is observed during injection of fluids in oil, gas or geothermal wells as a rather immediate response close to the injection wells due to the often high-rate pressurization. It was recognized even earlier in connection with more moderate rate injection of fluid waste on a longer time frame but higher induced event magnitudes. Today, injection-related induced seismicity significantly increased the number of events with M>3 in the Mid U.S. However, induced seismicity is also observed during production of fluids and gas, even years after the onset of production. E.g. in the Groningen gas field production was required to be reduced due to the increase in felt and damaging seismicity after more than 50 years of exploitation of that field. Thus, injection and production induced seismicity can cause severe impact in terms of hazard but also on economic measures. In order to understand the different onset times of induced seismicity we built a generic model to quantify the role of poro-elasticity processes with special emphasis on the factors time, regional crustal stress conditions and fault parameters for three case studies (injection into a low permeable crystalline rock, hydrothermal circulation and production of fluids). With this approach we consider the spatial and temporal variation of reservoir stress paths, the "early" injection-related induced events during stimulation and the "late" production induced ones. Furthermore, in dependence of the undisturbed in situ stress field conditions the stress tensor can change significantly due to injection and long-term production with changes of the tectonic stress regime in which previously not critically stressed faults could turn to be optimally oriented for fault reactivation.

  6. Pore-water pressures associated with clogging of soil pipes: Numerical analysis of laboratory experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Clogging of soil pipes due to excessive internal erosion has been hypothesized to cause extreme erosion events such as landslides, debris flows, and gullies, but confirmation of this phenomenon has been lacking. Laboratory and field measurements have failed to measure pore water pressures within pip...

  7. A Sequential Dynamic Bayesian Network for Pore Pressure Prediction and Quantification of Uncertainty.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oughton, R. H.; Wooff, D. A.; Hobbs, R. W.; Swarbrick, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    Pore pressure prediction is vital when drilling a well, as unexpected overpressure can cause drilling challenges and uncontrolled hydrocarbon leakage. One cause of overpressure is when pore fluid is trapped during burial and takes on part of the lithostatic load. Predictions often use porosity-based techniques, such as the Eaton Ratio method and equivalent depth method. These rely on an idealised compaction trend and use a single wireline log as a proxy for porosity. Such methods do not account for the many sources of uncertainty, or for the multivariate nature of the system. We propose a sequential dynamic Bayesian network (SDBN) as a solution to these issues. The SDBN models the quantities in the system (such as pressures, porosity, lithology, wireline logs, fluid properties and so on) using conditional probability distributions to capture their joint behaviour. A compaction model is central to the SDBN, relating porosity to vertical effective stress, with uncertainty in the relationship, so that the logic is similar to that of the equivalent depth method. The probability distribution for porosity depends on VES and lithology, with much more uncertainty in sandstone-like rocks than in shales to reflect a general lack of understanding of sandstone compaction. The distributions of the wireline logs depend on porosity and lithology, along with other quantities, and so when they are observed the SDBN learns about porosity and lithology and in turn VES and pore pressure, using Bayes theorem. The probability distribution for each quantity in the SDBN is updated in light of any data, so that rather than giving a single-valued prediction for pore pressure, the SDBN gives a prediction with uncertainty that takes into account the whole system, knowledge and data. The dynamic nature of the SDBN enables it to use the bulk density to calculate total vertical stress, and to account for the dissipation of pore pressure. The vertical correlation in the SDBN means it is suited to

  8. Influence of pore pressure on the successive failures of intact slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgari, Chrysoula; Utili, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    The presence of water can significantly change the stability of a slope and as a result the evolution of a slope in time. In this paper the influence of pore water pressure on the morphological evolution of natural cliffs subject to progressive retreat is investigated. The upper bound theorem of limit analysis is employed to evaluate the stability number and the failure mechanism of successive failures of uniform c, φ slopes with the presence of water. This model extends the existing analytical framework on the evolution of slopes subjected to weathering by accounting for the presence of water. Pore-water pressure is considered in the model by using the coefficient ru, a description of the pore-water pressure distribution that is approximate, but is commonly used in slope stability analyses. To account for the influence of the pore pressure, the work of pore-water pressure on the deformation of the soil along the failure surface had to be included in the model leading to modified analytical expressions of the energy balance equation (the balance between external work and dissipated energy) and as a consequence, of the function whose minimum provides the solution in terms of failure mechanisms and associated values of soil strength. With this model it is possible to relate the evolution of natural slopes with the presence of water by a sequence of rotational sliding block failures to the degradation of material strength properties. Computations were carried out for a wide range of parameters (friction angle φ and initial slope inclination β) and a set of normalized solutions is presented for different values of ru coefficient.

  9. Closing an open system: Pore pressure changes in permeable edifice rock at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael J.; Wadsworth, Fabian B.

    2016-04-01

    A permeable or open system will react as a closed system if the rocks implicated are deformed on a timescale that precludes fluid movement. Closed system ("undrained") deformation therefore leads to a failure mode dependent change in pore pressure: microcracking (dilatant behaviour) and cataclastic pore collapse (compactant behaviour) will decrease and increase pore pressure, respectively. In the dilatant regime (i.e., in the shallow edifice, < 1 km depth), a decrease in pore pressure will serve to strengthen rock-a process termed dilatancy hardening. However, it is shown here, using undrained triaxial deformation experiments, that the high initial porosity and microcrack density of typical edifice-forming andesites prevent dilatancy hardening. This allows the rock proximal to the magma-filled conduit in the shallow edifice to remain weak during periods of unrest when high magma strain rates could be transferred to the adjacent country rock. Although the propensity for fracturing will likely reduce the structural integrity of the edifice, fracturing of the shallow edifice may improve the outgassing efficiency of the nearby magma-filled conduit. The increase in pore pressure during undrained deformation in the compactant regime (i.e., in the deep edifice, > 1 km depth) could lead to pore pressure embrittlement and fracturing. Indeed, the experiments of this study show that the pore pressure increases during progressive compaction in a closed system. However, the pore pressure is prevented from reaching the critical value required to promote a dilatant response (i.e., fracturing) for two reasons. First, the rate of compaction (i.e., porosity decrease) slows as the sample is deformed at a constant strain rate, a consequence of the decay in effective pressure. Second, the emergence of microcracking as the rock approaches the compactant-dilatant transition acts as a negative feedback and prevents the rock from transiting into the dilatant field. At this point, local

  10. The representativeness of pore water samples collected from the unsaturated zone using pressure-vacuum lysimeters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, C.A.; Healy, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Studies have indicated that the chemistry of water samples may be altered by the collection technique, creating concern about the representativeness of the pore water samples obtained. A study using soil water pressure-vacuum lysimeters in outwash sand and glacial till deposits demonstrates that for non-dilute-solution samples the effect of pH of sampling with lysimeters is minimal, and that measured major cation and anion concentrations are representative of the natural pore water; trace-metal concentrations can be significantly altered by collection procedures at low concentrations. -from Authors

  11. Characterization of pores in high pressure die cast aluminum using active thermography and computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maierhofer, Christiane; Myrach, Philipp; Röllig, Mathias; Jonietz, Florian; Illerhaus, Bernhard; Meinel, Dietmar; Richter, Uwe; Miksche, Ronald

    2016-02-01

    Larger high pressure die castings (HPDC) and decreasing wall thicknesses are raising the issue of casting defects like pores in aluminum structures. Properties of components are often strongly influenced by inner porosity. As these products are being established more and more in lightweight construction (e.g. automotive and other transport areas), non-destructive testing methods, which can be applied fast and on-site, are required for quality assurance. In this contribution, the application of active thermography for the direct detection of larger pores is demonstrated. The analysis of limits and accuracy of the method are completed by numerical simulation and the method is validated using computed tomography.

  12. Excess pore pressure generation of oceanic basalt by permeabilty evolution at Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, W.; Kameda, J.; Yamaguchi, A.; Hamada, Y.; Tadai, O.

    2015-12-01

    Excess pore pressure can be generated along or near interfaces of plate boundary at subduction zones, which is predicted by seismic velocities, and it is a key to understand coseismic slip behaviors during large earthquakes. Evolution of permeability within fault zones and upper sediments during burial and subduction is one of possible mechanisms that generate excess fluid pressure. This evolution process for sediment materials has been reported in previous studies, though the permeability evolution for oceanic crust, which also controls the pore pressure distribution around plate boundary, is not known well. Basalt brocks in the Cretaceous Shimanto accretionary complex of Japan preserve paleo Nankai Subduction structure, and based on vitrinite reflectance, Ro, for neighbor sedimentary rocks, basalt brocks at different areas show different degree of alteration. Therefore, the evolution of fluid transport properties for oceanic basalt at Nankai Subduction zone is estimated by comparing transport properties for various basaltic rocks from the on shore Shimanto belt, South-western Japan. We measured the rock physical properties from Okitsu-Kozurutsu, Kure, Mugi, and Makimine sites in the southeast Japan. Permeability and porosity was measured at room temperature and under confining pressure from 1 to 160 MPa. The steady state gas flow method was applied to evaluate permeability by using nitrogen gas as a pore fluid. Permeability decreases from 10-18 to 10-22 m2 with an increase in the degree of alteration from 1 to 4.5 of Ro (Maximum paleo-temperatures are 80 and 320 oC, respectively). Porosity was also decreased from 5 to 0.5 % with alteration. The relationship between permeability and porosity is described by power law. Our results suggest that based on the evolution curves of permeability and porosity and dehydration rate, porosity reduction in oceanic basalt will contribute to pore pressure generation at shallower subduction zone. On the other hand, clay

  13. Deformation of a Volcanic Edifice by Pore Pressurization: An Analog Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyman, D.; Bursik, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic flank destabilization, preceded by pressurization-induced surface deformation or weakening, presents a significant hazard at stratovolcanoes with ample supply of magmatic volatiles or preexisting hydrothermal systems as in Bezymianny- and Bandai-type eruptions, respectively. Deformation is also an important sign of the nature of unrest at large calderas such as Long Valley, USA. Previous studies of volcanic inflation have focused primarily on the role of ascending magma. Relatively few studies have centered on surface deformation caused by pressurization from other volcanic fluids, including exsolved volatiles and pressurized hydrothermal systems. Most investigations of pore-pressurization have focused on numerical modelling of pore pressure transients. In analog experiments presented here, pore-filling fluids are injected into the base of a damp sand medium without exceeding dike propagating pressures, simulating the pressurization and bulk-permeable flow of volatile fluids through volcanic systems. The experiments examine surface deformation from a range of source depths and pressures as well as edifice geometries. 3D imaging is possible through use of the Microsoft® Kinect™ sensor, which allows for the generation of high-resolution, high frame rate, lab-scale Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). After initial processing to increase signal-to-noise ratio, surface deformation is measured using the DEM time-series generated by the Kinect™. Analysis of preliminary experiments suggests that inflation is possible up to approx. 10 % of pressure source depth. We also show that the Kinect™ sensor is useful in analog volcanological studies, an environment to which it is well-suited.

  14. Pore fluid pressure and shear behavior in debris flows of different compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaitna, Roland; Palucis, Marisa; Yohannes, Bereket; Hill, Kimberly; Dietrich, William

    2016-04-01

    Debris flows are mixtures of sediment and water that can have a wide range of different grain size distributions and water contents. The composition of the material is expected to have a strong effect on the development of pore fluid pressures in excess to hydrostatic, which in turn might affect the internal deformation behavior. We present a set of large scale experiments with debris flow mixtures of different compositions in a 4-m diameter rotating drum. Longitudinal profiles of basal fluid pressure and normal stress were measured and a probe to determine fluid pressure at different depths within the flow was developed and tested. Additionally we determined vertical profiles of mean particle velocities in the flow interior by measuring small variations of conductivity of the passing material and calculating the time lag between signals from two independent measurements at a small, known distance apart. Mean values of basal pore fluid pressure range from hydrostatic pressure for gravel-water flows to nearly complete liquefaction for muddy mixtures having a wide grain size distribution. The data indicate that the presence of fines dampens fluctuations of normalized fluid pressure and normal stress and concentrates shear at the base. The mobility of grain-fluid flows is strongly enhanced by a combination of fines in suspension as part of the interstitial fluid and a wide grain size distribution. Excess fluid pressure may arise from fluid displacement by converging grains at the front of the flow and the slow settling of grains through a highly viscous non-Newtonian fluid. Our findings support the need for pore pressure evolution and diffusion equations in debris flow models as they depend on particle size distributions. This study contributes to the understanding of the production of excess fluid pressure in grain fluid mixtures and may guide the development of constitutive models that describe natural events.

  15. Landslide stability: Role of rainfall-induced, laterally propagating, pore-pressure waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Priest, G.R.; Schulz, W.H.; Ellis, W.L.; Allan, J.A.; Niem, A.R.; Niem, W.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Johnson Creek Landslide is a translational slide in seaward-dipping Miocene siltstone and sandstone (Astoria Formation) and an overlying Quaternary marine terrace deposit. The basal slide plane slopes sub-parallel to the dip of the Miocene rocks, except beneath the back-tilted toe block, where it slopes inland. Rainfall events raise pore-water pressure in the basal shear zone in the form of pulses of water pressure traveling laterally from the headwall graben down the axis of the slide at rates of 1-6 m/hr. Infiltration of meteoric water and vertical pressure transmission through the unsaturated zone has been measured at ~50 mm/hr. Infiltration and vertical pressure transmission were too slow to directly raise head at the basal shear zone prior to landslide movement. Only at the headwall graben was the saturated zone shallow enough for rainfall events to trigger lateral pulses of water pressure through the saturated zone. When pressure levels in the basal shear zone exceeded thresholds defined in this paper, the slide began slow, creeping movement as an intact block. As pressures exceeded thresholds for movement in more of the slide mass, movement accelerated, and differential displacement between internal slide blocks became more pronounced. Rainfall-induced pore-pressure waves are probably a common landslide trigger wherever effective hydraulic conductivity is high and the saturated zone is located near the surface in some part of a slide. An ancillary finding is apparently greater accuracy of grouted piezometers relative to those in sand packs for measurement of pore pressures at the installed depth.

  16. Dilatancy and pore pressure effects during fracture and shear of antigorite-rich serpentinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, M. E.; Zhu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Geophysical observations show evidence of near-lithostatic pore pressure in fault zones that experience episodic slow slip events. In addition, dilatancy hardening is one of several hypotheses proposed to explain the transient self-sustaining nature of slow slip. Thus, pore pressure evolution is possibly an important control on slow slip behavior. Phyllosilicates are abundant in regions of subduction zones and along the deep San Andreas Fault where slow slip is observed, yet previous work on phyllosilicate-bearing rocks indicates that fracture and frictional sliding occur with little dilation of the pore space. We present experimental results of pore pressure effects during fracture and frictional shear of antigorite-rich serpentinite. Triaxial deformation experiments were conducted on intact cores 25.4 mm in diameter and 53.0 mm in length and ~1.5 mm thick gouge zones sandwiched between porous sandstone or steel sawcut forcing blocks. Experiments were conducted at room temperature, confining pressures from 50 to 100 MPa, pore pressure from 0 to 95 MPa, and axial displacement rates from 0.016 to 4.0 μm/s (shear rates from 0.02 to 5 μm/s). Foliated and macroscopically isotropic intact serpentinite samples were tested; fabric orientation is strongly correlated with both strength and dilatancy. When foliation is oriented parallel to σ1, strength and dilatancy are greatest and similar to those for crystalline rocks. When foliation is oriented 45 ° to σ1, however, dilatancy and strength are both greatly reduced. During frictional shear we observe a transition from rate-strengthening to rate-weakening behavior at ~0.5 μm/s, which is within range of typical slow slip rates and consistent with previous studies. This transition occurs concurrently with a transition from slip-induced compaction to dilation. Higher pore pressure correlates with overall higher friction coefficient, and also with lower compaction rates and higher dilation rates in the rate

  17. High-velocity frictional experiments on dolerite and quartzite under controlled pore pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togo, T.; Shimamoto, T.; Ma, S.

    2013-12-01

    High-velocity friction experiments on rocks with or without gouge have been conducted mostly under dry conditions and demonstrated dramatic weakening of faults at high velocities (e.g., Di Toro et al., 2011, Nature). Recent experiments under wet conditions (e.g., Ujiie and Tsutsumi, 2010, GRL; Faulkner et al., 2011, GRL) revealed very different behaviors from those of dry faults, but those experiments were done under drained conditions. Experiments with controlled pore pressure Pp are definitely needed to determine mechanical properties of faults under fluid-rich environments such as those in subduction zones. Thus we have developed a pressure vessel that can be attached to our rotary-shear low to high-velocity friction apparatus (Marui Co Ltd., MIS-233-1-76). With a current specimen holder, friction experiments can be done on hollow-cylindrical specimens of 15 and 40 mm in inner and outer diameters, respectively, at controlled Pp to 35 MPa, at effective normal stresses of 3~9 MPa, and at slip rates of 60 mm/year to 2 m/s. An effective normal stress can be applied with a 100 kN hydraulic actuator. We report an outline of the experimental system and preliminary high-velocity experiments on Shanxi dolerite and a quartzite from China that are composed of pyroxene and plagioclase and of almost pure quartz, respectively. High-velocity friction experiments were performed on hollow-cylindrical specimens of Shanxi dolerite at effective normal stresses of 0.13~1.07 MPa and at slip rates of 1, 10, 100 and 1000 mm/sec. All experiments were conducted first with the nitrogen gas filling the pressure vessel (dry tests) and then with a controlled pore-water pressure (wet tests). In the dry tests an axial force was kept at 1 kN and the nitrogen gas pressure was increased in steps to 5 MPa to change an effective normal stress. In the wet tests the specimens were soaked in distilled water in the vessel and Pp was applied by nitrogen gas in a similar manner as in the dry tests

  18. One-dimensional pore pressure diffusion of different grain-fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Thannen, Magdalena; Kaitna, Roland

    2015-04-01

    During the release and the flow of fully saturated debris, non-hydrostatic fluid pressure can build up and probably dissipate during the event. This excess fluid pressure has a strong influence on the flow and deposition behaviour of debris flows. Therefore, we investigate the influence of mixture composition on the dissipation of non-hydrostatic fluid pressures. For this we use a cylindrical pipe of acrylic glass with installed pore water pressure sensors in different heights and measure the evolution of the pore water pressure over time. Several mixtures with variable content of fine sediment (silt and clay) and variable content of coarse sediment (with fixed relative fractions of grains between 2 and 32 mm) are tested. For the fines two types of clay (smectite and kaolinite) and loam (Stoober Lehm) are used. The analysis is based on the one-dimensional consolidation theory which uses a diffusion coefficient D to model the decay of excess fluid pressure over time. Starting from artificially induced super-hydrostatic fluid pressures, we find dissipation coefficients ranging from 10-5 m²/s for liquid mixtures to 10-8 m²/s for viscous mixtures. The results for kaolinite and smectite are quite similar. For our limited number of mixtures the effect of fines content is more pronounced than the effect of different amounts of coarse particles.

  19. Transient pore pressure response to confining stress excursions in Berea sandstone flooded with an aqueous solution of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Jackson B.; Cooper, Clay A.

    2014-06-01

    We measured the pore pressure response due to carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubble nucleation and growth in a Berea sandstone core flooded with an initially subsaturated aqueous solution of CO2, in response to a rapid drop in confining stress, under conditions representative of a confined aquifer. A portion of the CO2 in the Earth's crust, derived from volcanic, magmatic, and biogenic sources, dissolves in groundwater. Sudden reductions in confining stress in the Earth's crust occur due to dilational strain generated by the propagation of seismic Rayleigh and P waves, or aseismic slip in the near field of earthquakes. A drop in confining stress produces a proportional drop in pore fluid pressure. When the pore fluid contains dissolved CO2, the pore pressure responds to a drop in confining stress like it does in the dissolved gas-free case, until the pore pressure falls below the bubble pressure. Gas bubble nucleation and diffusive growth in the pore space trigger spontaneous, transient buildup of the pore fluid pressure, and reduction of effective stress. We measured the rate of pore fluid pressure buildup in the 100 s immediately following the confining stress drop, as a function of the saturation with respect to CO2 at the lowest pore pressure realized during the confining stress drop, using five different CO2 partial pressures. The rate scales with the saturation with respect to dissolved CO2, from 10 kPa/min at 1.25 to 166 kPa/min at 1.8. The net pore pressure rise was as large as 0.7 MPa (100 psi) over 5 h.

  20. Micromechanics of Shear Localization under Elevated Temperature and Pore Pressure in Experimentally Deformed Quartz Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, T.; Hirth, G.

    2014-12-01

    Triaxial compression experiments were conducted on a permeable quartz sandstone under argon pore fluid and vented conditions at temperatures to 900°C and effective pressures to 175 MPa. Vented tests exhibit a transition from brittle faulting towards thermally-activated cataclastic flow. Microfracture density and acoustic emissions indicate that the transition corresponds to a change in mechanism from rate-insensitive fracture to subcritical cracking. We conclude that the transition occurs when shear microfracture propagation and macroscopic shear localization are suppressed under increased grain-scale fracture energy and reduced dilatancy. A comparison of the two tests shows that pore fluid has little influence on the failure behavior at low temperatures. Conversely, pore fluid tests exhibit substantially smaller strengths and enhanced ductility than those of vented tests at high temperatures and pressures, similar to weakening induced by decreasing strain rate in the water-saturated sandstone at room temperature. We infer that the observed weakening results from an enhancement in intergranular frictional slip involving subcritical cracking where retained intracrystalline water reduced fracture energy. We are characterizing detailed microstructures and finite strain fields in samples deformed at varied strains, as well as evolution in volume strain and other inelastic properties, to further constrain the pore fluid effects on shear localization processes.

  1. Determining Pore Pressures Along a Slip Surface Within a Saturated Elastic-Plastic Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, R. C.; Rice, J. R.; Dunham, E. M.

    2008-12-01

    Here we consider shear rupture along a slip surface in a fluid-saturated elastic-plastic porous medium, like in landslide and earthquake modeling, and assume that there are different poro-elasto-plastic response properties on the two sides of the slip surface. This different response may be because the fault bordering materials are dissimilar, or just because one side is actively yielding and the other is not, or is yielding but in a different mode. In effect, we are representing a core about a slip surface that divides two similar or contrasting materials. This representation is especially relevant in earthquake rupture dynamics. Studies of mature fault zones have noted a trend of fractured host rock extending 10--100m from the fault, with an ultracataclastic core ~100mm about or to one side of the principal slip surface (e.g., Chester and Chester, Tectonophys, 1998; Chester et al., Columbia Univ Pr, 2004). Furthermore, there is likely to exist a material contrast that may come from accumulating km of slip and a bias in accumulated damage. The local pore pressure at the slip surface influences the rupture dynamics because, through the effective stress concept, it controls the local shear strength along the fault, a feature neglected as a simplification in our preliminary poro-elasto-plastic modeling of dynamic rupture (Viesca et al., JGR, 2008). To determine pore pressures at the slip surface under locally elastic-plastic response, we must consider pore pressure discontinuities about that surface that arise in an undrained treatment of off-fault material and their amelioration within resulting thin diffusive boundary layers, such that pore pressure and fluid mass flux in the normal direction are continuous at the slip surface. Our approach builds on previous work considering the effect of contrasts in poroelastic properties on rupture propagation (Rudnicki and Rice, JGR, 2006; Dunham and Rice, JGR, 2008). Here we find expressions for the undrained pore pressure

  2. Pore-pressure influence in the poroelastic behavior of rocks: Experimental studies and results

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, J.; Bouteca, M.J.; Sarda, J.P.; Bary, D. )

    1993-06-01

    The influence of pore pressure on the elastic strain of rocks is basic to reservoir compaction and subsidence problems and in reservoir engineering and environment studies. Biot's coefficient is an important parameter used to determine the influence of pore pressure on rock deformation. This paper presents measurements of Biot's coefficient on limestone samples and interprets these measurements. The coefficients used in poroelastic studies first are defined as Biot's coefficient and compressibility coefficients proposed by Zimmerman. Then, the experimental apparatus and procedures used to measure these coefficients are described. Finally, the results, which confirm the theoretical framework of poroelasticity, are presented and discussed. The compressibility coefficients and Biot's coefficient increase with porosity according to a law that is formally similar to a Hashin-Shtrickman's type law. For porosities in the 4.5% to 23% range, Biot's coefficient increases from 0.34 to 0.83.

  3. Effects of elevated temperature and pore pressure on the mechanical behavior of Bullfrog tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, W.A.

    1982-02-01

    Samples of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff from the depth interval 758.9 to 759.2 m in hole USW-G1 on the Nevada Test Site were tested in triaxial compression. Test conditions were: (1) effective confining pressure to 20 MPa; (2) temperature of 200{sup 0}C; (3) both dry and with pore water pressures from 3.4 to 5 MPa; and (4) a strain-rate of 10{sup -4}/s. The results suggest that the presence of water causes the strength to decrease. In addition, the brittle-ductile transition pressure for this rock was found to be about 15 MPa, regardless of saturation. Below this pressure deformation is characterized by unstable stress drops and the development of a single fracture, and above this pressure deformation is stable and distributed more uniformly throughout the sample.

  4. Characterization of pore structure in cement-based materials using pressurization-depressurization cycling mercury intrusion porosimetry (PDC-MIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jian; Ye Guang; Breugel, Klaas van

    2010-07-15

    Numerous mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) studies have been carried out to investigate the pore structure in cement-based materials. However, the standard MIP often results in an underestimation of large pores and an overestimation of small pores because of its intrinsic limitation. In this paper, an innovative MIP method is developed in order to provide a more accurate estimation of pore size distribution. The new MIP measurements are conducted following a unique mercury intrusion procedure, in which the applied pressure is increased from the minimum to the maximum by repeating pressurization-depressurization cycles instead of a continuous pressurization followed by a continuous depressurization. Accordingly, this method is called pressurization-depressurization cycling MIP (PDC-MIP). By following the PDC-MIP testing sequence, the volumes of the throat pores and the corresponding ink-bottle pores can be determined at every pore size. These values are used to calculate pore size distribution by using the newly developed analysis method. This paper presents an application of PDC-MIP on the investigation of the pore size distribution in cement-based materials. The experimental results of PDC-MIP are compared with those measured by standard MIP. The PDC-MIP is further validated with the other experimental methods and numerical tool, including nitrogen sorption, backscanning electron (BSE) image analysis, Wood's metal intrusion porosimetry (WMIP) and the numerical simulation by the cement hydration model HYMOSTRUC3D.

  5. A pore-pressure diffusion model for estimating landslide-inducing rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    Many types of landslide movement are induced by large rainstorms, and empirical rainfall intensity/duration thresholds for initiating movement have been determined for various parts of the world. In this paper, I present a simple pressure diffusion model that provides a physically based hydrologic link between rainfall intensity/duration at the ground surface and destabilizing pore-water pressures at depth. The model approximates rainfall infiltration as a sinusoidally varying flux over time and uses physical parameters that can be determined independently. Using a comprehensive data set from an intensively monitored landslide, I demonstrate that the model is capable of distinguishing movement-inducing rainstorms. -Author

  6. Pore-pressure sensitivities to dynamic strains: observations in active tectonic regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbour, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Triggered seismicity arising from dynamic stresses is often explained by the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion, where elevated pore pressures reduce the effective strength of faults in fluid-saturated rock. The seismic response of a fluid-rock system naturally depends on its hydro-mechanical properties, but accurately assessing how pore-fluid pressure responds to applied stress over large scales in situ remains a challenging task; hence, spatial variations in response are not well understood, especially around active faults. Here I analyze previously unutilized records of dynamic strain and pore-pressure from regional and teleseismic earthquakes at Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) stations from 2006 through 2012 to investigate variations in response along the Pacific/North American tectonic plate boundary. I find robust scaling-response coefficients between excess pore pressure and dynamic strain at each station that are spatially correlated: around the San Andreas and San Jacinto fault systems, the response is lowest in regions of the crust undergoing the highest rates of secular shear strain. PBO stations in the Parkfield instrument cluster are at comparable distances to the San Andreas fault (SAF), and spatial variations there follow patterns in dextral creep rates along the fault, with the highest response in the actively creeping section, which is consistent with a narrowing zone of strain accumulation seen in geodetic velocity profiles. At stations in the San Juan Bautista (SJB) and Anza instrument clusters, the response depends non-linearly on the inverse fault-perpendicular distance, with the response decreasing towards the fault; the SJB cluster is at the northern transition from creeping-to-locked behavior along the SAF, where creep rates are at moderate to low levels, and the Anza cluster is around the San Jacinto fault, where to date there have been no statistically significant creep rates observed at the surface. These results suggest that the strength

  7. Elucidating the mechanical effects of pore water pressure increase on the stability of unsaturated soil slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscarnera, G.

    2012-12-01

    The increase of the pore water pressure due to rain infiltration can be a dominant component in the activation of slope failures. This paper shows an application of the theory of material stability to the triggering analysis of this important class of natural hazards. The goal is to identify the mechanisms through which the process of suction removal promotes the initiation of mechanical instabilities. The interplay between increase in pore water pressure, and failure mechanisms is investigated at material point level. In order to account for multiple failure mechanisms, the second-order work criterion is used and different stability indices are devised. The paper shows that the theory of material stability can assess the risk of shear failure and static liquefaction in both saturated and unsaturated contexts. It is shown that the combined use of an enhanced definition of second-order work for unsaturated porous media and a hydro-mechanical constitutive framework enables to retrieve bifurcation conditions for water-infiltration processes in unsaturated deposits. This finding discloses the importance of the coupling terms that incorporate the interaction between the solid skeleton and the pore fluids. As a consequence, these theoretical results suggest that some material properties that are not directly associated with the shearing resistance (e.g., the potential for wetting compaction) can play an important role in the initiation of slope failures. According to the proposed interpretation, the process of pore pressure increase can be understood as a trigger of uncontrolled strains, which at material point level are reflected by the onset of bifurcation conditions.

  8. Friction experiments of halite in brittle-ductile transition with high pore pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, H.; Takahashi, M.; Katayama, I.

    2015-12-01

    Flow stress of rock (τ) approximately linearly depends on normal stress on a shear zone (σn) minus pore pressure (p) in a brittle regime, and insensitive to σn in a fully plastic regime where pores are isolated and filled with fluid of high pressure comparable to the mean stress, like oil drops in water. How p affects τ in the transitional regime is not fully understood, although it is a key to understanding many important geological problems such as role of fluids in deformation mechanism, stress and strength profile of the crust, seismogenic depth range, and so on. The effective normal stress σe is often given by σe = σn - α p (α: a constant around 1 in the brittle regime), and frictional resistance, by τ = f σe (f: friction coefficient). Recently, Hirth and Beeler [2015] proposed a model of the effective stress law in the transitional regime. Because of increasing ratio of real area of contact to nominal area of frictional interface, α may decrease to zero towards fully plastic regime, causing a sharper peak in the strength profile than a conventional Brace-Goetze strength profile which is sometimes referred to as "Christmas tree". We investigated this idea by means of friction experiments at high temperature and pore pressure. We used halite as an analogue material which undergoes a transition from brittle to fully plastic regime under convenient conditions [Shimamoto, 1986]. We conducted friction experiments of a pre-cut sliding interface filled with halite gouge with gas-medium triaxial apparatus in Hiroshima University, at 150 MPa confining pressure, from room temperature to 210 °C, and from atmospheric pressure to more than 100 MPa fluid (argon gas) pressure in a reservoir. Our preliminary result shows that the sharp peak in the flow stress is probably absent. A phenomenological smooth connection proposed by Shimamoto and Noda [2014] based on friction experiments without a jacket (i.e. atmospheric pore pressure) may work in explaining the

  9. A New Mechanism for Pore Pressure Changes Induced by Distant Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Roeloffs, E.; Woodcock, D.; Gall, I.; Manga, M.

    2001-12-01

    Observations during the Mw=7.3 1992 Landers earthquake, Mw=7.4 Izmit earthquake and Mw=7.2 Hector Mine earthquake suggest that seismicity is triggered hundreds of kilometers from a mainshock epicenter. This puzzling phenomenon is not explained by traditional elastic models of seismic stresses. The fact that the triggered sites are often geothermal or magmatic suggests that fluids may be an important part of the triggering process. Rapid changes in pore pressure either reduce the effective stress on faults locally or prompt hydrofracturing to initiate local earthquakes. The challenge is to discover how the seismic waves generate a change in pore fluid pressure. We constrain a mechanism for seismically-induced pore pressure changes by studying coseismic water level drops at a well in Grants Pass, Oregon. Water level drops at the site have been associated with earthquakes for nearly 20 years. High-sample rate (up to 1 Hz) digital water level data is available for the two coseismic drops that have occurred since 1994. The approach of this study is to use the amplification of the seismic waves in the well to constrain variations of the aquifer properties during the water level drops. We find that the amplification of the seismic waves in the well is consistent with standard theory for 7 digitally recorded events without drops, but during an earthquake with a drop a dramatic change in amplification occurs during the passage of the Rayleigh waves. The change in amplification indicates that the transmissivity increases by a factor of 50 during the 11 cm coseismic water level drop accompanying the 1999 Mw=7.5 1999 Oaxaca, Mexico earthquake. Based on these observations, we propose a new model for coseismic pore pressure changes. Drops occur if an earthquake occurs when the well has become temporarily clogged by a solid precipitate or sediment. The seismic shaking induces a flow which removes the obstruction. Once a barrier is removed, water flows rapidly to generate dramatic

  10. Pore-lining composition and capillary breakthrough pressure of mudstone caprocks : sealing efficiency at geologic CO2 storage sites.

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Jason E.; Nemer, Martin B.; McPherson, Brian J. O. L.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Kotula, Paul Gabriel

    2010-12-01

    Subsurface containment of CO2 is predicated on effective caprock sealing. Many previous studies have relied on macroscopic measurements of capillary breakthrough pressure and other petrophysical properties without direct examination of solid phases that line pore networks and directly contact fluids. However, pore-lining phases strongly contribute to sealing behavior through interfacial interactions among CO2, brine, and the mineral or non-mineral phases. Our high resolution (i.e., sub-micron) examination of the composition of pore-lining phases of several continental and marine mudstones indicates that sealing efficiency (i.e., breakthrough pressure) is governed by pore shapes and pore-lining phases that are not identifiable except through direct characterization of pores. Bulk X-ray diffraction data does not indicate which phases line the pores and may be especially lacking for mudstones with organic material. Organics can line pores and may represent once-mobile phases that modify the wettability of an originally clay-lined pore network. For shallow formations (i.e., < {approx}800 m depth), interfacial tension and contact angles result in breakthrough pressures that may be as high as those needed to fracture the rock - thus, in the absence of fractures, capillary sealing efficiency is indicated. Deeper seals have poorer capillary sealing if mica-like wetting dominates the wettability. We thank the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and the Southeast and Southwest Carbon Sequestration Partnerships for supporting this work.

  11. Pore-lining composition and capillary breakthrough pressure of mudstone caprocks : sealing efficiency of geologic CO2 storage sites.

    SciTech Connect

    Petrusak, Robin; Heath, Jason E.; McPherson, Brian J. O. L.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Kotula, Paul Gabriel

    2010-08-01

    Subsurface containment of CO2 is predicated on effective caprock sealing. Many previous studies have relied on macroscopic measurements of capillary breakthrough pressure and other petrophysical properties without direct examination of solid phases that line pore networks and directly contact fluids. However, pore-lining phases strongly contribute to sealing behavior through interfacial interactions among CO2, brine, and the mineral or non-mineral phases. Our high resolution (i.e., sub-micron) examination of the composition of pore-lining phases of several continental and marine mudstones indicates that sealing efficiency (i.e., breakthrough pressure) is governed by pore shapes and pore-lining phases that are not identifiable except through direct characterization of pores. Bulk X-ray diffraction data does not indicate which phases line the pores and may be especially lacking for mudstones with organic material. Organics can line pores and may represent once-mobile phases that modify the wettability of an originally clay-lined pore network. For shallow formations (i.e., < {approx}800 m depth), interfacial tension and contact angles result in breakthrough pressures that may be as high as those needed to fracture the rock - thus, in the absence of fractures, capillary sealing efficiency is indicated. Deeper seals have poorer capillary sealing if mica-like wetting dominates the wettability.

  12. Predicting the Influence of Pore Characteristics on Ductility of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die Casting Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Li, Dongsheng

    2013-06-10

    In this paper, a two-dimensional microstructure-based finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die casting Mg materials on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM50 and AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope to obtain the overall information on the pore characteristics. The experimentally quantified pore characteristics are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructures with different pore sizes, pore volume fractions and pore size distributions. Pores are explicitly represented in the synthetic microstructures and meshed out for the subsequent finite element analysis. In the finite element analysis, an intrinsic critical strain value is used for the Mg matrix material, beyond which work-hardening is no longer permissible. With no artificial failure criterion prescribed, ductility levels are predicted for the various microstructures in the form of strain localization. Mesh size effect study is also conducted, from which a mesh size dependent critical strain curve is determined. A concept of scalability of pore size effects is then presented and examined with the use of the mesh size dependent critical strain curve. The results in this study show that, for the regions with lower pore size and lower volume fraction, the ductility generally decreases as the pore size and pore volume fraction increase whereas, for the regions with larger pore size and larger pore volume fraction, other factors such as the mean distance between the pores begin to have some substantial influence on the ductility. The results also indicate that the pore size effects may be scalable for the models with good-representative pore shape and distribution with the use of the mesh size dependent critical strain curve.

  13. The effects of pressure, temperature, and pore water on velocities in Westerly granite. [for seismic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. W., Jr.; Nur, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A description is presented of an experimental assembly which has been developed to conduct concurrent measurements of compressional and shear wave velocities in rocks at high temperatures and confining pressures and with independent control of the pore pressure. The apparatus was used in studies of the joint effects of temperature, external confining pressure, and internal pore water on sonic velocities in Westerly granite. It was found that at a given temperature, confining pressure has a larger accelerating effect on compressional waves in dry rock, whereas at a given confining pressure, temperature has a larger retarding effect on shear waves.

  14. Earthquake Fracture Energies and Weakening of Faults by Thermal Pressurization of Pore Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, J. R.

    2003-12-01

    Seismic inferences of fracture energy G constrain how fault strength degrades during slip and allow testing of candidate physical mechanisms. Recently G has been estimated by interpreting parameters from seismic slip inversions within a self-healing rupture model (Rice, Sammis and Parsons, 2003), and by studying the scaling of radiated energy and stress drop with earthquake size (Abercrombie and Rice, 2003). Those and earlier studies suggest that for larger events (slip > 0.1 m), G ranges from 0.1 to 10 MJ/m2 with average of 2-4 MJ/m2. There is a clear trend for G to increase with slip over the broad range from mm to m slip. Sibson-Lachenbruch thermal pressurization of pore water is examined as a possible general fault weakening mechanism for large crustal events. For adiabatic and undrained conditions, with strength given by the effective stress law with a constant friction coefficient f, the thermal properties of water in this context (Lachenbruch, 1980; Mase and Smith, 1988) lead to G = 1.7 (σ n - po) (1 + r) h. Here h is shearing zone thickness, σ n is normal stress, assumed constant during slip, po is ambient pore pressure, and r is the ratio fractional volume change of pore space per unit pore pressure increase divided by the compressibility of the pore fluid. Dilatancy is neglected; if confined to only the early phases of slip, it decreases po from ambient and so increases G, but the effect may be modest. The model predicts exponential decay of strength with slip, with e-folding slip distance 1.7 (1 + r) h / f. The total temperature rise in K is ≈ 0.6 (1 + r) (σ n - po) where the latter factor is in MPa. Estimating r = 1-2 and evaluating σ n - po as overburden minus hydrostatic pore pressure at 7 km as a representative centroidal depth for large crustal events, we obtain G ≈ 1-6 MJ/m2 for h = 2 to 10 mm. Shear zone thicknesses towards the lower end of such a range are suggested by recent field studies (Chester and Chester, 1998), which identify a

  15. Relations between hydrology and velocity of a continuously moving landslide-evidence of pore-pressure feedback regulating landslide motion?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, W.H.; McKenna, J.P.; Kibler, J.D.; Biavati, G.

    2009-01-01

    We measured displacement, pore-water pressure, and climatic conditions for 3 years at the continuously moving Slumgullion landslide in Colorado, USA. The landslide accelerated when pore-water pressure increased within the landslide body, but this occurred as pore-water pressure decreased along the landslide margin. The decrease probably occurred in response to shear-induced soil dilation at rates greater than pore-pressure diffusion and likely increased resistance to shear displacement and resulted in landslide deceleration. This dilative strengthening has been experimentally observed and explained theoretically, but not previously identified during field studies. Although landslide displacement should have exceeded that required to achieve critical-state density of shear boundaries, observed relocation of these boundaries indicates that shearing is episodic at fixed locations, so it permits renewed dilative strengthening when "fresh" soil is sheared. Thus, dilatant strengthening may be a considerable mechanism controlling landslide velocity, even for landslides that have continuously moved great distances. ?? Springer-Verlag 2009.

  16. Modeling strain and pore pressure associated with fluid extraction: The Pathfinder Ranch experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Andrew J.; Wyatt, Frank K.

    2014-06-01

    Strainmeters can be subject to hydrologic effects from pumping of nearby water wells, depending on the state of the local rock. Strain signals associated with hydrology are generally not used and regarded as troublesome because they are much larger than most tectonic signals (e.g., tides or slow slip episodes in Cascadia), but here we show that fluid extraction leads to detectable strain and pore pressure signals, which we use to constrain valuable material properties of the rock, namely the hydraulic diffusivity and elastic shear modulus. We collected multiple years of pump activity at two active water wells near a pair of Plate Boundary Observatory borehole strainmeters in southern California. These data demonstrate clearly the connection between fluid extraction and deformation: the onset of transient strains and pore pressures is strongly correlated with both the onset of fluid extraction, and the sizes of the transient signals are strongly correlated with cumulative extraction volumes. These data also suggest that the instruments are a possible tool for remote monitoring of fluid injection and withdrawal. Based on poroelastic modeling, we find estimates of hydraulic diffusivity (0.061 m2s-1 to 0.126 m2s-1) which are consistent with data for fractured igneous rock, and estimates of shear modulus (39.7 MPa to 101 MPa) which are comparable to data for shallow granodiorite—expected to be weak from weathering, and other sources of damage (e.g., faulting). We infer that crustal rock in this region is drained at shallow depths by pervasive, hydraulically conductive fractures: as a result of changes in applied stress, fluid flow will occur rather than a sustained change in pore fluid pressure.

  17. Analysis of pore pressure conditions leading to slope instability in Tuscany (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapporto, S.; Tofani, V.; Vannocci, P.; Casagli, N.

    2003-04-01

    Complex landslides, originated as rotational or planar slides that transform into flows, are frequent in the Italian landscape. Triggering mechanisms of such landslides are still poorly understood. The objective of this study is to investigate pore water pressure changes (negative and positive) during a rainfall event and their effect on slope stability. Two events that occurred on June 1996 and November 2000 respectively in Versilia and near Pescia (Tuscany), having different characteristics in terms of rainfall intensity, stratigraphy, vegetative cover, and geometry of failure, were analysed. A detailed topographic investigation of slope profiles in pre- and post-failure conditions was performed using a GPS. The geotechnical and hydrological properties of the materials involved were then investigated with a series of in situ (Borehole Shear Tests and Amoozemeter Tests) and laboratory tests (grain size analyses, Atterberg limits, phase relationship analyses, direct shear tests). The evaluation of the potential for slope failure during the event was performed with an analysis of infiltration, seepage, and instability mechanisms. First, the infiltration rate at the surface was predicted by modifying the Chu approach for the Green and Ampt equations in case of unsteady rainfall together with a water balance at the surface. Changes in positive and negative pore pressures during the event were then modelled by a finite element analysis of water flow in transient conditions, using as boundary condition for the nodes along the slope surface the computed infiltration rate. Finally, a slope stability analysis was conducted applying the limit equilibrium method (Morgenstern-Price), using pore water pressure distributions obtained in the different time steps by the seepage analysis as input data for the calculation of the factor of safety. The followed approach allows the detailed reconstruction of changes in the factor of safety during the event and the determination of the

  18. An evaluation of factors influencing pore pressure in accretionary complexes: Implications for taper angle and wedge mechanics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    At many subduction zones, accretionary complexes form as sediment is off-scraped from the subducting plate. Mechanical models that treat accretionary complexes as critically tapered wedges of sediment demonstrate that pore pressure controls their taper angle by modifying basal and internal shear strength. Here, we combine a numerical model of groundwater flow with critical taper theory to quantify the effects of sediment and de??collement permeability, sediment thickness, sediment partitioning between accretion and underthrusting, and plate convergence rate on steady state pore pressure. Our results show that pore pressure in accretionary wedges can be viewed as a dynamically maintained response to factors which drive pore pressure (source terms) and those that limit flow (permeability and drainage path length). We find that sediment permeability and incoming sediment thickness are the most important factors, whereas fault permeability and the partitioning of sediment have a small effect. For our base case model scenario, as sediment permeability is increased, pore pressure decreases from near-lithostatic to hydrostatic values and allows stable taper angles to increase from ??? 2.5?? to 8??-12.5??. With increased sediment thickness in our models (from 100 to 8000 m), increased pore pressure drives a decrease in stable taper angle from 8.4??-12.5?? to 15?? to <4??) with increased sediment thickness (from <1 to 7 km). One key implication is that hydrologic properties may strongly influence the strength of the crust in a wide range of geologic settings. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Estimation of the pore pressure distribution from three dimensional groundwater flow model at mine sites in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sangsoo; Jang, Myounghwan; Kim, Gyoungman; Kim, Donghui; Kim, Daehoon; Baek, Hwanjo

    2016-04-01

    Mining activities continually change the groundwater flow and associated pore pressure distributions within the rockmass around the mine openings or the open-pit bench during the operational periods. As the pore pressure distributions may substantially affect the mechanical behaviour or stability of the rockmass, it is important to monitor the variation of pore pressure incurred by mining operation. The pore pressure distributions within the rockmass can be derived using a two- or three-dimensional finite element groundwater flow model, adopted to simulate the groundwater flow. While the groundwater inflow at mines has generally been dealt with respect to the working environment, detailed case studies on the distribution of pore water pressure related to the stability analysis of mine openings have been relatively rare in Korea. Recently, however, as the health and safety problems are emerged for sustainable mining practice, these issues are of the major concerns for the mining industries. This study aims to establish a three dimensional groundwater flow model to estimate the pore pressure distributions in order to employ as an input parameter for numerical codes such as the FLAC 3D. Also, the groundwater flow simulated can be used for de-watering design at a mine site. The MINEDW code, a groundwater flow model code specifically developed to simulate the complicated hydro-geologic conditions related to mining, has mainly been used in this study. Based on the data collected from field surveys and literature reviews, a conceptual model was established and sensitivity analysis was performed.

  20. Hydromechanical Rock Mass Fatigue in Deep-Seated Landslides Accompanying Seasonal Variations in Pore Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preisig, Giona; Eberhardt, Erik; Smithyman, Megan; Preh, Alexander; Bonzanigo, Luca

    2016-06-01

    The episodic movement of deep-seated landslides is often governed by the presence of high pore pressures and reduced effective stresses along active shear surfaces. Pore pressures are subject to cyclic fluctuation under seasonal variations of groundwater recharge, resulting in an intermittent movement characterized by acceleration-deceleration phases. However, it is not always clear why certain acceleration phases reach alarming levels without a clear trigger (i.e., in the absence of an exceptional pore pressure event). This paper presents a conceptual framework linking hydromechanical cycling, progressive failure and fatigue to investigate and explain the episodic behavior of deep-seated landslides using the Campo Vallemaggia landslide in Switzerland as a case study. A combination of monitoring data and advanced numerical modeling is used. The principal processes forcing the slope into a critical disequilibrium state are analyzed as a function of rock mass damage and fatigue. Modeling results suggest that during periods of slope acceleration, the rock slope experiences localized fatigue and gradual weakening through slip along pre-existing natural fractures and yield of critically stressed intact rock bridges. At certain intervals, pockets of critically weakened rock may produce a period of enhanced slope movement in response to a small pore pressure increase similar to those routinely experienced each year. Accordingly, the distribution and connectivity of pre-existing permeable planes of weakness play a central role. These structures are often related to the rock mass's tectonic history or initiate (and dilate) in response to stress changes that disturb the entire slope, such as glacial unloading or seismic loading via large earthquakes. The latter is discussed in detail in a companion paper to this (Gischig et al., Rock Mech Rock Eng, 2015). The results and framework presented further demonstrate that episodic movement and progressive failure of deep

  1. Experimental Studies of Dynamic Fault Weakening Due to Thermal Pressurization of Pore Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsby, David; Tullis, Terry; Platt, John; Okazaki, Keishi

    2016-04-01

    High-velocity friction experiments and geophysical observations suggest that mature faults weaken dramatically during seismic slip. However, while many coseismic weakening mechanisms have been proposed, it is still unclear which mechanisms are most important or how the efficiency of weakening varies within the seismogenic zone. Thermal pressurization is one possible coseismic weakening mechanism driven by the thermal expansion of native pore fluids, which leads to elevated pore pressures and significant coseismic weakening. While thermal pressurization has been studied theoretically for many decades, and invoked in recent earthquake simulations, its activation in laboratory experiments has remained elusive. Several high-speed friction studies have yielded indirect evidence for thermal pressurization, yet none has directly linked with existing theoretical models or the relevant physical parameters, such as permeability, slip, and slip rate, that control the weakening rate. To fill this gap, we are conducting thermal pressurization experiments on fluid-saturated, low-permeability rocks (Frederick diabase) at slip rates up to ~5 mm/s, at constant confining pressures in the range 21-149 MPa and initial imposed pore pressures in the range 10-25 MPa. The impractically low permeability of the as-is diabase, ~10-23 m2, is increased prior to the test by thermal cracking, yielding measured permeabilities in the range 1.3*10-18 to 6.1*10-19 m2. These values of permeability are high enough to allow sample saturation over one to several days, but low enough to confine the elevated pore pressures generated by frictional heating during rapid sliding. Our experiments reveal a rapid decay of shear stress following a step-change in velocity from 10 μm/s to 4.8 mm/s. In one test, the decrease in shear stress of ~25% over the first 28 mm of slip at 4.8 mm/s agrees closely with the theoretical solution for slip on a plane (Rice [2006]), with an inferred slip-weakening distance of ~500

  2. Coupling of Pore Pressure and Ground Motion: Further Studies using Data Recorded at the NEES@UCSB Wildlife Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seale, S. H.; Lavallee, D.; Archuleta, R. J.; Steidl, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Pore pressure built up during an earthquake and the hazard associated with soil liquefaction present a major challenge for our society, as has been dramatically illustrated by recent large events (e.g. the 2011 Tohoku-oki, Japan, earthquake). There is consensus among scientists that a better assessment of the liquefaction risk requires a better understanding of the coupling between pore pressure and ground motion time histories. There is a basic need to investigate coupling as a function of the frequency content of the ground motion. The 2010 M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah event has provided a remarkable opportunity to investigate and model the coupling. The event was well recorded at the NEES@UCSB Wildlife station located 110 km from the hypocenter. The station is equipped with three-component strong-motion accelerometers at the surface and in boreholes at various depths and with pore pressure transducers located in a saturated, liquefiable layer. The recorded pore pressure and ground motion time histories both have frequency content that is a function of time. We have applied a wavelet decomposition technique to the El Mayor ground motion and pore pressure data, looking for a linear relationship between the signals. The analysis shows that the early P-wave accelerations (vertical component) initiate pore pressure response. However, the pore pressure records contain a low-frequency component that dominates the signal with no corresponding low-frequency component in the ground motion signals recorded near-by. Although uncommon, a similar behavior has been also reported in the literature for pore pressure signals recoded during the 1980 Mammoth Lakes, California, earthquake. We have extended this work to the analysis of 4 other seismic events that have induced an increase in pore pressure at WLA. As the response of pore pressure is potentially a local phenomenon, we have restricted our analysis to recordings from the same site. These events include the M5.8 Ocotillo

  3. In situ pore-pressure evolution during dynamic CPT measurements in soft sediments of the western Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Annedore; Stegmann, Sylvia; Mörz, Tobias; Lange, Matthias; Wever, Thomas; Kopf, Achim

    2008-08-01

    We present in situ strength and pore-pressure measurements from 57 dynamic cone penetration tests in sediments of Mecklenburg ( n = 51), Eckernförde ( n = 2) and Gelting ( n = 4) bays, western Baltic Sea, characterised by thick mud layers and partially free microbial gas resulting from the degradation of organic material. In Mecklenburg and Eckernförde bays, sediment sampling by nine gravity cores served sedimentological characterisation, analyses of geotechnical properties, and laboratory shear tests. At selected localities, high-resolution echo-sounder profiles were acquired. Our aim was to deploy a dynamic cone penetrometer (CPT) to infer sediment shear strength and cohesion of the sea bottom as a function of fluid saturation. The results show very variable changes in pore pressure and sediment strength during the CPT deployments. The majority of the CPT measurements ( n = 54) show initially negative pore-pressure values during penetration, and a delayed response towards positive pressures thereafter. This so-called type B pore-pressure signal was recorded in all three bays, and is typically found in soft muds with high water contents and undrained shear strengths of 1.6-6.4 kPa. The type B signal is further affected by displacement of sediment and fluid upon penetration of the lance, skin effects during dynamic profiling, enhanced consolidation and strength of individual horizons, the presence of free gas, and a dilatory response of the sediment. In Mecklenburg Bay, the remaining small number of CPT measurements ( n = 3) show a well-defined peak in both pore pressure and cone resistance during penetration, i.e. an initial marked increase which is followed by exponential pore-pressure decay during dissipation. This so-called type A pore-pressure signal is associated with normally consolidated mud, with indurated clay layers showing significantly higher undrained shear strength (up to 19 kPa). In Eckernförde and Gelting bays pore-pressure response type B is

  4. Modeling wave-induced pore pressure and effective stress in a granular seabed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtès, Luc; Chareyre, Bruno; Michallet, Hervé; Catalano, Emanuele; Marzougui, Donia

    2015-01-01

    The response of a sandy seabed under wave loading is investigated on the basis of numerical modeling using a multi-scale approach. To that aim, the discrete element method is coupled to a finite volume method specially enhanced to describe compressible fluid flow. Both solid and fluid phase mechanics are upscaled from considerations established at the pore level. Model's predictions are validated against poroelasticity theory and discussed in comparison with experiments where a sediment analog is subjected to wave action in a flume. Special emphasis is put on the mechanisms leading the seabed to liquefy under wave-induced pressure variation on its surface. Liquefaction is observed in both dilative and compactive regimes. It is shown that the instability can be triggered for a well-identified range of hydraulic conditions. Particularly, the results confirm that the gas content, together with the permeability of the medium are key parameters affecting the transmission of pressure inside the soil.

  5. Tremor-tide correlations and near-lithostatic pore pressure on the deep San Andreas fault.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Amanda M; Nadeau, Robert M; Bürgmann, Roland

    2009-12-24

    Since its initial discovery nearly a decade ago, non-volcanic tremor has provided information about a region of the Earth that was previously thought incapable of generating seismic radiation. A thorough explanation of the geologic process responsible for tremor generation has, however, yet to be determined. Owing to their location at the plate interface, temporal correlation with geodetically measured slow-slip events and dominant shear wave energy, tremor observations in southwest Japan have been interpreted as a superposition of many low-frequency earthquakes that represent slip on a fault surface. Fluids may also be fundamental to the failure process in subduction zone environments, as teleseismic and tidal modulation of tremor in Cascadia and Japan and high Poisson ratios in both source regions are indicative of pressurized pore fluids. Here we identify a robust correlation between extremely small, tidally induced shear stress parallel to the San Andreas fault and non-volcanic tremor activity near Parkfield, California. We suggest that this tremor represents shear failure on a critically stressed fault in the presence of near-lithostatic pore pressure. There are a number of similarities between tremor in subduction zone environments, such as Cascadia and Japan, and tremor on the deep San Andreas transform, suggesting that the results presented here may also be applicable in other tectonic settings. PMID:20033046

  6. Impact in dense granular suspensions: crucial role of dilatancy and pore pressure feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forterre, Yoel; Soundar Jerome, J. John; Vandenberghe, Nicolas; Duchemin, Laurent

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the impact of a rigid sphere onto a granular paste made of non-buoyant glass beads mixed with a liquid under gravity. We show that the initial volume fraction of the granular packing has a critical influence on the impact behavior. For loose packing, the ball sinks in the granular medium as in a liquid, giving rise to a collapsing cavity and a central jet as observed with fine powders in air. By contrast, for dense packing, the ball stops as soon as it hits the surface and its kinetic energy is almost instantly dissipated. We interpret this ``liquid-solid'' transition as the volume fraction change by a coupling between dilatancy effects and the liquid pore pressure during the impact. Dynamic pore pressure measurements and a simple diphasic model taking into account dilatancy support this mechanism. Our results show that ``shear-thickening-like'' phenomena in granular suspensions can arise from transient diphasic coupling rather than from the intrinsic rheology of the material. This work was supported by ANR through the program No. ANR-11-JS09-005-01.

  7. Pore Structure and Limit Pressure of Gas Slippage Effect in Tight Sandstone

    PubMed Central

    You, Lijun; Xue, Kunlin; Kang, Yili; Liao, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Gas slip effect is an important mechanism that the gas flow is different from liquid flow in porous media. It is generally considered that the lower the permeability in porous media is, the more severe slip effect of gas flow will be. We design and then carry out experiments with the increase of backpressure at the outlet of the core samples based on the definition of gas slip effect and in view of different levels of permeability of tight sandstone reservoir. This study inspects a limit pressure of the gas slip effect in tight sandstones and analyzes the characteristic parameter of capillary pressure curves. The experimental results indicate that gas slip effect can be eliminated when the backpressure reaches a limit pressure. When the backpressure exceeds the limit pressure, the measured gas permeability is a relatively stable value whose range is less than 3% for a given core sample. It is also found that the limit pressure increases with the decreasing in permeability and has close relation with pore structure of the core samples. The results have an important influence on correlation study on gas flow in porous medium, and are beneficial to reduce the workload of laboratory experiment. PMID:24379747

  8. Pore structure and limit pressure of gas slippage effect in tight sandstone.

    PubMed

    You, Lijun; Xue, Kunlin; Kang, Yili; Liao, Yi; Kong, Lie

    2013-01-01

    Gas slip effect is an important mechanism that the gas flow is different from liquid flow in porous media. It is generally considered that the lower the permeability in porous media is, the more severe slip effect of gas flow will be. We design and then carry out experiments with the increase of backpressure at the outlet of the core samples based on the definition of gas slip effect and in view of different levels of permeability of tight sandstone reservoir. This study inspects a limit pressure of the gas slip effect in tight sandstones and analyzes the characteristic parameter of capillary pressure curves. The experimental results indicate that gas slip effect can be eliminated when the backpressure reaches a limit pressure. When the backpressure exceeds the limit pressure, the measured gas permeability is a relatively stable value whose range is less than 3% for a given core sample. It is also found that the limit pressure increases with the decreasing in permeability and has close relation with pore structure of the core samples. The results have an important influence on correlation study on gas flow in porous medium, and are beneficial to reduce the workload of laboratory experiment. PMID:24379747

  9. Pore structure and limit pressure of gas slippage effect in tight sandstone.

    PubMed

    You, Lijun; Xue, Kunlin; Kang, Yili; Liao, Yi; Kong, Lie

    2013-01-01

    Gas slip effect is an important mechanism that the gas flow is different from liquid flow in porous media. It is generally considered that the lower the permeability in porous media is, the more severe slip effect of gas flow will be. We design and then carry out experiments with the increase of backpressure at the outlet of the core samples based on the definition of gas slip effect and in view of different levels of permeability of tight sandstone reservoir. This study inspects a limit pressure of the gas slip effect in tight sandstones and analyzes the characteristic parameter of capillary pressure curves. The experimental results indicate that gas slip effect can be eliminated when the backpressure reaches a limit pressure. When the backpressure exceeds the limit pressure, the measured gas permeability is a relatively stable value whose range is less than 3% for a given core sample. It is also found that the limit pressure increases with the decreasing in permeability and has close relation with pore structure of the core samples. The results have an important influence on correlation study on gas flow in porous medium, and are beneficial to reduce the workload of laboratory experiment.

  10. Effect of Pore Pressure on Slip Failure of an Impermeable Fault: A Coupled Micro Hydro-Geomechanical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    The geomechanical processes associated with subsurface fluid injection/extraction is of central importance for many industrial operations related to energy and water resources. However, the mechanisms controlling the stability and slip motion of a preexisting geologic fault remain poorly understood and are critical for the assessment of seismic risk. In this work, we develop a coupled hydro-geomechanical model to investigate the effect of fluid injection induced pressure perturbation on the slip behavior of a sealing fault. The model couples single-phase flow in the pores and mechanics of the solid phase. Granular packs (see example in Fig. 1a) are numerically generated where the grains can be either bonded or not, depending on the degree of cementation. A pore network is extracted for each granular pack with pore body volumes and pore throat conductivities calculated rigorously based on geometry of the local pore space. The pore fluid pressure is solved via an explicit scheme, taking into account the effect of deformation of the solid matrix. The mechanics part of the model is solved using the discrete element method (DEM). We first test the validity of the model with regard to the classical one-dimensional consolidation problem where an analytical solution exists. We then demonstrate the ability of the coupled model to reproduce rock deformation behavior measured in triaxial laboratory tests under the influence of pore pressure. We proceed to study the fault stability in presence of a pressure discontinuity across the impermeable fault which is implemented as a plane with its intersected pore throats being deactivated and thus obstructing fluid flow (Fig. 1b, c). We focus on the onset of shear failure along preexisting faults. We discuss the fault stability criterion in light of the numerical results obtained from the DEM simulations coupled with pore fluid flow. The implication on how should faults be treated in a large-scale continuum model is also presented.

  11. Ontogenesis Of Hydrofracturing: Pore Pressure Diffusion And Its Implications For Stress Dependant Matrix Permeability Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, I.; koehn, D.; Toussaint, R.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrofracturing is a common and important geological process that engineers different structures of varying scales in a variety of geological settings in the upper Crust. Many natural examples of joint and vein networks in layered rocks manifest porosity-effective stress relationships during deformation processes that are principally led by transient pore fluid overpressure. Local stimulation of extreme pore pressure by certain fluid expansion mechanisms in reservoirs tenders the evolution of effective stress, which has been postulated to be highly sensitive to the reservoir's permeability. Changes in effective stress introduce appreciable poro-elastic response of the matrix inducing new fractures or opening/closing existing faults and fractures. In this contribution, we investigate three aspects of time dependant dynamic mechanisms of hydro-fracturing at micro scale: (1) evolution of local effective stress by pore pressure, (2) permeability enhancement with respect to elastic deformation of host rock and (3) fracture propagation as long as fluid pressure heads the tensile strength of the rock. The numerical scheme is a 2d coupled hydro-mechanical model, which integrates DEM and a supplementary continuum description. It resides two overlapping areas in physical space, where one represents the solid media, which constitutes a small-scale triangular discrete spring network of the software 'Latte' (Elle) and is hybridized with the other large-scale (fixed) square lattice of continuum description. A general form of the macroscopic diffusion equation of pressure is given by the compressible Navier-Stokes equation that is derived by ensuring conservation of mass of the fluid and solid media along with local Darcy's Law. Finite difference ADI method is implemented on the square lattice for the pressure discretization (hydrodynamic) in order to acquire pressure diffusion. The hydraulic head then contributes to the net force on each particle in the elastic lattice through a

  12. CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR ORIGIN OF ABNORMALLY PRESSURED GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN LOW-PERMEABILITY RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Dickinson, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    The paper suggests that overpressured and underpressured gas accumulations of this type have a common origin. In basins containing overpressured gas accumulations, rates of thermogenic gas accumulation exceed gas loss, causing fluid (gas) pressure to rise above the regional hydrostatic pressure. Free water in the larger pores is forced out of the gas generation zone into overlying and updip, normally pressured, water-bearing rocks. While other diagenetic processes continue, a pore network with very low permeability develops. As a result, gas accumulates in these low-permeability reservoirs at rates higher than it is lost. In basins containing underpressured gas accumulations, rates of gas generation and accumulation are less than gas loss. The basin-center gas accumulation persists, but because of changes in the basin dynamics, the overpressured accumulation evolves into an underpressured system.

  13. Quantification of abnormal intracranial pressure waves and isotope cisternography for diagnosis of occult communicating hydrocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, E.R.; Piatek, D.; Del Bigio, M.R.; Stambrook, M.; Sutherland, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen consecutive patients with suspected occult communicating hydrocephalus were investigated by means of clinical evaluation, neuropsychological testing, isotope cisternography, computed tomography scanning, and continuous intracranial pressure monitoring. Semi-quantitative grading systems were used in the evaluation of the clinical, neuropsychological, and cisternographic assessments. Clinical examination, neuropsychological testing, and computed tomography scanning were repeated 3 months after ventriculoperitoneal shunting. All patients showed abnormal intracranial pressure waves and all improved after shunting. There was close correlation between number, peak, and pulse pressures of B waves and the mean intracranial pressure. However, quantification of B waves by means of number, frequency, and amplitude did not help in predicting the degree of clinical improvement postshunting. The most sensitive predictor of favorable response to shunting was enlargement of the temporal horns on computed tomography scan. Furthermore, the size of temporal horns correlated with mean intracranial pressure. There was no correlation between abnormalities on isotope cisternography and clinical improvement.

  14. Pore Pressure prediction in shale gas reservoirs using neural network and fuzzy logic with an application to Barnett Shale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliouane, Leila; Ouadfeul, Sid-Ali; Boudella, Amar

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of the proposed idea is to use the artificial intelligence such as the neural network and fuzzy logic to predict the pore pressure in shale gas reservoirs. Pore pressure is a very important parameter that will be used or estimation of effective stress. This last is used to resolve well-bore stability problems, failure plan identification from Mohr-Coulomb circle and sweet spots identification. Many models have been proposed to estimate the pore pressure from well-logs data; we can cite for example the equivalent depth model, the horizontal model for undercompaction called the Eaton's model…etc. All these models require a continuous measurement of the slowness of the primary wave, some thing that is not easy during well-logs data acquisition in shale gas formtions. Here, we suggest the use the fuzzy logic and the multilayer perceptron neural network to predict the pore pressure in two horizontal wells drilled in the lower Barnett shale formation. The first horizontal well is used for the training of the fuzzy set and the multilayer perecptron, the input is the natural gamma ray, the neutron porosity, the slowness of the compression and shear wave, however the desired output is the estimated pore pressure using Eaton's model. Data of another horizontal well are used for generalization. Obtained results clearly show the power of the fuzzy logic system than the multilayer perceptron neural network machine to predict the pore pressure in shale gas reservoirs. Keywords: artificial intelligence, fuzzy logic, pore pressure, multilayer perecptron, Barnett shale.

  15. Pore water pressure variations in Subpermafrost groundwater : Numerical modeling compared with experimental modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, Agnès.; Goncalves, Julio; Jost, Anne; Font, Marianne

    2010-05-01

    Development and degradation of permafrost directly affect numerous hydrogeological processes such as thermal regime, exchange between river and groundwater, groundwater flows patterns and groundwater recharge (Michel, 1994). Groundwater in permafrost area is subdivided into two zones: suprapermafrost and subpermafrost which are separated by permafrost. As a result of the volumetric expansion of water upon freezing and assuming ice lenses and frost heave do not form freezing in a saturated aquifer, the progressive formation of permafrost leads to the pressurization of the subpermafrost groundwater (Wang, 2006). Therefore disappearance or aggradation of permafrost modifies the confined or unconfined state of subpermafrost groundwater. Our study focuses on modifications of pore water pressure of subpermafrost groundwater which could appear during thawing and freezing of soil. Numerical simulation allows elucidation of some of these processes. Our numerical model accounts for phase changes for coupled heat transport and variably saturated flow involving cycles of freezing and thawing. The flow model is a combination of a one-dimensional channel flow model which uses Manning-Strickler equation and a two-dimensional vertically groundwater flow model using Richards equation. Numerical simulation of heat transport consisted in a two dimensional model accounting for the effects of latent heat of phase change of water associated with melting/freezing cycles which incorporated the advection-diffusion equation describing heat-transfer in porous media. The change of hydraulic conductivity and thermal conductivity are considered by our numerical model. The model was evaluated by comparing predictions with data from laboratory freezing experiments. Experimental design was undertaken at the Laboratory M2C (Univesité de Caen-Basse Normandie, CNRS, France). The device consisted of a Plexiglas box insulated on all sides except on the top. Precipitation and ambient temperature are

  16. A laboratory study of particle ploughing and pore-pressure feedback: A velocity-weakening mechanism for soft glacier beds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomason, J.F.; Iverson, N.R.

    2008-01-01

    If basal-water discharge and pressure are sufficiently high, a soft-bedded glacier will slip over its bed by ploughing, the process in which particles that span the ice-bed interface are dragged across the bed surface. Results of laboratory experiments indicate that resistance to ploughing can decrease with increasing ploughing velocity (velocity weakening). During ploughing at various velocities (15-400 ma-1), till was compacted in front of idealized particles, causing pore pressures there that were orders of magnitude higher than the ambient value. This excess pore pressure locally weakened the till in shear, thereby decreasing ploughing resistance by a factor of 3.0-6.6 with a six-fold increase in ploughing velocity. Characteristic timescales of pore-pressure diffusion and compaction down-glacier from ploughing particles depend on till diffusivity, ploughing velocity and sizes of ploughing particles. These timescales accurately predict the ranges of these variables over which excess pore pressure and velocity weakening occurred. Existing ploughing models do not account for velocity weakening. A new ploughing model with no adjustable parameters predicts ploughing resistance to no worse than 38% but requires that excess pore pressures be measured. Velocity weakening by this mechanism may affect fast glacier flow, sediment transport by bed deformation and basal seismicity.

  17. Irreversible xenon insertion into a small-pore zeolite at moderate pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Seoung, Donghoon; Cynn, Hyunchae; Park, Changyong; Choi, Kwang -Yong; Blom, Douglas A.; Evans, William J.; Kao, Chi -Chang; Vogt, Thomas; Lee, Yongjae

    2014-09-01

    Pressure drastically alters the chemical and physical properties of materials and allows structural phase transitions and chemical reactions to occur that defy much of our understanding gained under ambient conditions. Particularly exciting is the high-pressure chemistry of xenon, which is known to react with hydrogen and ice at high pressures and form stable compounds. Here, we show that Ag16Al16Si24O8·16H2O (Ag-natrolite) irreversibly inserts xenon into its micropores at 1.7 GPa and 250 °C, while Ag+ is reduced to metallic Ag and possibly oxidized to Ag2+. In contrast to krypton, xenon is retained within the pores of this zeolite after pressure release and requires heat to desorb. This irreversible insertion and trapping of xenon in Ag-natrolite under moderate conditions sheds new light on chemical reactions that could account for the xenon deficiency relative to argon observed in terrestrial and Martian atmospheres.

  18. Irreversible xenon insertion into a small-pore zeolite at moderate pressures and temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Seoung, Donghoon; Cynn, Hyunchae; Park, Changyong; Choi, Kwang -Yong; Blom, Douglas A.; Evans, William J.; Kao, Chi -Chang; Vogt, Thomas; Lee, Yongjae

    2014-09-01

    Pressure drastically alters the chemical and physical properties of materials and allows structural phase transitions and chemical reactions to occur that defy much of our understanding gained under ambient conditions. Particularly exciting is the high-pressure chemistry of xenon, which is known to react with hydrogen and ice at high pressures and form stable compounds. Here, we show that Ag16Al16Si24O8·16H2O (Ag-natrolite) irreversibly inserts xenon into its micropores at 1.7 GPa and 250 °C, while Ag+ is reduced to metallic Ag and possibly oxidized to Ag2+. In contrast to krypton, xenon is retained within the pores of this zeolite after pressure releasemore » and requires heat to desorb. This irreversible insertion and trapping of xenon in Ag-natrolite under moderate conditions sheds new light on chemical reactions that could account for the xenon deficiency relative to argon observed in terrestrial and Martian atmospheres.« less

  19. Irreversible xenon insertion into a small-pore zeolite at moderate pressures and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Seoung, Donghoon; Lee, Yongmoon; Cynn, Hyunchae; Park, Changyong; Choi, Kwang-Yong; Blom, Douglas A; Evans, William J; Kao, Chi-Chang; Vogt, Thomas; Lee, Yongjae

    2014-09-01

    Pressure drastically alters the chemical and physical properties of materials and allows structural phase transitions and chemical reactions to occur that defy much of our understanding gained under ambient conditions. Particularly exciting is the high-pressure chemistry of xenon, which is known to react with hydrogen and ice at high pressures and form stable compounds. Here, we show that Ag16Al16Si24O8·16H2O (Ag-natrolite) irreversibly inserts xenon into its micropores at 1.7 GPa and 250 °C, while Ag(+) is reduced to metallic Ag and possibly oxidized to Ag(2+). In contrast to krypton, xenon is retained within the pores of this zeolite after pressure release and requires heat to desorb. This irreversible insertion and trapping of xenon in Ag-natrolite under moderate conditions sheds new light on chemical reactions that could account for the xenon deficiency relative to argon observed in terrestrial and Martian atmospheres. PMID:25143221

  20. Understanding North Texas Seismicity: A Joint Analysis of Seismic Data and 3D Pore Pressure Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeShon, H. R.; Hornbach, M. J.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Oldham, H. R.; Hayward, C.; Stump, B. W.; Frohlich, C.; Olson, J. E.; Luetgert, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    In November 2013, a series of earthquakes began along a mapped ancient fault system near Azle, Texas. The Azle events are the third felt earthquake sequence in the Fort Worth (Barnett Shale) Basin since 2008, and several production and injection wells in the area are drilled to depths near the recent seismic activity. Understanding if and/or how injection and removal of fluids in the crystalline crust reactivates faults have important implications for seismology, the energy industry, and society. We assessed whether the Azle earthquakes were induced using a joint analysis of the earthquake data, subsurface geology and fault structure, and 3D pore pressure modeling. Using a 12-station temporary seismic deployment, we have recorded and located >300 events large enough to be recorded on multiple stations and 1000s of events during periods of swarm activity. High-resolution locations and focal mechanisms indicate that events occurred on NE-SW trending, steeply dipping normal faults associated with the southern end of the Newark East Fault Zone with hypocenters between 2-8 km depth. We considered multiple causes that might have changed stress along this system. Earthquakes resulting from natural processes, though perhaps unlikely in this historically inactive region, can be neither ruled out nor confirmed due to lack of information on the natural stress state of these faults. Analysis of lake and groundwater variations near Azle showed that no significant stress changes occurred prior to or during the earthquake sequence. In contrast, analysis of pore-pressure models shows that the combination of formation water production and wastewater injection near the fault could have caused pressure increases that induced earthquakes on near-critically stressed faults.

  1. Active structural growth in central Taiwan in relationship to large earthquakes and pore-fluid pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Li-Fan

    Central Taiwan is subject to a substantial long-term earthquake risk with a population of five million and two disastrous earthquakes in the last century, the 1935 ML=7.1 Tuntzuchiao and 1999 Mw=7.6 Chi-Chi earthquakes. Rich data from these earthquakes combined with substantial surface and subsurface data accumulated from petroleum exploration form the basis for these studies of the growth of structures in successive large earthquakes and their relationships to pore-fluid pressures. Chapter 1 documents the structural context of the bedding-parallel Chelungpu thrust that slipped in the Chi-Chi earthquake by showing for this richly instrumented earthquake the close geometric relationships between the complex 3D fault shape and the heterogeneous coseismic displacements constrained by geodesy and seismology. Chapter 2 studies the accumulation of deformation by successive large earthquakes by studying the deformation of flights of fluvial terraces deposited over the Chelungpu and adjacent Changhua thrusts, showing the deformation on a timescale of tens of thousands of years. Furthermore these two structures, involving the same stratigraphic sequence, show fundamentally different kinematics of deformation with associated contrasting hanging-wall structural geometries. The heights and shapes of deformed terraces allowed testing of existing theories of fault-related folding. Furthermore terrace dating constrains a combined shortening rate of 37 mm/yr, which is 45% of the total Taiwan plate-tectonic rate, and indicates a substantial earthquake risk for the Changhua thrust. Chapter 3 addresses the long-standing problem of the mechanics of long-thing thrust sheets, such as the Chelungpu and Changhua thrusts in western Taiwan, by presenting a natural test for the classic Hubbert-Rubey hypothesis, which argues that ambient excess pore-fluid pressure substantially reduces the effective fault friction allowing the thrusts to move. Pore-fluid pressure data obtained from 76 wells

  2. Sudden pore pressure rise and rapid landslide initiation induced under extreme rainfall conditions - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Wang, Fawu; Wang, Gonghui

    2010-05-01

    Since July 19 to 26, 2009, western Japan had a severe rainstorms and caused floods and landslides. Most of the landslides are debris slide - debris flows. Most devastated case took place in Hofu city, Japan. On July 21, extremely intense rainstorm caused numerous debris flows and mud flows in the hillslopes Some of the debris flows destroyed residential houses and home for elderly people, and finally killed 14 residents. Debris flow distribution map was prepared soon based on airphoto interpretation. Japanese Meteorological Agency runs nation-wide ground-based rain gauge network as well as radar rain gauges, which provide hourly to 10 minutes precipitation distribution real-time with spatial resolution of about 5 km. Distribution of daily (cumulative) precipitation of July 21 shows (1) The cumulative precipitation from 6 am -- 12 am of the day was evaluated that their return period could be 200 - 600 years statistically. In 2009, another extraordinary rainfall, of which intensity was evaluated as less than 100 years more more, caused floods in another city claiming many residents lives on the way to evacuation area. Those frequent extraordinary extreme rainfall is not concluded as the consequence of global warming nor climate change, however, those frequency of extreme rainfall events affecting societies are obviously increasing in Japan, too. As for the Hofu city case, it was proved that debris flows took place in the high precipitation area and covered by covered by weathered granite sands and silts which is called "masa". This sands has been proved susceptible against landslides under extreme rainfall conditions. However, the transition from slide - debris flow process is not well revealed, except authors past experiment on the similar masa samples in June 1999 Hiroshima debris flow case. Authors have embedded pore pressure control system for the undrained ring shear apparatus. Strongly weathered sandy soils were sampled just on the smooth and flat granitic

  3. Monitoring and Analysis of Transient Pore Water Pressures in Large Suspended Rock Slides near Poschiavo, CH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Palézieux, Larissa; Loew, Simon; Zwahlen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Many mountain slopes in the Alps exhibit large compound rock slides or Deep Seated Gravitational Slope Deformations. Due to the basal rupture plane geometry and the cumulative displacement magnitude such landslide bodies are often strongly deformed, highly fractured and - at least locally - very permeable. This can lead to high infiltration rates and low phreatic groundwater tables. This is also the situation in the studied mountain slopes southwest of Poschiavo, where large suspended rockslides occur, with very little surface runoff at high elevations, and torrents developing only at the elevation of the basal rupture planes. Below the landslide toes, at altitudes below ca. 1700 m a.s.l., groundwater appears forming spring lines or distributed spring clusters. Within the scope of the design of a hydropower pump storage plant in the Poschiavo valley by Lagobianco SA (Repower AG), numerous cored and deep boreholes (of 50 to 300 m depth) have been drilled along the planned pressure tunnel alignement at elevations ranging from 963 to 2538 m a.s.l. in the years 2010 and 2012. In several boreholes Lugeon and transient pressure tests were executed and pore water pressure sensors installed in short monitoring sections at various depths. Most of these boreholes intersect deep rockslides in crystalline rocks and limestones, showing highly fragmented rock masses and cohesionless cataclastic shear zones of several tens of meters thickness. This study explores these borehole observations in landslides and adjacent stable slopes and links them to the general hydrologic and hydrogeologic framework. The analysis of the pore water pressure data shows significant variability in seasonal trends and short-term events (from snow melt and summer rain storms) and remarkable pressure differences over short horizontal and vertical distances. This reflects rock mass damage within landslide bodies and important sealing horizons at their base. Based on water balances, the estimated effective

  4. Monitoring and Analysis of Transient Pore Water Pressures in Large Suspended Rock Slides near Poschiavo, CH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Palézieux, Larissa; Loew, Simon; Zwahlen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Many mountain slopes in the Alps exhibit large compound rock slides or Deep Seated Gravitational Slope Deformations. Due to the basal rupture plane geometry and the cumulative displacement magnitude such landslide bodies are often strongly deformed, highly fractured and - at least locally - very permeable. This can lead to high infiltration rates and low phreatic groundwater tables. This is also the situation in the studied mountain slopes southwest of Poschiavo, where large suspended rockslides occur, with very little surface runoff at high elevations, and torrents developing only at the elevation of the basal rupture planes. Below the landslide toes, at altitudes below ca. 1700 m a.s.l., groundwater appears forming spring lines or distributed spring clusters. Within the scope of the design of a hydropower pump storage plant in the Poschiavo valley by Lagobianco SA (Repower AG), numerous cored and deep boreholes (of 50 to 300 m depth) have been drilled along the planned pressure tunnel alignement at elevations ranging from 963 to 2538 m a.s.l. in the years 2010 and 2012. In several boreholes Lugeon and transient pressure tests were executed and pore water pressure sensors installed in short monitoring sections at various depths. Most of these boreholes intersect deep rockslides in crystalline rocks and limestones, showing highly fragmented rock masses and cohesionless cataclastic shear zones of several tens of meters thickness. This study explores these borehole observations in landslides and adjacent stable slopes and links them to the general hydrologic and hydrogeologic framework. The analysis of the pore water pressure data shows significant variability in seasonal trends and short-term events (from snow melt and summer rain storms) and remarkable pressure differences over short horizontal and vertical distances. This reflects rock mass damage within landslide bodies and important sealing horizons at their base. Based on water balances, the estimated effective

  5. Investigation of Microseismicity Triggered by Raised Pore Pressure through Laboratory CO2 Injection Tests in Berea Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Chang, C.

    2014-12-01

    One of the critical problems for carbon dioxide capture and storage projects is the occurrence of microseismicity due to increased pore pressure during CO2 injection. The mechanism of microseismicity can be explained by the notion that the injection-induced pore pressure increase can potentially alter the reservoir rock in the form of either creating fractures or triggering slip on pre-existing discontinuities by reducing the effective normal stress. Therefore, it is important to estimate the critical pore pressure (Pcr) to prevent excessive seismicity. The purpose of this study is to attempt to simulate the microseismicity induced from increased pore pressure by CO2 injection into Berea sandstone. Cylindrical specimens were saw-cut at 30° from the specimen axis. Specimens were either dry or saturated by tap water. The frictional coefficients of the fractures were determined from triaxial shear tests to be 0.71 (dry) and 0.65 (water-saturated). With the frictional coefficients known, we then injected CO2 (either gaseous of liquid state) into the specimens (either dry or water-saturated) subjected to triaxial stress conditions. Under the conditions of constant confining pressures and axial stresses, we increased pore pressure in steps by injecting CO2 using a syringe pump. We monitored shear slip along the fracture using axial LVDTs and microseismicity using an acoustic emission sensor. The critical pore pressure that would initiate shear slip along the fracture was calculated from the Coulomb friction law. When CO2 was injected into dry specimens, shear slip and associated microseismicity started to occur at the pore pressure levels exactly estimated from the Coulomb theory. However, when CO2 (both gaseous and liquid states) was injected into water-saturated specimens, the same were initiated at pore pressures slightly higher (by 1.2-3.7 MPa) than that estimated from the Coulomb friction law. These results suggest that the presence of water and associated water

  6. Permeability changes induced by microfissure closure and opening in tectonized materials. Effect on slope pore pressure regime.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Fuente, Maria; Vaunat, Jean; Pedone, Giuseppe; Cotecchia, Federica; Sollecito, Francesca; Casini, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    Tectonized clays are complex materials characterized by several levels of structures that may evolve during load and wetting/drying processes. Some microstructural patterns, as microfissures, have a particular influence on the value of permeability which is one of the main factors controlling pore pressure regime in slopes. In this work, the pore pressure regime measured in a real slope of tectonized clay in Southern Italy is analyzed by a numerical model that considers changes in permeability induced by microfissure closure and opening during the wetting and drying processes resulting from climatic actions. Permeability model accounts for the changes in Pore Size Distribution observed by Microscopy Intrusion Porosimetry. MIP tests are performed on representative samples of ground in initial conditions ("in situ" conditions) and final conditions (deformed sample after applying a wetting path that aims to reproduce the saturation of the soil under heavy rains). The resulting measurements allow for the characterization at microstructural level of the soil, identifying the distribution of dominant families pores in the sample and its evolution under external actions. Moreover, comparison of pore size density functions allows defining a microstructural parameter that depends on void ratio and degree of saturation and controls the variation of permeability. Model has been implemented in a thermo-hydro-mechanical code provided with a special boundary condition for climatic actions. Tool is used to analyze pore pressure measurements obtained in the tectonized clay slope. Results are analyzed at the light of the effect that permeability changes during wetting and drying have on the pore pressure regime.

  7. Effect of Gas Pores on Mechanical Properties of High-Pressure Die-Casting AM50 Magnesium Alloy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Cao, Zhanyi; Liu, Liping; Jiang, Bo

    2016-08-01

    High-pressure die-casting (HPDC) AM50 tensile specimens were used to investigate characteristics of gas pores and its effect on mechanical properties of HPDC AM50 magnesium alloy. Combining microstructure morphology gained from optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction with the experimental data from uniaxial tensile testing, we pursued the relationship between gas pores and the mechanical properties of HPDC AM50 Mg alloy. Results indicate that comparing with 3D reconstruction models, 2D images like optical metallography images and SEM images have one-sidedness. Furthermore, the size and maximum areal fraction of gas pores have negative effects on the mechanical properties of HPDC AM50 Mg alloy. With increase of the maximum size of gas pores in the specimen, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation decrease. In addition, with the maximum areal fraction becoming larger, both the UTS and elongation decrease linearly.

  8. Dependencies of pore pressure on elastic wave velocities and Vp/Vs ratio for thermally cracked gabbro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, K.; Uehara, S. I.; Mizoguchi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Marine seismic refraction have found that there are high Vp/Vs ratio regions in oceanic crusts at subducting oceanic plates (e.g, Cascadia subduction zone (2.0-2.8) (Audet et al., 2009)). Previous studies based on laboratory measurements indicated that Vp/Vs ratio is high when porosity and/or pore pressure is high (Christensen, 1984; Peacock et al., 2011). Although several studies have investigated the relationships between fracture distributions and Vp, Vs (e.g., Wang et al., 2012; Blake et al., 2013), the relationships for rocks (e.g., gabbro and basalt) composing oceanic crust are still unclear. This study reports the results of laboratory measurements of Vp, Vs (transmission method) at controlled confining and pore pressure and estimation of Vp/Vs ratio for thermally cracked gabbro which mimic highly fractured rocks in the high Vp/Vs ratio zone, in order to declare the dependence of fracture distributions on Vp/Vs. For the measurements, we prepared three type specimens; a non-heated intact specimen, specimens heated up to 500 °C and 700 °C for 24 hours. Porosities of intact, 500 °C and 700 °C specimens measured under the atmospheric pressure are 0.5, 3.4 and 3.5%, respectively. Measurements were conducted at a constant confining pressure of 50 MPa, with decreasing pore pressure from 49 to 0.1 MPa and then increasing to 49 MPa. While Vp/Vs for the intact specimen is almost constant at elevated pore pressure, the Vp/Vs values for the thermally cracked ones were 2.0~2.2 when pore pressure was larger than 30 MPa. In future, we will reveal the relationship between the measured elastic wave velocities and the characteristics of the microfracture distribution. This work was supported by JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Number 26400492).

  9. PORE PRESSURE RECOVERY AND COULOMB STRESS EVOLUTION FOLLOWING THE 2004 M9.2 SUMATRA-ANDAMAN EARTHQUAKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, K. L.; Masterlark, T.

    2009-12-01

    The 26 December 2004 M9.2 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (SAE) ruptured a 1200 km segment of the plate boundary separating the Indo-Australian plate and Burma microplate. Three months later on 28 March 2005, the M8.7 Nias earthquake (NE) ruptured a 400 km segment adjacent to, and south of, the SAE rupture. The spatial and temporal proximity of these two earthquakes suggests that the earthquakes were coupled; that is, the evolution of stress and pore pressure induced by the SAE advanced the timing of the NE. We construct 3D finite element models (FEMs) to simulate the coseismic and postseismic deformation of the SAE for a problem domain having a distribution of material properties expected for the Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone (SASZ), based on seismic tomography, gravity models, and observed geologic structures. The coseismic slip distribution, having both thrust and strike-slip components, is estimated from near-field GPS data, FEM-generated Green's Functions, and damped-least-squares inverse methods. The coseismic rupture of the SAE perturbs the stress and pore pressure fields in the region, as described by poroelastic mechanics. Following the SAE, the excess pore pressure recovers to equilibrium via fluid-flow driven by the excess pressure gradients. Characterizing this interplay of stress and pore pressure along nearby faults is key to predicting earthquake coupling. Coulomb stress quantifies this interplay as the change in tendency for slip to occur along a fault and is defined as Δσc = Δσs + f(Δσn + ΔP), where σc is Coulomb stress, σs is shear stress, f is friction, σn is normal stress, and P is pore pressure. Preliminary results suggest that the SAE initially increased Coulomb stress near the location of the NE hypocenter by about 1.0 MPa, even though pore pressure decreased by a similar amount. Pore pressure recovered during the three months separating the SAE and NE. Consequently, Coulomb stress increased during this three-month interval by about 0

  10. Slow slip pulses driven by thermal pressurization of pore fluid: theory and observational constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garagash, D.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss recently developed solutions for steadily propagating self-healing slip pulses driven by thermal pressurization (TP) of pore fluid [Garagash, 2012] on a fault with a constant sliding friction. These pulses are characterized by initial stage of undrained weakening of the fault (when fluid/heat can not yet escape the frictionally heated shear zone), which gives way to partial restrengthening due to increasing hydrothermal diffusion under conditions of diminished rate of heating, leading to eventual locking of the slip. The rupture speed of these pulses is decreasing function of the thickness (h) of the principal shear zone. We find that "thick" shear zones, h >> hdyna, where hdyna = (μ/τ0) (ρc/fΛ)(4α/cs), can support aseismic TP pulses propagating at a fraction hdyna/h of the shear wave speed cs, while "thin" shear zones, h˜hdyna or thinner, can only harbor seismic slip. (Here μ - shear modulus, τ0 - the nominal fault strength, f - sliding friction, ρc - the heat capacity of the fault gouge, Λ - the fluid thermal pressurization factor, α - hydrothermal diffusivity parameter of the gouge). For plausible range of fault parameters, hdyna is between 10s to 100s of micrometers, suggesting that slow slip transients propagating at 1 to 10 km/day may occur in the form of a TP slip pulse accommodated by a meter-thick shear zone. We verify that this is, indeed, a possibility by contrasting the predictions for aseismic, small-slip TP pulses operating at seismologically-constrained, near-lithostatic pore pressure (effective normal stress ≈ 3 to 10 MPa) with the observations (slip duration at a given fault location ≈ week, propagation speed ≈ 15 km/day, and the inferred total slip ≈ 2 to 3 cm) for along-strike propagation of the North Cascadia slow slip events of '98-99 [Dragert et al., 2001, 2004]. Furthermore, we show that the effect of thermal pressurization on the strength of the subduction interface is comparable to or exceeds that of the rate

  11. Laser-Doppler acoustic probing of granular media with in-depth property gradient and varying pore pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bodet, L.; Dhemaied, A.; Mourgues, R.; Tournat, V.; Rejiba, F.

    2012-05-24

    Non-contacting ultrasonic techniques recently proved to be efficient in the physical modeling of seismic-wave propagation at various application scales, as for instance in the context of geological analogue and seismic modeling. An innovative experimental set-up is proposed here to perform laser-Doppler acoustic probing of unconsolidated granular media with varying pore pressures. The preliminary experiments presented here provide reproducible results and exploitable data, thus validating both the proposed medium preparation and pressure gradient generation procedure.

  12. Intra-Ocular Pressure Measurement in a Patient with a Thin, Thick or Abnormal Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Colin I.; Parker, Douglas G.A.; Goldberg, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurement of intra-ocular pressure is a fundamental component of the ocular examination. The most common method of measuring IOP is by Goldmann applanation tonometry, the accuracy of which is influenced by the thickness and biomechanical properties of the cornea. Algorithms devised to correct for corneal thickness to estimate IOP oversimplify the effects of corneal biomechanics. The viscous and elastic properties of the cornea influence IOP measurements in unpredictable ways, a finding borne out in studies of patients with inherently abnormal and surgically altered corneal biomechanics. Dynamic contour tonometry, rebound tonometry and the ocular response analyzer provide useful alternatives to GAT in patients with abnormal corneas, such as those who have undergone laser vision correction or keratoplasty. This article reviews the various methods of intra-ocular pressure measurement available to the clinician and the ways in which their utility is influenced by variations in corneal thickness and biomechanics. PMID:27014386

  13. Intra-Ocular Pressure Measurement in a Patient with a Thin, Thick or Abnormal Cornea.

    PubMed

    Clement, Colin I; Parker, Douglas G A; Goldberg, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurement of intra-ocular pressure is a fundamental component of the ocular examination. The most common method of measuring IOP is by Goldmann applanation tonometry, the accuracy of which is influenced by the thickness and biomechanical properties of the cornea. Algorithms devised to correct for corneal thickness to estimate IOP oversimplify the effects of corneal biomechanics. The viscous and elastic properties of the cornea influence IOP measurements in unpredictable ways, a finding borne out in studies of patients with inherently abnormal and surgically altered corneal biomechanics. Dynamic contour tonometry, rebound tonometry and the ocular response analyzer provide useful alternatives to GAT in patients with abnormal corneas, such as those who have undergone laser vision correction or keratoplasty. This article reviews the various methods of intra-ocular pressure measurement available to the clinician and the ways in which their utility is influenced by variations in corneal thickness and biomechanics. PMID:27014386

  14. 2D Simulations of Earthquake Cycles at a Subduction Zone Based on a Rate and State Friction Law -Effects of Pore Fluid Pressure Changes-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Y.; Hirahara, K.

    2006-12-01

    There have been a lot of studies that simulate large earthquakes occurring quasi-periodically at a subduction zone, based on the laboratory-derived rate-and-state friction law [eg. Kato and Hirasawa (1997), Hirose and Hirahara (2002)]. All of them assume that pore fluid pressure in the fault zone is constant. However, in the fault zone, pore fluid pressure changes suddenly, due to coseismic pore dilatation [Marone (1990)] and thermal pressurization [Mase and Smith (1987)]. If pore fluid pressure drops and effective normal stress rises, fault slip is decelerated. Inversely, if pore fluid pressure rises and effective normal stress drops, fault slip is accelerated. The effect of pore fluid may cause slow slip events and low-frequency tremor [Kodaira et al. (2004), Shelly et al. (2006)]. For a simple spring model, how pore dilatation affects slip instability was investigated [Segall and Rice (1995), Sleep (1995)]. When the rate of the slip becomes high, pore dilatation occurs and pore pressure drops, and the rate of the slip is restrained. Then the inflow of pore fluid recovers the pore pressure. We execute 2D earthquake cycle simulations at a subduction zone, taking into account such changes of pore fluid pressure following Segall and Rice (1995), in addition to the numerical scheme in Kato and Hirasawa (1997). We do not adopt hydrostatic pore pressure but excess pore pressure for initial condition, because upflow of dehydrated water seems to exist at a subduction zone. In our model, pore fluid is confined to the fault damage zone and flows along the plate interface. The smaller the flow rate is, the later pore pressure recovers. Since effective normal stress keeps larger, the fault slip is decelerated and stress drop becomes smaller. Therefore the smaller flow rate along the fault zone leads to the shorter earthquake recurrence time. Thus, not only the frictional parameters and the subduction rate but also the fault zone permeability affects the recurrence time of

  15. Implications of perennial saline springs for abnormally high fluid pressures and active thrusting in western California

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, J.R.; Davisson, M.L.; Criss, R.E.; Moores, E.M. )

    1992-05-01

    Perennial saline springs in the Rumsey Hills area, southwestern Sacramento Valley, California, locally discharge at high elevations and near ridgetops. The springs are cold, are commonly associated with natural gas seeps, and typically emerge along west-vergent thrust faults. Stable isotope analyses indicate that the spring waters are similar to oil-field formation fluids and they have had a significant residence time in the subsurface at moderate temperatures. The nonmeteoric character of the springs demonstrates that they are not being fed by perched water tables. The authors propose that these subsurface formation waters are being forced to the surface by anomalously high porefluid pressures. The Rumsey Hills area is one of Quaternary uplift, thrusting, and crustal shortening, and prospect wells drilled there have encountered anomalously high fluid pressures at shallow depths. They attribute these high fluid pressures to active tectonic compression and shortening of Cretaceous marine sedimentary rocks. The widespread occurrence of anomalously high pore-fluid pressures and perennial saline springs in the Coast Ranges and western Great Valley suggests that much of western California may be characterized as a seismically active, overpressured thrust belt. The emergence of formation waters along thrust faults further suggests that patterns of subsurface fluid flow in western California may be similar to those in overpressured accretionary prisms, and that excess fluid pressures may also play a role in the distribution of seismicity.

  16. [Investigation of high pore fluid pressure in the Uinta Basin, Utah]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    High pore fluid pressures, approaching lithostatic, are observed in the deepest sections of the Uinta basin, Utah. The authors analyzed the cause of the anomalous overpressures with a 3-dimensional, numerical model of the evolution of the basin, including compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation as possible mechanisms. The numerical model builds the basin through time, coupling the structural, thermal and hydrodynamic evolution, and includes in situ hydrocarbon generation and migration. They used the evolution model to evaluate overpressure mechanisms and oil migration patterns for different possible conceptual models of the geologic history. Model results suggest that observed overpressures in the Uinta basin are probably caused by ongoing oil generation in strata with specific conditions of permeability, relative permeability, TOC content, and oil viscosity. They conducted a sensitivity analysis that suggests for oil generation to cause overpressures, the necessary conditions are: oil viscosity is {approximately}0.05 cP or higher, intrinsic permeability is {approximately}5 {times} 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2} or lower, and source rock TOC values are {approximately}0.5% or higher. The authors also analyzed hydrocarbon migration patterns in the basin and how they are affected by the basin`s structural history. Oil migration patterns produced by the model are consistent with published oil production maps: oil moves from the deep Altamont source rocks toward Redwash, the eastern Douglas Creek Arch area, and southward towards the Sunnyside tar-sands and Book Cliffs. Peak oil generation occurs from the time of maximum burial in the mid-Tertiary ({approximately}35 to {approximately}30 Ma). Most differential uplift of the basin`s flanks probably occurs well after this time, and most oil migration to the basin`s southern and eastern flanks occurs prior to uplift of these flanks. Model results show that if the basin`s flanks are uplifted too soon, reduced

  17. Abnormal fluid pressures at ODP Site 1251: Implications for fluid flow and hydrate concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, J. L.; Brown, K. M.

    2005-12-01

    Consolidation test results from whole round samples collected at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1251 were combined with geophysical logging-while-drilling (LWD) data to create a continuous down-hole record of fluid pressure in the slope basin to the east of Hydrate Ridge, OR. Underconsolidation of the sediment is documented in the void ratio vs. effective stress relationships from the consolidation studies in the upper 140 mbsf of the section. This interval corresponds with a zone of consistently elevated fluid pressure that reaches ~90% of the lithostatic overburden stress. Models of one dimensional sedimentation and consolidation show that the observed degree of overpressuring can be accounted for by the combined effect of rapid sedimentation (60 to 160 cm/k.y.) and low permeability (1x10-16 to 1x10-17 m2). Between 140 and 300 mbsf the fluid pressure varies from 90% of lithostatic to sub-hydrostatic in 5 distinct horizons. This variation may be linked to mechanical consolidation of the sediment related to pore fluid drainage along more permeable horizons, or changes in sedimentation rate related to either glacial/ interglacial cycles or the uplift history of the ridge. The derived pressure gradient and permeability measurements predict Darcy flow rates on the order of 1 mm/yr at this site, but a lack of laterally continuous permeable conduits likely prevents the flow generated by basin overpressures in the interval from 0 to 140 mbsf from contributing to flow at the crest of the ridge. Using an average methane concentration of 100 mM and the determined flow rate, the methane flux through the system is calculated to be ~5 x 10-11 kg s-1 m-2. These data can be used to examine the maximum theoretical percentage of the pore space that can be filled with hydrate given the time of deposition in the basin. At a depth of 50 mbsf, we find that the maximum concentration of hydrate in the pore space is expected to be 0.1 to 0.3%, agreeing with the lack of concentrated

  18. An evaluation of pore pressure diffusion into a shale overburden and sideburden induced by production-related changes in reservoir fluid pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Ludovic P.; MacBeth, Colin; HajNasser, Yesser; Schutjens, Peter

    2012-06-01

    It is commonplace in the simulation of reservoir fluid flow induced by hydrocarbon production to regard shales as barriers to flow. Whilst this appears correct for fluid exchange, this is not the case for the fluid pressure component of this process. Indeed, the authors observe that pore pressure reduction due to reservoir depletion can propagate significant distances into the shale overburden or sideburden over the production time scale. Shales may deplete their pore pressures by more than 10% of that experienced in the reservoir sand for distances of tens of metres to kilometres into the shale, depending on the production history, duration and the specific shale properties. An important factor controlling these results is heterogeneity of the shale sediments, and the pressure diffusion process can be considerably enhanced by the presence of silt laminations and streaks. These results suggest a possible risk to drillers when advancing towards the top of a depleting reservoir or when drilling a well alongside an already depleted reservoir. Our analyses conclude that pore pressure diffusion should be considered as a factor in geomechanical and fluid flow reservoir modelling, and in mud weight determination during infill drilling.

  19. Predicting pore pressure in active fold-thrust systems: An empirical model for the deepwater Sabah foldbelt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couzens-Schultz, Brent A.; Azbel, Konstantin

    2014-12-01

    Measurements related to mudrock (shale and siltstone) porosity such as acoustic velocity, density or electrical resistivity, have traditionally been used to predict pore pressures in extensional stress settings. The underlying assumption is that burial and vertical effective stress (VES), which is the overburden minus the pore pressure, controls the compaction of these rocks through porosity loss. The dataset presented here compares VES and acoustic velocity of similar composition mudrocks in both an extensional and a compressional stress setting. In the extensional stress environment, the mudrocks follow a typical compaction trend with a porosity loss and increase in acoustic velocity that can be related to VES. In an active fold-thrust belt, the compressive stresses further reduce the porosity and increase the acoustic velocity of the mudrocks. First a layer-parallel shortening compacts sediments beyond what is observed for the VES. This additional compaction is further enhanced near thrust faults and in anticlinal forelimbs, presumably due to additional shear stress in these areas. The mudrocks located in folds that are buried by additional sedimentation do not compact again until the tectonic compaction is overridden by enough new burial. After that, the mudrocks follow the observed extensional setting compaction trend. In the fold-thrust belt, the observed reduction in porosity by stresses other than burial leads to an under-prediction of pore pressure using traditional methods. To account for this, we present a correction that can be applied to the acoustic velocity (or porosity) using two parameters: (a) proximity to thrust faults and anticlinal forelimbs and (b) the amount of burial after fold formation. With these corrections, the extensional velocity-VES compaction trend can be used to accurately predict pore pressure within the active fold-thrust belt. The correction is calibrated with well data and is empirical. None-the-less, it is a first step toward

  20. Quaternary Sediment Accumulation in the Aleutian Trench: Implications for Dehydration Reaction Progress and Pore Pressure Development Offshore Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meridth, L. N.; Screaton, E.; Jaeger, J. M.; James, S. R.; Villaseñor, T. G.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment inputs to subduction zones impart a significant control on diagenetic reaction progress, fluid production and pore pressure development and thus affect hydrologic and tectonic behavior during subduction. Intensified glaciation following the mid-Pleistocene transition increased sediment flux to the Gulf of Alaska. Rapid sediment accumulation (>1 km/my) in the Aleutian Trench increases overburden and should accelerate dehydration of hydrous sedimentary components by elevating temperatures in the incoming sediment column. These processes have the potential to generate fluid overpressures in the mud-dominated, low permeability sediments deposited on the incoming plate, offshore SE Alaska. Mineralogical analyses on incoming sediments from Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 18 and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 341 show that both smectite and Opal-A are present as hydrous mineral phases. A 1-D numerical model was developed to track dehydration reaction progress and pore pressures in the incoming sediment column from the abyssal plain to the Aleutian Trench. Simulated temperatures in the incoming column increase due to the insulating effect of trench sediments. As a result, trench sedimentation causes smectite dehydration to begin and Opal-A dehydration to nearly reach completion at the deformation front. Simulated excess pore pressures in the proto-decollement zone increase from nearly hydrostatic to almost half of lithostatic due to the rapid deposition of trench sediments. The 1-D modeling results were incorporated into a 2-D model that follows the underthrust column at the deformation front into the subduction zone. Simulated results of the 2-D flow model illustrate the effects of lateral flow on pore pressure distribution following subduction.

  1. Differential equations governing slip-induced pore-pressure fluctuations in a water-saturated granular medium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    Macroscopic frictional slip in water-saturated granular media occurs commonly during landsliding, surface faulting, and intense bedload transport. A mathematical model of dynamic pore-pressure fluctuations that accompany and influence such sliding is derived here by both inductive and deductive methods. The inductive derivation shows how the governing differential equations represent the physics of the steadily sliding array of cylindrical fiberglass rods investigated experimentally by Iverson and LaHusen (1989). The deductive derivation shows how the same equations result from a novel application of Biot's (1956) dynamic mixture theory to macroscopic deformation. The model consists of two linear differential equations and five initial and boundary conditions that govern solid displacements and pore-water pressures. Solid displacements and water pressures are strongly coupled, in part through a boundary condition that ensures mass conservation during irreversible pore deformation that occurs along the bumpy slip surface. Feedback between this deformation and the pore-pressure field may yield complex system responses. The dual derivations of the model help explicate key assumptions. For example, the model requires that the dimensionless parameter B, defined here through normalization of Biot's equations, is much larger than one. This indicates that solid-fluid coupling forces are dominated by viscous rather than inertial effects. A tabulation of physical and kinematic variables for the rod-array experiments of Iverson and LaHusen and for various geologic phenomena shows that the model assumptions commonly are satisfied. A subsequent paper will describe model tests against experimental data. ?? 1993 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  2. Ultrasound and microbubble mediated drug delivery: acoustic pressure as determinant for uptake via membrane pores or endocytosis.

    PubMed

    De Cock, Ine; Zagato, Elisa; Braeckmans, Kevin; Luan, Ying; de Jong, Nico; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Lentacker, Ine

    2015-01-10

    Although promising results are achieved in ultrasound mediated drug delivery, its underlying biophysical mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Pore formation as well as endocytosis has been reported during ultrasound application. Due to the plethora of ultrasound settings used in literature, it is extremely difficult to draw conclusions on which mechanism is actually involved. To our knowledge, we are the first to show that acoustic pressure influences which route of drug uptake is addressed, by inducing different microbubble-cell interactions. To investigate this, FITC-dextrans were used as model drugs and their uptake was analyzed by flow cytometry. In fluorescence intensity plots, two subpopulations arose in cells with FITC-dextran uptake after ultrasound application, corresponding to cells having either low or high uptake. Following separation of the subpopulations by FACS sorting, confocal images indicated that the low uptake population showed endocytic uptake. The high uptake population represented uptake via pores. Moreover, the distribution of the subpopulations shifted to the high uptake population with increasing acoustic pressure. Real-time confocal recordings during ultrasound revealed that membrane deformation by microbubbles may be the trigger for endocytosis via mechanostimulation of the cytoskeleton. Pore formation was shown to be caused by microbubbles propelled towards the cell. These results provide a better insight in the role of acoustic pressure in microbubble-cell interactions and the possible consequences for drug uptake. In addition, it pinpoints the need for a more rational, microbubble behavior based choice of acoustic parameters in ultrasound mediated drug delivery experiments.

  3. Evaluation of two-phase relative permeability and capillary pressure relations for unstable displacements in a pore network

    SciTech Connect

    Dehoff, Karl J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Zhang, Changyong; Grate, Jay W.

    2012-10-29

    A series of displacement experiments was conducted using five wetting-nonwetting immiscible fluid pairs in a homogenous and uniform pore network. The micromodel was initially saturated with either polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG) or water as a wetting fluid, which was subsequently displaced by a nonwetting fluid (dodecane, hexadecane, or mineral oil) at different flow rates. The experiments were designed to allow determinations of nonwetting fluid relative permeabilities ( ), fluid saturations ( ), and capillary pressure heads ( ). In the displacements, nonwetting fluid saturations increased with increasing flow rates for all five fluid pairs, and viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement were observed. Viscous fingering occurred when PEG was displaced by either dodecane or hexadecane. For the water displacements, capillary fingers were observed at low capillary numbers. Due to unstable fingering phenomena, values for the PEG displacements were smaller than for the water displacements. A fitting exercise using the Brooks-Corey (1964) relationship showed that the fitted entry pressure heads are reasonably close to the computed entry pressure head. The fitted pore geometry factor, Sn values for the displacements are considerably lower than what is expected for displacements in homogeneous, highly uniform, porous systems, demonstrating the impact of unstable displacement on the apparent value of Sn. It was shown that a continuum-based multiphase model could be used to predict the average behavior for wetting fluid drainage in a pore network as long as independently fitted - and - relations are used. The use of a coupled approach through the Brooks-Corey pore geometry factor underpredicts observed values.

  4. Pore water pressure assessment in a forest watershed: Simulations and distributed field measurements related to forest practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Amod S.; Sidle, Roy C.

    2004-02-01

    A distributed shallow groundwater model related to slope stability is described to assess the spatial distribution of pore water pressure in steep forested terrain in British Columbia. Additionally, effects of timber harvesting and roads on measured changes in pressure head during rainstorms were evaluated for the first time to assess the need for incorporating different hydrological components in the event-driven distributed model. Although explicit spatial quantification of pore water pressure requires many measurements for accurate prediction, model performance using average parameter values was reasonable when compared with pressure heads measured at nine spatially distributed sites. Increases in maximum pressure head (varying from 9 to 28 cm) between preharvesting (after road construction) and postharvesting rainstorm events were observed in seven of nine sites. The remaining two sites showed either a small decrease (≈5 cm) or similar peak pressure heads following harvesting. Peak pressure head evaluated at one piezometer located 46 m downslope of the road decreased substantially (≈50 cm) after road construction during moderate rainstorms and then recovered following harvesting. Piezometric responses in sites upslope of the road were not affected by road construction but did increase after harvesting. Moderate storms caused the largest relative increases in pressure head between preharvesting (after roads) and postharvesting conditions; such increases were small during large storms, lending support to the idea that timber harvesting in temperate forests enhances hydrologic response only during small and moderate storms. Since landslides in coastal Pacific Northwest are typically caused by large winter rainstorms, it appears more justified to include better spatial representation of soil physical and engineering parameters in the distributed shallow groundwater model compared to specifying evapotranspiration; road hydrology may, however, need to be included.

  5. Pore pressure evolution at the plate interface along the Cascadia subduction zone from the trench to the ETS transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarbek, R. M.; Rempel, A. W.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Pore fluid pressures in subduction zones are a primary control on fault strength and slip dynamics. Numerous studies document elevated pore pressures in the outer wedge along several margins. Seismic observations and the occurrence of non-volcanic tremor provide additional evidence for the presence of near-lithostatic pore pressures at the plate interface far down-dip from the trench (~35 km depth). Here we use numerical models in one and two dimensions to evaluate the pore pressure and compaction state of sediments on the subducting Juan de Fuca plate in Cascadia from the trench to the ETS zone. 2-D models allow pressure to diffuse vertically and also laterally normal to strike of the megathrust; 1-D models simulate only vertical diffusion. Model parameters are chosen with reference to two strike-normal profiles: one through central Oregon and one through the Olympic Peninsula of Washington. We examine temporal variations in sediment input to the trench and consider implications for fault strength and permeability as well as the down-dip extent to which compactive dewatering can be considered a significant fluid source. In 1-D, we use a general and fully nonlinear model of sediment compaction derived without making any assumptions regarding stress-strain or porosity-permeability relations and allowing finite strains. In contrast, most previous models of fluid flow in subduction zones have used linear models of diffusion that rely on assumptions of constant sediment permeability and infinitesimal strains for their formulation. Our nonlinear finite-strain model remains valid at greater depths, where stresses and strains are large. Boundary conditions in 1-D are constrained by pore pressure estimates along the megathrust fault that are based on seismic velocities (e.g. Tobin and Saffer, 2010) and data from consolidation tests conducted on sediments gathered during ODP Leg 204 (Tan, 2001). Initial conditions rely on input sediment thickness; while sediment thickness

  6. 10+ years of ACORK: Continuous pore pressure record from the decollement zone at Nankai Trough off Muroto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, M.; Davis, E. E.; Becker, K.; Miyazaki, J.; Hulme, S.; Mendrum, R.; Toki, T.; Wheat, C. G.; Kasaya, T.

    2012-12-01

    Pore pressure and hydrological properties play key roles in governing coupling and slip behavior along the subducting plate interface. During the KR22-12 cruise, three dives were completed using ROV KAIKO onboard R/V KAIREI during Dec. 20-25, 2011, to retrieve pore pressure data and interstitial fluid samples from ACORKs at ODP Holes 808I and 1173B situated landward and seaward of the deformation front in the Nankai Trough off Cape Muroto. With 3-year-long and a 4-year-long new data records from Holes 808I and 1173B, respectively, we now have over 10-year-long continuous pressure records since June 2001 at both sites. Data from most monitoring depths show systematic variations in average pressure, and in formation pressure response to seafloor tidal loading. In 2005 and 2009, we observed significant decrease in the amplitudes of pressure response to semi-diurnal tidal loading at Hole 808I. Transient changes were observed at the time of several nearby earthquakes, including the 2011 Mar. 11 Tohoku earthquake, followed by long-lasting pressure changes in both holes starting on Mar. 23, 2011. Gas-tight fluid sampling operations were successfully carried out from the hydraulic port attached to the swellable packer inserted within the ACORK head at Hole 808I. The swellable packer was set in order to isolate the décollement zone that lies roughly 20 m below the bottom of casing at 922 m below the seafloor. We observed shimmering water venting through the port, and the flow rate was measured using a ball-type flowmeter. Fluid samples looked muddy, probably as a result of staining from the casing steel. We believe that the packer seal at the ACORK head is set properly, although the pore pressure at 922 m does not seem to have increased up to 2011. Still, the observed fluid seepage suggests a significant amount of fluid evacuated from the décollement zone since ACORK installation, which may have changed its hydrogeological condition.

  7. In-situ method for determining pore size distribution, capillary pressure and permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Waxman, M.H.

    1987-02-17

    A method is described for determining the pore sizes entered by the oil phase in an oil-bearing formation, comprising: logging the formation of interest with an induced polarization logging tool having at least one source electrode; computing from the induced polarization measurements obtained by the logging tool a normalized induced polarization response function; obtaining core material from the formation of interest; extracting the water and hydrocarbons from the core material; resaturating the core material with formation brine; measuring the normalized induced polarization response function for the core material; and determining the pore sizes containing oil in the formation by comparing the normalized induced polarization response function from the formation with the normalized induced polarization response function of the core.

  8. [Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone inhibitors for treatment of hypertension with abnormal circadian rhythm of blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Yagi, Shusuke; Sata, Masataka

    2014-08-01

    Circadian rhythm of blood pressure (BP) has recently been focused on because increase in nocturnal BP and morning BP surge have been shown to be risks for cardio-cerebrovascular diseases independent of 24-h BP level. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is involved in BP circadian rhythm, and RAAS inhibitors therefore play an important role in the control of circadian rhythm of BP. Bedtime administration of RAAS inhibitors is more effective than morning administration for reducing nocturnal and morning BP levels in addition to converting the BP profile into a dipper pattern, which is known as chronotherapy. For reducing cardio-cerebro-vascular events, controlling abnormal circadian rhythm of BP in addition to 24-h BP using RAAS inhibitors with optimal time dosing should be considered.

  9. Influence of slope angle on pore pressure generation and kinematics of pyroclastic flows: insights from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chédeville, Corentin; Roche, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    The influence of slope angle on pore pressure generation and kinematics of fines-rich pyroclastic flows was investigated through laboratory experiments. Granular flows were generated by the release of a column of fine glass beads ( d = 0.08 mm) in an inclined channel (0-30°). The granular column could be fluidized while the channel base was either smooth or made rough by glued beads of 3 mm diameter. Pore pressure measurements reveal that the degree of autofluidization, caused by air escaping from the substrate interstices into which flow particles settled, was high at all slope angles. Flow runout increase due to autofluidization, however, was reduced at slope angle higher than ˜12° because of the occurrence of a strong deceleration phase that limited the flow duration. This is probably caused by the combination of flow head thinning at increased slope angle and settling of particles into the substrate interstices until the flow ran out of mass. Analysis of high-speed videos suggests that ingestion of ambient air at the flow front did not occur, even on steep slopes of 30°. Experiments at inclinations close to (25°) or slightly higher (30°) than the repose angle of the granular material (28.5°) revealed the formation of a thin basal deposit that was then eroded as the flow thickness and velocity gradually decreased. Our study suggests that air escape from substrate interstices in nature can be a significant external cause of pore pressure generation that favors low energy dissipation and long runout distances of pyroclastic flows on moderate topographies.

  10. In situ measurement of soil moisture and pore-water pressures in an 'incipient' landslide: Lake Tutira, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Hawke, Richard; McConchie, Jack

    2011-02-01

    The immediate cost of shallow regolith landslides in New Zealand has been estimated to exceed US$33M annually. Since the majority of these landslides occur during prolonged wet conditions, or intense rainstorms, moisture conditions are a critical control. The nature, dynamics, and character of soil moisture conditions, and the piezometric response to rainfall, have been recorded within an 'incipient' landslide for more than 5 years. The study site, on pastoral hill country within the Lake Tutira catchment in northern Hawkes Bay, is typical of large areas of New Zealand episodically affected by extensive landsliding. Detailed continuous measurements show that both the soil moisture and piezometric response within the regolith are highly storm- and site-specific. The development of positive pore pressures is infrequent; they form only during intense rainstorms, and persist for a short time. The hydraulic response of the soil is primarily a function of storm characteristics, but this response can be modified by antecedent moisture conditions, topographic position, and heterogeneity of soil properties. Stability analysis shows that most slopes in the study area are significantly steeper than can be explained by the frictional strength of the regolith. Measured hydraulic conditions also show that positive pore-water pressures alone do not trigger slope instability. A recent slope failure followed a period of extremely high antecedent moisture conditions, and occurred when maximum soil moisture conditions, though not pore-water pressures, were recorded. Increased moisture content of the regolith reduces matric tension, and therefore effective cohesion of the soil. This cohesion is critical to maintaining stability of the regolith on these slopes.

  11. Slip-weakening zone sizes at nucleation of catastrophic subaerial and submarine landslides by gradually increasing pore pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, R. C.; Rice, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    We address the nucleation of dynamic landslide rupture in response to gradual pore pressure increases. Nucleation marks the onset of acceleration of the overlying slope mass due to the suddenly rapid enlargement of a sub-surface zone of shear failure, previously deforming quasi-statically. We model that zone as a planar surface undergoing initially linear slip-weakening frictional failure within a bordering linear-elastic medium. The results are also relevant to earthquake nucleation. The sub-surface rupture zone considered runs parallel to the free surface of a uniform slope, under a 2D plane-strain deformation state. We show results for ruptures with friction coefficients following linear slip weakening (i.e., the residual friction is not yet reached). For spatially broad increases in pore pressure, the nucleation length depends on a ratio of depth to a cohesive zone length scale. In the very broad-increase limit, a direct numerical solution for nucleation lengths compares well with solutions to a corresponding eigenvalue problem (similar to Uenishi and Rice [JGR '03]), in which spatial variations in normal stress are neglected. We estimate nucleation lengths for subaerial and submarine conditions using data [e.g., Bishop et al., Géotech. '71; Stark et al., JGGE '05] from ring-shear tests on sediments (peak friction fp = 0.5, frictional slip-weakening rate within the range w = -df/d(slip) = 0.1/cm-1/cm). We assume that only pre-stresses, and not material properties, vary with depth. With such fp and w, we find for a range of subsurface depths and shear moduli μ that nucleation lengths are typically several hundred meters long for shallow undersea slopes, and up to an order of magnitude less for steeper slopes on the Earth's surface. In the submarine case, this puts nucleation lengths in a size range comparable to observed pore-pressure-generated seafloor disturbances as pockmarks [e.g., Gay et al., MG '06].

  12. Impact of the carbon pore size and topology on the equilibrium quantum sieving of hydrogen isotopes at zero coverage and finite pressures.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Gauden, Piotr A; Terzyk, Artur P; Furmaniak, Sylwester

    2009-04-01

    Carbonaceous slit-shaped and square-shaped pores efficiently differentiate adsorbed hydrogen isotopes at 77 and 33 K. Extensive path integral Monte Carlo simulations revealed that the square-shaped carbon pores enhanced the selectivity of deuterium over hydrogen in comparison to equivalent slit-shaped carbon pores at zero coverage as well as at finite pressures (i.e. quantum sieving of hydrogen isotopes is pore-topology-dependent). We show that this enhancement of the D(2)/H(2) equilibrium selectivity results from larger localization of hydrogen isotopes in square-shaped pores. The operating pressures for efficient quantum sieving of hydrogen isotopes are strongly dependent on the topology as well as on the size of the carbon pores. However, for both considered carbon pore topologies the highest D(2)/H(2) separation factor is observed at zero-coverage limit. Depending on carbon pore size and topology we predicted monotonic decreasing and non-monotonic shape of the D(2)/H(2) equilibrium selectivity at finite pressures. For both kinds of carbonaceous pores of molecular sizes we predict high compression of hydrogen isotopes at 77 and 33 K (for example, the pore density of compressed hydrogen isotopes at 77 K and 0.25 MPa in a square-shaped carbon pore of size 2.6 Å exceeds 60 mmol cm(-3); for comparison, the liquid density of para-H(2) at 30 K and 30 MPa is 42 mmol cm(-3)). Finally, by direct comparison of simulation results with experimental data it is explained why 'ordinary' carbonaceous materials are not efficient quantum sieves.

  13. Development of a New Analog Test System Capable of Modeling Tectonic Deformation Incorporating the Effects of Pore Fluid Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Nakajima, H.; Takeda, M.; Aung, T. T.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding and predicting the tectonic deformation within geologic strata has been a very important research subject in many fields such as structural geology and petroleum geology. In recent years, such research has also become a fundamental necessity for the assessment of active fault migration, site selection for geological disposal of radioactive nuclear waste and exploration for methane hydrate. Although analog modeling techniques have played an important role in the elucidation of the tectonic deformation mechanisms, traditional approaches have typically used dry materials and ignored the effects of pore fluid pressure. In order for analog models to properly depict the tectonic deformation of the targeted, large-prototype system within a small laboratory-scale configuration, physical properties of the models, including geometry, force, and time, must be correctly scaled. Model materials representing brittle rock behavior require an internal friction identical to the prototype rock and virtually zero cohesion. Granular materials such as sand, glass beads, or steel beads of dry condition have been preferably used for this reason in addition to their availability and ease of handling. Modeling protocols for dry granular materials have been well established but such model tests cannot account for the pore fluid effects. Although the concept of effective stress has long been recognized and the role of pore-fluid pressure in tectonic deformation processes is evident, there have been few analog model studies that consider the effects of pore fluid movement. Some new applications require a thorough understanding of the coupled deformation and fluid flow processes within the strata. Taking the field of waste management as an example, deep geological disposal of radioactive waste has been thought to be an appropriate methodology for the safe isolation of the wastes from the human environment until the toxicity of the wastes decays to non-hazardous levels. For the

  14. Rapid intrusion of magma into wet rock: groundwater flow due to pore pressure increases.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, P.T.

    1982-01-01

    Analytical and numerical solutions are developed to simulate the pressurization, expansion, and flow of groundwater contained within saturated, intact host rocks subject to sudden heating from the planar surface of an igneous intrusion. For most rocks, water diffuses more rapidly than heat, assuring that groundwater is not heated along a constant-volume pressure path and that thermal expansion and pressurization adjacent to the intrusion drives a flow that extends well beyond the heated region. -from Author

  15. Underground structure of terrestrial mud volcanoes and abnormal water pressure formation in Niigata, Central JAPAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.; Shinya, T.; Miyata, Y.; Tokuyasu, S.

    2005-12-01

    Activity of mud volcano is thought to be caused by an abnormal water pressure generated in deep underground and make a serious problem for underground constructions such as railway tunnel, underground facility for radwaste and so on. It is important to investigate the underground structure of a mud volcano and the mechanism of abnormal water formation for site selection and safety assessment of such facilities. Serious trouble such as tunnel wall collapse due to the rock swelling has happened 180m deep under mud volcanoes. It took more than 10 years to excavate the section of 150 m long. 4 terrestrial mud volcanoes were found in the Tertiary sedimentary basin in Niigata, central Japan All the mud volcanoes are distributed along the rim of the topographic basin that is located at the NE-SW trending crest of mountainous area and distributed along the wing of anticline. Geological structure inside basin is heavily disturbed. The extinct mud volcano is exposed in the side-slope of newly constructed road and the internal vent structure of mud volcano can be observed. The vent is 30 m in diameter and is consisted of mud breccia and scaly network clay that is thought to be generated by hydro-fracturing and the following water-rock interaction between mudstone and groundwater. Groundwater erupted from mud volcano is highly saline with electric conductivity of 15 mS/cm and high 18 O/16 O isotope ratio of 1.2 parmillage. Also, the vitrinite reflectance is 1.5 to 1.9 % that is not expected in the sedimentary rocks exposed near ground surface. As a result, it is assumed that these erupted materials were introduced from the deep underground about 4000 m deep. CSA-MT geophysical exploration was carried out to survey the underground structure and obtained the profile of electrical resistivity from the surface to 800 m in depth. It is found that the disk-shaped low resistivity zone less than 1 m due to the high salinity content is identified in underground 600 m deep, 200 m thick

  16. Pore pressure distribution of a mega-splay fault system in the Nankai Trough subduction zone: Insight into up-dip extent of the seismogenic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Takeshi; Kamei, Rie; Pratt, R. Gerhard

    2014-06-01

    We use the pore pressure distribution predicted from a waveform tomography (WT) velocity model to interpret the evolution of the mega-splay fault system in the Nankai Trough off Kumano, Japan. To map pore pressure around the mega-splay fault and plate boundary décollement, we integrate the high-resolution WT velocities with laboratory data and borehole well log data using rock physics theory. The predicted pore pressure distribution shows that high pore pressures (close to lithostatic pressure) along the footwall of the mega-splay fault extend seaward to the trough region, and the normalized pore pressure ratio is nearly constant over that extent. This continuity of the overpressured zone indicates that a coseismic rupture can potentially propagate nearly to the trough axis. We interpret a high-pressure belt within an accretionary wedge on the landward side of the present mega-splay fault as evidence of the ancient mega-splay fault. Because the ancient mega-splay fault soles into the active mega-splay fault, the active mega-splay fault may function as a basal detachment fault and is directly connected to the seaward plate boundary décollement.

  17. Resting pulmonary artery pressure of 21-24 mmHg predicts abnormal exercise haemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lau, Edmund M T; Godinas, Laurent; Sitbon, Olivier; Montani, David; Savale, Laurent; Jaïs, Xavier; Lador, Frederic; Gunther, Sven; Celermajer, David S; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc; Chemla, Denis; Herve, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    A resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of 21-24 mmHg is above the upper limit of normal but does not reach criteria for the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). We sought to determine whether an mPAP of 21-24 mmHg is associated with an increased risk of developing an abnormal pulmonary vascular response during exercise.Consecutive patients (n=290) with resting mPAP <25 mmHg who underwent invasive exercise haemodynamics were analysed. Risk factors for pulmonary vascular disease or left heart disease were present in 63.4% and 43.8% of subjects. An abnormal pulmonary vascular response (or exercise PH) was defined by mPAP >30 mmHg and total pulmonary vascular resistance >3 WU at maximal exercise.Exercise PH occurred in 74 (86.0%) out of 86 versus 96 (47.1%) out of 204 in the mPAP of 21-24 mmHg and mPAP <21 mmHg groups, respectively (OR 6.9, 95% CI: 3.6-13.6; p<0.0001). Patients with mPAP of 21-24 mmHg had lower 6-min walk distance (p=0.002) and higher New York Heart Association functional class status (p=0.03). Decreasing levels of mPAP were associated with a lower prevalence of exercise PH, which occurred in 60.3%, 38.7% and 7.7% of patients with mPAP of 17-20, 13-16 and <13 mmHg, respectively.In an at-risk population, a resting mPAP between 21-24 mmHg is closely associated with exercise PH together with worse functional capacity. PMID:26965292

  18. Comparison between monitored and modeled pore water pressure and safety factor in a slope susceptible to shallow landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoni, Massimiliano; Meisina, Claudia; Zizioli, Davide; Valentino, Roberto; Bittelli, Marco; Chersich, Silvia

    2014-05-01

    Shallow landslides can be defined as slope movements affecting superficial deposits of small thicknesses which are usually triggered due to extreme rainfall events, also very concentrated in time. Shallow landslides are hazardous phenomena: in particular, if they happen close to urbanized areas they could cause significant damages to cultivations, structures, infrastructures and, sometimes, human losses. The triggering mechanism of rainfall-induced shallow landslides is strictly linked with the hydrological and mechanical responses of usually unsaturated soils to rainfall events. For this reason, it is fundamental knowing the intrinsic hydro-mechanical properties of the soils in order to assess both susceptibility and hazard of shallow landslide and to develop early-warning systems at large scale. The hydrological data collected by a 20 months monitoring on a slope susceptible to shallow landslides in an area of the North -Eastern Oltrepo Pavese (Northern Apennines, Italy) were used to identify the hydrological behaviors of the investigated soils towards rainfall events. Field conditions under different rainfall trends have also been modeled by using both hydrological and physically-based stability models for the evaluation of the slope safety factor . The main objectives of this research are: (a) to compare the field measured pore water pressures at different depths with results of hydrological models, in order to evaluate the efficiency of the tested models and to determine how precipitations affect pore pressure development; (b) to compare the time trends of the safety factor that have been obtained by applying different stability models; (c) to evaluate, through a sensitivity analysis, the effects of soil hydrological properties on modeling pore water pressure and safety factor. The test site slope where field measurements were acquired is representative of other sites in Northern Apennines affected by shallow landslides and is characterized by medium

  19. A fault constitutive relation accounting for thermal pressurization of pore fluid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    The heat generated in a slip zone during an earthquake can raise fluid pressure and thereby reduce frictional resistance to slip. The amount of fluid pressure rise depends on the associated fluid flow. The heat generated at a given time produces fluid pressure that decreases inversely with the square root of hydraulic diffusivity times the elapsed time. If the slip velocity function is crack-like, there is a prompt fluid pressure rise at the onset of slip, followed by a slower increase. The stress drop associated with the prompt fluid pressure rise increases with rupture propagation distance. The threshold propagation distance at which thermally induced stress drop starts to dominate over frictionally induced stress drop is proportional to hydraulic diffusivity. If hydraulic diffusivity is 0.02 m2/s, estimated from borehole samples of fault zone material, the threshold propagation distance is 300 m. The stress wave in an earthquake will induce an unknown amount of dilatancy and will increase hydraulic diffusivity, both of which will lessen the fluid pressure effect. Nevertheless, if hydraulic diffusivity is no more than two orders of magnitude larger than the laboratory value, then stress drop is complete in large earthquakes.

  20. Carbonate pore system evaluation using the velocity-porosity-pressure relationship, digital image analysis, and differential effective medium theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima Neto, Irineu A.; Misságia, Roseane M.; Ceia, Marco A.; Archilha, Nathaly L.; Oliveira, Lucas C.

    2014-11-01

    Carbonate reservoirs exhibit heterogeneous pore systems and a wide variety of grain types, which affect the rock's elastic properties and the reservoir parameter relationships. To study the Albian carbonates in the Campos Basin, a methodology is proposed to predict the amount of microporosity and the representative aspect ratio of these inclusions. The method assumes three pore-space scales in two representative inclusion scenarios: 1) a macro-mesopore median aspect ratio from the thin-section digital image analysis (DIA) and 2) a microporosity aspect ratio predicted based on the measured P-wave velocities. Through a laboratory analysis of 10 grainstone core samples of the Albian age, the P- and S-wave velocities (Vp and Vs) are evaluated at effective pressures of 0-10 MPa. The analytical theories in the proposed methodology are functions of the aspect ratios from the differential effective medium (DEM) theory, the macro-mesopore system recognized from the DIA, the amount of microporosity determined by the difference between the porosities estimated from laboratorial helium-gas and the thin-section petrographic images, and the P-wave velocities under dry effective pressure conditions. The DIA procedure is applied to estimate the local and global parameters, and the textural implications concerning ultrasonic velocities and image resolution. The macro-mesopore inclusions contribute to stiffer rocks and higher velocities, whereas the microporosity inclusions contribute to softer rocks and lower velocities. We observe a high potential for this methodology, which uses the microporosity aspect ratio inverted from Vp to predict Vs with a good agreement. The results acceptably characterize the Albian grainstones. The representative macro-mesopore aspect ratio is 0.5, and the inverted microporosity aspect ratio ranges from 0.01 to 0.07. The effective pressure induced an effect of slight porosity reduction during the triaxial tests, mainly in the microporosity inclusions

  1. Effect of hydrogel particle additives on water-accessible pore structure of sandy soils: a custom pressure plate apparatus and capillary bundle model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Y; Durian, D J

    2013-05-01

    To probe the effects of hydrogel particle additives on the water-accessible pore structure of sandy soils, we introduce a custom pressure plate method in which the volume of water expelled from a wet granular packing is measured as a function of applied pressure. Using a capillary bundle model, we show that the differential change in retained water per pressure increment is directly related to the cumulative cross-sectional area distribution f(r) of the water-accessible pores with radii less than r. This is validated by measurements of water expelled from a model sandy soil composed of 2-mm-diameter glass beads. In particular, it is found that the expelled water is dramatically dependent on sample height and that analysis using the capillary bundle model gives the same pore size distribution for all samples. The distribution is found to be approximately log normal, and the total cross-sectional area fraction of the accessible pore space is found to be f(0)=0.34. We then report on how the pore distribution and total water-accessible area fraction are affected by superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives, uniformly mixed into a fixed-height sample at varying concentrations. Under both fixed volume and free swelling conditions, the total area fraction of water-accessible pore space in a packing decreases exponentially as the gel concentration increases. The size distribution of the pores is significantly modified by the swollen hydrogel particles, such that large pores are clogged while small pores are formed.

  2. Cardiovascular abnormalities with normal blood pressure in tissue kallikrein-deficient mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneton, Pierre; Bloch-Faure, May; Hagege, Albert A.; Ruetten, Hartmut; Huang, Wei; Bergaya, Sonia; Ceiler, Debbie; Gehring, Doris; Martins, Isabelle; Salmon, Georges; Boulanger, Chantal M.; Nussberger, Jürg; Crozatier, Bertrand; Gasc, Jean-Marie; Heudes, Didier; Bruneval, Patrick; Doetschman, Tom; Ménard, Joël; Alhenc-Gelas, François

    2001-02-01

    Tissue kallikrein is a serine protease thought to be involved in the generation of bioactive peptide kinins in many organs like the kidneys, colon, salivary glands, pancreas, and blood vessels. Low renal synthesis and urinary excretion of tissue kallikrein have been repeatedly linked to hypertension in animals and humans, but the exact role of the protease in cardiovascular function has not been established largely because of the lack of specific inhibitors. This study demonstrates that mice lacking tissue kallikrein are unable to generate significant levels of kinins in most tissues and develop cardiovascular abnormalities early in adulthood despite normal blood pressure. The heart exhibits septum and posterior wall thinning and a tendency to dilatation resulting in reduced left ventricular mass. Cardiac function estimated in vivo and in vitro is decreased both under basal conditions and in response to βadrenergic stimulation. Furthermore, flow-induced vasodilatation is impaired in isolated perfused carotid arteries, which express, like the heart, low levels of the protease. These data show that tissue kallikrein is the main kinin-generating enzyme in vivo and that a functional kallikrein-kinin system is necessary for normal cardiac and arterial function in the mouse. They suggest that the kallikrein-kinin system could be involved in the development or progression of cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Abnormal Pressure Pain, Touch Sensitivity, Proprioception, and Manual Dexterity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Inmaculada; Hatem, Samar M.

    2016-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often display an abnormal reactivity to tactile stimuli, altered pain perception, and lower motor skills than healthy children. Nevertheless, these motor and sensory deficits have been mostly assessed by using clinical observation and self-report questionnaires. The present study aims to explore somatosensory and motor function in children with ASD by using standardized and objective testing procedures. Methods. Tactile and pressure pain thresholds in hands and lips, stereognosis, proprioception, and fine motor performance of the upper limbs were assessed in high-functioning children with ASD (n = 27) and compared with typically developing peers (n = 30).  Results. Children with ASD showed increased pain sensitivity, increased touch sensitivity in C-tactile afferents innervated areas, and diminished fine motor performance and proprioception compared to healthy children. No group differences were observed for stereognosis. Conclusion. Increased pain sensitivity and increased touch sensitivity in areas classically related to affective touch (C-tactile afferents innervated areas) may explain typical avoiding behaviors associated with hypersensitivity. Both sensory and motor impairments should be assessed and treated in children with ASD. PMID:26881091

  4. Pore Pressure Diffusion as a possible mechanism for the Ag. Ioanis 2001 earthquake swarm activity (Gulf of Corinth, Central Greece).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallianatos, F.; Michas, G.; Papadakis, G.; Sammonds, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Gulf of Corinth rift (Central Greece) is one of the most seismotectonically active areas in Europe (Ambraseys and Jackson, 1990; 1997), with an important continental N-S extension of about 13 mm/yr and 6 mm/yr at the west and east part respectively (Clarke et al., 1997a). The seismicity of the area includes 5 main earthquakes of magnitude greater than 5.8 since 1960. In the western part of the rift, where the extension reaches its maximum value, earthquake swarms are often being observed (Bourouis and Cornet, 2009). Such an earthquake crisis has been occurred on 2001 at the southern margin of the west part of the rift. The crisis lasted about 100 days with a major event the Ag. Ioanis earthquake (4.3 Mw) on 8th of April 2001 (Pacchiani and Lyon-Caen, 2010). The possible relation between fluids flow and the observed earthquake swarms at the west part of the Gulf of Corinth rift has been discussed in the works of Bourouis and Cornet (2009) and Pacchiani and Lyon-Caen (2010). In the present work we examine the spatiotemporal properties of the Ag. Ioanis 2001 earthquake swarm, using data from the CRL network (http://crlab.eu/). We connect these properties to a mechanism due to pore pressure diffusion (Shapiro et al., 1997) and we estimate the hydraulic diffusivity and the permeability of the surrounding rocks. A back front of the seismicity (Parotidis et al., 2004) is also been observed, related to the migration of seismicity and the development of a quiescence region near the area of the initial pore pressure perturbation. Moreover, anisotropy of the hydraulic diffusivity has been observed, revealing the heterogeneity of the surrounding rocks and the fracture systems. This anisotropy is consistent in direction with the fault zone responsible for the Ag. Ioanis earthquake (Pacchiani and Lyon-Caen, 2010). Our results indicate that fluids flow and pore pressure perturbations are possible mechanisms for the initiation and the evolution of the Ag. Ioanis 2001

  5. A two-phase debris-flow model that includes coupled evolution of volume fractions, granular dilatancy, and pore-fluid pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, David L.; Iverson, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-fluid pressure plays a crucial role in debris flows because it counteracts normal stresses at grain contacts and thereby reduces intergranular friction. Pore-pressure feedback accompanying debris deformation is particularly important during the onset of debrisflow motion, when it can dramatically influence the balance of forces governing downslope acceleration. We consider further effects of this feedback by formulating a new, depth-averaged mathematical model that simulates coupled evolution of granular dilatancy, solid and fluid volume fractions, pore-fluid pressure, and flow depth and velocity during all stages of debris-flow motion. To illustrate implications of the model, we use a finite-volume method to compute one-dimensional motion of a debris flow descending a rigid, uniformly inclined slope, and we compare model predictions with data obtained in large-scale experiments at the USGS debris-flow flume. Predictions for the first 1 s of motion show that increasing pore pressures (due to debris contraction) cause liquefaction that enhances flow acceleration. As acceleration continues, however, debris dilation causes dissipation of pore pressures, and this dissipation helps stabilize debris-flow motion. Our numerical predictions of this process match experimental data reasonably well, but predictions might be improved by accounting for the effects of grain-size segregation.

  6. Pore pressure regime leading to shallow failures in a mountain slope: monitoring and interpretation by soil-atmosphere coupled model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaunat, Jean; Hürlimann, Marcel; Luna, Boris

    2016-04-01

    The study deals with the onset of debris flows in the "El Rebaixader" basin, located in South Central Pyrenees. The initiation area of debris flows is located on a lateral moraine with a thickness of tens of meters, in which torrential processes and other shallow mass movements have generated a large scarp with steep slopes. To follow slope evolution towards shallow failure, different sensors have been installed to monitor meteorological data and hydraulic variables at shallow depths (positive and negative pore pressure, water content). Measurements are interpreted by means of a thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled Finite Element code provided with a specific boundary condition to model water mass and heat flux exchanged between the ground and the atmosphere, including infiltration, evaporation, sensible heat and solar radiation. Results evidence the different modes of pore regime variation imposed, on the one hand, by surface infiltration and evaporation and, on the other hand, by the settlement of a slope parallel flow in a loose layer at some decimetres depth. As a conclusion, the analysis highlights the strong dependency of slope stability to the water regime taking place in slightly more permeable horizons connected to the top of the catchment area rather than to surficial climatic input. On this basis, some keys about debris flow mitigation are finally put forward.

  7. Bubble snap-off and capillary-back pressure during counter-current spontaneous imbibition into model pores.

    PubMed

    Unsal, Evren; Mason, Geoffrey; Morrow, Norman R; Ruth, Douglas W

    2009-04-01

    A previous paper (Unsal, E.; Mason, G.; Ruth, D. W.; Morrow, N. R. J. Colloid Interface Sci. 2007, 315, 200-209) reported experiments involving counter-current spontaneous imbibition into a model pore system consisting of a rod in an angled slot covered by a glass plate. Such an arrangement gives two tubes with different cross-sections (both size and shape) with an interconnection through the gap between the rod and the plate. In the previous experiments, the wetting phase advanced in the small tube and nonwetting phase retreated in the large tube. No bubbles were formed. In this paper, we study experimentally and theoretically the formation of bubbles at the open end of the large tube and their subsequent snap-off. Such bubbles reduce the capillary back pressure produced by the larger tube and can thus have an effect on the local rate of imbibition. In the model pore system, the rod was either in contact with the glass, forming two independent tubes, or the rod was spaced from the glass to allow cross-flow between the tubes. For small gaps, there were three distinct menisci. The one with the highest curvature was between the rod and the plate. The next most highly curved was in the smaller tube, and the least highly curved meniscus was in the large tube and this was the tube from which the bubbles developed. The pressure in the dead end of the system was recorded during imbibition. Once the bubble starts to form outside of the tube, the pressure drops rapidly and then steadies. After the bubble snaps off, the pressure rises to almost the initial value and stays essentially constant until the next bubble starts to form. After snap-off, the meniscus in the large tube appears to invade the large tube for some distance. The snap-off is the result of capillary instability; it takes place significantly inside the large tube with flow of wetting phase moving in the angular corners. As imbibition into the small tube progresses, the rate of imbibition decreases and the

  8. Effect of pore pressure on the elastic moduli, porosity and permeability of Berea sandstone and Leuders limestone

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.W.; Kelkar, S.M.; Gray, K.E.

    1983-02-01

    The behavior of Berea sandstone and Leuders limestone under atmospheric and elevated pore pressures is reported. The porosity and the permeability changes, along with the static and dynamic moduli for these rocks have been determined under various conditions. The existing theoretical background pertinent to the study is reviewed along with the previous experimental work. The detailed descriptions and the discussions on the experimental procedure involved and the equipment utilized are presented. A discussion on the sources of experimental errors is included. It also includes the error propagation equations and relevant discussions on the data acquisition and analysis. The findings are summarized together with a discussion of the results. The conclusions drawn from these results are included. The bulk of the data acquired and the results computed from it are presented.

  9. Pore Characterization of Shale Rock and Shale Interaction with Fluids at Reservoir Pressure-Temperature Conditions Using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Hjelm, R.; Watkins, E.; Xu, H.; Pawar, R.

    2015-12-01

    Oil/gas produced from unconventional reservoirs has become strategically important for the US domestic energy independence. In unconventional realm, hydrocarbons are generated and stored in nanopores media ranging from a few to hundreds of nanometers. Fundamental knowledge of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes that control fluid flow and propagation within nano-pore confinement is critical for maximizing unconventional oil/gas production. The size and confinement of the nanometer pores creates many complex rock-fluid interface interactions. It is imperative to promote innovative experimental studies to decipher physical and chemical processes at the nanopore scale that govern hydrocarbon generation and mass transport of hydrocarbon mixtures in tight shale and other low permeability formations at reservoir pressure-temperature conditions. We have carried out laboratory investigations exploring quantitative relationship between pore characteristics of the Wolfcamp shale from Western Texas and the shale interaction with fluids at reservoir P-T conditions using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). We have performed SANS measurements of the shale rock in single fluid (e.g., H2O and D2O) and multifluid (CH4/(30% H2O+70% D2O)) systems at various pressures up to 20000 psi and temperature up to 150 oF. Figure 1 shows our SANS data at different pressures with H2O as the pressure medium. Our data analysis using IRENA software suggests that the principal changes of pore volume in the shale occurred on smaller than 50 nm pores and pressure at 5000 psi (Figure 2). Our results also suggest that with increasing P, more water flows into pores; with decreasing P, water is retained in the pores.

  10. MONITORING OF PORE WATER PRESSURE AND WATER CONTENT AROUND A HORIZONTAL DRIFT THROUGH EXCAVATION - MEASUREMENT AT THE 140m GALLERY IN THE HORONOBE URL -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuuchi, Satoshi; Kunimaru, Takanori; Kishi, Atsuyasu; Komatsu, Mitsuru

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been conducting the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory (URL) project in Horonobe, Hokkaido, as a part of the research and development program on geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Pore water pressure and water content around a horizontal drift in the URL have been monitored for over 18 months since before the drift excavation was started. During the drift excavation, both pore water pressure and water content were decreasing. Pore water pressure has been still positive though it continued to decrease with its gradient gradually smaller after excavation, while water content turned to increase about 6 months after the completion of the excavation. It turned to fall again about 5 months later. An unsaturated zone containing gases which were dissolved in groundwater may have been formed around the horizontal drift.

  11. Pore pressure diffusion and the hydrologic response of nearly saturated, thin landslide deposits of rainfall

    SciTech Connect

    Haneberg, W.C. )

    1991-11-01

    Previous workers have correlated slope failures during rainstorms with rainfall intensity, rainfall duration, and seasonal antecedent rainfall. This note shows how such relationships can be interpreted using a periodic steady-state solution to the well-known linear pressure diffusion equation. Normalization of the governing equation yields a characteristic response time that is a function of soil thickness, saturated hydraulic conductivity, and pre-storm effective porosity, and which is analogous to the travel time of a piston wetting front. The effects of storm frequency and magnitude are also successfully quantified using dimensionless attenuation factors and lag times.

  12. Note: Molecular diffusivity in a small pore zeolite measured by a variable pressure (piezometric) uptake method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Kobayashi, Yasukazu; Muhammad, Usman; Wang, Dezheng; Wang, Yao

    2016-03-01

    The use of numerical analysis to solve the diffusion equation in the uptake method allowed the measurement of molecular diffusivity in a zeolite with a variable pressure around it. The diffusivity was obtained from the data in the measurement of the adsorption isotherm, which means that the diffusivity measurement now needs neither a special instrument nor procedure. The diffusivities of all the gases are readily available from the measurement of their adsorption isotherms and these data include how the diffusivity changes versus adsorbed concentration. The modeling introduced can also be used for a zeolite with a surface barrier.

  13. Multistep triaxial strength tests: Investigating strength parameters and pore pressure effects on Opalinus Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräsle, W.

    Natural variability between rock samples often hampers a detailed analysis of material properties. For the investigation of strength parameters the concept of multistep triaxial strength tests was developed to avoid the impact of sample variability. The limit of linear elastic behavior, shear strength and residual strength were measured at different confining pressure on a single specimen. Appropriate tools for near real time data analysis were developed to facilitate a precise and timely control of the test procedure. This is essential to minimize the problem of sample degradation during the test. The feasibility of the test concept was proven on three samples of Opalinus Clay from the Mont Terri rock laboratory. Each investigated strength parameter displayed a distinct deviation from a linear dependency on confining pressure or mean stress respectively. Instead, curves consisting of two linear branches almost perfectly fit the test results. These results could be explained in the framework of poroelastic theory. Although it is not possible to determine Skempton’s B-parameter ( Skempton, 1954) and the Biot-Willis poroelastic parameter ( Biot and Willis, 1957) separately from multistep strength tests, the product of both parameters can be derived from the test results. Although material anisotropy was found by the test results, numerous simple strength tests ( Gräsle and Plischke, 2010) as well as true triaxial tests ( Naumann et al., 2007) provide a more efficient way to investigate anisotropy.

  14. Pore pressure evolution and induced seismicity within the Permian Basin, Southeast New Mexico USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Person, M. A.; Zhang, Y.; Mozley, P.; Broadhead, R.; Bilek, S.; Edel, S.

    2015-12-01

    We used three-dimensional hydrologic modeling to assess the potential linkages between crystalline basement seismicity (up to M3.2) beneath the Dagger Draw oil field in response to saline water reinjection. Production began in 2004 and preceded an increase in seismicity by about 5 years. Reinjection of produced brines occurred within the basal Ellenberger Group carbonate reservoir (yellow square). Published core permeability measurements for the Ellenberger vary between about 10-15 to 10-12 m2. Evidence for seismicity being triggered by injection include observations that the largest injection rates (> 106 barrels/month) occurred within wells closest to the induced seismicity (red circle about 15 km to the west of the injection well in A-C). Arguing against triggered seismicity is the apparent lack of temporal correlation between peak injection and felt seismicity as well as the extreme depth of the earthquakes (about 10-12 km below land surface). We conducted a numerical sensitivity study in which we varied the permeability of the basal reservoir as well as the crystalline basement rocks over several orders of magnitude. Assuming a crystalline basement permeability of 10-16 m2 and a basal reservoir permeability of 10-13 m2 produced about 50 m of excess heads in the seismogenic crust about 1900 days (D) after injection started. Prior studies suggest that excess heads of only a few meters could induce failure along critically stressed faults. The lag between injection and seismicity can be explained by the time required for the pressure envelope to propagate laterally 15 km and downward into the crystalline basement 11 km. Peak injection occurred 1900 days before recent increases in seismicity were observed. Future work will include assessing the potential role of relatively permeable Proterozoic faults in transmitting high fluid pressures into the crystalline basement.

  15. Effects of coarse grain size distribution and fine particle content on pore fluid pressure and shear behavior in experimental debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaitna, Roland; Palucis, Marisa C.; Yohannes, Bereket; Hill, Kimberly M.; Dietrich, William E.

    2016-02-01

    Debris flows are typically a saturated mixture of poorly sorted particles and interstitial fluid, whose density and flow properties depend strongly on the presence of suspended fine sediment. Recent research suggests that grain size distribution (GSD) influences excess pore pressures (i.e., pressure in excess of predicted hydrostatic pressure), which in turn plays a governing role in debris flow behaviors. We report a series of controlled laboratory experiments in a 4 m diameter vertically rotating drum where the coarse particle size distribution and the content of fine particles were varied independently. We measured basal pore fluid pressures, pore fluid pressure profiles (using novel sensor probes), velocity profiles, and longitudinal profiles of the flow height. Excess pore fluid pressure was significant for mixtures with high fines fraction. Such flows exhibited lower values for their bulk flow resistance (as measured by surface slope of the flow), had damped fluctuations of normalized fluid pressure and normal stress, and had velocity profiles where the shear was concentrated at the base of the flow. These effects were most pronounced in flows with a wide coarse GSD distribution. Sustained excess fluid pressure occurred during flow and after cessation of motion. Various mechanisms may cause dilation and contraction of the flows, and we propose that the sustained excess fluid pressures during flow and once the flow has stopped may arise from hindered particle settling and yield strength of the fluid, resulting in transfer of particle weight to the fluid. Thus, debris flow behavior may be strongly influenced by sustained excess fluid pressures controlled by particle settling rates.

  16. Revisit of basal effective friction and pore pressure for Japan trench from topographic point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koge, H.; Fujiwara, T.; Kodaira, S.; Sasaki, T.; Kameda, J.; Hamahashi, M.; Hamada, Y.; Kimura, G.

    2013-12-01

    2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (Mw9.0) produced a fault rupture, extending to the shallow part of the Japan Trench. Based on the bathymetry difference before and after the earthquake, it is demonstrated that the seafloor on outermost landward slope moved ~50 m east-southeastward towards the trench and uplifted ~7 to 10 m. Although the mechanism of the fault rupture is not clear, deformation and frictional properties beneath the forearc are the key to elucidate this important issue. Kimura et al (2012) focused on seismic reflection data along one seismic transect at the Japan Trench (name the transect), and calculated the basal effective friction of the plate boundary by using the critical taper theory. Limited profiles from narrow area, however, never represent general friction property of the plate boundary in the Japan trench. Therefore, several profiles are examined to investigate for the better understanding along-trench variation of the basal frictional properties. Bathymetric and seismic reflection data were taken before and after the Tohoku-oki earthquake to obtain the following angles; slope angle of upper surface, basal dip of the outer wedge. Acuired angles are limited to only the lowest trench slope of the Japan Trench. The limitation enables us to treat the wedge as a more uniform body than would have been achieved with the whole range of seismic cross sections. Applying the critical taper theory to the individual seismic cross sections, force balance among the interior and base of the wedge, fluid pressure ratio, and the basal effective friction of the plate boundary are calculated. Additionally, by using "earth pressure theory", we estimated basal effective friction of ~0.15 under the assumption that branching faults act as back-stops in lower slope areas. References Cubas et al., Geophysical Research Letters: DOI:10.1002/grl.50682 Fujiwara et al., Science 2 December 2011: Vol. 334 no. 6060 p. 1240 Wang and Hu, Journal of Geophysical Research, v.111, p1

  17. Modeling Activity of Very-Low-Frequency Earthquakes in Shallow Subduction Zone Considering Splay Faults and High Pore Pressure Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibazaki, B.; Ito, Y.; Ujiie, K.

    2010-12-01

    Recent observations reveal that very-low-frequency (VLF) earthquakes occur in the shallow subduction zones in the Nankai trough, Hyuganada, and off the coast of Tokachi, Japan (Obara and Ito, 2005; Asano et al., 2008; Obana and Kodaira, 2009). The ongoing super drilling project, Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE), involves sampling the core of seismogenic faults and conducting analyses, experiments, and in-situ borehole measurements at the Nankai trough where VLF earthquakes occur. The data obtained in this project will be used to develop a model of VLF earthquakes that integrates seismological observations, laboratory experimental results, and geological observations. In the present study, first, we perform 2D quasi-dynamic modeling of VLF earthquakes in an elastic half-space on the basis of a rate- and state-dependent friction law. We set a local unstable zone in a shallow stable zone. To explain very low stress drops and short recurrence intervals of VLF earthquakes, the effective stress is assumed to be around 0.2 MPa. The results indicate that VLF earthquakes are unstable slips that occur under high pore pressure conditions. The probable causes for the high pore pressure along the faults of VLF earthquakes are the sediment compaction and dehydration that occur during smectite-to-illite transition in the shallow subduction zone. Then, we model the generation process of VLF earthquakes by considering splay faults and the occurrences of large subduction earthquakes. We set the local unstable zones with high pore pressure in the stable splay fault zones. We assume the long-term average slip velocity of the splay faults, and that the shear stress is accumulated by the delay of the fault slip from the long-term slip motion. Depending on the frictional properties of the shallow splay faults, two types of VLF earthquakes can occur. When the effective stress is low all over the splay faults, the rupture of large earthquakes propagates to the

  18. Evolution of Abnormally Low Pressure at Bravo Dome and its Implications for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhbari, D.; Hesse, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage allows reductions of the rapidly rising CO2 from fossil fuel-based power generation, if large storage rates and capacities can be achieved. The injection of large fluid volumes at high rates leads to a build-up of pore-pressure in the storage formation that may induce seismicity and compromise the storage security. Many natural CO2 fields in midcontinent US, in contrast, are under-pressured rather than over-pressured suggesting that natural processes reduce initial over-pressures and generate significant under-pressures. The question is therefore to understand the sequence of process(es) that allow the initial over-pressure to be eliminated and the under-pressure to be maintained over geological periods of time. We therefore look into pressure evolution in Bravo Dome, one of the largest natural CO2 accumulations in North America, which stores 1.3 Gt of CO2. Bravo Dome is only 580-900 m deep and is divided into several compartments with near gas-static pressure (see Figure). The pre-production gas pressures in the two main compartments that account for 70% of the mass of CO2 stored at Bravo Dome are more than 6 MPa below hydrostatic pressure. Here we show that the under-pressure in the Bravo Dome CO2 reservoir is maintained by hydrological compartmentalization over millennial timescales and generated by a combination of processes including cooling, erosional unloading, limited leakage into overlying formations, and CO2 dissolution into brine. Herein, we introduce CO2 dissolution into brine as a new process that reduce gas pressure in a compartmentalized reservoir and our results suggest that it may contribute significantly to reduce the initial pressure build-up due to injection. Bravo Dome is the first documented case of pressure drop due to CO2 dissolution. To have an accurate prediction of pressure evolution in Bravo Dome, our models must include geomechanics and thermodynamics for the reservoir while they account for the pressure

  19. The electrical conductivity of CO2-bearing pore waters at elevated pressure and temperature: a laboratory study and its implications in CO2 storage monitoring and leakage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börner, Jana H.; Herdegen, Volker; Repke, Jens-Uwe; Spitzer, Klaus

    2015-11-01

    The electrical rock conductivity is a sensitive indicator for carbon dioxide (CO2) injection and migration processes. For a reliable balancing of the free CO2 in pore space with petrophysical models such as Archie's law or for the detection of migrating CO2, detailed knowledge of the pore water conductivity during interaction with CO2 is essential but not available yet. Contrary to common assumptions, pore water conductivity cannot be assumed constant since CO2 is a reactive gas that dissolves into the pore water in large amounts and provides additional charge carriers due to the dissociation of carbonic acid. We consequently carried out systematic laboratory experiments to quantify and analyse the changes in saline pore water conductivity caused by CO2 at thermodynamic equilibrium. Electrical conductivity is measured on pore water samples for pressures up to 30 MPa and temperatures up to 80 °C. The parameter range covers the gaseous, liquid and supercritical state of the CO2 involved. Pore water salinities from 0.006 up to 57.27 g L-1 sodium chloride were investigated as well as selective other ion species. At the same time, the CO2 concentration in the salt solution was determined by a wet-chemical procedure. A two-regime behaviour appears: for small salinities, we observe an increase of up to more than factor 3 in the electrical pore water conductivity, which strongly depends on the solution salinity (low-salinity regime). This is an expected behaviour, since the additional ions originating from the dissociation of carbonic acid positively contribute to the solution conductivity. However, when increasing salinities are considered this effect is completely diminished. For highly saline solutions, the increased mutual impeding causes the mobility of all ions to decrease, which may result in a significant reduction of conductivity by up to 15 per cent despite the added CO2 (high-salinity regime). We present the data set covering the pressure, temperature, salinity

  20. Pore pressure propagation in a permeable thin-layer coal seam based on a dual porosity model: A case of risk prediction of water inrush in coalmines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.; Gao, F.; Yang, J. W.; Zhou, G. Q.

    2016-08-01

    Thin-layer coal seams, a type of filling coal rock body, are considered aquifer systems made up of dual porosity medium with immediate floor. A numerical simulation for the pore pressure propagation along a thin-layer coal seam was carried out for the case of the Zhaogezhuang coalmine in China. By valuing the permeability (Kf ) of the thin-layer coal seam, pore pressure variation with time was simulated and compared to the analytical solutions of a dual porosity model (DPM). The main conclusions were drawn as follow: (1) Seepage in the thin-layer coal seam was predominant in the whole process, and the distance of seepage was lengthened and the pore pressure decreased with increased Kf , (2) A series of simulated hydraulic graphs demonstrated that the pore pressure characteristics of peak-occurring and time-lag effects agreed with the analytical solutions of DPM; (3) By adjusting the parameters of DPM, two results of analytical solutions and numerical solutions fit well, particularly in the thin-layer coal seam, (4) The power law relationship between the peak-values and lag time of pore pressure were derived statistically under consideration of the Kf parameter in the range of 10-8 to 10-10 m2/pa-s orders, and it was reasonable that the Kf of the thin-layer coal seam was in the range of 10-8 m2/pa-s orders. The results were significantly helpful in decision-making for mining water prevention and prediction in practice.

  1. Size of seismic events during borehole injections: the effects of source mechanisms, stress and pore pressure distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, T.; Ondovcin, T.; Zhao, P.

    2012-12-01

    and space-time distributions, source mechanisms and stress analyses on the available data to shed light on these questions. Our inversion for moment tensors of the Basel injection-induced seismicity shows that the microearthquakes had higher non-DC components during injection than after shut-in. This could be related to the higher stress drops found during injection. We model the pore pressure distribution and out-flow from the well the numerically solving the diffusion equation for the shut-in and open-well conditions. We compare the results of seismicity analysis with the models of pore pressure distribution during and after the injection to test the relevancy of several hypotheses of the occurrence of large events. We find that their anomalous occurrence during the shut-in phase is most-likely caused by the transient effects during the stop of injection. The anomalous space occurrence of large events is probably also related to the unequal distribution of faults in the vicinity of the injection well.

  2. Extraction of pore-morphology and capillary pressure curves of porous media from synchrotron-based tomography data

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feifei; Hingerl, Ferdinand F.; Xiao, Xianghui; Liu, Yijin; Wu, Ziyu; Benson, Sally M.; Toney, Michael F.

    2015-06-03

    The elevated level of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has caused serious concern of the progression of global warming. Geological sequestration is considered as one of the most promising techniques for mitigating the damaging effect of global climate change. Investigations over wide range of length-scales are important for systematic evaluation of the underground formations from prospective CO2 reservoir. Understanding the relationship between the micro morphology and the observed macro phenomena is even more crucial. Here we show Synchrotron based X-ray micro tomographic study of the morphological buildup of Sandstones. We present a numerical method to extract the pore sizes distribution of the porous structure directly, without approximation or complex calculation. We have also demonstrated its capability in predicting the capillary pressure curve in a mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) measurement. The method presented in this work can be directly applied to the morphological studies of heterogeneous systems in various research fields, ranging from Carbon Capture and Storage, and Enhanced Oil Recovery to environmental remediation in the vadose zone.

  3. Extraction of pore-morphology and capillary pressure curves of porous media from synchrotron-based tomography data

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Feifei; Hingerl, Ferdinand F.; Xiao, Xianghui; Liu, Yijin; Wu, Ziyu; Benson, Sally M.; Toney, Michael F.

    2015-06-03

    The elevated level of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has caused serious concern of the progression of global warming. Geological sequestration is considered as one of the most promising techniques for mitigating the damaging effect of global climate change. Investigations over wide range of length-scales are important for systematic evaluation of the underground formations from prospective CO2 reservoir. Understanding the relationship between the micro morphology and the observed macro phenomena is even more crucial. Here we show Synchrotron based X-ray micro tomographic study of the morphological buildup of Sandstones. We present a numerical method to extract the pore sizes distribution ofmore » the porous structure directly, without approximation or complex calculation. We have also demonstrated its capability in predicting the capillary pressure curve in a mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) measurement. The method presented in this work can be directly applied to the morphological studies of heterogeneous systems in various research fields, ranging from Carbon Capture and Storage, and Enhanced Oil Recovery to environmental remediation in the vadose zone.« less

  4. Extraction of pore-morphology and capillary pressure curves of porous media from synchrotron-based tomography data

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feifei; Hingerl, Ferdinand F.; Xiao, Xianghui; Liu, Yijin; Wu, Ziyu; Benson, Sally M.; Toney, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    The elevated level of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has caused serious concern of the progression of global warming. Geological sequestration is considered as one of the most promising techniques for mitigating the damaging effect of global climate change. Investigations over wide range of length-scales are important for systematic evaluation of the underground formations from prospective CO2 reservoir. Understanding the relationship between the micro morphology and the observed macro phenomena is even more crucial. Here we show Synchrotron based X-ray micro tomographic study of the morphological buildup of Sandstones. We present a numerical method to extract the pore sizes distribution of the porous structure directly, without approximation or complex calculation. We have also demonstrated its capability in predicting the capillary pressure curve in a mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) measurement. The method presented in this work can be directly applied to the morphological studies of heterogeneous systems in various research fields, ranging from Carbon Capture and Storage, and Enhanced Oil Recovery to environmental remediation in the vadose zone. PMID:26039795

  5. Extraction of pore-morphology and capillary pressure curves of porous media from synchrotron-based tomography data.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feifei; Hingerl, Ferdinand F; Xiao, Xianghui; Liu, Yijin; Wu, Ziyu; Benson, Sally M; Toney, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    The elevated level of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has caused serious concern of the progression of global warming. Geological sequestration is considered as one of the most promising techniques for mitigating the damaging effect of global climate change. Investigations over wide range of length-scales are important for systematic evaluation of the underground formations from prospective CO2 reservoir. Understanding the relationship between the micro morphology and the observed macro phenomena is even more crucial. Here we show Synchrotron based X-ray micro tomographic study of the morphological buildup of Sandstones. We present a numerical method to extract the pore sizes distribution of the porous structure directly, without approximation or complex calculation. We have also demonstrated its capability in predicting the capillary pressure curve in a mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) measurement. The method presented in this work can be directly applied to the morphological studies of heterogeneous systems in various research fields, ranging from Carbon Capture and Storage, and Enhanced Oil Recovery to environmental remediation in the vadose zone. PMID:26039795

  6. Studying the Hydrology of Landslides: Pore Water Pressure, Preferential Flow and Feedbacks Between Slope Displacement and Hillslope Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogaard, T.; Greco, R.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrology is one of the most important triggering factors for slope destabilization. When a slope becomes unstable, cracks and fissures develop during slope deformation. These discontinuities affect both geotechnical and hydrological conditions of the slope. The crucial role of water flow, and especially the important role of preferential flow in unstable slopes, is generally recognized. However, in hydrological modelling, the unstable slope is characterized using static subsurface properties. The dynamic feedback between slope deformation and slope hydrology, being positive or negative depending on other geotechnical conditions, is not taken into account although it influences the pore pressure distribution and as such the overall stability. This research aims to highlight and quantify the dynamic nature of the subsurface hydrological conditions in unstable slopes. We focus on the role preferential flow has on slope destabilization and more specifically on the feedbacks between differential displacement and hydrological behaviour of the subsurface in natural slopes. We will present examples of field experimental work where we measured the hydrological influence of fissures, theoretical analysis and case study modelling of combined hydrology and slope stability, including feedbacks. The results show the subtle trade-off of increased infiltration and storage capacity in a slope and the increased drainage capacity of well connected preferential flow paths. We will furthermore highlight the current status of our knowledge as well as identify the knowledge gaps we face and the importance of cross- and multidisciplinary approach to better understand the internal dynamics of slope deformation and hillslope hydrology.

  7. Studies on deformation/pore pressure coupling processes at Japanese URLs and the development of ultra-high resolution FBG strain sensors for rock mechanics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, T.; Matsui, H.; Zuyuan, H.; Kashiwai, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Generic, purpose-build underground research laboratories have been under construction in Japan. The objective for the construction is to conduct integrated studies on geology, geophysics, hydrogeology, rock mechanics, hydro-geochemistry, etc., to better understand the behavior and long-term stability of subsurface environments and subsurface openings. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency is responsible for the construction and selected two sites, i.e., Mizunami in central Japan and Horonobe in northern tip of Hokkaido, each representing granitic/crystalline rock environment and sedimentary formations, respectively. The construction of the Mizunami URL site began in July 2003, and the shafts reached to 400 m below ground level as of August 2009. The URL is situated in granitic rock masses including highly altered, fractured and faulted zones which are typical in Japan. The Main Shaft is situated at the fault which strikes to NNW while the Ventilation Shaft at the intact granitic rock. Sub-stages, which connect two shafts were constructed every 100 m depth interval, and several boreholes were drilled and are planned to be drilled from the shafts and the galleries for sampling rocks, groundwater, and for continuous monitoring of pore pressures. During the construction, we observed transient pore pressure responses caused by the excavation and dewatering/flooding of the shafts and boreholes. Here, we present one example of the spatio-temporal pore pressure responses caused by the rapid discharge of groundwater of which amount was 0.5 tons per minute from one pilot borehole. Pore pressure responses showed two distinct patterns, one continuous decline and the other transient increase and subsequent decline. The former pattern was observed at the locations where pore pressure transducers were set in the granitic rocks and were situated in the same block with discharge points with respect to the fault with NNW strike, while the latter in sedimentary formations and in the granite

  8. Seasonal Effects on the Relationships Between Soil Water Content, Pore Water Pressure and Shear Strength and Their Implications for Slope Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, P. N.

    2015-12-01

    A soil's shear resistance is mainly dependent upon the magnitude of effective stress. For small to medium height slopes (up to 10m) in clay soils the total stress acting along potential failure planes will be low, therefore the magnitude of effective stress (and hence soil shear strength) will be dominated by the pore-water pressure. The stability of slopes on this scale through periods of increased precipitation is improved by the generation of negative pore pressures (soil suctions) during preceding, warmer, drier periods. These negative pore water pressures increase the effective stress within the soil and cause a corresponding increase in shearing resistance. The relationships between soil water content and pore water pressure (soil water retention curves) are known to be hysteretic, but for the purposes of the majority of slope stability assessments in partially saturated clay soils, these are assumed to be consistent with time. Similarly, the relationship between shear strength and water content is assumed to be consistent over time. This research presents a laboratory study in which specimens of compacted Glacial Till (typical of engineered slopes within the UK) were subjected to repeated cycles of wetting and drying to simulate seasonal cycles. At predetermined water contents, measurements of soil suction were made using tensiometer and dewpoint potentiometer methods. The undrained shear strength of the specimens was then measured using triaxial strength testing equipment. Results indicate that repeated wetting and drying cycles caused a change in the soil water retention behaviour. A reduction in undrained shear strength at corresponding water contents along the wetting and drying paths was also observed. The mechanism for the change in the relationship is believed to be a deterioration in the soil physical structure due to shrink/swell induced micro-cracking. The non-stationarity of these relationships has implications for slope stability assessment.

  9. Developmental abnormalities, blood pressure variability and renal disease in Riley Day syndrome.

    PubMed

    Norcliffe-Kaufmann, L; Axelrod, F B; Kaufmann, H

    2013-01-01

    Riley Day syndrome, commonly referred to as familial dysautonomia (FD), is a genetic disease with extremely labile blood pressure owing to baroreflex deafferenation. Chronic renal disease is very frequent in these patients and was attributed to recurrent arterial hypotension and renal hypoperfusion. Aggressive treatment of hypotension, however, has not reduced its prevalence. We evaluated the frequency of kidney malformations as well as the impact of hypertension, hypotension and blood pressure variability on the severity of renal impairment. We also investigated the effect of fludrocortisone treatment on the progression of renal disease. Patients with FD appeared to have an increased incidence of hydronephrosis/reflux and patterning defects. Patients <4 years old had hypertension and normal estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR). Patients with more severe hypertension and greater variability in their blood pressure had worse renal function (both, P<0.01). In contrast, there was no relationship between eGFR and the lowest blood pressure recorded during upright tilt. The progression of renal disease was faster in patients receiving fludrocortisone (P<0.02). Hypertension precedes kidney disease in these patients. Moreover, increased blood pressure variability as well as mineralocorticoid treatment accelerate the progression of renal disease. No association was found between hypotension and renal disease in patients with FD.

  10. Abnormal increase of intraocular pressure in fellow eye after severe ocular trauma

    PubMed Central

    Vaajanen, Anu; Tuulonen, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: An ocular injury can lead to secondary glaucoma in the traumatized eye in 3% to 20% of cases. Literature on the risk of developing elevated intraocular pressure in the nontraumatized fellow eye is scant. Clinicians treating ocular traumas should also bear in mind sympathetic ophthalmia, a rare bilateral granulomatous panuveitis following accidental or surgical trauma to 1 eye. Case report: We report a case of high-pressure glaucoma of the fellow eye without any signs of uveitis. The left eye of a 24-year-old man was injured in an inadvertent movement during a free-time table-tennis match. The eye was severely crushed, leading to blindness. His right eye developed medically uncontrolled high-pressure glaucoma only 1 month after the injury. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of post-traumatic glaucoma in the nontraumatized eye after open-globe injury. PMID:27495058

  11. Increasing Body Mass Index, Blood Pressure, and Acanthosis Nigricans Abnormalities in School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Debra E.; Wang, Xiaohui; Garza, Viola; Fuentes, Lilia A.; Rodriguez, Melinda C.; Sullivan, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    This retrospective quantitative study examined the relationships among gender, Acanthosis Nigricans (AN), body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure (BP) in children attending school Grades 1-9 in Southwest Texas. Of the 34,897 health screening records obtained for the secondary analysis, 32,788 were included for the study. A logistic regression…

  12. Episodic Sediment Failure in Northern Flemish Pass, Eastern Canadian Margin: Interplay of Seismicity, Contour Current Winnowing, and Excess Pore Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, D.

    2015-12-01

    preconditioned the slope for earthquake triggering. There is circumstantial evidence that such preconditioning is related to excess pore pressures, released by fluid drainage at head scarps.

  13. Complete reversibility of physiological coronary vascular abnormalities in hypertrophied hearts produced by pressure overload in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Isoyama, S; Ito, N; Kuroha, M; Takishima, T

    1989-01-01

    Using an experimental model of ascending aortic banding in the rat, we examined whether coronary circulation abnormalities in hypertrophied hearts are reversible after debanding. 4-wk banding produced significant increases in in vivo left ventricular (LV) pressure (194 +/- 13 vs. 114 +/- 9 mmHg in shamoperated controls) and LV dry wt/body wt (48 +/- 5% above controls). In isolated hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer, coronary flow rate (CFR) was estimated under nonworking conditions. During maximal vasodilation after 1 min-ischemia, CFR at a coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) of 100 mmHg and CFR/myocardidial mass at CPPs of 100 and 150 mmHg decreased significantly (72 +/- 5%; 53 +/- 4 and 61 +/- 4% of controls). 1 or 4 wk after debanding, LV systolic pressures were similar to control values, and the degree of myocardial hypertrophy decreased to levels 23 +/- 6 (P less than 0.01) and 11 +/- 6% (P less than 0.01) above their control values, respectively. At 1 wk there was no significant increase in CFR/myocardial mass, compared to values in the banded group (67 +/- 8 vs. 53 +/- 4% of controls at 100 mmHg and 67 +/- 9 vs. 61 +/- 4% at 150 mmHg of CPP). At 4 wk, CFR and the ratio had increased toward normal. Thus, decreased coronary perfusion in hypertrophied hearts is completely reversible. Images PMID:2525568

  14. Cathode fall thickness of abnormal glow discharges between parallel-plane electrodes in different radii at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yangyang; Luo, Haiyun; Zou, Xiaobing; Wang, Xinxin

    2015-02-15

    In order to investigate the influence of electrode radius on the characteristics of cathode fall thickness, experiments of low-pressure (20 Pa ≤ p ≤ 30 Pa) abnormal glow discharge were carried out between parallel-plane electrodes in different radii keeping gap distance unchanged. Axial distributions of light intensity were obtained from the discharge images captured using a Charge Coupled Device camera. The assumption that the position of the negative glow peak coincides with the edge of cathode fall layer was verified based on a two-dimensional model, and the cathode fall thicknesses, d{sub c}, were calculated from the axial distributions of light intensity. It was observed that the position of peak emission shifts closer to the cathode as current or pressure grows. The dependence of cathode fall thickness on the gas pressure and normalized current J/p{sup 2} was presented, and it was found that for discharges between electrodes in large radius the curves of pd{sub c} against J/p{sup 2} were superimposed on each other, however, this phenomenon will not hold for discharges between the smaller electrodes. The reason for this phenomenon is that the transverse diffusions of charged particles are not the same in two gaps between electrodes with different radii.

  15. Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations: Linking the Chemical and Physical Effects to Elastic and Transport Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mavko, G.; Vanorio, T.; Vialle, S.; Saxena, N.

    2014-03-31

    Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities were measured over a range of confining pressures while injecting CO2 and brine into the samples. Pore fluid pressure was also varied and monitored together with porosity during injection. Effective medium models were developed to understand the mechanisms and impact of observed changes and to provide the means for implementation of the interpretation methodologies in the field. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities in carbonate rocks show as much as 20-50% decrease after injection of the reactive CO2-brine mixture; the changes were caused by permanent changes to the rock elastic frame associated with dissolution of mineral. Velocity decreases were observed under both dry and fluid-saturated conditions, and the amount of change was correlated with the initial pore fabrics. Scanning Electron Microscope images of carbonate rock microstructures were taken before and after injection of CO2-rich water. The images reveal enlargement of the pores, dissolution of micrite (micron-scale calcite crystals), and pitting of grain surfaces caused by the fluid- solid chemical reactivity. The magnitude of the changes correlates with the rock microtexture – tight, high surface area samples showed the largest changes in permeability and smallest changes in porosity and elastic stiffness compared to those in rocks with looser texture and larger intergranular pore space. Changes to the pore space also occurred from flow of fine particles with the injected fluid. Carbonates with grain-coating materials, such as residual oil, experienced very little permanent change during injection. In the tight micrite/spar cement component, dissolution is controlled by diffusion: the mass transfer of products and reactants is thus slow and the fluid is expected to be close to thermodynamical equilibrium with the calcite, leading to very little dissolution, or even precipitation. In the microporous rounded micrite and macropores, dissolution is controlled by

  16. Modeling seismic stimulation: Enhanced non-aqueous fluid extraction from saturated porous media under pore-pressure pulsing at low frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wei-Cheng; Sposito, Garrison; Huang, Yu-Han

    2012-03-01

    Seismic stimulation, the application of low-frequency stress-pulsing to the boundary of a porous medium containing water and a non-aqueous fluid to enhance the removal of the latter, shows great promise for both contaminated groundwater remediation and enhanced oil recovery, but theory to elucidate the underlying mechanisms lag significantly behind the progress achieved in experimental research. We address this conceptual lacuna by formulating a boundary-value problem to describe pore-pressure pulsing at seismic frequencies that is based on the continuum theory of poroelasticity for an elastic porous medium permeated by two immiscible fluids. An exact analytical solution is presented that is applied numerically using elasticity parameters and hydraulic data relevant to recent proof-of-principle laboratory experiments investigating the stimulation-induced mobilization of trichloroethene (TCE) in water flowing through a compressed sand core. The numerical results indicated that significant stimulation-induced increases of the TCE concentration in effluent can be expected from pore-pressure pulsing in the frequency range of 25-100 Hz, which is in good agreement with what was observed in the laboratory experiments. Sensitivity analysis of our numerical results revealed that the TCE concentration in the effluent increases with the porous medium framework compressibility and the pulsing pressure. Increasing compressibility also leads to an optimal stimulation response at lower frequencies, whereas changing the pulsing pressure does not affect the optimal stimulation frequency. Within the context of our model, the dominant physical cause for enhancement of non-aqueous fluid mobility by seismic stimulation is the dilatory motion of the porous medium in which the solid and fluid phases undergo opposite displacements, resulting in stress-induced changes of the pore volume.

  17. Why continued surveillance? Intermittent blood pressure and heart rate abnormality under treatment

    PubMed Central

    Katinas, G. S.; Cornélissen, G.; Otsuka, K.; Haus, E.; Bakken, E. E.; Halberg, F.

    2008-01-01

    Several opinion leaders have monitored their blood pressure systematically a sufficient number of times a day for chronomic (time structural) analyses, from the time of encountering chronobiology until their death; they set an example for others who also may not wish to base treatment on single spotchecks in a health care office. Such self-measurements, while extremely helpful, were not readily feasible without a noteworthy interruption of activities during waking as well as of sleep. New, relatively unobtrusive instrumentation now makes monitoring possible and cost-effective and will save lives. Illustrative results and problems encountered in an as-one-goes self-survey by GSK, a physician-scientist, are presented herein. Both MESOR-hypertension and CHAT (circadian hyper-amplitude-tension) can be intermittent conditions even under treatment, and treatment is best adjusted based on monitoring, rather than “flying blind”. PMID:16275483

  18. Abnormal heating of low-energy electrons in low-pressure capacitively coupled discharges.

    PubMed

    Park, G Y; You, S J; Iza, F; Lee, J K

    2007-02-23

    In low-pressure capacitively coupled plasmas, high-energy electrons are collisionlessly heated by large rf fields in the sheaths while low-energy electrons are confined in the bulk plasma by the ambipolar potential. Low-energy electrons are typically inefficiently heated due to their low collisionality and the weak rf electric field present in the bulk. It is shown, however, that as a result of the nonlinear interaction between the electron motion and the weak rf field present in the bulk, low-energy electrons can be efficiently heated. Electrons in the bulk that bounce inside the electrostatic potential well with a frequency equal to the rf excitation frequency are efficiently heated by the coherent interaction with the rf field. This resonant collisionless heating can be very efficient and manifest itself as a plateau in the electron energy probability function.

  19. Office blood pressure, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and echocardiographic abnormalities in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: role of obesity and androgen excess.

    PubMed

    Luque-Ramírez, Manuel; Martí, David; Fernández-Durán, Elena; Alpañés, Macarena; Álvarez-Blasco, Francisco; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F

    2014-03-01

    Whether or not blood pressure (BP) and heart function of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are altered remains unclear, albeit subtle abnormalities in the regulation of BP observed in these women might suggest a mild masculinization of their cardiovascular system. To study the influence of obesity and androgen excess on BP and echocardiographic profiles of women with the syndrome, we conducted a cross-sectional case-control study comparing office and ambulatory BP monitoring, as well as echocardiographic assessments, in 63 premenopausal women with the classic phenotype, 33 nonhyperandrogenic women with regular menses, and 25 young men. Forty-nine subjects were lean and 72 had weight excess (body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2)). Participants had no previous history of hypertension and were nonsmokers. Men showed the highest BP readings, and the lowest readings were observed in control women, whereas women with PCOS had intermediate values. Undiagnosed hypertension was more common in subjects with weight excess irrespective of sex and hyperandrogenism. Women with PCOS and weight excess showed frequencies of previously undiagnosed hypertension that were similar to those of men with weight excess and higher than those observed in nonhyperandrogenic women. Lastly, male sex, weight excess and hypertension, the latter in men as well as in women with PCOS, increased left ventricular wall thickness. In summary, our results show that patients with classic PCOS and weight excess frequently have undiagnosed BP abnormalities, leading to target organ damage.

  20. Increasing body mass index, blood pressure, and Acanthosis Nigricans abnormalities in school-age children.

    PubMed

    Otto, Debra E; Wang, Xiaohui; Garza, Viola; Fuentes, Lilia A; Rodriguez, Melinda C; Sullivan, Pamela

    2013-12-01

    This retrospective quantitative study examined the relationships among gender, Acanthosis Nigricans (AN), body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure (BP) in children attending school Grades 1-9 in Southwest Texas. Of the 34,897 health screening records obtained for the secondary analysis, 32,788 were included for the study. A logistic regression analysis was carried out with AN as the dependent variable, with year, gender, BMI, and BP as independent variables. The results indicate that the rate of children in each grade with three positive markers increased 2% during a 3-year period between 2008 and 2010. In the 5-year period between 2005 and 2010, a clear trend of significantly higher numbers of children with both AN and BMI markers was apparent. Gender played a significant role as females were more likely to have the AN marker than males. Further study is indicated based on the increasing trend of school-age children in Texas with positive markers for AN, increased BMI and BP.

  1. Abnormal acoustic wave velocities in basaltic and (Fe,Al)-bearing silicate glasses at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin; Lin, Jung-Fu

    2014-12-01

    We have measured acoustic VP and VS velocities of (Fe,Al)-bearing MgSiO3 silicate glasses and an Icelandic basalt glass up to 25 GPa. The velocity profiles of the (Fe,Al)-bearing and basaltic silicate glasses display decreased VP and VS with minima at approximately 5 and 2 GPa, respectively, which could be explained by the mode softening in the aluminosilicate networks. Our results represent the first observation of such velocity softening extending into the chemically complex basaltic glass at a relatively low transition pressure, which is likely due to its degree of polymerization, while the Fe and Al substitutions reduce sound velocities in MgSiO3 glass. If the velocity softening in the basaltic and silicate glasses can be used as analogs for understanding melts in Earth's interior, these observations suggest that the melt fraction needed to account for the velocity reduction in the upper mantle low-velocity zone may be smaller than previously thought.

  2. Melatonin secretion is impaired in women with preeclampsia and an abnormal circadian blood pressure rhythm.

    PubMed

    Bouchlariotou, Sofia; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Giannopoulou, Myrto; Arampatzis, Spyridon; Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Mertens, Peter R; Zintzaras, Elias; Messinis, Ioannis E; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2014-08-01

    Non-dipping circadian blood pressure (BP) is a common finding in preeclampsia, accompanied by adverse outcomes. Melatonin plays pivotal role in biological circadian rhythms. This study investigated the relationship between melatonin secretion and circadian BP rhythm in preeclampsia. Cases were women with preeclampsia treated between January 2006 and June 2007 in the University Hospital of Larissa. Volunteers with normal pregnancy, matched for chronological and gestational age, served as controls. Twenty-four hour ambulatory BP monitoring was applied. Serum melatonin and urine 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels were determined in day and night time samples by enzyme-linked immunoassays. Measurements were repeated 2 months after delivery. Thirty-one women with preeclampsia and 20 controls were included. Twenty-one of the 31 women with preeclampsia were non-dippers. Compared to normal pregnancy, in preeclampsia there were significantly lower night time melatonin (48.4 ± 24.7 vs. 85.4 ± 26.9 pg/mL, p<0.001) levels. Adjustment for circadian BP rhythm status ascribed this finding exclusively to non-dippers (p<0.01). Two months after delivery, in 11 of the 21 non-dippers both circadian BP and melatonin secretion rhythm reappeared. In contrast, in cases with retained non-dipping status (n=10) melatonin secretion rhythm remained impaired: daytime versus night time melatonin (33.5 ± 13.0 vs. 28.0 ± 13.8 pg/mL, p=0.386). Urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin levels were, overall, similar to serum melatonin. Circadian BP and melatonin secretion rhythm follow parallel course in preeclampsia, both during pregnancy and, at least 2 months after delivery. Our findings may be not sufficient to implicate a putative therapeutic effect of melatonin, however, they clearly emphasize that its involvement in the pathogenesis of a non-dipping BP in preeclampsia needs intensive further investigation.

  3. High Interstitial Fluid Pressure Is Associated with Tumor-Line Specific Vascular Abnormalities in Human Melanoma Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Trude G.; Gaustad, Jon-Vidar; Leinaas, Marit N.; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is highly elevated in many solid tumors. High IFP has been associated with low radiocurability and high metastatic frequency in human melanoma xenografts and with poor survival after radiation therapy in cervical cancer patients. Abnormalities in tumor vascular networks have been identified as an important cause of elevated tumor IFP. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between tumor IFP and the functional and morphological properties of tumor vascular networks. Materials and Methods A-07-GFP and R-18-GFP human melanomas growing in dorsal window chambers in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as preclinical tumor models. Functional and morphological parameters of the vascular network were assessed from first-pass imaging movies and vascular maps recorded after intravenous bolus injection of 155-kDa tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-labeled dextran. IFP was measured in the center of the tumors using a Millar catheter. Angiogenic profiles of A-07-GFP and R-18-GFP cells were obtained with a quantitative PCR array. Results High IFP was associated with low growth rate and low vascular density in A-07-GFP tumors, and with high growth rate and high vascular density in R-18-GFP tumors. A-07-GFP tumors showed chaotic and highly disorganized vascular networks, while R-18-GFP tumors showed more organized vascular networks with supplying arterioles in the tumor center and draining venules in the tumor periphery. Furthermore, A-07-GFP and R-18-GFP cells differed substantially in angiogenic profiles. A-07-GFP tumors with high IFP showed high geometric resistance to blood flow due to high vessel tortuosity. R-18-GFP tumors with high IFP showed high geometric resistance to blood flow due to a large number of narrow tumor capillaries. Conclusions High IFP in A-07-GFP and R-18-GFP human melanoma xenografts was primarily a consequence of high blood flow resistance caused by tumor-line specific vascular abnormalities. PMID

  4. Pore Pressure Evolution in Shallow Subduction Earthquake Sequences and Effects on Aseismic Slip Transients -- Numerical Modeling With Rate and State Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Rice, J. R.

    2005-12-01

    In 3D modeling of long tectonic loading and earthquake sequences on a shallow subduction fault [Liu and Rice, 2005], with depth-variable rate and state friction properties, we found that aseismic transient slip episodes emerge spontaneously with only a simplified representation of effects of metamorphic fluid release. That involved assumption of a constant in time but uniformly low effective normal stress in the downdip region. As suggested by observations in several major subduction zones [Obara, 2002; Rogers and Dragert, 2003; Kodaira et al, 2004], the presence of fluids, possibly released from dehydration reactions beneath the seismogenic zone, and their pressurization within the fault zone may play an important role in causing aseismic transients and associated non-volcanic tremors. To investigate the effects of fluids in the subduction zone, particularly on the generation of aseismic transients and their various features, we develop a more complete physical description of the pore pressure evolution (specifically, pore pressure increase due to supply from dehydration reactions and shear heating, decrease due to transport and dilatancy during slip), and incorporate that into the rate and state based 3D modeling. We first incorporated two important factors, dilatancy and shear heating, following Segall and Rice [1995, 2004] and Taylor [1998]. In the 2D simulations (slip varies with depth only), a dilatancy-stabilizing effect is seen which slows down the seismic rupture front and can prevent rapid slip from extending all the way to the trench, similarly to Taylor [1998]. Shear heating increases the pore pressure, and results in faster coseismic rupture propagation and larger final slips. In the 3D simulations, dilatancy also stabilizes the along-strike rupture propagation of both seismic and aseismic slips. That is, aseismic slip transients migrate along the strike faster with a shorter Tp (the characteristic time for pore pressure in the fault core to re

  5. Pressure-Induced Amorphization of Small Pore Zeolites—the Role of Cation-H2O Topology and Anti-glass Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chan Hwang, Gil; Joo Shin, Tae; Blom, Douglas A.; Vogt, Thomas; Lee, Yongjae

    2015-01-01

    Systematic studies of pressure-induced amorphization of natrolites (PIA) containing monovalent extra-framework cations (EFC) Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+ allow us to assess the role of two different EFC-H2O configurations within the pores of a zeolite: one arrangement has H2O molecules (NATI) and the other the EFC (NATII) in closer proximity to the aluminosilicate framework. We show that NATI materials have a lower onset pressure of PIA than the NATII materials containing Rb and Cs as EFC. The onset pressure of amorphization (PA) of NATII materials increases linearly with the size of the EFC, whereas their initial bulk moduli (P1 phase) decrease linearly. Only Cs- and Rb-NAT reveal a phase separation into a dense form (P2 phase) under pressure. High-Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF-STEM) imaging shows that after recovery from pressures near 25 and 20 GPa long-range ordered Rb-Rb and Cs-Cs correlations continue to be present over length scales up to 100 nm while short-range ordering of the aluminosilicate framework is significantly reduced—this opens a new way to form anti-glass structures. PMID:26455345

  6. Veins in Paleo-reservoir as a Natural Indication of Coupled Changes in Pore Pressure and Stress, Salt Wash Graben of SE Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwon, S.; Edwards, P.; Kim, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrofracturing associated with elevated fluid pressure coupled with changes in stress has been crucial in enhancing the production and recovery of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, it is also an important issue to access the efficiency and stability of long-term CO2 geologic storage reservoirs. Veins are mineral-filled extension fractures developed along the plane of σ1-σ2 and perpendicular to σ3, and the fluid pressure must exceed σ3applied to the plane when the vein opens. Therefore, vein is a well-known natural analogue for fluid migration in a paleo-reservoir. In the Salt Wash Graben of SE Utah, CO2-charged vein systems hosted in the bleached Entrada Formation are well developed and examined to understand the conditions of fluid pressure and stress during the injections of CO2-charged fluid. Based on color and relative cross-cutting relationship in the field, veins are subdivided into two sets; sub-vertical black mineral-rich veins and orthogonal calcite veins that have previously been described as 'grid-lock fractures'. The vein distribution and fluid leakage along through-going fractures in mechanic units allow us to determine the stress regime and driving stress condition through 3D-Mohr circle reconstruction. The results of this statistical analysis for the veins show that the orthogonal veins indicate a 'stress transition' with maximum principal stress direction changing from vertical to NNW-SSE sub-horizontal which coincides with the current regional stress regime. The possible causes of the stress transition can be considered. The process of repeated sealing, reactivation and localization of veins within the bleached zone is a natural indication of a coupled change in pore pressure and stress in the reservoir. Thus, an understanding of the effect of stress changes due to the volumetric injection of CO2 in the subsurface as well as a knowledge of how pre-existing fractures affect fluid flow with respect to elevated pore pressures in layered rocks are

  7. Land subsidence, seismicity and pore pressure monitoring: the new requirements for the future development of oil and gas fields in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macini, P.; Mesini, E.; Panei, L.; Terlizzese, F.

    2015-11-01

    The Emilia earthquake of 2012 (Italy) stimulated a controversial debate concerning the possibility that the event could have been induced or triggered by underground fluids production. The public discussion led the Italian Government to issue a protocol of guidelines for the monitoring of microseismic activity, ground deformation and reservoir pore pressure. The guidelines will be put into operation as soon as practicable when licensing is being considered, and all data provided by mining operators must be made available to the relevant Authorities. The implementation of an outreach and communication program to local residents and administrative authorities is prescribed, so that the civil and scientific community at large can gain confidence that operations are being managed optimally.

  8. Numerical Models of Pore Pressure and Stress Changes along Basement Faults due to Wastewater Injection: Applications to Potentially Induced Seismicity in Southern Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltermann, C.; Hearn, E. H.

    2015-12-01

    As hydrocarbon extraction techniques that generate large volumes of wastewater have come into widespread use in the central United States, increased volumes have been injected into deep disposal wells, with a corresponding dramatic increase in seismicity rates. South-central Kansas is of particular scientific interest because fluid injection rates have recently increased due to renewed gas and oil production from the Mississippi Lime Play, and the local seismicity is being monitored with a seismometer network deployed by the USGS. In addition, since only a small percentage of injection wells seem to induce seismicity, it is important to characterize contributing factors. We have developed groundwater flow models using MODFLOW-USG to (1) assess hydrogeologic conditions under which seismicity may be triggered, for cases in which wastewater is injected into sedimentary strata overlying fractured crystalline basement rock and to (2) explore the possible relationship between wastewater injection and the November 2014 M 4.8 Milan, Kansas earthquake. The USG version of MODFLOW allows us to use unstructured meshes, which vastly reduces computation time while allowing dense meshing near injection wells and faults. Our single-well test model has been benchmarked to published models (Zhang et al., 2013) and will be used to evaluate sensitivity pore pressures and stresses to model parameters. Our south Kansas model represents high-rate injection wells, as well as oil and gas wells producing from the Arbuckle and overlying Mississippian formations in a 40-km square region. Based on modeled pore pressure and stress changes along the target fault, we will identify conditions that would be consistent with inducing an earthquake at the Milan hypocenter. Parameters to be varied include hydraulic properties of sedimentary rock units, crystalline basement and the fault zone, as well as the (poorly resolved) Milan earthquake hypocenter depth.

  9. Relationships between pore pressure, stresses, and present-day geodynamics in the Scotian Shelf, offshore eastern Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Yassir, N.A.; Bell, J.S.

    1994-12-01

    A geomechanical study of the Mesozoic and Tertiary sediments beneath the Scotian Shelf shows that two major weak layers exist at depth: the over-pressured unit at 4000 m and the basal Argo salt, which is ductile and diapiric. A consistent relationships is observed between the overpressures and the stress state in the basin. First, the smaller horizontal principal stress increases dramatically just above the onset of overpressuring, and secondly, borehole breakouts, indicators of stress anisotropy-decrease in abundance within the overpressure zone. Neither tectonic shear nor rapid burial can explain these observations; however, overpressuring by fluid generation will result in horizontal stress increase and eventually lead to an isotropic stress state. Compelling evidence is found for hydrocarbon generation being a key cause of overpressuring in the Scotian Shelf.

  10. Seaward- Versus Landward-Verging Thrusts in Accretionary Wedges: A Numerical Modeling Study of the Effects of Heterogeneity in Pore Fluid Pressure and Frictional Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, G.; Moore, G. F.; Olive, J. A. L.; Weiss, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Whereas seaward-verging thrust faults are, by far, the most common large faults associated with accretionary wedges, the importance of the globally rare, landward verging thrusts has recently been highlighted given the prominence of landward vergence along the Cascadia margin as well as along the Andaman-Sumatra subduction zone, especially in the rupture area of the great 2004 earthquake. The mechanical processes that lead to seaward- versus landward-verging thrusts in accretionary wedges has long been a topic of debate. A weak frictional décollement is one explanation that indeed promotes landward vergence, but not only so, because the typical pattern is of dual verging conjugate faults. A non-brittle, ductile décollement is a second explanation that has been shown in the laboratory to produce a wide sequence of only landward-verging thrusts, but the mechanical causes are not well understood and numerical modeling studies have yet to reproduce this behavior. A seaward-dipping backstop is a third explanation; it promotes landward vergence locally, but more distally the backstop effects diminish and the sense of vergence transitions back to seaward. Mohr-Coulomb and minimum work theory predict that landward vergence should predominate when the direction of maximum principal compression dips landward. We hypothesize that such a condition can arise due to the migration of pore fluids and the associated spatial heterogeneity in frictional strength within the wedge. We test this hypothesis using 2-D numerical models that use a finite-difference, particle-in-cell method for simulating the deformation of an accretionary wedge with a viscoelastic-plastic rheology. With a uniform internal frictional strength, the calculations reproduce many of the faulting behaviors seen in prior laboratory and numerical modeling studies. We are exploring the impacts of heterogeneity in pore fluid pressure and frictional strength on the pattern and vergence of thrust faults.

  11. Correlation between pore fluid pressures and DInSAR post-seismic deformation of the May 20, 2012 Emilia-Romagna (Italy) earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, M.; Stramondo, S.; Albano, M.; Barba, S.; Solaro, G.; Saroli, M.; Bignami, C.

    2015-12-01

    The present work focuses on the detection and analysis of the postseismic surface deformations following the two earthquakes that hit the Emilia Romagna region (Italy) on May 20 and 29, 2012. The 2012 Emilia earthquake sequence struck the central sector of the Ferrara arc, which represents the external fold-and-thrust system of the Northern Apennines thrust belt buried below the Po plain. The May 20 event occurred on the Ferrara basal thrust at depth, at about 6-7 km, while, during the May 29 event, the rupture jumped on an inner splay of the Ferrara system. The analysis of the postseismic displacements was carried out thanks to a dataset of SAR COSMO­ SkyMed images covering a time span of about one year (May 20, 2012 - May 11, 2013) after the May 20 event. The DInSAR results revealed the presence of two deformation patches: the first one is located in the area that experienced the coseismic uplift. Here the postseismic displacements point out a further ground uplift occurring along the first three months after the 20 May event. The second deformation patch is located in the villages of San Carlo and Mirabello, where ground subsidence lasting about four months was detected. We hypothesized that both the observed phenomena are related to the pore pressure perturbation caused by the coseismic deformation. In particular, the ground uplift is due to the deep crustal deformations caused by the pore fluid diffusion at depth to re-establish the initial hydrostatic stresses. Instead, the ground subsidence is related to the compaction of the shallow sandy layers caused by the liquefaction phenomena, which widely affected the San Carlo and Mirabello area. Preliminary numerical analyses performed with the Finite Element Method and empirical relations confirmed our hypothesis.

  12. The effect of abnormal birth history on ambulatory blood pressure and disease progression in children with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Joseph T; Ng, Derek K; Chan, Grace J; Samuels, Joshua; Furth, Susan; Warady, Bradley; Greenbaum, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations between abnormal birth history (birth weight [BW] <2500 grams, gestational age <36 weeks, or small for gestational age), BP, and renal function among 332 participants (97 with abnormal and 235 with normal birth history) in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) Study, a cohort of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Study design Casual and 24-hour ambulatory BP were obtained. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was determined by iohexol disappearance. Confounders (birth and maternal characteristics, socioeconomic status) were used to generate predicted probabilities of abnormal birth history for propensity score matching. Weighted linear and logistic regression models with adjustment for quintiles of propensity scores and CKD diagnosis were used to assess the impact of birth history on BP and GFR. Results Age at enrollment, percent with glomerular disease, and baseline GFR were similar between the groups. Those with abnormal birth history were more likely to be female, of Black race or Hispanic ethnicity, to have low household income, or part of a multiple birth. Unadjusted BP measurements, baseline GFR and change in GFR did not differ significantly between the groups; no differences were seen after adjusting for confounders by propensity score matching. Conclusions Abnormal birth history does not appear to have exerted a significant influence on BP or GFR in this cohort of children with CKD. The absence of an observed association is likely secondary to the dominant effects of underlying CKD and its treatment. PMID:24698454

  13. Multi-Layer, Sharp-Interface Models of Pore Pressure Buildup within the Illinois Basin due to Basin-Wide CO2 Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Person, M. A.; Gable, C. W.; Celia, M. A.; Nordbotten, J. M.; Bandilla, K.; Elliot, T. R.; Rupp, J.; Ellett, K. M.; Bowen, B.; Pickett, W.; Woolsey, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    We recently developed and applied a new parallel, multi-layer, finite-element model to the Illinois Basin in order to assess the spatial extent and magnitude of pore pressure increases resulting from the annual projected injection of 100 million metric tons of CO2. One focus of this work is to assess the potential for inducing a seismic event associated with low effective stress conditions around CO2 injection wells in the southern Illinois Basin where Mt Simon permeability is relatively low (< 50 mD). We used a sharp-interface formulation to represent a CO2, freshwater, and brine transport within each layer. A simple parallelization scheme was used in which fluid transport in each layer is solved on a separate processor. The layers are linked at the after each time step through vertical fluxes of fresh and saline water across their respective confining units. This model was validated, in part, by comparison to computed pore pressure distributions from a published 8-layer test case. Our Illinois Basin model represents spatial variations in porosity using a modified form of Athy's law. Permeability is logarithmically related to porosity so that permeability. Principal reservoirs represented in our model include the Mt. Simon Formation, the Knox Dolomite, Ordovician carbonates, Silurian-Devonian and Mississippian-Pennsylvanian sandstone/carbonates units. Key confining unit represented include the Eau Claire, Maquoketa, and New Albany Shales. A limited number of low-permeability faults were also included in the model. The permeability of fault elements were set to between 10-100 times lower than surrounding sediments. We calibrated our model using historical freshwater pumping data from the Chicago area (128 million gallons per day of H2O) as well as the salinity distribution across the Illinois Basin. We found that incorporating a stream network which included the Rock River near Chicago was important in reproducing pre-development head patterns in the Cambro

  14. Nonpsychotropic cannabinoids, abnormal cannabidiol and canabigerol-dimethyl heptyl, act at novel cannabinoid receptors to reduce intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Szczesniak, Anna-Maria; Maor, Yehoshua; Robertson, Harold; Hung, Orlando; Kelly, Melanie E M

    2011-10-01

    The objective of our study was to examine the pharmacology of the intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering actions of the behaviorally inactive cannabinoids, abnormal cannabidiol (abn-CBD), and a cannabigerol analog, cannabigerol-dimethyl heptyl (CBG-DMH), in comparison to that of the nonselective cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB(1)R) and CB(2)R agonist, WIN55,212-2, in Brown Norway rats. The IOP was measured noninvasively using a hand-held tonometer in nonanesthetized animals. The IOP measurements were taken every 15 min for a period of 2 h after drug administration. All drugs were administered via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections, and abn-CBD and CBG-DMH were also given topically. Both abn-CBD and CBG-DMH reduced IOP when administrated i.p. at doses of ≥2.5 mg/kg or topically at concentrations of 1%-2%. The IOP-lowering effects of abn-CBD and CBG-DMH were reduced by i.p. administration of O-1918 (2.5 mg/kg), a selective antagonist of the abn-CBD-sensitive cannabinoid-related receptor (CBx), but were unaffected by the CB(1)R antagonist, AM251 (2.5 mg/kg), or the CB(2)R antagonist, AM630 (2.5 mg/kg). In contrast, the IOP-lowering action of WIN55,212-2 was completely blocked by the CB(1)R-selective antagonist, AM251, and was unaffected by the CBx receptor antagonist, O-1918. However, similar to the nonpsychotropic cannabinoids, the ocular hypotensive actions of WIN55,212-2 were also insensitive to block by the CB(2)R antagonist, AM630. Consistent with this, the selective CB(2)R agonist, HU-308 (2 mg/kg) failed to reduce IOP in Brown Norway rats. Concurrent application of a dose of WIN55,212-2 that was subthreshold to reduce IOP (0.25 mg/kg), together with a topical dose of either abn-CBD (0.5%) or CBG-DMH (0.25%), respectively, potentiated the ocular hypotensive effect of either compound applied alone. This study demonstrates that the atypical cannabinoid, abn-CBD, and the cannabigerol analog, CBG-DMH, decrease IOP in the normotensive Brown Norway rat eye independent of CB

  15. Time-dependent wellbore breakout growth caused by drilling-induced pore pressure transients: Implications for estimations of far field stress magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olcott, K. A.; Saffer, D. M.; Elsworth, D.

    2013-12-01

    One method used to constrain principal stress orientations and magnitudes in the crust combines estimates of rock strength with observations of wellbore failures, including drilling-induced tensile fractures (DITF) and compressional borehole breakouts (BO). This method has been applied at numerous Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) boreholes drilled into sediments in a wide range of settings, including the Gulf of Mexico, the N. Japan and Costa Rican subduction margins, and the Nankai Trough Accretionary Prism. At Nankai and N. Japan, BO widths defined by logging-while-drilling (LWD) resistivity images have been used to estimate magnitudes of far-field horizontal tectonic stresses. At several drillsites (C0010, C0002, and C0011), sections of the borehole were relogged with LWD after the hole was left open for times ranging from ~30 min to 3 days; times between acquisition were associated with pipe connections (~30 min), cleaning and circulating the hole (up to ~3 hr), and evacuation of the site for weather (~3 days). Relogged portions exhibit widening of BO, hypothesized to reflect time-dependent re-equilibration of instantaneous changes in pore fluid pressure (Pf) induced by opening the borehole. In this conceptual model, Pf decrease caused by initial excavation of the borehole and resulting changes in the state of stress at the borehole wall lead to an initial strengthening of the sediment. Re-equilibration of Pf results in time-dependent weakening of the sediment and subsequent BO growth. If correct, this hypothesis implies that stress magnitudes estimated by BO widths could be significantly underestimated. We test this idea using a finite-element model in COMSOL multiphysics that couples fluid flow and deformation in a poroelastic medium. We specify far-field horizontal principal stresses (SHmax and Shmin) in the model domain. At the start of simulations/at the time of borehole opening, we impose a decreased stress at the borehole wall. We consider a

  16. Evaluation of Pore Networks in Caprocks at Geologic Storage Sites: A Combined Study using High Temperature and Pressure Reaction Experiments, Small Angle Neutron Scattering, and Focused Ion Beam-Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzakis, K. M.; Sitchler, A.; Wang, X.; McCray, J. E.; Kaszuba, J. P.; Rother, G.; Dewers, T. A.; Heath, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Low permeability rock units, often shales or mudstones, that overlie geologic formations under consideration for CO2 sequestration will help contain injected CO2. CO2 that does flow through these rocks will dissolve into the porewaters, creating carbonic acid lowering the pH. This perturbation of the system may result in mineral dissolution or precipitation, which can change the pore structure and impact the flow properties of the caprocks. In order to investigate the impacts that reaction can have on caprock pore structure, we performed a combination of high pressure high temperature reaction experiments, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) experiments and high resolution focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) imaging on samples from the Gothic shale and Marine Tuscaloosa Group. Small angle neutron scattering was performed on unreacted and reacted caprocks at the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. New precipitates and pores are observed in high-resolution images of the reacted samples. The precipitates have been preliminarily identified as gypsum or anhydrite, and sulfide minerals. Results from small angle neutron scattering, a technique that provides information about pores and pore/mineral interfaces at scales ~ 5 to 300 nm, show an increased porosity and specific surface area after reaction with brine and CO2. However, there appear to be differences in how the pore networks change between the two samples that are related to sample mineralogy and original pore network structure. Changes to pores and formation of new pores may lead to different capillary sealing behavior and permeability. This combination of controlled laboratory experiments, neutron scattering and high-resolution imaging provides detailed information about the geochemical processes that occur at the pore scale as CO2 reacts with rocks underground. Such information is integral to the evaluation of large-scale CO2 sequestration as a feasible technology

  17. Landsliding as the progressive growth of a slipping region: Initiating dynamic rupture propagation by local pore-pressure increase and its potential for arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca-Falguières, R. C.; Rice, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Given the low angles of continental slopes, sedimentation alone may not be sufficient to initiate failure, in which case a source of locally elevated pore pressure p is a likely candidate. Heterogeneities in p may arise from spatially variable sources of gas (e.g., Fleischer et al., Geo-Mar. Lett. 2001), variations in permeability, and channelized seepage, and are expected in regions affected by methane hydrates and their dissociation (e.g., Xu & Germanovich, JGR 2006). Additionally, while marine sediments are ideally considered as normally consolidated sediments (for which shear strength is expected to increase with deformation), given typical sedimentation rates on these slopes (~mm/yr or less) strength may develop due to the long lifetime of interparticle contacts. Such behavior is indicated by increased sample stiffness following long periods of fixed loads in consolidation tests (e.g., Karig & Ask, JGR 2003); as well as by the development of increasingly peaked stress-strain profiles under triaxial loading conditions for normally consolidated samples previously held under loads for increasingly long times (e.g., Bjerrum & Lo, Geotechniqué 1963). Such strength would be lost upon sufficient disruption of contacts (i.e., the sediments are considered sensitive), and if weakening is sufficiently strong, localized deformation may be expected as traditionally is for overconsolidated sediments. Consequently, we apply a fracture-mechanics model of the quasistatic growth of a thin zone of localized shear (represented as a slipping crack surface) due to a locally peaked and increasing p profile of a generic nature. Strength on the slip surface weakens with slip and we find that the ruptured region may reach a limit at which the quasistatically calculated crack growth rates become unbounded, corresponding to initiation of dynamic rupture and landsliding. In some cases rupture propagation may not be indefinite, because another equilibrium crack length and slip

  18. Accounting for pore water pressure and confined aquifers in assessing the stability of slopes: a Limit Equilibrium analysis carried out through the Minimum Lithostatic Deviation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausilia Paparo, Maria; Tinti, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    The model we introduce is an implementation of the Minimum Lithostatic Deviation (MLD) method, developed by Tinti and Manucci (Tinti and Manucci 2006; 2008), that makes use of the limit equilibrium (LE) theory to estimate the stability of a slope. The main purpose here is to analyse the role of a confined aquifer on the value of the Safety Factor (F), the parameter that in the LE is used to determine if a slope is stable or unstable. The classical LE methods treat unconfined aquifers by including the water pore pressure in the Mohr-Coulomb failure formula: since the water decreases the friction shear strength, the soil above the sliding surface turns out to be more prone to instability. In case of a confined aquifer, however, due to a presence of impermeable layers, the water is not free to flow into the matrix of the overlying soil. We consider here the assumption of a permeable soil sliding over an impermeable layer, which is an occurrence that is found in several known landslide cases (e.g. Person, 2008; Strout and Tjeltja, 2008; Morgan et al., 2010 for offshore slides; and Palladino and Peck, 1972; Miller and Sias, 1998; Jiao et al. 2005; Paparo et al., 2013 for slopes in proximity of artificial or natural water basins) where clay beds form the potential sliding surface: the water, confined below, pushes along these layers and acts on the sliding body as an external bottom load. We modify the MLD method equations in order to take into account the load due to a confined aquifer and apply the new model to the Vajont case, where many have hypothesised the contribution of a confined aquifer to the failure. Our calculations show that the rain load i) infiltrating directly into the soil body and ii) penetrating into the confined aquifer below the clay layers, in addition with the lowering of the reservoir level, were key factors of destabilization of the Mt Toc flank and caused the disastrous landslide.

  19. Role of pore fluid pressure on transient strength changes and fabric development during serpentine dehydration at mantle conditions: Implications for subduction-zone seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Brooks; Hirth, Greg

    2015-07-01

    To further investigate the dehydration embrittlement hypothesis and its possible link to subduction-zone seismicity, we conducted deformation experiments on antigorite serpentinite in a Griggs-type apparatus at conditions below and above antigorite stability. Temperature ramps (crossing the antigorite thermal stability) were used in conjunction with a new experimental method that allows fluid produced during dehydration reactions to be drained, partially drained or undrained. During temperature ramps, weakening coupled with transient slip initiated at ˜ 650 °C, coincident with the predicted phase transition of antigorite to olivine and talc at ˜ 1 GPa. The weakening-rate and steady-state strength were dependent on drainage conditions; undrained samples weakened over a few minutes and supported the lowest shear stress (˜ 50 MPa), while drained samples weakened over a few hours and supported the highest shear stress (˜ 210 MPa). The coefficient of friction (shear stress over normal stress) in drained samples decreased from ˜0.4 to ˜0.16 after the temperature ramp. The strengths of samples that were first annealed at 700 °C for ˜ 12 h, then deformed, were similar to those observed in the temperature ramp experiments. Strain localization along fractures occurred in all samples during temperature ramping, regardless of the drainage conditions. However, microstructural observations indicate deformation by ductile mechanisms at higher strain under both undrained and drained conditions. The rheology and microstructures suggest dehydrating serpentinite deforms via semibrittle flow with grain-scale ductile deformation more active at high pore fluid pressures. Our results suggest that earthquakes in serpentinized mantle do not nucleate as a direct result of unstable frictional sliding along fractures generated at the onset of dehydration reactions.

  20. Relationship between long-term exposure to low-level arsenic in drinking water and the prevalence of abnormal blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanwu; Mao, Guangyun; He, Suxia; Yang, Zuopeng; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaojing; Qiu, Wenting; Ta, Na; Cao, Li; Yang, Hui; Guo, Xiaojuan

    2013-11-15

    Arsenic increases the risk and incidence of cardiovascular disease. To explore the impact of long-term exposure to low-level arsenic in drinking water on blood pressure including pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), a cross-sectional study was conducted in 2010 in which the blood pressure of 405 villagers was measured, who had been drinking water with an inorganic arsenic content <50 μg/L. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. After adjusting for age, gender, Body Mass Index (BMI), alcohol consumption and smoking, the odds ratios showed a 1.45-fold (95%CI: 0.63-3.35) increase in the group with >30-50 years of arsenic exposure and a 2.95-fold (95%CI: 1.31-6.67) increase in the group with >50 years exposure. Furthermore, the odds ratio for prevalence of abnormal PP and MAP were 1.06 (95%CI: 0.24-4.66) and 0.87 (95%CI: 0.36-2.14) in the group with >30-50 years of exposure, and were 2.46 (95%CI: 0.87-6.97) and 3.75 (95%CI: 1.61-8.71) for the group with >50 years exposure, compared to the group with arsenic exposure ≤ 30 years respectively. Significant trends for Hypertension (p<0.0001), PP (p<0.0001) and MAP (p=0.0016) were found. The prevalence of hypertension and abnormal PP as well as MAP is marked among a low-level arsenic exposure population, and significantly increases with the duration of arsenic exposure.

  1. Superconductivity and abnormal pressure effect in Sr{}_{0.5}La{}_{0.5}FBiSe2 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Xiang, Yongliang; Chen, Yihong; Jiao, Wenhe; Zhang, Chuhang; Zhang, Li; Dai, Jianhui; Li, Yuke

    2016-04-01

    Through the solid state reaction method, we synthesized a new BiSe2-based superconductor Sr{}0.5La{}0.5FBiSe2 with superconducting transition temperature T {}c ≈ \\quad 3.8 K. A strong diamagnetic signal below T c in susceptibility χ (T) is observed indicating the bulk nature of superconductivity. Different to most BiS2-based compounds where superconductivity develops from a semiconducting-like normal state, the present compound exhibits a metallic behavior down to T c . Under weak magnetic field or pressure, however, a remarkable crossover from metallic to insulating behaviors takes place around T min where the resistivity picks up a local minimum. With increasing pressure, T {}c decreases monotonously and T min shifts to high temperatures, while the absolute value of the normal state resistivity at low temperatures first decreases and then increases with pressure up to 2.5 GPa. These results imply that the electronic structure of Sr{}0.5La{}0.5FBiSe2 may be different to those in the other BiS2-based systems.

  2. Syn-eruptive, soft-sediment deformation of deposits from dilute pyroclastic density current: triggers from granular shear, dynamic pore pressure, ballistic impacts and shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douillet, G. A.; Taisne, B.; Tsang-Hin-Sun, E.; Muller, S. K.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-05-01

    Soft-sediment deformation structures can provide valuable information about the conditions of parent flows, the sediment state and the surrounding environment. Here, examples of soft-sediment deformation in deposits of dilute pyroclastic density currents are documented and possible syn-eruptive triggers suggested. Outcrops from six different volcanoes have been compiled in order to provide a broad perspective on the variety of structures: Soufriere Hills (Montserrat), Tungurahua (Ecuador), Ubehebe craters (USA), Laacher See (Germany), and Tower Hill and Purrumbete lakes (both Australia). The variety of features can be classified in four groups: (1) tubular features such as pipes; (2) isolated, laterally oriented deformation such as overturned or oversteepened laminations and vortex-shaped laminae; (3) folds-and-faults structures involving thick (>30 cm) units; (4) dominantly vertical inter-penetration of two layers such as potatoids, dishes, or diapiric flame-like structures. The occurrence of degassing pipes together with basal intrusions suggest fluidization during flow stages, and can facilitate the development of other soft-sediment deformation structures. Variations from injection dikes to suction-driven, local uplifts at the base of outcrops indicate the role of dynamic pore pressure. Isolated, centimeter-scale, overturned beds with vortex forms have been interpreted to be the signature of shear instabilities occurring at the boundary of two granular media. They may represent the frozen record of granular, pseudo Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. Their recognition can be a diagnostic for flows with a granular basal boundary layer. Vertical inter-penetration and those folds-and-faults features related to slumps are driven by their excess weight and occur after deposition but penecontemporaneous to the eruption. The passage of shock waves emanating from the vent may also produce trains of isolated, fine-grained overturned beds that disturb the surface bedding

  3. Syn-eruptive, soft-sediment deformation of dilute pyroclastic density current deposits: triggers from granular shear, dynamic pore pressure, ballistic impacts and shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douillet, Guilhem Amin; Kueppers, Ulrich; Taisne, Benoit; Tsang-Hin-Sun, Ève; Müller, Sebastian K.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-04-01

    Dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) represent peculiar transport mechanisms sharing similarities with turbidity currents, wind-blown transport and granular flows. Outcrops of syn-eruptive, soft-sediment deformation are compiled from seven volcanic centers in order to provide a broad perspective on the variety of structures: Ubehebe craters (USA), Tungurahua (Ecuador), Soufrière Hills (Montserrat), Laacher See (Germany), Lago di Albano (Italy), Tower Hill and Purrumbete lake (both Australia). The interpretation of the variety of triggers enlightens the understanding of the sedimentary environment and basal boundary processes for PDCs: 1/ Isolated, cm-scale, overturned beds with vortex forms have been interpreted to be the signature of shear instabilities occurring at the boundary of two granular media. They may represent the frozen record of granular, pseudo Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. 2/ The occurrence of degassing pipes together with basal intrusive dikes suggest fluidization during flow stages. This, in turn, can facilitate the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz structures. The occurrence of injection dikes at the base of flow units in some outcrops compared with suction-driven local uplifts in others indicates the role of dynamic pore pressure and local changes between depletive and accumulative dynamics of flows. 3/ Isolated slumps as well as sinking pseudonodules are driven by their excess weight and occur after deposition but penecontemporaneous to the eruption. 4/ Impact of ballistic blocks can trigger local displacement or liquefaction. Based on the deformation depth, these can yield precise insights into depositional unit boundaries. Such impact structures may also be at the origin of some of the steep truncation planes visible at the base of the so-called "chute and pool" structures. 5/ Finally, the passage of shock waves emanating from the vent may be preserved in the form of trains of isolated, fine-grained overturned beds, which may disturb

  4. Syn-eruptive, soft-sediment deformation of dilute pyroclastic density current deposits: triggers from granular shear, dynamic pore pressure, ballistic impacts and shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douillet, G. A.; Taisne, B.; Tsang-Hin-Sun, È.; Müller, S. K.; Kueppers, U.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Soft-sediment deformation produces intriguing sedimentary structures and can occur in diverse environments and from a variety of triggers. From the observation of such structures and their interpretation in terms of trigger mechanisms, valuable information can be extracted about former conditions. Here we document examples of syn-eruptive deformation in dilute pyroclastic density current deposits. Outcrops from 6 different volcanoes have been compiled in order to provide a broad perspective on the variety of structures: Ubehebe craters (USA), Tungurahua (Ecuador), Soufrière Hills (Montserrat), Laacher See (Germany), Tower Hill and Purrumbete lake (both Australia). Isolated slumps as well as sinking pseudonodules are driven by their excess weight and occur after deposition but penecontemporaneous to the eruption. Isolated, cm-scale, overturned beds with vortex forms have been interpreted to be the signature of shear instabilities occurring at the boundary of two granular media. They may represent the frozen record of granular, pseudo Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. Their recognition can be a diagnostic for flows with a granular basal boundary layer. The occurrence of degassing pipes together with basal intrusive dikes suggest fluidization during flow stages, and can facilitate the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz structures. The occurrence at the base of flow units of injection dikes in some outcrops compared with suction-driven local uplifts in others indicates the role of dynamic pore pressure. Variations of the latter are possibly related to local changes between depletive and accumulative dynamics of flows. Ballistic impacts can trigger unconventional sags producing local displacement or liquefaction. Based on the deformation depth, these can yield precise insights into depositional unit boundaries. Such impact structures may also be at the origin of some of the steep truncation planes visible at the base of the so-called "chute and pool" structures. Finally

  5. Poring over two-pore channel pore mutants

    PubMed Central

    Penny, Christopher J.; Patel, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    Two-pore channels are members of the voltage-gated ion channel superfamily. They localise to the endolysosomal system and are likely targets for the Ca2+ mobilising messenger NAADP. In this brief review, we relate mutagenesis of the TPC pore to a recently published homology model and discuss how pore mutants are informing us of TPC function. Molecular physiology of these ubiquitous proteins is thus emerging. PMID:27226934

  6. Comparative proteomics reveals abnormal binding of ATGL and dysferlin on lipid droplets from pressure overload-induced dysfunctional rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Li, Linghai; Zhang, Huina; Wang, Weiyi; Hong, Yun; Wang, Jifeng; Zhang, Shuyan; Xu, Shimeng; Shu, Qingbo; Li, Juanfen; Yang, Fuquan; Zheng, Min; Qian, Zongjie; Liu, Pingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Excessive retention of neutral lipids in cardiac lipid droplets (LDs) is a common observation in cardiomyopathy. Thus, the systematic investigation of the cardiac LD proteome will help to dissect the underlying mechanisms linking cardiac steatosis and myocardial dysfunction. Here, after isolation of LDs from normal and dysfunctional Sprague-Dawley rat hearts, we identified 752 heart-associated LD proteins using iTRAQ quantitative proteomic method, including 451 proteins previously unreported on LDs. The most noteworthy finding was the identification of the membrane resealing protein, dysferlin. An analysis of dysferlin truncation mutants indicated that its C2 domain was responsible for its LD localization. Quantitative proteomic results further determined that 27 proteins were increased and 16 proteins were decreased in LDs from post pressure overload-induced dysfunctional hearts, compared with normal hearts. Notably, adipose triacylglycerol lipase (ATGL) was dramatically decreased and dysferlin was substantially increased on dysfunctional cardiac LDs. This study for the first time reveals the dataset of the heart LD proteome in healthy tissue and the variation of it under cardiac dysfunction. These findings highlight an association between the altered LD protein localization of dysferlin and ATGL and myocardial dysfunction. PMID:26795240

  7. Comparative proteomics reveals abnormal binding of ATGL and dysferlin on lipid droplets from pressure overload-induced dysfunctional rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linghai; Zhang, Huina; Wang, Weiyi; Hong, Yun; Wang, Jifeng; Zhang, Shuyan; Xu, Shimeng; Shu, Qingbo; Li, Juanfen; Yang, Fuquan; Zheng, Min; Qian, Zongjie; Liu, Pingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Excessive retention of neutral lipids in cardiac lipid droplets (LDs) is a common observation in cardiomyopathy. Thus, the systematic investigation of the cardiac LD proteome will help to dissect the underlying mechanisms linking cardiac steatosis and myocardial dysfunction. Here, after isolation of LDs from normal and dysfunctional Sprague-Dawley rat hearts, we identified 752 heart-associated LD proteins using iTRAQ quantitative proteomic method, including 451 proteins previously unreported on LDs. The most noteworthy finding was the identification of the membrane resealing protein, dysferlin. An analysis of dysferlin truncation mutants indicated that its C2 domain was responsible for its LD localization. Quantitative proteomic results further determined that 27 proteins were increased and 16 proteins were decreased in LDs from post pressure overload-induced dysfunctional hearts, compared with normal hearts. Notably, adipose triacylglycerol lipase (ATGL) was dramatically decreased and dysferlin was substantially increased on dysfunctional cardiac LDs. This study for the first time reveals the dataset of the heart LD proteome in healthy tissue and the variation of it under cardiac dysfunction. These findings highlight an association between the altered LD protein localization of dysferlin and ATGL and myocardial dysfunction. PMID:26795240

  8. Development of a numerical workflow based on μ-CT imaging for the determination of capillary pressure-saturation-specific interfacial area relationship in 2-phase flow pore-scale porous-media systems: a case study on Heletz sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peche, Aaron; Halisch, Matthias; Bogdan Tatomir, Alexandru; Sauter, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In this case study, we present the implementation of a finite element method (FEM)-based numerical pore-scale model that is able to track and quantify the propagating fluid-fluid interfacial area on highly complex micro-computed tomography (μ-CT)-obtained geometries. Special focus is drawn to the relationship between reservoir-specific capillary pressure (pc), wetting phase saturation (Sw) and interfacial area (awn). The basis of this approach is high-resolution μ-CT images representing the geometrical characteristics of a georeservoir sample. The successfully validated 2-phase flow model is based on the Navier-Stokes equations, including the surface tension force, in order to consider capillary effects for the computation of flow and the phase-field method for the emulation of a sharp fluid-fluid interface. In combination with specialized software packages, a complex high-resolution modelling domain can be obtained. A numerical workflow based on representative elementary volume (REV)-scale pore-size distributions is introduced. This workflow aims at the successive modification of model and model set-up for simulating, such as a type of 2-phase problem on asymmetric μ-CT-based model domains. The geometrical complexity is gradually increased, starting from idealized pore geometries until complex μ-CT-based pore network domains, whereas all domains represent geostatistics of the REV-scale core sample pore-size distribution. Finally, the model can be applied to a complex μ-CT-based model domain and the pc-Sw-awn relationship can be computed.

  9. Prolonged elevation of intraocular pressure results in retinal ganglion cell loss and abnormal retinal function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Khan, A Kareem; Tse, Dennis Y; van der Heijden, Meike; Shah, Priya; Nusbaum, Derek; Yang, Zhuo; Wu, Samuel M; Frankfort, Benjamin J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of prolonged intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation on retinal anatomy and function in a mouse model of experimental glaucoma. IOP was elevated by anterior chamber injection of a fixed combination of polystyrene beads and sodium hyaluronate, and maintained via re-injection after 24 weeks. IOP was measured weekly with a rebound tonometer for 48 weeks. Histology was assessed with a combination of retrograde labeling and antibody staining. Retinal physiology and function was assessed with dark-adapted electroretinograms (ERGs). Comparisons between bead-injected animals and various controls were conducted at both 24 and 48 weeks after bead injection. IOP was elevated throughout the study. IOP elevation resulted in a reduction of retinal ganglion cell (RGCs) and an increase in axial length at both 24 and 48 weeks after bead injection. The b-wave amplitude of the ERG was increased to the same degree in bead-injected eyes at both time points, similar to previous studies. The positive scotopic threshold response (pSTR) amplitude, a measure of RGC electrical function, was diminished at both 24 and 48 weeks when normalized to the increased b-wave amplitude. At 48 weeks, the pSTR amplitude was reduced even without normalization, suggesting more profound RGC dysfunction. We conclude that injection of polystyrene beads and sodium hyaluronate causes chronic IOP elevation which results in phenotypes of stable b-wave amplitude increase and progressive pSTR amplitude reduction, as well as RGC loss and axial length elongation. PMID:25450059

  10. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Resolving pore-space characteristics by rate-controlled porosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, H.H.; Swanson, B.F.

    1989-03-01

    By monitoring the mercury capillary pressure in rate-controlled porosimetry (intrusion) experiments, new information regarding the pore space of a rock sample has been obtained. With this technique, called an apparatus for pore examination (APEX), it is now possible to resolve the pore space of a rock sample into two interconnected parts. One part identifies the individual pore systems (pore bodies), which are low-energy sumps or regions of low capillarity. The other part corresponds to the pore throats that interconnect with pore systems. New capillary-pressure curves have been obtained by partitioning the total capillary-pressure curve (normal capillary-pressure curve) into two subcurves: the subison capillary-pressure curve, which details the distribution of pore bodies, and the rison capillary-pressure curve, which details the distribution of pore throats. The authors present APEX data on Berea sandstone and San Andres dolomite that show the volume distribution of low-capillarity regions within the pore space of these rocks. These regions of low capillarity are the principal pore-space regions that trap the residual nonwetting phase upon imbibition of a strongly wetting fluid, as measured by toluene/air systems. The residual nonwetting-phase saturations as determined by the APEX method and by the toluene/air method are in excellent agreement. Thus, the detailed volume distribution of pore systems responsible for trapped nonwetting-phase saturation is determined from APEX measurements, which can have important implications for EOR.

  12. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  13. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  14. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  15. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... Just like the skin, the fingernails tell a lot about your health: ... the fingernail. These lines can occur after illness, injury to ...

  16. Continuous borehole strain and pore pressure in the near field of the 28 September 2004 M 6.0 parkfield, California, earthquake: Implications for nucleation, fault response, earthquake prediction and tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, M.J.S.; Borcherdt, R.D.; Linde, A.T.; Gladwin, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Near-field observations of high-precision borehole strain and pore pressure, show no indication of coherent accelerating strain or pore pressure during the weeks to seconds before the 28 September 2004 M 6.0 Parkfield earthquake. Minor changes in strain rate did occur at a few sites during the last 24 hr before the earthquake but these changes are neither significant nor have the form expected for strain during slip coalescence initiating fault failure. Seconds before the event, strain is stable at the 10-11 level. Final prerupture nucleation slip in the hypocentral region is constrained to have a moment less than 2 ?? 1012 N m (M 2.2) and a source size less than 30 m. Ground displacement data indicate similar constraints. Localized rupture nucleation and runaway precludes useful prediction of damaging earthquakes. Coseismic dynamic strains of about 10 microstrain peak-to-peak were superimposed on volumetric strain offsets of about 0.5 microstrain to the northwest of the epicenter and about 0.2 microstrain to the southeast of the epicenter, consistent with right lateral slip. Observed strain and Global Positioning System (GPS) offsets can be simply fit with 20 cm of slip between 4 and 10 km on a 20-km segment of the fault north of Gold Hill (M0 = 7 ?? 1017 N m). Variable slip inversion models using GPS data and seismic data indicate similar moments. Observed postseismic strain is 60% to 300% of the coseismic strain, indicating incomplete release of accumulated strain. No measurable change in fault zone compliance preceding or following the earthquake is indicated by stable earth tidal response. No indications of strain change accompany nonvolcanic tremor events reported prior to and following the earthquake.

  17. An integral-free expression for short-term changes in fault stability due to pore pressure induced when a point load is placed on the pervious boundary of a porous elastic half space containing a fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chander, Ramesh; Tomar, S. K.

    2014-10-01

    A concentrated load with step-function time behaviour is placed normal to the planar, pervious boundary of a porous elastic half space (PEHS) with compressible constituents. A planar fault exists in the PEHS in such a way that the poroelastic behaviour of the medium is unhindered. We derive an approximate but integral-free expression for CFSCPP, i.e., changes in fault stability due to changes in pore pressure, at a point not too far off the line along which the load acts. But, in the interest of simplicity, the main discussion is focussed on a consideration of CFSCPP at a point P located on the fault at depth z directly beneath the load. It is convenient to introduce dimensionless time t D directly proportional to real time t. The constant of proportionality is 4 c/ z 2, where c is hydraulic diffusivity. The derived approximate expression gives results with an accuracy of greater than 99% for limited values of t D after the load is imposed. We learn from the derived expression that, for a given z, fault stability undergoes an initial sudden decrease commensurate with the undrained pore pressure induced in the PEHS. This is followed by a more gradual decrease in fault stability with increasing t D until a minimum is reached. The real time t to minimum fault stability increases with z. The magnitude of CFSCPP decreases with z as z -2 for a given t D in the permissible range. The derived expression and the inferences based on it should be useful during earth science investigations of the possible hazards due to reactivation of a pre-existing shallow fault when a civil engineering project involving imposition of a heavy load on the earth's surface is to be executed nearby. They should be useful also for investigations if a shallow earthquake occurs near such a project soon after its execution.

  18. Pore Scale View of Fluid Displacement Fronts in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Or, D.; Moebius, F.

    2014-12-01

    The macroscopically smooth and regular motion of fluid fronts in porous media is composed of abrupt pore-scale interfacial jumps involving intense interfacial energy release marked by pressure bursts and acoustic emissions. The characteristics of these pore scale events affect residual phase entrapment and the resulting unsaturated transport properties behind the front. Experimental studies using acoustic emissions technique (AE), rapid imaging, and pressure measurements help characterize pore scale processes during drainage and imbibition in model porous media. Imbibition and drainage produce different AE signatures (obeying a power law). For rapid drainage, AE signals persist long after cessation of front motion indicative of redistribution and interfacial relaxation. Rapid imaging revealed that interfacial jumps exceed mean front velocity and are highly inertial (Re>1000). Imaged pore invasion volumes and pore volumes deduced from waiting times between pressure fluctuations were in remarkable agreement with geometric pores. Differences between invaded volumes and geometrical pores increase with increasing capillary numbers due to shorter pore evacuation times and onset of simultaneous invasion events. A new mechanistic model for interfacial motions through a pore-throat network enabled systematic evaluation of inertia in interfacial dynamics. Results suggest that in contrast to great sensitivity of pore scale dynamics to variations in pore geometry and boundary conditions, inertia exerts only a minor effect on average phase entrapment. Pore scale invasion events paint a complex picture of rapid and inertial motions and provide new insights on mechanisms at displacement fronts essential for improving the macroscopic description of multiphase flow in porous media.

  19. The relationship between red blood cell distribution width and blood pressure abnormal dipping in patients with essential hypertension: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Su, Dan; Guo, Qi; Gao, Ya; Han, Jin; Yan, Bin; Peng, Liyuan; Song, Anqi; Zhou, Fuling; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is associated with the blood pressure (BP) reverse-dipper pattern in patients with hypertension. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Single centre. Participants Patients with essential hypertension were included in our study (n=708). The exclusion criteria included age <18 or >90 years, incomplete clinical data, night workers, diagnosis of secondary hypertension, under antihypertensive treatment, intolerance for the 24 h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) and BP reading success rate <70%. Measurement Physical examination and ABPM were performed for all patients in our study. The value of RDW was measured using an automated haematology analyser. Statistical methods The distribution of RDW in patients with hypertension among different circadian BP pattern groups was analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Multinomial logistic regression was applied to explore the associations of RDW and other relevant variables with ABPM results. Results There was significantly increased RDW in reverse dippers (13.52±1.05) than dippers (13.25±0.85) of hypertension (p=0.012). Moreover, multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that RDW (OR 1.325, 95% CI 1.037 to 1.692, p=0.024) and diabetes mellitus (OR 2.286, 95% CI 1.380 to 3.788, p=0.001) were significantly different when comparing the reverse-dipper BP pattern with the dipper pattern. However, there was no difference of RDW between the non-dipper pattern and the reverse-dipper pattern (OR 1.036, 95% CI 0.867 to 1.238, p=0.693). In addition to this, RDW was negatively correlated with the decline rate of nocturnal systolic BP (r=−0.113; p=0.003) and diastolic BP (r=−0.101; p=0.007). Conclusions Our results suggested that RDW might associate with the abnormal dipper BP patterns of either reverse dipping or non-dipping homogeneously examined with 24 h ABPM. PMID:26908530

  20. Local pressure components and interfacial tensions of a liquid film in the vicinity of a solid surface with a nanometer-scale slit pore obtained by the perturbative method

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, K.; Shibahara, M.

    2015-03-07

    A classical molecular dynamics simulation was conducted for a liquid-solid interfacial system with a nanometer-scale slit pore in order to reveal local thermodynamic states: local pressure components and interfacial tensions of a liquid film in the vicinity of the slit. The simulation also examined the transition mechanism between the two states of the liquid film: (a) liquid film on the slit and (b) liquid film in the slit, based on the local thermodynamic quantities from a molecular point of view. An instantaneous expression of the local pressure components and interfacial tensions, which is based on a volume perturbation, was presented to investigate time-dependent phenomena in molecular dynamics simulations. The interactions between the particles were described by the 12-6 Lennard-Jones potential, and effects of the fluid-solid interaction intensity on the local pressure components and interfacial tensions of the fluid in the vicinity of the slit were examined in detail by the presented perturbative method. The results revealed that the local pressure components tangential to the solid surface in the vicinity of the 1st fluid layer from the solid surface are different in a two dimensional plane, and the difference became pronounced in the vicinity of the corner of the slit, for cases where the fluid-solid interaction intensities are relatively strong. The results for the local interfacial tensions of the fluid inside the slit suggested that the local interfacial tensions in the vicinity of the 2nd and 3rd layers of the solid atoms from the entrance of the slit act as a trigger for the transition between the two states under the influence of a varying fluid-solid interaction.

  1. Velocities in Solar Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Keil, S. L.; Smaldone, L. A.

    1996-05-01

    We investigate the three dimensional structure of solar pores and their surroundings using high spatial and spectral resolution data. We present evidence that surface velocities decrease around pores with a corresponding increase in the line-of-sight (LOS) velocities. LOS velocities in pores increase with the strength of the magnetic field. Surface velocities show convergence toward a weak downflow which appear to trace boundaries resembling meso-granular and super granular flows. The observed magnetic fields in the pores appear near these boundaries. We analyze the vertical velocity structure in pores and show that they generally have downflows decreasing exponentially with height, with a scale height of about 90 km. Evidence is also presented for the expanding nature of flux tubes. Finally we describe a phenomenological model for pores. This work was supported by AFOSR Task 2311G3. LAS was partially supported by the Progetto Nazionale Astrofisica e Fisica Cosmica of MURST and Scambi Internazionali of the Universita degli Studi di Napoli Frederico II. National Solar Observatory, NOAO, is operated for the National Science Foundation by AURA, Inc.

  2. On the cavitation and pore blocking in slit-shaped ink-bottle pores.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chunyan; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2011-04-01

    We present GCMC simulations of argon adsorption in slit pores of different channel geometry. We show that the isotherm for an ink-bottle pore can be reconstructed as a linear combination of the local isotherms of appropriately chosen independent unit cells. Second, depending on the system parameters and operating conditions, the phenomena of cavitation and pore blocking can occur for a given configuration of the ink-bottle pore by varying the geometrical aspect ratio. Although it has been argued in the literature that the geometrical aspects of the system govern the evaporation mechanism (either cavitation or pore blocking), we here put forward an argument that the local compressibility in different parts of the ink-bottle pore is the deciding factor for evaporation. When the fluid in the small neck is strongly bound, cavitation is the governing process, and molecules in the cavity evaporate to the surrounding bulk gas via a mass transfer mechanism through the pore neck. When the pore neck is sufficiently large, the system of neck and cavity evaporates at the same pressure, which is a consequence of the comparable compressibility between the fluid in the neck and that in the cavity. This suggests that local compressibility is the measure of cohesiveness of the fluid prior to evaporation. One consequence that we derive from the analysis of isotherms of a number of connected pores is that by analyzing the adsorption branch or the desorption branch of an experimental isotherm may not lead to the correct pore sizes and the correct pore volume distribution. PMID:21370903

  3. Pore structure analysis of American coals

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, D.P.; Smith, D.M.; Stermer, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The pore structure of 19 American coals, representing a wide range of rank and geographic origin, has been studied via gas adsorption, mercury porosimetry, helium displacement and NMR spin-lattice relaxation measurements. Nitrogen adsorption at 77 K was used to determine surface area in the pore range of r/sub p/ > approx. = 1nm and carbon dioxide adsorption at 273 K was used to obtain the total surface area. Porosimetry results were complicated by inter-particle void filling, surface roughness/porosity and sample compression. By employing a range of particle sizes, information concerning the relative magnitude of these mechanisms was ascertained as a function of pressure. Spin-lattice relaxation measurements of water contained in saturated coal were used to find pore size distributions over a broad range of T/sub 1/, the spin-lattice relaxation time. Good qualitative agreement was obtained between these measurements and gas adsorption/condensation results. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Pore networks in continental and marine mudstones: Characteristics and controls on sealing behavior

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heath, J.E.; Dewers, T.A.; McPherson, B.J.O.L.; Petrusak, R.; Chidsey, T.C.; Rinehart, A.J.; Mozley, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    Mudstone pore networks are strong modifiers of sedimentary basin fluid dynamics and have a critical role in the distribution of hydrocarbons and containment of injected fluids. Using core samples from continental and marine mudstones, we investigate properties of pore types and networks from a variety of geologic environments, together with estimates of capillary beam- scanning electron microscopy, suggest seven dominant mudstone pore types distinguished by geometry and connectivity. A dominant planar pore type occurs in all investigated mudstones and generally has high coordination numbers (i.e., number of neighboring connected pores). Connected networks of pores of this type contribute to high mercury capillary pressures due to small pore throats at the junctions of connected pores and likely control most matrix transport in these mudstones. Other pore types are related to authigenic (e.g., replacement or pore-lining precipitation) clay minerals and pyrite nodules; pores in clay packets adjacent to larger, more competent clastic grains; pores in organic phases; and stylolitic and microfracture-related pores. Pores within regions of authigenic clay minerals often form small isolated networks (<3 ??m). Pores in stringers of organic phases occur as tubular pores or slit- and/or sheet-like pores. These form short, connected lengths in 3D reconstructions, but appear to form networks no larger than a few microns in size. Sealing efficiency of the studied mudstones increases with greater distal depositional environments and greater maximum depth of burial. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  5. Electrokinetic induced solute dispersion in porous media; pore network modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuai; Schotting, Ruud; Raoof, Amir

    2013-04-01

    Electrokinetic flow plays an important role in remediation process, separation technique, and chromatography. The solute dispersion is a key parameter to determine transport efficiency. In this study, we present the electrokinetic effects on solute dispersion in porous media at the pore scale, using a pore network model. The analytical solution of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient was obtained to quantity the fluid flow velocity in a cylinder capillary. The effect of electrical double layer on the electrokinetic coupling coefficient was investigated by applying different ionic concentration. By averaging the velocity over cross section within a single pore, the average flux was obtained. Applying such single pore relationships, in the thin electrical double layer limit, to each and every pore within the pore network, potential distribution and the induced fluid flow was calculated for the whole domain. The resulting pore velocities were used to simulate solute transport within the pore network. By averaging the results, we obtained the breakthrough curve (BTC) of the average concentration at the outlet of the pore network. Optimizing the solution of continuum scale advection-dispersion equation to such a BTC, solute dispersion coefficient was estimated. We have compared the dispersion caused by electrokinetic flow and pure pressure driven flow under different Peclet number values. In addition, the effect of microstructure and topological properties of porous media on fluid flow and solute dispersion is presented, mainly based on different pore coordination numbers.

  6. Racial Differences in Abnormal Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Measures: Results From the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cora E.; Diaz, Keith M.; Carson, April P.; Kim, Yongin; Calhoun, David; Yano, Yuichiro; Viera, Anthony J.; Shimbo, Daichi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Several ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) measures have been associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk independent of clinic blood pressure (BP). African Americans have higher clinic BP compared with Whites but few data are available on racial differences in ABPM measures. METHODS We compared ABPM measures between African American (n = 178) and White (n = 103) participants at the Year 5 Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study visit. BP was measured during a study visit and the second and third measurements were averaged. ABPM was conducted over the following 24 hours. RESULTS Mean ± SD age of participants was 29.8±3.8 years and 30.8±3.5 years for African Americans and Whites, respectively. Mean daytime systolic BP (SBP) was 3.90 (SD 1.18) mm Hg higher among African Americans compared with Whites (P < 0.001) after age–gender adjustment and 1.71 (SD 1.03) mm Hg higher after multivariable adjustment including mean clinic SBP (P = 0.10). After multivariable adjustment including mean clinic SBP, nighttime SBP was 4.83 (SD 1.11) mm Hg higher among African Americans compared with Whites (P < 0.001). After multivariable adjustment, the African Americans were more likely than Whites to have nocturnal hypertension (prevalence ratio: 2.44, 95% CI: 0.99–6.05) and nondipping (prevalence ratio: 2.50, 95% CI: 1.39–4.48). The prevalence of masked hypertension among African Americans and Whites was 4.4% and 2.1%, respectively, (P = 0.49) and white coat hypertension was 3.3% and 3.9%, respectively (P = 0.99). Twenty-four hour BP variability on ABPM was higher among African Americans compared with Whites. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest racial differences in several ABPM measures exist. PMID:25376639

  7. The pore space scramble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormally, Alexandra; Bentham, Michelle; Vermeylen, Saskia; Markusson, Nils

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and energy security continue to be the context of the transition to a secure, affordable and low carbon energy future, both in the UK and beyond. This is reflected in for example, binding climate policy targets at the EU level, the introduction of renewable energy targets, and has also led to an increasing interest in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology with its potential to help mitigate against the effects of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning. The UK has proposed a three phase strategy to integrate CCS into its energy system in the long term focussing on off-shore subsurface storage (DECC, 2014). The potential of CCS therefore, raises a number of challenging questions and issues surrounding the long-term storage of CO2 captured and injected into underground spaces and, alongside other novel uses of the subsurface, contributes to opening a new field for discussion on the governance of the subsurface. Such 'novel' uses of the subsurface have lead to it becoming an increasingly contested space in terms of its governance, with issues emerging around the role of ownership, liability and property rights of subsurface pore space. For instance, questions over the legal ownership of pore space have arisen with ambiguity over the legal standpoint of the surface owner and those wanting to utilise the pore space for gas storage, and suggestions of whether there are depths at which legal 'ownership' becomes obsolete (Barton, 2014). Here we propose to discuss this 'pore space scramble' and provide examples of the competing trajectories of different stakeholders, particularly in the off-shore context given its priority in the UK. We also propose to highlight the current ambiguity around property law of pore space in the UK with reference to approaches currently taken in different national contexts. Ultimately we delineate contrasting models of governance to illustrate the choices we face and consider the ethics of these models for the common good

  8. Magnetic-resonance pore imaging of nonsymmetric microscopic pore shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, Stefan Andreas; Wang, Xindi; Hosking, Peter; Simpson, M. Cather; Hunter, Mark; Galvosas, Petrik

    2015-07-01

    Imaging of the microstructure of porous media such as biological tissue or porous solids is of high interest in health science and technology, engineering and material science. Magnetic resonance pore imaging (MRPI) is a recent technique based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which allows us to acquire images of the average pore shape in a given sample. Here we provide details on the experimental design, challenges, and requirements of MRPI, including its calibration procedures. Utilizing a laser-machined phantom sample, we present images of microscopic pores with a hemiequilateral triangular shape even in the presence of NMR relaxation effects at the pore walls. We therefore show that MRPI is applicable to porous samples without a priori knowledge about their pore shape and symmetry. Furthermore, we introduce "MRPI mapping," which combines MRPI with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This enables one to resolve microscopic pore sizes and shapes spatially, thus expanding the application of MRPI to samples with heterogeneous distributions of pores.

  9. Abnormal energetics and ATP depletion in pressure-overload mouse hearts: in vivo high-energy phosphate concentration measures by noninvasive magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashish; Chacko, V P; Weiss, Robert G

    2009-07-01

    (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) offers a unique means to noninvasively quantify the major cardiac high-energy phosphates, creatine phosphate (PCr) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), that are critical for normal myocardial contractile function and viability. Spatially localized (31)P MRS has been used to quantify the in vivo PCr-to-ATP ratio (PCr/ATP) of murine hearts, including those with pressure-overload hypertrophy induced by thoracic aortic constriction (TAC). To date, there has been no approach for measuring the absolute tissue concentrations of PCr and ATP in the in vivo mouse heart that promise a better understanding of high-energy metabolism. A method to quantify in vivo murine myocardial concentrations of PCr and ATP using an external reference is described, validated, and applied to normal and TAC hearts. This new method does not prolong the scan times in mice beyond those previously required to measure PCr/ATP. The new method renders an [ATP] of 5.0 +/- 0.9 (mean +/- SD) and [PCr] of 10.4 +/- 1.4 micromol/g wet wt in normal mouse hearts (n = 7) and significantly lower values in TAC hearts (n = 10) of 4.0 +/- 0.8 and 6.7 +/- 2.0 micromol/g wet wt for [ATP] (P < 0.04) and [PCr] (P < 0.001), respectively. The in vivo magnetic resonance [ATP] results are in good agreement with those obtained using an in vitro enzyme luminescent assay of perchloric acid extracts of the same hearts. In conclusion, a validated (31)P MRS method for quantifying [ATP] and [PCr] in the in vivo mouse heart using spatial localization and an external reference is described and used to demonstrate significant reductions in not only PCr/ATP but [ATP] in hypertrophied TAC hearts.

  10. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Hydrophilic Pores in Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Leontiadou, Hari; Mark, Alan E.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrophilic pores are formed in peptide free lipid bilayers under mechanical stress. It has been proposed that the transport of ionic species across such membranes is largely determined by the existence of such meta-stable hydrophilic pores. To study the properties of these structures and understand the mechanism by which pore expansion leads to membrane rupture, a series of molecular dynamics simulations of a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer have been conducted. The system was simulated in two different states; first, as a bilayer containing a meta-stable pore and second, as an equilibrated bilayer without a pore. Surface tension in both cases was applied to study the formation and stability of hydrophilic pores inside the bilayers. It is observed that below a critical threshold tension of ∼38 mN/m the pores are stabilized. The minimum radius at which a pore can be stabilized is 0.7 nm. Based on the critical threshold tension the line tension of the bilayer was estimated to be ∼3 × 10−11 N, in good agreement with experimental measurements. The flux of water molecules through these stabilized pores was analyzed, and the structure and size of the pores characterized. When the lateral pressure exceeds the threshold tension, the pores become unstable and start to expand causing the rupture of the membrane. In the simulations the mechanical threshold tension necessary to cause rupture of the membrane on a nanosecond timescale is much higher in the case of the equilibrated bilayers, as compared with membranes containing preexisting pores. PMID:15041656

  12. Dependence of hydrogen permeabilities of isotropic graphites on the pore structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, M.; Yamaguchi, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Tanaka, S.

    1991-03-01

    The permeation behavior of molecular hydrogen through isotropic graphites is investigated. The observed dependences of the permeation rate on pressure, specimen thickness, temperature and molecular weight suggest that hydrogen permeates by molecular flow, probably through open pores. A simple pore structure model is developed and is compared with the experimental results. It is revealed that hydrogen permeation through isotropic graphites depends not only on the pore size or the porosity, but also on the pore size distribution and tortuosity.

  13. Gaseous Diffusion and Pore Structure in Nuclear Graphites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, Timothy John

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. With the incentive of providing more information for oxidation and safety studies of graphite components in thermal nuclear reactors, a new method has been developed to determine the gas transport pore structure in nuclear graphites. It involves an analysis of the dependence on pressure of the isobaric, isothermal (room temperature) diffusivity ratios of components in a binary gas mixture flowing through annular graphite samples. A Wicke-Kallenbach apparatus was specially built to measure He-Ar diffusivity ratios at pressures below 100 Torr. The new apparatus incorporates capacitance manometers and servovalves for pressure measurement and control, hot wire meters for flow rate measurements, and a mass spectrometer for gas analysis. As pressure decreased, the diffusivity ratios were observed to decrease non-linearly, indicating that the mechanism of flow in the materials was in the transition region between molecular and Knudsen diffusion. A mathematical model was derived to relate the pressure dependence of the transition diffusivity ratio to gas transport pore structure, and a statistical analysis based on Tikhonov regularisation was developed which gave a good fit of the model to the data, and optimal estimates of the number of model capillary pores, and the distribution of pore sizes. In comparison, the established methods of molecular diffusion and permeation (flow of pure gases) only give mean data on the pore size distribution. Pore structure data from the new method accurately predicted CO_2-Ar molecular diffusivity ratios, but overestimated N_2 permeability coefficients, due, it was assumed, to differences between diffusion and permeation pore structure. The cumulative volume distributions for transport pores from the transition diffusion data were similar in shape to those for open pores from mercury porosimetry, but shifted towards higher pore radii, indicating that diffusion is not so influenced

  14. Pore dynamics in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozen, I.; Dommersnes, P.

    2014-09-01

    Transient circular pores can open in plasma membrane of cells due to mechanical stress, and failure to repair such pores lead to cell death. Similar pores in the form of defects also exist among smectic membranes, such as in myelin sheaths or mitochondrial membranes. The formation and growth of membrane defects are associated with diseases, for example multiple sclerosis. A deeper understanding of membrane pore dynamics can provide a more refined picture of membrane integrity-related disease development, and possibly also treatment options and strategies. Pore dynamics is also of great importance regarding healthcare applications such as drug delivery, gene or as recently been implied, cancer therapy. The dynamics of pores significantly differ in stacks which are confined in 2D compared to those in cells or vesicles. In this short review, we will summarize the dynamics of different types of pores that can be observed in biological membranes, which include circular transient, fusion and hemi-fusion pores. We will dedicate a section to floral and fractal pores which were discovered a few years ago and have highly peculiar characteristics. Finally, we will discuss the repair mechanisms of large area pores in conjunction with the current cell membrane repair hypotheses.

  15. Pore size engineering applied to starved electrochemical cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbey, K. M.; Thaller, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    To maximize performance in starved, multiplate cells, the cell design should rely on techniques which widen the volume tolerance characteristics. These involve engineering capillary pressure differences between the components of an electrochemical cell and using these forces to promote redistribution of electrolyte to the desired optimum values. This can be implemented in practice by prescribing pore size distributions for porous back-up plates, reservoirs, and electrodes. In addition, electrolyte volume management can be controlled by incorporating different pore size distributions into the separator. In a nickel/hydrogen cell, the separator must contain pores similar in size to the small pores of both the nickel and hydrogen electrodes in order to maintain an optimum conductive path for the electrolyte. The pore size distributions of all components should overlap in such a way as to prevent drying of the separator and/or flooding of the hydrogen electrode.

  16. Latent fingermark pore area reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Buckley, K; Sutton, R

    2008-08-01

    The study of the reproducibility of friction ridge pore detail in fingermarks is a measure of their usefulness in personal identification. Pore area in latent prints developed using cyanoacrylate and ninhydrin were examined and measured by photomicrography using appropriate software tools. The data were analysed statistically and the results showed that pore area is not reproducible in developed latent prints, using either of the development techniques. The results add further support to the lack of reliability of pore area in personal identification. PMID:18617339

  17. Pore size and pore throat types in a heterogeneous dolostone reservoir, Devonian Grosmont formation, western Canada sedimentary basin

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, P.; Machel, H. G.

    1995-11-01

    The Devonian Grosmont Formation in northeastern Alberta, Canada, is a giant heavy-oil reservoir. The main reservoir rocks are dolomitized and karstified platform and ramp carbonates, and the best reservoir facies occur in the upper Grosmont (UGM) units 3 and 2. In these units, reservoir properties are highly heterogeneous. Hand specimen, thin section, UV, and SEM petrography, as well as grading scales, mercury capillary pressure curve analysis, and statistics, have been used to characterize reservoir heterogeneity. Our investigation led to a new pore size classification for carbonate reservoirs; this new classification has four pore sizes: microporosity (pore diameters <1 {mu}m), mesoporosity (pore diameters 1-1000 {mu}m), macroporosity (pore diameters 1-256 mm), and megaporosity (pore diameters >256 mm). A combination of microscopic observations and capillary pressure curve characteristics led to the recognition of four pore throat texture types on the microporosity scale, and to five types on the mesoporosity scale. Microporosity pore types include (1) intracrystal dissolution porosity, (2) pervasive intercrystal and intracrystal dissolution porosity, (3) intergranular and/or intercrystal porosity in grainstones, and (4) primary or solution microporosity in mud matrix (only in limestones). Mesoporosity pore types include (1) intercrystal porosity, (2) solution-enhanced intercrystal porosity, (3) oversized porosity, (4) intragranular solution porosity, and (5) intergranular solution porosity. Some of these types are homogeneous (e.g., non-fabric selective dissolution porosity and intercrystal primary porosity), whereas others are heterogeneous. Generally, hydrocarbon recovery efficiency is good in the homogeneous pore throat types, but poor in the heterogeneous types.

  18. Cilia and Nuclear Pore Proteins: Pore No More?

    PubMed

    Obado, Samson O; Rout, Michael P

    2016-09-12

    Nuclear pore proteins at the base of cilia were thought to regulate transport into cilia. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Del Viso et al. (2016) challenge this view, showing instead that pore proteins localize to ciliary basal bodies and that their perturbation leads to congenital heart disease. PMID:27623377

  19. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Lucy; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common and debilitating condition with high direct and indirect costs. AUB frequently co-exists with fibroids, but the relationship between the two remains incompletely understood and in many women the identification of fibroids may be incidental to a menstrual bleeding complaint. A structured approach for establishing the cause using the Fédération International de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) PALM-COEIN (Polyp, Adenomyosis, Leiomyoma, Malignancy (and hyperplasia), Coagulopathy, Ovulatory disorders, Endometrial, Iatrogenic and Not otherwise classified) classification system will facilitate accurate diagnosis and inform treatment options. Office hysteroscopy and increasing sophisticated imaging will assist provision of robust evidence for the underlying cause. Increased availability of medical options has expanded the choice for women and many will no longer need to recourse to potentially complicated surgery. Treatment must remain individualised and encompass the impact of pressure symptoms, desire for retention of fertility and contraceptive needs, as well as address the management of AUB in order to achieve improved quality of life. PMID:26803558

  20. Nanometer-Scale Pore Characteristics of Lacustrine Shale, Songliao Basin, NE China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Yang, Jinxiu; Wang, Zhiwei; Lu, Shuangfang

    2015-01-01

    In shale, liquid hydrocarbons are accumulated mainly in nanometer-scale pores or fractures, so the pore types and PSDs (pore size distributions) play a major role in the shale oil occurrence (free or absorbed state), amount of oil, and flow features. The pore types and PSDs of marine shale have been well studied; however, research on lacustrine shale is rare, especially for shale in the oil generation window, although lacustrine shale is deposited widely around the world. To investigate the relationship between nanometer-scale pores and oil occurrence in the lacustrine shale, 10 lacustrine shale core samples from Songliao Basin, NE China were analyzed. Analyses of these samples included geochemical measurements, SEM (scanning electron microscope) observations, low pressure CO2 and N2 adsorption, and high-pressure mercury injection experiments. Analysis results indicate that: (1) Pore types in the lacustrine shale include inter-matrix pores, intergranular pores, organic matter pores, and dissolution pores, and these pores are dominated by mesopores and micropores; (2) There is no apparent correlation between pore volumes and clay content, however, a weak negative correlation is present between total pore volume and carbonate content; (3) Pores in lacustrine shale are well developed when the organic matter maturity (Ro) is >1.0% and the pore volume is positively correlated with the TOC (total organic carbon) content. The statistical results suggest that oil in lacustrine shale mainly occurs in pores with diameters larger than 40 nm. However, more research is needed to determine whether this minimum pore diameter for oil occurrence in lacustrine shale is widely applicable.

  1. Nanometer-Scale Pore Characteristics of Lacustrine Shale, Songliao Basin, NE China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Yang, Jinxiu; Wang, Zhiwei; Lu, Shuangfang

    2015-01-01

    In shale, liquid hydrocarbons are accumulated mainly in nanometer-scale pores or fractures, so the pore types and PSDs (pore size distributions) play a major role in the shale oil occurrence (free or absorbed state), amount of oil, and flow features. The pore types and PSDs of marine shale have been well studied; however, research on lacustrine shale is rare, especially for shale in the oil generation window, although lacustrine shale is deposited widely around the world. To investigate the relationship between nanometer-scale pores and oil occurrence in the lacustrine shale, 10 lacustrine shale core samples from Songliao Basin, NE China were analyzed. Analyses of these samples included geochemical measurements, SEM (scanning electron microscope) observations, low pressure CO2 and N2 adsorption, and high-pressure mercury injection experiments. Analysis results indicate that: (1) Pore types in the lacustrine shale include inter-matrix pores, intergranular pores, organic matter pores, and dissolution pores, and these pores are dominated by mesopores and micropores; (2) There is no apparent correlation between pore volumes and clay content, however, a weak negative correlation is present between total pore volume and carbonate content; (3) Pores in lacustrine shale are well developed when the organic matter maturity (Ro) is >1.0% and the pore volume is positively correlated with the TOC (total organic carbon) content. The statistical results suggest that oil in lacustrine shale mainly occurs in pores with diameters larger than 40 nm. However, more research is needed to determine whether this minimum pore diameter for oil occurrence in lacustrine shale is widely applicable. PMID:26285123

  2. PoreFlow: A complex pore-network model for simulation of reactive transport in variably saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoof, A.; Nick, H. M.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Spiers, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    This study introduces PoreFlow, a pore-network modeling tool capable of simulating fluid flow and multi-component reactive and adsorptive transport under saturated and variably saturated conditions. PoreFlow includes a variety of modules, such as: pore network generator, drainage simulator, calculation of pressure and velocity distributions, and modeling of reactive solute transport accounting for advection and diffusion. The pore space is represented using a multi-directional pore-network capable of capturing the random structure of a given porous media with user-defined directional connectivities for anisotropic pore structures. The chemical reactions can occur within the liquid phase, as well as between the liquid and solid phases which may result in an evolution of porosity and permeability. Under variably saturated conditions the area of interfaces changes with degree of the fluid saturation. PoreFlow uses complex formulations for more accurate modeling of transport problems in presence of the nonwetting phase. This is done by refining the discretization within drained pores. An implicit numerical scheme is used to solve the governing equations, and an efficient substitution method is applied to considerably minimize computational times. Several examples are provided, under saturated and variably saturated conditions, to demonstrate the model applicability in hydrogeology problems and petroleum fields. We show that PoreFlow is a powerful tool for upscaling of flow and transport in porous media, utilizing different pore scale information such as various interfaces, phase distributions and local fluxes and concentrations to determine macro scale properties such as average saturation, relative permeability, solute dispersivity, adsorption coefficients, effective diffusion and tortuosity. Such information can be used as constitutive relations within continuum scale governing equations to model physical and chemical processes more accurately at the larger scales.

  3. Velocity Profiles in Pores with Undulating Opening Diameter and Their Importance for Resistive-Pulse Experiments

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Pores with undulating opening diameters have emerged as an analytical tool enhancing the speed of resistive-pulse experiments, with a potential to simultaneously characterize size and mechanical properties of translocating objects. In this work, we present a detailed study of the characteristics of resistive-pulses of charged and uncharged polymer particles in pores with different aspect ratios and pore topography. Although no external pressure difference was applied, our experiments and modeling indicated the existence of local pressure drops, which modified axial and radial velocities of the solution. As a consequence of the complex velocity profiles, pores with undulating pore diameter and low-aspect ratio exhibited large dispersion of the translocation times. Distribution of the pulse amplitude, which is a measure of the object size, was not significantly affected by the pore topography. The importance of tuning pore geometry for the application in resistive-sensing and multipronged characterization of physical properties of translocating objects is discussed. PMID:25245282

  4. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  5. Multiscale pore-network representation of heterogeneous carbonate rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Tannaz; Butler, Ian B.; Geiger, Sebastian; van Dijke, Marinus I. J.; Jiang, Zeyun; Surmas, Rodrigo

    2016-07-01

    A multiscale network integration approach introduced by Jiang et al. (2013) is used to generate a representative pore-network for a carbonate rock with a pore size distribution across several orders of magnitude. We predict the macroscopic flow parameters of the rock utilising (i) 3-D images captured by X-ray computed microtomography and (ii) pore-network flow simulations. To capture the multiscale pore size distribution of the rock, we imaged four different rock samples at different resolutions and integrated the data to produce a pore-network model that combines information at several length-scales that cannot be recovered from a single tomographic image. A workflow for selection of the number and length-scale of the required input networks for the network integration process, as well as fine tuning the model parameters is presented. Mercury injection capillary-pressure data were used to evaluate independently the multiscale networks. We explore single-scale, two-scale, and three-scale network models and discuss their representativeness by comparing simulated capillary-pressure versus saturation curves with laboratory measurements. We demonstrate that for carbonate rocks with wide pore size distributions, it may be required to integrate networks extracted from two or three discrete tomographic data sets in order to simulate macroscopic flow parameters.

  6. Pore destruction resulting from mechanical thermal expression

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, S.A.; Wheeler, R.A.; Hoadley, A.F.A.

    2007-07-01

    Mechanical thermal expression (MTE) is a dewatering technology ideally suited for the dewatering of internally porous biomaterials. For such materials, the combined application of temperature and compressive force in the MTE process enhances the collapse of the porous structure, resulting in effective water removal. In this article, a comparison of the dewatering of titanium dioxide, which is an ideal incompressible, non-porous material, and lignite, which is a porous plant-based biomaterial, is presented. The comparison is based on the parameters critical to dewatering, namely the material compressibility and the permeability. With the aid of mercury porosimetry results, a detailed discussion of the pore destruction of lignite resulting from MTE processing is presented. It is illustrated that there is a well-defined relationship between the pore size distribution after MTE dewatering and the MTE temperature and pressure. The discussion is extended to an investigation of the effects of MTE processing conditions on the effective and noneffective porosity. The effective porosity is defined as the interconnected porosity, which contributes to flow through the compressed matrix, while the non-effective porosity is the remaining porosity, which does not contribute to flow. It is illustrated that there is a linear relationship in both the effective and non-effective porosity with the total porosity. The linear relationship is independent of the processing conditions. It is also shown that MTE processing collapses the effective and non-effective pores at roughly the same rate.

  7. The effective pore radius of screen wicks

    SciTech Connect

    Imura, Hideaki; Kozai, Hiroaki; Ikeda, Yuji

    1994-10-01

    The effective pore radius in screen-wick heat pipes was investigated, which is very important for the prediction of maximum heat transfer rates due to capillary limitation. An equation for the effective pore radius of the screen wicks was derived based on the model of the screen geometry. The capillary height for stainless steel and phosphor bronze screens was measured using water, ethyl alcohol, and Freon 113 as the test liquids. The effect of surface treatment (acid cleaning and oxidation) on the capillary height was also examined. From the comparison of the experimental data for water and ethyl alcohol with those for Freon 113, it was indicated that the contact angle was 24.2{degree} for water and 16.9{degree} for ethyl alcohol. Consequently, it was found that the effective pore radius of the screen wicks could be predicted fairly well from the expression presented in this study, and that the contact angle should be taken into consideration to evaluate the maximum capillary pressure accurately.

  8. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Designed membrane channels and pores.

    PubMed

    Bayley, H

    1999-02-01

    Advances in the synthesis and assembly of designed membrane channels and pores include addressable template-assisted synthetic protein (TASP) syntheses of helix bundles, the production of a new class of nanotubes and the ability to purify hetero-oligomeric pores. Channels and pores with altered functional properties and with built-in triggers and switches have been prepared. Progress in applications has been greatest in sensor technology, where sensor elements based on ligand activation, channel selectivity and channel block have been made. Structural information about natural membrane proteins is emerging to inspire new designs.

  10. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  11. Numerical Simulation on Hydromechanical Coupling in Porous Media Adopting Three-Dimensional Pore-Scale Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianjun; Song, Rui; Cui, Mengmeng

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach of simulating hydromechanical coupling in pore-scale models of porous media is presented in this paper. Parameters of the sandstone samples, such as the stress-strain curve, Poisson's ratio, and permeability under different pore pressure and confining pressure, are tested in laboratory scale. The micro-CT scanner is employed to scan the samples for three-dimensional images, as input to construct the model. Accordingly, four physical models possessing the same pore and rock matrix characteristics as the natural sandstones are developed. Based on the micro-CT images, the three-dimensional finite element models of both rock matrix and pore space are established by MIMICS and ICEM software platform. Navier-Stokes equation and elastic constitutive equation are used as the mathematical model for simulation. A hydromechanical coupling analysis in pore-scale finite element model of porous media is simulated by ANSYS and CFX software. Hereby, permeability of sandstone samples under different pore pressure and confining pressure has been predicted. The simulation results agree well with the benchmark data. Through reproducing its stress state underground, the prediction accuracy of the porous rock permeability in pore-scale simulation is promoted. Consequently, the effects of pore pressure and confining pressure on permeability are revealed from the microscopic view. PMID:24955384

  12. Computational modeling of electrokinetic transport in random networks of micro-pores and nano-pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Shima; Mani, Ali

    2014-11-01

    A reduced order model has been developed to study the nonlinear electrokinetic behaviors emerging in the transport of ionic species through micro-scale and nano-scale porous media. In this approach a porous structure is modeled as a network of long and thin pores. By assuming transport equilibrium in the thin dimensions for each pore, a 1D transport equation is developed in the longitudinal direction covering a wide range of conditions including extreme limits of thick and thin electric double layers. This 1D model includes transport via diffusion, electromigration and wide range of advection mechanisms including pressure driven flow, electroosmosis, and diffusion osmosis. The area-averaged equations governing the axial transport from different pores are coupled at the pore intersections using the proper conservation laws. Moreover, an asymptotic treatment has been included in order to remove singularities in the limit of small concentration. The proposed method provides an efficient framework for insightful simulations of porous electrokinetic systems with applications in water desalination and energy storage. PhD student in Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University. She received her Master's degree in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford at 2013. Her research interests include CFD, high performance computing, and optimization.

  13. Nanoscale Pore Imaging and Pore Scale Fluid Flow Modeling in Chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Tomutsa, Liviu; Silin, Dmitriy

    2004-08-19

    For many rocks of high economic interest such as chalk, diatomite, tight gas sands or coal, nanometer scale resolution is needed to resolve the 3D-pore structure, which controls the flow and trapping of fluids in the rocks. Such resolutions cannot be achieved with existing tomographic technologies. A new 3D imaging method, based on serial sectioning and using the Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technology has been developed. FIB allows for the milling of layers as thin as 10 nanometers by using accelerated Ga+ ions to sputter atoms from the sample surface. After each milling step, as a new surface is exposed, a 2D image of this surface is generated. Next, the 2D images are stacked to reconstruct the 3D pore or grain structure. Resolutions as high as 10 nm are achievable using such a technique. A new robust method of pore-scale fluid flow modeling has been developed and applied to sandstone and chalk samples. The method uses direct morphological analysis of the pore space to characterize the petrophysical properties of diverse formations. Not only petrophysical properties (porosity, permeability, relative permeability and capillary pressures) can be computed but also flow processes, such as those encountered in various IOR approaches, can be simulated. Petrophysical properties computed with the new method using the new FIB data will be presented. Present study is a part of the development of an Electronic Core Laboratory at LBNL/UCB.

  14. Micro/Nano-pore Network Analysis of Gas Flow in Shale Matrix.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengwei; Hu, Liming; Meegoda, Jay N; Gao, Shengyan

    2015-01-01

    The gas flow in shale matrix is of great research interests for optimized shale gas extraction. The gas flow in the nano-scale pore may fall in flow regimes such as viscous flow, slip flow and Knudsen diffusion. A 3-dimensional nano-scale pore network model was developed to simulate dynamic gas flow, and to describe the transient properties of flow regimes. The proposed pore network model accounts for the various size distributions and low connectivity of shale pores. The pore size, pore throat size and coordination number obey normal distribution, and the average values can be obtained from shale reservoir data. The gas flow regimes were simulated using an extracted pore network backbone. The numerical results show that apparent permeability is strongly dependent on pore pressure in the reservoir and pore throat size, which is overestimated by low-pressure laboratory tests. With the decrease of reservoir pressure, viscous flow is weakening, then slip flow and Knudsen diffusion are gradually becoming dominant flow regimes. The fingering phenomenon can be predicted by micro/nano-pore network for gas flow, which provides an effective way to capture heterogeneity of shale gas reservoir.

  15. Micro/Nano-pore Network Analysis of Gas Flow in Shale Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengwei; Hu, Liming; Meegoda, Jay N.; Gao, Shengyan

    2015-01-01

    The gas flow in shale matrix is of great research interests for optimized shale gas extraction. The gas flow in the nano-scale pore may fall in flow regimes such as viscous flow, slip flow and Knudsen diffusion. A 3-dimensional nano-scale pore network model was developed to simulate dynamic gas flow, and to describe the transient properties of flow regimes. The proposed pore network model accounts for the various size distributions and low connectivity of shale pores. The pore size, pore throat size and coordination number obey normal distribution, and the average values can be obtained from shale reservoir data. The gas flow regimes were simulated using an extracted pore network backbone. The numerical results show that apparent permeability is strongly dependent on pore pressure in the reservoir and pore throat size, which is overestimated by low-pressure laboratory tests. With the decrease of reservoir pressure, viscous flow is weakening, then slip flow and Knudsen diffusion are gradually becoming dominant flow regimes. The fingering phenomenon can be predicted by micro/nano-pore network for gas flow, which provides an effective way to capture heterogeneity of shale gas reservoir. PMID:26310236

  16. Triggered pore-forming agents

    DOEpatents

    Bayley, Hagan; Walker, Barbara J.; Chang, Chung-yu; Niblack, Brett; Panchal, Rekha

    1998-01-01

    An inactive pore-forming agent which is activated to lytic function by a condition such as pH, light, heat, reducing potential, or metal ion concentration, or substance such as a protease, at the surface of a cell.

  17. Metal structures with parallel pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherfey, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Four methods of fabricating metal plates having uniformly sized parallel pores are studied: elongate bundle, wind and sinter, extrude and sinter, and corrugate stack. Such plates are suitable for electrodes for electrochemical and fuel cells.

  18. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jennings, J C

    1995-11-01

    Physicians who care for female patients cannot avoid the frequent complaint of abnormal uterine bleeding. Knowledge of the disorders that cause this problem can prevent serious consequences in many patients and improve the quality of life for many others. The availability of noninvasive and minimally invasive diagnostic studies and minimally invasive surgical treatment has revolutionized management of abnormal uterine bleeding. Similar to any other disorder, the extent to which a physician manages abnormal uterine bleeding depends on his or her own level of comfort. When limitations of either diagnostic or therapeutic capability are encountered, consultation and referral should be used to the best interest of patients.

  19. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  20. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  1. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  2. Construction of Nuclear Envelope Shape by a High-Genus Vesicle with Pore-Size Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear pores have an approximately uniform distribution in the nuclear envelope of most living cells. Hence, the morphology of the nuclear envelope is a spherical stomatocyte with a high genus. We have investigated the morphology of high-genus vesicles under pore-size constraint using dynamically triangulated membrane simulations. Bending-energy minimization without volume or other constraints produces a circular-cage stomatocyte, where the pores are aligned in a circular line on an oblate bud. As the pore radius is reduced, the circular-pore alignment is more stabilized than a random pore distribution on a spherical bud. However, we have clarified the conditions for the formation of a spherical stomatocyte: a small perinuclear volume, osmotic pressure within nucleoplasm, and repulsion between the pores. When area-difference elasticity is taken into account, the formation of cylindrical or budded tubules from the stomatocyte and discoidal stomatocyte is found.

  3. Construction of Nuclear Envelope Shape by a High-Genus Vesicle with Pore-Size Constraint.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-23

    Nuclear pores have an approximately uniform distribution in the nuclear envelope of most living cells. Hence, the morphology of the nuclear envelope is a spherical stomatocyte with a high genus. We have investigated the morphology of high-genus vesicles under pore-size constraint using dynamically triangulated membrane simulations. Bending-energy minimization without volume or other constraints produces a circular-cage stomatocyte, where the pores are aligned in a circular line on an oblate bud. As the pore radius is reduced, the circular-pore alignment is more stabilized than a random pore distribution on a spherical bud. However, we have clarified the conditions for the formation of a spherical stomatocyte: a small perinuclear volume, osmotic pressure within nucleoplasm, and repulsion between the pores. When area-difference elasticity is taken into account, the formation of cylindrical or budded tubules from the stomatocyte and discoidal stomatocyte is found. PMID:27558725

  4. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Information Page Synonym(s): Hydrocephalus - Normal Pressure Table ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus? Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is an abnormal ...

  5. Pore-scale Modelling of Capillarity in Swelling Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Sweijen, T.; Nikooee, E.; Chareyre, B.

    2015-12-01

    Capillarity in granular porous media is a common and important phenomenon in earth materials and industrial products, and therefore has been studied extensively. To model capillarity in granular porous media, one needs to go beyond current models which simulate either two-phase flow in porous media or mechanical behaviour in granular media. Current pore-scale models for two-phase flow such as pore-network models are tailored for rigid pore-skeletons, even though in many applications, namely hydro-mechanical coupling in soils, printing, and hygienic products, the porous structure does change during two-phase flow. On the other hand, models such as Discrete Element Method (DEM), which simulate the deformable porous media, have mostly been employed for dry or saturated granular media. Here, the effects of porosity change and swelling on the retention properties was studied, for swelling granular materials. A pore-unit model that was capable to construct the capillary pressure - saturation curve was coupled to DEM. Such that the capillary pressure - saturation curve could be constructed for varying porosities and amounts of absorbed water. The study material was super absorbent polymer particles, which are capable to absorb water 10's to 200 times their initial weight. We have simulated quasi-static primary imbibition for different porosities and amounts of absorbed water. The results reveal a 3 dimensional surface between capillary pressure, saturation, and porosity, which can be normalized by means of the entry pressure and the effective water saturation to a unique curve.

  6. Methods for pore water extraction from unsaturated zone tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scofield, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    Assessing the performance of the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, requires an understanding of the chemistry of the water that moves through the host rock. The uniaxial compression method used to extract pore water from samples of tuffaceous borehole core was successful only for nonwelded tuff. An ultracentrifugation method was adopted to extract pore water from samples of the densely welded tuff of the proposed repository horizon. Tests were performed using both methods to determine the efficiency of pore water extraction and the potential effects on pore water chemistry. Test results indicate that uniaxial compression is most efficient for extracting pore water from nonwelded tuff, while ultracentrifugation is more successful in extracting pore water from densely welded tuff. Pore water splits collected from a single nonwelded tuff core during uniaxial compression tests have shown changes in pore water chemistry with increasing pressure for calcium, chloride, sulfate, and nitrate. Pore water samples collected from the intermediate pressure ranges should prevent the influence of re-dissolved, evaporative salts and the addition of ion-deficient water from clays and zeolites. Chemistry of pore water splits from welded and nonwelded tuffs using ultracentrifugation indicates that there is no substantial fractionation of solutes.

  7. Protein osmotic pressure gradients and microvascular reflection coefficients.

    PubMed

    Drake, R E; Dhother, S; Teague, R A; Gabel, J C

    1997-08-01

    Microvascular membranes are heteroporous, so the mean osmotic reflection coefficient for a microvascular membrane (sigma d) is a function of the reflection coefficient for each pore. Investigators have derived equations for sigma d based on the assumption that the protein osmotic pressure gradient across the membrane (delta II) does not vary from pore to pore. However, for most microvascular membranes, delta II probably does vary from pore to pore. In this study, we derived a new equation for sigma d. According to our equation, pore-to-pore differences in delta II increase the effect of small pores and decrease the effect of large pores on the overall membrane osmotic reflection coefficient. Thus sigma d for a heteroporous membrane may be much higher than previously derived equations indicate. Furthermore, pore-to-pore delta II differences increase the effect of plasma protein osmotic pressure to oppose microvascular fluid filtration. PMID:9277520

  8. Neutrons measure phase behavior in pores at Angstrom size

    SciTech Connect

    Bardoel, Agatha A; Melnichenko, Yuri B

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have measured the phase behavior of green house gases in pores at the Angstrom-level, using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor. Yuri Melnichenko, an instrument scientist on the General Purpose Small Angle Neutron Scattering (GP SANS) Diffractometer at ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor, his postdoctoral associate Lilin He and collaborators Nidia Gallego and Cristian Contescu from the Material Sciences Division (ORNL) were engaged in the work. They were studying nanoporous carbons to assess their attractiveness as storage media for hydrogen, with a view to potential use for on-board hydrogen storage for transportation applications. Nanoporous carbons can also serve as electrode material for supercapacitors and batteries. The researchers successfully determined that the most efficiently condensing pore size in a carbon nanoporous material for hydrogen storage is less than one nanometer. In a paper recently published by the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the collaborators used small angle neutron scattering to study how hydrogen condenses in small pores at ambient temperature. They discovered that the surface-molecule interactions create internal pressures in pores that may exceed the external gas pressure by a factor of up to 50. 'This is an exciting result,' Melnichenko said, 'as you achieve extreme densification in pores 'for free', i.e. without spending any energy. These results can be used to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored to maximize hydrogen storage capacities.' Another important factor that defines the adsorption capacity of sub-nanometer pores is their shape. In order to get accurate structural information and maximize sorption capacity, it is important that pores are small and of approximately uniform size. In collaboration with Drexel University's Yury Gogotsi who supplied the samples, Melnichenko and his collaborators used the GP SANS

  9. Estimation and modeling of coal pore accessibility using small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rui; Liu, Shimin; Bahadur, Jitendra; Elsworth, Derek; Melnichenko, Yuri; He, Lilin; Wang, Yi

    2015-09-04

    Gas diffusion in coal is controlled by nano-structure of the pores. The interconnectivity of pores not only determines the dynamics of gas transport in the coal matrix but also influences the mechanical strength. In this study, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was employed to quantify pore accessibility for two coal samples, one of sub-bituminous rank and the other of anthracite rank. Moreover, a theoretical pore accessibility model was proposed based on scattering intensities under both vacuum and zero average contrast (ZAC) conditions. Our results show that scattering intensity decreases with increasing gas pressure using deuterated methane (CD4) at low Q values for both coals. Pores smaller than 40 nm in radius are less accessible for anthracite than sub-bituminous coal. On the contrary, when the pore radius is larger than 40 nm, the pore accessibility of anthracite becomes larger than that of sub-bituminous coal. Only 20% of pores are accessible to CD4 for anthracite and 37% for sub-bituminous coal, where the pore radius is 16 nm. For these two coals, pore accessibility and pore radius follows a power-law relationship.

  10. Estimation and modeling of coal pore accessibility using small angle neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Rui; Liu, Shimin; Bahadur, Jitendra; Elsworth, Derek; Melnichenko, Yuri; He, Lilin; Wang, Yi

    2015-09-04

    Gas diffusion in coal is controlled by nano-structure of the pores. The interconnectivity of pores not only determines the dynamics of gas transport in the coal matrix but also influences the mechanical strength. In this study, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was employed to quantify pore accessibility for two coal samples, one of sub-bituminous rank and the other of anthracite rank. Moreover, a theoretical pore accessibility model was proposed based on scattering intensities under both vacuum and zero average contrast (ZAC) conditions. Our results show that scattering intensity decreases with increasing gas pressure using deuterated methane (CD4) at low Qmore » values for both coals. Pores smaller than 40 nm in radius are less accessible for anthracite than sub-bituminous coal. On the contrary, when the pore radius is larger than 40 nm, the pore accessibility of anthracite becomes larger than that of sub-bituminous coal. Only 20% of pores are accessible to CD4 for anthracite and 37% for sub-bituminous coal, where the pore radius is 16 nm. For these two coals, pore accessibility and pore radius follows a power-law relationship.« less

  11. Prediction of subsidence: Relationship between lowering of formation pressure and subsidence due to fluid withdrawal

    SciTech Connect

    Serebryakov, V.A.; Chilingar, G.V.

    2000-06-01

    Abnormally low formation pressures develop in petroleum reservoirs during intensive oil and gas production or in aquifers as a result of water extraction. A simple method is presented for calculating (predicting) the amount of compaction (and resulting subsidence) from the pressure drop in formation due to production, i.e., the increase in the effective pressure p{sub e} (p{sub e} = p{sub t} {minus} p{sub p}, where p{sub t} is the total overburden pressure and p{sub p} is the fluid or pore pressure). This work is based on extensive data collected in Russia. For example, large petroliferous areas in Western Siberia became marshlands as a result of fluid withdrawal. One should remember that sophisticated methods, such as FSMT (direct measurement of rock compaction by wireline tools in situ) and GPS (measurement of surface subsidence by satellite microwave Doppler techniques), are not yet available in many areas of the world.

  12. [Hair shaft abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Itin, P H; Düggelin, M

    2002-05-01

    Hair shaft disorders may lead to brittleness and uncombable hair. In general the hair feels dry and lusterless. Hair shaft abnormalities may occur as localized or generalized disorders. Genetic predisposition or exogenous factors are able to produce and maintain hair shaft abnormalities. In addition to an extensive history and physical examination the most important diagnostic examination to analyze a hair shaft problem is light microscopy. Therapy of hair shaft disorders should focus to the cause. In addition, minimizing traumatic influences to hair shafts, such as dry hair with an electric dryer, permanent waves and dyes is important. A short hair style is more suitable for such patients with hair shaft disorders.

  13. Triggered pore-forming agents

    DOEpatents

    Bayley, H.; Walker, B.J.; Chang, C.Y.; Niblack, B.; Panchal, R.

    1998-07-07

    An inactive pore-forming agent is revealed which is activated to lytic function by a condition such as pH, light, heat, reducing potential, or metal ion concentration, or substance such as a protease, at the surface of a cell. 30 figs.

  14. Membrane pores induced by magainin

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtke, S.J.; He, Ke; Heller, W.T.

    1996-10-29

    Magainin, found in the skin of Xenopus laevis, belongs to a broad class of antimicrobial peptides which kill bacteria by permeabilizing the cytoplasmic membrane but do not lyse eukaryotic cells. The 23-residue peptide has been shown to form an amphiphilic helix when associated with membranes. However, its molecular mechanism of action has been controversial. Oriented circular dichroism has detected helical magainin oriented perpendicular to the plane of the membrane at high peptide concentrations, but Raman, fluorescence, differential scanning calorimetry, and NMR all indicate that the peptide is associated with the head groups of the lipid bilayer. Here we show that neutron in-plane scattering detects pores formed by magainin 2 in membranes only when a substantial fraction of the peptide is oriented perpendicular to the membrane. The pores are almost twice as large as the alamethicin pores. On the basis of the in-plane scattering data, we propose a toroidal (or wormhole) model, which differs from the barrel-stave model of alamethicin in that the lipid bends back on itself like the inside of a torus. The bending requires a lateral expansion in the head group region of the bilayer. Magainin monomers play the role of fillers in the expansion region thereby stabilizing the pore. This molecular configuration is consistent with all published magainin data. 33 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Precipitation in pores: A geochemical frontier

    DOE PAGES

    Stack, Andrew G.

    2015-07-29

    velocities (Yoon et al. 2012). An improved ability to synthesize idealized porous media will allow for tailored control of pore distributions, mineralogy and will allow more reproducible results. This in turn may allow us to isolate specific processes without the competing and obfuscatory effects that hinder generalization of observations when working with solely natural samples. It is likely that no one single experiment, or simulation technique will provide the key discoveries: to make substantive progress will require a collaborative effort to understand the interplay between fluid transport and geochemistry. Finally, where rock fracturing and elevated pressures are of concern, an understanding and capability to model geomechanical properties are necessary (Scherer 1999).« less

  16. Precipitation in pores: A geochemical frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Stack, Andrew G.

    2015-07-29

    (Yoon et al. 2012). An improved ability to synthesize idealized porous media will allow for tailored control of pore distributions, mineralogy and will allow more reproducible results. This in turn may allow us to isolate specific processes without the competing and obfuscatory effects that hinder generalization of observations when working with solely natural samples. It is likely that no one single experiment, or simulation technique will provide the key discoveries: to make substantive progress will require a collaborative effort to understand the interplay between fluid transport and geochemistry. Finally, where rock fracturing and elevated pressures are of concern, an understanding and capability to model geomechanical properties are necessary (Scherer 1999).

  17. Pore morphologies of root induced biopores from single pore to network scale investigated by XRCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peth, Stephan; Wittig, Marlen C.; Uteau Puschmann, Daniel; Pagenkemper, Sebastian; Haas, Christoph; Holthusen, Dörthe; Horn, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    Biopores are assumed to be an important factor for nutrient acquisition by providing biologically highly active soil-root interfaces to re-colonizing roots and controlling oxygen and water flows at the pedon scale and within the rhizosphere through the formation of branching channel networks which potentially enhance microbial turnover processes. Characteristic differences in pore morphologies are to be expected depending on the genesis of biopores which, for example, can be earthworm-induced or root-induced or subsequently modified by one of the two. Our understanding of biophysical interactions between plants and soil can be significantly improved by quantifying 3D biopore architectures across scales ranging from single biopores to pedon scale pore networks and linking pore morphologies to microscale measurements of transport processes (e.g. oxygen diffusion). While a few studies in the past have investigated biopore networks on a larger scale yet little is known on the micro-morphology of root-induces biopores and their associated rhizosphere. Also little data is available on lateral transport of oxygen through the rhizosphere which will strongly influence microbial turnover processes and consequently control the release and uptake of nutrients. This paper highlights results gathered within a research unit on nutrient acquisition from the subsoil. Here we focus on X-ray microtomography (XRCT) studies ranging from large soil columns (70 cm length and 20 cm diameter) to individual biopores and its surrounding rhizosphere. Samples were collected from sites with different preceding crops (fescue, chicory, alfalfa) and various cropping durations (1-3 years). We will present an approach for quantitative image analysis combined with micro-sensor measurements of oxygen diffusion and spatial gradients of O2 partial pressures to relate pore structure with transport functions. Implications of various biopore architectures for the accessibility of nutrient resources in

  18. Kinetics of Diffusion and Convection in 3.2-Å Pores

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, David G.

    1973-01-01

    The kinetics of transport in pores the size postulated for cell membranes has been investigated by direct computer simulation (molecular dynamics). The simulated pore is 11 Å long and 3.2 Å in radius, and the water molecules are modeled by hard, smooth spheres, 1 Å in radius. The balls are given an initial set of positions and velocities (with an average temperature of 313° K) and the computer then calculates their exact paths through the pore. Two different conditions were used at the ends of the pore. In one, the ends are closed and the balls are completely isolated. In the other, the ball density in each end region is fixed so that a pressure difference can be established and a net convective flow produced. The following values were directly measured in the simulated experiments: net and diffusive (oneway) flux; pressure, temperature, and diffusion coefficients in the pore; area available for diffusion; probability distribution of ball positions in the pore; and the interaction between diffusion and convection. The density, viscosity, and diffusion coefficients in the bulk fluid were determined from the theory of hard sphere dense gases. From these values, the “equivalent” pore radius (determined by the same procedure that is used for cell membranes) was computed and compared with the physical pore radius of the simulated pore. PMID:4702015

  19. Network representation of pore scale imagery for percolation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klise, K. A.; McKenna, S. A.; Read, E.; Karpyn, Z. T.; Celauro, J.

    2012-12-01

    Multiphase flow under capillary dominated flow regimes is driven by an intricate relationship between pore geometry, material and fluid properties. In this research, high-resolution micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging experiments are used to investigate structural and surface properties of bead packs, and how they influence percolation pathways. Coreflood experiments use a mix of hydrophilic and hydrophobic beads to track the influence of variable contact angle on capillary flow. While high-resolution CT images can render micron scale representation of the pore space, data must be upscaled to capture pore and pore throat geometry for use in percolation models. In this analysis, the pore space is upscaled into a network representation based on properties of the medial axis. Finding the medial axis using micron scale images is computationally expensive. Here, we compare the efficiency and accuracy of medial axes using erosion-based and watershed algorithms. The resulting network representation is defined as a ball-and-stick model which represents pores and pore throats. The ball-and-stick model can be further reduced by eliminating sections of the network that fall below a capillary pressure threshold. In a system of mixed hydrophilic and hydrophobic beads, capillary pressure can change significantly throughout the network based on the interaction between surface and fluid properties. The upscaled network representations are used in percolation models to estimate transport pathway. Current results use a basic percolation model that sequentially fills neighboring pores with the highest potential. Future work will expand the percolation model to include additional mechanics, such as trapping, vacating pores, and viscous fingering. Results from the coreflood experiments will be used to validate upscaling techniques and percolation models. Preliminary results show that the relative strength of water-wet and oil-wet surfaces has a significant impact on percolation

  20. A robust model for pore-water chemistry of clayrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaucher, E. C.; Tournassat, C.; Pearson, F. J.; Blanc, P.; Crouzet, C.; Lerouge, C.; Altmann, S.

    2009-11-01

    The chemistry of pore water is an important property of clayrocks being considered as host rocks for long-term storage of radioactive waste. It may be difficult, if not impossible, to obtain water samples for chemical analysis from such rocks because of their low hydraulic conductivity. This paper presents an approach for calculating the pore-water compositions of clayrocks from laboratory-measured properties of core samples, including their leachable Cl and SO 4 concentrations and analysed exchangeable cations, and from mineral and cation exchange equilibria based on the formation mineralogy. New core sampling and analysis procedures are presented that reduce or quantify side reactions such as sample oxidation (e.g. pyrite) and soluble mineral dissolution (celestite, SrSO 4) that affect measured SO 4 concentrations and exchangeable cation distributions. The model considers phase equilibria only with minerals that are observed in the formation including the principal clay phases. The model has been used to calculate the composition of mobile pore water in the Callovo-Oxfordian clayrock and validated against measurements of water chemistry made in an underground research laboratory in that formation. The model reproduces the measured, in situ pore-water composition without any estimated parameters. All required parameters can be obtained from core sample analysis. We highlight the need to consider only those mineral phases which can be shown to be in equilibrium with contacting pore water. The consequence of this is that some conceptual models available in the literature appear not to be appropriate for modelling clayrocks, particularly those considering high temperature and/or high pressure detrital phases as chemical buffers of pore water. The robustness of our model with respect to uncertainties in the log K values of clay phases is also demonstrated. Large uncertainties in log K values for clay minerals have relatively small effects on modelled pore

  1. Pore network model of electrokinetic transport through charged porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obliger, Amaël; Jardat, Marie; Coelho, Daniel; Bekri, Samir; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2014-04-01

    We introduce a method for the numerical determination of the steady-state response of complex charged porous media to pressure, salt concentration, and electric potential gradients. The macroscopic fluxes of solvent, salt, and charge are computed within the framework of the Pore Network Model (PNM), which describes the pore structure of the samples as networks of pores connected to each other by channels. The PNM approach is used to capture the couplings between solvent and ionic flows which arise from the charge of the solid surfaces. For the microscopic transport coefficients on the channel scale, we take a simple analytical form obtained previously by solving the Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Stokes equations in a cylindrical channel. These transport coefficients are upscaled for a given network by imposing conservation laws for each pores, in the presence of macroscopic gradients across the sample. The complex pore structure of the material is captured by the distribution of channel diameters. We investigate the combined effects of this complex geometry, the surface charge, and the salt concentration on the macroscopic transport coefficients. The upscaled numerical model preserves the Onsager relations between the latter, as expected. The calculated macroscopic coefficients behave qualitatively as their microscopic counterparts, except for the permeability and the electro-osmotic coupling coefficient when the electrokinetic effects are strong. Quantitatively, the electrokinetic couplings increase the difference between the macroscopic coefficients and the corresponding ones for a single channel of average diameter.

  2. Ion exclusion by sub-2-nm carbon nanotube pores

    PubMed Central

    Fornasiero, Francesco; Park, Hyung Gyu; Holt, Jason K.; Stadermann, Michael; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica

    2008-01-01

    Biological pores regulate the cellular traffic of a large variety of solutes, often with high selectivity and fast flow rates. These pores share several common structural features: the inner surface of the pore is frequently lined with hydrophobic residues, and the selectivity filter regions often contain charged functional groups. Hydrophobic, narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes can provide a simplified model of membrane channels by reproducing these critical features in a simpler and more robust platform. Previous studies demonstrated that carbon nanotube pores can support a water flux comparable to natural aquaporin channels. Here, we investigate ion transport through these pores using a sub-2-nm, aligned carbon nanotube membrane nanofluidic platform. To mimic the charged groups at the selectivity region, we introduce negatively charged groups at the opening of the carbon nanotubes by plasma treatment. Pressure-driven filtration experiments, coupled with capillary electrophoresis analysis of the permeate and feed, are used to quantify ion exclusion in these membranes as a function of solution ionic strength, pH, and ion valence. We show that carbon nanotube membranes exhibit significant ion exclusion that can be as high as 98% under certain conditions. Our results strongly support a Donnan-type rejection mechanism, dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, whereas steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. PMID:18539773

  3. Postseismic rebound in fault step-overs caused by pore fluid flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peltzer, G.; Rosen, P.; Rogez, F.; Hudnut, K.

    1996-01-01

    Near-field strain induced by large crustal earthquakes results in changes in pore fluid pressure that dissipate with time and produce surface deformation. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry revealed several centimeters of postseismic uplift in pull-apart structures and subsidence in a compressive jog along the Landers, California, 1992 earthquake surface rupture, with a relaxation time of 270 ?? 45 days. Such a postseismic rebound may be explained by the transition of the Poisson's ratio of the deformed volumes of rock from undrained to drained conditions as pore fluid flow allows pore pressure to return to hydrostatic equilibrium.

  4. Storage of hydrogen at 303 K in graphite slitlike pores from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Tanaka, Hideki; Hołyst, Robert; Kaneko, Katsumi; Ohmori, Takumi; Miyamoto, Junichi

    2005-09-15

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were used for the modeling of the hydrogen adsorption in idealized graphite slitlike pores. In all simulations, quantum effects were included through the Feynman and Hibbs second-order effective potential. The simulated surface excess isotherms of hydrogen were used for the determination of the total hydrogen storage, density of hydrogen in graphite slitlike pores, distribution of pore sizes and volumes, enthalpy of adsorption per mole, total surface area, total pore volume, and average pore size of pitch-based activated carbon fibers. Combining experimental results with simulations reveals that the density of hydrogen in graphite slitlike pores at 303 K does not exceed 0.014 g/cm(3), that is, 21% of the liquid-hydrogen density at the triple point. The optimal pore size for the storage of hydrogen at 303 K in the considered pore geometry depends on the pressure of storage. For lower storage pressures, p < 30MPa, the optimal pore width is equal to a 2.2 collision diameter of hydrogen (i.e., 0.65 nm), whereas, for p congruent with 50MPa, the pore width is equal to an approximately 7.2 collision diameter of hydrogen (i.e., 2.13 nm). For the wider pores, that is, the pore width exceeds a 7.2 collision diameter of hydrogen, the surface excess of hydrogen adsorption is constant. The importance of quantum effects is recognized in narrow graphite slitlike pores in the whole range of the hydrogen pressure as well as in wider ones at high pressures of bulk hydrogen. The enthalpies of adsorption per mole for the considered carbonaceous materials are practically constant with hydrogen loading and vary within the narrow range q(st) congruent with 7.28-7.85 kJ/mol. Our systematic study of hydrogen adsorption at 303 K in graphite slitlike pores gives deep insight into the timely problem of hydrogen storage as the most promising source of clean energy. The calculated maximum storage of hydrogen is equal to approximately 1.4 wt

  5. Abnormal grain growth in Ni-5at.%W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, M.; Belde, M.; Barrales Mora, L.; de Boer, N.; Gilges, S.; Klöwer, J.; Gottstein, G.

    2012-12-01

    The growth of abnormally large grains in textured Ni-5at.%W substrates for high-temperature superconductors deteriorates the sharp texture of these materials and thus has to be avoided. Therefore the growth of abnormal grains is investigated and how it is influenced by the grain orientation and the annealing atmosphere. Texture measurements and grain growth simulations show that the grain orientation only matters so far that a high-angle grain boundary exists between an abnormally growing grain and the Cube-orientated matrix grains. The annealing atmosphere has a large influence on abnormal grain growth which is attributed to the differences in oxygen partial pressure.

  6. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  7. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  8. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  9. DESIGN INFORMATION ON FINE PORE AERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies were conducted over several years at municipal wastewater treatment plants employing line pore diffused aeration systems. These studies were designed to produce reliable information on the performance and operational requirements of fine pore devices under process ...

  10. Development of a sintering methodology through abnormal glow discharge for manufacturing metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, S.; Pineda, Y.; Sarmiento, A.; López, A.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a sintering methodology is presented by using abnormal glow discharge to metal matrix composites (MMC), consisting of 316 steel, reinforced with titanium carbide (TiC). The wear behaviour of these compounds was evaluated according to the standard ASTM G 99 in a tribometer pin-on-disk. The effect of the percentage of reinforcement (3, 6, and 9%), with 40 minutes of mixing in the planetary mill is analysed, using compaction pressure of 700MPa and sintering temperature of 1,100°C±5°C, gaseous atmosphere of H2 - N2, and sintering time of 30 minutes. As a result of the research, it shows that the best behaviour against wear is obtained when the MMC contains 6% TiC. Under this parameter the lowest percentage of pores and the lowest coefficient of friction are achieved, ensuring that the incorporation of ceramic particles (TiC) in 316 austenitic steel matrix significantly improves the wear resistance. Also, it is shown that it is possible to sinter such materials using the abnormal glow discharge, being a novel and effective method in which the working temperature is reached in a short time.

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides in Toroidal and Cylindrical Pores

    PubMed Central

    Mihajlovic, Maja

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small, usually cationic peptides, which permeabilize biological membranes. Their mechanism of action is still not well understood. Here we investigate the preference of alamethicin and melittin for pores of different shapes, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the peptides in pre-formed toroidal and cylindrical pores. When an alamethicin hexamer is initially embedded in a cylindrical pore, at the end of the simulation the pore remains cylindrical or closes if glutamines in the N-termini are not located within the pore. On the other hand, when a melittin tetramer is embedded in toroidal pore or in a cylindrical pore, at the end of the simulation the pore is lined both with peptides and lipid headgroups, and, thus, can be classified as a toroidal pore. These observations agree with the prevailing views that alamethicin forms barrel-stave pores whereas melittin forms toroidal pores. Both alamethicin and melittin form amphiphilic helices in the presence of membranes, but their net charge differs; at pH ~7, the net charge of alamethicin is −1 whereas that of melittin is +5. This gives rise to stronger electrostatic interactions of melittin with membranes than those of alamethicin. The melittin tetramer interacts more strongly with lipids in the toroidal pore than in the cylindrical one, due to more favorable electrostatic interactions. PMID:20403332

  12. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  13. Pore structure of the activated coconut shell charcoal carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, E.; Nasbey, H.; Yuniarti, B. D. P.; Nurmayatri, Y.; Fahdiana, J.; Budi, A. S.

    2014-09-01

    The development of activated carbon from coconut shell charcoal has been investigated by using physical method to determine the influence of activation parameters in term of temperature, argon gas pressure and time period on the pore structure of the activated carbon. The coconut shell charcoal was produced by pyrolisis process at temperature of about 75 - 150 °C for 6 hours. The charcoal was activated at various temperature (532, 700 and 868 °C), argon gas pressure (6.59, 15 and 23.4 kgf/cm2) and time period of (10, 60 and 120 minutes). The results showed that the pores size were reduced and distributed uniformly as the activation parameters are increased.

  14. Electron microscopic time-lapse visualization of surface pore filtration on particulate matter trapping process.

    PubMed

    Sanui, Ryoko; Hanamura, Katsunori

    2016-09-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to dynamically visualize the particulate matter (PM) trapping process on diesel particulate filter (DPF) walls at a micro scale as 'time-lapse' images corresponding to the increase in pressure drop simultaneously measured through the DPF. This visualization and pressure drop measurement led to the conclusion that the PM trapping in surface pores was driven by PM bridging and stacking at constricted areas in porous channels. This caused a drastic increase in the pressure drop during PM accumulation at the beginning of the PM trapping process. The relationship between the porous structure of the DPF and the depth of the surface pore was investigated in terms of the porosity distribution and PM penetration depth near the wall surface with respect to depth. The pressure drop calculated with an assumed surface pore depth showed a good correspondence to the measured pressure drop.

  15. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  17. Abnormal ionization in sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Juan; An, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Sonoluminescence is a complex phenomenon, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The present study reveals that an abnormal ionization process is likely to be present in the sonoluminescing bubble. To fit the experimental data of previous studies, we assume that the ionization energies of the molecules and atoms in the bubble decrease as the gas density increases and that the decrease of the ionization energy reaches about 60%-70% as the bubble flashes, which is difficult to explain by using previous models. Project supported by the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120002110031) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11334005).

  18. Pore formation by Cry toxins.

    PubMed

    Soberón, Mario; Pardo, Liliana; Muñóz-Garay, Carlos; Sánchez, Jorge; Gómez, Isabel; Porta, Helena; Bravo, Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacteria produce insecticidal Cry and Cyt proteins used in the biological control of different insect pests. In this review, we will focus on the 3d-Cry toxins that represent the biggest group of Cry proteins and also on Cyt toxins. The 3d-Cry toxins are pore-forming toxins that induce cell death by forming ionic pores into the membrane of the midgut epithelial cells in their target insect. The initial steps in the mode of action include ingestion of the protoxin, activation by midgut proteases to produce the toxin fragment and the interaction with the primary cadherin receptor. The interaction of the monomeric CrylA toxin with the cadherin receptor promotes an extra proteolytic cleavage, where helix alpha-1 of domain I is eliminated and the toxin oligomerization is induced, forming a structure of 250 kDa. The oligomeric structure binds to a secondary receptor, aminopeptidase N or alkaline phosphatase. The secondary receptor drives the toxin into detergent resistant membrane microdomains formingpores that cause osmotic shock, burst of the midgut cells and insect death. Regarding to Cyt toxins, these proteins have a synergistic effect on the toxicity of some Cry toxins. Cyt proteins are also proteolytic activated in the midgut lumen of their target, they bind to some phospholipids present in the mosquito midgut cells. The proposed mechanism of synergism between Cry and Cyt toxins is that Cyt1Aa function as a receptor for Cry toxins. The Cyt1A inserts into midgut epithelium membrane and exposes protein regions that are recognized by Cry11Aa. It was demonstrated that this interaction facilitates the oligomerization of Cry11Aa and also its pore formation activity.

  19. Pore accessibility by methane and carbon dioxide in coal as determined by neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    He, Lilin; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Mastalerz, Maria; Sakurovs, Richard; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell; Blach, Tomasz P

    2012-01-01

    Contrast-matching ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques were used for the first time to determine both the total pore volume and the fraction of the pore volume that is inaccessible to deuterated methane, CD{sub 4}, in four bituminous coals in the range of pore sizes between {approx}10 {angstrom} and {approx}5 {micro}m. Two samples originated from the Illinois Basin in the U.S.A., and the other two samples were commercial Australian bituminous coals from the Bowen Basin. The total and inaccessible porosity were determined in each coal using both Porod invariant and the polydisperse spherical particle (PDSP) model analysis of the scattering data acquired from coals both in vacuum and at the pressure of CD{sub 4}, at which the scattering length density of the pore-saturating fluid is equal to that of the solid coal matrix (zero average contrast pressure). The total porosity of the coals studied ranged from 7 to 13%, and the volume of pores inaccessible to CD{sub 4} varied from {approx}13 to {approx}36% of the total pore volume. The volume fraction of inaccessible pores shows no correlation with the maceral composition; however, it increases with a decreasing total pore volume. In situ measurements of the structure of one coal saturated with CO{sub 2} and CD{sub 4} were conducted as a function of the pressure in the range of 1-400 bar. The neutron scattering intensity from small pores with radii less than 35 {angstrom} in this coal increased sharply immediately after the fluid injection for both gases, which demonstrates strong condensation and densification of the invading subcritical CO{sub 2} and supercritical methane in small pores.

  20. Abnormal hematological indices in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Qamar, Amir A; Grace, Norman D

    2009-01-01

    Abnormalities in hematological indices are frequently encountered in cirrhosis. Multiple causes contribute to the occurrence of hematological abnormalities. Recent studies suggest that the presence of hematological cytopenias is associated with a poor prognosis in cirrhosis. The present article reviews the pathogenesis, incidence, prevalence, clinical significance and treatment of abnormal hematological indices in cirrhosis. PMID:19543577

  1. Correlation between gas permeability and pore structure of coal matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Yang, J.; Gao, F.; Li, Y.; Niu, H.; Gao, H.

    2012-04-01

    The sequestration of CO2 in unminable coal seams represents a promising option for CO2 geologic storage, because the injected CO2 may enhance coalbed methane recovery (CO2-ECBM), which could partly offset the costs of the storage process. The CO2-ECBM technology is based on the relative affinity of CO2 and CH4 to coals under given pressure and temperature conditions. The excess sorption capacity of coals for CO2 is generally higher than the sorption capacity for methane. The coal seams are characterized by a dual porosity structure including cleat and matrix pores. The cleats in the coal seams are considered as highways for gas and water flow, while the matrix is the storage location of gas by adsorption. The slow transport process of gas in coal matrix may constrain the efficiency of the displacement of CH4 by CO2 due to the compacted pore structure of the coal matrix. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the correlation between permeability of gas and pore structure in coal matrix is crucial for the CO2-ECBM processes. Yangquan coals originating from the Qingshui basin, which contains gas-rich coals in China, were selected for the tests in this study. Yangquan coals are classified as anthracite. In order to avoid the influence of coal cleats on fluid flow, small coal plugs (~6 mm in diameter, ~13 mm in length) were selected and fixed in the sample compartment by special glue. A test system for simultaneously measuring adsorption-porosity-permeability on the coal matrix blocks in its free state is constructed. The permeability of gas and porosity in coal plugs to He under different gas pressure and temperature conditions were simultaneously investigated. The permeability and excess sorption capacity of the coal plugs to He, N2, CH4 and CO2 were compared at a constant gas pressure and temperature. It is expected that gas break through a cleat-plug is much faster than that through a coal matrix-plug. Different sample plugs with the different pore structure results

  2. Novel biometrics based on nose pore recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shangling; Ohnuma, Kazuhiko; Liu, Zhi; Mei, Liangmo; Kawada, Akira; Monma, Tomoyuki

    2009-05-01

    We present a new member of the biometrics family-i.e., nose pores-which uses particularly interesting properties of nose pores as a basis for noninvasive biometric assessment. The pore distribution on the nose is stable and easily inspected. More important, nose pore distribution features are distinguishable between different persons. Thus, these features can be used for personal identification. However, little work has been done on nose pores as a biometric identifier. We have developed an end-to-end recognition system based on nose pore features. We also made use of a database of nose pore images obtained over a long period to examine the performance of nose pores as a biometric identifier. This research showed that the nose pore is a promising candidate for biometric identification and deserves further research. The experimental results based on the unique nose pores database demonstrated that nose pores can give an 88.07% correct recognition rate for biometric identification, which showed this biometric identifier's feasibility and effectiveness.

  3. Measuring kinetic drivers of pneumolysin pore structure.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Robert J C; Sonnen, Andreas F-P

    2016-05-01

    Most membrane attack complex-perforin/cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) proteins are thought to form pores in target membranes by assembling into pre-pore oligomers before undergoing a pre-pore to pore transition. Assembly during pore formation is into both full rings of subunits and incomplete rings (arcs). The balance between arcs and full rings is determined by a mechanism dependent on protein concentration in which arc pores arise due to kinetic trapping of the pre-pore forms by the depletion of free protein subunits during oligomerization. Here we describe the use of a kinetic assay to study pore formation in red blood cells by the MACPF/CDC pneumolysin from Streptococcus pneumoniae. We show that cell lysis displays two kinds of dependence on protein concentration. At lower concentrations, it is dependent on the pre-pore to pore transition of arc oligomers, which we show to be a cooperative process. At higher concentrations, it is dependent on the amount of pneumolysin bound to the membrane and reflects the affinity of the protein for its receptor, cholesterol. A lag occurs before cell lysis begins; this is dependent on oligomerization of pneumolysin. Kinetic dissection of cell lysis by pneumolysin demonstrates the capacity of MACPF/CDCs to generate pore-forming oligomeric structures of variable size with, most likely, different functional roles in biology. PMID:26906727

  4. Diffusive resistance of avian eggshell pores.

    PubMed

    Tøien, O; Paganelli, C V; Rahn, H; Johnson, R R

    1988-12-01

    Resistance to gas diffusion through the avian eggshell resides in the microscopic pores which penetrate the shell. We calculated the resistance to water vapor diffusion of individual pores in the shells of 23 species of avian eggs, based on measurements of pore dimensions taken from drawings of 321 pore casts published by Tyler (1962, 1964, 1965) and Tyler and Simkiss (1959). Diffusive resistances were calculated from Fick's first law, using a 100-segment model of each pore. In addition, we added 2 series resistances, calculated from Stefan's law, to account for boundary layer resistances at the inner and outer pore apertures. Convective resistances for the same 100-segment model were computed from Poiseuille's law. A special, symmetrically branching model is presented for the diffusive resistance of the branched pores of ostrich eggshells, based on the drawings of Tyler and Simkiss (1959). The total aperture resistance was less than 6.2% of total pore resistance, while the outside aperture effect was on average only 1.5%. The calculated average pore conductance for all species was 5.4 micrograms (day Torr)-1, about three times higher than the average value of 1.6 micrograms (day Torr)-1 obtained by dividing measured shell conductance by the number of pores (Ar and Rahn, 1985). A possible explanation for this discrepancy is advanced. However, it is to be noted that in spite of the discrepancy, both calculated and functional values of pore conductance appear to be independent of egg mass.

  5. METHODS FOR PORE WATER EXTRACTION FROM UNSATURATED ZONE TUFF, YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect

    K.M. SCOFIELD

    2006-03-22

    Assessing the performance of the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, requires an understanding of the chemistry of the water that moves through the host rock. The uniaxial compression method used to extract pore water from samples of tuffaceous borehole core was successful only for nonwelded tuff. An ultracentrifugation method was adopted to extract pore water from samples of the densely welded tuff of the proposed repository horizon. Tests were performed using both methods to determine the efficiency of pore water extraction and the potential effects on pore water chemistry. Test results indicate that uniaxial compression is most efficient for extracting pore water from nonwelded tuff, while ultracentrifugation is more successful in extracting pore water from densely welded tuff. Pore water splits taken from a single nonwelded tuff core during uniaxial compression tests have shown changes in pore water chemistry with increasing pressure for calcium, chloride, sulfate, and nitrate, while the chemistry of pore water splits from welded and nonwelded tuffs using ultracentrifugation indicates that there is no significant fractionation of solutes.

  6. Spirometric abnormalities among welders

    SciTech Connect

    Rastogi, S.K.; Gupta, B.N.; Husain, T.; Mathur, N.; Srivastava, S. )

    1991-10-01

    A group of manual welders age group 13-60 years having a mean exposure period of 12.4 {plus minus} 1.12 years were subjected to spirometry to evaluate the prevalence of spirometric abnormalities. The welders showed a significantly higher prevalence of respiratory impairment than that observed among the unexposed controls as a result of exposure to welding gases which comprised fine particles of lead, zinc, chromium, and manganese. This occurred despite the lower concentration of the pollutants at the work place. In the expose group, the smoking welders showed a prevalence of respiratory impairment significantly higher than that observed in the nonsmoking welders. The results of the pulmonary function tests showed a predominantly restrictive type of pulmonary impairment followed by a mixed ventilatory defect among the welders. The effect of age on pulmonary impairment was not discernible. Welders exposed for over 10 years showed a prevalence of respiratory abnormalities significantly higher than those exposed for less than 10 years. Smoking also had a contributory role.

  7. Nondestructive technique for the characterization of the pore size distribution of soft porous constructs for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Safinia, Laleh; Mantalaris, Athanasios; Bismarck, Alexander

    2006-03-28

    Polymer scaffolds tailored for tissue engineering applications possessing the desired pore structure require reproducible fabrication techniques. Nondestructive, quantitative methods for pore characterization are required to determine the pore size and its distribution. In this study, a promising alternative to traditional pore size characterization techniques is presented. We introduce a quantitative, nondestructive and inexpensive method to determine the pore size distribution of large soft porous solids based on the on the displacement of a liquid, that spreads without limits though a porous medium, by nitrogen. The capillary pressure is measured and related to the pore sizes as well as the pore size distribution of the narrowest bottlenecks of the largest interconnected pores in a porous medium. The measured pore diameters correspond to the narrowest bottleneck of the largest pores connecting the bottom with the top surface of a given porous solid. The applicability and reproducibility of the breakthrough technique is demonstrated on two polyurethane foams, manufactured using the thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) process, with almost identical overall porosity (60-70%) but very different pore morphology. By selecting different quenching temperatures to induce polymer phase separation, the pore structure could be regulated while maintaining the overall porosity. Depending on the quenching temperature, the foams exhibited either longitudinally oriented tubular macropores interconnected with micropores or independent macropores connected to adjacent pores via openings in the pore walls. The pore size and its distribution obtained by the breakthrough test were in excellent agreement to conventional characterization techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy combined with image analysis, BET technique, and mercury intrusion porosimetry. This technique is suitable for the characterization of the micro- and macropore structure of soft porous solids

  8. Glycosylation of the nuclear pore

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Kohler, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    The O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) post-translational modification was first discovered thirty years ago and is highly concentrated in the nuclear pore. In the years since the discovery of this single sugar modification, substantial progress has been made in understanding the biochemistry of O-GlcNAc and its regulation. Nonetheless, O-GlcNAc modification of proteins continues to be overlooked, due in large part to the lack of reliable methods available for its detection. Recently, a new crop of immunological and chemical detection reagents has changed the research landscape. Using these tools, approximately 1000 O-GlcNAc-modified proteins have been identified. While other forms of glycosylation are typically associated with extracellular proteins, O-GlcNAc is abundant on nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. In particular, phenylalanine-glycine (FG) nucleoporins (NUPs) are heavily O-GlcNAc-modified. Recent experiments are beginning to provide insight into the functional implications of O-GlcNAc modification on certain proteins, but its role in the nuclear pore has remained enigmatic. However, tantalizing new results suggest that O-GlcNAc may play roles in regulating nucleocytoplasmic transport. PMID:24423194

  9. In-situ X-ray Synchrotron Microtomography: Real Time Pore Structure Evolution during Olivine Carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Fusseis, F.; Lisabeth, H. P.; Xiao, X.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral carbonation has been proposed as a promising method for long-term, secure sequestration of carbon dioxide. In porous rocks, fluid-rock interactions can significantly alter the pore space and thus exert important controls over the rate and extent of carbonation. We constructed an x-ray transparent pressure cell [Fusseis et al., 2013] to investigate the real time pore structure evolution during mineral carbonation in porous olivine aggregates. In each experiment, a sintered olivine sample was subjected to a confining pressure of 13 MPa and a pore pressure of 10 MPa, with a sodium bicarbonate solution (NaHCO3 at 1.5 M) as pore fluid. At these pressure conditions, the cell was heated to 473 K. Constant pressure and temperature conditions were maintained during the length of the experiments, lasting 72-120 hours. Using a polychromatic beam in the 2-BM upstream hutch at the Advanced Photon Source, 3-dimensional (3-D) microtomography data were collected in 20 seconds with 30-minute interval. A novel phase retrieval reconstruction algorithm [Paganin et al., 2002] was used to reconstruct microtomographic datasets with a voxel size of ~1.1 micron. The microtomography images at different stages of the carbonation process reveal progressive growth of new crystals in the pore space. Integration of a x-ray transparent pressure vessel with flow through capacity and 3-D microtomography provides a novel research direction of studying the coupled chemo-hydro-thermal-mechanical processes in rocks.

  10. A thermodynamic approach to Alamethicin pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Asif; Lazaridis, Themis

    2013-01-01

    The structure and energetics of alamethicin Rf30 monomer to nonamer in cylindrical pores of 5 to 11 Å radius are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations in an implicit membrane model that includes the free energy cost of acyl chain hydrophobic area exposure. Stable, low energy pores are obtained for certain combinations of radius and oligomeric number. The trimer and the tetramer formed 6 Å pores that appear closed while the larger oligomers formed open pores at their optimal radius. The hexamer in an 8 Å pore and the octamer in an 11 Å pore give the lowest effective energy per monomer. However, all oligomers beyond the pentamer have comparable energies, consistent with the observation of multiple conductance levels. The results are consistent with the widely accepted “barrel-stave” model. The N terminal portion of the molecule exhibits smaller tilt with respect to the membrane normal than the C terminal portion, resulting in a pore shape that is a hybrid between a funnel and an hourglass. Transmembrane voltage has little effect on the structure of the oligomers but enhances or decreases their stability depending on its orientation. Antiparallel bundles are lower in energy than the commonly accepted parallel ones and could be present under certain experimental conditions. Dry aggregates (without an aqueous pore) have lower average effective energy than the corresponding aggregates in a pore, suggesting that alamethicin pores may be excited states that are stabilized in part by voltage and in part by the ion flow itself. PMID:24071593

  11. A Rare Stapes Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Kanona, Hala; Virk, Jagdeep Singh; Kumar, Gaurav; Chawda, Sanjiv; Khalil, Sherif

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to increase awareness of rare presentations, diagnostic difficulties alongside management of conductive hearing loss and ossicular abnormalities. We report the case of a 13-year-old female reporting progressive left-sided hearing loss and high resolution computed tomography was initially reported as normal. Exploratory tympanotomy revealed an absent stapedius tendon and lack of connection between the stapes superstructure and footplate. The footplate was fixed. Stapedotomy and stapes prosthesis insertion resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 50 dB. A review of world literature was performed using MedLine. Middle ear ossicular discontinuity can result in significant conductive hearing loss. This can be managed effectively with surgery to help restore hearing. However, some patients may not be suitable or decline surgical intervention and can be managed safely conservatively. PMID:25628909

  12. Pore Characteristics of Chitosan Scaffolds Studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tully-Dartez, Stephanie; Cardenas, Henry E.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a novel approach, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), was used to examine the pore characteristics of chitosan scaffolds under aqueous conditions. The EIS was run with a constant current of 0.1 mA with the frequency sweep of 106 to 10−4 Hz. The resulting complex impedance measurement was then used to calculate porosity, which was determined to be 71%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), two commonly used methods for scaffold characterization, were used to independently evaluate the pore characteristics and compare with that of EIS. The SEM and MIP were performed and analyzed under standard conditions. The pore diameter values found by SEM and MIP are 107 μm and 82 μm, respectively, indicating that both the image-based (SEM) and pressure-based (MIP) analyses provide similar results. The porosity of 73% calculated by MIP is comparable to that of EIS. From these results, it can be suggested that EIS, a relatively nondestructive test, is able to obtain comparable data on pore characteristics, as compared to SEM and MIP. The advantage of the EIS as an nondestructive test is that it can be performed under physiologically relevant conditions, whereas SEM and MIP require dry samples and vacuum conditions for measurement. These benefits make EIS a viable option for the characterization and long-term observation of tissue-engineered scaffolds. PMID:19580421

  13. Inertial effects during irreversible meniscus reconfiguration in angular pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Andrea; Lunati, Ivan

    2014-12-01

    In porous media, the dynamics of the invading front between two immiscible fluids is often characterized by abrupt reconfigurations caused by local instabilities of the interface. As a prototype of these phenomena we consider the dynamics of a meniscus in a corner as it can be encountered in angular pores. We investigate this process in detail by means of direct numerical simulations that solve the Navier-Stokes equations in the pore space and employ the Volume of Fluid method (VOF) to track the evolution of the interface. We show that for a quasi-static displacement, the numerically calculated surface energy agrees well with the analytical solutions that we have derived for pores with circular and square cross sections. However, the spontaneous reconfigurations are irreversible and cannot be controlled by the injection rate: they are characterized by the amount of surface energy that is spontaneously released and transformed into kinetic energy. The resulting local velocities can be orders of magnitude larger than the injection velocity and they induce damped oscillations of the interface that possess their own time scales and depend only on fluid properties and pore geometry. In complex media (we consider a network of cubic pores) reconfigurations are so frequent and oscillations last long enough that increasing inertial effects leads to a different fluid distribution by influencing the selection of the next pore to be invaded. This calls into question simple pore-filling rules based only on capillary forces. Also, we demonstrate that inertial effects during irreversible reconfigurations can influence the work done by the external forces that is related to the pressure drop in Darcy's law. This suggests that these phenomena have to be considered when upscaling multiphase flow because local oscillations of the menisci affect macroscopic quantities and modify the constitutive relationships to be used in macro-scale models. These results can be extrapolated to other

  14. Pore-throat sizes in sandstones, siltstones, and shales: Reply

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    2011-01-01

    In his discussion of my article (Nelson, 2009), W. K. Camp takes issue with the concept that buoyancy is not the dominant force in forming and maintaining the distribution of gas in tight-gas accumulations (Camp, 2011). I will restrict my response to the issues he raised regarding buoyant versus nonbuoyant drive and to a few comments regarding water saturation and production. I claim that the pressure generated in petroleum source rocks (Pg), instead of the buoyancy pressure (Pb), provides the energy to charge most tight sandstones with gas. The arguments are fourfold: (1) buoyant columns of sufficient height seldom exist in low-permeability sand-shale sequences, (2) tight-gas systems display a pressure profile that declines instead of increases upward, (3) gas is pervasive in overpressured systems, and (4) source rocks can generate pore pressures sufficiently high to charge tight sandstones.

  15. Open-pore polyurethane product

    DOEpatents

    Jefferson, R.T.; Salyer, I.O.

    1974-02-17

    The method is described of producing an open-pore polyurethane foam having a porosity of at least 50% and a density of 0.1 to 0.5 g per cu cm, and which consists of coherent spherical particles of less than 10 mu diam separated by interconnected interstices. It is useful as a filter and oil absorbent. The product is admirably adapted to scavenging of crude oil from the surface of seawater by preferential wicking. The oil-soaked product may then be compressed to recover the oil or burned for disposal. The crosslinked polyurethane structures are remarkably solvent and heat-resistance as compared with known thermoplastic structures. Because of their relative inertness, they are useful filters for gasoline and other hydrocarbon compounds. (7 claims)

  16. Nuclear Pore Proteins and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Songli; Powers, Maureen A.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of macromolecules, a highly specific and tightly regulated process, occurs exclusively through the Nuclear Pore Complex. This immense structure is assembled from approximately 30 proteins, termed nucleoporins. Here we discuss the four nucleoporins that have been linked to cancers, either through elevated expression in tumors (Nup88) or through involvement in chromosomal translocations that encode chimeric fusion proteins (Tpr, Nup98, Nup214). In each case we consider the normal function of the nucleoporin and its translocation partners, as well as what is known about their mechanistic contributions to carcinogenesis, particularly in leukemias. Studies of nucleoporin-linked cancers have revealed novel mechanisms of oncogenesis and. in the future, should continue to expand our understanding of cancer biology. PMID:19577736

  17. Fine structures at pore boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, L.; Quintero Noda, C.; Joshi, C.; Rakesh, S.; Pandya, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present high resolution observations of fine structures at pore boundaries. The inner part of granules towards umbra show dark striations which evolve into a filamentary structure with dark core and `Y' shape at the head of the filaments. These filaments migrate into the umbra similar to penumbral filaments. These filaments show higher temperature, lower magnetic field strength and more inclined field compared to the background umbra. The optical depth stratification of physical quantities suggests their similarity with penumbral filaments. However, line-of-sight velocity pattern is different from penumbral filaments where they show downflows in the deeper layers of the atmosphere while the higher layers show upflows. These observations show filamentation in a simple magnetic configuration.

  18. Fabrication of porous aluminium with directional pores through thermal decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, H.; Y Kim, S.; Park, J. S.

    2009-05-01

    Lotus-type porous metals were fabricated by unidirectional solidification in pressurized gas atmosphere. The elongated pres are evolved by insoluble gas resulted from the solubility gap between liquid and solid when the melt is solidified. Recently we developed a novel fabrication technique, in which gas compounds are used as a source of dissolving gas instead of the high pressure. In the present work this gas compound method was applied to fabrication of lotus aluminium. Hydrogen decomposed from calcium hydroxide, sodium bicarbonate and titanium hydride evolves cylindrical pores in aluminium. The porosity is about 20%. The pore size decreases and the pore number density increases with increasing amount of calcium hydroxide, which is explained by increase in pore nucleation sites.

  19. The one-dimensional compression method for extraction of pore water from unsaturated tuff and effects on pore-water chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, J.D.; Burger, P.A.; Yang, L.C.

    1997-12-31

    Study of the hydrologic system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, requires extraction of pore-water samples from unsaturated tuff bedrock. Two generations of compression cells have been designed and tested for extracting representative, unaltered pore-water samples from unsaturated tuff cores. The one-dimensional compression cell has a maximum compressive stress rating of 552 MPa. Results from 86 tests show that the minimum degree of saturation for successful extraction of pore water was about 14% for non welded tuff and about 61% for densely welded tuff. The high-pressure, one-dimensional compression cell has a maximum compressive stress rating of 827 MPa. Results from 109 tests show that the minimum degree of saturation for successful extraction of pore water was about 7.5% for non welded tuff and about 34% for densely welded tuff. Geochemical analyses show that, in general, there is a decrease in ion concentration of pore waters as extraction pressures increase. Only small changes in pore-water composition occur during the one-dimensional extraction test.

  20. Atomic Structure of Graphene Subnanometer Pores.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Alex W; Lee, Gun-Do; He, Kuang; Gong, Chuncheng; Chen, Qu; Yoon, Euijoon; Kirkland, Angus I; Warner, Jamie H

    2015-12-22

    The atomic structure of subnanometer pores in graphene, of interest due to graphene's potential as a desalination and gas filtration membrane, is demonstrated by atomic resolution aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy. High temperatures of 500 °C and over are used to prevent self-healing of the pores, permitting the successful imaging of open pore geometries consisting of between -4 to -13 atoms, all exhibiting subnanometer diameters. Picometer resolution bond length measurements are used to confirm reconstruction of five-membered ring projections that often decorate the pore perimeter, knowledge which is used to explore the viability of completely self-passivated subnanometer pore structures; bonding configurations where the pore would not require external passivation by, for example, hydrogen to be chemically inert.

  1. New general pore size distribution model by classical thermodynamics application: Activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lordgooei, M.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2001-01-01

    A model is developed using classical thermodynamics to characterize pore size distributions (PSDs) of materials containing micropores and mesopores. The thermal equation of equilibrium adsorption (TEEA) is used to provide thermodynamic properties and relate the relative pore filling pressure of vapors to the characteristic pore energies of the adsorbent/adsorbate system for micropore sizes. Pore characteristic energies are calculated by averaging of interaction energies between adsorbate molecules and adsorbent pore walls as well as considering adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. A modified Kelvin equation is used to characterize mesopore sizes by considering variation of the adsorbate surface tension and by excluding the adsorbed film layer for the pore size. The modified-Kelvin equation provides similar pore filling pressures as predicted by density functional theory. Combination of these models provides a complete PSD of the adsorbent for the micropores and mesopores. The resulting PSD is compared with the PSDs from Jaroniec and Choma and Horvath and Kawazoe models as well as a first-order approximation model using Polanyi theory. The major importance of this model is its basis on classical thermodynamic properties, less simplifying assumptions in its derivation compared to other methods, and ease of use.

  2. Microtomography and pore-scale modeling of two-phase Fluid Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, D.; Tomutsa, L.; Benson, S.; Patzek, T.

    2010-10-19

    Synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography (micro CT) at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) line 8.3.2 at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory produces three-dimensional micron-scale-resolution digital images of the pore space of the reservoir rock along with the spacial distribution of the fluids. Pore-scale visualization of carbon dioxide flooding experiments performed at a reservoir pressure demonstrates that the injected gas fills some pores and pore clusters, and entirely bypasses the others. Using 3D digital images of the pore space as input data, the method of maximal inscribed spheres (MIS) predicts two-phase fluid distribution in capillary equilibrium. Verification against the tomography images shows a good agreement between the computed fluid distribution in the pores and the experimental data. The model-predicted capillary pressure curves and tomography-based porosimetry distributions compared favorably with the mercury injection data. Thus, micro CT in combination with modeling based on the MIS is a viable approach to study the pore-scale mechanisms of CO{sub 2} injection into an aquifer, as well as more general multi-phase flows.

  3. Modeling the interaction of ultrasound with pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yichi; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Parthasarathi, Sanjai

    1991-01-01

    Factors that affect ultrasonic velocity sensing of density during consolidation of metal powders are examined. A comparison is made between experimental results obtained during the final stage of densification and the predictions of models that assume either a spherical or a spheroidal pore shape. It is found that for measurements made at low frequencies during the final stage of densification, relative density (pore fraction) and pore shape are the two most important factors determining the ultrasonic velocity, the effect of pore size is negligible.

  4. Effects of pore-size and shape distributions on diffusion pore imaging by nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuder, Tristan Anselm; Laun, Frederik Bernd

    2015-08-01

    In medical imaging and porous media research, NMR diffusion measurements are extensively used to investigate the structure of diffusion restrictions such as cell membranes. Recently, several methods have been proposed to unambiguously determine the shape of arbitrary closed pores or cells filled with an NMR-visible medium by diffusion experiments. The first approach uses a combination of a long and a short diffusion-weighting gradient pulse, while the other techniques employ short gradient pulses only. While the eventual aim of these methods is to determine pore-size and shape distributions, the focus has been so far on identical pores. Thus, the aim of this work is to investigate the ability of these different methods to resolve pore-size and orientation distributions. Simulations were performed comparing the various pore imaging techniques employing different distributions of pore size and orientation and varying timing parameters. The long-narrow gradient profile is most advantageous to investigate pore distributions, because average pore images can be directly obtained. The short-gradient methods suppress larger pores or induce a considerable blurring. Moreover, pore-shape-specific artifacts occur; for example, the central part of a distribution of cylinders may be largely underestimated. Depending on the actual pore distribution, short-gradient methods may nonetheless yield good approximations of the average pore shape. Furthermore, the application of short-gradient methods can be advantageous to differentiate whether pore-size distributions or intensity distributions, e.g., due to surface relaxation, are predominant.

  5. Pore network simulation of the dissolution of a single-component wetting nonaqueous phase liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W.; Ioannidis, M. A.

    2003-10-01

    Soil wettability has been recently recognized as a factor that can dramatically influence the dissolution behavior of residual nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPL). A NAPL that wets the solid surface is trapped within the smaller pores and along the corners of pores invaded by water (the nonwetting phase). We present a two-dimensional network simulator of wetting NAPL dissolution, inspired by observations of this process in transparent glass micromodels. The network model idealizes the pore space as a network of cubic pores connected by square tubes, following respective distributions. In accordance with micromodel observations, capillary equilibrium is assumed to exist between NAPL-water interfaces along pore corners and within pores. Advection and diffusion of the organic dissolved in the aqueous phase, as well as dissolution mass transfer from residual NAPL, are explicitly accounted for in the model. Pores filled with NAPL are invaded at a rate which is controlled by mass transfer from dissolving thick NAPL films in pore corners and in order of increasing entry capillary pressure, resulting in quasi-static drainage and fingering of the aqueous phase. Loss of NAPL continuity due to rupture of thick NAPL films and heterogeneity are found to affect profoundly the dissolution behavior, resulting in concentration tailing. The network simulator reproduces qualitatively the behavior observed in column experiments with oil-wet media.

  6. Upscaling of Transport Parameters in Reacting Porous Media; Pore-Scale Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoof, Amir; Nick, Hamidreza M.; Hassanizadeh, Majid

    2014-05-01

    Pore scale modelling provides a tool for upscaling of flow and transport parameters in porous media. We use PoreFlow, a pore-network modelling tool capable of simulating fluid flow and multi-component reactive and adsorptive transport under saturated and variably saturated conditions. Simulations include: pore network generator, drainage simulator, calculation of pressure and velocity distributions, and modelling of reactive solute transport accounting for advection and diffusion. The pore space is represented using a multi-directional pore-network capable of capturing the random structure of a given porous media with user-defined directional connectivities for anisotropic pore structures. The chemical reactions can occur within the liquid phase, as well as between the liquid and solid phases which may result in an evolution of porosity and permeability. Potential applications are geological sequestration of CO2, affecting the reservoir rock transport properties as well as influencing the wellbore integrity, and acid-gas injection during enhanced oil recovery. Other examples will be provided, showing use of pore-scale information to determine macro-scale properties such as permeability-porosity changes, solute dispersivity, adsorption reaction coefficients, effective diffusion and tortuosity. Such information can be used as constitutive relations within continuum scale governing equations to model physical and chemical processes more accurately at the larger scales.

  7. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  8. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy. PMID:27347227

  9. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  10. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential). PMID:261653

  11. Abortion for fetal abnormality.

    PubMed

    Maclean, N E

    1979-07-25

    I wish to thank Dr. Pauline Bennett for her reply (NZ Med J, 13 June). She has demonstrated well that in dealing with sensitive difficult issues such as abortion for fetal abnormality, the one thing the doctor is not recommended to do is to speak the truth] I am prompted to write this letter for 2 reasons. Firstly, the excellent letter written by Dr. A. M. Rutherford (NZ Med J, 13 June) on the subject of abortion stated, "The most disturbing feature about the whole controversy is the 'blunting of our conscience'." When the doctors are not encouraged to be honest with patients then indeed our conscience has been blunted. Secondly, I watched Holocaust last night, and cannot refrain from stating that I see frightening parallels between our liberal abortion policy and the activities of the Nazis. As I watched the "mental patients" being herded into the shed for gassing by the polite, tidy, white coated medical staff, and then heard the compassionate, sensitive, letter of the hospital authorities to the relatives of the deceased, the parallel became obvious. The mental patients were weak, defenseless, burdensome, and uneconomic; the unborn are weak, defenseless, burdensome, and uneconomic. The hospital authority's letter was acceptable in many ways, acceptable except that its words bore no relation to the truth. It is said that the "first casualty of war is the truth". Whether that war involves the Jews, or the insane, or the unborn, the statement would seem correct.

  12. Fabrication, properties, and applications of porous metals with directional pores.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Lotus-type porous metals with aligned long cylindrical pores are fabricated by unidirectional solidification from the melt with a dissolved gas such as hydrogen, nitrogen, or oxygen. The gas atoms can be dissolved into the melt via a pressurized gas atmosphere or thermal decomposition of gaseous compounds. Three types of solidification techniques have been developed: mold casting, continuous zone melting, and continuous casting techniques. The last method is superior from the viewpoint of mass production of lotus metals. The observed anisotropic behaviors of the mechanical properties, sound absorption, and thermal conductivity are inherent to the anisotropic porous structure. In particular, the remarkable anisotropy in the mechanical strength is attributed to the stress concentration around the pores aligned perpendicular to the loading direction. Heat sinks are a promising application of lotus metals due to the high cooling performance with a large heat transfer.

  13. Fabrication, properties, and applications of porous metals with directional pores

    PubMed Central

    NAKAJIMA, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Lotus-type porous metals with aligned long cylindrical pores are fabricated by unidirectional solidification from the melt with a dissolved gas such as hydrogen, nitrogen, or oxygen. The gas atoms can be dissolved into the melt via a pressurized gas atmosphere or thermal decomposition of gaseous compounds. Three types of solidification techniques have been developed: mold casting, continuous zone melting, and continuous casting techniques. The last method is superior from the viewpoint of mass production of lotus metals. The observed anisotropic behaviors of the mechanical properties, sound absorption, and thermal conductivity are inherent to the anisotropic porous structure. In particular, the remarkable anisotropy in the mechanical strength is attributed to the stress concentration around the pores aligned perpendicular to the loading direction. Heat sinks are a promising application of lotus metals due to the high cooling performance with a large heat transfer. PMID:21084772

  14. Open pore structure analysis of lithium bearing ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbel, H.

    1988-07-01

    The analysis of the open pore structure includes mercury porosimetry, helium stereopycnometry, gas permeability and specific surface area measurements. These methods were used in the analysis of different types of Li 2SiO 3 and Li 4SiO 4 specimens whose behaviour is tested under operation conditions in various irradiation experiments. Mercury porosimetry yielded density of the specimens, size distribution of the channels and amount of the open porosity. The correlation between mercury pressure and channel diameter was approximated by the Washburn equation. Density determinations by means of helium stereopycnometry demonstrated the existence of open pore volume below the mercury porosimetry detection. Additional information about the structure of open porosity was obtained by gas permeability measurements evaluated using the Carman relation, which is a generalization of the Hagen-Poiseuille law. This approach correlates structure parameters of the open porosity with permeability coefficients. The specific surface area was determined by applying the BET theory to volumetric nitrogen gas adsorption.

  15. Fabrication, properties, and applications of porous metals with directional pores.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Lotus-type porous metals with aligned long cylindrical pores are fabricated by unidirectional solidification from the melt with a dissolved gas such as hydrogen, nitrogen, or oxygen. The gas atoms can be dissolved into the melt via a pressurized gas atmosphere or thermal decomposition of gaseous compounds. Three types of solidification techniques have been developed: mold casting, continuous zone melting, and continuous casting techniques. The last method is superior from the viewpoint of mass production of lotus metals. The observed anisotropic behaviors of the mechanical properties, sound absorption, and thermal conductivity are inherent to the anisotropic porous structure. In particular, the remarkable anisotropy in the mechanical strength is attributed to the stress concentration around the pores aligned perpendicular to the loading direction. Heat sinks are a promising application of lotus metals due to the high cooling performance with a large heat transfer. PMID:21084772

  16. Laboratory tidal triggering in the presence of pore fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlow, N. M.; Lockner, D. A.; Beeler, N. M.

    2011-12-01

    The physical mechanism by which the low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) that make up tremor are created is poorly understood. In many areas of the world, it is consistently observed that LFEs appear to be strongly tidally modulated, whereas ordinary earthquakes are not (e.g. Thomas et al., Nature, 2009; Vidale et al., JGR, 1998). Here we build upon the work of Lockner and Beeler, JGR, 1999, and Beeler and Lockner, JGR, 2003, which investigated the response of laboratory stick-slip to oscillatory, tide-like loading. These previous experiments determined ranges of amplitude and frequency of the oscillatory loading that resulted in tidally correlated populations, and explained the results in a theoretical framework. Two modes were found: the threshold failure mode in which the necessary amplitude for correlated populations decreased with increasing frequency, and the delayed failure mode in which the amplitude stayed the same or increased with increasing frequency. The frequency of transition between the two modes, which scales with event nucleation time, is predicted to depend on effective stress. This dependence was never tested, since all previous experiments were carried out at one effective stress. The previous experiments were also carried out using room dry samples of Westerly granite. Here we update these results with new experiments on Westerly granite, with the addition of varying effective stress and pore fluid at two pressures. The addition of pore fluid is especially important as pore fluid pressure is thought to be high in LFE regions. We verify the effective stress dependence of the mode transition predicted in Beeler and Lockner, JGR, 2003, allowing extrapolation of the results to other effective stresses. We also find that pore fluid effects become important at high frequencies, when the period of oscillation is comparable to the diffusion time over the sample. These results help constrain the conditions at depth that give rise to tidally modulated LFEs

  17. Detection of abnormalities in a human gait using smart shoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Bae, Joonbum; Tomizuka, Masayoshi

    2008-03-01

    Health monitoring systems require a means for detecting and quantifying abnormalities from measured signals. In this paper, a new method for detecting abnormalities in a human gait is proposed for an improved gait monitoring system for patients with walking problems. In the previous work, we introduced a fuzzy logic algorithm for detecting phases in a human gait based on four foot pressure sensors for each of the right and left foot. The fuzzy logic algorithm detects the gait phases smoothly and continuously, and retains all information obtained from sensors. In this paper, a higher level algorithm for detecting abnormalities in the gait phases obtained from the fuzzy logic is discussed. In the proposed algorithm, two major abnormalities are detected 1) when the sensors measure improper foot pressure patterns, and 2) when the human does not follow a natural sequence of gait phases. For mathematical realization of the algorithm, the gait phases are dealt with by a vector analysis method. The proposed detection algorithm is verified by experiments on abnormal gaits as well as normal gaits. The experiment makes use of the Smart Shoes that embeds four bladders filled with air, the pressure changes in which are detected by pressure transducers.

  18. Haem degradation in abnormal haemoglobins.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S B; Docherty, J C

    1978-01-01

    The coupled oxidation of certain abnormal haemoglobins leads to different bile-pigment isomer distributions from that of normal haemoglobin. The isomer pattern may be correlated with the structure of the abnormal haemoglobin in the neighbourhood of the haem pocket. This is support for haem degradation by an intramolecular reaction. PMID:708385

  19. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Minemura, Masami; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimizu, Yukihiro

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases. PMID:19554648

  20. Electrocardiograph abnormalities revealed during laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Dubrey, Simon William

    2010-01-01

    This brief case presents a well patient in whom an electrocardiograph abnormality consistent with an accessory pathway was found during a routine procedure. We present the electrocardiographs, explain the underlying condition, and consider why the abnormality was revealed in this manner.

  1. Experimental study of the immiscible displacement of shear-thinning fluids in pore networks.

    PubMed

    Tsakiroglou, C D; Theodoropoulou, M; Karoutsos, V; Papanicolaou, D; Sygouni, V

    2003-11-01

    The pore scale mechanisms and network scale transient pattern of the immiscible displacement of a shear-thinning nonwetting oil phase (NWP) by a Newtonian wetting aqueous phase (WP) are investigated. Visualization imbibition experiments are performed on transparent glass-etched pore networks at a constant unfavorable viscosity ratio and varying values of the capillary number (Ca), and equilibrium contact angle (theta(e)). Dispersions of ozokerite in paraffin oil are used as the shear-thinning NWP, and aqueous solutions of PEG colored with methylene blue are used as the Newtonian WP. At high Ca values, the tip splitting and lateral spreading of WP viscous fingers are suppressed; at intermediate Ca values, the primary viscous fingers expand laterally with the growth of smaller capillary fingers; at low Ca values, network spanning clusters of capillary fingers separated by hydraulically conductive noninvaded zones of NWP arise. The spatial distribution of the mobility of shear-thinning NWP over the pore network is very broad. Pore network regions of low NWP mobility are invaded through a precursor advancement/swelling mechanism even at relatively high Ca and theta(e) values; this mechanism leads to irregular interfacial configurations and retention of a substantial amount of NWP along pore walls; it becomes the dominant mechanism in displacements performed at low Ca and theta(e) values. The residual NWP saturation increases and the end WP relative permeability decreases as Ca increases and both become more sensitive to this parameter as the shear-thinning behavior strengthens. The shear-thinning NWP is primarily entrapped in individual pores of the network rather than in clusters of pores bypassed by the WP. At relatively high flow rates, the amplitude of the variations of pressure drop, caused by fluid redistribution in the pore network, increase with shear-thinning strengthening, whereas at low flow rates, the motion of stable and unstable menisci in pores is

  2. Pore-fluid migration and the timing of the 2005 M8.7 Nias earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, K.L.H.; Masterlark, Timothy; Mooney, W.D.

    2011-01-01

    Two great earthquakes have occurred recently along the Sunda Trench, the 2004 M9.2 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake and the 2005 M8.7 Nias earthquake. These earthquakes ruptured over 1600 km of adjacent crust within 3 mo of each other. We quantitatively present poroelastic deformation analyses suggesting that postseismic fluid flow and recovery induced by the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake advanced the timing of the Nias earthquake. Simple back-slip simulations indicate that the megapascal (MPa)-scale pore-pressure recovery is equivalent to 7 yr of interseismic Coulomb stress accumulation near the Nias earthquake hypocenter, implying that pore-pressure recovery of the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake advanced the timing of the Nias earthquake by ~7 yr. That is, in the absence of postseismic pore-pressure recovery, we predict that the Nias earthquake would have occurred in 2011 instead of 2005. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  3. Fabrication of Porous Copper with Directional Pores through Thermal Decomposition of Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hideo; Ide, Takuya

    2008-02-01

    Lotus-type porous copper with aligned long cylindrical pores was fabricated by unidirectional solidification in an argon atmosphere. The hydrogen dissolved in molten copper through thermal decomposition of titanium hydride contained in the mold, which then formed hydrogen gas that evolved into the gas pores in the solidified copper. On the other hand, titanium may form oxides in the melt that serve as nucleation sites for insoluble hydrogen. The porosity and pore size decreased with increasing atmospheric argon pressure during the solidification, which can be explained by the Boyle-Charles law and the possible suppression of the decomposition due to external pressure. The addition of titanium hydride was more effective when it was added just before the melt solidified than when it was added to the melt. Moreover, the thermal decomposition method (TDM) is superior to the conventional fabrication method, which requires high pressure hydrogen gas. Thus, TDM is a promising fabrication technique for various lotus metals.

  4. Effect of Pore Fluid Salinity on Compressibility and Shear Strength Development of Clayey Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Paassen, Leon A.; Gareau, Laurent F.

    Investigations of shear strength, compressibility and moisture content of a recent marine clay in the Caspian Sea showed soil profiles with a lower shear strength and higher moisture content, than expected for a normally consolidated soil. Further, measured preconsolidation pressures were lower than the calculated in-situ effective stress, suggesting that the deposit was underconsolidated. The pore fluid salinity was also measured and showed an increase with depth up to saturation concentration. A research project was carried out to study the effect of pore fluid salinity on shear strength and compressibility of remoulded clays. Results of this study showed that increasing pore fluid salinity caused a decrease of the moisture content for a normally consolidated clayey soil of high plasticity. The remoulded shear strength corresponded with the measured moisture contents. The observed compressive behaviour of these clays is explained using the modified effective stress concept, which considers not only (excess) pore pressure and effective pressure, but also the electrochemical repulsive and attractive forces between the clay particles. The laboratory tests on remoulded clays show opposite results to the measurements on the natural soils. The effects of soil structure are used to explain the differences for the measurements of moisture content, undrained shear strength and preconsolidation pressure. The oedometer test procedure was reviewed and additional tests were performed on natural clay samples from this site. Results showed that the measured pre-consolidation pressure depends largely on the salinity of the permeating fluid used in the oedometer apparatus and suggest that when testing marine clays with very high pore fluid salinity, using a brine solution that closely resembles the pore fluid chemistry yields a measured preconsolidation pressure closer to the known geological stress history.

  5. Pore size effects on the sorption of supercritical carbon dioxide in mesoporous CPG-10 silica

    SciTech Connect

    Rother, Gernot; Krukowski, Elizabeth G; Wallacher, Dirk; Grimm, Nico; Bodnar, Robert J; Cole, David

    2012-01-01

    Excess sorption isotherms of supercritical carbon dioxide in mesoporous CPG-10 silica glasses with nominal pore sizes of 75 (7.5 nm) and 350 (35 nm) were measured gravimetrically at 35 C and 50 C and pressures of 0-200 bar. Formation of broad maxima in the excess sorption was observed at fluid densities below the bulk critical density. Positive values of excess sorption were measured at bulk densities below about 0.65-0.7 g/cm3, whereas zero and negative values were obtained at higher densities, indicating that the interfacial fluid becomes less dense than the corresponding bulk fluid at high fluid densities. A shift of the excess sorption peak position to higher fluid density is found with increasing pore width. The excess sorption of CO2 normalized to the specific surface area is higher for the 35 nm pore size material, suggesting pore confinement effects. Conversely, the pore volume normalized excess sorption is higher for the 7.5 nm pore size material. Assessment of mean pore density reveals regions of constant pore fluid density, located between the excess sorption peak and the adsorption/depletion transition. Both materials exhibit such regions of constant mean pore fluid density as a function of bulk CO2 density at the lower temperature of 35 C, but not at 50 C. The results of this study suggest that the CO2 storage capacity in quartz-rich reservoirs is higher for sites with low temperature and rock textures characterized by narrow pores with high surface to volume ratios.

  6. NUP98 fusion in human leukemia: dysregulation of the nuclear pore and homeodomain proteins.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takuro

    2005-07-01

    NUP98 is fused to a variety of partner genes, including abdominal B-like HOX, in human myeloid and T-cell malignancies via chromosomal translocation involving 11p15. NUP98 encodes a 98-kd nucleoporin that is a component of the nuclear pore complex and functions in nucleocytoplasmic transport, with its N-terminal GLFG repeats used as a docking site for karyopherins. Disruption of NUP98 may affect the nuclear pore function, and the abnormal expression and altered function of fusion partners may also be critical for leukemia development. Recent studies using mouse models expressing NUP98-HOX have confirmed its leukemogenic potential, and cooperative genes for NUP98-HOXA9 in leukemogenesis have been identified in these studies.Thus, the NUP98 chimera is a unique molecule that provides valuable information regarding nuclear pore function and the role of the homeobox protein in leukemogenesis/carcinogenesis.

  7. Characteristics of pore migration controlled by diffusion through the pore-filling fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrishcheva, E.; Renner, J.

    2010-10-01

    We analyze drag and drop of pores filled with a fluid phase, e.g., water or melt, in which the constituting elements of the solid matrix are dissolved. Assuming that the diffusion through the fluid-phase dominates bulk transport kinetics, we address the problem of pore motion and calculate the pore mobility and the critical velocity of elongated and lenticular pores on a grain boundary for arbitrary dihedral angle. The found variations in critical velocity and mobility with dihedral angle are modest for given volume of pores with the two considered geometries. For given pore size, however, the dependence on dihedral angle accounts for several orders of magnitude in pore mobility and critical velocity.

  8. Biliary manometry in choledochal cyst with abnormal choledochopancreatico ductal junction.

    PubMed

    Iwai, N; Tokiwa, K; Tsuto, T; Yanagihara, J; Takahashi, T

    1986-10-01

    Intraoperative manometry of the biliary tract and measurement of amylase levels in choledochal cysts were performed in seven patients, aged 14 months to 5 years, with choledochal cysts, in an investigation of the pathophysiology of the biliary tract. An abnormal choledochopancreatico ductal junction was observed in these seven patients by preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) or intraoperative cholangiograms. All six patients examined showed a high amylase level in the choledochal cyst (5,450 to 46,500 Somogyi Units). The intraoperative manometry of the biliary tract showed that a remarkable high pressure zone as was found in the area of sphincter of Oddi was not found in the area of abnormal choledochopancreatico ductal junction. The pressure recordings also demonstrated that the sphincter of Oddi pressure in the patient with choledochal cyst was increased by gastrin stimulation. On the contrary, no pressure reaction to gastrin or secretin was found in the area of abnormal choledochopancreatic ductal junction. From these results it seems that free reflux of pancreatic juice into the biliary system occurs, and the reflux stream depends upon the pressure gradient between pancreatic ductal pressure and common bile duct pressure because of the lack of a sphincter function at the choledochopancreatico ductal junction.

  9. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  10. Experimental measurement and thermodynamic modeling of the mixed CH4 + C3H8 clathrate hydrate equilibria in silica gel pores: effects of pore size and salinity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungmin; Seo, Yongwon

    2010-06-15

    We measured hydrate phase equilibria for the ternary CH(4) (90%) + C(3)H(8) (10%) + water mixtures in silica gel pores with nominal diameters of 6.0, 15.0, 30.0, and 100.0 nm and for the quaternary CH(4) (90%) + C(3)H(8) (10%) + NaCl + water mixtures of two different NaCl concentrations (3 and 10 wt %) in silica gel pores with nominal diameters of 6.0, 15.0, and 30.0 nm. The CH(4) (90%) + C(3)H(8) (10%) hydrate-water interfacial tension (sigma(HW)) of 42 +/- 3 mJ/m(2) was obtained through the Gibbs-Thomson equation for dissociation within cylindrical pores. With this value, the experimental results were in good agreement with the calculated ones based on the van der Waals and Platteeuw model. A correction term for the capillary effect and a Pitzer model for electrolyte solutions were adopted to calculate the activity of water in the aqueous electrolyte solutions within silica gel pores. At a specified temperature, three-phase H-L(W)-V equilibrium curves of pore hydrates were shifted to higher-pressure regions depending on pore sizes and NaCl concentrations. From the cage-dependent (13)C NMR chemical shifts of enclathrated guest molecules, the mixed CH(4) (90%) + C(3)H(8) (10%) gas hydrate was confirmed to be structure II.

  11. Fusion pore regulation of transmitter release.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Peruchena, Carlos; Navas, Sergio; Montes, María A; Alvarez de Toledo, Guillermo

    2005-09-01

    During the last decade a wealth of new information about the properties of the exocytotic fusion pore is changing our current view of exocytosis. The exocytotic fusion pore, a necessary stage before the full merging of the vesicle membrane with the plasma membrane, is becoming a key cellular structure that might critically control the amount of neurotransmitter released into the synaptic cleft and that can be subjected to control by second messengers and phosphorylated proteins. Fusion pores form, expand to fully merge membranes, or can close leaving an intact and identical synaptic vesicle in place for a new round of exocytosis. Transient formation of fusion pores is the mechanistic representation of the "kiss-and-run" hypothesis of transmitter release and offers new alternatives for synaptic vesicle recycling besides to the classical mechanism mediated by clathrin coat endocytosis. For vesicle recycling transient fusion pores ensures a fast mechanism for maintaining an active pool of synaptic vesicles. The size reached by transient fusion pores and the time spent on the open state can determine the release of subquantal synaptic transmission, which could be a mechanism of synaptic potentiation. In this review we will described the electrophysiological and fluorescence methods that contribute to further explore the biophysical properties of the exocytotic fusion pore and the relevant experiments obtained by these methods.

  12. A USANS/SANS study of the accessibility of pores in the Barnett Shale to methane and water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Sakurovs, Richard; Blach, Tomasz P.; He, Lilin; Melnichenko, Yuri B.; Mildner, David F.; Alcantar-Lopez, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Shale is an increasingly important source of natural gas in the United States. The gas is held in fine pores that need to be accessed by horizontal drilling and hydrofracturing techniques. Understanding the nature of the pores may provide clues to making gas extraction more efficient. We have investigated two Mississippian Barnett Shale samples, combining small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering (USANS) to determine the pore size distribution of the shale over the size range 10 nm to 10 μm. By adding deuterated methane (CD4) and, separately, deuterated water (D2O) to the shale, we have identified the fraction of pores that are accessible to these compounds over this size range. The total pore size distribution is essentially identical for the two samples. At pore sizes >250 nm, >85% of the pores in both samples are accessible to both CD4 and D2O. However, differences in accessibility to CD4 are observed in the smaller pore sizes (~25 nm). In one sample, CD4 penetrated the smallest pores as effectively as it did the larger ones. In the other sample, less than 70% of the smallest pores (4, but they were still largely penetrable by water, suggesting that small-scale heterogeneities in methane accessibility occur in the shale samples even though the total porosity does not differ. An additional study investigating the dependence of scattered intensity with pressure of CD4 allows for an accurate estimation of the pressure at which the scattered intensity is at a minimum. This study provides information about the composition of the material immediately surrounding the pores. Most of the accessible (open) pores in the 25 nm size range can be associated with either mineral matter or high reflectance organic material. However, a complementary scanning electron microscopy investigation shows that most of the pores in these shale samples are contained in the organic components. The neutron scattering results indicate that the pores are

  13. A thermal porosimetry method to estimate pore size distribution in highly porous insulating materials.

    PubMed

    Félix, V; Jannot, Y; Degiovanni, A

    2012-05-01

    Standard pore size determination methods such as mercury porosimetry, nitrogen sorption, microscopy, or x-ray tomography are not always applicable to highly porous, low density, and thus very fragile materials. For this kind of materials, a method based on thermal characterization is proposed. Indeed, the thermal conductivity of a highly porous and insulating medium is significantly dependent on the thermal conductivity of the interstitial gas that depends on both gas pressure and size of the considered pore (Knudsen effect). It is also possible to link the pore size with the thermal conductivity of the medium. Thermal conductivity measurements are realized on specimens placed in an enclosure where the air pressure is successively set to different values varying from 10(-1) to 10(5) Pa. Knowing the global porosity ratio, an effective thermal conductivity model for a two-phase air-solid material based on a combined serial-parallel model is established. Pore size distribution can be identified by minimizing the sum of the quadratic differences between measured values and modeled ones. The results of the estimation process are the volume fractions of the chosen ranges of pore size. In order to validate the method, measurements done on insulating materials are presented. The results are discussed and show that pore size distribution estimated by the proposed method is coherent. PMID:22667640

  14. A thermal porosimetry method to estimate pore size distribution in highly porous insulating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Félix, V.; Jannot, Y.; Degiovanni, A.

    2012-05-01

    Standard pore size determination methods such as mercury porosimetry, nitrogen sorption, microscopy, or x-ray tomography are not always applicable to highly porous, low density, and thus very fragile materials. For this kind of materials, a method based on thermal characterization is proposed. Indeed, the thermal conductivity of a highly porous and insulating medium is significantly dependent on the thermal conductivity of the interstitial gas that depends on both gas pressure and size of the considered pore (Knudsen effect). It is also possible to link the pore size with the thermal conductivity of the medium. Thermal conductivity measurements are realized on specimens placed in an enclosure where the air pressure is successively set to different values varying from 10-1 to 105 Pa. Knowing the global porosity ratio, an effective thermal conductivity model for a two-phase air-solid material based on a combined serial-parallel model is established. Pore size distribution can be identified by minimizing the sum of the quadratic differences between measured values and modeled ones. The results of the estimation process are the volume fractions of the chosen ranges of pore size. In order to validate the method, measurements done on insulating materials are presented. The results are discussed and show that pore size distribution estimated by the proposed method is coherent.

  15. A thermal porosimetry method to estimate pore size distribution in highly porous insulating materials

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, V.; Jannot, Y.; Degiovanni, A.

    2012-05-15

    Standard pore size determination methods such as mercury porosimetry, nitrogen sorption, microscopy, or x-ray tomography are not always applicable to highly porous, low density, and thus very fragile materials. For this kind of materials, a method based on thermal characterization is proposed. Indeed, the thermal conductivity of a highly porous and insulating medium is significantly dependent on the thermal conductivity of the interstitial gas that depends on both gas pressure and size of the considered pore (Knudsen effect). It is also possible to link the pore size with the thermal conductivity of the medium. Thermal conductivity measurements are realized on specimens placed in an enclosure where the air pressure is successively set to different values varying from 10{sup -1} to 10{sup 5} Pa. Knowing the global porosity ratio, an effective thermal conductivity model for a two-phase air-solid material based on a combined serial-parallel model is established. Pore size distribution can be identified by minimizing the sum of the quadratic differences between measured values and modeled ones. The results of the estimation process are the volume fractions of the chosen ranges of pore size. In order to validate the method, measurements done on insulating materials are presented. The results are discussed and show that pore size distribution estimated by the proposed method is coherent.

  16. Pore-scale investigation on stress-dependent characteristics of granular packs and the impact of pore deformation on fluid distribution

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Klise, Katherine A.; Torrealba, Victor A.; Karpyn, Zuleima T.; Crandall, D.

    2015-05-25

    Understanding the effect of changing stress conditions on multiphase flow in porous media is of fundamental importance for many subsurface activities including enhanced oil recovery, water drawdown from aquifers, soil confinement, and geologic carbon storage. Geomechanical properties of complex porous systems are dynamically linked to flow conditions, but their feedback relationship is often oversimplified due to the difficulty of representing pore-scale stress deformation and multiphase flow characteristics in high fidelity. In this work, we performed pore-scale experiments of single- and multiphase flow through bead packs at different confining pressure conditions to elucidate compaction-dependent characteristics of granular packs and their impactmore » on fluid flow. A series of drainage and imbibition cycles were conducted on a water-wet, soda-lime glass bead pack under varying confining stress conditions. Simultaneously, X-ray micro-CT was used to visualize and quantify the degree of deformation and fluid distribution corresponding with each stress condition and injection cycle. Micro-CT images were segmented using a gradient-based method to identify fluids (e.g., oil and water), and solid phase redistribution throughout the different experimental stages. Changes in porosity, tortuosity, and specific surface area were quantified as a function of applied confining pressure. Results demonstrate varying degrees of sensitivity of these properties to confining pressure, which suggests that caution must be taken when considering scalability of these properties for practical modeling purposes. Changes in capillary number with confining pressure are attributed to the increase in pore velocity as a result of pore contraction. Furthermore, this increase in pore velocity was found to have a marginal impact on average phase trapping at different confining pressures.« less

  17. Pore-scale investigation on stress-dependent characteristics of granular packs and the impact of pore deformation on fluid distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Hongkyu; Klise, Katherine A.; Torrealba, Victor A.; Karpyn, Zuleima T.; Crandall, D.

    2015-05-25

    Understanding the effect of changing stress conditions on multiphase flow in porous media is of fundamental importance for many subsurface activities including enhanced oil recovery, water drawdown from aquifers, soil confinement, and geologic carbon storage. Geomechanical properties of complex porous systems are dynamically linked to flow conditions, but their feedback relationship is often oversimplified due to the difficulty of representing pore-scale stress deformation and multiphase flow characteristics in high fidelity. In this work, we performed pore-scale experiments of single- and multiphase flow through bead packs at different confining pressure conditions to elucidate compaction-dependent characteristics of granular packs and their impact on fluid flow. A series of drainage and imbibition cycles were conducted on a water-wet, soda-lime glass bead pack under varying confining stress conditions. Simultaneously, X-ray micro-CT was used to visualize and quantify the degree of deformation and fluid distribution corresponding with each stress condition and injection cycle. Micro-CT images were segmented using a gradient-based method to identify fluids (e.g., oil and water), and solid phase redistribution throughout the different experimental stages. Changes in porosity, tortuosity, and specific surface area were quantified as a function of applied confining pressure. Results demonstrate varying degrees of sensitivity of these properties to confining pressure, which suggests that caution must be taken when considering scalability of these properties for practical modeling purposes. Changes in capillary number with confining pressure are attributed to the increase in pore velocity as a result of pore contraction. Furthermore, this increase in pore velocity was found to have a marginal impact on average phase trapping at different confining pressures.

  18. High temperature ion channels and pores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Xiaofeng (Inventor); Gu, Li Qun (Inventor); Cheley, Stephen (Inventor); Bayley, Hagan (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention includes an apparatus, system and method for stochastic sensing of an analyte to a protein pore. The protein pore may be an engineer protein pore, such as an ion channel at temperatures above 55.degree. C. and even as high as near 100.degree. C. The analyte may be any reactive analyte, including chemical weapons, environmental toxins and pharmaceuticals. The analyte covalently bonds to the sensor element to produce a detectable electrical current signal. Possible signals include change in electrical current. Detection of the signal allows identification of the analyte and determination of its concentration in a sample solution. Multiple analytes present in the same solution may also be detected.

  19. Control of pore size in epoxy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow; Lee, Elizabeth; Kallam, Alekhya; Majumdar, Partha; Dirk, Shawn M.; Gubbins, Nathan; Chisholm, Bret J.; Celina, Mathias Christopher; Bahr, James; Klein, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Both conventional and combinatorial approaches were used to study the pore formation process in epoxy based polymer systems. Sandia National Laboratories conducted the initial work and collaborated with North Dakota State University (NDSU) using a combinatorial research approach to produce a library of novel monomers and crosslinkers capable of forming porous polymers. The library was screened to determine the physical factors that control porosity, such as porogen loading, polymer-porogen interactions, and polymer crosslink density. We have identified the physical and chemical factors that control the average porosity, pore size, and pore size distribution within epoxy based systems.

  20. Enlarged facial pores: an update on treatments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Joanna; Lanoue, Julien; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-07-01

    Enlarged facial pores remain a common dermatologic and cosmetic concern from acne and rosacea, among other conditions, that is difficult to treat due to the multifactorial nature of their pathogenesis and negative impact on patients' quality of life. Enlarged facial pores are primarily treated through addressing associative factors, such as increased sebum production and cutaneous aging. We review the current treatment modalities for enlarged or dense facial pores, including topical retinoids, chemical peels, oral antiandrogens, and lasers and devices, with a focus on newer therapies. PMID:27529707

  1. A new method of evaluating tight gas sands pore structure from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Liang; Mao, Zhi-qiang; Xie, Xiu-hong

    2016-04-01

    Tight gas sands always display such characteristics of ultra-low porosity, permeability, high irreducible water, low resistivity contrast, complicated pore structure and strong heterogeneity, these make that the conventional methods are invalid. Many effective gas bearing formations are considered as dry zones or water saturated layers, and cannot be identified and exploited. To improve tight gas sands evaluation, the best method is quantitative characterizing rock pore structure. The mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves are advantageous in predicting formation pore structure. However, the MICP experimental measurements are limited due to the environment and economy factors, this leads formation pore structure cannot be consecutively evaluated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logs are considered to be promising in evaluating rock pore structure. Generally, to consecutively quantitatively evaluate tight gas sands pore structure, the best method is constructing pseudo Pc curves from NMR logs. In this paper, based on the analysis of lab experimental results for 20 core samples, which were drilled from tight gas sandstone reservoirs of Sichuan basin, and simultaneously applied for lab MICP and NMR measurements, the relationships of piecewise power function between nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transverse relaxation T2 time and pore-throat radius Rc are established. A novel method, which is used to transform NMR reverse cumulative curve as pseudo capillary pressure (Pc) curve is proposed, and the corresponding model is established based on formation classification. By using this model, formation pseudo Pc curves can be consecutively synthesized. The pore throat radius distribution, and pore structure evaluation parameters, such as the average pore throat radius (Rm), the threshold pressure (Pd), the maximum pore throat radius (Rmax) and so on, can also be precisely extracted. After this method is extended into field applications, several tight gas

  2. Direct Measurements of Pore Fluid Density by Vibrating Tube Densimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Rother, Gernot; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R; Wallacher, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The densities of pore-confined fluids were measured for the first time by means of a vibrating tube method. Isotherms of total adsorption capacity were measured directly making the method complementary to the conventional gravimetric or volumetric/piezometric adsorption techniques, which yield the excess adsorption (the Gibbsian surface excess). A custom-made high-pressure, high-temperature vibrating tube densimeter (VTD) was used to measure the densities of subcritical and supercritical propane (between 35 C and 97 C) and supercritical carbon dioxide (between 32 C and 50 C) saturating hydrophobic silica aerogel (0.2 g/cm3, 90% porosity) synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Additionally, excess adsorption isotherms for supercritical CO2 and the same porous solid were measured gravimetrically using a precise magnetically-coupled microbalance. Pore fluid densities and total adsorption isotherms increased monotonically with increasing density of the bulk fluid, in contrast to excess adsorption isotherms, which reached a maximum at a subcritical density of the bulk fluid, and then decreased towards zero or negative values at supercritical densities. Compression of the confined fluid significantly beyond the density of the bulk liquid at the same temperature was observed at subcritical temperatures. The features of the isotherms of confined fluid density are interpreted to elucidate the observed behavior of excess adsorption. The maxima of excess adsorption were found to occur below the critical density of the bulk fluid at the conditions corresponding to the beginning of the plateau of total adsorption, marking the end of the transition of pore fluid to a denser, liquid-like pore phase. The results for propane and carbon dioxide showed similarity in the sense of the principle of corresponding states. No measurable effect of pore confinement on the liquid-vapor critical point was found. Quantitative agreement was obtained between excess adsorption isotherms determined

  3. Direct measurements of pore fluid density by vibrating tube densimetry.

    PubMed

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw S; Rother, Gernot; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R; Wallacher, Dirk

    2012-03-20

    The densities of pore-confined fluids were measured for the first time by means of vibrating tube densimetry (VTD). A custom-built high-pressure, high-temperature vibrating tube densimeter was used to measure the densities of propane at subcritical and supercritical temperatures (between 35 and 97 °C) and carbon dioxide at supercritical temperatures (between 32 and 50 °C) saturating hydrophobic silica aerogel (0.2 g/cm(3), 90% porosity) synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Additionally, supercritical isotherms of excess adsorption for CO(2) and the same porous solid were measured gravimetrically using a precise magnetically coupled microbalance. Pore fluid densities and total adsorption isotherms increased monotonically with increasing density of the bulk fluid, in contrast to excess adsorption isotherms, which reached a maximum and then decreased toward zero or negative values above the critical density of the bulk fluid. The isotherms of confined fluid density and excess adsorption obtained by VTD contain additional information. For instance, the maxima of excess adsorption occur below the critical density of the bulk fluid at the beginning of the plateau region in the total adsorption, marking the end of the transition of pore fluid to a denser, liquidlike pore phase. Compression of the confined fluid significantly beyond the density of the bulk fluid at the same temperature was observed even at subcritical temperatures. The effect of pore confinement on the liquid-vapor critical temperature of propane was less than ~1.7 K. The results for propane and carbon dioxide showed similarity in the sense of the principle of corresponding states. Good quantitative agreement was obtained between excess adsorption isotherms determined from VTD total adsorption results and those measured gravimetrically at the same temperature, confirming the validity of the vibrating tube measurements. Thus, it is demonstrated that vibrating tube densimetry is a novel experimental

  4. On the application of focused ion beam nanotomography in characterizing the 3D pore space geometry of Opalinus clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Lukas M.; Holzer, Lorenz; Wepf, Roger; Gasser, Philippe; Münch, Beat; Marschall, Paul

    The evaluation and optimization of radioactive disposal systems requires a comprehensive understanding of mass transport processes. Among others, mass transport in porous geomaterials depends crucially on the topology and geometry of the pore space. Thus, understanding the mechanism of mass transport processes ultimately requires a 3D characterization of the pore structure. Here, we demonstrate the potential of focused ion beam nanotomography (FIB-nT) in characterizing the 3D geometry of pore space in clay rocks, i.e. Opalinus clay. In order to preserve the microstructure and to reduce sample preparation artefacts we used high pressure freezing and subsequent freeze drying to prepare the samples. Resolution limitations placed the lower limit in pore radii that can be analyzed by FIB-nT to about 10-15 nm. Image analysis and the calculation of pore size distribution revealed that pores with radii larger than 15 nm are related to a porosity of about 3 vol.%. To validate the method, we compared the pores size distribution obtained by FIB-nT with the one obtained by N 2 adsorption analysis. The latter yielded a porosity of about 13 vol.%. This means that FIB-nT can describe around 20-30% of the total pore space. For pore radii larger than 15 nm the pore size distribution obtained by FIB-nT and N 2 adsorption analysis were in good agreement. This suggests that FIB-nT can provide representative data on the spatial distribution of pores for pore sizes in the range of about 10-100 nm. Based on the spatial analysis of 3D data we extracted information on the spatial distribution of pore space geometrical properties.

  5. Pore-network study of bubble growth in porous media driven by heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Satik, C.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1996-05-01

    We present experimental and theoretical investigations of vapor phase growth in pore-network models of porous media. Visualization experiments of boiling of ethyl alcohol in horizontal etched-glass micromodels were conducted. The vapor phase was observed to grow into a disordered pattern following a sequence of pressurization and pore-filling steps. At sufficiently small cluster sizes, growth occurred `one pore at a time,` leading to invasion percolation patterns. Single-bubble (cluster) growth was next simulated with a pore-network simulator that includes heat transfer (convection and conduction), and capillary and viscous forces, although not gravity. A boundary in the parameter space was delineated that separates patterns of growth dictated solely by capillarity (invasion percolation) from other patterns. The region of validity of invasion percolation was found to decrease as the supersaturation (heat flux), the capillary number, the thermal diffusivity, and the vapor cluster size increase. Implications to continuum models are discussed. 33 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Monitoring CO2 invasion processes at the pore scale using geological labs on chip.

    PubMed

    Morais, S; Liu, N; Diouf, A; Bernard, D; Lecoutre, C; Garrabos, Y; Marre, S

    2016-09-21

    In order to investigate at the pore scale the mechanisms involved during CO2 injection in a water saturated pore network, a series of displacement experiments is reported using high pressure micromodels (geological labs on chip - GLoCs) working under real geological conditions (25 < T (°C) < 75 and 4.5 < p (MPa) < 8). The experiments were focused on the influence of three experimental parameters: (i) the p, T conditions, (ii) the injection flow rates and (iii) the pore network characteristics. By using on-chip optical characterization and imaging approaches, the CO2 saturation curves as a function of either time or the number of pore volume injected were determined. Three main mechanisms were observed during CO2 injection, namely, invasion, percolation and drying, which are discussed in this paper. Interestingly, besides conventional mechanisms, two counterintuitive situations were observed during the invasion and drying processes.

  7. Advanced NMR-based techniques for pore structure analysis of coal. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Hua, D.W.

    1996-02-01

    During the 3 year term of the project, new methods have been developed for characterizing the pore structure of porous materials such as coals, carbons, and amorphous silica gels. In general, these techniques revolve around; (1) combining multiple techniques such as small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and adsorption of contrast-matched adsorbates or {sup 129}Xe NMR and thermoporometry (the change in freezing point with pore size), (2) combining adsorption isotherms over several pressure ranges to obtain a more complete description of pore filling, or (3) applying NMR ({sup 129}Xe, {sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}) techniques with well-defined porous solids with pores in the large micropore size range (>1 nm).

  8. Monitoring CO2 invasion processes at the pore scale using geological labs on chip.

    PubMed

    Morais, S; Liu, N; Diouf, A; Bernard, D; Lecoutre, C; Garrabos, Y; Marre, S

    2016-09-21

    In order to investigate at the pore scale the mechanisms involved during CO2 injection in a water saturated pore network, a series of displacement experiments is reported using high pressure micromodels (geological labs on chip - GLoCs) working under real geological conditions (25 < T (°C) < 75 and 4.5 < p (MPa) < 8). The experiments were focused on the influence of three experimental parameters: (i) the p, T conditions, (ii) the injection flow rates and (iii) the pore network characteristics. By using on-chip optical characterization and imaging approaches, the CO2 saturation curves as a function of either time or the number of pore volume injected were determined. Three main mechanisms were observed during CO2 injection, namely, invasion, percolation and drying, which are discussed in this paper. Interestingly, besides conventional mechanisms, two counterintuitive situations were observed during the invasion and drying processes. PMID:27494277

  9. Idealized Shale Sorption Isotherm Measurements to Determine Pore Volume, Pore Size Distribution, and Surface Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, R.; Wang, B.; Aljama, H.; Rupp, E.; Wilcox, J.

    2014-12-01

    One method for mitigating the impacts of anthropogenic CO2-related climate change is the sequestration of CO2 in depleted gas and oil reservoirs, including shale. The accurate characterization of the heterogeneous material properties of shale, including pore volume, surface area, pore size distributions (PSDs) and composition is needed to understand the interaction of CO2 with shale. Idealized powdered shale sorption isotherms were created by varying incremental amounts of four essential components by weight. The first two components, organic carbon and clay, have been shown to be the most important components for CO2 uptake in shales. Organic carbon was represented by kerogen isolated from a Silurian shale, and clay groups were represented by illite from the Green River shale formation. The rest of the idealized shale was composed of equal parts by weight of SiO2 to represent quartz and CaCO3 to represent carbonate components. Baltic, Eagle Ford, and Barnett shale sorption measurements were used to validate the idealized samples. The idealized and validation shale sorption isotherms were measured volumetrically using low pressure N2 (77K) and CO2 (273K) adsorbates on a Quantachrome Autosorb IQ2. Gravimetric isotherms were also produced for a subset of these samples using CO2 and CH4adsorbates under subsurface temperature and pressure conditions using a Rubotherm magnetic suspension balance. Preliminary analyses were inconclusive in validating the idealized samples. This could be a result of conflicting reports of total organic carbon (TOC) content in each sample, a problem stemming from the heterogeneity of the samples and different techniques used for measuring TOC content. The TOC content of the validation samples (Eagle Ford and Barnett) was measured by Rock-Eval pyrolysis at Weatherford Laboratories, while the TOC content in the Baltic validation samples was determined by LECO TOC. Development of a uniform process for measuring TOC in the validation samples is

  10. Rock Pore Structure as Main Reason of Rock Deterioration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondrášik, Martin; Kopecký, Miloslav

    2014-03-01

    even when the temperature decreases to -20 ºC, and the second group F in which the pore water freezes. It has been found that the rocks from group N contain critical portion of adsorbed water in pores which prevents freezing of the pore water. The presence of adsorbed water enables thermodynamic processes related to osmosis which are dominantly responsible for deterioration of rocks from group N. A high correlation (R = 0.81) between content of adsorbed water and freeze-thaw loss was proved and can be used as durability estimator of rocks from group N. The rock deterioration of group F is caused not only by osmosis, but also by some other processes and influences, such as hydraulic pressure, permeability, grain size, rock and mineral tensile strength, degree of saturation, etc., and the deterioration cannot be predicted yet without the freeze-thaw test. Since the contents of absorbed water and ratio between adsorbed and bulk water (of which the absorbed water consists) is controlled by the porosity and pore structure, it can be concluded that the deterioration of some rocks is strongly related to rock pore structure.

  11. Electrolyte pore/solution partitioning by expanded grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Moucka, Filip; Bratko, Dusan; Luzar, Alenka

    2015-03-28

    Using a newly developed grand canonical Monte Carlo approach based on fractional exchanges of dissolved ions and water molecules, we studied equilibrium partitioning of both components between laterally extended apolar confinements and surrounding electrolyte solution. Accurate calculations of the Hamiltonian and tensorial pressure components at anisotropic conditions in the pore required the development of a novel algorithm for a self-consistent correction of nonelectrostatic cut-off effects. At pore widths above the kinetic threshold to capillary evaporation, the molality of the salt inside the confinement grows in parallel with that of the bulk phase, but presents a nonuniform width-dependence, being depleted at some and elevated at other separations. The presence of the salt enhances the layered structure in the slit and lengthens the range of inter-wall pressure exerted by the metastable liquid. Solvation pressure becomes increasingly repulsive with growing salt molality in the surrounding bath. Depending on the sign of the excess molality in the pore, the wetting free energy of pore walls is either increased or decreased by the presence of the salt. Because of simultaneous rise in the solution surface tension, which increases the free-energy cost of vapor nucleation, the rise in the apparent hydrophobicity of the walls has not been shown to enhance the volatility of the metastable liquid in the pores. PMID:25833601

  12. Frenkel-Halsey-Hill equation, dimensionality of adsorption, and pore anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Pomonis, Philippos J; Tsaousi, Eleni T

    2009-09-01

    The Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) equation V/V(m) approximately [log(P(0)/P)](-1/s) is revisited in relation to the meaning of its exponent in a specific intermediate range of pressure where capillary condensation occurs. It has been suggested in the past that plots of the form log V = constant - (D - 3)[loglog(P(0)/P)], or its equivalent log S = const - (D - 2) log r, can be used for the estimation of the dimensionality D of the adsorbing surface from those parts of the slopes at low pressure corresponding to straight lines. In the present study it is shown that, for pores of cylindrical geometry and at a specific range of pressure where those pores are filled-up during the process of capillary condensation, the local slopes d log V/d loglog[(P(0)/P)] or d log S/d log r, of plots similar to the above, may be used to estimate the pore anisotropy b of the adsorbing space from the relationships log b = [[d log V/d loglog[(P(0)/P)] - 3] log(0.5r) or log b = [[d log S/d log r] - 2] log(0.5r). These observations lead to the physicogeometrical conjunction that, during capillary condensation in cylindrical pores, usually assumed in nitrogen porosimetry, the scaling dimension of pore anisotropy b, scaled in units of radius r, is related to the dimensionality D of the process. PMID:19705894

  13. Electrolyte pore/solution partitioning by expanded grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Moucka, Filip; Bratko, Dusan Luzar, Alenka

    2015-03-28

    Using a newly developed grand canonical Monte Carlo approach based on fractional exchanges of dissolved ions and water molecules, we studied equilibrium partitioning of both components between laterally extended apolar confinements and surrounding electrolyte solution. Accurate calculations of the Hamiltonian and tensorial pressure components at anisotropic conditions in the pore required the development of a novel algorithm for a self-consistent correction of nonelectrostatic cut-off effects. At pore widths above the kinetic threshold to capillary evaporation, the molality of the salt inside the confinement grows in parallel with that of the bulk phase, but presents a nonuniform width-dependence, being depleted at some and elevated at other separations. The presence of the salt enhances the layered structure in the slit and lengthens the range of inter-wall pressure exerted by the metastable liquid. Solvation pressure becomes increasingly repulsive with growing salt molality in the surrounding bath. Depending on the sign of the excess molality in the pore, the wetting free energy of pore walls is either increased or decreased by the presence of the salt. Because of simultaneous rise in the solution surface tension, which increases the free-energy cost of vapor nucleation, the rise in the apparent hydrophobicity of the walls has not been shown to enhance the volatility of the metastable liquid in the pores.

  14. Block copolymer structures in nano-pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, Marco; Guo, Xiaohu; Zvelindovsky, Andrei

    2010-03-01

    We present results of coarse-grained computer modelling of block copolymer systems in cylindrical and spherical nanopores on Cell Dynamics Simulation. We study both cylindrical and spherical pores and systematically investigate structures formed by lamellar, cylinders and spherical block copolymer systems for various pore radii and affinity of block copolymer blocks to the pore walls. The obtained structures include: standing lamellae and cylinders, ``onions,'' cylinder ``knitting balls,'' ``golf-ball,'' layered spherical, ``virus''-like and mixed morphologies with T-junctions and U-type defects [1]. Kinetics of the structure formation and the differences with planar films are discussed. Our simulations suggest that novel porous nano-containers can be formed by confining block copolymers in pores of different geometries [1,2]. [4pt] [1] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, Polymer 49, 2797 (2008).[0pt] [2] M. Pinna, X. Guo, A.V. Zvelindovsky, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 214902 (2009).

  15. Uncovering Nuclear Pore Complexity with Innovation

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Rebecca L.; Wente, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in imaging and reductionist approaches provide a high-resolution understanding of nuclear pore complex structure and transport, revealing unexpected mechanistic complexities based on nucleoporin functions and specialized import and export pathways. PMID:23498931

  16. Colloid dispersion on the pore scale.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Thomas; Toops, Laura; Niessner, Reinhard

    2010-02-01

    Dispersion describes the spreading of a tracer or contaminant in an aquifer. Detailed knowledge of dispersion is the key to successful risk assessment in case of groundwater pollution or groundwater protection. The dispersion of colloids on the pore scale is controlled by flow velocity, ionic strength, colloid size, colloid concentration, and colloid-matrix interactions. The objective of this study was to provide quantitative data and to assess the scale dependency of colloid dispersion on the pore scale. The positions of carboxylated polystyrene microspheres (1 microm, 0.5 microm) were recorded during transport experiments in silicon micromodels with three pore topologies. The positions were combined into particle trajectories revealing the flow path of individual colloids. More than thousand trajectories were evaluated for each experiment to obtain the dispersivity of the colloids for flow distances between 10 and 1000 microm. All experiments were run at high Peclet numbers. The pore scale dispersivity was on the order of 8-30% of the flow distance with pure water, dependent on the heterogeneity of the pore topology. The dispersivity was positively correlated with the ionic strength and inversely correlated with the colloid size and the flow velocity. A coating of the micromodel surface with humic acid also increased dispersivity. The quantitative data set presented here supports the theoretical framework for colloid transport and allows to parametrize colloid transport on the pore scale.

  17. Colloid dispersion on the pore scale.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Thomas; Toops, Laura; Niessner, Reinhard

    2010-02-01

    Dispersion describes the spreading of a tracer or contaminant in an aquifer. Detailed knowledge of dispersion is the key to successful risk assessment in case of groundwater pollution or groundwater protection. The dispersion of colloids on the pore scale is controlled by flow velocity, ionic strength, colloid size, colloid concentration, and colloid-matrix interactions. The objective of this study was to provide quantitative data and to assess the scale dependency of colloid dispersion on the pore scale. The positions of carboxylated polystyrene microspheres (1 microm, 0.5 microm) were recorded during transport experiments in silicon micromodels with three pore topologies. The positions were combined into particle trajectories revealing the flow path of individual colloids. More than thousand trajectories were evaluated for each experiment to obtain the dispersivity of the colloids for flow distances between 10 and 1000 microm. All experiments were run at high Peclet numbers. The pore scale dispersivity was on the order of 8-30% of the flow distance with pure water, dependent on the heterogeneity of the pore topology. The dispersivity was positively correlated with the ionic strength and inversely correlated with the colloid size and the flow velocity. A coating of the micromodel surface with humic acid also increased dispersivity. The quantitative data set presented here supports the theoretical framework for colloid transport and allows to parametrize colloid transport on the pore scale. PMID:20042215

  18. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2015-04-01

    In extremely dynamic microhabitats as bio-pores made by earthworm, the in situ enzyme activities are assumed as a footprint of complex biotic interactions. Our study focused on the effect of earthworm on the enzyme activities inside bio-pores and visualizing the differences between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil by zymography technique (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2013). For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in bio-pores. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworms, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine-aminopeptidase, and phosphatase. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. However, the differences in activity of cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase between bio-pore and bulk soil were less pronounced. This demonstrated an applicability of zymography approach to monitor and to distinguish the in situ activity of hydrolytic enzymes in soil biopores.

  19. Onsager's irreversible thermodynamics of the dynamics of transient pores in spherical lipid vesicles.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Balbuena, L; Hernández-Zapata, E; Santamaría-Holek, I

    2015-09-01

    Onsager's irreversible thermodynamics is used to perform a systematic deduction of the kinetic equations governing the opening and collapse of transient pores in spherical vesicles. We show that the edge tension has to be determined from the initial stage of the pore relaxation and that in the final state the vesicle membrane is not completely relaxed, since the surface tension and the pressure difference are about 25% of its initial value. We also show that the pore life-time is controlled by the solution viscosity and its opening is driven by the solution leak-out and the surface tension drop. The final collapse is due to a non-linear interplay between the edge and the surface tensions together with the pressure difference. We also discuss the connection with previous models.

  20. Mechanical properties, pore size distribution, and pore solution of fly ash-belite cement mortars

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, A.; Goni, S.; Macias, A.; Luxan, M.P.

    1999-11-01

    The mechanical properties, pore size distribution, and extracted pore solution of fly ash-belite cement (FABC) mortars were studied for a period of 200 days. The influence of the calcination temperature, which ranged from 700 to 900 C, of the fly ash-belite cement was discussed. The evolution with hydration time of the pore size distribution was followed by mercury intrusion porosimetry, and the results correlated with those of flexural and compressive strength. The pore solution was expressed and analyzed at different times of hydration.

  1. Pore Size Effect on Methane Adsorption in Mesoporous Silica Materials Studied by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Wei-Shan; Fratini, Emiliano; Baglioni, Piero; Chen, Jin-Hong; Liu, Yun

    2016-09-01

    Methane adsorption in model mesoporous silica materials with the size range characteristic of shale is studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Size effect on the temperature-dependent gas adsorption at methane pressure about 100 kPa is investigated by SANS using MCM-41 and SBA-15 as adsorbents. Above the gas-liquid condensation temperature, the thickness of the adsorption layer is found to be roughly constant as a function of the temperature. Moreover, the gas adsorption properties, such as the adsorbed layer thickness and the specific amount of adsorbed gas, have little dependence on the pore size being studied, i.e., pore radius of 16.5 and 34.1 Å, but are mainly affected by the roughness of the pore surfaces. Hence, the surface properties of the pore wall are more dominant than the pore size in determining the methane gas adsorption of pores at the nanometer size range. Not surprisingly, the gas-liquid condensation temperature is observed to be sensitive to pore size and shifts to higher temperature when the pore size is smaller. Below the gas-liquid condensation temperature, even though the majority of gas adsorption experiments/simulations have assumed the density of confined liquid to be the same as the bulk density, the measured methane mass density in our samples is found to be appreciably smaller than the bulk methane density regardless of the pore sizes studied here. The mass density of liquid/solid methane in pores with different sizes shows different temperature dependence below the condensation temperature. With decreasing temperature, the methane density in larger pores (SBA-15) abruptly increases at approximately 65 K and then plateaus. In contrast, the density in smaller pores (MCM-41) monotonically increases with decreasing temperature before reaching a plateau at approximately 30 K.

  2. Pore Size Effect on Methane Adsorption in Mesoporous Silica Materials Studied by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Wei-Shan; Fratini, Emiliano; Baglioni, Piero; Chen, Jin-Hong; Liu, Yun

    2016-09-01

    Methane adsorption in model mesoporous silica materials with the size range characteristic of shale is studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Size effect on the temperature-dependent gas adsorption at methane pressure about 100 kPa is investigated by SANS using MCM-41 and SBA-15 as adsorbents. Above the gas-liquid condensation temperature, the thickness of the adsorption layer is found to be roughly constant as a function of the temperature. Moreover, the gas adsorption properties, such as the adsorbed layer thickness and the specific amount of adsorbed gas, have little dependence on the pore size being studied, i.e., pore radius of 16.5 and 34.1 Å, but are mainly affected by the roughness of the pore surfaces. Hence, the surface properties of the pore wall are more dominant than the pore size in determining the methane gas adsorption of pores at the nanometer size range. Not surprisingly, the gas-liquid condensation temperature is observed to be sensitive to pore size and shifts to higher temperature when the pore size is smaller. Below the gas-liquid condensation temperature, even though the majority of gas adsorption experiments/simulations have assumed the density of confined liquid to be the same as the bulk density, the measured methane mass density in our samples is found to be appreciably smaller than the bulk methane density regardless of the pore sizes studied here. The mass density of liquid/solid methane in pores with different sizes shows different temperature dependence below the condensation temperature. With decreasing temperature, the methane density in larger pores (SBA-15) abruptly increases at approximately 65 K and then plateaus. In contrast, the density in smaller pores (MCM-41) monotonically increases with decreasing temperature before reaching a plateau at approximately 30 K. PMID:27512895

  3. Kidney transplantation in abnormal bladder

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Shashi K.; Muthu, V.; Rajapurkar, Mohan M.; Desai, Mahesh R.

    2007-01-01

    Structural urologic abnormalities resulting in dysfunctional lower urinary tract leading to end stage renal disease may constitute 15% patients in the adult population and up to 20-30% in the pediatric population. A patient with an abnormal bladder, who is approaching end stage renal disease, needs careful evaluation of the lower urinary tract to plan the most satisfactory technical approach to the transplant procedure. Past experience of different authors can give an insight into the management and outcome of these patients. This review revisits the current literature available on transplantation in abnormal bladder and summarizes the clinical approach towards handling this group of difficult transplant patients. We add on our experience as we discuss the various issues. The outcome of renal transplant in abnormal bladder is not adversely affected when done in a reconstructed bladder. Correct preoperative evaluation, certain technical modification during transplant and postoperative care is mandatory to avoid complications. Knowledge of the abnormal bladder should allow successful transplantation with good outcome. PMID:19718334

  4. Facial skin pores: a multiethnic study.

    PubMed

    Flament, Frederic; Francois, Ghislain; Qiu, Huixia; Ye, Chengda; Hanaya, Tomoo; Batisse, Dominique; Cointereau-Chardon, Suzy; Seixas, Mirela Donato Gianeti; Dal Belo, Susi Elaine; Bazin, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Skin pores (SP), as they are called by laymen, are common and benign features mostly located on the face (nose, cheeks, etc) that generate many aesthetic concerns or complaints. Despite the prevalence of skin pores, related literature is scarce. With the aim of describing the prevalence of skin pores and anatomic features among ethnic groups, a dermatoscopic instrument, using polarized lighting, coupled to a digital camera recorded the major features of skin pores (size, density, coverage) on the cheeks of 2,585 women in different countries and continents. A detection threshold of 250 μm, correlated to clinical scorings by experts, was input into a specific software to further allow for automatic counting of the SP density (N/cm(2)) and determination of their respective sizes in mm(2). Integrating both criteria also led to establishing the relative part of the skin surface (as a percentage) that is actually covered by SP on cheeks. The results showed that the values of respective sizes, densities, and skin coverage: 1) were recorded in all studied subjects; 2) varied greatly with ethnicity; 3) plateaued with age in most cases; and 4) globally refected self-assessment by subjects, in particular those who self-declare having "enlarged pores" like Brazilian women. Inversely, Chinese women were clearly distinct from other ethnicities in having very low density and sizes. Analyzing the present results suggests that facial skin pore's morphology as perceived by human eye less result from functional criteria of associated appendages such as sebaceous glands. To what extent skin pores may be viewed as additional criteria of a photo-altered skin is an issue to be further addressed. PMID:25733918

  5. Low pore connectivity in natural rock.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P; Dultz, Stefan

    2012-05-15

    As repositories for CO(2) and radioactive waste, as oil and gas reservoirs, and as contaminated sites needing remediation, rock formations play a central role in energy and environmental management. The connectivity of the rock's porespace strongly affects fluid flow and solute transport. This work examines pore connectivity and its implications for fluid flow and chemical transport. Three experimental approaches (imbibition, tracer concentration profiles, and imaging) were used in combination with network modeling. In the imbibition results, three types of imbibition slope [log (cumulative imbibition) vs. log (imbibition time)] were found: the classical 0.5, plus 0.26, and 0.26 transitioning to 0.5. The imbibition slope of 0.26 seen in Indiana sandstone, metagraywacke, and Barnett shale indicates low pore connectivity, in contrast to the slope of 0.5 seen in the well-connected Berea sandstone. In the tracer profile work, rocks exhibited different distances to the plateau porosity, consistent with the pore connectivity from the imbibition tests. Injection of a molten metal into connected pore spaces, followed by 2-D imaging of the solidified alloy in polished thin sections, allowed direct assessment of pore structure and lateral connection in the rock samples. Pore-scale network modeling gave results consistent with measurements, confirming pore connectivity as the underlying cause of both anomalous behaviors: imbibition slope not having the classical value of 0.5, and accessible porosity being a function of distance from the edge. A poorly connected porespace will exhibit anomalous behavior in fluid flow and chemical transport, such as a lower imbibition slope (in air-water system) and diffusion rate than expected from classical behavior.

  6. Soil pore structure and substrate C mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleutel, Steven; Maenhout, Peter; Vanhoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle; De Neve, Stefaan

    2014-05-01

    Our aim was to investigate the complex interactions between soil pore structure, soil biota and decomposition of added OM substrates. We report on a lab incubation experiment in which CO2 respiration from soil cores was monitored (headspace GC analysis) and an X-ray CT approach yielded soil pore size distributions. Such combined use of X-ray CT with soil incubation studies was obstructed, until now, by many practical constraints such as CT-volume quality, limited resolution, scanning time and complex soil pore network quantification, which have largely been overcome in this study. We incubated a sandy loam soil (with application of ground grass or sawdust) in 18 small aluminium rings (Ø 1 cm, h 1 cm). Bulk density was adjusted to 1.1 or 1.3 Mg m-3 (compaction) and 6 rings were filled at a coarser Coarse Sand:Fine Sand:Silt+Clay ratio. While compaction induced a strong reduction in the cumulative C mineralization for both grass and sawdust substrates, artificial change to a coarser soil texture only reduced net C mineralization from the added sawdust. There thus appears to be a strong interaction effect between soil pore structure and substrate type on substrate decomposition. Correlation coefficients between the C mineralization rates and volumes of 7 pore size classes (from the X-ray CT data) also showed an increasing positive correlation with increasing pore size. Since any particulate organic matter initially present in the soil was removed prior to the experiment (sieving, ashing the >53µm fraction and recombining with the <53µm fraction), the added OM can be localized by means of X-ray CT. Through on-going image analysis the surrounding porosity of the added grass or sawdust particles is being quantified to further study the interaction between the soil pore structure and substrate decomposition.

  7. The Arabidopsis Nuclear Pore and Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Iris; Brkljacic, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear envelope is a double membrane structure that separates the eukaryotic cytoplasm from the nucleoplasm. The nuclear pores embedded in the nuclear envelope are the sole gateways for macromolecular trafficking in and out of the nucleus. The nuclear pore complexes assembled at the nuclear pores are large protein conglomerates composed of multiple units of about 30 different nucleoporins. Proteins and RNAs traffic through the nuclear pore complexes, enabled by the interacting activities of nuclear transport receptors, nucleoporins, and elements of the Ran GTPase cycle. In addition to directional and possibly selective protein and RNA nuclear import and export, the nuclear pore gains increasing prominence as a spatial organizer of cellular processes, such as sumoylation and desumoylation. Individual nucleoporins and whole nuclear pore subcomplexes traffic to specific mitotic locations and have mitotic functions, for example at the kinetochores, in spindle assembly, and in conjunction with the checkpoints. Mutants of nucleoporin genes and genes of nuclear transport components lead to a wide array of defects from human diseases to compromised plant defense responses. The nuclear envelope acts as a repository of calcium, and its inner membrane is populated by functionally unique proteins connected to both chromatin and—through the nuclear envelope lumen—the cytoplasmic cytoskeleton. Plant nuclear pore and nuclear envelope research—predominantly focusing on Arabidopsis as a model—is discovering both similarities and surprisingly unique aspects compared to the more mature model systems. This chapter gives an overview of our current knowledge in the field and of exciting areas awaiting further exploration. PMID:22303264

  8. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  9. Hydrochromic Approaches to Mapping Human Sweat Pores.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Hoon; Park, Bum Jun; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-06-21

    Hydrochromic materials, which undergo changes in their light absorption and/or emission properties in response to water, have been extensively investigated as humidity sensors. Recent advances in the design of these materials have led to novel applications, including monitoring the water content of organic solvents, water-jet-based rewritable printing on paper, and hydrochromic mapping of human sweat pores. Our interest in this area has focused on the design of hydrochromic materials for human sweat pore mapping. We recognized that materials appropriate for this purpose must have balanced sensitivities to water. Specifically, while they should not undergo light absorption and/or emission transitions under ambient moisture conditions, the materials must have sufficiently high hydrochromic sensitivities that they display responses to water secreted from human sweat pores. In this Account, we describe investigations that we have carried out to develop hydrochromic substances that are suitable for human sweat pore mapping. Polydiacetylenes (PDAs) have been extensively investigated as sensor matrices because of their stimulus-responsive color change property. We found that incorporation of headgroups composed of hygroscopic ions such as cesium or rubidium and carboxylate counterions enables PDAs to undergo a blue-to-red colorimetric transition as well as a fluorescence turn-on response to water. Very intriguingly, the small quantities of water secreted from human sweat pores were found to be sufficient to trigger fluorescence turn-on responses of the hydrochromic PDAs, allowing precise mapping of human sweat pores. Since the hygroscopic ion-containing PDAs developed in the initial stage display a colorimetric transition under ambient conditions that exist during humid summer periods, a new system was designed. A PDA containing an imidazolium ion was found to be stable under all ambient conditions and showed temperature-dependent hydrochromism corresponding to a

  10. Organization of the Mitochondrial Apoptotic BAK Pore

    PubMed Central

    Aluvila, Sreevidya; Mandal, Tirtha; Hustedt, Eric; Fajer, Peter; Choe, Jun Yong; Oh, Kyoung Joon

    2014-01-01

    The multidomain pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins BAK and BAX are believed to form large oligomeric pores in the mitochondrial outer membrane during apoptosis. Formation of these pores results in the release of apoptotic factors including cytochrome c from the intermembrane space into the cytoplasm, where they initiate the cascade of events that lead to cell death. Using the site-directed spin labeling method of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, we have determined the conformational changes that occur in BAK when the protein targets to the membrane and forms pores. The data showed that helices α1 and α6 disengage from the rest of the domain, leaving helices α2-α5 as a folded unit. Helices α2-α5 were shown to form a dimeric structure, which is structurally homologous to the recently reported BAX “BH3-in-groove homodimer.” Furthermore, the EPR data and a chemical cross-linking study demonstrated the existence of a hitherto unknown interface between BAK BH3-in-groove homodimers in the oligomeric BAK. This novel interface involves the C termini of α3 and α5 helices. The results provide further insights into the organization of the BAK oligomeric pores by the BAK homodimers during mitochondrial apoptosis, enabling the proposal of a BAK-induced lipidic pore with the topography of a “worm hole.” PMID:24337568

  11. Performance of Small Pore Microchannel Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Gummin, M. A.; Ravinett, T.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Edgar, M.

    1995-01-01

    Small pore size microchannel plates (MCP's) are needed to satisfy the requirements for future high resolution small and large format detectors for astronomy. MCP's with pore sizes in the range 5 micron to 8 micron are now being manufactured, but they are of limited availability and are of small size. We have obtained sets of Galileo 8 micron and 6.5 micron MCP's, and Philips 6 micron and 7 micron pore MCP's, and compared them to our larger pore MCP Z stacks. We have tested back to back MCP stacks of four of these MCP's and achieved gains greater than 2 x 1O(exp 7) with pulse height distributions of less than 40% FWHM, and background rates of less than 0.3 events sec(exp -1) cm(exp -2). Local counting rates up to approx. 100 events/pore/sec have been attained with little drop of the MCP gain. The bare MCP quantum efficiencies are somewhat lower than those expected, however. Flat field images are characterized by an absence of MCP fixed pattern noise.

  12. Analysis of a spatially deconvolved solar pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero Noda, C.; Shimizu, T.; Ruiz Cobo, B.; Suematsu, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ichimoto, K.

    2016-08-01

    Solar pores are active regions with large magnetic field strengths and apparent simple magnetic configurations. Their properties resemble the ones found for the sunspot umbra although pores do not show penumbra. Therefore, solar pores present themselves as an intriguing phenomenon that is not completely understood. We examine in this work a solar pore observed with Hinode/SP using two state of the art techniques. The first one is the spatial deconvolution of the spectropolarimetric data that allows removing the stray light contamination induced by the spatial point spread function of the telescope. The second one is the inversion of the Stokes profiles assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium that let us to infer the atmospheric physical parameters. After applying these techniques, we found that the spatial deconvolution method does not introduce artefacts, even at the edges of the magnetic structure, where large horizontal gradients are detected on the atmospheric parameters. Moreover, we also describe the physical properties of the magnetic structure at different heights finding that, in the inner part of the solar pore, the temperature is lower than outside, the magnetic field strength is larger than 2 kG and unipolar, and the line-of-sight velocity is almost null. At neighbouring pixels, we found low magnetic field strengths of same polarity and strong downward motions that only occur at the low photosphere, below the continuum optical depth log τ = -1. Finally, we studied the spatial relation between different atmospheric parameters at different heights corroborating the physical properties described before.

  13. [Emotion Disorders and Abnormal Perspiration].

    PubMed

    Umeda, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    This article reviewed the relationship between emotional disorders and abnormal perspiration. First, I focused on local brain areas related to emotional processing, and summarized the functions of the emotional network involving those local areas. Functional disorders followed by the damage in the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, and insular cortex were reviewed, including related abnormal perspiration. I then addressed the mechanisms of how autonomic disorders influence emotional processing. Finally, possible future directions for integrated understanding of the connection between neural activities and bodily reactions were discussed. PMID:27503817

  14. [Emotion Disorders and Abnormal Perspiration].

    PubMed

    Umeda, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    This article reviewed the relationship between emotional disorders and abnormal perspiration. First, I focused on local brain areas related to emotional processing, and summarized the functions of the emotional network involving those local areas. Functional disorders followed by the damage in the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, and insular cortex were reviewed, including related abnormal perspiration. I then addressed the mechanisms of how autonomic disorders influence emotional processing. Finally, possible future directions for integrated understanding of the connection between neural activities and bodily reactions were discussed.

  15. Tracing the effects of pore diameter on diffusion controlling regime by system collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghdi Tam, M.; Panjepour, M.; Particulate Material Simulation Lab

    2011-12-01

    By means of Random Walk Monte Carlo simulation, effect of pore diameter on diffusion controlling regime is studied in a single pore. After applying a certain pressure distribution scheme in the pore, by tracing different kinds of collisions in the system (gas molecule-wall and gas molecule- gas molecule collisions), a unique way of deducing the diffusion controlling regime change is acquired and certified by Knudsen number and transported gas fraction (f). The results show that by tracing the variation trend of the pore diameter with system collisions, the change in the diffusion controlling regime can be understood. Also by changing pore diameter, interesting effects can be seen on transported gas fraction. It was concluded in the authors' previous study that by sustaining the Knudsen diffusion regime after increasing the temperature, the transported gas fraction increases; however maintaining Knudsen regime by decreasing the pore diameter had the exact opposite effect on the f parameter which can be result of sudden increase in number of entrance dropped-out particles.

  16. Pore space analysis of NAPL distribution in sand-clay media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matmon, D.; Hayden, N.J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces a conceptual model of clays and non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) at the pore scale that has been developed from a mathematical unit cell model, and direct micromodel observation and measurement of clay-containing porous media. The mathematical model uses a unit cell concept with uniform spherical grains for simulating the sand in the sand-clay matrix (???10% clay). Micromodels made with glass slides and including different clay-containing porous media were used to investigate the two clays (kaolinite and montmorillonite) and NAPL distribution within the pore space. The results were used to understand the distribution of NAPL advancing into initially saturated sand and sand-clay media, and provided a detailed analysis of the pore-scale geometry, pore size distribution, NAPL entry pressures, and the effect of clay on this geometry. Interesting NAPL saturation profiles were observed as a result of the complexity of the pore space geometry with the different packing angles and the presence of clays. The unit cell approach has applications for enhancing the mechanistic understanding and conceptualization, both visually and mathematically, of pore-scale processes such as NAPL and clay distribution. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Limestone characterization to model damage from acidic precipitation: Effect of pore structure on mass transfer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leith, S.D.; Reddy, M.M.; Irez, W.F.; Heymans, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    The pore structure of Salem limestone is investigated, and conclusions regarding the effect of the pore geometry on modeling moisture and contaminant transport are discussed based on thin section petrography, scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, and nitrogen adsorption analyses. These investigations are compared to and shown to compliment permeability and capillary pressure measurements for this common building stone. Salem limestone exhibits a bimodal pore size distribution in which the larger pores provide routes for convective mass transfer of contaminants into the material and the smaller pores lead to high surface area adsorption and reaction sites. Relative permeability and capillary pressure measurements of the air/water system indicate that Salem limestone exhibits high capillarity end low effective permeability to water. Based on stone characterization, aqueous diffusion and convection are believed to be the primary transport mechanisms for pollutants in this stone. The extent of contaminant accumulation in the stone depends on the mechanism of partitioning between the aqueous and solid phases. The described characterization techniques and modeling approach can be applied to many systems of interest such as acidic damage to limestone, mass transfer of contaminants in concrete and other porous building materials, and modeling pollutant transport in subsurface moisture zones.

  18. NHANES III: influence of race on GFR thresholds and detection of metabolic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Foley, Robert N; Wang, Changchun; Ishani, Areef; Collins, Allan J

    2007-09-01

    Whether the creatinine-based glomerular filtration rate (GFR) thresholds used to define chronic kidney disease (CKD) identify metabolic abnormalities similarly in minority and nonminority populations is unknown. We addressed this question among adult participants in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) (n = 15,837). GFR was estimated from serum creatinine values and metabolic abnormalities were defined by 5th or 95th percentile values. After adjustment for age, demographic characteristics, and GFR, black participants were significantly more likely than white participants to have abnormal levels of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, hemoglobin, phosphorus, and uric acid. Hispanic subjects were significantly more likely to have abnormal levels of systolic blood pressure, hemoglobin, bicarbonate, and phosphorus. Among participants with GFR < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2), black participants were significantly more likely to have abnormal levels of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, hemoglobin, and uric acid; Hispanic subjects were significantly more likely to have abnormal systolic blood pressure levels. Metabolic abnormalities were more common in minority populations, and low GFR appeared to have a multiplicative effect. Defining CKD using a single GFR threshold may be disadvantageous for minority populations because metabolic abnormalities are present at higher levels of GFR.

  19. Using Microfluidics for Visualisation of Displacement Mechanisms on Pore Network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerami Kaviri Nejad, A.; Mostaghimi, P.; Armstrong, R. T.; Rafeie, M.; Ebrahimi Warkiani, M.

    2015-12-01

    We use microfluidic methods for studying displacement mechanisms of immiscible fluids including drainage and imbibition in porous media at the pore scale. We use soft lithography method to make 4' diameter silicon wafer to be used as a mould of our designs. We have fabricated a range of microfluidic chips based on a range of patterns including pore junction with unequal throats, junction of throats with different coordination numbers, and junction of tortuous throats. We also fabricate more complex networks as a combination of the mentioned simple patterns. Decane and water are used as the wetting and non-wetting phases, respectively. Using high-resolution microscopy, we visualise the displacement processes and the movement of the interface between two fluids at different saturations. We initially test to micromodel chip for modelling drainage into a pore junction and compare our results with the prediction by the Young-Laplace equations. Then we focus on the sequence of pore filling and effects of pore space geometry, tortuosity and the injection rate. We use plasma treating to vary the contact angle and then study the effects of wettability on interface movement. Using accurate pump and pressure controller, we measure pressure drop across the micromodels at different time. By image processing of fluids distribution in the microfluidic chip, saturation of both phases can be estimated. Then, we plot relative permeability versus saturation curves for different pore space geometries. Our results can be used for validation of numerical two phase flow simulation and also we provide novel suggestions for modifying the equations of motion in pore network models.

  20. Pore-Water Extraction Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments and Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Truex, Michael J.

    2011-06-30

    A series of flow cell experiments was conducted to demonstrate the process of water removal through pore-water extraction in unsaturated systems. In this process, a vacuum (negative pressure) is applied at the extraction well establishing gas and water pressure gradients towards the well. The gradient may force water and dissolved contaminants, such as 99Tc, to move towards the well. The tested flow cell configurations consist of packings, with or without fine-grained well pack material, representing, in terms of particle size distribution, subsurface sediments at the SX tank farm. A pore water extraction process should not be considered to be equal to soil vapor extraction because during soil vapor extraction, the main goal may be to maximize gas removal. For pore water extraction systems, pressure gradients in both the gas and water phases need to be considered while for soil vapor extraction purposes, gas phase flow is the only concern. In general, based on the limited set (six) of flow experiments that were conducted, it can be concluded that pore water extraction rates and cumulative outflow are related to water content, the applied vacuum, and the dimensions of the sediment layer providing the extracted water. In particular, it was observed that application of a 100-cm vacuum (negative pressure) in a controlled manner leads to pore-water extraction until the water pressure gradients towards the well approach zero. Increased cumulative outflow was obtained with an increase in initial water content from 0.11 to 0.18, an increase in the applied vacuum to 200 cm, and when the water-supplying sediment was not limited. The experimental matrix was not sufficiently large to come to conclusions regarding maximizing cumulative outflow.

  1. Optical detection of pores in adipocyte membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanina, I. Yu.; Doubrovski, V. A.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    Structures that can be interpreted as cytoplasm droplets leaking through the membrane are experimentally detected on the membranes of adipocytes using optical digital microscopy. The effect of an aqueous alcohol solution of brilliant green on the amount and sizes of structures is studied. It is demonstrated that the optical irradiation of the adipocytes that are sensitized with the aid of the brilliant green leads to an increase in the amount of structures (pores) after the irradiation. The experimental results confirm the existence of an earlier-proposed effect of photochemical action on the sensitized cells of adipose tissue that involves additional formation of pores in the membrane of the sensitized cell under selective optical irradiation. The proposed method for the detection of micropores in the membrane of adipose tissue based on the detection of the cytoplasm droplets leaking from the cell can be considered as a method for the optical detection of nanosized pores.

  2. Modeling Soil Pore Oxygen in Restored Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubol, S.; Loecke, T.; Burgin, A. J.; Franz, T.

    2015-12-01

    Soil pore oxygen (O2) is usually modeled indirectly as a function of soil moisture. However, using soil moisture to describe the oxic /anoxic status of a soil may not be sufficient accurate, especially when soil pore O2 rapidly changes, as following hydrological forcing. As first step, we use the dataset collected in the constructed wetland near Dayton, OH, by Loecke and Burgin, to reconstruct the environmental functions and re-aeration status of the soil. The dataset consist of 24 Apogee sensors and 24 soil moisture and temperature sensors located at 10 cm depth in upland, transitional and submerged zone (see Figure 1). Data were recorded over two years at temporal interval of 30 minutes. Then, we explore the capability of existing biogeochemical models to predict metabolic activity and the soil pore O2. Figure1: Restored wetland field site with soil O2 sensors (yellow stars) in upland (red), transitional (green) and submerged (blue) zones.

  3. Emulsion formation at the Pore-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, R. T.; Van Den Bos, P.; Berg, S.

    2012-12-01

    The use of surfactant cocktails to produce ultra-low interfacial tension between water and oil is an enhanced oil recovery method. In phase behavior tests three distinct emulsion phases are observed: (1) oil-in-water emulsion; (2) microemulsion; and (3) water-in-oil emulsion. However, it is unknown how phase behavior manifests at the pore-scale in a porous media system. What is the time scale needed for microemulsion formation? Where in the pore-space do the microemulsions form? And in what order do the different emulsion phases arrange during oil bank formation? To answer these questions micromodel experiments were conducted. These experiments are used to build a conceptual model for phase behavior at the pore-scale.

  4. Electrocardiograph abnormalities in intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Nagatani, Kimihiro; Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the prevalence and type of electrocardiography (ECG) abnormalities, and their possible association with the clinical/radiological findings in 118 consecutive patients with non-traumatic, non-neoplastic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). ECG frequently demonstrates abnormalities in patients with ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage, but little is known of ECG changes in ICH patients. Clinical and radiological information was retrospectively reviewed. ECG recordings that were obtained within 24 hours of the initial hemorrhage were analyzed. Sixty-six patients (56%) had one or more ECG abnormalities. The most frequent was ST depression (24%), followed by left ventricular hypertrophy (20%), corrected QT interval (QTc) prolongation (19%), and T wave inversion (19%). The logistic regression analysis demonstrated the following: insular involvement was an independent predictive factor of ST depression (p<0.001; odds ratio OR 10.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.84-36.57); insular involvement (p<0.001; OR 23.98; 95% CI 4.91-117.11) and presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (p<0.001; OR 8.72; 95% CI 2.69-28.29) were independent predictive factors of QTc prolongation; deep hematoma location (p<0.001; OR 19.12; 95% CI 3.82-95.81) and hematoma volume >30 ml (p=0.001; OR 6.58; 95% CI 2.11-20.46) were independent predictive factors of T wave inversion. We demonstrate associations between ECG abnormalities and detailed characteristics of ICH.

  5. Particle Deformation and Concentration Polarization in Electroosmotic Transport of Hydrogels through Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report detection of deformable, hydrogel particles by the resistive-pulse technique using single pores in a polymer film. The hydrogels pass through the pores by electroosmosis and cause formation of a characteristic shape of resistive pulses indicating the particles underwent dehydration and deformation. These effects were explained via a non-homogeneous pressure distribution along the pore axis modeled by the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier Stokes equations. The local pressure drops are induced by the electroosmotic fluid flow. Our experiments also revealed the importance of concentration polarization in the detection of hydrogels. Due to the negative charges as well as branched, low density structure of the hydrogel particles, concentration of ions in the particles is significantly higher than in the bulk. As a result, when electric field is applied across the membrane, a depletion zone can be created in the vicinity of the particle observed as a transient drop of the current. Our experiments using pores with openings between 200 and 1600 nm indicated the concentration polarization dominated the hydrogels detection for pores wider than 450 nm. The results are of importance for all studies that involve transport of molecules, particles and cells through pores with charged walls. The developed inhomogeneous pressure distribution can potentially influence the shape of the transported species. The concentration polarization changes the interpretation of the resistive pulses; the observed current change does not necessarily reflect only the particle size but also the size of the depletion zone that is formed in the particle vicinity.

  6. Pore-Scale Modeling of Pore Structure Effects on P-Wave Scattering Attenuation in Dry Rocks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks. PMID:25961729

  7. Pore-scale modeling of pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zizhen; Wang, Ruihe; Li, Tianyang; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Feifei

    2015-01-01

    Underground rocks usually have complex pore system with a variety of pore types and a wide range of pore size. The effects of pore structure on elastic wave attenuation cannot be neglected. We investigated the pore structure effects on P-wave scattering attenuation in dry rocks by pore-scale modeling based on the wave theory and the similarity principle. Our modeling results indicate that pore size, pore shape (such as aspect ratio), and pore density are important factors influencing P-wave scattering attenuation in porous rocks, and can explain the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity. From the perspective of scattering attenuation, porous rocks can safely suit to the long wavelength assumption when the ratio of wavelength to pore size is larger than 15. Under the long wavelength condition, the scattering attenuation coefficient increases as a power function as the pore density increases, and it increases exponentially with the increase in aspect ratio. For a certain porosity, rocks with smaller aspect ratio and/or larger pore size have stronger scattering attenuation. When the pore aspect ratio is larger than 0.5, the variation of scattering attenuation at the same porosity is dominantly caused by pore size and almost independent of the pore aspect ratio. These results lay a foundation for pore structure inversion from elastic wave responses in porous rocks.

  8. Characterization of Tight Gas Reservoir Pore Structure Using USANS/SANS and Gas Adsorption Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, Christopher R; He, Lilin; Agamalian, Michael; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Mastalerz, Maria; Bustin, Mark; Radlinski, Andrzej Pawell; Blach, Tomasz P

    2012-01-01

    Small-angle and ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS) measurements were performed on samples from the Triassic Montney tight gas reservoir in Western Canada in order to determine the applicability of these techniques for characterizing the full pore size spectrum and to gain insight into the nature of the pore structure and its control on permeability. The subject tight gas reservoir consists of a finely laminated siltstone sequence; extensive cementation and moderate clay content are the primary causes of low permeability. SANS/USANS experiments run at ambient pressure and temperature conditions on lithologically-diverse sub-samples of three core plugs demonstrated that a broad pore size distribution could be interpreted from the data. Two interpretation methods were used to evaluate total porosity, pore size distribution and surface area and the results were compared to independent estimates derived from helium porosimetry (connected porosity) and low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption (accessible surface area and pore size distribution). The pore structure of the three samples as interpreted from SANS/USANS is fairly uniform, with small differences in the small-pore range (< 2000 {angstrom}), possibly related to differences in degree of cementation, and mineralogy, in particular clay content. Total porosity interpreted from USANS/SANS is similar to (but systematically higher than) helium porosities measured on the whole core plug. Both methods were used to estimate the percentage of open porosity expressed here as a ratio of connected porosity, as established from helium adsorption, to the total porosity, as estimated from SANS/USANS techniques. Open porosity appears to control permeability (determined using pressure and pulse-decay techniques), with the highest permeability sample also having the highest percentage of open porosity. Surface area, as calculated from low-pressure N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption, is significantly less

  9. Hydrocarbon distribution in Tertiary sandstones as a function of formation pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, W.G. ); Fertl, W.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Hydrocarbon distribution is related to formation pressure and temperature, with the highest concentrations of all hydrocarbons encountered near the onset of abnormal pressure regimes. A thorough understanding of the interactive relationship between lithology, pressure, temperature, and hydrocarbon distribution is essential for the efficient exploration and development of oil and gas accumulations. All information, such as lithology, pore pressure, and temperature, can be obtained from geophysical well logs. The primary purpose of this presentation is to discuss distribution and redistribution of hydrocarbons in Tertiary sandstones of southern Louisiana with respect to the depth pressure, and temperature at which these oil and gas accumulations are predominantly encountered. Also discussed are the thermodynamics of ascending fluid movement and the sourcing of these hydrocarbons. Production data from approximately 33,000 well completions and pressure/temperature data from over 20,000 wells provide the database used in this analysis. In addition, similar findings are presented for clastic overpressured reservoirs in the Baram Delta, located offshore in Sarawak Malaysia and the hydrocarbon resources being developed in the West Turkmen depression of the Soviet Union.

  10. Pore-scale imaging and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunt, Martin J.; Bijeljic, Branko; Dong, Hu; Gharbi, Oussama; Iglauer, Stefan; Mostaghimi, Peyman; Paluszny, Adriana; Pentland, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Pore-scale imaging and modelling - digital core analysis - is becoming a routine service in the oil and gas industry, and has potential applications in contaminant transport and carbon dioxide storage. This paper briefly describes the underlying technology, namely imaging of the pore space of rocks from the nanometre scale upwards, coupled with a suite of different numerical techniques for simulating single and multiphase flow and transport through these images. Three example applications are then described, illustrating the range of scientific problems that can be tackled: dispersion in different rock samples that predicts the anomalous transport behaviour characteristic of highly heterogeneous carbonates; imaging of super-critical carbon dioxide in sandstone to demonstrate the possibility of capillary trapping in geological carbon storage; and the computation of relative permeability for mixed-wet carbonates and implications for oilfield waterflood recovery. The paper concludes by discussing limitations and challenges, including finding representative samples, imaging and simulating flow and transport in pore spaces over many orders of magnitude in size, the determination of wettability, and upscaling to the field scale. We conclude that pore-scale modelling is likely to become more widely applied in the oil industry including assessment of unconventional oil and gas resources. It has the potential to transform our understanding of multiphase flow processes, facilitating more efficient oil and gas recovery, effective contaminant removal and safe carbon dioxide storage.

  11. Pore-scale studies of gas shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silin, D.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Cabrini, S.; Kneafsey, T. J.; MacDowell, A.; Nico, P. S.; Radmilovic, V.

    2010-12-01

    Natural gas is the cleanest hydrocarbon fuel. The contribution of natural gas produced from shale to the United States energy portfolio has been steadily increasing over the past several years. The projections into the coming decades expect this trend to remain stable. Although the advancements in well stimulation technologies have made it possible to convert huge resources into recoverable reserves, the mechanisms of gas recovery from these practically impermeable rocks are not yet fully understood. We employed the powerful imaging facilities at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to gain insights into the pore geometry and structure of shale at micron and submicron scales. The X-ray micro-tomography facility at the Advanced Light Source produces 3D reconstructions of the pore space at resolutions approaching one micron. The Focused Ion-Beam sequential milling and imaging at the Molecular Foundry and National Center for Electron Microscopy allows for 3D shale structure and mineral composition at a resolution on the order of ten nanometers. We find that even a miniscule volume of reservoir shale includes an extremely rich diversity of minerals and geometries. Organic matter is consistently present as pore filling among solid grains. Some samples show a connected networks of pores in kerogen, apparently indicating its thermal maturity. Understanding the features controlling gas flow will help increase the ultimate recovery and extend the productive lifetime of a given well.

  12. Formation of conical fractures in sedimentary basins: Experiments involving pore fluids and implications for sandstone intrusion mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourgues, R.; Bureau, D.; Bodet, L.; Gay, A.; Gressier, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    Large sand intrusions often exhibit conical morphologies analogous to magmatic intrusions such as saucer-shaped or cup-shaped sills. Whereas some physical processes may be similar, we show with scaled experiments that the formation of conical sand intrusions may be favoured by the pore-pressure gradients prevailing in the host rock before sand injection. Our experiments involve injecting air into a permeable and cohesive analogue material to produce hydraulic fractures while controlling the pore pressure field. We control the state of overpressure in the overburden by applying homogeneous basal pore pressure, and then adding a second local pore pressure field by injecting air via a central injector to initiate hydraulic fractures near the injection point. In experiments involving small vertical effective stresses (small overburden, or high pore fluid overpressure), the fracturing pressure ( λfract) is supralithostatic and two dipping fractures are initiated at the injection point forming a conical structure. From theoretical considerations, we predict that high values of λfract are due to strong cohesion or high pore fluid overpressure distributed in the overburden. Such conditions are favoured by the pore pressure/stress coupling induced by both pore pressure fields. The dips of cones can be accounted for elastic-stress rotation occurring around the source. Contrary to magmatic chamber models, the aqueous fluid overpressure developed in a parent sandbody (and prevailing before the formation of injectites) may diffuse into the surrounding overburden, thus favouring stress rotation and the formation of inclined sheets far from the parent source. For experiments involving higher vertical effective stresses (thick overburden or low pore fluid overpressure), the fracturing pressure is lower than the lithostatic stress, and a single fracture is opened in mode I which then grows vertically. At a critical depth, the fracture separates into two dilatant branches forming

  13. High prevalence of thyroid ultrasonographic abnormalities in primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Armanini, Decio; Nacamulli, Davide; Scaroni, Carla; Lumachi, Franco; Selice, Riccardo; Fiore, Cristina; Favia, Gennaro; Mantero, Franco

    2003-11-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the prevalence of thyroid abnormalities detected by ultrasonography and, in particular, of multinodular nontoxic goiter in primary aldosteronism. We analyzed 80 consecutive of patients with primary hyperaldosteronism (40 with unilateral adenoma and 40 with idiopathic hyperaldosteronism) and 80 normotensive healthy controls, comparable for age, sex, iodine intake, and geographical area. Blood pressure, thyroid palpation, thyroid function, and ultrasonography were evaluated. The prevalence of ultrasonographic thyroid abnormalities was 60% in primary aldosteronism and 27% in controls (p < 0.0001). There was a statistically significant difference in prevalence of these abnormalities in unilateral adenoma and idiopathic hyperaldosteronism with respect to controls (p < 0.05 and p < 0.0001, respectively). The prevalence of multinodular nontoxic goiter in idiopathic hyperaldosteronism was higher than in controls (p < 0.001) and, in particular, in female patients. From these data it seems to be worth considering the existence of primary hyperaldosteronism in patients with multinodular goiter and hypertension. PMID:14665720

  14. From concave to convex: capillary bridges in slit pore geometry.

    PubMed

    Broesch, David J; Frechette, Joelle

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the morphological evolution of nonaxisymmetric capillary bridges in slit-pore geometry as the height of the pore and aspect ratio of the bridge are varied. The liquid bridges are formed between two hydrophobic surfaces patterned with hydrophilic strips. The aspect ratio of the capillary bridges (length/width) is varied from 2.5 to 120 by changing the separation between the surfaces, the width of the strips, or the fluid volume. As the bridge height is increased, the aspect ratio decreases and we observe a large increase in the mean curvature of the bridge. More specifically, the following counterintuitive result is observed: the mean curvature of the bridges changes sign and goes from negative (concave bridge) to positive (convex bridge) when the height is increased at constant volume. These experimental observations are in quantitative agreement with Surface Evolver simulations. Scaling shows a collapse of the data indicating that this transition in the sign of the Laplace pressure is universal for capillary bridges with high aspect ratios. Finally, we show that the morphology diagrams obtained from our 3D analysis are considerably different from those expected from a 2D analysis.

  15. From concave to convex: capillary bridges in slit pore geometry.

    PubMed

    Broesch, David J; Frechette, Joelle

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the morphological evolution of nonaxisymmetric capillary bridges in slit-pore geometry as the height of the pore and aspect ratio of the bridge are varied. The liquid bridges are formed between two hydrophobic surfaces patterned with hydrophilic strips. The aspect ratio of the capillary bridges (length/width) is varied from 2.5 to 120 by changing the separation between the surfaces, the width of the strips, or the fluid volume. As the bridge height is increased, the aspect ratio decreases and we observe a large increase in the mean curvature of the bridge. More specifically, the following counterintuitive result is observed: the mean curvature of the bridges changes sign and goes from negative (concave bridge) to positive (convex bridge) when the height is increased at constant volume. These experimental observations are in quantitative agreement with Surface Evolver simulations. Scaling shows a collapse of the data indicating that this transition in the sign of the Laplace pressure is universal for capillary bridges with high aspect ratios. Finally, we show that the morphology diagrams obtained from our 3D analysis are considerably different from those expected from a 2D analysis. PMID:23061424

  16. Calreticulin secures calcium-dependent nuclear pore competency required for cardiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Randolph S; Behfar, Atta; Groenendyk, Jody; Wyles, Saranya P; Niederlander, Nicolas; Reyes, Santiago; Puceat, Michel; Michalak, Marek; Terzic, Andre; Perez-Terzic, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Calreticulin deficiency causes myocardial developmental defects that culminate in an embryonic lethal phenotype. Recent studies have linked loss of this calcium binding chaperone to failure in myofibrillogenesis through an as yet undefined mechanism. The purpose of the present study was to identify cellular processes corrupted by calreticulin deficiency that precipitate dysregulation of cardiac myofibrillogenesis related to acquisition of cardiac phenotype. In an embryonic stem cell knockout model, calreticulin deficit (crt(-/-)) compromised nucleocytoplasmic transport of nuclear localization signal-dependent and independent pathways, disrupting nuclear import of the cardiac transcription factor MEF2C. The expression of nucleoporins and associated nuclear transport proteins in derived crt(-/-) cardiomyocytes revealed an abnormal nuclear pore complex (NPC) configuration. Altered protein content in crt(-/-) cells resulted in remodeled NPC architecture that caused decreased pore diameter and diminished probability of central channel occupancy versus wild type counterparts. Ionophore treatment of impaired calcium handling in crt(-/-) cells corrected nuclear pore microarchitecture and rescued nuclear import resulting in normalized myofibrillogenesis. Thus, calreticulin deficiency alters nuclear pore function and structure, impeding myofibrillogenesis in nascent cardiomyocytes through a calcium dependent mechanism. This essential role of calreticulin in nucleocytoplasmic communication competency ties its regulatory action with proficiency of cardiac myofibrillogenesis essential for proper cardiac development.

  17. Facial skin pores: a multiethnic study

    PubMed Central

    Flament, Frederic; Francois, Ghislain; Qiu, Huixia; Ye, Chengda; Hanaya, Tomoo; Batisse, Dominique; Cointereau-Chardon, Suzy; Seixas, Mirela Donato Gianeti; Dal Belo, Susi Elaine; Bazin, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Skin pores (SP), as they are called by laymen, are common and benign features mostly located on the face (nose, cheeks, etc) that generate many aesthetic concerns or complaints. Despite the prevalence of skin pores, related literature is scarce. With the aim of describing the prevalence of skin pores and anatomic features among ethnic groups, a dermatoscopic instrument, using polarized lighting, coupled to a digital camera recorded the major features of skin pores (size, density, coverage) on the cheeks of 2,585 women in different countries and continents. A detection threshold of 250 μm, correlated to clinical scorings by experts, was input into a specific software to further allow for automatic counting of the SP density (N/cm2) and determination of their respective sizes in mm2. Integrating both criteria also led to establishing the relative part of the skin surface (as a percentage) that is actually covered by SP on cheeks. The results showed that the values of respective sizes, densities, and skin coverage: 1) were recorded in all studied subjects; 2) varied greatly with ethnicity; 3) plateaued with age in most cases; and 4) globally refected self-assessment by subjects, in particular those who self-declare having “enlarged pores” like Brazilian women. Inversely, Chinese women were clearly distinct from other ethnicities in having very low density and sizes. Analyzing the present results suggests that facial skin pore’s morphology as perceived by human eye less result from functional criteria of associated appendages such as sebaceous glands. To what extent skin pores may be viewed as additional criteria of a photo-altered skin is an issue to be further addressed. PMID:25733918

  18. An integrated approach for determination of pore-type distribution in carbonate-siliciclastic Asmari Reservoir, Cheshmeh-Khosh Oilfield, SW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharechelou, Sajjad; Amini, Abdolhossein; Kadkhodaie-Ilkhchi, Ali; Moradi, Babak

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an integrated pore type study at microscopic (core data), mesoscopic (well logs) and megascopic scales (3D seismic data) in the mixed carbonate-siliciclastic Asmari Reservoir of the Cheshmeh-Khosh Oilfield, SW Iran. Firstly, pore types are determined in a microscopic scale based on petrographic studies of thin sections. Well logs and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log data are employed for pore type determination based on a velocity deviation log (mesoscopic scale). For each pore type subclass, a suite of physical rock properties including average poroperm values, T2 distribution, capillary pressure, pore size distribution and depositional texture are calculated. For this purpose, the NMR log, mercury injection capillary pressure data and core descriptions are interpreted in an integrated approach. Capillary pressure and pore size distribution in each pore type class are determined by mercury injection capillary pressure tests and synthesis of a continuous capillary pressure log from the NMR log (pseudo Pc curves). For dynamic behavior examination of the reservoir, the pore types are analysed in the framework of hydraulic flow units. Finally, 3D post-stacked seismic data are converted to a cube of pore types based on acoustic impedance inversion and seismic attributes. The methodology of this study is accomplished by using core and log data from three key wells and a 3D post-stack seismic data from the studied field. Lastly, a map of pore type distribution is established to provide a clue on the high and low permeable zones of the field. The presented methodology signifies reservoir anatomy on micro to mega scales.

  19. [Transient abnormal Q-waves].

    PubMed

    Godballe, C; Hoeck, H C; Sørensen, J A

    1990-01-01

    We present a case of transient abnormal Q-waves (TAQ) and a review of the literature. TAQ are defined as abnormal Q-waves, which disappear within ten days. They are most often seen in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) but are also seen in other conditions. Brief episodes of myocardial ischemia giving rise to reversible biochemical and ultrastructural myocardial changes, resulting in transient ECG changes, provide an accepted theory for the pathogenesis of TAO. Investigations have shown that the occurrence of exercise-induced TAQ may be a symptom of IHD. It is impossible to distinguish TAQ from Q-waves induced by myocardial infarction. Appearance of TAQ during exercise-testing frequently indicates IHD. PMID:2301045

  20. [Chromosome abnormalities in human cancer].

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Gómez, F

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigation on the presence of chromosome abnormalities in neoplasias has allowed outstanding advances in the knowledge of malignant transformation mechanisms and important applications in the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of leukaemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the most relevant cytogenetic aberrations, some of them described at the Unidad de Investigación Médica en Genética Humana, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, and to correlate these abnormalities with recent achievements in the knowledge of oncogenes, suppressor genes or antioncogenes, their chromosome localization, and their mutations in human neoplasia; as well as their perspectives in prevention and treatment of cancer that such findings permit to anticipate.

  1. Ultrasound screening for fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Chitty, L S

    1995-12-01

    Ultrasound screening for fetal abnormalities is increasingly becoming part of routine antenatal care in Europe and the UK. However, there has been very little formal evaluation of this practice. In this article reports of routine ultrasound screening are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages discussed. The majority of routine anomaly scanning is done in the second trimester but there may be a case for screening at other times in pregnancy and alternative anomaly screening policies are discussed. PMID:8710765

  2. [Endocrine abnormalities in HIV infections].

    PubMed

    Verges, B; Chavanet, P; Desgres, J; Kisterman, J P; Waldner, A; Vaillant, G; Portier, H; Brun, J M; Putelat, R

    The finding of endocrine gland lesions at pathological examination in AIDS and reports of several cases of endocrine disease in patients with this syndrome have prompted us to study endocrine functions in 63 patients (51 men, 12 women) with HIV-1 infection. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) classification system, 13 of these patients were stage CDC II, 27 stage CDC III and 23 stage CDC IV. We explored the adrenocortical function (ACTH, immediate tetracosactrin test) and the thyroid function (free T3 and T4 levels, TRH on TSH test) in all 63 patients. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (testosterone levels, LHRH test) and prolactin secretion (THR test) were explored in the 51 men. The results obtained showed early peripheral testicular insufficiency at stage CDC II and early pituitary gland abnormalities with hypersecretion of ACTH and prolactin also at stage CDC II. On the other hand, adrenocortical and pituitary abnormalities were not frequently found. The physiopathology of the endocrine abnormalities observed in HIV-1-infected patients remains unclear, but one may suspect that it involves interleukin-1 since this protein factor has recently been shown to stimulate the corticotropin-releasing hormone secretion and to act directly on the glycoprotein capsule of the virus (gp 120) whose structure is similar to that of some neurohormones.

  3. Pore structure of single-wall carbon nanohorn aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, K.; Kaneko, K.; Kokai, F.; Takahashi, K.; Yudasaka, M.; Iijima, S.

    2000-11-01

    Single-wall carbon nanohorn aggregates were characterized by N 2 adsorption at 77 K and `particle density' measurement using the high pressure He buoyancy method. The single-wall carbon nanohorn aggregate had micropores and its pore volume was 0.11 ml g -1. The particle density was 1.25 g ml -1. The particle density was not equal to the solid density of graphite (2.27 g ml -1) , but it agreed within 15% with the density of the single-wall carbon nanohorn estimated using previous TEM data. Hence single-wall carbon nanohorns have closed micropores covered with single graphene walls. According to N 2 adsorption, single-wall carbon nanohorns have a considerably large surface area (308 m2 g-1) and open microporosity which has been ascribed to the inter-particle aggregate structure, the so-called ` dahlia flower type structure'.

  4. Silicon nanofilter with absolute pore size and high mechanical strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wen Hwa; Ferrari, Mauro

    1995-12-01

    Microfabricated silicon filters with a nominal pore size of 20 nm have been successfully fabricated and characterized. The filter consists of a filtration membrane on top of a silicon surface and a mechanical support on the silicon substrate. Two polysilicon layers together with a low temperature oxide layer are used to generate the filtration membrane on the front side of silicon wafers. The filtration function is accomplished by the flow channel generated from a sandwiched thin silicon dioxide layer. The thickness of the sandwiched oxide determines the particle size that can pass through the filter. Both distilled water and cell culture medium have been used to test the flow rate for this nanofilter. We have found that the flow rate of the nanofilter is highest at the beginning of the test, and then slowly decreases to its asymptotic values for both water and the cell culture medium. The observed flow rate is linearly proportional to the applied pressure in the ranges tested. The typical flow rate of distilled water for 20 nm filter with 1.19 cm2 effective filtration area is about 0.07 ml/min for applied pressure of 8 PSI. The filter successfully sustained pressure of up to 20 PSI.

  5. Insular and caudate lesions release abnormal yawning in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Krestel, Heinz; Weisstanner, Christian; Hess, Christian W; Bassetti, Claudio L; Nirkko, Arto; Wiest, Roland

    2015-03-01

    Abnormal yawning is an underappreciated phenomenon in patients with ischemic stroke. We aimed at identifying frequently affected core regions in the supratentorial brain of stroke patients with abnormal yawning and contributing to the anatomical network concept of yawning control. Ten patients with acute anterior circulation stroke and ≥3 yawns/15 min without obvious cause were analyzed. The NIH stroke scale (NIHSS), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), symptom onset, period with abnormal yawning, blood oxygen saturation, glucose, body temperature, blood pressure, heart rate, and modified Rankin scale (mRS) were assessed for all patients. MRI lesion maps were segmented on diffusion-weighted images, spatially normalized, and the extent of overlap between the different stroke patterns was determined. Correlations between the period with abnormal yawning and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in the overlapping regions, total stroke volume, NIHSS and mRS were performed. Periods in which patients presented with episodes of abnormal yawning lasted on average for 58 h. Average GCS, NIHSS, and mRS scores were 12.6, 11.6, and 3.5, respectively. Clinical parameters were within normal limits. Ischemic brain lesions overlapped in nine out of ten patients: in seven patients in the insula and in seven in the caudate nucleus. The decrease of the ADC within the lesions correlated with the period with abnormal yawing (r = -0.76, Bonferroni-corrected p = 0.02). The stroke lesion intensity of the common overlapping regions in the insula and the caudate nucleus correlates with the period with abnormal yawning. The insula might be the long sought-after brain region for serotonin-mediated yawning.

  6. Interfacial velocities and capillary pressure gradients during Haines jumps.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Ryan T; Berg, Steffen

    2013-10-01

    Drainage is typically understood as a process where the pore space is invaded by a nonwetting phase pore-by-pore, the controlling parameters of which are represented by capillary number and mobility ratio. However, what is less understood and where experimental data are lacking is direct knowledge of the dynamics of pore drainage and the associated intrinsic time scales since the rate dependencies often observed with displacement processes are potentially dependent on these time scales. Herein, we study pore drainage events with a high speed camera in a micromodel system and analyze the dependency of interfacial velocity on bulk flow rate and spatial fluid configurations. We find that pore drainage events are cooperative, meaning that capillary pressure differences which extend over multiple pores directly affect fluid topology and menisci dynamics. Results suggest that not only viscous forces but also capillarity acts in a nonlocal way. Lastly, the existence of a pore morphological parameter where pore drainage transitions from capillary to inertial and/or viscous dominated is discussed followed by a discussion on capillary dispersion and time scale dependencies. We show that the displacement front is disperse when volumetric flow rate is less than the intrinsic time scale for a pore drainage event and becomes sharp when the flow rate is greater than the intrinsic time scale (i.e., overruns the pore drainage event), which clearly shows how pore-scale parameters influence macroscale flow behavior. PMID:24229279

  7. Multiphase flow predictions from carbonate pore space images using extracted network models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kharusi, Anwar S.; Blunt, Martin J.

    2008-06-01

    A methodology to extract networks from pore space images is used to make predictions of multiphase transport properties for subsurface carbonate samples. The extraction of the network model is based on the computation of the location and sizes of pores and throats to create a topological representation of the void space of three-dimensional (3-D) rock images, using the concept of maximal balls. In this work, we follow a multistaged workflow. We start with a 2-D thin-section image; convert it statistically into a 3-D representation of the pore space; extract a network model from this image; and finally, simulate primary drainage, waterflooding, and secondary drainage flow processes using a pore-scale simulator. We test this workflow for a reservoir carbonate rock. The network-predicted absolute permeability is similar to the core plug measured value and the value computed on the 3-D void space image using the lattice Boltzmann method. The predicted capillary pressure during primary drainage agrees well with a mercury-air experiment on a core sample, indicating that we have an adequate representation of the rock's pore structure. We adjust the contact angles in the network to match the measured waterflood and secondary drainage capillary pressures. We infer a significant degree of contact angle hysteresis. We then predict relative permeabilities for primary drainage, waterflooding, and secondary drainage that agree well with laboratory measured values. This approach can be used to predict multiphase transport properties when wettability and pore structure vary in a reservoir, where experimental data is scant or missing. There are shortfalls to this approach, however. We compare results from three networks, one of which was derived from a section of the rock containing vugs. Our method fails to predict properties reliably when an unrepresentative image is processed to construct the 3-D network model. This occurs when the image volume is not sufficient to represent the

  8. Fabrication and electrical characterization of a pore-cavity-pore device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedone, D.; Langecker, M.; Münzer, A. M.; Wei, R.; Nagel, R. D.; Rant, U.

    2010-11-01

    We present a solid state nanopore device structure comprising two nanopores which are stacked above each other and connected via a pyramidal cavity of 10 fl volume. The process of fabrication of the pore-cavity-pore device (PCP) relies on the formation of one pore in a Si3N4 membrane by electron beam lithography, while the other pore is chemically etched into the Si carrier by a feedback controlled process. The dimensions of the two nanopores as well as the cavity can be adjusted independently, which is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The PCP device is characterized with respect to its electrical properties, including noise analysis and impedance spectroscopy. An equivalent circuit model is identified and resistance, capacitance, and dielectric loss factors are obtained. Potential and electric field distributions inside the electrically biased device are simulated by finite element methods. The low noise characteristics of the PCP device (comparable to a single solid state nanopore) make it suitable for the stochastic sensing of single molecules; moreover, the pore-cavity-pore architecture allows for novel kinds of experiments including the trapping of single nano-objects and single molecule time-of-flight measurements.

  9. A pore-level scenario for the development of mixed-wettability in oil reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Kovscek, A.R.; Wong, H.; Radke, C.J.

    1992-09-01

    Understanding the role of thin films in porous media is vital if wettability is to be elucidated at the pore level. The type and thickness of films coating pore walls determines reservoir wettability and whether or not reservoir rock can be altered from its initial state of wettability. Pore shape, especially pore wall curvature, is an important factor in determining wetting-film thicknesses. Yet, pore shape and the physics of thin wetting films are generally neglected in models of flow in porous rocks. This paper incorporates thin-film forces into a collection of star-shaped capillary tubes model to describe the geological development of mixed-wettability in reservoir rock. Here, mixed-wettability refers to continuous and distinct oil and water-wetting surfaces coexisting in the porous medium. The proposed model emphasizes the remarkable role of thin films. New pore-level fluid configurations arise that are quite unexpected. For example, efficient water displacement of oil (i.e, low residual oil saturation) characteristic of mixed-wettability porous media is ascribed to interconnected oil lenses or rivulets which bridge the walls adjacent to a pore corner. Predicted residual oil saturations are approximately 35 % less in mixed-wet rock compared to completely water-wet rock. Calculated capillary pressure curves mimic those of mixed-wet porous media in the primary drainage of water, imbibition of water, and secondary drainage modes. Amott-Harvey indices range from {minus}0.18 to 0.36 also in good agreement with experimental values. (Morrow et al, 1986; Judhunandan and Morrow, 1991).

  10. Pore space connectivity and porosity using CT scans of tropical soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Previatello da Silva, Livia; de Jong Van Lier, Quirijn

    2015-04-01

    Microtomography has been used in soil physics for characterization and allows non-destructive analysis with high-resolution, yielding a three-dimensional representation of pore space and fluid distribution. It also allows quantitative characterization of pore space, including pore size distribution, shape, connectivity, porosity, tortuosity, orientation, preferential pathways and is also possible predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity using Darcy's equation and a modified Poiseuille's equation. Connectivity of pore space is an important topological property of soil. Together with porosity and pore-size distribution, it governs transport of water, solutes and gases. In order to quantify and analyze pore space (quantifying connectivity of pores and porosity) of four tropical soils from Brazil with different texture and land use, undisturbed samples were collected in São Paulo State, Brazil, with PVC ring with 7.5 cm in height and diameter of 7.5 cm, depth of 10 - 30 cm from soil surface. Image acquisition was performed with a CT system Nikon XT H 225, with technical specifications of dual reflection-transmission target system including a 225 kV, 225 W high performance Xray source equipped with a reflection target with pot size of 3 μm combined with a nano-focus transmission module with a spot size of 1 μm. The images were acquired at specific energy level for each soil type, according to soil texture, and external copper filters were used in order to allow the attenuation of low frequency X-ray photons and passage of one monoenergetic beam. This step was performed aiming minimize artifacts such as beam hardening that may occur during the attenuation in the material interface with different densities within the same sample. Images were processed and analyzed using ImageJ/Fiji software. Retention curve (tension table and the pressure chamber methods), saturated hydraulic conductivity (constant head permeameter), granulometry, soil density and particle density

  11. Pore Topology Method: A General and Fast Pore-Scale Modeling Approach to Simulate Fluid Flow in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riasi, M. S.; Huang, G.; Montemagno, C.; Yeghiazarian, L.

    2014-12-01

    Micro-scale modeling of multiphase flow in porous media is critical to characterize porous materials. Several modeling techniques have been implemented to date, but none can be used as a general strategy for all porous media applications due to challenges presented by non-smooth high-curvature and deformable solid surfaces, and by a wide range of pore sizes and porosities. Finite approaches like the finite volume method require a high quality, problem-dependent mesh, while particle-based approaches like the lattice Boltzmann require too many particles to achieve a stable meaningful solution. Both come at a large computational cost. Other methods such as pore network modeling (PNM) have been developed to accelerate the solution process by simplifying the solution domain, but so far a unique and straightforward methodology to implement PNM is lacking. Pore topology method (PTM) is a new topologically consistent approach developed to simulate multiphase flow in porous media. The core of PTM is to reduce the complexity of the 3-D void space geometry by working with its medial surface as the solution domain. Medial surface is capable of capturing all the corners and surface curvatures in a porous structure, and therefore provides a topologically consistent representative geometry for porous structure. Despite the simplicity and low computational cost, PTM provides a fast and straightforward approach for micro-scale modeling of fluid flow in all types of porous media irrespective of their porosity and pore size distribution. In our previous work, we developed a non-iterative fast medial surface finder algorithm to determine a voxel-wide medial surface of the void space of porous media as well as a set of simple rules to determine the capillary pressure-saturation curves for a porous system assuming quasi-static two-phase flow with a planar w-nw interface. Our simulation results for a highly porous fibrous material and polygonal capillary tubes were in excellent agreement

  12. Experimental Constraints on the Effective Pressure Law for Failure at the Base of the Seismogenic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, T.; Hirth, G.

    2012-12-01

    We are characterizing the Brittle-Ductile Transition (BDT) for quartz sandstone under elevated pore pressures to test whether the depth of the BDT increases with pore pressure - wherein fracture strength is reduced following the effective pressure law. The effects of pore pressure on the BDT are investigated through undrained, triaxial compression experiments on Fontainebleau Sandstone weld-sealed with 0 to 4 weight % pore water at a confining pressure of 1 GPa, temperature of 900 °C, and strain rate of 10-5 s-1, at which ductile flow has been observed without a significant pore pressure. The retainment of significant pore-spaces and -water suggests extreme pore pressures maintained throughout the experiments. However, the sandstone displays ductile deformation at all pore-fluid contents tested, distinguished by steady or increasing stress-strain relations, macroscopically distributed deformation, and dislocation creep microstructures. The flow strengths of the sandstone are relatively high overall at all pore-fluid contents, although the strength appears to decrease with an increase in retained pore-fluid content. Microstructures produced in high pore-fluid content tests indicate less pronounced grain boundary migration than in room dry tests, but nonetheless suggest dislocation creep remains the predominant deformation mechanism. Our observations are incompatible with the assumption in many crustal strength models that extreme pore pressures promote brittle failure at low stresses at depths greater than the BDT under dry conditions. The apparent break-down of the effective pressure law is consistent with the hypothesis that extensive inelastic deformation at grain junctions leads to a reduction in solid-pore fluid interfacial area and in turn the degree to which pore pressures act against the stresses applied from the exterior. Our results may have important implications for the processes of slow slip failure, many models of which assume the fully

  13. Pore-facies as a tool for incorporation of small-scale dynamic information in integrated reservoir studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehrazi, A.; Rezaee, R.; Rahimpour, H.

    2011-06-01

    In this study, the quantification and incorporation of pore geometry, a qualitative parameter, and a source of dynamic information, will be demonstrated in the integrated reservoir studies. To quantify pore geometry, mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP) curves have been exploited. For each MICP curve, 20 parameters were derived and multi-resolution graph-based clustering was applied to classify the curves into nine representative distinct clusters. The number of clusters was determined based on petrography and cluster analysis. The quantified pore geometry in terms of discrete variable has been called pore-facies, and like electro-facies and litho-facies could be used in facies modelling and rock typing phases of an integrated study. The dependence of dynamic reservoir rock properties on pore geometry makes the pore-facies an interesting and powerful approach for incorporation of small-scale dynamic data into a reservoir model. A comparison among various facies definitions proved that neither litho-facies nor electro-facies is capable of characterizing dynamic rock properties, and the best results were achieved by the pore-facies method. Based on this study, it is recommended that for facies analysis in reservoir modelling, methods based on pore characteristics such as pore-facies, introduced in this paper, be used rather than traditional facies that rely on matrix properties. The next generation of the reservoir models which incorporate pore-facies-based rock types will provide a basis for more accurate static and dynamic models, a narrower range of uncertainty in the models, and a better prediction of reservoir performance.

  14. Capillary pressure techniques: application to exploration and development geology

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, J.B.

    1987-10-01

    Capillary pressure can be viewed as the pressure required to drive a fluid through a pore throat and displace the pore wetting fluid, with greater pressure being required as the pore throat becomes smaller. The size and distribution of pore throats within a host rock control its capillary pressure characteristics, which in turn control fluid behavior in the pore system. Mercury-injection capillary pressure curves, which measure capillarity, are obtained by injecting mercury into sample plugs to produce a plot of injection pressure vs. mercury saturation. The resulting capillary pressure curves can provide qualitative assessments of reservoir rock using such calculated values as pore-throat sorting, reservoir grade, and oil columns required to obtain 50 and 75% oil saturations. Regional capillary pressure maps of these calculated values identify a north-south trend of favorable reservoir rock along the state line between Montana and North Dakota in the third porosity (C) zone of the Ordovician Red River Formation. Oil migration and trapping can be significantly controlled by capillary pressure. By understanding capillarity, they can obtain better insight on the nature of reservoir rock, oil accumulations, and permeability relationships. 15 figures, 1 table.

  15. Assessing the effects of microbial metabolism and metabolities on reservoir pore structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udegbunam, E.O.; Adkins, J.P.; Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Tanner, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of microbial treatment on pore structure of sandstone and carbonatereservoirs was determined. Understanding how different bacterial strains and their metabolic bioproducts affect reservoir pore structure will permit the prudent application of microorganisms for enhanced oil recovery. The microbial strains tested included Clostridium acetobutylicum, a polymer-producing Bacillus strain, and an unidentified halophilic anaerobe that mainly produced acids and gases. Electrical conductivity, absolute permeability, porosity and centrifuge capillary pressure were used to examine rock pore structures. Modifications of the pore structure observed in the laboratory cores included pore enlargement due to acid dissolution of carbonates and poare throat reduction due to biomass plugging. This paper shows that careful selection of microbes based on proper understanding of the reservoir petrophysical characteristics is necessary for applications of microbially enhanced oil recovery. These methods and results can be useful to field operators and laboratory researchers involved in design and screening of reservoirs for MEOR. The methods are also applicable in evaluation of formation damage caused by drilling, injection or completion fluids or stimulation caused by acids.

  16. Dynamic Pore-Scale Imaging of Reactive Transport in Heterogeneous Carbonates at Reservior Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menke, Hannah; Bijeljic, Branko; Andrew, Matthew; Blunt, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Sequestering carbon in deep geologic formations is one way of reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Carbon capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) in carbonate reservoirs has the added benefit of mobilizing more oil for extraction, increasing oil reservoir yield, and generating revenue while also mitigating climate change. The magnitude, speed, and type of dissolution are dependent the intrinsic properties of the rock. Understanding how small changes in the pore structure affect dissolution is paramount for successful predictive modelling both on the pore-scale and for up-scaled reservoir simulations. We propose an experimental method whereby both 'Pink Beam' synchrotron radiation and a Micro-CT lab source are used in dynamic X-ray microtomography to investigate the pore structure changes in carbonate rocks of varying heterogeneity at high temperatures and pressures. Four carbonate rock types were studied, two relatively homogeneous carbonates, Ketton and Mt. Gambier, and two very heterogeneous carbonates, Estalliades and Portland Basebed. Each rock type was imaged under the same reservoir and flow conditions to gain insight into the impact of heterogeneity. A 4-mm carbonate core was injected with CO2-saturated brine at 10 MPa and 50oC for 2 hours. Depending on sample heterogeneity and X-ray source, tomographic images were taken at between 30-second and 20-minute time-resolutions and a 4-micron spatial resolution during injection. Changes in porosity, permeability, and structure were obtained by first binning and filtering the images, then binarizing them with watershed segmentation, and finally extracting a pore/throat network. Furthermore, pore-scale flow modelling was performed directly on the binarized image and used to track velocity distributions as the pore network evolved. Significant differences in dissolution type and magnitude were found for each rock type. The most homogeneous carbonate, Ketton, was seen to have predominately uniform dissolution with

  17. Mineral dissolution kinetics at the pore scale

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.

    2007-05-24

    Mineral dissolution rates in the field have been reported to be orders of magnitude slower than those measured in the laboratory, an unresolved discrepancy that severely limits our ability to develop scientifically defensible predictive or even interpretive models for many geochemical processes in the earth and environmental sciences. One suggestion links this discrepancy to the role of physical and chemical heterogeneities typically found in subsurface soils and aquifers in producing scale-dependent rates where concentration gradients develop. In this paper, we examine the possibility that scale-dependent mineral dissolution rates can develop even at the single pore and fracture scale, the smallest and most fundamental building block of porous media. To do so, we develop two models to analyze mineral dissolution kinetics at the single pore scale: (1) a Poiseuille Flow model that applies laboratory-measured dissolution kinetics at the pore or fracture wall and couples this to a rigorous treatment of both advective and diffusive transport, and (2) a Well-Mixed Reactor model that assumes complete mixing within the pore, while maintaining the same reactive surface area, average flow rate, and geometry as the Poiseuille Flow model. For a fracture, a 1D Plug Flow Reactor model is considered in addition to quantify the effects of longitudinal versus transverse mixing. The comparison of averaged dissolution rates under various conditions of flow, pore size, and fracture length from the three models is used as a means to quantify the extent to which concentration gradients at the single pore and fracture scale can develop and render rates scale-dependent. Three important minerals that dissolve at widely different rates, calcite, plagioclase, and iron hydroxide, are considered. The modeling indicates that rate discrepancies arise primarily where concentration gradients develop due to comparable rates of reaction and advective transport, and incomplete mixing via molecular

  18. Pores and Void in Asclepiades’ Physical Theory

    PubMed Central

    Leith, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines a fundamental, though relatively understudied, aspect of the physical theory of the physician Asclepiades of Bithynia, namely his doctrine of pores. My principal thesis is that this doctrine is dependent on a conception of void taken directly from Epicurean physics. The paper falls into two parts: the first half addresses the evidence for the presence of void in Asclepiades’ theory, and concludes that his conception of void was basically that of Epicurus; the second half focuses on the precise nature of Asclepiadean pores, and seeks to show that they represent void interstices between the primary particles of matter which are the constituents of the human body, and are thus exactly analogous to the void interstices between atoms within solid objects in Epicurus’ theory. PMID:22984299

  19. Pores and Void in Asclepiades' Physical Theory.

    PubMed

    Leith, David

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines a fundamental, though relatively understudied, aspect of the physical theory of the physician Asclepiades of Bithynia, namely his doctrine of pores. My principal thesis is that this doctrine is dependent on a conception of void taken directly from Epicurean physics. The paper falls into two parts: the first half addresses the evidence for the presence of void in Asclepiades' theory, and concludes that his conception of void was basically that of Epicurus; the second half focuses on the precise nature of Asclepiadean pores, and seeks to show that they represent void interstices between the primary particles of matter which are the constituents of the human body, and are thus exactly analogous to the void interstices between atoms within solid objects in Epicurus' theory. PMID:22984299

  20. Abnormalities of vascular structure and function in pediatric hypertension.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Elaine M

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is associated with adverse cardiovascular (CV) events in adults. Measures of vascular structure and function, including increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and elevated arterial stiffness predict hard CV events in adulthood. Newer data suggest that abnormalities in target organ damage are occurring in adolescents and young adults with high blood pressure. In this review, we discuss the techniques for measuring vascular dysfunction in young people and the evidence linking blood pressure levels to this type of target organ damage.

  1. Pore morphology study of silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, D.W.; Anderson, J.; Haereid, S.; Smith, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    Silica aerogels have numerous properties which suggest applications such as ultra high efficiency thermal insulation. These properties relate directly to the aerogel`s pore size distribution. The micro and meso pore size ranges can be investigated by normal small angle x-ray scattering and possibly, nitrogen adsorption. However, the measurement of larger pores (> 250 {angstrom}) is more difficult. Due to their limited mechanical strength, mercury porosimetry and nitrogen condensation can disrupt the gel structure and electron microscopy provides only limited large scale structure information. The use of small angle light scattering techniques seems to have promise, the only hurdle is that aerogels exhibit significant multiple scattering. This can be avoided if one observes the gels in the wet stage since the structure of the aerogel should be very similar to the wet gel (as the result of supercritical drying). Thus, if one can match the refractive index, the morphology can be probed. The combination of certain alcoholic solvents fit this index matching criteria. Preliminary results for the gel network (micron range) and primary particle structure (manometer) are reported by using small angle light scattering and ultra-small angle x-ray scattering. The effects on structure over the length scale range of <1 nm to >5 {mu}m under different conditions (precursors, pH, etc.) are presented. The change in structure of an aerogel during isostatic compaction to 228 MPa (to simulate drying from wetting solvents) are also discussed.

  2. Collaborative Research: Evolution of Pore Structure and Permeability of Rocks Under Hydrothermal Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wenlu; Evans, J. Brian

    2007-04-15

    The physical and transport properties of porous rocks can be altered by a variety of diagenetic, metamorphic, and tectonic processes, and the changes that result are of critical importance to such industrial applications as resource recovery, carbon dioxide sequestration, and waste isolation in geologic formations. These inter-relationships between rocks, pore fluids, and deformation are also the key to understanding many natural processes, including: dynamic metamorphism, fault mechanics, fault stability, and pressure solution deformation. Here, we propose work to investigate the changes of permeability and pore geometry owing to inelastic deformation by solution-transfer, brittle fracturing, and dislocation creep. The work would study the relationship of deformation and permeability reduction in fluid-filled quartz and calcite rocks and investigate the effects of loading configuration on the evolution of porosity and permeability under hydrothermal conditions. We would use a combination of techniques, including laboratory experiments, numerical calculations, and observations of rock microstructure. The laboratory experiments provide mechanical and transport data under conditions that isolate each particular mechanism. Our apparatus are designed to provide simultaneous measurements of pore volume, permeability, axial and volumetric strain rates while being loaded under isostatic or conventional triaxial loading. Temperatures up to 1400 K may be obtained, while confining pressures and pore pressures are maintained independently up to 500 MPa. Observations of the structure will be made with standard optical, scanning electron, and laser confocal scanning optical microscopes. The data obtained will be used to quantify changes in surface roughness, porosity, pore dimensions, and their spatial fluctuations. The results of the experiments and the image data are then used in network, finite-difference and other numerical models to verify the validity of experimentally

  3. Making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

    PubMed

    Cody, Jannine DeMars; Hale, Daniel Esten

    2015-09-01

    Individuals affected by the classic chromosome deletion syndromes which were first identified at the beginning of the genetic age, are now positioned to benefit from genomic advances. This issue highlights five of these conditions (4p-, 5p-, 11q-, 18p-, and 18q-). It focuses on the increased in understanding of the molecular underpinnings and envisions how these can be transformed into effective treatments. While it is scientifically exciting to see the phenotypic manifestations of hemizygosity being increasingly understood at the molecular and cellular level, it is even more amazing to consider that we are now on the road to making chromosome abnormalities treatable conditions.

  4. [Erythrocyte membrane abnormalities - hereditary elliptocytosis].

    PubMed

    Kvezereli-Kopadze, M; Kvezereli-Kopadze, A; Mtvarelidze, Z; Bubuteishvili, A

    2015-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the 4 year old boy with Hereditary Elliptocitosis (HE). The diagnosis of this rare hemolytic anemia was based on detailed family history (positive in the 4-th generation), physical examination and Para-clinical data analyses. The vast majority of patients with HE are asymptomatic, severe forms are rare. The most important is examination of blood films, which is helpful to detect the morphology abnormalities of red cells. In case of HE a different approach is required. Positive family history and series of investigations should be conducted to determine the HE.

  5. Abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick G

    2013-12-01

    Primary abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane are characterized by clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity. Among this group, hereditary spherocytosis patients are more likely to experience symptomatic anemia. Treatment of hereditary spherocytosis with splenectomy is curative in most patients. Growing recognition of the long-term risks of splenectomy has led to re-evaluation of the role of splenectomy. Management guidelines acknowledge these considerations and recommend discussion between health care providers, patient, and family. The hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes are the most common primary disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, most elliptocytosis patients are asymptomatic and do not require therapy.

  6. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  7. Functionalized bioinspired microstructured optical fiber pores for applications in chemical vapor sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, Jacob A.

    Chemical vapor sensing for defense, homeland security, environmental, and agricultural application is a challenge, which due combined requirements of ppt sensitivity, high selectivity, and rapid response, cannot be met using conventional analytical chemistry techniques. New sensing approaches and platforms are necessary in order to make progress in this rapidly evolving field. Inspired by the functionalized nanopores on moth sensilla hairs that contribute to the high selectivity and sensitivity of this biological system, a chemical vapor sensor based on the micro to nanoscale pores in microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) was designed. This MOF based chemical vapor sensor design utilizes MOF pores functionalized with organic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for selectivity and separations and a gold plasmonic sensor for detection and discrimination. Thin well-controlled gold films in MOF pores are critical components for the fabrication of structured plasmonic chemical vapor sensors. Thermal decomposition of dimethyl Au(II) trifluoroacetylacetonate dissolved in near-critical CO2 was used to deposit gold island films within the MOF pores. Using a 3mercatopropyltrimethoxysilane adhesion layer, continuous gold thin films as thin as 20--30 nm were deposited within MOF pores as small as 500 nm in diameter. The gold island films proved to be SERS active and were used to detect 900 ppt 2,4 DNT vapor in high pressure nitrogen and 6 ppm benzaldehyde. MOF based waveguide Raman (WGR), which can probe the air/silica interface between a waveguiding core and surrounding pores, was developed to detect and characterize SAMs and other thin films deposited in micro to nanoscale MOF pores. MOF based WGR was used to characterize an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) SAM deposited in 1.6 mum diameter pores iv to demonstrate that the SAM was well-formed, uniform along the pore length, and only a single layer. MOF based WGR was used to detect a human serum albumin monolayer deposited on the

  8. INVESTIGATIONS INTO BIOFOULING PHENOMENA IN FINE PORE AERATION DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbiologically-based procedures were used to describe biofouling phenomena on fine pore aeration devices and to determine whether biofilm characteristics could be related to diffuser process performance parameters. Fine pore diffusers were obtained from five municipal wastewa...

  9. Medical management of abnormal