Science.gov

Sample records for abnormal protein accumulation

  1. The abnormal isoform of the prion protein accumulates in late-endosome-like organelles in scrapie-infected mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Arnold, J E; Tipler, C; Laszlo, L; Hope, J; Landon, M; Mayer, R J

    1995-08-01

    The prion encephalopathies are characterized by accumulation in the brain of the abnormal form PrPsc of a normal host gene product PrPc. The mechanism and site of formation of PrPsc from PrPc are currently unknown. In this study, ME7 scrapie-infected mouse brain was used to show, both biochemically and by double-labelled immunogold electron microscopy, that proteinase K-resistant PrPsc is enriched in subcellular structures which contain the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor, ubiquitin-protein conjugates, beta-glucuronidase, and cathepsin B, termed late endosome-like organelles. The glycosylinositol phospholipid membrane-anchored PrPc will enter such compartment for normal degradation and the organelles may therefore act as chambers for the conversion of PrPc into infectious PrPsc in this murine model of scrapie.

  2. PROTEIN L-ISOASPARTYL METHYLTRANSFERASE2 is differentially expressed in chickpea and enhances seed vigor and longevity by reducing abnormal isoaspartyl accumulation predominantly in seed nuclear proteins.

    PubMed

    Verma, Pooja; Kaur, Harmeet; Petla, Bhanu Prakash; Rao, Venkateswara; Saxena, Saurabh C; Majee, Manoj

    2013-03-01

    PROTEIN l-ISOASPARTYL METHYLTRANSFERASE (PIMT) is a widely distributed protein-repairing enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of abnormal l-isoaspartyl residues in spontaneously damaged proteins to normal aspartyl residues. This enzyme is encoded by two divergent genes (PIMT1 and PIMT2) in plants, unlike many other organisms. While the biological role of PIMT1 has been elucidated, the role and significance of the PIMT2 gene in plants is not well defined. Here, we isolated the PIMT2 gene (CaPIMT2) from chickpea (Cicer arietinum), which exhibits a significant increase in isoaspartyl residues in seed proteins coupled with reduced germination vigor under artificial aging conditions. The CaPIMT2 gene is found to be highly divergent and encodes two possible isoforms (CaPIMT2 and CaPIMT2') differing by two amino acids in the region I catalytic domain through alternative splicing. Unlike CaPIMT1, both isoforms possess a unique 56-amino acid amino terminus and exhibit similar yet distinct enzymatic properties. Expression analysis revealed that CaPIMT2 is differentially regulated by stresses and abscisic acid. Confocal visualization of stably expressed green fluorescent protein-fused PIMT proteins and cell fractionation-immunoblot analysis revealed that apart from the plasma membrane, both CaPIMT2 isoforms localize predominantly in the nucleus, while CaPIMT1 localizes in the cytosol. Remarkably, CaPIMT2 enhances seed vigor and longevity by repairing abnormal isoaspartyl residues predominantly in nuclear proteins upon seed-specific expression in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), while CaPIMT1 enhances seed vigor and longevity by repairing such abnormal proteins mainly in the cytosolic fraction. Together, our data suggest that CaPIMT2 has most likely evolved through gene duplication, followed by subfunctionalization to specialize in repairing the nuclear proteome.

  3. Progressive accumulation of the abnormal conformer of the prion protein and spongiform encephalopathy in the obex of nonsymptomatic and symptomatic Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) with chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Spraker, Terry R; Gidlewski, Thomas; Powers, Jenny G; Nichols, Tracy; Balachandran, Aru; Cummings, Bruce; Wild, Margaret A; VerCauteren, Kurt; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the progressive accumulation of the abnormal conformer of the prion protein (PrP(CWD)) and spongiform degeneration in a single section of brain stem in Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) with chronic wasting disease (CWD). A section of obex from 85 CWD-positive elk was scored using the presence and abundance of PrP(CWD) immunoreactivity and spongiform degeneration in 10 nuclear regions and the presence and abundance of PrP(CWD) in 10 axonal tracts, the subependymal area of the fourth ventricle, and the thin subpial astrocytic layer (glial limitans). Data was placed in a formula to generate an overall obex score. Data suggests that PrP(CWD) immunoreactivity and spongiform degeneration has a unique and relatively consistent pattern of progression throughout a section of obex. This scoring technique utilizing a single section of obex may prove useful in future work for estimating the presence and abundance of PrP(CWD) in peripheral tissues and the nervous system in elk with CWD. PMID:26185123

  4. Progressive accumulation of the abnormal conformer of the prion protein and spongiform encephalopathy in the obex of nonsymptomatic and symptomatic Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) with chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Spraker, Terry R; Gidlewski, Thomas; Powers, Jenny G; Nichols, Tracy; Balachandran, Aru; Cummings, Bruce; Wild, Margaret A; VerCauteren, Kurt; O'Rourke, Katherine I

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the progressive accumulation of the abnormal conformer of the prion protein (PrP(CWD)) and spongiform degeneration in a single section of brain stem in Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) with chronic wasting disease (CWD). A section of obex from 85 CWD-positive elk was scored using the presence and abundance of PrP(CWD) immunoreactivity and spongiform degeneration in 10 nuclear regions and the presence and abundance of PrP(CWD) in 10 axonal tracts, the subependymal area of the fourth ventricle, and the thin subpial astrocytic layer (glial limitans). Data was placed in a formula to generate an overall obex score. Data suggests that PrP(CWD) immunoreactivity and spongiform degeneration has a unique and relatively consistent pattern of progression throughout a section of obex. This scoring technique utilizing a single section of obex may prove useful in future work for estimating the presence and abundance of PrP(CWD) in peripheral tissues and the nervous system in elk with CWD.

  5. Progressive accumulation of the abnormal conformer of the prion protein and spongiform encephalopathy in the obex of nonsymptomatic and symptomatic Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) with chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, has been reported in captive and free-ranging cervids. An abnormal isoform of a prion protein (PrP-CWD) has been associated with CWD in Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) and this prion protein can be detected with i...

  6. [Seed, aggregation and propagation of abnormal proteins could explain neurodegeneration?].

    PubMed

    Murayama, Shigeo

    2011-11-01

    Braak proposed propagation staging paradigm of Lewy- related alpha-synucleinopathy, which starts from medulla oblongata and extends rostrally to neocortex. Since this propagation shares that of bovine spongiformic encephalopathy, alpha- synuclein- prionopathy hypothesis was presented and augumented by pathological reports of Lewy body pathology in fetal tansplants of midbrain to patients with Parkinson disease (PD). The prionopathy hypothesis expanded to include tau and TDP- 43, is now receiving considerable attention world wide. Laterality of clinical symptoms can be explained with this hypothesis in PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis- TDP43, frontotemoral lobar degeneration- semantic dementia- TDP43 and tauopathy including corticobasal degeneration and argyrophilic grain dementia. Major cons of prionopathy hypothesis is how to explain cell to cell transmission of intracellular amyloid- like proteins. Several clinical and experimental data are now accumulated to answer this question. The difference in speed of spread between prion disease and neurodegenerative disease could be explained by aggregation size of abnormal proteins. The hypothesis could also explain glinoneuronal interaction, which is receiving another hot topic of neurodeneration. We propose that seed, aggregation propagation of abnormal protein should form one factor of clinical progression of neurodegenerative diseases and can be a therapeutic targets in future research.

  7. Abnormal hepatic copper accumulation of spheroid composed of liver cells from LEC rats in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ueno, K; Yoshizawa, M; Satoh, T; Yoneda, S; Ohmichi, M; Yamazaki, M; Mori, Y; Suzuki, K T

    1995-11-01

    The LEC rat is a mutant strain displaying hereditary hepatitis, and shows abnormal accumulation of copper (Cu) similar to that occurring in Wilson's disease. We prepared a multicellular spheroid composed of LEC rat liver cells to investigate the mechanism for abnormal accumulation of Cu. These multicellular spheroids were prepared by detaching the monolayer on the collagen-conjugated thermo-responsive polymer coated culture dish at a temperature below the critical solution temperature and culturing on the non-adhesive substratum. Long-term cultured spheroids of LEC rat liver cells as well as SD rat liver cells were attempted. Non-parenchymal cells obtained by collagenase perfusion from the LEC liver were fewer than those from the SD liver. Cells from the LEC rat, over 11 weeks of age, did not form a cell sheet; however, a mixture of parenchymal cells from LEC rats over aged 11 weeks and non-parenchymal cells from SD rats of any age yielded intact spheroids. We examined the toxicity, the accumulation and distribution of Cu in spheroids. The accumulation of Cu in LEC spheroids was higher than that in SD spheroids. Results suggest that spheroids consisting of LEC liver cells are useful as an alternative model to in vivo tests to investigate the mechanism for abnormal accumulation of Cu in liver.

  8. A SENSITIVE IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE ASSAY FOR DETECTION OF P53 PROTEIN ACCUMULATION IN SPUTUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    p53 mutations are common genetic alterations in lung cancers and usually result in p53 protein accumulation in tumor cells. Sputum is noninvasive to collect and ideal for screening p53 abnormalities. This study was to determine the feasibility of detecting p53 protein accumulatio...

  9. Accumulation of abnormal adult-generated hippocampal granule cells predicts seizure frequency and severity

    PubMed Central

    Hester, Michael S.; Danzer, Steve C.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of abnormally integrated, adult-born, hippocampal dentate granule cells (DGC) is hypothesized to contribute to the development of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). DGCs have long been implicated in TLE, as they regulate excitatory signaling through the hippocampus and exhibit neuroplastic changes during epileptogenesis. Furthermore, DGCs are unusual in that they are continually generated throughout life, with aberrant integration of new cells underlying the majority of restructuring in the dentate during epileptogenesis. While it is known that these abnormal networks promote abnormal neuronal firing and hyperexcitability, it has yet to be established whether they directly contribute to seizure generation. If abnormal DGCs do contribute, a reasonable prediction would be that the severity of epilepsy will be correlated with the number or load of abnormal DGCs. To test this prediction, we utilized a conditional, inducible transgenic mouse model to fate-map adult-generated DGCs. Mossy cell loss, also implicated in epileptogenesis, was assessed as well. Transgenic mice rendered epileptic using the pilocarpine-status epilepticus model of epilepsy were monitored 24/7 by video/EEG for four weeks to determine seizure frequency and severity. Positive correlations were found between seizure frequency and: 1) the percentage of hilar ectopic DGCs, 2) the amount of mossy fiber sprouting and 3) the extent of mossy cell death. In addition, mossy fiber sprouting and mossy cell death were correlated with seizure severity. These studies provide correlative evidence in support of the hypothesis that abnormal DGCs contribute to the development of TLE, and also support a role for mossy cell loss. PMID:23699504

  10. CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR ORIGIN OF ABNORMALLY PRESSURED GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN LOW-PERMEABILITY RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Dickinson, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    The paper suggests that overpressured and underpressured gas accumulations of this type have a common origin. In basins containing overpressured gas accumulations, rates of thermogenic gas accumulation exceed gas loss, causing fluid (gas) pressure to rise above the regional hydrostatic pressure. Free water in the larger pores is forced out of the gas generation zone into overlying and updip, normally pressured, water-bearing rocks. While other diagenetic processes continue, a pore network with very low permeability develops. As a result, gas accumulates in these low-permeability reservoirs at rates higher than it is lost. In basins containing underpressured gas accumulations, rates of gas generation and accumulation are less than gas loss. The basin-center gas accumulation persists, but because of changes in the basin dynamics, the overpressured accumulation evolves into an underpressured system.

  11. Motor Protein Accumulation on Antiparallel Microtubule Overlaps.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Hui-Shun; Betterton, Meredith D

    2016-05-10

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Overlap motor density profiles and motor trajectories resemble experimental measurements. The phase diagram of the model is similar to the single-filament case for low switching rate, while for high switching rate we find a new (to our knowledge) low density-high density-low density-high density phase. The overlap center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would naïvely expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center motor density depends on total overlap length, motor speed, and motor switching rate. The size of the crowded boundary layer near the overlap ends is also dependent on the overlap length and switching rate in addition to the motor speed and bulk concentration. The antiparallel microtubule overlap geometry may offer a previously unrecognized mechanism for biological regulation of protein concentration and consequent activity. PMID:27166811

  12. Positive effects of duckweed polycultures on starch and protein accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Fantao; Daroch, Maurycy; Tang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    The effect of duckweed species composition (Lemna aequinoctialis 5505, Landoltia punctata 5506 and Spirodela polyrhiza 5507) in polyculture and monoculture on biomass and starch/protein content were investigated at different levels of temperature, light intensity, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. The three growth parameters significantly affect duckweed biomass accumulation. Different combinations of duckweed species greatly varied in starch/protein content. Although all the polycultures showed a median relative growth rate and the majority of the polycultures showed a median and starch/protein content as compared with their respective monocultures, some of the polycultures were found to promote the accumulation of starch/protein at different growth conditions. These findings indicated that proper combination of duckweed species could facilitate desirable biomass accumulation and improve biomass quality. The present study provides useful references for future large-scale duckweed cultivation. PMID:27515418

  13. Positive effects of duckweed polycultures on starch and protein accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Fantao; Daroch, Maurycy; Tang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    The effect of duckweed species composition (Lemna aequinoctialis 5505, Landoltia punctata 5506 and Spirodela polyrhiza 5507) in polyculture and monoculture on biomass and starch/protein content were investigated at different levels of temperature, light intensity, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. The three growth parameters significantly affect duckweed biomass accumulation. Different combinations of duckweed species greatly varied in starch/protein content. Although all the polycultures showed a median relative growth rate and the majority of the polycultures showed a median and starch/protein content as compared with their respective monocultures, some of the polycultures were found to promote the accumulation of starch/protein at different growth conditions. These findings indicated that proper combination of duckweed species could facilitate desirable biomass accumulation and improve biomass quality. The present study provides useful references for future large-scale duckweed cultivation.

  14. Positive effects of duckweed polycultures on starch and protein accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Fantao; Daroch, Maurycy; Tang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The effect of duckweed species composition (Lemna aequinoctialis 5505, Landoltia punctata 5506 and Spirodela polyrhiza 5507) in polyculture and monoculture on biomass and starch/protein content were investigated at different levels of temperature, light intensity, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations. The three growth parameters significantly affect duckweed biomass accumulation. Different combinations of duckweed species greatly varied in starch/protein content. Although all the polycultures showed a median relative growth rate and the majority of the polycultures showed a median and starch/protein content as compared with their respective monocultures, some of the polycultures were found to promote the accumulation of starch/protein at different growth conditions. These findings indicated that proper combination of duckweed species could facilitate desirable biomass accumulation and improve biomass quality. The present study provides useful references for future large-scale duckweed cultivation. PMID:27515418

  15. [Accumulation of abnormal psychosocial circumstances in juvenile delinquents with modified legal culpability].

    PubMed

    Brettel, Hauke; Poustka, Fritz

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate specific influence on the exclupation according the medical-legal certificate approved by the courts decision. 34 culpable young offenders have been compared with 40 young delinquents who have disorders of penal responsibility according to socio-demographic, anamnestic and diagnostic variables. A significant difference between the two compared groups was found in the associated, abnormal psychosocial situations. Those delinquents who were exculpated displayed more than three times higher scores in the abnormal psychosocial axis five of ICD-10 than among the non-exculpated group. The influence of actual abnormal psychosocial situations on a substantial general psychic vulnerability is discussed.

  16. Dietary protein alters tubular iron accumulation after partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Nankivell, B J; Tay, Y C; Boadle, R A; Harris, D C

    1994-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in progression of disease in the rat remnant kidney (RK) model of chronic renal failure. Substantial amounts of iron accumulate in proximal tubular lysosomes of RK and could damage tubules by ROS generation. The effect of dietary protein intake on ROS, tubular damage and iron accumulation assessed by energy dispersive analysis was determined in RK (5/6 nephrectomy, N = 12) and sham-operated kidneys (SO, N = 10). In RK, mean lysosomal iron concentration, urinary iron and protein excretion and morphological damage were increased and GFR decreased. Dietary protein loading (40% vs. 12%) increased the number of iron-containing lysosomes (P < 0.05) and the mean lysosomal iron (P < 0.02) in proximal tubular cells after four weeks. In RK, high protein diet increased renal weight (P < 0.01), numerical density of iron-containing lysosomes and tubular damage (both P < 0.05). ROS generation, assessed by tissue and plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), was also increased (both P < 0.05). Plasma MDA correlated with tubular iron accumulation (r = 0.75). In RK fed a high protein diet (N = 18) treatment with the iron-chelator desferrioxamine reduced serum iron, urinary volume, and tubular iron accumulation and damage compared to controls (P < 0.01). In summary, in RK dietary protein manipulation altered urinary iron and protein excretion, proximal tubular iron accumulation, renal cortical ROS generation and ultrastructural damage. Desferrioxamine treatment reduced tubular lysosomal iron and ultrastructural damage. These results suggest a role for tubular iron as a determinant of tubular injury associated with dietary protein loading in rats with partial nephrectomy.

  17. Strain-Dependent Effect of Macroautophagy on Abnormally Folded Prion Protein Degradation in Infected Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Daisuke; Homma, Takujiro; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Fuse, Takayuki; Sano, Kazunori; Takatsuki, Hanae; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are neurodegenerative disorders caused by the accumulation of abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) in the central nervous system. With the aim of elucidating the mechanism underlying the accumulation and degradation of PrPSc, we investigated the role of autophagy in its degradation, using cultured cells stably infected with distinct prion strains. The effects of pharmacological compounds that inhibit or stimulate the cellular signal transduction pathways that mediate autophagy during PrPSc degradation were evaluated. The accumulation of PrPSc in cells persistently infected with the prion strain Fukuoka-1 (FK), derived from a patient with Gerstmann–Sträussler–Scheinker syndrome, was significantly increased in cultures treated with the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3MA) but substantially reduced in those treated with the macroautophagy inducer rapamycin. The decrease in FK-derived PrPSc levels was mediated, at least in part, by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/MEK signalling pathway. By contrast, neither rapamycin nor 3MA had any apparently effect on PrPSc from either the 22L or the Chandler strain, indicating that the degradation of PrPSc in host cells might be strain-dependent. PMID:26368533

  18. Strain-Dependent Effect of Macroautophagy on Abnormally Folded Prion Protein Degradation in Infected Neuronal Cells.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Daisuke; Homma, Takujiro; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Fuse, Takayuki; Sano, Kazunori; Takatsuki, Hanae; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are neurodegenerative disorders caused by the accumulation of abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) in the central nervous system. With the aim of elucidating the mechanism underlying the accumulation and degradation of PrPSc, we investigated the role of autophagy in its degradation, using cultured cells stably infected with distinct prion strains. The effects of pharmacological compounds that inhibit or stimulate the cellular signal transduction pathways that mediate autophagy during PrPSc degradation were evaluated. The accumulation of PrPSc in cells persistently infected with the prion strain Fukuoka-1 (FK), derived from a patient with Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, was significantly increased in cultures treated with the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3MA) but substantially reduced in those treated with the macroautophagy inducer rapamycin. The decrease in FK-derived PrPSc levels was mediated, at least in part, by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/MEK signalling pathway. By contrast, neither rapamycin nor 3MA had any apparently effect on PrPSc from either the 22L or the Chandler strain, indicating that the degradation of PrPSc in host cells might be strain-dependent. PMID:26368533

  19. Abnormal aquaporin-3 protein expression in hyperproliferative skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Voss, Kristen E; Bollag, Roni J; Fussell, Nicole; By, Charya; Sheehan, Daniel J; Bollag, Wendy B

    2011-10-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) and psoriasis represent common hyperproliferative skin disorders, with approximately one million new NMSC diagnoses each year in the United States alone and a psoriasis prevalence of about 2% worldwide. We recently demonstrated that the glycerol channel, aquaporin-3 (AQP3) and the enzyme phospholipase D2 (PLD2) interact functionally in epidermal keratinocytes of the skin to inhibit their proliferation. However, others have suggested that AQP3 is pro-proliferative in keratinocytes and is upregulated in the NMSC, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To evaluate the AQP3/PLD2 signaling module in skin diseases, we determined their levels in SCC, basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and psoriasis as compared to normal epidermis. Skin biopsies with the appropriate diagnoses (10 normal, 5 SCC, 13 BCC and 10 plaque psoriasis samples) were obtained from the pathology archives and examined by immunohistochemistry using antibodies recognizing AQP3 and PLD2. In normal epidermis AQP3, an integral membrane protein, was localized mainly to the plasma membrane and PLD2 to the cell periphery, particularly in suprabasal layers. In BCC, AQP3 and PLD2 levels were reduced as compared to the normal-appearing overlying epidermis. In SCC, AQP3 staining was "patchy," with areas of reduced AQP3 immunoreactivity exhibiting positivity for Ki67, a marker of proliferation. PLD2 staining was unchanged in SCC. In psoriasis, AQP3 staining was usually observed in the cytoplasm rather than in the membrane. Also, in the majority of psoriatic samples, PLD2 showed weak immunoreactivity or aberrant localization. These results suggest that abnormalities in the AQP3/PLD2 signaling module correlate with hyperproliferation in psoriasis and the NMSCs. PMID:21400035

  20. Protein repair L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase in plants. Phylogenetic distribution and the accumulation of substrate proteins in aged barley seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Mudgett, M B; Lowenson, J D; Clarke, S

    1997-01-01

    Protein L-isoaspartate (D-aspartate) O-methyltransferases (MTs; EC 2.1.1.77) can initiate the conversion of detrimental L-isoaspartyl residues in spontaneously damaged proteins to normal L-aspartyl residues. We detected this enzyme in 45 species from 23 families representing most of the divisions of the plant kingdom. MT activity is often localized in seeds, suggesting that it has a role in their maturation, quiescence, and germination. The relationship among MT activity, the accumulation of abnormal protein L-isoaspartyl residues, and seed viability was explored in barley (Hordeum vulgare cultivar Himalaya) seeds, which contain high levels of MT. Natural aging of barley seeds for 17 years resulted in a significant reduction in MT activity and in seed viability, coupled with increased levels of "unrepaired" L-isoaspartyl residues. In seeds heated to accelerate aging, we found no reduction of MT activity, but we did observe decreased seed viability and the accumulation of isoaspartyl residues. Among populations of accelerated aged seed, those possessing the highest levels of L-isoaspartyl-containing proteins had the lowest germination percentages. These results suggest that the MT present in seeds cannot efficiently repair all spontaneously damaged proteins containing altered aspartyl residues, and their accumulation during aging may contribute to the loss of seed viability. PMID:9414558

  1. Accumulation of altered aspartyl residues in erythrocyte membrane proteins from patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Stefania; Trojsi, Francesca; Salvatore, Anna; Daniele, Luca; Raimo, Marianna; Galletti, Patrizia; Monsurrò, Maria Rosaria

    2013-11-01

    Spontaneous protein deamidation of labile asparagines (Asn), generating abnormal l-isoaspartyl residues (IsoAsp), is associated with cell aging and enhanced by an oxidative microenvironment. The presence of isopeptide bonds impairs protein structure/function. To minimize the damage, IsoAsp can be "repaired" by the protein l-isoaspartyl/d-aspartyl O-methyltransferase (PIMT) and S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) is the methyl donor of this reaction. PIMT is a repair enzyme that initiates the conversion of l-isoAsp (or d-Asp) residues to l-Asp residues. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe neurodegenerative disease principally affecting motor neurons. The condition of oxidative stress reported in familial and sporadic forms of ALS prompted us to investigate Asn deamidation in ALS tissue. Erythrocytes (RBCs) were selected as a model system since they are unable to replace damaged proteins and protein methylesterification is virtually the only AdoMet-consuming reaction operating in these cells. Our data show that, in vitro assay, abnormal IsoAsp residues were significantly higher in ALS patients erythrocyte membrane proteins with an increased methyl accepting capability relative to controls (p<0.05). Moreover, we observed a reduction in AdoMet levels, while AdoHcy concentration was comparable to that detected in the control, resulting in a lower [AdoMet]/[AdoHcy] ratio. Then, the accumulation of altered aspartyl residues in ALS patients is probably related to a reduced efficiency of the S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-dependent repair system causing increased protein instability at Asn sites. The increase of abnormal residues represents a new protein alteration that may be present not only in red blood cells but also in other cell types of patients suffering from ALS.

  2. Abnormal recruitment of extracellular matrix proteins by excess Notch3 ECD: a new pathomechanism in CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Monet-Leprêtre, Marie; Haddad, Iman; Baron-Menguy, Céline; Fouillot-Panchal, Maï; Riani, Meriem; Domenga-Denier, Valérie; Dussaule, Claire; Cognat, Emmanuel; Vinh, Joelle; Joutel, Anne

    2013-06-01

    -linked and soluble TIMP3 species. Moreover, reverse zymography assays show a significant elevation of TIMP3 activity in the brain vessels from mice and patients with CADASIL. Collectively, our findings lend support to a Notch3(ECD) cascade hypothesis in CADASIL disease pathology, which posits that aggregation/accumulation of Notch3(ECD) in the brain vessels is a central event, promoting the abnormal recruitment of functionally important extracellular matrix proteins that may ultimately cause multifactorial toxicity. Specifically, our results suggest a dysregulation of TIMP3 activity, which could contribute to mutant Notch3(ECD) toxicity by impairing extracellular matrix homeostasis in small vessels.

  3. Nuclear protein accumulation by facilitated transport and intranuclear binding.

    PubMed

    Paine, P L

    1993-10-01

    Nuclear proteins are transported from the cytoplasm into the nucleus via nuclear envelope pore complexes (NPCs). At the molecular level, the mechanisms responsible for this transport remain obscure. However, it is known that, for many proteins, the process requires ATP and proceeds against formidable nucleocytoplasmic concentration gradients. Therefore, the NPC is often thought of as an active transport site. In this article, Philip Paine presents the alternative hypothesis that, on current evidence, protein translocation across the nuclear envelope and accumulation in the nucleus can equally well be explained by facilitated transport through the NPC and subsequent intranuclear binding.

  4. TP53 gene mutations and protein accumulation in primary vaginal carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Skomedal, H.; Kristensen, G.; Helland, A.; Nesland, J. M.; Kooi, S.; Børresen, A. L.; Holm, R.

    1995-01-01

    Primary carcinomas from 46 patients were screened for TP53 alterations. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated nuclear TP53 protein accumulation in 22 (48%) cases using the polyclonal CM1 antiserum, whereas 15 (33%) cases showed positive nuclear staining with the mononuclear antibody PAb 1801. Constant denaturant gel electrophoresis (CDGE) was used to screen 27 of the vaginal carcinomas for mutations in the conserved regions of the TP53 gene (exons 5-8). Six of these tumours (22%) contained mutations: four were found in exon 5 and two in exon 8. A total of 50% of the primary vaginal carcinomas carried a TP53 alteration. These results indicate that TP53 abnormalities may be involved in the development of these tumours. However, there was no significant association between TP53 abnormalities and survival. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7599041

  5. Distribution of abnormal prion protein in a sheep affected with L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Y; Iwamaru, Y; Masujin, K; Imamura, M; Mohri, S; Yokoyama, T; Okada, H

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the topographical distribution and patterns of deposition of immunolabelled abnormal prion protein (PrP(Sc)), interspecies transmission of atypical L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to Cheviot ewes (ARQ/ARQ genotype) was performed. L-type BSE was successfully transmitted via the intracerebral route to a ewe, with an incubation period of 1,562 days. Minimal vacuolar change was detected in the basal ganglia, thalamus and brainstem, and PrP(Sc) accumulated throughout the brain. The L-type BSE-affected sheep was characterized by conspicuous fine particulate deposits in the neuropil, particulate and/or granular intraneuronal and intraglial deposits, and the absence of PrP(Sc) plaques or stellate deposits. In addition, immunohistochemical and western blot analyses revealed that PrP(Sc) accumulation was present in peripheral nervous tissues (including the trigeminal ganglia and dorsal root ganglion) and adrenal glands, but was absent in lymphoid tissues. These results suggest that L-type BSE has distinct and distinguishable characteristics as well as PrP(Sc) tissue tropism in sheep.

  6. The use of Diagnostic Imaging for Identifying Abnormal Gas Accumulations in Cetaceans and Pinnipeds.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Sophie; Fahlman, Andreas; Moore, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Recent dogma suggested that marine mammals are not at risk of decompression sickness due to a number of evolutionary adaptations. Several proposed adaptations exist. Lung compression and alveolar collapse that terminate gas-exchange before a depth is reached where supersaturation is significant and bradycardia with peripheral vasoconstriction affecting the distribution, and dynamics of blood and tissue nitrogen levels. Published accounts of gas and fat emboli and dysbaric osteonecrosis in marine mammals and theoretical modeling have challenged this view-point, suggesting that decompression-like symptoms may occur under certain circumstances, contrary to common belief. Diagnostic imaging modalities are invaluable tools for the non-invasive examination of animals for evidence of gas and have been used to demonstrate the presence of incidental decompression-related renal gas accumulations in some stranded cetaceans. Diagnostic imaging has also contributed to the recognition of clinically significant gas accumulations in live and dead cetaceans and pinnipeds. Understanding the appropriate application and limitations of the available imaging modalities is important for accurate interpretation of results. The presence of gas may be asymptomatic and must be interpreted cautiously alongside all other available data including clinical examination, clinical laboratory testing, gas analysis, necropsy examination, and histology results.

  7. The use of Diagnostic Imaging for Identifying Abnormal Gas Accumulations in Cetaceans and Pinnipeds.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Sophie; Fahlman, Andreas; Moore, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Recent dogma suggested that marine mammals are not at risk of decompression sickness due to a number of evolutionary adaptations. Several proposed adaptations exist. Lung compression and alveolar collapse that terminate gas-exchange before a depth is reached where supersaturation is significant and bradycardia with peripheral vasoconstriction affecting the distribution, and dynamics of blood and tissue nitrogen levels. Published accounts of gas and fat emboli and dysbaric osteonecrosis in marine mammals and theoretical modeling have challenged this view-point, suggesting that decompression-like symptoms may occur under certain circumstances, contrary to common belief. Diagnostic imaging modalities are invaluable tools for the non-invasive examination of animals for evidence of gas and have been used to demonstrate the presence of incidental decompression-related renal gas accumulations in some stranded cetaceans. Diagnostic imaging has also contributed to the recognition of clinically significant gas accumulations in live and dead cetaceans and pinnipeds. Understanding the appropriate application and limitations of the available imaging modalities is important for accurate interpretation of results. The presence of gas may be asymptomatic and must be interpreted cautiously alongside all other available data including clinical examination, clinical laboratory testing, gas analysis, necropsy examination, and histology results. PMID:22685439

  8. The use of Diagnostic Imaging for Identifying Abnormal Gas Accumulations in Cetaceans and Pinnipeds

    PubMed Central

    Dennison, Sophie; Fahlman, Andreas; Moore, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Recent dogma suggested that marine mammals are not at risk of decompression sickness due to a number of evolutionary adaptations. Several proposed adaptations exist. Lung compression and alveolar collapse that terminate gas-exchange before a depth is reached where supersaturation is significant and bradycardia with peripheral vasoconstriction affecting the distribution, and dynamics of blood and tissue nitrogen levels. Published accounts of gas and fat emboli and dysbaric osteonecrosis in marine mammals and theoretical modeling have challenged this view-point, suggesting that decompression-like symptoms may occur under certain circumstances, contrary to common belief. Diagnostic imaging modalities are invaluable tools for the non-invasive examination of animals for evidence of gas and have been used to demonstrate the presence of incidental decompression-related renal gas accumulations in some stranded cetaceans. Diagnostic imaging has also contributed to the recognition of clinically significant gas accumulations in live and dead cetaceans and pinnipeds. Understanding the appropriate application and limitations of the available imaging modalities is important for accurate interpretation of results. The presence of gas may be asymptomatic and must be interpreted cautiously alongside all other available data including clinical examination, clinical laboratory testing, gas analysis, necropsy examination, and histology results. PMID:22685439

  9. Accumulation of small protein molecules in a macroscopic complex coacervate.

    PubMed

    Lindhoud, Saskia; Claessens, Mireille M A E

    2016-01-14

    To obtain insight into the accumulation of proteins into macroscopic complex coacervate phases, the lysozyme concentration in complex coacervates containing the cationic polyelectrolyte poly-(N,N dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) and the anionic polyelectrolyte polyacrylic acid was investigated as a function of the mixing ratio, protein concentration and ionic strength. Maximal protein enrichment of the complex coacervate phase was observed to require the presence of all three macromolecules. Under optimized conditions the protein concentrations in the complex coacervate were as high as 200 g L(-1). Such high concentrations are comparable to the protein concentration in the cytosol, suggesting that these interesting liquid phases may serve a suitable model system for the phase behavior of the cytosol and genesis and function of membrane-less organelles. The high stability of the complexes and the salt dependent uptake of protein suggest that complex coacervates may provide a way to store hydrated proteins at high concentrations and might therefore be of interest in the formulation of high protein foods.

  10. Evidence for keratin proteins in normal and abnormal human meibomian fluids.

    PubMed

    Ong, B L; Hodson, S A; Wigham, T; Miller, F; Larke, J R

    1991-12-01

    Hyperkeratinization of meibomian glands has been postulated to cause gland dysfunction. Recent investigations on rabbits show that keratin proteins are indeed present in the meibomian fluids of these animals. In this report we present our findings on the presence of these water-insoluble proteins in human meibomian secretions. 6 anti-cytokeratin antibodies, CK8, 18, 19, CK7, CK8, CK14, CK19 and AE1/AE3 were used against the keratin proteins expressed from the human meibomian fluids. Using the immunoblotting (dot blot) technique, abnormal waxy meibomian fluids obtained from subjects diagnosed to have meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) were compared to normal clear meibomian fluids. The results show that keratins are present in a higher concentration (10%) in the abnormal human meibomian excreta as compared to the normals. Even though the presence of protein markers for keratinization in the abnormal meibomian excreta were not shown, the increased presence of keratin proteins in the abnormal meibomian fluids suggests that, in MGD patients, hyperkeratinization of ductal epithelium may have taken place. More keratin proteins (possibly those of higher molecular weights) were produced in addition to the keratin proteins normally produced by the duct epithelium. The increased amount of keratin proteins in the abnormal meibomian fluids may be explained by the susceptibility of duct epithelium to undergo the process of hyperkeratinization as postulated by other researchers.

  11. Genomically Biased Accumulation of Seed Storage Proteins in Allopolyploid Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guanjing; Houston, Norma L.; Pathak, Dharminder; Schmidt, Linnea; Thelen, Jay J.; Wendel, Jonathan F.

    2011-01-01

    Allopolyploidy is an important process during plant evolution that results in the reunion of two divergent genomes into a common nucleus. Many of the immediate as well as longer-term genomic and epigenetic responses to polyploidy have become appreciated. To investigate the modifications of gene expression at the proteome level caused by allopolyploid formation, we conducted a comparative analysis of cotton seed proteomes from the allopolyploid Gossypium hirsutum (AD genome) and its model A-genome and D-genome diploid progenitors. An unexpectedly high level of divergence among the three proteomes was found, with about one-third of all protein forms being genome specific. Comparative analysis showed that there is a higher degree of proteomic similarity between the allopolyploid and its D-genome donor than its A-genome donor, reflecting a biased accumulation of seed proteins in the allopolyploid. Protein identification and genetic characterization of high-abundance proteins revealed that two classes of seed storage proteins, vicilins and legumins, compose the major component of cotton seed proteomes. Analyses further indicate differential regulation or modification of homoeologous gene products, as well as novel patterns in the polyploid proteome that may result from the interaction between homoeologous gene products. Our findings demonstrate that genomic merger and doubling have consequences that extend beyond the transcriptome into the realm of the proteome and that unequal expression of proteins from diploid parental genomes may occur in allopolyploids. PMID:21900265

  12. Accumulated p53 protein and UVA protection level of sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Seité, S; Moyal, D; Verdier, M P; Hourseau, C; Fourtanier, A

    2000-02-01

    Nuclear p53 expression is a sensitive parameter for the detection of ultraviolet (UV)-induced skin damage, and it has been used as an endpoint to evaluate the effectiveness of sunscreens. In this study, we compared the protection provided by two sunscreens having identical sun protection factors (SPF) but different UVA protection factors (UVA-PF) measured by the persistent pigment darkening method (PPD). The SPF of the sunscreens was 7 and the UVA-PF were respectively 7 and 3. Nuclear p53 protein was quantified in human skin biopsies treated with sunscreens and exposed 8 times to 5 MED of solar simulated radiation (SSR). The results showed that both sunscreens offered only partial protection against the increased expression of nuclear p53 protein induced by repetitive SSR exposures. However, a significantly lower level of p53-positive cells was found in areas protected with the sunscreen having the higher UVA-PF compared to the other sunscreen protected areas. In order to verify whether the difference in efficacy of these products was due to the difference in UVA absorption capacity, we quantified epidermal p53 protein accumulation after 8 exposures to either UVA (320-400 nm) or UVA1 (340-400 nm). We showed that as with SSR, repetitive exposures to 12.5 and 25 J/cm2 of UVA or UVA1 induced a significant increase in p53-positive cells in the human epidermis. These results confirmed that SPF determined on the basis of an acute erythemal reaction does not predict the level of protection against cumulative damage. They also showed that the protection provided by two sunscreens with different UVA protection factors is different (based on nuclear p53 protein accumulation), and that the PPD method can distinguish varying levels of sunscreen efficacy against UVA-induced cell damage. PMID:10721857

  13. Loss of prion protein leads to age-dependent behavioral abnormalities and changes in cytoskeletal protein expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a multifunctional protein, whose exact physiological role remains elusive. Since previous studies indicated a neuroprotective function of PrPC, we investigated whether Prnp knockout mice(Prnp0/0)display age-dependent behavioral abnormalities. Matched sets of Prnp0/0 ...

  14. Scrapie prion proteins accumulate in the cytoplasm of persistently infected cultured cells

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a sialoglycoprotein anchored to the external surface of cells by a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol moiety. During scrapie, an abnormal PrP isoform designated PrPSc accumulates, and much evidence argues that it is a major and necessary component of the infectious prion. Based on the resistance of native PrPSc to proteolysis and to digestion with phosphatidylinositol- specific phospholipase C as well as the enhancement of PrPSc immunoreactivity after denaturation, we devised in situ immunoassays for the detection of PrPSc in cultured cells. Using these immunoassays, we identified the sites of PrPSc accumulation in scrapie-infected cultured cells. We also used these immunoassays to isolate PrPSc- producing clones from a new hamster brain cell line (HaB) and found an excellent correlation between their PrPSc content and prion infectivity titers. In scrapie-infected HaB cells as well as in scrapie-infected mouse neuroblastoma cells, most PrPSc was found to be intracellular and most localized with ligands of the Golgi marker wheat germ agglutinin. In one scrapie-infected HaB clone, PrPSc also localized extensively with MG-160, a protein resident of the medial-Golgi stack whereas this colocalization was not observed in another subclone of these cells. Whether the sites of intracellular accumulation of PrPSc are limited to a few subcellular organelles or they are highly variable remains to be determined. If the intracellular accumulation of PrPSc is found in the cells of the central nervous system, then it might be responsible for the neuronal dysfunction and degeneration which are cardinal features of prion diseases. PMID:1693623

  15. Rapid degradation of abnormal proteins in vacuoles from Acer pseudoplatanus L. cells

    SciTech Connect

    Canut, H.; Alibert, G.; Carrasco, A.; Boudet, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    In Acer pseudoplatanus cells, the proteins synthesized in the presence of an amino acid analog ((/sup 14/C)p-fluorophenylalanine), were degraded more rapidly than normal ones ((/sup 14/C)phenylalanine as precursor). The degradation of an important part of these abnormal proteins occurred inside the vacuoles. The degradation process was not apparently associated to a specific proteolytic system but was related to a preferential transfer of these aberrant proteins from the cytoplasm to the vacuole.

  16. Iron accumulation in deep cortical layers accounts for MRI signal abnormalities in ALS: correlating 7 tesla MRI and pathology.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Justin Y; Jeong, Suh Young; Van Gelderen, Peter; Deng, Han-Xiang; Quezado, Martha M; Danielian, Laura E; Butman, John A; Chen, Lingye; Bayat, Elham; Russell, James; Siddique, Teepu; Duyn, Jeff H; Rouault, Tracey A; Floeter, Mary Kay

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cortical and spinal motor neuron dysfunction. Routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have previously shown hypointense signal in the motor cortex on T(2)-weighted images in some ALS patients, however, the cause of this finding is unknown. To investigate the utility of this MR signal change as a marker of cortical motor neuron degeneration, signal abnormalities on 3T and 7T MR images of the brain were compared, and pathology was obtained in two ALS patients to determine the origin of the motor cortex hypointensity. Nineteen patients with clinically probable or definite ALS by El Escorial criteria and 19 healthy controls underwent 3T MRI. A 7T MRI scan was carried out on five ALS patients who had motor cortex hypointensity on the 3T FLAIR sequence and on three healthy controls. Postmortem 7T MRI of the brain was performed in one ALS patient and histological studies of the brains and spinal cords were obtained post-mortem in two patients. The motor cortex hypointensity on 3T FLAIR images was present in greater frequency in ALS patients. Increased hypointensity correlated with greater severity of upper motor neuron impairment. Analysis of 7T T(2)(*)-weighted gradient echo imaging localized the signal alteration to the deeper layers of the motor cortex in both ALS patients. Pathological studies showed increased iron accumulation in microglial cells in areas corresponding to the location of the signal changes on the 3T and 7T MRI of the motor cortex. These findings indicate that the motor cortex hypointensity on 3T MRI FLAIR images in ALS is due to increased iron accumulation by microglia.

  17. [Abnormal Serum Total Protein Measurement by Lipoprotein-X in an Infant with Biliary Atresia].

    PubMed

    Futatsugi, Akiko; Hidaka, Eiko; Kubota, Noriko; Nishijima, Fumie; Yoshizawa, Katsumi; Ishimine, Nau; Sugano, Mitsutoshi; Hori, Atsushi; Hidaka, Hiroya

    2015-11-01

    Lipoprotein-X (LP-X) in cholestatic jaundice causes abnormal reaction in assays for low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, but the effects on other test items are unknown. Here, we report an infant with biliary atresia showing abnormal reaction in total serum protein assay using the biuret method, and lipoprotein-X (LP-X) was then detected. In this 11-month-old female infant, jaundice was observed at 2 months old, and a diagnosis of biliary atresia was made. On biochemical tests at 12 months old, the total serum protein concentrations detected by the biuret method were very high, and the response curve and linearity of dilution were abnormal. LP-X was detected by agar electrophoresis. In addition and recovery experiments with normal serum fractionation of the patient's LP-X-rich lipoprotein fraction prepared by ultracentrifugation, normal γ-globulin fractionation showed an abnormal reaction by the biuret method. In infants with biliary atresia, we showed that the total serum protein assay by the biuret method was influenced by LP-X-rich lipoprotein, which may be caused by abnormal reaction of LP-X and γ-globulin. [Case Report].

  18. Absence of upregulated genes associated with protein accumulations in desmin myopathy.

    PubMed

    Raju, Raghavan; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2007-03-01

    In desmin myopathy but not hereditary inclusion-body myopathy (hIBM), there is accumulation of myofibrillar proteins including desmin, myotilin, dystrophin, gelsolin, actin, and CDC kinase. To assess the cause of protein excess, we studied the genes coding the accumulated proteins in desmin myopathy, hIBM, and controls. No differences were found among them. In desmin myopathy, protein accumulation is not due to upregulation of genes triggered by mutant desmin, but rather to posttranslational disassembly of intermediate filaments.

  19. Prion Protein Accumulation in Lipid Rafts of Mouse Aging Brain

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Federica; Dotti, Carlos G.; Pérez-Cañamás, Azucena; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC) is a normal constituent of neuronal cell membranes. The protein misfolding causes rare neurodegenerative disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious. Sporadic prion diseases are the most common form mainly affecting aging people. In this work, we investigate the biochemical environment in which sporadic prion diseases may develop, focusing our attention on the cell membrane of neurons in the aging brain. It is well established that with aging the ratio between the most abundant lipid components of rafts undergoes a major change: while cholesterol decreases, sphingomyelin content rises. Our results indicate that the aging process modifies the compartmentalization of PrPC. In old mice, this change favors PrPC accumulation in detergent-resistant membranes, particularly in hippocampi. To confirm the relationship between lipid content changes and PrPC translocation into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), we looked at PrPC compartmentalization in hippocampi from acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) knockout (KO) mice and synaptosomes enriched in sphingomyelin. In the presence of high sphingomyelin content, we observed a significant increase of PrPC in DRMS. This process is not due to higher levels of total protein and it could, in turn, favor the onset of sporadic prion diseases during aging as it increases the PrP intermolecular contacts into lipid rafts. We observed that lowering sphingomyelin in scrapie-infected cells by using fumonisin B1 led to a 50% decrease in protease-resistant PrP formation. This may suggest an involvement of PrP lipid environment in prion formation and consequently it may play a role in the onset or development of sporadic forms of prion diseases. PMID:24040215

  20. Mutations in the SPTLC1 protein cause mitochondrial structural abnormalities and endoplasmic reticulum stress in lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Myers, Simon J; Malladi, Chandra S; Hyland, Ryan A; Bautista, Tara; Boadle, Ross; Robinson, Phillip J; Nicholson, Garth A

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in serine palmitoyltransferase long chain subunit 1 (SPTLC1) cause the typical length-dependent axonal degeneration hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 (HSN1). Transmission electron microscopy studies on SPTLC1 mutant lymphoblasts derived from patients revealed specific structural abnormalities of mitochondria. Swollen mitochondria with abnormal cristae were clustered around the nucleus, with some mitochondria being wrapped in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. Total mitochondrial counts revealed a significant change in mitochondrial numbers between healthy and diseased lymphocytes but did not reveal any change in length to width ratios nor were there any changes to cellular function. However, there was a notable change in ER homeostasis, as assessed using key ER stress markers, BiP and ERO1-Lα, displaying reduced protein expression. The observations suggest that SPTLC1 mutations cause mitochondrial abnormalities and ER stress in HSN1 cells. PMID:24673574

  1. EVALUATION OF SOYASAPONIN, ISOFLAVONE, PROTEIN, LIPID, AND FREE SUGAR ACCUMULATION IN DEVELOPING SOYBEAN SEEDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A combination of analytical techniques were used to examine and quantify seed compositional components (protein content, lipid content, carbohydrates, isoflavones, and saponins) during bean development and maturation in two Korean soy cultivars. Protein accumulation was rapid during reproductive st...

  2. Protein accumulation in aleurone cells, sub-aleurone cells and the center starch endosperm of cereals.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yankun; Wang, Zhong

    2014-10-01

    There are mainly three endosperm storage tissues in the cereal endosperm: aleurone cells, sub-aleurone cells and the center starch endosperm. The protein accumulation is very different in the three endosperm storage tissues. The aleurone cells accumulate protein in aleurone granules. The sub-aleurone cells and the center starch endosperm accumulate protein in endoplasmic reticulum-derived protein bodies and vacuolar protein bodies. Proteins are deposited in different patterns within different endosperm storage tissues probably because of the special storage properties of these tissues. There are several special genes and other molecular factors to mediate the protein accumulation in these tissues. Different proteins have distinct functions in the protein body formation and the protein interactions determine protein body assembly. There are both cooperation and competition relationships between protein, starch and lipid in the cereal endosperm. This paper reviews the latest investigations on protein accumulation in aleurone cells, sub-aleurone cells and the center starch endosperm. Useful information will be supplied for future investigations on the cereal endosperm development.

  3. Oil body proteins sequentially accumulate throughout seed development in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Jolivet, Pascale; Boulard, Céline; Bellamy, Annick; Valot, Benoît; d'Andréa, Sabine; Zivy, Michel; Nesi, Nathalie; Chardot, Thierry

    2011-11-15

    Despite the importance of seed oil bodies (OBs) as enclosed compartments for oil storage, little is known about lipid and protein accumulation in OBs during seed formation. OBs from rapeseed (Brassica napus) consist of a triacylglycerol (TAG) core surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer embedded with integral proteins which confer high stability to OBs in the mature dry seed. In the present study, we investigated lipid and protein accumulation patterns throughout seed development (from 5 to 65 days after pollination [DAP]) both in the whole seed and in purified OBs. Deposition of the major proteins (oleosins, caleosins and steroleosins) into OBs was assessed through (i) gene expression pattern, (ii) proteomics analysis, and (iii) protein immunodetection. For the first time, a sequential deposition of integral OB proteins was established. Accumulation of oleosins and caleosins was observed starting from early stages of seed development (12-17 DAP), while steroleosins accumulated later (~25 DAP) onwards. PMID:21803444

  4. Role of endometrial cancer abnormal MMR protein in screening Lynch-syndrome families

    PubMed Central

    Long, Qiongxian; Peng, Yong; Tang, Zhirong; Wu, Cailiang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify patients with endometrial cancer with potential Lynch-related DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression defects and to explore the role of these defects in screening for LS. Methods: Endometrial cancers from 173 patients recruited to the Nanchong Central Hospital were tested for MMR (MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, and MSH6) protein expression using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results: In the 173 tumor tissue samples, the expression loss rates of MSH6, MSH2, PMS2 and MLH1 protein were 16.18% (28/173), 12.14% (21/173), 7.51% (13/173) and 5.78% (10/173), respectively. The total loss rate of MMR protein was 29.89% (27/87). There were 19 patients with a family history of cancer, of which 18 patients demonstrated loss of expression of MMR protein. In the 22 abnormal MMR patients without family history, five families were found to have Lynch-associated cancer (colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, ovarian cancer, stomach cancer) after follow-up for two years. Conclusion: MMR proteins play an important role in the progress of endometrial cancer. The routine testing of MMR proteins in endometrial cancer can contribute to the screening of LS families, especially small families. PMID:25400828

  5. Protein 4.1R–deficient mice are viable but have erythroid membrane skeleton abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zheng-Tao; Afzal, Veena; Coller, Barry; Patel, Dipti; Chasis, Joel A.; Parra, Marilyn; Lee, Gloria; Paszty, Chris; Stevens, Mary; Walensky, Loren; Peters, Luanne L.; Mohandas, Narla; Rubin, Edward; Conboy, John G.

    1999-01-01

    A diverse family of protein 4.1R isoforms is encoded by a complex gene on human chromosome 1. Although the prototypical 80-kDa 4.1R in mature erythrocytes is a key component of the erythroid membrane skeleton that regulates erythrocyte morphology and mechanical stability, little is known about 4.1R function in nucleated cells. Using gene knockout technology, we have generated mice with complete deficiency of all 4.1R protein isoforms. These 4.1R-null mice were viable, with moderate hemolytic anemia but no gross abnormalities. Erythrocytes from these mice exhibited abnormal morphology, lowered membrane stability, and reduced expression of other skeletal proteins including spectrin and ankyrin, suggesting that loss of 4.1R compromises membrane skeleton assembly in erythroid progenitors. Platelet morphology and function were essentially normal, indicating that 4.1R deficiency may have less impact on other hematopoietic lineages. Nonerythroid 4.1R expression patterns, viewed using histochemical staining for lacZ reporter activity incorporated into the targeted gene, revealed focal expression in specific neurons in the brain and in select cells of other major organs, challenging the view that 4.1R expression is widespread among nonerythroid cells. The 4.1R knockout mice represent a valuable animal model for exploring 4.1R function in nonerythroid cells and for determining pathophysiological sequelae to 4.1R deficiency. PMID:9927493

  6. Propiverine-induced accumulation of nuclear and cytosolic protein in F344 rat kidneys: Isolation and identification of the accumulating protein

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, D.R. Heussner, A.H.; O'Brien, E.; Gramatte, T.; Runkel, M.; Rumpf, S.; Day, B.W.

    2008-12-15

    Male and female F344 rats but not B6C3F1 mice exposed for 104 weeks to propiverine hydrochloride (1-methylpiperid-4-yl 2,2-diphenyl-2-(1-propoxy)acetate hydrochloride), used for treatment of patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and overactive bladder (OAB), presented with an accumulation of proteins in the cytosol and nuclei of renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, yet despite this, no increased renal tumor incidence was observed. In order to provide an improved interpretation of these findings and a better basis for human health risk assessment, male and female F344 rats were exposed for 16 weeks to 1000 ppm propiverine in the diet, the accumulating protein was isolated from the kidneys via cytosolic and nuclear preparations or laser-capture microdissection and analyzed using molecular weight determination and mass spectrometry. The accumulating protein was found to be D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), an enzyme involved in amino and fatty acid metabolism. Subsequent reanalysis of kidney homogenate and nuclear samples as well as tissue sections using western blot and DAAO-immunohistochemistry, confirmed the presence and localization of DAAO in propiverine-treated male and female F344 rats. The accumulation of DAAO only in rats, and the limited similarity of rat DAAO with other species, including humans, suggests a rat-specific mechanism underlying the drug-induced renal DAAO accumulation with little relevance for patients chronically treated with propiverine.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies against accumulation-associated protein affect EPS biosynthesis and enhance bacterial accumulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Xu, Tao; Zhu, Tao; Lou, Qiang; Wang, Xueqin; Wu, Yang; Huang, Renzheng; Liu, Jingran; Liu, Huayong; Yu, Fangyou; Ding, Baixing; Huang, Yalin; Tong, Wenyan; Qu, Di

    2011-01-01

    Because there is no effective antibiotic to eradicate Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm infections that lead to the failure of medical device implantations, the development of anti-biofilm vaccines is necessary. Biofilm formation by S. epidermidis requires accumulation-associated protein (Aap) that contains sequence repeats known as G5 domains, which are responsible for the Zn(2+)-dependent dimerization of Aap to mediate intercellular adhesion. Antibodies against Aap have been reported to inhibit biofilm accumulation. In the present study, three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the Aap C-terminal single B-repeat construct followed by the 79-aa half repeat (AapBrpt1.5) were generated. MAb(18B6) inhibited biofilm formation by S. epidermidis RP62A to 60% of the maximum, while MAb(25C11) and MAb(20B9) enhanced biofilm accumulation. All three MAbs aggregated the planktonic bacteria to form visible cell clusters. Epitope mapping revealed that the epitope of MAb(18B6), which recognizes an identical area within AapBrpt constructs from S. epidermidis RP62A, was not shared by MAb(25C11) and MAb(20B9). Furthermore, all three MAbs were found to affect both Aap expression and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS, including extracellular DNA and PIA) biosynthesis in S. epidermidis and enhance the cell accumulation. These findings contribute to a better understanding of staphylococcal biofilm formation and will help to develop epitope-peptide vaccines against staphylococcal infections.

  8. CCDC115 Deficiency Causes a Disorder of Golgi Homeostasis with Abnormal Protein Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jos C; Cirak, Sebahattin; van Scherpenzeel, Monique; Timal, Sharita; Reunert, Janine; Rust, Stephan; Pérez, Belén; Vicogne, Dorothée; Krawitz, Peter; Wada, Yoshinao; Ashikov, Angel; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Medrano, Celia; Arnoldy, Andrea; Hoischen, Alexander; Huijben, Karin; Steenbergen, Gerry; Quelhas, Dulce; Diogo, Luisa; Rymen, Daisy; Jaeken, Jaak; Guffon, Nathalie; Cheillan, David; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; Maeda, Yusuke; Kaiser, Olaf; Schara, Ulrike; Gerner, Patrick; van den Boogert, Marjolein A W; Holleboom, Adriaan G; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Sokal, Etienne; Salomon, Jody; van den Bogaart, Geert; Drenth, Joost P H; Huynen, Martijn A; Veltman, Joris A; Wevers, Ron A; Morava, Eva; Matthijs, Gert; Foulquier, François; Marquardt, Thorsten; Lefeber, Dirk J

    2016-02-01

    Disorders of Golgi homeostasis form an emerging group of genetic defects. The highly heterogeneous clinical spectrum is not explained by our current understanding of the underlying cell-biological processes in the Golgi. Therefore, uncovering genetic defects and annotating gene function are challenging. Exome sequencing in a family with three siblings affected by abnormal Golgi glycosylation revealed a homozygous missense mutation, c.92T>C (p.Leu31Ser), in coiled-coil domain containing 115 (CCDC115), the function of which is unknown. The same mutation was identified in three unrelated families, and in one family it was compound heterozygous in combination with a heterozygous deletion of CCDC115. An additional homozygous missense mutation, c.31G>T (p.Asp11Tyr), was found in a family with two affected siblings. All individuals displayed a storage-disease-like phenotype involving hepatosplenomegaly, which regressed with age, highly elevated bone-derived alkaline phosphatase, elevated aminotransferases, and elevated cholesterol, in combination with abnormal copper metabolism and neurological symptoms. Two individuals died of liver failure, and one individual was successfully treated by liver transplantation. Abnormal N- and mucin type O-glycosylation was found on serum proteins, and reduced metabolic labeling of sialic acids was found in fibroblasts, which was restored after complementation with wild-type CCDC115. PSI-BLAST homology detection revealed reciprocal homology with Vma22p, the yeast V-ATPase assembly factor located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Human CCDC115 mainly localized to the ERGIC and to COPI vesicles, but not to the ER. These data, in combination with the phenotypic spectrum, which is distinct from that associated with defects in V-ATPase core subunits, suggest a more general role for CCDC115 in Golgi trafficking. Our study reveals CCDC115 deficiency as a disorder of Golgi homeostasis that can be readily identified via screening for abnormal

  9. CCDC115 Deficiency Causes a Disorder of Golgi Homeostasis with Abnormal Protein Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jos C; Cirak, Sebahattin; van Scherpenzeel, Monique; Timal, Sharita; Reunert, Janine; Rust, Stephan; Pérez, Belén; Vicogne, Dorothée; Krawitz, Peter; Wada, Yoshinao; Ashikov, Angel; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Medrano, Celia; Arnoldy, Andrea; Hoischen, Alexander; Huijben, Karin; Steenbergen, Gerry; Quelhas, Dulce; Diogo, Luisa; Rymen, Daisy; Jaeken, Jaak; Guffon, Nathalie; Cheillan, David; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; Maeda, Yusuke; Kaiser, Olaf; Schara, Ulrike; Gerner, Patrick; van den Boogert, Marjolein A W; Holleboom, Adriaan G; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Sokal, Etienne; Salomon, Jody; van den Bogaart, Geert; Drenth, Joost P H; Huynen, Martijn A; Veltman, Joris A; Wevers, Ron A; Morava, Eva; Matthijs, Gert; Foulquier, François; Marquardt, Thorsten; Lefeber, Dirk J

    2016-02-01

    Disorders of Golgi homeostasis form an emerging group of genetic defects. The highly heterogeneous clinical spectrum is not explained by our current understanding of the underlying cell-biological processes in the Golgi. Therefore, uncovering genetic defects and annotating gene function are challenging. Exome sequencing in a family with three siblings affected by abnormal Golgi glycosylation revealed a homozygous missense mutation, c.92T>C (p.Leu31Ser), in coiled-coil domain containing 115 (CCDC115), the function of which is unknown. The same mutation was identified in three unrelated families, and in one family it was compound heterozygous in combination with a heterozygous deletion of CCDC115. An additional homozygous missense mutation, c.31G>T (p.Asp11Tyr), was found in a family with two affected siblings. All individuals displayed a storage-disease-like phenotype involving hepatosplenomegaly, which regressed with age, highly elevated bone-derived alkaline phosphatase, elevated aminotransferases, and elevated cholesterol, in combination with abnormal copper metabolism and neurological symptoms. Two individuals died of liver failure, and one individual was successfully treated by liver transplantation. Abnormal N- and mucin type O-glycosylation was found on serum proteins, and reduced metabolic labeling of sialic acids was found in fibroblasts, which was restored after complementation with wild-type CCDC115. PSI-BLAST homology detection revealed reciprocal homology with Vma22p, the yeast V-ATPase assembly factor located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Human CCDC115 mainly localized to the ERGIC and to COPI vesicles, but not to the ER. These data, in combination with the phenotypic spectrum, which is distinct from that associated with defects in V-ATPase core subunits, suggest a more general role for CCDC115 in Golgi trafficking. Our study reveals CCDC115 deficiency as a disorder of Golgi homeostasis that can be readily identified via screening for abnormal

  10. Alaska pollack protein prevents the accumulation of visceral fat in rats fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Yoshie; Dohmoto, Nobuhiko

    2009-04-01

    In the first study (Study 1), 4-wk-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were fed high fat diets containing casein, Alaska pollack, yellowfin tuna, or chicken as the protein source for 28 d. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of Alaska pollack protein with other animal proteins (casein, yellowfin tuna, and chicken) on the prevention of visceral fat accumulation. We found that Alaska pollack protein was a more potent inhibitor of visceral fat accumulation than the other proteins (p<0.05). In the second study (Study 2), we determined the quantity of Alaska pollack protein needed to have an effect. To test this, 4-wk-old SD rats were fed diets containing different percentages of Alaska pollack proteins (0, 3, 10, 30 or 100%) to replace casein as the protein source for 28 d. The diets with 30 or 100% Alaska pollack protein as the protein source prevented visceral fat accumulation and elevated plasma adiponectin levels. Based on these findings, an inhibitory effect on the accumulation of visceral fats can be achieved by consuming a diet in which 30% or more of the total protein content comes from Alaska pollack. PMID:19436142

  11. Identification and Kinetics of Accumulation of Proteins Induced by Ethylene in Bean Abscission Zones 1

    PubMed Central

    del Campillo, Elena; Lewis, Lowell N.

    1992-01-01

    A two-dimensional gel electrophoresis system that combines a cationic polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH near neutrality with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the spectrum of basic polypeptides that accumulate in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) abscission zones after treatment with ethylene. Results showed that, as abscission progressed, at least seven basic proteins accumulated in the abscission zone prior to the accumulation of 9.5 cellulase. Six of the seven proteins correspond to pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. Among them, two isoforms of β-1,3-glucanase and multiple isoforms of chitinase were identified. A 22 kilodalton polypeptide that accumulated to high levels was identified as a thaumatin-like protein by analysis of its N-terminal sequence (up to 20 amino acids) and its serological relationship with heterologous thaumatin antibodies. A 15 kilodalton polypeptide serologically related to PR P1 (p14) from tomato was identified as bean PR P1 (p14)-like protein. The kinetics of accumulation of glucanases, chitinases, thaumatin-like and PR P1 (p14)-like proteins during ethylene treatment were similar and they showed that PR proteins accumulated in abscission zones prior to the increase in 9.5 cellulase. Addition of indoleacetic acid, a potent inhibitor of abscission, reduced the accumulation of these proteins to a similar extent (60%). The synchronized accumulation of this set of PR proteins, early in the abscission process, may play a role in induced resistance to possible fungal attack after a plant part is shed. The seventh protein does not correspond to any previously characterized PR protein. This new 45 kilodalton polypeptide accumulated in abscission zones on exposure to ethylene concomitantly with the increase in 9.5 cellulase. Its N-terminal sequence (up to 15 amino acids) showed some homology with the amino terminal sequence of chitinase. Polyclonal antibodies against chitinase recognized the 45

  12. Conditional expression of human bone Gla protein in osteoblasts causes skeletal abnormality in mice.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Tsukui, Tohru; Tanaka, Daisuke; Maruyama, Yojiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-07-20

    Bone Gla protein (BGP), also known as osteocalcin, is one of the most abundant γ-carboxylated noncollagenous protein in bone matrix and plays important roles in mineralization and calcium ion homeostasis. BGP is synthesized specifically in osteoblasts; however, its precise function in bone metabolism has not been fully elucidated. To investigate the in vivo function of human BGP (hBGP), we generated CAG-GFP(floxed)-hBGP transgenic mice carrying a transgene cassette composed of the promoter and a floxed GFP linked to hBGP cDNA. The mice were crossed with ColI-Cre mice, which express the Cre recombinase driven by the mouse collagen type 1a1 gene promoter, to obtain hBGP(ColI) conditional transgenic mice that expressed human BGP in osteoblasts. The hBGP(ColI) mice did not survive more than 2days after birth. The analysis of the 18.5-day post coitum fetuses of the hBGP(ColI) mice revealed that they displayed abnormal skeletal growth such as deformity of the rib and short femur and cranium lengths. Moreover, increased BGP levels were detected in the serum of the neonates. These findings indicate that hBGP expression in osteoblasts resulted in the abnormal skeletal growth in the mice. Our study provides a valuable model for understanding the fundamental role of BGP in vivo.

  13. Cell-specific abnormal prenylation of Rab proteins in platelets and melanocytes of the gunmetal mouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Zhen, Lijie; Li, Wei; Novak, Edward K; Collinson, Lucy M; Jang, Elliott K; Haslam, Richard J; Elliott, Rosemary W; Swank, Richard T

    2002-05-01

    The mutant gunmetal mouse exhibits reduced rates of platelet synthesis, abnormalities of platelet alpha and dense granules and hypopigmentation. Several of these features resemble those of human alpha/delta platelet storage pool disease, grey platelet syndrome and Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. Gunmetal mice have reduced levels of Rab geranylgeranyltransferase (RabGGTase), which adds lipophilic prenyl groups to the carboxyl terminus of Rab proteins. The degree of prenylation and the subcellular distribution of several Rab proteins were evaluated in mutant platelets, melanocytes and other tissues. Significant deficits in prenylation and membrane binding of most Rabs were observed in platelets and melanocytes. In contrast, minimal alterations in Rab prenylation were apparent in several other gunmetal tissues despite the fact that RabGGTase activity was equally diminished in these tissues. The mutant tissue-specific effects are probably due to increased concentrations of Rab proteins in platelets and melanocytes. These experiments show that Rab proteins are differentially sensitive to levels of RabGGTase activity and that normal platelet synthesis, platelet organelle function and normal pigmentation are highly sensitive to the degree of prenylation and membrane association of Rab proteins. Further, the tissue-specific effects of the gunmetal mutation suggest that RabGGTase is a potential target for therapy of thrombocytosis.

  14. Heat shock protein 27 expression in the human testis showing normal and abnormal spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Adly, Mohamed A; Assaf, Hanan A; Hussein, Mahmoud Rezk A

    2008-10-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones involved in protein folding, assembly and transport, and which play critical roles in the regulation of cell growth, survival and differentiation. We set out to test the hypothesis that HSP27 protein is expressed in the human testes and its expression varies with the state of spermatogenesis. HSP27 expression was examined in 30 human testicular biopsy specimens (normal spermatogenesis, maturation arrest and Sertoli cell only syndrome, 10 cases each) using immunofluorescent methods. The biopsies were obtained from patients undergoing investigations for infertility. The seminiferous epithelium of the human testes showing normal spermatogenesis had a cell type-specific expression of HSP27. HSP27 expression was strong in the cytoplasm of the Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, and Leydig cells. Alternatively, the expression was moderate in the spermatocytes, weak in the spermatids and absent in the spermatozoa. In testes showing maturation arrest, HSP27 expression was strong in the Sertoli cells, weak in the spermatogonia, and spermatocytes. It was absent in the spermatids and Leydig cells. In Sertoli cell only syndrome, HSP27 expression was strong in the Sertoli cells and absent in the Leydig cells. We report for the first time the expression patterns of HSP27 in the human testes and show differential expression during normal spermatogenesis, indicating a possible role in this process. The altered expression of this protein in testes showing abnormal spermatogenesis may be related to the pathogenesis of male infertility.

  15. Characterization of the proteostasis roles of glycerol accumulation, protein degradation and protein synthesis during osmotic stress in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Burkewitz, Kristopher; Choe, Keith P; Lee, Elaine Choung-Hee; Deonarine, Andrew; Strange, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of C. elegans to hypertonic stress-induced water loss causes rapid and widespread cellular protein damage. Survival in hypertonic environments depends critically on the ability of worm cells to detect and degrade misfolded and aggregated proteins. Acclimation of C. elegans to mild hypertonic stress suppresses protein damage and increases survival under more extreme hypertonic conditions. Suppression of protein damage in acclimated worms could be due to 1) accumulation of the chemical chaperone glycerol, 2) upregulation of protein degradation activity, and/or 3) increases in molecular chaperoning capacity of the cell. Glycerol and other chemical chaperones are widely thought to protect proteins from hypertonicity-induced damage. However, protein damage is unaffected by gene mutations that inhibit glycerol accumulation or that cause dramatic constitutive elevation of glycerol levels. Pharmacological or RNAi inhibition of proteasome and lyosome function and measurements of cellular protein degradation activity demonstrated that upregulation of protein degradation mechanisms plays no role in acclimation. Thus, changes in molecular chaperone capacity must be responsible for suppressing protein damage in acclimated worms. Transcriptional changes in chaperone expression have not been detected in C. elegans exposed to hypertonic stress. However, acclimation to mild hypertonicity inhibits protein synthesis 50-70%, which is expected to increase chaperone availability for coping with damage to existing proteins. Consistent with this idea, we found that RNAi silencing of essential translational components or acute exposure to cycloheximide results in a 50-80% suppression of hypertonicity-induced aggregation of polyglutamine-YFP (Q35::YFP). Dietary changes that increase protein production also increase Q35::YFP aggregation 70-180%. Our results demonstrate directly for the first time that inhibition of protein translation protects extant proteins from damage brought

  16. Accumulation of helper component/proteinase and coat protein of turnip mosaic virus in intact plants.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, K

    1999-02-01

    The helper component/proteinase (HC/Pro) protein of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) was fused with glutathione S-transferase (GST) and expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The quality of antiserum raised against the GST-HC/Pro fusion protein was compared to that of antiserum raised against coat protein (CP) by image analyser. The result showed that these antisera were of similar quality. Then the both antisera were used to follow the time course of accumulation of HC/Pro protein and CP in intact TuMV-infected leaves. CP appeared first at day 3 post inoculation (p.i.) and gradually accumulated in uninoculated upper leaves, whereas HC/Pro protein appeared first at day 4 p.i., accumulated up to day 7 p.i. and then gradually decreased. Potyvirus proteins are encoded by a single translation unit spanning most of the genome and are presumably synthesized in equimolar ratios. Therefore, the reduced accumulation of HC/Pro protein in relation to CP at one month p.i. in infected plants is presumed to be the result of its degradation. PMID:10672341

  17. Endometrial inflammation and abnormal expression of extracellular matrix proteins induced by Mycoplasma bovis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengyao; Wang, Guoqing; Lv, Tingting; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tiancheng; Xie, Guanghong; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng; Cao, Rongfeng

    2014-03-15

    Mycoplasma bovis infection can cause endometrial inflammation leading to infertility and involuntary culling in dairy cows. Because extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins affect the adherence of mycoplasma to eukaryotic cell surface, they may play a role in the pathogenesis of the bacteria. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the endometrial inflammatory response and ECM protein expression induced by M bovis. Endometrial concentrations of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and mRNA and protein expression of collagen IV (CL-IV), fibronectin (FN), and laminin (LN) were evaluated 10, 20, and 30 days after M bovis intrauterine infusion in breed cows 18 days postpartum. The presence of the bacteria in the uterus was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Endometrial TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 concentrations in the treatment group were greater (P < 0.05) than in the positive and negative control groups 20 and 30 days after infusion. Endometrial CL-IV, FN, and LN mRNA and protein expression increased (P < 0.01) 20 days after infusion in all groups. However, the increase was more pronounced in the treatment group and reactive expressions were greater (P < 0.05) than in the positive and negative control groups 10, 20, and 30 days after infusion. In conclusion, M bovis triggered endometrial inflammatory response and increased CL-IV, FN, and LN mRNA and protein expression. The abnormal expression of ECM these proteins may promote the pathogenic effects of M bovis that lead to endometrial tissue damage and infertility.

  18. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of plasma reveals abnormalities in lipid metabolism proteins in chronic kidney disease-related atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luczak, Magdalena; Formanowicz, Dorota; Marczak, Łukasz; Suszyńska-Zajczyk, Joanna; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2016-09-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a considerably higher risk of death due to cardiovascular causes. Using an iTRAQ MS/MS approach, we investigated the alterations in plasma protein accumulation in patients with CKD and classical cardiovascular disease (CVD) without CKD. The proteomic analysis led to the identification of 130 differentially expressed proteins among CVD and CKD patients and healthy volunteers. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 29 differentially expressed proteins were involved in lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis, 20 of which were apolipoproteins and constituents of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Although dyslipidemia is common in CKD patients, we found that significant changes in apolipoproteins were not strictly associated with changes in plasma lipid levels. A lack of correlation between apoB and LDL concentration and an inverse relationship of some proteins with the HDL level were revealed. An increased level of apolipoprotein AIV, adiponectin, or apolipoprotein C, despite their anti-atherogenic properties, was not associated with a decrease in cardiovascular event risk in CKD patients. The presence of the distinctive pattern of apolipoproteins demonstrated in this study may suggest that lipid abnormalities in CKD are characterized by more qualitative abnormalities and may be related to HDL function rather than HDL deficiency.

  19. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of plasma reveals abnormalities in lipid metabolism proteins in chronic kidney disease-related atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Luczak, Magdalena; Formanowicz, Dorota; Marczak, Łukasz; Suszyńska-Zajczyk, Joanna; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a considerably higher risk of death due to cardiovascular causes. Using an iTRAQ MS/MS approach, we investigated the alterations in plasma protein accumulation in patients with CKD and classical cardiovascular disease (CVD) without CKD. The proteomic analysis led to the identification of 130 differentially expressed proteins among CVD and CKD patients and healthy volunteers. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 29 differentially expressed proteins were involved in lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis, 20 of which were apolipoproteins and constituents of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Although dyslipidemia is common in CKD patients, we found that significant changes in apolipoproteins were not strictly associated with changes in plasma lipid levels. A lack of correlation between apoB and LDL concentration and an inverse relationship of some proteins with the HDL level were revealed. An increased level of apolipoprotein AIV, adiponectin, or apolipoprotein C, despite their anti-atherogenic properties, was not associated with a decrease in cardiovascular event risk in CKD patients. The presence of the distinctive pattern of apolipoproteins demonstrated in this study may suggest that lipid abnormalities in CKD are characterized by more qualitative abnormalities and may be related to HDL function rather than HDL deficiency. PMID:27600335

  20. iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis of plasma reveals abnormalities in lipid metabolism proteins in chronic kidney disease-related atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Luczak, Magdalena; Formanowicz, Dorota; Marczak, Łukasz; Suszyńska-Zajczyk, Joanna; Pawliczak, Elżbieta; Wanic-Kossowska, Maria; Stobiecki, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a considerably higher risk of death due to cardiovascular causes. Using an iTRAQ MS/MS approach, we investigated the alterations in plasma protein accumulation in patients with CKD and classical cardiovascular disease (CVD) without CKD. The proteomic analysis led to the identification of 130 differentially expressed proteins among CVD and CKD patients and healthy volunteers. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 29 differentially expressed proteins were involved in lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis, 20 of which were apolipoproteins and constituents of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Although dyslipidemia is common in CKD patients, we found that significant changes in apolipoproteins were not strictly associated with changes in plasma lipid levels. A lack of correlation between apoB and LDL concentration and an inverse relationship of some proteins with the HDL level were revealed. An increased level of apolipoprotein AIV, adiponectin, or apolipoprotein C, despite their anti-atherogenic properties, was not associated with a decrease in cardiovascular event risk in CKD patients. The presence of the distinctive pattern of apolipoproteins demonstrated in this study may suggest that lipid abnormalities in CKD are characterized by more qualitative abnormalities and may be related to HDL function rather than HDL deficiency. PMID:27600335

  1. The molten globule of β(2)-microglobulin accumulated at pH 4 and its role in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Mukaiyama, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takashi; Makabe, Koki; Maki, Kosuke; Goto, Yuji; Kuwajima, Kunihiro

    2013-01-23

    The acid transition of β(2)-microglobulin (β2m) was studied by tryptophan fluorescence, peptide circular dichroism, and NMR spectroscopy. The protein exhibits a three-state transition with an equilibrium intermediate accumulated at pH4 (25°C). The pH4 intermediate has typical characteristics of the molten globule (MG) state; it showed a native-like secondary structure without specific side-chain tertiary structure, and the hydrodynamic radius determined by pulse field gradient NMR was only 20% larger than that of the native state. The accumulation of the pH4 intermediate is very analogous to the behavior of apomyoglobin, for which the pH4 MG has been well characterized, although β2m, a β-protein, is structurally very different from α-helical apomyoglobin. NMR pH titration of histidine residues of β2m has also indicated that His84 has an abnormally low pK(a) value in the native state. From the pH dependence of the unfolding transition, the protonations of this histidine and 10 weakly abnormal carboxylates triggered the transition from the native to the MG state. This behavior is again analogous to that of apomyoglobin, suggesting a common mechanism of production of the pH4 MG. In contrast to the folding of apomyoglobin, in which the MG was equivalent to the burst-phase kinetic folding intermediate, the burst-phase refolding intermediate of β2m, detected by stopped-flow circular dichroism, was significantly more structured than the pH4 intermediate. It is proposed that the folding of β2m from its acid-denatured state takes place in the following order: denatured state→MG→burst-phase intermediate→native state. PMID:23154171

  2. Loss of prion protein leads to age-dependent behavioral abnormalities and changes in cytoskeletal protein expression.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Matthias; Greis, Catharina; Ottis, Philipp; Silva, Christopher J; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Wrede, Arne; Koppe, Katharina; Onisko, Bruce; Requena, Jesús R; Govindarajan, Nambirajan; Korth, Carsten; Fischer, Andre; Zerr, Inga

    2014-12-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a highly conserved protein whose exact physiological role remains elusive. In the present study, we investigated age-dependent behavioral abnormalities in PrPC-knockout (Prnp0/0) mice and wild-type (WT) controls. Prnp0/0 mice showed age-dependent behavioral deficits in memory performance, associative learning, basal anxiety, and nest building behavior. Using a hypothesis-free quantitative proteomic investigation, we found that loss of PrPC affected the levels of neurofilament proteins in an age-dependent manner. In order to understand the biochemical basis of these observations, we analyzed the phosphorylation status of neurofilament heavy chain (NF-H). We found a reduction in NF-H phosphorylation in both Prnp0/0 mice and in PrPC-deficient cells. The expression of Fyn and phospho-Fyn, a potential regulator for NF phosphorylation, was associated with PrPC ablation. The number of β-tubulin III-positive neurons in the hippocampus was diminished in Prnp0/0 mice relative to WT mice. These data indicate that PrPC plays an important role in cytoskeletal organization, brain function, and age-related neuroprotection. Our work represents the first direct biochemical link between these proteins and the observed behavioral phenotypes.

  3. Growth of plasmodium falciparum in human erythrocytes containing abnormal membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schulman, S. City Univ. of New York, NY ); Roth, E.F. Jr.; Cheng, B.; Rybicki, A.C.; Sussman, I.I.; Wong, M.; Nagel, R.L.; Schwartz, R.S. ); Wang, W. ); Ranney, H.M. )

    1990-09-01

    To evaluate the role of erythrocyte (RBC) membrane proteins in the invasion and maturation of Plasmodium falciparum, the authors have studied, in culture, abnormal RBCs containing quantitative or qualitative membrane protein defects. These defects included hereditary spherocytosis (HS) due to decreases in the content of spectrin (HS(Sp{sup +})), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) due to protein 4.1 deficiency (HE(4.1{sup 0})), HE due to a spectrin {alpha}I domain structural variant that results in increased content of spectrin dimers (HE(Sp{alpha}{sup I/65})), and band 3 structural variants. Parasite invasion, measured by the initial uptake of ({sup 3}H)hypoxanthine 18 hr after inoculation with merozoites, was normal in all of the pathologic RBCs. In contrast, RBCs from six HS(Sp{sup +}) subjects showed marked growth inhibition that became apparent after the first or second growth cycle. The extent of decreased parasite growth in HS(Sp{sup +}) RBCs closely correlated with the extent of RBC spectrin deficiency. Homogeneous subpopulations of dense HS RBCs exhibited decreased parasite growth to the same extent as did HS whole blood. RBCs from four HE subjects showed marked parasite growth and development.

  4. Cadmium toxicity in diazotrophic Anabaena spp. adjudged by hasty up-accumulation of transporter and signaling and severe down-accumulation of nitrogen metabolism proteins.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Shrivastava, Alok Kumar; Chatterjee, Antra; Pandey, Sarita; Rai, Snigdha; Singh, Shilpi; Rai, L C

    2015-09-01

    Present study demonstrates interspecies variation in proteome and survival strategy of three Anabaena species i.e., Anabaena L31, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and Anabaena doliolum subjected to respective LC50 doses of Cd at 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7day intervals. The proteome coverage with 452 differentially accumulated proteins unveiled species and time specific expression and interaction network of proteins involved in important cellular functions. Statistical analysis of protein abundance across Cd-treated proteomes clustered their co-expression pattern into four groups viz., (i) early (days 1 and 3) accumulated proteins, (ii) proteins up-accumulated for longer duration, (iii) late (days 5 and 7) accumulated proteins, and (iv) mostly down-accumulated proteins. Appreciable growth of Cd treated A L31 over other two species may be ascribed to proteins contained in the first and second groups (belonging to energy and carbohydrate metabolism (TK, G6-PI, PGD, FBA, PPA, ATP synthase)), sulfur metabolism (GR, GST, PGDH, PAPS reductase, GDC-P, and SAM synthetase), fatty acid metabolism (AspD, PspA, SQD-1), phosphorous metabolism (PhoD, PstB and SQD1), molecular chaperones (Gro-EL, FKBP-type peptidylprolyl isomerase), and antioxidative defense enzymes (SOD-A, catalase). Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 harboring proteins largely from the third group qualified as a late accumulator and A. doliolum housing majority of proteins from the fourth group emerged as the most sensitive species. Thus early up-accumulation of transporter and signaling category proteins and drastic reduction of nitrogen assimilation proteins could be taken as a vital indicator of cadmium toxicity in Anabaena spp. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India.

  5. Lipofuscin accumulation, abnormal electrophysiology, and photoreceptor degeneration in mutant ELOVL4 transgenic mice: a model for macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Karan, G; Lillo, C; Yang, Z; Cameron, D J; Locke, K G; Zhao, Y; Thirumalaichary, S; Li, C; Birch, D G; Vollmer-Snarr, H R; Williams, D S; Zhang, K

    2005-03-15

    Macular degeneration is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by photoreceptor degeneration and atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in the central retina. An autosomal dominant form of Stargardt macular degeneration (STGD) is caused by mutations in ELOVL4, which is predicted to encode an enzyme involved in the elongation of long-chain fatty acids. We generated transgenic mice expressing a mutant form of human ELOVL4 that causes STGD. In these mice, we show that accumulation by the RPE of undigested phagosomes and lipofuscin, including the fluorophore, 2-[2,6-dimethyl-8-(2,6,6-trimethyl-1-cyclohexen-1-yl)-1E,3E,5E,7E-octatetraenyl]-1-(2-hyydroxyethyl)-4-[4-methyl-6-(2,6,6,-trimethyl-1-cyclohexen-1-yl)-1E,3E,5E-hexatrienyl]-pyridinium (A2E) is followed by RPE atrophy. Subsequently, photoreceptor degeneration occurs in the central retina in a pattern closely resembling that of human STGD and age-related macular degeneration. The ELOVL4 transgenic mice thus provide a good model for both STGD and dry age-related macular degeneration, and represent a valuable tool for studies on therapeutic intervention in these forms of blindness. PMID:15749821

  6. Identification of Leaf Proteins Differentially Accumulated between Wheat Cultivars Distinct in Their Levels of Drought Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Yanwei; Dong, Liwei; Deng, Xiong; Li, Xiaohui; Yan, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    The drought-tolerant ‘Ningchun 47’ (NC47) and drought-sensitive ‘Chinese Spring’ (CS) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars were treated with different PEG6000 concentrations at the three-leaf stage. An analysis on the physiological and proteomic changes of wheat seedling in response to drought stress was performed. In total, 146 differentially accumulated protein (DAP) spots were separated and recognised using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In total, 101 DAP spots representing 77 unique proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry. These proteins were allocated to 10 groups according to putative functions, which were mainly involved in carbon metabolism (23.4%), photosynthesis/respiration (22.1%) and stress/defence/detoxification (18.2%). Some drought stress-related proteins in NC47, such as enolase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, Oxygen-evolving enhancer protein 2, fibrillin-like protein, 2-Cys peroxiredoxin BAS1 and 70-kDa heat shock protein, were more upregulated than those in CS. Multivariate principal components analysis revealed obvious differences between the control and treatments in both NC47 and CS, while cluster analysis showed that the DAPs displayed five and six accumulation patterns in NC47 and CS, respectively. Protein–protein interaction network analysis showed that some key DAPs, such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxin BAS1, RuBisCO large subunit-binding protein, 50S ribosomal protein L1, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzyme and 70-kDa heat shock protein, with upregulated accumulation in NC47, had complex interactions with other proteins related to amino acid metabolism, carbon metabolism, energy pathway, signal transduction, stress/defence/detoxification, protein folding and nucleotide metabolism. These proteins could play important roles in drought-stress tolerance and contribute to the relatively stronger drought tolerance of NC47

  7. Inhibition of dendritic cell differentiation and accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in cancer is regulated by S100A9 protein

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Pingyan; Corzo, Cesar A.; Luetteke, Noreen; Yu, Bin; Nagaraj, Srinivas; Bui, Marylin M.; Ortiz, Myrna; Nacken, Wolfgang; Sorg, Clemens; Vogl, Thomas; Roth, Johannes; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) associated with inhibition of dendritic cell (DC) differentiation is one of the major immunological abnormalities in cancer and leads to suppression of antitumor immune responses. The molecular mechanism of this phenomenon remains unclear. We report here that STAT3-inducible up-regulation of the myeloid-related protein S100A9 enhances MDSC production in cancer. Mice lacking this protein mounted potent antitumor immune responses and rejected implanted tumors. This effect was reversed by administration of wild-type MDSCs from tumor-bearing mice to S100A9-null mice. Overexpression of S100A9 in cultured embryonic stem cells or transgenic mice inhibited the differentiation of DCs and macrophages and induced accumulation of MDSCs. This study demonstrates that tumor-induced up-regulation of S100A9 protein is critically important for accumulation of MDSCs and reveals a novel molecular mechanism of immunological abnormalities in cancer. PMID:18809714

  8. Abnormal expression of vesicular transport proteins in pulmonary arterial hypertension in monocrotaline-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongliang; Luo, Qin; Liu, Zhihong; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Zhihui

    2015-03-01

    Intracellular vesicular transport is shown to be dysfunctional in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the expression of intracellular vesicular transport proteins in PAH remains unclear. To elucidate the possible role of these proteins in the development of PAH, the changes in the expressions of N-ethyl-maleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), α-soluble NSF attachment protein (α-SNAP), synaptosome-associated membrane protein 23 (SNAP23), type 2 bone morphogenetic receptor (BMPR2), caveolin-1 (cav-1), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were examined in lung tissues of monocrotaline (MCT)-treated rats by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. In addition, caspase-3, also examined by western blot analysis, was used as an indicator of apoptosis. Our data showed that during the development of PAH, the expressions of NSF, α-SNAP, and SNAP23 were significantly increased before pulmonary arterial pressure started to increase and then significantly decreased after PAH was established. The expressions of BMPR2 and eNOS were similar to those of NSF, α-SNAP, and SNAP23; however, the expression of cav-1 was down-regulated after MCT treatment. Caspase-3 expression was increased after exposure to MCT. In conclusion, the expressions of NSF, α-SNAP, and SNPA23 changed greatly during the onset of PAH, which was accompanied by abnormal expressions of BMPR2, cav-1, and eNOS, as well as an increase in apoptosis. Thus, changes in NSF, α-SNAP, and SNAP23 expressions appear to be mechanistically associated with the development of PAH in MCT-treated rats. PMID:25630652

  9. ATP6AP1 deficiency causes an immunodeficiency with hepatopathy, cognitive impairment and abnormal protein glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Eric J R; Timal, Sharita; Ryan, Margret; Ashikov, Angel; van Scherpenzeel, Monique; Graham, Laurie A; Mandel, Hanna; Hoischen, Alexander; Iancu, Theodore C; Raymond, Kimiyo; Steenbergen, Gerry; Gilissen, Christian; Huijben, Karin; van Bakel, Nick H M; Maeda, Yusuke; Rodenburg, Richard J; Adamowicz, Maciej; Crushell, Ellen; Koenen, Hans; Adams, Darius; Vodopiutz, Julia; Greber-Platzer, Susanne; Müller, Thomas; Dueckers, Gregor; Morava, Eva; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Martens, Gerard J M; Wevers, Ron A; Niehues, Tim; Huynen, Martijn A; Veltman, Joris A; Stevens, Tom H; Lefeber, Dirk J

    2016-01-01

    The V-ATPase is the main regulator of intra-organellar acidification. Assembly of this complex has extensively been studied in yeast, while limited knowledge exists for man. We identified 11 male patients with hemizygous missense mutations in ATP6AP1, encoding accessory protein Ac45 of the V-ATPase. Homology detection at the level of sequence profiles indicated Ac45 as the long-sought human homologue of yeast V-ATPase assembly factor Voa1. Processed wild-type Ac45, but not its disease mutants, restored V-ATPase-dependent growth in Voa1 mutant yeast. Patients display an immunodeficiency phenotype associated with hypogammaglobulinemia, hepatopathy and a spectrum of neurocognitive abnormalities. Ac45 in human brain is present as the common, processed ∼40-kDa form, while liver shows a 62-kDa intact protein, and B-cells a 50-kDa isoform. Our work unmasks Ac45 as the functional ortholog of yeast V-ATPase assembly factor Voa1 and reveals a novel link of tissue-specific V-ATPase assembly with immunoglobulin production and cognitive function. PMID:27231034

  10. Prognostic value of serum tumor abnormal protein in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    LAN, FENG; ZHU, MING; QI, QIUFENG; ZHANG, YAPING; LIU, YONGPING

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of protein occurs in nearly all types of cancers and has been confirmed to be associated with tumor progression, metastasis and the survival rate of patients. The present study aimed to explore the prognostic value of tumor abnormal protein (TAP) in gastric cancer patients. TAP was detected in the blood of 42 gastric cancer patients and 56 healthy volunteers by using the TAP testing kit. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis were performed to evaluate the prognostic value of TAP. In total, 64.3% of gastric cancer patients were positive for TAP, and TAP was significantly correlated with poor prognosis [progression-free survival (PFS), 4.2 vs. 12.6 months; P=0.043]. TAP [hazard ratio (HR), 64.487; P<0.01), differentiation (HR, 17.279; P<0.01) and TNM stage (HR, 45.480; P<0.01) were found to be independent predictive factors for PFS. Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier curves indicated that TAP is associated with a reduced PFS in gastric cancer patients. The results of the present study therefore indicated that the TAP test has significant prognostic value for gastric cancer patients. PMID:27330802

  11. ATP6AP1 deficiency causes an immunodeficiency with hepatopathy, cognitive impairment and abnormal protein glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Eric J. R.; Timal, Sharita; Ryan, Margret; Ashikov, Angel; van Scherpenzeel, Monique; Graham, Laurie A.; Mandel, Hanna; Hoischen, Alexander; Iancu, Theodore C.; Raymond, Kimiyo; Steenbergen, Gerry; Gilissen, Christian; Huijben, Karin; van Bakel, Nick H. M.; Maeda, Yusuke; Rodenburg, Richard J.; Adamowicz, Maciej; Crushell, Ellen; Koenen, Hans; Adams, Darius; Vodopiutz, Julia; Greber-Platzer, Susanne; Müller, Thomas; Dueckers, Gregor; Morava, Eva; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Martens, Gerard J. M.; Wevers, Ron A.; Niehues, Tim; Huynen, Martijn A.; Veltman, Joris A.; Stevens, Tom H.; Lefeber, Dirk J.

    2016-01-01

    The V-ATPase is the main regulator of intra-organellar acidification. Assembly of this complex has extensively been studied in yeast, while limited knowledge exists for man. We identified 11 male patients with hemizygous missense mutations in ATP6AP1, encoding accessory protein Ac45 of the V-ATPase. Homology detection at the level of sequence profiles indicated Ac45 as the long-sought human homologue of yeast V-ATPase assembly factor Voa1. Processed wild-type Ac45, but not its disease mutants, restored V-ATPase-dependent growth in Voa1 mutant yeast. Patients display an immunodeficiency phenotype associated with hypogammaglobulinemia, hepatopathy and a spectrum of neurocognitive abnormalities. Ac45 in human brain is present as the common, processed ∼40-kDa form, while liver shows a 62-kDa intact protein, and B-cells a 50-kDa isoform. Our work unmasks Ac45 as the functional ortholog of yeast V-ATPase assembly factor Voa1 and reveals a novel link of tissue-specific V-ATPase assembly with immunoglobulin production and cognitive function. PMID:27231034

  12. Abnormal Phosphorylation of the Microtubule-Associated Protein τ (Tau) in Alzheimer Cytoskeletal Pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid; Tung, Yunn-Chyn; Quinlan, Maureen; Wisniewski, Henryk M.; Binder, Lester I.

    1986-07-01

    A monoclonal antibody to the microtubule-associated protein τ (tau) labeled some neurofibrillary tangles and plaque neurites, the two major locations of paired-helical filaments (PHF), in Alzheimer disease brain. The antibody also labeled isolated PHF that had been repeatedly washed with NaDodSO4. Dephosphorylation of the tissue sections with alkaline phosphatase prior to immunolabeling dramatically increased the number of tangles and plaques recognized by the antibody. The plaque core amyloid was not stained in either dephosphorylated or nondephosphorylated tissue sections. On immunoblots PHF polypeptides were labeled readily only when dephosphorylated. In contrast, a commercially available monoclonal antibody to a phosphorylated epitope of neurofilaments that labeled the tangles and the plaque neurites in tissue did not label any PHF polypeptides on immunoblots. The PHF polypeptides, labeled with the monoclonal antibody to τ , electrophoresed with those polypeptides recognized by antibodies to isolated PHF. The antibody to τ -labeled microtubules from normal human brains assembled in vitro but identically treated Alzheimer brain preparations had to be dephosphorylated to be completely recognized by this antibody. These findings suggest that τ in Alzheimer brain is an abnormally phosphorylated protein component of PHF.

  13. Early Expressed Clb Proteins Allow Accumulation of Mitotic Cyclin by Inactivating Proteolytic Machinery during S Phase

    PubMed Central

    Yeong, Foong May; Lim, Hong Hwa; Wang, Ya; Surana, Uttam

    2001-01-01

    Periodic accumulation and destruction of mitotic cyclins are important for the initiation and termination of M phase. It is known that both APCCdc20 and APCHct1 collaborate to destroy mitotic cyclins during M phase. Here we show that this relationship between anaphase-promoting complex (APC) and Clb proteins is reversed in S phase such that the early Clb kinases (Clb3, Clb4, and Clb5 kinases) inactivate APCHct1 to allow Clb2 accumulation. This alternating antagonism between APC and Clb proteins during S and M phases constitutes an oscillatory system that generates undulations in the levels of mitotic cyclins. PMID:11438663

  14. Biogenesis of protein bodies during vicilin accumulation in Medicago truncatula immature seeds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Grain legumes play a worldwide role as a source of plant proteins for feed and food. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, the organisation of protein storage vacuoles (PSV) in maturing seeds remains unknown. Findings The sub-cellular events accompanying the accumulation of vicilin (globulin7S) were analysed during seed mid-maturation. Immuno-detection of vicilin in light microscopy, allowed a semi-quantitative assessment of the protein body complement. The identified populations of vicilin-containing protein bodies are distinguished by their number and size which allowed to propose a model of their biogenesis. Two distributions were detected, enabling a separation of their processing at early and mid maturation stages. The largest protein bodies, at 16 and 20 days after pollination (DAP), were formed by the fusion of small bodies. They have probably attained their final size and correspond to mature vicilin aggregations. Electron microscopic observations revealed the association of the dense protein bodies with rough endoplasmic reticulum. The presence of a ribosome layer surrounding protein bodies, would support an endoplasmic reticulum–vacuole trafficking pathway. Conclusions The stastistic analysis may be useful for screening mutations of candidate genes governing protein content. The definitive evidence for an ER-storage vacuole pathway corresponds to a challenge, for the storage of post-translationally unstable proteins. It was proposed for the accumulation of one class of storage protein, the vicilins. This alternative pathway is a matter of controversy in dicotyledonous seeds. PMID:22862819

  15. Stable accumulation of seed storage proteins containing vaccine peptides in transgenic soybean seeds.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Nobuyuki; Fujiwara, Keigo; Yokoyama, Kazunori; Cabanos, Cerrone; Hasegawa, Hisakazu; Takagi, Kyoko; Nishizawa, Keito; Uki, Yuriko; Kawarabayashi, Takeshi; Shouji, Mikio; Ishimoto, Masao; Terakawa, Teruhiko

    2014-10-01

    There has been a significant increase in the use of transgenic plants for the large-scale production of pharmaceuticals and industrial proteins. Here, we report the stable accumulation of seed storage proteins containing disease vaccine peptides in transgenic soybean seeds. To synthesize vaccine peptides in soybean seeds, we used seed storage proteins as a carrier and a soybean breeding line lacking major seed storage proteins as a host. Vaccine peptides were inserted into the flexible disordered regions in the A1aB1b subunit three-dimensional structure. The A1aB1b subunit containing vaccine peptides in the disordered regions were sorted to the protein storage vacuoles where vaccine peptides are partially cleaved by proteases. In contrast, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-retention type of the A1aB1b subunit containing vaccine peptides accumulated in compartments that originated from the ER as an intact pro-form. These results indicate that the ER may be an organelle suitable for the stable accumulation of bioactive peptides using seed storage proteins as carriers.

  16. Abnormal Intracellular Accumulation and Extracellular Aβ Deposition in Idiopathic and Dup15q11.2-q13 Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wegiel, Jerzy; Frackowiak, Janusz; Mazur-Kolecka, Bozena; Schanen, N. Carolyn; Cook, Edwin H.; Sigman, Marian; Brown, W. Ted; Kuchna, Izabela; Wegiel, Jarek; Nowicki, Krzysztof; Imaki, Humi; Ma, Shuang Yong; Chauhan, Abha; Chauhan, Ved; Miller, David L.; Mehta, Pankaj D.; Flory, Michael; Cohen, Ira L.; London, Eric; Reisberg, Barry; de Leon, Mony J.; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background It has been shown that amyloid ß (Aβ), a product of proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid β precursor protein (APP), accumulates in neuronal cytoplasm in non-affected individuals in a cell type–specific amount. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, we found that the percentage of amyloid-positive neurons increases in subjects diagnosed with idiopathic autism and subjects diagnosed with duplication 15q11.2-q13 (dup15) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In spite of interindividual differences within each examined group, levels of intraneuronal Aβ load were significantly greater in the dup(15) autism group than in either the control or the idiopathic autism group in 11 of 12 examined regions (p<0.0001 for all comparisons; Kruskall-Wallis test). In eight regions, intraneuronal Aβ load differed significantly between idiopathic autism and control groups (p<0.0001). The intraneuronal Aβ was mainly N-terminally truncated. Increased intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ17–40/42 in children and adults suggests a life-long enhancement of APP processing with α-secretase in autistic subjects. Aβ accumulation in neuronal endosomes, autophagic vacuoles, Lamp1-positive lysosomes and lipofuscin, as revealed by confocal microscopy, indicates that products of enhanced α-secretase processing accumulate in organelles involved in proteolysis and storage of metabolic remnants. Diffuse plaques containing Aβ1–40/42 detected in three subjects with ASD, 39 to 52 years of age, suggest that there is an age-associated risk of alterations of APP processing with an intraneuronal accumulation of a short form of Aβ and an extracellular deposition of full-length Aβ in nonfibrillar plaques. Conclusions/Significance The higher prevalence of excessive Aβ accumulation in neurons in individuals with early onset of intractable seizures, and with a high risk of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy in autistic subjects with dup(15) compared to subjects with idiopathic

  17. Complex proteinopathy with accumulations of prion protein, hyperphosphorylated tau, α-synuclein and ubiquitin in experimental bovine spongiform encephalopathy of monkeys.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, Pedro; Cervenak, Juraj; Bu, Ming; Miller, Lindsay; Asher, David M

    2014-07-01

    Proteins aggregate in several slowly progressive neurodegenerative diseases called 'proteinopathies'. Studies with cell cultures and transgenic mice overexpressing mutated proteins suggested that aggregates of one protein induced misfolding and aggregation of other proteins as well - a possible common mechanism for some neurodegenerative diseases. However, most proteinopathies are 'sporadic', without gene mutation or overexpression. Thus, proteinopathies in WT animals genetically close to humans might be informative. Squirrel monkeys infected with the classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent developed an encephalopathy resembling variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with accumulations not only of abnormal prion protein (PrP(TSE)), but also three other proteins: hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau), α-synuclein and ubiquitin; β-amyloid protein (Aβ) did not accumulate. Severity of brain lesions correlated with spongiform degeneration. No amyloid was detected. These results suggested that PrP(TSE) enhanced formation of p-tau and aggregation of α-synuclein and ubiquitin, but not Aβ, providing a new experimental model for neurodegenerative diseases associated with complex proteinopathies.

  18. Adipocyte differentiation-related protein promotes lipid accumulation in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, H B; Yu, K; Luo, J; Li, J; Tian, H B; Zhu, J J; Sun, Y T; Yao, D W; Xu, H F; Shi, H P; Loor, J J

    2015-10-01

    Milk fat originates from the secretion of cytosolic lipid droplets (CLD) synthesized within mammary epithelial cells. Adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADRP; gene symbol PLIN2) is a CLD-binding protein that is crucial for synthesis of mature CLD. Our hypothesis was that ADRP regulates CLD production and metabolism in goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC) and thus plays a role in determining milk fat content. To understand the role of ADRP in ruminant milk fat metabolism, ADRP (PLIN2) was overexpressed or knocked down in GMEC using an adenovirus system. Immunocytochemical staining revealed that ADRP localized to the surface of CLD. Supplementation with oleic acid (OA) enhanced its colocalization with CLD surface and enhanced lipid accumulation. Overexpression of ADRP increased lipid accumulation and the concentration of triacylglycerol in GMEC. In contrast, morphological examination revealed that knockdown of ADRP decreased lipid accumulation even when OA was supplemented. This response was confirmed by the reduction in mass of cellular TG when ADRP was knocked down. The fact that knockdown of ADRP did not completely eliminate lipid accumulation at a morphological level in GMEC without OA suggests that some other compensatory factors may also aid in the process of CLD formation. The ADRP reversed the decrease of CLD accumulation induced by adipose triglyceride lipase. This is highly suggestive of ADRP promoting triacylglycerol stability within CLD by preventing access to adipose triglyceride lipase. Collectively, these data provide direct in vitro evidence that ADRP plays a key role in CLD formation and stability in GMEC. PMID:26298750

  19. Protein accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum as a non-equilibrium phase transition.

    PubMed

    Budrikis, Zoe; Costantini, Giulio; La Porta, Caterina A M; Zapperi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Several neurological disorders are associated with the aggregation of aberrant proteins, often localized in intracellular organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum. Here we study protein aggregation kinetics by mean-field reactions and three dimensional Monte carlo simulations of diffusion-limited aggregation of linear polymers in a confined space, representing the endoplasmic reticulum. By tuning the rates of protein production and degradation, we show that the system undergoes a non-equilibrium phase transition from a physiological phase with little or no polymer accumulation to a pathological phase characterized by persistent polymerization. A combination of external factors accumulating during the lifetime of a patient can thus slightly modify the phase transition control parameters, tipping the balance from a long symptomless lag phase to an accelerated pathological development. The model can be successfully used to interpret experimental data on amyloid-β clearance from the central nervous system. PMID:24722051

  20. Protein accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum as a non-equilibrium phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Budrikis, Zoe; Costantini, Giulio; La Porta, Caterina A. M.; Zapperi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Several neurological disorders are associated with the aggregation of aberrant proteins, often localized in intracellular organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum. Here we study protein aggregation kinetics by mean-field reactions and three dimensional Monte carlo simulations of diffusion-limited aggregation of linear polymers in a confined space, representing the endoplasmic reticulum. By tuning the rates of protein production and degradation, we show that the system undergoes a non-equilibrium phase transition from a physiological phase with little or no polymer accumulation to a pathological phase characterized by persistent polymerization. A combination of external factors accumulating during the lifetime of a patient can thus slightly modify the phase transition control parameters, tipping the balance from a long symptomless lag phase to an accelerated pathological development. The model can be successfully used to interpret experimental data on amyloid-β clearance from the central nervous system. PMID:24722051

  1. MTHFSD and DDX58 are novel RNA-binding proteins abnormally regulated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    MacNair, Laura; Xiao, Shangxi; Miletic, Denise; Ghani, Mahdi; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Keith, Julia; Zinman, Lorne; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Robertson, Janice

    2016-01-01

    Tar DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is an RNA-binding protein normally localized to the nucleus of cells, where it elicits functions related to RNA metabolism such as transcriptional regulation and alternative splicing. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, TDP-43 is mislocalized from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of diseased motor neurons, forming ubiquitinated inclusions. Although mutations in the gene encoding TDP-43, TARDBP, are found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, these are rare. However, TDP-43 pathology is common to over 95% of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases, suggesting that abnormalities of TDP-43 play an active role in disease pathogenesis. It is our hypothesis that a loss of TDP-43 from the nucleus of affected motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will lead to changes in RNA processing and expression. Identifying these changes could uncover molecular pathways that underpin motor neuron degeneration. Here we have used translating ribosome affinity purification coupled with microarray analysis to identify the mRNAs being actively translated in motor neurons of mutant TDP-43(A315T) mice compared to age-matched non-transgenic littermates. No significant changes were found at 5 months (presymptomatic) of age, but at 10 months (symptomatic) the translational profile revealed significant changes in genes involved in RNA metabolic process, immune response and cell cycle regulation. Of 28 differentially expressed genes, seven had a ≥ 2-fold change; four were validated by immunofluorescence labelling of motor neurons in TDP-43(A315T) mice, and two of these were confirmed by immunohistochemistry in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases. Both of these identified genes, DDX58 and MTHFSD, are RNA-binding proteins, and we show that TDP-43 binds to their respective mRNAs and we identify MTHFSD as a novel component of stress granules. This discovery-based approach has for the first time revealed translational changes in motor neurons of a TDP-43 mouse model

  2. Abnormal behaviors and developmental disorder of hippocampus in zinc finger protein 521 (ZFP521) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Nobutaka; Matsubara, Etsuko; Yamanouchi, Jun; Akazawa, Rie; Aoto, Mamoru; Suzuki, Yoji; Sakai, Ikuya; Abe, Takaya; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Seiji; Yasukawa, Masaki; Mitsuda, Noriaki

    2014-01-01

    Zinc finger protein 521 (ZFP521) regulates a number of cellular processes in a wide range of tissues, such as osteoblast formation and adipose commitment and differentiation. In the field of neurobiology, it is reported to be an essential factor for transition of epiblast stem cells into neural progenitors in vitro. However, the role of ZFP521 in the brain in vivo still remains elusive. To elucidate the role of ZFP521 in the mouse brain, we generated mice lacking exon 4 of the ZFP521 gene. The birth ratio of our ZFP521Δ/Δ mice was consistent with Mendel's laws. Although ZFP521Δ/Δ pups had no apparent defect in the body and were indistinguishable from ZFP521+/+ and ZFP521+/Δ littermates at the time of birth, ZFP521Δ/Δ mice displayed significant weight reduction as they grew, and most of them died before 10 weeks of age. They displayed abnormal behavior, such as hyper-locomotion, lower anxiety and impaired learning, which correspond to the symptoms of schizophrenia. The border of the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus of the mice was indistinct and granular neurons were reduced in number. Furthermore, Sox1-positive neural progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus and cerebellum were significantly reduced in number. Taken together, these findings indicate that ZFP521 directly or indirectly affects the formation of the neuronal cell layers of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus, and thus ZFP521Δ/Δ mice displayed schizophrenia-relevant symptoms. ZFP521Δ/Δ mice may be a useful research tool as an animal model of schizophrenia.

  3. Leptospira interrogans induces uterine inflammatory responses and abnormal expression of extracellular matrix proteins in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Gao, Xuejiao; Guo, Mengyao; Zhang, Wenlong; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Zecai; Jiang, Haichao; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans), a worldwide zoonosis, infect humans and animals. In dogs, four syndromes caused by leptospirosis have been identified: icteric, hemorrhagic, uremic (Stuttgart disease) and reproductive (abortion and premature or weak pups), and also it caused inflammation. Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex mixture of matrix molecules that is crucial to the reproduction. Both inflammatory response and ECM are closed relative to reproductive. The aim of this study was to clarify how L. interrogans affected the uterus of dogs, by focusing on the inflammatory responses, and ECM expression in dogs uterine tissue infected by L. interrogans. In the present study, 27 dogs were divided into 3 groups, intrauterine infusion with L. interrogans, to make uterine infection, sterile EMJH, and normal saline as a control, respectively. The uteruses were removed by surgical operation in 10, 20, and 30 days, respectively. The methods of histopathological analysis, ELISA, Western blot and qPCR were used. The results showed that L. interrogans induced significantly inflammatory responses, which were characterized by inflammatory cellular infiltration and high expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in uterine tissue of these dogs. Furthermore, L. interrogans strongly down-regulated the expression of ECM (collagens (CL) IV, fibronectins (FN) and laminins (LN)) in mRNA and protein levels. These data indicated that strongly inflammatory responses, and abnormal regulation of ECM might contribute to the proliferation of dogs infected by L. interrogans. PMID:25153777

  4. Leptospira interrogans induces uterine inflammatory responses and abnormal expression of extracellular matrix proteins in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Gao, Xuejiao; Guo, Mengyao; Zhang, Wenlong; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Zecai; Jiang, Haichao; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans), a worldwide zoonosis, infect humans and animals. In dogs, four syndromes caused by leptospirosis have been identified: icteric, hemorrhagic, uremic (Stuttgart disease) and reproductive (abortion and premature or weak pups), and also it caused inflammation. Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex mixture of matrix molecules that is crucial to the reproduction. Both inflammatory response and ECM are closed relative to reproductive. The aim of this study was to clarify how L. interrogans affected the uterus of dogs, by focusing on the inflammatory responses, and ECM expression in dogs uterine tissue infected by L. interrogans. In the present study, 27 dogs were divided into 3 groups, intrauterine infusion with L. interrogans, to make uterine infection, sterile EMJH, and normal saline as a control, respectively. The uteruses were removed by surgical operation in 10, 20, and 30 days, respectively. The methods of histopathological analysis, ELISA, Western blot and qPCR were used. The results showed that L. interrogans induced significantly inflammatory responses, which were characterized by inflammatory cellular infiltration and high expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in uterine tissue of these dogs. Furthermore, L. interrogans strongly down-regulated the expression of ECM (collagens (CL) IV, fibronectins (FN) and laminins (LN)) in mRNA and protein levels. These data indicated that strongly inflammatory responses, and abnormal regulation of ECM might contribute to the proliferation of dogs infected by L. interrogans.

  5. Positive Lysosomal Modulation As a Unique Strategy to Treat Age-Related Protein Accumulation Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Meagan L.; Butler, David

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Lysosomes are involved in degrading and recycling cellular ingredients, and their disruption with age may contribute to amyloidogenesis, paired helical filaments (PHFs), and α-synuclein and mutant huntingtin aggregation. Lysosomal cathepsins are upregulated by accumulating proteins and more so by the modulator Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK). Such positive modulators of the lysosomal system have been studied in the well-characterized hippocampal slice model of protein accumulation that exhibits the pathogenic cascade of tau aggregation, tubulin breakdown, microtubule destabilization, transport failure, and synaptic decline. Active cathepsins were upregulated by PADK; Rab proteins were modified as well, indicating enhanced trafficking, whereas lysosome-associated membrane protein and proteasome markers were unchanged. Lysosomal modulation reduced the pre-existing PHF deposits, restored tubulin structure and transport, and recovered synaptic components. Further proof-of-principle studies used Alzheimer disease mouse models. It was recently reported that systemic PADK administration caused dramatic increases in cathepsin B protein and activity levels, whereas neprilysin, insulin-degrading enzyme, α-secretase, and β-secretase were unaffected by PADK. In the transgenic models, PADK treatment resulted in clearance of intracellular amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide and concomitant reduction of extracellular deposits. Production of the less pathogenic Aβ1–38 peptide corresponded with decreased levels of Aβ1–42, supporting the lysosome's antiamyloidogenic role through intracellular truncation. Amelioration of synaptic and behavioral deficits also indicates a neuroprotective function of the lysosomal system, identifying lysosomal modulation as an avenue for disease-modifying therapies. From the in vitro and in vivo findings, unique lysosomal modulators represent a minimally invasive, pharmacologically controlled strategy against protein accumulation disorders

  6. SRFR1 Negatively Regulates Plant NB-LRR Resistance Protein Accumulation to Prevent Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingzhong; Li, Shuxin; Bi, Dongling; Cheng, Yu Ti; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2010-01-01

    Plant defense responses need to be tightly regulated to prevent auto-immunity, which is detrimental to growth and development. To identify negative regulators of Resistance (R) protein-mediated resistance, we screened for mutants with constitutive defense responses in the npr1-1 background. Map-based cloning revealed that one of the mutant genes encodes a conserved TPR domain-containing protein previously known as SRFR1 (SUPPRESSOR OF rps4-RLD). The constitutive defense responses in the srfr1 mutants in Col-0 background are suppressed by mutations in SNC1, which encodes a TIR-NB-LRR (Toll Interleukin1 Receptor-Nucleotide Binding-Leu-Rich Repeat) R protein. Yeast two-hybrid screens identified SGT1a and SGT1b as interacting proteins of SRFR1. The interactions between SGT1 and SRFR1 were further confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation analysis. In srfr1 mutants, levels of multiple NB-LRR R proteins including SNC1, RPS2 and RPS4 are increased. Increased accumulation of SNC1 is also observed in the sgt1b mutant. Our data suggest that SRFR1 functions together with SGT1 to negatively regulate R protein accumulation, which is required for preventing auto-activation of plant immunity. PMID:20862316

  7. Accumulation of plant small heat-stress proteins in storage organs.

    PubMed

    Lubaretz, Olga; Zur Nieden, Uta

    2002-06-01

    Plant small heat-stress proteins (sHSPs) have been shown to be expressed not only after exposure to elevated temperatures, but also at particular developmental stages such as embryogenesis, microsporogenesis, and fruit maturation. This paper presents new data on the occurrence of sHSPs in vegetative tissues, their tissue-specific distribution, and cellular localization. We have found sHSPs in 1-year-old twigs of Acer platanoides L. and Sambucus nigra L. and in the liana Aristolochia macrophylla Lamk. exclusively in the winter months. In tendrils of Aristolochia, sHSPs were localized in vascular cambium cells. After budding, in spring, these proteins were no longer present. Furthermore, accumulation of sHSPs was demonstrated in tubers and bulbs of Allium cepa L., Amaryllis ( Hippeastrum hybridum hort.), Crocus albiflorus L., Hyacinthus orientalis L., Narcissus pseudonarcissus L., Tulipa gesneriana L., and Solanum tuberosum L. (potato). In potato tubers and bulb scales of Narcissus the stress proteins were localized in the central vacuoles of storage parenchyma cells. In order to obtain more information on a possible functional correlation between storage proteins and sHSPs, the accumulation of both types of protein in tobacco seeds during seed ripening and germination was monitored. The expression of sHSPs and globulins started simultaneously at about the 17th day after anthesis. During seed germination the sHSPs disappeared in parallel with the storage proteins. Furthermore, in embryos of transgenic tobacco plants, which do not contain any protein bodies or storage proteins, no sHSPs were found. Thus, the occurrence of sHSPs in perennial plant storage organs seems to be associated with the presence of storage proteins. PMID:12029471

  8. Dopamine induces the accumulation of insoluble prion protein and affects autophagic flux

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, Marcio H. M.; Peres, Italo T.; Santos, Tiago G.; Martins, Vilma R.; Icimoto, Marcelo Y.; Lee, Kil S.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of protein aggregates is a histopathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, but in most cases the aggregation occurs without defined mutations or clinical histories, suggesting that certain endogenous metabolites can promote aggregation of specific proteins. One example that supports this hypothesis is dopamine and its metabolites. Dopamine metabolism generates several oxidative metabolites that induce aggregation of α-synuclein, and represents the main etiology of Parkinson's diseases. Because dopamine and its metabolites are unstable and can be highly reactive, we investigated whether these molecules can also affect other proteins that are prone to aggregate, such as cellular prion protein (PrPC). In this study, we showed that dopamine treatment of neuronal cells reduced the number of viable cells and increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as demonstrated in previous studies. Overall PrPC expression level was not altered by dopamine treatment, but its unglycosylated form was consistently reduced at 100 μM of dopamine. At the same concentration, the level of phosphorylated mTOR and 4EBP1 was also reduced. Moreover, dopamine treatment decreased the solubility of PrPC, and increased its accumulation in autophagosomal compartments with concomitant induction of LC3-II and p62/SQSTM1 levels. In vitro oxidation of dopamine promoted formation of high-order oligomers of recombinant prion protein. These results suggest that dopamine metabolites alter the conformation of PrPC, which in turn is sorted to degradation pathway, causing autophagosome overload and attenuation of protein synthesis. Accumulation of PrPC aggregates is an important feature of prion diseases. Thus, this study brings new insight into the dopamine metabolism as a source of endogenous metabolites capable of altering PrPC solubility and its subcellular localization. PMID:25698927

  9. Mitochondrial iron accumulation exacerbates hepatic toxicity caused by hepatitis C virus core protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, Shuichi; Ito, Konomi; Watanabe, Haruna; Nakano, Takafumi; Moriya, Kyoji; Shintani, Yoshizumi; Fujie, Hajime; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Miyoshi, Hideyuki; Fujinaga, Hidetake; Shinzawa, Seiko; Koike, Kazuhiko; Horie, Toshiharu

    2015-02-01

    Patients with long-lasting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at major risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Iron accumulation in the livers of these patients is thought to exacerbate conditions of oxidative stress. Transgenic mice that express the HCV core protein develop HCC after the steatosis stage and produce an excess of hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS in the liver is the net result of HCV core protein-induced dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This study examined the impact of ferric nitrilacetic acid (Fe-NTA)-mediated iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing HepG2 (human HCC) cells (Hep39b cells). A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production were observed following Fe-NTA treatment. After continuous exposure to Fe-NTA for six days, cell toxicity was observed in Hep39b cells, but not in mock (vector-transfected) HepG2 cells. Moreover, mitochondrial iron ({sup 59}Fe) uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. This increase in mitochondrial iron uptake was inhibited by Ru360, a mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, the Fe-NTA-induced augmentation of mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production, and cell toxicity were also inhibited by Ru360 in Hep39b cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates hepatocyte toxicity caused by the HCV core protein. - Highlights: • Iron accumulation in the livers of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is thought to exacerbate oxidative stress. • The impact of iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing cells were examined. • Mitochondrial iron uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. • Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates

  10. Brome mosaic virus capsid protein regulates accumulation of viral replication proteins by binding to the replicase assembly RNA element.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guanghui; Letteney, Ester; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Kao, C Cheng

    2009-04-01

    Viruses provide valuable insights into the regulation of molecular processes. Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is one of the simplest entities with four viral proteins and three genomic RNAs. Here we report that the BMV capsid protein (CP), which functions in RNA encapsidation and virus trafficking, also represses viral RNA replication in a concentration-dependent manner by inhibiting the accumulation of the RNA replication proteins. Expression of the replication protein 2a in trans can partially rescue BMV RNA accumulation. A mutation in the CP can decrease the repression of translation. Translation repression by the CP requires a hairpin RNA motif named the B Box that contains seven loop nucleotides (nt) within the 5' untranslated regions (UTR) of BMV RNA1 and RNA2. Purified CP can bind directly to the B Box RNA with a K (d) of 450 nM. The secondary structure of the B Box RNA was determined to contain a highly flexible 7-nt loop using NMR spectroscopy, native gel analysis, and thermal denaturation studies. The B Box is also recognized by the BMV 1a protein to assemble the BMV replicase, suggesting that the BMV CP can act to regulate several viral infection processes.

  11. Mutational analysis of PVX TGBp3 links subcellular accumulation and protein turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, H.-J.; Ye, C.-M.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2008-05-25

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp3 is required for virus cell-to-cell transport, has an N-terminal transmembrane domain, and a C-terminal cytosolic domain. In the absence of virus infection TGBp3:GFP is seen in the cortical and perinuclear ER. In PVX infected cells the TGBp3:GFP fusion is also seen in the nucleoplasm indicating that events during PVX infection trigger entry into the nucleus. Mutational analysis failed to identify a nuclear targeting domain. Mutations inhibiting TGBp3 association with the ER and inhibiting virus movement did not block TGBp3:GFP in the nucleoplasm. A mutation disrupting the N-terminal transmembrane domain of TGBp3 caused the fusion to accumulate in the nucleus indicating that nuclear import is regulated by ER interactions. Tunicamycin, an ER-stress inducing chemical, caused lower levels of GFP and TGBp3:GFP to accumulate in virus infected protoplasts. MG115 and MG132 were used to demonstrate that wild-type and mutant TGBp3:GFP fusions were degraded by the 26S proteasome. These observations are consistent with an ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway suggesting that PVX TGBp3, similar to aberrant ER proteins, is translocate to the cytoplasm for degradation. Nuclear accumulation of mutant and wild-type TGBp3:GFP is independent of other PVX proteins and may be another feature of an ERAD pathway.

  12. Myeloid differentiation protein-2-dependent and -independent neutrophil accumulation during Escherichia coli pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shanshan; Zemans, Rachel L; Young, Scott K; Worthen, G Scott; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2009-06-01

    Bacterial pneumonia remains a serious disease. Pattern recognition receptors play an integral role in neutrophil accumulation during pneumonia. Although myeloid differentiation protein (MD)-2 has been recognized as a key molecule for LPS signaling, the role of MD-2 in neutrophil accumulation in the lung during bacterial infection has not been explored. Here, we investigate the role of MD-2 in Escherichia coli LPS-induced lung inflammation and E. coli-induced pneumonia. LPS-induced CD14-independent neutrophil accumulation was abolished in CD14/MD-2(-/-) mice. MD-2(-/-) mice challenged with LPS displayed attenuated neutrophil influx, NF-kappaB activation, cytokine/chemokine expression, and lung histopathology. MD-2(-/-) mice transplanted with MD-2(+/+) bone marrow demonstrated decreased neutrophil influx and cytokine/chemokine expression in the lungs when challenged by LPS. MD-2(-/-) mice infected with E. coli demonstrated reduced neutrophil influx and cytokine/chemokine expression in the lungs, whereas heat-killed E. coli did not induce either neutrophil accumulation or cytokine/chemokine expression in MD-2(-/-) mice infected with E. coli. Furthermore, MD-2(-/-) mice displayed increased bacterial burden in the lungs and enhanced bacterial dissemination. Toll-like receptor (TLR)-5(-/-) mice infected with E. coli exhibited attenuated neutrophil accumulation, whereas MD-2/TLR5(-/-) mice inoculated with E. coli showed further attenuated neutrophil influx and impaired bacterial clearance. Taken together, these new findings demonstrate: (1) the important role of MD-2 in the CD14-independent LPS-mediated cascade of neutrophil influx; (2) the relative importance of bone marrow- and non-bone marrow cell-derived MD-2 in LPS-induced inflammation; and (3) the essential role of MD-2-dependent and MD-2-independent (TLR5) signaling in E. coli-induced neutrophil accumulation and pulmonary host defense. PMID:18988922

  13. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease recapitulates phosphorylation during development.

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, M; Jakes, R; Crowther, R A; Six, J; Lübke, U; Vandermeeren, M; Cras, P; Trojanowski, J Q; Lee, V M

    1993-01-01

    Tau is a neuronal phosphoprotein whose expression is developmentally regulated. A single tau isoform is expressed in fetal human brain but six isoforms are expressed in adult brain, with the fetal isoform corresponding to the shortest of the adult isoforms. Phosphorylation of tau is also developmentally regulated, as fetal tau is phosphorylated at more sites than adult tau. In Alzheimer disease, the six adult tau isoforms become abnormally phosphorylated and form the paired helical filament, the major fibrous component of the characteristic neurofibrillary lesions. We show here that Ser-202 (in the numbering of the longest human brain tau isoform) is a phosphorylation site that distinguishes fetal from adult tau and we identify it as one of the abnormal phosphorylation sites in Alzheimer disease. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease thus recapitulates normal phosphorylation during development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8506352

  14. Serine-rich protein is a novel positive regulator for silicon accumulation in mangrove.

    PubMed

    Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Siti Nor Akmar, A; Rafii, Mohd Y; Azizi, Parisa; Idris, A S

    2015-02-10

    Silicon (Si) plays an important role in reducing plant susceptibility against a variety of different biotic and abiotic stresses; and also has an important regulatory role in soil to avoid heavy metal toxicity and providing suitable growing conditions for plants. A full-length cDNAs of 696bp of serine-rich protein was cloned from mangrove plant (Rhizophora apiculata) by amplification of cDNA ends from an expressed sequence tag homologous to groundnut (Arachis hypogaea), submitted to NCBI (KF211374). This serine-rich protein gene encodes a deduced protein of 223 amino acids. The transcript titre of the serine-rich protein was found to be strongly enriched in roots compared with the leaves of two month old mangrove plants and expression level of this serine-rich protein was found to be strongly induced when the mangrove seedlings were exposed to SiO2. Expression of the serine-rich protein transgenic was detected in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana, where the amount of serine increased from 1.02 to 37.8mg/g. The same trend was also seen in Si content in the roots (14.3%) and leaves (7.4%) of the transgenic A. thaliana compared to the wild-type plants under Si treatment. The biological results demonstrated that the accumulation of the serine amino acid in the vegetative tissues of the transgenic plants enhanced their ability to absorb and accumulate more Si in the roots and leaves and suggests that the serine-rich protein gene has potential for use in genetic engineering of different stress tolerance characteristics.

  15. Serine-rich protein is a novel positive regulator for silicon accumulation in mangrove.

    PubMed

    Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Siti Nor Akmar, A; Rafii, Mohd Y; Azizi, Parisa; Idris, A S

    2015-02-10

    Silicon (Si) plays an important role in reducing plant susceptibility against a variety of different biotic and abiotic stresses; and also has an important regulatory role in soil to avoid heavy metal toxicity and providing suitable growing conditions for plants. A full-length cDNAs of 696bp of serine-rich protein was cloned from mangrove plant (Rhizophora apiculata) by amplification of cDNA ends from an expressed sequence tag homologous to groundnut (Arachis hypogaea), submitted to NCBI (KF211374). This serine-rich protein gene encodes a deduced protein of 223 amino acids. The transcript titre of the serine-rich protein was found to be strongly enriched in roots compared with the leaves of two month old mangrove plants and expression level of this serine-rich protein was found to be strongly induced when the mangrove seedlings were exposed to SiO2. Expression of the serine-rich protein transgenic was detected in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana, where the amount of serine increased from 1.02 to 37.8mg/g. The same trend was also seen in Si content in the roots (14.3%) and leaves (7.4%) of the transgenic A. thaliana compared to the wild-type plants under Si treatment. The biological results demonstrated that the accumulation of the serine amino acid in the vegetative tissues of the transgenic plants enhanced their ability to absorb and accumulate more Si in the roots and leaves and suggests that the serine-rich protein gene has potential for use in genetic engineering of different stress tolerance characteristics. PMID:25479011

  16. Reproductive Aging Drives Protein Accumulation in the Uterus and Limits Lifespan in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Stephanie M.; Hinkson, Izumi V.; Elias, Joshua E.; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans is characterized by widespread physiological and molecular changes, but the mechanisms that determine the rate at which these changes occur are not well understood. In this study, we identify a novel link between reproductive aging and somatic aging in C. elegans. By measuring global age-related changes in the proteome, we identify a previously uncharacterized group of secreted proteins in the adult uterus that dramatically increase in abundance with age. This accumulation is blunted in animals with an extended reproductive period and accelerated in sterile animals lacking a germline. Uterine proteins are not removed in old post-reproductive animals or in young vulvaless worms, indicating that egg-laying is necessary for their rapid removal in wild-type young animals. Together, these results suggest that age-induced infertility contributes to extracellular protein accumulation in the uterus with age. Finally, we show that knocking down multiple age-increased proteins simultaneously extends lifespan. These results provide a mechanistic example of how the cessation of reproduction contributes to detrimental changes in the soma, and demonstrate how the timing of reproductive decline can influence the rate of aging. PMID:26656270

  17. Reproductive Aging Drives Protein Accumulation in the Uterus and Limits Lifespan in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Stephanie M; Hinkson, Izumi V; Elias, Joshua E; Kim, Stuart K

    2015-12-01

    Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans is characterized by widespread physiological and molecular changes, but the mechanisms that determine the rate at which these changes occur are not well understood. In this study, we identify a novel link between reproductive aging and somatic aging in C. elegans. By measuring global age-related changes in the proteome, we identify a previously uncharacterized group of secreted proteins in the adult uterus that dramatically increase in abundance with age. This accumulation is blunted in animals with an extended reproductive period and accelerated in sterile animals lacking a germline. Uterine proteins are not removed in old post-reproductive animals or in young vulvaless worms, indicating that egg-laying is necessary for their rapid removal in wild-type young animals. Together, these results suggest that age-induced infertility contributes to extracellular protein accumulation in the uterus with age. Finally, we show that knocking down multiple age-increased proteins simultaneously extends lifespan. These results provide a mechanistic example of how the cessation of reproduction contributes to detrimental changes in the soma, and demonstrate how the timing of reproductive decline can influence the rate of aging.

  18. Accumulation of slightly deleterious mutations in mitochondrial protein-coding genes of large versus small mammals

    PubMed Central

    Popadin, Konstantin; Polishchuk, Leonard V.; Mamirova, Leila; Knorre, Dmitry; Gunbin, Konstantin

    2007-01-01

    After the effective size of a population, Ne, declines, some slightly deleterious amino acid replacements which were initially suppressed by purifying selection become effectively neutral and can reach fixation. Here we investigate this phenomenon for a set of all 13 mitochondrial protein-coding genes from 110 mammalian species. By using body mass as a proxy for Ne, we show that large mammals (i.e., those with low Ne) as compared with small ones (in our sample these are, on average, 369.5 kg and 275 g, respectively) have a 43% higher rate of accumulation of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions relative to synonymous substitutions, and an 8–40% higher rate of accumulation of radical amino acid substitutions relative to conservative substitutions, depending on the type of amino acid classification. These higher rates result in a 6% greater amino acid dissimilarity between modern species and their most recent reconstructed ancestors in large versus small mammals. Because nonsynonymous substitutions are likely to be more harmful than synonymous substitutions, and radical amino acid substitutions are likely to be more harmful than conservative ones, our results suggest that large mammals experience less efficient purifying selection than small mammals. Furthermore, because in the course of mammalian evolution body size tends to increase and, consequently, Ne tends to decline, evolution of mammals toward large body size may involve accumulation of slightly deleterious mutations in mitochondrial protein-coding genes, which may contribute to decline or extinction of large mammals. PMID:17679693

  19. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii PsbS Protein Is Functional and Accumulates Rapidly and Transiently under High Light.

    PubMed

    Tibiletti, Tania; Auroy, Pascaline; Peltier, Gilles; Caffarri, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    Photosynthetic organisms must respond to excess light in order to avoid photo-oxidative stress. In plants and green algae the fastest response to high light is non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), a process that allows the safe dissipation of the excess energy as heat. This phenomenon is triggered by the low luminal pH generated by photosynthetic electron transport. In vascular plants the main sensor of the low pH is the PsbS protein, while in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii LhcSR proteins appear to be exclusively responsible for this role. Interestingly, Chlamydomonas also possesses two PsbS genes, but so far the PsbS protein has not been detected and its biological function is unknown. Here, we reinvestigated the kinetics of gene expression and PsbS and LhcSR3 accumulation in Chlamydomonas during high light stress. We found that, unlike LhcSR3, PsbS accumulates very rapidly but only transiently. In order to determine the role of PsbS in NPQ and photoprotection in Chlamydomonas, we generated transplastomic strains expressing the algal or the Arabidopsis psbS gene optimized for plastid expression. Both PsbS proteins showed the ability to increase NPQ in Chlamydomonas wild-type and npq4 (lacking LhcSR3) backgrounds, but no clear photoprotection activity was observed. Quantification of PsbS and LhcSR3 in vivo indicates that PsbS is much less abundant than LhcSR3 during high light stress. Moreover, LhcSR3, unlike PsbS, also accumulates during other stress conditions. The possible role of PsbS in photoprotection is discussed. PMID:27329221

  20. Ice-binding proteins that accumulate on different ice crystal planes produce distinct thermal hysteresis dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Drori, Ran; Celik, Yeliz; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2014-01-01

    Ice-binding proteins that aid the survival of freeze-avoiding, cold-adapted organisms by inhibiting the growth of endogenous ice crystals are called antifreeze proteins (AFPs). The binding of AFPs to ice causes a separation between the melting point and the freezing point of the ice crystal (thermal hysteresis, TH). TH produced by hyperactive AFPs is an order of magnitude higher than that produced by a typical fish AFP. The basis for this difference in activity remains unclear. Here, we have compared the time dependence of TH activity for both hyperactive and moderately active AFPs using a custom-made nanolitre osmometer and a novel microfluidics system. We found that the TH activities of hyperactive AFPs were time-dependent, and that the TH activity of a moderate AFP was almost insensitive to time. Fluorescence microscopy measurement revealed that despite their higher TH activity, hyperactive AFPs from two insects (moth and beetle) took far longer to accumulate on the ice surface than did a moderately active fish AFP. An ice-binding protein from a bacterium that functions as an ice adhesin rather than as an antifreeze had intermediate TH properties. Nevertheless, the accumulation of this ice adhesion protein and the two hyperactive AFPs on the basal plane of ice is distinct and extensive, but not detectable for moderately active AFPs. Basal ice plane binding is the distinguishing feature of antifreeze hyperactivity, which is not strictly needed in fish that require only approximately 1°C of TH. Here, we found a correlation between the accumulation kinetics of the hyperactive AFP at the basal plane and the time sensitivity of the measured TH. PMID:25008081

  1. Ice-binding proteins that accumulate on different ice crystal planes produce distinct thermal hysteresis dynamics.

    PubMed

    Drori, Ran; Celik, Yeliz; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2014-09-01

    Ice-binding proteins that aid the survival of freeze-avoiding, cold-adapted organisms by inhibiting the growth of endogenous ice crystals are called antifreeze proteins (AFPs). The binding of AFPs to ice causes a separation between the melting point and the freezing point of the ice crystal (thermal hysteresis, TH). TH produced by hyperactive AFPs is an order of magnitude higher than that produced by a typical fish AFP. The basis for this difference in activity remains unclear. Here, we have compared the time dependence of TH activity for both hyperactive and moderately active AFPs using a custom-made nanolitre osmometer and a novel microfluidics system. We found that the TH activities of hyperactive AFPs were time-dependent, and that the TH activity of a moderate AFP was almost insensitive to time. Fluorescence microscopy measurement revealed that despite their higher TH activity, hyperactive AFPs from two insects (moth and beetle) took far longer to accumulate on the ice surface than did a moderately active fish AFP. An ice-binding protein from a bacterium that functions as an ice adhesin rather than as an antifreeze had intermediate TH properties. Nevertheless, the accumulation of this ice adhesion protein and the two hyperactive AFPs on the basal plane of ice is distinct and extensive, but not detectable for moderately active AFPs. Basal ice plane binding is the distinguishing feature of antifreeze hyperactivity, which is not strictly needed in fish that require only approximately 1°C of TH. Here, we found a correlation between the accumulation kinetics of the hyperactive AFP at the basal plane and the time sensitivity of the measured TH.

  2. Transgenic rice seeds accumulating recombinant hypoallergenic birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 generate giant protein bodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuyi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Kawakatsu, Taiji; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2013-06-01

    A versatile hypoallergenic allergen derivative against multiple allergens is an ideal tolerogen for allergen-specific immunotherapy. Such a tolerogen should exhibit high efficacy, without side effects, when administered at high doses and should be applicable to several allergens. Tree pollen chimera 7 (TPC7), a hypoallergenic Bet v 1 tolerogen against birch pollen allergy, was previously selected by DNA shuffling of 14 types of Fagales tree pollen allergens. In this study, transgenic rice seed accumulating TPC7 was generated as an oral vaccine against birch pollen allergy by expressing this protein as a secretory protein using the N-terminal signal peptide and the C-terminal KDEL tag under the control of an endosperm-specific glutelin promoter. The highest level of TPC7 accumulation was approximately 207 µg grain(-1). Recombinant TPC7 is a glycoprotein with high mannose-type N-glycan, but without β1,2-xylose or α1,3-fucose, suggesting that TPC7 is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). TPC7 is deposited as a novel, giant spherical ER-derived protein body, >20 µm in diameter, which is referred to as the TPC7 body. Removal of the KDEL retention signal or mutation of a cysteine residue resulted in an alteration of TPC7 body morphology, and deletion of the signal peptide prevented the accumulation of TPC7 in rice seeds. Therefore, the novel TPC7 bodies may have formed aggregates within the ER lumen, primarily due to the intrinsic physicochemical properties of the protein.

  3. GUN1 Controls Accumulation of the Plastid Ribosomal Protein S1 at the Protein Level and Interacts with Proteins Involved in Plastid Protein Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tadini, Luca; Pesaresi, Paolo; Kleine, Tatjana; Rossi, Fabio; Guljamow, Arthur; Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Masiero, Simona; Pribil, Mathias; Rothbart, Maxi; Hedtke, Boris; Grimm, Bernhard; Leister, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Developmental or metabolic changes in chloroplasts can have profound effects on the rest of the plant cell. Such intracellular responses are associated with signals that originate in chloroplasts and convey information on their physiological status to the nucleus, which leads to large-scale changes in gene expression (retrograde signaling). A screen designed to identify components of retrograde signaling resulted in the discovery of the so-called genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Genetic evidence suggests that the chloroplast protein GUN1 integrates signals derived from perturbations in plastid redox state, plastid gene expression, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, exerting biogenic control of chloroplast functions. However, the molecular mechanism by which GUN1 integrates retrograde signaling in the chloroplast is unclear. Here we show that GUN1 also operates in adult plants, contributing to operational control of chloroplasts. The gun1 mutation genetically interacts with mutations of genes for the chloroplast ribosomal proteins S1 (PRPS1) and L11. Analysis of gun1 prps1 lines indicates that GUN1 controls PRPS1 accumulation at the protein level. The GUN1 protein physically interacts with proteins involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis based on coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments suggest that GUN1 might transiently interact with several TPB enzymes, including Mg-chelatase subunit D (CHLD) and two other TPB enzymes known to activate retrograde signaling. Moreover, the association of PRPS1 and CHLD with protein complexes is modulated by GUN1. These findings allow us to speculate that retrograde signaling might involve GUN1-dependent formation of protein complexes. PMID:26823545

  4. Abnormal Expression of Synaptic Proteins and Neurotrophin-3 in the Down Syndrome Mouse Model Ts65Dn

    PubMed Central

    Pollonini, Gabriella; Gao, Virginia; Rabe, Ausma; Palminiello, Sonia; Albertini, Giorgio; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2008-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) results from triplication of the whole or distal part of human chromosome 21. DS subjects suffer from deficits in learning and memory and cognitive functions in general, and, starting from early development, their brains show dendritic and spine structural alterations and cell loss. These defects concern many cortical brain regions as well as the hippocampus, which is known to play a critical role in memory and cognition. Most of these abnormalities are reproduced in the mouse model Ts65Dn, which is partially trisomic for the mouse chromosome 16 that is homologous to a portion of human chromosome 21. Thus, Ts65Dn is widely utilized as an animal model of DS. To better understand the molecular defects underlying the cognitive and particularly the memory impairments of DS, we investigated whether the expression of several molecules known to play critical roles in long-term synaptic plasticity and long-term memory in a variety of species is dysregulated in either the neonatal brain or adult hippocampus of Ts65Dn mice. We found abnormal expression of the synaptic proteins synaptophysin, MAP2 and CDK5 and of the neurotrophin NT-3. Both the neonatal brain and adult hippocampus revealed significant abnormalities. These results suggest that a dysregulation in the expression of neurotrophins as well as proteins involved in synaptic development and plasticity may play a potential role in the neural pathology of DS in humans. PMID:18703118

  5. Myelin basic protein accumulation is impaired in a model of protein deficiency during development.

    PubMed

    Montanha-Rojas, E A; Ferreira, A A; Tenório, F; Barradas, P C

    2005-02-01

    During the development of the central nervous system (CNS) there is a great possibility of permanent effects in consequence of environmental disturbances. Nutritional deficiency is one of the factors that impair the normal CNS formation. In general, the protein deficiency evokes, beyond the damages in the maturation of nervous system, several consequences in body growth, biochemical maturation, motor function and the major cognitive functions. These effects were observed in undernourished children all over the world. Even in a restricted period, the malnutrition status may evoke permanent impairments in feeding behavior and in metabolism. Rats submitted to malnutrition during development, showed a marked decrease in the number of myelinated fibers. This condition may reflect a failure in the beginning of the wrapping of axons by oligodendroglial processes and/or a delay in the myelin synthesis. Myelin basic protein (MBP) is an intracellular oligodendrocyte protein that is directly related to the formation of the myelin sheath. In this study we verified the temporal pattern of MBP expression, by immunohistochemical and immunoblotting analyses, in a model of protein malnutrition induced during the first half of the lactation period. We showed that MBP expression was impaired in our malnutrition model and that some of the effects were maintained in adulthood, with possible consequences in the maturation of myelin sheath.

  6. Proteomic profiling of maize opaque endosperm mutants reveals selective accumulation of lysine-enriched proteins

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Kyla J.; Jia, Shangang; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced prolamin (zein) accumulation and defective endoplasmic reticulum (ER) body formation occurs in maize opaque endosperm mutants opaque2 (o2), floury2 (fl2), defective endosperm*B30 (DeB30), and Mucronate (Mc), whereas other opaque mutants such as opaque1 (o1) and floury1 (fl1) are normal in these regards. This suggests that other factors contribute to kernel texture. A liquid chromatography approach coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomics was used to compare non-zein proteins of nearly isogenic opaque endosperm mutants. In total, 2762 proteins were identified that were enriched for biological processes such as protein transport and folding, amino acid biosynthesis, and proteolysis. Principal component analysis and pathway enrichment suggested that the mutants partitioned into three groups: (i) Mc, DeB30, fl2 and o2; (ii) o1; and (iii) fl1. Indicator species analysis revealed mutant-specific proteins, and highlighted ER secretory pathway components that were enriched in selected groups of mutants. The most significantly changed proteins were related to stress or defense and zein partitioning into the soluble fraction for Mc, DeB30, o1, and fl1 specifically. In silico dissection of the most significantly changed proteins revealed novel qualitative changes in lysine abundance contributing to the overall lysine increase and the nutritional rebalancing of the o2 and fl2 endosperm. PMID:26712829

  7. Interaction between environmental factors affects the accumulation of root proteins in hydroponically grown Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.).

    PubMed

    Bedon, Frank; Majada, Juan; Feito, Isabel; Chaumeil, Philippe; Dupuy, Jean-William; Lomenech, Anne-Marie; Barre, Aurélien; Gion, Jean-Marc; Plomion, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.) is used for pulp and paper production worldwide. In this report we studied changes in protein expression in one osmotically stressed elite clone widely used in industrial plantations in Spain. High molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used as an osmoticum in the growing medium. Roots of rooted cuttings were sampled after 3 and 36 h of treatment. Water potential and abscissic acid content were measured in shoot and root apices to characterize the physiological states of the plants. Total soluble proteins from roots were extracted and separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Gels were stained with Coomassie brillant blue for quantitative analysis of protein accumulation. From a total of 406 reproducible spots, 34 were found to be differentially expressed depending on treatment (osmotic versus control condition) and/or stress duration (3 h versus 36 h), and were further characterized by tandem mass spectrometry. Several proteins were reliably identified including adenosine kinase, actin, stress-related proteins as well as proteins associated to cellular processes, among which some residents of the endoplasmic reticulum. This study constitutes the first investigation of the root proteome in this important forest tree genus. PMID:20974537

  8. Interaction between environmental factors affects the accumulation of root proteins in hydroponically grown Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.).

    PubMed

    Bedon, Frank; Majada, Juan; Feito, Isabel; Chaumeil, Philippe; Dupuy, Jean-William; Lomenech, Anne-Marie; Barre, Aurélien; Gion, Jean-Marc; Plomion, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Eucalyptus globulus (Labill.) is used for pulp and paper production worldwide. In this report we studied changes in protein expression in one osmotically stressed elite clone widely used in industrial plantations in Spain. High molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used as an osmoticum in the growing medium. Roots of rooted cuttings were sampled after 3 and 36 h of treatment. Water potential and abscissic acid content were measured in shoot and root apices to characterize the physiological states of the plants. Total soluble proteins from roots were extracted and separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Gels were stained with Coomassie brillant blue for quantitative analysis of protein accumulation. From a total of 406 reproducible spots, 34 were found to be differentially expressed depending on treatment (osmotic versus control condition) and/or stress duration (3 h versus 36 h), and were further characterized by tandem mass spectrometry. Several proteins were reliably identified including adenosine kinase, actin, stress-related proteins as well as proteins associated to cellular processes, among which some residents of the endoplasmic reticulum. This study constitutes the first investigation of the root proteome in this important forest tree genus.

  9. Knockdown of ribosomal protein S7 causes developmental abnormalities via p53 dependent and independent pathways in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Duan, Juan; Ba, Qian; Wang, Ziliang; Hao, Miao; Li, Xiaoguang; Hu, Pingting; Zhang, Deyi; Zhang, Ruiwen; Wang, Hui

    2011-08-01

    Ribosomal proteins (RPs), structural components of the ribosome involved in protein synthesis, are of significant importance in all organisms. Previous studies have suggested that some RPs may have other functions in addition to assembly of the ribosome. The small ribosomal subunits RPS7, has been reported to modulate the mdm2-p53 interaction. To further investigate the biological functions of RPS7, we used morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (MO) to specifically knockdown RPS7 in zebrafish. In RPS7-deficient embryos, p53 was activated, and its downstream target genes and biological events were induced, including apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Hematopoiesis was also impaired seriously in RPS7-deficient embryos, which was confirmed by the hemoglobin O-dianisidine staining of blood cells, and the expression of scl, gata1 and α-E1 globin were abnormal. The matrix metalloproteinase (mmp) family genes were also activated in RPS7 morphants, indicating that improper cell migration might also cause development defects. Furthermore, simultaneously knockdown of the p53 protein by co-injecting a p53 MO could partially reverse the abnormal phenotype in the morphants. These results strengthen the hypothesis that specific ribosomal proteins regulate p53 and that their deficiency affects hematopoiesis. Moreover, our data implicate that RPS7 is a regulator of matrix metalloproteinase (mmp) family in zebrafish system. These specific functions of RPS7 may provide helpful clues to study the roles of RPs in human disease.

  10. Cadmium accumulation and protein binding patterns in tissues of the rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri.

    PubMed Central

    Kay, J; Thomas, D G; Brown, M W; Cryer, A; Shurben, D; Solbe, J F; Garvey, J S

    1986-01-01

    Rainbow trout were exposed to defined levels of cadmium in their aquarium water for differing periods at a variety of near-lethal concentrations that ensured the survival of the majority of the fish. The gills, liver and kidney together accounted for 99% of the accumulated load of body cadmium in the fish under these conditions. Although the proportion of total cadmium present in the liver remained relatively constant throughout, the distribution of the remainder between gill and kidney altered with the time of exposure. The cadmium in all three organs was bound by two low molecular weight proteins distinct in character from metallothionein. The isoforms of metallothionein were also present but were found to bind only zinc and copper. By contrast, when trout were injected with cadmium intraperitoneally, most of the metal accumulated in the liver where it was sequestered by the two isoforms of metallothionein. Pre-exposure of the trout to either a low concentration of cadmium (for several months) or to an elevated concentration of zinc (for 5 days) allowed the animals to survive a subsequent exposure to a high, otherwise lethal concentration of cadmium. The proteins responsible for sequestration of the two metals were identified, but two different mechanisms seemed to be involved in the protection of the animals. The significance of these observations in terms of the induction of proteins and the prevention of the toxic effects of cadmium is considered. PMID:3709433

  11. Uniform accumulation of recombinant miraculin protein in transgenic tomato fruit using a fruit-ripening-specific E8 promoter.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Tadayoshi; Kim, You-Wang; Kato, Kazuhisa; Hiwasa-Tanase, Kyoko; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    The E8 promoter, a tomato fruit-ripening-specific promoter, and the CaMV 35S promoter, a constitutive promoter, were used to express the miraculin gene encoding the taste-modifying protein in tomato. The accumulation of miraculin protein and mRNA was compared among transgenic tomatoes expressing the miraculin gene driven by these promoters. Recombinant miraculin protein predominantly accumulated in transgenic tomato lines using the E8 promoter (E8-MIR) only at the red fruit stage. The accumulations were almost uniform among all fruit tissues. When the 35S promoter (35S-MIR) was used, miraculin accumulation in the exocarp was much higher than in other tissues, indicating that the miraculin accumulation pattern can be regulated by using different types of promoters. We also discuss the potential of the E8-MIR lines for practical use. PMID:21359850

  12. Kartogenin, transforming growth factor-β1 and bone morphogenetic protein-7 coordinately enhance lubricin accumulation in bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Ma, Xueqin; Li, Tao; Zhang, Qiqing

    2015-09-01

    Osteoarthritis, a common joint degeneration, can cause breakdown of articular cartilage with the presence of lubricin metabolic abnormalities. Lubricin is a multi-level chondroprotective mucinous glycoprotein in articular joints. Joint defect and infection is elevated and accompanied by accelerated cartilage lesions involving degradation and loss of lubricin. However, a novel, heterocyclic compound called kartogenin (KGN) was discovered to stimulate chondrogenic differentiation of bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). And the synergistic effect of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) could provoke lubricin accumulation. This paper attempted to explore the connection between accumulation of lubricin and the effect of TGF-β1, BMP-7 and/or KGN. Hence, we investigated the expression and secretion of lubricin in BMSCs treated with different combinations of TGF-β1, BMP-7, and/or KGN. Using an in vitro BMSCs system, we observed the content of lubricin from BMSCs treated with TGF-β1, BMP-7, and KGN was the highest at both the protein level and the gene level. The accumulation of lubricin was enhanced coordinately by the increase of synthesis and decrease of degradation possibly via c-Myc and adamts5 pathway. These results further suggested that supplementation of the defect parts with lubricin by using growth factors and small molecules showed a promising potential on preventing joint deterioration in patients with acquired or genetic deficiency of lubricin in the future of regenerative medicine.

  13. Collagen protein abnormalities produced by site-directed mutagenesis of the pro alpha 1(I) gene.

    PubMed

    Bateman, J F; Mascara, T; Cole, W G; Stacey, A; Jaenisch, R

    1989-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of collagen genes offers a powerful new approach for studying structure-function relationships. The construction of engineered mutant collagen genes coding for glycine substitutions and their expression giving rise to the osteogenesis imperfecta type II phenotype in cells and transgenic mice has recently been achieved. This paper further defines the molecular abnormalities of collagen and bone pathology resulting from the expression of the mutant genes.

  14. Post-translational regulation by gustavus contributes to selective Vasa protein accumulation in multipotent cells during embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, Eric A.; Yajima, Mamiko; Juliano, Celina E.; Wessel, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    Vasa is a broadly conserved DEAD-box RNA helicase associated with germ line development and is expressed in multipotent cells in many animals. During embryonic development of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, Vasa protein is enriched in the small micromeres despite a uniform distribution of vasa transcript. Here we show that the Vasa coding region is sufficient for its selective enrichment and find that gustavus, the B30.2/SPRY and SOCS box domain gene, contributes to this phenomenon. In vitro binding analyses show that Gustavus binds the N-terminal and DEAD-box portions of Vasa protein independently. A knockdown of Gustavus protein reduces both Vasa protein abundance and its propensity for accumulation in the small micromeres, whereas overexpression of the Vasa-interacting domain of Gustavus (GusΔSOCS) results in Vasa protein accumulation throughout the embryo. We propose that Gustavus has a conserved, positive regulatory role in Vasa protein accumulation during embryonic development. PMID:21035437

  15. Post-translational regulation by gustavus contributes to selective Vasa protein accumulation in multipotent cells during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Eric A; Yajima, Mamiko; Juliano, Celina E; Wessel, Gary M

    2011-01-15

    Vasa is a broadly conserved DEAD-box RNA helicase associated with germ line development and is expressed in multipotent cells in many animals. During embryonic development of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, Vasa protein is enriched in the small micromeres despite a uniform distribution of vasa transcript. Here we show that the Vasa coding region is sufficient for its selective enrichment and find that gustavus, the B30.2/SPRY and SOCS box domain gene, contributes to this phenomenon. In vitro binding analyses show that Gustavus binds the N-terminal and DEAD-box portions of Vasa protein independently. A knockdown of Gustavus protein reduces both Vasa protein abundance and its propensity for accumulation in the small micromeres, whereas overexpression of the Vasa-interacting domain of Gustavus (GusΔSOCS) results in Vasa protein accumulation throughout the embryo. We propose that Gustavus has a conserved, positive regulatory role in Vasa protein accumulation during embryonic development. PMID:21035437

  16. Transcriptional activation by TAL1 and FUS-CHOP proteins expressed in acute malignancies as a result of chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-García, I; Rabbitts, T H

    1994-01-01

    Proteins that appear to participate in transcriptional control of gene expression are increasingly implicated in leukemias and malignant solid tumors. We report here that the N-terminal domains of the proteins TAL1 (ectopically activated in T-cell acute leukemias after chromosomal abnormalities caused by V-D-J recombinase error) (V, variable; D, diversity; J, joining) and FUS-CHOP (a liposarcoma tumor-specific fusion protein that is produced as a result of a chromosomal translocation) can function as transcription activators of specific responsive reporter genes. The result with TAL1 provides evidence that transcriptional activation can be mediated by a gene activated by translocation in T-cell acute leukemias. In the case of the liposarcoma, transactivation by the FUS-CHOP protein occurs because the FUS transcriptional activation domain is added to the DNA-binding CHOP protein normally lacking such activity. Therefore, the association of transcriptional activation and DNA-binding elements is a common consequence in proteins activated or newly created as fusion proteins after chromosomal translocations in acute leukemias and in malignant solid tumors. Images PMID:8058726

  17. Differential Nanos 2 protein stability results in selective germ cell accumulation in the sea urchin.

    PubMed

    Oulhen, Nathalie; Wessel, Gary M

    2016-10-01

    Nanos is a translational regulator required for the survival and maintenance of primordial germ cells. In the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Sp), Nanos 2 mRNA is broadly transcribed but accumulates specifically in the small micromere (sMic) lineage, in part because of the 3'UTR element GNARLE leads to turnover in somatic cells but retention in the sMics. Here we found that the Nanos 2 protein is also selectively stabilized; it is initially translated throughout the embryo but turned over in the future somatic cells and retained only in the sMics, the future germ line in this animal. This differential stability of Nanos protein is dependent on the open reading frame (ORF), and is independent of the sumoylation and ubiquitylation pathways. Manipulation of the ORF indicates that 68 amino acids in the N terminus of the Nanos protein are essential for its stability in the sMics whereas a 45 amino acid element adjacent to the zinc fingers targets its degradation. Further, this regulation of Nanos protein is cell autonomous, following formation of the germ line. These results are paradigmatic for the unique presence of Nanos in the germ line by a combination of selective RNA retention, distinctive translational control mechanisms (Oulhen et al., 2013), and now also by defined Nanos protein stability.

  18. Differential Nanos 2 protein stability results in selective germ cell accumulation in the sea urchin.

    PubMed

    Oulhen, Nathalie; Wessel, Gary M

    2016-10-01

    Nanos is a translational regulator required for the survival and maintenance of primordial germ cells. In the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (Sp), Nanos 2 mRNA is broadly transcribed but accumulates specifically in the small micromere (sMic) lineage, in part because of the 3'UTR element GNARLE leads to turnover in somatic cells but retention in the sMics. Here we found that the Nanos 2 protein is also selectively stabilized; it is initially translated throughout the embryo but turned over in the future somatic cells and retained only in the sMics, the future germ line in this animal. This differential stability of Nanos protein is dependent on the open reading frame (ORF), and is independent of the sumoylation and ubiquitylation pathways. Manipulation of the ORF indicates that 68 amino acids in the N terminus of the Nanos protein are essential for its stability in the sMics whereas a 45 amino acid element adjacent to the zinc fingers targets its degradation. Further, this regulation of Nanos protein is cell autonomous, following formation of the germ line. These results are paradigmatic for the unique presence of Nanos in the germ line by a combination of selective RNA retention, distinctive translational control mechanisms (Oulhen et al., 2013), and now also by defined Nanos protein stability. PMID:27424271

  19. Abnormal activation of calpain and protein kinase Cα promotes a constitutive release of matrix metalloproteinase 9 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Averna, Monica; Bavestrello, Margherita; Cresta, Federico; Pedrazzi, Marco; De Tullio, Roberta; Minicucci, Laura; Sparatore, Bianca; Salamino, Franca; Pontremoli, Sandro; Melloni, Edon

    2016-08-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) is physiologically involved in remodeling the extracellular matrix components but its abnormal release has been observed in several human pathologies. We here report that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients homozygous for F508del-cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), express constitutively and release at high rate MMP9 due to the alteration in their intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. This spontaneous and sustained MMP9 secretion may contribute to the accumulation of this protease in fluids of CF patients. Conversely, in PBMCs isolated from healthy donors, expression and secretion of MMP9 are undetectable but can be evoked, after 12 h of culture, by paracrine stimulation which also promotes an increase in [Ca(2+)]i. We also demonstrate that in both CF and control PBMCs the Ca(2+)-dependent MMP9 secretion is mediated by the concomitant activation of calpain and protein kinase Cα (PKCα), and that MMP9 expression involves extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. Our results are supported by the fact that either the inhibition of Ca(2+) entry or chelation of [Ca(2+)]i as well as the inhibition of single components of the signaling pathway or the restoration of CFTR activity all promote the reduction of MMP9 secretion. PMID:27349634

  20. Cell Membrane Proteins Modulate the Carbon Nanotube Optical Bandgap via Surface Charge Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Roxbury, Daniel; Jena, Prakrit V; Shamay, Yosi; Horoszko, Christopher P; Heller, Daniel A

    2016-01-26

    Cell adhesion is a protein-mediated process intrinsic to most living organisms. Dysfunction in cell adhesion processes is implicated in various diseases, including thrombosis and metastatic cancers. Using an approach to resolve spectral features from cell membrane-associated photoluminescent single-walled carbon nanotubes, we found that nanotube optical bandgaps respond to the electrostatic potential of the cell surface, which corresponds to cell adhesion properties. We studied the carbon nanotube emission energy response to solution ionic potentials, which suggests sensitivity to local charge accumulation. We conclude that nanotubes respond to cell surface electrostatic potentials that are mediated by membrane proteins, which vary significantly across cell types. These findings portend the optical measurement of surface electrostatic potentials for biophysical measurements and biomedical applications. PMID:26654246

  1. Hypoandrogenism and abnormal regulation of gonadotropin secretion in rats fed a low protein diet.

    PubMed

    Glass, A R; Mellitt, R; Vigersky, R A; Swerdloff, R S

    1979-02-01

    The function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis was evaluated in rats fed a low protein diet for 4 weeks beginning at 21 days of age. Compared to control, the low protein group had decreased seminal vesicle and prostate weights as well as decreased testicular testosterone output in vitro, although serum testosterone was not different. The low protein group showed no consistent alterations in serum LH (basal, post-LHRH, and postcastration) compared to control although serum FSH (basal and post-LHRH) was lower in the low protein group. Despite this lower basal FSH, the low protein group had supranormal serum FSH after castration. Seminiferous tubule diameter and testicular histology were normal in the low protein group although testicular androgen-binding protein was absent. Testicular androgen-binding protein was also undetectable in a modestly food-restricted control group which had normal testicular size, testicular histology, androgen output, and serum FSH. This finding suggests that loss of testicular androgen-binding protein may be a sensitive sign of undernutrition. We conclude that rats fed a low protein diet have hypoandrogenism, normal testicular histology, and supranormal FSH after castration despite subnormal basal FSH. The latter combination suggests overproduction of an FSH inhibitor of testicular origin.

  2. HMGB1 and RAGE in skeletal muscle inflammation: Implications for protein accumulation in inclusion body myositis.

    PubMed

    Muth, Ingrid E; Zschüntzsch, Jana; Kleinschnitz, Konstanze; Wrede, Arne; Gerhardt, Ellen; Balcarek, Peter; Schreiber-Katz, Olivia; Zierz, Stephan; Dalakas, Marinos C; Voll, Reinhard E; Schmidt, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation is associated with protein accumulation in IBM, but precise mechanisms are elusive. The "alarmin" HMGB1 is upregulated in muscle inflammation. Its receptor RAGE is crucial for β-amyloid-associated neurodegeneration. Relevant signaling via HMGB1/RAGE is expected in IBM pathology. By real-time-PCR, mRNA-expression levels of HMGB1 and RAGE were upregulated in muscle biopsies of patients with IBM and PM, but not in muscular dystrophy or non-myopathic controls. By immunohistochemistry, both molecules displayed the highest signal in IBM, where they distinctly co-localized to intra-fiber accumulations of β-amyloid and neurofilament/tau. In these fibers, identification of phosphorylated Erk suggested that relevant downstream activation is present upon HMGB1 signaling via RAGE. Protein expressions of HMGB1, RAGE, Erk and phosphorylated Erk were confirmed by Western blot. In a well established cell-culture model for pro-inflammatory cell-stress, exposure of human muscle-cells to IL-1β+IFN-γ induced cytoplasmic translocation of HMGB1 and subsequent release as evidenced by ELISA. Upregulation of RAGE on the cell surface was demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and flow-cytometry. Recombinant HMGB1 was equally potent as IL-1β+IFN-γ in causing amyloid-accumulation and cell-death, and both were abrogated by the HMGB1-blocker BoxA. The findings strengthen the concept of unique interactions between degenerative and inflammatory mechanisms and suggest that HMGB1/RAGE signaling is a critical pathway in IBM pathology.

  3. Chromothripsis in healthy individuals affects multiple protein-coding genes and can result in severe congenital abnormalities in offspring.

    PubMed

    de Pagter, Mirjam S; van Roosmalen, Markus J; Baas, Annette F; Renkens, Ivo; Duran, Karen J; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Hochstenbach, Ron; van der Veken, Lars T; Cuppen, Edwin; Kloosterman, Wigard P

    2015-04-01

    Chromothripsis represents an extreme class of complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs) with major effects on chromosomal architecture. Although recent studies have associated chromothripsis with congenital abnormalities, the incidence and pathogenic effects of this phenomenon require further investigation. Here, we analyzed the genomes of three families in which chromothripsis rearrangements were transmitted from a mother to her child. The chromothripsis in the mothers resulted in completely balanced rearrangements involving 8-23 breakpoint junctions across three to five chromosomes. Two mothers did not show any phenotypic abnormalities, although 3-13 protein-coding genes were affected by breakpoints. Unbalanced but stable transmission of a subset of the derivative chromosomes caused apparently de novo complex copy-number changes in two children. This resulted in gene-dosage changes, which are probably responsible for the severe congenital phenotypes of these two children. In contrast, the third child, who has a severe congenital disease, harbored all three chromothripsis chromosomes from his healthy mother, but one of the chromosomes acquired de novo rearrangements leading to copy-number changes. These results show that the human genome can tolerate extreme reshuffling of chromosomal architecture, including breakage of multiple protein-coding genes, without noticeable phenotypic effects. The presence of chromothripsis in healthy individuals affects reproduction and is expected to substantially increase the risk of miscarriages, abortions, and severe congenital disease.

  4. Expression of CD1d protein in human testis showing normal and abnormal spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Adly, Mohamed A; Abdelwahed Hussein, Mahmoud-Rezk

    2011-05-01

    CD1d is a member of CD1 family of transmembrane glycoproteins, which represent antigen-presenting molecules. Immunofluorescent staining methods were utilized to examine expression pattern of CD1d in human testicular specimens. In testis showing normal spermatogenesis, a strong CD1d cytoplasmic expression was seen the Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, and Leydig cells. A moderate expression was observed in the spermatocytes. In testes showing maturation arrest, CD1d expression was strong in the Sertoli cells and weak in spermatogonia and spermatocytes compared to testis with normal spermatogenesis. In Sertoli cell only syndrome, CD1d expression was strong in the Sertoli and Leydig cells. This preliminary study displayed testicular infertility-related changes in CD1d expression. The ultrastructural changes associated with with normal and abnormal spermatogenesis are open for further investigations.

  5. Functional region identification in proteins by accumulative-quantitative peptide mapping using RP-HPLC-MS.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Bas J H; Bakx, E J; Gruppen, Harry

    2007-11-14

    A new method was developed to identify regions in proteins from which peptides are derived with specific functional properties. This method is applicable for systems in which peptides of a hydrolyzed protein possess specific functional properties, but are too large to be sequenced directly and/or the peptide mixture is too complex to purify and characterize each peptide individually. In the present work, aggregating peptides obtained by proteolytic hydrolysis of soy glycinin were used as a case study. The aggregating peptides are isolated and subsequently further degraded with trypsin to result in peptides with a mass <5000 Da to enable sequence identification using RP-HPLC-MS in combination with MS/MS. Prior to RP-HPLC the peptides are fractionated using anion and cation exchange chromatography. The fractions obtained are analyzed with RP-HPLC-MS. The peptides, with identified sequences, were quantified using the peak areas of the RP-HPLC chromatograms measured at 214 nm. Next, the peak areas were corrected for the molar extinction coefficient of the individual peptides, followed by accumulative-quantitative peptide mapping. The results show that in complex systems, based on the method described, the regions in the parental protein from which the functional peptides originate can be properly identified.

  6. Glycosylation inhibition reduces cholesterol accumulation in NPC1 protein-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Deffieu, Maika S; Lee, Peter L; Saha, Piyali; Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2015-12-01

    Lysosomes are lined with a glycocalyx that protects the limiting membrane from the action of degradative enzymes. We tested the hypothesis that Niemann-Pick type C 1 (NPC1) protein aids the transfer of low density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol across this glycocalyx. A prediction of this model is that cells will be less dependent upon NPC1 if their glycocalyx is decreased in density. Lysosome cholesterol content was significantly lower after treatment of NPC1-deficient human fibroblasts with benzyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-α-D-galactopyranoside, an inhibitor of O-linked glycosylation. Direct biochemical measurement of cholesterol showed that lysosomes purified from NPC1-deficient fibroblasts contained at least 30% less cholesterol when O-linked glycosylation was blocked. As an independent means to modify protein glycosylation, we used Chinese hamster ovary ldl-D cells defective in UDP-Gal/UDP-GalNAc 4-epimerase in which N- and O-linked glycosylation can be controlled. CRISPR generated, NPC1-deficient ldl-D cells supplemented with galactose accumulated more cholesterol than those in which sugar addition was blocked. In the absence of galactose supplementation, NPC1-deficient ldl-D cells also transported more cholesterol from lysosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum, as monitored by an increase in cholesteryl [(14)C]-oleate levels. These experiments support a model in which NPC1 protein functions to transfer cholesterol past a lysosomal glycocalyx.

  7. Spider dragline silk proteins in transgenic tobacco leaves: accumulation and field production.

    PubMed

    Menassa, Rima; Zhu, Hong; Karatzas, Costas N; Lazaris, Anthoula; Richman, Alex; Brandle, Jim

    2004-09-01

    Spider dragline silk is a unique biomaterial and represents nature's strongest known fibre. As it is almost as strong as many commercial synthetic fibres, it is suitable for use in many industrial and medical applications. The prerequisite for such a widespread use is the cost-effective production in sufficient quantities for commercial fibre manufacturing. Agricultural biotechnology and the production of recombinant dragline silk proteins in transgenic plants offer the potential for low-cost, large-scale production. The purpose of this work was to examine the feasibility of producing the two protein components of dragline silk (MaSp1 and MaSp2) from Nephila clavipes in transgenic tobacco. Two different promoters, the enhanced CaMV 35S promoter (Kay et al., 1987) and a new tobacco cryptic constitutive promoter, tCUP (Foster et al., 1999) were used, in conjunction with a plant secretory signal (PR1b), a translational enhancer (alfalfa mosaic virus, AMV) and an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal (KDEL), to express the MaSp1 and MaSp2 genes in the leaves of transgenic plants. Both genes expressed successfully and recombinant protein accumulated in transgenic plants grown in both greenhouse and field trials.

  8. Spider dragline silk proteins in transgenic tobacco leaves: accumulation and field production.

    PubMed

    Menassa, Rima; Zhu, Hong; Karatzas, Costas N; Lazaris, Anthoula; Richman, Alex; Brandle, Jim

    2004-09-01

    Spider dragline silk is a unique biomaterial and represents nature's strongest known fibre. As it is almost as strong as many commercial synthetic fibres, it is suitable for use in many industrial and medical applications. The prerequisite for such a widespread use is the cost-effective production in sufficient quantities for commercial fibre manufacturing. Agricultural biotechnology and the production of recombinant dragline silk proteins in transgenic plants offer the potential for low-cost, large-scale production. The purpose of this work was to examine the feasibility of producing the two protein components of dragline silk (MaSp1 and MaSp2) from Nephila clavipes in transgenic tobacco. Two different promoters, the enhanced CaMV 35S promoter (Kay et al., 1987) and a new tobacco cryptic constitutive promoter, tCUP (Foster et al., 1999) were used, in conjunction with a plant secretory signal (PR1b), a translational enhancer (alfalfa mosaic virus, AMV) and an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal (KDEL), to express the MaSp1 and MaSp2 genes in the leaves of transgenic plants. Both genes expressed successfully and recombinant protein accumulated in transgenic plants grown in both greenhouse and field trials. PMID:17168889

  9. Plasma antibodies to heat shock protein 60 and heat shock protein 70 are associated with increased risk of electrocardiograph abnormalities in automobile workers exposed to noise.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Yang, Miao; Yao, Huiling; Zheng, Jianru; Yang, Qiaoling; Chen, Sheng; Wei, Qingyi; Tanguay, Robert M; Wu, Tangchun

    2005-01-01

    In the living and working environment, stressful factors, such as noise, can cause health problems including cardiovascular diseases and noise-induced hearing loss. Some heat shock proteins (Hsps) play an important role in protecting cardiac cells against ischemic injury, and antibodies against these Hsps are associated with the development and prognosis of atherogenesis, coronary heart disease, and hypertension. Whether the presence of such antibodies is associated with abnormal electrocardiography (ECG) in stressed autoworkers exposed to chronic noise is presently unknown. Therefore, we investigated the association between the levels of plasma anti-Hsp60 and anti-Hsp70 with electrocardiograph abnormality in 396 autoworkers exposed to different noise levels by using Western blot, ECG, and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The results showed that the increase in levels of anti-Hsp70 was associated with a higher risk of ECG abnormalities characteristic of chronic myocardial ischemia (P < 0.05), conductive abnormality (P < 0.01), or heart displacement (P < 0.05); in contrast, elevated anti-Hsp60 was related to ECG abnormalities characteristic of sinus arrhythmia, chronic myocardial ischemia, and ectopic rhythm (P < 0.01 for all). Overall, high levels of both anti-Hsp70 and anti-Hsp60 were associated with significantly increased risk of ECG abnormalities (odds ratio [OR] = 1.73 and 95% confidence interval [Cl] = 1.04-2.86 for anti-Hsp70 and OR = 1.36 and 95% Cl = 1.07-1.72 for anti-Hsp60) with and without adjustment for cumulative noise exposure (OR = 1.96 and 95% Cl = 1.20-3.21 for anti-Hsp70 and OR = 3.93 and 95% Cl = 1.72-8.92 for anti-Hsp60). These findings suggest that the production of both anti-Hsp70 and anti-Hsp60 may be independent risk factors for the development and progression of abnormal ECG and therefore possibly cardiovascular diseases in autoworkers exposed to occupational noise.

  10. Autophagy deficiency leads to accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, ER stress, and cell death in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Munch, David; Rodriguez, Eleazar; Bressendorff, Simon; Park, Ohkmae K; Hofius, Daniel; Petersen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic degradation and recycling process that is also involved in defense against microbial pathogens and in certain forms of cellular suicide. Autophagy has been proposed to negatively regulate plant immunity-associated cell death related to the hypersensitive response (HR), as older autophagy-deficient mutants are unable to contain this type of cell death 5 to 10 d after infection. Such spreading cell death was found to require NPR1 (nonexpressor of PR genes 1), but surprisingly did not occur in younger atg mutants. In contrast, we find that npr1 mutants are not impaired in rapid programmed cell death activation upon pathogen recognition. Furthermore, our molecular evidence suggests that the NPR1-dependent spreading cell death in older atg mutants may originate from an inability to cope with excessive accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and ER stress which derive from salicylic acid (SA)-dependent signaling (e.g., systemic acquired resistance). We also demonstrate that both senescence and immunity-related cell death seen in older atg mutants can be recapitulated in younger atg mutants primed with ER stress. We therefore propose that the reduction in SA signaling caused by npr1 loss-of-function is sufficient to alleviate the stress levels accumulated during aging in autophagy deficient cells which would otherwise become insurmountable and lead to uncontrolled cell death. PMID:25046116

  11. LDL Receptor-Related Protein-1 (LRP1) Regulates Cholesterol Accumulation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Anna P.; Muratoglu, Selen Catania; Au, Dianaly T.; Migliorini, Mary; Lee, Mi-Jeong; Fried, Susan K.; Mikhailenko, Irina; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2015-01-01

    Within the circulation, cholesterol is transported by lipoprotein particles and is taken up by cells when these particles associate with cellular receptors. In macrophages, excessive lipoprotein particle uptake leads to foam cell formation, which is an early event in the development of atherosclerosis. Currently, mechanisms responsible for foam cell formation are incompletely understood. To date, several macrophage receptors have been identified that contribute to the uptake of modified forms of lipoproteins leading to foam cell formation, but the contribution of the LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) to this process is not known. To investigate the role of LRP1 in cholesterol accumulation in macrophages, we generated mice with a selective deletion of LRP1 in macrophages on an LDL receptor (LDLR)-deficient background (macLRP1-/-). After feeding mice a high fat diet for 11 weeks, peritoneal macrophages isolated from Lrp+/+ mice contained significantly higher levels of total cholesterol than those from macLRP1-/- mice. Further analysis revealed that this was due to increased levels of cholesterol esters. Interestingly, macLRP1-/- mice displayed elevated plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels resulting from accumulation of large, triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles in the circulation. This increase did not result from an increase in hepatic VLDL biosynthesis, but rather results from a defect in catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein particles in macLRP1-/- mice. These studies reveal an important in vivo contribution of macrophage LRP1 to cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:26061292

  12. Cadmium accumulation and protein binding patterns in tissues of the rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, J.; Thomas, D.G.; Brown, M.W.; Cryer, A.; Shurben, D.; Solbe, J.F.deL.G.; Garvey, J.S.

    1986-03-01

    Rainbow trout were exposed to defined levels of cadmium in their aquarium water for differing periods at a variety of near-lethal concentrations that ensured the survival of the majority of the fish. The gills, liver and kidney together accounted for 99% of the accumulated load of body cadmium in the fish under these conditions. Although the proportion of total cadmium present in the liver remained relatively constant throughout, the distribution of the remainder between gill and kidney altered with the time of exposure. The cadmium in all three organs was bound by two low molecular weight proteins distinct in character from metallothionein. By contrast, when trout were injected with cadmium intraperitoneally, most of the metal accumulated in the liver where it was sequestered by the two isoforms of metallothionein. Pre-exposure of the trout to either a low concentration of cadmium (for several months) or to an elevated concentration of zinc (for 5 days) allowed the animals to survive a subsequent exposure to a high, otherwise lethal concentration of cadmium.

  13. The maize gamma-zein sequesters alpha-zein and stabilizes its accumulation in protein bodies of transgenic tobacco endosperm.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, C E; Herman, E M; Takasaki, K; Larkins, B A

    1996-01-01

    Zeins are seed storage proteins that form accretions called protein bodies in the rough endoplasmic reticulum of maize endosperm cells. Four types of zeins, alpha, beta, gamma, and delta, aggregate in a distinctive spatial pattern within the protein body. We created transgenic tobacco plants expressing alpha-zein, gamma-zein, or both to examine the interactions between these proteins leading to the formation of protein bodies in the endosperm. Whereas gamma-zein accumulated in seeds of these plants, stable accumulation of alpha-zein required simultaneous synthesis of gamma-zein. The zein proteins formed accretions in the endoplasmic reticulum similar to those in maize endosperm. Protein bodies were also found in protein storage vacuoles. The accumulation of both types of zeins peaked early in development and declined during maturation. Even in the presence of gamma-zein, there was a turnover of alpha-zein, suggesting that the interaction between the two proteins might be transitory. We suggest that gamma-zein plays an important role in protein body formation and demonstrate the utility of tobacco for studying interactions between different zeins. PMID:8989886

  14. Accumulation of a translation intermediate of D1 protein by light-dark transition in isolated spinach chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, N; Satoh, K

    1992-03-23

    In an in vitro translation experiment using spinach chloroplasts, a novel protein band of about 17.5 kDa appeared by light to dark transition. The protein never accumulated in detectable amounts either in continuous illumination or in continuous darkness. The 17.5 kDa protein accumulated upon light-dark transition, on the other hand, disappeared by the subsequent illumination. Accumulation of the protein in light, however, was observed when stromal level of ATP in chloroplasts was lowered after preillumination by the addition of various chemical compounds which, irrespective of the mode of action, eventually decrease the ATP level, e.g. atrazine, carbonyl-cyanide-m-chlorophenyl hydrazone and glycerate. The dark-accumulated protein was concluded to be a translation intermediate of D1 protein based on the facts that this component precipitates with specific antibodies and is resistant to lysylendopeptidase treatment. The suppression by chloramphenicol of both appearance upon light-dark transition and disappearance by the subsequent illumination of the protein also supported this conclusion. The phenomenon was discussed in terms of pausing in the translation of psbA mRNA.

  15. No obvious abnormality in mice deficient in receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta.

    PubMed

    Harroch, S; Palmeri, M; Rosenbluth, J; Custer, A; Okigaki, M; Shrager, P; Blum, M; Buxbaum, J D; Schlessinger, J

    2000-10-01

    The development of neurons and glia is governed by a multitude of extracellular signals that control protein tyrosine phosphorylation, a process regulated by the action of protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Receptor PTPbeta (RPTPbeta; also known as PTPzeta) is expressed predominantly in the nervous system and exhibits structural features common to cell adhesion proteins, suggesting that this phosphatase participates in cell-cell communication. It has been proposed that the three isoforms of RPTPbeta play a role in regulation of neuronal migration, neurite outgrowth, and gliogenesis. To investigate the biological functions of this PTP, we have generated mice deficient in RPTPbeta. RPTPbeta-deficient mice are viable, are fertile, and showed no gross anatomical alterations in the nervous system or other organs. In contrast to results of in vitro experiments, our study demonstrates that RPTPbeta is not essential for neurite outgrowth and node formation in mice. The ultrastructure of nerves of the central nervous system in RPTPbeta-deficient mice suggests a fragility of myelin. However, conduction velocity was not altered in RPTPbeta-deficient mice. The normal development of neurons and glia in RPTPbeta-deficient mice demonstrates that RPTPbeta function is not necessary for these processes in vivo or that loss of RPTPbeta can be compensated for by other PTPs expressed in the nervous system. PMID:11003666

  16. The HIV matrix protein p17 induces hepatic lipid accumulation via modulation of nuclear receptor transcriptoma.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Francisci, Daniela; Carino, Adriana; Marchianò, Silvia; Cipriani, Sabrina; Chiara Monti, Maria; Del Sordo, Rachele; Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Distrutti, Eleonora; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2015-10-15

    Liver disease is the second most common cause of mortality in HIV-infected persons. Exactly how HIV infection per se affects liver disease progression is unknown. Here we have investigated mRNA expression of 49 nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) and 35 transcriptional coregulators in HepG2 cells upon stimulation with the HIV matrix protein p17. This viral protein regulated mRNA expression of some NRs among which LXRα and its transcriptional co-activator MED1 were highly induced at mRNA level. Dissection of p17 downstream intracellular pathway demonstrated that p17 mediated activation of Jak/STAT signaling is responsible for the promoter dependent activation of LXR. The treatment of both HepG2 as well as primary hepatocytes with HIV p17 results in the transcriptional activation of LXR target genes (SREBP1c and FAS) and lipid accumulation. These effects are lost in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with a serum from HIV positive person who underwent a vaccination with a p17 peptide as well as in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with the natural LXR antagonist gymnestrogenin. These results suggest that HIV p17 affects NRs and their related signal transduction thus contributing to the progression of liver disease in HIV infected patients.

  17. Antioxidant enzymes and proteins of wetland plants: their relation to Pb tolerance and accumulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junxing; Ye, Zhihong

    2015-02-01

    Constructed wetlands used to clean up toxic metals such as lead (Pb) from contaminated wastewater are considered as an effective and low-cost technology. The effect of Pb on the biomass, tolerance, soluble protein, and antioxidant enzymes in 18 candidate wetland plant species grown in soils without (control) and spiked with 900 and 1800 mg Pb kg(-1) was studied in a pot trial. Our pot experiment showed that the biomass, tolerance, and leaf protein contents decreased with increasing concentrations of Pb in soil. There were significant differences between the plants in their Pb tolerance indices (29-82 % in the 900 mg Pb kg(-1) amended soil) and also Pb uptake (13-749 mg kg(-1) in shoots and 1112-4891 mg kg(-1) in roots, in the same treatments). Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) in leaves of most of the plants increased with increasing level of soil Pb concentration. Conversely, catalase (CAT) activity in leaves declined when plants were subjected to Pb stress. Lead accumulation by the 18 wetland plant species screened was strongly dependent on the species and Pb concentrations in the soil. However, Pb translocation from root to shoot was generally low in all species. Increases in SOD and POD activities suggest that the antioxidant system may play an important role in alleviating Pb toxicity in wetland plants. The data obtained should help in future species selection for the use in designing wetlands in Pb-contaminated environments.

  18. Nonpeptidic Lysosomal Modulators Derived from Z-Phe-Ala-Diazomethylketone for Treating Protein Accumulation Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Lysosomes are involved in protein turnover and removing misfolded species, and their enzymes have the potential to offset the defect in proteolytic clearance that contributes to the age-related dementia Alzheimer's disease (AD). The weak cathepsin B and L inhibitor Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK) enhances lysosomal cathepsin levels at low concentrations, thereby eliciting protective clearance of PHF-τ and Aβ42 in the hippocampus and other brain regions. Here, a class of positive modulators is established with compounds decoupled from the cathepsin inhibitory properties. We utilized PADK as a departure point to develop nonpeptidic structures with the hydroxyethyl isostere. The first-in-class modulators SD1002 and SD1003 exhibit improved levels of cathepsin up-regulation but almost complete removal of cathepsin inhibitory properties as compared to PADK. Isomers of the lead compound SD1002 were synthesized, and the modulatory activity was determined to be stereoselective. In addition, the lead compound was tested in transgenic mice with results indicating protection against AD-type protein accumulation pathology. PMID:24900408

  19. [Congenital stomatocytosis with hemolytic anemia--with abnormal cation permeability and defective membrane proteins].

    PubMed

    Rix, M; Bjerrum, P J; Wieth, J O; Frandsen, B

    1991-03-01

    A case of hereditary stomatocytosis with haemolytic anaemia in a nine year-old girl is presented. This rare syndrome is associated with increased permeability for monovalent cations across the erythrocyte membrane leading to high intracellular sodium (72 mmol/l erythrocytes) and low potassium (32 mmol/l erythrocytes) accompanied by an increased water content. In our patient the passive Na+ and K+ flux were increased to approximately 20 times normal with a compensatory maximal activation of the normal Na, K transport. The cation permeability defect was partly corrected in vitro by a bifunctional imidoester, dimethyl suberimidate. Electrophoresis of solubilizer membrane proteins revealed changes in the protein band pattern with reduction of band 7, as reported previously, and increase in the band 4.1a/4.1b ratio and increased band 4.8.

  20. RPT2/NCH1 subfamily of NPH3-like proteins is essential for the chloroplast accumulation response in land plants.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Takemiya, Atsushi; Kong, Sam-Geun; Higa, Takeshi; Komatsu, Aino; Shimazaki, Ken-Ichiro; Kohchi, Takayuki; Wada, Masamitsu

    2016-09-13

    In green plants, the blue light receptor kinase phototropin mediates various photomovements and developmental responses, such as phototropism, chloroplast photorelocation movements (accumulation and avoidance), stomatal opening, and leaf flattening, which facilitate photosynthesis. In Arabidopsis, two phototropins (phot1 and phot2) redundantly mediate these responses. Two phototropin-interacting proteins, NONPHOTOTROPIC HYPOCOTYL 3 (NPH3) and ROOT PHOTOTROPISM 2 (RPT2), which belong to the NPH3/RPT2-like (NRL) family of BTB (broad complex, tramtrack, and bric à brac) domain proteins, mediate phototropism and leaf flattening. However, the roles of NRL proteins in chloroplast photorelocation movement remain to be determined. Here, we show that another phototropin-interacting NRL protein, NRL PROTEIN FOR CHLOROPLAST MOVEMENT 1 (NCH1), and RPT2 redundantly mediate the chloroplast accumulation response but not the avoidance response. NPH3, RPT2, and NCH1 are not involved in the chloroplast avoidance response or stomatal opening. In the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, the NCH1 ortholog, MpNCH1, is essential for the chloroplast accumulation response but not the avoidance response, indicating that the regulation of the phototropin-mediated chloroplast accumulation response by RPT2/NCH1 is conserved in land plants. Thus, the NRL protein combination could determine the specificity of diverse phototropin-mediated responses. PMID:27578868

  1. Impairment of lon-induced protection against the accumulation of oxidized proteins in senescent wi-38 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Jenny K; Pomatto, Laura C D; Bota, Daniela A; Koop, Alison L; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2011-11-01

    Oxidative damage to mitochondrial proteins is thought to contribute to the aging process, but the Lon protease normally degrades such proteins. In early-passage WI-38 human lung fibroblasts, Lon expression is rapidly induced during H(2)O(2) stress, which prevents the accumulation of oxidized proteins and protects cell viability. In contrast, middle passage cells exhibit only sluggish induction of Lon expression in oxidative stress, and oxidized proteins initially accumulate. Late-passage, or senescent, cells have low basal levels of Lon and high levels of accumulated oxidized proteins; in response to oxidative stress, they fail to induce Lon expression and exhibit continually increasing accumulation of oxidized proteins. Senescent cells separated into two populations, one exhibiting normal mitochondrial mass and a second displaying significant loss of mitochondria; both populations had diminished mitochondrial transmembrane potential. These senescent changes are similar to the effects of Lon silencing in young cells. We suggest that loss of Lon stress inducibility is part of a pattern of diminishing stress adaptability that predisposes cells to senescence.

  2. Accumulation of the F plasmid TraJ protein in cpx mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, P M; Tran, L; Harris, R; Gaudin, H M

    1993-01-01

    We report here studies of the cellular control of F plasmid TraJ protein levels, focusing on the effects of chromosomal cpx mutations. The principal conclusion from our results is that the cpx mutations impair accumulation of the TraJ protein, thereby reducing tra gene expression. We measured TraJ activity in vivo by expression of a traY'-'lacZ fusion gene and TraJ protein by immuno-overlay blot. In strains with normal TraJ levels, traY expression and donor-related functions were reduced in cells carrying any of four cpxA mutations. In the strain background used to isolate cpx mutants, these reductions were especially evident in cells grown to high density, when traY expression and donor activity both increased in cpx+ cells. In each of the four cpxA mutants tested, TraJ levels were lower than in the otherwise isogenic cpxA+ strain. In cells grown to high density, the differences ranged from 4-fold in the cpxA6 strain to > 10-fold in the cpxA2, cpxA5, and cpxA9 strains. The cpxA2 mutation had little or no effect on traY expression or on donor-related functions when TraJ was present in excess of its limiting level in F' or Hfr cells or on a mutant traY promoter whose expression in vivo was independent of TraJ. Images PMID:8432716

  3. Abnormal desmin protein in myofibrillar myopathies caused by desmin gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Dalakas, M C

    2001-04-01

    Muscle proteins were extracted in various sodium dodecyl sulfate buffers from 6 patients with myofibrillar myopathy (MFM) and previously identified with mutations in the desmin gene (desmin myopathy; DesM), 6 with MFM without mutations, and 14 disease controls to search for alterations in biochemistry and solubility of mutated desmin filaments. In the 1% posthigh-speed pellet fraction, desmin was detected with immunoblots only in DesM and not the other MFM. We conclude that mutant desmin forms insoluble aggregates that are specific for the DesM and can be detected with Western blots.

  4. Accumulation and dissemination of prion protein in experimental sheep scrapie in the natural host

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Stephen J; Dexter, Glenda E; Heasman, Lindsay; Warner, Richard; Moore, S Jo

    2009-01-01

    Background In order to study the sites of uptake and mechanisms of dissemination of scrapie prions in the natural host under controlled conditions, lambs aged 14 days and homozygous for the VRQ allele of the PrP gene were infected by the oral route. Infection occurred in all lambs with a remarkably short and highly consistent incubation period of approximately 6 months. Challenge of lambs at approximately eight months of age resulted in disease in all animals, but with more variable incubation periods averaging significantly longer than those challenged at 14 days. This model provides an excellent system in which to study the disease in the natural host by virtue of the relatively short incubation period and close resemblance to natural infection. Results Multiple sites of prion uptake were identified, of which the most important was the Peyer's patch of the distal ileum. Neuroinvasion was detected initially in the enteric nervous system prior to infection of the central nervous system. At end stage disease prion accumulation was widespread throughout the entire neuraxis, but vacuolar pathology was absent in most animals that developed disease at 6–7 months of age. Conclusion Initial spread of detectable PrP was consistent with drainage in afferent lymph to dependent lymph nodes. Subsequent accumulation of prions in lymphoid tissue not associated with the gut is consistent with haematogenous spread. In addition to macrophages and follicular dendritic cells, prion containing cells consistent with afferent lymph dendritic cells were identified and are suggested as a likely vehicle for carriage of prions from initial site of uptake to the lymphoreticular system, and as potential carriers of prion protein in blood. It is apparent that spongiform change, the characteristic lesion of scrapie and other prion diseases, is not responsible for the clinical signs in sheep, but may develop in an age dependent manner. PMID:19243608

  5. Abnormal lipopolysaccharide binding protein as marker of gastrointestinal inflammation in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Gian D.; Shaikh, Maliha; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Ouyang, Bichun; Keshavarzian, Ali; Shannon, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: An inflammation-driven model of PD has been proposed based on the endotoxin lipopolysaccaride (LPS), a potential source of inflammation in the gastrointestinal system linked to neurotoxicity. Systemic exposure to bacterial endotoxin (LPS) can be determined by measuring plasma LPS binding protein (LBP). We aimed to evaluate whether lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) can be used to distinguish PD subjects from control subjects and to assess whether LBP levels correlate with PD disease severity. Methods: We measured plasma LBP (ng/ml) using an ELISA kit in 94 PD subjects of various stages and 97 control subjects. Disease severity was assessed using the UPDRS and Hoehn and Yahr staging. The LBP level between the PD and control groups was compared using analysis of covariance. Spearman correlation was used to explore the relationship between LBP level and disease severity. Results: The mean LBP level in PD subjects (n = 94) was significantly different from control subjects (n = 95, p = 0.018). In PD subjects, we did not find a correlation between mean LBP level and disease severity. Conclusions: Our data suggests that LBP is one GI biomarker related to LPS induced neurotoxicity. However, there was significant variability in LBP levels within the PD and control groups, limiting its utility as a stand-alone biomarker. This study supports the role of LPS induced neurotoxicity in PD and further exploration of this pathway may be useful in developing sensitive and specific biomarkers for PD. PMID:26388718

  6. Abnormalities of ADP/ATP carrier protein in J-2-N cardiomyopathic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Yang, J; Iwai, T; Tanamura, A; Arino, T; Kawashima, O; Takeda, N

    1993-02-17

    ADP/ATP carrier protein (AAC) is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane and has an important function in mitochondrial energy supply. This protein transports ATP to the cytoplasm and counter transports ADP into the mitochondria. J-2-N cardiomyopathic hamsters were investigated to determine the AAC content in cardiac mitochondria. After recording an electrocardiogram and collecting blood, the cardiac mitochondria were isolated. The mitochondrial membranes were labelled with eosin-5-maleimide (EMA) and separated on SDS polyacrylamide gels. The position of the AAC component was identified by exposing the gel under UV light, and the AAC content was determined by densitometry after staining with Coomassie blue. The AAC content ratio was significantly decreased in both 10-week-old and 1-year survived J-2-N hamsters when compared to control Golden hamster. Among 10-week-old J-2-N hamsters, the decrease in the AAC content ratio was more marked for the animals with more severe myocardial damage. The H(+)-ATPase activities of mitochondrial membrane were higher in 10-week-old J-2-N hamsters than in control hamsters. These results suggest that the decrease of AAC in J-2-N hamster plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy in J-2-N hamsters. PMID:8455591

  7. Epilepsy, Behavioral Abnormalities, and Physiological Comorbidities in Syntaxin-Binding Protein 1 (STXBP1) Mutant Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Marchese, Maria; Hamling, Kyla R.; Kumar, Maneesh G.; Krasniak, Christopher S.; Sicca, Federico; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Patel, Manisha; Baraban, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the synaptic machinery gene syntaxin-binding protein 1, STXBP1 (also known as MUNC18-1), are linked to childhood epilepsies and other neurodevelopmental disorders. Zebrafish STXBP1 homologs (stxbp1a and stxbp1b) have highly conserved sequence and are prominently expressed in the larval zebrafish brain. To understand the functions of stxbp1a and stxbp1b, we generated loss-of-function mutations using CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing and studied brain electrical activity, behavior, development, heart physiology, metabolism, and survival in larval zebrafish. Homozygous stxbp1a mutants exhibited a profound lack of movement, low electrical brain activity, low heart rate, decreased glucose and mitochondrial metabolism, and early fatality compared to controls. On the other hand, homozygous stxbp1b mutants had spontaneous electrographic seizures, and reduced locomotor activity response to a movement-inducing “dark-flash” visual stimulus, despite showing normal metabolism, heart rate, survival, and baseline locomotor activity. Our findings in these newly generated mutant lines of zebrafish suggest that zebrafish recapitulate clinical phenotypes associated with human syntaxin-binding protein 1 mutations. PMID:26963117

  8. Modeling grain nitrogen accumulation and protein composition to understand the sink/source regulations of nitrogen remobilization for wheat.

    PubMed

    Martre, Pierre; Porter, John R; Jamieson, Peter D; Triboï, Eugène

    2003-12-01

    A functional explanation for the regulation of grain nitrogen (N) accumulation in cereal by environmental and genetic factors remains elusive. Here, new mechanistic hypotheses of grain N accumulation are proposed and tested for wheat (Triticum aestivum). First, we tested experimentally the hypothesis that grain N accumulation is mostly source regulated. Four contrasting cultivars, in terms of their grain N concentrations and yield potentials, were grown with non-limiting N supply. Grain number per ear was reduced by removing the top part of the ear at anthesis. Reduction in grain number gave a significant increase in N content per grain for all cultivars, showing that grain N accumulation was source regulated. However, on a per ear basis, cultivars with a high grain number fully compensated their N accumulation for reduced grain number at anthesis. Cultivars with a lower grain number did not compensate completely, and grain N per ear was decreased by 16%. Second, new mechanistic hypotheses of the origins of grain N source regulation and its response to environment were tested by simulation. The hypotheses were: (a). The regulation by N sources of grain N accumulation applies only for the storage proteins (i.e. gliadin and glutenin fractions); (b). accumulation of structural and metabolic proteins (i.e. albumin-globulin and amphiphilic fractions) is sink-regulated; and (c). N partitioning between gliadins and glutenins is constant during grain development and unmodified by growing conditions. Comparison of experimental and simulation results of the accumulation of grain protein fractions under wide ranges of N fertilization, temperatures, and irrigation supported these hypotheses.

  9. Immunomodulation targeting abnormal protein conformation reduces pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Fernando; Prelli, Frances; Ji, Yong; Scholtzova, Henrieta; Yang, Jing; Sun, Yanjie; Liang, Feng-Xia; Kascsak, Regina; Kascsak, Richard; Mehta, Pankaj; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the conformational change of normal self-proteins into amyloidogenic, pathological conformers, which share structural properties such as high β-sheet content and resistance to degradation. The most common is Alzheimer's disease (AD) where the normal soluble amyloid β (sAβ) peptide is converted into highly toxic oligomeric Aβ and fibrillar Aβ that deposits as neuritic plaques and congophilic angiopathy. Currently, there is no highly effective treatment for AD, but immunotherapy is emerging as a potential disease modifying intervention. A major problem with most active and passive immunization approaches for AD is that both the normal sAβ and pathogenic forms are equally targeted with the potential of autoimmune inflammation. In order to avoid this pitfall, we have developed a novel immunomodulatory method that specifically targets the pathological conformations, by immunizing with polymerized British amyloidosis (pABri) related peptide which has no sequence homology to Aβ or other human proteins. We show that the pABri peptide through conformational mimicry induces a humoral immune response not only to the toxic Aβ in APP/PS1 AD transgenic mice but also to paired helical filaments as shown on AD human tissue samples. Treated APP/PS1 mice had a cognitive benefit compared to controls (p<0.0001), associated with a reduction in the amyloid burden (p = 0.0001) and Aβ40/42 levels, as well as reduced Aβ oligomer levels. This type of immunomodulation has the potential to be a universal β-sheet disrupter, which could be useful for the prevention or treatment of a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20967130

  10. Spatial Intensity Distribution Analysis Reveals Abnormal Oligomerization of Proteins in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Godin, Antoine G; Rappaz, Benjamin; Potvin-Trottier, Laurent; Kennedy, Timothy E; De Koninck, Yves; Wiseman, Paul W

    2015-08-18

    Knowledge of membrane receptor organization is essential for understanding the initial steps in cell signaling and trafficking mechanisms, but quantitative analysis of receptor interactions at the single-cell level and in different cellular compartments has remained highly challenging. To achieve this, we apply a quantitative image analysis technique-spatial intensity distribution analysis (SpIDA)-that can measure fluorescent particle concentrations and oligomerization states within different subcellular compartments in live cells. An important technical challenge faced by fluorescence microscopy-based measurement of oligomerization is the fidelity of receptor labeling. In practice, imperfect labeling biases the distribution of oligomeric states measured within an aggregated system. We extend SpIDA to enable analysis of high-order oligomers from fluorescence microscopy images, by including a probability weighted correction algorithm for nonemitting labels. We demonstrated that this fraction of nonemitting probes could be estimated in single cells using SpIDA measurements on model systems with known oligomerization state. Previously, this artifact was measured using single-step photobleaching. This approach was validated using computer-simulated data and the imperfect labeling was quantified in cells with ion channels of known oligomer subunit count. It was then applied to quantify the oligomerization states in different cell compartments of the proteolipid protein (PLP) expressed in COS-7 cells. Expression of a mutant PLP linked to impaired trafficking resulted in the detection of PLP tetramers that persist in the endoplasmic reticulum, while no difference was measured at the membrane between the distributions of wild-type and mutated PLPs. Our results demonstrate that SpIDA allows measurement of protein oligomerization in different compartments of intact cells, even when fractional mislabeling occurs as well as photobleaching during the imaging process, and

  11. Dissecting root proteome of transgenic rice cultivars unravels metabolic alterations and accumulation of novel stress responsive proteins under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Paul, Soumitra; Gayen, Dipak; Datta, Swapan K; Datta, Karabi

    2015-05-01

    Generation of drought tolerant rice plants by overexpressing Arabidopsis DREB1A is a significant development for abiotic stress research. However, the metabolic network regulated in the drought tolerant transgenic rice plants is poorly understood. In this research study, we have demonstrated the comparative proteome analysis between the roots of wild type and transgenic DREB1A overexpressing homozygous plants under drought stress condition. After 7d of dehydration stress at reproductive stage, the plants were re-watered for 24h. The roots were collected separately from wild type and transgenic plants grown under water, drought stress and re-watering conditions and total proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). Among the large number of differentially accumulated spots, 30, 27 and 20 spots were successfully identified as differentially expressed proteins in three different conditions respectively. The major class of identified proteins belongs to carbohydrate and energy metabolism category while stress and defense related proteins are especially up-accumulated under drought stress in both the plants. A novel protein, R40C1 was reported to be up-accumulated in roots of transgenic plants which may play an important role in generation of drought tolerant plants. Protein-protein interaction helps to identify the network of drought stress signaling pathways. PMID:25804816

  12. Lipid thioesters derived from acylated proteins accumulate in infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis: correction of the defect in lymphoblasts by recombinant palmitoyl-protein thioesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, J Y; Verkruyse, L A; Hofmann, S L

    1996-01-01

    Palmitoyl-protein thioesterase is a lysosomal long-chain fatty acyl hydrolase that removes fatty acyl groups from modified cysteine residues in proteins. Mutations in palmitoyl-protein thioesterase were recently found to cause the neurodegenerative disorder infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, a disease characterized by accumulation of amorphous granular deposits in cortical neurons, leading to blindness, seizures, and brain death by the age of three. In the current study, we demonstrate that [35S]cysteine-labeled lipid thioesters accumulate in immortalized lymphoblasts of patients with infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. The accumulation in cultured cells is reversed by the addition of recombinant palmitoyl-protein thioesterase that is competent for lysosomal uptake through the mannose-6-phosphate receptor. The [35S]cysteine-labeled lipids are substrates for palmitoyl-protein thioesterase in vitro, and their formation requires prior protein synthesis. These data support a role for palmitoyl-protein thioesterase in the lysosomal degradation of S-acylated proteins and define a major new pathway for the catabolism of acylated proteins in the lysosome. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8816748

  13. Accumulation of non-outer segment proteins in the outer segment underlies photoreceptor degeneration in Bardet–Biedl syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Poppy; Allamargot, Chantal; Hudson, Joseph S.; Andersen, Emily K.; Bhattarai, Sajag; Drack, Arlene V.; Sheffield, Val C.; Seo, Seongjin

    2015-01-01

    Compartmentalization and polarized protein trafficking are essential for many cellular functions. The photoreceptor outer segment (OS) is a sensory compartment specialized for phototransduction, and it shares many features with primary cilia. As expected, mutations disrupting protein trafficking to cilia often disrupt protein trafficking to the OS and cause photoreceptor degeneration. Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS) is one of the ciliopathies associated with defective ciliary trafficking and photoreceptor degeneration. However, precise roles of BBS proteins in photoreceptor cells and the underlying mechanisms of photoreceptor degeneration in BBS are not well understood. Here, we show that accumulation of non-OS proteins in the OS underlies photoreceptor degeneration in BBS. Using a newly developed BBS mouse model [Leucine zipper transcription factor-like 1 (Lztfl1)/Bbs17 mutant], isolated OSs, and quantitative proteomics, we determined 138 proteins that are enriched more than threefold in BBS mutant OS. In contrast, only eight proteins showed a more than threefold reduction. We found striking accumulation of Stx3 and Stxbp1/Munc18-1 and loss of polarized localization of Prom1 within the Lztfl1 and Bbs1 mutant OS. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that large vesicles are formed in the BBS OS, disrupting the lamellar structure of the OS. Our findings suggest that accumulation (and consequent sequestration) of non-OS proteins in the OS is likely the primary cause of photoreceptor degeneration in BBS. Our data also suggest that a major function of BBS proteins in photoreceptors is to transport proteins from the OS to the cell body or to prevent entry of non-OS proteins into the OS. PMID:26216965

  14. Arabidopsis SEIPIN Proteins Modulate Triacylglycerol Accumulation and Influence Lipid Droplet Proliferation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The lipodystrophy protein SEIPIN is important for lipid droplet (LD) biogenesis in human and yeast cells. In contrast with the single SEIPIN genes in humans and yeast, there are three SEIPIN homologs in Arabidopsis thaliana, designated SEIPIN1, SEIPIN2, and SEIPIN3. Essentially nothing is known about the functions of SEIPIN homologs in plants. Here, a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) SEIPIN deletion mutant strain and a plant (Nicotiana benthamiana) transient expression system were used to test the ability of Arabidopsis SEIPINs to influence LD morphology. In both species, expression of SEIPIN1 promoted accumulation of large-sized lipid droplets, while expression of SEIPIN2 and especially SEIPIN3 promoted small LDs. Arabidopsis SEIPINs increased triacylglycerol levels and altered composition. In tobacco, endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized SEIPINs reorganized the normal, reticulated ER structure into discrete ER domains that colocalized with LDs. N-terminal deletions and swapping experiments of SEIPIN1 and 3 revealed that this region of SEIPIN determines LD size. Ectopic overexpression of SEIPIN1 in Arabidopsis resulted in increased numbers of large LDs in leaves, as well as in seeds, and increased seed oil content by up to 10% over wild-type seeds. By contrast, RNAi suppression of SEIPIN1 resulted in smaller seeds and, as a consequence, a reduction in the amount of oil per seed compared with the wild type. Overall, our results indicate that Arabidopsis SEIPINs are part of a conserved LD biogenesis machinery in eukaryotes and that in plants these proteins may have evolved specialized roles in the storage of neutral lipids by differentially modulating the number and sizes of lipid droplets. PMID:26362606

  15. G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor (GPER) Expression in Normal and Abnormal Endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Lessey, Bruce A.; Taylor, Robert N.; Wang, Wei; Bagchi, Milan K.; Yuan, Lingwen; Scotchie, Jessica; Fritz, Marc A.; Young, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid estrogen effects are mediated by membrane receptors, and evidence suggests a role for both a membrane-associated form of estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1; ERα) and G-protein coupled receptor 30 (GPER; GPR30). Considering estrogen’s importance in endometrial physiology and endometriosis pathophysiology, we hypothesized that GPER could be involved in both cyclic changes in endometrial estrogen action and that aberrant expression might be seen in the eutopic endometrium of women with endometriosis. Using real-time reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical analysis of normal endometrium, endometrial samples demonstrated cycle-regulated expression of GPER, with maximal expression in the proliferative phase. Eutopic and ectopic endometrium from women with endometriosis overexpressed GPER as compared to eutopic endometrium of normal participants. Ishikawa cells, an adenocarcinoma cell line, expressed GPER, with increased expression upon treatment with estrogen or an ESR1 agonist, but not with a GPER-specific agonist. Decreased expression was seen in Ishikawa cells stably transfected with progesterone receptor A. Together, these data suggest that normal endometrial GPER expression is cyclic and regulated by nuclear estrogen and progesterone receptors, while expression is dysregulated in endometriosis. PMID:22378861

  16. Abnormal IGF-Binding Protein Profile in the Bone Marrow of Multiple Myeloma Patients.

    PubMed

    Bieghs, Liesbeth; Brohus, Malene; Kristensen, Ida B; Abildgaard, Niels; Bøgsted, Martin; Johnsen, Hans E; Conover, Cheryl A; De Bruyne, Elke; Vanderkerken, Karin; Overgaard, Michael T; Nyegaard, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signalling plays a key role in homing, progression, and treatment resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). In the extracellular environment, the majority of IGF molecules are bound to one of six IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP1-6), leaving a minor fraction of total IGF free and accessible for receptor activation. In MM, high IGF-receptor type 1 expression levels correlate with a poor prognosis, but the status and role of IGF and IGFBPs in the pathobiology of MM is unknown. Here we measured total IGF1, IGF2, and intact IGFBP levels in blood and bone marrow samples from MM (n = 17), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) (n = 37), and control individuals (n = 15), using ELISA (IGFs) and 125I-IGF1 Western Ligand Blotting (IGFBPs). MGUS and MM patients displayed a significant increase in intact IGFBP-2 (2.5-3.8 fold) and decrease in intact IGFBP-3 (0.6-0.5 fold) in the circulation compared to control individuals. Further, IGFBP-2 as well as total IGFBP levels were significantly lower in bone marrow compared to circulation in MM and MGUS only, whereas IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP-3 were equally distributed between the two compartments. In conclusion, the profound change in IGFBP profile strongly suggests an increased IGF bioavailability in the bone marrow microenvironment in MGUS and MM, despite no change in growth factor concentration. PMID:27111220

  17. Abnormal IGF-Binding Protein Profile in the Bone Marrow of Multiple Myeloma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bieghs, Liesbeth; Brohus, Malene; Kristensen, Ida B.; Abildgaard, Niels; Bøgsted, Martin; Johnsen, Hans E.; Conover, Cheryl A.; De Bruyne, Elke; Vanderkerken, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signalling plays a key role in homing, progression, and treatment resistance in multiple myeloma (MM). In the extracellular environment, the majority of IGF molecules are bound to one of six IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP1-6), leaving a minor fraction of total IGF free and accessible for receptor activation. In MM, high IGF-receptor type 1 expression levels correlate with a poor prognosis, but the status and role of IGF and IGFBPs in the pathobiology of MM is unknown. Here we measured total IGF1, IGF2, and intact IGFBP levels in blood and bone marrow samples from MM (n = 17), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) (n = 37), and control individuals (n = 15), using ELISA (IGFs) and 125I-IGF1 Western Ligand Blotting (IGFBPs). MGUS and MM patients displayed a significant increase in intact IGFBP-2 (2.5–3.8 fold) and decrease in intact IGFBP-3 (0.6–0.5 fold) in the circulation compared to control individuals. Further, IGFBP-2 as well as total IGFBP levels were significantly lower in bone marrow compared to circulation in MM and MGUS only, whereas IGF1, IGF2, and IGFBP-3 were equally distributed between the two compartments. In conclusion, the profound change in IGFBP profile strongly suggests an increased IGF bioavailability in the bone marrow microenvironment in MGUS and MM, despite no change in growth factor concentration. PMID:27111220

  18. Changes in contractile protein mRNA accumulation in response to spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Esser, K A; Hardeman, E C

    1995-02-01

    Ten rats were exposed to 9 days of zero gravity aboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration SLS-1 space mission (June 1991). Levels of fast and slow isoform mRNAs from six contractile protein gene families were quantified in the flight soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles. The gene families studied were myosin light chain-1 (MLC-1), myosin light chain-2 (MLC-2), troponin (Tn) T, TnI, TnC, and tropomyosin. In the EDL muscle there was no change in slow mRNA levels with a general increase in fast mRNA levels from 23 to 232%. Changes in slow mRNA levels were seen in the flight soleus muscle with TnCslow and TnTslow levels increasing slightly, and MLC-1slow a, MLC-1slow b, TnIslow, alpha-Tmslow, and MLC-2slow levels decreasing. All fast mRNA levels increased in the flight soleus muscle from 170 to 1,100%. We can conclude that exposure to zero gravity results in 1) a general increase in fast mRNA levels in both fast and slow muscles and 2) differing directional changes in slow mRNA accumulation in the soleus muscle. PMID:7864086

  19. Induced changes in chloroplast protein accumulation during heat bleaching in Euglena gracilis

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, W.; Wilson, C.J. )

    1988-02-01

    When growing cultures of light-grown Euglena gracilis Z are exposed to slightly elevated temperatures (33{degree}C) there is a time-dependent decrease in chlorophyll (bleaching) and a gradual transformation of chloroplasts into rudimentary plastids. A study was undertaken whose primary objective was to document major changes in polypeptide composition in the stroma and in thylakoids of cells that have been exposed to the bleaching temperature for up to 57 hours. A novel polypeptide of about 60,000 to 63,000 M{sub r} whose function is presently unknown, accumulates in the stroma and in thylakoids in response to growth at the bleaching temperature. The levels of the large and small subunit of ribuolosebisphosphate carboxylase, on the other hand, decrease to very low levels at about 33 hours and remain very low for the duration of the temperature treatment. Of two polypeptides associated with the light-harvesting chlorophyll-protein complex of photosystem II (28,000 and 24,500 M{sub r}) only the level of the smaller polypeptide decreases at the elevated temperature. The levels of 28,000 M{sub r} species remain virtually unchanged throughout the temperature treatment period.

  20. Abnormal Sensory Protein Expression and Urothelial Dysfunction in Ketamine-Related Cystitis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to analyze patterns of sensory protein expression and urothelial dysfunction in ketamine-related cystitis (KC) in humans. Methods Biopsies of bladder mucosa were performed in 29 KC patients during cystoscopy. Then specimens were analyzed for tryptase, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), E-cadherin, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) with immunofluorescence staining and quantification. In addition, 10 healthy control bladder specimens were analyzed and compared with the KC specimens. Another 16 whole bladder specimens obtained from partial cystectomy were also analyzed for the muscarinic receptors M2 and M3, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), β-3 adrenergic receptors (β3-ARs), and the P2X3 receptor by western blotting. In addition, 3 normal control bladder specimens were analyzed and compared with the KC specimens. Results The KC bladder mucosa revealed significantly less expression of ZO-1 and E-cadherin, and greater expression of TUNEL and tryptase activity than the control samples. The expression of M3 and β3-AR in the KC specimens was significantly greater than in the controls. The expression of iNOS, eNOS, M2, and P2X3 was not significantly different between the KC and control specimens. Conclusions The bladder tissue of KC patients revealed significant urothelial dysfunction, which was associated with mast-cell mediated inflammation, increased urothelial cell apoptosis, and increased expression of the M3 and β3-AR. PMID:27706016

  1. [Effects of sprinkler irrigation on the plant nitrogen accumulation and translocation and kernel protein content of winter wheat].

    PubMed

    Yao, Su-mei; Kang, Yue-hu; Ru, Zhen-gang; Liu, Ming-jiu; Yang, Wen-ping; Li, Gan

    2013-08-01

    Taking wheat cultivar Bainong AK58 as test material, a field experiment was conducted to study the plant nitrogen accumulation and translocation and kernel protein content of winter wheat under sprinkler irrigation and surface irrigation, aimed to understand the differences in the nitrogen metabolism characteristics of winter wheat under different irrigation regimes. At booting stage, no significant difference was observed in the total amount of plant nitrogen accumulation between sprinkler irrigation and surface irrigation; while from booting stage to maturing stage, the total amount of plant nitrogen accumulation under sprinkler irrigation was significantly higher. Under sprinkler irrigation, the translocation amount and contribution rate of the nitrogen stored in leaf, glume, stem and sheath at pre-anthesis to the kernel increased, while the contribution rate of the assimilated nitrogen after anthesis to the kernel nitrogen declined. Both the relative protein content and the total protein yield in the kernel increased significantly under sprinkler irrigation. In conclusion, sprinkler irrigation could significantly regulate the nitrogen translocation and kernel protein accumulation of winter wheat. PMID:24380339

  2. Blocking protein farnesylation improves nuclear shape abnormalities in keratinocytes of mice expressing the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexia; Östlund, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA leading to expression of a truncated prelamin A variant termed progerin. Whereas a farnesylated polypeptide is normally removed from the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A during endoproteolytic processing to lamin A, progerin lacks the cleavage site and remains farnesylated. Cultured cells from human subjects with HGPS and genetically modified mice expressing progerin have nuclear morphological abnormalities, which are reversed by inhibitors of protein farnesylation. In addition, treatment with protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors improves whole animal phenotypes in mouse models of HGPS. However, improvement in nuclear morphology in tissues after treatment of animals has not been demonstrated. We therefore treated transgenic mice that express progerin in epidermis with the protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor FTI-276 or a combination of pravastatin and zoledronate to determine if they reversed nuclear morphological abnormalities in tissue. Immunofluorescence microscopy and “blinded” electron microscopic analysis demonstrated that systemic administration of FTI-276 or pravastatin plus zoledronate significantly improved nuclear morphological abnormalities in keratinocytes of transgenic mice. These results show that pharmacological blockade of protein prenylation reverses nuclear morphological abnormalities that occur in HGPS in vivo. They further suggest that skin biopsy may be useful to determine if protein farnesylation inhibitors are exerting effects in subjects with HGPS in clinical trials. PMID:21326826

  3. Blocking protein farnesylation improves nuclear shape abnormalities in keratinocytes of mice expressing the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexia; Ostlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J

    2010-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an accelerated aging disorder caused by mutations in LMNA leading to expression of a truncated prelamin A variant termed progerin. Whereas a farnesylated polypeptide is normally removed from the carboxyl-terminus of prelamin A during endoproteolytic processing to lamin A, progerin lacks the cleavage site and remains farnesylated. Cultured cells from human subjects with HGPS and genetically modified mice expressing progerin have nuclear morphological abnormalities, which are reversed by inhibitors of protein farnesylation. In addition, treatment with protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors improves whole animal phenotypes in mouse models of HGPS. However, improvement in nuclear morphology in tissues after treatment of animals has not been demonstrated. We therefore treated transgenic mice that express progerin in epidermis with the protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor FTI-276 or a combination of pravastatin and zoledronate to determine if they reversed nuclear morphological abnormalities in tissue. Immunofluorescence microscopy and "blinded" electron microscopic analysis demonstrated that systemic administration of FTI-276 or pravastatin plus zoledronate significantly improved nuclear morphological abnormalities in keratinocytes of transgenic mice. These results show that pharmacological blockade of protein prenylation reverses nuclear morphological abnormalities that occur in HGPS in vivo. They further suggest that skin biopsy may be useful to determine if protein farnesylation inhibitors are exerting effects in subjects with HGPS in clinical trials.

  4. A relaxed (rel) mutant of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) with a missing ribosomal protein lacks the ability to accumulate ppGpp, A-factor and prodigiosin.

    PubMed

    Ochi, K

    1990-12-01

    A relaxed (rel) mutant was found among 70 thiopeptin-resistant isolates of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) which arose spontaneously. The ability of the rel mutant to accumulate ppGpp during Casamino acid deprivation was reduced 10-fold compared to the wild-type. Analysis of the ribosomal proteins by two-dimensional PAGE revealed that the mutant lacked a ribosomal protein, tentatively designated ST-L11. It was therefore classified as a relC mutant. The mutant was defective in producing A-factor and the pigmented antibiotic prodigiosin, in both liquid and agar cultures, but produced agarase normally. Production of actinorhodin, another pigmented antibiotic, was also abnormal; it appeared suddenly in agar cultures after 10 d incubation. Although aerial mycelium still formed, its appearance was markedly delayed. Whereas liquid cultures of the parent strain accumulated ppGpp, agar cultures accumulated only trace amounts. Instead, a substance characterized only as an unidentified HPLC peak accumulated intracellularly in the late growth phase, just before aerial mycelium formation and antibiotic production. This substance did not accumulate in mutant cells. It was found in S. lividans 66 and S. parvulus, but not in seven other Streptomyces species tested. The significance of these observations, and the relationship of the mutant to earlier rel isolates of Streptomyces is discussed.

  5. Membrane association of Wuhan nodavirus protein A is required for its ability to accumulate genomic RNA1 template.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yang; Wang, Zhaowei; Liu, Yongxiang; Qi, Nan; Miao, Meng; Si, Jie; Xiang, Xue; Cai, Dawei; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2013-05-10

    One common feature of positive-strand RNA viruses is the association of viral RNA and viral RNA replicase proteins with specific intracellular membranes to form RNA replication complexes. Wuhan nodavirus (WhNV) encodes protein A, which is the sole viral RNA replicase. Here, we showed that WhNV protein A closely associates with mitochondrial outer membranes and colocalizes with viral RNA replication sites. We further identified the transmembrane domains (N-terminal aa 33-64 and aa 212-254) of protein A for membrane association and mitochondrial localization. Moreover, we found that protein A accumulates genomic RNA by stabilizing the RNA. And our further investigation revealed that the ability of WhNV protein A to associate with membranes is closely linked with its ability for membrane recruitment and stabilization of viral genomic RNA templates. This study represents an advance toward understanding the mechanism of the RNA replication of WhNV and probably other nodaviruses. PMID:23490047

  6. How Integrated Management Strategies Promote Protein Quality of Cotton Embryos: High Levels of Soil Available N, N Assimilation and Protein Accumulation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, HongKun; Meng, YaLi; Chen, BingLin; Zhang, XingYue; Wang, YouHua; Zhao, WenQing; Zhou, ZhiGuo

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed is widely used as a source of ruminant feed and for industrial purposes. Therefore, there is a tremendous need to improve the nutritional value of cotton embryos. In this study, a conventional management (CM) and two integrated cotton management strategies (IMS1, IMS2) were performed at two soil fertility levels to study the relationships among soil N, N assimilation, embryonic protein accumulation and protein quality. The levels of proteins, essential amino acids, and semi-essential amino acids, especially those of glutamate, lysine, and methionine, were higher in IMS1 and IMS2 embryos than in CM embryos. These changes were significantly positively correlated with the soil-available N content, glutamine synthetase activity and peak value of protein accumulation rate and were negatively correlated with the free amino acid level. These results illustrated that integrated management strategies, especially the rates and timing of N application, raise the level of soil available N, which is beneficial for N assimilation in developing cotton embryos. The protein content was limited by the rate of protein accumulation rather than by the free amino acid content. The combination of target yield fertilization, a growth-driven N application schedule, a high plant density and the seedling raising with bio-organic fertilizer can substantially improve protein quality in cotton embryos, especially at a soil with low soil organic matter and total nitrogen. PMID:27532007

  7. How Integrated Management Strategies Promote Protein Quality of Cotton Embryos: High Levels of Soil Available N, N Assimilation and Protein Accumulation Rate.

    PubMed

    Yang, HongKun; Meng, YaLi; Chen, BingLin; Zhang, XingYue; Wang, YouHua; Zhao, WenQing; Zhou, ZhiGuo

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed is widely used as a source of ruminant feed and for industrial purposes. Therefore, there is a tremendous need to improve the nutritional value of cotton embryos. In this study, a conventional management (CM) and two integrated cotton management strategies (IMS1, IMS2) were performed at two soil fertility levels to study the relationships among soil N, N assimilation, embryonic protein accumulation and protein quality. The levels of proteins, essential amino acids, and semi-essential amino acids, especially those of glutamate, lysine, and methionine, were higher in IMS1 and IMS2 embryos than in CM embryos. These changes were significantly positively correlated with the soil-available N content, glutamine synthetase activity and peak value of protein accumulation rate and were negatively correlated with the free amino acid level. These results illustrated that integrated management strategies, especially the rates and timing of N application, raise the level of soil available N, which is beneficial for N assimilation in developing cotton embryos. The protein content was limited by the rate of protein accumulation rather than by the free amino acid content. The combination of target yield fertilization, a growth-driven N application schedule, a high plant density and the seedling raising with bio-organic fertilizer can substantially improve protein quality in cotton embryos, especially at a soil with low soil organic matter and total nitrogen. PMID:27532007

  8. How Integrated Management Strategies Promote Protein Quality of Cotton Embryos: High Levels of Soil Available N, N Assimilation and Protein Accumulation Rate.

    PubMed

    Yang, HongKun; Meng, YaLi; Chen, BingLin; Zhang, XingYue; Wang, YouHua; Zhao, WenQing; Zhou, ZhiGuo

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed is widely used as a source of ruminant feed and for industrial purposes. Therefore, there is a tremendous need to improve the nutritional value of cotton embryos. In this study, a conventional management (CM) and two integrated cotton management strategies (IMS1, IMS2) were performed at two soil fertility levels to study the relationships among soil N, N assimilation, embryonic protein accumulation and protein quality. The levels of proteins, essential amino acids, and semi-essential amino acids, especially those of glutamate, lysine, and methionine, were higher in IMS1 and IMS2 embryos than in CM embryos. These changes were significantly positively correlated with the soil-available N content, glutamine synthetase activity and peak value of protein accumulation rate and were negatively correlated with the free amino acid level. These results illustrated that integrated management strategies, especially the rates and timing of N application, raise the level of soil available N, which is beneficial for N assimilation in developing cotton embryos. The protein content was limited by the rate of protein accumulation rather than by the free amino acid content. The combination of target yield fertilization, a growth-driven N application schedule, a high plant density and the seedling raising with bio-organic fertilizer can substantially improve protein quality in cotton embryos, especially at a soil with low soil organic matter and total nitrogen.

  9. Zinc and/or cadmium accumulation in Gynura pseudochina (L.) DC. studied in vitro and the effect on crude protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitlertumpai, Natthawoot; Nakbanpote, Woranan; Sangdee, Aphidech; Thumanu, Kanjana; Nakai, Izumi; Hokura, Akiko

    2013-03-01

    Gynura pseudochina (L.) DC. is a zinc (Zn)/cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulative plant. The aim of this study was to examine the tolerance of G. pseudochina (L.) DC. for Zn and/or Cd accumulation and protein expression. An in vitro tissue culture system was used to control the environment and effects of the microorganisms. Treatments with higher Zn and Cd concentrations increased chlorosis and the accumulation of metals in the root and shoot. Cd treatment at low levels induced the growth of the plant, and the translocation factor was high. A dual treatment with Cd and Zn decreased the metals' toxicity and demonstrated the plant's proclivity to accumulate Cd. The SDS-PAGE and FT-IR analyses showed the effect of the metals' toxicity on protein expression and secondary structure. Moreover, using XAFS techniques, it was demonstrated that treatment with a high Zn concentration (100 mg l-1) resulted in tetrahedral coordination with mixed S/O ligation in the protein extract as compared with Znsbnd O coordination in the protein extract from the control plant cultured in the presence of trace levels of Zn (0.04 mg l-1). This research suggested that G. pseudochina (L.) DC. had properties to tolerate a high Zn and Cd concentration, related to the sulphur proteins.

  10. Accumulation and degradation of thiamin-binding protein and level of thiamin in wheat seeds during seed maturation and germination.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Katsumi; Nishida, Naoko; Adachi, Takashi; Ueda, Motoko; Mitsunaga, Toshio; Kawamura, Yukio

    2004-06-01

    Changes in the levels of thiamin-binding globulin and thiamin in wheat seeds during maturation and germination were studied. The thiamin-binding activity of the seed proteins increased with seed development after flowering. The thiamin content of the seeds also increased with development. Thiamin-binding activity decreased during seed germination. On the other hand, immunological analysis using an antibody directed against the thiamin-binding protein isolated from wheat seeds showed that the thiamin-binding globulin accumulated in the aleurone layer of the seeds during maturation, and then the protein was degraded and disappeared during seed germination. These results suggested that the thiamin-binding globulin of wheat seeds was synthesized and accumulated in the aleurone layer of the seeds with seed development, similar to the thiamin-binding albumin in sesame seeds, and that thiamin bound to the thiamin-binding globulin in the dormant wheat seeds for germ growth during germination.

  11. Possible role played by R1 protein in starch accumulation in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seedlings under phosphate deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Lilia; Coello, Patricia; Martínez-Barajas, Eleazar

    2005-09-01

    The effect of phosphate (Pi) deficiency on starch accumulation was studied in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). After 3 weeks of Pi deprivation total Pi concentration in root and shoot was reduced by 68% and 42%, respectively; however, only shoot growth was affected. In leaves, Pi deprivation induced glucose, fructose and starch accumulation. Pi deficiency did not affect starch synthesis, but it reduced its mobilization during the dark period. At the same time, starch produced by Pi deficient plants have fewer Pi bound and was also less susceptible to beta-amylase hydrolysis. R1 protein is the protein responsible of phosphorylating C3 and C6 glucosyl residues of the polyglucan, increasing the hydration capacity and the interaction with amylolytic enzymes. Pi deprivation did not change the amount of R1 protein detected in total extracts but decreased its association with starch granules.

  12. The molecular chaperone TRiC/CCT binds to the Trp-Asp 40 (WD40) repeat protein WDR68 and promotes its folding, protein kinase DYRK1A binding, and nuclear accumulation.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Yoshihiko; Shibata, Takeshi; Aoshima, Masato; Tsubata, Takuichi; Nishida, Eisuke

    2014-11-28

    Trp-Asp (WD) repeat protein 68 (WDR68) is an evolutionarily conserved WD40 repeat protein that binds to several proteins, including dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated protein kinase (DYRK1A), MAPK/ERK kinase kinase 1 (MEKK1), and Cullin4-damage-specific DNA-binding protein 1 (CUL4-DDB1). WDR68 affects multiple and diverse physiological functions, such as controlling anthocyanin synthesis in plants, tissue growth in insects, and craniofacial development in vertebrates. However, the biochemical basis and the regulatory mechanism of WDR68 activity remain largely unknown. To better understand the cellular function of WDR68, here we have isolated and identified cellular WDR68 binding partners using a phosphoproteomic approach. More than 200 cellular proteins with wide varieties of biochemical functions were identified as WDR68-binding protein candidates. Eight T-complex protein 1 (TCP1) subunits comprising the molecular chaperone TCP1 ring complex/chaperonin-containing TCP1 (TRiC/CCT) were identified as major WDR68-binding proteins, and phosphorylation sites in both WDR68 and TRiC/CCT were identified. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the binding between TRiC/CCT and WDR68. Computer-aided structural analysis suggested that WDR68 forms a seven-bladed β-propeller ring. Experiments with a series of deletion mutants in combination with the structural modeling showed that three of the seven β-propeller blades of WDR68 are essential and sufficient for TRiC/CCT binding. Knockdown of cellular TRiC/CCT by siRNA caused an abnormal WDR68 structure and led to reduction of its DYRK1A-binding activity. Concomitantly, nuclear accumulation of WDR68 was suppressed by the knockdown of TRiC/CCT, and WDR68 formed cellular aggregates when overexpressed in the TRiC/CCT-deficient cells. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the molecular chaperone TRiC/CCT is essential for correct protein folding, DYRK1A binding, and nuclear accumulation of WDR68. PMID

  13. Electron beam irradiation induces abnormal development and the stabilization of p53 protein of American serpentine leafminer, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Hyun-Na; Yun, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Changmann; Kim, Gil-Hah

    2012-01-01

    The American serpentine leafminer fly, Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), is one of the most destructive polyphagous pests worldwide. In this study, we determined electron beam doses for inhibition of normal development of the leaf miner and investigated the effect of electron beam irradiation on DNA damage and p53 stability. Eggs (0-24 h old), larvae (2nd instar), puparia (0-24 h old after pupariation) and adults (24 h after emergence) were irradiated with increasing doses of electron beam irradiation (six levels between 30 and 200 Gy). At 150 Gy, the number of adults that developed from irradiated eggs, larvae and puparia was lower than in the untreated control. Fecundity and egg hatchability decreased depending on the doses applied. Reciprocal crosses between irradiated and unirradiated flies demonstrated that males were more radiotolerant than females. Adult longevity was not affected in all stages. The levels of DNA damage in L. trifolii adults were evaluated using the alkaline comet assay. Our results indicate that electron beam irradiation increased levels of DNA damage in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, low doses of electron beam irradiation led to the rapid appearance of p53 protein within 6 h; however, it decreased after exposure to high doses (150 Gy and 200 Gy). These results suggest that electron beam irradiation induced not only abnormal development and reproduction but also p53 stability caused by DNA damage in L. trifolii. We conclude that a minimum dose of 150 Gy should be sufficient for female sterilization of L. trifolii.

  14. Meiosis I arrest abnormalities lead to severe oligozoospermia in meiosis 1 arresting protein (M1ap)-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Arango, Nelson Alexander; Li, Li; Dabir, Deepa; Nicolau, Fotini; Pieretti-Vanmarcke, Rafael; Koehler, Carla; McCarrey, John R; Lu, Naifang; Donahoe, Patricia K

    2013-03-01

    Meiosis 1 arresting protein (M1ap) is a novel vertebrate gene expressed exclusively in germ cells of the embryonic ovary and the adult testis. In male mice, M1ap expression, which is present from spermatogonia to secondary spermatocytes, is evolutionarily conserved and has a specific spatial and temporal pattern suggestive of a role during germ cell development. To test its function, mice deficient in M1ap were created. Whereas females had histologically normal ovaries, males exhibited reduced testicular size and a myriad of tubular defects, which led to severe oligozoospermia and infertility. Although some germ cells arrested at the zygotene/pachytene stages, most cells advanced to metaphase I before arresting and entering apoptosis. Cells that reached metaphase I were unable to properly align their chromosomes at the metaphase plate due to abnormal chromosome synapses and failure to form crossover foci. Depending on the state of tubular degeneration, all germ cells, with the exemption of spermatogonia, disappeared; with further deterioration, tubules displaying only Sertoli cells reminiscent of Sertoli cell-only syndrome in humans were observed. Our results uncovered an essential role for M1ap as a novel germ cell gene not previously implicated in male germ cell development and suggest that mutations in M1AP could account for some cases of nonobstructive oligozoospermia in men.

  15. Low expression of secreted frizzled-related protein 2 and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in aggressive nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    WU, YOUTU; BAI, JIWEI; HONG, LINCHUAN; LIU, CHUNHUI; YU, SHENGYUAN; YU, GUOQIANG; ZHANG, YAZHUO

    2016-01-01

    The identification of a specific molecular marker for aggressiveness of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) is urgently required in order to guide the clinical diagnosis and treatment of NFPAs. In the present study, low expression of secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (sFRP2) in NFPAs was demonstrated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. The results confirmed an abnormal accumulation of free β-catenin in the nuclei of NFPAs, which is the core step for the activation of the Wnt canonical signaling pathway. Furthermore, cyclin D1 and c-Myc, the downstream proteins of the Wnt canonical signaling pathway, were overexpressed in aggressive NFPAs. These findings demonstrated the activation of the Wnt canonical signaling pathway in aggressive NFPAs. In addition, sFRP2 expression was observed to be inversely correlated to the aggressiveness of NFPAs. Therefore, sFRP2 may act as a tumor suppressor through modulation of the cellular cytosolic pool of β-catenin in NFPAs. Furthermore, the expression of sFRP2 may serve as a biomarker for NFPAs aggressiveness and prognosis. PMID:27347125

  16. Metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by inhibiting FOXO1-mediated transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 4

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jun; Ren, Pingping; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xing Li; Chen, Li; Shen, Ying H.

    2010-02-26

    Objective: The accumulation of lipids in macrophages contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Strategies to reduce lipid accumulation in macrophages may have therapeutic potential for preventing and treating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The antidiabetic drug metformin has been reported to reduce lipid accumulation in adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of metformin on lipid accumulation in macrophages and investigated the mechanisms involved. Methods and results: We observed that metformin significantly reduced palmitic acid (PA)-induced intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages. Metformin promoted the expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT-1), while reduced the expression of fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) which was involved in PA-induced lipid accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that metformin regulates FABP4 expression at the transcriptional level. We identified forkhead transcription factor FOXO1 as a positive regulator of FABP4 expression. Inhibiting FOXO1 expression with FOXO1 siRNA significantly reduced basal and PA-induced FABP4 expression. Overexpression of wild-type FOXO1 and constitutively active FOXO1 significantly increased FABP4 expression, whereas dominant negative FOXO1 dramatically decreased FABP4 expression. Metformin reduced FABP4 expression by promoting FOXO1 nuclear exclusion and subsequently inhibiting its activity. Conclusions: Taken together, these results suggest that metformin reduces lipid accumulation in macrophages by repressing FOXO1-mediated FABP4 transcription. Thus, metformin may have a protective effect against lipid accumulation in macrophages and may serve as a therapeutic agent for preventing and treating atherosclerosis in metabolic syndrome.

  17. Differentially Accumulated Proteins in Coffea arabica Seeds during Perisperm Tissue Development and Their Relationship to Coffee Grain Size.

    PubMed

    Alves, Leonardo Cardoso; Magalhães, Diogo Maciel De; Labate, Mônica Teresa Veneziano; Guidetti-Gonzalez, Simone; Labate, Carlos Alberto; Domingues, Douglas Silva; Sera, Tumoru; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves; Pereira, Luiz Filipe Protasio

    2016-02-24

    Coffee is one of the most important crops for developing countries. Coffee classification for trading is related to several factors, including grain size. Larger grains have higher market value then smaller ones. Coffee grain size is determined by the development of the perisperm, a transient tissue with a highly active metabolism, which is replaced by the endosperm during seed development. In this study, a proteomics approach was used to identify differentially accumulated proteins during perisperm development in two genotypes with regular (IPR59) and large grain sizes (IPR59-Graudo) in three developmental stages. Twenty-four spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS, corresponding to 15 proteins. We grouped them into categories as follows: storage (11S), methionine metabolism, cell division and elongation, metabolic processes (mainly redox), and energy. Our data enabled us to show that perisperm metabolism in IPR59 occurs at a higher rate than in IPR59-Graudo, which is supported by the accumulation of energy and detoxification-related proteins. We hypothesized that grain and fruit size divergences between the two coffee genotypes may be due to the comparatively earlier triggering of seed development processes in IPR59. We also demonstrated for the first time that the 11S protein is accumulated in the coffee perisperm.

  18. Differentially Accumulated Proteins in Coffea arabica Seeds during Perisperm Tissue Development and Their Relationship to Coffee Grain Size.

    PubMed

    Alves, Leonardo Cardoso; Magalhães, Diogo Maciel De; Labate, Mônica Teresa Veneziano; Guidetti-Gonzalez, Simone; Labate, Carlos Alberto; Domingues, Douglas Silva; Sera, Tumoru; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves; Pereira, Luiz Filipe Protasio

    2016-02-24

    Coffee is one of the most important crops for developing countries. Coffee classification for trading is related to several factors, including grain size. Larger grains have higher market value then smaller ones. Coffee grain size is determined by the development of the perisperm, a transient tissue with a highly active metabolism, which is replaced by the endosperm during seed development. In this study, a proteomics approach was used to identify differentially accumulated proteins during perisperm development in two genotypes with regular (IPR59) and large grain sizes (IPR59-Graudo) in three developmental stages. Twenty-four spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS, corresponding to 15 proteins. We grouped them into categories as follows: storage (11S), methionine metabolism, cell division and elongation, metabolic processes (mainly redox), and energy. Our data enabled us to show that perisperm metabolism in IPR59 occurs at a higher rate than in IPR59-Graudo, which is supported by the accumulation of energy and detoxification-related proteins. We hypothesized that grain and fruit size divergences between the two coffee genotypes may be due to the comparatively earlier triggering of seed development processes in IPR59. We also demonstrated for the first time that the 11S protein is accumulated in the coffee perisperm. PMID:26809209

  19. Accumulation of p21 proteins at DNA damage sites independent of p53 and core NHEJ factors following irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Manabu; Yutoku, Yasutomo; Koike, Aki

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} p21 accumulated rapidly at laser-irradiated sites via its C-terminal region. {yields} p21 colocalized with the DSB marker {gamma}-H2AX and the DSB sensor Ku80. {yields} Accumulation of p21 is dependent on PCNA, but not p53 and the NHEJ core factors. {yields} Accumulation activity of p21 was conserved among human and animal cells. {yields} p21 is a useful tool as a detection marker of DNA damaged sites. -- Abstract: The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21 plays key roles in p53-dependent DNA-damage responses, i.e., cell cycle checkpoints, senescence, or apoptosis. p21 might also play a role in DNA repair. p21 foci arise at heavy-ion-irradiated DNA-double-strand break (DSB) sites, which are mainly repaired by nonhomologous DNA-end-joining (NHEJ). However, no mechanisms of p21 accumulation at double-strand break (DSB) sites have been clarified in detail. Recent works indicate that Ku70 and Ku80 are essential for the accumulation of other NHEJ core factors, e.g., DNA-PKcs, XRCC4 and XLF, and other DNA damage response factors, e.g., BRCA1. Here, we show that p21 foci arise at laser-irradiated sites in cells from various tissues from various species. The accumulation of EGFP-p21 was detected in not only normal cells, but also transformed or cancer cells. Our results also showed that EGFP-p21 accumulated rapidly at irradiated sites, and colocalized with the DSB marker {gamma}-H2AX and with the DSB sensor protein Ku80. On the other hand, the accumulation occurred in Ku70-, Ku80-, or DNA-PKcs-deficient cell lines and in human papillomavirus 18-positive cells, whereas the p21 mutant without the PCNA-binding region (EGFP-p21(1-146)) failed to accumulate at the irradiated sites. These findings suggest that the accumulation of p21, but not functional p53 and the NHEJ core factors, is dependent on PCNA. These findings also suggest that the accumulation activity of p21 at DNA damaged sites is conserved among human and animal cells, and p21 is a useful

  20. Convergent Signaling Pathways Controlled by LRP1 (Receptor-related Protein 1) Cytoplasmic and Extracellular Domains Limit Cellular Cholesterol Accumulation.

    PubMed

    El Asmar, Zeina; Terrand, Jérome; Jenty, Marion; Host, Lionel; Mlih, Mohamed; Zerr, Aurélie; Justiniano, Hélène; Matz, Rachel L; Boudier, Christian; Scholler, Estelle; Garnier, Jean-Marie; Bertaccini, Diego; Thiersé, Danièle; Schaeffer, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Herz, Joachim; Bruban, Véronique; Boucher, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a ubiquitously expressed cell surface receptor that protects from intracellular cholesterol accumulation. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here we show that the extracellular (α) chain of LRP1 mediates TGFβ-induced enhancement of Wnt5a, which limits intracellular cholesterol accumulation by inhibiting cholesterol biosynthesis and by promoting cholesterol export. Moreover, we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic (β) chain of LRP1 suffices to limit cholesterol accumulation in LRP1(-/-) cells. Through binding of Erk2 to the second of its carboxyl-terminal NPXY motifs, LRP1 β-chain positively regulates the expression of ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and of neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (NCEH1). These results highlight the unexpected functions of LRP1 and the canonical Wnt5a pathway and new therapeutic potential in cholesterol-associated disorders including cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Dysferlin and other non-red cell proteins accumulate in the red cell membrane of Diamond-Blackfan Anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Pesciotta, Esther N; Sriswasdi, Sira; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Speicher, David W; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a congenital anemia usually caused by diverse mutations in ribosomal proteins. Although the genetics of DBA are well characterized, the mechanisms that lead to macrocytic anemia remain unclear. We systematically analyzed the proteomes of red blood cell membranes from multiple DBA patients to determine whether abnormalities in protein translation or erythropoiesis contribute to the observed macrocytosis or alterations in the mature red blood cell membrane. In depth proteome analysis of red cell membranes enabled highly reproducible identification and quantitative comparisons of 1100 or more proteins. These comparisons revealed clear differences between red cell membrane proteomes in DBA patients and healthy controls that were consistent across DBA patients with different ribosomal gene mutations. Proteins exhibiting changes in abundance included those known to be increased in DBA such as fetal hemoglobin and a number of proteins not normally found in mature red cell membranes, including proteins involved in the major histocompatibility complex class I pathway. Most striking was the presence of dysferlin in the red blood cell membranes of DBA patients but absent in healthy controls. Immunoblot validation using red cell membranes isolated from additional DBA patients and healthy controls confirmed a distinct membrane protein signature specific to patients with DBA.

  2. Dysferlin and Other Non-Red Cell Proteins Accumulate in the Red Cell Membrane of Diamond-Blackfan Anemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pesciotta, Esther N.; Sriswasdi, Sira; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Speicher, David W.; Mason, Philip J.; Bessler, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a congenital anemia usually caused by diverse mutations in ribosomal proteins. Although the genetics of DBA are well characterized, the mechanisms that lead to macrocytic anemia remain unclear. We systematically analyzed the proteomes of red blood cell membranes from multiple DBA patients to determine whether abnormalities in protein translation or erythropoiesis contribute to the observed macrocytosis or alterations in the mature red blood cell membrane. In depth proteome analysis of red cell membranes enabled highly reproducible identification and quantitative comparisons of 1100 or more proteins. These comparisons revealed clear differences between red cell membrane proteomes in DBA patients and healthy controls that were consistent across DBA patients with different ribosomal gene mutations. Proteins exhibiting changes in abundance included those known to be increased in DBA such as fetal hemoglobin and a number of proteins not normally found in mature red cell membranes, including proteins involved in the major histocompatibility complex class I pathway. Most striking was the presence of dysferlin in the red blood cell membranes of DBA patients but absent in healthy controls. Immunoblot validation using red cell membranes isolated from additional DBA patients and healthy controls confirmed a distinct membrane protein signature specific to patients with DBA. PMID:24454878

  3. Endogenous salicylic acid levels correlate with accumulation of pathogenesis-related proteins and virus resistance in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Yalpani, N.; Shulaev, V.; Raskin, I. )

    1993-07-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is hypothesized to be an endogenous regulator of local and systemic disease resistance and an inducer of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins among plants. High levels of PR proteins have been observed in an uninoculated amphidiploid hybrid of Nicotiana glutinosa [times] N. debneyi, which is highly resistant to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Fluoresence, UV, and mass spectral analysis established that the levels of SA in healthy N. glutinosa [times] N. debneyi leaves were 30 times greater than in N. tabacum [open quotes]Xanthi-nc[close quotes] tobacco, which does not constitutively express PR proteins and is less resistant to TMV. Upon TMV-inoculation SA levels increased at least 70-fold leaves of Xanthi-nc but role only slightly in the hybrid. Phloem exudates of N. glutinosa [times] N. debneyi contained at least 500 times more SA than those of Xanthi-nc. SA treatment caused the appearance of PR-1 protein in Xanthi-nc but did not affect constitutively high levels of PR-1 protein in N. glutinosa [times] N. debneyi. In contrast to Xanthi-nc tobacco, TMV-inoculated N. glutinosa [times] N. debneyi kept at 32 C accumulated more than 0.5 [mu]g SA/g fresh weight, maintained high levels of PR proteins, and developed a hypersensitive response to TMV. PR proteins have previously been shown to accumulate in the lower leaves of healthy, flowering Xanthi-nc tobacco, which exhibited increased resistance to TMV. These developmentally induced increases in resistance and PR-1 proteins positively correlated with tissue levels of SA. These results affirm the regulatory role of SA in disease resistance and PR protein production. 31 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. The Citrus transcription factor, CitERF13, regulates citric acid accumulation via a protein-protein interaction with the vacuolar proton pump, CitVHA-c4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shao-jia; Yin, Xue-ren; Xie, Xiu-lan; Allan, Andrew C.; Ge, Hang; Shen, Shu-ling; Chen, Kun-song

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are essential to fruit flavor. The vacuolar H+ transporting adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase) plays an important role in organic acid transport and accumulation. However, less is known of V-ATPase interacting proteins and their relationship with organic acid accumulation. The relationship between V-ATPase and citric acid was investigated, using the citrus tangerine varieties ‘Ordinary Ponkan (OPK)’ and an early maturing mutant ‘Zaoshu Ponkan (ZPK)’. Five V-ATPase genes (CitVHA) were predicted as important to citric acid accumulation. Among the genes, CitVHA-c4 was observed, using a yeast two-hybrid screen, to interact at the protein level with an ethylene response factor, CitERF13. This was verified using bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. A similar interaction was also observed between Arabidopsis AtERF017 (a CitERF13 homolog) and AtVHA-c4 (a CitVHA-c4 homolog). A synergistic effect on citric acid levels was observed between V-ATPase proteins and interacting ERFs when analyzed using transient over-expression in tobacco and Arabidopsis mutants. Furthermore, the transcript abundance of CitERF13 was concomitant with CitVHA-c4. CitERF13 or AtERF017 over-expression leads to significant citric acid accumulation. This accumulation was abolished in an AtVHA-c4 mutant background. ERF-VHA interactions appear to be involved in citric acid accumulation, which was observed in both citrus and Arabidopsis. PMID:26837571

  5. Influence of Host Chloroplast Proteins on Tobacco mosaic virus Accumulation and Intercellular Movement1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Sumana; Folimonova, Svetlana Y.; Cole, Anthony B.; Ballard, Kimberly D.; Lei, Zhentian; Watson, Bonnie S.; Sumner, Lloyd W.; Nelson, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) forms dense cytoplasmic bodies containing replication-associated proteins (virus replication complexes [VRCs]) upon infection. To identify host proteins that interact with individual viral components of VRCs or VRCs in toto, we isolated viral replicase- and VRC-enriched fractions from TMV-infected Nicotiana tabacum plants. Two host proteins in enriched fractions, ATP-synthase γ-subunit (AtpC) and Rubisco activase (RCA) were identified by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Through pull-down analysis, RCA bound predominantly to the region between the methyltransferase and helicase domains of the TMV replicase. Tobamovirus, but not Cucumber mosaic virus or Potato virus X, infection of N. tabacum plants resulted in 50% reductions in Rca and AtpC messenger RNA levels. To investigate the role of these host proteins in TMV accumulation and plant defense, we used a Tobacco rattle virus vector to silence these genes in Nicotiana benthamiana plants prior to challenge with TMV expressing green fluorescent protein. TMV-induced fluorescent lesions on Rca- or AtpC-silenced leaves were, respectively, similar or twice the size of those on leaves expressing these genes. Silencing Rca and AtpC did not influence the spread of Tomato bushy stunt virus and Potato virus X. In AtpC- and Rca-silenced leaves TMV accumulation and pathogenicity were greatly enhanced, suggesting a role of both host-encoded proteins in a defense response against TMV. In addition, silencing these host genes altered the phenotype of the TMV infection foci and VRCs, yielding foci with concentric fluorescent rings and dramatically more but smaller VRCs. The concentric rings occurred through renewed virus accumulation internal to the infection front. PMID:23096159

  6. A protein kinase binds the C-terminal domain of the readthrough protein of Turnip yellows virus and regulates virus accumulation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Boissinot, Sylvaine; Chapuis, Sophie; Gereige, Dalya; Rastegar, Maryam; Erdinger, Monique; Revers, Frédéric; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Brault, Véronique

    2015-12-01

    Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a phloem-limited virus, encodes a 74kDa protein known as the readthrough protein (RT) involved in virus movement. We show here that a TuYV mutant deleted of the C-terminal part of the RT protein (TuYV-∆RTCter) was affected in long-distance trafficking in a host-specific manner. By using the C-terminal domain of the RT protein as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a phloem cDNA library from Arabidopsis thaliana we identified the calcineurin B-like protein-interacting protein kinase-7 (AtCIPK7). Transient expression of a GFP:CIPK7 fusion protein in virus-inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves led to local increase of wild-type TuYV accumulation, but not that of TuYV-∆RTCter. Surprisingly, elevated virus titer in inoculated leaves did not result in higher TuYV accumulation in systemic leaves, which indicates that virus long-distance movement was not affected. Since GFP:CIPK7 was localized in or near plasmodesmata, CIPK7 could negatively regulate TuYV export from infected cells. PMID:26402374

  7. A protein kinase binds the C-terminal domain of the readthrough protein of Turnip yellows virus and regulates virus accumulation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Boissinot, Sylvaine; Chapuis, Sophie; Gereige, Dalya; Rastegar, Maryam; Erdinger, Monique; Revers, Frédéric; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Brault, Véronique

    2015-12-01

    Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a phloem-limited virus, encodes a 74kDa protein known as the readthrough protein (RT) involved in virus movement. We show here that a TuYV mutant deleted of the C-terminal part of the RT protein (TuYV-∆RTCter) was affected in long-distance trafficking in a host-specific manner. By using the C-terminal domain of the RT protein as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a phloem cDNA library from Arabidopsis thaliana we identified the calcineurin B-like protein-interacting protein kinase-7 (AtCIPK7). Transient expression of a GFP:CIPK7 fusion protein in virus-inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves led to local increase of wild-type TuYV accumulation, but not that of TuYV-∆RTCter. Surprisingly, elevated virus titer in inoculated leaves did not result in higher TuYV accumulation in systemic leaves, which indicates that virus long-distance movement was not affected. Since GFP:CIPK7 was localized in or near plasmodesmata, CIPK7 could negatively regulate TuYV export from infected cells.

  8. Transgenic soya bean seeds accumulating β-carotene exhibit the collateral enhancements of oleate and protein content traits.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Monica A; Parrott, Wayne A; Hildebrand, David F; Berg, R Howard; Cooksey, Amanda; Pendarvis, Ken; He, Yonghua; McCarthy, Fiona; Herman, Eliot M

    2015-05-01

    Transgenic soya bean (Glycine max) plants overexpressing a seed-specific bacterial phytoene synthase gene from Pantoea ananatis modified to target to plastids accumulated 845 μg β carotene g(-1) dry seed weight with a desirable 12:1 ratio of β to α. The β carotene accumulating seeds exhibited a shift in oil composition increasing oleic acid with a concomitant decrease in linoleic acid and an increase in seed protein content by at least 4% (w/w). Elevated β-carotene accumulating soya bean cotyledons contain 40% the amount of abscisic acid compared to nontransgenic cotyledons. Proteomic and nontargeted metabolomic analysis of the mid-maturation β-carotene cotyledons compared to the nontransgenic did not reveal any significant differences that would account for the altered phenotypes of both elevated oleate and protein content. Transcriptomic analysis, confirmed by RT-PCR, revealed a number of significant differences in ABA-responsive transcripton factor gene expression in the crtB transgenics compared to nontransgenic cotyledons of the same maturation stage. The altered seed composition traits seem to be attributed to altered ABA hormone levels varying transcription factor expression. The elevated β-carotene, oleic acid and protein traits in the β-carotene soya beans confer a substantial additive nutritional quality to soya beans.

  9. The Thylakoid Membrane Protein CGL160 Supports CF1CF0 ATP Synthase Accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Fristedt, Rikard; Martins, Nádia Figueira; Strenkert, Daniela; Clarke, Cornelia A.; Suchoszek, Monika; Thiele, Wolfram; Schöttler, Mark Aurel; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2015-01-01

    The biogenesis of the major thylakoid protein complexes of the photosynthetic apparatus requires auxiliary proteins supporting individual assembly steps. Here, we identify a plant lineage specific gene, CGL160, whose homolog, atp1, co-occurs with ATP synthase subunits in an operon-like arrangement in many cyanobacteria. Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertion mutants, which no longer accumulate the nucleus-encoded CGL160 protein, accumulate less than 25% of wild-type levels of the chloroplast ATP synthase. Severe cosmetic or growth phenotypes result under either short day or fluctuating light growth conditions, respectively, but this is ameliorated under long day constant light growth conditions where the growth, ATP synthase activity and photosynthetic electron transport of the mutants are less affected. Accumulation of other photosynthetic complexes is largely unaffected in cgl160 mutants, suggesting that CGL160 is a specific assembly or stability factor for the CF1CF0 complex. CGL160 is not found in the mature assembled complex but it does interact specifically with subunits of ATP synthase, predominantly those in the extrinsic CF1 sub-complex. We suggest therefore that it may facilitate the assembly of CF1 into the holocomplex. PMID:25835989

  10. Abnormal Expression of Urea Transporter Protein in a Rat Model of Hepatorenal Syndrome Induced by Succinylated Gelatin

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weiping; Qi, Xiaolong; Zhang, Wenhui; Zhao, C Yingying; Cao, Yan; Wang, Fei; Yang, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a serious complication of advanced chronic liver disease. Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) occurs with dysfunction of multiple organs when abdominal pressure increases. Here, we report on a novel model of ACS with ascites and a model of HRS in rats to observe the urea transporter protein (UT) expression in the 2 models. Material/Methods A liver cirrhosis model was induced by CCl4. After changes of liver histopathology were observed, rats were injected intraperitoneally with succinylated gelatin to establish a model of ACS and HRS. Then, changes in BUN, Cr, and renal histopathology were detected. Moreover, the UT in ACS and HRS were also quantified. Results The surfaces of liver in the cirrhotic group became coarse, with visible small nodules and became yellow and greasy. The normal structure of the hepatic lobules were destroyed, and hyperplasia of fibrotic tissue and pseudo-lobe was observed. The levels of BUN and Cr were significantly increased in rats suffering from ACS and HRS, respectively, compared to their control groups. In addition, the mRNA levels of UT-A2 and UT-A3 decreased in rats with HRS compared to cirrhotic rats. However, there was no significant difference between the mRNA levels of UT-A2, UT-A3, and UT-B in rats with ACS vs. normal rats. Conclusions It is feasible to model ACS in rats by injecting succinylated gelatin into the abdominal cavity. Increasing the intra-abdominal pressure by succinylated gelatin is also a novel approach for modeling HRS in cirrhotic rats. Compared with control rats, there is an abnormal mRNA expression of UT in ACS rats and HRS rats. PMID:26414230

  11. The actin-binding protein Lasp promotes Oskar accumulation at the posterior pole of the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Ritsuko; Jenny, Andreas; Curado, Silvia; Pellis-van Berkel, Wendy; Ephrussi, Anne

    2009-01-01

    During Drosophila oogenesis, Oskar mRNA is transported to the posterior pole of the oocyte, where it is locally translated and induces germ-plasm assembly. Oskar protein recruits all of the components necessary for the establishment of posterior embryonic structures and of the germline. Tight localization of Oskar is essential, as its ectopic expression causes severe patterning defects. Here, we show that the Drosophila homolog of mammalian Lasp1 protein, an actin-binding protein previously implicated in cell migration in vertebrate cell culture, contributes to the accumulation of Oskar protein at the posterior pole of the embryo. The reduced number of primordial germ cells in embryos derived from lasp mutant females can be rescued only with a form of Lasp that is capable of interacting with Oskar, revealing the physiological importance of the Lasp-Oskar interaction.

  12. Subcellular Clearance and Accumulation of Huntington Disease Protein: A Mini-Review.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Hong, Yan; Li, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Shi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant, progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in the N-terminal region of mutant huntingtin (mHtt). As a result, mHtt forms aggregates that are abundant in the nuclei and processes of neuronal cells. Although the roles of mHtt aggregates are still debated, the formation of aggregates points to deficient clearance of mHtt in brain cells. Since the accumulation of mHtt is a prerequisite for its neurotoxicity, exploring the mechanisms for mHtt accumulation and clearance would advance our understanding of HD pathogenesis and help us develop treatments for HD. We know that the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy play important roles in clearing mHtt; however, how mHtt preferentially accumulates in neuronal nuclei and processes remains unclear. Studying the clearance of mHtt in neuronal cells is a challenge because neurons are morphologically and functionally polarized, which means the turnover of mHtt may be distinct in different cellular compartments. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge about the clearance and accumulation of mHtt and strategies examining mHtt clearance and accumulation in different subcellular regions. PMID:27147961

  13. Myeloid Differentiation Protein-2–Dependent and –Independent Neutrophil Accumulation during Escherichia coli Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shanshan; Zemans, Rachel L.; Young, Scott K.; Worthen, G. Scott; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia remains a serious disease. Pattern recognition receptors play an integral role in neutrophil accumulation during pneumonia. Although myeloid differentiation protein (MD)-2 has been recognized as a key molecule for LPS signaling, the role of MD-2 in neutrophil accumulation in the lung during bacterial infection has not been explored. Here, we investigate the role of MD-2 in Escherichia coli LPS–induced lung inflammation and E. coli–induced pneumonia. LPS-induced CD14-independent neutrophil accumulation was abolished in CD14/MD-2−/− mice. MD-2−/− mice challenged with LPS displayed attenuated neutrophil influx, NF-κB activation, cytokine/chemokine expression, and lung histopathology. MD-2−/− mice transplanted with MD-2+/+ bone marrow demonstrated decreased neutrophil influx and cytokine/chemokine expression in the lungs when challenged by LPS. MD-2−/− mice infected with E. coli demonstrated reduced neutrophil influx and cytokine/chemokine expression in the lungs, whereas heat-killed E. coli did not induce either neutrophil accumulation or cytokine/chemokine expression in MD-2−/− mice infected with E. coli. Furthermore, MD-2−/− mice displayed increased bacterial burden in the lungs and enhanced bacterial dissemination. Toll-like receptor (TLR)-5−/− mice infected with E. coli exhibited attenuated neutrophil accumulation, whereas MD-2/TLR5−/− mice inoculated with E. coli showed further attenuated neutrophil influx and impaired bacterial clearance. Taken together, these new findings demonstrate: (1) the important role of MD-2 in the CD14-independent LPS-mediated cascade of neutrophil influx; (2) the relative importance of bone marrow– and non–bone marrow cell–derived MD-2 in LPS-induced inflammation; and (3) the essential role of MD-2–dependent and MD-2–independent (TLR5) signaling in E. coli–induced neutrophil accumulation and pulmonary host defense. PMID:18988922

  14. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Rapid and Highly Sensitive Detection of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Abnormal Prion Protein on Steel Surfaces by Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification: Application to Prion Decontamination Studies.

    PubMed

    Belondrade, Maxime; Nicot, Simon; Béringue, Vincent; Coste, Joliette; Lehmann, Sylvain; Bougard, Daisy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in the population remains uncertain, although it has been estimated that 1 in 2000 people in the United Kingdom are positive for abnormal prion protein (PrPTSE) by a recent survey of archived appendix tissues. The prominent lymphotropism of vCJD prions raises the possibility that some surgical procedures may be at risk of iatrogenic vCJD transmission in healthcare facilities. It is therefore vital that decontamination procedures applied to medical devices before their reprocessing are thoroughly validated. A current limitation is the lack of a rapid model permissive to human prions. Here, we developed a prion detection assay based on protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) technology combined with stainless-steel wire surfaces as carriers of prions (Surf-PMCA). This assay allowed the specific detection of minute quantities (10-8 brain dilution) of either human vCJD or ovine scrapie PrPTSE adsorbed onto a single steel wire, within a two week timeframe. Using Surf-PMCA we evaluated the performance of several reference and commercially available prion-specific decontamination procedures. Surprisingly, we found the efficiency of several marketed reagents to remove human vCJD PrPTSE was lower than expected. Overall, our results demonstrate that Surf-PMCA can be used as a rapid and ultrasensitive assay for the detection of human vCJD PrPTSE adsorbed onto a metallic surface, therefore facilitating the development and validation of decontamination procedures against human prions. PMID:26800081

  16. Rapid and Highly Sensitive Detection of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Abnormal Prion Protein on Steel Surfaces by Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification: Application to Prion Decontamination Studies.

    PubMed

    Belondrade, Maxime; Nicot, Simon; Béringue, Vincent; Coste, Joliette; Lehmann, Sylvain; Bougard, Daisy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in the population remains uncertain, although it has been estimated that 1 in 2000 people in the United Kingdom are positive for abnormal prion protein (PrPTSE) by a recent survey of archived appendix tissues. The prominent lymphotropism of vCJD prions raises the possibility that some surgical procedures may be at risk of iatrogenic vCJD transmission in healthcare facilities. It is therefore vital that decontamination procedures applied to medical devices before their reprocessing are thoroughly validated. A current limitation is the lack of a rapid model permissive to human prions. Here, we developed a prion detection assay based on protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) technology combined with stainless-steel wire surfaces as carriers of prions (Surf-PMCA). This assay allowed the specific detection of minute quantities (10-8 brain dilution) of either human vCJD or ovine scrapie PrPTSE adsorbed onto a single steel wire, within a two week timeframe. Using Surf-PMCA we evaluated the performance of several reference and commercially available prion-specific decontamination procedures. Surprisingly, we found the efficiency of several marketed reagents to remove human vCJD PrPTSE was lower than expected. Overall, our results demonstrate that Surf-PMCA can be used as a rapid and ultrasensitive assay for the detection of human vCJD PrPTSE adsorbed onto a metallic surface, therefore facilitating the development and validation of decontamination procedures against human prions.

  17. Rapid and Highly Sensitive Detection of Variant Creutzfeldt - Jakob Disease Abnormal Prion Protein on Steel Surfaces by Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification: Application to Prion Decontamination Studies

    PubMed Central

    Belondrade, Maxime; Nicot, Simon; Béringue, Vincent; Coste, Joliette; Lehmann, Sylvain; Bougard, Daisy

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in the population remains uncertain, although it has been estimated that 1 in 2000 people in the United Kingdom are positive for abnormal prion protein (PrPTSE) by a recent survey of archived appendix tissues. The prominent lymphotropism of vCJD prions raises the possibility that some surgical procedures may be at risk of iatrogenic vCJD transmission in healthcare facilities. It is therefore vital that decontamination procedures applied to medical devices before their reprocessing are thoroughly validated. A current limitation is the lack of a rapid model permissive to human prions. Here, we developed a prion detection assay based on protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) technology combined with stainless-steel wire surfaces as carriers of prions (Surf-PMCA). This assay allowed the specific detection of minute quantities (10−8 brain dilution) of either human vCJD or ovine scrapie PrPTSE adsorbed onto a single steel wire, within a two week timeframe. Using Surf-PMCA we evaluated the performance of several reference and commercially available prion-specific decontamination procedures. Surprisingly, we found the efficiency of several marketed reagents to remove human vCJD PrPTSE was lower than expected. Overall, our results demonstrate that Surf-PMCA can be used as a rapid and ultrasensitive assay for the detection of human vCJD PrPTSE adsorbed onto a metallic surface, therefore facilitating the development and validation of decontamination procedures against human prions. PMID:26800081

  18. Argonaute Proteins Affect siRNA Levels and Accumulation of a Novel Extrachromosomal DNA from the Dictyostelium Retrotransposon DIRS-1*

    PubMed Central

    Boesler, Benjamin; Meier, Doreen; Förstner, Konrad U.; Friedrich, Michael; Hammann, Christian; Sharma, Cynthia M.; Nellen, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The retrotransposon DIRS-1 is the most abundant retroelement in Dictyostelium discoideum and constitutes the pericentromeric heterochromatin of the six chromosomes in D. discoideum. The vast majority of cellular siRNAs is derived from DIRS-1, suggesting that the element is controlled by RNAi-related mechanisms. We investigated the role of two of the five Argonaute proteins of D. discoideum, AgnA and AgnB, in DIRS-1 silencing. Deletion of agnA resulted in the accumulation of DIRS-1 transcripts, the expression of DIRS-1-encoded proteins, and the loss of most DIRS-1-derived secondary siRNAs. Simultaneously, extrachromosomal single-stranded DIRS-1 DNA accumulated in the cytoplasm of agnA− strains. These DNA molecules appear to be products of reverse transcription and thus could represent intermediate structures before transposition. We further show that transitivity of endogenous siRNAs is impaired in agnA− strains. The deletion of agnB alone had no strong effect on DIRS-1 transposon regulation. However, in agnA−/agnB− double mutant strains strongly reduced accumulation of extrachromosomal DNA compared with the single agnA− strains was observed. PMID:25352599

  19. Crystal Structure of Okadaic Acid Binding Protein 2.1: A Sponge Protein Implicated in Cytotoxin Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ehara, Haruhiko; Makino, Marie; Kodama, Koichiro; Konoki, Keiichi; Ito, Takuhiro; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Fukuzawa, Seketsu; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tachibana, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a marine polyether cytotoxin that was first isolated from the marine sponge Halichondria okadai. OA is a potent inhibitor of protein serine/threonine phosphatases (PP) 1 and 2A, and the structural basis of phosphatase inhibition has been well investigated. However, the role and mechanism of OA retention in the marine sponge have remained elusive. We have solved the crystal structure of okadaic acid binding protein 2.1 (OABP2.1) isolated from H. okadai; it has strong affinity for OA and limited sequence homology to other proteins. The structure revealed that OABP2.1 consists of two α-helical domains, with the OA molecule deeply buried inside the protein. In addition, the global fold of OABP2.1 was unexpectedly similar to that of aequorin, a jellyfish photoprotein. The presence of structural homologues suggested that, by using similar protein scaffolds, marine invertebrates have developed diverse survival systems adapted to their living environments.

  20. Heat-induced Accumulation of Chloroplast Protein Synthesis Elongation Factor, EF-TU, in Winter Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chloroplast protein synthesis elongation factor, EF-Tu, has been implicated in heat tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.). Chloroplast EF-Tu is highly conserved, and it is possible that this protein may be of importance to heat tolerance in other species including wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). In this ...

  1. Accumulation of stress protein 72 (HSP72) in muscle and spleen of goldfish taken into space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, T.; Tsuji, K.; Ohmura, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Wang, X.; Takahahsi, A.; Nagaoka, S.; Takabayashi, A.

    Using Western blot analysis, here, we report the levels of HSP72 in several organs from goldfish which were taken into space on the NASA space shuttle. A remarkable accumulation of HSP72 was detected in muscle and spleen of those fish taken into space as compared with controls. These results suggested that the HSP72 induction is a kind of stress response at the molecular level introduced by the space environment consisting of microgravity and/or cosmic radiation as stressors.

  2. Ciliary abnormalities due to defects in the retrograde transport protein DYNC2H1 in short-rib polydactyly syndrome.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Amy E; Merriman, Barry; Farrington-Rock, Claire; Camacho, Natalia; Sebald, Eiman T; Funari, Vincent A; Schibler, Matthew J; Firestein, Marc H; Cohn, Zachary A; Priore, Mary Ann; Thompson, Alicia K; Rimoin, David L; Nelson, Stanley F; Cohn, Daniel H; Krakow, Deborah

    2009-04-01

    The short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndromes are a heterogeneous group of perinatal lethal skeletal disorders with polydactyly and multisystem organ abnormalities. Homozygosity by descent mapping in a consanguineous SRP family identified a genomic region that contained DYNC2H1, a cytoplasmic dynein involved in retrograde transport in the cilium. Affected individuals in the family were homozygous for an exon 12 missense mutation that predicted the amino acid substitution R587C. Compound heterozygosity for one missense and one null mutation was identified in two additional nonconsanguineous SRP families. Cultured chondrocytes from affected individuals showed morphologically abnormal, shortened cilia. In addition, the chondrocytes showed abnormal cytoskeletal microtubule architecture, implicating an altered microtubule network as part of the disease process. These findings establish SRP as a cilia disorder and demonstrate that DYNC2H1 is essential for skeletogenesis and growth.

  3. β-Propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration: a new X-linked dominant disorder with brain iron accumulation.

    PubMed

    Hayflick, Susan J; Kruer, Michael C; Gregory, Allison; Haack, Tobias B; Kurian, Manju A; Houlden, Henry H; Anderson, James; Boddaert, Nathalie; Sanford, Lynn; Harik, Sami I; Dandu, Vasuki H; Nardocci, Nardo; Zorzi, Giovanna; Dunaway, Todd; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Skinner, Steven; Holden, Kenton R; Frucht, Steven; Hanspal, Era; Schrander-Stumpel, Connie; Mignot, Cyril; Héron, Delphine; Saunders, Dawn E; Kaminska, Margaret; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Lascelles, Karine; Cuno, Stephan M; Meyer, Esther; Garavaglia, Barbara; Bhatia, Kailash; de Silva, Rajith; Crisp, Sarah; Lunt, Peter; Carey, Martyn; Hardy, John; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Hogarth, Penelope

    2013-06-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders with high iron in the basal ganglia encompass an expanding collection of single gene disorders collectively known as neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation. These disorders can largely be distinguished from one another by their associated clinical and neuroimaging features. The aim of this study was to define the phenotype that is associated with mutations in WDR45, a new causative gene for neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation located on the X chromosome. The study subjects consisted of WDR45 mutation-positive individuals identified after screening a large international cohort of patients with idiopathic neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation. Their records were reviewed, including longitudinal clinical, laboratory and imaging data. Twenty-three mutation-positive subjects were identified (20 females). The natural history of their disease was remarkably uniform: global developmental delay in childhood and further regression in early adulthood with progressive dystonia, parkinsonism and dementia. Common early comorbidities included seizures, spasticity and disordered sleep. The symptoms of parkinsonism improved with l-DOPA; however, nearly all patients experienced early motor fluctuations that quickly progressed to disabling dyskinesias, warranting discontinuation of l-DOPA. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed iron in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus, with a 'halo' of T1 hyperintense signal in the substantia nigra. All patients harboured de novo mutations in WDR45, encoding a beta-propeller protein postulated to play a role in autophagy. Beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration, the only X-linked disorder of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, is associated with de novo mutations in WDR45 and is recognizable by a unique combination of clinical, natural history and neuroimaging features.

  4. Identification of differentially accumulating pistil proteins associated with self-incompatibility of non-heading Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Peng, H; Ge, T; Liu, T; Hou, X; Li, Y

    2014-01-01

    Non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Makino), an important vegetable crop in China, exhibits a typical sporophytic self-incompatibility (SI) system. To better understand the mechanism of SI response and identify potential candidate proteins involved in the SI system of this vegetable crop, the proteomic approach was taken to identify differential accumulating pistil proteins. Pistils were collected at 0 h and 2 h after self-pollination at anthesis in self-incompatible and compatible lines of non-heading Chinese cabbage, and total proteins were extracted and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). A total of 25 protein spots that displayed differential abundance were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) and peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF). Among them, 22 protein spots were confidently established. The mRNA levels of the corresponding genes were detected by quantitative RT-PCR. The 22 identified protein spots are involved in energy metabolism (four), protein biosynthesis (three), photosynthesis (six), stress response and defence (five), and protein degradation (four). Among these potential candidate proteins, UDP-sugar pyrophosphorylase could be involved in sucrose degradation to influence pollen germination and growth. Glutathione S-transferases could be involved in pollen maturation, and affect pollen fertility. Senescence-associated cysteine protease, which is related to programmed cell death, could be mainly related to self pollen recognition of non-heading Chinese cabbage. The study will contribute to further investigations of molecular mechanism of sporophytic SI in Brassicaceae. PMID:23581423

  5. Lipid peroxidation-derived 4-hydroxynonenal-modified proteins accumulate in human facial skin fibroblasts during ageing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Peter; Milkovic, Lidija; Zarkovic, Neven; Waeg, Georg; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2014-02-01

    The reactive aldehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), is recognized as a product of lipid peroxidation, which binds to macromolecules, in particular proteins. HNE-modified proteins (HNE-MP) have been shown to accumulate during ageing, generally by using polyclonal antibodies, which increase the possibility of detecting false positives. Therefore, we have used a genuine monoclonal antibody specific for HNE-His adducts of proteins/peptides, which were revealed by immunoblotting method for whole-cell HNE-MP measurements in serially passaged human facial skin fibroblasts undergoing ageing in vitro. There was a significant increase in the levels of HNE-MP in serially passaged cells approaching a near senescent state at high passage level (P-61), as compared with low passage level (P-11) young and middle-aged (P-27) cells. However, if the cells were analyzed soon after re-initiation from the frozen samples with little further passaging, the amount of HNE-MP was low even in relatively high passage level (P-37) cells, which is an indication of selective elimination of cells with high molecular damage during the process of thawing and re-initiation in culture. This pilot study on normal human facial skin fibroblasts shows that HNE-MP detection by monoclonal antibody-based dot blot method can be used as a marker for age-related accumulation of lipid peroxidative molecular damage, and could be useful for testing and monitoring the effects of potential skin care products on ageing parameters.

  6. Accumulation of transcription factors and cell signaling-related proteins in the nucleus during citrus-Xanthomonas interaction.

    PubMed

    Rani, T Swaroopa; Durgeshwar, P; Podile, Appa Rao

    2015-07-20

    The nucleus is the maestro of the cell and is involved in the modulation of cell signaling during stress. We performed a comprehensive nuclear proteome analysis of Citrus sinensis during interaction with host (Xanthomonas citri pv. citri-Xcc) and non-host (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae-Xoo) pathogens. The nuclear proteome was obtained using a sequential method of organelle enrichment and determined by nano-LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 243 proteins accumulated differentially during citrus-Xanthomonas interaction, belonging to 11 functional groups, with signaling and transcription-related proteins dominating. MADS-box transcription factors, DEAD-box RNA helicase and leucine aminopeptidase, mainly involved in jasmonic acid (JA) responses, were in high abundance during non-host interaction (Xoo). Signaling-related proteins like serine/threonine kinase, histones (H3.2, H2A), phosphoglycerate kinase, dynamin, actin and aldolase showed increased accumulation early during Xoo interaction. Our results suggest that there is a possible involvement of JA-triggered defense responses during non-host resistance, with early recognition of the non-host pathogen.

  7. Accumulation of a 5' proximal subgenomic RNA of Citrus tristeza virus is correlated with encapsidation by the minor coat protein.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Siddarame; Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Hilf, Mark E; Dawson, William O

    2009-06-20

    During replication, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) produces large amounts of two unusual subgenomic (sg) RNAs that are positive-stranded and 5' coterminal. Although these RNAs are produced in similar amounts and are similar in size, with LMT1 ( approximately 750 nt) only slightly larger than LMT2 ( approximately 650), we found that the similar sgRNAs are produced differently. We previously showed that the LMT1 RNA is produced by premature termination during genomic RNA synthesis. However, LMT2 production was found to correlate with virion assembly instead of RNA replication. The time course of accumulation of the LMT2 RNA occurred late, coinciding with virion accumulation. The long flexuous virions of CTV contain two coat proteins that encapsidate the virions in a polar manner. The major coat protein encapsidates approximately 97% of the virion, while the minor capsid protein encapsidates the remainder of the genome beginning in the 5' non-translated region with the transition zone at approximately 630 nucleotides from the 5' end. The section of the virion RNA that was encapsidated by CPm was identical in size to the LMT2 RNA, suggesting that the LMT2 RNA represented a portion of the viral RNA protected by CPm encapsidation. Mutations that abrogated encapsidation by CPm also abolished the accumulation of LMT2 RNA. Thus, these two unusual but similar RNAs are produced via different pathways, one from RNA replication and one processed by the virion assembly process. To our knowledge, this represents the first evidence of a viral RNA processed by the assembly mechanism. PMID:19446304

  8. Gains of REL in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma coincide with nuclear accumulation of REL protein.

    PubMed

    Weniger, Marc A; Gesk, Stefan; Ehrlich, Steve; Martin-Subero, José I; Dyer, Martin J S; Siebert, Reiner; Möller, Peter; Barth, Thomas F E

    2007-04-01

    Gains or amplifications of the REL locus are frequently seen in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). In classical Hodgkin's lymphoma, genomic overrepresentation of REL correlated with nuclear REL protein accumulation. To investigate the correlation between REL gene copies and its RNA and protein expression in PMBL, we analyzed genomic, transcriptional, and protein levels in 20 PMBLs and the PMBL derived cell lines MedB-1 and Karpas1106P. We found gains/amplifications in 75% of the PMBLs by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and genomic REL overrepresentation in the PMBL lines. Three of the five PMBLs with amplifications displayed elevated REL transcripts, while only 3/10 PMBLs with gains showed increased REL transcripts by real-time PCR. One PMBL without gains displayed increased REL transcription. REL protein expression exhibited a variable pattern across the PMBLs except for a single case that was completely negative by immunohistochemistry despite having gained REL. Although transcript levels were generally low and nuclear REL staining was weak in the lymphoma cell lines, these nevertheless exhibited high NF-kappaB activation. By fluorescence immunophenotyping and interphase cytogenetics as a tool for investigation of neoplasms, genomic gains/amplifications of REL significantly correlated with nuclear REL expression (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the frequent genomic overrepresentation of REL in PMBL does not necessarily trigger an increased transcription/translation of REL. However, combined genomic and protein analysis revealed a significant association of gained REL and nuclear REL accumulation at the single cell level. PMID:17243160

  9. Development of photochemical activity in relation to pigment and membrane protein accumulation in chloroplasts of barley and its virescens mutant.

    PubMed

    Kyle, D J; Zalik, S

    1982-06-01

    The development of photochemical activity in relation to pigment and membrane protein accumulation in chloroplasts of greening wild-type barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Gateway) and its virescens mutant were studied. The rate of chlorophyll accumulation per plastid was faster in the wild-type than in the mutant seedlings upon illumination after 6 days of etiolation, but was not different after 8 days. Although the protein content per plastid did not vary during greening, there was a change in the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel polypeptide profiles. High molecular weight proteins of 96,000 and 66,000 decreased whereas those at 34,000, 27,000 and 22,000 increased in relative quantity as a function of greening. The fully greened mutant seedlings were not deficient in the light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complex (LHC) or the reaction centers of photosystem I and photosystem II. Photosystem I-associated photochemical activities appeared within the first hour of plastid development and photosystem II associated activities and O(2) evolution within the next 6 hours. In all cases, the developmental rates per unit protein were slower in the mutant following 6 days of etiolation, but no differences between the two genotypes could be seen after 8 days due to a decrease in the developmental rate of the wild-type chloroplasts. An increase in photosynthetic unit size associated with plastid morphogenesis was faster in the wild-type seedlings after 6 days, but again the difference was negligible after 8 days. It was concluded that no single measured photochemical parameter is affected by this mutation, but rather, all aspects of chloroplast development are affected similarly by an overall reduction in the rate of chloroplast morphogenesis. This mutant, therefore, undergoes the normal pattern of proplastid to chloroplast development, but at a markedly reduced rate.

  10. Craniofacial Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the skull and face. Craniofacial abnormalities are birth defects of the face or head. Some, like cleft ... palate, are among the most common of all birth defects. Others are very rare. Most of them affect ...

  11. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... decade, newer techniques have been developed that allow scientists and doctors to screen for chromosomal abnormalities without using a microscope. These newer methods compare the patient's DNA to a normal DNA ...

  12. Walking abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Arthritis of the leg or foot joints Conversion disorder (a psychological disorder) Foot problems (such as a ... injuries. For an abnormal gait that occurs with conversion disorder, counseling and support from family members are strongly ...

  13. Nail abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Beau's lines; Fingernail abnormalities; Spoon nails; Onycholysis; Leukonychia; Koilonychia; Brittle nails ... Just like the skin, the fingernails tell a lot about your health: ... the fingernail. These lines can occur after illness, injury to ...

  14. Abnormal accumulation of trace metals by plants

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, R.D.; Brooks, R.R.; Baker, A.J.M.

    1996-12-31

    The article describes the hyperaccumulation of metals by plants. Ranges for low, normal, high, and hyperaccumulating uptake are established. A partial list of hyperaccumulator species and their localities is included. Studies are reviewed and summarized for zinc, cadmium and lead, nickel, cobalt and copper, selenium, and cadmium and manganese hyperaccumulation.

  15. Increase of hepatic fat accumulation by liver specific expression of Hepatitis B virus X protein in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Yun-Sheng; Chang, Yin-Shan; Hong, Jiann-Ruey; Chen, Li-Je; Jou, Luen-Kuang; Hsu, Chia-Chun; Her, Guor Mour

    2010-07-01

    The pathogenesis of fatty liver disease remains largely unknown. Here, we assessed the importance of hepatic fat accumulation on the progression of hepatitis in zebrafish by liver specific expression of Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx). Transgenic zebrafish lines, GBXs, which selectively express the GBx transgene (GFP-fused HBx gene) in liver, were established. GBX Liver phenotypes were evaluated by histopathology and molecular analysis of fatty acid (FA) metabolism-related genes expression. Most GBXs (66-81%) displayed obvious emaciation starting at 4 months old. Over 99% of the emaciated GBXs developed hepatic steatosis or steatohepatitis, which in turn led to liver hypoplasia. The liver histology of GBXs displayed steatosis, lobular inflammation, and balloon degeneration, similar to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Oil red O stain detected the accumulation of fatty droplets in GBXs. RT-PCR and Q-rt-PCR analysis revealed that GBx induced hepatic steatosis had significant increases in the expression of lipogenic genes, C/EBP-alpha, SREBP1, ChREBP and PPAR-gamma, which then activate key enzymes of the de novo FA synthesis, ACC1, FAS, SCD1, AGAPT, PAP and DGAT2. In addition, the steatohepatitic GBX liver progressed to liver degeneration and exhibited significant differential gene expression in apoptosis and stress. The GBX models exhibited both the genetic and functional factors involved in lipid accumulation and steatosis-associated liver injury. In addition, GBXs with transmissible NASH-like phenotypes provide a promising model for studying liver disease. PMID:20416398

  16. Polyethylene glycol treatment after traumatic brain injury reduces beta-amyloid precursor protein accumulation in degenerating axons.

    PubMed

    Koob, Andrew O; Borgens, Richard B

    2006-06-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG; 2,000 MW; 30% v/v) is a nontoxic molecule that can be injected intravenously and possesses well-documented neuroprotective properties in the spinal cord of the guinea pig. Recent studies have shown that intravenous PEG can also enter the rat brain parenchyma after injury and repair cellular membrane damage in the region of the corpus callosum. Disrupted anterograde axonal transport and resulting beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) accumulation are byproducts of traumatic axonal injury (TAI) in the brain. APP accumulation indicates axonal degeneration as a result of axotomy, a detriment that can lead to cell death. In this study, we show that PEG treatment can eliminate APP accumulation in specific brain areas of rats receiving TAI. Six areas of the brain were analyzed: the medial cortex, hippocampus, lateral cortex, thalamus, medial lemniscus, and medial longitudinal fasciculus. Increased APP expression after injury was abolished in the thalamus and reduced in the medial longitudinal fasciculus by PEG treatment. In all remaining areas except for the lateral cortex, APP expression was not increased between injured and uninjured brains, indicating that damage was undetected in those brain areas in this study.

  17. Heat shock protein synthesis and trehalose accumulation are not required for induced thermotolerance in depressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gross, C; Watson, K

    1996-03-27

    Intrinsic and heat shock induced thermotolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated in cells grown on glucose and acetate supplemented media. Heat shocked cells (37 degrees C/30 min), in either medium, exhibited induced synthesis of heat shock proteins (hsp) and trehalose. In all cases, with the notable exception of repressed cells of a relatively thermosensitive strain, heat shock acquisition of thermotolerance also occurred in the absence of protein synthesis and coincident decrease in trehalose accumulation. Results indicted that the marked increase in thermotolerance exhibited by non-fermenting (acetate) cells compared with fermenting (glucose) cells was not closely correlated with levels of hsp or trehalose. It was concluded that mechanisms for intrinsic and induced thermotolerance appear to be different and that growth on acetate endows cells with a biochemical predisposition, other than hsp or trehalose, that confers intrinsic tolerance, a factor which may be subject to heat induced modification.

  18. Effect of a nutritional shift on the degradation of abnormal proteins in the mouse liver. Decreased degradation during rapid liver growth.

    PubMed Central

    Amils, R; Conde, R D; Scornik, O A

    1977-01-01

    1. The intravenous injection of puromycin to mice 0.5 min after administration of radioactive leucine resulted in the release of labelled ribosome-bound nascent protein chains with the next 0.5 min. 2. During the subsequent 13 min, 40% of the liver protein radioactivity disappeared. The rate of this process was already maximal 0.5 min after the injection of puromycin, with no apparent lag. 3. Evidence is presented that this phenomenon represents the selective degradation of puromycinyl-peptides: (a) the magnitude of this fraction corresponded to the calculated proportion of protein radioactivity in nascent chains at the time of the puromycin effect; (b) the size distribution of the proteins disappearing between 2 and 14 min was smaller than that of those retained at 14 min; and (c) when the injection of puromycin was delayed for 5 min, or when the leucine pulse was interrupted by the injection of cycloheximide (rather than puromycin), the fraction disappearing within 14 min was much smaller. 4. The degradation of puromycinyl-peptides was much slower in the rapidly growing livers of animals recovering from a protein depletion than in the protein-depleted controls. It is concluded that the large decrease in the overall rates of total liver protein degradation previously described during liver growth is a general phenomenon, also affecting the rate of scavenging of abnormal proteins. PMID:880243

  19. Drosophila yolk protein produced in E. coli is accumulated by mosquito ovaries.

    PubMed

    Bownes, M; Hurd, H; Büsgen, T; Servay, D; Alvis, S; Popovic, B; Bruce, S; Burns, I; Rothwell, K; Walkinshaw, Malcolm

    2002-10-01

    Despite similar functions, the yolk proteins of the higher dipteran flies and the vitellogenins found in other insects are unrelated at the sequence level and have evolved from different genes. Both are selectively endocytosed into the ovary via receptors belonging to the LDLR receptor subfamily. We cloned the Drosophila yp1 gene into an E. coli expression vector and showed that the yolk protein produced by E. coli is taken up into ovaries of both Drosophila melanogaster and the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae, which normally uses vitellogenin. PMID:12230547

  20. Accumulation of the NON-YELLOW COLORING 1 protein of the chlorophyll cycle requires chlorophyll b in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ting; Ito, Hisashi; Hu, Xueyun; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2015-02-01

    Chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b are interconverted in the chlorophyll cycle. The initial step in the conversion of chlorophyll b to chlorophyll a is catalyzed by the chlorophyll b reductases NON-YELLOW COLORING 1 (NYC1) and NYC1-like (NOL), which convert chlorophyll b to 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a. This step is also the first stage in the degradation of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complex (LHC). In this study, we examined the effect of chlorophyll b on the level of NYC1. NYC1 mRNA and NYC1 protein were in low abundance in green leaves, but their levels increased in response to dark-induced senescence. When the level of chlorophyll b was enhanced by the introduction of a truncated chlorophyllide a oxygenase gene and the leaves were incubated in the dark, the amount of NYC1 was greatly increased compared with that of the wild type; however, the amount of NYC1 mRNA was the same as in the wild type. In contrast, NYC1 did not accumulate in the mutant without chlorophyll b, even though the NYC1 mRNA level was high after incubation in the dark. Quantification of the LHC protein showed no strong correlation between the levels of NYC1 and LHC proteins. However, the level of chlorophyll fluorescence of the dark adapted plant (Fo ) was closely related to the accumulation of NYC1, suggesting that the NYC1 level is related to the energetically uncoupled LHC. These results and previous reports on the degradation of chlorophyllide a oxygenase suggest that the a feedforward and feedback network is included in chlorophyll cycle.

  1. Changes in NMDA receptor subunits and interacting PSD proteins in dorsolateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex indicate abnormal regional expression in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, L V; Beneyto, M; Haroutunian, V; Meador-Woodruff, J H

    2006-08-01

    Abnormal expression of the N-methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor and its interacting molecules of the postsynaptic density (PSD) are thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Frontal regions of neocortex including dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) are essential for cognitive and behavioral functions that are affected in schizophrenia. In this study, we have measured protein expression of two alternatively spliced isoforms of the NR1 subunit (NR1C2 and NR1C2') as well as expression of the NR2A-D subunits of the NMDA receptor in DLPFC and ACC in post-mortem samples from elderly schizophrenic patients and a comparison group. We found significantly increased expression of NR1C2' but not of NR1C2 in ACC, suggesting altered NMDA receptor cell membrane expression in this cortical area. We did not find significant changes in the expression of either of the NR1 isoforms in DLPFC. We did not detect changes of any of the NR2 subunits studied in either cortical area. In addition, we studied expression of the NMDA-interacting PSD molecules NF-L, SAP102, PSD-95 and PSD-93 in ACC and DLPFC at both transcriptional and translational levels. We found significant changes in the expression of NF-L in DLPFC, and PSD-95 and PSD-93 in ACC; increased transcript expression was associated with decreased protein expression, suggesting abnormal translation and/or accelerated protein degradation of these molecules in schizophrenia. Our findings suggest abnormal regional processing of the NMDA receptor and its associated PSD molecules, possibly involving transcription, translation, trafficking and protein stability in cortical areas in schizophrenia.

  2. 99Tcm-HIG accumulates in the synovial tissue of rats with adjuvant arthritis by binding to extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    de Bois, M H; Welling, M; Verwey, C L; de Vries, E; Pauwels, E K; Breedveld, F C; Tak, P P

    1996-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the mechanism of accumulation of 99Tcm-labelled non-specific polyclonal human immunoglobulin (99Tcm-HIG) in inflamed synovial tissue (ST) in an experimental animal model of arthritis. Following 99Tcm-HIG scintigraphy, the in vivo localization of 99Tcm-HIG in the ST of knee joints of rats with adjuvant arthritis was studied using immunohistochemical techniques. In addition, the in vitro binding of 99Tcm-HIG to extracellular matrix proteins was analysed by means of immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). After 99Tcm-HIG scintigraphy, 99Tcm-HI was detected in the ST of rats with adjuvant arthritis. 99Tcm-HIG was diffusely distributed and not bound to cells. In vitro incubation of 99Tcm-HIG on the ST of rats with adjuvant arthritis revealed binding of 99Tcm-HIG to inflamed, but not to non-inflamed, ST. In addition, specific binding of 99Tcm-HIG to fibronectin, fibrin, collagen type I and III was demonstrated by ELISA. We conclude that the accumulation of 99Tcm-HIG in inflamed ST can be explained by the binding of 99Tcm-HIG to extracellular matrix proteins.

  3. Phosphorylation modulates rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and cytoplasmic accumulation of Neurospora clock protein FRQ on a circadian time scale

    PubMed Central

    Diernfellner, Axel C.R.; Querfurth, Christina; Salazar, Carlos; Höfer, Thomas; Brunner, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Neurospora clock protein FREQUENCY (FRQ) is an essential regulator of the circadian transcription factor WHITE COLLAR COMPLEX (WCC). In the course of a circadian period, the subcellular distribution of FRQ shifts from mainly nuclear to mainly cytosolic. This shift is crucial for coordinating the negative and positive limbs of the clock. We show that the subcellular redistribution of FRQ on a circadian time scale is governed by rapid, noncircadian cycles of nuclear import and export. The rate of nuclear import of newly synthesized FRQ is progressively reduced in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, leading to an increase in the steady-state level of cytoplasmic FRQ. The long-period frq7 mutant displays reduced kinetics of FRQ7 protein phosphorylation and a prolonged accumulation in the nucleus. We present a mathematical model that describes the cytoplasmic accumulation of wild-type and mutant FRQ on a circadian time scale on the basis of frequency-modulated rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling cycles. PMID:19759264

  4. Nucleophosmin modulates stability, activity, and nucleolar accumulation of base excision repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Poletto, Mattia; Lirussi, Lisa; Wilson, David M.; Tell, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM1) is a multifunctional protein that controls cell growth and genome stability via a mechanism that involves nucleolar–cytoplasmic shuttling. It is clear that NPM1 also contributes to the DNA damage response, yet its exact function is poorly understood. We recently linked NPM1 expression to the functional activation of the major abasic endonuclease in mammalian base excision repair (BER), apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1). Here we unveil a novel role for NPM1 as a modulator of the whole BER pathway by 1) controlling BER protein levels, 2) regulating total BER capacity, and 3) modulating the nucleolar localization of several BER enzymes. We find that cell treatment with the genotoxin cisplatin leads to concurrent relocalization of NPM1 and BER components from nucleoli to the nucleoplasm, and cellular experiments targeting APE1 suggest a role for the redistribution of nucleolar BER factors in determining cisplatin toxicity. Finally, based on the use of APE1 as a representative protein of the BER pathway, our data suggest a function for BER proteins in the regulation of ribogenesis. PMID:24648491

  5. Arabidopsis SEIPIN proteins modulate triacylglycerol accumulation and influence lipid droplet proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lipodystrophy protein SEIPIN is important for lipid droplet (LD) biogenesis in human and yeast cells. By contrast to the single SEIPIN genes in humans and yeast, there are three SEIPIN homologues in Arabidopsis thaliana, designated At-SEIPIN1, At-SEIPIN2 and At-SEIPIN3. Here, a yeast (Saccharomy...

  6. Regulation of myofibrillar accumulation in chick muscle cultures - Evidence for the involvement of calcium and lysosomes in non-uniform turnover of contractile proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Geri; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of calcium on the synthesis and the degradation of individual myofibrillar proteins were investigated using primary chick-leg skeletal muscle cultures labeled with S-35-methionine (for protein accumulation experiments) or Ca(2+)-45 (for calcium efflux experiments). It was found that the turnover of individual contractile proteins is regulated nonuniformly by a calcium-dependent mechanism involving lysosomes. The results also indicate that contractile proteins are released from the myofibril before their breakdown to amino acids.

  7. Cardiac remodeling associated with protein increase and lipid accumulation in early-stage chronic kidney disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Mieko; Bannai, Kenji; Segawa, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Yamato, Hideyuki

    2014-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risks of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Cardiac remodeling including myocardial fibrosis and hypertrophy is frequently observed in CKD patients. In this study, we investigate the mechanism involved in cardiac hypertrophy associated with CKD using a rat model, by morphological and chemical component changes of the hypertrophic and non-hypertrophic hearts. Sprague-Dawley rats were 4/5 nephrectomized (Nx) at 11 weeks of age and assigned to no treatment and treatment with AST-120, which was reported to affect the cardiac damage, at 18 weeks of age. At 26 weeks of age, the rats were euthanized under anesthesia, and biochemical tests as well as analysis of cardiac condition were performed by histological and spectrophotometric methods. Cardiac hypertrophy and CKD were observed in 4/5 Nx rats even though vascular calcification and myocardial fibrosis were not detected. The increasing myocardial protein was confirmed in hypertrophic hearts by infrared spectroscopy. The absorption of amide I and other protein bands in hypertrophic hearts increased at the same position as in normal cardiac absorption. Infrared spectra also showed that lipid accumulation was also detected in hypertrophic heart. Conversely, the absorptions of protein were obviously reduced in the myocardium of non-hypertrophic heart with CKD compared to that of hypertrophic heart. The lipid associated absorption was also decreased in non-hypertrophic heart. Our results suggest that cardiac remodeling associated with relatively early-stage CKD may be suppressed by reducing increased myocardial protein and ameliorating cardiac lipid load.

  8. JUB1 suppresses Pseudomonas syringae-induced defense responses through accumulation of DELLA proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shahnejat-Bushehri, Sara; Nobmann, Barbara; Devi Allu, Annapurna; Balazadeh, Salma

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Phytohormones act in concert to coordinate plant growth and the response to environmental cues. Gibberellins (GAs) are growth-promoting hormones that recently emerged as modulators of plant immune signaling. By regulating the stability of DELLA proteins, GAs intersect with the signaling pathways of the classical primary defense hormones, salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA), thereby altering the final outcome of the immune response. DELLA proteins confer resistance to necrotrophic pathogens by potentiating JA signaling and raise the susceptibility to biotrophic pathogens by attenuating the SA pathway. Here, we show that JUB1, a core element of the GA - brassinosteroid (BR) - DELLA regulatory module, functions as a negative regulator of defense responses against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000) and mediates the crosstalk between growth and immunity. PMID:27159137

  9. Lack of Globulin Synthesis during Seed Development Alters Accumulation of Seed Storage Proteins in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye-Jung; Jo, Yeong-Min; Lee, Jong-Yeol; Lim, Sun-Hyung; Kim, Young-Mi

    2015-01-01

    The major seed storage proteins (SSPs) in rice seeds have been classified into three types, glutelins, prolamins, and globulin, and the proportion of each SSP varies. It has been shown in rice mutants that when either glutelins or prolamins are defective, the expression of another type of SSP is promoted to counterbalance the deficit. However, we observed reduced abundances of glutelins and prolamins in dry seeds of a globulin-deficient rice mutant (Glb-RNAi), which was generated with RNA interference (RNAi)-induced suppression of globulin expression. The expression of the prolamin and glutelin subfamily genes was reduced in the immature seeds of Glb-RNAi lines compared with those in wild type. A proteomic analysis of Glb-RNAi seeds showed that the reductions in glutelin and prolamin were conserved at the protein level. The decreased pattern in glutelin was also significant in the presence of a reductant, suggesting that the polymerization of the glutelin proteins via intramolecular disulfide bonds could be interrupted in Glb-RNAi seeds. We also observed aberrant and loosely packed structures in the storage organelles of Glb-RNAi seeds, which may be attributable to the reductions in SSPs. In this study, we evaluated the role of rice globulin in seed development, showing that a deficiency in globulin could comprehensively reduce the expression of other SSPs. PMID:26133242

  10. Cockayne syndrome group B protein prevents the accumulation of damaged mitochondria by promoting mitochondrial autophagy.

    PubMed

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Ramamoorthy, Mahesh; Sykora, Peter; Maynard, Scott; Lin, Ping-Chang; Minor, Robin K; Wilson, David M; Cooper, Marcus; Spencer, Richard; de Cabo, Rafael; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2012-04-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a devastating autosomal recessive disease characterized by neurodegeneration, cachexia, and accelerated aging. 80% of the cases are caused by mutations in the CS complementation group B (CSB) gene known to be involved in DNA repair and transcription. Recent evidence indicates that CSB is present in mitochondria, where it associates with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We report an increase in metabolism in the CSB(m/m) mouse model and CSB-deficient cells. Mitochondrial content is increased in CSB-deficient cells, whereas autophagy is down-regulated, presumably as a result of defects in the recruitment of P62 and mitochondrial ubiquitination. CSB-deficient cells show increased free radical production and an accumulation of damaged mitochondria. Accordingly, treatment with the autophagic stimulators lithium chloride or rapamycin reverses the bioenergetic phenotype of CSB-deficient cells. Our data imply that CSB acts as an mtDNA damage sensor, inducing mitochondrial autophagy in response to stress, and that pharmacological modulators of autophagy are potential treatment options for this accelerated aging phenotype.

  11. Uncoupling protein 3 expression and intramyocellular lipid accumulation by NMR following local burn trauma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qunhao; Cao, Haihui; Astrakas, Loukas G; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Mindrinos, Michael N; Schulz, John; Tompkins, Ronald G; Rahme, Laurence G; Tzika, A Aria

    2006-12-01

    Burn trauma is a clinical condition accompanied by muscle wasting that severely impedes rehabilitation in burn survivors. Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is uniformly expressed in myoskeletal mitochondria and its expression has been found to increase in other clinical syndromes that, like burn trauma, are associated with muscle wasting (e.g., starvation, fasting, cancer, sepsis). The aim of this study was to explore the effects of burn trauma on UCP3 expression, intramyocellular lipids, and plasma-free fatty acids. Mice were studied at 6 h, 1 d and 3 d after nonlethal hindlimb burn trauma. Intramyocellular lipids in hindlimb skeletal muscle samples collected from burned and normal mice were measured using 1H NMR spectroscopy on a Bruker 14.1 Tesla spectrometer at 4 degrees C. UCP3 mRNA and protein levels were also measured in these samples. Plasma-free fatty acids were measured in burned and normal mice. Local burn trauma was found to result in: 1) upregulation of UCP3 mRNA and protein expression in hindlimb myoskeletal mitochondria by 6 h postburn; 2) increased intramyocellular lipids; and 3) increased plasma-free fatty acids. Our findings show that the increase in UCP3 after burn trauma may be linked to burn-induced alterations in lipid metabolism. Such a link could reveal novel insights into how processes related to energy metabolism are controlled in burn and suggest that induction of UCP3 by burn in skeletal muscle is protective by either activating cellular redox signaling and/or mitochondrial uncoupling. PMID:17089030

  12. Overexpression of Promyelocytic Leukemia Protein Precludes the Dispersal of ND10 Structures and Has No Effect on Accumulation of Infectious Herpes Simplex Virus 1 or Its Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Pascal; Jacob, Robert J.; Roizman, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    A key early event in the replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is the localization of infected-cell protein no. 0 (ICP0) in nuclear structures knows as ND10 or promyelocytic leukemia oncogenic domains (PODs). This is followed by dispersal of ND10 constituents such as the promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML), CREB-binding protein (CBP), and Daxx. Numerous experiments have shown that this dispersal is mediated by ICP0. PML is thought to be the organizing structural component of ND10. To determine whether the virus targets PML because it is inimical to viral replication, telomerase-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts and HEp-2 cells were transduced with wild-type baculovirus or a baculovirus expressing the Mr 69,000 form of PML. The transduced cultures were examined for expression and localization of PML in mock-infected and HSV-1-infected cells. The results obtained from studies of cells overexpressing PML were as follows. (i) Transduced cells accumulate large amounts of unmodified and SUMO-I-modified PML. (ii) Mock-infected cells exhibited enlarged ND10 structures containing CBP and Daxx in addition to PML. (iii) In infected cells, ICP0 colocalized with PML in ND10 early in infection, but the two proteins did not overlap or were juxtaposed in orderly structures. (iv) The enlarged ND10 structures remained intact at least until 12 h after infection and retained CBP and Daxx in addition to PML. (v) Overexpression of PML had no effect on the accumulation of viral proteins representative of α, β, or γ groups and had no effect on the accumulation of infectious virus in cells infected with wild-type virus or a mutant (R7910) from which the α0 genes had been deleted. These results indicate the following: (i) PML overexpressed in transduced cells cannot be differentiated from endogenous PML with respect to sumoylation and localization in ND10 structures. (ii) PML does not affect viral replication or the changes in the localization of ICP0 through infection

  13. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  14. SGT1 interacts with the Prf resistance protein and is required for Prf accumulation and Prf-mediated defense signaling.

    PubMed

    Kud, Joanna; Zhao, Zhulu; Du, Xinran; Liu, Yule; Zhao, Yun; Xiao, Fangming

    2013-02-15

    The highly conserved eukaryotic co-chaperone SGT1 (suppressor of the G2 allele of skp1) is an important signaling component of plant defense responses and positively regulates disease resistance conferred by many resistance (R) proteins. In this study, we investigated the contribution of SGT1 in the Prf-mediated defense responses in both Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). SGT1 was demonstrated to interact with Prf in plant cells by co-immunoprecipitation. The requirement of SGT1 in the accumulation of Prf or autoactive Prf(D1416V) was determined by the degradation of these proteins in N. benthamiana, in which SGT1 was repressed by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Pseudomonas pathogen assay on the SGT1-silenced tomato plants implicates SGT1 is required for the Prf-mediated full resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst). These results suggest that, in both N. benthamiana and tomato, SGT1 contributes to the Prf-mediated defense responses by stabilizing Prf protein via its co-chaperone activity.

  15. A Caleosin-Like Protein with Peroxygenase Activity Mediates Aspergillus flavus Development, Aflatoxin Accumulation, and Seed Infection

    PubMed Central

    Almousally, Ibrahem; Shaban, Mouhnad; Blee, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Caleosins are a small family of calcium-binding proteins endowed with peroxygenase activity in plants. Caleosin-like genes are present in fungi; however, their functions have not been reported yet. In this work, we identify a plant caleosin-like protein in Aspergillus flavus that is highly expressed during the early stages of spore germination. A recombinant purified 32-kDa caleosin-like protein supported peroxygenase activities, including co-oxidation reactions and reduction of polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides. Deletion of the caleosin gene prevented fungal development. Alternatively, silencing of the gene led to the increased accumulation of endogenous polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides and antioxidant activities but to a reduction of fungal growth and conidium formation. Two key genes of the aflatoxin biosynthesis pathway, aflR and aflD, were downregulated in the strains in which A. flavus PXG (AfPXG) was silenced, leading to reduced aflatoxin B1 production in vitro. Application of caleosin/peroxygenase-derived oxylipins restored the wild-type phenotype in the strains in which AfPXG was silenced. PXG-deficient A. flavus strains were severely compromised in their capacity to infect maize seeds and to produce aflatoxin. Our results uncover a new branch of the fungal oxylipin pathway and may lead to the development of novel targets for controlling fungal disease. PMID:26116672

  16. A Caleosin-Like Protein with Peroxygenase Activity Mediates Aspergillus flavus Development, Aflatoxin Accumulation, and Seed Infection.

    PubMed

    Hanano, Abdulsamie; Almousally, Ibrahem; Shaban, Mouhnad; Blee, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    Caleosins are a small family of calcium-binding proteins endowed with peroxygenase activity in plants. Caleosin-like genes are present in fungi; however, their functions have not been reported yet. In this work, we identify a plant caleosin-like protein in Aspergillus flavus that is highly expressed during the early stages of spore germination. A recombinant purified 32-kDa caleosin-like protein supported peroxygenase activities, including co-oxidation reactions and reduction of polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides. Deletion of the caleosin gene prevented fungal development. Alternatively, silencing of the gene led to the increased accumulation of endogenous polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides and antioxidant activities but to a reduction of fungal growth and conidium formation. Two key genes of the aflatoxin biosynthesis pathway, aflR and aflD, were downregulated in the strains in which A. flavus PXG (AfPXG) was silenced, leading to reduced aflatoxin B1 production in vitro. Application of caleosin/peroxygenase-derived oxylipins restored the wild-type phenotype in the strains in which AfPXG was silenced. PXG-deficient A. flavus strains were severely compromised in their capacity to infect maize seeds and to produce aflatoxin. Our results uncover a new branch of the fungal oxylipin pathway and may lead to the development of novel targets for controlling fungal disease. PMID:26116672

  17. Niemann-Pick Type C2 Protein Mediates Hepatic Stellate Cells Activation by Regulating Free Cholesterol Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Twu, Yuh-Ching; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Lin, Yun-Lian; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Wang, Yuan-Hsi; Liao, Chia-Yu; Wang, Chung-Kwe; Liang, Yu-Chih; Liao, Yi-Jen

    2016-01-01

    In chronic liver diseases, regardless of their etiology, the development of fibrosis is the first step toward the progression to cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the main profibrogenic cells that promote the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis, and so it is important to identify the molecules that regulate HSCs activation and liver fibrosis. Niemann-Pick type C2 (NPC2) protein plays an important role in the regulation of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis by directly binding with free cholesterol. However, the roles of NPC2 in HSCs activation and liver fibrosis have not been explored in detail. Since a high-cholesterol diet exacerbates liver fibrosis progression in both rodents and humans, we propose that the expression of NPC2 affects free cholesterol metabolism and regulates HSCs activation. In this study, we found that NPC2 is decreased in both thioacetamide- and carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis tissues. In addition, NPC2 is expressed in quiescent HSCs, but its activation status is down-regulated. Knockdown of NPC2 in HSC-T6 cells resulted in marked increases in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced collagen type 1 α1 (Col1a1), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, and Smad2 phosphorylation. In contrast, NPC2 overexpression decreased TGF-β1-induced HSCs activation. We further demonstrated that NPC2 deficiency significantly increased the accumulation of free cholesterol in HSCs, increasing Col1a1 and α-SMA expression and activating Smad2, and leading to sensitization of HSCs to TGF-β1 activation. In contrast, overexpression of NPC2 decreased U18666A-induced free cholesterol accumulation and inhibited the subsequent HSCs activation. In conclusion, our study has demonstrated that NPC2 plays an important role in HSCs activation by regulating the accumulation of free cholesterol. NPC2 overexpression may thus represent a new treatment strategy for liver fibrosis. PMID:27420058

  18. Receptor protein kinase FERONIA controls leaf starch accumulation by interacting with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Wang, Long; Li, Chiyu; Liu, Ying; Zhu, Sirui; Qi, Yinyao; Liu, Xuanming; Lin, Qinglu; Luan, Sheng; Yu, Feng

    2015-09-11

    Cell expansion is coordinated by several cues, but available energy is the major factor determining growth. Receptor protein kinase FERONIA (FER) is a master regulator of cell expansion, but the details of its control mechanisms are not clear. Here we show that FER interacts with cytosolic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, GAPC1 and GAPC2), that catalyzes a key reaction in glycolysis, which contributes to energy production. When there is an FER deficiency, there are corresponding decreases in the enzyme activity of GAPDH and increased amounts of starch. More importantly, gapc1/2 mutants mimic fer4 mutants. These data indicate that FER regulated starch content is an evolutionarily conserved function in plants that connects the cell expansion and energy metabolism pathways.

  19. Behavioral abnormalities in prion protein knockout mice and the potential relevance of PrPc for the cytoskeleton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a highly conserved protein, which is anchored to the outer surface of the plasma membrane. Even though its physiological function has already been investigated in different cell or mouse models where PrPC expression is either up-regulated or depleted, its exact p...

  20. Host-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells Accumulate in Cardiac Allografts: Role of Inflammation and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Bojakowski, Krzysztof; Soin, Joanna; Nozynski, Jerzy; Zakliczynski, Michal; Gaciong, Zbigniew; Zembala, Marian; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is characterized by inflammation and intimal thickening caused by accumulation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) both from donor and recipient. We assessed the relationship between clinical factors and the presence of host-derived SMCs in 124 myocardial biopsies from 26 consecutive patients who received hearts from opposite-sex donors. Clinical and demographic information was obtained from the patients' medical records. Host-derived SMCs accounted for 3.35±2.3% of cells in arterioles (range, 0.08–12.51%). As shown by linear regression analysis, an increased number of SMCs was associated with rejection grade (mean, 1.41±1.03, p = 0.034) and the number of leukocytes (19.1±12.7 per 20 high-power fields, p = 0.01). The accumulation of host-derived SMCs was associated with an increased number of leukocytes in the allografts. In vitro, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) released from leukocytes was crucial for SMC migration. After heart allotransplantion, mice treated with MCP-1-specific antibodies had significantly fewer host-derived SMCs in the grafts than mice treated with isotypic antibody controls. We conclude that the number of host-derived SMCs in human cardiac allografts is associated with the rejection grade and that MCP-1 may play pivotal role in recruiting host-derived SMCs into cardiac allografts. PMID:19142231

  1. Rapid and systemic accumulation of chloroplast mRNA-binding protein transcripts after flame stimulus in tomato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vian, A.; Henry-Vian, C.; Davies, E.

    1999-01-01

    It has been shown that tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants respond to flame wounding and electrical stimulation by a rapid (15 min) and systemic up-regulation of proteinase inhibitor (pin) genes. To find other genes having a similar expression pattern, we used subtractive cDNA screening between flamed and control plants to select clones up-regulated by flame wounding. We report the characterization of one of them, a chloroplast mRNA-binding protein encoded by a single gene and expressed preferentially in the leaves. Systemic gene expression in response to flaming in the youngest terminal leaf exhibited three distinct phases: a rapid and transient increase (5-15 min) in transcript accumulation, a decline to basal levels (15-45 min), and then a second, more prolonged increase (60-90 min). In contrast, after a mechanical wound the rapid, transient increase (5 min) was followed by a rapid decline to basal levels but no later, prolonged accumulation. In the petiole, the initial flame-wound-evoked transient increase (15 min) was followed by a continuous decline for 3 h. The nature of the wound signal(s) causing such rapid changes in transcript abundance is discussed in relation to electrical signaling, which has recently been implicated in plant responses to wounding.

  2. Antidepressants Accumulate in Lipid Rafts Independent of Monoamine Transporters to Modulate Redistribution of the G Protein, Gαs.

    PubMed

    Erb, Samuel J; Schappi, Jeffrey M; Rasenick, Mark M

    2016-09-16

    Depression is a significant public health problem for which currently available medications, if effective, require weeks to months of treatment before patients respond. Previous studies have shown that the G protein responsible for increasing cAMP (Gαs) is increasingly localized to lipid rafts in depressed subjects and that chronic antidepressant treatment translocates Gαs from lipid rafts. Translocation of Gαs, which shows delayed onset after chronic antidepressant treatment of rats or of C6 glioma cells, tracks with the delayed onset of therapeutic action of antidepressants. Because antidepressants appear to specifically modify Gαs localized to lipid rafts, we sought to determine whether structurally diverse antidepressants accumulate in lipid rafts. Sustained treatment of C6 glioma cells, which lack 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters, showed marked concentration of several antidepressants in raft fractions, as revealed by increased absorbance and by mass fingerprint. Closely related molecules without antidepressant activity did not concentrate in raft fractions. Thus, at least two classes of antidepressants accumulate in lipid rafts and effect translocation of Gαs to the non-raft membrane fraction, where it activates the cAMP-signaling cascade. Analysis of the structural determinants of raft localization may both help to explain the hysteresis of antidepressant action and lead to design and development of novel substrates for depression therapeutics.

  3. Retroviral GAG proteins recruit AGO2 on viral RNAs without affecting RNA accumulation and translation.

    PubMed

    Bouttier, Manuella; Saumet, Anne; Peter, Marion; Courgnaud, Valérie; Schmidt, Ute; Cazevieille, Chantal; Bertrand, Edouard; Lecellier, Charles-Henri

    2012-01-01

    Cellular micro(mi)RNAs are able to recognize viral RNAs through imperfect micro-homologies. Similar to the miRNA-mediated repression of cellular translation, this recognition is thought to tether the RNAi machinery, in particular Argonaute 2 (AGO2) on viral messengers and eventually to modulate virus replication. Here, we unveil another pathway by which AGO2 can interact with retroviral mRNAs. We show that AGO2 interacts with the retroviral Group Specific Antigen (GAG) core proteins and preferentially binds unspliced RNAs through the RNA packaging sequences without affecting RNA stability or eliciting translation repression. Using RNAi experiments, we provide evidences that these interactions, observed with both the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and the primate foamy virus 1 (PFV-1), are required for retroviral replication. Taken together, our results place AGO2 at the core of the retroviral life cycle and reveal original AGO2 functions that are not related to miRNAs and translation repression.

  4. Prion neuropathology follows the accumulation of alternate prion protein isoforms after infective titre has peaked

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Malin K.; Al-Doujaily, Huda; Sharps, Bernadette; De Oliveira, Michael Wiggins; Schmidt, Christian; Richard-Londt, Angela; Lyall, Sarah; Linehan, Jacqueline M.; Brandner, Sebastian; Wadsworth, Jonathan D. F.; Clarke, Anthony R.; Collinge, John

    2014-01-01

    Prions are lethal infectious agents thought to consist of multi-chain forms (PrPSc) of misfolded cellular prion protein (PrPC). Prion propagation proceeds in two distinct mechanistic phases: an exponential phase 1, which rapidly reaches a fixed level of infectivity irrespective of PrPC expression level, and a plateau (phase 2), which continues until clinical onset with duration inversely proportional to PrPC expression level. We hypothesized that neurotoxicity relates to distinct neurotoxic species produced following a pathway switch when prion levels saturate. Here we show a linear increase of proteinase K-sensitive PrP isoforms distinct from classical PrPSc at a rate proportional to PrPC concentration, commencing at the phase transition and rising until clinical onset. The unaltered level of total PrP during phase 1, when prion infectivity increases a million-fold, indicates that prions comprise a small minority of total PrP. This is consistent with PrPC concentration not being rate limiting to exponential prion propagation and neurotoxicity relating to critical concentrations of alternate PrP isoforms whose production is PrPC concentration dependent. PMID:25005024

  5. The relationships among IGF-1, DNA content, and protein accumulation during skeletal muscle hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. R.; Haddad, F.

    1996-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is known to have anabolic effects on skeletal muscle cells. This study examined the time course of muscle hypertrophy and associated IGF-1 peptide and mRNA expression. Data were collected at 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after surgical removal of synergistic muscles of both normal and hypophysectomized (HX) animals. Overloading increased the plantaris (Plant) mass, myofiber size, and protein-to-body weight ratio in both groups (normal and HX; P < 0.05). Muscle IGF-1 peptide levels peaked at 3 (normal) and 7 (HX) days of overloading with maximum 4.1-fold (normal) and 6.2-fold (HX) increases. Increases in muscle IGF-1 preceded the hypertrophic response. Total DNA content of the overloaded Plant increased in both groups. There was a strong positive relationship between IGF-1 peptide and DNA content in the overloaded Plant from both groups. These results indicate that 1) the muscles from rats with both normal and severely depressed systemic levels of IGF-1 respond to functional overload with an increase in local IGF-1 expression and 2) this elevated IGF-1 may be contributing to the hypertrophy response, possibly via the mobilization of satellite cells to provide increases in muscle DNA.

  6. Essential role of conserved DUF177A protein in plastid 23S rRNA accumulation and plant embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiani; Suzuki, Masaharu; McCarty, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    DUF177 proteins are nearly universally conserved in bacteria and plants except the Chlorophyceae algae. Thus far, duf177 mutants in bacteria have not established a function. In contrast, duf177a mutants have embryo lethal phenotypes in maize and Arabidopsis. In maize inbred W22, duf177a mutant embryos arrest at an early transition stage, whereas the block is suppressed in the B73 inbred background, conditioning an albino seedling phenotype. Background-dependent embryo lethal phenotypes are characteristic of maize plastid gene expression mutants. Consistent with the plastid gene expression hypothesis, quantitative real-time PCR revealed a significant reduction of 23S rRNA in an Escherichia coli duf177 knockout. Plastid 23S rRNA contents of duf177a mutant tissues were also markedly reduced compared with the wild-type, whereas plastid 16S, 5S, and 4.5S rRNA contents were less affected, indicating that DUF177 is specifically required for accumulation of prokaryote-type 23S rRNA. An AtDUF177A–green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene controlled by the native AtDUF177A promoter fully complemented the Arabidopsis atduf177a mutant. Transient expression of AtDUF177A–GFP in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves showed that the protein was localized in chloroplasts. The essential role of DUF177A in chloroplast–ribosome formation is reminiscent of IOJAP, another highly conserved ribosome-associated protein, suggesting that key mechanisms controlling ribosome formation in plastids evolved from non-essential pathways for regulation of the prokaryotic ribosome. PMID:27574185

  7. The Terminal A Domain of the Fibrillar Accumulation-Associated Protein (Aap) of Staphylococcus epidermidis Mediates Adhesion to Human Corneocytes▿

    PubMed Central

    Macintosh, Robin L.; Brittan, Jane L.; Bhattacharya, Ritwika; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Derrick, Jeremy; Upton, Mathew; Handley, Pauline S.

    2009-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis colonizes indwelling medical devices by biofilm formation but is primarily a skin resident. In many S. epidermidis strains biofilm formation is mediated by a cell wall-anchored protein, the accumulation-associated protein (Aap). Here, we investigate the role of Aap in skin adhesion. Aap is an LPXTG protein with a domain architecture including a terminal A domain and a B-repeat region. S. epidermidis NCTC 11047 expresses Aap as localized, lateral tufts of fibrils on one subpopulation of cells (Fib+), whereas a second subpopulation does not express these fibrils of Aap (Fib−). Flow cytometry showed that 72% of NCTC 11047 cells expressed Aap and that 28% of cells did not. Aap is involved in the adhesion of Fib+ cells to squamous epithelial cells from the hand (corneocytes), as the recombinant A-domain protein partially blocked binding to corneocytes. To confirm the role of the Aap A domain in corneocyte attachment, Aap was expressed on the surface of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 as sparsely distributed, peritrichous fibrils. The expression of Aap increased corneocyte adhesion 20-fold compared to L. lactis carrying Aap without an A domain. S. epidermidis isolates from catheters, artificial joints, skin, and the nose also used the A domain of Aap to adhere to corneocytes, emphasizing the role of Aap in skin adhesion. In addition, L. lactis expressing Aap with different numbers of B repeats revealed a positive correlation between the number of B repeats and adhesion to corneocytes, suggesting an additional function for the B region in enhancing A-domain-dependent attachment to skin. Therefore, in addition to its established role in biofilm formation, Aap can also promote adhesion to corneocytes and is likely to be an important adhesin in S. epidermidis skin colonization. PMID:19749046

  8. Accumulated SET protein up-regulates and interacts with hnRNPK, increasing its binding to nucleic acids, the Bcl-xS repression, and cellular proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, Luciana O.; Garcia, Cristiana B.; Matos-Silva, Flavia A.; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M.

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • hnRNPK is a new target of SET. • SET regulates hnRNPK. • SET and hnRNPK accumulation promotes tumorigenesis. • SET accumulation is a potential model to study genes regulated by SET-hnRNPK. - Abstract: SET and hnRNPK are proteins involved in gene expression and regulation of cellular signaling. We previously demonstrated that SET accumulates in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); hnRNPK is a prognostic marker in cancer. Here, we postulate that SET and hnRNPK proteins interact to promote tumorigenesis. We performed studies in HEK293 and HNSCC (HN6, HN12, and HN13) cell lines with SET/hnRNPK overexpression and knockdown, respectively. We found that SET and/or hnRNPK protein accumulation increased cellular proliferation. SET accumulation up-regulated hnRNPK mRNA and total/phosphorylated protein, promoted hnRNPK nuclear location, and reduced Bcl-x mRNA levels. SET protein directly interacted with hnRNPK, increasing both its binding to nucleic acids and Bcl-xS repression. We propose that hnRNPK should be a new target of SET and that SET–hnRNPK interaction, in turn, has potential implications in cell survival and malignant transformation.

  9. Dietary supplementation with soy isoflavones or replacement with soy proteins prevents hepatic lipid droplet accumulation and alters expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chao Wu; Wood, Carla M; Weber, Dorcas; Aziz, Syed A; Mehta, Rekha; Griffin, Philip; Cockell, Kevin A

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of hepatic lipid droplet (HLD) is the hallmark pathology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This study examined the effects of soy isoflavones (ISF) and different amounts of soy proteins on the accumulation of HLD, lipid metabolism and related gene expression in rats. Weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets containing either 20 % casein protein without (D1) or with (D2) supplemental ISF (50 mg/kg diet) or substitution of casein with increasing amounts of alcohol-washed soy protein isolate (SPI, 5, 10, and 20 %; D3, D4, D5) for 90 days. Dietary casein (20 %) induced accumulation of HLD in female, but not in male rats. Both soy proteins and ISF remarkably prevented the formation of HLD. Soy proteins lowered hepatic total cholesterol and triglyceride in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, soy proteins but not ISF significantly increased free fatty acids in the liver of the female rats compared to D1. Proteomic analysis showed that at least 3 enzymes involved in lipogenesis were down-regulated and 7 proteins related to fatty acid β-oxidation or lipolysis were up-regulated by soy protein over D1. Additionally, 9 differentially expressed proteins identified were related to amino acid metabolism, 5 to glycolysis and 2 to cholesterol metabolism. Dietary ISF and SPI markedly reduced hepatic-peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2) and fat-specific protein 27 (FSP27) in female rats. Overall, this study has shown that partial or full replacement of dietary casein by soy protein or supplementation with soy ISF can effectively prevent the accumulation of HLD. The potential molecular mechanism(s) involved might be due to suppression of lipogenesis and stimulation of lipolysis and down-regulation of PPARγ2 and FSP27. This suggests that consumption of soy foods or supplements might be a useful strategy for the prevention or treatment of fatty liver diseases.

  10. Fatty Acid Transport Protein-2 inhibitor Grassofermata/CB5 protects cells against lipid accumulation and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Nipun; Black, Paul N.; Montefusco, David; DiRusso, Concetta C.

    2015-01-01

    The inhibition of the fatty acid uptake into non-adipose tissues provides an attractive target for prevention of lipotoxicity leading to obesity-associated non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes. Fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) are bifunctional proteins involved in the uptake and activation of fatty acids by esterification with coenzyme A. Here we characterize Grassofermata/CB5, previously identified as a fatty acid uptake inhibitor directed against HsFATP2. The compound was effective in inhibiting the uptake of fatty acids in the low micro-molar range (IC50 8–11μM) and prevented palmitate-mediated lipid accumulation and cell death in cell lines that are models for intestines, liver, muscle and pancreas. In adipocytes, uptake inhibition was less effective (IC50 58μM). Inhibition was specific for long chain fatty acids and was ineffective toward medium chain fatty acids, which are transported by diffusion. Kinetic analysis of Grassofermata-dependent FA transport inhibition verified a non-competitive mechanism. By comparison with Grassofermata, several atypical antipsychotic drugs previously implicated as inhibitors of FA uptake were ineffectual. In mice Grassofermata decreased absorption of 13C-oleate demonstrating its potential as a therapeutic agent. PMID:26284975

  11. The actin-related protein hArp8 accumulates on the mitotic chromosomes and functions in chromosome alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Naoki; Oka, Asako; Kitayama, Kumiko; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Harata, Masahiko

    2008-02-15

    The actin family consists of conventional actin and various actin-related proteins (Arps). Some of these Arps are localized in the nucleus, and a fraction of each of these nuclear Arps is functionally involved in chromatin remodeling and histone acetyltransferase complexes. On the other hand, in mitotic cells, the localization and function of the nuclear Arps are largely unknown. Human Arp8 (hArp8), an ortholog of yeast nuclear Arp8, was recently found to be associated with the hINO80-chromatin remodeling complex along with hArp5. Here we report that hArp8, but not hArp5, accumulates on mitotic chromosomes. This is the first example where a member of the actin family is found to be associated with mitotic chromosomes. Expression of truncated hArp8 proteins and depletion of endogenous hArp8 by RNA interference caused misalignment of mitotic chromosomes, suggesting that chromosome-associated hArp8 has a role in chromosome behavior. In contrast, depletion of hIno80 and hArp5 did not cause misalignment of chromosomes, suggesting that the role of hArp8 at mitotic chromosomes is independent of the activity of hINO80 complexes. These findings provide the first insight into a novel function of actin family members in mitosis.

  12. Intermediate filament protein accumulation in motor neurons derived from giant axonal neuropathy iPSCs rescued by restoration of gigaxonin.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Kerner, Bethany L; Ahmad, Faizzan S; Diaz, Alejandro Garcia; Greene, John Palmer; Gray, Steven J; Samulski, Richard Jude; Chung, Wendy K; Van Coster, Rudy; Maertens, Paul; Noggle, Scott A; Henderson, Christopher E; Wichterle, Hynek

    2015-03-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the GAN gene resulting in a loss of a ubiquitously expressed protein, gigaxonin. Gene replacement therapy is a promising strategy for treatment of the disease; however, the effectiveness and safety of gigaxonin reintroduction have not been tested in human GAN nerve cells. Here we report the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from three GAN patients with different GAN mutations. Motor neurons differentiated from GAN iPSCs exhibit accumulation of neurofilament (NF-L) and peripherin (PRPH) protein and formation of PRPH aggregates, the key pathological phenotypes observed in patients. Introduction of gigaxonin either using a lentiviral vector or as a stable transgene resulted in normalization of NEFL and PRPH levels in GAN neurons and disappearance of PRPH aggregates. Importantly, overexpression of gigaxonin had no adverse effect on survival of GAN neurons, supporting the feasibility of gene replacement therapy. Our findings demonstrate that GAN iPSCs provide a novel model for studying human GAN neuropathologies and for the development and testing of new therapies in relevant cell types.

  13. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  14. A potential screening factor for accumulation of cholesteyl ester transfer protein deficiency in East Asia: Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Shinji

    2014-04-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP)-deficiency manifests a unique plasma lipoprotein profile without other apparent symptoms. It is highly common in East Asia while rather rare anywhere else. A potential environmental screening factor(s) may therefore contribute to this eccentric distribution, such as its selective advantage against a regional illness, most likely an infectious disease, in relation to plasma lipoproteins. Blood flukes use the host plasma lipoproteins as nutrient sources through the lipoprotein receptor-like systems. Its Asian-specific species, Schistosoma (S) japonicum, which has been endemic in East Asia, takes up cholesteryl ester (CE) from high-density lipoprotein (HDL) for the embryonation of their eggs to miracidia, a critical step of the hepatic pathogenesis of this parasite, but poorly from HDL of CETP-deficiency. CD36-related protein (CD36RP) was cloned from the adults and the eggs of S. japonicum, with 1880-bp encoding 506 amino-acid residues exhibiting the CD36 domains and two transmembrane regions. Its extracellular domain selectively bound human HDL but neither LDL nor CETP-deficiency HDL, and the antibody against the extracellular domain suppressed the selective HDL-CE uptake and embryonation of the eggs. When infected with S. japonicum, wild-type mice developed less hepatic granulomatosis than CETP-transgenic mice by the ectopic egg embryonation. CD36RP is thus a candidate receptor of S. japonicum to facilitate uptake of HDL-CE necessary for egg embryonation. Abnormal HDL caused by CETP-deficiency retards this process and thereby protects the patients from development of hepatic lesions. S. japonicum infection is a potential screening factor for high prevalence of CETP deficiency in East Asia. PMID:24388961

  15. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA targeted against the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus transcriptional activator protein gene efficiently block the viral DNA accumulation.

    PubMed

    Shanmugapriya, Gnanasekaran; Das, Sudhanshu Sekhar; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-06-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) is a bipartite begomovirus that infects many pulse crops such as blackgram, mungbean, mothbean, Frenchbean, and soybean. We tested the efficacy of the transgenically expressed intron-spliced hairpin RNA gene of the transcriptional activator protein (hpTrAP) in reducing MYMV DNA accumulation. Tobacco plants transformed with the MYMV hpTrAP gene accumulated 21-22 nt siRNA. Leaf discs of the transgenic plants, agroinoculated with the partial dimers of MYMV, displayed pronounced reduction in MYMV DNA accumulation. Thus, silencing of the TrAP gene, a suppressor of gene silencing, emerged as an effective strategy to control MYMV. PMID:26436122

  16. Delayed accumulation of the yeast G1 cyclins Cln1 and Cln2 and the F-box protein Grr1 in response to glucose.

    PubMed

    Fey, Julien P; Lanker, Stefan

    2007-05-01

    The ability to integrate nutrient availability into cell cycle regulation is critical for the viability of organisms. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ubiquitin ligase SCF(Grr1) regulates the stability of several proteins that participate in cell division or nutrient sensing. Two of its targets, the cyclins Cln1 and Cln2, accumulate in the presence of glucose. When glucose is added to cells growing asynchronously, we show that the accumulation of the cyclins is a very slow response. We report that the F-box protein Grr1 also accumulates at higher levels in the presence of glucose, and that the response to glucose follows a delayed pattern strikingly similar to that described for Cln1 and Cln2. A model for the regulation of F-box proteins predicts that substrate accumulation could stabilize Grr1. While we found that Grr1 is more stable in cells growing with glucose, we show that the delayed responses to glucose occur independently: Grr1 accumulates in the absence of the cyclins, and vice versa. Thus, our results indicate that this model might not apply to the cyclins and Grr1. Glucose is known to strengthen the interaction of Grr1 with Skp1 in the SCF complex. We hypothesize that glucose could promote the accumulation of Grr1 and its assembly into a SCF complex as a feedback regulation that helps compensate for higher cyclins levels.

  17. Final Report for CRADA Agreement , AL-C-2006-01 with Microsens Biotechnologies: Detection of the Abnormal Prion Protein in Blood by Improving the Extraction of this Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerr, Mary Jo

    2009-03-31

    Several conditions were examined to optimize the extraction protocol using Seprion beads for the abnormal prion protein. Different combinations of water, hexafluro-2-propanol and formic acid were used. The results of these extraction protocols showed that the magnetic beads coated with Seprion reagents were subject to degradation, themselves, when the extraction conditions that would solubilize the abnormal prion protein were used. These compounds caused interference in the immunoassay for the abnormal prion protein and rendered these protocols incompatible with the assay systems. In an attempt to overcome this problem, another approach was then used. The coated beads were used as an integral part of the assay platform. After washing away denaturing agents, the beads with the 'captured' abnormal prion were incubated directly in the immunoassay, followed by analysis by the capillary electrophoresis. When a capillary electrophoresis electro-kinetic separation was attempted, the beads disturbed the analysis making it impossible to interpret. A pressure separation method was then developed for capillary electrophoresis analysis. When 20 samples, 5 of which were positive were analyzed, the assay identified 4 of the 5 positives and had no false positives. When a larger number of samples were analyzed the results were not as good - there were false positives and false negatives. It was then observed that the amount of beads that were loaded was dependent upon how long the beads were allowed to settle before loading them into the capillary. This resulted in unacceptable variations in the results and explained that when large numbers of samples were evaluated the results were not consistent. Because the technical difficulties with using the Seprion beads could not be overcome at this time, another approach is underway that is outside of the scope of this CRADA. No further agreements have been developed. Because the results were not favorable, no manuscripts were written nor

  18. Proportional accumulation of yolk proteins derived from multiple vitellogenins is precisely regulated during vitellogenesis in striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Williams, Valerie N; Reading, Benjamin J; Amano, Haruna; Hiramatsu, Naoshi; Schilling, Justin; Salger, Scott A; Islam Williams, Taufika; Gross, Kevin; Sullivan, Craig V

    2014-07-01

    We quantified three vitellogenins (VtgAa, VtgAb, VtgC) or their derived yolk proteins (YPs) in the liver, plasma, and ovary during pre-vitellogenic (PreVG), mid-vitellogenic (MVG), and late-vitellogenic (LVG) oocyte growth and during post-vitellogenesis (PostVG) in the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (MS). Western blotting of the samples using antisera raised against gray mullet (Mugil cephalus) lipovitellins derived from VtgAa, VtgAb, and VtgC confirmed the MS results. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed liver as the primary site of expression for all three Vtgs, with extra-hepatic transcription weakly detected in ovary, foregut, adipose tissue, and brain. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR confirmed vtgAb to be primarily expressed in liver and VtgAb proteins were predominant in liver and plasma from MVG to PostVG. However, the primary period of deposition into oocytes of VtgAb occurred up until MVG, whereas VtgAa was primarily deposited from MVG to LVG. The VtgC was gradually taken up by oocytes throughout vitellogenesis and was detected at trace levels in plasma. The ratio of yolk proteins derived from VtgAa, VtgAb, VtgC (YPAa/YPAb/YPC) in PostVG ovary is 1.4:1.4:1, which differs from ratios previously reported for other fish species in that YPC comprises a greater proportion of the egg yolk. Our results indicate that proportional accumulation of multiple Vtgs in the yolk may depend both on the precise rates of their hepatic secretion and specific uptake by oocytes. Furthermore, composition of the Vtg-derived yolk may vary among Acanthomorph fishes, perhaps reflecting their different early life histories and reproductive strategies. PMID:24648375

  19. Proportional accumulation of yolk proteins derived from multiple vitellogenins is precisely regulated during vitellogenesis in striped bass (Morone saxatilis).

    PubMed

    Williams, Valerie N; Reading, Benjamin J; Amano, Haruna; Hiramatsu, Naoshi; Schilling, Justin; Salger, Scott A; Islam Williams, Taufika; Gross, Kevin; Sullivan, Craig V

    2014-07-01

    We quantified three vitellogenins (VtgAa, VtgAb, VtgC) or their derived yolk proteins (YPs) in the liver, plasma, and ovary during pre-vitellogenic (PreVG), mid-vitellogenic (MVG), and late-vitellogenic (LVG) oocyte growth and during post-vitellogenesis (PostVG) in the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) using label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (MS). Western blotting of the samples using antisera raised against gray mullet (Mugil cephalus) lipovitellins derived from VtgAa, VtgAb, and VtgC confirmed the MS results. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed liver as the primary site of expression for all three Vtgs, with extra-hepatic transcription weakly detected in ovary, foregut, adipose tissue, and brain. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR confirmed vtgAb to be primarily expressed in liver and VtgAb proteins were predominant in liver and plasma from MVG to PostVG. However, the primary period of deposition into oocytes of VtgAb occurred up until MVG, whereas VtgAa was primarily deposited from MVG to LVG. The VtgC was gradually taken up by oocytes throughout vitellogenesis and was detected at trace levels in plasma. The ratio of yolk proteins derived from VtgAa, VtgAb, VtgC (YPAa/YPAb/YPC) in PostVG ovary is 1.4:1.4:1, which differs from ratios previously reported for other fish species in that YPC comprises a greater proportion of the egg yolk. Our results indicate that proportional accumulation of multiple Vtgs in the yolk may depend both on the precise rates of their hepatic secretion and specific uptake by oocytes. Furthermore, composition of the Vtg-derived yolk may vary among Acanthomorph fishes, perhaps reflecting their different early life histories and reproductive strategies.

  20. Pho85p, a cyclin-dependent protein kinase, and the Snf1p protein kinase act antagonistically to control glycogen accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, D; Farkas, I; Roach, P J

    1996-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, nutrient levels control multiple cellular processes. Cells lacking the SNF1 gene cannot express glucose-repressible genes and do not accumulate the storage polysaccharide glycogen. The impaired glycogen synthesis is due to maintenance of glycogen synthase in a hyperphosphorylated, inactive state. In a screen for second site suppressors of the glycogen storage defect of snf1 cells, we identified a mutant gene that restored glycogen accumulation and which was allelic with PHO85, which encodes a member of the cyclin-dependent kinase family. In cells with disrupted PHO85 genes, we observed hyperaccumulation of glycogen, activation of glycogen synthase, and impaired glycogen synthase kinase activity. In snf1 cells, glycogen synthase kinase activity was elevated. Partial purification of glycogen synthase kinase activity from yeast extracts resulted in the separation of two fractions by phenyl-Sepharose chromatography, both of which phosphorylated and inactivated glycogen synthase. The activity of one of these, GPK2, was inhibited by olomoucine, which potently inhibits cyclin-dependent protein kinases, and contained an approximately 36-kDa species that reacted with antibodies to Pho85p. Analysis of Ser-to-Ala mutations at the three potential Gsy2p phosphorylation sites in pho85 cells implicated Ser-654 and/or Thr-667 in PHO85 control of glycogen synthase. We propose that Pho85p is a physiological glycogen synthase kinase, possibly acting downstream of Snf1p. PMID:8754836

  1. Small-molecule structure correctors target abnormal protein structure and function: structure corrector rescue of apolipoprotein E4-associated neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Mahley, Robert W; Huang, Yadong

    2012-11-01

    An attractive strategy to treat proteinopathies (diseases caused by malformed or misfolded proteins) is to restore protein function by inducing proper three-dimensional structure. We hypothesized that this approach would be effective in reversing the detrimental effects of apolipoprotein (apo) E4, the major allele that significantly increases the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. ApoE4's detrimental effects result from its altered protein conformation ("domain interaction"), making it highly susceptible to proteolytic cleavage and the generation of neurotoxic fragments. Here, we review apoE structure and function and how apoE4 causes neurotoxicity, and describe the identification of potent small-molecule-based "structure correctors" that induce proper apoE4 folding. SAR studies identified a series of small molecules that significantly reduced apoE4's neurotoxic effects in cultured neurons and a series that reduced apoE4 fragment levels in vivo, providing proof-of-concept for our approach. Structure-corrector-based therapies could prove to be highly effective for the treatment of many protein-misfolding diseases.

  2. Early ALS-type gait abnormalities in AMP-dependent protein kinase-deficient mice suggest a role for this metabolic sensor in early stages of the disease.

    PubMed

    Vergouts, Maxime; Marinangeli, Claudia; Ingelbrecht, Caroline; Genard, Geraldine; Schakman, Olivier; Sternotte, Anthony; Calas, André-Guilhem; Hermans, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective loss of motoneurons. While the principal cause of the disease remains so far unknown, the onset and progression of the pathology are increasingly associated with alterations in the control of cell metabolism. On the basis of the well-known key roles of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in sensing and regulating the intracellular energy status, we hypothesized that mice with a genetic deletion of AMPK would develop locomotor abnormalities that bear similarity with those detected in the very early disease stage of mice carrying the ALS-associated mutated gene hSOD1(G93A). Using an automated gait analysis system (CatWalk), we here show that hSOD1(G93A) mice and age-matched mice lacking the neuronal and skeletal muscle predominant α2 catalytic subunit of AMPK showed an altered gait, clearly different from wild type control mice. Double mutant mice lacking AMPK α2 and carrying hSOD1(G93A) showed the same early gait abnormalities as hSOD1(G93A) mice over an age span of 8 to 16 weeks. Taken together, these data support the concept that altered AMPK function and associated bioenergetic abnormalities could constitute an important component in the early pathogenesis of ALS. Therapeutic interventions acting on metabolic pathways could prove beneficial on early locomotor deficits, which are sensitively detectable in rodent models using the CatWalk system. PMID:26152932

  3. Protein cryoprotective activity of a cytosolic small heat shock protein that accumulates constitutively in chestnut stems and is up-regulated by low and high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Matas, Maria-Angeles; Nuñez, Paulina; Soto, Alvaro; Allona, Isabel; Casado, Rosa; Collada, Carmen; Guevara, Maria-Angeles; Aragoncillo, Cipriano; Gomez, Luis

    2004-04-01

    Heat shock, and other stresses that cause protein misfolding and aggregation, trigger the accumulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in virtually all organisms. Among the HSPs of higher plants, those belonging to the small HSP (sHSP) family remain the least characterized in functional terms. We analyzed the occurrence of sHSPs in vegetative organs of Castanea sativa (sweet chestnut), a temperate woody species that exhibits remarkable freezing tolerance. A constitutive sHSP subject to seasonal periodic changes of abundance was immunodetected in stems. This protein was identified by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry and internal peptide sequencing as CsHSP17.5, a cytosolic class I sHSP previously described in cotyledons. Expression of the corresponding gene in stems was confirmed through cDNA cloning and reverse transcription-PCR. Stem protein and mRNA profiles indicated that CsHSP17.5 is significantly up-regulated in spring and fall, reaching maximal levels in late summer and, especially, in winter. In addition, cold exposure was found to quickly activate shsp gene expression in both stems and roots of chestnut seedlings kept in growth chambers. Our main finding is that purified CsHSP17.5 is very effective in protecting the cold-labile enzyme lactate dehydrogenase from freeze-induced inactivation (on a molar basis, CsHSP17.5 is about 400 times more effective as cryoprotectant than hen egg-white lysozyme). Consistent with these observations, repeated freezing/thawing did not affect appreciably the chaperone activity of diluted CsHSP17.5 nor its ability to form dodecameric complexes in vitro. Taken together, these results substantiate the hypothesis that sHSPs can play relevant roles in the acquisition of freezing tolerance.

  4. Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx)-induced abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism revealed by 1H-NMR-based metabonomics

    PubMed Central

    Dan Yue; Zhang, Yuwei; Cheng, Liuliu; Ma, Jinhu; Xi, Yufeng; Yang, Liping; Su, Chao; Shao, Bin; Huang, Anliang; Xiang, Rong; Cheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays an important role in HBV-related hepatocarcinogenesis; however, mechanisms underlying HBx-mediated carcinogenesis remain unclear. In this study, an NMR-based metabolomics approach was applied to systematically investigate the effects of HBx on cell metabolism. EdU incorporation assay was conducted to examine the effects of HBx on DNA synthesis, an important feature of nucleic acid metabolism. The results revealed that HBx disrupted metabolism of glucose, lipids, and amino acids, especially nucleic acids. To understand the potential mechanism of HBx-induced abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism, gene expression profiles of HepG2 cells expressing HBx were investigated. The results showed that 29 genes involved in DNA damage and DNA repair were differentially expressed in HBx-expressing HepG2 cells. HBx-induced DNA damage was further demonstrated by karyotyping, comet assay, Western blotting, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry analyses. Many studies have previously reported that DNA damage can induce abnormalities of nucleic acid metabolism. Thus, our results implied that HBx initially induces DNA damage, and then disrupts nucleic acid metabolism, which in turn blocks DNA repair and induces the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These findings further contribute to our understanding of the occurrence of HCC. PMID:27075403

  5. A Novel Asp121Asn Mutation of Myelin Protein Zero Is Associated with Late-Onset Axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease, Hearing Loss and Pupil Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaohui; Gu, Weihong; Hao, Ying; Wang, Renbin; Wen, Hong; Sun, Shaojie; Jiao, Jinsong; Fan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Myelin protein zero (MPZ) is a major component of compact myelin in peripheral nerves. Mutations in MPZ have been associated with different Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMT) phenotypes (CMT1B, CMT2I/J, CMTDI), Dejerine–Sottas syndrome, and congenital hypomyelination neuropathy. Here, we report phenotypic variability in a four-generation Chinese family with the MPZ mutation Asp121Asn. Genetic testing was performed on nine family members and 200 controls. Clinical, electrophysiological and skeletal muscle MRI assessments were available for review in six family members. A novel heterozygous missense mutation, Asp121Asn, was observed in five affected members of the family. Unaffected relatives and 200 normal controls were without the mutation. Four of the affected members of the family displayed late-onset, predominantly axonal sensory and motor neuropathy, pupil abnormalities, and progressive sensorineural hearing loss. One young affected member presented with Argyll–Robertson pupils and diminished deep tendon reflexes in the lower limbs. The MPZ mutation Asp121Asn may be associated with late-onset axonal neuropathy, early onset hearing loss and pupil abnormalities. Our report expands the number and phenotypic spectrum of MPZ mutations. PMID:27774063

  6. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species regulate the accumulation of heat shock proteins in tomato leaves in response to heat shock and pathogen infection.

    PubMed

    Piterková, Jana; Luhová, Lenka; Mieslerová, Barbora; Lebeda, Aleš; Petřivalský, Marek

    2013-06-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) are produced in response to various stress stimuli to prevent cell damage. We evaluated the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the accumulation of Hsp70 proteins in tomato leaves induced by abiotic and biotic stress stimuli. A model system of leaf discs was used with two tomato genotypes, Solanum lycopersicum cv. Amateur and Solanum chmielewskii, differing in their resistance to fungal pathogen Oidium neolycopersici. Leaf discs were exposed to stress factors as heat shock and pathogen infection alone or in a combination, and treated with substances modulating endogenous NO and ROS levels. Two proteins of Hsp70 family were detected in stressed tomato leaf discs: a heat-inducible 72 kDa protein and a constitutive 75 kDa protein. The pathogenesis and mechanical stress influenced Hsp75 accumulation, whereas heat stress induced mainly Hsp72 production. Treatment with NO donor and NO scavenger significantly modulated the level of Hsp70 in variable manner related to the genotype resistance. Hsp70 accumulation correlated with endogenous NO level in S. lycopersicum and ROS levels in S. chmielewskii. We conclude NO and ROS are involved in the regulation of Hsp70 production and accumulation under abiotic and biotic stresses in dependence on plant ability to trigger its defence mechanisms. PMID:23602099

  7. Proteomics Profiling Reveals Carbohydrate Metabolic Enzymes and 14-3-3 Proteins Play Important Roles for Starch Accumulation during Cassava Root Tuberization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuchu; Chang, Lili; Tong, Zheng; Wang, Dongyang; Yin, Qi; Wang, Dan; Jin, Xiang; Yang, Qian; Wang, Liming; Sun, Yong; Huang, Qixing; Guo, Anping; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cassava is one of the most important root crops as a reliable source of food and carbohydrates. Carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation in cassava storage root is a cascade process that includes large amounts of proteins and cofactors. Here, comparative proteomics were conducted in cassava root at nine developmental stages. A total of 154 identified proteins were found to be differentially expressed during starch accumulation and root tuberization. Many enzymes involved in starch and sucrose metabolism were significantly up-regulated, and functional classification of the differentially expressed proteins demonstrated that the majority were binding-related enzymes. Many proteins were took part in carbohydrate metabolism to produce energy. Among them, three 14-3-3 isoforms were induced to be clearly phosphorylated during storage root enlargement. Overexpression of a cassava 14-3-3 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana confirmed that the older leaves of these transgenic plants contained higher sugar and starch contents than the wild-type leaves. The 14-3-3 proteins and their binding enzymes may play important roles in carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root tuberization. These results not only deepened our understanding of the tuberous root proteome, but also uncovered new insights into carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root enlargement. PMID:26791570

  8. Proteomics Profiling Reveals Carbohydrate Metabolic Enzymes and 14-3-3 Proteins Play Important Roles for Starch Accumulation during Cassava Root Tuberization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuchu; Chang, Lili; Tong, Zheng; Wang, Dongyang; Yin, Qi; Wang, Dan; Jin, Xiang; Yang, Qian; Wang, Liming; Sun, Yong; Huang, Qixing; Guo, Anping; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-21

    Cassava is one of the most important root crops as a reliable source of food and carbohydrates. Carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation in cassava storage root is a cascade process that includes large amounts of proteins and cofactors. Here, comparative proteomics were conducted in cassava root at nine developmental stages. A total of 154 identified proteins were found to be differentially expressed during starch accumulation and root tuberization. Many enzymes involved in starch and sucrose metabolism were significantly up-regulated, and functional classification of the differentially expressed proteins demonstrated that the majority were binding-related enzymes. Many proteins were took part in carbohydrate metabolism to produce energy. Among them, three 14-3-3 isoforms were induced to be clearly phosphorylated during storage root enlargement. Overexpression of a cassava 14-3-3 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana confirmed that the older leaves of these transgenic plants contained higher sugar and starch contents than the wild-type leaves. The 14-3-3 proteins and their binding enzymes may play important roles in carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root tuberization. These results not only deepened our understanding of the tuberous root proteome, but also uncovered new insights into carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root enlargement.

  9. Role for the A domain of unprocessed accumulation-associated protein (Aap) in the attachment phase of the Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm phenotype.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Brian P; Geoghegan, Joan A; Waters, Elaine M; McCarthy, Hannah; Rowe, Sarah E; Davies, Julia R; Schaeffer, Carolyn R; Foster, Timothy J; Fey, Paul D; O'Gara, James P

    2014-12-01

    The polysaccharide intercellular adhesin or the cell wall-anchored accumulation-associated protein (Aap) mediates cellular accumulation during Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm maturation. Mutation of sortase, which anchors up to 11 proteins (including Aap) to the cell wall, blocked biofilm development by the cerebrospinal fluid isolate CSF41498. Aap was implicated in this phenotype when Western blots and two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis revealed increased levels of the protein in culture supernatants. Unexpectedly, reduced levels of primary attachment were associated with impaired biofilm formation by CSF41498 srtA and aap mutants. In contrast to previous studies, which implicated Aap proteolytic cleavage and, specifically, the Aap B domains in biofilm accumulation, the CSF41498 Aap protein was unprocessed. Furthermore, aap appeared to play a less important role in the biofilm phenotype of S. epidermidis 1457, in which the Aap protein is processed. Anti-Aap A-domain IgG inhibited primary attachment and biofilm formation in strain CSF41498 but not in strain 1457. The nucleotide sequences of the aap gene A-domain region and cleavage site in strains CSF41498 and 1457 were identical, implicating altered protease activity in the differential Aap processing results in the two strains. These data reveal a new role for the A domain of unprocessed Aap in the attachment phase of biofilm formation and suggest that extracellular protease activity can influence whether Aap contributes to the attachment or accumulation phases of the S. epidermidis biofilm phenotype.

  10. Abnormal centrosome amplification in cells through the targeting of Ran-binding protein-1 by the human T cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Peloponese, Jean-Marie; Haller, Kerstin; Miyazato, Akiko; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2005-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus etiologically causal of adult T cell leukemia. The virus encodes a Tax oncoprotein that functions in transcriptional regulation, cell cycle control, and transformation. Because adult T cell leukemia like many other human cancers is a disease of genomic instability with frequent gains and losses of chromosomes, to understand this disease it is important to comprehend how HTLV-1 engenders aneuploidy in host cells. In this regard, loss of cell cycle checkpoints permits tolerance of aneuploidy but does not explain how aneuploidy is created. We show here that HTLV-1 Tax causes abnormal centrosome fragmentation in the mitotic phase of the cell cycle. We report that Tax directly binds Ran and Ran-binding protein-1, locates to centrosomes/spindle poles, and causes supernumerary centrosomes. PMID:16365316

  11. Disruption of the gene encoding the latent transforming growth factor-β binding protein 4 (LTBP-4) causes abnormal lung development, cardiomyopathy, and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sterner-Kock, Anja; Thorey, Irmgard S.; Koli, Katri; Wempe, Frank; Otte, Jürgen; Bangsow, Thorsten; Kuhlmeier, Katharina; Kirchner, Thomas; Jin, Shenchu; Keski-Oja, Jorma; von Melchner, Harald

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-βs (TGF-βs) are multifunctional growth factors that are secreted as inactive (latent) precursors in large protein complexes. These complexes include the latency-associated propeptide (LAP) and a latent transforming growth factor-β binding protein (LTBP). Four isoforms of LTBPs (LTBP-1–LTBP-4) have been cloned and are believed to be structural components of connective tissue microfibrils and local regulators of TGF-β tissue deposition and signaling. By using a gene trap strategy that selects for integrations into genes induced transiently during early mouse development, we have disrupted the mouse homolog of the human LTBP-4 gene. Mice homozygous for the disrupted allele develop severe pulmonary emphysema, cardiomyopathy, and colorectal cancer. These highly tissue-specific abnormalities are associated with profound defects in the elastic fiber structure and with a reduced deposition of TGF-β in the extracellular space. As a consequence, epithelial cells have reduced levels of phosphorylated Smad2 proteins, overexpress c-myc, and undergo uncontrolled proliferation. This phenotype supports the predicted dual role of LTBP-4 as a structural component of the extracellular matrix and as a local regulator of TGF-β tissue deposition and signaling. PMID:12208849

  12. Fatty acid transport protein-2 inhibitor Grassofermata/CB5 protects cells against lipid accumulation and toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, Nipun; Black, Paul N.; Montefusco, David; DiRusso, Concetta C.

    2015-09-25

    The inhibition of the fatty acid uptake into non-adipose tissues provides an attractive target for prevention of lipotoxicity leading to obesity-associated non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes. Fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) are bifunctional proteins involved in the uptake and activation of fatty acids by esterification with coenzyme A. Here we characterize Grassofermata/CB5, previously identified as a fatty acid uptake inhibitor directed against HsFATP2. The compound was effective in inhibiting the uptake of fatty acids in the low micro-molar range (IC{sub 50} 8–11 μM) and prevented palmitate-mediated lipid accumulation and cell death in cell lines that are models for intestines, liver, muscle and pancreas. In adipocytes, uptake inhibition was less effective (IC{sub 50} 58 μM). Inhibition was specific for long chain fatty acids and was ineffective toward medium chain fatty acids, which are transported by diffusion. Kinetic analysis of Grassofermata-dependent FA transport inhibition verified a non-competitive mechanism. By comparison with Grassofermata, several atypical antipsychotic drugs previously implicated as inhibitors of FA uptake were ineffectual. In mice Grassofermata decreased absorption of {sup 13}C-oleate demonstrating its potential as a therapeutic agent. - Highlights: • Grassofermata is a small compound inhibitor of FATP2. • Uptake inhibition is specific for long chain fatty acids. • Uptake kinetics shows low specificity for adipocytes compared to other cell types. • Inhibition is by a non-competitive mechanism. • Atypical antipsychotics do not inhibit FA uptake by comparison with Grassofermata.

  13. Cadmium and manganese accumulation in Phytolacca americana L. and the roles of non-protein thiols and organic acids.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lu; Peng, Kejian; Xia, Yan; Wang, Guiping; Niu, Liyuan; Lian, Chunlan; Shen, Zhenguo

    2013-01-01

    Phytolacca americana L. can accumulate large amounts of heavy metals in its aerial tissues, especially cadmium (Cd) and manganese (Mn). It has great potential for use in phytoextraction of metals from multi-metal-contaminated soils. This study was conducted to further investigate the Cd- and Mn-tolerance strategies of this plant. Concentrations of non-protein thiols (NPTs) and phytochelatins (PCs) in leaves and roots increased significantly as the concentration of Cd in solution increased. The molar ratios of PCs:soluble Cd ranged from 1.8 to 3.6 in roots and 8.1 to 31.6 in leaves, suggesting that the cellular response involving PC synthesis was sufficient to complex Cd ions in the cytosol, especially that of leaves. In contrast, excess Mn treatments did not result in a significant increase in NPT or PC concentrations in leaves or roots. Oxalic acid concentrations in leaves of plants exposed to 2 or 20 mM Mn reached 69.4 to 89.3 mg (0.771 to 0.992 mmol) g(-1) dry weight, respectively, which was approximately 3.7- to 8.6-fold higher than the Mn level in the 0.6 M HCl extract. Thus, oxalic acid may play an important role in the detoxification of Mn.

  14. The roles of protein and lipid in the accumulation and distribution of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) in plants grown in biosolids-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bei; Wu, Yali; Zhang, Hongna; Liu, Yu; Hu, Xiaoyu; Huang, Honglin; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2016-09-01

    The roles of protein and lipid in the accumulation and distribution of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) in seven species of plants from biosolids-amended soils were investigated. The PFOS and PFOA root concentration factors (Croot/Csoil) ranged from 1.37 to 4.68 and 1.69 to 10.3 (ng/groot)/(ng/gsoil), respectively, while the translocation factors (Cshoot/Croot) ranged from 0.055 to 0.16 and 0.093 to 1.8 (ng/gshoot)/(ng/groot), respectively. The PFOS and PFOA accumulations in roots correlated positively with root protein contents (P < 0.05), while negatively with root lipid contents (P < 0.05). These suggested the promotion effects of protein and inhibition effects of lipid on root uptake. The translocation factors correlated positively with the ratios between protein contents in shoots to those in roots (P < 0.05), showing the importance of protein on PFOS and PFOA translocation. This study is the first to reveal the different roles of protein and lipid in the accumulation and distribution of PFOS and PFOA in plants. PMID:27381874

  15. Temporal resolution of misfolded prion protein transport, accumulation, glial activation, and neuronal death in the retinas of mice inoculated with scrapie

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, there is a lack of pathologic landmarks to describe the progression of prion disease in vivo. The goal of this work was to determine the temporal relationship between the transport of misfolded prion protein from the brain to the retina, the accumulation of PrPSc in the retina, the respon...

  16. Proteomic analysis reveals differential accumulation of small heat shock proteins and late embryogenesis abundant proteins between ABA-deficient mutant vp5 seeds and wild-type Vp5 seeds in maize.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolin; Gong, Fangping; Yang, Le; Hu, Xiuli; Tai, Fuju; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    ABA is a major plant hormone that plays important roles during many phases of plant life cycle, including seed development, maturity and dormancy, and especially the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. Understanding of the molecular basis of ABA-mediated plant response to stress is of interest not only in basic research on plant adaptation but also in applied research on plant productivity. Maize mutant viviparous-5 (vp5), deficient in ABA biosynthesis in seeds, is a useful material for studying ABA-mediated response in maize. Due to carotenoid deficiency, vp5 endosperm is white, compared to yellow Vp5 endosperm. However, the background difference at proteome level between vp5 and Vp5 seeds is unclear. This study aimed to characterize proteome alterations of maize vp5 seeds and to identify ABA-dependent proteins during seed maturation. We compared the embryo and endosperm proteomes of vp5 and Vp5 seeds by gel-based proteomics. Up to 46 protein spots, most in embryos, were found to be differentially accumulated between vp5 and Vp5. The identified proteins included small heat shock proteins (sHSPs), late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, stress proteins, storage proteins and enzymes among others. However, EMB564, the most abundant LEA protein in maize embryo, accumulated in comparable levels between vp5 and Vp5 embryos, which contrasted to previously characterized, greatly lowered expression of emb564 mRNA in vp5 embryos. Moreover, LEA proteins and sHSPs displayed differential accumulations in vp5 embryos: six out of eight identified LEA proteins decreased while nine sHSPs increased in abundance. Finally, we discussed the possible causes of global proteome alterations, especially the observed differential accumulation of identified LEA proteins and sHSPs in vp5 embryos. The data derived from this study provides new insight into ABA-dependent proteins and ABA-mediated response during maize seed maturation. PMID:25653661

  17. In a model of Batten disease, palmitoyl protein thioesterase-1 deficiency is associated with brown adipose tissue and thermoregulation abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Khaibullina, Alfia; Kenyon, Nicholas; Guptill, Virginia; Quezado, Martha M; Wang, Li; Koziol, Deloris; Wesley, Robert; Moya, Pablo R; Zhang, Zhongjian; Saha, Arjun; Mukherjee, Anil B; Quezado, Zenaide M N

    2012-01-01

    Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a deficiency of palmitoyl-protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1). We have previously shown that children with INCL have increased risk of hypothermia during anesthesia and that PPT1-deficiency in mice is associated with disruption of adaptive energy metabolism, downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), and mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we hypothesized that Ppt1-knockout mice, a well-studied model of INCL that shows many of the neurologic manifestations of the disease, would recapitulate the thermoregulation impairment observed in children with INCL. We also hypothesized that when exposed to cold, Ppt1-knockout mice would be unable to maintain body temperature as in mice thermogenesis requires upregulation of Pgc-1α and uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp-1) in brown adipose tissue. We found that the Ppt1-KO mice had lower basal body temperature as they aged and developed hypothermia during cold exposure. Surprisingly, this inability to maintain body temperature during cold exposure in Ppt1-KO mice was associated with an adequate upregulation of Pgc-1α and Ucp-1 but with lower levels of sympathetic neurotransmitters in brown adipose tissue. In addition, during baseline conditions, brown adipose tissue of Ppt1-KO mice had less vacuolization (lipid droplets) compared to wild-type animals. After cold stress, wild-type animals had significant decreases whereas Ppt1-KO had insignificant changes in lipid droplets compared with baseline measurements, thus suggesting that Ppt1-KO had less lipolysis in response to cold stress. These results uncover a previously unknown phenotype associated with PPT1 deficiency, that of altered thermoregulation, which is associated with impaired lipolysis and neurotransmitter release to brown adipose tissue during cold exposure. These findings suggest that INCL should be added to the list of neurodegenerative

  18. Enzymatic activity of a subtilisin homolog, Tk-SP, from Thermococcus kodakarensis in detergents and its ability to degrade the abnormal prion protein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tk-SP is a member of subtilisin-like serine proteases from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. It has been known that the hyper-stable protease, Tk-SP, could exhibit enzymatic activity even at high temperature and in the presence of chemical denaturants. In this work, the enzymatic activity of Tk-SP was measured in the presence of detergents and EDTA. In addition, we focused to demonstrate that Tk-SP could degrade the abnormal prion protein (PrPSc), a protease-resistant isoform of normal prion protein (PrPC). Results Tk-SP was observed to maintain its proteolytic activity with nonionic surfactants and EDTA at 80°C. We optimized the condition in which Tk-SP functions efficiently, and demonstrated that the enzyme is highly stable in the presence of 0.05% (w/v) nonionic surfactants and 0.01% (w/v) EDTA, retaining up to 80% of its activity. Additionally, we also found that Tk-SP can degrade PrPSc to a level undetectable by western-blot analysis. Conclusions Our results indicate that Tk-SP has a great potential for technological applications, such as thermo-stable detergent additives. In addition, it is also suggested that Tk-SP-containing detergents can be developed to decrease the secondary infection risks of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE). PMID:23448268

  19. Accumulated SET protein up-regulates and interacts with hnRNPK, increasing its binding to nucleic acids, the Bcl-xS repression, and cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luciana O; Garcia, Cristiana B; Matos-Silva, Flavia A; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M

    2014-02-28

    SET and hnRNPK are proteins involved in gene expression and regulation of cellular signaling. We previously demonstrated that SET accumulates in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); hnRNPK is a prognostic marker in cancer. Here, we postulate that SET and hnRNPK proteins interact to promote tumorigenesis. We performed studies in HEK293 and HNSCC (HN6, HN12, and HN13) cell lines with SET/hnRNPK overexpression and knockdown, respectively. We found that SET and/or hnRNPK protein accumulation increased cellular proliferation. SET accumulation up-regulated hnRNPK mRNA and total/phosphorylated protein, promoted hnRNPK nuclear location, and reduced Bcl-x mRNA levels. SET protein directly interacted with hnRNPK, increasing both its binding to nucleic acids and Bcl-xS repression. We propose that hnRNPK should be a new target of SET and that SET-hnRNPK interaction, in turn, has potential implications in cell survival and malignant transformation.

  20. meso-Dihydroguaiaretic acid inhibits hepatic lipid accumulation by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung-Su; Kim, Kyung Jin; Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic lipid accumulation is a major risk factor for dyslipidemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and insulin resistance. The present study was conducted to evaluate hypolipidemic effects of meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (MDA), anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory compound isolated from the Myristica fragrans HOUTT., by oil red O staining, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and Western blot. MDA significantly inhibited insulin-induced hepatic lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. The lipid-lowering effect of MDA was accompanied by increased expression of proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation and decreased expression of lipid synthetic proteins. In addition, MDA activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as determined by phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a downstream target of AMPK. The effects of MDA on lipogenic protein expression were suppressed by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. Taken together, these findings show that MDA inhibits insulin-induced lipid accumulation in human HepG2 cells by suppressing expression of lipogenic proteins through AMPK signaling, suggesting a potent lipid-lowering agent. PMID:21963507

  1. Domains of the cucumber mosaic virus 2b silencing suppressor protein affecting inhibition of salicylic acid-induced resistance and priming of salicylic acid accumulation during infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Murphy, Alex M.; Lewsey, Mathew G.; Westwood, Jack H.; Zhang, Heng-Mu; González, Inmaculada; Canto, Tomás

    2014-01-01

    The cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) 2b silencing suppressor protein allows the virus to overcome resistance to replication and local movement in inoculated leaves of plants treated with salicylic acid (SA), a resistance-inducing plant hormone. In Arabidopsis thaliana plants systemically infected with CMV, the 2b protein also primes the induction of SA biosynthesis during this compatible interaction. We found that CMV infection of susceptible tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) also induced SA accumulation. Utilization of mutant 2b proteins expressed during infection of tobacco showed that the N- and C-terminal domains, which had previously been implicated in regulation of symptom induction, were both required for subversion of SA-induced resistance, while all mutants tested except those affecting the putative phosphorylation domain had lost the ability to prime SA accumulation and expression of the SA-induced marker gene PR-1. PMID:24633701

  2. Synaptic abnormalities and cytoplasmic glutamate receptor aggregates in contactin associated protein-like 2/Caspr2 knockout neurons

    PubMed Central

    Varea, Olga; Martin-de-Saavedra, Maria Dolores; Kopeikina, Katherine J.; Schürmann, Britta; Fleming, Hunter J.; Fawcett-Patel, Jessica M.; Bach, Anthony; Jang, Seil; Peles, Elior; Kim, Eunjoon; Penzes, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Central glutamatergic synapses and the molecular pathways that control them are emerging as common substrates in the pathogenesis of mental disorders. Genetic variation in the contactin associated protein-like 2 (CNTNAP2) gene, including copy number variations, exon deletions, truncations, single nucleotide variants, and polymorphisms have been associated with intellectual disability, epilepsy, schizophrenia, language disorders, and autism. CNTNAP2, encoded by Cntnap2, is required for dendritic spine development and its absence causes disease-related phenotypes in mice. However, the mechanisms whereby CNTNAP2 regulates glutamatergic synapses are not known, and cellular phenotypes have not been investigated in Cntnap2 knockout neurons. Here we show that CNTNAP2 is present in dendritic spines, as well as axons and soma. Structured illumination superresolution microscopy reveals closer proximity to excitatory, rather than inhibitory synaptic markers. CNTNAP2 does not promote the formation of synapses and cultured neurons from Cntnap2 knockout mice do not show early defects in axon and dendrite outgrowth, suggesting that CNTNAP2 is not required at this stage. However, mature neurons from knockout mice show reduced spine density and levels of GluA1 subunits of AMPA receptors in spines. Unexpectedly, knockout neurons show large cytoplasmic aggregates of GluA1. Here we characterize, for the first time to our knowledge, synaptic phenotypes in Cntnap2 knockout neurons and reveal a novel role for CNTNAP2 in GluA1 trafficking. Taken together, our findings provide insight into the biological roles of CNTNAP2 and into the pathogenesis of CNTNAP2-associated neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25918374

  3. Abnormal Expression of Golgi Protein 73 in Clinical Values and Their Role in HBV-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma Diagnosis and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Sai, Wenli; Wang, Li; Zheng, Wenjie; Yang, Junling; Pan, Liuhong; Cai, Yin; Qiu, Liwei; Zhang, Haijian; Wu, Wei; Yao, Dengfu

    2015-01-01

    Background: The up-regulation of hepatic Golgi protein 73 (GP73) is associated with the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the exact mechanism and clinical values of its diagnosis and prognosis still need to be clarified. Objectives: To investigate the clinical values of abnormal liver or circulating GP73 expression and their effect on HCC diagnosis and prognosis. Materials and Methods: The expression of GP73 was investigated in 88 cancerous and self-control non-cancerous tissues using tissue microarrays with immunohisto- chemistry and was confirmed by Western blotting. Circulating GP73 levels were detected in the sera of 281 patients with liver diseases using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: The levels of circulating GP73 expression in the HCC group were higher than those in any group of benign liver diseases or controls. No significant difference was found between GP73 expression and patients’ sex or age, tumor size, or AFP level except for those with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection or distal metastasis (P < 0.05). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity, and specificity for HCC diagnosis were 0.881, 78.34%, and 77.59% for GP73 levels over 70 μg/L or 0.754, 71.97%, and 84.48% for alpha-fetoprotein levels over 50 μg/L, respectively. The total incidence of GP73 plus alpha-fetoprotein was up to 87.26% for HCC. A positive GP73 result with brown particles was mainly located in the cytosol, with a few in the nucleus and none in the cell membrane, with abnormal expression in HCC tissues (480.7 ± 148.7) that was significantly higher (t = 10.730, P < 0.001) than those in their non-cancerous tissues (208.0 ± 66.1). The high GP73 expression in HCC was related to lymph node metastasis (χ2 = 6.940, P = 0.008), gross classification (χ2 = 6.311, P = 0.012), HBV (χ2 = 4.803, P = 0.028), tumor node metastasis staging (χ2 = 4.887, P = 0.027), and five-year survival (χ2 = 5.206, P = 0.023). Conclusions

  4. Amyloid-β Precursor Protein Modulates the Sorting of Testican-1 and Contributes to Its Accumulation in Brain Tissue and Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Arlt, Sönke; Matschke, Jakob; Hartmann, Ursula; Puig, Berta; Ferrer, Isidre; Zürbig, Petra; Glatzel, Markus; Jahn, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation in sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) are unknown but both increased production or impaired clearance likely contribute to aggregation. To understand the potential roles of the extracellular matrix proteoglycan Testican-1 in the pathophysiology of AD, we used samples from AD patients and controls and an in vitro approach. Protein expression analysis showed increased levels of Testican-1 in frontal and temporal cortex of AD patients; histological analysis showed that Testican-1 accumulates and co-aggregates with Aβ plaques in the frontal, temporal and entorhinal cortices of AD patients. Proteomic analysis identified 10 fragments of Testican-1 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from AD patients. HEK293T cells expressing human wild type or mutant Aβ precursor protein (APP) were transfected with Testican-1. The co-expression of both proteins modified the sorting of Testican-1 into the endocytic pathway leading to its transient accumulation in Golgi, which seemed to affect APP processing, as indicated by reduced Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels in APP mutant cells. In conclusion, patient data reflect a clearance impairment that may favor Aβ accumulation in AD brains and our in vitro model supports the notion that the interaction between APP and Testican-1 may be a key step in the production and aggregation of Aβ species. PMID:27486134

  5. Amyloid-β Precursor Protein Modulates the Sorting of Testican-1 and Contributes to Its Accumulation in Brain Tissue and Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Arlt, Sönke; Matschke, Jakob; Hartmann, Ursula; Puig, Berta; Ferrer, Isidre; Zürbig, Petra; Glatzel, Markus; Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Jahn, Holger

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms leading to amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation in sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) are unknown but both increased production or impaired clearance likely contribute to aggregation. To understand the potential roles of the extracellular matrix proteoglycan Testican-1 in the pathophysiology of AD, we used samples from AD patients and controls and an in vitro approach. Protein expression analysis showed increased levels of Testican-1 in frontal and temporal cortex of AD patients; histological analysis showed that Testican-1 accumulates and co-aggregates with Aβ plaques in the frontal, temporal and entorhinal cortices of AD patients. Proteomic analysis identified 10 fragments of Testican-1 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from AD patients. HEK293T cells expressing human wild type or mutant Aβ precursor protein (APP) were transfected with Testican-1. The co-expression of both proteins modified the sorting of Testican-1 into the endocytic pathway leading to its transient accumulation in Golgi, which seemed to affect APP processing, as indicated by reduced Aβ40 and Aβ42 levels in APP mutant cells. In conclusion, patient data reflect a clearance impairment that may favor Aβ accumulation in AD brains and our in vitro model supports the notion that the interaction between APP and Testican-1 may be a key step in the production and aggregation of Aβ species. PMID:27486134

  6. Phophatidylinositol-3 kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin/p70S6K regulates contractile protein accumulation in airway myocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Halayko, Andrew J; Kartha, Sreedharan; Stelmack, Gerald L; McConville, John; Tam, John; Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca; Forsythe, Sean M; Hershenson, Marc B; Solway, Julian

    2004-09-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle in airway remodeling results from myocyte proliferation and hypertrophy. Skeletal and vascular smooth muscle hypertrophy is induced by phosphatidylinositide-3 kinase (PI(3) kinase) via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and p70S6 kinase (p70S6K). We tested the hypothesis that this pathway regulates contractile protein accumulation in cultured canine airway myocytes acquiring an elongated contractile phenotype in serum-free culture. In vitro assays revealed a sustained activation of PI(3) kinase and p70S6K during serum deprivation up to 12 d, with concomitant accumulation of SM22 and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (smMHC) proteins. Immunocytochemistry revealed that activation of PI3K/mTOR/p70S6K occurred almost exclusively in myocytes that acquire the contractile phenotype. Inhibition of PI(3) kinase or mTOR with LY294002 or rapamycin blocked p70S6K activation, prevented formation of large elongated contractile phenotype myocytes, and blocked accumulation of SM22 and smMHC. Inhibition of MEK had no effect. Steady-state mRNA abundance for SM22 and smMHC was unaffected by blocking p70S6K activation. These studies provide primary evidence that PI(3) kinase and mTOR activate p70S6K in airway myocytes leading to the accumulation of contractile apparatus proteins, differentiation, and growth of large, elongated contractile phenotype airway smooth muscle cells. PMID:15105162

  7. Zinc finger protein genes from Cucurbita pepo are promising tools for conferring non-Cucurbitaceae plants with ability to accumulate persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Inui, Hideyuki; Hirota, Matashi; Goto, Junya; Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Kodama, Noriko; Matsui, Tomomi; Yamazaki, Kiyoshi; Eun, Heesoo

    2015-03-01

    Some cultivars of cucumbers, melons, pumpkins, and zucchini, which are members of the Cucurbitaceae family, are uniquely subject to contamination by hydrophobic pollutants such as the organohalogen insecticides DDT. However, the molecular mechanisms for the accumulation of these pollutants in cucurbits have not been determined. Here, cDNA subtraction analysis of Cucurbita pepo cultivars that are low and high accumulators of hydrophobic contaminants revealed that a gene for zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) are preferentially expressed in high accumulators. The cloned CpZFP genes were classified into 2 types: (1) the PBG type, which were expressed in C. pepo cultivars Patty Green, Black Beauty, and Gold Rush, and (2) the BG type, which were expressed in Black Beauty and Gold Rush. Expression of these CpZFP genes in transgenic tobacco plants carrying an aryl hydrocarbon receptor-based inducible gene expression system significantly induced β-glucuronidase activity when the plants were treated with a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compound, indicating that highly hydrophobic PCBs accumulated in the plants. In transgenic tobacco plants carrying CpZFPs, accumulation of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds increased in their aerial parts when they were cultivated in the dioxin-contaminated soil. In summary, we propose that addition of CpZFP genes is a promising tool for conferring noncucurbits with the ability to accumulate hydrophobic contaminants. PMID:25532761

  8. Zinc finger protein genes from Cucurbita pepo are promising tools for conferring non-Cucurbitaceae plants with ability to accumulate persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Inui, Hideyuki; Hirota, Matashi; Goto, Junya; Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Kodama, Noriko; Matsui, Tomomi; Yamazaki, Kiyoshi; Eun, Heesoo

    2015-03-01

    Some cultivars of cucumbers, melons, pumpkins, and zucchini, which are members of the Cucurbitaceae family, are uniquely subject to contamination by hydrophobic pollutants such as the organohalogen insecticides DDT. However, the molecular mechanisms for the accumulation of these pollutants in cucurbits have not been determined. Here, cDNA subtraction analysis of Cucurbita pepo cultivars that are low and high accumulators of hydrophobic contaminants revealed that a gene for zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) are preferentially expressed in high accumulators. The cloned CpZFP genes were classified into 2 types: (1) the PBG type, which were expressed in C. pepo cultivars Patty Green, Black Beauty, and Gold Rush, and (2) the BG type, which were expressed in Black Beauty and Gold Rush. Expression of these CpZFP genes in transgenic tobacco plants carrying an aryl hydrocarbon receptor-based inducible gene expression system significantly induced β-glucuronidase activity when the plants were treated with a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compound, indicating that highly hydrophobic PCBs accumulated in the plants. In transgenic tobacco plants carrying CpZFPs, accumulation of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds increased in their aerial parts when they were cultivated in the dioxin-contaminated soil. In summary, we propose that addition of CpZFP genes is a promising tool for conferring noncucurbits with the ability to accumulate hydrophobic contaminants.

  9. Regulation of G0/G1 Switch Gene 2 (G0S2) Protein Ubiquitination and Stability by Triglyceride Accumulation and ATGL Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Heckmann, Bradlee L.; Zhang, Xiaodong; Saarinen, Alicia M.; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis or lipolysis is catalyzed by the key intracellular triglyceride hydrolase, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). The G0/G1 Switch Gene 2 (G0S2) was recently identified as the major selective inhibitor of ATGL and its hydrolase function. Since G0S2 levels are dynamically linked and rapidly responsive to nutrient status or metabolic requirements, the identification of its regulation at the protein level is of significant value. Earlier evidence from our laboratory demonstrated that G0S2 is a short-lived protein degraded through the proteasomal pathway. However, little is currently known regarding the underlying mechanisms. In the current study we find that 1) protein degradation is initiated by K48-linked polyubiquitination of the lysine- 25 in G0S2; and 2) G0S2 protein is stabilized in response to ATGL expression and TG accumulation. Mutation of lysine-25 of G0S2 abolished ubiquitination and increased protein stability. More importantly, G0S2 was stabilized via different mechanisms in the presence of ATGL vs. in response to fatty acid (FA)-induced TG accumulation. Furthermore, G0S2 protein but not mRNA levels were reduced in the adipose tissue of ATGL-deficient mice, corroborating the involvement of ATGL in the stabilization of G0S2. Taken together our data illustrate for the first time a crucial multifaceted mechanism for the stabilization of G0S2 at the protein level. PMID:27248498

  10. Allosteric Modulation of the Calcium-sensing Receptor Rectifies Signaling Abnormalities Associated with G-protein α-11 Mutations Causing Hypercalcemic and Hypocalcemic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Babinsky, Valerie N; Hannan, Fadil M; Gorvin, Caroline M; Howles, Sarah A; Nesbit, M Andrew; Rust, Nigel; Hanyaloglu, Aylin C; Hu, Jianxin; Spiegel, Allen M; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2016-05-13

    Germline loss- and gain-of-function mutations of G-protein α-11 (Gα11), which couples the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) to intracellular calcium (Ca(2+) i) signaling, lead to familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia type 2 (FHH2) and autosomal dominant hypocalcemia type 2 (ADH2), respectively, whereas somatic Gα11 mutations mediate uveal melanoma development by constitutively up-regulating MAPK signaling. Cinacalcet and NPS-2143 are allosteric CaSR activators and inactivators, respectively, that ameliorate signaling disturbances associated with CaSR mutations, but their potential to modulate abnormalities of the downstream Gα11 protein is unknown. This study investigated whether cinacalcet and NPS-2143 may rectify Ca(2+) i alterations associated with FHH2- and ADH2-causing Gα11 mutations, and evaluated the influence of germline gain-of-function Gα11 mutations on MAPK signaling by measuring ERK phosphorylation, and assessed the effect of NPS-2143 on a uveal melanoma Gα11 mutant. WT and mutant Gα11 proteins causing FHH2, ADH2 or uveal melanoma were transfected in CaSR-expressing HEK293 cells, and Ca(2+) i and ERK phosphorylation responses measured by flow-cytometry and Alphascreen immunoassay following exposure to extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+) o) and allosteric modulators. Cinacalcet and NPS-2143 rectified the Ca(2+) i responses of FHH2- and ADH2-associated Gα11 loss- and gain-of-function mutations, respectively. ADH2-causing Gα11 mutations were demonstrated not to be constitutively activating and induced ERK phosphorylation following Ca(2+) o stimulation only. The increased ERK phosphorylation associated with ADH2 and uveal melanoma mutants was rectified by NPS-2143. These findings demonstrate that CaSR-targeted compounds can rectify signaling disturbances caused by germline and somatic Gα11 mutations, which respectively lead to calcium disorders and tumorigenesis; and that ADH2-causing Gα11 mutations induce non-constitutive alterations in MAPK signaling

  11. Influence of high temperature during grain filling on the accumulation of storage proteins and grain quality in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Ju; Li, Chia-Yu; Lin, Shao-Kai; Yang, Fan-Hsuan; Huang, Ji-Jwo; Liu, Yun-Hua; Lur, Huu-Sheng

    2010-10-13

    The present study was performed to understand the effects of high temperature (HT) during filling on the expression of storage proteins and the quality of rice grains. HT (35/30 °C day/night) reduced the weight, amylose content, and flour gel consistency of grains. It increased the accumulation of all classes of storage proteins at early filling stage but decreased the accumulation of prolamins at maturation. For albumins, the expressions of cyclophilin 2, peroxiredoxin, and HSP16.9 were differentially enhanced by HT. For globulins, HT decreased the accumulation of globulin but increased that of glyoxalase I and peroxiredoxin. HT enhanced the transcription of genes for glutelins, prolamins, globulins, and protein disulfide isomerase at early filling stage but decreased the expression of these genes at a later stage. Low amounts of prolamins and globulins, as well as low pH value, were found in sound, immature, and dead kernels grown under HT. The relationships among HT, storage proteins, and grain quality are discussed.

  12. An activator of protein kinase C (phorbol dibutyrate) attenuates atrial-natriuretic-factor-stimulated cyclic GMP accumulation in smooth-muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nambi, P; Whitman, M; Aiyar, N; Stassen, F; Crooke, S T

    1987-01-01

    Rat thoracic aortic smooth-muscle cells (A-10; A.T.C.C. CRL 1476) displays a high density of vasopressin and atrial-natriuretic-factor (ANF) receptors and a low density of beta-adrenergic receptors. ANF stimulates cGMP (cyclic GMP) accumulation in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Pretreatment of these cells with phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu), a known activator of protein kinase C, attenuated ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation without affecting basal cGMP concentrations. This effect was concentration-dependent and was observed as early as 2 min after treatment. 4 alpha-Phorbol 12, 13-didecanoate (alpha PDD), which does not activate protein kinase C, did not inhibit the cGMP accumulation. PDBu pretreatment did not affect the density and affinity of ANF receptors. These data suggest that PDBu, presumably via activation of protein kinase C, might stimulate phosphorylation of a key regulatory protein in the ANF/cGMP pathway. PMID:2822009

  13. The proteins encoded by the Drosophila Planar Polarity Effector genes inturned, fuzzy and fritz interact physically and can re-pattern the accumulation of “upstream” Planar Cell Polarity proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Yan, Jie; Lee, Haeryun; Lu, Qiuheng; Adler, Paul N.

    2014-01-01

    The frizzled/starry night pathway regulates planar cell polarity in a wide variety of tissues in many types of animals. It was discovered and has been most intensively studied in the Drosophila wing where it controls the formation of the array of distally pointing hairs that cover the wing. The pathway does this by restricting the activation of the cytoskeleton to the distal edge of wing cells. This results in hairs initiating at the distal edge and growing in the distal direction. All of the proteins encoded by genes in the pathway accumulate asymmetrically in wing cells. The pathway is a hierarchy with the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) genes (aka the core genes) functioning as a group upstream of the Planar Polarity Effector (PPE) genes which in turn function as a group upstream of multiple wing hairs. Upstream proteins, such as Frizzled accumulate on either the distal and/or proximal edges of wing cells. Downstream PPE proteins accumulate on the proximal edge under the instruction of the upstream proteins. A variety of types of data support this hierarchy, however, we have found that when over expressed the PPE proteins can alter both the subcellular location and level of accumulation of the upstream proteins. Thus, the epistatic relationship is context dependent. We further show that the PPE proteins interact physically and can modulate the accumulation of each other in wing cells. We also find that over expression of Frtz results in a marked delay in hair initiation suggesting that it has a separate role/activity in regulating the cytoskeleton that is not shared by other members of the group. PMID:25072625

  14. The Bean Pod Mottle Virus RNA2-Encoded 58-Kilodalton Protein P58 Is Required in cis for RNA2 Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Junyan; Guo, Jiangbo; Finer, John; Dorrance, Anne E.; Redinbaugh, Margaret G.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) is a bipartite, positive-sense (+) RNA plant virus in the Secoviridae family. Its RNA1 encodes proteins required for genome replication, whereas RNA2 primarily encodes proteins needed for virion assembly and cell-to-cell movement. However, the function of a 58-kDa protein (P58) encoded by RNA2 has not been resolved. P58 and the movement protein (MP) of BPMV are two largely identical proteins differing only at their N termini, with P58 extending MP upstream by 102 amino acid residues. In this report, we unveil a unique role for P58. We show that BPMV RNA2 accumulation in infected cells was abolished when the start codon of P58 was eliminated. The role of P58 does not require the region shared by MP, as RNA2 accumulation in individual cells remained robust even when most of the MP coding sequence was removed. Importantly, the function of P58 required the P58 protein, rather than its coding RNA, as compensatory mutants could be isolated that restored RNA2 accumulation by acquiring new start codons upstream of the original one. Most strikingly, loss of P58 function could not be complemented by P58 provided in trans, suggesting that P58 functions in cis to selectively promote the accumulation of RNA2 copies that encode a functional P58 protein. Finally, we found that all RNA1-encoded proteins are cis-acting relative to RNA1. Together, our results suggest that P58 probably functions by recruiting the RNA1-encoded polyprotein to RNA2 to enable RNA2 reproduction. IMPORTANCE Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) is one of the most important pathogens of the crop plant soybean, yet its replication mechanism is not well understood, hindering the development of knowledge-based control measures. The current study examined the replication strategy of BPMV RNA2, one of the two genomic RNA segments of this virus, and established an essential role for P58, one of the RNA2-encoded proteins, in the process of RNA2 replication. Our study demonstrates for

  15. B cell–intrinsic deficiency of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) causes severe abnormalities of the peripheral B-cell compartment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Recher, Mike; Burns, Siobhan O.; de la Fuente, Miguel A.; Volpi, Stefano; Dahlberg, Carin; Walter, Jolan E.; Moffitt, Kristin; Mathew, Divij; Honke, Nadine; Lang, Philipp A.; Patrizi, Laura; Falet, Hervé; Keszei, Marton; Mizui, Masayuki; Csizmadia, Eva; Candotti, Fabio; Nadeau, Kari; Bouma, Gerben; Delmonte, Ottavia M.; Frugoni, Francesco; Fomin, Angela B. Ferraz; Buchbinder, David; Lundequist, Emma Maria; Massaad, Michel J.; Tsokos, George C.; Hartwig, John; Manis, John; Terhorst, Cox; Geha, Raif S.; Snapper, Scott; Lang, Karl S.; Malley, Richard; Westerberg, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Wiskott Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is caused by mutations in the WAS gene that encodes for a protein (WASp) involved in cytoskeleton organization in hematopoietic cells. Several distinctive abnormalities of T, B, and natural killer lymphocytes; dendritic cells; and phagocytes have been found in WASp-deficient patients and mice; however, the in vivo consequence of WASp deficiency within individual blood cell lineages has not been definitively evaluated. By conditional gene deletion we have generated mice with selective deficiency of WASp in the B-cell lineage (B/WcKO mice). We show that this is sufficient to cause a severe reduction of marginal zone B cells and inability to respond to type II T-independent Ags, thereby recapitulating phenotypic features of complete WASp deficiency. In addition, B/WcKO mice showed prominent signs of B-cell dysregulation, as indicated by an increase in serum IgM levels, expansion of germinal center B cells and plasma cells, and elevated autoantibody production. These findings are accompanied by hyperproliferation of WASp-deficient follicular and germinal center B cells in heterozygous B/WcKO mice in vivo and excessive differentiation of WASp-deficient B cells into class-switched plasmablasts in vitro, suggesting that WASp-dependent B cell–intrinsic mechanisms critically contribute to WAS-associated autoimmunity. PMID:22302739

  16. Accumulation of Small Heat-Shock Protein Homologs in the Endoplasmic Reticulum of Cortical Parenchyma Cells in Mulberry in Association with Seasonal Cold Acclimation1

    PubMed Central

    Ukaji, Norifumi; Kuwabara, Chikako; Takezawa, Daisuke; Arakawa, Keita; Yoshida, Shizuo; Fujikawa, Seizo

    1999-01-01

    Cortical parenchyma cells of mulberry (Morus bombycis Koidz.) trees acquire extremely high freezing tolerance in winter as a result of seasonal cold acclimation. The amount of total proteins in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-enriched fractions isolated from these cells increased in parallel with the process of cold acclimation. Protein compositions in the ER-enriched fraction also changed seasonally, with a prominent accumulation of 20-kD (WAP20) and 27-kD (WAP27) proteins in winter. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of WAP20 exhibited homology to ER-localized small heat-shock proteins (smHSPs), whereas that of WAP27 did not exhibit homology to any known proteins. Like other smHSPs, WAP20 formed a complex of high molecular mass in native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, not only WAP20 but also 21-kD proteins reacted with antibodies against WAP20. Fractionation of the crude microsomes by isopycnic sucrose-gradient centrifugation revealed that both WAP27 and WAP20 were distributed on a density corresponding to the fractions with higher activity of ER marker enzyme, suggesting localization of these proteins in the ER. When ER-enriched fractions were treated with trypsin in the absence of detergent, WAP20 and WAP27 were undigested, suggesting localization of these proteins inside the ER vesicle. The accumulation of a large quantity of smHSPs in the ER in winter as a result of seasonal cold acclimation indicates that these proteins may play a significant role in the acquisition of freezing tolerance in cortical parenchyma cells of mulberry trees. PMID:10364399

  17. Accumulation of 52 kDa glycine rich protein in auxin-deprived strawberry fruits and its role in fruit growth. [Fragaria ananassa

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, A.S.N.; Poovaiah, B.W.

    1987-04-01

    Growth of strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Duch) receptacles can be stopped at any stage by deachening the fruits and can be resumed by exogenous application of auxin. In their earlier studies they demonstrated auxin regulated polypeptide changes at different stages of strawberry fruit development. Removal of achenes from fruits to deprive auxin resulted in the accumulation of 52 KDa polypeptide. This polypeptide is associated with cell wall and its concentration is increased in a time-dependent manner in auxin deprived receptacles. Incorporation studies with (/sup 35/S) methionine showed the promotion of labelling of 52 kDa polypeptide in the auxin-deprived receptacles within 12 h after removal of the achenes. Amino acid analysis revealed that the 52 KDa polypeptide is rich in glycine. Their studies, with normal and mutant strawberry receptacles, indicate that the synthesis and accumulation of this glycine rich protein correlates with cessation of receptacle growth. These results suggest a role for the glycine rich protein in growth.

  18. Mutations in Radial Spoke Head Protein Genes RSPH9 and RSPH4A Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia with Central-Microtubular-Pair Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Castleman, Victoria H.; Romio, Leila; Chodhari, Rahul; Hirst, Robert A.; de Castro, Sandra C.P.; Parker, Keith A.; Ybot-Gonzalez, Patricia; Emes, Richard D.; Wilson, Stephen W.; Wallis, Colin; Johnson, Colin A.; Herrera, Rene J.; Rutman, Andrew; Dixon, Mellisa; Shoemark, Amelia; Bush, Andrew; Hogg, Claire; Gardiner, R. Mark; Reish, Orit; Greene, Nicholas D.E.; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Purton, Saul; Chung, Eddie M.K.; Mitchison, Hannah M.

    2009-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous inherited disorder arising from dysmotility of motile cilia and sperm. This is associated with a variety of ultrastructural defects of the cilia and sperm axoneme that affect movement, leading to clinical consequences on respiratory-tract mucociliary clearance and lung function, fertility, and left-right body-axis determination. We performed whole-genome SNP-based linkage analysis in seven consanguineous families with PCD and central-microtubular-pair abnormalities. This identified two loci, in two families with intermittent absence of the central-pair structure (chromosome 6p21.1, Zmax 6.7) and in five families with complete absence of the central pair (chromosome 6q22.1, Zmax 7.0). Mutations were subsequently identified in two positional candidate genes, RSPH9 on chromosome 6p21.1 and RSPH4A on chromosome 6q22.1. Haplotype analysis identified a common ancestral founder effect RSPH4A mutation present in UK-Pakistani pedigrees. Both RSPH9 and RSPH4A encode protein components of the axonemal radial spoke head. In situ hybridization of murine Rsph9 shows gene expression restricted to regions containing motile cilia. Investigation of the effect of knockdown or mutations of RSPH9 orthologs in zebrafish and Chlamydomonas indicate that radial spoke head proteins are important in maintaining normal movement in motile, “9+2”-structure cilia and flagella. This effect is rescued by reintroduction of gene expression for restoration of a normal beat pattern in zebrafish. Disturbance in function of these genes was not associated with defects in left-right axis determination in humans or zebrafish. PMID:19200523

  19. Mutations in radial spoke head protein genes RSPH9 and RSPH4A cause primary ciliary dyskinesia with central-microtubular-pair abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Castleman, Victoria H; Romio, Leila; Chodhari, Rahul; Hirst, Robert A; de Castro, Sandra C P; Parker, Keith A; Ybot-Gonzalez, Patricia; Emes, Richard D; Wilson, Stephen W; Wallis, Colin; Johnson, Colin A; Herrera, Rene J; Rutman, Andrew; Dixon, Mellisa; Shoemark, Amelia; Bush, Andrew; Hogg, Claire; Gardiner, R Mark; Reish, Orit; Greene, Nicholas D E; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Purton, Saul; Chung, Eddie M K; Mitchison, Hannah M

    2009-02-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous inherited disorder arising from dysmotility of motile cilia and sperm. This is associated with a variety of ultrastructural defects of the cilia and sperm axoneme that affect movement, leading to clinical consequences on respiratory-tract mucociliary clearance and lung function, fertility, and left-right body-axis determination. We performed whole-genome SNP-based linkage analysis in seven consanguineous families with PCD and central-microtubular-pair abnormalities. This identified two loci, in two families with intermittent absence of the central-pair structure (chromosome 6p21.1, Zmax 6.7) and in five families with complete absence of the central pair (chromosome 6q22.1, Zmax 7.0). Mutations were subsequently identified in two positional candidate genes, RSPH9 on chromosome 6p21.1 and RSPH4A on chromosome 6q22.1. Haplotype analysis identified a common ancestral founder effect RSPH4A mutation present in UK-Pakistani pedigrees. Both RSPH9 and RSPH4A encode protein components of the axonemal radial spoke head. In situ hybridization of murine Rsph9 shows gene expression restricted to regions containing motile cilia. Investigation of the effect of knockdown or mutations of RSPH9 orthologs in zebrafish and Chlamydomonas indicate that radial spoke head proteins are important in maintaining normal movement in motile, "9+2"-structure cilia and flagella. This effect is rescued by reintroduction of gene expression for restoration of a normal beat pattern in zebrafish. Disturbance in function of these genes was not associated with defects in left-right axis determination in humans or zebrafish.

  20. Rosiglitazone ameliorates abnormal expression and activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B in the skeletal muscle of fat-fed, streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Ouyang, Jing Ping; Wu, Ke; Wang, Shi Shun; Wen, Chong Yuan; Xia, Zheng Yuan

    2005-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) acts as a physiological negative regulator of insulin signaling by dephosphorylating the activated insulin receptor (IR). Here we examine the role of PTP1B in the insulin-sensitizing action of rosiglitazone (RSG) in skeletal muscle and liver. Fat-fed, streptozotocin-treated rats (10-week-old), an animal model of type II diabetes, and age-matched, nondiabetic controls were treated with RSG (10 μmol kg−1 day−1) for 2 weeks. After RSG treatment, the diabetic rats showed a significant decrease in blood glucose and improved insulin sensitivity. Diabetic rats showed significantly increased levels and activities of PTP1B in the skeletal muscle (1.6- and 2-fold, respectively) and liver (1.7- and 1.8-fold, respectively), thus diminishing insulin signaling in the target tissues. We found that the decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (55%), tyrosine phosphorylation of IRβ-subunits (48%), and IR substrate-1 (IRS-1) (39%) in muscles of diabetic rats were normalized after RSG treatment. These effects were associated with 34 and 30% decreases in increased PTP1B levels and activities, respectively, in skeletal muscles of diabetic rats. In contrast, RSG did not affect the increased PTP1B levels and activities or the already reduced insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis and tyrosine phosphorylation of IRβ-subunits and IRS-2 in livers of diabetic rats. RSG treatment in normal rats did not significantly change PTP1B activities and levels or protein levels of IRβ, IRS-1, and -2 in diabetic rats. These data suggest that RSG enhances insulin activity in skeletal muscle of diabetic rats possibly by ameliorating abnormal levels and activities of PTP1B. PMID:15997237

  1. Antiproliferative action of tumor necrosis factor-alpha on MCF-7 breastcancer cells is associated with increased insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 accumulation.

    PubMed

    Rozen, F; Zhang, J; Pollak, M

    1998-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a multifunctional cytokine involved in host response to neoplasia. TNF-alpha has been shown to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells. Insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I and IGF-II) are potent mitogens involved in growth regulation of breast epithelial cells and are implicated in the pathophysiology of breast cancer. Their bioactivity is strongly influenced by specific IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). We report that accumulation of IGFBP-3 in the conditioned media of MCF-7 cells is increased over control values in the presence of TNF-alpha. The increased IGFBP-3 accumulation induced by TNF-alpha is correlated with increased IGFBP-3 mRNA abundance. TNF-alpha also decreases IGF-I receptor levels in MCF-7 cells. Estradiol-stimulated MCF-7 cell proliferation is associated with reduced IGFBP-3 accumulation, and we show that TNF-alpha attenuation of estradiol-stimulated proliferation is associated with increased IGFBP-3 accumulation. Finally, we demonstrate that an IGFBP-3 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide antagonizes TNF-alpha-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and TNF-alpha-induced IGFBP-3 accumulation. These data strongly suggest that IGFBP-3 plays a role in modulation of breast cancer cell proliferation by TNF-alpha.

  2. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  3. The high-affinity phosphate-binding protein PstS is accumulated under high fructose concentrations and mutation of the corresponding gene affects differentiation in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Margarita; Esteban, Ana; Fernández-Abalos, José Manuel; Santamaría, Ramón I

    2005-08-01

    The secreted protein pattern of Streptomyces lividans depends on the carbon source present in the culture media. One protein that shows the most dramatic change is the high-affinity phosphate-binding protein PstS, which is strongly accumulated in the supernatant of liquid cultures containing high concentrations (>3 %) of certain sugars, such as fructose, galactose and mannose. The promoter region of this gene and that of its Streptomyces coelicolor homologue were used to drive the expression of a xylanase in S. lividans that was accumulated in the culture supernatant when grown in the presence of fructose. PstS accumulation was dramatically increased in a S. lividans polyphosphate kinase null mutant (Deltappk) and was impaired in a deletion mutant lacking phoP, the transcriptional regulator gene of the two-component phoR-phoP system that controls the Pho regulon. Deletion of the pstS genes in S. lividans and S. coelicolor impaired phosphate transport and accelerated differentiation and sporulation on solid media. Complementation with a single copy in a S. lividans pstS null mutant returned phosphate transport and sporulation to levels similar to those of the wild-type strain. The present work demonstrates that carbon and phosphate metabolism are linked in the regulation of genes and that this can trigger the genetic switch towards morphogenesis.

  4. Cytoskeletal abnormalities in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: beneficial or detrimental effects?

    PubMed

    Julien, J P; Beaulieu, J M

    2000-11-01

    Cytoskeletal abnormalities have been reported in cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) including abnormal inclusions containing neurofilaments (NFs) and/or peripherin, reduced mRNA levels for the NF light (NF-L) protein and mutations in the NF heavy (NF-H) gene. Recently, transgenic mouse approaches have been used to address whether cytoskeletal changes may contribute to motor neuron disease. Mice lacking one of the three NF subunits are viable and do not develop motor neuron disease. Nonetheless, mice with null mutations for NF-L or for both NF-M and NF-H genes developed severe atrophy of ventral and dorsal root axons. The atrophic process is associated with hind limb paralysis during aging in mice deficient for both NF-M and NF-H proteins. The overexpression in mice of transgenes coding for wild-type or mutant NF proteins can provoke abnormal NF accumulations, axonal atrophy and sometimes motor dysfunction. However, the perikaryal NF accumulations are generally well tolerated by motor neurons and, except for expression of a mutant NF-L transgene, they did not provoke massive motor neuron death. Increasing the levels of perikaryal NF proteins may even confer protection in motor neuron disease caused by ALS-linked mutations in the superoxide dismutase (SOD1). In contrast, the overexpression of wild-type peripherin, a type of IF gene upregulated by inflammatory cytokines, provoked the formation of toxic IF inclusions with the high-molecular-weight NF proteins resulting in the death of motor neurons during aging. These results together with the detection of peripherin inclusions at early stage of disease in mice expressing mutant SOD1 suggest that IF inclusions containing peripherin may play a contributory role in ALS pathogenesis.

  5. Correction of metabolic abnormalities in a rodent model of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus by inhibitors of hepatic protein kinase C-ι.

    PubMed

    Sajan, Mini P; Nimal, Sonali; Mastorides, Stephen; Acevedo-Duncan, Mildred; Kahn, C Ronald; Fields, Alan P; Braun, Ursula; Leitges, Michael; Farese, Robert V

    2012-04-01

    Excessive activity of hepatic atypical protein kinase (aPKC) is proposed to play a critical role in mediating lipid and carbohydrate abnormalities in obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In previous studies of rodent models of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, adenoviral-mediated expression of kinase-inactive aPKC rapidly reversed or markedly improved most if not all metabolic abnormalities. Here, we examined effects of 2 newly developed small-molecule PKC-ι/λ inhibitors. We used the mouse model of heterozygous muscle-specific knockout of PKC-λ, in which partial deficiency of muscle PKC-λ impairs glucose transport in muscle and thereby causes glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia, which, via hepatic aPKC activation, leads to abdominal obesity, hepatosteatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia. One inhibitor, 1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide, 5-amino-1-[2,3-dihydroxy-4-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]cyclopentyl-[1R-(1a,2b,3b,4a)], binds to the substrate-binding site of PKC-λ/ι, but not other PKCs. The other inhibitor, aurothiomalate, binds to cysteine residues in the PB1-binding domains of aPKC-λ/ι/ζ and inhibits scaffolding. Treatment with either inhibitor for 7 days inhibited aPKC, but not Akt, in liver and concomitantly improved insulin signaling to Akt and aPKC in muscle and adipocytes. Moreover, both inhibitors diminished excessive expression of hepatic, aPKC-dependent lipogenic, proinflammatory, and gluconeogenic factors; and this was accompanied by reversal or marked improvements in hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, abdominal obesity, hepatosteatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia. Our findings highlight the pathogenetic importance of insulin signaling to hepatic PKC-ι in obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus and suggest that 1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide, 5-amino-1-[2,3-dihydroxy-4-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]cyclopentyl-[1R-(1a,2b,3b,4a)] and aurothiomalate or similar agents that

  6. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  7. Disruption of the A-Kinase Anchoring Domain in Flagellar Radial Spoke Protein 3 Results in Unregulated Axonemal cAMP-dependent Protein Kinase Activity and Abnormal Flagellar Motility

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Anne R.; Fox, Laura A.; Rhea, Jeanne M.; Craige, Branch

    2006-01-01

    Biochemical studies of Chlamydomonas flagellar axonemes revealed that radial spoke protein (RSP) 3 is an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP). To determine the physiological role of PKA anchoring in the axoneme, an RSP3 mutant, pf14, was transformed with an RSP3 gene containing a mutation in the PKA-binding domain. Analysis of several independent transformants revealed that the transformed cells exhibit an unusual phenotype: a fraction of the cells swim normally; the remainder of the cells twitch feebly or are paralyzed. The abnormal/paralyzed motility is not due to an obvious deficiency of radial spoke assembly, and the phenotype cosegregates with the mutant RSP3. We postulated that paralysis was due to failure in targeting and regulation of axonemal cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). To test this, reactivation experiments of demembranated cells were performed in the absence or presence of PKA inhibitors. Importantly, motility in reactivated cell models mimicked the live cell phenotype with nearly equal fractions of motile and paralyzed cells. PKA inhibitors resulted in a twofold increase in the number of motile cells, rescuing paralysis. These results confirm that flagellar RSP3 is an AKAP and reveal that a mutation in the PKA binding domain results in unregulated axonemal PKA activity and inhibition of normal motility. PMID:16571668

  8. High-resolution differentiation of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy strains by quantitative N-terminal amino acid profiling (N-TAAP) of PK-digested abnormal prion protein.

    PubMed

    Gielbert, Adriana; Davis, Linda A; Sayers, A Robin; Hope, James; Gill, Andrew C; Sauer, Maurice J

    2009-03-01

    New forms of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) continue to be identified, and consequently sensitive differential diagnosis is increasingly important both for the management of disease in humans and livestock and in providing confidence in the safety of the food chain. TSE diseases are associated with accumulation of protease-resistant prion protein (PrP(Sc)) and detection of this marker protein is central to diagnosis. Proteolysis by proteinase K (PK) generates protease-resistant products (PrP(res)) with partially variable N-termini. The conformation(s) of PrP(Sc) and thus the points of PK cleavage are thought to be dependent on the strain of prion disease. Western blot (WB) analysis of PrP(res) gives characteristic migration patterns that can be used to diagnose TSEs, but the relatively low resolution of this technique limits its ability to differentiate certain disease strains. Mass spectrometry (MS) has the capability to resolve these various PK cleavage sites to the level of individual amino acid residues. In the present study multiple selected reaction monitoring (mSRM) was used to detect and quantify PrP(res) N-terminal tryptic peptides by MS and thus to define the N-terminal amino acid profiles (N-TAAPs) of PrP(res) characteristic for various TSEs in sheep. The fragmentation behaviour of the N-terminal tryptic peptides was studied to allow selection of the transitions specific for each peptide. Different PrP(res) preparation methods were evaluated and the most effective approach applied to differentiate the N-TAAPs corresponding to various sheep TSE isolates. Marked differences were identified between the N-TAAPs of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and classical scrapie, and between classical scrapie and the experimental strains SSBP/1 and CH1641, thereby validating this approach as a means of TSE-strain specific diagnosis.

  9. [Endocrine abnormalities in patients with chronic renal failure - part II].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Kędzia, Agnieszka; Krupej-Kędzierska, Joanna; Kowalska, Beata; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-05-01

    The kidneys play a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis of fluids and electrolytes, acid-base balance, and volume regulation. In subjects with chronic renal failure, particularly at its later stages, these adaptive responses are impaired and some of these alterations are of clinical relevance. The ways in which chronic renal failure affects function of endocrine organs include impaired secretion of kidney-derived hormones, altered peripheral hormone metabolism, disturbed binding to carrier proteins, accumulation of hormone inhibitors, as well as abnormal target organ responsiveness. Apart from secondary hyperparathyroidism, thyroid dysfunction and impaired growth, reviewed in our previous study, endocrine disturbances that most frequently affect this group of patients include: abnormal functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamicpituitary- gonadal axes, bone loss and gynecomastia. The clinical picture and laboratory findings of these endocrine disturbances depend on the treatment strategy.

  10. Is alopecia areata an autoimmune-response against melanogenesis-related proteins, exposed by abnormal MHC class I expression in the anagen hair bulb?

    PubMed Central

    Paus, R.; Slominski, A.; Czarnetzki, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    The etiology of alopecia areata (AA), a putative autoimmune disease characterized by sudden hair loss, has remained obscure. It is not understood, how the characteristic inflammatory infiltrate that selectively attacks anagen hair follicles in AA is generated. We hypothesize that this reflects an unexplored form of autoimmunity, a cytotoxic T cell attack on rhythmically synthesized autoantigens normally sequestered by a lack or very low level of MHC class I (MHC I)-expression, and suggest the following mechanism of AA pathogenesis: Microtrauma, neurogenic inflammation, or microbial antigens cause a localized breakdown of MHC I-"negativity" in the proximal anagen hair bulb via proinflammatory cytokines. This exposes autoantigens derived from melanogenesis-related proteins (MRP-DP), which are only generated during anagen, and triggers two successive waves of autoimmune responses: CD8+ cytotoxic T cells initiate AA after recognizing MRP-DP abnormally presented by MHC I molecules on hair matrix melanocytes and/or keratinocytes; a secondary attack, carried by CD4+ T cells and antigen presenting cells, is then mounted against MHC class II--presented additional autoantigens exposed by damaged melanocytes and keratinocytes. The latter causes most of the follicular damage, and extrafollicular disease, and depends greatly on the immunogenetic background of affected individuals. This unifying hypothesis explains the clinical heterogeneity and all salient features of AA, and argues that only the unlikely coincidence of multiple predisposing events triggers AA. The suppression of MHC I--expression and synthesis of MRP in the hair bulb, and the "tolerization" of MRP-DP autoreactive CD8+ T cells may be promising strategies for treating AA. PMID:7716973

  11. Decreased C-reactive protein induces abnormal vascular structure in a rat model of liver dysfunction induced by bile duct ligation

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Ji Hye; Choi, Jong Ho; Bae, Si Hyun; Oh, Seh Hoon; Kim, Gi Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Chronic liver disease leads to liver fibrosis, and although the liver does have a certain regenerative capacity, this disease is associated with dysfunction of the liver vessels. C-reactive protein (CRP) is produced in the liver and circulated from there for metabolism. CRP was recently shown to inhibit angiogenesis by inducing endothelial cell dysfunction. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of CRP levels on angiogenesis in a rat model of liver dysfunction induced by bile duct ligation (BDL). Methods The diameter of the hepatic vein was analyzed in rat liver tissues using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The expression levels of angiogenic factors, albumin, and CRP were analyzed by real-time PCR and Western blotting. A tube formation assay was performed to confirm the effect of CRP on angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with lithocholic acid (LCA) and siRNA-CRP. Results The diameter of the hepatic portal vein increased significantly with the progression of cirrhosis. The expression levels of angiogenic factors were increased in the cirrhotic liver. In contrast, the expression levels of albumin and CRP were significantly lower in the liver tissue obtained from the BDL rat model than in the normal liver. The CRP level was correlated with the expression of albumin in hepatocytes treated with LCA and siRNA-CRP. Tube formation was significantly decreased in HUVECs when they were treated with LCA or a combination of LCA and siRNA-CRP. Conclusion CRP seems to be involved in the abnormal formation of vessels in hepatic disease, and so it could be a useful diagnostic marker for hepatic disease. PMID:27729629

  12. Nickel accumulation and its effect on biomass, protein content and antioxidative enzymes in roots and leaves of watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.).

    PubMed

    Duman, Fatih; Ozturk, Fatma

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand its response towards nickel stress, watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.) was exposed to nickel (1-25 mg/L) for 1, 3, 5 and 7 days. The accumulation and translocation of nickel were determined and the influence of nickel on biomass, protein content and enzymatic antioxidants was examined for both roots and leaves. It was determined that N. officinale could accumulate appreciable amounts of Ni in both roots and leaves. Nickel accumulated particularly in the roots of plants. Biomass increased at low nickel concentrations but certain measurable change was not found at high concentrations. Under stress conditions the antioxidant enzymes were up-regulated compared to control. An increase in protein content and enzyme activities was observed at moderate exposure conditions followed by a decline at both roots and leaves. The maximum enzyme activities were observed at different exposure conditions. Our results showed that N. officinale had the capacity to overcome nickel-induced stress especially at moderate nickel exposure. Therefore, N. officinale may be used as a phytoremediator in moderately polluted aquatic ecosystems.

  13. Citrus psorosis virus 24K protein interacts with citrus miRNA precursors, affects their processing and subsequent miRNA accumulation and target expression.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Carina A; Ocolotobiche, Eliana E; Marmisollé, Facundo E; Robles Luna, Gabriel; Borniego, María B; Bazzini, Ariel A; Asurmendi, Sebastian; García, María L

    2016-04-01

    Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis), one of the most important fruit crops worldwide, may suffer from disease symptoms induced by virus infections, thus resulting in dramatic economic losses. Here, we show that the infection of sweet orange plants with two isolates of Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV) expressing different symptomatology alters the accumulation of a set of endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs). Within these miRNAs, miR156, miR167 and miR171 were the most down-regulated, with almost a three-fold reduction in infected samples. This down-regulation led to a concomitant up-regulation of some of their targets, such as Squamosa promoter-binding protein-like 9 and 13, as well as Scarecrow-like 6. The processing of miRNA precursors, pre-miR156 and pre-miR171, in sweet orange seems to be affected by the virus. For instance, virus infection increases the level of unprocessed precursors, which is accompanied by a concomitant decrease in mature species accumulation. miR156a primary transcript accumulation remained unaltered, thus strongly suggesting a processing deregulation for this transcript. The co-immunoprecipitation of viral 24K protein with pre-miR156a or pre-miR171a suggests that the alteration in the processing of these precursors might be caused by a direct or indirect interaction with this particular viral protein. This result is also consistent with the nuclear localization of both miRNA precursors and the CPsV 24K protein. This study contributes to the understanding of the manner in which a virus can alter host regulatory mechanisms, particularly miRNA biogenesis and target expression.

  14. Red-backed vole brain promotes highly efficient in vitro amplification of abnormal prion protein from macaque and human brains infected with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nemecek, Julie; Nag, Nabanita; Carlson, Christina M.; Schneider, Jay R.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Johnson, Christopher J.; Asher, David M.; Gregori, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Rapid antemortem tests to detect individuals with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) would contribute to public health. We investigated a technique known as protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) to amplify abnormal prion protein (PrPTSE) from highly diluted variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD)-infected human and macaque brain homogenates, seeking to improve the rapid detection of PrPTSE in tissues and blood. Macaque vCJD PrPTSE did not amplify using normal macaque brain homogenate as substrate (intraspecies PMCA). Next, we tested interspecies PMCA with normal brain homogenate of the southern red-backed vole (RBV), a close relative of the bank vole, seeded with macaque vCJD PrPTSE. The RBV has a natural polymorphism at residue 170 of the PrP-encoding gene (N/N, S/S, and S/N). We investigated the effect of this polymorphism on amplification of human and macaque vCJD PrPTSE. Meadow vole brain (170N/N PrP genotype) was also included in the panel of substrates tested. Both humans and macaques have the same 170S/S PrP genotype. Macaque PrPTSE was best amplified with RBV 170S/S brain, although 170N/N and 170S/N were also competent substrates, while meadow vole brain was a poor substrate. In contrast, human PrPTSE demonstrated a striking narrow selectivity for PMCA substrate and was successfully amplified only with RBV 170S/S brain. These observations suggest that macaque PrPTSE was more permissive than human PrPTSE in selecting the competent RBV substrate. RBV 170S/S brain was used to assess the sensitivity of PMCA with PrPTSE from brains of humans and macaques with vCJD. PrPTSE signals were reproducibly detected by Western blot in dilutions through 10-12 of vCJD-infected 10% brain homogenates. This is the first report showing PrPTSE from vCJD-infected human and macaque brains efficiently amplified with RBV brain as the substrate. Based on our estimates, PMCA showed a sensitivity that might be sufficient to detect PrPTSE in v

  15. Red-backed vole brain promotes highly efficient in vitro amplification of abnormal prion protein from macaque and human brains infected with variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent.

    PubMed

    Nemecek, Julie; Nag, Nabanita; Carlson, Christina M; Schneider, Jay R; Heisey, Dennis M; Johnson, Christopher J; Asher, David M; Gregori, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Rapid antemortem tests to detect individuals with transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) would contribute to public health. We investigated a technique known as protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) to amplify abnormal prion protein (PrP(TSE)) from highly diluted variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD)-infected human and macaque brain homogenates, seeking to improve the rapid detection of PrP(TSE) in tissues and blood. Macaque vCJD PrP(TSE) did not amplify using normal macaque brain homogenate as substrate (intraspecies PMCA). Next, we tested interspecies PMCA with normal brain homogenate of the southern red-backed vole (RBV), a close relative of the bank vole, seeded with macaque vCJD PrP(TSE). The RBV has a natural polymorphism at residue 170 of the PrP-encoding gene (N/N, S/S, and S/N). We investigated the effect of this polymorphism on amplification of human and macaque vCJD PrP(TSE). Meadow vole brain (170N/N PrP genotype) was also included in the panel of substrates tested. Both humans and macaques have the same 170S/S PrP genotype. Macaque PrP(TSE) was best amplified with RBV 170S/S brain, although 170N/N and 170S/N were also competent substrates, while meadow vole brain was a poor substrate. In contrast, human PrP(TSE) demonstrated a striking narrow selectivity for PMCA substrate and was successfully amplified only with RBV 170S/S brain. These observations suggest that macaque PrP(TSE) was more permissive than human PrP(TSE) in selecting the competent RBV substrate. RBV 170S/S brain was used to assess the sensitivity of PMCA with PrP(TSE) from brains of humans and macaques with vCJD. PrP(TSE) signals were reproducibly detected by Western blot in dilutions through 10⁻¹² of vCJD-infected 10% brain homogenates. This is the first report showing PrP(TSE) from vCJD-infected human and macaque brains efficiently amplified with RBV brain as the substrate. Based on our estimates, PMCA showed a sensitivity that might be sufficient to detect Pr

  16. A Fusion between Domains of the Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 and Maize 27 kD γ-Zein Accumulates to High Levels in the Endoplasmic Reticulum without Forming Protein Bodies in Transgenic Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Ceresoli, Valentina; Mainieri, Davide; Del Fabbro, Massimo; Weinstein, Roberto; Pedrazzini, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (hBMP2) is an osteoinductive agent physiologically involved in bone remodeling processes. A commercialized recombinant hBMP2 produced in mammalian cell lines is available in different clinical applications where bone regeneration is needed, but widespread use has been hindered due to an unfavorable cost/effective ratio. Protein bodies are very large insoluble protein polymers that originate within the endoplasmic reticulum by prolamine accumulation during the cereal seed development. The N-terminal domain of the maize prolamin 27 kD γ-zein is able to promote protein body biogenesis when fused to other proteins. To produce high yield of recombinant hBMP2 active domain (ad) in stably transformed tobacco plants we have fused it to the γ-zein domain. We show that this zein-hBMP2ad fusion is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum without forming insoluble protein bodies. The accumulation levels are above 1% of total soluble leaf proteins, indicating that it could be a rapid and suitable strategy to produce hBMP2ad at affordable costs. PMID:27047526

  17. Metal accumulation and differentially expressed proteins in gill of oyster (Crassostrea hongkongensis) exposed to long-term heavy metal-contaminated estuary.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lianzhong; Ke, Caihuan; Guo, Xiaoyu; Shi, Bo; Huang, Miaoqin

    2014-06-01

    Bio-accumulation and bio-transmission of toxic metals and the toxicological responses of organisms exposed to toxic metals have been focused, due to heavy metal contaminations have critically threatened the ecosystem and food security. However, still few investigations focused on the responses of certain organisms exposed to the long term and severe heavy metal contamination in specific environments. In present investigation, the Hong Kong oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis were obtained from 3 sites which were contaminated by different concentrations of heavy metals (such as zinc, copper, manganese and lead etc.), respectively. Heavy metal concentrations in the sea water samples collected from the 3 sites and the dissected tissues of the oysters with blue visceral mass were determinated to estimate the metal contamination levels in environments and the bio-accumulation ratios of the heavy metals in the different tissues of oysters. Moreover, Proteomic methods were employed to analyze the differentially expressed proteins in the gills of oysters exposed to long-term heavy metal contaminations. Results indicated that the Jiulong River estuary has been severely contaminated by Cu, Zn and slightly with Cr, Ni, Mn, etc, moreover, Zn and Cu were the major metals accumulated by oysters to phenomenally high concentrations (more than 3.0% of Zn and about 2.0% of Cu against what the dry weight of tissues were accumulated), and Cr, Ni, Mn, etc were also significantly accumulated. The differentially expressed proteins in the gills of oysters exposed to heavy metals participate in several cell processes, such as metal binding, transporting and saving, oxidative-reduction balance maintaining, stress response, signal transduction, etc. Significantly up-regulated expression (about 10 folds) of an important metal binding protein, metallothionein (MT) and granular cells was observed in the gills of oysters exposed to long-term and severely heavy-metal-contaminated estuary, it

  18. Metal accumulation and differentially expressed proteins in gill of oyster (Crassostrea hongkongensis) exposed to long-term heavy metal-contaminated estuary.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lianzhong; Ke, Caihuan; Guo, Xiaoyu; Shi, Bo; Huang, Miaoqin

    2014-06-01

    Bio-accumulation and bio-transmission of toxic metals and the toxicological responses of organisms exposed to toxic metals have been focused, due to heavy metal contaminations have critically threatened the ecosystem and food security. However, still few investigations focused on the responses of certain organisms exposed to the long term and severe heavy metal contamination in specific environments. In present investigation, the Hong Kong oyster, Crassostrea hongkongensis were obtained from 3 sites which were contaminated by different concentrations of heavy metals (such as zinc, copper, manganese and lead etc.), respectively. Heavy metal concentrations in the sea water samples collected from the 3 sites and the dissected tissues of the oysters with blue visceral mass were determinated to estimate the metal contamination levels in environments and the bio-accumulation ratios of the heavy metals in the different tissues of oysters. Moreover, Proteomic methods were employed to analyze the differentially expressed proteins in the gills of oysters exposed to long-term heavy metal contaminations. Results indicated that the Jiulong River estuary has been severely contaminated by Cu, Zn and slightly with Cr, Ni, Mn, etc, moreover, Zn and Cu were the major metals accumulated by oysters to phenomenally high concentrations (more than 3.0% of Zn and about 2.0% of Cu against what the dry weight of tissues were accumulated), and Cr, Ni, Mn, etc were also significantly accumulated. The differentially expressed proteins in the gills of oysters exposed to heavy metals participate in several cell processes, such as metal binding, transporting and saving, oxidative-reduction balance maintaining, stress response, signal transduction, etc. Significantly up-regulated expression (about 10 folds) of an important metal binding protein, metallothionein (MT) and granular cells was observed in the gills of oysters exposed to long-term and severely heavy-metal-contaminated estuary, it

  19. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on protein accumulation by murine peritoneal macrophages: the correlation to activation for macrophage tumoricidal function

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    The protein synthetic patterns of tumoricidal murine peritoneal macrophage populations have been compared to those of non-tumoricidal populations utilizing two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) of (/sup 35/S)-methionine-labeled proteins. While the protein synthetic patterns exhibited by resident, inflammatory and activated macrophages had numerous common features which distinguished them from the other normal non-macrophage cell types examined, unique proteins also distinguished each macrophage population from the others. Peritoneal macrophages elicited by treatment with heat killed Propionibacterium acnes, the live, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG, Listeria monocytogenes and the protozoan flagellate Trypanosoma rhodesiense, all exhibited tumoricidal activity in 16h or 72h functional assays, and shared a common protein synthetic profile which differentiated them from the synthetic patterns characteristic of the non-tumoricidal resident and inflammatory macrophages.

  20. Effective inhibition of mRNA accumulation and protein expression of H5N1 avian influenza virus NS1 gene in vitro by small interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Hanwei; Du, Li; Hao, Yongchang; Cheng, Ying; Luo, Jing; Kuang, Wenhua; Zhang, Donglin; Lei, Ming; Jia, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Xiaoru; Qi, Chao; He, Hongxuan; Wang, Fengyang

    2013-07-01

    Avian influenza has emerged as a devastating disease and may cross species barrier and adapt to a new host, causing enormous economic loss and great public health threats, and non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a multifunctional non-structural protein of avian influenza virus (AIV) that counters cellular antiviral activities and is a virulence factor. RNA interference (RNAi) provides a powerful promising approach to inhibit viral infection specifically. To explore the possibility of using RNAi as a strategy against AIV infection, after the fusion protein expression plasmids pNS1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), which contain the EGFP reporter gene and AIV NS1 as silencing target, were constructed and NS1-EGFP fusion protein expressing HEK293 cell lines were established, four small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting NS1 gene were designed, synthesized, and used to transfect the stable cell lines. Flow cytometry, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot were performed to assess the expression level of NS1. The results suggested that sequence-dependent specific siRNAs effectively inhibited mRNA accumulation and protein expression of AIV NS1 in vitro. These findings provide useful information for the development of RNAi-based prophylaxis and therapy for AIV infection.

  1. Two key arginine residues in the coat protein of Bamboo mosaic virus differentially affect the accumulation of viral genomic and subgenomic RNAs.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chien-Jen; Hu, Chung-Chi; Lin, Na-Sheng; Lee, Ya-Chien; Meng, Menghsiao; Tsai, Ching-Hsiu; Hsu, Yau-Heiu

    2014-02-01

    The interactions between viral RNAs and coat proteins (CPs) are critical for the efficient completion of infection cycles of RNA viruses. However, the specificity of the interactions between CPs and genomic or subgenomic RNAs remains poorly understood. In this study, Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) was used to analyse such interactions. Using reversible formaldehyde cross-linking and mass spectrometry, two regions in CP, each containing a basic amino acid (R99 and R227, respectively), were identified to bind directly to the 5' untranslated region of BaMV genomic RNA. Analyses of the alanine mutations of R99 and R227 revealed that the secondary structures of CP were not affected significantly, whereas the accumulation of BaMV genomic, but not subgenomic, RNA was severely decreased at 24 h post-inoculation in the inoculated protoplasts. In the absence of CP, the accumulation levels of genomic and subgenomic RNAs were decreased to 1.1%-1.5% and 33%-40% of that of the wild-type (wt), respectively, in inoculated leaves at 5 days post-inoculation (dpi). In contrast, in the presence of mutant CPs, the genomic RNAs remained about 1% of that of wt, whereas the subgenomic RNAs accumulated to at least 87%, suggesting that CP might increase the accumulation of subgenomic RNAs. The mutations also restricted viral movement and virion formation in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves at 5 dpi. These results demonstrate that R99 and R227 of CP play crucial roles in the accumulation, movement and virion formation of BaMV RNAs, and indicate that genomic and subgenomic RNAs interact differently with BaMV CP.

  2. Tamm-Horsfall protein in recurrent calcium kidney stone formers with positive family history: abnormalities in urinary excretion, molecular structure and function.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, Markus; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Zipperle, Ljerka; Hess, Bernhard

    2007-04-01

    Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP) powerfully inhibits calcium oxalate crystal aggregation, but structurally abnormal THPs from recurrent calcium stone formers may promote crystal aggregation. Therefore, increased urinary excretion of abnormal THP might be of relevance in nephrolithiasis. We studied 44 recurrent idiopathic calcium stone formers with a positive family history of stone disease (RCSF(fam)) and 34 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (C). Twenty-four-hour urinary THP excretion was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Structural properties of individually purified THPs were obtained from analysis of elution patterns from a Sepharose 4B column. Sialic acid (SA) contents of native whole 24-h urines, crude salt precipitates of native urines and individually purified THPs were measured. THP function was studied by measuring inhibition of CaOx crystal aggregation in vitro (pH 5.7, 200 mM sodium chloride). Twenty-four-hour urine excretion of THP was higher in RCSF(fam) (44.0 +/- 4.0 mg/day) than in C (30.9 +/- 2.2 mg/day, P = 0.015). Upon salt precipitation and lyophilization, elution from a Sepharose 4B column revealed one major peak (peak A, cross-reacting with polyclonal anti-THP antibody) and a second minor peak (peak B, not cross-reacting). THPs from RCSF(fam) eluted later than those from C (P = 0.021), and maximum width of THP peaks was higher in RCSF(fam )than in C (P = 0.024). SA content was higher in specimens from RCSF(fam) than from C, in native 24-h urines (207.5 +/- 20.4 mg vs. 135.2 +/- 16.1 mg, P = 0.013) as well as in crude salt precipitates of 24-h urines (10.4 +/- 0.5 mg vs. 7.4 +/- 0.9 mg, P = 0.002) and in purified THPs (75.3 +/- 9.3 microg/mg vs. 48.8 +/- 9.8 microg/mg THP, P = 0.043). Finally, inhibition of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal aggregation by 40 mg/L of THP was lower in RCSF(fam) (6.1 +/- 5.5%, range -62.0 to +84.2%) than in C (24.9 +/- 6.0%, range -39.8 to +82.7%), P = 0.022, and only 25 out of 44 (57%) THPs from RCSF

  3. The methionine-rich low-molecular-weight chloroplast heat-shock protein: evolutionary conservation and accumulation in relation to thermotolerance.

    PubMed

    Downs, C; Heckathorn, S; Bryan, J; Coleman, J

    1998-02-01

    The evolutionary conservation of the low-molecular-weight chloroplast-localized heat-shock protein (LMW chlpHsp) in vascular plants was examined using immunological methods. An antibody (Abmet) specific to the LMW chlpHsp was produced using a synthetic 28-residue peptide containing the most conserved elements of its unique "methionine-rich domain" as an antigen. This antibody detected a heat-inducible low-molecular-weight chloroplast protein in plants of six divergent Anthophyta species, including C3, C4, CAM, monocot, and dicot species. Abmet also detected a LMW chlpHsp in species from the Divisions Psilotophyta, Equisetophyta, Polypodiophyta, and Ginkgophyta. A preliminary examination of the relationship between accumulation of the LMW chlpHsp and habitat was also conducted. Seven Anthophyta species originating from both warm- and cool-temperature habitats were grown at 28C and then heat stressed at 40C. A positive qualitative relationship between the accumulation of the LMW chlpHsp and organismal thermotolerance in these species was observed; similar results were obtained separately with four nonAnthophyta species. The strong evolutionary conservation of this LMW Hsp and its localization to the chloroplast, and the correlation between production of this protein and plant thermotolerance, suggest that the LMW chlpHsp plays an important role in adaptation to heat stress.

  4. Quantitative Proteomics-Based Reconstruction and Identification of Metabolic Pathways and Membrane Transport Proteins Related to Sugar Accumulation in Developing Fruits of Pear (Pyrus communis).

    PubMed

    Reuscher, Stefan; Fukao, Yoichiro; Morimoto, Reina; Otagaki, Shungo; Oikawa, Akira; Isuzugawa, Kanji; Shiratake, Katsuhiro

    2016-03-01

    During their 6 month development, pear (Pyrus communis) fruits undergo drastic changes in their morphology and their chemical composition. To gain a better understanding of the metabolic pathways and transport processes active during fruit development, we performed a time-course analysis using mass spectrometry (MS)-based protein identification and quantification of fruit flesh tissues. After pre-fractionation of the samples, 2,841 proteins were identified. A principal component analysis (PCA) separated the samples from seven developmental stages into three distinct clusters representing the early, mid and late developmental phase. Over-representation analysis of proteins characteristic of each developmental phase revealed both expected and novel biological processes relevant at each phase. A high abundance of aquaporins was detected in samples from fruits in the cell expansion stage. We were able quantitatively to reconstruct basic metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which indicates sufficient coverage to reconstruct other metabolic pathways. Most of the enzymes that presumably contribute to sugar accumulation in pear fruits could be identified. Our data indicate that invertases do not play a major role in the sugar conversions in developing pear fruits. Rather, sucrose might be broken down by sucrose synthases. Further focusing on sugar transporters, we identified several putative sugar transporters from diverse families which showed developmental regulation. In conclusion, our data set comprehensively describes the proteome of developing pear fruits and provides novel insights about sugar accumulation as well as candidate genes for key reactions and transport steps.

  5. 20-Hydroxyecdysone stimulates nuclear accumulation of BmNep1, a nuclear ribosome biogenesis-related protein in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Ji, M-M; Liu, A-Q; Sima, Y-H; Xu, S-Q

    2016-10-01

    The pathway of communication between endocrine hormones and ribosome biogenesis critical for physiological adaptation is largely unknown. Nucleolar essential protein 1 (Nep1) is an essential gene for ribosome biogenesis and is functionally conserved in many in vertebrate and invertebrate species. In this study, we cloned Bombyx mori Nep1 (BmNep1) due to its high expression in silk glands of silkworms on day 3 of the fifth instar. We found that BmNep1 mRNA and protein levels were upregulated in silk glands during fourth-instar ecdysis and larval-pupal metamorphosis. By immunoprecipitation with the anti-BmNep1 antibody and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses, it was shown that BmNep1 probably interacts with proteins related to ribosome structure formation. Immunohistochemistry, biochemical fractionation and immunocytochemistry revealed that BmNep1 is localized to the nuclei in Bombyx cells. Using BmN cells originally derived from ovaries, we demonstrated that 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) induced BmNep1 expression and stimulated nuclear accumulation of BmNep1. Under physiological conditions, BmNep1 was also upregulated in ovaries during larval-pupal metamorphosis. Overall, our results indicate that the endocrine hormone 20E facilitates nuclear accumulation of BmNep1, which is involved in nuclear ribosome biogenesis in Bombyx. PMID:27329527

  6. Strategies for Cd accumulation in Dittrichia viscosa (L.) Greuter: role of the cell wall, non-protein thiols and organic acids.

    PubMed

    Fernández, R; Fernández-Fuego, D; Bertrand, A; González, A

    2014-05-01

    Dittrichia viscosa (L.) Greuter is plant species commonly found in degraded zones of Asturias (Spain), where it accumulates high levels of Cd, but the mechanisms involved in this response in non-model plants have not been elucidated. In this way, we analysed the fraction of the total Cd bound to the cell walls, the ultrastructural localization of this metal, and non-protein thiol and organic acid concentrations of two clones of D. viscosa: DV-A (from a metal-polluted soil) and DV-W (from a non-polluted area). After 10 days of hydroponic culture with Cd, fractionation and ultrastructural localisation studies showed that most of the Cd accumulated by D. viscosa was kept in the cell wall. The non-protein thiol content rose in D. viscosa with Cd exposure, especially in the non-metallicolous DV-W clone, and in both clones we found with Cd exposure a synthesis de novo of phytochelatins PC2 and PC3 in shoots and roots and also of other phytochelatin-related compounds, particularly in roots. Regarding organic acids, their concentration in both clones decreased in shoots after Cd treatment, but increased in roots, mainly due to changes in the citric acid concentration. Thus, retention of Cd in the cell wall seems to be the first strategy in response to metal entry in D. viscosa and once inside cells non-protein thiols and organic acids might also participate in Cd tolerance.

  7. Quantitative Proteomics-Based Reconstruction and Identification of Metabolic Pathways and Membrane Transport Proteins Related to Sugar Accumulation in Developing Fruits of Pear (Pyrus communis).

    PubMed

    Reuscher, Stefan; Fukao, Yoichiro; Morimoto, Reina; Otagaki, Shungo; Oikawa, Akira; Isuzugawa, Kanji; Shiratake, Katsuhiro

    2016-03-01

    During their 6 month development, pear (Pyrus communis) fruits undergo drastic changes in their morphology and their chemical composition. To gain a better understanding of the metabolic pathways and transport processes active during fruit development, we performed a time-course analysis using mass spectrometry (MS)-based protein identification and quantification of fruit flesh tissues. After pre-fractionation of the samples, 2,841 proteins were identified. A principal component analysis (PCA) separated the samples from seven developmental stages into three distinct clusters representing the early, mid and late developmental phase. Over-representation analysis of proteins characteristic of each developmental phase revealed both expected and novel biological processes relevant at each phase. A high abundance of aquaporins was detected in samples from fruits in the cell expansion stage. We were able quantitatively to reconstruct basic metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which indicates sufficient coverage to reconstruct other metabolic pathways. Most of the enzymes that presumably contribute to sugar accumulation in pear fruits could be identified. Our data indicate that invertases do not play a major role in the sugar conversions in developing pear fruits. Rather, sucrose might be broken down by sucrose synthases. Further focusing on sugar transporters, we identified several putative sugar transporters from diverse families which showed developmental regulation. In conclusion, our data set comprehensively describes the proteome of developing pear fruits and provides novel insights about sugar accumulation as well as candidate genes for key reactions and transport steps. PMID:26755692

  8. Increased placental fatty acid transporter 6 and binding protein 3 expression and fetal liver lipid accumulation in a mouse model of obesity in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Paula; Harris, Jessica; Rosario, Fredrick J; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2015-12-15

    Obesity in pregnancy is associated with increased fetal growth and adiposity, which, in part, is determined by transplacental nutrient supply. Trophoblast uptake and intracellular trafficking of lipids are dependent on placental fatty acid transport proteins (FATP), translocase (FAT/CD36), and fatty acid binding proteins (FABP). We hypothesized that maternal obesity in mice leads to increased placental expression of FAT/CD36, FATPs, and FABPs, and lipid accumulation in the fetal liver. C57/BL6J female mice were fed either a control (C; n = 10) or an obesogenic (OB; n = 10) high-fat, high-sugar diet before mating and throughout pregnancy. At E18.5, placentas and fetal livers were collected. Trophoblast plasma membranes (TPM) were isolated from placental homogenates. Expression of FAT/CD36 and FATP (TPM) and FABP (homogenates) was determined by immunoblotting. Gene expression was assessed by RT-quantitative PCR. Sections of fetal livers were stained for Oil Red O, and lipid droplets were quantified. TPM protein expression of FAT/CD36, FATP 2, and FATP 4 was comparable between C and OB groups. Conversely, TPM FATP 6 expression was increased by 35% in OB compared with C placentas without changes in mRNA expression. FABPs 1, 3-5 and PPARγ were expressed in homogenates, and FABP 3 expression increased 27% in OB compared with C placentas; however, no changes were observed in mRNA expression. Lipid droplet accumulation was 10-fold higher in the livers of fetuses from OB compared with C group. We propose that increased lipid transport capacity in obese mice promotes transplacental fatty acid transport and contributes to excess lipid accumulation in the fetal liver.

  9. Chromoplast-specific carotenoid-associated protein appears to be important for enhanced accumulation of carotenoids in hp1 tomato fruits.

    PubMed

    Kilambi, Himabindu Vasuki; Kumar, Rakesh; Sharma, Rameshwar; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju

    2013-04-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) high-pigment mutants with lesions in diverse loci such as DNA Damage-Binding Protein1 (high pigment1 [hp1]), Deetiolated1 (hp2), Zeaxanthin Epoxidase (hp3), and Intense pigment (Ip; gene product unknown) exhibit increased accumulation of fruit carotenoids coupled with an increase in chloroplast number and size. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms exaggerating the carotenoid accumulation and the chloroplast number in these mutants. A comparison of proteome profiles from the outer pericarp of hp1 mutant and wild-type (cv Ailsa Craig) fruits at different developmental stages revealed at least 72 differentially expressed proteins during ripening. Hierarchical clustering grouped these proteins into three clusters. We found an increased abundance of chromoplast-specific carotenoid-associated protein (CHRC) in hp1 fruits at red-ripe stage that is also reflected in its transcript level. Western blotting using CHRC polyclonal antibody from bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) revealed a 2-fold increase in the abundance of CHRC protein in the red-ripe stage of hp1 fruits compared with the wild type. CHRC levels in hp2 were found to be similar to that of hp1, whereas hp3 and Ip showed intermediate levels to those in hp1, hp2, and wild-type fruits. Both CHRC and carotenoids were present in the isolated plastoglobules. Overall, our results suggest that loss of function of DDB1, DET1, Zeaxanthin Epoxidase, and Ip up-regulates CHRC levels. Increase in CHRC levels may contribute to the enhanced carotenoid content in these high-pigment fruits by assisting in the sequestration and stabilization of carotenoids.

  10. Chromoplast-specific carotenoid-associated protein appears to be important for enhanced accumulation of carotenoids in hp1 tomato fruits.

    PubMed

    Kilambi, Himabindu Vasuki; Kumar, Rakesh; Sharma, Rameshwar; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju

    2013-04-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) high-pigment mutants with lesions in diverse loci such as DNA Damage-Binding Protein1 (high pigment1 [hp1]), Deetiolated1 (hp2), Zeaxanthin Epoxidase (hp3), and Intense pigment (Ip; gene product unknown) exhibit increased accumulation of fruit carotenoids coupled with an increase in chloroplast number and size. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms exaggerating the carotenoid accumulation and the chloroplast number in these mutants. A comparison of proteome profiles from the outer pericarp of hp1 mutant and wild-type (cv Ailsa Craig) fruits at different developmental stages revealed at least 72 differentially expressed proteins during ripening. Hierarchical clustering grouped these proteins into three clusters. We found an increased abundance of chromoplast-specific carotenoid-associated protein (CHRC) in hp1 fruits at red-ripe stage that is also reflected in its transcript level. Western blotting using CHRC polyclonal antibody from bell pepper (Capsicum annuum) revealed a 2-fold increase in the abundance of CHRC protein in the red-ripe stage of hp1 fruits compared with the wild type. CHRC levels in hp2 were found to be similar to that of hp1, whereas hp3 and Ip showed intermediate levels to those in hp1, hp2, and wild-type fruits. Both CHRC and carotenoids were present in the isolated plastoglobules. Overall, our results suggest that loss of function of DDB1, DET1, Zeaxanthin Epoxidase, and Ip up-regulates CHRC levels. Increase in CHRC levels may contribute to the enhanced carotenoid content in these high-pigment fruits by assisting in the sequestration and stabilization of carotenoids. PMID:23400702

  11. Elevated temperature differentially affects virulence, VirB protein accumulation, and T-pilus formation in different Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium vitis strains.

    PubMed

    Baron, C; Domke, N; Beinhofer, M; Hapfelmeier, S

    2001-12-01

    That gene transfer to plant cells is a temperature-sensitive process has been known for more than 50 years. Previous work indicated that this sensitivity results from the inability to assemble a functional T pilus required for T-DNA and protein transfer to recipient cells. The studies reported here extend these observations and more clearly define the molecular basis of this assembly and transfer defect. T-pilus assembly and virulence protein accumulation were monitored in Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain C58 at different temperatures ranging from 20 degrees C to growth-inhibitory 37 degrees C. Incubation at 28 degrees C but not at 26 degrees C strongly inhibited extracellular assembly of the major T-pilus component VirB2 as well as of pilus-associated protein VirB5, and the highest amounts of T pili were detected at 20 degrees C. Analysis of temperature effects on the cell-bound virulence machinery revealed three classes of virulence proteins. Whereas class I proteins (VirB2, VirB7, VirB9, and VirB10) were readily detected at 28 degrees C, class II proteins (VirB1, VirB4, VirB5, VirB6, VirB8, VirB11, VirD2, and VirE2) were only detected after cell growth below 26 degrees C. Significant levels of class III proteins (VirB3 and VirD4) were only detected at 20 degrees C and not at higher temperatures. Shift of virulence-induced agrobacteria from 20 to 28 or 37 degrees C had no immediate effect on cell-bound T pili or on stability of most virulence proteins. However, the temperature shift caused a rapid decrease in the amount of cell-bound VirB3 and VirD4, and VirB4 and VirB11 levels decreased next. To assess whether destabilization of virulence proteins constitutes a general phenomenon, levels of virulence proteins and of extracellular T pili were monitored in different A. tumefaciens and Agrobacterium vitis strains grown at 20 and 28 degrees C. Levels of many virulence proteins were strongly reduced at 28 degrees C compared to 20 degrees C, and T-pilus assembly did

  12. Nuclear protein accumulation in cellular senescence and organismal aging revealed with a novel single-cell resolution fluorescence microscopy assay

    PubMed Central

    De Cecco, Marco; Jeyapalan, Jessie; Zhao, Xiaoai; Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi; Sedivy, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Replicative cellular senescence was discovered some 50 years ago. The phenotypes of senescent cells have been investigated extensively in cell culture, and found to affect essentially all aspects of cellular physiology. The relevance of cellular senescence in the context of age-associated pathologies as well as normal aging is a topic of active and ongoing interest. Considerable effort has been devoted to biomarker discovery to enable the microscopic detection of single senescent cells in tissues. One characteristic of senescent cells documented very early in cell culture studies was an increase in cell size and total protein content, but whether this occurs in vivo is not known. A limiting factor for studies of protein content and localization has been the lack of suitable fluorescence microscopy tools. We have developed an easy and flexible method, based on the merocyanine dye known as NanoOrange, to visualize and quantitatively measure total protein levels by high resolution fluorescence microscopy. NanoOrange staining can be combined with antibody-based immunofluorescence, thus providing both specific target and total protein information in the same specimen. These methods are optimally combined with automated image analysis platforms for high throughput analysis. We document here increasing protein content and density in nuclei of senescent human and mouse fibroblasts in vitro, and in liver nuclei of aged mice in vivo. Additionally, in aged liver nuclei NanoOrange revealed protein-dense foci that colocalize with centromeric heterochromatin. PMID:22006542

  13. Acquisition of thermotolerance in soybean seedlings: synthesis and accumulation of heat shock proteins and their cellular localization

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.Y.; Roberts, J.K.; Key, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    When soybean Glycine max var Wayne seedlings are shifted from a normal growth temperature of 28/sup 0/C up to 40/sup 0/C (heat shock or HS), there is a dramatic change in protein synthesis. A new set of proteins known as shock proteins (HSPs) is produced and normal protein synthesis is greatly reduced. However, a pretreatmemt at 40/sup 0/C or a brief (10 minute) pulse treatment at 45/sup 0/C followed by a 28/sup 0/C incubation provide protection (thermal tolerance) to a subsequent exposure at 45/sup 0/C. During 40/sup 0/C HS, some HSPs become localized and stably associated with purified organelle fractions while others do not. A chase at 28/sup 0/C results in the gradual loss over a 4-hour period of the HSPs from the organelle fractions, but the HSPs remain selectively localized during a 40/sup 0/C chase period. The relative amount of HSPs which relocalize during a second HS increases with higher temperatures from 40/sup 0/C to 45/sup 0/C. Proteins induced by arsenite treatment are not selectively localized with organelle fractions at 28/sup 0/C but become organelle-associated during a subsequent HS at 40/sup 0/C.

  14. Tualang Honey Protects against BPA-Induced Morphological Abnormalities and Disruption of ERα, ERβ, and C3 mRNA and Protein Expressions in the Uterus of Rats.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Zaid, Siti Sarah; Kassim, Normadiah M; Othman, Shatrah

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) that can disrupt the normal functions of the reproductive system. The objective of the study is to investigate the potential protective effects of Tualang honey against BPA-induced uterine toxicity in pubertal rats. The rats were administered with BPA by oral gavage over a period of six weeks. Uterine toxicity in BPA-exposed rats was determined by the degree of the morphological abnormalities, increased lipid peroxidation, and dysregulated expression and distribution of ERα, ERβ, and C3 as compared to the control rats. Concurrent treatment of rats with BPA and Tualang honey significantly improved the uterine morphological abnormalities, reduced lipid peroxidation, and normalized ERα, ERβ, and C3 expressions and distribution. There were no abnormal changes observed in rats treated with Tualang honey alone, comparable with the control rats. In conclusion, Tualang honey has potential roles in protecting the uterus from BPA-induced toxicity, possibly accounted for by its phytochemical properties.

  15. Temporal Resolution of Misfolded Prion Protein Transport, Accumulation, Glial Activation, and Neuronal Death in the Retinas of Mice Inoculated with Scrapie.

    PubMed

    West Greenlee, M Heather; Lind, Melissa; Kokemuller, Robyn; Mammadova, Najiba; Kondru, Naveen; Manne, Sireesha; Smith, Jodi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Greenlee, Justin

    2016-09-01

    Currently, there is a lack of pathological landmarks to describe the progression of prion disease in vivo. Our goal was to use an experimental model to determine the temporal relationship between the transport of misfolded prion protein (PrP(Sc)) from the brain to the retina, the accumulation of PrP(Sc) in the retina, the response of the surrounding retinal tissue, and loss of neurons. Retinal samples from mice inoculated with RML scrapie were collected at 30, 60, 90, 105, and 120 days post inoculation (dpi) or at the onset of clinical signs of disease (153 dpi). Retinal homogenates were tested for prion seeding activity. Antibody staining was used to assess accumulation of PrP(Sc) and the resulting response of retinal tissue. Loss of photoreceptors was used as a measure of neuronal death. PrP(Sc) seeding activity was first detected in all samples at 60 dpi. Accumulation of PrP(Sc) and coincident activation of retinal glia were first detected at 90 dpi. Activation of microglia was first detected at 105 dpi, but neuronal death was not detectable until 120 dpi. Our results demonstrate that by using the retina we can resolve the temporal separation between several key events in the pathogenesis of prion disease. PMID:27521336

  16. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β (GSK3β) Negatively Regulates PTTG1/Human Securin Protein Stability, and GSK3β Inactivation Correlates with Securin Accumulation in Breast Tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Santos, Mar; Limón-Mortés, M. Cristina; Giráldez, Servando; Herrero-Ruiz, Joaquín; Sáez, Carmen; Japón, Miguel Á.; Tortolero, Maria; Romero, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    PTTG1, also known as securin, is an inactivating partner of separase, the major effector for chromosome segregation during mitosis. At the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, securin is targeted for proteasomal destruction by the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome, allowing activation of separase. In addition, securin is overexpressed in metastatic or genomically instable tumors, suggesting a relevant role for securin in tumor progression. Stability of securin is regulated by phosphorylation; some phosphorylated forms are degraded out of mitosis, by the action of the SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) complex. The kinases targeting securin for proteolysis have not been identified, and mechanistic insight into the cause of securin accumulation in human cancers is lacking. Here, we demonstrate that glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) phosphorylates securin to promote its proteolysis via SCFβTrCP E3 ubiquitin ligase. Importantly, a strong correlation between securin accumulation and GSK3β inactivation was observed in breast cancer tissues, indicating that GSK3β inactivation may account for securin accumulation in breast cancers. PMID:21757741

  17. Protein Profiles for Muscle Development and Intramuscular Fat Accumulation at Different Post-Hatching Ages in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Fu, Ruiqi; Liu, Ranran; Zhao, Guiping; Zheng, Maiqing; Cui, Huanxian; Li, Qinghe; Song, Jiao; Wang, Jie; Wen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Muscle development and growth influences the efficiency of poultry meat production, and is closely related to deposition of intramuscular fat (IMF), which is crucial in meat quality. To clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying muscle development and IMF deposition in chickens, protein expression profiles were examined in the breast muscle of Beijing-You chickens at ages 1, 56, 98 and 140 days, using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ). Two hundred and four of 494 proteins were expressed differentially. The expression profile at day 1 differed greatly from those at day 56, 98 and 140. KEGG pathway analysis of differential protein expression from pair-wise comparisons (day 1 vs. 56; 56 vs. 98; 98 vs. 140), showed that the fatty acid degradation pathway was more active during the stage from day 1 to 56 than at other periods. This was consistent with the change in IMF content, which was highest at day 1 and declined dramatically thereafter. When muscle growth was most rapid (days 56-98), pathways involved in muscle development were dominant, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, cardiac muscle contraction, tight junctions and focal adhesion. In contrast with hatchlings, the fatty acid degradation pathway was downregulated from day 98 to 140, which was consistent with the period for IMF deposition following rapid muscle growth. Changes in some key specific proteins, including fast skeletal muscle troponin T isoform, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 and apolipoprotein A1, were verified by Western blotting, and could be potential biomarkers for IMF deposition in chickens. Protein-protein interaction networks showed that ribosome-related functional modules were clustered in all three stages. However, the functional module involved in the metabolic pathway was only clustered in the first stage (day 1 vs. 56). This study improves our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying muscle development and IMF deposition in

  18. Far-infrared radiation protects viability in a cell model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia by preventing polyQ protein accumulation and improving mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Wu, Shey-Lin; Hoel, Fredrik; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Liu, Ko-Hung; Hsieh, Mingli; Hoel, August; Tronstad, Karl Johan; Yan, Kuo-Chia; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Lin, Wei-Yong; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Su, Shih-Li; Liu, Chin-San

    2016-01-01

    Far infrared radiation (FIR) is currently investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy in various diseases though the mechanism is unknown. Presently, we tested if FIR mediates beneficial effects in a cell model of the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3). SCA3 is caused by a mutation leading to an abnormal polyglutamine expansion (PolyQ) in ataxin-3 protein. The consequent aggregation of mutant ataxin-3 results in disruption of vital cell functions. In this study, neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) was transduced to express either non-pathogenic ataxin-3-26Q or pathogenic ataxin-3-78Q proteins. The cells expressing ataxin-3-78Q demonstrated decreased viability, and increased sensitivity to metabolic stress in the presence rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. FIR exposure was found to protect against these effects. Moreover, FIR improved mitochondrial respiratory function, which was significantly compromised in ataxin-3-78Q and ataxin-3-26Q expressing cells. This was accompanied by decreased levels of mitochondrial fragmentation in FIR treated cells, as observed by fluorescence microscopy and protein expression analysis. Finally, the expression profile LC3-II, Beclin-1 and p62 suggested that FIR prevent the autophagy inhibiting effects observed in ataxin-3-78Q expressing cells. In summary, our results suggest that FIR have rescuing effects in cells expressing mutated pathogenic ataxin-3, through recovery of mitochondrial function and autophagy. PMID:27469193

  19. Far-infrared radiation protects viability in a cell model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia by preventing polyQ protein accumulation and improving mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Wu, Shey-Lin; Hoel, Fredrik; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Liu, Ko-Hung; Hsieh, Mingli; Hoel, August; Tronstad, Karl Johan; Yan, Kuo-Chia; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Lin, Wei-Yong; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Su, Shih-Li; Liu, Chin-San

    2016-01-01

    Far infrared radiation (FIR) is currently investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy in various diseases though the mechanism is unknown. Presently, we tested if FIR mediates beneficial effects in a cell model of the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3). SCA3 is caused by a mutation leading to an abnormal polyglutamine expansion (PolyQ) in ataxin-3 protein. The consequent aggregation of mutant ataxin-3 results in disruption of vital cell functions. In this study, neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) was transduced to express either non-pathogenic ataxin-3-26Q or pathogenic ataxin-3-78Q proteins. The cells expressing ataxin-3-78Q demonstrated decreased viability, and increased sensitivity to metabolic stress in the presence rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. FIR exposure was found to protect against these effects. Moreover, FIR improved mitochondrial respiratory function, which was significantly compromised in ataxin-3-78Q and ataxin-3-26Q expressing cells. This was accompanied by decreased levels of mitochondrial fragmentation in FIR treated cells, as observed by fluorescence microscopy and protein expression analysis. Finally, the expression profile LC3-II, Beclin-1 and p62 suggested that FIR prevent the autophagy inhibiting effects observed in ataxin-3-78Q expressing cells. In summary, our results suggest that FIR have rescuing effects in cells expressing mutated pathogenic ataxin-3, through recovery of mitochondrial function and autophagy. PMID:27469193

  20. Far-infrared radiation protects viability in a cell model of Spinocerebellar Ataxia by preventing polyQ protein accumulation and improving mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Wu, Shey-Lin; Hoel, Fredrik; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Liu, Ko-Hung; Hsieh, Mingli; Hoel, August; Tronstad, Karl Johan; Yan, Kuo-Chia; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Lin, Wei-Yong; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Su, Shih-Li; Liu, Chin-San

    2016-07-29

    Far infrared radiation (FIR) is currently investigated as a potential therapeutic strategy in various diseases though the mechanism is unknown. Presently, we tested if FIR mediates beneficial effects in a cell model of the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3). SCA3 is caused by a mutation leading to an abnormal polyglutamine expansion (PolyQ) in ataxin-3 protein. The consequent aggregation of mutant ataxin-3 results in disruption of vital cell functions. In this study, neuroblastoma cells (SK-N-SH) was transduced to express either non-pathogenic ataxin-3-26Q or pathogenic ataxin-3-78Q proteins. The cells expressing ataxin-3-78Q demonstrated decreased viability, and increased sensitivity to metabolic stress in the presence rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration. FIR exposure was found to protect against these effects. Moreover, FIR improved mitochondrial respiratory function, which was significantly compromised in ataxin-3-78Q and ataxin-3-26Q expressing cells. This was accompanied by decreased levels of mitochondrial fragmentation in FIR treated cells, as observed by fluorescence microscopy and protein expression analysis. Finally, the expression profile LC3-II, Beclin-1 and p62 suggested that FIR prevent the autophagy inhibiting effects observed in ataxin-3-78Q expressing cells. In summary, our results suggest that FIR have rescuing effects in cells expressing mutated pathogenic ataxin-3, through recovery of mitochondrial function and autophagy.

  1. The senescence-accelerated prone mouse (SAMP8): a model of age-related cognitive decline with relevance to alterations of the gene expression and protein abnormalities in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, D Allan; Poon, H Fai

    2005-10-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) is an accelerated aging model that was established through phenotypic selection from a common genetic pool of AKR/J strain of mice. The SAM model was established in 1981, including nine major senescence-accelerated mouse prone (SAMP) substrains and three major senescence-accelerated mouse resistant (SAMR) substrains, each of which exhibits characteristic disorders. Recently, SAMP8 have drawn attention in gerontological research due to its characteristic learning and memory deficits at old age. Many recent reports provide insight into mechanisms of the cognitive impairment and pathological changes in SAMP8. Therefore, this mini review examines the recent findings of SAMP8 mice abnormalities at the gene and protein levels. The genes and proteins described in this review are functionally categorized into neuroprotection, signal transduction, protein folding/degradation, cytoskeleton/transport, immune response and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. All of these processes are involved in learning and memory. Although these studies provide insight into the mechanisms that contribute to the learning and memory decline in aged SAMP8 mice, higher throughput techniques of proteomics and genomics are necessary to study the alterations of gene expression and protein abnormalities in SAMP8 mice brain in order to more completely understand the central nervous system dysfunction in this mouse model. The SAMP8 is a good animal model to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of age-related learning and memory deficits at the gene and protein levels. PMID:16026957

  2. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27627966

  3. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27627966

  4. Accumulation-Associated Protein Enhances Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Formation under Dynamic Conditions and Is Required for Infection in a Rat Catheter Model

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Carolyn R.; Woods, Keith M.; Longo, G. Matt; Kiedrowski, Megan R.; Paharik, Alexandra E.; Büttner, Henning; Christner, Martin; Boissy, Robert J.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Rohde, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation is the primary virulence factor of Staphylococcus epidermidis. S. epidermidis biofilms preferentially form on abiotic surfaces and may contain multiple matrix components, including proteins such as accumulation-associated protein (Aap). Following proteolytic cleavage of the A domain, which has been shown to enhance binding to host cells, B domain homotypic interactions support cell accumulation and biofilm formation. To further define the contribution of Aap to biofilm formation and infection, we constructed an aap allelic replacement mutant and an icaADBC aap double mutant. When subjected to fluid shear, strains deficient in Aap production produced significantly less biofilm than Aap-positive strains. To examine the in vivo relevance of our findings, we modified our previously described rat jugular catheter model and validated the importance of immunosuppression and the presence of a foreign body to the establishment of infection. The use of our allelic replacement mutants in the model revealed a significant decrease in bacterial recovery from the catheter and the blood in the absence of Aap, regardless of the production of polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), a well-characterized, robust matrix molecule. Complementation of the aap mutant with full-length Aap (containing the A domain), but not the B domain alone, increased initial attachment to microtiter plates, as did in trans expression of the A domain in adhesion-deficient Staphylococcus carnosus. These results demonstrate Aap contributes to S. epidermidis infection, which may in part be due to A domain-mediated attachment to abiotic surfaces. PMID:25332125

  5. Methyl jasmonate induces ATP biosynthesis deficiency and accumulation of proteins related to secondary metabolism in Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-May, Eliel; De-la-Peña, Clelia; Galaz-Ávalos, Rosa M; Lei, Zhentian; Watson, Bonnie S; Sumner, Lloyd W; Loyola-Vargas, Víctor M

    2011-08-01

    Jasmonates are specific signal molecules in plants that are involved in a diverse set of physiological and developmental processes. However, methyl jasmonate (MeJA) has been shown to have a negative effect on root growth and, so far, the biochemical mechanism for this is unknown. Using Catharanthus roseus hairy roots, we were able to observe the effect of MeJA on growth inhibition, cell disorganization and cell death of the root cap. Hairy roots treated with MeJA induced the perturbation of mitochondrial membrane integrity and a diminution in ATP biosynthesis. Furthermore, several proteins were identified that were involved in energy and secondary metabolism; the changes in accumulation of these proteins were observed with 100 μM MeJA. In conclusion, our results suggest that a switch of the metabolic fate of hairy roots in response to MeJA could cause an increase in the accumulation of secondary metabolites. This is likely to have important consequences in the production of specific alkaloids important for the pharmaceutical industry.

  6. Accumulation-associated protein enhances Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation under dynamic conditions and is required for infection in a rat catheter model.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Carolyn R; Woods, Keith M; Longo, G Matt; Kiedrowski, Megan R; Paharik, Alexandra E; Büttner, Henning; Christner, Martin; Boissy, Robert J; Horswill, Alexander R; Rohde, Holger; Fey, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation is the primary virulence factor of Staphylococcus epidermidis. S. epidermidis biofilms preferentially form on abiotic surfaces and may contain multiple matrix components, including proteins such as accumulation-associated protein (Aap). Following proteolytic cleavage of the A domain, which has been shown to enhance binding to host cells, B domain homotypic interactions support cell accumulation and biofilm formation. To further define the contribution of Aap to biofilm formation and infection, we constructed an aap allelic replacement mutant and an icaADBC aap double mutant. When subjected to fluid shear, strains deficient in Aap production produced significantly less biofilm than Aap-positive strains. To examine the in vivo relevance of our findings, we modified our previously described rat jugular catheter model and validated the importance of immunosuppression and the presence of a foreign body to the establishment of infection. The use of our allelic replacement mutants in the model revealed a significant decrease in bacterial recovery from the catheter and the blood in the absence of Aap, regardless of the production of polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), a well-characterized, robust matrix molecule. Complementation of the aap mutant with full-length Aap (containing the A domain), but not the B domain alone, increased initial attachment to microtiter plates, as did in trans expression of the A domain in adhesion-deficient Staphylococcus carnosus. These results demonstrate Aap contributes to S. epidermidis infection, which may in part be due to A domain-mediated attachment to abiotic surfaces.

  7. CEP215 is involved in the dynein-dependent accumulation of pericentriolar matrix proteins for spindle pole formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seongju; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2010-02-15

    CEP 215 is a human orthologue of Drosophila centrosomin which is a core centrosome component for the pericentriolar matrix protein recruitment. Recent investigations revealed that CEP 215 is required for centrosome cohesion, centrosomal attachment of the gamma-TuRC, and microtubule dynamics. However, it remains obscure how CEP 215 functions for recruitment of the centrosomal proteins during the centrosome cycle. Here, we investigated a role of CEP 215 during mitosis. Knockdown of CEP 215 resulted in characteristic mitotic phenotypes, including monopolar spindle formation, a decrease in distance between the spindle pole pair, and detachment of the centrosomes from the spindle poles. We noticed that CEP 215 is critical for centrosomal localization of dynein throughout the cell cycle. As a consequence, the selective centrosomal proteins were not recruited to the centrosome properly. Finally, the centrosomal localization of CEP 215 also depends on the dynein-dynactin complex. Based on the results, we propose that CEP 215 regulates a dynein-dependent transport of the pericentriolar matrix proteins during the centrosome maturation. PMID:20139723

  8. Modified bean seed protein phaseolin did not accumulate stably in transgenic tobacco seeds after methionine enhancement mutations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major seed storage protein phaseolin of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is deficient in methionine, an essential amino acid for human and animal health. To improve the nutritional quality of common bean, we designed methionine enhancement of phaseolin based on the three dimensional structure...

  9. Effects of Mineral Nutrition and Temperature on Accumulation of Gluten Proteins are Related to Their Content of CYs and Met

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excess N and/or high temperature had effects somewhat similar to S-deficiency on flour protein composition. Grain was produced under climate-controlled conditions with average day and nighttime temperatures of 24oC and 17oC (cool), or 37oC and 28oC (hot), from anthesis until maturity. Pots were irr...

  10. αA-Crystallin Peptide 66SDRDKFVIFLDVKHF80 Accumulating in Aging Lens Impairs the Function of α-Crystallin and Induces Lens Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Santhoshkumar, Puttur; Raju, Murugesan; Sharma, K. Krishna

    2011-01-01

    Background The eye lens is composed of fiber cells that are filled with α-, β- and γ-crystallins. The primary function of crystallins is to maintain the clarity of the lens through ordered interactions as well as through the chaperone-like function of α-crystallin. With aging, the chaperone function of α-crystallin decreases, with the concomitant accumulation of water-insoluble, light-scattering oligomers and crystallin-derived peptides. The role of crystallin-derived peptides in age-related lens protein aggregation and insolubilization is not understood. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that αA-crystallin-derived peptide, 66SDRDKFVIFLDVKHF80, which accumulates in the aging lens, can inhibit the chaperone activity of α-crystallin and cause aggregation and precipitation of lens crystallins. Age-related change in the concentration of αA-(66-80) peptide was estimated by mass spectrometry. The interaction of the peptide with native crystallin was studied by multi-angle light scattering and fluorescence methods. High molar ratios of peptide-to-crystallin were favourable for aggregation and precipitation. Time-lapse recordings showed that, in the presence of αA-(66-80) peptide, α-crystallin aggregates and functions as a nucleus for protein aggregation, attracting aggregation of additional α-, β- and γ-crystallins. Additionally, the αA-(66-80) peptide shares the principal properties of amyloid peptides, such as β-sheet structure and fibril formation. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that crystallin-derived peptides such as αA-(66-80), generated in vivo, can induce age-related lens changes by disrupting the structure and organization of crystallins, leading to their insolubilization. The accumulation of such peptides in aging lenses may explain a novel mechanism for age-related crystallin aggregation and cataractogenesis. PMID:21552534

  11. Protein Profiles for Muscle Development and Intramuscular Fat Accumulation at Different Post-Hatching Ages in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ranran; Zhao, Guiping; Zheng, Maiqing; Cui, Huanxian; Li, Qinghe; Song, Jiao; Wang, Jie; Wen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Muscle development and growth influences the efficiency of poultry meat production, and is closely related to deposition of intramuscular fat (IMF), which is crucial in meat quality. To clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying muscle development and IMF deposition in chickens, protein expression profiles were examined in the breast muscle of Beijing-You chickens at ages 1, 56, 98 and 140 days, using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ). Two hundred and four of 494 proteins were expressed differentially. The expression profile at day 1 differed greatly from those at day 56, 98 and 140. KEGG pathway analysis of differential protein expression from pair-wise comparisons (day 1 vs. 56; 56 vs. 98; 98 vs. 140), showed that the fatty acid degradation pathway was more active during the stage from day 1 to 56 than at other periods. This was consistent with the change in IMF content, which was highest at day 1 and declined dramatically thereafter. When muscle growth was most rapid (days 56–98), pathways involved in muscle development were dominant, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, cardiac muscle contraction, tight junctions and focal adhesion. In contrast with hatchlings, the fatty acid degradation pathway was downregulated from day 98 to 140, which was consistent with the period for IMF deposition following rapid muscle growth. Changes in some key specific proteins, including fast skeletal muscle troponin T isoform, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A1 and apolipoprotein A1, were verified by Western blotting, and could be potential biomarkers for IMF deposition in chickens. Protein–protein interaction networks showed that ribosome-related functional modules were clustered in all three stages. However, the functional module involved in the metabolic pathway was only clustered in the first stage (day 1 vs. 56). This study improves our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying muscle development and IMF deposition

  12. Effect of ethephon on protein degradation and the accumulation of pathogensis-related (PR) proteins in tomato leaf discs. [Lycopersicon esculentum

    SciTech Connect

    Vera, P.; Conejero, V. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of ethephon (2-chloroetylphosphonic acid) on the degradation of proteins and on the induction of Lycopersicon esculentum pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins was studied in tomato leaf discs. The rate of ribulose, -1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) degradation was maximal in discs after 48 hours of incubation with 1 millimolar ethephon, leading to complete disappearance of Rubisco after 96 hours. This effect was correlated with an increase in PR protein synthesis and the induction of the previously reported alkaline proteolytic enzyme PR-P69. In vivo pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that ethephon not only affected Rubisco content but that of many other {sup 35}S-labeled proteins as well, indicating that ethylene activates a general and nonspecific mechanism of protein degradation. This effect was partially inhibited in vivo by the action of pCMB, a selective inhibitor of cysteine-proteinases such as P69. These data reinforce the hypothesis that P69 and perhaps other PR proteins are involved in the mechanism of accelerated protein degradation activated by ethylene.

  13. CPB1 of Aedes aegypti interacts with DENV2 E protein and regulates intracellular viral accumulation and release from midgut cells.

    PubMed

    Tham, Hong-Wai; Balasubramaniam, Vinod R M T; Tejo, Bimo Ario; Ahmad, Hamdan; Hassan, Sharifah Syed

    2014-12-01

    Aedes aegypti is a principal vector responsible for the transmission of dengue viruses (DENV). To date, vector control remains the key option for dengue disease management. To develop new vector control strategies, a more comprehensive understanding of the biological interactions between DENV and Ae. aegypti is required. In this study, a cDNA library derived from the midgut of female adult Ae. aegypti was used in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screenings against DENV2 envelope (E) protein. Among the many interacting proteins identified, carboxypeptidase B1 (CPB1) was selected, and its biological interaction with E protein in Ae. aegypti primary midgut cells was further validated. Our double immunofluorescent assay showed that CPB1-E interaction occurred in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the Ae. aegypti primary midgut cells. Overexpression of CPB1 in mosquito cells resulted in intracellular DENV2 genomic RNA or virus particle accumulation, with a lower amount of virus release. Therefore, we postulated that in Ae. aegypti midgut cells, CPB1 binds to the E protein deposited on the ER intraluminal membranes and inhibits DENV2 RNA encapsulation, thus inhibiting budding from the ER, and may interfere with immature virus transportation to the trans-Golgi network. PMID:25521592

  14. The yeast NOP4 gene product is an essential nucleolar protein required for pre-rRNA processing and accumulation of 60S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, C; Woolford, J L

    1994-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NOP4 gene was isolated by screening a lambda gt11 yeast genomic DNA library with a monoclonal antibody against a yeast nucleolar protein. NOP4 encodes a 78 kDa protein that contains two prototypical RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) flanking an imperfect RRM lacking characteristic RNP1 and RNP2 motifs. In addition, there is a fourth incomplete RRM. NOP4 is a single copy essential gene present on chromosome XVI, between RAD1 and PEP4. To examine the function of Nop4p, we constructed a conditional null allele of NOP4 by placing this gene under the control of the glucose-repressible GAL1 promoter. When cells are shifted from galactose-containing medium to glucose-containing medium, NOP4 transcription is terminated, Nop4 protein is depleted and cell growth is impaired. Nop4 protein depletion results in diminished accumulation of 60S ribosomal subunits, assignable to a defect in ribosome biogenesis arising from a lack of production of mature 25S rRNA from 27S precursor rRNA. Images PMID:8039505

  15. Accumulation of PrLeg, a Perilla legumin protein in potato tuber results in enhanced level of sulphur-containing amino acids.

    PubMed

    Goo, Young-Min; Kim, Tae-Won; Lee, Min-Kyung; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2013-09-01

    Potato is the fourth staple food in the world, following rice, wheat, and maize, whereas tubers contain high quality of starch, relatively high amounts of vitamin C and many other important substances. It also contains relatively good quality of protein (about 3 to 6% of the dried weight) and patatin, and 11S globulin is a major storage protein with high level of lysine. However, tuber protein contains relatively low amounts of sulphur-containing amino acids, which may result in low nutritional value. Recently, we cloned a gene encoding PrLeg polypeptide, a seed storage protein from Perilla, which contains relatively higher levels of sulphur-containing amino acids. We transformed PrLeg cDNA into a potato plant to over-express under the direction of the tuber-specific promoter, patatin. Most of the transgenic lines identified through PCR and RT-PCR analyses were able to accumulate high amount of prLeg transcript in their tuber tissue, while very little or no transcript that were detected in their leaf tissues. The level of methionine content was elevated up to three-fold compared to non-transgenic parental line, without any significant changes in other amino acids, suggesting that further research is required to get a deeper insight into their nutritional value. PMID:24161240

  16. CPB1 of Aedes aegypti interacts with DENV2 E protein and regulates intracellular viral accumulation and release from midgut cells.

    PubMed

    Tham, Hong-Wai; Balasubramaniam, Vinod R M T; Tejo, Bimo Ario; Ahmad, Hamdan; Hassan, Sharifah Syed

    2014-12-16

    Aedes aegypti is a principal vector responsible for the transmission of dengue viruses (DENV). To date, vector control remains the key option for dengue disease management. To develop new vector control strategies, a more comprehensive understanding of the biological interactions between DENV and Ae. aegypti is required. In this study, a cDNA library derived from the midgut of female adult Ae. aegypti was used in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screenings against DENV2 envelope (E) protein. Among the many interacting proteins identified, carboxypeptidase B1 (CPB1) was selected, and its biological interaction with E protein in Ae. aegypti primary midgut cells was further validated. Our double immunofluorescent assay showed that CPB1-E interaction occurred in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the Ae. aegypti primary midgut cells. Overexpression of CPB1 in mosquito cells resulted in intracellular DENV2 genomic RNA or virus particle accumulation, with a lower amount of virus release. Therefore, we postulated that in Ae. aegypti midgut cells, CPB1 binds to the E protein deposited on the ER intraluminal membranes and inhibits DENV2 RNA encapsulation, thus inhibiting budding from the ER, and may interfere with immature virus transportation to the trans-Golgi network.

  17. gar2 is a nucleolar protein from Schizosaccharomyces pombe required for 18S rRNA and 40S ribosomal subunit accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Gulli, M P; Girard, J P; Zabetakis, D; Lapeyre, B; Melese, T; Caizergues-Ferrer, M

    1995-01-01

    Several nucleolar proteins, such as nucleolin, NOP1/fibrillarin, SSB1, NSR1 and GAR1 share a common glycine and arginine rich structural motif called the GAR domain. To identify novel nucleolar proteins from fission yeast we screened Schizosaccharomyces pombe genomic DNA libraries with a probe encompassing the GAR structural motif. Here we report the identification and characterization of a S.pombe gene coding for a novel nucleolar protein, designated gar2. The structure of the fission yeast gar2 is reminiscent of that of nucleolin from vertebrates and NSR1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, like these proteins, gar2 has a nucleolar localisation. The disruption of the gar2+ gene affects normal cell growth, leads to an accumulation of 35S pre-rRNA and a decrease of mature 18S rRNA steady state levels. Moreover, ribosomal profiles of the mutant show an increase of free 60S ribosomal subunits and an absence of free 40S ribosomal subunits. gar2 is able to rescue a S.cerevisiae mutant lacking NSR1, thus establishing gar2 as a functional homolog of NSR1. We propose that gar2 helps the assembly of pre-ribosomal particles containing 18S rRNA. Images PMID:7596817

  18. Effect of NO/sub 2/ inhalation and vitamin C deficiency on protein and lipid accumulation in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Selgrade, M.K.; Mole, M.L.; Miller, F.J.; Hatch, G.E.; Gardner, D.E.; Hu, P.C

    1981-12-01

    Vitamin C-deficient and normal guinea pigs were exposed to various concentrations of NO/sub 2/ or air, and lavage fluid was obtained and analyzed for protein and lipid content. Exposure of normal animals to 752, 1880, 5640, or 9400 ..mu..g NO/sub 2//m/sup 3/ (0.4, 1.0, 3.0, or 5.0 ppm) for 72 hr did not alter the protein or lipid content of lung lavage fluid. However, exposure of vitamin C-deficient animals to the same concentrations of NO/sub 2/ caused marked increases in lavage proteins and lipids at all but the 752 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ (0.4 ppm) level. At 9400 ..mu..g NO/sub 2//m/sup 3/ (5.0 ppm), 50% of the exposed C-deficient animals died, and pathologic study of the lungs showed proteinaceous edema fluid in the alveoli. Lungs from air-exposed animals and normal animals exposed to NO/sub 2/ appeared healthy. No effects were seen at 752 ..mu..g NO/sub 2/ (0.4 ppm) in either normal or deficient animals even when the time of exposure was extended to 1 week. At 9400 ..mu..g NO/sub 2//m/sup 3/ (5 ppm) effects could be seen in vitamin C-deficient animals even when the exposure period was shortened to 3 hr. Assessment of protein and lipid content of lavage fluid provided a sensitive method for determining subtle changes in the lung following NO/sub 2/ exposure.

  19. Differential accumulation of soluble proteins in roots of metallicolous and nonmetallicolous populations of Agrostis capillaris L. exposed to Cu.

    PubMed

    Hego, Elena; Bes, Clémence M; Bedon, Frank; Palagi, Patricia M; Chaumeil, Philippe; Barré, Aurélien; Claverol, Stéphane; Dupuy, Jean-William; Bonneu, Marc; Lalanne, Céline; Plomion, Christophe; Mench, Michel

    2014-08-01

    Differential expression of soluble proteins was explored in roots of metallicolous (M) and non-M (NM) plants of Agrostis capillaris L. exposed to increasing Cu to partially identify molecular mechanisms underlying higher Cu tolerance in M plants. Plants were cultivated for 2 months on perlite with a CuSO4 (1-30 μM) spiked-nutrient solution. Soluble proteins extracted by the trichloroacetic acid/acetone procedure were separated with 2DE (linear 4-7 pH gradient). After Coomassie Blue staining and image analysis, 19 proteins differentially expressed were identified using LC-MS/MS and Expressed Sequence Tag (ESTs) databases. At supra-optimal Cu exposure (15-30 μM), glycolysis was likely altered in NM roots with increased production of glycerone-P and methylglyoxal based on overexpression of triosephosphate isomerase and fructose bisphosphate aldolase. Changes in tubulins and higher expressions of 5-methyltetrahydropteroyltriglutamatehomocysteine methyltransferase and S-adenosylmethionine synthase underpinned impacts on the cytoskeleton and stimulation of ethylene metabolism. Increased l-methionine and S-adenosylmethionine amounts may also facilitate production of nicotianamine, which complexes Cu, and of l-cysteine, needed for metallothioneins and GSH. In M roots, the increase of [Cu/Zn] superoxide dismutase suggested a better detoxification of superoxide, when Cu exposure rose. Higher Cu-tolerance of M plants would rather result from simultaneous cooperation of various processes than from a specific mechanism. PMID:24842164

  20. Escherichia coli rimM and yjeQ null strains accumulate immature 30S subunits of similar structure and protein complement

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Vivian; Kent, Meredith; Jomaa, Ahmad; Ortega, Joaquin

    2013-01-01

    Assembly of the Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits proceeds through multiple parallel pathways. The protein factors RimM, YjeQ, RbfA, and Era work in conjunction to assist at the late stages of the maturation process of the small subunit. However, it is unclear how the functional interplay between these factors occurs in the context of multiple parallel pathways. To understand how these factors work together, we have characterized the immature 30S subunits that accumulate in ΔrimM cells and compared them with immature 30S subunits from a ΔyjeQ strain. The cryo-EM maps obtained from these particles showed that the densities representing helices 44 and 45 in the rRNA were partially missing, suggesting mobility of these motifs. These 30S subunits were also partially depleted in all tertiary ribosomal proteins, particularly those binding in the head domain. Using image classification, we identified four subpopulations of ΔrimM immature 30S subunits differing in the amount of missing density for helices 44 and 45, as well as the amount of density existing in these maps for the underrepresented proteins. The structural defects found in these immature subunits resembled those of the 30S subunits that accumulate in the ΔyjeQ strain. These findings are consistent with an “early convergency model” in which multiple parallel assembly pathways of the 30S subunit converge into a late assembly intermediate, as opposed to the mature state. Functionally related factors will bind to this intermediate to catalyze the last steps of maturation leading to the mature 30S subunit. PMID:23611982

  1. Strategies for Cd accumulation in Dittrichia viscosa (L.) Greuter: role of the cell wall, non-protein thiols and organic acids.

    PubMed

    Fernández, R; Fernández-Fuego, D; Bertrand, A; González, A

    2014-05-01

    Dittrichia viscosa (L.) Greuter is plant species commonly found in degraded zones of Asturias (Spain), where it accumulates high levels of Cd, but the mechanisms involved in this response in non-model plants have not been elucidated. In this way, we analysed the fraction of the total Cd bound to the cell walls, the ultrastructural localization of this metal, and non-protein thiol and organic acid concentrations of two clones of D. viscosa: DV-A (from a metal-polluted soil) and DV-W (from a non-polluted area). After 10 days of hydroponic culture with Cd, fractionation and ultrastructural localisation studies showed that most of the Cd accumulated by D. viscosa was kept in the cell wall. The non-protein thiol content rose in D. viscosa with Cd exposure, especially in the non-metallicolous DV-W clone, and in both clones we found with Cd exposure a synthesis de novo of phytochelatins PC2 and PC3 in shoots and roots and also of other phytochelatin-related compounds, particularly in roots. Regarding organic acids, their concentration in both clones decreased in shoots after Cd treatment, but increased in roots, mainly due to changes in the citric acid concentration. Thus, retention of Cd in the cell wall seems to be the first strategy in response to metal entry in D. viscosa and once inside cells non-protein thiols and organic acids might also participate in Cd tolerance. PMID:24636908

  2. Rosuvastatin ameliorates inflammation, renal fat accumulation, and kidney injury in transgenic spontaneously hypertensive rats expressing human C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Šilhavý, J; Zídek, V; Landa, V; Šimáková, M; Mlejnek, P; Oliyarnyk, O; Malínská, H; Kazdová, L; Mancini, M; Pravenec, M

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we derived "humanized" spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-CRP) in which transgenic expression of human CRP induces inflammation, oxidative stress, several features of metabolic syndrome and target organ injury. In addition, we found that rosuvastatin treatment of SHR-CRP transgenic rats can protect against pro-inflammatory effects of human CRP and also reduce cardiac inflammation and oxidative damage. In the current study, we tested the effects of rosuvastatin (5 mg/kg) on kidney injury in SHR-CRP males versus untreated SHR-CRP and SHR controls. All rats were fed a high sucrose diet. In SHR-CRP transgenic rats, treatment with rosuvastatin for 10 weeks, compared to untreated transgenic rats and SHR controls, was associated with significantly reduced systemic inflammation which was accompanied with activation of antioxidative enzymes in the kidney, lower renal fat accumulation, and with amelioration of histopathological changes in the kidney. These findings provide evidence that, in the presence of high CRP levels, rosuvastatin exhibits significant anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and renoprotective effects.

  3. PTHrP in differentiating human mesenchymal stem cells: transcript isoform expression, promoter methylation, and protein accumulation.

    PubMed

    Longo, Alessandra; Librizzi, Mariangela; Naselli, Flores; Caradonna, Fabio; Tobiasch, Edda; Luparello, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Human PTHrP gene displays a complex organization with nine exons producing diverse mRNA variants due to alternative splicing at 5' and 3' ends and the existence of three different transcriptional promoters (P1, P2 and P3), two of which (P2 and P3) contain CpG islands. It is known that the expression of PTHrP isoforms may be differentially regulated in a developmental stage- and tissue-specific manner. To search for novel molecular markers of stemness/differentiation, here we have examined isoform expression in fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells both maintained in stem conditions and induced toward adipo- and osteogenesis. In addition, the expression of the splicing isoforms derived from P2 and P3 promoters was correlated to the state of methylation of the latter. Moreover, we also performed a quantitative evaluation of intracellular and secreted PTHrP protein product in undifferentiated stem cells and in parallel cultures at various differentiation stages. The data obtained indicate that from the stemness condition to that of osteo- and adipo-genic differentiated cells, the expression of isoforms becomes increasingly selective, thereby being a potential gene signature for the monitoring of cell stem or committed/differentiating state and that the switching-off of PTHrP isoform expression is mostly promoter methylation-dependent. Moreover, PTHrP intracellular retention is down-regulated in osteo-differentiating cells whereas the secretion of the protein in the extracellular medium is up-regulated with respect to stem cells, thereby suggesting that these variations of the intracellular and extracellular levels of PTHrP could potentially be enclosed in the list of the available protein signature of osteogenic differentiation.

  4. PTHrP in differentiating human mesenchymal stem cells: transcript isoform expression, promoter methylation, and protein accumulation.

    PubMed

    Longo, Alessandra; Librizzi, Mariangela; Naselli, Flores; Caradonna, Fabio; Tobiasch, Edda; Luparello, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Human PTHrP gene displays a complex organization with nine exons producing diverse mRNA variants due to alternative splicing at 5' and 3' ends and the existence of three different transcriptional promoters (P1, P2 and P3), two of which (P2 and P3) contain CpG islands. It is known that the expression of PTHrP isoforms may be differentially regulated in a developmental stage- and tissue-specific manner. To search for novel molecular markers of stemness/differentiation, here we have examined isoform expression in fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells both maintained in stem conditions and induced toward adipo- and osteogenesis. In addition, the expression of the splicing isoforms derived from P2 and P3 promoters was correlated to the state of methylation of the latter. Moreover, we also performed a quantitative evaluation of intracellular and secreted PTHrP protein product in undifferentiated stem cells and in parallel cultures at various differentiation stages. The data obtained indicate that from the stemness condition to that of osteo- and adipo-genic differentiated cells, the expression of isoforms becomes increasingly selective, thereby being a potential gene signature for the monitoring of cell stem or committed/differentiating state and that the switching-off of PTHrP isoform expression is mostly promoter methylation-dependent. Moreover, PTHrP intracellular retention is down-regulated in osteo-differentiating cells whereas the secretion of the protein in the extracellular medium is up-regulated with respect to stem cells, thereby suggesting that these variations of the intracellular and extracellular levels of PTHrP could potentially be enclosed in the list of the available protein signature of osteogenic differentiation. PMID:23810909

  5. The effect of the anti-allergic agent avil on abnormal scar fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, J; Ramakrishnan, M; Habibullah, C M; Babu, M

    1999-05-01

    Abnormal wound healing in humans leads to the formation of hypertrophic scar and keloids. These abnormal scars accumulate excessive extracellular matrix proteins through increased synthesis as well as decreased degradation. In order to find a therapeutic control for scar formation, we investigated the effect of avil (pheniramine maleate) on fibroblasts cultured from abnormal scars in comparison to normal skin. We observed a decrease in the proliferation rate in cells from normal skin (39%), hypertrophic scar (44%), keloid (63%) and in DNA synthesis in cells from normal skin (50%), hypertrophic scar (55%) and keloid (63%) treated with 8 mM avil (72 h). The rate of decrease in collagen synthesis in normal skin (44%), hypertrophic scar (74%) and keloid fibroblast (73%) correlated with changes in DNA synthesis.

  6. Expression of Pokeweed Antiviral Protein in Transgenic Plants Induces Virus Resistance in Grafted Wild-Type Plants Independently of Salicylic Acid Accumulation and Pathogenesis-Related Protein Synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, S.; Shulaev, V.; Tumer, N. E.

    1997-01-01

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), a 29-kD protein isolated from Phytolacca americana, inhibits translation by catalytically removing a specific adenine residue from the large rRNA of the 60S subunit of eukaryotic ribosomes. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants expressing PAP or a variant (PAP-v) were shown to be resistant to a broad spectrum of plant viruses. Expression of PAP-v in transgenic plants induces synthesis of pathogenesis-related proteins and a very weak (<2-fold) increase in salicylic acid levels. Using reciprocal grafting experiments, we demonstrate here that transgenic tobacco rootstocks expressing PAP-v induce resistance to tobacco mosaic virus infection in both N. tabacum NN and nn scions. Increased resistance to potato virus X was also observed in N. tabacum nn scions grafted on transgenic rootstocks. PAP expression was not detected in the wild-type scions or rootstocks that showed virus resistance, nor was there any increase in salicylic acid levels or pathogenesis-related protein synthesis. Grafting experiments with transgenic plants expressing an inactive PAP mutant demonstrated that an intact active site of PAP is necessary for induction of virus resistance in wild-type scions. These results indicate that enzymatic activity of PAP is responsible for generating a signal that renders wild-type scions resistant to virus infection in the absence of increased salicylic acid levels and pathogenesis-related protein synthesis. PMID:12223762

  7. Pvlea-18, a Member of a New Late-Embryogenesis-Abundant Protein Family That Accumulates during Water Stress and in the Growing Regions of Well-Irrigated Bean Seedlings1

    PubMed Central

    Colmenero-Flores, José M.; Moreno, Liz P.; Smith, Claudia E.; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    1999-01-01

    Pvlea-18 is a novel stress gene whose transcript is present in the dry embryo and the endosperm from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seeds. It accumulates in vegetative tissues in response to water deficit and abscisic acid application (J.M. Colmenero-Flores, F. Campos, A. Garciarrubio, A.A. Covarrubias [1997] Plant Mol Biol 35: 393–405). We show that the Pvlea-18 gene encodes a 14-kD protein that accumulates during late embryogenesis. Related proteins have been detected in both monocots and dicots, indicating that PvLEA-18 is a member of a new family of LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant) proteins. We also show that the PvLEA-18 transcript and protein accumulate not only in different organs of the bean seedlings during water stress but also in well-irrigated seedlings. This accumulation occurs in seedling regions with more negative values of water and osmotic potentials, such as the growing region of the hypocotyl. This phenomenon has not previously been described for LEA proteins. Immunohistochemical localization showed that the PvLEA-18 protein is present in the nucleus and cytoplasm of all cell types, with a higher accumulation in the epidermis and vascular cylinder tissues, particularly in protoxylem cells and root meristematic tissues. We found a similar localization but a higher abundance in water-stressed seedlings. PMID:10318687

  8. Effect of subsoiling in fallow period on soil water storage and grain protein accumulation of dryland wheat and its regulatory effect by nitrogen application.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Gao, ZhiQiang; Zhao, WeiFeng; Deng, LianFeng; Deng, Yan; Zhao, HongMei; Ren, AiXia; Li, Gang; Yang, ZhenPing

    2013-01-01

    To provide a new way to increase water storage and retention of dryland wheat, a field study was conducted at Wenxi experimental site of Shanxi Agricultural University. The effect of subsoiling in fallow period on soil water storage, accumulation of proline, and formation of grain protein after anthesis were determined. Our results showed that subsoiling in fallow period could increase water storage in the 0-300 cm soil at pre-sowing stage and at anthesis stage with low or medium N application, especially for the 60-160 cm soil. However, the proline content, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity in flag leaves and grains were all decreased by subsoiling in fallow period. In addition, the content of albumin, gliadin, and total protein in grains were also decreased while globulin content, Glu/Gli, protein yield, and glutelin content were increased. With N application increasing, water storage of soil layers from 20 to 200 cm was decreased at anthesis stage. High N application resulted in the increment of proline content and GS activity in grains. Besides, correlation analysis showed that soil storage in 40-160 cm soil was negatively correlated with proline content in grains; proline content in grains was positively correlated with GS and GDH activity in flag leaves. Contents of albumin, globulin and total protein in grains were positively correlated with proline content in grains and GDH activity in flag leaves. In conclusion, subsoiling in fallow period, together with N application at 150 kg·hm(-2), was beneficial to increase the protein yield and Glu/Gli in grains which improve the quality of wheat.

  9. Effect of subsoiling in fallow period on soil water storage and grain protein accumulation of dryland wheat and its regulatory effect by nitrogen application.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Gao, ZhiQiang; Zhao, WeiFeng; Deng, LianFeng; Deng, Yan; Zhao, HongMei; Ren, AiXia; Li, Gang; Yang, ZhenPing

    2013-01-01

    To provide a new way to increase water storage and retention of dryland wheat, a field study was conducted at Wenxi experimental site of Shanxi Agricultural University. The effect of subsoiling in fallow period on soil water storage, accumulation of proline, and formation of grain protein after anthesis were determined. Our results showed that subsoiling in fallow period could increase water storage in the 0-300 cm soil at pre-sowing stage and at anthesis stage with low or medium N application, especially for the 60-160 cm soil. However, the proline content, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity in flag leaves and grains were all decreased by subsoiling in fallow period. In addition, the content of albumin, gliadin, and total protein in grains were also decreased while globulin content, Glu/Gli, protein yield, and glutelin content were increased. With N application increasing, water storage of soil layers from 20 to 200 cm was decreased at anthesis stage. High N application resulted in the increment of proline content and GS activity in grains. Besides, correlation analysis showed that soil storage in 40-160 cm soil was negatively correlated with proline content in grains; proline content in grains was positively correlated with GS and GDH activity in flag leaves. Contents of albumin, globulin and total protein in grains were positively correlated with proline content in grains and GDH activity in flag leaves. In conclusion, subsoiling in fallow period, together with N application at 150 kg·hm(-2), was beneficial to increase the protein yield and Glu/Gli in grains which improve the quality of wheat. PMID:24098371

  10. Tualang Honey Protects against BPA-Induced Morphological Abnormalities and Disruption of ERα, ERβ, and C3 mRNA and Protein Expressions in the Uterus of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad Zaid, Siti Sarah; Kassim, Normadiah M.; Othman, Shatrah

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) that can disrupt the normal functions of the reproductive system. The objective of the study is to investigate the potential protective effects of Tualang honey against BPA-induced uterine toxicity in pubertal rats. The rats were administered with BPA by oral gavage over a period of six weeks. Uterine toxicity in BPA-exposed rats was determined by the degree of the morphological abnormalities, increased lipid peroxidation, and dysregulated expression and distribution of ERα, ERβ, and C3 as compared to the control rats. Concurrent treatment of rats with BPA and Tualang honey significantly improved the uterine morphological abnormalities, reduced lipid peroxidation, and normalized ERα, ERβ, and C3 expressions and distribution. There were no abnormal changes observed in rats treated with Tualang honey alone, comparable with the control rats. In conclusion, Tualang honey has potential roles in protecting the uterus from BPA-induced toxicity, possibly accounted for by its phytochemical properties. PMID:26788107

  11. Accumulation and altered localization of telomere-associated protein TRF2 in immortally transformed and tumor-derived human breast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nijjar, Tarlochan; Bassett, Ekaterina; Garbe, James; Takenaka, Yasuhiro; Stampfer, Martha R.; Gilley, David; Yaswen, Paul

    2004-12-23

    We have used cultured human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and breast tumor-derived lines to gain information on defects that occur during breast cancer progression. HMEC immortalized by a variety of agents (the chemical carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene, oncogenes c-myc and ZNF217, and/or dominant negative p53 genetic suppressor element GSE22) displayed marked up regulation (10-15 fold) of the telomere binding protein, TRF2. Up-regulation of TRF2 protein was apparently due to differences in post-transcriptional regulation, as mRNA levels remained comparable in finite life span and immortal HMEC. TRF2 protein was not up-regulated by the oncogenic agents alone in the absence of immortalization, nor by expression of exogenously introduced hTERT genes. We found TRF2 levels to be at least 2-fold higher than in control cells in 11/15 breast tumor cell lines, suggesting that elevated TRF2 levels are a frequent occurrence during the transformation of breast tumor cells in vivo. The dispersed distribution of TRF2 throughout the nuclei in some immortalized and tumor-derived cells indicated that not all the TRF2 was associated with telomeres in these cells. The process responsible for accumulation of TRF2 in immortalized HMEC and breast tumor-derived cell lines may promote tumorigenesis by contributing to the cells ability to maintain an indefinite life span.

  12. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 accumulates to high levels in culture medium of senescent and quiescent human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, S; Moerman, E J; Jones, R A; Baxter, R C

    1991-11-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) mRNA levels were consistently higher in both senescent normal human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) at late passage (old cells) and prematurely senescent HDFs from a subject with Werner syndrome (WS) during serum depletion and repletion of growth medium and during proliferation from sparse to high-density inhibited cultures, compared to normal early-passage (young) HDFs. However, IGFBP-3 protein accumulated to higher levels in conditioned medium of old cells than in medium of WS and young cells, in that order, under the same conditions. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) was not detected in naive medium or in any of the media conditioned by these three cell types, whereas IGF-II was detectable in serum-repleted medium and remained relatively constant. Thus, molar ratios of IGFBP-3/IGF-II were consistently higher in old and WS cells and increased substantially as all three cell types became quiescent, due to either serum depletion or high cell density. These data are consistent with either an adaptive or a causal role for IGFBP-3 protein in the senescent and quiescent growth arrest of HDFs.

  13. Zn deficiency in Brassica napus induces Mo and Mn accumulation associated with chloroplast proteins variation without Zn remobilization.

    PubMed

    Billard, Vincent; Maillard, Anne; Garnica, Maria; Cruz, Florence; Garcia-Mina, José-Maria; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Ourry, Alain; Etienne, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The importance of zinc (Zn) has been of little concern in human nutrition despite a strong decrease of this element in crops since the rise of high yielding varieties. For better food quality, Zn biofortification can be used, but will be optimal only if mechanisms governing Zn management are better known. Using Zn deficiency, we are able to demonstrate that Zn is not remobilized in Brassica napus (B. napus). Thus, remobilization processes should not be targeted by biofortification strategies. This study also complemented previous work by investigating leaf responses to Zn deficiency, especially from proteomic and ionomic points of view, showing for example, an increase in Manganese (Mn) content and of the Mn-dependent protein, Oxygen Evolving Enhancer. PMID:25438138

  14. Copper-Deficiency in Brassica napus Induces Copper Remobilization, Molybdenum Accumulation and Modification of the Expression of Chloroplastic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Billard, Vincent; Ourry, Alain; Maillard, Anne; Garnica, Maria; Coquet, Laurent; Jouenne, Thierry; Cruz, Florence; Garcia-Mina, José-Maria; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Etienne, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    During the last 40 years, crop breeding has strongly increased yields but has had adverse effects on the content of micronutrients, such as Fe, Mg, Zn and Cu, in edible products despite their sufficient supply in most soils. This suggests that micronutrient remobilization to edible tissues has been negatively selected. As a consequence, the aim of this work was to quantify the remobilization of Cu in leaves of Brassica napus L. during Cu deficiency and to identify the main metabolic processes that were affected so that improvements can be achieved in the future. While Cu deficiency reduced oilseed rape growth by less than 19% compared to control plants, Cu content in old leaves decreased by 61.4%, thus demonstrating a remobilization process between leaves. Cu deficiency also triggered an increase in Cu transporter expression in roots (COPT2) and leaves (HMA1), and more surprisingly, the induction of the MOT1 gene encoding a molybdenum transporter associated with a strong increase in molybdenum (Mo) uptake. Proteomic analysis of leaves revealed 33 proteins differentially regulated by Cu deficiency, among which more than half were located in chloroplasts. Eleven differentially expressed proteins are known to require Cu for their synthesis and/or activity. Enzymes that were located directly upstream or downstream of Cu-dependent enzymes were also differentially expressed. The overall results are then discussed in relation to remobilization of Cu, the interaction between Mo and Cu that occurs through the synthesis pathway of Mo cofactor, and finally their putative regulation within the Calvin cycle and the chloroplastic electron transport chain. PMID:25333918

  15. Copper-deficiency in Brassica napus induces copper remobilization, molybdenum accumulation and modification of the expression of chloroplastic proteins.

    PubMed

    Billard, Vincent; Ourry, Alain; Maillard, Anne; Garnica, Maria; Coquet, Laurent; Jouenne, Thierry; Cruz, Florence; Garcia-Mina, José-Maria; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Etienne, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    During the last 40 years, crop breeding has strongly increased yields but has had adverse effects on the content of micronutrients, such as Fe, Mg, Zn and Cu, in edible products despite their sufficient supply in most soils. This suggests that micronutrient remobilization to edible tissues has been negatively selected. As a consequence, the aim of this work was to quantify the remobilization of Cu in leaves of Brassica napus L. during Cu deficiency and to identify the main metabolic processes that were affected so that improvements can be achieved in the future. While Cu deficiency reduced oilseed rape growth by less than 19% compared to control plants, Cu content in old leaves decreased by 61.4%, thus demonstrating a remobilization process between leaves. Cu deficiency also triggered an increase in Cu transporter expression in roots (COPT2) and leaves (HMA1), and more surprisingly, the induction of the MOT1 gene encoding a molybdenum transporter associated with a strong increase in molybdenum (Mo) uptake. Proteomic analysis of leaves revealed 33 proteins differentially regulated by Cu deficiency, among which more than half were located in chloroplasts. Eleven differentially expressed proteins are known to require Cu for their synthesis and/or activity. Enzymes that were located directly upstream or downstream of Cu-dependent enzymes were also differentially expressed. The overall results are then discussed in relation to remobilization of Cu, the interaction between Mo and Cu that occurs through the synthesis pathway of Mo cofactor, and finally their putative regulation within the Calvin cycle and the chloroplastic electron transport chain. PMID:25333918

  16. Data on amyloid precursor protein accumulation, spontaneous physical activity, and motor learning after traumatic brain injury in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yasushi; Shishido, Hajime; Sawanishi, Mayumi; Toyota, Yasunori; Ueno, Masaki; Kubota, Takashi; Kirino, Yutaka; Tamiya, Takashi; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    This data article contains supporting information regarding the research article entitled "Traumatic brain injury accelerates amyloid-β deposition and impairs spatial learning in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease" (H. Shishido, Y. Kishimoto, N. Kawai, Y. Toyota, M. Ueno, T. Kubota, Y. Kirino, T. Tamiya, 2016) [1]. Triple-transgenic (3×Tg)-Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) model mice exhibited significantly poorer spatial learning than sham-treated 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Correspondingly, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition within the hippocampus was significantly greater in 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after TBI. However, data regarding the short-term and long-term influences of TBI on amyloid precursor protein (APP) accumulation in AD model mice remain limited. Furthermore, there is little data showing whether physical activity and motor learning are affected by TBI in AD model mice. Here, we provide immunocytochemistry data confirming that TBI induces significant increases in APP accumulation in 3×Tg-AD mice at both 7 days and 28 days after TBI. Furthermore, 3×Tg-AD model mice exhibit a reduced ability to acquire conditioned responses (CRs) during delay eyeblink conditioning compared to sham-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice 28 days after TBI. However, physical activity and motor performance are not significantly changed in TBI-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice. PMID:27656663

  17. Data on amyloid precursor protein accumulation, spontaneous physical activity, and motor learning after traumatic brain injury in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yasushi; Shishido, Hajime; Sawanishi, Mayumi; Toyota, Yasunori; Ueno, Masaki; Kubota, Takashi; Kirino, Yutaka; Tamiya, Takashi; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-12-01

    This data article contains supporting information regarding the research article entitled "Traumatic brain injury accelerates amyloid-β deposition and impairs spatial learning in the triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer׳s disease" (H. Shishido, Y. Kishimoto, N. Kawai, Y. Toyota, M. Ueno, T. Kubota, Y. Kirino, T. Tamiya, 2016) [1]. Triple-transgenic (3×Tg)-Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) model mice exhibited significantly poorer spatial learning than sham-treated 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Correspondingly, amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition within the hippocampus was significantly greater in 3×Tg-AD mice 28 days after TBI. However, data regarding the short-term and long-term influences of TBI on amyloid precursor protein (APP) accumulation in AD model mice remain limited. Furthermore, there is little data showing whether physical activity and motor learning are affected by TBI in AD model mice. Here, we provide immunocytochemistry data confirming that TBI induces significant increases in APP accumulation in 3×Tg-AD mice at both 7 days and 28 days after TBI. Furthermore, 3×Tg-AD model mice exhibit a reduced ability to acquire conditioned responses (CRs) during delay eyeblink conditioning compared to sham-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice 28 days after TBI. However, physical activity and motor performance are not significantly changed in TBI-treated 3×Tg-AD model mice.

  18. Nuclear accumulation of Yes-Associated Protein (YAP) maintains the survival of doxorubicin-induced senescent cells by promoting survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai; Xu, Qing; Wang, Shuren; Zhang, Weina; Liu, Mei; Liang, Shufang; Zhu, Hongxia; Xu, Ningzhi

    2016-05-28

    Although chemotherapeutic drugs can induce senescence to prohibit further division of tumor cells, senescence could also promote tumorigenesis mainly through a senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Therefore, senescent tumor cells should be eliminated immediately to prevent drug resistance and recurrence. Here, we used a doxorubicin-induced senescence model to explore the mechanism underlying the survival of therapy-induced senescent cells. After low-dose doxorubicin treatment, tumor cells turned on a senescence program and became large and flattened, increasing their contact area with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Furthermore, Yes-associated protein (YAP) accumulated in the nucleus and YAP activity was increased in doxorubicin-induced senescent cells. Knockdown of YAP increased the sensitivity of cells to low-dose doxorubicin treatment, causing apoptosis rather than senescence. Moreover, the anti-apoptotic gene survivin, a YAP target gene, was overexpressed in senescent cells. Inhibition of survivin could lead to selective elimination of senescent cells through apoptosis. Our study indicates that nuclear accumulation of YAP could promote the survival of senescent cells by increasing survivin expression. Therefore, targeting YAP or survivin might be a new strategy for clearing senescent cancer cells during drug treatment.

  19. The accumulation and efflux of lead partly depend on ATP-dependent efflux pump-multidrug resistance protein 1 and glutathione in testis Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaoxin; Ye, Jingping; Yu, Jun; Chen, Li; Zhou, Langhuan; Wang, Hong; Li, Zhen; Wang, Chunhong

    2014-05-01

    Since lead accumulation is toxic to cells, its excretion is crucial for organisms to survive the toxicity. In this study, mouse testis sertoli (TM4) and Mrp1 lower-expression TM4-sh cells were used to explore the lead accumulation characteristics, and the role of ATP-dependent efflux pump-multidrug resistance protein 1 (Mrp1) in lead excretion. TM4 cells possess Mrp-like transport activity. The expression levels of mrp1 mRNA and Mrp1 increased after lead treatments at first and then decreased. The maximum difference of relative mRNA expression reached 10 times. In the presence of lead acetate, the amount of cumulative lead in TM4-sh was much higher than that in TM4. After the treatment with lead acetate at 10-40 μM for 12h or 24h, the differences were about 2-8 times. After with the switch to lead-free medium, the cellular lead content in TM4-sh remains higher than that in TM4 cells at 1,3, 6, and 9h time points (P<0.01). Energy inhibitor sodium azide, Mrp inhibitors MK571 and glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis inhibitor BSO could block lead efflux from TM4 cells significantly. These results indicate that lead excretion may be mediated by Mrp1 and GSH in TM4 cells. Mrp1 could be one of the important intervention points for lead detoxification.

  20. Rare Earth Ion Mediated Fluorescence Accumulation on a Single Microbead: An Ultrasensitive Strategy for the Detection of Protein Kinase Activity at the Single-Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Liu, Chenghui; Wang, Honghong; Wang, Hui; Li, Zhengping

    2015-12-01

    A single microbead-based fluorescence imaging (SBFI) strategy that enables detection of protein kinase activity from single cell lysates is reported. We systematically investigated the ability of various rare earth (RE) ions, immobilized on the microbead, for specific capturing of kinase-induced phosphopeptides, and Dy(3+) was found to be the most prominent one. Through the efficient concentration of kinase-induced fluorescent phosphopeptides on a Dy(3+) -functionalized single microbead, kinase activity can be detected and quantified by reading the fluorescence on the microbead with a confocal fluorescence microscope. Owing to the extremely specific recognition of Dy(3+) towards phosphopeptides and the highly-concentrated fluorescence accumulation on only one microbead, ultrahigh sensitivity has been achieved for the SBFI strategy which allows direct kinase analysis at the single-cell level. PMID:26482714

  1. Rare Earth Ion Mediated Fluorescence Accumulation on a Single Microbead: An Ultrasensitive Strategy for the Detection of Protein Kinase Activity at the Single-Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Liu, Chenghui; Wang, Honghong; Wang, Hui; Li, Zhengping

    2015-12-01

    A single microbead-based fluorescence imaging (SBFI) strategy that enables detection of protein kinase activity from single cell lysates is reported. We systematically investigated the ability of various rare earth (RE) ions, immobilized on the microbead, for specific capturing of kinase-induced phosphopeptides, and Dy(3+) was found to be the most prominent one. Through the efficient concentration of kinase-induced fluorescent phosphopeptides on a Dy(3+) -functionalized single microbead, kinase activity can be detected and quantified by reading the fluorescence on the microbead with a confocal fluorescence microscope. Owing to the extremely specific recognition of Dy(3+) towards phosphopeptides and the highly-concentrated fluorescence accumulation on only one microbead, ultrahigh sensitivity has been achieved for the SBFI strategy which allows direct kinase analysis at the single-cell level.

  2. A Novel DNA-Binding Protein, PhaR, Plays a Central Role in the Regulation of Polyhydroxyalkanoate Accumulation and Granule Formation in the Haloarchaeon Haloferax mediterranei

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shuangfeng; Cai, Lei; Zhao, Dahe; Liu, Guiming; Han, Jing; Zhou, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are synthesized and assembled as PHA granules that undergo well-regulated formation in many microorganisms. However, this regulation remains unclear in haloarchaea. In this study, we identified a PHA granule-associated regulator (PhaR) that negatively regulates the expression of both its own gene and the granule structural gene phaP in the same operon (phaRP) in Haloferax mediterranei. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR (ChIP-qPCR) assays demonstrated a significant interaction between PhaR and the phaRP promoter in vivo. Scanning mutagenesis of the phaRP promoter revealed a specific cis-element as the possible binding position of the PhaR. The haloarchaeal homologs of the PhaR contain a novel conserved domain that belongs to a swapped-hairpin barrel fold family found in AbrB-like proteins. Amino acid substitution indicated that this AbrB-like domain is critical for the repression activity of PhaR. In addition, the phaRP promoter had a weaker activity in the PHA-negative strains, implying a function of the PHA granules in titration of the PhaR. Moreover, the H. mediterranei strain lacking phaR was deficient in PHA accumulation and produced granules with irregular shapes. Interestingly, the PhaR itself can promote PHA synthesis and granule formation in a PhaP-independent manner. Collectively, our results demonstrated that the haloarchaeal PhaR is a novel bifunctional protein that plays the central role in the regulation of PHA accumulation and granule formation in H. mediterranei. PMID:25344243

  3. Enhanced cadmium accumulation and tolerance in transgenic tobacco overexpressing rice metal tolerance protein gene OsMTP1 is promising for phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Das, Natasha; Bhattacharya, Surajit; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2016-08-01

    One of the most grievous heavy metal pollutants in the environment is cadmium (Cd), which is not only responsible for the crop yield loss owing to its phytotoxicity, but also for the human health hazards as the toxic elements usually accumulate in the consumable parts of crop plants. In the present study, we aimed to isolate and functionally characterize the OsMTP1 gene from indica rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. IR64) to study its potential application for efficient phytoremediation of Cd. The 1257 bp coding DNA sequence (CDS) of OsMTP1 encodes a ∼46 kDa protein belonging to the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) or metal tolerance/transport protein (MTP) family. The OsMTP1 transcript in rice plant was found to respond during external Cd stress. Heterologous expression of OsMTP1 in tobacco resulted in the reduction of Cd stress-induced phytotoxic effects, including growth inhibition, lipid peroxidation, and cell death. Compared to untransformed control, the transgenic tobacco plants showed enhanced vacuolar thiol content, indicating vacuolar localization of the sequestered Cd. The transgenic tobacco plants exhibited significantly higher biomass growth (2.2-2.8-folds) and hyperaccumulation of Cd (1.96-2.22-folds) compared to untransformed control under Cd exposure. The transgenic plants also showed moderate tolerance and accumulation of arsenic (As) upon exogenous As stress, signifying broad substrate specificity of OsMTP1. Together, findings of our research suggest that the transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing OsMTP1 with its hyperaccumulating activity and increased growth rate could be useful for future phytoremediation applications to clean up the Cd-contaminated soil. PMID:27214086

  4. Houttuynia cordata attenuates lipid accumulation via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun; Koppula, Sushruta

    2014-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata (H. cordata) from the family Saururaceae is a perennial herb native to Southeast Asia. It possesses a range of medicinal properties to treat several disease symptoms including allergic inflammation and anaphylaxis. In the present investigation, we provided the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of H. cordata extract (HCE) in the prevention of high glucose-induced lipid accumulation in human HepG2 hepatocytes. HepG2 cells were pre-treated with various concentrations of HCE (0, 10, 20, 40, and 80 μg/mL) and treated with serum-free medium with normal glucose (5 mM) for 1 h, followed by exposure to high glucose (25 mM D-glucose) for 24 h. HCE significantly and dose-dependently attenuated lipid accumulation in human HepG2 hepatocytes when exposed to high glucose (25 mM D-glucose) (p < 0.05, p < 0.01 and p < 0.001 at 20, 40, and 80 μg/mL concentrations, respectively). Further, HCE attenuated the expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 and glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferases (GPATs). The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was also activated by HCE treatment when exposed to high glucose (25 mM D-glucose) in human HepG2 hepatocytes. This study suggests the hypolipidemic effects of HCE by the inhibition of lipid biosynthesis mediated through AMPK signaling, which may play an active role and can be developed as an anti-obesity agent. PMID:24871657

  5. Abnormal Gephyrin Immunoreactivity Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease Pathologic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Hales, Chadwick M.; Rees, Howard; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Dammer, Eric B.; Duong, Duc M.; Gearing, Marla; Montine, Thomas J.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Thambisetty, Madhav; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J; Wingo, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative disorders involve the abnormal accumulation of proteins. In addition to the well-known findings of neurofibrillary tangles and β-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer’s disease, here we show that abnormal accumulations of gephyrin, an inhibitory receptor anchoring protein, are highly correlated with the neuropathologic diagnosis of AD (odds ratio of 72.7; p = 6.844 × 10−6 by Fisher’s exact test, n = 17 AD and n = 14 control cases). Furthermore, the gephyrin accumulations are specific for AD and not seen in other neurodegenerative diseases. Gephyrin accumulations overlap with β-amyloid plaques and, more rarely, neurofibrillary tangles. Follow-up biochemical and proteomic studies suggest alterations in the gephyrin solubility and reveal elevated levels of gephyrin lower-molecular-weight species in the AD insoluble fraction. Since gephyrin is involved in synaptic organization and synaptic dysfunction is an early event in AD, these findings point to a possible role for gephyrin in AD pathogenesis. PMID:24128675

  6. A Single B-repeat of Staphylococcus epidermidis accumulation-associated protein induces protective immune responses in an experimental biomaterial-associated infection mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Hongyan; Chiu, David; Bryers, James D

    2014-09-01

    Nosocomial infections are the fourth leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, resulting in 2 million infections and ∼100,000 deaths each year. More than 60% of these infections are associated with some type of biomedical device. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a commensal bacterium of the human skin and is the most common nosocomial pathogen infecting implanted medical devices, especially those in the cardiovasculature. S. epidermidis antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation on inert surfaces make these infections hard to treat. Accumulation-associated protein (Aap), a cell wall-anchored protein of S. epidermidis, is considered one of the most important proteins involved in the formation of S. epidermidis biofilm. A small recombinant protein vaccine comprising a single B-repeat domain (Brpt1.0) of S. epidermidis RP62A Aap was developed, and the vaccine's efficacy was evaluated in vitro with a biofilm inhibition assay and in vivo in a murine model of biomaterial-associated infection. A high IgG antibody response against S. epidermidis RP62A was detected in the sera of the mice after two subcutaneous immunizations with Brpt1.0 coadministered with Freund's adjuvant. Sera from Brpt1.0-immunized mice inhibited in vitro S. epidermidis RP62A biofilm formation in a dose-dependent pattern. After receiving two immunizations, each mouse was surgically implanted with a porous scaffold disk containing 5 × 10(6) CFU of S. epidermidis RP62A. Weight changes, inflammatory markers, and histological assay results after challenge with S. epidermidis indicated that the mice immunized with Brpt1.0 exhibited significantly higher resistance to S. epidermidis RP62A implant infection than the control mice. Day 8 postchallenge, there was a significantly lower number of bacteria in scaffold sections and surrounding tissues and a lower residual inflammatory response to the infected scaffold disks for the Brpt1.0-immunized mice than for of the ovalbumin (Ova

  7. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  8. Downstream targets of methyl CpG binding protein 2 and their abnormal expression in the frontal cortex of the human Rett syndrome brain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Rett Syndrome (RTT) brain displays regional histopathology and volumetric reduction, with frontal cortex showing such abnormalities, whereas the occipital cortex is relatively less affected. Results Using microarrays and quantitative PCR, the mRNA expression profiles of these two neuroanatomical regions were compared in postmortem brain tissue from RTT patients and normal controls. A subset of genes was differentially expressed in the frontal cortex of RTT brains, some of which are known to be associated with neurological disorders (clusterin and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1) or are involved in synaptic vesicle cycling (dynamin 1). RNAi-mediated knockdown of MeCP2 in vitro, followed by further expression analysis demonstrated that the same direction of abnormal expression was recapitulated with MeCP2 knockdown, which for cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 was associated with a functional respiratory chain defect. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that MeCP2 associated with the promoter regions of some of these genes suggesting that loss of MeCP2 function may be responsible for their overexpression. Conclusions This study has shed more light on the subset of aberrantly expressed genes that result from MECP2 mutations. The mitochondrion has long been implicated in the pathogenesis of RTT, however it has not been at the forefront of RTT research interest since the discovery of MECP2 mutations. The functional consequence of the underexpression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 indicates that this is an area that should be revisited. PMID:20420693

  9. ApRab3, a biosynthetic Rab protein, accumulates on the maturing phagosomes and symbiosomes in the tropical sea anemone, Aiptasia pulchella.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ming-Cheng; Huang, Yung-Sen; Lin, Wen-Wen; Fang, Lee-Shing; Chen, Ming-Chyuan

    2009-03-01

    Symbiosome biogenesis and function are central to the endosymbiotic interaction between symbiotic dinoflagellates and their host cnidarians. To understand these important organelles, we have been conducting studies to identify and characterize symbiosome-associated proteins of the Rab family, key regulatory components of vesicular trafficking and membrane fusion in eukaryotic cells. Our prior studies have implicated three endocytic Rab proteins in the regulation of symbiosome biogenesis. Here, we show that ApRab3 is a new member of the Rab3 subfamily, associating with symbiosomes and accumulating on the maturing phagosomes in the A. pulchella digestive cells. ApRab3 is 78% identical to human Rab3C, and contains all Rab 3-specific signature motifs. EGFP-ApRab3-labeled vesicular structures tended to either align along the cell peripheral, or aggregate at one side of the nucleus. ApRab3 specifically co-distributed with the TGN marker, WGA, but not other organelle-specific markers tested. Immunofluorescence staining with a specific peptide antibody showed similar results. Significantly, an expression of a constitutively active mutant caused the enlargement and random dispersion of EGFP-ApRab3-decorated compartments in PC12 cells. Together, these data suggest that ApRab3 is a new member of the Rab3 subfamily, participating in the biosynthetic trafficking pathway, and symbiosome biogenesis involves an interaction with ApRab3-positive vesicles. PMID:19110066

  10. A probable crosstalk between Ca⁺², reactive oxygen species accumulation and scavenging mechanisms and modulation of protein kinase C activity during seed development in sunflower.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Anita; Bhatla, Satish C

    2014-01-01

    Seed development in sunflower involves a gradual dehydration and accumulation of oil bodies in the cells of developing cotyledons during transition from 30 to 40 DAA stage. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) content decreased with seed maturation. NO content and NO contributed by putative nitric oxide synthase, however, did not change markedly. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity exhibited a peak at 30 DAA stage, indicating its scavenging role at the mid-stage of seed development. H₂O₂ produced as a result of SOD action is subsequently scavenged primarily by elevation of GR activity. Significant temporal differences were evident in GR and POD activity during seed development. Protein kinase C (PKC) activity also showed modulation during early stages of embryo and seed development. Use of PKC-specific fluorescent probe, Fim-1, and PKC inhibitors (staurosporine and bisindoylmaleamide) provided evidence for increase in PKC activity at 40 DAA stage with an increase in protein concentration (50 to 200 µg). Endogenous calcium content also increased with seed maturation. Tissue homogenates from 40 DAA stage showed enhanced fluorescence due to Fim-1-PKC binding in presence of calcium ions and its lowering due to calcium chelating agent (BAPTA). Western blot analysis revealed an increase in the intensity of 2 bands representing PKC with the advancement of seed maturation and their further upregulation by calcium. Present findings, thus, provide new information on the biochemical regulation of seed development in sunflower, with evidence for a possible correlation between calcium, ROS, their scavenging enzymes and "conventional" PKC activity.

  11. Tissue-specific autoregulation of Drosophila suppressor of forked by alternative poly(A) site utilization leads to accumulation of the suppressor of forked protein in mitotically active cells.

    PubMed

    Juge, F; Audibert, A; Benoit, B; Simonelig, M

    2000-11-01

    The Suppressor of forked protein is the Drosophila homolog of the 77K subunit of human cleavage stimulation factor, a complex required for the first step of the mRNA 3'-end-processing reaction. We have shown previously that wild-type su(f) function is required for the accumulation of a truncated su(f) transcript polyadenylated in intron 4 of the gene. This led us to propose a model in which the Su(f) protein would negatively regulate its own accumulation by stimulating 3'-end formation of this truncated su(f) RNA. In this article, we demonstrate this model and show that su(f) autoregulation is tissue specific. The Su(f) protein accumulates at a high level in dividing tissues, but not in nondividing tissues. We show that this distribution of the Su(f) protein results from stimulation by Su(f) of the tissue-specific utilization of the su(f) intronic poly(A) site, leading to the accumulation of the truncated su(f) transcript in nondividing tissues. Utilization of this intronic poly(A) site is affected in a su(f) mutant and restored in the mutant with a transgene encoding wild-type Su(f) protein. These data provide an in vivo example of cell-type-specific regulation of a protein level by poly(A) site choice, and confirm the role of Su(f) in regulation of poly(A) site utilization.

  12. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  13. Thallium-201 accumulation in cerebral candidiasis: Unexpected finding on SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Tonami, N.; Matsuda, H.; Ooba, H.; Yokoyama, K.; Hisada, K.; Ikeda, K.; Yamashita, J. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors present an unexpected finding of Tl-201 uptake in the intracerebral lesions due to candidiasis. SPECT demonstrated the extent of the lesions and a high target-to-background ratio. The regions where abnormal Tl-201 accumulation was seen were nearly consistent with CT scans of those enhanced by a contrast agent. After treatment, most of the abnormal Tl-201 accumulation disappeared.

  14. The laminin binding protein p40 is involved in inducing limb abnormality of mouse fetuses as the effects of methoxyacetic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruyani, Aceng; Sudarwati, Sri; Sutasurya, Lien A; Sumarsono, Sony H; Gloe, Torsten

    2003-09-01

    This study is intended to characterize a protein that is linked with mouse limb teratogenicity as the effects of methoxyacetic acid (MAA) treatment. A single dose of MAA (10 mmol/kg body weight) was given by gavage on gestation day (GD) 11, whereas the control group were administered vehicle only. The pregnant mice were killed at 4 h after MAA treatment, and forelimb buds were isolated from both the control and treated group embryos. Proteins from forelimb buds GD 11 + 4 h, which were precipitated out using 40-60% ammonium sulfate, then were analyzed by two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D SDS-PAGE) technique. The 2-D gels reveal one protein with 41.6 kDa and pI 6.4, which expression was downregulated after MAA treatment. Tentative protein identification via peptide mass database search and definitive protein identification via a primary sequence database search indicate that the protein matches exactly to 34/67 kDa laminin binding protein (LBP; P14206, SwissProt), which is encoded by p40 gene (MGI:105381). The identity was further verified by Western blotting with an antibody against the 67 kDa LBP. The results suggest that MAA treatment to pregnant mice downregulates the LBP-p40 in the forelimb buds.

  15. The freshwater Amazonian stingray, Potamotrygon motoro, up-regulates glutamine synthetase activity and protein abundance, and accumulates glutamine when exposed to brackish (15 per thousand) water.

    PubMed

    Ip, Y K; Loong, A M; Ching, B; Tham, G H Y; Wong, W P; Chew, S F

    2009-12-01

    This study aimed to examine whether the stenohaline freshwater stingray, Potamotrygon motoro, which lacks a functional ornithine-urea cycle, would up-regulate glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and protein abundance, and accumulate glutamine during a progressive transfer from freshwater to brackish (15 per thousand) water with daily feeding. Our results revealed that, similar to other freshwater teleosts, P. motoro performed hyperosmotic regulation, with very low urea concentrations in plasma and tissues, in freshwater. In 15 per thousand water, it was non-ureotelic and non-ureoosmotic, acting mainly as an osmoconformer with its plasma osmolality, [Na+] and [Cl-] comparable to those of the external medium. There were significant increases in the content of several free amino acids (FAAs), including glutamate, glutamine and glycine, in muscle and liver, but not in plasma, indicating that FAAs could contribute in part to cell volume regulation. Furthermore, exposure of P. motoro to 15 per thousand water led to up-regulation of GS activity and protein abundance in both liver and muscle. Thus, our results indicate for the first time that, despite the inability to synthesize urea and the lack of functional carbamoyl phosphate synthetase III (CPS III) which uses glutamine as a substrate, P. motoro retained the capacity to up-regulate the activity and protein expression of GS in response to salinity stress. Potamotrygon motoro was not nitrogen (N) limited when exposed to 15 per thousand water with feeding, and there were no significant changes in the amination and deamination activities of hepatic glutamate dehydrogenase. In contrast, P. motoro became N limited when exposed to 10 per thousand water with fasting and could not survive well in 15 per thousand water without food.

  16. Structurally abnormal human autosomes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 25, discusses structurally abnormal human autosomes. This discussion includes: structurally abnormal chromosomes, chromosomal polymorphisms, pericentric inversions, paracentric inversions, deletions or partial monosomies, cri du chat (cat cry) syndrome, ring chromosomes, insertions, duplication or pure partial trisomy and mosaicism. 71 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Skeletal Muscle Abnormalities in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kinugawa, Shintaro; Takada, Shingo; Matsushima, Shouji; Okita, Koichi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Exercise capacity is lowered in patients with heart failure, which limits their daily activities and also reduces their quality of life. Furthermore, lowered exercise capacity has been well demonstrated to be closely related to the severity and prognosis of heart failure. Skeletal muscle abnormalities including abnormal energy metabolism, transition of myofibers from type I to type II, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduction in muscular strength, and muscle atrophy have been shown to play a central role in lowered exercise capacity. The skeletal muscle abnormalities can be classified into the following main types: 1) low endurance due to mitochondrial dysfunction; and 2) low muscle mass and muscle strength due to imbalance of protein synthesis and degradation. The molecular mechanisms of these skeletal muscle abnormalities have been studied mainly using animal models. The current review including our recent study will focus upon the skeletal muscle abnormalities in heart failure. PMID:26346520

  18. Morphological abnormalities among lampreys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manion, Patrick J.

    1967-01-01

    The experimental control of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) in the Great Lakes has required the collection of thousands of lampreys. Representatives of each life stage of the four species of the Lake Superior basin were examined for structural abnormalities. The most common aberration was the presence of additional tails. The accessory tails were always postanal and smaller than the normal tail. The point of origin varied; the extra tails occurred on dorsal, ventral, or lateral surfaces. Some of the extra tails were misshaped and curled, but others were normal in shape and pigment pattern. Other abnormalities in larval sea lampreys were malformed or twisted tails and bodies. The cause of the structural abnormalities is unknown. The presence of extra caudal fins could be genetically controlled, or be due to partial amputation or injury followed by abnormal regeneration. Few if any lampreys with structural abnormalities live to sexual maturity.

  19. Molecular regulation of sinapate ester metabolism in Brassica napus: expression of genes, properties of the encoded proteins and correlation of enzyme activities with metabolite accumulation.

    PubMed

    Milkowski, Carsten; Baumert, Alfred; Schmidt, Diana; Nehlin, Lilian; Strack, Dieter

    2004-04-01

    Members of the Brassicaceae family accumulate specific sinapate esters, i.e. sinapoylcholine (sinapine), which is considered as a major antinutritive compound in seeds of important crop plants like Brassica napus, and sinapoylmalate, which is implicated in UV-B tolerance in leaves. We have studied the molecular regulation of the sinapate ester metabolism in B. napus, and we describe expression of genes, some properties of the encoded proteins and profiles of the metabolites and enzyme activities. The cloned cDNAs encoding the key enzymes of sinapine biosynthesis, UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc):B. napus sinapate glucosyltransferase (BnSGT1) and sinapoylglucose:B. napus choline sinapoyltransferase (BnSCT), were functionally expressed. BnSGT1 belongs to a subgroup of plant GTs catalysing the formation of 1-O-hydroxycinnamoyl-beta-d-glucoses. BnSCT is another member of serine carboxypeptidase-like (SCPL) family of acyltransferases. The B. napus genome contains at least two SGT and SCT genes, each derived from its progenitors B. oleracea and B. rapa. BnSGT1 and BnSCT activities are subjected to pronounced transcriptional regulation. BnSGT1 transcript level increases throughout early stages of seed development until the early cotyledonary stage, and stays constant in later stages. The highest level of BnSGT1 transcripts is reached in 2-day-old seedlings followed by a dramatic decrease. In contrast, expression of BnSCT is restricted to developing seeds. Regulation of gene expression at the transcript level seems to be responsible for changes of BnSGT1 and BnSCT activities during seed and seedling development of B. napus. Together with sinapine esterase (SCE) and sinapoylglucose:malate sinapoyltransferase (SMT), activities of BnSGT1 and BnSCT show a close correlation with the accumulation kinetics of the corresponding metabolites.

  20. P-glycoprotein (MDR1/ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) restrict brain accumulation of the JAK1/2 inhibitor, CYT387.

    PubMed

    Durmus, S; Xu, N; Sparidans, R W; Wagenaar, E; Beijnen, J H; Schinkel, A H

    2013-10-01

    CYT387 is an orally bioavailable, small molecule inhibitor of Janus family of tyrosine kinases (JAK) 1 and 2. It is currently undergoing Phase I/II clinical trials for the treatment of myelofibrosis and myeloproliferative neoplasms. We aimed to establish whether the multidrug efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp; MDR1; ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP;ABCG2) restrict oral availability and brain penetration of CYT387. In vitro, CYT387 was efficiently transported by both human MDR1 and BCRP, and very efficiently by mouse Bcrp1 and its transport could be inhibited by specific MDR1 inhibitor, zosuquidar and/or specific BCRP inhibitor, Ko143. CYT387 (10 mg/kg) was orally administered to wild-type (WT), Bcrp1(-/-), Mdr1a/1b(-/-) and Bcrp1;Mdr1a/1b(-/-) mice and plasma and brain concentrations were analyzed. Over 8h, systemic exposure of CYT387 was similar between all the strains, indicating that these transporters do not substantially limit oral availability of CYT387. Despite the similar systemic exposure, brain accumulation of CYT387 was increased 10.5- and 56-fold in the Bcrp1;Mdr1a/1b(-/-) mice compared to the WT strain at 2 and 8h after CYT387 administration, respectively. In single Bcrp1(-/-) mice, brain accumulation of CYT387 was more substantially increased than in Mdr1a/1b(-/-) mice, suggesting that CYT387 is a slightly better substrate of Bcrp1 than of Mdr1a at the blood-brain barrier. These results indicate a marked and additive role of Bcrp1 and Mdr1a/1b in restricting brain penetration of CYT387, potentially limiting efficacy of this compound against brain (micro) metastases positioned behind a functional blood-brain barrier.

  1. Abnormal corneal epithelial maintenance in mice heterozygous for the micropinna microphthalmia mutation Mp.

    PubMed

    Douvaras, Panagiotis; Dorà, Natalie J; Mort, Richard L; Lodge, Emily J; Hill, Robert E; West, John D

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the corneal morphology of adult Mp/+ mice, which are heterozygous for the micropinna microphthalmia mutation, and identified several abnormalities, which implied that corneal epithelial maintenance was abnormal. The Mp/+ corneal epithelium was thin, loosely packed and contained goblet cells in older mice. Evidence also suggested that the barrier function was compromised. However, there was no major effect on corneal epithelial cell turnover and mosaic patterns of radial stripes indicated that radial cell movement was normal. Limbal blood vessels formed an abnormally wide limbal vasculature ring, K19-positive cells were distributed more widely than normal and K12 was weakly expressed in the peripheral cornea. This raises the possibilities that the limbal-corneal boundary was poorly defined or the limbus was wider than normal. BrdU label-retaining cell numbers and quantitative clonal analysis suggested that limbal epithelial stem cell numbers were not depleted and might be higher than normal. However, as corneal epithelial homeostasis was abnormal, it is possible that Mp/+ stem cell function was impaired. It has been shown recently that the Mp mutation involves a chromosome 18 inversion that disrupts the Fbn2 and Isoc1 genes and produces an abnormal, truncated fibrillin-2(MP) protein. This abnormal protein accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of cells that normally express Fbn2 and causes ER stress. It was also shown that Fbn2 is expressed in the corneal stroma but not the corneal epithelium, suggesting that the presence of truncated fibrillin-2(MP) protein in the corneal stroma disrupts corneal epithelial homeostasis in Mp/+ mice. PMID:27235794

  2. Overexpression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mannosylphosphodolichol synthase-encoding gene in Trichoderma reesei results in an increased level of protein secretion and abnormal cell ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Kruszewska, J S; Butterweck, A H; Kurzatkowski, W; Migdalski, A; Kubicek, C P; Palamarczyk, G

    1999-06-01

    Production of extracellular proteins plays an important role in the physiology of Trichoderma reesei and has potential industrial application. To improve the efficiency of protein secretion, we overexpressed in T. reesei the DPM1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding mannosylphosphodolichol (MPD) synthase, under homologous, constitutively acting expression signals. Four stable transformants, each with different copy numbers of tandemly integrated DPM1, exhibited roughly double the activity of MPD synthase in the respective endoplasmic reticulum membrane fraction. On a dry-weight basis, they secreted up to sevenfold-higher concentrations of extracellular proteins during growth on lactose, a carbon source promoting formation of cellulases. Northern blot analysis showed that the relative level of the transcript of cbh1, which encodes the major cellulase (cellobiohydrolase I [CBH I]), did not increase in the transformants. On the other hand, the amount of secreted CBH I and, in all but one of the transformants, intracellular CBH I was elevated. Our results suggest that posttranscriptional processes are responsible for the increase in CBH I production. The carbohydrate contents of the extracellular proteins were comparable in the wild type and in the transformants, and no hyperglycosylation was detected. Electron microscopy of the DPM1-amplified strains revealed amorphous structure of the cell wall and over three times as many mitochondria as in the control. Our data indicate that molecular manipulation of glycan biosynthesis in Trichoderma can result in improved protein secretion.

  3. A Single B-repeat of Staphylococcus epidermidis accumulation-associated protein induces protective immune responses in an experimental biomaterial-associated infection mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Hongyan; Chiu, David; Bryers, James D

    2014-09-01

    Nosocomial infections are the fourth leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, resulting in 2 million infections and ∼100,000 deaths each year. More than 60% of these infections are associated with some type of biomedical device. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a commensal bacterium of the human skin and is the most common nosocomial pathogen infecting implanted medical devices, especially those in the cardiovasculature. S. epidermidis antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation on inert surfaces make these infections hard to treat. Accumulation-associated protein (Aap), a cell wall-anchored protein of S. epidermidis, is considered one of the most important proteins involved in the formation of S. epidermidis biofilm. A small recombinant protein vaccine comprising a single B-repeat domain (Brpt1.0) of S. epidermidis RP62A Aap was developed, and the vaccine's efficacy was evaluated in vitro with a biofilm inhibition assay and in vivo in a murine model of biomaterial-associated infection. A high IgG antibody response against S. epidermidis RP62A was detected in the sera of the mice after two subcutaneous immunizations with Brpt1.0 coadministered with Freund's adjuvant. Sera from Brpt1.0-immunized mice inhibited in vitro S. epidermidis RP62A biofilm formation in a dose-dependent pattern. After receiving two immunizations, each mouse was surgically implanted with a porous scaffold disk containing 5 × 10(6) CFU of S. epidermidis RP62A. Weight changes, inflammatory markers, and histological assay results after challenge with S. epidermidis indicated that the mice immunized with Brpt1.0 exhibited significantly higher resistance to S. epidermidis RP62A implant infection than the control mice. Day 8 postchallenge, there was a significantly lower number of bacteria in scaffold sections and surrounding tissues and a lower residual inflammatory response to the infected scaffold disks for the Brpt1.0-immunized mice than for of the ovalbumin (Ova

  4. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Jennings, J C

    1995-11-01

    Physicians who care for female patients cannot avoid the frequent complaint of abnormal uterine bleeding. Knowledge of the disorders that cause this problem can prevent serious consequences in many patients and improve the quality of life for many others. The availability of noninvasive and minimally invasive diagnostic studies and minimally invasive surgical treatment has revolutionized management of abnormal uterine bleeding. Similar to any other disorder, the extent to which a physician manages abnormal uterine bleeding depends on his or her own level of comfort. When limitations of either diagnostic or therapeutic capability are encountered, consultation and referral should be used to the best interest of patients.

  5. Abnormal protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with a submicroscopic X-chromosomal deletion associated with Norrie disease: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Joy, J E; Poglod, R; Murphy, D L; Sims, K B; de la Chapelle, A; Sankila, E M; Norio, R; Merril, C R

    1991-01-01

    Norrie disease is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by congenital blindness and, in many cases, mental retardation. Some Norrie disease cases have been shown to be associated with a submicroscopic deletion in chromosomal region Xp11.3. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected from four male patients with an X-chromosomal deletion associated with Norrie disease. CSF proteins were resolved using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and then analyzed by computer using the Elsie V program. Our analysis revealed a protein that appears to be altered in patients with Norrie disease deletion.

  6. High-level accumulation of recombinant miraculin protein in transgenic tomatoes expressing a synthetic miraculin gene with optimized codon usage terminated by the native miraculin terminator.

    PubMed

    Hiwasa-Tanase, Kyoko; Nyarubona, Mpanja; Hirai, Tadayoshi; Kato, Kazuhisa; Ichikawa, Takanari; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    In our previous study, a transgenic tomato line that expressed the MIR gene under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the nopaline synthase terminator (tNOS) produced the taste-modifying protein miraculin (MIR). However, the concentration of MIR in the tomatoes was lower than that in the MIR gene's native miracle fruit. To increase MIR production, the native MIR terminator (tMIR) was used and a synthetic gene encoding MIR protein (sMIR) was designed to optimize its codon usage for tomato. Four different combinations of these genes and terminators (MIR-tNOS, MIR-tMIR, sMIR-tNOS and sMIR-tMIR) were constructed and used for transformation. The average MIR concentrations in MIR-tNOS, MIR-tMIR, sMIR-tNOS and sMIR-tMIR fruits were 131, 197, 128 and 287 μg/g fresh weight, respectively. The MIR concentrations using tMIR were higher than those using tNOS. The highest MIR accumulation was detected in sMIR-tMIR fruits. On the other hand, the MIR concentration was largely unaffected by sMIR-tNOS. The expression levels of both MIR and sMIR mRNAs terminated by tMIR tended to be higher than those terminated by tNOS. Read-through mRNA transcripts terminated by tNOS were much longer than those terminated by tMIR. These results suggest that tMIR enhances mRNA expression and permits the multiplier effect of optimized codon usage. PMID:21076835

  7. Skeletal muscle cells lacking the retinoblastoma protein display defects in muscle gene expression and accumulate in S and G2 phases of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Viral oncoproteins that inactivate the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRb) family both block skeletal muscle differentiation and promote cell cycle progression. To clarify the dependence of terminal differentiation on the presence of the different pRb-related proteins, we have studied myogenesis using isogenic primary fibroblasts derived from mouse embryos individually deficient for pRb, p107, or p130. When ectopically expressed in fibroblasts lacking pRb, MyoD induces an aberrant skeletal muscle differentiation program characterized by normal expression of early differentiation markers such as myogenin and p21, but attenuated expression of late differentiation markers such as myosin heavy chain (MHC). Similar defects in MHC expression were not observed in cells lacking either p107 or p130, indicating that the defect is specific to the loss of pRb. In contrast to wild-type, p107- deficient, or p130-deficient differentiated myocytes that are permanently withdrawn from the cell cycle, differentiated myocytes lacking pRb accumulate in S and G2 phases and express extremely high levels of cyclins A and B, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk2), and Cdc2, but fail to readily proceed to mitosis. Administration of caffeine, an agent that removes inhibitory phosphorylations on inactive Cdc2/cyclin B complexes, specifically induced mitotic catastrophe in pRb-deficient myocytes, consistent with the observation that the majority of pRb- deficient myocytes arrest in S and G2. Together, these findings indicate that pRb is required for the expression of late skeletal muscle differentiation markers and for the inhibition of DNA synthesis, but that a pRb-independent mechanism restricts entry of differentiated myocytes into mitosis. PMID:8896600

  8. A probable crosstalk between Ca+2, reactive oxygen species accumulation and scavenging mechanisms and modulation of protein kinase C activity during seed development in sunflower

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Anita; Bhatla, Satish C

    2014-01-01

    Seed development in sunflower involves a gradual dehydration and accumulation of oil bodies in the cells of developing cotyledons during transition from 30 to 40 DAA stage. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) content decreased with seed maturation. NO content and NO contributed by putative nitric oxide synthase, however, did not change markedly. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity exhibited a peak at 30 DAA stage, indicating its scavenging role at the mid-stage of seed development. H2O2 produced as a result of SOD action is subsequently scavenged primarily by elevation of GR activity. Significant temporal differences were evident in GR and POD activity during seed development. Protein kinase C (PKC) activity also showed modulation during early stages of embryo and seed development. Use of PKC-specific fluorescent probe, Fim-1, and PKC inhibitors (staurosporine and bisindoylmaleamide) provided evidence for increase in PKC activity at 40 DAA stage with an increase in protein concentration (50 to 200 µg). Endogenous calcium content also increased with seed maturation. Tissue homogenates from 40 DAA stage showed enhanced fluorescence due to Fim-1-PKC binding in presence of calcium ions and its lowering due to calcium chelating agent (BAPTA). Western blot analysis revealed an increase in the intensity of 2 bands representing PKC with the advancement of seed maturation and their further upregulation by calcium. Present findings, thus, provide new information on the biochemical regulation of seed development in sunflower, with evidence for a possible correlation between calcium, ROS, their scavenging enzymes and “conventional” PKC activity. PMID:24521818

  9. Heat accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, A.

    1981-09-29

    A heat accumulator comprises a thermally-insulated reservoir full of paraffin wax mixture or other flowable or meltable heat storage mass, heat-exchangers immersed in the mass, a heat-trap connected to one of the heat-exchangers, and a heat user connected to the other heat-exchanger. Pumps circulate fluids through the heat-trap and the heat-using means and the respective heat-exchangers, and a stirrer agitates and circulates the mass, and the pumps and the stirrer and electric motors driving these devices are all immersed in the mass.

  10. ER reorganization is remarkably induced in COS-7 cells accumulating transmembrane protein receptors not competent for export from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Massimo; Crespi, Arianna; Polishchuk, Elena; Generoso, Serena; Martire, Gianluca; Colombo, Sara Francesca; Bonatti, Stefano

    2014-11-01

    The newly synthesized mutant L501fsX533 Frizzled-4 form and the alpha3beta4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed in the absence of nicotine accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum of COS-7 cells and induce the formation of large areas of smooth and highly convoluted cisternae. This results in a generalized block of the transport to the Golgi complex of newly synthesized proteins. Intriguingly, both effects happen peculiarly in COS-7 cells; HeLa, Huh-7, and HEK293 cells expressing the two receptors at similar level than COS-7 cells show normal ER and normal transport toward the plasma membrane. These results question the conclusion that a dominant-negative mechanism would explain the dominance of the mutant L501fsX533 Fz4 allele in the transmission of a form of Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy. Moreover, they indicate that the coordination of endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis in COS-7 cells is particularly error prone. This finding suggests that COS-7 cells may be extremely useful to study the molecular mechanisms regulating endoplasmic reticulum size and architecture.

  11. Hyaluronan and Hyaluronan-Binding Proteins Accumulate in Both Human Type 1 Diabetic Islets and Lymphoid Tissues and Associate With Inflammatory Cells in Insulitis

    PubMed Central

    Bogdani, Marika; Johnson, Pamela Y.; Potter-Perigo, Susan; Nagy, Nadine; Day, Anthony J.; Bollyky, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan that is present in pancreatic islets, but little is known about its involvement in the development of human type 1 diabetes (T1D). We have evaluated whether pancreatic islets and lymphoid tissues of T1D and nondiabetic organ donors differ in the amount and distribution of HA and HA-binding proteins (hyaladherins), such as inter-α-inhibitor (IαI), versican, and tumor necrosis factor–stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6). HA was dramatically increased both within the islet and outside the islet endocrine cells, juxtaposed to islet microvessels in T1D. In addition, HA was prominent surrounding immune cells in areas of insulitis. IαI and versican were present in HA-rich areas of islets, and both molecules accumulated in diabetic islets and regions exhibiting insulitis. TSG-6 was observed within the islet endocrine cells and in inflammatory infiltrates. These patterns were only observed in tissues from younger donors with disease duration of <10 years. Furthermore, HA and IαI amassed in follicular germinal centers and in T-cell areas in lymph nodes and spleens in T1D patients compared with control subjects. Our observations highlight potential roles for HA and hyaladherins in the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:24677718

  12. Binding of sperm protein Izumo1 and its egg receptor Juno drives Cd9 accumulation in the intercellular contact area prior to fusion during mammalian fertilization.

    PubMed

    Chalbi, Myriam; Barraud-Lange, Virginie; Ravaux, Benjamin; Howan, Kevin; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Soule, Pierre; Ndzoudi, Arnaud; Boucheix, Claude; Rubinstein, Eric; Wolf, Jean Philippe; Ziyyat, Ahmed; Perez, Eric; Pincet, Frédéric; Gourier, Christine

    2014-10-01

    Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that induce gamete fusion during mammalian fertilization. After initial contact, adhesion between gametes only leads to fusion in the presence of three membrane proteins that are necessary, but insufficient, for fusion: Izumo1 on sperm, its receptor Juno on egg and Cd9 on egg. What happens during this adhesion phase is a crucial issue. Here, we demonstrate that the intercellular adhesion that Izumo1 creates with Juno is conserved in mouse and human eggs. We show that, along with Izumo1, egg Cd9 concomitantly accumulates in the adhesion area. Without egg Cd9, the recruitment kinetics of Izumo1 are accelerated. Our results suggest that this process is conserved across species, as the adhesion partners, Izumo1 and its receptor, are interchangeable between mouse and human. Our findings suggest that Cd9 is a partner of Juno, and these discoveries allow us to propose a new model of the molecular mechanisms leading to gamete fusion, in which the adhesion-induced membrane organization assembles all key players of the fusion machinery.

  13. Resistance to Tomato yellow leaf curl virus accumulation in the tomato wild relative Solanum habrochaites associated with the C4 viral protein.

    PubMed

    Tomás, Diego M; Cañizares, M Carmen; Abad, Jesús; Fernández-Muñoz, Rafael; Moriones, Enrique

    2011-07-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD) is a severe threat to tomato crops worldwide and is caused by Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and several other begomoviruses (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae). Host plant resistance is the best TYLCD control method but limited sources of resistance are available. In this study, two Solanum habrochaites TYLCD-resistance sources, EELM-388 and EELM-889, were found after a wide germplasm screening and were further characterized. A consistent resistance to the widely distributed strain TYLCV-IL was observed when plants were inoculated by Bemisia tabaci or by agroinoculation using an infectious clone, with no symptoms or virus accumulation observed in inoculated plants. Moreover, the resistance was effective under field conditions with high TYLCD pressure. Two independent loci, one dominant and one recessive, were associated with EELM-889 resistance. The study shows these loci to be distinct from that of the resistance gene (Ty-1 gene) commonly deployed in commercial tomato cultivars. Therefore, both kinds of resistance could be combined to provide improved resistance to TYLCD. Four additional TYLCD-associated viruses were challenged, showing that the resistance always prevented symptom expression, although systemic infection could occur in some cases. By using chimeric and mutant expression constructs, the C4 protein was shown to be associated with the ability to result in effective systemic infection. PMID:21405986

  14. Reduced cytosolic carboxypeptidase 6 (CCP6) level leads to accumulation of serum polyglutamylated DNAJC7 protein: A potential biomarker for renal cell carcinoma early detection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Ding, Juan; Ren, Shuangchun; Zhao, Heping; Wu, Song; Tian, Yong; Wang, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is frequently diagnosed at advanced stages of disease, although early diagnosis has much favorable prognosis. This study assessed aberrant expression of cytosolic carboxypeptidase 6 (CCP6) leading to accumulation of serum polyglutamylated DNAJC7 as a biomarker for early RCC detection. A total of 835 RCCs, 143 chronic nephritis, 170 kidney stones and 415 health controls were collected for qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis of CCP6 expression and mass spectrometry of DNAJC7 and polyglutamylated DNAJC7. The data showed that CCP6 expression was significantly decreased in 30 RCC tissues and that mass spectrometric and pull-down analysis identified DNAJC7 as a substrate of CCP6 and showed upregulated polyglutamylated-DNAJC7 (polyE-DNAJC7) in sera of RCC patients. The electrochemiluminescence immunoassay of large-scale serum samples from multi-institutes further confirmed the remarkable increase of polyE-DNAJC7 in 805 RCCs compared to that of 385 healthy controls (p < 0.001), 128 patients with chronic nephritis (p < 0.001), and 153 with kidney stone (p < 0.001). Serum level of DNAJC7-polyE protein was also associated with advanced RCC stage and grade in 805 patients. The data from the current study for the first time demonstrated increased serum polyglutamylated DNAJC7 as a potential biomarker for RCC early detection and association with advanced tumor stages and grade, which provides support of further polyglutamylation research in RCC. PMID:26993597

  15. Inhibition of histone deacetylase 10 induces thioredoxin-interacting protein and causes accumulation of reactive oxygen species in SNU-620 human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hee; Jeong, Eun-Goo; Choi, Moon-Chang; Kim, Sung-Hak; Park, Jung-Hyun; Song, Sang-Hyun; Park, Jinah; Bang, Yung-Jue; Kim, Tae-You

    2010-08-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC)10, a novel class IIb histone deacetylase, is the most similar to HDAC6, since both contain a unique second catalytic domain. Unlike HDAC6, which is located in the cytoplasm, HDAC10 resides in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. The transcriptional targets of HDAC10 that are associated with HDAC10 gene regulation have not been identified. In the present study, we found that knockdown of HDAC10 significantly increased the mRNA expression levels of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) in SNU-620 human gastric cancer cells; whereas inhibition of HDAC1, HDAC2, and HDAC6 did not affect TXNIP expression. TXNIP is the endogenous inhibitor of thioredoxin (TRX), which acts as a cellular antioxidant. Real-time PCR and immunoblot analysis confirmed that inhibition of HDAC10 induced TXNIP expression. Compared to class I only HDAC inhibitors, inhibitors targeting both class I and II upregulated TXNIP, indicating that TXNIP is regulated by class II HDACs such as HDAC10. We further verified that inhibition of HDAC10 induced release of cytochrome c and activated apoptotic signaling molecules through accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Taken together, our results demonstrate that HDAC10 is involved in transcriptional downregulation of TXNIP, leading to altered ROS signaling in human gastric cancer cells. How TXNIP is preferentially regulated by HDAC10 needs further investigation.

  16. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    MedlinePlus

    ... of protein and fat, called lipoproteins (such as LDL cholesterol). ... globulin proteins may indicate: Abnormally low level of LDL cholesterol Malnutrition Increased gamma globulin proteins may indicate: Bone ...

  17. Re-analysis of protein data reveals the germination pathway and up accumulation mechanism of cell wall hydrolases during the radicle protrusion step of seed germination in Podophyllum hexandrum- a high altitude plant.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Vivek; Bagler, Ganesh; Sreenivasulu, Yelam

    2015-01-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum Royle is an important high-altitude plant of Himalayas with immense medicinal value. Earlier, it was reported that the cell wall hydrolases were up accumulated during radicle protrusion step of Podophyllum seed germination. In the present study, Podophyllum seed Germination protein interaction Network (PGN) was constructed by using the differentially accumulated protein (DAP) data set of Podophyllum during the radicle protrusion step of seed germination, with reference to Arabidopsis protein-protein interaction network (AtPIN). The developed PGN is comprised of a giant cluster with 1028 proteins having 10,519 interactions and a few small clusters with relevant gene ontological signatures. In this analysis, a germination pathway related cluster which is also central to the topology and information dynamics of PGN was obtained with a set of 60 key proteins. Among these, eight proteins which are known to be involved in signaling, metabolism, protein modification, cell wall modification, and cell cycle regulation processes were found commonly highlighted in both the proteomic and interactome analysis. The systems-level analysis of PGN identified the key proteins involved in radicle protrusion step of seed germination in Podophyllum.

  18. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  19. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal uterine bleeding is any bleeding from the uterus (through your vagina) other than your normal monthly ... or fibroids (small and large growths) in the uterus can also cause bleeding. Rarely, a thyroid problem, ...

  20. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... as cancer of the uterus, cervix, or vagina • Polycystic ovary syndrome How is abnormal bleeding diagnosed? Your health care ... before the fetus can survive outside the uterus. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A condition characterized by two of the following ...

  1. Effects of zinc chloride on the RNP structures in HEp-2 cells: accumulation of perichromatin granules

    SciTech Connect

    Cervera, J.; Baguena-Cervellera, R.; Martinez, A.

    1985-12-01

    The effects of zinc on the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) constituents of HEp-2 cells have been analyzed. Pulse-chase autoradiographic experiments show a preferential inhibition of nucleolar RNA synthesis and a block in the transport of nucleolar and extranucleolar RNA in zinc-treated cells. Concomitantly with the disturbance in RNA metabolism and in protein synthesis, nucleolar condensation, accumulation of perichromatin granules and fibrils, condensation of interchromatin fibrils, and appearance of dense granular bodies occur. Accumulation of perichromatin fibrils and condensation of interchromatin fibrils appear to be related to the block in the transport of heterogeneous nuclear RNA. Depletion of certain proteins required for the assembly of RNP particles could share in the abnormal behavior of RNA and lead to the accumulation of perichromatin granules and the appearance of dense granular bodies.

  2. Abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick G

    2013-12-01

    Primary abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane are characterized by clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity. Among this group, hereditary spherocytosis patients are more likely to experience symptomatic anemia. Treatment of hereditary spherocytosis with splenectomy is curative in most patients. Growing recognition of the long-term risks of splenectomy has led to re-evaluation of the role of splenectomy. Management guidelines acknowledge these considerations and recommend discussion between health care providers, patient, and family. The hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes are the most common primary disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, most elliptocytosis patients are asymptomatic and do not require therapy.

  3. [Endocrine abnormalities in HIV infections].

    PubMed

    Verges, B; Chavanet, P; Desgres, J; Kisterman, J P; Waldner, A; Vaillant, G; Portier, H; Brun, J M; Putelat, R

    The finding of endocrine gland lesions at pathological examination in AIDS and reports of several cases of endocrine disease in patients with this syndrome have prompted us to study endocrine functions in 63 patients (51 men, 12 women) with HIV-1 infection. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) classification system, 13 of these patients were stage CDC II, 27 stage CDC III and 23 stage CDC IV. We explored the adrenocortical function (ACTH, immediate tetracosactrin test) and the thyroid function (free T3 and T4 levels, TRH on TSH test) in all 63 patients. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (testosterone levels, LHRH test) and prolactin secretion (THR test) were explored in the 51 men. The results obtained showed early peripheral testicular insufficiency at stage CDC II and early pituitary gland abnormalities with hypersecretion of ACTH and prolactin also at stage CDC II. On the other hand, adrenocortical and pituitary abnormalities were not frequently found. The physiopathology of the endocrine abnormalities observed in HIV-1-infected patients remains unclear, but one may suspect that it involves interleukin-1 since this protein factor has recently been shown to stimulate the corticotropin-releasing hormone secretion and to act directly on the glycoprotein capsule of the virus (gp 120) whose structure is similar to that of some neurohormones.

  4. Small-molecule Structure Correctors Target Abnormal Protein Structure and Function: The Structure Corrector Rescue of Apolipoprotein E4–associated Neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Mahley, Robert W.; Huang, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    An attractive strategy to treat proteinopathies—diseases caused by malformed or misfolded proteins—is to restore protein function by inducing proper three-dimensional structure. We hypothesized that this approach would be effective in reversing the detrimental effects of apolipoprotein (apo) E4, the major allele that significantly increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. ApoE4’s detrimental effects result from its altered protein conformation (“domain interaction”), making it highly susceptible to proteolytic cleavage and the generation of neurotoxic fragments. Here, we review apoE structure and function, how apoE4 causes neurotoxicity, and describe the identification of potent small-molecule-based “structure correctors” that induce proper apoE4 folding. SAR studies identified a series of small molecules that significantly reduced apoE4’s neurotoxic effects in cultured neurons, and a series that reduced apoE4 fragment levels in vivo, providing proof-of-concept for our approach. Structure corrector–based therapies could prove highly effective for the treatment of many protein-misfolding diseases. PMID:23013167

  5. Re-analysis of protein data reveals the germination pathway and up accumulation mechanism of cell wall hydrolases during the radicle protrusion step of seed germination in Podophyllum hexandrum- a high altitude plant

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Vivek; Bagler, Ganesh; Sreenivasulu, Yelam

    2015-01-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum Royle is an important high-altitude plant of Himalayas with immense medicinal value. Earlier, it was reported that the cell wall hydrolases were up accumulated during radicle protrusion step of Podophyllum seed germination. In the present study, Podophyllum seed Germination protein interaction Network (PGN) was constructed by using the differentially accumulated protein (DAP) data set of Podophyllum during the radicle protrusion step of seed germination, with reference to Arabidopsis protein–protein interaction network (AtPIN). The developed PGN is comprised of a giant cluster with 1028 proteins having 10,519 interactions and a few small clusters with relevant gene ontological signatures. In this analysis, a germination pathway related cluster which is also central to the topology and information dynamics of PGN was obtained with a set of 60 key proteins. Among these, eight proteins which are known to be involved in signaling, metabolism, protein modification, cell wall modification, and cell cycle regulation processes were found commonly highlighted in both the proteomic and interactome analysis. The systems-level analysis of PGN identified the key proteins involved in radicle protrusion step of seed germination in Podophyllum. PMID:26579141

  6. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Bhoiwala, Devang L; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2016-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: β-thalassemia major, β-TI: β-thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelial degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-thalassemia major are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by iron chelation therapy. Some who were never treated with iron chelation therapy exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving iron chelation therapy had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-thalassemia major viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  7. Inhibition of Cell Growth and Cellular Protein, DNA and RNA Synthesis in Human Hepatoma (HepG2) Cells by Ethanol Extract of Abnormal Savda Munziq of Traditional Uighur Medicine.

    PubMed

    Upur, Halmurat; Yusup, Abdiryim; Baudrimont, Isabelle; Umar, Anwar; Berke, Benedicte; Yimit, Dilxat; Lapham, Jaya Conser; Creppy, Edmon E; Moore, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal Savda Munziq (ASMq) is a traditional Uighur medicinal herbal preparation, commonly used for the treatment and prevention of cancer. We tested the effects of ethanol extract of ASMq on cultured human hepatoma cells (HepG2) to explore the mechanism of its putative anticancer properties, using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) bromide, neutral red and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage assays, testing the incorporation of (3)[H]-leucine and (3)[H]-nucleosides into protein, DNA and RNA, and quantifying the formation of malondialdehyde-thiobarbituric acid (MDA) adducts. ASMq ethanol extract significantly inhibited the growth of HepG2 and cell viability, increased the leakage of LDH after 48 hours or 72 hours treatment, in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (P < .05). Cellular protein, DNA and RNA synthesis were inhibited in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (P < .05). No significant MDA release in culture medium and no lipid peroxidation in cells were observed. The results suggest that the cytotoxic effects of ASMq ethanol extract might be related to inhibition of cancer cell growth, alteration of cell membrane integrity and inhibition of cellular protein, DNA and RNA synthesis.

  8. Inhibition of Cell Growth and Cellular Protein, DNA and RNA Synthesis in Human Hepatoma (HepG2) Cells by Ethanol Extract of Abnormal Savda Munziq of Traditional Uighur Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Upur, Halmurat; Yusup, Abdiryim; Baudrimont, Isabelle; Umar, Anwar; Berke, Benedicte; Yimit, Dilxat; Lapham, Jaya Conser; Creppy, Edmon E.; Moore, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal Savda Munziq (ASMq) is a traditional Uighur medicinal herbal preparation, commonly used for the treatment and prevention of cancer. We tested the effects of ethanol extract of ASMq on cultured human hepatoma cells (HepG2) to explore the mechanism of its putative anticancer properties, using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) bromide, neutral red and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage assays, testing the incorporation of 3[H]-leucine and 3[H]-nucleosides into protein, DNA and RNA, and quantifying the formation of malondialdehyde-thiobarbituric acid (MDA) adducts. ASMq ethanol extract significantly inhibited the growth of HepG2 and cell viability, increased the leakage of LDH after 48 hours or 72 hours treatment, in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (P < .05). Cellular protein, DNA and RNA synthesis were inhibited in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (P < .05). No significant MDA release in culture medium and no lipid peroxidation in cells were observed. The results suggest that the cytotoxic effects of ASMq ethanol extract might be related to inhibition of cancer cell growth, alteration of cell membrane integrity and inhibition of cellular protein, DNA and RNA synthesis. PMID:18955370

  9. A Splicing Mutation in the Novel Mitochondrial Protein DNAJC11 Causes Motor Neuron Pathology Associated with Cristae Disorganization, and Lymphoid Abnormalities in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ioakeimidis, Fotis; Ott, Christine; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Violitzi, Foteini; Rinotas, Vagelis; Makrinou, Eleni; Eliopoulos, Elias; Fasseas, Costas; Kollias, George; Douni, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial structure and function is emerging as a major contributor to neuromuscular disease, highlighting the need for the complete elucidation of the underlying molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms. Following a forward genetics approach with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-mediated random mutagenesis, we identified a novel mouse model of autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease caused by a splice-site hypomorphic mutation in a novel gene of unknown function, DnaJC11. Recent findings have demonstrated that DNAJC11 protein co-immunoprecipitates with proteins of the mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex involved in the formation of mitochondrial cristae and cristae junctions. Homozygous mutant mice developed locomotion defects, muscle weakness, spasticity, limb tremor, leucopenia, thymic and splenic hypoplasia, general wasting and early lethality. Neuropathological analysis showed severe vacuolation of the motor neurons in the spinal cord, originating from dilatations of the endoplasmic reticulum and notably from mitochondria that had lost their proper inner membrane organization. The causal role of the identified mutation in DnaJC11 was verified in rescue experiments by overexpressing the human ortholog. The full length 63 kDa isoform of human DNAJC11 was shown to localize in the periphery of the mitochondrial outer membrane whereas putative additional isoforms displayed differential submitochondrial localization. Moreover, we showed that DNAJC11 is assembled in a high molecular weight complex, similarly to mitofilin and that downregulation of mitofilin or SAM50 affected the levels of DNAJC11 in HeLa cells. Our findings provide the first mouse mutant for a putative MICOS protein and establish a link between DNAJC11 and neuromuscular diseases. PMID:25111180

  10. Local Drug-Drug Interaction of Donepezil with Cilostazol at Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (ABCG2) Increases Drug Accumulation in Heart.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Ryota; Shinozaki, Kohki; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2016-01-01

    Clinical reports indicate that cardiotoxicity due to donepezil can occur after coadministration with cilostazol. We speculated that the concentration of donepezil in heart tissue might be increased as a result of interaction with cilostazol at efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2), which are expressed in many tissues including the heart, and our study tested this hypothesis. First, donepezil was confirmed to be a substrate of both BCRP and P-glycoprotein in transporter-transfected cells in vitro. Cilostazol inhibited BCRP and P-glycoprotein with half-inhibitory concentrations of 130 nM and 12.7 μM, respectively. Considering the clinically achievable unbound plasma concentration of cilostazol (about 200 nM), it is plausible that BCRP-mediated transport of donepezil would be affected by cilostazol in vivo. Indeed, in an in vivo rat study, we found that coadministration of cilostazol significantly increased the concentrations of donepezil in the heart and brain, where BCRP functions as a part of the blood-tissue barrier, whereas the plasma concentration of donepezil was unaffected. In addition, in vitro accumulation of donepezil in heart tissue slices of rats was significantly increased in the presence of cilostazol. These results indicate that donepezil-cilostazol interaction at BCRP may be clinically relevant in heart and brain tissues. In other words, the tissue distribution of drugs can be influenced by drug-drug interaction (DDI) at efflux transporters in certain tissues (local DDI) without any apparent change in plasma concentration (systemic DDI).

  11. Novel perforin mutation in a patient with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and CD45 abnormal splicing.

    PubMed

    McCormick, James; Flower, Darren R; Strobel, Stephan; Wallace, Diana L; Beverley, Peter C L; Tchilian, Elma Z

    2003-03-15

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) composes a group of rare heterogenous disorders characterized by uncontrolled accumulation and infiltration of activated T lymphocytes and macrophages. Cytotoxic T and natural killer cell activity is significantly reduced or absent in these patients. Mutations in the important mediator of lymphocyte cytotoxicity perforin were identified in a number of HLH individuals. Here we report a novel missense mutation thr435met in the conserved Ca(2+) binding domain of perforin in a patient with HLH. Prediction of the 3-dimensional structure of the thr435met perforin mutant using comparative molecular modeling indicates that the protein's ability to bind Ca(2+), and therefore its cytolytic function, would be strongly compromised. In addition, this patient exhibited abnormal CD45 splicing caused by a C77G mutation in the gene encoding CD45 (PTPRC). Our findings suggest a combined role for perforin mutation and abnormal CD45 splicing as significant contributory factors in the pathogenesis of HLH. PMID:12599189

  12. A diagnostic approach for neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation: clinical features, genetics and brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Salomão, Rubens Paulo Araújo; Pedroso, José Luiz; Gama, Maria Thereza Drumond; Dutra, Lívia Almeida; Maciel, Ricardo Horta; Godeiro-Junior, Clécio; Chien, Hsin Fen; Teive, Hélio A G; Cardoso, Francisco; Barsottini, Orlando G P

    2016-07-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) represents a heterogeneous and complex group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases, characterized by excessive iron accumulation, particularly in the basal ganglia. Common clinical features of NBIA include movement disorders, particularly parkinsonism and dystonia, cognitive dysfunction, pyramidal signs, and retinal abnormalities. The forms of NBIA described to date include pantothenase kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), phospholipase A2 associated neurodegeneration (PLAN), neuroferritinopathy, aceruloplasminemia, beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (BPAN), Kufor-Rakeb syndrome, mitochondrial membrane protein-associated neurodegeneration (MPAN), fatty acid hydroxylase-associated neurodegeneration (FAHN), coenzyme A synthase protein-associated neurodegeneration (CoPAN) and Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome. This review is a diagnostic approach for NBIA cases, from clinical features and brain imaging findings to the genetic etiology.

  13. Accelerated Disease Onset with Stabilized Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)-linked Mutant TDP-43 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shoji; Kaneko, Kumi; Yamanaka, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal protein accumulation is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases, including accumulation of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Dominant mutations in the TDP-43 gene are causative for familial ALS; however, the relationship between mutant protein biochemical phenotypes and disease course and their significance to disease pathomechanism are not known. Here, we found that longer half-lives of mutant proteins correlated with accelerated disease onset. Based on our findings, we established a cell model in which chronic stabilization of wild-type TDP-43 protein provoked cytotoxicity and recapitulated pathogenic protein cleavage and insolubility to the detergent Sarkosyl, TDP-43 properties that have been observed in sporadic ALS lesions. Furthermore, these cells showed proteasomal impairment and dysregulation of their own mRNA levels. These results suggest that chronically increased stability of mutant or wild-type TDP-43 proteins results in a gain of toxicity through abnormal proteostasis. PMID:23235148

  14. [Hair shaft abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Itin, P H; Düggelin, M

    2002-05-01

    Hair shaft disorders may lead to brittleness and uncombable hair. In general the hair feels dry and lusterless. Hair shaft abnormalities may occur as localized or generalized disorders. Genetic predisposition or exogenous factors are able to produce and maintain hair shaft abnormalities. In addition to an extensive history and physical examination the most important diagnostic examination to analyze a hair shaft problem is light microscopy. Therapy of hair shaft disorders should focus to the cause. In addition, minimizing traumatic influences to hair shafts, such as dry hair with an electric dryer, permanent waves and dyes is important. A short hair style is more suitable for such patients with hair shaft disorders.

  15. Abnormal Protein Glycosylation and Activated PI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathway: Role in Bladder Cancer Prognosis and Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Luís; Peixoto, Andreia; Fernandes, Elisabete; Neves, Diogo; Neves, Manuel; Gaiteiro, Cristiana; Tavares, Ana; Gil da Costa, Rui M.; Cruz, Ricardo; Amaro, Teresina; Oliveira, Paula A.; Ferreira, José Alexandre; Santos, Lúcio L.

    2015-01-01

    Muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC, stage ≥T2) is generally associated with poor prognosis, constituting the second most common cause of death among genitourinary tumours. Due to high molecular heterogeneity significant variations in the natural history and disease outcome have been observed. This has also delayed the introduction of personalized therapeutics, making advanced stage bladder cancer almost an orphan disease in terms of treatment. Altered protein glycosylation translated by the expression of the sialyl-Tn antigen (STn) and its precursor Tn as well as the activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway are cancer-associated events that may hold potential for patient stratification and guided therapy. Therefore, a retrospective design, 96 bladder tumours of different stages (Ta, T1-T4) was screened for STn and phosphorylated forms of Akt (pAkt), mTOR (pmTOR), S6 (pS6) and PTEN, related with the activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. In our series the expression of Tn was residual and was not linked to stage or outcome, while STn was statically higher in MIBC when compared to non-muscle invasive tumours (p = 0.001) and associated decreased cancer-specific survival (log rank p = 0.024). Conversely, PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway intermediates showed an equal distribution between non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and MIBC and did not associate with cancer-specif survival (CSS) in any of these groups. However, the overexpression of pAKT, pmTOR and/or pS6 allowed discriminating STn-positive advanced stage bladder tumours facing worst CSS (p = 0.027). Furthermore, multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that overexpression of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway proteins in STn+ MIBC was independently associated with approximately 6-fold risk of death by cancer (p = 0.039). Mice bearing advanced stage chemically-induced bladder tumours mimicking the histological and molecular nature of human tumours were then administrated with mTOR-pathway inhibitor sirolimus (rapamycin

  16. Abnormal Protein Glycosylation and Activated PI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathway: Role in Bladder Cancer Prognosis and Targeted Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Costa, Céu; Pereira, Sofia; Lima, Luís; Peixoto, Andreia; Fernandes, Elisabete; Neves, Diogo; Neves, Manuel; Gaiteiro, Cristiana; Tavares, Ana; Gil da Costa, Rui M; Cruz, Ricardo; Amaro, Teresina; Oliveira, Paula A; Ferreira, José Alexandre; Santos, Lúcio L

    2015-01-01

    Muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC, stage ≥T2) is generally associated with poor prognosis, constituting the second most common cause of death among genitourinary tumours. Due to high molecular heterogeneity significant variations in the natural history and disease outcome have been observed. This has also delayed the introduction of personalized therapeutics, making advanced stage bladder cancer almost an orphan disease in terms of treatment. Altered protein glycosylation translated by the expression of the sialyl-Tn antigen (STn) and its precursor Tn as well as the activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway are cancer-associated events that may hold potential for patient stratification and guided therapy. Therefore, a retrospective design, 96 bladder tumours of different stages (Ta, T1-T4) was screened for STn and phosphorylated forms of Akt (pAkt), mTOR (pmTOR), S6 (pS6) and PTEN, related with the activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. In our series the expression of Tn was residual and was not linked to stage or outcome, while STn was statically higher in MIBC when compared to non-muscle invasive tumours (p = 0.001) and associated decreased cancer-specific survival (log rank p = 0.024). Conversely, PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway intermediates showed an equal distribution between non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and MIBC and did not associate with cancer-specif survival (CSS) in any of these groups. However, the overexpression of pAKT, pmTOR and/or pS6 allowed discriminating STn-positive advanced stage bladder tumours facing worst CSS (p = 0.027). Furthermore, multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that overexpression of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway proteins in STn+ MIBC was independently associated with approximately 6-fold risk of death by cancer (p = 0.039). Mice bearing advanced stage chemically-induced bladder tumours mimicking the histological and molecular nature of human tumours were then administrated with mTOR-pathway inhibitor sirolimus (rapamycin

  17. Abnormal Protein Glycosylation and Activated PI3K/Akt/mTOR Pathway: Role in Bladder Cancer Prognosis and Targeted Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Costa, Céu; Pereira, Sofia; Lima, Luís; Peixoto, Andreia; Fernandes, Elisabete; Neves, Diogo; Neves, Manuel; Gaiteiro, Cristiana; Tavares, Ana; Gil da Costa, Rui M; Cruz, Ricardo; Amaro, Teresina; Oliveira, Paula A; Ferreira, José Alexandre; Santos, Lúcio L

    2015-01-01

    Muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC, stage ≥T2) is generally associated with poor prognosis, constituting the second most common cause of death among genitourinary tumours. Due to high molecular heterogeneity significant variations in the natural history and disease outcome have been observed. This has also delayed the introduction of personalized therapeutics, making advanced stage bladder cancer almost an orphan disease in terms of treatment. Altered protein glycosylation translated by the expression of the sialyl-Tn antigen (STn) and its precursor Tn as well as the activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway are cancer-associated events that may hold potential for patient stratification and guided therapy. Therefore, a retrospective design, 96 bladder tumours of different stages (Ta, T1-T4) was screened for STn and phosphorylated forms of Akt (pAkt), mTOR (pmTOR), S6 (pS6) and PTEN, related with the activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. In our series the expression of Tn was residual and was not linked to stage or outcome, while STn was statically higher in MIBC when compared to non-muscle invasive tumours (p = 0.001) and associated decreased cancer-specific survival (log rank p = 0.024). Conversely, PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway intermediates showed an equal distribution between non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and MIBC and did not associate with cancer-specif survival (CSS) in any of these groups. However, the overexpression of pAKT, pmTOR and/or pS6 allowed discriminating STn-positive advanced stage bladder tumours facing worst CSS (p = 0.027). Furthermore, multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that overexpression of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway proteins in STn+ MIBC was independently associated with approximately 6-fold risk of death by cancer (p = 0.039). Mice bearing advanced stage chemically-induced bladder tumours mimicking the histological and molecular nature of human tumours were then administrated with mTOR-pathway inhibitor sirolimus (rapamycin

  18. Increased expression of host iron-binding proteins precedes iron accumulation and calcification of primary lung lesions in experimental tuberculosis in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Basaraba, Randall J; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Eschelbach, Ellie K; Reisenhauer, Claire; Tolnay, Airn E; Taraba, Lauren C; Shanley, Crystal A; Smith, Erin A; Bedwell, Cathy L; Chlipala, Elizabeth A; Orme, Ian M

    2008-01-01

    The growth and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis depends on its ability to scavenge host iron, an essential and limited micronutrient in vivo. In this study, we show that ferric iron accumulates both intra- and extra-cellularly in the primary lung lesions of guinea pigs aerosol-infected with the H37Rv strain of M. tuberculosis. Iron accumulated within macrophages at the periphery of the primary granulomatous lesions while extra-cellular ferric iron was concentrated in areas of lesion necrosis. Accumulation of iron within primary lesions was preceded by an increase in expression of heavy chain (H) ferritin, lactoferrin and receptors for transferrin, primarily by macrophages and granulocytes. The increased expression of intra-cellular H ferritin and extra-cellular lactoferrin, more so than transferrin receptor, paralleled the development of necrosis within primary lesions. The deposition of extra-cellular ferric iron within necrotic foci coincided with the accumulation of calcium and phosphorus and other cations in the form of dystrophic calcification. Primary lung lesions from guinea pigs vaccinated with Mycobactrium bovis BCG prior to experimental infection, had reduced iron accumulation as well as H ferritin, lactoferrin and transferrin receptor expression. The amelioration of primary lesion necrosis and dystrophic calcification by BCG vaccination was coincident with the lack of extra-cellular ferric iron and lactoferrin accumulation. These data demonstrate that BCG vaccination ameliorates primary lesion necrosis, dystrophic mineralization and iron accumulation, in part by down-regulating the expression of macrophage H ferritin, lactoferrin and transferrin receptors, in vivo.

  19. Level of urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein is associated with cardiac markers and electrocardiographic abnormalities in type-2 diabetes with chronic kidney disease stage G1 and G2.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yoshiteru; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ishii, Junnichi; Sekiguchi-Ueda, Sahoko; Shibata, Megumi; Yoshino, Yasumasa; Asano, Shogo; Hayakawa, Nobuki; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Akiyama, Yasukazu; Kitagawa, Fumihiko; Sakuishi, Toshiaki; Fujita, Takashi; Hashimoto, Shuji; Ozaki, Yukio; Itoh, Mitsuyasu

    2015-05-01

    Urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) reflects the degree of stress in proximal tubules of the kidney. We examined the level of L-FABP in type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage G1 and G2, and its relationship with cardiac markers and electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities. T2DM patients whose estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) were recruited [n = 276 (165 males), mean age 64 years]. The median level of urinary L-FABP was 6.6 μg/gCr. Urinary L-FABP showed significant correlation with urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) (r = 0.51, p < 0.0001). Median (25th-75th percentile) eGFR was 82 (72-95) mL/min/1.73 m2. We divided patients into four subgroups (group 1, L-FABP ≤8.4 μg/gCr and ACR ≤30 mg/gCr; group 2, L-FABP ≤8.4 μg/gCr and ACR >30 mg/gCr; group 3, L-FABP >8.4 μg/gCr and ACR ≤30 mg/gCr; group 4, L-FABP >8.4 μg/gCr and ACR >30 mg/gCr). Compared with group 1, group 4 was significantly higher in systolic blood pressure, and eGFR using standardized serum cystatin C, high-sensitivity troponin T, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Group 4 had significantly higher level of NT-proBNP than group 3. Groups 2, 3 and 4 showed more ECG abnormalities than group 1. These findings suggest that simultaneous measurement of urinary L-FABP and ACR should be useful to assess cardiovascular damage reflecting on the elevation of cardiac markers and ECG abnormalities in T2DM with CKD G1 and G2.

  20. Treatment with N- and C-Terminal Peptides of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Partly Compensate the Skeletal Abnormalities in IGF-I Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Portal-Núñez, Sergio; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Lozano, Daniel; Cediel, Rafael; Esbrit, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) deficiency causes growth delay, and IGF-I has been shown to partially mediate bone anabolism by parathyroid hormone (PTH). PTH-related protein (PTHrP) is abundant in bone, and has osteogenic features by poorly defined mechanisms. We here examined the capacity of PTHrP (1–36) and PTHrP (107–111) (osteostatin) to reverse the skeletal alterations associated with IGF-I deficiency. Igf1-null mice and their wild type littermates were treated with each PTHrP peptide (80 µg/Kg/every other day/2 weeks; 2 males and 4 females for each genotype) or saline vehicle (3 males and 3 females for each genotype). We found that treatment with either PTHrP peptide ameliorated trabecular structure in the femur in both genotypes. However, these peptides were ineffective in normalizing the altered cortical structure at this bone site in Igf1-null mice. An aberrant gene expression of factors associated with osteoblast differentiation and function, namely runx2, osteoprotegerin/receptor activator of NF-κB ligand ratio, Wnt3a, cyclin D1, connexin 43, catalase and Gadd45, as well as in osteocyte sclerostin, was found in the long bones of Igf1-null mice. These mice also displayed a lower amount of trabecular osteoblasts and osteoclasts in the tibial metaphysis than those in wild type mice. These alterations in Igf1-null mice were only partially corrected by each PTHrP peptide treatment. The skeletal expression of Igf2, Igf1 receptor and Irs2 was increased in Igf1-null mice, and this compensatory profile was further improved by treatment with each PTHrP peptide related to ERK1/2 and FoxM1 activation. In vitro, PTHrP (1–36) and osteostatin were effective in promoting bone marrow stromal cell mineralization in normal mice but not in IGF-I-deficient mice. Collectively, these findings indicate that PTHrP (1–36) and osteostatin can exert several osteogenic actions even in the absence of IGF-I in the mouse bone. PMID:24503961

  1. Treatment with N- and C-terminal peptides of parathyroid hormone-related protein partly compensate the skeletal abnormalities in IGF-I deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-de la Rosa, Lourdes; López-Herradón, Ana; Portal-Núñez, Sergio; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Lozano, Daniel; Cediel, Rafael; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Esbrit, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) deficiency causes growth delay, and IGF-I has been shown to partially mediate bone anabolism by parathyroid hormone (PTH). PTH-related protein (PTHrP) is abundant in bone, and has osteogenic features by poorly defined mechanisms. We here examined the capacity of PTHrP (1-36) and PTHrP (107-111) (osteostatin) to reverse the skeletal alterations associated with IGF-I deficiency. Igf1-null mice and their wild type littermates were treated with each PTHrP peptide (80 µg/Kg/every other day/2 weeks; 2 males and 4 females for each genotype) or saline vehicle (3 males and 3 females for each genotype). We found that treatment with either PTHrP peptide ameliorated trabecular structure in the femur in both genotypes. However, these peptides were ineffective in normalizing the altered cortical structure at this bone site in Igf1-null mice. An aberrant gene expression of factors associated with osteoblast differentiation and function, namely runx2, osteoprotegerin/receptor activator of NF-κB ligand ratio, Wnt3a , cyclin D1, connexin 43, catalase and Gadd45, as well as in osteocyte sclerostin, was found in the long bones of Igf1-null mice. These mice also displayed a lower amount of trabecular osteoblasts and osteoclasts in the tibial metaphysis than those in wild type mice. These alterations in Igf1-null mice were only partially corrected by each PTHrP peptide treatment. The skeletal expression of Igf2, Igf1 receptor and Irs2 was increased in Igf1-null mice, and this compensatory profile was further improved by treatment with each PTHrP peptide related to ERK1/2 and FoxM1 activation. In vitro, PTHrP (1-36) and osteostatin were effective in promoting bone marrow stromal cell mineralization in normal mice but not in IGF-I-deficient mice. Collectively, these findings indicate that PTHrP (1-36) and osteostatin can exert several osteogenic actions even in the absence of IGF-I in the mouse bone.

  2. Calorie Restriction Prevents Metabolic Aging Caused by Abnormal SIRT1 Function in Adipose Tissues.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng; Cai, Yu; Fan, Pengcheng; Bai, Bo; Chen, Jie; Deng, Han-Bing; Che, Chi-Ming; Xu, Aimin; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Wang, Yu

    2015-05-01

    Adipose tissue is a pivotal organ determining longevity, due largely to its role in maintaining whole-body energy homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. SIRT1 is a NAD-dependent protein deacetylase possessing antiaging activities in a wide range of organisms. The current study demonstrates that mice with adipose tissue-selective overexpression of hSIRT1(H363Y), a dominant-negative mutant that disrupts endogenous SIRT1 activity, show accelerated development of metabolic aging. These mice, referred to as Adipo-H363Y, exhibit hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, ectopic lipid deposition, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance at a much younger age than their wild-type littermates. The metabolic defects of Adipo-H363Y are associated with abnormal epigenetic modifications and chromatin remodeling in their adipose tissues, as a result of excess accumulation of biotin, which inhibits endogenous SIRT1 activity, leading to increased inflammation, cellularity, and collagen deposition. The enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 plays an important role in biotin accumulation within adipose tissues of Adipo-H363Y. Calorie restriction prevents biotin accumulation, abolishes abnormal histone biotinylation, and completely restores the metabolic and adipose functions of Adipo-H363Y. The effects are mimicked by short-term restriction of biotin intake, an approach potentially translatable to humans for maintaining the epigenetic and chromatin remodeling capacity of adipose tissues and preventing aging-associated metabolic disorders.

  3. Consumption of a high-fat meal containing cheese compared with a vegan alternative lowers postprandial C-reactive protein in overweight and obese individuals with metabolic abnormalities: a randomised controlled cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Demmer, Elieke; Van Loan, Marta D; Rivera, Nancy; Rogers, Tara S; Gertz, Erik R; German, J Bruce; Zivkovic, Angela M; Smilowitz, Jennifer T

    2016-01-01

    Dietary recommendations suggest decreased consumption of SFA to minimise CVD risk; however, not all foods rich in SFA are equivalent. To evaluate the effects of SFA in a dairy food matrix, as Cheddar cheese, v. SFA from a vegan-alternative test meal on postprandial inflammatory markers, a randomised controlled cross-over trial was conducted in twenty overweight or obese adults with metabolic abnormalities. Individuals consumed two isoenergetic high-fat mixed meals separated by a 1- to 2-week washout period. Serum was collected at baseline, and at 1, 3 and 6 h postprandially and analysed for inflammatory markers (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17, IL-18, TNFα, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1)), acute-phase proteins C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid-A (SAA), cellular adhesion molecules and blood lipids, glucose and insulin. Following both high-fat test meals, postprandial TAG concentrations rose steadily (P < 0·05) without a decrease by 6 h. The incremental AUC (iAUC) for CRP was significantly lower (P < 0·05) in response to the cheese compared with the vegan-alternative test meal. A treatment effect was not observed for any other inflammatory markers; however, for both test meals, multiple markers significantly changed from baseline over the 6 h postprandial period (IL-6, IL-8, IL-18, TNFα, MCP-1, SAA). Saturated fat in the form of a cheese matrix reduced the iAUC for CRP compared with a vegan-alternative test meal during the postprandial 6 h period. The study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov under NCT01803633. PMID:27313852

  4. Consumption of a high-fat meal containing cheese compared with a vegan alternative lowers postprandial C-reactive protein in overweight and obese individuals with metabolic abnormalities: a randomised controlled cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Demmer, Elieke; Van Loan, Marta D; Rivera, Nancy; Rogers, Tara S; Gertz, Erik R; German, J Bruce; Zivkovic, Angela M; Smilowitz, Jennifer T

    2016-01-01

    Dietary recommendations suggest decreased consumption of SFA to minimise CVD risk; however, not all foods rich in SFA are equivalent. To evaluate the effects of SFA in a dairy food matrix, as Cheddar cheese, v. SFA from a vegan-alternative test meal on postprandial inflammatory markers, a randomised controlled cross-over trial was conducted in twenty overweight or obese adults with metabolic abnormalities. Individuals consumed two isoenergetic high-fat mixed meals separated by a 1- to 2-week washout period. Serum was collected at baseline, and at 1, 3 and 6 h postprandially and analysed for inflammatory markers (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17, IL-18, TNFα, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1)), acute-phase proteins C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid-A (SAA), cellular adhesion molecules and blood lipids, glucose and insulin. Following both high-fat test meals, postprandial TAG concentrations rose steadily (P < 0·05) without a decrease by 6 h. The incremental AUC (iAUC) for CRP was significantly lower (P < 0·05) in response to the cheese compared with the vegan-alternative test meal. A treatment effect was not observed for any other inflammatory markers; however, for both test meals, multiple markers significantly changed from baseline over the 6 h postprandial period (IL-6, IL-8, IL-18, TNFα, MCP-1, SAA). Saturated fat in the form of a cheese matrix reduced the iAUC for CRP compared with a vegan-alternative test meal during the postprandial 6 h period. The study is registered at clinicaltrials.gov under NCT01803633.

  5. Establishment of a simple cell-based ELISA for the direct detection of abnormal isoform of prion protein from prion-infected cells without cell lysis and proteinase K treatment.

    PubMed

    Shan, Zhifu; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Suzuki, Akio; Hasebe, Rie; Horiuchi, Motohiro

    2016-07-01

    Prion-infected cells have been used for analyzing the effect of compounds on the formation of abnormal isoform of prion protein (PrP(Sc)). PrP(Sc) is usually detected using anti-prion protein (PrP) antibodies after the removal of the cellular isoform of prion protein (PrP(C)) by proteinase K (PK) treatment. However, it is expected that the PK-sensitive PrP(Sc) (PrP(Sc)-sen), which possesses higher infectivity and conversion activity than the PK-resistant PrP(Sc) (PrP(Sc)-res), is also digested through PK treatment. To overcome this problem, we established a novel cell-based ELISA in which PrP(Sc) can be directly detected from cells persistently infected with prions using anti-PrP monoclonal antibody (mAb) 132 that recognizes epitope consisting of mouse PrP amino acids 119-127. The novel cell-based ELISA could distinguish prion-infected cells from prion-uninfected cells without cell lysis and PK treatment. MAb 132 could detect both PrP(Sc)-sen and PrP(Sc)-res even if all PrP(Sc) molecules were not detected. The analytical dynamic range for PrP(Sc) detection was approximately 1 log. The coefficient of variation and signal-to-background ratio were 7%-11% and 2.5-3.3, respectively, demonstrating the reproducibility of this assay. The addition of a cytotoxicity assay immediately before PrP(Sc) detection did not affect the following PrP(Sc) detection. Thus, all the procedures including cell culture, cytotoxicity assay, and PrP(Sc) detection were completed in the same plate. The simplicity and non-requirement for cell lysis or PK treatment are advantages for the high throughput screening of anti-prion compounds. PMID:27565564

  6. Establishment of a simple cell-based ELISA for the direct detection of abnormal isoform of prion protein from prion-infected cells without cell lysis and proteinase K treatment.

    PubMed

    Shan, Zhifu; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Suzuki, Akio; Hasebe, Rie; Horiuchi, Motohiro

    2016-07-01

    Prion-infected cells have been used for analyzing the effect of compounds on the formation of abnormal isoform of prion protein (PrP(Sc)). PrP(Sc) is usually detected using anti-prion protein (PrP) antibodies after the removal of the cellular isoform of prion protein (PrP(C)) by proteinase K (PK) treatment. However, it is expected that the PK-sensitive PrP(Sc) (PrP(Sc)-sen), which possesses higher infectivity and conversion activity than the PK-resistant PrP(Sc) (PrP(Sc)-res), is also digested through PK treatment. To overcome this problem, we established a novel cell-based ELISA in which PrP(Sc) can be directly detected from cells persistently infected with prions using anti-PrP monoclonal antibody (mAb) 132 that recognizes epitope consisting of mouse PrP amino acids 119-127. The novel cell-based ELISA could distinguish prion-infected cells from prion-uninfected cells without cell lysis and PK treatment. MAb 132 could detect both PrP(Sc)-sen and PrP(Sc)-res even if all PrP(Sc) molecules were not detected. The analytical dynamic range for PrP(Sc) detection was approximately 1 log. The coefficient of variation and signal-to-background ratio were 7%-11% and 2.5-3.3, respectively, demonstrating the reproducibility of this assay. The addition of a cytotoxicity assay immediately before PrP(Sc) detection did not affect the following PrP(Sc) detection. Thus, all the procedures including cell culture, cytotoxicity assay, and PrP(Sc) detection were completed in the same plate. The simplicity and non-requirement for cell lysis or PK treatment are advantages for the high throughput screening of anti-prion compounds.

  7. Yellow mosaic symptom caused by the nuclear shuttle protein gene of mungbean yellow mosaic virus is associated with single-stranded DNA accumulation and mesophyll spread of the virus.

    PubMed

    Kuruba, B L; Buvani, A P; Veluthambi, K

    2016-01-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-[India:Vigna] (MYMV-[IN:Vig]), a blackgram isolate of MYMV, causes yellow mosaic disease in blackgram and mungbean. Two variable DNA-B components, KA22 and KA27, cause distinct symptoms in blackgram [V. mungo (L.) Hepper] with the same DNA-A component. KA22 + DNA-A-agroinoculated blackgram plants displayed yellow mosaic symptom and accumulated high levels of viral single-stranded (ss) DNA. KA27 + DNA-A-agroinoculated blackgram plants displayed severe stunting symptom and accumulated very low levels of viral ssDNA. However, in mungbean [V. radiata (L.) Wilczek], KA27 + DNA-A caused yellow mosaic symptom and a high level of viral ssDNA accumulated. Swapping of KA27 DNA-B with the nuclear shuttle protein gene (NSP) of KA22 DNA-B (KA27xKA22 NSP) caused yellow mosaic symptom in blackgram, suggesting that KA22 NSP is the determinant of yellow mosaic symptom. Interestingly, KA27xKA22 NSP-infected blackgram plants accumulated high levels of viral ssDNA, comparable to that of KA22 DNA-B infection, suggesting that the KA22 NSP is responsible for accumulation of high levels of viral ssDNA. MYMV distribution was studied in blackgram and mungbean plants by leaf tissue hybridization, which showed mesophyll spread of the virus in KA22-infected blackgram leaflets and in KA27-infected mungbean leaflets, both of which displayed yellow mosaic symptom. However, the virus did not accumulate in the mesophyll in the case of KA27-infected blackgram leaflets. Interestingly, the swapped KA27xKA22 NSP-infected blackgram leaflets showed mesophyll accumulation of the virus, suggesting that KA22 NSP determines its mesophyll spread. PMID:27640432

  8. Yellow mosaic symptom caused by the nuclear shuttle protein gene of mungbean yellow mosaic virus is associated with single-stranded DNA accumulation and mesophyll spread of the virus.

    PubMed

    Kuruba, B L; Buvani, A P; Veluthambi, K

    2016-01-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-[India:Vigna] (MYMV-[IN:Vig]), a blackgram isolate of MYMV, causes yellow mosaic disease in blackgram and mungbean. Two variable DNA-B components, KA22 and KA27, cause distinct symptoms in blackgram [V. mungo (L.) Hepper] with the same DNA-A component. KA22 + DNA-A-agroinoculated blackgram plants displayed yellow mosaic symptom and accumulated high levels of viral single-stranded (ss) DNA. KA27 + DNA-A-agroinoculated blackgram plants displayed severe stunting symptom and accumulated very low levels of viral ssDNA. However, in mungbean [V. radiata (L.) Wilczek], KA27 + DNA-A caused yellow mosaic symptom and a high level of viral ssDNA accumulated. Swapping of KA27 DNA-B with the nuclear shuttle protein gene (NSP) of KA22 DNA-B (KA27xKA22 NSP) caused yellow mosaic symptom in blackgram, suggesting that KA22 NSP is the determinant of yellow mosaic symptom. Interestingly, KA27xKA22 NSP-infected blackgram plants accumulated high levels of viral ssDNA, comparable to that of KA22 DNA-B infection, suggesting that the KA22 NSP is responsible for accumulation of high levels of viral ssDNA. MYMV distribution was studied in blackgram and mungbean plants by leaf tissue hybridization, which showed mesophyll spread of the virus in KA22-infected blackgram leaflets and in KA27-infected mungbean leaflets, both of which displayed yellow mosaic symptom. However, the virus did not accumulate in the mesophyll in the case of KA27-infected blackgram leaflets. Interestingly, the swapped KA27xKA22 NSP-infected blackgram leaflets showed mesophyll accumulation of the virus, suggesting that KA22 NSP determines its mesophyll spread.

  9. 2-Arachidonylglyceryl ether and abnormal cannabidiol-induced vascular smooth muscle relaxation in rabbit pulmonary arteries via receptor-pertussis toxin sensitive G proteins-ERK1/2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Su, Judy Y; Vo, Anhkiet C

    2007-03-22

    The receptor(s) used by cannabinoids to relax vascular smooth muscle is unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of 2-arachidonylglyceryl ether (2-AG ether), a metabolically stable endocannabinoid, and abnormal cannabidiol (abn-CBD) on relaxation of permeabilized pulmonary arterial strips monitored with force, and on extracellular signal-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in permeabilized vascular smooth muscle cells using immunoblotting. We found that 2-AG ether and abn-CBD caused relaxation and increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2. 2-AG ether effects were completely abolished by N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251), and N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716A), and partially blocked by (-)-1.3-dimethoxy-2-(3-3,4-trans-p-menthadien-(1,8)-yl)-orcinol (O-1918). In contrast, abn-CBD effects were completely abolished by O-1918, and only partially blocked by AM251, and SR141716A. Both 2-AG ether and abn-CBD effects were partially blocked by pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of Gi/o proteins. PD98059, an inhibitor of mitogen activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), completely abolished the relaxation, but only partially blocked the increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 by 2-AG ether. In contrast, abn-CBD-induced relaxation was partially blocked and the increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was abolished by PD98059. These findings suggest that 2-AG ether and abn-CBD-induced vascular smooth muscle relaxation are mediated by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor, and the abn-CBD receptor, respectively, and are modulated by cross-talk between the receptors. These responses occur mainly by coupling to pertussis toxin sensitive G proteins, but also, in part independent of these G proteins, which have been classically thought to initiate MEK/ERK1/2 signaling to relax vascular smooth muscle.

  10. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed.

  11. Chromosome abnormalities in glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.S.; Ramsay, D.A.; Fan, Y.S.

    1994-09-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed in 25 patients with gliomas. An interesting finding was a seemingly identical abnormality, an extra band on the tip of the short arm of chromosome 1, add(1)(p36), in two cases. The abnormality was present in all cells from a patient with a glioblastoma and in 27% of the tumor cells from a patient with a recurrent irradiated anaplastic astrocytoma; in the latter case, 7 unrelated abnormal clones were identified except 4 of those clones shared a common change, -Y. Three similar cases have been described previously. In a patient with pleomorphic astrocytoma, the band 1q42 in both homologues of chromosome 1 was involved in two different rearrangements. A review of the literature revealed that deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 including 1q42 often occurs in glioma. This may indicate a possible tumor suppressor gene in this region. Cytogenetic follow-up studies were carried out in two patients and emergence of unrelated clones were noted in both. A total of 124 clonal breakpoints were identified in the 25 patients. The breakpoints which occurred three times or more were: 1p36, 1p22, 1q21, 1q25, 3q21, 7q32, 8q22, 9q22, 16q22, and 22q13.

  12. [Congenital foot abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Delpont, M; Lafosse, T; Bachy, M; Mary, P; Alves, A; Vialle, R

    2015-03-01

    The foot may be the site of birth defects. These abnormalities are sometimes suspected prenatally. Final diagnosis depends on clinical examination at birth. These deformations can be simple malpositions: metatarsus adductus, talipes calcaneovalgus and pes supinatus. The prognosis is excellent spontaneously or with a simple orthopedic treatment. Surgery remains outstanding. The use of a pediatric orthopedist will be considered if malposition does not relax after several weeks. Malformations (clubfoot, vertical talus and skew foot) require specialized care early. Clubfoot is characterized by an equine and varus hindfoot, an adducted and supine forefoot, not reducible. Vertical talus combines equine hindfoot and dorsiflexion of the forefoot, which is performed in the midfoot instead of the ankle. Skew foot is suspected when a metatarsus adductus is resistant to conservative treatment. Early treatment is primarily orthopedic at birth. Surgical treatment begins to be considered after walking age. Keep in mind that an abnormality of the foot may be associated with other conditions: malposition with congenital hip, malformations with syndromes, neurological and genetic abnormalities. PMID:25524290

  13. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  14. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) 4 from rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is a novel member inducing ROS accumulation and cell death.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Ye, Chaofei; Zhao, Rui; Li, Xin; Liu, Wu-zhen; Wu, Feifei; Yan, Jingli; Jiang, Yuan-Qing; Yang, Bo

    2015-11-27

    MAPKKK is the largest family of MAPK cascade, which is known to play important roles in plant growth, development and immune responses. So far, only a few have been functionally characterized even in the model plant, Arabidopsis due to the potential functional redundancy of MAPKKK. We previously identified and cloned a few MAPKKK family genes from rapeseed. In this study, BnaMAPKKK4 was characterized as a member in eliciting accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death. This is accompanied with accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), anthocyanin as well as nuclear DNA fragmentation. The transcript abundance of a series of ROS accumulation, cell death, and defense response related genes were up-regulated by the expression of MAPKKK4. Further investigation identified BnaMAPKKK4 elicited ROS through the downstream MPK3. These results indicate that BnaMAPKKK4 and its downstream components function in the ROS-induced cell death.

  15. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) 4 from rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is a novel member inducing ROS accumulation and cell death.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Ye, Chaofei; Zhao, Rui; Li, Xin; Liu, Wu-zhen; Wu, Feifei; Yan, Jingli; Jiang, Yuan-Qing; Yang, Bo

    2015-11-27

    MAPKKK is the largest family of MAPK cascade, which is known to play important roles in plant growth, development and immune responses. So far, only a few have been functionally characterized even in the model plant, Arabidopsis due to the potential functional redundancy of MAPKKK. We previously identified and cloned a few MAPKKK family genes from rapeseed. In this study, BnaMAPKKK4 was characterized as a member in eliciting accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death. This is accompanied with accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), anthocyanin as well as nuclear DNA fragmentation. The transcript abundance of a series of ROS accumulation, cell death, and defense response related genes were up-regulated by the expression of MAPKKK4. Further investigation identified BnaMAPKKK4 elicited ROS through the downstream MPK3. These results indicate that BnaMAPKKK4 and its downstream components function in the ROS-induced cell death. PMID:26498521

  16. Stomatocytosis, abnormal platelets and pseudo-homozygous hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed

    Stewart, G W; O'Brien, H; Morris, S A; Owen, J S; Lloyd, J K; Ames, J A

    1987-04-01

    A 13-yr-old girl with congenital haemolytic anaemia associated with pseudo-homozygous hypercholesterolaemia is described. The erythrocyte morphology showed 50-80% stomatocytes, but no abnormality of membrane lipid or protein composition or of cation transport was detected. The platelets were reduced in number, abnormally large and showed reduced adhesion. Successful treatment of the hypercholesterolaemia did not influence the stomatocytosis.

  17. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  18. [Nutritional abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gea, Joaquim; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-07-22

    Nutritional abnormalities are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a frequency ranging from 2 to 50%, depending on the geographical area and the study design. Diagnostic tools include anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, dual energy radioabsortiometry and deuterium dilution, being the body mass and the lean mass indices the most frequently used parameters. While the most important consequences of nutritional abnormalities are muscle dysfunction and exercise limitation, factors implicated include an imbalance between caloric intake and consumption, and between anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammation, tobacco smoking, poor physical activity, hypoxemia, some drugs and aging/comorbidities. The most important molecular mechanism for malnutrition associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be the mismatching between protein synthesis and breakdown. Among the therapeutic measures proposed for these nutritional abnormalities are improvements in lifestyle and nutritional support, although the use of anabolic drugs (such as secretagogues of the growth hormone) offers a new therapeutic strategy.

  19. [Nutritional abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gea, Joaquim; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-07-22

    Nutritional abnormalities are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a frequency ranging from 2 to 50%, depending on the geographical area and the study design. Diagnostic tools include anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, dual energy radioabsortiometry and deuterium dilution, being the body mass and the lean mass indices the most frequently used parameters. While the most important consequences of nutritional abnormalities are muscle dysfunction and exercise limitation, factors implicated include an imbalance between caloric intake and consumption, and between anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammation, tobacco smoking, poor physical activity, hypoxemia, some drugs and aging/comorbidities. The most important molecular mechanism for malnutrition associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be the mismatching between protein synthesis and breakdown. Among the therapeutic measures proposed for these nutritional abnormalities are improvements in lifestyle and nutritional support, although the use of anabolic drugs (such as secretagogues of the growth hormone) offers a new therapeutic strategy. PMID:24054776

  20. Minichromosome maintenance 2 and 5 expressions are increased in the epithelium of hereditary gingival fibromatosis associated with dental abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio; de Oliveira Santos, Carolina; Bonan, Paulo Rogério; de Figueiredo Moura, Paula; Bitu, Carolina Cavalcante; León, Jorge Esquiche; Coletta, Ricardo D

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Gingiva fibromatosis is a relatively rare condition characterized by diffuse enlargement of the gingiva, which is caused by expansion and accumulation of the connective tissue. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate proliferative and apoptotic biomarker expression in normal gingiva and two forms of gingival fibromatosis. METHODS: Archived tissue specimens of hereditary gingival fibromatosis, gingival fibromatosis and dental abnormality syndrome and normal gingiva were subject to morphological analysis and immunohistochemical staining. The results were analyzed statistically. RESULTS: Proteins associated with proliferation were found in the nuclei of epithelial cells from the basal and suprabasal layers, whereas apoptotic proteins were detected in the cytoplasm of the upper layers of the epithelium. Increased expressions of minichromosome maintenance proteins 2 and 5 were observed in the gingival fibromatosis and dental abnormality syndrome samples. In contrast, geminin expression was higher in normal gingiva samples. No difference in the expression of apoptotic proteins was observed among the groups. CONCLUSION: Our findings support a role for augmented proliferation of epithelial cells within the overgrown tissues associated with gingival fibromatosis or dental abnormality syndrome. However, our data suggest that different biological mechanisms may account for the pathogenesis of different types of gingival fibromatosis. PMID:21789376

  1. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  3. Abnormal ionization in sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Juan; An, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Sonoluminescence is a complex phenomenon, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The present study reveals that an abnormal ionization process is likely to be present in the sonoluminescing bubble. To fit the experimental data of previous studies, we assume that the ionization energies of the molecules and atoms in the bubble decrease as the gas density increases and that the decrease of the ionization energy reaches about 60%-70% as the bubble flashes, which is difficult to explain by using previous models. Project supported by the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Hig