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Sample records for abnormal signal intensity

  1. Cerebral signal intensity abnormalities on T2-weighted MR images in HIV patients with highly active antiretroviral therapy: relationship with clinical parameters and interval changes.

    PubMed

    Hanning, Uta; Husstedt, Ingo W; Niederstadt, Thomas-Ulrich; Evers, Stefan; Heindel, Walter; Kloska, Stephan P

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between immune state and cerebral signal intensity abnormalities (SIAs) on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images in subjects with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection and highly active antiretroviral therapy. Thirty-two subjects underwent a total of 109 magnetic resonance studies. The presence of human immunodeficiency virus-associated neurocognitive disorder, categorized CD4(+) T lymphocyte count, and plasma viral load were assessed for relationship with the severity and interval change of SIAs for different anatomic locations of the brain. Subjects with multifocal patterns of SIAs had CD4(+) cell counts < 200 cells/μL in 66.0%, whereas subjects with diffuse patterns of SIAs had CD4(+) cell counts < 200 cells/μL in only 31.4% (P < .001). Subjects without SIAs in the basal ganglia had CD4(+) cell counts < 200 cells/μL in 37.0%, whereas subjects with minor and moderate SIAs in the basal ganglia had CD4(+) cell counts < 200 cells/μL in 78.3% and 80.0%, respectively (P < .005). The percentage of subjects with CD4(+) cell counts < 200 cells/μL was 85.7% when there were progressive periventricular SIA changes and 45.5% when periventricular SIA changes were stable in follow-up (P < .05). The presence and progression of cerebral SIAs on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images reflecting cerebral infection with human immunodeficiency virus are significantly related to impaired immune state as measured by CD4(+) cell count. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery: correlations of hippocampal cell densities with signal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Diehl, B; Najm, I; Mohamed, A; Wyllie, E; Babb, T; Ying, Z; Hilbig, A; Bingaman, W; Lüders, H O; Ruggieri, P

    2001-09-25

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is characterized by hippocampal atrophy and increased signal on T2-weighted images and on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. To quantitate cell loss and compare it with signal abnormalities on FLAIR images. Thirty-one patients with temporal lobe resection, pathologically proven HS, and Engel class I and II outcome were included: 20 with HS only and 11 with HS associated with pathologically proven cortical dysplasia (dual pathology). The signal intensity on FLAIR was rated as present or absent in the hippocampus and correlated with the neuronal losses in the hippocampus. FLAIR signal increases were present in 77% (24/31) of all patients studied. In patients with isolated HS, 90% (18/20) had ipsilateral signal increases, but in patients with dual pathology, only 55% (6/11; p < 0.02) showed FLAIR signal increase. Hippocampal cell losses were significantly higher in the isolated HS group. The average cell loss in patients with FLAIR signal abnormalities was 64.8 +/- 8.0% as compared with only 32.7 +/- 5.1% in patients with no FLAIR signal abnormalities. There was a significant positive correlation between the presence of signal abnormality and average hippocampal cell loss in both pathologic groups. Ipsilateral FLAIR signal abnormalities occur in the majority of patients with isolated HS but are less frequent in those with dual pathology. The presence of increased FLAIR signal is correlated with higher hippocampal cell loss.

  3. Vascular signaling abnormalities in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Grammas, Paula; Sanchez, Alma; Tripathy, Debjani; Luo, Ester; Martinez, Joseph

    2011-08-01

    Our laboratory has documented that brain microvessels derived from patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) express or release a myriad of factors that have been implicated in vascular activation and angiogenesis. In addition, we have documented that signaling cascades associated with vascular activation and angiogenesis are upregulated in AD-derived brain microvessels. These results are consistent with emerging data suggesting that factors and processes characteristic of vascular activation and angiogenesis are found in the AD brain. Despite increases in proangiogenic factors and signals in the AD brain, however, evidence for increased vascularity in AD is lacking. Cerebral hypoperfusion/hypoxia, a potent stimulus for vascular activation and angiogenesis, triggers hypometabolic, cognitive, and degenerative changes in the brain. In our working model, hypoxia stimulates the angiogenic process; yet, there is no new vessel growth. Therefore, there are no feedback signals to shut off vascular activation, and endothelial cells become irreversibly activated. This activation results in release of a large number of proteases, inflammatory proteins, and other gene products with biologic activity that can injure or kill neurons. Pathologic activation of brain vasculature may contribute noxious mediators that lead to neuronal injury and disease processes in AD brains. This concept is supported by preliminary experiments in our laboratory, which show that pharmacologic blockade of vascular activation improves cognitive function in an animal model of AD. Thus, "vascular activation" could be a novel, unexplored therapeutic target in AD.

  4. Abnormal environmental light exposure in the intensive care environment.

    PubMed

    Fan, Emily P; Abbott, Sabra M; Reid, Kathryn J; Zee, Phyllis C; Maas, Matthew B

    2017-08-01

    We sought to characterize ambient light exposure in the intensive care unit (ICU) environment to identify patterns of light exposure relevant to circadian regulation. A light monitor was affixed to subjects' bed at eye level in a modern intensive care unit and continuously recorded illuminescence for at least 24h per subject. Blood was sampled hourly and measured for plasma melatonin. Subjects underwent hourly vital sign and bedside neurologic assessments. Care protocols and the ICU environment were not modified for the study. A total of 67,324 30-second epochs of light data were collected from 17 subjects. Light intensity peaked in the late morning, median 64.1 (interquartile range 19.7-138.7) lux. The 75th percentile of light intensity exceeded 100lx only between 9AM and noon, and never exceeded 150lx. There was no correlation between melatonin amplitude and daytime, nighttime or total light exposure (Spearman's correlation coefficients all <0.2 and p>0.5). Patients' environmental light exposure in the intensive care unit is consistently low and follows a diurnal pattern. No effect of nighttime light exposure was observed on melatonin secretion. Inadequate daytime light exposure in the ICU may contribute to abnormal circadian rhythms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Oxidative and inflammatory signals in obesity-associated vascular abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Reho, John J; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2017-07-15

    Obesity is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in part due to vascular abnormalities such as endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffening. The hypertension and other health complications that arise from these vascular defects increase the risk of heart diseases and stroke. Prooxidant and proinflammatory signaling pathways as well as adipocyte-derived factors have emerged as critical mediators of obesity-associated vascular abnormalities. Designing treatments aimed specifically at improving the vascular dysfunction caused by obesity may provide an effective therapeutic approach to prevent the cardiovascular sequelae associated with excessive adiposity. In this review, we discuss the recent evidence supporting the role of oxidative stress and cytokines and inflammatory signals within the vasculature as well as the impact of the surrounding perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) on the regulation of vascular function and arterial stiffening in obesity. In particular, we focus on the highly plastic nature of the vasculature in response to altered oxidant and inflammatory signaling and highlight how weight management can be an effective therapeutic approach to reduce the oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling and improve vascular function. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  6. 33 CFR 86.21 - Intensity of signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intensity of signal. 86.21... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX III: TECHNICAL DETAILS OF SOUND SIGNAL APPLIANCES Bell or Gong § 86.21 Intensity of signal. A bell or gong, or other device having similar sound characteristics shall produce a sound...

  7. 33 CFR 86.21 - Intensity of signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intensity of signal. 86.21... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX III: TECHNICAL DETAILS OF SOUND SIGNAL APPLIANCES Bell or Gong § 86.21 Intensity of signal. A bell or gong, or other device having similar sound characteristics shall produce a sound...

  8. 33 CFR 86.21 - Intensity of signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intensity of signal. 86.21... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX III: TECHNICAL DETAILS OF SOUND SIGNAL APPLIANCES Bell or Gong § 86.21 Intensity of signal. A bell or gong, or other device having similar sound characteristics shall produce a sound...

  9. 33 CFR 86.21 - Intensity of signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intensity of signal. 86.21... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX III: TECHNICAL DETAILS OF SOUND SIGNAL APPLIANCES Bell or Gong § 86.21 Intensity of signal. A bell or gong, or other device having similar sound characteristics shall produce a sound...

  10. 33 CFR 86.21 - Intensity of signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intensity of signal. 86.21... NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX III: TECHNICAL DETAILS OF SOUND SIGNAL APPLIANCES Bell or Gong § 86.21 Intensity of signal. A bell or gong, or other device having similar sound characteristics shall produce a sound...

  11. Abnormal electrocardiographic findings in athletes: Correlation with intensity of sport and level of competition.

    PubMed

    Dores, Hélder; Malhotra, Aneil; Sheikh, Nabeel; Millar, Lynne; Dhutia, Harshil; Narain, Rajay; Merghani, Ahmed; Papadakis, Michael; Sharma, Sanjay

    2016-11-01

    Athletes can exhibit abnormal electrocardiogram (ECG) phenotypes that require further evaluation prior to competition. These are apparently more prevalent in high-intensity endurance sports. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between ECG findings in athletes and intensity of sport and level of competition. A cohort of 3423 competitive athletes had their ECGs assessed according to the Seattle criteria (SC). The presence of abnormal ECGs was correlated with: (1) intensity of sport (low/moderate vs. at least one high static or dynamic component); (2) competitive level (regional vs. national/international); (3) training volume (≤20 vs. >20 hours/week); (4) type of sport (high dynamic vs. high static component). The same endpoints were studied according to the 'Refined Criteria' (RC). Abnormal ECGs according to the SC were present in 225 (6.6%) athletes, more frequently in those involved in high-intensity sports (8.0% vs. 5.4%; p=0.002), particularly in dynamic sports, and competing at national/international level (7.1% vs. 4.9%; p=0.028). Training volume was not significantly associated with abnormal ECGs. By multivariate analysis, high-intensity sport (OR 1.55, 1.18-2.03; p=0.002) and national/international level (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.04-2.14; p=0.027) were independent predictors of abnormal ECGs, and these variables, when combined, doubled the prevalence of this finding. According to the RC, abnormal ECGs decreased to 103 (3.0%), but were also more frequent in high-intensity sports (4.2% vs. 2.0%; p<0.001). There is a positive correlation between higher intensity of sports and increased prevalence of ECG abnormalities. This relationship persists with the use of more restrictive criteria for ECG interpretation, although the number of abnormal ECGs is lower. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Signal intensity influences on the atomic Faraday filter.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Yin, Longfei; Xiong, Junyu; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2018-06-01

    Previous studies of the Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) mainly focus on the weak signal light filtering, without regard for the influences of the signal light intensity on the filter itself. However, in some applications the signal light is strong enough to change the filter's performance. In this work, the influences of the signal light intensity on the transmittance spectrum is experimentally investigated in a 780 nm Rb85 FADOF in both the line-center and wings operation modes. The results show that the transmittance spectrum varies significantly with the signal light intensity. As the signal light increases, some existing transmittance peaks decline, some new transmittance peaks appear, and the maximum transmittance peak frequency may change. The spectrum in strong signal lights can be quite different from those calculated by programs in the condition of weak signal lights. These results are important for applications of the FADOF in the condition of strong signal lights.

  13. Extraction of ECG signal with adaptive filter for hearth abnormalities detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnip, Mardi; Saragih, Rijois. I. E.; Dharma, Abdi; Esti Kusumandari, Dwi; Turnip, Arjon; Sitanggang, Delima; Aisyah, Siti

    2018-04-01

    This paper demonstrates an adaptive filter method for extraction ofelectrocardiogram (ECG) feature in hearth abnormalities detection. In particular, electrocardiogram (ECG) is a recording of the heart's electrical activity by capturing a tracingof cardiac electrical impulse as it moves from the atrium to the ventricles. The applied algorithm is to evaluate and analyze ECG signals for abnormalities detection based on P, Q, R and S peaks. In the first phase, the real-time ECG data is acquired and pre-processed. In the second phase, the procured ECG signal is subjected to feature extraction process. The extracted features detect abnormal peaks present in the waveform. Thus the normal and abnormal ECG signal could be differentiated based on the features extracted.

  14. Wavelet-based characterization of gait signal for neurological abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Baratin, E; Sugavaneswaran, L; Umapathy, K; Ioana, C; Krishnan, S

    2015-02-01

    Studies conducted by the World Health Organization (WHO) indicate that over one billion suffer from neurological disorders worldwide, and lack of efficient diagnosis procedures affects their therapeutic interventions. Characterizing certain pathologies of motor control for facilitating their diagnosis can be useful in quantitatively monitoring disease progression and efficient treatment planning. As a suitable directive, we introduce a wavelet-based scheme for effective characterization of gait associated with certain neurological disorders. In addition, since the data were recorded from a dynamic process, this work also investigates the need for gait signal re-sampling prior to identification of signal markers in the presence of pathologies. To benefit automated discrimination of gait data, certain characteristic features are extracted from the wavelet-transformed signals. The performance of the proposed approach was evaluated using a database consisting of 15 Parkinson's disease (PD), 20 Huntington's disease (HD), 13 Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 16 healthy control subjects, and an average classification accuracy of 85% is achieved using an unbiased cross-validation strategy. The obtained results demonstrate the potential of the proposed methodology for computer-aided diagnosis and automatic characterization of certain neurological disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Congenitally learned helpless rats show abnormalities in intracellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Kohen, Ruth; Neumaier, John F; Hamblin, Mark W; Edwards, Emmeline

    2003-03-15

    Affective disorders and the drugs used to treat them lead to changes in intracellular signaling. We used a genetic animal model to investigate to what extent changes in intracellular signal transduction confer a vulnerability to mood or anxiety disorders. Levels of gene expression in a selectively bred strain of rats with a high vulnerability to develop congenitally learned helplessness (cLH), a strain highly resistant to the same behavior (cNLH) and outbred Sprague-Dawley (SD) control animals were compared using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Congenitally learned helpless animals had a 24%-30% reduced expression of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in the hippocampus and a 40%-41% increased level of the antiapoptotic protein bcl-2 mRNA in the prefrontal cortex compared to cNLH and SD rats. Other significant changes included changes in the expression levels of the alpha catalytic subunit of protein kinase A, glycogen synthase kinase 3beta, and protein kinase C epsilon. Congenitally learned helpless animals show evidence of altered signal transduction and regulation of apoptosis compared to cNLH and SD control animals.

  16. Quantifying facial expression signal and intensity use during development.

    PubMed

    Rodger, Helen; Lao, Junpeng; Caldara, Roberto

    2018-06-12

    Behavioral studies investigating facial expression recognition during development have applied various methods to establish by which age emotional expressions can be recognized. Most commonly, these methods employ static images of expressions at their highest intensity (apex) or morphed expressions of different intensities, but they have not previously been compared. Our aim was to (a) quantify the intensity and signal use for recognition of six emotional expressions from early childhood to adulthood and (b) compare both measures and assess their functional relationship to better understand the use of different measures across development. Using a psychophysical approach, we isolated the quantity of signal necessary to recognize an emotional expression at full intensity and the quantity of expression intensity (using neutral expression image morphs of varying intensities) necessary for each observer to recognize the six basic emotions while maintaining performance at 75%. Both measures revealed that fear and happiness were the most difficult and easiest expressions to recognize across age groups, respectively, a pattern already stable during early childhood. The quantity of signal and intensity needed to recognize sad, angry, disgust, and surprise expressions decreased with age. Using a Bayesian update procedure, we then reconstructed the response profiles for both measures. This analysis revealed that intensity and signal processing are similar only during adulthood and, therefore, cannot be straightforwardly compared during development. Altogether, our findings offer novel methodological and theoretical insights and tools for the investigation of the developing affective system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Disruption of Axonal Transport Perturbs Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) - Signaling and Contributes to Synaptic Abnormalities in Two Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min Jung; Hansen, Timothy J.; Mickiewicz, Monique; Kaczynski, Tadeusz J.; Fye, Samantha; Gunawardena, Shermali

    2014-01-01

    Formation of new synapses or maintenance of existing synapses requires the delivery of synaptic components from the soma to the nerve termini via axonal transport. One pathway that is important in synapse formation, maintenance and function of the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-signaling pathway. Here we show that perturbations in axonal transport directly disrupt BMP signaling, as measured by its downstream signal, phospho Mad (p-Mad). We found that components of the BMP pathway genetically interact with both kinesin-1 and dynein motor proteins. Thick vein (TKV) vesicle motility was also perturbed by reductions in kinesin-1 or dynein motors. Interestingly, dynein mutations severely disrupted p-Mad signaling while kinesin-1 mutants showed a mild reduction in p-Mad signal intensity. Similar to mutants in components of the BMP pathway, both kinesin-1 and dynein motor protein mutants also showed synaptic morphological defects. Strikingly TKV motility and p-Mad signaling were disrupted in larvae expressing two human disease proteins; expansions of glutamine repeats (polyQ77) and human amyloid precursor protein (APP) with a familial Alzheimer's disease (AD) mutation (APPswe). Consistent with axonal transport defects, larvae expressing these disease proteins showed accumulations of synaptic proteins along axons and synaptic abnormalities. Taken together our results suggest that similar to the NGF-TrkA signaling endosome, a BMP signaling endosome that directly interacts with molecular motors likely exist. Thus problems in axonal transport occurs early, perturbs BMP signaling, and likely contributes to the synaptic abnormalities observed in these two diseases. PMID:25127478

  18. Extraction of fault component from abnormal sound in diesel engines using acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayong, Ning; Changle, Sun; Yongjun, Gong; Zengmeng, Zhang; Jiaoyi, Hou

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a method for extracting fault components from abnormal acoustic signals and automatically diagnosing diesel engine faults is presented. The method named dislocation superimposed method (DSM) is based on the improved random decrement technique (IRDT), differential function (DF) and correlation analysis (CA). The aim of DSM is to linearly superpose multiple segments of abnormal acoustic signals because of the waveform similarity of faulty components. The method uses sample points at the beginning of time when abnormal sound appears as the starting position for each segment. In this study, the abnormal sound belonged to shocking faulty type; thus, the starting position searching method based on gradient variance was adopted. The coefficient of similar degree between two same sized signals is presented. By comparing with a similar degree, the extracted fault component could be judged automatically. The results show that this method is capable of accurately extracting the fault component from abnormal acoustic signals induced by faulty shocking type and the extracted component can be used to identify the fault type.

  19. Impact of depression on the intensity of patient navigation for women with abnormal cancer screenings.

    PubMed

    De La Cruz, Ignacio I; Freund, Karen M; Battaglia, Tracy A; Chen, Clara A; Bak, Sharon; Kalish, Richard; Lottero, Barbara; Egan, Patrick; Heeren, Tim; Kronman, Andrea C

    2014-02-01

    Patient navigation is increasingly being used to support vulnerable patients to receive timely and quality medical care. We sought to understand whether patients with depression utilize additional patient navigation services after abnormal cancer screening. We compared depressed and non-depressed women using three different measures of intensity of patient navigation: number of patient-navigator encounters, encounter time, and number of unique barriers to care. The study population consisted of 1,455 women who received navigation after abnormal screening for breast or cervical cancer at one of six community health centers in Boston. Navigators spent a median of 60-75 minutes over one or two encounters per participant, with 49% of participants having one or more documented barrier to care. Depressed women did not differ in total numbers of encounters, encounter time, or unique barriers compared with non-depressed women. Our findings suggest that pre-existing depression does not predict which women will utilize additional navigation services.

  20. Signal intensity enhancement of laser ablated volume holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versnel, J. M.; Williams, C.; Davidson, C. A. B.; Wilkinson, T. D.; Lowe, C. R.

    2017-11-01

    Conventional volume holographic gratings (VHGs) fabricated in photosensitive emulsions such as gelatin containing silver salts enable the facile visualization of the holographic image in ambient lighting. However, for the fabrication of holographic sensors, which require more defined and chemically-functionalised polymer matrices, laser ablation has been introduced to create the VHGs and thereby broaden their applications, although the replay signal can be challenging to detect in ambient lighting. When traditional photochemical bleaching solutions used to reduce light scattering and modulate refractive index within the VHG are applied to laser ablated volume holographic gratings, these procedures decrease the holographic peak intensity. This is postulated to occur because both light and dark fringes contain a proportion of metal particles, which upon solubilisation are converted immediately to silver iodide, yielding no net refractive index modulation. This research advances a hypothesis that the reduced intensity of holographic replay signals is linked to a gradient of different sized metal particles within the emulsion, which reduces the holographic signal and may explain why traditional bleaching processes result in a reduction in intensity. In this report, a novel experimental protocol is provided, along with simulations based on an effective medium periodic 1D stack, that offers a solution to increase peak signal intensity of holographic sensors by greater than 200%. Nitric acid is used to etch the silver nanoparticles within the polymer matrix and is thought to remove the smaller particles to generate more defined metal fringes containing a soluble metal salt. Once the grating efficiency has been increased, this salt can be converted to a silver halide, to modulate the refractive index and increase the intensity of the holographic signal. This new protocol has been tested in a range of polymer chemistries; those containing functional groups that help to

  1. Ultrastructural brain abnormalities and associated behavioral changes in mice after low-intensity blast exposure.

    PubMed

    Song, Hailong; Konan, Landry M; Cui, Jiankun; Johnson, Catherine E; Langenderfer, Martin; Grant, DeAna; Ndam, Tina; Simonyi, Agnes; White, Tommi; Demirci, Utkan; Mott, David R; Schwer, Doug; Hubler, Graham K; Cernak, Ibolja; DePalma, Ralph G; Gu, Zezong

    2018-07-16

    Explosive blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), a "signature wound" of recent military conflicts, commonly affects service members. While past blast injury studies have provided insights into TBI with moderate- to high-intensity explosions, the impact of primary low-intensity blast (LIB)-mediated pathobiology on neurological deficits requires further investigation. Our prior considerations of blast physics predicted ultrastructural injuries at nanoscale levels. Here, we provide quantitative data using a primary LIB injury murine model exposed to open field detonation of 350 g of high-energy explosive C4. We quantified ultrastructural and behavioral changes up to 30 days post blast injury (DPI). The use of an open-field experimental blast generated a primary blast wave with a peak overpressure of 6.76 PSI (46.6 kPa) at a 3-m distance from the center of the explosion, a positive phase duration of approximate 3.0 milliseconds (ms), a maximal impulse of 8.7 PSI × ms and a sharp rising time of 9 × 10 -3  ms, with no apparent impact/acceleration in exposed animals. Neuropathologically, myelinated axonal damage was observed in blast-exposed groups at 7 DPI. Using transmission electron microscopy, we observed and quantified myelin sheath defects and mitochondrial abnormalities at 7 and 30 DPI. Inverse correlations between blast intensities and neurobehavioral outcomes including motor activities, anxiety levels, nesting behavior, spatial learning and memory occurred. These observations uncover unique ultrastructural brain abnormalities and associated behavioral changes due to primary blast injury and provide key insights into its pathogenesis and potential treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Meclozine Facilitates Proliferation and Differentiation of Chondrocytes by Attenuating Abnormally Activated FGFR3 Signaling in Achondroplasia

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Masaki; Kitoh, Hiroshi; Ohkawara, Bisei; Mishima, Kenichi; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2013-01-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH) is one of the most common skeletal dysplasias with short stature caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGFR3 encoding the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3. We used the drug repositioning strategy to identify an FDA-approved drug that suppresses abnormally activated FGFR3 signaling in ACH. We found that meclozine, an anti-histamine drug that has long been used for motion sickness, facilitates chondrocyte proliferation and mitigates loss of extracellular matrix in FGF2-treated rat chondrosarcoma (RCS) cells. Meclozine also ameliorated abnormally suppressed proliferation of human chondrosarcoma (HCS-2/8) cells that were infected with lentivirus expressing constitutively active mutants of FGFR3-K650E causing thanatophoric dysplasia, FGFR3-K650M causing SADDAN, and FGFR3-G380R causing ACH. Similarly, meclozine alleviated abnormally suppressed differentiation of ATDC5 chondrogenic cells expressing FGFR3-K650E and -G380R in micromass culture. We also confirmed that meclozine alleviates FGF2-mediated longitudinal growth inhibition of embryonic tibia in bone explant culture. Interestingly, meclozine enhanced growth of embryonic tibia in explant culture even in the absence of FGF2 treatment. Analyses of intracellular FGFR3 signaling disclosed that meclozine downregulates phosphorylation of ERK but not of MEK in FGF2-treated RCS cells. Similarly, meclozine enhanced proliferation of RCS cells expressing constitutively active mutants of MEK and RAF but not of ERK, which suggests that meclozine downregulates the FGFR3 signaling by possibly attenuating ERK phosphorylation. We used the C-natriuretic peptide (CNP) as a potent inhibitor of the FGFR3 signaling throughout our experiments, and found that meclozine was as efficient as CNP in attenuating the abnormal FGFR3 signaling. We propose that meclozine is a potential therapeutic agent for treating ACH and other FGFR3-related skeletal dysplasias. PMID:24324705

  3. Resolution of abnormal cardiac MRI T2 signal following immune suppression for cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Crouser, Elliott D; Ruden, Emily; Julian, Mark W; Raman, Subha V

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac MR (CMR) with late gadolinium enhancement is commonly used to detect cardiac damage in the setting of cardiac sarcoidosis. The addition of T2 mapping to CMR was recently shown to enhance cardiac sarcoidosis detection and correlates with increased cardiac arrhythmia risk. This study was conducted to determine if CMR T2 abnormalities and related arrhythmias are reversible following immune suppression therapy. A retrospective study of subjects with cardiac sarcoidosis with abnormal T2 signal on baseline CMR and a follow-up CMR study at least 4 months later was conducted at The Ohio State University from 2011 to 2015. Immune suppression treated participants had a significant reduction in peak myocardial T2 value (70.0±5.5 vs 59.2±6.1 ms, pretreatment vs post-treatment; p=0.017), and 83% of immune suppression treated subjects had objective improvement in cardiac arrhythmias. Two subjects who had received inadequate immune suppression treatment experienced progression of cardiac sarcoidosis. This report indicates that abnormal CMR T2 signal represents an acute inflammatory manifestation of cardiac sarcoidosis that is potentially reversible with adequate immune suppression therapy. Copyright © 2016 American Federation for Medical Research.

  4. Evolution of Intrameniscal Signal-Intensity Alterations Detected on MRI Over 24 Months in Patients With Traumatic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear.

    PubMed

    Guimaraes, Julio Brandao; Facchetti, Luca; Schwaiger, Benedikt J; Gersing, Alexandra S; Majumdar, Sharmila; Ma, Benjamin C; Li, Xiaojuan; Link, Thomas M

    2017-02-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the prevalence and evolution of intrameniscal signal-intensity alteration in subjects with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear over 24 months and compare clinical outcome and changes of cartilage between subjects with and those without this meniscal abnormality. Fifty-seven subjects with an ACL tear were screened for intrameniscal signal-intensity alteration. Morphologic and compositional MRI was performed before ACL reconstruction and 12 and 24 months after ACL reconstruction. Twelve subjects with an intrameniscal signal-intensity alteration and 12 subjects without any meniscal abnormality on MRI were identified. Clinical outcome was measured using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and T1ρ and T2 maps of the cartilage were obtained. In 10 of 12 subjects (83%) the meniscal signal-intensity abnormality identified on baseline MRI was located at the posterior horn of the medial meniscus. None of these subjects presented with a meniscal tear over 24 months of follow-up. At 12 months after the ACL tear, the intrameniscal signal-intensity alteration detected on baseline MRI had completely resolved in seven of 12 subjects (58%), showed a signal-intensity decrease in four (33%), and remained stable in one subject (8%). Of the 10 subjects who underwent MRI at 24 months, the meniscal signal-intensity alteration had completely resolved in eight (80%), and the signal intensity had decreased in the other two subjects. Changes in the KOOS and cartilage T1ρ and T2 values from baseline and 24 months did not differ significantly between subjects with and those without intrameniscal signal-intensity alteration (p > 0.05). High intrameniscal signal-intensity alterations are a common finding in subjects with an ACL tear and have a benign course over 24 months after surgical repair of the ACL tear.

  5. Compressive sensing-based electrostatic sensor array signal processing and exhausted abnormal debris detecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xin; Chen, Zhongsheng; Li, Yue; Yang, Yongmin

    2018-05-01

    When faults happen at gas path components of gas turbines, some sparsely-distributed and charged debris will be generated and released into the exhaust gas. The debris is called abnormal debris. Electrostatic sensors can detect the debris online and further indicate the faults. It is generally considered that, under a specific working condition, a more serious fault generates more and larger debris, and a piece of larger debris carries more charge. Therefore, the amount and charge of the abnormal debris are important indicators of the fault severity. However, because an electrostatic sensor can only detect the superposed effect on the electrostatic field of all the debris, it can hardly identify the amount and position of the debris. Moreover, because signals of electrostatic sensors depend on not only charge but also position of debris, and the position information is difficult to acquire, measuring debris charge accurately using the electrostatic detecting method is still a technical difficulty. To solve these problems, a hemisphere-shaped electrostatic sensors' circular array (HSESCA) is used, and an array signal processing method based on compressive sensing (CS) is proposed in this paper. To research in a theoretical framework of CS, the measurement model of the HSESCA is discretized into a sparse representation form by meshing. In this way, the amount and charge of the abnormal debris are described as a sparse vector. It is further reconstructed by constraining l1-norm when solving an underdetermined equation. In addition, a pre-processing method based on singular value decomposition and a result calibration method based on weighted-centroid algorithm are applied to ensure the accuracy of the reconstruction. The proposed method is validated by both numerical simulations and experiments. Reconstruction errors, characteristics of the results and some related factors are discussed.

  6. iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes reveal abnormal TGFβ signaling in left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kodo, Kazuki; Ong, Sang-Ging; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Termglinchan, Vittavat; Hirono, Keiichi; InanlooRahatloo, Kolsoum; Ebert, Antje D.; Shukla, Praveen; Abilez, Oscar J.; Churko, Jared M.; Karakikes, Ioannis; Jung, Gwanghyun; Ichida, Fukiko; Wu, Sean M.; Snyder, Michael P.; Bernstein, Daniel; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC) is the third most prevalent cardiomyopathy in children and its pathogenesis has been associated with the developmental defect of the embryonic myocardium. We show that patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) generated from LVNC patients carrying a mutation in the cardiac transcription factor TBX20 recapitulate a key aspect of the pathological phenotype at the single-cell level and was associated with perturbed transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling. LVNC iPSC-CMs have decreased proliferative capacity due to abnormal activation of TGFβ signaling. TBX20 regulates the expression of TGFβ signaling modifiers including a known genetic cause of LVNC, PRDM16, and genome editing of PRDM16 caused proliferation defects in iPSC-CMs. Inhibition of TGFβ signaling and genome correction of the TBX20 mutation were sufficient to reverse the disease phenotype. Our study demonstrates that iPSC-CMs are a useful tool for the exploration of pathological mechanisms underlying poorly understood cardiomyopathies including LVNC. PMID:27642787

  7. Early Standard Electroencephalogram Abnormalities Predict Mortality in Septic Intensive Care Unit Patients.

    PubMed

    Azabou, Eric; Magalhaes, Eric; Braconnier, Antoine; Yahiaoui, Lyria; Moneger, Guy; Heming, Nicholas; Annane, Djillali; Mantz, Jean; Chrétien, Fabrice; Durand, Marie-Christine; Lofaso, Frédéric; Porcher, Raphael; Sharshar, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is associated with increased mortality, delirium and long-term cognitive impairment in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities occurring at the acute stage of sepsis may correlate with severity of brain dysfunction. Predictive value of early standard EEG abnormalities for mortality in ICU septic patients remains to be assessed. In this prospective, single center, observational study, standard EEG was performed, analyzed and classified according to both Synek and Young EEG scales, in consecutive patients acutely admitted in ICU for sepsis. Delirium, coma and the level of sedation were assessed at the time of EEG recording; and duration of sedation, occurrence of in-ICU delirium or death were assessed during follow-up. Adjusted analyses were carried out using multiple logistic regression. One hundred ten patients were included, mean age 63.8 (±18.1) years, median SAPS-II score 38 (29-55). At the time of EEG recording, 46 patients (42%) were sedated and 22 (20%) suffered from delirium. Overall, 54 patients (49%) developed delirium, of which 32 (29%) in the days after EEG recording. 23 (21%) patients died in the ICU. Absence of EEG reactivity was observed in 27 patients (25%), periodic discharges (PDs) in 21 (19%) and electrographic seizures (ESZ) in 17 (15%). ICU mortality was independently associated with a delta-predominant background (OR: 3.36; 95% CI [1.08 to 10.4]), absence of EEG reactivity (OR: 4.44; 95% CI [1.37-14.3], PDs (OR: 3.24; 95% CI [1.03 to 10.2]), Synek grade ≥ 3 (OR: 5.35; 95% CI [1.66-17.2]) and Young grade > 1 (OR: 3.44; 95% CI [1.09-10.8]) after adjustment to Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS-II) at admission and level of sedation. Delirium at the time of EEG was associated with ESZ in non-sedated patients (32% vs 10%, p = 0.037); with Synek grade ≥ 3 (36% vs 7%, p< 0.05) and Young grade > 1 (36% vs 17%, p< 0.001). Occurrence of delirium in the days after EEG was associated with a delta

  8. Early Standard Electroencephalogram Abnormalities Predict Mortality in Septic Intensive Care Unit Patients

    PubMed Central

    Azabou, Eric; Magalhaes, Eric; Braconnier, Antoine; Yahiaoui, Lyria; Moneger, Guy; Heming, Nicholas; Annane, Djillali; Mantz, Jean; Chrétien, Fabrice; Durand, Marie-Christine; Lofaso, Frédéric; Porcher, Raphael; Sharshar, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is associated with increased mortality, delirium and long-term cognitive impairment in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities occurring at the acute stage of sepsis may correlate with severity of brain dysfunction. Predictive value of early standard EEG abnormalities for mortality in ICU septic patients remains to be assessed. Methods In this prospective, single center, observational study, standard EEG was performed, analyzed and classified according to both Synek and Young EEG scales, in consecutive patients acutely admitted in ICU for sepsis. Delirium, coma and the level of sedation were assessed at the time of EEG recording; and duration of sedation, occurrence of in-ICU delirium or death were assessed during follow-up. Adjusted analyses were carried out using multiple logistic regression. Results One hundred ten patients were included, mean age 63.8 (±18.1) years, median SAPS-II score 38 (29–55). At the time of EEG recording, 46 patients (42%) were sedated and 22 (20%) suffered from delirium. Overall, 54 patients (49%) developed delirium, of which 32 (29%) in the days after EEG recording. 23 (21%) patients died in the ICU. Absence of EEG reactivity was observed in 27 patients (25%), periodic discharges (PDs) in 21 (19%) and electrographic seizures (ESZ) in 17 (15%). ICU mortality was independently associated with a delta-predominant background (OR: 3.36; 95% CI [1.08 to 10.4]), absence of EEG reactivity (OR: 4.44; 95% CI [1.37–14.3], PDs (OR: 3.24; 95% CI [1.03 to 10.2]), Synek grade ≥ 3 (OR: 5.35; 95% CI [1.66–17.2]) and Young grade > 1 (OR: 3.44; 95% CI [1.09–10.8]) after adjustment to Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS-II) at admission and level of sedation. Delirium at the time of EEG was associated with ESZ in non-sedated patients (32% vs 10%, p = 0.037); with Synek grade ≥ 3 (36% vs 7%, p< 0.05) and Young grade > 1 (36% vs 17%, p< 0.001). Occurrence of delirium in the days after

  9. Mathematical models for the diffusion magnetic resonance signal abnormality in patients with prion diseases.

    PubMed

    Figini, Matteo; Alexander, Daniel C; Redaelli, Veronica; Fasano, Fabrizio; Grisoli, Marina; Baselli, Giuseppe; Gambetti, Pierluigi; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Bizzi, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice signal hyperintensity in the cortex and/or in the striatum on magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted images (DWIs) is a marker of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (sCJD). MR diagnostic accuracy is greater than 90%, but the biophysical mechanisms underpinning the signal abnormality are unknown. The aim of this prospective study is to combine an advanced DWI protocol with new mathematical models of the microstructural changes occurring in prion disease patients to investigate the cause of MR signal alterations. This underpins the later development of more sensitive and specific image-based biomarkers. DWI data with a wide a range of echo times and diffusion weightings were acquired in 15 patients with suspected diagnosis of prion disease and in 4 healthy age-matched subjects. Clinical diagnosis of sCJD was made in nine patients, genetic CJD in one, rapidly progressive encephalopathy in three, and Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome in two. Data were analysed with two bi-compartment models that represent different hypotheses about the histopathological alterations responsible for the DWI signal hyperintensity. A ROI-based analysis was performed in 13 grey matter areas located in affected and apparently unaffected regions from patients and healthy subjects. We provide for the first time non-invasive estimate of the restricted compartment radius, designed to reflect vacuole size, which is a key discriminator of sCJD subtypes. The estimated vacuole size in DWI hyperintense cortex was in the range between 3 and 10 µm that is compatible with neuropathology measurements. In DWI hyperintense grey matter of sCJD patients the two bi-compartment models outperform the classic mono-exponential ADC model. Both new models show that T2 relaxation times significantly increase, fast and slow diffusivities reduce, and the fraction of the compartment with slow/restricted diffusion increases compared to unaffected grey matter of patients and healthy

  10. Brain MRI signal abnormalities and right-to-left shunting in asymptomatic military divers.

    PubMed

    Gempp, Emmanuel; Sbardella, Fabrice; Stephant, Eric; Constantin, Pascal; De Maistre, Sebastien; Louge, Pierre; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2010-11-01

    We conducted a controlled study to assess the prevalence of brain MRI hyperintense signals and their correlation with right-to-left shunting (RLS) in military divers. We prospectively enrolled 32 asymptomatic military divers under 41 yr of age and 32 non-diving healthy subjects matched with respect to age and vascular disease risk factors. We examined both groups with a 3-Tesla brain MRI; RLS was detected using transcranial pulsed Doppler in divers only. Hyperintense spots were observed in 43.7% of the divers and 21.8% of the control subjects. In particular, divers with significant shunting exhibited a higher prevalence of hyperintensities compared to those with slight or no RLS (75% vs. 25%, respectively). Linear trend analysis also revealed a positive correlation between focal white matter changes, determined using a validated visual rating scale and the RLS grade. Healthy military divers with a hemodynamically relevant RLS have an increased likelihood of cerebral hyperintense spots compared to age-matched normal subjects. The clinical relevance of these MRI signal abnormalities and their causal relationship with diving remain unclear.

  11. Signal intensity on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images of condylar marrow changes correspond with slight pain in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Sayaka; Otonari-Yamamoto, Mika; Sano, Tsukasa; Sakamoto, Junichirou; Imoto, Kenichi; Wakoh, Mamoru

    2014-01-01

    Edema and necrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) have been described in terms of bone marrow signal abnormalities in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, painful joints often show no such signaling abnormalities, making the diagnosis of TMJ disorders difficult in the clinical setting. An association has been suggested between TMJ bone marrow change and TMJ pain, but even when such change results in slight pain, it may be too slight to be visually apparent on MR images. We hypothesized that fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) can be used to detect such minimal changes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is an association between signal intensity on FLAIR images and pain in the TMJ. The study included 85 TMJs in 45 patients referred to our department for MRI. The signal intensity on FLAIR images was measured. Pain was evaluated based on the visual analog scale. An unpaired t test and Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient were used for the statistical analysis. A p value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Signal intensity on the FLAIR images was significantly higher in painful than in nonpainful TMJs, although a significant correlation was not observed between the signal intensity and the pain score. The results of this study suggest an association between abnormalities in the marrow of the mandibular condyle and pain. They also indicate that FLAIR imaging is a useful tool in the clinical diagnosis of painful TMJs.

  12. Sizing gaseous emboli using Doppler embolic signal intensity.

    PubMed

    Banahan, Caroline; Hague, James P; Evans, David H; Patel, Rizwan; Ramnarine, Kumar V; Chung, Emma M L

    2012-05-01

    Extension of transcranial Doppler embolus detection to estimation of bubble size has historically been hindered by difficulties in applying scattering theory to the interpretation of clinical data. This article presents a simplified approach to the sizing of air emboli based on analysis of Doppler embolic signal intensity, by using an approximation to the full scattering theory that can be solved to estimate embolus size. Tests using simulated emboli show that our algorithm is theoretically capable of sizing 90% of "emboli" to within 10% of their true radius. In vitro tests show that 69% of emboli can be sized to within 20% of their true value under ideal conditions, which reduces to 30% of emboli if the beam and vessel are severely misaligned. Our results demonstrate that estimation of bubble size during clinical monitoring could be used to distinguish benign microbubbles from potentially harmful macrobubbles during intraoperative clinical monitoring. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 33 CFR 86.05 - Sound signal intensity and range of audibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sound signal intensity and range... HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX III: TECHNICAL DETAILS OF SOUND SIGNAL APPLIANCES Whistles § 86.05 Sound signal intensity and range of audibility. A whistle on a vessel shall provide, in the...

  14. 33 CFR 86.05 - Sound signal intensity and range of audibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sound signal intensity and range... HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX III: TECHNICAL DETAILS OF SOUND SIGNAL APPLIANCES Whistles § 86.05 Sound signal intensity and range of audibility. A whistle on a vessel shall provide, in the...

  15. 33 CFR 86.05 - Sound signal intensity and range of audibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sound signal intensity and range... HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX III: TECHNICAL DETAILS OF SOUND SIGNAL APPLIANCES Whistles § 86.05 Sound signal intensity and range of audibility. A whistle on a vessel shall provide, in the...

  16. Axonal degeneration in Alzheimer’s disease: When signaling abnormalities meet the axonal transport system

    PubMed Central

    Kanaan, Nicholas M.; Pigino, Gustavo F.; Brady, Scott T.; Lazarov, Orly; Binder, Lester I.; Morfini, Gerardo A.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by progressive, age-dependent degeneration of neurons in the central nervous system. A large body of evidence indicates that neurons affected in AD follow a dying-back pattern of degeneration, where abnormalities in synaptic function and axonal connectivity long precede somatic cell death. Mechanisms underlying dying-back degeneration of neurons in AD remain elusive but several have been proposed, including deficits in fast axonal transport (FAT). Accordingly, genetic evidence linked alterations in FAT to dying-back degeneration of neurons, and FAT defects have been widely documented in various AD models. In light of these findings, we discuss experimental evidence linking several AD-related pathogenic polypeptides to aberrant activation of signaling pathways involved in the phosphoregulation of microtubule-based motor proteins. While each pathway appears to affect FAT in a unique manner, in the context of AD, many of these pathways might work synergistically to compromise the delivery of molecular components critical for the maintenance and function of synapses and axons. Therapeutic approaches aimed at preventing FAT deficits by normalizing the activity of specific protein kinases may help prevent degeneration of vulnerable neurons in AD. PMID:22721767

  17. Low-Intensity Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Improves Abnormal Visual Cortical Circuit Topography and Upregulates BDNF in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Makowiecki, Kalina; Harvey, Alan R.; Sherrard, Rachel M.

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is increasingly used as a treatment for neurological and psychiatric disorders. Although the induced field is focused on a target region during rTMS, adjacent areas also receive stimulation at a lower intensity and the contribution of this perifocal stimulation to network-wide effects is poorly defined. Here, we examined low-intensity rTMS (LI-rTMS)-induced changes on a model neural network using the visual systems of normal (C57Bl/6J wild-type, n = 22) and ephrin-A2A5−/− (n = 22) mice, the latter possessing visuotopic anomalies. Mice were treated with LI-rTMS or sham (handling control) daily for 14 d, then fluorojade and fluororuby were injected into visual cortex. The distribution of dorsal LGN (dLGN) neurons and corticotectal terminal zones (TZs) was mapped and disorder defined by comparing their actual location with that predicted by injection sites. In the afferent geniculocortical projection, LI-rTMS decreased the abnormally high dispersion of retrogradely labeled neurons in the dLGN of ephrin-A2A5−/− mice, indicating geniculocortical map refinement. In the corticotectal efferents, LI-rTMS improved topography of the most abnormal TZs in ephrin-A2A5−/− mice without altering topographically normal TZs. To investigate a possible molecular mechanism for LI-rTMS-induced structural plasticity, we measured brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the visual cortex and superior colliculus after single and multiple stimulations. BDNF was upregulated after a single stimulation for all groups, but only sustained in the superior colliculus of ephrin-A2A5−/− mice. Our results show that LI-rTMS upregulates BDNF, promoting a plastic environment conducive to beneficial reorganization of abnormal cortical circuits, information that has important implications for clinical rTMS. PMID:25100609

  18. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr -/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr +/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr -/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  19. Effect of signal intensity and camera quantization on laser speckle contrast analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lipei; Elson, Daniel S.

    2012-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA) is limited to being a qualitative method for the measurement of blood flow and tissue perfusion as it is sensitive to the measurement configuration. The signal intensity is one of the parameters that can affect the contrast values due to the quantization of the signals by the camera and analog-to-digital converter (ADC). In this paper we deduce the theoretical relationship between signal intensity and contrast values based on the probability density function (PDF) of the speckle pattern and simplify it to a rational function. A simple method to correct this contrast error is suggested. The experimental results demonstrate that this relationship can effectively compensate the bias in contrast values induced by the quantized signal intensity and correct for bias induced by signal intensity variations across the field of view. PMID:23304650

  20. Aspirin suppresses the abnormal lipid metabolism in liver cancer cells via disrupting an NFκB-ACSL1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Jinyan; Liu, Yunxia; Wang, Tianjiao; Zhao, Man; Ye, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2017-05-06

    Abnormal lipid metabolism is a hallmark of tumorigenesis. Hence, the alterations of metabolism enhance the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Aspirin is able to inhibit the growth of cancers through targeting nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). However, the role of aspirin in disrupting abnormal lipid metabolism in HCC remains poorly understood. In this study, we report that aspirin can suppress the abnormal lipid metabolism of HCC cells through inhibiting acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 1 (ACSL1), a lipid metabolism-related enzyme. Interestingly, oil red O staining showed that aspirin suppressed lipogenesis in HepG2 cells and Huh7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, aspirin attenuated the levels of triglyceride and cholesterol in the cells, respectively. Strikingly, we identified that aspirin was able to down-regulate ACSL1 at the levels of mRNA and protein. Moreover, we validated that aspirin decreased the nuclear levels of NF-κB in HepG2 cells. Mechanically, PDTC, an inhibitor of NF-κB, could down-regulate ACSL1 at the levels of mRNA and protein in the cells. Functionally, PDTC reduced the levels of lipid droplets, triglyceride and cholesterol in HepG2 cells. Thus, we conclude that aspirin suppresses the abnormal lipid metabolism in HCC cells via disrupting an NFκB-ACSL1 signaling. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism by which aspirin inhibits abnormal lipid metabolism of HCC. Therapeutically, aspirin is potentially available for HCC through controlling abnormal lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Aspirin suppresses the abnormal lipid metabolism in liver cancer cells via disrupting an NFκB-ACSL1 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Guang; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Jinyan

    Abnormal lipid metabolism is a hallmark of tumorigenesis. Hence, the alterations of metabolism enhance the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Aspirin is able to inhibit the growth of cancers through targeting nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). However, the role of aspirin in disrupting abnormal lipid metabolism in HCC remains poorly understood. In this study, we report that aspirin can suppress the abnormal lipid metabolism of HCC cells through inhibiting acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 1 (ACSL1), a lipid metabolism-related enzyme. Interestingly, oil red O staining showed that aspirin suppressed lipogenesis in HepG2 cells and Huh7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Inmore » addition, aspirin attenuated the levels of triglyceride and cholesterol in the cells, respectively. Strikingly, we identified that aspirin was able to down-regulate ACSL1 at the levels of mRNA and protein. Moreover, we validated that aspirin decreased the nuclear levels of NF-κB in HepG2 cells. Mechanically, PDTC, an inhibitor of NF-κB, could down-regulate ACSL1 at the levels of mRNA and protein in the cells. Functionally, PDTC reduced the levels of lipid droplets, triglyceride and cholesterol in HepG2 cells. Thus, we conclude that aspirin suppresses the abnormal lipid metabolism in HCC cells via disrupting an NFκB-ACSL1 signaling. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism by which aspirin inhibits abnormal lipid metabolism of HCC. Therapeutically, aspirin is potentially available for HCC through controlling abnormal lipid metabolism. - Highlights: • Aspirin inhibits the levels of liquid droplets, triglyceride and cholesterol in HCC cells. • Aspirin is able to down-regulate ACSL1 in HCC cells. • NF-κB inhibitor PDTC can down-regulate ACSL1 and reduces lipogenesis in HCC cells. • Aspirin suppresses the abnormal lipid metabolism in HCC cells via disrupting an NFκB-ACSL1 signaling.« less

  2. 33 CFR 86.05 - Sound signal intensity and range of audibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... direction of the forward axis of the whistle and at a distance of 1 meter from it, a sound pressure level in... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sound signal intensity and range... HOMELAND SECURITY INLAND NAVIGATION RULES ANNEX III: TECHNICAL DETAILS OF SOUND SIGNAL APPLIANCES Whistles...

  3. BIANCA (Brain Intensity AbNormality Classification Algorithm): A new tool for automated segmentation of white matter hyperintensities.

    PubMed

    Griffanti, Ludovica; Zamboni, Giovanna; Khan, Aamira; Li, Linxin; Bonifacio, Guendalina; Sundaresan, Vaanathi; Schulz, Ursula G; Kuker, Wilhelm; Battaglini, Marco; Rothwell, Peter M; Jenkinson, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Reliable quantification of white matter hyperintensities of presumed vascular origin (WMHs) is increasingly needed, given the presence of these MRI findings in patients with several neurological and vascular disorders, as well as in elderly healthy subjects. We present BIANCA (Brain Intensity AbNormality Classification Algorithm), a fully automated, supervised method for WMH detection, based on the k-nearest neighbour (k-NN) algorithm. Relative to previous k-NN based segmentation methods, BIANCA offers different options for weighting the spatial information, local spatial intensity averaging, and different options for the choice of the number and location of the training points. BIANCA is multimodal and highly flexible so that the user can adapt the tool to their protocol and specific needs. We optimised and validated BIANCA on two datasets with different MRI protocols and patient populations (a "predominantly neurodegenerative" and a "predominantly vascular" cohort). BIANCA was first optimised on a subset of images for each dataset in terms of overlap and volumetric agreement with a manually segmented WMH mask. The correlation between the volumes extracted with BIANCA (using the optimised set of options), the volumes extracted from the manual masks and visual ratings showed that BIANCA is a valid alternative to manual segmentation. The optimised set of options was then applied to the whole cohorts and the resulting WMH volume estimates showed good correlations with visual ratings and with age. Finally, we performed a reproducibility test, to evaluate the robustness of BIANCA, and compared BIANCA performance against existing methods. Our findings suggest that BIANCA, which will be freely available as part of the FSL package, is a reliable method for automated WMH segmentation in large cross-sectional cohort studies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Abnormal salience signaling in schizophrenia: The role of integrative beta oscillations.

    PubMed

    Liddle, Elizabeth B; Price, Darren; Palaniyappan, Lena; Brookes, Matthew J; Robson, Siân E; Hall, Emma L; Morris, Peter G; Liddle, Peter F

    2016-04-01

    Aberrant salience attribution and cerebral dysconnectivity both have strong evidential support as core dysfunctions in schizophrenia. Aberrant salience arising from an excess of dopamine activity has been implicated in delusions and hallucinations, exaggerating the significance of everyday occurrences and thus leading to perceptual distortions and delusional causal inferences. Meanwhile, abnormalities in key nodes of a salience brain network have been implicated in other characteristic symptoms, including the disorganization and impoverishment of mental activity. A substantial body of literature reports disruption to brain network connectivity in schizophrenia. Electrical oscillations likely play a key role in the coordination of brain activity at spatially remote sites, and evidence implicates beta band oscillations in long-range integrative processes. We used magnetoencephalography and a task designed to disambiguate responses to relevant from irrelevant stimuli to investigate beta oscillations in nodes of a network implicated in salience detection and previously shown to be structurally and functionally abnormal in schizophrenia. Healthy participants, as expected, produced an enhanced beta synchronization to behaviorally relevant, as compared to irrelevant, stimuli, while patients with schizophrenia showed the reverse pattern: a greater beta synchronization in response to irrelevant than to relevant stimuli. These findings not only support both the aberrant salience and disconnectivity hypotheses, but indicate a common mechanism that allows us to integrate them into a single framework for understanding schizophrenia in terms of disrupted recruitment of contextually appropriate brain networks. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Abnormal salience signaling in schizophrenia: The role of integrative beta oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Liddle, Elizabeth B.; Price, Darren; Palaniyappan, Lena; Brookes, Matthew J.; Robson, Siân E.; Hall, Emma L.; Morris, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aberrant salience attribution and cerebral dysconnectivity both have strong evidential support as core dysfunctions in schizophrenia. Aberrant salience arising from an excess of dopamine activity has been implicated in delusions and hallucinations, exaggerating the significance of everyday occurrences and thus leading to perceptual distortions and delusional causal inferences. Meanwhile, abnormalities in key nodes of a salience brain network have been implicated in other characteristic symptoms, including the disorganization and impoverishment of mental activity. A substantial body of literature reports disruption to brain network connectivity in schizophrenia. Electrical oscillations likely play a key role in the coordination of brain activity at spatially remote sites, and evidence implicates beta band oscillations in long‐range integrative processes. We used magnetoencephalography and a task designed to disambiguate responses to relevant from irrelevant stimuli to investigate beta oscillations in nodes of a network implicated in salience detection and previously shown to be structurally and functionally abnormal in schizophrenia. Healthy participants, as expected, produced an enhanced beta synchronization to behaviorally relevant, as compared to irrelevant, stimuli, while patients with schizophrenia showed the reverse pattern: a greater beta synchronization in response to irrelevant than to relevant stimuli. These findings not only support both the aberrant salience and disconnectivity hypotheses, but indicate a common mechanism that allows us to integrate them into a single framework for understanding schizophrenia in terms of disrupted recruitment of contextually appropriate brain networks. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1361‐1374, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26853904

  6. v-Src-driven transformation is due to chromosome abnormalities but not Src-mediated growth signaling.

    PubMed

    Honda, Takuya; Morii, Mariko; Nakayama, Yuji; Suzuki, Ko; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2018-01-18

    v-Src is the first identified oncogene product and has a strong tyrosine kinase activity. Much of the literature indicates that v-Src expression induces anchorage-independent and infinite cell proliferation through continuous stimulation of growth signaling by v-Src activity. Although all of v-Src-expressing cells are supposed to form transformed colonies, low frequencies of v-Src-induced colony formation have been observed so far. Using cells that exhibit high expression efficiencies of inducible v-Src, we show that v-Src expression causes cell-cycle arrest through p21 up-regulation despite ERK activation. v-Src expression also induces chromosome abnormalities and unexpected suppression of v-Src expression, leading to p21 down-regulation and ERK inactivation. Importantly, among v-Src-suppressed cells, only a limited number of cells gain the ability to re-proliferate and form transformed colonies. Our findings provide the first evidence that v-Src-driven transformation is attributed to chromosome abnormalities, but not continuous stimulation of growth signaling, possibly through stochastic genetic alterations.

  7. An Odor-Specific Threshold Deficit Implicates Abnormal Intracellular Cyclic AMP Signaling in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Turetsky, Bruce I.; Moberg, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Although olfactory deficits are common in schizophrenia, their underlying pathophysiology remains unknown. Recent evidence has suggested that cAMP signaling may be disrupted in schizophrenia. Since cAMP mediates signal transduction in olfactory receptor neurons, this could contribute to the etiology of observed olfactory deficits. This study was designed to test this hypothesis by determining odor detection threshold sensitivities to two odorants that differ in their relative activations of this intracellular cAMP signaling cascade. Method Thirty schizophrenia patients, 25 healthy comparison subjects, and 19 unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients were studied. Odor detection threshold sensitivities were measured for the two odorants citralva and lyral. Although both have fruity/floral scents, citralva strongly activates adenylyl cyclase to increase cAMP levels, while lyral is a very weak activator of adenylyl cyclase. Results There was a significant group-by-odor interaction. Both schizophrenia patients and unaffected first-degree relatives were impaired in their ability to detect lyral versus citralva. Comparison subjects were equally sensitive to both odorants. This selective deficit could not be explained by differences in age, sex, smoking, clinical symptom profile, or medication use. Conclusions This study establishes the presence of an odor-specific hyposmia that may denote a disruption of cAMP-mediated signal transduction in schizophrenia. The presence of a parallel deficit in the patients’ unaffected first-degree relatives suggests that this deficit is genetically mediated. Although additional physiological studies are needed to confirm the underlying mechanism, these results offer strong inferential support for the hypothesis that cAMP signaling is dys-regulated in schizophrenia. PMID:19074977

  8. An odor-specific threshold deficit implicates abnormal intracellular cyclic AMP signaling in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Turetsky, Bruce I; Moberg, Paul J

    2009-02-01

    Although olfactory deficits are common in schizophrenia, their underlying pathophysiology remains unknown. Recent evidence has suggested that cAMP signaling may be disrupted in schizophrenia. Since cAMP mediates signal transduction in olfactory receptor neurons, this could contribute to the etiology of observed olfactory deficits. This study was designed to test this hypothesis by determining odor detection threshold sensitivities to two odorants that differ in their relative activations of this intracellular cAMP signaling cascade. Thirty schizophrenia patients, 25 healthy comparison subjects, and 19 unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients were studied. Odor detection threshold sensitivities were measured for the two odorants citralva and lyral. Although both have fruity/floral scents, citralva strongly activates adenylyl cyclase to increase cAMP levels, while lyral is a very weak activator of adenylyl cyclase. There was a significant group-by-odor interaction. Both schizophrenia patients and unaffected first-degree relatives were impaired in their ability to detect lyral versus citralva. Comparison subjects were equally sensitive to both odorants. This selective deficit could not be explained by differences in age, sex, smoking, clinical symptom profile, or medication use. This study establishes the presence of an odor-specific hyposmia that may denote a disruption of cAMP-mediated signal transduction in schizophrenia. The presence of a parallel deficit in the patients' unaffected first-degree relatives suggests that this deficit is genetically mediated. Although additional physiological studies are needed to confirm the underlying mechanism, these results offer strong inferential support for the hypothesis that cAMP signaling is dysregulated in schizophrenia.

  9. Augmented Indian hedgehog signaling in cranial neural crest cells leads to craniofacial abnormalities and dysplastic temporomandibular joint in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ling; Gu, Shuping; Ye, Wenduo; Song, Yingnan; Chen, YiPing

    2016-01-01

    Extensive studies have pinpointed the crucial role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling in the development of the appendicular skeleton and the essential function of Ihh in the formation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this study, we have investigated the effect of augmented Ihh signaling in TMJ development. We took a transgenic gain-of-function approach by overexpressing Ihh in the cranial neural crest (CNC) cells using a conditional Ihh transgenic allele and the Wnt1-Cre allele. We found that Wnt1-Cre-mediated tissue-specific overexpression of Ihh in the CNC lineage caused severe craniofacial abnormalities, including cleft lip/palate, encephalocele, anophthalmos, micrognathia, and defective TMJ development. In the mutant TMJ, the glenoid fossa was completely absent, whereas the condyle and the articular disc appeared relatively normal with slightly delayed chondrocyte differentiation. Our findings thus demonstrate that augmented Ihh signaling is detrimental to craniofacial development, and that finely tuned Ihh signaling is critical for TMJ formation. Our results also provide additional evidence that the development of the condyle and articular disc is independent of the glenoid fossa. PMID:26553654

  10. Cocaine Self-Administration Experience Induces Pathological Phasic Accumbens Dopamine Signals and Abnormal Incentive Behaviors in Drug-Abstinent Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuefei; Sugam, Jonathan A.; Carelli, Regina M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to drugs of abuse is linked to long-lasting alterations in the function of limbic system structures, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Although cocaine acts via dopaminergic mechanisms within the NAc, less is known about whether phasic dopamine (DA) signaling in the NAc is altered in animals with cocaine self-administration experience or if these animals learn and interact normally with stimuli in their environment. Here, separate groups of rats self-administered either intravenous cocaine or water to a receptacle (controls), followed by 30 d of enforced abstinence. Next, all rats learned an appetitive Pavlovian discrimination and voltammetric recordings of real-time DA release were taken in either the NAc core or shell of cocaine and control subjects. Cocaine experience differentially impaired DA signaling in the core and shell relative to controls. Although phasic DA signals in the shell were essentially abolished for all stimuli, in the core, DA did not distinguish between cues and was abnormally biased toward reward delivery. Further, cocaine rats were unable to learn higher-order associations and even altered simple conditioned approach behaviors, displaying enhanced preoccupation with cue-associated stimuli (sign-tracking; ST) but diminished time at the food cup awaiting reward delivery (goal-tracking). Critically, whereas control DA signaling correlated with ST behaviors, cocaine experience abolished this relationship. These findings show that cocaine has persistent, differential, and pathological effects on both DA signaling and DA-dependent behaviors and suggest that psychostimulant experience may remodel the very circuits that bias organisms toward repeated relapse. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Relapsing to drug abuse despite periods of abstinence and sincere attempts to quit is one of the most pernicious facets of addiction. Unfortunately, little is known about how the dopamine (DA) system functions after periods of drug abstinence

  11. Cocaine Self-Administration Experience Induces Pathological Phasic Accumbens Dopamine Signals and Abnormal Incentive Behaviors in Drug-Abstinent Rats.

    PubMed

    Saddoris, Michael P; Wang, Xuefei; Sugam, Jonathan A; Carelli, Regina M

    2016-01-06

    Chronic exposure to drugs of abuse is linked to long-lasting alterations in the function of limbic system structures, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Although cocaine acts via dopaminergic mechanisms within the NAc, less is known about whether phasic dopamine (DA) signaling in the NAc is altered in animals with cocaine self-administration experience or if these animals learn and interact normally with stimuli in their environment. Here, separate groups of rats self-administered either intravenous cocaine or water to a receptacle (controls), followed by 30 d of enforced abstinence. Next, all rats learned an appetitive Pavlovian discrimination and voltammetric recordings of real-time DA release were taken in either the NAc core or shell of cocaine and control subjects. Cocaine experience differentially impaired DA signaling in the core and shell relative to controls. Although phasic DA signals in the shell were essentially abolished for all stimuli, in the core, DA did not distinguish between cues and was abnormally biased toward reward delivery. Further, cocaine rats were unable to learn higher-order associations and even altered simple conditioned approach behaviors, displaying enhanced preoccupation with cue-associated stimuli (sign-tracking; ST) but diminished time at the food cup awaiting reward delivery (goal-tracking). Critically, whereas control DA signaling correlated with ST behaviors, cocaine experience abolished this relationship. These findings show that cocaine has persistent, differential, and pathological effects on both DA signaling and DA-dependent behaviors and suggest that psychostimulant experience may remodel the very circuits that bias organisms toward repeated relapse. Relapsing to drug abuse despite periods of abstinence and sincere attempts to quit is one of the most pernicious facets of addiction. Unfortunately, little is known about how the dopamine (DA) system functions after periods of drug abstinence, particularly its role in

  12. Parenchymal Signal Intensity in 3-T Body MRI of Dogs with Hematopoietic Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Daniel A; Sharkey, Leslie C; Steward, Susan M; Bahr, Katherine L; Henson, Michael S; Ito, Daisuke; O'Brien, Timothy D; Jessen, Carl R; Husbands, Brian D; Borgatti, Antonella; Modiano, Jaime F

    2013-01-01

    We performed a preliminary study involving 10 dogs to assess the applicability of body MRI for staging of canine diffuse hematopoietic neoplasia. T1-weighted (before and after intravenous gadolinium), T2-weighted, in-phase, out-of-phase, and short tau inversion recovery pulse sequences were used. By using digital region of interest (ROI) and visual comparison techniques, relative parenchymal organ (medial iliac lymph nodes, liver, spleen, kidney cortex, and kidney medulla) signal intensity was quantified as less than, equal to, or greater than that of skeletal muscle in 2 clinically normal young adult dogs and 10 dogs affected with either B-cell lymphoma (n = 7) or myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 3). Falciform fat and urinary bladder were evaluated to provide additional perspective regarding signal intensity from the pulse sequences. Dogs with nonfocal disease could be distinguished from normal dogs according to both the visual and ROI signal-intensity relationships. In normal dogs, liver signal intensity on the T2-weighted sequence was greater than that of skeletal muscle by using either the visual or ROI approach. However in affected dogs, T2-weighted liver signal intensity was less than that of skeletal muscle by using either the ROI approach (10 of 10 dogs) or the visual approach (9 of 10 dogs). These findings suggest that the comparison of relative signal intensity among organs may have merit as a research model for infiltrative parenchymal disease (ROI approach) or metabolic effects of disease; this comparison may have practical clinical applicability (visual comparison approach) as well. PMID:23582424

  13. Parenchymal signal intensity in 3-T body MRI of dogs with hematopoietic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Daniel A; Sharkey, Leslie C; Steward, Susan M; Bahr, Katherine L; Henson, Michael S; Ito, Daisuke; O'Brien, Timothy D; Jessen, Carl R; Husbands, Brian D; Borgatti, Antonella; Modiano, Jaime F

    2013-04-01

    We performed a preliminary study involving 10 dogs to assess the applicability of body MRI for staging of canine diffuse hematopoietic neoplasia. T1-weighted (before and after intravenous gadolinium), T2-weighted, in-phase, out-of-phase, and short tau inversion recovery pulse sequences were used. By using digital region of interest (ROI) and visual comparison techniques, relative parenchymal organ (medial iliac lymph nodes, liver, spleen, kidney cortex, and kidney medulla) signal intensity was quantified as less than, equal to, or greater than that of skeletal muscle in 2 clinically normal young adult dogs and 10 dogs affected with either B-cell lymphoma (n = 7) or myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 3). Falciform fat and urinary bladder were evaluated to provide additional perspective regarding signal intensity from the pulse sequences. Dogs with nonfocal disease could be distinguished from normal dogs according to both the visual and ROI signal-intensity relationships. In normal dogs, liver signal intensity on the T2-weighted sequence was greater than that of skeletal muscle by using either the visual or ROI approach. However in affected dogs, T2-weighted liver signal intensity was less than that of skeletal muscle by using either the ROI approach (10 of 10 dogs) or the visual approach (9 of 10 dogs). These findings suggest that the comparison of relative signal intensity among organs may have merit as a research model for infiltrative parenchymal disease (ROI approach) or metabolic effects of disease; this comparison may have practical clinical applicability (visual comparison approach) as well.

  14. Temporal fractal analysis of the rs-BOLD signal identifies brain abnormalities in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Dona, Olga; Hall, Geoffrey B; Noseworthy, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    Brain connectivity in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has proven difficult to characterize due to the heterogeneous nature of the spectrum. Connectivity in the brain occurs in a complex, multilevel and multi-temporal manner, driving the fluctuations observed in local oxygen demand. These fluctuations can be characterized as fractals, as they auto-correlate at different time scales. In this study, we propose a model-free complexity analysis based on the fractal dimension of the rs-BOLD signal, acquired with magnetic resonance imaging. The fractal dimension can be interpreted as measure of signal complexity and connectivity. Previous studies have suggested that reduction in signal complexity can be associated with disease. Therefore, we hypothesized that a detectable difference in rs-BOLD signal complexity could be observed between ASD patients and Controls. Anatomical and functional data from fifty-five subjects with ASD (12.7 ± 2.4 y/o) and 55 age-matched (14.1 ± 3.1 y/o) healthy controls were accessed through the NITRC database and the ABIDE project. Subjects were scanned using a 3T GE Signa MRI and a 32-channel RF-coil. Axial FSPGR-3D images were used to prescribe rs-BOLD (TE/TR = 30/2000ms) where 300 time points were acquired. Motion correction was performed on the functional data and anatomical and functional images were aligned and spatially warped to the N27 standard brain atlas. Fractal analysis, performed on a grey matter mask, was done by estimating the Hurst exponent in the frequency domain using a power spectral density approach and refining the estimation in the time domain with de-trended fluctuation analysis and signal summation conversion methods. Voxel-wise fractal dimension (FD) was calculated for every subject in the control group and in the ASD group to create ROI-based Z-scores for the ASD patients. Voxel-wise validation of FD normality across controls was confirmed, and non-Gaussian voxels were eliminated from subsequent analysis. To maintain

  15. Intense acoustic bursts as a signal-enhancement mechanism in ultrasound-modulated optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chulhong; Zemp, Roger J; Wang, Lihong V

    2006-08-15

    Biophotonic imaging with ultrasound-modulated optical tomography (UOT) promises ultrasonically resolved imaging in biological tissues. A key challenge in this imaging technique is a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We show significant UOT signal enhancement by using intense time-gated acoustic bursts. A CCD camera captured the speckle pattern from a laser-illuminated tissue phantom. Differences in speckle contrast were observed when ultrasonic bursts were applied, compared with when no ultrasound was applied. When CCD triggering was synchronized with burst initiation, acoustic-radiation-force-induced displacements were detected. To avoid mechanical contrast in UOT images, the CCD camera acquisition was delayed several milliseconds until transient effects of acoustic radiation force attenuated to a satisfactory level. The SNR of our system was sufficiently high to provide an image pixel per acoustic burst without signal averaging. Because of the substantially improved SNR, the use of intense acoustic bursts is a promising signal enhancement strategy for UOT.

  16. Noiseless intensity amplification of repetitive signals by coherent addition using the temporal Talbot effect

    PubMed Central

    Maram, Reza; Van Howe, James; Li, Ming; Azaña, José

    2014-01-01

    Amplification of signal intensity is essential for initiating physical processes, diagnostics, sensing, communications and measurement. During traditional amplification, the signal is amplified by multiplying the signal carriers through an active gain process, requiring the use of an external power source. In addition, the signal is degraded by noise and distortions that typically accompany active gain processes. We show noiseless intensity amplification of repetitive optical pulse waveforms with gain from 2 to ~20 without using active gain. The proposed method uses a dispersion-induced temporal self-imaging (Talbot) effect to redistribute and coherently accumulate energy of the original repetitive waveforms into fewer replica waveforms. In addition, we show how our passive amplifier performs a real-time average of the wave-train to reduce its original noise fluctuation, as well as enhances the extinction ratio of pulses to stand above the noise floor. Our technique is applicable to repetitive waveforms in any spectral region or wave system. PMID:25319207

  17. Can Signal Abnormalities Detected with MR Imaging in Knee Articular Cartilage Be Used to Predict Development of Morphologic Cartilage Defects? 48-Month Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Gersing, Alexandra S.; Mbapte Wamba, John; Nevitt, Michael C.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Link, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the incidence with which morphologic articular cartilage defects develop over 48 months in cartilage with signal abnormalities at baseline magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in comparison with the incidence in articular cartilage without signal abnormalities at baseline. Materials and Methods The institutional review boards of all participating centers approved this HIPAA-compliant study. Right knees of 90 subjects from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (mean age, 55 years ± 8 [standard deviation]; 51% women) with cartilage signal abnormalities but without morphologic cartilage defects at 3.0-T MR imaging and without radiographic osteoarthritis (Kellgren-Lawrence score, 0–1) were frequency matched for age, sex, Kellgren-Lawrence score, and body mass index with right knees in 90 subjects without any signal abnormalities or morphologic defects in the articular cartilage (mean age, 54 years ± 5; 51% women). Individual signal abnormalities (n = 126) on intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo MR images were categorized into four subgrades: subgrade A, hypointense; subgrade B, inhomogeneous; subgrade C, hyperintense; and subgrade D, hyperintense with swelling. The development of morphologic articular cartilage defects (Whole-Organ MR Imaging Score ≥2) at 48 months was analyzed on a compartment level and was compared between groups by using generalized estimating equation logistic regression models. Results Cartilage signal abnormalities were more frequent in the patellofemoral joint than in the tibiofemoral joint (59.5% vs 39.5%). Subgrade A was seen more frequently than were subgrades C and D (36% vs 22%). Incidence of morphologic cartilage defects at 48 months was 57% in cartilage with baseline signal abnormalities, while only 4% of compartments without baseline signal abnormalities developed morphologic defects at 48 months (all compartments combined and each compartment separately, P < .01). The development of morphologic defects was not

  18. Intensity invariance properties of auditory neurons compared to the statistics of relevant natural signals in grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Jan; Weschke, Gerroth; Vogel, Astrid; Ronacher, Bernhard

    2010-04-01

    The temporal pattern of amplitude modulations (AM) is often used to recognize acoustic objects. To identify objects reliably, intensity invariant representations have to be formed. We approached this problem within the auditory pathway of grasshoppers. We presented AM patterns modulated at different time scales and intensities. Metric space analysis of neuronal responses allowed us to determine how well, how invariantly, and at which time scales AM frequency is encoded. We find that in some neurons spike-count cues contribute substantially (20-60%) to the decoding of AM frequency at a single intensity. However, such cues are not robust when intensity varies. The general intensity invariance of the system is poor. However, there exists a range of AM frequencies around 83 Hz where intensity invariance of local interneurons is relatively high. In this range, natural communication signals exhibit much variation between species, suggesting an important behavioral role for this frequency band. We hypothesize, just as has been proposed for human speech, that the communication signals might have evolved to match the processing properties of the receivers. This contrasts with optimal coding theory, which postulates that neuronal systems are adapted to the statistics of the relevant signals.

  19. Minimisation of Signal Intensity Differences in Distortion Correction Approaches of Brain Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Do-Wan; Henry, David; Park, Hae-Jin; Han, Bong-Soo; Woo, Dong-Cheol

    2018-04-12

    To evaluate the effects of signal intensity differences between the b0 image and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in the image registration process. To correct signal intensity differences between the b0 image and DTI data, a simple image intensity compensation (SIMIC) method, which is a b0 image re-calculation process from DTI data, was applied before the image registration. The re-calculated b0 image (b0 ext ) from each diffusion direction was registered to the b0 image acquired through the MR scanning (b0 nd ) with two types of cost functions and their transformation matrices were acquired. These transformation matrices were then used to register the DTI data. For quantifications, the dice similarity coefficient (DSC) values, diffusion scalar matrix, and quantified fibre numbers and lengths were calculated. The combined SIMIC method with two cost functions showed the highest DSC value (0.802 ± 0.007). Regarding diffusion scalar values and numbers and lengths of fibres from the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and cortico-spinal tract, only using normalised cross correlation (NCC) showed a specific tendency toward lower values in the brain regions. Image-based distortion correction with SIMIC for DTI data would help in image analysis by accounting for signal intensity differences as one additional option for DTI analysis. • We evaluated the effects of signal intensity differences at DTI registration. • The non-diffusion-weighted image re-calculation process from DTI data was applied. • SIMIC can minimise the signal intensity differences at DTI registration.

  20. Peripheral Insulin Resistance and Impaired Insulin Signaling Contribute to Abnormal Glucose Metabolism in Preterm Baboons

    PubMed Central

    McGill-Vargas, Lisa L.; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Seidner, Steven R.; McCurnin, Donald C.; Leland, Michelle M.; Anzueto, Diana G.; Johnson, Marney C.; Liang, Hanyu; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Musi, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Premature infants develop hyperglycemia shortly after birth, increasing their morbidity and death. Surviving infants have increased incidence of diabetes as young adults. Our understanding of the biological basis for the insulin resistance of prematurity and developmental regulation of glucose production remains fragmentary. The objective of this study was to examine maturational differences in insulin sensitivity and the insulin-signaling pathway in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue of 30 neonatal baboons using the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Preterm baboons (67% gestation) had reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity shortly after birth (M value 12.5 ± 1.5 vs 21.8 ± 4.4 mg/kg · min in term baboons) and at 2 weeks of age (M value 12.8 ± 2.6 vs 16.3 ± 4.2, respectively). Insulin increased Akt phosphorylation, but these responses were significantly lower in preterm baboons during the first week of life (3.2-fold vs 9.8-fold). Preterm baboons had lower glucose transporter-1 protein content throughout the first 2 weeks of life (8%-12% of term). In preterm baboons, serum free fatty acids (FFAs) did not decrease in response to insulin, whereas FFAs decreased by greater than 80% in term baboons; the impaired suppression of FFAs in the preterm animals was paired with a decreased glucose transporter-4 protein content in adipose tissue. In conclusion, peripheral insulin resistance and impaired non-insulin-dependent glucose uptake play an important role in hyperglycemia of prematurity. Impaired insulin signaling (reduced Akt) contributes to the defect in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Counterregulatory hormones are not major contributors. PMID:25560831

  1. Peripheral insulin resistance and impaired insulin signaling contribute to abnormal glucose metabolism in preterm baboons.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Cynthia L; McGill-Vargas, Lisa L; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Seidner, Steven R; McCurnin, Donald C; Leland, Michelle M; Anzueto, Diana G; Johnson, Marney C; Liang, Hanyu; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Musi, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Premature infants develop hyperglycemia shortly after birth, increasing their morbidity and death. Surviving infants have increased incidence of diabetes as young adults. Our understanding of the biological basis for the insulin resistance of prematurity and developmental regulation of glucose production remains fragmentary. The objective of this study was to examine maturational differences in insulin sensitivity and the insulin-signaling pathway in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue of 30 neonatal baboons using the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Preterm baboons (67% gestation) had reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity shortly after birth (M value 12.5 ± 1.5 vs 21.8 ± 4.4 mg/kg · min in term baboons) and at 2 weeks of age (M value 12.8 ± 2.6 vs 16.3 ± 4.2, respectively). Insulin increased Akt phosphorylation, but these responses were significantly lower in preterm baboons during the first week of life (3.2-fold vs 9.8-fold). Preterm baboons had lower glucose transporter-1 protein content throughout the first 2 weeks of life (8%-12% of term). In preterm baboons, serum free fatty acids (FFAs) did not decrease in response to insulin, whereas FFAs decreased by greater than 80% in term baboons; the impaired suppression of FFAs in the preterm animals was paired with a decreased glucose transporter-4 protein content in adipose tissue. In conclusion, peripheral insulin resistance and impaired non-insulin-dependent glucose uptake play an important role in hyperglycemia of prematurity. Impaired insulin signaling (reduced Akt) contributes to the defect in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Counterregulatory hormones are not major contributors.

  2. Muscle MRI STIR signal intensity and atrophy are correlated to focal lower limb neuropathy severity.

    PubMed

    Deroide, N; Bousson, V; Mambre, L; Vicaut, E; Laredo, J D; Kubis, Nathalie

    2015-03-01

    The objective is to determine if muscle MRI is useful for assessing neuropathy severity. Clinical, MRI and electromyography (EMG) examinations were performed in 17 patients with focal lower limb neuropathies. MRI Short Tau Inversion Recovery (STIR) signal intensity, amyotrophy, and muscle fatty infiltration measured after T1-weighted image acquisition, EMG spontaneous activity (SA), and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) were graded using semiquantitative scores and quantitative scores for STIR signal intensity and were correlated to the Medical Research Council (MRC) score for testing muscle strength. Within this population, subgroups were selected according to severity (mild versus severe), duration (subacute versus chronic), and topography (distal versus proximal) of the neuropathy. EMG SA and MVC MRI amyotrophy and quantitative scoring of muscle STIR intensity were correlated with the MRC score. Moreover, MRI amyotrophy was significantly increased in severe, chronic, and proximal neuropathies along with fatty infiltration in chronic lesions. Muscle MRI atrophy and quantitative evaluation of signal intensity were correlated to MRC score in our study. Semiquantitative evaluation of muscle STIR signal was sensitive enough for detection of topography of the nerve lesion but was not suitable to assess severity. Muscle MRI could support EMG in chronic and proximal neuropathy, which showed poor sensitivity in these patients.

  3. [CD22 signal abnormalities in the pathogenesis of immune related pancytopenia].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaojing; Shao, Zonghong; Ruan, Erbao; Fu, Rong; Wang, Guojin; Liu, Hong; Wu, Yuhong; Song, Jia; Xing, Limin; Qu, Wen; Cuan, Jing; Li, Lijuan; Wang, Xiaoming; Liu, Hui; Wang, Yihao; Wang, Huaquan

    2015-07-14

    To investigate the expression of CD22 and its downstream signal molecule spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) and their phosphorylation of B lymphocytes in patients with immune related pancytopenia(IRP), and to explore the role of CD22 in pathogenesis of IRP. The expression of CD22, SYK and their phosphorylation, along with the expression of IgG and IgM, which obtained from B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of 46 patients with IRP(22 new diagnosed and 24 remitted patients returned to normal after treatment), 22 healthy controls and 12 chronic lymphocytic leukemia(CLL) patients from February to December 2014 were analyzed by flow cytometry. And the mRNA expression of CD22 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell was determined by real-time quantitative PCR. The ratios of CD22+ cells and phosphorylated CD22(pCD22)+ cells of B lymphocytes in new diagnosed group (60. 03% ± 20. 94% 71. 32% ± 11. 16%) were significantly higher than those in remission group (46. 92% ± 20. 04%, 55. 82% ± 14. 42%), normal control group (46. 86% ± 17. 78%, 53. 28% ± 14. 76%) and CLL group (39. 74% ± 18. 96%, 59. 07% ± 17.09%) (all P <0.05). The ratios of phosphorylated SYK( pSYK) + cells in the four groups had the same trend (all P <0. 05). The ratio of pCD22+ cells/pSYK+ cells in new diagnosed group was significantly lower than that in normal control group and CLL group (27. 39 (5. 06 - 102. 70) vs 55. 95 (15. 25 - 298. 53), 56. 92(5. 60 - 228. 96), both P <0. 05), and pCD22+ cells positively correlated to pSYK+ cells ( r = 0. 341, P < 0. 05). The expression of IgG in new diagnosed group and remission group was significantly higher than that in normal control group, and the expression of IgM in new diagnosed group was significantly higher than that in normal control group and CLL group (all P <0. 05). The expression levels of CD22 mRNA in new diagnosed group was significantly higher than that in remission group, normal control group and CLL group (all P <0. 05). The BCR signal pathway of B

  4. Genetic and functional analyses demonstrate a role for abnormal glycinergic signaling in autism.

    PubMed

    Pilorge, M; Fassier, C; Le Corronc, H; Potey, A; Bai, J; De Gois, S; Delaby, E; Assouline, B; Guinchat, V; Devillard, F; Delorme, R; Nygren, G; Råstam, M; Meier, J C; Otani, S; Cheval, H; James, V M; Topf, M; Dear, T N; Gillberg, C; Leboyer, M; Giros, B; Gautron, S; Hazan, J; Harvey, R J; Legendre, P; Betancur, C

    2016-07-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a common neurodevelopmental condition characterized by marked genetic heterogeneity. Recent studies of rare structural and sequence variants have identified hundreds of loci involved in ASD, but our knowledge of the overall genetic architecture and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remains incomplete. Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are ligand-gated chloride channels that mediate inhibitory neurotransmission in the adult nervous system but exert an excitatory action in immature neurons. GlyRs containing the α2 subunit are highly expressed in the embryonic brain, where they promote cortical interneuron migration and the generation of excitatory projection neurons. We previously identified a rare microdeletion of the X-linked gene GLRA2, encoding the GlyR α2 subunit, in a boy with autism. The microdeletion removes the terminal exons of the gene (GLRA2(Δex8-9)). Here, we sequenced 400 males with ASD and identified one de novo missense mutation, p.R153Q, absent from controls. In vitro functional analysis demonstrated that the GLRA2(Δex8)(-)(9) protein failed to localize to the cell membrane, while the R153Q mutation impaired surface expression and markedly reduced sensitivity to glycine. Very recently, an additional de novo missense mutation (p.N136S) was reported in a boy with ASD, and we show that this mutation also reduced cell-surface expression and glycine sensitivity. Targeted glra2 knockdown in zebrafish induced severe axon-branching defects, rescued by injection of wild type but not GLRA2(Δex8-9) or R153Q transcripts, providing further evidence for their loss-of-function effect. Glra2 knockout mice exhibited deficits in object recognition memory and impaired long-term potentiation in the prefrontal cortex. Taken together, these results implicate GLRA2 in non-syndromic ASD, unveil a novel role for GLRA2 in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory, and link altered glycinergic signaling to social and cognitive

  5. Relationship of ultrasound signal intensity with SonoVue concentration at body temperature in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin; Li, Jing; He, Xiaoling; Wu, Kaizhi; Yuan, Yun; Ding, Mingyue

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the relationship between image intensity and ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) concentration is investigated. Experiments are conducted in water bath using a silicon tube filled with UCA (SonoVue) at different concentrations (100μl/l to 6000μl/l) at around 37 °C to simulate the temperature in human body. The mean gray-scale intensity within the region of interest (ROI) is calculated to obtain the plot of signal intensity to UCA concentration. The results show that the intensity firstly exhibits a linear increase to the peak at approximately 1500μl/l then appears a downward trend due to the multiple scattering (MS) effects.

  6. Appearance of low signal intensity lines in MRI of silicone breast implants.

    PubMed

    Stroman, P W; Rolland, C; Dufour, M; Grondin, P; Guidoin, R G

    1996-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of five explanted mammary prostheses were obtained with a 1.5 T GE Signa system using a conventional spin-echo pulse sequence, in order to investigate the low-intensity curvilinear lines which may be observed in MR images of silicone gel-filled breast implants under pressure from fibrous capsules. MR images showed ellipsoid prostheses, often containing multiple low-intensity curvilinear lines which in some cases presented an appearance very similar to that of the linguine sign. Upon opening the fibrous capsules, however, all of the prostheses were found to be completely intact demonstrating that the appearance of multiple low signal intensity curvilinear lines in MR images of silicone gel-filled prostheses is not necessarily a sign of prosthesis rupture. The MR image features which are specific to the linguine sign must be more precisely defined.

  7. A Robust Dynamic Heart-Rate Detection Algorithm Framework During Intense Physical Activities Using Photoplethysmographic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jiajia; Li, Dan; Ma, Xiaoyuan; Teng, Guowei; Wei, Jianming

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic accurate heart-rate (HR) estimation using a photoplethysmogram (PPG) during intense physical activities is always challenging due to corruption by motion artifacts (MAs). It is difficult to reconstruct a clean signal and extract HR from contaminated PPG. This paper proposes a robust HR-estimation algorithm framework that uses one-channel PPG and tri-axis acceleration data to reconstruct the PPG and calculate the HR based on features of the PPG and spectral analysis. Firstly, the signal is judged by the presence of MAs. Then, the spectral peaks corresponding to acceleration data are filtered from the periodogram of the PPG when MAs exist. Different signal-processing methods are applied based on the amount of remaining PPG spectral peaks. The main MA-removal algorithm (NFEEMD) includes the repeated single-notch filter and ensemble empirical mode decomposition. Finally, HR calibration is designed to ensure the accuracy of HR tracking. The NFEEMD algorithm was performed on the 23 datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Processing Cup Database. The average estimation errors were 1.12 BPM (12 training datasets), 2.63 BPM (10 testing datasets) and 1.87 BPM (all 23 datasets), respectively. The Pearson correlation was 0.992. The experiment results illustrate that the proposed algorithm is not only suitable for HR estimation during continuous activities, like slow running (13 training datasets), but also for intense physical activities with acceleration, like arm exercise (10 testing datasets). PMID:29068403

  8. Uterine Fibroids: Correlation of T2 Signal Intensity with Semiquantitative Perfusion MR Parameters in Patients Screened for MR-guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Choi, Chel Hun; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo; Rhim, Hyunchul; Lim, Hyo Keun

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the relationships between T2 signal intensity and semiquantitative perfusion magnetic resonance (MR) parameters of uterine fibroids in patients who were screened for MR-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Institutional review board approval was granted, and informed consents were waived. One hundred seventy most symptom-relevant, nondegenerated uterine fibroids (mean diameter, 7.3 cm; range, 3.0-17.2 cm) in 170 women (mean age, 43.5 years; range, 24-56 years) undergoing screening MR examinations for MR-guided HIFU ablation from October 2009 to April 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Fibroid signal intensity was assessed as the ratio of the fibroid T2 signal intensity to that of skeletal muscle. Parameters of semiquantitative perfusion MR imaging obtained during screening MR examination (peak enhancement, percentage of relative peak enhancement, time to peak [in seconds], wash-in rate [per seconds], and washout rate [per seconds]) were investigated to assess their relationships with T2 signal ratio by using multiple linear regression analysis. Correlations between T2 signal intensity and independently significant perfusion parameters were then evaluated according to fibroid type by using Spearman correlation test. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that relative peak enhancement showed an independently significant correlation with T2 signal ratio (Β = 0.004, P < .001). Submucosal intracavitary (n = 20, ρ = 0.275, P = .240) and type III (n = 18, ρ = 0.082, P = .748) fibroids failed to show significant correlations between perfusion and T2 signal intensity, while significant correlations were found for all other fibroid types (ρ = 0.411-0.629, P < .05). In possible candidates for MR-guided HIFU ablation, the T2 signal intensity of nondegenerated uterine fibroids showed an independently significant positive correlation with relative peak enhancement in most cases, except those of submucosal intracavitary or type III

  9. NIST mixed stain study 3: signal intensity balance in commercial short tandem repeat multiplexes.

    PubMed

    Duewer, David L; Kline, Margaret C; Redman, Janette W; Butler, John M

    2004-12-01

    Short-tandem repeat (STR) allelic intensities were collected from more than 60 forensic laboratories for a suite of seven samples as part of the National Institute of Standards and Technology-coordinated 2001 Mixed Stain Study 3 (MSS3). These interlaboratory challenge data illuminate the relative importance of intrinsic and user-determined factors affecting the locus-to-locus balance of signal intensities for currently used STR multiplexes. To varying degrees, seven of the eight commercially produced multiplexes used by MSS3 participants displayed very similar patterns of intensity differences among the different loci probed by the multiplexes for all samples, in the hands of multiple analysts, with a variety of supplies and instruments. These systematic differences reflect intrinsic properties of the individual multiplexes, not user-controllable measurement practices. To the extent that quality systems specify minimum and maximum absolute intensities for data acceptability and data interpretation schema require among-locus balance, these intrinsic intensity differences may decrease the utility of multiplex results and surely increase the cost of analysis.

  10. Improving the Molecular Ion Signal Intensity for In Situ Liquid SIMS Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yufan; Yao, Juan; Ding, Yuanzhao

    In situ liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) enabled by system for analysis at the liquid vacuum interface (SALVI) has proven to be a promising new tool to provide molecular information at solid–liquid and liquid–vacuum interfaces. However, the initial data showed that useful signals in positive ion spectra are too weak to be meaningful in most cases. In addition, it is difficult to obtain strong negative molecular ion signals when m/z>200. These two drawbacks have been the biggest obstacle towards practical use of this new analytical approach. In this study, we report that strong and reliable positive and negative molecularmore » signals are achievable after optimizing the SIMS experimental conditions. Four model systems, including a 1,8-diazabicycloundec-7-ene (DBU)-base switchable ionic liquid, a live Shewanella oneidensis biofilm, a hydrated mammalian epithelia cell, and an electrolyte popularly used in Li ion batteries were studied. A signal enhancement of about two orders of magnitude was obtained in comparison with non-optimized conditions. Therefore, molecular ion signal intensity has become very acceptable to use for in situ liquid SIMS to study solid–liquid and liquid–vacuum interfaces.« less

  11. Improving the Molecular Ion Signal Intensity for In Situ Liquid SIMS Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufan; Yao, Juan; Ding, Yuanzhao; Yu, Jiachao; Hua, Xin; Evans, James E; Yu, Xiaofei; Lao, David B; Heldebrant, David J; Nune, Satish K; Cao, Bin; Bowden, Mark E; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Xue-Lin; Zhu, Zihua

    2016-12-01

    In situ liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) enabled by system for analysis at the liquid vacuum interface (SALVI) has proven to be a promising new tool to provide molecular information at solid-liquid and liquid-vacuum interfaces. However, the initial data showed that useful signals in positive ion spectra are too weak to be meaningful in most cases. In addition, it is difficult to obtain strong negative molecular ion signals when m/z>200. These two drawbacks have been the biggest obstacle towards practical use of this new analytical approach. In this study, we report that strong and reliable positive and negative molecular signals are achievable after optimizing the SIMS experimental conditions. Four model systems, including a 1,8-diazabicycloundec-7-ene (DBU)-base switchable ionic liquid, a live Shewanella oneidensis biofilm, a hydrated mammalian epithelia cell, and an electrolyte popularly used in Li ion batteries were studied. A signal enhancement of about two orders of magnitude was obtained in comparison with non-optimized conditions. Therefore, molecular ion signal intensity has become very acceptable for use of in situ liquid SIMS to study solid-liquid and liquid-vacuum interfaces. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Arterial spin-labeling assessment of normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity as a predictor of histologic grade of astrocytic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Furtner, J; Schöpf, V; Schewzow, K; Kasprian, G; Weber, M; Woitek, R; Asenbaum, U; Preusser, M; Marosi, C; Hainfellner, J A; Widhalm, G; Wolfsberger, S; Prayer, D

    2014-03-01

    Pulsed arterial spin-labeling is a noninvasive MR imaging perfusion method performed with the use of water in the arterial blood as an endogenous contrast agent. The purpose of this study was to determine the inversion time with the largest difference in normalized intratumoral signal intensity between high-grade and low-grade astrocytomas. Thirty-three patients with gliomas, histologically classified as low-grade (n = 7) or high-grade astrocytomas (n = 26) according to the World Health Organization brain tumor classification, were included. A 3T MR scanner was used to perform pulsed arterial spin-labeling measurements at 8 different inversion times (370 ms, 614 ms, 864 ms, 1114 ms, 1364 ms, 1614 ms, 1864 ms, and 2114 ms). Normalized intratumoral signal intensity was calculated, which was defined by the signal intensity ratio of the tumor and the contralateral normal brain tissue for all fixed inversion times. A 3-way mixed ANOVA was used to reveal potential differences in the normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity between high-grade and low-grade astrocytomas. The difference in normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity between high-grade and low-grade astrocytomas obtained the most statistically significant results at 370 ms (P = .003, other P values ranged from .012-.955). The inversion time by which to differentiate high-grade and low-grade astrocytomas by use of normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity was 370 ms in our study. The normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity values at this inversion time mainly reflect the labeled intra-arterial blood bolus and therefore could be referred to as normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity. Our data indicate that the use of normalized vascular intratumoral signal intensity values allows differentiation between low-grade and high-grade astrocytomas and thus may serve as a new, noninvasive marker for astrocytoma grading.

  13. Evaluation of a signal intensity mask in the interpretation of functional MR imaging activation maps.

    PubMed

    Strigel, Roberta M; Moritz, Chad H; Haughton, Victor M; Badie, Behnam; Field, Aaron; Wood, David; Hartman, Michael; Rowley, Howard A

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of susceptibility artifacts on functional MR imaging (fMRI) studies and their effect on fMRI readings. We hypothesized that the availability of the signal intensity maps (SIMs) changes the interpretation of fMRI studies in which susceptibility artifacts affected eloquent brain regions. We reviewed 152 consecutive clinical fMRI studies performed with a SIM. The SIM consisted of the initial echo-planar images (EPI) in each section thresholded to eliminate signal intensity from outside the brain and then overlaid on anatomic images. The cause of the artifact was then determined by examining the images. Cases with a susceptibility artifact in eloquent brain were included in a blinded study read by four readers, first without and then with the SIM. For each reader, the number of times the interpretation changed on viewing the SIM was counted. Of 152 patients, 44% had signal intensity loss involving cerebral cortex and 18% involving an eloquent brain region. Causes of the artifacts were: surgical site artifact, blood products, dental devices, calcium, basal ganglia calcifications, ICP monitors, embolization materials, and air. When provided with the SIM, readers changed interpretations in 8-38% of patient cases, depending on reader experience and size and location of susceptibility artifact. Patients referred for clinical fMRI have a high incidence of susceptibility artifacts, whose presence and size can be determined by inspection of the SIM but not anatomic images. The availability of the SIM may affect interpretation of the fMRI.

  14. Light intensity and temperature affect systemic spread of silencing signal in transient agroinfiltration studies.

    PubMed

    Patil, Basavaprabhu L; Fauquet, Claude M

    2015-06-01

    RNA silencing is a sequence-specific post-transcriptional gene inactivation mechanism that operates in diverse organisms and that can extend beyond its site of initiation, owing to the movement of the silencing signal, called non-autonomous gene silencing. Previous studies have shown that several factors manifest the movement of the silencing signal, such as the size (21 or 24 nucleotides) of the secondary small interfering RNA (siRNA) produced, the steady-state concentration of siRNAs and their cognate messenger RNA (mRNA) or a change in the sink-source status of plant parts affecting phloem translocation. Our study shows that both light intensity and temperature have a significant impact on the systemic movement of the silencing signal in transient agroinfiltration studies in Nicotiana benthamiana. At higher light intensities (≥ 450 μE/m(2)/s) and higher temperatures (≥ 30 °C), gene silencing was localized to leaf tissue that was infiltrated, without any systemic spread. Interestingly, in these light and temperature conditions (≥ 450 μE/m(2) /s and ≥ 30 °C), the N. benthamiana plants showed recovery from the viral symptoms. However, the reduced systemic silencing and reduced viral symptom severity at higher light intensities were caused by a change in the sink-source status of the plant, ultimately affecting the phloem translocation of small RNAs or the viral genome. In contrast, at lower light intensities (<300 μE/m(2)/s) with a constant temperature of 25 °C, there was strong systemic movement of the silencing signal in the N. benthamiana plants and reduced recovery from virus infections. The accumulation of gene-specific siRNAs was reduced at higher temperature as a result of a reduction in the accumulation of transcript on transient agroinfiltration of RNA interference (RNAi) constructs, mostly because of poor T-DNA transfer activity of Agrobacterium, possibly also accompanied by reduced phloem translocation. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS

  15. Abnormal brain MRI signals in the splenium of the corpus callosum, basal ganglia and internal capsule in a suspected case with tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Hirotani, Makoto; Yabe, Ichiro; Hamada, Shinsuke; Tsuji, Sachiko; Kikuchi, Seiji; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2007-01-01

    A 34-year-old man visited the hospital with chief complaints of headache, fever, and disturbance of consciousness. In view of his clinical condition, the course of the disease, and results of examination, he was diagnosed with viral meningitis and treated accordingly. However, his clinical condition worsened, and MRI revealed abnormal signals in the splenium of the corpus callosum, in the basal ganglia and in the internal capsule, as well as the presence of severe inflammation in the base of the brain. Since he had a high ADA level in the cerebrospinal fluid and was consequently suspected to have tuberculous meningitis, he was placed on antitubercular agents. Then, his clinical condition began to improve. Additional steroid pulse therapy further improved his condition, and abnormal signals in the splenium of the corpus callosum and the basal ganglia resolved. This valuable case suggests that an immune mechanism contributed to the occurrence of central nervous system symptoms associated with tuberculous meningitis.

  16. Predicting the intensity mapping signal for multi-J CO lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashian, Natalie; Sternberg, Amiel; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel approach to estimating the intensity mapping signal of any CO rotational line emitted during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). Our approach is based on large velocity gradient (LVG) modeling, a radiative transfer modeling technique that generates the full CO spectral line energy distribution (SLED) for a specified gas kinetic temperature, volume density, velocity gradient, molecular abundance, and column density. These parameters, which drive the physics of CO transitions and ultimately dictate the shape and amplitude of the CO SLED, can be linked to the global properties of the host galaxy, mainly the star formation rate (SFR) and the SFR surface density. By further employing an empirically derived SFR-M relation for high redshift galaxies, we can express the LVG parameters, and thus the specific intensity of any CO rotational transition, as functions of the host halo mass M and redshift z. Integrating over the range of halo masses expected to host CO-luminous galaxies, we predict a mean CO(1-0) brightness temperature ranging from ~ 0.6 μK at z = 6 to ~ 0.03 μK at z = 10 with brightness temperature fluctuations of ΔCO2 ~ 0.1 and 0.005 μK respectively, at k = 0.1 Mpc-1. In this model, the CO emission signal remains strong for higher rotational levels at z = 6, with langle TCO rangle ~ 0.3 and 0.05 μK for the CO J = 6arrow5 and CO J = 10arrow9 transitions respectively. Including the effects of CO photodissociation in these molecular clouds, especially at low metallicities, results in the overall reduction in the amplitude of the CO signal, with the low- and high-J lines weakening by 2-20% and 10-45%, respectively, over the redshift range 4 < z < 10.

  17. The relationship between quantitative measures of disc height and disc signal intensity with Pfirrmann score of disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Salamat, Sara; Hutchings, John; Kwong, Clemens; Magnussen, John; Hancock, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    To assess the relationship between quantitative measures of disc height and signal intensity with the Pfirrmann disc degeneration scoring system and to test the inter-rater reliability of the quantitative measures. Participants were 76 people who had recently recovered from their last episode of acute low back pain and underwent MRI scan on a single 3T machine. At all 380 lumbar discs, quantitative measures of disc height and signal intensity were made by 2 independent raters and compared to Pfirrmann scores from a single radiologist. For quantitative measures of disc height and signal intensity a "raw" score and 2 adjusted ratios were calculated and the relationship with Pfirrmann scores was assessed. The inter-tester reliability of quantitative measures was also investigated. There was a strong linear relationship between quantitative disc signal intensity and Pfirrmann scores for grades 1-4, but not for grades 4 and 5. For disc height only, Pfirrmann grade 5 had significantly reduced disc height compared to all other grades. Results were similar regardless of whether raw or adjusted scores were used. Inter-rater reliability for the quantitative measures was excellent (ICC > 0.97). Quantitative measures of disc signal intensity were strongly related to Pfirrmann scores from grade 1 to 4; however disc height only differentiated between grade 4 and 5 Pfirrmann scores. Using adjusted ratios for quantitative measures of disc height or signal intensity did not significantly alter the relationship with Pfirrmann scores.

  18. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation promotes osteoblast differentiation through hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenichi; Shimo, Tsuyoshi; Kurio, Naito; Okui, Tatsuo; Ibaragi, Soichiro; Kunisada, Yuki; Obata, Kyoichi; Masui, Masanori; Pai, Pang; Horikiri, Yuu; Yamanaka, Nobuyuki; Takigawa, Masaharu; Sasaki, Akira

    2018-06-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been used as an adjunct to fracture healing therapies, but the mechanisms underlying its action are not known. We reported that sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling was activated in osteoblasts at the dynamic remodeling site of a bone fracture. Mechanical stimulation is a crucial factor in bone remodeling, and it is related to the primary cilia as a sensor of hedgehog signaling. Here we observed that LIPUS promoted callus formation in accord with Gli2-positive cells after 14 days at the mouse femur fractured site compared with a control group. An immunofluorescence analysis showed that the numbers of primary cilia and cilia/osterix double-positive osteoblasts were increased at the fracture site by LIPUS. LIPUS stimulated not only the number and the length of primary cilia, but also the levels of ciliated protein, Ift88 mRNA, and SHH, Gli1, and Gli2 in MC3T3-E1 cells. Further experiments revealed that LIPUS stimulated osteogenic differentiation in the presence of smoothened agonist (SAG) treatment. These results indicate that LIPUS stimulates osteogenic differentiation and the maturation of osteoblasts by a primary cilium-mediated activation of hedgehog signaling. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Environmental obesogen tributyltin chloride leads to abnormal hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis function by disruption in kisspeptin/leptin signaling in female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, Gabriela C.; Freitas-Lima, Leandro C.; Merlo

    TBT may be associated with abnormal HPG function. A strong negative correlation between the hyperleptinemia and lower Kiss responsiveness was observed in the TBT rats. These findings provide evidence that TBT leads to toxic effects direct on the HPG axis and/or indirectly by abnormal metabolic regulation of the HPG axis. - Highlights: • TBT disrupted proper functioning of the HPG axis in female rats. • TBT leads to obesity and abnormal kisspeptin/leptin signaling in female rats. • TBT impairs GnRH neurons function, estrogen negative feedback role and fertility in female rats. • TBT leads to hyperleptinemia that may be associated at least in part with abnormal HPG function.« less

  20. Diagnosis of retrodiscal tissue in painful temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signal intensity.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Migiwa; Otonari-Yamamoto, Mika; Sano, Tsukasa; Fujikura, Mamiko; Wakoh, Mamoru

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the present study is to analyze the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signal intensity of the retrodiscal tissue in a painful temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and to develop a diagnostic system based on FLAIR data. The study was based on 33 joints of 17 patients referred for MR imaging of the TMJ. Regions of interest were placed over retrodiscal tissue and gray matter (GM) on FLAIR images. Using signal intensities of GM as reference points, signal intensity ratios (SIR) of retrodiscal tissue were calculated. SIRs in painful TMJ were compared with those in painless TMJ. Wilcoxon's Rank Sum Test was used to analyze the difference in SIRs between the painful and painless groups (P<0·05). The SIRs of retrodiscal tissue were significantly higher in painful joints than in painless joints. FLAIR sequences provide a high signal in patients having painful TMJ, and it suggests that retrodiscal tissue in painful TMJ contains elements such as protein.

  1. Pulse-coupled neural nets: translation, rotation, scale, distortion, and intensity signal invariance for images.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J L

    1994-09-10

    The linking-field neural network model of Eckhorn et al. [Neural Comput. 2, 293-307 (1990)] was introduced to explain the experimentally observed synchronous activity among neural assemblies in the cat cortex induced by feature-dependent visual activity. The model produces synchronous bursts of pulses from neurons with similar activity, effectively grouping them by phase and pulse frequency. It gives a basic new function: grouping by similarity. The synchronous bursts are obtained in the limit of strong linking strengths. The linking-field model in the limit of moderate-to-weak linking characterized by few if any multiple bursts is investigated. In this limit dynamic, locally periodic traveling waves exist whose time signal encodes the geometrical structure of a two-dimensional input image. The signal can be made insensitive to translation, scale, rotation, distortion, and intensity. The waves transmit information beyond the physical interconnect distance. The model is implemented in an optical hybrid demonstration system. Results of the simulations and the optical system are presented.

  2. High signal intensity of intervertebral calcified disks on T1-weighted MR images resulting from fat content.

    PubMed

    Malghem, Jacques; Lecouvet, Frédéric E; François, Robert; Vande Berg, Bruno C; Duprez, Thierry; Cosnard, Guy; Maldague, Baudouin E

    2005-02-01

    To explain a cause of high signal intensity on T1-weighted MR images in calcified intervertebral disks associated with spinal fusion. Magnetic resonance and radiological examinations of 13 patients were reviewed, presenting one or several intervertebral disks showing a high signal intensity on T1-weighted MR images, associated both with the presence of calcifications in the disks and with peripheral fusion of the corresponding spinal segments. Fusion was due to ligament ossifications (n=8), ankylosing spondylitis (n=4), or posterior arthrodesis (n=1). Imaging files included X-rays and T1-weighted MR images in all cases, T2-weighted MR images in 12 cases, MR images with fat signal suppression in 7 cases, and a CT scan in 1 case. Histological study of a calcified disk from an anatomical specimen of an ankylosed lumbar spine resulting from ankylosing spondylitis was examined. The signal intensity of the disks was similar to that of the bone marrow or of perivertebral fat both on T1-weighted MR images and on all sequences, including those with fat signal suppression. In one of these disks, a strongly negative absorption coefficient was focally measured by CT scan, suggesting a fatty content. The histological examination of the ankylosed calcified disk revealed the presence of well-differentiated bone tissue and fatty marrow within the disk. The high signal intensity of some calcified intervertebral disks on T1-weighted MR images can result from the presence of fatty marrow, probably related to a disk ossification process in ankylosed spines.

  3. Consistency of signal intensity and T2* in frozen ex vivo heart muscle, kidney, and liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Elena A; Josan, Sonal; Lu, Aiming; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Daniel, Bruce L; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2010-03-01

    To investigate tissue dependence of the MRI-based thermometry in frozen tissue by quantification and comparison of signal intensity and T2* of ex vivo frozen tissue of three different types: heart muscle, kidney, and liver. Tissue samples were frozen and imaged on a 0.5 Tesla MRI scanner with ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence. Signal intensity and T2* were determined as the temperature of the tissue samples was decreased from room temperature to approximately -40 degrees C. Statistical analysis was performed for (-20 degrees C, -5 degrees C) temperature interval. The findings of this study demonstrate that signal intensity and T2* are consistent across three types of tissue for (-20 degrees C, -5 degrees C) temperature interval. Both parameters can be used to calculate a single temperature calibration curve for all three types of tissue and potentially in the future serve as a foundation for tissue-independent MRI-based thermometry.

  4. Influence of signal intensity non-uniformity on brain volumetry using an atlas-based method.

    PubMed

    Goto, Masami; Abe, Osamu; Miyati, Tosiaki; Kabasawa, Hiroyuki; Takao, Hidemasa; Hayashi, Naoto; Kurosu, Tomomi; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Yamashita, Fumio; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Aoki, Shigeki; Ino, Kenji; Yano, Keiichi; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have reported pre-processing effects for brain volumetry; however, no study has investigated whether non-parametric non-uniform intensity normalization (N3) correction processing results in reduced system dependency when using an atlas-based method. To address this shortcoming, the present study assessed whether N3 correction processing provides reduced system dependency in atlas-based volumetry. Contiguous sagittal T1-weighted images of the brain were obtained from 21 healthy participants, by using five magnetic resonance protocols. After image preprocessing using the Statistical Parametric Mapping 5 software, we measured the structural volume of the segmented images with the WFU-PickAtlas software. We applied six different bias-correction levels (Regularization 10, Regularization 0.0001, Regularization 0, Regularization 10 with N3, Regularization 0.0001 with N3, and Regularization 0 with N3) to each set of images. The structural volume change ratio (%) was defined as the change ratio (%) = (100 × [measured volume - mean volume of five magnetic resonance protocols] / mean volume of five magnetic resonance protocols) for each bias-correction level. A low change ratio was synonymous with lower system dependency. The results showed that the images with the N3 correction had a lower change ratio compared with those without the N3 correction. The present study is the first atlas-based volumetry study to show that the precision of atlas-based volumetry improves when using N3-corrected images. Therefore, correction for signal intensity non-uniformity is strongly advised for multi-scanner or multi-site imaging trials.

  5. Influence of Signal Intensity Non-Uniformity on Brain Volumetry Using an Atlas-Based Method

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Osamu; Miyati, Tosiaki; Kabasawa, Hiroyuki; Takao, Hidemasa; Hayashi, Naoto; Kurosu, Tomomi; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Yamashita, Fumio; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Aoki, Shigeki; Ino, Kenji; Yano, Keiichi; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2012-01-01

    Objective Many studies have reported pre-processing effects for brain volumetry; however, no study has investigated whether non-parametric non-uniform intensity normalization (N3) correction processing results in reduced system dependency when using an atlas-based method. To address this shortcoming, the present study assessed whether N3 correction processing provides reduced system dependency in atlas-based volumetry. Materials and Methods Contiguous sagittal T1-weighted images of the brain were obtained from 21 healthy participants, by using five magnetic resonance protocols. After image preprocessing using the Statistical Parametric Mapping 5 software, we measured the structural volume of the segmented images with the WFU-PickAtlas software. We applied six different bias-correction levels (Regularization 10, Regularization 0.0001, Regularization 0, Regularization 10 with N3, Regularization 0.0001 with N3, and Regularization 0 with N3) to each set of images. The structural volume change ratio (%) was defined as the change ratio (%) = (100 × [measured volume - mean volume of five magnetic resonance protocols] / mean volume of five magnetic resonance protocols) for each bias-correction level. Results A low change ratio was synonymous with lower system dependency. The results showed that the images with the N3 correction had a lower change ratio compared with those without the N3 correction. Conclusion The present study is the first atlas-based volumetry study to show that the precision of atlas-based volumetry improves when using N3-corrected images. Therefore, correction for signal intensity non-uniformity is strongly advised for multi-scanner or multi-site imaging trials. PMID:22778560

  6. Statistical analysis of measured free-space laser signal intensity over a 2.33 km optical path.

    PubMed

    Tunick, Arnold

    2007-10-17

    Experimental research is conducted to determine the characteristic behavior of high frequency laser signal intensity data collected over a 2.33 km optical path. Results focus mainly on calculated power spectra and frequency distributions. In addition, a model is developed to calculate optical turbulence intensity (C(n)/2) as a function of receiving and transmitting aperture diameter, log-amplitude variance, and path length. Initial comparisons of calculated to measured C(n)/2 data are favorable. It is anticipated that this kind of signal data analysis will benefit laser communication systems development and testing at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and elsewhere.

  7. Long-term reproducibility of phantom signal intensities in nonuniformity corrected STIR-MRI examinations of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Viddeleer, Alain R; Sijens, Paul E; van Ooijen, Peter M A; Kuypers, Paul D L; Hovius, Steven E R; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2009-08-01

    Nerve regeneration could be monitored by comparing MRI image intensities in time, as denervated muscles display increased signal intensity in STIR sequences. In this study long-term reproducibility of STIR image intensity was assessed under clinical conditions and the required image intensity nonuniformity correction was improved by using phantom scans obtained at multiple positions. Three-dimensional image intensity nonuniformity was investigated in phantom scans. Next, over a three-year period, 190 clinical STIR hand scans were obtained using a standardized acquisition protocol, and corrected for intensity nonuniformity by using the results of phantom scanning. The results of correction with 1, 3, and 11 phantom scans were compared. The image intensities in calibration tubes close to the hands were measured every time to determine the reproducibility of our method. With calibration, the reproducibility of STIR image intensity improved from 7.8 to 6.4%. Image intensity nonuniformity correction with 11 phantom scans gave significantly better results than correction with 1 or 3 scans. The image intensities in clinical STIR images acquired at different times can be compared directly, provided that the acquisition protocol is standardized and that nonuniformity correction is applied. Nonuniformity correction is preferably based on multiple phantom scans.

  8. Electronic polarization-division demultiplexing based on digital signal processing in intensity-modulation direct-detection optical communication systems.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2014-01-27

    We propose a novel configuration of optical receivers for intensity-modulation direct-detection (IM · DD) systems, which can cope with dual-polarization (DP) optical signals electrically. Using a Stokes analyzer and a newly-developed digital signal-processing (DSP) algorithm, we can achieve polarization tracking and demultiplexing in the digital domain after direct detection. Simulation results show that the power penalty stemming from digital polarization manipulations is negligibly small.

  9. Signal intensity of lanthanum carbonate on magnetic resonance images: phantom study.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shinichi; Awai, Kazuo; Komi, Masanori; Morita, Kosuke; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Yanaga, Yumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Date, Shuji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2011-06-01

    Lanthanum carbonate (LC) is used to treat hyperphosphatemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the signal intensity (SI) of LC on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of phantoms. LC tablets were thoroughly ground and mixed with distilled water or edible agar (0.05, 0.25, 0.5, and 2.5 mg/ml) in plastic bottles. Four intact tablets were placed in plastic bottles that did or did not contain distilled water or agar. Two radiologists consensually evaluated T1- and T2-weighted images (WIs) obtained with 1.5- and 3.0-T MRI systems for the SI of unground and ground tablets. On T1- and T2WI, the SIs of the LC suspensions and the solvents alone were similar; the SIs of unground tablets alone and of the air were also similar. Unground tablets in phantoms filled with solvent exhibited lower SI than the solvent. Ground tablets in suspension were not visualized on MRI or computed tomography. These results remained unchanged regardless of differences in magnetic field strength or the solvent used. Ground LC had no contrast enhancement effect on T1WI; on T2WI it did not affect the SI of the solvent. Unground LC tablets may be visualized as a "filling defect" on MRI.

  10. The impact of relative intensity noise on the signal in multiple reference optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhaus, Kai; Subhash, Hrebesh; Alexandrov, Sergey; Dsouza, Roshan; Hogan, Josh; Wilson, Carol; Leahy, Martin; Slepneva, Svetlana; Huyet, Guillaume

    2016-03-01

    Multiple reference optical coherence tomography (MR-OCT) applies a unique low-cost solution to enhance the scanning depth of standard time domain OCT by inserting an partial mirror into the reference arm of the interferometric system. This novel approach achieves multiple reflections for different layers and depths of an sample with minimal effort of engineering and provides an excellent platform for low-cost OCT systems based on well understood production methods for micro-mechanical systems such as CD/DVD pick-up systems. The direct integration of a superluminescent light-emitting diode (SLED) is a preferable solution to reduce the form- factor of an MR-OCT system. Such direct integration exposes the light source to environmental conditions that can increase fluctuations in heat dissipation and vibrations and affect the noise characteristics of the output spectrum. This work describes the impact of relative intensity noise (RIN) on the quality of the interference signal of MR-OCT related to a variety of environmental conditions, such as temperature.

  11. Abnormal structural luteolysis in ovaries of the senescence accelerated mouse (SAM): expression of Fas ligand/Fas-mediated apoptosis signaling molecules in luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Kiso, Minako; Manabe, Noboru; Komatsu, Kohji; Shimabe, Munetake; Miyamoto, Hajime

    2003-12-01

    Senescence accelerated mouse-prone (SAMP) mice with a shortened life span show accelerated changes in many of the signs of aging and a shorter reproductive life span than SAM-resistant (SAMR) controls. We previously showed that functional regression (progesterone dissimilation) occurs in abnormally accumulated luteal bodies (aaLBs) of SAMP mice, but structural regression of luteal cells in aaLB is inhibited. A deficiency of luteal cell apoptosis causes the abnormal accumulation of LBs in SAMP ovaries. In the present study, to show the abnormality of Fas ligand (FasL)/Fas-mediated apoptosis signal transducing factors in the aaLBs of the SAMP ovaries, we assessed the changes in the expression of FasL, Fas, caspase-8 and caspase-3 mRNAs by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and in the expression and localization of FasL, Fas and activated caspase-3 proteins by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively, during the estrus cycle/luteolysis. These mRNAs and proteins were expressed in normal LBs of both SAMP and SAMR ovaries, but not at all or only in trace amounts in aaLBs of SAMP, indicating that structural regression is inhibited by blockage of the expression of these transducing factors in luteal cells of aaLBs in SAMP mice.

  12. Quantification of myocardial perfusion based on signal intensity of flow sensitized MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeykoon, Sumeda B.

    The quantitative assessment of perfusion is important for early recognition of a variety of heart diseases, determination of disease severity and their cure. In conventional approach of measuring cardiac perfusion by arterial spin labeling, the relative difference in the apparent T1 relaxation times in response to selective and non-selective inversion of blood entering the region of interest is related to perfusion via a two-compartment tissue model. But accurate determination of T1 in small animal hearts is difficult and prone to errors due to long scan times. The purpose of this study is to develop a fast, robust and simple method to quantitatively assess myocardial perfusion using arterial spin labeling. The proposed method is based on signal intensities (SI) of inversion recovery slice-select, non-select and steady-state images. Especially in this method data are acquired at a single inversion time and at short repetition times. This study began by investigating the accuracy of assessment of perfusion using a two compartment system. First, determination of perfusion by T1 and SI were implemented to a simple, two-compartment phantom model. Mathematical model developed for full spin exchange models (in-vivo experiments) by solving a modified Bloch equation was modified to develop mathematical models (T1 and SI) for a phantom (zero spin exchange). The phantom result at different flow rates shows remarkable evidence of accuracy of the two-compartment model and SI, T1 methods: the SI method has less propagation error and less scan time. Next, twelve healthy C57BL/6 mice were scanned for quantitative perfusion assessment and three of them were repeatedly scanned at three different time points for a reproducibility test. The myocardial perfusion of healthy mice obtained by the SI-method, 5.7+/-1.6 ml/g/min, was similar (p=0.38) to that obtained by the conventional T1 method, 5.6+/- 2.3 ml/g/min. The reproducibility of the SI method shows acceptable results: the

  13. GABA receptor subunit distribution and FMRP-mGluR5 signaling abnormalities in the cerebellum of subjects with schizophrenia, mood disorders, and autism

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Folsom, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. GABAergic receptor abnormalities have been documented in several major psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, mood disorders, and autism. Abnormal expression of mRNA and protein for multiple GABA receptors has also been observed in multiple brain regions leading to alterations in the balance between excitatory/inhibitory signaling in the brain with potential profound consequences for normal cognition and maintenance of mood and perception. Altered expression of GABAA receptor subunits has been documented in Fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) knockout mice, suggesting that loss of its protein product, fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), impacts GABAA subunit expression. Recent postmortem studies from our laboratory have shown reduced expression of FMRP in brains of subjects with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, and autism. FMRP acts as a translational repressor and, under normal conditions, inhibits metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5)-mediated signaling. In fragile X syndrome (FXS), absence of FMRP is hypothesized to lead to unregulated mGluR5 signaling, ultimately resulting in the behavioral and intellectual impairments associated with this disorder. Our laboratory has identified changes in mGluR5 expression in autism, schizophrenia, and mood disorders. In the current review article, we discuss our postmortem data on GABA receptors, FMRP, and mGluR5 levels and compare our results with other laboratories. Finally, we discuss the interactions between these molecules and the potential for new therapeutic interventions that target these interconnected signaling systems. PMID:25432637

  14. GABA receptor subunit distribution and FMRP-mGluR5 signaling abnormalities in the cerebellum of subjects with schizophrenia, mood disorders, and autism.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, S Hossein; Folsom, Timothy D

    2015-09-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. GABAergic receptor abnormalities have been documented in several major psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, mood disorders, and autism. Abnormal expression of mRNA and protein for multiple GABA receptors has also been observed in multiple brain regions leading to alterations in the balance between excitatory/inhibitory signaling in the brain with potential profound consequences for normal cognition and maintenance of mood and perception. Altered expression of GABAA receptor subunits has been documented in fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) knockout mice, suggesting that loss of its protein product, fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), impacts GABAA subunit expression. Recent postmortem studies from our laboratory have shown reduced expression of FMRP in the brains of subjects with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, and autism. FMRP acts as a translational repressor and, under normal conditions, inhibits metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5)-mediated signaling. In fragile X syndrome (FXS), the absence of FMRP is hypothesized to lead to unregulated mGluR5 signaling, ultimately resulting in the behavioral and intellectual impairments associated with this disorder. Our laboratory has identified changes in mGluR5 expression in autism, schizophrenia, and mood disorders. In the current review article, we discuss our postmortem data on GABA receptors, FMRP, and mGluR5 levels and compare our results with other laboratories. Finally, we discuss the interactions between these molecules and the potential for new therapeutic interventions that target these interconnected signaling systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Trans-Resveratrol on hyperglycemia-induced abnormal spermatogenesis, DNA damage and alterations in poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase signaling in rat testis

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelali, Ala

    Diabetes induces oxidative stress, DNA damage and alters several intracellular signaling pathways in organ systems. This study investigated modulatory effects of Trans-Resveratrol on type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM)-induced abnormal spermatogenesis, DNA damage and alterations in poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) signaling in rat testis. Trans-Resveratrol administration (5mg/kg/day, ip) to Streptozotocin-induced T1DM adult male Wistar rats from day 22–42 resulted in recovery of induced oxidative stress, abnormal spermatogenesis and inhibited DNA synthesis, and led to mitigation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine formation in the testis and spermatozoa, and DNA double-strand breaks in the testis. Trans-Resveratrol aggravated T1DM-induced up-regulation of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex-interacting multifunctional proteinmore » 2 expression; however, it did not modify the up-regulated total PARP and down-regulated PARP1 expressions, but recovered the decreased SirT1 (Sirtuin 1) levels in T1DM rat testis. Trans-Resveratrol, when given alone, reduced the poly (ADP-ribosyl)ation (pADPr) process in the testis due to an increase in PAR glycohydrolase activity, but when given to T1DM rats it did not affect the pADPr levels. T1DM with or without Trans-Resveratrol did not induce nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and the formation of 50 kb DNA breaks, suggesting to the lack of caspase-3-independent cell death called parthanatos. T1DM with or without Trans-Resveratrol did not increase necrotic cell death in the testis. Primary spermatocytes, Sertoli cells, Leydig cells and intra-testicular vessels showed the expression of PARP pathway related proteins. In conclusion, Trans-Resveratrol mitigates T1DM-induced sperm abnormality and DNA damage, but does not significantly modulate PARP signaling pathway, except the SirT1 expression, in the rat testis. - Highlights: • Resveratrol inhibits diabetes-induced abnormal sperm morphogenesis • Resveratrol recovers

  16. Mis-segmentation in voxel-based morphometry due to a signal intensity change in the putamen.

    PubMed

    Goto, Masami; Abe, Osamu; Miyati, Tosiaki; Aoki, Shigeki; Gomi, Tsutomu; Takeda, Tohoru

    2017-12-01

    The aims of this study were to demonstrate an association between changes in the signal intensity of the putamen on three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance images (3D-T1WI) and mis-segmentation, using the voxel-based morphometry (VBM) 8 toolbox. The sagittal 3D-T1WIs of 22 healthy volunteers were obtained for VBM analysis using the 1.5-T MR scanner. We prepared five levels of 3D-T1WI signal intensity (baseline, same level, background level, low level, and high level) in regions of interest containing the putamen. Groups of smoothed, spatially normalized tissue images were compared to the baseline group using a paired t test. The baseline was compared to the other four levels. In all comparisons, significant volume changes were observed around and outside the area that included the signal intensity change. The present study demonstrated an association between a change in the signal intensity of the putamen on 3D-T1WI and changed volume in segmented tissue images.

  17. Quantitative signal intensity alteration in infrapatellar fat pad predict incident radiographic osteoarthritis: the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kang; Ding, Changhai; Hannon, Michael J; Chen, Zhongshan; Kwoh, C Kent; Hunter, David J

    2018-04-12

    To determine if infrapatellar fat pad (IPFP) signal intensity (SI) measures are predictive of incident radiographic osteoarthritis (iROA) over 4 years in the OA Initiative (OAI) study. Case knees (n=355) defined by iROA were matched one-to-one by gender, age and radiographic status with control knees. T2-weighted MR images were assessed at P0 (the visit when iROA was found on radiograph), P-1 (1 year prior to P0) and baseline, and utilized to assess IPFP SI semi-automatically using MATLAB. Conditional logistic regression analyses were used to assess risk of iROA associated with IPFP SI alteration after adjustment for covariates. Participants were on average 60.2 years old, predominantly female (66.7%) and overweight (mean BMI: 28.3). Baseline IPFP measures including mean value and standard deviation of IPFP SI [Mean(IPFP), sDev(IPFP)] (HR, 95%CI: 5.2, 1.1 to 23.6 and 5.7, 2.2 to 14.5, respectively), mean value and standard deviation of IPFP high SI [Mean(H), sDev(H)] (HR, 95%CI: 3.3, 1.7 to 6.4 and 3.1, 1.3 to 7.7, respectively), median value and upper quartile value of IPFP high SI [Median(H), UQ(H)], and clustering effect of high SI [Clustering factor(H)] were associated with iROA during 4 years. All P-1 IPFP measures were associated with iROA after 12 months. P-0 IPFP SI measures were all associated with ROA. The quantitative segmentation of high signal in IPFP is confirming previous work based on semiquantitative assessment suggesting its predictive validity. The IPFP high SI alteration could be an important imaging biomarker to predict the occurrence of radiographic OA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamic characteristics of T2*-weighted signal in calf muscles of peripheral artery disease during low-intensity exercise.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijun; Muller, Matthew D; Wang, Jianli; Sica, Christopher T; Karunanayaka, Prasanna; Sinoway, Lawrence I; Yang, Qing X

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the dynamic characteristics of T2* -weighted signal change in exercising skeletal muscle of healthy subjects and peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients under a low-intensity exercise paradigm. Nine PAD patients and nine age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers underwent a low-intensity exercise paradigm while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (3.0T) was obtained. T2*-weighted signal time-courses in lateral gastrocnemius, medial gastrocnemius, soleus, and tibialis anterior were acquired and analyzed. Correlations were performed between dynamic T2*-weighted signal and changes in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, leg pain, and perceived exertion. A significant signal decrease was observed during exercise in soleus and tibialis anterior of healthy participants (P = 0.0007-0.04 and 0.001-0.009, respectively). In PAD, negative signals were observed (P = 0.008-0.02 and 0.003-0.01, respectively) in soleus and lateral gastrocnemius during the early exercise stage. Then the signal gradually increased above the baseline in the lateral gastrocnemius during and after exercise in six of the eight patients who completed the study. This signal increase in patients' lateral gastrocnemius was significantly greater than in healthy subjects' during the later exercise stage (two-sample t-tests, P = 0.001-0.03). Heart rate and mean arterial pressure responses to exercise were significantly higher in PAD than healthy subjects (P = 0.036 and 0.008, respectively) and the patients experienced greater leg pain and exertion (P = 0.006 and P = 0.0014, respectively). During low-intensity exercise, there were different dynamic T2*-weighted signal behavior in the healthy and PAD exercising muscles. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:40-48. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. An odor-specific threshold deficit implicates abnormal cAMP signaling in youths at clinical risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Vidyulata; Moberg, Paul J; Calkins, Monica E; Borgmann-Winter, Karin; Conroy, Catherine G; Gur, Raquel E; Kohler, Christian G; Turetsky, Bruce I

    2012-07-01

    While olfactory deficits have been reported in schizophrenia and youths at-risk for psychosis, few studies have linked these deficits to current pathophysiological models of the illness. There is evidence that disrupted cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) signaling may contribute to schizophrenia pathology. As cAMP mediates olfactory signal transduction, the degree to which this disruption could manifest in olfactory impairment was ascertained. Odor-detection thresholds to two odorants that differ in the degree to which they activate intracellular cAMP were assessed in clinical risk and low-risk participants. Birhinal assessments of odor-detection threshold sensitivity to lyral and citralva were acquired in youths experiencing prodromal symptoms (n=17) and controls at low risk for developing psychosis (n=15). Citralva and lyral are odorants that differ in cAMP activation; citralva is a strong cAMP activator and lyral is a weak cAMP activator. The overall group-by-odor interaction was statistically significant. At-risk youths showed significantly reduced odor detection thresholds for lyral, but showed intact detection thresholds for citralva. This odor-specific threshold deficit was uncorrelated with deficits in odor identification or discrimination, which were also present. ROC curve analysis revealed that olfactory performance correctly classified at-risk and low-risk youths with greater than 97% accuracy. This study extends prior findings of an odor-specific hyposmia implicating cAMP-mediated signal transduction in schizophrenia and unaffected first-degree relatives to include youths at clinical risk for developing the disorder. These results suggest that dysregulation of cAMP signaling may be present during the psychosis prodrome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. An odor-specific threshold deficit implicates abnormal cAMP signaling in youths at clinical risk for psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Vidyulata; Moberg, Paul J.; Calkins, Monica E.; Borgmann-Winter, Karin; Conroy, Catherine G.; Gur, Raquel E.; Kohler, Christian G.; Turetsky, Bruce I.

    2012-01-01

    Background While olfactory deficits have been reported in schizophrenia and youths at-risk for psychosis, few studies have linked these deficits to current pathophysiological models of the illness. There is evidence that disrupted cyclic adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP) signaling may contribute to schizophrenia pathology. As cAMP mediates olfactory signal transduction, the degree to which this disruption could manifest in olfactory impairment was ascertained. Odor-detection thresholds to two odorants that differ in the degree to which they activate intracellular cAMP were assessed in clinical risk and low-risk participants. Method Birhinal assessments of odor-detection threshold sensitivity to lyral and citralva were acquired in youths experiencing prodromal symptoms (n = 17) and controls at low risk for developing psychosis (n = 15). Citralva and lyral are odorants that differ in cAMP activation; citralva is a strong cAMP activator and lyral is a weak cAMP activator. Results The overall group-by-odor interaction was statistically significant. At-risk youths showed significantly reduced odor detection thresholds for lyral, but showed intact detection thresholds for citralva. This odor-specific threshold deficit was uncorrelated with deficits in odor identification or discrimination, which were also present. ROC curve analysis revealed that olfactory performance correctly classified at-risk and low-risk youths with greater than 97% accuracy. Conclusions This study extends prior findings of an odor-specific hyposmia implicating cAMP-mediated signal transduction in schizophrenia and unaffected first-degree relatives to include youths at clinical risk for developing the disorder. These results suggest that dysregulation of cAMP signaling may be present during the psychosis prodrome. PMID:22537567

  1. Decreased SAP expression in T cells from patients with SLE contributes to early signaling abnormalities and reduced IL-2 production

    PubMed Central

    Karampetsou, Maria P.; Comte, Denis; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C.; Tsokos, George C.

    2016-01-01

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of functions including increased early signaling events following engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR). Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family (SLAMF) cell surface receptors and the X-chromosome-defined signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) adaptor are important in the development of several immunocyte lineages and modulating immune response. Here we present evidence that SAP protein levels are decreased in T cells and in their main subsets isolated from 32 women and 3 men with SLE independently of disease activity. In SLE T cells the SAP protein is also subject to increased degradation by a caspase-3. Forced expression of SAP in SLE T cells simultaneously heightened IL-2 production, calcium (Ca2+) responses and tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of proteins. Exposure of normal T cells to SLE serum IgG, known to contain anti-CD3/TCR antibodies, resulted in SAP downregulation. We conclude that SLE T cells display reduced levels of the adaptor protein SAP probably as a result of continuous T cell activation and degradation by caspase-3. Restoration of SAP levels in SLE T cells corrects the overexcitable lupus T cell phenotype. PMID:27183584

  2. Correlation of the near-infrared spectroscopy signals with signal intensity in T(2)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the human masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Kuboki, T; Suzuki, K; Maekawa, K; Inoue-Minakuchi, M; Acero, C O; Yanagi, Y; Wakasa, T; Kishi, K; Yatani, H; Clark, G T

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast blood volume changes transcutaneously measured using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy against water signal intensity changes taken from a transverse T(2)-weighted MR image of the masseter muscle in healthy human subjects before, during and after contraction. Eight healthy non-smoking males with no history of chronic muscle pain or vascular headaches participated (mean age: 23.9+/-0.6 years). The MRI data were gathered using a turbo spin echo sequence (TR: 2300 ms; TE: 90 ms; FOV: 188x300 mm; scanning time: 30 s; slice thickness: 10 mm) and the slice level was set at the mid-point between the origin and insertion of the masseter. Intramuscular haemoglobin (Hb) levels and water content of the right masseter muscle were continuously monitored for 2 min before, 30 s during and 15 min after a maximum voluntary clenching (MVC) task. Both the near-infrared and MRI data were baseline-corrected and normalized and mean levels were established and plotted. Plots of the data showed that both near-infrared-based total Hb and T(2)-weighted MRI-based signal-intensity levels clearly decreased during contraction and a clear post-contraction rebound response was evident after the contraction. The near-infrared data were found to be highly correlated with MRI-based signal-intensity data (Pearson's r=0.909, P<0.0001). In conclusion, these data provide powerful evidence that near-infrared data (total Hb), transcutaneously taken from the masseter muscle in humans, will reflect the intramuscular water signal intensity changes seen using a T(2)-weighted MRI imaging method.

  3. [Abnormal expression of genes that regulate retinoid metabolism and signaling in non-small-cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, E S; Zinovieva, O L; Oparina, N Yu; Prokofjeva, M M; Spirin, P V; Favorskaya, I A; Zborovskaya, I B; Lisitsyn, N A; Prassolov, V S; Mashkova, T D

    2016-01-01

    Retinoids are signaling molecules that control a wide variety of cellular processes and possess antitumor activity. This work presents a comprehensive description of changes in the expression of 23 genes that regulate retinoid metabolism and signaling in non-small-cell lung cancer tumors compared to adjacent normal tissues obtained using RT-PCR. Even at early stages of malignant transformation, a significant decrease in ADH1B, ADH3, RDHL, and RALDH1 mRNA levels was observed in 82, 79, 73, and 64% of tumor specimens, respectively, and a considerable increase in AKR1B10 mRNA content was observed in 80% of tumors. Dramatic changes in the levels of these mRNAs can impair the synthesis of all-trans retinoic acid, a key natural regulatory retinoid. Apart from that, it was found that mRNA levels of nuclear retinoid receptor genes RXRγ, RARα, RXRα, and gene RDH11 were significantly decreased in 80, 67, 57, and 66% of tumor specimens, respectively. Thus, neoplastic transformation of lung tissue cells is accompanied with deregulated expression of key genes of retinoid metabolism and function.

  4. Diagnosis of retrodiscal tissue in painful temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signal intensity.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Migiwa; Otonari-Yamamoto, Mika; Sano, Tsukasa; Fujikura, Mamiko; Wakoh, Mamoru

    2014-09-09

    Aims: The purpose of the present study is to analyze the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) signal intensity of the retrodiscal tissue in a painful temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and to develop a diagnostic system based on FLAIR data. Methodology: The study was based on 33 joints of 17 patients referred for MR imaging of the TMJ. Regions of interest were placed over retrodiscal tissue and gray matter (GM) on FLAIR images. Using signal intensities of GM as reference points, signal intensity ratios (SIR) of retrodiscal tissue were calculated. SIRs in painful TMJ were compared with those in painless TMJ. Wilcoxon's Rank Sum Test was used to analyze the difference in SIRs between the painful and painless groups (P<0·05). Results: The SIRs of retrodiscal tissue were significantly higher in painful joints than in painless joints. Conclusion: FLAIR sequences provide a high signal in patients having painful TMJ, and it suggests that retrodiscal tissue in painful TMJ contains elements such as protein.

  5. Decreased SAP Expression in T Cells from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Contributes to Early Signaling Abnormalities and Reduced IL-2 Production.

    PubMed

    Karampetsou, Maria P; Comte, Denis; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C; Tsokos, George C

    2016-06-15

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of abnormalities, including increased early signaling events following engagement of the TCR. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family cell surface receptors and the X-chromosome-defined signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) adaptor are important in the development of several immunocyte lineages and modulating the immune response. We present evidence that SAP protein levels are decreased in T cells and in their main subsets isolated from 32 women and three men with SLE, independent of disease activity. In SLE T cells, SAP protein is also subject to increased degradation by caspase-3. Forced expression of SAP in SLE T cells normalized IL-2 production, calcium (Ca(2+)) responses, and tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of proteins. Exposure of normal T cells to SLE serum IgG, known to contain anti-CD3/TCR Abs, resulted in SAP downregulation. We conclude that SLE T cells display reduced levels of the adaptor protein SAP, probably as a result of continuous T cell activation and degradation by caspase-3. Restoration of SAP levels in SLE T cells corrects the overexcitable lupus T cell phenotype. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Reference-tissue correction of T2-weighted signal intensity for prostate cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yahui; Jiang, Yulei; Oto, Aytekin

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether correction with respect to reference tissue of T2-weighted MRimage signal intensity (SI) improves its effectiveness for classification of regions of interest (ROIs) as prostate cancer (PCa) or normal prostatic tissue. Two image datasets collected retrospectively were used in this study: 71 cases acquired with GE scanners (dataset A), and 59 cases acquired with Philips scanners (dataset B). Through a consensus histology- MR correlation review, 175 PCa and 108 normal-tissue ROIs were identified and drawn manually. Reference-tissue ROIs were selected in each case from the levator ani muscle, urinary bladder, and pubic bone. T2-weighted image SI was corrected as the ratio of the average T2-weighted image SI within an ROI to that of a reference-tissue ROI. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the effectiveness of T2-weighted image SIs for differentiation of PCa from normal-tissue ROIs. AUC (+/- standard error) for uncorrected T2-weighted image SIs was 0.78+/-0.04 (datasets A) and 0.65+/-0.05 (datasets B). AUC for corrected T2-weighted image SIs with respect to muscle, bladder, and bone reference was 0.77+/-0.04 (p=1.0), 0.77+/-0.04 (p=1.0), and 0.75+/-0.04 (p=0.8), respectively, for dataset A; and 0.81+/-0.04 (p=0.002), 0.78+/-0.04 (p<0.001), and 0.79+/-0.04 (p<0.001), respectively, for dataset B. Correction in reference to the levator ani muscle yielded the most consistent results between GE and Phillips images. Correction of T2-weighted image SI in reference to three types of extra-prostatic tissue can improve its effectiveness for differentiation of PCa from normal-tissue ROIs, and correction in reference to the levator ani muscle produces consistent T2-weighted image SIs between GE and Phillips MR images.

  7. Abnormal Activation of RhoA/ROCK-I Signaling in Junctional Zone Smooth Muscle Cells of Patients With Adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Duan, H; Zhang, Y; Sun, F Q

    2016-03-01

    Adenomyosis (ADS) is a common estrogen-dependent gynecological disease with unknown etiology. The RhoA/Rho-kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway is involved in various cellular functions, including migration, proliferation, and smooth muscle contraction. Here we examined the potential role of this pathway in junctional zone (JZ) contraction in women with and without ADS. We demonstrated that in the normal JZ, RhoA and ROCK-I messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression was significantly higher in the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle than in the secretory phase. Expression of RhoA and ROCK-I in the JZ from women with ADS was significantly higher than in the control women and showed no significant differences across the menstrual cycle. Treatment of JZ smooth muscle cells (JZSMCs) with estrogen at 0, 1, 10, or 100 nmol/L for 24 hours resulted in increased expression of RhoA, ROCK-I, and myosin light-chain (MLC) phosphorylation (p-MLC) in a dose-dependent manner. In parallel to its effects on p-MLC, estrogen-mediated, dose-dependent contraction responses in JZSMCs. Estrogen-mediated contraction in the ADS group was significantly higher than in the controls and also showed no significant differences across the menstrual cycle. These effects were suppressed in the presence of ICI 182780 or Y27632, supporting an estrogen receptor-dependent and RhoA activation-dependent mechanism. Our results indicate that the level of RhoA and ROCK-I increases in patients with ADS and the cyclic change is lost. Estrogen may affect uterine JZ contraction of ADS by enhancing RhoA/ ROCK-I signaling. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Relationships between laser powers and photoacoustic signal intensities of flavin adenine dinucleotide and beta-carotene dissolved in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imakubo, Keiichi

    1994-10-01

    Ar ion laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy has been performed on 0.01 mu M flavin adenine dinucleotide in H2O and 0.01 mu M beta-carotene in n-hexane where the optical absorption spectroscopy is not applicable. On the basis of the linear relationships between laser powers and photoacoustic signal intensities up to 500 mW, it may be concluded that laser power ranging from 10 to 50 mW is required for the successful observation of photoacoustic signals without any photochemical or photobiological effects.

  9. Wavelength reused bidirectional transmission of adaptively modulated optical OFDM signals in WDM-PONs incorporating SOA and RSOA intensity modulators.

    PubMed

    Wei, J L; Hugues-Salas, E; Giddings, R P; Jin, X Q; Zheng, X; Mansoor, S; Tang, J M

    2010-05-10

    Detailed numerical investigations are undertaken of wavelength reused bidirectional transmission of adaptively modulated optical OFDM (AMOOFDM) signals over a single SMF in a colorless WDM-PON incorporating a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) intensity modulator and a reflective SOA (RSOA) intensity modulator in the optical line termination and optical network unit, respectively. A comprehensive theoretical model describing the performance of such network scenarios is, for the first time, developed, taking into account dynamic optical characteristics of SOA and RSOA intensity modulators as well as the effects of Rayleigh backscattering (RB) and residual downstream signal-induced crosstalk. The developed model is rigorously verified experimentally in RSOA-based real-time end-to-end OOFDM systems at 7.5 Gb/s. It is shown that the RB noise and crosstalk effects are dominant factors limiting the maximum achievable downstream and upstream transmission performance. Under optimum SOA and RSOA operating conditions as well as practical downstream and upstream optical launch powers, 10 Gb/s downstream and 6 Gb/s upstream over 40 km SMF transmissions of conventional double sideband AMOOFDM signals are feasible without utilizing in-line optical amplification and chromatic dispersion compensation. In particular, the aforementioned transmission performance can be improved to 23 Gb/s downstream and 8 Gb/s upstream over 40 km SMFs when single sideband subcarrier modulation is adopted in the downstream systems. (c) 2010 Optical Society of America.

  10. Intensive removal of signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) from rivers increases numbers and taxon richness of macroinvertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Moorhouse, Tom P; Poole, Alison E; Evans, Laura C; Bradley, David C; Macdonald, David W

    2014-02-01

    Invasive species are a major cause of species extinction in freshwater ecosystems, and crayfish species are particularly pervasive. The invasive American signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus has impacts over a range of trophic levels, but particularly on benthic aquatic macroinvertebrates. Our study examined the effect on the macroinvertebrate community of removal trapping of signal crayfish from UK rivers. Crayfish were intensively trapped and removed from two tributaries of the River Thames to test the hypothesis that lowering signal crayfish densities would result in increases in macroinvertebrate numbers and taxon richness. We removed 6181 crayfish over four sessions, resulting in crayfish densities that decreased toward the center of the removal sections. Conversely in control sections (where crayfish were trapped and returned), crayfish density increased toward the center of the section. Macroinvertebrate numbers and taxon richness were inversely correlated with crayfish densities. Multivariate analysis of the abundance of each taxon yielded similar results and indicated that crayfish removals had positive impacts on macroinvertebrate numbers and taxon richness but did not alter the composition of the wider macroinvertebrate community. Synthesis and applications: Our results demonstrate that non-eradication-oriented crayfish removal programmes may lead to increases in the total number of macroinvertebrates living in the benthos. This represents the first evidence that removing signal crayfish from riparian systems, at intensities feasible during control attempts or commercial crayfishing, may be beneficial for a range of sympatric aquatic macroinvertebrates.

  11. Low-level laser irradiation at a high power intensity increased human endothelial cell exosome secretion via Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Hesam Saghaei; Mousavi, Monireh; Rezabakhsh, Aysa; Rezaie, Jafar; Rasta, Seyed Hossein; Nourazarian, Alireza; Avci, Çigir Biray; Tajalli, Habib; Talebi, Mehdi; Oryan, Ahmad; Khaksar, Majid; Kazemi, Masoumeh; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Ghaderi, Shahrooz; Bagca, Bakiye Goker; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Sokullu, Emel

    2018-03-30

    The distinct role of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on endothelial exosome biogenesis remains unclear. We hypothesize that laser irradiation of high dose in human endothelial cells (ECs) contributes to the modulation of exosome biogenesis via Wnt signaling pathway. When human ECs were treated with LLLI at a power density of 80 J/cm 2 , the survival rate reduced. The potential of irradiated cells to release exosomes was increased significantly by expressing genes CD63, Alix, Rab27a, and b. This occurrence coincided with an enhanced acetylcholine esterase activity, pseudopodia formation, and reduced zeta potential value 24 h post-irradiation. Western blotting showed the induction of LC3 and reduced level of P62, confirming autophagy response. Flow cytometry and electron microscopy analyses revealed the health status of the mitochondrial function indicated by normal ΔΨ activity without any changes in the transcription level of PINK1 and Optineurin. When cells exposed to high power laser irradiation, p-Akt/Akt ratio and in vitro tubulogenesis capacity were blunted. PCR array and bioinformatics analyses showed the induction of transcription factors promoting Wnt signaling pathways and GTPase activity. Thus, LLLI at high power intensity increased exosome biogenesis by the induction of autophagy and Wnt signaling. LLLI at high power intensity increases exosome biogenesis by engaging the transcription factors related to Wnt signaling and autophagy stimulate.

  12. Intensive removal of signal crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) from rivers increases numbers and taxon richness of macroinvertebrate species

    PubMed Central

    Moorhouse, Tom P; Poole, Alison E; Evans, Laura C; Bradley, David C; Macdonald, David W

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species are a major cause of species extinction in freshwater ecosystems, and crayfish species are particularly pervasive. The invasive American signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus has impacts over a range of trophic levels, but particularly on benthic aquatic macroinvertebrates. Our study examined the effect on the macroinvertebrate community of removal trapping of signal crayfish from UK rivers. Crayfish were intensively trapped and removed from two tributaries of the River Thames to test the hypothesis that lowering signal crayfish densities would result in increases in macroinvertebrate numbers and taxon richness. We removed 6181 crayfish over four sessions, resulting in crayfish densities that decreased toward the center of the removal sections. Conversely in control sections (where crayfish were trapped and returned), crayfish density increased toward the center of the section. Macroinvertebrate numbers and taxon richness were inversely correlated with crayfish densities. Multivariate analysis of the abundance of each taxon yielded similar results and indicated that crayfish removals had positive impacts on macroinvertebrate numbers and taxon richness but did not alter the composition of the wider macroinvertebrate community. Synthesis and applications: Our results demonstrate that non-eradication-oriented crayfish removal programmes may lead to increases in the total number of macroinvertebrates living in the benthos. This represents the first evidence that removing signal crayfish from riparian systems, at intensities feasible during control attempts or commercial crayfishing, may be beneficial for a range of sympatric aquatic macroinvertebrates. PMID:24634733

  13. Is courtship intensity a signal of male parental care in Red-winged Blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus)?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yasukawa, Ken; Knight, Richard L.; Skagen, Susan Knight

    1987-01-01

    We studied Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) behavior in marsh and prairie habitats to determine whether courting males provide cues of their nest defense, whether females prefer males that defend nests vigorously, and whether male nest defense affects nest success. We found no evidence that courtship behavior provides cues of male nest defense, or that females prefer males that court intensely. We found evidence that females nesting in marshes prefer males that defend nests intensely, but no evidence that intensely defending males in the prairie habitat achieve high nest success. We found differences, however, between marsh and prairie habitats that suggest a coarse-grained relationship between male parental quality and female choice of mate in this species.

  14. Prenatal and Early Postnatal Exposure to Cigarette Smoke Decreases BDNF/TrkB Signaling and Increases Abnormal Behaviors Later in Life

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lan; Kish, Vincent L.; Benders, Katherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cigarette smoke exposure during prenatal and early postnatal periods increases the incidence of a variety of abnormal behaviors later in life. The purpose of this study was to identify the possible critical period of susceptibility to cigarette smoke exposure and evaluate the possibe effects of cigarette smoke during early life on brain-derived neurotrophic factor/neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor B signaling in the brain. Methods: Three different age of imprinting control region mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or filtered air for 10 consecutive days beginning on either gestational day 7 by maternal exposure, or postnatal days 2 or 21 by direct inhalation. A series of behavioral profiles and neurotrophins in brain were measured 24 hours after mice received acute restraint stress for 1 hour on postnatal day 59. Results: Cigarette smoke exposure in gestational day 7 and postnatal day 2 produced depression-like behaviors as evidenced by significantly increased immobility in both tail suspension and forced-swim test. Increased entry latencies, but not ambulation in the open field test, were also observed in the gestational day 7 and postnatal day 2 cigarette smoke exposure groups. Genetic analysis showed that gestational day 7 cigarette smoke exposure significantly altered mRNA level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tyrosine kinase receptor B in the hippocampus. However, behavioral profiles and brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tyrosine kinase receptor B signaling were not significantly changed in PND21 cigarette smoke exposure group compared with FA group. Conclusions: These results suggest that a critical period of susceptibility to cigarette smoke exposure exists in the prenatal and early postnatal period, which results a downregulation in brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tyrosine kinase receptor B signaling in the hippocampus and enhances depression-like behaviors later in life. PMID:26503133

  15. An analytical method to simulate the H I 21-cm visibility signal for intensity mapping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Anjan Kumar; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Marthi, Visweshwar Ram

    2018-01-01

    Simulations play a vital role in testing and validating H I 21-cm power spectrum estimation techniques. Conventional methods use techniques like N-body simulations to simulate the sky signal which is then passed through a model of the instrument. This makes it necessary to simulate the H I distribution in a large cosmological volume, and incorporate both the light-cone effect and the telescope's chromatic response. The computational requirements may be particularly large if one wishes to simulate many realizations of the signal. In this paper, we present an analytical method to simulate the H I visibility signal. This is particularly efficient if one wishes to simulate a large number of realizations of the signal. Our method is based on theoretical predictions of the visibility correlation which incorporate both the light-cone effect and the telescope's chromatic response. We have demonstrated this method by applying it to simulate the H I visibility signal for the upcoming Ooty Wide Field Array Phase I.

  16. Transcriptomic Profiling of Soybean in Response to High-Intensity UV-B Irradiation Reveals Stress Defense Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Min Young; Kim, Moon Young; Shim, Sangrae; Kim, Kyung Do; Ha, Jungmin; Shin, Jin Hee; Kang, Sungtaeg; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2016-01-01

    The depletion of the ozone layer in the stratosphere has led to a dramatic spike in ultraviolet B (UV-B) intensity and increased UV-B light levels. The direct absorption of high-intensity UV-B induces complex abiotic stresses in plants, including excessive light exposure, heat, and dehydration. However, UV-B stress signaling mechanisms in plants including soybean (Glycine max [L.]) remain poorly understood. Here, we surveyed the overall transcriptional responses of two soybean genotypes, UV-B-sensitive Cheongja 3 and UV-B-resistant Buseok, to continuous UV-B irradiation for 0 (control), 0.5, and 6 h using RNA-seq analysis. Homology analysis using UV-B-related genes from Arabidopsis thaliana revealed differentially expressed genes (DEGs) likely involved in UV-B stress responses. Functional classification of the DEGs showed that the categories of immune response, stress defense signaling, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism were over-represented. UV-B-resistant Buseok utilized phosphatidic acid-dependent signaling pathways (based on subsequent reactions of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase) rather than phospholipase D in response to UV-B exposure at high fluence rates, and genes involved in its downstream pathways, such as ABA signaling, mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades, and ROS overproduction, were upregulated in this genotype. In addition, the DEGs for TIR-NBS-LRR and heat shock proteins are positively activated. These results suggest that defense mechanisms against UV-B stress at high fluence rates are separate from the photomorphogenic responses utilized by plants to adapt to low-level UV light. Our study provides valuable information for deep understanding of UV-B stress defense mechanisms and for the development of resistant soybean genotypes that survive under high-intensity UV-B stress. PMID:28066473

  17. Signal intensity analysis and optimization for in vivo imaging of Cherenkov and excited luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRochelle, Ethan P. M.; Shell, Jennifer R.; Gunn, Jason R.; Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2018-04-01

    During external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), in vivo Cherenkov optical emissions can be used as a dosimetry tool or to excite luminescence, termed Cherenkov-excited luminescence (CEL) with microsecond-level time-gated cameras. The goal of this work was to develop a complete theoretical foundation for the detectable signal strength, in order to provide guidance on optimization of the limits of detection and how to optimize near real time imaging. The key parameters affecting photon production, propagation and detection were considered and experimental validation with both tissue phantoms and a murine model are shown. Both the theoretical analysis and experimental data indicate that the detection level is near a single photon-per-pixel for the detection geometry and frame rates commonly used, with the strongest factor being the signal decrease with the square of distance from tissue to camera. Experimental data demonstrates how the SNR improves with increasing integration time, but only up to the point where the dominance of camera read noise is overcome by stray photon noise that cannot be suppressed. For the current camera in a fixed geometry, the signal to background ratio limits the detection of light signals, and the observed in vivo Cherenkov emission is on the order of 100×  stronger than CEL signals. As a result, imaging signals from depths  <15 mm is reasonable for Cherenkov light, and depths  <3 mm is reasonable for CEL imaging. The current investigation modeled Cherenkov and CEL imaging of two oxygen sensing phosphorescent compounds, but the modularity of the code allows for easy comparison of different agents or alternative cameras, geometries or tissues.

  18. Signal intensity analysis and optimization for in vivo imaging of Cherenkov and excited luminescence.

    PubMed

    LaRochelle, Ethan P M; Shell, Jennifer R; Gunn, Jason R; Davis, Scott C; Pogue, Brian W

    2018-04-20

    During external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), in vivo Cherenkov optical emissions can be used as a dosimetry tool or to excite luminescence, termed Cherenkov-excited luminescence (CEL) with microsecond-level time-gated cameras. The goal of this work was to develop a complete theoretical foundation for the detectable signal strength, in order to provide guidance on optimization of the limits of detection and how to optimize near real time imaging. The key parameters affecting photon production, propagation and detection were considered and experimental validation with both tissue phantoms and a murine model are shown. Both the theoretical analysis and experimental data indicate that the detection level is near a single photon-per-pixel for the detection geometry and frame rates commonly used, with the strongest factor being the signal decrease with the square of distance from tissue to camera. Experimental data demonstrates how the SNR improves with increasing integration time, but only up to the point where the dominance of camera read noise is overcome by stray photon noise that cannot be suppressed. For the current camera in a fixed geometry, the signal to background ratio limits the detection of light signals, and the observed in vivo Cherenkov emission is on the order of 100×  stronger than CEL signals. As a result, imaging signals from depths  <15 mm is reasonable for Cherenkov light, and depths  <3 mm is reasonable for CEL imaging. The current investigation modeled Cherenkov and CEL imaging of two oxygen sensing phosphorescent compounds, but the modularity of the code allows for easy comparison of different agents or alternative cameras, geometries or tissues.

  19. TROIKA: a general framework for heart rate monitoring using wrist-type photoplethysmographic signals during intensive physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhilin; Pi, Zhouyue; Liu, Benyuan

    2015-02-01

    Heart rate monitoring using wrist-type photoplethysmographic signals during subjects' intensive exercise is a difficult problem, since the signals are contaminated by extremely strong motion artifacts caused by subjects' hand movements. So far few works have studied this problem. In this study, a general framework, termed TROIKA, is proposed, which consists of signal decomposiTion for denoising, sparse signal RecOnstructIon for high-resolution spectrum estimation, and spectral peaK trAcking with verification. The TROIKA framework has high estimation accuracy and is robust to strong motion artifacts. Many variants can be straightforwardly derived from this framework. Experimental results on datasets recorded from 12 subjects during fast running at the peak speed of 15 km/h showed that the average absolute error of heart rate estimation was 2.34 beat per minute, and the Pearson correlation between the estimates and the ground truth of heart rate was 0.992. This framework is of great values to wearable devices such as smartwatches which use PPG signals to monitor heart rate for fitness.

  20. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. 2: Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    A randomized sequence of tone bursts was delivered to subjects at short inter-stimulus intervals with the tones originating from one of three spatially and frequency specific channels. The subject's task was to count the tones in one of the three channels at a time, ignoring the other two, and press a button after each tenth tone. In different conditions, tones were given at high and low intensities and with or without a background white noise to mask the tones. The N sub 1 component of the auditory vertex potential was found to be larger in response to attended channel tones in relation to unattended tones. This selective enhancement of N sub 1 was minimal for loud tones presented without noise and increased markedly for the lower tone intensity and in noise added conditions.

  1. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Direct Assessment of Wall Shear Stress by Signal Intensity Gradient from Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography.

    PubMed

    Han, Kap-Soo; Lee, Sang Hyuk; Ryu, Han Uk; Park, Se-Hyoung; Chung, Gyung-Ho; Cho, Young I; Jeong, Seul-Ki

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to calculate the arterial wall signal intensity gradient (SIG) from time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF-MRA) and represent arterial wall shear stress. We developed a new algorithm that uses signal intensity (SI) of a TOF-MRA to directly calculate the signal intensity gradient (SIG). The results from our phantom study showed that the TOF-MRA SIG could be used to distinguish the magnitude of blood flow rate as high (mean SIG ± SD, 2.2 ± 0.4 SI/mm for 12.5 ± 2.3 L/min) and low (0.9 ± 0.3 SI/mm for 8.5 ± 2.6 L/min) in vessels ( p < 0.001). Additionally, we found that the TOF-MRA SIG values were highly correlated with various flow rates ( β = 0.96, p < 0.001). Remarkably, the correlation coefficient between the WSS obtained from the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and the TOF-MRA SIG was greater than 0.8 in each section at the carotid artery ( p < 0.001 for all β values). This new technique using TOF-MRA could enable the rapid calculation of the TOF-MRA SIG and thereby the WSS. Thus, the TOF-MRA SIG can provide clinicians with an accurate and efficient screening method for making rapid decisions on the risk of vascular disease for a patient in clinical practice.

  3. Direct Assessment of Wall Shear Stress by Signal Intensity Gradient from Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hyuk; Ryu, Han Uk; Park, Se-Hyoung; Chung, Gyung-Ho; Cho, Young I.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to calculate the arterial wall signal intensity gradient (SIG) from time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF-MRA) and represent arterial wall shear stress. We developed a new algorithm that uses signal intensity (SI) of a TOF-MRA to directly calculate the signal intensity gradient (SIG). The results from our phantom study showed that the TOF-MRA SIG could be used to distinguish the magnitude of blood flow rate as high (mean SIG ± SD, 2.2 ± 0.4 SI/mm for 12.5 ± 2.3 L/min) and low (0.9 ± 0.3 SI/mm for 8.5 ± 2.6 L/min) in vessels (p < 0.001). Additionally, we found that the TOF-MRA SIG values were highly correlated with various flow rates (β = 0.96, p < 0.001). Remarkably, the correlation coefficient between the WSS obtained from the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and the TOF-MRA SIG was greater than 0.8 in each section at the carotid artery (p < 0.001 for all β values). This new technique using TOF-MRA could enable the rapid calculation of the TOF-MRA SIG and thereby the WSS. Thus, the TOF-MRA SIG can provide clinicians with an accurate and efficient screening method for making rapid decisions on the risk of vascular disease for a patient in clinical practice. PMID:28900625

  4. Cortical encoding and neurophysiological tracking of intensity and pitch cues signaling English stress patterns in native and nonnative speakers.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wei-Lun; Bidelman, Gavin M

    2016-01-01

    We examined cross-language differences in neural encoding and tracking of intensity and pitch cues signaling English stress patterns. Auditory mismatch negativities (MMNs) were recorded in English and Mandarin listeners in response to contrastive English pseudowords whose primary stress occurred either on the first or second syllable (i.e., "nocTICity" vs. "NOCticity"). The contrastive syllable stress elicited two consecutive MMNs in both language groups, but English speakers demonstrated larger responses to stress patterns than Mandarin speakers. Correlations between the amplitude of ERPs and continuous changes in the running intensity and pitch of speech assessed how well each language group's brain activity tracked these salient acoustic features of lexical stress. We found that English speakers' neural responses tracked intensity changes in speech more closely than Mandarin speakers (higher brain-acoustic correlation). Findings demonstrate more robust and precise processing of English stress (intensity) patterns in early auditory cortical responses of native relative to nonnative speakers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A boostrap algorithm for temporal signal reconstruction in the presence of noise from its fractional Fourier transformed intensity spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; /Fermilab

    2011-02-01

    A bootstrap algorithm for reconstructing the temporal signal from four of its fractional Fourier intensity spectra in the presence of noise is described. An optical arrangement is proposed which realises the bootstrap method for the measurement of ultrashort laser pulses. The measurement of short laser pulses which are less than 1 ps is an ongoing challenge in optical physics. One reason is that no oscilloscope exists today which can directly measure the time structure of these pulses and so it becomes necessary to invent other techniques which indirectly provide the necessary information for temporal pulse reconstruction. One method called FROGmore » (frequency resolved optical gating) has been in use since 19911 and is one of the popular methods for recovering these types of short pulses. The idea behind FROG is the use of multiple time-correlated pulse measurements in the frequency domain for the reconstruction. Multiple data sets are required because only intensity information is recorded and not phase, and thus by collecting multiple data sets, there is enough redundant measurements to yield the original time structure, but not necessarily uniquely (or even up to an arbitrary constant phase offset). The objective of this paper is to describe another method which is simpler than FROG. Instead of collecting many auto-correlated data sets, only two spectral intensity measurements of the temporal signal are needed in the absence of noise. The first can be from the intensity components of its usual Fourier transform and the second from its FrFT (fractional Fourier transform). In the presence of noise, a minimum of four measurements are required with the same FrFT order but with two different apertures. Armed with these two or four measurements, a unique solution up to a constant phase offset can be constructed.« less

  6. Optimizing the position resolution of a Z-stack microchannel plate resistive anode detector for low intensity signals

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, B. B.; Richardson, E.; Siwal, D.

    A method for achieving good position resolution of low-intensity electron signals using a microchannel plate resistive anode detector is demonstrated. Electron events at a rate of 7 counts s{sup −1} are detected using a Z-stack microchannel plate. The dependence of position resolution on both the distance and the potential difference between the microchannel plate and resistive anode is investigated. Using standard commercial electronics, a measured position resolution of 170 μm (FWHM) is obtained, which corresponds to an intrinsic resolution of 157 μm (FWHM)

  7. Shades of white: diffusion properties of T1- and FLAIR-defined white matter signal abnormalities differ in stages from cognitively normal to dementia.

    PubMed

    Riphagen, Joost M; Gronenschild, Ed H B M; Salat, David H; Freeze, Whitney M; Ivanov, Dimo; Clerx, Lies; Verhey, Frans R J; Aalten, Pauline; Jacobs, Heidi I L

    2018-08-01

    The underlying pathology of white matter signal abnormalities (WMSAs) is heterogeneous and may vary dependent on the magnetic resonance imaging contrast used to define them. We investigated differences in white matter diffusivity as an indicator for white matter integrity underlying WMSA based on T1-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging contrast. In addition, we investigated which white matter region of interest (ROI) could predict clinical diagnosis best using diffusion metrics. One hundred three older individuals with varying cognitive impairment levels were included and underwent neuroimaging. Diffusion metrics were extracted from WMSA areas based on T1 and FLAIR contrast and from their overlapping areas, the border surrounding the WMSA and the normal-appearing white matter (NAWM). Regional diffusivity differences were calculated with linear mixed effects models. Multinomial logistic regression determined which ROI diffusion values classified individuals best into clinically defined diagnostic groups. T1-based WMSA showed lower white matter integrity compared to FLAIR WMSA-defined regions. Diffusion values of NAWM predicted diagnostic group best compared to other ROI's. To conclude, T1- or FLAIR-defined WMSA provides distinct information on the underlying white matter integrity associated with cognitive decline. Importantly, not the "diseased" but the NAWM is a potentially sensitive indicator for cognitive brain health status. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Factors Influencing Continuous Breath Signal in Intubated and Mechanically-Ventilated Intensive Care Unit Patients Measured by an Electronic Nose

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jan Hendrik; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Colombo, Camilla; Sterk, Peter J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Bos, Lieuwe D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Continuous breath analysis by electronic nose (eNose) technology in the intensive care unit (ICU) may be useful in monitoring (patho) physiological changes. However, the application of breath monitoring in a non-controlled clinical setting introduces noise into the data. We hypothesized that the sensor signal is influenced by: (1) humidity in the side-stream; (2) patient-ventilator disconnections and the nebulization of medication; and (3) changes in ventilator settings and the amount of exhaled CO2. We aimed to explore whether the aforementioned factors introduce noise into the signal, and discuss several approaches to reduce this noise. Methods: Study in mechanically-ventilated ICU patients. Exhaled breath was monitored using a continuous eNose with metal oxide sensors. Linear (mixed) models were used to study hypothesized associations. Results: In total, 1251 h of eNose data were collected. First, the initial 15 min of the signal was discarded. There was a negative association between humidity and Sensor 1 (Fixed-effect β: −0.05 ± 0.002) and a positive association with Sensors 2–4 (Fixed-effect β: 0.12 ± 0.001); the signal was corrected for this noise. Outliers were most likely due to noise and therefore removed. Sensor values were positively associated with end-tidal CO2, tidal volume and the pressure variables. The signal was corrected for changes in these ventilator variables after which the associations disappeared. Conclusion: Variations in humidity, ventilator disconnections, nebulization of medication and changes of ventilator settings indeed influenced exhaled breath signals measured in ventilated patients by continuous eNose analysis. We discussed several approaches to reduce the effects of these noise inducing variables. PMID:27556467

  9. Study on signal intensity of low field nuclear magnetic resonance via an indirect coupling measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Feng-Ying; Wang, Ning; Jin, Yi-Rong; Deng, Hui; Tian, Ye; Lang, Pei-Lin; Li, Jie; Chen, Ying-Fei; Zheng, Dong-Ning

    2013-04-01

    We carry out an ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment based on high-Tc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). The measurement field is in a micro-tesla range (~10 μT-100 μT) and the experiment is conducted in a home-made magnetically-shielded-room (MSR). The measurements are performed by the indirect coupling method in which the signal of nuclei precession is indirectly coupled to the SQUID through a tuned copper coil transformer. In such an arrangement, the interferences of applied measurement and polarization field to the SQUID sensor are avoided and the performance of the SQUID is not destroyed. In order to compare the detection sensitivity obtained by using the SQUID with that achieved using a conventional low-noise-amplifier, we perform the measurements using a commercial room temperature amplifier. The results show that in a wide frequency range (~1 kHz-10 kHz) the measurements with the SQUID sensor exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio. Further, we discuss the dependence of NMR peak magnitude on measurement frequency. We attribute the reduction of the peak magnitude at high frequency to the increased field inhomogeneity as the measurement field increases. This is verified by compensating the field gradient using three sets of gradient coils.

  10. A Robust Random Forest-Based Approach for Heart Rate Monitoring Using Photoplethysmography Signal Contaminated by Intense Motion Artifacts.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yalan; He, Wenwen; Cheng, Yunfei; Huang, Wenxia; Zhang, Zhilin

    2017-02-16

    The estimation of heart rate (HR) based on wearable devices is of interest in fitness. Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a promising approach to estimate HR due to low cost; however, it is easily corrupted by motion artifacts (MA). In this work, a robust approach based on random forest is proposed for accurately estimating HR from the photoplethysmography signal contaminated by intense motion artifacts, consisting of two stages. Stage 1 proposes a hybrid method to effectively remove MA with a low computation complexity, where two MA removal algorithms are combined by an accurate binary decision algorithm whose aim is to decide whether or not to adopt the second MA removal algorithm. Stage 2 proposes a random forest-based spectral peak-tracking algorithm, whose aim is to locate the spectral peak corresponding to HR, formulating the problem of spectral peak tracking into a pattern classification problem. Experiments on the PPG datasets including 22 subjects used in the 2015 IEEE Signal Processing Cup showed that the proposed approach achieved the average absolute error of 1.65 beats per minute (BPM) on the 22 PPG datasets. Compared to state-of-the-art approaches, the proposed approach has better accuracy and robustness to intense motion artifacts, indicating its potential use in wearable sensors for health monitoring and fitness tracking.

  11. [Study of the effect of JNK signal transduction pathway in intense noise-induced apoptosis in cochlea of guinea pig].

    PubMed

    Xue, Qiuhong; Chen, Jia; Gong, Shusheng; Xie, Jing; He, Jian; Chen, Xiaolin

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the mechanism of intense noise-induced cochlea cells death in guinea pig, and the effect of JNK signal transduction pathway in the procedure of cochlea cells apoptosis by intense noise-induced. Thirty-two guinea pigs were randomly divided into 4 groups. The guinea pigs in the experiment groups were exposed to 4 kHz narrow band noise at 120 dB SPL for 4 h. After the noise expose for 1, 4, 14 days of the experiment guinea pigs, ABR of the guinea pigs on experiment and control groups were tested before put them to death. Four guinea pig's cochleas of every group were taken to paraffin section, and the rest was extracted the total cochlear's protein. Apoptosis was tested by terminal deoxynucleotidyl Transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (d-UTP) nick and labeling method (TUNEL). The phosphorylation of JNK and c-Jun were tested by immunohistochemistry and western blot methods. Tunel-Positive cells in the Corti's, SGC and SV of experiment groups, and there have significant differences compared with the control group (P<0.01) and Tunel-Positive cells are most in 1 d experiment group. The positive cells of P-JNK and P-c-Jun could be detected in guinea pig's cochleas after noise exposed, but no positive cells were found in the control. Protein levels of P-JNK and P-c-Jun were risen up and activated quickly after noise exposed, and achieved peak in 1 d, 4 d and then fallen-offs, but still maintained higher levels within 14 d. Intense noise causes cochlea cell lesion by inducing apoptosis to result in and JNK signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the procedure of apoptosis.

  12. Low intensity exercise prevents disturbances in rat cardiac insulin signaling and endothelial nitric oxide synthase induced by high fructose diet.

    PubMed

    Stanišić, Jelena; Korićanac, Goran; Ćulafić, Tijana; Romić, Snježana; Stojiljković, Mojca; Kostić, Milan; Pantelić, Marija; Tepavčević, Snežana

    2016-01-15

    Increase in fructose consumption together with decrease in physical activity contributes to the development of metabolic syndrome and consequently cardiovascular diseases. The current study examined the preventive role of exercise on defects in cardiac insulin signaling and function of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in fructose fed rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into control, sedentary fructose (received 10% fructose for 9 weeks) and exercise fructose (additionally exposed to low intensity exercise) groups. Concentration of triglycerides, glucose, insulin and visceral adipose tissue weight were determined to estimate metabolic syndrome development. Expression and/or phosphorylation of cardiac insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), tyrosine-specific protein phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), Akt, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and eNOS were evaluated. Fructose overload increased visceral adipose tissue, insulin concentration and homeostasis model assessment index. Exercise managed to decrease visceral adiposity and insulin level and to increase insulin sensitivity. Fructose diet increased level of cardiac PTP1B and pIRS1 (Ser307), while levels of IR and ERK1/2, as well as pIRS1 (Tyr 632), pAkt (Ser473, Thr308) and pERK1/2 were decreased. These disturbances were accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177. Exercise managed to prevent most of the disturbances in insulin signaling caused by fructose diet (except phosphorylation of IRS1 at Tyr 632 and phosphorylation and protein expression of ERK1/2) and consequently restored function of eNOS. Low intensity exercise could be considered as efficient treatment of cardiac insulin resistance induced by fructose diet. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Radio Frequency Ultrasound Time Series Signal Analysis to Evaluate High-intensity Focused Ultrasound Lesion Formation Status in Tissue.

    PubMed

    Mobasheri, Saeedeh; Behnam, Hamid; Rangraz, Parisa; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a novel treatment modality used by scientists and clinicians in the recent decades. This modality has had a great and significant success as a noninvasive surgery technique applicable in tissue ablation therapy and cancer treatment. In this study, radio frequency (RF) ultrasound signals were acquired and registered in three stages of before, during, and after HIFU exposures. Different features of RF time series signals including the sum of amplitude spectrum in the four quarters of the frequency range, the slope, and intercept of the best-fit line to the entire power spectrum and the Shannon entropy were utilized to distinguish between the HIFU-induced thermal lesion and the normal tissue. We also examined the RF data, frame by frame to identify exposure effects on the formation and characteristics of a HIFU thermal lesion at different time steps throughout the treatment. The results obtained showed that the spectrum frequency quarters and the slope and intercept of the best fit line to the entire power spectrum both increased two times during the HIFU exposures. The Shannon entropy, however, decreased after the exposures. In conclusion, different characteristics of RF time series signal possess promising features that can be used to characterize ablated and nonablated tissues and to distinguish them from each other in a quasi-quantitative fashion.

  14. The D153del Mutation in GNB3 Gene Causes Tissue Specific Signalling Patterns and an Abnormal Renal Morphology in Rge Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Tummala, Hemanth; Fleming, Stewart; Hocking, Paul M.; Wehner, Daniel; Naseem, Zahid; Ali, Manir; Inglehearn, Christopher F.; Zhelev, Nikolai; Lester, Douglas H.

    2011-01-01

    Background The GNB3 gene is expressed in cone but not rod photoreceptors of vertebrates, where it acts as the β transducin subunit in the colour visual transduction process. A naturally occurring mutation ‘D153del’ in the GNB3 gene causes the recessively inherited blinding phenotype retinopathy globe enlarged (rge) disease in chickens. GNB3 is however also expressed in most other vertebrate tissues suggesting that the D153del mutation may exert pathological effects that outlie from eye. Principal Findings Recombinant studies in COS-7 cells that were transfected with normal and mutant recombinant GNB3 constructs and subjected to cycloheximide chase showed that the mutant GNB3d protein had a much shorter half life compared to normal GNB3. GNB3 codes for the Gβ3 protein subunit that, together with different Gγ and Gα subunits, activates and regulates phosphorylation cascades in different tissues. As expected, the relative levels of cGMP and cAMP secondary messengers and their activated kinases such as MAPK, AKT and GRK2 were also found to be altered significantly in a tissue specific manner in rge chickens. Histochemical analysis on kidney tissue sections, from rge homozygous affected chickens, showed the chickens had enlargement of the glomerular capsule, causing glomerulomegaly and tubulointerstitial inflammation whereas other tissues (brain, heart, liver, pancreas) were unaffected. Significance These findings confirm that the D153del mutation in GNB3 gene targets GNB3 protein to early degradation. Lack of GNB3 signalling causes reduced phosphorylation activity of ERK2 and AKT leading to severe pathological phenotypes such as blindness and renal abnormalities in rge chickens. PMID:21887213

  15. T2-weighted high-intensity signals in the basal ganglia as an interesting image finding in Unverricht-Lundborg disease.

    PubMed

    Korja, Miikka; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Soilu-Hänninen, Merja; Magaudda, Adriana; Marttila, Reijo; Genton, Pierre; Parkkola, Riitta

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a search for white matter changes (WMCs) in 13 Unverricht-Lundborg disease patients and compared the prevalence of WMCs in these patients to age-matched long-term epileptics and healthy controls. ULD patients had significantly more T2-weighted high-intensity signals on MRI than control subjects, due to the increased prevalence of these signals in the basal ganglia. Interestingly, ULD patients with the basal ganglia changes were overweight. Basal ganglia T2-weighted high-intensity signals are novel findings in ULD. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Optimization of parameters affecting signal intensity in an LTQ-orbitrap in negative ion mode: A design of experiments approach.

    PubMed

    Lemonakis, Nikolaos; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Tsarbopoulos, Anthony; Gikas, Evagelos

    2016-01-15

    A multistage optimization of all the parameters affecting detection/response in an LTQ-orbitrap analyzer was performed, using a design of experiments methodology. The signal intensity, a critical issue for mass analysis, was investigated and the optimization process was completed in three successive steps, taking into account the three main regions of an orbitrap, the ion generation, the ion transmission and the ion detection regions. Oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol were selected as the model compounds. Overall, applying this methodology the sensitivity was increased more than 24%, the resolution more than 6.5%, whereas the elapsed scan time was reduced nearly to its half. A high-resolution LTQ Orbitrap Discovery mass spectrometer was used for the determination of the analytes of interest. Thus, oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol were infused via the instruments syringe pump and they were analyzed employing electrospray ionization (ESI) in the negative high-resolution full-scan ion mode. The parameters of the three main regions of the LTQ-orbitrap were independently optimized in terms of maximum sensitivity. In this context, factorial design, response surface model and Plackett-Burman experiments were performed and analysis of variance was carried out to evaluate the validity of the statistical model and to determine the most significant parameters for signal intensity. The optimum MS conditions for each analyte were summarized and the method optimum condition was achieved by maximizing the desirability function. Our observation showed good agreement between the predicted optimum response and the responses collected at the predicted optimum conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube defects. However, there is also a genetic influence to this type of congenital anomaly. Unknown Causes The vast majority of congenital abnormalities have no known cause. This is particularly troubling for parents who plan to have more children, because there is no way to predict if ...

  18. Characteristic Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint: Focus on Abnormal Bone Marrow Signal of the Mandibular Condyle, Pannus, and Lymph Node Swelling in the Parotid Glands.

    PubMed

    Hirahara, Naohisa; Kaneda, Takashi; Muraoka, Hirotaka; Fukuda, Taiga; Ito, Kotaro; Kawashima, Yusuke

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings indicating bone and soft tissue involvement in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs). Twenty-one patients with RA and TMJ pain who underwent MRI examination of the TMJs at the authors' hospital from August 2006 to December 2014 were included in this study. Twenty-two patients with normal TMJs who underwent MRI examination at the authors' hospital from November to December 2014 were included as controls. MRI findings were compared between the 2 groups. MRI findings of RA in the TMJ included 1) abnormal disc position (95.2%), 2) abnormal disc morphology (83.3%), 3) joint effusion (30.9%), 4) osseous changes in the mandibular condyle (83.3%), 5) synovial proliferation (pannus; 85.7%), 6) erosion of the articular eminence and glenoid fossa (9.52%), 7) deformity of the articular eminence and glenoid fossa (16.6%), 8) abnormal bone marrow signal in the mandibular condyle (83.3%), and 9) swelling of lymph nodes in the parotid glands (78.5%). The abnormal bone marrow signal and pannus in the mandibular condyle and lymph node swelling in the parotid glands were markedly more common in patients with RA than in controls. MRI findings of RA of the TMJs were characterized by bone and soft tissue involvement, including abnormal bone marrow signal of the mandibular condyle, pannus, and swelling of lymph nodes in the parotid glands. These characteristic MRI findings could be useful in detecting RA in the TMJ in a clinical situation. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Exercise-intensity dependent alterations in plasma redox status do not reflect skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Parker, Lewan; Trewin, Adam; Levinger, Itamar; Shaw, Christopher S; Stepto, Nigel K

    2018-04-01

    Redox homeostasis and redox-sensitive protein signaling play a role in exercise-induced adaptation. The effects of sprint-interval exercise (SIE), high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and continuous moderate-intensity exercise (CMIE), on post-exercise plasma redox status are unclear. Furthermore, whether post-exercise plasma redox status reflects skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling is unknown. In a randomized crossover design, eight healthy adults performed a cycling session of HIIE (5×4min at 75% W max ), SIE (4×30s Wingate's), and CMIE work-matched to HIIE (30min at 50% of W max ). Plasma hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and catalase activity were measured immediately post, 1h, 2h and 3h post-exercise. Plasma redox status biomarkers were correlated with phosphorylation of skeletal muscle p38-MAPK, JNK, NF-κB, and IκBα protein content immediately and 3h post-exercise. Plasma catalase activity was greater with SIE (56.6±3.8Uml -1 ) compared to CMIE (42.7±3.2, p<0.01) and HIIE (49.0±5.5, p=0.07). Peak plasma H 2 O 2 was significantly (p<0.05) greater after SIE (4.6±0.6nmol/ml) and HIIE (4.1±0.4) compared to CMIE (3.3±0.5). Post-exercise plasma TBARS and SOD activity significantly (p<0.05) decreased irrespective of exercise protocol. A significant positive correlation was detected between plasma catalase activity and skeletal muscle p38-MAPK phosphorylation 3h post-exercise (r=0.40, p=0.04). No other correlations were detected (all p>0.05). Low-volume SIE elicited greater post-exercise plasma catalase activity compared to HIIE and CMIE, and greater H 2 O 2 compared to CMIE. Plasma redox status did not, however, adequately reflect skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Amplitude and phase perturbations on VLF/LF signals at Belgrade due to X-ray flare intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulic, Desanka

    2016-07-01

    during nighttime and daytime condition, respectively. Propagation of LF radio signal is performed with n _{n} ˜34 (nighttime) and n _{d} ˜10 (daytime) discrete modes. The second purpose of this paper is to give an account of the narrowband VLF/LF perturbations induced by disturbances in the D-region to the event of solar X-ray flare. During occurrence of solar flare the altitude profile of ionospheric conductivity changes, a VLF/LF signal reflects from lower height and these changes result that VLF/LF propagation is performed with more discrete modes than in normal ionospheric condition. Amplitude and phase perturbations on different VLF/LF signals observed at Belgrade have sensitive dependence on: X-ray flare intensity, solar zenith angle, occurrence of solar flare under solar zenith angle which is close with timing of amplitude minimum in normal ionospheric condition and geophysical characteristics of path. The GQD-BEL path is short, D = 1982 km and oriented west-east. A solar flare X17.2 (I _{X} = 1.72 10 ^{-3} Wm ^{-2}) class occurred on 28 Oct 2003 with peak of intensity at 11:10 UT. This powerful solar flare induced amplitude and huge phase perturbation on GQD/22.10 kHz signal (Δ A=5.35 dB and Δ φ = 75 ^{0}). The NSC-BEL path is short, D = 953 km and oriented southwest-northeast. A solar flare M5.77 (I _{X} = 5.77 10 ^{-4} Wm ^{-2}) class occurred on 10 May 2012 with peak of intensity at 04:18 UT. Illumination of the D-region from east to west was under solar zenith angle 80.3 ^{0} < χ < 87.4 ^{0} and the consequence is very untypical LF perturbations. It is interesting to note that these two events are very rare.

  1. Participation of an abnormality in the transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway in resistance of malignant glioma cells to growth inhibition induced by that factor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Sato, Eiji; Amagasaki, Kenichi; Nakao, Atsuhito; Naganuma, Hirofumi

    2006-07-01

    , treatment, except in one cell line that displayed a slight increase in p21 protein. Overall, the expression of the Smad2 and Smad3 proteins was low in the glioma cell lines, the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad2 and Smad3 were impaired, and the TGFbeta receptor signal did not affect the expression of the SnoN, p21, p15, cyclin D1, and CDK4 proteins. These results suggest that the ability to resist TGFbeta-mediated growth inhibition in malignant glioma cells is due to abnormalities in the TGFbeta signaling pathway.

  2. Modulation of low-latitude west wind on abnormal track and intensity of tropical cyclone Nargis (2008) in the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei-Wei; Wang, Chunzai; Wang, Dongxiao; Yang, Lei; Deng, Yi

    2012-03-01

    Tropical cyclone (TC) Nargis (2008) made landfall in Myanmar on 02 May 2008, bringing a storm surge, major flooding, and resulting in a significant death toll. TC Nargis (2008) displayed abnormal features, including rare eastward motion in its late stage, rapid intensification before landing. Using reanalysis data and a numerical model, we investigated how a low-latitude westerly wind modulated TC Nargis' (2008) track and provided favorable atmospheric conditions for its rapid intensification. More importantly, we found a possible counterbalance effect of flows from the two hemispheres on the TC track in the Bay of Bengal. Our analysis indicates that a strong westerly wind burst across the Bay of Bengal, resulting in TC Nargis' (2008) eastward movement after its recurvature. This sudden enhancement of westerly wind was mainly due to the rapidly intensified mid-level cross-equatorial flow. Our results show that a high-pressure system in the Southern Hemisphere induced this strong, mid-level, cross-equatorial flow. During the rapid intensification period of TC Nargis (2008), this strong and broad westerly wind also transported a large amount of water vapor to TC Nargis (2008). Sufficient water vapor gave rise to continuously high and increased mid-level relative humidity, which was favorable to TC Nargis' (2008) intensification. Condensation of water vapor increased the energy supply, which eventuated the intensification of TC Nargis (2008) to a category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson scale.

  3. Lung Parenchymal Signal Intensity in MRI: A Technical Review with Educational Aspirations Regarding Reversible Versus Irreversible Transverse Relaxation Effects in Common Pulse Sequences.

    PubMed

    Mulkern, Robert; Haker, Steven; Mamata, Hatsuho; Lee, Edward; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Oshio, Koichi; Balasubramanian, Mukund; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2014-03-01

    Lung parenchyma is challenging to image with proton MRI. The large air space results in ~l/5th as many signal-generating protons compared to other organs. Air/tissue magnetic susceptibility differences lead to strong magnetic field gradients throughout the lungs and to broad frequency distributions, much broader than within other organs. Such distributions have been the subject of experimental and theoretical analyses which may reveal aspects of lung microarchitecture useful for diagnosis. Their most immediate relevance to current imaging practice is to cause rapid signal decays, commonly discussed in terms of short T 2 * values of 1 ms or lower at typical imaging field strengths. Herein we provide a brief review of previous studies describing and interpreting proton lung spectra. We then link these broad frequency distributions to rapid signal decays, though not necessarily the exponential decays generally used to define T 2 * values. We examine how these decays influence observed signal intensities and spatial mapping features associated with the most prominent torso imaging sequences, including spoiled gradient and spin echo sequences. Effects of imperfect refocusing pulses on the multiple echo signal decays in single shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) sequences and effects of broad frequency distributions on balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) sequence signal intensities are also provided. The theoretical analyses are based on the concept of explicitly separating the effects of reversible and irreversible transverse relaxation processes, thus providing a somewhat novel and more general framework from which to estimate lung signal intensity behavior in modern imaging practice.

  4. Population structure and genome-wide association analysis for frost tolerance in oat using continuous SNP array signal intensity ratios.

    PubMed

    Tumino, Giorgio; Voorrips, Roeland E; Rizza, Fulvia; Badeck, Franz W; Morcia, Caterina; Ghizzoni, Roberta; Germeier, Christoph U; Paulo, Maria-João; Terzi, Valeria; Smulders, Marinus J M

    2016-09-01

    Infinium SNP data analysed as continuous intensity ratios enabled associating genotypic and phenotypic data from heterogeneous oat samples, showing that association mapping for frost tolerance is a feasible option. Oat is sensitive to freezing temperatures, which restricts the cultivation of fall-sown or winter oats to regions with milder winters. Fall-sown oats have a longer growth cycle, mature earlier, and have a higher productivity than spring-sown oats, therefore improving frost tolerance is an important goal in oat breeding. Our aim was to test the effectiveness of a Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) for mapping QTLs related to frost tolerance, using an approach that tolerates continuously distributed signals from SNPs in bulked samples from heterogeneous accessions. A collection of 138 European oat accessions, including landraces, old and modern varieties from 27 countries was genotyped using the Infinium 6K SNP array. The SNP data were analyzed as continuous intensity ratios, rather than converting them into discrete values by genotype calling. PCA and Ward's clustering of genetic similarities revealed the presence of two main groups of accessions, which roughly corresponded to Continental Europe and Mediterranean/Atlantic Europe, although a total of eight subgroups can be distinguished. The accessions were phenotyped for frost tolerance under controlled conditions by measuring fluorescence quantum yield of photosystem II after a freezing stress. GWAS were performed by a linear mixed model approach, comparing different corrections for population structure. All models detected three robust QTLs, two of which co-mapped with QTLs identified earlier in bi-parental mapping populations. The approach used in the present work shows that SNP array data of heterogeneous hexaploid oat samples can be successfully used to determine genetic similarities and to map associations to quantitative phenotypic traits.

  5. Cerebral High-Intensity Transient Signals during Pediatric Cardiac Catheterization: A Pilot Study Using Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    LaRovere, Kerri L; Kapur, Kush; McElhinney, Doff B; Razumovsky, Alexander; Kussman, Barry D

    2017-07-01

    Cerebral emboli are one potential cause of acute brain injury in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) undergoing cardiac catheterization. In this pilot study using transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography, we sought to evaluate the incidence, burden, and circumstances of cerebral high-intensity transient signals (HITS), presumably representing emboli, during pediatric cardiac catheterization. Emboli monitoring of the right middle cerebral artery was performed in five children. HITS, counted offline, were defined as unidirectional signals associated with audible "chirp" and sinusoidal correlation. HITS were grouped as single, >10 HITS ("cluster"), or HITS "with curtain effect" per 3-5 cardiac cycles. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) and pulsatility index (PI) were recorded after anesthetic induction (baseline). Total HITS in the cohort was 1,697 (790 single HITS, 606 HITS within clusters, and 301 HITS within curtains). HITS in clusters and curtains comprised 53% (907/1,697) of total HITS, and occurred in 44 clusters/curtains. Events associated with clusters/curtains included left ventricular angiography (39%; 17/44), right ventricular angiography (16%; 7/44), device placement (16%; 7/44), heparin bolus (9%; 4/44), pulmonary artery angiography (9%; 4/44), venous access (5%; 2/44), right atrial angiography (2%; 1/44), arterial access (2%; 1/44), and hemodynamic measurements (2%; 1/44). No patient had clinically detectable neurologic injury. HITS are common during pediatric cardiac catheterization, and associated with procedural factors. Whether curtains/clusters are worse than single, repetitive HITS is unknown. Larger studies are needed to determine whether HITS are a marker of risk of neurologic injury from emboli during pediatric cardiac catheterization. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  6. Environmental obesogen tributyltin chloride leads to abnormal hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis function by disruption in kisspeptin/leptin signaling in female rats.

    PubMed

    Sena, Gabriela C; Freitas-Lima, Leandro C; Merlo, Eduardo; Podratz, Priscila L; de Araújo, Julia F P; Brandão, Poliane A A; Carneiro, Maria T W D; Zicker, Marina C; Ferreira, Adaliene V M; Takiya, Christina M; de Lemos Barbosa, Carolina M; Morales, Marcelo M; Santos-Silva, Ana Paula; Miranda-Alves, Leandro; Silva, Ian V; Graceli, Jones B

    2017-03-15

    Tributyltin chloride (TBT) is a xenobiotic used as a biocide in antifouling paints that has been demonstrated to induce endocrine-disrupting effects, such as obesity and reproductive abnormalities. An integrative metabolic control in the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis was exerted by leptin. However, studies that have investigated the obesogenic TBT effects on the HPG axis are especially rare. We investigated whether metabolic disorders as a result of TBT are correlated with abnormal hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis function, as well as kisspeptin (Kiss) action. Female Wistar rats were administered vehicle and TBT (100ng/kg/day) for 15days via gavage. We analyzed their effects on the tin serum and ovary accumulation (as biomarker of TBT exposure), estrous cyclicity, surge LH levels, GnRH expression, Kiss action, fertility, testosterone levels, ovarian apoptosis, uterine inflammation, fibrosis, estrogen negative feedback, body weight gain, insulin, leptin, adiponectin levels, as well as the glucose tolerance (GTT) and insulin sensitivity tests (IST). TBT led to increased serum and ovary tin levels, irregular estrous cyclicity, and decreased surge LH levels, GnRH expression and Kiss responsiveness. A strong negative correlation between the serum and ovary tin levels with lower Kiss responsiveness and GnRH mRNA expression was observed in TBT rats. An increase in the testosterone levels, ovarian and uterine fibrosis, ovarian apoptosis, and uterine inflammation and a decrease in fertility and estrogen negative feedback were demonstrated in the TBT rats. We also identified an increase in the body weight gain and abnormal GTT and IST tests, which were associated with hyperinsulinemia, hyperleptinemia and hypoadiponectinemia, in the TBT rats. TBT disrupted proper functioning of the HPG axis as a result of abnormal Kiss action. The metabolic dysfunctions co-occur with the HPG axis abnormalities. Hyperleptinemia as a result of obesity induced by TBT may be

  7. Incorporating reversible and irreversible transverse relaxation effects into Steady State Free Precession (SSFP) signal intensity expressions for fMRI considerations.

    PubMed

    Mulkern, Robert V; Balasubramanian, Mukund; Orbach, Darren B; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Haker, Steven J

    2013-04-01

    Among the multiple sequences available for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the Steady State Free Precession (SSFP) sequence offers the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) per unit time as well as distortion free images not feasible with the more commonly employed single-shot echo planar imaging (EPI) approaches. Signal changes occurring with activation in SSFP sequences reflect underlying changes in both irreversible and reversible transverse relaxation processes. The latter are characterized by changes in the central frequencies and widths of the inherent frequency distribution present within a voxel. In this work, the well-known frequency response of the SSFP signal intensity is generalized to include the widths and central frequencies of some common frequency distributions on SSFP signal intensities. The approach, using a previously unnoted series expansion, allows for a separation of reversible from irreversible transverse relaxation effects on SSFP signal intensity changes. The formalism described here should prove useful for identifying and modeling mechanisms associated with SSFP signal changes accompanying neural activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Abnormal placentation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Samuel T; Bonanno, Clarissa

    2009-04-01

    Abnormal placentation poses a diagnostic and treatment challenge for all providers caring for pregnant women. As one of the leading causes of postpartum hemorrhage, abnormal placentation involves the attachment of placental villi directly to the myometrium with potentially deeper invasion into the uterine wall or surrounding organs. Surgical procedures that disrupt the integrity of uterus, including cesarean section, dilatation and curettage, and myomectomy, have been implicated as key risk factors for placenta accreta. The diagnosis is typically made by gray-scale ultrasound and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging, which may better delineate the extent of placental invasion. It is critical to make the diagnosis before delivery because preoperative planning can significantly decrease blood loss and avoid substantial morbidity associated with placenta accreta. Aggressive management of hemorrhage through the use of uterotonics, fluid resuscitation, blood products, planned hysterectomy, and surgical hemostatic agents can be life-saving for these patients. Conservative management, including the use of uterine and placental preservation and subsequent methotrexate therapy or pelvic artery embolization, may be considered when a focal accreta is suspected; however, surgical management remains the current standard of care.

  9. Plyometric exercise combined with high-intensity interval training improves metabolic abnormalities in young obese females more so than interval training alone.

    PubMed

    Racil, Ghazi; Zouhal, Hassane; Elmontassar, Wassim; Ben Abderrahmane, Abderraouf; De Sousa, Maysa Vieira; Chamari, Karim; Amri, Mohamed; Coquart, Jeremy B

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 12 weeks of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) with the effects of 12 weeks of plyometric exercise combined with HIIT (P+HIIT) on anthropometric, biochemical, and physical fitness data in young obese females. Sixty-eight participants (age, 16.6 ± 1.3 y; body mass, 82.8 ± 5.0 kg; body fat, 39.4% ± 3.3%; body mass index z score, 2.9 ± 0.4) were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: HIIT (2 blocks per session of 6-8 bouts of 30-s runs at 100% velocity at peak oxygen uptake, with 30-s active recovery between bouts at 50%velocity at peak oxygen uptake (n = 23)); P+HIIT (2 blocks per session of 3 different 15-s plyometric exercises with 15-s passive recoveries, totaling 2 min for each plyometric exercise + the same HIIT program (n = 26)); or control (no exercise (n = 19)). Anthropometric (body mass, body mass index z score, body fat, lean body mass, and waist circumference), biochemical (plasma glucose, insulin, leptin and adiponectin concentrations, leptin/adiponectin ratio, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)), physical fitness (peak oxygen uptake, velocity at peak oxygen uptake, squat jump, and countermovement jump performances), and energy intake data were collected. Both training programs improved the anthropometric, biochemical, and physical fitness variables. However, the P+HIIT program induced greater improvements than did the HIIT program in lean body mass (+3.0% ± 1.7%), plasma glucose and leptin concentrations (-11.0% ± 4.7% and -23.8% ± 5.8%, respectively), plasma leptin/adiponectin ratio (-40.9% ± 10.9%), HOMA-IR (-37.3% ± 6.2%), and squat jump performance (22.2% ± 7.5%). Taken together, these findings suggest that adding plyometric exercises to a HIIT program may be more beneficial than HIIT alone in obese female adolescents.

  10. Signal intensity alteration within infrapatellar fat pad predicts knee replacement within 5 years: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    PubMed

    Wang, K; Ding, C; Hannon, M J; Chen, Z; Kwoh, C K; Lynch, J; Hunter, D J

    2018-05-26

    To investigate whether infrapatellar fat pad (IPFP) signal intensity (SI) alteration predicts the occurrence of knee replacement (KR) in knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients over 5 years. The subjects were selected from Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) study. Case knees (n = 127) were defined as those who received KR during 5 years follow-up visit. They were matched by gender, age and radiographic status with control knees (n = 127). We used T2-weighted MR images to measure IPFP SI alteration using a newly developed algorithm in MATLAB. The measurements were assessed at baseline (BL), T0 (the visit just before KR) and 1 year before T0 (T-1). Conditional logistic regression was used to analyse the associations between IPFP SI alterations and the risk of KR. Participants were mostly female (57%), with an average age of 63.7 years old and a mean body mass index (BMI) of 29.5 kg/m 2 . In multivariable analysis, the standard deviation (SD) of IPFP SI [sDev (IPFP)] and the ratio of high SI region volume to whole IPFP volume [Percentage (H)] measured at BL were significantly associated with increased risks of KR after adjustment for covariates. IPFP SI alterations measured at T-1 including sDev (IPFP), Percentage (H) and clustering effect of high SI [Clustering factor (H)] were significantly associated with higher risks of KR. All measurements were significantly associated with higher risks of KR at T0. IPFP SI is associated with the occurrence of KR suggesting it may play a role in end-stage knee OA. Copyright © 2018 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Predictive value of T2 relative signal intensity for response to somatostatin analogs in newly diagnosed acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ming; Zhang, Qilin; Liu, Wenjuan; Wang, Meng; Zhu, Jingjing; Ma, Zengyi; He, Wenqiang; Li, Shiqi; Shou, Xuefei; Li, Yiming; Zhang, Zhaoyun; Ye, Hongying; He, Min; Lu, Bin; Yao, Zhenwei; Lu, Yun; Qiao, Nidan; Ye, Zhao; Zhang, Yichao; Yang, Yeping; Zhao, Yao; Wang, Yongfei

    2016-11-01

    The difficulty of predicting the efficacy of somatostatin analogs (SSA) is not fully resolved. Here, we quantitatively evaluated the predictive value of relative signal intensity (rSI) on T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the short-term efficacy (3 months) of SSA therapy in patients with active acromegaly and assessed the correlation between MRI rSI and expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTR). This was a retrospective review of prospectively recorded data. Ninety-two newly diagnosed patients (37 males and 55 females) with active acromegaly were recruited. All patients were treated with pre-surgical SSA, followed by reassessment and transspenoidal surgery. rSI values were generated by calculating the ratio of SI in the tumor to the SI of normal frontal white matter. The Youden indices were calculated to determine the optimal cutoff of rSI to determine the efficacy of SSA. The correlation between rSI and expression of SSTR2/5 was analyzed by the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. T2 rSI was strongly correlated with biochemical sensitivity to SSA. The cutoff value of T2 rSI to distinguish biochemical sensitivity was 1.205, with a positive predictive value (PPV) of 81.5 % and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 77.3 %. No correlation was found between MRI and tumor size sensitivity. Moreover, T2 rSI was negatively correlated with the expression of SSTR5. T2 rSI correlates with the expression of SSTR5 and quantitatively predicts the biochemical efficacy of SSA in acromegaly.

  12. Detection of tissue coagulation by decorrelation of ultrasonic echo signals in cavitation-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Shin; Matsuura, Keiko; Takagi, Ryo; Yamamoto, Mariko; Umemura, Shin-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    A noninvasive technique to monitor thermal lesion formation is necessary to ensure the accuracy and safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. The purpose of this study is to ultrasonically detect the tissue change due to thermal coagulation in the HIFU treatment enhanced by cavitation microbubbles. An ultrasound imaging probe transmitted plane waves at a center frequency of 4.5 MHz. Ultrasonic radio-frequency (RF) echo signals during HIFU exposure at a frequency of 1.2 MHz were acquired. Cross-correlation coefficients were calculated between in-phase and quadrature (IQ) data of two B-mode images with an interval time of 50 and 500 ms for the estimation of the region of cavitation and coagulation, respectively. Pathological examination of the coagulated tissue was also performed to compare with the corresponding ultrasonically detected coagulation region. The distribution of minimum hold cross-correlation coefficient between two sets of IQ data with 50-ms intervals was compared with a pulse inversion (PI) image. The regions with low cross-correlation coefficients approximately corresponded to those with high brightness in the PI image. The regions with low cross-correlation coefficients in 500-ms intervals showed a good agreement with those with significant change in histology. The results show that the regions of coagulation and cavitation could be ultrasonically detected as those with low cross-correlation coefficients between RF frames with certain intervals. This method will contribute to improve the safety and accuracy of the HIFU treatment enhanced by cavitation microbubbles.

  13. Hepatobiliary MRI: Signal intensity based assessment of liver function correlated to 13C-Methacetin breath test.

    PubMed

    Haimerl, Michael; Probst, Ute; Poelsterl, Stefanie; Beyer, Lukas; Fellner, Claudia; Selgrad, Michael; Hornung, Matthias; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wiggermann, Philipp

    2018-06-13

    Gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) is a paramagnetic MRI contrast agent with raising popularity and has been used for evaluation of imaging-based liver function in recent years. In order to verify whether liver function as determined by real-time breath analysis using the intravenous administration of 13 C-methacetin can be estimated quantitatively from Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI using signal intensity (SI) values. 110 patients underwent Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced 3-T MRI and, for the evaluation of liver function, a 13 C-methacetin breath test ( 13 C-MBT). SI values from before (SI pre ) and 20 min after (SI post ) contrast media injection were acquired by T1-weighted volume-interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) sequences with fat suppression. The relative enhancement (RE) between the plain and contrast-enhanced SI values was calculated and evaluated in a correlation analysis of 13 C-MBT values to SI post and RE to obtain a SI-based estimation of 13 C-MBT values. The simple regression model showed a log-linear correlation of 13 C-MBT values with SI post and RE (p < 0.001). Stratified by 3 different categories of 13 C-MBT readouts, there was a constant significant decrease in both SI post (p ≤ 0.002) and RE (p ≤ 0.033) with increasing liver disease progression as assessed by the 13 C-MBT. Liver function as determined using real-time 13 C-methacetin breath analysis can be estimated quantitatively from Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI using SI-based indices.

  14. Thirty Minutes of Running Exercise Decreases T2 Signal Intensity but Not Thickness of the Knee Joint Cartilage: A 3.0-T Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Karanfil, Yiğitcan; Babayeva, Naila; Dönmez, Gürhan; Diren, H Barış; Eryılmaz, Muzaffer; Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Korkusuz, Feza

    2018-04-01

    Objective Recent studies showed a potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which can be used as an additional tool for diagnosing cartilage degeneration in the early stage. We designed a cross-sectional study in order to evaluate knee joint cartilage adaptation to running, using 3.0-T MRI equipped with the 3-dimensional turbo spin echo (VISTA = Volume ISotropic Turbo spin echo Acquisition) software. By this thickness (mm) and signal intensity (mean pixel value) can be quantified, which could be closely related to the fluid content of the knee joint cartilage, before and after running. Methods A total of 22 males, aged 18 to 35 years, dominant (right) and nondominant (left) knees were assessed before and after 30 minutes of running. Cartilage thickness and signal intensity of surfaces of the patella, medial and lateral femoral and tibial condyles were measured. Results Cartilage thickness of the lateral condyle decreased at the dominant knee, while it increased at the medial tibial plateau. Signal intensity decreased at all locations, except the lateral patella in both knees. The most obvious decrease in signal intensity (10.6%) was at the medial tibial plateau from 949.8 to 849.0 of the dominant knee. Conclusion There was an increase in thickness measurements and decrease in signal intensity in medial tibial plateau of the dominant knee after 30 minutes of running. This outcome could be related to fluid outflow from the tissue. Greater reductions in the medial tibial plateau cartilage indicate greater load sharing by these areas of the joint during a 30-minute running.

  15. Lung Parenchymal Signal Intensity in MRI: A Technical Review with Educational Aspirations Regarding Reversible Versus Irreversible Transverse Relaxation Effects in Common Pulse Sequences

    PubMed Central

    MULKERN, ROBERT; HAKER, STEVEN; MAMATA, HATSUHO; LEE, EDWARD; MITSOURAS, DIMITRIOS; OSHIO, KOICHI; BALASUBRAMANIAN, MUKUND; HATABU, HIROTO

    2014-01-01

    Lung parenchyma is challenging to image with proton MRI. The large air space results in ~l/5th as many signal-generating protons compared to other organs. Air/tissue magnetic susceptibility differences lead to strong magnetic field gradients throughout the lungs and to broad frequency distributions, much broader than within other organs. Such distributions have been the subject of experimental and theoretical analyses which may reveal aspects of lung microarchitecture useful for diagnosis. Their most immediate relevance to current imaging practice is to cause rapid signal decays, commonly discussed in terms of short T2* values of 1 ms or lower at typical imaging field strengths. Herein we provide a brief review of previous studies describing and interpreting proton lung spectra. We then link these broad frequency distributions to rapid signal decays, though not necessarily the exponential decays generally used to define T2* values. We examine how these decays influence observed signal intensities and spatial mapping features associated with the most prominent torso imaging sequences, including spoiled gradient and spin echo sequences. Effects of imperfect refocusing pulses on the multiple echo signal decays in single shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) sequences and effects of broad frequency distributions on balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) sequence signal intensities are also provided. The theoretical analyses are based on the concept of explicitly separating the effects of reversible and irreversible transverse relaxation processes, thus providing a somewhat novel and more general framework from which to estimate lung signal intensity behavior in modern imaging practice. PMID:25228852

  16. Intravenous injection of gadobutrol in an epidemiological study group did not lead to a difference in relative signal intensities of certain brain structures after 5 years.

    PubMed

    Kromrey, Marie-Luise; Liedtke, Kim Rouven; Ittermann, Till; Langner, Sönke; Kirsch, Michael; Weitschies, Werner; Kühn, Jens-Peter

    2017-02-01

    To investigate if application of macrocyclic gadolinium-based contrast agents in volunteers is associated with neuronal deposition detected by magnetic resonance imaging in a 5-year longitudinal survey. Three hundred eighty-seven volunteers who participated in a population-based study were enrolled. Subjects underwent plain T1-weighted brain MRI at baseline and 5 years later with identical sequence parameters. At baseline, 271 participants additionally received intravenous injection of the macrocyclic contrast agent gadobutrol (0.15 mmol/kg). A control group including 116 subjects received no contrast agent. Relative signal intensities of thalamus, pallidum, pons and dentate nucleus were compared at baseline and follow-up. No difference in relative signal intensities was observed between contrast group (thalamus, p = 0.865; pallidum, p = 0.263; pons, p = 0.533; dentate nucleus, p = 0.396) and control group (thalamus, p = 0.683; pallidum; p = 0.970; pons, p = 0.773; dentate nucleus, p = 0.232) at both times. Comparison between both groups revealed no significant differences in relative signal intensities (thalamus, p = 0.413; pallidum, p = 0.653; pons, p = 0.460; dentate nucleus, p = 0.751). The study showed no significant change in globus pallidus-to-thalamus or dentate nucleus-to-pons ratios. Five years after administration of a 1.5-fold dose gadobutrol to normal subjects, signal intensity of thalamus, pallidum, pons and dentate nucleus did not differ from participants who had not received gadobutrol. • Gadobutrol does not lead to neuronal signal alterations after 5 years. • Neuronal deposition of macrocyclic contrast agent could not be confirmed. • Macrocyclic contrast agents in a proven dosage are safe.

  17. Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Enhanced Mesenchymal Stem Cell Recruitment through Stromal Derived Factor-1 Signaling in Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fang-Yuan; Leung, Kwok-Sui; Li, Gang; Qin, Jianghui; Chow, Simon Kwoon-Ho; Huang, Shuo; Sun, Ming-Hui; Qin, Ling; Cheung, Wing-Hoi

    2014-01-01

    Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been proven effective in promoting fracture healing but the underlying mechanisms are not fully depicted. We examined the effect of LIPUS on the recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and the pivotal role of stromal cell-derived factor-1/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (SDF-1/CXCR4) pathway in response to LIPUS stimulation, which are essential factors in bone fracture healing. For in vitro study, isolated rat MSCs were divided into control or LIPUS group. LIPUS treatment was given 20 minutes/day at 37°C for 3 days. Control group received sham LIPUS treatment. After treatment, intracellular CXCR4 mRNA, SDF-1 mRNA and secreted SDF-1 protein levels were quantified, and MSCs migration was evaluated with or without blocking SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway by AMD3100. For in vivo study, fractured 8-week-old young rats received intracardiac administration of MSCs were assigned to LIPUS treatment, LIPUS+AMD3100 treatment or vehicle control group. The migration of transplanted MSC to the fracture site was investigated by ex vivo fluorescent imaging. SDF-1 protein levels at fracture site and in serum were examined. Fracture healing parameters, including callus morphology, micro-architecture of the callus and biomechanical properties of the healing bone were investigated. The in vitro results showed that LIPUS upregulated SDF-1 and CXCR4 expressions in MSCs, and elevated SDF-1 protein level in the conditioned medium. MSCs migration was promoted by LIPUS and partially inhibited by AMD3100. In vivo study demonstrated that LIPUS promoted MSCs migration to the fracture site, which was associated with an increase of local and serum SDF-1 level, the changes in callus formation, and the improvement of callus microarchitecture and mechanical properties; whereas the blockade of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling attenuated the LIPUS effects on the fractured bones. These results suggested SDF-1 mediated MSCs migration might be one of the crucial mechanisms

  18. Ca²⁺ signal contributing to the synthesis and emission of monoterpenes regulated by light intensity in Lilium 'siberia'.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zenghui; Li, Tianjiao; Zheng, Jian; Yang, Kai; He, Xiangfeng; Leng, Pingsheng

    2015-06-01

    The floral scent is an important part of plant volatile compounds, and is influenced by environmental factors. The emission of monoterpenes of Lilium 'siberia' is regulated by light intensity, but the mechanism is large unknown. In this study, the expression of Li-mTPS, a monoterpene synthase gene in the tepals of Lilium 'siberia', and net Ca(2+) flux were investigated after exposure to different levels of light intensity (0, 100, 300, 600, 1000, and 1500 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). Moreover the effect of LaCl3 and ethylene glycol-bis-(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) on the Li-mTPS expression, monoterpene emission, and net Ca(2+) flux were examined at 600 μmol m(-2) s(-1). The results showed that along with the enhancement of light intensity, the expression level of Li-mTPS increased gradually, and the net Ca(2+) influx was also enhanced showing a similar pattern. It was found that LaCl3 and EGTA effectively inhibited the increase in expression of Li-mTPS and the net Ca(2+) influx induced by light treatment. Moreover, the release amounts of monoterpenes decreased significantly after treatment with LaCl3 and EGTA. So it can be concluded that Ca(2+) signal contributed to the biosynthesis and emission of monoterpenes regulated by light intensity in Lilium 'siberia' tepals. The increased light intensity firstly triggered the Ca(2+) influx to cytoplasm, and then the gene expression of monoterpene synthases downstream was activated to regulate the biosynthesis and emission of monoterpenes. But in the signaling pathway other mechanisms were thought to be involved in the emission of monoterpenes regulated by light intensity, which need to be investigated in future research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The anomalous esr dating signal intensity observed for human remains from the namu burial site on the island of Taumako, Solomon islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, K. J.; Oduwole, A. D.; Sales, K. D.

    Bone and tooth specimens taken from human remains ca -100 years old in the Namu burial site. Taumako, Solomon Islands, show intense electron spin resonance (ESR) dating signals that are partially saturated. A comparison with laboratory y-irradiated modern tooth samples suggests that the specimens had received a total dose of ca 20 kGy. Techniques other than ESR spectroscopy indicate that there is a negligible internal radiation dose. A study of the thermal generation of the so-called alanine radical signal in these specimens and in laboratory γ-irradiated modern samples shows that the signal grows at similar rates in both cases. From these data, the Taumako specimens are estimated to have received their radiation dose about 26 years ago.

  20. Diffusion-weighted imaging of mucinous carcinoma of the breast: evaluation of apparent diffusion coefficient and signal intensity in correlation with histologic findings.

    PubMed

    Woodhams, Reiko; Kakita, Satoko; Hata, Hirofumi; Iwabuchi, Keiichi; Umeoka, Shigeaki; Mountford, Carolyn E; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2009-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of mucinous carcinoma of the breast with that of other breast tumors and to analyze correlations between signal intensity on diffusion-weighted images and the histologic features of mucinous carcinoma. Two hundred seventy-six patients with 277 lesions, including 15 mucinous carcinomas (13 pure type, two mixed type), 204 other malignant tumors, and 58 benign lesions, were examined with 1.5-T MRI at b values of 0 and 1,500 s/mm(2). The correlations between cellularity and ADC, homogeneity of signal intensity on diffusion-weighted images, and histopathologic findings were analyzed. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The mean ADC of mucinous carcinoma (1.8 +/- 0.4 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s) was statistically higher than that of benign lesions (1.3+/- 0.3 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s) and other malignant tumors (0.9 +/- 0.2 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s) (p < 0.001). The ADC of pure type mucinous carcinoma (1.8 +/- 0.3 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s) was higher than that of mixed type mucinous carcinoma (1.2 +/- 0.2 x 10(-3) mm(2)/s) (p < 0.001) and other histologic types (p > 0.05). The correlation between mean cellularity and the ADC of mucinous carcinoma was significant (rho(s) = -0.754; p = 0.001). The homogeneity of signal intensity on diffusion-weighted images correlated with the homogeneity of histologic structures of mucinous carcinoma (p < 0.001; kappa = 0.826). Mucinous carcinoma can be clearly differentiated from other breast tumors on the basis of ADC. The low signal intensity of mucinous carcinoma on diffusion-weighted images appears to reflect the presence of mucin and low cellularity. High signal intensity on diffusion-weighted images may reflect the presence of fibrovascular bundles, increased cell density, or a combination of these features.

  1. Recovery from welding-fume-exposure-induced MRI T1 signal intensities after cessation of welding-fume exposure in brains of cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Han, Jeong Hee; Chung, Yong Hyun; Park, Jung Duck; Kim, Choong Yong; Yang, Seoung Oh; Khang, Hyun Soo; Cheong, Hae Kwan; Lee, Jong Seong; Ha, Chang Soo; Song, Chang-Woo; Kwon, Il Hoon; Sung, Jae Hyuck; Heo, Jeong Doo; Kim, Na-Young; Huang, Mingai; Cho, Myung Haing; Yu, Il Je

    2008-09-01

    The shortening of the MRI T1 relaxation time, indicative of a high signal intensity in a T1-weighted MRI, is known as a useful biomarker for Mn exposure after short-term welding-fume exposure. A previous monkey experimental study found that the T1 relaxation times decreased time-dependently after exposure, and a visually detectable high signal intensity appeared after 150 days of exposure. The nadir for the shortening of the T1 relaxation time was also previously found to correspond well with the blood Mn concentration in welders, suggesting a correlation between a prolonged high blood Mn concentration and shortened T1 relaxation time. Accordingly, to clarify the clearance of the brain Mn concentration after the cessation of welding-fume exposure, cynomolgus monkeys were assigned to 3 groups-unexposed, low dose (31 mg/m(3) total suspended particulate (TSP), 0.9 mg Mn/m(3)), and high dose (62 mg/m(3) TSP, 1.95 mg Mn/m(3))-and exposed to manual metal-arc stainless steel (MMA-SS) welding fumes for 2 h per day for 8 mo in an inhalation chamber system equipped with an automatic fume generator. After reaching the peak MRI T1 signal intensity (shortest T1 relaxation time), the monkeys were allowed to recover by ceasing the welding-fume exposure. Within 2 mo, the MRI T1 signal intensities for the exposed monkeys returned to nearly the same level as those for the unexposed monkeys, indicating the potential for recovery from a high MRI T1 signal intensity induced by welding-fume exposure, even after prolonged exposure. Clearance of the Mn tissue concentration was also demonstrated in the globus pallidus, plus other tissues from the brain, liver, spleen, and blood. In contrast, there was no clearance of the lung concentrations of Mn, indicating that a soluble form of Mn was transported to the blood and brain. Therefore, the solubility of Mn in welding fumes would appear to be an important determinant as regards the retention of blood Mn levels and brain tissue Mn

  2. A Novel Time-Varying Spectral Filtering Algorithm for Reconstruction of Motion Artifact Corrupted Heart Rate Signals During Intense Physical Activities Using a Wearable Photoplethysmogram Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Salehizadeh, Seyed M. A.; Dao, Duy; Bolkhovsky, Jeffrey; Cho, Chae; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of heart rates from photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals during intense physical activity is a very challenging problem. This is because strenuous and high intensity exercise can result in severe motion artifacts in PPG signals, making accurate heart rate (HR) estimation difficult. In this study we investigated a novel technique to accurately reconstruct motion-corrupted PPG signals and HR based on time-varying spectral analysis. The algorithm is called Spectral filter algorithm for Motion Artifacts and heart rate reconstruction (SpaMA). The idea is to calculate the power spectral density of both PPG and accelerometer signals for each time shift of a windowed data segment. By comparing time-varying spectra of PPG and accelerometer data, those frequency peaks resulting from motion artifacts can be distinguished from the PPG spectrum. The SpaMA approach was applied to three different datasets and four types of activities: (1) training datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 12 subjects while performing treadmill exercise from 1 km/h to 15 km/h; (2) test datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 11 subjects while performing forearm and upper arm exercise. (3) Chon Lab dataset including 10 min recordings from 10 subjects during treadmill exercise. The ECG signals from all three datasets provided the reference HRs which were used to determine the accuracy of our SpaMA algorithm. The performance of the SpaMA approach was calculated by computing the mean absolute error between the estimated HR from the PPG and the reference HR from the ECG. The average estimation errors using our method on the first, second and third datasets are 0.89, 1.93 and 1.38 beats/min respectively, while the overall error on all 33 subjects is 1.86 beats/min and the performance on only treadmill experiment datasets (22 subjects) is 1.11 beats/min. Moreover, it was found that dynamics of heart rate variability can be

  3. A Novel Time-Varying Spectral Filtering Algorithm for Reconstruction of Motion Artifact Corrupted Heart Rate Signals During Intense Physical Activities Using a Wearable Photoplethysmogram Sensor.

    PubMed

    Salehizadeh, Seyed M A; Dao, Duy; Bolkhovsky, Jeffrey; Cho, Chae; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H

    2015-12-23

    Accurate estimation of heart rates from photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals during intense physical activity is a very challenging problem. This is because strenuous and high intensity exercise can result in severe motion artifacts in PPG signals, making accurate heart rate (HR) estimation difficult. In this study we investigated a novel technique to accurately reconstruct motion-corrupted PPG signals and HR based on time-varying spectral analysis. The algorithm is called Spectral filter algorithm for Motion Artifacts and heart rate reconstruction (SpaMA). The idea is to calculate the power spectral density of both PPG and accelerometer signals for each time shift of a windowed data segment. By comparing time-varying spectra of PPG and accelerometer data, those frequency peaks resulting from motion artifacts can be distinguished from the PPG spectrum. The SpaMA approach was applied to three different datasets and four types of activities: (1) training datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 12 subjects while performing treadmill exercise from 1 km/h to 15 km/h; (2) test datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 11 subjects while performing forearm and upper arm exercise. (3) Chon Lab dataset including 10 min recordings from 10 subjects during treadmill exercise. The ECG signals from all three datasets provided the reference HRs which were used to determine the accuracy of our SpaMA algorithm. The performance of the SpaMA approach was calculated by computing the mean absolute error between the estimated HR from the PPG and the reference HR from the ECG. The average estimation errors using our method on the first, second and third datasets are 0.89, 1.93 and 1.38 beats/min respectively, while the overall error on all 33 subjects is 1.86 beats/min and the performance on only treadmill experiment datasets (22 subjects) is 1.11 beats/min. Moreover, it was found that dynamics of heart rate variability can be

  4. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  5. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal uterine bleeding? Abnormal uterine bleeding is any heavy or unusual bleeding from the uterus (through your ... one symptom of abnormal uterine bleeding. Having extremely heavy bleeding during your period can also be considered ...

  6. Impaired proteoglycan glycosylation, elevated TGF-β signaling, and abnormal osteoblast differentiation as the basis for bone fragility in a mouse model for gerodermia osteodysplastica

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wing Lee; Steiner, Magdalena; Egerer, Johannes; Mizumoto, Shuji; Pestka, Jan M.; Zhang, Haikuo; Khayal, Layal Abo; Ott, Claus-Eric; Kolanczyk, Mateusz; Schinke, Thorsten; Paganini, Chiara; Rossi, Antonio; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Amling, Michael; Knaus, Petra; Chan, Danny; Mundlos, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    Gerodermia osteodysplastica (GO) is characterized by skin laxity and early-onset osteoporosis. GORAB, the responsible disease gene, encodes a small Golgi protein of poorly characterized function. To circumvent neonatal lethality of the GorabNull full knockout, Gorab was conditionally inactivated in mesenchymal progenitor cells (Prx1-cre), pre-osteoblasts (Runx2-cre), and late osteoblasts/osteocytes (Dmp1-cre), respectively. While in all three lines a reduction in trabecular bone density was evident, only GorabPrx1 and GorabRunx2 mutants showed dramatically thinned, porous cortical bone and spontaneous fractures. Collagen fibrils in the skin of GorabNull mutants and in bone of GorabPrx1 mutants were disorganized, which was also seen in a bone biopsy from a GO patient. Measurement of glycosaminoglycan contents revealed a reduction of dermatan sulfate levels in skin and cartilage from GorabNull mutants. In bone from GorabPrx1 mutants total glycosaminoglycan levels and the relative percentage of dermatan sulfate were both strongly diminished. Accordingly, the proteoglycans biglycan and decorin showed reduced glycanation. Also in cultured GORAB-deficient fibroblasts reduced decorin glycanation was evident. The Golgi compartment of these cells showed an accumulation of decorin, but reduced signals for dermatan sulfate. Moreover, we found elevated activation of TGF-β in GorabPrx1 bone tissue leading to enhanced downstream signalling, which was reproduced in GORAB-deficient fibroblasts. Our data suggest that the loss of Gorab primarily perturbs pre-osteoblasts. GO may be regarded as a congenital disorder of glycosylation affecting proteoglycan synthesis due to delayed transport and impaired posttranslational modification in the Golgi compartment. PMID:29561836

  7. Auxin-to-Gibberellin Ratio as a Signal for Light Intensity and Quality in Regulating Soybean Growth and Matter Partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng; Fan, Yuanfang; Wu, Xiaoling; Cheng, Yajiao; Liu, Qinlin; Feng, Lingyang; Chen, Junxu; Wang, Zhonglin; Wang, Xiaochun; Yong, Taiwen; Liu, Weiguo; Liu, Jiang; Du, Junbo; Shu, Kai; Yang, Wenyu

    2018-01-01

    The intensity and quality (red to far-red (R/Fr) ratio) of light directly affect growth of plant under shading. Gibberellins (GAs) and auxin [indole-3-acetic acid (IAA)] play important roles in mediating the shading adaptive responses of plants. Thus, the intensity and quality of the uncoupling light from shading were assessed to identify the influence of each component on the morphology and matter distribution of the leaf, stem, and petiole. This assessment was based on the changes in endogenous Gibberellin 1 (GA1) and IAA levels. Soybean plants were grown in a growth chamber with four treatments [normal (N), N+Fr, low (L), and L+Fr light]. Results revealed that the reductions in photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and R/Fr ratio equally increased height and stem mass fractions (SMFs) of the soybean seedling. The light intensity significantly influenced the dry mass per unit area and mass fraction of soybean leaves, whereas the light quality regulated the petiole elongation and mass fraction. Low R/Fr ratio (high Fr light) increased the soybean biomass by improving the photosynthetic assimilation rate and quantum yield of photosystem II. In addition, the IAA and GA1 levels in the leaf, stem, and petiole did not reflect the growth response trends of each tissue toward light intensity and quality; however, trends of the IAA-to-GA1 content ratios were similar to those of the growth and matter allocation of each soybean tissue under different light environments. Therefore, the response of growth and matter allocation of soybean to light intensity and quality may be regulated by the IAA-to-GA1 content ratio in the tissues of the soybean plant. PMID:29441084

  8. Differences in Signal Intensity and Enhancement on MR Images of the Perivascular Spaces in the Basal Ganglia versus Those in White Matter.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, Shinji; Nakane, Toshiki; Kawai, Hisashi; Taoka, Toshiaki

    2018-01-18

    To elucidate differences between the perivascular space (PVS) in the basal ganglia (BG) versus that found in white matter (WM) using heavily T 2 -weighted FLAIR (hT 2 -FL) in terms of 1) signal intensity on non-contrast enhanced images, and 2) the degree of contrast enhancement by intravenous single dose administration of gadolinium based contrast agent (IV-SD-GBCA). Eight healthy men and 13 patients with suspected endolymphatic hydrops were included. No subjects had renal insufficiency. All subjects received IV-SD-GBCA. MR cisternography (MRC) and hT 2 -FL images were obtained prior to and 4 h after IV-SD-GBCA. The signal intensity of the PVS in the BG, subinsular WM, and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in Ambient cistern (CSF AC ) and CSF in Sylvian fissure (CSF Syl ) was measured as well as that of the thalamus. The signal intensity ratio (SIR) was calculated by dividing the intensity by that of the thalamus. We used 5% as a threshold to determine the significance of the statistical test. In the pre-contrast scan, the SIR of the PVS in WM (Mean ± standard deviation, 1.83 ± 0.46) was significantly higher than that of the PVS in the BG (1.05 ± 0.154), CSF Syl (1.03 ± 0.15) and the CSF AC (0.97 ± 0.29). There was no significant difference between the SIR of the PVS in the BG compared to the CSF AC and CSF Syl . For the evaluation of the contrast enhancement effect, significant enhancement was observed in the PVS in the BG, the CSF AC and the CSF Syl compared to the pre-contrast scan. No significant contrast enhancement was observed in the PVS in WM. The signal intensity difference between the PVS in the BG versus WM on pre-contrast images suggests that the fluid composition might be different between these PVSs. The difference in the contrast enhancement between the PVSs in the BG versus WM suggests a difference in drainage function.

  9. Cascade and parallel combination (CPC) of adaptive filters for estimating heart rate during intensive physical exercise from photoplethysmographic signal

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Tanvir Ahmed, Sk.; Zabir, Ishmam; Shahnaz, Celia

    2018-01-01

    Photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal is getting popularity for monitoring heart rate in wearable devices because of simplicity of construction and low cost of the sensor. The task becomes very difficult due to the presence of various motion artefacts. In this study, an algorithm based on cascade and parallel combination (CPC) of adaptive filters is proposed in order to reduce the effect of motion artefacts. First, preliminary noise reduction is performed by averaging two channel PPG signals. Next in order to reduce the effect of motion artefacts, a cascaded filter structure consisting of three cascaded adaptive filter blocks is developed where three-channel accelerometer signals are used as references to motion artefacts. To further reduce the affect of noise, a scheme based on convex combination of two such cascaded adaptive noise cancelers is introduced, where two widely used adaptive filters namely recursive least squares and least mean squares filters are employed. Heart rates are estimated from the noise reduced PPG signal in spectral domain. Finally, an efficient heart rate tracking algorithm is designed based on the nature of the heart rate variability. The performance of the proposed CPC method is tested on a widely used public database. It is found that the proposed method offers very low estimation error and a smooth heart rate tracking with simple algorithmic approach. PMID:29515812

  10. Low signal intensity in motor cortex on susceptibility-weighted MR imaging is correlated with clinical signs of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hironobu; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Shimada, Hitoshi; Ueda, Takehiro; Kowa, Hisatomo; Kanda, Fumio; Toda, Tatsushi

    2018-03-01

    There is no reliable objective indicator for upper motor neuron dysfunction in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). To determine the clinical significance and potential utility of magnetic resonance (MR) signals, we investigated the relationship between clinical symptoms and susceptibility changes in the motor cortex measured using susceptibility-weighted MR imaging taken by readily available 3-T MRI in clinical practice. Twenty-four ALS patients and 14 control subjects underwent 3-T MR T1-weighted imaging and susceptibility-weighted MR imaging with the principles of echo-shifting with a train of observations (PRESTO) sequence. We analysed relationships between relative susceptibility changes in the motor cortex assessed using voxel-based analysis (VBA) and clinical scores, including upper motor neuron score, ALS functional rating scale revised score, and Medical Research Council sum score on physical examination. Patients with ALS exhibited significantly lower signal intensity in the precentral gyrus on susceptibility-weighted MR imaging compared with controls. Clinical scores were significantly correlated with susceptibility changes. Importantly, the extent of the susceptibility changes in the bilateral precentral gyri was significantly correlated with upper motor neuron scores. The results of our pilot study using VBA indicated that low signal intensity in motor cortex on susceptibility-weighted MR imaging may correspond to clinical symptoms, particularly upper motor neuron dysfunction. Susceptibility-weighted MR imaging may be a useful diagnostic tool as an objective indicator of upper motor neuron dysfunction.

  11. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Benetti-Pinto, Cristina Laguna; Rosa-E-Silva, Ana Carolina Japur de Sá; Yela, Daniela Angerame; Soares Júnior, José Maria

    2017-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is a frequent condition in Gynecology. It may impact physical, emotional sexual and professional aspects of the lives of women, impairing their quality of life. In cases of acute and severe bleeding, women may need urgent treatment with volumetric replacement and prescription of hemostatic substances. In some specific cases with more intense and prolonged bleeding, surgical treatment may be necessary. The objective of this chapter is to describe the main evidence on the treatment of women with abnormal uterine bleeding, both acute and chronic. Didactically, the treatment options were based on the current International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) classification system (PALM-COEIN). The etiologies of PALM-COEIN are: uterine Polyp (P), Adenomyosis (A), Leiomyoma (L), precursor and Malignant lesions of the uterine body (M), Coagulopathies (C), Ovulatory dysfunction (O), Endometrial dysfunction (E), Iatrogenic (I), and Not yet classified (N). The articles were selected according to the recommendation grades of the PubMed, Cochrane and Embase databases, and those in which the main objective was the reduction of uterine menstrual bleeding were included. Only studies written in English were included. All editorial or complete papers that were not consistent with abnormal uterine bleeding, or studies in animal models, were excluded. The main objective of the treatment is the reduction of menstrual flow and morbidity and the improvement of quality of life. It is important to emphasize that the treatment in the acute phase aims to hemodynamically stabilize the patient and stop excessive bleeding, while the treatment in the chronic phase is based on correcting menstrual dysfunction according to its etiology and clinical manifestations. The treatment may be surgical or pharmacological, and the latter is based mainly on hormonal therapy, anti-inflammatory drugs and antifibrinolytics. Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro

  12. Disrupted mGluR5-Homer scaffolds mediate abnormal mGluR5 signaling, circuit function and behavior in a mouse model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ronesi, Jennifer A.; Collins, Katie A.; Hays, Seth A.; Tsai, Nien-Pei; Guo, Weirui; Birnbaum, Shari G.; Hu, Jia-Hua; Worley, Paul F.; Gibson, Jay R.; Huber, Kimberly M.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced mGluR5 function is causally associated with the pathophysiology of Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), a leading inherited cause of intellectual disability and autism. Here we provide evidence that altered mGluR5-Homer scaffolds contribute to mGluR5 dysfunction and phenotypes in the FXS mouse model, Fmr1 KO. In Fmr1 KO mice mGluR5 is less associated with long Homer isoforms, but more associated with the short Homer1a. Genetic deletion of Homer1a restores mGluR5- long Homer scaffolds and corrects multiple phenotypes in Fmr1 KO mice including altered mGluR5 signaling, neocortical circuit dysfunction, and behavior. Acute, peptide-mediated disruption of mGluR5-Homer scaffolds in wildtype mice mimics many Fmr1 KO phenotypes. In contrast, Homer1a deletion does not rescue altered mGluR-dependent long-term synaptic depression or translational control of FMRP target mRNAs. Our findings reveal novel functions for mGluR5-Homer interactions in the brain and delineate distinct mechanisms of mGluR5 dysfunction in a mouse model of cognitive dysfunction and autism. PMID:22267161

  13. Control of treatment size in cavitation-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound using radio-frequency echo signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiyasu, Kentaro; Takagi, Ryo; Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2017-07-01

    In high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment, controlling the ultrasound dose at each focal target spot is important because it is a problem that the length of the coagulated region in front of the focal point deviates owing to the differences in absorption in each focal target spot and attenuation in the intervening tissues. In this study, the detected changes in the power spectra of HIFU echoes were used by controlling the HIFU duration in the “trigger HIFU” sequence with the aim to increase coagulation size through the enhancement of the ultrasonic heating by the cavitation induced by the preceding extremely high intensity short “trigger” pulse. The result shows that this method can be used to detect boiling bubbles and the following generated cavitation bubbles at their early stage. By automatically stopping HIFU exposure immediately after detecting the bubbles, overheating was prevented and the deviation of the length of the coagulated region was reduced.

  14. Localization of Coronary High-Intensity Signals on T1-Weighted MR Imaging: Relation to Plaque Morphology and Clinical Severity of Angina Pectoris.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Ehara, Shoichi; Hasegawa, Takao; Sakaguchi, Mikumo; Otsuka, Kenichiro; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Shimada, Kenei

    2015-10-01

    This study sought to investigate the relationship between localization of high-intensity signals (HISs) on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) with the noncontrast magnetic resonance technique and plaque morphology detected on optical coherence tomography, and the clinical severity of angina pectoris. Since the introduction of the T1WI noncontrast magnetic resonance technique for plaque imaging, some groups have reported that HISs in the coronary artery on T1WI are associated with a vulnerable morphology and future cardiac events. However, the association between the localization of HISs, such as coronary intrawall or intraluminal, and plaque morphology has not been investigated. One hundred lesions with either stable or unstable angina were included and divided into 3 groups according to the following criteria using T1WI. First, the plaques with the ratio between the signal intensities of coronary plaque and cardiac muscle ≤1.0 were classified as non-HISs (n = 39). Then, HISs with the ratio between the signal intensities of coronary plaque and cardiac muscle >1.0 were classified into 2 types by using cross-sectional T1WI. Those localized within the coronary wall when the lumen was identified were defined as intrawall HISs (n = 37), whereas those occupying the lumen when the lumen was not, or even if only partly, identified, were defined as intraluminal HISs (n = 24). Multivariate analysis revealed that intrawall HISs were associated with macrophage accumulation and the absence of calcification assessed by using optical coherence tomography. In contrast, thrombus and intimal vasculature were independent factors associated with intraluminal HISs. Furthermore, 50% of patients with intraluminal HISs experienced rest angina, such as Braunwald class II or III. This study shows that intrawall and intraluminal HISs on T1WI in patients with angina are related to the different types of vulnerable plaque morphology and the clinical severity. Copyright © 2015 American College of

  15. Prenatal diagnosis of fetal respiratory function: evaluation of fetal lung maturity using lung-to-liver signal intensity ratio at magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Oka, Yasuko; Rahman, Mosfequr; Sasakura, Chihaya; Waseda, Tomoo; Watanabe, Yukio; Fujii, Ryota; Makinoda, Satoru

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study is to determine the fetal lung-to-liver signal intensity ratio (LLSIR) on T2-weighted images for the prediction of neonatal respiratory outcome. One hundred ten fetuses who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination for various indications after 22 weeks of gestation participated in this study. LLSIR was measured as the ratio of signal intensities of the fetal lung and liver on T2-weighted images at MRI. We examined the changes of the ratio with advancing gestation and the relations between LLSIR and the presence of the severe respiratory disorder (SRD) after birth. The best cut-off value of the LLSIR to predict respiratory outcome after birth was calculated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Lung-to-liver signal intensity ratio correlated significantly with advancing gestational age (R = 0.35, p < 0.001). The non-SRD group had higher LLSIR compared with the SRD group (2.15 ± 0.30 vs. 1.53 ± 0.40, p < 0.001). ROC curve analysis showed that fetuses with an LLSIR < 2.00 were more likely to develop SRD [sensitivity: 100%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 52-100%; specificity: 73%, 95% CI 54-88%]. The fetal LLSIR on T2-weighted images is an accurate marker to diagnose the fetal lung maturity. © 2014 The Authors. Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. LH-21 and abnormal cannabidiol improve β-cell function in isolated human and mouse islets through GPR55-dependent and -independent signalling.

    PubMed

    Ruz-Maldonado, Inmaculada; Pingitore, Attilio; Liu, Bo; Atanes, Patricio; Huang, Guo Cai; Baker, David; Alonso, Francisco José; Bermúdez-Silva, Francisco Javier; Persaud, Shanta J

    2018-04-01

    To examine the effects of Abn-CBD (GPR55 agonist) and LH-21 (CB1 antagonist) on human and mouse islet function, and to determine signalling via GPR55 using islets from GPR55 -/- mice. Islets isolated from human organ donors and mice were incubated in the absence or presence of Abn-CBD or LH-21, and insulin secretion, [Ca 2+ ] i, cAMP , apoptosis, β-cell proliferation and CREB and AKT phosphorylation were examined using standard techniques. Abn-CBD potentiated glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and elevated [Ca 2+ ] i in human islets and islets from both GPR55 +/+ and GPR55 -/- mice. LH-21 also increased insulin secretion and [Ca 2+ ] i in human islets and GPR55 +/+ mouse islets, but concentrations of LH-21 up to 0.1 μM were ineffective in islets from GPR55 -/- mice. Neither ligand affected basal insulin secretion or islet cAMP levels. Abn-CBD and LH-21 reduced cytokine-induced apoptosis in human islets and GPR55 +/+ mouse islets, and these effects were suppressed after GPR55 deletion. They also increased β-cell proliferation: the effects of Abn-CBD were preserved in islets from GPR55 -/- mice, while those of LH-21 were abolished. Abn-CBD and LH-21 increased AKT phosphorylation in mouse and human islets. This study showed that Abn-CBD and LH-21 improve human and mouse islet β-cell function and viability. Use of islets from GPR55 -/- mice suggests that designation of Abn-CBD and LH-21 as a GPR55 agonist and a CB1 antagonist, should be revised. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound promotes spinal fusion and enhances migration and proliferation of MG63s through sonic hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Yi; Xu, Xi-Ming; Wu, Sui-Yi; Zhang, Zi-Cheng; Wang, Fei; Yang, Yi-Lin; Li, Ming; Wei, Xian-Zhao

    2018-05-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been found to accelerate the healing process of spinal fusion via a process closely related to osteoblast differentiation and migration. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling plays an important role in development and homeostasis, including a critical function in bone formation. However, its role in spinal fusion during LIPUS treatment is still unknown. This study showed that LIPUS treatment after spinal fusion surgery increased bone formation. The increased bone mass under LIPUS treatment appeared to result from the increased migration and proliferation of osteoblasts, resulting from upregulation of the Shh signaling pathway. In contrast, inhibition of Shh reduced the migratory and proliferative ability of osteoblast-like MG63 cells and blocked the efficacy of LIPUS treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Signal Statistics and Maximum Likelihood Sequence Estimation in Intensity Modulated Fiber Optic Links Containing a Single Optical Pre-amplifier.

    PubMed

    Alić, Nikola; Papen, George; Saperstein, Robert; Milstein, Laurence; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2005-06-13

    Exact signal statistics for fiber-optic links containing a single optical pre-amplifier are calculated and applied to sequence estimation for electronic dispersion compensation. The performance is evaluated and compared with results based on the approximate chi-square statistics. We show that detection in existing systems based on exact statistics can be improved relative to using a chi-square distribution for realistic filter shapes. In contrast, for high-spectral efficiency systems the difference between the two approaches diminishes, and performance tends to be less dependent on the exact shape of the filter used.

  19. MRI Signal Intensity Based B-Spline Nonrigid Registration for Pre- and Intraoperative Imaging During Prostate Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Oguro, Sota; Tokuda, Junichi; Elhawary, Haytham; Haker, Steven; Kikinis, Ron; Tempany, Clare M.C.; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To apply an intensity-based nonrigid registration algorithm to MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy clinical data and to assess its accuracy. Materials and Methods A nonrigid registration of preoperative MRI to intraoperative MRI images was carried out in 16 cases using a Basis-Spline algorithm in a retrospective manner. The registration was assessed qualitatively by experts’ visual inspection and quantitatively by measuring the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) for total gland (TG), central gland (CG), and peripheral zone (PZ), the mutual information (MI) metric, and the fiducial registration error (FRE) between corresponding anatomical landmarks for both the nonrigid and a rigid registration method. Results All 16 cases were successfully registered in less than 5 min. After the nonrigid registration, DSC values for TG, CG, PZ were 0.91, 0.89, 0.79, respectively, the MI metric was −0.19 ± 0.07 and FRE presented a value of 2.3 ± 1.8 mm. All the metrics were significantly better than in the case of rigid registration, as determined by one-sided t-tests. Conclusion The intensity-based nonrigid registration method using clinical data was demonstrated to be feasible and showed statistically improved metrics when compare to only rigid registration. The method is a valuable tool to integrate pre- and intraoperative images for brachytherapy. PMID:19856437

  20. MRI signal intensity based B-spline nonrigid registration for pre- and intraoperative imaging during prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Oguro, Sota; Tokuda, Junichi; Elhawary, Haytham; Haker, Steven; Kikinis, Ron; Tempany, Clare M C; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2009-11-01

    To apply an intensity-based nonrigid registration algorithm to MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy clinical data and to assess its accuracy. A nonrigid registration of preoperative MRI to intraoperative MRI images was carried out in 16 cases using a Basis-Spline algorithm in a retrospective manner. The registration was assessed qualitatively by experts' visual inspection and quantitatively by measuring the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) for total gland (TG), central gland (CG), and peripheral zone (PZ), the mutual information (MI) metric, and the fiducial registration error (FRE) between corresponding anatomical landmarks for both the nonrigid and a rigid registration method. All 16 cases were successfully registered in less than 5 min. After the nonrigid registration, DSC values for TG, CG, PZ were 0.91, 0.89, 0.79, respectively, the MI metric was -0.19 +/- 0.07 and FRE presented a value of 2.3 +/- 1.8 mm. All the metrics were significantly better than in the case of rigid registration, as determined by one-sided t-tests. The intensity-based nonrigid registration method using clinical data was demonstrated to be feasible and showed statistically improved metrics when compare to only rigid registration. The method is a valuable tool to integrate pre- and intraoperative images for brachytherapy.

  1. Acute low-intensity cycling with blood-flow restriction has no effect on metabolic signaling in human skeletal muscle compared to traditional exercise.

    PubMed

    Smiles, William J; Conceição, Miguel S; Telles, Guilherme D; Chacon-Mikahil, Mara P T; Cavaglieri, Cláudia R; Vechin, Felipe C; Libardi, Cleiton A; Hawley, John A; Camera, Donny M

    2017-02-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradative system sensitive to hypoxia and exercise-induced perturbations to cellular bioenergetics. We determined the effects of low-intensity endurance-based exercise performed with blood-flow restriction (BFR) on cell signaling adaptive responses regulating autophagy and substrate metabolism in human skeletal muscle. In a randomized cross-over design, nine young, healthy but physically inactive males completed three experimental trials separated by 1 week of recovery consisting of either a resistance exercise bout (REX: 4 × 10 leg press repetitions, 70% 1-RM), endurance exercise (END: 30 min cycling, 70% VO 2peak ), or low-intensity cycling with BFR (15 min, 40% VO 2peak ). A resting muscle biopsy was obtained from the vastus lateralis 2 weeks prior to the first exercise trial and 3 h after each exercise bout. END increased ULK1 Ser757 phosphorylation above rest and BFR (~37 to 51%, P < 0.05). Following REX, there were significant elevations compared to rest (~348%) and BFR (~973%) for p38γ MAPK Thr180/Tyr182 phosphorylation (P < 0.05). Parkin content was lower following BFR cycling compared to REX (~20%, P < 0.05). There were no exercise-induced changes in select markers of autophagy following BFR. Genes implicated in substrate metabolism (HK2 and PDK4) were increased above rest (~143 to 338%) and BFR cycling (~212 to 517%) with END (P < 0.001). A single bout of low-intensity cycling with BFR is insufficient to induce intracellular "stress" responses (e.g., high rates of substrate turnover and local hypoxia) necessary to activate skeletal muscle autophagy signaling.

  2. Autoshaping of abnormal children.

    PubMed

    Deckner, C W; Wilcox, L M; Maisto, S A; Blanton, R L

    1980-09-01

    Three experimentally naive abnormal children were exposed to a terminal operant contingency, i.e., reinforcement was delivered only if the children pressed a panel during intervals when it was lighted. Despite the absence of both successive approximation and manual shaping, it was found that each child began to respond discriminatively within a small number of trials. These data replicated previous animal studies concerned with the phenomena of autoshaping and signal-controlled responding. It was also found, however, that one type of autoshaping, the classical conditioning procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on the discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted of intrasubject reversal an multiple baseline designs established the internal validity of the findings. The finding of rapid acquisition of signal-controlled responding obtained with the initial procedure is suggessted to have practical significance. The disruptive effects of the classical form of autoshaping are discussed in terms of negative behavioral contrast.

  3. Temperature-dependent MR signals in cortical bone: potential for monitoring temperature changes during high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment in bone.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Elizabeth; Mougenot, Charles; Kazem, Mohammad; Laetsch, Theodore W; Chopra, Rajiv

    2015-10-01

    Because existing magnetic resonance thermometry techniques do not provide temperature information within bone, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposures in bone are monitored using temperature changes in adjacent soft tissues. In this study, the potential to monitor temperature changes in cortical bone using a short TE gradient echo sequence is evaluated. The feasibility of this proposed method was initially evaluated by measuring the temperature dependence of the gradient echo signal during cooling of cortical bone samples implanted with fiber-optic temperature sensors. A subsequent experiment involved heating a cortical bone sample using a clinical MR-HIFU system. A consistent relationship between temperature change and the change in magnitude signal was observed within and between cortical bone samples. For the two-dimensional gradient echo sequence implemented in this study, a least-squares linear fit determined the percentage change in signal to be (0.90 ± 0.01)%/°C. This relationship was used to estimate temperature changes observed in the HIFU experiment and these temperatures agreed well with those measured from an implanted fiber-optic sensor. This method appears capable of displaying changes related to temperature in cortical bone and could improve the safety of MR-HIFU treatments. Further investigations into the sensitivity of the technique in vivo are warranted. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The influence of laser pulse duration and energy on ICP-MS signal intensity, elemental fractionation, and particle size distribution in NIR fs-LA-ICP-MS

    PubMed Central

    Diwakar, Prasoon K.; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; LaHaye, Nicole L.; Hassanein, Ahmed; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Laser parameters, typically wavelength, pulse width, irradiance, repetition rate, and pulse energy, are critical parameters which influence the laser ablation process and thereby influence the LA-ICP-MS signal. In recent times, femtosecond laser ablation has gained popularity owing to the reduction in fractionation related issues and improved analytical performance which can provide matrix-independent sampling. The advantage offered by fs-LA is due to shorter pulse duration of the laser as compared to the phonon relaxation time and heat diffusion time. Hence the thermal effects are minimized in fs-LA. Recently, fs-LA-ICP-MS demonstrated improved analytical performance as compared to ns-LA-ICP-MS, but detailed mechanisms and processes are still not clearly understood. Improvement of fs-LA-ICP-MS over ns-LA-ICP-MS elucidates the importance of laser pulse duration and related effects on the ablation process. In this study, we have investigated the influence of laser pulse width (40 fs to 0.3 ns) and energy on LA-ICP-MS signal intensity and repeatability using a brass sample. Experiments were performed in single spot ablation mode as well as rastering ablation mode to monitor the Cu/Zn ratio. The recorded ICP-MS signal was correlated with total particle counts generated during laser ablation as well as particle size distribution. Our results show the importance of pulse width effects in the fs regime that becomes more pronounced when moving from femtosecond to picosecond and nanosecond regimes. PMID:26664120

  5. Radiological changes with magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography after irradiating minipig mandibles: The role of T2-SPIR mixed signal intensities in the detection of osteoradionecrosis.

    PubMed

    Poort, Lucas J; Postma, Alida A; Stadler, Annika A R; Böckmann, Roland A; Hoebers, Frank J; Kessler, Peter A W H

    2017-05-01

    Radiotherapy in the head and neck can induce several radiologically detectable changes in bone, osteoradionecrosis (ORN) among them. The purpose is to investigate radiological changes in mandibular bone after irradiation with various doses with and without surgery and to determine imaging characteristics of radiotherapy and ORN in an animal model. Sixteen Göttingen minipigs were divided into groups and were irradiated with two fractions with equivalent doses of 0, 25, 50 and 70 Gray. Thirteen weeks after irradiation, left mandibular teeth were removed and dental implants were placed. CT-scans and MR-imaging were made before irradiation and twenty-six weeks after. Alterations in the bony structures were recorded on CT-scan and MR-imaging and scored by two head-neck radiologists. Increased signal changes on MR-imaging were associated with higher radiation doses. Two animals developed ORN clinically. Radiologically mixed signal intensities on T2-SPIR were seen. On CT-scans cortical destruction was found in three animals. Based on imaging, three animals were diagnosed with ORN. Irradiation of minipig mandibles with various doses induced damages of the mandibular bone. Imaging with CT-scan and MR-imaging showed signal and structural changes that can be interpreted as prolonged and insufficient repair of radiation induced bone damages. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  7. MRI signal intensity of anterior cruciate ligament graft after transtibial versus anteromedial portal technique (TRANSIG): design of a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Ruiter, Simeon J S; Brouwer, Reinoud W; Meys, Tim W G M; Slump, Cornelis H; van Raay, Jos J A M

    2016-08-10

    There are two primary surgical techniques to reconstruct the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), transtibial (TT) technique and anteromedial portal (AMP) technique. Currently, there is no consensus which surgical technique elicits the best clinical and functional outcomes. MRI-derived measures of the signal intensity (SI) of the ACL graft have been described as an independent predictor of graft properties. The purpose of this study is to compare the MRI derived SI measurements of the ACL graft one year after ACL reconstruction, in order to compare the outcomes of both the AMP and TT ACL reconstruction technique. Thirty-six patients will be included in a randomized controlled trial. Patients who are admitted for primary unilateral ACL reconstruction will be included in the study. Exclusion criteria are a history of previous surgery on the ipsilateral knee, re-rupture of the ipsilateral ACL graft, associated ligamentous injuries or meniscal tear of the ipsilateral knee, unhealthy contralateral knee, contra-indications for MRI and a preference for one of the two surgical techniques and/or orthopaedic surgeon. Primary outcome is MRI Signal intensity ratio (SIR) of the ACL graft. Secondary outcome measures are the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Knee Examination Form,the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores (KOOS) and the Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS). Differences between MRI SIR assessment with the current MRI protocol (proton density weighted imaging protocol) and the additional T2*-weighted gradient-echo protocol will be assessed. There is no consensus regarding the TT or AMP ACL reconstruction technique. SI measurements with MRI have been used in other clinical studies for evaluation of the ACL graft and maturation after ACL reconstruction compared to clinical and functional outcomes. This randomized controlled trial has been designed to compare the TT technique with the AMP technique with the use of MRI SI of the

  8. T2-weighted signal intensity-selected volumetry for prediction of pathological complete response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungwon; Han, Kyunghwa; Seo, Nieun; Kim, Hye Jin; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Koom, Woong Sub; Ahn, Joong Bae; Lim, Joon Seok

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of signal intensity (SI)-selected volumetry findings in T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a potential biomarker for predicting pathological complete response (pCR) to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer. Forty consecutive patients with pCR after preoperative CRT were compared with 80 age- and sex-matched non-pCR patients in a case-control study. SI-selected tumor volume was measured on post-CRT T2-weighted MRI, which included voxels of the treated tumor exceeding the SI (obturator internus muscle SI + [ischiorectal fossa fat SI - obturator internus muscle SI] × 0.2). Three blinded readers independently rated five-point pCR confidence scores and compared the diagnostic outcome with SI-selected volumetry findings. The SI-selected volumetry protocol was validated in 30 additional rectal cancer patients. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) of SI-selected volumetry for pCR prediction was 0.831, with an optimal cutoff value of 649.6 mm 3 (sensitivity 0.850, specificity 0.725). The AUC of the SI-selected tumor volume was significantly greater than the pooled AUC of readers (0.707, p < 0.001). At this cutoff, the validation trial yielded an accuracy of 0.87. SI-selected volumetry in post-CRT T2-weighted MRI can help predict pCR after preoperative CRT in patients with rectal cancer. • Fibrosis and viable tumor MRI signal intensities (SIs) are difficult to distinguish. • T2 SI-selected volumetry yields high diagnostic performance for assessing pathological complete response. • T2 SI-selected volumetry is significantly more accurate than readers and non-SI-selected volumetry. • Post-chemoradiation therapy T2-weighted MRI SI-selected volumetry facilitates prediction of pathological complete response.

  9. Weighted Mean of Signal Intensity for Unbiased Fiber Tracking of Skeletal Muscles: Development of a New Method and Comparison With Other Correction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Giraudo, Chiara; Motyka, Stanislav; Weber, Michael; Resinger, Christoph; Thorsten, Feiweier; Traxler, Hannes; Trattnig, Siegfried; Bogner, Wolfgang

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the origin of random image artifacts in stimulated echo acquisition mode diffusion tensor imaging (STEAM-DTI), assess the role of averaging, develop an automated artifact postprocessing correction method using weighted mean of signal intensities (WMSIs), and compare it with other correction techniques. Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained. The right calf and thigh of 10 volunteers were scanned on a 3 T magnetic resonance imaging scanner using a STEAM-DTI sequence.Artifacts (ie, signal loss) in STEAM-based DTI, presumably caused by involuntary muscle contractions, were investigated in volunteers and ex vivo (ie, human cadaver calf and turkey leg using the same DTI parameters as for the volunteers). An automated postprocessing artifact correction method based on the WMSI was developed and compared with previous approaches (ie, iteratively reweighted linear least squares and informed robust estimation of tensors by outlier rejection [iRESTORE]). Diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tracking metrics, using different averages and artifact corrections, were compared for region of interest- and mask-based analyses. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance with Greenhouse-Geisser correction and Bonferroni post hoc tests were used to evaluate differences among all tested conditions. Qualitative assessment (ie, images quality) for native and corrected images was performed using the paired t test. Randomly localized and shaped artifacts affected all volunteer data sets. Artifact burden during voluntary muscle contractions increased on average from 23.1% to 77.5% but were absent ex vivo. Diffusion tensor imaging metrics (mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity) had a heterogeneous behavior, but in the range reported by literature. Fiber track metrics (number, length, and volume) significantly improved in both calves and thighs after artifact

  10. Sleep Physiology, Abnormal States, and Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wickboldt, Alvah T.; Bowen, Alex F.; Kaye, Aaron J.; Kaye, Adam M.; Rivera Bueno, Franklin; Kaye, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is essential. Unfortunately, a significant portion of the population experiences altered sleep states that often result in a multitude of health-related issues. The regulation of sleep and sleep-wake cycles is an area of intense research, and many options for treatment are available. The following review summarizes the current understanding of normal and abnormal sleep-related conditions and the available treatment options. All clinicians managing patients must recommend appropriate therapeutic interventions for abnormal sleep states. Clinicians' solid understanding of sleep physiology, abnormal sleep states, and treatments will greatly benefit patients regardless of their disease process. PMID:22778676

  11. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  12. Prediction of heart abnormality using MLP network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Fakroul Ridzuan; Januar, Yulni; Mat, Muhammad Hadzren; Rizman, Zairi Ismael; Awang, Mat Kamil

    2018-02-01

    Heart abnormality does not choose gender, age and races when it strikes. With no warning signs or symptoms, it can result to a sudden death of the patient. Generally, heart's irregular electrical activity is defined as heart abnormality. Via implementation of Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) network, this paper tries to develop a program that allows the detection of heart abnormality activity. Utilizing several training algorithms with Purelin activation function, an amount of heartbeat signals received through the electrocardiogram (ECG) will be employed to condition the MLP network.

  13. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound promotes Schwann cell viability and proliferation via the GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Cong; Chen, Xiaohui; Du, Ning; Geng, Shuo; Hu, Yingying; Liu, Xin; Wu, Xianxian; Lin, Yuan; Bai, Xue; Yin, Wenzhe; Cheng, Shi; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Yong

    2018-01-01

    Background: It has been reported that ultrasound enhances peripheral nerve regeneration, but the mechanism remains elusive. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been reported to enhance proliferation and alter protein production in various types of cells. In this study, we detected the effects of LIPUS on Schwann cells. Material and methods: Schwann cells were separated from new natal Sprague-Dawley rat sciatic nerves and were cultured and purified. The Schwann cells were treated by LIPUS for 10 minutes every day, with an intensity of 27.37 mW/cm2. After treatment for 5 days, MTT, EdU staining, and flow cytometry were performed to examine cell viability and proliferation. Neurotrophic factors, including FGF, NGF, BDNF, and GDNF, were measured by western blot and real-time PCR. GSK-3β, p-GSK-3β, β-catenin and Cyclin D1 protein levels were detected using a western blot analysis. The expression of Cyclin D1 was also detected by immunofluorescence. Results: MTT and EdU staining showed that LIPUS increased the Schwann cells viability and proliferation. Compared to the control group, LIPUS increased the expression of growth factors and neurotrophic factors, including FGF, NGF, BDNF, GDNF, and Cyclin D1. Meanwhile, GSK-3β activity was inhibited in the LIPUS group as demonstrated by the increased level of p-GSK-3β and the ratio of the p-GSK-3β/GSK-3β level. The mRNA and protein expressions of β-catenin were increased in the LIPUS group. However, SB216763, a GSK-3β inhibitor, reversed the effects of LIPUS on Schwann cells. Conclusion: LIPUS promotes Schwann cell viability and proliferation by increasing Cyclin D1 expression via enhancing the GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  14. T2 signal intensity as an imaging biomarker for patients with superficial Fibromatoses of the hands (Dupuytren's disease) and feet (Ledderhose disease) undergoing definitive electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Banks, James S; Wolfson, Aaron H; Subhawong, Ty K

    2018-02-01

    Electron beam therapy is a definitive radiation treatment option for superficial fibromatoses of the hands and feet. Because objective criteria for treatment response remain poorly defined, we sought to describe changes in electron beam treated lesions on MRI. The study included 1 male and 9 female patients with a total of 37 superficial fibromatoses; average age was 60.7 years. Standard 6 MeV electron beam treatment included 3 Gy per fraction for 10 or 12 treatments using split-course with 3-month halfway break. Pre- and post-treatment MRIs were evaluated to determine lesion size (cm3), T2 signal intensity and contrast enhancement (5-point ordinal scales) by a fellowship trained musculoskeletal radiologist. MRI findings were correlated with clinical response using a composite 1-5 ordinal scale, Karnofsky Performance Scale and patient-reported 10-point visual analog scale for pain. Mean volume decreased from 1.5 to 1.2 cm 3 (p = 0.01, paired t-test). Mean T2 hyperintensity score decreased from 3.0 to 2.1 (p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon signed-rank). Mean enhancement score available for 22 lesions decreased from 3.8 to 3.0 (p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon signed-rank). Performance scores improved from 78.9 ± 13.7 to 84.6 ± 6.9 (p = 0.007, paired t-test). Pain scores decreased from 3.0 ± 3.3 to 1.1 ± 2.0 (p = 0.0001, paired t-test). Post-treatment T2 signal correlated weakly with performance and pain (Spearman's ρ = -0.37 and 0.16, respectively). MRI is valuable for evaluating patients undergoing electron beam therapy for superficial fibromatoses: higher pretreatment T2 intensity may predict benefit from radiotherapy. T2 hypointensity may be a better marker than size for therapeutic effect.

  15. Low-Intensity Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy Enhances Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression through PERK/ATF4 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bohan; Ning, Hongxiu; Reed-Maldonado, Amanda B; Zhou, Jun; Ruan, Yajun; Zhou, Tie; Wang, Hsun Shuan; Oh, Byung Seok; Banie, Lia; Lin, Guiting; Lue, Tom F

    2017-02-16

    Low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy (Li-ESWT) is used in the treatment of erectile dysfunction, but its mechanisms are not well understood. Previously, we found that Li-ESWT increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Here we assessed the underlying signaling pathways in Schwann cells in vitro and in penis tissue in vivo after nerve injury. The result indicated that BDNF were significantly increased by the Li-ESWT after nerve injury, as well as the expression of BDNF in Schwann cells (SCs, RT4-D6P2T) in vitro. Li-ESWT activated the protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum (ER) kinase (PERK) pathway by increasing the phosphorylation levels of PERK and eukaryotic initiation factor 2a (eIF2α), and enhanced activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) in an energy-dependent manner. In addition, GSK2656157-an inhibitor of PERK-effectively inhibited the effect of Li-ESWT on the phosphorylation of PERK, eIF2α, and the expression of ATF4. Furthermore, silencing ATF4 dramatically attenuated the effect of Li-ESWT on the expression of BDNF, but had no effect on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α or glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in Schwann cells. In conclusion, our findings shed new light on the underlying mechanisms by which Li-ESWT may stimulate the expression of BDNF through activation of PERK/ATF4 signaling pathway. This information may help to refine the use of Li-ESWT to further improve its clinical efficacy.

  16. Low-Intensity Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy Enhances Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression through PERK/ATF4 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bohan; Ning, Hongxiu; Reed-Maldonado, Amanda B.; Zhou, Jun; Ruan, Yajun; Zhou, Tie; Wang, Hsun Shuan; Oh, Byung Seok; Banie, Lia; Lin, Guiting; Lue, Tom F.

    2017-01-01

    Low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy (Li-ESWT) is used in the treatment of erectile dysfunction, but its mechanisms are not well understood. Previously, we found that Li-ESWT increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Here we assessed the underlying signaling pathways in Schwann cells in vitro and in penis tissue in vivo after nerve injury. The result indicated that BDNF were significantly increased by the Li-ESWT after nerve injury, as well as the expression of BDNF in Schwann cells (SCs, RT4-D6P2T) in vitro. Li-ESWT activated the protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum (ER) kinase (PERK) pathway by increasing the phosphorylation levels of PERK and eukaryotic initiation factor 2a (eIF2α), and enhanced activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) in an energy-dependent manner. In addition, GSK2656157—an inhibitor of PERK—effectively inhibited the effect of Li-ESWT on the phosphorylation of PERK, eIF2α, and the expression of ATF4. Furthermore, silencing ATF4 dramatically attenuated the effect of Li-ESWT on the expression of BDNF, but had no effect on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)1α or glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in Schwann cells. In conclusion, our findings shed new light on the underlying mechanisms by which Li-ESWT may stimulate the expression of BDNF through activation of PERK/ATF4 signaling pathway. This information may help to refine the use of Li-ESWT to further improve its clinical efficacy. PMID:28212323

  17. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) influences the multilineage differentiation of mesenchymal stem and progenitor cell lines through ROCK-Cot/Tpl2-MEK-ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kusuyama, Joji; Bandow, Kenjiro; Shamoto, Mitsuo; Kakimoto, Kyoko; Ohnishi, Tomokazu; Matsuguchi, Tetsuya

    2014-04-11

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are pluripotent cells that can differentiate into multilineage cell types, including adipocytes and osteoblasts. Mechanical stimulus is one of the crucial factors in regulating MSC differentiation. However, it remains unknown how mechanical stimulus affects the balance between adipogenesis and osteogenesis. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) therapy is a clinical application of mechanical stimulus and facilitates bone fracture healing. Here, we applied LIPUS to adipogenic progenitor cell and MSC lines to analyze how multilineage cell differentiation was affected. We found that LIPUS suppressed adipogenic differentiation of both cell types, represented by impaired lipid droplet appearance and decreased gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ2 (Pparg2) and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (Fabp4). LIPUS also down-regulated the phosphorylation level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ2 protein, inhibiting its transcriptional activity. In contrast, LIPUS promoted osteogenic differentiation of the MSC line, characterized by increased cell calcification as well as inductions of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Osteocalcin mRNAs. LIPUS induced phosphorylation of cancer Osaka thyroid oncogene/tumor progression locus 2 (Cot/Tpl2) kinase, which was essential for the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated kinase kinase 1 (MEK1) and p44/p42 extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs). Notably, effects of LIPUS on both adipogenesis and osteogenesis were prevented by a Cot/Tpl2-specific inhibitor. Furthermore, effects of LIPUS on MSC differentiation as well as Cot/Tpl2 phosphorylation were attenuated by the inhibition of Rho-associated kinase. Taken together, these results indicate that mechanical stimulus with LIPUS suppresses adipogenesis and promotes osteogenesis of MSCs through Rho-associated kinase-Cot/Tpl2-MEK-ERK signaling pathway.

  18. Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Enhances Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neurite Outgrowth through Mechanotransduction-Mediated ERK1/2-CREB-Trx-1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu; Feng, Yi; Hu, Hong; Shi, Aiwei; Zhang, Lei; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-12-01

    Enhancing the action of nerve growth factor (NGF) is a potential therapeutic approach to neural regeneration. To facilitate neural regeneration, we investigated whether combining low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and NGF could promote neurite outgrowth, an essential process in neural regeneration. In the present study, PC12 cells were subjected to a combination of LIPUS (1 MHz, 30 or 50 mW/cm 2 , 20% duty cycle and 100-Hz pulse repetition frequency, 10 min every other day) and NGF (50 ng/mL) treatment, and then neurite outgrowth was compared. Our findings indicated that the combined treatment with LIPUS (50 mW/cm 2 ) and NGF (50 ng/mL) promotes neurite outgrowth that is comparable to that achieved by NGF (100 ng/mL) treatment alone. LIPUS significantly increased NGF-induced neurite length, but not neurite branching. These effects were attributed to the enhancing effects of LIPUS on NGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and CREB and the expression of thioredoxin (Trx-1). Furthermore, blockage of stretch-activated ion channels with Gd 3+ suppressed the stimulating effects of LIPUS on NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and the downstream signaling activation. Taken together, our findings suggest that LIPUS enhances NGF-induced neurite outgrowth through mechanotransduction-mediated signaling of the ERK1/2-CREB-Trx-1 pathway. The combination of LIPUS and NGF could potentially be used for the treatment of nerve injury and neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS) Influences the Multilineage Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem and Progenitor Cell Lines through ROCK-Cot/Tpl2-MEK-ERK Signaling Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Kusuyama, Joji; Bandow, Kenjiro; Shamoto, Mitsuo; Kakimoto, Kyoko; Ohnishi, Tomokazu; Matsuguchi, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are pluripotent cells that can differentiate into multilineage cell types, including adipocytes and osteoblasts. Mechanical stimulus is one of the crucial factors in regulating MSC differentiation. However, it remains unknown how mechanical stimulus affects the balance between adipogenesis and osteogenesis. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) therapy is a clinical application of mechanical stimulus and facilitates bone fracture healing. Here, we applied LIPUS to adipogenic progenitor cell and MSC lines to analyze how multilineage cell differentiation was affected. We found that LIPUS suppressed adipogenic differentiation of both cell types, represented by impaired lipid droplet appearance and decreased gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ2 (Pparg2) and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (Fabp4). LIPUS also down-regulated the phosphorylation level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ2 protein, inhibiting its transcriptional activity. In contrast, LIPUS promoted osteogenic differentiation of the MSC line, characterized by increased cell calcification as well as inductions of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Osteocalcin mRNAs. LIPUS induced phosphorylation of cancer Osaka thyroid oncogene/tumor progression locus 2 (Cot/Tpl2) kinase, which was essential for the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated kinase kinase 1 (MEK1) and p44/p42 extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs). Notably, effects of LIPUS on both adipogenesis and osteogenesis were prevented by a Cot/Tpl2-specific inhibitor. Furthermore, effects of LIPUS on MSC differentiation as well as Cot/Tpl2 phosphorylation were attenuated by the inhibition of Rho-associated kinase. Taken together, these results indicate that mechanical stimulus with LIPUS suppresses adipogenesis and promotes osteogenesis of MSCs through Rho-associated kinase-Cot/Tpl2-MEK-ERK signaling pathway. PMID:24550383

  20. Scaled signal intensity of uterine fibroids based on T2-weighted MR images: a potential objective method to determine the suitability for magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery of uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun; Yoon, Sang-Wook; Sokolov, Amit

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery (MRgFUS) is a non-invasive method to treat uterine fibroids. To help determine the patient suitability for MRgFUS, we propose a new objective measure: the scaled signal intensity (SSI) of uterine fibroids in T2 weighted MR images (T2WI). Forty three uterine fibroids in 40 premenopausal women were included in this retrospective study. SSI of each fibroid was measured from the screening T2WI by standardizing its mean signal intensity to a 0-100 scale, using reference intensities of rectus abdominis muscle (0) and subcutaneous fat (100). Correlation between the SSI and the non-perfused volume (NPV) ratio (a measure for treatment success) was calculated. Pre-treatment SSI showed a significant inverse-correlation with post treatment NPV ratio (p < 0.05). When dichotomizing NPV ratio at 45 %, the optimal cut off value of the SSI was found to be 16.0. A fibroid with SSI value 16.0 or less can be expected to have optimal responses. The SSI of uterine fibroids in T2WI can be suggested as an objective parameter to help in patient selection for MRgFUS. • Signal intensity of fibroid in MR images predicts treatment response to MRgFUS. • Signal intensity is standardized into scaled form using adjacent tissues as references. • Fibroids with SSI less than 16.0 are expected to have optimal responses.

  1. Volume change and liver parenchymal signal intensity in Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging after portal vein embolization prior to hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Ayako; Murata, Satoru; Mine, Takahiko; Onozawa, Shiro; Sekine, Tetsuro; Amano, Yasuo; Kawano, Youichi; Uchida, Eiji; Kumita, Shin-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the liver volume change and the potential of early evaluation by contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) after portal vein embolization (PVE). Retrospective evaluations of computed tomography (CT) volumetry of total liver and nonembolized areas were performed before and 3 weeks after PVE in 37 cases. The percentage of future liver remnant (%FLR) and the change ratio of %FLR (%FLR ratio) were calculated. Prospective evaluation of signal intensities (SIs) was performed to estimate the role of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI as a predictor of hypertrophy in 16 cases. The SI contrast between embolized and nonembolized areas was calculated 1 week after PVE. The change in SI contrast before and after PVE (SI ratio) was also calculated in 11 cases. %FLR ratio significantly increased, and SI ratio significantly decreased (both P < 0.01). There were significant negative correlations between %FLR and SI contrast and between %FLR and SI ratio (both P < 0.01). Hypertrophy in the nonembolized area after PVE was indicated by CT volumetry, and measurement of SI contrast and SI ratio in Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI early after PVE may be useful to predict the potential for hepatic hypertrophy.

  2. Reduction of emission level in approach signals of greater mouse-eared bats (Myotis myotis): No evidence for a closed loop control system for intensity compensation.

    PubMed

    Budenz, Tobias; Denzinger, Annette; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    Bats lower the emission SPL when approaching a target. The SPL reduction has been explained by intensity compensation which implies that bats adjust the emission SPL to perceive the retuning echoes at the same level. For a better understanding of this control mechanism we recorded the echolocation signals of four Myotis myotis with an onboard microphone when foraging in the passive mode for rustling mealworms offered in two feeding dishes with different target strength, and determined the reduction rate for the emission SPL and the increase rate for the SPL of the returning echoes. When approaching the dish with higher target strength bats started the reduction of the emission SPL at a larger reaction distance (1.05 ± 0.21 m) and approached it with a lower reduction rate of 7.2 dB/halving of distance (hd), thus producing a change of echo rate at the ears of + 4 dB/hd. At the weaker target reaction distance was shorter (0.71 ± 0.24 m) and the reduction rate (9.1 dB/hd) was higher, producing a change of echo rate of-1.2 dB/hd. Independent of dish type, bats lowered the emission SPL by about 26 dB on average. In one bat where the echo SPL from both targets could be measured, the reduction of emission SPL was triggered when the echo SPL surpassed a similar threshold value around 41-42 dB. Echo SPL was not adjusted at a constant value indicating that Myotis myotis and most likely all other bats do not use a closed loop system for intensity compensation when approaching a target of interest. We propose that bats lower the emission SPL to adjust the SPL of the perceived pulse-echo-pairs to the optimal auditory range for the processing of range information and hypothesize that bats use flow field information not only to control the reduction of the approach speed to the target but also to control the reduction of emission SPL.

  3. Correlation between magnetic resonance T2 image signal intensity ratio and cell apoptosis in a rabbit spinal cord cervical myelopathy model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lei; Zhang, Di; Chen, Wei; Shen, Yong; Zhang, Yingze; Ding, Wenyuan; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Linfeng; Yang, Dalong

    2014-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a common cause of disability in elderly patients. Previous studies have shown that spinal cord cell apoptosis due to spinal cord compression plays an important role in the pathology of myelopathy. Although changes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2 signal intensity ratio (SIR) are considered to be an indicator of CSM, little information is published supporting the correlation between changes in MRI signal and pathological changes. This study aims to testify the correlation between MRI T2 SIR changes and cell apoptosis using a CSM animal model. Forty-eight rabbits were randomly assigned to four groups: one control group and three experimental chronic compression groups, with each group containing 12 animals. Chronic compression of the cervical spinal cord was implemented in the experimental groups by implanting a screw in the C3 vertebra. The control group underwent sham surgery. Experimental groups were observed for 3, 6, or 9 months after surgery. MRI T2-weighted SIR Tarlov motor scores and cortical somatosensory-evoked potentials (CSEPs) were periodically monitored. At each time point, rabbits from one group were sacrificed to determine the level of apoptosis by histology (n = 6) and Western blotting (n = 6). Tarlov motor scores in the compression groups were lower at all time points than the control group scores, with the lowest score at 9 months (P < 0.001). Electrophysiological testing showed a significantly prolonged latency in CSEP in the compression groups compared with the control group. All rabbits in the compression groups showed higher MRI T2 SIR in the injury epicenter compared with controls, and higher SIR was also found at 9 months compared with 3 or 6 months. Histological analysis showed significant apoptosis in the spinal cord tissue in the compression groups, but not in the control group. There were significant differences in apoptosis degree over time (P < 0.001), with the 9-month group displaying the

  4. Analysis of the temperature and pressure dependence of the 129Xe NMR chemical shift and signal intensity for the derivation of basic parameters of adsorption as applied to zeolite ZSM-5.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Yoko; Adachi, Yuko; Haga, Saori; Fukutomi, Junko; Imai, Hirohiko; Kimura, Atsuomi; Fujiwara, Hideaki

    2007-12-01

    Temperature and pressure dependences of the 129Xe NMR chemical shift and the signal intensity have been investigated using ZSM-5 as an adsorbent under routine conditions without using any high-pressure or especially high-temperature facilities. The use of a rigorously shielded system and a calibration sample for the signal intensity was found to be valuable to obtain reliable data about the chemical shift and the signal intensity. The 129Xe NMR data obtained between 0.05 and 1.5 atm and from 24 to 80 degrees C were analyzed based on the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation as well as the Langmuir type equation. In both analyses, chemical shift data succeeded only partially in providing the profile of adsorption, such as energetic aspects, surface area, saturated amount of Xe adsorption and specific parameters of 129Xe chemical shift. It was shown that the reliable total analysis was achieved when the chemical shift data were used together with the intensity data. Such an analysis of the chemical shift data, aided by the intensity data, will be useful in performing nano-material analysis on 129Xe NMR without invoking the traditional methodology of gravimetric or volumetric adsorption experiments.

  5. [Diagnostic efficiency of decline rate of signal intensity and apparent diffusion coefficient with different b values for differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions on diffusion-weighted 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing; Liu, Wanhua; Ye, Yuanyuan; Wang, Rui; Li, Fengfang; Peng, Chengyu

    2014-06-17

    To investigate the diagnostic efficiency of decline rate of signal intensity and apparent diffusion coefficient with different b values for differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions on diffusion-weighted 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 152 patients with 162 confirmed histopathologically breast lesions (85 malignant and 77 benign) underwent 3.0 T diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Four b values (0, 400, 800 and 1 000 s/mm²) were used. The signal intensity and ADC values of breast lesions were measured respectively. The signal intensity decline rate (SIDR) and apparent diffusion coefficient decline rate (ADCDR) were calculated respectively. SIDR = (signal intensity of lesions with low b value-signal intensity of lesions with high b value)/signal intensity of lesions with low b value, ADCDR = (ADC value of lesions with low b value-ADC value of lesions with high b value) /ADC value of lesions with low b value. The independent sample t-test was employed for statistical analyses and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for evaluating the diagnosis efficiency of SIDR and ADCDR values. Significant differences were observed in SIDR between benign and malignant breast lesions with b values of 0-400, 400-800 and 800-1 000 s/mm². The sensitivities of SIDR for differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions were 61.2%, 68.2% and 67.1%, the specificities 74.0%, 85.7% and 67.5%, the diagnosis accordance rates 67.3%, 76.5% and 67.3%, the positive predictive values 72.2%, 84.1% and 69.5% and the negative predictive values 63.3%, 71.0% and 65.0% respectively. Significant differences were observed in ADCDR between benign and malignant breast lesions with b values of 400-800 s/mm² and 800-1 000 s/mm². The sensitivities of SDR for differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions were 80.0% and 65.9%, the specificities 72.7% and 65.0%, the diagnostic accordance rates 76.5% and 65.4%, the positive predictive values 76.4% and 67

  6. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  7. Perfusion MR imaging detection of carcinoma arising from preexisting salivary gland pleomorphic adenoma by computer-assisted analysis of time-signal intensity maps

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ikuo; Eida, Sato; Fujita, Shuichi; Hotokezaka, Yuka; Sumi, Misa

    2017-01-01

    Tumor perfusion can be evaluated by analyzing the time-signal intensity curve (TIC) after dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR imaging. Accordingly, TIC profiles are characteristic of some benign and malignant salivary gland tumors. A carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (CXPA) arises from a long-standing pleomorphic adenoma (PA) and has a distinctive prognostic risk depending on the tumor growth potential such as invasion beyond the preexisting capsule. Differentiating CXPA from PA can be very challenging. In this study, we have attempted to discriminate CXPA from PA based on a two-dimensional TIC mapping algorithm. TIC mapping analysis was performed on 8 patients with CXPA and 20 patients with PA after dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR imaging using a 1.5-T MR system. The TIC profiles obtained were automatically categorized into 5 types based on the enhancement ratio, maximum time, and washout ratio (Type 1 TIC with flat profile, Type 2 TIC with slow uptake, Type 3 TIC with rapid uptake and a low washout ratio, Type 4 TIC with rapid uptake and a high washout ratio, and Type 5 TIC not otherwise specific). The percentage tumor areas with each of the 5 TIC types were compared between CXPAs and PAs. Stepwise differentiation and cluster analysis using multiple TIC cut-off thresholds distinguished CXPAs from PAs with 75% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 86% accuracy, and 86% positive and 90% negative predictive values, when tumors with ≤1.1% Type 1 and ≥15% Type 4, or those with ≤1.1% Type 1, ≥78.1% Type 2, ≥16.1% Type 3, and <15% Type 4, or those with >1.1% Type 1, ≥78.1% Type 2, and ≥16.1% Type 3 areas were diagnosed as CXPAs. The overall TIC profiles predicted some aggressive CXPA growth patterns. These results suggest that stepwise differentiation based on TIC mapping is helpful in differentiating CXPAs from PAs. PMID:28531213

  8. The challenge of cerebral magnetic resonance imaging in neonates: A new method using mathematical morphology for the segmentation of structures including diffuse excessive high signal intensities.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongchao; Morel, Baptiste; Dahdouh, Sonia; Puybareau, Élodie; Virzì, Alessio; Urien, Héléne; Géraud, Thierry; Adamsbaum, Catherine; Bloch, Isabelle

    2018-05-17

    Preterm birth is a multifactorial condition associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI) has been recently described on T2-weighted MR sequences in this population and thought to be associated with neuropathologies. To date, no robust and reproducible method to assess the presence of white matter hyperintensities has been developed, perhaps explaining the current controversy over their prognostic value. The aim of this paper is to propose a new semi-automated framework to detect DEHSI on neonatal brain MR images having a particular pattern due to the physiological lack of complete myelination of the white matter. A novel method for semi- automatic segmentation of neonatal brain structures and DEHSI, based on mathematical morphology and on max-tree representations of the images is thus described. It is a mandatory first step to identify and clinically assess homogeneous cohorts of neonates for DEHSI and/or volume of any other segmented structures. Implemented in a user-friendly interface, the method makes it straightforward to select relevant markers of structures to be segmented, and if needed, apply eventually manual corrections. This method responds to the increasing need for providing medical experts with semi-automatic tools for image analysis, and overcomes the limitations of visual analysis alone, prone to subjectivity and variability. Experimental results demonstrate that the method is accurate, with excellent reproducibility and with very few manual corrections needed. Although the method was intended initially for images acquired at 1.5T, which corresponds to the usual clinical practice, preliminary results on images acquired at 3T suggest that the proposed approach can be generalized. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Diabetes mellitus and carotid artery plaques exhibiting high-intensity signals on MR angiography are related to increased platelet reactivity after carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Masanori; Enomoto, Yukiko; Kokuzawa, Jouji; Iwama, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Increased platelet reactivity after carotid artery stenting (CAS) may cause thromboembolic complications. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of increased platelet reactivity after CAS and to determine the factors related to it. Patients who underwent CAS were recruited prospectively. They received pre-procedural antiplatelet therapy comprising some combination of aspirin (100 mg/day), clopidogrel (75 mg/day), and/or cilostazol (200 mg/day) for a minimum of 7 days. ADP- and collagen-induced platelet aggregation were measured before and 4 days after CAS. Changes in platelet reactivity were reported as changes in the categorized platelet reactivity grade based on the effective dose 50%. Clinical characteristics of patients with and without increased platelet reactivity were compared. Among 38 consecutive patients who underwent CAS, 18 (47%) exhibited increased platelet reactivity. Diabetes mellitus (OR 15.0; 95% CI 2.1 to 106.5; p=0.007) and carotid artery plaques exhibiting high-intensity signals (HIS) on time-of-flight MR angiography (TOF-MRA) (OR 25.2; 95% CI 2.0 to 316.2; p=0.013) were independently associated with increased platelet reactivity in a multivariate analysis. Increased platelet reactivity occurred in nearly half of the studied patients subjected to CAS and was independently associated with diabetes mellitus and carotid artery plaques exhibiting HIS on TOF-MRA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. High-intensity high-volume swimming induces more robust signaling through PGC-1α and AMPK activation than sprint interval swimming in m. triceps brachii.

    PubMed

    Casuso, Rafael A; Plaza-Díaz, Julio; Ruiz-Ojeda, Francisco J; Aragón-Vela, Jerónimo; Robles-Sanchez, Cándido; Nordsborg, Nikolai B; Hebberecht, Marina; Salmeron, Luis M; Huertas, Jesus R

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to test whether high-intensity high-volume training (HIHVT) swimming would induce more robust signaling than sprint interval training (SIT) swimming within the m. triceps brachii due to lower metabolic and oxidation. Nine well-trained swimmers performed the two training procedures on separate randomized days. Muscle biopsies from m. triceps brachii and blood samples were collected at three different time points: a) before the intervention (pre), b) immediately after the swimming procedures (post) and c) after 3 h of rest (3 h). Hydroperoxides, creatine kinase (CK), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were quantified from blood samples, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and the AMPKpTHR172/AMPK ratio were quantified by Western blot analysis. PGC-1α, sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), superoxide-dismutase 2 (SOD2), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA levels were also quantified. SIT induced a higher release of LDH (p < 0.01 at all time points) and CK (p < 0.01 at post) than HIHVT, but neither SIT nor HIHVT altered systemic hydroperoxides. Additionally, neither SIRT3 nor SOD2 mRNA levels increased, while PGC-1α transcription increased at 3 h after SIT (p < 0.01) and after HIHVT (p < 0.001). However, PGC-1α protein was higher after HIHVT than after SIT (p < 0.05). Moreover, the AMPKpTHR172/AMPK ratio increased at post after SIT (p < 0.05), whereas this effect was delayed after HIHVT as it increased after 3 h (p < 0.05). In addition, VEGF transcription was higher in response to HIHVT (p < 0.05). In conclusion, SIT induces higher muscular stress than HIHVT without increasing systemic oxidation. In addition, HIHVT may induce more robust oxidative adaptations through PGC-1α and AMPK.

  11. High-intensity high-volume swimming induces more robust signaling through PGC-1α and AMPK activation than sprint interval swimming in m. triceps brachii

    PubMed Central

    Plaza-Díaz, Julio; Ruiz-Ojeda, Francisco J.; Aragón-Vela, Jerónimo; Robles-Sanchez, Cándido; Nordsborg, Nikolai B.; Hebberecht, Marina; Salmeron, Luis M.; Huertas, Jesus R.

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to test whether high-intensity high-volume training (HIHVT) swimming would induce more robust signaling than sprint interval training (SIT) swimming within the m. triceps brachii due to lower metabolic and oxidation. Nine well-trained swimmers performed the two training procedures on separate randomized days. Muscle biopsies from m. triceps brachii and blood samples were collected at three different time points: a) before the intervention (pre), b) immediately after the swimming procedures (post) and c) after 3 h of rest (3 h). Hydroperoxides, creatine kinase (CK), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were quantified from blood samples, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and the AMPKpTHR172/AMPK ratio were quantified by Western blot analysis. PGC-1α, sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), superoxide-dismutase 2 (SOD2), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA levels were also quantified. SIT induced a higher release of LDH (p < 0.01 at all time points) and CK (p < 0.01 at post) than HIHVT, but neither SIT nor HIHVT altered systemic hydroperoxides. Additionally, neither SIRT3 nor SOD2 mRNA levels increased, while PGC-1α transcription increased at 3 h after SIT (p < 0.01) and after HIHVT (p < 0.001). However, PGC-1α protein was higher after HIHVT than after SIT (p < 0.05). Moreover, the AMPKpTHR172/AMPK ratio increased at post after SIT (p < 0.05), whereas this effect was delayed after HIHVT as it increased after 3 h (p < 0.05). In addition, VEGF transcription was higher in response to HIHVT (p < 0.05). In conclusion, SIT induces higher muscular stress than HIHVT without increasing systemic oxidation. In addition, HIHVT may induce more robust oxidative adaptations through PGC-1α and AMPK. PMID:28973039

  12. Study of interhemispheric asymmetries in electroencephalographic signals by frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, J. F.; Garzón, J.

    2011-01-01

    This study provides a new method for the detection of interhemispheric asymmetries in patients with continuous video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring at Intensive Care Unit (ICU), using wavelet energy. We obtained the registration of EEG signals in 42 patients with different pathologies, and then we proceeded to perform signal processing using the Matlab program, we compared the abnormalities recorded in the report by the neurophysiologist, the images of each patient and the result of signals analysis with the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Conclusions: there exists correspondence between the abnormalities found in the processing of the signal with the clinical reports of findings in patients; according to previous conclusion, the methodology used can be a useful tool for diagnosis and early quantitative detection of interhemispheric asymmetries.

  13. Cardiac abnormality prediction using HMLP network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan, Ja'afar; Ahmad, K. A.; Mat, Muhamad Hadzren; Rizman, Zairi Ismael; Ahmad, Shahril

    2018-02-01

    Cardiac abnormality often occurs regardless of gender, age and races but depends on the lifestyle. This problem sometimes does not show any symptoms and usually detected once it already critical which lead to a sudden death to the patient. Basically, cardiac abnormality is the irregular electrical signal that generate by the pacemaker of the heart. This paper attempts to develop a program that can detect cardiac abnormality activity through implementation of Hybrid Multilayer Perceptron (HMLP) network. A certain amount of data of the heartbeat signals from the electrocardiogram (ECG) will be used in this project to train the MLP and HMLP network by using Modified Recursive Prediction Error (MRPE) algorithm and to test the network performance.

  14. Evaluation of Brain Iron Content Based on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Comparison among Phase Value, R2* and Magnitude Signal Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shen-Qiang; Sun, Jian-Zhong; Yan, Yu-Qing; Wang, He; Lou, Min

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are being exploited to measure brain iron levels increasingly as iron deposition has been implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases. However, there remains no unified evaluation of these methods as postmortem measurement isn't commonly available as the reference standard. The purpose of this study was to make a comparison among these methods and try to find a new index of brain iron. Methods We measured both phase values and R2* in twenty-four adults, and performed correlation analysis among the two methods and the previously published iron concentrations. We also proposed a new method using magnitude signal intensity and compared it with R2* and brain iron. Results We found phase value correlated with R2* in substantia nigra (r = −0.723, p<0.001) and putamen (r = −0.514, p = 0.010), while no correlations in red nucleus (r = −0.236, p = 0.268) and globus pallidus (r = −0.111, p = 0.605). And the new magnitude method had significant correlations in red nucleus (r = −0.593, p = 0.002), substantia nigra (r = −0.521, p = 0.009), globus pallidus (r = −0.750, p<0.001) and putamen (r = −0.547, p = 0.006) with R2*. A strong inverse correlation was also found between the new magnitude method and previously published iron concentrations in seven brain regions (r = −0.982, P<0.001). Conclusions Our study indicates that phase value may not be used for assessing the iron content in some brain regions especially globus pallidus. The new magnitude method is highly consistent with R2* especially in globus pallidus, and we assume that this approach may be acceptable as an index of iron content in iron-rich brain regions. PMID:22363719

  15. Intraindividual Analysis of Signal Intensity Changes in the Dentate Nucleus After Consecutive Serial Applications of Linear and Macrocyclic Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Radbruch, Alexander; Weberling, Lukas D; Kieslich, Pascal J; Hepp, Johanna; Kickingereder, Philipp; Wick, Wolfgang; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Bendszus, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies reported an increase in the dentate nucleus (DN)-to-pons signal intensity (SI) ratio (DN-pons SI ratio) on unenhanced T1-weighted images in patients who received consecutive serial injections of linear gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). In contrast, most studies found no increase in the DN-pons SI ratio when patients were treated with consecutive serial injections of macrocyclic GBCAs. However, the potential difference between macrocyclic and linear GBCAs has never been assessed in individuals who received subsequent applications of both contrast agents. In this retrospective study, we assessed the evolution of the DN-pons SI ratio change in patients that were treated with a comparable number of serial consecutive injections of the linear GBCA gadopentetate dimeglumine and subsequent serial injections of the macrocyclic GBCAs gadobutrol and gadoterate meglumine. Data of 36 patients was analyzed. All patients underwent at least 5 consecutive administrations of the linear GBCA gadopentetate dimeglumine followed by an equal number of consecutive administrations of the macrocyclic GBCA gadobutrol. In 12 of the 36 patients, 5 or more final consecutive injections of the macrocyclic GBCA gadoterate meglumine were analyzed additionally. The difference of DN-pons SI ratios on unenhanced T1-weighted images was calculated by subtracting the ratio at the first examination from the ratio at the last examination in each of the 3 periods. The mean DN-pons SI ratio difference in the gadopentetate dimeglumine period was significantly greater than 0 (mean ± SD, 0.0448 ± 0.0345; P < 0.001), whereas the mean DN-pons SI ratio difference in the subsequent gadobutrol and gadoterate meglumine period was significantly smaller than 0 (gadobutrol: -0.0178 ± 0.0459, P = 0.026; gadoterate meglumine: -0.0250 ± 0.0284, P = 0.011). In this observational study, the application of the linear GBCA gadopentetate dimeglumine was associated with a DN-pons SI ratio increase

  16. Clinical-Radiological Parameters Improve the Prediction of the Thrombolysis Time Window by Both MRI Signal Intensities and DWI-FLAIR Mismatch.

    PubMed

    Madai, Vince Istvan; Wood, Carla N; Galinovic, Ivana; Grittner, Ulrike; Piper, Sophie K; Revankar, Gajanan S; Martin, Steve Z; Zaro-Weber, Olivier; Moeller-Hartmann, Walter; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Federico C; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Ebinger, Martin; Fiebach, Jochen B; Sobesky, Jan

    2016-01-01

    With regard to acute stroke, patients with unknown time from stroke onset are not eligible for thrombolysis. Quantitative diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI relative signal intensity (rSI) biomarkers have been introduced to predict eligibility for thrombolysis, but have shown heterogeneous results in the past. In the present work, we investigated whether the inclusion of easily obtainable clinical-radiological parameters would improve the prediction of the thrombolysis time window by rSIs and compared their performance to the visual DWI-FLAIR mismatch. In a retrospective study, patients from 2 centers with proven stroke with onset <12 h were included. The DWI lesion was segmented and overlaid on ADC and FLAIR images. rSI mean and SD, were calculated as follows: (mean ROI value/mean value of the unaffected hemisphere). Additionally, the visual DWI-FLAIR mismatch was evaluated. Prediction of the thrombolysis time window was evaluated by the area-under-the-curve (AUC) derived from receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Factors such as the association of age, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, MRI field strength, lesion size, vessel occlusion and Wahlund-Score with rSI were investigated and the models were adjusted and stratified accordingly. In 82 patients, the unadjusted rSI measures DWI-mean and -SD showed the highest AUCs (AUC 0.86-0.87). Adjustment for clinical-radiological covariates significantly improved the performance of FLAIR-mean (0.91) and DWI-SD (0.91). The best prediction results based on the AUC were found for the final stratified and adjusted models of DWI-SD (0.94) and FLAIR-mean (0.96) and a multivariable DWI-FLAIR model (0.95). The adjusted visual DWI-FLAIR mismatch did not perform in a significantly worse manner (0.89). ADC-rSIs showed fair performance in all models. Quantitative DWI and FLAIR MRI biomarkers as well as the visual DWI-FLAIR mismatch provide excellent

  17. Lenticular abnormalities in children.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Sudarshan; Agarwal, Tushar; Kumar, Gaurav; Kushmesh, Rakhi; Tejwani, Lalit Kumar

    2012-01-01

    To study the lenticular problems in children presenting at an apex institute. Retrospective analysis of records (< 14 years) of new lens clinic cases was done. Of 1,047 children, 687 were males. Mean age at presentation was 6.35 ± 4.13 years. Developmental cataract was seen in 45.6% and posttraumatic cataract in 29.7% of patients. Other abnormalities were cataract with retinal detachment, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, subluxated lens, micro/spherophakia, cataract secondary to uveitis, intraocular lens complications, cataract with choroidal coloboma, and visual axis opacification. Developmental and posttraumatic cataracts were the most common abnormalities. Delayed presentation is of concern. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Neurologic abnormalities in murderers.

    PubMed

    Blake, P Y; Pincus, J H; Buckner, C

    1995-09-01

    Thirty-one individuals awaiting trial or sentencing for murder or undergoing an appeal process requested a neurologic examination through legal counsel. We attempted in each instance to obtain EEG, MRI or CT, and neuropsychological testing. Neurologic examination revealed evidence of "frontal" dysfunction in 20 (64.5%). There were symptoms or some other evidence of temporal lobe abnormality in nine (29%). We made a specific neurologic diagnosis in 20 individuals (64.5%), including borderline or full mental retardation (9) and cerebral palsy (2), among others. Neuropsychological testing revealed abnormalities in all subjects tested. There were EEG abnormalities in eight of the 20 subjects tested, consisting mainly of bilateral sharp waves with slowing. There were MRI or CT abnormalities in nine of the 19 subjects tested, consisting primarily of atrophy and white matter changes. Psychiatric diagnoses included paranoid schizophrenia (8), dissociative disorder (4), and depression (9). Virtually all subjects had paranoid ideas and misunderstood social situations. There was a documented history of profound, protracted physical abuse in 26 (83.8%) and of sexual abuse in 10 (32.3%). It is likely that prolonged, severe physical abuse, paranoia, and neurologic brain dysfunction interact to form the matrix of violent behavior.

  19. Effect of resistance exercise intensity on the expression of PGC-1α isoforms and the anabolic and catabolic signaling mediators, IGF-1 and myostatin, in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Neil A; McKinley-Barnard, Sarah K; Spillane, Mike B; Andre, Thomas L; Gann, Joshua J; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute messenger (mRNA) expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) isoforms, insulin-like growth factor-1Ea (IGF-1Ea), and myostatin in response to 2 resistance exercise intensities. In a uniform-balanced, crossover design, 10 participants performed 2 separate testing sessions involving a lower body resistance exercise component consisting of a lower intensity (50% of 1-repetition maximum; 1RM) protocol and a higher intensity (80% of 1RM) protocol of equal volumes. Muscle samples were obtained at before exercise, 45 min, 3 h, 24 h, and 48 h postexercise. Resistance exercise did not alter total PGC-1α mRNA expression; however, distinct responses of each PGC-1α isoform were observed. The response of each isoform was consistent between sessions, suggesting no effect of resistance exercise intensity on the complex transcriptional expression of the PGC-1α gene. IGF-1Ea mRNA expression significantly increased following the higher intensity session compared with pre-exercise and the lower intensity session. Myostatin mRNA expression was significantly reduced compared with pre-exercise values at all time points with no difference between exercise intensity. Further research is needed to determine the effects of the various isoforms of PGC-1α in human skeletal muscle on the translational level as well as their relation to the expression of IGF-1 and myostatin.

  20. Abnormal Head Position in Infantile Nystagmus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Noval, Susana; González-Manrique, Mar; Rodríguez-Del Valle, José María; Rodríguez-Sánchez, José María

    2011-01-01

    Infantile nystagmus is an involuntary, bilateral, conjugate, and rhythmic oscillation of the eyes which is present at birth or develops within the first 6 months of life. It may be pendular or jerk-like and, its intensity usually increases in lateral gaze, decreasing with convergence. Up to 64% of all patients with nystagmus also present strabismus, and even more patients have an abnormal head position. The abnormal head positions are more often horizontal, but they may also be vertical or take the form of a tilt, even though the nystagmus itself is horizontal. The aim of this article is to review available information about the origin and treatment of the abnormal head position associated to nystagmus, and to describe our treatment strategies. PMID:24533187

  1. Using Correlative Properties of Neighboring Pixels to Enhance Contrast-to-Noise Ratio of Abnormal Hippocampus in Patients With Intractable Epilepsy and Mesial Temporal Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Matthew S; Sharma, Aseem; Hildebolt, Charles

    2018-06-12

    To test whether an image-processing algorithm can aid in visualization of mesial temporal sclerosis on magnetic resonance imaging by selectively increasing contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between abnormal hippocampus and normal brain. In this Institutional Review Board-approved and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study, baseline coronal fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images of 18 adults (10 females, eight males; mean age 41.2 years) with proven mesial temporal sclerosis were processed using a custom algorithm to produce corresponding enhanced images. Average (Hmean) and maximum (Hmax) CNR for abnormal hippocampus were calculated relative to normal ipsilateral white matter. CNR values for normal gray matter (GM) were similarly calculated using ipsilateral cingulate gyrus as the internal control. To evaluate effect of image processing on visual conspicuity of hippocampal signal alteration, a neuroradiologist masked to the side of hippocampal abnormality rated signal intensity (SI) of hippocampi on baseline and enhanced images using a five-point scale (definitely abnormal to definitely normal). Differences in Hmean, Hmax, GM, and SI ratings for abnormal hippocampi on baseline and enhanced images were assessed for statistical significance. Both Hmean and Hmax were significantly higher in enhanced images as compared to baseline images (p < 0.0001 for both). There was no significant difference in the GM between baseline and enhanced images (p = 0.9375). SI ratings showed a more confident identification of abnormality on enhanced images (p = 0.0001). Image-processing resulted in increased CNR of abnormal hippocampus without affecting the CNR of normal gray matter. This selective increase in conspicuity of abnormal hippocampus was associated with more confident identification of hippocampal signal alteration. Copyright © 2018 Academic Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Targeted Elimination of G Proteins and Arrestins Defines Their Specific Contributions to Both Intensity and Duration of G Protein-coupled Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Inoue, Asuka; Jenkins, Laura; Raihan, Sheikh Zahir; Prihandoko, Rudi; Tobin, Andrew B; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-12-30

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can initiate intracellular signaling cascades by coupling to an array of heterotrimeric G proteins and arrestin adaptor proteins. Understanding the contribution of each of these coupling options to GPCR signaling has been hampered by a paucity of tools to selectively perturb receptor function. Here we employ CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to eliminate selected G proteins (Gα q and Gα 11 ) or arrestin2 and arrestin3 from HEK293 cells together with the elimination of receptor phosphorylation sites to define the relative contribution of G proteins, arrestins, and receptor phosphorylation to the signaling outcomes of the free fatty acid receptor 4 (FFA4). A lack of FFA4-mediated elevation of intracellular Ca 2+ in Gα q /Gα 11 -null cells and agonist-mediated receptor internalization in arrestin2/3-null cells confirmed previously reported canonical signaling features of this receptor, thereby validating the genome-edited HEK293 cells. FFA4-mediated ERK1/2 activation was totally dependent on G q / 11 but intriguingly was substantially enhanced for FFA4 receptors lacking sites of regulated phosphorylation. This was not due to a simple lack of desensitization of G q / 11 signaling because the G q / 11 -dependent calcium response was desensitized by both receptor phosphorylation and arrestin-dependent mechanisms, whereas a substantially enhanced ERK1/2 response was only observed for receptors lacking phosphorylation sites and not in arrestin2/3-null cells. In conclusion, we validate CRISPR/Cas9 engineered HEK293 cells lacking G q / 11 or arrestin2/3 as systems for GPCR signaling research and employ these cells to reveal a previously unappreciated interplay of signaling pathways where receptor phosphorylation can impact on ERK1/2 signaling through a mechanism that is likely independent of arrestins. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Abnormality, rationality, and sanity.

    PubMed

    Hertwig, Ralph; Volz, Kirsten G

    2013-11-01

    A growing body of studies suggests that neurological and mental abnormalities foster conformity to norms of rationality that are widely endorsed in economics and psychology, whereas normality stands in the way of rationality thus defined. Here, we outline the main findings of these studies, discuss their implications for experimental design, and consider how 'sane' some benchmarks of rationality really are. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  5. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  6. Evaluation of a rubber-compound diaphragm for acoustic fisheries surveys: Effects on dual-beam signal intensity and beam patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleischer, Guy W.; Argyle, R.L.; Nester, R.T.; Dawson, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The use of rubber-compound windows for fisheries acoustics must consider operating frequency and ambient water temperatures. Signal attenuation by the rubber becomes pronounced with increased frequency and decreased temperature. Based on our results, a 420 k Hz system could be expected to lose up to 3-4 dB in colder water through a 5.1-cm thick rubber diaphragm. At 120 k Hz, signal loss was negligible and would undoubtedly also be inconsequential for even lower frequencies used in fisheries applications (e.g., 70, 38 k Hz).

  7. Determination of the laser intensity applied to a Ta witness plate from the measured X-ray signal using a pulsed micro-channel plate detector

    SciTech Connect

    Pickworth, L. A.; Rosen, M. D.; Schneider, M. B.

    The laser intensity distribution at the surface of a high-Z material, such as Ta, can be deduced from imaging the self-emission of the produced x-ray spot using suitable calibration data. This paper presents a calibration method which uses the measured x-ray emissions from laser spots of di erent intensities hitting a Ta witness plate. The x-ray emission is measured with a micro-channel plate (MCP) based x-ray framing camera plus filters. Data from di erent positions on one MCP strip or from di erent MCP assemblies are normalized to each other using a standard candle laser beam spot at 1x10 14more » W/cm 2 intensity. The distribution of the resulting dataset agrees with results from a pseudo spectroscopic model for laser intensities between 4 and 15x10 13 W/cm 2. The model is then used to determine the absolute scaling factor between the experimental results from assemblies using two di erent x-ray filters. The data and model method also allows unique calibration factors for each MCP system and each MCP gain to be compared. We also present simulation results investigating alternate witness plate materials (Ag, Eu and Au).« less

  8. Determination of the laser intensity applied to a Ta witness plate from the measured X-ray signal using a pulsed micro-channel plate detector

    DOE PAGES

    Pickworth, L. A.; Rosen, M. D.; Schneider, M. B.; ...

    2017-04-14

    The laser intensity distribution at the surface of a high-Z material, such as Ta, can be deduced from imaging the self-emission of the produced x-ray spot using suitable calibration data. This paper presents a calibration method which uses the measured x-ray emissions from laser spots of di erent intensities hitting a Ta witness plate. The x-ray emission is measured with a micro-channel plate (MCP) based x-ray framing camera plus filters. Data from di erent positions on one MCP strip or from di erent MCP assemblies are normalized to each other using a standard candle laser beam spot at 1x10 14more » W/cm 2 intensity. The distribution of the resulting dataset agrees with results from a pseudo spectroscopic model for laser intensities between 4 and 15x10 13 W/cm 2. The model is then used to determine the absolute scaling factor between the experimental results from assemblies using two di erent x-ray filters. The data and model method also allows unique calibration factors for each MCP system and each MCP gain to be compared. We also present simulation results investigating alternate witness plate materials (Ag, Eu and Au).« less

  9. Data based abnormality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwar, Yashasvi

    Data based abnormality detection is a growing research field focussed on extracting information from feature rich data. They are considered to be non-intrusive and non-destructive in nature which gives them a clear advantage over conventional methods. In this study, we explore different streams of data based anomalies detection. We propose extension and revisions to existing valve stiction detection algorithm supported with industrial case study. We also explored the area of image analysis and proposed a complete solution for Malaria diagnosis. The proposed method is tested over images provided by pathology laboratory at Alberta Health Service. We also address the robustness and practicality of the solution proposed.

  10. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  11. Insights in the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal generation underwater using dual pulse excitation — Part II: Plasma emission intensity as a function of interpulse delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazic, V.; Laserna, J. J.; Jovicevic, S.

    2013-04-01

    Influence of time delay between two laser pulses on the LIBS (laser induced breakdown spectroscopy) signal inside liquids was investigated and the results are compared with data from literature. Plasma was produced by laser ablation (LA) of aluminum inside water and its emission after the second laser pulse was characterized by spectrally and time resolved detection. Light propagation through the vapor bubble formed by the first laser pulse was studied by measurements of beam scattering and transmission. Optical absorption by the evolving bubble is not significant, but its growth is accompanied by lowering of its refraction index nb with respect to surrounding liquid; this effect increases defocusing both of the incident beam and of the out-coming plasma radiation. Collection efficiency of the secondary plasma emission rapidly degrades with the cavity growth, but close to its full expansion the LIBS signal partially recovers through Snell's reflections at the liquid-vapor interface, which produce a bright spot close to the bubble center. Such a light redistribution allows detecting of the emission from external plasma volume, otherwise deflected out of the collection system. Except for strong line transitions from the main sample constituents, self-absorbed inside the high-pressure cavity, we observed the highest LIBS signal when sending the second pulse well before the bubble is fully expanded. Transitions of the pressure wave through the focal volume, formed by the first laser pulse and reflected from the cell's walls and sample back-plane, enhances the LIBS signal importantly. The measured lifetime of the secondary plasma rapidly decreases with the bubble expansion. Here, we also discuss the optimization of the optical collection system and some analytical aspects of double-pulse (DP) LIBS inside liquids.

  12. Color-coded automated signal intensity curves for detection and characterization of breast lesions: preliminary evaluation of a new software package for integrated magnetic resonance-based breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Pediconi, Federica; Catalano, Carlo; Venditti, Fiammetta; Ercolani, Mauro; Carotenuto, Luigi; Padula, Simona; Moriconi, Enrica; Roselli, Antonella; Giacomelli, Laura; Kirchin, Miles A; Passariello, Roberto

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the value of a color-coded automated signal intensity curve software package for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance mammography (CE-MRM) in patients with suspected breast cancer. Thirty-six women with suspected breast cancer based on mammographic and sonographic examinations were preoperatively evaluated on CE-MRM. CE-MRM was performed on a 1.5-T magnet using a 2D Flash dynamic T1-weighted sequence. A dosage of 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd-BOPTA was administered at a flow rate of 2 mL/s followed by 10 mL of saline. Images were analyzed with the new software package and separately with a standard display method. Statistical comparison was performed of the confidence for lesion detection and characterization with the 2 methods and of the diagnostic accuracy for characterization compared with histopathologic findings. At pathology, 54 malignant lesions and 14 benign lesions were evaluated. All 68 (100%) lesions were detected with both methods and good correlation with histopathologic specimens was obtained. Confidence for both detection and characterization was significantly (P < or = 0.025) better with the color-coded method, although no difference (P > 0.05) between the methods was noted in terms of the sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy for lesion characterization. Excellent agreement between the 2 methods was noted for both the determination of lesion size (kappa = 0.77) and determination of SI/T curves (kappa = 0.85). The novel color-coded signal intensity curve software allows lesions to be visualized as false color maps that correspond to conventional signal intensity time curves. Detection and characterization of breast lesions with this method is quick and easily interpretable.

  13. A Comparison of Theory-Based and Experimentally Determined Myocardial Signal Intensity Correction Methods in First-Pass Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fluckiger, Jacob U; Benefield, Brandon C; Bakhos, Lara; Harris, Kathleen R; Lee, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of correcting myocardial signal saturation on the accuracy of absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF) measurements. We performed 15 dual bolus first-pass perfusion studies in 7 dogs during global coronary vasodilation and variable degrees of coronary artery stenosis. We compared microsphere MBF to MBF calculated from uncorrected and corrected MRI signal. Four correction methods were tested, two theoretical methods (Th1 and Th2) and two empirical methods (Em1 and Em2). The correlations with microsphere MBF (n = 90 segments) were: uncorrected (y = 0.47x + 1.1, r = 0.70), Th1 (y = 0.53x + 1.0, r = 0.71), Th2 (y = 0.62x + 0.86, r = 0.73), Em1 (y = 0.82x + 0.86, r = 0.77), and Em2 (y = 0.72x + 0.84, r = 0.75). All corrected methods were not significantly different from microspheres, while uncorrected MBF values were significantly lower. For the top 50% of microsphere MBF values, flows were significantly underestimated by uncorrected SI (31%), Th1 (25%), and Th2 (19%), while Em1 (1%), and Em2 (9%) were similar to microsphere MBF. Myocardial signal saturation should be corrected prior to flow modeling to avoid underestimation of MBF by MR perfusion imaging.

  14. Origin and production process of eolian dust emitted from the Tarim Basin and their evolution through the Plio-Pleostocene based on ESR signal intensity and crystallinity of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, R.; Isozaki, Y.; Zheng, H.; Sun, Y.; Toyoda, S.; Hasegawa, H.; Yoshida, T.

    2010-12-01

    Tarim Basin (or Taklimakan Desert) is regarded as one of the major source area of eolian dust in the northern hemisphere. Although a previous study hypothesized that the detrital materials in the Tarim Basin were produced by glacial activity in the surrounding mountains, delivered by rivers, and homogenized by wind within the basin, not enough evidence has been presented to support this hypothesis. Here, we conducted provenance study of eolian dust in the Tarim Basin by examining fine silt fraction (< 20 μm) of the sediments collected from all over the Tarim Basin. We focused on quartz and measured its electron spin resonance [ESR] signal intensity and Crystallinity Index [CI] in the fine (<16μm) and coarse (> 64μm) fractions of various types of sediments including river sediments derived from the Kunlun and Tian Shan Mountains, dry lake sediments in the eastern part of the basin, and mountain loess on the northern slope of the Kunlun Mountains, to examine the process to produce eolian dust within the Tarim Basin. The result revealed that the coarse fractions of river sediments were derived from bedrocks exposed in the drainage area of each river, and that quartz in coarse fraction of the river sediment has ESR signal intensity and CI values unique to each river. ESR signal intensity and CI of quartz in fine fractions of river sediments discharged from the Tian Shan Mountains, which are located windward of the basin, and those discharged from mountainous rivers show values similar to the values for coarse fractions, suggesting that their sources are the same as those for the coarse fractions. On the other hand, ESR signal intensity and CI of quartz in fine fractions of river sediments discharged from the Kunlun Mountains show values different from those for the coarse fractions, and converged to the values close to the average values for the fine fractions of river sediments in the basin and also for the mountain loess, the latter represents the eolian dust

  15. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy.

  16. Structural Abnormalities on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients With Patellofemoral Pain: A Cross-sectional Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Rianne A; de Kanter, Janneke L M; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Verhaar, Jan A N; van Veldhoven, Peter L J; Krestin, Gabriel P; Oei, Edwin H G; van Middelkoop, Marienke

    2016-09-01

    Structural abnormalities of the patellofemoral joint might play a role in the pathogenesis of patellofemoral pain (PFP), a common knee problem among young and physically active individuals. No previous study has investigated if PFP is associated with structural abnormalities of the patellofemoral joint using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To investigate the presence of structural abnormalities of the patellofemoral joint on high-resolution MRI in patients with PFP compared with healthy control subjects. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients with PFP and healthy control subjects between 14 and 40 years of age underwent high-resolution 3-T MRI. All images were scored using the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Osteoarthritis Knee Score with the addition of specific patellofemoral features. Associations between PFP and the presence of structural abnormalities were analyzed using logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI), sex, and sports participation. A total of 64 patients and 70 control subjects were included in the study. Mean ± SD age was 23.2 ± 6.4 years, mean BMI ± SD was 22.9 ± 3.4 kg/m(2), and 56.7% were female. Full-thickness cartilage loss was not present. Minor patellar cartilage defects, patellar bone marrow lesions, and high signal intensity of the Hoffa fat pad were frequently seen in both patients (23%, 53%, and 58%, respectively) and control subjects (21%, 51%, and 51%, respectively). After adjustment for age, BMI, sex, and sports participation, none of the structural abnormalities were statistically significantly associated with PFP. Structural abnormalities of the patellofemoral joint have been hypothesized as a factor in the pathogenesis of PFP, but the study findings suggest that structural abnormalities of the patellofemoral joint on MRI are not associated with PFP. © 2016 The Author(s).

  17. Role of Wnt signaling during inflammation and sepsis: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Houschyar, Khosrow Siamak; Chelliah, Malcolm P; Rein, Susanne; Maan, Zeshaan N; Weissenberg, Kristian; Duscher, Dominik; Branski, Ludwik K; Siemers, Frank

    2018-05-01

    Despite the development of modern intensive care and new antimicrobial agents, the mortality of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock remains high. Systemic inflammation is a consequence of activation of the innate immune system. It is characterized by the intravascular release of proinflammatory cytokines and other vasoactive mediators, with concurrent activation of innate immune cells. The Wnt signaling pathway plays a critical role in the development of multicellular organisms. Abnormal Wnt signaling has been associated with many human diseases, ranging from inflammation and degenerative diseases to cancer. This article reviews the accumulating evidence that the Wnt signaling pathway plays a distinct role in inflammation and sepsis.

  18. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Ying; Cameron, Iain T; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2017-09-01

    It is not uncommon for a woman to suffer from abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) or heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) at some point during her lifetime. Once pathology is excluded, in practice, management needs to be individualised, taking into account the improvement of the woman's symptoms and quality of life. Peer-reviewed journals, governmental and professional society publications. There is now agreement on a structured, universal approach to the diagnosis of AUB, with the aide memoirs PALM (polyps, adenomyosis, leiomyoma, malignancy) and COEIN (coagulopathies, ovulatory dysfunction, endometrial, iatrogenic, not otherwise classified). Once malignancy and significant pelvic pathology have been ruled out, medical treatment is an effective first-line therapeutic option, with surgery, including endometrial ablation and hysterectomy, offered when medical management has failed to resolve symptoms and fertility is no longer desired. There remains controversy around the management of the types and subtypes of adenomyosis and leiomyoma, and understanding their impact on clinical reproductive outcomes. Standardised assessment tools for measuring outcomes of AUB are being developed. Novel diagnostic and monitoring tools should be developed to help stratify treatment for women with AUB, particularly relating to 'unclassified' and 'endometrial' causes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  19. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  20. Tansig activation function (of MLP network) for cardiac abnormality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan, Ja'afar; Daud, Nik Ghazali Nik; Ishak, Mohd Taufiq; Rizman, Zairi Ismael; Rahman, Muhammad Izzuddin Abd

    2018-02-01

    Heart abnormality often occurs regardless of gender, age and races. This problem sometimes does not show any symptoms and it can cause a sudden death to the patient. In general, heart abnormality is the irregular electrical activity of the heart. This paper attempts to develop a program that can detect heart abnormality activity through implementation of Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) network. A certain amount of data of the heartbeat signals from the electrocardiogram (ECG) will be used in this project to train the MLP network by using several training algorithms with Tansig activation function.

  1. Syringomyelia and Craniocervical Junction Abnormalities in Chihuahuas.

    PubMed

    Kiviranta, A-M; Rusbridge, C; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, O; Hielm-Björkman, A; Lappalainen, A K; Knowler, S P; Jokinen, T S

    2017-11-01

    Chiari-like malformation (CM) and syringomyelia (SM) are widely reported in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and Griffon Bruxellois dogs. Increasing evidence indicates that CM and SM also occur in other small and toy breed dogs, such as Chihuahuas. To describe the presence of SM and craniocervical junction (CCJ) abnormalities in Chihuahuas and to evaluate the possible association of CCJ abnormalities with SM. To describe CM/SM-related clinical signs and neurologic deficits and to investigate the association of CM/SM-related clinical signs with signalment, SM, or CCJ abnormalities. Fifty-three client-owned Chihuahuas. Prospective study. Questionnaire analyses and physical and neurologic examinations were obtained before magnetic resonance and computed tomography imaging. Images were evaluated for the presence of SM, CM, and atlantooccipital overlapping. Additionally, medullary kinking, dorsal spinal cord compression, and their sum indices were calculated. Scratching was the most common CM/SM-related clinical sign and decreased postural reaction the most common neurologic deficit in 73 and 87% of dogs, respectively. Chiari-like malformation and SM were present in 100 and 38% of dogs, respectively. Syringomyelia was associated with the presence of CM/SM-related clinical signs (P = 0.034), and medullary kinking and sum indices were higher in dogs with clinical signs (P = 0.016 and P = 0.007, respectively). Syringomyelia and CCJ abnormalities are prevalent in Chihuahuas. Syringomyelia was an important factor for the presence of CM/SM-related clinical signs, but many dogs suffered from similar clinical signs without being affected by SM, highlighting the clinical importance of CCJ abnormalities in Chihuahuas. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. Effect of a laboratory result pager on provider behavior in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Samal, L; Stavroudis, Ta; Miller, Re; Lehmann, Hp; Lehmann, Cu

    2011-01-01

    A computerized laboratory result paging system (LRPS) that alerts providers about abnormal results ("push") may improve upon active laboratory result review ("pull"). However, implementing such a system in the intensive care setting may be hindered by low signal-to-noise ratio, which may lead to alert fatigue. To evaluate the impact of an LRPS in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Utilizing paper chart review, we tallied provider orders following an abnormal laboratory result before and after implementation of an LRPS. Orders were compared with a predefined set of appropriate orders for such an abnormal result. The likelihood of a provider response in the post-implementation period as compared to the pre-implementation period was analyzed using logistic regression. The provider responses were analyzed using logistic regression to control for potential confounders. The likelihood of a provider response to an abnormal laboratory result did not change significantly after implementation of an LRPS. (Odds Ratio 0.90, 95% CI 0.63-1.30, p-value 0.58) However, when providers did respond to an alert, the type of response was different. The proportion of repeat laboratory tests increased. (26/378 vs. 7/278, p-value = 0.02). Although the laboratory result pager altered healthcare provider behavior in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, it did not increase the overall likelihood of provider response.

  3. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. I - Effects of stimulus delivery rate. II - Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of varying the rate of delivery of dichotic tone pip stimuli on selective attention measured by evoked-potential amplitudes and signal detectability scores were studied. The subjects attended to one channel (ear) of tones, ignored the other, and pressed a button whenever occasional targets - tones of a slightly higher pitch were detected in the attended ear. Under separate conditions, randomized interstimulus intervals were short, medium, and long. Another study compared the effects of attention on the N1 component of the auditory evoked potential for tone pips presented alone and when white noise was added to make the tones barely above detectability threshold in a three-channel listening task. Major conclusions are that (1) N1 is enlarged to stimuli in an attended channel only in the short interstimulus interval condition (averaging 350 msec), (2) N1 and P3 are related to different modes of selective attention, and (3) attention selectivity in multichannel listening task is greater when tones are faint and/or difficult to detect.

  4. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  5. Steganography in arrhythmic electrocardiogram signal.

    PubMed

    Edward Jero, S; Ramu, Palaniappan; Ramakrishnan, S

    2015-08-01

    Security and privacy of patient data is a vital requirement during exchange/storage of medical information over communication network. Steganography method hides patient data into a cover signal to prevent unauthenticated accesses during data transfer. This study evaluates the performance of ECG steganography to ensure secured transmission of patient data where an abnormal ECG signal is used as cover signal. The novelty of this work is to hide patient data into two dimensional matrix of an abnormal ECG signal using Discrete Wavelet Transform and Singular Value Decomposition based steganography method. A 2D ECG is constructed according to Tompkins QRS detection algorithm. The missed R peaks are computed using RR interval during 2D conversion. The abnormal ECG signals are obtained from the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. Metrics such as Peak Signal to Noise Ratio, Percentage Residual Difference, Kullback-Leibler distance and Bit Error Rate are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach.

  6. New methods of MR image intensity standardization via generalized scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madabhushi, Anant; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    2005-04-01

    Image intensity standardization is a post-acquisition processing operation designed for correcting acquisition-to-acquisition signal intensity variations (non-standardness) inherent in Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. While existing standardization methods based on histogram landmarks have been shown to produce a significant gain in the similarity of resulting image intensities, their weakness is that, in some instances the same histogram-based landmark may represent one tissue, while in other cases it may represent different tissues. This is often true for diseased or abnormal patient studies in which significant changes in the image intensity characteristics may occur. In an attempt to overcome this problem, in this paper, we present two new intensity standardization methods based on the concept of generalized scale. In reference 1 we introduced the concept of generalized scale (g-scale) to overcome the shape, topological, and anisotropic constraints imposed by other local morphometric scale models. Roughly speaking, the g-scale of a voxel in a scene was defined as the largest set of voxels connected to the voxel that satisfy some homogeneity criterion. We subsequently formulated a variant of the generalized scale notion, referred to as generalized ball scale (gB-scale), which, in addition to having the advantages of g-scale, also has superior noise resistance properties. These scale concepts are utilized in this paper to accurately determine principal tissue regions within MR images, and landmarks derived from these regions are used to perform intensity standardization. The new methods were qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on a total of 67 clinical 3D MR images corresponding to four different protocols and to normal, Multiple Sclerosis (MS), and brain tumor patient studies. The generalized scale-based methods were found to be better than the existing methods, with a significant improvement observed for severely diseased and abnormal patient studies.

  7. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhapsmore » reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.« less

  8. Abnormal mTOR Activation in Autism.

    PubMed

    Winden, Kellen D; Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; Sahin, Mustafa

    2018-01-25

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an important signaling hub that integrates environmental information regarding energy availability and stimulates anabolic molecular processes and cell growth. Abnormalities in this pathway have been identified in several syndromes in which autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is highly prevalent. Several studies have investigated mTOR signaling in developmental and neuronal processes that, when dysregulated, could contribute to the development of ASD. Although many potential mechanisms still remain to be fully understood, these associations are of great interest because of the clinical availability of mTOR inhibitors. Clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of mTOR Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Neuroscience Volume 41 is July 8, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  9. Brain abnormality segmentation based on l1-norm minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Ke; Erus, Guray; Tanwar, Manoj; Davatzikos, Christos

    2014-03-01

    We present a method that uses sparse representations to model the inter-individual variability of healthy anatomy from a limited number of normal medical images. Abnormalities in MR images are then defined as deviations from the normal variation. More precisely, we model an abnormal (pathological) signal y as the superposition of a normal part ~y that can be sparsely represented under an example-based dictionary, and an abnormal part r. Motivated by a dense error correction scheme recently proposed for sparse signal recovery, we use l1- norm minimization to separate ~y and r. We extend the existing framework, which was mainly used on robust face recognition in a discriminative setting, to address challenges of brain image analysis, particularly the high dimensionality and low sample size problem. The dictionary is constructed from local image patches extracted from training images aligned using smooth transformations, together with minor perturbations of those patches. A multi-scale sliding-window scheme is applied to capture anatomical variations ranging from fine and localized to coarser and more global. The statistical significance of the abnormality term r is obtained by comparison to its empirical distribution through cross-validation, and is used to assign an abnormality score to each voxel. In our validation experiments the method is applied for segmenting abnormalities on 2-D slices of FLAIR images, and we obtain segmentation results consistent with the expert-defined masks.

  10. The handicap of abnormal colour vision.

    PubMed

    Cole, Barry L

    2004-07-01

    All people with abnormal colour vision, except for a few mildly affected deuteranomals, report that they experience problems with colour in everyday life and at work. Contemporary society presents them with increasing problems because colour is now so widely used in printed materials and in computer displays. Equal opportunity law gives them protection against unfair discrimination in employment, so a decision to exclude a person from employment on the grounds of abnormal colour vision must now be well supported by good evidence and sound argument. This paper reviews the investigations that have contributed to understanding the nature and consequences of the problems they have. All those with abnormal colour vision are at a disadvantage with comparative colour tasks that involve precise matching of colours or discrimination of fine colour differences either because of their loss of colour discrimination or anomalous perception of metamers. The majority have problems when colour is used to code information, in man-made colour codes and in naturally occurring colour codes that signal ripeness of fruit, freshness of meat or illness. They can be denied the benefit of colour to mark out objects and organise complex visual displays. They may be unreliable when a colour name is used as an identifier. They are slower and less successful in search when colour is an attribute of the target object or is used to organise the visual display. Because those with the more severe forms of abnormal colour vision perceive a very limited gamut of colours, they are at a disadvantage in the pursuit and appreciation of those forms of art that use colour.

  11. Abnormal Reward System Activation in Mania

    PubMed Central

    Abler, Birgit; Greenhouse, Ian; Ongur, Dost; Walter, Henrik; Heckers, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Transmission of reward signals is a function of dopamine, a neurotransmitter known to be involved in the mechanism of psychosis. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated how expectation and receipt of monetary rewards modulate brain activation in patients with bipolar mania and schizophrenia. We studied 12 acutely manic patients with a history of bipolar disorder, 12 patients with a current episode of schizoaffective disorder or schizophrenia and 12 healthy subjects. All patients were treated with dopamine antagonists at the time of the study. Subjects performed a delayed incentive paradigm with monetary reward in the scanner that allowed for investigating effects of expectation, receipt, and omission of rewards. Patients with schizophrenia and healthy control subjects showed the expected activation of dopaminergic brain areas, that is, ventral tegmentum activation upon expectation of monetary rewards and nucleus accumbens activation during receipt vs omission of rewards. In manic patients, however, we did not find a similar pattern of brain activation and the differential signal in the nucleus accumbens upon receipt vs omission of rewards was significantly lower compared to the healthy control subjects. Our findings provide evidence for abnormal function of the dopamine system during receipt or omission of expected rewards in bipolar disorder. These deficits in prediction error processing in acute mania may help to explain symptoms of disinhibition and abnormal goal pursuit regulation. PMID:17987058

  12. Skin - abnormally dark or light

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003242.htm Abnormally dark or light skin To use the sharing features ... The bronze color can range from light to dark (in fair-skinned people) with the degree of ...

  13. Detector for flow abnormalities in gaseous diffusion plant compressors

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F.; Castleberry, Kim N.

    1998-01-01

    A detector detects a flow abnormality in a plant compressor which outputs a motor current signal. The detector includes a demodulator/lowpass filter demodulating and filtering the motor current signal producing a demodulated signal, and first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters connected to the demodulator/lowpass filter, and filtering the demodulated signal in accordance with first, second, third and fourth bandpass frequencies generating first, second, third and fourth filtered signals having first, second, third and fourth amplitudes. The detector also includes first, second, third and fourth amplitude detectors connected to the first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters respectively, and detecting the first, second, third and fourth amplitudes, and first and second adders connected to the first and fourth amplitude detectors and the second and third amplitude detectors respectively, and adding the first and fourth amplitudes and the second and third amplitudes respectively generating first and second added signals. Finally, the detector includes a comparator, connected to the first and second adders, and comparing the first and second added signals and detecting the abnormal condition in the plant compressor when the second added signal exceeds the first added signal by a predetermined value.

  14. Detector for flow abnormalities in gaseous diffusion plant compressors

    DOEpatents

    Smith, S.F.; Castleberry, K.N.

    1998-06-16

    A detector detects a flow abnormality in a plant compressor which outputs a motor current signal. The detector includes a demodulator/lowpass filter demodulating and filtering the motor current signal producing a demodulated signal, and first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters connected to the demodulator/lowpass filter, and filtering the demodulated signal in accordance with first, second, third and fourth bandpass frequencies generating first, second, third and fourth filtered signals having first, second, third and fourth amplitudes. The detector also includes first, second, third and fourth amplitude detectors connected to the first, second, third and fourth bandpass filters respectively, and detecting the first, second, third and fourth amplitudes, and first and second adders connected to the first and fourth amplitude detectors and the second and third amplitude detectors respectively, and adding the first and fourth amplitudes and the second and third amplitudes respectively generating first and second added signals. Finally, the detector includes a comparator, connected to the first and second adders, and comparing the first and second added signals and detecting the abnormal condition in the plant compressor when the second added signal exceeds the first added signal by a predetermined value. 6 figs.

  15. Biochemical abnormalities in neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Sood, Arvind; Grover, Neelam; Sharma, Roshan

    2003-03-01

    The presence of seizure does not constitute a diagnoses but it is a symptom of an underlying central nervous system disorder due to systemic or biochemical disturbances. Biochemical disturbances occur frequently in the neonatal seizures either as an underlying cause or as an associated abnormality. In their presence, it is difficult to control seizure and there is a risk of further brain damage. Early recognition and treatment of biochemical disturbances is essential for optimal management and satisfactory long term outcome. The present study was conducted in the department of pediatrics in IGMC Shimla on 59 neonates. Biochemical abnormalities were detected in 29 (49.15%) of cases. Primary metabolic abnormalities occurred in 10(16.94%) cases of neonatal seizures, most common being hypocalcaemia followed by hypoglycemia, other metabolic abnormalities include hypomagnesaemia and hyponateremia. Biochemical abnormalities were seen in 19(38.77%) cases of non metabolic seizure in neonates. Associated metabolic abnormalities were observed more often with Hypoxic-ischemic-encephalopathy (11 out of 19) cases and hypoglycemia was most common in this group. No infant had hyponateremia, hyperkelemia or low zinc level.

  16. Pleiotrophin is a driver of vascular abnormalization in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Dimberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    In a recent report by Zhang et al. , pleiotrophin (PTN) was demonstrated to enhance glioma growth by promoting vascular abnormalization. PTN stimulates glioma vessels through anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk)-mediated perivascular deposition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Targeting of Alk or VEGF signaling normalizes tumor vessels in PTN-expressing tumors.

  17. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in opiate addicts.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Christina; Stöllberger, Claudia; Hlavin, Anton; Finsterer, Josef; Hager, Isabella; Hermann, Peter

    2008-12-01

    To determine in a cross-sectional study the prevalence of electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities in opiate addicts who were therapy-seeking and its association with demographic, clinical and drug-specific parameters. In consecutive therapy-seeking opiate addicts, a 12-lead ECG was registered within 24 hours after admission and evaluated according to a pre-set protocol between October 2004 and August 2006. Additionally, demographic, clinical and drug-specific parameters were recorded. Included were 511 opiate-addicts, 25% female, with a mean age of 29 years (range 17-59 years). One or more ECG abnormalities were found in 314 patients (61%). In the 511 patients we found most commonly ST abnormalities (19%), QTc prolongation (13%), tall R- and/or S-waves (11%) and missing R progression (10%). ECG abnormalities were more common in males than in females (64 versus 54%, P < 0.05), and in patients with positive than negative urine findings for cannabis (68 versus 57%, P < 0.05). Patients with ST abnormalities were more often males than females (21 versus 11%, P < 0.05), had a history of seizures less often (16 versus 27%, P < 0.05), had positive than negative urine findings for cannabis more often (26 versus 15%, P < 0.01) and had negative than positive urine findings for methadone more often (21 versus 11%, P < 0.05). QTc prolongation was more frequent in patients with high dosages of maintenance drugs than in patients with medium or low dosages (27 versus 12 versus 10%, P < 0.05) and in patients whose urine findings were positive than negative for methadone (23 versus 11%, P < 0.001) as well as for benzodiazepines (17 versus 9%, P < 0.05). Limitations of the data are that in most cases other risk factors for the cardiac abnormalities were not known. ECG abnormalities are frequent in opiate addicts. The most frequent ECG abnormalities are ST abnormalities, QTc prolongation and tall R- and/or S-waves. ST abnormalities are associated with cannabis, and QTc prolongation

  18. Atypical MR lenticular signal change in infantile isovaleric acidemia.

    PubMed

    Wani, Nisar A; Qureshi, Umer Amin; Jehangir, Majid; Ahmad, Kaiser; Hussain, Zahid

    2016-01-01

    Isovaleric acidemia (IVA) is an inborn error of branched chain amino acid metabolism that may manifest as acute neonatal metabolic acidosis or as chronic intermittent form with developmental delay or recurrent episodes of acute metabolic acidosis. Early diagnosis is the key to prevent morbidity and mortality. Brain imaging abnormalities are rarely described in IVA. We report a case of chronic intermittent IVA with acute presentation in a 4-month-old infant who presented with acute metabolic acidosis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed symmetric signal intensity changes in bilateral lentiform nuclei with an unreported T1-weighted (T1W) symmetric hyperintense ring-like appearance in bilateral putamen.

  19. Crizotinib-Induced Abnormal Signal Processing in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Toshiyuki; Iwasawa, Shunichiro; Kurimoto, Ryota; Maeda, Akemi; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Kaneda, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Molecular target therapy for cancer is characterized by unique adverse effects that are not usually observed with cytotoxic chemotherapy. For example, the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor crizotinib causes characteristic visual disturbances, whereas such effects are rare when another ALK-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, alectinib, is used. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for these visual disturbances, the responses to light exhibited by retinal ganglion cells treated with these agents were evaluated using a C57BL6 mouse ex vivo model. Both crizotinib and alectinib changed the firing rate of ON and OFF type retinal ganglion cells. However, the ratio of alectinib-affected cells (15.7%) was significantly lower than that of crizotinib-affected cells (38.6%). Furthermore, these drugs changed the response properties to light stimuli of retinal ganglion cells in some of the affected cells, i.e., OFF cells responded to both ON and OFF stimuli, etc. Finally, the expressions of ALK (a target receptor of both crizotinib and alectinib) and of MET and ROS1 (additional target receptors of crizotinib) were observed at the mRNA level in the retina. Our findings suggest that these drugs might target retinal ganglion cells and that the potency of the drug actions on the light responses of retinal ganglion cells might be responsible for the difference in the frequencies of visual disturbances observed between patients treated with crizotinib and those treated with alectinib. The present experimental system might be useful for screening new molecular target agents prior to their use in clinical trials. PMID:26271036

  20. Abnormal Temporal Difference Reward-Learning Signals in Major Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, P.; Waiter, G.; Ahearn, T.; Milders, M.; Reid, I.; Steele, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    Anhedonia is a core symptom of major depressive disorder (MDD), long thought to be associated with reduced dopaminergic function. However, most antidepressants do not act directly on the dopamine system and all antidepressants have a delayed full therapeutic effect. Recently, it has been proposed that antidepressants fail to alter dopamine…

  1. Pinna abnormalities and low-set ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect - pinna; Congenital defect - pinna Images Ear abnormalities Pinna of the newborn ear References Haddad J, Keesecker S. Congenital malformations. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, ...

  2. Quantitative evaluation of high intensity signal on MIP images of carotid atherosclerotic plaques from routine TOF-MRA reveals elevated volumes of intraplaque hemorrhage and lipid rich necrotic core.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kiyofumi; Song, Yan; Hippe, Daniel S; Sun, Jie; Dong, Li; Xu, Dongxiang; Ferguson, Marina S; Chu, Baocheng; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Chen, Min; Zhou, Cheng; Yuan, Chun

    2012-11-29

    Carotid intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH) and lipid rich necrotic core (LRNC) have been associated with accelerated plaque growth, luminal narrowing, future surface disruption and development of symptomatic events. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quantitative relationships between high intensity signals (HIS) in the plaque on TOF-MRA and IPH or LRNC volumes as measured by multicontrast weighted CMR. Seventy six patients with a suspected carotid artery stenosis or carotid plaque by ultrasonography underwent multicontrast carotid CMR. HIS presence and volume were measured from TOF-MRA MIP images while IPH and LRNC volumes were separately measured from multicontrast CMR. For detecting IPH, HIS on MIP images overall had high specificity (100.0%, 95% CI: 93.0 - 100.0%) but relatively low sensitivity (32%, 95% CI: 20.8 - 47.9%). However, the sensitivity had a significant increasing relationship with underlying IPH volume (p = 0.033) and degree of stenosis (p = 0.022). Mean IPH volume was 2.7 times larger in those with presence of HIS than in those without (142.8 ± 97.7 mm(3) vs. 53.4 ± 56.3 mm(3), p = 0.014). Similarly, mean LRNC volume was 3.4 times larger in those with HIS present (379.8 ± 203.4 mm(3) vs. 111.3 ± 122.7 mm(3), p = 0.001). There was a strong correlation between the volume of the HIS region and the IPH volume measured from multicontrast CMR (r = 0.96, p < 0.001). MIP images are easily reformatted from three minute, routine, clinical TOF sequences. High intensity signals in carotid plaque on TOF-MRA MIP images are associated with increased intraplaque hemorrhage and lipid-rich necrotic core volumes. The technique is most sensitive in patients with moderate to severe stenosis.

  3. Changes in Signal Intensity of the Dentate Nucleus and Globus Pallidus in Pediatric Patients: Impact of Brain Irradiation and Presence of Primary Brain Tumors Independent of Linear Gadolinium-based Contrast Agent Administration.

    PubMed

    Tamrazi, Benita; Nguyen, Binh; Liu, Chia-Shang J; Azen, Colleen G; Nelson, Mary B; Dhall, Girish; Nelson, Marvin D

    2018-05-01

    Purpose To determine whether whole-brain irradiation, chemotherapy, and primary brain pathologic conditions affect magnetic resonance (MR) imaging signal changes in pediatric patients independent of the administration of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs). Materials and Methods This institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant study included 144 pediatric patients who underwent intravenous GBCA-enhanced MR imaging examinations (55 patients with primary brain tumors and whole-brain irradiation, 19 with primary brain tumors and chemotherapy only, 52 with primary brain tumors without any treatment, and 18 with neuroblastoma without brain metastatic disease). The signal intensities (SIs) in the globus pallidus (GP), thalamus (T), dentate nucleus (DN), and pons (P) were measured on unenhanced T1-weighted images. GP:T and DN:P SI ratios were compared between groups by using the analysis of variance and were analyzed relative to group, total cumulative number of doses of GBCA, age, and sex by using multivariable linear models. Results DN:P ratio for the radiation therapy group was greater than that for the other groups except for the group of brain tumors treated with chemotherapy (P < .05). The number of GBCA doses was correlated with the DN:P ratio for the nontreated brain tumor group (P < .0001). The radiation therapy-treated brain tumor group demonstrated higher DN:P ratios than the nontreated brain tumor group for number of doses less than or equal to 10 (P < .0001), whereas ratios in the nontreated brain tumor group were higher than those in the radiation therapy-treated brain tumor group for doses greater than 20 (P = .05). The GP:T ratios for the brain tumor groups were greater than that for the neuroblastoma group (P = .01). Conclusion Changes in SI of the DN and GP that are independent of the administration of GBCA occur in patients with brain tumors undergoing brain irradiation, as well as in patients with untreated primary brain tumors. © RSNA

  4. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  5. Endocrine abnormalities in lithium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Gabriella; Mishra, Vinita; Nikolova, Stanka

    2017-10-01

    Lithium toxicity can manifest as a variety of biochemical -abnormalities. This case report describes a patient -presenting to the emergency department with neuropsychiatric -symptoms on a background of bipolar disorder, for which she was prescribed lithium for 26 years previously. Cases of lithium toxicity are rare but can be severe and this case report -demonstrates to clinicians that they must be thorough in investigating patients with lithium toxicity, as there are many potential abnormalities that can manifest concurrently. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  6. Defining the nature of the cerebral abnormalities in the premature infant: a qualitative magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Inder, Terrie E; Wells, Scott J; Mogridge, Nina B; Spencer, Carole; Volpe, Joseph J

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to define qualitatively the nature and extent of white and gray matter abnormalities in a longitudinal population-based study of infants with very low birth weight. Perinatal factors were then related to the presence and severity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities. From November 1998 to December 2000, 100 consecutive premature infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit at Christchurch Women's Hospital were recruited (98% eligible) after informed parental consent to undergo an MRI scan at term equivalent. The scans were analyzed by a single neuroradiologist experienced in pediatric MRI, with a second independent scoring of the MRI using a combination of criteria for white matter (cysts, signal abnormality, loss of volume, ventriculomegaly, corpus callosal thinning, myelination) and gray matter (gray matter signal abnormality, gyration, subarachnoid space). Results were analyzed against individual item scores as well as the presence of moderate-severe white matter score, total gray matter score, and total brain score. The mean gestational age was 27.9+/-2.4 weeks (range, 23-32 weeks), and mean birth weight was 1063+/-292 g. The greatest univariate predictors for moderate-severe white matter abnormality were lower gestational age (odds ratio [OR], 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.7; P<.01), maternal fever (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1-4.6; P<.04), proven sepsis in the infant at delivery (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-3.6; P=0.03), inotropic support (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.5-4.5; P<.001), patent ductus arteriosus (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-3.8; P=.01), grade III/IV intraventricular hemorrhage (P=.015), and the occurrence of a pneumothorax (P=.05). There was a significant protective effect of intrauterine growth restriction (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.23-0.99; P=.04). Gray matter abnormality was highly related to the presence and severity of white matter abnormality. A unique pattern of cerebral abnormality consisting of significant diffuse

  7. Abnormal dark-adapted electroretinogram in Best's vitelliform macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Lachapelle, P; Quigley, M G; Polomeno, R C; Little, J M

    1988-10-01

    It is generally well accepted that in Best's vitelliform macular degeneration (BVMD) the electroretinogram (ERG) is normal whereas the electro-oculogram (EOG) is markedly abnormal. We describe a patient in whom BVMD was suspected on the basis of the clinical findings, EOG and family history (one of her daughters had the typical vitelliform lesion). However, her dark-adapted ERG was markedly abnormal. Similar anomalies were found in the dark-adapted ERG of the daughter. While the temporal features of the various ERG waves were well preserved, a substantial decrease in the amplitude of specific segments of the ERG signal was observed. A similar decrease in the amplitude of the oscillatory potentials was also found. We believe that this unusual combination of BVMD and abnormal dark-adapted ERG may be due to the reported reduced penetrance and variable expressivity of the BVMD gene(s).

  8. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation facilitates in vitro osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells via up-regulation of heat shock protein (HSP)70, HSP90, and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhonglei; Ma, Yalin; Guo, Shaowen; He, Yi; Bai, Gang; Zhang, Wenjun

    2018-05-29

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has positive effects on osteogenic differentiation. However, the effect of LIPUS on osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether LIPUS could promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hASCs. hASCs were isolated and osteogenically induced with LIPUS stimulation at 20 and 30 mW cm -2 for 30 min day -1 Cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential of hASCs were respectively analyzed by cell counting kit-8 assay, Alizarin Red S staining, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting. The results indicated that LIPUS stimulation did not significantly affect the proliferation of hASCs, but significantly increased their alkaline phosphatase activity on day 6 of culture and markedly promoted the formation of mineralized nodules on day 21 of culture. The mRNA expression levels of runt-related transcription factor, osteopontin, and osteocalcin were significantly up-regulated by LIPUS stimulation. LIPUS stimulation did not affect the expression of heat shock protein (HSP) 27, HSP40, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-6 and BMP-9, but significantly up-regulated the protein levels of HSP70, HSP90, BMP-2, and BMP-7 in the hASCs. Further studies found that LIPUS increased the mRNA levels of Smad 1 and Smad 5, elevated the phosphorylation of Smad 1/5, and suppressed the expression of BMP antagonist Noggin. These findings indicated that LIPUS stimulation enhanced osteogenic differentiation of hASCs possibly through the up-regulation of HSP70 and HSP90 expression and activation of BMP signaling pathway. Therefore, LIPUS might have the potential to promote the repair of bone defect. © 2018 The Author(s).

  9. Combination of Pre-Treatment DWI-Signal Intensity and S-1 Treatment: A Predictor of Survival in Patients with Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Sequential S-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Xiaofei; Liu, Ri; Wang, Xianglian; Sun, Gaofeng; Song, Jiaqi; Lu, Jianping; Zhang, Huojun

    2018-04-01

    To identify whether the combination of pre-treatment radiological and clinical factors can predict the overall survival (OS) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with stereotactic body radiation and sequential S-1 (a prodrug of 5-FU combined with two modulators) therapy with improved accuracy compared with that of established clinical and radiologic risk models. Patients admitted with LAPC underwent diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) scan at 3.0-T (b = 600 s/mm 2 ). The mean signal intensity (SI b = 600) of region-of-interest (ROI) was measured. The Log-rank test was done for tumor location, biliary stent, S-1, and other treatments and the Cox regression analysis was done to identify independent prognostic factors for OS. Prediction error curves (PEC) were used to assess potential errors in prediction of survival. The accuracy of prediction was evaluated by Integrated Brier Score (IBS) and C index. 41 patients were included in this study. The median OS was 11.7 months (2.8-23.23 months). The 1-year OS was 46%. Multivariate analysis showed that pre-treatment SI b = 600 value and administration of S-1 were independent predictors for OS. The performance of pre-treatment SI b = 600 and S-1 treatment in combination was better than that of SI b = 600 or S-1 treatment alone. The combination of pre-treatment SI b = 600 and S-1 treatment could predict the OS in patients with LAPC undergoing SBRT and sequential S-1 therapy with improved accuracy compared with that of established clinical and radiologic risk models. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Signal intensity of the pancreas on magnetic resonance imaging: Prediction of postoperative pancreatic fistula after a distal pancreatectomy using a triple-row stapler.

    PubMed

    Arai, Takuma; Kobayashi, Akira; Yokoyama, Takahide; Ohya, Ayumi; Fujinaga, Yasunari; Shimizu, Akira; Motoyama, Hiroaki; Furusawa, Norihiko; Sakai, Hiroshi; Uehara, Takeshi; Kadoya, Masumi; Miyagawa, Shin-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the pancreatic signal intensity (SI) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings for predicting the development of pancreatic fistula (PF) after a distal pancreatectomy (DP) involving a triple-row stapler closure. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for clinical PF, as defined by the International Study Group on Pancreatic Fistula grade B or C. The pancreas-to-muscle SI ratio was evaluated using fat-suppressed T1-weighted MRI. Of the 41 enrolled patients, 8 (19.5%) developed clinical PF. The pancreatic thickness (≥15 mm) and SI ratio (≥1.3) were identified as independent predictors of clinical PF in a multivariate analysis. Clinical PF was observed in one patient with a thick pancreas and a low SI ratio (14.3%), whereas it was observed in 60% of the patients with a thick pancreas and a high SI ratio. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for a predictive model consisting of the two factors was 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.75 to 0.99), the level of which tended to be greater than that for pancreatic thickness alone (0.81, p = 0.09). The SI ratio as evaluated using MRI might be useful for predicting clinical PF in patients with the pancreatic thickness ≥15 mm after DP involving a stapler closure. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Hemostatic abnormalities in Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Artoni, Andrea; Selicorni, Angelo; Passamonti, Serena M; Lecchi, Anna; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Cerutti, Marta; Cianci, Paola; Gianniello, Francesca; Martinelli, Ida

    2014-05-01

    A bleeding diathesis is a common feature of Noonan syndrome, and various coagulation abnormalities have been reported. Platelet function has never been carefully investigated. The degree of bleeding diathesis in a cohort of patients with Noonan syndrome was evaluated by a validated bleeding score and investigated with coagulation and platelet function tests. If ratios of prothrombin time and/or activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged, the activity of clotting factors was measured. Individuals with no history of bleeding formed the control group. The study population included 39 patients and 28 controls. Bleeding score was ≥2 (ie, suggestive of a moderate bleeding diathesis) in 15 patients (38.5%) and ≥4 (ie, suggestive of a severe bleeding diathesis) in 7 (17.9%). Abnormal coagulation and/or platelet function tests were found in 14 patients with bleeding score ≥2 (93.3%) but also in 21 (87.5%) of those with bleeding score <2. The prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged in 18 patients (46%) and partial deficiency of factor VII, alone or in combination with the deficiency of other vitamin K-dependent factors, was the most frequent coagulation abnormality. Moreover, platelet aggregation and secretion were reduced in 29 of 35 patients (82.9%, P < .01 for all aggregating agents). Nearly 40% of patients with the Noonan syndrome had a bleeding diathesis and >90% of them had platelet function and/or coagulation abnormalities. Results of these tests should be taken into account in the management of bleeding or invasive procedures in these patients. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. [Normal and abnormal skin color].

    PubMed

    Ortonne, J-P

    2012-11-01

    The varieties of normal skin color in humans range from people of "no color" (pale white) to "people of color" (light brown, dark brown, and black). Skin color is a blend resulting from the skin chromophores red (oxyhaemoglobin), blue (deoxygenated haemoglobin), yellow-orange (carotene, an exogenous pigment), and brown (melanin). Melanin, however, is the major component of skin color ; it is the presence or absence of melanin in the melanosomes in melanocytes and melanin in keratinocytes that is responsible for epidermal pigmentation, and the presence of melanin in macrophages or melanocytes in the dermis that is responsible for dermal pigmentation. Two groups of pigmentary disorders are commonly distinguished: the disorders of the quantitative and qualitative distribution of normal pigment and the abnormal presence of exogenous or endogenous pigments in the skin. The first group includes hyperpigmentations, which clinically manifest by darkening of the skin color, and leukodermia, which is characterized by lightening of the skin. Hypermelanosis corresponds to an overload of melanin or an abnormal distribution of melanin in the skin. Depending on the color, melanodermia (brown/black) and ceruloderma (blue/grey) are distinguished. Melanodermia correspond to epidermal hypermelanocytosis (an increased number of melanocytes) or epidermal hypermelanosis (an increase in the quantity of melanin in the epidermis with no modification of the number of melanocytes). Ceruloderma correspond to dermal hypermelanocytosis (abnormal presence in the dermis of cells synthesizing melanins) ; leakage in the dermis of epidermal melanin also exists, a form of dermal hypermelanosis called pigmentary incontinence. Finally, dyschromia can be related to the abnormal presence in the skin of a pigment of exogenous or endogenous origin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Abnormal uterine bleeding in perimenopause.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, S R; Lumsden, M A

    2017-10-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the commonest presenting complaints encountered in a gynecologist's office or primary-care setting. The wider availability of diagnostic tools has allowed prompt diagnosis and treatment of an increasing number of menstrual disorders in an office setting. This White Paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of transvaginal ultrasound, blind endometrial sampling and diagnostic hysteroscopy. Once a proper diagnosis has been established, appropriate therapy may be embarked upon. Fortunately, only a minority of such patients will have premalignant or malignant disease. When bleeding is sufficient to cause severe anemia or even hypovolemia, prompt intervention is called for. In most of the cases, however, the abnormal uterine bleeding will be disquieting to the patient and significantly affect her 'quality of life'. Sometimes, reassurance and expectant management will be sufficient in such patients. Overall, however, in cases of benign disease, some intervention will be required. The use of oral contraceptive pills especially those with a short hormone-free interval, the insertion of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system, the incorporation of newer medical therapies including antifibrinolytic drugs and selective progesterone receptor modulators and minimally invasive treatments have made outpatient therapy increasingly effective. For others, operative hysteroscopy and endometrial ablation are proven therapeutic tools to provide both long- and short-term relief of abnormal uterine bleeding, thus avoiding, or deferring, hysterectomy.

  14. G protein abnormalities in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Spada, A; Lania, A; Ballarè, E

    1998-07-25

    It has been demonstrated that the majority of secreting and nonsecreting adenomas is monoclonal in origin suggesting that these neoplasia arise from the replication of a single mutated cell, in which growth advantage results from either activation of protooncogenes or inactivation of antioncogenes. Although a large number of genes has been screened for mutations, only few genetic abnormalities have been found in pituitary tumors such as allelic deletion of chromosome 11q13 where the MEN-1 gene has been localised, and mutations in the gene encoding the alpha subunit of the stimulatory Gs and Gi2 protein. These mutations constitutively activate the alpha subunit of the Gs and Gi2 protein by inhibiting their intrinsic GTPase activity. Both Gs alpha and Gi2alpha can be considered products of protooncogenes (gsp and gip2, respectively) since gain of function mutations that activate mitogenic signals have been recognized in human tumors. Gsp oncogene is found in 30-40% of GH-secreting adenomas, in a low percentage of nonfunctioning and ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas, in toxic thyroid adenomas and differentiated thyroid carcinomas. The same mutations, occurred early in embriogenesis, have been also identified in tissues from patients affected with the McCune Albright syndrome. These mutations result in an increased cAMP production and in the subsequent overactivation of specific pathways involved in both cell growth and specific programmes of cell differentiation. By consequence, the endocrine tumors expressing gsp oncogene retain differentiated functions. The gip2 oncogene has been identified in about 10% of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas, in tumors of the ovary and the adrenal cortex. However, it remains to be established whether Gi proteins activate mitogenic signals in pituitary cells. Since Gi proteins are involved in mediating the effect of inhibitory neurohormones on intracellular effectors, it has been proposed that in pituitary tumors the low expression of

  15. Signal voter

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, Roy L.

    1981-01-01

    A voter for providing a single accurate output signal that is derived from the closest two signal levels of three input signals, each of which signals represents a measurement of the same phenomena. By means of the voting circuit, the signals are first sorted by level of amplitude and then ranked as highest, middle or lowest. The highest or lowest signal that is furthest from the middle signal is rejected, while the other highest or lowest signal is selected for processing. The selected high or low signal is then averaged with the middle signal to provide the output signal.

  16. Identification of abnormal accident patterns at intersections

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-08-01

    This report presents the findings and recommendations based on the Identification of Abnormal Accident Patterns at Intersections. This project used a statistically valid sampling method to determine whether a specific intersection has an abnormally h...

  17. Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAQ187 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results • What is cervical cancer screening? • What causes abnormal cervical cancer screening test results? • What is the difference between the terms cervical ...

  18. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  19. Abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick G

    2013-12-01

    Primary abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane are characterized by clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity. Among this group, hereditary spherocytosis patients are more likely to experience symptomatic anemia. Treatment of hereditary spherocytosis with splenectomy is curative in most patients. Growing recognition of the long-term risks of splenectomy has led to re-evaluation of the role of splenectomy. Management guidelines acknowledge these considerations and recommend discussion between health care providers, patient, and family. The hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes are the most common primary disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, most elliptocytosis patients are asymptomatic and do not require therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Transient abnormal Q waves during exercise electrocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Alameddine, F F; Zafari, A M

    2004-01-01

    Myocardial ischaemia during exercise electrocardiography is usually manifested by ST segment depression or elevation. Transient abnormal Q waves are rare, as Q waves indicate an old myocardial infarction. The case of a patient with exercise induced transient abnormal Q waves is reported. The potential mechanisms involved in the development of such an abnormality and its clinical implications are discussed. PMID:14676264

  1. Theoretical considerations in measurement of time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity curves in estimates of regional myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Takahiro; Ishida, Masaki; Kitagawa, Kakuya; Nagata, Motonori; Sakuma, Hajime; Ichihara, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to determine time discrepancies between input and myocardial time-signal intensity (TSI) curves for accurate estimation of myocardial perfusion with first-pass contrast-enhanced MRI. Estimation of myocardial perfusion with contrast-enhanced MRI using kinetic models requires faithful recording of contrast content in the blood and myocardium. Typically, the arterial input function (AIF) is obtained by setting a region of interest in the left ventricular cavity. However, there is a small delay between the AIF and the myocardial curves, and such time discrepancies can lead to errors in flow estimation using Patlak plot analysis. In this study, the time discrepancies between the arterial TSI curve and the myocardial tissue TSI curve were estimated based on the compartment model. In the early phase after the arrival of the contrast agent in the myocardium, the relationship between rate constant K1 and the concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and arterial blood (LV blood) can be described by the equation K1={dCmyo(tpeak)/dt}/Ca(tpeak), where Cmyo(t) and Ca(t) are the relative concentrations of Gd-DTPA contrast agent in the myocardium and in the LV blood, respectively, and tpeak is the time corresponding to the peak of Ca(t). In the ideal case, the time corresponding to the maximum upslope of Cmyo(t), tmax, is equal to tpeak. In practice, however, there is a small difference in the arrival times of the contrast agent into the LV and into the myocardium. This difference was estimated to correspond to the difference between tpeak and tmax. The magnitudes of such time discrepancies and the effectiveness of the correction for these time discrepancies were measured in 18 subjects who underwent myocardial perfusion MRI under rest and stress conditions. The effects of the time discrepancies could be corrected effectively in the myocardial perfusion estimates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  2. Measuring hepatic functional reserve using T1 mapping of Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced 3T MR imaging: A preliminary study comparing with 99mTc GSA scintigraphy and signal intensity based parameters.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masataka; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Shimizu, Kie; Morita, Kosuke; Sakamoto, Fumi; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Shiraishi, Shinya; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2017-07-01

    To determine the utility of liver T1-mapping on gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the measurement of liver functional reserve compared with the signal intensity (SI) based parameters, technetium-99m-galactosyl serum albumin ( 99m Tc-GSA) scintigraphy and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance. This retrospective study included 111 patients (Child-Pugh-A 90; -B 21) performed with both Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced liver MR imaging and 99m Tc-GSA (76 patients with ICG). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to compare diagnostic performances of T1-relaxation-time parameters [pre-(T1pre) and post-contrast (T1hb) Gd-EOB-DTPA], SI based parameters [relative enhancement (RE), liver-to-muscle-ratio (LMR), liver-to-spleen-ratio (LSR)] and 99m Tc-GSA scintigraphy blood clearance index (HH15)] for Child-Pugh classification. Pearson's correlation was used for comparisons among T1-relaxation-time parameters, SI-based parameters, HH15 and ICG. A significant difference was obtained for Child-Pugh classification with T1hb, ΔT1, all SI based parameters and HH15. T1hb had the highest AUC followed by RE, LMR, LSR, ΔT1, HH15 and T1pre. The correlation coefficients with HH15 were T1pre 0.22, T1hb 0.53, ΔT1 -0.38 of T1 relaxation parameters; RE -0.44, LMR -0.45, LSR -0.43 of SI-based parameters. T1hb was highest for correlation with HH15. The correlation coefficients with ICG were T1pre 0.29, T1hb 0.64, ΔT1 -0.42 of T1 relaxation parameters; RE -0.50, LMR -0.61, LSR -0.58 of SI-based parameters; 0.64 of HH15. Both T1hb and HH15 were highest for correlation with ICG. T1 relaxation time at post-contrast of Gd-EOB-DTPA (T1hb) was strongly correlated with ICG clearance and moderately correlated HH15 with 99m Tc-GSA. T1hb has the potential to provide robust parameter of liver functional reserve. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiac Abnormalities in Primary Hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Mookadam, Farouk; Smith, Travis; Jiamsripong, Panupong; Moustafa, Sherif E; Monico, Carla G.; Lieske, John C.; Milliner, Dawn S.

    2018-01-01

    Background In patients with primary hyperoxaluria (PH), oxalate overproduction can result in recurrent urolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis, which in some cases results in a progressive decline in renal function, oxalate retention, and systemic oxalosis involving bone, retina, arterial media, peripheral nerves, skin, and heart. Oxalosis involving the myocardium or conduction system can potentially lead to heart failure and fatal arrhythmias. Methods and Results A retrospective review of our institution’s database was conducted for all patients with a confirmed diagnosis of PH between 1/1948 and 1/2006 (n=103). Electrocardiogram (ECG) and echocardiography were used to identify cardiac abnormalities. Ninety-three patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, 58% were male. Mean follow-up was 11.9 (median 8.8) years. In 38 patients who received an ECG or echocardiography, 31 were found to have any cardiac abnormalities. Cardiac findings correlated with decline in renal function. Conclusions Our data suggests that physicians caring for patients with PH should pay close attention to cardiac status, especially if renal function is impaired. PMID:20921818

  4. [EPR study of iron status in human body during intensive physical activity].

    PubMed

    Ibragimova, M I; Chushnikov, A I; Cherepnev, G V; Petukhov, V Iu; Zheglov, E P

    2014-01-01

    The iron metabolism was studied in serum blood samples collected from 26 professional sportsmen undergoing intensive physical exercises using EPR combined with haematological and biochemical laboratory tests. Only 23% of EPR spectra (n = 6) were practically normal while in the rest spectra additional abnormal absorption lines were detected. Presumably, the significant portion of new signals may be caused by different cytochromes. Moreover, the anisotropic signals with g1 approximately equal to 2.02; g2 approximately equal to 1.94 and g3 approximately equal to 1.86 registered in some spectra pointed to the sulfur-iron centers. There was nearly linear correlation between the concentration of Fe3+ in transfferin (Fe(3+)-Tf) obtained from the EPR spectra and the serum iron concentration measured by absorption photometry both for sportsmen and controls (healthy individuals and patients with different diseases). At equal serum iron concentrations the Fe(3+)-Tf level was higher in sportsmen than that in controls. The Pearson correlation coefficient (r) for Fe(3+)-Tf and serum iron values was equal to 0.89 in sportsmen versus r = 0.97 in controls. Additional new lines in serum EPR spectra of professional sportsmen prove the suitability of EPR assay for scheduled medical exams since routinebiochemical and haematological tests are insufficient to discover all abnormalities in iron metabolism under intensive physical exercises.

  5. Cardiac abnormalities in Parkinson's disease and Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Scorza, Fulvio A; Fiorini, Ana C; Scorza, Carla A; Finsterer, Josef

    2018-07-01

    Though there is increasing evidence for primary cardiac disease in Parkinson's disease (PD) and Parkinsonism (PS), this evidence is hardly included in the general management of these patients. Literature review. PD is one of the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Epidemiological studies have shown that PD is accompanied by high rates of premature death compared with the general population. In general, death in PD/PS is usually caused by determinant factors such as pneumonia, cerebrovascular, and cardiovascular disease. There is a significant body of literature demonstrating involvement of the heart in PD/PS. Cardiac involvement in PD/PS includes cardiac autonomic dysfunction, cardiomyopathy, coronary heart disease, arrhythmias, conduction defects, and sudden cardiac death (SCD), and sudden unexpected death in Parkinson's disease (SUDPAR). Cardiac abnormalities found in PD/PS are manifold but the most prominent is cardiac autonomic dysfunction. The frequency of coronary heart disease in PD is a matter of debate. Only rarely reported in PD/PS are cardiomyopathies, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death, and SUDPAR. It is particularly recommended that PD/PS patients are more intensively investigated cardiologically as soon as the diagnosis is established. Early recognition of cardiac involvement is important for preventing SCD and SUDPAR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Brain MRI abnormalities in the adult form of myotonic dystrophy type 1: A longitudinal case series study.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Renata; de Cristofaro, Mario; Cristofano, Adriana; Brogna, Barbara; Sardaro, Angela; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Cirillo, Sossio; Di Costanzo, Alfonso

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to verify whether brain abnormalities, previously described in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), progressed over time and, if so, to characterize their progression. Thirteen DM1 patients, who had at least two MRI examinations, were retrospectively evaluated and included in the study. The mean duration (± standard deviation) of follow-up was 13.4 (±3.8) years, over a range of 7-20 years. White matter lesions (WMLs) were rated by semi-quantitative method, the signal intensity of white matter poster-superior to trigones (WMPST) by reference to standard images and brain atrophy by ventricular/brain ratio (VBR). At the end of MRI follow-up, the scores relative to lobar, temporal and periventricular WMLs, to WMPST signal intensity and to VBR were significantly increased compared to baseline, and MRI changes were more evident in some families than in others. No correlation was found between the MRI changes and age, onset, disease duration, muscular involvement, CTG repetition and follow-up duration. These results demonstrated that white matter involvement and brain atrophy were progressive in DM1 and suggested that progression rate varied from patient to patient, regardless of age, disease duration and genetic defect. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Muscle abnormalities in osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Veilleux, L-N.; Trejo, P.; Rauch, F.

    2017-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is mainly characterized by bone fragility but muscle abnormalities have been reported both in OI mouse models and in children with OI. Muscle mass is decreased in OI, even when short stature is taken into account. Dynamic muscle tests aiming at maximal eccentric force production reveal functional deficits that can not be explained by low muscle mass alone. However, it appears that diaphyseal bone mass is normally adapted to muscle force. At present the determinants of muscle mass and function in OI have not been clearly defined. Physiotherapy interventions and bisphosphonate treatment appear to have some effect on muscle function in OI. Interventions targeting muscle mass have shown encouraging results in OI animal models and are an interesting area for further research. PMID:28574406

  8. Detecting rare, abnormally large grains by x-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Boyce, Brad L.; Furnish, Timothy Allen; Padilla, H. A.; ...

    2015-07-16

    Bimodal grain structures are common in many alloys, arising from a number of different causes including incomplete recrystallization and abnormal grain growth. These bimodal grain structures have important technological implications, such as the well-known Goss texture which is now a cornerstone for electrical steels. Yet our ability to detect bimodal grain distributions is largely confined to brute force cross-sectional metallography. The present study presents a new method for rapid detection of unusually large grains embedded in a sea of much finer grains. Traditional X-ray diffraction-based grain size measurement techniques such as Scherrer, Williamson–Hall, or Warren–Averbach rely on peak breadth andmore » shape to extract information regarding the average crystallite size. However, these line broadening techniques are not well suited to identify a very small fraction of abnormally large grains. The present method utilizes statistically anomalous intensity spikes in the Bragg peak to identify regions where abnormally large grains are contributing to diffraction. This needle-in-a-haystack technique is demonstrated on a nanocrystalline Ni–Fe alloy which has undergone fatigue-induced abnormal grain growth. In this demonstration, the technique readily identifies a few large grains that occupy <0.00001 % of the interrogation volume. Finally, while the technique is demonstrated in the current study on nanocrystalline metal, it would likely apply to any bimodal polycrystal including ultrafine grained and fine microcrystalline materials with sufficiently distinct bimodal grain statistics.« less

  9. Conservative management of placenta previa complicated by abnormal placentation.

    PubMed

    Bręborowicz, Grzegorz H; Markwitz, Wiesław; Gaca, Michał; Koziołek, Agnieszka; Ropacka-Lesiak, Mariola; Dera, Anna; Brych, Mariusz; Szymankiewicz-Bręborowicz, Marta; Kruszyński, Grzegorz; Gruca-Stryjak, Karolina; Madejczyk, Mateusz; Szpera-Goździewicz, Agata; Krzyścin, Mariola

    2013-07-01

    Abnormal implantation of placenta previa is life-threatening condition. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the conservative management of pregnancies with such complication on maternal morbidity rate and the chance for uterine preservation (fertility). Eleven patients with abnormal implantation of placenta previa were analyzed prospectively. This complication was diagnosed antenatally by two-dimensional ultrasound and color flow Doppler. The following outcomes were analyzed: need for blood transfusion, admission and duration of stay in intensive care unit, infections, coagulopathies, time between cesarean section and delivery of placenta, hysterectomy and preservation of uterus. Among the 20 085 women who had a singleton gestation, 11 (0.054%) were identified with placenta previa with abnormal placentation. In five patients (group A), hysterectomy was performed because of hemorrhage or placenta ablation. In six patients (group B), conservative management succeeded and placenta were preserved. In group A, placenta were delivered earlier (2 d-8 weeks) in comparison with group B (6-15 weeks). Estimated blood loss during the delayed delivery of placenta was higher in the group with hysterectomy (respectively, 450-1600 and 300-500 ml). Conservative management of placenta previa with abnormal implantation decreases the risk of severe hemorrhage at the time of delivery and can preserve fertility.

  10. HIV Infection and Bone Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aamir N; Ahmad, Shahid N; Ahmad, Nafees

    2017-01-01

    More than 36 million people are living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection worldwide and 50% of them have access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). While recent advances in HIV therapy have reduced the viral load, restored CD4 T cell counts and decreased opportunistic infections, several bone-related abnormalities such as low bone mineral density (BMD), osteoporosis, osteopenia, osteomalacia and fractures have emerged in HIV-infected individuals. Of all classes of antiretroviral agents, HIV protease inhibitors used in ART combination showed a higher frequency of osteopenia, osteoporosis and low BMD in HIV-infected patients. Although the mechanisms of HIV and/or ART associated bone abnormalities are not known, it is believed that the damage is caused by a complex interaction of T lymphocytes with osteoclasts and osteoblasts, likely influenced by both HIV and ART. In addition, infection of osteoclasts and bone marrow stromal cells by HIV, including HIV Gp120 induced apoptosis of osteoblasts and release of proinflammatory cytokines have been implicated in impairment of bone development and maturation. Several of the newer antiretroviral agents currently used in ART combination, including the widely used tenofovir in different formulations show relative adverse effects on BMD. In this context, switching the HIV-regimen from tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) to tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) showed improvement in BMD of HIV-infected patients. In addition, inclusion of integrase inhibitor in ART combination is associated with improved BMD in patients. Furthermore, supplementation of vitamin D and calcium with the initiation of ART may mitigate bone loss. Therefore, levels of vitamin D and calcium should be part of the evaluation of HIV-infected patients.

  11. White matter abnormalities of microstructure and physiological noise in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hu; Newman, Sharlene D; Kent, Jerillyn S; Bolbecker, Amanda; Klaunig, Mallory J; O'Donnell, Brian F; Puce, Aina; Hetrick, William P

    2015-12-01

    White matter abnormalities in schizophrenia have been revealed by many imaging techniques and analysis methods. One of the findings by diffusion tensor imaging is a decrease in fractional anisotropy (FA), which is an indicator of white matter integrity. On the other hand, elevation of metabolic rate in white matter was observed from positron emission tomography (PET) studies. In this report, we aim to compare the two structural and functional effects on the same subjects. Our comparison is based on the hypothesis that signal fluctuation in white matter is associated with white matter functional activity. We examined the variance of the signal in resting state fMRI and found significant differences between individuals with schizophrenia and non-psychiatric controls specifically in white matter tissue. Controls showed higher temporal signal-to-noise ratios clustered in regions including temporal, frontal, and parietal lobes, cerebellum, corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and other major white matter tracts. These regions with higher temporal signal-to-noise ratio agree well with those showing higher metabolic activity reported by studies using PET. The results suggest that individuals with schizophrenia tend to have higher functional activity in white matter in certain brain regions relative to healthy controls. Despite some overlaps, the distinct regions for physiological noise are different from those for FA derived from diffusion tensor imaging, and therefore provide a unique angle to explore potential mechanisms to white matter abnormality.

  12. Glutamatergic abnormalities of the thalamus in schizophrenia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Watis, L; Chen, S H; Chua, H C; Chong, S A; Sim, K

    2008-01-01

    The thalamus, a key information processing centre in facilitating sensory discrimination and cognitive processes, has been implicated in schizophrenia due to the increasing evidence showing structural and functional thalamic abnormalities. Glutamatergic abnormalities, in particular, have been examined since glutamate is one of the main neurotransmitters found in the thalamus. We aimed to review the existing literature (1978 till 2007) on post-mortem and in vivo studies of the various components of glutamatergic neurotransmission as well as studies of the glutamate receptor genes within the thalamus in schizophrenia. The literature search was done using multiple databases including Scopus, Web of Science, EBSCO host, Pubmed and ScienceDirect. Keywords used were "glutamate", "thalamus", "schizophrenia", "abnormalities", and "glutamatergic". Further searches were made using the bibliographies in the main journals and related papers were obtained. The extant data suggest that abnormalities of the glutamate receptors as well as other molecules involved in glutamatergic neurotransmission (including glutamate transporters and associated proteins, N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-associated intracellular signaling proteins, and glutamatergic enzymes) are found within the thalamus in schizophrenia. There is a pressing need for more rapid replication of findings from post mortem and genetic studies as well as the promotion of multi-component or multi-modality assessments of glutamatergic anomalies within the thalamus in order to allow a better appreciation of disruptions in these molecular networks in schizophrenia. These and future findings may represent potential novel targets for antipsychotic drugs to ameliorate the symptoms of schizophrenia.

  13. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings... shape or size, tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis, and any other significant abnormal...

  14. Abnormal sleep/wake dynamics in orexin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Diniz Behn, Cecilia G; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Mochizuki, Takatoshi; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Scammell, Thomas E

    2010-03-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is caused by a loss of orexin (hypocretin) signaling, but the physiologic mechanisms that result in poor maintenance of wakefulness and fragmented sleep remain unknown. Conventional scoring of sleep cannot reveal much about the process of transitioning between states or the variations within states. We developed an EEG spectral analysis technique to determine whether the state instability in a mouse model of narcolepsy reflects abnormal sleep or wake states, faster movements between states, or abnormal transitions between states. We analyzed sleep recordings in orexin knockout (OXKO) mice and wild type (WT) littermates using a state space analysis technique. This non-categorical approach allows quantitative and unbiased examination of sleep/wake states and state transitions. OXKO mice spent less time in deep, delta-rich NREM sleep and in active, theta-rich wake and instead spent more time near the transition zones between states. In addition, while in the midst of what should be stable wake, OXKO mice initiated rapid changes into NREM sleep with high velocities normally seen only in transition regions. Consequently, state transitions were much more frequent and rapid even though the EEG progressions during state transitions were normal. State space analysis enables visualization of the boundaries between sleep and wake and shows that narcoleptic mice have less distinct and more labile states of sleep and wakefulness. These observations provide new perspectives on the abnormal state dynamics resulting from disrupted orexin signaling and highlight the usefulness of state space analysis in understanding narcolepsy and other sleep disorders.

  15. Abnormal characteristics of binary molecular clusters in DMSO–ethanol mixtures under external electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiyan; Huang, Kama

    2018-05-01

    For the nonlinearly phenomena on the dielectric properties of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-ethanol mixtures under a low intensity microwave field, we propose a conjecture that there exist some abnormal molecular clusters. To interpret the mechanism of abnormal phenomena and confirm our conjecture about the existence of abnormal molecular clusters, an in-depth investigation about the structure evolutions of (DMSO)m(C2H5OH)n (m = 0-4; n = 0-4; m + n ≤ 4) molecular clusters induced by external electric fields has been given by using density functional theory. The results show that there exist some binary molecular clusters with large cluster radii in mixtures, and some of them are unstable under exposure of electric fields. It implies that the existence of certain abnormal molecular clusters in DMSO-ethanol mixtures results in their abnormality of dielectric properties.

  16. Neurophysiological model of the normal and abnormal human pupil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krenz, W.; Robin, M.; Barez, S.; Stark, L.

    1985-01-01

    Anatomical, experimental, and computer simulation studies were used to determine the structure of the neurophysiological model of the pupil size control system. The computer simulation of this model demonstrates the role played by each of the elements in the neurological pathways influencing the size of the pupil. Simulations of the effect of drugs and common abnormalities in the system help to illustrate the workings of the pathways and processes involved. The simulation program allows the user to select pupil condition (normal or an abnormality), specific site along the neurological pathway (retina, hypothalamus, etc.) drug class input (barbiturate, narcotic, etc.), stimulus/response mode, display mode, stimulus type and input waveform, stimulus or background intensity and frequency, the input and output conditions, and the response at the neuroanatomical site. The model can be used as a teaching aid or as a tool for testing hypotheses regarding the system.

  17. The Real Culprit in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Abnormal Epigenetic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haijing; Zhao, Ming; Chang, Christopher; Lu, Qianjin

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease involving multiple organs and the presence of anti-nuclear antibodies. The pathogenesis of SLE has been intensively studied but remains far from clear. B and T lymphocyte abnormalities, dysregulation of apoptosis, defects in the clearance of apoptotic materials, and various genetic and epigenetic factors are attributed to the development of SLE. The latest research findings point to the association between abnormal epigenetic regulation and SLE, which has attracted considerable interest worldwide. It is the purpose of this review to present and discuss the relationship between aberrant epigenetic regulation and SLE, including DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs in patients with SLE, the possible mechanisms of immune dysfunction caused by epigenetic changes, and to better understand the roles of aberrant epigenetic regulation in the initiation and development of SLE and to provide an insight into the related therapeutic options in SLE. PMID:25988383

  18. [Cognitive abnormalities and cannabis use].

    PubMed

    Solowij, Nadia; Pesa, Nicole

    2010-05-01

    Evidence that cannabis use impairs cognitive function in humans has been accumulating in recent decades. The purpose of this overview is to update knowledge in this area with new findings from the most recent literature. Literature searches were conducted using the Web of Science database up to February 2010. The terms searched were: "cannabi*" or "marijuana", and "cogniti*" or "memory" or "attention" or "executive function", and human studies were reviewed preferentially over the animal literature. Cannabis use impairs memory, attention, inhibitory control, executive functions and decision making, both during the period of acute intoxication and beyond, persisting for hours, days, weeks or more after the last use of cannabis. Pharmacological challenge studies in humans are elucidating the nature and neural substrates of cognitive changes associated with various cannabinoids. Long-term or heavy cannabis use appears to result in longer-lasting cognitive abnormalities and possibly structural brain alterations. Greater adverse cognitive effects are associated with cannabis use commencing in early adolescence. The endogenous cannabinoid system is involved in regulatory neural mechanisms that modulate processes underlying a range of cognitive functions that are impaired by cannabis. Deficits in human users most likely therefore reflect neuroadaptations and altered functioning of the endogenous cannabinoid system.

  19. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Dandy-Walker syndrome and chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Imataka, George; Yamanouchi, Hideo; Arisaka, Osamu

    2007-12-01

    Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is a brain malformation of unknown etiology, but several reports have been published indicating that there is a causal relationship to various types of chromosomal abnormalities and malformation syndromes. In the present article, we present a bibliographical survey of several previously issued reports on chromosomal abnormalities associated with DWS, including our case of DWS found in trisomy 18. There are various types of chromosomal abnormalities associated with DWS; most of them are reported in chromosome 3, 9, 13 and 18. We also summarize some other chromosomal abnormalities and various congenital malformation syndromes.

  1. Abnormal Sleep/Wake Dynamics in Orexin Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Diniz Behn, Cecilia G.; Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Mochizuki, Takatoshi; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Scammell, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is caused by a loss of orexin (hypocretin) signaling, but the physiologic mechanisms that result in poor maintenance of wakefulness and fragmented sleep remain unknown. Conventional scoring of sleep cannot reveal much about the process of transitioning between states or the variations within states. We developed an EEG spectral analysis technique to determine whether the state instability in a mouse model of narcolepsy reflects abnormal sleep or wake states, faster movements between states, or abnormal transitions between states. Design: We analyzed sleep recordings in orexin knockout (OXKO) mice and wild type (WT) littermates using a state space analysis technique. This non-categorical approach allows quantitative and unbiased examination of sleep/wake states and state transitions. Measurements and Results: OXKO mice spent less time in deep, delta-rich NREM sleep and in active, theta-rich wake and instead spent more time near the transition zones between states. In addition, while in the midst of what should be stable wake, OXKO mice initiated rapid changes into NREM sleep with high velocities normally seen only in transition regions. Consequently, state transitions were much more frequent and rapid even though the EEG progressions during state transitions were normal. Conclusions: State space analysis enables visualization of the boundaries between sleep and wake and shows that narcoleptic mice have less distinct and more labile states of sleep and wakefulness. These observations provide new perspectives on the abnormal state dynamics resulting from disrupted orexin signaling and highlight the usefulness of state space analysis in understanding narcolepsy and other sleep disorders. Citation: Diniz Behn CG; Klerman EB; Mochizuki T; Lin S; Scammell TE. Abnormal sleep/wake dynamics in orexin knockout mice. SLEEP 2010;33(3):297-306. PMID:20337187

  2. Habitat quality affects the incidence of morphological abnormalities in the endangered salamander Ambystoma ordinarium

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Identification of early warning signals previous to the occurrence of population decline or extinction is a major challenge for the conservation of animal species. Prevalence of morphological abnormalities in a population can be one of these signals. We registered morphological abnormalities in the salamander Ambystoma ordinarium. We also evaluated the relation between habitat quality and the prevalence of abnormalities in this species. We used scores from rapid bioassessment protocols (RBPs) to assess the habitat quality of streams inhabited by A. ordinarium. A preliminary survey indicated that of 29 streams where this species has been historically registered, 13 might have few or no A. ordinarium. The association between habitat quality and the incidence of morphological abnormalities was evaluated in these 16 streams. Of 502 sampled individuals, 224 (44.62%) had at least one body abnormality. Of the 224 individuals with body abnormalities, 84 (37.5%) presented more than one abnormality. Of a total of 5,522 evaluated morphological characters, 344 (6.74%) were abnormal. Partial loss of gills and missing digits were the most frequent abnormalities. Results of a binomial logistic regression indicated that the probability of a character of an individual to be abnormal was significantly associated with habitat quality; as the levels of the quality of the habitat increased, the prevalence of morphological abnormalities decreased. These results suggest that RBPs are a quick and useful method for assessing the habitat quality of streams inhabited by A. ordinarium. Given that RBPs provide rapid and cost-effective assessments of the ecological health of aquatic ecosystems, it will be important to test if the RBPs protocols can be used to rapidly assess habitat quality for other species of stream amphibians. The negative association between habitat quality and the prevalence of morpohological abnormalities that we found indicates that habitat condition plays an important

  3. Detection of Structural Abnormalities Using Neural Nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.; Maccalla, A.; Daggumati, V.; Gulati, S.; Toomarian, N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a feed-forward neural net approach for detection of abnormal system behavior based upon sensor data analyses. A new dynamical invariant representing structural parameters of the system is introduced in such a way that any structural abnormalities in the system behavior are detected from the corresponding changes to the invariant.

  4. Immune Abnormalities in Patients with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Reed P.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study of 31 autistic patients (3-28 years old) has revealed several immune-system abnormalities, including decreased numbers of T lymphocytes and an altered ratio of helper-to-suppressor T cells. Immune-system abnormalities may be directly related to underlying biologic processes of autism or an indirect reflection of the actual pathologic…

  5. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  6. Stellar Temporal Intensity Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kian, Tan Peng

    Stellar intensity interferometry was developed by Hanbury-Brown & Twiss [1954, 1956b, 1957, 1958] to bypass the diffraction limit of telescope apertures, with successful measurements including the determination of 32 stellar angular diameters using the Narrabri Stellar Intensity Interferometer [Hanbury-Brown et al., 1974]. This was achieved by measuring the intensity correlations between starlight received by a pair of telescopes separated by varying baselines b which, by invoking the van Cittert-Zernicke theorem [van Cittert, 1934; Zernicke, 1938], are related to the angular intensity distributions of the stellar light sources through a Fourier transformation of the equal-time complex degree of coherence gamma(b) between the two telescopes. This intensity correlation, or the second order correlation function g(2) [Glauber, 1963], can be described in terms of two-photoevent coincidence measurements [Hanbury-Brown, 1974] for our use of photon-counting detectors. The application of intensity interferometry in astrophysics has been largely restricted to the spatial domain but not found widespread adoption due to limitations by its signal-to-noise ratio [Davis et al., 1999; Foellmi, 2009; Jensen et al., 2010; LeBohec et al., 2008, 2010], although there is a growing movement to revive its use [Barbieri et al., 2009; Capraro et al., 2009; Dravins & Lagadec, 2014; Dravins et al., 2015; Dravins & LeBohec, 2007]. In this thesis, stellar intensity interferometry in the temporal domain is investigated instead. We present a narrowband spectral filtering scheme [Tan et al., 2014] that allows direct measurements of the Lorentzian temporal correlations, or photon bunching, from the Sun, with the preliminary Solar g(2)(tau = 0) = 1.3 +/- 0.1, limited mostly by the photon detector response [Ghioni et al., 2008], compared to the theoretical value of g(2)(0) = 2. The measured temporal photon bunching signature of the Sun exceeded the previous records of g(2)(0) = 1.03 [Karmakar et al

  7. Dynamic changes of striatal and extrastriatal abnormalities in glutaric aciduria type I.

    PubMed

    Harting, Inga; Neumaier-Probst, Eva; Seitz, Angelika; Maier, Esther M; Assmann, Birgit; Baric, Ivo; Troncoso, Monica; Mühlhausen, Chris; Zschocke, Johannes; Boy, Nikolas P S; Hoffmann, Georg F; Garbade, Sven F; Kölker, Stefan

    2009-07-01

    In glutaric aciduria type I, an autosomal recessive disease of mitochondrial lysine, hydroxylysine and tryptophan catabolism, striatal lesions are characteristically induced by acute encephalopathic crises during a finite period of brain development (age 3-36 months). The frequency of striatal injury is significantly less in patients diagnosed as asymptomatic newborns by newborn screening. Most previous studies have focused on the onset and mechanism of striatal injury, whereas little is known about neuroradiological abnormalities in pre-symptomatically diagnosed patients and about dynamic changes of extrastriatal abnormalities. Thus, the major aim of the present retrospective study was to improve our understanding of striatal and extrastriatal abnormalities in affected individuals including those diagnosed by newborn screening. To this end, we systematically analysed magnetic resonance imagings (MRIs) in 38 patients with glutaric aciduria type I diagnosed before or after the manifestation of neurological symptoms. To identify brain regions that are susceptible to cerebral injury during acute encephalopathic crises, we compared the frequency of magnetic resonance abnormalities in patients with and without such crises. Major specific changes after encephalopathic crises were found in the putamen (P < 0.001), nucleus caudatus (P < 0.001), globus pallidus (P = 0.012) and ventricles (P = 0.001). Analysis of empirical cumulative distribution frequencies, however, demonstrated that isolated pallidal abnormalities did not significantly differ over time in both groups (P = 0.544) suggesting that isolated pallidal abnormalities are not induced by acute crises--in contrast to striatal abnormalities. The manifestation of motor disability was associated with signal abnormalities in putamen, caudate, pallidum and ventricles. In addition, we found a large number of extrastriatal abnormalities in patients with and without preceding encephalophatic crises. These abnormalities

  8. Possible Electromagnetic Effects on Abnormal Animal Behavior Before an Earthquake

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Masashi

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary Possible electromagnetic effects on abnormal animal behavior before earthquakes. Abstract The former statistical properties summarized by Rikitake (1998) on unusual animal behavior before an earthquake (EQ) have first been presented by using two parameters (epicentral distance (D) of an anomaly and its precursor (or lead) time (T)). Three plots are utilized to characterize the unusual animal behavior; (i) EQ magnitude (M) versus D, (ii) log T versus M, and (iii) occurrence histogram of log T. These plots are compared with the corresponding plots for different seismo-electromagnetic effects (radio emissions in different frequency ranges, seismo-atmospheric and -ionospheric perturbations) extensively obtained during the last 15–20 years. From the results of comparisons in terms of three plots, it is likely that lower frequency (ULF (ultra-low-frequency, f ≤ 1 Hz) and ELF (extremely-low-frequency, f ≤ a few hundreds Hz)) electromagnetic emissions exhibit a very similar temporal evolution with that of abnormal animal behavior. It is also suggested that a quantity of field intensity multiplied by the persistent time (or duration) of noise would play the primary role in abnormal animal behavior before an EQ. PMID:26487307

  9. Ovarian Cancers: Genetic Abnormalities, Tumor Heterogeneity and Progression, Clonal Evolution and Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Testa, Ugo; Petrucci, Eleonora; Pasquini, Luca; Castelli, Germana; Pelosi, Elvira

    2018-02-01

    Four main histological subtypes of ovarian cancer exist: serous (the most frequent), endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell; in each subtype, low and high grade. The large majority of ovarian cancers are diagnosed as high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGS-OvCas). TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in HGS-OvCas; about 50% of these tumors displayed defective homologous recombination due to germline and somatic BRCA mutations, epigenetic inactivation of BRCA and abnormalities of DNA repair genes; somatic copy number alterations are frequent in these tumors and some of them are associated with prognosis; defective NOTCH, RAS/MEK, PI3K and FOXM1 pathway signaling is frequent. Other histological subtypes were characterized by a different mutational spectrum: LGS-OvCas have increased frequency of BRAF and RAS mutations; mucinous cancers have mutation in ARID1A , PIK3CA , PTEN , CTNNB1 and RAS . Intensive research was focused to characterize ovarian cancer stem cells, based on positivity for some markers, including CD133, CD44, CD117, CD24, EpCAM, LY6A, ALDH1. Ovarian cancer cells have an intrinsic plasticity, thus explaining that in a single tumor more than one cell subpopulation, may exhibit tumor-initiating capacity. The improvements in our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of ovarian cancers should lead to more efficacious treatments.

  10. Ovarian Cancers: Genetic Abnormalities, Tumor Heterogeneity and Progression, Clonal Evolution and Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Germana; Pelosi, Elvira

    2018-01-01

    Four main histological subtypes of ovarian cancer exist: serous (the most frequent), endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell; in each subtype, low and high grade. The large majority of ovarian cancers are diagnosed as high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGS-OvCas). TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in HGS-OvCas; about 50% of these tumors displayed defective homologous recombination due to germline and somatic BRCA mutations, epigenetic inactivation of BRCA and abnormalities of DNA repair genes; somatic copy number alterations are frequent in these tumors and some of them are associated with prognosis; defective NOTCH, RAS/MEK, PI3K and FOXM1 pathway signaling is frequent. Other histological subtypes were characterized by a different mutational spectrum: LGS-OvCas have increased frequency of BRAF and RAS mutations; mucinous cancers have mutation in ARID1A, PIK3CA, PTEN, CTNNB1 and RAS. Intensive research was focused to characterize ovarian cancer stem cells, based on positivity for some markers, including CD133, CD44, CD117, CD24, EpCAM, LY6A, ALDH1. Ovarian cancer cells have an intrinsic plasticity, thus explaining that in a single tumor more than one cell subpopulation, may exhibit tumor-initiating capacity. The improvements in our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of ovarian cancers should lead to more efficacious treatments. PMID:29389895

  11. Gamma abnormalities during perception of illusory figures in autism.

    PubMed

    Brown, Caroline; Gruber, Thomas; Boucher, Jill; Rippon, Gina; Brock, Jon

    2005-06-01

    This experiment was designed to test the hypothesis that perceptual abnormalities in autism might be associated with alteration of induced gamma activity patterns overlying visual cortical regions. EEG was recorded from six adolescents with autism and eight controls matched on chronological age, and verbal and nonverbal mental age, whilst identifying the presence or absence of an illusory Kanizsa shape. Although there were no reaction time or accuracy differences between the groups there were significant task-related differences in cortical activity. Control participants showed typical gamma-band activity over parietal regions at around 350 msec post onset of shape trials, similar to gamma patterns found in previous studies with non-impaired adults. In contrast, autistic participants showed overall increased activity, including an early 100 msec gamma peak and a late induced peak, 50 to 70 msec earlier than that shown by the control group. We interpret the abnormal gamma activity to reflect decreased "signal to noise" due to decreased inhibitory processing. In this experiment we did not establish a link between altered perception and abnormal gamma, as the autistic participants' behaviour did not differ from the controls. Future work should be designed to replicate this phenomenon and establish the perceptual consequences of altered gamma activity.

  12. Abnormal Structure–Function Relationship in Spasmodic Dysphonia

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2012-01-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is a primary focal dystonia characterized by involuntary spasms in the laryngeal muscles during speech production. Although recent studies have found abnormal brain function and white matter organization in SD, the extent of gray matter alterations, their structure–function relationships, and correlations with symptoms remain unknown. We compared gray matter volume (GMV) and cortical thickness (CT) in 40 SD patients and 40 controls using voxel-based morphometry and cortical distance estimates. These measures were examined for relationships with blood oxygen level–dependent signal change during symptomatic syllable production in 15 of the same patients. SD patients had increased GMV, CT, and brain activation in key structures of the speech control system, including the laryngeal sensorimotor cortex, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), superior/middle temporal and supramarginal gyri, and in a structure commonly abnormal in other primary dystonias, the cerebellum. Among these regions, GMV, CT and activation of the IFG and cerebellum showed positive relationships with SD severity, while CT of the IFG correlated with SD duration. The left anterior insula was the only region with decreased CT, which also correlated with SD symptom severity. These findings provide evidence for coupling between structural and functional abnormalities at different levels within the speech production system in SD. PMID:21666131

  13. Piezoelectric extraction of ECG signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al

    2016-11-01

    The monitoring and early detection of abnormalities or variations in the cardiac cycle functionality are very critical practices and have significant impact on the prevention of heart diseases and their associated complications. Currently, in the field of biomedical engineering, there is a growing need for devices capable of measuring and monitoring a wide range of cardiac cycle parameters continuously, effectively and on a real-time basis using easily accessible and reusable probes. In this paper, the revolutionary generation and extraction of the corresponding ECG signal using a piezoelectric transducer as alternative for the ECG will be discussed. The piezoelectric transducer pick up the vibrations from the heart beats and convert them into electrical output signals. To this end, piezoelectric and signal processing techniques were employed to extract the ECG corresponding signal from the piezoelectric output voltage signal. The measured electrode based and the extracted piezoelectric based ECG traces are well corroborated. Their peaks amplitudes and locations are well aligned with each other.

  14. Abnormal branching and regression of the notochord and its relationship to foregut abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Vleesch Dubois, V N; Quan Qi, B; Beasley, S W; Williams, A

    2002-04-01

    An abnormally positioned notochord has been reported in embryos that develop foregut abnormalities, vertebral defects and other abnormalities of the VATER association. This study examines the patterns of regression of the abnormal notochord in the rat model of the VATER association and investigates the relationship between developmental abnormalities of the notochord and those of the vertebra and foregut. Timed-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given daily intraperitoneal injections of 1.75 mg/kg adriamycin on gestational days 6 - 9 inclusive. Rats were sacrificed between days 14 and 20 and their embryos harvested, histologically sectioned and stained and examined serially. The location and appearance of the degenerating notochord and its relationship to regional structural defects were analysed. All 26 embryos exposed to adriamycin developed foregut abnormalities and had an abnormal notochord. The notochord disappeared by a process of apoptotic degeneration that lagged behind that of the normal embryo: the notochord persisted in the abnormal embryo beyond day 17, whereas in the normal rat it had already disappeared. Similarly, formation of the nucleus pulposus was delayed. Vertebral abnormalities occurred when the notochord was ventrally-positioned. The notochord disappears during day 16 in the normal embryo whereas abnormal branches of the notochord persist until day 19 in the adriamycin-treated embryo. Degeneration of the notochord is dominated by apoptosis. An excessively ventrally-placed notochord is closely associated with abnormalities of the vertebral column, especially hemivertebrae.

  15. Brain and bone abnormalities of thanatophoric dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Miller, Elka; Blaser, Susan; Shannon, Patrick; Widjaja, Elysa

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the imaging findings of skeletal and brain abnormalities in thanatophoric dwarfism, a lethal form of dysplastic dwarfism. The bony abnormalities associated with thanatophoric dwarfism include marked shortening of the tubular bones and ribs. Abnormal temporal lobe development is a common associated feature and can be visualized as early as the second trimester. It is important to assess the brains of fetuses with suspected thanatophoric dwarfism because the presence of associated brain malformations can assist in the antenatal diagnosis of thanatophoric dwarfism.

  16. Sex chromosome abnormalities and psychiatric diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinzhu; Yang, Jian; Li, Yuhong; Ma, Xin; Li, Rena

    2017-01-01

    Excesses of sex chromosome abnormalities in patients with psychiatric diseases have recently been observed. It remains unclear whether sex chromosome abnormalities are related to sex differences in some psychiatric diseases. While studies showed evidence of susceptibility loci over many sex chromosomal regions related to various mental diseases, others demonstrated that the sex chromosome aneuploidies may be the key to exploring the pathogenesis of psychiatric disease. In this review, we will outline the current evidence on the interaction of sex chromosome abnormalities with schizophrenia, autism, ADHD and mood disorders. PMID:27992373

  17. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Brainstem abnormalities and vestibular nerve enhancement in acute neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Farshad-Amacker, Nadja A; Scheffel, Hans; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2013-12-21

    Borreliosis is a widely distributed disease. Neuroborreliosis may present with unspecific symptoms and signs and often remains difficult to diagnose in patients with central nervous system symptoms, particularly if the pathognomonic erythema chronica migrans does not develop or is missed. Thus, vigilance is mandatory in cases with atypical presentation of the disease and with potentially severe consequences if not recognized early. We present a patient with neuroborreliosis demonstrating brain stem and vestibular nerve abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging. A 28-year-old Caucasian female presented with headaches, neck stiffness, weight loss, nausea, tremor, and gait disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging showed T2-weighted hyperintense signal alterations in the pons and in the vestibular nerves as well as bilateral post-contrast enhancement of the vestibular nerves. Serologic testing of the cerebrospinal fluid revealed the diagnosis of neuroborreliosis. Patients infected with neuroborreliosis may present with unspecific neurologic symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging as a noninvasive imaging tool showing signal abnormalities in the brain stem and nerve root enhancement may help in establishing the diagnosis.

  19. Four families with immunodeficiency and chromosome abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    Candy, D C; Hayward, A R; Hughes, D T; Layward, L; Soothill, J F

    1979-01-01

    Six children, with severe deficiency of some or all of the immunoglobulins and minor somatic abnormalities, had chromosomal abnormalities: (1) 45,XY,t(13q/18q), (2) 46,XY,21ps +, (3) two brothers 46,XY (inv. 7) (4) 45,X,t(11p/10p)/46X,iXq,t(11p/10p) and, (5) in addendum, 45,XX,-18;46,XX, r18. The chromosome abnormalities were detected in B- as well as T-lymphocytes (as evidenced by using both PHA- and PWM-stimulated cultures) in all probands, but one was mosaic in PHA culture, although all his PWM-stimulated cells were abnormal. Chromosomal variants were also detected in relatives of three and immunodeficiency in relatives of two. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:314782

  20. Video Traffic Analysis for Abnormal Event Detection

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-01-01

    We propose the use of video imaging sensors for the detection and classification of abnormal events to be used primarily for mitigation of traffic congestion. Successful detection of such events will allow for new road guidelines; for rapid deploymen...

  1. Video traffic analysis for abnormal event detection.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2010-01-01

    We propose the use of video imaging sensors for the detection and classification of abnormal events to : be used primarily for mitigation of traffic congestion. Successful detection of such events will allow for : new road guidelines; for rapid deplo...

  2. Loud and angry: sound intensity modulates amygdala activation to angry voices in social anxiety disorder

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Doerte; Becker, Michael; Mothes-Lasch, Martin; Miltner, Wolfgang H.R.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Angry expressions of both voices and faces represent disorder-relevant stimuli in social anxiety disorder (SAD). Although individuals with SAD show greater amygdala activation to angry faces, previous work has failed to find comparable effects for angry voices. Here, we investigated whether voice sound-intensity, a modulator of a voice’s threat-relevance, affects brain responses to angry prosody in SAD. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore brain responses to voices varying in sound intensity and emotional prosody in SAD patients and healthy controls (HCs). Angry and neutral voices were presented either with normal or high sound amplitude, while participants had to decide upon the speaker’s gender. Loud vs normal voices induced greater insula activation, and angry vs neutral prosody greater orbitofrontal cortex activation in SAD as compared with HC subjects. Importantly, an interaction of sound intensity, prosody and group was found in the insula and the amygdala. In particular, the amygdala showed greater activation to loud angry voices in SAD as compared with HC subjects. This finding demonstrates a modulating role of voice sound-intensity on amygdalar hyperresponsivity to angry prosody in SAD and suggests that abnormal processing of interpersonal threat signals in amygdala extends beyond facial expressions in SAD. PMID:27651541

  3. Loud and angry: sound intensity modulates amygdala activation to angry voices in social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Simon, Doerte; Becker, Michael; Mothes-Lasch, Martin; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Straube, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Angry expressions of both voices and faces represent disorder-relevant stimuli in social anxiety disorder (SAD). Although individuals with SAD show greater amygdala activation to angry faces, previous work has failed to find comparable effects for angry voices. Here, we investigated whether voice sound-intensity, a modulator of a voice's threat-relevance, affects brain responses to angry prosody in SAD. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore brain responses to voices varying in sound intensity and emotional prosody in SAD patients and healthy controls (HCs). Angry and neutral voices were presented either with normal or high sound amplitude, while participants had to decide upon the speaker's gender. Loud vs normal voices induced greater insula activation, and angry vs neutral prosody greater orbitofrontal cortex activation in SAD as compared with HC subjects. Importantly, an interaction of sound intensity, prosody and group was found in the insula and the amygdala. In particular, the amygdala showed greater activation to loud angry voices in SAD as compared with HC subjects. This finding demonstrates a modulating role of voice sound-intensity on amygdalar hyperresponsivity to angry prosody in SAD and suggests that abnormal processing of interpersonal threat signals in amygdala extends beyond facial expressions in SAD. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Abnormal findings in peers during skills learning.

    PubMed

    Wearn, Andy; Nakatsuji, Miriam; Bhoopatkar, Harsh

    2017-02-01

    Peer physical examination (PPE), where students examine each other, is common in contemporary clinical skills learning. A range of benefits and risks have been explored in the literature. One persistent concern has been the identification and management of abnormal physical findings. Two previous studies have attempted to quantify the risk, one through the discussion of two exemplar cases and the other with a retrospective student survey. Here, we report the first prospective study of the number and type of abnormalities encountered as part of early clinical skills learning in a medical programme. We have a formal written consent process for PPE, which includes the management of abnormal findings through the completion of an event form. Our data come from cohorts undertaking years 2 and 3 of the programme between 2003 and 2014. One persistent concern (of PPE) has been the identification and management of abnormal physical findings RESULTS: Nineteen event forms were completed over this period. The incidence rates per year ranged from 0.23 to 1.05 per cent. Abnormal findings included raised blood pressure, heart murmur, abnormal bedside test values, and eye and skin conditions. The low event rate, along with a feasible process for dealing with this issue, goes some way to reassuring those with concerns. We acknowledge that some abnormalities may have been missed, and that some data may have been lost as a result of incorrect process; however, even the highest annual rate is low in absolute terms. We recommend a formal process for managing abnormalities. Ideally this would be part of an overall PPE written policy, communicated to students, enacted by tutors and approved by the local ethics committee. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Congenital abnormalities associated with extrahepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Odièvre, M; Pigé, G; Alagille, D

    1977-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities were present in 12 out of 30 (40%) children with extrahepatic portal hypertension of unknown cause, but in only 2 out of 17 (12%) children with extnahepatic portal hypertension secondary to umbilical vein catheterization or omphalitis. The most frequent abnormalities in this series and in published reports were atrial septal defect, malformation of the biliary tract, and anomalous inferior vena cava. These findings are consistent with the view that some cases with extrahepatic portal hypertension are congenital in origin. PMID:869567

  6. [Hysteroscopic polypectomy, treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding].

    PubMed

    de Los Rios, P José F; López, R Claudia; Cifuentes, P Carolina; Angulo, C Mónica; Palacios-Barahona, Arlex U

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the hysteroscopic polypectomy in terms of the decrease of the abnormal uterine bleeding. A cross-sectional and analytical study was done with patients to whom a hysteroscopic polypectomy was done for treating the abnormal uterine bleeding, between January 2009 and December 2013. The response to the treatment was evaluated via a survey given to the patients about the behavior of the abnormal uterine bleeding after the procedure and about overall satisfaction. The results were obtained after a hysteroscopic polypectomy done to 128 patients and were as follows. The average time from the polypectomy applied until the survey was 30.5 months, with a standard deviation of 18 months. 67.2% of the patients reported decreased abnormal uterine bleeding and the 32.8% reported a persistence of symptoms. On average 82.8% of the. patients were satisfied with the treatment. Bivariate and multivariate analysis showed no association between the variables studied and no improvement of abnormal uterine bleeding after surgery (polypectomy). There were no complications. Hysteroscopic polypectomy is a safe surgical treatment, which decreases on two of three patients the abnormal uterine bleeding in the presence of endometrial polyps, with an acceptable level of satisfaction.

  7. New MR imaging assessment tool to define brain abnormalities in very preterm infants at term.

    PubMed

    Kidokoro, H; Neil, J J; Inder, T E

    2013-01-01

    WM injury is the dominant form of injury in preterm infants. However, other cerebral structures, including the deep gray matter and the cerebellum, can also be affected by injury and/or impaired growth. Current MR imaging injury assessment scales are subjective and are challenging to apply. Thus, we developed a new assessment tool and applied it to MR imaging studies obtained from very preterm infants at term age. MR imaging scans from 97 very preterm infants (< 30 weeks' gestation) and 22 healthy term-born infants were evaluated retrospectively. The severity of brain injury (defined by signal abnormalities) and impaired brain growth (defined with biometrics) was scored in the WM, cortical gray matter, deep gray matter, and cerebellum. Perinatal variables for clinical risks were collected. In very preterm infants, brain injury was observed in the WM (n=23), deep GM (n=5), and cerebellum (n=23). Combining measures of injury and impaired growth showed moderate to severe abnormalities most commonly in the WM (n=38) and cerebellum (n=32) but still notable in the cortical gray matter (n=16) and deep gray matter (n=11). WM signal abnormalities were associated with a reduced deep gray matter area but not with cerebellar abnormality. Intraventricular and/or parenchymal hemorrhage was associated with cerebellar signal abnormality and volume reduction. Multiple clinical risk factors, including prolonged intubation, prolonged parenteral nutrition, postnatal corticosteroid use, and postnatal sepsis, were associated with increased global abnormality on MR imaging. Very preterm infants demonstrate a high prevalence of injury and growth impairment in both the WM and gray matter. This MR imaging scoring system provides a more comprehensive and objective classification of the nature and extent of abnormalities than existing measures.

  8. Intensity mapping the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Rupert

    Intensity mapping (IM) is the use of one or more emission lines to trace out the structure of the Universe without needing to resolve individual objects (such as galaxies or gas clouds). It is one of the most promising ways to radically extend the sky survey revolution in cosmology. By making spectra of the entire sky, rather than the one part in one million captured by current fiber spectrographs, one would be sensitive to all structure. There are potentially huge discoveries to be made in the vast majority of the sky that is currently spectrally unmapped, and also great gains in signal to noise of cosmological clustering measurements. Intensity mapping with the 21cm radio line has been explored theoretically by many and instruments are being built, particularly targeting the epoch of reionization. In the UV, visible and infrared, however other lines have enormous promise, and will be exploited by a range of future NASA missions including WFIRST, Euclid, and the proposed SPHEREx instrument, a dedicated intensity mapping satellite. The first measurement of large-scale structure outside the radio (using Lyman-alpha emission) was recently made by the PI and collaborators. The Ly-a absorption line also traces a continuous cosmological field, the Lyman-alpha forest, and the enormous recent increase in the number of observed quasar spectra have made it possible to interpolate between quasar sightlines to create three-dimensional maps. Being able to trace the same cosmic structure in emission and absorption offers huge advantages when we seek to understand the processes involved. It will help us make comprehensive maps of the Universe's contents and offer us the opportunity to create new powerful cosmological tests. In our proposed work we will explore the possibilities afforded by taking grism and integral field spectra of large volumes of the Universe, using state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We will make use of analysis techniques developed for

  9. Signaling aggression.

    PubMed

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Extreme developmental temperatures result in morphological abnormalities in painted turtles (Chrysemys picta): a climate change perspective.

    PubMed

    Telemeco, Rory S; Warner, Daniel A; Reida, Molly K; Janzen, Fredric J

    2013-06-01

    Increases in extreme environmental events are predicted to be major results of ongoing global climate change and may impact the persistence of species. We examined the effects of heat and cold waves during embryonic development of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) in natural nests on the occurrence of abnormal shell morphologies in hatchlings. We found that nests exposed to extreme hot temperatures for >60 h produced more hatchlings with abnormalities than nests exposed to extreme hot temperatures for shorter periods, regardless of whether or not nesting females displayed abnormal morphologies. We observed no effect of extreme cold nest temperatures on the occurrence of hatchlings with abnormalities. Moreover, the frequency of nesting females with abnormal shell morphologies was approximately 2-fold lower than that of their offspring, suggesting that such abnormalities are negatively correlated with survival and fitness. Female turtles could potentially buffer their offspring from extreme heat by altering aspects of nesting behavior, such as choosing shadier nesting sites. We addressed this hypothesis by examining the effects of shade cover on extreme nest temperatures and the occurrence of hatchling abnormalities. While shade cover was negatively correlated with the occurrence of extreme hot nest temperatures, it was not significantly correlated with abnormalities. Therefore, female choice of shade cover does not appear to be a viable target for selection to reduce hatchling abnormalities. Our results suggest that increases in the frequency and intensity of heat waves associated with climate change might perturb developmental programs and thereby reduce the fitness of entire cohorts of turtles. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd, ISZS and IOZ/CAS.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia Printable PDF Open ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked lissencephaly with abnormal genitalia (XLAG) is a ...

  12. Estimation of stress relaxation time for normal and abnormal breast phantoms using optical technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayakumar, K.; Sujatha, N.

    2015-03-01

    Many of the early occurring micro-anomalies in breast may transform into a deadliest cancer tumor in future. Probability of curing early occurring abnormalities in breast is more if rightly identified. Even in mammogram, considered as a golden standard technique for breast imaging, it is hard to pick up early occurring changes in the breast tissue due to the difference in mechanical behavior of the normal and abnormal tissue when subjected to compression prior to x-ray or laser exposure. In this paper, an attempt has been made to estimate the stress relaxation time of normal and abnormal breast mimicking phantom using laser speckle image correlation. Phantoms mimicking normal breast is prepared and subjected to precise mechanical compression. The phantom is illuminated by a Helium Neon laser and by using a CCD camera, a sequence of strained phantom speckle images are captured and correlated by the image mean intensity value at specific time intervals. From the relation between mean intensity versus time, tissue stress relaxation time is quantified. Experiments were repeated for phantoms with increased stiffness mimicking abnormal tissue for similar ranges of applied loading. Results shows that phantom with more stiffness representing abnormal tissue shows uniform relaxation for varying load of the selected range, whereas phantom with less stiffness representing normal tissue shows irregular behavior for varying loadings in the given range.

  13. Dysmorphometrics: the modelling of morphological abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Claes, Peter; Daniels, Katleen; Walters, Mark; Clement, John; Vandermeulen, Dirk; Suetens, Paul

    2012-02-06

    The study of typical morphological variations using quantitative, morphometric descriptors has always interested biologists in general. However, unusual examples of form, such as abnormalities are often encountered in biomedical sciences. Despite the long history of morphometrics, the means to identify and quantify such unusual form differences remains limited. A theoretical concept, called dysmorphometrics, is introduced augmenting current geometric morphometrics with a focus on identifying and modelling form abnormalities. Dysmorphometrics applies the paradigm of detecting form differences as outliers compared to an appropriate norm. To achieve this, the likelihood formulation of landmark superimpositions is extended with outlier processes explicitly introducing a latent variable coding for abnormalities. A tractable solution to this augmented superimposition problem is obtained using Expectation-Maximization. The topography of detected abnormalities is encoded in a dysmorphogram. We demonstrate the use of dysmorphometrics to measure abrupt changes in time, asymmetry and discordancy in a set of human faces presenting with facial abnormalities. The results clearly illustrate the unique power to reveal unusual form differences given only normative data with clear applications in both biomedical practice & research.

  14. Abnormalities of High Density Lipoproteins in Abetalipoproteinemia*

    PubMed Central

    Jones, John W.; Ways, Peter

    1967-01-01

    Detailed studies of the high density lipoproteins from three patients with abetalipoproteinemia have revealed the following principal abnormalities: 1) High density lipoprotein 3 (HDL3) is reduced in both absolute and relative concentration, although HDL2 is present in normal amounts. 2) The phospholipid distribution of both HDL fractions is abnormal, with low concentrations of lecithin and an increased percentage (though normal absolute quantity) of sphingomyelin. 3) In both HDL fractions, lecithin contains less linoleate and more oleate than normal. The cholesteryl esters are also low in linoleic acid, and the sphingomyelin is high in nervonic acid. Dietary intake influences the linoleic acid concentration within 2 weeks, and perhaps sooner, but the elevated sphingomyelin nervonic acid is little affected by up to 6 months of corn oil supplementation. Qualitatively similar changes in fatty acid composition, but not phospholipid distribution, are also found in other malabsorption states. The available evidence suggests that the abnormally low levels of HDL3 and the deranged phospholipid distribution are more specific for abetalipoproteinemia than the fatty acid abnormalities. However, the absence of these abnormalities in obligate heterozygous subjects makes their relationship to the primary defect of abetalipoproteinemia difficult to assess. Images PMID:6027078

  15. [Liver enzyme abnormalities among oil refinery workers].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fernando Martins; Silvany Neto, Annibal Muniz; Mendes, João Luiz Barberino; Cotrim, Helma Pinchemel; Nascimento, Ana Lísia Cunha; Lima Júnior, Alberto Soares; Cunha, Tatiana Oliveira Bernardo da

    2006-02-01

    Occupational exposure typical of an oil refinery may alter liver function among the workers. Thus, the objective of the study was to identify risk factors for liver enzyme abnormalities among oil refinery workers. The workers at an oil refinery in Northeastern Brazil underwent routine annual medical examination from 1982 to 1998. This case-control study investigated all the 150 cases of individuals with simultaneous gamma-glutamyltransferase and alanine aminotransferase abnormalities of at least 10% above reference levels. As controls, 150 workers without any liver enzyme or bilirubin abnormalities since starting to work there were selected. Odds ratios and the respective 95% confidence intervals were calculated from logistic regression models. In all the production sectors, the risk of liver enzyme abnormalities was significantly higher than in the administrative sector (OR=5.7; 95% CI: 1.7-18.4), even when the effects of alcohol, obesity and medical history of hepatitis were controlled for. During the period from 1992 to 1994, 88 out of the 89 cases occurred among workers from the various production sectors. Occupational exposure plays an important role in causing liver enzyme abnormalities among oil refinery workers. This is in addition to the specifically biological and/or behavioral risk factors such as obesity and alcohol consumption.

  16. Chromosome and molecular abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Fenaux, Pierre

    2001-06-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities are seen in approximately 50% of cases of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and 80% of cases of secondary MDS (following chemotherapy or radiotherapy). These abnormalities generally consist of partial or complete chromosome deletion or addition (del5q, -7, +8, -Y, del20q), whereas balanced or unbalanced translocations are rarely found in MDS. Fluorescence hybridization techniques (fluorescence in situ hybridization [FISH], multiplex FISH, and spectral karyotyping) are useful in detecting chromosomal anomalies in cases in which few mitoses are obtained or rearrangements are complex. Ras mutations are the molecular abnormalities most frequently found in MDS, followed by p15 gene hypermethylation, FLT3 duplications, and p53 mutations, but none of these abnormalities are specific for MDS. The rare cases of balanced translocations in MDS have allowed the identification of genes whose rearrangements appear to play a role in the pathogenesis of some cases of MDS. These genes include MDS1-EVI1 in t(3;3) or t(3;21) translocations, TEL in t(5;12), HIP1 in t(5;7), MLF1 in t(3;5), and MEL1 in t(1;3). Genes more frequently implicated in the pathogenesis of MDS cases, such as those involving del5q, remain unknown, although some candidate genes are currently being studied. Cytogenetic and known molecular abnormalities generally carry a poor prognosis in MDS and can be incorporated into prognostic scoring systems such as the International Prognostic Scoring System.

  17. Abnormal Magnetic Field Effects on Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Haiping; Shen, Yan; Wang, Hongfeng; He, Lei; Hu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    We report abnormal magnetic field effects on electrogenerated chemiluminescence (MFEECL) based on triplet emission from the Ru(bpy)3Cl2-TPrA electrochemical system: the appearance of MFEECL after magnetic field ceases. In early studies the normal MFEECL have been observed from electrochemical systems during the application of magnetic field. Here, the abnormal MFEECL suggest that the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes may become magnetized in magnetic field and experience a long magnetic relaxation after removing magnetic field. Our analysis indicates that the magnetic relaxation can gradually increase the density of charge-transfer complexes within reaction region due to decayed magnetic interactions, leading to a positive component in the abnormal MFEECL. On the other hand, the magnetic relaxation facilitates an inverse conversion from triplets to singlets within charge-transfer complexes. The inverse triplet --> singlet conversion reduces the density of triplet light-emitting states through charge-transfer complexes and gives rise to a negative component in the abnormal MFEECL. The combination of positive and negative components can essentially lead to a non-monotonic profile in the abnormal MFEECL after ceasing magnetic field. Nevertheless, our experimental studies may reveal un-usual magnetic behaviors with long magnetic relaxation from the activated charge-transfer [Ru(bpy)33+ … TPrA•] complexes in solution at room temperature.

  18. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings other than..., tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis, and any other significant abnormal findings, NIOSH will...

  19. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Bhoiwala, Devang L; Dunaief, Joshua L

    2016-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: β-thalassemia major, β-TI: β-thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelial degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-thalassemia major are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by iron chelation therapy. Some who were never treated with iron chelation therapy exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving iron chelation therapy had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-thalassemia major viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Retinal abnormalities in β-thalassemia major

    PubMed Central

    Bhoiwala, Devang L.; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with beta (β)-thalassemia (β-TM: thalassemia major, β-TI: thalassemia intermedia) have a variety of complications that may affect all organs, including the eye. Ocular abnormalities include retinal pigment epithelium degeneration, angioid streaks, venous tortuosity, night blindness, visual field defects, decreased visual acuity, color vision abnormalities, and acute visual loss. Patients with β-TM are transfusion dependent and require iron chelation therapy (ICT) in order to survive. Retinal degeneration may result from either retinal iron accumulation from transfusion-induced iron overload or retinal toxicity induced by ICT. Some who were never treated with ICT exhibited retinopathy, and others receiving ICT had chelator-induced retinopathy. We will focus on retinal abnormalities present in individuals with β-TM viewed in light of new findings on the mechanisms and manifestations of retinal iron toxicity. PMID:26325202

  1. Advances in understanding paternally transmitted Chromosomal Abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Sloter, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2001-03-01

    Multicolor FISH has been adapted for detecting the major types of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm including aneuploidies for clinically-relevant chromosomes, chromosomal aberrations including breaks and rearrangements, and other numerical abnormalities. The various sperm FISH assays have been used to evaluate healthy men, men of advanced age, and men who have received mutagenic cancer therapy. The mouse has also been used as a model to investigate the mechanism of paternally transmitted genetic damage. Sperm FISH for the mouse has been used to detect chromosomally abnormal mouse sperm, while the PAINT/DAPI analysis of mouse zygotes has been used to evaluate themore » types of chromosomal defects that can be paternally transmitted to the embryo and their effects on embryonic development.« less

  2. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  3. Neurological abnormalities associated with CDMA exposure.

    PubMed

    Hocking, B; Westerman, R

    2001-09-01

    Dysaesthesiae of the scalp and neurological abnormality after mobile phone use have been reported previously, but the roles of the phone per se or the radiations in causing these findings have been questioned. We report finding a neurological abnormality in a patient after accidental exposure of the left side of the face to mobile phone radiation [code division multiple access (CDMA)] from a down-powered mobile phone base station antenna. He had headaches, unilateral left blurred vision and pupil constriction, unilateral altered sensation on the forehead, and abnormalities of current perception thresholds on testing the left trigeminal ophthalmic nerve. His nerve function recovered during 6 months follow-up. His exposure was 0.015-0.06 mW/cm(2) over 1-2 h. The implications regarding health effects of radiofrequency radiation are discussed.

  4. Volumetric brain differences in children with periventricular T2-signal hyperintensities: a grouping by gestational age at birth.

    PubMed

    Panigrahy, A; Barnes, P D; Robertson, R L; Back, S A; Sleeper, L A; Sayre, J W; Kinney, H C; Volpe, J J

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare both the volumes of the lateral ventricles and the cerebral white matter with gestational age at birth of children with periventricular white matter (PVWM) T2-signal hyperintensities on MR images. The spectrum of neuromotor abnormalities associated with these hyperintensities was also determined. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 70 patients who were between the ages of 1 and 5 years and whose images showed PVWM T2-signal hyperintensities. The patients were divided into premature (n = 35 children) and term (n = 35) groups depending on their gestational age at birth. Volumetric analysis was performed on four standardized axial sections using T2-weighted images. Volumes of interest were digitized on the basis of gray-scale densities of signal intensities to define the hemispheric cerebral white matter and lateral ventricles. Age-adjusted comparisons of volumetric measurements between the premature and term groups were performed using analysis of covariance. The volume of the cerebral white matter was smaller in the premature group (54 +/- 2 cm(3)) than in the term group (79 +/- 3 cm(3), p < 0.0001). The volume of the lateral ventricles was greater among the patients in the premature group (30 +/- 2 cm(3)) than among those in the term group (13 +/- 1 cm(3), p < 0.0001). Fifty percent of all the premature children had spastic diplegia or quadriplegia. Thirty-two percent of all the term children had hypotonia. There were patients in both groups whose PVWM T2-signal hyperintensities did not correlate with any neuromotor abnormalities but were associated with seizures or developmental delays. The differences in volumetric measurements of cerebral white matter and lateral ventricles in children with PVWM T2-signal hyperintensities are related to their gestational age at birth. Several neurologic motor abnormalities are found in children with such hyperintensities.

  5. Intestinal Rotation Abnormalities and Midgut Volvulus.

    PubMed

    Langer, Jacob C

    2017-02-01

    Rotation abnormalities may be asymptomatic or may be associated with obstruction caused by bands, midgut volvulus, or associated atresia or web. The most important goal of clinicians is to determine whether the patient has midgut volvulus with intestinal ischemia, in which case an emergency laparotomy should be done. If the patient is not acutely ill, the next goal is to determine whether the patient has a narrow-based small bowel mesentery. In general, the outcomes for children with a rotation abnormality are excellent, unless there has been midgut volvulus with significant intestinal ischemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Temporal abnormalities in children with developmental dyscalculia.

    PubMed

    Vicario, Carmelo Mario; Rappo, Gaetano; Pepi, Annamaria; Pavan, Andrea; Martino, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Recent imaging studies have associated Developmental dyscalculia (DD) to structural and functional alterations corresponding Parietal and the Prefrontal cortex (PFC). Since these areas were shown also to be involved in timing abilities, we hypothesized that time processing is abnormal in DD. We compared time processing abilities between 10 children with pure DD (8 years old) and 11 age-matched healthy children. Results show that the DD group underestimated duration of a sub-second scale when asked to perform a time comparison task. The timing abnormality observed in our DD participants is consistent with evidence of a shared fronto-parietal neural network for representing time and quantity.

  7. Nonpathologizing trauma interventions in abnormal psychology courses.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Stephanie M; Luchner, Andrew F; Pickett, Rachel F

    2016-01-01

    Because abnormal psychology courses presuppose a focus on pathological human functioning, nonpathologizing interventions within these classes are particularly powerful and can reach survivors, bystanders, and perpetrators. Interventions are needed to improve the social response to trauma on college campuses. By applying psychodynamic and feminist multicultural theory, instructors can deliver nonpathologizing interventions about trauma and trauma response within these classes. We recommend class-based interventions with the following aims: (a) intentionally using nonpathologizing language, (b) normalizing trauma responses, (c) subjectively defining trauma, (d) challenging secondary victimization, and (e) questioning the delineation of abnormal and normal. The recommendations promote implications for instructor self-reflection, therapy interventions, and future research.

  8. Hemorheological abnormalities in human arterial hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Hopps, Eugenia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Blood rheology is impaired in hypertensive patients. The alteration involves blood and plasma viscosity, and the erythrocyte behaviour is often abnormal. The hemorheological pattern appears to be related to some pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension and to organ damage, in particular left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. Abnormalities have been observed in erythrocyte membrane fluidity, explored by fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance. This may be relevant for red cell flow in microvessels and oxygen delivery to tissues. Although blood viscosity is not a direct target of antihypertensive therapy, the rheological properties of blood play a role in the pathophysiology of arterial hypertension and its vascular complications.

  9. Abnormal carbene-silicon halide complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuzhong; Xie, Yaoming; Wei, Pingrong; Schaefer, Henry F; Robinson, Gregory H

    2016-04-14

    Reaction of the anionic N-heterocyclic dicarbene (NHDC), [:C{[N(2,6-Pr(i)2C6H3)]2CHCLi}]n (1), with SiCl4 gives the trichlorosilyl-substituted (at the C4 carbon) N-heterocyclic carbene complex (7). Abnormal carbene-SiCl4 complex (8) may be conveniently synthesized by combining 7 with HCl·NEt3. In addition, 7 may react with CH2Cl2 in warm hexane, giving the abnormal carbene-complexed SiCl3(+) cation (9). The nature of the bonding in 9 was probed with complementary DFT computations.

  10. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in amateur male marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, Anna M; Lewicka, Ewa; Dąbrowska-Kugacka, Alicja; Lewicka-Potocka, Zuzanna; Wabich, Elżbieta; Szerszyńska, Anna; Dyda, Julia; Sobolewski, Jakub; Koenner, Jakub; Raczak, Grzegorz

    2018-06-18

    Sports activity has become extremely popular among amateurs. Electrocardiography is a useful tool in screening for cardiac pathologies in athletes; however, there is little data on electrocardiographic abnormalities in the group of amateur athletes. The aim of this study was to analyze the abnormalities in resting and exercise electrocardiograms (ECGs) in a group of amateur athletes, and try to determine whether the criteria applied for the general population or for athletes' ECGs should be implemented in this group. In 40 amateur male marathon runners, 3 consecutive 12-lead ECGs were performed: 2-3 weeks before (stage 1), just after the run (stage 2) and 2-3 weeks after the marathon (stage 3). Resting (stage 1) and exercise (stage 2) ECGs were analyzed following the refined criteria for the assessment of athlete's ECG (changes classified as training-related, borderline or training-unrelated). In resting ECGs, at least 1 abnormality was found in 92.5% of the subjects and the most common was sinus bradycardia (62.5%). In post-exercise ECGs, at least 1 abnormality was present in 77.5% of the subjects and the most common was right atrium enlargement (RAE) (42.5%). Training-related ECG variants were more frequent at rest (82.5% vs 42.5%; p = 0.0008), while borderline variants - after the run (22.5% vs 57.5%; p = 0.0004). Training-unrelated abnormalities were found in 15% and 10% of the subjects, respectively (p-value - nonsignificant), and the most common was T-wave inversion. Even if the refined criteria rather than the criteria used for normal sedentary population were applied, the vast majority of amateur runners showed at least 1 abnormality in resting ECGs, which were mainly training-related variants. However, at rest, in 15% of the subjects, pathologic training-unrelated abnormalities were found. The most frequent post-exercise abnormality was right atrial enlargement. General electrocardiographic screening in amateur athletes should be taken into consideration.

  11. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  12. Abnormal evening vertical plasma drift and effects on ESF and EIA over Brazil-South Atlantic sector during the 30 October 2003 superstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdu, M. A.; de Paula, E. R.; Batista, I. S.; Reinisch, B. W.; Matsuoka, M. T.; Camargo, P. O.; Veliz, O.; Denardini, C. M.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Kherani, E. A.; de Siqueira, P. M.

    2008-07-01

    Equatorial F region vertical plasma drifts, spread F and anomaly responses, in the south American longitude sector during the superstorm of 30 October 2003, are analyzed using data from an array of instruments consisting of Digisondes, a VHF radar, GPS TEC and scintillation receivers in Brazil, and a Digisonde and a magnetometer in Jicamarca, Peru. Prompt penetrating eastward electric field of abnormally large intensity drove the F layer plasma up at a velocity ˜1200 ms-1 during post dusk hours in the eastern sector over Brazil. The equatorial anomaly was intensified and expanded poleward while the development of spread F/plasma bubble irregularities and GPS signal scintillations were weaker than their quiet time intensity. Significantly weaker F region response over Jicamarca presented a striking difference in the intensity of prompt penetration electric field between Peru and eastern longitudes of Brazil. The enhanced post dusk sector vertical drift over Brazil is attributed to electro-dynamics effects arising energetic particle precipitation in the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly (SAMA). These extraordinary results and their longitudinal differences are presented and discussed in this paper.

  13. Abuse of Amphetamines and Structural Abnormalities in Brain

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Steven; O’Neill, Joseph; Fears, Scott; Bartzokis, George; London, Edythe D.

    2009-01-01

    We review evidence that structural brain abnormalities are associated with abuse of amphetamines. A brief history of amphetamine use/abuse, and evidence for toxicity is followed by a summary of findings from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of human subjects who had abused amphetamines and children who were exposed to amphetamines in utero. Evidence comes from studies that used a variety of techniques that include manual tracing, pattern matching, voxel-based, tensor-based, or cortical thickness mapping, quantification of white matter signal hyperintensities, and diffusion tensor imaging. Ten studies compared controls to individuals who were exposed to methamphetamine. Three studies assessed individuals exposed to 3-4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). Brain structural abnormalities were consistently reported in amphetamine abusers, as compared to control subjects. These included lower cortical gray matter volume and higher striatal volume than control subjects. These differences might reflect brain features that could predispose to substance dependence. High striatal volumes might also reflect compensation for toxicity in the dopamine-rich basal ganglia. Prenatal exposure was associated with striatal volume that was below control values, suggesting that such compensation might not occur in utero. Several forms of white matter abnormality are also common, and may involve gliosis. Many of the limitations and inconsistencies in the literature relate to techniques and cross-sectional designs, which cannot infer causality. Potential confounding influences include effects of pre-existing risk/protective factors, development, gender, severity of amphetamine abuse, abuse of other drugs, abstinence, and differences in lifestyle. Longitudinal designs in which multimodal datasets are acquired and are subjected to multivariate analyses would enhance our ability to provide general conclusions regarding the associations between amphetamine abuse and brain

  14. Abnormalities of Object Visual Processing in Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Feusner, Jamie D.; Hembacher, Emily; Moller, Hayley; Moody, Teena D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder may have perceptual distortions for their appearance. Previous studies suggest imbalances in detailed relative to configural/holistic visual processing when viewing faces. No study has investigated the neural correlates of processing non-symptom-related stimuli. The objective of this study was to determine whether individuals with body dysmorphic disorder have abnormal patterns of brain activation when viewing non-face/non-body object stimuli. Methods Fourteen medication-free participants with DSM-IV body dysmorphic disorder and 14 healthy controls participated. We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging while participants matched photographs of houses that were unaltered, contained only high spatial frequency (high detail) information, or only low spatial frequency (low detail) information. The primary outcome was group differences in blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes. Results The body dysmorphic disorder group showed lesser activity in the parahippocampal gyrus, lingual gyrus, and precuneus for low spatial frequency images. There were greater activations in medial prefrontal regions for high spatial frequency images, although no significant differences when compared to a low-level baseline. Greater symptom severity was associated with lesser activity in dorsal occipital cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex for normal and high spatial frequency images. Conclusions Individuals with body dysmorphic disorder have abnormal brain activation patterns when viewing objects. Hypoactivity in visual association areas for configural and holistic (low detail) elements and abnormal allocation of prefrontal systems for details is consistent with a model of imbalances in global vs. local processing. This may occur not only for appearance but also for general stimuli unrelated to their symptoms. PMID:21557897

  15. Model observer design for multi-signal detection in the presence of anatomical noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Gezheng; Markey, Mia K.; Park, Subok

    2017-02-01

    As psychophysical studies are resource-intensive to conduct, model observers are commonly used to assess and optimize medical imaging quality. Model observers are typically designed to detect at most one signal. However, in clinical practice, there may be multiple abnormalities in a single image set (e.g. multifocal multicentric (MFMC) breast cancer), which can impact treatment planning. Prevalence of signals can be different across anatomical regions, and human observers do not know the number or location of signals a priori. As new imaging techniques have the potential to improve multiple-signal detection (e.g. digital breast tomosynthesis may be more effective for diagnosis of MFMC than mammography), image quality assessment approaches addressing such tasks are needed. In this study, we present a model observer to detect multiple signals in an image dataset. A novel implementation of partial least squares (PLS) was developed to estimate different sets of efficient channels directly from the images. The PLS channels are adaptive to the characteristics of signals and the background, and they capture the interactions among signal locations. Corresponding linear decision templates are employed to generate both image-level and location-specific scores on the presence of signals. Our results show that: (1) the model observer can achieve high performance with a reasonably small number of channels; (2) the model observer with PLS channels outperforms that with benchmark modified Laguerre-Gauss channels, especially when realistic signal shapes and complex background statistics are involved; (3) the tasks of clinical interest, and other constraints such as sample size would alter the optimal design of the model observer.

  16. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Lorenzen, Marina Boff; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES). METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%). Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%), abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%), prominent occiput (52%), posteriorly rotated (46%) and low set ears (44%), and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%). Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%), orofacial clefts (12%), preauricular tags (10%), facial palsy (4%), encephalocele (4%), absence of external auditory canal (2%) and asymmetric face (2%). One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS) or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature. PMID:24142310

  17. Abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in male psychopathic offenders

    PubMed Central

    Hoppenbrouwers, Sylco S.; De Jesus, Danilo R.; Sun, Yinming; Stirpe, Tania; Hofman, Dennis; McMaster, Jeff; Hughes, Ginny; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.; Schutter, Dennis J.L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Psychopathic offenders inevitably violate interpersonal norms and frequently resort to aggressive and criminal behaviour. The affective and cognitive deficits underlying these behaviours have been linked to abnormalities in functional interhemispheric connectivity. However, direct neurophysiological evidence for dysfunctional connectivity in psychopathic offenders is lacking. Methods We used transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography to examine interhemispheric connectivity in the dorsolateral and motor cortex in a sample of psychopathic offenders and healthy controls. We also measured intracortical inhibition and facilitation over the left and right motor cortex to investigate the effects of local cortical processes on interhemispheric connectivity. Results We enrolled 17 psychopathic offenders and 14 controls in our study. Global abnormalities in right to left functional connectivity were observed in psychopathic offenders compared with controls. Furthermore, in contrast to controls, psychopathic offenders showed increased intracortical inhibition in the right, but not the left, hemisphere. Limitations The relatively small sample size limited the sensitivity to show that the abnormalities in interhemispheric connectivity were specifically related to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in psychopathic offenders. Conclusion To our knowledge, this study provides the first neurophysiological evidence for abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in psychopathic offenders and may further our understanding of the disruptive antisocial behaviour of these offenders. PMID:23937798

  18. Neuroimaging evidence of brain abnormalities in mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Boddaert, N; Salvador, A; Chandesris, M O; Lemaître, H; Grévent, D; Gauthier, C; Naggara, O; Georgin-Lavialle, S; Moura, D S; Munsch, F; Jaafari, N; Zilbovicius, M; Lortholary, O; Gaillard, R; Hermine, O

    2017-08-08

    Mastocytosis is a rare disease in which chronic symptoms are related to mast cell accumulation and activation. Patients can display depression-anxiety-like symptoms and cognitive impairment. The pathophysiology of these symptoms may be associated with tissular mast cell infiltration, mast cell mediator release or both. The objective of this study is to perform morphological or functional brain analyses in mastocytosis to identify brain changes associated with this mast cell disorder. We performed a prospective and monocentric comparative study to evaluate the link between subjective psycho-cognitive complaints, psychiatric evaluation and objective medical data using magnetic resonance imaging with morphological and perfusion sequences (arterial spin-labeled perfusion) in 39 patients with mastocytosis compared with 33 healthy controls. In the test cohort of 39 mastocytosis patients with psycho-cognitive complaints, we found that 49% of them had morphological brain abnormalities, mainly abnormal punctuated white matter abnormalities (WMA). WMA were equally frequent in cutaneous mastocytosis patients and indolent forms of systemic mastocytosis patients (42% and 41% of patients with WMA, respectively). Patients with WMA showed increased perfusion in the putamen compared with patients without WMA and with healthy controls. Putamen perfusion was also negatively correlated with depression subscores. This study demonstrates, for we believe the first time, a high prevalence of morphological and functional abnormalities in the brains of mastocytosis patients with neuropsychiatric complaints. Further studies are required to determine the mechanism underpinning this association and to ascertain its specificity.

  19. Abnormally high formation pressures, Potwar Plateau, Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Shah, S.H.A.; Malik, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormally high formation pressures in the Potwar Plateau of north-central Pakistan are major obstacles to oil and gas exploration. Severe drilling problems associated with high pressures have, in some cases, prevented adequate evaluation of reservoirs and significantly increased drilling costs. Previous investigations of abnormal pressure in the Potwar Plateau have only identified abnormal pressures in Neogene rocks. We have identified two distinct pressure regimes in this Himalayan foreland fold and thrust belt basin: one in Neogene rocks and another in pre-Neogene rocks. Pore pressures in Neogene rocks are as high as lithostatic and are interpreted to be due to tectonic compression and compaction disequilibrium associated with high rates of sedimentation. Pore pressure gradients in pre-Neogene rocks are generally less than those in Neogene rocks, commonly ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 psi/ft (11.3 to 15.8 kPa/m) and are most likely due to a combination of tectonic compression and hydrocarbon generation. The top of abnormally high pressure is highly variable and doesn't appear to be related to any specific lithologic seal. Consequently, attempts to predict the depth to the top of overpressure prior to drilling are precluded.

  20. Gastric emptying abnormal in duodenal ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, S.; Heading, R.C.; Taylor, T.V.

    1986-07-01

    To investigate the possibility that an abnormality of gastric emptying exists in duodenal ulcer and to determine if such an abnormality persists after ulcer healing, scintigraphic gastric emptying measurements were undertaken in 16 duodenal ulcer patients before, during, and after therapy with cimetidine; in 12 patients with pernicious anemia, and in 12 control subjects. No difference was detected in the rate or pattern of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer patients before and after ulcer healing with cimetidine compared with controls, but emptying of the solid component of the test meal was more rapid during treatment with the drug. Comparison ofmore » emptying patterns obtained in duodenal ulcer subjects during and after cimetidine treatment with those obtained in pernicious anemia patients and controls revealed a similar relationship that was characterized by a tendency for reduction in the normal differentiation between the emptying of solid and liquid from the stomach. The similarity in emptying patterns in these groups of subjects suggests that gastric emptying of solids may be influenced by changes in the volume of gastric secretion. The failure to detect an abnormality of gastric emptying in duodenal ulcer subjects before and after ulcer healing calls into question the widespread belief that abnormally rapid gastric emptying is a feature with pathogenetic significance in duodenal ulcer disease.« less

  1. Teaching Abnormal Psychology in a Multimedia Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, JoAnne

    1996-01-01

    Examines the techniques used in teaching an abnormal psychology class in a multimedia environment with two computers and a variety of audiovisual equipment. Students respond anonymously to various questions via keypads mounted on their desks, then immediately view and discuss summaries of their responses. (MJP)

  2. Schizophrenogenic Parenting in Abnormal Psychology Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Otto F.

    1989-01-01

    Considers the treatment of family causation of schizophrenia in undergraduate abnormal psychology textbooks. Reviews texts published only after 1986. Points out a number of implications for psychologists which arise from the inclusion in these texts of the idea that parents cause schizophrenia, not the least of which is the potential for…

  3. Psychology Faculty Perceptions of Abnormal Psychology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapport, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    The problem. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the perceptions and opinions of psychology professors regarding the accuracy and inclusiveness of abnormal psychology textbooks. It sought answers from psychology professors to the following questions: (1) What are the expectations of the psychology faculty at a private university of…

  4. Abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in male psychopathic offenders.

    PubMed

    Hoppenbrouwers, Sylco S; De Jesus, Danilo R; Sun, Yinming; Stirpe, Tania; Hofman, Dennis; McMaster, Jeff; Hughes, Ginny; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2014-01-01

    Psychopathic offenders inevitably violate interpersonal norms and frequently resort to aggressive and criminal behaviour. The affective and cognitive deficits underlying these behaviours have been linked to abnormalities in functional interhemispheric connectivity. However, direct neurophysiological evidence for dysfunctional connectivity in psychopathic offenders is lacking. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with electroencephalography to examine interhemispheric connectivity in the dorsolateral and motor cortex in a sample of psychopathic offenders and healthy controls. We also measured intracortical inhibition and facilitation over the left and right motor cortex to investigate the effects of local cortical processes on interhemispheric connectivity. We enrolled 17 psychopathic offenders and 14 controls in our study. Global abnormalities in right to left functional connectivity were observed in psychopathic offenders compared with controls. Furthermore, in contrast to controls, psychopathic offenders showed increased intracortical inhibition in the right, but not the left, hemisphere. The relatively small sample size limited the sensitivity to show that the abnormalities in interhemispheric connectivity were specifically related to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in psychopathic offenders. To our knowledge, this study provides the first neurophysiological evidence for abnormal interhemispheric connectivity in psychopathic offenders and may further our understanding of the disruptive antisocial behaviour of these offenders.

  5. Sensory Abnormalities in Autism: A Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klintwall Lars; Holm, Anette; Eriksson, Mats; Carlsson, Lotta Hoglund; Olsson, Martina Barnevik; Hedvall, Asa; Gillberg, Christopher; Fernell, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Sensory abnormalities were assessed in a population-based group of 208 20-54-month-old children, diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and referred to a specialized habilitation centre for early intervention. The children were subgrouped based upon degree of autistic symptoms and cognitive level by a research team at the centre. Parents…

  6. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-05-06

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted.

  7. Eye movement abnormalities in essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Plinta, Klaudia; Krzak-Kubica, Agnieszka; Zajdel, Katarzyna; Falkiewicz, Marcel; Dylak, Jacek; Ober, Jan; Szczudlik, Andrzej; Rudzińska, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Essential tremor (ET) is the most prevalent movement disorder, characterized mainly by an action tremor of the arms. Only a few studies published as yet have assessed oculomotor abnormalities in ET and their results are unequivocal. The aim of this study was to assess the oculomotor abnormalities in ET patients compared with the control group and to find the relationship between oculomotor abnormalities and clinical features of ET patients. We studied 50 ET patients and 42 matched by age and gender healthy controls. Saccadometer Advanced (Ober Consulting, Poland) was used to investigate reflexive, pace-induced and cued saccades and conventional electrooculography for evaluation of smooth pursuit and fixation. The severity of the tremor was assessed by the Clinical Rating Scale for Tremor. Significant differences between ET patients and controls were found for the incidence of reflexive saccades dysmetria and deficit of smooth pursuit. Reflexive saccades dysmetria was more frequent in patients in the second and third phase of ET compared to the first phase. The reflexive saccades latency increase was correlated with severity of the tremor. In conclusion, oculomotor abnormalities were significantly more common in ET patients than in healthy subjects. The most common oculomotor disturbances in ET were reflexive saccades dysmetria and slowing of smooth pursuit. The frequency of reflexive saccades dysmetria increased with progression of ET. The reflexive saccades latency increase was related to the severity of tremor. PMID:28149393

  8. Abnormal Web Usage Control by Proxy Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Hsiang-Fu; Tseng, Li-Ming

    2002-01-01

    Approaches to designing a proxy server with Web usage control and to making the proxy server effective on local area networks are proposed to prevent abnormal Web access and to prioritize Web usage. A system is implemented to demonstrate the approaches. The implementation reveals that the proposed approaches are effective, such that the abnormal…

  9. Abnormal Selective Attention Normalizes P3 Amplitudes in PDD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoeksma, Marco R.; Kemner, Chantal; Kenemans, J. Leon; van Engeland, Herman

    2006-01-01

    This paper studied whether abnormal P3 amplitudes in PDD are a corollary of abnormalities in ERP components related to selective attention in visual and auditory tasks. Furthermore, this study sought to clarify possible age differences in such abnormalities. Children with PDD showed smaller P3 amplitudes than controls, but no abnormalities in…

  10. Neonatal White Matter Abnormalities an Important Predictor of Neurocognitive Outcome for Very Preterm Children

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Lianne J.; Clark, Caron A. C.; Bora, Samudragupta; Inder, Terrie E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebral white matter abnormalities on term MRI are a strong predictor of motor disability in children born very preterm. However, their contribution to cognitive impairment is less certain. Objective Examine relationships between the presence and severity of cerebral white matter abnormalities on neonatal MRI and a range of neurocognitive outcomes assessed at ages 4 and 6 years. Design/Methods The study sample consisted of a regionally representative cohort of 104 very preterm (≤32 weeks gestation) infants born from 1998–2000 and a comparison group of 107 full-term infants. At term equivalent, all preterm infants underwent a structural MRI scan that was analyzed qualitatively for the presence and severity of cerebral white matter abnormalities, including cysts, signal abnormalities, loss of white matter volume, ventriculomegaly, and corpus callosal thinning/myelination. At corrected ages 4 and 6 years, all children underwent a comprehensive neurodevelopmental assessment that included measures of general intellectual ability, language development, and executive functioning. Results At 4 and 6 years, very preterm children without cerebral white matter abnormalities showed no apparent neurocognitive impairments relative to their full-term peers on any of the domain specific measures of intelligence, language, and executive functioning. In contrast, children born very preterm with mild and moderate-to-severe white matter abnormalities were characterized by performance impairments across all measures and time points, with more severe cerebral abnormalities being associated with increased risks of cognitive impairment. These associations persisted after adjustment for gender, neonatal medical risk factors, and family social risk. Conclusions Findings highlight the importance of cerebral white matter connectivity for later intact cognitive functioning amongst children born very preterm. Preterm born children without cerebral white matter abnormalities on

  11. Structural and behavioral correlates of abnormal encoding of money value in the sensorimotor striatum in cocaine addiction

    PubMed Central

    Konova, Anna B.; Moeller, Scott J.; Tomasi, Dardo; Parvaz, Muhammad A.; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Volkow, Nora D.; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormalities in frontostriatal systems are thought to be central to the pathophysiology of addiction, and may underlie maladaptive processing of the highly generalizable reinforcer, money. Although abnormal frontostriatal structure and function have been observed in individuals addicted to cocaine, it is less clear how individual variability in brain structure is associated with brain function to influence behavior. Our objective was to examine frontostriatal structure and neural processing of money value in chronic cocaine users and closely matched healthy controls. A reward task that manipulated different levels of money was used to isolate neural activity associated with money value. Gray matter volume measures were used to assess frontostriatal structure. Our results indicated that cocaine users had an abnormal money value signal in the sensorimotor striatum (right putamen/globus pallidus) which was negatively associated with accuracy adjustments to money and was more pronounced in individuals with more severe use. In parallel, group differences were also observed in both function and gray matter volume of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex; in the cocaine users, the former was directly associated with response to money in the striatum. These results provide strong evidence for abnormalities in the neural mechanisms of valuation in addiction and link these functional abnormalities with deficits in brain structure. In addition, as value signals represent acquired associations, their abnormal processing in the sensorimotor striatum, a region centrally implicated in habit formation, could signal disadvantageous associative learning in cocaine addiction. PMID:22775285

  12. Hemostatic Abnormalities in Multiple Myeloma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gogia, Aarti; Sikka, Meera; Sharma, Satender; Rusia, Usha

    2018-01-01

    Background: Multiple myeloma (MM) is a neoplastic plasma cell disorder characterized by clonal proliferation of plasma cells in the bone marrow. Diverse hemostatic abnormalities have been reported in patients with myeloma which predispose to bleeding and also thrombosis. Methods: Complete blood count, biochemical parameters and parameters of hemostasis i.e. platelet count, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), factor VIII assay results, plasma fibrinogen, D-dimer and lupus anticoagulant, were assessed in 29 MM patients and 30 age matched controls. Results: The most frequent abnormal screening parameter was APTT. Of the six indicative of a bleeding tendency i.e. thrombocytopenia, prolonged PT, APTT, TT, reduced plasma fibrinogen and factor VIII, at least one was abnormal in 8 (27.6%) patients. Of the four prothrombotic markers, lupus anticoagulant, D-dimer, elevated factor VIII and plasma fibrinogen, one or more marker was present in 24 (82.7%). D-dimer was the most common prothrombotic marker, being elevated in 22 (75.9%) patients. One or more laboratory parameter of hemostasis was abnormal in all 29 (100%) patients. Though thrombotic complications are reported to be less frequent as compared to hemorrhagic manifestations, one or more marker of thrombosis was present in 24 (82.7%) patients. Conclusion: This study provided laboratory evidence of hemostatic dysfunction which may be associated with thrombotic or bleeding complications at diagnosis in all MM patients. Hence, screening for these abnormalities at the time of diagnosis should help improved prognosis in such cases. PMID:29373903

  13. [Electrocardiographic abnormalities in acute olanzapine poisonings].

    PubMed

    Ciszowski, Krzysztof; Sein Anand, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    Olanzapine is an atypical antipsychotic used for many years in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Poisonings with this medicine can results with cardiotoxic effects in the form of ECG abnormalities. To evaluate the nature and incidence of electrocardiographic abnormalities in patients with acute olanzapine poisoning. 23 adult (mean age 38.4 +/- 15.5 years) patients with acute olanzapine poisoning, including 10 men (30.4 +/- 8.1 years) and 11 women (45.7 +/- 17.2 years), where 1 man and 1 woman were poisoned twice. The toxic serum level of olanzapine (above 100 ng/mL) was confirmed in each patient. Evaluation of electrocardiograms performed in patients in the first day of hospitalization with automatic measurement of durations of PQ, QRS and QTc and the identification of arrhythmias and conduction disorders on the basis of visual analysis of the ECG waveforms. Statistical analysis of the results using the methods of descriptive statistics. The mean durations of PQ, QRS and QTc in the study group were as follows: 135 +/- 23 ms, 91 +/- 12 ms, and 453 +/- 48 ms, respectively. The most common ECG abnormalities were prolonged QTc and supraventricular tachycardia (including sinus tachycardia) - each 22%; less common were ST-T changes (17%) and supraventricular premature complexes (9%), and only in individual cases (4%) ventricular premature complexes, bundle branch block, sinus bradycardia and atrial fibrillation were present. In the course of acute olanzapine poisonings: (1) prolonged QTc interval is quite common, but rarely leads to torsade de pointes tachycardia; (2) fast supraventricular rhythms are also common, but rarely cause irregular tachyarrhythmias, eg. atrial fibrillation; (3) conduction disorders (atrioventricular blocks, bundle branch blocks) are not typical abnormalities; (4) the observed ECG abnormalities emphasize the need of continuous ECG monitoring in these patients.

  14. Intensive Intervention in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Sarah R.; Fuchs, Lynn S.

    2015-01-01

    Students who demonstrate persistent mathematics difficulties and whose performance is severely below grade level require "intensive intervention". Intensive intervention is an individualized approach to instruction that is more demanding and concentrated than Tier 2 intervention efforts. We present the elements of intensive intervention…

  15. Studies into abnormal aggression in humans and rodents: Methodological and translational aspects.

    PubMed

    Haller, Jozsef

    2017-05-01

    Here we review the principles based on which aggression is rendered abnormal in humans and laboratory rodents, and comparatively overview the main methodological approaches based on which this behavior is studied in the two categories of subjects. It appears that the discriminating property of abnormal aggression is rule breaking, which renders aggression dysfunctional from the point of view of the perpetrator. We show that rodent models of abnormal aggression were created by the translation of human conditions into rodent equivalents, and discuss how findings obtained with such models may be "translated back" to human conditions when the mechanisms underlying aggression and its possibilities of treatment are investigated. We suggest that the complementary nature of human and rodent research approaches invite a more intense cross-talk between the two sides of aggression research than the one presently observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Signalling crosstalk in plants: emerging issues.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jane E; McAinsh, Martin R

    2004-01-01

    The Oxford English Dictionary defines crosstalk as 'unwanted transfer of signals between communication channels'. How does this definition relate to the way in which we view the organization and function of signalling pathways? Recent advances in the field of plant signalling have challenged the traditional view of a signalling transduction cascade as isolated linear pathways. Instead the picture emerging of the mechanisms by which plants transduce environmental signals is of the interaction between transduction chains. The manner in which these interactions occur (and indeed whether the transfer of these signals is 'unwanted' or beneficial) is currently the topic of intense research.

  17. Signal propagation in cortical networks: a digital signal processing approach.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Francisco Aparecido; da Fontoura Costa, Luciano

    2009-01-01

    This work reports a digital signal processing approach to representing and modeling transmission and combination of signals in cortical networks. The signal dynamics is modeled in terms of diffusion, which allows the information processing undergone between any pair of nodes to be fully characterized in terms of a finite impulse response (FIR) filter. Diffusion without and with time decay are investigated. All filters underlying the cat and macaque cortical organization are found to be of low-pass nature, allowing the cortical signal processing to be summarized in terms of the respective cutoff frequencies (a high cutoff frequency meaning little alteration of signals through their intermixing). Several findings are reported and discussed, including the fact that the incorporation of temporal activity decay tends to provide more diversified cutoff frequencies. Different filtering intensity is observed for each community in those networks. In addition, the brain regions involved in object recognition tend to present the highest cutoff frequencies for both the cat and macaque networks.

  18. LIPID ABNORMALITIES AND LIPID-BASED REPAIR STRATEGIES IN ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies have revealed the key roles played by Th1/Th2 cell dysregulation, IgE production, mast cell hyperactivity, and dendritic cell signaling in the evolution of the chronic, pruritic, inflammatory dermatosis that characterizes atopic dermatitis (AD). We review here increasing evidence that the inflammation in AD results primarily from inherited abnormalities in epidermal structural and enzymatic proteins that impact permeability barrier function. We also will show that the barrier defect can be attributed to a paracellular abnormality due to a variety of abnormalities in lipid composition, transport and extracellular organization. Accordingly, we also review the therapeutic implications of this emerging pathogenic paradigm, including several current and potentially novel, lipid-based approaches to corrective therapy. PMID:24128970

  19. Introduction to the special section: Myelin and oligodendrocyte abnormalities in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Haroutunian, Vahram; Davis, Kenneth L

    2007-08-01

    A central tenet of modern views of the neurobiology of schizophrenia is that the symptoms of schizophrenia arise from a failure of adequate communication between different brain regions and disruption of the circuitry that underlies behaviour and perception. Historically this disconnectivity syndrome has been approached from a neurotransmitter-based perspective. However, efficient communication between brain circuits is also contingent on saltatory signal propagation and salubrious myelination of axons. The papers in this Special Section examine the neuroanatomical and molecular biological evidence for abnormal myelination and oligodendroglial function in schizophrenia through studies of post-mortem brain tissue and animal model systems. The picture that emerges from the studies described suggests that although schizophrenia is not characterized by gross abnormalities of white matter such as those evident in multiple sclerosis, it does involve a profound dysregulation of myelin-associated gene expression, reductions in oligodendrocyte numbers, and marked abnormalities in the ultrastructure of myelin sheaths.

  20. Texture Analysis of T1-Weighted and Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Images Detects Abnormalities That Correlate With Cognitive Decline in Small Vessel Disease.

    PubMed

    Tozer, Daniel J; Zeestraten, Eva; Lawrence, Andrew J; Barrick, Thomas R; Markus, Hugh S

    2018-06-04

    Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful to assess disease severity in cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), identify those individuals who are most likely to progress to dementia, monitor disease progression, and act as surrogate markers to test new therapies. Texture analysis extracts information on the relationship between signal intensities of neighboring voxels. A potential advantage over techniques, such as diffusion tensor imaging, is that it can be used on clinically obtained magnetic resonance sequences. We determined whether texture parameters (TP) were abnormal in SVD, correlated with cognitive impairment, predicted cognitive decline, or conversion to dementia. In the prospective SCANS study (St George's Cognition and Neuroimaging in Stroke), we assessed TP in 121 individuals with symptomatic SVD at baseline, 99 of whom attended annual cognitive testing for 5 years. Conversion to dementia was recorded for all subjects during the 5-year period. Texture analysis was performed on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and T1-weighted images. The TP obtained from the SVD cohort were cross-sectionally compared with 54 age-matched controls scanned on the same magnetic resonance imaging system. There were highly significant differences in several TP between SVD cases and controls. Within the SVD population, TP were highly correlated to other magnetic resonance imaging parameters (brain volume, white matter lesion volume, lacune count). TP correlated with executive function and global function at baseline and predicted conversion to dementia, after controlling for age, sex, premorbid intelligence quotient, and magnetic resonance parameters. TP, which can be obtained from routine clinical images, are abnormal in SVD, and the degree of abnormality correlates with executive dysfunction and global cognition at baseline and decline during 5 years. TP may be useful to assess disease severity in clinically collected data. This needs testing in data clinically acquired

  1. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awarenessmore » to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.« less

  2. Selective mutism and abnormal electroencephalography (EEG) tracings.

    PubMed

    Politi, Keren; Kivity, Sara; Goldberg-Stern, Hadassa; Halevi, Ayelet; Shuper, Avinoam

    2011-11-01

    Epileptic discharges are not considered a part of the clinical picture of selective mutism, and electroencephalography is generally not recommended in its work-up. This report describes 6 children with selective mutism who were found to have a history of epilepsy and abnormal interictal or subclinical electroencephalography recordings. Two of them had benign epilepsy of childhood with centro-temporal spikes. The mutism was not related in time to the presence of active seizures. While seizures could be controlled in all children by medications, the mutism resolved only in 1. Although the discharges could be coincidental, they might represent a co-morbidity of selective mutism or even play a role in its pathogenesis. Selective mutism should be listed among the psychiatric disorders that may be associated with electroencephalographic abnormalities. It can probably be regarded as a symptom of a more complicated organic brain disorder.

  3. Middle ear abnormalities in Van Maldergem syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verheij, Emmy; Thomeer, Henricus G X M; Pameijer, Frank A; Topsakal, Vedat

    2017-01-01

    Van Maldergem syndrome (VMS) is a very rare syndrome that was first described in 1992. The main features of this syndrome comprise intellectual disability, blepharo-naso-facial malformation, and hand anomalies. Almost all nine described patients have been shown to be affected by conductive hearing impairment attributed to microtia, and atresia of the outer ear canal. Here, we present a VMS patient with congenital malformations of the middle ear as the main reason for severe conductive bilateral hearing impairment. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe middle ear abnormalities in VMS. These malformations were seen on high resolution Computed Tomography scanning and during an exploratory tympanotomy. Due to the severity of the middle ear abnormalities and the risk for facial nerve damage, the patient was not offered an ossicular chain reconstruction but a bone conduction device after this exploratory tympanotomy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Abnormal Notochord Branching Is Associated with Foregut Malformations in the Adriamycin Treated Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hajduk, Piotr; Sato, Hideaki; Puri, Prem; Murphy, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Oesophageal atresia (OA) and tracheooesophageal fistula (TOF) are relatively common human congenital malformations of the foregut where the oesophagus does not connect with the stomach and there is an abnormal connection between the stomach and the respiratory tract. They require immediate corrective surgery and have an impact on the future health of the individual. These abnormalities are mimicked by exposure of rat and mouse embryos in utero to the drug adriamycin. The causes of OA/TOF during human development are not known, however a number of mouse mutants where different signalling pathways are directly affected, show similar abnormalities, implicating multiple and complex signalling mechanisms. The similarities in developmental outcome seen in human infants and in the adriamycin treated mouse model underline the potential of this model to unravel the early embryological events and further our understanding of the processes disturbed, leading to such abnormalities. Here we report a systematic study of the foregut and adjacent tissues in embryos treated with adriamycin at E7 and E8 and analysed between E9 and E12, comparing morphology in 3D in 149 specimens. We describe a spectrum of 8 defects, the most common of which is ventral displacement and branching of the notochord (in 94% of embryos at E10) and a close spatial correspondence between the site of notochord branching and defects of the foregut. In addition gene expression analysis shows altered dorso-ventral foregut patterning in the vicinity of notochord branches. This study shows a number of features of the adriamycin mouse model not previously reported, implicates the notochord as a primary site of disturbance in such abnormalities and underlines the importance of the model to further address the mechanistic basis of foregut congenital abnormalities. PMID:22132119

  5. Abnormal notochord branching is associated with foregut malformations in the adriamycin treated mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hajduk, Piotr; Sato, Hideaki; Puri, Prem; Murphy, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Oesophageal atresia (OA) and tracheooesophageal fistula (TOF) are relatively common human congenital malformations of the foregut where the oesophagus does not connect with the stomach and there is an abnormal connection between the stomach and the respiratory tract. They require immediate corrective surgery and have an impact on the future health of the individual. These abnormalities are mimicked by exposure of rat and mouse embryos in utero to the drug adriamycin. The causes of OA/TOF during human development are not known, however a number of mouse mutants where different signalling pathways are directly affected, show similar abnormalities, implicating multiple and complex signalling mechanisms. The similarities in developmental outcome seen in human infants and in the adriamycin treated mouse model underline the potential of this model to unravel the early embryological events and further our understanding of the processes disturbed, leading to such abnormalities. Here we report a systematic study of the foregut and adjacent tissues in embryos treated with adriamycin at E7 and E8 and analysed between E9 and E12, comparing morphology in 3D in 149 specimens. We describe a spectrum of 8 defects, the most common of which is ventral displacement and branching of the notochord (in 94% of embryos at E10) and a close spatial correspondence between the site of notochord branching and defects of the foregut. In addition gene expression analysis shows altered dorso-ventral foregut patterning in the vicinity of notochord branches. This study shows a number of features of the adriamycin mouse model not previously reported, implicates the notochord as a primary site of disturbance in such abnormalities and underlines the importance of the model to further address the mechanistic basis of foregut congenital abnormalities.

  6. Chorionic villus sampling for abnormal screening compared to historical indications: prevalence of abnormal karyotypes.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Nicole E; Fraley, Gwen; Feist, Cori; Burns, Michael J; Pereira, Leonardo

    2012-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of abnormal karyotype results in women undergoing chorionic villus sampling (CVS) for abnormal first trimester screening compared to CVS for historical indications (advanced maternal age (AMA) or prior aneuploidy). Retrospective cohort of all patients undergoing CVS at Oregon Health & Science University from January 2006 to June 2010. Patients were separated based on CVS indication: (1) positive ultrasound (U/S) or serum screening; or (2) AMA or prior aneuploidy with normal or no screening. Prevalence of abnormal karyotype results were compared between groups. Fetal karyotyping was successful in 500 of 506 CVS procedures performed. 203 CVS were performed for positive screening with 69 abnormal karyotypes (34.0%). 264 CVS were performed for historical indications with 11 abnormal karyotypes (4.2%). This difference was statistically significant (χ(2) 71.9, p < 0.001; OR 11.8 [95% CI 5.8, 24.6]). There were two age-related aneuplodies in AMA women without positive screening. 42 out of 44 AMA women diagnosed with aneuploidy (95.5%) had abnormal U/S and/or serum screening (35 U/S, 4 serum, 3 U/S and serum). Combined ultrasound and serum screening should be recommended to all women, including AMA women, prior to undergoing invasive testing to improve risk-based counseling and minimize morbidity.

  7. Varenicline and Abnormal Sleep Related Events

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Ruth L.; Zekarias, Alem; Caduff-Janosa, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess adverse drug reaction reports of “abnormal sleep related events” associated with varenicline, a partial agonist to the α4β2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on neurones, indicated for smoking cessation. Design: Twenty-seven reports of “abnormal sleep related events” often associated with abnormal dreams, nightmares, or somnambulism, which are known to be associated with varenicline use, were identified in the World Health Organisation (WHO) Global Individual Case Safety Reports Database. Original anonymous reports were obtained from the four national pharmacovigilance centers that submitted these reports and assessed for reaction description and causality. Measurements and Results: These 27 reports include 10 of aggressive activity occurring during sleep and seven of other sleep related harmful or potentially harmful activities, such as apparently deliberate self-harm, moving a child or a car, or lighting a stove or a cigarette. Assessment of these 17 reports of aggression or other actual or potential harm showed that nine patients recovered or were recovering on varenicline withdrawal and there were no consistent alternative explanations. Thirteen patients experienced single events, and two had multiple events. Frequency was not stated for the remaining two patients. Conclusions: The descriptions of the reports of aggression during sleep with violent dreaming are similar to those of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and also nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep parasomnias in some adults. Patients who experience somnambulism or dreams of a violent nature while taking varenicline should be advised to consult their health providers. Consideration should be given to clarifying the term sleep disorders in varenicline product information and including sleep related harmful and potentially harmful events. Citation: Savage RL, Zekarias A, Caduff-Janosa P. Varenicline and abnormal sleep related events. SLEEP 2015

  8. CT of trauma to the abnormal kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Rhyner, P.; Federle, M.P.; Jeffrey, R.B.

    Traumatic injuries to already abnormal kidneys are difficult to assess by excretory urography and clinical evaluation. Bleeding and urinary extravasation may accompany minor trauma; conversely, underlying tumors, perirenal hemorrhage, and extravasation may be missed on urography. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in eight cases including three neoplasms, one adult polycystic disease, one simple renal cyst, two hydronephrotic kidneys, and one horseshoe kidney. CT provided specific and clinically useful information in each case that was not apparent on excretory urography.

  9. Axonal abnormalities in vanishing white matter.

    PubMed

    Klok, Melanie D; Bugiani, Marianna; de Vries, Sharon I; Gerritsen, Wouter; Breur, Marjolein; van der Sluis, Sophie; Heine, Vivi M; Kole, Maarten H P; Baron, Wia; van der Knaap, Marjo S

    2018-04-01

    We aimed to study the occurrence and development of axonal pathology and the influence of astrocytes in vanishing white matter. Axons and myelin were analyzed using electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry on Eif2b4 and Eif2b5 single- and double-mutant mice and patient brain tissue. In addition, astrocyte-forebrain co-culture studies were performed. In the corpus callosum of Eif2b5- mutant mice, myelin sheath thickness, axonal diameter, and G-ratio developed normally up to 4 months. At 7 months, however, axons had become thinner, while in control mice axonal diameters had increased further. Myelin sheath thickness remained close to normal, resulting in an abnormally low G-ratio in Eif2b5- mutant mice. In more severely affected Eif2b4-Eif2b5 double-mutants, similar abnormalities were already present at 4 months, while in milder affected Eif2b4 mutants, few abnormalities were observed at 7 months. Additionally, from 2 months onward an increased percentage of thin, unmyelinated axons and increased axonal density were present in Eif2b5 -mutant mice. Co-cultures showed that Eif2b5 mutant astrocytes induced increased axonal density, also in control forebrain tissue, and that control astrocytes induced normal axonal density, also in mutant forebrain tissue. In vanishing white matter patient brains, axons and myelin sheaths were thinner than normal in moderately and severely affected white matter. In mutant mice and patients, signs of axonal transport defects and cytoskeletal abnormalities were minimal. In vanishing white matter, axons are initially normal and atrophy later. Astrocytes are central in this process. If therapy becomes available, axonal pathology may be prevented with early intervention.

  10. Binocular combination in abnormal binocular vision

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jian; Klein, Stanley A.; Levi, Dennis M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated suprathreshold binocular combination in humans with abnormal binocular visual experience early in life. In the first experiment we presented the two eyes with equal but opposite phase shifted sine waves and measured the perceived phase of the cyclopean sine wave. Normal observers have balanced vision between the two eyes when the two eyes' images have equal contrast (i.e., both eyes contribute equally to the perceived image and perceived phase = 0°). However, in observers with strabismus and/or amblyopia, balanced vision requires a higher contrast image in the nondominant eye (NDE) than the dominant eye (DE). This asymmetry between the two eyes is larger than predicted from the contrast sensitivities or monocular perceived contrast of the two eyes and is dependent on contrast and spatial frequency: more asymmetric with higher contrast and/or spatial frequency. Our results also revealed a surprising NDE-to-DE enhancement in some of our abnormal observers. This enhancement is not evident in normal vision because it is normally masked by interocular suppression. However, in these abnormal observers the NDE-to-DE suppression was weak or absent. In the second experiment, we used the identical stimuli to measure the perceived contrast of a cyclopean grating by matching the binocular combined contrast to a standard contrast presented to the DE. These measures provide strong constraints for model fitting. We found asymmetric interocular interactions in binocular contrast perception, which was dependent on both contrast and spatial frequency in the same way as in phase perception. By introducing asymmetric parameters to the modified Ding-Sperling model including interocular contrast gain enhancement, we succeeded in accounting for both binocular combined phase and contrast simultaneously. Adding binocular contrast gain control to the modified Ding-Sperling model enabled us to predict the results of dichoptic and binocular contrast discrimination experiments

  11. Sleep abnormalities in children with Dravet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dhamija, Radhika; Erickson, Maia K; St Louis, Erik K; Wirrell, Elaine; Kotagal, Suresh

    2014-05-01

    Mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel SCN1A gene are responsible for the majority of Dravet syndrome cases. There is evidence that the Nav1.1 channel coded by the SCN1A gene is involved in sleep regulation. We evaluated sleep abnormalities in children with Dravet syndrome using nocturnal polysomnography. We identified six children at our institution with genetically confirmed Dravet syndrome who had also undergone formal sleep consultation with nocturnal polysomnography. Indications for polysomnography were parental concern of daytime fatigue or sleepiness, hyperactivity, inattention, disruptive behavior, nighttime awakenings, or nocturnal seizures. Sleep studies were scored according to guidelines of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and non-rapid eye movement cyclic alternating pattern was visually identified and scored according to established methods. The mean age of the subjects at the time of polysomnography was 6 years. Standard polysomnography did not show any consistent abnormalities in the obstructive or central apnea index, arousal index, sleep efficiency, or architecture. Cyclic alternating pattern analysis on five patients showed an increased mean rate of 50.3% (vs 31% to 34% in neurological normal children) with a mild increase in A1 subtype of 89.4% (vs 84.5%). A2/A3 subtype (5.3% vs 7.3%) and B phase duration (22.4 vs 24.7 seconds) were similar to previously reported findings in neurologically normal children. Despite parental concerns for sleep disturbance in patients with Dravet syndrome, we could not identify abnormalities in sleep macroarchitecture. Non-rapid eye movement sleep microarchitecture was, however, abnormal, with increased A1 subtype, somewhat resembling a tracé alternant pattern of neonates and possibly suggestive of cortical synaptic immaturity in Dravet syndrome. Larger studies are needed to replicate these results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  13. Abnormal mitochondrial respiration in failed human myocardium.

    PubMed

    Sharov, V G; Todor, A V; Silverman, N; Goldstein, S; Sabbah, H N

    2000-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is associated with morphologic abnormalities of cardiac mitochondria including hyperplasia, reduced organelle size and compromised structural integrity. In this study, we examined whether functional abnormalities of mitochondrial respiration are also present in myocardium of patients with advanced HF. Mitochondrial respiration was examined using a Clark electrode in an oxygraph cell containing saponin-skinned muscle bundles obtained from myocardium of failed explanted human hearts due to ischemic (ICM, n=9) or idiopathic dilated (IDC, n=9) cardiomyopathy. Myocardial specimens from five normal donor hearts served as controls (CON). Basal respiratory rate, respiratory rate after addition of the substrates glutamate and malate (V(SUB)), state 3 respiration (after addition of ADP, V(ADP)) and respiration after the addition of atractyloside (V(AT)) were measured in scar-free muscle bundles obtained from the subendocardial (ENDO) and subepicardial (EPI) thirds of the left ventricular (LV) free wall, interventricular septum and right ventricular (RV) free wall. There were no differences in basal and substrate-supported respiration between CON and HF regardless of etiology. V(ADP)was significantly depressed both in ICM and IDC compared to CON in all the regions studied. The respiratory control ratio, V(ADP)/V(AT), was also significantly decreased in HF compared to CON. In both ICM and IDC, V(ADP)was significantly lower in ENDO compared to EPI. The results indicate that mitochondrial respiration is abnormal in the failing human heart. The findings support the concept of low myocardial energy production in HF via oxidative phosphorylation, an abnormality with a potentially impact on global cardiac performance. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. Binocular combination in abnormal binocular vision.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jian; Klein, Stanley A; Levi, Dennis M

    2013-02-08

    We investigated suprathreshold binocular combination in humans with abnormal binocular visual experience early in life. In the first experiment we presented the two eyes with equal but opposite phase shifted sine waves and measured the perceived phase of the cyclopean sine wave. Normal observers have balanced vision between the two eyes when the two eyes' images have equal contrast (i.e., both eyes contribute equally to the perceived image and perceived phase = 0°). However, in observers with strabismus and/or amblyopia, balanced vision requires a higher contrast image in the nondominant eye (NDE) than the dominant eye (DE). This asymmetry between the two eyes is larger than predicted from the contrast sensitivities or monocular perceived contrast of the two eyes and is dependent on contrast and spatial frequency: more asymmetric with higher contrast and/or spatial frequency. Our results also revealed a surprising NDE-to-DE enhancement in some of our abnormal observers. This enhancement is not evident in normal vision because it is normally masked by interocular suppression. However, in these abnormal observers the NDE-to-DE suppression was weak or absent. In the second experiment, we used the identical stimuli to measure the perceived contrast of a cyclopean grating by matching the binocular combined contrast to a standard contrast presented to the DE. These measures provide strong constraints for model fitting. We found asymmetric interocular interactions in binocular contrast perception, which was dependent on both contrast and spatial frequency in the same way as in phase perception. By introducing asymmetric parameters to the modified Ding-Sperling model including interocular contrast gain enhancement, we succeeded in accounting for both binocular combined phase and contrast simultaneously. Adding binocular contrast gain control to the modified Ding-Sperling model enabled us to predict the results of dichoptic and binocular contrast discrimination experiments

  15. Abnormal stress echocardiography findings in cardiac amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Ong, Kevin C; Askew, J Wells; Dispenzieri, Angela; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Klarich, Kyle W; Anavekar, Nandan S; Mulvagh, Sharon L; Grogan, Martha

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac involvement in immunoglobulin light chain (amyloid light chain, AL) amyloidosis is characterized by myocardial interstitial deposition but can also cause obstructive deposits in the coronary microvasculature. We retrospectively identified 20 patients who underwent stress echocardiography within 1 year prior to the histologic diagnosis of AL amyloidosis. Only patients with cardiac amyloidosis and no known obstructive coronary disease were included. Stress echocardiograms (13 exercise; 7 dobutamine) were performed for evaluation of dyspnea and/or chest pain. Stress-induced wall motion abnormalities (WMAs) occurred in 11 patients (55%), 4 of whom had normal left ventricular wall thickness. Coronary angiogram was performed in 9 of 11 patients and demonstrated no or mild epicardial coronary artery disease. Seven (54%) patients had an abnormal exercise blood pressure which occurred with similar likelihood between those with and without stress-induced WMAs. Stress-induced WMAs and abnormal exercise blood pressure may occur in patients with cardiac AL amyloidosis despite the absence of significant epicardial coronary artery disease. This finding should raise the possibility of cardiac amyloidosis even in the absence of significant myocardial thickening.

  16. XYY chromosome abnormality in sexual homicide perpetrators.

    PubMed

    Briken, Peer; Habermann, Niels; Berner, Wolfgang; Hill, Andreas

    2006-03-05

    In a retrospective investigation of the court reports about sexual homicide perpetrators chromosome analysis had been carried out in 13 of 166 (7.8%) men. Three men (1.8%) with XYY chromosome abnormality were found. This rate is much higher than that found in unselected samples of prisoners (0.7-0.9%) or in the general population (0.01%). The three men had shown prepubescent abnormalities, school problems, and had suffered from physical abuse. The chromosome analysis in all cases had been carried out in connection with the forensic psychiatric court report due to the sexual homicide. However, two men had earlier psychiatric referrals. All were diagnosed as sexual sadistic, showed a psychopathic syndrome or psychopathy according to the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised [Hare RD, 1991, The Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised, Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Multi-Health Systems]. Two were multiple murderers. Especially forensic psychiatrists should be vigilant of the possibility of XYY chromosome abnormalities in sexual offenders. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of abnormal dental pain.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ken-Ichi

    2016-03-01

    Most dental pain is caused by an organic problem such as dental caries, periodontitis, pulpitis, or trauma. Diagnosis and treatment of these symptoms are relatively straightforward. However, patients often also complain of abnormal dental pain that has a non-dental origin, whose diagnosis is challenging. Such abnormal dental pain can be categorized on the basis of its cause as referred pain, neuromodulatory pain, and neuropathic pain. When it is difficult to diagnose a patient's dental pain, these potential alternate causes should be considered. In this clinical review, we have presented a case of referred pain from the digastric muscle (Patient 1), of pulpectomized (Patient 2), and of pulpectomized pain (Patient 3) to illustrate referred, neuromodulatory, and neuropathic pain, respectively. The Patient 1 was advised muscle stretching and gentle massage of the trigger points, as well as pain relief using a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory and the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline. The pain in Patient 2 was relieved completely by the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline. In Patient 3, the pain was controlled using either a continuous drip infusion of adenosine triphosphate or intravenous Mg2+ and lidocaine administered every 2 weeks. In each case of abnormal dental pain, the patient's diagnostic chart was used (Fig.2 and 3). Pain was satisfactorily relieved in all cases.

  18. Developmental abnormalities of the posterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    di Iorgi, Natascia; Secco, Andrea; Napoli, Flavia; Calandra, Erika; Rossi, Andrea; Maghnie, Mohamad

    2009-01-01

    While the molecular mechanisms of anterior pituitary development are now better understood than in the past, both in animals and in humans, little is known about the mechanisms regulating posterior pituitary development. The posterior pituitary gland is formed by the evagination of neural tissue from the floor of the third ventricle. It consists of the distal axons of the hypothalamic magnocellular neurones that shape the neurohypophysis. After its downward migration, it is encapsulated together with the ascending ectodermal cells of Rathke's pouch which form the anterior pituitary. By the end of the first trimester, this development is completed and vasopressin and oxytocin can be detected in neurohypophyseal tissue. Abnormal posterior pituitary migration such as the ectopic posterior pituitary lobe appearing at the level of median eminence or along the pituitary stalk have been reported in idiopathic GH deficiency or in subjects with HESX1, LHX4 and SOX3 gene mutations. Another intriguing feature of abnormal posterior pituitary development involves genetic forms of posterior pituitary neurodegeneration that have been reported in autosomal-dominant central diabetes insipidus and Wolfram disease. Defining the phenotype of the posterior pituitary gland can have significant clinical implications for management and counseling, as well as providing considerable insight into normal and abnormal mechanisms of posterior pituitary development in humans.

  19. Abnormal hippocampal shape in offenders with psychopathy.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, Marina; Ganzola, Rossana; Rossi, Roberta; Sabattoli, Francesca; Laakso, Mikko P; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Vaurio, Olli; Könönen, Mervi; Aronen, Hannu J; Thompson, Paul M; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Tiihonen, Jari

    2010-03-01

    Posterior hippocampal volumes correlate negatively with the severity of psychopathy, but local morphological features are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate hippocampal morphology in habitually violent offenders having psychopathy. Manual tracings of hippocampi from magnetic resonance images of 26 offenders (age: 32.5 +/- 8.4), with different degrees of psychopathy (12 high, 14 medium psychopathy based on the Psychopathy Checklist Revised), and 25 healthy controls (age: 34.6 +/- 10.8) were used for statistical modelling of local changes with a surface-based radial distance mapping method. Both offenders and controls had similar hippocampal volume and asymmetry ratios. Local analysis showed that the high psychopathy group had a significant depression along the longitudinal hippocampal axis, on both the dorsal and ventral aspects, when compared with the healthy controls and the medium psychopathy group. The opposite comparison revealed abnormal enlargement of the lateral borders in both the right and left hippocampi of both high and medium psychopathy groups versus controls, throughout CA1, CA2-3 and the subicular regions. These enlargement and reduction effects survived statistical correction for multiple comparisons in the main contrast (26 offenders vs. 25 controls) and in most subgroup comparisons. A statistical check excluded a possible confounding effect from amphetamine and polysubstance abuse. These results indicate that habitually violent offenders exhibit a specific abnormal hippocampal morphology, in the absence of total gray matter volume changes, that may relate to different autonomic modulation and abnormal fear-conditioning. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Abnormal dynamics of language in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Stephane, Massoud; Kuskowski, Michael; Gundel, Jeanette

    2014-05-30

    Language could be conceptualized as a dynamic system that includes multiple interactive levels (sub-lexical, lexical, sentence, and discourse) and components (phonology, semantics, and syntax). In schizophrenia, abnormalities are observed at all language elements (levels and components) but the dynamic between these elements remains unclear. We hypothesize that the dynamics between language elements in schizophrenia is abnormal and explore how this dynamic is altered. We, first, investigated language elements with comparable procedures in patients and healthy controls. Second, using measures of reaction time, we performed multiple linear regression analyses to evaluate the inter-relationships among language elements and the effect of group on these relationships. Patients significantly differed from controls with respect to sub-lexical/lexical, lexical/sentence, and sentence/discourse regression coefficients. The intercepts of the regression slopes increased in the same order above (from lower to higher levels) in patients but not in controls. Regression coefficients between syntax and both sentence level and discourse level semantics did not differentiate patients from controls. This study indicates that the dynamics between language elements is abnormal in schizophrenia. In patients, top-down flow of linguistic information might be reduced, and the relationship between phonology and semantics but not between syntax and semantics appears to be altered. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Antioxidants, Redox Signaling, and Pathophysiology in Schizophrenia: An Integrative View

    PubMed Central

    Keshavan, Matcheri S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Schizophrenia (SZ) is a brain disorder that has been intensively studied for over a century; yet, its etiology and multifactorial pathophysiology remain a puzzle. However, significant advances have been made in identifying numerous abnormalities in key biochemical systems. One among these is the antioxidant defense system (AODS) and redox signaling. This review summarizes the findings to date in human studies. The evidence can be broadly clustered into three major themes: perturbations in AODS, relationships between AODS alterations and other systems (i.e., membrane structure, immune function, and neurotransmission), and clinical implications. These domains of AODS have been examined in samples from both the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. Findings in patients with SZ include decreased nonenzymatic antioxidants, increased lipid peroxides and nitric oxides, and homeostatic imbalance of purine catabolism. Reductions of plasma antioxidant capacity are seen in patients with chronic illness as well as early in the course of SZ. Notably, these data indicate that many AODS alterations are independent of treatment effects. Moreover, there is burgeoning evidence indicating a link among oxidative stress, membrane defects, immune dysfunction, and multineurotransmitter pathologies in SZ. Finally, the body of evidence reviewed herein provides a theoretical rationale for the development of novel treatment approaches. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 2011–2035. PMID:21126177

  2. Perceived functional impact of abnormal facial appearance.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Marlene; Borah, Gregory L

    2003-06-01

    Functional facial deformities are usually described as those that impair respiration, eating, hearing, or speech. Yet facial scars and cutaneous deformities have a significant negative effect on social functionality that has been poorly documented in the scientific literature. Insurance companies are declining payments for reconstructive surgical procedures for facial deformities caused by congenital disabilities and after cancer or trauma operations that do not affect mechanical facial activity. The purpose of this study was to establish a large, sample-based evaluation of the perceived social functioning, interpersonal characteristics, and employability indices for a range of facial appearances (normal and abnormal). Adult volunteer evaluators (n = 210) provided their subjective perceptions based on facial physical appearance, and an analysis of the consequences of facial deformity on parameters of preferential treatment was performed. A two-group comparative research design rated the differences among 10 examples of digitally altered facial photographs of actual patients among various age and ethnic groups with "normal" and "abnormal" congenital deformities or posttrauma scars. Photographs of adult patients with observable congenital and posttraumatic deformities (abnormal) were digitally retouched to eliminate the stigmatic defects (normal). The normal and abnormal photographs of identical patients were evaluated by the large sample study group on nine parameters of social functioning, such as honesty, employability, attractiveness, and effectiveness, using a visual analogue rating scale. Patients with abnormal facial characteristics were rated as significantly less honest (p = 0.007), less employable (p = 0.001), less trustworthy (p = 0.01), less optimistic (p = 0.001), less effective (p = 0.02), less capable (p = 0.002), less intelligent (p = 0.03), less popular (p = 0.001), and less attractive (p = 0.001) than were the same patients with normal facial

  3. Study on the abnormal data rejection and normal condition evaluation applied in wind turbine farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Qian, Zheng; Tian, Shuangshu

    2016-01-01

    The condition detection of wind turbine is always an important issue which attract more and more attentions because of the rapid development of wind farm. And the on-line data analysis is also difficult since a lot of measured data is collected. In this paper, the abnormal data rejection and normal condition evaluation of wind turbine is processed. At first, since there are large amounts of abnormal data in the normal operation of wind turbine, which is probably caused by fault, maintenance downtime, power-limited operation and failure of wind speed sensor, a novel method is proposed to reject abnormal data in order to make more accurate analysis for the wind turbine condition. The core principle of this method is to fit the wind power curves by using the scatter diagram. The data outside the area covered by wind power curves is the abnormal data. The calculation shows that the abnormal data is rejected effectively. After the rejection, the vibration signals of wind turbine bearing which is a critical component are analyzed and the relationship between the vibration characteristic value and the operating condition of wind turbine is discussed. It will provide powerful support for the accurate fault analysis of wind turbine.

  4. Retinal adaptation abnormalities in primary open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Dul, Mitchell; Ennis, Robert; Radner, Shira; Lee, Barry; Zaidi, Qasim

    2015-01-22

    Dynamic color and brightness adaptation are crucial for visual functioning. The effects of glaucoma on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) could compromise these functions. We have previously used slow dynamic changes of light at moderate intensities to measure the speed and magnitude of subtractive adaptation in RGCs. We used the same procedure to test if RGC abnormalities cause slower and weaker adaptation for patients with glaucoma when compared to age-similar controls. We assessed adaptation deficits in specific classes of RGCs by testing along the three cardinal color axes that isolate konio, parvo, and magno RGCs. For one eye each of 10 primary open-angle glaucoma patients and their age-similar controls, we measured the speed and magnitude of adapting to 1/32 Hz color modulations along the three cardinal axes, at central fixation and 8° superior, inferior, nasal, and temporal to fixation. In all 15 comparisons (5 locations × 3 color axes), average adaptation was slower and weaker for glaucoma patients than for controls. Adaptation developed slower at central targets than at 8° eccentricities for controls, but not for patients. Adaptation speed and magnitude differed between affected and control eyes even at retinal locations showing no visual field loss with clinical perimetry. Neural adaptation is weaker in glaucoma patients for all three classes of RGCs. Since adaptation abnormalities are manifested even at retinal locations not exhibiting a visual field loss, this novel form of assessment may offer a functional insight into glaucoma and an early diagnosis tool. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  5. Retinal Adaptation Abnormalities in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Dul, Mitchell; Ennis, Robert; Radner, Shira; Lee, Barry; Zaidi, Qasim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Dynamic color and brightness adaptation are crucial for visual functioning. The effects of glaucoma on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) could compromise these functions. We have previously used slow dynamic changes of light at moderate intensities to measure the speed and magnitude of subtractive adaptation in RGCs. We used the same procedure to test if RGC abnormalities cause slower and weaker adaptation for patients with glaucoma when compared to age-similar controls. We assessed adaptation deficits in specific classes of RGCs by testing along the three cardinal color axes that isolate konio, parvo, and magno RGCs. Methods. For one eye each of 10 primary open-angle glaucoma patients and their age-similar controls, we measured the speed and magnitude of adapting to 1/32 Hz color modulations along the three cardinal axes, at central fixation and 8° superior, inferior, nasal, and temporal to fixation. Results. In all 15 comparisons (5 locations × 3 color axes), average adaptation was slower and weaker for glaucoma patients than for controls. Adaptation developed slower at central targets than at 8° eccentricities for controls, but not for patients. Adaptation speed and magnitude differed between affected and control eyes even at retinal locations showing no visual field loss with clinical perimetry. Conclusions. Neural adaptation is weaker in glaucoma patients for all three classes of RGCs. Since adaptation abnormalities are manifested even at retinal locations not exhibiting a visual field loss, this novel form of assessment may offer a functional insight into glaucoma and an early diagnosis tool. PMID:25613950

  6. Method and apparatus for guiding ablative therapy of abnormal biological electrical excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armoundas, Antonis A. (Inventor); Feldman, Andrew B. (Inventor); Sherman, Derin A. (Inventor); Cohen, Richard J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention involves method and apparatus for guiding ablative therapy of abnormal biological electrical excitation. In particular, it is designed for treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. In the method of this invention electrical signals are acquired from passive electrodes, and an inverse dipole method is used to identify the site of origin of an arrhytmia. The location of the tip of the ablation catheter is similarly localized from signals acquired from the passive electrodes while electrical energy is delivered to the tip of the catheter. The catheter tip is then guided to the site of origin of the arrhythmia, and ablative radio frequency energy is delivered to its tip to ablate the site.

  7. Intensive Care, Intense Conflict: A Balanced Approach.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Erin Talati; Kolaitis, Irini N

    2015-01-01

    Caring for a child in a pediatric intensive care unit is emotionally and physically challenging and often leads to conflict. Skilled mediators may not always be available to aid in conflict resolution. Careproviders at all levels of training are responsible for managing difficult conversations with families and can often prevent escalation of conflict. Bioethics mediators have acknowledged the important contribution of mediation training in improving clinicians' skills in conflict management. Familiarizing careproviders with basic mediation techniques is an important step towards preventing escalation of conflict. While training in effective communication is crucial, a sense of fairness and justice that may only come with the introduction of a skilled, neutral third party is equally important. For intense conflict, we advocate for early recognition, comfort, and preparedness through training of clinicians in de-escalation and optimal communication, along with the use of more formally trained third-party mediators, as required. Copyright 2015 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  8. Primary cilia maintain corneal epithelial homeostasis by regulation of the Notch signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Grisanti, Laura; Revenkova, Ekaterina; Gordon, Ronald E.

    2016-01-01

    Primary cilia have been linked to signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, cell motility and cell polarity. Defects in ciliary function result in developmental abnormalities and multiple ciliopathies. Patients affected by severe ciliopathies, such as Meckel syndrome, present several ocular surface disease conditions of unclear pathogenesis. Here, we show that primary cilia are predominantly present on basal cells of the mouse corneal epithelium (CE) throughout development and in the adult. Conditional ablation of cilia in the CE leads to an increase in proliferation and vertical migration of basal corneal epithelial cells (CECs). A consequent increase in cell density of suprabasal layers results in a thicker than normal CE. Surprisingly, in cilia-deficient CE, cilia-mediated signaling pathways, including Hh and Wnt pathways, were not affected but the intensity of Notch signaling was severely diminished. Although Notch1 and Notch2 receptors were expressed normally, nuclear Notch1 intracellular domain (N1ICD) expression was severely reduced. Postnatal development analysis revealed that in cilia-deficient CECs downregulation of the Notch pathway precedes cell proliferation defects. Thus, we have uncovered a function of the primary cilium in maintaining homeostasis of the CE by balancing proliferation and vertical migration of basal CECs through modulation of Notch signaling. PMID:27122169

  9. [Anesthesia for surgery of degenerative and abnormal cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Béal, J L; Lopin, M C; Binnert, M

    1993-01-01

    A feature common to all congenital or inflammatory abnormalities of the cervical spine is an actual or potential reduction in the lumen of the spinal canal. The spinal cord and nerve roots are at risk. During intubation, and positioning the patient on the table, all untoward movements of the cervical spine may lead to spinal cord compression. Abnormalities of the cervical spine carry the risk of a difficult intubation. If there is much debate as to what constitutes optimum management of the airway, there is no evidence that any one method is the best. Recognizing the possible instability and intubating with care, are probably much more important in preserving neurological function than any particular mode of intubation. During maintenance of anaesthesia, the main goal is to preserve adequate spinal cord perfusion in order to prevent further damage. Spinal cord blood flow seems to be regulated by the same factors as cerebral blood flow. Hypercapnia increases cord blood flow while hypocapnia decreases it. Therefore, normocapnia or mild hypocapnia is recommended. Induced hypotension is frequently used to decrease blood loss. However, in patients with a marginally perfused spinal cord, the reduction in blood flow may cause ischaemia of the spinal cord and may therefore be relatively contraindicated. In addition to standard intraoperative monitoring, spinal cord monitoring is almost mandatory. Monitoring somatosensory evoked potentials is used routinely. However, the major limitation is that this technique only monitors dorsal column function; theoretically, motor paralysis can occur despite a lack of change in recorded signals. Neurogenic motor evoked potentials may now be used to monitor anterior spinal cord integrity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Structural Pituitary Abnormalities Associated With CHARGE Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Louise C.; Gevers, Evelien F.; Baker, Joanne; Kasia, Tessa; Chong, Kling; Josifova, Dragana J.; Caimari, Maria; Bilan, Frederic; McCabe, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: CHARGE syndrome is a multisystem disorder that, in addition to Kallmann syndrome/isolated hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, has been associated with anterior pituitary hypoplasia (APH). However, structural abnormalities such as an ectopic posterior pituitary (EPP) have not yet been described in such patients. Objective: The aims of the study were: 1) to describe the association between CHARGE syndrome and a structurally abnormal pituitary gland; and 2) to investigate whether CHD7 variants, which are identified in 65% of CHARGE patients, are common in septo-optic dysplasia /hypopituitarism. Methods: We describe 2 patients with features of CHARGE and EPP. CHD7 was sequenced in these and other patients with septo-optic dysplasia/hypopituitarism. Results: EPP, APH, and GH, TSH, and probable LH/FSH deficiency were present in 1 patient, and EPP and APH with GH, TSH, LH/FSH, and ACTH deficiency were present in another patient, both of whom had features of CHARGE syndrome. Both had variations in CHD7 that were novel and undetected in control cohorts or in the international database of CHARGE patients, but were also present in their unaffected mothers. No CHD7 variants were detected in the patients with septo-optic dysplasia/hypopituitarism without additional CHARGE features. Conclusion: We report a novel association between CHARGE syndrome and structural abnormalities of the pituitary gland in 2 patients with variations in CHD7 that are of unknown significance. However, CHD7 mutations are an uncommon cause of septo-optic dysplasia or hypopituitarism. Our data suggest the need for evaluation of pituitary function/anatomy in patients with CHARGE syndrome. PMID:23526466

  11. Eye Movement Abnormalities in Joubert Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Avery H.; Doherty, Dan; Parisi, Melissa; Shaw, Dennis; Glass, Ian; Phillips, James O.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Joubert syndrome is a genetic disorder characterized by hypoplasia of the midline cerebellum and deficiency of crossed connections between neural structures in the brain stem that control eye movements. The goal of the study was to quantify the eye movement abnormalities that occur in Joubert syndrome. Methods Eye movements were recorded in response to stationary stimuli and stimuli designed to elicit smooth pursuit, saccades, optokinetic nystagmus (OKN), vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and vergence using video-oculography or Skalar search coils in 8 patients with Joubert syndrome. All patients underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Results All patients had the highly characteristic molar tooth sign on brain MRI. Six patients had conjugate pendular (n = 4) or see-saw nystagmus (n = 2); gaze holding was stable in four patients. Smooth-pursuit gains were 0.28 to 1.19, 0.11 to 0.68, and 0.33 to 0.73 at peak stimulus velocities of 10, 20, and 30 deg/s in six patients; smooth pursuit could not be elicited in four patients. Saccade gains in five patients ranged from 0.35 to 0.91 and velocities ranged from 60.9 to 259.5 deg/s. Targeted saccades could not be elicited in five patients. Horizontal OKN gain was uniformly reduced across gratings drifted at velocities of 15, 30, and 45 deg/s. VOR gain was 0.8 or higher and phase appropriate in three of seven subjects; VOR gain was 0.3 or less and phase was indeterminate in four subjects. Conclusions The abnormalities in gaze-holding and eye movements are consistent with the distributed abnormalities of midline cerebellum and brain stem regions associated with Joubert syndrome. PMID:19443711

  12. Varenicline and abnormal sleep related events.

    PubMed

    Savage, Ruth L; Zekarias, Alem; Caduff-Janosa, Pia

    2015-05-01

    To assess adverse drug reaction reports of "abnormal sleep related events" associated with varenicline, a partial agonist to the α4β2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on neurones, indicated for smoking cessation. Twenty-seven reports of "abnormal sleep related events" often associated with abnormal dreams, nightmares, or somnambulism, which are known to be associated with varenicline use, were identified in the World Health Organisation (WHO) Global Individual Case Safety Reports Database. Original anonymous reports were obtained from the four national pharmacovigilance centers that submitted these reports and assessed for reaction description and causality. These 27 reports include 10 of aggressive activity occurring during sleep and seven of other sleep related harmful or potentially harmful activities, such as apparently deliberate self-harm, moving a child or a car, or lighting a stove or a cigarette. Assessment of these 17 reports of aggression or other actual or potential harm showed that nine patients recovered or were recovering on varenicline withdrawal and there were no consistent alternative explanations. Thirteen patients experienced single events, and two had multiple events. Frequency was not stated for the remaining two patients. The descriptions of the reports of aggression during sleep with violent dreaming are similar to those of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and also nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep parasomnias in some adults. Patients who experience somnambulism or dreams of a violent nature while taking varenicline should be advised to consult their health providers. Consideration should be given to clarifying the term sleep disorders in varenicline product information and including sleep related harmful and potentially harmful events. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  13. Mechanisms of Normal and Abnormal Endometrial Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    Expression of tissue factor (TF), the primary initiator of coagulation, is enhanced in decidualized human endometrial stromal cells (HESC) during the progesterone-dominated luteal phase. Progesterone also augments a second HESC hemostatic factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). In contrast, progestins inhibit HESC matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, 3 and 9 expression to stabilize endometrial stromal and vascular extracellular matrix. Through these mechanisms decidualized endometrium is rendered both hemostatic and resistant to excess trophoblast invasion in the mid-luteal phase and throughout gestation to prevent hemorrhage and accreta. In non-fertile cycles, progesterone withdrawal results in decreased HESC TF and PAI-expression and increased MMP activity and inflammatory cytokine production promoting the controlled hemorrhage of menstruation and related tissue sloughing. In contrast to these well ordered biochemical processes, unpredictable endometrial bleeding associated with anovulation reflects absence of progestational effects on TF, PAI-1 and MMP activity as well as unrestrained angiogenesis rendering the endometrium non-hemostatic, proteolytic and highly vascular. Abnormal bleeding associated with long-term progestin-only contraceptives results not from impaired hemostasis but from unrestrained angiogenesis leading to large fragile endometrial vessels. This abnormal angiogenesis reflects progestational inhibition of endometrial blood flow promoting local hypoxia and generation of reactive oxygen species that increase production of angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in HESCs and Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) in endometrial endothelial cells while decreasing HESC expression of angiostatic, Ang-1. The resulting vessel fragility promotes bleeding. Aberrant angiogenesis also underlies abnormal bleeding associated with myomas and endometrial polyps however there are gaps in our understanding of this pathology. PMID:21499503

  14. Abnormal aldosterone physiology and cardiometabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Anand; Underwood, Patricia C; Hopkins, Paul N; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Ferri, Claudio; Williams, Gordon H; Adler, Gail K

    2013-04-01

    Abnormal aldosterone physiology has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic diseases. Single aldosterone measurements capture only a limited range of aldosterone physiology. New methods of characterizing aldosterone physiology may provide a more comprehensive understanding of its relationship with cardiometabolic disease. We evaluated whether novel indices of aldosterone responses to dietary sodium modulation, the sodium-modulated aldosterone suppression-stimulation index (SASSI for serum and SAUSSI for urine), could predict cardiometabolic risk factors. We performed cross-sectional analyses on 539 subjects studied on liberal and restricted sodium diets with serum and urinary aldosterone measurements. SASSI and SAUSSI were calculated as the ratio of aldosterone on liberal (maximally suppressed aldosterone) to the aldosterone on restricted (stimulated aldosterone) diets and associated with risk factors using adjusted regression models. Cardiometabolic risk factors associated with either impaired suppression of aldosterone on liberal diet, or impaired stimulation on restricted diet, or both; in all of these individual cases, these risk factors associated with higher SASSI or SAUSSI. In the context of abnormalities that constitute the metabolic syndrome, there was a strong positive association between the number of metabolic syndrome components (0-4) and both SASSI and SAUSSI (P<0.0001) that was independent of known aldosterone secretagogues (angiotensin II, corticotropin, potassium). SASSI and SAUSSI exhibited a high sensitivity in detecting normal individuals with zero metabolic syndrome components (86% for SASSI and 83% for SAUSSI). Assessing the physiological range of aldosterone responses may provide greater insights into adrenal pathophysiology. Dysregulated aldosterone physiology may contribute to, or result from, early cardiometabolic abnormalities.

  15. Down's Syndrome and Leukemia: Mechanism of Additional Chromosomal Abnormalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Goh, Kong-oo

    1978-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities, some appearing in a stepwise clonal evoluation, were found in five Down's syndrome patients (35 weeks to 12 years old), four with acute leukemia and one with abnormal regulation of leukopoiesis. (Author/SBH)

  16. Chromosomal abnormalities as a cause of recurrent abortions in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    El-Dahtory, Faeza Abdel Mogib

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 4%-8% of couples with recurrent abortion, at least one of the partners has chromosomal abnormality. Most spontaneous miscarriages which happen in the first and second trimesters are caused by chromosomal abnormalities. These chromosomal abnormalities may be either numerical or structural. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cytogenetic study was done for 73 Egyptian couples who presented with recurrent abortion at Genetic Unit of Children Hospital, Mansoura University. RESULTS: We found that the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities was not significantly different from that reported worldwide. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 9 (6.1%) of 73 couples. Seven of chromosomal abnormalities were structural and two of them were numerical. CONCLUSION: Our results showed that 6.1% of the couples with recurrent abortion had chromosomal abnormalities, with no other abnormalities. We suggest that it is necessary to perform cytogenetic in vestigation for couples who have recurrent abortion. PMID:22090718

  17. NEW FRONTIER IN UNDERSTANDING THE MECHANISMS OF DEVELOPMENTAL ABNORMALITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent advancements in molecular developmental biology afford an opportunity to apply newly developed tools for understanding the mechanisms of both normal and abnormal development. lthough a number of agents have been identified as causing developmental abnormalities, knowledge ...

  18. Light intensity compressor

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1990-02-06

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  19. Light intensity compressor

    DOEpatents

    Rushford, Michael C.

    1990-01-01

    In a system for recording images having vastly differing light intensities over the face of the image, a light intensity compressor is provided that utilizes the properties of twisted nematic liquid crystals to compress the image intensity. A photoconductor or photodiode material that is responsive to the wavelength of radiation being recorded is placed adjacent a layer of twisted nematic liquid crystal material. An electric potential applied to a pair of electrodes that are disposed outside of the liquid crystal/photoconductor arrangement to provide an electric field in the vicinity of the liquid crystal material. The electrodes are substantially transparent to the form of radiation being recorded. A pair of crossed polarizers are provided on opposite sides of the liquid crystal. The front polarizer linearly polarizes the light, while the back polarizer cooperates with the front polarizer and the liquid crystal material to compress the intensity of a viewed scene. Light incident upon the intensity compressor activates the photoconductor in proportion to the intensity of the light, thereby varying the field applied to the liquid crystal. The increased field causes the liquid crystal to have less of a twisting effect on the incident linearly polarized light, which will cause an increased percentage of the light to be absorbed by the back polarizer. The intensity of an image may be compressed by forming an image on the light intensity compressor.

  20. Causes and Diagnosis of Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Elizabeth; Peddinti, Radhika

    2015-07-01

    Abnormal vaginal bleeding in a postmenarchal adolescent patient is most often related to dysfunctional uterine bleeding. However, there are other potential etiologies, including hematologic disorders, infections, and oncologic problems. We present a 12-year-old girl who presented with prolonged vaginal bleeding and was ultimately diagnosed with rhabdomyosarcoma. In this article, we discuss the approach to a patient with vaginal bleeding along with a more in-depth review of risk stratification in rhabdomyosarcoma, including treatment options such as chemotherapy, surgery, and radiation therapy. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Quantifying the eating abnormalities in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rebekah M; Irish, Muireann; Kam, Jonathan; van Keizerswaard, Jolanda; Bartley, Lauren; Samaras, Katherine; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    Presence of eating abnormalities is one of the core criteria for the diagnosis of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), yet their occurrence in other subtypes of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and effect on metabolic health is not known. To define and quantify patterns of eating behavior and energy, sugar, carbohydrate, protein, and fat intake, as well as indices of metabolic health in patients with bvFTD and semantic dementia (SD) compared with patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and healthy control participants. Prospective case-controlled study involving patient and caregiver completion of surveys. Seventy-five participants with dementia (21 with bvFTD, 26 with SD, and 28 with AD) and 18 age- and education-matched healthy controls were recruited from FRONTIER, the FTD research clinic at Neuroscience Research Australia in Sydney. Caregivers of patients with FTD and AD completed validated questionnaires on appetite, eating behaviors, energy consumption, and dietary macronutrient composition. All participants completed surveys on hunger and satiety. Body mass index and weight measurements were prospectively collected. The bvFTD group had significant abnormalities in the domains of appetite (U = 111.0, z = 2.7, P = .007), eating habits (U = 69.5, z = 3.8, P = .001), food preferences (U = 57.0, z = 4.1, P = .001), swallowing (U = 109.0, z = 3.0, P = .003), and other oral behaviors (U = 141.0, z = 2.6, P = .009) compared with the AD group. The bvFTD and SD groups tended to have increased energy consumption. Compared with controls, the bvFTD group had significantly increased carbohydrate intake (251 vs 170 g/d; P = .05) and the SD group had significantly increased sugar intake (114 vs 76 g/d; P = .049). No significant differences in total fat or protein intake between the groups were found. Despite similar energy intake, the SD group had lower hunger and satiety scores compared with the bvFTD group. In contrast, hunger and satiety scores did not differ

  2. Abnormal grain growth in iron-silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Tricia A.

    Abnormal grain growth (AGG) was studied in an Fe-1%Si alloy using automated Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) to determine the driving force for this phenomenon. Experiments were performed with the knowledge that there are several possible driving forces and, the intent to determine the true driving force by elimination of the other potential candidates. These potential candidates include surface energy anisotropy, anisotropic grain boundary properties and the stored energy of deformation. In this work, surface energy and grain boundary anisotropies as well as the stored energy of deformation were investigated as the possible driving forces for AGG. Accordingly, industrially processed samples that were temper rolled to 1.5% and 8% were annealed in air for various times followed by quenching in water. The results obtained were compared to those from heat treatments performed in wet 15%H2-85%N2 at a US Steel facility. In addition, for a more complete study of the effect of surface energy anisotropies on AGG, the 1.5% temper-rolled material was heat-treated in other atmospheres such as 5%H2-95%Ar, 98%H2-2%He, 98%H2-2%H 2S, and 98%H2-2%N2 for 1 hour followed by quenching in water. The character of the grain boundaries in the materials was also examined for each set of experiments conducted, while the influence of stored energy was evaluated by examining intragranular orientation gradients. AGG occurred regardless of annealing atmosphere though the most rapid progression was observed in samples annealed in air. In general, grains of varying orientations grew abnormally. One consistently observed trend in all the detailed studies was that the matrix grains remained essentially static and either did not grow or only grew very slowly. On the other hand, the abnormally large grains (ALG), on average, were approximately 10 times the size of the matrix. Analysis of the grain boundary character of the interfaces between abnormal grains and the matrix showed no

  3. Prediction of Oncogenic Interactions and Cancer-Related Signaling Networks Based on Network Topology

    PubMed Central

    Acencio, Marcio Luis; Bovolenta, Luiz Augusto; Camilo, Esther; Lemke, Ney

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a systems biology disease since many investigators have demonstrated that this malignant phenotype emerges from abnormal protein-protein, regulatory and metabolic interactions induced by simultaneous structural and regulatory changes in multiple genes and pathways. Therefore, the identification of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks is crucial for better understanding cancer. As experimental techniques for determining such interactions and signaling networks are labor-intensive and time-consuming, the development of a computational approach capable to accomplish this task would be of great value. For this purpose, we present here a novel computational approach based on network topology and machine learning capable to predict oncogenic interactions and extract relevant cancer-related signaling subnetworks from an integrated network of human genes interactions (INHGI). This approach, called graph2sig, is twofold: first, it assigns oncogenic scores to all interactions in the INHGI and then these oncogenic scores are used as edge weights to extract oncogenic signaling subnetworks from INHGI. Regarding the prediction of oncogenic interactions, we showed that graph2sig is able to recover 89% of known oncogenic interactions with a precision of 77%. Moreover, the interactions that received high oncogenic scores are enriched in genes for which mutations have been causally implicated in cancer. We also demonstrated that graph2sig is potentially useful in extracting oncogenic signaling subnetworks: more than 80% of constructed subnetworks contain more than 50% of original interactions in their corresponding oncogenic linear pathways present in the KEGG PATHWAY database. In addition, the potential oncogenic signaling subnetworks discovered by graph2sig are supported by experimental evidence. Taken together, these results suggest that graph2sig can be a useful tool for investigators involved in cancer research

  4. Accumulated source imaging of brain activity with both low and high-frequency neuromagnetic signals

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jing; Luo, Qian; Kotecha, Rupesh; Korman, Abraham; Zhang, Fawen; Luo, Huan; Fujiwara, Hisako; Hemasilpin, Nat; Rose, Douglas F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the importance of high-frequency brain signals (>70 Hz). One challenge of high-frequency signal analysis is that the size of time-frequency representation of high-frequency brain signals could be larger than 1 terabytes (TB), which is beyond the upper limits of a typical computer workstation's memory (<196 GB). The aim of the present study is to develop a new method to provide greater sensitivity in detecting high-frequency magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in a single automated and versatile interface, rather than the more traditional, time-intensive visual inspection methods, which may take up to several days. To address the aim, we developed a new method, accumulated source imaging, defined as the volumetric summation of source activity over a period of time. This method analyzes signals in both low- (1~70 Hz) and high-frequency (70~200 Hz) ranges at source levels. To extract meaningful information from MEG signals at sensor space, the signals were decomposed to channel-cross-channel matrix (CxC) representing the spatiotemporal patterns of every possible sensor-pair. A new algorithm was developed and tested by calculating the optimal CxC and source location-orientation weights for volumetric source imaging, thereby minimizing multi-source interference and reducing computational cost. The new method was implemented in C/C++ and tested with MEG data recorded from clinical epilepsy patients. The results of experimental data demonstrated that accumulated source imaging could effectively summarize and visualize MEG recordings within 12.7 h by using approximately 10 GB of computer memory. In contrast to the conventional method of visually identifying multi-frequency epileptic activities that traditionally took 2–3 days and used 1–2 TB storage, the new approach can quantify epileptic abnormalities in both low- and high-frequency ranges at source levels, using much less time and computer memory. PMID:24904402

  5. Accumulated source imaging of brain activity with both low and high-frequency neuromagnetic signals.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jing; Luo, Qian; Kotecha, Rupesh; Korman, Abraham; Zhang, Fawen; Luo, Huan; Fujiwara, Hisako; Hemasilpin, Nat; Rose, Douglas F

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the importance of high-frequency brain signals (>70 Hz). One challenge of high-frequency signal analysis is that the size of time-frequency representation of high-frequency brain signals could be larger than 1 terabytes (TB), which is beyond the upper limits of a typical computer workstation's memory (<196 GB). The aim of the present study is to develop a new method to provide greater sensitivity in detecting high-frequency magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in a single automated and versatile interface, rather than the more traditional, time-intensive visual inspection methods, which may take up to several days. To address the aim, we developed a new method, accumulated source imaging, defined as the volumetric summation of source activity over a period of time. This method analyzes signals in both low- (1~70 Hz) and high-frequency (70~200 Hz) ranges at source levels. To extract meaningful information from MEG signals at sensor space, the signals were decomposed to channel-cross-channel matrix (CxC) representing the spatiotemporal patterns of every possible sensor-pair. A new algorithm was developed and tested by calculating the optimal CxC and source location-orientation weights for volumetric source imaging, thereby minimizing multi-source interference and reducing computational cost. The new method was implemented in C/C++ and tested with MEG data recorded from clinical epilepsy patients. The results of experimental data demonstrated that accumulated source imaging could effectively summarize and visualize MEG recordings within 12.7 h by using approximately 10 GB of computer memory. In contrast to the conventional method of visually identifying multi-frequency epileptic activities that traditionally took 2-3 days and used 1-2 TB storage, the new approach can quantify epileptic abnormalities in both low- and high-frequency ranges at source levels, using much less time and computer memory.

  6. Abnormal Behavior in Relation to Cage Size in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulk, H. H.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Examines the effects of cage size on stereotyped and normal locomotion and on other abnormal behaviors in singly caged animals, whether observed abnormal behaviors tend to co-occur, and if the development of an abnormal behavior repertoire leads to reduction in the number of normal behavior categories. (Author/RK)

  7. Implications of white striping and spaghetti meat abnormalities on meat quality and histological features in broilers.

    PubMed

    Baldi, G; Soglia, F; Mazzoni, M; Sirri, F; Canonico, L; Babini, E; Laghi, L; Cavani, C; Petracci, M

    2018-01-01

    samples, which consequently led to a reduction of the water holding capacity of meat. As for functional properties, abnormal fillets exhibited a lower protein solubility and higher ultimate pH values on both the superficial and deep sections. Although abnormal fillets exhibited higher yellowness values, no relevant effect on meat color was observed. The occurrence of WS and SM abnormalities led to increased carbonylation levels and more intense proteolytic processes. Overall, muscle abnormalities mainly affect the superficial layer of P. major muscle and particularly the occurrence of SM myopathy seems to implicate a more pronounced modification of meat quality traits than the mere presence of WS.

  8. Structural brain abnormalities in Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bauduin, Stephanie E E C; van der Wee, Nic J A; van der Werff, Steven J A

    2018-05-08

    Alongside various physical symptoms, patients with Cushing's disease and Cushing's syndrome display a wide variety of neuropsychiatric and cognitive symptoms, which are indicative of involvement of the central nervous system. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the structural brain abnormalities that are associated with Cushing's disease and Cushing's syndrome and their relation to behavioral and cognitive symptomatology. In this review, we discuss the gray matter structural abnormalities found in patients with active Cushing's disease and Cushing's syndrome, the reversibility and persistence of these changes and the white matter structural changes related to Cushing's syndrome. Recent findings are of particular interest because they provide more detailed information on localization of the structural changes as well as possible insights into the underlying biological processes. Active Cushing's disease and Cushing's syndrome is related to volume reductions of the hippocampus and in a prefrontal region involving the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and medial frontal gyrus (MFG). Whilst there are indications that the reductions in hippocampal volume are partially reversible, the changes in the ACC and MFG appear to be more persistent. In contrast to the volumetric findings, changes in white matter connectivity are typically widespread involving multiple tracts.

  9. Abnormalities of tooth development in pituitary dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Kosowicz, J; Rzymski, K

    1977-12-01

    Roentgenographic studies of the jaws and teeth in a group of forty-eight pituitary dwarfs showed the following abnormalities in the development of the teeth: 1. Delayed shedding of the deciduous teeth. 2. Absence of resorption of the roots of the deciduous teeth at the usual time. 3. Marked delay in eruption of the permanent teeth. 4. Retention of permanent teeth in the maxillary and mandibular shafts. 5. Development of the apical parts of roots of the retained permanent teeth and their growth toward the lower mandibular edge. 6. Displacement of the first molars from the mandibular shaft to rami. 7. Tilting of some of the retained teeth. 8. Small size of the maxilla and mandible with overcrowding of the teeth in these bones. 9. Complete absence of buds of the wisdom teeth, even in patients in the fourth decade of life. 10. Stimulation of development and eruption of the teeth after administration of anabolic drugs. These abnormalities when present in combination depend on growth hormone deficiency since they do not occur in other types of dwarfism.

  10. Abnormal tactile temporal discrimination in psychogenic dystonia.

    PubMed

    Morgante, F; Tinazzi, M; Squintani, G; Martino, D; Defazio, G; Romito, L; Albanese, A; Di Matteo, A; Quartarone, A; Girlanda, P; Fiorio, M; Berardelli, A

    2011-09-20

    Neurophysiologic studies demonstrated that patients with primary torsion dystonia (PTD) and with psychogenic dystonia (Psy-D) share similar abnormalities in the motor system. In this study, we evaluated somatosensory function in Psy-D by testing temporal discrimination threshold (TDT), and compared the results with those obtained in patients with PTD. TDT of tactile stimuli was assessed in 10 patients with Psy-D, 10 patients with PTD, and 16 control subjects. The 2 groups of patients were matched for age, gender, disease duration, and distribution of dystonia. Tactile stimuli consisted of pairs of non-noxious electrical shocks delivered to the right or left hand at interstimulus interval increasing from 0 to 400 msec, in 10-msec steps. TDT was defined as the value at which subjects recognized the 2 stimuli as asynchronous. TDT was higher in Psy-D and PTD compared to control subjects, for both the right and the left hand. In a subgroup of patients with unilateral dystonia (Psy-D = 4, PTD = 5), TDT did not differ between the affected and the unaffected side in both groups of patients. Disease duration was not correlated to the increased TDT value. Our study suggests an impaired processing of somatosensory inputs in both Psy-D and PTD. These abnormalities might represent a neurophysiological trait predisposing to develop a dystonic posture triggered by psychiatric and psychological factors.

  11. Small Airway Dysfunction and Abnormal Exercise Responses

    PubMed Central

    Petsonk, Edward L.; Stansbury, Robert C.; Beeckman-Wagner, Lu-Ann; Long, Joshua L.; Wang, Mei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Coal mine dust exposure can cause symptoms and loss of lung function from multiple mechanisms, but the roles of each disease process are not fully understood. Objectives We investigated the implications of small airway dysfunction for exercise physiology among a group of workers exposed to coal mine dust. Methods Twenty coal miners performed spirometry, first breathing air and then helium-oxygen, single-breath diffusing capacity, and computerized chest tomography, and then completed cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Measurements and Main Results Six participants meeting criteria for small airway dysfunction were compared with 14 coal miners who did not. At submaximal workload, miners with small airway dysfunction used a higher proportion of their maximum voluntary ventilation and had higher ventilatory equivalents for both O2 and CO2. Regression modeling indicated that inefficient ventilation was significantly related to small airway dysfunction but not to FEV1 or diffusing capacity. At the end of exercise, miners with small airway dysfunction had 27% lower O2 consumption. Conclusions Small airway abnormalities may be associated with important inefficiency of exercise ventilation. In dust-exposed individuals with only mild abnormalities on resting lung function tests or chest radiographs, cardiopulmonary exercise testing may be important in defining causes of exercise intolerance. PMID:27073987

  12. Abnormal appearances: inspection, display and the clinic.

    PubMed

    Featherstone, Katie; Atkinson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We provide an examination of the field of dysmorphology, a clinical speciality that in its current form combines a long history of inspection and display with the identification and representation of associated underlying molecular changes. The recognition and description of abnormal appearances is thus increasingly accompanied by genetic and other molecular investigations. Our analysis draws on our long-term ethnographic engagement with a UK clinical genetics service and the work of two clinical genetics teams within a regional teaching hospital. We document the intersection of genetic science with clinical work to suggest that while molecular testing often identifies the genetic basis for unusual appearances and abnormal development, it does not fully supplant clinical apperception and interpretation. The two modes of knowledge--the clinical and the biomedical--co-exist in the work and the discourse of dysmorphology practice. The contemporary dysmorphology clinic thus encapsulates the epistemological systems of modern medicine, grounded in the clinical gaze and on the classificatory systems of classic nosology. Within such a system of clinical knowledge, the 'monstrous' does not escape the boundaries of knowledge. Monstrous appearances are accommodated and domesticated within the classificatory systems of normal medicine.

  13. Native fluorescence characterization of human liver abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Singaravelu; Madhuri, S.; Aruna, Prakasa R.; Suchitra, S.; Srinivasan, T. G.

    1999-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy of intrinsic biomolecules has been extensively used in biology and medicine for the past several decades. In the present study, we report the native fluorescence characteristics of blood plasma from normal human subjects and patients with different liver abnormalities such as hepatitis, leptospirosis, jaundice, cirrhosis and liver cell failure. Native fluorescence spectra of blood plasma -- acetone extract were measured at 405 nm excitation. The average spectrum of normal blood plasma has a prominent emission peak around 464 nm whereas in the case of liver diseased subjects, the primary peak is red shifted with respect to normal. In addition, liver diseased cases show distinct secondary emission peak around 615 nm, which may be attributed to the presence of endogenous porphyrins. The red shift of the prominent emission peak with respect to normal is found to be maximum for hepatitis and minimum for cirrhosis whereas the secondary emission peak around 615 nm was found to be more prominent in the case of cirrhosis than the rest. The ratio parameter I465/I615 is found to be statistically significant (p less than 0.001) in discriminating liver abnormalities from normal.

  14. Evaluation of abnormal liver function tests.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Swastik; Dhiman, Radha K; Limdi, Jimmy K

    2016-04-01

    Incidentally detected abnormality in liver function tests is a common situation encountered by physicians across all disciplines. Many of these patients do not have primary liver disease as most of the commonly performed markers are not specific for the liver and are affected by myriad factors unrelated to liver disease. Also, many of these tests like liver enzyme levels do not measure the function of the liver, but are markers of liver injury, which is broadly of two types: hepatocellular and cholestatic. A combination of a careful history and clinical examination along with interpretation of pattern of liver test abnormalities can often identify type and aetiology of liver disease, allowing for a targeted investigation approach. Severity of liver injury is best assessed by composite scores like the Model for End Stage Liver Disease rather than any single parameter. In this review, we discuss the interpretation of the routinely performed liver tests along with the indications and utility of quantitative tests. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Control of Abnormal Synchronization in Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Popovych, Oleksandr V.; Tass, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    In the nervous system, synchronization processes play an important role, e.g., in the context of information processing and motor control. However, pathological, excessive synchronization may strongly impair brain function and is a hallmark of several neurological disorders. This focused review addresses the question of how an abnormal neuronal synchronization can specifically be counteracted by invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation as, for instance, by deep brain stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, or by acoustic stimulation for the treatment of tinnitus. On the example of coordinated reset (CR) neuromodulation, we illustrate how insights into the dynamics of complex systems contribute to successful model-based approaches, which use methods from synergetics, non-linear dynamics, and statistical physics, for the development of novel therapies for normalization of brain function and synaptic connectivity. Based on the intrinsic multistability of the neuronal populations induced by spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), CR neuromodulation utilizes the mutual interdependence between synaptic connectivity and dynamics of the neuronal networks in order to restore more physiological patterns of connectivity via desynchronization of neuronal activity. The very goal is to shift the neuronal population by stimulation from an abnormally coupled and synchronized state to a desynchronized regime with normalized synaptic connectivity, which significantly outlasts the stimulation cessation, so that long-lasting therapeutic effects can be achieved. PMID:25566174

  16. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  17. Abnormal Fixational Eye Movements in Amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Kumar, Priyanka; Ghasia, Fatema F

    2016-01-01

    Fixational saccades shift the foveal image to counteract visual fading related to neural adaptation. Drifts are slow eye movements between two adjacent fixational saccades. We quantified fixational saccades and asked whether their changes could be attributed to pathologic drifts seen in amblyopia, one of the most common causes of blindness in childhood. Thirty-six pediatric subjects with varying severity of amblyopia and eleven healthy age-matched controls held their gaze on a visual target. Eye movements were measured with high-resolution video-oculography during fellow eye-viewing and amblyopic eye-viewing conditions. Fixational saccades and drifts were analyzed in the amblyopic and fellow eye and compared with controls. We found an increase in the amplitude with decreased frequency of fixational saccades in children with amblyopia. These alterations in fixational eye movements correlated with the severity of their amblyopia. There was also an increase in eye position variance during drifts in amblyopes. There was no correlation between the eye position variance or the eye velocity during ocular drifts and the amplitude of subsequent fixational saccade. Our findings suggest that abnormalities in fixational saccades in amblyopia are independent of the ocular drift. This investigation of amblyopia in pediatric age group quantitatively characterizes the fixation instability. Impaired properties of fixational saccades could be the consequence of abnormal processing and reorganization of the visual system in amblyopia. Paucity in the visual feedback during amblyopic eye-viewing condition can attribute to the increased eye position variance and drift velocity.

  18. Pain assessment in self-injurious patients with borderline personality disorder using signal detection theory.

    PubMed

    Kemperman, I; Russ, M J; Clark, W C; Kakuma, T; Zanine, E; Harrison, K

    1997-05-30

    Signal detection theory measures of thermal responsivity were examined to determine whether differences in reported pain experienced during self-injurious behavior in female patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are explained by neurosensory factors and/or attitudinal factors (response bias). Female patients with BPD who do not experience pain during self-injury (BPD-NP group) were found to discriminate more poorly between noxious thermal stimuli of similar intensity, low P(A), than female patients with BPD who experience pain during self-injury (BPD-P group), female patients with BPD who do not have a history of self-injury (BPD-C group), and age-matched normal women. The BPD-NP group also had a higher response criterion, B (more stoical) than the BPD-C group. These findings suggest that 'analgesia' during self-injury in patients with BPD is related to both neurosensory and attitudinal/psychological abnormalities.

  19. Intensity Biased PSP Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, Chelakara S.; Amer, Tahani R.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The current pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique assumes a linear relationship (Stern-Volmer Equation) between intensity ratio (I(sub 0)/I) and pressure ratio (P/P(sub 0)) over a wide range of pressures (vacuum to ambient or higher). Although this may be valid for some PSPs, in most PSPs the relationship is nonlinear, particularly at low pressures (less than 0.2 psia when the oxygen level is low). This non-linearity can be attributed to variations in the oxygen quenching (de-activation) rates (which otherwise is assumed constant) at these pressures. Other studies suggest that some paints also have non-linear calibrations at high pressures; because of heterogeneous (non-uniform) oxygen diffusion and c quenching. Moreover, pressure sensitive paints require correction for the output intensity due to light intensity variation, paint coating variation, model dynamics, wind-off reference pressure variation, and temperature sensitivity. Therefore to minimize the measurement uncertainties due to these causes, an in- situ intensity correction method was developed. A non-oxygen quenched paint (which provides a constant intensity at all pressures, called non-pressure sensitive paint, NPSP) was used for the reference intensity (I(sub NPSP)) with respect to which all the PSP intensities (I) were measured. The results of this study show that in order to fully reap the benefits of this technique, a totally oxygen impermeable NPSP must be available.

  20. Intensity Biased PSP Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, Chelakara S.; Amer, Tahani R.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Burkett, Cecil G., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The current pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique assumes a linear relationship (Stern-Volmer Equation) between intensity ratio (I(sub o)/I) and pressure ratio (P/P(sub o)) over a wide range of pressures (vacuum to ambient or higher). Although this may be valid for some PSPs, in most PSPs the relationship is nonlinear, particularly at low pressures (less than 0.2 psia when the oxygen level is low). This non-linearity can be attributed to variations in the oxygen quenching (de-activation) rates (which otherwise is assumed constant) at these pressures. Other studies suggest that some paints also have non-linear calibrations at high pressures; because of heterogeneous (non-uniform) oxygen diffusion and quenching. Moreover, pressure sensitive paints require correction for the output intensity due to light intensity variation, paint coating variation, model dynamics, wind-off reference pressure variation, and temperature sensitivity. Therefore to minimize the measurement uncertainties due to these causes, an insitu intensity correction method was developed. A non-oxygen quenched paint (which provides a constant intensity at all pressures, called non-pressure sensitive paint, NPSP) was used for the reference intensity (I(sub NPSP) with respect to which all the PSP intensities (I) were measured. The results of this study show that in order to fully reap the benefits of this technique, a totally oxygen impermeable NPSP must be available.

  1. Using K-Nearest Neighbor Classification to Diagnose Abnormal Lung Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin-Hsing; Huang, Wen-Tzeng; Tan, Tan-Hsu; Chang, Cheng-Chun; Chang, Yuan-Jen

    2015-01-01

    A reported 30% of people worldwide have abnormal lung sounds, including crackles, rhonchi, and wheezes. To date, the traditional stethoscope remains the most popular tool used by physicians to diagnose such abnormal lung sounds, however, many problems arise with the use of a stethoscope, including the effects of environmental noise, the inability to record and store lung sounds for follow-up or tracking, and the physician’s subjective diagnostic experience. This study has developed a digital stethoscope to help physicians overcome these problems when diagnosing abnormal lung sounds. In this digital system, mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) were used to extract the features of lung sounds, and then the K-means algorithm was used for feature clustering, to reduce the amount of data for computation. Finally, the K-nearest neighbor method was used to classify the lung sounds. The proposed system can also be used for home care: if the percentage of abnormal lung sound frames is > 30% of the whole test signal, the system can automatically warn the user to visit a physician for diagnosis. We also used bend sensors together with an amplification circuit, Bluetooth, and a microcontroller to implement a respiration detector. The respiratory signal extracted by the bend sensors can be transmitted to the computer via Bluetooth to calculate the respiratory cycle, for real-time assessment. If an abnormal status is detected, the device will warn the user automatically. Experimental results indicated that the error in respiratory cycles between measured and actual values was only 6.8%, illustrating the potential of our detector for home care applications. PMID:26053756

  2. The Frequency and Severity of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Abnormalities in Infants with Mild Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Brian H; Neil, Jeffrey; Morey, JoAnn; Yang, Edward; Silvera, Michelle V; Inder, Terrie E; Ortinau, Cynthia

    2017-08-01

    To assess and contrast the incidence and severity of abnormalities on cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between infants with mild, moderate, and severe neonatal encephalopathy who received therapeutic hypothermia. This retrospective cohort studied infants with mild, moderate, and severe neonatal encephalopathy who received therapeutic hypothermia at a single tertiary neonatal intensive care unit between 2013 and 2015. Two neuroradiologists masked to the clinical condition evaluated brain MRIs for cerebral injury after therapeutic hypothermia using the Barkovich classification system. Additional abnormalities not included in this classification system were also noted. The rate, pattern, and severity of abnormalities/injury were compared across the grades of neonatal encephalopathy. Eighty-nine infants received therapeutic hypothermia and met study criteria, 48 with mild neonatal encephalopathy, 35 with moderate neonatal encephalopathy, and 6 with severe neonatal encephalopathy. Forty-eight infants (54%) had an abnormality on MRI. There was no difference in the rate of overall MRI abnormalities by grade of neonatal encephalopathy (mild neonatal encephalopathy 54%, moderate neonatal encephalopathy 54%, and severe neonatal encephalopathy 50%; P= .89). Basal ganglia/thalamic injury was more common in those with severe neonatal encephalopathy (mild neonatal encephalopathy 4%, moderate neonatal encephalopathy 9%, severe neonatal encephalopathy 34%; P = .03). In contrast, watershed injury did not differ between neonatal encephalopathy grades (mild neonatal encephalopathy 36%, moderate neonatal encephalopathy 32%, severe neonatal encephalopathy 50%; P = .3). Mild neonatal encephalopathy is commonly associated with MRI abnormalities after therapeutic hypothermia. The grade of neonatal encephalopathy during the first hours of life may not discriminate adequately between infants with and without cerebral injury noted on MRI after therapeutic hypothermia

  3. Ergonomics for enhancing detection of machine abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Illankoon, Prasanna; Abeysekera, John; Singh, Sarbjeet

    2016-10-17

    Detecting abnormal machine conditions is of great importance in an autonomous maintenance environment. Ergonomic aspects can be invaluable when detection of machine abnormalities using human senses is examined. This research outlines the ergonomic issues involved in detecting machine abnormalities and suggests how ergonomics would improve such detections. Cognitive Task Analysis was performed in a plant in Sri Lanka where Total Productive Maintenance is being implemented to identify sensory types that would be used to detect machine abnormalities and relevant Ergonomic characteristics. As the outcome of this research, a methodology comprising of an Ergonomic Gap Analysis Matrix for machine abnormality detection is presented.

  4. [INDIVIDUAL EVALUATION OF LORETA ABNORMALITIES IN IDIOPATHIC GENERALIZED EPILEPSY].

    PubMed

    Clemens, Béla; Puskás, Szilvia; Besenyei, Mónika; Kondákor, István; Hollódy, Katalin; Fogarasi, Andrós; Bense, Katalin; Emri, Miklós; Opposits Gábor; Kovács, Noémi Zsuzsanna; Fekete, István

    2016-03-30

    Contemporary neuroimaging methods disclosed structural and functional cerebral abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs). However, individual electrical (EEG) abnormalities have not been evaluated yet in IGE patients. IGE patients were investigated in the drug-free condition and after 3-6 month of antiepileptic treatment. To estimate the reproducibility of qEEG variables a retrospective recruited cohort of IGE patients was investigated. 19-channel resting state EEG activity was recorded. For each patient a total of 2 minutes EEG activity was analyzed by LORETA (Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography). Raw LORETA values were Z-transformed and projected to a MRI template. Z-values outside within the [+3Z] to [-3Z] range were labelled as statistically abnormal. 1. In drug-free condition, 41-50% of IGE patients showed abnormal LORETA values. 2. Abnormal LORETA findings showed great inter-individual variability. 3. Most abnormal LORETA-findings were symmetrical. 4. Most maximum Z-values were localized to frontal or temporal cortex. 5. Succesfull treatment was mostly coupled with disappearence of LORETA-abnormality, persistent seizures were accompanied by persistent LORETA abnormality. 1. LORETA abnormalities detected in the untreated condition reflect seizure-generating property of the cortex in IGE patients. 2. Maximum LORETA-Z abnormalities were topographically congruent with structural abnormalities reported by other research groups. 3. LORETA might help to investigate drug effects at the whole-brain level.

  5. Clozapine-induced EEG abnormalities and clinical response to clozapine.

    PubMed

    Risby, E D; Epstein, C M; Jewart, R D; Nguyen, B V; Morgan, W N; Risch, S C; Thrivikraman, K V; Lewine, R L

    1995-01-01

    The authors hypothesized that patients who develop gross EEG abnormalities during clozapine treatment would have a less favorable outcome than patients who did not develop abnormal EEGs. The clinical EEGs and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) scores of 12 patients with schizophrenia and 4 patients with schizoaffective disorder were compared before and during treatment with clozapine. Eight patients developed significant EEG abnormalities on clozapine; 1 showed worsening of an abnormal pre-clozapine EEG; none of these subjects had clinical seizures. BPRS scores improved significantly in the group of patients who developed abnormal EEGs but not in the group who did not. Findings are consistent with previous reports of a high incidence of clozapine-induced EEG abnormalities and a positive association between these abnormalities and clinical improvement.

  6. What proportion of congenital abnormalities can be prevented?

    PubMed Central

    Czeizel, A E; Intôdy, Z; Modell, B

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To estimate the proportion of preventable congenital abnormalities in Hungary. DESIGN--Analysis of available Hungarian data-bases and of the effectiveness of primary, secondary, and tertiary preventive methods. SETTING--Databases of ad hoc epidemiological studies and of the Hungarian congenital abnormality registry. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Prevalence at birth and prevalence after prevention in 73 congenital abnormality types or groups. RESULTS--Preventive methods are available for 51 (70%) of the 73 congenital abnormality types or groups evaluated. The birth prevalence of all congenital abnormalities could be reduced from 65 to 26 per 1000; thus 39 per 1000 (60%) are preventable. Without congenital dislocation of the hip, which is unusually common in Hungary, the preventable proportion of congenital abnormalities is 52%. CONCLUSION--Many congenital abnormalities can be prevented, but as they do not represent a single pathological category there is no single strategy for their prevention. Images p502-a p503-a PMID:8448464

  7. [Intensive medicine in Spain].

    PubMed

    2011-03-01

    Intensive care medicine is a medical specialty that was officially established in our country in 1978, with a 5-year training program including two years of common core training followed by three years of specific training in an intensive care unit accredited for training. During this 32-year period, intensive care medicine has carried out an intense and varied activity, which has allowed its positioning as an attractive and with future specialty in the hospital setting. This document summarizes the history of the specialty, its current situation, the key role played in the programs of organ donation and transplantation of the National Transplant Organization (after more than 20 years of mutual collaboration), its training activities with the development of the National Plan of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, with a trajectory of more than 25 years, its interest in providing care based on quality and safety programs for the severely ill patient. It also describes the development of reference registries due to the need for reliable data on the care process for the most prevalent diseases, such as ischemic heart disease or ICU-acquired infections, based on long-term experience (more than 15 years), which results in the availability of epidemiological information and characteristics of care that may affect the practical patient's care. Moreover, features of its scientific society (SEMICYUC) are reported, an organization that agglutinates the interests of more than 280 ICUs and more than 2700 intensivists, with reference to the journal Medicina Intensiva, the official journal of the society and the Panamerican and Iberian Federation of Critical Medicine and Intensive Care Societies. Medicina Intensiva is indexed in the Thompson Reuters products of Science Citation Index Expanded (Scisearch(®)) and Journal Citation Reports, Science Edition. The important contribution of the Spanish intensive care medicine to the scientific community is also analyzed, and in relation to

  8. EIT Intensity Noise Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescimanno, Michael; Xiao, Yanhong; Baryakhtar, Maria; Hohensee, Michael; Phillips, David; Walsworth, Ron

    2008-10-01

    Intensity noise correlations in coherently-prepared media can reveal underlying spectroscopic detail, such as power broadening-free resonances. We analyze recent experimental results using very simple theory: The intensity noise correlation spectra can be quantitatively understood entirely in terms of static ensemble averages of the medium's steady state response. This is significantly simpler than stochastic integration of the Bloch equations, and leads to physical insights we apply to non-linear Faraday rotation and noise spectra in optically thick media.

  9. Enhanced visualization of abnormalities in digital-mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Susan S.; Moore, William E.

    2002-05-01

    This paper describes two new presentation methods that are intended to improve the ability of radiologists to visualize abnormalities in mammograms by enhancing the appearance of the breast parenchyma pattern relative to the fatty-tissue surroundings. The first method, referred to as mountain- view, is obtained via multiscale edge decomposition through filter banks. The image is displayed in a multiscale edge domain that causes the image to have a topographic-like appearance. The second method displays the image in the intensity domain and is referred to as contrast-enhancement presentation. The input image is first passed through a decomposition filter bank to produce a filtered output (Id). The image at the lowest resolution is processed using a LUT (look-up table) to produce a tone scaled image (I'). The LUT is designed to optimally map the code value range corresponding to the parenchyma pattern in the mammographic image into the dynamic range of the output medium. The algorithm uses a contrast weight control mechanism to produce the desired weight factors to enhance the edge information corresponding to the parenchyma pattern. The output image is formed using a reconstruction filter bank through I' and enhanced Id.

  10. RASSP signal processing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, Fred; Bassett, Bob; Letellier, J. P.

    1995-06-01

    The rapid prototyping of application specific signal processors (RASSP) program is an ARPA/tri-service effort to dramatically improve the process by which complex digital systems, particularly embedded signal processors, are specified, designed, documented, manufactured, and supported. The domain of embedded signal processing was chosen because it is important to a variety of military and commercial applications as well as for the challenge it presents in terms of complexity and performance demands. The principal effort is being performed by two major contractors, Lockheed Sanders (Nashua, NH) and Martin Marietta (Camden, NJ). For both, improvements in methodology are to be exercised and refined through the performance of individual 'Demonstration' efforts. The Lockheed Sanders' Demonstration effort is to develop an infrared search and track (IRST) processor. In addition, both contractors' results are being measured by a series of externally administered (by Lincoln Labs) six-month Benchmark programs that measure process improvement as a function of time. The first two Benchmark programs are designing and implementing a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processor. Our demonstration team is using commercially available VME modules from Mercury Computer to assemble a multiprocessor system scalable from one to hundreds of Intel i860 microprocessors. Custom modules for the sensor interface and display driver are also being developed. This system implements either proprietary or Navy owned algorithms to perform the compute-intensive IRST function in real time in an avionics environment. Our Benchmark team is designing custom modules using commercially available processor ship sets, communication submodules, and reconfigurable logic devices. One of the modules contains multiple vector processors optimized for fast Fourier transform processing. Another module is a fiberoptic interface that accepts high-rate input data from the sensors and provides video-rate output data to a

  11. Do abnormal responses show utilitarian bias?

    PubMed

    Kahane, Guy; Shackel, Nicholas

    2008-03-20

    Neuroscience has recently turned to the study of utilitarian and non-utilitarian moral judgement. Koenigs et al. examine the responses of normal subjects and those with ventromedial-prefrontal-cortex (VMPC) damage to moral scenarios drawn from functional magnetic resonance imaging studies by Greene et al., and claim that patients with VMPC damage have an abnormally "utilitarian" pattern of moral judgement. It is crucial to the claims of Koenigs et al. that the scenarios of Greene et al. pose a conflict between utilitarian consequence and duty: however, many of them do not meet this condition. Because of this methodological problem, it is too early to claim that VMPC patients have a utilitarian bias.

  12. Computed tomography of the abnormal thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, R.L.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) should be the imaging method of choice following plain chest radiographs when a suspected thymic abnormality requires further evaluation. Based upon a six-year experience, including the evaluation of 25 patients with thymic pathology, CT was found useful in suggesting or excluding a diagnosis of thymoma and in distinguishing thymic hyperplasis from thymoma in patients with myasthenia gravis. The thickness of the thymic lobes determined by CT was found to be a more accurate indicator of infiltrative disease (thymic hyperplasia and lymphoma) than the width. CT was helpful in differentiating benign thymic cysts from solid tumors, and inmore » defining the extent of a thymic neoplasms. On occasion, CT may suggest the specific histologic nature of a thymic lesion.« less

  13. An adolescent girl with abnormal liver profile.

    PubMed

    Nair, S; Pitchumoni, C S

    1998-04-01

    A 17-year-old previously healthy high school student who lived in a dormitory was referred to our office by her private physician for evaluation of abnormal liver function tests. She was sexually active with one partner but denied any current or past substance abuse. The patient was not taking any medications or nutritional supplements. Family history was unremarkable. Physical examination revealed scleral icterus and minimal hepatomegaly. Spleen was not palpable. The liver function tests are shown in table 1. Total leucocyte count was 6.3 x 10(9)/1 with 53% lymphocytes. The platelet count was normal. Anti-Hbc IgM antibody was negative, so were anti-HAV IgM and anti-HCV antibodies. HBsAg was negative and anti-HBs antibody was positive. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was 16 mm in the first hour. An abdominal sonogram was done to evaluate a persistent elevation in alkaline phosphatase and it showed only hepatomegaly.

  14. "Idiopathic" mental retardation and new chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mental retardation is a heterogeneous condition, affecting 1-3% of general population. In the last few years, several emerging clinical entities have been described, due to the advent of newest genetic techniques, such as array Comparative Genomic Hybridization. The detection of cryptic microdeletion/microduplication abnormalities has allowed genotype-phenotype correlations, delineating recognizable syndromic conditions that are herein reviewed. With the aim to provide to Paediatricians a combined clinical and genetic approach to the child with cognitive impairment, a practical diagnostic algorithm is also illustrated. The use of microarray platforms has further reduced the percentage of "idiopathic" forms of mental retardation, previously accounted for about half of total cases. We discussed the putative pathways at the basis of remaining "pure idiopathic" forms of mental retardation, highlighting possible environmental and epigenetic mechanisms as causes of altered cognition. PMID:20152051

  15. Microstructural Abnormalities Were Found in Brain Gray Matter from Patients with Chronic Myofascial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Peng; Qin, Bangyong; Song, Ganjun; Zhang, Yi; Cao, Song; Yu, Jin; Wu, Jianjiang; Wang, Jiang; Zhang, Tijiang; Zhang, Xiaoming; Yu, Tian; Zheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain, presented as myofascial trigger points (MTrPs)-related pain, is a common, chronic disease involving skeletal muscle, but its underlying mechanisms have been poorly understood. Previous studies have revealed that chronic pain can induce microstructural abnormalities in the cerebral gray matter. However, it remains unclear whether the brain gray matters of patients with chronic MTrPs-related pain undergo alteration. In this study, we employed the Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI) technique, which is particularly sensitive to brain microstructural perturbation, to monitor the MTrPs-related microstructural alterations in brain gray matter of patients with chronic pain. Our results revealed that, in comparison with the healthy controls, patients with chronic myofascial pain exhibited microstructural abnormalities in the cerebral gray matter and these lesions were mainly distributed in the limbic system and the brain areas involved in the pain matrix. In addition, we showed that microstructural abnormalities in the right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) had a significant negative correlation with the course of disease and pain intensity. The results of this study demonstrated for the first time that there are microstructural abnormalities in the brain gray matter of patients with MTrPs-related chronic pain. Our findings may provide new insights into the future development of appropriate therapeutic strategies to this disease. PMID:28066193

  16. The incidence of chromosome abnormalities in neonates with structural heart disease.

    PubMed

    Dykes, John C; Al-mousily, Mohammad F; Abuchaibe, Eda-Cristina; Silva, Jennifer N; Zadinsky, Jennifer; Duarte, Daniel; Welch, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of chromosomal anomalies in newborns with structural heart disease admitted to the cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) at Nicklaus Children's Hospital (NCH). A retrospective review identified newborns age 30 days or less admitted to NCH CICU between 2004 and 2010. Patients with structural heart disease who required admission to our CICU and received karyotype or karyotype and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) testing were included in the study. All patients were examined for the presence of dysmorphic features. Four hundred and eighty-two patients met the criteria for the study; 405 (84%) received both karyotype and FISH. Chromosome abnormalities were present in 86 (17.8%) patients. Syndromes accounted for 20 (5.1%) of those with normal chromosomes. Dysmorphic features were seen in 79.1% of patients with abnormal chromosomes and 25.5% of those with normal chromosomes. All patients with syndromes were dysmorphic. Race and gender did not significantly affect the incidence of genetic abnormalities. Chromosome abnormalities, including syndromes, are prevalent in newborns with congenital heart disease. Further research is needed to evaluate the utility of cytogenetic screening in all children with congenital heart disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Amplitude of low frequency fluctuation abnormalities in adolescents with online gaming addiction.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kai; Jin, Chenwang; Cheng, Ping; Yang, Xuejuan; Dong, Tao; Bi, Yanzhi; Xing, Lihong; von Deneen, Karen M; Yu, Dahua; Liu, Junyu; Liang, Jun; Cheng, Tingting; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    The majority of previous neuroimaging studies have demonstrated both structural and task-related functional abnormalities in adolescents with online gaming addiction (OGA). However, few functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies focused on the regional intensity of spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) during the resting state and fewer studies investigated the relationship between the abnormal resting-state properties and the impaired cognitive control ability. In the present study, we employed the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) method to explore the local features of spontaneous brain activity in adolescents with OGA and healthy controls during resting-state. Eighteen adolescents with OGA and 18 age-, education- and gender-matched healthy volunteers participated in this study. Compared with healthy controls, adolescents with OGA showed a significant increase in ALFF values in the left medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), the left precuneus, the left supplementary motor area (SMA), the right parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) and the bilateral middle cingulate cortex (MCC). The abnormalities of these regions were also detected in previous addiction studies. More importantly, we found that ALFF values of the left medial OFC and left precuneus were positively correlated with the duration of OGA in adolescents with OGA. The ALFF values of the left medial OFC were also correlated with the color-word Stroop test performance. Our results suggested that the abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity of these regions may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of OGA.

  18. Adding signals to coordinated traffic signal systems.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1983-08-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of adding or : removing traffic signals within a coordinated, signal-controlled street network. : The report includes a discussion of coordinated signal systems; arterial street : network con...

  19. Abnormal auditory pattern perception in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Haigh, Sarah M; Coffman, Brian A; Murphy, Timothy K; Butera, Christiana D; Salisbury, Dean F

    2016-10-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) in response to deviation from physical sound parameters (e.g., pitch, duration) is reduced in individuals with long-term schizophrenia (Sz), suggesting deficits in deviance detection. However, MMN can appear at several time intervals as part of deviance detection. Understanding which part of the processing stream is abnormal in Sz is crucial for understanding MMN pathophysiology. We measured MMN to complex pattern deviants, which have been shown to produce multiple MMNs in healthy controls (HC). Both simple and complex MMNs were recorded from 27 Sz and 27 matched HC. For simple MMN, pitch- and duration-deviants were presented among frequent standard tones. For complex MMN, patterns of five single tones were repeatedly presented, with the occasional deviant group of tones containing an extra sixth tone. Sz showed smaller pitch MMN (p=0.009, ~110ms) and duration MMN (p=0.030, ~170ms) than healthy controls. For complex MMN, there were two deviance-related negativities. The first (~150ms) was not significantly different between HC and SZ. The second was significantly reduced in Sz (p=0.011, ~400ms). The topography of the late complex MMN was consistent with generators in anterior temporal cortex. Worse late MMN in Sz was associated with increased emotional withdrawal, poor attention, lack of spontaneity/conversation, and increased preoccupation. Late MMN blunting in schizophrenia suggests a deficit in later stages of deviance processing. Correlations with negative symptoms measures are preliminary, but suggest that abnormal complex auditory perceptual processes may compound higher-order cognitive and social deficits in the disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Abnormal electroretinogram associated with developmental brain anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Cibis, G W; Fitzgerald, K M

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have encountered abnormal ERGs associated with optic nerve hypoplasia, macular, optic nerve and chorioretinal colobomata and developmental brain anomalies. Brain anomalies include cortical dysgenesis, lissencephaly, porencephaly, cerebellar and corpus callosum hypoplasia. We describe six exemplar cases. METHODS: Scotopic and photopic ERGs adherent to international standards were performed as well as photopic ERGs to long-duration stimuli. CT or MRI studies were also done. The ERGs were compared to age-matched normal control subjects. RESULTS: ERG changes include reduced amplitude b-waves to blue and red stimuli under scotopic testing conditions. Implicit times were often delayed. The photopic responses also showed reduced amplitude a- and b-waves with implicit time delays. The long-duration photopic ERG done in one case shows attenuation of both ON- and OFF-responses. CONCLUSIONS: Common underlying developmental genetic or environmental unifying casualties are speculated to be at fault in causing these cases of associated retinal and brain abnormalities. No single etiology is expected. Multiple potential causes acting early in embryogenesis effecting neuronal induction, migration and differentiation are theorized. These occur at a time when brain and retinal cells are sufficiently undifferentiated to be similarly effected. We call these cases examples of Brain Retina Neuroembryodysgenesis (BRNED). Homeobox and PAX genes with global neuronal developmental influences are gene candidates to unify the observed disruption of brain and retinal cell development. The ERG can provide a valuable clinical addition in understanding and ultimately classifying these disorders. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:8719676