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Sample records for abnormal skin barrier

  1. Reevaluation of the non-lesional dry skin in atopic dermatitis by acute barrier disruption: an abnormal permeability barrier homeostasis with defective processing to generate ceramide.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Ayumi; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Atsuko; Imokawa, Genji

    2014-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is characterized by disruption of the cutaneous barrier due to reduced ceramide levels even in non-lesional dry skin. Following further acute barrier disruption by repeated tape strippings, we re-characterized the non-lesional dry skin of subjects with atopic dermatitis, which shows significantly reduced levels of barrier function and ceramide but not of beta-glucocerebrosidase activity. For the first time, we report an abnormal trans-epidermal water loss homeostasis in which delayed recovery kinetics of trans-epidermal water loss occurred on the first day during the 4 days after acute barrier disruption compared with healthy control skin. Interestingly, whereas the higher ceramide level in the stratum corneum of healthy control skin was further significantly up-regulated at 4 days post-tape stripping, the lower ceramide level in the stratum corneum of subjects with atopic dermatitis was not significantly changed. In a parallel study, whereas beta-glucocerebrosidase activity at 4 days post-tape stripping was significantly up-regulated in healthy control skin compared with before tape stripping, the level of that activity remained substantially unchanged in atopic dermatitis. These findings indicate that subjects with atopic dermatitis have a defect in sphingolipid-metabolic processing that generates ceramide in the interface between the stratum corneum and the epidermis. The results also support the notion that the continued disruption of barrier function in atopic dermatitis non-lesional skin is associated with the impaired homeostasis of a ceramide-generating process, which underscores an atopy-specific inflammation-triggered ceramide deficiency that is distinct from other types of dermatitis.

  2. Skin - abnormally dark or light

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003242.htm Abnormally dark or light skin To use the sharing features ... The bronze color can range from light to dark (in fair-skinned people) with the degree of ...

  3. Skin Barrier and Calcium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Eun; Lee, Seung Hun

    2018-06-01

    Epidermal barrier formation and the maintenance of barrier homeostasis are essential to protect us from the external environments and organisms. Moreover, impaired keratinocytes differentiation and dysfunctional skin barrier can be the primary causes or aggravating factors for many inflammatory skin diseases including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Therefore, understanding the regulation mechanisms of keratinocytes differentiation and skin barrier homeostasis is important to understand many skin diseases and establish an effective treatment strategy. Calcium ions (Ca 2+ ) and their concentration gradient in the epidermis are essential in regulating many skin functions, including keratinocyte differentiation, skin barrier formation, and permeability barrier homeostasis. Recent studies have suggested that the intracellular Ca 2+ stores such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are the major components that form the epidermal calcium gradient and the ER calcium homeostasis is crucial for regulating keratinocytes differentiation, intercellular junction formation, antimicrobial barrier, and permeability barrier homeostasis. Thus, both Ca 2+ release from intracellular stores, such as the ER and Ca 2+ influx mechanisms are important in skin barrier. In addition, growing evidences identified the functional existence and the role of many types of calcium channels which mediate calcium flux in keratinocytes. In this review, the origin of epidermal calcium gradient and their role in the formation and regulation of skin barrier are focused. We also focus on the role of ER calcium homeostasis in skin barrier. Furthermore, the distribution and role of epidermal calcium channels, including transient receptor potential channels, store-operated calcium entry channel Orai1, and voltage-gated calcium channels in skin barrier are discussed.

  4. [Normal and abnormal skin color].

    PubMed

    Ortonne, J-P

    2012-11-01

    The varieties of normal skin color in humans range from people of "no color" (pale white) to "people of color" (light brown, dark brown, and black). Skin color is a blend resulting from the skin chromophores red (oxyhaemoglobin), blue (deoxygenated haemoglobin), yellow-orange (carotene, an exogenous pigment), and brown (melanin). Melanin, however, is the major component of skin color ; it is the presence or absence of melanin in the melanosomes in melanocytes and melanin in keratinocytes that is responsible for epidermal pigmentation, and the presence of melanin in macrophages or melanocytes in the dermis that is responsible for dermal pigmentation. Two groups of pigmentary disorders are commonly distinguished: the disorders of the quantitative and qualitative distribution of normal pigment and the abnormal presence of exogenous or endogenous pigments in the skin. The first group includes hyperpigmentations, which clinically manifest by darkening of the skin color, and leukodermia, which is characterized by lightening of the skin. Hypermelanosis corresponds to an overload of melanin or an abnormal distribution of melanin in the skin. Depending on the color, melanodermia (brown/black) and ceruloderma (blue/grey) are distinguished. Melanodermia correspond to epidermal hypermelanocytosis (an increased number of melanocytes) or epidermal hypermelanosis (an increase in the quantity of melanin in the epidermis with no modification of the number of melanocytes). Ceruloderma correspond to dermal hypermelanocytosis (abnormal presence in the dermis of cells synthesizing melanins) ; leakage in the dermis of epidermal melanin also exists, a form of dermal hypermelanosis called pigmentary incontinence. Finally, dyschromia can be related to the abnormal presence in the skin of a pigment of exogenous or endogenous origin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Standards for the Protection of Skin Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Arnau, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The skin is a vital organ, and through our skin we are in close contact with the entire environment. If we lose our skin we lose our life. The barrier function of the skin is mainly driven by the sophisticated epidermis in close relationship with the dermis. The epidermal epithelium is a mechanically, chemically, biologically and immunologically active barrier submitted to continuous turnover. The barrier function of the skin needs to be protected and restored. Its own physiology allows its recovery, but many times this is not sufficient. This chapter is focused on the standards to restore, treat and prevent barrier function disruption. These standards were developed from a scientific, academic and clinical point of view. There is a lack of standardized administrative recommendations. Still, there is a walk to do that will help to reduce the social and economic burden of diseases characterized by an abnormal skin barrier function. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Penetration through the Skin Barrier.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Benfeldt, Eva; Holmgaard, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    The skin is a strong and flexible organ with barrier properties essential for maintaining homeostasis and thereby human life. Characterizing this barrier is the ability to prevent some chemicals from crossing the barrier while allowing others, including medicinal products, to pass at varying rates. During recent decades, the latter has received increased attention as a route for intentionally delivering drugs to patients. This has stimulated research in methods for sampling, measuring and predicting percutaneous penetration. Previous chapters have described how different endogenous, genetic and exogenous factors may affect barrier characteristics. The present chapter introduces the theory for barrier penetration (Fick's law), and describes and discusses different methods for measuring the kinetics of percutaneous penetration of chemicals, including in vitro methods (static and flow-through diffusion cells) as well as in vivo methods (microdialysis and microperfusion). Then follows a discussion with examples of how different characteristics of the skin (age, site and integrity) and of the penetrants (size, solubility, ionization, logPow and vehicles) affect the kinetics of percutaneous penetration. Finally, a short discussion of the advantages and challenges of each method is provided, which will hopefully allow the reader to improve decision making and treatment planning, as well as the evaluation of experimental studies of percutaneous penetration of chemicals. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. The Infant Skin Barrier: Can We Preserve, Protect, and Enhance the Barrier?

    PubMed Central

    Telofski, Lorena S.; Morello, A. Peter; Mack Correa, M. Catherine; Stamatas, Georgios N.

    2012-01-01

    Infant skin is different from adult in structure, function, and composition. Despite these differences, the skin barrier is competent at birth in healthy, full-term neonates. The primary focus of this paper is on the developing skin barrier in healthy, full-term neonates and infants. Additionally, a brief discussion of the properties of the skin barrier in premature neonates and infants with abnormal skin conditions (i.e., atopic dermatitis and eczema) is included. As infant skin continues to mature through the first years of life, it is important that skin care products (e.g., cleansers and emollients) are formulated appropriately. Ideally, products that are used on infants should not interfere with skin surface pH or perturb the skin barrier. For cleansers, this can be achieved by choosing the right type of surfactant, by blending surfactants, or by blending hydrophobically-modified polymers (HMPs) with surfactants to increase product mildness. Similarly, choosing the right type of oil for emollients is important. Unlike some vegetable oils, mineral oil is more stable and is not subject to oxidation and hydrolysis. Although emollients can improve the skin barrier, more studies are needed to determine the potential long-term benefits of using emollients on healthy, full-term neonates and infants. PMID:22988452

  8. Abnormal Barrier Function in Gastrointestinal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Farré, Ricard; Vicario, María

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing concern in identifying the mechanisms underlying the intimate control of the intestinal barrier, as deregulation of its function is strongly associated with digestive (organic and functional) and a number of non-digestive (schizophrenia, diabetes, sepsis, among others) disorders. The intestinal barrier is a complex and effective defensive functional system that operates to limit luminal antigen access to the internal milieu while maintaining nutrient and electrolyte absorption. Intestinal permeability to substances is mainly determined by the physicochemical properties of the barrier, with the epithelium, mucosal immunity, and neural activity playing a major role. In functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs), the absence of structural or biochemical abnormalities that explain chronic symptoms is probably close to its end, as recent research is providing evidence of structural gut alterations, at least in certain subsets, mainly in functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). These alterations are associated with increased permeability, which seems to reflect mucosal inflammation and neural activation. The participation of each anatomical and functional component of barrier function in homeostasis and intestinal dysfunction is described, with a special focus on FGIDs.

  9. Matching the skin barrier to the skin type.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Hyacinth; North, Jacqui; Davenport, Rebecca; Williams, Julia

    Peristomal skin problems are thought to be common (Herlufsson et al, 2006; Williams et al, 2010), and can interfere with the security of stoma products. Stoma patients are reliant on the integrity of their peristomal skin to maintain a normal lifestyle. Bekkers et al (1996) highlighted that, if the peristomal skin becomes damaged, it not only affects the person physically, but also psychologically, ultimately prolonging rehabilitation and adaptation to the stoma. Therefore, it can be concluded that maintaining skin integrity is a basic and essential skill in ensuring good stoma management. This article explores the assessment of four stoma patients, highlighting the importance of matching their skin type with their skin barrier for optimum skin protection. The patients have kindly agreed for their case studies to be published as a means of informing others. All names have been changed in line with Nursing and Midwifery Council (2010) guidelines to maintain patient confidentiality. This article was originally presented at the World Council of Enterostomal Therapists' (WCET) annual conference in 2010, receiving first prize at poster presentations.

  10. Skin barrier function recovery after diamond microdermabrasion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hei Sung; Lim, Sook Hee; Song, Ji Youn; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Lee, Ji Ho; Park, Jong Gap; Kim, Hyung Ok; Park, Young Min

    2009-10-01

    Microdermabrasion is a popular method for facial rejuvenation and is performed worldwide. Despite its extensive usage, there are few publications on skin barrier change after microdermabrasion and none concerning diamond microdermabrasion. Our object was to see changes in transepidermal water loss (TEWL), hydration and erythema of the face following diamond microdermabrasion. Twenty-eight patients were included in this spilt face study. TEWL, stratum corneum hydration and the degree of erythema were measured from the right and left sides of the face (forehead and cheek) at baseline. One side of the face was treated with diamond microdermabrasion and the other side was left untreated. Measurements were taken right after the procedure and repeated at set time intervals. Diamond microdermabrasion was associated with a statistically significant increase in TEWL immediately after the procedure and at 24 h. However, on day 2, levels of TEWL were back to baseline. An increase in hydration and erythema was observed right after microdermabrasion, but both returned to baseline on day 1. The results show that skin barrier function of the forehead and cheek recovers within 2 days of diamond microdermabrasion. Diamond microdermabrasion performed on a weekly basis, as presently done, is expected to allow sufficient time for the damaged skin to recover its barrier function in most parts of the face.

  11. Surfactants have multi-fold effects on skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Lemery, Emmanuelle; Briançon, Stéphanie; Chevalier, Yves; Oddos, Thierry; Gohier, Annie; Boyron, Olivier; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine

    2015-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) is responsible for the barrier properties of the skin and the role of intercorneocyte skin lipids, particularly their structural organization, in controlling SC permeability is acknowledged. Upon contacting the skin, surfactants interact with the SC components leading to barrier damage. To improve knowledge of the effect of several classes of surfactant on skin barrier function at three different levels. The influence of treatments of human skin explants with six non-ionic and four ionic surfactant solutions on the physicochemical properties of skin was investigated. Skin surface wettability and polarity were assessed through contact angle measurements. Infrared spectroscopy allowed monitoring the SC lipid organization. The lipid extraction potency of surfactants was evaluated thanks to HPLC-ELSD assays. One anionic and one cationic surfactant increased the skin polarity by removing the sebaceous and epidermal lipids and by disturbing the organization of the lipid matrix. Another cationic surfactant displayed a detergency effect without disturbing the skin barrier. Several non-ionic surfactants disturbed the lipid matrix organization and modified the skin wettability without any extraction of the skin lipids. Finally two non-ionic surfactants did not show any effect on the investigated parameters or on the skin barrier. The polarity, the organization of the lipid matrix and the lipid composition of the skin allowed describing finely how surfactants can interact with the skin and disturb the skin barrier function.

  12. The role of skin barrier in occupational contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Jakasa, Ivone; Thyssen, Jacob P; Kezic, Sanja

    2018-06-12

    Skin diseases represent one of the most common work-related diseases and may have a detrimental effect on social, personal and occupational aspects of life. Contact dermatitis, which comprises predominately irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) accounts for vast majority of occupational skin diseases, especially in occupations associated with frequent skin contact with irritants and contact allergens. Although ICD and ACD have similar clinical manifestation, their pathophysiology and the role of the skin barrier is different. In ICD, perturbation of the skin barrier is the primary event which sets into motion diverse metabolic processes and triggers activation of innate immunity without involvement of adaptive immune system. In ACD, a type IV hypersensitivity reaction induced by contact allergens, the skin barrier impairment may evoke innate signaling pathways during the sensitization phase required for the activation of T-cell adaptive response. Thus, skin barrier impairment may increase the risk of ICD or ACD not only because of enhanced permeability and ingress of irritants and allergens, but also by generation of innate immune signal needed for the induction of allergic response. Hence, an efficient way to prevent CD is to avoid skin barrier damage in the workplace. This review focuses on the skin barrier, how it is affected by skin irritants and how its impairment contributes to development of ICD and ACD. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Using FLIM in the study of permeability barrier function of aged and young skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, P.; Choi, E. H.; Man, M. Q.; Crumrine, D.; Mauro, T.; Elias, P.

    2006-02-01

    Aged skin commonly is afflicted by inflammatory skin diseases or xerosis/eczema that can be triggered or exacerbated by impaired epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. It has been previously described a permeability barrier defect in humans of advanced age (> 75 years), which in a murine analog >18 mos, could be attributed to reduced lipid synthesis synthesis. However, the functional abnormality in moderately aged mice is due not to decreased lipid synthesis, but rather to a specific defect in stratum corneum (SC) acidification causing impaired lipid processing processing. Endogenous Na +/H + antiporter (NHE1) level was found declined in moderately aged mouse epidermis. This acidification defect leads to perturbed permeability barrier homeostasis through more than one pathways, we addressed suboptimal activation of the essential, lipid-processing enzyme, β-glucocerebrosidase (BGC) is linked to elevated SC pH. Finally, the importance of the epidermis acidity is shown by the normalization of barrier function after exogenous acidification of moderately aged skin.

  14. Sebaceous Gland, Hair Shaft, and Epidermal Barrier Abnormalities in Keratosis Pilaris with and without Filaggrin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Robert; Sugarman, Jeffrey L.; Crumrine, Debra; Hupe, Melanie; Mauro, Theodora M.; Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Brandner, Johanna M.; Hennies, Hans-Christian; Schmuth, Matthias; Elias, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Although keratosis pilaris (KP) is common, its etiopathogenesis remains unknown. KP is associated clinically with ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis and molecular genetically with filaggrin-null mutations. In 20 KP patients and 20 matched controls, we assessed the filaggrin and claudin 1 genotypes, the phenotypes by dermatoscopy, and the morphology by light and transmission electron microscopy. Thirty-five percent of KP patients displayed filaggrin mutations, demonstrating that filaggrin mutations only partially account for the KP phenotype. Major histologic and dermatoscopic findings of KP were hyperkeratosis, hypergranulosis, mild T helper cell type 1-dominant lymphocytic inflammation, plugging of follicular orifices, striking absence of sebaceous glands, and hair shaft abnormalities in KP lesions but not in unaffected skin sites. Changes in barrier function and abnormal paracellular permeability were found in both interfollicular and follicular stratum corneum of lesional KP, which correlated ultrastructurally with impaired extracellular lamellar bilayer maturation and organization. All these features were independent of filaggrin genotype. Moreover, ultrastructure of corneodesmosomes and tight junctions appeared normal, immunohistochemistry for claudin 1 showed no reduction in protein amounts, and molecular analysis of claudin 1 was unremarkable. Our findings suggest that absence of sebaceous glands is an early step in KP pathogenesis, resulting in downstream hair shaft and epithelial barrier abnormalities. PMID:25660180

  15. Skin Barrier Disruption - A Requirement for Allergen Sensitization?

    PubMed Central

    De Benedetto, Anna; Kubo, Akiharu; Beck, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    For at least half a century, noninvasive techniques have been available to quantify skin barrier function, and these have shown that a number of human skin conditions and disorders are associated with defects in skin permeability. In the last decade, several genes responsible for skin barrier defects observed in both monogenetic and complex, polygenic disorders have been elucidated and functionally characterized. This has led to an explosion of work in the last six years that has identified pathways connecting epidermal barrier disruption and antigen uptake as well as the quality and/or magnitude of the antigen-specific adaptive immune response. This review will introduce the notion that diseases arise from the dynamic crosstalk that occurs between the skin barrier and immune system using atopic dermatitis or eczema as the disease prototype. Nevertheless, the concepts put forth are highly relevant to a number of antigen-driven disorders for which skin barrier is at least transiently compromised such as psoriasis, allergic contact dermatitis and blistering disorders. PMID:22217737

  16. Development of methods for skin barrier peeling tests.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yuko; Kazuharu, Seki; Kenji, Oishi

    2006-01-01

    We sought to develop a more effective method to evaluate the adhesive properties of skin barriers. The experimental design used was based on 3 principles: partial control, randomization, and repetition. Using these principles, the 180-degree peeling tests were conducted as specified in a standardized methodology (JIS Z0297) to the extent possible. However, the use of a stainless steel plate as a proxy for skin barrier application may result in the stretching and breaking of the skin barrier, making it impossible to obtain suitable measurements. Tests were conducted in constant temperature/ humidity chambers using a Tensilon Automatic Elongation Tester, where a sample was fixed on the side of a sample immobilization device, a sturdy metal (aluminum) box from which the air in the box was drawn off with a vacuum pump. A fluorocarbon polymer film was applied to the adhesive surface of a sample skin barrier. The film was peeled off in the volte-face (180-degree) direction in order to measure adhesive strengths. The films exhibit such properties as (a) ease of removal from the adhesive surface, (b) no resistance to a 180-degree fold back due to the thinness and flexibility of the material, and (c) tolerance of elongation. The adhesive properties of skin barriers were measured by peeling the fluorocarbon polymers in a 180-degree direction. Twelve specimen skin barrier products were selected for measurement, providing results with satisfactory reproducibility. Results based on the conventional stainless steel plate-based testing method acted as a control. The newly developed testing method enables chronological measurement results for skin barriers applied to fluorocarbon polymer films after 24 hours, 48 hours, and longer period.

  17. Interleukin-17 receptor A maintains and protects the skin barrier to prevent allergic skin inflammation1

    PubMed Central

    Floudas, Achilleas; Saunders, Sean P.; Moran, Tara; Schwartz, Christian; Hams, Emily; Fitzgerald, Denise C.; Johnston, James A.; Ogg, Graham S.; McKenzie, Andrew N.; Walsh, Patrick T.; Fallon, Padraic G.

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease affecting up to 20% of children and 3% of adults worldwide and is associated with dysregulation of the skin barrier. While type 2 responses are implicated in AD, emerging evidence indicates potential role for the IL-17A signalling axis in AD pathogenesis. In this study we show that in the filaggrin mutant mouse model of spontaneous AD, IL-17RA deficiency (Il17ra-/-) resulted in severe exacerbation of skin inflammation. Interestingly, Il17ra-/- mice without the filaggrin mutation also developed spontaneous progressive skin inflammation with eosinophilia, increased levels of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) and IL-5 in the skin. Il17ra-/- mice have a defective skin barrier with altered filaggrin expression. The barrier dysregulation and spontaneous skin inflammation in Il17ra-/- mice was dependent on TSLP, but not the other alarmins IL-25 and IL-33. The associated skin inflammation was mediated by IL-5 expressing pathogenic effector (pe) Th2 cells and was independent of TCRγδ T cells and IL-22. An absence of IL-17RA in non-hematopoietic cells, but not in the hematopoietic cells, was required for the development of spontaneous skin inflammation. Skin microbiome dysbiosis developed in the absence of IL-17RA, with antibiotic intervention resulting in significant amelioration of skin inflammation and reductions in skin infiltrating peTh2 cells and TSLP. This study describes a previously unappreciated protective role for IL-17RA signalling in regulation of the skin barrier and maintenance of skin immune homeostasis. PMID:28615416

  18. Acute irritant threshold correlates with barrier function, skin hydration and contact hypersensitivity in atopic dermatitis and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Kazandjieva, Jana; Tsankov, Nikolai; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to disclose interactions between epidermal barrier, skin irritation and sensitization in healthy and diseased skin. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and stratum corneum hydration (SCH) were assessed in adult patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), rosacea and healthy controls. A 4-h patch test with seven concentrations of sodium lauryl sulphate was performed to determine the irritant threshold (IT). Contact sensitization pattern was revealed by patch testing with European baseline series. Subjects with a lower IT had higher TEWL values and lower SCH. Subjects with positive allergic reactions had significantly lower IT. In AD, epidermal barrier deterioration was detected on both volar forearm and nasolabial fold, while in rosacea, impeded skin physiology parameters were observed on the facial skin only, suggesting that barrier impediment is restricted to the face in rosacea, in contrast with AD where the abnormal skin physiology is generalized. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Atopic Dermatitis: A Disease of Altered Skin Barrier and Immune Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Boguniewicz, Mark; Leung, Donald YM

    2011-01-01

    Summary Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an important chronic or relapsing inflammatory skin disease that often precedes asthma and allergic disorders. New insights into the genetics and pathophysiology of AD point to an important role of structural abnormalities in the epidermis as well as immune dysregulation not only for this skin disease but also for the development of asthma and allergies. Patients with AD have a unique predisposition to colonization or infection by microbial organisms, most notably Staphylococcus aureus and herpes simplex virus. Measures directed at healing and protecting the skin barrier and addressing the immune dysregulation are essential in the treatment of patients with AD and early intervention may improve outcomes for both the skin disease as well as other target organs. PMID:21682749

  20. Increased retinoic acid levels through ablation of Cyp26b1 determine the processes of embryonic skin barrier formation and peridermal development

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Junko; Lichti, Ulrike; Mamiya, Satoru; Aronova, Maria; Zhang, Guofeng; Yuspa, Stuart H.; Hamada, Hiroshi; Sakai, Yasuo; Morasso, Maria I.

    2012-01-01

    The process by which the periderm transitions to stratified epidermis with the establishment of the skin barrier is unknown. Understanding the cellular and molecular processes involved is crucial for the treatment of human pathologies, where abnormal skin development and barrier dysfunction are associated with hypothermia and perinatal dehydration. For the first time, we demonstrate that retinoic acid (RA) levels are important for periderm desquamation, embryonic skin differentiation and barrier formation. Although excess exogenous RA has been known to have teratogenic effects, little is known about the consequences of elevated endogenous retinoids in skin during embryogenesis. Absence of cytochrome P450, family 26, subfamily b, polypeptide 1 (Cyp26b1), a retinoic-acid-degrading enzyme, results in aberrant epidermal differentiation and filaggrin expression, defective cornified envelopes and skin barrier formation, in conjunction with peridermal retention. We show that these alterations are RA dependent because administration of exogenous RA in vivo and to organotypic skin cultures phenocopy Cyp26b1−/− skin abnormalities. Furthermore, utilizing the Flaky tail (Ft/Ft) mice, a mouse model for human ichthyosis, characterized by mutations in the filaggrin gene, we establish that proper differentiation and barrier formation is a prerequisite for periderm sloughing. These results are important in understanding pathologies associated with abnormal embryonic skin development and barrier dysfunction. PMID:22366455

  1. Microbiome dynamics of human epidermis following skin barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent advances in sequencing technologies have enabled metagenomic analyses of many human body sites. Several studies have catalogued the composition of bacterial communities of the surface of human skin, mostly under static conditions in healthy volunteers. Skin injury will disturb the cutaneous homeostasis of the host tissue and its commensal microbiota, but the dynamics of this process have not been studied before. Here we analyzed the microbiota of the surface layer and the deeper layers of the stratum corneum of normal skin, and we investigated the dynamics of recolonization of skin microbiota following skin barrier disruption by tape stripping as a model of superficial injury. Results We observed gender differences in microbiota composition and showed that bacteria are not uniformly distributed in the stratum corneum. Phylogenetic distance analysis was employed to follow microbiota development during recolonization of injured skin. Surprisingly, the developing neo-microbiome at day 14 was more similar to that of the deeper stratum corneum layers than to the initial surface microbiome. In addition, we also observed variation in the host response towards superficial injury as assessed by the induction of antimicrobial protein expression in epidermal keratinocytes. Conclusions We suggest that the microbiome of the deeper layers, rather than that of the superficial skin layer, may be regarded as the host indigenous microbiome. Characterization of the skin microbiome under dynamic conditions, and the ensuing response of the microbial community and host tissue, will shed further light on the complex interaction between resident bacteria and epidermis. PMID:23153041

  2. Disturbed skin barrier in children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wojtowicz-Prus, Elzbieta; Kilis-Pstrusinska, Katarzyna; Reich, Adam; Zachwieja, Katarzyna; Miklaszewska, Monika; Szczepanska, Maria; Szepietowski, Jacek C

    2015-02-01

    There are limited data on skin lesions in children with end-stage renal failure. The aim of the study was an evaluation of the skin barrier in children with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The prevalence of xerosis, its severity, as well as its link selected demographic factors, were examined. The study included 103 children: 72 with CKD stages 3-5 (38 on conservative treatment and 34 on dialysis) and 31 patients with primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis as a control group. Initially, the study subjects described the localisation and severity of dry skin by themselves. Next, clinical evaluation of xerosis, non-invasive corneometric assessment of epidermis moisturising and the measurement of transepidermal water loss were performed. Most CKD children reported dry skin. The problem of xerosis was identified more frequently in patients on dialysis (67.6 %) than on conservative treatment (42.1 %) (p = 0.01). CKD patients divided according to skin dryness did not differ with regards to age, sex, initial kidney disease and CKD duration. Disturbed skin barrier is an important concern of children with CKD, intensifying as the disease progresses. This symptom occurs on early stages of CKD and it should be taken into consideration in the CKD management.

  3. An ex vivo human skin model for studying skin barrier repair.

    PubMed

    Danso, Mogbekeloluwa O; Berkers, Tineke; Mieremet, Arnout; Hausil, Farzia; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2015-01-01

    In the studies described in this study, we introduce a novel ex vivo human skin barrier repair model. To develop this, we removed the upper layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC) by a reproducible cyanoacrylate stripping technique. After stripping the explants, they were cultured in vitro to allow the regeneration of the SC. We selected two culture temperatures 32 °C and 37 °C and a period of either 4 or 8 days. After 8 days of culture, the explant generated SC at a similar thickness compared to native human SC. At 37 °C, the early and late epidermal differentiation programmes were executed comparably to native human skin with the exception of the barrier protein involucrin. At 32 °C, early differentiation was delayed, but the terminal differentiation proteins were expressed as in stripped explants cultured at 37 °C. Regarding the barrier properties, the SC lateral lipid organization was mainly hexagonal in the regenerated SC, whereas the lipids in native human SC adopt a more dense orthorhombic organization. In addition, the ceramide levels were higher in the cultured explants at 32 °C and 37 °C than in native human SC. In conclusion, we selected the stripped ex vivo skin model cultured at 37 °C as a candidate model to study skin barrier repair because epidermal and SC characteristics mimic more closely the native human skin than the ex vivo skin model cultured at 32 °C. Potentially, this model can be used for testing formulations for skin barrier repair. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Advancements in the maintenance of skin barrier/skin lipid composition and the involvement of metabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Le; Jia, Yan; Cheng, Zhi-Wei; Gao, Ying; Zhang, Gao-Lei; Li, Jing-Yi; He, Cong-Fen

    2016-12-01

    The human skin barrier has an important role in protection and defense, reflected not only in the ability to resist entry of harmful substances into the human body, but also in the ability to prevent loss of water and nutrients. Once the skin barrier is damaged, the skin may become dry, scaly, and wrinkled, and a series of skin problems may occur. In this article, we review the composition of lipids, such as ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids, in the skin and examine the expression of enzymes related to lipid metabolism, such as kallikreins, elongase of elongation of very long-chain fatty acids, hydrolases, and lipid synthases. Additionally, we discuss the involvement of these proteins in skin barrier function and structure. The information presented in this review is expected to provide a theoretical basis for the development of skin care products facilitating the maintenance and repair of skin barrier function. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Decreased ATP synthesis and lower pH may lead to abnormal muscle contraction and skin sensitivity in human skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ju; Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Kim, Jung Yun; Lee, Min Jung; Choi, Won Woo; Eun, Hee Chul; Chung, Jin Ho

    2014-12-01

    Sensitive skin represents hyperactive sensory symptoms showing exaggerated reactions in response to internal stimulants or external irritants. Although sensitive skin is a very common condition affecting an estimated 50% of the population, its pathophysiology remains largely elusive, particularly with regard to its metabolic aspects. The objective of our study was to investigate the pathogenesis of sensitive skin. We recruited healthy participants with 'sensitive' or 'non-sensitive' skin based on standardized questionnaires and 10% lactic acid stinging test, and obtained skin samples for microarray analysis and subsequent experiments. Microarray transcriptome profiling revealed that genes involved in muscle contraction, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and ion transport and balance were significantly decreased in sensitive skin. These altered genes could account for the abnormal muscle contraction, decreased ATP amount in sensitive skin. In addition, pain-related transcripts such as TRPV1, ASIC3 and CGRP were significantly up-regulated in sensitive skin, compared with non-sensitive skin. Our findings suggest that sensitive skin is closely associated with the dysfunction of muscle contraction and metabolic homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A controlled, three-part trial to investigate the barrier function and skin hydration properties of six skin protectants.

    PubMed

    Hoggarth, Andrew; Waring, Mike; Alexander, James; Greenwood, Amanada; Callaghan, Theresa

    2005-12-01

    In the treatment of incontinence dermatitis, a skin protectant primarily prevents skin breakdown due to moisture and biological irritants in urine and feces. To assess the barrier and skin hydration properties of six currently available skin protectants with different formulations, a controlled, three-phase study was conducted at a research facility in the UK among 18 healthy volunteers. The study addressed each product's efficacy against insult from a known irritant (sodium lauryl sulphate), skin hydration potential, and maintenance of skin barrier and barrier efficacy against maceration. Using white petrolatum (glycerin) as the positive control and untreated sites as the negative control, the results show that each one of the products tested has different performance properties. Products containing petrolatum demonstrated protection against irritants (P = 0.006 at 24 hours) and maceration (P < 0.005) and provided some skin hydration. Products containing dimethicone varied in protection against irritants (P < 0.005, or P > or = 0.806 at 24 hours) and have good skin hydration potential and low barrier efficacy (P > 0.500). Zinc oxide-based products showed protection against irritants (P < 0.005) but poor skin hydration and barrier properties to prevent maceration (P = 0.262). Overall, only the water-in-oil petrolatum- based product performed effectively within all the parameters tested. This study suggests that skin barrier protection involves more than the inclusion of an active barrier ingredient. Further testing and use of barrier products in the clinical setting will provide additional evidence for appropriate product selection.

  7. Cyclic Alopecia and Abnormal Epidermal Cornification in Zdhhc13-Deficient Mice Reveal the Importance of Palmitoylation in Hair and Skin Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai-Ming; Chen, Yi-Ju; Shen, Li-Fen; Haddad, Amir N S; Song, I-Wen; Chen, Li-Ying; Chen, Yu-Ju; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Yen, Jeffrey J Y; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2015-11-01

    Many biochemical pathways involved in hair and skin development have not been investigated. Here, we reported on the lesions and investigated the mechanism underlying hair and skin abnormalities in Zdhhc13(skc4) mice with a deficiency in DHHC13, a palmitoyl-acyl transferase encoded by Zdhhc13. Homozygous affected mice showed ragged and dilapidated cuticle of the hair shaft (CUH, a hair anchoring structure), poor hair anchoring ability, and premature hair loss at early telogen phase of the hair cycle, resulting in cyclic alopecia. Furthermore, the homozygous affected mice exhibited hyperproliferation of the epidermis, disturbed cornification, fragile cornified envelope (CE, a skin barrier structure), and impaired skin barrier function. Biochemical investigations revealed that cornifelin, which contains five palmitoylation sites at cysteine residues (C58, C59, C60, C95, and C101), was a specific substrate of DHHC13 and that it was absent in the CUH and CE structures of the affected mice. Furthermore, cornifelin levels were markedly reduced when two palmitoylated cysteines were replaced with serine (C95S and C101S). Taken together, our results suggest that DHHC13 is important for hair anchoring and skin barrier function and that cornifelin deficiency contributes to cyclic alopecia and skin abnormalities in Zdhhc13(skc4) mice.

  8. Postnatal ecdysis establishes the permeability barrier in snake skin: new insights into barrier lipid structures.

    PubMed

    Tu, M C; Lillywhite, H B; Menon, J G; Menon, G K

    2002-10-01

    A competent barrier to transepidermal water loss (TEWL) is essential for terrestrial life. In various vertebrates, epidermal water barriers composed of lipids prevent excessive TEWL, which varies inversely with habitat aridity. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms and regulation of permeability relative to natal transition from the 'aqueous' environments of gestation to the 'aerial' environments of terrestrial neonates. We investigated newly hatched California king snakes Lampropeltis getula to test the hypothesis that the first ecdysis is important for establishing the barrier to TEWL. We found that skin resistance to TEWL increases twofold following the first postnatal ecdysis, corresponding with a roughly twofold increase in thickness and deposition of lamellar lipids in the mesos layer, the site of the skin permeability barrier in snakes. In addition, novel observations on lipid inclusions within the alpha layer of epidermis suggest that this layer has functional similarities with avian epidermis. It appears that emergence of the integument from embryonic fluids, and its subsequent pan-body replacement following contact with air, are essential for completion of barrier competence in the newborn. These conditions provide a potentially useful model for investigations on the mechanism of barrier formation. We also found that hatchling snakes are transiently endothermic, with skin temperatures elevated by approximately 0.6 degrees C above ambient air temperature during the period of barrier formation. Behaviourally, hatchlings showed a higher tendency to seek humid microenvironments before the first ecdysis than after. The degree of water movement across the integument might explain the switch from reclusive to dispersive behaviours associated with postnatal ecdysis in snakes.

  9. The outcomes of barrier protection in periwound skin and stoma care.

    PubMed

    Stephen-Haynes, Jackie

    This article considers the anatomy and physiology of the skin,wound healing, excoriation, maceration, peristomal skin and the importance of periwound protection. The results of a 54-patient study of the use of barrier film forming skin protection in periwound skin are presented and a 10-patient healthy volunteer experimental evaluation. The results confirm the effectiveness of barrier protection in healthy skin in an experimental evaluation and a 54-patient study requiring periwound protection.

  10. Sensations of skin infestation linked to abnormal frontolimbic brain reactivity and differences in self-representation.

    PubMed

    Eccles, J A; Garfinkel, S N; Harrison, N A; Ward, J; Taylor, R E; Bewley, A P; Critchley, H D

    2015-10-01

    Some patients experience skin sensations of infestation and contamination that are elusive to proximate dermatological explanation. We undertook a functional magnetic resonance imaging study of the brain to demonstrate, for the first time, that central processing of infestation-relevant stimuli is altered in patients with such abnormal skin sensations. We show differences in neural activity within amygdala, insula, middle temporal lobe and frontal cortices. Patients also demonstrated altered measures of self-representation, with poorer sensitivity to internal bodily (interoceptive) signals and greater susceptibility to take on an illusion of body ownership: the rubber hand illusion. Together, these findings highlight a potential model for the maintenance of abnormal skin sensations, encompassing heightened threat processing within amygdala, increased salience of skin representations within insula and compromised prefrontal capacity for self-regulation and appraisal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. In vivo measurements of skin barrier: comparison of different methods and advantages of laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzelt, A.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2010-12-01

    A major function of the skin is to provide a protective barrier at the interface between external environment and the organism. For skin barrier measurement, a multiplicity of methods is available. As standard methods, the determination of the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) as well as the measurement of the stratum corneum hydration, are widely accepted, although they offer some obvious disadvantages such as increased interference liability. Recently, new optical and spectroscopic methods have been introduced to investigate skin barrier properties in vivo. Especially, laser scanning microscopy has been shown to represent an excellent tool to study skin barrier integrity in many areas of relevance such as cosmetology, occupation, diseased skin, and wound healing.

  12. Potential skin involvement in ALS: revisiting Charcot's observation - a review of skin abnormalities in ALS.

    PubMed

    Paré, Bastien; Gros-Louis, François

    2017-07-26

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons of the brain and spinal cord, leading to progressive paralysis and death. Interestingly, many skin changes have been reported in ALS patients, but never as yet fully explained. These observations could be due to the common embryonic origin of the skin and neural tissue known as the ectodermal germ layer. Following the first observation in ALS patients' skin by Dr Charcot in the 19th century, in the absence of bedsores unlike other bedridden patients, other morphological and molecular changes have been observed. Thus, the skin could be of interest in the study of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. This review summarizes skin changes reported in the literature over the years and discusses about a novel in vitro ALS tissue-engineered skin model, derived from patients, for the study of ALS.

  13. The skin microbiome: impact of modern environments on skin ecology, barrier integrity, and systemic immune programming.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Susan L; Larcombe, Danica-Lea; Logan, Alan C; West, Christina; Burks, Wesley; Caraballo, Luis; Levin, Michael; Etten, Eddie Van; Horwitz, Pierre; Kozyrskyj, Anita; Campbell, Dianne E

    2017-01-01

    Skin barrier structure and function is essential to human health. Hitherto unrecognized functions of epidermal keratinocytes show that the skin plays an important role in adapting whole-body physiology to changing environments, including the capacity to produce a wide variety of hormones, neurotransmitters and cytokine that can potentially influence whole-body states, and quite possibly, even emotions. Skin microbiota play an integral role in the maturation and homeostatic regulation of keratinocytes and host immune networks with systemic implications. As our primary interface with the external environment, the biodiversity of skin habitats is heavily influenced by the biodiversity of the ecosystems in which we reside. Thus, factors which alter the establishment and health of the skin microbiome have the potential to predispose to not only cutaneous disease, but also other inflammatory non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Indeed, disturbances of the stratum corneum have been noted in allergic diseases (eczema and food allergy), psoriasis, rosacea, acne vulgaris and with the skin aging process. The built environment, global biodiversity losses and declining nature relatedness are contributing to erosion of diversity at a micro-ecological level, including our own microbial habitats. This emphasises the importance of ecological perspectives in overcoming the factors that drive dysbiosis and the risk of inflammatory diseases across the life course.

  14. Evaluation of a cyanoacrylate dressing to manage peristomal skin alterations under ostomy skin barrier wafers.

    PubMed

    Milne, Catherine T; Saucier, Darlene; Trevellini, Chenel; Smith, Juliet

    2011-01-01

    Peristomal skin alterations under ostomy barrier wafers are a commonly reported problem. While a number of interventions to manage this issue have been reported, the use of a topically applied cyanoacrylate has received little attention. This case series describes the use of a topical cyanoacrylate for the management of peristomal skin alterations in persons living with an ostomy. Using a convenience sample, the topical cyanoacrylate dressing was applied to 11 patients with peristomal skin disruption under ostomy wafers in acute care and outpatient settings. The causes of barrier function interruption were also addressed to enhance outcomes. Patients were assessed for wound discomfort using a Likert Scale, time to healing, and number of appliance changes. Patient satisfaction was also examined. Average reported discomfort levels were 9.5 out of 10 at the initial peristomal irritation assessment visit decreased to 3.5 at the first wafer change and were absent by the second wafer change. Wafers had increasing wear time between changes in both settings with acute care patients responding faster. Epidermal resurfacing occurred within 10.2 days in outpatients and within 7 days in acute care patients. Because of the skin sealant action of this dressing, immediate adherence of the wafer was reported at all pouch changes.

  15. Increased Bacterial Load and Expression of Antimicrobial Peptides in Skin of Barrier-Deficient Mice with Reduced Cancer Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Natsuga, Ken; Cipolat, Sara; Watt, Fiona M

    2016-01-01

    Mice lacking three epidermal barrier proteins-envoplakin, periplakin, and involucrin (EPI-/- mice)-have a defective cornified layer, reduced epidermal γδ T cells, and increased dermal CD4(+) T cells. They are also resistant to developing skin tumors. The tumor-protective mechanism involves signaling between Rae-1 expressing keratinocytes and the natural killer group 2D receptor on immune cells, which also plays a role in host defenses against infection. Given the emerging link between bacteria and cancer, we investigated whether EPI-/- mice have an altered skin microbiota. The bacterial phyla were similar in wild-type and EPI-/- skin. However, bacteria were threefold more abundant in EPI-/- skin and penetrated deeper into the epidermis. The major epithelial defense mechanism against bacteria is production of antimicrobial proteins (AMPs). EPI-/- skin exhibited enhanced expression of antimicrobial peptides. However, reducing the bacterial load by antibiotic treatment or breeding mice under specific pathogen-free conditions did not reduce AMP expression or alleviate the abnormalities in T-cell populations. We conclude that the atopic characteristics of EPI-/- skin are a consequence of the defective barrier rather than a response to the increased bacterial load. It is therefore unlikely that the increase in skin microbiota contributes directly to the observed cancer resistance. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of a Ceramide-Infused Skin Barrier Versus a Standard Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Ariel; Inglese, Gary; Skountrianos, George; Karlsmark, Tonny; Oguz, Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the cost-effectiveness of a ceramide-infused skin barrier (CIB) versus other skin barriers (standard of care) among patients who have undergone ostomy creation. DESIGN: Cost-effectiveness analysis, based on a decision-analytic model that was estimated using data from the ADVOCATE (A Study Determining Variances in Ostomy Skin Conditions And The Economic Impact) trial, which investigated stoma-related healthcare costs over 12 weeks among patients who recently underwent fecal ostomy, and from other sources. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: Analysis was based on a hypothetical cohort of 1000 patients who recently underwent fecal ostomy; over a 1-year period, 500 patients were assumed to use CIB and 500 were assumed to use standard of care. METHODS: We adapted a previous economic model to estimate expected 1-year costs and outcomes among persons with a new ostomy assumed to use CIB versus standard of care. Outcomes of interest included peristomal skin complications (PSCs) (up to 2 during the 1-year period of interest) and quality-adjusted life days (QALDs); QALDs vary from 1, indicating a day of perfect health to 0, indicating a day with the lowest possible health (deceased). Subjects were assigned QALDs on a daily basis, with the value of the QALD on any given day based on whether the patient was experiencing a PSC. Costs included those related to skin barriers, ostomy accessories, and care of PSCs. The incremental cost-effectiveness of CIB versus standard of care was estimated as the incremental cost per PSC averted and QALD gained, respectively; net monetary benefit of CIB was also estimated. All analyses were run using the perspective of an Australian payer. RESULTS: On a per-patient basis, use of CIB was expected over a 1-year period to result in 0.16 fewer PSCs, an additional 0.35 QALDs, and a savings of A$180 (Australian dollars, US $137) in healthcare costs all versus standard of care. Management with CIB provided a net monetary benefit (calculated as

  17. Peristomal skin disorders in patients with intestinal and urinary ostomies: influence of adhesive forces of various hydrocolloid wafer skin barriers.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yuko; Yamabe, Motoko; Anazawa, Sadao

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the adhesiveness of hydrocolloid wafers and its relationship to physical damage of the underlying skin. Observational study. All subjects received ostomy care at the Tokyo Ostomy Center and outpatient departments of 4 hospitals in Tokyo, Japan. One hundred ninety-four of 917 patients receiving care over a 23-year span agreed to participate in the research. Subjects met 2 inclusion criteria: (1) ostomy management was performed using a combination of skin barriers and an adhesive ostomy pouch; and (2) the patient's medical file and color photographs were available, allowing analysis of the peristomal skin over time. Photographs were taken with an Olympus (OM2) camera equipped with an Olympus macro lens and a ring flash. We analyzed the impact of the adhesive force of various hydrocolloid wafers on the underlying skin. Photographs were digitized and systematically examined the peristomal skin exposed to regular use of skin barriers. The observation period varied among individual patients, ranging from 1 week to 30 years after surgery. The incidence of dermatologic changes (active, inactive, and area cutanea changes) was lower in patients who used skin barriers with adhesive force of not more than 2 Newtons(N) than among those using higher forces (>2 N). Specifically, there was a significant difference in change of the area cutanea. The incidence of papules and erosion was unrelated to the adhesive force of skin barriers. These results suggest that the peristomal skin is irritated by repeated peeling, resulting in physical damage to the horny layer of the skin. The presence of papules and erosion was not associated with the adhesive force of skin barriers. This finding suggests that these changes are associated with an inflammatory process, possibly caused by chemical substances within the skin barrier.

  18. Assessment of skin barrier function and biochemical changes of ex vivo human skin in response to physical and chemical barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Döge, Nadine; Avetisyan, Araks; Hadam, Sabrina; Pfannes, Eva Katharina Barbosa; Rancan, Fiorenza; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2017-07-01

    Topical dermatotherapy is intended to be used on diseased skin. Novel drug delivery systems even address differences between intact and diseased skin underlining the need for pre-clinical assessment of different states of barrier disruption. Herein, we studied how short-term incubation in culture media compared to incubation in humidified chambers affects human skin barrier function and viability. On both models we assessed different types and intensities of physical and chemical barrier disruption methods with regard to structural integrity, biophysical parameters and cytokine levels. Tissue degeneration and proliferative activity limited the use of tissue cultures to 48h. Viability is better preserved in cultured tissue. Tape-stripping (50×TS) and 4h sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) pre-treatment were identified as highly reproducible and effective procedures for barrier disruption. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) values reproducibly increased with the intensity of disruption while sebum content and skin surface pH were of limited value. Interleukin (IL)-6/8 and various chemokines and proteases were increased in tape-stripped skin which was more pronounced in SLS-treated skin tissue extracts. Thus, albeit limited to 48h, cultured full-thickness skin maintained several barrier characteristics and responded to different intensities of barrier disruption. Potentially, these models can be used to assess pre-clinically the efficacy and penetration of anti-inflammatory compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Tritiated Water Skin Barrier Integrity Test: Considerations for Acceptance Criteria with and Without 14C-Octanol.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Paul A; Beatch, Kacie; Raney, Sam G; Franz, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    A study was designed to assess barrier integrity simultaneously using separate compounds (probes) for polar and non-polar pathways through the skin, 3 H 2 O and 14 C-octanol, respectively; and to determine whether the two probe approach could better define barrier integrity. A 5-min dose of water containing 3 H 2 O and 14 C -octanol was applied to ex vivo human skin mounted in Franz diffusion cells. The receptor solution was sampled at 30 min, analyzed for 3 H and 14 C content, and the correlation between water and octanol absorption was determined by statistical tests suitable for non-normally distributed data. This study was conducted on skin from 37 donors with from 3 to 30 replicate skin sections per donor (a total of 426 sections). The correlation between 3 H 2 O and 14 C-octanol absorption was low (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.3485). The 3 H 2 O absorption cutoff used in this study to select for a normal skin barrier rejected some sections in which 14 C-octanol absorption was within normal limits and accepted others in which 14 C-octanol absorption was abnormally high. The converse was true for 3 H 2 O absorption when the 14 C-octanol-based cutoff was used. The results of the 3 H 2 O test or of similar tests that primarily assess the permeability of polar pathways through the skin may not necessarily provide information relevant to the absorption of highly lipophilic compounds. Octanol, or another molecule that more closely matches the physicochemical attributes of the test compound, may characterize properties of the skin barrier that are more relevant to compounds of low water solubility.

  20. Multiple barriers delay care among women with abnormal cancer screening despite patient navigation.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Ambili; Freund, Karen M; Bak, Sharon M; Heeren, Timothy C; Chen, Clara A; Battaglia, Tracy A

    2015-01-01

    While there is widespread dissemination of patient navigation programs in an effort to reduce delays in cancer care, little is known about the impact of barriers to care on timely outcomes. We conducted a secondary analysis of the Boston Patient Navigation Research Program (PNRP) to examine the effect that the presence of barriers had on time to diagnostic resolution of abnormal breast or cervical cancer screening tests. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression with time to diagnostic resolution as the outcome to examine the effect of the number of barriers, controlling for demographic covariates and clustered by patients' primary navigator. There were 1481 women who received navigation; mean age was 39 years; 32% were White, 27% Black, and 31% Hispanic; 28% had private health insurance; and 38% did not speak English. Overall, half (n=745, 50%) had documentation of one or more barriers to care. Women with barriers were more likely to be older, non-White, non-English language speakers, and on public or no health insurance compared with women without barriers. In multivariable analyses, we found less timely diagnostic resolution as the number of barriers increased (one barrier, adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.81 [95% CI 0.56-1.17], p=0.26; two barriers, aHR 0.55 [95% CI 0.37-0.81], p=0.0025; three or more barriers, aHR 0.31 [95% CI 0.21-0.46], p<0.0001)]. Within a patient navigation program proven to reduce delays in care, we found that navigated patients with documented barriers to care experience less timely resolution of abnormal cancer screening tests.

  1. Epidermal barrier defects link atopic dermatitis with altered skin cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Cipolat, Sara; Hoste, Esther; Natsuga, Ken; Quist, Sven R; Watt, Fiona M

    2014-05-05

    Atopic dermatitis can result from loss of structural proteins in the outermost epidermal layers, leading to a defective epidermal barrier. To test whether this influences tumour formation, we chemically induced tumours in EPI-/- mice, which lack three barrier proteins-Envoplakin, Periplakin, and Involucrin. EPI-/- mice were highly resistant to developing benign tumours when treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). The DMBA response was normal, but EPI-/- skin exhibited an exaggerated atopic response to TPA, characterised by abnormal epidermal differentiation, a complex immune infiltrate and elevated serum thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). The exacerbated TPA response could be normalised by blocking TSLP or the immunoreceptor NKG2D but not CD4+ T cells. We conclude that atopy is protective against skin cancer in our experimental model and that the mechanism involves keratinocytes communicating with cells of the immune system via signalling elements that normally protect against environmental assaults.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01888.001. Copyright © 2014, Cipolat et al.

  2. Barriers to Follow-Up for Abnormal Papanicolaou Smears among Female Sex Workers in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Aharon, Devora; Calderon, Martha; Solari, Vicky; Alarcon, Patricia; Zunt, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most prevalent cancer among Peruvian women. Female sex workers (FSW) in Peru are at elevated risk for HPV infection, and receive annual Papanicolaou screening. The objective of this study was to identify barriers to follow-up for abnormal Pap smears among FSW in Peru. 97 FSW attending the Alberto Barton Health Center in Lima were surveyed regarding their STI screening history. 17 women with a history of an abnormal Pap smear were interviewed about their experiences regarding follow-up care. Of the 27 HPV-positive women, only 8 (30%) received follow-up treatment. Of the 19 women who did not receive follow-up, 7 (37%) had not been informed of their abnormal result. Qualitative interviews revealed that the major barrier to follow-up was lack of knowledge about HPV and potential health consequences of an abnormal Pap smear. HPV infection is highly prevalent in Peruvian FSW, yet only 30% of FSW with abnormal Pap smears receive follow-up care. The predominant barriers to follow-up were lack of standardization in recording and communicating results and insufficient FSW knowledge regarding health consequences of HPV infection. Standardization of record-keeping and distribution of educational pamphlets have been implemented to improve follow-up for HPV.

  3. Traversing the Skin Barrier with Nano-emulsions.

    PubMed

    Burger, Cornel; Shahzad, Yasser; Brummer, Alicia; Gerber, Minja; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, colloidal delivery systems based on nano-emulsion are gaining popularity; being used for encapsulation and delivery of many drugs. This review therefore aims at summarizing various methods of nano-emulsion formulation and their use as a topical and transdermal delivery vehicle for a number of active pharmaceutical ingredients from different pharmacological classes. This article represents a systematic review of nano-emulsions for topical and transdermal drug delivery. A vast literature was searched and critically analysed. Nano-emulsions are thermokinetically stable dispersion systems, which have been used in topical and transdermal delivery of a number of pharmaceutically active compounds. Nano-emulsions have a narrow droplet size range with tuneable surface properties, which make them an ideal delivery vehicle. Nanoemulsions have a number of advantages over conventional emulsions, including easy preparation using various low and high energy methods, optical transparency, high solubilisation capacity, high stability to droplet aggregation and the ability to penetrate the skin; thus allowing the transdermal delivery of drugs. This review indicated that nano-emulsions are promising vehicle for entrapping various drugs and are suitable for traversing the skin barrier for systemic effects. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Lipid mediator profile in vernix caseosa reflects skin barrier development.

    PubMed

    Checa, Antonio; Holm, Tina; Sjödin, Marcus O D; Reinke, Stacey N; Alm, Johan; Scheynius, Annika; Wheelock, Craig E

    2015-11-02

    Vernix caseosa (VC) is a protective layer that covers the skin of most human newborns. This study characterized the VC lipid mediator profile, and examined its relationship to gestational period, gender of the newborn and maternal lifestyle. VC collected at birth from 156 newborns within the ALADDIN birth cohort was analyzed and 3 different groups of lipid mediators (eicosanoids and related oxylipin analogs, endocannabinoids and sphingolipids) were screened using LC-MS/MS. A total of 54 compounds were detected in VC. A number of associations between lipid mediators and the gestational period were observed, including increases in the ceramide to sphingomyelin ratio as well as the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Gender-specific differences in lipid mediator levels were observed for all 3 lipid classes. In addition, levels of the linoleic acid oxidation products 9(10)-epoxy-12Z-octadecenoic and 12(13)-epoxy-9Z-octadecenoic acid (EpOMEs) as well as 12,13-dihydroxy-9Z-octadecenoic acid (DiHOME) were increased in VC of children from mothers with an anthroposophic lifestyle. Accordingly, VC was found to be rich in multiple classes of bioactive lipid mediators, which evidence lifestyle, gender and gestational week dependencies. Levels of lipid mediators in VC may therefore be useful as early stage non-invasive markers of the development of the skin as a protective barrier.

  5. Are barriers to physical activity similar for adults with and without abnormal glucose metabolism?

    PubMed

    Hume, Clare; Dunstan, David; Salmon, Jo; Healy, Genevieve; Andrianopoulos, Nick; Owen, Neville

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine perceived barriers to physical activity among adults with and without abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM), and whether barriers varied according to physical activity status. The 1999 to 2000 Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle Study (AusDiab) was a population-based cross-sectional study among adults aged > or =25 years. AGM was identified through an oral glucose tolerance test. The previous week's physical activity and individual, social, and environmental barriers to physical activity were self-reported. Logistic regression analyses examined differences in barriers to physical activity between those with and without AGM, and for those with and without AGM who did and did not meet the minimum recommendation of 150 minutes/week of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity. Of the 7088 participants (47.5 +/- 12.7 years; 46% male), 18.5% had AGM. Approximately 47.5% of those with AGM met the physical activity recommendation, compared to 54.7% of those without AGM (P < .001). Key barriers to physical activity included lack of time, other priorities, and being tired. Following adjustment for sociodemographic and behavioral factors, there were few differences in barriers to physical activity between those with and without AGM, even after stratifying according to physical activity. Adults with AGM report similar barriers to physical activity, as do those without AGM. Programs for those with AGM can therefore focus on the known generic adult-reported barriers to physical activity.

  6. Multifactorial skin barrier deficiency and atopic dermatitis: Essential topics to prevent the atopic march.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Gyohei; Kabashima, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common inflammatory skin disease in the industrialized world and has multiple causes. Over the past decade, data from both experimental models and patients have highlighted the primary pathogenic role of skin barrier deficiency in patients with AD. Increased access of environmental agents into the skin results in chronic inflammation and contributes to the systemic "atopic (allergic) march." In addition, persistent skin inflammation further attenuates skin barrier function, resulting in a positive feedback loop between the skin epithelium and the immune system that drives pathology. Understanding the mechanisms of skin barrier maintenance is essential for improving management of AD and limiting downstream atopic manifestations. In this article we review the latest developments in our understanding of the pathomechanisms of skin barrier deficiency, with a particular focus on the formation of the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin, which contributes significantly to skin barrier function. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Loss of corneodesmosin leads to severe skin barrier defect, pruritus, and atopy: unraveling the peeling skin disease.

    PubMed

    Oji, Vinzenz; Eckl, Katja-Martina; Aufenvenne, Karin; Nätebus, Marc; Tarinski, Tatjana; Ackermann, Katharina; Seller, Natalia; Metze, Dieter; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Hausser, Ingrid; Traupe, Heiko; Hennies, Hans Christian

    2010-08-13

    Generalized peeling skin disease is an autosomal-recessive ichthyosiform erythroderma characterized by lifelong patchy peeling of the skin. After genome-wide linkage analysis, we have identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in CDSN in a large consanguineous family with generalized peeling skin, pruritus, and food allergies, which leads to a complete loss of corneodesmosin. In contrast to hypotrichosis simplex, which can be associated with specific dominant CDSN mutations, peeling skin disease is characterized by a complete loss of CDSN expression. The skin phenotype is consistent with a recent murine Cdsn knockout model. Using three-dimensional human skin models, we demonstrate that lack of corneodesmosin causes an epidermal barrier defect supposed to account for the predisposition to atopic diseases, and we confirm the role of corneodesmosin as a decisive epidermal adhesion molecule. Therefore, peeling skin disease will represent a new model disorder for atopic diseases, similarly to Netherton syndrome and ichthyosis vulgaris in the recent past.

  8. Loss of Corneodesmosin Leads to Severe Skin Barrier Defect, Pruritus, and Atopy: Unraveling the Peeling Skin Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oji, Vinzenz; Eckl, Katja-Martina; Aufenvenne, Karin; Nätebus, Marc; Tarinski, Tatjana; Ackermann, Katharina; Seller, Natalia; Metze, Dieter; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Hausser, Ingrid; Traupe, Heiko; Hennies, Hans Christian

    2010-01-01

    Generalized peeling skin disease is an autosomal-recessive ichthyosiform erythroderma characterized by lifelong patchy peeling of the skin. After genome-wide linkage analysis, we have identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in CDSN in a large consanguineous family with generalized peeling skin, pruritus, and food allergies, which leads to a complete loss of corneodesmosin. In contrast to hypotrichosis simplex, which can be associated with specific dominant CDSN mutations, peeling skin disease is characterized by a complete loss of CDSN expression. The skin phenotype is consistent with a recent murine Cdsn knockout model. Using three-dimensional human skin models, we demonstrate that lack of corneodesmosin causes an epidermal barrier defect supposed to account for the predisposition to atopic diseases, and we confirm the role of corneodesmosin as a decisive epidermal adhesion molecule. Therefore, peeling skin disease will represent a new model disorder for atopic diseases, similarly to Netherton syndrome and ichthyosis vulgaris in the recent past. PMID:20691404

  9. Trait Positive Affect Buffers the Effects of Acute Stress on Skin Barrier Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Theodore F.; Brooks, Kathryn P.; Pressman, Sarah D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study examines the role of self-reported trait positive affect (PA) on skin barrier recovery after skin disruption, and whether the role of trait PA in wound healing is consistent with the direct effects model or the stress-buffering model of PA and health. Design Sixty healthy participants (mean age 22.7 ± 3.9 years) completed a self-report measure of trait positive and negative affect, underwent a “tape-stripping” procedure that disrupts normal skin barrier function, and were randomly assigned to a Stress (Trier Social Stress Test) or No Stress (reading task) condition. Main Outcome Measures Skin barrier recovery was assessed by measuring transepidermal water loss up to 2 hr after skin disruption. Results Multilevel modeling indicated that greater trait PA was related to faster skin barrier recovery (p < .05). The effects of PA on skin barrier recovery were independent of levels of trait NA. Conclusion These findings suggest that trait PA may influence skin barrier recovery following a brief stressor. In addition, these results provide additional evidence that trait PA can positively impact objective health outcomes. PMID:19450044

  10. The relationship between skin function, barrier properties, and body-dependent factors.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowska, A K; Spano, F; Derler, S; Adlhart, C; Spencer, N D; Rossi, R M

    2018-05-01

    Skin is a multilayer interface between the body and the environment, responsible for many important functions, such as temperature regulation, water transport, sensation, and protection from external triggers. This paper provides an overview of principal factors that influence human skin and describes the diversity of skin characteristics, its causes and possible consequences. It also discusses limitations in the barrier function of the skin, describing mechanisms of absorption. There are a number of in vivo investigations focusing on the diversity of human skin characteristics with reference to barrier properties and body-dependent factors. Skin properties vary among individuals of different age, gender, ethnicity, and skin types. In addition, skin characteristics differ depending on the body site and can be influenced by the body-mass index and lifestyle. Although one of the main functions of the skin is to act as a barrier, absorption of some substances remains possible. Various factors can alter human skin properties, which can be reflected in skin function and the quality of everyday life. Skin properties and function are strongly interlinked. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Hydrogel-forming microneedles increase in volume during swelling in skin, but skin barrier function recovery is unaffected

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Ryan F.; Mooney, Karen; McCrudden, Maelíosa T.C.; Vicente-Pérez, Eva M.; Belaid, Luc; González-Vázquez, Patricia; McElnay, James C.; Woolfson, A. David

    2014-01-01

    We describe, for the first time, quantification of in-skin swelling and fluid uptake by hydrogel-forming microneedle arrays (MN) and skin barrier recovery in human volunteers. Such MN, prepared from aqueous blends of hydrolysed poly(methylvinylether/maleicanhydride) (15% w/w) and the crosslinker poly(ethyleneglycol) 10,000 daltons (7.5% w/w), were inserted into the skin of human volunteers (n = 15) to depths of approximately 300 μm by gentle hand pressure. The MN swelled in skin, taking up skin interstitial fluid, such that their mass had increased by approximately 30% after 6 hours in skin. Importantly, however, skin barrier function recovered within 24 hours post microneedle removal, regardless of how long the MN had been in skin or how much their volume had increased with swelling. Further research on closure of MN-induced micropores is required, since transepidermal water loss measurements suggested micropore closure, while optical coherence tomography indicated that MN-induced micropores had not closed over, even 24 hours after MN had been removed. There were no complaints of skin reactions, adverse events or strong views against MN use by any of the volunteers. Only some minor erythema was noted after patch removal, although this always resolved within 48 hours and no adverse events were present on follow-up. PMID:24633895

  12. Atopic dermatitis results in intrinsic barrier and immune abnormalities: Implications for contact dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gittler, Julia K.; Krueger, James G.; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD), as well as irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), are common skin diseases. These diseases are characterized by skin inflammation mediated by activated innate immunity or acquired immune mechanisms. Although AD, ICD, and ACD can be encountered in pure forms by allergists and dermatologists, patients with AD often present with increased frequency of ICD and ACD. Although a disturbed barrier alone could potentiate immune reactivity in patients with AD through increased antigen penetration, additional immune mechanisms might explain the increased susceptibility of atopic patients to ICD and ACD. This review discusses cellular pathways associated with increased skin inflammation in all 3 conditions and presents mechanisms that might contribute to the increased rate of ICD and ACD in patients with AD. PMID:22939651

  13. Dexpanthenol enhances skin barrier repair and reduces inflammation after sodium lauryl sulphate-induced irritation.

    PubMed

    Proksch, E; Nissen, H P

    2002-12-01

    Dexpanthenol-containing creams have been widely used for treatment of lesions (superficial wounds) of the skin and mucous membranes. Dexpanthenol is converted in tissues to pantothenic acid, a component of coenzyme A. Coenzyme A catalyses early steps in the synthesis of fatty acids and sphingolipids which are of crucial importance for stratum corneum lipid bilayers and cell membrane integrity. In the present study, the effects were examined of a dexpanthenol-containing cream on skin barrier repair, stratum corneum hydration, skin roughness, and inflammation after sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS)-induced irritation. Irritation was induced by application of SLS in patch test chambers. The dexpanthenol-contaming cream or the vehicle were applied twice daily and barrier repair, hydration, roughness, and inflammation of the skin were determined by using biophysical methods. Significantly accelerated skin barrier repair was found in treatments with the dexpanthenol-containing cream (verum) compared with vehicle-treated (placebo) or untreated skin. Both verum and placebo showed an increase in stratum corneum hydration, but significantly more so with the dexpanthenol-containing cream. Both creams reduced skin roughness, but again the verum was superior. The dexpanthenol-containing cream significantly reduced skin redness as a sign of inflammation in contrast to the vehicle, which produced no effect. Treatment with a dexpanthenol-containing cream showed significantly enhanced skin barrier repair and stratum corneum hydration, while reducing skin roughness and inflammation.

  14. Percutaneous absorption of aromatic amines in rubber industry workers: impact of impaired skin and skin barrier creams

    PubMed Central

    Korinth, G; Weiss, T; Penkert, S; Schaller, K H; Angerer, J; Drexler, H

    2007-01-01

    Background Several aromatic amines (AA) could cause bladder cancer and are an occupational hygiene problem in the workplace. However, little is known about the percutaneous absorption of chemicals via impaired skin and about the efficacy of skin protection measures to reduce internal exposure. Aims To determine the impact of skin status and of skin protection measures on the internal exposure to AA in workers manufacturing rubber products. Methods 51 workers occupationally exposed to aniline and o‐toluidine were examined. The workplace conditions, risk factors for skin and the use of personal protective equipment were assessed by means of a self‐administered questionnaire. The skin of hands and forearms was clinically examined. Exposure to aniline and o‐toluidine was assessed by ambient air and biological monitoring (analyses of urine samples and of haemoglobin adducts). Results Haemoglobin‐AA‐adduct levels in workers with erythema (73%) were significantly higher (p<0.04) than in workers with healthy skin (mean values: aniline 1150.4 ng/l vs 951.7 ng/l, o‐toluidine 417.9 ng/l vs 118.3 ng/l). The multiple linear regression analysis showed that wearing gloves significantly reduced the internal exposure. A frequent use of skin barrier creams leads to a higher internal exposure of AA (p<0.03). However, the use of skincare creams at the workplace was associated with a reduced internal exposure (p<0.03). From these findings we assume that internal exposure of the workers resulted primarily from the percutaneous uptake. Conclusions The study demonstrates a significantly higher internal exposure to AA in workers with impaired skin compared with workers with healthy skin. Daily wearing of gloves efficiently reduced internal exposure. However, an increased use of skin barrier creams enhances the percutaneous uptake of AA. Skincare creams seem to support skin regeneration and lead to reduced percutaneous uptake. PMID:17182646

  15. Impairment of skin barrier function via cholinergic signal transduction in a dextran sulphate sodium-induced colitis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Satoshi; Hiramoto, Keiichi; Koyama, Mayu; Ooi, Kazuya

    2015-10-01

    Dry skin has been clinically associated with visceral diseases, including liver disease, as well as for our previously reported small intestinal injury mouse model, which have abnormalities in skin barrier function. To clarify this disease-induced skin disruption, we used a dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mouse model. Following treatment with DSS, damage to the colon and skin was monitored using histological and protein analysis methods as well as the detection of inflammatory mediators in the plasma. Notably, transepidermal water loss was higher, and skin hydration was lower in DSS-treated mice compared to controls. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 and NO2-/NO3- levels were also upregulated in the plasma, and a decrease in body weight and colon length was observed in DSS-treated mice. However, when administered TNF-α antibody or an iNOS inhibitor, no change in skin condition was observed, indicating that another signalling mechanism is utilized. Interestingly, the number of tryptase-expressing mast cells, known for their role in immune function via cholinergic signal transduction, was elevated. To evaluate the function of cholinergic signalling in this context, atropine (a muscarinic cholinoceptor antagonist) or hexamethonium (a nicotinic cholinergic ganglion-blocking agent) was administered to DSS-treated mice. Our data indicate that muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are the primary receptors functioning in colon-to-skin signal transduction, as DSS-induced skin disruption was suppressed by atropine. Thus, skin disruption is likely associated with DSS-induced colitis, and the activation of mast cells via mAChRs is critical to this association. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Oral intake of beet extract provides protection against skin barrier impairment in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Ken-Ichi; Umemura, Kazuo

    2013-05-01

    The epidermis acts as a functional barrier against the external environment. Disturbances in the function of this barrier cause water loss and increase the chances of penetration by various irritable stimuli, leading to skin diseases such as dry skin, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis. Ceramides are a critical natural element of the protective epidermal barrier. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the oral intake of beet (Beta vulgaris) extract, a natural product rich in glucosylceramide (GlcCer), may prevent disturbance in skin barrier function. When HR-1 hairless mice were fed a special diet (HR-AD), transepidermal water loss (TEWL) from the dorsal skin increased, with a compensatory increase in water intake after 5 weeks. Mice fed with HR-AD had dry skin with erythema and showed increased scratching behaviour. Histological examinations revealed a remarkable increase in the thickness of the skin at 8 weeks. Supplemental addition of beet extract, which contained GlcCer at a final concentration of 0.1%, significantly prevented an increase TEWL, water intake, cumulative scratching time, and epidermal thickness at 8 weeks. These results indicate that oral intake of beet extract shows potential for preventing skin diseases associated with impaired skin barrier function. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Determination of the thickness and structure of the skin barrier by in vivo laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Astner, S.; Patzelt, A.; Knorr, F.; Sterry, W.; Antoniou, Ch

    2008-04-01

    Normal skin barrier function is an essential aspect of skin homeostasis and regeneration. Dynamic inflammatory, proliferative and neoplastic skin processes such as wound healing, psoriasis and contact dermatitis are associated with a significant disruption of the skin barrier. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in evaluating cosmetic and pharmacologic products for their ability to restore these protective properties. The gold standard for characterization of barrier function has been the measurement of the transepidermal water loss, however the disadvantage of this method is its interference with several endogenous and exogenous factors such as hydration, perspiration and topically applied substances. This study was aimed to test the clinical applicability of a fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM) for a systematic morphologic analysis of the structure, integrity and thickness of the stratum corneum in 10 otherwise healthy volunteers. The influence of skin treatment with commercial moisturizing cream on skin barrier function was evaluated in serial non-invasive examinations. Our findings showed that in vivo LSM may represent a simple and efficient method for the characterization of skin barrier properties, such as the thickness and hydration of the stratum corneum.

  18. Could tight junctions regulate the barrier function of the aged skin?

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Marek; Bílková, Zuzana; Muthný, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The skin is known to be the largest organ in human organism creating interface with outer environment. The skin provides protective barrier against pathogens, physical and chemical insults, and against uncontrolled loss of water. The barrier function was primarily attributed to the stratum corneum (SC) but recent studies confirmed that epidermal tight junctions (TJs) also play important role in maintaining barrier properties of the skin. Independent observations indicate that barrier function and its recovery is impaired in aged skin. However, trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) values remains rather unchanged in elderly population. UV radiation as major factor of photoageing impairs TJ proteins, but TJs have great self-regenerative potential. Since it may be possible that TJs can compensate TEWL in elderly due to its regenerative and compensatory capabilities, important question remains to be answered: how are TJs regulated during skin ageing? This review provides an insight into TJs functioning as epidermal barrier and summarizes current knowledge about the impact of ageing on the barrier function of the skin and epidermal TJs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Review: Pathogenesis of canine atopic dermatitis: skin barrier and host-micro-organism interaction.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Domenico; Marsella, Rosanna; Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M; Eisenschenk, Melissa N C; Nuttall, Tim; Bizikova, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, genetically predisposed, inflammatory and pruritic skin disease. The pathogenesis of canine AD is incompletely understood. The aim of this review is to provide an in-depth update on the involvement of skin barrier and host-microbiome interaction in the pathogenesis of canine AD. Online citation databases and abstracts from international meetings were searched for publications related to skin barrier and host-microbiome interaction (e.g. bacteria, yeast, antimicrobial peptides). A total of 126 publications were identified. This review article focuses on epidermal barrier dysfunction and the interaction between cutaneous microbes (bacteria and yeasts) and the host (antimicrobial peptides). Epidemiological updates on the presence of pathogenic organisms and canine AD are also provided. Major advances have been made in the investigation of skin barrier dysfunction in canine AD, although many questions still remain. Skin barrier dysfunction and host-microbiome interactions are emerging as primary alterations in canine AD. Based on this review, it is clear that future studies focused on the development of drugs able to restore the skin barrier and increase the natural defences against pathogenic organisms are needed. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  20. Natural Oils for Skin-Barrier Repair: Ancient Compounds Now Backed by Modern Science.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Alexandra R; Clark, Ashley K; Sivamani, Raja K; Shi, Vivian Y

    2018-02-01

    Natural plant oils are commonly used as topical therapy worldwide. They are usually easily accessible and are relatively inexpensive options for skin care. Many natural oils possess specific compounds with antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-itch properties, making them attractive alternative and complementary treatments for xerotic and inflammatory dermatoses associated with skin-barrier disruption. Unique characteristics of various oils are important when considering their use for topical skin care. Differing ratios of essential fatty acids are major determinants of the barrier repair benefits of natural oils. Oils with a higher linoleic acid to oleic acid ratio have better barrier repair potential, whereas oils with higher amounts of irritating oleic acid may be detrimental to skin-barrier function. Various extraction methods for oils exist, including cold pressing to make unrefined oils, heat and chemical distillation to make essential oils, and the addition of various chemicals to simulate a specific scent to make fragranced oils. The method of oil processing and refinement is an important component of selecting oil for skin care, and cold pressing is the preferred method of oil extraction as the heat- and chemical-free process preserves beneficial lipids and limits irritating byproducts. This review summarizes evidence on utility of natural plant-based oils in dermatology, particularly in repairing the natural skin-barrier function, with the focus on natural oils, including Olea europaea (olive oil), Helianthus annus (sunflower seed oil), Cocos nucifera (coconut oil), Simmondsia chinesis (jojoba oil), Avena sativa (oat oil), and Argania spinosa (argan oil).

  1. Barriers reported among patients with breast and cervical abnormalities in the patient navigation research program: impact on timely care.

    PubMed

    Katz, Mira L; Young, Gregory S; Reiter, Paul L; Battaglia, Tracy A; Wells, Kristen J; Sanders, Mechelle; Simon, Melissa; Dudley, Donald J; Patierno, Steven R; Paskett, Electra D

    2014-01-01

    Patient navigation (PN) is a system-level strategy to decrease cancer mortality rates by reducing barriers to cancer care. Barriers to resolution among participants in the PN intervention arm with a breast or cervical abnormality in the Patient Navigation Research Program and navigators' actions to address those barriers were examined. Data from seven institutions (2005-2010) included 1,995 breast and 1,194 cervical patients. A stratified Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to examine the effects of barriers on time to resolution of an abnormal screening test or clinical finding. The range of unique barriers was 0 to 12 and 0 to 7 among participants with breast and cervical abnormalities, respectively. About two thirds of breast and one half of cervical participants had at least one barrier resulting in longer time to diagnostic resolution among breast (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.744; p < .001) and cervical (adjusted HR, 0.792; p < .001) participants. Patient- and system-level barriers were most common. Frequent navigator actions were making arrangements, scheduling appointments, referrals, and education. Having a barrier resulted in a delay in diagnostic resolution of an abnormal screening test or clinical finding. Health care systems can use these findings to improve existing PN programs or when developing new programs. Copyright © 2014 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Increased skin barrier disruption by sodium lauryl sulfate in mice expressing a constitutively active STAT6 in T cells.

    PubMed

    DaSilva, Sonia C; Sahu, Ravi P; Konger, Raymond L; Perkins, Susan M; Kaplan, Mark H; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a pruritic, chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects 10-20% of children and 1-3% of adults worldwide. Recent studies have indicated that the ability of Th2 cytokines, such as interleukin-4 (IL-4) to regulate skin barrier function may be a predisposing factor for AD development. The present studies examined the ability of increased Th2 activity to affect cutaneous barrier function in vivo and epidermal thickening. Mice that express a constitutively active Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 6 (STAT6VT) have increased Th2 cells and a predisposition to allergic inflammation were used in these studies, they demonstrate that topical treatment with the irritant sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) caused increased transepidermal water loss and epidermal thickening in STAT6VT mice over similarly treated wild-type mice. The proliferation marker Ki-67 was increased in the epidermis of STAT6VT compared to the wild-type mice. However, these differences do not appear to be linked to the addition of an irritant as control-treated STAT6VT skin also exhibited elevated Ki-67 levels, suggesting that the increased epidermal thickness in SLS-treated STAT6VT mice is primarily driven by epidermal cell hypertrophy rather than an increase in cellular proliferation. Our results suggest that an environment with increased Th2 cytokines results in abnormal responses to topical irritants.

  3. Increased skin barrier disruption by sodium lauryl sulfate in mice expressing a constitutively active STAT6 in T cells

    PubMed Central

    DaSilva, Sonia C.; Sahu, Ravi P.; Konger, Raymond L.; Perkins, Susan M.; Kaplan, Mark H.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a pruritic, chronic inflammatory skin disease that affects 10–20% of children and 1–3% of adults worldwide. Recent studies have indicated that the ability of Th2 cytokines such as interleukin-4 (IL-4) to regulate skin barrier function may be a predisposing factor for AD development. The present studies examined the ability of increased Th2 activity to affect cutaneous barrier function in vivo and epidermal thickening. Mice that express a constitutively active Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 6 (STAT6VT) have increased Th2 cells and a predisposition to allergic inflammation were used in these studies; they demonstrate that topical treatment with the irritant sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) caused increased transepidermal water loss and epidermal thickening in STAT6VT mice over similarly treated wild-type mice. The proliferation marker Ki-67 was increased in the epidermis of STAT6VT compared to wild-type mice. However, these differences do not appear to be linked to the addition of an irritant as control-treated STAT6VT skin also exhibited elevated Ki-67 levels, suggesting that the increased epidermal thickness in SLS-treated STAT6VT mice is primarily driven by epidermal cell hypertrophy rather than an increase in cellular proliferation. Our results suggest that an environment with increased Th2 cytokines results in abnormal responses to topical irritants. PMID:21959772

  4. Mechanism for initiation of food allergy: Dependence on skin barrier mutations and environmental allergen costimulation.

    PubMed

    Walker, Matthew T; Green, Jeremy E; Ferrie, Ryan P; Queener, Ashley M; Kaplan, Mark H; Cook-Mills, Joan M

    2018-05-01

    Mechanisms for the development of food allergy in neonates are unknown but clearly linked in patient populations to a genetic predisposition to skin barrier defects. Whether skin barrier defects contribute functionally to development of food allergy is unknown. The purpose of the study was to determine whether skin barrier mutations, which are primarily heterozygous in patient populations, contribute to the development of food allergy. Mice heterozygous for the filaggrin (Flg) ft and Tmem79 ma mutations were skin sensitized with environmental and food allergens. After sensitization, mice received oral challenge with food allergen, and then inflammation, inflammatory mediators, and anaphylaxis were measured. We define development of inflammation, inflammatory mediators, and food allergen-induced anaphylaxis in neonatal mice with skin barrier mutations after brief concurrent cutaneous exposure to food and environmental allergens. Moreover, neonates of allergic mothers have increased responses to suboptimal sensitization with food allergens. Importantly, responses to food allergens by these neonatal mice were dependent on genetic defects in skin barrier function and on exposure to environmental allergens. ST2 blockade during skin sensitization inhibited the development of anaphylaxis, antigen-specific IgE, and inflammatory mediators. Neonatal anaphylactic responses and antigen-specific IgE were also inhibited by oral pre-exposure to food allergen, but interestingly, this was blunted by concurrent pre-exposure of the skin to environmental allergen. These studies uncover mechanisms for food allergy sensitization and anaphylaxis in neonatal mice that are consistent with features of human early-life exposures and genetics in patients with clinical food allergy and demonstrate that changes in barrier function drive development of anaphylaxis to food allergen. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Physiological and Molecular Effects of in vivo and ex vivo Mild Skin Barrier Disruption.

    PubMed

    Pfannes, Eva K B; Weiss, Lina; Hadam, Sabrina; Gonnet, Jessica; Combardière, Béhazine; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2018-01-01

    The success of topically applied treatments on skin relies on the efficacy of skin penetration. In order to increase particle or product penetration, mild skin barrier disruption methods can be used. We previously described cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping as an efficient method to open hair follicles, enhance particle penetration, and activate Langerhans cells. We conducted ex vivo and in vivo measurements on human skin to characterize the biological effect and quantify barrier disruption-related inflammation on a molecular level. Despite the known immunostimulatory effects, this barrier disruption and hair follicle opening method was well accepted and did not result in lasting changes of skin physiological parameters, cytokine production, or clinical side effects. Only in ex vivo human skin did we find a discrete increase in IP-10, TGF-β, IL-8, and GM-CSF mRNA. The data underline the safety profile of this method and demonstrate that the procedure per se does not cause substantial inflammation or skin damage, which is also of interest when applied to non-invasive sampling of biomarkers in clinical trials. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Skin rash, headache and abnormal behaviour: unusual presentation of intracranial haemorrhage in dengue fever

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Abdul Majid; Mejally, Mousa Ali Al; Hussain, Waleed Mohd; Maimani, Wail Al; Hanif, Sadia; Khoujah, Amer Mohd; Siddiqi, Ahmad; Akhtar, Mubeena; Bafaraj, Mazen G; Fareed, Khurram

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. The dengue virus is a single stranded RNA virus belonging to the Flaviviridae family. There are four serotypes (DEN 1–4) classified according to biological and immunological criteria. Patients may be asymptomatic or their condition may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide and 2.5 billion people are at risk. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment are vital if disease related morbidity and mortality are to be limited. We present an interesting case of dengue fever with headache, skin rash and abnormal behaviour who had a massive intracranial haemorrhage with fatal outcome. PMID:22242067

  7. Damage and recovery of skin barrier function after glycolic acid chemical peeling and crystal microdermabrasion.

    PubMed

    Song, Ji Youn; Kang, Hyun A; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Park, Young Min; Kim, Hyung Ok

    2004-03-01

    Superficial chemical peeling and microdermabrasion have become increasingly popular methods for producing facial rejuvenation. However, there are few studies reporting the skin barrier function changes after these procedures. To evaluate objectively the degree of damage visually and the time needed for the skin barrier function to recover after glycolic acid peeling and aluminum oxide crystal microdermabrasion using noninvasive bioengineering methods. Superficial chemical peeling using 30%, 50%, and 70% glycolic acid and aluminum oxide crystal microdermabrasion were used on the volar forearm of 13 healthy women. The skin response was measured by a visual observation and using an evaporimeter, corneometer, and colorimeter before and after peeling at set time intervals. Both glycolic acid peeling and aluminum oxide crystal microdermabrasion induced significant damage to the skin barrier function immediately after the procedure, and the degree of damage was less severe after the aluminum oxide crystal microdermabrasion compared with glycolic acid peeling. The damaged skin barrier function had recovered within 24 hours after both procedures. The degree of erythema induction was less severe after the aluminum oxide crystal microdermabrasion compared with the glycolic acid peeling procedure. The degree of erythema induced after the glycolic acid peeling procedure was not proportional to the peeling solution concentration used. The erythema subsided within 1 day after the aluminum oxide crystal microdermabrasion procedure and within 4 days after the glycolic acid peeling procedure. These results suggest that the skin barrier function is damaged after the glycolic acid peeling and aluminum oxide crystal microdermabrasion procedure but recovers within 1 to 4 days. Therefore, repeating the superficial peeling procedure at 2-week intervals will allow sufficient time for the damaged skin to recover its barrier function.

  8. Abnormal mural cell recruitment in lymphatic capillaries: a common pathological feature in chronic lymphedematous skin?

    PubMed

    Yu, Zi-You; Sun, Di; Luo, Yi; Liu, Ning-Fei

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to explore the structural and functional characteristics of dermal lymphatic capillaries in patients with chronic LE, specifically focused on the mural cells that are associated with skin lymphatics. Forty-four patients (30 primary LE and 14 secondary LE) and eight healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Genetic analysis of the FOXC2 was performed in 18 patients with primary LE. Full-thickness skin was excised and immunohistologically stained for podoplanin and α-SMA. The proportions of α-SMA + Lv (α-SMA + Lv%) were calculated. Lymphatic vascular function was assessed by indocyanine green lymphography. Analysis of FOXC2 revealed two mutations in two patients with LDs. Histologically, thirty-nine patients exhibited increased α-SMA + mural cell coverage of lymphatic capillaries. The α-SMA + Lv% values in the superficial and deep dermis in patients with primary and secondary LE were significantly higher than in the control group. Compared with imaging findings in healthy limbs, in which the collecting lymphatics were clearly visualized, lymphedematous extremities all exhibited dermal backflow. Abnormal recruitment of mural cells in dermal lymphatic capillaries is a common pathological event in chronic LE, and may play a role in disease evolution. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. In vitro permeation and disposition of niacinamide in silicone and porcine skin of skin barrier-mimetic formulations.

    PubMed

    Haque, Tasnuva; Lane, Majella E; Sil, Bruno C; Crowther, Jonathan M; Moore, David J

    2017-03-30

    Niacinamide (NIA) is an amide form of vitamin B3 which is used in cosmetic formulations to improve various skin conditions and it has also been shown to increase stratum corneum thickness following repeated application. In this study, three doses (5, 20 and 50μL per cm 2 ) of two NIA containing oil-in-water skin barrier-mimetic formulations were evaluated in silicone membrane and porcine ear skin and compared with a commercial control formulation. Permeation studies were conducted over 24h in Franz cells and at the end of the experiment membranes were washed and niacinamide was extracted. For the three doses, retention or deposition of NIA was generally higher in porcine skin compared with silicone membrane, consistent with the hydrophilic nature of the active. Despite the control containing a higher amount of active, comparable amounts of NIA were deposited in skin for all formulations for all doses; total skin absorption values (permeation and retention) of NIA were also comparable across all formulations. For infinite (50μL) and finite (5μL) doses the absolute permeation of NIA from the control formulation was significantly higher in porcine skin compared with both test formulations. This likely reflects differences in formulation components and/or presence of skin penetration enhancers in the formulations. Higher permeation for the 50 and 20μL dose was also evident in porcine skin compared with silicone membrane but the opposite is the case for the finite dose. The findings point to the critical importance of dose and occlusion when evaluating topical formulations in vitro and also the likelihood of exaggerated effects of excipients on permeation at infinite and pseudo-finite dose applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Improvement of hydration and epidermal barrier function in human skin by a novel compound isosorbide dicaprylate.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, R K; Bojanowski, K

    2017-10-01

    The study involved the synthesis of a novel derivative of caprylic acid - isosorbide dicaprylate (IDC) - and the evaluation of its potential in improving water homoeostasis and epidermal barrier function in human skin. The effect of IDC on gene expression was assayed in skin organotypic cultures by DNA microarrays. The results were then confirmed for a few key genes by quantitative PCR, immuno- and cytochemistry. Final validation of skin hydration properties was obtained by four separate clinical studies. Level of hydration was measured by corneometer either by using 2% IDC lotion alone vs placebo or in combination with 2% glycerol lotion vs 2% glycerol only. A direct comparison in skin hydration between 2% IDC and 2% glycerol lotions was also carried out. The epidermal barrier function improvement was assessed by determining changes in transepidermal water loss (TEWL) on the arms before and after treatment with 2% IDC lotion versus placebo. IDC was found to upregulate the expression of AQP3, CD44 and proteins involved in keratinocyte differentiation as well as the formation and function of stratum corneum. A direct comparison between 2% IDC versus 2% glycerol lotions revealed a three-fold advantage of IDC in providing skin hydration. Severely dry skin treated with 2% IDC in combination with 2% glycerol showed 133% improvement, whereas 35% improvement was observed with moderately dry human skin. Topical isosorbide dicaprylate favourably modulates genes involved in the maintenance of skin structure and function, resulting in superior clinical outcomes. By improving skin hydration and epidermal permeability barrier, it offers therapeutic applications in skin ageing. © 2017 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  11. Topical Apigenin Improves Epidermal Permeability Barrier Homeostasis in Normal Murine Skin by Divergent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Maihua; Sun, Richard; Hupe, Melanie; Kim, Peggy L.; Park, Kyungho; Crumrine, Debra; Lin, Tzu-kai; Santiago, Juan Luis; Mauro, Theodora M.; Elias, Peter M.; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    The beneficial effects of certain herbal medicines on cutaneous function have been appreciated for centuries. Among these agents, Chrysanthemum extract, apigenin, has been used for skin care, particularly in China, for millennia. However, the underlying mechanisms by which apigenin benefits the skin are not known. In the present study, we first determined whether topical apigenin positively influences permeability barrier homeostasis, and then the basis thereof. Hairless mice were treated topically with either 0.1% apigenin or vehicle alone twice-daily for 9 days. At the end of treatments, permeability barrier function was assessed with either an electrolytic water analyzer or a Tewameter. Our results show that topical apigenin significantly enhanced permeability barrier homeostasis after tape stripping, though basal permeability barrier function remained unchanged. Improved barrier function correlated with enhanced filaggrin expression and lamellar body production, which was paralleled by elevated mRNA levels for the epidermal ABCA12. The mRNA levels for key lipid synthetic enzymes also were up-regulated by apigenin. Finally, both CAMP and mBD3 immunostaining were increased by apigenin. We conclude that topical apigenin improves epidermal permeability barrier function by stimulating epidermal differentiation, lipid synthesis and secretion, as well as cutaneous antimicrobial peptide production. Apigenin could be useful for the prevention and treatment of skin disorders characterized by permeability barrier dysfunction, associated with reduced filaggrin levels, and impaired antimicrobial defenses, such as atopic dermatitis. PMID:23489424

  12. The role of filaggrin in the skin barrier and disease development.

    PubMed

    Armengot-Carbo, M; Hernández-Martín, Á; Torrelo, A

    2015-03-01

    Filaggrin is a structural protein that is fundamental in the development and maintenance of the skin barrier. The function of filaggrin and its involvement in various cutaneous and extracutaneous disorders has been the subject of considerable research in recent years. Mutations in FLG, the gene that encodes filaggrin, have been shown to cause ichthyosis vulgaris, increase the risk of atopic dermatitis and other atopic diseases, and exacerbate certain conditions. The present article reviews the current knowledge on the role of filaggrin in the skin barrier, FLG mutations, and the consequences of filaggrin deficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  13. Coal tar induces AHR-dependent skin barrier repair in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    van den Bogaard, Ellen H.; Bergboer, Judith G.M.; Vonk-Bergers, Mieke; van Vlijmen-Willems, Ivonne M.J.J.; Hato, Stanleyson V.; van der Valk, Pieter G.M.; Schröder, Jens Michael; Joosten, Irma; Zeeuwen, Patrick L.J.M.; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2013-01-01

    Topical application of coal tar is one of the oldest therapies for atopic dermatitis (AD), a T helper 2 (Th2) lymphocyte–mediated skin disease associated with loss-of-function mutations in the skin barrier gene, filaggrin (FLG). Despite its longstanding clinical use and efficacy, the molecular mechanism of coal tar therapy is unknown. Using organotypic skin models with primary keratinocytes from AD patients and controls, we found that coal tar activated the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), resulting in induction of epidermal differentiation. AHR knockdown by siRNA completely abrogated this effect. Coal tar restored filaggrin expression in FLG-haploinsufficient keratinocytes to wild-type levels, and counteracted Th2 cytokine–mediated downregulation of skin barrier proteins. In AD patients, coal tar completely restored expression of major skin barrier proteins, including filaggrin. Using organotypic skin models stimulated with Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, we found coal tar to diminish spongiosis, apoptosis, and CCL26 expression, all AD hallmarks. Coal tar interfered with Th2 cytokine signaling via dephosphorylation of STAT6, most likely due to AHR-regulated activation of the NRF2 antioxidative stress pathway. The therapeutic effect of AHR activation herein described opens a new avenue to reconsider AHR as a pharmacological target and could lead to the development of mechanism-based drugs for AD. PMID:23348739

  14. Coal tar induces AHR-dependent skin barrier repair in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    van den Bogaard, Ellen H; Bergboer, Judith G M; Vonk-Bergers, Mieke; van Vlijmen-Willems, Ivonne M J J; Hato, Stanleyson V; van der Valk, Pieter G M; Schröder, Jens Michael; Joosten, Irma; Zeeuwen, Patrick L J M; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2013-02-01

    Topical application of coal tar is one of the oldest therapies for atopic dermatitis (AD), a T helper 2 (Th2) lymphocyte-mediated skin disease associated with loss-of-function mutations in the skin barrier gene, filaggrin (FLG). Despite its longstanding clinical use and efficacy, the molecular mechanism of coal tar therapy is unknown. Using organotypic skin models with primary keratinocytes from AD patients and controls, we found that coal tar activated the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), resulting in induction of epidermal differentiation. AHR knockdown by siRNA completely abrogated this effect. Coal tar restored filaggrin expression in FLG-haploinsufficient keratinocytes to wild-type levels, and counteracted Th2 cytokine-mediated downregulation of skin barrier proteins. In AD patients, coal tar completely restored expression of major skin barrier proteins, including filaggrin. Using organotypic skin models stimulated with Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, we found coal tar to diminish spongiosis, apoptosis, and CCL26 expression, all AD hallmarks. Coal tar interfered with Th2 cytokine signaling via dephosphorylation of STAT6, most likely due to AHR-regulated activation of the NRF2 antioxidative stress pathway. The therapeutic effect of AHR activation herein described opens a new avenue to reconsider AHR as a pharmacological target and could lead to the development of mechanism-based drugs for AD.

  15. Diabetic and sympathetic influences on the water permeability barrier function of human skin as measured using transepidermal water loss: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung Hoon; Park, Ji Woong

    2017-11-01

    The presence of long-standing hyperglycemic conditions has been suggested to lead to many skin problems associated with an impaired skin barrier function. However, the relationship between impaired skin barrier status and altered peripheral nervous system function has not yet been determined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the water evaporation rate as a measure of the permeability barrier function of diabetic skin and its relationship to diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSPN) and peripheral autonomic neuropathy (PAN) using well-controlled confounding variables.This case-control study included 42 participants with chronic diabetes and 43 matched healthy controls. The diabetic group underwent a nerve conduction study and sympathetic skin response (SSR) test to confirm the presence of DSPN and PAN, respectively. Different skin regions were analyzed using the noninvasive Tewameter instrument (Courage + Khazaka Electronic GmbH, Cologne, Germany). The impacts of PAN, DSPN, age, and diabetes duration on the values of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were each analyzed and compared between the groups.Regardless of the presence of DSPN or PAN, the TEWL values as measured on the distal extremities were significantly lower in the diabetic group than in the control group. In the diabetic group, participants with abnormal SSR test results showed decreased TEWL values in the finger, sole, and first toe, as compared with participants with normal SSR test results. In the control group, age showed a negative correlation with the TEWL values with respect to some measured regions. However, in the diabetic group, there was no significant correlation between either patient age or diabetes duration and TEWL values.The presence of a long-term hyperglycemic state can reduce the permeability barrier function of the skin, a phenomenon that might be related to the presence of an impaired peripheral sympathetic nervous system, rather than peripheral sensorimotor

  16. Two Ancient Gene Families Are Critical for Maintenance of the Mammalian Skin Barrier in Postnatal Life.

    PubMed

    Cangkrama, Michael; Darido, Charbel; Georgy, Smitha R; Partridge, Darren; Auden, Alana; Srivastava, Seema; Wilanowski, Tomasz; Jane, Stephen M

    2016-07-01

    The skin barrier is critical for mammalian survival in the terrestrial environment, affording protection against fluid loss, microbes, toxins, and UV exposure. Many genes indispensable for barrier formation in the embryo have been identified, but loss of these genes in adult mice does not induce barrier regression. We describe a complex regulatory network centered on two ancient gene families, the grainyhead-like (Grhl) transcription factors and the protein cross-linking enzymes (tissue transglutaminases [Tgms]), which are essential for skin permeability barrier maintenance in adult mice. Embryonic deletion of Grhl3 induces loss of Tgm1 expression, which disrupts the cornified envelope, thus preventing permeability barrier formation leading to neonatal death. However, gene deletion of Grhl3 in adult mice does not disrupt the preformed barrier, with cornified envelope integrity maintained by Grhl1 and Tgm5, which are up-regulated in response to postnatal loss of Grhl3. Concomitant deletion of both Grhl factors in adult mice induced loss of Tgm1 and Tgm5 expression, perturbation of the cornified envelope, and complete permeability barrier regression that was incompatible with life. These findings define the molecular safeguards for barrier function that accompany the transition from intrauterine to terrestrial life. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Controlling the hydration of the skin though the application of occluding barrier creams

    PubMed Central

    Sparr, Emma; Millecamps, Danielle; Isoir, Muriel; Burnier, Véronique; Larsson, Åsa; Cabane, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The skin is a barrier membrane that separates environments with profoundly different water contents. The barrier properties are assured by the outer layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), which controls the transepidermal water loss. The SC acts as a responding membrane, since its hydration and permeability vary with the boundary condition, which is the activity of water at the outer surface of the skin. We show how this boundary condition can be changed by the application of a barrier cream that makes a film with a high resistance to the transport of water. We present a quantitative model that predicts hydration and water transport in SC that is covered by such a film. We also develop an experimental method for measuring the specific resistance to water transport of films made of occluding barrier creams. Finally, we combine the theoretical model with the measured properties of the barrier creams to predict how a film of cream changes the activity of water at the outer surface of the SC. Using the known variations of SC permeability and hydration with the water activity in its environment (i.e. the relative humidity), we can thus predict how a film of barrier cream changes SC hydration. PMID:23269846

  18. Controlling the hydration of the skin though the application of occluding barrier creams.

    PubMed

    Sparr, Emma; Millecamps, Danielle; Isoir, Muriel; Burnier, Véronique; Larsson, Åsa; Cabane, Bernard

    2013-03-06

    The skin is a barrier membrane that separates environments with profoundly different water contents. The barrier properties are assured by the outer layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), which controls the transepidermal water loss. The SC acts as a responding membrane, since its hydration and permeability vary with the boundary condition, which is the activity of water at the outer surface of the skin. We show how this boundary condition can be changed by the application of a barrier cream that makes a film with a high resistance to the transport of water. We present a quantitative model that predicts hydration and water transport in SC that is covered by such a film. We also develop an experimental method for measuring the specific resistance to water transport of films made of occluding barrier creams. Finally, we combine the theoretical model with the measured properties of the barrier creams to predict how a film of cream changes the activity of water at the outer surface of the SC. Using the known variations of SC permeability and hydration with the water activity in its environment (i.e. the relative humidity), we can thus predict how a film of barrier cream changes SC hydration.

  19. Skin Barrier Restoration and Moisturization Using Horse Oil-Loaded Dissolving Microneedle Patches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chisong; Eom, Younghyon Andrew; Yang, Huisuk; Jang, Mingyu; Jung, Sang Uk; Park, Ye Oak; Lee, Si Eun; Jung, Hyungil

    2018-01-01

    Horse oil (HO) has skin barrier restoration and skin-moisturizing effects. Although cream formulations have been used widely and safely, their limited penetration through the stratum corneum is a major obstacle to maximizing the cosmetic efficacy of HO. Therefore, we aimed to encapsulate HO in a cosmetic dissolving microneedle (DMN) for efficient transdermal delivery. To overcome these limitations of skin permeation, HO-loaded DMN (HO-DMN) patches were developed and evaluated for their efficacy and safety using in vitro and clinical studies. Despite the lipophilic nature of HO, the HO-DMN patches had a sharp shape and uniform array, with an average length and tip diameter of 388.36 ± 16.73 and 38.54 ± 5.29 µm, respectively. The mechanical strength of the HO-DMN patches was sufficient (fracture force of 0.29 ± 0.01 N), and they could successfully penetrate pig skin. During the 4-week clinical evaluation, HO-DMN patches caused significant improvements in skin and dermal density, skin elasticity, and moisturization. Additionally, a brief safety assessment showed that the HO-DMN patches induced negligible adverse events. The HO-DMNs are efficient, safe, and convenient for wide use in cosmetic applications for skin barrier restoration and moisturization. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. The impact of urban particulate pollution on skin barrier function and the subsequent drug absorption.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tai-Long; Wang, Pei-Wen; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Huang, Chi-Ting; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-04-01

    Ambient particulate matters (PMs) are known as inducers that adversely affect a variety of human organs. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the influence of PMs on the permeation of drugs and sunscreens via the skin. The role of skin-barrier properties such as the stratum corneum (SC) and tight junctions (TJs) during the delivery process was explored. This work was conducted using both in vitro and in vivo experiments in pigs to check the responses of the skin to PMs. PMs primarily containing heavy metals (1648a) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, 1649b) were employed to treat the skin. According to the transepidermal water loss (TEWL), 1649b but not 1648a significantly disrupted the SC integrity by 2-fold compared to the PBS control. The immunohistochemistry (IHC) of cytokeratin, filaggrin, and E-cadherin exhibited that 1649b mildly damaged TJs. The cytotoxicity of keratinocytes and skin fibroblasts caused by 1649b was stronger than that caused by 1648a. The 1649b elicited apoptosis via caspase-3 activation. The proteomic profiles showed that PMs upregulated Annexin A2 by >5-fold, which can be a biomarker of PM-induced barrier disruption. We found that the skin uptake of ascorbic acid, an extremely hydrophilic drug, was increased from 74 to 112 μg/g by 1649b treatment. The extremely lipophilic drug tretinoin also showed a 2.6-fold increase of skin accumulation. Oxybenzone and dextran absorption was not affected by PMs. The in vivo dye distribution visualized by fluorescence microscopy had indicated that 1649b intervention promoted permeant partitioning into SC. Caution should be taken in exposing the skin to airborne dust due to its ability to reduce barrier function and increase the risk of drug overabsorption, although this effect was not very marked. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Epidermal ADAM17 maintains the skin barrier by regulating EGFR ligand–dependent terminal keratinocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cobzaru, Cristina; Triantafyllopoulou, Antigoni; Löffek, Stefanie; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Threadgill, David W.; Kurz, Thomas; van Rooijen, Nico; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2012-01-01

    ADAM17 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17) is ubiquitously expressed and cleaves membrane proteins, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands, l-selectin, and TNF, from the cell surface, thus regulating responses to tissue injury and inflammation. However, little is currently known about its role in skin homeostasis. We show that mice lacking ADAM17 in keratinocytes (A17ΔKC) have a normal epidermal barrier and skin architecture at birth but develop pronounced defects in epidermal barrier integrity soon after birth and develop chronic dermatitis as adults. The dysregulated expression of epidermal differentiation proteins becomes evident 2 d after birth, followed by reduced transglutaminase (TGM) activity, transepidermal water loss, up-regulation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-36α, and inflammatory immune cell infiltration. Activation of the EGFR was strongly reduced in A17ΔKC skin, and topical treatment of A17ΔKC mice with recombinant TGF-α significantly improved TGM activity and decreased skin inflammation. Finally, we show that mice lacking the EGFR in keratinocytes (EgfrΔKC) closely resembled A17ΔKC mice. Collectively, these results identify a previously unappreciated critical role of the ADAM17–EGFR signaling axis in maintaining the homeostasis of the postnatal epidermal barrier and suggest that this pathway could represent a good target for treatment of epidermal barrier defects. PMID:22565824

  2. Barriers to Seeking Help for Skin Cancer Detection in Rural Australia

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Kate M.; Martin, Kimberley; Wilson, Carlene J.; Trenerry, Camilla; Sharplin, Greg; Dollman, James

    2017-01-01

    This study explores rural South Australians’ barriers to help-seeking for skin cancer detection. A total of 201 randomly selected rural adults (18–94 years, 66% female) were presented with a skin-cancer-related scenario via telephone and were asked the extent to which various barriers would impede their help-seeking, based on an amended version of the Barriers to Help-Seeking Scale. Older (≥63 years) and less educated participants endorsed barriers more strongly than their younger, more educated counterparts in the following domains; “Concrete barriers and distrust of caregivers”, “Emotional control”, “Minimising problem and Normalisation”, “Need for control and self-reliance” (every domain other than “Privacy”). Socioeconomic disadvantage, gender, and farmer status did not predict stronger overall barriers, but some gender and occupation-related differences were detected at the item level. Farmers were also more likely to endorse the “Minimising problem and normalization” domain than their non-farmer working rural counterparts. Widely endorsed barriers included the tendency to minimise the problem, a desire to remain in control/not be influenced by others, reluctance to show emotion or complain, and having concerns about privacy or waiting times. PMID:28208803

  3. The effect of environmental humidity and temperature on skin barrier function and dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Engebretsen, K A; Johansen, J D; Kezic, S; Linneberg, A; Thyssen, J P

    2016-02-01

    Physicians are aware that climatic conditions negatively affect the skin. In particular, people living in equator far countries such as the Northern parts of Europe and North America are exposed to harsh weather during the winter and may experience dry and itchy skin, or deterioration of already existing dermatoses. We searched the literature for studies that evaluated the mechanisms behind this phenomenon. Commonly used meteorological terms such as absolute humidity, relative humidity and dew point are explained. Furthermore, we review the negative effect of low humidity, low temperatures and different seasons on the skin barrier and on the risk of dermatitis. We conclude that low humidity and low temperatures lead to a general decrease in skin barrier function and increased susceptible towards mechanical stress. Since pro-inflammatory cytokines and cortisol are released by keratinocytes, and the number of dermal mast cells increases, the skin also becomes more reactive towards skin irritants and allergens. Collectively, published data show that cold and dry weather increase the prevalence and risk of flares in patients with atopic dermatitis. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  4. Effect of olive and sunflower seed oil on the adult skin barrier: implications for neonatal skin care.

    PubMed

    Danby, Simon G; AlEnezi, Tareq; Sultan, Amani; Lavender, Tina; Chittock, John; Brown, Kirsty; Cork, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Natural oils are advocated and used throughout the world as part of neonatal skin care, but there is an absence of evidence to support this practice. The goal of the current study was to ascertain the effect of olive oil and sunflower seed oil on the biophysical properties of the skin. Nineteen adult volunteers with and without a history of atopic dermatitis were recruited into two randomized forearm-controlled mechanistic studies. The first cohort applied six drops of olive oil to one forearm twice daily for 5 weeks. The second cohort applied six drops of olive oil to one forearm and six drops of sunflower seed oil to the other twice daily for 4 weeks. The effect of the treatments was evaluated by determining stratum corneum integrity and cohesion, intercorneocyte cohesion, moisturization, skin-surface pH, and erythema. Topical application of olive oil for 4 weeks caused a significant reduction in stratum corneum integrity and induced mild erythema in volunteers with and without a history of atopic dermatitis. Sunflower seed oil preserved stratum corneum integrity, did not cause erythema, and improved hydration in the same volunteers. In contrast to sunflower seed oil, topical treatment with olive oil significantly damages the skin barrier, and therefore has the potential to promote the development of, and exacerbate existing, atopic dermatitis. The use of olive oil for the treatment of dry skin and infant massage should therefore be discouraged. These findings challenge the unfounded belief that all natural oils are beneficial for the skin and highlight the need for further research. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Anti-Inflammatory and Skin Barrier Repair Effects of Topical Application of Some Plant Oils

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-Kai; Zhong, Lily; Santiago, Juan Luis

    2017-01-01

    Plant oils have been utilized for a variety of purposes throughout history, with their integration into foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical products. They are now being increasingly recognized for their effects on both skin diseases and the restoration of cutaneous homeostasis. This article briefly reviews the available data on biological influences of topical skin applications of some plant oils (olive oil, olive pomace oil, sunflower seed oil, coconut oil, safflower seed oil, argan oil, soybean oil, peanut oil, sesame oil, avocado oil, borage oil, jojoba oil, oat oil, pomegranate seed oil, almond oil, bitter apricot oil, rose hip oil, German chamomile oil, and shea butter). Thus, it focuses on the therapeutic benefits of these plant oils according to their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects on the skin, promotion of wound healing and repair of skin barrier. PMID:29280987

  6. Anti-Inflammatory and Skin Barrier Repair Effects of Topical Application of Some Plant Oils.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Kai; Zhong, Lily; Santiago, Juan Luis

    2017-12-27

    Plant oils have been utilized for a variety of purposes throughout history, with their integration into foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical products. They are now being increasingly recognized for their effects on both skin diseases and the restoration of cutaneous homeostasis. This article briefly reviews the available data on biological influences of topical skin applications of some plant oils (olive oil, olive pomace oil, sunflower seed oil, coconut oil, safflower seed oil, argan oil, soybean oil, peanut oil, sesame oil, avocado oil, borage oil, jojoba oil, oat oil, pomegranate seed oil, almond oil, bitter apricot oil, rose hip oil, German chamomile oil, and shea butter). Thus, it focuses on the therapeutic benefits of these plant oils according to their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects on the skin, promotion of wound healing and repair of skin barrier.

  7. Skin sensitivity and skin microbiota: Is there a link?

    PubMed

    Seite, Sophie; Misery, Laurent

    2018-05-21

    Sensitive skin is defined by the occurrence of unpleasant sensations, accompanied or not by erythema, in response to stimuli which normally should not provoke such sensations and that cannot be linked to skin disease. Even if its pathophysiology is not completely known, hyper-reactivity of the cutaneous nervous system associated with an abnormal skin barrier has been hypothesized as a primary culprit including more recently a role of the cutaneous microbiota. The objective of this short review is to discuss the relationship between the skin microbiota, skin sensitivity and the skin barrier function. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabolic and redox barriers in the skin exposed to drugs and xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Korkina, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    Growing exposure of human skin to environmental and occupational hazards, to numerous skin care/beauty products, and to topical drugs led to a biomedical concern regarding sustainability of cutaneous chemical defence that is essential for protection against intoxication. Since skin is the largest extra-hepatic drug/xenobiotic metabolising organ where redox-dependent metabolic pathways prevail, in this review, publications on metabolic processes leading to redox imbalance (oxidative stress) and its autocrine/endocrine impact to cutaneous drug/xenobiotic metabolism were scrutinised. Chemical and photo-chemical skin barriers contain metabolic and redox compartments: their protective and homeostatic functions. The review will examine the striking similarity of adaptive responses to exogenous chemical/photo-chemical stressors and endogenous toxins in cutaneous metabolic and redox system; the role(s) of xenobiotics/drugs and phase II enzymes in the endogenous antioxidant defence and maintenance of redox balance; redox regulation of interactions between metabolic and inflammatory responses in skin cells; skin diseases sharing metabolic and redox problems (contact dermatitis, lupus erythematosus, and vitiligo) Due to exceptional the redox dependence of cutaneous metabolic pathways and interaction of redox active metabolites/exogenous antioxidants with drug/xenobiotic metabolism, metabolic tests of topical xenobiotics/drugs should be combined with appropriate redox analyses and performed on 3D human skin models.

  9. Skin-derived TSLP triggers progression from epidermal-barrier defects to asthma.

    PubMed

    Demehri, Shadmehr; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Holtzman, Michael J; Kopan, Raphael

    2009-05-19

    Asthma is a common allergic lung disease frequently affecting individuals with a prior history of eczema/atopic dermatitis (AD); however, the mechanism underlying the progression from AD to asthma (the so-called "atopic march") is unclear. Here we show that, like humans with AD, mice with skin-barrier defects develop AD-like skin inflammation and are susceptible to allergic asthma. Furthermore, we show that thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), overexpressed by skin keratinocytes, is the systemic driver of this bronchial hyper-responsiveness. As an AD-like model, we used mice with keratinocyte-specific deletion of RBP-j that sustained high systemic levels of TSLP. Antigen-induced allergic challenge to the lung airways of RBP-j-deficient animals resulted in a severe asthmatic phenotype not seen in similarly treated wild-type littermates. Elimination of TSLP signaling in these animals blocked the atopic march, demonstrating that high serum TSLP levels were required to sensitize the lung to allergic inflammation. Furthermore, we analyzed outbred K14-TSLP(tg) mice that maintained high systemic levels of TSLP without developing any skin pathology. Importantly, epidermal-derived TSLP was sufficient to trigger the atopic march, sensitizing the lung airways to inhaled allergens in the absence of epicutaneous sensitization. Based on these findings, we propose that in addition to early treatment of the primary skin-barrier defects, selective inhibition of systemic TSLP may be the key to blocking the development of asthma in AD patients.

  10. The effects of using a moldable skin barrier on peristomal skin condition in persons with an ostomy: results of a prospective, observational, multinational study.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Maria Teresa; Majewska, Grazyna; Cabral, Mary V; Hölzel-Piontek, Karin

    2014-12-01

    Peristomal skin problems are the most commonly experienced physical complication following ostomy surgery and often are caused by leakage or a poorly fitting skin barrier. A prospective, multicenter, observational evaluation of persons with a colostomy, ileostomy, or urostomy was conducted to assess the incidence of peristomal lesions and level of patient satisfaction with moldable skin barriers. Peristomal skin was assessed using the Studio Alterazoni Cutanee Stomale (SACS™) scale, and patients were asked to rate barrier application and usage variables. During a period of 12 months, and using convenience sampling, 561 patients from 90 centers in 3 countries were enrolled: 28 in Germany, 48 in Poland, and 14 in the United States. Participants included 277 new stoma patients (average time since surgery 0.3 months; average age 64.7 ± 12.86 years) who had a colostomy (174), ileostomy (72), or urostomy (10); and 284 patients with an existing stoma (average time since surgery 18.2 months; average age 66 ± 12.62 years) who had a colostomy (174), ileostomy (88), or urostomy (22) who experienced skin complications using a traditional skin barrier (ie, a solid or flexible barrier with precut opening or one requiring cutting an opening to accommodate the stoma). All patients were assessed at baseline and after 1 and 2 months. In the patients with a new stoma, 225 (90.4%) had intact skin at baseline, 239 (95.6%) had intact skin after 2 months, and 98% rated overall satisfaction with the barrier as good or excellent. In the patients with an existing stoma, intact skin was observed in 103 patients (39.5%) at baseline and 225 (86.2%) after 2 months, with 96.5% of patients rating overall satisfaction with the barrier as good or excellent. In this group, the proportion of patients who used accessory products (eg, belt, deodorants, powder) was 73% at baseline and 64.2% at the 2-month follow-up. The moldable skin barriers evaluated were effective in preventing and healing

  11. Associations between skin barrier characteristics, skin conditions and health of aged nursing home residents: a multi-center prevalence and correlational study.

    PubMed

    Hahnel, Elisabeth; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Trojahn, Carina; Kottner, Jan

    2017-11-13

    Geriatric patients are affected by a range of skin conditions and dermatological diseases, functional limitations and chronic diseases. Skin problems are highly prevalent in elderly populations. Aim of this study was to investigate possible associations between health, functional and cutaneous variables in aged long-term care residents. This observational, cross-sectional, descriptive prevalence study was conducted in a random sample of 10 institutional long-term care facilities in Berlin. In total, n = 223 residents were included. Demographic and functional characteristics, xerosis cutis, incontinence associated dermatitis, pressure ulcers and skin tears were assessed. Stratum corneum hydration, transepidermal water loss, skin surface pH and skin temperature were measured. Data analysis was descriptive and explorative. To explore possible bivariate associations, a correlation matrix was created. The correlation matrix was also used to detect possible collinearity in the subsequent regression analyses. Mean age (n = 223) was 83.6 years, 67.7% were female. Most residents were affected by xerosis cutis (99.1%; 95% CI: 97.7% - 100.0%). The prevalence of pressure ulcers was 9.0% (95% CI: 5.0% - 13.0%), of incontinence associated dermatitis 35.4% (95% CI: 29.9% - 42.2%) and of skin tears 6.3% (95% CI: 3.2% - 9.5%). Biophysical skin parameters were not associated with overall care dependency, but with age and skin dryness. In general, skin dryness and measured skin barrier parameters were associated between arms and legs indicating similar overall skin characteristics of the residents. Prevalence of xerosis cutis, pressure ulcers and skin tears were high, indicating the load of these adverse skin conditions in this population. Only few associations of demographic characteristics, skin barrier impairments and the occurrence of dry skin, pressure ulcers, skin tears and incontinence-associated dermatitis have been detected, that might limit the diagnostic value of skin

  12. Pathogenic Cx31 is un/misfolded to cause skin abnormality via a Fos/JunB-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chengyuan; Chen, Xiang; Chi, Jingwei; Yang, Dawei; Liu, Shu; Liu, Mujun; Pan, Qian; Fan, Jianbing; Wang, Danling; Zhang, Zhuohua

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in connexin-31 (Cx31) are associated with multiple human diseases, including familial erythrokeratodermia variabilis (EKV). The pathogenic mechanism of EKV-associated Cx31 mutants remains largely elusive. Here, we show that EKV-pathogenic Cx31 mutants are un/misfolded and temperature sensitive. In Drosophila, expression of pathogenic Cx31, but not wild-type Cx31, causes depigmentation and degeneration of ommatidia that are rescued by expression of either dBip or dHsp70. Ectopic expression of Cx31 in mouse skin results in skin abnormalities resembling human EKV. The affected tissues show remarkable disrupted gap junction formation and significant upregulation of chaperones Bip and Hsp70 as well as AP-1 proteins c-Fos and JunB, in addition to molecular signatures of skin diseases. Consistently, c-Fos, JunB, Bip and Hsp70 are strikingly higher in keratinocytes of EKV patients than their matched control individuals. Furthermore, a druggable AP-1 inhibitory small molecule suppresses skin phenotype and pathological abnormalities of transgenic Cx31 mice. The study suggests that Cx31 mutant proteins are un/misfolded to cause EKV likely via an AP-1-mediated mechanism and identifies a small molecule with therapeutic potential of the disease. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Dodecyl Amino Glucoside Enhances Transdermal and Topical Drug Delivery via Reversible Interaction with Skin Barrier Lipids.

    PubMed

    Kopečná, Monika; Macháček, Miloslav; Prchalová, Eva; Štěpánek, Petr; Drašar, Pavel; Kotora, Martin; Vávrová, Kateřina

    2017-03-01

    Skin permeation/penetration enhancers are substances that enable drug delivery through or into the skin. To search for new enhancers with high but reversible activity and acceptable toxicity, we synthesized a series of D-glucose derivatives, both hydrophilic and amphiphilic. Initial evaluation of the ability of these sugar derivatives to increase permeation and penetration of theophylline through/into human skin compared with a control (no enhancer) or sorbitan monolaurate (Span 20; positive control) revealed dodecyl 6-amino-6-deoxy-α-D-glucopyranoside 5 as a promising enhancer. Furthermore, this amino sugar 5 increased epidermal concentration of a highly hydrophilic antiviral cidofovir by a factor of 7. The effect of compound 5 on skin electrical impedance suggested its direct interaction with the skin barrier. Infrared spectroscopy of isolated stratum corneum revealed no effect of enhancer 5 on the stratum corneum proteins but an overall decrease in the lipid chain order. The enhancer showed acceptable toxicity on HaCaT keratinocyte and 3T3 fibroblast cell lines. Finally, transepidermal water loss returned to baseline values after enhancer 5 had been removed from the skin. Compound 5, a dodecyl amino glucoside, is a promising enhancer that acts through a reversible interaction with the stratum corneum lipids.

  14. The role of social closeness during tape stripping to facilitate skin barrier recovery: Preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Hayley; Ravikulan, Abhimati; Nater, Urs M; Skoluda, Nadine; Jarrett, Paul; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    Social support is known to reduce the negative effects of stress on health, but there is mixed evidence for the effects of social support on wound healing. This study aimed to investigate whether undergoing a task designed to promote social closeness with a fellow participant and being paired with that person during a tape-stripping procedure could reduce stress and improve skin barrier recovery compared to going through tape stripping alone. Seventy-two healthy adults were randomized to either a social closeness condition where participants completed a relationship-building task and tape stripping in pairs or a control condition where they completed tape stripping alone. Skin barrier recovery was measured using transepidermal water loss. Salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase were collected at four time points as markers of the endocrine and autonomic stress response. Social closeness had a beneficial effect on skin barrier recovery compared to the control condition, t(54) = 2.86, p = .006, r = .36. Social closeness significantly reduced self-reported stress. The effects of the intervention on skin barrier recovery were moderated by self-reported stress reduction (p = .035). There were no significant differences in cortisol between groups, but alpha-amylase increased significantly more from baseline to after tape stripping in the control group compared to the intervention group. This is the first study to show that social closeness with a person going through a similar unfamiliar procedure can positively influence wound healing. Future research needs to replicate these findings in other wound types and in clinical settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Influence of Repeated Senna Laxative Use on Skin Barrier Function in Mice.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Satoshi; Hiramoto, Keiichi; Yamate, Yurika; Ooi, Kazuya

    2017-08-01

    Senna, one of the major stimulant laxatives, is widely used for treating constipation. Chronic senna use has been reported to be associated with colonic disorders such as melanosis coli and/or epithelial hyperplasia. However, there is no obvious information on the influence of chronic senna use on organs except for the intestine. To clarify the influence of senna laxative use on skin barrier function by repeated senna administration. Eight-week-old male hairless mice received senna (10 mg/kg/day) for 21 days. After administration, we evaluated transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and investigated the biomarkers in plasma and skin using protein analysis methods. Fecal water content on day seven was significantly increased; however, on day 21, it was significantly decreased after repeated senna administration. In the senna-administered group, TEWL was significantly higher compared to the control on days seven and 21. Plasma acetylcholine concentration and NO 2 - /NO 3 - were increased on days seven and 21, respectively. In skin, tryptase-positive mast cells and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-positive cells were increased on days seven and 21, respectively. The increase of TEWL on days seven and 21 was suppressed by the administration of atropine and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, respectively. It was suggested that diarrhea or constipation induced by repeated senna administration caused the impairment of skin barrier function. There is a possibility that this impaired skin barrier function occurred due to degranulation of mast cells via cholinergic signals or oxidative stress derived from iNOS.

  16. Human skin penetration and local effects of topical nano zinc oxide after occlusion and barrier impairment.

    PubMed

    Leite-Silva, V R; Sanchez, W Y; Studier, H; Liu, D C; Mohammed, Y H; Holmes, A M; Ryan, E M; Haridass, I N; Chandrasekaran, N C; Becker, W; Grice, J E; Benson, H A E; Roberts, M S

    2016-07-01

    Public health concerns continue to exist over the safety of zinc oxide nanoparticles that are commonly used in sunscreen formulations. In this work, we assessed the effects of two conditions which may be encountered in everyday sunscreen use, occlusion and a compromised skin barrier, on the penetration and local toxicity of two topically applied zinc oxide nanoparticle products. Caprylic/capric triglyceride (CCT) suspensions of commercially used zinc oxide nanoparticles, either uncoated or with a silane coating, were applied to intact and barrier impaired skin of volunteers, without and with occlusion for a period of six hours. The exposure time was chosen to simulate normal in-use conditions. Multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging was used to noninvasively assess zinc oxide penetration and cellular metabolic changes that could be indicative of toxicity. We found that zinc oxide nanoparticles did not penetrate into the viable epidermis of intact or barrier impaired skin of volunteers, without or with occlusion. We also observed no apparent toxicity in the viable epidermis below the application sites. These findings were validated by ex vivo human skin studies in which zinc penetration was assessed by multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging as well as Zinpyr-1 staining and toxicity was assessed by MTS assays in zinc oxide treated skin cryosections. In conclusion, applications of zinc oxide nanoparticles under occlusive in-use conditions to volunteers are not associated with any measurable zinc oxide penetration into, or local toxicity in the viable epidermis below the application site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Barrier Function of the Repaired Skin Is Disrupted Following Arrest of Dicer in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ghatak, Subhadip; Chan, Yuk Cheung; Khanna, Savita; Banerjee, Jaideep; Weist, Jessica; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K

    2015-01-01

    Tissue injury transiently silences miRNA-dependent posttranscriptional gene silencing in its effort to unleash adult tissue repair. Once the wound is closed, miRNA biogenesis is induced averting neoplasia. In this work, we report that Dicer plays an important role in reestablishing the barrier function of the skin post-wounding via a miRNA-dependent mechanism. MicroRNA expression profiling of skin and wound-edge tissue revealed global upregulation of miRNAs following wound closure at day 14 post-wounding with significant induction of Dicer expression. Barrier function of the skin, as measured by trans-epidermal water loss, was compromised in keratinocyte-specific conditional (K14/Lox-Cre) Dicer-ablated mice because of malformed cornified epithelium lacking loricrin expression. Studies on human keratinocytes recognized that loricrin expression was inversely related to the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Waf1/Cip1. Compared to healthy epidermis, wound-edge keratinocytes from Dicer-ablated skin epidermis revealed elevated p21Waf1/Cip1 expression. Adenoviral and pharmacological suppression of p21Waf1/Cip1 in keratinocyte-specific conditional Dicer-ablated mice improved wound healing indicating a role of Dicer in the suppression of p21Waf1/Cip1. This work upholds p21Waf1/Cip1 as a druggable target to restore barrier function of skin suffering from loss of Dicer function as would be expected in diabetes and other forms of oxidant insult. PMID:25896246

  18. Enhanced barrier functions and anti-inflammatory effect of cultured coconut extract on human skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soomin; Jang, Ji Eun; Kim, Jihee; Lee, Young In; Lee, Dong Won; Song, Seung Yong; Lee, Ju Hee

    2017-08-01

    Natural plant oils have been used as a translational alternative to modern medicine. Particularly, virgin coconut oil (VCO) has gained popularity because of its potential benefits in pharmaceutical, nutritional, and cosmetic applications. Cultured coconut extract (CCE) is an alternative end product of VCO, which undergoes a further bacterial fermentation process. This study aimed to investigate the effects of CCE on human skin. We analyzed the expression of skin barrier molecules and collagens after applying CCE on human explanted skin. To evaluate the anti-inflammatory properties of CCE, the expression of inflammatory markers was analyzed after ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation. The CCE-treated group showed increased expression of cornified cell envelope components, which contribute to protective barrier functions of the stratum corneum. Further, the expression of inflammatory markers was lower in the CCE-treated group after exposure to UVB radiation. These results suggest an anti-inflammatory effect of CCE against UVB irradiation-induced inflammation. Additionally, the CCE-treated group showed increased collagen and hyaluronan synthase-3 expression. In our study, CCE showed a barrier-enhancing effect and anti-inflammatory properties against ex vivo UVB irradiation-induced inflammation. The promising effect of CCE may be attributed to its high levels of polyphenols and fatty acid components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Thiolated silicone oils as adhesive skin protectants for improved barrier function.

    PubMed

    Partenhauser, A; Zupančič, O; Rohrer, J; Bonengel, S; Bernkop-Schnürch, A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was the evaluation of thiolated silicone oil as novel skin protectant exhibiting prolonged residence time, enhanced barrier function and reinforced occlusivity. Two silicone conjugates were synthesized with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and thioglycolic acid (TGA) as thiol ligands. Adhesion, protection against artificial urine and water vapour permeability with both a Payne cup set-up and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements on porcine skin were assessed. Silicone thiomers showed pronounced substantivity on skin with 22.1 ± 6.3% and 39.2 ± 6.7% remaining silicone after 8 h for silicone-TGA and silicone-MPA, respectively, whereas unmodified silicone oil and dimethicone were no longer detectable. In particular, silicone-MPA provided a protective shield against artificial urine penetration with less than 25% leakage within 6 h. An up to 2.5-fold improved water vapour impermeability for silicone-MPA in comparison with unmodified control was discovered with the Payne cup model. In addition, for silicone-MPA a reduced TEWL by two-thirds corresponding to non-thiolated control was determined for up to 8 h. Thiolation of silicone oil leads to enhanced skin adhesiveness and barrier function, which is a major advantage compared to commonly used silicones and might thus be a promising treatment modality for various topical applications. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  20. The barrier function of organotypic non-melanoma skin cancer models.

    PubMed

    Zoschke, Christian; Ulrich, Martina; Sochorová, Michaela; Wolff, Christopher; Vávrová, Kateřina; Ma, Nan; Ulrich, Claas; Brandner, Johanna M; Schäfer-Korting, Monika

    2016-07-10

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most frequent human cancer with continuously rising incidences worldwide. Herein, we investigated the molecular basis for the impaired skin barrier function of organotypic NMSC models. We unraveled disturbed epidermal differentiation by reflectance confocal microscopy and histopathological evaluation. While the presence of claudin-4 and occludin were distinctly reduced, zonula occludens protein-1 was more wide-spread, and claudin-1 was heterogeneously distributed within the NMSC models compared with normal reconstructed human skin. Moreover, the cancer altered stratum corneum lipid packing and profile with decreased cholesterol content, increased phospholipid amount, and altered ceramide subclasses. These alterations contributed to increased surface pH and to 1.5 to 2.6-fold enhanced caffeine permeability of the NMSC models. Three topical applications of ingenol mebutate gel (0.015%) caused abundant epidermal cell necrosis, decreased Ki-67 indices, and increased lactate dehydrogenase activity. Taken together, our study provides new biological insights into the microenvironment of organotypic NMSC models, improves the understanding of the disease model by revealing causes for impaired skin barrier function in NMSC models at the molecular level, and fosters human cell-based approaches in preclinical drug evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of glyceryl glucoside on AQP3 expression, barrier function and hydration of human skin.

    PubMed

    Schrader, A; Siefken, W; Kueper, T; Breitenbach, U; Gatermann, C; Sperling, G; Biernoth, T; Scherner, C; Stäb, F; Wenck, H; Wittern, K-P; Blatt, T

    2012-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) present in the epidermis are essential hydration-regulating elements controlling cellular water and glycerol transport. In this study, the potential of glyceryl glucoside [GG; alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-alpha-(1->2)-glycerol], an enhanced glycerol derivative, to increase the expression of AQP3 in vitro and ex vivo was evaluated. In vitro studies with real-time RT-PCR and FACS measurements were performed to test the induction by GG (3% w/v) of AQP3 mRNA and protein in cultured human keratinocytes. GG-containing formulations were applied topically to volunteer subjects and suction blister biopsies were analyzed to assess whether GG (5%) could penetrate the epidermis of intact skin, and subsequently upregulate AQP3 mRNA expression and improve barrier function. AQP3 mRNA and protein levels were significantly increased in cultured human keratinocytes. In the studies on volunteer subjects, GG significantly increased AQP3 mRNA levels in the skin and reduced transepidermal water loss compared with vehicle-controlled areas. GG promotes AQP3 mRNA and protein upregulation and improves skin barrier function, and may thus offer an effective treatment option for dehydrated skin. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. In-situ evaluation of barrier-cream performance on human skin using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Q; Tran, M; Smith, B; Winefordner, J D

    2000-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used to evaluate the effect of barrier creams (skin protective creams) on human skin. A Nd: YAG laser at 1,064 nm was used with a pulse energy of 100 mJ. A method was developed to measure the effectiveness of barrier creams against zinc ion absorption from aqueous zinc chloride solution and oil paste zinc oxide, which represent model hydrophilic and lipophilic metal compounds, respectively. Zinc was chosen since it posed no risk to human skin. 3 representative commercial barrier creams advertised as being effective against lipophilic and hydrophilic substances were evaluated by measuring zinc absorbed through the stratum corneum. 4 consecutive skin surface biopsies (SSB) were taken from biceps of the forearms of 6 volunteers at time periods of 0.5 h and 3 h after application of the protective cream. Results were compared with control skin where no barrier cream was used. The zinc atomic emission line at 213.9 nm was selected. Gate delay and gate width time was optimized to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and precision. This method provided a facile and rapid screening of the effectiveness of skin barrier creams against zinc ion penetration. The barrier creams were shown to provide appreciable protection against the penetration of both ZnCl2 and ZnO into the skin.

  3. Barriers to health care contribute to delays in follow-up among women with abnormal cancer screening: Data from the Patient Navigation Research Program.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Ambili; Snyder, Frederick R; Katz, Mira L; Darnell, Julie S; Dudley, Donald J; Patierno, Steven R; Sanders, Mechelle R; Valverde, Patricia A; Simon, Melissa A; Warren-Mears, Victoria; Battaglia, Tracy A

    2015-11-15

    There is limited understanding of the association between barriers to care and clinical outcomes within patient navigation programs. Secondary analyses of data from the intervention arms of the Patient Navigation Research Program were performed, which included navigated participants with abnormal breast and cervical cancer screening tests from 2007 to 2010. Independent variables were: 1) the number of unique barriers to care (0, 1, 2, or ≥3) documented during patient navigation encounters; and 2) the presence of socio-legal barriers originating from social policy (yes/no). The median time to diagnostic resolution of index screening abnormalities was estimated using Kaplan-Meier cumulative incidence curves. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression examined the impact of barriers on time to resolution, controlling for sociodemographics and stratifying by study center. Among 2600 breast screening participants, approximately 75% had barriers to care documented (25% had 1 barrier, 16% had 2 barriers, and 34% had ≥3 barriers). Among 1387 cervical screening participants, greater than one-half had barriers documented (31% had 1 barrier, 11% had 2 barriers, and 13% had ≥3 barriers). Among breast screening participants, the presence of barriers was associated with less timely resolution for any number of barriers compared with no barriers. Among cervical screening participants, only the presence of ≥2 barriers was found to be associated with less timely resolution. Both types of barriers, socio-legal and other barriers, were found to be associated with delay among breast and cervical screening participants. Navigated women with barriers resolved cancer screening abnormalities at a slower rate compared with navigated women with no barriers. Further innovations in navigation care are necessary to maximize the impact of patient navigation programs nationwide. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  4. Barriers to healthcare contribute to delays in follow-up among women with abnormal cancer screening: data from the Patient Navigation Research Program

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Ambili; Snyder, Frederick; Katz, Mira L.; Darnell, Julie; Dudley, Donald; Patierno, Steven R.; Sanders, Mechelle R; Valverde, Patricia A; Simon, Melissa A; Warren-Mears, Victoria; Battaglia, Tracy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is limited understanding of the association between barriers to care and clinical outcomes within patient navigation programs. Methods Secondary analyses of data from the intervention arms of the Patient Navigation Research Program (PNRP), including navigated participants with abnormal breast and cervical cancer screening tests from 2007 to 2010. Independent variables were (a) number of unique barriers to care (0, 1, 2, or 3+) documented during patient navigation encounters and (b) presence of socio-legal barriers originating from social policy (yes/no). Median time to diagnostic resolution of index screening abnormalities was estimated using Kaplan-Meier cumulative incidence curves. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression examined the impact of barriers on time to resolution, controlling for socio-demographics and stratifying by study center. Results Among 2600 breast participants, three-quarters had barriers to care (25% 1 barrier, 16% 2 barriers and 34% 3+ barriers). Among 1387 cervical participants, more than half had barriers (31% 1 barrier, 11% 2 barriers, and 13% 3+ barriers). Among breast participants, the presence of barriers was associated with less timely resolution for any number of barriers compared to no barriers. Among cervical participants, only the presence of 2 or more barriers was associated with less timely resolution. Both types of barriers, socio-legal and other barriers, were associated with delay among breast and cervical participants. Conclusions Navigated women with barriers resolve cancer screening abnormalities at a slower rate compared to navigated women with no barriers. Further innovations in navigation care are necessary to maximize the impact of patient navigation programs nationwide. PMID:26385420

  5. Nicotinic Acid Receptor Abnormalities in Human Skin Cancer: Implications for a Role in Epidermal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez, Yira; Benavente, Claudia A.; Meyer, Ralph G.; Coyle, W. Russell; Jacobson, Myron K.; Jacobson, Elaine L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic UV skin exposure leads to epidermal differentiation defects in humans that can be largely restored by pharmacological doses of nicotinic acid. Nicotinic acid has been identified as a ligand for the human G-protein-coupled receptors GPR109A and GPR109B that signal through Gi-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. We have examined the expression, cellular distribution, and functionality of GPR109A/B in human skin and skin derived epidermal cells. Results Nicotinic acid increases epidermal differentiation in photodamaged human skin as judged by the terminal differentiation markers caspase 14 and filaggrin. Both GPR109A and GPR109B genes are transcribed in human skin and in epidermal keratinocytes, but expression in dermal fibroblasts is below limits of detection. Receptor transcripts are greatly over-expressed in squamous cell cancers. Receptor protein in normal skin is prominent from the basal through granular layers of the epidermis, with cellular localization more dispersive in the basal layer but predominantly localized at the plasma membrane in more differentiated epidermal layers. In normal human primary and immortalized keratinocytes, nicotinic acid receptors show plasma membrane localization and functional Gi-mediated signaling. In contrast, in a squamous cell carcinoma derived cell line, receptor protein shows a more diffuse cellular localization and the receptors are nearly non-functional. Conclusions The results of these studies justify future genetic and pharmacological intervention studies to define possible specific role(s) of nicotinic acid receptors in human skin homeostasis. PMID:21655214

  6. Mast Cells Regulate Epidermal Barrier Function and the Development of Allergic Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sehra, Sarita; Serezani, Ana P M; Ocaña, Jesus A; Travers, Jeffrey B; Kaplan, Mark H

    2016-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by infiltration of eosinophils, T helper cells, and mast cells. The role of mast cells in atopic dermatitis is not completely understood. To define the effects of mast cells on skin biology, we observed that mast cells regulate the homeostatic expression of epidermal differentiation complex and other skin genes. Decreased epidermal differentiation complex gene expression in mice that genetically lack mast cells (Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice) is associated with increased uptake of protein antigens painted on the skin by dendritic cells (DCs) compared with similarly treated wild-type mice, suggesting a protective role for mast cells in exposure to nominal environmental allergens. To test this further, we crossed Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice with signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (i.e., Stat6) VT transgenic mice that develop spontaneous atopic dermatitis-like disease that is dependent on T helper cell 2 cytokines and is associated with high serum concentrations of IgE. We observed that Stat6VT × Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice developed more frequent and more severe allergic skin inflammation than Stat6VT transgenic mice that had mast cells. Together, these studies suggest that mast cells regulate epidermal barrier function and have a potential protective role in the development of atopic dermatitis-like disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Counterregulation between thymic stromal lymphopoietin- and IL-23-driven immune axes shapes skin inflammation in mice with epidermal barrier defects.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiagui; Leyva-Castillo, Juan Manuel; Hener, Pierre; Eisenmann, Aurelie; Zaafouri, Sarra; Jonca, Nathalie; Serre, Guy; Birling, Marie-Christine; Li, Mei

    2016-07-01

    Epidermal barrier dysfunction has been recognized as a critical factor in the initiation and exacerbation of skin inflammation, particularly in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and AD-like congenital disorders, including peeling skin syndrome type B. However, inflammatory responses developed in barrier-defective skin, as well as the underlying mechanisms, remained incompletely understood. We aimed to decipher inflammatory axes and the cytokine network in mouse skin on breakdown of epidermal stratum corneum barrier. We generated Cdsn(iep-/-) mice with corneodesmosin ablation in keratinocytes selectively in an inducible manner. We characterized inflammatory responses and cytokine expression by using histology, immunohistochemistry, ELISA, and quantitative PCR. We combined mouse genetic tools, antibody-mediated neutralization, signal-blocking reagents, and topical antibiotic treatment to explore the inflammatory axes. We show that on breakdown of the epidermal stratum corneum barrier, type 2 and type 17 inflammatory responses are developed simultaneously, driven by thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) and IL-23, respectively. Importantly, we reveal a counterregulation between these 2 inflammatory axes. Furthermore, we show that protease-activated receptor 2 signaling is involved in mediating the TSLP/type 2 axis, whereas skin bacteria are engaged in induction of the IL-23/type 17 axis. Moreover, we find that IL-1β is induced in skin of Cdsn(iep-/-) mice and that blockade of IL-1 signaling suppresses both TSLP and IL-23 expression and ameliorates skin inflammation. The inflammatory phenotype in barrier-defective skin is shaped by counterregulation between the TSLP/type 2 and IL-23/type 17 axes. Targeting IL-1 signaling could be a promising therapeutic option for controlling skin inflammation in patients with peeling skin syndrome type B and other diseases related to epidermal barrier dysfunction, including AD. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma

  8. Evaluation of skin surface hydration state and barrier function of stratum corneum of dorsa of hands and heels treated with PROTECT X2 skin protective cream.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takahiro

    2012-06-01

    Skin roughness is a term commonly used in Japan to describe a poor skin condition related to a rough and dry skin surface that develops as a result of various damaging effects from the environment or skin inflammation. Recovery from skin roughness requires skin care for a long period, thus it is important to prevent development of such skin changes. PROTECT X2 contains agents used for a protective covering of the skin from frequent hand washing or use of alcohol-based disinfectants. These unique components are also thought to be effective to treat skin roughness of the dorsa of the hands and heels. In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of PROTECT X2 to increase skin surface hydration state, as well as enhance the barrier function of the stratum corneum of the dorsa of the hands and heels in elderly individuals. A total of 8 elderly subjects and their caretakers without any skin diseases participated in the study. They applied PROTECT X2 by themselves to the dorsum area of 1 hand and heel 3 to 5 times daily for 1 month, while the opposite sides were left untreated. We measured stratum corneum (SC) hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) before beginning treatment, then 1 week and 1 month after the start of treatment to compare between the treated and untreated skin. SC hydration state after applications of PROTECT X2 was 1.5- to 3.0-fold higher than that of the untreated skin in the dorsa of both hands and heels, indicating that the moisturizing ingredients accompanied by water were replenished in those areas where the cream was applied. Also, TEWL in the dorsum of the hands was 17.0-27.9% lower on the treated side, indicating improvement in SC barrier function. On the basis of these findings, we concluded that PROTECT X2 enhances water-holding in the SC and aids the barrier function of the skin in the dorsum of the hands. In addition, we consider that this formulation is useful for not only protecting the hands from the effects of such agents

  9. Abnormal brain activation in excoriation (skin-picking) disorder: evidence from an executive planning fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Odlaug, Brian L.; Hampshire, Adam; Chamberlain, Samuel R.; Grant, Jon E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Excoriation (skin-picking) disorder (SPD) is a relatively common psychiatric condition whose neurobiological basis is unknown. Aims To probe the function of fronto-striatal circuitry in SPD. Method Eighteen participants with SPD and 15 matched healthy controls undertook an executive planning task (Tower of London) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Activation during planning was compared between groups using region of interest and whole-brain permutation cluster approaches. Results The SPD group exhibited significant functional underactivation in a cluster encompassing bilateral dorsal striatum (maximal in right caudate), bilateral anterior cingulate and right medial frontal regions. These abnormalities were, for the most part, outside the dorsal planning network typically activated by executive planning tasks. Conclusions Abnormalities of neural regions involved in habit formation, action monitoring and inhibition appear involved in the pathophysiology of SPD. Implications exist for understanding the basis of excessive grooming and the relationship of SPD with putative obsessive–compulsive spectrum disorders. PMID:26159604

  10. Skin Barrier Development Depends on CGI-58 Protein Expression during Late-Stage Keratinocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Grond, Susanne; Radner, Franz P.W.; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Kolb, Dagmar; Grabner, Gernot F.; Wolinski, Heimo; Gruber, Robert; Hofer, Peter; Heier, Christoph; Schauer, Silvia; Rülicke, Thomas; Hoefler, Gerald; Schmuth, Matthias; Elias, Peter M.; Lass, Achim; Zechner, Rudolf; Haemmerle, Guenter

    2017-01-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and its coactivator comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) are limiting in cellular triglyceride catabolism. Although ATGL deficiency is compatible with normal skin development, mice globally lacking CGI-58 die postnatally and exhibit a severe epidermal permeability barrier defect, which may originate from epidermal and/or peripheral changes in lipid and energy metabolism. Here, we show that epidermis-specific disruption of CGI-58 is sufficient to provoke a defect in the formation of a functional corneocyte lipid envelope linked to impaired ω-O-acylceramide synthesis. As a result, epidermis-specific CGI-58-deficient mice show severe skin dysfunction, arguing for a tissue autonomous cause of disease development. Defective skin permeability barrier formation in global CGI-58-deficient mice could be reversed via transgenic restoration of CGI-58 expression in differentiated but not basal keratinocytes suggesting that CGI-58 is essential for lipid metabolism in suprabasal epidermal layers. The compatibility of ATGL deficiency with normal epidermal function indicated that CGI-58 may stimulate an epidermal triglyceride lipase beyond ATGL required for the adequate provision of fatty acids as a substrate for ω-O-acylceramide synthesis. Pharmacological inhibition of ATGL enzyme activity similarly reduced triglyceride-hydrolytic activities in wild-type and CGI-58 overexpressing epidermis implicating that CGI-58 participates in ω-O-acylceramide biogenesis independent of its role as a coactivator of epidermal triglyceride catabolism. PMID:27725204

  11. Nanocrystal: a novel approach to overcome skin barriers for improved topical drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Viral; Sharma, Om Prakash; Mehta, Tejal

    2018-04-01

    Skin is an important route of drug delivery for the treatment of various dermatological conditions. The advent of nanotechnology is paving the roadmaps for topical drug delivery by providing sustained release as well as maintaining a localized effect, outweighing the toxicity concern. Area covered: This review highlighted the morphology of skin, its barrier nature as well as drug penetration pathways after topical application of formulations. The existing methods to improve topical drug delivery, by infringing or permeating the skin barriers, are discussed. This context concretes the foundation to accentuate the need for the development of nanocrystal-based topical formulation. The mechanism of drug release, immediate as well as sustained release, after topical administration of drug nanocrystals is also elaborated. The special emphasis is given on the breakthrough achieved, in topical drug delivery using drug nanocrystals, so far in the plethora of literature, patents, and products, under clinical trial as well as in the market. Expert opinion: The current research on nanocrystals for topical drug delivery is highlighting the breakthroughs achieved so far. The output of these research envisages that topical nanocrystals based formulations can be a novel strategy for the drugs which are facing solubility, bioavailability and toxicity concerns.

  12. Effect of skin barrier disruption on immune responses to topically applied cross-reacting material, CRM(197), of diphtheria toxin.

    PubMed

    Godefroy, S; Peyre, M; Garcia, N; Muller, S; Sesardic, D; Partidos, C D

    2005-08-01

    The high accessibility of the skin and the presence of immunocompetent cells in the epidermis makes this surface an attractive route for needle-free administration of vaccines. However, the lining of the skin by the stratum corneum is a major obstacle to vaccine delivery. In this study we examined the effect of skin barrier disruption on the immune responses to the cross-reacting material CRM(197), a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin (DTx) that is considered as a vaccine candidate. Application of CRM(197), together with cholera toxin (CT), onto the tape-stripped skin of mice elicited antibody responses that had anti-DTx neutralizing activity. Vaccine delivery onto mildly ablated skin or intact skin did not elicit any detectable anti-CRM(197) antibodies. Mice immunized with CRM(197) alone onto the tape-stripped skin mounted a vigorous antigen-specific proliferative response. In contrast, the induction of cellular immunity after CRM(197) deposition onto mildly ablated or intact skin was adjuvant dependent. Furthermore, epidermal cells were activated and underwent apoptosis that was more pronounced when the stratum corneum was removed by tape stripping. Overall, these findings highlight the potential for transcutaneous delivery of CRM(197) and establish a correlation between the degree of barrier disruption and levels of antigen-specific immune responses. Moreover, these results provide the first evidence that the development of a transcutaneous immunization strategy for diphtheria, based on simple and practical methods to disrupt the skin barrier, is feasible.

  13. Simulations of skin barrier function: free energies of hydrophobic and hydrophilic transmembrane pores in ceramide bilayers.

    PubMed

    Notman, Rebecca; Anwar, Jamshed; Briels, W J; Noro, Massimo G; den Otter, Wouter K

    2008-11-15

    Transmembrane pore formation is central to many biological processes such as ion transport, cell fusion, and viral infection. Furthermore, pore formation in the ceramide bilayers of the stratum corneum may be an important mechanism by which penetration enhancers such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) weaken the barrier function of the skin. We have used the potential of mean constraint force (PMCF) method to calculate the free energy of pore formation in ceramide bilayers in both the innate gel phase and in the DMSO-induced fluidized state. Our simulations show that the fluid phase bilayers form archetypal water-filled hydrophilic pores similar to those observed in phospholipid bilayers. In contrast, the rigid gel-phase bilayers develop hydrophobic pores. At the relatively small pore diameters studied here, the hydrophobic pores are empty rather than filled with bulk water, suggesting that they do not compromise the barrier function of ceramide membranes. A phenomenological analysis suggests that these vapor pores are stable, below a critical radius, because the penalty of creating water-vapor and tail-vapor interfaces is lower than that of directly exposing the strongly hydrophobic tails to water. The PMCF free energy profile of the vapor pore supports this analysis. The simulations indicate that high DMSO concentrations drastically impair the barrier function of the skin by strongly reducing the free energy required for pore opening.

  14. Simulations of Skin Barrier Function: Free Energies of Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Transmembrane Pores in Ceramide Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Notman, Rebecca; Anwar, Jamshed; Briels, W. J.; Noro, Massimo G.; den Otter, Wouter K.

    2008-01-01

    Transmembrane pore formation is central to many biological processes such as ion transport, cell fusion, and viral infection. Furthermore, pore formation in the ceramide bilayers of the stratum corneum may be an important mechanism by which penetration enhancers such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) weaken the barrier function of the skin. We have used the potential of mean constraint force (PMCF) method to calculate the free energy of pore formation in ceramide bilayers in both the innate gel phase and in the DMSO-induced fluidized state. Our simulations show that the fluid phase bilayers form archetypal water-filled hydrophilic pores similar to those observed in phospholipid bilayers. In contrast, the rigid gel-phase bilayers develop hydrophobic pores. At the relatively small pore diameters studied here, the hydrophobic pores are empty rather than filled with bulk water, suggesting that they do not compromise the barrier function of ceramide membranes. A phenomenological analysis suggests that these vapor pores are stable, below a critical radius, because the penalty of creating water-vapor and tail-vapor interfaces is lower than that of directly exposing the strongly hydrophobic tails to water. The PMCF free energy profile of the vapor pore supports this analysis. The simulations indicate that high DMSO concentrations drastically impair the barrier function of the skin by strongly reducing the free energy required for pore opening. PMID:18708461

  15. Examination of the skin barrier repair/wound healing process using a living skin equivalent model and matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization-mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Lewis, E E L; Barrett, M R T; Freeman-Parry, L; Bojar, R A; Clench, M R

    2018-04-01

    Examination of the skin barrier repair/wound healing process using a living skin equivalent (LSE) model and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) to identify lipids directly involved as potential biomarkers. These biomarkers may be used to determine whether an in vivo wound is going to heal for example if infected. An in vitro LSE model was wounded with a scalpel blade and assessed at day 4 post-wounding by histology and MALDI-MSI. Samples were sectioned at wound site and were either formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) for histology or snapped frozen (FF) for MSI analysis. The combination of using an in vitro wounded skin model with MSI allowed the identification of lipids involved in the skin barrier repair/wound healing process. The technique was able to highlight lipids directly in the wound site and distinguish differences in lipid distribution between the epidermis and wound site. This novel method of coupling an in vitro LSE with MSI allowed in-depth molecular analysis of the skin barrier repair/wound healing process. The technique allowed the identification of lipids directly involved in the skin barrier repair/wound healing process, indicating these biomarkers may be potentially be used within the clinic. These biomarkers will help to determine, which stage of the skin barrier repair/wound healing process the wound is in to provide the best treatment. © 2018 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  16. Eczema in early life: Genetics, the skin barrier, and lessons learned from birth cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Biagini Myers, Jocelyn M.; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.

    2010-01-01

    Eczema is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the skin that affects up to 30% of children. It often afflicts infants in the first few months of life and can be the first indicator of the atopic march. Recent results from birth cohort studies have uncovered novel information regarding genetic and environmental factors that promote the development of eczema. Birth cohort studies provide an optimal study design to elucidate these associations and prospectively track longitudinal data including exposure assessment and health outcomes from birth into early life and childhood. This is especially relevant for eczema given the age specific emergence of this disease. In this review, we will provide a general overview of pediatric eczema and discuss the important findings in the literature with respect to genetics and environmental exposures, highlighting those derived from birth cohort studies. Additionally, we will review how these relate to the atopic march, the hygiene hypothesis and the integrity of the skin barrier. PMID:20739029

  17. Efficacy of a Hand Regimen in Skin Barrier Protection in Individuals With Occupational Irritant Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Laura

    2016-11-01

    Occupational irritant contact dermatitis (OICD) is a dif cult and hard to manage condition. It occurs more frequently in certain occupations where contact with harsh chemicals, use of alcohol-based disinfectants, and frequent hand washing heightens the risk. Treatment for OICD includes patient education in addition to physical, topical, and systemic therapies. To review the pathogenesis and treatment options for OICD and evaluate the ef cacy of a selective skin-care regimen involv- ing a hand protectant cream alone as well as combined with a repair cream and speci c cleanser. A single-center open study was performed comprising 42 healthy male and female adult volunteers prone to occupational irritant contact dermatitis due to frequent wet work or contact with detergents. Between day 0 and day 7, subjects applied a hand protectant cream as needed on both hands (at least twice daily). On days 7 to 14, subjects applied a hand protectant cream and cleanser as needed on both hands (at least twice daily) as well as a repair cream each evening. A diary log was given to each volunteer for application control and for a subjective evaluation of daily tolerability. In these subjects prone to occupational irritant contact dermatitis, the hand protectant cream applied during the initial 7-day period was effective in restoring the damaged skin barrier and improving the stratum corneum hydration. A regimen that combined the hand protectant and repair creams with a speci c cleanser during a further 7-day period allowed contin- ued improvement of skin hydration and additional clinical bene ts while respecting the skin barrier function. The results of this study support the use of a 3-step approach for patients who are at risk of repeated exposure to external irritants. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(suppl 11):s81-85..

  18. Effects of Locally Applied Glycerol and Xylitol on the Hydration, Barrier Function and Morphological Parameters of the Skin.

    PubMed

    Korponyai, Csilla; Szél, Edit; Behány, Zoltán; Varga, Erika; Mohos, Gábor; Dura, Ágnes; Dikstein, Shabtay; Kemény, Lajos; Erős, Gábor

    2017-02-08

    Glycerol and xylitol hydrate the skin and improve its barrier function over a short period. We studied the effects of glycerol and xylitol on the physiological properties and morphology of the skin after longer-term application. Twelve volunteers with dry skin were examined. Three areas on the arms were determined. Area 1 served as untreated control. The vehicle was applied to area 2, while area 3 was treated twice daily with a formulation containing glycerol (5%) and xylitol (5%) for 14 days. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), hydration and biomechanical properties of the skin were monitored. Biopsies were taken for routine histology and immunohistochemistry for filaggrin and matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1). The polyols increased the skin hydration and protein quantity of filaggrin, elevated the interdigitation index, decreased the TEWL and improved the biomechanical properties of the skin, but did not change the protein expression of MMP-1. A combination of glycerol and xylitol can be useful additional therapy for dry skin.

  19. Stratum Corneum Lipids: Their Role for the Skin Barrier Function in Healthy Subjects and Atopic Dermatitis Patients.

    PubMed

    van Smeden, Jeroen; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2016-01-01

    Human skin acts as a primary barrier between the body and its environment. Crucial for this skin barrier function is the lipid matrix in the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC). Two of its functions are (1) to prevent excessive water loss through the epidermis and (2) to avoid that compounds from the environment permeate into the viable epidermal and dermal layers and thereby provoke an immune response. The composition of the SC lipid matrix is dominated by three lipid classes: cholesterol, free fatty acids and ceramides. These lipids adopt a highly ordered, 3-dimensional structure of stacked densely packed lipid layers (lipid lamellae): the lateral and lamellar lipid organization. The way in which these lipids are ordered depends on the composition of the lipids. One very common skin disease in which the SC lipid barrier is affected is atopic dermatitis (AD). This review addresses the SC lipid composition and organization in healthy skin, and elaborates on how these parameters are changed in lesional and nonlesional skin of AD patients. Concerning the lipid composition, the changes in the three main lipid classes and the importance of the carbon chain lengths of the lipids are discussed. In addition, this review addresses how these changes in lipid composition induce changes in lipid organization and subsequently correlate with an impaired skin barrier function in both lesional and nonlesional skin of these patients. Furthermore, the effect of filaggrin and mutations in the filaggrin gene on the SC lipid composition is critically discussed. Also, the breakdown products of filaggrin, the natural moisturizing factor molecules and its relation to SC-pH is described. Finally, the paper discusses some major changes in epidermal lipid biosynthesis in patients with AD and other related skin diseases, and how inflammation has a deteriorating effect on the SC lipids and SC biosynthesis. The review ends with perspectives on future studies in relation to

  20. Abnormal Collagen Metabolism in Cultured Skin Fibroblasts from Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodemann, H. Peter; Bayreuther, Klaus

    1984-08-01

    Total collagen synthesis is decreased by about 29% (P < 0.01) in skin fibroblasts established in vitro from male patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) as compared with that in normal male skin fibroblasts in vitro. The reduction in collagen synthesis is associated with an approximately 2-fold increase in collagen degradation in DMD fibroblasts. Correlated to these alterations in the metabolism of collagen, DMD fibroblasts express a significantly higher hydroxyproline/proline ratio (DMD: 1.36-1.45; P < 0.01) than do normal fibroblasts (controls: 0.86-0.89). The increased hydroxylation of proline residues of collagen (composed of type I and type III) could be the cause for the enhanced degradation of collagen in DMD fibroblasts.

  1. The effects of polar excipients transcutol and dexpanthenol on molecular mobility, permeability, and electrical impedance of the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Sebastian; Pham, Quoc Dat; Jensen, Louise Bastholm; Knudsen, Nina Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Dencker; Ekelund, Katarina; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas; Engblom, Johan; Sparr, Emma

    2016-10-01

    In the development of transdermal and topical products it is important to understand how formulation ingredients interact with the molecular components of the upper layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), and thereby influence its macroscopic barrier properties. The aim here was to investigate the effect of two commonly used excipients, transcutol and dexpanthenol, on the molecular as well as the macroscopic properties of the skin membrane. Polarization transfer solid-state NMR methods were combined with steady-state flux and impedance spectroscopy measurements to investigate how these common excipients influence the molecular components of SC and its barrier function at strictly controlled hydration conditions in vitro with excised porcine skin. The NMR results provide completely new molecular insight into how transcutol and dexpanthenol affect specific molecular segments of both SC lipids and proteins. The presence of transcutol or dexpanthenol in the formulation at fixed water activity results in increased effective skin permeability of the model drug metronidazole. Finally, impedance spectroscopy data show clear changes of the effective skin capacitance after treatment with transcutol or dexpanthenol. Based on the complementary data, we are able to draw direct links between effects on the molecular properties and on the macroscopic barrier function of the skin barrier under treatment with formulations containing transcutol or dexpanthenol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of adhesive dressing edges on cutaneous irritancy and skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Dykes, P J

    2007-03-01

    To assess the effect of repeated application and removal of adhesive edges from wound-care products on cutaneous irritancy and barrier function in normal volunteer subjects. This was a study using a 'repeat-insult patch test'. Adhesive edges from six commonly used wound-care products were applied continuously to the same site (six applications over a 14-day period) in 30 normal volunteer subjects. The test sites were assessed clinically before product reapplication using established ranking scales for cutaneous erythema. The cumulative irritancy score (CIS) for each test site was determined by adding the erythema scores at days 3, 5, 8, 10, 12 and 15. At the study end the barrier function of each test site was assessed by measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL). The CIS showed that the products fall into two distinct groups, with Mepilex, Tielle and Allevyn giving low scores and Biatain, Comfeel and DuoDERM higher scores. Statistical analysis indicated significant differences (p < 0.05) between Mepilex and Biatain, Mepilex and Comfeel, Mepilex and DuoDERM, Tielle and Biatain, Allevyn and Biatain. The mean TEWL values also indicated that the products fall into two distinct groups: Mepilex, Tielle and Allevyn with low mean values close to that of normal adjacent back skin and Biatain, Comfeel and DuoDERM with much higher mean values. Statistical analysis indicated that Mepilex, Tielle and Allevyn were not significantly different from normal skin (p < 0.05), whereas Biatain, Comfeel and DuoDERM were significantly higher than normal skin and the other products tested. The results show clear differences between products; the clinical scores and TEWL measurements indicate that the products fall into two distinct groups. This novel approach seems able to discriminate between adhesive borders and may be useful during product development and in selecting products for clinical trials.

  3. Emollient enhancement of the skin barrier from birth offers effective atopic dermatitis prevention

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Eric L.; Chalmers, Joanne R.; Hanifin, Jon M.; Thomas, Kim S.; Cork, Michael J.; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Brown, Sara J.; Chen, Zunqiu; Chen, Yiyi; Williams, Hywel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (atopic eczema) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that has reached epidemic proportions in children worldwide and is increasing in prevalence. Because of the significant socioeconomic effect of atopic dermatitis and its effect on the quality of life of children and families, there have been decades of research focused on disease prevention, with limited success. Recent advances in cutaneous biology suggest skin barrier defects might be key initiators of atopic dermatitis and possibly allergic sensitization. Objective Our objective was to test whether skin barrier enhancement from birth represents a feasible strategy for reducing the incidence of atopic dermatitis in high-risk neonates. Methods We performed a randomized controlled trial in the United States and United Kingdom of 124 neonates at high risk for atopic dermatitis. Parents in the intervention arm were instructed to apply full-body emollient therapy at least once per day starting within 3 weeks of birth. Parents in the control arm were asked to use no emollients. The primary feasibility outcome was the percentage of families willing to be randomized. The primary clinical outcome was the cumulative incidence of atopic dermatitis at 6 months, as assessed by a trained investigator. Results Forty-two percent of eligible families agreed to be randomized into the trial. All participating families in the intervention arm found the intervention acceptable. A statistically significant protective effect was found with the use of daily emollient on the cumulative incidence of atopic dermatitis with a relative risk reduction of 50% (relative risk, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.28-0.9; P = .017). There were no emollient-related adverse events and no differences in adverse events between groups. Conclusion The results of this trial demonstrate that emollient therapy from birth represents a feasible, safe, and effective approach for atopic dermatitis prevention. If confirmed in larger trials

  4. Chronic liver injury in mice promotes impairment of skin barrier function via tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Satoshi; Hiramoto, Keiichi; Koyama, Mayu; Ooi, Kazuya

    2016-09-01

    Alcohol is frequently used to induce chronic liver injury in laboratory animals. Alcohol causes oxidative stress in the liver and increases the expression of inflammatory mediators that cause hepatocellular damage. However, during chronic liver injury, it is unclear if/how these liver-derived factors affect distal tissues, such as the skin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate skin barrier function during chronic liver injury. Hairless mice were administered 5% or 10% ethanol for 8 weeks, and damages to the liver and skin were assessed using histological and protein-analysis methods, as well as by detecting inflammatory mediators in the plasma. After alcohol administration, the plasma concentration of the aspartate and alanine aminotransferases increased, while albumin levels decreased. In mice with alcohol-induced liver injury, transepidermal water loss was significantly increased, and skin hydration decreased concurrent with ceramide and type I collagen degradation. The plasma concentrations of [Formula: see text]/[Formula: see text] and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were significantly increased in mice with induced liver injury. TNF receptor (TNFR) 2 expression was upregulated in the skin of alcohol-administered mice, while TNFR1 levels remained constant. Interestingly, the impairment of skin barrier function in mice administered with 10% ethanol was ameliorated by administering an anti-TNF-α antibody. We propose a novel mechanism whereby plasma TNF-α, via TNFR2 alone or with TNFR1, plays an important role in skin barrier function during chronic liver disease in these mouse models.

  5. A new methodology for evaluating the damage to the skin barrier caused by repeated application and removal of adhesive dressings.

    PubMed

    Waring, Mike; Bielfeldt, Stephan; Mätzold, Katja; Wilhelm, Klaus-Peter

    2013-02-01

    Chronic wounds require frequent dressing changes. Adhesive dressings used for this indication can be damaging to the stratum corneum, particularly in the elderly where the skin tends to be thinner. Understanding the level of damage caused by dressing removal can aid dressing selection. This study used a novel methodology that applied a stain to the skin and measured the intensity of that stain after repeated application and removal of a series of different adhesive types. Additionally, a traditional method of measuring skin barrier damage (transepidermal water loss) was also undertaken and compared with the staining methodology. The staining methodology and measurement of transepidermal water loss differentiated the adhesive dressings, showing that silicone adhesives caused least trauma to the skin. The staining methodology was shown to be as effective as transepidermal water loss in detecting damage to the stratum corneum and was shown to detect disruption of the barrier earlier than the traditional technique. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Molecular interactions of plant oil components with stratum corneum lipids correlate with clinical measures of skin barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Mack Correa, Mary Catherine; Mao, Guangru; Saad, Peter; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard; Walters, Russel M

    2014-01-01

    Plant-derived oils consisting of triglycerides and small amounts of free fatty acids (FFAs) are commonly used in skincare regimens. FFAs are known to disrupt skin barrier function. The objective of this study was to mechanistically study the effects of FFAs, triglycerides and their mixtures on skin barrier function. The effects of oleic acid (OA), glyceryl trioleate (GT) and OA/GT mixtures on skin barrier were assessed in vivo through measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and fluorescein dye penetration before and after a single application. OA's effects on stratum corneum (SC) lipid order in vivo were measured with infrared spectroscopy through application of perdeuterated OA (OA-d34). Studies of the interaction of OA and GT with skin lipids included imaging the distribution of OA-d34 and GT ex vivo with IR microspectroscopy and thermodynamic analysis of mixtures in aqueous monolayers. The oil mixtures increased both TEWL and fluorescein penetration 24 h after a single application in an OA dose-dependent manner, with the highest increase from treatment with pure OA. OA-d34 penetrated into skin and disordered SC lipids. Furthermore, the ex vivo IR imaging studies showed that OA-d34 permeated to the dermal/epidermal junction while GT remained in the SC. The monolayer experiments showed preferential interspecies interactions between OA and SC lipids, while the mixing between GT and SC lipids was not thermodynamically preferred. The FFA component of plant oils may disrupt skin barrier function. The affinity between plant oil components and SC lipids likely determines the extent of their penetration and clinically measurable effects on skin barrier functions. PMID:24372651

  7. Mucosal Barrier Depletion and Loss of Bacterial Diversity are Primary Abnormalities in Paediatric Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Misagh; Zaidi, Deenaz; Valcheva, Rosica; Jovel, Juan; Martínez, Inés; Sergi, Consolato; Walter, Jens; Mason, Andrew L.; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Dieleman, Levinus A.; Carroll, Matthew W.; Huynh, Hien Q.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Ulcerative colitis [UC] is associated with colonic mucosa barrier defects and bacterial dysbiosis, but these features may simply be the result of inflammation. Therefore, we sought to assess whether these features are inherently abrogated in the terminal ileum [TI] of UC patients, where inflammation is absent. Methods: TI biopsies from paediatric inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] subsets [Crohn’s disease [CD; n = 13] and UC [n = 10

  8. Impact of systemic alitretinoin treatment on skin barrier gene and protein expression in patients with chronic hand eczema.

    PubMed

    Kumari, V; Timm, K; Kühl, A A; Heine, G; Worm, M

    2016-12-01

    Chronic hand eczema (CHE) is a common inflammatory skin disease that affects approximately 10% of the population. Systemic alitretinoin has been shown to be effective in patients with CHE who are refractory to topical corticosteroids. To analyse the impact of alitretinoin on the skin barrier genes and protein expression in the skin lesions of patients with CHE. Fifteen patients with CHE were treated with 30 mg daily of alitretinoin for up to 27 weeks. Disease severity was assessed using a clinical score. Skin biopsies from all the patients were evaluated before and after therapy for the expression of Ki-67, various skin barrier genes and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. After alitretinoin application, an improvement in the clinical severity of CHE was observed in the majority of patients. Analysis of skin biopsies before treatment showed a significant increase in Ki-67-positive cells in the suprabasal layer and a dysregulated expression of various skin barrier genes, such as claudin 1, loricrin, filaggrin and cytokeratin 10, which were normalized after treatment. TSLP was significantly upregulated in patients with CHE and also normalized after alitretinoin treatment and negatively correlated with filaggrin. Our data indicate that the expression of barrier genes and proteins was normalized following treatment with alitretinoin in patients with CHE. The change in expression levels of these genes correlated with the clinical efficacy, suggesting that alitretinoin exhibits a disease-modifying activity. TSLP is upregulated in CHE and seems to counteract filaggrin expression in the skin. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  9. Vibrational spectroscopy and microscopic imaging: novel approaches for comparing barrier physical properties in native and human skin equivalents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guo; Zhang, Guojin; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy and imaging have been used to compare barrier properties in human skin, porcine skin, and two human skin equivalents, Epiderm 200X with an enhanced barrier and Epiderm 200 with a normal barrier. Three structural characterizations were performed. First, chain packing and conformational order were compared in isolated human stratum corneum (SC), isolated porcine SC, and in the Epiderm 200X surface layers. The infrared (IR) spectrum of isolated human SC revealed a large proportion of orthorhombically packed lipid chains at physiological temperatures along with a thermotropic phase transition to a state with hexagonally packed chains. In contrast, the lipid phase at physiological temperatures in both porcine SC and in Epiderm 200X, although dominated by conformationally ordered chains, lacked significant levels of orthorhombic subcell packing. Second, confocal Raman imaging of cholesterol bands showed extensive formation of cholesterol-enriched pockets within the human skin equivalents (HSEs). Finally, IR imaging tracked lipid barrier dimensions as well as the spatial disposition of ordered lipids in human SC and Epiderm 200X. These approaches provide a useful set of experiments for exploring structural differences between excised human skin and HSEs, which in turn may provide a rationale for the functional differences observed among these preparations.

  10. Accelerated barrier recovery and enhancement of the barrier integrity and properties by topical application of a pH 4 compared to a pH 5.8 w/o emulsion in aged skin.

    PubMed

    Angelova-Fischer, I; Fischer, T W; Abels, C; Zillikens, D

    2018-03-25

    Increased skin surface pH is an important host-related factor for deteriorated barrier function in the aged. We investigated whether restoration of the skin pH through topical application of a water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion with pH 4 improved the barrier homeostasis in aged skin and compared the effects to an identical galenic formulation with pH 5.8. The effects of the test formulations on the barrier recovery were investigated by repeated measurements of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin pH 3 h, 6 h and 24 h after acetone-induced impairment of the barrier function in aged skin. The long-term effects of the pH 4 and pH 5.8 emulsions were analyzed by investigation of the barrier integrity/cohesion, the skin surface pH and the skin roughness and scaliness before and after a 4-week, controlled application of the formulations. The application of the pH 4 emulsion accelerated the barrier recovery in aged skin: 3 h and 6 h after acetone-induced barrier disruption the differences in the TEWL recovery between the pH4-treated and acetone control field were significant. Furthermore, the long-term application of the pH 4 formulation resulted in significantly decreased skin pH, enhanced barrier integrity and reduced skin surface roughness and scaliness. At the same time points, the pH 5.8 formulation exerted only minor effects on the barrier function parameters. Exogenous acidification through topical application of a w/o emulsion with pH 4 leads to improvement of the barrier function and maintenance of the barrier homeostasis in aged skin. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of single and repeated exposure to biocidal active substances on the barrier function of the skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Buist, Harrie E; van de Sandt, Johannes J M; van Burgsteden, Johan A; de Heer, Cees

    2005-10-01

    The dermal route of exposure is important in worker exposure to biocidal products. Many biocidal active substances which are used on a daily basis may decrease the barrier function of the skin to a larger extent than current risk assessment practice addresses, due to possible skin effects of repeated exposure. The influence of repeated and single exposure to representative biocidal active substances on the skin barrier was investigated in vitro. The biocidal active substances selected were alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (ADBAC), boric acid, deltamethrin, dimethyldidecylammonium chloride (DDAC), formaldehyde, permethrin, piperonyl butoxide, sodium bromide, and tebuconazole. Of these nine compounds, only the quaternary ammonium chlorides ADBAC and DDAC had a clear and consistent influence on skin permeability of the marker compounds tritiated water and [(14)C]propoxur. For these compounds, repeated exposure increased skin permeability more than single exposure. At high concentrations the difference between single and repeated exposure was quantitatively significant: repeated exposure to 300 mg/L ADBAC increased skin permeability two to threefold in comparison to single exposure. Therefore, single and repeated exposure to specific biocidal products may significantly increase skin permeability, especially when used undiluted.

  12. Oral administration of Bifidobacterium breve attenuates UV-induced barrier perturbation and oxidative stress in hairless mice skin.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yuki; Sugimoto, Saho; Izawa, Naoki; Sone, Toshiro; Chiba, Katsuyoshi; Miyazaki, Kouji

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that some probiotics affect not only the gut but also the skin. However, the effects of probiotics on ultraviolet (UV)-induced skin damage are poorly understood. In this study, we aim to examine whether oral administration of live Bifidobacterium breve strain Yakult (BBY), a typical probiotic, can attenuate skin barrier perturbation caused by UV and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hairless mice. The mice were orally supplemented with a vehicle only or BBY once a day for nine successive days. Mouse dorsal skin was irradiated with UV from days 6 to 9. The day after the final irradiation, the transepidermal water loss (TEWL), stratum corneum hydration, and oxidation-related factors of the skin were evaluated. We elucidated that BBY prevented the UV-induced increase in TEWL and decrease in stratum corneum hydration. In addition, BBY significantly suppressed the UV-induced increase in hydrogen peroxide levels, oxidation of proteins and lipids, and xanthine oxidase activity in the skin. Conversely, antioxidant capacity did not change regardless of whether BBY was administered or not. In parameters we evaluated, there was a positive correlation between the increase in TEWL and the oxidation levels of proteins and lipids. Our results suggest that oral administration of BBY attenuates UV-induced barrier perturbation and oxidative stress of the skin, and this antioxidative effect is not attributed to enhancement of antioxidant capacity but to the prevention of ROS generation.

  13. The effects of heat on skin barrier function and in vivo dermal absorption.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Gabriela; Leverett, Jesse C; Emamzadeh, Mandana; Lane, Majella E

    2014-04-10

    Enhanced delivery of ingredients across the stratum corneum (SC) is of great interest for improving the efficacy of topically applied formulations. Various methods for improving dermal penetration have been reported including galvanic devices and micro-needles. From a safety perspective it is important that such approaches do not compromise SC barrier function. This study investigates the influence of topically applied heat in vivo on the dermal uptake and penetration of a model active, allantoin from gel and lotion formulations. A custom designed device was used to deliver 42°C for 30s daily to human subjects after application of two formulations containing allantoin. The results were compared with sites treated with formulations containing no active and no heat, and a control site. In addition to penetration of allantoin, the integrity of the SC was monitored using trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements. The results showed that just 30s of 42°C topically applied heat was enough to cause significantly more penetration of allantoin from the lotion formulation compared with no application of heat. TEWL data indicated that the integrity of the skin was not compromised by the treatment. However, the application of heat did not promote enhanced penetration of the active from the gel formulation. Vehicle composition is therefore an important factor when considering thermal enhancement strategies for targeting actives to the skin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Reactive fluxes delivered by dielectric barrier discharge filaments to slightly wounded skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Kushner, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    The application of atmospheric-pressure plasmas to human tissue has been shown to have therapeutic effects for wound healing and in treatment of skin diseases. In this paper, we report on a computational study of the intersection of plasma filaments in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with a small wound in human skin in the context of plasma medicine. The wound is represented as a small cut in the epidermal layer of cells. Intracellular structures and their electrical properties were incorporated into the two-dimensional computational mesh in order to self-consistently couple gas phase plasma transport with the charging of the surface of the wound. We quantify the fluxes of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, ions and photons produced in or diffusing into the wound as might occur during the first few discharge pulses of treatment. Comparison is made to fluxes predicted by global modelling. We show that the relative location of the plasma filament with respect to the wound is important on plasma time scales (ns) for ions and photons, and for radicals directly produced by electron impact processes. On the longer-term diffusion time scales (ms) the position of the plasma filament relative to the wound is not so critical. For typical DBD conditions, the magnitude of these fluxes to the cellular surfaces corresponds to fluences of radicals nearly equal to the surface site density. These results imply that the biological reactivity is limited by reaction probabilities and not the availability of radical fluxes.

  15. Measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in cats with experimental skin barrier dysfunction using a closed chamber system.

    PubMed

    Momota, Yutaka; Shimada, Kenichiro; Gin, Azusa; Matsubara, Takako; Azakami, Daigo; Ishioka, Katsumi; Nakamura, Yuka; Sako, Toshinori

    2016-10-01

    A closed chamber evaporimeter is suitable for measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in cats because of the compact device size, tolerance to sudden movement and short measuring time. TEWL is a representative parameter for skin barrier dysfunction, which is one of the clinical signs of atopic dermatitis in humans and dogs. Measurement of feline TEWL has been reported, but applicability of this parameter has not been validated. The aims of this study were to determine if tape stripping is a valid experimental model in cats for studying TEWL and to determine if a closed chambered system is a suitable measurement tool for cats. Ten clinically normal cats. In order to evaluate variation of the measured values, TEWL was measured at the right and left side of the three clipped regions (axillae, lateral thigh and groin). Subsequently, TEWL was measured using sequential tape stripping of the stratum corneum as a model of acute barrier disruption. The variations between both sides of the three regions showed no significant difference. Sequential tape stripping was associated with increasing values for TEWL. Feline TEWL was shown to reflect changes in the skin barrier in an experimental model using a closed chamber system and has the potential for evaluating skin barrier function in cats with skin diseases. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  16. Psychosocial barriers to follow-up adherence after an abnormal cervical cytology test result among low-income, inner-city women.

    PubMed

    Hui, Siu-Kuen Azor; Miller, Suzanne M; Wen, Kuang-Yi; Fang, Zhu; Li, Tianyu; Buzaglo, Joanne; Hernandez, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    Low-income, inner-city women bear a disproportionate burden of cervical cancer in both incidence and mortality rates in the United States, largely because of low adherence to follow-up recommendations after an abnormal cervical cytology result in the primary care setting. The goals of the present study were to delineate the theory-based psychosocial barriers underlying these persistent low follow-up rates and their sociodemographic correlates. Guided by a well-validated psychosocial theory of health behaviors, this cross-sectional, correlational study assessed the barriers to follow-up adherence among underserved women (N = 210) who received an abnormal cervical cytology result. Participants were recruited through an inner-city hospital colposcopy clinic, and were assessed by telephone prior to the colposcopy appointment. Participants were largely of African American race (82.2%), lower than high school completion education (58.7%), single, never married (67.3%), and without full-time employment (64.1%). Knowledge barriers were most often endorsed (68%, M = 3.22), followed by distress barriers (64%, M = 3.09), and coping barriers (36%, M = 2.36). Forty-six percent reported more than one barrier category. Less education and being unemployed were correlated with higher knowledge barriers (P < .0001 and P < .01, respectively) and more coping barriers (P < .05 and P < .05, respectively). Women who were younger than 30 years displayed greater distress barriers (P < .05). In the primary care setting, assessing and addressing knowledge and distress barriers after feedback of an abnormal cervical cytology result may improve adherence to follow-up recommendations. The use of structured counseling protocols and referral to navigational and other resources may facilitate this process and thereby reduce disparities in cervical cancer. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Determinants of hand dermatitis, urticaria and loss of skin barrier function in professional cleaners in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Douwes, Jeroen; Slater, Tania; Shanthakumar, Mathangi; McLean, Dave; Firestone, Ridvan Tua; Judd, Lissa; Pearce, Neil

    2017-04-01

    This study assessed the risk of dermatitis, urticaria and loss of skin barrier function in 425 cleaners and 281 reference workers (retail workers and bus drivers). Symptoms, atopy and skin barrier function were assessed by questionnaire, skin prick tests, and measurement of transepidermal water loss. Cleaners had an increased risk of current (past 3 months) hand/arm dermatitis (14.8% vs. 10.0%; OR = 1.9, p < 0.05) and urticaria (11% vs. 5.3%; OR = 2.4, p < 0.05) and were more likely to have dermatitis as adults (17.6% vs. 11.4%; OR = 1.8, p < 0.05). The risk of atopy was not increased, but associations with symptoms were more pronounced in atopics. Transepidermal water loss was significantly higher in cleaners. Wet-work was a significant risk factor for dermatitis and hand washing and drying significantly reduced the risk of urticaria. In conclusion, cleaners have an increased risk of hand/arm dermatitis, urticaria and loss of skin barrier function.

  18. Dietary Milk Sphingomyelin Prevents Disruption of Skin Barrier Function in Hairless Mice after UV-B Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Oba, Chisato; Morifuji, Masashi; Ichikawa, Satomi; Ito, Kyoko; Kawahata, Keiko; Yamaji, Taketo; Asami, Yukio; Itou, Hiroyuki; Sugawara, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation causes skin barrier defects. Based on earlier findings that milk phospholipids containing high amounts of sphingomyelin (SM) improved the water content of the stratum corneum (SC) in normal mice, here we investigated the effects of dietary milk SM on skin barrier defects induced by a single dose of UV-B irradiation in hairless mice. Nine week old hairless mice were orally administrated SM (146 mg/kg BW/day) for a total of ten days. After seven days of SM administration, the dorsal skin was exposed to a single dose of UV-B (20 mJ/cm2). Administration of SM significantly suppressed an increase in transepidermal water loss and a decrease in SC water content induced by UV-B irradiation. SM supplementation significantly maintained covalently-bound ω-hydroxy ceramide levels and down-regulated mRNA levels of acute inflammation-associated genes, including thymic stromal lymphopoietin, interleukin-1 beta, and interleukin-6. Furthermore, significantly higher levels of loricrin and transglutaminase-3 mRNA were observed in the SM group. Our study shows for the first time that dietary SM modulates epidermal structures, and can help prevent disruption of skin barrier function after UV-B irradiation.

  19. Is the Fractional Laser Still Effective in Assisting Cutaneous Macromolecule Delivery in Barrier-Deficient Skin? Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis as the Disease Models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Sung, Calvin T; Liu, Pei-Ying; Fang, Jia-You

    2018-04-26

    Most of the investigations into laser-assisted skin permeation have used the intact skin as the permeation barrier. Whether the laser is effective in improving cutaneous delivery via barrier-defective skin is still unclear. In this study, ablative (Er:YAG) and non-ablative (Er:glass) lasers were examined for the penetration of peptide and siRNA upon topical application on in vitro skin with a healthy or disrupted barrier. An enhanced peptide flux (6.9 fold) was detected after tape stripping of the pig stratum corneum (SC). A further increase of flux to 11.7 fold was obtained after Er:YAG laser irradiation of the SC-stripped skin. However, the application of Er:glass modality did not further raise the flux via the SC-stripped skin. A similar trend was observed in the case of psoriasiform skin. Conversely, the flux was enhanced 3.7 and 2.6 fold after treatment with the Er:YAG and the Er:glass laser on the atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin. The 3-D skin structure captured by confocal microscopy proved the distribution of peptide and siRNA through the microchannels and into the surrounding tissue. The fractional laser was valid for ameliorating macromolecule permeation into barrier-disrupted skin although the enhancement level was lower than that of normal skin.

  20. Effect of Fluid Intake on Hydration Status and Skin Barrier Characteristics in Geriatric Patients: An Explorative Study.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, Merve; Boeing, Heiner; Müller-Werdan, Ursula; Aykac, Volkan; Steffen, Annika; Schell, Mareike; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Inadequate fluid intake is assumed to be a trigger of water-loss dehydration, which is a major health risk in aged and geriatric populations. Thus, there is a need to search for easy to use diagnostic tests to identify dehydration. Our overall aim was to investigate whether skin barrier parameters could be used for predicting fluid intake and/or hydration status in geriatric patients. An explorative observational comparative study was conducted in a geriatric hospital including patients aged 65 years and older. We measured 3-day fluid intake, skin barrier parameters, Overall Dry Skin Score, serum osmolality, cognitive and functional health, and medications. Forty patients were included (mean age 78.45 years and 65% women) with a mean fluid intake of 1,747 mL/day. 20% of the patients were dehydrated and 22.5% had an impending dehydration according to serum osmolality. Multivariate analysis suggested that skin surface pH and epidermal hydration at the face were associated with fluid intake. Serum osmolality was associated with epidermal hydration at the leg and skin surface pH at the face. Fluid intake was not correlated with serum osmolality. Diuretics were associated with high serum osmolality. Approximately half of the patients were diagnosed as being dehydrated according to osmolality, which is the current reference standard. However, there was no association with fluid intake, questioning the clinical relevance of this measure. Results indicate that single skin barrier parameters are poor markers for fluid intake or osmolality. Epidermal hydration might play a role but most probably in combination with other tests. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Sensitive skin is highly frequent in extrinsic atopic dermatitis and correlates with disease severity markers but not necessarily with skin barrier impairment.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Tsuyoshi; Shimauchi, Takatoshi; Yamaguchi, Hayato; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Aoshima, Masahiro; Ikeya, Shigeki; Tatsuno, Kazuki; Fujiyama, Toshiharu; Ito, Taisuke; Ojima, Toshiyuki; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2018-01-01

    Sensitive skin is a condition of cutaneous hypersensitivity to environmental factors. Lactic acid stinging test (LAST) is commonly used to assess sensitive skin and composed of four distinct sensations (pain, burning sensation, itch, and crawly feeling). A link between sensitive skin and barrier dysfunction has been proposed in atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. However, clinical and laboratory factors that are associated with sensitive skin remain unelucidated. To investigate relationship between sensitive skin and AD-associated markers. Forty-two Japanese AD patients and 10 healthy subjects (HS) were enrolled. AD patients were divided into extrinsic (EAD; high IgE levels) and intrinsic (IAD; normal IgE levels) types. We conducted 1% LAST by assessing the four distinct sensations and calculated the frequencies of sensitive skin in EAD, IAD, and HS. We also performed clinical AD-related tests, including transepidermal water loss (TEWL), visual analogue scale (VAS) of pruritus, and quality of life, and measured laboratory markers, including blood levels of IgE, CCL17/TARC, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and eosinophil counts, and concentration levels of serum Th1/Th2 cytokines. Filaggrin (FLG) mutations were examined in 21 patients. These values were subjected to correlation analyses with each of the four sensation elements. According to the standard criteria for LAST positivity, the frequencies of LAST-positive subjects were 54.8% and 10.0% in AD and HS, respectively (P=0.014). EAD patients showed a significantly (P=0.026) higher frequency of positive LAST (65.6%) than did IAD patients (20.0%). Among the four LAST sensation elements, the crawly feeling and pain scores positively correlated with VAS of pruritus, total serum IgE, mite-specific IgE, CCL17/TARC, and/or LDH. There was no association of the LAST scores with serum Th1/Th2 cytokine levels. Notably, neither TEWL nor FLG mutations correlated with LAST positivity or any sensation scores. The frequency of sensitive

  2. Effects of a Skin Barrier Cream on Management of Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis in Older Women: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kon, Yuka; Ichikawa-Shigeta, Yoshie; Iuchi, Terumi; Nakajima, Yukari; Nakagami, Gojiro; Tabata, Keiko; Sanada, Hiromi; Sugama, Junko

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a skin barrier cream with moisturization and skin-protectant characteristics for improving the severity of incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) pertaining to the skin physiology and appearance. We measured the following outcomes: (1) skin physiological characteristics indicating skin protection and enhancement of the skin's moisture barrier (stratum corneum hydration, dermis hydration level, transepidermal water loss, and skin pH); and (2) changes in skin appearance (the degree of erythema and pigmentation, and the sulcus cutis condition). Single-blind, cluster randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a long-term care facility in Japan between November 7, 2011, and May 6, 2012. We used block randomization to obtain a random sample of 6 (4 experimental and 2 control) out of 10 available wards. All subjects were elderly women with IAD of the buttock or inner thigh. We assessed 295 patients, but only 33 met inclusion criteria; 18 were allocated to the experimental group and 15 were allocated to the control group. All participants were managed with cleansing with a skin cleanser and application of a moisturizer daily. In addition, a skin barrier cream designed to enhance the skin's moisture barrier and act as a protective barrier was applied to the skin of patients in the experimental group 3 times a day when absorptive briefs were changed. Skin physiological and appearance characteristics were scored only at the buttock or thigh area. All data were collected on days 1 and 14 of the study. Univariate analysis found that the erythema index was lower in the intervention group than in the control group at day 14 (P = .004). Multivariate analysis found significant associations between use of the skin barrier cream and increased stratum corneum hydration (β= .443, P = .031), decreased skin pH (β=-.439, P = .020), and magnitude of erythema (β=-.451, P = .018). Study findings suggest that a barrier

  3. Effects of moisturizing skincare on skin barrier function and the prevention of skin problems in 3-month-old infants: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Kaori; Haruna, Megumi; Matsuzaki, Masayo; Shiraishi, Mie; Kojima, Reiji

    2018-01-01

    An effective newborn skincare protocol has not been established. We aimed to evaluate the effects of moisturizing skincare, including using lotion and reducing routine bathing. Our hypothesis was that moisturizing skincare would improve skin barrier function. This randomized controlled trial included 227 healthy Asian newborns between 1 week and 3 months old. We compared moisturizing skincare (bathing every 2 days and using lotion daily; intervention, n = 113) to daily bathing without lotion (control, n = 114). We assessed the skin barrier function (transepidermal water loss [TEWL], stratum corneum hydration [SCH], skin pH and sebum secretion) as a primary outcome at 3 months old. We also assessed the incidence of skin problems according to parents' diary reports. Compared with the control, the intervention group had a lower face TEWL (mean ± standard deviation, 14.69 ± 7.38 vs 17.08 ± 8.26 g/m 2 per h, P = 0.033), higher face SCH (60.38 ± 13.66 vs 53.52 ± 14.55, P = 0.001) and higher body SCH (58.89 ± 12.96 vs 53.02 ± 10.08, P < 0.001). Compared with the control, newborns in the intervention group had significantly lower rates of diaper dermatitis between birth and 1 month old (6.3% vs 15.9%, P = 0.022), and tended to have lower rates of body skin problems between 1 and 3 months (42.1% vs 55.2%, P = 0.064). Moisturizing skincare was effective for improving skin barrier function and preventing newborns' diaper dermatitis. The results of our study may help parents make informed decisions about newborn skincare. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  4. Skin barrier disruption by sodium lauryl sulfate-exposure alters the expressions of involucrin, transglutaminase 1, profilaggrin, and kallikreins during the repair phase in human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Törmä, Hans; Lindberg, Magnus; Berne, Berit

    2008-05-01

    Detergents are skin irritants affecting keratinocytes. In this study, healthy volunteers were exposed to water (vehicle) and 1% sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) under occlusive patch tests for 24 hours. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of keratinocyte differentiation markers and of enzymes involved in corneodesmosome degradation was examined in skin biopsies (n=8) during the repair phase (6 hours to 7 days postexposure) using real-time reverse-transcription PCR. It was found that the expression of involucrin was increased at 6 hours, but then rapidly normalized. The expression of transglutaminase 1 exhibited a twofold increase after 24 hours in the SLS-exposed skin. Profilaggrin was decreased after 6 hours. Later (4-7 days), the expression in SLS-exposed areas was >50% above than in control areas. An increased and altered immunofluorescence pattern of involucrin, transglutaminase 1, and filaggrin was also found (n=4). At 6 hours post-SLS exposure, the mRNA expression of kallikrein-7 (KLK-7) and kallikrein-5 (KLK-5) was decreased by 50 and 75%, respectively, as compared with control and water-exposed areas. Thereafter, the expression pattern of KLK-7 and KLK-5 was normalized. Changes in protein expression of KLK-5 were also found. In conclusion, SLS-induced skin barrier defects induce altered mRNA expression of keratinocyte differentiation markers and enzymes degrading corneodesmosomes.

  5. Recovery Effects of Oral Administration of Glucosylceramide and Beet Extract on Skin Barrier Destruction by UVB in Hairless Mice.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Yoshihiro; Masutani, Noriomi; Uchino, Shohei; Fukai, Hisano

    2017-10-27

    Purified glucosylceramide from beet extract (beet GlcCer) and beet extract containing an equal amount of GlcCer were administered orally to ultra violet B (UVB)-irradiated mice, and differences in the protective effects against skin barrier dysfunction caused by UVB irradiation were compared. In the beet GlcCer group, epidermal thickening and the decrease in stratum corneum (SC) ceramide content caused by UVB irradiation were reduced. In the group that was orally administered beet extract containing glucosylceramide, effects similar to those in the beet GlcCer group were observed. Oral administration of beet GlcCer had no obvious effects against an increase in TEWL or decrease in SC water content after UVB irradiation, but there was improvement in the beet extract group. Oral administration of beet GlcCer is effective in improving skin barrier function in UVB-irradiated mice. Beet extract contains constituents other than GlcCer that are also effective in improving skin barrier function.

  6. Effects of Collagen Tripeptide Supplement on Photoaging and Epidermal Skin Barrier in UVB-exposed Hairless Mice.

    PubMed

    Pyun, Hee-Bong; Kim, Minji; Park, Jieun; Sakai, Yasuo; Numata, Noriaki; Shin, Jin-Yeong; Shin, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Do-Un; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2012-12-01

    Collagen tripeptide (CTP) is a functional food material with several biological effects such as improving dry skin and wound and bone fracture healing. This study focused on the anti-photoaging effects of CTP on a hairless mouse model. To evaluate the effects of CTP on UVB-induced skin wrinkle formation in vivo, the hairless mice were exposed to UVB radiation with oral administration of CTP for 14 weeks. Compared with the untreated UVB control group, mice treated with CTP showed significantly reduced wrinkle formation, skin thickening, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Skin hydration and hydroxyproline were increased in the CTP-treated group. Moreover, oral administration of CTP prevented UVB-induced MMP-3 and -13 activities as well as MMP-2 and -9 expressions. Oral administration of CTP increased skin elasticity and decreased abnormal elastic fiber formation. Erythema was also decreased in the CTP-treated group. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that CTP has potential as an anti-photoaging agent.

  7. Effects of Collagen Tripeptide Supplement on Photoaging and Epidermal Skin Barrier in UVB-exposed Hairless Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pyun, Hee-Bong; Kim, Minji; Park, Jieun; Sakai, Yasuo; Numata, Noriaki; Shin, Jin-Yeong; Shin, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Do-Un; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2012-01-01

    Collagen tripeptide (CTP) is a functional food material with several biological effects such as improving dry skin and wound and bone fracture healing. This study focused on the anti-photoaging effects of CTP on a hairless mouse model. To evaluate the effects of CTP on UVB-induced skin wrinkle formation in vivo, the hairless mice were exposed to UVB radiation with oral administration of CTP for 14 weeks. Compared with the untreated UVB control group, mice treated with CTP showed significantly reduced wrinkle formation, skin thickening, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Skin hydration and hydroxyproline were increased in the CTP-treated group. Moreover, oral administration of CTP prevented UVB-induced MMP-3 and -13 activities as well as MMP-2 and -9 expressions. Oral administration of CTP increased skin elasticity and decreased abnormal elastic fiber formation. Erythema was also decreased in the CTP-treated group. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that CTP has potential as an anti-photoaging agent. PMID:24471092

  8. Non-animal models of epithelial barriers (skin, intestine and lung) in research, industrial applications and regulatory toxicology.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sarah; Daneshian, Mardas; Bouwstra, Joke; Caloni, Francesca; Constant, Samuel; Davies, Donna E; Dandekar, Gudrun; Guzman, Carlos A; Fabian, Eric; Haltner, Eleonore; Hartung, Thomas; Hasiwa, Nina; Hayden, Patrick; Kandarova, Helena; Khare, Sangeeta; Krug, Harald F; Kneuer, Carsten; Leist, Marcel; Lian, Guoping; Marx, Uwe; Metzger, Marco; Ott, Katharina; Prieto, Pilar; Roberts, Michael S; Roggen, Erwin L; Tralau, Tewes; van den Braak, Claudia; Walles, Heike; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Models of the outer epithelia of the human body - namely the skin, the intestine and the lung - have found valid applications in both research and industrial settings as attractive alternatives to animal testing. A variety of approaches to model these barriers are currently employed in such fields, ranging from the utilization of ex vivo tissue to reconstructed in vitro models, and further to chip-based technologies, synthetic membrane systems and, of increasing current interest, in silico modeling approaches. An international group of experts in the field of epithelial barriers was convened from academia, industry and regulatory bodies to present both the current state of the art of non-animal models of the skin, intestinal and pulmonary barriers in their various fields of application, and to discuss research-based, industry-driven and regulatory-relevant future directions for both the development of new models and the refinement of existing test methods. Issues of model relevance and preference, validation and standardization, acceptance, and the need for simplicity versus complexity were focal themes of the discussions. The outcomes of workshop presentations and discussions, in relation to both current status and future directions in the utilization and development of epithelial barrier models, are presented by the attending experts in the current report.

  9. Placental Growth Factor Contributes to Micro-Vascular Abnormalization and Blood-Retinal Barrier Breakdown in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczuk, Laura; Touchard, Elodie; Omri, Samy; Jonet, Laurent; Klein, Christophe; Valamanes, Fatemeh; Berdugo, Marianne; Bigey, Pascal; Massin, Pascale; Jeanny, Jean-Claude; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2011-01-01

    Objective There are controversies regarding the pro-angiogenic activity of placental growth factor (PGF) in diabetic retinopathy (DR). For a better understanding of its role on the retina, we have evaluated the effect of a sustained PGF over-expression in rat ocular media, using ciliary muscle electrotransfer (ET) of a plasmid encoding rat PGF-1 (pVAX2-rPGF-1). Materials and Methods pVAX2-rPGF-1 ET in the ciliary muscle (200 V/cm) was achieved in non diabetic and diabetic rat eyes. Control eyes received saline or naked plasmid ET. Clinical follow up was carried out over three months using slit lamp examination and fluorescein angiography. After the control of rPGF-1 expression, PGF-induced effects on retinal vasculature and on the blood-external barrier were evaluated respectively by lectin and occludin staining on flat-mounts. Ocular structures were visualized through histological analysis. Results After fifteen days of rPGF-1 over-expression in normal eyes, tortuous and dilated capillaries were observed. At one month, microaneurysms and moderate vascular sprouts were detected in mid retinal periphery in vivo and on retinal flat-mounts. At later stages, retinal pigmented epithelial cells demonstrated morphological abnormalities and junction ruptures. In diabetic retinas, PGF expression rose between 2 and 5 months, and, one month after ET, rPGF-1 over-expression induced glial activation and proliferation. Conclusion This is the first demonstration that sustained intraocular PGF production induces vascular and retinal changes similar to those observed in the early stages of diabetic retinopathy. PGF and its receptor Flt-1 may therefore be looked upon as a potential regulatory target at this stage of the disease. PMID:21408222

  10. [The significance of climate and environment protection for health under special consideration of skin barrier damages and allergic sequelae].

    PubMed

    Heuson, Clemens; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia

    2018-06-01

    The skin, together with gut and respiratory tract, harbor a central epithelial barrier function in regards to the interaction of an individual with the environment. Continuing exposure to environmental influences can cause epithelial barrier damages and thus pave the way for atopy development. The latter describes the tendency for allergies, i. e. hypersensitivity of the skin, intestine, and respiratory tract towards per se unharmful environmental substances.Allergies are classified as non-communicable diseases (NCDs). According to the World Health Organization (WHO), they are presently the most demanding medical challenge. Allergies are the most frequent NCDs and are characterized by a high and multi-facetted level of suffering. An enormous socio-economic burden and the urgent need for effective prevention follows as consequence. Prevention options have by no means been sufficiently used. Within the skin barrier's key function in regards to the defense of atopic diseases are so far inadequately used prevention possibilities. They are based on ambitious environmental and climatic policy that pointedly addresses the barrier disrupting environmental factors.On the basis of this proposition, the present article assigns appropriate environmental and climatic policy measures. The two main arguments for such measures are a disburdening of the healthcare system as well as a far better life quality for the affected people. They are the legitimization towards an ambitious environmental and climatic policy. For its realization an integrated approach of (allergy) prevention and environmental research is necessary. Now, campaigning for its acceptance in politics and society is an urgent matter.

  11. The rational design of biomimetic skin barrier lipid formulations using biophysical methods.

    PubMed

    Bulsara, P A; Varlashkin, P; Dickens, J; Moore, D J; Rawlings, A V; Clarke, M J

    2017-04-01

    The focus of this communication was to study phospholipid-structured emulsions whose phase behaviour is modified with monoalkyl fatty amphiphiles. Ideally, these systems would mimic key physical and structural attributes observed in human stratum corneum (SC) so that they better alleviate xerotic skin conditions. Phosphatidylcholine-structured emulsions were prepared, and their phase behaviour modified with monoalkyl fatty amphiphiles. The effect of molecular volume, acyl chain length and head-group interactions was studied using a combination of physical methods. Water vapour transmission rate (WVTR) was used as a primary test to assess occlusive character. Changes in the vibrational modes observed in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and bilayer spacing measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) were then applied to elucidate the lateral and lamellar microstructural characteristics in the systems. Water vapour transmission rate demonstrated that as the phosphatidylcholine acyl chain length increased from C14, to C18, to C22, there was a corresponding increase in occlusive character. The addition of monoalkyl fatty amphiphiles such as behenic acid, behenyl alcohol or cetostearyl alcohol to a base formulation incorporating dipalmitoyl and distearoylphosphatidylcholine (C18) was seen to further increase barrier characteristics of the emulsions. FTIR methods used to probe lipid-chain conformational ordering demonstrated that as phosphatidylcholine acyl chain lengths increased, there was a corresponding improvement in acyl chain ordering, with an increase in thermal transition temperatures. The addition of a monoalkyl fatty amphiphile resulted in conformational order and thermal transition temperature improvements trending towards those observed in stratum corneum. FTIR also demonstrated that systems containing behenic acid or behenyl alcohol exhibited features associated with orthorhombic character. X-ray diffraction data showed that addition of monoalkyl fatty

  12. Comfort and microbial barrier properties of garments worn next to the skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopitar, D.; Rogina-Car, B.; Skenderi, Z.

    2017-10-01

    Compared with viscose fibre, modal fibre is characterized by some advantageous properties such as higher dry and wet tenacities, higher wet modulus, lower water retention capacity and lower level of swelling. Impact of different knitted fabric structure made of cotton and 97 % CMD/3 % EL fibres on thermo-physiological comfort and microbial barrier properties were investigated. All knitted fabrics have very good physiological properties. The microbial barrier permeability of knitted fabric after extreme contamination with bacterial spores in dry state showed that double jersey offered more effective microbial barrier than the single jersey knitted fabrics respectively the greater thickness of double jersey knitted fabric provide more difficult barrier to bacterial spores to pass. In wet state all knitted fabrics have more effective microbial barrier which could be explained by cellulose fibres swelling. In wet state 97 % CMD/3 % EL single jersey knitted fabric have more effective microbial barrier then cotton double and single jersey knitted fabrics.

  13. [Impact of wet work on epidermal barrier (tewl and stratum corneum hydration) and skin viscoelasticity in nurses].

    PubMed

    Kieć-Świcrczyńska, Marta; Chomiczewska-Skóra, Dorota; Świerczyńska-Machura, Dominika; Kręcisz, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Nurses are prone to develop hand eczema due to occupational exposure to irritants, including wet work. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of wet work on selected skin properties, reflecting epidermal barrier function--transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and stratum corneum hydration--and additionally skin viscoelasticity, in nurses. Study subjects included 90 nurses employed in hospital wards. Measurements were carried out within the dorsal aspect of the dominant hand, using a Cutometer MPA 580 equipped with Tewameter TM 300 and Corneometer CM 825 (Courage & Khazaka, Germany) probes. Examina- tions took place on hospital premises. Similar measurements were performed in the control group of females non-exposed to irritants. In the examined group of nurses, mean TEWL was 15.5 g/h/m2 and was higher than in the control group (12.99 g/h/m2). After rejecting the extreme results, the difference between the groups proved to be statistically significant (p < 0.05). The mean value of stratum corneum hydration was lower in the examined group (37.915) compared with the control group (40.05), but the difference was not sta tistically significant. Also results of viscoelasticity assessment showed no significant differences between studied groups. The results of the assessment of skin biophysical properties show that wet work exerts a moderately adverse impact on skin condition. A higher TEWL value and a lower stratum corneum hydration in workers exposed to irritants reflect an adverse impact of these factors on the epidermal barrier function.

  14. Targeting NRF2 for Improved Skin Barrier Function and Photoprotection: Focus on the Achiote-Derived Apocarotenoid Bixin

    PubMed Central

    Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Krajisnik, Andrea; Zhang, Donna D.; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2017-01-01

    The transcription factor NRF2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2) orchestrates major cellular defense mechanisms including phase-II detoxification, inflammatory signaling, DNA repair, and antioxidant response. Recent studies strongly suggest a protective role of NRF2-mediated gene expression in the suppression of cutaneous photodamage induced by solar UV (ultraviolet) radiation. The apocarotenoid bixin, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved natural food colorant (referred to as ‘annatto’) originates from the seeds of the achiote tree native to tropical America, consumed by humans since ancient times. Use of achiote preparations for skin protection against environmental insult and for enhanced wound healing has long been documented. We have recently reported that (i) bixin is a potent canonical activator of the NRF2-dependent cytoprotective response in human skin keratinocytes; that (ii) systemic administration of bixin activates NRF2 with protective effects against solar UV-induced skin damage; and that (iii) bixin-induced suppression of photodamage is observable in Nrf2+/+ but not in Nrf2−/− SKH-1 mice confirming the NRF2-dependence of bixin-induced antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. In addition, bixin displays molecular activities as sacrificial antioxidant, excited state quencher, PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor) α/γ agonist, and TLR (Toll-like receptor) 4/NFκB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) antagonist, all of which might be relevant to the enhancement of skin barrier function and environmental stress protection. Potential skin photoprotection and photochemoprevention benefits provided by topical application or dietary consumption of this ethno-pharmacologically validated phytochemical originating from the Americas deserves further preclinical and clinical examination. PMID:29258247

  15. Impact of sleep restriction on local immune response and skin barrier restoration with and without "multinutrient" nutrition intervention.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tracey J; Wilson, Marques A; Karl, J Philip; Orr, Jeb; Smith, Carl D; Cooper, Adam D; Heaton, Kristin J; Young, Andrew J; Montain, Scott J

    2018-01-01

    Systemic immune function is impaired by sleep restriction. However, the impact of sleep restriction on local immune responses and to what extent any impairment can be mitigated by nutritional supplementation is unknown. We assessed the effect of 72-h sleep restriction (2-h nightly sleep) on local immune function and skin barrier restoration of an experimental wound, and determined the influence of habitual protein intake (1.5 g·kg -1 ·day -1 ) supplemented with arginine, glutamine, zinc sulfate, vitamin C, vitamin D3, and omega-3 fatty acids compared with lower protein intake (0.8 g·kg -1 ·day -1 ) without supplemental nutrients on these outcomes. Wounds were created in healthy adults by removing the top layer of less than or equal to eight forearm blisters induced via suction, after adequate sleep (AS) or 48 h of a 72-h sleep restriction period (SR; 2-h nightly sleep). A subset of participants undergoing sleep restriction received supplemental nutrients during and after sleep restriction (SR+). Wound fluid was serially sampled 48 h postblistering to assess local cytokine responses. The IL-8 response of wound fluid was higher for AS compared with SR [area-under-the-curve (log 10 ), 5.1 ± 0.2 and 4.9 ± 0.2 pg/ml, respectively; P = 0.03]; and both IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations were higher for SR+ compared with SR ( P < 0.0001), suggestive of a potentially enhanced early wound healing response. Skin barrier recovery was shorter for AS (4.2 ± 0.9 days) compared with SR (5.0 ± 0.9 days) ( P = 0.02) but did not differ between SR and SR+ ( P = 0.18). Relatively modest sleep disruption delays wound healing. Supplemental nutrition may mitigate some decrements in local immune responses, without detectable effects on wound healing rate. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The data herein characterizes immune function in response to sleep restriction in healthy volunteers with and without nutrition supplementation. We used a unique skin wound model to show that sleep

  16. Comparison of the Efficacy of Atopalm(®) Multi-Lamellar Emulsion Cream and Physiogel(®) Intensive Cream in Improving Epidermal Permeability Barrier in Sensitive Skin.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sekyoo; Lee, Sin Hee; Park, Byeong Deog; Wu, Yan; Man, George; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    The management of sensitive skin, which affects over 60% of the general population, has been a long-standing challenge for both patients and clinicians. Because defective epidermal permeability barrier is one of the clinical features of sensitive skin, barrier-enhancing products could be an optimal regimen for sensitive skin. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of two barrier-enhancing products, i.e., Atopalm (®) Multi-Lamellar Emulsion (MLE) Cream and Physiogel (®) Intensive Cream for sensitive skin. 60 patients with sensitive skin, aged 22-40 years old, were randomly assigned to one group treated with Atopalm MLE Cream, and another group treated with Physiogel Intensive Cream twice daily for 4 weeks. Lactic acid stinging test scores (LASTS), stratum hydration (SC) and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were assessed before, 2 and 4 weeks after the treatment. Atopalm MLE Cream significantly lowered TEWL after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment (p < 0.01). In contrast, Physiogel Intensive Cream significantly increased TEWL after 2 weeks of treatment (p < 0.05) while TEWL significantly decreased after 4-week treatments. Moreover, both Atopalm MLE Cream and Physiogel Intensive Cream significantly increased SC hydration, and improved LASTS after 4 weeks of treatment. Both barrier-enhancing products are effective and safe for improving epidermal functions, including permeability barrier, SC hydration and LASTS, in sensitive skin. These products could be a valuable alternative for management of sensitive skin. Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California, USA, and NeoPharm Co., Ltd., Daejeon, Korea.

  17. Evaluation of Barrier Skin Cream Effectiveness Against JP-8 Jet Fuel Absorption and Irritation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    quantify the colorimeter measurements. This system uses spectral chromaticity coordinates and corresponding color- matching functions based on...in the caudal thigh or lumbar muscles and the rabbit was monitored throughout the procedure. Once anesthetized, a baseline visual and colorimeter ...Visual Scoring Technique All barrier creams were scored in 3 ways; by visual scoring described in the Draize method, by colorimeter , and by

  18. Compound Heterozygous Desmoplakin Mutations Result in a Phenotype with a Combination of Myocardial, Skin, Hair, and Enamel Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Mỹ G.; Sadowski, Sara; Brennan, Donna; Pikander, Pekka; Saukko, Pekka; Wahl, James; Aho, Heikki; Heikinheimo, Kristiina; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Fertala, Andrzej; Peltonen, Juha; Uitto, Jouni; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2014-01-01

    Desmoplakin (DP) anchors the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to the desmosomal cadherins and thereby confers structural stability to tissues. In this study, we present a patient with extensive mucocutaneous blisters, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, nail dystrophy, enamel dysplasia, and sparse woolly hair. The patient died at the age of 14 years from undiagnosed cardiomyopathy. The skin showed hyperplasia and acantholysis in the mid- and lower epidermal layers, whereas the heart showed extensive fibrosis and fibrofatty replacement in both ventricles. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed a reduction in the C-terminal domain of DP in the skin and oral mucosa. Sequencing of the DP gene showed undescribed mutations in the maternal and paternal alleles. Both mutations affected exon 24 encoding the C-terminal domain. The paternal mutation, c.6310delA, leads to a premature stop codon. The maternal mutation, c.7964 C to A, results in a substitution of an aspartic acid for a conserved alanine residue at amino acid 2655 (A2655D). Structural modeling indicated that this mutation changes the electrostatic potential of the mutated region of DP, possibly altering functions that depend on intermolecular interactions. To conclude, we describe a combination of DP mutation phenotypes affecting the skin, heart, hair, and teeth. This patient case emphasizes the importance of heart examination of patients with desmosomal genodermatoses. PMID:19924139

  19. Comparison of skin barrier function and sensory nerve electric current perception threshold between IgE-high extrinsic and IgE-normal intrinsic types of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Mori, T; Ishida, K; Mukumoto, S; Yamada, Y; Imokawa, G; Kabashima, K; Kobayashi, M; Bito, T; Nakamura, M; Ogasawara, K; Tokura, Y

    2010-01-01

    Background Two types of atopic dermatitis (AD) have been proposed, with different pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this seemingly heterogeneous disorder. The extrinsic type shows high IgE levels presumably as a consequence of skin barrier damage and feasible allergen permeation, whereas the intrinsic type exhibits normal IgE levels and is not mediated by allergen-specific IgE. Objectives To investigate the relationship between pruritus perception threshold and skin barrier function of patients with AD in a comparison between the extrinsic and intrinsic types. Methods Enrolled in this study were 32 patients with extrinsic AD, 17 with intrinsic AD and 24 healthy individuals. The barrier function of the stratum corneum was assessed by skin surface hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and pruritus perception was evaluated by the electric current perception threshold (CPT) of sensory nerves upon neuroselective transcutaneous electric stimulation. Results Skin surface hydration was significantly lower and TEWL was significantly higher in extrinsic AD than intrinsic AD or normal controls. Although there was no statistically significant difference in CPT among extrinsic AD, intrinsic AD and normal controls, CPT was significantly correlated with skin surface hydration and inversely with TEWL in intrinsic AD and normal controls, but not extrinsic AD. Finally, CPT was correlated with the visual analogue scale of itch in the nonlesional skin of patients with extrinsic but not intrinsic AD. Conclusions Patients with extrinsic AD have an impaired barrier, which increases the pre-existing pruritus but rather decreases sensitivity to external stimuli. In contrast, patients with intrinsic AD retain a normal barrier function and sensory reactivity to external pruritic stimuli.

  20. Randomized, Controlled Trial Evaluating a Baby Wash Product on Skin Barrier Function in Healthy, Term Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Tina; Bedwell, Carol; Roberts, Stephen A; Hart, Anna; Turner, Mark A; Carter, Lesley-Anne; Cork, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the hypothesis that the use of a wash product formulated for newborn (<1 month of age) bathing is not inferior (no worse) to bathing with water only. Design Assessor-blinded, randomized, controlled, noninferiority trial. Setting A teaching hospital in the Northwest of England and in participants’ homes. Participants Three-hundred-and-seven healthy, term infants recruited within 48 hours of birth. Method We compared bathing with a wash product (n = 159) to bathing with water alone (n = 148). The primary outcome was transepidermal water loss (TEWL) at 14 days postbirth; the predefined difference deemed to be unimportant was 1.2. Secondary outcomes comprised changes in stratum corneum hydration, skin surface pH, clinical observations of the skin, and maternal views. Results Complete TEWL data were obtained for 242 (78.8%) infants. Wash was noninferior to water alone in terms of TEWL (intention-to-treat analysis: 95% confidence interval [CI] for difference [wash–water, adjusted for family history of eczema, neonate state, and baseline] −1.24, 1.07; per protocol analysis: 95% CI −1.42, 1.09). No significant differences were found in secondary outcomes. Conclusion We were unable to detect any differences between the newborn wash product and water. These findings provide reassurance to parents who choose to use the test newborn wash product or other technically equivalent cleansers and provide the evidence for health care professionals to support parental choice. PMID:23421327

  1. Essential role of the cytochrome P450 CYP4F22 in the production of acylceramide, the key lipid for skin permeability barrier formation

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yusuke; Nakamichi, Shota; Ohkuni, Aya; Kamiyama, Nozomi; Naoe, Ayano; Tsujimura, Hisashi; Yokose, Urara; Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Ishikawa, Junko; Akiyama, Masashi; Kihara, Akio

    2015-01-01

    A skin permeability barrier is essential for terrestrial animals, and its impairment causes several cutaneous disorders such as ichthyosis and atopic dermatitis. Although acylceramide is an important lipid for the skin permeability barrier, details of its production have yet to be determined, leaving the molecular mechanism of skin permeability barrier formation unclear. Here we identified the cytochrome P450 gene CYP4F22 (cytochrome P450, family 4, subfamily F, polypeptide 22) as the long-sought fatty acid ω-hydroxylase gene required for acylceramide production. CYP4F22 has been identified as one of the autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis-causative genes. Ichthyosis-mutant proteins exhibited reduced enzyme activity, indicating correlation between activity and pathology. Furthermore, lipid analysis of a patient with ichthyosis showed a drastic decrease in acylceramide production. We determined that CYP4F22 was a type I membrane protein that locates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), suggesting that the ω-hydroxylation occurs on the cytoplasmic side of the ER. The preferred substrate of the CYP4F22 was fatty acids with a carbon chain length of 28 or more (≥C28). In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that CYP4F22 is an ultra-long-chain fatty acid ω-hydroxylase responsible for acylceramide production and provide important insights into the molecular mechanisms of skin permeability barrier formation. Furthermore, based on the results obtained here, we proposed a detailed reaction series for acylceramide production. PMID:26056268

  2. Local Burn Injury Promotes Defects in the Epidermal Lipid and Antimicrobial Peptide Barriers in Human Autograft Skin and Burn Margin: Implications for Burn Wound Healing and Graft Survival

    PubMed Central

    Plichta, Jennifer K.; Holmes, Casey J.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Radek, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Burn injury increases the risk of morbidity and mortality by promoting severe hemodynamic shock and risk for local or systemic infection. Graft failure due to poor wound healing or infection remains a significant problem for burn subjects. The mechanisms by which local burn injury compromises the epithelial antimicrobial barrier function in the burn margin, containing the elements necessary for healing of the burn site, and in distal unburned skin, which serves as potential donor tissue, are largely unknown. The objective of this study was to establish defects in epidermal barrier function in human donor skin and burn margin, in order to identify potential mechanisms that may lead to graft failure and/or impaired burn wound healing. In the present study, we established that epidermal lipids and respective lipid synthesis enzymes were significantly reduced in both donor skin and burn margin. We further identified diverse changes in the gene expression and protein production of several candidate skin antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in both donor skin and burn margin. These results also parallel changes in cutaneous AMP activity against common burn wound pathogens, aberrant production of epidermal proteases known to regulate barrier permeability and AMP activity, and greater production of pro-inflammatory cytokines known to be induced by AMPs. These findings suggest that impaired epidermal lipid and AMP regulation could contribute to graft failure and infectious complications in subjects with burn or other traumatic injury. PMID:27183442

  3. Randomized, controlled trial evaluating a baby wash product on skin barrier function in healthy, term neonates.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Tina; Bedwell, Carol; Roberts, Stephen A; Hart, Anna; Turner, Mark A; Carter, Lesley-Anne; Cork, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    To examine the hypothesis that the use of a wash product formulated for newborn (<1 month of age) bathing is not inferior (no worse) to bathing with water only. Assessor-blinded, randomized, controlled, noninferiority trial. A teaching hospital in the Northwest of England and in participants' homes. Three-hundred-and-seven healthy, term infants recruited within 48 hours of birth. We compared bathing with a wash product (n = 159) to bathing with water alone (n = 148). The primary outcome was transepidermal water loss (TEWL) at 14 days postbirth; the predefined difference deemed to be unimportant was 1.2. Secondary outcomes comprised changes in stratum corneum hydration, skin surface pH, clinical observations of the skin, and maternal views. Complete TEWL data were obtained for 242 (78.8%) infants. Wash was noninferior to water alone in terms of TEWL (intention-to-treat analysis: 95% confidence interval [CI] for difference [wash-water, adjusted for family history of eczema, neonate state, and baseline] -1.24, 1.07; per protocol analysis: 95% CI -1.42, 1.09). No significant differences were found in secondary outcomes. We were unable to detect any differences between the newborn wash product and water. These findings provide reassurance to parents who choose to use the test newborn wash product or other technically equivalent cleansers and provide the evidence for health care professionals to support parental choice. © 2013 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  4. Cationic Supramolecular Hydrogels for Overcoming the Skin Barrier in Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Limón, David; Jiménez‐Newman, Claire; Rodrigues, Mafalda; González‐Campo, Arántzazu; Amabilino, David B.; Calpena, Ana C.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A cationic bis‐imidazolium‐based amphiphile was used to form thermoreversible nanostructured supramolecular hydrogels incorporating neutral and cationic drugs for the topical treatment of rosacea. The concentration of the gelator and the type and concentration of the drug incorporated were found to be factors that strongly influenced the gelling temperature, gel‐formation period, and overall stability and morphology. The incorporation of brimonidine tartrate resulted in the formation of the most homogeneous material of the three drugs explored, whereas the incorporation of betamethasone resulted in a gel with a completely different morphology comprising linked particles. NMR spectroscopy studies proved that these gels kept the drug not only at the interstitial space but also within the fibers. Due to the design of the gelator, drug release was up to 10 times faster and retention of the drug within the skin was up to 20 times more effective than that observed for commercial products. Experiments in vivo demonstrated the rapid efficacy of these gels in reducing erythema, especially in the case of the gel with brimonidine. The lack of coulombic attraction between the gelator–host and the guest–drug seemed particularly important in highly effective release, and the intermolecular interactions operating between them were found to lie at the root of the excellent properties of the materials for topical delivery and treatment of rosacea. PMID:28794954

  5. Abnormalities of hair structure and skin histology derived from CRISPR/Cas9-based knockout of phospholipase C-delta 1 in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Min; Liu, Wei; Jia, Jun-Shuang; Chen, Bang-Zhu; Chen, Heng-Wei; Liu, Yu; Bie, Ya-Nan; Gu, Peng; Sun, Yan; Xiao, Dong; Gu, Wei-Wang

    2018-05-25

    Hairless mice have been widely applied in skin-related researches, while hairless pigs will be an ideal model for skin-related study and other biomedical researches because of the similarity of skin structure with humans. The previous study revealed that hairlessness phenotype in nude mice is caused by insufficient expression of phospholipase C-delta 1 (PLCD1), an essential molecule downstream of Foxn1, which encouraged us to generate PLCD1-deficient pigs. In this study, we plan to firstly produce PLCD1 knockout (KO) mice by CRISPR/Cas9 technology, which will lay a solid foundation for the generation of hairless PLCD1 KO pigs. Generation of PLCD1 sgRNAs and Cas 9 mRNA was performed as described (Shao in Nat Protoc 9:2493-2512, 2014). PLCD1-modified mice (F0) were generated via co-microinjection of PLCD1-sgRNA and Cas9 mRNA into the cytoplasm of C57BL/6J zygotes. Homozygous PLCD1-deficient mice (F1) were obtained by intercrossing of F0 mice with the similar mutation. PLCD1-modified mice (F0) showed progressive hair loss after birth and the genotype of CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations in exon 2 of PLCD1 locus, suggesting the sgRNA is effective to cause mutations that lead to hair growth defect. Homozygous PLCD1-deficient mice (F1) displayed baldness in abdomen and hair sparse in dorsa. Histological abnormalities of the reduced number of hair follicles, irregularly arranged and curved hair follicles, epidermal hyperplasia and disturbed differentiation of epidermis were observed in the PLCD1-deficient mice. Moreover, the expression level of PLCD1 was significantly decreased, while the expression levels of other genes (i.e., Krt1, Krt5, Krt13, loricrin and involucrin) involved in the differentiation of hair follicle were remarkerably increased in skin tissues of PLCD1-deficient mice. In conclusion, we achieve PLCD1 KO mice by CRISPR/Cas9 technology, which provide a new animal model for hair development research, although homozygotes don't display completely hairless

  6. Dietary Cerebroside from Sea Cucumber (Stichopus japonicus): Absorption and Effects on Skin Barrier and Cecal Short-Chain Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jingjing; Ishida, Marina; Aida, Kazuhiko; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Zhang, Jin; Manabe, Yuki; Hirata, Takashi; Sugawara, Tatsuya

    2016-09-21

    Sphingolipids from marine sources have attracted more attention recently because of their distinctive structures and expected functions. In this study, the content and components of cerebroside from sea cucumber Stichopus japonicus were analyzed. The absorption of cerebroside from S. japonicus was investigated with an in vivo lipid absorption assay. The result revealed that S. japonicus is a rich source of cerebroside that contained considerable amounts of odd carbon chain sphingoid bases. The cumulative recoveries of d17:1- and d19:2-containing cerebrosides were 0.31 ± 0.16 and 0.32 ± 0.10%, respectively, for 24 h after administration. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first work that shows sphingolipids from a marine source could be absorbed in vivo and incorporated into ceramides. In addition, dietary supplementation with sea cucumber cerebroside to hairless mouse improved the skin barrier function and increased short-chain fatty acids in cecal contents, which have shown beneficial effects on the host.

  7. Ultraviolet A photosensitivity profile of dexchlorpheniramine maleate and promethazine-based creams: Anti-inflammatory, antihistaminic, and skin barrier protection properties.

    PubMed

    Facchini, Gustavo; Eberlin, Samara; Clerici, Stefano Piatto; Alves Pinheiro, Ana Lucia Tabarini; Costa, Adilson

    2017-12-01

    Unwanted side effects such as dryness, hypersensitivity, and cutaneous photosensitivity are challenge for adherence and therapeutical success for patients using treatments for inflammatory and allergic skin response. In this study, we compared the effects of two dermatological formulations, which are used in inflammatory and/or allergic skin conditions: dexchlorpheniramine maleate (DCP; 10 mg/g) and promethazine (PTZ; 20 mg/g). We evaluated both formulations for phototoxicity potential, skin irritation, anti-inflammatory and antihistaminic abilities, and skin barrier repair in vitro and ex vivo using the standard OECD test guideline n° 432, the ECVAM protocol n° 78, and cultured skin explants from a healthy patient. Ultraviolet A was chosen as exogenous agent to induce allergic and inflammatory response. Both PTZ and DCP promoted increases in interleukin-1 (IL-1) synthesis in response to ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation compared to control. However, the increase observed with PTZ was significantly greater than the DCP, indicating that the latter has a lower irritant potential. DCP also demonstrated a protective effect on UVA-induced leukotriene B4 and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) synthesis. Conversely, PTZ demonstrates more robust UVA antihistaminic activity. Likewise, PTZ promoted a significantly greater increase in the production of involucrin and keratin 14, both associated with protective skin barrier property. In conclusion, these data suggest possible diverging UVA response mechanisms of DCP and PTZ, which gives greater insight into the contrasting photosensitizing potential between DCP and PTZ observed in the patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. No Sting Barrier Film to Protect Skin in Adult Patients: Findings From a Scoping Review With Implications for Evidence-Based Practice.

    PubMed

    Micheli, Chiara; Palese, Alvisa; Canzan, Federica; Ambrosi, Elisa

    2017-10-01

    In the industrialized world, approximately 1-1.5% of the population has received treatments for skin lesions. In the 1990s, a polymeric barrier film called the No Sting Barrier Film (NSBF) was developed as an alternative to petrolatum-based ointments and zinc oxide formulas. To date, few studies have explored the effectiveness of NSBF in protecting skin integrity. To map the methods, fields and outcomes used to produce evidence on NSBF effectiveness. A scoping review was performed in 2015. A search strategy for identifying relevant studies was designed and performed. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, and comparative studies for all types of interventions were included; research conducted in any clinical context was eligible for inclusion. Studies were selected by two reviewers; data extraction and analysis also was performed by two reviewers and disagreements were discussed. Six studies were included. NSBF's potential as a skin protector was investigated with respect to (a) chronic wounds (pressure ulcers or vascular leg ulcers); (b) urinary or fecal incontinence; and (c) post-mastectomy irradiation. The principal clinical outcomes investigated were, respectively: (a) wound healing, wound exudates and erythema control; (b) incidence of incontinence-associated dermatitis and skin reactions; and (c) intensity of pruritus and skin reactions. Pain and comfort were measured in all clinical applications. The main process outcomes investigated were: (a) ease of application, (b) application and removal time, and (c) costs. Zinc oxide and petroleum formulations were the most common comparison interventions in research on chronic ulcers and incontinence; sorbolene cream and topical corticosteroids were the most frequent comparisons in the context of post-mastectomy irradiation. NBSF may be used for peri-wound skin protection in patients with chronic wounds, with urinary or fecal incontinence and for women undergoing

  9. Hataedock treatment has preventive therapeutic effects for atopic dermatitis through skin barrier protection in Dermatophagoides farinae-induced NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Cha, Ho-Yeol; Ahn, Sang-Hyun; Cheon, Jin-Hong; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Kibong

    2017-07-12

    Hataedock treatment is traditionally used for the purpose of preventing the future skin disease by feeding herbal extracts to the newborn in traditional Chinese and Korean medicine. This study investigated the preventive therapeutic effects of Hataedock (HTD) treatment for atopic dermatitis (AD) through skin barrier protection in Dermatophagoides farinae-induced NC/Nga mice. To the HTD treatment group, the extract of Coptis japonica Makino and Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fischer, which analyzed with High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)-fingerprint for quality consistency, was administered orally to the 3-week-old mice before inducing AD. After that, Dermatophagoides farinae was applied except the control group to induce AD-like skin lesions. We confirmed the effects of HTD on morphological changes, protection of skin barrier, regulation of Th2 differentiation, inflammation regulation and induction of apoptosis through histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. HTD effectively reduced edema, angiogenesis and skin lesion. HTD also increased the levels of liver X receptor (LXR) and filaggrin but decreased the level of protein kinase C (PKC) (p<0.01). The levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, signal transducer and activator of transcription-6 (STAT-6) and Cluster of differentiation 40 (CD40) were significantly reduced in the HTD treated group (p<0.01). HTD also suppressed the mast cell degranulation and the level of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcɛRI), substance P, Matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) (p<0.01). The levels of inflammatory factors such as nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) p65, phosphorylated IκB (p-IκB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were also decreased (p<0.01). Apoptosis of inflammatory cells was also found to increase (p<0.01). Our results indicate that HTD effectively regulate the Th2 differentiation, mast cell activation and

  10. Effect of Standardized Boesenbergia pandurata Extract and Its Active Compound Panduratin A on Skin Hydration and Barrier Function in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seon Wook; Rhim, Dong-Bin; Kim, Changhee; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2015-03-01

    The skin plays a key role in protecting the body from the environment and from water loss. Cornified envelope (CE) and natural moisturizing factor (NMF) are considered as the primary regulators of skin hydration and barrier function. The CE prevents loss of water from the body and is formed by cross-linking of several proteins. Among these proteins, filaggrin is an important protein because NMF is produced by the degradation of filaggrin. Proteases, including matriptase and prostasin, stimulate the generation of filaggrin from profilaggrin and caspase-14 plays a role in the degradation of filaggrin. This study elucidated the effects of an ethanol extract of Boesenbergia pandurata (Roxb.) Schltr., known as fingerroot, and its active compound panduratin A on CE formation and filaggrin processing in HaCaT, human epidermal keratinocytes. B. pandurata extract (BPE) and panduratin A significantly stimulated not only CE formation but also the expression of CE proteins, such as loricrin, involucrin, and transglutaminase, which were associated with PPARα expression. The mRNA and protein levels of filaggrin and filaggrin-related enzymes, such as matriptase, prostasin, and caspase-14 were also up-regulated by BPE and panduratin A treatment. These results suggest that BPE and panduratin A are potential nutraceuticals which can enhance skin hydration and barrier function based on their CE formation and filaggrin processing.

  11. Pilot Study to Evaluate the Effect of Topical Dimethicone on Clinical Signs and Skin Barrier Function in Dogs with Naturally Occurring Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pellicoro, C.; Marsella, R.; Ahrens, K.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a skin protectant solution (dimethicone 2%) on clinical signs and skin barrier function in canine atopic dermatitis (AD). Eighteen dogs with AD were randomly divided into two groups, one received dimethicone and the other received the vehicle (cyclomethicone) on selected areas (pinnae, groin, and axillae) daily for 4 weeks. Owners and investigators were blinded regarding group allocation. Clinical efficacy was evaluated using a scoring system and skin barrier by measuring the transepidermal water loss. Twelve dogs completed the study (50% drop rate in the vehicle and 20% in the dimethicone). For clinical signs, analysis of variance showed an effect of time (P < 0.005; day 0 > day 28) and region (axillae < groin < pinnae) but no effect of group or group × time interaction. For transepidermal water loss, analysis of variance showed only a main effect of region (axillae > pinnae > groin). Pearson found no correlation between transepidermal water loss and clinical scores. In this pilot study dimethicone had no significant effect on clinical signs and transepidermal water loss in canine atopic dermatitis. PMID:23710417

  12. Noninvasive penetration of 5 nm hyaluronic acid molecules across the epidermal barrier (in vitro) and its interaction with human skin cells.

    PubMed

    Nashchekina, Yu A; Raydan, M

    2018-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid represents one of the major components of the extracellular environment. The main challenge remains in the ability to deliver these molecules noninvasively across the skin barrier, which can be overcome by the reduction in size to an extent that allows these molecules to pass across the skin barrier. The aim of this study was to measure the penetration and bioavailability of low molecular weight hyaluronic acid to cross an epidermal barrier model. Determining the quantity of hyaluronic acid in the test solutions was carried with method of photocolorimetry analysis. Investigation of the interaction of cells with LMWHA was studied with a confocal microscope. The study showed that LMWHA is able to cross the epidermis. Most effective penetration level is during the first 6 hours reaching 75%, and then the concentration started to decline and reached the equilibrium state within the following 2 hours. Confocal laser microscopy demonstrated different distribution and behavior of these molecules among the keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Reducing the size of hyaluronic acid to 5 nm enhance their transport across the epidermal layer. The concentration of hyaluronic acid molecules was higher on the fibroblast surface in comparison to their extracellular environment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Alteration of skin hydration and its barrier function by vehicle and permeation enhancers: a study using TGA, FTIR, TEWL and drug permeation as markers.

    PubMed

    Shah, D K; Khandavilli, S; Panchagnula, R

    2008-09-01

    Vehicles and permeation enhancers (PEs) used in transdermal drug delivery (TDD) of a drug can affect skin hydration, integrity and permeation of the solute administered. This investigation was designed to study the effect of the most commonly used vehicles and PEs on rat skin hydration, barrier function and permeation of an amphiphilic drug, imipramine hydrochloride (IMH). An array of well-established techniques were used to confirm the findings of the study. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to determine changes in skin hydration. Alteration of the stratum corneum (SC) structure was investigated using FTIR studies. To monitor the barrier function alteration, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurement and permeation studies were performed. Our findings indicate that with hydration, there was an increase in the bound water content of the skin, and pseudoequilibrium of hydration (a drastic decrease in hydration rate) was achieved at around 12 h. Hydration increased the ratio between amide-I and amide-II peaks in FTIR and reduced the C-H stretching peak area. Both propylene glycol (PG) and ethanol (EtOH) dehydrated skin, with the latter showing a predominant effect. Furthermore, it was confirmed that PG and EtOH decreased the bound water content due to alteration in the protein domains and extraction of SC lipids, respectively. The effect of hydration on the SC was found to be similar to that reported for temperature. Permeation studies revealed that the dehydration caused by vehicles decreased IMH flux, whereas the flux was enhanced by PEs. The role of partition was predominant for the permeation of IMH through dehydrated skin. A synergistic effect was observed for PG and menthol in the enhancement of IMH. Further findings provided strong evidence that PG affects protein domains and EtOH extracts lipids from the bilayer. Both PG and EtOH, with or without PEs, increased TEWL. Initial TEWL was well

  14. Antidiabetic drugs restore abnormal transport of amyloid-β across the blood-brain barrier and memory impairment in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Dong, Rong Rong; Zhong, Kai Long; Ghosh, Arijit; Tang, Su Su; Long, Yan; Hu, Mei; Miao, Ming Xing; Liao, Jian Min; Sun, Hong Bing; Kong, Ling Yi; Hong, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies have shown significant changes in amyloid-β (Aβ) transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) under diabetic conditions with hypoinsulinemia, which is involved in diabetes-associated cognitive impairment. Present study employed db/db mice with hyperinsulinemia to investigate changes in Aβ transport across the BBB, hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and restorative effects of antidiabetic drugs. Our results showed that db/db mice exhibited similar changes in Aβ transport across the BBB to that of insulin-deficient mice. Chronic treatment of db/db mice with antidiabetic drugs such as metformin, glibenclamide and insulin glargine significantly decreased Aβ influx across the BBB determined by intra-arterial infusion of (125)I-Aβ(1-40), and expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) participating in Aβ influx. Insulin glargine, but not, metformin or glibenclamide increased Aβ efflux across the BBB determined by stereotaxic intra-cerebral infusion of (125)I-Aβ(1-40), and expression of the low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 1 (LRP1) participating in Aβ efflux. Moreover, treatment with these drugs significantly decreased hippocampal Aβ(1-40) or Aβ(1-42) and inhibited neuronal apoptosis. The drugs also ameliorated memory impairment confirmed by improved performance on behavioral tasks. However, insulin glargine or glibenclamide, but not metformin, restored hippocampal synaptic plasticity characterized by enhancing in vivo long-term potentiation (LTP). Further study found that these three drugs significantly restrained NF-κB, but only insulin glargine enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) activity at the BBB in db/db mice. Our data indicate that the antidiabetic drugs can partially restore abnormal Aβ transport across the BBB and memory impairment under diabetic context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Stages of Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of skin biopsies: Shave biopsy : A sterile razor blade is used to “shave-off” the abnormal-looking ... the surface of the skin with a small blade. Electrodesiccation and curettage : The tumor is cut from ...

  16. Skin Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... of skin biopsies: Shave biopsy : A sterile razor blade is used to “shave-off” the abnormal-looking ... the surface of the skin with a small blade. Electrodesiccation and curettage : The tumor is cut from ...

  17. The pH of the main Brazilian commercial moisturizers and liquid soaps: considerations on the repair of the skin barrier*

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Giovana M; Brianezi, Gabrielli; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2017-01-01

    The pH of the skin is slightly acidic (4.6 to 5.8) which is important for appropriate antibacterial, antifungal, constitution of barrier function, as well as structuring and maturation of the stratum corneum. This study aimed to evaluate the pH of the main commercial moisturizers and liquid soaps in Brazil. Thus, pH of the products was quantified by pH meter in three measurements. A total of 38 moisturizers and six commercial liquid soaps were evaluated. Mean pH of 63% and 50% of the moisturizing and liquid soaps presented results above 5.5, disfavoring repair, function, and synthesis of dermal barrier. PMID:29166523

  18. The pH of the main Brazilian commercial moisturizers and liquid soaps: considerations on the repair of the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Giovana M; Brianezi, Gabrielli; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2017-01-01

    The pH of the skin is slightly acidic (4.6 to 5.8) which is important for appropriate antibacterial, antifungal, constitution of barrier function, as well as structuring and maturation of the stratum corneum. This study aimed to evaluate the pH of the main commercial moisturizers and liquid soaps in Brazil. Thus, pH of the products was quantified by pH meter in three measurements. A total of 38 moisturizers and six commercial liquid soaps were evaluated. Mean pH of 63% and 50% of the moisturizing and liquid soaps presented results above 5.5, disfavoring repair, function, and synthesis of dermal barrier.

  19. Skin graft - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100100.htm Skin graft - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... entire body, and acts as a protective barrier. Skin grafts may be recommended for: Extensive wounds Burns Specific ...

  20. Effects of Hydroxydecine(®) (10-hydroxy-2-decenoic acid) on skin barrier structure and function in vitro and clinical efficacy in the treatment of UV-induced xerosis.

    PubMed

    Duplan, Hélène; Questel, Emmanuel; Hernandez-Pigeon, Hélène; Galliano, Marie Florence; Caruana, Antony; Ceruti, Isabelle; Ambonati, Marco; Mejean, Carine; Damour, Odile; Castex-Rizzi, Nathalie; Bessou-Touya, Sandrine; Schmitt, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    10-Hydroxy-2-decenoic acid, a natural fatty acid only found in royal jelly, may be of value in correcting skin barrier dysfunction. We evaluated the activity of Hydroxydecine(®), its synthetic counterpart, in vitro on the regulation of epidermal differentiation markers, ex vivo on the inflammatory response and restoration of skin barrier function, and in vivo on UV-induced xerosis in healthy human volunteers. In cultured normal human keratinocytes, Hydroxydecine(®) induced involucrin, transglutaminase-1 and filaggrin protein production. In topically Hydroxydecine(®)-treated skin equivalents, immunohistochemical analysis revealed an increase in involucrin, transglutaminase-1 and filaggrin staining. In a model of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP)-induced inflamed epidermis, a Hydroxydecine(®)-containing emulsion inhibited TSLP release. In a model of inflammation and barrier impairment involving human skin explants maintained alive, Hydroxydecine(®) balm restored stratum corneum cohesion and significantly increased filaggrin expression, as shown by immunohistochemistry. It also decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13). In healthy volunteers with UV-induced xerosis, the hydration index increased by +28.8% (p<0.01) and +60.4% (p<0.001) after 7 and 21 days of treatment with Hydroxydecine(®) cream, respectively. Hydroxydecine(®) thus proved its efficacy in activating keratinocyte differentiation processes in vitro, restoring skin barrier function and reducing inflammation ex vivo, and hydrating dry skin in vivo.

  1. Characterization of skin abnormalities in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta using high resolution magnetic resonance imaging and Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Canuto, H C; Fishbein, K W; Huang, A; Doty, S B; Herbert, R A; Peckham, J; Pleshko, N; Spencer, R G

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation of the skin phenotype in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) typically involves biochemical measurements, such as histologic or biochemical assessment of the collagen produced from biopsy-derived dermal fibroblasts. As an alternative, the current study utilized non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) microscopy and optical spectroscopy to define biophysical characteristics of skin in an animal model of OI. MRI of skin harvested from control, homozygous oim/oim and heterozygous oim/+ mice demonstrated several differences in anatomic and biophysical properties. Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) was used to interpret observed MRI signal characteristics in terms of chemical composition. Differences between wild-type and OI mouse skin included the appearance of a collagen-depleted lower dermal layer containing prominent hair follicles in the oim/oim mice, accounting for 55% of skin thickness in these. The MRI magnetization transfer rate was lower by 50% in this layer as compared to the upper dermis, consistent with lower collagen content. The MRI transverse relaxation time, T2, was greater by 30% in the dermis of the oim/oim mice compared to controls, consistent with a more highly hydrated collagen network. Similarly, an FT-IRIS-defined measure of collagen integrity was 30% lower in the oim/oim mice. We conclude that characterization of phenotypic differences between the skin of OI and wild-type mice by MRI and FT-IRIS is feasible, and that these techniques provide powerful complementary approaches for the analysis of the skin phenotype in animal models of disease. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Mathematical models to describe iontophoretic transport in vitro and in vivo and the effect of current application on the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Gratieri, Taís; Kalia, Yogeshvar N

    2013-02-01

    The architecture and composition of the stratum corneum make it a particularly effective barrier against the topical and transdermal delivery of hydrophilic molecules and ions. As a result, different strategies have been explored in order to expand the range of therapeutic agents that can be administered by this route. Iontophoresis involves the application of a small electric potential to increase transport into and across the skin. Since current flow is preferentially via transport pathways with at least some aqueous character, it is ideal for hydrosoluble molecules containing ionisable groups. Hence, the physicochemical properties that limit partitioning and passive diffusion through the intercellular lipid matrix are beneficial for electrically-assisted delivery. The presence of fixed ionisable groups in the skin (pI 4-4.5) means that application of the electric field results in a convective solvent flow (i.e., electroosmosis) in the direction of ion motion so as to neutralise membrane charge. Hence, under physiological conditions, cation electrotransport is due to both electromigration and electroosmosis-their relative contribution depends on the formulation conditions and the physicochemical properties of the permeant. Different mathematical models have been developed to provide a theoretical framework in order to explain iontophoretic transport kinetics. They usually involve solutions of the Nernst-Planck equation - using either the constant field (Goldman) or electroneutrality (Nernst) approximations - with or without terms for the convective solvent flow component. Investigations have also attempted to elucidate the nature of ion transport pathways and to explain the effect of current application on the electrical properties of the skin-more specifically, the stratum corneum. These studies have led to the development of different equivalent circuit models. These range from simple parallel arrangements of a resistor and a capacitor to the inclusion of the

  3. A novel, topical, nonsteroidal, TRPV1 antagonist, PAC-14028 cream improves skin barrier function and exerts anti-inflammatory action through modulating epidermal differentiation markers and suppressing Th2 cytokines in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hae; Choi, Chang Soon; Bae, Il-Hong; Choi, Jin Kyu; Park, Young-Ho; Park, Miyoung

    2018-04-30

    Although it is established that epidermal barrier disturbance and immune dysfunction resulting in IgE sensitization are critical factors in the development of cutaneous inflammation, the pathogenesis and targeted therapy of atopic dermatitis (AD)-specific pathways have still been unknown. Taking into account the fact that Th2 cytokines in AD have both unique and overlapping functions including increased epidermal thickening, inflammation, and decreased expressing of the barrier proteins keratinocyte differentiation, we sought to clarify our hypothesis that TRPV1 antagonist plays a critical role in skin barrier function and can be a therapeutic target for AD. AD-like dermatitis was induced in hairless mice by repeated oxazolone (Ox) challenges to hairless mice. The functional studies concerning skin barrier function, anti-inflammatory action, and molecular mechanism by TRPV1 antagonism were conducted by histopathological assays, ELISA, qPCR, western blotting, and skin blood flow measurement. Topically administered TRPV1 antagonist, PAC-14028 (Asivatrep: C 21 H 22 F 5 N 3 O 3 S), improved AD-like dermatitis and skin barrier functions, and restored the expression of epidermal differentiation markers. In addition, the PAC-14028 cream significantly inhibited cutaneous inflammation by decreasing the expression of serum IgE, and the epidermal expression of IL-4, and IL-13 in Ox-AD mice. These results may provide a novel insight into the molecular mechanism of PAC-14028 cream involved in anti-inflammatory effects and skin barrier functions by suppressing the multiple signaling pathways including IL-4/-13-mediated activation of JAK/STAT, TRPV1, and neuropeptides. PAC-14028 cream can be a potential therapeutic tool for the treatment of chronic inflammation and disrupted barrier function in patients with AD. Copyright © 2018 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Epirubicin-loaded superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles for transdermal delivery: cancer therapy by circumventing the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yue-feng; Chen, Wei; Liang, Xing-guang; Huang, Yong-zhuo; Miao, Jing; Liu, Lin; Lou, Yan; Zhang, Xing-guo; Wang, Ben; Tang, Rui-kang; Chen, Zhong; Lu, Xiao-yang

    2015-01-14

    The transdermal administration of chemotherapeutic agents is a persistent challenge for tumor treatments. A model anticancer agent, epirubicin (EPI), is attached to functionalized superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPION). The covalent modification of the SPION results in EPI-SPION, a potential drug delivery vector that uses magnetism for the targeted transdermal chemotherapy of skin tumors. The spherical EPI-SPION composite exhibits excellent magnetic responsiveness with a saturation magnetization intensity of 77.8 emu g(-1) . They feature specific pH-sensitive drug release, targeting the acidic microenvironment typical in common tumor tissues or endosomes/lysosomes. Cellular uptake studies using human keratinocyte HaCaT cells and melanoma WM266 cells demonstrate that SPION have good biocompatibility. After conjugation with EPI, the nanoparticles can inhibit WM266 cell proliferation; its inhibitory effect on tumor proliferation is determined to be dose-dependent. In vitro transdermal studies demonstrate that the EPI-SPION composites can penetrate deep inside the skin driven by an external magnetic field. The magnetic-field-assisted SPION transdermal vector can circumvent the stratum corneum via follicular pathways. The study indicates the potential of a SPION-based vector for feasible transdermal therapy of skin cancer. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. The effect of a combination of 0.1% octenidine dihydrochloride and 2% 2-phenoxyethanol (octenisept) on wound healing in pigs in vivo and its in vitro percutaneous permeation through intact and barrier disrupted porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Jessica; Braun, Michael; Siebert, Joerg; Kietzmann, Manfred

    2010-02-01

    A combination of 0.1% octenidine dihydrochloride and 2% 2-phenoxyethanol (octenisept) is a commonly used disinfectant in human medicine. As porcine skin represents an adequate model for human skin, the effect of octenidine dihydrochloride and phenoxyethanol on wound healing is studied in pigs. Furthermore, the in vitro percutaneous permeation of the test substances is studied. The impact of the test formulations on wound healing is examined (A) under non occlusive conditions and (B) in comparison to another disinfectant based on povidone-iodine under occlusive conditions, while wounds are treated daily with the test substances. The percutaneous permeation of octenidine dihydrochloride and phenoxyethanol is studied in Franz-type diffusion cells with intact skin as well as barrier disrupted after tape stripping. Compared with povidone-iodine or vehicle treatment as well as untreated control wounds the treatment of wounds with the test formulation has no influence on the healing rate in pigs and does not induce retardation of wound healing. The in vitro diffusion experiment reveals that octenidine dihydrochloride is only detectable in the acceptor chamber of three-barrier disrupted skin samples. Phenoxyethanol permeates through intact porcine skin in amounts of 11.3% and through barrier disrupted skin in amounts of 43.9%

  6. Drug Delivery Through the Skin: Molecular Simulations of Barrier Lipids to Design more Effective Noninvasive Dermal and Transdermal Delivery Systems for Small Molecules Biologics and Cosmetics

    SciTech Connect

    J Torin Huzil; S Sivaloganathan; M Kohandel

    The delivery of drugs through the skin provides a convenient route of administration that is often preferable to injection because it is noninvasive and can typically be self-administered. These two factors alone result in a significant reduction of medical complications and improvement in patient compliance. Unfortunately, a significant obstacle to dermal and transdermal drug delivery alike is the resilient barrier that the epidermal layers of the skin, primarily the stratum corneum, presents for the diffusion of exogenous chemical agents. Further advancement of transdermal drug delivery requires the development of novel delivery systems that are suitable for modern, macromolecular protein andmore » nucleotide therapeutic agents. Significant effort has already been devoted to obtain a functional understanding of the physical barrier properties imparted by the epidermis, specifically the membrane structures of the stratum corneum. However, structural observations of membrane systems are often hindered by low resolutions, making it difficult to resolve the molecular mechanisms related to interactions between lipids found within the stratum corneum. Several models describing the molecular diffusion of drug molecules through the stratum corneum have now been postulated, where chemical permeation enhancers are thought to disrupt the underlying lipid structure, resulting in enhanced permeability. Recent investigations using biphasic vesicles also suggested a possibility for novel mechanisms involving the formation of complex polymorphic lipid phases. In this review, we discuss the advantages and limitations of permeation-enhancing strategies and how computational simulations, at the atomic scale, coupled with physical observations can provide insight into the mechanisms of diffusion through the stratum corneum.« less

  7. Barrier function and microbiotic dysbiosis in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Seite, Sophie; Bieber, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) or atopic eczema is the common inflammatory skin disorder, the prevalence of which has considerably increased during the last 30 years. It affects 15%–30% of children and 2%–10% of adults. AD characteristically alternates between periods of exacerbation or flares and periods of remission, which may be therapeutically induced or spontaneous. Current knowledge about AD includes abnormalities of the skin barrier (physical and chemical), the immune barrier, and more recently, the microbial barrier or microbiota. There is growing evidence for a tight relationship between them. To obtain satisfactory control of this condition, the clinical strategy to manage AD involves prescribing both anti-inflammatory medications and dermocosmetic products. The role of the physician is therefore to advise the patient with regard to hygiene measures aimed to help to improve these three barriers or to prevent any further deterioration. PMID:26396539

  8. Skin Barrier Function and Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in Vestibulum Nasi and Fauces in Healthy Infants and Infants with Eczema: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Berents, Teresa Løvold; Carlsen, Karin Cecilie Lødrup; Mowinckel, Petter; Skjerven, Håvard Ove; Kvenshagen, Bente; Rolfsjord, Leif Bjarte; Bradley, Maria; Lieden, Agne; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Gaustad, Peter; Gjersvik, Petter

    2015-01-01

    Atopic eczema (AE) is associated with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) colonization and skin barrier dysfunction, often measured by increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL). In the present study, the primary aim was to see whether S. aureus colonization in the vestibulum nasi and/or fauces was associated with increased TEWL in infants with healthy skin and infants with eczema. Secondarily, we aimed to investigate whether TEWL measurements on non-lesional skin on the lateral upper arm is equivalent to volar forearm in infants. In 167 of 240 infants, recruited from the general population, TEWL measurements on the lateral upper arm and volar forearm, using a DermaLab USB, fulfilled our environmental requirements. The mean of three TEWL measurements from each site was used for analysis. The infants were diagnosed with no eczema (n = 110), possible AE (n = 28) or AE (n = 29). DNA samples were analysed for mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG). Bacterial cultures were reported positive with the identification of at least one culture with S. aureus from vestibulum nasi and/or fauces. S. aureus colonization, found in 89 infants (53%), was not associated with increased TEWL (i.e. TEWL in the upper quartile), neither on the lateral upper arm or volar forearm (p = 0.08 and p = 0.98, respectively), nor with AE (p = 0.10) or FLG mutation (p = 0.17). TEWL was significantly higher on both measuring sites in infants with AE compared to infants with possible AE and no eczema. FLG mutation was significantly associated with increased TEWL, with a 47% difference in TEWL. We conclude that S. aureus in vestibulum nasi and/or fauces was not associated with TEWL, whereas TEWL measurements on the lateral upper arm and volar forearm appear equally appropriate in infants.

  9. A Paired, Double-Blind, Randomized Comparison of a Moisturizing Durable Barrier Cream to 10% Glycerine Cream in the Prophylactic Management of Postmastectomy Irradiation Skin Care: Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 04.01

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Peter H., E-mail: peter.graham@sesiahs.health.nsw.gov.au; Plant, Natalie; Graham, Jennifer L.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A previous, unblinded study demonstrated that an alcohol-free barrier film containing an acrylate terpolymer (ATP) was effective in reducing skin reactions compared with a 10% glycerine cream (sorbolene). The different appearances of these products precluded a blinded comparison. To test the acrylate terpolymer principle in a double-blinded manner required the use of an alternative cream formulation, a moisturizing durable barrier cream (MDBC); the study was conducted by the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) as protocol 04.01. Methods and Materials: A total of 333 patients were randomized; 1 patient was ineligible and 14 patients withdrew or had less thanmore » 7 weeks' observations, leaving 318 for analysis. The chest wall was divided into medial and lateral compartments, and patients were randomized to have MDBC applied daily to the medial or lateral compartment and sorbolene to the other compartment. Weekly observations, photographs, and symptom scores (pain and pruritus) were collected to week 12 or resolution of skin reactions if earlier. Skin dose was confirmed by centrally calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters. Results: Rates of medial and lateral compartment Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), version 3, greater than or equal to grade 3 skin reactions were 23% and 41%, but rates by skin care product were identical at 32%. There was no significant difference between MDBC and sorbolene in the primary endpoint of peak skin reactions or secondary endpoints of area-under-the-curve skin reaction scores. Conclusions: The MDBC did not reduce the peak skin reaction compared to sorbolene. It is possible that this is related to the difference in the formulation of the cream compared with the film formulation. Skin dosimetry verification and double blinding are essential for radiation skin care comparative studies.« less

  10. The skin barrier function gene SPINK5 is associated with challenge-proven IgE-mediated food allergy in infants.

    PubMed

    Ashley, S E; Tan, H-T T; Vuillermin, P; Dharmage, S C; Tang, M L K; Koplin, J; Gurrin, L C; Lowe, A; Lodge, C; Ponsonby, A-L; Molloy, J; Martin, P; Matheson, M C; Saffery, R; Allen, K J; Ellis, J A; Martino, D

    2017-09-01

    A defective skin barrier is hypothesized to be an important route of sensitization to dietary antigens and may lead to food allergy in some children. Missense mutations in the serine peptidase inhibitor Kazal type 5 (SPINK5) skin barrier gene have previously been associated with allergic conditions. To determine whether genetic variants in and around SPINK5 are associated with IgE-mediated food allergy. We genotyped 71 "tag" single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag-SNPs) within a region spanning ~263 kb including SPINK5 (~61 kb) in n=722 (n=367 food-allergic, n=199 food-sensitized-tolerant and n=156 non-food-allergic controls) 12-month-old infants (discovery sample) phenotyped for food allergy with the gold standard oral food challenge. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measures were collected at 12 months from a subset (n=150) of these individuals. SNPs were tested for association with food allergy using the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test adjusting for ancestry strata. Association analyses were replicated in an independent sample group derived from four paediatric cohorts, total n=533 (n=203 food-allergic, n=330 non-food-allergic), mean age 2.5 years, with food allergy defined by either clinical history of reactivity, 95% positive predictive value (PPV) or challenge, corrected for ancestry by principal components. SPINK5 variant rs9325071 (A⟶G) was associated with challenge-proven food allergy in the discovery sample (P=.001, OR=2.95, CI=1.49-5.83). This association was further supported by replication (P=.007, OR=1.58, CI=1.13-2.20) and by meta-analysis (P=.0004, OR=1.65). Variant rs9325071 is associated with decreased SPINK5 gene expression in the skin in publicly available genotype-tissue expression data, and we generated preliminary evidence for association of this SNP with elevated TEWL also. We report, for the first time, association between SPINK5 variant rs9325071 and challenge-proven IgE-mediated food allergy. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A

  11. Filaggrin 2 deficiency results in abnormal cell-cell adhesion in the cornified cell layers and causes peeling skin syndrome type A.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Janan; Sarig, Ofer; Godsel, Lisa M; Peled, Alon; Malchin, Natalia; Bochner, Ron; Vodo, Dan; Rabinowitz, Tom; Pavlovsky, Mor; Taiber, Shahar; Fried, Maya; Eskin-Schwartz, Marina; Assi, Siwar; Shomron, Noam; Uitto, Jouni; Koetsier, Jennifer L; Bergman, Reuven; Green, Kathleen J; Sprecher, Eli

    2018-05-11

    Peeling skin syndromes form a large and heterogeneous group of inherited disorders characterized by superficial detachment of the epidermal cornified cell layers, often associated with inflammatory features. Here we report on a consanguineous family featuring non-inflammatory peeling of the skin exacerbated by exposure to heat and mechanical stress. Whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation in FLG2, encoding filaggrin 2, which co-segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. The mutation was found to result in decreased FLG2 RNA levels as well almost total absence of filaggrin 2 in the patient epidermis. Filaggrin 2 was found to be expressed throughout the cornified cell layers and to co-localize with corneodesmosin which plays a crucial role in maintaining cell-cell adhesion in this region of the epidermis. Absence of filaggrin 2 in the patient skin was associated with markedly decreased corneodesmosin expression, which may contribute to the peeling phenotype displayed by the patients. Accordingly, using the dispase dissociation assay, we showed that FLG2 down-regulation interferes with keratinocyte cell-cell adhesion. Of particular interest, this effect was aggravated by temperature elevation, consistent with the clinical phenotype. Restoration of CDSN levels by ectopic expression rescued cell-cell adhesion.Taken together, the present data suggest that filaggrin 2 is essential for normal cell-cell adhesion in the cornified cell layers. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Abnormal ultraviolet mutagenic spectrum in plasmid DNA replicated in cultured fibroblasts from a patient with the skin cancer-prone disease, xeroderma pigmentosum

    SciTech Connect

    Seetharam, S.; Protic-Sabljic, M.; Seidman, M.M.

    1987-12-01

    A shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, was utilized to assess the types of mutations that cells from a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group D, introduce into ultraviolet (UV) damaged, replicating DNA. Patients with xeroderma pigmentosum have clinical and cellular UV hypersensitivity, increased frequency of sun-induced skin cancer, and deficient DNA repair. In comparison to UV-treated pZ189 replicated in DNA repair-proficient cells, there were fewer surviving plasmids, a higher frequency of plasmids with mutations, fewer plasmids with two or more mutations in the marker gene, and a new mutagenic hotspot. The major type of base substitution mutation was the G:C tomore » A:T transition with both cell lines. These results, together with similar findings published earlier with cells from a xeroderma pigmentosum patient in complementation group A, suggest that isolated G:C to A:T somatic mutations may be particularly important in generation of human skin cancer by UV radiation.« less

  13. Pericentric inversion of chromosome 11 (p14.3q21) associated with developmental delays, hypopigmented skin lesions and abnormal brain MRI findings - a new case report

    SciTech Connect

    Zachor, D.A.; Lofton, M.

    1994-09-01

    We report 3 year old male, referred for evaluation of developmental delays. Pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios, proteinuria and prematurity. Medical history revealed: bilateral inguinal hernia, small scrotal sac, undescended testes, developmental delays and behavioral problems. The child had: microcephaly, facial dysmorphic features, single palmar creases, hypopigmented skin lesions of variable size, intermittent exotropia and small retracted testes. Neurological examination was normal. Cognitive level was at the average range with mild delay in his adaptive behavior. Expressive language delays and severe articulation disorder were noted, as well as clumsiness, poor control and precision of gross and fine motor skills. Chromosomalmore » analysis of peripheral leukocytes indicated that one of the number 11 chromosomes had undergone a pericentric inversion with breakpoints on the short (p) arm at band p14.3 and the long (q) arm at band q21. An MRI of the brain showed mild delay in myelinization pattern of white matter. Chromosome 11 inversion in other sites was associated with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and several malignancies. To our knowledge this is the first description of inv(11)(p14.3q21) that is associated with microcephaly, dysmorphic features, hypopigmented skin lesions and speech delay. This inversion may disrupt the expression of the involved genes. However, additional cases with the same cytogenetic anomaly are needed to explore the phenotypic significance of this disorder.« less

  14. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Scalded skin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection. IV fluids are also given to prevent dehydration. Much of the body's fluid is lost through open skin. Moist compresses ... result include: Abnormal level of fluids in the body causing ... or electrolyte imbalance Poor temperature control (in young ...

  16. Alzheimer disease in a mouse model: MR imaging-guided focused ultrasound targeted to the hippocampus opens the blood-brain barrier and improves pathologic abnormalities and behavior.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Alison; Dubey, Sonam; Yeung, Sharon; Hough, Olivia; Eterman, Naomi; Aubert, Isabelle; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-12-01

    To validate whether repeated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided focused ultrasound treatments targeted to the hippocampus, a brain structure relevant for Alzheimer disease ( AD Alzheimer disease ), could modulate pathologic abnormalities, plasticity, and behavior in a mouse model. All animal procedures were approved by the Animal Care Committee and are in accordance with the Canadian Council on Animal Care. Seven-month-old transgenic (TgCRND8) (Tg) mice and their nontransgenic (non-Tg) littermates were entered in the study. Mice were treated weekly with MR imaging-guided focused ultrasound in the bilateral hippocampus (1.68 MHz, 10-msec bursts, 1-Hz burst repetition frequency, 120-second total duration). After 1 month, spatial memory was tested in the Y maze with the novel arm prior to sacrifice and immunohistochemical analysis. The data were compared by using unpaired t tests and analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc analysis. Untreated Tg mice spent 61% less time than untreated non-Tg mice exploring the novel arm of the Y maze because of spatial memory impairments (P < .05). Following MR imaging-guided focused ultrasound, Tg mice spent 99% more time exploring the novel arm, performing as well as their non-Tg littermates. Changes in behavior were correlated with a reduction of the number and size of amyloid plaques in the MR imaging-guided focused ultrasound-treated animals (P < .01). Further, after MR imaging-guided focused ultrasound treatment, there was a 250% increase in the number of newborn neurons in the hippocampus (P < .01). The newborn neurons had longer dendrites and more arborization after MR imaging-guided focused ultrasound, as well (P < .01). Repeated MR imaging-guided focused ultrasound treatments led to spatial memory improvement in a Tg mouse model of AD Alzheimer disease . The behavior changes may be mediated by decreased amyloid pathologic abnormalities and increased neuronal plasticity. © RSNA, 2014.

  17. A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effect of a new skincare regimen on skin barrier function in those with podoconiosis in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J; Ersser, S J; Cowdell, F; Gardiner, E; Mengistu, A; Matts, P J

    2017-11-01

    Podoconiosis affects an estimated 3 million people in Ethiopia with a further 19 million at risk. Volcanic soil and pathogens enter skin breaches in the feet causing inflammation, lymphoedema and hyperkeratosis. There is no robust evidence on optimal podoconiosis skincare regimens to improve skin barrier function (SBF). To evaluate the effectiveness of a new, low-cost, evidence-based intervention to improve SBF in the lower limbs of those with podoconiosis. A randomized controlled trial (NCT02839772) was conducted over 3 months in two podoconiosis clinics (n = 193). The intervention comprised 2% (v/v) glycerine added to a reduced volume of soaking water. The control group received the current skincare regimen. Primary outcome measures were transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and stratum corneum hydration (SCH) at four specific sites on the lower limbs. Improvement in SBF was observed in both groups across all measurement sites and time points, although this was significantly greater in the experimental group. TEWL reduced in both groups at all sites. For example, on top of the foot the estimated group difference in TEWL at visit 4 was 1·751 [standard error (SE) = 0·0390] in favour of the experimental group [t = 3·15, degrees of freedom (df) = 189·58, P = 0·002, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·066-2·85], indicating a greater reduction in TEWL in the experimental group. Similarly, at the same site the estimated group difference in SCH at visit 4 was -2·041 (SE = 0·572) in favour of the experimental group (t = -3·56, df = 186·74, P < 0·001, 95% CI -3·16 to -0·91), indicating a greater increase in SCH in the experimental group. There were also significantly greater reductions in odour, number of wounds and largest foot circumference in the experimental vs. the control group. The addition of 2% (v/v) glycerol to a reduced volume (83% reduction) of soaking water significantly improved SBF. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  18. Efficacy of IPL device combined with intralesional corticosteroid injection for the treatment of keloids and hypertrophic scars with regards to the recovery of skin barrier function: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Young; Park, Hyun Sun; Yoon, Hyun-Sun; Cho, Soyun

    2015-10-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are prevalent and psychologically distressful dermatologic conditions. Various treatment modalities have been tried but without complete success by any one method. We evaluated the efficacy of a combination of intense pulsed light (IPL) device and intralesional corticosteroid injection for the treatment of keloids and hypertrophic scars with respect to the recovery of skin barrier function. Totally 52 Korean patients were treated by the combined treatment at 4-8-week intervals. Using digital photographs, changes in scar appearance were assessed with modified Vancouver Scar Scale (MVSS), physicians' global assessment (PGA) and patient's satisfaction score. In 12 patients, the stratum corneum (SC) barrier function was assessed by measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and SC capacitance. Most scars demonstrated significant clinical improvement in MVSS, PGA and patient's satisfaction score after the combined therapy. A significant decrease of TEWL and elevation of SC capacitance were also documented after the treatment. The combination therapy (IPL + corticosteroid injection) not only improves the appearance of keloids and hypertrophic scars but also increases the recovery level of skin hydration status in terms of the skin barrier function.

  19. Quantifying rates of cell migration and cell proliferation in co-culture barrier assays reveals how skin and melanoma cells interact during melanoma spreading and invasion.

    PubMed

    Haridas, Parvathi; Penington, Catherine J; McGovern, Jacqui A; McElwain, D L Sean; Simpson, Matthew J

    2017-06-21

    Malignant spreading involves the migration of cancer cells amongst other native cell types. For example, in vivo melanoma invasion involves individual melanoma cells migrating through native skin, which is composed of several distinct subpopulations of cells. Here, we aim to quantify how interactions between melanoma and fibroblast cells affect the collective spreading of a heterogeneous population of these cells in vitro. We perform a suite of circular barrier assays that includes: (i) monoculture assays with fibroblast cells; (ii) monoculture assays with SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells; and (iii) a series of co-culture assays initiated with three different ratios of SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells and fibroblast cells. Using immunostaining, detailed cell density histograms are constructed to illustrate how the two subpopulations of cells are spatially arranged within the spreading heterogeneous population. Calibrating the solution of a continuum partial differential equation to the experimental results from the monoculture assays allows us to estimate the cell diffusivity and the cell proliferation rate for the melanoma and the fibroblast cells, separately. Using the parameter estimates from the monoculture assays, we then make a prediction of the spatial spreading in the co-culture assays. Results show that the parameter estimates obtained from the monoculture assays lead to a reasonably accurate prediction of the spatial arrangement of the two subpopulations in the co-culture assays. Overall, the spatial pattern of spreading of the melanoma cells and the fibroblast cells is very similar in monoculture and co-culture conditions. Therefore, we find no clear evidence of any interactions other than cell-to-cell contact and crowding effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The 24-hour skin hydration and barrier function effects of a hyaluronic 1%, glycerin 5%, and Centella asiatica stem cells extract moisturizing fluid: an intra-subject, randomized, assessor-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Milani, Massimo; Sparavigna, Adele

    2017-01-01

    Moisturizing products are commonly used to improve hydration in skin dryness conditions. However, some topical hydrating products could have negative effects on skin barrier function. In addition, hydrating effects of moisturizers are not commonly evaluated up to 24 hours after a single application. Hyaluronic acid (HA) and glycerin are very well-known substances able to improve skin hydration. Centella asiatica extract (CAE) could exert lenitive, anti-inflammatory and reepithelialization actions. Furthermore, CAE could inhibit hyaluronidase enzyme activity, therefore prolonging the effect of HA. A fluid containing HA 1%, glycerin 5% and stem cells CAE has been recently developed (Jaluronius CS [JCS] fluid). To evaluate and compare the 24-hour effects of JCS fluid on skin hydration and on transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in healthy subjects in comparison with the control site. Twenty healthy women, mean age 40 years, were enrolled in an intra-subject (right vs left), randomized, assessor-blinded, controlled, 1-day trial. The primary end points were the skin hydration and TEWL, evaluated at the volar surface of the forearm and in standardized conditions (temperature- and humidity-controlled room: 23°C and 30% of humidity) using a corneometer and a vapometer device at baseline, 1, 8 and 24 hours after JCS fluid application. Measurements were performed by an operator blinded for the treatments. Skin hydration after 24 hours was significantly higher ( P =0.001; Mann-Whitney U test) in the JCS-treated area in comparison with the control site. JCS induced a significant ( P =0.0001) increase in skin hydration at each evaluation time (+59% after 1 hour, +48% after 8 hours and +29% after 24 hours) in comparison with both baseline ( P =0.0001) and non-treated control site ( P =0.001). TEWL after 24 hours was significantly lower ( P =0.049; Mann-Whitney U test) in the JCS-treated area in comparison with the control site (13±4 arbitrary units [AU] vs 16±6 AU). JCS fluid

  1. Congenital Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... tube defects. However, there is also a genetic influence to this type of congenital anomaly. Unknown Causes The vast majority of congenital abnormalities have no known cause. This is particularly troubling for parents who plan to have more children, because there is no way to predict if ...

  2. Application of protease technology in dermatology: rationale for incorporation into skin care with initial observations on formulations designed for skin cleansing, maintenance of hydration, and restoration of the epidermal permeability barrier.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q

    2013-06-01

    This article reviews background on proteases and their functions, their physiological significance in skin, and the potential implications of incorporating specific proteases and protease blends into dermatological products, including skin care formulations. The history of protease blend formulations used in wound model studies and for other disorders is reviewed. In vitro data with use of a specific 3-protease blend with evaluation of the impact on various skin proteins and peptides is also discussed in this article.

  3. A mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1/2 (mTORC1)/V-Akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT1)/cathepsin H axis controls filaggrin expression and processing in skin, a novel mechanism for skin barrier disruption in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Aishath S; Tommasi, Cristina; Cole, Christian; Brown, Stuart J; Zhu, Yanan; Way, Benjamin; Willis Owen, Saffron A G; Moffatt, Miriam; Cookson, William O; Harper, John I; Di, Wei-Li; Brown, Sara J; Reinheckel, Thomas; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L

    2017-04-01

    Filaggrin, which is encoded by the filaggrin gene (FLG), is an important component of the skin's barrier to the external environment, and genetic defects in FLG strongly associate with atopic dermatitis (AD). However, not all patients with AD have FLG mutations. We hypothesized that these patients might possess other defects in filaggrin expression and processing contributing to barrier disruption and AD, and therefore we present novel therapeutic targets for this disease. We describe the relationship between the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1/2 protein subunit regulatory associated protein of the MTOR complex 1 (RAPTOR), the serine/threonine kinase V-Akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 (AKT1), and the protease cathepsin H (CTSH), for which we establish a role in filaggrin expression and processing. Increased RAPTOR levels correlated with decreased filaggrin expression in patients with AD. In keratinocyte cell cultures RAPTOR upregulation or AKT1 short hairpin RNA knockdown reduced expression of the protease CTSH. Skin of CTSH-deficient mice and CTSH short hairpin RNA knockdown keratinocytes showed reduced filaggrin processing, and the mouse had both impaired skin barrier function and a mild proinflammatory phenotype. Our findings highlight a novel and potentially treatable signaling axis controlling filaggrin expression and processing that is defective in patients with AD. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Treatment Options for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of skin biopsies: Shave biopsy : A sterile razor blade is used to “shave-off” the abnormal-looking ... the surface of the skin with a small blade. Electrodesiccation and curettage : The tumor is cut from ...

  5. [A case of skin autograft for skin ulcers in ichthyosis].

    PubMed

    Li, Shiwei; Yang, Xiaodong; Liu, Lijun; Tang, Xueyang

    2017-10-28

    Ichthyosis refers to a group of skin diseases characterized by abnormal keratinization of the epidermis, resulting in dryness, roughness and scale of the skin. A girl with ichthyosis, who presented with skin ulcers and infection of the right dorsal foot, was admitted to our department. An autologous razor-thin skin grafting procedure was performed to repair the skin ulcers after debridement and vacuum sealing drain. After 8 months of follow-up, both the donor and recipient site healed well and there were no newly formed ulcers or infections. Although the skin quality of ichthyosis is poor, the lesion area can still be used as donor or recipient cite.

  6. Abnormal placentation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Samuel T; Bonanno, Clarissa

    2009-04-01

    Abnormal placentation poses a diagnostic and treatment challenge for all providers caring for pregnant women. As one of the leading causes of postpartum hemorrhage, abnormal placentation involves the attachment of placental villi directly to the myometrium with potentially deeper invasion into the uterine wall or surrounding organs. Surgical procedures that disrupt the integrity of uterus, including cesarean section, dilatation and curettage, and myomectomy, have been implicated as key risk factors for placenta accreta. The diagnosis is typically made by gray-scale ultrasound and confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging, which may better delineate the extent of placental invasion. It is critical to make the diagnosis before delivery because preoperative planning can significantly decrease blood loss and avoid substantial morbidity associated with placenta accreta. Aggressive management of hemorrhage through the use of uterotonics, fluid resuscitation, blood products, planned hysterectomy, and surgical hemostatic agents can be life-saving for these patients. Conservative management, including the use of uterine and placental preservation and subsequent methotrexate therapy or pelvic artery embolization, may be considered when a focal accreta is suspected; however, surgical management remains the current standard of care.

  7. Expression of IL-22 in the Skin Causes Th2-Biased Immunity, Epidermal Barrier Dysfunction and Pruritus via Stimulating Epithelial Th2 Cytokines and the GRP Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Hongfei; Lu, Jingning; Choi, Eun Byul; Oh, Min Hee; Jeong, Mingeum; Barmettler, Sara; Zhu, Zhou; Zheng, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Increased expression of Th22 cytokine IL-22 is a characteristic finding in atopic dermatitis (AD). However, the specific role of IL-22 in the pathogenesis of AD in vivo has yet to be elucidated. Consistent with observations in human AD, IL-22 was significantly increased in the AD skin of mice after epicutaneous sensitization to house dust mite allergen. Utilizing a skin-specific inducible transgenic system, we show here that expression of IL-22 in the skin of mice caused an AD-like phenotype characterized by chronic pruritic dermatitis associated with Th2-biased local and systemic immune responses, down-regulation of Epidermal Differentiation Complex genes and enhanced dermatitis upon epicutaneous allergen exposure. IL-22 potently induced the expression of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), a neuropeptide pruritogen, in dermal immune cells and sensory afferents and in their skin-innervating sensory neurons. IL-22 also differentially up-regulated the expression of GRP receptor (GRPR) on keratinocytes of AD skin. The number of GRP+ cells in the skin correlated with the AD severity and the intensity of pruritus. IL-22 directly upregulated the expression of epithelial-derived type 2 cytokines (TSLP and IL-33) and GRP in primary keratinocytes. Furthermore, GRP not only strongly induced TSLP but also increased the expression IL-33 and GRPR synergistically with IL-22. Importantly, we found that the expression of GRP was strikingly increased in the skin of patients with AD. These results indicate that IL-22 plays important pathogenic roles in the initiation and development of AD, in part through inducing keratinocyte production of type 2 cytokines and activation of the GRP/GRPR pathway. PMID:28228560

  8. Epidermal Overexpression of Xenobiotic Receptor PXR Impairs the Epidermal Barrier and Triggers Th2 Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Elentner, Andreas; Schmuth, Matthias; Yannoutsos, Nikolaos; Eichmann, Thomas O; Gruber, Robert; Radner, Franz P W; Hermann, Martin; Del Frari, Barbara; Dubrac, Sandrine

    2018-01-01

    The skin is in daily contact with environmental pollutants, but the long-term effects of such exposure remain underinvestigated. Many of these toxins bind and activate the pregnane X receptor (PXR), a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates genes central to xenobiotic metabolism. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of constitutive activation of PXR in the basal layer of the skin to mimic repeated skin exposure to noxious molecules. We designed a transgenic mouse model that overexpresses the human PXR gene linked to the herpes simplex VP16 domain under the control of the keratin 14 promoter. We show that transgenic mice display increased transepidermal water loss and elevated skin pH, abnormal stratum corneum lipids, focal epidermal hyperplasia, activated keratinocytes expressing more thymic stromal lymphopoietin, a T helper type 2/T helper type 17 skin immune response, and increased serum IgE. Furthermore, the cutaneous barrier dysfunction precedes development of the T helper type 2/T helper type 17 inflammation in transgenic mice, thereby mirroring the time course of atopic dermatitis development in humans. Moreover, further experiments suggest increased PXR signaling in the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis when compared with healthy skin. Thus, PXR activation by environmental pollutants may compromise epidermal barrier function and favor an immune response resembling atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Skin graft

    MedlinePlus

    ... that need skin grafts to heal Venous ulcers, pressure ulcers , or diabetic ulcers that do not heal Very ... graft; Full thickness skin graft Patient Instructions Preventing pressure ulcers Surgical wound care - open Images Skin graft Skin ...

  10. Defects of filaggrin-like proteins in both lesional and nonlesional atopic skin.

    PubMed

    Pellerin, Laurence; Henry, Julie; Hsu, Chiung-Yueh; Balica, Stéfana; Jean-Decoster, Catherine; Méchin, Marie-Claire; Hansmann, Britta; Rodriguez, Elke; Weindinger, Stefan; Schmitt, Anne-Marie; Serre, Guy; Paul, Carle; Simon, Michel

    2013-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by a disturbed epidermal barrier. In a subset of patients, this is explained by nonsense mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG). We sought to evaluate the respective role of FLG mutations and proinflammatory cytokines and to assess the expression of FLG, hornerin (HRNR), and FLG2, 2 FLG-like proteins, which are involved in epidermal barrier functions, in normal skin and both lesional and nonlesional skin of patients with AD. An FLG-genotyped cohort of 73 adults with AD and 73 aged-matched control subjects was analyzed by using immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Normal primary human keratinocytes were differentiated in either the absence or presence of IL-4, IL-13, and IL-25. Compared with control subjects, FLG, HRNR, and FLG2 were detected at significantly lower levels in the skin of patients with AD, irrespective of their FLG genotype. The reduction was greater in lesional compared with nonlesional skin. In addition, the proFLG/FLG ratio was found to be higher in the skin of wild-type patients than in control subjects. Cytokine treatment of keratinocytes induced a dramatic reduction in FLG, FLG2, and HRNR expression both at the mRNA and protein levels. The stratum corneum of lesional but also clinically unaffected skin of adults with AD is abnormal, with reduced expression of FLG and FLG-like proteins. In addition to nonsense mutations, proinflammatory cytokines and some defects in the proFLG processing can contribute to the FLG downregulation. Our study suggests that skin inflammation reduces the expression of FLG-like proteins, contributing to the AD-related epidermal barrier dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is ... abnormal bleeding? •Glossary What is a normal menstrual cycle? The normal length of the menstrual cycle is ...

  12. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... abnormal uterine bleeding? Abnormal uterine bleeding is any heavy or unusual bleeding from the uterus (through your ... one symptom of abnormal uterine bleeding. Having extremely heavy bleeding during your period can also be considered ...

  13. Probing the role of ceramide hydroxylation in skin barrier lipid models by 2H solid-state NMR spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Kováčik, Andrej; Vogel, Alexander; Adler, Juliane; Pullmannová, Petra; Vávrová, Kateřina; Huster, Daniel

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we studied model stratum corneum lipid mixtures composed of the hydroxylated skin ceramides N-lignoceroyl 6-hydroxysphingosine (Cer[NH]) and α-hydroxylignoceroyl phytosphingosine (Cer[AP]). Two model skin lipid mixtures of the composition Cer[NH] or Cer[AP], N-lignoceroyl sphingosine (Cer[NS]), lignoceric acid (C24:0) and cholesterol in a 0.5:0.5:1:1 molar ratio were compared. Model membranes were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and 2 H solid-state NMR spectroscopy at temperatures from 25 °C to 80 °C. Each component of the model mixture was specifically deuterated for selective detection by 2 H NMR. Thus, the exact phase composition of the mixture at varying temperatures could be quantified. Moreover, using X-ray powder diffraction we investigated the lamellar phase formation. From the solid-state NMR and DSC studies, we found that both hydroxylated Cer[NH] and Cer[AP] exhibit a similar phase behavior. At physiological skin temperature of 32 °C, the lipids form a crystalline (orthorhombic) phase. With increasing temperature, most of the lipids become fluid and form a liquid-crystalline phase, which converts to the isotropic phase at higher temperatures (65-80 °C). Interestingly, lignoceric acid in the Cer[NH]-containing mixture has a tendency to form two types of fluid phases at 65 °C. This tendency was also observed in Cer[AP]-containing membranes at 80 °C. While Cer[AP]-containing lipid models formed a short periodicity phase featuring a repeat spacing of d = 5.4 nm, in the Cer[NH]-based model skin lipid membranes, the formation of unusual long periodicity phase with a repeat spacing of d = 10.7 nm was observed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pinus densiflora bark extract ameliorates 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced atopic dermatitis in NC/Nga mice by regulating Th1/Th2 balance and skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Woo; Wu, Qianwen; Jang, Young Pyo; Choung, Se Young

    2018-06-01

    Korean red pine (Pinus densiflora) bark has been traditionally used in Korea and other parts of East Asia to relieve inflammatory diseases. Although many studies using P. densiflora bark have been reported, its effect on atopic dermatitis (AD) has not been elucidated. Thus, we investigated whether the P. densiflora bark extract (PBE) has potential to attenuate AD symptoms and elucidated the molecular mechanism. Oral administration of PBE to mice with 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB)-induced AD lessened dermatitis scores and scratching behavior and significantly reduced measures of epidermal thickness, infiltration of mast cells and eosinophils, levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE), and IgG 1 /IgG 2a ratio in serum. PBE not only inhibited IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 but also increased IFN-γ in splenic production. Furthermore, PBE significantly suppressed mRNA expression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and further downregulated the mRNA expression of Th2 and Th17 cytokines such as IL-4, IL-13, IL-17, IL-31, and TNF-α. In addition, the protein expressions of filaggrin, involucrin, and loricrin in lesional skin were recovered by PBE. These results suggest that PBE attenuates DNCB-induced AD via regulating Th1/Th2 balance and skin barrier function. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled pilot study on the effects of topical blackcurrant emulsion enriched in essential fatty acids, ceramides and 18-beta glycyrrhetinic acid on clinical signs and skin barrier function in dogs with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Marsella, Rosanna; Cornegliani, Luisa; Ozmen, Ibrahim; Bohannon, Mary; Ahrens, Kim; Santoro, Domenico

    2017-12-01

    Lipid-based emulsions can be useful for the management of canine atopic dermatitis (cAD). 18-beta glycyrrhetinic acid (GRA), a component of liquorice root, has anti-inflammatory and anti-pruritic effects. To evaluate the effects of a topical lipid emulsion containing ceramides, fatty acids and GRA on clinical signs of cAD and skin barrier in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. Client owned (n = 45) dogs with nonseasonal, mild/moderate AD, received either treatment or placebo for three months. Skin lesions, pruritus, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and global assessment (GA) were evaluated. Fourteen dogs receiving treatment and 14 receiving the placebo completed the study. After one month ≥50% reduction in pruritus was seen in seven of 14 dogs (50%) in the Treatment group, and in two of 14 dogs (14.3%) in the Control group (P = 0.047). After two and three months, significant reduction in pruritus was not seen. For Canine Atopic Dermatitis Extent and Severity Index (CADESI), TEWL and GA, there were no significant findings over time or between groups. The emulsion had some transient beneficial clinical effects. However, it was not effective in controlling pruritus as a monotherapy. Further studies should examine whether owner compliance was a factor in the steady decline of effect on pruritus scores. Further studies evaluating its role as an adjunctive therapy are indicated. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  16. Inflammatory peeling skin syndrome caused a novel mutation in CDSN.

    PubMed

    Telem, Dana Fuchs; Israeli, Shirli; Sarig, Ofer; Sprecher, Eli

    2012-04-01

    Generalized peeling skin syndrome (PSS) is a rare autosomal recessive dermatosis manifesting with continuous exfoliation of the stratum corneum. The inflammatory (type B) subtype of PSS was recently found to be caused by deleterious mutations in the CDSN gene encoding corneodesmosin, a major component of desmosomal junctions in the uppermost layers of the epidermis. In the present study, we assessed a 10-month-old baby, who presented with generalized superficial peeling of the skin. Using PCR amplification and direct sequencing, we identified the third PSS-associated mutation in CDSN, a homozygous 4 bp duplication in the second exon of the gene (c.164_167dup GCCT; p.Thr57ProfsX6). These data further support the notion that corneodesmosin deficiency impairs cell-cell adhesion in the upper epidermis, paving the way for an abnormal inflammatory response due to epidermal barrier disruption.

  17. Skin Bioengineering: Noninvasive Transdermal Monitoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    involves the application of a small and defined electrical current to the skin. This process causes increased molecular transport through the skin and has...flow of electrons is translated into an ion flux across the skin. A power supply establishes the electric field that causes electrons to migrate in...a model designed to mimic the developing cutaneous barrier in a premature neonate (Sekkat et al 2002). While the idea appears feasible for full-term

  18. Barrier function and natural moisturizing factor levels after cumulative exposure to a fruit-derived organic acid and a detergent: different outcomes in atopic and healthy skin and relevance for occupational contact dermatitis in the food industry.

    PubMed

    Angelova-Fischer, Irena; Hoek, Anne-Karin; Dapic, Irena; Jakasa, Ivone; Kezic, Sanja; Fischer, Tobias W; Zillikens, Detlef

    2015-12-01

    Fruit-derived organic compounds and detergents are relevant exposure factors for occupational contact dermatitis in the food industry. Although individuals with atopic dermatitis (AD) are at risk for development of occupational contact dermatitis, there have been no controlled studies on the effects of repeated exposure to multiple irritants, relevant for the food industry, in atopic skin. The aim of the study was to investigate the outcomes of repeated exposure to a fruit-derived organic acid and a detergent in AD compared to healthy volunteers. The volunteers were exposed to 2.0% acetic acid (AcA) and/or 0.5% sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) in controlled tandem repeated irritation test. The outcomes were assessed by measurements of erythema, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and natural moisturizing factor (NMF) levels. In the AD volunteers, repeated AcA exposure led to barrier disruption and significant TEWL increase; no significant differences after the same exposure in the healthy controls were found. Repeated exposure to SLS and the irritant tandems enhanced the reactions and resulted in a significantly higher increase in TEWL in the AD compared to the control group. Cumulative irritant exposure reduced the NMF levels in both groups. Differences in the severity of irritant-induced barrier impairment in atopic individuals contribute to the risk for occupational contact dermatitis in result of multiple exposures to food-derived irritants and detergents. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Skin Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    Your skin is your body's largest organ. It covers and protects your body. Your skin Holds body fluids in, preventing dehydration Keeps harmful ... it Anything that irritates, clogs, or inflames your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning, ...

  20. Cryotherapy - skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin; Warts - freezing; Warts - cryotherapy; Actinic keratosis - cryotherapy; Solar keratosis - cryotherapy ... warts Destroy precancerous skin lesions (actinic keratoses or solar keratoses) In rare cases, cryotherapy is used to ...

  1. Skin abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Abscess - skin; Cutaneous abscess; Subcutaneous abscess; MRSA - abscess; Staph infection - abscess ... Skin abscesses are common and affect people of all ages. They occur when an infection causes pus ...

  2. First Safety and Performance Evaluation of T45K, a Self-Assembling Peptide Barrier Hemostatic Device, After Skin Lesion Excision.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, George; Prats, Jayne; Norchi, Terrence; Kates, Steven; McInerney, Veronica; Woods, Jack; Kelly, Jack

    2018-01-29

    The self-assembling peptide barrier T45K (SAPB-T45K) is an oligopeptide that rapidly forms a biocompatible hemostatic barrier when applied to wounds. Evaluate safety and performance of SAPB-T45K in cutaneous surgery. In this single-blind study, after sequential shave excision of 2 lesions, wounds were randomized (intrapatient) to SAPB-T45K or control treatment. Safety was assessed at treatment, Day 7, and Day 30. Performance was evaluated using time to hemostasis (TTH) and ASEPSIS wound scores, with a subgroup analysis for patients with or without antiplatelet therapy. Each of 46 patients (10 [22%] with antiplatelet therapy) received randomized SAPB-T45K or control treatment for 2 wounds. Safety assessments were similar, and ASEPSIS scores reflected normal healing in both wound groups. SAPB-T45K demonstrated significantly faster median TTH (24.5 [range, 7-165] seconds) compared with control (44 [10-387] seconds), for a 41% median TTH reduction (18 [95% confidence interval, 7-35] seconds, p < .001). SAPB-T45K provided an identical median TTH of 24 seconds, regardless of antiplatelet therapy. Control median TTH was 90 and 40 seconds for patients taking or not taking antiplatelet therapy, respectively. SAPB-T45K provided significantly faster median TTH versus control, especially with antiplatelet therapy, and safety profiles were similar.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  3. Environment and the skin

    SciTech Connect

    Suskind, R.R.

    The effects of the environment on skin are surveyed. Specific patterns of adverse skin response can be characterized by morphological, physiological, and biochemical features. Cutaneous defenses and adaptations of the skin are discussed. Dermal resiliency, epidermal and pigment components, neural components, immunobiological processes, and the epidermal barrier are examined. Percutaneous absorption is reviewed. Environmental factors that cause adverse skin reactions include water, salts of heavy metals, hydrocarbons, solvents, lipids, aromatics, esters, ultraviolet light, and various modalities of ionizing radiation. Pathologic patterns and reaction sites are discussed in terms of inflammatory, allergic, benign epidermal, eccrine sweat gland, and pilosebaceous reactions, pigmentarymore » disturbances, cancer, and blood vessel changes. Although critical epidemiologic data are limited, cutaneous illnesses constitute a significant segment of occupational disease. Recommendations for further research are summarized. 42 references.« less

  4. Skin tightening.

    PubMed

    Woolery-Lloyd, Heather; Kammer, Jenna N

    2011-01-01

    Skin tightening describes the treatment of skin laxity via radiofrequency (RF), ultrasound, or light-based devices. Skin laxity on the face is manifested by progressive loss of skin elasticity, loosening of the connective tissue framework, and deepening of skin folds. This results in prominence of submandibular and submental tissues. Genetic factors (chronological aging) and extrinsic factors (ultraviolet radiation) both contribute to skin laxity. There are many RF, ultrasound, and light-based devices directed at treating skin laxity. All of these devices target and heat the dermis to induce collagen contraction. Heating of the dermis causes collagen denaturation and immediate collagen contraction in addition to long-term collagen remodeling. Via RF, light, or ultrasound, these skin tightening devices deliver heat to the dermis to create new collagen and induce skin tightening. This chapter will provide an overview of the various skin tightening devices. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Urine - abnormal color

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  6. Bifidobacterium fermented milk and galacto-oligosaccharides lead to improved skin health by decreasing phenols production by gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, K; Masuoka, N; Kano, M; Iizuka, R

    2014-06-01

    A questionnaire survey found that women suffering from abnormal bowel movements have many skin problems such as a high frequency of dry skin. Although there are similarities between the structure and barrier function mechanism of the gut and skin, experimental data are insufficient to show an association between the intestinal environment and skin conditions. Phenols, for example phenol and p-cresol, as metabolites of aromatic amino acids produced by gut bacteria, are regarded as bioactive toxins and serum biomarkers of a disturbed gut environment. Recent studies have demonstrated that phenols disturb the differentiation of monolayer-cultured keratinocytes in vitro, and that phenols produced by gut bacteria accumulate in the skin via the circulation and disrupt keratinocyte differentiation in hairless mice. Human studies have demonstrated that restriction of probiotics elevated serum free p-cresol levels and harmed skin conditions (reduced skin hydration, disrupted keratinisation). In contrast, daily intake of the prebiotic galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) restored serum free p-cresol levels and skin conditions in adult women. Moreover, a double-blind placebo-controlled trial demonstrated that the daily intake of fermented milk containing the probiotic Bifidobacterium breve strain Yakult and prebiotic GOS reduced serum total phenol levels and prevented skin dryness and disruption of keratinisation in healthy adult women. It is concluded that phenols produced by gut bacteria are one of the causes of skin problems. Probiotics and/or prebiotics, such as B. breve strain Yakult and/or GOS, are expected to help maintain a healthy skin by decreasing phenols production by gut microbiota. These findings support the hypothesis that probiotics and prebiotics provide health benefits to the skin as well as the gut.

  7. Advanced therapies of skin injuries.

    PubMed

    Maver, Tina; Maver, Uroš; Kleinschek, Karin Stana; Raščan, Irena Mlinarič; Smrke, Dragica Maja

    2015-12-01

    The loss of tissue is still one of the most challenging problems in healthcare. Efficient laboratory expansion of skin tissue to reproduce the skins barrier function can make the difference between life and death for patients with extensive full-thickness burns, chronic wounds, or genetic disorders such as bullous conditions. This engineering has been initiated based on the acute need in the 1980s and today, tissue-engineered skin is the reality. The human skin equivalents are available not only as models for permeation and toxicity screening, but are frequently applied in vivo as clinical skin substitutes. This review aims to introduce the most important recent development in the extensive field of tissue engineering and to describe already approved, commercially available skin substitutes in clinical use.

  8. Sagging Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Varicose Veins Sclerotherapy for Varicose Veins Back Hair Transplants Laser Treatments for Pre-Cancerous ... Skin Sagging skin in the lower face and neck is a natural part of the aging process. Why treat sagging ...

  9. Ionic skin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jeong-Yun; Keplinger, Christoph; Whitesides, George M; Suo, Zhigang

    2014-12-03

    Electronic skins (i.e., stretchable sheets of distributed sensors) report signals using electrons, whereas natural skins report signals using ions. Here, ionic conductors are used to create a new type of sensory sheet, called "ionic skin". Ionic skins are highly stretchable, transparent, and biocompatible. They readily measure strains from 1% to 500%, and pressures as low as 1 kPa. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Skin Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Skin Biopsy KidsHealth / For Teens / Skin Biopsy What's in ... en español Biopsia de piel What Is a Skin Biopsy and Who Would Need One? In a ...

  11. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  12. Skin Diseases: Skin Health and Skin Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. Melanoma, a more serious type of skin ... The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, ...

  13. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  14. Cardiac Abnormalities in Primary Hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Mookadam, Farouk; Smith, Travis; Jiamsripong, Panupong; Moustafa, Sherif E; Monico, Carla G.; Lieske, John C.; Milliner, Dawn S.

    2018-01-01

    Background In patients with primary hyperoxaluria (PH), oxalate overproduction can result in recurrent urolithiasis and nephrocalcinosis, which in some cases results in a progressive decline in renal function, oxalate retention, and systemic oxalosis involving bone, retina, arterial media, peripheral nerves, skin, and heart. Oxalosis involving the myocardium or conduction system can potentially lead to heart failure and fatal arrhythmias. Methods and Results A retrospective review of our institution’s database was conducted for all patients with a confirmed diagnosis of PH between 1/1948 and 1/2006 (n=103). Electrocardiogram (ECG) and echocardiography were used to identify cardiac abnormalities. Ninety-three patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, 58% were male. Mean follow-up was 11.9 (median 8.8) years. In 38 patients who received an ECG or echocardiography, 31 were found to have any cardiac abnormalities. Cardiac findings correlated with decline in renal function. Conclusions Our data suggests that physicians caring for patients with PH should pay close attention to cardiac status, especially if renal function is impaired. PMID:20921818

  15. The impact of aging on epithelial barriers.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Alan R

    2017-10-02

    The epithelium has many critical roles in homeostasis, including an essential responsibility in establishing tissue barriers. In addition to the fundamental role in separating internal from external environment, epithelial barriers maintain nutrient, fluid, electrolyte and metabolic waste balance in multiple organs. While, by definition, barrier function is conserved, the structure of the epithelium varies across organs. For example, the skin barrier is a squamous layer of cells with distinct structural features, while the lung barrier is composed of a very thin single cell to minimize diffusion space. With the increased focus on age-dependent alterations in organ structure and function, there is an emerging interest in the impact of age on epithelial barriers. This review will focus on the impact of aging on the epithelial barrier of several organs, including the skin, lung, gastrointestinal tract and the kidney, at a structural and functional level.

  16. Autoimmune and infectious skin diseases that target desmogleins

    PubMed Central

    AMAGAI, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    Desmosomes are intercellular adhesive junctions of epithelial cells that contain two major transmembrane components, the desmogleins (Dsg) and desmocollins (Dsc), which are cadherin-type cell–cell adhesion molecules and are anchored to intermediate filaments of keratin through interactions with plakoglobin and desmoplakin. Desmosomes play an important role in maintaining the proper structure and barrier function of the epidermis and mucous epithelia. Four Dsg isoforms have been identified to date, Dsg1–Dsg4, and are involved in several skin and heart diseases. Dsg1 and Dsg3 are the two major Dsg isoforms in the skin and mucous membranes, and are targeted by IgG autoantibodies in pemphigus, an autoimmune disease of the skin and mucous membranes. Dsg1 is also targeted by exfoliative toxin (ET) released by Staphylococcus aureus in the infectious skin diseases bullous impetigo and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS). ET is a unique serine protease that shows lock and key specificity to Dsg1. Dsg2 is expressed in all tissues possessing desmosomes, including simple epithelia and myocardia, and mutations in this gene are responsible for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia. Dsg4 plays an important adhesive role mainly in hair follicles, and Dsg4 mutations cause abnormal hair development. Recently, an active disease model for pemphigus was generated by a unique approach using autoantigen-deficient mice that do not acquire tolerance against the defective autoantigen. Adoptive transfer of Dsg3−/− lymphocytes into mice expressing Dsg3 induces stable anti-Dsg3 IgG production with development of the pemphigus phenotype. This mouse model is a valuable tool with which to investigate immunological mechanisms of harmful IgG autoantibody production in pemphigus. Further investigation of desmoglein molecules will continue to provide insight into the unsolved pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases and aid in the development of novel therapeutic

  17. Abnormal findings in peers during skills learning.

    PubMed

    Wearn, Andy; Nakatsuji, Miriam; Bhoopatkar, Harsh

    2017-02-01

    Peer physical examination (PPE), where students examine each other, is common in contemporary clinical skills learning. A range of benefits and risks have been explored in the literature. One persistent concern has been the identification and management of abnormal physical findings. Two previous studies have attempted to quantify the risk, one through the discussion of two exemplar cases and the other with a retrospective student survey. Here, we report the first prospective study of the number and type of abnormalities encountered as part of early clinical skills learning in a medical programme. We have a formal written consent process for PPE, which includes the management of abnormal findings through the completion of an event form. Our data come from cohorts undertaking years 2 and 3 of the programme between 2003 and 2014. One persistent concern (of PPE) has been the identification and management of abnormal physical findings RESULTS: Nineteen event forms were completed over this period. The incidence rates per year ranged from 0.23 to 1.05 per cent. Abnormal findings included raised blood pressure, heart murmur, abnormal bedside test values, and eye and skin conditions. The low event rate, along with a feasible process for dealing with this issue, goes some way to reassuring those with concerns. We acknowledge that some abnormalities may have been missed, and that some data may have been lost as a result of incorrect process; however, even the highest annual rate is low in absolute terms. We recommend a formal process for managing abnormalities. Ideally this would be part of an overall PPE written policy, communicated to students, enacted by tutors and approved by the local ethics committee. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Epidermal ablation of Dlx3 is linked to IL-17–associated skin inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Joonsung; Kita, Ryosuke; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Choi, Eung Ho; Lee, Seung Hun; Udey, Mark C.; Morasso, Maria I.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to understand the role of Distal-less 3 (Dlx3) in cutaneous biology and pathophysiology, we generated and characterized a mouse model with epidermal ablation of Dlx3. K14cre;Dlx3Kin/f mice exhibited epidermal hyperproliferation and abnormal differentiation of keratinocytes. Results from subsequent analyses revealed cutaneous inflammation that featured accumulation of IL-17–producing CD4+ T, CD8+ T, and γδ T cells in the skin and lymph nodes of K14cre;Dlx3Kin/f mice. The gene expression signature of K14cre;Dlx3Kin/f skin shared features with lesional psoriatic skin, and Dlx3 expression was markedly and selectively decreased in psoriatic skin. Interestingly, cultured Dlx3 null keratinocytes triggered cytokine production that is potentially linked to inflammatory responses in K14cre;Dlx3Kin/f mice. Thus, Dlx3 ablation in epidermis is linked to altered epidermal differentiation, barrier development, and IL-17–associated skin inflammation. This model provides a platform that will allow the systematic exploration of the contributions of keratinocytes to cutaneous inflammation. PMID:21709238

  19. Skin Pigment

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Concussion in Past Year AHA: Take Your Dog to Work -- And Reap the Health Benefits Could ... drugs, procedures, news and more, written in everyday language. Tap to switch to the Professional ... a Skin Cancer Body Check (Video) Pubic Lice (Video) Skin Cancer Additional ...

  20. Skin (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body. The skin and its derivatives (hair, nails, sweat and oil glands) make up the integumentary system. One of the main functions of the skin is protection. It protects the body from external factors such as bacteria, chemicals, and temperature.

  1. Superficial Immunity: Antimicrobial Responses Are More Than Skin Deep.

    PubMed

    Mack, Madison R; Kim, Brian S

    2016-07-19

    The skin barrier is essential for host defense, but how the skin provides protection when the barrier is breached is not well understood. In this issue of Immunity, Gallo and colleagues report that keratinocytes integrate signals from antimicrobial peptides via MAVS signaling to amplify their antiviral immune response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Newborn infant skin: physiology, development, and care.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Marty O; Adam, Ralf; Brink, Susanna; Odio, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Infant skin is critical to the newborn child's transition from the womb environment to the journey to self-sufficiency. This review provides an integrative perspective on the skin development in full term and premature infants. There is a particular focus on the role of vernix caseosa and on the implications of skin development for epidermal penetration of exogenous compounds. Healthy full-term newborn skin is well-developed and functional at birth, with a thick epidermis and well-formed stratum corneum (SC) layers. Transepidermal water loss is very low at birth, equal to, or lower than adults, indicating a highly effective skin barrier. Vernix facilitates SC development in full-term infants through a variety of mechanisms including physical protection from amniotic fluid and enzymes, antimicrobial effects, skin surface pH lowering, provision of lipids, and hydration. Premature infants, particularly those of very low birth weight, have a poor skin barrier with few cornified layers and deficient dermal proteins. They are at increased risk for skin damage, increased permeability to exogenous agents and infection. The SC barrier develops rapidly after birth but complete maturation requires weeks to months. The best methods for caring for infant skin, particularly in the diaper region, are described and related to these developmental changes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimating physiological skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Saurabh; Banerjee, Amit; Burlina, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    We describe an approach for estimating human skin parameters, such as melanosome concentration, collagen concentration, oxygen saturation, and blood volume, using hyperspectral radiometric measurements (signatures) obtained from in vivo skin. We use a computational model based on Kubelka-Munk theory and the Fresnel equations. This model forward maps the skin parameters to a corresponding multiband reflectance spectra. Machine-learning-based regression is used to generate the inverse map, and hence estimate skin parameters from hyperspectral signatures. We test our methods using synthetic and in vivo skin signatures obtained in the visible through the short wave infrared domains from 24 patients of both genders and Caucasian, Asian, and African American ethnicities. Performance validation shows promising results: good agreement with the ground truth and well-established physiological precepts. These methods have potential use in the characterization of skin abnormalities and in minimally-invasive prescreening of malignant skin cancers.

  4. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  5. Newborn Skin: Common Skin Problems.

    PubMed

    Kutlubay, Zekayi; Tanakol, Ali; Engýn, Burhan; Onel, Cristina; Sýmsek, Ersin; Serdaroglu, Server; Tuzun, Yalçýn; Yilmaz, Erkan; Eren, Bülent

    2017-01-01

    The newborn skin can be separated from adult's skin in several ways. In dermatologic examination it can be easily observed that it is thinner, less hairy and has less sweat and sebaceous gland secretions. These differentiations present especially in preterm newborns. Their skin is exposed to mechanical trauma, bacteria and weather, heat alterations. At birth, newborn skin is protected by the coverage of vernix caseosa, which has lubricating and antibacterial features and its pH ranges from 6.7 to 7.4. Beneath the vernix caseosa the skin has a pH of 5.5-6.0. In newborn dermatologic examination it is very important to distinguish transient benign dermatoses and severe diseases, make early diagnosis and treat congenital skin disorders. Although the benign cases are common in this life period, clinical presentations can be much more exaggerated, dramatic and cause a great deal of anxiety to parents. Therefore, as a doctor, knowing the dermatological, pathological and non-pathological common skin rashes guides the family in the right direction, offers advice to reduce uncertainty and time for the treatment of severe conditions and builds a confidential doctor-patient relationship. In this review, our aim is to provide a general overview to common skin rashes in newborn period.

  6. The role of barrier protection ain pressure ulcer prevention.

    PubMed

    Stephen-Haynes, Jackie

    This article considers the anatomy and physiology of the skin, the natural protection the skin provides in relation to barrier protection and the importance of barrier protection in pressure ulcer prevention. The current national pressure ulcer agenda including high impact actions and the SSKIN care bundle, along with their implementation within one NHS Health Care Trust are discussed.

  7. The investigation of the skin characteristics of males focusing on gender differences, skin perception, and skin care habits.

    PubMed

    Mizukoshi, Koji; Akamatsu, Hisashi

    2013-05-01

    Various studies have examined the properties of male skin. However, because these studies mostly involved simple measurement with non-invasive devices, a lack of understanding of the properties of male skin remains. In this study, we focused and investigated not only on simple instrumental measurements but also on gender differences and men's subjective perceptions of skin and daily skin care habits. Barrier function depends on corneocyte maturation level as well as sebum amount. Irrespective of the skin type, a high percentage of male subjects perceived a 'tacky feeling'. However, the percentage of men perceiving a 'shiny feeling' differed by skin type. Furthermore, there was a relationship between skin care habits and skin function. Men who did not perform a daily skincare regimen demonstrated a significantly higher sebum amount and transepidermal water loss value than those who did perform a daily skincare regimen. The results of this study indicate that male skin has two specific characteristics: impaired barrier function because of the excess amount of sebum and a lack of an appropriate skin care regimen because of the 'tacky feeling' caused by excess sebum. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Skin Cancer in Skin of Color

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Porcia T.

    2009-01-01

    Skin cancers in skin of color often present atypically or with advanced stage in comparison to Caucasian patients. Health care providers must maintain a high index of suspicion when examining skin lesions in skin of color. PMID:19691228

  9. Hyperelastic skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... is most often seen in people who have Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. People with this disorder have very elastic skin. ... any member of your family been diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome? What other symptoms are present? Genetic counseling may ...

  10. Skin lumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... The skin. In: Swartz MH, ed. Textbook of Physical Diagnosis: History and Examination . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 5. Review Date 4/14/2017 Updated by: Kevin Berman, ...

  11. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... States. The two most common types are basal cell cancer and squamous cell cancer. They usually form on the head, face, ... If not treated, some types of skin cancer cells can spread to other tissues and organs. Treatments ...

  12. TRP channels in the skin.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Balázs I; Oláh, Attila; Szöllősi, Attila Gábor; Bíró, Tamás

    2014-05-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels not only act as 'polymodal cellular sensors' on sensory neurons but are also functionally expressed by a multitude of non-neuronal cell types. This is especially true in the skin, one of the largest organs of the body, where they appear to be critically involved in regulating various cutaneous functions both under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, we focus on introducing the roles of several cutaneous TRP channels in the regulation of the skin barrier, skin cell proliferation and differentiation, and immune functions. Moreover, we also describe the putative involvement of several TRP channels in the development of certain skin diseases and identify future TRP channel-targeted therapeutic opportunities. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Wet Work and Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Fartasch, Manigé

    2016-01-01

    Wet work defined as unprotected exposure to humid environments/water; high frequencies of hand washing procedures or prolonged glove occlusion is believed to cause irritant contact dermatitis in a variety of occupations. This review considers the recent studies on wet-work exposure and focuses on its influence on barrier function. There are different methods to study the effect of wet work on barrier function. On the one hand, occupational cohorts at risk can be monitored prospectively by skin bioengineering technology and clinical visual scoring systems; on the other hand, experimental test procedures with defined application of water, occlusion and detergents are performed in healthy volunteers. Both epidemiological studies and the results of experimental procedures are compared and discussed. A variety of epidemiological studies analyze occupational cohorts at risk. The measurement of transepidermal water loss, an indicator of the integrity of the epidermal barrier, and clinical inspection of the skin have shown that especially the frequencies of hand washing and water contact/contact to aqueous mixtures seem to be the main factors for the occurrence of barrier alterations. On the other hand, in a single cross-sectional study, prolonged glove wearing (e.g. occlusion for 6 h per shift in clean-room workers) without exposure to additional hazardous substances seemed not to affect the skin negatively. But regarding the effect of occlusion, there is experimental evidence that previously occluded skin challenged with sodium lauryl sulfate leads to an increased susceptibility to the irritant with an aggravation of the irritant reaction. These findings might have relevance for the real-life situation in so far as after occupational glove wearing, the skin is more susceptible to potential hazards to the skin even during leisure hours. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Vehicle barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hirsh, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

  15. Lenticular abnormalities in children.

    PubMed

    Khokhar, Sudarshan; Agarwal, Tushar; Kumar, Gaurav; Kushmesh, Rakhi; Tejwani, Lalit Kumar

    2012-01-01

    To study the lenticular problems in children presenting at an apex institute. Retrospective analysis of records (< 14 years) of new lens clinic cases was done. Of 1,047 children, 687 were males. Mean age at presentation was 6.35 ± 4.13 years. Developmental cataract was seen in 45.6% and posttraumatic cataract in 29.7% of patients. Other abnormalities were cataract with retinal detachment, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, subluxated lens, micro/spherophakia, cataract secondary to uveitis, intraocular lens complications, cataract with choroidal coloboma, and visual axis opacification. Developmental and posttraumatic cataracts were the most common abnormalities. Delayed presentation is of concern. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Sensitive skin: review of an ascending concept*

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Ida; Silveira, Jéssica Eleonora P. S.; Hafner, Mariana de Figueiredo Silva; Toyota, Raquel; Pedroso, Debora Midori M.

    2017-01-01

    Sensitive skin is a condition characterized by stinging, burning and itching sensations. The diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of sensitive skin are still under discussion. In the last years, studies on its epidemiology have been performed, showing a high prevalence and impact on quality of life. Brazilian population was also considered in these studies. Cosmetics, climate changes and skin barrier impairment are the main factors that contribute for skin hyperreactivity. New studies are trying to bring new knowledge about the theme. This review will describe data on epidemiology, triggering factors, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:28954102

  17. [Skin hydration and hydrating products].

    PubMed

    Duplan, H; Nocera, T

    2018-05-01

    One of the skin's principal functions is to protect the body against its environment by maintaining an effective epidermal barrier, not only against external factors, but also to prevent water loss from the body. Indeed, water homeostasis is vital for the normal physiological functioning of skin. Hydration levels affect not only visible microscopic parameters such as the suppleness and softness of skin, but also molecular parameters, enzyme activities and cellular signalling within the epidermis. The body is continually losing some of its water, but this phenomenon is limited and the optimal hydration gradient in skin is ensured via a set of sophisticated regulatory processes that rely on the functional and dynamic properties of the uppermost level of the skin consisting of the stratum corneum. The present article brings together data recently acquired in the fields of skin hydration and the characterisation of dehydrated or dry skin, whether through study of the regulatory processes involved or as a result of changes in the techniques used for in situ measurement, and thus in optimisation of management. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Filaggrin-stratified transcriptomic analysis of pediatric skin identifies mechanistic pathways in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Cole, Christian; Kroboth, Karin; Schurch, Nicholas J; Sandilands, Aileen; Sherstnev, Alexander; O'Regan, Grainne M; Watson, Rosemarie M; McLean, W H Irwin; Barton, Geoffrey J; Irvine, Alan D; Brown, Sara J

    2014-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD; eczema) is characterized by a widespread abnormality in cutaneous barrier function and propensity to inflammation. Filaggrin is a multifunctional protein and plays a key role in skin barrier formation. Loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) are a highly significant risk factor for atopic disease, but the molecular mechanisms leading to dermatitis remain unclear. We sought to interrogate tissue-specific variations in the expressed genome in the skin of children with AD and to investigate underlying pathomechanisms in atopic skin. We applied single-molecule direct RNA sequencing to analyze the whole transcriptome using minimal tissue samples. Uninvolved skin biopsy specimens from 26 pediatric patients with AD were compared with site-matched samples from 10 nonatopic teenage control subjects. Cases and control subjects were screened for FLG genotype to stratify the data set. Two thousand four hundred thirty differentially expressed genes (false discovery rate, P < .05) were identified, of which 211 were significantly upregulated and 490 downregulated by greater than 2-fold. Gene ontology terms for "extracellular space" and "defense response" were enriched, whereas "lipid metabolic processes" were downregulated. The subset of FLG wild-type cases showed dysregulation of genes involved with lipid metabolism, whereas filaggrin haploinsufficiency affected global gene expression and was characterized by a type 1 interferon-mediated stress response. These analyses demonstrate the importance of extracellular space and lipid metabolism in atopic skin pathology independent of FLG genotype, whereas an aberrant defense response is seen in subjects with FLG mutations. Genotype stratification of the large data set has facilitated functional interpretation and might guide future therapy development. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Neurologic abnormalities in murderers.

    PubMed

    Blake, P Y; Pincus, J H; Buckner, C

    1995-09-01

    Thirty-one individuals awaiting trial or sentencing for murder or undergoing an appeal process requested a neurologic examination through legal counsel. We attempted in each instance to obtain EEG, MRI or CT, and neuropsychological testing. Neurologic examination revealed evidence of "frontal" dysfunction in 20 (64.5%). There were symptoms or some other evidence of temporal lobe abnormality in nine (29%). We made a specific neurologic diagnosis in 20 individuals (64.5%), including borderline or full mental retardation (9) and cerebral palsy (2), among others. Neuropsychological testing revealed abnormalities in all subjects tested. There were EEG abnormalities in eight of the 20 subjects tested, consisting mainly of bilateral sharp waves with slowing. There were MRI or CT abnormalities in nine of the 19 subjects tested, consisting primarily of atrophy and white matter changes. Psychiatric diagnoses included paranoid schizophrenia (8), dissociative disorder (4), and depression (9). Virtually all subjects had paranoid ideas and misunderstood social situations. There was a documented history of profound, protracted physical abuse in 26 (83.8%) and of sexual abuse in 10 (32.3%). It is likely that prolonged, severe physical abuse, paranoia, and neurologic brain dysfunction interact to form the matrix of violent behavior.

  20. Skin Physiology of the Neonate and Infant: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Oranges, Teresa; Dini, Valentina; Romanelli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Significance: The skin is a complex and dynamic organ that performs several vital functions. The maturation process of the skin starts at birth with the adaption of the skin to the comparatively dry environment compared to the in utero milieu. This adaptive flexibility results in the unique properties of infant skin. To deliver appropriate care to infant skin, it is necessary to understand that it is evolving with unique characteristics. Recent Advances: The role of biophysical noninvasive techniques in the assessment of skin development underlines the importance of an objective evaluation of skin physiology parameters. Skin hydration, transepidermal water loss, and pH values are measurable with specific instruments that give us an accurate and reproducible assessment during infant skin maturation. The recording of these values, following standard measurement procedures, allows us to evaluate the integrity of the skin barrier and to monitor the functionality of the maturing skin over time. Critical Issues: During the barrier development, impaired skin function makes the skin vulnerable to chemical damage, microbial infections, and skin diseases, possibly compromising the general health of the infant. Preterm newborns, during the first weeks of life, have an even less developed skin barrier and, therefore, are even more at risk. Thus, it is extremely important to evaluate the risk of infection, skin breakdown, topical agent absorption, and the risk of thermoregulation failure. Future Directions: Detailed and objective evaluations of infant skin maturation are necessary to improve infant skin care. The results of these evaluations should be formed into general protocols that will allow doctors and caregivers to give more personalized care to full-term newborns, preterm newborns, and infants. PMID:26487977

  1. Progress and opportunities for tissue-engineered skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacNeil, Sheila

    2007-02-01

    Tissue-engineered skin is now a reality. For patients with extensive full-thickness burns, laboratory expansion of skin cells to achieve barrier function can make the difference between life and death, and it was this acute need that drove the initiation of tissue engineering in the 1980s. A much larger group of patients have ulcers resistant to conventional healing, and treatments using cultured skin cells have been devised to restart the wound-healing process. In the laboratory, the use of tissue-engineered skin provides insight into the behaviour of skin cells in healthy skin and in diseases such as vitiligo, melanoma, psoriasis and blistering disorders.

  2. Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... early. Cancerous tissue can be removed with a minor surgical procedure. In many cases, that is all the treatment needed. Future lesions may occur. You will need to be vigilant about checking your skin and calling your doctor if you see changes. For more advanced cases, living with cancer during ...

  3. Abnormality, rationality, and sanity.

    PubMed

    Hertwig, Ralph; Volz, Kirsten G

    2013-11-01

    A growing body of studies suggests that neurological and mental abnormalities foster conformity to norms of rationality that are widely endorsed in economics and psychology, whereas normality stands in the way of rationality thus defined. Here, we outline the main findings of these studies, discuss their implications for experimental design, and consider how 'sane' some benchmarks of rationality really are. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Male skin and ingredients relevant to male skin care.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Z D

    2012-03-01

    Male skin care needs are heavily influenced by the need to remove facial hair on a regular basis. Facial skin issues associated with poor hair removal approaches are common and include razor burn and irritation. This paper evaluates current research on shaving technology and how careful ingredient selection can contribute to male skin health. The importance of maintaining hair softness during the shave and restoring facial hydration post-shave is discussed. Data are presented on how post-shave moisturizers containing glycerine and emollients can create an environment for improved barrier function which can be further improved by incorporating specific ingredients such as niacinamide. © 2012 The Author. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  5. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  6. A custom tailored model to investigate skin penetration in porcine skin and its comparison with human skin.

    PubMed

    Herbig, Michael E; Houdek, Pia; Gorissen, Sascha; Zorn-Kruppa, Michaela; Wladykowski, Ewa; Volksdorf, Thomas; Grzybowski, Stephan; Kolios, Georgios; Willers, Christoph; Mallwitz, Henning; Moll, Ingrid; Brandner, Johanna M

    2015-09-01

    Reliable models for the determination of skin penetration and permeation are important for the development of new drugs and formulations. The intention of our study was to develop a skin penetration model which (1) is viable and well supplied with nutrients during the period of the experiment (2) is mimicking human skin as far as possible, but still is independent from the problems of supply and heterogeneity, (3) can give information about the penetration into different compartments of the skin and (4) considers specific inter-individual differences in skin thickness. In addition, it should be quick and inexpensive (5) and without ethical implications (6). Using a chemically divers set of four topically approved active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), namely diclofenac, metronidazole, tazarotene, and terbinafine, we demonstrated that the model allows reliable determination of drug concentrations in different layers of the viable epidermis and dermis. For APIs susceptible for skin metabolism, the extent of metabolic transformation in epidermis and dermis can be monitored. Furthermore, a high degree of accordance in the ability for discrimination of skin concentrations of the substances in different layers was found in models derived from porcine and human skin. Viability, proliferation, differentiation and markers for skin barrier function were surveyed in the model. This model, which we call 'Hamburg model of skin penetration' is particularly suited to support a rational ranking and selection of dermatological formulations within drug development projects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Persistent kallikrein 5 activation induces atopic dermatitis-like skin architecture independent of PAR2 activity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanan; Underwood, Joanne; Macmillan, Derek; Shariff, Leila; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan; Harper, John I; Pickard, Chris; Friedmann, Peter S; Healy, Eugene; Di, Wei-Li

    2017-11-01

    Upregulation of kallikreins (KLKs) including KLK5 has been reported in atopic dermatitis (AD). KLK5 has biological functions that include degrading desmosomal proteins and inducing proinflammatory cytokine secretion through protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). However, due to the complex interactions between various cells in AD inflamed skin, it is difficult to dissect the precise and multiple roles of upregulated KLK5 in AD skin. We investigated the effect of upregulated KLK5 on the expression of epidermal-related proteins and cytokines in keratinocytes and on skin architecture. Lesional and nonlesional AD skin biopsies were collected for analysis of morphology and protein expression. The relationship between KLK5 and barrier-related molecules was investigated using an ex vivo dermatitis skin model with transient KLK5 expression and a cell model with persistent KLK5 expression. The influence of upregulated KLK5 on epidermal morphology was investigated using an in vivo skin graft model. Upregulation of KLK5 and abnormal expression of desmoglein 1 (DSG1) and filaggrin, but not PAR2 were identified in AD skin. PAR2 was increased in response to transient upregulation of KLK5, whereas persistently upregulated KLK5 did not show this effect. Persistently upregulated KLK5 degraded DSG1 and stimulated secretion of IL-8, IL-10, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin independent of PAR2 activity. With control of higher KLK5 activity by the inhibitor sunflower trypsin inhibitor G, restoration of DSG1 expression and a reduction in AD-related cytokine IL-8, thymic stromal lymphopoietin, and IL-10 secretion were observed. Furthermore, persistently elevated KLK5 could induce AD-like skin architecture in an in vivo skin graft model. Persistently upregulated KLK5 resulted in AD-like skin architecture and secretion of AD-related cytokines from keratinocytes in a PAR2 independent manner. Inhibition of KLK5-mediated effects may offer potential as a therapeutic approach in AD. Copyright

  8. Skin Pigmentation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Your skin gets its color from a pigment called melanin. Special cells in the skin make melanin. When these cells become damaged or ...

  9. Skin lesion biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... biopsy - skin; Skin cancer - biopsy; Melanoma - biopsy; Squamous cell cancer - biopsy; Basal cell cancer - biopsy; Mohs microsurgery ... dermatitis Infection from bacteria or fungus Melanoma Basal cell skin cancer Squamous cell skin cancer

  10. The influence of a non-occlusive bi-layer composite membrane on skin barrier properties. A non-invasive evaluation with a right-left intra-individual pre/post comparison study.

    PubMed

    Brazzelli, V; Berardesca, E; Rona, C; Borroni, G

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this placebo-controlled right-left intra-individual pre/post comparison study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new bi-layer composite membrane, composed of a layer of knitted cotton and a layer of semi-permeable polyurethane, developed in order to improve skin hydration. Eighteen healthy subjects entered the study. A T-shirt, dedicated to this study, was prepared and it was worn for 8 h, mimicking overnight wearing. Before and at the removal of the T-shirt an objective quantification of skin parameters was performed by measuring hydration, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin surface pH, bilaterally, on the inner side of the forearm. Measurements were performed both at the interface between the skin and the bi-layer composite membrane or cotton and on the outer side of the membrane (to assess permeation of water and occlusive properties of the product) with and without a single application of a moisturizer. A statistically significant improvement of skin hydration, recorded on the stratum corneum underneath the bi-layer membrane versus cotton alone, was measured both with (p < 0.0001) and without application of the moisturizer (p < 0.002). TEWL was shown to decrease significantly on the side of the bi-layer membrane, if compared with cotton (p < 0.008), after application of the moisturizer. TEWL through the membrane showed no significant differences as compared to placebo, confirming the permeability of the fabric. Our data suggest that this bi-layer composite membrane can promote the hydration process of the stratum corneum, increasing the hydrating properties of the moisturizer agent. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  12. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Benetti-Pinto, Cristina Laguna; Rosa-E-Silva, Ana Carolina Japur de Sá; Yela, Daniela Angerame; Soares Júnior, José Maria

    2017-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is a frequent condition in Gynecology. It may impact physical, emotional sexual and professional aspects of the lives of women, impairing their quality of life. In cases of acute and severe bleeding, women may need urgent treatment with volumetric replacement and prescription of hemostatic substances. In some specific cases with more intense and prolonged bleeding, surgical treatment may be necessary. The objective of this chapter is to describe the main evidence on the treatment of women with abnormal uterine bleeding, both acute and chronic. Didactically, the treatment options were based on the current International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) classification system (PALM-COEIN). The etiologies of PALM-COEIN are: uterine Polyp (P), Adenomyosis (A), Leiomyoma (L), precursor and Malignant lesions of the uterine body (M), Coagulopathies (C), Ovulatory dysfunction (O), Endometrial dysfunction (E), Iatrogenic (I), and Not yet classified (N). The articles were selected according to the recommendation grades of the PubMed, Cochrane and Embase databases, and those in which the main objective was the reduction of uterine menstrual bleeding were included. Only studies written in English were included. All editorial or complete papers that were not consistent with abnormal uterine bleeding, or studies in animal models, were excluded. The main objective of the treatment is the reduction of menstrual flow and morbidity and the improvement of quality of life. It is important to emphasize that the treatment in the acute phase aims to hemodynamically stabilize the patient and stop excessive bleeding, while the treatment in the chronic phase is based on correcting menstrual dysfunction according to its etiology and clinical manifestations. The treatment may be surgical or pharmacological, and the latter is based mainly on hormonal therapy, anti-inflammatory drugs and antifibrinolytics. Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro

  13. Data based abnormality detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwar, Yashasvi

    Data based abnormality detection is a growing research field focussed on extracting information from feature rich data. They are considered to be non-intrusive and non-destructive in nature which gives them a clear advantage over conventional methods. In this study, we explore different streams of data based anomalies detection. We propose extension and revisions to existing valve stiction detection algorithm supported with industrial case study. We also explored the area of image analysis and proposed a complete solution for Malaria diagnosis. The proposed method is tested over images provided by pathology laboratory at Alberta Health Service. We also address the robustness and practicality of the solution proposed.

  14. Morphological abnormalities in elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Moore, A B M

    2015-08-01

    A total of 10 abnormal free-swimming (i.e., post-birth) elasmobranchs are reported from The (Persian-Arabian) Gulf, encompassing five species and including deformed heads, snouts, caudal fins and claspers. The complete absence of pelvic fins in a milk shark Rhizoprionodon acutus may be the first record in any elasmobranch. Possible causes, including the extreme environmental conditions and the high level of anthropogenic pollution particular to The Gulf, are briefly discussed. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  15. In vitro models to estimate drug penetration through the compromised stratum corneum barrier.

    PubMed

    Engesland, André; Škalko-Basnet, Nataša; Flaten, Gøril Eide

    2016-11-01

    The phospholipid vesicle-based permeation assay (PVPA) is a recently established in vitro stratum corneum model to estimate the permeability of intact and healthy skin. The aim here was to further evolve this model to mimic the stratum corneum in a compromised skin barrier by reducing the barrier functions in a controlled manner. To mimic compromised skin barriers, PVPA barriers were prepared with explicitly defined reduced barrier function and compared with literature data from both human and animal skin with compromised barrier properties. Caffeine, diclofenac sodium, chloramphenicol and the hydrophilic marker calcein were tested to compare the PVPA models with established models. The established PVPA models mimicking the stratum corneum in healthy skin showed good correlation with biological barriers by ranking drugs similar to those ranked by the pig ear skin model and were comparable to literature data on permeation through healthy human skin. The PVPA models provided reproducible and consistent results with a distinction between the barriers mimicking compromised and healthy skin. The trends in increasing drug permeation with an increasing degree of compromised barriers for the model drugs were similar to the literature data from other in vivo and in vitro models. The PVPA models have the potential to provide permeation predictions when investigating drugs or cosmeceuticals intended for various compromised skin conditions and can thus possibly reduce the time and cost of testing as well as the use of animal testing in the early development of drug candidates, drugs and cosmeceuticals.

  16. Cutaneous skin tag

    MedlinePlus

    Skin tag; Acrochordon; Fibroepithelial polyp ... have diabetes. They are thought to occur from skin rubbing against skin. ... The tag sticks out of the skin and may have a short, narrow stalk connecting it to the surface of the skin. Some skin tags are as long as ...

  17. Chemical peeling in ethnic skin: an update.

    PubMed

    Salam, A; Dadzie, O E; Galadari, H

    2013-10-01

    With the growth of cosmetic dermatology worldwide, treatments that are effective against skin diseases and augment beauty without prolonged recovery periods, or exposing patients to the risks of surgery, are increasing in popularity. Chemical peels are a commonly used, fast, safe and effective clinic room treatment that may be used for cosmetic purposes, such as for fine lines and photoageing, but also as primary or adjunct therapies for acne, pigmentary disorders and scarring. Clinicians are faced with specific challenges when using peels on ethnic skin (skin of colour). The higher risk of postinflammatory dyschromias and abnormal scarring makes peels potentially disfiguring. Clinicians should therefore have a sound knowledge of the various peels available and their safety in ethnic skin. This article aims to review the background, classification, various preparations, indications, patient assessment and complications of using chemical peels in ethnic skin. © 2013 The Authors BJD © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  18. Efficacy of a shower cream and a lotion with skin-identical lipids in healthy subjects with atopic dry skin.

    PubMed

    Berardesca, Enzo; Mortillo, Susan; Cameli, Norma; Ardigo, Marco; Mariano, Maria

    2018-05-10

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, pruritic inflammatory skin disease that adversely affects quality of life. The current study evaluates the efficacy of a shower cream and a lotion, each with skin-identical lipids and emollients, in the treatment of atopic dry skin of subjects with a history of atopic condition. In all, 40 healthy females with clinically dry skin on the lower legs were enrolled in the study and underwent 4 weeks of daily use of the shower cream and 2 additional weeks of both the shower cream and the body lotion. Subjects were evaluated at day 0, week 4, and week 6. Skin barrier function was assessed by Tewameter ® , skin hydration by Corneometer ® , smoothness and desquamation by Visioscan ® , and stratum corneum architecture by reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). The investigator assessed the degree of dryness, roughness, redness, cracks, tingling and itch, and subjective self-assessment evaluated the perception of skin soothing, smoothness, and softness. Skin barrier function and skin moisture maintenance were significantly improved using the shower cream. The lotion with physiological lipids, together with the shower cream, also improved skin barrier function and moisture. Both the shower cream and the body lotion reduced clinical dryness, roughness, redness, cracks, tingling and itch, according to the dermatologist, and increased soothing, smoothness, and softness, according to the subjects of the study. The combination of a shower cream and a lotion with physiological lipids efficiently restores skin barrier function and increases skin hydration, becoming an effective skin-care option for patients with atopic dry skin. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Using infrared and Raman microspectroscopies to compare ex vivo involved psoriatic skin with normal human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Marie; Lefèvre, Thierry; Pouliot, Roxane; Auger, Michèle; Laroche, Gaétan

    2015-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic dermatosis that affects around 3% of the world's population. The etiology of this autoimmune pathology is not completely understood. The barrier function of psoriatic skin is known to be strongly altered, but the structural modifications at the origin of this dysfunction are not clear. To develop strategies to reduce symptoms of psoriasis or adequate substitutes for modeling, a deep understanding of the organization of psoriatic skin at a molecular level is required. Infrared and Raman microspectroscopies have been used to obtain direct molecular-level information on psoriatic and healthy human skin biopsies. From the intensities and positions of specific vibrational bands, the lipid and protein distribution and the lipid order have been mapped in the different layers of the skin. Results showed a similar distribution of lipids and collagen for normal and psoriatic human skin. However, psoriatic skin is characterized by heterogeneity in lipid/protein composition at the micrometer scale, a reduction in the definition of skin layer boundaries and a decrease in lipid chain order in the stratum corneum as compared to normal skin. A global decrease of the structural organization is exhibited in psoriatic skin that is compatible with an alteration of its barrier properties.

  20. Skin findings in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kozel, Beth A; Bayliss, Susan J; Berk, David R; Waxler, Jessica L; Knutsen, Russell H; Danback, Joshua R; Pober, Barbara R

    2014-09-01

    Previous examination in a small number of individuals with Williams syndrome (also referred to as Williams-Beuren syndrome) has shown subtly softer skin and reduced deposition of elastin, an elastic matrix protein important in tissue recoil. No quantitative information about skin elasticity in individuals with Williams syndrome is available; nor has there been a complete report of dermatologic findings in this population. To fill this knowledge gap, 94 patients with Williams syndrome aged 7-50 years were recruited as part of the skin and vascular elasticity (WS-SAVE) study. They underwent either a clinical dermatologic assessment by trained dermatologists (2010 WSA family meeting) or measurement of biomechanical properties of the skin with the DermaLab™ suction cup (2012 WSA family meeting). Clinical assessment confirmed that soft skin is common in this population (83%), as is premature graying of the hair (80% of those 20 years or older), while wrinkles (92%), and abnormal scarring (33%) were detected in larger than expected proportions. Biomechanical studies detected statistically significant differences in dP (the pressure required to lift the skin), dT (the time required to raise the skin through a prescribed gradient), VE (viscoelasticity), and E (Young's modulus) relative to matched controls. The RT (retraction time) also trended longer but was not significant. The biomechanical differences noted in these patients did not correlate with the presence of vascular defects also attributable to elastin insufficiency (vascular stiffness, hypertension, and arterial stenosis) suggesting the presence of tissue specific modifiers that modulate the impact of elastin insufficiency in each tissue. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Thermal therapy techniques for skin and superficial tissue disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Paul R.

    2000-01-01

    There are numerous diseases and abnormal growths and conditions that afflict the skin and underlying superficial tissues. In addition to cancers such as primary, recurrent, and metastatic melanomas and carcinomas, there are many non-malignant conditions such as psoriasis plaques, port wine stains, warts, and superficial cut and bum wounds. Many of these clinical conditions have been shown responsive to treatment with thermal therapy - either low temperature freezing (cryotherapy),. moderate temperature warming to about 41-45°C (hyperthermia), or high temperature (>50°C) ablation or coagulation necrosis therapy. Because both very low and very high temperature therapies are for the most part non-selectively destructive in nature, they normally are used for applications where therapy can be localized precisely in the desired target and some necrosis of adjacent normal tissues is acceptable. With the exception of precision controlled cryotherapy or laser surgery (e.g. wart, mole, tattoo and port wine stain removal) or focal thermal surgery of small deep-seated nodules, it is generally preferred to use moderate thermal therapy (hyperthermia) in the treatment of skin and subcutaneous tissue disease in order to preserve the protective barrier characteristic of intact skin within the target region while inducing more subtle long term therapeutic improvement in the disease condition. This type of subtle thermal therapy is usually administered in combination with one or more other therapies such as radiation or chemotherapy - something with a differential effect on the target and surrounding normal tissues that can be magnified by the adjuvant use of heat.

  2. Organizational barriers

    Treesearch

    Kenneth S. Blonski

    1995-01-01

    One of the traditional roles that prescribed fire has played in the fire management arena is reduction of hazardous fuel buildups under controlled, well-defined environmental conditions. However, our ability to use this tool effectively is blocked by many barriers. The preceding panel discussion about the causes of limited success in implementing prescribed burning...

  3. Melatonin, mitochondria, and the skin.

    PubMed

    Slominski, Andrzej T; Zmijewski, Michal A; Semak, Igor; Kim, Tae-Kang; Janjetovic, Zorica; Slominski, Radomir M; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

    2017-11-01

    The skin being a protective barrier between external and internal (body) environments has the sensory and adaptive capacity to maintain local and global body homeostasis in response to noxious factors. An important part of the skin response to stress is its ability for melatonin synthesis and subsequent metabolism through the indolic and kynuric pathways. Indeed, melatonin and its metabolites have emerged as indispensable for physiological skin functions and for effective protection of a cutaneous homeostasis from hostile environmental factors. Moreover, they attenuate the pathological processes including carcinogenesis and other hyperproliferative/inflammatory conditions. Interestingly, mitochondria appear to be a central hub of melatonin metabolism in the skin cells. Furthermore, substantial evidence has accumulated on the protective role of the melatonin against ultraviolet radiation and the attendant mitochondrial dysfunction. Melatonin and its metabolites appear to have a modulatory impact on mitochondrion redox and bioenergetic homeostasis, as well as the anti-apoptotic effects. Of note, some metabolites exhibit even greater impact than melatonin alone. Herein, we emphasize that melatonin-mitochondria axis would control integumental functions designed to protect local and perhaps global homeostasis. Given the phylogenetic origin and primordial actions of melatonin, we propose that the melatonin-related mitochondrial functions represent an evolutionary conserved mechanism involved in cellular adaptive response to skin injury and repair.

  4. Devices for overcoming biological barriers: the use of physical forces to disrupt the barriers.

    PubMed

    Mitragotri, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Overcoming biological barriers including skin, mucosal membranes, blood brain barrier as well as cell and nuclear membrane constitutes a key hurdle in the field of drug delivery. While these barriers serve the natural protective function in the body, they limit delivery of drugs into the body. A variety of methods have been developed to overcome these barriers including formulations, targeting peptides and device-based technologies. This review focuses on the use of physical methods including acoustic devices, electric devices, high-pressure devices, microneedles and optical devices for disrupting various barriers in the body including skin and other membranes. A summary of the working principles of these devices and their ability to enhance drug delivery is presented. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy.

  6. Effects of various vehicles on skin hydration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wiedersberg, S; Leopold, C S; Guy, R H

    2009-01-01

    The stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin, regulates the passive loss of water to the environment. Furthermore, it is well accepted that drug penetration is influenced by skin hydration, which may be manipulated by the application of moisturizing or oleaginous vehicles. Measurements of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and of skin hydration using a corneometer, were used to assess the effect of different vehicles on stratum corneum barrier function in vivo in human volunteers. A microemulsion significantly increased skin hydration relative to a reference vehicle based on medium chain triglycerides; in contrast, Transcutol(R) lowered skin hydration. TEWL measurements confirmed these observations. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. The Effect of Liquid Gun Propellant (LGP) on Skin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-27

    sodium lauryl sulfate ) decreased the barrier properties of hairless guinea pig skin to the greatest extent after I day, and the barrier returned to normal...San Francisco, CA. Wilhelm K.-P., Surber, C. and Maibach, H.I. Effect of sodium lauryl sulfate - induced skin irritation on in vivo percutaneous...NJ), followed by an intravenous injection of sodium pentobarbital (18 mg/kg, Anthony Products, Arcadia, CA). A Padgett Electro Dermatome (Padgett

  8. Xenobiotic metabolism in human skin and 3D human skin reconstructs: a review.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Sue; van de Sandt, Johannes J M; Merk, Hans F; Lockley, David J; Pendlington, Ruth U; Pease, Camilla K

    2007-12-01

    In this review, we discuss and compare studies of xenobiotic metabolism in both human skin and 3D human skin reconstructs. In comparison to the liver, the skin is a less studied organ in terms of characterising metabolic capability. While the skin forms the major protective barrier to environmental chemical exposure, it is also a potential target organ for adverse health effects. Occupational, accidental or intended-use exposure to toxic chemicals could result in acute or delayed injury to the skin (e.g. inflammation, allergy, cancer). Skin metabolism may play a role in the manifestation or amelioration of adverse effects via the topical route. Today, we have robust testing strategies to assess the potential for local skin toxicity of chemical exposure. Such methods (e.g. the local lymph node assay for assessing skin sensitisation; skin painting carcinogenicity studies) incorporate skin metabolism implicitly in the in vivo model system used. In light of recent European legislation (i.e. 7(th) Amendment to the Cosmetics Directive and Registration Evaluation and Authorisation of existing Chemicals (REACH)), non-animal approaches will be required to reduce and replace animal experiments for chemical risk assessment. It is expected that new models and approaches will need to account for skin metabolism explicitly, as the mechanisms of adverse effects in the skin are deconvoluted. 3D skin models have been proposed as a tool to use in new in vitro alternative approaches. In order to be able to use 3D skin models in this context, we need to understand their metabolic competency in relation to xenobiotic biotransformation and whether functional activity is representative of that seen in human skin.

  9. MicroRNAs in skin tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kyle J; Brown, David A; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Ramchal, Talisha D; Levinson, Howard

    2015-07-01

    35.2 million annual cases in the U.S. require clinical intervention for major skin loss. To meet this demand, the field of skin tissue engineering has grown rapidly over the past 40 years. Traditionally, skin tissue engineering relies on the "cell-scaffold-signal" approach, whereby isolated cells are formulated into a three-dimensional substrate matrix, or scaffold, and exposed to the proper molecular, physical, and/or electrical signals to encourage growth and differentiation. However, clinically available bioengineered skin equivalents (BSEs) suffer from a number of drawbacks, including time required to generate autologous BSEs, poor allogeneic BSE survival, and physical limitations such as mass transfer issues. Additionally, different types of skin wounds require different BSE designs. MicroRNA has recently emerged as a new and exciting field of RNA interference that can overcome the barriers of BSE design. MicroRNA can regulate cellular behavior, change the bioactive milieu of the skin, and be delivered to skin tissue in a number of ways. While it is still in its infancy, the use of microRNAs in skin tissue engineering offers the opportunity to both enhance and expand a field for which there is still a vast unmet clinical need. Here we give a review of skin tissue engineering, focusing on the important cellular processes, bioactive mediators, and scaffolds. We further discuss potential microRNA targets for each individual component, and we conclude with possible future applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Abnormal mitochondrial respiration in failed human myocardium.

    PubMed

    Sharov, V G; Todor, A V; Silverman, N; Goldstein, S; Sabbah, H N

    2000-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is associated with morphologic abnormalities of cardiac mitochondria including hyperplasia, reduced organelle size and compromised structural integrity. In this study, we examined whether functional abnormalities of mitochondrial respiration are also present in myocardium of patients with advanced HF. Mitochondrial respiration was examined using a Clark electrode in an oxygraph cell containing saponin-skinned muscle bundles obtained from myocardium of failed explanted human hearts due to ischemic (ICM, n=9) or idiopathic dilated (IDC, n=9) cardiomyopathy. Myocardial specimens from five normal donor hearts served as controls (CON). Basal respiratory rate, respiratory rate after addition of the substrates glutamate and malate (V(SUB)), state 3 respiration (after addition of ADP, V(ADP)) and respiration after the addition of atractyloside (V(AT)) were measured in scar-free muscle bundles obtained from the subendocardial (ENDO) and subepicardial (EPI) thirds of the left ventricular (LV) free wall, interventricular septum and right ventricular (RV) free wall. There were no differences in basal and substrate-supported respiration between CON and HF regardless of etiology. V(ADP)was significantly depressed both in ICM and IDC compared to CON in all the regions studied. The respiratory control ratio, V(ADP)/V(AT), was also significantly decreased in HF compared to CON. In both ICM and IDC, V(ADP)was significantly lower in ENDO compared to EPI. The results indicate that mitochondrial respiration is abnormal in the failing human heart. The findings support the concept of low myocardial energy production in HF via oxidative phosphorylation, an abnormality with a potentially impact on global cardiac performance. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. Rapid Morphological Brain Abnormalities during Acute Methamphetamine Intoxication in the Rat. An Experimental study using Light and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Hari S.; Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes morphological abnormalities of brain cells during acute methamphetamine (METH) intoxication in the rat and demonstrates the role of hyperthermia, disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and edema in their development. Rats with chronically implanted brain, muscle and skin temperature probes and an intravenous (iv) catheter were exposed to METH (9 mg/kg) at standard (23°C) and warm (29°C) ambient temperatures, allowing for the observation of hyperthermia ranging from mild to pathological levels (38–42°C). When brain temperature peaked or reached a level suggestive of possible lethality (>41.5°C), rats were injected with Evans blue (EB), rapidly anesthetized, perfused, and their brains were taken for further analyses. Four brain areas (cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and hypothalamus) were analyzed for EB extravasation, water and electrolyte (Na+, K+, Cl−) contents, immunostained for albumin and glial fibrillary acidic protein, and examined for neuronal, glial and axonal alterations using standard light and electron microscopy. These examinations revealed profound abnormalities in neuronal, glial, and endothelial cells, which were stronger with METH administered at 29°C than 23°C and tightly correlated with brain and body hyperthermia. These changes had some structural specificity, but in each structure they tightly correlated with increases in EB levels, the numbers of albumin-positive cells, and water and ion contents, suggesting leakage of the BBB, acutely developing brain edema, and serious shifts in brain ion homeostasis as leading factors underlying brain abnormalities. While most of these acute structural and functional abnormalities appear to be reversible, they could trigger subsequent cellular alterations in the brain and accelerate neurodegeneration—the most dangerous complication of chronic amphetamine-like drug abuse. PMID:18773954

  12. Skin integrated with perfusable vascular channels on a chip.

    PubMed

    Mori, Nobuhito; Morimoto, Yuya; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2017-02-01

    This paper describes a method for fabricating perfusable vascular channels coated with endothelial cells within a cultured skin-equivalent by fixing it to a culture device connected to an external pump and tubes. A histological analysis showed that vascular channels were constructed in the skin-equivalent, which showed a conventional dermal/epidermal morphology, and the endothelial cells formed tight junctions on the vascular channel wall. The barrier function of the skin-equivalent was also confirmed. Cell distribution analysis indicated that the vascular channels supplied nutrition to the skin-equivalent. Moreover, the feasibility of a skin-equivalent containing vascular channels as a model for studying vascular absorption was demonstrated by measuring test molecule permeation from the epidermal layer into the vascular channels. The results suggested that this skin-equivalent can be used for skin-on-a-chip applications including drug development, cosmetics testing, and studying skin biology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2011.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2012-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2011. Food allergy appears to be increasing in prevalence and carries a strong economic burden. Risk factors can include dietary ones, such as deficiency of vitamin D and timing of complementary foods, and genetic factors, such as filaggrin loss-of-function mutations. Novel mechanisms underlying food allergy include the role of invariant natural killer T cells and influences of dietary components, such as isoflavones. Among numerous preclinical and clinical treatment studies, promising observations include the efficacy of sublingual and oral immunotherapy, a Chinese herbal remedy showing promising in vitro results, the potential immunotherapeutic effects of having children ingest foods with baked-in milk if they tolerate it, and the use of anti-IgE with or without concomitant immunotherapy. Studies of allergic skin diseases, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity to drugs and insect venom are elucidating cellular mechanisms, improved diagnostics, and potential targets for future treatment. The role of skin barrier abnormalities, as well as the modulatory effects of the innate and adaptive immune responses, are major areas of investigation. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Electrochemical monitoring of native catalase activity in skin using skin covered oxygen electrode.

    PubMed

    Nocchi, Sarah; Björklund, Sebastian; Svensson, Birgitta; Engblom, Johan; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas

    2017-07-15

    A skin covered oxygen electrode, SCOE, was constructed with the aim to study the enzyme catalase, which is part of the biological antioxidative system present in skin. The electrode was exposed to different concentrations of H 2 O 2 and the amperometric current response was recorded. The observed current is due to H 2 O 2 penetration through the outermost skin barrier (referred to as the stratum corneum, SC) and subsequent catalytic generation of O 2 by catalase present in the underlying viable epidermis and dermis. By tape-stripping the outermost skin layers we demonstrate that SC is a considerable diffusion barrier for H 2 O 2 penetration. Our experiments also indicate that skin contains a substantial amount of catalase, which is sufficient to detoxify H 2 O 2 that reaches the viable epidermis after exposure of skin to high concentrations of peroxide (0.5-1mM H 2 O 2 ). Further, we demonstrate that the catalase activity is reduced at acidic pH, as compared with the activity at pH 7.4. Finally, experiments with often used penetration enhancer thymol shows that this compound interferes with the catalase reaction. Health aspect of this is briefly discussed. Summarizing, the results of this work show that the SCOE can be utilized to study a broad spectrum of issues involving the function of skin catalase in particular, and the native biological antioxidative system in skin in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Tumors of the skin and soft tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    The majority of the body surface is covered by the skin. Many internal disorders are reflected in the condition of the skin. One of the major functions of the skin is protection of the other organ systems from a variety of environmental insults. In this role, the skin itself is exposed to factors that can ultimately cause chronic diseases and cancer. Since it is relatively easy to recognize skin abnormalities, most skin cancers are brought to professional attention sooner than other types of cancer. However, due to the close resemblance between many skin neoplasms and noncancerous dermatologic disorders, these neoplasmsmore » may be mistreated for months or even years. In veterinary oncology, as in human medicine, most cancers can be effectively treated or cured following an accurate diagnosis. Once diagnosed, skin neoplasms should be aggressively treated. If causal factors are known, exposure to these factors should be limited through removal of the agent (for chemical carcinogens) or limiting exposure to the agent (for other carcinogens such as sunlight). 10 tabs. (MHB)« less

  16. Structure and Function of Your Skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... the innermost layer. Blood vessels, nerves, hair follicles, oil glands and sweat glands are located in the dermis. What It Does . . . The major function of skin is to provide a barrier between you and the outside environment. Without this protective covering, your life on earth ...

  17. Abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Ying; Cameron, Iain T; Critchley, Hilary O D

    2017-09-01

    It is not uncommon for a woman to suffer from abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) or heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) at some point during her lifetime. Once pathology is excluded, in practice, management needs to be individualised, taking into account the improvement of the woman's symptoms and quality of life. Peer-reviewed journals, governmental and professional society publications. There is now agreement on a structured, universal approach to the diagnosis of AUB, with the aide memoirs PALM (polyps, adenomyosis, leiomyoma, malignancy) and COEIN (coagulopathies, ovulatory dysfunction, endometrial, iatrogenic, not otherwise classified). Once malignancy and significant pelvic pathology have been ruled out, medical treatment is an effective first-line therapeutic option, with surgery, including endometrial ablation and hysterectomy, offered when medical management has failed to resolve symptoms and fertility is no longer desired. There remains controversy around the management of the types and subtypes of adenomyosis and leiomyoma, and understanding their impact on clinical reproductive outcomes. Standardised assessment tools for measuring outcomes of AUB are being developed. Novel diagnostic and monitoring tools should be developed to help stratify treatment for women with AUB, particularly relating to 'unclassified' and 'endometrial' causes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  19. Autoshaping of abnormal children.

    PubMed

    Deckner, C W; Wilcox, L M; Maisto, S A; Blanton, R L

    1980-09-01

    Three experimentally naive abnormal children were exposed to a terminal operant contingency, i.e., reinforcement was delivered only if the children pressed a panel during intervals when it was lighted. Despite the absence of both successive approximation and manual shaping, it was found that each child began to respond discriminatively within a small number of trials. These data replicated previous animal studies concerned with the phenomena of autoshaping and signal-controlled responding. It was also found, however, that one type of autoshaping, the classical conditioning procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on the discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted of intrasubject reversal an multiple baseline designs established the internal validity of the findings. The finding of rapid acquisition of signal-controlled responding obtained with the initial procedure is suggessted to have practical significance. The disruptive effects of the classical form of autoshaping are discussed in terms of negative behavioral contrast.

  20. The top skin-associated genes: a comparative analysis of human and mouse skin transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Peter Arne; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Schrumpf, Holger; Homey, Bernhard; Zlotnik, Albert; Hevezi, Peter

    2014-06-01

    The mouse represents a key model system for the study of the physiology and biochemistry of skin. Comparison of skin between mouse and human is critical for interpretation and application of data from mouse experiments to human disease. Here, we review the current knowledge on structure and immunology of mouse and human skin. Moreover, we present a systematic comparison of human and mouse skin transcriptomes. To this end, we have recently used a genome-wide database of human gene expression to identify genes highly expressed in skin, with no, or limited expression elsewhere - human skin-associated genes (hSAGs). Analysis of our set of hSAGs allowed us to generate a comprehensive molecular characterization of healthy human skin. Here, we used a similar database to generate a list of mouse skin-associated genes (mSAGs). A comparative analysis between the top human (n=666) and mouse (n=873) skin-associated genes (SAGs) revealed a total of only 30.2% identity between the two lists. The majority of shared genes encode proteins that participate in structural and barrier functions. Analysis of the top functional annotation terms revealed an overlap for morphogenesis, cell adhesion, structure, and signal transduction. The results of this analysis, discussed in the context of published data, illustrate the diversity between the molecular make up of skin of both species and grants a probable explanation, why results generated in murine in vivo models often fail to translate into the human.

  1. An implementation algorithm to improve skin-to-skin practice in the first hour after birth.

    PubMed

    Brimdyr, Kajsa; Cadwell, Karin; Stevens, Jeni; Takahashi, Yuki

    2018-04-01

    Evidence supporting the practice of skin-to-skin contact and breastfeeding soon after birth points to physiologic, social, and psychological benefits for both mother and baby. The 2009 revision of Step 4 of the WHO/UNICEF "Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding" elaborated on the practice of skin-to-skin contact between the mother and her newly born baby indicating that the practice should be "immediate" and "without separation" unless documented medically justifiable reasons for delayed contact or interruption exist. While in immediate, continuous, uninterrupted skin-to-skin contact with mother in the first hour after birth, babies progress through 9 instinctive, complex, distinct, and observable stages including self-attachment and suckling. However, the most recent Cochrane review of early skin-to-skin contact cites inconsistencies in the practice; the authors found "inadequate evidence with respect to details … such as timing of initiation and dose." This paper introduces a novel algorithm to analyse the practice of skin to skin in the first hour using two data sets and suggests opportunities for practice improvement. The algorithm considers the mother's Robson criteria, skin-to-skin experience, and Widström's 9 Stages. Using data from vaginal births in Japan and caesarean births in Australia, the algorithm utilizes data in a new way to highlight challenges to best practice. The use of a tool to analyse the implementation of skin-to-skin care in the first hour after birth illuminates the successes, barriers, and opportunities for improvement to achieving the standard of care for babies. Future application should involve more diverse facilities and Robson's classifications. © 2017 The Authors. Maternal and Child Nutrition Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Fungal Skin Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Infections Overview of Fungal Skin Infections Candidiasis (Yeast Infection) Dermatophytid Reaction Intertrigo Tinea Versicolor Overview of ... breasts. Common fungal skin infections are caused by yeasts (such as Candida or Malassezia furfur ) or dermatophytes , ...

  3. Skin care and incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin problems such as redness, peeling, irritation, and yeast infections likely. Bedsores ( pressure sores ) may also develop ... drying the skin. Incontinence problems can cause a yeast infection on the skin. This is an itchy, ...

  4. Skin color - patchy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003224.htm Skin color - patchy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Patchy skin color is areas where the skin color is irregular. ...

  5. Histoplasma skin test

    MedlinePlus

    Histoplasmosis skin test ... health care provider cleans an area of your skin, usually the forearm. An allergen is injected just below the cleaned skin surface. An allergen is a substance that causes ...

  6. Skin Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Resources > Skin Complications of IBD Go Back Skin Complications of IBD Email Print + Share After arthritis, ... about 5% of people with inflammatory bowel disease. SKIN DISORDERS COMMONLY SEEN IN IBD ERHTHEMA NODOSUM The ...

  7. Skin Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... You at Risk? UVA & UVB Skin of Color Tanning Teacher Resources Related: What Is Skin Cancer? | Window ... Tribute Page | Share Your Story | Skin Cancer Information | Tanning | Get Involved Healthy Lifestyle Go With Your Own ...

  8. Soybean-fragmented proteoglycans against skin aging.

    PubMed

    Barba, Clara; Alonso, Cristina; Sánchez, Isabel; Suñer, Elisa; Sáez-Martín, L C; Coderch, Luisa

    2017-08-01

    The majority of age-dependent skin changes happen in the dermis layer inducing changes in skin collagen and in the proteoglycans. The main aim of this work is to study the efficacy of a Proteum serum, containing soybean-fragmented proteoglycans, against skin aging. In vitro tests were performed to evaluate the Proteum serum ability on activating the production of collagen and proteoglycans. An in vivo long-term study was performed to determine the efficacy of the Proteum serum when applied on skin. Protection of healthy skin against detergent-induced dermatitis and the antioxidant properties of the applied Proteum serum were also studied. The in vitro tests demonstrated that the Proteum serum was able to elevate the production of molecules which are essential for supporting the dermal extracellular matrix organization. These results were correlated by the in vivo measurements where a clear trend on improving the measured skin parameters due to the Proteum serum application was found. A beneficial effect of the Proteum serum was demonstrated with an improvement in the skin roughness and a reinforcement of the skin barrier function. Moreover, a significant protector effect on human stratum corneum against lipids peroxides (LPO) was demonstrated.

  9. Stimulation of the penetration of particles into the skin by plasma tissue interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, O.; Richter, H.; Kramer, A.; Patzelt, A.; Meinke, M. C.; Graf, C.; Gao, Q.; Korotianskiy, E.; Rühl, E.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Lademann, J.; Koch, S.

    2011-10-01

    A high number of treatments in dermatology are based on the penetration of topically applied drugs through the skin barrier. This process is predominantly inefficient, on account of the strong protection properties of the upper skin layer - the stratum corneum. If the skin barrier is damaged, the penetration efficiency of topically applied drugs increases. Therefore, different methods have been developed to influence the barrier properties of the skin. Recently, it could be demonstrated that a cold tissue tolerable plasma (TTP) produced by a plasma-jet can strongly enhance drug delivery through the skin. These investigations were performed by using a solution of fluorescent dye as a model drug. In the present study, these investigations were carried out using fluorescent silica particles at different sizes. The aim of the study was to investigate whether or not there is a limitation in size for topically applied substances to pass through the skin barrier after plasma treatment.

  10. Bleeding into the skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... red; Pinpoint red spots on the skin; Petechiae; Purpura ... in the newborn) Aging skin (ecchymosis) Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (petechiae and purpura) Henoch-Schonlein purpura (purpura) Leukemia ( ...

  11. Photoprotective effects of topical ginseng leaf extract using Ultraflo L against UVB-induced skin damage in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yang Hee; Lee, Hyun-Sun; Jung, Eun Young; Han, Sung-Hee; Park, Yooheon; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2017-10-01

    Abnormal activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) plays an important role in UV-induced wrinkle formation, which is a major dermatological problem. This formation occurs due to the degeneration of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we investigated the cutaneous photoprotective effects of Ultraflo L treated ginseng leaf (UTGL) in hairless mice. SKH-1 hairless mice (6 weeks of age) were randomly divided into four groups (8 mice/group). UTGL formulation was applied topically to the skin of the mice for 10 weeks. The normal control group received nonvehicle and was not irradiated with UVB. The UV control (UVB) group received nonvehicle and was exposed to gradient-UVB irradiation. The groups (GA) receiving topical application of UTGL formulation were subjected to gradient-UVB irradiation on 0.5 mg/cm 2 [GA-low (GA-L)] and 1.0 mg/cm 2 [(GA-high (GA-H)] of dorsal skin area, respectively. We found that topical treatment with UTGL attenuated UVB-induced epidermal thickness and impairment of skin barrier function. Additionally, UTGL suppressed the expression of MMP-2, -3, and -13 induced by UVB irradiation. Our results show that topical application of UTGL protects the skin against UVB-induced damage in hairless mice and suggest that UTGL can act as a potential agent for preventing and/or treating UVB-induced photoaging. UTGL possesses sunscreen properties and may exhibit photochemoprotective activities inside the skin of mice. Therefore, UTGL could be used as a potential therapeutic agent to protect the skin against UVB-induced photoaging.

  12. Acral peeling skin syndrome: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    García, Elena García; Carreño, Rosario Granados; Martínez González, Miguel A; Reyes, José Jiménez

    2005-01-01

    Peeling skin syndrome is a rare dermatosis characterized by spontaneous and painless peeling of the skin. The authors report two patients with history of spontaneous, asymptomatic, and noninflammatory peeling skin of the acral surfaces after soaking in water. On light microscopy, blisters were located in the mid layers of the stratum corneum, above the granular layer. Ultrastructural examination revealed increased intercellular lipids and abnormal, "moth-eaten," keratohyalin granules, but the authors were unable to determine whether the separation initiated within the horny cells or between adjacent cells. These patients represented a localized variant of peeling skin syndrome.

  13. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  14. TRP channels in the skin

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Balázs I; Oláh, Attila; Szöllősi, Attila Gábor; Bíró, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels not only act as ‘polymodal cellular sensors’ on sensory neurons but are also functionally expressed by a multitude of non-neuronal cell types. This is especially true in the skin, one of the largest organs of the body, where they appear to be critically involved in regulating various cutaneous functions both under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, we focus on introducing the roles of several cutaneous TRP channels in the regulation of the skin barrier, skin cell proliferation and differentiation, and immune functions. Moreover, we also describe the putative involvement of several TRP channels in the development of certain skin diseases and identify future TRP channel-targeted therapeutic opportunities. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24372189

  15. [Recent studies on corneal epithelial barrier function].

    PubMed

    Liu, F F; Li, W; Liu, Z G; Chen, W S

    2016-08-01

    Corneal epithelium, the outermost layer of eyeball, is the main route for foreign materials to enter the eye. Under physiological conditions, the corneal epithelial superficial cells form a functionally selective permeability barrier. Integral corneal epithelial barrier function not only ensures the enrolling of nutrients which is required for regular metabolism, but also prevents foreign bodies, or disease-causing microorganism invasion. Recently, a large number of clinical and experimental studies have shown that abnormal corneal epithelial barrier function is the pathological basis for many ocular diseases. In addition, some study found that corneal epithelial barrier constitutes a variety of proteins involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and a series of physiological and pathological processes. This paper reviewed recent studies specifically on the corneal epithelial barrier, highlights of its structure, function and influence factors. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 631-635).

  16. Chromium-induced skin damage among Taiwanese cement workers.

    PubMed

    Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Wang, Po-Chih; Wu, Jyun-De; Sheu, Shiann-Cherng

    2016-10-01

    Little research has been done on the relationships between chromium exposure, skin barrier function, and other hygienic habits in cement workers. Our purpose was to investigate chromium-induced skin barrier disruption due to cement exposure among cement workers. One hundred and eight cement workers were recruited in this study. Urinary chromium concentration was used to characterize exposure levels. The biological exposure index was used to separate high and low chromium exposure. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was used to assess the skin barrier function. TEWL was significantly increased in workers with high chromium exposure levels than those with low chromium exposure levels (p = 0.048). A positive correlation was also found between urinary chromium concentration and TEWL (R = 0.28, p = 0.004). After adjusting for smoking status and glove use, a significant correlation between urinary chromium concentrations and TEWL remained. Moreover, workers who smoked and had a high chromium exposure had significantly increased TEWL compared to nonsmokers with low chromium exposure (p = 0.01). Skin barrier function of cement workers may have been disrupted by chromium in cement, and smoking might significantly enhance such skin barrier perturbation with chromium exposure. Decreased chromium skin exposure and smoking cessation should be encouraged at work. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Skin Color and Pigmentation in Ethnic Skin.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Marty O

    2017-02-01

    Skin coloration is highly diverse, partly due to the presence of pigmentation. Color variation is related to the extent of ultraviolet radiation exposure, as well as other factors. Inherent skin coloration arises from differences in basal epidermal melanin amount and type. Skin color is influenced by both the quantity and distribution of melanocytes. The effectiveness of inherent pigmentation for protecting living cells also varies. This article discusses skin color, pigmentation, and ethnicity in relation to clinical practice. Color perception, skin typing/classification, and quantitation of pigmentation are reviewed in relation to ethnicity, environmental stresses/irritants, and potential treatment effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dermocosmetics for dry skin: a new role for botanical extracts.

    PubMed

    Casetti, F; Wölfle, U; Gehring, W; Schempp, C M

    2011-01-01

    Dry skin is associated with a disturbed skin barrier and reduced formation of epidermal proteins and lipids. During recent years, skin-barrier-reinforcing properties of some botanical compounds have been described. Searching the PubMed database revealed 9 botanical extracts that specifically improve skin barrier and/or promote keratinocyte differentiation in vivo after topical application. The topical application of Aloe vera (leaf gel), Betula alba (birch bark extract), Helianthus annuus (sunflower oleodistillate), Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort extract), Lithospermum erythrorhizon (root extract), Piptadenia colubrina (angico-branco extract) and Simarouba amara (bitter wood extract) increased skin hydration, reduced the transepidermal water loss, or promoted keratinocyte differentiation in humans in vivo. The topical application of Rubia cordifolia root extract and rose oil obtained from Rosa spp. flowers stimulated keratinocyte differentiation in mouse models. The underlying mechanisms of these effects are discussed. It is concluded that some botanical compounds display skin-barrier-reinforcing properties that may be used in dermocosmetics for dry skin. However, more investigations on the mode of action and more vehicle-controlled studies are required. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. In vitro permeation of levothyroxine across the skin.

    PubMed

    Padula, Cristina; Pappani, Alice; Santi, Patrizia

    2008-02-12

    The aim of this work was to investigate the in vitro transdermal permeation characteristics of sodium levothyroxine, in view of its topical application. Permeation experiments were performed in vitro, using rabbit ear skin as barrier. At the end of the experiments levothyroxine retained in the skin was extracted and quantified by HPLC. The formulations tested were solutions and a commercial cream. The use of dimethyl beta-cyclodextrin as solubilizing agent increased to a significant extent levothyroxine solubility, but reduced its skin accumulation. Skin stripping before drug application produced a considerable increase in the amount retained and levothyroxine was found also in the receptor compartment. The application of the commercial cream in occlusive conditions increased to a significant extent drug retention in the skin. In conclusion, levothyroxine skin administration is promising in view of a localized effect, because it was retained in the skin. On the contrary, transdermal administration in view of systemic effect does not represent a concrete possibility.

  20. Comparison of the Skin Penetration of 3 Metabolically Stable Chemicals Using Fresh and Frozen Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Jacques-Jamin, Carine; Duplan, Hélène; Rothe, Helga; Vaillant, Ophelie; Eilstein, Joan; Grégoire, Sebastien; Cubberley, Richard; Lange, Daniela; Ellison, Corie; Klaric, Martina; Hewitt, Nicola; Schepky, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The Cosmetics Europe ADME Task Force is developing in vitro and in silico tools for predicting skin and systemic concentrations after topical application of cosmetic ingredients. There are conflicting reports as to whether the freezing process affects the penetration of chemicals; therefore, we evaluated whether the storage of human skin used in our studies (8-12 weeks at -20°C) affected the penetration of model chemicals. Finite doses of trans-cinnamic acid (TCA), benzoic acid (BA), and 6-methylcoumarin (6MC) (non-volatile, non-protein reactive and metabolically stable in skin) were applied to fresh and thawed frozen skin from the same donors. The amounts of chemicals in different skin compartments were analysed after 24 h. Although there were some statistical differences in some parameters for 1 or 2 donors, the penetration of TCA, BA, and 6MC was essentially the same in fresh and frozen skin, i.e., there were no biologically relevant differences in penetration values. Statistical differences that were evident indicated that penetration was marginally lower in frozen than in fresh skin, indicating that the barrier function of the skin was not lost. The penetration of the 3 chemicals was essentially unaffected by freezing the skin at -20°C for up to 12 weeks. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Simplifying Skin Disease Diagnosis with Topical Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Yeo, David C; Xu, Chenjie

    2018-05-01

    A new study published in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering 1 documents a novel diagnostic technology that exploits topically applied nanotechnology to detect skin tissue biomarkers for diagnosis. This concept is demonstrated by noninvasively imaging connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) mRNA in abnormal scar cells, whole tissue, and animal models. In this commentary, we highlight the main findings and discuss their implications. Successful implementation in the clinic could give rise to self-applied, biopsy-free diagnostic technology and significantly reduce healthcare burden. Crucially, noninvasive visualization of disease biomarkers, mobile device signal acquisition, and Internet-enabled transmission could significantly transform the diagnosis of skin disease and other superficial tissues.

  2. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhapsmore » reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.« less

  3. Healthy Skin Matters

    MedlinePlus

    ... the risk of skin cancer and premature skin aging just like too much sun. In fact, most tanning beds emit mainly UVA rays, which may increase the risk of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. Physical activity Being physically active is good for your skin! It increases the ...

  4. Sensitive skin in Europe.

    PubMed

    Misery, L; Boussetta, S; Nocera, T; Perez-Cullell, N; Taieb, C

    2009-04-01

    Sensitive skin appears as a very frequent condition, but there is no comparative data between countries. To perform an epidemiological approach to skin sensitivity in different European countries. An opinion poll was conducted in eight European countries: Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Portugal, Spain and Switzerland. This sample (4506 persons) was drawn from a representative sample of each population aged 15 years or older. Sensitive or very sensitive skin was declared by 38.4% and slightly or not sensitive skin by 61.6%. Women declared more sensitive skin than men. A dermatological disease was declared by 31.2% of people with very sensitive skin, 17.6% of those with sensitive skin, 8.7% of those with slightly sensitive skin and 3.7% of those who do not have sensitive skin. A history of childhood atopic dermatitis was more frequent in patients with sensitive or very sensitive skin. The interviewees who declared that they had dry or oily skin also reported significantly more frequently sensitive or very sensitive skin than those with normal skin. Sensitive and very sensitive skins were clearly more frequent in Italy and France. This study is the first study that compares skin sensitivity in European countries. Prevalence is high, but significant differences are noted between these countries. Dermatological antecedents (or treatments?) could be involved in the occurrence of skin sensitivity.

  5. Reconstitution of full‐thickness skin by microcolumn grafting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Vuong, Linh N.; Fisher, Jeremy M.; Farinelli, William A.; Anderson, R. Rox

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In addition to providing a physical barrier, skin also serves a diverse range of physiological functions through different specialized resident cell types/structures, including melanocytes (pigmentation and protection against ultraviolet radiation), Langerhans cells (adaptive immunity), fibroblasts (maintaining extracellular matrix, paracrine regulation of keratinocytes), sweat glands (thermoregulation) and hair follicles (hair growth, sensation and a stem cell reservoir). Restoration of these functional elements has been a long‐standing challenge in efforts to engineer skin tissue, while autologous skin grafting is limited by the scarcity of donor site skin and morbidity caused by skin harvesting. We demonstrate an alternative approach of harvesting and then implanting μm‐scale, full‐thickness columns of human skin tissue, which can be removed from a donor site with minimal morbidity and no scarring. Fresh human skin microcolumns were used to reconstitute skin in wounds on immunodeficient mice. The restored skin recapitulated many key features of normal human skin tissue, including epidermal architecture, diverse skin cell populations, adnexal structures and sweat production in response to cholinergic stimulation. These promising preclinical results suggest that harvesting and grafting of microcolumns may be useful for reconstituting fully functional skin in human wounds, without donor site morbidity. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27296503

  6. Reconstitution of full-thickness skin by microcolumn grafting.

    PubMed

    Tam, Joshua; Wang, Ying; Vuong, Linh N; Fisher, Jeremy M; Farinelli, William A; Anderson, R Rox

    2017-10-01

    In addition to providing a physical barrier, skin also serves a diverse range of physiological functions through different specialized resident cell types/structures, including melanocytes (pigmentation and protection against ultraviolet radiation), Langerhans cells (adaptive immunity), fibroblasts (maintaining extracellular matrix, paracrine regulation of keratinocytes), sweat glands (thermoregulation) and hair follicles (hair growth, sensation and a stem cell reservoir). Restoration of these functional elements has been a long-standing challenge in efforts to engineer skin tissue, while autologous skin grafting is limited by the scarcity of donor site skin and morbidity caused by skin harvesting. We demonstrate an alternative approach of harvesting and then implanting μm-scale, full-thickness columns of human skin tissue, which can be removed from a donor site with minimal morbidity and no scarring. Fresh human skin microcolumns were used to reconstitute skin in wounds on immunodeficient mice. The restored skin recapitulated many key features of normal human skin tissue, including epidermal architecture, diverse skin cell populations, adnexal structures and sweat production in response to cholinergic stimulation. These promising preclinical results suggest that harvesting and grafting of microcolumns may be useful for reconstituting fully functional skin in human wounds, without donor site morbidity. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Operative treatment of functional facial skin disorders

    PubMed Central

    Scheithauer, Marc Oliver; Rettinger, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    The skin is the principal interface between the body and the surrounding world and thus serves as a protective barrier against trauma, temperature extremes and radiation. With receptors for pressure, movement, heat and cold, it also acts as sensory organ and through sweat secretion plays a role in thermoregulation and electrolyte metabolism. Not all of these functions are relevant to facial skin, however, cosmetic aspects are of vital importance. Disorders primarily affect the protective skin function in defect and scar areas. For operative correction, the following principles should be applied: Minimization of scar development by adherence to indicated incision lines in the face, preferred use of local skin flaps for defect coverage in order to obtain optimal results regarding texture, complexion and sensitivity of skin, as well as consideration of aesthetic units. Recent developments in this field are tissue culture, occlusive dressings, and the use of growth factors. Age-related skin changes with impairment of cosmetic function are characterized by the development of creases and looseness of skin. Rejuvenation has become an important segment of skin surgery. For surface treatment, especially of creases and acne scars, various types of laser treatment are employed. Deeper lines can be filled with filler materials. The integration of the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) into face lift procedures has lead to more viable and natural results. Due to protruding tissue, blepharoplasty of the upper lid is often carried out in combination with forehead lift and eyebrow lift procedures. The optimized use of growth factors and synthetic materials, which serve as a matrix, are aimed at skin replacement which mimics the quality and functions of skin as closely as possible. On the whole, however, the reconstruction of defect through local tissue transfer is still considered as the treatment of choice. PMID:22073066

  8. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopic studies of human and animal skins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Brian W.; Edwards, Howell G.; Williams, Adrian C.

    1994-01-01

    The stratum corneum is the outermost layer of the skin and provides the principal barrier for the ingress of chemicals and environmental toxins into human and animal tissues. However, human skin has several advantages for the administration of therapeutic agents (transdermal drug delivery), but problems occur with the supply, storage, and biohazardous nature of human tissue. Hence, alternative animal tissues have been prepared to model drug diffusion across human skin but the molecular basis for comparison is lacking. Here, FT-Raman spectra of mammalian (human and pig) and reptilian (snake) skins have been obtained and the structural dissimilarities are correlated with drug diffusion studies across the tissues.

  9. Stratum corneum integrity as a predictor for peristomal skin problems in ostomates.

    PubMed

    Nybaek, H; Lophagen, S; Karlsmark, T; Bang Knudsen, D; Jemec, G B E

    2010-02-01

    Peristomal skin problems are common, most often the result is disruption of the skin barrier and this may account for more than one in three visits to ostomy nurses. Therefore a specific assessment of individual risk factors relating to the skin barrier function would be of great interest. Skin barrier integrity in ostomy patients with peristomal skin problems (PSP) was compared with that of ostomy patients with normal skin (controls) using transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Mechanical barrier disruption was determined by a tape stripping test and chemical barrier disruption [sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) 0.25%]. Patients and controls had a highly significant increase in TEWL value in the peristomal area compared with nonperistomal contralateral abdominal skin (P < 0.0001 for both groups). The skin barrier of normal-looking contralateral skin of ostomates was found to be borderline impaired in patients with PSP compared with those without. A linear association was seen between the number of tape strips removed and TEWL for both cases and controls. Tape stripping suggested that patients with PSP had less resilient skin (P = 0.002). A significant difference in TEWL value between cases and controls was also seen for the SLS patch test on the dorsal skin (P = 0.02). Successive tape stripping, a situation analogous to the normal use of a pouching system, caused a higher degree of barrier damage more rapidly in patients with PSP, indicating an impaired mechanical quality of the barrier. The SLS exposure test suggested a generally increased susceptibility to irritant dermatitis as assessed by TEWL. Our findings suggest tape stripping and SLS testing may have a role as predictive tests to identify patients at risk of PSP.

  10. Biochemical abnormalities in neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Sood, Arvind; Grover, Neelam; Sharma, Roshan

    2003-03-01

    The presence of seizure does not constitute a diagnoses but it is a symptom of an underlying central nervous system disorder due to systemic or biochemical disturbances. Biochemical disturbances occur frequently in the neonatal seizures either as an underlying cause or as an associated abnormality. In their presence, it is difficult to control seizure and there is a risk of further brain damage. Early recognition and treatment of biochemical disturbances is essential for optimal management and satisfactory long term outcome. The present study was conducted in the department of pediatrics in IGMC Shimla on 59 neonates. Biochemical abnormalities were detected in 29 (49.15%) of cases. Primary metabolic abnormalities occurred in 10(16.94%) cases of neonatal seizures, most common being hypocalcaemia followed by hypoglycemia, other metabolic abnormalities include hypomagnesaemia and hyponateremia. Biochemical abnormalities were seen in 19(38.77%) cases of non metabolic seizure in neonates. Associated metabolic abnormalities were observed more often with Hypoxic-ischemic-encephalopathy (11 out of 19) cases and hypoglycemia was most common in this group. No infant had hyponateremia, hyperkelemia or low zinc level.

  11. Abnormal lung function at preschool age asthma in adolescence?

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Katariina; Kalliola, Satu; Kotaniemi-Syrjänen, Anne; Sarna, Seppo; Malmberg, L Pekka; Pelkonen, Anna S; Mäkelä, Mika J

    2018-05-01

    Asthma often begins early in childhood. However, the risk for persistence is challenging to evaluate. This longitudinal study relates lung function assessed with impulse oscillometry (IOS) in preschool children to asthma in adolescence. Lung function was measured with IOS in 255 children with asthma-like symptoms aged 4-7 years. Baseline measurements were followed by exercise challenge and bronchodilation tests. At age 12-16 years, 121 children participated in the follow-up visit, when lung function was assessed with spirometry, followed by a bronchodilation test. Asthma symptoms and medication were recorded by a questionnaire and atopy defined by skin prick tests. Abnormal baseline values in preschool IOS were significantly associated with low lung function, the need for asthma medication, and asthma symptoms in adolescence. Preschool abnormal R5 at baseline (z-score ≥1.645 SD) showed 9.2 odds ratio (95%CI 2.7;31.7) for abnormal FEV1/FVC, use of asthma medication in adolescence, and 9.9 odds ratio (95%CI 2.9;34.4) for asthma symptoms. Positive exercise challenge and modified asthma-predictive index at preschool age predicted asthma symptoms and the need for asthma medication, but not abnormal lung function at teenage. Abnormal preschool IOS is associated with asthma and poor lung function in adolescence and might be utilised for identification of asthma persistence. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Skin vessel lesions in aluminum potroom workers].

    PubMed

    Siurin, S A; Nikanov, A N; Shilov, V V

    2012-01-01

    The features of development of the skin vessels lesions in 550 aluminum production workers have been investigated. The high prevalence of these disorders have been revealed in anode-operators and cell-operators, 49, 3 and 26.0% of workers, respectively. The regularity and staging of the development of this abnormity have been established, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical significance of those remain unknown.

  13. Linear scleroderma en coup de sabre including abnormal dental development.

    PubMed

    Hørberg, M; Lauesen, S R; Daugaard-Jensen, J; Kjær, I

    2015-04-01

    Linear scleroderma en coup de sabre (SCS) is a rare skin condition, where dense collagen is deposited in a localised groove of the head and neck area resembling the stroke of a sabre. The SCS may involve the oral cavity, but the severity and relation to this skin abnormality is unknown. A paediatric dentist may be the first medical person to identify SCS by its involvement in dentition. It is assumed that the malformation of a dentition could be associated with the severity of the skin deviation. A 6-year and 10-month-old Turkish girl with a history of SCS was referred for dental diagnostics and treatment. The SCS skin lesion affected the left side of her hairline over the forehead and nose, involving the left orbit proceeding towards the left oral region. Dental clinical/radiographic examination revealed malformed left maxillary incisors with short roots and lack of eruption. The patient has been regularly controlled and treated since she was first diagnosed. A surgical and orthodontic treatment was performed to ensure optimal occlusion, space and alveolar bone development. The present age of the patient is 14 years and 10 months. This case demonstrated a patient with a left-sided skin defect (SCS) and a left-sided local malformation in her dentition. It is possible that there is a developmental connection between these two left-sided defects, both with an ectodermal origin.

  14. In vivo skin penetration of macromolecules in irritant contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Mottaleb, Mona M A; Lamprecht, Alf

    2016-12-30

    Recently, a selective preferential accumulation of polymeric nanoparticles (in the size range around 100nm) has been observed in the follicular system of dermatitis skin. The present investigation aimed at clearly investigating the effect of irritant contact dermatitis on the barrier permeability for colloidal systems below this size range, namely quantum dots and hydrophilic macromolecules. Irritant dermatitis was induced in mice and the penetrability of quantum dots (5nm) and hydrophilic dextran molecules has been tracked in both healthy and inflamed skin using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The selective accumulation of the quantum dots was clearly observed in inflamed skin while hydrophilic dextran behaved similarly in both healthy and inflamed skin. The therapeutic potential for the transdermal delivery of peptide drugs through inflamed skin has been also tested in rats. Results revealed that the transdermal permeation of insulin and calcitonin was not significantly enhanced in dermatitis compared to healthy skin. On the other side, permeation through stripped skin was significantly higher. However, the effect was limited and shorter compared to the SC injection where t min was 0.5h and 2h with a 70% and 46% reduction in blood glucose levels for the stripped skin and the SC injection respectively. Similarly, t min was 4h and 8h with area under the curve of 161±65% and 350±97% for the stripped skin and the SC injection respectively. In conclusion, the changes in skin permeability accompanied with skin inflammation did not affect its permeability to peptide drugs. Our findings also underline that experiments with the tape stripped skin model as a surrogate for inflamed skin can risk misleading conclusions due to significant difference of skin permeability between the tape stripped skin and inflamed skin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in opiate addicts.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Christina; Stöllberger, Claudia; Hlavin, Anton; Finsterer, Josef; Hager, Isabella; Hermann, Peter

    2008-12-01

    To determine in a cross-sectional study the prevalence of electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities in opiate addicts who were therapy-seeking and its association with demographic, clinical and drug-specific parameters. In consecutive therapy-seeking opiate addicts, a 12-lead ECG was registered within 24 hours after admission and evaluated according to a pre-set protocol between October 2004 and August 2006. Additionally, demographic, clinical and drug-specific parameters were recorded. Included were 511 opiate-addicts, 25% female, with a mean age of 29 years (range 17-59 years). One or more ECG abnormalities were found in 314 patients (61%). In the 511 patients we found most commonly ST abnormalities (19%), QTc prolongation (13%), tall R- and/or S-waves (11%) and missing R progression (10%). ECG abnormalities were more common in males than in females (64 versus 54%, P < 0.05), and in patients with positive than negative urine findings for cannabis (68 versus 57%, P < 0.05). Patients with ST abnormalities were more often males than females (21 versus 11%, P < 0.05), had a history of seizures less often (16 versus 27%, P < 0.05), had positive than negative urine findings for cannabis more often (26 versus 15%, P < 0.01) and had negative than positive urine findings for methadone more often (21 versus 11%, P < 0.05). QTc prolongation was more frequent in patients with high dosages of maintenance drugs than in patients with medium or low dosages (27 versus 12 versus 10%, P < 0.05) and in patients whose urine findings were positive than negative for methadone (23 versus 11%, P < 0.001) as well as for benzodiazepines (17 versus 9%, P < 0.05). Limitations of the data are that in most cases other risk factors for the cardiac abnormalities were not known. ECG abnormalities are frequent in opiate addicts. The most frequent ECG abnormalities are ST abnormalities, QTc prolongation and tall R- and/or S-waves. ST abnormalities are associated with cannabis, and QTc prolongation

  16. Estrogens and aging skin.

    PubMed

    Thornton, M Julie

    2013-04-01

    Estrogen deficiency following menopause results in atrophic skin changes and acceleration of skin aging. Estrogens significantly modulate skin physiology, targeting keratinocytes, fibroblasts, melanocytes, hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and improve angiogenesis, wound healing and immune responses. Estrogen insufficiency decreases defense against oxidative stress; skin becomes thinner with less collagen, decreased elasticity, increased wrinkling, increased dryness and reduced vascularity. Its protective function becomes compromised and aging is associated with impaired wound healing, hair loss, pigmentary changes and skin cancer.   Skin aging can be significantly delayed by the administration of estrogen. This paper reviews estrogen effects on human skin and the mechanisms by which estrogens can alleviate the changes due to aging. The relevance of estrogen replacement, selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and phytoestrogens as therapies for diminishing skin aging is highlighted. Understanding estrogen signaling in skin will provide a basis for interventions in aging pathologies.

  17. Skin physiology and textiles - consideration of basic interactions.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Abdel-Naser, M B; Verma, S

    2006-01-01

    The skin exerts a number of essential protective functions ensuring homeostasis of the whole body. In the present review barrier function of the skin, thermoregulation, antimicrobial defence and the skin-associated immune system are discussed. Barrier function is provided by the dynamic stratum corneum structure composed of lipids and corneocytes. The stratum corneum is a conditio sine qua non for terrestrial life. Impairment of barrier function can be due to injury and inflammatory skin diseases. Textiles, in particular clothing, interact with skin functions in a dynamic pattern. Mechanical properties like roughness of fabric surface are responsible for non-specific skin reactions like wool intolerance or keratosis follicularis. Thermoregulation, which is mediated by local blood flow and evaporation of sweat, is an important subject for textile-skin interactions. There are age-, gender- and activity-related differences in thermoregulation of skin that should be considered for the development of specifically designed fabrics. The skin is an important immune organ with non-specific and specific activities. Antimicrobial textiles may interfere with non-specific defence mechanisms like antimicrobial peptides of skin or the resident microflora. The use of antibacterial compounds like silver, copper or triclosan is a matter of debate despite their use for a very long period. Macromolecules with antimicrobial activity like chitosan that can be incorporated into textiles or inert material like carbon fibres or activated charcoal seem to be promising agents. Interaction of textiles with the specific immune system of skin is a rare event but may lead to allergic contact dermatitis. Electronic textiles and other smart textiles offer new areas of usage in health care and risk management but bear their own risks for allergies.

  18. Rheological and sensory properties of hydrophilic skin protection gels based on polyacrylates.

    PubMed

    Kulawik-Pióro, Agnieszka; Kurpiewska, Joanna; Kułaszka, Agnieszka

    2018-03-01

    With the current increases in occupational skin diseases, literature data attesting the decreasing efficiency of barrier creams with respect to the manufacturer's declarations and legal regulations granting skin protection gels for employees, research is required to analyse and evaluate the recipes used for hydrophilic skin protection gels based on polyacrylates. This study investigated the rheological properties, pH and sensory perception of hydrophilic barrier gels based on polyacrylates. The acrylic acid derivatives used were good thickeners, and helped to form transparent gels of adequate durability. They could be used to create hydrophilic films on the surface of the skin to protect it against hydrophobic substances. A correlation was shown between the results of the rheological properties and the barrier properties of the gels. This confirms the possibility of monitoring the quality of the gels at the stage of recipe development. Polyacrylates are viable for use in industry to produce hydrophilic barrier creams suitable for skin protection.

  19. Tight junctions form a barrier in porcine hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Christiane; Brandner, Johanna M; Laue, Michael; Raesch, Simon S; Hansen, Steffi; Failla, Antonio V; Vidal, Sabine; Moll, Ingrid; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2016-02-01

    Follicular penetration has gained increasing interest regarding (i) safety concerns about (environmentally born) xenobiotics available to the hair follicle (HF), e.g. nanomaterials or allergens which should not enter the skin, and (ii) the possibility for non-invasive follicular drug and antigen delivery. However, not much is known about barriers in the HF which have to be surpassed upon uptake and/or penetration into surrounding tissue. Thus, aim of this work was a detailed investigation of this follicular barrier function, as well as particle uptake into the HF of porcine skin which is often used as a model system for human skin for such purposes. We show that follicular tight junctions (TJs) form a continuous barrier from the infundibulum down to the suprabulbar region, complementary to the stratum corneum in the most exposed upper follicular region, but remaining as the only barrier in the less accessible lower follicular regions. In the bulbar region of the HF no TJ barrier was found, demonstrating the importance of freely supplying this hair-forming part with e.g. nutrients or hormones from the dermal microenvironment. Moreover, the dynamic character of the follicular TJ barrier was shown by modulating its permeability using EDTA. After applying polymeric model-nanoparticles (154 nm) to the skin, transmission electron microscopy revealed that the majority of the particles were localized in the upper part of the HF where the double-barrier is present. Only few penetrated deeper, reaching regions where TJs act as the only barrier, and no particles were observed in the bulbar, barrier-less region. Lastly, the equivalent expression and distribution of TJ proteins in human and porcine HF further supports the suitability of porcine skin as a predictive model to study the follicular penetration and further biological effects of dermally applied nanomaterials in humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Hand hygiene and skin health.

    PubMed

    Kownatzki, E

    2003-12-01

    The high rate of hand problems associated with the hand hygiene of medical professions is due to a combination of damaging factors: (1) the removal of barrier lipids by detergent cleaning and alcohol antisepsis followed by a loss of moisturizers and stratum corneum water and (2) the overhydration of the stratum corneum by sweat trapped within gloves. Together the facilitate the invasion of irritants and allergens which elicit inflammatory responses in the dermis. Among the lipids and water-soluble substances removed are natural antibacterials. Their loss leads to increased growth of transient and pathogenic micro-organisms which jeapordizes the very intention of skin hygiene. The kinetics of damage and its repair, and epidemiological evidence suggest that modern synthetic detergents as used in foaming liquid cleansers are the major offender. Conversely, the replacement of detergents with non-detergent emulsion cleansers has been shown to be effective in reducing the prevalence of hand problems among hospital staff. Presently recommended hand antisepsis reduces the risks to patients, but puts the burden on the health care provider. Rather than fighting micro-organisms at the expense of the skin's health, the skin and its own defences should be considered a collaborator in combating infectious diseases.

  1. Cosmetic formulations containing Lithospermum erythrorhizon root extract show moisturizing effects on human skin.

    PubMed

    Chang, Man-Jau; Huang, Huey-Chun; Chang, Hsien-Cheh; Chang, Tsong-Min

    2008-07-01

    Retention of water in the stratum corneum of skin epidermis plays an important role in regulation of skin function. Loss of water may decline skin appearance gradually and lead to irregular skin disorders. The root extract of Lithospermum erythrorhizon (LES) is known for its various pharmacological activities. However, the potential skin care effect of LES is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the moisturizing efficacy and skin barrier repairing activity of LES. For this study, 30 healthy Asian females (age 20-30) with healthy skin had applied the test emulsions twice daily over a period of 28 days. The skin properties were measured by skin bioengineering techniques. Our preliminary results indicated that LES show moisturizing effect on skin hydration in a time- and dose-dependent pattern, and the maximum increase in skin humidity was 11.77 +/- 1.18% for emulsion LES5.00. Particularly, LES-containing emulsions significantly improve skin barrier function by decreasing the value of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in a time- and dose-dependent pattern, and the maximum decrease in TEWL value was 7.68 +/- 0.79% for emulsion LES5.00. Taken together, our data demonstrate that LES is more effective in increasing skin humidity and decreasing the TEWL values, indicating the potential skin care effects of LES.

  2. Infant Skin Care Products: What Are the Issues?

    PubMed

    Kuller, Joanne McManus

    2016-10-01

    Infant skin is susceptible to dryness and irritation from external factors, including topical skin care products not formulated for the infant's skin. This may increase the risk of contact dermatitis. Parents frequently express concern regarding potential harm from ingredients in skin care products and seek information. This is complicated by several skin care myths. The purpose of this literature review was to provide evidence-based information to educate parents on the use of products for preterm and term infants. Multiple searches using PubMed were conducted including the search terms "infant skin care," "infant products," "infant bath," "emollients," "diaper skin care," and "diaper wipes." Reference lists of comprehensive reviews were also scanned. Google searches were used to assess consumer information, product information, and regulatory guidelines. There is little scientific evidence to support safety of natural/organic products on infant skin. Raw materials originate from different sources, complicating testing and comparisons of ingredients. Research shows that cleansers formulated for infant skin do not weaken the skin barrier the way harsher soaps and detergents can. Oils with the lowest oleic acid content provide a lower risk of irritant contact dermatitis. Nurses must be informed about natural and organic products, preservatives, and fragrances and know the definition of commonly used marketing terms. Decisions regarding the use of infant products in preterm and term infants should be evidence based. More research is needed to support claims regarding the safety of products used on infant skin.

  3. Cytogenetics of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Carless, Melanie A; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers has revealed recurrent aberrations, the frequency of which is reflective of malignant potential. Highly aberrant karyotypes are seen in melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis, Merkel cell carcinoma and cutaneous lymphomas with more stable karyotypes seen in basal cell carcinoma, keratoacanthoma, Bowen's disease and dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. Some aberrations are common among a number of skin cancer types including rearrangements and numerical abnormalities of chromosome 1, -3p, +3q, partial or entire trisomy 6, trisomy 7, +8q, -9p, +9q, partial or entire loss of chromosome 10, -17p, +17q and partial or entire gain of chromosome 20. Combination of cytogenetic analysis with other molecular genetic techniques has enabled the identification of not only aberrant chromosomal regions, but also the genes that contribute to a malignant phenotype. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the pertinent cytogenetic aberrations associated with a variety of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers.

  4. Pinna abnormalities and low-set ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect - pinna; Congenital defect - pinna Images Ear abnormalities Pinna of the newborn ear References Haddad J, Keesecker S. Congenital malformations. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, ...

  5. Natural and Sun-Induced Aging of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Rittié, Laure; Fisher, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    With worldwide expansion of the aging population, research on age-related pathologies is receiving growing interest. In this review, we discuss current knowledge regarding the decline of skin structure and function induced by the passage of time (chronological aging) and chronic exposure to solar UV irradiation (photoaging). Nearly every aspect of skin biology is affected by aging. The self-renewing capability of the epidermis, which provides vital barrier function, is diminished with age. Vital thermoregulation function of eccrine sweat glands is also altered with age. The dermal collagenous extracellular matrix, which comprises the bulk of skin and confers strength and resiliency, undergoes gradual fragmentation, which deleteriously impacts skin mechanical properties and dermal cell functions. Aging also affects wound repair, pigmentation, innervation, immunity, vasculature, and subcutaneous fat homeostasis. Altogether, age-related alterations of skin lead to age-related skin fragility and diseases. PMID:25561721

  6. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  7. Impact of chemical peeling combined with negative pressure on human skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, S J; Kang, I J; Shin, M K; Jeong, K H; Baek, J H; Koh, J S; Lee, S J

    2016-10-01

    In vivo changes in skin barrier function after chemical peeling with alpha hydroxyacids (AHAs) have been previously reported. However, the additional effects of physical treatment with chemical agents on skin barrier function have not been adequately studied. This study measured the degree of acute skin damage and the time required for skin barrier repair using non-invasive bioengineering methods in vivo with human skin to investigate the additional effect of a 4% AHA chemical jet accelerated at supersonic velocities. Thirteen female subjects (average age: 29.54 ± 4.86 years) participated in this study. The faces of the subjects were divided into half according to the block randomization design and were then assigned to receive AHA peeling alone or AHA peeling combined with pneumatic pressure on each side of the face. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin colour and skin blood flow were evaluated at baseline and at 30 min, 2, 5 and 7 days after treatment. The TEWL and skin blood flow were significantly increased after 30 min in chemodermabrasion compared with chemical peeling alone (P < 0.05). The TEWL and skin blood flow recovered to baseline after 2 days, and TEWL was significantly decreased at 7 days compared with chemical peeling alone (P < 0.05). Chemodermabrasion can temporarily impair skin barriers, but it is estimated that it can enhance the skin barrier function after 7 days compared to the use of a chemical agent alone. In addition, chemodermabrasion has a more effective impact in the dermis and relatively preserves the skin barrier. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  8. Skin layers (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... system. One of the main functions of the skin is protection. It protects the body from external factors such as bacteria, chemicals, and temperature. The skin contains secretions that can kill bacteria and the ...

  9. Squamous cell skin cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur on skin that is regularly exposed to sunlight or other ultraviolet radiation. The earliest form of ... skin cancer is to reduce your exposure to sunlight . Always use sunscreen: Apply sunscreen with sun protection ...

  10. PPD skin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a method used to diagnose silent (latent) tuberculosis (TB) infection. PPD stands for purified protein derivative. ... skin test; Tuberculin skin test; Mantoux test Images Tuberculosis in the kidney Tuberculosis in the lung Positive ...

  11. Examine Your Skin

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ...

  12. An evaluation of the skin stripping of wound dressing adhesives.

    PubMed

    Waring, M; Bielfeldt, S; Mätzold, K; Wilhelm, K P; Butcher, M

    2011-09-01

    This study looks at six different modern wound dressings to investigate how likely they are to cause skin stripping and impairment of the skin's barrier function. Healthy volunteers had each dressing applied, removed and reapplied to the skin on their back over the study period of 15 days. Skin barrier function was investigated using the amount of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and then related to the amount of skin stripping, investigated by measuring stained skin removal, the thickness of the stratum corneum after treatment, and the amount of skin attached to the removed dressings. General signs of trauma, such as skin dryness and erythema, were investigated by subjective and objective parameters. TEWL values measured on the untreated test area, as well as after application of Urgotul Trio, remained relatively unchanged and Mepilex Border decreased slightly (?1g/m2/h), while all other dressings displayed an increased in TEWL: Allevyn Adhesive (5g/m2/h), Versiva XC (14g/m2/h), Comfeel Plus (22g/m2/h) and Biatain (28g/m2/h). By the end of the study, only the untreated area (mean 43% dye remaining), Mepilex Border (76%) and Urgotul Trio (34%) areas had visible dye remaining. It is interesting to note that the untreated site had a colour change, suggesting loss of stratum corneum, due to the shedding of skin cells from the surface. The increase in total skin colour for Comfeel Plus and Biatain after day 8 might be assigned to an increased redness due to erythema. All the dressings showed evidence of stratum corneum attached to the adhesive, except Mepilex Border, which appeared to be free of any attached stratum corneum. Overall the best performance in terms of skin protection and failure to cause skin trauma was found to be for Mepilex Border. This project was funded by a grant from Mölnlycke Healthcare Ltd.

  13. Endocrine abnormalities in lithium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Gabriella; Mishra, Vinita; Nikolova, Stanka

    2017-10-01

    Lithium toxicity can manifest as a variety of biochemical -abnormalities. This case report describes a patient -presenting to the emergency department with neuropsychiatric -symptoms on a background of bipolar disorder, for which she was prescribed lithium for 26 years previously. Cases of lithium toxicity are rare but can be severe and this case report -demonstrates to clinicians that they must be thorough in investigating patients with lithium toxicity, as there are many potential abnormalities that can manifest concurrently. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of contact barrier on electron transport in graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang-Bo; Han, Bing-Hong; Liao, Zhi-Min; Zhao, Qing; Xu, Jun; Yu, Da-Peng

    2010-01-14

    The influence of the barrier between metal electrodes and graphene on the electrical properties was studied on a two-electrode device. A classical barrier model was used to analyze the current-voltage characteristics. Primary parameters including barrier height and effective resistance were achieved. The electron transport properties under magnetic field were further investigated. An abnormal peak-valley-peak shape of voltage-magnetoresistance curve was observed. The underlying mechanisms were discussed under the consideration of the important influence of the contact barrier. Our results indicate electrical properties of graphene based devices are sensitive to the contact interface.

  15. Aging changes in skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... can cause rashes, skin lesions , and other skin changes, even if you have no other symptoms. Keep skin moist with lotions and other moisturizers. DO NOT use soaps that are heavily perfumed. Bath oils are not recommended because they can cause you ...

  16. [Dermatology and skin color].

    PubMed

    Petit, Antoine

    2010-09-01

    Melanin is the pigment that is responsible for skin, hair and eye colours. Genetics and sun exposure are the two key factors that determine skin pigmentation. In dermatology, skin colours is significant, not only for semiology and diagnosis, but also for epidemiology and wounds healing.

  17. On skin expansion.

    PubMed

    Pamplona, Djenane C; Velloso, Raquel Q; Radwanski, Henrique N

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses skin expansion without considering cellular growth of the skin. An in vivo analysis was carried out that involved expansion at three different sites on one patient, allowing for the observation of the relaxation process. Those measurements were used to characterize the human skin of the thorax during the surgical process of skin expansion. A comparison between the in vivo results and the numerical finite elements model of the expansion was used to identify the material elastic parameters of the skin of the thorax of that patient. Delfino's constitutive equation was chosen to model the in vivo results. The skin is considered to be an isotropic, homogeneous, hyperelastic, and incompressible membrane. When the skin is extended, such as with expanders, the collagen fibers are also extended and cause stiffening in the skin, which results in increasing resistance to expansion or further stretching. We observed this phenomenon as an increase in the parameters as subsequent expansions continued. The number and shape of the skin expanders used in expansions were also studied, both mathematically and experimentally. The choice of the site where the expansion should be performed is discussed to enlighten problems that can lead to frustrated skin expansions. These results are very encouraging and provide insight into our understanding of the behavior of stretched skin by expansion. To our knowledge, this study has provided results that considerably improve our understanding of the behavior of human skin under expansion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Biology of Skin Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcos, Alain

    1983-01-01

    Information from scientific journals on the biology of skin color is discussed. Major areas addressed include: (1) biology of melanin, melanocytes, and melanosomes; (2) melanosome and human diversity; (3) genetics of skin color; and (4) skin color, geography, and natural selection. (JN)

  19. Skin care in nursing: A critical discussion of nursing practice and research.

    PubMed

    Kottner, Jan; Surber, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Skin (self-)care is part of human life from birth until death. Today many different skin care practices, preferences, traditions and routines exist in parallel. In addition, preventive and therapeutic skin care is delivered in nursing and healthcare by formal and informal caregivers. The aim of this contribution is a critical discussion about skin care in the context of professional nursing practice. An explicit skin assessment using accurate diagnostic statements is needed for clinical decision making. Special attention should be paid on high risk skin areas, which may be either too dry or too moist. From a safety perspective the protection and maintenance of skin integrity should have the highest priority. Skin cleansing is the removal of unwanted substances from the skin surface. Despite cleansing efficacy soap, other surfactants and water will inevitably always result in the destruction of the skin barrier. Thousands of products are available to hydrate, moisturize, protect and restore skin properties dependent upon their formulation and the concentration of ingredients. These products intended to left in contact with skin exhibit several actions on and in the skin interfering with skin biology. Unwanted side effects include hyper-hydration and disorganization of lipid bilayers in the stratum corneum, a dysfunctional barrier, increased susceptibility to irritants and allergies, and increases of skin surface pH. Where the skin barrier is impaired appropriate interventions, e.g. apply lipophilic products in sufficient quantity to treat dry skin or protect the skin from exposure to irritants should be provided. A key statement of this contribution is: every skin care activity matters. Every time something is placed on the skin, a functional and structural response is provoked. This response can be either desired or undesired, beneficial or harmful. The choice of all skin care interventions in nursing and healthcare practice must be based on an accurate assessment

  20. Vehicle influence on permeation through intact and compromised skin.

    PubMed

    Gujjar, Meera; Banga, Ajay K

    2014-09-10

    The purpose of this study was to compare the transdermal permeation of a model compound, diclofenac diethylamine, from a hydrophilic and lipophilic vehicle across in vitro models simulating compromised skin. Mineral oil served as a lipophilic vehicle while 10mM phosphate buffered saline served as a hydrophilic vehicle. Compromised skin was simulated by tape stripping, delipidization, or microneedle application and compared with intact skin as a control. Transepidermal water loss was measured to assess barrier function. Skin compromised with tape stripping and delipidization significantly (p<0.05) increased permeation of diclofenac diethylamine compared to intact and microneedle treated skin with phosphate buffered saline vehicle. A similar trend in permeation was observed with mineral oil as the vehicle. For both vehicles, permeation across skin increased in the same order and correlated with degree of barrier impairment as indicated by transepidermal water loss values: intactskin compared to mineral oil vehicle for all simulated models of compromised skin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Skin Immune Landscape: Inside and Outside the Organism.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Florence; Mijouin, Lily; Pichon, Chantal

    2017-01-01

    The skin is an essential organ to the human body protecting it from external aggressions and pathogens. Over the years, the skin was proven to have a crucial immunological role, not only being a passive protective barrier but a network of effector cells and molecular mediators that constitute a highly sophisticated compound known as the "skin immune system" (SIS). Studies of skin immune sentinels provided essential insights of a complex and dynamic immunity, which was achieved through interaction between the external and internal cutaneous compartments. In fact, the skin surface is cohabited by microorganisms recognized as skin microbiota that live in complete harmony with the immune sentinels and contribute to the epithelial barrier reinforcement. However, under stress, the symbiotic relationship changes into a dysbiotic one resulting in skin disorders. Hence, the skin microbiota may have either positive or negative influence on the immune system. This review aims at providing basic background information on the cutaneous immune system from major cellular and molecular players and the impact of its microbiota on the well-coordinated immune responses in host defense.

  2. Passive and iontophoretic transport through the skin polar pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, S K; Peck, K D

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present article is to briefly recount the contributions of Prof. William I. Higuchi to the area of skin transport. These contributions include developing fundamental knowledge of the barrier properties of the stratum corneum, mechanisms of skin transport, concentration gradient across skin in topical drug applications that target the viable epidermal layer, and permeation enhancement by chemical and electrical means. The complex and changeable nature of the skin barrier makes it difficult to assess and characterize the critical parameters that influence skin permeation. The systematic and mechanistic approaches taken by Dr. Higuchi in studying these parameters provided fundamental knowledge in this area and had a measured and lasting influence upon this field of study. This article specifically reviews the validation and characterization of the polar permeation pathway, the mechanistic model of skin transport, the influence of the dermis on the target skin concentration concept, and iontophoretic transport across the polar pathway of skin including the effects of electroosmosis and electropermeabilization. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    No matter if your skin is light, dark, or somewhere in between, everyone is at risk for skin cancer. Learn what skin cancer looks like, how to find it early, and how to lower the chance of skin cancer.

  4. The cutaneous citadel: a holistic view of skin and immunity.

    PubMed

    Spellberg, B

    2000-06-23

    Human skin has 4 major functions: endogenous homeostasis (e.g. regulation of body temperature and fluid balance), metabolism (e.g. Vitamin D synthesis), sensory input, and to serve as a barrier to external threats (e.g. infection, mechanical injury, ultraviolet light). It is the latter function which concerns this review, for the skin's remarkable success in protecting the human body from the outside world is a major component of our immune system. The eminent pathologist, Virchow, whose work in the mid 19th century revolutionized many aspects of medical understanding, viewed the skin as an effective but inanimate barrier (1). However, recent technologies have elucidated a highly complex, dynamic interplay between the skin and other members of the immune system.

  5. Development of a Perfusion Platform for Dynamic Cultivation of in vitro Skin Models.

    PubMed

    Strüver, Kay; Friess, Wolfgang; Hedtrich, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Reconstructed skin models are suitable test systems for toxicity testing and for basic investigations on (patho-)physiological aspects of human skin. Reconstructed human skin, however, has clear limitations such as the lack of immune cells and a significantly weaker skin barrier function compared to native human skin. Potential reasons for the latter might be the lack of mechanical forces during skin model cultivation which is performed classically in static well-plate setups. Mechanical forces and shear stress have a major impact on tissue formation and, hence, tissue engineering. In the present work, a perfusion platform was developed allowing dynamic cultivation of in vitro skin models. The platform was designed to cultivate reconstructed skin at the air-liquid interface with a laminar and continuous medium flow below the dermis equivalent. Histological investigations confirmed the formation of a significantly thicker stratum corneum compared to the control cultivated under static conditions. Moreover, the skin differentiation markers involucrin and filaggrin as well as the tight junction proteins claudin 1 and occludin showed increased expression in the dynamically cultured skin models. Unexpectedly, despite improved differentiation, the skin barrier function of the dynamically cultivated skin models was not enhanced compared with the skin models cultivated under static conditions. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Peeling skin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ilknur, Turna; Demirtaşoğlu, Melda; Akarsu, Sevgi; Lebe, Banu; Güneş, Ali Tahsin; Ozkan, Sebnem

    2006-01-01

    Peeling skin syndrome is a rare disease characterized by widespread painless peeling of the skin. To date, several cases have been described with different clinical features called peeling skin syndrome. Previous reports describe two types (type A and type B) of peeling skin syndrome, both of which show generalized desquamation, sparing palms and soles. We report a 23-year old man who has been classified as neither type A nor type B, and whose history, clinical features and histopathological findings led to a diagnosis of peeling skin syndrome. In addition, the desquamation pattern in our patient was different from that of both types because our case's palms and soles were involved too.

  7. Stratum corneum hydration and skin surface pH in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Knor, Tanja; Meholjić-Fetahović, Ajša; Mehmedagić, Aida

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronically relapsing skin disease with genetic predisposition, which occurs most frequently in preschool children. It is considered that dryness and pruritus, which are always present in AD, are in correlation with degradation of the skin barrier function. Measurement of hydration and pH value of the stratum corneum is one of the noninvasive methods for evaluation of skin barrier function. The aim of the study was to assess skin barrier function by measuring stratum corneum hydration and skin surface pH of the skin with lesions, perilesional skin and uninvolved skin in AD patients, and skin in a healthy control group. Forty-two patients were included in the study: 21 young and adult AD patients and 21 age-matched healthy controls. Capacitance, which is correlated with hydration of stratum corneum and skin surface pH were measured on the forearm in the above areas by SM810/CM820/pH900 combined units (Courage AND Khazaka, Germany). The mean value of water capacitance measured in AD patients was 44.1 ± 11.6 AU (arbitrary units) on the lesions, 60.2 ± 12.4 AU on perilesional skin and 67.2 ± 8.8 AU on uninvolved skin. In healthy controls, the mean value was 74.1 ± 9.2 AU. The mean pH value measured in AD patients was 6.13 ± 0.52 on the lesions, 5.80 ± 0.41 on perilesional skin, and 5.54 ± 0.49 on uninvolved skin. In control group, the mean pH of the skin surface was 5.24 ± 0.40. The values of both parameters measured on lesional skin were significantly different (capacitance decreased and pH increased) from the values recorded on perilesional skin and uninvolved skin. The same held for the relation between perilesional and uninvolved skin. According to study results, the uninvolved skin of AD patients had significantly worse values of the measured parameters as compared with control group. The results of this study suggested the skin barrier function to be degraded in AD patients, which is specifically expressed in lesional skin.

  8. Human age and skin physiology shape diversity and abundance of Archaea on skin

    DOE PAGES

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Probst, Alexander J.; Birarda, Giovanni; ...

    2017-06-22

    The human skin microbiome acts as an important barrier protecting our body from pathogens and other environmental influences. Recent investigations have provided evidence that Archaea are a constant but highly variable component of the human skin microbiome, yet factors that determine their abundance changes are unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the abundance of archaea on human skin is influenced by human age and skin physiology by quantitative PCR of 51 different skin samples taken from human subjects of various age. Our results reveal that archaea are more abundant in human subjects either older than 60 years or youngermore » than 12 years as compared to middle-aged human subjects. These results, together with results obtained from spectroscopy analysis, allowed us gain first insights into a potential link of lower sebum levels and lipid content and thus reduced skin moisture with an increase in archaeal signatures. In conclusion, amplicon sequencing of selected samples revealed the prevalence of specific eury- and mainly thaumarchaeal taxa, represented by a core archaeome of the human skin.« less

  9. Human age and skin physiology shape diversity and abundance of Archaea on skin

    SciTech Connect

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Probst, Alexander J.; Birarda, Giovanni

    The human skin microbiome acts as an important barrier protecting our body from pathogens and other environmental influences. Recent investigations have provided evidence that Archaea are a constant but highly variable component of the human skin microbiome, yet factors that determine their abundance changes are unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the abundance of archaea on human skin is influenced by human age and skin physiology by quantitative PCR of 51 different skin samples taken from human subjects of various age. Our results reveal that archaea are more abundant in human subjects either older than 60 years or youngermore » than 12 years as compared to middle-aged human subjects. These results, together with results obtained from spectroscopy analysis, allowed us gain first insights into a potential link of lower sebum levels and lipid content and thus reduced skin moisture with an increase in archaeal signatures. In conclusion, amplicon sequencing of selected samples revealed the prevalence of specific eury- and mainly thaumarchaeal taxa, represented by a core archaeome of the human skin.« less

  10. Sensorineural Deafness, Distinctive Facial Features and Abnormal Cranial Bones

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Alona; Laurino, Mercy; Maravilla, Kenneth R.; Matsushita, Mark; Raskind, Wendy H.

    2008-01-01

    The Waardenburg syndromes (WS) account for approximately 2% of congenital sensorineural deafness. This heterogeneous group of diseases currently can be categorized into four major subtypes (WS types 1-4) on the basis of characteristic clinical features. Multiple genes have been implicated in WS, and mutations in some genes can cause more than one WS subtype. In addition to eye, hair and skin pigmentary abnormalities, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal bridge are seen in WS type 1. Mutations in the PAX3 gene are responsible for the condition in the majority of these patients. In addition, mutations in PAX3 have been found in WS type 3 that is distinguished by musculoskeletal abnormalities, and in a family with a rare subtype of WS, craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome (CDHS), characterized by dysmorphic facial features, hand abnormalities, and absent or hypoplastic nasal and wrist bones. Here we describe a woman who shares some, but not all features of WS type 3 and CDHS, and who also has abnormal cranial bones. All sinuses were hypoplastic, and the cochlea were small. No sequence alteration in PAX3 was found. These observations broaden the clinical range of WS and suggest there may be genetic heterogeneity even within the CDHS subtype. PMID:18553554

  11. Pursuing prosthetic electronic skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chortos, Alex; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-09-01

    Skin plays an important role in mediating our interactions with the world. Recreating the properties of skin using electronic devices could have profound implications for prosthetics and medicine. The pursuit of artificial skin has inspired innovations in materials to imitate skin's unique characteristics, including mechanical durability and stretchability, biodegradability, and the ability to measure a diversity of complex sensations over large areas. New materials and fabrication strategies are being developed to make mechanically compliant and multifunctional skin-like electronics, and improve brain/machine interfaces that enable transmission of the skin's signals into the body. This Review will cover materials and devices designed for mimicking the skin's ability to sense and generate biomimetic signals.

  12. Nutrition and skin.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Apostolos; Liakou, Aikaterini; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2016-09-01

    Nutrition has long been associated with skin health, including all of its possible aspects from beauty to its integrity and even the aging process. Multiple pathways within skin biology are associated with the onset and clinical course of various common skin diseases, such as acne, atopic dermatitis, aging, or even photoprotection. These conditions have been shown to be critically affected by nutritional patterns and dietary interventions where well-documented studies have demonstrated beneficial effects of essential nutrients on impaired skin structural and functional integrity and have restored skin appearance and health. Although the subject could be vast, the intention of this review is to provide the most relevant and the most well-documented information on the role of nutrition in common skin conditions and its impact on skin biology.

  13. Immediate or early skin-to-skin contact after a Caesarean section: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jeni; Schmied, Virginia; Burns, Elaine; Dahlen, Hannah

    2014-10-01

    The World Health Organization and the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund recommends that mothers and newborns have skin-to-skin contact immediately after a vaginal birth, and as soon as the mother is alert and responsive after a Caesarean section. Skin-to-skin contact can be defined as placing a naked infant onto the bare chest of the mother. Caesarean birth is known to reduce initiation of breastfeeding, increase the length of time before the first breastfeed, reduce the incidence of exclusive breastfeeding, significantly delay the onset of lactation and increase the likelihood of supplementation. The aim of this review is to evaluate evidence on the facilitation of immediate (within minutes) or early (within 1 h) skin-to-skin contact following Caesarean section for healthy mothers and their healthy term newborns, and identify facilitators, barriers and associated maternal and newborn outcomes. A range of electronic databases were searched for papers reporting research findings published in English between January 2003 and October 2013. Seven papers met the criteria. This review has provided some evidence that with appropriate collaboration skin-to-skin contact during Caesarean surgery can be implemented. Further evidence was provided, albeit limited, that immediate or early skin-to-skin contact after a Caesarean section may increase breastfeeding initiation, decrease time to the first breastfeed, reduce formula supplementation in hospital, increase bonding and maternal satisfaction, maintain the temperature of newborns and reduce newborn stress. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Measurement of the Biomechanical Function and Structure of Ex Vivo Drying Skin Using Raman Spectral Analysis and its Modulation with Emollient Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Biniek, Krysta; Tfayli, Ali; Vyumvuhore, Raoul; Quatela, Alessia; Galliano, Marie-Florence; Delalleau, Alexandre; Baillet-Guffroy, Arlette; Dauskardt, Reinhold H; Duplan, Helene

    2018-06-22

    An important aspect of the biomechanical behavior of the stratum corneum (SC) is the drying stresses that develop with water loss. These stresses act as a driving force for damage in the form of chapping and cracking. Betasitosterol is a plant sterol with a structure similar to cholesterol, a key component in the intercellular lipids of the outermost layer of human skin, the SC. Cholesterol plays an important role in stabilizing the SC lipid structure, and altered levels of cholesterol have been linked with SC barrier abnormalities. Betasitosterol is currently applied topically to skin for treatment of wounds and burns. However, it is unknown what effect betasitosterol has on the biomechanical barrier function of skin. Here, by analyzing the drying stress profile of SC generated during a kinetics of dehydration, we show that betasitosterol, in combination with two emollient molecules, isocetyl stearoyl stearate (ISS) and glyceryl tri-2-ethylhexanoate (GTEH), causes a significant modulation of the drying stress behavior of the SC by reducing both the maximal peak stress height and average plateau of the drying stress profile. Raman spectra analyses demonstrate that the combination of betasitosterol with the two emollients, ISS and GTEH, allows a high water retention capacity within the SC, while the lipid conformational order by increasing the amount of trans conformers. Our study highlights the advantage of combining a biomechanical approach together with Raman spectroscopy in engineering a suitable combination of molecules for alleviating dryness and dry skin damage. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Skin disease prevalence study in schoolchildren in rural Côte d'Ivoire: Implications for integration of neglected skin diseases (skin NTDs).

    PubMed

    Yotsu, Rie Roselyne; Kouadio, Kouamé; Vagamon, Bamba; N'guessan, Konan; Akpa, Amari Jules; Yao, Aubin; Aké, Julien; Abbet Abbet, Rigobert; Tchamba Agbor Agbor, Barbine; Bedimo, Roger; Ishii, Norihisa; Fuller, L Claire; Hay, Roderick; Mitjà, Oriol; Drechsler, Henning; Asiedu, Kingsley

    2018-05-01

    Early detection of several skin-related neglected tropical diseases (skin NTDs)-including leprosy, Buruli ulcer, yaws, and scabies- may be achieved through school surveys, but such an approach has seldom been tested systematically on a large scale in endemic countries. Additionally, a better understanding of the spectrum of skin diseases and the at-risk populations to be encountered during such surveys is necessary to facilitate the process. We performed a school skin survey for selected NTDs and the spectrum of skin diseases, among primary schoolchildren aged 5 to 15 in Côte d'Ivoire, West Africa. This 2-phase survey took place in 49 schools from 16 villages in the Adzopé health district from November 2015 to January 2016. The first phase involved a rapid visual examination of the skin by local community healthcare workers (village nurses) to identify any skin abnormality. In a second phase, a specialized medical team including dermatologists performed a total skin examination of all screened students with any skin lesion and provided treatment where necessary. Of a total of 13,019 children, 3,504 screened positive for skin lesions and were listed for the next stage examination. The medical team examined 1,138 of these children. The overall prevalence of skin diseases was 25.6% (95% CI: 24.3-26.9%). The predominant diagnoses were fungal infections (n = 858, prevalence: 22.3%), followed by inflammatory skin diseases (n = 265, prevalence: 6.9%). Skin diseases were more common in boys and in children living along the main road with heavy traffic. One case of multi-bacillary type leprosy was detected early, along with 36 cases of scabies. Our survey was met with very good community acceptance. We carried out the first large-scale integrated, two-phase pediatric multi-skin NTD survey in rural Côte d'Ivoire, effectively reaching a large population. We found a high prevalence of skin diseases in children, but only limited number of skin NTDs. With the lessons learned

  16. Heavy Cigarette Smokers in a Chinese Population Display a Compromised Permeability Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Shujun; Ye, Li; Lv, Chengzhi; Elias, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with various cutaneous disorders with defective permeability. Yet, whether cigarette smoking influences epidermal permeability barrier function is largely unknown. Here, we measured skin biophysical properties, including permeability barrier homeostasis, stratum corneum (SC) integrity, SC hydration, skin surface pH, and skin melanin/erythema index, in cigarette smokers. A total of 99 male volunteers were enrolled in this study. Smokers were categorized as light-to-moderate (<20 cigarettes/day) or heavy smokers (≥20 cigarettes/day). An MPA5 was used to measure SC hydration and skin melanin/erythema index on the dorsal hand, forehead, and cheek. Basal transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and barrier recovery rates were assessed on the forearm. A Skin-pH-Meter pH900 was used to measure skin surface pH. Our results showed that heavy cigarette smokers exhibited delayed barrier recovery after acute abrogation (1.02% ± 13.06 versus 16.48% ± 6.07), and barrier recovery rates correlated negatively with the number of daily cigarettes consumption (p = 0.0087). Changes in biophysical parameters in cigarette smokers varied with body sites. In conclusion, heavy cigarette smokers display compromised permeability barrier homeostasis, which could contribute, in part, to the increased prevalence of certain cutaneous disorders characterized by defective permeability. Thus, improving epidermal permeability barrier should be considered for heavy cigarette smokers. PMID:27437403

  17. Potential Applications of Phyto-Derived Ceramides in Improving Epidermal Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Tessema, Efrem N; Gebre-Mariam, Tsige; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Wohlrab, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    The outer most layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, consists of corneocytes which are coated by a cornified envelope and embedded in a lipid matrix of ordered lamellar structure. It is responsible for the skin barrier function. Ceramides (CERs) are the backbone of the intercellular lipid membranes. Skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis and aged skin are characterized by dysfunctional skin barrier and dryness which are associated with reduced levels of CERs. Previously, the effectiveness of supplementation of synthetic and animal-based CERs in replenishing the depleted natural skin CERs and restoring the skin barrier function have been investigated. Recently, however, the barrier function improving effect of plant-derived CERs has attracted much attention. Phyto-derived CERs (phytoCERs) are preferable due to their assumed higher safety as they are mostly isolated from dietary sources. The beneficial effects of phytoCER-based oral dietary supplements for skin hydration and skin barrier reinforcement have been indicated in several studies involving animal models as well as human subjects. Ingestible dietary supplements containing phytoCERs are also widely available on the market. Nonetheless, little effort has been made to investigate the potential cosmetic applications of topically administered phytoCERs. Therefore, summarizing the foregoing investigations and identifying the gap in the scientific data on plant-derived CERs intended for skin-health benefits are of paramount importance. In this review, an attempt is made to synthesize the information available in the literature regarding the effects of phytoCER-based oral dietary supplements on skin hydration and barrier function with the underlying mechanisms. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Hemostatic abnormalities in Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Artoni, Andrea; Selicorni, Angelo; Passamonti, Serena M; Lecchi, Anna; Bucciarelli, Paolo; Cerutti, Marta; Cianci, Paola; Gianniello, Francesca; Martinelli, Ida

    2014-05-01

    A bleeding diathesis is a common feature of Noonan syndrome, and various coagulation abnormalities have been reported. Platelet function has never been carefully investigated. The degree of bleeding diathesis in a cohort of patients with Noonan syndrome was evaluated by a validated bleeding score and investigated with coagulation and platelet function tests. If ratios of prothrombin time and/or activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged, the activity of clotting factors was measured. Individuals with no history of bleeding formed the control group. The study population included 39 patients and 28 controls. Bleeding score was ≥2 (ie, suggestive of a moderate bleeding diathesis) in 15 patients (38.5%) and ≥4 (ie, suggestive of a severe bleeding diathesis) in 7 (17.9%). Abnormal coagulation and/or platelet function tests were found in 14 patients with bleeding score ≥2 (93.3%) but also in 21 (87.5%) of those with bleeding score <2. The prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged in 18 patients (46%) and partial deficiency of factor VII, alone or in combination with the deficiency of other vitamin K-dependent factors, was the most frequent coagulation abnormality. Moreover, platelet aggregation and secretion were reduced in 29 of 35 patients (82.9%, P < .01 for all aggregating agents). Nearly 40% of patients with the Noonan syndrome had a bleeding diathesis and >90% of them had platelet function and/or coagulation abnormalities. Results of these tests should be taken into account in the management of bleeding or invasive procedures in these patients. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Abnormal uterine bleeding in perimenopause.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, S R; Lumsden, M A

    2017-10-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the commonest presenting complaints encountered in a gynecologist's office or primary-care setting. The wider availability of diagnostic tools has allowed prompt diagnosis and treatment of an increasing number of menstrual disorders in an office setting. This White Paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of transvaginal ultrasound, blind endometrial sampling and diagnostic hysteroscopy. Once a proper diagnosis has been established, appropriate therapy may be embarked upon. Fortunately, only a minority of such patients will have premalignant or malignant disease. When bleeding is sufficient to cause severe anemia or even hypovolemia, prompt intervention is called for. In most of the cases, however, the abnormal uterine bleeding will be disquieting to the patient and significantly affect her 'quality of life'. Sometimes, reassurance and expectant management will be sufficient in such patients. Overall, however, in cases of benign disease, some intervention will be required. The use of oral contraceptive pills especially those with a short hormone-free interval, the insertion of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system, the incorporation of newer medical therapies including antifibrinolytic drugs and selective progesterone receptor modulators and minimally invasive treatments have made outpatient therapy increasingly effective. For others, operative hysteroscopy and endometrial ablation are proven therapeutic tools to provide both long- and short-term relief of abnormal uterine bleeding, thus avoiding, or deferring, hysterectomy.

  20. Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge Jet for Skin Disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creyghton, Yves; Meijer, Rogier; Verweij, Paul; van der Zanden, Frank; Leenders, Paul

    A consortium consisting of the research institute TNO, the medical ­university and hospital St Radboud and two industrial enterprises is working on a non-thermal plasma treatment method for hand disinfection. The group is seeking for cooperation, in particular in the field of validation methods and potential ­standardization for plasma based disinfection procedures. The present paper describes technical progress in plasma source development together with initial microbiological data. Particular properties of the sheet shaped plasma volume are the possibility of treating large irregular surfaces in a short period of time, effective plasma produced species transfer to the surface together with high controllability of the nature of plasma species by means of temperature conditioning.

  1. Chronic Diarrhea and Skin Hyperpigmentation: A New Association

    PubMed Central

    Al Qoaer, Khaled; Al Mehaidib, Ali; Shabib, Sohail; Banemai, Mohammed

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims: The objective of this study was to describe patients with chronic diarrhea and abnormal skin hyperpigmentation with distinct distribution. Methods: This is a retrospective review of children who presented with diarrhea and skin hyperpigmentation. The clinical presentation, laboratory investigations as well as endoscopic and histological data were reviewed. Results: Seven patients with chronic diarrhea had abnormal skin hyperpigmentation with distinct distribution and presented in the first two months of life. Six patients had other features such as abnormal hair and facial dysmorphism. Mental retardation was reported in one patient. Consanguinity was positive in six patients, and there was family history of consanguinity in four patients, with two patients being siblings. No significant immunodeficiency was reported. Intestinal biopsies were obtained in six patients and showed active chronic inflammation in three patients, partial villous atrophy in two patients, and eosinophilic infiltrate with mild villous atrophy in one patient. Colonic biopsies showed mild focal colitis in three patients and mild colitis with eosinophilic infiltrate in one patient. Skin biopsies showed a greater number of melanophagies with fibrosis of papillary derma in two patients but skin biopsy was normal in one patient. The hair of two patients was analyzed by electron microscopy, which showed an abnormal pattern with decreased pigmentation and diameter; however, its chemical analysis was normal. Two other patients had trichorrhexis nodosa, but no abnormalities were seen in one patient. Chromosomal number was normal in three patients. One patient died because of sepsis, and only one patient was dependent on total parenteral nutrition. Conclusions: We believe that this association might represent a new syndrome with an autosomal recessive inheritance that warrants further studies. PMID:19568536

  2. Spin Transfer in Polymer Degradation of Abnormal Linkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tianrong; Tian, Chuanjin; Liu, Xizhe; Wang, Jia; Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2017-07-01

    The degradation of polymer materials plays an important role in production and life. In this work, the degradation mechanism of poly-α-methylstyrene (PAMS) tetramers with abnormal linkage was investigated by using density functional theory (DFT). Calculated results indicate that the head-to-head and the tail-to-tail reactions needed to overcome the energy barriers are about 0.15 eV and about 1.26 eV, respectively. The broken C-C bond at the unsaturated end of the chain leads to the dissociation of alpha-methylstyrene (AMS) monomers one by one. Furthermore, the analyses of bond characteristics are in good agreement with the results of energy barriers. In addition, the spin population analysis presents an interesting net spin transfer process in depolymerization reactions. We hope that the current theoretical results provide useful help to understand the degradation mechanism of polymers.

  3. A Perspective on the Interplay of Ultraviolet-Radiation, Skin Microbiome and Skin Resident Memory TCRαβ+ Cells.

    PubMed

    Patra, VijayKumar; Laoubi, Léo; Nicolas, Jean-François; Vocanson, Marc; Wolf, Peter

    2018-01-01

    The human skin is known to be inhabited by diverse microbes, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, archaea, and mites. This microbiome exerts a protective role against infections by promoting immune development and inhibiting pathogenic microbes to colonize skin. One of the factors having an intense effect on the skin and its resident microbes is ultraviolet-radiation (UV-R). UV-R can promote or inhibit the growth of microbes on the skin and modulate the immune system which can be either favorable or harmful. Among potential UV-R targets, skin resident memory T cells (T RM ) stand as well positioned immune cells at the forefront within the skin. Both CD4 + or CD8 + αβ T RM cells residing permanently in peripheral tissues have been shown to play prominent roles in providing accelerated and long-lived specific immunity, tissue homeostasis, wound repair. Nevertheless, their response upon UV-R exposure or signals from microbiome are poorly understood compared to resident TCRγδ cells. Skin T RM survive for long periods of time and are exposed to innumerable antigens during lifetime. The interplay of T RM with skin residing microbes may be crucial in pathophysiology of various diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and polymorphic light eruption. In this article, we share our perspective about how UV-R may directly shape the persistence, phenotype, specificity, and function of skin T RM ; and moreover, whether UV-R alters barrier function, leading to microbial-specific skin T RM , disrupting the healthy balance between skin microbiome and skin immune cells, and resulting in chronic inflammation and diseased skin.

  4. Skin friction related behaviour of artificial turf systems.

    PubMed

    Tay, Sock Peng; Fleming, Paul; Hu, Xiao; Forrester, Steph

    2017-08-01

    The occurrence of skin friction related injuries is an issue for artificial turf sports pitches and remains a barrier to their acceptance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current industry standard Securisport® Sports Surface Tester that measures skin surface related frictional behaviour of artificial turf. Little research has been published about the device and its efficacy, despite its widespread use as a standard FIFA test instrument. To achieve a range of frictional behaviours, several "third generation" (3G) carpet and infill combinations were investigated; friction time profiles throughout the Securisport rotations were assessed in combination with independent measurements of skin roughness before and after friction testing via 3D surface scanning. The results indicated that carpets without infill had greatest friction (coefficients of friction 0.97-1.20) while those completely filled with sand or rubber had similar and lower values independent of carpet type (coefficient of friction (COF) ≈0.57). Surface roughness of a silicone skin (s-skin) decreased after friction testing, with the largest change on sand infilled surfaces, indicating an "abrasive" polishing effect. The combined data show that the s-skin is damaged in a surface-specific manner, thus the Securisport COF values appear to be a poor measure of the potential for skin abrasion. It is proposed that the change in s-skin roughness improves assessment of the potential for skin damage when players slide on artificial turf.

  5. The targeted overexpression of a Claudin mutant in the epidermis of transgenic mice elicits striking epidermal and hair follicle abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Troy, Tammy-Claire; Turksen, Kursad

    2007-06-01

    Skin is one of the largest organs of the body, and is formed during development through a highly orchestrated process involving mesenchymal-epithelial interactions, cell commitment, and terminal differentiation. It protects against microorganism invasion and UV irradiation, inhibits water loss, regulates body temperature, and is an important part of the immune system. Using transgenic mouse technology, we have demonstrated that Claudin (Cldn)-containing tight junctions (TJs) are intricately involved in cell signaling during epidermal differentiation and that an epidermal suprabasal overexpression of Cldn6 results in a perturbed epidermal terminal differentiation program with distinct phenotypic abnormalities. To delineate the role of the Cldn cytoplasmic tail domain in epidermal differentiation, we engineered transgenic mice targeting the overexpression of a Cldn6 cytoplasmic tail-truncation mutant in the epidermis. Transgenic mice were characterized by a lethal barrier dysfunction in addition to the existence of hyperproliferative squamous invaginations/cysts replacing hair follicles. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed an epidermal cytoplasmic accumulation of Cldn6, Cldn11, Cldn12, and Cldn18, downregulation of Cldn1 and aberrant expression of various classical markers of epidermal differentiation; namely the basal keratins as well as K1, involucrin, loricrin, and filaggrin. Collectively these studies suggest an important role for Cldns in epidermal/hair follicle differentiation programs likely involving cross talk to signaling pathways (e.g., Notch) directing cell fate selection and differentiation.

  6. Skin lesion removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... benign; Cryosurgery - skin, benign; BCC - removal; Basal cell cancer - removal; Actinic keratosis - removal; Wart - removal; Squamous cell - removal; Mole - removal; Nevus - removal; Nevi - removal; Scissor ...

  7. Effects of topical application of aqueous solutions of hexoses on epidermal permeability barrier recovery rate after barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Denda, Mitsuhiro

    2011-11-01

    Previous studies have suggested that hexose molecules influence the stability of phospholipid bilayers. Therefore, the effects of topical application of all 12 stereoisomers of dextro-hexose on the epidermal barrier recovery rate after barrier disruption were evaluated. Immediately after tape stripping, 0.1 m aqueous solution of each hexose was applied on hairless mouse skin. Among the eight dextro-aldohexoses, topical application of altose, idose, mannose and talose accelerated the barrier recovery, while allose, galactose, glucose and gulose had no effect. Among the four dextro-ketohexoses, psicose, fructose, sorbose and tagatose all accelerated the barrier recovery. As the effects of hexoses on the barrier recovery rate appeared within 1 h, the mechanism is unlikely to be genomic. Instead, these hexoses may influence phase transition of the lipid bilayers of lamellar bodies and cell membrane, a crucial step in epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Prevention and management of incontinence-associated dermatitis using a barrier cream.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, Sharon; Graham, Katriona

    2014-12-01

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a common skin disorder affecting patients with urinary and/or faecal incontinence. Maintaining the skin's integrity is a challenge, particularly in the elderly and individuals with medical or surgical comorbidities. It is widely reported that the issue is complex and recognition is inconsistent, with symptoms often being confused with those of pressure ulcers. This article explores the causes of IAD, looking at the structure of healthy skin and the pathology that occurs during skin breakdown. It identifies risk factors and prevention and management strategies, including the use of barrier creams. The article then presents the results of a large product evaluation that took place with Cavilon Durable Barrier Cream (3M). The barrier cream was shown to be more effective in treating and managing patients with IAD than the previous product that patients had been using. A case study is also included to demonstrate the efficacy of the newest version of Cavilon Durable Barrier Cream.

  9. Fatty acids are required for epidermal permeability barrier function.

    PubMed

    Mao-Qiang, M; Elias, P M; Feingold, K R

    1993-08-01

    The permeability barrier is mediated by a mixture of ceramides, sterols, and free fatty acids arranged as extracellular lamellar bilayers in the stratum corneum. Whereas prior studies have shown that cholesterol and ceramides are required for normal barrier function, definitive evidence for the importance of nonessential fatty acids is not available. To determine whether epidermal fatty acid synthesis also is required for barrier homeostasis, we applied 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furancarboxylic acid (TOFA), an inhibitor of acetyl CoA carboxylase, after disruption of the barrier by acetone or tape stripping. TOFA inhibits epidermal fatty acid by approximately 50% and significantly delays barrier recovery. Moreover, coadministration of palmitate with TOFA normalizes barrier recovery, indicating that the delay is due to a deficiency in bulk fatty acids. Furthermore, TOFA treatment also delays the return of lipids to the stratum corneum and results in abnormalities in the structure of lamellar bodies, the organelle which delivers lipid to the stratum corneum. In addition, the organization of secreted lamellar body material into lamellar bilayers within the stratum corneum interstices is disrupted by TOFA treatment. Finally, these abnormalities in lamellar body and stratum corneum membrane structure are corrected by coapplication of palmitate with TOFA. These results demonstrate a requirement for bulk fatty acids in barrier homeostasis. Thus, inhibiting the epidermal synthesis of any of the three key lipids that form the extracellular, lipid-enriched membranes of the stratum corneum results in an impairment in barrier homeostasis.

  10. Fatty acids are required for epidermal permeability barrier function.

    PubMed Central

    Mao-Qiang, M; Elias, P M; Feingold, K R

    1993-01-01

    The permeability barrier is mediated by a mixture of ceramides, sterols, and free fatty acids arranged as extracellular lamellar bilayers in the stratum corneum. Whereas prior studies have shown that cholesterol and ceramides are required for normal barrier function, definitive evidence for the importance of nonessential fatty acids is not available. To determine whether epidermal fatty acid synthesis also is required for barrier homeostasis, we applied 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furancarboxylic acid (TOFA), an inhibitor of acetyl CoA carboxylase, after disruption of the barrier by acetone or tape stripping. TOFA inhibits epidermal fatty acid by approximately 50% and significantly delays barrier recovery. Moreover, coadministration of palmitate with TOFA normalizes barrier recovery, indicating that the delay is due to a deficiency in bulk fatty acids. Furthermore, TOFA treatment also delays the return of lipids to the stratum corneum and results in abnormalities in the structure of lamellar bodies, the organelle which delivers lipid to the stratum corneum. In addition, the organization of secreted lamellar body material into lamellar bilayers within the stratum corneum interstices is disrupted by TOFA treatment. Finally, these abnormalities in lamellar body and stratum corneum membrane structure are corrected by coapplication of palmitate with TOFA. These results demonstrate a requirement for bulk fatty acids in barrier homeostasis. Thus, inhibiting the epidermal synthesis of any of the three key lipids that form the extracellular, lipid-enriched membranes of the stratum corneum results in an impairment in barrier homeostasis. Images PMID:8102380

  11. Evaluation of out-in skin transparency using a colorimeter and food dye in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, H; Tadaki, H; Takami, S; Muramatsu, R; Hagiwara, S; Mizuno, T; Arakawa, H

    2009-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a disease of skin barrier dysfunction and outside stimuli can cross the skin barrier. To examine a new method for evaluating the outside to inside skin transparency with a colorimeter and yellow dyes. In study 1, a total of 28 volunteer subjects (24 normal and four with atopic dermatitis) participated. After provocation with yellow dye, the skin colour of all the subjects was measured using a colorimeter. The skin transparency index was calculated by the changes of the skin colour to yellow. Other variables of skin function, including transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and stratum corneum hydration, were also measured. In study 2, the skin transparency index was evaluated for a cohort of 38 patients with atopic dermatitis, 27 subjects with dry skin and 29 healthy controls. In study 1, the measurement of skin colour (b*) using tartrazine showed good results. There was a significant relationship between the skin transparency index with tartrazine and the atopic dermatitis score (P = 0.014). No other measurements of skin function, including the TEWL, were correlated. In study 2, the skin transparency index score obtained with tartrazine in the patients with atopic dermatitis was significantly higher than that of the controls and those with dry skin (P < 0.001 and P = 0.022, respectively). However, the TEWL in patients with atopic dermatitis was not significantly higher than that of patients with dry skin and the TEWL in subjects with dry skin was not higher than that of the controls. This method, which used a colorimeter and food dye, is noninvasive, safe and reliable for the evaluation of out-in skin transparency and can demonstrate the characteristic dysfunction in the skin barrier in patients with atopic dermatitis.

  12. California highway barrier aesthetics.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-06-01

    This report will familiarize designers with current barrier design options, and encourage : appropriate aesthetic considerations to develop visually pleasing context sensitive solutions for : highway projects. The development of alternative barriers ...

  13. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1998-03-31

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

  14. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.; Ramsey, David R.; Stampfer, Joseph F.; Macdonald, John M.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material.

  15. Identification of abnormal accident patterns at intersections

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1999-08-01

    This report presents the findings and recommendations based on the Identification of Abnormal Accident Patterns at Intersections. This project used a statistically valid sampling method to determine whether a specific intersection has an abnormally h...

  16. Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAQ187 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results • What is cervical cancer screening? • What causes abnormal cervical cancer screening test results? • What is the difference between the terms cervical ...

  17. Effect of topically applied lipids on surfactant-irritated skin.

    PubMed

    Lodén, M; Andersson, A C

    1996-02-01

    Moisturizers are used daily by many people to alleviate symptoms of dry skin. All of them contain lipids. It has been suggested that topically applied lipids may interfere with the structure and function of the permeability barrier. The influence of a single application of nine different lipids on normal skin and skin irritated by sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) was studied in 21 healthy subjects. Parameters assessed were visible signs of irritation, and objectively measured cutaneous blood flow and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). The substances tested were hydrocortisone, petrolatum, fish oil, borage oil, sunflower seed oil, canola oil, shea butter, and fractions of unsaponifiable lipids from canola oil and shea butter. Water was included as a control. On normal skin, no significant differences in the effects of the test substances were found, whereas significant differences were observed when they were applied to SLS-irritated skin. The visible signs of SLS-induced irritation were significantly less pronounced after treatment with the sterol-enriched fraction from canola oil than after treatment with water. This fraction, and hydrocortisone, reduced cutaneous blood flow. Furthermore, application of hydrocortisone, canola oil, and its sterol-enriched fraction, resulted in significantly lower TEWL than with water. The other lipids had no effect on the degree of irritation. In conclusion, lipids commonly used in moisturizers may reduce skin reactions to irritants. Previous studies have shown that, in barrier perturbed skin, the synthesis of sterols is increased. The observed effects of canola oil and its fraction of unsaponifiable lipids on SLS-induced irritation suggest the possibility that they assisted the skin in supplying the damaged barrier with adequate lipids.

  18. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  19. Abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick G

    2013-12-01

    Primary abnormalities of the erythrocyte membrane are characterized by clinical, laboratory, and genetic heterogeneity. Among this group, hereditary spherocytosis patients are more likely to experience symptomatic anemia. Treatment of hereditary spherocytosis with splenectomy is curative in most patients. Growing recognition of the long-term risks of splenectomy has led to re-evaluation of the role of splenectomy. Management guidelines acknowledge these considerations and recommend discussion between health care providers, patient, and family. The hereditary elliptocytosis syndromes are the most common primary disorders of erythrocyte membrane proteins. However, most elliptocytosis patients are asymptomatic and do not require therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Barriers Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Confederation Coll. of Applied Arts and Technology, Thunder Bay (Ontario).

    In 1987, the Barriers Project was initiated by Confederation College of Applied Arts and Technology to engage 31 selected community colleges in Canada in an organized self-appraisal of institutional barriers to the enrollment of part-time credit students. From the outset, colleges were encouraged to limit their investigation to barriers over which…

  1. Evaluation of noise barriers.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1979-01-01

    Noise measurements were taken at six barrier sites: two wooden, two metal, and one concrete barrier were studied; the sixth site had no barrier and was studied to determine the ground effect. The approach was to determine insertion losses by taking s...

  2. Protecting the radiation-damaged skin from friction: a mini review

    SciTech Connect

    Herst, Patries M

    2014-06-15

    Radiation-induced skin reactions are an unavoidable side effect of external beam radiation therapy, particularly in areas prone to friction and excess moisture such as the axilla, head and neck region, perineum and skin folds. Clinical studies investigating interventions for preventing or managing these reactions have largely focussed on formulations with moisturising, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and wound healing properties. However, none of these interventions has emerged as a consistent candidate for best practice. Much less emphasis has been placed on evaluating ways to protect the radiation-damaged skin from friction and excess moisture. This mini review analyses the clinical evidence for barrier productsmore » that form a protective layer by adhering very closely to the skin folds and do not cause further trauma to the radiation-damaged skin upon removal. A database search identified only two types of barrier products that fitted these criteria and these were tested in two case series and six controlled clinical trials. Friction protection was most effective when the interventions were used from the start of treatment and continued for several weeks after completion of treatment. Soft silicone dressings (Mepilex Lite and Mepitel Film) and Cavilon No Sting Barrier Film, but not Cavilon Moisturizing Barrier Cream, decreased skin reaction severity, most likely due to differences in formulation and skin build-up properties. It seems that prophylactic use of friction protection of areas at risk could be a worthwhile addition to routine care of radiation-damaged skin.« less

  3. Protecting the radiation-damaged skin from friction: a mini review

    PubMed Central

    Herst, Patries M

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced skin reactions are an unavoidable side effect of external beam radiation therapy, particularly in areas prone to friction and excess moisture such as the axilla, head and neck region, perineum and skin folds. Clinical studies investigating interventions for preventing or managing these reactions have largely focussed on formulations with moisturising, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and wound healing properties. However, none of these interventions has emerged as a consistent candidate for best practice. Much less emphasis has been placed on evaluating ways to protect the radiation-damaged skin from friction and excess moisture. This mini review analyses the clinical evidence for barrier products that form a protective layer by adhering very closely to the skin folds and do not cause further trauma to the radiation-damaged skin upon removal. A database search identified only two types of barrier products that fitted these criteria and these were tested in two case series and six controlled clinical trials. Friction protection was most effective when the interventions were used from the start of treatment and continued for several weeks after completion of treatment. Soft silicone dressings (Mepilex Lite and Mepitel Film) and Cavilon No Sting Barrier Film, but not Cavilon Moisturizing Barrier Cream, decreased skin reaction severity, most likely due to differences in formulation and skin build-up properties. It seems that prophylactic use of friction protection of areas at risk could be a worthwhile addition to routine care of radiation-damaged skin. PMID:26229646

  4. Dendritic Core-Multishell Nanocarriers in Murine Models of Healthy and Atopic Skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radbruch, Moritz; Pischon, Hannah; Ostrowski, Anja; Volz, Pierre; Brodwolf, Robert; Neumann, Falko; Unbehauen, Michael; Kleuser, Burkhard; Haag, Rainer; Ma, Nan; Alexiev, Ulrike; Mundhenk, Lars; Gruber, Achim D.

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic hPG-amid-C18-mPEG core-multishell nanocarriers (CMS) represent a novel class of unimolecular micelles that hold great potential as drug transporters, e.g., to facilitate topical therapy in skin diseases. Atopic dermatitis is among the most common inflammatory skin disorders with complex barrier alterations which may affect the efficacy of topical treatment.

  5. Health Care Utilization among Migrant Latino Farmworkers: The Case of Skin Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Steven R.; Vallejos, Quirina M.; Quandt, Sara A.; Fleischer, Alan B., Jr.; Schulz, Mark R.; Verma, Amit; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Skin diseases are common occupational illnesses for migrant farmworkers. Farmworkers face many barriers in accessing health care resources. Purpose: Framed by the Health Behavior Model, the purpose of this study was to assess health care utilization for skin disease by migrant Latino farmworkers. Methods: Three hundred and four migrant…

  6. Psychological interventions in the management of common skin conditions

    PubMed Central

    Shenefelt, Philip D

    2010-01-01

    The nervous system and the skin develop next to each other in the embryo and remain intimately interconnected and interactive throughout life. The nervous system can influence skin conditions through psychoneuroimmunoendocrine mechanisms and through behaviors. Understanding the pathophysiology aids in selection of treatment plans for correcting the negative effects of the psyche on specific skin conditions. Medication options include standard psychotropic medications and alternative herbs and supplements. Other options include biofeedback, cognitive-behavioral methods, hypnosis, meditation, progressive relaxation, the placebo effect, and suggestion. When simple measures fail, combining medications with other therapeutic options may produce better results. Skin conditions that have strong psychophysiologic aspects may respond well to techniques such as biofeedback, cognitive-behavioral methods, hypnosis, meditation, or progressive relaxation that help to counteract stress. Treatment of primary psychiatric disorders that negatively influence skin conditions often results in improvement of those skin conditions. Abnormal conditions of the skin, hair, and nails can also influence the psyche negatively. Treatment of secondary psychiatric disorders such as anxiety or depression that are triggered or exacerbated by the appearance of these skin conditions or the associated discomfort may also be required. PMID:22110329

  7. Extracellular Matrix Modulation: Optimizing Skin Care and Rejuvenation Procedures.

    PubMed

    Widgerow, Alan D; Fabi, Sabrina G; Palestine, Roberta F; Rivkin, Alexander; Ortiz, Arisa; Bucay, Vivian W; Chiu, Annie; Naga, Lina; Emer, Jason; Chasan, Paul E

    2016-04-01

    Normal aging and photoaging of the skin are chronic processes that progress gradually. The extracellular matrix (ECM), constituting over 70% of the skin, is the central hub for repair and regeneration of the skin. As such, the ECM is the area where changes related to photodamage are most evident. Degradation of the ECM with fragmentation of proteins significantly affects cross talk and signaling between cells, the matrix, and its constituents. The accumulation of collagen fragments, amorphous elastin agglutinations, and abnormal cross-linkages between the collagen fragments impedes the ECM from its normal repair and regenerative capacity, which manifests as wrinkled, non-elastic skin. Similar to how the chronic wound healing process requires wound bed preparation before therapeutic intervention, treatment of chronic aging of the skin would likely benefit from a "skin bed preparation" to optimize the outcome of rejuvenation procedures and skin maintenance programs. This involves introducing agents that can combat stress-induced oxidation, proteasome dysfunction, and non-enzymatic cross linkages involved in glycation end products, to collectively modulate this damaged ECM, and upregulate neocollagenesis and elastin production. Agents of particular interest are matrikines, peptides originating from the fragmentation of matrix proteins that exhibit a wide range of biological activities. Peptides of this type (tripeptide and hexapeptide) are incorporated in ALASTIN™ Skin Nectar with TriHex™ technology (ALASTIN Skincare, Inc., Carlsbad, CA), which is designed to target ECM modulation with a goal of optimizing results following invasive and non-invasive dermal rejuvenating procedures.

  8. Appearance benefits of skin moisturization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Z-X; DeLaCruz, J

    2011-02-01

    Skin hydration is essential for skin health. Moisturized skin is generally regarded as healthy and healthy looking. It is thus speculated that there may be appearance benefits of skin moisturization. This means that there are corresponding changes in the optical properties when skin is moisturized. The appearance of the skin is the result of light reflection, scattering and absorption at various skin layers of the stratum corneum, epidermis, dermis and beyond. The appearance benefits of skin moisturization are likely primarily due to the changes in the optical properties of the stratum corneum. We hypothesize that the major optical effect of skin moisturization is the decrease of light scattering at the skin surface, i.e., the stratum corneum. This decrease of surface scattering corresponds to an increase of light penetration into the deeper layers of the skin. An experiment was conducted to measure the corresponding change in skin spectral reflectance, the skin scattering coefficient and skin translucency with a change in skin hydration. In the experiment, skin hydration was decreased with the topical application of acetone and alcohol and increased with the topical application of known moisturizers and occlusives such as PJ. It was found that both the skin spectral reflectance and the skin scattering coefficient increased when the skin was dehydrated and decreased when the skin was hydrated. Skin translucency increased as the skin became moisturized. The results agree with the hypothesis that there is less light scattering at the skin surface and more light penetration into the deeper skin layers when the skin is moisturized. As a result, the skin appears darker, more pinkish and more translucent. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. [Developmental abnormalities and nevi of the scalp].

    PubMed

    Behle, V; Hamm, H

    2014-12-01

    Unusual congenital or early-onset skin lesions on the scalp often pose a diagnostic challenge particularly as the clinical evaluation may be hampered by dense hair growth. Thus, this paper provides a concise review on developmental abnormalities and nevi with exclusive or predominant scalp localization. Aplasia cutis congenita occurs as an isolated finding, in association with genetic syndromes, nevi and anomalies or as a consequence of intrauterine trauma and teratogens. A hairless area with a narrow surrounding rim of hypertrichosis (hair collar sign) may point to occult cranial dysraphism, especially if accompanied by further suggestive signs as port-wine stains, large hemangiomas, dimples, congenital dermoid cysts, and sinuses. Many diverse entities may hide behind cutis verticis gyrata with the primary essential form being rare and representing a diagnosis of exclusion. In contrast to former belief, benign adnexal tumors arise in a nevus sebaceus considerably more often than basal cell carcinomas and other malignant epithelial tumors. Provided that tumor development is not suspected, excision of a nevus sebaceus nevus is indicated primarily for aesthetic-psychosocial reasons. However, surgical treatment is considerably easier in small children. Nevus sebaceus may be a cutaneous marker for several complex syndromes whereas nevus psiloliparus presents almost always in connection with encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis. Congenital melanocytic nevi of the scalp tend toward clinical regression, so that surgical intervention in large lesions should be carefully considered. In contrast, the threshold for excision of blue nevi and other conspicuous melanocytic nevi on the scalp should be low, especially since they are difficult to monitor.

  10. Skin Diseases: Skin and Sun—Not a good mix

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Skin and Sun —Not a good mix Past Issues / Fall 2008 ... turn Javascript on. Good skin care begins with sun safety. Whether it is something as simple as ...

  11. Skin sparing/skin reducing mastectomy (SSM/SRM) and the concept of oncoplastic breast surgery.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, Bishara; Dibo, Saad; Zgheib, Elias; Abbas, Jaber

    2014-10-01

    With the better understanding of breast cancer history and biology, improved diagnostic modalities and the shift towards minimally invasive surgeries, indications for prophylactic mastectomy, skin sparing or skin reducing mastectomies (SSM/SRM) with nipple areolar complex (NAC) preservation coupled with immediate breast reconstruction are gaining popularity. The authors share their experience and conception with mastectomy and immediate alloplastic breast reconstruction with the esthetic circumvertical mammoplasty pattern combined with the dermal barrier buttress flap. The described technique was performed for 28 patients presenting for mastectomy and immediate alloplastic breast reconstruction. With close collaboration between the oncologic and plastic surgeons, mastectomy was performed in all cases with the esthetic circumvertical mammoplasty pattern. To achieve safe excision and optimal reconstruction, the standard incisions could be custom designed to fit oncologic requirements and allow the creation of a dermal barrier flap used as a buttress separating the implant from the suture line. The circumvertical mastectomy pattern combined with the dermal barrier buttress flap is a versatile option allowing safe reconstruction regardless of the tumor and necessary skin excision location. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Grenz ray-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Frentz, G.

    1989-09-01

    In 28 patients, nonmelanoma skin cancers developed in areas previously exposed to grenz rays. In 17 patients who did not have psoriasis, no other relevant carcinogenic exposure could be incriminated. Women were more often affected than men. Most of the tumors were basal cell cancers, and most of the patients had multiple tumors. No threshold dose could be established. The distribution of the latency time among patients without psoriasis was strictly normal (median 18 years). These observations suggest that usual therapeutic doses of grenz rays, as a single agent, are capable of causing skin cancer, but only in those personsmore » who are abnormally sensitive to x-rays. 9 references.« less

  13. LIPID ABNORMALITIES AND LIPID-BASED REPAIR STRATEGIES IN ATOPIC DERMATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies have revealed the key roles played by Th1/Th2 cell dysregulation, IgE production, mast cell hyperactivity, and dendritic cell signaling in the evolution of the chronic, pruritic, inflammatory dermatosis that characterizes atopic dermatitis (AD). We review here increasing evidence that the inflammation in AD results primarily from inherited abnormalities in epidermal structural and enzymatic proteins that impact permeability barrier function. We also will show that the barrier defect can be attributed to a paracellular abnormality due to a variety of abnormalities in lipid composition, transport and extracellular organization. Accordingly, we also review the therapeutic implications of this emerging pathogenic paradigm, including several current and potentially novel, lipid-based approaches to corrective therapy. PMID:24128970

  14. Biothermomechanics of skin tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, F.; Lu, T. J.; Seffen, K. A.

    Biothermomechanics of skin is highly interdisciplinary involving bioheat transfer, burn damage, biomechanics and neurophysiology. During heating, thermally induced mechanical stress arises due to the thermal denaturation of collagen, resulting in macroscale shrinkage. Thus, the strain, stress, temperature and thermal pain/damage are highly correlated; in other words, the problem is fully coupled. The aim of this study is to develop a computational approach to examine the heat transfer process and the heat-induced mechanical response, so that the differences among the clinically applied heating modalities can be quantified. Exact solutions for temperature, thermal damage and thermal stress for a single-layer skin model were first derived for different boundary conditions. For multilayer models, numerical simulations using the finite difference method (FDM) and finite element method (FEM) were used to analyze the temperature, burn damage and thermal stress distributions in the skin tissue. The results showed that the thermomechanical behavior of skin tissue is very complex: blood perfusion has little effect on thermal damage but large influence on skin temperature distribution, which, in turn, influences significantly the resulting thermal stress field; the stratum corneum layer, although very thin, has a large effect on the thermomechanical behavior of skin, suggesting that it should be properly accounted for in the modeling of skin thermal stresses; the stress caused by non-uniform temperature distribution in the skin may also contribute to the thermal pain sensation.

  15. Skin Conditions during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... by an increase in the body’s melanin—a natural substance that gives color to the skin and hair. Dark spots and melasma usually fade on their ... of female reproductive organs. Immune System: The body’s natural defense ... pubic hair that darkens during pregnancy. Melasma: A common skin ...

  16. Skin Cancer - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Expand Section Skin Cancer: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Cáncer de piel: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español (Spanish) National Library of Medicine Skin Cancer - español (Spanish) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Ukrainian ( ...

  17. Transient abnormal Q waves during exercise electrocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Alameddine, F F; Zafari, A M

    2004-01-01

    Myocardial ischaemia during exercise electrocardiography is usually manifested by ST segment depression or elevation. Transient abnormal Q waves are rare, as Q waves indicate an old myocardial infarction. The case of a patient with exercise induced transient abnormal Q waves is reported. The potential mechanisms involved in the development of such an abnormality and its clinical implications are discussed. PMID:14676264

  18. The menstrual cycle and the skin.

    PubMed

    Raghunath, R S; Venables, Z C; Millington, G W M

    2015-03-01

    Perimenstrual exacerbations of dermatoses are commonly recognized, yet our knowledge of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remains imperfect. Research into the effects of oestrogen on the skin has provided evidence to suggest that oestrogen is associated with increases in skin thickness and dermal water content, improved barrier function, and enhanced wound healing. Research into the effects of progesterone suggests that the presence of various dermatoses correlates with peak levels of progesterone. Dermatoses that are exacerbated perimenstrually include acne, psoriasis, atopic eczema and irritant dermatitis, and possibly also erythema multiforme. Exacerbations occur at the peak levels of progesterone in the menstrual cycle. Underlying mechanisms include reduced immune and barrier functions as a result of cyclical fluctuations in oestrogen and/or progesterone. Autoimmune progesterone and oestrogen dermatitis are the best-characterized examples of perimenstrual cutaneous reactions to hormones produced during the menstrual cycle. In this review, we describe the current understanding of the menstrual cycle, and its effect on the skin and cutaneous disorders. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  19. Substance P restores normal skin architecture and reduces epidermal infiltration of sensory nerve fiber in TNCB-induced atopic dermatitis-like lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeongwon; Kim, Dong-Jin; Nam, Seungwoo; Lim, Sunki; Hwang, Jae-Sung; Park, Ki Sook; Hong, Hyun Sook; Won, Younsun; Shin, Min Kyung; Chung, Eunkyung; Son, Youngsook

    2018-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder characterized by intense pruritus and eczematous lesion. Substance P (SP) is an 11-amino-acid endogenous neuropeptide that belongs to the tachykinin family and several reports recently have supported the anti-inflammatory and tissue repairing roles of SP. In this study, we investigated whether SP can improve AD symptoms, especially the impaired skin barrier function, in 2, 4, 6-trinitrochlorobenzene (TNCB)-induced chronic dermatitis of NC/Nga mice or not. AD-like dermatitis was induced in NC/Nga mice by repeated sensitization with TNCB for 5 weeks. The experimental group designations and topical treatments were as follows: vehicle group (AD-VE); SP group (AD-SP); and SP with NK1R antagonist CP99994 (AD-SP-A) group. Histological analysis was performed to evaluate epidermal differentiation, dermal integrity, and epidermal nerve innervation in AD-like lesions. The skin barrier functions and pruritus of NC/Nga mice were evaluated by measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and scratching behavior, respectively. Topical SP treatment resulted in significant down-regulation of Ki67 and the abnormal-type keratins (K) K6, K16, and K17, restoration of filaggrin and claudin-1, marked reduction of TEWL, and restoration of basement membrane and dermal collagen deposition, even under continuous sensitization of low dose TNCB. In addition, SP significantly reduced innervation of itch-evoking nerve fibers, gelatinase activity and nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the epidermis but upregulated semaphorin-3A (Sema3A) expression in the epidermis, along with reduced scratching behavior in TNCB-treated NC/Nga mice. All of these effects were completely reversed by co-treatment with the NK1R antagonist CP99994. In cultured human keratinocytes, SP treatment reduced expression of TGF-α, but upregulated TGF-β and Sema3A. Topically administered SP can restore normal skin barrier function, reduce epidermal infiltration

  20. Respiratory and psychiatric abnormalities in chronic symptomatic hyperventilation.

    PubMed Central

    Bass, C; Gardner, W N

    1985-01-01

    Many physicians believe that the hyperventilation syndrome is invariably associated with anxiety or undiagnosed organic disease such as asthma and pulmonary embolus, or both. Twenty one patients referred by specialist physicians with unexplained somatic symptoms and unequivocal chronic hypocapnia (resting end tidal Pco2 less than or equal to 4 kPa (30 mm Hg) on repeated occasions during prolonged measurement) were investigated. All but one complained of inability to take a satisfying breath. Standard lung function test results and chest radiographs were normal in all patients, but histamine challenge showed bronchial hyper-reactivity in two of 20 patients tested, and skin tests to common allergens were positive in three of 18. Ventilation-perfusion scanning was abnormal in a further three of 15 patients studied, with unmatched perfusion defects in two and isolated ventilation defects in one. None of the 21 had thyrotoxicosis, severe coronary heart disease, or other relevant cardiovascular abnormalities. Ten of the 21 patients were neurotic and suffered from chronic psychiatric disturbance characterised by anxiety, panic, and phobic symptoms. The remainder had no detectable psychiatric disorders but reported proportionately more somatic than anxiety symptoms. Severe hyperventilation can occur in the absence of formal psychiatric or detectable respiratory or other organic abnormalities. Asthma and pulmonary embolus must be specifically excluded. PMID:3922504

  1. Evaluation of mild skin cleansers.

    PubMed

    Wortzman, M S

    1991-01-01

    Each person makes the decision of how best to care for his or her own skin. Among the prime concerns, especially for facial skin, is the type of dirt, debris, or make-up to be removed. In most cases, all products do an adequate job in the removal of dirt; if not, the washing techniques can be modified to accomplish the task at hand. What cannot be controlled are the adverse side effects inherent in the use of that product. These adverse properties include damages to the barrier function of the skin; increased susceptibility to environmental sources of irritation and sensitization; frank irritation responses, such as erythema and edema; and reduction of the cosmetic qualities of the skin, such as degree of moisture and smoothness. Part of the problem is that most of these changes are subtle, occurring slowly over time. Often, the association of these problems with the use of a particular facial cleansing regimen is overlooked. The typical woman uses as many as 10 to 15 facial cosmetic and cleansing products each day, making the identification of a problem even more difficult. It is important to identify the risks associated with individual products and with product categories in general. Although the identification of a safe group of products to use for facial cleansing is desirable, the results of this investigation indicate that there are no simple answers. It has been assumed that because moisturizing cream formulations are routinely safe and mild in general use, a cleansing product in the same general form would share these attributes. We can see from the results in Table 2 and Figures 2, 3, 5, 7, and 9 that cleansing creams are not uniformly superior to cleansing bars in the key attributes that are used to evaluate mildness. In each evaluation there were individual cleansing creams that demonstrated statistically weaker performance than did cleansing bars in general. As a group, cleansing creams did well in the cosmetic categories of dryness and texture but

  2. Impact of depression on the intensity of patient navigation for women with abnormal cancer screenings.

    PubMed

    De La Cruz, Ignacio I; Freund, Karen M; Battaglia, Tracy A; Chen, Clara A; Bak, Sharon; Kalish, Richard; Lottero, Barbara; Egan, Patrick; Heeren, Tim; Kronman, Andrea C

    2014-02-01

    Patient navigation is increasingly being used to support vulnerable patients to receive timely and quality medical care. We sought to understand whether patients with depression utilize additional patient navigation services after abnormal cancer screening. We compared depressed and non-depressed women using three different measures of intensity of patient navigation: number of patient-navigator encounters, encounter time, and number of unique barriers to care. The study population consisted of 1,455 women who received navigation after abnormal screening for breast or cervical cancer at one of six community health centers in Boston. Navigators spent a median of 60-75 minutes over one or two encounters per participant, with 49% of participants having one or more documented barrier to care. Depressed women did not differ in total numbers of encounters, encounter time, or unique barriers compared with non-depressed women. Our findings suggest that pre-existing depression does not predict which women will utilize additional navigation services.

  3. Comparing barrier algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenstorf, Norbert S.; Jordan, Harry F.

    1987-01-01

    A barrier is a method for synchronizing a large number of concurrent computer processes. After considering some basic synchronization mechanisms, a collection of barrier algorithms with either linear or logarithmic depth are presented. A graphical model is described that profiles the execution of the barriers and other parallel programming constructs. This model shows how the interaction between the barrier algorithms and the work that they synchronize can impact their performance. One result is that logarithmic tree structured barriers show good performance when synchronizing fixed length work, while linear self-scheduled barriers show better performance when synchronizing fixed length work with an imbedded critical section. The linear barriers are better able to exploit the process skew associated with critical sections. Timing experiments, performed on an eighteen processor Flex/32 shared memory multiprocessor, that support these conclusions are detailed.

  4. Gentle cleansing and moisturizing for patients with atopic dermatitis and sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Wai Kwong

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common condition characterized by pruritus, inflammation, and dryness of the skin. Inflammation disrupts the barrier function of the stratum corneum, predisposing the skin to be dry, and increases susceptibility to irritants and secondary bacterial infection. Sensitive skin is common, reported by 40-50% of women and 30% of men in the US, Europe, and Japan. Basic requirements in managing eczema and sensitive skin include effective cleansers that do not compromise skin barrier integrity, alleviation of skin dryness, and restoration of skin barrier function through the use of therapeutic moisturizers. The selection of a skin cleanser is therefore an important part of managing these conditions. Studies have reported clinical improvement with the use of soap-free cleansers in combination with topical treatments. While topical corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents are mainstays of treatment for atopic dermatitis, therapeutic moisturizers are important adjuncts. Moisturizers improve skin hydration, reduce susceptibility to irritation, restore the integrity of the stratum corneum, and enhance the efficacy of topical corticosteroids.

  5. Urostomy - stoma and skin care

    MedlinePlus

    ... the correct size opening, so urine does not leak Taking good care of the skin around your stoma To care for you skin in this area: Wash your skin with warm water and dry it well before you attach the ...

  6. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... AP Photo/Herald-Mail, Kevin G. Gilbert Skin Cancer Skin cancer is the most common form of ...

  7. Quantitative analysis on collagen of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans skin by second harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shulian; Huang, Yudian; Li, Hui; Wang, Yunxia; Zhang, Xiaoman

    2015-01-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is a skin cancer usually mistaken as other benign tumors. Abnormal DFSP resection results in tumor recurrence. Quantitative characterization of collagen alteration on the skin tumor is essential for developing a diagnostic technique. In this study, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy was performed to obtain images of the human DFSP skin and normal skin. Subsequently, structure and texture analysis methods were applied to determine the differences in skin texture characteristics between the two skin types, and the link between collagen alteration and tumor was established. Results suggest that combining SHG microscopy and texture analysis methods is a feasible and effective method to describe the characteristics of skin tumor like DFSP. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [Climatic change and skin: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges].

    PubMed

    Llamas-Velasco, M; García-Díez, A

    2010-06-01

    Scientifics are warning us about a global warming tendency and diminished rainfalls. Quantity, causes and human activity influence remain controversial. Warming could increase prevalence of some cutaneous pathology. Sensible skin and skin xerosis would be more prevalent if relative humidity decreases. Alterations of skin barrier;s function would increase seriousness and prevalence of atopic dermatitis. Furthermore, the higher UVB proportion reaching Earth's surface, in conjunction with increased sunbathing population habits, will increase cutaneous cancer and photoaging rates without a correct photoprotection. Also, habitats of some infectious diseases; vectors are changing. The facing of these problems will be a real challenge for the dermatologist, who will have a very important role on prevention, diagnoses and early treatment of them.

  9. Next generation human skin constructs as advanced tools for drug development.

    PubMed

    Abaci, H E; Guo, Zongyou; Doucet, Yanne; Jacków, Joanna; Christiano, Angela

    2017-11-01

    Many diseases, as well as side effects of drugs, manifest themselves through skin symptoms. Skin is a complex tissue that hosts various specialized cell types and performs many roles including physical barrier, immune and sensory functions. Therefore, modeling skin in vitro presents technical challenges for tissue engineering. Since the first attempts at engineering human epidermis in 1970s, there has been a growing interest in generating full-thickness skin constructs mimicking physiological functions by incorporating various skin components, such as vasculature and melanocytes for pigmentation. Development of biomimetic in vitro human skin models with these physiological functions provides a new tool for drug discovery, disease modeling, regenerative medicine and basic research for skin biology. This goal, however, has long been delayed by the limited availability of different cell types, the challenges in establishing co-culture conditions, and the ability to recapitulate the 3D anatomy of the skin. Recent breakthroughs in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and microfabrication techniques such as 3D-printing have allowed for building more reliable and complex in vitro skin models for pharmaceutical screening. In this review, we focus on the current developments and prevailing challenges in generating skin constructs with vasculature, skin appendages such as hair follicles, pigmentation, immune response, innervation, and hypodermis. Furthermore, we discuss the promising advances that iPSC technology offers in order to generate in vitro models of genetic skin diseases, such as epidermolysis bullosa and psoriasis. We also discuss how future integration of the next generation human skin constructs onto microfluidic platforms along with other tissues could revolutionize the early stages of drug development by creating reliable evaluation of patient-specific effects of pharmaceutical agents. Impact statement Skin is a complex tissue that hosts various

  10. DOCK8 regulates lymphocyte shape integrity for skin antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Dove, Christopher G.; Hor, Jyh Liang; Murdock, Heardley M.; Strauss-Albee, Dara M.; Garcia, Jordan A.; Mandl, Judith N.; Grodick, Rachael A.; Jing, Huie; Chandler-Brown, Devon B.; Lenardo, Timothy E.; Crawford, Greg; Matthews, Helen F.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Cornall, Richard J.; Germain, Ronald N.

    2014-01-01

    DOCK8 mutations result in an inherited combined immunodeficiency characterized by increased susceptibility to skin and other infections. We show that when DOCK8-deficient T and NK cells migrate through confined spaces, they develop cell shape and nuclear deformation abnormalities that do not impair chemotaxis but contribute to a distinct form of catastrophic cell death we term cytothripsis. Such defects arise during lymphocyte migration in collagen-dense tissues when DOCK8, through CDC42 and p21-activated kinase (PAK), is unavailable to coordinate cytoskeletal structures. Cytothripsis of DOCK8-deficient cells prevents the generation of long-lived skin-resident memory CD8 T cells, which in turn impairs control of herpesvirus skin infections. Our results establish that DOCK8-regulated shape integrity of lymphocytes prevents cytothripsis and promotes antiviral immunity in the skin. PMID:25422492

  11. Fernblock (Polypodium leucotomos Extract): Molecular Mechanisms and Pleiotropic Effects in Light-Related Skin Conditions, Photoaging and Skin Cancers, a Review.

    PubMed

    Parrado, Concepcion; Mascaraque, Marta; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Juarranz, Angeles; Gonzalez, Salvador

    2016-06-29

    Healthier life styles include increased outdoors time practicing sports and walking. This means increased exposure to the sun, leading to higher risk of sunburn, photoaging and skin cancer. In addition to topical barrier products, oral supplementations of various botanicals endowed with antioxidant activity are emerging as novel method of photoprotection. Polypodium leucotomos extract (PL, commercial name Fernblock(®), IFC Group, Spain) is a powerful antioxidant due to its high content of phenolic compounds. PL is administered orally, with proven safety, and it can also be used topically. Its mechanisms include inhibition of the generation and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by ultraviolet (UV) light. It also prevents UV- and ROS-induced DNA damage with inhibition of AP1 and NF-κB and protection of natural antioxidant enzyme systems. At the cellular level, PL decreases cellular apoptosis and necrosis mediated UV and inhibits abnormal extracellular matrix remodeling. PL reduces inflammation, prevents immunosuppression, activates tumor suppressor p53 and inhibits UV-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme expression. In agreement with increased p53 activity, PL decreased UV radiation-induced cell proliferation. PL also prevents common deletions mitochondrial DNA damage induced by UVA, and MMP-1 expression induced Visible Light and Infrared Radiation. These cellular and molecular effects are reflected in inhibitions of carcinogenesis and photoaging.

  12. Fernblock (Polypodium leucotomos Extract): Molecular Mechanisms and Pleiotropic Effects in Light-Related Skin Conditions, Photoaging and Skin Cancers, a Review

    PubMed Central

    Parrado, Concepcion; Mascaraque, Marta; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Juarranz, Angeles; Gonzalez, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Healthier life styles include increased outdoors time practicing sports and walking. This means increased exposure to the sun, leading to higher risk of sunburn, photoaging and skin cancer. In addition to topical barrier products, oral supplementations of various botanicals endowed with antioxidant activity are emerging as novel method of photoprotection. Polypodium leucotomos extract (PL, commercial name Fernblock®, IFC Group, Spain) is a powerful antioxidant due to its high content of phenolic compounds. PL is administered orally, with proven safety, and it can also be used topically. Its mechanisms include inhibition of the generation and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by ultraviolet (UV) light. It also prevents UV- and ROS-induced DNA damage with inhibition of AP1 and NF-κB and protection of natural antioxidant enzyme systems. At the cellular level, PL decreases cellular apoptosis and necrosis mediated UV and inhibits abnormal extracellular matrix remodeling. PL reduces inflammation, prevents immunosuppression, activates tumor suppressor p53 and inhibits UV-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme expression. In agreement with increased p53 activity, PL decreased UV radiation-induced cell proliferation. PL also prevents common deletions mitochondrial DNA damage induced by UVA, and MMP-1 expression induced Visible Light and Infrared Radiation. These cellular and molecular effects are reflected in inhibitions of carcinogenesis and photoaging. PMID:27367679

  13. Topical use of dexpanthenol in skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Fritz; Heller, Andreas; Rippke, Frank; Tausch, Irene

    2002-01-01

    Pantothenic acid is essential to normal epithelial function. It is a component of coenzyme A, which serves as a cofactor for a variety of enzyme-catalyzed reactions that are important in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids, proteins, gluconeogenesis, sterols, steroid hormones, and porphyrins. The topical use of dexpanthenol, the stable alcoholic analog of pantothenic acid, is based on good skin penetration and high local concentrations of dexpanthenol when administered in an adequate vehicle, such as water-in-oil emulsions. Topical dexpanthenol acts like a moisturizer, improving stratum corneum hydration, reducing transepidermal water loss and maintaining skin softness and elasticity. Activation of fibroblast proliferation, which is of relevance in wound healing, has been observed both in vitro and in vivo with dexpanthenol. Accelerated re-epithelization in wound healing, monitored by means of the transepidermal water loss as an indicator of the intact epidermal barrier function, has also been seen. Dexpanthenol has been shown to have an anti-inflammatory effect on experimental ultraviolet-induced erythema. Beneficial effects of dexpanthenol have been observed in patients who have undergone skin transplantation or scar treatment, or therapy for burn injuries and different dermatoses. The stimulation of epithelization, granulation and mitigation of itching were the most prominent effects of formulations containing dexpanthenol. In double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trials, dexpanthenol was evaluated for its efficacy in improving wound healing. Epidermal wounds treated with dexpanthenol emulsion showed a reduction in erythema, and more elastic and solid tissue regeneration. Monitoring of transepidermal water loss showed a significant acceleration of epidermal regeneration as a result of dexpanthenol therapy, as compared with the vehicle. In an irritation model, pretreatment with dexpanthenol cream resulted in significantly less damage to the stratum

  14. Gene Expression Profiling in Pachyonychia Congenita Skin

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yu-An; Hickerson, Robyn P.; Seegmiller, Brandon L.; Grapov, Dmitry; Gross, Maren M.; Bessette, Marc R.; Phinney, Brett S.; Flores, Manuel A.; Speaker, Tycho J.; Vermeulen, Annaleen; Bravo, Albert A.; Bruckner, Anna L.; Milstone, Leonard M.; Schwartz, Mary E.; Rice, Robert H.; Kaspar, Roger L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pachyonychia congenita (PC) is a skin disorder resulting from mutations in keratin (K) proteins including K6a, K6b, K16, and K17. One of the major symptoms is painful plantar keratoderma. The pathogenic sequelae resulting from the keratin mutations remain unclear. Objective To better understand PC pathogenesis. Methods RNA profiling was performed on biopsies taken from PC-involved and uninvolved plantar skin of seven genotyped PC patients (two K6a, one K6b, three K16, and one K17) as well as from control volunteers. Protein profiling was generated from tape-stripping samples. Results A comparison of PC-involved skin biopsies to adjacent uninvolved plantar skin identified 112 differentially-expressed mRNAs common to patient groups harboring K6 (i.e., both K6a and K6b) and K16 mutations. Among these mRNAs, 25 encode structural proteins including keratins, small proline-rich and late cornified envelope proteins, 20 are related to metabolism and 16 encode proteases, peptidases, and their inhibitors including kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs), and serine protease inhibitors (SERPINs). mRNAs were also identified to be differentially expressed only in K6 (81) or K16 (141) patient samples. Furthermore, 13 mRNAs were identified that may be involved in pain including nociception and neuropathy. Protein profiling, comparing three K6a plantar tape-stripping samples to non-PC controls, showed changes in the PC corneocytes similar, but not identical, to the mRNA analysis. Conclusion Many differentially-expressed genes identified in PC-involved skin encode components critical for skin barrier homeostasis including keratinocyte proliferation, differentiation, cornification, and desquamation. The profiling data provide a foundation for unraveling the pathogenesis of PC and identifying targets for developing effective PC therapeutics. PMID:25656049

  15. Impact of prebiotics and probiotics on skin health.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghazzewi, F H; Tester, R F

    2014-06-01

    This review discusses the role of pre- and probiotics with respect to improving skin health by modulating the cutaneous microbiota. The skin ecosystem is a complex environment covered with a diverse microbiota community. These are classified as either transient or resident, where some are considered as beneficial, some essentially neutral and others pathogenic or at least have the capacity to be pathogenic. Colonisation varies between different parts of the body due to different environmental factors. Pre- and probiotic beneficial effects can be delivered topically or systemically (by ingestion). The pre- and probiotics have the capacity to optimise, maintain and restore the microbiota of the skin in different ways. Topical applications of probiotic bacteria have a direct effect at the site of application by enhancing the skin natural defence barriers. Probiotics as well as resident bacteria can produce antimicrobial peptides that benefit cutaneous immune responses and eliminate pathogens. In cosmetic formulations, prebiotics can be applied to the skin microbiota directly and increase selectively the activity and growth of beneficial 'normal' skin microbiota. Little is known about the efficacy of topically applied prebiotics. Nutritional products containing prebiotics and/or probiotics have a positive effect on skin by modulating the immune system and by providing therapeutic benefits for atopic diseases. This review underlines the potential use of pre- and probiotics for skin health.

  16. BP180 dysfunction triggers spontaneous skin inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Hwang, Bin-Jin; Liu, Zhen; Li, Ning; Lough, Kendall; Williams, Scott E; Chen, Jinbo; Burette, Susan W; Diaz, Luis A; Su, Maureen A; Xiao, Shengxiang; Liu, Zhi

    2018-06-04

    BP180, also known as collagen XVII, is a hemidesmosomal component and plays a key role in maintaining skin dermal/epidermal adhesion. Dysfunction of BP180, either through genetic mutations in junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) or autoantibody insult in bullous pemphigoid (BP), leads to subepidermal blistering accompanied by skin inflammation. However, whether BP180 is involved in skin inflammation remains unknown. To address this question, we generated a BP180-dysfunctional mouse strain and found that mice lacking functional BP180 (termed Δ NC16A ) developed spontaneous skin inflammatory disease, characterized by severe itch, defective skin barrier, infiltrating immune cells, elevated serum IgE levels, and increased expression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). Severe itch is independent of adaptive immunity and histamine, but dependent on increased expression of TSLP by keratinocytes. In addition, a high TSLP expression is detected in BP patients. Our data provide direct evidence showing that BP180 regulates skin inflammation independently of adaptive immunity, and BP180 dysfunction leads to a TSLP-mediated itch. The newly developed mouse strain could be a model for elucidation of disease mechanisms and development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin inflammation and BP180-related skin conditions.

  17. Host Responses to Malassezia spp. in the Mammalian Skin

    PubMed Central

    Sparber, Florian; LeibundGut-Landmann, Salomé

    2017-01-01

    The skin of mammalian organisms is home for a myriad of microbes. Many of these commensals are thought to have beneficial effects on the host by critically contributing to immune homeostasis. Consequently, dysbiosis can have detrimental effects for the host that may manifest with inflammatory diseases at the barrier tissue. Besides bacteria, fungi make an important contribution to the microbiota and among these, the yeast Malassezia widely dominates in most areas of the skin in healthy individuals. There is accumulating evidence that Malassezia spp. are involved in a variety of skin disorders in humans ranging from non- or mildly inflammatory conditions such as dandruff and pityriasis versicolor to more severe inflammatory skin diseases like seborrheic eczema and atopic dermatitis. In addition, Malassezia is strongly linked to the development of dermatitis and otitis externa in dogs. However, the association of Malassezia spp. with such diseases remains poorly characterized. Until now, studies on the fungus–host interaction remain sparse and they are mostly limited to experiments with isolated host cells in vitro. They suggest a multifaceted crosstalk of Malassezia spp. with the skin by direct activation of the host via conserved pattern recognition receptors and indirectly via the release of fungus-derived metabolites that can modulate the function of hematopoietic and/or non-hematopoietic cells in the barrier tissue. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the host response to Malassezia spp. in the mammalian skin. PMID:29213272

  18. Host Responses to Malassezia spp. in the Mammalian Skin.

    PubMed

    Sparber, Florian; LeibundGut-Landmann, Salomé

    2017-01-01

    The skin of mammalian organisms is home for a myriad of microbes. Many of these commensals are thought to have beneficial effects on the host by critically contributing to immune homeostasis. Consequently, dysbiosis can have detrimental effects for the host that may manifest with inflammatory diseases at the barrier tissue. Besides bacteria, fungi make an important contribution to the microbiota and among these, the yeast Malassezia widely dominates in most areas of the skin in healthy individuals. There is accumulating evidence that Malassezia spp. are involved in a variety of skin disorders in humans ranging from non- or mildly inflammatory conditions such as dandruff and pityriasis versicolor to more severe inflammatory skin diseases like seborrheic eczema and atopic dermatitis. In addition, Malassezia is strongly linked to the development of dermatitis and otitis externa in dogs. However, the association of Malassezia spp. with such diseases remains poorly characterized. Until now, studies on the fungus-host interaction remain sparse and they are mostly limited to experiments with isolated host cells in vitro . They suggest a multifaceted crosstalk of Malassezia spp. with the skin by direct activation of the host via conserved pattern recognition receptors and indirectly via the release of fungus-derived metabolites that can modulate the function of hematopoietic and/or non-hematopoietic cells in the barrier tissue. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the host response to Malassezia spp. in the mammalian skin.

  19. The Roles of Vitamin C in Skin Health.

    PubMed

    Pullar, Juliet M; Carr, Anitra C; Vissers, Margreet C M

    2017-08-12

    The primary function of the skin is to act as a barrier against insults from the environment, and its unique structure reflects this. The skin is composed of two layers: the epidermal outer layer is highly cellular and provides the barrier function, and the inner dermal layer ensures strength and elasticity and gives nutritional support to the epidermis. Normal skin contains high concentrations of vitamin C, which supports important and well-known functions, stimulating collagen synthesis and assisting in antioxidant protection against UV-induced photodamage. This knowledge is often used as a rationale for the addition of vitamin C to topical applications, but the efficacy of such treatment, as opposed to optimising dietary vitamin C intake, is poorly understood. This review discusses the potential roles for vitamin C in skin health and summarises the in vitro and in vivo research to date. We compare the efficacy of nutritional intake of vitamin C versus topical application, identify the areas where lack of evidence limits our understanding of the potential benefits of vitamin C on skin health, and suggest which skin properties are most likely to benefit from improved nutritional vitamin C intake.

  20. The Roles of Vitamin C in Skin Health

    PubMed Central

    Pullar, Juliet M.; Carr, Anitra C.; Vissers, Margreet C. M.

    2017-01-01

    The primary function of the skin is to act as a barrier against insults from the environment, and its unique structure reflects this. The skin is composed of two layers: the epidermal outer layer is highly cellular and provides the barrier function, and the inner dermal layer ensures strength and elasticity and gives nutritional support to the epidermis. Normal skin contains high concentrations of vitamin C, which supports important and well-known functions, stimulating collagen synthesis and assisting in antioxidant protection against UV-induced photodamage. This knowledge is often used as a rationale for the addition of vitamin C to topical applications, but the efficacy of such treatment, as opposed to optimising dietary vitamin C intake, is poorly understood. This review discusses the potential roles for vitamin C in skin health and summarises the in vitro and in vivo research to date. We compare the efficacy of nutritional intake of vitamin C versus topical application, identify the areas where lack of evidence limits our understanding of the potential benefits of vitamin C on skin health, and suggest which skin properties are most likely to benefit from improved nutritional vitamin C intake. PMID:28805671

  1. DFD-01 Reduces Transepidermal Water Loss and Improves Skin Hydration and Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Jackson, J Mark; Grove, Gary L; Allenby, Kent; Houser, Tim

    2017-12-01

    In plaque psoriasis, the benefit of topical steroids is well established. The vehicle formulation of topical steroids may also provide benefit in addition to the effects of the steroid itself. DFD-01 (betamethasone dipropionate spray, 0.05%) is a formulation composed of a topical steroid in an emollient-like vehicle that enhances penetration to the target site of inflammation in the skin. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of DFD-01 and its vehicle on skin hydration and barrier function in compromised skin and to evaluate its effect on flexibility in healthy skin. Eighteen healthy white volunteers were enrolled in each of two studies. In Study 1, dry shaving of volar forearms created a compromised skin barrier, through which transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was measured using an evaporimeter. Capacitance, a measure of epidermal hydration, was also measured at baseline and at 1, 2 and 4 h after application of DFD-01 or its vehicle formulation. In Study 2, intact skin flexibility was tested with a cutometer before and at 1, 2 and 4 h after application of DFD-01 or vehicle. In Study 1, both DFD-01 and its vehicle were effective at reducing TEWL through the compromised stratum corneum. Capacitance measurements confirmed this finding; razor-chafed skin treated with either DFD-01 or vehicle exhibited levels of skin hydration similar to unshaved control skin. Study 2 found softening and greater flexibility of normal skin treated with either DFD-01 or vehicle compared with nontreated control skin samples. These tests suggest that the DFD-01 formulation and its vehicle are each effective at retaining moisture within a damaged skin barrier and for softening and increasing the flexibility of intact skin. Dr. Reddy's Laboratories.

  2. Archaea on Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Alexander J.; Auerbach, Anna K.; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin. PMID:23776475

  3. Skin and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Poljsak, Borut; Dahmane, Raja; Godic, Aleksandar

    2013-04-01

    It is estimated that total sun exposure occurs non-intentionally in three quarters of our lifetimes. Our skin is exposed to majority of UV radiation during outdoor activities, e.g. walking, practicing sports, running, hiking, etc. and not when we are intentionally exposed to the sun on the beach. We rarely use sunscreens during those activities, or at least not as much and as regular as we should and are commonly prone to acute and chronic sun damage of the skin. The only protection of our skin is endogenous (synthesis of melanin and enzymatic antioxidants) and exogenous (antioxidants, which we consume from the food, like vitamins A, C, E, etc.). UV-induced photoaging of the skin becomes clinically evident with age, when endogenous antioxidative mechanisms and repair processes are not effective any more and actinic damage to the skin prevails. At this point it would be reasonable to ingest additional antioxidants and/or to apply them on the skin in topical preparations. We review endogenous and exogenous skin protection with antioxidants.

  4. Formulation design for topical drug and nanoparticle treatment of skin disease.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Anthony P; Garrastazu, Gabriela; Sonvico, Fabio; Prow, Tarl W

    2015-02-01

    The skin has evolved to resist the penetration of foreign substances and particles. Topical therapeutic and cosmeceutical delivery is a growing field founded on selectively overcoming this barrier. Both the biology of the skin and the nature of the formulation/active ingredient must be aligned for efficient transcutaneous delivery. This review discusses the biological changes in the skin barrier that occur with common dermatological conditions. This context is the foundation for the discussion of formulation strategies to improve penetration profiles of common active ingredients in dermatology. Finally, we compare and contrast those approaches to recent advances described in the research literature with an eye toward the future of topical formulation design.

  5. Quantification of changes in skin hydration and sebum after tape stripping using infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezerskaia, A.; Pereira, S. F.; Urbach, H. P.; Varghese, B.

    2017-02-01

    Skin barrier function relies on well balanced water and lipid system of stratum corneum. Optimal hydration and oiliness levels are indicators of skin health and integrity. We demonstrate an accurate and sensitive depth profiling of stratum corneum sebum and hydration levels using short wave infrared spectroscopy in the spectral range around 1720 nm. We demonstrate that short wave infrared spectroscopic technique combined with tape stripping can provide morequantitative and more reliable skin barrier function information in the low hydration regime, compared to conventional biophysical methods.

  6. Emerging Skin T-Cell Functions in Response to Environmental Insults

    PubMed Central

    Suwanpradid, Jutamas; Holcomb, Zachary E.; MacLeod, Amanda S.

    2017-01-01

    Skin is the primary barrier between the body and the outside world, functioning not only as a physical barrier, but also as an immunologic first line of defense. A large number of T cells populate the skin. This review highlights the ability of these cutaneous T cells to regulate skin-specific environmental threats, including microbes, injuries, solar UV radiation, and allergens. Since much of this knowledge has been advanced from murine studies, we focus our review on how the mouse state has informed the human state, emphasizing the key parallels and differences. PMID:27784595

  7. Muscle abnormalities in osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Veilleux, L-N.; Trejo, P.; Rauch, F.

    2017-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is mainly characterized by bone fragility but muscle abnormalities have been reported both in OI mouse models and in children with OI. Muscle mass is decreased in OI, even when short stature is taken into account. Dynamic muscle tests aiming at maximal eccentric force production reveal functional deficits that can not be explained by low muscle mass alone. However, it appears that diaphyseal bone mass is normally adapted to muscle force. At present the determinants of muscle mass and function in OI have not been clearly defined. Physiotherapy interventions and bisphosphonate treatment appear to have some effect on muscle function in OI. Interventions targeting muscle mass have shown encouraging results in OI animal models and are an interesting area for further research. PMID:28574406

  8. Extremely Preterm Infant Skin Care: A Transformation of Practice Aimed to Prevent Harm.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Deanna E

    2016-10-01

    The skin of extremely preterm infants is underdeveloped and has poor barrier function. Skin maintenance interventions initiated in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) have immediate and lifelong implications when the potential for infection, allergen sensitization, and altered aesthetic outcomes are considered. In addition, the high-level medical needs of extremely preterm infants demand skin-level medical interventions that too often result in unintended skin harm. We describe the use of a harm prevention, or consequence-centered, approach to skin care, which facilitates safer practice for extremely premature infants. Neonatal and pediatric Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRN) came together for monthly meetings to review the evidence around best skin care practices for extremely preterm infants, with an emphasis on reduction of skin harm. Findings were focused on the population of interest and clinical implementation strategies. Skin care for extremely preterm infants remains overlooked by current literature. However, clinical practice pearls were extracted and applied in a manner that promotes safer skin care practices in the NICU. Gentle adhesives, such as silicone tapes and hydrogel-backed electrodes, can help to reduce medical adhesive-related skin injuries. Diaper wipes are not appropriate for use among extremely preterm infants, as many ingredients may contain potential allergens. Skin cleansers should be pH neutral to the skin and the prophylactic use of petrolatum-based emollients should be avoided. Further exploration and understanding of skin care practices that examine issues of true risk versus hypothetical risk of harm.

  9. HIV Infection and Bone Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Aamir N; Ahmad, Shahid N; Ahmad, Nafees

    2017-01-01

    More than 36 million people are living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection worldwide and 50% of them have access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). While recent advances in HIV therapy have reduced the viral load, restored CD4 T cell counts and decreased opportunistic infections, several bone-related abnormalities such as low bone mineral density (BMD), osteoporosis, osteopenia, osteomalacia and fractures have emerged in HIV-infected individuals. Of all classes of antiretroviral agents, HIV protease inhibitors used in ART combination showed a higher frequency of osteopenia, osteoporosis and low BMD in HIV-infected patients. Although the mechanisms of HIV and/or ART associated bone abnormalities are not known, it is believed that the damage is caused by a complex interaction of T lymphocytes with osteoclasts and osteoblasts, likely influenced by both HIV and ART. In addition, infection of osteoclasts and bone marrow stromal cells by HIV, including HIV Gp120 induced apoptosis of osteoblasts and release of proinflammatory cytokines have been implicated in impairment of bone development and maturation. Several of the newer antiretroviral agents currently used in ART combination, including the widely used tenofovir in different formulations show relative adverse effects on BMD. In this context, switching the HIV-regimen from tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) to tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) showed improvement in BMD of HIV-infected patients. In addition, inclusion of integrase inhibitor in ART combination is associated with improved BMD in patients. Furthermore, supplementation of vitamin D and calcium with the initiation of ART may mitigate bone loss. Therefore, levels of vitamin D and calcium should be part of the evaluation of HIV-infected patients.

  10. Micronuclei and other erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities in fishes from the Great Lakes Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braham, Ryan P.; Blazer, Vicki S.; Shaw, Cassidy H.; Mazik, Patricia M.

    2017-01-01

    Biological markers (biomarkers) sensitive to genotoxic and mutagenic contamination in fishes are widely used to identify exposure effects in aquatic environments. The micronucleus assay was incorporated into a suite of indicators to assess exposure to genotoxic and mutagenic contamination at five Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs), as well as one non-AOC (reference) site. The assay allowed enumeration of micronuclei as well as other nuclear abnormalities for both site and species comparisons. Erythrocyte abnormality data was also compared to skin and liver tumor prevalence and hepatic transcript abundance. Erythrocyte abnormalities were observed at all sites with variable occurrence and severity among sites and species. Benthic-oriented brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) and white sucker (Catostomus commersonii) expressed lower rates of erythrocyte abnormalities, but higher rates of skin and liver neoplasms, when compared to pelagic-oriented largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) or smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) at the same site. The reduced erythrocyte abnormalities, increased transcript abundance associated with Phase I and II toxicant responsive pathways, and increased neoplastic lesions among benthic-oriented taxa may indicate the development of contaminant resistance of these species to more acute effects.

  11. Micronuclei and other erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities in fishes from the Great Lakes Basin, USA

    PubMed Central

    Braham, Ryan P.; Shaw, Cassidy H.; Mazik, Patricia M.; Umbuzeiro, G.

    2017-01-01

    Biological markers (biomarkers) sensitive to genotoxic and mutagenic contamination in fishes are widely used to identify exposure effects in aquatic environments. The micronucleus assay was incorporated into a suite of indicators to assess exposure to genotoxic and mutagenic contamination at five Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs), as well as one non‐AOC (reference) site. The assay allowed enumeration of micronuclei as well as other nuclear abnormalities for both site and species comparisons. Erythrocyte abnormality data was also compared to skin and liver tumor prevalence and hepatic transcript abundance. Erythrocyte abnormalities were observed at all sites with variable occurrence and severity among sites and species. Benthic‐oriented brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) and white sucker (Catostomus commersonii) expressed lower rates of erythrocyte abnormalities, but higher rates of skin and liver neoplasms, when compared to pelagic‐oriented largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) or smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) at the same site. The reduced erythrocyte abnormalities, increased transcript abundance associated with Phase I and II toxicant responsive pathways, and increased neoplastic lesions among benthic‐oriented taxa may indicate the development of contaminant resistance of these species to more acute effects. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:570–581, 2017. © 2017 This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society PMID:28868735

  12. Skin Fungi from Colonization to Infection.

    PubMed

    de Hoog, Sybren; Monod, Michel; Dawson, Tom; Boekhout, Teun; Mayser, Peter; Gräser, Yvonne

    2017-07-01

    Humans are exceptional among vertebrates in that their living tissue is directly exposed to the outside world. In the absence of protective scales, feathers, or fur, the skin has to be highly effective in defending the organism against the gamut of opportunistic fungi surrounding us. Most (sub)cutaneous infections enter the body by implantation through the skin barrier. On intact skin, two types of fungal expansion are noted: (A) colonization by commensals, i.e., growth enabled by conditions prevailing on the skin surface without degradation of tissue, and (B) infection by superficial pathogens that assimilate epidermal keratin and interact with the cellular immune system. In a response-damage framework, all fungi are potentially able to cause disease, as a balance between their natural predilection and the immune status of the host. For this reason, we will not attribute a fixed ecological term to each species, but rather describe them as growing in a commensal state (A) or in a pathogenic state (B).

  13. Genetic skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Moss, C

    2000-11-01

    Neonatologists do not require a detailed knowledge of all genetic skin disorders but need to recognize one if they see it. The unique accessibility of the skin makes it possible to observe the physical signs and deduce the child's immediate needs from first principles. The morphological classification given here will help the nondermatologist establish a clinical diagnosis. Tremendous advances over the last 10 years in understanding the molecular basis of skin disease make it possible, in many cases, to confirm the diagnosis and to counsel the family accurately. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  14. The Skin Punch Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Blakeman, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The skin punch biopsy is a simple and safe office procedure which is a valuable aid in diagnosing many skin diseases. It can be performed in a few minutes and offers in most situations a very suitable histological specimen with a minimum amount of scarring and little or no pain or discomfort to the patient. The indications for skin biopsy, selection of a proper site and the technique are described. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:21283375

  15. Thermal Skin fabrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, T. B.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced fabrication techniques applicable to Thermal Skin structures were investigated, including: (1) chemical machining; (2) braze bonding; (3) diffusion bonding; and (4) electron beam welding. Materials investigated were nickel and nickel alloys. Sample Thermal Skin panels were manufactured using the advanced fabrication techniques studied and were structurally tested. Results of the program included: (1) development of improved chemical machining processes for nickel and several nickel alloys; (2) identification of design geometry limits; (3) identification of diffusion bonding requirements; (4) development of a unique diffusion bonding tool; (5) identification of electron beam welding limits; and (6) identification of structural properties of Thermal Skin material.

  16. Ultrasound skin tightening.

    PubMed

    Minkis, Kira; Alam, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound skin tightening is a noninvasive, nonablative method that allows for energy deposition into the deep dermal and subcutaneous tissue while avoiding epidermal heating. Ultrasound coagulation is confined to arrays of 1-mm(3) zones that include the superficial musculoaponeurotic system and connective tissue. This technology gained approval from the Food and Drug Administration as the first energy-based skin "lifting" device, specifically for lifting lax tissue on the neck, submentum, and eyebrows. Ultrasound has the unique advantage of direct visualization of treated structures during treatment. Ultrasound is a safe and efficacious treatment for mild skin tightening and lifting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of seasonal and geographical differences on skin and effect of treatment with an osmoprotectant: Sorbitol.

    PubMed

    Muizzuddin, Neelam; Ingrassia, Michael; Marenus, Kenneth D; Maes, Daniel H; Mammone, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Human skin maintains an optimal permeability barrier function in a terrestrial environment that varies considerably in humidity. Cells cultured under hyperosmotic stress accumulate osmolytes including sorbitol. Epidermal keratinocytes experience similar high osmolality under dry environmental conditions because of increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and concomitant drying of the skin. This study was designed to determine if epidermal keratinocytes, in vitro, could be protected from high osmotic stress, with the exogenous addition of sorbitol. In addition, we evaluated the effect of a formulation containing topical sorbitol on skin barrier and moisturization of subjects living in arid and humid regions in summer as well as in winter. Results from in vitro experiments showed that 50 mM sorbitol protected epidermal keratinocytes from osmotic toxicity induced by sodium chloride. Clinical studies indicated that skin chronically exposed to hot, dry environment appeared to exhibit stronger skin barrier and a lower baseline TEWL. In addition, skin barrier was stronger in summer than in winter. Sorbitol exhibited significant improvement in both barrier repair and moisturization, especially in individuals subjected to arid environmental conditions.

  18. 42 CFR 37.54 - Notification of abnormal radiographic findings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., abnormality of cardiac shape or size, tuberculosis, lung cancer, or any other significant abnormal findings... shape or size, tuberculosis, cancer, complicated pneumoconiosis, and any other significant abnormal...

  19. Electrical measurement of the hydration state of the skin surface in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tagami, H

    2014-09-01

    Healthy skin surface is smooth and soft, because it is covered by the properly hydrated stratum corneum (SC), an extremely thin and soft barrier membrane produced by the underlying normal epidermis. By contrast, the skin surfaces covering pathological lesions exhibit dry and scaly changes and the SC shows poor barrier function. The SC barrier function has been assessed in vivo by instrumentally measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL). However, there was a lack of any appropriate method for evaluating the hydration state of the skin surface in vivo until 1980 when we reported the feasibility of employing high-frequency conductance or capacitance to evaluate it quickly and accurately. With such measurements, we can assess easily the moisturizing efficacy of various topical agents in vivo as well as the distribution pattern of water in the SC by combining it with a serial tape-stripping procedure of the skin surface. © 2014 The Author BJD © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  20. Skin blotting: a noninvasive technique for evaluating physiological skin status.

    PubMed

    Minematsu, Takeo; Horii, Motoko; Oe, Makoto; Sugama, Junko; Mugita, Yuko; Huang, Lijuan; Nakagami, Gojiro; Sanada, Hiromi

    2014-06-01

    The skin performs important structural and physiological functions, and skin assessment represents an important step in identifying skin problems. Although noninvasive techniques for assessing skin status exist, no such techniques for monitoring its physiological status are available. This study aimed to develop a novel skin-assessment technique known as skin blotting, based on the leakage of secreted proteins from inside the skin following overhydration in mice. The applicability of this technique was further investigated in a clinical setting. Skin blotting involves 2 steps: collecting proteins by attaching a damp nitrocellulose membrane to the surface of the skin, and immunostaining the collected proteins. The authors implanted fluorescein-conjugated dextran (F-DEX)-containing agarose gels into mice and detected the tissue distribution of F-DEX under different blotting conditions. They also analyzed the correlations between inflammatory cytokine secretion and leakage following ultraviolet irradiation in mice and in relation to body mass index in humans. The F-DEX in mice was distributed in the deeper and shallower layers of skin and leaked through the transfollicular and transepidermal routes, respectively. Ultraviolet irradiation induced tumor necrosis factor secretion in the epidermis in mice, which was detected by skin blotting, whereas follicular tumor necrosis factor was associated with body mass index in obese human subjects. These results support the applicability of skin blotting for skin assessment. Skin blotting represents a noninvasive technique for assessing skin physiology and has potential as a predictive and diagnostic tool for skin disorders.

  1. Skin Diseases: Cross-section of human skin

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Cross-section of human skin Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Logical Images, Inc. I n the areas of skin health and skin diseases, the NIH's National Institute ...

  2. Multilayer moisture barrier

    DOEpatents

    Pankow, Joel W; Jorgensen, Gary J; Terwilliger, Kent M; Glick, Stephen H; Isomaki, Nora; Harkonen, Kari; Turkulainen, Tommy

    2015-04-21

    A moisture barrier, device or product having a moisture barrier or a method of fabricating a moisture barrier having at least a polymer layer, and interfacial layer, and a barrier layer. The polymer layer may be fabricated from any suitable polymer including, but not limited to, fluoropolymers such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) or polyethylene naphthalate (PEN), or ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE). The interfacial layer may be formed by atomic layer deposition (ALD). In embodiments featuring an ALD interfacial layer, the deposited interfacial substance may be, but is not limited to, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, AlSiO.sub.x, TiO.sub.2, and an Al.sub.2O.sub.3/TiO.sub.2 laminate. The barrier layer associated with the interfacial layer may be deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The barrier layer may be a SiO.sub.xN.sub.y film.

  3. Complement System in Dermatological Diseases – Fire Under the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Panelius, Jaana; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The complement system plays a key role in several dermatological diseases. Overactivation, deficiency, or abnormality of the control proteins are often related to a skin disease. Autoimmune mechanisms with autoantibodies and a cytotoxic effect of the complement membrane attack complex on epidermal or vascular cells can cause direct tissue damage and inflammation, e.g., in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), phospholipid antibody syndrome, and bullous skin diseases like pemphigoid. By evading complement attack, some microbes like Borrelia spirochetes and staphylococci can persist in the skin and cause prolonged symptoms. In this review, we present the most important skin diseases connected to abnormalities in the function of the complement system. Drugs having an effect on the complement system are also briefly described. On one hand, drugs with free hydroxyl on amino groups (e.g., hydralazine, procainamide) could interact with C4A, C4B, or C3 and cause an SLE-like disease. On the other hand, progress in studies on complement has led to novel anti-complement drugs (recombinant C1-inhibitor and anti-C5 antibody, eculizumab) that could alleviate symptoms in diseases associated with excessive complement activation. The main theme of the manuscript is to show how relevant the complement system is as an immune effector system in contributing to tissue injury and inflammation in a broad range of skin disorders. PMID:25688346

  4. Scaly-skinned Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-20

    The style of erosion along the highlands-lowlands boundary of southern Elysium Planitia has produced a strange pattern of troughs that look like the skin of a reptile, as seen in this image from NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft.

  5. Skin lesion KOH exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... present. The fungus may be related to ringworm , athlete's foot , jock itch , or another fungal infection. If the ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Athlete's Foot Read more Skin Infections Read more Tinea Infections ...

  6. Allergic Skin Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common types are atopic dermatitis (often called eczema) and contact dermatitis. Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema) Eczema is a chronic ... contact with your skin, they may cause a rash called contact dermatitis. There are two kinds of contact dermatitis: ...

  7. Skin, Hair, and Nails

    MedlinePlus

    ... as asthma and seasonal, environmental, and food allergies. Contact dermatitis. This occurs when the skin comes into contact ... or sensitive to. The best-known cause of contact dermatitis is poison ivy, but there are many others, ...

  8. Skin or nail culture

    MedlinePlus

    Mucosal culture; Culture - skin; Culture - mucosal; Nail culture; Culture - fingernail; Fingernail culture ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture). It is then watched to see if bacteria, ...

  9. Allergy Skin Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... allergic rhinitis) Allergic asthma Dermatitis (eczema) Food allergies Penicillin allergy Bee venom allergy Latex allergy Skin tests ... check for an allergy to insect venom or penicillin. Patch test Patch testing is generally done to ...

  10. Allergy testing - skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you're allergic to bee venom or penicillin. Or it may be used if the skin ... sore, or swollen after contact with the substance Penicillin allergy Venom allergy Allergies to penicillin and related ...

  11. Chromophores in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Antony R.

    1997-05-01

    Human skin, especially the epidermis, contains several major solar ultraviolet-radiation- (UVR-) absorbing endogenous chromophores including DNA, urocanic acid, amino acids, melanins and their precursors and metabolites. The lack of solubility of melanins prevents their absorption spectra being defined by routine techniques. Indirect spectroscopic methods show that their spectral properties depend on the stimulus for melanogenesis. The photochemical consequences of UVR absorption by some epidermal chromophores are relatively well understood whereas we lack a detailed understanding of the consequent photobiological and clinical responses. Skin action spectroscopy is not a reliable way of relating a photobiological outcome to a specific chromophore but is important for UVR hazard assessment. Exogenous chromophores may be administered to the skin in combination with UVR exposure for therapeutic benefit, or as sunscreens for the prevention of sunburn and possibly skin cancer.

  12. Impairments in Skin Integrity.

    PubMed

    Murphree, Rose W

    2017-09-01

    Altered skin integrity increases the chance of infection, impaired mobility, and decreased function and may result in the loss of limb or, sometimes, life. Skin is affected by both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Intrinsic factors can include altered nutritional status, vascular disease issues, and diabetes. Extrinsic factors include falls, accidents, pressure, immobility, and surgical procedures. Ensuring skin integrity in the elderly requires a team approach and includes the individual, caregivers, and clinicians. The twenty-first century clinician has several online, evidence-based tools to assist with optimal treatment plans. Understanding best practices in addressing skin integrity issues can promote positive outcomes with the elderly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Components of skin

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... lose its youthful appearance. Located in the dermis are sensory receptors. They allow the body to receive ... get in the skin's pores. These oil glands are all over the body, except on the palms ...

  14. Skin grafting impairs postsynaptic cutaneous vasodilator and sweating responses.

    PubMed

    Davis, Scott L; Shibasaki, Manabu; Low, David A; Cui, Jian; Keller, David M; Purdue, Gary F; Hunt, John L; Arnoldo, Brett D; Kowalske, Karen J; Crandall, Craig G

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that postsynaptic cutaneous vascular responses to endothelial-dependent and -independent vasodilators, as well as sweat gland function, are impaired in split-thickness grafted skin 5 to 9 months after surgery. Intradermal microdialysis membranes were placed in grafted and adjacent control skin, thereby allowing local delivery of the endothelial-dependent vasodilator, acetylcholine (ACh; 1 x 10(-7) to 1 x 10(-1) M at 10-fold increments) and the endothelial-independent nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 5 x 10(-8) to 5 x 10(-2) M at 10-fold increments). Skin blood flow and sweat rate were simultaneously assessed over the semipermeable portion of the membrane. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated from the ratio of laser Doppler-derived skin blood flow to mean arterial blood pressure. deltaCVC responses from baseline to these drugs were modeled via nonlinear regression curve fitting to identify the dose of ACh and SNP causing 50% of the maximal vasodilator response (EC50). A rightward shift in the CVC dose response curve for ACh was observed in grafted (EC50 = -2.61 +/- 0.44 log M) compared to adjacent control skin (EC50 = -3.34 +/- 0.46 log M; P = .003), whereas the mean EC50 for SNP was similar between grafted (EC50 = -4.21 +/- 0.94 log M) and adjacent control skin (EC50 = -3.87 +/- 0.65 log M; P = 0.332). Only minimal sweating to exogenous ACh was observed in grafted skin whereas normal sweating was observed in control skin. Increased EC50 and decreased maximal CVC responses to the exogenous administration of ACh suggest impairment of endothelial-dependent cutaneous vasodilator responses in grafted skin 5 to 9 months after surgery. Greatly attenuated sweating responses to ACh suggests either abnormal or an absence of functional sweat glands in the grafted skin.

  15. Profile of vemurafenib-induced severe skin toxicities.

    PubMed

    Peuvrel, L; Quéreux, G; Saint-Jean, M; Brocard, A; Nguyen, J M; Khammari, A; Knol, A C; Varey, E; Dréno, B

    2016-02-01

    Vemurafenib, a BRAF inhibitor, is commonly associated with skin toxicity. The impact of severe forms is unknown. To determine the rate of permanent vemurafenib discontinuation due to grade 3-4 skin toxicity, features of these toxicities, their recurrence rate after a switch to dabrafenib and their impact on overall survival. Retrospective cohort study of 131 patients treated with vemurafenib for melanoma between November 2010 and December 2014. Data on skin toxicities, the need for vemurafenib adjustment and the impact of switching to dabrafenib were collected. Regarding survival analysis, a conditional landmark analysis was performed to correct lead-time bias. Among the 131 vemurafenib-treated patients, 26% developed grade 3-4 skin toxicity. Forty-four percent of them permanently discontinued their treatment, mainly due to rash and classic skin adverse reactions (Steven-Johnson syndrome, Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms). Conversely, photosensitivity and carcinomas rarely required treatment adjustment. Grade 3-4 rashes were associated with clinical or biological abnormalities in 94% of patients. Among the 10 patients who subsequently switched to dabrafenib, skin toxicity recurred only in one patient. Overall survival was significantly prolonged in case of severe skin toxicity emerging within the first 4 (P = 0.014) and 8 weeks (P = 0.038) on vemurafenib, with only a trend at 12 weeks (P = 0.052). Median overall survival was also prolonged in case of severe rash. In this study, vemurafenib was continued in 56% of patients with grade 3-4 skin toxicity, which was associated with prolonged overall survival when emerging within the first 4 and 8 weeks of treatment. While developing severe skin adverse reactions permanently contraindicates vemurafenib use, other rashes should lead to retreatment attempts with dose reduction. In case of recurrence, dabrafenib seems to be an interesting option. For other skin toxicities, including photosensitivity and

  16. Thermal barriers for compartments

    DOEpatents

    Kreutzer, Cory J.; Lustbader, Jason A.

    2017-10-17

    An aspect of the present disclosure is a thermal barrier that includes a core layer having a first surface, a second surface, and a first edge, and a first outer layer that includes a third surface and a second edge, where the third surface substantially contacts the first surface, the core layer is configured to minimize conductive heat transfer through the barrier, and the first outer layer is configured to maximize reflection of light away from the barrier.

  17. Coffee polyphenols extracted from green coffee beans improve skin properties and microcirculatory function.

    PubMed

    Fukagawa, Satoko; Haramizu, Satoshi; Sasaoka, Shun; Yasuda, Yuka; Tsujimura, Hisashi; Murase, Takatoshi

    2017-09-01

    Coffee polyphenols (CPPs), including chlorogenic acid, exert various physiological activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of CPPs on skin properties and microcirculatory function in humans. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 49 female subjects with mildly xerotic skin received either a test beverage containing CPPs (270 mg/100 mL/day) or a placebo beverage for 8 weeks. The ingestion of CPPs significantly lowered the clinical scores for skin dryness, decreased transepidermal water loss, skin surface pH, and increased stratum corneum hydration and the responsiveness of skin blood flow during local warming. Moreover, the amounts of free fatty acids and lactic acid in the stratum corneum significantly increased after the ingestion of CPPs. These results suggest that an 8-week intake of CPPs improve skin permeability barrier function and hydration, with a concomitant improvement in microcirculatory function, leading to efficacy in the alleviation of mildly xerotic skin.

  18. Time-Restricted Feeding Shifts the Skin Circadian Clock and Alters UVB-Induced DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; van Spyk, Elyse; Liu, Qiang; Geyfman, Mikhail; Salmans, Michael L; Kumar, Vivek; Ihler, Alexander; Li, Ning; Takahashi, Joseph S; Andersen, Bogi

    2017-08-01

    The epidermis is a highly regenerative barrier protecting organisms from environmental insults, including UV radiation, the main cause of skin cancer and skin aging. Here, we show that time-restricted feeding (RF) shifts the phase and alters the amplitude of the skin circadian clock and affects the expression of approximately 10% of the skin transcriptome. Furthermore, a large number of skin-expressed genes are acutely regulated by food intake. Although the circadian clock is required for daily rhythms in DNA synthesis in epidermal progenitor cells, RF-induced shifts in clock phase do not alter the phase of DNA synthesis. However, RF alters both diurnal sensitivity to UVB-induced DNA damage and expression of the key DNA repair gene, Xpa. Together, our findings indicate regulation of skin function by time of feeding and emphasize a link between circadian rhythm, food intake, and skin health. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Common bacterial skin infections.

    PubMed

    Trent, J T; Federman, D; Kirsner, R S

    2001-08-01

    Skin infections account for a significant portion of dermatologic disease, often resulting in or as a consequence of a disruption in the skin's integrity. This article covers the presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of the more common bacterial infections. The infections presented herein include impetigo, ecthyma, folliculitis, carbuncles/furuncles, cellulitis, toxic shock syndrome, and ecthyma gangrenosum. Once a diagnosis is made, treatment is based on the culture and antibiotic sensitivities of the offending organisms.

  20. Tunnel barrier schottky

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Rongming; Cao, Yu; Li, Zijian

    2018-02-20

    A diode includes: a semiconductor substrate; a cathode metal layer contacting a bottom of the substrate; a semiconductor drift layer on the substrate; a graded aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN) semiconductor barrier layer on the drift layer and having a larger bandgap than the drift layer, the barrier layer having a top surface and a bottom surface between the drift layer and the top surface, the barrier layer having an increasing aluminum composition from the bottom surface to the top surface; and an anode metal layer directly contacting the top surface of the barrier layer.

  1. Structural and functional maturation of skin during metamorphosis in the Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus).

    PubMed

    Alves, Ricardo N; Sundell, Kristina S; Anjos, Liliana; Sundh, Henrik; Harboe, Torstein; Norberg, Birgitta; Power, Deborah M

    2018-06-01

    To establish if the developmental changes in the primary barrier and osmoregulatory capacity of Atlantic halibut skin are modified during metamorphosis, histological, histochemical, gene expression and electrophysiological measurements were made. The morphology of the ocular and abocular skin started to diverge during the metamorphic climax and ocular skin appeared thicker and more stratified. Neutral mucins were the main glycoproteins produced by the goblet cells in skin during metamorphosis. Moreover, the number of goblet cells producing neutral mucins increased during metamorphosis and asymmetry in their abundance was observed between ocular and abocular skin. The increase in goblet cell number and their asymmetric abundance in skin was concomitant with the period that thyroid hormones (THs) increase and suggests that they may be under the control of these hormones. Several mucin transcripts were identified in metamorphosing halibut transcriptomes and Muc18 and Muc5AC were characteristic of the body skin. Na + , K + -ATPase positive (NKA) cells were observed in skin of all metamorphic stages but their number significantly decreased with the onset of metamorphosis. No asymmetry was observed between ocular and abocular skin in NKA cells. The morphological changes observed were linked to modified skin barrier function as revealed by modifications in its electrophysiological properties. However, the maturation of the skin functional characteristics preceded structural maturation and occurred at stage 8 prior to the metamorphic climax. Treatment of Atlantic halibut with the THs disrupter methimazole (MMI) affected the number of goblet cells producing neutral mucins and the NKA cells. The present study reveals that the asymmetric development of the skin in Atlantic halibut is TH sensitive and is associated with metamorphosis and that this barrier's functional properties mature earlier and are independent of metamorphosis.

  2. Maintaining Healthy Skin -- Part 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells). Oxygen is essential for skin health, and is carried by red blood cells. A decrease in their number means less oxygen gets to the skin, which means that skin cells may become unhealthy or even ... cholesterol. The result is decreased blood flow to the skin. Work closely ...

  3. Ultrastructural examination of skin biopsies may assist in diagnosing mitochondrial cytopathy when muscle biopsies yield negative results.

    PubMed

    McAfee, John L; Warren, Christine B; Prayson, Richard A

    2017-08-01

    Ultrastructural evaluation of skin biopsies has been utilized for diagnosis of mitochondrial disease. This study investigates how frequently skin biopsies reveal mitochondrial abnormalities, correlates skin and muscle biopsy findings, and describes clinical diagnoses rendered following the evaluation. A retrospective review of surgical pathology reports from 1990 to 2015 identified skin biopsies examined by electron microscopy for suspected metabolic disease. A total of 630 biopsies were included from 615 patients. Of these patients, 178 also underwent a muscle biopsy. Of the 630 skin biopsies, 75 (12%) showed ultrastructural abnormalities and 34 (5%) specifically showed mitochondrial abnormalities including increased size (n=27), reduced or abnormal cristae (n=23), dense matrices (n=20), and increased number (n=8). Additional findings included lysosomal abnormalities (n=13), lipid accumulation (n=2) or glycogen accumulation (n=1). Of the 34 patients with mitochondrial abnormalities on skin biopsy, 20 also had muscle biopsies performed and nine showed abnormalities suggestive of a mitochondrial disorder including absent cytochrome oxidase staining (n=2), increased subsarcolemmal NADH, SDH, or cytochrome oxidase staining (n=1), or ultrastructural findings including large mitochondrial size (n=5), abnormal mitochondrial structure (n=5), and increased mitochondrial number (n=4). The most common presenting symptoms were intellectual disability (n=13), seizures (n=12), encephalopathy (n=9), and gastrointestinal disturbances (n=9). At last known follow-up, 12 patients had a definitive diagnosis of a mitochondrial disorder. One patient each had Complex I deficiency, Complex III deficiency, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, and Phelan-McDermid syndrome. Our results suggest that skin biopsy sometimes yields diagnostic clues suggestive of a mitochondrial cytopathy in cases with a negative muscle biopsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  4. Skin flaps and grafts - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Free flap - self-care; Skin autografting - self-care; Pressure ulcer skin flap self-care; Burns skin flap self- ... skin infection Surgery for skin cancer Venous ulcers , pressure ulcers , or diabetic ulcers that DO NOT heal After ...

  5. [Cognitive abnormalities and cannabis use].

    PubMed

    Solowij, Nadia; Pesa, Nicole

    2010-05-01

    Evidence that cannabis use impairs cognitive function in humans has been accumulating in recent decades. The purpose of this overview is to update knowledge in this area with new findings from the most recent literature. Literature searches were conducted using the Web of Science database up to February 2010. The terms searched were: "cannabi*" or "marijuana", and "cogniti*" or "memory" or "attention" or "executive function", and human studies were reviewed preferentially over the animal literature. Cannabis use impairs memory, attention, inhibitory control, executive functions and decision making, both during the period of acute intoxication and beyond, persisting for hours, days, weeks or more after the last use of cannabis. Pharmacological challenge studies in humans are elucidating the nature and neural substrates of cognitive changes associated with various cannabinoids. Long-term or heavy cannabis use appears to result in longer-lasting cognitive abnormalities and possibly structural brain alterations. Greater adverse cognitive effects are associated with cannabis use commencing in early adolescence. The endogenous cannabinoid system is involved in regulatory neural mechanisms that modulate processes underlying a range of cognitive functions that are impaired by cannabis. Deficits in human users most likely therefore reflect neuroadaptations and altered functioning of the endogenous cannabinoid system.

  6. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Dandy-Walker syndrome and chromosomal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Imataka, George; Yamanouchi, Hideo; Arisaka, Osamu

    2007-12-01

    Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is a brain malformation of unknown etiology, but several reports have been published indicating that there is a causal relationship to various types of chromosomal abnormalities and malformation syndromes. In the present article, we present a bibliographical survey of several previously issued reports on chromosomal abnormalities associated with DWS, including our case of DWS found in trisomy 18. There are various types of chromosomal abnormalities associated with DWS; most of them are reported in chromosome 3, 9, 13 and 18. We also summarize some other chromosomal abnormalities and various congenital malformation syndromes.

  8. Skin care practice in German nursing homes: a German-wide cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kottner, Jan; Rahn, Yasmin; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Lahmann, Nils

    2013-04-01

    Due to anatomical and physiological changes in the course of aging and due to increased vulnerability, there are special skin care needs in elderly and care-dependent persons. Little is known about skin care practice in German long-term care facilities. The aim of the study was to gather epidemiological data about skin care practice in German nursing homes. In spring 2012 a German-wide cross sectional study was conducted in 47 nursing homes. Based on standardized data collection sheets. demographics and variables about methods and frequencies of skin cleansing and application of skin care products for 3 552 nursing home residents were collected and analyzed. The variables age, gender and level of care dependency was representative for the group of all German nursing home residents. More than 90% of investigated nursing home residents required skin care assistance. Washing body parts or the whole body were conducted most frequently (89.1%, 95% CI 88.0- 90.1). Skin