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Sample records for abnormal skin barrier

  1. Is the skin barrier abnormal in dogs with atopic dermatitis?

    PubMed

    Olivry, Thierry

    2011-11-15

    In mammalian skin, the stratum corneum exerts a barrier function that protects from transepidermal water loss and the penetration of exogenous molecules, such as allergens, from the environment. Recently, skin barrier defects have been shown to be of prime importance in the pathogenesis of human atopic dermatitis. In this review, we summarize the latest research data pertinent to the stratum corneum and barrier function of dogs with atopic dermatitis. At the time of this writing, there is increasing evidence that a skin barrier defect likely exists in dogs with atopic dermatitis. This barrier dysfunction is characterized by abnormal intercellular stratum corneum lipid lamellae, abnormal stratum corneum morphology, reduced and abnormal ceramide content and, in some but not all dogs, abnormal filaggrin expression. In association with these changes, there is higher transepidermal water loss in atopic than in normal canine skin. Furthermore, atopic inflammation appears to worsen transepidermal water loss and filaggrin expression. It remains unknown, however, if the changes observed are primary (i.e. of genetic origin) or secondary to atopic inflammation that also exists even in clinically normal skin. Finally, whether or not a therapeutic intervention aimed at restoring a dysfunctional skin barrier is of any clinical benefit to atopic dogs has not yet been proven unequivocally.

  2. Abnormal skin barrier in the etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.; Schmuth, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Many recent studies have revealed the key roles played by Th1/Th2 cell dysregulation, IgE production, mast cell hyperactivity, and dendritic cell signaling in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Accordingly, current therapy has been largely directed towards ameliorating Th2-mediated inflammation and/or pruritus. We will review here emerging evidence that the inflammation in atopic dermatitis results from inherited and acquired insults to the barrier and the therapeutic implications of this new paradigm. Recent findings Recent molecular genetic studies have shown a strong association between mutations in FILAGGRIN and atopic dermatitis, particularly in Northern Europeans. But additional acquired stressors to the barrier are required to initiate inflammation. Sustained hapten access through a defective barrier stimulates a Th1 → Th2 shift in immunophenotype, which in turn further aggravates the barrier. Secondary Staphylococcus aureus colonization not only amplifies inflammation but also further stresses the barrier in atopic dermatitis. Summary These results suggest a new ‘outside-to-inside, back to outside’ paradigm for the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. This new concept is providing impetus for the development of new categories of ‘barrier repair’ therapy. PMID:19550302

  3. Abnormal skin barrier in the etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Elias, Peter M; Schmuth, Matthias

    2009-07-01

    Prior studies revealed the key roles played by T-helper type 1 and type 2 (Th1/Th2) cell dysregulation, IgE production, mast cell hyperactivity, and dendritic cell signaling in the evolution of the chronic, pruritic, inflammatory dermatosis that characterizes atopic dermatitis (AD). Accordingly, current therapy has been largely directed toward ameliorating Th2-mediated inflammation and pruritus. This article reviews emerging evidence that the inflammation in AD results from inherited and acquired insults to the barrier, as well as the therapeutic implications of this new paradigm.

  4. Abnormalities in itch sensation and skin barrier function in atopic NC/Tnd mice.

    PubMed

    Amagai, Yosuke; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Akane

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by dryness and itchy skin. Genetic factors as well as other factors, including abnormality in skin barrier function, hypersensitivity of itch sensory nerves, and dysfunction of the immune system, strongly affect the onset and exacerbation of AD. Recently, it has become clear that itch sensation is closely related to pain sensation. By using NC/Tnd mice, a unique spontaneous animal model for human AD, we found abnormalities in sensitivity against external stimuli as compared to two standard strains, BALB/c and B6 mice. Particularly, in conventional NC/Tnd mice with AD, stimulation against transient receptor potential (TRP) V1 reduced the scratching behavior, suggesting the possibility of a TRPV1 modulator in the treatment of atopic itch. The review outlines observations regarding itch sensation and skin barrier function in NC/Tnd mice by using a novel itch quantification system for the laboratory animals, which may bring great progress in the future study of itch.

  5. Mechanisms of abnormal lamellar body secretion and the dysfunctional skin barrier in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.; Wakefield, Joan

    2014-01-01

    We review here how diverse inherited and acquired abnormalities in epidermal structural and enzymatic proteins converge to produce defective permeability barrier function and antimicrobial defense in AD. Although best known are mutations in filaggrin (FLG), mutations in other member of the fused S-100 family of proteins (i.e., hornerin [hrn] and filaggrin 2 [flg-2]); the cornified envelope precursor (e.g., SPRR3); mattrin, encoded by Tmem79, which regulates the assembly of lamellar bodies; SPINK5, which encodes the serine protease inhibitor, LEKTI1; and the fatty acid transporter, FATP4, have all been linked to AD. Yet, these abnormalities often only predispose to AD; additional acquired stressors that further compromise barrier function; e.g., psychological stress, a low ambient humidity, or high pH surfactants, often are required to trigger disease. Th2 cytokines can also compromise barrier function by downregulating expression of multiple epidermal structural proteins, lipid synthetic enzymes and antimicrobial peptides. All of these inherited and acquired abnormalities converge on the lamellar body secretory system, producing abnormalities in lipid composition, secretion and/or extracellular lamellar membrane organization, as well as in antimicrobial defense. Finally, we briefly review therapeutic options that address this new pathogenic paradigm. PMID:25131691

  6. Mechanisms of abnormal lamellar body secretion and the dysfunctional skin barrier in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Elias, Peter M; Wakefield, Joan S

    2014-10-01

    I review how diverse inherited and acquired abnormalities in epidermal structural and enzymatic proteins converge to produce defective permeability barrier function and antimicrobial defense in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). Although best known are mutations in filaggrin (FLG), mutations in other member of the fused S-100 family of proteins (ie, hornerin [hrn] and filaggrin 2 [flg-2]); the cornified envelope precursor (ie, SPRR3); mattrin, which is encoded by TMEM79 and regulates the assembly of lamellar bodies; SPINK5, which encodes the serine protease inhibitor lymphoepithelial Kazal-type trypsin inhibitor type 1; and the fatty acid transporter fatty acid transport protein 4 have all been linked to AD. Yet these abnormalities often only predispose to AD; additional acquired stressors that further compromise barrier function, such as psychological stress, low ambient humidity, or high-pH surfactants, often are required to trigger disease. T(H)2 cytokines can also compromise barrier function by downregulating expression of multiple epidermal structural proteins, lipid synthetic enzymes, and antimicrobial peptides. All of these inherited and acquired abnormalities converge on the lamellar body secretory system, producing abnormalities in lipid composition, secretion, and/or extracellular lamellar membrane organization, as well as antimicrobial defense. Finally, I briefly review therapeutic options that address this new pathogenic paradigm.

  7. Reevaluation of the non-lesional dry skin in atopic dermatitis by acute barrier disruption: an abnormal permeability barrier homeostasis with defective processing to generate ceramide.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Ayumi; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Mizuno, Atsuko; Imokawa, Genji

    2014-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is characterized by disruption of the cutaneous barrier due to reduced ceramide levels even in non-lesional dry skin. Following further acute barrier disruption by repeated tape strippings, we re-characterized the non-lesional dry skin of subjects with atopic dermatitis, which shows significantly reduced levels of barrier function and ceramide but not of beta-glucocerebrosidase activity. For the first time, we report an abnormal trans-epidermal water loss homeostasis in which delayed recovery kinetics of trans-epidermal water loss occurred on the first day during the 4 days after acute barrier disruption compared with healthy control skin. Interestingly, whereas the higher ceramide level in the stratum corneum of healthy control skin was further significantly up-regulated at 4 days post-tape stripping, the lower ceramide level in the stratum corneum of subjects with atopic dermatitis was not significantly changed. In a parallel study, whereas beta-glucocerebrosidase activity at 4 days post-tape stripping was significantly up-regulated in healthy control skin compared with before tape stripping, the level of that activity remained substantially unchanged in atopic dermatitis. These findings indicate that subjects with atopic dermatitis have a defect in sphingolipid-metabolic processing that generates ceramide in the interface between the stratum corneum and the epidermis. The results also support the notion that the continued disruption of barrier function in atopic dermatitis non-lesional skin is associated with the impaired homeostasis of a ceramide-generating process, which underscores an atopy-specific inflammation-triggered ceramide deficiency that is distinct from other types of dermatitis.

  8. Skin barrier in rosacea.

    PubMed

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea.

  9. Skin barrier in rosacea*

    PubMed Central

    Addor, Flavia Alvim Sant'Anna

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies about the cutaneous barrier demonstrated consistent evidence that the stratum corneum is a metabolically active structure and also has adaptive functions, may play a regulatory role in the inflammatory response with activation of keratinocytes, angiogenesis and fibroplasia, whose intensity depends primarily on the intensity the stimulus. There are few studies investigating the abnormalities of the skin barrier in rosacea, but the existing data already show that there are changes resulting from inflammation, which can generate a vicious circle caused a prolongation of flare-ups and worsening of symptoms. This article aims to gather the most relevant literature data about the characteristics and effects of the state of the skin barrier in rosacea. PMID:26982780

  10. Genetics of psoriasis: evidence for epistatic interaction between skin barrier abnormalities and immune deviation.

    PubMed

    Bergboer, Judith G M; Zeeuwen, Patrick L J M; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2012-10-01

    Psoriasis was until recently regarded as a T-cell-driven disease with presumed (auto)immune mechanisms as its primary cause. This view was supported by clinical data and genetic studies that identified risk factors functioning in adaptive and innate immunity, such as HLA-C*06, ERAP1, the IL-23 pathway, and NF-k B signaling. Candidate gene approaches and genome-wide association studies, however, have identified copy number polymorphisms of the b-defensin cluster and deletion of late cornified envelope (LCE) 3B and 3C genes (LCE3C_LCE3B-del) as psoriasis risk factors.As these genes are expressed in epithelial cells and not by the immune system, these findings may cause a change of paradigm for psoriasis, not unlike the reported filaggrin association that has profoundly changed the views on atopic dermatitis. In addition to genetic polymorphisms of the immune system, genetic variations affecting the skin barrier are likely to contribute to psoriasis. Recent studies have shown epistatic interactions involving HLA-C*06, ERAP1, and LCE3C_LCE3B-del, which makes psoriasis a unique model to investigate genetic and biological interactions of associated genes in a complex disease. We present a model for disease initiation and perpetuation, which integrates the available genetic, immunobiological, and clinical data.

  11. Skin - abnormally dark or light

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/003242.htm Skin - abnormally dark or light To use the sharing features on this page, ... the hands. The bronze color can range from light to dark (in fair-skinned people) with the ...

  12. The Role of the Skin Barrier in Occupational Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kasemsarn, Pranee; Bosco, Joanna; Nixon, Rosemary L

    2016-01-01

    Occupational skin diseases (OSDs) are the second most common occupational diseases worldwide. Occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) is the most frequent OSD, and comprises irritant contact dermatitis (ICD), allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), contact urticaria and protein contact dermatitis. There are many endogenous and exogenous factors which affect the development of OCD, including age, sex, ethnicity, atopic skin diathesis, certain occupations and environmental factors. One of the most important contributing causes is skin barrier dysfunction. The skin provides a first-line defense from environmental assaults and incorporates physical, chemical and biological protection. Skin barrier disturbance plays a crucial role in various skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis (AD), ichthyosis, ICD and ACD. Genetic factors, such as filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations, and external factors, such as skin irritants interfering with stratum corneum structure and composition, may lead to abnormalities in skin barrier function and increased vulnerability to skin diseases. FLG encodes the cornified envelope protein, filaggrin, which is involved in skin barrier function. FLG mutation is associated with the development of OCD. High-risk occupations for OCD include health care workers, hairdressers and construction workers. There are often multiple contributing causes to OCD, as workers are exposed to both irritants and allergens. AD is also associated with skin barrier disruption and plays an important role in OCD. ICD often precedes and facilitates the development of ACD, with impairment of the skin barrier contributing to the concurrence of ICD and ACD in many workers with OCD.

  13. [Normal and abnormal skin color].

    PubMed

    Ortonne, J-P

    2012-11-01

    The varieties of normal skin color in humans range from people of "no color" (pale white) to "people of color" (light brown, dark brown, and black). Skin color is a blend resulting from the skin chromophores red (oxyhaemoglobin), blue (deoxygenated haemoglobin), yellow-orange (carotene, an exogenous pigment), and brown (melanin). Melanin, however, is the major component of skin color ; it is the presence or absence of melanin in the melanosomes in melanocytes and melanin in keratinocytes that is responsible for epidermal pigmentation, and the presence of melanin in macrophages or melanocytes in the dermis that is responsible for dermal pigmentation. Two groups of pigmentary disorders are commonly distinguished: the disorders of the quantitative and qualitative distribution of normal pigment and the abnormal presence of exogenous or endogenous pigments in the skin. The first group includes hyperpigmentations, which clinically manifest by darkening of the skin color, and leukodermia, which is characterized by lightening of the skin. Hypermelanosis corresponds to an overload of melanin or an abnormal distribution of melanin in the skin. Depending on the color, melanodermia (brown/black) and ceruloderma (blue/grey) are distinguished. Melanodermia correspond to epidermal hypermelanocytosis (an increased number of melanocytes) or epidermal hypermelanosis (an increase in the quantity of melanin in the epidermis with no modification of the number of melanocytes). Ceruloderma correspond to dermal hypermelanocytosis (abnormal presence in the dermis of cells synthesizing melanins) ; leakage in the dermis of epidermal melanin also exists, a form of dermal hypermelanosis called pigmentary incontinence. Finally, dyschromia can be related to the abnormal presence in the skin of a pigment of exogenous or endogenous origin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Skin Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Like other inflammatory dermatoses, the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) has been largely attributed to abnormalities in adaptive immunity. T helper (Th) cell types 1 and 2 cell dysregulation, IgE production, mast cell hyperactivity, and dendritic cell signaling are thought to account for the chronic, pruritic, and inflammatory dermatosis that characterizes AD. Not surprisingly, therapy has been directed toward ameliorating Th2-mediated inflammation and pruritus. Here, we review emerging evidence that inflammation in AD occurs downstream to inherited and acquired insults to the barrier. Therapy based upon this new view of pathogenesis should emphasize approaches that correct the primary abnormality in barrier function, which drives downstream inflammation and allows unrestricted antigen access. PMID:18606081

  15. Cytokines and the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Hänel, Kai H; Cornelissen, Christian; Lüscher, Bernhard; Baron, Jens Malte

    2013-03-26

    The skin is the largest organ of the human body and builds a barrier to protect us from the harmful environment and also from unregulated loss of water. Keratinocytes form the skin barrier by undergoing a highly complex differentiation process that involves changing their morphology and structural integrity, a process referred to as cornification. Alterations in the epidermal cornification process affect the formation of the skin barrier. Typically, this results in a disturbed barrier, which allows the entry of substances into the skin that are immunologically reactive. This contributes to and promotes inflammatory processes in the skin but also affects other organs. In many common skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, a defect in the formation of the skin barrier is observed. In these diseases the cytokine composition within the skin is different compared to normal human skin. This is the result of resident skin cells that produce cytokines, but also because additional immune cells are recruited. Many of the cytokines found in defective skin are able to influence various processes of differentiation and cornification. Here we summarize the current knowledge on cytokines and their functions in healthy skin and their contributions to inflammatory skin diseases.

  16. Cytokines and the Skin Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Hänel, Kai H.; Cornelissen, Christian; Lüscher, Bernhard; Baron, Jens Malte

    2013-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the human body and builds a barrier to protect us from the harmful environment and also from unregulated loss of water. Keratinocytes form the skin barrier by undergoing a highly complex differentiation process that involves changing their morphology and structural integrity, a process referred to as cornification. Alterations in the epidermal cornification process affect the formation of the skin barrier. Typically, this results in a disturbed barrier, which allows the entry of substances into the skin that are immunologically reactive. This contributes to and promotes inflammatory processes in the skin but also affects other organs. In many common skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, a defect in the formation of the skin barrier is observed. In these diseases the cytokine composition within the skin is different compared to normal human skin. This is the result of resident skin cells that produce cytokines, but also because additional immune cells are recruited. Many of the cytokines found in defective skin are able to influence various processes of differentiation and cornification. Here we summarize the current knowledge on cytokines and their functions in healthy skin and their contributions to inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:23531535

  17. Treatments Improving Skin Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Lodén, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Moisturizers affect the stratum corneum architecture and barrier homeostasis, i.e. topically applied ingredients are not as inert to the skin as one might expect. A number of different mechanisms behind the barrier-influencing effects of moisturizers have been suggested, such as simple deposition of lipid material outside the skin. Ingredients in the moisturizers may also change the lamellar organization and the packing of the lipid matrix and thereby skin permeability. Topically applied substances may also penetrate deeper into the skin and interfere with the production of barrier lipids and the maturation of corneocytes. Furthermore, moisturizing creams may influence the desquamatory proteases and alter the thickness of the stratum corneum.

  18. Filaggrin and Skin Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Kezic, Sanja; Jakasa, Ivone

    2016-01-01

    The skin barrier function is greatly dependent on the structure and composition of the uppermost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum (SC), which is made up of flattened anucleated cells surrounded by highly organized and continuous lipid matrix. The interior of the corneocytes consists mainly of keratin filaments aggregated by filaggrin (FLG) protein. Next, together with several other proteins, FLG is cross-linked into a mechanically robust cornified cell envelope providing a scaffold for the extracellular lipid matrix. In addition to its role for the SC structural and mechanical integrity, FLG degradation products account in part for the water-holding capacity and maintenance of acidic pH of the SC, both crucial for the epidermal barrier homoeostasis by regulating activity of multiple enzymes that control desquamation, lipid synthesis and inflammation. The major determinant of FLG expression in the skin are loss-of-function mutations in FLG, the strongest genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD), an inflammatory skin disease characterized by a reduced skin barrier function. The prevalence of FLG mutations varies greatly among different populations and ranges from about 10% in Northern Europeans to less than 1% in the African populations. An impaired skin barrier facilitates absorption of potentially hazardous chemicals, which might cause adverse effects in the skin, such as contact dermatitis, or systemic toxicity after their passage into blood. In another direction, a leaky epidermal barrier will lead to enhanced loss of water from the skin. A recent study has shown that even subtle increase in epidermal water loss in newborns increases the risk for AD. Although there are multiple modes of action by which FLG might affect skin barrier it is still unclear whether and how FLG deficiency leads to the reduced skin barrier function. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge in this field obtained from clinical studies, and animal and in vitro models

  19. Irritants and Skin Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Angelova-Fischer, Irena

    2016-01-01

    The barrier response to irritant challenge involves complex biologic events and can be modulated by various environmental, exposure and host-related factors. Irritant damage to the epidermal barrier elicits a cascade of homeostatic or pathologic responses that could be investigated by both in vitro and in vivo methods providing different information at biochemical and functional level. The present chapter summarizes the changes in key barrier function parameters following irritant exposure with focus on experimental controlled in vivo human skin studies.

  20. Standards for the Protection of Skin Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Arnau, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The skin is a vital organ, and through our skin we are in close contact with the entire environment. If we lose our skin we lose our life. The barrier function of the skin is mainly driven by the sophisticated epidermis in close relationship with the dermis. The epidermal epithelium is a mechanically, chemically, biologically and immunologically active barrier submitted to continuous turnover. The barrier function of the skin needs to be protected and restored. Its own physiology allows its recovery, but many times this is not sufficient. This chapter is focused on the standards to restore, treat and prevent barrier function disruption. These standards were developed from a scientific, academic and clinical point of view. There is a lack of standardized administrative recommendations. Still, there is a walk to do that will help to reduce the social and economic burden of diseases characterized by an abnormal skin barrier function.

  1. The skin: an indispensable barrier.

    PubMed

    Proksch, Ehrhardt; Brandner, Johanna M; Jensen, Jens-Michael

    2008-12-01

    The skin forms an effective barrier between the organism and the environment preventing invasion of pathogens and fending off chemical and physical assaults, as well as the unregulated loss of water and solutes. In this review we provide an overview of several components of the physical barrier, explaining how barrier function is regulated and altered in dermatoses. The physical barrier is mainly localized in the stratum corneum (SC) and consists of protein-enriched cells (corneocytes with cornified envelope and cytoskeletal elements, as well as corneodesmosomes) and lipid-enriched intercellular domains. The nucleated epidermis also contributes to the barrier through tight, gap and adherens junctions, as well as through desmosomes and cytoskeletal elements. During epidermal differentiation lipids are synthesized in the keratinocytes and extruded into the extracellular domains, where they form extracellular lipid-enriched layers. The cornified cell envelope, a tough protein/lipid polymer structure, resides below the cytoplasmic membrane on the exterior of the corneocytes. Ceramides A and B are covalently bound to cornified envelope proteins and form the backbone for the subsequent addition of free ceramides, free fatty acids and cholesterol in the SC. Filaggrin is cross-linked to the cornified envelope and aggregates keratin filaments into macrofibrils. Formation and maintenance of barrier function is influenced by cytokines, 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate and calcium. Changes in epidermal differentiation and lipid composition lead to a disturbed skin barrier, which allows the entry of environmental allergens, immunological reaction and inflammation in atopic dermatitis. A disturbed skin barrier is important for the pathogenesis of contact dermatitis, ichthyosis, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.

  2. Skin Barrier Function and Allergens.

    PubMed

    Engebretsen, Kristiane Aasen; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2016-01-01

    The skin is an important barrier protecting us from mechanical insults, microorganisms, chemicals and allergens, but, importantly, also reducing water loss. A common hallmark for many dermatoses is a compromised skin barrier function, and one could suspect an elevated risk of contact sensitization (CS) and allergy following increased penetration of potential allergens. However, the relationship between common dermatoses such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis (AD) and irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) and the development of contact allergy (CA) is complex, and depends on immunologic responses and skin barrier status. Psoriasis has traditionally been regarded a Th1-dominated disease, but the discovery of Th17 cells and IL-17 provides new and interesting information regarding the pathogenesis of the disease. Research suggests an inverse relationship between psoriasis and CA, possibly due to increased levels of Th17 cells and its associated cytokines. As for AD, a positive association to CS has been established in epidemiological studies, but is still unresolved. Experimental studies show, however, an inverse relationship between AD and CS. The opposing and antagonistic influences of Th1 (CS) and Th2 (AD) have been proposed as an explanation. Finally, there is convincing evidence that exposure to irritants increases the risk of CS, and patients with ICD are, therefore, at great risk of developing CA. Skin irritation leads to the release of IL-1 and TNF-α, which affects the function of antigen-presenting cells and promotes their migration to local lymph nodes, thus increasing the probability of CS and ultimately the development of CA.

  3. Penetration through the Skin Barrier.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Benfeldt, Eva; Holmgaard, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    The skin is a strong and flexible organ with barrier properties essential for maintaining homeostasis and thereby human life. Characterizing this barrier is the ability to prevent some chemicals from crossing the barrier while allowing others, including medicinal products, to pass at varying rates. During recent decades, the latter has received increased attention as a route for intentionally delivering drugs to patients. This has stimulated research in methods for sampling, measuring and predicting percutaneous penetration. Previous chapters have described how different endogenous, genetic and exogenous factors may affect barrier characteristics. The present chapter introduces the theory for barrier penetration (Fick's law), and describes and discusses different methods for measuring the kinetics of percutaneous penetration of chemicals, including in vitro methods (static and flow-through diffusion cells) as well as in vivo methods (microdialysis and microperfusion). Then follows a discussion with examples of how different characteristics of the skin (age, site and integrity) and of the penetrants (size, solubility, ionization, logPow and vehicles) affect the kinetics of percutaneous penetration. Finally, a short discussion of the advantages and challenges of each method is provided, which will hopefully allow the reader to improve decision making and treatment planning, as well as the evaluation of experimental studies of percutaneous penetration of chemicals. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Exogenous Factors in Skin Barrier Repair.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Julia; Friedman, Adam J

    2016-11-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) is the skin's outermost layer and serves the primary function of acting as a shield to keep foreign matter out and to essential elements, such as moisture and water, in. Maintenance of this skin barrier is crucial to healthy functioning skin. A damaged or diseased skin barrier is vulnerable to infection, irritants, and allergens. The cornerstone of skin barrier regulation and repair is through the use of moisturizers. While healthcare providers and patients may underestimate the importance of moisturizers due to their lack of active ingredients, the benefit of a well-planned moisturizer regimen for skin barrier regulation should not be discounted. Dermatologists should be comfortable prescribing and educating about over-the-counter moisturizers to patients with skin barrier is- sues. A general understanding of basic moisturizer ingredients and formulations will aid the dermatologist in providing a personalized moisturizer regimen to their patients. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(11):1289-1294..

  5. The Infant Skin Barrier: Can We Preserve, Protect, and Enhance the Barrier?

    PubMed Central

    Telofski, Lorena S.; Morello, A. Peter; Mack Correa, M. Catherine; Stamatas, Georgios N.

    2012-01-01

    Infant skin is different from adult in structure, function, and composition. Despite these differences, the skin barrier is competent at birth in healthy, full-term neonates. The primary focus of this paper is on the developing skin barrier in healthy, full-term neonates and infants. Additionally, a brief discussion of the properties of the skin barrier in premature neonates and infants with abnormal skin conditions (i.e., atopic dermatitis and eczema) is included. As infant skin continues to mature through the first years of life, it is important that skin care products (e.g., cleansers and emollients) are formulated appropriately. Ideally, products that are used on infants should not interfere with skin surface pH or perturb the skin barrier. For cleansers, this can be achieved by choosing the right type of surfactant, by blending surfactants, or by blending hydrophobically-modified polymers (HMPs) with surfactants to increase product mildness. Similarly, choosing the right type of oil for emollients is important. Unlike some vegetable oils, mineral oil is more stable and is not subject to oxidation and hydrolysis. Although emollients can improve the skin barrier, more studies are needed to determine the potential long-term benefits of using emollients on healthy, full-term neonates and infants. PMID:22988452

  6. Moisturization and skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, A V; Harding, C R

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, great progress has been made toward elucidating the structure and function of the stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the epidermis. SC cells (corneocytes) protect against desiccation and environmental challenge by regulating water flux and retention. Maintenance of an optimal level of hydration by the SC is largely dependent on several factors. First, intercellular lamellar lipids, organized predominantly in an orthorhombic gel phase, provide an effective barrier to the passage of water through the tissue. Secondly, the diffusion path length also retards water loss, since water must traverse the tortuous path created by the SC layers and corneocyte envelopes. Thirdly, and equally important, is natural moisturizing factor (NMF), a complex mixture of low-molecular-weight, water-soluble compounds first formed within the corneocytes by degradation of the histidine-rich protein known as filaggrin. Each maturation step leading to the formation of an effective moisture barrier--including corneocyte strengthening, lipid processing, and NMF generation--is influenced by the level of SC hydration. These processes, as well as the final step of corneodesmolysis that mediates exfoliation, are often disturbed upon environmental challenge, resulting in dry, flaky skin conditions. The present paper reviews our current understanding of the biology of the SC, particularly its homeostatic mechanisms of hydration.

  7. Cleansing Formulations That Respect Skin Barrier Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Russel M.; Mao, Guangru; Gunn, Euen T.; Hornby, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Surfactants in skin cleansers interact with the skin in several manners. In addition to the desired benefit of providing skin hygiene, surfactants also extract skin components during cleansing and remain in the stratum corneum (SC) after rinsing. These side effects disrupt SC structure and degrade its barrier properties. Recent applications of vibrational spectroscopy and two-photon microscopy in skin research have provided molecular-level information to facilitate our understanding of the interaction between skin and surfactant. In the arena of commercial skin cleansers, technologies have been developed to produce cleansers that both cleanse and respect skin barrier. The main approach is to minimize surfactant interaction with skin through altering its solution properties. Recently, hydrophobically modified polymers (HMPs) have been introduced to create skin compatible cleansing systems. At the presence of HMP, surfactants assemble into larger, more stable structures. These structures are less likely to penetrate the skin, thereby resulting in less aggressive cleansers and the integrity of the skin barrier is maintained. In this paper, we reviewed our recent findings on surfactant and SC interactions at molecular level and provided an overview of the HM technology for developing cleansers that respect skin barrier. PMID:22927835

  8. Skin barrier in atopic dermatitis: beyond filaggrin*

    PubMed Central

    Zaniboni, Mariana Colombini; Samorano, Luciana Paula; Orfali, Raquel Leão; Aoki, Valéria

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a complex pathogenesis, where changes in skin barrier and imbalance of the immune system are relevant factors. The skin forms a mechanic and immune barrier, regulating water loss from the internal to the external environment, and protecting the individual from external aggressions, such as microorganisms, ultraviolet radiation and physical trauma. Main components of the skin barrier are located in the outer layers of the epidermis (such as filaggrin), the proteins that form the tight junction (TJ) and components of the innate immune system. Recent data involving skin barrier reveal new information regarding its structure and its role in the mechanic-immunological defense; atopic dermatitis (AD) is an example of a disease related to dysfunctions associated with this complex. PMID:27579743

  9. Abnormal electrochemical skin conductance in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Dominique; Brunswick, Philippe; Calvet, Jean-Henri; Dusser, Daniel; Fajac, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical skin conductance measurement is an active electrophysiologic method in which incremental low direct voltage is applied on the skin. It generates a current due to reverse iontophoresis which previous studies suggested to be mostly related to chloride anion movements. As sweat chloride movements upon electric stimulation were likely to be impaired in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, we designed a proof-of-concept study to measure electrochemical skin conductance in CF patients and control subjects and to test the ability of this method to discriminate CF from controls. Electrochemical skin conductance was measured in 41 adult patients with classical CF and 20 healthy control subjects. Patients placed their hands and feet on nickel electrodes and an incremental low direct voltage was applied on the anode during 2min. The resulting voltage on the cathode and the current generated between anode and cathode were measured and from them, two electrochemical skin conductance variables were calculated: ESC, obtained when a low voltage of 1.6V was applied, and dESC which took into account electrochemical skin conductances obtained when low and high voltages were applied. ESC measurements on hands and feet were significantly different in CF patients (on feet: 75±10μSi), as compared with control subjects (62±13μSi, p<0.0001); dESC was also significantly different and more discriminative in CF patients (on feet: 34±24μSi), as compared with control subjects (93±24μSi, p<0.0001). dESC measurement provided a diagnostic specificity of 1 and a sensitivity of 0.93. These results show that electrochemical skin conductance which is easily and rapidly measured is abnormal in CF patients. Trial registry name in the European Clinical Trials Database (eudraCT): "EZSCAN MUCO1: Mesure de la conductance cutanée par chronoampérométrie", N°EUDRACT: 2007-A00221-52. Copyright © 2010 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Skin Barrier Defects in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rachana; Woodfolk, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with complex etiology that is dependent upon interactions between the host and the environment. Acute skin lesions exhibit the features of a Th2-driven inflammatory disorder and many patients are highly atopic. The skin barrier plays key roles in immune surveillance and homeostasis, and in preventing penetration of microbial products and allergens. Defects that compromise the structural integrity, or else the immune function of the skin barrier play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD. This article provides an overview of the array of molecular building blocks that are essential to maintaining healthy skin. The basis for structural defects in the skin is discussed in relation to AD, with an emphasis on filaggrin and its genetic underpinnings. Aspects of innate immunity, including the role of anti-microbial peptides and proteases are also discussed. PMID:24633617

  11. Skin barrier defects in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rachana; Woodfolk, Judith A

    2014-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin condition with complex etiology that is dependent upon interactions between the host and the environment. Acute skin lesions exhibit the features of a Th2-driven inflammatory disorder, and many patients are highly atopic. The skin barrier plays key roles in immune surveillance and homeostasis, and in preventing penetration of microbial products and allergens. Defects that compromise the structural integrity or else the immune function of the skin barrier play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD. This article provides an overview of the array of molecular building blocks that are essential to maintaining healthy skin. The basis for structural defects in the skin is discussed in relation to AD, with an emphasis on filaggrin and its genetic underpinnings. Aspects of innate immunity, including the role of antimicrobial peptides and proteases, are also discussed.

  12. Ceramides and barrier function in healthy skin.

    PubMed

    Mutanu Jungersted, Jakob; Hellgren, Lars I; Høgh, Julie K; Drachmann, T; Jemec, Gregor B E; Agner, Tove

    2010-07-01

    Lipids in the stratum corneum are key components in the barrier function of the skin. Changes in lipid composition related to eczematous diseases are well known, but limited data are available on variations within healthy skin. The objective of the present study was to compare ceramide subgroups and ceramide/cholesterol ratios in young, old, male and female healthy skin. A total of 55 participants with healthy skin was included in the study. Lipid profiles were correlated with transepidermal water loss and with information on dry skin from a questionnaire including 16 people. No statistically significant differences were found between young and old skin for ceramide subgroups or ceramide/cholesterol ratios, and there was no statistically significant correlation between answers about dry skin and ceramide levels. Interestingly, a statistically significant higher ceramide/cholesterol ratio was found for men than for women (p = 0.02).

  13. Importance of Tight Junctions in Relation to Skin Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Brandner, Johanna M

    2016-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are complex cell-cell junctions that form a barrier in the stratum granulosum of mammalian skin. Besides forming a barrier themselves, TJs influence other skin barriers, e.g. the stratum corneum barrier, and are influenced by other skin barriers, e.g. by the chemical, the microbiome, or the immunological barrier and likely by the basement membrane. This review summarizes the dynamic interaction of the TJ barrier with other barriers in the skin and the central role of TJs in skin barrier function. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Solar UV radiation reduces the barrier function of human skin.

    PubMed

    Biniek, Krysta; Levi, Kemal; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2012-10-16

    The ubiquitous presence of solar UV radiation in human life is essential for vitamin D production but also leads to skin photoaging, damage, and malignancies. Photoaging and skin cancer have been extensively studied, but the effects of UV on the critical mechanical barrier function of the outermost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum (SC), are not understood. The SC is the first line of defense against environmental exposures like solar UV radiation, and its effects on UV targets within the SC and subsequent alterations in the mechanical properties and related barrier function are unclear. Alteration of the SC's mechanical properties can lead to severe macroscopic skin damage such as chapping and cracking and associated inflammation, infection, scarring, and abnormal desquamation. Here, we show that UV exposure has dramatic effects on cell cohesion and mechanical integrity that are related to its effects on the SC's intercellular components, including intercellular lipids and corneodesmosomes. We found that, although the keratin-controlled stiffness remained surprisingly constant with UV exposure, the intercellular strength, strain, and cohesion decreased markedly. We further show that solar UV radiation poses a double threat to skin by both increasing the biomechanical driving force for damage while simultaneously decreasing the skin's natural ability to resist, compromising the critical barrier function of the skin.

  15. Stratum corneum barrier integrity controls skin homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Smith, W

    1999-04-01

    The stratum corneum water barrier controls structural and functional properties of both the epidermis and the dermis. Treatments which chronically disrupt the stratum corneum water barrier can induce changes similar to those seen with 'anti-aging' treatments such as (-Hydroxy acids (AHAs) and Retin Atrade mark. Barrier disruption via daily tape stripping increases epidermal and dermal thickness, superficial and integral skin firmness, and improves skin surface texture. Modest or transitory disruption did not produce such effects. Similar results were observed with topical application of AHAs, retinoids or mild irritants after about 4-6 weeks provided such treatments resulted in prolonged elevation in TEWL (trans-epidermal water loss). Treatments that did not chronically elevate TEWL could also produce positive cosmetic effects, but such effects were in general restricted to the skin surface or epidermis. Irritation, which was observed with some treatments, was not solely responsible for the positive effects observed.

  16. Matching the skin barrier to the skin type.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Hyacinth; North, Jacqui; Davenport, Rebecca; Williams, Julia

    Peristomal skin problems are thought to be common (Herlufsson et al, 2006; Williams et al, 2010), and can interfere with the security of stoma products. Stoma patients are reliant on the integrity of their peristomal skin to maintain a normal lifestyle. Bekkers et al (1996) highlighted that, if the peristomal skin becomes damaged, it not only affects the person physically, but also psychologically, ultimately prolonging rehabilitation and adaptation to the stoma. Therefore, it can be concluded that maintaining skin integrity is a basic and essential skill in ensuring good stoma management. This article explores the assessment of four stoma patients, highlighting the importance of matching their skin type with their skin barrier for optimum skin protection. The patients have kindly agreed for their case studies to be published as a means of informing others. All names have been changed in line with Nursing and Midwifery Council (2010) guidelines to maintain patient confidentiality. This article was originally presented at the World Council of Enterostomal Therapists' (WCET) annual conference in 2010, receiving first prize at poster presentations.

  17. Caffeine improves barrier function in male skin.

    PubMed

    Brandner, J M; Behne, M J; Huesing, B; Moll, I

    2006-10-01

    The influence of androgens, especially testosterone and its effector dihydrotestosterone, results in a constitutive disadvantage for male skin, e.g. reduced viability of hair at the scalp and reduced epidermal permeability barrier repair capacity. Dihydrotestosterone can act, among others, as an adenyl cyclase inhibitor. Caffeine on the other hand is an inexpensive and (in regular doses) harmless substance used in various cosmetic products, which can act as a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. To prove the hypothesis that caffeine as a phosphodiesterase inhibitor is able to override testosterone-induced effects on barrier function, we performed a double-blind placebo controlled study with healthy volunteers. In this study, 0.5% caffeine in a hydroxyethylcellulose gel preparation (HEC) was applied on one forearm, HEC without caffeine on the other forearm of male and female volunteers for 7 days and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was measured before and at the end of the treatment period. Basal TEWL did not differ significantly between male and female subjects but the application of caffeine significantly reduced TEWL in male skin compared with female skin. We conclude that caffeine is beneficial for barrier function in male skin.

  18. Acute skin barrier disruption with repeated tape stripping: an in vivo model for damage skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanrui; Wang, Xuemin; Chen, Shuangyu; Li, Shuyuan; Liu, Xiaoping

    2013-05-01

    To establish a model of standardized acute barrier disruption, investigate the response of normal human to repeated tape stripping, and analyze the change of damaged skin with non-invasive examination techniques for skin, such as TEWL and squamometry. Repeated tape stripping with corneofix was applied on three different anatomical sites; the measurement of TEWL was performed on the baseline and after every 5 strips. Then, the samples of corneofix were analyzed using Visioscan VC98 and squamometry. The parameter of TEWL and cohesion score show stable change trend. TEWL increased with frequency of stripping and were significantly higher compared with that of baseline on three sites. The results of staining of corneofix showed that the intercorneocyte cohesion is increased with the number of strips, and the more the number of strips, the more the fixation of dye per cell. The changes in the skin barrier function of different sites were different after it accepted physical stimulation, the process of damaging skin barrier could be divided into three stages based on the △TEWL. In addition, through stripping the skin of an adult, the in vivo model of damaged skin barrier could be setup. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Surfactants have multi-fold effects on skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Lemery, Emmanuelle; Briançon, Stéphanie; Chevalier, Yves; Oddos, Thierry; Gohier, Annie; Boyron, Olivier; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine

    2015-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) is responsible for the barrier properties of the skin and the role of intercorneocyte skin lipids, particularly their structural organization, in controlling SC permeability is acknowledged. Upon contacting the skin, surfactants interact with the SC components leading to barrier damage. To improve knowledge of the effect of several classes of surfactant on skin barrier function at three different levels. The influence of treatments of human skin explants with six non-ionic and four ionic surfactant solutions on the physicochemical properties of skin was investigated. Skin surface wettability and polarity were assessed through contact angle measurements. Infrared spectroscopy allowed monitoring the SC lipid organization. The lipid extraction potency of surfactants was evaluated thanks to HPLC-ELSD assays. One anionic and one cationic surfactant increased the skin polarity by removing the sebaceous and epidermal lipids and by disturbing the organization of the lipid matrix. Another cationic surfactant displayed a detergency effect without disturbing the skin barrier. Several non-ionic surfactants disturbed the lipid matrix organization and modified the skin wettability without any extraction of the skin lipids. Finally two non-ionic surfactants did not show any effect on the investigated parameters or on the skin barrier. The polarity, the organization of the lipid matrix and the lipid composition of the skin allowed describing finely how surfactants can interact with the skin and disturb the skin barrier function.

  20. Influence of different cosmetic formulations on the human skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, K; Heinrich, U; Tronnier, H

    2014-01-01

    The human skin barrier is an important part of the skin's intactness and its functionality is a precondition for healthy skin. Ingredients in cosmetic formulations, especially penetration enhancers, can influence this barrier function as they transport active agents into deeper skin layers. In this study different cosmetic formulations were tested by 60 healthy female volunteers over a period of 4 weeks. The skin hydration and barrier function before and during the application were measured. Significant changes in both parameters were determined. A negative influence on the barrier function by penetration enhancers could be observed, but it was also found that lamellar lipid structures (DermaMembranSysteme®, DMS®) are able to enhance the skin barrier. Both penetration enhancers as well as DMS can increase skin hydration. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Attachment, skin deep? Relationships between adult attachment and skin barrier recovery

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Theodore F.; Brooks, Kathryn P.; Kane, Heidi S.; Schetter, Christine Dunkel

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between individual differences in adult attachment and skin barrier recovery. Dating couples (N = 34) completed a self-report measure of attachment anxiety and avoidance, and during two separate laboratory visits, normal skin barrier function was disrupted using a tape-stripping procedure, followed by a 20 min discussion of personal concerns in one visit and relationship problems in the other, counterbalanced randomly across visits. Skin barrier recovery was assessed by measuring transepidermal water loss up to 2 h after skin disruption. Multilevel modeling showed that skin barrier recovery did not differ between the personal concern or relationship problem discussions. Among women, greater attachment anxiety predicted faster skin barrier recovery across the two visits, while greater attachment avoidance predicted slower skin barrier recovery. Among men, greater attachment anxiety predicted slower skin barrier recovery during the personal concern discussion only. The observed effects remained significant after controlling for transepidermal water loss in undisturbed skin, suggesting that the relationship between attachment security and skin barrier recovery was not due to other skin-related factors like sweating. Cortisol changes, self-reported emotions, stress appraisals, and supportiveness ratings were tested as potential mediators, and none explained the relationships between attachment and skin barrier recovery. These findings are the first to demonstrate associations between individual differences in attachment style and restorative biological processes in the skin, even in a sample of young dating couples in satisfied relationships. PMID:22546664

  2. Attachment, skin deep? Relationships between adult attachment and skin barrier recovery.

    PubMed

    Robles, Theodore F; Brooks, Kathryn P; Kane, Heidi S; Schetter, Christine Dunkel

    2013-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between individual differences in adult attachment and skin barrier recovery. Dating couples (N = 34) completed a self-report measure of attachment anxiety and avoidance, and during two separate laboratory visits, normal skin barrier function was disrupted using a tape-stripping procedure, followed by a 20 min discussion of personal concerns in one visit and relationship problems in the other, counterbalanced randomly across visits. Skin barrier recovery was assessed by measuring transepidermal water loss up to 2 h after skin disruption. Multilevel modeling showed that skin barrier recovery did not differ between the personal concern or relationship problem discussions. Among women, greater attachment anxiety predicted faster skin barrier recovery across the two visits, while greater attachment avoidance predicted slower skin barrier recovery. Among men, greater attachment anxiety predicted slower skin barrier recovery during the personal concern discussion only. The observed effects remained significant after controlling for transepidermal water loss in undisturbed skin, suggesting that the relationship between attachment security and skin barrier recovery was not due to other skin-related factors like sweating. Cortisol changes, self-reported emotions, stress appraisals, and supportiveness ratings were tested as potential mediators, and none explained the relationships between attachment and skin barrier recovery. These findings are the first to demonstrate associations between individual differences in attachment style and restorative biological processes in the skin, even in a sample of young dating couples in satisfied relationships.

  3. Influence of skin penetration enhancers on skin barrier function and skin protease activity.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Diar; Hirata, Kazumasa; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2014-01-23

    In order to overcome the skin's excellent barrier function formulation scientists often employ skin penetration enhancers (SPEs) in topical and transdermal formulations. The effects of these compounds on skin health is still not well understood at the molecular level. The aim of the present work was to probe the effects of some common SPEs on desquamatory protease activity in healthy skin. The SPEs studied were isopropyl myristate (IPM), propylene glycol, (PG), propylene glycol laurate (PGL) and Transcutol™ (TC). Occluded infinite doses of each SPE were applied to human volunteers for 24 h. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements were taken before and after application of SPEs. Tape strips were collected from the treated sites to determine protein content and the activity of two desquamatory proteases kallikrein 5 (KLK5) and kallikrein 7 (KLK7). TEWL values were also measured after tape stripping. PG was found to elevate both TEWL values and KLK7 activity to a significant extent (p<0.05). No significant effects were observed for the other SPEs. The ability of PG to alter the skin barrier at the macroscopic level and the influence of the molecule on protease activity reported here may have implications for its use in topical formulations used for the management of impaired skin barrier function such as atopic eczema or psoriasis.

  4. Using FLIM in the study of permeability barrier function of aged and young skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, P.; Choi, E. H.; Man, M. Q.; Crumrine, D.; Mauro, T.; Elias, P.

    2006-02-01

    Aged skin commonly is afflicted by inflammatory skin diseases or xerosis/eczema that can be triggered or exacerbated by impaired epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. It has been previously described a permeability barrier defect in humans of advanced age (> 75 years), which in a murine analog >18 mos, could be attributed to reduced lipid synthesis synthesis. However, the functional abnormality in moderately aged mice is due not to decreased lipid synthesis, but rather to a specific defect in stratum corneum (SC) acidification causing impaired lipid processing processing. Endogenous Na +/H + antiporter (NHE1) level was found declined in moderately aged mouse epidermis. This acidification defect leads to perturbed permeability barrier homeostasis through more than one pathways, we addressed suboptimal activation of the essential, lipid-processing enzyme, β-glucocerebrosidase (BGC) is linked to elevated SC pH. Finally, the importance of the epidermis acidity is shown by the normalization of barrier function after exogenous acidification of moderately aged skin.

  5. New treatments for restoring impaired epidermal barrier permeability: skin barrier repair creams.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2012-01-01

    Skin health depends on an intact barrier composed of protein-rich corneocytes surrounded by the lamellar intercellular lipids. This barrier provides waterproof protection for the body, preventing infection, regulating electrolyte balance, maintaining body temperature, and providing a mechanism for sensation. Damage to the skin barrier results in skin disease that can be treated by a variety of externally applied substances, such as ceramides, hyaluronic acid, licorice extracts, dimethicone, petrolatum, and paraffin wax. These substances are found in moisturizers that are sold as cosmetics and in prescriptions as 510(k) devices. This contribution examines the formulation and effect of skin barrier creams.

  6. A study on the quantitative evaluation of skin barrier function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tomomi; Kabetani, Yasuhiro; Kido, Michiko; Yamada, Kenji; Oikaze, Hirotoshi; Takechi, Yohei; Furuta, Tomotaka; Ishii, Shoichi; Katayama, Haruna; Jeong, Hieyong; Ohno, Yuko

    2015-03-01

    We propose a quantitative evaluation method of skin barrier function using Optical Coherence Microscopy system (OCM system) with coherency of near-infrared light. There are a lot of skin problems such as itching, irritation and so on. It has been recognized skin problems are caused by impairment of skin barrier function, which prevents damage from various external stimuli and loss of water. To evaluate skin barrier function, it is a common strategy that they observe skin surface and ask patients about their skin condition. The methods are subjective judgements and they are influenced by difference of experience of persons. Furthermore, microscopy has been used to observe inner structure of the skin in detail, and in vitro measurements like microscopy requires tissue sampling. On the other hand, it is necessary to assess objectively skin barrier function by quantitative evaluation method. In addition, non-invasive and nondestructive measuring method and examination changes over time are needed. Therefore, in vivo measurements are crucial for evaluating skin barrier function. In this study, we evaluate changes of stratum corneum structure which is important for evaluating skin barrier function by comparing water-penetrated skin with normal skin using a system with coherency of near-infrared light. Proposed method can obtain in vivo 3D images of inner structure of body tissue, which is non-invasive and non-destructive measuring method. We formulate changes of skin ultrastructure after water penetration. Finally, we evaluate the limit of performance of the OCM system in this work in order to discuss how to improve the OCM system.

  7. Epidermal Permeability Barrier (EPB) measurement in mammalian skin

    PubMed Central

    Indra, Arup Kumar; Leid, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A defective skin epidermal permeability barrier (EPB) is responsible for a high mortality rate in premature infants, and is an important risk factor in inflammatory skin diseases such as eczema. We report here fast and accurate methods for measurement of EPB in animal models or in human patients using simple techniques that monitor diffusion of dyes (X-Gal or Lucifer Yellow) through the upper epidermis and measure transepidermal water loss (TEWL) resulting from a defective skin barrier. Accurate diagnosis and early detection of EPB defects in human patients are critical for effective treatment of certain classes of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:21874444

  8. Role of topical emollients and moisturizers in the treatment of dry skin barrier disorders.

    PubMed

    Lodén, Marie

    2003-01-01

    children. In double-blind studies moisturizers with urea have been shown to reduce TEWL in atopic and ichthyotic patients. Urea also makes normal and atopic skin less susceptible against irritation to sodium laurilsulfate. Treatments improving the barrier function may reduce the likelihood of further aggravation of the disease. In order to have optimum effect it is conceivable that moisturizers should be tailored with respect to the epidermal abnormality. New biochemical approaches and non-invasive instruments will increase our understanding of skin barrier disorders and facilitate optimum treatments. The chemistry and function of dry skin and moisturizers is a challenging subject for the practicing dermatologist, as well as for the chemist developing these agents in the pharmaceutical/cosmetic industry.

  9. An update of the defensive barrier function of skin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Ahn, Sung Ku

    2006-06-30

    Skin, as the outermost organ in the human body, continuously confronts the external environment and serves as a primary defense system. The protective functions of skin include UV-protection, anti-oxidant and antimicrobial functions. In addition to these protections, skin also acts as a sensory organ and the primary regulator of body temperature. Within these important functions, the epidermal permeability barrier, which controls the transcutaneous movement of water and other electrolytes, is probably the most important. This permeability barrier resides in the stratum corneum, a resilient layer composed of corneocytes and stratum corneum intercellular lipids. Since the first realization of the structural and biochemical diversities involved in the stratum corneum, a tremendous amount of work has been performed to elucidate its roles and functions in the skin, and in humans in general. The perturbation of the epidermal permeability barrier, previously speculated to be just a symptom involved in skin diseases, is currently considered to be a primary pathophysiologic factor for many skin diseases. In addition, much of the evidence provides support for the idea that various protective functions in the skin are closely related or even co-regulated. In this review, the recent achievements of skin researchers focusing on the functions of the epidermal permeability barrier and their importance in skin disease, such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, are introduced.

  10. The antimicrobial skin barrier in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Schittek, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Keratinocytes represent the major cell population in the epithelial skin barrier and actively participate in innate immune responses by recognizing pathogenic microorganisms, followed by a fine-tuned production of cytokines, chemokines and antimicrobial peptides or proteins (AMPs). Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) suffer from a defective permeability barrier which favors pathogen infection indicating that the permeability and antimicrobial barrier functions are interdependent. Several early studies showed that the inducible AMPs LL-37, HBD-2 and HBD-3 are expressed at lower levels in atopic skin compared to psoriatic skin. However, recent data indicate that AMP induction is not compromised in AD patients and that several AMPs are expressed at significantly higher amounts in AD compared to healthy skin. AD patients have an increased susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus skin infection suggesting that AMP levels expressed by keratinocytes of AD patients might not be sufficient to combat pathogenic skin infection or that AMP function is disturbed. Increasing AMP expression in AD skin and repairing the skin barrier defect might have a therapeutic effect in AD patients enabling the skin to mount an enhanced response to pathogens.

  11. An Update of the Defensive Barrier Function of Skin

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Se Kyoo; Ahn, Sung Ku

    2006-01-01

    Skin, as the outermost organ in the human body, continuously confronts the external environment and serves as a primary defense system. The protective functions of skin include UV-protection, anti-oxidant and antimicrobial functions. In addition to these protections, skin also acts as a sensory organ and the primary regulator of body temperature. Within these important functions, the epidermal permeability barrier, which controls the transcutaneous movement of water and other electrolytes, is probably the most important. This permeability barrier resides in the stratum corneum, a resilient layer composed of corneocytes and stratum corneum intercellular lipids. Since the first realization of the structural and biochemical diversities involved in the stratum corneum, a tremendous amount of work has been performed to elucidate its roles and functions in the skin, and in humans in general. The perturbation of the epidermal permeability barrier, previously speculated to be just a symptom involved in skin diseases, is currently considered to be a primary pathophysiologic factor for many skin diseases. In addition, much of the evidence provides support for the idea that various protective functions in the skin are closely related or even co-regulated. In this review, the recent achievements of skin researchers focusing on the functions of the epidermal permeability barrier and their importance in skin disease, such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, are introduced. PMID:16807977

  12. Skin barrier breakdown: a renaissance in emollient therapy.

    PubMed

    Cork, Michael J; Danby, Simon

    Breakdown of the skin barrier is the first event in the development of atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis). Research over the past five years has indicated that this arises as a result of the interaction of environmental agents such as soap and other detergents with the products of changes in several genes. These genetic changes predispose to the breakdown of the skin barrier, which allows the penetration of allergens, triggering a flare of atopic eczema. This new understanding of how breakdown of the skin barrier is the first event in the development of atopic eczema provides a rationale for a renaissance in the use of a complete emollient therapy regimen in atopic eczema and related skin barrier breakdown diseases, such as asteatotic eczema and irritant contact dermatitis.

  13. Fixing the skin barrier: past, present and future--man and dog compared.

    PubMed

    Marsella, Rosanna

    2013-02-01

    Skin barrier dysfunction exists in both human and canine atopic dermatitis, leading to increased water loss and potentially facilitating allergen penetration and sensitization. Both lipid (e.g. ceramides) and protein (e.g. filaggrin) abnormalities have been described. Some are genetically inherited (e.g. filaggrin mutations are one of the major risk factors in humans) and some are secondary and linked to inflammation. In humans, numerous studies have shown efficacy of emollients and moisturizers in barrier restoration, and this approach has been for years the mainstay of therapy. Recently, this strategy has shown promise as a preventative function. In veterinary medicine, evidence regarding skin barrier impairment is rapidly building. Decreased ceramides and filaggrin (in some subsets of dogs) have been described. Altered metabolism of ceramides has also been proposed. Despite these preliminary data and the availability of products marketed to improve the skin barrier, evidence regarding the clinical benefit of skin repair intervention is still limited. Preliminary studies have demonstrated that topical application of fatty acids and ceramides and systemic administration of fatty acids improve lipid deficiencies in the skin of dogs with atopic dermatitis, but limited clinical evidence exists. Disease remission in humans is paralleled by an improved skin barrier, both with calcineurin inhibitors and glucocorticoids. In veterinary medicine, a preliminary study on ciclosporin and prednisone failed to detect significant improvement of water loss, while successful immunotherapy correlated with an improved skin barrier. Controlled, large studies are needed to address the question of which skin repair approach is clinically most effective and whether this can be used as a preventative strategy.

  14. Unexpected skin barrier influence from nonionic emulsifiers.

    PubMed

    Bárány, E; Lindberg, M; Lodén, M

    2000-02-15

    Skin disorders are often treated with creams containing various active substances. The creams also contain emulsifiers, which are surface-active ingredients used to stabilize the emulsion. Emulsifiers are potential irritants and in the present study the influence of stearic acid, glyceryl stearate, PEG-2, -9, -40, and -100 stearate, steareth-2, -10 and -21 on normal as well as on irritated skin have been evaluated with non-invasive measurements. Test emulsions were created by incorporating 5% emulsifiers in a water/mineral oil mixture (50:50). The emulsions and their vehicle were then applied to normal skin for 48 h and to sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) damaged skin for 17 h in aluminum chambers. Twenty-four hours after removal of the chambers the test sites were evaluated for degree of irritation. In normal skin, the emulsifiers induced significant differences in TEWL but not in skin blood flow. Five of the emulsifiers increased TEWL. In SLS-damaged skin an aggravation of the irritation was expected. However, no differences regarding skin blood flow was noted from the emulsifiers. Furthermore, three emulsifiers unexpectedly decreased TEWL. These results highlight the possibility of absorption of these emulsifiers into the lipid bilayer, which increase TEWL in normal skin and decrease TEWL in damaged skin.

  15. Postnatal maturation of skin barrier function in premature infants.

    PubMed

    Kanti, V; Bonzel, A; Stroux, A; Proquitté, H; Bührer, C; Blume-Peytavi, U; Bartels, N Garcia

    2014-01-01

    In preterm infants, skin barrier maturation entails regional variability. To characterize postnatal skin barrier development in covered, uncovered and diapered regions in healthy premature infants over a longitudinal observation period. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), stratum corneum hydration (SCH), pH and sebum were measured at postnatal ages of 1-7 days and 2-7 weeks on the forehead, abdomen, thigh and buttock of preterm infants (gestational age 30-37 weeks; n = 48) under monitored ambient conditions. A standard minimal skin care regimen was practised. TEWL increased significantly on the buttock (p = 0.007), while remaining stable on the forehead, abdomen and thigh. SCH and sebum remained stable in all studied body regions with increasing age. On the buttock, pH increased (p = 0.049), while other body regions exhibited a significant decrease (p ≤ 0.019). TEWL (p < 0.001) and SCH (p ≤ 0.002) revealed significantly higher values on the buttock, compared to other body regions. Stable TEWL, SCH and sebum values may indicate a lack of skin barrier maturation. Postnatal decrease in skin pH suggests an adaptation process with acid mantle formation. Differences in skin barrier development were observed between anatomical regions. SCH, TEWL and pH values demonstrated a distinct course in the diaper area, indicating an impaired skin barrier function in this region. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Stimulation of PPARα normalizes the skin lipid ratio and improves the skin barrier of normal and filaggrin deficient reconstructed skin.

    PubMed

    Wallmeyer, Leonie; Lehnen, Dominika; Eger, Natascha; Sochorová, Michaela; Opálka, Lukáš; Kováčik, Andrej; Vávrová, Kateřina; Hedtrich, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Therapeutic options for atopic dermatitis mostly address the symptoms but causal therapies are still missing. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) agonists exert beneficial effects in patients suffering this disease, whereas the stimulation of PPARα and γ seemed most promising. To elucidate the effects of the PPARα specific agonist WY14643, the PPARγ agonist ciglitazone, and the dual PPARα+γ agonist docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on the homeostasis and barrier function of filaggrin deficient skin. The effects of the PPAR agonists on skin differentiation were evaluated via qPCR, Western blot, histological or immunofluorescence staining. Skin lipid organization was determined by ATR-FTIR and lipid composition was analyzed by HPTLC. Ultimately, the skin barrier function was assessed by skin absorption studies using the radioactively labeled compound testosterone. Significant upregulation of filaggrin after DHA and WY14643 supplementation, but no effect of ciglitazone, on protein and mRNA level was detected. DHA and WY14643, but not ciglitazone, normalized the molar ratio of the main skin barrier lipids to 1:1:1 (free fatty acids:ceramides:cholesterol). Furthermore, DHA and WY14643 supplementation normalized the skin lipid profile in filaggrin deficient skin, but only WY14643 significantly improved the skin barrier function. Supplementation particularly with the PPARα agonist WY14643 improved the homeostasis and barrier function of filaggrin deficient skin models by normalization of the free fatty acid profile underlining the potential of PPAR agonists for the treatment of filaggrin-associated skin diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Skin Barrier Disruption - A Requirement for Allergen Sensitization?

    PubMed Central

    De Benedetto, Anna; Kubo, Akiharu; Beck, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    For at least half a century, noninvasive techniques have been available to quantify skin barrier function, and these have shown that a number of human skin conditions and disorders are associated with defects in skin permeability. In the last decade, several genes responsible for skin barrier defects observed in both monogenetic and complex, polygenic disorders have been elucidated and functionally characterized. This has led to an explosion of work in the last six years that has identified pathways connecting epidermal barrier disruption and antigen uptake as well as the quality and/or magnitude of the antigen-specific adaptive immune response. This review will introduce the notion that diseases arise from the dynamic crosstalk that occurs between the skin barrier and immune system using atopic dermatitis or eczema as the disease prototype. Nevertheless, the concepts put forth are highly relevant to a number of antigen-driven disorders for which skin barrier is at least transiently compromised such as psoriasis, allergic contact dermatitis and blistering disorders. PMID:22217737

  18. A long-standing hyperglycaemic condition impairs skin barrier by accelerating skin ageing process.

    PubMed

    Park, Hwa-Young; Kim, Jae-Hong; Jung, Minyoung; Chung, Choon Hee; Hasham, Rosnani; Park, Chang Seo; Choi, Eung Ho

    2011-12-01

    Uncontrolled chronic hyperglycaemia including type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) induces many skin problems related to chronic impaired skin barrier state. However, little is known about the skin barrier state of chronic hyperglycaemia patients, the dysfunction of which may be a major cause of their skin problems. In this study, we investigated whether a long-standing hyperglycaemic condition including type 2 DM impairs skin barrier homoeostasis in proportion to the duration and its pathomechanism. We utilized the Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats as an animal model of long-standing hyperglycaemia and Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats as a control strain. We confirmed that a long-standing hyperglycaemia delayed skin barrier homoeostasis, which correlated with haemoglobin A1c levels. OLETF rats as a long-standing hyperglycaemia model exhibited decreased epidermal lipid synthesis and antimicrobial peptide expression with increasing age. Decreased epidermal lipid synthesis accounted for decreased lamellar body production. In addition, OLETF rats had significantly higher serum levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and elevated levels of the receptor for AGE in the epidermis. A long-standing hyperglycaemic condition impairs skin barrier function including permeability and antimicrobial barriers by accelerating skin ageing process in proportion to the duration of hyperglycaemia, which could be a major pathophysiology underlying cutaneous complications of DM.

  19. Effect of glove occlusion on the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Tiedemann, Daniel; Clausen, Maja Lisa; John, Swen Malthe; Angelova-Fischer, Irena; Kezic, Sanja; Agner, Tove

    2016-01-01

    Wet work tasks are the most common exposures leading to occupational irritant contact dermatitis. Use of liquid-proof gloves is recommended when performing wet work, however, gloves may also contribute to impairment of the skin barrier and development of irritant contact dermatitis. The aim of this study is to review the literature on the effects of glove occlusion on skin barrier function. The PubMed database was searched up to 1 February 2015 for articles on the association between glove occlusion and skin barrier function, including human studies only and in English. Only experimental studies including assessment of the skin barrier function were included in the data analysis. Thirteen articles were identified, 8 with focus on occlusion alone, 7 with focus on occlusion in combination with irritant exposure (some overlapping), and 2 field studies. In conclusion, data from the literature showed that the negative effect of occlusion in itself is limited, and that only extensive and long-term occlusion will cause barrier impairment. However, studies investigating combined effect of occlusion and exposure to soaps/detergents indicate that occlusion significantly enhances the skin barrier damage caused by detergents/soaps in a dose-response fashion.

  20. Sebaceous gland, hair shaft, and epidermal barrier abnormalities in keratosis pilaris with and without filaggrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Robert; Sugarman, Jeffrey L; Crumrine, Debra; Hupe, Melanie; Mauro, Theodora M; Mauldin, Elizabeth A; Thyssen, Jacob P; Brandner, Johanna M; Hennies, Hans-Christian; Schmuth, Matthias; Elias, Peter M

    2015-04-01

    Although keratosis pilaris (KP) is common, its etiopathogenesis remains unknown. KP is associated clinically with ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis and molecular genetically with filaggrin-null mutations. In 20 KP patients and 20 matched controls, we assessed the filaggrin and claudin 1 genotypes, the phenotypes by dermatoscopy, and the morphology by light and transmission electron microscopy. Thirty-five percent of KP patients displayed filaggrin mutations, demonstrating that filaggrin mutations only partially account for the KP phenotype. Major histologic and dermatoscopic findings of KP were hyperkeratosis, hypergranulosis, mild T helper cell type 1-dominant lymphocytic inflammation, plugging of follicular orifices, striking absence of sebaceous glands, and hair shaft abnormalities in KP lesions but not in unaffected skin sites. Changes in barrier function and abnormal paracellular permeability were found in both interfollicular and follicular stratum corneum of lesional KP, which correlated ultrastructurally with impaired extracellular lamellar bilayer maturation and organization. All these features were independent of filaggrin genotype. Moreover, ultrastructure of corneodesmosomes and tight junctions appeared normal, immunohistochemistry for claudin 1 showed no reduction in protein amounts, and molecular analysis of claudin 1 was unremarkable. Our findings suggest that absence of sebaceous glands is an early step in KP pathogenesis, resulting in downstream hair shaft and epithelial barrier abnormalities.

  1. Sebaceous Gland, Hair Shaft, and Epidermal Barrier Abnormalities in Keratosis Pilaris with and without Filaggrin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Robert; Sugarman, Jeffrey L.; Crumrine, Debra; Hupe, Melanie; Mauro, Theodora M.; Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Thyssen, Jacob P.; Brandner, Johanna M.; Hennies, Hans-Christian; Schmuth, Matthias; Elias, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Although keratosis pilaris (KP) is common, its etiopathogenesis remains unknown. KP is associated clinically with ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis and molecular genetically with filaggrin-null mutations. In 20 KP patients and 20 matched controls, we assessed the filaggrin and claudin 1 genotypes, the phenotypes by dermatoscopy, and the morphology by light and transmission electron microscopy. Thirty-five percent of KP patients displayed filaggrin mutations, demonstrating that filaggrin mutations only partially account for the KP phenotype. Major histologic and dermatoscopic findings of KP were hyperkeratosis, hypergranulosis, mild T helper cell type 1-dominant lymphocytic inflammation, plugging of follicular orifices, striking absence of sebaceous glands, and hair shaft abnormalities in KP lesions but not in unaffected skin sites. Changes in barrier function and abnormal paracellular permeability were found in both interfollicular and follicular stratum corneum of lesional KP, which correlated ultrastructurally with impaired extracellular lamellar bilayer maturation and organization. All these features were independent of filaggrin genotype. Moreover, ultrastructure of corneodesmosomes and tight junctions appeared normal, immunohistochemistry for claudin 1 showed no reduction in protein amounts, and molecular analysis of claudin 1 was unremarkable. Our findings suggest that absence of sebaceous glands is an early step in KP pathogenesis, resulting in downstream hair shaft and epithelial barrier abnormalities. PMID:25660180

  2. Mice lacking desmocollin 1 show epidermal fragility accompanied by barrier defects and abnormal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chidgey, M; Brakebusch, C; Gustafsson, E; Cruchley, A; Hail, C; Kirk, S; Merritt, A; North, A; Tselepis, C; Hewitt, J; Byrne, C; Fassler, R; Garrod, D

    2001-11-26

    The desmosomal cadherin desmocollin (Dsc)1 is expressed in upper epidermis where strong adhesion is required. To investigate its role in vivo, we have genetically engineered mice with a targeted disruption in the Dsc1 gene. Soon after birth, null mice exhibit flaky skin and a striking punctate epidermal barrier defect. The epidermis is fragile, and acantholysis in the granular layer generates localized lesions, compromising skin barrier function. Neutrophils accumulate in the lesions and further degrade the tissue, causing sloughing (flaking) of lesional epidermis, but rapid wound healing prevents the formation of overt lesions. Null epidermis is hyperproliferative and overexpresses keratins 6 and 16, indicating abnormal differentiation. From 6 wk, null mice develop ulcerating lesions resembling chronic dermatitis. We speculate that ulceration occurs after acantholysis in the fragile epidermis because environmental insults are more stringent and wound healing is less rapid than in neonatal mice. This dermatitis is accompanied by localized hair loss associated with formation of utriculi and dermal cysts, denoting hair follicle degeneration. Possible resemblance of the lesions to human blistering diseases is discussed. These results show that Dsc1 is required for strong adhesion and barrier maintenance in epidermis and contributes to epidermal differentiation.

  3. Mice lacking desmocollin 1 show epidermal fragility accompanied by barrier defects and abnormal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chidgey, Martyn; Brakebusch, Cord; Gustafsson, Erika; Cruchley, Alan; Hail, Chris; Kirk, Sarah; Merritt, Anita; North, Alison; Tselepis, Chris; Hewitt, Jane; Byrne, Carolyn; Fassler, Reinhard; Garrod, David

    2001-01-01

    The desmosomal cadherin desmocollin (Dsc)1 is expressed in upper epidermis where strong adhesion is required. To investigate its role in vivo, we have genetically engineered mice with a targeted disruption in the Dsc1 gene. Soon after birth, null mice exhibit flaky skin and a striking punctate epidermal barrier defect. The epidermis is fragile, and acantholysis in the granular layer generates localized lesions, compromising skin barrier function. Neutrophils accumulate in the lesions and further degrade the tissue, causing sloughing (flaking) of lesional epidermis, but rapid wound healing prevents the formation of overt lesions. Null epidermis is hyperproliferative and overexpresses keratins 6 and 16, indicating abnormal differentiation. From 6 wk, null mice develop ulcerating lesions resembling chronic dermatitis. We speculate that ulceration occurs after acantholysis in the fragile epidermis because environmental insults are more stringent and wound healing is less rapid than in neonatal mice. This dermatitis is accompanied by localized hair loss associated with formation of utriculi and dermal cysts, denoting hair follicle degeneration. Possible resemblance of the lesions to human blistering diseases is discussed. These results show that Dsc1 is required for strong adhesion and barrier maintenance in epidermis and contributes to epidermal differentiation. PMID:11714727

  4. Effects of skin surface temperature on epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Denda, Mitsuhiro; Sokabe, Takaaki; Fukumi-Tominaga, Tomoko; Tominaga, Makoto

    2007-03-01

    Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family are temperature sensors, and TRPV1, V3, and V4 are expressed in epidermal keratinocytes. To evaluate the influence of these receptors on epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis, we kept both hairless mouse skin and human skin at various temperatures immediately after tape stripping. At temperatures from 36 to 40 degrees C, barrier recovery was accelerated in both cases compared with the area at 34 degrees C. At 34 or 42 degrees C, barrier recovery was delayed compared with the un-occluded area. 4Alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanone, an activator of TRPV4, accelerated barrier recovery, whereas ruthenium red, a blocker of TRPV4, delayed barrier recovery. Capsaicin, an activator of TRPV1, delayed barrier recovery, whereas capsazepin, an antagonist of TRPV1, blocked this delay. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and camphor, TRPV3 activators, did not affect the barrier recovery rate. As TRPV4 is activated at about 35 degrees C and above, whereas TRPV1 is activated at about 42 degrees C and above, these results suggest that both TRPV1 and TRPV4 play important roles in skin permeability barrier homeostasis. Previous reports suggest the existence of a water flux sensor in the epidermis, and as TRPV4 is known to be activated by osmotic pressure, our results indicate that it might be this sensor.

  5. Normal and abnormal development of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Farrell, C L; Risau, W

    1994-04-15

    The blood-brain barrier is responsible for the maintenance of the neuronal microenvironment. This is accomplished by isolation of the brain from the blood by the tight junctions that join endothelial cells in cerebral microvessels, and by selective transport and metabolism of substances from blood or brain by the endothelial cells. This review describes the growth and maturation of the brain vasculature, and the development of the special properties of the endothelia at the blood-brain interface. Evidence suggests that the development of the unique properties of the brain microvasculature is a consequence of tissue-specific interactions between endothelial cells of extraneural origin and developing brain cells. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that control these processes are as yet unknown but this review will include experimental studies which have used in vivo and in vitro systems to investigate what factors may be involved, and some pathological conditions in which abnormal barrier development is thought to be an important aspect of the disease process.

  6. A synthetic C16 omega-hydroxyphytoceramide improves skin barrier functions from diversely perturbed epidermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Myoung Jin; Nam, Jin Ju; Lee, Eun Ok; Kim, Jin Wook; Park, Chang Seo

    2016-10-01

    Omega-hydroxyceramides (ω-OH-Cer) play a crucial role in maintaining the integrity of skin barrier. ω-OH-Cer are the primary lipid constituents of the corneocyte lipid envelope (CLE) covalently attached to the outer surface of the cornified envelope linked to involucrin to become bound form lipids in stratum corneum (SC). CLE becomes a hydrophobic impermeable layer of matured corneocyte preventing loss of natural moisturizing factor inside the corneocytes. More importantly, CLE may also play an important role in the formation of proper orientation of intercellular lipid lamellar structure by interdigitating with the intercellular lipids in a comb-like fashion. Abnormal barrier conditions associated with atopic dermatitis but also UVB-irradiated skins are known to have lowered level of bound lipids, especially ω-OH-Cer, which indicate that ω-OH-Cer play an important role in maintaining the integrity of skin barrier. In this study, protective effects of a novel synthetic C16 omega-hydroxyphytoceramides (ω-OH-phytoceramide) on skin barrier function were investigated. Epidermal barrier disruption was induced by UVB irradiation, tape-stripping in hairless mouse and human skin. Protective effect of damaged epidermis was evaluated using the measurement of transepidermal water loss and cohesion of SC. Increased keratinocyte differentiation was verified using cultured keratinocyte through western blot. Results clearly demonstrated that a synthetic C16 ω-OH-phytoceramide enhanced the integrity of SC and accelerated the recovery of damaged skin barrier function by stimulating differentiation process. In a conclusion, a synthetic C16 ω-OH-phytoceramide treatment improved epidermal homeostasis in several disrupted conditions.

  7. Unravelling the skin barrier: a new paradigm for atopic dermatitis and house dust mites.

    PubMed

    Marsella, Rosanna; Samuelson, Don

    2009-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease caused by complex interactions between genetics and environmental factors. In human beings, impairment of the skin barrier is demonstrated and thought to be responsible for enhanced penetration of allergens and increased risk for allergic sensitization. Once inflammation is triggered, further impairment of the skin barrier occurs, leading to self-perpetuating cycles of sensitizations. Canine AD appears to share many similarities with the human counterpart, clinically and immunologically. It is hypothesized that a primary defect of skin barrier function also exists in subsets of atopic dogs (e.g. in an experimental model using high IgE-producing beagles), particularly in young dogs, and in sites predisposed to the development of lesions. This impairment is present in clinically normal skin, worsens with development of lesions and can be quantified by measurement of transepidermal water loss. Therefore, the distribution of lesions in AD may be linked to a primary skin barrier defect in those sites and not simply due to contact with allergens, and increased susceptibility to penetration of allergen may exist early in life. Ultrastructurally, transmission electron microscopy reveals that clinically normal skin in atopic dogs has abnormalities in lamellar body secretion and extracellular lamellar bilayer structure when compared with normal dogs. Development of lesions worsens these changes (e.g. widening of intercellular spaces, release of lamellar bodies, and disorganization of lipid lamellae). It is proposed that the paradigm of canine AD as primarily due to immunologic aberration ('inside/outside') should be shifted to include a primary defect in barrier function ('outside/inside').

  8. Acute irritant threshold correlates with barrier function, skin hydration and contact hypersensitivity in atopic dermatitis and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Kazandjieva, Jana; Tsankov, Nikolai; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to disclose interactions between epidermal barrier, skin irritation and sensitization in healthy and diseased skin. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and stratum corneum hydration (SCH) were assessed in adult patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), rosacea and healthy controls. A 4-h patch test with seven concentrations of sodium lauryl sulphate was performed to determine the irritant threshold (IT). Contact sensitization pattern was revealed by patch testing with European baseline series. Subjects with a lower IT had higher TEWL values and lower SCH. Subjects with positive allergic reactions had significantly lower IT. In AD, epidermal barrier deterioration was detected on both volar forearm and nasolabial fold, while in rosacea, impeded skin physiology parameters were observed on the facial skin only, suggesting that barrier impediment is restricted to the face in rosacea, in contrast with AD where the abnormal skin physiology is generalized.

  9. Harlequin ichthyosis model mouse reveals alveolar collapse and severe fetal skin barrier defects.

    PubMed

    Yanagi, Teruki; Akiyama, Masashi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Sakai, Kaori; Nishie, Wataru; Tanaka, Shinya; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    Harlequin ichthyosis (HI), which is the most severe genodermatosis, is caused by loss-of-function mutations in ABCA12, a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family. To investigate the pathomechanism of HI and the function of the ABCA12 protein, we generated ABCA12-deficient mice (Abca12(-/-)) by targeting Abca12. Abca12(-/-) mice closely reproduce the human HI phenotype, showing marked hyperkeratosis with eclabium and skin fissure. Lamellar granule abnormalities and defective ceramide distribution were remarkable in the epidermis. Skin permeability assay of Abca12(-/-) fetuses revealed severe skin barrier dysfunction after the initiation of keratinization. Surprisingly, the Abca12(-/-) mice also demonstrated lung alveolar collapse immediately after birth. Lamellar bodies in alveolar type II cells of the Abca12(-/-) mice lacked normal lamellar structures. The level of surfactant protein B, an essential component of alveolar surfactant, was reduced in the Abca12(-/-) mice. Fetal therapeutic trials with systemic administration of retinoid or dexamethasone, which are effective for HI and respiratory distress, respectively, to the pregnant mother mice neither improved the skin phenotype nor extended the survival period. Our HI model mice reproduce the human HI skin phenotype soon after the initiation of fetal skin keratinization and provide evidence that ABCA12 plays pivotal roles in lung and skin barrier functions.

  10. Urea-containing moisturizers influence barrier properties of normal skin.

    PubMed

    Loden, M

    1996-02-01

    Moisturizers are used in the treatment of dry skin, both clinically and in cosmetic products. In the present study the influence of different moisturizers on the normal skin barrier properties was evaluated by measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin capacitance. In addition, the skin reactivity to a topically applied surfactant, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), following the use of the moisturizers was examined. The skin reaction was assessed visually and by measuring TEWL and superficial blood flow. Treatment with two urea-containing moisturizers for 10 and 20 days decreased TEWL. The irritant reactions after exposure to SLS were also significantly decreased after prior treatment for 20 days with the urea-containing moisturizers. In a double-blind vehicle-controlled part of the study, urea was found to decrease the skin susceptibility to SLS after only three applications. However, this decrease in skin reactivity was not preceded by a reduction in TEWL. Skin capacitance increased after three applications of urea-containing moisturizers and was still increased after 10 days, but not after 20 days of this treatment. Treatment for 20 days with two moisturizers without urea did not influence either TEWL or the susceptibility to irritation from SLS, but it increased the skin capacitance significantly. The mechanism underlying these changes is not known. The lower degree of SLS-induced irritation in the skin treated previously with urea-containing moisturizers may be of clinical relevance in reducing contact dermatitis from irritant stimuli.

  11. Short-chain ceramides decrease skin barrier properties.

    PubMed

    Novotný, J; Janůsová, B; Novotný, M; Hrabálek, A; Vávrová, K

    2009-01-01

    Stratum corneum ceramides are major determinants of skin barrier function. Although their physiological and pathological role has been widely investigated, to date no structure-activity relationships have been established. In this study, a series of short-chain ceramide analogues with polar head structure identical to ceramide NS, a sphingosine length of 12 carbons and an acyl chain length of 2-12 carbons was synthesized. Their effect on skin permeability was evaluated using porcine skin and two model drugs, theophylline and indomethacin, and compared to that of a physiological ceramide NS. The results showed that the ceramide chain length was crucial for their barrier properties. Ceramides with a 4- to 8-carbon acyl chain were able to increase skin permeability for both drugs up to 10.8 times with maximum effect at a 6-carbon acyl chain. No increase in permeability was found for ceramide analogues with 2- and 12-carbon acyl chains and ceramide NS. The same relationships were obtained for skin concentrations of the model drugs. The relationship between ceramide acyl chain length and its ability to perturb skin barrier showed striking similarity to the behavior of short-chain ceramides in sphingomyelin/phospholipid membranes and confirmed that short-chain ceramides do not act as natural ceramides and their use as experimental tools should be cautious. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Using skin models to assess the effects of a protection cream on skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    zur Mühlen, A; Klotz, A; Weimans, S; Veeger, M; Thörner, B; Diener, B; Hermann, M

    2004-01-01

    There is a basic necessity to understand the mechanisms of the protective effects of emulsions. This would promote the development of protective cosmetics and therefore improve the prevention and treatment of occupational skin diseases. However, for such studies, no reliable skin model is available. An in vitro skin model test was developed to evaluate the protective mechanism of cosmetic ingredients. The efficacy of three products was assessed by an in vivo test (Repetitive Occlusive Irritation Test) and then 3-dimensional skin model tests were carried out. In vivo test results demonstrate that the best protection against sodium dodecyl sulphate is offered by a multiple emulsion. In the case of a skin model test, sodium dodecyl sulphate led to cell damage, an increase in pro-inflammatory markers and some barrier lipids. The multiple emulsion increased the content of skin lipids, without inducing irritation or cell death. Skin models react similarly to sodium dodecyl sulphate compared to human skin and therefore they are suitable to study barrier repair after sodium dodecyl sulphate damage. It is likely that the superior protective effect of the multiple emulsion in vivo is based on the increased amount of skin barrier lipids.

  13. Effect of microplasma irradiation on skin barrier function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuo; Tran, An N.; Blajan, Marius

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we introduce the feasibility of atmospheric-pressure argon microplasma irradiation (AAMI) to promote percutaneous absorption. A hairless Yucatan micropig skin was used for this ex vivo study. After AAMI, the disturbance in the stratum corneum (SC) lipids was observed using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Also, an increase in transepidermal water loss and no physical damage on pig skins were confirmed by microscopic observation. These results of AAMI were compared with those of a plasma jet irradiation (PJI) and a tape stripping test (TST) leading to the conclusion that AAMI reduces the barrier function of the skin and could also enhance the transdermal absorption of drugs.

  14. Skin barrier structure and function: the single gel phase model.

    PubMed

    Norlén, L

    2001-10-01

    A new model for the structure and function of the mammalian skin barrier is postulated. It is proposed that the skin barrier, i.e., the intercellular lipid within the stratum corneum, exists as a single and coherent lamellar gel phase. This membrane structure is stabilized by the very particular lipid composition and lipid chain length distributions of the stratum corneum intercellular space and has virtually no phase boundaries. The intact, i.e., unperturbed, single and coherent lamellar gel phase is proposed to be mainly located at the lower half of stratum corneum. Further up, crystalline segregation and phase separation may occur as a result of the desquamation process. The single gel phase model differs significantly from earlier models in that it predicts that no phase separation, neither between liquid crystalline and gel phases nor between different crystalline phases with hexagonal and orthorhombic chain packing, respectively, is present in the unperturbed barrier structure. The new skin barrier model may explain: (i) the measured water permeability of stratum corneum; (ii) the particular lipid composition of the stratum corneum intercellular space; (iii) the absence of swelling of the stratum corneum intercellular lipid matrix upon hydration; and (iv) the simultaneous presence of hexagonal and orthorhombic hydrocarbon chain packing of the stratum corneum intercellular lipid matrix at physiologic temperatures. Further, the new model is consistent with skin barrier formation according to the membrane folding model of Norlén (2001). This new theoretical model could fully account for the extraordinary barrier capacity of mammalian skin and is hereafter referred to as the single gel phase model.

  15. A laboratory comparison between two liquid skin barrier products.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kevin Y; Chakravarthy, Debashish

    2014-10-01

    Exposure of skin to friction and moisture is detrimental to skin health. The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the ability of a cyanoacrylate polymer film to protect human skin against moisture and abrasion. A secondary purpose of this study was to compare this cyanoacrylate material to a traditional barrier film. Twelve healthy subjects participated in the wash-off resistance test to determine the percentage of dye that was left on the skin after repeated washing. Ten subjects participated in the abrasion test. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was measured before and after abrasion to determine the level of skin damage, as high water loss seen post-abrasion is indicative of skin damage post-abrasion. Skin treated with cyanoacrylate had significantly more dye remaining than sites treated with traditional film barrier or control sites. The change in TEWL was statistically lower for cyanoacrylate-treated areas. © 2014 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2014 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. BASIS FOR ENHANCED BARRIER FUNCTION OF PIGMENTED SKIN

    PubMed Central

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Lin, Tzu-Kai; Santiago, Juan Luis; Celli, Anna; Zhong, Lily; Huang, Zhi-Ming; Roelandt, Truus; Hupe, Melanie; Sundberg, John P.; Silva, Kathleen A.; Crumrine, Debra; Martin-Ezquerra, Gemma; Trullas, Carles; Sun, Richard; Wakefield, Joan S.; Wei, Maria L.; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Mauro, Theodora M.; Elias, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Humans with darkly-pigmented skin display superior permeability barrier function in comparison to humans with lightly-pigmented skin. The reduced pH of the stratum corneum (SC) of darkly-pigmented skin could account for enhanced function, because acidifying lightly-pigmented human SC resets barrier function to darkly-pigmented levels. In SKH1 (non-pigmented) vs. SKH2/J (pigmented) hairless mice, we evaluated how a pigment-dependent reduction in pH could influence epidermal barrier function. Permeability barrier homeostasis is enhanced in SKH2/J vs. SKH1 mice, correlating with a reduced pH in the lower SC that co-localizes with the extrusion of melanin granules. Darkly-pigmented human epidermis also shows substantial melanin extrusion in the outer epidermis. Both acute barrier disruption and topical basic pH challenges accelerate re-acidification of SKH2/J (but not SKH1) SC, while inducing melanin extrusion. SKH2/J mice also display enhanced expression of the SC acidifying enzyme, secretory phospholipase A2f (sPLA2f). Enhanced barrier function of SKH2/J mice could be attributed to enhanced activity of two acidic pH-dependent, ceramide-generating enzymes, β-glucocerebrosidase and acidic sphingomyelinase, leading to accelerated maturation of SC lamellar bilayers. Finally, organotypic cultures of darkly-pigmented-bearing human keratinocytes display enhanced barrier function in comparison to lightly-pigmented cultures. Together, these results suggest that the superior barrier function of pigmented epidermis can be largely attributed to the pH-lowering impact of melanin persistence/extrusion and enhanced sPLA2f expression. PMID:24732399

  17. Basis for enhanced barrier function of pigmented skin.

    PubMed

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Lin, Tzu-Kai; Santiago, Juan L; Celli, Anna; Zhong, Lily; Huang, Zhi-Ming; Roelandt, Truus; Hupe, Melanie; Sundberg, John P; Silva, Kathleen A; Crumrine, Debra; Martin-Ezquerra, Gemma; Trullas, Carles; Sun, Richard; Wakefield, Joan S; Wei, Maria L; Feingold, Kenneth R; Mauro, Theodora M; Elias, Peter M

    2014-09-01

    Humans with darkly pigmented skin display superior permeability barrier function in comparison with humans with lightly pigmented skin. The reduced pH of the stratum corneum (SC) of darkly pigmented skin could account for enhanced function, because acidifying lightly pigmented human SC resets barrier function to darkly pigmented levels. In SKH1 (nonpigmented) versus SKH2/J (pigmented) hairless mice, we evaluated how a pigment-dependent reduction in pH could influence epidermal barrier function. Permeability barrier homeostasis is enhanced in SKH2/J versus SKH1 mice, correlating with a reduced pH in the lower SC that colocalizes with the extrusion of melanin granules. Darkly pigmented human epidermis also shows substantial melanin extrusion in the outer epidermis. Both acute barrier disruption and topical basic pH challenges accelerate reacidification of SKH2/J (but not SKH1) SC, while inducing melanin extrusion. SKH2/J mice also display enhanced expression of the SC acidifying enzyme, secretory phospholipase A2f (sPLA2f). Enhanced barrier function of SKH2/J mice could be attributed to enhanced activity of two acidic pH-dependent, ceramide-generating enzymes, β-glucocerebrosidase and acidic sphingomyelinase, leading to accelerated maturation of SC lamellar bilayers. Finally, organotypic cultures of darkly pigmented human keratinocytes display enhanced barrier function in comparison with lightly pigmented cultures. Together, these results suggest that the superior barrier function of pigmented epidermis can be largely attributed to the pH-lowering impact of melanin persistence/extrusion and enhanced sPLA2f expression.

  18. Treatment of symptomatic abnormal skin scars with electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Perry, D; Colthurst, J; Giddings, P; McGrouther, D A; Morris, J; Bayat, A

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of non-invasive biofeedback electrical stimulation on symptomatic abnormal skin scars. Thirty patients with over 140 scars with long-term pain and itch were recruited into the study. Patients monitored the intensity of symptoms (pain and itching) on a numerical rating scale. In addition, a modified Manchester scar scale was used to objectively assess digital photographs of each scar in terms of colour, contour, distortion and texture, while a non-invasive spectrophotometric intracutaneous analysis was used to monitor the scars' physical characteristics. The electrical stimulation device resulted in a clinically and statistically significant (p < 0.05) reduction of symptoms and scar scores. Pain and itch scores were both reduced to a median score of 0 by 2 months, from a baseline of 7 and 6 respectively. Scar scores were reduced from a baseline of 14 to a median score of 11 by 2 months. These results give a preliminary indication of the potential role of non-invasive biofeedback electrical stimulation in the management of chronic scar pain and itch. However, further large scale controlled studies are warranted to elucidate its overall efficacy and mechanistic action. Funding was provided from Fenzian Ltd for this study.

  19. New aspects of the skin barrier organization.

    PubMed

    Bouwstra, J; Pilgram, G; Gooris, G; Koerten, H; Ponec, M

    2001-01-01

    In the superficial layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), the lipids form two crystalline lamellar phases with periodicities of 6.4 and 13.4 nm (long-periodicity phase). The main lipid classes in SC are ceramides, free fatty acids and cholesterol. Studies with mixtures prepared with isolated ceramides revealed that cholesterol and ceramides are very important for the formation of the lamellar phases, and the presence of ceramide 1 is crucial for the formation of the long-periodicity phase. This observation and the broad-narrow-broad sequence of lipid layers in the 13.4-nm phase led us to propose a molecular model for this phase. This consists of one narrow central lipid layer with fluid domains on both sides of a broad layer with a crystalline structure. This model is referred to as 'the sandwich model'. While the presence of free fatty acids does not substantially affect the lipid lamellar organization, it is crucial for the formation of the orthorhombic sublattice, since the addition of free fatty acids to cholesterol/ceramide mixtures results in transition from a hexagonal to a crystalline lipid phase. Studies examining lipid organization in SC derived from dry or lamellar X-linked ichthyosis skin revealed that in native tissue the role of ceramide 1 and free fatty acids is similar to that observed with mixtures prepared with isolated SC lipids. From this we conclude that the results obtained with lipid mixtures can be used to predict the SC lipid organization in native tissue. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Increased retinoic acid levels through ablation of Cyp26b1 determine the processes of embryonic skin barrier formation and peridermal development

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Junko; Lichti, Ulrike; Mamiya, Satoru; Aronova, Maria; Zhang, Guofeng; Yuspa, Stuart H.; Hamada, Hiroshi; Sakai, Yasuo; Morasso, Maria I.

    2012-01-01

    The process by which the periderm transitions to stratified epidermis with the establishment of the skin barrier is unknown. Understanding the cellular and molecular processes involved is crucial for the treatment of human pathologies, where abnormal skin development and barrier dysfunction are associated with hypothermia and perinatal dehydration. For the first time, we demonstrate that retinoic acid (RA) levels are important for periderm desquamation, embryonic skin differentiation and barrier formation. Although excess exogenous RA has been known to have teratogenic effects, little is known about the consequences of elevated endogenous retinoids in skin during embryogenesis. Absence of cytochrome P450, family 26, subfamily b, polypeptide 1 (Cyp26b1), a retinoic-acid-degrading enzyme, results in aberrant epidermal differentiation and filaggrin expression, defective cornified envelopes and skin barrier formation, in conjunction with peridermal retention. We show that these alterations are RA dependent because administration of exogenous RA in vivo and to organotypic skin cultures phenocopy Cyp26b1−/− skin abnormalities. Furthermore, utilizing the Flaky tail (Ft/Ft) mice, a mouse model for human ichthyosis, characterized by mutations in the filaggrin gene, we establish that proper differentiation and barrier formation is a prerequisite for periderm sloughing. These results are important in understanding pathologies associated with abnormal embryonic skin development and barrier dysfunction. PMID:22366455

  1. Increased retinoic acid levels through ablation of Cyp26b1 determine the processes of embryonic skin barrier formation and peridermal development.

    PubMed

    Okano, Junko; Lichti, Ulrike; Mamiya, Satoru; Aronova, Maria; Zhang, Guofeng; Yuspa, Stuart H; Hamada, Hiroshi; Sakai, Yasuo; Morasso, Maria I

    2012-04-01

    The process by which the periderm transitions to stratified epidermis with the establishment of the skin barrier is unknown. Understanding the cellular and molecular processes involved is crucial for the treatment of human pathologies, where abnormal skin development and barrier dysfunction are associated with hypothermia and perinatal dehydration. For the first time, we demonstrate that retinoic acid (RA) levels are important for periderm desquamation, embryonic skin differentiation and barrier formation. Although excess exogenous RA has been known to have teratogenic effects, little is known about the consequences of elevated endogenous retinoids in skin during embryogenesis. Absence of cytochrome P450, family 26, subfamily b, polypeptide 1 (Cyp26b1), a retinoic-acid-degrading enzyme, results in aberrant epidermal differentiation and filaggrin expression, defective cornified envelopes and skin barrier formation, in conjunction with peridermal retention. We show that these alterations are RA dependent because administration of exogenous RA in vivo and to organotypic skin cultures phenocopy Cyp26b1(-/-) skin abnormalities. Furthermore, utilizing the Flaky tail (Ft/Ft) mice, a mouse model for human ichthyosis, characterized by mutations in the filaggrin gene, we establish that proper differentiation and barrier formation is a prerequisite for periderm sloughing. These results are important in understanding pathologies associated with abnormal embryonic skin development and barrier dysfunction.

  2. Disturbed skin barrier in children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wojtowicz-Prus, Elzbieta; Kilis-Pstrusinska, Katarzyna; Reich, Adam; Zachwieja, Katarzyna; Miklaszewska, Monika; Szczepanska, Maria; Szepietowski, Jacek C

    2015-02-01

    There are limited data on skin lesions in children with end-stage renal failure. The aim of the study was an evaluation of the skin barrier in children with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The prevalence of xerosis, its severity, as well as its link selected demographic factors, were examined. The study included 103 children: 72 with CKD stages 3-5 (38 on conservative treatment and 34 on dialysis) and 31 patients with primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis as a control group. Initially, the study subjects described the localisation and severity of dry skin by themselves. Next, clinical evaluation of xerosis, non-invasive corneometric assessment of epidermis moisturising and the measurement of transepidermal water loss were performed. Most CKD children reported dry skin. The problem of xerosis was identified more frequently in patients on dialysis (67.6 %) than on conservative treatment (42.1 %) (p = 0.01). CKD patients divided according to skin dryness did not differ with regards to age, sex, initial kidney disease and CKD duration. Disturbed skin barrier is an important concern of children with CKD, intensifying as the disease progresses. This symptom occurs on early stages of CKD and it should be taken into consideration in the CKD management.

  3. Microbiome dynamics of human epidermis following skin barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent advances in sequencing technologies have enabled metagenomic analyses of many human body sites. Several studies have catalogued the composition of bacterial communities of the surface of human skin, mostly under static conditions in healthy volunteers. Skin injury will disturb the cutaneous homeostasis of the host tissue and its commensal microbiota, but the dynamics of this process have not been studied before. Here we analyzed the microbiota of the surface layer and the deeper layers of the stratum corneum of normal skin, and we investigated the dynamics of recolonization of skin microbiota following skin barrier disruption by tape stripping as a model of superficial injury. Results We observed gender differences in microbiota composition and showed that bacteria are not uniformly distributed in the stratum corneum. Phylogenetic distance analysis was employed to follow microbiota development during recolonization of injured skin. Surprisingly, the developing neo-microbiome at day 14 was more similar to that of the deeper stratum corneum layers than to the initial surface microbiome. In addition, we also observed variation in the host response towards superficial injury as assessed by the induction of antimicrobial protein expression in epidermal keratinocytes. Conclusions We suggest that the microbiome of the deeper layers, rather than that of the superficial skin layer, may be regarded as the host indigenous microbiome. Characterization of the skin microbiome under dynamic conditions, and the ensuing response of the microbial community and host tissue, will shed further light on the complex interaction between resident bacteria and epidermis. PMID:23153041

  4. An ex vivo human skin model for studying skin barrier repair.

    PubMed

    Danso, Mogbekeloluwa O; Berkers, Tineke; Mieremet, Arnout; Hausil, Farzia; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2015-01-01

    In the studies described in this study, we introduce a novel ex vivo human skin barrier repair model. To develop this, we removed the upper layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC) by a reproducible cyanoacrylate stripping technique. After stripping the explants, they were cultured in vitro to allow the regeneration of the SC. We selected two culture temperatures 32 °C and 37 °C and a period of either 4 or 8 days. After 8 days of culture, the explant generated SC at a similar thickness compared to native human SC. At 37 °C, the early and late epidermal differentiation programmes were executed comparably to native human skin with the exception of the barrier protein involucrin. At 32 °C, early differentiation was delayed, but the terminal differentiation proteins were expressed as in stripped explants cultured at 37 °C. Regarding the barrier properties, the SC lateral lipid organization was mainly hexagonal in the regenerated SC, whereas the lipids in native human SC adopt a more dense orthorhombic organization. In addition, the ceramide levels were higher in the cultured explants at 32 °C and 37 °C than in native human SC. In conclusion, we selected the stripped ex vivo skin model cultured at 37 °C as a candidate model to study skin barrier repair because epidermal and SC characteristics mimic more closely the native human skin than the ex vivo skin model cultured at 32 °C. Potentially, this model can be used for testing formulations for skin barrier repair. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Skin barrier function and the use of emollients in dermatological nursing.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Sandra

    Nurses will be observing the skin on a daily basis while caring for their patients. Many may appear to have a dry skin or have a skin disease with dryness being the presenting feature in conditions such as atopic eczema, contact dermatitis (irritant and allergic) psoriasis and the ichthyoses. This article explores the barrier function of the skin, factors which influence skin barrier function and the use of emollients for dry skin and skin conditions.

  6. Tranexamic acid accelerates skin barrier recovery and upregulates occludin in damaged skin.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chao; Wang, Xue-Min; Yang, Li-Jie; Wu, Pei-Lan

    2014-08-01

    Tranexamic acid (TA) is a traditional plasmin inhibitor, and its role in the renovation of damaged skin has become the topic of a lot of research. The aim of this study is to determine whether TA could repair the skin barrier by means of tight intercellular junctions. Two kinds of damaged skin models were set up and subjected to repeated application of sodium lauryl sulfate and irradiation of ultraviolet B. Through bioengineering technology and immunohistochemistry tests, TA-induced changes in skin were detected. After 1, 3, 7, and 14 days of application, TA can significantly accelerate barrier recovery and decrease the melanin index values of ultraviolet B irritation skin. The mean optic density of occludin from TA treatment is higher than from self-repair. These experiments suggest that TA can accelerate skin barrier recovery and upregulate occludin induced by physicochemical damages of human skin, but it is advisable to perform more research on the upregulation of occludin in molecular mechanism in the future. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  7. Increased Th2 activity and diminished skin barrier function cooperate in allergic skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sehra, Sarita; Krishnamurthy, Purna; Koh, Byunghee; Zhou, Hong-Ming; Seymour, Lee; Akhtar, Nahid; Travers, Jeffrey B; Turner, Matthew J; Kaplan, Mark H

    2016-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease induced by a complex interaction between susceptibility genes encoding skin barrier components and environmental allergen exposure that results in type 2 cytokine production. Although genetic lesions in either component can be risk factors for disease in patients, whether these pathways interact in the development of AD is not clear. To test this, we mated mice with T-cell specific expression of constitutively active Stat6 (Stat6VT) that spontaneously develop allergic skin inflammation with Flaky tail (Ft) mice that have mutations in Flg and Tmem79 genes that each affect skin barrier function. Our results demonstrate that over 90% of the Stat6VT transgenic mice carrying the Ft alleles (Stat6VTxFt(-/-) ) develop severe atopic dermatitis lesions by 3-5 months of age, compared with only 40% of Stat6VT mice that develop disease by 6-7 months of age. Further, histopathological analysis of skin tissues from Stat6VTxFt(-/-) mice revealed extensive thickening of the dermis with increased inflammatory infiltrates as compared with Stat6VT mice. Our study suggests that skin barrier defects and altered Th2 responses independently cooperate in the pathogenesis of allergic skin inflammation, similar to effects observed in patients with AD. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Histamine suppresses epidermal keratinocyte differentiation and impairs skin barrier function in a human skin model

    PubMed Central

    Gschwandtner, M; Mildner, M; Mlitz, V; Gruber, F; Eckhart, L; Werfel, T; Gutzmer, R; Elias, P M; Tschachler, E

    2013-01-01

    Background Defects in keratinocyte differentiation and skin barrier are important features of inflammatory skin diseases like atopic dermatitis. Mast cells and their main mediator histamine are abundant in inflamed skin and thus may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Methods Human primary keratinocytes were cultured under differentiation-promoting conditions in the presence and absence of histamine, histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. The expression of differentiation-associated genes and epidermal junction proteins was quantified by real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence labeling. The barrier function of human skin models was tested by the application of biotin as tracer molecule. Results The addition of histamine to human keratinocyte cultures and organotypic skin models reduced the expression of the differentiation-associated proteins keratin 1/10, filaggrin, and loricrin by 80–95%. Moreover, the addition of histamine to skin models resulted in the loss of the granular layer and thinning of the epidermis and stratum corneum by 50%. The histamine receptor H1R agonist, 2-pyridylethylamine, suppressed keratinocyte differentiation to the same extent as did histamine. Correspondingly, cetirizine, an antagonist of H1R, virtually abrogated the effect of histamine. The expression of tight junction proteins zona occludens-1, occludin, claudin-1, and claudin-4, as well as that of desmosomal junction proteins corneodesmosin and desmoglein-1, was down-regulated by histamine. The tracer molecule biotin readily penetrated the tight junction barrier of skin cultures grown in the presence of histamine, while their diffusion was completely blocked in nontreated controls. Conclusions Our findings suggest a new mechanism by which mast cell activation and histamine release contribute to skin barrier defects in inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:23157658

  9. Defective channels lead to an impaired skin barrier

    PubMed Central

    Blaydon, Diana C.; Kelsell, David P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Channels are integral membrane proteins that form a pore, allowing the passive movement of ions or molecules across a membrane (along a gradient), either between compartments within a cell, between intracellular and extracellular environments or between adjacent cells. The ability of cells to communicate with one another and with their environment is a crucial part of the normal physiology of a tissue that allows it to carry out its function. Cell communication is particularly important during keratinocyte differentiation and formation of the skin barrier. Keratinocytes in the skin epidermis undergo a programme of apoptosis-driven terminal differentiation, whereby proliferating keratinocytes in the basal (deepest) layer of the epidermis stop proliferating, exit the basal layer and move up through the spinous and granular layers of the epidermis to form the stratum corneum, the external barrier. Genes encoding different families of channel proteins have been found to harbour mutations linked to a variety of rare inherited monogenic skin diseases. In this Commentary, we discuss how human genetic findings in aquaporin (AQP) and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels reveal different mechanisms by which these channel proteins function to ensure the proper formation and maintenance of the skin barrier. PMID:25179597

  10. Cathepsin D repairing role in photodamaged skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yue; Chen, Haiyan; Lai, Wei; Xu, Qingfang; Liu, Chen; Wu, Lin; Maibach, Howard I

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUNDS/OBJECTIVES: Cathepsin D plays an important part in maintaining a normal skin barrier. Our previous study found that cathepsin D decreased in chronic photodamaged skin. This study investigated the cathepsin D content change in the stratum corneum (SC) and the repairing role of cathepsin D in chronic photodamaged skin barrier via the application of cathepsin D gel. Cathepsin D gel (0.001%) was applied to chronic photodamaged (sun-exposed forearm) human skin on identical sites (1 cm(2)/area) twice daily for 2 weeks. At 30 min and at 1, 3, 7, and 14 days, skin hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) average values were detected via noninvasive skin detection equipment. Cathepsin D and transglutaminase (TGase)-1 in the skin sublayers were separated and detected via tape stripping, ELISA and Western blot. After 2 weeks of cathepsin D gel application, the skin moisture value increased from 86.8 ± 1.2 to 95.2 ± 2.7 (p < 0.05), while TEWL decreased from 17.88 ± 1.87 to 11.58 ± 2.14 (p < 0.05). Cathepsin D protein was detected in the upper epidermis (12.6 ± 2.6 ng/cm(2)), mid-epidermis (8.4 ± 0.8 ng/cm(2)) and deep epidermis (16.2 ± 2.6 ng/cm(2)) in the cathepsin D gel group compared to the control group (2.2 ± 0.7, 3.0 ± 1.1 and 3.85 ± 1.4 ng/cm(2), respectively; p < 0.05). TGase-1 enzyme expression was upregulated 2.54 ± 0.19 times in the matrix gel-treated skin. These data suggest that cathepsin D gel could increase the SC cathepsin D content and repair the epidermal barrier in chronic photodamaged skin. The mechanism might be related to increasing TGase-1 expression and activity. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Airborne formaldehyde causes skin barrier dysfunction in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Han, Y; Ahn, J H; Kim, S W; Lee, S I; Lee, K H; Ahn, K

    2016-08-01

    It remains to be elucidated whether exposure to air pollutants aggravates atopic dermatitis (AD). This study aimed to evaluate the effects of exposure to formaldehyde for 1 h and 2 h on skin barrier function in both the control and the AD groups. In 41 patients with AD and 34 healthy children, a provocation test was performed in which two different areas of normal-appearing skin on the forearm were stimulated with airborne formaldehyde at 500 μg m(-3) or placebo for 2 h. We measured transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin pH, and calculated the percentage change from baseline. Exposure to formaldehyde increased TEWL in the control group [P < 0·001; median of difference 1·4; interquartile range (IQR) 0·9-1·6] and in the AD group (P < 0·001; median of difference 2·5; IQR 2·0-3·6). The percentage change of TEWL after formaldehyde exposure in the AD group was higher than in the control group (P < 0·001), whereas exposure to placebo showed no differences between both groups. The AD group also demonstrated a higher percentage increase in skin pH after exposure to formaldehyde than the control group (P < 0·001). Short-term exposure to formaldehyde causes skin barrier dysfunction in both healthy children and children with AD, and this effect is more prominent in children with AD. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  12. The integration of physiologically-targeted skin care in the management of atopic dermatitis: focus on the use of a cleanser and moisturizer system incorporating a ceramide precursor, filaggrin degradation products, and specific "skin-barrier-friendly" excipients.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Kircik, Leon H

    2013-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) may be considered the "poster disease" for exemplifying the significance of abnormalities of the epidermal barrier that occur predominantly within the stratum corneum (SC) and upper epidermis. Specifically, impairments of the SC permeability barrier, antimicrobial barrier, and immunologic barrier contribute markedly to the fundamental pathophysiology of AD. The multiple clinical sequelae associated with epidermal barrier impairments inherent to AD include dry skin, pruritus, increased skin sensitivity to irritants and allergens, eczematous skin changes, staphylococcal skin and anterior nares colonization, and increase in some cutaneous infections (ie, molluscum contagiosum). This article addresses the pathophysiology of AD with clinically relevant correlations, and discusses the scientific basis of a specially designed cleanser and moisturizer system that incorporates ceramide technology and filaggrin degradation products along with other "barrier-friendly" excipients.

  13. Optimized parametric skin modelling for diagnosis of skin abnormalities by combining light back-scatter and laser speckle imaging.

    PubMed

    Orun, A B; Goodyer, E; Seker, H; Smith, G; Uslan, V; Chauhan, D

    2014-11-01

    Optical and parametric skin imaging methods which can efficiently identify invisible sub-skin features or subtle changes in skin layers are very important for accurate optical skin modelling. In this study, a hybrid method is introduced that helps develop a parametric optical skin model by utilizing interdisciplinary techniques including light back-scatter analysis, laser speckle imaging, image-texture analysis and Bayesian inference methods. The model aims to detect subtle skin changes and hence very early signs of skin abnormalities/diseases. Light back-scatter and laser speckle image textural analysis are applied onto the normal and abnormal skin regions (lesions) to generate set of attributes/parameters. These are then optimized by Bayesian inference method in order to build an optimized parametric model. The attributes selected by Bayesian inference method in the optimization stage were used to build an optimized model and then successfully verified. It was clearly proven that Bayesian inference based optimization process yields good results to build an optimized skin model. The outcome of this study clearly shows the applicability of this hybrid method in the analysis of skin features and is therefore expected to lead development of non-invasive and low-cost instrument for early detection of skin changes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Sensitive Skin: Assessment of the Skin Barrier Using Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Richters, Renée J H; Falcone, Denise; Uzunbajakava, Natallia E; Varghese, Babu; Caspers, Peter J; Puppels, Gerwin J; van Erp, Piet E J; van de Kerkhof, Peter C M

    2017-01-01

    Sensitive skin (SS), a frequently reported condition in the Western world, has been suggested to be underlined by an impaired skin barrier. The aim of this study was to investigate the skin barrier molecular composition in SS subjects using confocal Raman microspectroscopy (CRS), and to compare it with that of non-SS (NSS) individuals as well as atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (AR) subjects, who frequently report SS. Subjects with SS (n = 29), NSS (n = 30), AD (n = 11), and AR (n = 27) were included. Stratum corneum (SC) thickness, water, ceramides/fatty acids, and natural moisturizing factor (NMF) were measured by CRS along with transepidermal water loss and capacitance on the ventral forearm, thenar, and cheek. Sebum levels were additionally measured on the forearm and cheek. No differences between SS and NSS subjects were found regarding SC thickness, water, and NMF content, yet a trend towards lower ceramides/fatty acids was observed in the cheek. Compared to AD subjects, the SS group showed higher ceramides/fatty acid content in the forearm, whereas no differences emerged with AR. The correlation of macroscopic biophysical techniques and CRS was weak, yet CRS confirmed the well-known lower content of NMF and water, and thinner SC in subjects with filaggrin mutations. The skin barrier in SS is not impaired in terms of SC thickness, water, NMF, and ceramides/fatty acid content. The failure of biophysical techniques to follow alterations in the molecular composition of the skin barrier revealed by CRS emphasizes a strong need in sensitive and specific tools for in vivo skin barrier analysis. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Sensitive Skin: Assessment of the Skin Barrier Using Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Richters, Renée J.H.; Falcone, Denise; Uzunbajakava, Natallia E.; Varghese, Babu; Caspers, Peter J.; Puppels, Gerwin J.; van Erp, Piet E.J.; van de Kerkhof, Peter C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Sensitive skin (SS), a frequently reported condition in the Western world, has been suggested to be underlined by an impaired skin barrier. The aim of this study was to investigate the skin barrier molecular composition in SS subjects using confocal Raman microspectroscopy (CRS), and to compare it with that of non-SS (NSS) individuals as well as atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (AR) subjects, who frequently report SS. Methods Subjects with SS (n = 29), NSS (n = 30), AD (n = 11), and AR (n = 27) were included. Stratum corneum (SC) thickness, water, ceramides/fatty acids, and natural moisturizing factor (NMF) were measured by CRS along with transepidermal water loss and capacitance on the ventral forearm, thenar, and cheek. Sebum levels were additionally measured on the forearm and cheek. Results No differences between SS and NSS subjects were found regarding SC thickness, water, and NMF content, yet a trend towards lower ceramides/fatty acids was observed in the cheek. Compared to AD subjects, the SS group showed higher ceramides/fatty acid content in the forearm, whereas no differences emerged with AR. The correlation of macroscopic biophysical techniques and CRS was weak, yet CRS confirmed the well-known lower content of NMF and water, and thinner SC in subjects with filaggrin mutations. Conclusion The skin barrier in SS is not impaired in terms of SC thickness, water, NMF, and ceramides/fatty acid content. The failure of biophysical techniques to follow alterations in the molecular composition of the skin barrier revealed by CRS emphasizes a strong need in sensitive and specific tools for in vivo skin barrier analysis. PMID:28122376

  16. Flightless I over-expression impairs skin barrier development, function and recovery following skin blistering.

    PubMed

    Kopecki, Zlatko; Yang, Gink N; Arkell, Ruth M; Jackson, Jessica E; Melville, Elizabeth; Iwata, Hiroaki; Ludwig, Ralf J; Zillikens, Detlef; Murrell, Dedee F; Cowin, Allison J

    2014-04-01

    Development of an intact epidermis is critical for maintaining the integrity of the skin. Patients with epidermolysis bullosa (EB) experience multiple erosions, which breach the epidermal barrier and lead to increased microbial colocalization of wounds, infections and sepsis. The cytoskeletal protein Flightless I (Flii) is a known regulator of both development and wound healing. Using Flii(+/-), WT and Flii(Tg/Tg) mice, we investigated the effect of altering Flii levels in embryos and adult mice on the development of the epidermal barrier and, consequently, how this affects the integrity of the skin in EB. Flii over-expression resulted in delayed formation of the epidermal barrier in embryos and decreased expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins Claudin-1 and ZO-2. Increased intercellular space and transepidermal water loss was observed in Flii(Tg)(/Tg) adult mouse skin, while Flii(Tg/Tg) keratinocytes showed altered TJ protein localization and reduced transepithelial resistance. Flii is increased in the blistered skin of patients with EB, and over-expression of Flii in experimental EBA showed impaired Claudin-1 and -4 TJ protein expression and delayed recovery of functional barrier post-blistering. Immunoprecipitation confirmed Flii associated with TJ proteins and in vivo actin assays showed that the effect of Flii on actin polymerization underpinned the impaired barrier function observed in Flii(Tg/Tg) mice. These results therefore demonstrate an important role for Flii in the development and regulation of the epidermal barrier, which may contribute to the impaired healing and skin fragility of EB patients. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Skin barrier dysfunction and systemic sensitization to allergens through the skin.

    PubMed

    Strid, Jessica; Strobel, Stephan

    2005-10-01

    Most allergic, atopic and hypersensitive reactions are associated with Th2-biased immune responses and allergen-specific IgE antibodies. Pathological allergic disorders are on an alarming increase in the industrialized world. Understanding the mechanism of primary sensitization to allergens is important in elucidating the pathogenesis of these diseases and for possibly preventing their development. In this article, we review recent information supporting that epidermal allergen exposure may contribute to systemic allergic diseases and that atopy may be secondary to skin barrier dysfunction in some dermatoses. The skin is an active immunological organ, which functions as a primary defence and biosensor to the external environment. The critical permeability barrier function is mediated by the outmost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum. Perturbation of the stratum corneum initiates a chain of event, which activates homeostatic responses in the underlying epidermis. Repeated barrier-disruption, whether environmentally or genetically determined, may however stimulate signaling cascades that lead to inflammation and epidermal hyperplasia. Skin barrier dysfunction may also allow entry of allergens, which can lead to primary systemic sensitization. The altered epidermal microenvironment in barrier-disrupted skin appears to be particularly well suited for the induction of potent Th2-type responses with production of allergen-specific IgE. Epidermal exposure to food antigens can prevent the normal induction of oral tolerance and also lead to airway eosinophilia following inhalation. Exposure to allergens on barrier-disrupted skin may as such serve as a natural sensitization pathway for food allergy and respiratory allergic disease.

  18. Social service barriers delay care among women with abnormal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Primeau, Sarah W; Freund, Karen M; Ramachandran, Ambili; Bak, Sharon M; Heeren, Timothy; Chen, Clara A; Morton, Samantha; Battaglia, Tracy A

    2014-01-01

    Inequity in cancer outcomes for minorities and vulnerable populations has been linked to delays in cancer care that arise from barriers to accessing care. Social service barriers represent those obstacles related to meeting life's most basic needs, like housing and income, which are often supported by public policy, regulation and services. To examine the association between social service barriers and timely diagnostic resolution after a cancer screening abnormality. Secondary analysis of the intervention arm of Boston Patient Navigation Research Program (2007-2008) conducted across six urban community health centers. Subjects with no barriers, other barriers, and social service barriers were compared on their time to diagnostic resolution. Women ≥ 18 years of age with a breast or cervical cancer screening abnormality. Social service barriers included: income supports, housing and utilities, education and employment, and personal/family stability and safety. Time to event analyses compared across five groups: those with no barriers, one barrier (other), one barrier (social service), two or more barriers (all other), and two or more barriers (at least one social service). 1,481 navigated women; 31 % Hispanic, 27 % Black, 32 % White; 37 % non-English speakers and 28 % had private health insurance. Eighty-eight women (6 %) had social service barriers. Compared to those without social service barriers, those with were more likely to be Hispanic, younger, have public/no health insurance, and have multiple barriers. Those with two or more barriers (at least one social service barrier), had the longest time to resolution compared to the other four groups (aHR resolution < 60 days = 0.27, ≥ 60 days = 0.37). Vulnerable women with multiple barriers, when at least one is a social service barrier, have delays in care despite navigation. The impact of patient navigation may never be fully realized if social service barriers persist without being identified

  19. Advancements in the maintenance of skin barrier/skin lipid composition and the involvement of metabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Le; Jia, Yan; Cheng, Zhi-Wei; Gao, Ying; Zhang, Gao-Lei; Li, Jing-Yi; He, Cong-Fen

    2016-12-01

    The human skin barrier has an important role in protection and defense, reflected not only in the ability to resist entry of harmful substances into the human body, but also in the ability to prevent loss of water and nutrients. Once the skin barrier is damaged, the skin may become dry, scaly, and wrinkled, and a series of skin problems may occur. In this article, we review the composition of lipids, such as ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids, in the skin and examine the expression of enzymes related to lipid metabolism, such as kallikreins, elongase of elongation of very long-chain fatty acids, hydrolases, and lipid synthases. Additionally, we discuss the involvement of these proteins in skin barrier function and structure. The information presented in this review is expected to provide a theoretical basis for the development of skin care products facilitating the maintenance and repair of skin barrier function. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A controlled, three-part trial to investigate the barrier function and skin hydration properties of six skin protectants.

    PubMed

    Hoggarth, Andrew; Waring, Mike; Alexander, James; Greenwood, Amanada; Callaghan, Theresa

    2005-12-01

    In the treatment of incontinence dermatitis, a skin protectant primarily prevents skin breakdown due to moisture and biological irritants in urine and feces. To assess the barrier and skin hydration properties of six currently available skin protectants with different formulations, a controlled, three-phase study was conducted at a research facility in the UK among 18 healthy volunteers. The study addressed each product's efficacy against insult from a known irritant (sodium lauryl sulphate), skin hydration potential, and maintenance of skin barrier and barrier efficacy against maceration. Using white petrolatum (glycerin) as the positive control and untreated sites as the negative control, the results show that each one of the products tested has different performance properties. Products containing petrolatum demonstrated protection against irritants (P = 0.006 at 24 hours) and maceration (P < 0.005) and provided some skin hydration. Products containing dimethicone varied in protection against irritants (P < 0.005, or P > or = 0.806 at 24 hours) and have good skin hydration potential and low barrier efficacy (P > 0.500). Zinc oxide-based products showed protection against irritants (P < 0.005) but poor skin hydration and barrier properties to prevent maceration (P = 0.262). Overall, only the water-in-oil petrolatum- based product performed effectively within all the parameters tested. This study suggests that skin barrier protection involves more than the inclusion of an active barrier ingredient. Further testing and use of barrier products in the clinical setting will provide additional evidence for appropriate product selection.

  1. Effect of Skin-To-Skin Contact on Preterm Infant Skin Barrier Function and Hospital-Acquired Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abouelfettoh, Amel; Ludington-Hoe, Susan M.; Burant, Chris J.; Visscher, Marty O.

    2011-01-01

    Background The preterm infants' skin is structurally and functionally immature at birth because of immature stratum corneum barrier function, leading to problems with fluid loses, thermoregulation, and infection. Two parameters of barrier function can be non-invasively assessed: Stratum Corneum Hydration (SCH) and Transepidermal Water Loss (TEWL). Skin-to-Skin Care (SSC) is the proposed independent variable that might affect barrier function by decreasing TEWL and increasing SCH, thereby improving stratum corneum barrier function and consequently decreasing the rate of infection. No study of SSC's effects on TEWL and SCH of preterm infants could be found. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of 5 daily Skin-to-Skin Contact sessions on infant skin hydration (SCH), transepidermal evaporated water loss (TEWL), and on SCH when TEWL was controlled, and on the presence of hospital acquired infection. Methods A one-group pretest-test-posttest design with 10 preterm infants (28 - 30 wks GA < 32 wks postmenstrual age, and no infection at entry). Test = 90 minutes of SSC; pre-test and post-test = 30 minutes each of prone positioning in an incubator. SCH and TEWL were taken on Days 1 and 5 at the beginning, middle and end of each period using Multi-Probe Adaptor. A 3 X 3 X 2 Repeated Measures Mixed Models Design, including a covariate, was used to analyze level of Skin Hydration. Specifically, the model tested comparisons in SCH made across repetitions, time, and days, as well as all possible interactions while controlling for TEWL. Descriptive statistics described the number of positive blood cultures during hospitalization and the presence of infections four weeks post-discharge. Results Significant differences in skin hydration were found across TIME (Pre-SSC, SSC, Post-SSC) (F = 21.86; p < 0.001). One infant had a positive blood culture during hospitalization; no infants had signs of infection by 4 weeks post-discharge. Conclusions The study has begun

  2. Postnatal ecdysis establishes the permeability barrier in snake skin: new insights into barrier lipid structures.

    PubMed

    Tu, M C; Lillywhite, H B; Menon, J G; Menon, G K

    2002-10-01

    A competent barrier to transepidermal water loss (TEWL) is essential for terrestrial life. In various vertebrates, epidermal water barriers composed of lipids prevent excessive TEWL, which varies inversely with habitat aridity. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms and regulation of permeability relative to natal transition from the 'aqueous' environments of gestation to the 'aerial' environments of terrestrial neonates. We investigated newly hatched California king snakes Lampropeltis getula to test the hypothesis that the first ecdysis is important for establishing the barrier to TEWL. We found that skin resistance to TEWL increases twofold following the first postnatal ecdysis, corresponding with a roughly twofold increase in thickness and deposition of lamellar lipids in the mesos layer, the site of the skin permeability barrier in snakes. In addition, novel observations on lipid inclusions within the alpha layer of epidermis suggest that this layer has functional similarities with avian epidermis. It appears that emergence of the integument from embryonic fluids, and its subsequent pan-body replacement following contact with air, are essential for completion of barrier competence in the newborn. These conditions provide a potentially useful model for investigations on the mechanism of barrier formation. We also found that hatchling snakes are transiently endothermic, with skin temperatures elevated by approximately 0.6 degrees C above ambient air temperature during the period of barrier formation. Behaviourally, hatchlings showed a higher tendency to seek humid microenvironments before the first ecdysis than after. The degree of water movement across the integument might explain the switch from reclusive to dispersive behaviours associated with postnatal ecdysis in snakes.

  3. Abnormal thermal hyperaemia in the skin in paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Barbenel, J C; Cui, Z F

    1993-08-01

    Surface insulation, together with laser Doppler flowmetry, was used to assess the skin microcirculation of paraplegic patients. Two control groups of five male and five female subjects were used to establish the response of normals with which to compare the results obtained from six paraplegic subjects. No significant sex related difference was revealed from this study. It was found that in normal subjects, surface insulation resulted in a significant increase in both skin temperature and skin blood flow. In paraplegic patients, the temperature increase was significantly less than in the normal subjects and there was no significant thermally induced hyperaemia after surface insulation.

  4. [Normal and abnormal human skin color: from research to esthetics].

    PubMed

    Ortonne, J-P

    2009-10-01

    Skin color is controlled by pigmentary genes that regulate constitutive skin pigmentation and by environmental factors, the most obvious of them being solar U.V. At this time, more than 130 distinct pigmentary genes are known. They affect embryogenesis and survival of the melanocyte system, mélanosome biogenesis, melanogenesis, mélanosome transport and transfer, eumelanins/pheomelanins ratio and epidermal mélanosome turn-over and elimination. The pigmentary disorders of the skin are common and represent an important part of dermatologist activity. They concern at the same time the general dermatology and the aesthetic dermatology.

  5. Characterization of the canine skin barrier restoration following acute disruption by tape stripping.

    PubMed

    Vidémont, Emilie; Mariani, Claire; Vidal, Stéphanie; Pin, Didier

    2012-04-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) forms the main part of the permeability barrier of the skin. In mice and in humans, cutaneous barrier disruption can be generated by removing the SC with tape stripping (TS) and the skin barrier function can be assessed by measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL). The aim of the present study was to characterize the skin barrier restoration in the dog following mechanical disruption and to analyse the correlation between the skin barrier recovery and TEWL measurement. Thirty sequential TS were performed on 12 sites on four healthy beagle dogs. The number of TS was chosen to ensure a sufficient barrier disruption with a slow recovery. Skin repair was assessed for 72 h by clinical and histological examinations, and TEWL measurements. The results showed that performing 30 TS was adequate to disrupt the skin barrier in the dog. The homeostatic repair response, initiated in the skin, was rapid and characterized by complete restoration of the SC within 72 h, accompanied by greater basal cell proliferation, and dermal eosinophilic inflammation. TEWL was significantly increased by complete removal of the SC but recovered along with restoration of the SC (Scheffe test, P ≤ 0.05). Characterization of a canine model of barrier disruption and restoration and assessment of the skin barrier function by TEWL measurements could help better understand the events implied in skin barrier function. Development of this canine model is also necessary for future studies on the effects of treatments aimed at restoring the skin barrier.

  6. Loss of ceramide synthase 3 causes lethal skin barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Jennemann, Richard; Rabionet, Mariona; Gorgas, Karin; Epstein, Sharon; Dalpke, Alexander; Rothermel, Ulrike; Bayerle, Aline; van der Hoeven, Franciscus; Imgrund, Silke; Kirsch, Joachim; Nickel, Walter; Willecke, Klaus; Riezman, Howard; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Sandhoff, Roger

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum as the outermost epidermal layer protects against exsiccation and infection. Both the underlying cornified envelope (CE) and the intercellular lipid matrix contribute essentially to these two main protective barriers. Epidermis-unique ceramides with ultra-long-chain acyl moities (ULC-Cers) are key components of extracellular lipid lamellae (ELL) and are bound to CE proteins, thereby contributing to the cornified lipid envelope (CLE). Here, we identified human and mouse ceramide synthase 3 (CerS3), among CerS1-6, to be exclusively required for the ULC-Cer synthesis in vitro and of mouse CerS3 in vivo. Deficiency of CerS3 in mice results in complete loss of ULC-Cers (≥C26), lack of continuous ELL and a non-functional CLE. Consequently, newborn mutant mice die shortly after birth from transepidermal water loss. Mutant skin is prone to Candida albicans infection highlighting ULC-Cers to be pivotal for both barrier functions. Persistent periderm, hyperkeratosis and deficient cornification are hallmarks of mutant skin demonstrating loss of Cers to trigger a keratinocyte maturation arrest at an embryonic pre-barrier stage.

  7. The outcomes of barrier protection in periwound skin and stoma care.

    PubMed

    Stephen-Haynes, Jackie

    This article considers the anatomy and physiology of the skin,wound healing, excoriation, maceration, peristomal skin and the importance of periwound protection. The results of a 54-patient study of the use of barrier film forming skin protection in periwound skin are presented and a 10-patient healthy volunteer experimental evaluation. The results confirm the effectiveness of barrier protection in healthy skin in an experimental evaluation and a 54-patient study requiring periwound protection.

  8. In vivo measurements of skin barrier: comparison of different methods and advantages of laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzelt, A.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2010-12-01

    A major function of the skin is to provide a protective barrier at the interface between external environment and the organism. For skin barrier measurement, a multiplicity of methods is available. As standard methods, the determination of the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) as well as the measurement of the stratum corneum hydration, are widely accepted, although they offer some obvious disadvantages such as increased interference liability. Recently, new optical and spectroscopic methods have been introduced to investigate skin barrier properties in vivo. Especially, laser scanning microscopy has been shown to represent an excellent tool to study skin barrier integrity in many areas of relevance such as cosmetology, occupation, diseased skin, and wound healing.

  9. Decreased ATP synthesis and lower pH may lead to abnormal muscle contraction and skin sensitivity in human skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ju; Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Kim, Jung Yun; Lee, Min Jung; Choi, Won Woo; Eun, Hee Chul; Chung, Jin Ho

    2014-12-01

    Sensitive skin represents hyperactive sensory symptoms showing exaggerated reactions in response to internal stimulants or external irritants. Although sensitive skin is a very common condition affecting an estimated 50% of the population, its pathophysiology remains largely elusive, particularly with regard to its metabolic aspects. The objective of our study was to investigate the pathogenesis of sensitive skin. We recruited healthy participants with 'sensitive' or 'non-sensitive' skin based on standardized questionnaires and 10% lactic acid stinging test, and obtained skin samples for microarray analysis and subsequent experiments. Microarray transcriptome profiling revealed that genes involved in muscle contraction, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and ion transport and balance were significantly decreased in sensitive skin. These altered genes could account for the abnormal muscle contraction, decreased ATP amount in sensitive skin. In addition, pain-related transcripts such as TRPV1, ASIC3 and CGRP were significantly up-regulated in sensitive skin, compared with non-sensitive skin. Our findings suggest that sensitive skin is closely associated with the dysfunction of muscle contraction and metabolic homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cyclic Alopecia and Abnormal Epidermal Cornification in Zdhhc13-Deficient Mice Reveal the Importance of Palmitoylation in Hair and Skin Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai-Ming; Chen, Yi-Ju; Shen, Li-Fen; Haddad, Amir N S; Song, I-Wen; Chen, Li-Ying; Chen, Yu-Ju; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Yen, Jeffrey J Y; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2015-11-01

    Many biochemical pathways involved in hair and skin development have not been investigated. Here, we reported on the lesions and investigated the mechanism underlying hair and skin abnormalities in Zdhhc13(skc4) mice with a deficiency in DHHC13, a palmitoyl-acyl transferase encoded by Zdhhc13. Homozygous affected mice showed ragged and dilapidated cuticle of the hair shaft (CUH, a hair anchoring structure), poor hair anchoring ability, and premature hair loss at early telogen phase of the hair cycle, resulting in cyclic alopecia. Furthermore, the homozygous affected mice exhibited hyperproliferation of the epidermis, disturbed cornification, fragile cornified envelope (CE, a skin barrier structure), and impaired skin barrier function. Biochemical investigations revealed that cornifelin, which contains five palmitoylation sites at cysteine residues (C58, C59, C60, C95, and C101), was a specific substrate of DHHC13 and that it was absent in the CUH and CE structures of the affected mice. Furthermore, cornifelin levels were markedly reduced when two palmitoylated cysteines were replaced with serine (C95S and C101S). Taken together, our results suggest that DHHC13 is important for hair anchoring and skin barrier function and that cornifelin deficiency contributes to cyclic alopecia and skin abnormalities in Zdhhc13(skc4) mice.

  11. Olopatadine hydrochloride accelerates the recovery of skin barrier function in mice.

    PubMed

    Amano, T; Takeda, T; Yano, H; Tamura, T

    2007-05-01

    The skin barrier function in patients with atopic dermatitis is disrupted and prolonged topical steroid therapy produces epidermal barrier disturbance. Olopatadine hydrochloride (olopatadine; Allelock; Kyowa Hakko Kogyo Co., Ltd, Shizuoka, Japan) is an antiallergic drug with histamine H(1) receptor antagonistic action. This drug alleviates skin inflammation and decreases the number of scratching episodes in a murine model of chronic contact dermatitis. To investigate the effects of olopatadine and a steroid on the recovery of skin barrier function after barrier disruption in mice. The skin barrier of the ears of mice was disrupted by tape stripping. The recovery of skin barrier function was monitored by measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) after barrier disruption. Epidermal hyperplasia was induced by repeated tape stripping for 7 days. Olopatadine was administered orally once daily from 3 days before the first barrier disruption. Betamethasone 17-valerate (betamethasone) was applied topically once daily from 3 days before barrier disruption. Tape stripping led to a significant increase in TEWL. TEWL decreased with time after tape stripping and the skin barrier function recovered by over 60% within 9 h after tape stripping. The recovery of skin barrier in olopatadine-treated mice was significantly accelerated, compared with that in vehicle-treated mice. In contrast, the skin barrier recovery in mice treated with topical betamethasone was significantly delayed, compared with that in vehicle-treated mice. Combined treatment with olopatadine and betamethasone ameliorated the delay in barrier recovery induced by topical treatment with betamethasone. In addition, olopatadine significantly prevented the increase in epidermal thickness induced by prolonged barrier disruption. These results suggest that systemic administration of olopatadine accelerates the recovery of skin barrier function and ameliorates the adverse effects of topical steroids on skin barrier

  12. [Electroacupuncture intervention improved changes of skin barrier and color in type 2 diabetes rats].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xu; Rong, Pei-Jing; Wang, Hong-Cai; Li, Shao-Yuan; Meng, Hong; He, Meng-Dong; Huang, Feng; Wang, Xia; Song, Jie

    2013-02-01

    To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) of auricular concha region (ACR), "Zusanli" (ST 36) and "Sanyinjiao"(SP 6) on abnormal skin barrier and color in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T 2 DM) rats so as to find a better therapeutic method. Fifty male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomized into control (n = 10), model (n = 13), EA-ST 36-SP 6 (n = 14) and EA-ACR (n = 13) groups. T 2 DM model was established by intraperitoneal injection of 1% STZ (50 mg/kg) and by feeding the animals with high-fat diet for 30 days. EA (15 Hz, 1 mA) was applied to bilateral "Zusanli" (ST 36), "Sanyinjiao" (SP 6) and ACR respectively for 30 min, once daily for 14 days. Multi Probe Adapter 9 skin measurement system (MPA 9) was used to measure the stratum corneum hydration (SCH), transepidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema index (El), melanin index (MI) and chromatic aberration values (L. a. b.) of the abdomenal and back (L1 - L6) skin, respectively. In comparison with the control group and pre-modeling, blood glucose contents of the model, EA-ST 36-SP 6 and EA-ACR groups were increased significantly (P < 0.01) after modeling. Compared with the model group, blood glucose levels of both EA-ST 36-SP 6 and EA-ACR groups were down-regulated apparently (P < 0.01) after treatment. Thirty days after modeling, the SCH, TEWL, EI, MI, L. and a. levels of the back skin, and the SCH and L. levels of the abdominal skin were decreased significantly (P < 0.05), while the level of b. in the back skin, and those of TEWL, EL, a. and b. of the abdominal skin increased considerably in the model group (P < 0.05). After EA, the levels of SCH, TEWL MI, L. a. and b. in the EA-ST 36-SP 6 group, SCH, TEWL, L. and b. in the EA-ACR group of the back skin, and SCH, L. and b. of both EAST 36-SP 6 and EA-ACR groups, as well as EI and a. of the EA-ST 36-SP 6 group of the abdominal skin were reversed remarkably (P < 0.05). No significant differences were found between the EA-ST 36-SP 6

  13. Facial skin pigmentation is not related to stratum corneum cohesion, basal transepidermal water loss, barrier integrity and barrier repair.

    PubMed

    Voegeli, R; Rawlings, A V; Summers, B

    2015-04-01

    Hypotheses have been developed for the evolutionary selection of skin pigmentation one of which relates to improved skin barrier function. The aim of this study was to compare facial skin condition on photoexposed (cheek) and photoprotected (post-auricular) sites of naturally pigmented subjects of different ethnicities (Fitzpatrick skin phototypes II/III and V/VI) and Albino African subjects to understand better the relationship between facial stratum corneum (SC) barrier function, skin surface pH and skin pigmentation. Expert grading of skin conditions, capacitance, skin surface pH and skin barrier function measurements were performed. For the latter, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements before (basal TEWL), after 3, 6 and 9 consecutive tape strippings (SC integrity) and 3.5 and 24 h post tape stripping (barrier recovery) were taken. Amounts of SC protein removed during stripping were estimated using infrared densitometry (SC cohesion). Firstly, correlation analysis of the biometric data of the Black African and Caucasian subjects showed there to be no relationship between skin surface pH and ITA° values nor pH and ITA° with basal TEWL. Neither skin surface pH nor ITA° correlated with SC integrity and barrier recovery measurements, but skin surface pH correlated with SC cohesion. ITA° values were correlated with skin hydration. Secondly, on comparing the three ethnic groups, severe skin photodamage was observed in the Albino African subjects and their SC was thicker. Whereas their basal TEWL was elevated, superior values for SC integrity and barrier recovery were measured. No differences in basal TEWL, SC integrity and barrier recovery were found between the other two subject groups. Equally, SC cohesion and skin surface pH values were similar among the three groups. There was no relationship between ITA° values and basal TEWL, SC integrity, SC cohesion and barrier recovery, but ITA° was correlated with skin hydration. Skin surface pH, irrespective

  14. Colloidal Oatmeal (Avena Sativa) Improves Skin Barrier Through Multi-Therapy Activity.

    PubMed

    Ilnytska, Olha; Kaur, Simarna; Chon, Suhyoun; Reynertson, Kurt A; Nebus, Judith; Garay, Michelle; Mahmood, Khalid; Southall, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    Oats (Avena sativa) are a centuries-old topical treatment for a variety of skin barrier conditions, including dry skin, skin rashes, and eczema; however, few studies have investigated the actual mechanism of action for the skin barrier strengthening activity of colloidal oatmeal. Four extracts of colloidal oatmeal were prepared with various solvents and tested in vitro for skin barrier related gene expression and activity. Extracts of colloidal oatmeal were found to induce the expression of genes related to epidermal differentiation, tight junctions and lipid regulation in skin, and provide pH-buffering capacity. Colloidal oatmeal boosted the expression of multiple target genes related to skin barrier, and resulted in recovery of barrier damage in an in vitro model of atopic dermatitis. In addition, an investigator-blinded study was performed with 50 healthy female subjects who exhibited bilateral moderate to severe dry skin on their lower legs. Subjects were treated with a colloidal oatmeal skin protectant lotion. Clinically, the colloidal oatmeal lotion showed significant clinical improvements in skin dryness, moisturization, and barrier. Taken together, these results demonstrate that colloidal oatmeal can provide clinically effective benefits for dry and compromised skin by strengthening skin barrier.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(6):684-690.

  15. The Role of Cutaneous Microbiota Harmony in Maintaining a Functional Skin Barrier.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Hilary E; Bhatia, Neal D; Friedman, Adam; Eng, Richard Martin; Seite, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    The skin is constantly exposed to various endogenous and exogenous factors that may impact its barrier function at the physical, mechanical, immunological, and microbial levels. These factors have the potential to initiate or exacerbate a variety of inflammatory skin conditions, especially those associated with barrier dysfunction. The barrier function of the skin depends upon a symbiotic relationship between resident microbial communities and host tissue. This symbiosis results from complex signals involved in both the innate and adaptive immune responses. Recent research indicates that both bacterial diversity and the relative abundance of different microbes present on and in the skin, may contribute to skin barrier stability or dysfunction. The objectives of this review are to discuss the relationship between the skin microbiota and skin barrier function and to consider mechanisms that may help its preservation. J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(1):12-18..

  16. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Visualizes Ceramides and the Pathogenesis of Dorfman-Chanarin Syndrome Due to Ceramide Metabolic Abnormality in the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Nakajima, Kimiko; Holleran, Walter M.; Sano, Shigetoshi

    2012-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a useful cutting edge technology used to investigate the distribution of biomolecules such as drugs and metabolites, as well as to identify molecular species in tissues and cells without labeling. To protect against excess water loss that is essential for survival in a terrestrial environment, mammalian skin possesses a competent permeability barrier in the stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the epidermis. The key lipids constituting this barrier in the SC are the ceramides (Cers) comprising of a heterogeneous molecular species. Alterations in Cer composition have been reported in several skin diseases that display abnormalities in the epidermal permeability barrier function. Not only the amounts of different Cers, but also their localizations are critical for the barrier function. We have employed our new imaging system, capable of high-lateral-resolution IMS with an atmospheric-pressure ionization source, to directly visualize the distribution of Cers. Moreover, we show an ichthyotic disease pathogenesis due to abnormal Cer metabolism in Dorfman–Chanarin syndrome, a neutral lipid storage disorder with ichthyosis in human skin, demonstrating that IMS is a novel diagnostic approach for assessing lipid abnormalities in clinical setting, as well as for investigating physiological roles of lipids in cells/tissues. PMID:23166695

  17. Imaging mass spectrometry visualizes ceramides and the pathogenesis of dorfman-chanarin syndrome due to ceramide metabolic abnormality in the skin.

    PubMed

    Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Nakajima, Kimiko; Holleran, Walter M; Sano, Shigetoshi; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2012-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a useful cutting edge technology used to investigate the distribution of biomolecules such as drugs and metabolites, as well as to identify molecular species in tissues and cells without labeling. To protect against excess water loss that is essential for survival in a terrestrial environment, mammalian skin possesses a competent permeability barrier in the stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the epidermis. The key lipids constituting this barrier in the SC are the ceramides (Cers) comprising of a heterogeneous molecular species. Alterations in Cer composition have been reported in several skin diseases that display abnormalities in the epidermal permeability barrier function. Not only the amounts of different Cers, but also their localizations are critical for the barrier function. We have employed our new imaging system, capable of high-lateral-resolution IMS with an atmospheric-pressure ionization source, to directly visualize the distribution of Cers. Moreover, we show an ichthyotic disease pathogenesis due to abnormal Cer metabolism in Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome, a neutral lipid storage disorder with ichthyosis in human skin, demonstrating that IMS is a novel diagnostic approach for assessing lipid abnormalities in clinical setting, as well as for investigating physiological roles of lipids in cells/tissues.

  18. Quantification of quantum dot murine skin penetration with UVR barrier impairment.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Luke J; Jatana, Samreen; Gelein, Robert; De Benedetto, Anna; De Mesy Bentley, Karen L; Beck, Lisa A; Elder, Alison; Delouise, Lisa A

    2013-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) skin exposure is a common exogenous insult that can alter skin barrier and immune functions. With the growing presence of nanoparticles (NPs) in consumer goods and technological applications the potential for NPs to contact UVR-exposed skin is increasing. Therefore it is important to understand the effect of UVR on NP skin penetration and the potential for systemic translocation. Previous studies qualitatively showed that UVR skin exposure can increase the penetration of NPs below the stratum corneum. In this work, an in vivo mouse model was used to quantitatively examine the skin penetration of carboxylated (CdSe/ZnS, core/shell) quantum dots (QDs) through intact and UVR barrier-disrupted murine skin by organ Cd mass analysis. Transepidermal water loss was used to measure the magnitude of the skin barrier defect as a function of UVR dose and time post-UVR exposure. QDs were applied to mice 3-4 days post-UVR exposure at the peak of the skin barrier disruption. Our results reveal unexpected trends that suggest these negative-charged QDs can penetrate barrier intact skin and that penetration and systemic transport depends on the QD application time post-UVR exposure. The effect of UVR on skin-resident dendritic cells and their role in the systemic translocation of these QDs are described. Our results suggest that NP skin penetration and translocation may depend on the specific barrier insult and the inflammatory status of the skin.

  19. Quantification of quantum dot murine skin penetration with UVR barrier impairment

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Luke J.; Jatana, Samreen; Gelein, Robert; De Benedetto, Anna; De Mesy Bentley, Karen L.; Beck, Lisa; Elder, Alison; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) skin exposure is a common exogenous insult that can alter skin barrier and immune functions. With the growing presence of nanoparticles (NPs) in consumer goods and technological applications the potential for NPs to contact UVR exposed skin is increasing. Therefore it is important to understand the effect of UVR on NP skin penetration and potential for systemic translocation. Previous studies qualitatively showed that UVR skin exposure can increase the penetration of NPs below the stratum corneum. In the present work, an in vivo mouse model was used to quantitatively examine the skin penetration of carboxylated (CdSe/ZnS, core/shell) quantum dots (QDs) through intact and UVR barrier disrupted murine skin by organ Cd mass analysis. Transepidermal water loss was used to measure the magnitude of the skin barrier defect as a function of dose and time post UVR exposure. QDs were applied to mice 3-4 days post UVR exposure at the peak of the skin barrier disruption. Our results reveal unexpected trends that suggest these negative charged QDs can penetrate barrier intact skin and that penetration and systemic transport depends on the QD application time post UVR exposure. The effect of UVR on skin resident dendritic cells and their role in the systemic translocation of these QDs are described. Our results suggest that NP skin penetration and translocation may depend on the specific barrier insult and the inflammatory status of the skin. PMID:23078247

  20. Effect of microplasma irradiation on skin barrier function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuo; Tran, Nhat An; Blajan, Marius

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of atmospheric-pressure argon microplasma irradiation (AAMI) to promote drug delivery through skin. Yucatan micropig skin was used as a biological object for evaluation of in vitro percutaneous absorption. The changes in lipids, proteins and water content of the pig stratum corneum (SC) after AAMI were compared to those of a tape stripping test (TST) and plasma jet irradiation (PJI) using attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis. The significant reduction in the methylene stretching modes absorbance resulted in the disturbance in the SC lipids caused by AAMI was observed at 2850 and 2920 cm-1. Moreover, as the result of TST, trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) after both AAMI and PJI were also increased, that could lead to a decrease of barrier function of SC, and could enhance the transdermal absorption of drugs. Under the conditions of this study, TEWL value of 5 minutes AAMI (35.92 +/- 3.48 g/m2h) was approximately the same as that value of 10 times TST (34.30 +/- 3.54 g/m2h), that makes the effect of these manipulations on the surfaces is considered to be at the same levels. Furthermore, unlike the obtained microscopic observation from PJI, there was no thermal damage observed on the skins after AAMI.

  1. Biological Variation in Skin Barrier Function: From A (Atopic Dermatitis) to X (Xerosis).

    PubMed

    Danby, Simon G

    2016-01-01

    The skin barrier, formed by the stratum corneum, envelops our bodies and provides an essential protective function. However, this barrier function differs between individuals due to biological variation. This variation arises as a result of inherited genetic variants, negative environmental or extrinsic factors, and age. A multitude of genetic changes determine a person's predisposition to a skin barrier defect and consequently their risk of developing a dry skin condition, such as atopic dermatitis. Extrinsic factors, including the weather and detrimental skin care practices, interact with these genetic changes to determine the severity of the defect and additively increase the risk of developing dry skin conditions. How these dry skin conditions present clinically, and how they persist and progress depends very much on a person's age. Understanding how the skin barrier varies between individuals, how it differs based on clinical presentation, and how it alters with age is important in developing optimum therapies to maintain healthy skin that provides the best protection.

  2. Targeting of liposome-associated calcipotriol to the skin: effect of liposomal membrane fluidity and skin barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Nina Østergaard; Jorgensen, Lene; Hansen, Jens; Vermehren, Charlotte; Frokjaer, Sven; Foged, Camilla

    2011-09-20

    Many dermal diseases like psoriasis are characterized by major changes in skin barrier function, which challenge the reproducible delivery of drugs into specific layers of diseased skin. The purpose of this study was to elucidate how liposomal bilayer fluidity and barrier integrity affected the delivery of liposome-associated calcipotriol to the skin. Calcipotriol-containing gel state and liquid state dipalmitoylphosphatidyl-choline:dilauroylphosphatidylcholine liposomes were prepared by extrusion. Using Langmuir monolayers, calcipotriol was shown to affect the packing of the lipid membrane. The penetration of radioactively labeled lipid and calcipotriol into pig skin was examined using the Franz diffusion cell model, and tape stripping was applied to impose an impaired barrier. Distorting the skin barrier resulted in an enhanced penetration of lipid from both gel and liquid state liposomes. In addition, increased penetration of lipid from liquid state liposomes was observed compared to gel state liposomes into barrier-impaired skin. For barrier-impaired skin, an elevated calcipotriol-to-lipid ratio was found in the receptor fluid for both liposome compositions indicating that calcipotriol is released from the vesicles. This suggests that the liposome-mediated delivery of calcipotriol to the epidermis of diseased skin is affected by the fluidity of the liposomal membrane. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Increased Bacterial Load and Expression of Antimicrobial Peptides in Skin of Barrier-Deficient Mice with Reduced Cancer Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Natsuga, Ken; Cipolat, Sara; Watt, Fiona M.

    2016-01-01

    Mice lacking three epidermal barrier proteins—envoplakin, periplakin, and involucrin (EPI-/- mice)—have a defective cornified layer, reduced epidermal γδ T cells, and increased dermal CD4+ T cells. They are also resistant to developing skin tumors. The tumor-protective mechanism involves signaling between Rae-1 expressing keratinocytes and the natural killer group 2D receptor on immune cells, which also plays a role in host defenses against infection. Given the emerging link between bacteria and cancer, we investigated whether EPI-/- mice have an altered skin microbiota. The bacterial phyla were similar in wild-type and EPI-/- skin. However, bacteria were threefold more abundant in EPI-/- skin and penetrated deeper into the epidermis. The major epithelial defense mechanism against bacteria is production of antimicrobial proteins (AMPs). EPI-/- skin exhibited enhanced expression of antimicrobial peptides. However, reducing the bacterial load by antibiotic treatment or breeding mice under specific pathogen-free conditions did not reduce AMP expression or alleviate the abnormalities in T-cell populations. We conclude that the atopic characteristics of EPI-/- skin are a consequence of the defective barrier rather than a response to the increased bacterial load. It is therefore unlikely that the increase in skin microbiota contributes directly to the observed cancer resistance. PMID:26763429

  4. Increased Bacterial Load and Expression of Antimicrobial Peptides in Skin of Barrier-Deficient Mice with Reduced Cancer Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Natsuga, Ken; Cipolat, Sara; Watt, Fiona M

    2016-01-01

    Mice lacking three epidermal barrier proteins-envoplakin, periplakin, and involucrin (EPI-/- mice)-have a defective cornified layer, reduced epidermal γδ T cells, and increased dermal CD4(+) T cells. They are also resistant to developing skin tumors. The tumor-protective mechanism involves signaling between Rae-1 expressing keratinocytes and the natural killer group 2D receptor on immune cells, which also plays a role in host defenses against infection. Given the emerging link between bacteria and cancer, we investigated whether EPI-/- mice have an altered skin microbiota. The bacterial phyla were similar in wild-type and EPI-/- skin. However, bacteria were threefold more abundant in EPI-/- skin and penetrated deeper into the epidermis. The major epithelial defense mechanism against bacteria is production of antimicrobial proteins (AMPs). EPI-/- skin exhibited enhanced expression of antimicrobial peptides. However, reducing the bacterial load by antibiotic treatment or breeding mice under specific pathogen-free conditions did not reduce AMP expression or alleviate the abnormalities in T-cell populations. We conclude that the atopic characteristics of EPI-/- skin are a consequence of the defective barrier rather than a response to the increased bacterial load. It is therefore unlikely that the increase in skin microbiota contributes directly to the observed cancer resistance. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of skin barrier function and biochemical changes of ex vivo human skin in response to physical and chemical barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Döge, Nadine; Avetisyan, Araks; Hadam, Sabrina; Pfannes, Eva Katharina Barbosa; Rancan, Fiorenza; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika

    2017-07-01

    Topical dermatotherapy is intended to be used on diseased skin. Novel drug delivery systems even address differences between intact and diseased skin underlining the need for pre-clinical assessment of different states of barrier disruption. Herein, we studied how short-term incubation in culture media compared to incubation in humidified chambers affects human skin barrier function and viability. On both models we assessed different types and intensities of physical and chemical barrier disruption methods with regard to structural integrity, biophysical parameters and cytokine levels. Tissue degeneration and proliferative activity limited the use of tissue cultures to 48h. Viability is better preserved in cultured tissue. Tape-stripping (50×TS) and 4h sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) pre-treatment were identified as highly reproducible and effective procedures for barrier disruption. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) values reproducibly increased with the intensity of disruption while sebum content and skin surface pH were of limited value. Interleukin (IL)-6/8 and various chemokines and proteases were increased in tape-stripped skin which was more pronounced in SLS-treated skin tissue extracts. Thus, albeit limited to 48h, cultured full-thickness skin maintained several barrier characteristics and responded to different intensities of barrier disruption. Potentially, these models can be used to assess pre-clinically the efficacy and penetration of anti-inflammatory compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sensations of skin infestation linked to abnormal frontolimbic brain reactivity and differences in self-representation.

    PubMed

    Eccles, J A; Garfinkel, S N; Harrison, N A; Ward, J; Taylor, R E; Bewley, A P; Critchley, H D

    2015-10-01

    Some patients experience skin sensations of infestation and contamination that are elusive to proximate dermatological explanation. We undertook a functional magnetic resonance imaging study of the brain to demonstrate, for the first time, that central processing of infestation-relevant stimuli is altered in patients with such abnormal skin sensations. We show differences in neural activity within amygdala, insula, middle temporal lobe and frontal cortices. Patients also demonstrated altered measures of self-representation, with poorer sensitivity to internal bodily (interoceptive) signals and greater susceptibility to take on an illusion of body ownership: the rubber hand illusion. Together, these findings highlight a potential model for the maintenance of abnormal skin sensations, encompassing heightened threat processing within amygdala, increased salience of skin representations within insula and compromised prefrontal capacity for self-regulation and appraisal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Abnormal lymphocyte response to ultraviolet radiation in multiple skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Munch-Petersen, B.; Frentz, G.; Squire, B.; Wallevik, K.; Horn, C.C.; Reymann, F.; Faber, M. )

    1985-06-01

    The lymphocyte response to ultraviolet radiation (254 nm) was investigated by two different methods in 29 unselected patients with multiple epidermal cancer. The ultraviolet-induced DNA synthesis was determined as the increase in incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine in irradiated cells compared with non-irradiated cells after incubation for 2 h. The ultraviolet tolerance was measured as the ultraviolet dose necessary for 50% reduction in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. Patients with both squamous cell differentiated tumours and basal cell carcinomas had very high ultraviolet-induced DNA synthesis values. The ultraviolet tolerance in patient lymphocytes was considerably lower than in control lymphocytes with the lowest values occurring in patients with clinical sun intolerance. These investigations may be of predictive value in skin carcinogenesis.

  8. HATS syndrome: hemimaxillary enlargement, asymmetry of the face, tooth abnormalities, and skin findings.

    PubMed

    Alshaiji, Jasem M; Handler, Marc Z; Huo, Ran; Freedman, Ann; Schachner, Lawrence A

    2014-10-01

    Hemimaxillary enlargement, asymmetry of the face, tooth abnormalities, and skin findings (HATS syndrome) is a rare developmental disorder involving the first and second branchial arches. Physical manifestations may present at birth or during early childhood. Characteristic findings include unilateral abnormalities of the face involving the bones, teeth, gums, and skin. Among the characteristic cutaneous manifestations of HATS syndrome, Becker nevus is the most common. A variety of modalities have been utilized in the treatment of HATS syndrome, but no standardized therapy has been established. We report a case of this rare condition in a 14-year-old adolescent boy.

  9. Harlequin ichthyosis: ABCA12 mutations underlie defective lipid transport, reduced protease regulation and skin-barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Scott, Claire A; Rajpopat, Shefali; Di, Wei-Li

    2013-02-01

    Harlequin ichthyosis (HI) is a devastating autosomal recessive congenital skin disease. It has been vital to elucidate the biological importance of the protein ABCA12 in skin-barrier permeability, following the discovery that ABCA12 gene mutations can result in this rare disease. ATP-binding cassette transporter A12 (ABCA12) is a member of the subfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporters and functions to transport lipid glucosylceramides (GlcCer) to the extracellular space through lamellar granules (LGs). GlcCer are hydrolysed into hydroxyceramides extracellularly and constitute a portion of the extracellular lamellar membrane, lipid envelope and lamellar granules. In HI skin, loss of function of ABCA12 due to null mutations results in impaired lipid lamellar membrane formation in the cornified layer, leading to defective permeability of the skin barrier. In addition, abnormal lamellar granule formation (distorted shape, reduced in number or absent) could further cause aberrant production of LG-associated desquamation enzymes, which are likely to contribute to the impaired skin barrier in HI. This article reviews current opinions on the patho-mechanisms of ABCA12 action in HI and potential therapeutic interventions based on targeted molecular therapy and gene therapy strategies.

  10. Potential skin involvement in ALS: revisiting Charcot's observation - a review of skin abnormalities in ALS.

    PubMed

    Paré, Bastien; Gros-Louis, François

    2017-03-25

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons of the brain and spinal cord, leading to progressive paralysis and death. Interestingly, many skin changes have been reported in ALS patients, but never as yet fully explained. These observations could be due to the common embryonic origin of the skin and neural tissue known as the ectodermal germ layer. Following the first observation in ALS patients' skin by Dr Charcot in the 19th century, in the absence of bedsores unlike other bedridden patients, other morphological and molecular changes have been observed. Thus, the skin could be of interest in the study of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. This review summarizes skin changes reported in the literature over the years and discusses about a novel in vitro ALS tissue-engineered skin model, derived from patients, for the study of ALS.

  11. Skin Barrier Recovery by Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Antagonist Lobaric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Yeon Ah; Chung, Hyunjin; Yoon, Sohyun; Park, Jong Il; Lee, Ji Eun; Myung, Cheol Hwan; Hwang, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) results from gene and environment interactions that lead to a range of immunological abnormalities and breakdown of the skin barrier. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) belongs to a family of G-protein coupled receptors and is expressed in suprabasal layers of the epidermis. PAR2 is activated by both trypsin and a specific agonist peptide, SLIGKV-NH2 and is involved in both epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis and epithelial inflammation. In this study, we investigated the effect of lobaric acid on inflammation, keratinocyte differentiation, and recovery of the skin barrier in hairless mice. Lobaric acid blocked trypsin-induced and SLIGKV-NH2-induced PAR2 activation resulting in decreased mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid reduced expression of interleukin-8 induced by SLIGKV-NH2 and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (TARC) induced by tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) and IFN-γ in HaCaT keratinocytes. Lobaric acid also blocked SLIGKV-NH2-induced activation of ERK, which is a downstream signal of PAR2 in normal human keratinocytes (NHEKs). Treatment with SLIGKV-NH2 downregulated expression of involucrin, a differentiation marker protein in HaCaT keratinocytes, and upregulated expression of involucrin, transglutamase1 and filaggrin in NHEKs. However, lobaric acid antagonized the effect of SLIGKV-NH2 in HaCaT keratinocytes and NHEKs. Topical application of lobaric acid accelerated barrier recovery kinetics in a SKH-1 hairless mouse model. These results suggested that lobaric acid is a PAR2 antagonist and could be a possible therapeutic agent for atopic dermatitis. PMID:27169822

  12. Multiple barriers delay care among women with abnormal cancer screening despite patient navigation.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Ambili; Freund, Karen M; Bak, Sharon M; Heeren, Timothy C; Chen, Clara A; Battaglia, Tracy A

    2015-01-01

    While there is widespread dissemination of patient navigation programs in an effort to reduce delays in cancer care, little is known about the impact of barriers to care on timely outcomes. We conducted a secondary analysis of the Boston Patient Navigation Research Program (PNRP) to examine the effect that the presence of barriers had on time to diagnostic resolution of abnormal breast or cervical cancer screening tests. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression with time to diagnostic resolution as the outcome to examine the effect of the number of barriers, controlling for demographic covariates and clustered by patients' primary navigator. There were 1481 women who received navigation; mean age was 39 years; 32% were White, 27% Black, and 31% Hispanic; 28% had private health insurance; and 38% did not speak English. Overall, half (n=745, 50%) had documentation of one or more barriers to care. Women with barriers were more likely to be older, non-White, non-English language speakers, and on public or no health insurance compared with women without barriers. In multivariable analyses, we found less timely diagnostic resolution as the number of barriers increased (one barrier, adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.81 [95% CI 0.56-1.17], p=0.26; two barriers, aHR 0.55 [95% CI 0.37-0.81], p=0.0025; three or more barriers, aHR 0.31 [95% CI 0.21-0.46], p<0.0001)]. Within a patient navigation program proven to reduce delays in care, we found that navigated patients with documented barriers to care experience less timely resolution of abnormal cancer screening tests.

  13. Investigation of Skin Barrier Functions and Allergic Sensitization in Patients with Hyper-IgE Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mócsai, Gábor; Gáspár, Krisztián; Dajnoki, Zsolt; Tóth, Beáta; Gyimesi, Edit; Bíró, Tamás; Maródi, László; Szegedi, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES) is a severe primary immunodeficiency, characterized by increased serum IgE levels as well as recurrent infections and atopic dermatitis (AD)-like skin lesions. AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with immunologic alterations (Th2-Th22 polarization) and characteristic skin barrier dysfunctions. Our aim was to investigate physicochemical skin barrier alterations and allergic sensitization in STAT3-HIES patients in order to explore whether skin barrier dysfunction can play a role in the eczematoid skin lesions in these patients. In our experiments STAT3 and FLG mutation analyses were performed in STAT3-HIES (n = 7) and AD (n = 49) patients. Laboratory parameters (LDH and Eos counts), immunologic alterations (Th17 cell counts), allergic sensitization (total and specific IgE levels, skin prick tests, and medical history records), skin barrier changes [transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin pH], serum and stratum corneum thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) levels were also examined. Impaired Th17 cell numbers, but normal physicochemical barrier functions, as well as serum and stratum corneum TSLP levels, were found in STAT3-HIES, while these parameters were significantly altered in AD patients. Allergic sensitization was detected in nearly all AD patients, while no signs of sensitization occurred in STAT3-HIES. Our study demonstrated that the skin barrier functions of STAT3-HIES patients are not damaged and they differ significantly from the altered skin barrier functions of AD patients. A well-functioning physicochemical skin barrier may be one of the explanations on the contradiction between the extremely high total IgE levels and the lack of allergic sensitization in these patients. Our study underlines the importance of skin barrier in the development of allergic sensitization.

  14. Epidermal barrier defects link atopic dermatitis with altered skin cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Cipolat, Sara; Hoste, Esther; Natsuga, Ken; Quist, Sven R; Watt, Fiona M

    2014-05-05

    Atopic dermatitis can result from loss of structural proteins in the outermost epidermal layers, leading to a defective epidermal barrier. To test whether this influences tumour formation, we chemically induced tumours in EPI-/- mice, which lack three barrier proteins-Envoplakin, Periplakin, and Involucrin. EPI-/- mice were highly resistant to developing benign tumours when treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). The DMBA response was normal, but EPI-/- skin exhibited an exaggerated atopic response to TPA, characterised by abnormal epidermal differentiation, a complex immune infiltrate and elevated serum thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). The exacerbated TPA response could be normalised by blocking TSLP or the immunoreceptor NKG2D but not CD4+ T cells. We conclude that atopy is protective against skin cancer in our experimental model and that the mechanism involves keratinocytes communicating with cells of the immune system via signalling elements that normally protect against environmental assaults.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01888.001. Copyright © 2014, Cipolat et al.

  15. Barriers to Follow-Up for Abnormal Papanicolaou Smears among Female Sex Workers in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Aharon, Devora; Calderon, Martha; Solari, Vicky; Alarcon, Patricia; Zunt, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most prevalent cancer among Peruvian women. Female sex workers (FSW) in Peru are at elevated risk for HPV infection, and receive annual Papanicolaou screening. The objective of this study was to identify barriers to follow-up for abnormal Pap smears among FSW in Peru. 97 FSW attending the Alberto Barton Health Center in Lima were surveyed regarding their STI screening history. 17 women with a history of an abnormal Pap smear were interviewed about their experiences regarding follow-up care. Of the 27 HPV-positive women, only 8 (30%) received follow-up treatment. Of the 19 women who did not receive follow-up, 7 (37%) had not been informed of their abnormal result. Qualitative interviews revealed that the major barrier to follow-up was lack of knowledge about HPV and potential health consequences of an abnormal Pap smear. HPV infection is highly prevalent in Peruvian FSW, yet only 30% of FSW with abnormal Pap smears receive follow-up care. The predominant barriers to follow-up were lack of standardization in recording and communicating results and insufficient FSW knowledge regarding health consequences of HPV infection. Standardization of record-keeping and distribution of educational pamphlets have been implemented to improve follow-up for HPV.

  16. Barriers to Follow-Up for Abnormal Papanicolaou Smears among Female Sex Workers in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Aharon, Devora; Calderon, Martha; Solari, Vicky; Alarcon, Patricia; Zunt, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is the most prevalent cancer among Peruvian women. Female sex workers (FSW) in Peru are at elevated risk for HPV infection, and receive annual Papanicolaou screening. The objective of this study was to identify barriers to follow-up for abnormal Pap smears among FSW in Peru. Methods 97 FSW attending the Alberto Barton Health Center in Lima were surveyed regarding their STI screening history. 17 women with a history of an abnormal Pap smear were interviewed about their experiences regarding follow-up care. Results Of the 27 HPV-positive women, only 8 (30%) received follow-up treatment. Of the 19 women who did not receive follow-up, 7 (37%) had not been informed of their abnormal result. Qualitative interviews revealed that the major barrier to follow-up was lack of knowledge about HPV and potential health consequences of an abnormal Pap smear. Conclusion HPV infection is highly prevalent in Peruvian FSW, yet only 30% of FSW with abnormal Pap smears receive follow-up care. The predominant barriers to follow-up were lack of standardization in recording and communicating results and insufficient FSW knowledge regarding health consequences of HPV infection. Standardization of record-keeping and distribution of educational pamphlets have been implemented to improve follow-up for HPV. PMID:28060937

  17. Non-invasive in vivo methods for investigation of the skin barrier physical properties.

    PubMed

    Darlenski, R; Sassning, S; Tsankov, N; Fluhr, J W

    2009-06-01

    Skin as an organ of protection covers the body and accomplishes multiple defensive functions. The intact skin represents a barrier to the uncontrolled loss of water, proteins, and plasma components from the organism. Due to its complex structure, the epidermal barrier with its major component, stratum corneum, is the rate-limiting unit for the penetration of exogenous substances through the skin. The epidermal barrier is not a static structure. The permeability barrier status can be modified by different external and internal factors such as climate, physical stressors, and a number of skin and systemic diseases. Today, different non-invasive approaches are used to monitor the skin barrier physical properties in vivo. The quantification of parameters such as transepidermal water loss, stratum corneum hydration, and skin surface acidity is essential for the integral evaluation of the epidermal barrier status. Novel methods such as in vivo confocal Raman microspectroscopy offer the possibility for precise and detailed characterization of the skin barrier. This paper will allow the readership to get acquainted with the non-invasive, in vivo methods for the investigation of the skin barrier.

  18. Inflammation-induced alterations in the skin barrier function: implications in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Christian; Hvid, Malene; Johansen, Claus; Kemp, Kaare; Deleuran, Bent; Deleuran, Mette

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD) is very complex, but best characterized by an inflammatory reaction in the skin and a disrupted skin barrier. Until recently, these two factors have been studied as separate entities; however, it has been shown that inflammatory cytokines can regulate filaggrin, a very important component of the skin barrier, as well as proteins involved in the processing and maturation of filaggrin. Therefore, inflammation itself may be able to induce a functional skin barrier dysfunction and thereby aggravate the eczematous reaction in AD.

  19. Epidermal barrier abnormalities in exfoliative ichthyosis with a novel homozygous loss-of-function mutation in CSTA.

    PubMed

    Moosbrugger-Martinz, V; Jalili, A; Schossig, A S; Jahn-Bassler, K; Zschocke, J; Schmuth, M; Stingl, G; Eckl, K M; Hennies, H C; Gruber, R

    2015-06-01

    Autosomal recessive exfoliative ichthyosis (AREI) results from mutations in CSTA, encoding cysteine protease inhibitor A (cystatin A). We present a 25-year-old man from Iran with consanguineous parents, who presented with congenital erythroderma, hyperhidrosis and diffuse hyperkeratosis with coarse palmoplantar peeling of the skin, aggravated by exposure to water and by occlusion. Candidate gene analysis revealed a previously unknown homozygous loss-of-function mutation c.172C>T (p.Arg58Ter) in CSTA, and immunostaining showed absence of epidermal cystatin A, confirming the diagnosis of AREI. Ultrastructural analysis by transmission electron microscopy showed normal degradation of corneodesmosomes, mild intercellular oedema in the spinous layer but not in the basal layer, normal-appearing desmosomes, and prominent keratin filaments within basal keratinocytes. Thickness of cornified envelopes was reduced, lamellar lipid bilayers were disturbed, lamellar body secretion occurred prematurely and processing of secreted lamellar body contents was delayed. These barrier abnormalities were reminiscent of (albeit less severe than in) Netherton syndrome, which results from a deficiency of the serine protease inhibitor LEKTI. This work describes ultrastructural findings with evidence of epidermal barrier abnormalities in AREI.

  20. Structural and biophysical characteristics of human skin in maintaining proper epidermal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Boer, Magdalena; Duchnik, Ewa; Maleszka, Romuald; Marchlewicz, Mariola

    2016-02-01

    The complex structure of human skin and its physicochemical properties turn it into an efficient outermost defence line against exogenous factors, and help maintain homeostasis of the human body. This role is played by the epidermal barrier with its major part - stratum corneum. The condition of the epidermal barrier depends on individual and environmental factors. The most important biophysical parameters characterizing the status of this barrier are the skin pH, epidermal hydration, transepidermal water loss and sebum excretion. The knowledge of biophysical skin processes may be useful for the implementation of prophylactic actions whose aim is to restore the barrier function.

  1. Structural and biophysical characteristics of human skin in maintaining proper epidermal barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Duchnik, Ewa; Maleszka, Romuald; Marchlewicz, Mariola

    2016-01-01

    The complex structure of human skin and its physicochemical properties turn it into an efficient outermost defence line against exogenous factors, and help maintain homeostasis of the human body. This role is played by the epidermal barrier with its major part – stratum corneum. The condition of the epidermal barrier depends on individual and environmental factors. The most important biophysical parameters characterizing the status of this barrier are the skin pH, epidermal hydration, transepidermal water loss and sebum excretion. The knowledge of biophysical skin processes may be useful for the implementation of prophylactic actions whose aim is to restore the barrier function. PMID:26985171

  2. The coordinated Response of the Physical and Antimicrobial Peptide Barriers of the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Andrew W.; Gallo, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an essential and multifunctional element for immune defense of the skin during infection and injury. In this issue, Ahrens et al. characterize the response of β-defensins, a class of AMPs, following acute and chronic challenges to the permeability barrier of the skin. Their findings suggest that the antimicrobial and permeability barriers of the skin are closely linked. PMID:21228809

  3. Corneodesmosin gene ablation induces lethal skin-barrier disruption and hair-follicle degeneration related to desmosome dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Emilie A; Huchenq, Anne; Mattiuzzo, Nicolas R; Metzger, Daniel; Chambon, Pierre; Ghyselinck, Norbert B; Serre, Guy; Jonca, Nathalie; Guerrin, Marina

    2009-08-01

    Corneodesmosin (CDSN) is specific to desmosomes of epithelia undergoing cornification, mainly the epidermis and the inner root sheath of the hair follicles. CDSN nonsense mutations are associated with hypotrichosis simplex of the scalp, a rare disease that leads to complete baldness in young adults. CDSN displays adhesive properties, mostly attributable to its N-terminal glycine-rich domain, and is sequentially proteolyzed as corneocytes migrate towards the skin surface. K14-promoter driven Cre-mediated deletion of Cdsn in mice resulted in neonatal death as a result of epidermal tearing upon minor mechanical stress. Ultrastructural analyses revealed a desmosomal break at the interface between the living and cornified layers. After grafting onto nude mice, knockout skin showed a chronic defect in the epidermal permeability barrier. The epidermis was first hyperproliferative with a thick cornified layer, then, both the epidermis and the hair follicles degenerated. In adults, Cdsn deletion resulted in similar histological abnormalities and in a lethal barrier defect. We demonstrate that Cdsn is not essential for skin-barrier formation in utero, but is vital throughout life to preserve this barrier by maintaining desmosome integrity. The strong adhesive function that the protein confers on corneodesmosomes also seems necessary for maintaining the architecture of the hair follicle.

  4. Gauze versus solid skin barrier for tracheostomy care: a crossover randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wen-Ling; Huang, Wen-Pei; Chen, Mei-Hsing; Liu, I-Ping; Yu, Wen-Liang; Chin, Chi-Chun

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare gauze and a solid pectin-based skin barrier to evaluate clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of care for tracheostomy wounds. A randomized clinical trial with crossover design was conducted to compare gauze to a solid skin barrier for management of patients with tracheostomies. The main study outcomes were skin integrity, dressing change frequency, time required for dressing changes, product costs, and nurses' satisfaction. A convenience sample was recruited from 2 medical centers in Taiwan. Using permuted block randomization, patients undergoing tracheostomy were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 groups. One group received tracheostomy care with gauze for the first 6 days and a solid pectin-based skin barrier for the following 6 days. This regimen was reversed in the second group. Skin integrity was significantly better among patients managed with a solid skin barrier as compared to management with gauze (Z=-2.75, P= .006). No significant differences in dressing change frequency, time required for dressing changes, or product costs between the 2 groups were found. Nurses' satisfaction was significantly higher for the solid skin barrier as compared to gauze (Z=-2.31, P= .021, for group 1, and T=-1.97, P= .048, for group 2). The use of a solid skin barrier for tracheostomy care was associated with lower occurrences of impaired skin integrity and higher satisfaction among nurses when compared to gauze.

  5. Multifactorial skin barrier deficiency and atopic dermatitis: Essential topics to prevent the atopic march.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Gyohei; Kabashima, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common inflammatory skin disease in the industrialized world and has multiple causes. Over the past decade, data from both experimental models and patients have highlighted the primary pathogenic role of skin barrier deficiency in patients with AD. Increased access of environmental agents into the skin results in chronic inflammation and contributes to the systemic "atopic (allergic) march." In addition, persistent skin inflammation further attenuates skin barrier function, resulting in a positive feedback loop between the skin epithelium and the immune system that drives pathology. Understanding the mechanisms of skin barrier maintenance is essential for improving management of AD and limiting downstream atopic manifestations. In this article we review the latest developments in our understanding of the pathomechanisms of skin barrier deficiency, with a particular focus on the formation of the stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin, which contributes significantly to skin barrier function. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reducing Friction on Skin at Risk: The Use of 3M™ Cavilon™ No Sting Barrier Film

    PubMed Central

    Bernatchez, Stéphanie F.; Mengistu, Golie E.; Ekholm, Bruce P.; Sanghi, Shilpi; Theiss, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the coefficient of friction (CoF) of skin against fabric when the skin is covered with a liquid barrier film versus a silicone dressing, relative to a bare skin baseline. Approach: A laboratory instrument allowing the measurement of friction between two surfaces was used to compare the CoF between a fabric representing bed linen (100% cotton) and the skin of two laboratory operators, either bare (dry or hydrated) or covered with a liquid barrier film or a silicone dressing. Results: The CoF of hydrated skin was over twice the value found for dry skin. The liquid barrier film product reduced the CoF of hydrated skin to a greater extent than the silicone dressing. Innovation and Conclusion: Silicone dressings have recently been promoted to help prevent pressure ulcers. Published data have shown that their CoF is lower than other dressings, but the data were not compared to bare skin. We found that a liquid barrier film provided a greater reduction in the CoF of skin against linen than a silicone dressing. In the context of preventative use (e.g., application on intact skin) to reduce the risk of pressure ulcers, applying a liquid barrier film may reduce friction better than a silicone dressing. PMID:26634182

  7. Abnormal skin in toe webs is a marker for abnormal glucose metabolism. A cross-sectional survey among 1,849 adults in Finland.

    PubMed

    Sinikumpu, Suvi-Päivikki; Auvinen, Juha; Jokelainen, Jari; Huilaja, Laura; Puukka, Katri; Ruokonen, Aimo; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Tasanen, Kaisa; Timonen, Markku

    2017-08-22

    Diabetes is undiagnosed disease and easy screening tools for it are warranted. Because foot complications are usual in diabetes, we aimed to test hypothesis that skin abnormalities are found already from patients who are not aware of having diabetes, by studying the possible association between unhealthy toe web skin and abnormal glucose metabolism. 1,849 cases without previously diagnosed diabetes participated to the 46-year follow-up study of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort. A skin investigation was performed for all, and abnormal skin findings in toe web spaces were taken as explanatory variables. Abnormal glucose tolerance was the main outcome and it was tested with an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), glycosylated haemoglobin fraction (HbA1c) Values are numbers (percentages) of sub and fasting blood glucose. The participants who had any abnormal skin findings in toe webs were associated with 2.5-fold (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3-4.9) and 6-fold (OR 6.2, 1.4-27.6) increased risk of having previously undiagnosed diabetes detected by a 2-hour OGTT and HbA1c, respectively. The predictive power of toe web findings was comparable with FINDRISC score. Abnormal skin findings in the toe webs show increased risk of occult diabetes, and may, thus serve as an additional sign of undiagnosed diabetes.

  8. Novel Functions of the Anticoagulant Activated Protein C in Maintaining Skin Barrier Integrity to Impact on Skin Disease.

    PubMed

    Xue, Meilang; Jackson, Christopher John

    2015-01-01

    The epidermis is the outermost skin layer and provides the first line of defence against the external environment. Keratinocytes are the most predominant cells in the epidermis and play a critical role in maintaining epidermal barrier function. When the barrier is disrupted any of a number of diseases, such as chronic wounds, psoriasis, pemphigus, atopic dermatitis or toxic epidermal necrolysis, can take hold. Activated protein C (APC) or its precursor, protein C, is abundantly expressed by skin epidermal keratinocytes and stimulates their proliferation and migration, and inhibits apoptosis and inflammation, leading to a healing phenotype. Importantly, APC also increases the barrier function of keratinocytes by promoting expression and cell-cell contact redistribution of tight junction proteins. These cytoprotective properties of APC on epidermal keratinocytes place it as an exciting new therapy for skin disorders associated with the disruption of barrier function and inflammation.

  9. Loss of corneodesmosin leads to severe skin barrier defect, pruritus, and atopy: unraveling the peeling skin disease.

    PubMed

    Oji, Vinzenz; Eckl, Katja-Martina; Aufenvenne, Karin; Nätebus, Marc; Tarinski, Tatjana; Ackermann, Katharina; Seller, Natalia; Metze, Dieter; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Hausser, Ingrid; Traupe, Heiko; Hennies, Hans Christian

    2010-08-13

    Generalized peeling skin disease is an autosomal-recessive ichthyosiform erythroderma characterized by lifelong patchy peeling of the skin. After genome-wide linkage analysis, we have identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in CDSN in a large consanguineous family with generalized peeling skin, pruritus, and food allergies, which leads to a complete loss of corneodesmosin. In contrast to hypotrichosis simplex, which can be associated with specific dominant CDSN mutations, peeling skin disease is characterized by a complete loss of CDSN expression. The skin phenotype is consistent with a recent murine Cdsn knockout model. Using three-dimensional human skin models, we demonstrate that lack of corneodesmosin causes an epidermal barrier defect supposed to account for the predisposition to atopic diseases, and we confirm the role of corneodesmosin as a decisive epidermal adhesion molecule. Therefore, peeling skin disease will represent a new model disorder for atopic diseases, similarly to Netherton syndrome and ichthyosis vulgaris in the recent past.

  10. Impaired skin barrier function in mice with colon carcinoma induced by azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Satoshi; Hiramoto, Keiichi; Koyama, Mayu; Ooi, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that impaired skin barrier function was induced by small intestinal injury in mice. Therefore, we postulated that other intestinal diseases might also influence skin barrier function. In this study, we evaluated the skin barrier function of hairless mice with colon carcinoma that was induced by azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). In mice treated with these drugs, we observed elevated transepidermal water loss and reduced skin hydration levels, compared to those in the control mice. In addition, plasma nitrogen di/trioxide (NO2(-)/NO3(-)) levels were significantly elevated, and expression of type I collagen was significantly reduced in the treated mice, compared to those in control. These results suggest that impaired skin barrier function occurs in mice when colon carcinoma is present.

  11. Trait positive affect buffers the effects of acute stress on skin barrier recovery.

    PubMed

    Robles, Theodore F; Brooks, Kathryn P; Pressman, Sarah D

    2009-05-01

    This study examines the role of self-reported trait positive affect (PA) on skin barrier recovery after skin disruption, and whether the role of trait PA in wound healing is consistent with the direct effects model or the stress-buffering model of PA and health. Sixty healthy participants (mean age 22.7 +/- 3.9 years) completed a self-report measure of trait positive and negative affect, underwent a "tape-stripping" procedure that disrupts normal skin barrier function, and were randomly assigned to a Stress (Trier Social Stress Test) or No Stress (reading task) condition. Skin barrier recovery was assessed by measuring transepidermal water loss up to 2 hr after skin disruption. Multilevel modeling indicated that greater trait PA was related to faster skin barrier recovery (p < .05). The effects of PA on skin barrier recovery were independent of levels of trait NA. These findings suggest that trait PA may influence skin barrier recovery following a brief stressor. In addition, these results provide additional evidence that trait PA can positively impact objective health outcomes.

  12. Trait Positive Affect Buffers the Effects of Acute Stress on Skin Barrier Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Theodore F.; Brooks, Kathryn P.; Pressman, Sarah D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study examines the role of self-reported trait positive affect (PA) on skin barrier recovery after skin disruption, and whether the role of trait PA in wound healing is consistent with the direct effects model or the stress-buffering model of PA and health. Design Sixty healthy participants (mean age 22.7 ± 3.9 years) completed a self-report measure of trait positive and negative affect, underwent a “tape-stripping” procedure that disrupts normal skin barrier function, and were randomly assigned to a Stress (Trier Social Stress Test) or No Stress (reading task) condition. Main Outcome Measures Skin barrier recovery was assessed by measuring transepidermal water loss up to 2 hr after skin disruption. Results Multilevel modeling indicated that greater trait PA was related to faster skin barrier recovery (p < .05). The effects of PA on skin barrier recovery were independent of levels of trait NA. Conclusion These findings suggest that trait PA may influence skin barrier recovery following a brief stressor. In addition, these results provide additional evidence that trait PA can positively impact objective health outcomes. PMID:19450044

  13. Hydrogel-forming microneedles increase in volume during swelling in skin, but skin barrier function recovery is unaffected.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Ryan F; Mooney, Karen; McCrudden, Maelíosa T C; Vicente-Pérez, Eva M; Belaid, Luc; González-Vázquez, Patricia; McElnay, James C; Woolfson, A David

    2014-05-01

    We describe, for the first time, quantification of in-skin swelling and fluid uptake by hydrogel-forming microneedle (MN) arrays and skin barrier recovery in human volunteers. Such MN arrays, prepared from aqueous blends of hydrolyzed poly(methylvinylether/maleic anhydride) (15%, w/w) and the cross-linker poly(ethyleneglycol) 10,000 Da (7.5%, w/w), were inserted into the skin of human volunteers (n = 15) to depths of approximately 300 μm by gentle hand pressure. The MN arrays swelled in skin, taking up skin interstitial fluid, such that their mass had increased by approximately 30% after 6 h in skin. Importantly, however, skin barrier function recovered within 24 h after MN removal, regardless of how long the MN had been in skin or how much their volume had increased with swelling. Further research on closure of MN-induced micropores is required because transepidermal water loss measurements suggested micropore closure, whereas optical coherence tomography indicated that MN-induced micropores had not closed over, even 24 h after MN had been removed. There were no complaints of skin reactions, adverse events, or strong views against MN use by any of the volunteers. Only some minor erythema was noted after patch removal, although this always resolved within 48 h, and no adverse events were present on follow-up. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  14. Hydrogel-forming microneedles increase in volume during swelling in skin, but skin barrier function recovery is unaffected

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Ryan F.; Mooney, Karen; McCrudden, Maelíosa T.C.; Vicente-Pérez, Eva M.; Belaid, Luc; González-Vázquez, Patricia; McElnay, James C.; Woolfson, A. David

    2014-01-01

    We describe, for the first time, quantification of in-skin swelling and fluid uptake by hydrogel-forming microneedle arrays (MN) and skin barrier recovery in human volunteers. Such MN, prepared from aqueous blends of hydrolysed poly(methylvinylether/maleicanhydride) (15% w/w) and the crosslinker poly(ethyleneglycol) 10,000 daltons (7.5% w/w), were inserted into the skin of human volunteers (n = 15) to depths of approximately 300 μm by gentle hand pressure. The MN swelled in skin, taking up skin interstitial fluid, such that their mass had increased by approximately 30% after 6 hours in skin. Importantly, however, skin barrier function recovered within 24 hours post microneedle removal, regardless of how long the MN had been in skin or how much their volume had increased with swelling. Further research on closure of MN-induced micropores is required, since transepidermal water loss measurements suggested micropore closure, while optical coherence tomography indicated that MN-induced micropores had not closed over, even 24 hours after MN had been removed. There were no complaints of skin reactions, adverse events or strong views against MN use by any of the volunteers. Only some minor erythema was noted after patch removal, although this always resolved within 48 hours and no adverse events were present on follow-up. PMID:24633895

  15. Skin Barrier Function and Its Importance at the Start of the Atopic March

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Mary Beth; Peele, Kathy; Wilson, Nevin W.

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis can be due to a variety of causes from nonatopic triggers to food allergy. Control of egress of water and protection from ingress of irritants and allergens are key components of cutaneous barrier function. Current research suggests that a degraded barrier function of the skin allows the immune system inappropriate access to environmental allergens. Epidermal aeroallergen exposure may allow sensitization to allergen possibly initiating the atopic march. Further research into connections between epidermal barrier function and possible allergen sensitization will be important to undertake. Future clinical trials focused on skin barrier protection may be of value as a possible intervention in prevention of the initiation of the atopic march. PMID:22619686

  16. Toll-like receptor 3 activation is required for normal skin barrier repair following UV damage

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Andrew W.; Kuo, I-Hsin; Bernard, Jamie J.; Yoshida, Takeshi; Williams, Michael R.; Hung, Nai-Jung; Yu, Benjamin D.; Beck, Lisa A.; Gallo, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) damage to the skin leads to the release of noncoding RNA (ncRNA) from necrotic keratinocytes that activates toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). This release of ncRNA triggers inflammation in the skin following UV damage. Recently, TLR3 activation was also shown to aid wound repair and increase expression of genes associated with permeability barrier repair. Here, we sought to test if skin barrier repair after UVB damage is dependent on the activation of TLR3. We observed that multiple ncRNAs induced expression of skin barrier repair genes, that the TLR3 ligand Poly (I:C) also induced expression and function of tight junctions, and that the ncRNA U1 acts in a TLR3-dependent manner to induce expression of skin barrier repair genes. These observations were shown to have functional relevance as Tlr3−/− mice displayed a delay in skin barrier repair following UVB damage. Combined, these data further validate the conclusion that recognition of endogenous RNA by TLR3 is an important step in the program of skin barrier repair. PMID:25118157

  17. Toll-like receptor 3 activation is required for normal skin barrier repair following UV damage.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Andrew W; Kuo, I-Hsin; Bernard, Jamie J; Yoshida, Takeshi; Williams, Michael R; Hung, Nai-Jung; Yu, Benjamin D; Beck, Lisa A; Gallo, Richard L

    2015-02-01

    UV damage to the skin leads to the release of noncoding RNA (ncRNA) from necrotic keratinocytes that activates Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). This release of ncRNA triggers inflammation in the skin following UV damage. Recently, TLR3 activation was also shown to aid wound repair and increase the expression of genes associated with permeability barrier repair. Here, we sought to test whether skin barrier repair after UVB damage is dependent on the activation of TLR3. We observed that multiple ncRNAs induced expression of skin barrier repair genes, that the TLR3 ligand Poly (I:C) also induced expression and function of tight junctions, and that the ncRNA U1 acts in a TLR3-dependent manner to induce expression of skin barrier repair genes. These observations were shown to have functional relevance as Tlr3-/- mice displayed a delay in skin barrier repair following UVB damage. Combined, these data further validate the conclusion that recognition of endogenous RNA by TLR3 is an important step in the program of skin barrier repair.

  18. Kinetin Improves Barrier Function of the Skin by Modulating Keratinocyte Differentiation Markers

    PubMed Central

    An, Sungkwan; Cha, Hwa Jun; Ko, Jung-Min; Han, Hyunjoo; Kim, Su Young; Kim, Kyung-Suk; Lee, Song Jeong; An, In-Sook; Kim, Sangwon; Youn, Hae Jeong

    2017-01-01

    Background Kinetin is a plant hormone that regulates growth and differentiation. Keratinocytes, the basic building blocks of the epidermis, function in maintaining the skin barrier. Objective We examined whether kinetin induces skin barrier functions in vitro and in vivo. Methods To evaluate the efficacy of kinetin at the cellular level, expression of keratinocyte differentiation markers was assessed. Moreover, we examined the clinical efficacy of kinetin by evaluating skin moisture, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and skin surface roughness in patients who used kinetin-containing cream. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to measure the expression of keratinocyte differentiation markers in HaCaT cells following treatment. A clinical trial was performed to assess skin moisture, TEWL, and evenness of skin texture in subjects who used kinetin-containing cream for 4 weeks. Results Kinetin increased involucrin, and keratin 1 mRNA in HaCaT cells. Moreover, use of a kinetin-containing cream improved skin moisture and TEWL while decreasing roughness of skin texture. Conclusion Kinetin induced the expression of keratinocyte differentiation markers, suggesting that it may affect differentiation to improve skin moisture content, TEWL, and other signs of skin aging. Therefore, kinetin is a potential new component for use in cosmetics as an anti-aging agent that improves the barrier function of skin. PMID:28223740

  19. TRPV1 antagonist can suppress the atopic dermatitis-like symptoms by accelerating skin barrier recovery.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jun-Won; Seo, Jung A; Jeong, Yeon Su; Bae, Il-Hong; Jang, Won-Hee; Lee, Jihae; Kim, Sun-Young; Shin, Song-Seok; Woo, Byoung-Young; Lee, Ki-Wha; Lim, Kyung-Min; Park, Young-Ho

    2011-04-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a cation channel activated by diverse obnoxious stimuli like capsaicin, low pH or heat. Recently, it was revealed that TRPV1 might be deeply associated with skin permeability barrier function, suggesting that modulation of TRPV1 might be beneficial for the skin disorders with barrier damages. We aimed to investigate whether the blockade of TRPV1 activation might accelerate skin barrier recovery and alleviate atopic dermatitis (AD)-like symptoms, employing a novel TRPV1 antagonist, PAC-14028. TRPV1 antagonistic effects of PAC-14028 in human keratinocytes and skin were confirmed through capsaicin-evoked calcium influx assay and capsaicin-induced blood perfusion increase. Effects of PAC-14028 on skin barrier recovery were examined in vivo tape-stripping-induced barrier disruption in hairless mice. To determine the effects of PAC-14028 on AD, Dermatophagoides farina (Df)- and oxazolone (OXZ)-induced AD models were employed. PAC-14028 could inhibit capsaicin-evoked calcium influx in keratinocytes at sub-micromolar concentrations. This potent TRPV1 antagonistic activity in keratinocytes was manifested in vivo as the blockade of capsaicin-induced blood perfusion increase, and the accelerated barrier recovery from tape-stripping-induced barrier damages in hairless mice. PAC-14028 could also attenuate dermatitis-associated barrier damages in Df and OXZ models as determined by lower TEWL (trans-epidermal water loss), reformation of neutral lipid layer and reversion of changes in loricrin and filaggrin expression. Importantly, along with accelerated recovery of skin barrier function, PAC-14028 alleviated the general AD-like symptoms, including serum IgE increase, mast cell degranulation, scratching behavior and clinical severity of dermatitis. These results reflect that the blockade of TRPV1 activation can suppress the atopic dermatitis-like symptoms by accelerating skin barrier recovery. Copyright © 2010 Japanese

  20. Oral intake of beet extract provides protection against skin barrier impairment in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Ken-Ichi; Umemura, Kazuo

    2013-05-01

    The epidermis acts as a functional barrier against the external environment. Disturbances in the function of this barrier cause water loss and increase the chances of penetration by various irritable stimuli, leading to skin diseases such as dry skin, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis. Ceramides are a critical natural element of the protective epidermal barrier. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the oral intake of beet (Beta vulgaris) extract, a natural product rich in glucosylceramide (GlcCer), may prevent disturbance in skin barrier function. When HR-1 hairless mice were fed a special diet (HR-AD), transepidermal water loss (TEWL) from the dorsal skin increased, with a compensatory increase in water intake after 5 weeks. Mice fed with HR-AD had dry skin with erythema and showed increased scratching behaviour. Histological examinations revealed a remarkable increase in the thickness of the skin at 8 weeks. Supplemental addition of beet extract, which contained GlcCer at a final concentration of 0.1%, significantly prevented an increase TEWL, water intake, cumulative scratching time, and epidermal thickness at 8 weeks. These results indicate that oral intake of beet extract shows potential for preventing skin diseases associated with impaired skin barrier function.

  1. Changes in skin barrier function following long-term treatment with moisturizers, a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Buraczewska, I; Berne, B; Lindberg, M; Törmä, H; Lodén, M

    2007-03-01

    Moisturizers are commonly used by patients with dry skin conditions as well as people with healthy skin. Previous studies on short-term treatment have shown that moisturizers can weaken or strengthen skin barrier function and also influence skin barrier recovery. However, knowledge of the effects on skin barrier function of long-term treatment with moisturizers is still scarce. To investigate the impact of long-term treatment with moisturizers on the barrier function of normal skin, as measured by transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and susceptibility to an irritant, and to relate those effects to the composition of the designed experimental moisturizers. Volunteers (n = 78) were randomized into five groups. Each group treated one volar forearm for 7 weeks with one of the following preparations: (i) one of three simplified creams, containing only a few ingredients in order to minimize the complexity of the system; (ii) a lipid-free gel; (iii) one ordinary cream, containing 5% urea, which has previously been shown to decrease TEWL. The lipids in the simplified creams were either hydrocarbons or vegetable triglyceride oil, and one of them also contained 5% urea. After 7 weeks, treated and control forearms were exposed for 24 h to sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) using a patch test. TEWL, blood flow and skin capacitance of both SLS-exposed and undamaged skin were evaluated 24 h after removal of patches. Additionally, a 24-h irritancy patch test of all test preparations was performed on 11 volunteers in order to check their possible acute irritancy potential. Changes were found in the barrier function of normal skin after 7 weeks of treatment with the test preparations. The simplified creams and the lipid-free gel increased TEWL and skin response to SLS, while the ordinary cream had the opposite effect. One of the simplified creams also decreased skin capacitance. All test preparations were shown to be nonirritant, both by short-term irritancy patch test and by measurement of

  2. Targeted Disruption of Decorin Leads to Abnormal Collagen Fibril Morphology and Skin Fragility

    PubMed Central

    Danielson, Keith G.; Baribault, Helene; Holmes, David F.; Graham, Helen; Kadler, Karl E.; Iozzo, Renato V.

    1997-01-01

    Decorin is a member of the expanding group of widely distributed small leucine-rich proteoglycans that are expected to play important functions in tissue assembly. We report that mice harboring a targeted disruption of the decorin gene are viable but have fragile skin with markedly reduced tensile strength. Ultrastructural analysis revealed abnormal collagen morphology in skin and tendon, with coarser and irregular fiber outlines. Quantitative scanning transmission EM of individual collagen fibrils showed abrupt increases and decreases in mass along their axes, thereby accounting for the irregular outlines and size variability observed in cross-sections. The data indicate uncontrolled lateral fusion of collagen fibrils in the decorindeficient mice and provide an explanation for the reduced tensile strength of the skin. These findings demonstrate a fundamental role for decorin in regulating collagen fiber formation in vivo. PMID:9024701

  3. Impairment of skin barrier function via cholinergic signal transduction in a dextran sulphate sodium-induced colitis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Satoshi; Hiramoto, Keiichi; Koyama, Mayu; Ooi, Kazuya

    2015-10-01

    Dry skin has been clinically associated with visceral diseases, including liver disease, as well as for our previously reported small intestinal injury mouse model, which have abnormalities in skin barrier function. To clarify this disease-induced skin disruption, we used a dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mouse model. Following treatment with DSS, damage to the colon and skin was monitored using histological and protein analysis methods as well as the detection of inflammatory mediators in the plasma. Notably, transepidermal water loss was higher, and skin hydration was lower in DSS-treated mice compared to controls. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 and NO2-/NO3- levels were also upregulated in the plasma, and a decrease in body weight and colon length was observed in DSS-treated mice. However, when administered TNF-α antibody or an iNOS inhibitor, no change in skin condition was observed, indicating that another signalling mechanism is utilized. Interestingly, the number of tryptase-expressing mast cells, known for their role in immune function via cholinergic signal transduction, was elevated. To evaluate the function of cholinergic signalling in this context, atropine (a muscarinic cholinoceptor antagonist) or hexamethonium (a nicotinic cholinergic ganglion-blocking agent) was administered to DSS-treated mice. Our data indicate that muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are the primary receptors functioning in colon-to-skin signal transduction, as DSS-induced skin disruption was suppressed by atropine. Thus, skin disruption is likely associated with DSS-induced colitis, and the activation of mast cells via mAChRs is critical to this association.

  4. Genetic background of skin barrier dysfunction in the pathogenesis of psoriasis vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Stawczyk-Macieja, Marta; Szczerkowska-Dobosz, Aneta; Rębała, Krzysztof; Purzycka-Bohdan, Dorota

    2015-04-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease. It is known to be a complex condition with multifactorial mode of inheritance, however the associations between particular pathogenic pathways remain unclear. A novel report on the pathogenesis of psoriasis has recently included the genetic determination of the skin barrier dysfunction. In this paper, we focus on specific genetic variants associated with formation of the epidermal barrier and their role in the complex pathogenesis of the disease.

  5. Hypo-osmotic shock-induced subclinical inflammation of skin in a rat model of disrupted skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Chihiro; Minematsu, Takeo; Huang, Lijuan; Mugita, Yuko; Kitamura, Aya; Nakagami, Gojiro; Yamane, Takumi; Yoshida, Mikako; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Funakubo, Megumi; Mori, Taketoshi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-03-01

    Aging disrupts skin barrier function and induces xerosis accompanied by pruritus. In many cases, elderly patients complain of pruritus during skin hygiene care, a condition called aquagenic pruritus of the elderly (APE). To date, the pathophysiology and mechanism of action of APE have not been elucidated. We conducted the present study to test the hypothesis that hypo-osmotic shock of epidermal cells induces skin inflammation and elongation of C-fibers by nerve growth factor β (NGFβ) as a basic mechanism of APE. The dorsal skin of HWY rats, which are a model for disrupted skin barrier function, was treated with distilled water (hypotonic treatment [Hypo] group) or normal saline (isotonic treatment [Iso] group) by applying soaked gauze for 7 days. Untreated rats were used as a control (no-treatment [NT] group). Histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses revealed inflammatory responses in the epidermis and the dermal papillary layer in the Hypo group, while no alterations were observed in the Iso or NT groups. Induction of expression and secretion of NGFβ and elongation of C-fibers into the epidermis were found in the Hypo group. In contrast, secretion of NGFβ was significantly lower and elongation of C-fibers was not observed in the Iso group. These results suggest that hypo-osmotic shock-induced inflammatory reactions promote hypersensitivity to pruritus in skin with disrupted barrier function.

  6. Do repeated skin barrier measurements influence each other's results? An explorative study.

    PubMed

    Kottner, Jan; Ludriksone, Laine; Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Biophysical skin measurement techniques are widely used to quantify the skin barrier function. In clinical research usually several parameters are subsequently measured in the same skin areas. In this study, possible interfering effects of subsequent measurement procedures on transepidermal water loss (TEWL), stratum corneum hydration (SCH) and skin surface pH were investigated. An exploratory study was conducted. Twelve young (mean age 32.9 ± 7.2 years) and 12 elderly (mean age 68.3 ± 2.5 years) subjects without any skin diseases were enrolled. The parameters TEWL, skin surface pH, SCH, sebum content, and surface evaluation of living skin were obtained successively in pairs from 4 contralateral volar forearm skin areas. SCH and skin surface pH seemed to be unaffected by previous measurement procedures. TEWL was systematically increased after pH and systematically decreased after stratum corneum measurements. Measurements per se might interact with the skin, thus changing its characteristics. If several skin barrier function parameters need to be assessed subsequently in the same skin areas, we recommend that TEWL should be measured first followed by all others.

  7. Could tight junctions regulate the barrier function of the aged skin?

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Marek; Bílková, Zuzana; Muthný, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    The skin is known to be the largest organ in human organism creating interface with outer environment. The skin provides protective barrier against pathogens, physical and chemical insults, and against uncontrolled loss of water. The barrier function was primarily attributed to the stratum corneum (SC) but recent studies confirmed that epidermal tight junctions (TJs) also play important role in maintaining barrier properties of the skin. Independent observations indicate that barrier function and its recovery is impaired in aged skin. However, trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) values remains rather unchanged in elderly population. UV radiation as major factor of photoageing impairs TJ proteins, but TJs have great self-regenerative potential. Since it may be possible that TJs can compensate TEWL in elderly due to its regenerative and compensatory capabilities, important question remains to be answered: how are TJs regulated during skin ageing? This review provides an insight into TJs functioning as epidermal barrier and summarizes current knowledge about the impact of ageing on the barrier function of the skin and epidermal TJs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Review: Pathogenesis of canine atopic dermatitis: skin barrier and host-micro-organism interaction.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Domenico; Marsella, Rosanna; Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M; Eisenschenk, Melissa N C; Nuttall, Tim; Bizikova, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, genetically predisposed, inflammatory and pruritic skin disease. The pathogenesis of canine AD is incompletely understood. The aim of this review is to provide an in-depth update on the involvement of skin barrier and host-microbiome interaction in the pathogenesis of canine AD. Online citation databases and abstracts from international meetings were searched for publications related to skin barrier and host-microbiome interaction (e.g. bacteria, yeast, antimicrobial peptides). A total of 126 publications were identified. This review article focuses on epidermal barrier dysfunction and the interaction between cutaneous microbes (bacteria and yeasts) and the host (antimicrobial peptides). Epidemiological updates on the presence of pathogenic organisms and canine AD are also provided. Major advances have been made in the investigation of skin barrier dysfunction in canine AD, although many questions still remain. Skin barrier dysfunction and host-microbiome interactions are emerging as primary alterations in canine AD. Based on this review, it is clear that future studies focused on the development of drugs able to restore the skin barrier and increase the natural defences against pathogenic organisms are needed. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  9. Evaluation of moisture penetration through skin protectant barriers by paper chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shah, S; Cornell, M; Ward, A J

    1995-01-01

    Currently, there is no convenient and safe experimental method in the literature to evaluate skin protectant formulations for barrier properties. A novel and simple experimental method, based on paper chromatography, was developed to screen a broad spectrum of skin protectants available for moisture penetration. The method involves the use of paper chromatography for determining the Moisture Penetration Rate through a thin barrier film of a given skin protectant product. It is simple, inexpensive, convenient, and safe and was used to evaluate 12 products currently used as skin protectants. This method can be used by formulators in their development efforts and by caregivers to determine the barrier properties of various products in a short period of time without expensive instrumentation or extensive time commitments. Skin irritation resulting from fecal and urinary incontinence is a common problem for geriatric patients (Fiers & Siebert, 1993, Talbot, 1994). Various products on the market today are used as protective barriers to prevent skin irritation from moisture penetration. However, from the caregiver's perspective, there is a need for identifying the best product or the relative ranking of products based on suitable test methods. There is a lack of suitable in vitro test methods to screen skin protectant barriers (Guillemin, Murset, Lob, & Riquez, 1974; Pigatto, Bigardi, Legori, Altomare, & Finzi, 1993) on the market. For any method to be acceptable it must be convenient, simple, reproducible, and safe for use on human volunteers. More importantly, it must have clinical relevance.

  10. Determination of the thickness and structure of the skin barrier by in vivo laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Astner, S.; Patzelt, A.; Knorr, F.; Sterry, W.; Antoniou, Ch

    2008-04-01

    Normal skin barrier function is an essential aspect of skin homeostasis and regeneration. Dynamic inflammatory, proliferative and neoplastic skin processes such as wound healing, psoriasis and contact dermatitis are associated with a significant disruption of the skin barrier. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in evaluating cosmetic and pharmacologic products for their ability to restore these protective properties. The gold standard for characterization of barrier function has been the measurement of the transepidermal water loss, however the disadvantage of this method is its interference with several endogenous and exogenous factors such as hydration, perspiration and topically applied substances. This study was aimed to test the clinical applicability of a fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM) for a systematic morphologic analysis of the structure, integrity and thickness of the stratum corneum in 10 otherwise healthy volunteers. The influence of skin treatment with commercial moisturizing cream on skin barrier function was evaluated in serial non-invasive examinations. Our findings showed that in vivo LSM may represent a simple and efficient method for the characterization of skin barrier properties, such as the thickness and hydration of the stratum corneum.

  11. Comparing the effectiveness and wash-off resistance of skin barrier creams: a healthy volunteer study.

    PubMed

    Dykes, P; Bradbury, S

    2017-09-02

    Preventing moisture damage and breakdown of the skin can be a particular challenge for patients with incontinence. The level of protection offered by various skin protectant products can vary according to the chemical nature of the formulation and can decrease following wash procedures. The aim of this study was to compare five silicone-containing skin barrier creams indicated for use on incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) in terms of their resistance to a standardised wash cycle in healthy volunteer subjects. A skin surface hygrometer (Skicon 200EX) evaluated skin surface conduction non-invasively on 36 non-patient subjects using a high-frequency (3.5MHz) electric current. This provided an index of the degree of protection given by barrier products after a single application and also any reduction in barrier properties after a repeated wash procedure. Medi Derma-S barrier cream (MDS), Cavilon barrier cream (CBC) and LBF barrier cream (LBF) all demonstrated statistically significant differences (p<0.001) in the Skicon values following the first moisture challenge compared with Medihoney (MH), Remedy barrier cream (RBC) and the untreated control. All other comparisons were not significant (p>0.05). Statistical analysis following four moisture challenges reflected the results following the first, whereby Skicon values following treatment with MDS, CBC and LBF was significantly different compared with MH, RBC and the untreated control. Again, all other comparisons were not significant (p>0.05). When expressed as percentage barrier effectiveness, the results show a similar pattern to the absolute Skicon values. The results of this study show that there were differences between the barrier creams in terms of the initial moisture challenge and the resistance to wash-off following a repeated standardised wash procedure. It was concluded that MDS, CBC and LBF barrier cream all showed significant and equally effective moisture barrier protection and wash-off resistance.

  12. Cichorium intybus root extract: A "vitamin D-like" active ingredient to improve skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Maia Campos, P M B G; G Mercurio, D; O Melo, M; Closs-Gonthier, B

    2017-02-01

    During the aging process, the human skin suffers many alterations including dryness, skin barrier function damage. The skin barrier function is important to the prevention of skin alterations and maintenance of homeostasis. So, the objective of this study was to assess the clinical efficacy on skin barrier function of Cichorium intybus root extract in cosmetic formulations with or without UV filters. Fifty women, aged between 45 and 60 years, were divided into two groups. One group received vehicle formulations containing UV filters, and the other group received formulations without UV filters. Both groups received a formulation containing the extract and the vehicle. The formulations were applied twice daily to the upper arms after washing with sodium lauryl sulphate. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin microrelief were evaluated before and after a 14- and 28-day period of treatment. The control regions and regions where the vehicles were applied showed an increase in the TEWL. For the formulations containing the extract, decreased TEWL and improved microrelief were observed when compared to the vehicle and control areas after a 28-day period. In conclusion, Cichorium intybus root extract showed protective and restructuring effects on the skin and stands out as an innovative ingredient to improve skin barrier function.

  13. The role of tight junctions in skin barrier function and dermal absorption.

    PubMed

    Bäsler, Katja; Bergmann, Sophia; Heisig, Michael; Naegel, Arne; Zorn-Kruppa, Michaela; Brandner, Johanna M

    2016-11-28

    The skin protects our body from external assaults like pathogens, xenobiotics or UV irradiation. In addition, it prevents the loss of water and solutes. To fulfill these important tasks, a complex barrier system has developed which comprises the stratum corneum, tight junctions, the microbiome, the chemical barrier and the immunological barrier. These barriers do not act separately, but influence each other e.g. after external manipulation or in skin diseases. Especially the two mechanical barriers, i.e. stratum corneum and tight junctions, are of great interest for drug delivery, because they are the first interaction partners of drug delivery systems and play the major role in skin absorption. Tight junctions are of special interest, as they are centrally localized in this complex barrier system in the outermost viable layer - the stratum granulosum of the interfollicular epidermis and the companion cell layer of the hair follicle - and because they can react very quickly to stimuli. We summarize here our current knowledge about tight junction barrier function in mammalian interfollicular epidermis and hair follicles, and the interaction of tight junctions with other skin barrier components in health and disease. Furthermore, we discuss their relevance for drug delivery and provide examples for tight junction modulators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. In vivo Raman Confocal Spectroscopy in the Investigation of the Skin Barrier.

    PubMed

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal barrier, predominantly attributed to the stratum corneum (SC), is the outermost part of our body that comprises multiple defensive functions against exogenous attacks and the loss of body substances, e.g. water. A novel investigative method, in vivo Raman confocal spectroscopy (RCS), is employed to study the composition of the epidermal barrier and compounds penetrating the epidermis both in a space-resolved manner. By using this method, a semiquantitative analysis of skin barrier constituents can be evaluated, namely SC lipids, natural moisturizing factor components and sweat constituents. The technique enables to examine epidermal barrier impairment in experimental settings as well as the penetration of exogenous substances into the epidermis, e.g. retinol. RCS can reveal microcompositional changes in the skin barrier as a function of age. We also review the use of RCS in studying antioxidant defense components. This chapter discusses the application of in vivo RCS in the investigation of the epidermal barrier.

  15. The effect of pimecrolimus on expression of genes associated with skin barrier dysfunction in atopic dermatitis skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Grzanka, Alicja; Zebracka-Gala, Jadwiga; Rachowska, Regina; Bozek, Andrzej; Kowalska, Małgorzata; Jarzab, Jerzy

    2012-03-01

    The mechanism of action of pimecrolimus (PIM) on atopic lesions is still under consideration. Thus far, we have evidence of its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activity, and recent papers focus on its effect on epidermal barrier function. This study analysed changes in the expression of genes associated with skin barrier dysfunction in atopic dermatitis (AD) skin lesions after 2 weeks of exposure to PIM 1% cream. A real-time quantitative PCR analysis of selected epidermal differentiation complex genes and three alternative pathway keratins was performed in skin biopsies from 11 individuals with AD before and after PIM exposure. The real-time quantitative PCR analysis was compared to non-lesional skin in the same patients. Involucrin, a small proline-rich region (SPRR) 2C gene, and alternative pathway keratin 16 showed significant over-expression in lesional skin followed by significant decrease after PIM therapy. The SPRR1A gene, S100A9, and keratin 6A were also increased; however, the decrease after PIM treatment was not significant. The changes in S100 A2, A7 and A8 followed a similar course with borderline significance. SPRR4 had a significant decrease in expression in lesional versus non-lesional skin, which persisted after PIM treatment. No significant changes were detected in mRNA expression levels of filaggrin and loricrin. Our results suggest that PIM can be effective in restoring the epidermal barrier in patients with AD at least in part by its impact on expression of genes, which are important for the normal barrier function of skin.

  16. Galectin-7 in the stratum corneum: a biomarker of the skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Niiyama, S; Yoshino, T; Yasuda, C; Yu, X; Izumi, R; Ishiwatari, S; Matsukuma, S; Mukai, H

    2016-10-01

    Skin barrier disruption often occurs in diseased and damaged skin conditions such as atopic dermatitis (AD). We focused the galectin-7 protein (Gal-7) as a biomarker of skin condition and assessed whether the content of Gal-7 in stratum corneum (scGal-7) could be used as an indicator of skin barrier disruption and as an index of local skin symptoms in AD patients. Alteration of Gal-7 expression levels in keratinocyte and scGal-7 contents after barrier disruption by sodium dodecyl sulphate were evaluated in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Correlation between scGal-7 content and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was examined in 126 healthy subjects. We performed single measurements of scGal-7 contents in 34 AD patients and serial measurements of 15 inpatients among them. SC samples were collected by the tape-stripping method, and scGal-7 content was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Gal-7 expression in keratinocytes increased after barrier disruption. The scGal-7 content reflected the disruption of the skin barrier. The scGal-7 contents and TEWL values correlated in healthy subjects. The scGal-7 level was higher in AD patients than in healthy subjects. The scGal-7 contents in the cheek and neck of AD patients significantly correlated with the total and local skin lesion severity scores. Serial measurements in the inpatients showed that the scGal-7 contents in the cheek and neck decreased in tandem with local severity scores in response to treatment. Measurement of scGal-7 content in tape-stripped samples was useful for the evaluation of the skin barrier function in dry skin conditions such as AD. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  17. Bathing in a magnesium-rich Dead Sea salt solution improves skin barrier function, enhances skin hydration, and reduces inflammation in atopic dry skin.

    PubMed

    Proksch, Ehrhardt; Nissen, Hans-Peter; Bremgartner, Markus; Urquhart, Colin

    2005-02-01

    Magnesium salts, the prevalent minerals in Dead Sea water, are known to exhibit favorable effects in inflammatory diseases. We examined the efficacy of bathing atopic subjects in a salt rich in magnesium chloride from deep layers of the Dead Sea (Mavena(R) Dermaline Mg(46) Dead Sea salt, Mavena AG, Belp, Switzerland). Volunteers with atopic dry skin submerged one forearm for 15 min in a bath solution containing 5% Dead Sea salt. The second arm was submerged in tap water as control. Before the study and at weeks 1-6, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration, skin roughness, and skin redness were determined. We found one subgroup with a normal and one subgroup with an elevated TEWL before the study. Bathing in the Dead Sea salt solution significantly improved skin barrier function compared with the tap water-treated control forearm in the subgroup with elevated basal TEWL. Skin hydration was enhanced on the forearm treated with the Dead Sea salt in each group, which means the treatment moisturized the skin. Skin roughness and redness of the skin as a marker for inflammation were significantly reduced after bathing in the salt solution. This demonstrates that bathing in the salt solution was well tolerated, improved skin barrier function, enhanced stratum corneum hydration, and reduced skin roughness and inflammation. We suggest that the favorable effects of bathing in the Dead Sea salt solution are most likely related to the high magnesium content. Magnesium salts are known to bind water, influence epidermal proliferation and differentiation, and enhance permeability barrier repair.

  18. Drug permeation and barrier damage in Leishmania-infected mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Van Bocxlaer, Katrien; Yardley, Vanessa; Murdan, Sudaxshina; Croft, Simon L

    2016-06-01

    Pathological disorder can disrupt the barrier integrity of the skin, thereby altering the drug delivery from topical formulations to the target site. Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is an infection of the dermal layers of the skin and manifests as a variety of skin lesions from defined nodular forms to plaques and chronic ulcers. The aim of this work was to characterize the physiology and barrier integrity of the Leishmania-infected BALB/c mouse skin and how they impacted delivery of drugs into the skin. A histological evaluation of the structural differences between uninfected and infected skin was performed using haematoxylin/eosin, elastic Van Gieson and Iba-1 stains. As a CL nodule developed and progressed, the skin pH, hydration and trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) were recorded. Finally, Franz diffusion cells were used to evaluate the influence of the infection on drug delivery through the skin. We found: (i) structural changes in both the epidermal and dermal layers due to the ingress of inflammatory cells, as shown by immunohistochemistry; (ii) a significant increase in TEWL; and (iii) significantly higher permeation of the model permeants caffeine and ibuprofen and the antileishmanial drugs buparvaquone and paromomycin, for Leishmania-infected skin compared with uninfected skin. The infection had no measurable influence on skin pH and hydration. We report profound changes in the skin barrier physiology, function and permeability to drugs of Leishmania-infected skin. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Changes in skin barrier during treatment with systemic alitretinoin: focus on skin susceptibility and stratum corneum ceramides.

    PubMed

    Jungersted, Jakob Mutanu; Høgh, Julie K; Hellgren, Lars I; Jemec, Gregor B E; Agner, Tove

    2010-11-01

    Alitretinoin is a new drug for systemic treatment of chronic hand eczema. Previous functional tests of skin topically treated with retinoids have indicated impaired skin barrier function, but no data are available on barrier parameters after systemic alitretinoin treatment. To investigate the effect of systemic alitretinoin on skin barrier function and response to irritants, a secondary objective was to determine if changes occur in the lipid profile of stratum corneum after treatment with systemic alitretinoin. We conducted an open clinical intervention study on eight people ascribed to systemic alitretinoin treatment. The criteria for being ascribed to alitretinoin were chronic hand eczema and insufficient therapeutic response to potent topical corticosteroids. Before initiation and after 2 months of systemic treatment with 30 mg alitretinoin, a challenge with sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) was performed on the volar forearm and evaluated by trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema, and a cyanoacrylate skin sample was obtained for lipid analysis. We found no significant changes in response to SLS irritation as evaluated by TEWL and erythema, after treatment with alitretinoin for 2 months. No significant changes in stratum corneum lipids were found after 2 months of treatment. In conclusion, systemic alitretinoin does not influence skin susceptibility to irritants or the ceramide profile of stratum corneum.

  20. Natural Oils for Skin-Barrier Repair: Ancient Compounds Now Backed by Modern Science.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Alexandra R; Clark, Ashley K; Sivamani, Raja K; Shi, Vivian Y

    2017-07-13

    Natural plant oils are commonly used as topical therapy worldwide. They are usually easily accessible and are relatively inexpensive options for skin care. Many natural oils possess specific compounds with antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-itch properties, making them attractive alternative and complementary treatments for xerotic and inflammatory dermatoses associated with skin-barrier disruption. Unique characteristics of various oils are important when considering their use for topical skin care. Differing ratios of essential fatty acids are major determinants of the barrier repair benefits of natural oils. Oils with a higher linoleic acid to oleic acid ratio have better barrier repair potential, whereas oils with higher amounts of irritating oleic acid may be detrimental to skin-barrier function. Various extraction methods for oils exist, including cold pressing to make unrefined oils, heat and chemical distillation to make essential oils, and the addition of various chemicals to simulate a specific scent to make fragranced oils. The method of oil processing and refinement is an important component of selecting oil for skin care, and cold pressing is the preferred method of oil extraction as the heat- and chemical-free process preserves beneficial lipids and limits irritating byproducts. This review summarizes evidence on utility of natural plant-based oils in dermatology, particularly in repairing the natural skin-barrier function, with the focus on natural oils, including Olea europaea (olive oil), Helianthus annus (sunflower seed oil), Cocos nucifera (coconut oil), Simmondsia chinesis (jojoba oil), Avena sativa (oat oil), and Argania spinosa (argan oil).

  1. Current evidence of skin barrier dysfunction in human and canine atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Marsella, Rosanna; Olivry, Thierry; Carlotti, Didier-Noel

    2011-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifaceted disease resulting from a complex interaction between environmental and genetic factors. Both of these factors can shape skin barrier function and the immunological response of predisposed patients. There is increasing evidence that an impaired skin barrier plays a role in both human and canine AD. Although many primary skin barrier defects had already been documented in the past in humans, the recent identification of the filaggrin mutations and the fact that such mutations are now considered the most important risk factor for development of AD have further emphasized the relevance of epidermal dysfunction in human AD. Much less is known in veterinary medicine, but evidence is rapidly building to support a role for skin barrier dysfunction in canine AD. Canine AD shares many clinical and immunological similarities with its human counterpart. The similar distribution of clinical lesions and the importance of the epicutaneous route of allergen exposure provided the incentive to investigate the role of skin barrier impairments in canine AD. The purpose of this comparative review is to present the current evidence of barrier dysfunction in both human and canine AD.

  2. Unraveling barrier properties of three different in-house human skin equivalents.

    PubMed

    Thakoersing, Varsha S; Gooris, Gerrit S; Mulder, Aat; Rietveld, Marion; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2012-01-01

    Human skin equivalents (HSEs) are three-dimensional culture models that are used as a model for native human skin. In this study the barrier properties of two novel HSEs, the fibroblast-derived matrix model (FDM) and the Leiden epidermal model (LEM), were compared with the full-thickness collagen model (FTM) and human skin. Since the main skin barrier is located in the lipid regions of the upper layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), we investigated the epidermal morphology, expression of differentiation markers, SC permeability, lipid composition, and lipid organization of all HSEs and native human skin. Our results demonstrate that the barrier function of the FDM and LEM improved compared with that of the FTM, but all HSEs are more permeable than human skin. Further, the FDM and LEM have a relatively lower free fatty acid content than the FTM and human skin. Several similarities between the FDM, LEM and FTM were observed: (1) the morphology and the expression of the investigated differentiation markers were similar to those observed in native human skin, except for the observed expression of keratin 16 and premature expression of involucrin that were detected in all HSEs, (2) the lipids in the SC of all HSEs were arranged in lipid lamellae, similar to human skin, but show an increase in the number of lipid lamellae in the intercellular regions and (3) the SC lipids of all HSEs show a less densely packed lateral lipid organization compared with human SC. These findings indicate that the HSEs mimic many aspects of native human skin, but differ in their barrier properties.

  3. Control of the Physical and Antimicrobial Skin Barrier by an IL-31-IL-1 Signaling Network.

    PubMed

    Hänel, Kai H; Pfaff, Carolina M; Cornelissen, Christian; Amann, Philipp M; Marquardt, Yvonne; Czaja, Katharina; Kim, Arianna; Lüscher, Bernhard; Baron, Jens M

    2016-04-15

    Atopic dermatitis, a chronic inflammatory skin disease with increasing prevalence, is closely associated with skin barrier defects. A cytokine related to disease severity and inhibition of keratinocyte differentiation is IL-31. To identify its molecular targets, IL-31-dependent gene expression was determined in three-dimensional organotypic skin models. IL-31-regulated genes are involved in the formation of an intact physical skin barrier. Many of these genes were poorly induced during differentiation as a consequence of IL-31 treatment, resulting in increased penetrability to allergens and irritants. Furthermore, studies employing cell-sorted skin equivalents in SCID/NOD mice demonstrated enhanced transepidermal water loss following s.c. administration of IL-31. We identified the IL-1 cytokine network as a downstream effector of IL-31 signaling. Anakinra, an IL-1R antagonist, blocked the IL-31 effects on skin differentiation. In addition to the effects on the physical barrier, IL-31 stimulated the expression of antimicrobial peptides, thereby inhibiting bacterial growth on the three-dimensional organotypic skin models. This was evident already at low doses of IL-31, insufficient to interfere with the physical barrier. Together, these findings demonstrate that IL-31 affects keratinocyte differentiation in multiple ways and that the IL-1 cytokine network is a major downstream effector of IL-31 signaling in deregulating the physical skin barrier. Moreover, by interfering with IL-31, a currently evaluated drug target, we will have to consider that low doses of IL-31 promote the antimicrobial barrier, and thus a complete inhibition of IL-31 signaling may be undesirable.

  4. Impaired skin barrier function in dermatologic disease and repair with moisturization.

    PubMed

    Lebwohl, Mark; Herrmann, Lisa G

    2005-12-01

    There is a substantial body of data demonstrating that atopic dermatitis and various other skin diseases are associated with disturbances of skin barrier function as evidenced by an increase in transepidermal water loss (TEWL), a decrease in water-binding properties, and a reduction in skin surface lipids, specifically levels of ceramides. The results of clinical studies suggest that these deficits can be addressed through the judicious use of appropriate moisturizers, which have been shown to improve skin hydration, reduce susceptibility to irritation, and restore the integrity of the stratum corneum. Some emollients also supply the compromised stratum corneum with vital lipids and accelerate barrier recovery. Moisturizers serve as an important first-line therapeutic option for patients with atopic dermatitis and other chronic skin diseases and can be highly beneficial in improving the clinical signs and symptoms of these challenging dermatologic conditions.

  5. Language Barriers, Location of Care and Delays in Follow-up of Abnormal Mammograms

    PubMed Central

    Karliner, LS; Ma, L; Hofmann, M; Kerlikowske, K

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is frequently diagnosed after an abnormal mammography result. Language barriers can complicate communication of those results. Objectives We evaluated the association of non-English language with delay in follow-up. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of women at three mammography facilities participating in the San Francisco Mammography Registry (SFMR) with an abnormal mammogram result from 1997-2008. We measured median time from report of abnormal result to first follow-up test. Results Of 13,014 women with 16,109 abnormal mammograms, 4,027 (31%) had a non-English patient language. Clinical facilities differed in proportion of non-English-speakers and in time to first follow-up test: facility A (38%; 25 days), facility B (18%; 14 days), facility C (51%; 41 days). Most (67%) mammography examinations had BIRADS 0 (incomplete) assessment, requiring radiographic follow-up. At 30 days of follow-up 67% of all English speakers with incomplete assessments had a follow-up exam compared with 50% of all non-English speakers (p<.0001). The facility with the least delay and the lowest proportion of non-English speakers, had the biggest difference by language; compared to English speakers and adjusting for education, non-English speakers had twice the odds of >30 day delay in follow-up (OR 2.3; 95 CI 1.4-3.9). Conclusions There are considerable differences among facilities in delays in diagnostic follow-up of abnormal mammography results. More attention must be paid to understanding mammography facility factors, such as wait time to schedule diagnostic mammography and radiology workload, in order to improve rates of timely follow-up, particularly for those facilities disproportionately serving vulnerable non-English speaking patients. PMID:21993060

  6. Elastase 2 is expressed in human and mouse epidermis and impairs skin barrier function in Netherton syndrome through filaggrin and lipid misprocessing.

    PubMed

    Bonnart, Chrystelle; Deraison, Céline; Lacroix, Matthieu; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Besson, Céline; Robin, Aurélie; Briot, Anaïs; Gonthier, Marie; Lamant, Laurence; Dubus, Pierre; Monsarrat, Bernard; Hovnanian, Alain

    2010-03-01

    The human epidermis serves 2 crucial barrier functions: it protects against water loss and prevents penetration of infectious agents and allergens. The physiology of the epidermis is maintained by a balance of protease and antiprotease activities, as illustrated by the rare genetic skin disease Netherton syndrome (NS), in which impaired inhibition of serine proteases causes severe skin erythema and scaling. Here, utilizing mass spectrometry, we have identified elastase 2 (ELA2), which we believe to be a new epidermal protease that is specifically expressed in the most differentiated layer of living human and mouse epidermis. ELA2 localized to keratohyalin granules, where it was found to directly participate in (pro-)filaggrin processing. Consistent with the observation that ELA2 was hyperactive in skin from NS patients, transgenic mice overexpressing ELA2 in the granular layer of the epidermis displayed abnormal (pro-)filaggrin processing and impaired lipid lamellae structure, which are both observed in NS patients. These anomalies led to dehydration, implicating ELA2 in the skin barrier defect seen in NS patients. Thus, our work identifies ELA2 as a major new epidermal protease involved in essential pathways for skin barrier function. These results highlight the importance of the control of epidermal protease activity in skin homeostasis and designate ELA2 as a major protease driving the pathogenesis of NS.

  7. Elastase 2 is expressed in human and mouse epidermis and impairs skin barrier function in Netherton syndrome through filaggrin and lipid misprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Bonnart, Chrystelle; Deraison, Céline; Lacroix, Matthieu; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Besson, Céline; Robin, Aurélie; Briot, Anaïs; Gonthier, Marie; Lamant, Laurence; Dubus, Pierre; Monsarrat, Bernard; Hovnanian, Alain

    2010-01-01

    The human epidermis serves 2 crucial barrier functions: it protects against water loss and prevents penetration of infectious agents and allergens. The physiology of the epidermis is maintained by a balance of protease and antiprotease activities, as illustrated by the rare genetic skin disease Netherton syndrome (NS), in which impaired inhibition of serine proteases causes severe skin erythema and scaling. Here, utilizing mass spectrometry, we have identified elastase 2 (ELA2), which we believe to be a new epidermal protease that is specifically expressed in the most differentiated layer of living human and mouse epidermis. ELA2 localized to keratohyalin granules, where it was found to directly participate in (pro-)filaggrin processing. Consistent with the observation that ELA2 was hyperactive in skin from NS patients, transgenic mice overexpressing ELA2 in the granular layer of the epidermis displayed abnormal (pro-)filaggrin processing and impaired lipid lamellae structure, which are both observed in NS patients. These anomalies led to dehydration, implicating ELA2 in the skin barrier defect seen in NS patients. Thus, our work identifies ELA2 as a major new epidermal protease involved in essential pathways for skin barrier function. These results highlight the importance of the control of epidermal protease activity in skin homeostasis and designate ELA2 as a major protease driving the pathogenesis of NS. PMID:20179351

  8. Improvement of epidermal barrier properties in cultured skin substitutes after grafting onto athymic mice.

    PubMed

    Barai, Namrata D; Supp, Andrew P; Kasting, Gerald B; Visscher, Marty O; Boyce, Steven T

    2007-01-01

    Barrier function in cultured skin substitutes (CSS) prepared from human cell sources was measured by noninvasive (surface hydration, transepidermal water loss) and invasive methods (water permeation, niacinamide flux) before and after grafting onto athymic mice. In vitro measurements were made on days 7 and 14. Although three of the four measures of barrier function improved markedly from day 7 to 14, the values obtained were still far from those obtained with native human skin controls. Additional CSS were grafted onto athymic mice on day 14, and skin was harvested 2 and 6 weeks after grafting. Grafting brought about a substantial decrease in all measurements by 2 weeks and almost complete normalization of barrier function after 6 weeks. The most sensitive measure of this recovery was niacinamide permeability, which decreased from (280 +/- 40) x 10(-4) cm/h in vitro to (17 +/- 30) x 10(-4) cm/h 2 weeks after grafting and (5 +/- 2) x 10(-4) cm/h 6 weeks after grafting, versus control values of (2 +/- 2) x 10(-4) cm/h in human cadaver skin and (0.6 +/- 0.4) x 10(-4) cm/h in human epidermal membrane prepared from freshly excised breast skin. These results demonstrate the reformation of epidermal barrier function after transplantation and provide insights for the development of a functional epidermal barrier in CSS in vitro.

  9. Barrier Properties of an N/TERT-Based Human Skin Equivalent

    PubMed Central

    van Drongelen, Vincent; Danso, Mogbekeloluwa O.; Mulder, Aat; Mieremet, Arnout; van Smeden, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Human skin equivalents (HSEs) can be considered a valuable tool to study aspects of human skin, including the skin barrier, or to perform chemical or toxicological screenings. HSEs are three-dimensional skin models that are usually established using primary keratinocytes and closely mimic human skin. The use of primary keratinocytes has several drawbacks, including a limited in vitro life span and large donor–donor variation. This makes them less favorable for in vitro toxicity screenings. Usage of an established keratinocyte cell line circumvents these drawbacks and enables the generation of easy-to-generate and reproducible HSEs, which can be used for pharmacological and/or toxicological screenings. For such screenings, a proper barrier function is required. In this study, we investigated the barrier properties of HSEs established with the keratinocyte cell line N/TERT (N-HSEs). N-HSEs showed comparable tissue morphology and expression of several epidermal proteins compared with HSEs established with primary keratinocytes. Our results clearly demonstrate that N-HSEs not only contain several stratum corneum (SC) barrier properties similar to HSEs, including the presence of the long periodicity phase and a comparable SC permeability, but also show some differences in lipid composition. Nonetheless, the similarities in barrier properties makes N/TERT cells a promising alternative for primary keratinocytes to generate HSEs. PMID:24819925

  10. The important role of epidermal triacylglycerol metabolism for maintenance of the skin permeability barrier function.

    PubMed

    Radner, Franz P W; Fischer, Judith

    2014-03-01

    Survival in a terrestrial, dry environment necessitates a permeability barrier for regulated permeation of water and electrolytes in the cornified layer of the skin (the stratum corneum) to minimize desiccation of the body. This barrier is formed during cornification and involves a cross-linking of corneocyte proteins as well as an extensive remodeling of lipids. The cleavage of precursor lipids from lamellar bodies by various hydrolytic enzymes generates ceramides, cholesterol, and non-esterified fatty acids for the extracellular lipid lamellae in the stratum corneum. However, the important role of epidermal triacylglycerol (TAG) metabolism during formation of a functional permeability barrier in the skin was only recently discovered. Humans with mutations in the ABHD5/CGI-58 (α/β hydrolase domain containing protein 5, also known as comparative gene identification-58, CGI-58) gene suffer from a defect in TAG catabolism that causes neutral lipid storage disease with ichthyosis. In addition, mice with deficiencies in genes involved in TAG catabolism (Abhd5/Cgi-58 knock-out mice) or TAG synthesis (acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase-2, Dgat2 knock-out mice) also develop severe skin permeability barrier dysfunctions and die soon after birth due to increased dehydration. As a result of these defects in epidermal TAG metabolism, humans and mice lack ω-(O)-acylceramides, which leads to malformation of the cornified lipid envelope of the skin. In healthy skin, this epidermal structure provides an interface for the linkage of lamellar membranes with corneocyte proteins to maintain permeability barrier homeostasis. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of biochemical mechanisms involved in epidermal neutral lipid metabolism and the generation of a functional skin permeability barrier. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Important Role of Lipids in the Epidermis and their Role in the Formation and Maintenance of the Cutaneous

  11. An emulsion restores the skin barrier by decreasing the skin pH and inflammation in a canine experimental model.

    PubMed

    Pin, D; Bekrich, M; Fantini, O; Noel, G; Vidémont, E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Douxo(®) Calm Mousse (Sogeval, Laval, France) on restoration of the skin barrier in a canine model of barrier disruption. Tape strips were performed, daily for 6 days, on the lateral thorax of five healthy beagle dogs. Douxo(®) Calm Mousse was applied daily for 5 days to one side of the thorax and the opposite side was left untreated. The effects of treatment were evaluated by measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and pH and by histological assessment of disrupted skin at various times during barrier repair. Although no effect on TEWL was observed, Douxo(®) Calm Mousse maintained an acidic pH after three applications and reduced skin inflammation, which was most pronounced after five applications. The results of the study suggest that Douxo(®) Calm Mousse exerts a beneficial effect on barrier restoration and on markers of inflammation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Skin Barrier Recovery is not Associated with Self-Perceived Stress.

    PubMed

    Benham, Grant

    2016-12-01

    The primary aim of the current study was to examine the association between self-perceived stress and skin-barrier recovery. From an initial sample of 410 students, 19 high-stress and 12 low-stress Hispanic women completed a behavioural survey and were assessed for recovery of skin barrier following a tape-stripping procedure. No association was found between self-perceived stress and skin barrier recovery at either the 30-min or 3.15-h recovery period. Supplemental analysis showed a positive correlation between skin barrier recovery and self-reported sleep quantity at both recovery periods. Barrier repair reflects a single, minimally invasive, measure of wound healing; thus, our findings do not necessarily contradict the notion that stress measures can be used to predict wound healing more broadly defined. Supplemental analysis demonstrated an intriguing relationship between barrier recovery and the number of hours slept, but these findings are considered tentative and will require replication with more rigorous measures of sleep quantity and quality. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Clinical scoring and biophysical evaluation of nasolabial skin barrier damage caused by rhinorrhea.

    PubMed

    Houben, Evi; Adam, Ralf; Hachem, Jean-Pierre; Roseeuw, Diane; Rogiers, Vera; De Paepe, Kristien

    2008-11-01

    An acute viral cold is a very common illness and is characterized by sneezing and a runny nose. Because of rhinorrhea and frequent use of handkerchiefs, the skin around the nose feels uncomfortably dry and flaky. To evaluate the nasolabial skin barrier impairment, 14 female volunteers with a common cold were recruited. Visually assessed clinical scoring and/or biophysical measurements--including transepidermal water loss, stratum corneum hydration, skin colour, squamometry, skin pH, and a skin surface lipid profile analysis--were carried out at the start of the cold, a second time when the severity of the cold symptoms was maximal, and finally when the volunteers felt healthy again and stopped using handkerchiefs. Transepidermal water loss assessments showed significantly higher measurements on the maximum outcome of the nasal cold compared with the time-point when the symptoms of the cold had disappeared. This was in accordance with skin colour chroma a* measurements and the visually assessed skin erythema and scaliness scores, indicating that the superficial nasolabial skin barrier was inferior at the maximum of a nasal cold in comparison with the skin condition when volunteers were fully recovered.

  14. Local burn injury impairs epithelial permeability and antimicrobial peptide barrier function in distal unburned skin.

    PubMed

    Plichta, Jennifer K; Droho, Steve; Curtis, Brenda J; Patel, Parita; Gamelli, Richard L; Radek, Katherine A

    2014-06-01

    Our objective was to characterize the mechanisms by which local burn injury compromises epithelial barrier function in burn margin, containing the elements necessary for healing of the burn site, and in distal unburned skin, which serves as potential donor tissue. Experimental mouse scald burn injury. University Research Laboratory. C57/Bl6 Male mice, 8-12 weeks old. To confirm that dehydration was not contributing to our observed barrier defects, in some experiments mice received 1 mL of saline fluid immediately after burn, while a subgroup received an additional 0.5 mL at 4 hours and 1 mL at 24 hours following burn. We then assessed skin pH and transepidermal water loss every 12 hours on the burn wounds for 72 hours postburn. Burn margin exhibited increased epidermal barrier permeability indicated by higher pH, greater transepidermal water loss, and reduced lipid synthesis enzyme expression and structural protein production up to 96 hours postburn. By contrast, antimicrobial peptide production and protease activity were elevated in burn margin. Skin extracts from burn margin did not exhibit changes in the ability to inhibit bacterial growth. However, distal unburned skin from burned mice also demonstrated an impaired response to barrier disruption, indicated by elevated transepidermal water loss and reduced lipid synthesis enzyme and structural protein expression up to 96 hours postburn. Furthermore, skin extracts from distal unburned skin exhibited greater protease activity and a reduced capacity to inhibit bacterial growth of several skin pathogens. Finally, we established that antimicrobial peptide levels were also altered in the lung and bladder, which are common sites of secondary infection in burn-injured patients. These findings reveal several undefined deficiencies in epithelial barrier function at the burn margin, potential donor skin sites, and organs susceptible to secondary infection. These functional and biochemical data provide novel insights into

  15. Hyperglycemia Induces Skin Barrier Dysfunctions with Impairment of Epidermal Integrity in Non-Wounded Skin of Type 1 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Junko; Kojima, Hideto; Katagi, Miwako; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Nakae, Yuki; Terashima, Tomoya; Kurakane, Takeshi; Kubota, Mamoru; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Udagawa, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes causes skin complications, including xerosis and foot ulcers. Ulcers complicated by infections exacerbate skin conditions, and in severe cases, limb/toe amputations are required to prevent the development of sepsis. Here, we hypothesize that hyperglycemia induces skin barrier dysfunction with alterations of epidermal integrity. The effects of hyperglycemia on the epidermis were examined in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice with/without insulin therapy. The results showed that dye leakages were prominent, and transepidermal water loss after tape stripping was exacerbated in diabetic mice. These data indicate that hyperglycemia impaired skin barrier functions. Additionally, the distribution of the protein associated with the tight junction structure, tight junction protein-1 (ZO-1), was characterized by diffuse and significantly wider expression in the diabetic mice compared to that in the control mice. In turn, epidermal cell number was significantly reduced and basal cells were irregularly aligned with ultrastructural alterations in diabetic mice. In contrast, the number of corneocytes, namely, denucleated and terminally differentiated keratinocytes significantly increased, while their sensitivity to mechanical stress was enhanced in the diabetic mice. We found that cell proliferation was significantly decreased, while apoptotic cells were comparable in the skin of diabetic mice, compared to those in the control mice. In the epidermis, Keratin 5 and keratin 14 expressions were reduced, while keratin 10 and loricrin were ectopically induced in diabetic mice. These data suggest that hyperglycemia altered keratinocyte proliferation/differentiation. Finally, these phenotypes observed in diabetic mice were mitigated by insulin treatment. Reduction in basal cell number and perturbation of the proliferation/differentiation process could be the underlying mechanisms for impaired skin barrier functions in diabetic mice. PMID:27846299

  16. Hyperglycemia Induces Skin Barrier Dysfunctions with Impairment of Epidermal Integrity in Non-Wounded Skin of Type 1 Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Okano, Junko; Kojima, Hideto; Katagi, Miwako; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Nakae, Yuki; Terashima, Tomoya; Kurakane, Takeshi; Kubota, Mamoru; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Udagawa, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes causes skin complications, including xerosis and foot ulcers. Ulcers complicated by infections exacerbate skin conditions, and in severe cases, limb/toe amputations are required to prevent the development of sepsis. Here, we hypothesize that hyperglycemia induces skin barrier dysfunction with alterations of epidermal integrity. The effects of hyperglycemia on the epidermis were examined in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice with/without insulin therapy. The results showed that dye leakages were prominent, and transepidermal water loss after tape stripping was exacerbated in diabetic mice. These data indicate that hyperglycemia impaired skin barrier functions. Additionally, the distribution of the protein associated with the tight junction structure, tight junction protein-1 (ZO-1), was characterized by diffuse and significantly wider expression in the diabetic mice compared to that in the control mice. In turn, epidermal cell number was significantly reduced and basal cells were irregularly aligned with ultrastructural alterations in diabetic mice. In contrast, the number of corneocytes, namely, denucleated and terminally differentiated keratinocytes significantly increased, while their sensitivity to mechanical stress was enhanced in the diabetic mice. We found that cell proliferation was significantly decreased, while apoptotic cells were comparable in the skin of diabetic mice, compared to those in the control mice. In the epidermis, Keratin 5 and keratin 14 expressions were reduced, while keratin 10 and loricrin were ectopically induced in diabetic mice. These data suggest that hyperglycemia altered keratinocyte proliferation/differentiation. Finally, these phenotypes observed in diabetic mice were mitigated by insulin treatment. Reduction in basal cell number and perturbation of the proliferation/differentiation process could be the underlying mechanisms for impaired skin barrier functions in diabetic mice.

  17. Improved epidermal barrier formation in human skin models by chitosan modulated dermal matrices

    PubMed Central

    Mieremet, Arnout; Rietveld, Marion; Absalah, Samira; van Smeden, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Full thickness human skin models (FTMs) contain an epidermal and a dermal equivalent. The latter is composed of a collagen dermal matrix which harbours fibroblasts. Current epidermal barrier properties of FTMs do not fully resemble that of native human skin (NHS), which makes these human skin models less suitable for barrier related studies. To further enhance the resemblance of NHS for epidermal morphogenesis and barrier formation, we modulated the collagen dermal matrix with the biocompatible polymer chitosan. Herein, we report that these collagen-chitosan FTMs (CC-FTMs) possess a well-organized epidermis and maintain both the early and late differentiation programs as in FTMs. Distinctively, the epidermal cell activation is reduced in CC-FTMs to levels observed in NHS. Dermal-epidermal interactions are functional in both FTM types, based on the formation of the basement membrane. Evaluation of the barrier structure by the organization of the extracellular lipid matrix of the stratum corneum revealed an elongated repeat distance of the long periodicity phase. The ceramide composition exhibited a higher resemblance of the NHS, based on the carbon chain-length distribution and subclass profile. The inside-out barrier functionality indicated by the transepidermal water loss is significantly improved in the CC-FTMs. The expression of epidermal barrier lipid processing enzymes is marginally affected, although more restricted to a single granular layer. The novel CC-FTM resembles the NHS more closely, which makes them a promising tool for epidermal barrier related studies. PMID:28333992

  18. Topical apigenin improves epidermal permeability barrier homoeostasis in normal murine skin by divergent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hou, Maihua; Sun, Richard; Hupe, Melanie; Kim, Peggy L; Park, Kyungho; Crumrine, Debra; Lin, Tzu-Kai; Santiago, Juan Luis; Mauro, Theodora M; Elias, Peter M; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2013-03-01

    The beneficial effects of certain herbal medicines on cutaneous function have been appreciated for centuries. Among these agents, chrysanthemum extract, apigenin, has been used for skin care, particularly in China, for millennia. However, the underlying mechanisms by which apigenin benefits the skin are not known. In this study, we first determined whether topical apigenin positively influences permeability barrier homoeostasis, and then the basis thereof. Hairless mice were treated topically with either 0.1% apigenin or vehicle alone twice daily for 9 days. At the end of the treatments, permeability barrier function was assessed with either an electrolytic water analyzer or a Tewameter. Our results show that topical apigenin significantly enhanced permeability barrier homoeostasis after tape stripping, although basal permeability barrier function remained unchanged. Improved barrier function correlated with enhanced filaggrin expression and lamellar body production, which was paralleled by elevated mRNA levels for the epidermal ABCA12. The mRNA levels for key lipid synthetic enzymes also were upregulated by apigenin. Finally, both cathelicidin-related peptide and mouse beta-defensin 3 immunostaining were increased by apigenin. We conclude that topical apigenin improves epidermal permeability barrier function by stimulating epidermal differentiation, lipid synthesis and secretion, as well as cutaneous antimicrobial peptide production. Apigenin could be useful for the prevention and treatment of skin disorders characterized by permeability barrier dysfunction, associated with reduced filaggrin levels and impaired antimicrobial defenses, such as atopic dermatitis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Improved epidermal barrier formation in human skin models by chitosan modulated dermal matrices.

    PubMed

    Mieremet, Arnout; Rietveld, Marion; Absalah, Samira; van Smeden, Jeroen; Bouwstra, Joke A; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb

    2017-01-01

    Full thickness human skin models (FTMs) contain an epidermal and a dermal equivalent. The latter is composed of a collagen dermal matrix which harbours fibroblasts. Current epidermal barrier properties of FTMs do not fully resemble that of native human skin (NHS), which makes these human skin models less suitable for barrier related studies. To further enhance the resemblance of NHS for epidermal morphogenesis and barrier formation, we modulated the collagen dermal matrix with the biocompatible polymer chitosan. Herein, we report that these collagen-chitosan FTMs (CC-FTMs) possess a well-organized epidermis and maintain both the early and late differentiation programs as in FTMs. Distinctively, the epidermal cell activation is reduced in CC-FTMs to levels observed in NHS. Dermal-epidermal interactions are functional in both FTM types, based on the formation of the basement membrane. Evaluation of the barrier structure by the organization of the extracellular lipid matrix of the stratum corneum revealed an elongated repeat distance of the long periodicity phase. The ceramide composition exhibited a higher resemblance of the NHS, based on the carbon chain-length distribution and subclass profile. The inside-out barrier functionality indicated by the transepidermal water loss is significantly improved in the CC-FTMs. The expression of epidermal barrier lipid processing enzymes is marginally affected, although more restricted to a single granular layer. The novel CC-FTM resembles the NHS more closely, which makes them a promising tool for epidermal barrier related studies.

  20. Skin Barrier Health: Regulation and Repair of the Stratum Corneum and the Role of Over-the-Counter Skin Care.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thomas; Friedman, Adam

    2016-09-01

    The epidermis functions as a physical barrier that separates the inner body from the outside environment. The outermost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum, plays a key role in maintaining this barrier. There are numerous biochemical changes that take place to and in the keratinocyte as it migrates from the bottom, or startum basale, to the top layer of the epidermis in order for this barrier to function appropriately. In addition, external and internal factors, such as irritants and underlying medical diseases, can also affect the stratum corneum, both of which can potentially lead to disruption of barrier function and ultimately skin pathology. In this article, we will review keratinocyte biology as it relates to the formation and function of the stratum corneum. We will also review stratum corneum structure, physiology, and the impact of chemical agents and defective stratum corneum components that can lead to skin disease. Finally, we will briefly discuss how moisturizers repair defects in the stratum corneum and restore barrier function.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(9):1047-1051.

  1. Influence of sportive activity on skin barrier function: a quantitative evaluation of 60 athletes.

    PubMed

    Luebberding, Stefanie; Kolbe, Lea; Kerscher, Martina

    2013-06-01

    While sports-related diseases are well documented in the literature, no study regarding the physiology of athlete's skin has been published yet. However, some evidence is given for impairment of the skin barrier due to sportive activity accompanied by an increase in sweating. In this explorative study, we investigated the effect of sportive activity on skin physiology, namely stratum corneum hydration, skin surface pH, and sebum content. A total of 60 healthy Caucasian volunteers (35 females, 25 males; mean 27.35 ± 4.09) were enrolled in this study. Measurements were done before and after 45 minutes of endurance cardio training at forehead, chest, forearm, and armpits. Hydration level, sebum secretion, and pH value of hydrolipid acid film were measured with worldwide-acknowledged biophysical measuring methods. Stratum corneum hydration significantly increased after sportive activity. The increase was about 51.9% at the forearm and 31.9% at the chest. Sebum content at the forehead significantly decreased during exercising, from 87.36 μg/cm2 to 62.41 μg/cm2. At all investigated body sites, measured values for skin surface pH increased after sportive activity. Highest pH value was measured in armpits (pH 5.64-5.98) and lowest at forearm (pH 4.75-4.93). Sportive activity is accompanied by significant changes of skin physiology that could stress the barrier function of the skin. Higher skin surface pH and hyperhydration of the stratum corneum as well as increased lipid content on the skin surface are probably caused by an increased sweat production. The impaired skin barrier may also be the reason for some reported sports-related dermatoses. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  2. Iontophoresis itself on hairless mouse skin induces the loss of the epidermal calcium gradient without skin barrier impairment.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Choi, E H; Feingold, K R; Jiang, S; Ahn, S K

    1998-07-01

    Iontophoresis increases the delivery of drugs across the stratum corneum, but the pathway by which ionized drugs transit the stratum corneum is unknown. In this study we examined the effect of iontophoresis on the skin barrier and the epidermal calcium gradient. Hairless mice were subjected to iontophoresis for 5-120 min and skin specimens were prepared for electron microscopy. Neither positive nor negative iontophoresis affected transepidermal water loss. Lacunar dilatation and partial distention of the intercellular layers of the stratum corneum were observed in rough proportion to applied time in iontophoresis skin as well as control skin. Additionally, using calcium capture cytochemistry, we demonstrated that both positive and negative iontophoresis caused the disappearance of the epidermal calcium gradient with marked decrease in calcium content in the upper epidermis. Positive iontophoresis was associated with increased calcium in the stratum basale and dermis, whereas negative iontophoresis increased calcium in the stratum corneum. Moreover, as previously shown after barrier disruption and sonophoresis, the decrease in calcium content in the upper epidermis was associated with an increase in lamellar body secretion and the build up of lamellar material at the stratum corneum-stratum granulosum interface. In conclusion, iontophoresis on the skin of hairless mice may induce the change of ionized molecules in the epidermis, as the loss of the calcium gradient, which causes the decrease of skin impedence, gives charged drugs the ability to cross the skin more easily. Also, the structural changes, such as lacunar dilatation, whether they result from hydration or occlusion, may help the transport of charged drugs across the stratum corneum.

  3. Nanocapsules for drug delivery through the skin barrier by tissue-tolerable plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Patzelt, A.; Richter, H.; Lademann, O.; Baier, G.; Breucker, L.; Landfester, K.

    2013-08-01

    For many years, several attempts have been made to enhance skin penetration by chemical, physical or mechanical manipulation to reduce the barrier function of the skin. The present study demonstrates the possibility of penetration enhancement for 400 nm sized nanocapsules loaded with a model drug consisting of a fluorescent dye by the application of tissue-tolerable plasma (TTP). Therefore, the stability of the nanocapsules and their penetration through the skin barrier prior to and in combination with TTP application was evaluated. The results revealed that the penetration of the nanocapsules could be effectively enhanced when applied in combination with TTP, hence delivering the model drug unaffected by plasma into deeper skin layers. The stability testing showed no significant structural changes of the nanocapsules after contact with TTP. Thus, the present study introduces a new strategy for the penetration enhancement of substances by the combined utilization of nanocapsules and TTP.

  4. In vitro permeation and disposition of niacinamide in silicone and porcine skin of skin barrier-mimetic formulations.

    PubMed

    Haque, Tasnuva; Lane, Majella E; Sil, Bruno C; Crowther, Jonathan M; Moore, David J

    2017-03-30

    Niacinamide (NIA) is an amide form of vitamin B3 which is used in cosmetic formulations to improve various skin conditions and it has also been shown to increase stratum corneum thickness following repeated application. In this study, three doses (5, 20 and 50μL per cm(2)) of two NIA containing oil-in-water skin barrier-mimetic formulations were evaluated in silicone membrane and porcine ear skin and compared with a commercial control formulation. Permeation studies were conducted over 24h in Franz cells and at the end of the experiment membranes were washed and niacinamide was extracted. For the three doses, retention or deposition of NIA was generally higher in porcine skin compared with silicone membrane, consistent with the hydrophilic nature of the active. Despite the control containing a higher amount of active, comparable amounts of NIA were deposited in skin for all formulations for all doses; total skin absorption values (permeation and retention) of NIA were also comparable across all formulations. For infinite (50μL) and finite (5μL) doses the absolute permeation of NIA from the control formulation was significantly higher in porcine skin compared with both test formulations. This likely reflects differences in formulation components and/or presence of skin penetration enhancers in the formulations. Higher permeation for the 50 and 20μL dose was also evident in porcine skin compared with silicone membrane but the opposite is the case for the finite dose. The findings point to the critical importance of dose and occlusion when evaluating topical formulations in vitro and also the likelihood of exaggerated effects of excipients on permeation at infinite and pseudo-finite dose applications.

  5. Lipid ingredients in moisturizers can modulate skin responses to UV in barrier-disrupted human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Byun, Hee Jin; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Eun, Hee Chul; Lee, Min-Jung; Lee, Youngae; Lee, Serah; Chung, Jin Ho

    2012-02-01

    Chemicals with a molecular weight <500 and adequate lipid solubility can penetrate the intact human skin. As many lipid ingredients in moisturizers have molecular weights <500, the lipid ingredients may penetrate into the skin and affect skin responses to UV; however, little is known about this phenomenon. To evaluate the effects of major lipid ingredients in moisturizers on skin responses to UV in tape-stripped human skin in vivo. We evaluated the effects of three major lipid ingredients in moisturizers (cholesterol, linoleic acid, and a synthetic ceramide, N-oleoyl-phytosphingosine) on skin responses to UV in the tape-stripped skin of healthy volunteers. After 2 days of lipid-application, the areas were irradiated with UV, and skin samples were obtained 24h after irradiation. Histologic features and the expression of the markers of collagen metabolism and inflammatory mediators were evaluated. Compared to vehicle, topical cholesterol significantly decreased the degree of dermal inflammatory infiltrates and exocytosis, and also decreased the expression of MMP-1, IL-6, and IL-1ß mRNA. In contrast, topical linoleic acid increased the induction of apoptotic cells, and the expression of MMP-1 and IL-6 mRNA. N-oleoyl-phytosphingosine increased the expression of MMP-1 and IL-6 mRNA, while decreasing the expression of COX-2 mRNA. Topical cholesterol can protect the barrier-disrupted skin against UV-induced damage, while linoleic acid or N-oleoyl-phytosphingosine alone has the potential to aggravate the damage. Copyright © 2011 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The role of filaggrin in the skin barrier and disease development.

    PubMed

    Armengot-Carbo, M; Hernández-Martín, Á; Torrelo, A

    2015-03-01

    Filaggrin is a structural protein that is fundamental in the development and maintenance of the skin barrier. The function of filaggrin and its involvement in various cutaneous and extracutaneous disorders has been the subject of considerable research in recent years. Mutations in FLG, the gene that encodes filaggrin, have been shown to cause ichthyosis vulgaris, increase the risk of atopic dermatitis and other atopic diseases, and exacerbate certain conditions. The present article reviews the current knowledge on the role of filaggrin in the skin barrier, FLG mutations, and the consequences of filaggrin deficiency.

  7. Standardized diaper care regimen: a prospective, randomized pilot study on skin barrier function and epidermal IL-1α in newborns.

    PubMed

    Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Massoudy, Lida; Scheufele, Ramona; Dietz, Ekkehart; Proquitté, Hans; Wauer, Roland; Bertin, Christiane; Serrano, José; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation of skin barrier function and interleukin-1α (IL-1α) content in diapered and nondiapered skin are poorly characterized in newborns receiving standard skin care. In a monocentric, prospective pilot study 44 healthy, full-term neonates were randomly assigned to skin care with baby wipes (n = 21) or water-moistened washcloth (n = 23) at each diaper change. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration, skin-pH, IL-1α, and epidermal desquamation were measured on days 2, 14, and 28 postpartum. Microbiological colonization was evaluated at baseline and on day 28. Significantly lower TEWL was found on the buttock in the group using baby wipes compared to water. IL-1α and skin hydration significantly increased and pH decreased independent of skin care regimen. IL-1α was significantly higher in diapered skin compared to nondiapered skin. Although skin care with wipes seems to stabilize TEWL better than using water, the skin condition and microbiological colonization were comparable using both cleansing procedures. Increase of epidermal IL-1α may reflect postnatal skin barrier maturation. These data suggest that neither of the two cleansing procedures harms skin barrier maturation within the first four weeks postpartum. Longer observations on larger populations could provide more insight into postnatal skin barrier maturation.

  8. Developmental Changes in Skin Barrier and Structure during the First 5 Years of Life.

    PubMed

    Walters, Russel M; Khanna, Preeya; Chu, Melissa; Mack, M Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The structure of the stratum corneum (SC) and the corresponding skin barrier develops from before birth up to about 4 years of age. Large subject-to-subject variability within an age group requires a large population to observe trends in skin barrier properties over time. Barrier function, quantified by transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and SC thickness, was measured on the upper inner arm and dorsal forearm in subjects aged 3 months to 4 years (n = 171) and a subset of mothers (n = 44). The rate of skin surface area expansion as a function of age peaked before birth (∼90 cm2/week) and declined to a steady plateau (∼10 cm2/week) by 1 year of age. SC thickness increased and TEWL decreased, but did not reach adult values until 3-4 years of age. A better understanding of how skin hydration changes after birth suggests that barrier function may be related mechanistically to skin surface area expansion. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Breaching the skin barrier--insights from molecular simulation of model membranes.

    PubMed

    Notman, Rebecca; Anwar, Jamshed

    2013-02-01

    Breaching the skin's barrier function by design is an important strategy for delivering drugs and vaccines to the body. However, while there are many proposed approaches for reversibly breaching the skin barrier, our understanding of the molecular processes involved is still rudimentary. Molecular simulation offers an unprecedented molecular-level resolution with an ability to reproduce molecular and bulk level properties. We review the basis of the molecular simulation methodology and give applications of relevance to the skin lipid barrier, focusing on permeation of molecules and chemical approaches for breaching the lipid barrier by design. The bulk kinetic model based on Fick's Law describing absorption of a drug through skin has been reconciled with statistical mechanical quantities such as the local excess chemical potential and local diffusion coefficient within the membrane structure. Applications of molecular simulation reviewed include investigations of the structure and dynamics of simple models of skin lipids, calculation of the permeability of molecules in simple model membranes, and mechanisms of action of the penetration enhancers, DMSO, ethanol and oleic acid. The studies reviewed illustrate the power and potential of molecular simulation to yield important physical insights, inform and rationalize experimental studies, and to predict structural changes, and kinetic and thermodynamic quantities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The genetics of the skin barrier in eczema and other allergic disorders.

    PubMed

    Marenholz, Ingo; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Lee, Young-Ae

    2015-10-01

    We summarize current knowledge on the genetic determinants of skin barrier deficiency in relation to eczema and disease progression to other allergic manifestations. There is increasing evidence that impairment of epidermal barrier function is not only a risk factor for the development of eczema but also for disease progression to allergic airway disease and food allergy. Support comes from recent association studies linking genetic variants in epidermal genes with eczema and food allergy, from monogenic diseases with severe skin barrier defects which display multiple allergic manifestations, and from mouse models providing a mechanism from skin inflammation to allergic reactions in the lung and intestine. The key role of the skin barrier defect in the development of eczema and eczema-associated allergic diseases may have important implications for prevention and treatment strategies. Initial clinical trials with moisturizing creams revealed promising results for the prevention of eczema in early infancy. Their long-term effects will be critical to demonstrate the potential benefit of barrier repair therapy in allergic disease prevention.

  11. Two Ancient Gene Families Are Critical for Maintenance of the Mammalian Skin Barrier in Postnatal Life.

    PubMed

    Cangkrama, Michael; Darido, Charbel; Georgy, Smitha R; Partridge, Darren; Auden, Alana; Srivastava, Seema; Wilanowski, Tomasz; Jane, Stephen M

    2016-07-01

    The skin barrier is critical for mammalian survival in the terrestrial environment, affording protection against fluid loss, microbes, toxins, and UV exposure. Many genes indispensable for barrier formation in the embryo have been identified, but loss of these genes in adult mice does not induce barrier regression. We describe a complex regulatory network centered on two ancient gene families, the grainyhead-like (Grhl) transcription factors and the protein cross-linking enzymes (tissue transglutaminases [Tgms]), which are essential for skin permeability barrier maintenance in adult mice. Embryonic deletion of Grhl3 induces loss of Tgm1 expression, which disrupts the cornified envelope, thus preventing permeability barrier formation leading to neonatal death. However, gene deletion of Grhl3 in adult mice does not disrupt the preformed barrier, with cornified envelope integrity maintained by Grhl1 and Tgm5, which are up-regulated in response to postnatal loss of Grhl3. Concomitant deletion of both Grhl factors in adult mice induced loss of Tgm1 and Tgm5 expression, perturbation of the cornified envelope, and complete permeability barrier regression that was incompatible with life. These findings define the molecular safeguards for barrier function that accompany the transition from intrauterine to terrestrial life. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhancement of percutaneous penetration of aniline and o-toluidine in vitro using skin barrier creams.

    PubMed

    Korinth, Gintautas; Lüersen, Lars; Schaller, Karl Heinz; Angerer, Jürgen; Drexler, Hans

    2008-04-01

    Aniline (ANI) and the human carcinogen o-toluidine (OT) are released at the workplace during the production and processing of rubber. Recently, we showed in rubber industry workers that a frequent use of skin barrier creams (SBC) increased the internal exposure of ANI and OT. In the present study, diffusion cells were used to investigate the effects of two SBC and one skin care cream (SCC) on percutaneous penetration of neat ANI and OT as well as of OT from a mixture with a workplace specific lubricant. The experiments were carried out with untreated and with skin creams treated human skin. A considerable percutaneous penetration enhancement of test compounds was observed for treated skin compared with untreated skin; the highest enhancement (mean factors 6.2-12.3) was found for SBC (based on oil in water emulsion) treated skin. The lowest penetration enhancement showed SCC treated skin (mean factors 4.2-9.7). The in vitro data support our findings in workers that the percutaneous absorption of aromatic amines significantly increases in presence of skin creams. The efficacy of skin creams to protect the percutaneous penetration of aromatic amines is not confirmed by our own experiments.

  13. Coal tar induces AHR-dependent skin barrier repair in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    van den Bogaard, Ellen H.; Bergboer, Judith G.M.; Vonk-Bergers, Mieke; van Vlijmen-Willems, Ivonne M.J.J.; Hato, Stanleyson V.; van der Valk, Pieter G.M.; Schröder, Jens Michael; Joosten, Irma; Zeeuwen, Patrick L.J.M.; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2013-01-01

    Topical application of coal tar is one of the oldest therapies for atopic dermatitis (AD), a T helper 2 (Th2) lymphocyte–mediated skin disease associated with loss-of-function mutations in the skin barrier gene, filaggrin (FLG). Despite its longstanding clinical use and efficacy, the molecular mechanism of coal tar therapy is unknown. Using organotypic skin models with primary keratinocytes from AD patients and controls, we found that coal tar activated the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), resulting in induction of epidermal differentiation. AHR knockdown by siRNA completely abrogated this effect. Coal tar restored filaggrin expression in FLG-haploinsufficient keratinocytes to wild-type levels, and counteracted Th2 cytokine–mediated downregulation of skin barrier proteins. In AD patients, coal tar completely restored expression of major skin barrier proteins, including filaggrin. Using organotypic skin models stimulated with Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, we found coal tar to diminish spongiosis, apoptosis, and CCL26 expression, all AD hallmarks. Coal tar interfered with Th2 cytokine signaling via dephosphorylation of STAT6, most likely due to AHR-regulated activation of the NRF2 antioxidative stress pathway. The therapeutic effect of AHR activation herein described opens a new avenue to reconsider AHR as a pharmacological target and could lead to the development of mechanism-based drugs for AD. PMID:23348739

  14. Murine filaggrin-2 is involved in epithelial barrier function and down-regulated in metabolically induced skin barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hansmann, Britta; Ahrens, Kerstin; Wu, Zhihong; Proksch, Ehrhardt; Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf; Schröder, Jens-Michael

    2012-04-01

    The S100 fused-type proteins (SFTPs) are thought to be involved in the barrier formation and function of the skin. Mutations in the profilaggrin gene, one of the best investigated members of this family, are known to be the major risk factors for ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis. Recently, we identified human filaggrin-2 as a new member of the SFTP family. To achieve further insight into its function, here the murine filaggrin-2 was analysed as a possible orthologue. The 5' and 3' ends of the mouse filaggrin-2 cDNA of the BALB/c strain were sequenced and confirmed an organization typical for SFTPs. Murine filaggrin-2 showed an expression pattern mainly in keratinizing epithelia in the upper cell layers on both mRNA and protein levels. The expression in cultured mouse keratinocytes was increased upon elevated Ca(2+) levels. Immunoblotting experiments indicated an intraepidermal processing of the 250-kDa full-length protein. In metabolically (essential fatty acid-deficient diet) induced skin barrier dysfunction, filaggrin-2 expression was significantly reduced, whereas filaggrin expression was up-regulated. In contrast, mechanical barrier disruption with acetone treatment did not affect filaggrin-2 mRNA expression. These results suggest that filaggrin-2 may contribute to epidermal barrier function and its regulation differs, at least in parts, from that of filaggrin.

  15. Controlling the hydration of the skin though the application of occluding barrier creams

    PubMed Central

    Sparr, Emma; Millecamps, Danielle; Isoir, Muriel; Burnier, Véronique; Larsson, Åsa; Cabane, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The skin is a barrier membrane that separates environments with profoundly different water contents. The barrier properties are assured by the outer layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), which controls the transepidermal water loss. The SC acts as a responding membrane, since its hydration and permeability vary with the boundary condition, which is the activity of water at the outer surface of the skin. We show how this boundary condition can be changed by the application of a barrier cream that makes a film with a high resistance to the transport of water. We present a quantitative model that predicts hydration and water transport in SC that is covered by such a film. We also develop an experimental method for measuring the specific resistance to water transport of films made of occluding barrier creams. Finally, we combine the theoretical model with the measured properties of the barrier creams to predict how a film of cream changes the activity of water at the outer surface of the SC. Using the known variations of SC permeability and hydration with the water activity in its environment (i.e. the relative humidity), we can thus predict how a film of barrier cream changes SC hydration. PMID:23269846

  16. A comparison of cost and efficacy of three incontinence skin barrier products.

    PubMed

    Zehrer, Cindy L; Lutz, James B; Hedblom, Edwin C; Ding, Li

    2004-12-01

    Maintaining healthy, intact perineal skin in nursing home residents with incontinence is a challenge. Their condition puts them at risk for developing incontinence dermatitis, possibly predisposing them to develop pressure ulcers. To examine the cost-effectiveness of three perineal skin barriers (a polymer-based barrier film and two petrolatum ointments) used to prevent incontinence dermatitis, a 6-month descriptive study was conducted among residents (N = 250) from four long-term care facilities (nursing homes) in the upper Midwestern US. All residents were incontinent and had intact perineal skin when they enrolled in the study. An economic analysis was performed using time-motion data from a convenience sample of enrolled residents and their caregivers. Residents had an average of 4.1 (+/-2.307) incontinent episodes per day, the occurrence of incontinence dermatitis was 3.3 % and not significantly different between the different protocols of care (P = 0.4448). Results of the economic analysis showed that daily barrier application costs ranged from $0.17 for the barrier film to $0.76 for the ointments evaluated. With labor included in the analysis, costs were also lower for the barrier film that required the least frequent application ($0.26) compared to ointments that required more frequent application ($1.40). Results of this study suggest that the daily or three times weekly barrier film protocols are affordable alternatives to using petrolatum ointments in the prevention of incontinence dermatitis.

  17. Skin Barrier Function Is Not Impaired and Kallikrein 7 Gene Polymorphism Is Frequently Observed in Korean X-linked Ichthyosis Patients Diagnosed by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Noo Ri; Yoon, Na Young; Jung, Minyoung; Kim, Ji-Yun; Seo, Seong Jun; Wang, Hye-Young; Lee, Hyeyoung; Sohn, Young Bae; Choi, Eung Ho

    2016-08-01

    X-linked ichthyosis (XLI) is a recessively inherited ichthyosis. Skin barrier function of XLI patients reported in Western countries presented minimally abnormal or normal. Here, we evaluated the skin barrier properties and a skin barrier-related gene mutation in 16 Korean XLI patients who were diagnosed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and array comparative genomic hybridization analysis. Skin barrier properties were measured, cytokine expression levels in the stratum corneum (SC) were evaluated with the tape stripped specimen from skin surface, and a genetic test was done on blood. XLI patients showed significantly lower SC hydration, but normal basal trans-epidermal water loss and skin surface pH as compared to a healthy control group. Histopathology of ichthyosis epidermis showed no acanthosis, and levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines in the corneal layer did not differ between control and lesional/non-lesional skin of XLI patients. Among the mutations in filaggrin (FLG), kallikrein 7 (KLK7), and SPINK5 genes, the prevalence of KLK7 gene mutations was significantly higher in XLI patients (50%) than in controls (0%), whereas FLG and SPINK5 prevalence was comparable. Korean XLI patients exhibited unimpaired skin barrier function and frequent association with the KLK7 gene polymorphism, which may differentiate them from Western XLI patients.

  18. Skin Barrier Function Is Not Impaired and Kallikrein 7 Gene Polymorphism Is Frequently Observed in Korean X-linked Ichthyosis Patients Diagnosed by Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization and Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    X-linked ichthyosis (XLI) is a recessively inherited ichthyosis. Skin barrier function of XLI patients reported in Western countries presented minimally abnormal or normal. Here, we evaluated the skin barrier properties and a skin barrier-related gene mutation in 16 Korean XLI patients who were diagnosed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and array comparative genomic hybridization analysis. Skin barrier properties were measured, cytokine expression levels in the stratum corneum (SC) were evaluated with the tape stripped specimen from skin surface, and a genetic test was done on blood. XLI patients showed significantly lower SC hydration, but normal basal trans-epidermal water loss and skin surface pH as compared to a healthy control group. Histopathology of ichthyosis epidermis showed no acanthosis, and levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines in the corneal layer did not differ between control and lesional/non-lesional skin of XLI patients. Among the mutations in filaggrin (FLG), kallikrein 7 (KLK7), and SPINK5 genes, the prevalence of KLK7 gene mutations was significantly higher in XLI patients (50%) than in controls (0%), whereas FLG and SPINK5 prevalence was comparable. Korean XLI patients exhibited unimpaired skin barrier function and frequent association with the KLK7 gene polymorphism, which may differentiate them from Western XLI patients. PMID:27478344

  19. Deficiency of filaggrin regulates endogenous cysteine protease activity, leading to impaired skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Wang, X W; Wang, J J; Gutowska-Owsiak, D; Salimi, M; Selvakumar, T A; Gwela, A; Chen, L Y; Wang, Y J; Giannoulatou, E; Ogg, G

    2017-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disorder, characterized by skin barrier defects and enhanced allergen priming. Null mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are strongly associated with moderate to severe AD, but the pathways linking barrier dysfunction and cutaneous inflammation are still largely unknown. To assess alteration of endogenous cysteine protease activity in FLG-deficient keratinocytes, and to determine whether the alteration in cysteine protease activity affects epidermal barrier function and associated gene and protein expression. We established a stable FLG knockdown cell line, and reconstructed epidermal equivalents in vitro. Barrier function of the reconstructed epidermis, the barrier-associated genes and proteins, and the activity of endogenous cysteine proteases were tested. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases were used to further evaluate the role of endogenous cysteine proteases in epidermal barrier function. FLG knockdown induced impaired epidermal barrier function. Microarray, western blotting and fluorescence staining showed reduced expression of K10, ZO-1, E-cadherin, claudin-1 and occludin in FLG knockdown keratinocytes. Compared with cysteine protease activity in control cells, protease activity was dramatically enhanced in FLG knockdown keratinocytes. Furthermore, administration of cysteine protease inhibitors significantly recovered expression of K10 and tight junction proteins, and the barrier defect induced by FLG deficiency. This is the first observation of elevated endogenous cysteine protease activity in FLG-deficient keratinocytes, which may play an important role in impaired barrier function in AD skin. Modulation of cysteine protease activity might be a novel therapeutic approach for AD treatment. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  20. Abnormal barrier function in the pathogenesis of ichthyosis: Therapeutic implications for lipid metabolic disorders☆

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Peter M.; Williams, Mary L.; Feingold, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    Ichthyoses, including inherited disorders of lipid metabolism, display a permeability barrier abnormality in which the severity of the clinical phenotype parallels the prominence of the barrier defect. The pathogenesis of the cutaneous phenotype represents the consequences of the mutation for epidermal function, coupled with a “best attempt” by affected epidermis to generate a competent barrier in a terrestrial environment. A compromised barrier in normal epidermis triggers a vigorous set of metabolic responses that rapidly normalizes function, but ichthyotic epidermis, which is inherently compromised, only partially succeeds in this effort. Unraveling mechanisms that account for barrier dysfunction in the ichthyoses has identified multiple, subcellular, and biochemical processes that contribute to the clinical phenotype. Current treatment of the ichthyoses remains largely symptomatic: directed toward reducing scale or corrective gene therapy. Reducing scale is often minimally effective. Gene therapy is impeded by multiple pitfalls, including difficulties in transcutaneous drug delivery, high costs, and discomfort of injections. We have begun to use information about disease pathogenesis to identify novel, pathogenesis-based therapeutic strategies for the ichthyoses. The clinical phenotype often reflects not only a deficiency of pathway end product due to reduced-function mutations in key synthetic enzymes but often also accumulation of proximal, potentially toxic metabolites. As a result, depending upon the identified pathomechanism(s) for each disorder, the accompanying ichthyosis can be treated by topical provision of pathway product (eg, cholesterol), with or without a proximal enzyme inhibitor (eg, simvastatin), to block metabolite production. Among the disorders of distal cholesterol metabolism, the cutaneous phenotype in Congenital Hemidysplasia with Ichthyosiform Erythroderma and Limb Defects (CHILD syndrome) and X-linked ichthyosis reflect metabolite

  1. The Effect of an Emollient Containing Urea, Ceramide NP, and Lactate on Skin Barrier Structure and Function in Older People with Dry Skin.

    PubMed

    Danby, Simon G; Brown, Kirsty; Higgs-Bayliss, Tim; Chittock, John; Albenali, Lujain; Cork, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Xerosis affects up to 75% of older people and develops as a result of a skin barrier defect. Emollients are widely used to treat xerosis; however, there is limited understanding of the differences between them and their effects on the skin barrier in older people. This study aimed to compare the effect of a commercially available emollient containing 5% urea, ceramide NP and lactate (test emollient) to an alternative emollient without these additives (control emollient) on the properties of the skin barrier in older people. Two cohorts of 21 volunteers aged >60 years with dry skin were recruited. The first applied the test emollient to one forearm and no treatment to the other for 28 days. The second compared the test emollient to the control emollient observing the same parameters. Effects on the skin barrier were determined by measuring skin barrier function, hydration, skin surface pH and by analysing Fourier transform infrared spectra before and after treatment. A third cohort of 6 young adults was recruited to investigate the effect of a single treatment with the test emollient on the molecular structure of the skin barrier at greater depths by employing the tape-stripping technique. The test emollient hydrated the skin to a significantly greater extent and for a longer period of time compared to the control emollient, an effect associated with a significant elevation of carboxylate groups (a marker of natural moisturizing factor content) within the stratum corneum. Furthermore, the test emollient imparted additional benefits to the structure and function of the skin barrier not exhibited by the control emollient. In conclusion, the test emollient addressed the pathological features of xerotic aged skin, supporting its use as first-line therapy for xerotic skin conditions in this population. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Effect of a lipid-rich emollient containing ceramide 3 in experimentally induced skin barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kucharekova, M; Schalkwijk, J; Van De Kerkhof, P C M; Van De Valk, P G M

    2002-06-01

    In the present study we compared the effect of a ceramide 3-containing emollient (Locobase(R) Repair) with a control emollient (vaselinum album/cremor lanette ana) and untreated damaged skin using clinical, bioengineering and immunohistochemical methods in two different models of experimentally induced skin barrier dysfunction. In model A (n = 13) skin barrier dysfunction was inflicted at three investigation sites by tape stripping. In model B (n = 13) the volunteers were patch tested at three investigation sites with sodium dodecyl sulphate (0.2%) for 4 h a day for 4 consecutive days. The investigation sites were treated once a day with the above-mentioned agents. Irritant reaction was assessed daily by erythema scoring and measurements of transepidermal water loss (TEWL). After 5D, punch biopsies were taken from all sites. Immunohistochemical assessment was carried out with respect to epidermal proliferation, epidermal differentiation and Langerhans cells. Tape stripping resulted in an erythematous reaction and an increase of TEWL associated with up-regulation of cycling cells, involucrin and expression of cytokeratin 16. At day 4, ceramide 3-containing emollient significantly decreased (p < 0.03) the erythema score, TEWL and cycling cells in comparison with the untreated site. Repetitive exposure to SDS induced a variable degree of erythema, gradual increase of TEWL, an increase of cycling cells, and up-regulation of involucrin, E-FABP and SKALP. The treatment with the control emollient significantly prevented erythema, increase of TEWL and cycling cells at day 4 compared to the untreated site. In summary, the present study demonstrated that both tested emollients improve skin barrier in different conditions compared to the untreated skin. There is some indication that formulations containing skin-related lipids might be of benefit in barrier disruption following tape stripping. Different models and clinical trials are needed to establish the usefulness in

  3. A suction blister model reliably assesses skin barrier restoration and immune response.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tracey J; Wilson, Marques A; Young, Andrew J; Montain, Scott J

    2015-02-01

    Skin wound healing models can be used to detect changes in immune function in response to interventions. This study used a test-retest format to assess the reliability of a skin suction blister procedure for quantitatively evaluating human immune function in repeated measures type studies. Up to eight suction blisters (~30 mm(2)) were induced via suction on each participant's left and right forearm (randomized order; blister session 1 and 2), separated by approximately one week. Fluid was sampled from each blister, and the top layer of each blister was removed to reveal up to eight skin wounds. Fluid from each wound was collected 4, 7 and 24h after blisters were induced, and proinflammatory cytokines were measured. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), to assess skin barrier recovery, was measured daily at each wound site until values were within 90% of baseline values (i.e., unbroken skin). Sleep, stress and inflammation (i.e., factors that affect wound healing and immune function), preceding the blister induction, were assessed via activity monitors (Actical, Philips Respironics, Murrysville, Pennsylvania), the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and C-reactive protein (CRP), respectively. Area-under-the-curve and TEWL, between blister session 1 and 2, were compared using Pearson correlations and partial correlations (controlling for average nightly sleep, PSS scores and CRP). The suction blister method was considered reliable for assessing immune response and skin barrier recovery if correlation coefficients reached 0.7. Volunteers (n=16; 12 M; 4F) were 23 ± 5 years [mean ± SD]. Time to skin barrier restoration was 4.9 ± 0.8 and 4.8 ± 0.9 days for sessions 1 and 2, respectively. Correlation coefficients for skin barrier restoration, IL-6, IL-8 and MIP-1α were 0.9 (P<0.0001), 0.7 (P=0.008) and 0.9 (P<0.0001), respectively. When average nightly sleep, PSS scores and CRP (i.e., percent difference between sessions 1 and 2) were taken into consideration, correlations in

  4. Barriers to Seeking Help for Skin Cancer Detection in Rural Australia

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Kate M.; Martin, Kimberley; Wilson, Carlene J.; Trenerry, Camilla; Sharplin, Greg; Dollman, James

    2017-01-01

    This study explores rural South Australians’ barriers to help-seeking for skin cancer detection. A total of 201 randomly selected rural adults (18–94 years, 66% female) were presented with a skin-cancer-related scenario via telephone and were asked the extent to which various barriers would impede their help-seeking, based on an amended version of the Barriers to Help-Seeking Scale. Older (≥63 years) and less educated participants endorsed barriers more strongly than their younger, more educated counterparts in the following domains; “Concrete barriers and distrust of caregivers”, “Emotional control”, “Minimising problem and Normalisation”, “Need for control and self-reliance” (every domain other than “Privacy”). Socioeconomic disadvantage, gender, and farmer status did not predict stronger overall barriers, but some gender and occupation-related differences were detected at the item level. Farmers were also more likely to endorse the “Minimising problem and normalization” domain than their non-farmer working rural counterparts. Widely endorsed barriers included the tendency to minimise the problem, a desire to remain in control/not be influenced by others, reluctance to show emotion or complain, and having concerns about privacy or waiting times. PMID:28208803

  5. The impact of urban particulate pollution on skin barrier function and the subsequent drug absorption.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tai-Long; Wang, Pei-Wen; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Huang, Chi-Ting; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-04-01

    Ambient particulate matters (PMs) are known as inducers that adversely affect a variety of human organs. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the influence of PMs on the permeation of drugs and sunscreens via the skin. The role of skin-barrier properties such as the stratum corneum (SC) and tight junctions (TJs) during the delivery process was explored. This work was conducted using both in vitro and in vivo experiments in pigs to check the responses of the skin to PMs. PMs primarily containing heavy metals (1648a) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, 1649b) were employed to treat the skin. According to the transepidermal water loss (TEWL), 1649b but not 1648a significantly disrupted the SC integrity by 2-fold compared to the PBS control. The immunohistochemistry (IHC) of cytokeratin, filaggrin, and E-cadherin exhibited that 1649b mildly damaged TJs. The cytotoxicity of keratinocytes and skin fibroblasts caused by 1649b was stronger than that caused by 1648a. The 1649b elicited apoptosis via caspase-3 activation. The proteomic profiles showed that PMs upregulated Annexin A2 by >5-fold, which can be a biomarker of PM-induced barrier disruption. We found that the skin uptake of ascorbic acid, an extremely hydrophilic drug, was increased from 74 to 112 μg/g by 1649b treatment. The extremely lipophilic drug tretinoin also showed a 2.6-fold increase of skin accumulation. Oxybenzone and dextran absorption was not affected by PMs. The in vivo dye distribution visualized by fluorescence microscopy had indicated that 1649b intervention promoted permeant partitioning into SC. Caution should be taken in exposing the skin to airborne dust due to its ability to reduce barrier function and increase the risk of drug overabsorption, although this effect was not very marked. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Correlation of skin barrier impairment in atopic dermatitis with aeroallergen sensitization.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, Federica; Piacentini, Giorgio L; Piazza, Michele; Sandri, Marco; Boner, Attilio L; Peroni, Diego G

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) often predates the development of allergic sensitization in the so-called atopic march. Several studies have pointed out epidermal barrier impairment as a major cause of this evolution. The present study aimed to assess atopic skin integrity by means of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and Corneometer, and to investigate possible correlations between barrier integrity measurements and the degree of sensitization to aeroallergens (allergy score). Sixty-one children (6 months to 17 years old) with AD were clinically evaluated by the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis index. TEWL and Corneometer evaluations were performed on lesion sites as well as on healthy skin. The subjects underwent skin-prick testing, and the severity of allergic sensitization was assessed for each patient by summing all wheal diameters (the allergy score). The same tests were performed in 20 children without AD. In patients with AD, TEWL and Corneometer results were found to be higher and lower, respectively, on eczematous areas in comparison with healthy skin, and differences were significantly correlated to the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis index (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.007, respectively). The TEWL result was significantly higher in nonlesional skin of the patients with AD compared with that of individuals without AD (p = 0.017). Of the patients with AD, 59% were sensitized to inhalant allergens; allergy scores were positively correlated with both AD duration (r = 0.63; p < 0.0001) and nonlesional skin TEWL values (r = 0.46; p = 0.002). No significant correlation was found between allergy scores and skin parameters in subjects without AD. Patients with AD are affected by barrier function impairment, even on noneczematous skin. This defect is associated with greater aeroallergen sensitization and may contribute to allergic respiratory symptom development.

  7. Lipid to protein ratio plays an important role in the skin barrier function in patients with atopic eczema.

    PubMed

    Janssens, M; van Smeden, J; Puppels, G J; Lavrijsen, A P M; Caspers, P J; Bouwstra, J A

    2014-06-01

    The barrier function of the skin is primarily provided by the stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the skin. Skin barrier impairment is thought to be a primary factor in the pathogenesis of atopic eczema (AE). Filaggrin is an epidermal barrier protein and common mutations in the filaggrin gene strongly predispose for AE. However, the role of filaggrin mutations in the decreased skin barrier in AE is not fully understood. It was recently shown that changes in SC lipid composition and organization play a role in the reduced skin barrier in AE. To determine whether the lipid/protein ratio and the total dry SC mass per surface area are related to the skin barrier function of controls and patients with AE. A case-control study was performed to compare nonlesional and lesional skin of AE with skin of controls. The dry SC mass was determined by tape-stripping and Squamescan(™) . The ratio between lipid and protein bands in the Raman spectrum was used to determine the lipid/protein ratio. Skin barrier function was assessed by transepidermal water loss. The results show that the dry SC mass per skin area is altered only in lesional SC of patients with AE compared with control subjects. The observed reduction in the lipid/protein ratio in SC of patients with AE was more pronounced, both in lesional and nonlesional SC and correlated strongly with the skin barrier function and disease severity. The lipid/protein ratio plays a role in the reduced skin barrier function in AE. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  8. Non-sting barrier cream in radiotherapy-induced skin reactions.

    PubMed

    Scott, Audrey

    A pilot evaluation was undertaken in 13 patients with head and neck cancer exploring the use of a non-sting barrier film (Sorbaderm(®,) Aspen Medical Europe Ltd). The Society of Radiographers issued guidance in 2013 warning their members that the use of Aqueous cream for moisturising the skin during radiotherapy was potentially harmful. Patients were monitored over a period of 6 weeks and the aim was to explore whether applying non-sting barrier cream provided a protective barrier that did not impair treatment, slowed or prevented skin damage, was easy and simple to apply for patients and carers, improved quality of life for patients during radiotherapy or aided healing. There appeared to be a delay in skin breakdown in this evaluation from week 3 to week 4 and then only mild pain was recorded and with a maximum Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale of 2.5 in the patient that had combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The patients' overall assessment demonstrated that the use of non-sting barrier cream provided symptom relief in both dry, tightening and itching of the skin associated with radiotherapy. All except one patient found the cream easy to apply. The head and neck nursing team rated the product as 'good' to 'very good'.

  9. Sunscreen formulations may serve as additional water barrier on skin surface: a clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Shyr, T; Ou-Yang, H

    2016-04-01

    Extended water exposure can cause stratum corneum swelling and a more porous skin barrier. People often wear water-resistant sunscreen formulations during extended period of water activities in the summer to protect skin from harmful UV rays. We wanted to evaluate whether sunscreen formulations can also serve as additional water barriers to help mitigate the disruption in stratum corneum caused by constant exposure to water. We conducted trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) measurement in a controlled water patch (including salt and chlorine water) model and then applied this relevant model to study the effects of pre-treatments of sunscreen sprays and stick. We also conducted water sorption-desorption test in vivo with and without sunscreens. Finally, we studied the effect of constant water exposure combined with a known irritant, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), in a randomized clinical trial. We found that application of sunscreen formulations help mitigate water-induced barrier disruption by repelling water at skin surface. Pre-treatment of sunscreen also statistically decreased the irritation in an acute patch test model. Hydrophobic sunscreen formulations can help protect skin from extended water exposure by serving as additional water barriers. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  10. Epidermal ADAM17 maintains the skin barrier by regulating EGFR ligand–dependent terminal keratinocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cobzaru, Cristina; Triantafyllopoulou, Antigoni; Löffek, Stefanie; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Threadgill, David W.; Kurz, Thomas; van Rooijen, Nico; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2012-01-01

    ADAM17 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17) is ubiquitously expressed and cleaves membrane proteins, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands, l-selectin, and TNF, from the cell surface, thus regulating responses to tissue injury and inflammation. However, little is currently known about its role in skin homeostasis. We show that mice lacking ADAM17 in keratinocytes (A17ΔKC) have a normal epidermal barrier and skin architecture at birth but develop pronounced defects in epidermal barrier integrity soon after birth and develop chronic dermatitis as adults. The dysregulated expression of epidermal differentiation proteins becomes evident 2 d after birth, followed by reduced transglutaminase (TGM) activity, transepidermal water loss, up-regulation of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-36α, and inflammatory immune cell infiltration. Activation of the EGFR was strongly reduced in A17ΔKC skin, and topical treatment of A17ΔKC mice with recombinant TGF-α significantly improved TGM activity and decreased skin inflammation. Finally, we show that mice lacking the EGFR in keratinocytes (EgfrΔKC) closely resembled A17ΔKC mice. Collectively, these results identify a previously unappreciated critical role of the ADAM17–EGFR signaling axis in maintaining the homeostasis of the postnatal epidermal barrier and suggest that this pathway could represent a good target for treatment of epidermal barrier defects. PMID:22565824

  11. The effect of tacrolimus compared with betamethasone valerate on the skin barrier in volunteers with quiescent atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Danby, S G; Chittock, J; Brown, K; Albenali, L H; Cork, M J

    2014-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disease arising as a result of immune system and skin barrier defects. Topical corticosteroids are safe and effective treatments for AD, when used in short courses. Prolonged use is associated with skin barrier damage. Topical calcineurin inhibitors are alternative immune-modulating treatments for AD purported to have no negative effects on the skin barrier. To compare the effects of betamethasone valerate 0·1% cream (BMVc) and tacrolimus 0·1% ointment (TACo) on the skin barrier. Twenty volunteers with quiescent AD (no active signs for 6 months) participated in a randomized observer-blind study, wherein BMVc was applied to one forearm and TACo to the other, twice daily for 4 weeks. The biophysical/biological properties of the stratum corneum were assessed before and after treatment. Nine volunteers with active disease and 10 with healthy skin were assessed at untreated sites. BMVc significantly reduced skin barrier function, integrity and cohesion, and the levels of pyrrolidone carboxylic acid (PCA) and urocanic acid (UCA) towards the subclinical barrier defect observed in patients with AD (nonlesional sites). TACo preserved skin barrier function, integrity, cohesion and PCA and UCA levels, while significantly increasing skin hydration to levels comparable with healthy skin. Both treatments reduced skin surface pH and trypsin-like protease activity, with TACo doing so to a significantly greater degree. In quiescent AD, 4 weeks of BMVc treatment adversely affected the biophysical properties of the skin and reduced the levels of natural moisturizing factor, whereas TACo improved the condition of the skin barrier. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  12. Influence of lidocaine hydrochloride and penetration enhancers on the barrier function of human skin.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Kazumasa; Mohammed, Diar; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2014-12-30

    Skin penetration enhancers (SPEs) are commonly employed in pharmaceutical and personal care products. These compounds transiently alter the barrier properties of the skin and we have previously investigated the effects of specific SPEs on skin barrier function in vivo. In the present study the effects of incorporation of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), lidocaine hydrochloride (LID HCl) in the SPEs previously studied were investigated. Solutions of LID HCl were prepared and applied to the volar forearm of human subjects with occlusion for 24h. Subsequently, tape stripping and trans epidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements were conducted for treated and control sites. The activities of the desquamatory proteases, kallikrein 5 (KLK 5) and kallikrein 7 (KLK 7) and API content were also measured from the tape strips. The propylene glycol (PG) formulation increased TEWL significantly (p<0.05) compared with the other SPEs and a mixture of the SPEs. However, only the isopropyl myristate (IPM) solution altered protease activity with a significant observed increase in kallikrein 5 (KLK 5). Incorporation of LID HCl appeared to ameliorate the effects of some of the SPEs on TEWL measurements compared with our previous study. Overall uptake of LID HCl into skin from the various formulations correlated very well with changes in TEWL. The findings should have implications for the choice of SPEs in topical and transdermal formulations, particularly where the skin barrier function of patients is already impaired for example in atopic eczema or psoriasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Phase behaviour of skin barrier model membranes at pH 7.4.

    PubMed

    Bouwsta, J A; Gooris, G S; Dubbelaar, F E; Ponec, M

    2000-07-01

    The main function of the skin is to protect the body against exogenous substances. The skin barrier is located in the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC). This layer consists of keratin enriched cells embedded in lipid lamellae that form the main barrier for diffusion of substances through the skin. The main lipid classes in this barrier are ceramides, cholesterol and free fatty acids. Cholesterol sulfate and calcium are also present in SC. Furthermore it has been suggested that a pH gradient exists. In a previous paper the effect of cholesterol sulfate and calcium on the lipid phase behaviour of mixtures prepared from cholesterol, ceramides and free fatty acids at pH 5 was reported (approximate pH at the skin surface). In the present study the phase behaviour of mixtures prepared from cholesterol, ceramides and free fatty acids prepared at pH 7.4 (the pH of viable cells) has been examined between 25 and 95 degrees C. Our studies reveal that a reversed hexagonal phase has been formed at elevated temperatures. Addition of calcium inhibits the formation of the reversed hexagonal phase, while cholesterol sulfate promotes the presence of the reversed hexagonal phase at increased temperatures. From our results we can conclude that the lipid mixtures prepared at pH 5 resemble more closely the lipid phase behaviour in intact SC than the lipid mixtures prepared at pH 7.4.

  14. Incontinence pad absorption and skin barrier creams: a non-patient study.

    PubMed

    Dykes, Peter; Bradbury, Sarah

    2016-12-08

    Exposure of the skin to excessive moisture, such as in cases of incontinence, can damage its natural barrier function and lead to tissue damage and breakdown. Common methods for managing incontinence and preventing related skin damage include the use of incontinence pads and the application of skin barrier creams to reduce exposure to moisture and irritants. Previous reports have indicated that barrier creams can transfer onto incontinence pads from the skin and reduce their absorbency, and thus the efficacy of both products. This study, using non-patient volunteers, investigated the effect on incontinence pad absorbency of Medi Derma-S and Medi Derma-Pro; two products from the Medi Skin Protection range, in comparison with other market-leading products. Results indicated that, while there was a small degree of product transfer onto the incontinence pads, this did not have a major impact on the absorption of synthetic urine. Medi Derma-S and Medi Derma-Pro performed consistently with other similar market-leading products.

  15. Shielded corneosurfametry and corneoxenometry: novel bioassays for the assessment of skin barrier products.

    PubMed

    Goffin, V; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Piérard, G E

    1998-01-01

    One of the most frequent occupational and environmental insults to the skin is linked to chronic exposure to weak irritants. There is a need for new predictive tests assessing the efficacy of barrier creams. Shielded variants of corneosurfametry and corneoxenometry are introduced as novel ex vivo bioassays applicable for comparing protection to surfactants and organic solvents. Both bioassays showed good reproducibility for each offending agent and skin-protective products. Significant differences in efficacy were indicated between the presumptive barrier products. Shielded corneosurfametry and corneoxenometry may be convenient bioassays to compare the protection afforded by topical products against specific offending compounds to the skin. They avoid animal testing and toxicological hazards in human testing. In addition, they are cheap, rapid and reproducible.

  16. The atopic march: current insights into skin barrier dysfunction and epithelial cell-derived cytokines.

    PubMed

    Han, Hongwei; Roan, Florence; Ziegler, Steven F

    2017-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis often precedes the development of other atopic diseases. The atopic march describes this temporal relationship in the natural history of atopic diseases. Although the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie this relationship are poorly understood, epidemiological and genetic data have suggested that the skin might be an important route of sensitization to allergens. Animal models have begun to elucidate how skin barrier defects can lead to systemic allergen sensitization. Emerging data now suggest that epithelial cell-derived cytokines such as thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), IL-33, and IL-25 may drive the progression from atopic dermatitis to asthma and food allergy. This review focuses on current concepts of the role of skin barrier defects and epithelial cell-derived cytokines in the initiation and maintenance of allergic inflammation and the atopic march. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Dimethicone barrier cream prevents infection of human skin by schistosome cercariae: evidence from Franz cell studies.

    PubMed

    Ingram, R J; Bartlett, A; Brown, M B; Marriott, C; Whiffield, R J

    2002-04-01

    One approach to the prevention of schistosomiasis is the use of topical formulations to inhibit cercarial penetration of skin. A number of formulations containing either cercaricidal ingredients or components designed to inhibit penetration have been studied, but with variable results. Such studies have rarely considered the persistence of inhibitory effects through time, and to date, there have been no systematic investigations of barrier formulations. The aim of this study was to use Franz cells to investigate the effect of such barrier creams on the penetration of S. mansoni cercariae into human skin. The results show that a single application of a barrier cream based on dimethicone offers a high level of protection against penetration that is sustained for at least 48 hr.

  18. Chemical ultraviolet absorbers topically applied in a skin barrier mimetic formulation remain in the outer stratum corneum of porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Haque, T; Crowther, J M; Lane, M E; Moore, D J

    2016-08-20

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the fate of three chemical sunscreens, isoamyl p-methoxycinnamate (IPMC), diethylamino hydroxybenzoyl hexyl benzoate (DHHB), and bis-ethylhexylphenol methoxyphenyl triazine (BEMT), topically applied to mammalian skin from a skin barrier mimetic oil-in-water formulation. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) methods were developed for the analysis of each molecule and validated. Franz cell permeation studies were conducted following application of finite doses of the formulations to excised porcine skin. A vehicle formulation containing no sunscreens was evaluated as a control. Permeation studies were conducted for 12h after which full mass balance studies were carried out. Analysis of individual UV sunscreens was achieved with HPLC following application of the formulation to the skin with no interference from the vehicle components. No skin permeation of any of the chemical sunscreens was evident after 12h. While sunscreens were detected in up to 12 tape strips taken from the SC, 87% or more of the applied doses recovered in the first 5 tape strips. When corrected for the amount of protein removed per tape strip this corresponded to a penetration depth in porcine stratum corneum of ∼1.7μm. Mass balance studies indicated total recovery values were within accepted guidelines for cosmetic formulations. Overall, only superficial penetration into the SC was observed for each compound. These findings are consistent with the physicochemical properties of the selected UV absorbing molecules and their formulation into an ordered biomimetic barrier formulation thus support their intended use in topical consumer formulations designed to protect from UV exposure. To our knowledge this is the first report of depth profiling of chemical sunscreens in the SC that combines tape stripping and protein determination following in vitro Franz cell studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute Pain Speeds Skin Barrier Recovery in Healthy Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Jennifer E.; Song, Sunmi; Engeland, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Psychological stress is known to impair skin barrier recovery, but little is known about the impact of pain on skin healing processes. Our primary goals were to examine the degree to which acute pain affects recovery from skin barrier disruption, and the potential mediating impact of cortisol and catecholamines. Methods Healthy non-smokers aged 18-43 (N=53, 65% women) underwent a 3-minute cold pressor pain stimulus to their foot. Tape-stripping of forearm skin occurred at two separate locations: before (site 1) and after (site 2) the pain stimulus. Transepidural water loss (TEWL) was assessed at baseline (pre-stripping), immediately post-stripping, and at 75 minutes to determine skin barrier recovery. Cortisol and catecholamine responses were obtained from multiple saliva and plasma samples, respectively. Results Contrary to expectations, greater pain was associated with faster skin barrier recovery, even after controlling for demographics, mood, anxiety, and other factors. Those who reported higher pain showed faster recovery at site 2 compared to a) individuals who experienced lower pain; and b) their own recovery at site 1. Greater increase in norepinephrine (but not in cortisol) was also associated with faster recovery at site 2, and mediated the impact of pain on recovery. Discussion Results bolster evidence that acute pain can affect immune-related processes. It is possible that acute pain may speed recovery from dermal abrasions, although pain is likely to impair recovery from more severe wounds. As pain is an important potential target for clinical intervention, further investigation of pain, stress, and healing processes is warranted. PMID:23148814

  20. The effect of environmental humidity and temperature on skin barrier function and dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Engebretsen, K A; Johansen, J D; Kezic, S; Linneberg, A; Thyssen, J P

    2016-02-01

    Physicians are aware that climatic conditions negatively affect the skin. In particular, people living in equator far countries such as the Northern parts of Europe and North America are exposed to harsh weather during the winter and may experience dry and itchy skin, or deterioration of already existing dermatoses. We searched the literature for studies that evaluated the mechanisms behind this phenomenon. Commonly used meteorological terms such as absolute humidity, relative humidity and dew point are explained. Furthermore, we review the negative effect of low humidity, low temperatures and different seasons on the skin barrier and on the risk of dermatitis. We conclude that low humidity and low temperatures lead to a general decrease in skin barrier function and increased susceptible towards mechanical stress. Since pro-inflammatory cytokines and cortisol are released by keratinocytes, and the number of dermal mast cells increases, the skin also becomes more reactive towards skin irritants and allergens. Collectively, published data show that cold and dry weather increase the prevalence and risk of flares in patients with atopic dermatitis.

  1. Selectively reduced glycerol in skin of aquaporin-3-deficient mice may account for impaired skin hydration, elasticity, and barrier recovery.

    PubMed

    Hara, Mariko; Ma, Tonghui; Verkman, A S

    2002-11-29

    Deletion of the epidermal water/glycerol transporter aquaporin-3 (AQP3) in mice reduced superficial skin conductance by approximately 2-fold (Ma, T., Hara, M., Sougrat, R., Verbavatz, J. M., and Verkman, A. S. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 17147-17153), suggesting defective stratum corneum (SC) hydration. Here, we demonstrate significant impairment of skin hydration, elasticity, barrier recovery, and wound healing in AQP3 null mice in a hairless (SKH1) genetic background and investigate the cause of the functional defects by analysis of SC morphology and composition. Utilizing a novel (3)H(2)O distribution method, SC water content was reduced by approximately 50% in AQP3 null mice. Skin elasticity measured by cutometry was significantly reduced in AQP3 null mice with approximately 50% reductions in elasticity parameters Uf, Ue, and Ur. Although basal skin barrier function was not impaired, AQP3 deletion produced an approximately 2-fold delay in recovery of barrier function as measured by transepidermal water loss after tape stripping. Another biosynthetic skin function, wound healing, was also approximately 2-fold delayed by AQP3 deletion. By electron microscopy AQP3 deletion did not affect the structure of the unperturbed SC. The SC content of ions (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+)) and small solutes (urea, lactic acid, glucose) was not affected by AQP3 deletion nor was the absolute amount or profile of lipids and free amino acids. However, AQP3 deletion produced significant reductions in glycerol content in SC and epidermis (in nmol/microg protein: 5.5 +/- 0.4 versus 2.3 +/- 0.7 in SC; 0.037 +/- 0.007 versus 0.022 +/- 0.005 in epidermis) but not in dermis or blood. These results establish hydration, mechanical, and biosynthetic defects in skin of AQP3-deficient mice. The selective reduction in epidermal and SC glycerol content in AQP3 null mice may account for these defects, providing the first functional evidence for physiologically important glycerol transport by an

  2. The role of the skin barrier in modulating the effects of common skin microbial species on the inflammation, differentiation and proliferation status of epidermal keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Skin resident microbial species are often thought of either as pathogenic or commensal. However, little is known about the role of the skin barrier in modulating their potential for causing disease. To investigate this question we measured the effects of three microbial species commonly found on the skin (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Propionibacterium acnes) on a reconstructed human epidermal model by either applying the bacteria on the model surface (intact barrier) or adding them to the culture medium (simulating barrier breach). Results When added to the medium, all of the tested species induced inflammatory responses and keratinocyte cell death with species-specific potency. P. acnes and S. epidermidis induced specific alterations in the expression of keratinocyte differentiation and proliferation markers, suggesting a barrier reparation response. S. aureus induced complete keratinocyte cell death. On the contrary, topically applied S. epidermidis and P. acnes caused no inflammatory response even when tested at high concentrations, while topical S. aureus induced a weak reaction. None of the tested species were able to alter the expression of keratinocyte differentiation or expression markers, when applied topically. Conclusions We show that the skin barrier prevents the effects of common skin bacteria on epidermal keratinocyte inflammation, differentiation and proliferation and highlight the importance of skin barrier in defending against the pathogenic effects of common skin bacteria. PMID:24245826

  3. Local Burn Injury Impairs Epithelial Permeability and Antimicrobial Peptide Barrier Function in Distal Unburned Skin*

    PubMed Central

    Plichta, Jennifer K.; Droho, Steve; Curtis, Brenda J.; Patel, Parita; Gamelli, Richard L.; Radek, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to characterize the mechanisms by which local burn injury compromises epithelial barrier function in burn margin, containing the elements necessary for healing of the burn site, and in distal unburned skin, which serves as potential donor tissue. Design Experimental mouse scald burn injury. Setting University Research Laboratory. Subjects C57/Bl6 Male mice, 8–12 weeks old. Interventions To confirm that dehydration was not contributing to our observed barrier defects, in some experiments mice received 1 mL of saline fluid immediately after burn, while a subgroup received an additional 0.5 mL at 4 hours and 1 mL at 24 hours following burn. We then assessed skin pH and transepidermal water loss every 12 hours on the burn wounds for 72 hours postburn. Measurements and Main Results Burn margin exhibited increased epidermal barrier permeability indicated by higher pH, greater transepidermal water loss, and reduced lipid synthesis enzyme expression and structural protein production up to 96 hours postburn. By contrast, antimicrobial peptide production and protease activity were elevated in burn margin. Skin extracts from burn margin did not exhibit changes in the ability to inhibit bacterial growth. However, distal unburned skin from burned mice also demonstrated an impaired response to barrier disruption, indicated by elevated transepidermal water loss and reduced lipid synthesis enzyme and structural protein expression up to 96 hours postburn. Furthermore, skin extracts from distal unburned skin exhibited greater protease activity and a reduced capacity to inhibit bacterial growth of several skin pathogens. Finally, we established that antimicrobial peptide levels were also altered in the lung and bladder, which are common sites of secondary infection in burn-injured patients. Conclusions These findings reveal several undefined deficiencies in epithelial barrier function at the burn margin, potential donor skin sites, and organs

  4. Ichthyosis in Sjögren–Larsson syndrome reflects defective barrier function due to abnormal lamellar body structure and secretion

    PubMed Central

    S’Aulis, Dana; Jennings, M. Anitia; Crumrine, Debra A.; Williams, Mary L.; Elias, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Sjögren–Larsson syndrome is a genetic disease characterized by ichthyosis, mental retardation, spasticity and mutations in the ALDH3A2 gene coding for fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase, an enzyme necessary for oxidation of fatty aldehydes and fatty alcohols. We investigated the cutaneous abnormalities in 9 patients with Sjögren–Larsson syndrome to better understand how the enzymatic deficiency results in epidermal dysfunction. Histochemical staining for aldehyde oxidizing activity was profoundly reduced in the epidermis. Colloidal lanthanum perfusion studies showed abnormal movement of tracer into the extracellular spaces of the stratum corneum consistent with a leaky water barrier. The barrier defect could be attributed to the presence of abnormal lamellar bodies, many with disrupted limiting membranes or lacking lamellar contents. Entombed lamellar bodies were present in the cytoplasm of corneocytes suggesting blockade of lamellar body secretion. At the stratum granulosum–stratum corneum interface, non-lamellar material displaced or replaced secreted lamellar membranes, and in the stratum corneum, the number of lamellar bilayers declined and lamellar membrane organization was disrupted by foci of lamellar/non-lamellar phase separation. These studies demonstrate the presence of a permeability barrier abnormality in Sjögren–Larsson syndrome, which localizes to the stratum corneum interstices and can be attributed to abnormalities in lamellar body formation and secretion. PMID:20049467

  5. Ichthyosis in Sjögren-Larsson syndrome reflects defective barrier function due to abnormal lamellar body structure and secretion.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, William B; S'Aulis, Dana; Jennings, M Anitia; Crumrine, Debra A; Williams, Mary L; Elias, Peter M

    2010-08-01

    Sjögren-Larsson syndrome is a genetic disease characterized by ichthyosis, mental retardation, spasticity and mutations in the ALDH3A2 gene coding for fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase, an enzyme necessary for oxidation of fatty aldehydes and fatty alcohols. We investigated the cutaneous abnormalities in 9 patients with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome to better understand how the enzymatic deficiency results in epidermal dysfunction. Histochemical staining for aldehyde oxidizing activity was profoundly reduced in the epidermis. Colloidal lanthanum perfusion studies showed abnormal movement of tracer into the extracellular spaces of the stratum corneum consistent with a leaky water barrier. The barrier defect could be attributed to the presence of abnormal lamellar bodies, many with disrupted limiting membranes or lacking lamellar contents. Entombed lamellar bodies were present in the cytoplasm of corneocytes suggesting blockade of lamellar body secretion. At the stratum granulosum-stratum corneum interface, non-lamellar material displaced or replaced secreted lamellar membranes, and in the stratum corneum, the number of lamellar bilayers declined and lamellar membrane organization was disrupted by foci of lamellar/non-lamellar phase separation. These studies demonstrate the presence of a permeability barrier abnormality in Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, which localizes to the stratum corneum interstices and can be attributed to abnormalities in lamellar body formation and secretion.

  6. Effect of olive and sunflower seed oil on the adult skin barrier: implications for neonatal skin care.

    PubMed

    Danby, Simon G; AlEnezi, Tareq; Sultan, Amani; Lavender, Tina; Chittock, John; Brown, Kirsty; Cork, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Natural oils are advocated and used throughout the world as part of neonatal skin care, but there is an absence of evidence to support this practice. The goal of the current study was to ascertain the effect of olive oil and sunflower seed oil on the biophysical properties of the skin. Nineteen adult volunteers with and without a history of atopic dermatitis were recruited into two randomized forearm-controlled mechanistic studies. The first cohort applied six drops of olive oil to one forearm twice daily for 5 weeks. The second cohort applied six drops of olive oil to one forearm and six drops of sunflower seed oil to the other twice daily for 4 weeks. The effect of the treatments was evaluated by determining stratum corneum integrity and cohesion, intercorneocyte cohesion, moisturization, skin-surface pH, and erythema. Topical application of olive oil for 4 weeks caused a significant reduction in stratum corneum integrity and induced mild erythema in volunteers with and without a history of atopic dermatitis. Sunflower seed oil preserved stratum corneum integrity, did not cause erythema, and improved hydration in the same volunteers. In contrast to sunflower seed oil, topical treatment with olive oil significantly damages the skin barrier, and therefore has the potential to promote the development of, and exacerbate existing, atopic dermatitis. The use of olive oil for the treatment of dry skin and infant massage should therefore be discouraged. These findings challenge the unfounded belief that all natural oils are beneficial for the skin and highlight the need for further research.

  7. Moisturizers change the mRNA expression of enzymes synthesizing skin barrier lipids.

    PubMed

    Buraczewska, Izabela; Berne, Berit; Lindberg, Magnus; Lodén, Marie; Törmä, Hans

    2009-09-01

    In a previous study, 7-week treatment of normal human skin with two test moisturizers, Complex cream and Hydrocarbon cream, was shown to affect mRNA expression of certain genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation. Moreover, the treatment altered transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in opposite directions. In the present study, the mRNA expression of genes important for formation of barrier lipids, i.e., cholesterol, free fatty acids and ceramides, was examined. Treatment with Hydrocarbon cream, which increased TEWL, also elevated the gene expression of GBA, SPTLC2, SMPD1, ALOX12B, ALOXE3, and HMGCS1. In addition, the expression of PPARG was decreased. On the other hand, Complex cream, which decreased TEWL, induced only the expression of PPARG, although not confirmed at the protein level. Furthermore, in the untreated skin, a correlation between the mRNA expression of PPARG and ACACB, and TEWL was found, suggesting that these genes are important for the skin barrier homeostasis. The observed changes further demonstrate that long-term treatment with certain moisturizers may induce dysfunctional skin barrier, and as a consequence several signaling pathways are altered.

  8. Fabrication of pseudo-ceramide-based lipid microparticles for recovery of skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hoon; Park, Woo Ram; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Cho, Eun Chul; An, Eun Jung; Kim, Jin-Woong; Oh, Seong-Geun

    2012-06-01

    The recovery of skin barrier functions was investigated with pseudo-ceramide-based lipid microparticles. The microparticles were prepared by using a fluid bed technique where lipid components (a pseudo-ceramide, cholesterol and a fatty acid) were coated on a sugar seed, and a polymer was subsequently coated on the lipid microparticles. The microparticles contained large amount of pseudo-ceramide, and the pseudo-ceramide was in the form of lamellar structures mixed with other lipid components. In addition, the microparticles were stably dispersed in aqueous media or emulsion systems without any disruption of the microparticles' structures, thereby supplying sufficient amount of the pseudo-ceramide to skins for improving skin barrier functions such as preventing water loss. Such a role of the microparticles was proven by evaluating in vivo the efficacy of the lipid microparticles in reducing a trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) of impaired murine skins. As a result, the novel pseudo-ceramide-based lipid microparticles for barrier recovery may potentially be applied in the field of dermatology, cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Niacinamide-containing facial moisturizer improves skin barrier and benefits subjects with rosacea.

    PubMed

    Draelos, Zoe Diana; Ertel, Keith; Berge, Cindy

    2005-08-01

    A growing body of literature suggests that some moisturizers can improve stratum corneum barrier function, as well as ameliorate dry skin. The clinical signs and symptoms of rosacea, which include increased facial skin dryness and sensitivity, suggest a possible role for such moisturizers as an adjuvant in the management of this condition. This randomized, investigator-blind, controlled observational study (N = 50) was designed to assess whether a niacinamide-containing facial moisturizer would improve the stratum corneum barrier and thus provide a clinical benefit to subjects with rosacea. Subjects with rosacea applied the test moisturizer to their face and to one forearm twice daily for 4 weeks. The other forearm remained untreated as a control. Barrier function on the forearms was assessed instrumentally and using a dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) chemical probe. Stratum corneum hydration also was measured instrumentally. The dermatologist investigator evaluated each subject's rosacea condition over the course of the study, and subjects self-assessed their facial skin condition at study end. Instruments provided objective measures of stratum corneum barrier function and hydration on the face.

  10. Superresolution and Fluorescence Dynamics Evidence Reveal That Intact Liposomes Do Not Cross the Human Skin Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Dreier, Jes; Sørensen, Jens A.; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we use the combination of super resolution optical microscopy and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) to study the mechanism of action of liposomes as transdermal drug delivery systems in human skin. Two different compositions of liposomes were applied to newly excised human skin, a POPC liposome and a more flexible liposome containing the surfactant sodium cholate. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED) images of intact skin and cryo-sections of skin treated with labeled liposomes were recorded displaying an optical resolution low enough to resolve the 100 nm liposomes in the skin. The images revealed that virtually none of the liposomes remained intact beneath the skin surface. RICS two color cross correlation diffusion measurements of double labeled liposomes confirmed these observations. Our results suggest that the liposomes do not act as carriers that transport their cargo directly through the skin barrier, but mainly burst and fuse with the outer lipid layers of the stratum corneum. It was also found that the flexible liposomes showed a greater delivery of the fluorophore into the stratum corneum, indicating that they functioned as chemical permeability enhancers. PMID:26751684

  11. Metabolic and redox barriers in the skin exposed to drugs and xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Korkina, Liudmila

    2016-01-01

    Growing exposure of human skin to environmental and occupational hazards, to numerous skin care/beauty products, and to topical drugs led to a biomedical concern regarding sustainability of cutaneous chemical defence that is essential for protection against intoxication. Since skin is the largest extra-hepatic drug/xenobiotic metabolising organ where redox-dependent metabolic pathways prevail, in this review, publications on metabolic processes leading to redox imbalance (oxidative stress) and its autocrine/endocrine impact to cutaneous drug/xenobiotic metabolism were scrutinised. Chemical and photo-chemical skin barriers contain metabolic and redox compartments: their protective and homeostatic functions. The review will examine the striking similarity of adaptive responses to exogenous chemical/photo-chemical stressors and endogenous toxins in cutaneous metabolic and redox system; the role(s) of xenobiotics/drugs and phase II enzymes in the endogenous antioxidant defence and maintenance of redox balance; redox regulation of interactions between metabolic and inflammatory responses in skin cells; skin diseases sharing metabolic and redox problems (contact dermatitis, lupus erythematosus, and vitiligo) Due to exceptional the redox dependence of cutaneous metabolic pathways and interaction of redox active metabolites/exogenous antioxidants with drug/xenobiotic metabolism, metabolic tests of topical xenobiotics/drugs should be combined with appropriate redox analyses and performed on 3D human skin models.

  12. Glycerol replacement corrects defective skin hydration, elasticity, and barrier function in aquaporin-3-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Mariko; Verkman, A. S.

    2003-01-01

    Mice deficient in the epidermal water/glycerol transporter aquaporin-3 (AQP3) have reduced stratum corneum (SC) hydration and skin elasticity, and impaired barrier recovery after SC removal. SC glycerol content is reduced 3-fold in AQP3 null mice, whereas SC structure, protein/lipid composition, and ion/osmolyte content are not changed. We show here that glycerol replacement corrects each of the defects in AQP3 null mice. SC water content, measured by skin conductance and 3H2O accumulation, was 3-fold lower in AQP3 null vs. wild-type mice, but became similar after topical or systemic administration of glycerol in quantities that normalized SC glycerol content. SC water content was not corrected by glycerol-like osmolytes such as xylitol, erythritol, and propanediol. Orally administered glycerol fully corrected the reduced skin elasticity in AQP3 null mice as measured by the kinetics of skin displacement after suction, and the delayed barrier recovery as measured by transepidermal water loss after tape-stripping. Analysis of [14C]glycerol kinetics indicated reduced blood-to-SC transport of glycerol in AQP3 null mice, resulting in slowed lipid biosynthesis. These data provide functional evidence for a physiological role of glycerol transport by an aquaglyceroporin, and indicate that glycerol is a major determinant of SC water retention, and mechanical and biosynthetic functions. Our findings establish a scientific basis for the >200-yr-old empirical practice of including glycerol in cosmetic and medicinal skin formulations. PMID:12771381

  13. The role of ceramide chain length distribution on the barrier properties of the skin lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Mojumdar, E H; Kariman, Z; van Kerckhove, L; Gooris, G S; Bouwstra, J A

    2014-10-01

    The skin barrier function is provided by the stratum corneum (SC). The lipids in the SC are composed of three lipid classes: ceramides (CERs), cholesterol (CHOL) and free fatty acids (FFAs) which form two crystalline lamellar structures. In the present study, we investigate the effect of CER chain length distribution on the barrier properties of model lipid membranes mimicking the lipid composition and organization of SC. The membranes were prepared with either isolated pig CERs (PCERs) or synthetic CERs. While PCERs have a wide chain length distribution, the synthetic CERs are quite uniform in chain length. The barrier properties were examined by means of permeation studies using hydrocortisone as a model drug. Our studies revealed a reduced barrier in lipid membranes prepared with PCERs compared to synthetic CERs. Additional studies revealed that a wider chain length distribution of PCERs results in an enhanced hexagonal packing and increased conformational disordering of the lipid tails compared to synthetic CERs, while the lamellar phases did not change. This demonstrates that the chain length distribution affects the lipid barrier by reducing the lipid ordering and density within the lipid lamellae. In subsequent studies, the effect of increased levels of FFAs or CERs with a long acyl chain in the PCERs membranes was also studied. These changes in lipid composition enhanced the level of orthorhombic packing, reduced the conformational disordering and increased the barrier of the lipid membranes. In conclusion, the CER chain length distribution is an important key factor for maintaining a proper barrier.

  14. Mechanisms of contact sensitization offer insights into the role of barrier defects vs. intrinsic immune abnormalities as drivers of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Dhingra, Nikhil; Gulati, Nicholas; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2013-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory skin disease characterized by wet, oozing, erythematous, pruritic lesions in the acute stage and xerotic, lichenified plaques in the chronic stage. It frequently coexists with asthma and allergic rhinitis, sharing some mechanistic features with these diseases as part of the "atopic march." Controversy exists as to whether immune abnormalities, epidermal barrier defects, or both are the primary factors responsible for disease pathogenesis. In AD patients, there is often a coexisting irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) or allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) that is sometimes clinically difficult to distinguish from AD. ACD shares molecular mechanisms with AD, including increased cellular infiltrates and cytokine activation (Gittler et al., 2013). In this issue, Newell et al. (2013) used an experimental contact sensitization model with dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) to gain insight into the unique immune phenotype of AD patients.

  15. Characteristic differences in barrier and hygroscopic properties between normal and cosmetic dry skin. I. Enhanced barrier analysis with sequential tape-stripping.

    PubMed

    Lu, N; Chandar, P; Tempesta, D; Vincent, C; Bajor, J; McGuiness, H

    2014-04-01

    Cosmetic dry skin often has a lower hydration level but a similar apparent barrier function, as measured by transepidermal water loss (TEWL), than that of the normal skin. To investigate the intrinsic difference in barrier property and moisture-holding ability between the cosmetic dry and normal skin, we developed a new clinical and data analysis procedure based on sequential tape-stripping with TEWL measurement, coupled with chemical analysis for protein and natural moisturizing factors (NMF) in the stratum corneum. A clinical study consisting of 64 healthy Caucasian female subjects with normal and cosmetic dry skin was conducted according to our clinical and data collection protocols. After the baseline visual dryness assessment, 20 tape-strips were placed and removed on each test site using D-Squame tapes. TEWL was measured at baseline and after the 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th tape-strips. All tapes were analysed for protein mass via chemical extraction and the Pierce BCA protein assay, as well as using an infrared densitometry device SquameScan 850A. The stratum corneum thickness and barrier quality (water transport resistance per thickness of the stratum corneum) were decoupled from the apparent barrier function using the TEWL and protein data. A linear relationship between 1/TEWL and cumulative protein removal was observed for both normal and cosmetic dry skin. However, the slope of the linear relation was significantly steeper for normal skin, and significantly more protein was removed from cosmetic dry skin. The results showed that on average, the barrier quality of the stratum corneum of the normal skin is about 40% higher than that of the dry skin, whereas the stratum corneum of the dry skin is about 30% thicker than that of the normal skin. In addition, the amount of SC removal in sequential tape-stripping is generally non-uniform. Our results demonstrated that there are characteristic differences in the barrier property between normal and cosmetic dry skin

  16. IL-25 induces both inflammation and skin barrier dysfunction in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Deleuran, Mette; Hvid, Malene; Kemp, Kaare; Christensen, Gitte B; Deleuran, Bent; Vestergaard, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing skin disease characterized by having both an epidermal and a dermal component, shown as a barrier deficiency and inflammation. The mechanisms resulting in skewing the immune response in a Th2 direction in AD are still not fully elucidated. We suggest that IL-25 could be a major target in AD. IL-25 is produced by cells within the dermis of AD patients, and we suggest these to be dendritic cells (DCs). Furthermore, we show that IL-25 can inhibit filaggrin synthesis in keratinocytes. These results point towards a central role of IL-25 producing DCs that can induce both a Th2 response and inhibit filaggrin synthesis. We believe this strongly supports a role for IL-25 in AD, bridging the gap between inflammation and impaired skin barrier function.

  17. The role of social closeness during tape stripping to facilitate skin barrier recovery: Preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Hayley; Ravikulan, Abhimati; Nater, Urs M; Skoluda, Nadine; Jarrett, Paul; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    Social support is known to reduce the negative effects of stress on health, but there is mixed evidence for the effects of social support on wound healing. This study aimed to investigate whether undergoing a task designed to promote social closeness with a fellow participant and being paired with that person during a tape-stripping procedure could reduce stress and improve skin barrier recovery compared to going through tape stripping alone. Seventy-two healthy adults were randomized to either a social closeness condition where participants completed a relationship-building task and tape stripping in pairs or a control condition where they completed tape stripping alone. Skin barrier recovery was measured using transepidermal water loss. Salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase were collected at four time points as markers of the endocrine and autonomic stress response. Social closeness had a beneficial effect on skin barrier recovery compared to the control condition, t(54) = 2.86, p = .006, r = .36. Social closeness significantly reduced self-reported stress. The effects of the intervention on skin barrier recovery were moderated by self-reported stress reduction (p = .035). There were no significant differences in cortisol between groups, but alpha-amylase increased significantly more from baseline to after tape stripping in the control group compared to the intervention group. This is the first study to show that social closeness with a person going through a similar unfamiliar procedure can positively influence wound healing. Future research needs to replicate these findings in other wound types and in clinical settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Skin barrier homeostasis in atopic dermatitis: feedback regulation of kallikrein activity.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Reiko J; Ono, Masahiro; Harrington, Heather A

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a widely spread cutaneous chronic disease characterised by sensitive reactions (eg. eczema) to normally innocuous elements. Although relatively little is understood about its underlying mechanisms due to its complexity, skin barrier dysfunction has been recognised as a key factor in the development of AD. Skin barrier homeostasis requires tight control of the activity of proteases, called kallikreins (KLKs), whose activity is regulated by a complex network of protein interactions that remains poorly understood despite its pathological importance. Characteristic symptoms of AD include the outbreak of inflammation triggered by external (eg. mechanical and chemical) stimulus and the persistence and aggravation of inflammation even if the initial stimulus disappears. These characteristic symptoms, together with some experimental data, suggest the presence of positive feedback regulation for KLK activity by inflammatory signals. We developed simple mathematical models for the KLK activation system to study the effects of feedback loops and carried out bifurcation analysis to investigate the model behaviours corresponding to inflammation caused by external stimulus. The model analysis confirmed that the hypothesised core model mechanisms capture the essence of inflammation outbreak by a defective skin barrier. Our models predicted the outbreaks of inflammation at weaker stimulus and its longer persistence in AD patients compared to healthy control. We also proposed a novel quantitative indicator for inflammation level by applying principal component analysis to microarray data. The model analysis reproduced qualitative AD characteristics revealed by this indicator. Our results strongly implicate the presence and importance of feedback mechanisms in KLK activity regulation. We further proposed future experiments that may provide informative data to enhance the system-level understanding on the regulatory mechanisms of skin barrier in AD and

  19. Enhanced barrier functions and anti-inflammatory effect of cultured coconut extract on human skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soomin; Jang, Ji Eun; Kim, Jihee; Lee, Young In; Lee, Dong Won; Song, Seung Yong; Lee, Ju Hee

    2017-08-01

    Natural plant oils have been used as a translational alternative to modern medicine. Particularly, virgin coconut oil (VCO) has gained popularity because of its potential benefits in pharmaceutical, nutritional, and cosmetic applications. Cultured coconut extract (CCE) is an alternative end product of VCO, which undergoes a further bacterial fermentation process. This study aimed to investigate the effects of CCE on human skin. We analyzed the expression of skin barrier molecules and collagens after applying CCE on human explanted skin. To evaluate the anti-inflammatory properties of CCE, the expression of inflammatory markers was analyzed after ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation. The CCE-treated group showed increased expression of cornified cell envelope components, which contribute to protective barrier functions of the stratum corneum. Further, the expression of inflammatory markers was lower in the CCE-treated group after exposure to UVB radiation. These results suggest an anti-inflammatory effect of CCE against UVB irradiation-induced inflammation. Additionally, the CCE-treated group showed increased collagen and hyaluronan synthase-3 expression. In our study, CCE showed a barrier-enhancing effect and anti-inflammatory properties against ex vivo UVB irradiation-induced inflammation. The promising effect of CCE may be attributed to its high levels of polyphenols and fatty acid components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Olopatadine ameliorates rat experimental cutaneous inflammation by improving skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Tadafumi; Matsubara, Masahiro; Amano, Toru; Chida, Michihiro

    2008-01-01

    Olopatadine hydrochloride (olopatadine) is an antiallergic agent with histamine H(1) receptor antagonistic action. We investigated the possible efficacies of olopatadine on the chronic inflammatory dermatitis and the impaired skin barrier functions induced by repeated application of oxazolone in rats. Oxazolone-sensitized rats were challenged with oxazolone applied to the ear every 3 days. Olopatadine was orally administered once daily (1 and 3 mg/kg/day). The effects of the drug were quantified by measurements of ear thickness, levels of cytokines in the lesioned ear and the number of scratching episodes. As parameters of skin barrier function, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and hyaluronic acid (HA) levels in the lesioned ear were measured. The effect of olopatadine on the production of HA by cultured dermal fibroblasts was also measured. Repeated topical application of oxazolone to rat ears induced local inflammation that was exemplified by swelling. In inflamed ears, the amount of IFN gamma increased at both the protein and mRNA level, but IL-4 levels changed minimally. Olopatadine significantly decreased ear swelling and the number of scratching episodes. The drug also significantly inhibited the increase of IFN gamma and nerve growth factor production in inflamed ears. Olopatadine significantly inhibited the increase in TEWL and the decrease in HA in lesioned ears. Furthermore, the drug stimulated the production of HA by cultured dermal fibroblasts. These results suggest that olopatadine suppressed inflammation and scratching not only by inhibiting cytokine production, but also by repairing skin barrier function. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Intercellular skin barrier lipid composition and organization in Netherton syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    van Smeden, Jeroen; Janssens, Michelle; Boiten, Walter A; van Drongelen, Vincent; Furio, Laetitia; Vreeken, Rob J; Hovnanian, Alain; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2014-05-01

    Netherton syndrome (NTS) is a rare genetic skin disease caused by mutations in the serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 5 gene, which encodes the lympho-epithelial Kazal-type-related inhibitor. NTS patients have profoundly impaired skin barrier function. As stratum corneum (SC) lipids have a crucial role in the skin barrier function, we investigated the SC lipid composition and organization in NTS patients. We studied the SC lipid composition by means of mass spectrometry, and the lipid organization was examined by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Decreased free fatty acid (FFA) chain length and increased levels of monounsaturated FFAs were observed in the SC of NTS patients compared with controls. Furthermore, the level of short-chain ceramides (CERs) was enhanced in NTS patients and a strong reduction in long-chain CER levels was seen in several patients. The changes in lipid composition modified the lipid organization leading to an increased disordering of the lipids compared with the controls. In addition, in a subgroup of patients the organization of the lipid layers changed dramatically. The altered FFA and CER profiles in NTS patients corresponded to changes in the expression of enzymes involved in SC lipid processing. The observed changes in lipid composition, lipid organization, and enzyme expression are likely to contribute to the barrier dysfunction in NTS.

  2. Investigating the barrier function of skin lipid models with varying compositions.

    PubMed

    Groen, Daniël; Poole, Dana S; Gooris, Gert S; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2011-10-01

    The lipids in the uppermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), play an important role in the barrier function. The main lipid classes in stratum corneum are ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. In previous publications, a lipid model was presented, referred to as the stratum corneum substitute (SCS), that closely mimics the SC lipid organization and SC barrier function. In the present study, we use the SCS to study the effect of changes in lipid organization on the lipid barrier function using benzoic acid as permeation compound. First, in the SCS, we increased the level of one of the three major lipid classes keeping the ratio between the other lipid classes constant. An increased cholesterol level resulted in an increase in phase-separated cholesterol and a reduction in the permeability. An increase in ceramide or free fatty acid level resulted in the formation of additional phases, but had no significant influence on the permeability. We also examined models that mimic selected changes in lipid composition reported for dry or diseased skin. The SCS that mimics the composition in recessive X-linked ichthyosis skin displayed a twofold increase in permeability. This increase is possibly related to the formation of an additional, less ordered phase in this model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The importance of free fatty acid chain length for the skin barrier function in atopic eczema patients.

    PubMed

    van Smeden, Jeroen; Janssens, Michelle; Kaye, Edward C J; Caspers, Peter J; Lavrijsen, Adriana P; Vreeken, Rob J; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2014-01-01

    An important feature of atopic eczema (AE) is a decreased skin barrier function. The stratum corneum (SC) lipids - comprised of ceramides (CERs), free fatty acids (FFAs) and cholesterol - fulfil a predominant role in the skin barrier function. In this clinical study, the carbon chain length distribution of SC lipids (FFAs and CERs) and their importance for the lipid organization and skin barrier function were examined in AE patients and compared with control subjects. A reduction in FFA chain length and an increase in unsaturated FFAs are observed in non-lesional and lesional SC of AE patients. The reduction in FFA chain length associates with a reduced CER chain length, suggesting a common synthetic pathway. The lipid chain length reduction correlates with a less dense lipid organization and a decreased skin barrier function. All changes are more pronounced in lesional SC compared with non-lesional skin. No association was observed between lipid properties and filaggrin mutations, an important predisposing factor for developing AE. The results of this study demonstrate an altered SC lipid composition and signify the importance of these changes (specifically regarding the CER and FFA chain lengths) for the impaired skin barrier function in AE. This provides insights into epidermal lipid metabolism as well as new opportunities for skin barrier repair. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The self-recovery of facial skin barrier and erythema after nanochip treatment.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yan Ling; Bin Jameel, Afzaal Ahmed; Miao, Ying Ying; Xu, Bai; Wu, Yan Ting; Liu, Juan; Zhou, Bing Rong; Luo, Dan

    2017-06-28

    To determine the degree of acute skin damage and the time required for the recovery of facial skin barrier function after the skin was treated with micro-needles and nanochips of various tip lengths. For this split face comparative study, a total of 16 subjects were enrolled and randomly divided into 2 groups. In the first group, one of the facial side of each subject was treated with 0.25-mm long nanotips for a total of 6 times while the other facial side was treated with 0.25-mm traditional micro-needles with a straight blade for a total of 6 times. In the second group, one of the facial side was treated with 0.5-mm nanotips for a total of 6 times while the other facial side was treated with 0.5-mm traditional micro-needles with a straight blade for a total of 6 times. Evaluations for trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration and erythema were carried out at baseline, 0, 4, 8, 24, 48 and 72 hours after the treatment. There was no significant difference in TEWL, skin hydration and erythema between the two facial sides of the subjects in the Group one who were treated with 0.25 mm nanochips and traditional micro-needles. However, in the subjects of the Group two, the mean TEWL of the facial side treated with 0.5 mm nanochips was relatively lower than that of the 0.5 mm traditional micro-needles treated facial side at 0, 4, 8 and 24 hours after the treatment. Mean erythema of the facial side treated with 0.5-mm nanochips micro-needles was also relatively lower than that of the 0.5-mm traditional micro-needles treated facial side at 8 hours after the treatment. Rapid recovery of skin barrier function was observed within 4-8 hours after treatment with various lengths of nanochips while it took at least 48-72 hours for recovery of skin barrier function after treatment with various lengths of traditional micro-needles as measured by TEWL. The skin disruption caused by nanotips treatment recovers quicker than the traditional microneedle treatment at equal lengths.

  5. Profile of skin barrier proteins and cytokines in adults with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Orfali, Raquel L; Zaniboni, Mariana C; Aoki, Valeria

    2017-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD), an inflammatory skin disorder with chronic course and characterized by intense pruritus, is a dermatosis of high prevalence of childhood. However, persistence of the disease in adolescents and adults may occur, and more studies regarding the interactions of the complex triggering factors, especially between the adaptive and innate immune alterations and skin barrier defects are needed. In this review the authors summarize the major novel findings of a dysfunctional skin barrier in AD, with emphasis on tight junction components, such as claudins and on proteins of the keratinocyte differentiation, such as filaggrin. This review also provides an update on the characterization of immune response in adults with atopic dermatitis. The adaptive immune dysfunction in AD, classically known as a Th2/Th1 model, has changed its profile, with recent reported cytokines such as interleukins 17, 22, and 31; as for the innate immune system scenario in AD, the characterization of skin microbiome opens new frontiers for the understanding of such a complex inflammatory disease.

  6. Thiolated silicone oils as adhesive skin protectants for improved barrier function.

    PubMed

    Partenhauser, A; Zupančič, O; Rohrer, J; Bonengel, S; Bernkop-Schnürch, A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was the evaluation of thiolated silicone oil as novel skin protectant exhibiting prolonged residence time, enhanced barrier function and reinforced occlusivity. Two silicone conjugates were synthesized with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and thioglycolic acid (TGA) as thiol ligands. Adhesion, protection against artificial urine and water vapour permeability with both a Payne cup set-up and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements on porcine skin were assessed. Silicone thiomers showed pronounced substantivity on skin with 22.1 ± 6.3% and 39.2 ± 6.7% remaining silicone after 8 h for silicone-TGA and silicone-MPA, respectively, whereas unmodified silicone oil and dimethicone were no longer detectable. In particular, silicone-MPA provided a protective shield against artificial urine penetration with less than 25% leakage within 6 h. An up to 2.5-fold improved water vapour impermeability for silicone-MPA in comparison with unmodified control was discovered with the Payne cup model. In addition, for silicone-MPA a reduced TEWL by two-thirds corresponding to non-thiolated control was determined for up to 8 h. Thiolation of silicone oil leads to enhanced skin adhesiveness and barrier function, which is a major advantage compared to commonly used silicones and might thus be a promising treatment modality for various topical applications. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  7. PNPLA1 has a crucial role in skin barrier function by directing acylceramide biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hirabayashi, Tetsuya; Anjo, Tatsuki; Kaneko, Arisa; Senoo, Yuuya; Shibata, Akitaka; Takama, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Kohei; Nishito, Yasumasa; Ono, Tomio; Taya, Choji; Muramatsu, Kazuaki; Fukami, Kiyoko; Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Brash, Alan R.; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Arita, Makoto; Akiyama, Masashi; Murakami, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 1 (PNPLA1) cause autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis, but the mechanism involved remains unclear. Here we show that PNPLA1, an enzyme expressed in differentiated keratinocytes, plays a crucial role in the biosynthesis of ω-O-acylceramide, a lipid component essential for skin barrier. Global or keratinocyte-specific Pnpla1-deficient neonates die due to epidermal permeability barrier defects with severe transepidermal water loss, decreased intercellular lipid lamellae in the stratum corneum, and aberrant keratinocyte differentiation. In Pnpla1−/− epidermis, unique linoleate-containing lipids including acylceramides, acylglucosylceramides and (O-acyl)-ω-hydroxy fatty acids are almost absent with reciprocal increases in their putative precursors, indicating that PNPLA1 catalyses the ω-O-esterification with linoleic acid to form acylceramides. Moreover, acylceramide supplementation partially rescues the altered differentiation of Pnpla1−/− keratinocytes. Our findings provide valuable insight into the skin barrier formation and ichthyosis development, and may contribute to novel therapeutic strategies for treatment of epidermal barrier defects. PMID:28248300

  8. Analysis of gene expression dynamics revealed delayed and abnormal epidermal repair process in aged compared to young skin.

    PubMed

    Sextius, Peggy; Marionnet, Claire; Tacheau, Charlotte; Bon, François-Xavier; Bastien, Philippe; Mauviel, Alain; Bernard, Bruno A; Bernerd, Françoise; Dubertret, Louis

    2015-05-01

    With aging, epidermal homeostasis and barrier function are disrupted. In a previous study, we analyzed the transcriptomic response of young skin epidermis after stratum corneum removal, and obtained a global kinetic view of the molecular processes involved in barrier function recovery. In the present study, the same analysis was performed in aged skin in order to better understand the defects which occur with aging. Thirty healthy male volunteers (67 ± 4 years old) were involved. Tape-strippings were carried out on the inner face of one forearm, the other unstripped forearm serving as control. At 2, 6, 18, 30 and 72 h after stripping, TEWL measurements were taken, and epidermis samples were collected. Total RNA was extracted and analyzed using DermArray(®) cDNA microarrays. The results highlighted that barrier function recovery and overall kinetics of gene expression were delayed following stripping in aged skin. Indeed, the TEWL measurements showed that barrier recovery in the young group appeared to be dramatically significant during the overall kinetics, while there were no significant evolution in the aged group until 30 h. Moreover, gene expression analysis revealed that the number of modulated genes following tape stripping increased as a function of time and reached a peak at 6 h after tape stripping in young skin, while it was at 30 h in aged skin, showing that cellular activity linked to the repair process may be engaged earlier in young epidermis than in aged epidermis. A total of 370 genes were modulated in the young group. In the aged group, 382 genes were modulated, whose 184 were also modulated in the young group. Only eight genes that were modulated in both groups were significantly differently modulated. The characterization of these genes into 15 functional families helped to draw a scenario for the aging process affecting epidermal repair capacity.

  9. Barriers to healthcare contribute to delays in follow-up among women with abnormal cancer screening: data from the Patient Navigation Research Program

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Ambili; Snyder, Frederick; Katz, Mira L.; Darnell, Julie; Dudley, Donald; Patierno, Steven R.; Sanders, Mechelle R; Valverde, Patricia A; Simon, Melissa A; Warren-Mears, Victoria; Battaglia, Tracy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is limited understanding of the association between barriers to care and clinical outcomes within patient navigation programs. Methods Secondary analyses of data from the intervention arms of the Patient Navigation Research Program (PNRP), including navigated participants with abnormal breast and cervical cancer screening tests from 2007 to 2010. Independent variables were (a) number of unique barriers to care (0, 1, 2, or 3+) documented during patient navigation encounters and (b) presence of socio-legal barriers originating from social policy (yes/no). Median time to diagnostic resolution of index screening abnormalities was estimated using Kaplan-Meier cumulative incidence curves. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression examined the impact of barriers on time to resolution, controlling for socio-demographics and stratifying by study center. Results Among 2600 breast participants, three-quarters had barriers to care (25% 1 barrier, 16% 2 barriers and 34% 3+ barriers). Among 1387 cervical participants, more than half had barriers (31% 1 barrier, 11% 2 barriers, and 13% 3+ barriers). Among breast participants, the presence of barriers was associated with less timely resolution for any number of barriers compared to no barriers. Among cervical participants, only the presence of 2 or more barriers was associated with less timely resolution. Both types of barriers, socio-legal and other barriers, were associated with delay among breast and cervical participants. Conclusions Navigated women with barriers resolve cancer screening abnormalities at a slower rate compared to navigated women with no barriers. Further innovations in navigation care are necessary to maximize the impact of patient navigation programs nationwide. PMID:26385420

  10. Barriers to health care contribute to delays in follow-up among women with abnormal cancer screening: Data from the Patient Navigation Research Program.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Ambili; Snyder, Frederick R; Katz, Mira L; Darnell, Julie S; Dudley, Donald J; Patierno, Steven R; Sanders, Mechelle R; Valverde, Patricia A; Simon, Melissa A; Warren-Mears, Victoria; Battaglia, Tracy A

    2015-11-15

    There is limited understanding of the association between barriers to care and clinical outcomes within patient navigation programs. Secondary analyses of data from the intervention arms of the Patient Navigation Research Program were performed, which included navigated participants with abnormal breast and cervical cancer screening tests from 2007 to 2010. Independent variables were: 1) the number of unique barriers to care (0, 1, 2, or ≥3) documented during patient navigation encounters; and 2) the presence of socio-legal barriers originating from social policy (yes/no). The median time to diagnostic resolution of index screening abnormalities was estimated using Kaplan-Meier cumulative incidence curves. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression examined the impact of barriers on time to resolution, controlling for sociodemographics and stratifying by study center. Among 2600 breast screening participants, approximately 75% had barriers to care documented (25% had 1 barrier, 16% had 2 barriers, and 34% had ≥3 barriers). Among 1387 cervical screening participants, greater than one-half had barriers documented (31% had 1 barrier, 11% had 2 barriers, and 13% had ≥3 barriers). Among breast screening participants, the presence of barriers was associated with less timely resolution for any number of barriers compared with no barriers. Among cervical screening participants, only the presence of ≥2 barriers was found to be associated with less timely resolution. Both types of barriers, socio-legal and other barriers, were found to be associated with delay among breast and cervical screening participants. Navigated women with barriers resolved cancer screening abnormalities at a slower rate compared with navigated women with no barriers. Further innovations in navigation care are necessary to maximize the impact of patient navigation programs nationwide. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  11. Involvement of skin barrier dysfunction in itch-related scratching in special diet-fed hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Masanori; Nabe, Takeshi; Tomozawa, Junko; Kohno, Shigekatsu

    2006-01-13

    HR-1 hairless mice fed with a special diet develop atopic-like dry skin, characterized by increased transepidermal water loss, and prolonged bouts of spontaneous scratching. In this study, the role of the skin barrier dysfunction in the prolongation of scratching was evaluated. Although the prolonged scratching was dose-dependently inhibited by opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, neither H(1) receptor antagonist, mepyramine, nor 5-HT(1/2) receptor antagonist, methysergide, affected it. Thus, the prolonged scratching could be itch-related response independent of histamine and serotonin. The application of petrolatum ointment on the skin temporarily alleviated the increase of transepidermal water loss for 60 min after treatment. Due to this alleviation in barrier dysfunction, the prolongation of scratching was significantly suppressed. However, when the barrier dysfunction relapsed, the scratching worsened. Taken together, a skin barrier dysfunction is associated with the itch-related response.

  12. Gender-Based Differences and Barriers in Skin Protection Behaviors in Melanoma Survivors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeffrey; Shih, Johnny; Tran, Andrew; Mullane, Aaron; Thomas, Christina; Aydin, Nail; Misra, Subhasis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Skin protection behaviors and environmental exposure play a crucial role in the development and subsequent management of melanoma. This study investigates gender-based differences in skin protection behaviors after melanoma treatment. Methods. Patients diagnosed and surgically treated for cutaneous melanomas over the last six years in a geographically high risk area were surveyed over telephone using a standardized script. Results. Of 150 survey results obtained, there were 82 males and 68 females. Overall, 87% of participants reported skin self-examination for abnormal markings more often and 94% reported wearing skin protective clothing more often, with females being more than males. Females limited outdoor activity more often than males, 79% to 54%, p < 0.05. When outside, females sought shade more often than males, 75% to 56%, p < 0.05. However, males wore a wide brim hat more often than females, 52% to 28%, p < 0.05. Interestingly, 60% of participants reported wearing SPF 30 sunscreen less often, p < 0.05. Conclusion. Larger percentage of females adopted behavioral changes to prevent future melanoma. Those living in high risk areas and with outdoor occupations need particular attention to skin care. Population based screening should be adopted to deal with this rising public health crisis.

  13. Gender-Based Differences and Barriers in Skin Protection Behaviors in Melanoma Survivors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Skin protection behaviors and environmental exposure play a crucial role in the development and subsequent management of melanoma. This study investigates gender-based differences in skin protection behaviors after melanoma treatment. Methods. Patients diagnosed and surgically treated for cutaneous melanomas over the last six years in a geographically high risk area were surveyed over telephone using a standardized script. Results. Of 150 survey results obtained, there were 82 males and 68 females. Overall, 87% of participants reported skin self-examination for abnormal markings more often and 94% reported wearing skin protective clothing more often, with females being more than males. Females limited outdoor activity more often than males, 79% to 54%, p < 0.05. When outside, females sought shade more often than males, 75% to 56%, p < 0.05. However, males wore a wide brim hat more often than females, 52% to 28%, p < 0.05. Interestingly, 60% of participants reported wearing SPF 30 sunscreen less often, p < 0.05. Conclusion. Larger percentage of females adopted behavioral changes to prevent future melanoma. Those living in high risk areas and with outdoor occupations need particular attention to skin care. Population based screening should be adopted to deal with this rising public health crisis. PMID:27648306

  14. A functional mechanistic study of the effect of emollients on the structure and function of the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Danby, S G; Chalmers, J; Brown, K; Williams, H C; Cork, M J

    2016-11-01

    Preventing relapses of atopic dermatitis (AD) through the regular use of topical products to repair the skin barrier defect is an emerging concept. It is still unclear if some commonly used emollients exert a positive effect on the skin barrier. To determine the skin barrier effects of emollients commonly prescribed in the U.K. Two cohorts of volunteers with quiescent AD undertook observer-blind forearm-controlled studies. The first cohort (18 volunteers) treated the volar side of one forearm with two fingertip units of Doublebase(™) gel twice daily for 4 weeks. The second cohort (19 volunteers) undertook the same regimen using Diprobase(®) cream. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), stratum corneum integrity and hydration, skin surface pH and redness were determined at the test sites before and after treatment. Neither Diprobase(®) cream nor Doublebase(™) gel significantly affected the underlying skin barrier function. Both emollients were associated with significantly increased skin surface pH immediately after application (by 0·8 ± 0·19 and 1·0 ± 0·18 units, respectively), and no erythema. Diprobase(®) cream artificially and transiently (6 h) improved permeability barrier function by 2·9-3·1 g m(-2)  h(-1) TEWL and increased skin hydration by 6·0-6·2 units. Doublebase(™) gel, containing humectants, was associated with a greater (between 10·1 and 13·0 units during the first 6 h) and more sustained increase in hydration, lasting more than 12 h following repeated use. Diprobase(®) cream and Doublebase(™) gel are not associated with skin barrier harm and appear to be appropriate for AD treatment. While displaying emollient properties, neither formulation displayed an ability to actively improve sustained skin barrier function. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  15. Counterregulation between thymic stromal lymphopoietin- and IL-23-driven immune axes shapes skin inflammation in mice with epidermal barrier defects.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiagui; Leyva-Castillo, Juan Manuel; Hener, Pierre; Eisenmann, Aurelie; Zaafouri, Sarra; Jonca, Nathalie; Serre, Guy; Birling, Marie-Christine; Li, Mei

    2016-07-01

    Epidermal barrier dysfunction has been recognized as a critical factor in the initiation and exacerbation of skin inflammation, particularly in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and AD-like congenital disorders, including peeling skin syndrome type B. However, inflammatory responses developed in barrier-defective skin, as well as the underlying mechanisms, remained incompletely understood. We aimed to decipher inflammatory axes and the cytokine network in mouse skin on breakdown of epidermal stratum corneum barrier. We generated Cdsn(iep-/-) mice with corneodesmosin ablation in keratinocytes selectively in an inducible manner. We characterized inflammatory responses and cytokine expression by using histology, immunohistochemistry, ELISA, and quantitative PCR. We combined mouse genetic tools, antibody-mediated neutralization, signal-blocking reagents, and topical antibiotic treatment to explore the inflammatory axes. We show that on breakdown of the epidermal stratum corneum barrier, type 2 and type 17 inflammatory responses are developed simultaneously, driven by thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) and IL-23, respectively. Importantly, we reveal a counterregulation between these 2 inflammatory axes. Furthermore, we show that protease-activated receptor 2 signaling is involved in mediating the TSLP/type 2 axis, whereas skin bacteria are engaged in induction of the IL-23/type 17 axis. Moreover, we find that IL-1β is induced in skin of Cdsn(iep-/-) mice and that blockade of IL-1 signaling suppresses both TSLP and IL-23 expression and ameliorates skin inflammation. The inflammatory phenotype in barrier-defective skin is shaped by counterregulation between the TSLP/type 2 and IL-23/type 17 axes. Targeting IL-1 signaling could be a promising therapeutic option for controlling skin inflammation in patients with peeling skin syndrome type B and other diseases related to epidermal barrier dysfunction, including AD. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma

  16. Mast Cells Regulate Epidermal Barrier Function and the Development of Allergic Skin Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sehra, Sarita; Serezani, Ana PM; Ocaña, Jesus A.; Travers, Jeffrey B.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by infiltration of eosinophils, T helper cells and mast cells. The role of mast cells in AD is not completely understood. To define the effects of mast cells on skin biology, we observed that mast cells regulate the homeostatic expression of Epidermal Differentiation Complex (EDC) and other skin genes. Decreased EDC gene expression in mice that genetically lack mast cells (KitW-sh/W-sh mice) is associated with increased uptake of protein antigens painted on the skin by dendritic cells, compared to similarly treated wild-type mice, suggesting a protective role for mast cells in exposure to nominal environmental allergens. To test this further, we crossed KitW-sh/W-sh mice with Stat6VT transgenic mice that develop spontaneous AD-like disease that is dependent on Th2 cytokines and associated with high serum concentrations of IgE. We observed that Stat6VT x KitW-sh/W-sh mice developed more frequent and more severe allergic skin inflammation than Stat6VT transgenic mice that had mast cells. Together, these studies suggest that mast cells regulate epidermal barrier function and have a potential protective role in the development of AD-like disease. PMID:27021404

  17. Mast Cells Regulate Epidermal Barrier Function and the Development of Allergic Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sehra, Sarita; Serezani, Ana P M; Ocaña, Jesus A; Travers, Jeffrey B; Kaplan, Mark H

    2016-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by infiltration of eosinophils, T helper cells, and mast cells. The role of mast cells in atopic dermatitis is not completely understood. To define the effects of mast cells on skin biology, we observed that mast cells regulate the homeostatic expression of epidermal differentiation complex and other skin genes. Decreased epidermal differentiation complex gene expression in mice that genetically lack mast cells (Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice) is associated with increased uptake of protein antigens painted on the skin by dendritic cells (DCs) compared with similarly treated wild-type mice, suggesting a protective role for mast cells in exposure to nominal environmental allergens. To test this further, we crossed Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice with signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (i.e., Stat6) VT transgenic mice that develop spontaneous atopic dermatitis-like disease that is dependent on T helper cell 2 cytokines and is associated with high serum concentrations of IgE. We observed that Stat6VT × Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice developed more frequent and more severe allergic skin inflammation than Stat6VT transgenic mice that had mast cells. Together, these studies suggest that mast cells regulate epidermal barrier function and have a potential protective role in the development of atopic dermatitis-like disease.

  18. Is an orthorhombic lateral packing and a proper lamellar organization important for the skin barrier function?

    PubMed

    Groen, Daniël; Poole, Dana S; Gooris, Gert S; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2011-06-01

    The lipid organization in the stratum corneum (SC), plays an important role in the barrier function of the skin. SC lipids form two lamellar phases with a predominantly orthorhombic packing. In previous publications a lipid model was presented, referred to as the stratum corneum substitute (SCS), that closely mimics the SC lipid organization and barrier function. Therefore, the SCS serves as a unique tool to relate lipid organization with barrier function. In the present study we examined the effect of the orthorhombic to hexagonal phase transition on the barrier function of human SC and SCS. In addition, the SCS was modified by changing the free fatty acid composition, resulting in a hexagonal packing and perturbed lamellar organization. By measuring the permeability to benzoic acid as function of temperature, Arrhenius plots were constructed from which activation energies were calculated. The results suggest that the change from orthorhombic to hexagonal packing in human SC and SCS, does not have an effect on the permeability. However, the modified SCS revealed an increased permeability to benzoic acid, which we related to its perturbed lamellar organization. Thus, a proper lamellar organization is more crucial for a competent barrier function than the presence of an orthorhombic lateral packing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. In vivo barrier challenge and long-term recovery in human facial skin.

    PubMed

    Gorcea, Mihaela; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E; Moore, David J

    2013-06-01

    Recently, we developed a biophysical approach to characterize in vivo facial cheek skin as a function of stratum corneum (SC) depth, barrier function and during a 24-h recovery period. The current study extends this work and characterizes the human facial cheek after barrier challenge and, for the first time, facial SC barrier recovery over a 4-week period. Changes in the corneocyte size over the 4-week recovery period, and correlations with changes in Trans-Epidermal Water Loss (TEWL) were monitored. This approach allows complete characterization of SC barrier function after a full biological regeneration of the SC barrier following tape stripping. The structural and compositional changes in facial cheek were investigated using Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infra Red (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, tape stripping, TEWL measurements and image analysis combined with optical microscopy to characterize the SC depth profile during the tape stripping stress and over 4-week recovery period. TEWL increased significantly from baseline after sequential tape stripping. Corneocyte size decreased with successive tape stripping. An inverse direct correlation was determined between TEWL and corneocyte surface area. After 4 weeks, the corneocyte size and TEWL for the facial cheek recovered 100% from the tape stripping procedure. The in vivo ATR-FTIR data demonstrated that lipid and sebum components on the surface of the facial cheek SC recovered within 24 h post tape stripping, whereas protein (Amide II) and water components recovered after 1 week.

  20. Stratum corneum lipids, skin barrier function and filaggrin mutations in patients with atopic eczema.

    PubMed

    Jungersted, J M; Scheer, H; Mempel, M; Baurecht, H; Cifuentes, L; Høgh, J K; Hellgren, L I; Jemec, G B E; Agner, T; Weidinger, S

    2010-07-01

    Prior to the discovery of filaggrin (FLG) mutations, evidence for an impaired skin barrier in atopic dermatitis (AD) has been documented, and changes in ceramide profile, altered skin pH and increased trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) in patients with AD have been reported. Until now, no studies have analysed stratum corneum (SC) lipids combined with skin barrier parameters in subjects of known FLG genotype. A cohort of 49 German individuals genotyped for the most common FLG mutations (R501X, 2282del4) had SC samples taken for lipid analysis by high-performance thin layer chromatography. In addition, TEWL, erythema, skin hydration and pH were measured. In 27 of the 49 individuals, a 24-h irritation patch test with sodium lauryl sulphate was performed. For the analysis, both the AD group and the control group were stratified by FLG mutation status (FLGmut/FLGwt). In the FLGmut AD group, significantly lower levels of ceramide 4 and significantly higher levels of ceramide 7 were observed when compared to both healthy control groups. However, ceramide 7 levels also significantly differed between FLGwt AD and FLGwt controls, as did ceramide 1 levels. No significant differences were observed for ceramide 2, 3, 5 and 6. FLGmut individuals had significantly higher skin pH values than individuals not carrying FLG mutations. Patients with AD with FLG mutations had significantly higher erythema compared to patients with AD without FLG mutations. Our results confirm previous observations of altered ceramide levels in AD, which however appear to show no clear relationship with FLG mutations.

  1. Effects of ethyl alpha-D-glucoside on skin barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, N; Ota, Y; Haratake, A; Ikemoto, T; Tanno, O; Horikoshi, T

    1997-01-01

    Daily treatments of skin in hairless mice with concentrates of rice wine, Japanese traditional alcohol, lowered transepidermal water loss levels compared to the controls on the 3rd day after ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation. These findings indicate that the concentrates of rice wine suppress the murine skin barrier disruption caused by UVB. Ethyl alpha-D-glucoside (alpha-ethylglucoside), one of the peculiar components in rice wine, showed the same effect, whereas beta-ethylglucoside had no effect. In order to clarify the functions of alpha-ethylglucoside on murine skin, we examined the effects of this compound on the expression of some phenotypes in human keratinocytes in vitro. As a result, alpha-ethylglucoside as well as beta-ethylglucoside enhanced cell proliferation weakly, and the formation of cornified envelopes and differentiated type keratin (K1) in keratinocytes was accelerated by alpha-ethylglucoside but not by beta-ethylglucoside. From the results, we conclude that alpha-ethylglucoside enhanced the differentiation of keratinocytes, which might be related to reduced barrier disruption by UVB.

  2. Electrical, magnetic, photomechanical and cavitational waves to overcome skin barrier for transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tin Wui

    2014-11-10

    Transdermal drug delivery is hindered by the barrier property of the stratum corneum. It limits the route to transport of drugs with a log octanol-water partition coefficient of 1 to 3, molecular weight of less than 500Da and melting point of less than 200°C. Active methods such as iontophoresis, electroporation, sonophoresis, magnetophoresis and laser techniques have been investigated for the past decades on their ability, mechanisms and limitations in modifying the skin microenvironment to promote drug diffusion and partition. Microwave, an electromagnetic wave characterized by frequencies range between 300MHz and 300GHz, has recently been reported as the potential skin permeation enhancer. Microwave has received a widespread application in food, engineering and medical sectors. Its potential use to facilitate transdermal drug transport is still in its infancy stage of evaluation. This review provides an overview and update on active methods utilizing electrical, magnetic, photomechanical and cavitational waves to overcome the skin barrier for transdermal drug administration with insights into mechanisms and future perspectives of the latest microwave technique described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Skin Barrier Development Depends on CGI-58 Protein Expression during Late-Stage Keratinocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Grond, Susanne; Radner, Franz P W; Eichmann, Thomas O; Kolb, Dagmar; Grabner, Gernot F; Wolinski, Heimo; Gruber, Robert; Hofer, Peter; Heier, Christoph; Schauer, Silvia; Rülicke, Thomas; Hoefler, Gerald; Schmuth, Matthias; Elias, Peter M; Lass, Achim; Zechner, Rudolf; Haemmerle, Guenter

    2017-02-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and its coactivator comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) are limiting in cellular triglyceride catabolism. Although ATGL deficiency is compatible with normal skin development, mice globally lacking CGI-58 die postnatally and exhibit a severe epidermal permeability barrier defect, which may originate from epidermal and/or peripheral changes in lipid and energy metabolism. Here, we show that epidermis-specific disruption of CGI-58 is sufficient to provoke a defect in the formation of a functional corneocyte lipid envelope linked to impaired ω-O-acylceramide synthesis. As a result, epidermis-specific CGI-58-deficient mice show severe skin dysfunction, arguing for a tissue autonomous cause of disease development. Defective skin permeability barrier formation in global CGI-58-deficient mice could be reversed via transgenic restoration of CGI-58 expression in differentiated but not basal keratinocytes suggesting that CGI-58 is essential for lipid metabolism in suprabasal epidermal layers. The compatibility of ATGL deficiency with normal epidermal function indicated that CGI-58 may stimulate an epidermal triglyceride lipase beyond ATGL required for the adequate provision of fatty acids as a substrate for ω-O-acylceramide synthesis. Pharmacological inhibition of ATGL enzyme activity similarly reduced triglyceride-hydrolytic activities in wild-type and CGI-58 overexpressing epidermis implicating that CGI-58 participates in ω-O-acylceramide biogenesis independent of its role as a coactivator of epidermal triglyceride catabolism. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Barrier function in reconstructed epidermis and its resemblance to native human skin.

    PubMed

    Ponec, M; Gibbs, S; Pilgram, G; Boelsma, E; Koerten, H; Bouwstra, J; Mommaas, M

    2001-01-01

    One of the prerequisites for the use of human skin equivalents for scientific and screening purposes is that their barrier function is similar to that of native skin. Using human epidermis reconstructed on de-epidermized dermis we demonstrated that the formation of the stratum corneum (SC) barrier in vitro proceeds similarly as in vivo as judged from the extensive production of lamellar bodies, their complete extrusion at the stratum granulosum/SC interface, and the formation of multiple broad lamellar structures in the intercorneocyte space. The presence of well-ordered lipid lamellar phases was confirmed by small-angle X-ray diffraction. Although the long periodicity lamellar phase was present in both the native and the reconstructed epidermis, the short periodicity lamellar phase was present only in native tissue. In addition, the SC lipids predominantly formed the hexagonal sublattice. Analysis of lipid composition revealed that all SC lipids are synthesized in vitro. Differences in SC lipid organization in reconstructed epidermis may be ascribed to the differences in fatty acid content and profile indicating that further improvement in culture conditions is required for generation of in vitro reconstructed epidermis with stratum barrier properties of the native tissue. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. An In Vitro Skin Equivalent for Evaluation of Skin Absorption of Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    to mimic the barrier properties of human skin in vivo. The HSE has been characterized for morphology, lipid composition and barrier properties and...impaired desquamation (Vicanová, J., Boelsma, E. et al. 1998), abnormal skin lipid profiles or the presence of unkeratinized microscopic foci (Mak...simulate the barrier properties of skin in vivo. The model has been characterized for lipid composition, morphology and permeability to various model

  6. Epidermal tight junction barrier function is altered by skin inflammation, but not by filaggrin-deficient stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Yokouchi, Mariko; Kubo, Akiharu; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Kazue; Ishii, Ken; Furuse, Mikio; Amagai, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    The tight junction (TJ) barrier is located in the granular layer of the epidermis. Filaggrin deficiency predisposes patients to atopic dermatitis (AD) by impairing stratum corneum (SC) barrier function. Altered TJ barrier function has been observed in the skin of patients with AD; however, it remains unclear whether TJ function is influenced by filaggrin deficiency directly or secondarily via skin inflammation. To investigate the in vivo effects of filaggrin deficiency and skin inflammation on epidermal TJ function. Morphological changes in the TJ were investigated in filaggrin knockout mice and mice with hapten-induced dermatitis using en face visualization of epidermal sheets, and functional changes in the TJ were assessed with an in vivo permeation assay using tracers of various sizes. In filaggrin knockout mice, there was no apparent change in the honeycomb morphology of the TJ, TJ component mRNA expression, or TJ barrier function in neonates and adults, indicating that filaggrin-deficiency had no direct effects on the TJ. By contrast, in mice with hapten-induced dermatitis, the mRNA expression of TJ components was decreased markedly and the TJ barrier function was size-dependently impaired: the TJ leaked small tracers (<5 kDa), but not large tracers (>30 kDa). Filaggrin deficiency did not affect the epidermal TJ barrier directly, but once dermatitis occurred, the skin inflammation induced TJ dysfunction. Since TJ dysfunction induces the SC barrier impairment, skin inflammation will enhance skin permeability to external antigens and result in a vicious cycle of barrier dysfunction and skin inflammation. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of skin barrier disruption on immune responses to topically applied cross-reacting material, CRM(197), of diphtheria toxin.

    PubMed

    Godefroy, S; Peyre, M; Garcia, N; Muller, S; Sesardic, D; Partidos, C D

    2005-08-01

    The high accessibility of the skin and the presence of immunocompetent cells in the epidermis makes this surface an attractive route for needle-free administration of vaccines. However, the lining of the skin by the stratum corneum is a major obstacle to vaccine delivery. In this study we examined the effect of skin barrier disruption on the immune responses to the cross-reacting material CRM(197), a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin (DTx) that is considered as a vaccine candidate. Application of CRM(197), together with cholera toxin (CT), onto the tape-stripped skin of mice elicited antibody responses that had anti-DTx neutralizing activity. Vaccine delivery onto mildly ablated skin or intact skin did not elicit any detectable anti-CRM(197) antibodies. Mice immunized with CRM(197) alone onto the tape-stripped skin mounted a vigorous antigen-specific proliferative response. In contrast, the induction of cellular immunity after CRM(197) deposition onto mildly ablated or intact skin was adjuvant dependent. Furthermore, epidermal cells were activated and underwent apoptosis that was more pronounced when the stratum corneum was removed by tape stripping. Overall, these findings highlight the potential for transcutaneous delivery of CRM(197) and establish a correlation between the degree of barrier disruption and levels of antigen-specific immune responses. Moreover, these results provide the first evidence that the development of a transcutaneous immunization strategy for diphtheria, based on simple and practical methods to disrupt the skin barrier, is feasible.

  8. Loss of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) disrupts skin barrier integrity and sensitizes mice to epicutaneous allergen challenge.

    PubMed

    Ming, Mei; Zhao, Baozhong; Shea, Christopher R; Shah, Palak; Qiang, Lei; White, Steven R; Sims, Diane M; He, Yu-Ying

    2015-04-01

    Skin barrier integrity requires a highly coordinated molecular system involving the structural protein filaggrin (FLG). Mutational loss of the skin barrier protein FLG predisposes subjects to the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). We sought to determine the role of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in skin barrier function, FLG expression, and development of AD. Skin histology of mice with skin-specific SIRT1 deletion and wild-type control animals was examined by using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Protein and mRNA abundance was analyzed by means of immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and RT-PCR. Serum antibody levels were assessed by means of ELISA. Here we show that FLG is regulated by the protein deacetylase SIRT1 and that SIRT1 is critical for skin barrier integrity. Epidermis-specific SIRT1 ablation causes AD-like skin lesions in mice, and mice with epidermal SIRT1 deletion are sensitive to percutaneous challenge by the protein allergen ovalbumin. In normal human keratinocytes and mouse skin SIRT1 knockdown or genetic deletion downregulates FLG, and regulation of FLG expression by SIRT1 requires the deacetylase activity of SIRT1. SIRT1 also promotes activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligand restores FLG expression in SIRT1-inhibited cells. Compared with normal human skin, SIRT1 is downregulated in both AD and non-AD lesions. Our findings demonstrate a critical role of SIRT1 in skin barrier maintenance, open up new opportunities to use SIRT1 as a pharmacologic target, and might facilitate the development of mechanism-based agents for AD prevention and therapy. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Loss of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) disrupts skin barrier integrity and sensitizes mice to epicutaneous allergen challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Mei; Zhao, Baozhong; Shea, Christopher R.; Shah, Palak; Qiang, Lei; White, Steven R.; Sims, Diane M.; He, Yu-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Background Skin barrier integrity requires a highly coordinated molecular system involving the structural protein filaggrin. Mutational loss of the skin barrier protein filaggrin predisposes individuals to the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). Objective to determine the role of SIRT1 in skin barrier function, filaggrin expression, and the development of AD. Methods Skin histology of mice with skin-specific SIRT1 deletion and wild-type controls was examined by Hematoxyline and Eosin (H&E). Protein and mRNA abundance was analyzed by immunoblot, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and RT-PCR. Serum antibody levels were assessed by ELISA. Results Here we show that filaggrin is regulated by the protein deacetylase SIRT1, and that SIRT1 is critical for skin barrier integrity. Epidermis-specific SIRT1 ablation causes AD-like skin lesions in mice, and mice with epidermal SIRT1 deletion are sensitive to percutaneous challenge by the protein allergen ovalbumin. In normal human keratinocytes and mouse skin, SIRT1 knockdown or genetic deletion down-regulates filaggrin, and regulation of filaggrin expression by SIRT1 requires the deacetylase activity of SIRT1. SIRT1 also promotes the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and the AhR ligand restores filaggrin expression in SIRT1-inhibited cells. As compared with normal human skin, SIRT1 is down-regulated in the lesions of atopic dermatitis as well as non-atopic dermatitis. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate a critical role of SIRT1 in skin barrier maintenance, open up new opportunities to use SIRT1 as a pharmacological target, and may facilitate the development of mechanism-based agents for AD prevention and therapy. PMID:25445829

  10. Effects of UVA (320-400 nm) on the barrier characteristics of the skin

    SciTech Connect

    McAuliffe, D.J.; Blank, I.H. )

    1991-05-01

    The stratum corneum serves as the major barrier to the entrance of most molecules into the skin. In the studies presented here, the effects of UVA radiation (320-400 nm) on the barrier capacity of human stratum corneum were examined. Penetration of a homologous series of primary alcohols through unirradiated (control) and UVA-irradiated (test) human epidermis was determined in vitro. Permeability constants, kp, were calculated. Mean ratios of permeability constants for UVA-irradiated and unirradiated epidermis (mean kp test)/(mean kp control) ranged from 2.3 to 3.0 for methanol and from 2.2 to 2.5 for ethanol. These mean ratios were determined using different pieces of epidermis from the same piece of skin for test and control samples. When kp control and kp test were determined on the same piece of epidermis on successive days, the ratios (kp test/kp control) were similar to the mean ratios determined on different pieces of epidermis. For other primary alcohols, propanol, butanol, hexanol, and heptanol, UVA radiation did not alter their permeability constants significantly. Partition coefficients, Km, were determined for ethanol and heptanol using UVA-irradiated and unirradiated stratum corneum. For ethanol, irradiation resulted in a 1.5 to 2.6 times increase in Km. For heptanol, irradiation caused no change in Km. These results demonstrate that the barrier capacity of stratum corneum for small, polar, primary alcohols is diminished (permeability increases) and for higher molecular weight less polar alcohols, is unaffected by small doses of UVA radiation. This increased permeability of small polar alcohols through human skin may be due to enhanced partitioning into UVA-irradiated stratum corneum, which was not apparent for a higher molecular weight less polar alcohol.

  11. Eczema in early life: Genetics, the skin barrier, and lessons learned from birth cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Biagini Myers, Jocelyn M.; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.

    2010-01-01

    Eczema is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the skin that affects up to 30% of children. It often afflicts infants in the first few months of life and can be the first indicator of the atopic march. Recent results from birth cohort studies have uncovered novel information regarding genetic and environmental factors that promote the development of eczema. Birth cohort studies provide an optimal study design to elucidate these associations and prospectively track longitudinal data including exposure assessment and health outcomes from birth into early life and childhood. This is especially relevant for eczema given the age specific emergence of this disease. In this review, we will provide a general overview of pediatric eczema and discuss the important findings in the literature with respect to genetics and environmental exposures, highlighting those derived from birth cohort studies. Additionally, we will review how these relate to the atopic march, the hygiene hypothesis and the integrity of the skin barrier. PMID:20739029

  12. Intracellular electric fields produced by dielectric barrier discharge treatment of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Kushner, Mark J.

    2010-05-01

    The application of atmospheric pressure plasmas to human tissue has been shown to have therapeutic effects for wound healing and in treatment of skin diseases. These effects are attributed to both production of beneficial radicals which intersect with biological reaction chains and to the surface and intracellular generation of electric fields. In this paper, we report on computational studies of the intersection of plasma streamers in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in air with human skin tissue, with emphasis on the intracellular generation of electric fields. Intracellular structures and their electrical properties were incorporated into the computational mesh in order to self-consistently couple gas phase plasma transport with the charging of the surface of the skin and the intracellular production of electrical currents. The short duration of a single plasma filament in DBDs and its intersection with skin enables the intracellular penetration of electric fields. The magnitude of these electric fields can reach 100 kV cm-1 which may exceed the threshold for electroporation.

  13. Efficacy of Topical Application of Emu Oil on Areola Skin Barrier in Breastfeeding Women.

    PubMed

    Zanardo, Vincenzo; Giarrizzo, David; Maiolo, Luigi; Straface, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate hydration and skin surface pH are of fundamental importance in preventing areola skin barrier damage and breastfeeding success. We studied the dermal effects of emu oil on areola skin soon after birth in 70 at-term breastfeeding mothers by noninvasive bioengineering method. Emu oil-based cream was found to be effective in improving stratum corneum hydration of breast areolae (mean ± standard deviation, from 56.9 ± 18.2 to 65.0 ± 17.2 conventional units, P < .003) and did not affect skin pH, temperature, or elasticity. The significant improvement in hydration values was more pronounced in the puerperae presenting with basal hydration in the lower quartiles (mean ± standard deviation, from 41.6 ± 17.2 to 59.6 ± 21.2 conventional units, P < .001). Further studies are warranted to confirm the long-term beneficial effects of this preparation in a very sensitive patient population.

  14. Safety evaluation of perfluoropolyethers, liquid polymers used in barrier creams and other skin-care products.

    PubMed

    Malinverno, G; Pantini, G; Bootman, J

    1996-07-01

    Fomblin HC products are a 'family' of high-purity perfluoropolyethers manufactured for barrier cream and other personal care applications which involve direct application to the skin. To confirm the safety of such use, representative Fomblin HC products were tested in experimental animals for acute toxicity, primary and repeated insult irritancy, sensitization and photosensitization, subacute oral toxicity and comedogenicity; mutagenicity was examined in vitro, and irritancy or sensitization was also investigated on human skin (in patch tests with volunteers). A high molecular weight Fomblin HC only was tested in rats for subacute oral toxicity and in man for dermal effects. Single oral doses of 15 g/kg body weight were without evident toxicity to rats, as were single dermal applications or an ip injection at 5 g/kg. No primary irritant action was seen in rabbits or man, and similarly there was no evidence of skin sensitization or photosensitization in guinea pigs, or sensitization in man. No mutagenic action on Salmonella strains of tester bacteria was seen. In repeat dose irritancy or oral toxicity tests in rabbits or rats, no adverse effects of Fomblin HC products were noted; in particular, daily oral administration (1000 mg/kg/day) to rats over 28 days produced no significant reaction. No comedogenic action was found. From the known chemistry of the perfluoropolyethers, the test programme reported here and the limited published data, it is concluded that the intended use of Fomblin HC products in formulations applied to human skin has a high margin of safety.

  15. Human β-defensin-2 as a marker for disease severity and skin barrier properties in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Clausen, M-L; Jungersted, J M; Andersen, P S; Slotved, H-C; Krogfelt, K A; Agner, T

    2013-09-01

    Skin infections related to disrupted antimicrobial defence are a common problem in atopic dermatitis (AD). Altered levels of antimicrobial peptides, including human β-defensin (hBD)-2, have been reported in AD skin, and a link to impaired barrier function has been suggested. To study hBD-2 in relation to skin barrier function in patients with AD and controls, and to study hBD-2 in relation to disease severity. Twenty-five patients with AD and 11 controls were enrolled. hBD-2 peptide concentration was determined in stratum corneum samples collected by a minimally invasive tape-stripping method. Disease severity was assessed by SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD), and skin barrier function was evaluated by measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin pH. Patients with AD were characterized according to filaggrin mutations. hBD-2 concentrations in the stratum corneum were found to differ between lesional and nonlesional AD skin and controls, with the highest values in lesional skin (P < 0·001). SCORAD and TEWL were significantly increased in participants with measureable hBD-2 (P < 0·018 and P < 0·007, respectively). Significant correlations between hBD-2 in lesional skin, and TEWL and SCORAD were observed (R = 0·55 and R = 0·44, respectively). No correlations with skin pH were found. hBD-2 was not found to relate to filaggrin mutations. A significant correlation was found between hBD-2, disturbed skin barrier function and disease severity. The minimally invasive skin sample technique enables evaluation of the stratum corneum and its proteins over time and provides the possibility of relating these findings to treatment, infections and physiological variations. © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  16. Efficacy of a Hand Regimen in Skin Barrier Protection in Individuals With Occupational Irritant Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Laura

    2016-11-01

    Occupational irritant contact dermatitis (OICD) is a dif cult and hard to manage condition. It occurs more frequently in certain occupations where contact with harsh chemicals, use of alcohol-based disinfectants, and frequent hand washing heightens the risk. Treatment for OICD includes patient education in addition to physical, topical, and systemic therapies. To review the pathogenesis and treatment options for OICD and evaluate the ef cacy of a selective skin-care regimen involv- ing a hand protectant cream alone as well as combined with a repair cream and speci c cleanser. A single-center open study was performed comprising 42 healthy male and female adult volunteers prone to occupational irritant contact dermatitis due to frequent wet work or contact with detergents. Between day 0 and day 7, subjects applied a hand protectant cream as needed on both hands (at least twice daily). On days 7 to 14, subjects applied a hand protectant cream and cleanser as needed on both hands (at least twice daily) as well as a repair cream each evening. A diary log was given to each volunteer for application control and for a subjective evaluation of daily tolerability. In these subjects prone to occupational irritant contact dermatitis, the hand protectant cream applied during the initial 7-day period was effective in restoring the damaged skin barrier and improving the stratum corneum hydration. A regimen that combined the hand protectant and repair creams with a speci c cleanser during a further 7-day period allowed contin- ued improvement of skin hydration and additional clinical bene ts while respecting the skin barrier function. The results of this study support the use of a 3-step approach for patients who are at risk of repeated exposure to external irritants. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(suppl 11):s81-85..

  17. Effects of Locally Applied Glycerol and Xylitol on the Hydration, Barrier Function and Morphological Parameters of the Skin.

    PubMed

    Korponyai, Csilla; Szél, Edit; Behány, Zoltán; Varga, Erika; Mohos, Gábor; Dura, Ágnes; Dikstein, Shabtay; Kemény, Lajos; Erős, Gábor

    2017-02-08

    Glycerol and xylitol hydrate the skin and improve its barrier function over a short period. We studied the effects of glycerol and xylitol on the physiological properties and morphology of the skin after longer-term application. Twelve volunteers with dry skin were examined. Three areas on the arms were determined. Area 1 served as untreated control. The vehicle was applied to area 2, while area 3 was treated twice daily with a formulation containing glycerol (5%) and xylitol (5%) for 14 days. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), hydration and biomechanical properties of the skin were monitored. Biopsies were taken for routine histology and immunohistochemistry for filaggrin and matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1). The polyols increased the skin hydration and protein quantity of filaggrin, elevated the interdigitation index, decreased the TEWL and improved the biomechanical properties of the skin, but did not change the protein expression of MMP-1. A combination of glycerol and xylitol can be useful additional therapy for dry skin.

  18. The effect of damaged skin barrier induced by subclinical irritation on the sequential irritant contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Yan-yu, Wu; Xue-min, Wang; Yi-Mei, Tan; Ying, Cheng; Na, Liu

    2011-12-01

    Skin damage caused by a single specific stimulus has been extensively studied. However, many additional mild skin irritants are experienced every day before obvious irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) appears. The effect that these previously experienced mild irritations have on the incidence and severity of sequential ICD remains undefined. The purpose of this work was to explore whether the effects of skin barrier damage induced by either the open patch test with 1% sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), tape stripping test (TAP) (10×), or irradiation with 0.75 median erythemal dose UVB (MED) will affect the severity of sequential irritant dermatitis induced by a 0.5% SLS occlusive patch test (PT). Nine treatments were applied to nine different locations of the ventral forearm of each subject at random. The nine treatment types were as follows: open patch test with 1% SLS; 10× TAP; UVB irradiation with 0.75 MED; open patch test with 1% SLS + PT with 0.5% SLS (SLSPT); 10× TAP + PT with 0.5% SLS (TAPPT); UVB irradiation with 0.75 MED + PT with 0.5% SLS (UVPT); PT with distilled water (DISPT); PT with 0.5% SLS (PT); and the CONTROL (no treatment). After 5 days of subclinical irritation, the PT was applied on day 6. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), capacitance (CAP), and skin color (a*) were measured at baseline and on days 6, 7, and 8. After the PT, indices of irritancy of PT, UVPT, SLSPT, and TAPPT were 60, 80, 87 and 100%, respectively. The index of irritancy of TAPPT and SLSPT were significantly higher than that of PT (p < 0.05). Clinical scores of SLSPT and TAPPT were also significantly higher than PT (p < 0.05). After 5 days of irritation, TEWL of SLS, TAP, SLSPT, and TAPPT were increased significantly compared to that of baseline. After the PT, D-value of TEWL between day 8 and day 6 ((≥6-8)TEWL) of SLSPT and TAPPT were greater than that of PT, and D-value of TEWL between day 8 and day 7 ((≥7-8)TEWL) of SLSPT and TAPPT were less than that of PT values. After the

  19. Cleansing without compromise: the impact of cleansers on the skin barrier and the technology of mild cleansing.

    PubMed

    Ananthapadmanabhan, K P; Moore, David J; Subramanyan, Kumar; Misra, Manoj; Meyer, F

    2004-01-01

    Cleanser technology has come a long way from merely cleansing to providing mildness and moisturizing benefits as well. It is known that harsh surfactants in cleansers can cause damage to skin proteins and lipids, leading to after-wash tightness, dryness, barrier damage, irritation, and even itch. In order for cleansers to provide skin-care benefits, they first must minimize surfactant damage to skin proteins and lipids. Secondly, they must deposit and deliver beneficial agents such as occlusives, skin lipids, and humectants under wash conditions to improve skin hydration, as well as mechanical and visual properties. While all surfactants tend to interact to some degree with lipids, their interaction with proteins can vary significantly, depending upon the nature of their functional head group. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo studies have shown that surfactants that cause significant skin irritation interact strongly with skin proteins. Based on this understanding, several surfactants and surfactant mixtures have been identified as "less irritating" mild surfactants because of their diminished interactions with skin proteins. Surfactants that interact minimally with both skin lipids and proteins are especially mild. Another factor that can aggravate surfactant-induced dryness and irritation is the pH of the cleanser. The present authors' recent studies demonstrate that high pH (pH 10) solutions, even in the absence of surfactants, can increase stratum corneum (SC) swelling and alter lipid rigidity, thereby suggesting that cleansers with neutral or acidic pH, close to SC-normal pH 5.5, may be potentially less damaging to the skin. Mildness enhancers and moisturizing agents such as lipids, occlusives, and humectants minimize damaging interactions between surfactants, and skin proteins and lipids, and thereby, reduce skin damage. In addition, these agents play an ameliorative role, replenishing the skin lipids lost during the wash period. The present review discusses

  20. Nicotinic Acid Receptor Abnormalities in Human Skin Cancer: Implications for a Role in Epidermal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez, Yira; Benavente, Claudia A.; Meyer, Ralph G.; Coyle, W. Russell; Jacobson, Myron K.; Jacobson, Elaine L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic UV skin exposure leads to epidermal differentiation defects in humans that can be largely restored by pharmacological doses of nicotinic acid. Nicotinic acid has been identified as a ligand for the human G-protein-coupled receptors GPR109A and GPR109B that signal through Gi-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. We have examined the expression, cellular distribution, and functionality of GPR109A/B in human skin and skin derived epidermal cells. Results Nicotinic acid increases epidermal differentiation in photodamaged human skin as judged by the terminal differentiation markers caspase 14 and filaggrin. Both GPR109A and GPR109B genes are transcribed in human skin and in epidermal keratinocytes, but expression in dermal fibroblasts is below limits of detection. Receptor transcripts are greatly over-expressed in squamous cell cancers. Receptor protein in normal skin is prominent from the basal through granular layers of the epidermis, with cellular localization more dispersive in the basal layer but predominantly localized at the plasma membrane in more differentiated epidermal layers. In normal human primary and immortalized keratinocytes, nicotinic acid receptors show plasma membrane localization and functional Gi-mediated signaling. In contrast, in a squamous cell carcinoma derived cell line, receptor protein shows a more diffuse cellular localization and the receptors are nearly non-functional. Conclusions The results of these studies justify future genetic and pharmacological intervention studies to define possible specific role(s) of nicotinic acid receptors in human skin homeostasis. PMID:21655214

  1. Stratum Corneum Lipids: Their Role for the Skin Barrier Function in Healthy Subjects and Atopic Dermatitis Patients.

    PubMed

    van Smeden, Jeroen; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2016-01-01

    Human skin acts as a primary barrier between the body and its environment. Crucial for this skin barrier function is the lipid matrix in the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC). Two of its functions are (1) to prevent excessive water loss through the epidermis and (2) to avoid that compounds from the environment permeate into the viable epidermal and dermal layers and thereby provoke an immune response. The composition of the SC lipid matrix is dominated by three lipid classes: cholesterol, free fatty acids and ceramides. These lipids adopt a highly ordered, 3-dimensional structure of stacked densely packed lipid layers (lipid lamellae): the lateral and lamellar lipid organization. The way in which these lipids are ordered depends on the composition of the lipids. One very common skin disease in which the SC lipid barrier is affected is atopic dermatitis (AD). This review addresses the SC lipid composition and organization in healthy skin, and elaborates on how these parameters are changed in lesional and nonlesional skin of AD patients. Concerning the lipid composition, the changes in the three main lipid classes and the importance of the carbon chain lengths of the lipids are discussed. In addition, this review addresses how these changes in lipid composition induce changes in lipid organization and subsequently correlate with an impaired skin barrier function in both lesional and nonlesional skin of these patients. Furthermore, the effect of filaggrin and mutations in the filaggrin gene on the SC lipid composition is critically discussed. Also, the breakdown products of filaggrin, the natural moisturizing factor molecules and its relation to SC-pH is described. Finally, the paper discusses some major changes in epidermal lipid biosynthesis in patients with AD and other related skin diseases, and how inflammation has a deteriorating effect on the SC lipids and SC biosynthesis. The review ends with perspectives on future studies in relation to

  2. The role of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles in inducing skin barrier perturbation in the presence of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Saswata; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) serves as the skin barrier between the body and the environment. When the skin is contacted with an aqueous solution of the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), a well-known model skin irritant, SDS penetrates into the skin and disrupts this barrier. It is well established, both in vitro and in vivo, that the SDS skin penetration is dose-dependent, and that it increases with an increase in the total SDS concentration above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of SDS. However, when we added the humectant glycerol at a concentration of 10 wt% to the aqueous SDS contacting solution, we observed, through in vitro quantitative skin radioactivity assays using (14)C-radiolabeled SDS, that the dose dependence in SDS skin penetration is almost completely eliminated. To rationalize this important observation, which may also be related to the well-known beneficial effects of glycerol on skin barrier perturbation in vivo, we hypothesize that the addition of 10 wt% glycerol may hinder the ability of the SDS micelles to penetrate into the skin barrier through aqueous pores that exist in the SC. To test this hypothesis, we conducted mannitol skin permeability as well as average skin electrical resistivity measurements in vitro upon exposure of the skin to an aqueous SDS contacting solution and to an aqueous SDS + 10 wt% glycerol contacting solution in the context of a hindered-transport aqueous porous pathway model of the SC. Our in vitro studies demonstrated that the addition of 10 wt% glycerol: (i) reduces the average aqueous pore radius resulting from exposure of the skin to the aqueous SDS contacting solution from 33 +/- 5 Angstrom to 20 +/- 5 Angstrom, such that a SDS micelle of radius 18.5 +/- 1 Angstrom (as determined using dynamic light-scattering measurements) experiences significant steric hindrance and cannot penetrate into the SC, and (ii) reduces the number density of aqueous pores in the SC by more than 50%, thereby further reducing

  3. Optimisation of a dosing regime for a topical skin protectant (barrier cream).

    PubMed

    Chilcott, Robert P; Larner, Joanne; Matar, Hazem; Kansagra, Sneha; Theivendran, Baveetharan; Viegas, Vanessa Anne; Goldman, Virginia Streusand

    2015-01-01

    Topical skin protectants (barrier creams) have the potential to reduce or enhance the severity of dermal lesions following exposure to allergens or irritants. Therefore, it is essential that such products are subject to appropriate clinical evaluation prior to marketing. Consequently, it is important to accurately define a dosing regime in order to assess test products under appropriate conditions. In this study, we extended the use of a standard rubefacient (methyl nicotinate; MN) assay to establish the optimum thickness and duration of action of a novel barrier cream (RD1433). White petroleum jelly (Vaseline(®)) was used as a comparator product. The dermal response to MN was measured on the volar forearm skin of volunteers (n = 12; average age 47.5 years) using an array of biophysical instruments and visual scoring. When applied at a nominal thickness of 0.1 mm, RD1433 retained effectiveness against MN for up to six hours. In contrast, Vaseline(®) was relatively ineffective. Moreover, RD1433 provoked no measurable signs of irritation and so can be considered acceptable for further clinical evaluation. Future clinical studies using RD1433 should be based on topical application of a 0.1 mm thickness layer every six hours.

  4. Abnormal Morphology of Blood Vessels in Erythematous Skin From Atopic Dermatitis Patients.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Moe; Fukuda, Maki; Kumamoto, Junichi; Goto, Makiko; Denda, Sumiko; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Aiba, Setsuya; Nagayama, Masaharu; Denda, Mitsuhiro

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies suggest that altered peripheral blood circulation might be associated with erythema or inflammation in atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. However, the overall structure of blood vessels and capillaries in AD skin is poorly understood because most studies have involved light-microscopic observation of thin skin sections. In the present study, we compared the 3-dimensional structures of peripheral blood vessels of healthy subjects and AD patients in detail by means of 2-photon microscopy. In skin from healthy subjects, superficial vascular plexus and capillaries originating from flexous blood vessels were observed. However, skin from AD patients contained thickened, flexuous blood vessels, which might be associated with increased blood flow, in both erythematous and nonlesional areas. However, patients with lichenification did not display these morphological changes. Bifurcation of vessels was not observed in either erythematous or lichenification lesions. These results might be helpful for developing new clinical strategies to treat erythema in AD patients.

  5. The effects of polar excipients transcutol and dexpanthenol on molecular mobility, permeability, and electrical impedance of the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Sebastian; Pham, Quoc Dat; Jensen, Louise Bastholm; Knudsen, Nina Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Dencker; Ekelund, Katarina; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas; Engblom, Johan; Sparr, Emma

    2016-10-01

    In the development of transdermal and topical products it is important to understand how formulation ingredients interact with the molecular components of the upper layer of the skin, the stratum corneum (SC), and thereby influence its macroscopic barrier properties. The aim here was to investigate the effect of two commonly used excipients, transcutol and dexpanthenol, on the molecular as well as the macroscopic properties of the skin membrane. Polarization transfer solid-state NMR methods were combined with steady-state flux and impedance spectroscopy measurements to investigate how these common excipients influence the molecular components of SC and its barrier function at strictly controlled hydration conditions in vitro with excised porcine skin. The NMR results provide completely new molecular insight into how transcutol and dexpanthenol affect specific molecular segments of both SC lipids and proteins. The presence of transcutol or dexpanthenol in the formulation at fixed water activity results in increased effective skin permeability of the model drug metronidazole. Finally, impedance spectroscopy data show clear changes of the effective skin capacitance after treatment with transcutol or dexpanthenol. Based on the complementary data, we are able to draw direct links between effects on the molecular properties and on the macroscopic barrier function of the skin barrier under treatment with formulations containing transcutol or dexpanthenol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Abnormal brain activation in excoriation (skin-picking) disorder: evidence from an executive planning fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Odlaug, Brian L.; Hampshire, Adam; Chamberlain, Samuel R.; Grant, Jon E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Excoriation (skin-picking) disorder (SPD) is a relatively common psychiatric condition whose neurobiological basis is unknown. Aims To probe the function of fronto-striatal circuitry in SPD. Method Eighteen participants with SPD and 15 matched healthy controls undertook an executive planning task (Tower of London) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Activation during planning was compared between groups using region of interest and whole-brain permutation cluster approaches. Results The SPD group exhibited significant functional underactivation in a cluster encompassing bilateral dorsal striatum (maximal in right caudate), bilateral anterior cingulate and right medial frontal regions. These abnormalities were, for the most part, outside the dorsal planning network typically activated by executive planning tasks. Conclusions Abnormalities of neural regions involved in habit formation, action monitoring and inhibition appear involved in the pathophysiology of SPD. Implications exist for understanding the basis of excessive grooming and the relationship of SPD with putative obsessive–compulsive spectrum disorders. PMID:26159604

  7. Emollient enhancement of the skin barrier from birth offers effective atopic dermatitis prevention

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Eric L.; Chalmers, Joanne R.; Hanifin, Jon M.; Thomas, Kim S.; Cork, Michael J.; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Brown, Sara J.; Chen, Zunqiu; Chen, Yiyi; Williams, Hywel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (atopic eczema) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that has reached epidemic proportions in children worldwide and is increasing in prevalence. Because of the significant socioeconomic effect of atopic dermatitis and its effect on the quality of life of children and families, there have been decades of research focused on disease prevention, with limited success. Recent advances in cutaneous biology suggest skin barrier defects might be key initiators of atopic dermatitis and possibly allergic sensitization. Objective Our objective was to test whether skin barrier enhancement from birth represents a feasible strategy for reducing the incidence of atopic dermatitis in high-risk neonates. Methods We performed a randomized controlled trial in the United States and United Kingdom of 124 neonates at high risk for atopic dermatitis. Parents in the intervention arm were instructed to apply full-body emollient therapy at least once per day starting within 3 weeks of birth. Parents in the control arm were asked to use no emollients. The primary feasibility outcome was the percentage of families willing to be randomized. The primary clinical outcome was the cumulative incidence of atopic dermatitis at 6 months, as assessed by a trained investigator. Results Forty-two percent of eligible families agreed to be randomized into the trial. All participating families in the intervention arm found the intervention acceptable. A statistically significant protective effect was found with the use of daily emollient on the cumulative incidence of atopic dermatitis with a relative risk reduction of 50% (relative risk, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.28-0.9; P = .017). There were no emollient-related adverse events and no differences in adverse events between groups. Conclusion The results of this trial demonstrate that emollient therapy from birth represents a feasible, safe, and effective approach for atopic dermatitis prevention. If confirmed in larger trials

  8. The effect of adhesive dressing edges on cutaneous irritancy and skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Dykes, P J

    2007-03-01

    To assess the effect of repeated application and removal of adhesive edges from wound-care products on cutaneous irritancy and barrier function in normal volunteer subjects. This was a study using a 'repeat-insult patch test'. Adhesive edges from six commonly used wound-care products were applied continuously to the same site (six applications over a 14-day period) in 30 normal volunteer subjects. The test sites were assessed clinically before product reapplication using established ranking scales for cutaneous erythema. The cumulative irritancy score (CIS) for each test site was determined by adding the erythema scores at days 3, 5, 8, 10, 12 and 15. At the study end the barrier function of each test site was assessed by measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL). The CIS showed that the products fall into two distinct groups, with Mepilex, Tielle and Allevyn giving low scores and Biatain, Comfeel and DuoDERM higher scores. Statistical analysis indicated significant differences (p < 0.05) between Mepilex and Biatain, Mepilex and Comfeel, Mepilex and DuoDERM, Tielle and Biatain, Allevyn and Biatain. The mean TEWL values also indicated that the products fall into two distinct groups: Mepilex, Tielle and Allevyn with low mean values close to that of normal adjacent back skin and Biatain, Comfeel and DuoDERM with much higher mean values. Statistical analysis indicated that Mepilex, Tielle and Allevyn were not significantly different from normal skin (p < 0.05), whereas Biatain, Comfeel and DuoDERM were significantly higher than normal skin and the other products tested. The results show clear differences between products; the clinical scores and TEWL measurements indicate that the products fall into two distinct groups. This novel approach seems able to discriminate between adhesive borders and may be useful during product development and in selecting products for clinical trials.

  9. Effect of occupational exposure to rayon manufacturing chemicals on skin barrier to evaporative water loss.

    PubMed

    Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Tsai, Jui-Chen; Wu, Jyun-De; Sheu, Hamm-Min; Chang, Ho-Yuan

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of the occupational exposure to rayon manufacturing chemicals (RMC, containing predominantly carbon disulfide (CS(2)) and minor sulfuric acid) in a rayon factory on the basal transepidermal water loss (TEWL), barrier integrity (BI), and sequential increasing TEWL profiles. Six Thais and five Chinese workers in the spinning department of a rayon manufacturing plant and five healthy unexposed controls were recruited as the test subjects. An area of 4.5 x 5.5 cm on the mid-side of the volar forearm on the right hand was stripped by means of moderate pressure with commercially available adhesive tape by the same technician throughout the experiment. The skin was progressively stripped until glistening. TEWL was measured at every three and five tape strips on the right hand. The corresponding site on the left hand was measured parallel as the self-control. We found significant differences in basal TEWL and in BI between Chinese workers and Chinese controls, and between Thai workers and Chinese workers, respectively. Two-stage patterns of progressive TEWL profiles were found in such a chronic and repeated occupational exposure to RMC containing CS(2). The occupational exposure to RMC could result in the perturbation of the skin barrier function. Basal TEWL might be more sensitive to chronic skin irritant exposure. The TEWL profile achieved to the glistening stage might be necessary to avoid erroneous pattern estimation. Due to the lack of Thais control in this study, the racial difference in response to the RMC warrants further study.

  10. Effect of diaper cream and wet wipes on skin barrier properties in infants: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Lünnemann, Lena; Stroux, Andrea; Kottner, Jan; Serrano, José; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    The effect of different diaper care procedures on skin barrier function in infants has been minimally investigated and may be assessed using objective methods. In a single-center, prospective trial, 89 healthy 9-month-old infants (±8 wks) were randomly assigned to three diaper care regimens: group I used water-moistened washcloths at diaper changes (n = 30), group II additionally applied diaper cream twice daily (n = 28), and group III used wet wipes and diaper cream twice daily (n = 31). Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration (SCH), skin pH, interleukin 1α (IL-1α) levels, and microbiologic colonization were measured in diapered skin (upper outer quadrant of the buttocks), nondiapered skin (upper leg), and if diaper dermatitis (DD) occurred, using the most affected skin area at day 1 and weeks 4 and 8. Skin condition was assessed utilizing a neonatal skin condition score and diaper rash grade. On diapered skin, SCH decreased in groups II and III, whereas TEWL values were reduced in group II only. Skin pH increased in groups II and III. In general, SCH, skin pH, and IL-1α levels were higher in healthy diapered skin than in nondiapered skin. The incidence and course of DD was comparable in all groups. Areas with DD had greater TEWL and skin pH than unaffected skin areas. Infants who received diaper cream had lower SCH and TEWL and higher pH levels in the diapered area than on nondiapered skin. No correlation with the occurrence of DD was found.

  11. Inter- and intra-individual variability in human skin barrier function: a large scale retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Meidan, Victor M; Roper, Clive S

    2008-06-01

    In vitro transepidermal tritiated water flux measurements are frequently used to evaluate skin barrier integrity for quality control purposes. However, research in this area to date has been largely based upon small-scale studies, each involving relatively few skin permeation measurements. In order to enhance our understanding in this area, we have conducted a much larger scale retrospective statistical analysis of tritiated water kp values. These values reflected the permeability of 2400 skin samples that were derived from 112 female volunteers over a 4 year period. It was found that the population of tritiated water kp values constituted a positively skewed, non-Normal distribution. Mean kp was 2.04 x 10(-3)cm/h while the 95th percentile was 4.50 x 10(-3)cm/h. Both values are higher than those reported in previous smaller studies. Hence, our study indicates that previously suggested upper limits for tritiated water flux are too low and that they be revised upwards to a value of 4.5 x 10(-3)cm/h. Analysis was also performed on smaller data subsets allowing inter-individual and intra-individual comparisons. For intra-individual kp variability, site-related differences yielded a non-Normal, positively skewed pattern in most individuals. Inter-individual variability was Normally-distributed and showed scatter that was much smaller in magnitude.

  12. Effects of various grit-containing cleansers on skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Wigger-Alberti, W; Fischer, T; Greif, C; Maddern, P; Elsner, P

    1999-09-01

    Products intended for individuals in contact with strongly adhering dirt often contain grit. Various clinical test methods have been developed for evaluating the potential of personal washing products to induce skin irritation. In the present study, differences in the irritant effects of washing products containing naturally-derived grit and synthetic grit were investigated in a forearm wash test. The forearms of 16 test subjects were washed in a total of 18 treatments (4 per day for 4 days, with 2 treatments on the 5th day). Treatment consisted of continuous washing for 2 min by a technician, who gently slid his fingertips with the lather up and down the forearm. Non-invasive instrumental measurements of skin barrier function were performed. Repetitive washing for 1 week lead to increased TEWL values, skin redness and decreased stratum corneum hydration. Results indicate differences in irritancy potential due to different types of grit, their surface and concentration. It is concluded that the repeated wash test seems to be adequate for rating personal washing products that contain grit.

  13. mTORC1 and mTORC2 regulate skin morphogenesis and epidermal barrier formation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaolei; Bloch, Wilhelm; Iden, Sandra; Rüegg, Markus A.; Hall, Michael N.; Leptin, Maria; Partridge, Linda; Eming, Sabine A.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a regulator of growth in many tissues, mediates its activity through two multiprotein complexes, mTORC1 or mTORC2. The role of mTOR signalling in skin morphogenesis and epidermal development is unknown. Here we identify mTOR as an essential regulator in skin morphogenesis by epidermis-specific deletion of Mtor in mice (mTOREKO). mTOREKO mutants are viable, but die shortly after birth due to deficits primarily during the early epidermal differentiation programme and lack of a protective barrier development. Epidermis-specific loss of Raptor, which encodes an essential component of mTORC1, confers the same skin phenotype as seen in mTOREKO mutants. In contrast, newborns with an epidermal deficiency of Rictor, an essential component of mTORC2, survive despite a hypoplastic epidermis and disruption in late stage terminal differentiation. These findings highlight a fundamental role for mTOR in epidermal morphogenesis that is regulated by distinct functions for mTORC1 and mTORC2. PMID:27807348

  14. Chronic liver injury in mice promotes impairment of skin barrier function via tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Satoshi; Hiramoto, Keiichi; Koyama, Mayu; Ooi, Kazuya

    2016-09-01

    Alcohol is frequently used to induce chronic liver injury in laboratory animals. Alcohol causes oxidative stress in the liver and increases the expression of inflammatory mediators that cause hepatocellular damage. However, during chronic liver injury, it is unclear if/how these liver-derived factors affect distal tissues, such as the skin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate skin barrier function during chronic liver injury. Hairless mice were administered 5% or 10% ethanol for 8 weeks, and damages to the liver and skin were assessed using histological and protein-analysis methods, as well as by detecting inflammatory mediators in the plasma. After alcohol administration, the plasma concentration of the aspartate and alanine aminotransferases increased, while albumin levels decreased. In mice with alcohol-induced liver injury, transepidermal water loss was significantly increased, and skin hydration decreased concurrent with ceramide and type I collagen degradation. The plasma concentrations of [Formula: see text]/[Formula: see text] and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were significantly increased in mice with induced liver injury. TNF receptor (TNFR) 2 expression was upregulated in the skin of alcohol-administered mice, while TNFR1 levels remained constant. Interestingly, the impairment of skin barrier function in mice administered with 10% ethanol was ameliorated by administering an anti-TNF-α antibody. We propose a novel mechanism whereby plasma TNF-α, via TNFR2 alone or with TNFR1, plays an important role in skin barrier function during chronic liver disease in these mouse models.

  15. Penetration of spherical and rod-like gold nanoparticles into intact and barrier-disrupted human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Christina; Nordmeyer, Daniel; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Raabe, Jörg; Vogt, Annika; Lademann, Jürgen; Rancan, Fiorenza; Rühl, Eckart

    2015-03-01

    The penetration of spherical and rod-like gold nanoparticles into human skin is reported. Several skin preparation techniques are applied, including cryo techniques, such as plunge freezing and freeze drying, and the use of wet cells. Their advantages and drawbacks for observing nanoparticle uptake are discussed. Independent of the particle shape no uptake into intact skin is observed by a combination of imaging approaches, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and scanning X-ray microscopy (STXM). These results are discussed along with suitable skin preparation approaches. Experiments on barrier-disrupted skin, i.e. mechanical lesions made by pricking, indicate, however, that gold particles can be identified deep in the dermis, as follows from STXM studies on wet skin samples.

  16. Changes in villus-like projections of corneocytes from the facial skin in normal infants with or without infantile eczema; useful parameter to assess barrier function.

    PubMed

    Naoko, Ota; Satoshi, Hirakawa; Fukuyoshi, Mori; Mitsuyoshi, Honda

    2013-11-01

    Skin barrier function changes rapidly during the first year of life in infants. Measuring skin barrier function in infants is difficult because of the burden on patients and their parents or guardians. A simple method for assessing barrier function in infants that can be performed quickly and would enable swift treatment and skin care management. We used laser microscopy to investigate villus-like projections (VPs) observed on the lower surface of corneocytes obtained on tape strips from 18 normal Japanese infants at the ages of 1, 3, and 6 months. We also performed transepidermal water loss and corneocyte size measurements. A dermatologist clinically assessed the cutaneous findings. We rapidly measured skin barrier function changes during the first 6 months of life in infants. During the study period, very slight erythema and pityriasis were the primary reasons for skin rash, which were generally most severe at 3 months. The results showed that barrier function declined at approximately 3 months of age in nearly all subjects. Therefore, we found that normal barrier function of infantile skin becomes temporarily impaired after birth. We conclude that even in patients with very mild skin rashes, multiple objective indices of skin barrier function deteriorate simultaneously. Observation of VPs on the surface of corneocytes using laser microscopy is a rapid, painless, and effective method of monitoring skin barrier function in infants, and VP score offers a useful index for assessing barrier function. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Mucosal Barrier Depletion and Loss of Bacterial Diversity are Primary Abnormalities in Paediatric Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Alipour, Misagh; Zaidi, Deenaz; Valcheva, Rosica; Jovel, Juan; Martínez, Inés; Sergi, Consolato; Walter, Jens; Mason, Andrew L; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Dieleman, Levinus A; Carroll, Matthew W; Huynh, Hien Q; Wine, Eytan

    2016-04-01

    Ulcerative colitis [UC] is associated with colonic mucosa barrier defects and bacterial dysbiosis, but these features may simply be the result of inflammation. Therefore, we sought to assess whether these features are inherently abrogated in the terminal ileum [TI] of UC patients, where inflammation is absent. TI biopsies from paediatric inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] subsets [Crohn's disease [CD; n = 13] and UC [n = 10

  18. Correlation between the chemical composition of thermoresponsive nanogels and their interaction with the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Giulbudagian, Michael; Rancan, Fiorenza; Klossek, André; Yamamoto, Kenji; Jurisch, Jana; Neto, Victor Colombo; Schrade, Petra; Bachmann, Sebastian; Rühl, Eckart; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Vogt, Annika; Calderón, Marcelo

    2016-12-10

    In this paper we present a comprehensive study for the ability of thermoresponsive nanogels (tNG) to act as cutaneous penetration enhancers. Given the unique properties of such molecular architectures with regard to their chemical composition and thermoresponsive properties, we propose a particular mode of penetration enhancement mechanism, i.e. hydration of the stratum corneum. Different tNG were fabricated using dendritic polyglycerol as a multifunctional crosslinker and three different kinds of thermoresponsive polymers as linear counterpart: poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM), p(di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate - co - oligo ethylene glycol methacrylate) (DEGMA-co-OEGMA475), and poly(glycidyl methyl ether - co - ethyl glycidyl ether) (tPG). Excised human skin was investigated by means of fluorescence microscopy, which enabled the detection of significant increment in the penetration of tNG as well as the encapsulated fluorescein. The morphology of the treated skin samples was thoroughly investigated by transmission electron microscopy and stimulated Raman spectromicroscopy. We found that tNG can perturbate the organization of both proteins and lipids in the skin barrier, which was attributed to tNG hydration effects. Interestingly, different drug delivery properties were detected and the ability of each investigated tNG to enhance skin penetration correlated well with the degree of induced stratum corneum hydration. The differences in the penetration enhancements could be attributed to the chemical structures of the nanogels used in this study. The most effective stratum corneum hydration was detected for nanogels having additional or more exposed polyether structure in their chemical composition.

  19. The effect of obesity on skin disease and epidermal permeability barrier status in children.

    PubMed

    Nino, Massimiliano; Franzese, Adriana; Ruggiero Perrino, Nunzia; Balato, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Obese adult patients have many dermatoses, such as skin tags, candida infection, cellulite, and intertrigo, but only limited data have been published on obese children and the barrier function of their skin. Sixty-five overweight and obese children (n = 40, BMI 85th-95th percentile; n = 25, BMI > 95th percentile) (aged 8-15; mean age 11.6) and 30 normal-weight controls (aged 7-15; mean age 11.1) underwent a clinical evaluation and calculation of transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Higher weight percentile was associated with a higher incidence of some dermatoses. Skin tags were found in 40% of subjects in the 95th percentile and 2.5% of those in the 85th percentile. Striae distensae were observed in 32% of patients in the 95th percentile and 22.5% of those in the 85th percentile. Plantar hyperkeratosis was observed only in 20% of the 95th percentile subjects and was not observed in the other groups. TEWL values at the forearm site were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in obese children than in the control group, but no significant differences in TEWL values according to BMI level were found between the two groups of obese children. Degree of obesity influences the incidence of some associated dermatoses; skin tags, striae distensae, and plantar hyperkeratosis were more frequent in children in the 95th percentile of BMI. Obesity increases the TEWL rate, suggesting that obese children might become more easily overheated as weight increases, with more profuse sweating because of the thick layers of subcutaneous fat.

  20. Molecular interactions of plant oil components with stratum corneum lipids correlate with clinical measures of skin barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Mack Correa, Mary Catherine; Mao, Guangru; Saad, Peter; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard; Walters, Russel M

    2014-01-01

    Plant-derived oils consisting of triglycerides and small amounts of free fatty acids (FFAs) are commonly used in skincare regimens. FFAs are known to disrupt skin barrier function. The objective of this study was to mechanistically study the effects of FFAs, triglycerides and their mixtures on skin barrier function. The effects of oleic acid (OA), glyceryl trioleate (GT) and OA/GT mixtures on skin barrier were assessed in vivo through measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and fluorescein dye penetration before and after a single application. OA's effects on stratum corneum (SC) lipid order in vivo were measured with infrared spectroscopy through application of perdeuterated OA (OA-d34). Studies of the interaction of OA and GT with skin lipids included imaging the distribution of OA-d34 and GT ex vivo with IR microspectroscopy and thermodynamic analysis of mixtures in aqueous monolayers. The oil mixtures increased both TEWL and fluorescein penetration 24 h after a single application in an OA dose-dependent manner, with the highest increase from treatment with pure OA. OA-d34 penetrated into skin and disordered SC lipids. Furthermore, the ex vivo IR imaging studies showed that OA-d34 permeated to the dermal/epidermal junction while GT remained in the SC. The monolayer experiments showed preferential interspecies interactions between OA and SC lipids, while the mixing between GT and SC lipids was not thermodynamically preferred. The FFA component of plant oils may disrupt skin barrier function. The affinity between plant oil components and SC lipids likely determines the extent of their penetration and clinically measurable effects on skin barrier functions. PMID:24372651

  1. Molecular interactions of plant oil components with stratum corneum lipids correlate with clinical measures of skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Mack Correa, Mary Catherine; Mao, Guangru; Saad, Peter; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard; Walters, Russel M

    2014-01-01

    Plant-derived oils consisting of triglycerides and small amounts of free fatty acids (FFAs) are commonly used in skincare regimens. FFAs are known to disrupt skin barrier function. The objective of this study was to mechanistically study the effects of FFAs, triglycerides and their mixtures on skin barrier function. The effects of oleic acid (OA), glyceryl trioleate (GT) and OA/GT mixtures on skin barrier were assessed in vivo through measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and fluorescein dye penetration before and after a single application. OA's effects on stratum corneum (SC) lipid order in vivo were measured with infrared spectroscopy through application of perdeuterated OA (OA-d34 ). Studies of the interaction of OA and GT with skin lipids included imaging the distribution of OA-d34 and GT ex vivo with IR microspectroscopy and thermodynamic analysis of mixtures in aqueous monolayers. The oil mixtures increased both TEWL and fluorescein penetration 24 h after a single application in an OA dose-dependent manner, with the highest increase from treatment with pure OA. OA-d34 penetrated into skin and disordered SC lipids. Furthermore, the ex vivo IR imaging studies showed that OA-d34 permeated to the dermal/epidermal junction while GT remained in the SC. The monolayer experiments showed preferential interspecies interactions between OA and SC lipids, while the mixing between GT and SC lipids was not thermodynamically preferred. The FFA component of plant oils may disrupt skin barrier function. The affinity between plant oil components and SC lipids likely determines the extent of their penetration and clinically measurable effects on skin barrier functions. © 2013. Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies Inc.. Experimental Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A new topical panthenol-containing emollient: Results from two randomized controlled studies assessing its skin moisturization and barrier restoration potential, and the effect on skin microflora.

    PubMed

    Stettler, Hans; Kurka, Peter; Lunau, Nathalie; Manger, Caroline; Böhling, Arne; Bielfeldt, Stephan; Wilhelm, Klaus-Peter; Dähnhardt-Pfeiffer, Stephan; Dähnhardt, Dorothee; Brill, Florian H H; Lenz, Holger

    2017-03-01

    Two randomized, intra-individual comparison studies were performed in healthy subjects to evaluate the skin moisturization and barrier restoration potential of a new topical panthenol-containing emollient (NTP-CE) (Study 1), and its effect on skin microflora (Study 2). In Study 1 (N = 23), two skin areas, one challenged with 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution and one unchallenged, were treated with NTP-CE for 3 weeks. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration, and intercellular lipid lamellae (ICLL) organization were measured at regular intervals during the study. In Study 2 (N = 20), quantitative bacterial cultures were obtained over 6 h from a skin area undergoing wash stress with 10% SDS with subsequent single application of NTP-CE. In Study 1, mean AUC for TEWL reduction from baseline was more pronounced with NTP-CE compared with control (-168.36 vs. -123.38 g/m(2)/h, p = 0.023). NTP-CE use was also associated with statistically significant improvements in stratum corneum hydration and an increase in mean ICLL length from baseline (day 22: 120.61 vs. 35.85 nm/1000 nm(2), p < 0.001). In Study 2, NTP-CE use had no negative impact on bacterial viability. NTP-CE use has favorable and lasting effects on barrier function and repair as well as skin hydration without negatively influencing bacterial viability.

  3. Vibrational spectroscopy and microscopic imaging: novel approaches for comparing barrier physical properties in native and human skin equivalents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Guo; Zhang, Guojin; Flach, Carol R.; Mendelsohn, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy and imaging have been used to compare barrier properties in human skin, porcine skin, and two human skin equivalents, Epiderm 200X with an enhanced barrier and Epiderm 200 with a normal barrier. Three structural characterizations were performed. First, chain packing and conformational order were compared in isolated human stratum corneum (SC), isolated porcine SC, and in the Epiderm 200X surface layers. The infrared (IR) spectrum of isolated human SC revealed a large proportion of orthorhombically packed lipid chains at physiological temperatures along with a thermotropic phase transition to a state with hexagonally packed chains. In contrast, the lipid phase at physiological temperatures in both porcine SC and in Epiderm 200X, although dominated by conformationally ordered chains, lacked significant levels of orthorhombic subcell packing. Second, confocal Raman imaging of cholesterol bands showed extensive formation of cholesterol-enriched pockets within the human skin equivalents (HSEs). Finally, IR imaging tracked lipid barrier dimensions as well as the spatial disposition of ordered lipids in human SC and Epiderm 200X. These approaches provide a useful set of experiments for exploring structural differences between excised human skin and HSEs, which in turn may provide a rationale for the functional differences observed among these preparations.

  4. Skin pH Is the Master Switch of Kallikrein 5-Mediated Skin Barrier Destruction in a Murine Atopic Dermatitis Model.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyosun; Matsuda, Akira; Jung, Kyungsook; Karasawa, Kaoru; Matsuda, Kenshiro; Oida, Kumiko; Ishizaka, Saori; Ahn, Ginnae; Amagai, Yosuke; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Sung-Ho; Arkwright, Peter D; Takamori, Kenji; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Akane

    2016-01-01

    Elevated skin surface pH has been reported in patients with atopic dermatitis. In this study, we explored the role of skin pH in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis using the NC/Tnd murine atopic dermatitis model. Alkalinization of the skin of asymptomatic NC/Tnd mice housed in specific pathogen-free conditions induced kallikrein 5 and activated protease-activated receptor 2, resulting in thymic stromal lymphopoietin secretion and a cutaneous T-helper 2 allergic response. This was associated with increased transepidermal water loss and development of eczematous lesions in these specific pathogen-free NC/Tnd mice, which normally do not suffer from atopic dermatitis. Injection of recombinant thymic stromal lymphopoietin also induced scratching behavior in the specific pathogen-free NC/Tnd mice. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin production and dermatitis induced by alkalinization of the skin could be blocked by the protease-activated receptor 2 antagonist ENMD-1068. In contrast, weak acidification of eczematous skin in conventionally housed NC/Tnd mice reduced kallikrein 5 activity and ameliorated the dermatitis. Onset of the dermatitis was associated with increased epidermal filaggrin expression and impaired activity of the sodium/hydrogen exchanger 1, a known regulator of skin pH. We conclude that alterations in skin pH directly modulate kallikrein 5 activity leading to skin barrier dysfunction, itch, and dermatitis via the protease-activated receptor 2-thymic stromal lymphopoietin pathway.

  5. Absence of Glial α-Dystrobrevin Causes Abnormalities of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Progressive Brain Edema*

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Chun Fu; Mohanta, Sarajo Kumar; Frontczak-Baniewicz, Malgorzata; Swinny, Jerome D.; Zablocka, Barbara; Górecki, Dariusz C.

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a key role in maintaining brain functionality. Although mammalian BBB is formed by endothelial cells, its function requires interactions between endotheliocytes and glia. To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in these interactions is currently a major challenge. We show here that α-dystrobrevin (α-DB), a protein contributing to dystrophin-associated protein scaffolds in astrocytic endfeet, is essential for the formation and functioning of BBB. The absence of α-DB in null brains resulted in abnormal brain capillary permeability, progressively escalating brain edema, and damage of the neurovascular unit. Analyses in situ and in two-dimensional and three-dimensional in vitro models of BBB containing α-DB-null astrocytes demonstrated these abnormalities to be associated with loss of aquaporin-4 water and Kir4.1 potassium channels from glial endfeet, formation of intracellular vacuoles in α-DB-null astrocytes, and defects of the astrocyte-endothelial interactions. These caused deregulation of tight junction proteins in the endothelia. Importantly, α-DB but not dystrophins showed continuous expression throughout development in BBB models. Thus, α-DB emerges as a central organizer of dystrophin-associated protein in glial endfeet and a rare example of a glial protein with a role in maintaining BBB function. Its abnormalities might therefore lead to BBB dysfunction. PMID:23043099

  6. Opioid receptor delta as a global modulator of skin differentiation and barrier function repair.

    PubMed

    Chajra, H; Amstutz, B; Schweikert, K; Auriol, D; Redziniak, G; Lefèvre, F

    2015-08-01

    The aims of this study were to confirm the properties of selective agonist peptide (Rubixyl) contained in the spinach towards opioid receptor delta. In fact, agonist properties of both spinach peptides (Rubiscolin-5 and Rubixyl) towards opioid receptor delta were demonstrated by Zang et al., but their effects on the other opioid receptors were not studied [1]. We also studied the expression of opioid receptor delta in epidermis under normal and stress condition (inflammatory) and its role in epidermis homeostasis under stress condition in vitro and in vivo. Agonist properties studies were performed using functional agonist cellular model containing human opioid receptors. Opioid receptor delta expression and epidermis homeostasis were studied on human reconstructed epidermis under normal and stress conditions (inflammatory stress) using gene expression (RT-qPCR) and protein expression analysis (immunohistological analysis). Skin repair properties of opioid receptor delta agonist were based on the following parameters TEWL (trans epidermal water loss, hydration and wrinkle depth at periocular and perilabial area) on human volunteers having either intrinsic ageing (more than 40 years old and non-smoker group) and both intrinsic ageing and extrinsic ageing (more than 40 years old and smoker group). We have demonstrated that the Rubixyl peptide is a specific agonist of opioid receptor delta. We have demonstrated that opioid receptor delta expression is modulated under inflammatory condition. The agonist Rubixyl was able to block the depletion of opioid receptor delta seen under inflammatory condition in reconstructed human epidermis. Inflammatory conditions lead to the unbalanced gene and protein expressions of markers involved in epidermis integrity and barrier function properties. The treatment of human reconstructed epidermis with the agonist Rubixyl leads to the normalization of unbalanced gene and protein expressions. In vivo study has confirmed the

  7. Risk Factors in Patients with Venous Stasis-Related Skin Lesions without Major Abnormalities on Duplex Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Kotaro; Morikage, Noriyasu; Yamashita, Osamu; Harada, Takasuke; Samura, Makoto; Takeuchi, Yuriko; Mizoguchi, Takahiro; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify the risk factors for venous stasis-related skin lesions in the legs in patients without major abnormalities on duplex ultrasonography (DUS). Methods: Fifty patients (nine males and 41 females, age 27-93 years) with symptoms of C4 or greater according to the Clinical, Etiological, Anatomical, Pathological (CEAP) classification, but having no abnormalities on DUS were reviewed for known risk factors for chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) such as older age (>70 years), obesity (body mass index [BMI] >30 kg/m(2)), short walking distance (<200 m/day), reduced ankle range of motion (<20°), and occupation requiring prolonged standing (>8h per day). Results: The risk factor was different between male and female patients; although all patients had at least one of the above risk factors, the most commonly found risk factor in male patients was occupation requiring prolonged standing (63%), while advanced age (78%) and limited walking distance (83%) were risk factors in female patients. Conclusions: Although male and female patients had different risk factors, insufficient walking seemed to be closely related to the development of venous stasis-related skin lesions.

  8. Risk Factors in Patients with Venous Stasis-Related Skin Lesions without Major Abnormalities on Duplex Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Morikage, Noriyasu; Yamashita, Osamu; Harada, Takasuke; Samura, Makoto; Takeuchi, Yuriko; Mizoguchi, Takahiro; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify the risk factors for venous stasis-related skin lesions in the legs in patients without major abnormalities on duplex ultrasonography (DUS). Methods: Fifty patients (nine males and 41 females, age 27–93 years) with symptoms of C4 or greater according to the Clinical, Etiological, Anatomical, Pathological (CEAP) classification, but having no abnormalities on DUS were reviewed for known risk factors for chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) such as older age (>70 years), obesity (body mass index [BMI] >30 kg/m2), short walking distance (<200 m/day), reduced ankle range of motion (<20°), and occupation requiring prolonged standing (>8h per day). Results: The risk factor was different between male and female patients; although all patients had at least one of the above risk factors, the most commonly found risk factor in male patients was occupation requiring prolonged standing (63%), while advanced age (78%) and limited walking distance (83%) were risk factors in female patients. Conclusions: Although male and female patients had different risk factors, insufficient walking seemed to be closely related to the development of venous stasis-related skin lesions. PMID:27738462

  9. Mucosal Barrier Depletion and Loss of Bacterial Diversity are Primary Abnormalities in Paediatric Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Misagh; Zaidi, Deenaz; Valcheva, Rosica; Jovel, Juan; Martínez, Inés; Sergi, Consolato; Walter, Jens; Mason, Andrew L.; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Dieleman, Levinus A.; Carroll, Matthew W.; Huynh, Hien Q.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Ulcerative colitis [UC] is associated with colonic mucosa barrier defects and bacterial dysbiosis, but these features may simply be the result of inflammation. Therefore, we sought to assess whether these features are inherently abrogated in the terminal ileum [TI] of UC patients, where inflammation is absent. Methods: TI biopsies from paediatric inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] subsets [Crohn’s disease [CD; n = 13] and UC [n = 10

  10. The topical use of non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD): nitric oxide related effects on human skin.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Kiara; Hoffmanns, Martin A; Demir, Erhan; Baldus, Sabrina; Volkmar, Christine M; Röhle, Mirco; Fuchs, Paul C; Awakowicz, Peter; Suschek, Christoph V; Opländer, Christian

    2015-01-30

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) devices generate air plasma above the skin containing active and reactive species including nitric oxide (NO). Since NO plays an essential role in skin physiology, a topical application of NO by plasma may be useful in the treatment of skin infections, impaired microcirculation and wound healing. Thus, after safety assessments of plasma treatment using human skin specimen and substitutes, NO-penetration through the epidermis, the loading of skin tissue with NO-derivates in vitro and the effects on human skin in vivo were determined. After the plasma treatment (0-60 min) of skin specimen or reconstructed epidermis no damaging effects were found (TUNEL/MTT). By Franz diffusion cell experiments plasma-induced NO penetration through epidermis and dermal enrichment with NO related species (nitrite 6-fold, nitrate 7-fold, nitrosothiols 30-fold) were observed. Furthermore, skin surface was acidified (~pH 2.7) by plasma treatment (90 s). Plasma application on the forearms of volunteers increased microcirculation fourfold in 1-2 mm and twofold in 6-8 mm depth in the treated skin areas. Regarding the NO-loading effects, skin acidification and increase in dermal microcirculation, plasma devices represent promising tools against chronic/infected wounds. However, efficacy of plasma treatment needs to be quantified in further studies and clinical trials.

  11. Efficacy of a Moisturizing Foam in Skin Barrier Regeneration and Itch Relief in Subjects Prone to Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lio, Peter A

    2016-11-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by impaired epidermal barrier with increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Scratching further compromises skin integrity, contributing to a cycle of inflammation. The objective of the present study was to investigate a topical anti-itch foam in improving skin barrier and itch. A single center open study was performed on 26 adults previously diagnosed with AD but without active lesions. One leg was treated with a single application of an anti-itch foam. Dryness, scaling, roughness, cracking, and signs of scratching were assessed before, 6, and 24 hours after application. Skin hydration was measured at 24 hours. The same product was applied twice daily for 7.5 days to the other leg, and skin hydration and TEWL were measured at baseline and on days 2, 8, and 10. Pruritus was assessed by volunteers and by a dermatologist. A significant increase in skin moisture (P less than 0.001) was measured 6 hours after a single application. Scores of dryness, scaling, roughness (P less than 0.001) and cracking (P=0.002) were significantly improved up to 24 hours after a single application. After a 7.5-day repeated application period, the anti-itch foam significantly reduced TEWL (P less than 0.001) compared to baseline. Skin hydration significantly improved (P less than 0.001) in the same time period. 48 hours after the last application, these improvements remained significant (P less than 0.001). The anti-itch foam improved the skin barrier. It provided immediate relief of clinical signs of AD including pruritus. Moreover, it delivered a long-lasting moisturizing effect, comforting the skin, and improving overall skin condition. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(suppl 11):s77-80..

  12. The effect of aqueous cream BP on the skin barrier in volunteers with a previous history of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Danby, S G; Al-Enezi, T; Sultan, A; Chittock, J; Kennedy, K; Cork, M J

    2011-08-01

    The emollient aqueous cream BP is frequently used for the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD), yet it is associated with a high rate of adverse cutaneous reactions. It contains the harsh anionic surfactant sodium lauryl sulphate, a known negative environmental factor associated with the exacerbation of AD. To investigate the effect of aqueous cream BP on stratum corneum (SC) integrity and skin barrier function in volunteers with a predisposition to a defective skin barrier. Thirteen volunteers with a previous history of AD (no symptoms for 6 months) applied aqueous cream BP twice daily to the volar side of one forearm for 4 weeks. The other forearm was left untreated as a control. Permeability barrier function and SC integrity were determined before and after treatment by measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in conjunction with tape-stripping. For comparison, 13 volunteers with current AD were recruited for assessment, without treatment, of SC integrity and skin barrier function at unaffected sites. Topical application of aqueous cream BP resulted in significant elevation of baseline TEWL and a concomitant decrease in SC integrity. Measurements made after no treatment in volunteers with current AD, at unaffected sites, suggest that application of aqueous cream BP negatively affects the skin barrier towards the damaged state associated with onset of flares of the disease. Aqueous cream BP used as a leave-on emollient caused severe damage to the skin barrier in volunteers with a previous history of AD. Aqueous cream BP should not be used as a leave-on emollient in patients with AD. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists 2011.

  13. Abnormal Collagen Metabolism in Cultured Skin Fibroblasts from Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodemann, H. Peter; Bayreuther, Klaus

    1984-08-01

    Total collagen synthesis is decreased by about 29% (P < 0.01) in skin fibroblasts established in vitro from male patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) as compared with that in normal male skin fibroblasts in vitro. The reduction in collagen synthesis is associated with an approximately 2-fold increase in collagen degradation in DMD fibroblasts. Correlated to these alterations in the metabolism of collagen, DMD fibroblasts express a significantly higher hydroxyproline/proline ratio (DMD: 1.36-1.45; P < 0.01) than do normal fibroblasts (controls: 0.86-0.89). The increased hydroxylation of proline residues of collagen (composed of type I and type III) could be the cause for the enhanced degradation of collagen in DMD fibroblasts.

  14. In vitro model systems for studying the impact of organic chemicals on the skin barrier lipids.

    PubMed

    Groen, Daniël; Berthaud, Fabienne; Bouwstra, Joke A; Chapuis, Christian; Gooris, Gert S; Boncheva, Mila

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes two synthetic lipid models designed to replace human stratum corneum (SC) in studies of the impact of volatile organic chemicals on the molecular organization of the skin barrier lipids. The models built upon previously developed self-assembled lipid membranes which have composition and 3D organization similar to those of the lipid matrix in SC. In one model the target chemicals were incorporated in the lipids before their self-assembly, and in the other one they were applied on top of a preformed lipid membrane. The chemicals could be incorporated within the model membranes in quantities close to those reached within human SC upon heavy surface loading. The dose-dependent effects of the chemicals on the lateral molecular organization in the models were qualitatively identical to those observed by infrared spectroscopy in human SC. The models facilitated the interpretation of X-ray diffraction profiles used to determine the nature of the interactions between the chemicals and the lipid lamellae and the position of the exogenous molecules within the unit cell of the lipid phases. These model systems are suitable for in vitro studies in the areas of skin biophysics, dermatology, transdermal drug delivery, and risk assessment.

  15. The effects of heat on skin barrier function and in vivo dermal absorption.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Gabriela; Leverett, Jesse C; Emamzadeh, Mandana; Lane, Majella E

    2014-04-10

    Enhanced delivery of ingredients across the stratum corneum (SC) is of great interest for improving the efficacy of topically applied formulations. Various methods for improving dermal penetration have been reported including galvanic devices and micro-needles. From a safety perspective it is important that such approaches do not compromise SC barrier function. This study investigates the influence of topically applied heat in vivo on the dermal uptake and penetration of a model active, allantoin from gel and lotion formulations. A custom designed device was used to deliver 42°C for 30s daily to human subjects after application of two formulations containing allantoin. The results were compared with sites treated with formulations containing no active and no heat, and a control site. In addition to penetration of allantoin, the integrity of the SC was monitored using trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements. The results showed that just 30s of 42°C topically applied heat was enough to cause significantly more penetration of allantoin from the lotion formulation compared with no application of heat. TEWL data indicated that the integrity of the skin was not compromised by the treatment. However, the application of heat did not promote enhanced penetration of the active from the gel formulation. Vehicle composition is therefore an important factor when considering thermal enhancement strategies for targeting actives to the skin.

  16. Reactive fluxes delivered by dielectric barrier discharge filaments to slightly wounded skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Kushner, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    The application of atmospheric-pressure plasmas to human tissue has been shown to have therapeutic effects for wound healing and in treatment of skin diseases. In this paper, we report on a computational study of the intersection of plasma filaments in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with a small wound in human skin in the context of plasma medicine. The wound is represented as a small cut in the epidermal layer of cells. Intracellular structures and their electrical properties were incorporated into the two-dimensional computational mesh in order to self-consistently couple gas phase plasma transport with the charging of the surface of the wound. We quantify the fluxes of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, ions and photons produced in or diffusing into the wound as might occur during the first few discharge pulses of treatment. Comparison is made to fluxes predicted by global modelling. We show that the relative location of the plasma filament with respect to the wound is important on plasma time scales (ns) for ions and photons, and for radicals directly produced by electron impact processes. On the longer-term diffusion time scales (ms) the position of the plasma filament relative to the wound is not so critical. For typical DBD conditions, the magnitude of these fluxes to the cellular surfaces corresponds to fluences of radicals nearly equal to the surface site density. These results imply that the biological reactivity is limited by reaction probabilities and not the availability of radical fluxes.

  17. Reflectance near-infrared measurements for determining changes in skin barrier function and scattering in relation to moisturizer application.

    PubMed

    Qassem, Meha; Kyriacou, Panayiotis A

    2015-09-01

    Skin moisture relates to the state of multiple skin constituents and aspects, but unfortunately, a device which could provide comprehensive and in vivo analysis is not available. Nevertheless, several reports have demonstrated accurate estimations of dermal water content using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and the potential of employing this technique in skin analysis. We aim to investigate whether NIRS could detect changes in skin barrier function through evaluation of skin water uptake in relation to moisturizer application. NIR and capacitance data were collected from 20 volunteers at both forearms, prior to and after seven days of regular moisturizer use. Results indicated lower peak intensities at the 1940-nm minima and higher intensities at the 1450-nm equivalent minima with moisturizer abstinence, while the opposite was true with regular moisturizer application. As the light beam would have traveled deeper into the skin at 1450 nm, it has been concluded that long-term, frequent moisturizer use had limited the penetration of extrinsic water. Partial least squares analysis showed that separation of sample’s scores increased with abstinence of moisturizer use. Thus, NIRS can provide valuable information not only on dermal water contents but also on additional parameters such as skin barrier function.

  18. Use of lanthanum to detect changes in the permeability barrier of rat skin after dermal exposure to organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Mattie, D.R.; McDougal, J.N.; Chase, M.R.; Hixson, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    Occupational dermal exposures to organic solvents are of importance due to local effects in the skin and systematic toxicity if penetration occurs through the skin. Repeated or prolonged contact with organic solvents have been shown to penetrate the skin; little information is available however, concerning effects on the barrier properties of skin after dermal exposure to solvents. This investigation examines the ultrastructural changes in rat skin after exposure of 3 organic chemicals and to correlate changes with the location of an electron-dense tracer, lanthanum, which is normally excluded by the permeability barrier in the stratum corneum. Male rats were exposed for 24 h to sterile saline, trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PERC), or toluene using dermal-exposure cells developed in this laboratory. Rat skin exposed to saline for 24 h appeared normal. Rat skin exposed to neat TCE, PERC or toluene for 24 h caused acute, coagulative necrosis of the epidermis and upper 1/2 to 1/3 of the dermis.

  19. Oral administration of Bifidobacterium breve attenuates UV-induced barrier perturbation and oxidative stress in hairless mice skin.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yuki; Sugimoto, Saho; Izawa, Naoki; Sone, Toshiro; Chiba, Katsuyoshi; Miyazaki, Kouji

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that some probiotics affect not only the gut but also the skin. However, the effects of probiotics on ultraviolet (UV)-induced skin damage are poorly understood. In this study, we aim to examine whether oral administration of live Bifidobacterium breve strain Yakult (BBY), a typical probiotic, can attenuate skin barrier perturbation caused by UV and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hairless mice. The mice were orally supplemented with a vehicle only or BBY once a day for nine successive days. Mouse dorsal skin was irradiated with UV from days 6 to 9. The day after the final irradiation, the transepidermal water loss (TEWL), stratum corneum hydration, and oxidation-related factors of the skin were evaluated. We elucidated that BBY prevented the UV-induced increase in TEWL and decrease in stratum corneum hydration. In addition, BBY significantly suppressed the UV-induced increase in hydrogen peroxide levels, oxidation of proteins and lipids, and xanthine oxidase activity in the skin. Conversely, antioxidant capacity did not change regardless of whether BBY was administered or not. In parameters we evaluated, there was a positive correlation between the increase in TEWL and the oxidation levels of proteins and lipids. Our results suggest that oral administration of BBY attenuates UV-induced barrier perturbation and oxidative stress of the skin, and this antioxidative effect is not attributed to enhancement of antioxidant capacity but to the prevention of ROS generation.

  20. Effects of single and repeated exposure to biocidal active substances on the barrier function of the skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Buist, Harrie E; van de Sandt, Johannes J M; van Burgsteden, Johan A; de Heer, Cees

    2005-10-01

    The dermal route of exposure is important in worker exposure to biocidal products. Many biocidal active substances which are used on a daily basis may decrease the barrier function of the skin to a larger extent than current risk assessment practice addresses, due to possible skin effects of repeated exposure. The influence of repeated and single exposure to representative biocidal active substances on the skin barrier was investigated in vitro. The biocidal active substances selected were alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (ADBAC), boric acid, deltamethrin, dimethyldidecylammonium chloride (DDAC), formaldehyde, permethrin, piperonyl butoxide, sodium bromide, and tebuconazole. Of these nine compounds, only the quaternary ammonium chlorides ADBAC and DDAC had a clear and consistent influence on skin permeability of the marker compounds tritiated water and [(14)C]propoxur. For these compounds, repeated exposure increased skin permeability more than single exposure. At high concentrations the difference between single and repeated exposure was quantitatively significant: repeated exposure to 300 mg/L ADBAC increased skin permeability two to threefold in comparison to single exposure. Therefore, single and repeated exposure to specific biocidal products may significantly increase skin permeability, especially when used undiluted.

  1. Reflectance near-infrared measurements for determining changes in skin barrier function and scattering in relation to moisturizer application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qassem, Meha; Kyriacou, Panayiotis A.

    2015-09-01

    Skin moisture relates to the state of multiple skin constituents and aspects, but unfortunately, a device which could provide comprehensive and in vivo analysis is not available. Nevertheless, several reports have demonstrated accurate estimations of dermal water content using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and the potential of employing this technique in skin analysis. We aim to investigate whether NIRS could detect changes in skin barrier function through evaluation of skin water uptake in relation to moisturizer application. NIR and capacitance data were collected from 20 volunteers at both forearms, prior to and after seven days of regular moisturizer use. Results indicated lower peak intensities at the 1940-nm minima and higher intensities at the 1450-nm equivalent minima with moisturizer abstinence, while the opposite was true with regular moisturizer application. As the light beam would have traveled deeper into the skin at 1450 nm, it has been concluded that long-term, frequent moisturizer use had limited the penetration of extrinsic water. Partial least squares analysis showed that separation of sample's scores increased with abstinence of moisturizer use. Thus, NIRS can provide valuable information not only on dermal water contents but also on additional parameters such as skin barrier function.

  2. Hydration-driven transport of deformable lipid vesicles through fine pores and the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Cevc, Gregor; Gebauer, Dieter

    2003-02-01

    We studied aggregate transport through semipermeable, nano-porous barriers experimentally and theoretically. By measuring and modeling the effect of hydration gradient across such barriers, spontaneous transbarrier transport of suitable lipid aggregates in vesicular form was proven to be driven by partial aggregate dehydration at the application site. By generalizing the Onsager transport model we derived a set of equations that rationalize all pertinent observations. Dehydration-induced vesicle motion starts with a lag time. This corresponds to the time needed to reach the limiting vesicle hydration; both are proportional to the starting excess water volume and decrease with increasing relative humidity at application site. The rate of transbarrier transport is insensitive to these parameters but increases with vesicle deformability and volume exchange capability. Both these properties depend on membrane composition. Reversible demixing of bilayer components is the cause of nonlinear bilayer characteristics and also potentially affects the effective membrane hydrophilicity. High hydrophilicity of vesicle surface and extreme aggregate shape adaptability together are necessary for successful material transport across the skin. This demonstrates the significance of basic biophysical investigations for better understanding of biological systems and for the practical use of artificial, nature-inspired carriers in drug delivery.

  3. Emollient enhancement of the skin barrier from birth offers effective atopic dermatitis prevention.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Eric L; Chalmers, Joanne R; Hanifin, Jon M; Thomas, Kim S; Cork, Michael J; McLean, W H Irwin; Brown, Sara J; Chen, Zunqiu; Chen, Yiyi; Williams, Hywel C

    2014-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis (atopic eczema) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that has reached epidemic proportions in children worldwide and is increasing in prevalence. Because of the significant socioeconomic effect of atopic dermatitis and its effect on the quality of life of children and families, there have been decades of research focused on disease prevention, with limited success. Recent advances in cutaneous biology suggest skin barrier defects might be key initiators of atopic dermatitis and possibly allergic sensitization. Our objective was to test whether skin barrier enhancement from birth represents a feasible strategy for reducing the incidence of atopic dermatitis in high-risk neonates. We performed a randomized controlled trial in the United States and United Kingdom of 124 neonates at high risk for atopic dermatitis. Parents in the intervention arm were instructed to apply full-body emollient therapy at least once per day starting within 3 weeks of birth. Parents in the control arm were asked to use no emollients. The primary feasibility outcome was the percentage of families willing to be randomized. The primary clinical outcome was the cumulative incidence of atopic dermatitis at 6 months, as assessed by a trained investigator. Forty-two percent of eligible families agreed to be randomized into the trial. All participating families in the intervention arm found the intervention acceptable. A statistically significant protective effect was found with the use of daily emollient on the cumulative incidence of atopic dermatitis with a relative risk reduction of 50% (relative risk, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.28-0.9; P = .017). There were no emollient-related adverse events and no differences in adverse events between groups. The results of this trial demonstrate that emollient therapy from birth represents a feasible, safe, and effective approach for atopic dermatitis prevention. If confirmed in larger trials, emollient therapy from birth would be a simple and low

  4. Measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in cats with experimental skin barrier dysfunction using a closed chamber system.

    PubMed

    Momota, Yutaka; Shimada, Kenichiro; Gin, Azusa; Matsubara, Takako; Azakami, Daigo; Ishioka, Katsumi; Nakamura, Yuka; Sako, Toshinori

    2016-10-01

    A closed chamber evaporimeter is suitable for measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in cats because of the compact device size, tolerance to sudden movement and short measuring time. TEWL is a representative parameter for skin barrier dysfunction, which is one of the clinical signs of atopic dermatitis in humans and dogs. Measurement of feline TEWL has been reported, but applicability of this parameter has not been validated. The aims of this study were to determine if tape stripping is a valid experimental model in cats for studying TEWL and to determine if a closed chambered system is a suitable measurement tool for cats. Ten clinically normal cats. In order to evaluate variation of the measured values, TEWL was measured at the right and left side of the three clipped regions (axillae, lateral thigh and groin). Subsequently, TEWL was measured using sequential tape stripping of the stratum corneum as a model of acute barrier disruption. The variations between both sides of the three regions showed no significant difference. Sequential tape stripping was associated with increasing values for TEWL. Feline TEWL was shown to reflect changes in the skin barrier in an experimental model using a closed chamber system and has the potential for evaluating skin barrier function in cats with skin diseases. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  5. Effect of skin barrier therapy on neonatal mortality rates in preterm infants in Bangladesh: a randomized, controlled, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Darmstadt, Gary L; Saha, Samir K; Ahmed, A S M Nawshad Uddin; Ahmed, Saifuddin; Chowdhury, M A K Azad; Law, Paul A; Rosenberg, Rebecca E; Black, Robert E; Santosham, Mathuram

    2008-03-01

    Skin barrier therapy during the neonatal period, when the skin barrier is most highly compromised and the risk of death is greatest, has been shown to have a number of potential benefits, including reduced risk of nosocomial sepsis. Topical application of emollients that augment skin barrier function was evaluated as a strategy for improving survival rates among hospitalized preterm infants in Bangladesh. A prospective, randomized, controlled, clinical trial was conducted in the special care nursery at Dhaka Shishu (Children) Hospital, the largest tertiary care children's hospital in Bangladesh. Preterm infants (gestational age: < or = 33 weeks; N = 497) received daily topical applications of sunflower seed oil or Aquaphor ointment. Neonatal mortality rates were compared in an intent-to-treat analysis with a control group that did not receive emollient therapy. Treatment with sunflower seed oil resulted in a statistically significant 26% reduction in mortality rates, compared with infants not receiving topical emollient therapy. Aquaphor therapy also significantly reduced mortality rates, by 32%. Topical therapy with skin barrier-enhancing emollients improved survival rates among preterm hospitalized infants in Bangladesh. This study provides strong evidence for the implementation of topical therapy for high-risk preterm neonates in developing countries.

  6. Effect of "rose essential oil" inhalation on stress-induced skin-barrier disruption in rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Mika; Kano, Eri; Miyoshi, Michio; Komaki, Ryoichi; Watanabe, Tatsuo

    2012-05-01

    In stressed animals, several brain regions (e.g., hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus [PVN]) exhibit neuronal activation, which increases plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and glucocorticoids. We previously reported that so-called "green odor" inhibits stress-induced activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPA axis) and thereby prevents the chronic stress-induced disruption of the skin barrier. Here, we investigated whether rose essential oil, another sedative odorant, inhibits the stress-induced 1) increases in PVN neuronal activity in rats and plasma glucocorticoids (corticosterone [CORT] in rats and cortisol in humans) and 2) skin-barrier disruption in rats and humans. The results showed that in rats subjected to acute restraint stress, rose essential oil inhalation significantly inhibited the increase in plasma CORT and reduced the increases in the number of c-Fos-positive cells in PVN. Inhalation of rose essential oil significantly inhibited the following effects of chronic stress: 1) the elevation of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), an index of the disruption of skin-barrier function, in both rats and humans and 2) the increase in the salivary concentration of cortisol in humans. These results suggest that in rats and humans, chronic stress-induced disruption of the skin barrier can be limited or prevented by rose essential oil inhalation, possibly through its inhibitory effect on the HPA axis.

  7. Cell surface abnormality in clones of skin fibroblasts from a carrier of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Hillier, J; Jones, G E; Statham, H E; Witkowski, J A; Dubowitz, V

    1985-01-01

    We have previously reported that skin fibroblasts from patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have a lower intercellular adhesiveness than control cells, and that cells from carriers of DMD have normal adhesiveness instead of the expected intermediate value. We have now cloned skin fibroblasts from a carrier of DMD (subject AS) who is also heterozygous for G6PD B/G6PD Mediterranean and determined the intercellular adhesiveness and G6PD phenotypes of the clones. G6PD activity was determined using the 2d-G6P/G6P ratio method. Normal cells had a percentage utilisation of 7.31% and uncloned cells from AS a value of 25.16%. Of 16 clones, 15 had normal values (mean 8.72%) while one clone was G6PD Med with a value of 57.5%. Mean intercellular adhesiveness of normal and uncloned cells from AS were 2.95 and 2.90 respectively. Of 11 clones tested, nine had normal values of adhesiveness (mean 3.1) and all these clones were G6PD B. The single G6PD Med clone had a value of 0.88, compared with 1.39 for DMD cells. We have no explanation at present for the single clone that was G6PD B but DMD-like on aggregation. PMID:3989823

  8. White Matter Abnormalities in Skin Picking Disorder: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian L; Hampshire, Adam; Schreiber, Liana RN; Chamberlain, Samuel R

    2013-01-01

    Skin picking disorder (SPD) is characterized by the repetitive and compulsive picking of skin, resulting in tissue damage. Neurocognitive findings in SPD implicate difficulty with response inhibition (suppression of pre-potent motor responses). This function is dependent on the integrity of the right frontal gyrus and the anterior cingulate cortices, and white-matter tracts connecting such neural nodes. It was hypothesized that SPD would be associated with reduced fractional anisotropy in regions implicated in top-down response suppression, particularly white-matter tracts in proximity of the bilateral anterior cingulate and right frontal (especially orbitofrontal and inferior frontal) cortices. 13-subjects meeting proposed SPD criteria for DSM-5 free from other current psychiatric comorbidities, and 12 healthy comparison subjects underwent MRI with a 3-T system. Between-group comparisons of imaging data underwent voxelwise analysis with permutation modeling and cluster correction. Fractional anisotropy (measured using diffusion tensor imaging) was the primary outcome measure. Subjects with SPD exhibited significantly reduced fractional anisotropy in tracts distributed bilaterally, which included the anterior cingulate cortices. Fractional anisotropy did not correlate significantly with SPD disease severity, or depressive or anxiety scores. These findings implicate disorganization of white-matter tracts involved in motor generation and suppression in the pathophysiology of SPD, findings remarkably similar to those previously reported in trichotillomania. This study adds considerable support to the notion that—in addition to the phenomenological and comorbid overlap between SPD and trichotillomania—these disorders likely share overlapping neurobiology. PMID:23303052

  9. FGFR2 abnormalities underlie a spectrum of bone, skin, and cancer pathologies.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masaru

    2009-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)2 is regulated on the basis of the balance of FGFs, heparan-sulfate proteoglycans, FGFR2 isoforms, endogenous inhibitors, and microRNAs. FGFR2 signals cross-talk with hedgehog, bone morphogenetic protein, and other regulatory networks. Some cases of congenital skeletal disorders with an FGFR2 mutation show skin phenotypes, including acne, cutis gyrata, and acanthosis nigricans. Gain-of-function mutations or variations of human FGFR2 occur in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, diffuse-type gastric cancer, and endometrial uterine cancer. Oral administration of AZD2171 or Ki23057 inhibits in vivo proliferation of cancer cells with aberrant FGFR2 activation in rodent therapeutic models. However, loss-of-function mutations of FGFR2 are reported in human melanoma. Conditional Fgfr2b knockout in the rodent epidermis leads to increased macrophage infiltration to the dermis and adipose tissue, epidermal thickening accompanied by basal-layer dysplasia and parakeratosis, and the promotion of chemically induced squamous-cell carcinoma. Dysregulation of FGFR2 results in a spectrum of bone and skin pathologies and several types of cancer.

  10. Skin Ceramide Alterations in First-Episode Schizophrenia Indicate Abnormal Sphingolipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Smesny, Stefan; Schmelzer, Christian E. H.; Hinder, Anke; Köhler, Alexandra; Schneider, Christiane; Rudzok, Maria; Schmidt, Ulrike; Milleit, Berko; Milleit, Christine; Nenadic, Igor; Sauer, Heinrich; Neubert, Reinhard H. H.; Fluhr, Joachim W.

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable evidence for specific pathology of lipid metabolism in schizophrenia, affecting polyunsaturated fatty acids and in particular sphingolipids. These deficits are assumed to interfere with neuronal membrane functioning and the development and maintenance of myelin sheaths. Recent studies suggest that some of these lipid pathologies might also be detected in peripheral skin tests. In this study, we examined different skin lipids and their relation to schizophrenia. We assessed epidermal lipid profiles in 22 first-episode antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients and 22 healthy controls matched for age and gender using a hexan/ethanol extraction technique and combined high-performance thin-layer chromatography/gas-chromatography. We found highly significant increase of ceramide AH and NH/AS classes in patients and decrease of EOS and NP ceramide classes. This is the first demonstration of specific peripheral sphingolipid alterations in schizophrenia. The results support recent models of systemic lipid pathology and in particular of specific sphingolipids, which are crucial in neuronal membrane integrity. Given recent findings showing amelioration of psychopathology using fatty acid supplementation, our findings also bear relevance for sphingolipids as potential biomarkers of the disease. PMID:22589371

  11. Skin ceramide alterations in first-episode schizophrenia indicate abnormal sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Smesny, Stefan; Schmelzer, Christian E H; Hinder, Anke; Köhler, Alexandra; Schneider, Christiane; Rudzok, Maria; Schmidt, Ulrike; Milleit, Berko; Milleit, Christine; Nenadic, Igor; Sauer, Heinrich; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2013-07-01

    There is considerable evidence for specific pathology of lipid metabolism in schizophrenia, affecting polyunsaturated fatty acids and in particular sphingolipids. These deficits are assumed to interfere with neuronal membrane functioning and the development and maintenance of myelin sheaths. Recent studies suggest that some of these lipid pathologies might also be detected in peripheral skin tests. In this study, we examined different skin lipids and their relation to schizophrenia. We assessed epidermal lipid profiles in 22 first-episode antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients and 22 healthy controls matched for age and gender using a hexan/ethanol extraction technique and combined high-performance thin-layer chromatography/gas-chromatography. We found highly significant increase of ceramide AH and NH/AS classes in patients and decrease of EOS and NP ceramide classes. This is the first demonstration of specific peripheral sphingolipid alterations in schizophrenia. The results support recent models of systemic lipid pathology and in particular of specific sphingolipids, which are crucial in neuronal membrane integrity. Given recent findings showing amelioration of psychopathology using fatty acid supplementation, our findings also bear relevance for sphingolipids as potential biomarkers of the disease.

  12. Psychosocial Barriers to Follow-up Adherence After an Abnormal Cervical Cytology Test Result Among Low-Income, Inner-City Women

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Siu-kuen Azor; Miller, Suzanne M.; Wen, Kuang-Yi; Fang, Zhu; Li, Tianyu; Buzaglo, Joanne; Hernandez, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Low-income, inner-city women bear a disproportionate burden of cervical cancer in both incidence and mortality rates in the United States, largely because of low adherence to follow-up recommendations after an abnormal cervical cytology result in the primary care setting. The goals of the present study were to delineate the theory-based psychosocial barriers underlying these persistent low follow-up rates and their sociodemographic correlates. Methods Guided by a well-validated psychosocial theory of health behaviors, this cross-sectional, correlational study assessed the barriers to follow-up adherence among underserved women (N = 210) who received an abnormal cervical cytology result. Participants were recruited through an inner-city hospital colposcopy clinic, and were assessed by telephone prior to the colposcopy appointment. Results Participants were largely of African American race (82.2%), lower than high school completion education (58.7%), single, never married (67.3%), and without full-time employment (64.1%). Knowledge barriers were most often endorsed (68%, M = 3.22), followed by distress barriers (64%, M = 3.09), and coping barriers (36%, M = 2.36). Forty-six percent reported more than one barrier category. Less education and being unemployed were correlated with higher knowledge barriers (P < .0001 and P < .01, respectively) and more coping barriers (P < .05 and P < .05, respectively). Women who were younger than 30 years displayed greater distress barriers (P < .05). Conclusion In the primary care setting, assessing and addressing knowledge and distress barriers after feedback of an abnormal cervical cytology result may improve adherence to follow-up recommendations. The use of structured counseling protocols and referral to navigational and other resources may facilitate this process and thereby reduce disparities in cervical cancer. PMID:24718518

  13. Psychosocial barriers to follow-up adherence after an abnormal cervical cytology test result among low-income, inner-city women.

    PubMed

    Hui, Siu-Kuen Azor; Miller, Suzanne M; Wen, Kuang-Yi; Fang, Zhu; Li, Tianyu; Buzaglo, Joanne; Hernandez, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    Low-income, inner-city women bear a disproportionate burden of cervical cancer in both incidence and mortality rates in the United States, largely because of low adherence to follow-up recommendations after an abnormal cervical cytology result in the primary care setting. The goals of the present study were to delineate the theory-based psychosocial barriers underlying these persistent low follow-up rates and their sociodemographic correlates. Guided by a well-validated psychosocial theory of health behaviors, this cross-sectional, correlational study assessed the barriers to follow-up adherence among underserved women (N = 210) who received an abnormal cervical cytology result. Participants were recruited through an inner-city hospital colposcopy clinic, and were assessed by telephone prior to the colposcopy appointment. Participants were largely of African American race (82.2%), lower than high school completion education (58.7%), single, never married (67.3%), and without full-time employment (64.1%). Knowledge barriers were most often endorsed (68%, M = 3.22), followed by distress barriers (64%, M = 3.09), and coping barriers (36%, M = 2.36). Forty-six percent reported more than one barrier category. Less education and being unemployed were correlated with higher knowledge barriers (P < .0001 and P < .01, respectively) and more coping barriers (P < .05 and P < .05, respectively). Women who were younger than 30 years displayed greater distress barriers (P < .05). In the primary care setting, assessing and addressing knowledge and distress barriers after feedback of an abnormal cervical cytology result may improve adherence to follow-up recommendations. The use of structured counseling protocols and referral to navigational and other resources may facilitate this process and thereby reduce disparities in cervical cancer. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. The human skin barrier is organized as stacked bilayers of fully extended ceramides with cholesterol molecules associated with the ceramide sphingoid moiety.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Ichiro; Han, HongMei; den Hollander, Lianne; Svensson, Stina; Ofverstedt, Lars-Göran; Anwar, Jamshed; Brewer, Jonathan; Bloksgaard, Maria; Laloeuf, Aurelie; Nosek, Daniel; Masich, Sergej; Bagatolli, Luis A; Skoglund, Ulf; Norlén, Lars

    2012-09-01

    The skin barrier is fundamental to terrestrial life and its evolution; it upholds homeostasis and protects against the environment. Skin barrier capacity is controlled by lipids that fill the extracellular space of the skin's surface layer--the stratum corneum. Here we report on the determination of the molecular organization of the skin's lipid matrix in situ, in its near-native state, using a methodological approach combining very high magnification cryo-electron microscopy (EM) of vitreous skin section defocus series, molecular modeling, and EM simulation. The lipids are organized in an arrangement not previously described in a biological system-stacked bilayers of fully extended ceramides (CERs) with cholesterol molecules associated with the CER sphingoid moiety. This arrangement rationalizes the skin's low permeability toward water and toward hydrophilic and lipophilic substances, as well as the skin barrier's robustness toward hydration and dehydration, environmental temperature and pressure changes, stretching, compression, bending, and shearing.

  15. Oral collagen-derived dipeptides, prolyl-hydroxyproline and hydroxyprolyl-glycine, ameliorate skin barrier dysfunction and alter gene expression profiles in the skin.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Jun; Asami, Naoto; Kataoka, Aya; Sugihara, Fumihito; Inoue, Naoki; Kimira, Yoshifumi; Wada, Masahiro; Mano, Hiroshi

    2015-01-09

    Oral supplementation with collagen hydrolysate (CH) has been shown to improve the condition of the skin in humans and experimental animals. Several hydroxyproline-containing oligo-peptides were previously detected in human peripheral blood after the ingestion of CH, and the two dipeptides, prolyl-hydroxyproline (PO) and hydroxyprolyl-glycine (OG), have been proposed to have beneficial effects on human health. When HR-1 hairless mice were fed a HR-AD diet, which lacked magnesium and zinc, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) increased and water content of stratum corneum decreased. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary PO and OG on skin barrier dysfunction in HR-1 hairless mice. Mice were fed a HR-AD diet with or without PO (0.15%) and OG (0.15%) for 35 consecutive days. The administration of PO and OG significantly decreased TEWL, and significantly increased water content of stratum corneum. A DNA microarray analysis of the dorsal skin revealed differences in gene expression between the group administered PO and OG and the control group. We also identified muscle-related Gene Ontology as a result of analyzing the up-regulated genes. These results suggested that the administration of PO and OG improved skin barrier dysfunction and altered muscle-related gene expression.

  16. A mutation in NFkB interacting protein 1 results in cardiomyopathy and abnormal skin development in wa3 mice.

    PubMed

    Herron, Bruce J; Rao, Cherie; Liu, Shanming; Laprade, Lisa; Richardson, James A; Olivieri, Emily; Semsarian, Chris; Millar, Sarah E; Stubbs, Lisa; Beier, David R

    2005-03-01

    We have identified waved 3 (wa3), a novel recessive mutation that causes abnormalities of the heart and skin. The cardiac defect results in a severe and rapidly progressive dilated cardiomyopathy. We identified the gene mutated in these mice, which we call NFkB interacting protein1 (Nkip1), using positional cloning. Nkip1 is expressed in skin, heart and vascular endothelium and shares homology with a small family of proteins that play a role in the regulation of transcription factors. A C-terminal fragment of this protein was previously identified as the RelA associated inhibitor (RAI). We show that the full-length protein is larger than previously described, and we confirm that it interacts with NFkB in vivo. Expression analysis of genes known to be regulated by NFkB revealed that Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (Icam1) expression is consistently elevated in mutant mice. This result suggests that wa3 mutant mice represent a potentially important model for the analysis of the role of inflammatory processes in heart disease.

  17. Acceptability of Massage with Skin Barrier-enhancing Emollients in Young Neonates in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A.S.M. Nawshad Uddin; Saha, Samir K.; Chowdhury, M.A.K. Azad; Law, Paul A.; Black, Robert E.; Santosham, Mathuram; Darmstadt, Gary L.

    2007-01-01

    Oil massage of newborns has been practised for generations in the Indian sub-continent; however, oils may vary from potentially beneficial, e.g. sunflower seed oil, to potentially toxic, e.g. mustard oil. The study was carried out to gain insights into oil-massage practices and acceptability of skin barrier-enhancing emollients in young, preterm Bangladeshi neonates. Preterm infants of <33 weeks gestational age were randomized to high-linoleate sunflower seed oil, Aquaphor Original Emollient Ointment™, or the comparison group (usual care). A survey was administered at admission to assess routine skin-care practices prior to admission and at discharge to assess acceptability of emollient therapy during hospitalization. Oil massage was given to 83 (21%) of 405 babies before hospital admission, 86% (71/83) of whom were delivered at home. Application of oil, most commonly mustard oil (88%, 73/83), was started within one hour of birth in 51 cases (61%) and was applied all over the body (89%, 74/83) one to six (mean 2.2) times before admission. Of infants who received emollient therapy in the hospital, 42% (n=32) of mothers reported that the emollient applied in the hospital was better than that available at home, and only 29% would use the same oil (i.e. mustard oil) in the future as used previously at home. No problems resulted from use of emollient in the hospital. Topical therapy with sunflower seed oil or Aquaphor was perceived by many families to be superior to mustard oil. If caregivers and health professionals can be motivated to use inexpensive, available emollients, such as sunflower seed oil that are beneficial, emollient therapy could have substantial public-health benefit. PMID:17985826

  18. Structural modification of the skin barrier by OH radicals: a reactive molecular dynamics study for plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Paal, J.; Verlackt, C. C.; Yusupov, M.; Neyts, E. C.; Bogaerts, A.

    2015-04-01

    While plasma treatment of skin diseases and wound healing has been proven highly effective, the underlying mechanisms, and more generally the effect of plasma radicals on skin tissue, are not yet completely understood. In this paper, we perform ReaxFF-based reactive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interaction of plasma generated OH radicals with a model system composed of free fatty acids, ceramides, and cholesterol molecules. This model system is an approximation of the upper layer of the skin (stratum corneum). All interaction mechanisms observed in our simulations are initiated by H-abstraction from one of the ceramides. This reaction, in turn, often starts a cascade of other reactions, which eventually lead to the formation of aldehydes, the dissociation of ceramides or the elimination of formaldehyde, and thus eventually to the degradation of the skin barrier function.

  19. Dietary Milk Sphingomyelin Prevents Disruption of Skin Barrier Function in Hairless Mice after UV-B Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Oba, Chisato; Morifuji, Masashi; Ichikawa, Satomi; Ito, Kyoko; Kawahata, Keiko; Yamaji, Taketo; Asami, Yukio; Itou, Hiroyuki; Sugawara, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation causes skin barrier defects. Based on earlier findings that milk phospholipids containing high amounts of sphingomyelin (SM) improved the water content of the stratum corneum (SC) in normal mice, here we investigated the effects of dietary milk SM on skin barrier defects induced by a single dose of UV-B irradiation in hairless mice. Nine week old hairless mice were orally administrated SM (146 mg/kg BW/day) for a total of ten days. After seven days of SM administration, the dorsal skin was exposed to a single dose of UV-B (20 mJ/cm2). Administration of SM significantly suppressed an increase in transepidermal water loss and a decrease in SC water content induced by UV-B irradiation. SM supplementation significantly maintained covalently-bound ω-hydroxy ceramide levels and down-regulated mRNA levels of acute inflammation-associated genes, including thymic stromal lymphopoietin, interleukin-1 beta, and interleukin-6. Furthermore, significantly higher levels of loricrin and transglutaminase-3 mRNA were observed in the SM group. Our study shows for the first time that dietary SM modulates epidermal structures, and can help prevent disruption of skin barrier function after UV-B irradiation.

  20. Epithelial Barriers in Murine Skin during Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection: The Role of Tight Junction Formation.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Elena; Thier, Katharina; Petermann, Philipp; Rübsam, Matthias; Staeheli, Peter; Iden, Sandra; Niessen, Carien M; Knebel-Mörsdorf, Dagmar

    2017-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 has to overcome skin or mucosa barriers to infect its human host. The impact of the various barrier functions on successful viral invasion is not known. On ex vivo infection of murine skin, we observed efficient invasion only via the basal epidermal layer when the dermis was removed. Here, we investigated how wounding and intercellular junction formation control successful viral entry. After wounding of skin samples or removal of the stratum corneum, infected cells were rarely detected. On the basis of infection studies in epidermis from IFN-stimulated mice, we assume that mechanical wounding does not lead to an antiviral state that impedes infection. When we infected human skin equivalents, we observed entry only into unstratified keratinocytes or after wounding of fully stratified cultures. Reduced infection of keratinocytes after calcium-induced stratification confirmed the impact of junction formation. To assess the effect of functional tight junctions, stratified cultures of polarity regulator partitioning-defective-3- or E-cadherin-deficient keratinocytes were infected. As the number of infected cells strongly increased with enhanced paracellular permeability, we conclude that the formation of functional tight junctions interferes with viral entry indicating that next to the stratum corneum tight junctions are a major physical barrier for herpes simplex virus 1 invasion into tissue. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of a novel formulation of fluocinonide 0.1% cream on skin barrier function in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Matthew T.; Brown, Peter A.; Baig-Lewis, Shahana F.; Simpson, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of a novel formulation of fluocinonide cream on skin barrier function in subjects with atopic dermatitis. Design The authors performed an open-label, investigator-blinded, side-by-side, controlled trial examining skin barrier function before and after a two-week course of a class I, super-potent topical steroid. Setting Outpatient university-based dermatology clinic in Portland, Oregon. Subjects Twenty-five subjects aged 12 or older with a diagnosis of moderate, severe, or very severe AD were recruited for this study. Intervention Fluocinonide 0.1% cream, a novel formulation of a class I super-potent topical steroid, was applied to all affected areas, except a control site, once daily tor two weeks or until clear. The control target site was treated with the vehicle once daily. Main Outcome Measure(s) The study’s primary outcome was change in skin barrier function as measured by basal transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in acute lesional skin from baseline as measured at two weeks. Results TEWL readings significantly decreased (reflecting improved barrier function) in both the active and control target sites. The active target site decreased 14.35 ± 16 mg/cm2 per hour; 95 percent confidence interval, P<0.001. The control target site decreased 8.75 ± 11.80 mg/cm2 per hour in 25 subjects; 95 per cent confidence interval, P<0.001. Skin electrical capacitance also improved significantly, reflecting improved stratum corneum hydration with therapy. Pruritus, clinical severity, and quality of life scores all showed significant improvement by the end of the study. Conclusion The authors have shown that short-term treatment with a novel formulation of 0.1% fluocinonide led to significantly improved barrier function as measured by basal TEWL in subjects with active moderate to severe AD. These data suggest short-term treatment with AD with a super-potent corticosteroid improves skin barrier function. PMID:21283922

  2. In vitro Percutaneous Absorption of Niacinamide and Phytosterols and in vivo Evaluation of their Effect on Skin Barrier Recovery.

    PubMed

    Offerta, Alessia; Bonina, Francesco; Gasparri, Franco; Zanardi, Andrea; Micicche, Lucia; Puglia, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated different strategies to optimize the percutaneous absorption of niacinamide (NA) and soy phytosterols (FITO) by making use of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and penetration enhancers, such as the hydrogenated lecithin. The evaluation of the skin permeation of NA and FITO has been effected in vitro using excised human skin (i.e., stratum corneum-epidermis or SCE). Furthermore, we evaluated the in vivo effect that NA and FITO has on skin barrier recovery after the topical application; using the extent of methyl nicotinate (MN)-induced erythema in damaged skin as a parameter to determine the rate of stratum corneum recovery. Results pointed out the importance of these strategies as valid tools for NA and FITO topical delivery. In fact, soy lecithin based formulations were able to increase the percutaneous absorption of the two active ingredients, while SLN guaranteed an interesting delayed and sustained release of FITO. In vivo evaluation showed clearly that the formulation containing both the actives (NA and FITO) is able to recover about 95% of skin barrier integrity eight days after tape stripping. This effect is probably due to the "synergistic effect" of NA and FITO.

  3. Consumption of functional fermented milk containing borage oil, green tea and vitamin E enhances skin barrier function.

    PubMed

    Puch, Florence; Samson-Villeger, Sandrine; Guyonnet, Denis; Blachon, Jean-Luc; Rawlings, Anthony Vincent; Lassel, Taous

    2008-08-01

    As emerging studies show that skin functioning can be improved with orally imbibed ingredients, we decided to investigate a mixture of borage oil, catechins, vitamin E and probiotics, all known for their reported effects on epidermal function, in a fermented dairy product, for the first time. Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and catechins bioavailability and their effects on skin functionality have not been previously investigated from a fermented dairy product. Firstly, we assessed the bioavailability of GLA and catechins mixed in a fermented dairy matrix by measuring their levels in chylomicrons and plasma samples respectively. For the GLA contained in the dairy matrix, the area under the curve and time for maximal absorption were significantly different to the same kinetic parameters compared with absorption from the free oil indicating improved oral bioavailability. However, the overall absorption of catechins over the 6-h period was identical for both product forms. These results were sufficiently promising to warrant a 24 week skin nutrition intervention study in female volunteers having dry and sensitive skin. The product improved stratum corneum barrier function compared with a control product as early as 6 weeks after the consumption which continued throughout the rest of the study. The reduction in transepidermal water loss relative to control was maintained throughout the trial despite seasonal changes. Moreover, as a result of the enhanced bioavailability, a much greater effect on skin barrier function occurred than reported previously for the individual ingredients. Nevertheless, body mass index significantly influenced various outcome measurements of this study.

  4. Effects of a Skin Barrier Cream on Management of Incontinence-Associated Dermatitis in Older Women: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kon, Yuka; Ichikawa-Shigeta, Yoshie; Iuchi, Terumi; Nakajima, Yukari; Nakagami, Gojiro; Tabata, Keiko; Sanada, Hiromi; Sugama, Junko

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a skin barrier cream with moisturization and skin-protectant characteristics for improving the severity of incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) pertaining to the skin physiology and appearance. We measured the following outcomes: (1) skin physiological characteristics indicating skin protection and enhancement of the skin's moisture barrier (stratum corneum hydration, dermis hydration level, transepidermal water loss, and skin pH); and (2) changes in skin appearance (the degree of erythema and pigmentation, and the sulcus cutis condition). Single-blind, cluster randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a long-term care facility in Japan between November 7, 2011, and May 6, 2012. We used block randomization to obtain a random sample of 6 (4 experimental and 2 control) out of 10 available wards. All subjects were elderly women with IAD of the buttock or inner thigh. We assessed 295 patients, but only 33 met inclusion criteria; 18 were allocated to the experimental group and 15 were allocated to the control group. All participants were managed with cleansing with a skin cleanser and application of a moisturizer daily. In addition, a skin barrier cream designed to enhance the skin's moisture barrier and act as a protective barrier was applied to the skin of patients in the experimental group 3 times a day when absorptive briefs were changed. Skin physiological and appearance characteristics were scored only at the buttock or thigh area. All data were collected on days 1 and 14 of the study. Univariate analysis found that the erythema index was lower in the intervention group than in the control group at day 14 (P = .004). Multivariate analysis found significant associations between use of the skin barrier cream and increased stratum corneum hydration (β= .443, P = .031), decreased skin pH (β=-.439, P = .020), and magnitude of erythema (β=-.451, P = .018). Study findings suggest that a barrier

  5. Why is sodium cocoyl isethionate (SCI) mild to the skin barrier? - An in vitro investigation based on the relative sizes of the SCI micelles and the skin aqueous pores.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Saswata; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Sodium cocoyl isethionate (SCI) is an important surfactant ingredient in mild, syndet (synthetic detergent) cleansing bars. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that SCI is mild and less damaging to the skin barrier than soaps and surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). We have recently shown that SDS forms small micelles in aqueous solutions contacting the skin relative to the aqueous pores in the stratum corneum (SC), and as a result, the SDS micelles can contribute to SDS skin penetration and induce skin barrier perturbation. In this paper, we attempt to explain the well-documented skin mildness of SCI by examining the size of the SCI micelles relative to that of the aqueous pores in the SC. For this purpose, we have conducted in vitro mannitol skin permeability and average skin electrical resistivity measurements upon exposure of the skin to an aqueous SCI contacting solution in the context of a hindered-transport aqueous porous pathway model of the SC. These in vitro studies demonstrate that an SCI micelle of radius 33.5 +/- 1 Angstrom (as determined using dynamic light-scattering measurements) experiences significant steric hindrance and cannot penetrate into the SC through aqueous pores that have an average radius of 29 +/- 5 Angstrom. We believe that this inability of the SCI micelles to contribute to SCI skin penetration and associated skin barrier perturbation is responsible for the observed skin mildness of SCI. Through in vitro quantitative skin radioactivity assays using (14)C-radiolabeled SCI and pig full-thickness skin (p-FTS), we also show conclusively that SCI skin penetration is dose-independent, an important finding that provides additional evidence that the larger SCI micelles cannot penetrate into the SC through the smaller aqueous pores that exist in the SC, and therefore, cannot induce skin barrier perturbation.

  6. Effect of ethanol on lipid metabolism and epithelial permeability barrier of skin and oral mucosa in the rat.

    PubMed

    Squier, Christopher A; Kremer, Mary J; Wertz, Philip W

    2003-11-01

    Ethanol consumption induces changes in lipid metabolism. This might be reflected locally as an alteration in the epithelial lipid barrier. Rats were fed with an isocaloric liquid diet with, or without, ethanol (6.7%) and were sacrificed at 60 or 120 days. Plasma and liver triglycerides, gamma-glutamyl-transferase (GGTP) levels, and permeability (Kp) of skin and buccal mucosa to tritiated water and the tobacco carcinogen, nitrosonornicotine, were determined. Significant elevation of GGTP at 120 days and triglycerides at both 60 and 120 days was observed for rats fed with ethanol diet. For this diet, Kp values to both penetrants increased significantly for skin in rats after 120 days compared to all other groups. The parallel between changes in lipid metabolism and permeability suggests that one effect of ingested alcohol is to alter the lipid-containing permeability barrier of stratified squamous epithelium.

  7. Effects of moisturizing skincare on skin barrier function and the prevention of skin problems in 3-month-old infants: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Kaori; Haruna, Megumi; Matsuzaki, Masayo; Shiraishi, Mie; Kojima, Reiji

    2017-10-06

    An effective newborn skincare protocol has not been established. We aimed to evaluate the effects of moisturizing skincare, including using lotion and reducing routine bathing. Our hypothesis was that moisturizing skincare would improve skin barrier function. This randomized controlled trial included 227 healthy Asian newborns between 1 week and 3 months old. We compared moisturizing skincare (bathing every 2 days and using lotion daily; intervention, n = 113) to daily bathing without lotion (control, n = 114). We assessed the skin barrier function (transepidermal water loss [TEWL], stratum corneum hydration [SCH], skin pH and sebum secretion) as a primary outcome at 3 months old. We also assessed the incidence of skin problems according to parents' diary reports. Compared with the control, the intervention group had a lower face TEWL (mean ± standard deviation, 14.69 ± 7.38 vs 17.08 ± 8.26 g/m(2) per h, P = 0.033), higher face SCH (60.38 ± 13.66 vs 53.52 ± 14.55, P = 0.001) and higher body SCH (58.89 ± 12.96 vs 53.02 ± 10.08, P < 0.001). Compared with the control, newborns in the intervention group had significantly lower rates of diaper dermatitis between birth and 1 month old (6.3% vs 15.9%, P = 0.022), and tended to have lower rates of body skin problems between 1 and 3 months (42.1% vs 55.2%, P = 0.064). Moisturizing skincare was effective for improving skin barrier function and preventing newborns' diaper dermatitis. The results of our study may help parents make informed decisions about newborn skincare. © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  8. Cutaneous Na+ storage strengthens the antimicrobial barrier function of the skin and boosts macrophage-driven host defense

    PubMed Central

    Jantsch, Jonathan; Schatz, Valentin; Friedrich, Diana; Schröder, Agnes; Kopp, Christoph; Siegert, Isabel; Maronna, Andreas; Wendelborn, David; Linz, Peter; Binger, Katrina J.; Gebhardt, Matthias; Heinig, Matthias; Neubert, Patrick; Fischer, Fabian; Teufel, Stefan; David, Jean-Pierre; Neufert, Clemens; Cavallaro, Alexander; Rakova, Natalia; Küper, Christoph; Beck, Franz-Xaver; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Muller, Dominik N.; Schuler, Gerold; Uder, Michael; Bogdan, Christian; Luft, Friedrich C.; Titze, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Summary Immune cells regulate a hypertonic microenvironment in the skin; however, the biological advantage of increased skin Na+ concentrations is unknown. We found that Na+ accumulated at the site of bacterial skin infections in humans and in mice. We used the protozoan parasite Leishmania major as a model of skin-prone macrophage infection to test the hypothesis that skin-Na+ storage facilitates antimicrobial host defense. Activation of macrophages in the presence of high NaCl concentrations modified epigenetic markers and enhanced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38/MAPK)-dependent nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5) activation. This high-salt response resulted in elevated type-2 nitric oxide synthase (Nos2)-dependent NO production and improved Leishmania major control. Finally, we found that increasing Na+ content in the skin by a high-salt diet boosted activation of macrophages in an Nfat5-dependent manner and promoted cutaneous antimicrobial defense. We suggest that the hypertonic microenvironment could serve as a barrier to infection. PMID:25738463

  9. Cutaneous Na+ storage strengthens the antimicrobial barrier function of the skin and boosts macrophage-driven host defense.

    PubMed

    Jantsch, Jonathan; Schatz, Valentin; Friedrich, Diana; Schröder, Agnes; Kopp, Christoph; Siegert, Isabel; Maronna, Andreas; Wendelborn, David; Linz, Peter; Binger, Katrina J; Gebhardt, Matthias; Heinig, Matthias; Neubert, Patrick; Fischer, Fabian; Teufel, Stefan; David, Jean-Pierre; Neufert, Clemens; Cavallaro, Alexander; Rakova, Natalia; Küper, Christoph; Beck, Franz-Xaver; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Muller, Dominik N; Schuler, Gerold; Uder, Michael; Bogdan, Christian; Luft, Friedrich C; Titze, Jens

    2015-03-03

    Immune cells regulate a hypertonic microenvironment in the skin; however, the biological advantage of increased skin Na(+) concentrations is unknown. We found that Na(+) accumulated at the site of bacterial skin infections in humans and in mice. We used the protozoan parasite Leishmania major as a model of skin-prone macrophage infection to test the hypothesis that skin-Na(+) storage facilitates antimicrobial host defense. Activation of macrophages in the presence of high NaCl concentrations modified epigenetic markers and enhanced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38/MAPK)-dependent nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5) activation. This high-salt response resulted in elevated type-2 nitric oxide synthase (Nos2)-dependent NO production and improved Leishmania major control. Finally, we found that increasing Na(+) content in the skin by a high-salt diet boosted activation of macrophages in a Nfat5-dependent manner and promoted cutaneous antimicrobial defense. We suggest that the hypertonic microenvironment could serve as a barrier to infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. PNPLA1 is a transacylase essential for the generation of the skin barrier lipid ω-O-acylceramide

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yusuke; Kamiyama, Nozomi; Nakamichi, Shota; Kihara, Akio

    2017-01-01

    Lipids are the primary components of the skin permeability barrier, which is the body's most powerful defensive mechanism against pathogens. Acylceramide (ω-O-acylceramide) is a specialized lipid essential for skin barrier formation. Here, we identify PNPLA1 as the long-sought gene involved in the final step of acylceramide synthesis, esterification of ω-hydroxyceramide with linoleic acid, by cell-based assays. We show that increasing triglyceride levels by overproduction of the diacylglycerol acyltransferase DGAT2 stimulates acylceramide production, suggesting that triglyceride may act as a linoleic acid donor. Indeed, the in vitro analyses confirm that PNPLA1 catalyses acylceramide synthesis using triglyceride as a substrate. Mutant forms of PNPLA1 found in patients with ichthyosis exhibit reduced or no enzyme activity in either cell-based or in vitro assays. Altogether, our results indicate that PNPLA1 is directly involved in acylceramide synthesis as a transacylase, and provide important insights into the molecular mechanisms of skin barrier formation and of ichthyosis pathogenesis. PMID:28248318

  11. Visualization and quantification of skin barrier perturbation induced by surfactant-humectant systems using two-photon fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Saswata; Kim, Daekeun; So, Peter; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    In order to visualize the effects of aqueous surfactant-humectant systems on the skin barrier, an in vitro two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPM) study, including dual-channel visualization, was carried out. TPM is a non-invasive imaging technique based on two-photon induced nonlinear excitations of fluorophores, with the capability for deep-tissue imaging (up to several hundred micrometers). The following aqueous solutions of surfactants, a humectant, and a surfactant+humectant mixture that contacted pig full-thickness skin (p-FTS) were studied: (i) a harsh surfactant solution-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) (1 wt%); (ii) a harsh surfactant+humectant solution-SDS (1 wt%) + glycerol (10 wt%); (iii) a mild surfactant solution-sodium cocoyl isethionate (SCI) (1 wt%); (iv) a control solution-phosphate-buffered saline (PBS); and (v) a humectant solution-glycerol (10 wt%). Sulforhodamine B (SRB), a hydrophilic fluorescent probe, was used to visualize the effects of aqueous contacting solutions i-v on the skin barrier morphology. The results of the TPM visualization study revealed that SDS induces corneocyte damage by denaturing keratins and creating intracorneocyte penetration pathways. On the other hand, SDS+glycerol did not significantly induce corneocyte damage. The dual-channel TPM images corresponding to aqueous contacting solutions iii-v showed low SRB penetration into the corneocytes, as well as localization of the SRB probe within the lipid bilayers surrounding the corneocytes of the SC. Through a quantification of the amount of SRB that penetrated into the skin as a function of skin depth, we found that adding glycerol to an SDS aqueous contacting solution can significantly reduce the SDS-induced penetration depth of SRB, which provides evidence of the ability of glycerol to mitigate SDS-induced skin barrier perturbation. The distribution of SRB in the p-FTS samples was analyzed using a theoretical model that quantified changes in the skin aqueous pore

  12. Non-animal models of epithelial barriers (skin, intestine and lung) in research, industrial applications and regulatory toxicology.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Sarah; Daneshian, Mardas; Bouwstra, Joke; Caloni, Francesca; Constant, Samuel; Davies, Donna E; Dandekar, Gudrun; Guzman, Carlos A; Fabian, Eric; Haltner, Eleonore; Hartung, Thomas; Hasiwa, Nina; Hayden, Patrick; Kandarova, Helena; Khare, Sangeeta; Krug, Harald F; Kneuer, Carsten; Leist, Marcel; Lian, Guoping; Marx, Uwe; Metzger, Marco; Ott, Katharina; Prieto, Pilar; Roberts, Michael S; Roggen, Erwin L; Tralau, Tewes; van den Braak, Claudia; Walles, Heike; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Models of the outer epithelia of the human body - namely the skin, the intestine and the lung - have found valid applications in both research and industrial settings as attractive alternatives to animal testing. A variety of approaches to model these barriers are currently employed in such fields, ranging from the utilization of ex vivo tissue to reconstructed in vitro models, and further to chip-based technologies, synthetic membrane systems and, of increasing current interest, in silico modeling approaches. An international group of experts in the field of epithelial barriers was convened from academia, industry and regulatory bodies to present both the current state of the art of non-animal models of the skin, intestinal and pulmonary barriers in their various fields of application, and to discuss research-based, industry-driven and regulatory-relevant future directions for both the development of new models and the refinement of existing test methods. Issues of model relevance and preference, validation and standardization, acceptance, and the need for simplicity versus complexity were focal themes of the discussions. The outcomes of workshop presentations and discussions, in relation to both current status and future directions in the utilization and development of epithelial barrier models, are presented by the attending experts in the current report.

  13. In vitro evaluation of the efficacy of skin barrier creams and protective gloves on percutaneous absorption of industrial solvents.

    PubMed

    Korinth, G; Geh, S; Schaller, K H; Drexler, H

    2003-06-01

    The aim of the experiments was to evaluate the efficacy of skin barrier creams (SBCs) and protective gloves and its potential for reduction of percutaneous absorption of industrial solvents. We assessed percutaneous absorption of ethylene glycol (EG), isopropyl alcohol (IA) and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene (TMB), using static diffusion cells. These solvents were applied neat (EG, TMB) as well as in 10% and 50% aqueous solution (EG, IA) or in 10% and 50% ethanol-diluted solution (TMB). Furthermore, we tested the percutaneous absorption of IA mixed in one cleaning agent (CA), used in newspaper printing shops to clean the rollers of printing machines. Additionally, the penetration behaviour of 10% and 50% solutions of EG, IA and TMB was tested. The experiments were carried out on untreated and on SBC-treated excised human skin from one donor, and on protective gloves. Saline was used as receptor fluid for EG and IA, and neat ethanol for TMB. The penetration of 50% EG, IA and TMB solutions through SBC-treated skin was higher than in untreated skin (factor 3.9 for EG, 0.32 for IA and 0.06 for TMB). The penetration of IA in the IA-CA mixture was five-times higher through untreated skin as for the single compound in 10% aqueous solution. In skin, treated with SBC, we found a 17-fold penetration enhancement of IA in the IA-CA mixture. No appreciable penetration of EG and IA was observed through nitrile rubber gloves. Our in vitro experiments could not demonstrate an efficacy of SBC to protect skin penetration for the tested solvents. The percutaneous absorption of all solvents in 50% solution was increased through skin treated with SBCs. Furthermore, SBCs enhance the penetration rates of solvents from complex mixtures compared with the single solvents. The tested gloves showed sufficient protection for the hydrophilic solvents, but not for TMB.

  14. Epidermal Permeability Barrier Defects and Barrier Repair Therapy in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease perpetuated by gene-environmental interactions and which is characterized by genetic barrier defects and allergic inflammation. Recent studies demonstrate an important role for the epidermal permeability barrier in AD that is closely related to chronic immune activation in the skin during systemic allergic reactions. Moreover, acquired stressors (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus infection) to the skin barrier may also initiate inflammation in AD. Many studies involving patients with AD revealed that defective skin barriers combined with abnormal immune responses might contribute to the pathophysiology of AD, supporting the outside-inside hypothesis. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in human and animal models, focusing on the defects of the epidermal permeability barrier, its immunologic role and barrier repair therapy in AD. PMID:24991450

  15. GPHR-dependent functions of the Golgi apparatus are essential for the formation of lamellar granules and the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Tarutani, Masahito; Nakajima, Kimiko; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Takaishi, Mikiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Ikawa, Masahito; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Kinoshita, Taroh; Elias, Peter M; Sano, Shigetoshi; Maeda, Yusuke

    2012-08-01

    The lumen of the Golgi apparatus is regulated to be weakly acidic, which is critical for its functions. The Golgi pH regulator (GPHR) is an anion channel essential for normal acidification of the Golgi apparatus, and is therefore required for its functions. The Golgi apparatus has been thought to be the origin of lamellar granules in the skin. To study the functional role(s) of GPHR in the skin, we established keratinocyte-specific GPHR-knockout mice using the Cre-loxP system. These mutant mice exhibited hypopigmented skin, hair loss, and scaliness. Histological examination of GPHR-knockout mice showed ballooning of the basal cells and follicular dysplasia. In addition, inflammatory cells were seen in the dermis. The expression of trans-Golgi network 46, a marker for lamellar bodies, and kallikrein 7, a protein within lamellar bodies, is diminished in GPHR-knockout mouse skin. Examination by electron microscopy revealed that keratinocytes produced aberrant lamellar bodies. The transepidermal water loss of these knockout mice was increased compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, expression of cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) in the skin was diminished. These results suggest that GPHR is essential for the homeostasis of the epidermis including the formation of lamellar bodies and for the barrier function.

  16. The enzyme Cyp26b1 mediates inhibition of mast cell activation by fibroblasts to maintain skin-barrier homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kurashima, Yosuke; Amiya, Takeaki; Fujisawa, Kumiko; Shibata, Naoko; Suzuki, Yuji; Kogure, Yuta; Hashimoto, Eri; Otsuka, Atsushi; Kabashima, Kenji; Sato, Shintaro; Sato, Takeshi; Kubo, Masato; Akira, Shizuo; Miyake, Kensuke; Kunisawa, Jun; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-04-17

    Mast cells (MCs) mature locally, thus possessing tissue-dependent phenotypes for their critical roles in both protective immunity against pathogens and the development of allergy or inflammation. We previously reported that MCs highly express P2X7, a receptor for extracellular ATP, in the colon but not in the skin. The ATP-P2X7 pathway induces MC activation and consequently exacerbates the inflammation. Here, we identified the mechanisms by which P2X7 expression on MCs is reduced by fibroblasts in the skin, but not in the other tissues. The retinoic-acid-degrading enzyme Cyp26b1 is highly expressed in skin fibroblasts, and its inhibition resulted in the upregulation of P2X7 on MCs. We also noted the increased expression of P2X7 on skin MCs and consequent P2X7- and MC-dependent dermatitis (so-called retinoid dermatitis) in the presence of excessive amounts of retinoic acid. These results demonstrate a unique skin-barrier homeostatic network operating through Cyp26b1-mediated inhibition of ATP-dependent MC activation by fibroblasts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Regulation of caspase 14 expression in keratinocytes by inflammatory cytokines--a possible link between reduced skin barrier function and inflammation?

    PubMed

    Hvid, Malene; Johansen, Claus; Deleuran, Bent; Kemp, Kaare; Deleuran, Mette; Vestergaard, Christian

    2011-08-01

    Caspase 14 is a unique member of the cysteinyl aspartate-specific proteinase family. Its expression is confined primarily to cornified epithelium such as the skin. Caspase 14 has been associated with the processing of filaggrin monomers and the development of natural moisturising factors of the skin, and thus, it could be speculated that caspase 14 dysregulation is implicated in the development of an impaired skin barrier function. We have investigated the regulation of caspase 14 transcription in cultured primary keratinocytes following stimulation with a number of factors present in inflamed skin, including T(H)1- and T(H)2-associated cytokines in addition to LPS and peptidoglycan. In particular, we found that T(H)2-associated cytokines reduced the caspase 14 mRNA level significantly. Furthermore, we found that the expression of caspase 14 was reduced in skin biopsies from patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), psoriasis and contact dermatitis, further supporting a role for this kinase in inflammatory skin conditions. Hence, the regulation of caspase 14 levels provides a possible link between impaired skin barrier function and inflammatory reactions in skin diseases such as AD and may offer an explanation to the skin barrier dysfunction in inflamed skin lesions.

  18. Activation of epidermal toll-like receptor 2 enhances tight junction function – Implications for atopic dermatitis and skin barrier repair

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, I-Hsin; Carpenter-Mendini, Amanda; Yoshida, Takeshi; McGirt, Laura Y.; Ivanov, Andrei I.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Gallo, Richard L.; Borkowski, Andrew W.; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Leung, Donald Y.; Georas, Steve N.; De Benedetto, Anna; Beck, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by epidermal tight junction (TJ) defects and a propensity for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) skin infections. S. aureus is sensed by many pattern recognition receptors including toll-like receptor (TLR) 2. We hypothesized that an effective innate immune response will include skin barrier repair and that this response is impaired in AD subjects. S. aureus-derived peptidoglycan (PGN) and synthetic TLR2 agonists enhanced TJ barrier and increased expression of TJ proteins, CLDN1, CLDN23, occludin and ZO-1 in primary human keratinocytes. A TLR2 agonist enhanced skin barrier recovery in human epidermis wounded by tape-stripping. Tlr2−/− mice had a delayed and incomplete barrier recovery following tape-stripping. AD subjects had reduced epidermal TLR2 expression as compared to nonatopic (NA) subjects, which inversely correlated (r= 0.654, P= 0.0004) with transepidermal water loss (TEWL). These observations indicate that TLR2 activation enhances skin barrier in murine and human skin and is an important part of a wound repair response. Reduced epidermal TLR2 expression observed in AD patients may play a role in their incompetent skin barrier. PMID:23223142

  19. Nucleophilic addition to olefins. 19. Abnormally high intrinsic barrier in the reaction of piperidine and morpholine with benzylideneacetylacetone

    SciTech Connect

    Bernasconi, C.F.; Kanavarioti, A.

    1986-11-26

    The title reaction leads to the formation of the zwitterionic Michael adduct T/sup +/-/ (PhCH(R/sub 2/NH/sup +/)C(COCH/sub 3/)/sub 2//sup -/) which is in rapid acid-base equilibrium with its anionic form T/sup -/ (PhCH(R/sub 2/N)C(COCH/sub 3/)/sub 2//sup -/). Rate (K/sub 1/, k/sub -1/) and equilibrium constants (K/sub 1/) for nucleophilic addition and the pK/sub a/ of the T/sup +/-/-adducts were determined in 50% Me/sub 2/SO-50% water at 20/sup 0/C. From an interpolation of the rate constants to K/sub 1/ = 1 an intrinsic rate constant, log k/sub 0/ = 0.3, was determined. This value deviates negatively by approximately 2.5 log units from a correlation of log k/sub 0/ for amine addition to five olefins of the type PhCH=CXY, with log k/sub 0/ for the deprotonation of the corresponding carbon acids CH/sub 2/XY. Two major factors are believed to contribute to this depressed intrinsic rate constant or enhanced intrinsic barrier: (1) steric inhibition of resonance in T/sup +/-/ with the steric effect developing ahead of C-N bond formation (this conclusion is supported by an X-ray crystallographic study of p-methoxybenzylideneacetylacetone which shows that steric hindrance to optimal ..pi..-overlap in the adduct T/sup+/-/ is already present in the substrate); (2) intramolecular hydrogen bonding in T/sup +/-/, which is inferred from abnormally high pK/sub a/ values and whose development lags behind C-N bond formation. These effects are shown to be manifestations of the Principle of Nonperfect Synchronization.

  20. Atopic Dermatitis and the Stratum Corneum: Part 1: The Role of Filaggrin in the Stratum Corneum Barrier and Atopic Skin

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Sheila Fallon; Del Rosso, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    This three-part review presents what is currently known about the involvement and interdependency of the barrier properties of the epidermis, especially the stratum corneum and various specific immunological responses in the etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Part 1 of this review depicts the role of filaggrin in atopic dermatitis while Part 2 (which will be published in an upcoming issue of The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology) evaluates the role of serine proteases and specific lipids in the structural and functional integrity of the stratum corneum and related barrier functions in atopic dermatitis. Filaggrin is a key component of the stratum corneum that is derived from a larger precursor protein and contributes to its physical strength, hydration status, skin pH, and buffering capacity among other physiochemical properties. Filaggrin gene loss of function mutations appear to play a pathophysiological role; however, they are not the sole pathogenic factor in atopic dermatitis. Adverse structural changes of the stratum corneum are caused by upregulation of serine proteases activity, which causes degradation of certain stratum corneum proteins that are integral to barrier functions; interference with the formation of the stratum corneum intercellular lipid membrane, which normally regulates epidermal water flux and gradient; and induction of a TH2 pattern of inflammation, which is characteristic of atopic skin. Alteration in lipid ratios and changes in lipid-directed enzymes may play a role in the impairment of epidermal barrier functions that are associated with atopic dermatitis. Part 3 of this review (which will be published in an upcoming issue of The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology) discusses how immune dysregulation, including upregulation of a TH2 inflammation pattern, augmented allergic sensitization, sustained wound healing inflammation, and impaired innate immunity all play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis

  1. Atopic dermatitis and the stratum corneum: part 1: the role of filaggrin in the stratum corneum barrier and atopic skin.

    PubMed

    Levin, Jacquelyn; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon; Del Rosso, James Q

    2013-10-01

    This three-part review presents what is currently known about the involvement and interdependency of the barrier properties of the epidermis, especially the stratum corneum and various specific immunological responses in the etiopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Part 1 of this review depicts the role of filaggrin in atopic dermatitis while Part 2 (which will be published in an upcoming issue of The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology) evaluates the role of serine proteases and specific lipids in the structural and functional integrity of the stratum corneum and related barrier functions in atopic dermatitis. Filaggrin is a key component of the stratum corneum that is derived from a larger precursor protein and contributes to its physical strength, hydration status, skin pH, and buffering capacity among other physiochemical properties. Filaggrin gene loss of function mutations appear to play a pathophysiological role; however, they are not the sole pathogenic factor in atopic dermatitis. Adverse structural changes of the stratum corneum are caused by upregulation of serine proteases activity, which causes degradation of certain stratum corneum proteins that are integral to barrier functions; interference with the formation of the stratum corneum intercellular lipid membrane, which normally regulates epidermal water flux and gradient; and induction of a TH2 pattern of inflammation, which is characteristic of atopic skin. Alteration in lipid ratios and changes in lipid-directed enzymes may play a role in the impairment of epidermal barrier functions that are associated with atopic dermatitis. Part 3 of this review (which will be published in an upcoming issue of The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology) discusses how immune dysregulation, including upregulation of a TH2 inflammation pattern, augmented allergic sensitization, sustained wound healing inflammation, and impaired innate immunity all play a role in the development of atopic dermatitis

  2. δ-Aminolevulinate synthase is required for apical transcellular barrier formation in the skin of the Drosophila larva.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Khaleelulla Saheb; Meyer, Frauke; Vázquez, Angel Vizoso; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Cerdán, Maria Esperanza; Moussian, Bernard

    2012-03-01

    Animals construct a layered skin to prevent dehydration and pathogen entrance. The barrier function of the skin relies on the extensive cross-linking of specialised components. In insects, for instance, epidermal cells produce an apical extracellular cuticle that consists of a network of proteins, chitin and lipids. We have identified mutations in the Drosophila gene coding for the δ-aminolevulinate synthase (Alas) that cause massive water loss. The cuticle of alas mutant larvae detaches from the epidermis and its basal region is frayed suggesting that an Alas dependent pathway is needed to organise the contact between the cuticle and the epidermis and anchor the cuticle to the apical surface of epidermal cells. Concomitantly, reduction of Alas function results in weakening of the extracellular dityrosines network in the cuticle, whereas glutamyl-lysine isopeptide bonds are not affected. The lateral septate junctions of epidermal cells that serve as a paracellular plug are intact, as well. Taken together, we hypothesise that Alas activity, which initiates heme biosynthesis in the mitochondrion, is needed for the formation of a dityrosine-based barrier that confers resistance to the internal hydrostatic pressure protecting both the cuticle from transcellular infiltration of body fluid and the animal from dehydration. We conclude that at least two modules--an apical protein-chitin lattice and the lateral septate junctions, act in parallel to ensure Drosophila skin impermeability.

  3. Orally administered ethanol: transepidermal pathways and effects on the human skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, Ute; Bartoll, Jens; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    Ethanol intake is associated with a variety of skin diseases. The aim of the present study was (1) to identify the pathways of release of orally administered ethanol through the skin, and (2) to investigate the effects of a single oral dose of ethanol on the penetration of topically applied substances into the skin. Ethanol evaporation via the skin was measured using the new technique of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin surface temperature were simultaneously measured before and after ethanol consumption. Measurements were performed on skin sites with different stratum corneum (SC) thickness, and density of follicles and sweat glands. These appendages were selectively sealed to investigate their participation in ethanol evaporation. The penetration of a topically applied UV filter substance was studied before and after ethanol consumption after removing the SC with adhesive tape. Ethanol evaporation was measured within 5 min of consumption, while the skin surface temperature remained nearly constant. The sealing of the appendages did not have a significant effect on ethanol evaporation. On the forehead, a higher TEWL value was measured than on the forearm. On both skin sites, an increase in TEWL was observed after ethanol ingestion. No influence of orally administered ethanol on the penetration of the topically applied UV filter substance was observed. The results indicate that ethanol evaporation occurs via the lipid layers without a significant effect on the penetration of the topically applied substance.

  4. Transepidermal water loss for probing full-thickness skin barrier function: correlation with tritiated water flux, sensitivity to punctures and diverse surfactant exposures.

    PubMed

    Elmahjoubi, Eman; Frum, Yakov; Eccleston, Gillian M; Wilkinson, Simon C; Meidan, Victor M

    2009-10-01

    Skin barrier function is a key parameter to consider when performing in vitro percutaneous absorption studies. Whilst tritiated water flux measurements were often used to assess skin integrity, recent decades have witnessed the emergence of the more rapid and user-friendly transepidermal water loss (TEWL) approach. Yet to date, the nature of the correlation between TEWL and skin barrier function in vitro has still not been comprehensively established. In this study, a novel TEWL device, operating on a cold-induced vapour sink principle, was used to probe the barrier function of full-thickness porcine skin. The method was sufficiently sensitive to show the influence of punctures on barrier function although the observed non-linear pattern suggested tissue swelling processes and/or capillary action could be occurring. The results of various surfactant application experiments strongly suggested that TEWL was indeed largely predictive of skin sample integrity. A key finding was that basal TEWL was linearly correlated with basal tritiated water flux (r(2)=0.80, n=63). Thus, a dedicated TEWL method can be used as a good alternative to water flux measurements for assessing full-thickness skin barrier function.

  5. In vivo methods for the analysis of the penetration of topically applied substances in and through the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Lademann, J; Meinke, M C; Schanzer, S; Richter, H; Darvin, M E; Haag, S F; Fluhr, J W; Weigmann, H-J; Sterry, W; Patzelt, A

    2012-12-01

    The efficacy of a drug is characterized by its action mechanism and its ability to pass the skin barrier. In this article, different methods are discussed, which permit this penetration process to be analysed non-invasively. Providing qualitative and quantitative information, tape stripping is one of the oldest procedures for penetration studies. Although single cell layers of corneocytes are removed from the skin surface, this procedure is considered as non-invasive and is applicable exclusively to the stratum corneum. Recently, optical and spectroscopic methods have been used to investigate the penetration process. Fluorescence-labelled drugs can be easily detected in the skin by laser scanning microscopy. This method has the disadvantage that the dye labelling changes the molecular structures of the drug and consequently might influence the penetration properties. The penetration process of non-fluorescent substances can be analysed by Raman spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance, CARS and multiphoton microscopic measurements. Using these methods, the concentration of the topically applied formulations in different depths of the stratum corneum can be detected by moving the laser focus from the skin surface deeper into the stratum corneum. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods will be discussed in this article.

  6. Phytosphingosine enhances moisture level in human skin barrier through stimulation of the filaggrin biosynthesis and degradation leading to NMF formation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Kyung; Cho, Young Hoon; Lee, Eun Ok; Kim, Jin Wook; Park, Chang Seo

    2017-09-21

    Phytosphingosine (PHS) is a sphingoid that is a key component of phytoceramides NP, AP and EOP. PHS has been known to have anti-inflammation and antimicrobial activities and to stimulate epidermal differentiation. In addition, it is reported that PHS treatment notably increased phytoceramide content in keratinocytes. In this study, we tried to investigate whether PHS has any effect on the maturation of corneocytes such as formation of cornified envelope and natural moisturizing factor (NMF) that is also an essential event during the formation of skin barrier, stratum corneum. Special focus was made on the filaggrin (FLG) metabolism that is directly responsible for NMF production. PHS increased the expression of essential keratinocyte differentiation genes such as involucrin and transglutaminase 1 in cultured human keratinocytes. Interestingly, the expressions of FLG, caspase 14 and bleomycin hydrolase, all of which involved in NMF production in corneocytes, were significantly induced by PHS treatment in vitro. The effect of PHS on FLG metabolism was manifested as the increase of pyrrolidone carboxylic acid and skin hydration in vivo human skin. Results showed PHS had skin moisturizing effect by modulating FLG metabolic pathways and suggested to be an essential role in coordinated formation of the corneocyte envelope and NMF within.

  7. 3-O-Laurylglyceryl ascorbate reinforces skin barrier function through not only the reduction of oxidative stress but also the activation of ceramide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Y; Taira, N; Tsuboi, T; Yoshioka, M; Masaki, H; Muraoka, O

    2017-02-01

    A higher trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) occurs in rough skin, in elder skin and also in atopic dermatitis. An impaired skin barrier function is considered to be caused by an incomplete construction of the intercellular lamellar structure due to the quantitative reduction of ceramides. Since these symptoms coexist with oxidative stress, we hypothesized that impairment of the skin barrier function is accelerated by oxidative stress. Thus, the purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of oxidative stress on ceramide synthesis and to characterize whether antioxidants can improve skin barrier function. 3-O-Laurylglyceryl ascorbate (VC-3LG), which is a newly amphipathic derivative of ascorbic acid, was evaluated as a candidate antioxidant. We characterized the mRNA expression levels of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) treated with H2 O2 using real-time PCR analysis. In order to evaluate the effect of VC-3LG on skin barrier function, we used several assays with reconstructed human epidermis equivalents (RHEEs). Ceramide synthesis was down-regulated in NHEKs by oxidative stress. Treatment with VC-3LG abrogated the down-regulation of SPT mRNA in NHEKs caused by oxidative stress, and stimulated SPT mRNA expression levels. In experiments characterizing the antioxidative properties of VC-3LG, VC-3LG reduced oxidative stress in NHEKs by up-regulating catalase mRNA expression. In addition, VC-3LG stimulated the skin barrier function in RHEEs, which had lower TEWL values compared with untreated RHEEs. Furthermore, VC-3LG increased the quantity of ceramide in RHEEs. Taken together, we conclude that VC-3LG reinforces the skin barrier function due to its reduction of oxidative stress and its promotion of ceramide synthesis. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  8. Microspectroscopic Confocal Raman and Macroscopic Biophysical Measurements in the in vivo Assessment of the Skin Barrier: Perspective for Dermatology and Cosmetic Sciences.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Denise; Uzunbajakava, Natallia E; Varghese, Babu; de Aquino Santos, Gabriela Ricardo; Richters, Renée J H; van de Kerkhof, Peter C M; van Erp, Piet E J

    2015-01-01

    Skin barrier function, confined to the stratum corneum, is traditionally evaluated using established, noninvasive biophysical methods like transepidermal water loss, capacitance and conductance. However, these methods neither measure skin molecular composition nor its structure, hindering the actual causes of skin barrier change or impairment. At the same time, confocal Raman microspectroscopy (CRS) can directly measure skin molecular composition and structure and has proven itself to be a powerful technique for biomolecular analysis. The aims of this literature review were to evaluate noninvasive biophysical methods in view of CRS and to outline a direction towards more specific and informative skin measurement methods. We address this by investigating, for the first time, the relation between in vivo assessment of the skin barrier using indirect biophysical methods and the actual skin composition and structure as given by CRS, and emphasize the high potential of CRS for dermatology and cosmetic sciences. CRS acceptance in these fields will require close collaboration between dermatologists, skin scientists and spectroscopy experts towards simplifying the technology and creating robust, rapid, easy-to-use and less expensive CRS applications. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Influence of the skin barrier on the penetration of topically-applied dexamethasone probed by soft X-ray spectromicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Klossek, A; Flesch, R; Rancan, F; Weigand, M; Bykova, I; Bechtel, M; Ahlberg, S; Vogt, A; Blume-Peytavi, U; Schrade, P; Bachmann, S; Hedtrich, S; Schäfer-Korting, M; Rühl, E

    2017-09-01

    The penetration of dexamethasone into human skin ex vivo is reported. X-ray microscopy is used for label-free probing of the drug and quantification of the local drug concentration with a spatial resolution reaching 70±5nm. This is accomplished by selective probing the dexamethasone by X-ray absorption. Varying the penetration time between 10min and 1000min provides detailed information on the penetration process. In addition, the stratum corneum has been damaged by tape-stripping in order to determine the importance of this barrier regarding temporally resolved drug penetration profiles. Dexamethasone concentrations distinctly vary, especially close to the border of the stratum corneum and the viable epidermis, where a local minimum in drug concentration is observed. Furthermore, near the basal membrane the drug concentration strongly drops. High spatial resolution studies along with a de-convolution procedure reveal the spatial distribution of dexamethasone in the interspaces between the corneocytes consisting of stratum corneum lipids. These results on local drug concentrations are interpreted in terms of barriers affecting the drug penetration in human skin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Classification of inflammatory skin diseases: a proposal based on the disorders of the three-layered defense systems, barrier, innate immunity and acquired immunity.

    PubMed

    Dainichi, Teruki; Hanakawa, Sho; Kabashima, Kenji

    2014-11-01

    The host defense system of the skin is composed of (1) a barrier, (2) innate immunity, and (3) acquired immunity. Inflammatory skin diseases can be classified into one of the disorders of these layers of the defense system, unless there is an ordinary response to specific infectious agents or internal/external injury. Any inflammatory skin disease partly simulates the response to real infections or dangers. Disorders of acquired immunity can be classified into (1) immunodeficiency, (2) immunohyperactivity (allergy), and (3) qualitative disorder (autoimmunity). Disorders of innate immunity can be classified into (1) innate immunodeficiency, (2) innate immunohyperactivity (general or local autoinflammation), and (3) qualitative disorder (general or local innate autoimmunity). The barrier of the skin is composed of (1) the physical barrier and (2) the chemical barrier. Several diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, are attributed to the disorder of these components of the barrier. Here, we propose an algorithm to classify the pathology of inflammatory skin diseases by means of what disorder in the specific layer of the host defense system is truly responsible. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ranking of aqueous surfactant-humectant systems based on an analysis of in vitro and in vivo skin barrier perturbation measurements.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Saswata; Hornby, Sidney; Grove, Gary; Zerwick, Charles; Appa, Yohini; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    We propose that skin electrical current measurements can be used in vitro to effectively rank aqueous solutions containing surfactants and humectants (the enhancer) contacting the skin, relative to a PBS aqueous solution (the control) contacting the skin, based on their ability to perturb the skin aqueous pores. Specifically, we develop an in vitro ranking metric using the increase in the skin electrical current induced by an enhancer relative to the control. Aqueous contacting solutions containing (i) surfactants [SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate)] and C(12)E(6) [dodecyl hexa (ethylene oxide)], (ii) humectants (glycerol and propylene glycol), and (iii) a control (PBS) were studied. Utilizing the new in vitro ranking metric, these aqueous contacting solutions were ranked as follows (from the mildest to the harshest): glycerol < propylene glycol < PBS < C(12)E(6) < SDS. In order to further develop this ranking methodology, which can potentially lead to the reduction, or elimination, of costly and time-consuming procedures, such as human and animal testing and trial-and-error screening in vivo, it was important to correlate the findings of the in vitro ranking metric with direct in vivo skin barrier measurements. For this purpose, in vivo soap chamber measurements, including transepidermal water loss, visual skin dryness, and chromameter erythema measurements, were carried out on human volunteers using the aqueous surfactant-humectant solutions described above. The results of these in vivo measurements were found to be consistent with the ranking results obtained using the in vitro ranking metric. To further explore the validity of our model and to verify the skin barrier mitigating effect of glycerol, in vivo soap chamber measurements were carried out for aqueous SDS solutions containing 10 wt% added glycerol. These in vivo measurements support our recent in vitro finding that glycerol reduces the average radius and the pore number density of the skin aqueous pores, such

  12. Skin barrier disruptions in tape stripped and allergic dermatitis models have no effect on dermal penetration and systemic distribution of AHAPS-functionalized silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Anja; Nordmeyer, Daniel; Boreham, Alexander; Brodwolf, Robert; Mundhenk, Lars; Fluhr, Joachim W; Lademann, Jürgen; Graf, Christina; Rühl, Eckart; Alexiev, Ulrike; Gruber, Achim D

    2014-10-01

    The skin is a potential site of entry for nanoparticles (NP) but the role of disease-associated barrier disturbances on the path and extent of skin penetration of NP remains to be characterized. Silica nanoparticles (SiO2-NP) possess promising potential for various medical applications. Here, effects of different skin barrier disruptions on the penetration of N-(6-aminohexyl)-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (AHAPS) functionalized SiO2-NP were studied. AHAPS-SiO2-NP (55±6 nm diameter) were topically applied on intact, tape stripped or on inflamed skin of SKH1 mice with induced allergic contact dermatitis for one or five consecutive days, respectively. Penetration of AHAPS-SiO2-NP through the skin was not observed regardless of the kind of barrier disruption. However, only after subcutaneous injection, AHAPS-SiO2-NP were incorporated by macrophages and transported to the regional lymph node only. Adverse effects on cells or tissues were not observed. In conclusion, AHAPS-SiO2-NP seem to not cross the normal or perturbed mouse skin. From the clinical editor: Skin is a potential site of entry for nanoparticles; however, it is poorly understood how skin diseases may alter this process. In tape-stripped skin and allergic contact dermatitis models the delivery properties of AHAPS-SiO2 nanoparticles remained unchanged, and in neither case were these NP-s able to penetrate the skin. No adverse effects were noted on the skin in these models and control mice.

  13. Profile of skin barrier proteins (filaggrin, claudins 1 and 4) and Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines in adults with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Batista, D I S; Perez, L; Orfali, R L; Zaniboni, M C; Samorano, L P; Pereira, N V; Sotto, M N; Ishizaki, A S; Oliveira, L M S; Sato, M N; Aoki, V

    2015-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) in adults and profile of skin barrier proteins and inflammatory cytokines. Evaluation of the expression of skin barrier proteins such as filaggrin, claudins 1 and 4 and of circulating inflammatory cytokines (Th1/Th2/Th17) in adults with AD. Thirty-three adult patients with AD diagnosed according to the Hanifin & Rajkacriteria, and 25 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. AD severity was measured by Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI). Laboratory assays included immunohistochemistry analysis of skin barrier proteins, such as filaggrin, claudins 1 and 4 and interleukin-17 (IL-17) from skin samples and determination of circulating cytokine levels (IL-2, 4, 5, 6, 10, 17A, TNF and IFN-γ) by flow cytometry (Cytometric Bead Array). We observed a reduced expression of filaggrin and claudin 1 in lesional skin of AD patients, when compared to controls. There was an inverse correlation of filaggrin expression and disease severity. In addition, IL-17 expression was enhanced in AD patients. Similarly, higher levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, 5, 6, 10, 17A and IFN-γ) were found in AD patients. Our data reinforce the role of an altered skin barrier in the pathogenesis of AD. Our results show not only reduced expression of filaggrin and claudin 1 in lesional atopic skin but also inverse correlation of filaggrin expression and disease severity. Moreover, elevation of in situ IL-17 and of circulating interleukin levels in AD emphasize the systemic, inflammatory profile of this defective skin barrier dermatosis. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  14. Relationship between skin barrier function in early neonates and diaper dermatitis during the first month of life: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Kaori; Haruna, Megumi; Shiraishi, Mie; Matsuzaki, Masayo; Sanada, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Diaper dermatitis, a common skin problem in newborn infants, is characterized by poor functioning of the skin barrier. This study aimed to elucidate the relationship between skin barrier function in 4-day-old infants and the occurrence of diaper dermatitis during the first month of life. We recruited healthy Japanese infants born at 35 weeks of gestation or more. We measured indicators of skin barrier function, namely skin pH and transepidermal water loss, in 4-day-old infants on four places on the body. Individual characteristics were recorded from the infants' medical charts. The presence of diaper dermatitis was judged using the diaper rash and erythema scoring scale, which was based on daily recording of the infants' skin condition by their parents. The parents also filled out a questionnaire 1 month after birth regarding stool frequency and certain external factors. The association between diaper dermatitis and skin barrier function was assessed using multiple logistic regression analysis. The analysis included 88 infants. The incidence of diaper dermatitis was 25.0%. After adjusting for stool frequency for 1 month we noted that high pH on the inner arm skin in 4-day-old infants increased the risk of diaper dermatitis during the first month of life (adjusted odds ratio 3.35 [95% confidence interval = 1.12, 10.04]). Early neonatal skin pH may predict the risk of diaper dermatitis during the first month of life. Our results may be useful in devising strategies to prevent diaper dermatitis.

  15. Role of Micronutrients in Skin Health and Function

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyungho

    2015-01-01

    Skin is the first line of defense for protecting our bodies against external perturbations, including ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, mechanical/chemical stress, and bacterial infection. Nutrition is one of many factors required for the maintenance of overall skin health. An impaired nutritional status alters the structural integrity and biological function of skin, resulting in an abnormal skin barrier. In particular, the importance of micronutrients (such as certain vitamins and minerals) for skin health has been highlighted in cell culture, animal, and clinical studies. These micronutrients are employed not only as active compounds in therapeutic agents for treating certain skin diseases, but also as ingredients in cosmetic products. Here, the author describes the barrier function of the skin and the general nutritional requirements for skin health. The goal of this review is to discuss the potential roles and current knowledge of selected micronutrients in skin health and function. PMID:25995818

  16. Role of micronutrients in skin health and function.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyungho

    2015-05-01

    Skin is the first line of defense for protecting our bodies against external perturbations, including ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, mechanical/chemical stress, and bacterial infection. Nutrition is one of many factors required for the maintenance of overall skin health. An impaired nutritional status alters the structural integrity and biological function of skin, resulting in an abnormal skin barrier. In particular, the importance of micronutrients (such as certain vitamins and minerals) for skin health has been highlighted in cell culture, animal, and clinical studies. These micronutrients are employed not only as active compounds in therapeutic agents for treating certain skin diseases, but also as ingredients in cosmetic products. Here, the author describes the barrier function of the skin and the general nutritional requirements for skin health. The goal of this review is to discuss the potential roles and current knowledge of selected micronutrients in skin health and function.

  17. Loss of the acyl-CoA binding protein (Acbp) results in fatty acid metabolism abnormalities in mouse hair and skin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lance; DeBono, C Anthony; Campagna, Dean R; Young, David C; Moody, D Branch; Fleming, Mark D

    2007-01-01

    Proper fatty acid metabolism is critical for hair and skin development and maintenance. The acyl-CoA binding protein (Acbp) is a widely expressed protein that binds long-chain fatty acyl-CoA esters and plays a role in fatty acyl-CoA transport and pool formation. However, loss of function of Acbp in the whole animal has not been investigated. Here, we show that deletion of Acbp in mouse results in sebocyte hyperplasia and sparse, matted hair with a greasy appearance. Consistent with these gross abnormalities, Acbp is highly expressed in the pilosebaceous units of mouse skin as determined by Northern analysis and in situ hybridization. Loss of Acbp also results in fatty acid metabolism abnormalities, with hair lipid profiles showing altered levels of triacylglycerols and nearly co-migrating lipids. These data suggest that Acbp plays a role in triacylglycerol biosynthesis, and that regulation of this process is important for proper hair and skin development and maintenance in the mouse.

  18. The absence of a microbiota enhances TSLP expression in mice with defective skin barrier but does not affect the severity of their allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yockey, Laura J; Demehri, Shadmehr; Turkoz, Mustafa; Turkoz, Ahu; Ahern, Philip P; Jassim, Omar; Manivasagam, Sindhu; Kearney, John F; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Kopan, Raphael

    2013-12-01

    Evidence is accumulating to suggest that our indigenous microbial communities (microbiota) may have a role in modulating allergic and immune disorders of the skin. To examine the link between the microbiota and atopic dermatitis (AD), we examined a mouse model of defective cutaneous barrier function with an AD-like disease due to loss of Notch signaling. Comparisons of conventionally raised and germ-free (GF) mice revealed a similar degree of allergic skin inflammation, systemic atopy, and airway hypersensitivity. GF mutant animals expressed significantly higher levels of thymic stromal lymphopoietin, a major proinflammatory cytokine released by skin with defective barrier function, resulting in a more severe B-lymphoproliferative disorder that persisted into adulthood. These findings suggest a role for the microbiota in ameliorating stress signals released by keratinocytes in response to perturbation in cutaneous barrier function.

  19. Comparison of the Efficacy of Atopalm(®) Multi-Lamellar Emulsion Cream and Physiogel(®) Intensive Cream in Improving Epidermal Permeability Barrier in Sensitive Skin.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sekyoo; Lee, Sin Hee; Park, Byeong Deog; Wu, Yan; Man, George; Man, Mao-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    The management of sensitive skin, which affects over 60% of the general population, has been a long-standing challenge for both patients and clinicians. Because defective epidermal permeability barrier is one of the clinical features of sensitive skin, barrier-enhancing products could be an optimal regimen for sensitive skin. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of two barrier-enhancing products, i.e., Atopalm (®) Multi-Lamellar Emulsion (MLE) Cream and Physiogel (®) Intensive Cream for sensitive skin. 60 patients with sensitive skin, aged 22-40 years old, were randomly assigned to one group treated with Atopalm MLE Cream, and another group treated with Physiogel Intensive Cream twice daily for 4 weeks. Lactic acid stinging test scores (LASTS), stratum hydration (SC) and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were assessed before, 2 and 4 weeks after the treatment. Atopalm MLE Cream significantly lowered TEWL after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment (p < 0.01). In contrast, Physiogel Intensive Cream significantly increased TEWL after 2 weeks of treatment (p < 0.05) while TEWL significantly decreased after 4-week treatments. Moreover, both Atopalm MLE Cream and Physiogel Intensive Cream significantly increased SC hydration, and improved LASTS after 4 weeks of treatment. Both barrier-enhancing products are effective and safe for improving epidermal functions, including permeability barrier, SC hydration and LASTS, in sensitive skin. These products could be a valuable alternative for management of sensitive skin. Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California, USA, and NeoPharm Co., Ltd., Daejeon, Korea.

  20. Effect of moisturizers on epidermal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Lodén, Marie

    2012-01-01

    A daily moisturizing routine is a vital part of the management of patients with atopic dermatitis and other dry skin conditions. The composition of the moisturizer determines whether the treatment strengthens or deteriorates the skin barrier function, which may have consequences for the outcome of the dermatitis. One might expect that a patient's impaired skin barrier function should improve in association with a reduction in the clinical signs of dryness. Despite visible relief of the dryness symptoms, however, the abnormal transepidermal water loss has been reported to remain high, or even to increase under certain regimens, whereas other moisturizers improve skin barrier function. Differing outcomes have also been reported in healthy skin: some moisturizers produce deterioration in skin barrier function and others improve the skin. Possible targets for barrier-influencing moisturizing creams include the intercellular lipid bilayers, where the fraction of lipids forming a fluid phase might be changed due to compositional or organizational changes. Other targets are the projected size of the corneocytes or the thickness of the stratum corneum. Moisturizers with barrier-improving properties may delay relapse of dermatitis in patients with atopic dermatitis. In a worst-case scenario, treatment with moisturizing creams could increase the risks of dermatitis and asthma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Vitamin C regulates keratinocyte viability, epidermal barrier, and basement membrane in vitro, and reduces wound contraction after grafting of cultured skin substitutes.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Steven T; Supp, Andrew P; Swope, Viki B; Warden, Glenn D

    2002-04-01

    Cultured skin substitutes have become useful as adjunctive treatments for excised, full-thickness burns, but no skin substitutes have the anatomy and physiology of native skin. Hypothetically, deficiencies of structure and function may result, in part, from nutritional deficiencies in culture media. To address this hypothesis, vitamin C was titrated at 0.0, 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 mM in a cultured skin substitute model on filter inserts. Cultured skin substitute inserts were evaluated at 2 and 5 wk for viability by incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) conversion. Subsequently, cultured skin substitute grafts consisting of cultured human keratinocytes and fibroblasts attached to collagen-glycosaminoglycan substrates were incubated for 5 wk in media containing 0.0 mM or 0.1 mM vitamin C, and then grafted to athymic mice. Cultured skin substitutes (n = 3 per group) were evaluated in vitro at 2 wk of incubation for collagen IV, collagen VII, and laminin 5, and through 5 wk for epidermal barrier by surface electrical capacitance. Cultured skin substitutes were grafted to full-thickness wounds in athymic mice (n = 8 per group), evaluated for surface electrical capacitance through 6 wk, and scored for percentage original wound area through 8 wk and for HLA-ABC-positive wounds at 8 wk after grafting. The data show that incubation of cultured skin substitutes in medium containing vitamin C results in greater viability (higher BrdU and MTT), more complete basement membrane development at 2 wk, and better epidermal barrier (lower surface electrical capacitance) at 5 wk in vitro. After grafting, cultured skin substitutes with vitamin C developed functional epidermal barrier earlier, had less wound contraction, and had more HLA-positive wounds at 8 wk than without vitamin C. These results suggest that incubation of cultured skin substitutes in medium containing vitamin C extends cellular viability

  2. Keratin 76 is required for tight junction function and maintenance of the skin barrier.

    PubMed

    DiTommaso, Tia; Cottle, Denny L; Pearson, Helen B; Schlüter, Holger; Kaur, Pritinder; Humbert, Patrick O; Smyth, Ian M

    2014-10-01

    Keratins are cytoskeletal intermediate filament proteins that are increasingly being recognised for their diverse cellular functions. Here we report the consequences of germ line inactivation of Keratin 76 (Krt76) in mice. Homozygous disruption of this epidermally expressed gene causes neonatal skin flaking, hyperpigmentation, inflammation, impaired wound healing, and death prior to 12 weeks of age. We show that this phenotype is associated with functionally defective tight junctions that are characterised by mislocalization of the integral protein CLDN1. We further demonstrate that KRT76 interacts with CLDN1 and propose that this interaction is necessary to correctly position CLDN1 in tight junctions. The mislocalization of CLDN1 has been associated in various dermopathies, including the inflammatory disease, psoriasis. These observations establish a previously unknown connection between the intermediate filament cytoskeleton network and tight junctions and showcase Krt76 null mice as a possible model to study aberrant tight junction driven skin diseases.

  3. Keratin 76 Is Required for Tight Junction Function and Maintenance of the Skin Barrier

    PubMed Central

    DiTommaso, Tia; Cottle, Denny L.; Pearson, Helen B.; Schlüter, Holger; Kaur, Pritinder; Humbert, Patrick O.; Smyth, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    Keratins are cytoskeletal intermediate filament proteins that are increasingly being recognised for their diverse cellular functions. Here we report the consequences of germ line inactivation of Keratin 76 (Krt76) in mice. Homozygous disruption of this epidermally expressed gene causes neonatal skin flaking, hyperpigmentation, inflammation, impaired wound healing, and death prior to 12 weeks of age. We show that this phenotype is associated with functionally defective tight junctions that are characterised by mislocalization of the integral protein CLDN1. We further demonstrate that KRT76 interacts with CLDN1 and propose that this interaction is necessary to correctly position CLDN1 in tight junctions. The mislocalization of CLDN1 has been associated in various dermopathies, including the inflammatory disease, psoriasis. These observations establish a previously unknown connection between the intermediate filament cytoskeleton network and tight junctions and showcase Krt76 null mice as a possible model to study aberrant tight junction driven skin diseases. PMID:25340345

  4. Random skin biopsy of patients with intravascular large B-cell lymphoma associated with thrombocytopenia and coagulation abnormalities: proposal of a modified biopsy method.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Takeo; Komine, Mayumi; Murata, Satoru; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro

    2015-03-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is classified as a rare type of non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma by the World Health Organization. It is characterized by the presence of lymphoma cells in the lumens of the small vessels of several organs, most notably the skin. Diagnosis of IVLBCL is difficult because of the lack of lymphadenopathy and because lesions need to be histologically confirmed via a biopsy of the affected organs. Random skin biopsy (RSB) of normal-appearing skin is a useful and apparently safe means of evaluating IVLBCL. However, patients with IVLBCL often exhibit thrombocytopenia, and we describe a case in which a patient with thrombocytopenia experienced hemorrhagic shock and died shortly after RSB. For this reason, we reviewed cases of RSB performed at our hospital and found that the middle adipose tissue contained a higher percentage of atypical lymphoid cells than other layers of the skin. On the basis of our findings, we propose a strategy for the safer performance of RSB in IVLBCL patients with thrombocytopenia and coagulation abnormalities. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  5. The Influence of Two Different Foam Creams on Skin Barrier Repair of Foot Xerosis: A Prospective, Double-Blind, Randomised, Placebo-Controlled Intra-Individual Study.

    PubMed

    Daehnhardt, Dorothee; Daehnhardt-Pfeiffer, Stephan; Schulte-Walter, Judith; Neubourg, Thomas; Hanisch, Eckhard; Schmetz, Christel; Breuer, Marion; Fölster-Holst, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Dry skin, or xerosis, is a common condition and a key feature of skin diseases like atopic dermatitis (AD) and ichthyosis vulgaris. Foot xerosis may exist without underlying disease and could be related to very mild forms of AD or ichthyosis vulgaris. The synthesis of important skin lipids (cholesterol, free fatty acids and ceramides) is reduced in xerosis and AD, and reduced lipid synthesis is responsible for a lack of lipids and enzymes in the skin barrier. This slows down reorganisation of the lipid lamellae in the stratum corneum (SC). Skin barrier integrity was measured by morphometric analysis of the lipid lamellae in the SC after 4 weeks of treatment with a foam cream (active agent vs. placebo). Significant treatment effects were shown after 2 and 4 weeks by an increasing amount of intercellular lipids in the SC. This study shows that a quick reorganisation of the SC lipids initiates a good restoration of the whole skin barrier after 4 weeks of treatment with a foam cream. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Impact of sleep restriction on local immune response and skin barrier restoration with and without 'multi-nutrient' nutrition intervention.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tracey J; Wilson, Marques A; Karl, J Philip; Orr, Jeb; Smith, Carl D; Cooper, Adam D; Heaton, Kristin J; Young, Andrew J; Montain, Scott J

    2017-09-14

    Systemic immune function is impaired by sleep restriction. However, the impact of sleep restriction on local immune responses, and to what extent any impairment can be mitigated by nutritional supplementation is unknown. We assessed the effect of 72-h sleep restriction (2-h nightly sleep) on local immune function and skin barrier restoration of an experimental wound, and determined the influence of habitual protein intake (1.5 g·kg(-1)·d(-1)) supplemented with arginine, glutamine, zinc sulfate, vitamin C, vitamin D3 and omega-3 fatty acids compared to lower protein intake (0.8 g·kg(-1)·d(-1)) without supplemental nutrients on these outcomes. Wounds were created in healthy adults by removing the top layer of ≤ 8 forearm blisters induced via suction, after adequate sleep (AS) or 48-h of a 72-h sleep restriction period (SR; 2-h nightly sleep). A subset of participants undergoing sleep restriction received supplemental nutrients during and after sleep restriction (SR+). Wound fluid was serially sampled 48-hpost-blistering to assess local cytokine responses. The IL-8 response of wound fluid was higher for AS compared to SR (area-under-the-curve (log10), 5.1±0.2 and 4.9±0.2 pg·mL(-1), respectively (P=0.03); and, both IL-6 and IL-8 concentrations were higher for SR+ compared to SR (p<0.0001), suggestive of a potentially enhanced early wound healing response. Skin barrier recovery was shorter for AS (4.2 ± 0.9 days) compared to SR (5.0 ± 0.9 days) (P=0.02), but did not differ between SR and SR+ (P=0.18). Relatively modest sleep disruption delays wound healing. Supplemental nutrition may mitigate some decrements in local immune responses, without detectable effects on wound healing rate. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  7. Comparison of skin barrier function and sensory nerve electric current perception threshold between IgE-high extrinsic and IgE-normal intrinsic types of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Mori, T; Ishida, K; Mukumoto, S; Yamada, Y; Imokawa, G; Kabashima, K; Kobayashi, M; Bito, T; Nakamura, M; Ogasawara, K; Tokura, Y

    2010-01-01

    Background Two types of atopic dermatitis (AD) have been proposed, with different pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this seemingly heterogeneous disorder. The extrinsic type shows high IgE levels presumably as a consequence of skin barrier damage and feasible allergen permeation, whereas the intrinsic type exhibits normal IgE levels and is not mediated by allergen-specific IgE. Objectives To investigate the relationship between pruritus perception threshold and skin barrier function of patients with AD in a comparison between the extrinsic and intrinsic types. Methods Enrolled in this study were 32 patients with extrinsic AD, 17 with intrinsic AD and 24 healthy individuals. The barrier function of the stratum corneum was assessed by skin surface hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and pruritus perception was evaluated by the electric current perception threshold (CPT) of sensory nerves upon neuroselective transcutaneous electric stimulation. Results Skin surface hydration was significantly lower and TEWL was significantly higher in extrinsic AD than intrinsic AD or normal controls. Although there was no statistically significant difference in CPT among extrinsic AD, intrinsic AD and normal controls, CPT was significantly correlated with skin surface hydration and inversely with TEWL in intrinsic AD and normal controls, but not extrinsic AD. Finally, CPT was correlated with the visual analogue scale of itch in the nonlesional skin of patients with extrinsic but not intrinsic AD. Conclusions Patients with extrinsic AD have an impaired barrier, which increases the pre-existing pruritus but rather decreases sensitivity to external stimuli. In contrast, patients with intrinsic AD retain a normal barrier function and sensory reactivity to external pruritic stimuli.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of O-acylated-ω-hydroxy fatty acids as skin-protecting barrier lipids.

    PubMed

    Pérez, B; Dahlgaard, S E; Bulsara, P; Rawlings, A V; Jensen, M M; Dong, M; Glasius, M; Clarke, M J; Guo, Z

    2017-03-15

    A series of O-acylated-ω-hydroxy fatty acids (Acyl acids) of up to 34 carbons were synthesized and characterized through DSC, FTIR and Langmuir isotherm measurements to identify potential replacements to petrolatum, a highly used occlusive technology that if unrefined, it can potentially be classified as carcinogenic. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies demonstrated that long acyl acids engender orthorhombic packing; packing behavior that is predominant in the lipid matrix of healthy stratum corneum, the outmost layer of the skin. In addition, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Langmuir isotherm studies suggested that the length of the hydrocarbon chain and the position of the ester bond influence the molecular organization of the acyl acids. For instance, 16-(tetradecanoyloxy)hexadecanoic acid (30 carbons) displayed a higher melting point (mp=68°C) than 10-(stearoyloxy)decanoic acid (28 carbons; mp=63°C) and 10-(tetradecanoyloxy)decanoic acid (24 carbons; mp=55°C) according to DSC. Moreover, Langmuir isotherm studies showed that mixtures of acyl acid with distearoylphosphatidylcholine improved packing behavior. Finally, Water Vapor Transmission Rate (WVTR) measurements showed that the compounds in fact decrease WVTR compared to untreated control (P<0.001) which demonstrates the potential of these ingredients as occlusive technologies to combat skin barrier diseases.

  9. Alteration of the 4-sphingenine scaffolds of ceramides in keratinocyte-specific Arnt-deficient mice affects skin barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Satoshi; Tojo, Hiromasa; Tomita, Shuhei; Sano, Shigetoshi; Itami, Satoshi; Hara, Mariko; Inoue, Shintaro; Horie, Kyoji; Kondoh, Gen; Hosokawa, Ko; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Takeda, Junji

    2003-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), a transcription factor of the Per/AHR/ARNT/Sim family, regulates gene expression in response to environmental stimuli including xenobiotics and hypoxia. To examine its role in the epidermis, the Cre-loxP system was used to disrupt the Arnt gene in a keratinocyte-specific manner. Gene-targeted, newborn mice with almost normal appearance died neonatally of severe dehydration caused by water loss. Histology showed small changes in the architecture of cornified layers, with apparently preserved intercorneocyte lamellar structures responsible for the skin barrier function. In contrast, HPLC/ion-trap mass spectrometry revealed significant alterations in the compositions of ceramides, the major components of the lamellae. The murine epidermal ceramides normally contain 4-sphingenine and 4-hydroxysphinganine. In Arnt-null epidermis, 4-sphingenine was largely replaced by sphinganine and the amounts of ceramides with 4-hydroxysphinganine were greatly decreased, suggesting deficiency of dihydroceramide desaturases that catalyze the formation of both 4-sphingenyl and 4-hydroxysphinganyl moieties. A desaturase isoenzyme, DES-1, prefers desaturation, but DES-2 catalyzes both reactions to a similar extent. Transcript levels of Des-2, but not Des-1, were considerably decreased in cultured keratinocytes from Arnt-null epidermis. These results indicate that proper ceramide compositions through 4-desaturation regulated by ARNT are crucial for maintaining the epidermal barrier function. PMID:14597763

  10. Mechanical and metabolic injury to the skin barrier leads to increased expression of murine β-defensin-1, -3, and -14.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Kerstin; Schunck, Michael; Podda, Graziella-Francesca; Meingassner, Josef; Stuetz, Anton; Schröder, Jens-Michael; Harder, Jürgen; Proksch, Ehrhardt

    2011-02-01

    Protection of the skin against microbiological infection is provided by the permeability barrier and by antimicrobial proteins. We asked whether the expression of murine β-defensins (mBDs)-1, -3, and -14-orthologs of human β-defensins hBD-1, -2, and -3, respectively--is stimulated by mechanically/physicochemically (tape stripping or acetone treatment) or metabolically (essential fatty acid-deficient (EFAD) diet) induced skin barrier dysfunction. Both methods led to a moderate induction of mBD-1 and mBD-14 and a pronounced induction of mBD-3 mRNA. Protein expression of the mBDs was increased as shown by immunohistology and by western blotting. Artificial barrier repair by occlusion significantly reduced the increased expression of mBD-14 after mechanical injury and of all three mBDs in EFAD mice, supporting an interrelationship between permeability and the antimicrobial barrier. mBD-3 expression was stimulated in vitro by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and a neutralizing anti-TNF-α antibody significantly reduced increased mBD-3 expression after barrier injury in mouse skin, indicating that induction of mBD-3 expression is mediated by cytokines. The expression of mBD-14 was stimulated by transforming growth factor-α and not by TNF-α. In summary, we demonstrated upregulation of mBD1, -3, and -14 after mechanically and metabolically induced skin barrier disruption, which may be an attempt to increase defense in the case of permeability barrier dysfunction.

  11. Randomized, Controlled Trial Evaluating a Baby Wash Product on Skin Barrier Function in Healthy, Term Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Tina; Bedwell, Carol; Roberts, Stephen A; Hart, Anna; Turner, Mark A; Carter, Lesley-Anne; Cork, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the hypothesis that the use of a wash product formulated for newborn (<1 month of age) bathing is not inferior (no worse) to bathing with water only. Design Assessor-blinded, randomized, controlled, noninferiority trial. Setting A teaching hospital in the Northwest of England and in participants’ homes. Participants Three-hundred-and-seven healthy, term infants recruited within 48 hours of birth. Method We compared bathing with a wash product (n = 159) to bathing with water alone (n = 148). The primary outcome was transepidermal water loss (TEWL) at 14 days postbirth; the predefined difference deemed to be unimportant was 1.2. Secondary outcomes comprised changes in stratum corneum hydration, skin surface pH, clinical observations of the skin, and maternal views. Results Complete TEWL data were obtained for 242 (78.8%) infants. Wash was noninferior to water alone in terms of TEWL (intention-to-treat analysis: 95% confidence interval [CI] for difference [wash–water, adjusted for family history of eczema, neonate state, and baseline] −1.24, 1.07; per protocol analysis: 95% CI −1.42, 1.09). No significant differences were found in secondary outcomes. Conclusion We were unable to detect any differences between the newborn wash product and water. These findings provide reassurance to parents who choose to use the test newborn wash product or other technically equivalent cleansers and provide the evidence for health care professionals to support parental choice. PMID:23421327

  12. Beneficial effects of a skin tolerance-tested moisturizing cream on the barrier function in experimentally-elicited irritant and allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    De Paépe, K; Hachem, J P; Vanpee, E; Goossens, A; Germaux, M A; Lachapelle, J M; Lambert, J; Matthieu, L; Roseeuw, D; Suys, E; Van Hecke, E; Rogiers, V

    2001-06-01

    In experimentally-induced irritant (ICD) and allergic (ACD) contact dermatitis, an oil-in-water (o/w) cream was applied to investigate its effects on a disturbed barrier function compared to untreated physiological barrier repair. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements were performed. Before the start of the experiments, the skin tolerance of the cream was examined, revealing the non-irritating characteristics of the ingredients and the absence of any contact allergic patch test reaction. In the ICD study, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) patches were applied to the forearms of young female volunteers. Consequently, it was observed that repeated cream application (14 days, 2x/day) significantly improved the TEWL of SLS-damaged skin, leading to a complete recovery on day 15. In the ACD study, disruption of skin barrier function was obtained by a nickel-mediated contact allergy patch (CAP) test. The cream was then applied 2x/day for 4 consecutive days. Assessment of TEWL clearly showed that recovery of the disrupted skin significantly improved after cream application in comparison to untreated barrier repair.

  13. Essential role of the cytochrome P450 CYP4F22 in the production of acylceramide, the key lipid for skin permeability barrier formation

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yusuke; Nakamichi, Shota; Ohkuni, Aya; Kamiyama, Nozomi; Naoe, Ayano; Tsujimura, Hisashi; Yokose, Urara; Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Ishikawa, Junko; Akiyama, Masashi; Kihara, Akio

    2015-01-01

    A skin permeability barrier is essential for terrestrial animals, and its impairment causes several cutaneous disorders such as ichthyosis and atopic dermatitis. Although acylceramide is an important lipid for the skin permeability barrier, details of its production have yet to be determined, leaving the molecular mechanism of skin permeability barrier formation unclear. Here we identified the cytochrome P450 gene CYP4F22 (cytochrome P450, family 4, subfamily F, polypeptide 22) as the long-sought fatty acid ω-hydroxylase gene required for acylceramide production. CYP4F22 has been identified as one of the autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis-causative genes. Ichthyosis-mutant proteins exhibited reduced enzyme activity, indicating correlation between activity and pathology. Furthermore, lipid analysis of a patient with ichthyosis showed a drastic decrease in acylceramide production. We determined that CYP4F22 was a type I membrane protein that locates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), suggesting that the ω-hydroxylation occurs on the cytoplasmic side of the ER. The preferred substrate of the CYP4F22 was fatty acids with a carbon chain length of 28 or more (≥C28). In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that CYP4F22 is an ultra-long-chain fatty acid ω-hydroxylase responsible for acylceramide production and provide important insights into the molecular mechanisms of skin permeability barrier formation. Furthermore, based on the results obtained here, we proposed a detailed reaction series for acylceramide production. PMID:26056268

  14. Essential role of the cytochrome P450 CYP4F22 in the production of acylceramide, the key lipid for skin permeability barrier formation.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yusuke; Nakamichi, Shota; Ohkuni, Aya; Kamiyama, Nozomi; Naoe, Ayano; Tsujimura, Hisashi; Yokose, Urara; Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Ishikawa, Junko; Akiyama, Masashi; Kihara, Akio

    2015-06-23

    A skin permeability barrier is essential for terrestrial animals, and its impairment causes several cutaneous disorders such as ichthyosis and atopic dermatitis. Although acylceramide is an important lipid for the skin permeability barrier, details of its production have yet to be determined, leaving the molecular mechanism of skin permeability barrier formation unclear. Here we identified the cytochrome P450 gene CYP4F22 (cytochrome P450, family 4, subfamily F, polypeptide 22) as the long-sought fatty acid ω-hydroxylase gene required for acylceramide production. CYP4F22 has been identified as one of the autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis-causative genes. Ichthyosis-mutant proteins exhibited reduced enzyme activity, indicating correlation between activity and pathology. Furthermore, lipid analysis of a patient with ichthyosis showed a drastic decrease in acylceramide production. We determined that CYP4F22 was a type I membrane protein that locates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), suggesting that the ω-hydroxylation occurs on the cytoplasmic side of the ER. The preferred substrate of the CYP4F22 was fatty acids with a carbon chain length of 28 or more (≥C28). In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that CYP4F22 is an ultra-long-chain fatty acid ω-hydroxylase responsible for acylceramide production and provide important insights into the molecular mechanisms of skin permeability barrier formation. Furthermore, based on the results obtained here, we proposed a detailed reaction series for acylceramide production.

  15. Ultradeformable lipid vesicles can penetrate the skin and other semi-permeable barriers unfragmented. Evidence from double label CLSM experiments and direct size measurements.

    PubMed

    Cevc, Gregor; Schätzlein, Andreas; Richardsen, Holger

    2002-08-19

    The stability of various aggregates in the form of lipid bilayer vesicles was tested by three different methods before and after crossing different semi-permeable barriers. First, polymer membranes with pores significantly smaller than the average aggregate diameter were used as the skin barrier model; dynamic light scattering was employed to monitor vesicle size changes after barrier passage for several lipid mixtures with different bilayer elasticities. This revealed that vesicles must adapt their size and/or shape, dependent on bilayer stability and elasto-mechanics, to overcome an otherwise confining pore. For the mixed lipid aggregates with highly flexible bilayers (Transfersomes), the change is transient and only involves vesicle shape and volume adaptation. The constancy of ultradeformable vesicle size before and after pores penetration proves this. This is remarkable in light of the very strong aggregate deformation during an enforced barrier passage. Simple phosphatidylcholine vesicles, with less flexible bilayers, lack such capability and stability. Conventional liposomes are therefore fractured during transport through a semi-permeable barrier; as reported by other researchers, liposomes are fragmented to the size of a narrow pore if sufficient pressure is applied across the barrier; otherwise, liposomes clog the pores. The precise outcome depends on trans-barrier flux and/or on relative vesicle vs. pore size. Lipid vesicles applied on the skin behave accordingly. Mixed lipid vesicles penetrate the skin if they are sufficiently deformable. If this is the case, they cross inter-cellular constrictions in the organ without significant composition or size modification. To prove this, we labelled vesicles with two different fluorescent markers and applied the suspension on intact murine skin without occlusion. The confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) of the skin then revealed a practically indistinguishable distribution of both labels in the stratum

  16. Developing food allergy: a potential immunologic pathway linking skin barrier to gut

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yui-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated food allergy is an adverse reaction to foods and is driven by uncontrolled type-2 immune responses. Current knowledge cannot explain why only some individuals among those with food allergy are prone to develop life-threatening anaphylaxis. It is increasingly evident that the immunologic mechanisms involved in developing IgE-mediated food allergy are far more complex than allergic sensitization. Clinical observations suggest that patients who develop severe allergic reactions to food are often sensitized through the skin in early infancy. Environmental insults trigger epidermal thymic stromal lymphopoietin and interleukin-33 (IL-33) production, which endows dendritic cells with the ability to induce CD4 +TH2 cell-mediated allergic inflammation. Intestinal IL-25 propagates the allergic immune response by enhancing collaborative interactions between resident type-2 innate lymphoid cells and CD4 +TH2 cells expanded by ingested antigens in the gastrointestinal tract. IL-4 signaling provided by CD4 +TH2 cells induces emigrated mast cell progenitors to become multi-functional IL-9-producing mucosal mast cells, which then expand greatly after repeated food ingestions. Inflammatory cytokine IL-33 promotes the function and maturation of IL-9-producing mucosal mast cells, which amplify intestinal mastocytosis, resulting in increased clinical reactivity to ingested food allergens. These findings provide the plausible view that the combinatorial signals from atopic status, dietary allergen ingestions, and inflammatory cues may govern the perpetuation of allergic reactions from the skin to the gut and promote susceptibility to life-threatening anaphylaxis. Future in-depth studies of the molecular and cellular factors composing these stepwise pathways may facilitate the discovery of biomarkers and therapeutic targets for diagnosing, preventing, and treating food allergy. PMID:27853507

  17. Randomized, controlled trial evaluating a baby wash product on skin barrier function in healthy, term neonates.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Tina; Bedwell, Carol; Roberts, Stephen A; Hart, Anna; Turner, Mark A; Carter, Lesley-Anne; Cork, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    To examine the hypothesis that the use of a wash product formulated for newborn (<1 month of age) bathing is not inferior (no worse) to bathing with water only. Assessor-blinded, randomized, controlled, noninferiority trial. A teaching hospital in the Northwest of England and in participants' homes. Three-hundred-and-seven healthy, term infants recruited within 48 hours of birth. We compared bathing with a wash product (n = 159) to bathing with water alone (n = 148). The primary outcome was transepidermal water loss (TEWL) at 14 days postbirth; the predefined difference deemed to be unimportant was 1.2. Secondary outcomes comprised changes in stratum corneum hydration, skin surface pH, clinical observations of the skin, and maternal views. Complete TEWL data were obtained for 242 (78.8%) infants. Wash was noninferior to water alone in terms of TEWL (intention-to-treat analysis: 95% confidence interval [CI] for difference [wash-water, adjusted for family history of eczema, neonate state, and baseline] -1.24, 1.07; per protocol analysis: 95% CI -1.42, 1.09). No significant differences were found in secondary outcomes. We were unable to detect any differences between the newborn wash product and water. These findings provide reassurance to parents who choose to use the test newborn wash product or other technically equivalent cleansers and provide the evidence for health care professionals to support parental choice. © 2013 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  18. Association between microbial flora and tissue abnormality around dental implants penetrating the skin in reconstructed oral cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ayman; Chambers, Mark S; Goldschmidt, Millicent C; Habib, Ahmed; Lei, Xiudong; Jacob, Rhonda F

    2012-01-01

    Patients with skin-penetrating implants sometimes report episodic soft tissue reactions. This pilot clinical trial identified the oral microflora of the peri-implant sulcus of cancer patients with jaw reconstruction and compared sites with and without clinical signs of inflammation. Ten patients were selected during routine follow-up of their implant-supported removable prostheses. Eligible patients had at least two intraoral skin-penetrating implants; one showed clinical signs of inflammation with/without symptoms and the other served as a healthy control site. Eight of the 10 patients had undergone osseocutaneous fibula free flap reconstruction and two had received split-thickness skin grafts on the surface of the native mandible. Subjects were assessed on two visits, 30 to 40 days apart. Subgingival microbial samples were obtained and periodontal pocket depths were measured at the test implant abutment. Between visits, patients followed a strict oral hygiene regimen. Radiographic marginal bone loss around implants was measured using cone beam imaging during the second visit. The microflora were identified after isolation and purification of all growing colonies. The number of different microorganisms ranged from 10 to 21 per site. Among all patients, a total of 47 different microorganisms were identified, but none were considered virulent red-complex periodontal pathogens. By the time of the second visit, after adherence to strict mechanical oral hygiene, the average number of microorganisms per site was reduced through elimination of some species. Almost all subjects had identical microbial species in both sites, but the number of visible colonies was lower at the healthy site. Oral peri-implant epidermal proliferation does not appear to be caused by specific microbial pathogens but is likely related to increased microbial load in the implant sulci. Mechanical oral hygiene improves and maintains healthier peri-implant skin tissues.

  19. Compound heterozygous desmoplakin mutations result in a phenotype with a combination of myocardial, skin, hair, and enamel abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, My G; Sadowski, Sara; Brennan, Donna; Pikander, Pekka; Saukko, Pekka; Wahl, James; Aho, Heikki; Heikinheimo, Kristiina; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Fertala, Andrzej; Peltonen, Juha; Uitto, Jouni; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2010-04-01

    Desmoplakin (DP) anchors the intermediate filament cytoskeleton to the desmosomal cadherins and thereby confers structural stability to tissues. In this study, we present a patient with extensive mucocutaneous blisters, epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma, nail dystrophy, enamel dysplasia, and sparse woolly hair. The patient died at the age of 14 years from undiagnosed cardiomyopathy. The skin showed hyperplasia and acantholysis in the mid- and lower epidermal layers, whereas the heart showed extensive fibrosis and fibrofatty replacement in both ventricles. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed a reduction in the C-terminal domain of DP in the skin and oral mucosa. Sequencing of the DP gene showed undescribed mutations in the maternal and paternal alleles. Both mutations affected exon 24 encoding the C-terminal domain. The paternal mutation, c.6310delA, leads to a premature stop codon. The maternal mutation, c.7964 C to A, results in a substitution of an aspartic acid for a conserved alanine residue at amino acid 2655 (A2655D). Structural modeling indicated that this mutation changes the electrostatic potential of the mutated region of DP, possibly altering functions that depend on intermolecular interactions. To conclude, we describe a combination of DP mutation phenotypes affecting the skin, heart, hair, and teeth. This patient case emphasizes the importance of heart examination of patients with desmosomal genodermatoses.

  20. Commonly Employed African Neonatal Skin Care Products Compromise Epidermal Function in Mice.

    PubMed

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Sun, Richard; Man, George; Lee, Dale; Hill, Zelee; Elias, Peter M

    2016-09-01

    Neonatal mortality is much higher in the developing world than in developed countries. Infections are a major cause of neonatal death, particularly in preterm infants, in whom defective epidermal permeability barrier function facilitates transcutaneous pathogen invasion. The objective was to determine whether neonatal skin care products commonly used in Africa benefit or compromise epidermal functions in murine skin. After twice-daily treatment of 6- to 8-week-old hairless mice with each skin care product for 3 days, epidermal permeability barrier function, skin surface pH, stratum corneum hydration, and barrier recovery were measured using a multiprobe adapter system physiology monitor. For products showing some benefits in these initial tests, the epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis was assessed 1 and 5 hours after a single application to acutely disrupted skin. All of the skin care products compromised basal permeability barrier function and barrier repair kinetics. Moreover, after 3 days of treatment, most of the products also reduced stratum corneum hydration while elevating skin surface pH to abnormal levels. Some neonatal skin care products that are widely used in Africa perturb important epidermal functions, including permeability barrier homeostasis in mice. Should these products have similar effects on newborn human skin, they could cause a defective epidermal permeability barrier, which can increase body fluid loss, impair thermoregulation, and contribute to the high rates of neonatal morbidity and mortality seen in Africa. Accordingly, alternative products that enhance permeability barrier function should be identified, particularly for use in preterm infants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Cationic Supramolecular Hydrogels for Overcoming the Skin Barrier in Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Limón, David; Jiménez‐Newman, Claire; Rodrigues, Mafalda; González‐Campo, Arántzazu; Amabilino, David B.; Calpena, Ana C.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A cationic bis‐imidazolium‐based amphiphile was used to form thermoreversible nanostructured supramolecular hydrogels incorporating neutral and cationic drugs for the topical treatment of rosacea. The concentration of the gelator and the type and concentration of the drug incorporated were found to be factors that strongly influenced the gelling temperature, gel‐formation period, and overall stability and morphology. The incorporation of brimonidine tartrate resulted in the formation of the most homogeneous material of the three drugs explored, whereas the incorporation of betamethasone resulted in a gel with a completely different morphology comprising linked particles. NMR spectroscopy studies proved that these gels kept the drug not only at the interstitial space but also within the fibers. Due to the design of the gelator, drug release was up to 10 times faster and retention of the drug within the skin was up to 20 times more effective than that observed for commercial products. Experiments in vivo demonstrated the rapid efficacy of these gels in reducing erythema, especially in the case of the gel with brimonidine. The lack of coulombic attraction between the gelator–host and the guest–drug seemed particularly important in highly effective release, and the intermolecular interactions operating between them were found to lie at the root of the excellent properties of the materials for topical delivery and treatment of rosacea. PMID:28794954

  2. Cationic Supramolecular Hydrogels for Overcoming the Skin Barrier in Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Limón, David; Jiménez-Newman, Claire; Rodrigues, Mafalda; González-Campo, Arántzazu; Amabilino, David B; Calpena, Ana C; Pérez-García, Lluïsa

    2017-08-01

    A cationic bis-imidazolium-based amphiphile was used to form thermoreversible nanostructured supramolecular hydrogels incorporating neutral and cationic drugs for the topical treatment of rosacea. The concentration of the gelator and the type and concentration of the drug incorporated were found to be factors that strongly influenced the gelling temperature, gel-formation period, and overall stability and morphology. The incorporation of brimonidine tartrate resulted in the formation of the most homogeneous material of the three drugs explored, whereas the incorporation of betamethasone resulted in a gel with a completely different morphology comprising linked particles. NMR spectroscopy studies proved that these gels kept the drug not only at the interstitial space but also within the fibers. Due to the design of the gelator, drug release was up to 10 times faster and retention of the drug within the skin was up to 20 times more effective than that observed for commercial products. Experiments in vivo demonstrated the rapid efficacy of these gels in reducing erythema, especially in the case of the gel with brimonidine. The lack of coulombic attraction between the gelator-host and the guest-drug seemed particularly important in highly effective release, and the intermolecular interactions operating between them were found to lie at the root of the excellent properties of the materials for topical delivery and treatment of rosacea.

  3. The influence of a humectant-rich mixture on normalz skin barrier function and on once- and twice-daily treatment of foot xerosis. A prospective, randomized, evaluator-blind, bilateral and untreated-control study.

    PubMed

    Lodén, Marie; von Scheele, Johan; Michelson, Sophie

    2013-11